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The Washington Post – April 24, 2018

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Capitals beat Blue Jackets in Game 6, will face Penguins next. D1
ABCDE
Prices may vary in areas outside metropolitan Washington.
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Rain 59/55 • Tomorrow: Rain 66/48 B8
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
Move comes 2 days
before nominee to head
VA was set to testify
MANHUNT ENDS
NEAR SHOOTING SITE
S EUNG M IN K IM,
L ISA R EIN
AND J OSH D AWSEY
BY
JACKSON CONTINUED ON A9
Pompeo prevails: Panel backs
nominee for State post. A11
Not tight: Giuliani and Trump
share less than it appears. A7
Nashville police say
motive remains unclear
BY K ATIE Z EZIMA,
K RISTINE P HILLIPS,
M ARK B ERMAN
AND W ILLIAM W AN
AARON VINCENT ELKAIM/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Police and emergency crews respond to a street in Toronto where pedestrians were struck and killed by a van. Canadian authorities
have a man in custody but said they do not yet know what the motive was.
Van hits crowd in Toronto; 10 die
Authorities detain driver, say they’ve found nothing linking incident to national security
A MANDA C OLETTA,
A LAN F REEMAN
AND C HICO H ARLAN
BY
toronto — A white rental van
plowed through pedestrians on a
sidewalk along a busy commercial street here Monday, killing
10, injuring 15 and leaving one of
the world’s safest big cities with a
path of carnage that spread for
nearly a mile.
The incident offered the latest
Despite Amazon’s ban,
paid reviews proliferate
Facebook groups help
sellers boost important
customer ratings
BY E LIZABETH D WOSKIN
AND C RAIG T IMBERG
san francisco — On Amazon,
customer comments can help a
product surge in popularity. The
online retail giant says that more
than 99 percent of its reviews are
legitimate because they are written by real shoppers who aren’t
paid for them.
But a Washington Post examination found that for some popular product categories, such as
Bluetooth
headphones
and
speakers, the vast majority of
. $2
Waffle
House
suspect
arrested
Senate
postpones
Jackson
hearing
Senate lawmakers have postponed the confirmation hearing
for Ronny L. Jackson, President
Trump’s nominee to lead the
Department of Veterans Affairs,
after top Republicans and Democrats raised concerns about his
qualifications and oversight of
the White House medical staff,
White House and other administration officials were told Monday.
The development came just
two days before Jackson, the
White House physician, was
scheduled to testify before the
Senate Committee on Veterans’
Affairs and threw what was looking to be a difficult confirmation
process into further jeopardy.
In addition to Jackson’s lack of
management experience, the former combat surgeon had come
under fire for his glowing appraisal of Trump’s health following his annual physical in January. Jackson said then that the
president might live to the age of
200 with a healthier diet. In
recent days, fresh concerns arose
about Jackson’s management of
the White House medical office,
said the officials, who declined to
provide details.
“I can tell you we’re vetting out
Jackson,” said Sen. Jon Tester
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
reviews appear to violate Amazon’s prohibition on paid reviews.
Such reviews have certain characteristics, such as repetitive
wording that people probably cut
and paste in.
Many of these fraudulent reviews originate on Facebook,
where sellers seek shoppers on
dozens of networks, including
Amazon Review Club and Amazon Reviewers Group, to give
glowing feedback in exchange for
money or other compensation.
The practice artificially inflates
the ranking of thousands of products, experts say, misleading consumers.
Amazon.com banned paying
for reviews a year and a half ago
because of research it conducted
showing that consumers distrust
paid reviews. Every once in a
AMAZON CONTINUED ON A20
grim reminder of how a vehicle
could turn into a weapon — in
this case, by speeding through a
crowd at lunch hour on a sunny
day, sending people and mailboxes and baby strollers flying, in
what eyewitnesses and Canadian
officials described as a deliberate
act.
Officials said the incident did
not appear to have a connection
to national security, though they
did not yet know of a motive.
E. coli mystery The source of contaminated
romaine lettuce that has sickened at least 60
people remains unknown, the FDA said. A2
TORONTO CONTINUED ON A9
REINKING CONTINUED ON A4
‘So much left for him’: Mourning
for the victims, all in their 20s. A6
‘Not feeling too safe’: Residents
afraid after two mass shootings. A4
Territory being squeezed by Israel and the Palestinian Authority is a powder keg of privation and anger
BY L OVEDAY M ORRIS
AND H AZEM B ALOUSHA
IN GAZA CITY
E
very Friday for the past
month, thousands of Palestinians have surged to Gaza’s
border fence with Israel in a show of
anger and defiance, some throwing
stones and molotov cocktails, others simply wanting to be there.
Demonstrators say they are seeking to challenge the loss of their
ancestral homes to Israel 70 years
ago. But a stream of men who risk
their lives — more than 30 have
been shot dead by Israeli soldiers —
also despair at their mounting economic woes.
“Young people have nothing to
lose,” said 31-year-old Mohammed
Sukkar, a few hundred yards from
the boundary fence on the first
day of protests last month as the
crowd retreated after pops of gun-
THE NATION
Welcome, little prince Britain’s Duchess of
Cambridge gave birth to her third child, a boy.
His name has not been announced. A8
minister of public safety minister, Ralph Goodale, said at an
evening news conference. “The
events that happened on the
street behind us are horrendous,
but they do not appear to be
connected in any way to national
security based on the information at this time.”
Toronto’s police chief, Mark
Saunders, said nothing was being ruled out, and Minassian was
Behind Gaza clashes lies economic misery
IN THE NEWS
JOHN STILLWELL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Toronto’s police chief identified
the driver as Alek Minassian, 25,
of Richmond Hill, Ontario. Minassian, who was not carrying a
weapon, was taken into custody
after a showdown in which he
brandished an object and told
officers, “Shoot me in the head.”
“On the basis of all available
information at the present time,
there would appear to be no national security connection to this
particular incident,” Canada’s
Police on Monday arrested a
man accused of killing four people
at a Waffle House this weekend,
ending a 34-hour, door-to-door
manhunt that locked down
schools and sent fear rippling
across the Nashville region.
Authorities discovered Travis
Reinking, 29, hiding in the woods
behind a construction site about a
mile from the restaurant where
the shooting occurred in the community of Antioch, southeast of
downtown Nashville. Police said
Reinking immediately lay on the
ground and surrendered when an
officer approached him with his
gun drawn.
Reinking was taken to a hospital after his arrest and booked
later Monday at the Hill Detention Center on four counts of
criminal homicide.
Reinking requested a lawyer
and refused to answer questions
or make a statement, said Don
Aaron, a spokesman for the Metropolitan Nashville Police Department. He did not explain how
Reinking eluded officers, police
A notorious jail in Philadelphia is set to close as
new criminal justice initiatives shrink the city’s
inmate population. A2
The Supreme Court
heard arguments in a case
that could dramatically
change the status of federal administrative law
judges. A3
Police wrestled a black
woman to the ground at a
Waffle House restaurant
in Alabama, sparking
protests over the force
used to subdue her. A3
Skeptics of plans for a
new “extreme” vetting
center say it would du-
plicate what is already
being done to screen
foreign visitors. A11
THE WORLD
Canada’s foreign minister put Ukraine’s travails at the hands of
Russia at the top of the
agenda for the Group of
Seven’s next meeting. A7
An airstrike by the
Saudi-led coalition
fighting in Yemen’s civil
war killed more than 20
people at a wedding
party, officials said. A8
The U.S. ordered its
embassy staff out of Nicaragua after at least
nine deaths in protests
against President Daniel
WISSAM NASSAR FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Court employees in Gaza City handle financial case files. The value
of checks bounced in the territory surged to $112 million last year,
the Palestine Monetary Authority says, an increase of $50 million.
The unemployment rate in Gaza is reported to be near 50 percent.
Ortega. A10
Two Korean Air heiresses will resign from
management positions
following behavior that
has produced widespread backlash. A13
THE ECONOMY
The 10-year Treasury
note is approaching a
3 percent yield, worrying some that the rise
will prompt a stock market sell-off. A14
A federal contractor
underpaid workers by as
much as $100 million, a
union alleged in a Labor
Department complaint. A15
THE REGION
D.C. officials are exploring the impact of
ride-hailing services on
trips in the city. B1
Prince William County supervisors will vote
on a proposal that
would sharply raise taxes on computer-heavy
businesses. B1
Virginia teens successfully lobbied state lawmakers to pass legislation requiring mental
health education for
high school students. B1
On the first day of trial,
prosecutors described
the 2016 shooting death
of a District woman as
“a meticulously planned
execution.” B1
Maryland Gov. Larry
Hogan, a Republican
presiding over a blue
state, has broad popularity, a poll found. B5
fire. Sukkar is unemployed and
said he is hard-pressed to feed his
six children.
Across the 140-square-mile territory, Gazans are struggling to finance their daily lives. Young people — unable to pay for weddings or
homes of their own — are delaying
marriage, figures show, while
health officials say suicide, once
virtually unheard of in Gaza, is on
the rise.
Universities say students are
dropping out because they cannot
afford the fees. At the Islamic
University in Gaza City, a third of
the students did not re-enroll this
semester. Graduates have little
hope of finding work in their
specialized fields.
Unemployment in Gaza is nearly
50 percent, and 68 percent of those
between the ages of 20 and 24 are
jobless, according to figures from
GAZA CONTINUED ON A20
Inside
HEALTH & SCIENCE
Extended family
Disabled Russians, often
isolated, find purpose in
a farming community. E1
ST YLE
Divided fan base
The woman behind the
updates to “Nancy”
embraces readers. C1
BUSINESS NEWS........................A13
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES..........................A17
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS .............................. A8
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 140
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
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EZ
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
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Products v. Hebei Welcome Pharmaceutical, involving
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CO R R ECTI O N S
An April 22 Sports article about
the Toyota Owners 400 NASCAR
race in Richmond misidentified a
driver. He is Ryan Blaney, not
Dave Blaney. Dave Blaney is his
father.
An April 21 Page One article
about turmoil within the altright movement incorrectly
stated that Traditionalist Worker
Party co-founder Matt Parrott
concocted a plan to catch his wife
in an affair with co-founder
Matthew Heimbach. According
to a police report, it is unclear
who concocted the plan. Parrott
said he did not.
An April 18 Sports article about
Boston Marathon women’s
runner-up Sarah Sellers
misstated the age of her brother.
Ryan Callister is 25, not 24.
An April 9 Metro article about
Richard Overton, the country’s
oldest World War II veteran, said
that he served as a sharpshooter
in the war. No such job
description existed at that time
in the Army, although he was
said to have good marksmanship.
The Washington Post is committed to
correcting errors that appear in the
newspaper. Those interested in
contacting the paper for that purpose
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Call: 202-334-6000, and ask to be
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Comments can be directed to The
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APRIL 24 , 2018
BY J OEL A CHENBACH
AND L ENA H . S UN
President Trump and first lady Melania Trump host
French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife, Brigitte
Macron, in Washington. Scheduled events include a Rose
Garden news conference, a State Department lunch
hosted by Vice President Pence, a wreath-laying ceremony
at Arlington National Ceremony, a ceremony honoring U.S.
veterans of World War II at the French Embassy, and a
White House state dinner. Visit washingtonpost.com/
politics for developments.
All day
. TUESDAY,
Source of E. coli contamination remains a mystery
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
All day
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Eight sick prisoners in Nome,
Alaska, have provided a clue to
authorities about the origin of a
nationwide outbreak of dangerous E. coli infections from romaine lettuce, but U.S. officials
said Monday they still have not
pinpointed the source of the contamination.
The Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are
warning consumers to throw
away romaine, in any form, that
comes from the Yuma, Ariz., growing region, and to avoid eating
romaine of unknown origin. Most
romaine sold in the United States
during the winter is grown in the
Yuma region.
This is a dangerous strain of
E. coli, known as 0157:H7. It produces a Shiga toxin that can enter
a person’s bloodstream and wreak
havoc on kidney function. Symptoms of infection include vomiting, painful cramps and diarrhea
that may be bloody.
Outbreak investigations often
take weeks because food in the
United States is handled and processed many times as it is distributed nationwide. Typically, the
contamination comes from animal feces. Investigators are
searching the Yuma area and doing field tests to determine where
the problem originated.
The Nome case, revealed late
last week, could potentially be a
break in the investigation, because all the prisoners at the Anvil
Mountain Correctional Center ate
lettuce that came from a single
supplier. Jeremy Ayers, a section
manager in Alaska’s food-safety
program, reiterated Monday that
the lettuce had been traced to a
farm in Yuma.
Using purchase orders, state officials traced the romaine to one
lettuce supplier for the jail. That
supplier received its lettuce from
one packer in California, which
got its romaine from one farm in
Yuma, he said.
“We just kept doing that until
we arrived at the farm,” Ayers said.
But FDA spokesman Peter Cassell said on Monday that although
the Alaska information has been
helpful, it has not solved the mystery. No single source has been
identified for the contamination
nationwide, he said.
“FDA’s investigation is still ongoing. What they have is not conclusive,” Cassell said, referring to
GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCK
An E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown near Yuma, Ariz., has sickened at least 60 people.
Eight infected prisoners in Alaska have provided a clue to the origin, but officials say it’s still unknown.
the Alaska probe. It’s not known
publicly whether the farm in
Yuma and the packer in California
also sent romaine to other suppliers. “We are still working on the
traceback. We have not traced it
back to a particular farm or supplier,” he said.
On Twitter on Monday, FDA
Commissioner Scott Gottlieb noted that romaine has a short shelf
life, and the winter growing season is ending in Yuma.
“It’s likely that any romaine
sold now is from California, not
AZ,” he tweeted. “Consumers
should continue asking grocers
and restaurants to make sure their
romaine isn’t from Yuma.”
From winter through March,
the Yuma region grows the majority of the romaine sold in the United States, and production continues into April, before southwest
Arizona becomes too hot. Production then shifts to California.
According to the most recent
official count, the outbreak has
sickened 53 people in 16 states,
with no known fatalities. That
count includes one of the Alaska
prisoners. When all affected Alaska inmates are included, the number sickened is at least 60. About
two-thirds of the people sickened
have been women, officials said,
and the age range is 10 to 85.
The outbreak at the prison
could be a major clue to figuring
out the source. Salad was on the
menu for dinner every day from
March 26 through April 6, state
officials said.
“The prison is a perfect control
— they all ate the same things at
the same time, and they ate romaine,” said Bill Marler, a foodsafety lawyer who has been involved in many E. coli outbreak
cases in the past 15 years. “The
chances that eight prisoners from
Nome not being linked to the illnesses in the Lower 48 is zero,
given that they are a genetic match
to the outbreak strain of E. coli.”
Marler said he is representing
28 individuals who became sick,
several of them children hospitalized with severe kidney failure.
Seven or eight of his clients have
not been interviewed by state
health officials, he said, and thus
are unlikely to be included in the
official count of the extent of the
outbreak.
Gary Weber, who until June
served as prevention manager for
the FDA’s Coordinated Outbreak
Response and Evaluation network, told The Washington Post
that he was puzzled that it has
taken so long to identify the
source of the contamination. With
this many sick people and with
known clusters of illness — including at the Alaska prison and in
restaurants in New Jersey — there
should be enough information to
trace the E. coli to a specific location rather than a general geographic area, he said.
“This seems odd to me,” Weber
said.
The CDC put out its first warn-
ing of an outbreak on April 10. It
did not specify romaine lettuce as
the food item involved.
Three days later, the CDC released an update that said evidence “indicates that chopped romaine lettuce is the likely source
of this outbreak.” Most people who
became sick said they ordered salads in restaurants. The restaurants reported that they used
bagged, chopped lettuce. “At this
time, ill people are not reporting
whole heads or hearts of romaine,”
the CDC said on its website. It
reported that “preliminary information” linked the lettuce to the
Yuma growing region.
On April 20, the CDC updated
its advisory to include a warning
about whole-head lettuce. That
came after the CDC learned the
Alaska prison had used wholehead lettuce.
The CDC found that people began getting sick on March 13. Most
of the documented cases involved
people becoming sick between
March 24 and March 28, with
Pennsylvania leading the way
with a dozen cases. But the CDC
says it is possible that some cases
since March 29 have not yet been
reported to state authorities. The
most recent documented cases involved people who became sick on
April 6.
joel.achenbach@washpost.com
lena.sun@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
Amid reforms, Philadelphia to shut notorious jail
BY
T OM J ACKMAN
The American criminal justice
system’s gradual realization that
too many people are needlessly in
jail just got a large, visible boost
from the city of Philadelphia. The
city announced last week that it
would close its notorious, 91-yearold House of Correction jail because reforms begun two years
ago have dropped the city’s jail
population by 33 percent, without
causing any increase in crime or
chaos.
Defense attorneys are working
harder to get defendants released
quickly with no bail or low bail,
prosecutors typically don’t oppose that, and the city’s judges are
agreeing. Philadelphia police are
taking more defendants to treatment rather than jail. More petitions for early parole from longer
sentences are being granted.
More space is now available in the
city’s six jails for rehabilitation
programs, and less overtime pay
is needed for guards. There is a
strong consensus at the top levels
of Philadelphia’s justice system
that the reforms, made with the
help of a $3.5 million grant and
guidance from the MacArthur
Foundation, are working.
“The system didn’t work,” said
Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney.
“It didn’t have outcomes that were
acceptable. We had a revolving
door. Rather than holistically
treating people, we’d just lock
them up, they’d do their time, and
then they’d be right back. It’s difficult to take care of your kids or
your parents if you’re not there.”
Kenney cited two new approaches he thought were particularly successful. One is “early bail
review,” for people still in jail after
five days with bonds of $50,000 or
less. Kenney said 84 percent of
those reviewed were released
within five days, and more than
92 percent showed up for their
subsequent hearings. A second
initiative involves police diverting
drug-related offenders to treatment clinics, and since December
“no one who’s been in the program
has been rearrested,” the mayor
said.
And Part I crime in Philadelphia — murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny and auto theft — is down 3 percent over the past two years, Kenney said.
CLEM MURRAY/PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER
Inside Philadelphia’s 91-year-old House of Correction, which lacks air conditioning and a sprinkler
system. Officials say they can now close the jail because the city’s inmate population has dropped.
“What you have in Philadelphia,” said Laurie R. Garduque,
director of justice reform for the
MacArthur Foundation, “are
shared values with respect to a
fair and effective justice system
and protecting public safety. And
a realization that there are better
ways to hold people accountable
instead of incarceration. When
you start to shrink the footprint of
the system and do it safely, you’re
in a posture that’s more fair and
more effective.”
In July 2015, Philadelphia had
8,082 people in its six jails. The
reforms began in 2016, and last
Friday, Philadelphia had 5,394
people in its jails, according to the
city’s Department of Prisons.
That’s a 33 percent decrease, to a
level not seen since the 1990s. The
House of Correction, with no
sprinkler system or air conditioning, is down to 199 inmates in its
166 cells, so Kenney announced
that it would close by 2020.
“Reaching the point where we can
shutter this facility once and for
all,” he said at a news conference,
“without needing to build a new
prison — this is a milestone.”
The city’s chief public defender,
Keir Bradford-Grey, said getting
the grant from the MacArthur
Foundation “brought all of us to-
gether to really examine what’s
going on in our system. We all
agreed to work on what’s in our
purview to say, ‘Okay, we can do
things differently here.’ ”
One thing the city’s defender
system did was to place lawyers at
police district stations to represent clients immediately after an
arrest, during their first appearance before a bail commissioner.
The lawyers are there 24 hours a
day, seven days a week, BradfordGrey said, and have handled more
than 1,400 cases in the past two
years.
“Now that we’re able to give
judges much better information,”
she said, “they have found it very
useful when they make decisions.
Usually they have no more information than the current charges
and the criminal history.” But by
providing more context about a
defendant’s past, living arrangements and employment, “people
are more likely to be released
without a cash bond or with more
affordable bond amounts.”
Justice experts have found that
mass incarceration — Philadelphia had the highest per capita
incarceration rate among the nation’s 10 biggest cities before this
project — often imposes unnecessary harm on defendants who
aren’t violent or a threat to flee by
costing them their jobs and their
ability to hold their own financially; in turn, this can harm families.
Bail has also been found to disproportionately affect poor and minority defendants, who must sit in
jail while defendants who can
post higher bonds on the same
charges are released.
Philadelphia’s newly elected
district attorney, Larry Krasner,
announced in February that his
office would no longer ask for cash
bail for low-level offenses, which
he said would make the system
“fairer for the poor and for people
of color.”
Krasner’s predecessor, Seth
Williams, initially involved the
city’s prosecutors in the project,
and municipal court judges also
have endorsed the reforms.
Another new initiative that
prosecutors and judges have not
opposed is early parole. Public
defenders began offering to help
convicts convince the courts that
they should be released before
their parole dates, and judges
have granted close to 60 percent
of the requests, officials said.
tom.jackman@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/true-crime
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
SU
Politics & the Nation
High court weighs power of
administrative law judges
BY
R OBERT B ARNES
In 2012, the Securities and
Exchange Commission said the
“Buckets of Money” strategy that
Raymond J. Lucia pitched at investment seminars violated antifraud statutes.
An SEC administrative law
judge held a hearing and fined
Lucia $300,000 and barred him
from working as an investment
adviser, a decision the commission affirmed.
Lucia’s case was at the Supreme Court on Monday, not
challenging the decision of the
administrative law judge — although Lucia does — but arguing
that the judge was improperly
appointed to his job, something
that could have a much larger
impact on the federal government.
The court is considering
whether administrative law judges, like the one in Lucia’s case, are
simply employees of the agency,
or as Lucia contends, should be
considered officers of the United
States, as defined by the Constitution. That would mean appointment by either the president, the courts, or heads of
departments.
There are administrative law
judges throughout the federal
government, and any number of
decisions could become suspect if
the court agrees with Lucia. An
added twist in the case is that the
Trump
administration
has
switched sides and supports Lucia.
An hour of arguments did not
point clearly to an outcome, although it appeared that some
justices were looking for ways to
limit the impact of whatever they
decided.
Chief Justice John G. Roberts
Jr. indicated that the agency
judges have significant power,
and that there is a lack of clarity
about to whom they are responsible.
“The commission can say:
‘Don’t blame us. We didn’t do it.’
The president can say: ‘Don’t
blame me. I didn’t appoint
them,’ ” Roberts said. “Instead,
it’s something in the administrative bureaucracy which operates as insulation from the political accountability that the
drafters of the Constitution intended.”
makers, he said, are not employees who can be hired by the
chief administrative law judge,
as the judge in Lucia’s case was.
The dispute could have an
impact on more than 100 cases at
the SEC, and it could affect judges in other departments such as
the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Perry told Justice
Anthony M. Kennedy that about
150 agency judges could be affected, but it would not have an
impact on such employees in the
Social Security Administration.
To head off challenges of its
decisions, the SEC voted to appoint its five administrative law
There are administrative law judges throughout
the federal government, and any number of
decisions could become suspect if the court agrees
with Raymond J. Lucia.
Justices Stephen G. Breyer and
Elena Kagan, on the other hand,
worried about the independence
of the agency judges if political
players were more involved in
their hiring.
“We typically think we want
the decision-maker to be insulated from political pressures,” Kagan said to Mark Perry, Lucia’s
lawyer. “So wouldn’t putting
those decision-makers even closer to the political body only
exacerbate the problem that
you’re complaining of ?”
But Perry said the judges
have the kind of “sovereign
powers” that would define
them as officers. Such decision-
judges, which Deputy Solicitor
General Jeffrey B. Wall said satisfies the constitutional requirement and eliminates the problem
(Lucia disagrees).
Because the Trump administration generally agreed with
Lucia’s position on the judges,
the court appointed New York
lawyer Anton Metlitsky to argue
for the SEC. Metlitsky said the
administrative law judges do
not qualify as officers because
their authority is limited. Every
decision they make can be reviewed by the commission, he
said.
The case is Lucia v. SEC.
robert.barnes@washpost.com
Ala. restaurant arrest sparks uproar
BY A LEX H ORTON
AND R ACHEL S IEGEL
White police officers in Alabama wrestled a black woman to
the ground in a Waffle House early
Sunday, exposing her breasts during the struggle and prompting
comparisons to the arrest of two
black men at a Philadelphia Starbucks this month.
Yet local police maintain that
the three officers involved followed protocol and said the department is “not choosing to take
any action at this time.” At a news
conference Monday afternoon, officials said the woman and her
friend were acting belligerently
inside the Waffle House, drunkenly yelling profanities at the restaurant’s employees and threatening
to return with a gun and “shoot
this place up.”
The incident sparked a sit-in at
the store Sunday afternoon and
led to responses from the NAACP
and celebrities, even as Waffle
House officials contested the details of the family’s story.
A video that has gone viral
shows Chikesia Clemons, 25, sitting on a chair at the diner in
Saraland, north of Mobile, as one
of the officers grabs her neck and
right wrist in an attempt to subdue
her. Clemons describes a disagreement with an employee that triggered the police response. She
soon appears conscious of her
tube top and raises her arms to
cover her bust line.
“You’re not going to grab on me
like that, no,” Clemons tells the
officer, who appears to speak to
another officer off-camera in the
video filmed by Clemons’s friend,
Canita Adams.
What happens next is unclear.
The widely circulated video of the
incident taken by Adams suddenly
jumps to the moment when Clemons and the two officers go to the
ground in a violent tumble. It is
Video shows officers
wrestling woman
described as belligerent
unclear from the video who initiated the struggle that forced Clemons and the officers to the floor.
“What are you doing?” Clemons
asks as the struggle continues on
the tile floor.
“I’ll break your arm, that’s what
I’m about to do,” an officer says.
The struggle continues, with officers demanding that Clemons
stop “resisting” as her breast is
exposed.
At one point, an officer places
his hand around her neck.
“You’re choking me!” Clemons
cries out.
The officer releases his grip
when a third officer nearby gestures with his hand. Clemons was
arrested about 2:45 a.m. and
charged with disorderly conduct
and resisting arrest, officials confirmed at the news conference.
Officials from the Saraland Police Department said an investigation into Clemons’s arrest and the
officers’ conduct began early Sunday. At Monday’s news conference,
Detective Collette Little played the
911 call made by a Waffle House
employee about 2:30 a.m., as well
as surveillance footage.
According to the call, the employee said she was told by one of
her managers to call the police
because two black women and one
black man had entered the restaurant with alcohol. The customers
were told that they were not allowed to drink inside, the employee told the dispatcher.
Little said that after a few minutes, “the situation escalates between the patrons at that table
and the employees.” The employees ask Clemons, Adams and their
male friend to leave the restaurant. Adams and the male friend
can be seen briefly exiting the
Waffle House in the footage. Clemons briefly reaches the door then
walks back to her booth to reengage with the employees. Adams
soon returns.
Soon, the three officers arrive
one by one. In one of the frames,
Clemons is seen being taken to the
floor. Little said that during the
arrest, the officers were attempting to handcuff Clemons “behind
her back, which again is standard
procedure.”
Little said that one of the officers asked Adams “if she will assist
in pulling Ms. Clemons’s shirt
back up. And Ms. Adams refuses.”
The male friend then “asks permission to pull her dress up, and
the female gives him permission.”
At that point, Clemons, Adams,
the male friend and the three officers leave the Waffle House.
Little said that when the police
arrived, Clemons “appeared to be
intoxicated” and that she “got
sick” after being booked.
Detective Brian Mims said that
in conducting the investigation,
he interviewed the officers and
seven witnesses. The witnesses
said Clemons and Adams loudly
shouted profanities at employees.
One shouted, “I’ll come over this
counter” and threatened to beat
the employee, saying “B----, I’m
going to have your job, you ain’t
going to be here tomorrow.”
One witness reported hearing:
“I may have a gun, I may have
anything. I can come back here
and shoot this place up if I need
to.”
Clemons and Adams could not
be reached for comment.
The Alabama incident came the
same day a gunman killed four
people with a semiautomatic rifle
at a Waffle House in Tennessee.
alex.horton@washpost.com
rachel.siegel@washpost.com
DIGEST
TEXAS
George H.W. Bush
in hospital for infection
Former president George H.W.
Bush was hospitalized Sunday
morning “after contracting an
infection that spread to his
blood,” a family spokesman said.
Bush, 93, was admitted to
Houston Methodist Hospital just
one day after his wife, former first
lady Barbara Bush, was laid to
rest, said spokesman Jim
McGrath. The 41st president is
responding to treatments and
appears to be recovering, he said.
Barbara Bush died April 17 at
age 92, two days after the family
announced that she had “decided
not to seek additional medical
treatment” after recent
hospitalizations amid her “failing
health.” Her husband, whose own
health has been declining, sat in
his wheelchair in front of her
casket at her funeral Saturday,
greeting mourners for 20
minutes.
Bush has been battling a form
of Parkinson’s disease and has
needed hospital care several
times in recent years because of
respiratory problems. He also
suffered from Graves’ disease, a
thyroid ailment, during his
presidency. He remains America’s
longest-living president, having
surpassed Gerald Ford, who died
at 93 years and 165 days, last
November. Bush’s 94th birthday
is June 12.
CALIFORNIA
Judges reject lawsuit
over monkey’s selfies
— Marwa Eltagouri
VERMONT
Four charges dropped
in alleged shooting plot
Prosecutors have dropped the
four most serious charges against
a teen accused of plotting to shoot
up his former high school and
cause mass casualties in a case
that has led to new restrictions in
Vermont’s gun laws.
A ruling by the state Supreme
Court has made the prosecution
against 18-year-old Jack Sawyer
“untenable,” Rutland County
State’s Attorney Rose Kennedy
said. The state was dropping
charges of attempted murder and
aggravated assault with a
weapon, Kennedy said in a notice
released Monday.
Kennedy said she would
proceed with two lesser charges
of criminal threatening and
carrying a dangerous weapon.
Sawyer has pleaded not guilty
to all charges. He had been held
without bail following his arrest
on Feb. 15, a day after the
Parkland, Fla., high school
shooting that left 17 people dead,
but the judge in his case set his
bail at $100,000 last week.
Prosecutors say Sawyer kept a
diary called “The Journal of an
Active Shooter” in which he made
SHANNON STAPLETON/REUTERS
Winter-weary New Yorkers take in Monday’s warmer weather at Sheep Meadow in Central Park. Aside
from some rain on Wednesday, forecasters predict that temperatures will rise through the week, reaching
65 degrees by Saturday.
plans for a shooting at Fair Haven
Union High in Fair Haven, and
said his goal was to kill more
people than in any school
shooting. Sawyer’s defense team
contended that he didn’t take any
concrete steps toward
committing a crime that under
state law would justify the
charges. The Supreme Court
ruled that “preparation alone” did
not prove an attempt at
aggravated murder.
Gov. Phil Scott (R), after
reading the police affidavit in the
case, said he changed his stance
on some gun restrictions.
U.S. copyright law does not
allow lawsuits that seek to give
animals rights to photos or other
original work, limiting such
claims to people, a federal appeals
court ruled Monday in a novel
case over selfies taken by a
monkey in Indonesia.
The unanimous decision by a
three-judge panel of the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the 9th
Circuit upheld a lower-court
ruling that also dismissed the
lawsuit by People for the Ethical
Treatment of Animals against a
photographer whose camera was
used by a crested macaque to take
the photos in 2011.
PETA’s 2015 suit against David
Slater sought financial control of
the photos — including a famous
selfie of the monkey’s toothy grin
— for the benefit of the animal,
named Naruto. Naruto snapped
the photos with an unattended
camera while Slater was on a trip
to Sulawesi, Indonesia.
Slater later argued that his
company, Wildlife Personalities
Ltd., owned worldwide
commercial rights to the photos.
Slater and PETA said in
September that they had reached
a settlement, but the court still
decided to rule in the case.
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
Suspect had history of mental instability, run-ins with law
REINKING FROM A1
dogs and search helicopters, and
he would not say what drove the
suspect to allegedly open fire on
apparent strangers early Sunday
morning.
Reinking’s bond was set at
$2 million — $500,000 for each
homicide count. He is scheduled
to make his first appearance in
court Wednesday morning.
Reinking had accumulated a
long list of red flags in recent
years; police said he showed signs
of mental instability, had extensive run-ins with authorities, and
had his firearms license revoked
and his guns taken away by authorities last year. He allegedly
carried out the mass shooting
with one of the guns police had
confiscated.
Last summer, Reinking was arrested outside the White House
after he tried to cross a security
barrier, declaring himself a “sovereign citizen” who wanted to
speak with President Trump. The
incident put Reinking under the
scrutiny of the Secret Service and
the FBI, as well as state and local
police in Illinois, where he lived at
the time.
In August, state and local authorities seized his guns and gave
them to his father, Jeffrey Reinking, who agreed to keep the firearms secure and away from Travis,
officials said. Since Sunday’s
shooting, the father has told police that he eventually gave the
guns back to his son.
Federal officials said Monday
that the transfer was probably
illegal and that the older Reinking
might be charged. A man answering the door at the Reinking family’s house in Morton, Ill., said the
family had no comment.
Police suspect that Travis
Reinking is the gunman who
opened fire at the Waffle House in
Antioch just before 3:30 a.m. on
Sunday.
The gunman sat in his pickup
truck at the restaurant for a few
minutes, looking around, before
he got out — wearing nothing but
a green jacket — and immediately
began shooting at customers in
the parking lot, police said.
The gunman kept shooting as
he walked inside, shattering the
restaurant’s glass windows. At
one point, he stopped, presumably to reload. That’s when, police
say, a customer, James Shaw Jr.,
lunged at the gunman, wrestled
the weapon away and tossed it
over the counter.
Three people died in the restaurant, and a fourth died later at a
hospital. Two more people were
injured and remained hospitalized in stable condition Monday.
After the shooting, police said,
Reinking was last spotted fleeing
shirtless into a wooded area behind his apartment.
Just an hour before arresting
Reinking, police acknowledged
having “no confirmed sightings”
of the suspect. Even as authorities
expanded their search, with 160
officers scouring surrounding
neighborhoods, they said they
weren’t sure if he remained in the
area.
Reinking’s arrest provided few
clues about his activities since the
shooting. He was wearing a maroon shirt and had a backpack
when taken into custody. Inside
the backpack, police said, was a
loaded handgun, .45-caliber ammunition, a flashlight and a holster.
Beginning in May 2016, Reinking had a number of increasingly
fraught encounters with authorities. That month, he told police in
Illinois that pop star Taylor Swift
was stalking and harassing him,
according to police records.
Reinking believed that Swift had
hacked into his Netflix account
and that his family was involved
in the harassment. He told police a
bizarre story about a Dairy Queen
meetup with Swift that ended
with Reinking searching for the
singer on the restaurant’s roof.
His parents told officers that he
had threatened to kill himself and
owned guns at home. Eventually
Reinking agreed to go to a hospital for evaluation, something he
told police he had done before.
On June 16, 2017, police said,
Reinking went to a local pool
wearing a women’s pink housecoat; he swam in his underwear,
exposed his genitals and tried to
pick fights with lifeguards.
That same day, records show,
Reinking — who was living in a
shop above the offices of his father’s construction business in
Tremont, Ill. — walked down to
the offices wearing a pink dress,
holding a rifle and shouting expletives at employees, before throwing the rifle in his car and speeding away.
An officer called his father, Jeffrey Reinking, who was out of
state at the time, according to
reports from the Tazewell County
Sheriff’s Office. The father told
police that he had taken three
rifles and a handgun away from
Travis because his son was having
problems. But he eventually returned the guns to his son.
In the report, an officer said he
later called Jeffrey Reinking and
told him that “when he gets back
home, he might want to lock the
guns back up until Travis gets
mental help which he stated he
would.”
Three weeks later, Travis
Reinking traveled to Washington
and picked a fight with federal
authorities.
On July 7, Reinking told authorities outside the White House that
he had to get in to speak with the
president. He said that “he was a
sovereign citizen and has a right
to inspect the grounds,” according
to a D.C. police report. Sovereign
citizens are viewed by the FBI as
anti-government extremists who
believe they are not subject to
governmental laws, and law enforcement officials have described
them as a major concern.
When an officer told him to
stop blocking the entrance, Reinking “began to take his tie off and
balled it into a fist” while walking
past the security barriers and
toward an officer, the police report says.
“Do what you need to do,”
Reinking said, according to the
report. “Arrest me if you have to.”
Reinking was charged with un-
METROPOLITAN NASHVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT/JOSE ROMERO/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
MARK HUMPHREY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOP: Suspect Travis Reinking, 29, after his arrest. Police discovered him hiding in a wooded area.
ABOVE: A worker cleans up shattered glass at the Waffle House in Antioch, Tenn.
“He’s a good man. He was raised in a Christian home. A guy who perpetrates
a crime like that naked? Come on, he’s not in his right mind.”
Bill Koepnick, a neighbor of Travis Reinking’s family in Morton, Ill.
lawful entry, a misdemeanor, officials said.
He was ordered to perform 32
hours of community service at
Cornerstone Baptist Church in
Morton, Ill., and to stay away from
the White House for four months.
He mowed grass, ran a forklift to
move pallets of food, and packaged food for distribution to local
food banks as well as hygiene
packets for hurricane relief, according to court records.
After an investigation by the
FBI office in Springfield, Ill., the
Tazewell County Sheriff’s Office
said Monday, it was asked by the
Illinois State Police to take away
Reinking’s firearm owners identi-
fication (FOID) card, which he
needed to legally possess guns or
ammunition in Illinois.
When a person’s FOID card is
revoked, they have to hand it over
to authorities and fill out paperwork confirming that their guns
have been transferred to someone
who has a valid card, the sheriff’s
office said.
Reinking signed his four guns
over to his father on Aug. 24, 2017,
according to state records.
Matthew E. Espenshade, assistant special agent in charge of the
FBI’s Memphis division, said
Monday that “every federal resource was brought to bear” in
Reinking’s case after his arrest at
the White House and the FBI assessment, pointing specifically to
the attempts to keep him from
possessing firearms.
“We were able to effectively
neutralize what we felt was the
threat at the time by ensuring that
he did not have the ability to
purchase or own weapons and
that those weapons were taken,”
Espenshade said. “He was not able
to possess or own those weapons.”
Illinois State Police said they
could not provide details about
when Reinking obtained the
FOID card or whether any red
flags arose during his application.
It was not immediately clear
whether he had been diagnosed
with any mental illness. Illinois
law bars someone who’s been “adjudicated as a mental defective” or
has been a patient at a mental
institution from obtaining a firearm license.
The Waffle House shooting is
the latest attack to raise questions
about the systems intended to
prevent such violence — systems
that have repeatedly broken
down.
In Parkland, Fla., police and the
FBI did not act upon explicit
warnings that a teenager intended to shoot up a high school in the
weeks and months before 17 people were killed there in February.
In Sutherland Springs, Tex., the
gunman who killed more than
two dozen churchgoers last year
was able to buy firearms because
his domestic violence conviction
had not been entered into a national database that would have
flagged it during his background
check.
The FBI said a breakdown in
the background check system also
let the Charleston, S.C., shooter
obtain the gun he used to kill nine
people in a church there.
The Waffle House shooting is
the second in less than a year to hit
the town of Antioch, where a
masked gunman opened fire at a
church last year.
Last fall, Reinking moved to the
Nashville area and worked in the
construction industry, authorities
said. He was fired from a job about
three weeks ago, police said, and
was recently hired by another employer but had not been to work
since April 16.
On Tuesday, a few days before
the Waffle House shooting, Reinking nearly had another run-in
with police. Authorities say he
stole a BMW from a dealership in
suburban Nashville. Police later
tracked the car to Reinking’s
apartment complex but had no
idea who the thief was. After the
shooting, a keyfob for the BMW
was found in Reinking’s apartment, officials said.
A neighbor near his family’s
home in Morton, Ill., said Reinking worked for a while for his
father’s company, J&J Cranes.
“He’s a good man. He was raised
in a Christian home,” said Bill
Koepnick, who called Reinking
hard-working and honest. “A guy
who perpetrates a crime like that
naked? Come on, he’s not in his
right mind.”
But Abede Dasilva, who was in
the Waffle House with his brother,
Akilah Dasilva, when Akilah was
fatally shot, said he is struggling
to understand why Reinking’s
family allowed him to keep his
firearms.
“That is your child,” Dasilva
said. “If something is mentally
wrong with him, then you have to
know that. How did they think it
was okay to give him his guns
back?”
katie.zezima@washpost.com
kristine.phillips@washpost.com
mark.berman@washpost.com
william.wan@washpost.com
Tara Haelle in Morton, Ill., and Devlin
Barrett, Keith L. Alexander, Julie Tate,
Magda Jean-Louis and Alice Crites in
Washington contributed to this report.
In little Antioch, two mass shootings and fear of ‘living next to murderers’
AND
BY B RANDON G EE
A BIGAIL H AUSLOHNER
antioch, tenn. — Travis Reinking, suspected of a mass killing, was
on the loose in this community on
the outskirts of Nashville for 34
hours before police found him lurking in the woods with a loaded
handgun Monday afternoon. They
said the 29-year-old was armed with
an assault-style rifle when he
stormed into a local Waffle House
early Sunday morning, killing four
people.
The arrest allayed the immediate fears of a community gripped
by unease over the course of a
tense manhunt. But the sense of
fear lingered.
They were concerned that
Reinking, who was not supposed
to have access to guns after he
tried to breach the White House
grounds in July 2017, was able to
get his hands on those guns again
so easily. They were concerned
that Reinking is white, and all six
of his victims were people of color
— five black and one Hispanic — in
a region with a history of racial
tensions. And they were concerned because Antioch, a quiet
working-class town of 93,000,
now has witnessed two mass
shootings in six months.
As the nation grapples with the
root causes of a spate of deadly
shootings — many with the same
type of gun Reinking allegedly
used, the AR-15 — Antioch is at the
center of it all again. And the
community is struggling to come
to grips with its budding notoriety, its causes as elusive as the
motives for the shootings.
On Monday, theories — and wor-
ANDREW NELLES/THE TENNESSEAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
SHELLEY MAYS/THE TENNESSEAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
LEFT: Connie Robinson, left, hugs her daughter Kayla Compton, during a vigil at Burnette Chapel Church of Christ in Antioch, Tenn.,
after a gunman killed one person and injured several others there in 2017. RIGHT: Personnel from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives search a wooded area near the church Monday for the suspect in the Waffle House shooting nearby.
ries — grew across town: Maybe it’s
the prevalence of guns that has
caused two men in their 20s to go
on shooting rampages at gathering
spots here, one in a church and the
other in a restaurant. Maybe it’s the
dearth of mental-health services
for those in need.
Angela Marie Durand, a former
pharmacist, suggested that it
could be related to the opioid epidemic. Clarice Grooms, a real estate agent, said she thinks the
violence is related to rising crime
and gang activity. Leah Chay, a
38-year-old mother, said she just
can’t believe this would happen
here, twice.
“Nobody is taking any steps to
get at the root causes,” said Mikal
Rios, 50, who lives a mile from the
Waffle House, where four people
were killed and two were injured
Sunday morning. “We need to take
more steps as adults to address
kids that have issues. We need to
listen to kids more. We need to
listen to what they’re saying.”
Antioch is a 30-minute drive
from downtown Nashville, home
to auto plant workers and a growing immigrant population, which
has led to a smattering of notable
Ethiopian and Mexican restaurants locating here. The Waffle
House on Murfreesboro Pike —
one of several in Antioch — is a
popular late-night hangout for local college students and a regular
breakfast and coffee destination
for their early-riser parents.
There are a lot of churches here
— almost two dozen — and like
many other American towns, they
fill up on Sunday mornings.
Now both of these local main-
stays have been targets. Both
shootings involved a young man
storming into a crowd with a gun,
and both involved an unarmed
hero who stopped him.
In September, a man identified
as Emanuel Kidega Samson
walked into the Burnette Chapel
Church of Christ and opened fire
with two handguns, striking seven
people and killing one. Samson,
who is black, had attended the
church. His victims were white.
And police, who have charged him
with murder, aggravated assault
and civil rights intimidation, told
the Tennessean newspaper that
his car contained a letter referring
to a 2015 shooting by a white man
targeting black churchgoers in
South Carolina, raising the possibility of a racial motive.
A month later, a group of white
supremacists rallied in nearby
Shelbyville, which they hoped
would attract recruits, in part, because of anger at the Antioch
church shooting.
And so, as police searched for
Reinking on Monday, Rhonda Miller, who lives in the same apartment complex as the alleged shooter, couldn’t help but wonder
whether race had something to do
with his attack. Miller, who is black,
is a regular at the Waffle House.
Had Reinking shown up three
hours later, she and her husband
might have been there having their
morning coffee. And her daughter,
Nikia Woods, said a group of her
sorority sisters had also just missed
the shooting, leaving the restaurant at about 3 a.m., shortly before
the shots were fired there.
“It just kind of crossed my
mind, like: ‘Wow, did he just target
the black people?’ ” Miller said.
Ryan Gatlin, who also lives at
the apartment complex, where a
majority of residents are black,
said he is ready to move.
“Seriously,” he said. “It’s too hot
over here to be living next to murderers. Not feeling too safe, especially with all the victims being
minority.”
For much of Monday, police
were involved in a manhunt. A
helicopter moved steadily overhead, and swarms of police, a
SWAT team, sheriff’s deputies and
FBI agents staged their operations
from beneath tents and alongside
vehicles in the grocery store parking lot across from the Waffle
House.
Mountain View Elementary
School, half a mile from the apartment complex where Reinking
lived, was in session, but it seemed
cloaked in an unnatural silence
from the outside. Its playground
was empty at lunch hour, and a
sign on the door in English and
Arabic instructed parents that
only students and staff would be
allowed to enter the building.
Mizelle Calloway, whose three
children attend Cane Ridge High
School, said they didn’t go to
school Monday because the family
“didn’t want to take a chance.”
“It just had everybody up on
edge,” said Calloway, who owns a
barbershop a mile north of the
Waffle House. “I’ve been making
sure I’m on point with everything,
watching my whereabouts.”
abigail.hauslohner@washpost.com
Hauslohner reported from
Washington.
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
‘There was so much left for him’: Mourning for the victims, all in their 20s
R ACHEL C HASON,
K ARIN B RULLIARD
AND E VA R UTH M ORAVEC
BY
Abede Dasilva always tried to
protect his younger brother. So
when he ran out of the bathroom
where he had been hiding from
gunfire that broke out at a Waffle
House restaurant near Nashville
early Sunday, he was looking for
Akilah.
He found the 23-year-old conscious but bleeding from a gunshot wound in his arm. His
brother’s girlfriend was nearby,
shot in the leg. He sat with
Akilah Dasilva — a musician and
music video producer — and
Shanita Waggoner until the ambulance arrived, providing comfort to both.
Akilah Dasilva died at Vanderbilt University Medical Center
soon after. He was one of four
victims killed in the attack. DeEbony Groves, 21, Taurean C.
Sanderlin, 29, and Joe Perez Jr.,
20, died inside the Waffle House,
where authorities say Travis
Reinking opened fire before a
customer wrestled his semiautomatic AR-15 rifle away from him.
Waggoner, 21, of Nashville, is
among two victims in stable
condition at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Sharita Henderson, 24, of Antioch, Tenn.,
also remains hospitalized.
The shooting unleashed a
nearly 34-hour manhunt for
Reinking, who was arrested in a
wooded area about a mile from
the Waffle House on Monday
afternoon.
Akilah Dasilva “accomplished
so much in such a short space of
time,” said Abede Dasilva, 29,
noting that he and his brother
had released a rap music video
the day before the shooting.
“There was so much left for him.”
He described his younger
brother, who studied engineering technology at Middle Tennessee State University, as a quick
learner who was good with technology. Dasilva said that, even at
4 years old, his little brother was
beating him at video games —
despite their six-year age gap.
Akilah Dasilva’s love of video
games turned into a passion for
engineering, videography and
photography, and an ability to
“fix anything,” his brother said.
“He was inspiring to me,” he
said.
HARRISON MCCLARY/REUTERS
TOP: A Nashville police officer
inspects the Waffle House after
Sunday’s shooting. Joe Perez
Jr., above left, and Taurean C.
Sanderlin died in the attack.
In a written statement, their
mother, Shaundelle Brooks, said
her son “had a smile that could
light up a room and a laugh that
would warm your heart.”
She called the shooting a
“senseless act of terrorism and
hate” and said that her family
hopes the tragedy will lead to
“true gun reform.”
Relatives of Taurean C. Sanderlin, who was working as a cook
at the Waffle House, said he
rarely talked about politics or
gun policies. But his cousin Maria Holt said the family is bothered by the circumstances
around the shooting, particularly that Reinking’s father gave
him access to the AR-15 rifle used
in the rampage, after officials
had revoked Reinking’s firearm
license.
“There is no one who is more
responsible for a child’s behavior
than a parent,” Holt said. She
called Sanderlin, who had
worked at Waffle House for five
years, a “kind, gentle-hearted
gentleman.”
“He is the one who opens
every door for ladies,” said Holt,
33, a nurse. “He’s quiet, but he
opens up when he gets to know
you.”
Sanderlin, who grew up in
Nashville and Stanton, Tenn.,
played football and liked hunting and fishing in the country
with his father when he was
growing up, she said.
He was saving up money for
one day when he might have a
family of his own.
“Some people want to cook
fancy food in fancy restaurants,
but he wanted to be comfortable
in a job he liked,” Holt said.
DeEbony Groves, who was
weeks away from graduating
from Belmont University with a
degree in social work, had “ambitious and endless potential,”
the university’s student government association wrote on Facebook.
She was a member of Delta
Sigma Theta sorority, held down
a part-time job and regularly
attended a Baptist church, an
aunt said.
Still, she regularly made time
to see her 73-year-old grandmother, who lives about 40 miles
away in the town of Portland,
Tenn. Carolyn Groves said her
granddaughter came out this
month for a typical visit: DeEbony Groves stretched out on the
sofa while her grandmother
ribbed her about a boyfriend and
insisted on seeing his photo.
“She was a sweetheart. Stubborn, kind of like, but a sweetheart,” Carolyn Groves said. “I
called her my little darling. That
was my nickname for her.”
DeEbony Groves was “real
smart,” she said — a strong
student from the time she started primary school and on the
dean’s list at least once at Belmont. She was mulling a move to
New York after graduation, her
grandmother said.
“We really hadn’t talked a lot
about what she was going to do
afterward,” said her aunt, Angela
Clay. “But I know it was going to
be something, because she was
extremely smart.”
Clay described Groves’s parents and brother as “managing”
their grief right now.
“You know, this was senseless.
It didn’t have to happen,” Clay
said. “She was a beautiful soul.”
Joe Perez Jr. moved to Nashville last December to live and
work with his older brother,
Christian Perez, 26, who delivers
and installs home appliances.
Late Saturday, he sent a text
message to his mother saying he
was on his way home after being
out with friends.
“He said, ‘I miss you and I love
you,’ ” Joe Perez Sr. said in an
interview at his home in Buda,
Tex.
Sunday morning, Christian
Perez called his parents to tell
them his brother hadn’t made it
home. Perez Sr. and his wife
tracked their son’s phone to the
Waffle House. A frantic Christian
Perez called his parents back
after finding his brother’s car in
the parking lot of the crime
scene.
“He was crying and yelling,”
Perez Sr. said. “He blames himself. He just feels bad that he
couldn’t protect him.”
Perez Jr. was a social butterfly
who enjoyed spending time with
his friends and family, including
his brother’s daughter, who was
born in October, Perez Sr. said.
“He was a very loving person,”
he said.
Perez Jr., who grew up in Kyle,
Tex., attended school in the Hays
Consolidated
Independent
School District south of Austin
but withdrew in 2015, his sophomore year, a district spokesman
said. His father said college
wasn’t for him, and Perez Jr. had
mostly busied himself with “odds
and ends” for employment, his
father said, like working in area
convenience stores. When his
older brother asked him for help
in Nashville, Perez Jr. was eager
to go.
“We blame ourselves, too, for
sending him there,” Perez Sr.
said. “But it was just some idiot
with a gun. We never would have
expected this.”
rachel.chason@washpost.com
karin.brulliard@washpost.com
Sarah Grace Taylor in Antioch, Tenn.,
contributed to this report.
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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Trump, Giuliani share similarities — but too many differences to be friends
BY
M ARC F ISHER
Before President Trump hired
Rudolph W. Giuliani to defend
him in the Russia investigation,
before Giuliani delivered a hotblooded, fists-clenched speech on
Trump’s behalf at the 2016 Republican National Convention, the
most sensational moment in the
duo’s long history came when
Trump kissed Giuliani on the
breast.
The former New York mayor
was dressed in drag. The kiss was
part of a spoof show in 2000 for a
good cause. Elliot Cuker, the stage
director who made it happen,
said he picked Trump to pair up
with Giuliani because “he’s a terrific actor, period. There was no
strong connection between
them.”
On the surface, the president
and the man he has now turned to
for a defense against special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s
investigation of alleged Trump
campaign ties with Russia share
some similarities. Trump and
Giuliani are both street-savvy
New Yorkers, Yankees fans and
political populists with a passion
for straight, blunt talk.
But the notion that Giuliani
and Trump have a special bond
does not comport with the recollections of people who worked
closely with both men in the
1980s and 1990s, when the mayor
and the real estate developer
were two of the biggest names in
the nation’s largest city.
“They were nowhere near close
in spirit or how they operated,”
said Cuker, a dealer in classic cars
who was friends with Giuliani for
many years. “Back then, Donald
was more concerned with his
image, his playfulness, a different
kind of narcissism, whereas Rudy
was much more conservative,
more drawn into himself. I never
saw a real bond between them.
Whatever relationship they had
was convenient for both.”
Both men relished being in the
public eye, going to great lengths
to build their images. Both were
mainstays in New York tabloid
headlines and regular guests on
David Letterman’s TV show and
Don Imus’s and Howard Stern’s
radio broadcasts.
“Rudy was prepared to work
very hard for applause and so was
Donald Trump,” said Wendeen
Eolis, a former adviser to Giuliani
who runs a legal consulting firm
in Manhattan. “Rudy became
very well known in the later years
for being not just blunt, but also
critical for effect, and I think it’s
fair to say they share that trait.”
But Eolis said the two men
were too different to have been
buddies. “I believe Donald is savvy about encouraging relationships, both for his business purposes and his personal convenience,” she said. “I do not recall
the name Donald Trump coming
to Rudy’s lips in the consideration
of a government initiative, only as
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President-elect Trump greets Rudolph W. Giuliani at the Trump National Golf Club Bedminster in Bedminster Township, N.J. on Nov. 20,
2016. Trump has hired the former New York mayor to defend him in the special counsel investigation of alleged campaign ties to Russia.
a reaction to coverage of him.”
Others who worked with the
two say it was Trump who sought
favor from the mayor, although at
least on paper the relationship
went both ways.
In 1989, Trump was co-chairman of Giuliani’s first major
fundraiser in his first run for
mayor; the event pulled in
$850,000. But Trump also donated that year to Giuliani’s opponent, Democrat David Dinkins.
And the developer said on several
occasions that his primary motive
in the race was making sure that
Mayor Ed Koch (D), with whom
Trump had had a long feud, did
not win a fourth term.
A decade later, when Giuliani
was running for a U.S. Senate seat
from New York, Trump again held
a fundraiser for him, at $500 a
head. About the same time, Giuliani let it be known that he was
supportive of a Trump run for
president as a Reform Party candidate. Some news reports from
the time said Giuliani was drawn
to a Trump candidacy because the
developer in those days described
himself as a “liberal.” (Giuliani at
the time was a vocal defender of
gun control, gay rights and a path
to citizenship for undocumented
immigrants.)
Things do change, but Trump’s
role in Giuliani’s campaigns remained consistent. He raised
money for the former mayor, but
not exclusively. In 2007, Trump
again chaired a fundraiser for
Giuliani, who was considering a
run for the Republican presidential nomination. About the same
time, Trump held a fundraiser for
a presidential candidate seeking
the Democratic nod: Hillary Clinton.
Trump went on Stern’s show to
explain himself: “I’d like her to
win on the Democratic side, Rudy
to win on the Republican side,” he
said. “I have to, you know, make a
decision . . . but they’re both great
people, Howard.”
Trump and Giuliani first ran
across each other in the 1980s,
when Giuliani was U.S. attorney
in Manhattan and Trump was
cultivating his celebrity in service
of building a real estate empire.
Trump was the youngster in a
New York rat pack of business
bigwigs who would hang out together at a members-only spot
called Le Club, or in Yankees
owner George Steinbrenner’s
suite at the stadium in the Bronx.
The group included Steinbrenner, Fox media magnate Rupert Murdoch, Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca, and Roy Cohn,
Trump’s first and most important
lawyer and fixer.
“Donald was the young guy
who hung out with them,” said a
New York executive who knew the
group well, who spoke on the
condition of anonymity. “Rudy
was much closer to Iacocca and
Steinbrenner. He and Donald
never really socialized. They were
very different people.”
As Giuliani entered politics,
Trump became a booster of his
career, arguing that the former
prosecutor would be good for
developers and tough on crime.
But Giuliani was at times wary
of Trump. In 1989, after Trump
bought full-page ads in New York
newspapers calling for the execution of “roving bands of wild
criminals [who] roam our neighborhoods,” Giuliani, then running for mayor, said that he didn’t
endorse the Trump ads but that
they contributed to “a healthy
debate.” Trump was then days
away from co-chairing Giuliani’s
first big fundraiser.
A decade later, when Trump
proposed building the world’s
tallest all-residential tower on
Manhattan’s East Side, Giuliani,
still mayor, declined to take a
position even as many residents
denounced the plan as overbearing and aesthetically overwrought. Neighbors criticized the
mayor for his uncharacteristic
silence but Trump, asked about
Giuliani’s reticence, said, “I am
very respectful of his stance.”
The building, which has 72
stories although its elevator buttons go up to 90, was completed
in 2001 and held the world record
for height for about two years.
Trump and Giuliani did occasionally find themselves on the
same side in New York City. They
positioned themselves against
what Trump called “the civics” —
the historic preservationists,
housing advocates and social-service providers who often
fought his real estate proposals.
But the relationship didn’t
blossom until after Giuliani endorsed Trump for president in
April 2016, after Trump had vanquished most of the Republican
field. Giuliani had been openly
skeptical of his candidacy before
that, slamming Trump’s proposal
to ban immigration by Muslims
and pushing back when Trump
falsely contended that “thousands” of Muslims had gathered
in New Jersey to cheer the collapse of the World Trade Center
on Sept. 11, 2001.
After the endorsement, Giuliani’s tone changed. He praised
Trump’s suggestion that Giuliani
help lead a task force on radical
Islam.
“Rudy saw a path to becoming
secretary of state, and from then
on, he was all in,” said a former
aide to Giuliani who spoke on the
condition of anonymity to be
frank about his ex-boss.
Disappointed when he didn’t
get the job as the nation’s top
diplomat, Giuliani stepped away
from Trump for a time, said several former associates. But he was
willing to sign up as the president’s lawyer as a possible step
toward a top administration position, they said.
Some of Giuliani’s friends worry that he is reentering Trump’s
orbit only to be disappointed by a
president who seeks his services
for this job alone. They say the
two men have used each other
through the years, but have no
real bond.
Cuker, who put the two together for the 2000 kiss, said his
purpose in staging the encounter
was to humanize the mayor, then
in his second term.
“By that point, everyone
thought he was such a b------, so I
thought people should see that he
has a sense of humor,” said Cuker,
who directed the Inner Circle
show, a charity event put on by
reporters who cover New York
politics.
The director said Trump took it
upon himself to bury his face in
Giuliani’s breast. Trump’s instructions had been only to act as
if he were attracted to Giuliani’s
voluptuous character, “Rudia.”
“He did the kiss himself,” Cuker
said. “He was spontaneous and
open to it, and those are the
earmarks of a real showman.”
marc.fisher@washpost.com
Canada puts Ukraine atop G-7 agenda
BY
C AROL M ORELLO
toronto — Among the diplomats who gathered in Toronto
for a meeting of the leading
industrialized nations, Pavlo
Klimkin was an outlier.
The foreign minister of
Ukraine represents a country
with a gross domestic product of
$93 billion, compared with envoys from countries with economies measured in the trillions of
dollars.
But it was no accident that
Klimkin had star billing at the
meeting of top diplomats from
the Group of Seven countries,
known as the G-7. Or that
Canadian Foreign Minister
Chrystia Freeland had him and
the other diplomats over to her
house for a brunch of waffles
and eggs that her children
prepared. Or that the first
working session was dedicated
to Russian interference in
Ukraine.
On Monday, the G-7 foreign
ministers agreed to establish a
working group that aims to
“call out” Russian “malign behavior in all of its manifestations,” said British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, “whether
it is cyberwarfare, whether it’s
disinformation, assassination
attempts, whatever it happens
to be.”
It was Russia’s behavior in
Ukraine in 2014 that got it ousted
from the group, which was then
known as the G-8. The G-7 now
comprises Britain, Canada,
France, Germany, Italy, Japan
and the United States.
Freeland, who has close ties to
Ukraine, designed it so that the
country would be front and center.
To Freeland, Ukraine is Exhibit A for Russian interference
and an arena for what she calls
the defining issue of our time —
Russia’s actions against
country are a focus of
meetings in Toronto
democracy vs. authoritarianism.
She is the grandchild of
Ukrainian immigrants on her
mother's side. She grew up
speaking Ukrainian with her
parents and now speaks it with
her children. She is believed to
be the world’s only foreign minister who speaks with her Ukrainian counterparts in their own
language.
As a young woman, Freeland
worked as a journalist in Kiev in
the early 1990s, a time of political upheaval that provided an
experience she has said now
permeates her work as foreign
minister.
“Observing the collapse of the
vastest communist regime in the
world and the efforts to build
something in its place has
shaped my thinking profoundly,”
she told students at the
University of Toronto in early
April.
It has turned her into one of
the G-7’s fiercest critics of the
Kremlin and President Vladimir
Putin. In retaliation for her
barbed critiques, Moscow has
banned her from visiting.
The G-7 meeting was another
opportunity for Freeland to
push Ukraine to the top of the
agenda, even though Russia has
given no hint of ever returning
Crimea to Ukraine or ending its
support of separatists in eastern
Ukraine.
“Largely because Russia is
not showing major signs of
flexibility, we need to reinforce
to them and the broader international community that our
support for Ukraine is not flagging,” said a Canadian diplomat, speaking on the condition
of anonymity because he was
not authorized to speak on her
behalf.
In Canada, being proUkraine is smart domestic politics. More than 1.3 million
Canadians, about 3 percent of
the population, are of Ukrainian origin, and many follow the
country’s politics closely. The
nation has universal support
among politicians.
“Ukraine is us in Canada,” said
John Kirton, head of the G-7
Research Group at the University
of Toronto. “Chrystia is from that
community in a way no other
member of the G-7 is.”
Ukraine also fits into Freeland’s worldview — as a canary
in a coal mine in the fight to
defend liberal democracy at a
time when it is under assault
worldwide.
“A lot of people felt in 1991
that we were part of this beautiful spread of democracy and
human rights and liberal values
around the world, and it was
unstoppable,” she said in her
meeting with university students. But, she added, the
spread of liberal values and
democracies “is not inevitable.”
The Canadian diplomat, who
spoke to Klimkin after he had the
chance to talk with his counterparts, said his presence helped
counter Russian propaganda
that Ukraine is forgotten and on
its own, no longer front-page
news.
“The broad international support of key players reiterated in
this special format was significant to him,” the diplomat said.
“It’s important not just to him
and the Ukrainian leadership
but to the Ukrainian political
class at large.”
carol.morello@washpost.com
Health science is in our DNA.
Maryland leads the world in adult stem cell production
and vaccine development, is home to the NIH, FDA, NIST,
and has the largest concentration of employed doctoral
scientists and engineers in the nation. Let’s talk business.
Open.Maryland.gov
A8
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
The World
Yemeni
wedding
guests die
in airstrike
BY
A LI A L- M UJAHED
sanaa, yemen — An airstrike by
BEN STANSALL/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A little prince arrives in Britain
Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, gives birth to her third child, a baby boy who is fifth in line to the throne
BY K ARLA A DAM
AND W ILLIAM B OOTH
london — Catherine, Duchess of
Cambridge, gave birth to a healthy
baby boy on Monday, touching off
polite, happy but muted jubilation
— and a few yawns — across Britain.
Her husband, Prince William,
35, was by her side for the delivery
of their third child, who is a prince.
This birth, it must be said, was
not as exciting to most Britons as
the previous ones. The firstborn
child may become king; the second,
queen; the third, less likely.
In accordance with custom,
news of the arrival was displayed on
an easel in front of Buckingham
Palace. But by then, everyone knew.
“The baby weighs 8lbs
7oz,” Kensington Palace announced in an early morning
tweet, showing how the British
royals and their massive publicrelations operation both maintain and upend tradition. “The
Duke of Cambridge was present
for the birth. Her Royal Highness
and her child are both doing well.”
The roadway in front of the maternity entrance at St. Mary’s Hospital was lined all day with reporters, speaking a babel of languages
and doing stand-ups with cameras
pointed at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
A surge of royal fans played for
the media. But they numbered in
the hundreds, not thousands.
Self-proclaimed royalist Tony
Appleton, 81, showed up dressed
in a feathered tricorn hat, unfurled a faux parchment and
roared: “Oyez, oyez, oyez! We’ve
got a royal baby, a prince!”
“I knew it. Oh, what a day,” said
Margaret Ashford, who was visiting
the hospital to see a sick friend
when the nearby streets erupted
with people shouting — in muted
British fashion — “It’s a boy!”
Prince George, 4, who was still
wearing his school uniform, and
Princess Charlotte, 2, came to meet
their new sibling on Monday afternoon. Before walking in, Charlotte
gave a wee royal hand wave to the
cannonade of cameras. It was the
shot of the day.
Then, just before 6 p.m., the
world got its first peek at the newest
royal, when the duke and the duchess stepped out of the hospital.
Catherine cradled the newborn in
her arms, his tiny fingers poking
out from a white blanket.
The duchess, wearing a red
dress, sparked a wave of comment on social media about how
a mum who had just given birth
could look so great — and also
how her flawless reemergence
only hours after delivery put
pressure on women who may be
overwhelmed physically and
mentally postpartum.
As the Cambridges got into their
waiting Land Rover, William told
the throng of reporters that he was
“very delighted, thank you.”
“Thrice the worry now,” he added, in a bit of fatherly wisdom.
The trio then returned to their
CHRIS JACKSON/GETTY IMAGES
TOP: Prince William and
Catherine, Duchess of
Cambridge, wave to the
crowds outside St. Mary’s
Hospital in London on
Monday. ABOVE: The
newborn prince weighed
in at 8 pounds, 7 ounces.
home at Kensington Palace, just a
couple miles away, with a police
escort.
The soon-to-be-named babe is
fifth in line for the throne — not a
bad résumé for his first day on the
job.
In the dynastic line to succeed
great-grandmother Queen Elizabeth II, who turned 92 on Saturday, the baby is behind grandfather Prince Charles, father William, brother George and sister
Charlotte. A 2013 act of Parliament removed preference for
male heirs. The child is the
queen’s sixth great-grandchild.
The baby knocks William’s
brother, Prince Harry, down a
notch in the succession to the
throne. But for royal watchers, the
clamor surrounding the birth of
the royal baby is merely a warmup for next month, when Harry
will marry American actress
Meghan Markle.
Despite being overshadowed by
that other upcoming event, royal
baby fever had ratcheted up in recent weeks — thanks in part to
parking authorities.
Kensington Palace had disclosed
that the baby was due in April. But
it never dished on the exact due
date.
Earlier this month, however,
yellow signs appeared outside the
Lindo Wing of St. Mary’s Hospital,
announcing parking restrictions
from April 9 to 30 because of an
“event.” As students of royal baby
births know, this was code for:
Royal. Baby. Watch. Is. On.
A clutch of die-hard fans quickly
changed into Union Jack-themed
attire and made a beeline for the
hospital. For days, they slept outside on benches and in tents,
opined on baby names and stared
at the door to the private maternity
unit where Kate, as she is informally known, would give birth.
“If it’s a boy, they could call it
Philip Michael. Philip after the
duke and Michael after Catherine’s
father,” mused John Loughrey, 63,
who had been sleeping in a red tent
since April 9. He said Monday that
the staff at the hospital had been
generous, offering them showers,
coffee and food.
To be sure, the fever never rose to
the soaring temperatures of the
“Great Kate Wait,” before Catherine
gave birth to her first child in 2013.
George’s arrival was greeted by
prime-time specials and wall-towall media coverage. And that was
just in the United States.
But a royal baby is still a royal
baby, even if he’s the third. Attention will soon shift to the name of
Baby Cambridge, which may not be
announced immediately. George
was two days old when the world
learned of his name.
Luckily, British bookies, who
will take bets on nearly anything,
are helping to fill that void. Arthur, Albert and Jack are top
picks. And to be fair to the bookies, George and Charlotte were
two of their top picks for the other
Cambridge children.
Rupert Adams, a spokesman
for the bookmaker William Hill,
said that for George, the bookie
took in about 1 million pounds
($1.4 million) in bets; for Charlotte, it was about 800,000
pounds ($1.1 million).
“We’d be chuffed if we got
600,000 this time,” he said. “It is
the third child.”
karla.adam@washpost.com
william.booth@washpost.com
Jennifer Hassan in London
contributed to this report.
the Saudi-led coalition fighting in
Yemen’s civil war killed more
than 20 people at a wedding party
late Sunday night, Yemeni officials said.
Most of the victims of the
attack in northwestern Yemen
appeared to be children, according to officials and photos posted
by victims and their families on
social media sites. In televised
footage, widely shared online, a
crying child in a green shirt is
seen clutching the body of his
father, refusing to allow responders to take them to a hospital.
“I will not let go,” the boy
screams repeatedly.
The attack comes after a top
political leader for the Houthis,
the rebel movement that controls
much of northern Yemen, was
reportedly killed in an airstrike
last week. The rebels vowed Monday to avenge the death of Saleh
Ali al-Sammad, chairman of their
Supreme Political Council, who
wielded great influence in the
movement.
“The assassination of alSammad will not go unpaid,” said
Mohammed Abdul-Salam, a
Houthi spokesman, on the rebels’
television channel, al-Masirah.
More than 55 people were
wounded in the attack in Alraqqah,
a remote village in Hajjah province,
health officials said. The death toll
is expected to rise.
“There are many children in
critical and severe conditions, and
[they] have been put in intensive
care and operation rooms,” said
Mohammed al-Sowmali, general
manager of al-Jamhouri hospital,
where most of the victims were
taken. “Four children have had at
least one of their limbs amputated.”
It was the third deadly attack on
civilians in recent days. On Sunday,
an airstrike hit a house, killing a
family of five, and on Saturday, at
least 20 people died in an airstrike
that hit a commuter bus near the
southwestern city of Taiz.
The three-year-old war pits the
Shiite Houthis against a regional
coalition of Sunni powers led by
Saudi Arabia. The coalition,
backed by the United States and
other Western powers, is seeking
to restore the government of President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi,
whom the Houthis drove from the
capital, Sanaa, early in 2015.
The humanitarian crisis has
only worsened in Yemen, the Middle East’s poorest country. More
than 10,000 people have been
killed, and countless more
wounded, while an estimated
3 million people have been forced
to flee their homes. A hunger
crisis and epidemics of cholera
and other diseases have gripped
the country.
The conflict is widely considered a proxy war between the
Iran-backed Houthis and Saudi
Arabia, the Shiite theocracy’s
main regional rival.
An official with the Saudi-led
coalition was not reachable for
comment.
foreign@washpost.com
DIGEST
BELGIUM
Paris suspect convicted
on shootout charges
A Belgian court on Monday
convicted Salah Abdeslam, the
lone survivor of a group accused of
carrying out terrorist attacks in
Paris and Brussels in 2015 and
2016, on charges related to a
shootout with police as he was
captured in Belgium.
The conviction for wounding
four police officers in a terrorist
context was the first test for
authorities as they seek justice for
the families of the victims of the
attacks, which killed 130 people in
Paris and 32 in Brussels. Although
Monday’s verdict was not directly
related to the terrorist plots,
it offered a guide for what to
expect in higher-profile trials of
terrorism suspects scheduled for
next year in France and Belgium.
Abdeslam, 28, and codefendant Sofien Ayari, 24, were
sentenced to 20-year prison terms
and fined about $14,600 each.
Abdeslam, a Belgian-born
French national of Moroccan
descent, is believed to have driven
some of the attackers to the
national soccer stadium outside
Paris on the night of Nov. 13, 2015,
then eluded a police dragnet to
escape to Belgium.
Investigators said Abdeslam
remained mostly underground in
the Brussels neighborhood of
Molenbeek until authorities
closed in on him on March 15,
2016. Police that day raided a safe
house where Abdeslam and his
accomplices had been staying, and
four officers were wounded in the
shootout.
Abdeslam escaped but
was caught three days later. Then,
on March 22, 2016, others in the
terrorist cell bombed the Brussels
subway and airport.
In violence elsewhere in the
country, four police officers were
killed and three were wounded
Monday in a Taliban attack in the
western province of Farah,
according to a spokesman for the
provincial governor. Three
Taliban fighters were killed and
two were wounded.
The attacks, coming on the
heels of Sunday’s suicide blast in
Kabul, underscore the struggles
the government faces to rein in
militant assaults.
— Associated Press
Greek island police arrest 120
migrants: Police on the Greek
— Michael Birnbaum
and Quentin Ariès
EMILIO MORENATTI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
AFGHANISTAN
Attacks kill 18 troops
and police officers
Taliban attacks in western
Afghanistan killed 18 soldiers and
police officers Monday as Kabul
residents prepared to bury loved
ones slain in a horrific bombing
by the Islamic State group that
targeted a voter registration
center the day before, killing 57.
Prayer services were held for
the Kabul victims as families of
those killed in Sunday’s bombing
Hundreds of Catalans leave yellow roses at a central Barcelona
square in support of jailed separatists they view as political prisoners
in the campaign to break away from Spain. The action coincided with
the celebration of Sant Jordi, the patron saint of Catalonia. Catalans
give a book and a red rose as gifts to mark the day, but this year many
chose yellow roses, a color that symbolizes the secessionist drive.
carried the bodies of their kin to a
cemetery in the hills above the
Afghan capital.
Nine troops were killed in
the first of Monday’s nearly
simultaneous attacks in the
northwestern province of
Badghis, with army units hit in
the district of Ab Kamari, said the
deputy provincial police chief.
Moments later, insurgents struck
police in Qadis district, killing
five officers.
Taliban spokesman Zabiullah
Mujahid claimed the attacks in a
statement to the media.
island of Lesbos arrested 120
asylum seekers for illegal
camping, following overnight
violence by locals trying to end
the migrants’ five-day sit-in
protest in the island capital. The
clashes in Mytilene left at least 10
people hospitalized. State TV said
most of the injured were
migrants. The sit-in began after a
high court ruled that migrants
arriving on Greek islands from
Turkey could travel to the Greek
mainland while their asylum
applications were being
processed. The ruling does not
have retroactive effect, meaning
that migrants already there will
not be allowed to leave.
Malaysia releases images of
suspects in Palestinian’s killing:
Malaysian police released images
of two suspects in the killing of a
Palestinian engineer and said
they appeared to be European or
Middle Eastern, fueling suspicion
that the slaying was an Israeli
assassination. Hamas, which
controls the Gaza Strip, has
accused Israel of being behind the
shooting of Fadi al-Batsh, a key
member of the militant group.
Police said Batsh, 34, was shot by
two assailants in a suburb of
Kuala Lumpur.
Christian woman burned to
death in Pakistan: Police in
Pakistan have arrested a Muslim
man accused of burning a
Christian woman to death for
refusing his marriage offer, an
official said. Ijaz Shahid, a police
official in the eastern province of
Punjab, said the man hurled
gasoline at the woman outside
her home in the city of Sialkot last
week before setting her on fire
and fleeing. Shahid said Asma
Yaqub was taken to a hospital,
where she died. He said Rizwan
Gujar admitted to the attack.
— From news services
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
SU
Toronto o∞cial: ‘We lost a little bit of our innocence’
Dan Cass, the hospital’s executive
vice president.
While Canadians are proud of
living in a country where crime
rates are generally low and ethnic
diversity is celebrated rather than
feared, several terrorism-related
incidents in recent years have reminded the public that Canada is
not immune to the kinds of events
that have struck Europe and the
United States.
TORONTO FROM A1
“He just destroyed so
many people’s lives.”
Ali Shaker, speaking to CTV News
AARON VINCENT ELKAIM/CANADIAN PRESS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
407
400
ST.
YONGE
not previously known to police.
The incident had echoes of vehicle
attacks in the French city of Nice,
as well as in London and New York
City — a method that the Islamic
State militant group encouraged
followers to use. But people with
no terrorism connections have
also carried out such assaults.
“We lost a little bit of our innocence,” John Filion, a city council
member who represents the area
where the incident occurred, said
in a phone interview Monday. “We
often think of ourselves as being
somewhat excluded from the violence and craziness that goes on in
other parts of the world. You just
kind of don’t think of Toronto as a
place where that kind of violence
will come to.”
Peter Yuen, Toronto police services deputy chief, told reporters:
“I can assure the public all our
available resources have been
brought in to investigate this tragic situation,” according to the Associated Press.
Save for a police helicopter circling overhead, the incident
brought an eerie silence to one of
the city’s busiest streets, which
had been filled Monday afternoon
with people enjoying one of the
first warm and sunny days of the
year after a long winter.
The attack took place in the
center of North York, a part of
Toronto that has grown over the
past two decades into a secondary
downtown.
The area is so busy that Toronto’s city council debated widening
the sidewalks and reducing lanes
of traffic to make it more pedestrian-friendly earlier this year.
“He started going down on the
sidewalk and crumbling down
people one by one,” Ali Shaker,
who was in the vicinity of the
incident, told CTV News. “He just
destroyed so many people’s lives.”
He said the driver was traveling at
an estimated 35 to 45 mph.
Teresa Nolan, who lives nearby,
walked out of the Sheppard subway station — near where the van
came to a stop — shortly after the
incident occurred, to“a scary
scene.” She watched as police offi-
Police gather near a van that struck pedestrians on a Toronto
sidewalk on Monday, killing 10 and injuring 15. The incident had
echoes of vehicle attacks in London and New York City.
48
404
Van strikes pedestrians
.
E. W
H AV
FINC
NORTH YORK
Van stopped
by police
2 MILES
2
CANADA
Toronto
Buffalo NEW
YORK
OHIO
Toronto
L ak e On tario
PENN.
Source: Maps4News/HERE
THE WASHINGTON POST
cers apprehended the suspect and
heard onlookers describing how
they performed CPR on the injured.
“I watched it all happen, but
didn’t really take it all in until after
it ended,” she said.
Nolan has lived in the area for
almost two years and “just loves its
whole multicultural feel.”
She lives on her own and said
she finds the community safe.
“I would never let this deter
me,” she said.
Late Monday, Irene Lan, who
said she had not been following
the news, arrived in the area, hoping to pick up dinner from her
favorite Korean restaurant.
She was bewildered to find
what is usually a bustling street
transformed into something resembling a ghost town.
“It’s absolutely shocking,” she
said.
Sunnybrook Hospital, a trauma
center near the site, said it had
received 10 victims, all of them
adults. Two were pronounced
dead, five patients were in critical
condition and the rest were in
serious condition, according to
In September, Abdulahi Hasan
Sharif was arrested in Edmonton,
Alberta, after two related incidents on the same evening. In the
first one, Sharif, a Somali refugee,
is alleged to have rammed into a
police officer who was at a police
roadblock near a sports event. He
then stabbed the police officer and
escaped. A few hours later, the
same man is alleged to have
rammed into four pedestrians
with a rental van. No one was
killed, but Sharif faces multiple
counts of attempted murder.
In Quebec City, elsewhere in the
country, Alexandre Bissonnette is
in court this week for a sentencing
hearing after pleading guilty last
month to six counts of first-degree
murder in the shooting of six Muslim men as they attended prayers
at a mosque in the city in January
2017. Bissonnette had mental
health issues and was attracted to
far-right politics and anti-immigrant rhetoric.
And in 2014, Canada’s Parliament was the scene of another
terrorism-related incident. Michael Zehar-Bibeau, a drug addict
and convert to Islam, shot and
killed a Canadian sentry on duty at
the National War Memorial before
heading to Parliament, where he
was killed in a shootout with security officers.
chico.harlan@washpost.com
Freeman reported from Ottawa and
Harlan from Washington.
ADVERTISEMENT
Hearing
postponed
for Trump’s
VA pick
JACKSON FROM A1
(Mont.), the committee’s ranking
Democrat. “I can’t get into specifics, but we’re doing our job to
make sure he’s fit for the job.”
Aides to the committee’s chairman, Sen. Johnny Isakson
(R-Ga.), declined to comment.
Sen. Jerry Moran (R-Kan.), another committee member, said
he had raised concerns about
Jackson’s lack of management
background to the White House
and requested to speak with
Chief of Staff John F. Kelly on the
matter.
“This job is so difficult,” Moran
said Monday. “Nothing about
this is easy, and it takes a very
unique person to be able to lead
an organization that is so difficult to lead, and I need to be
convinced that’s the case regardless of the sense of his experience.”
The White House also is assessing whether questions that
have been raised about Jackson
have validity, officials said.
Committee Democrats gathered Monday evening to discuss
the issues surrounding Jackson’s
nomination. Following the meeting, Sen. Richard Blumenthal
(D-Conn.) said in a brief interview that “there is a need for a
very serious and exacting scrutiny, as with any presidential nominee.”
It’s unclear whether lawmakers have chosen an alternate date
for Jackson’s hearing — or
whether it will be postponed
indefinitely. Three White House
officials said Monday that they
worried the nomination was in
peril.
In recent days, Isakson called
the White House to express his
concern that Jackson was unqualified, White House officials
said, and vouched instead for his
ally and former top aide Thomas
Bowman, VA’s deputy secretary.
Jackson was a surprise nominee to succeed David Shulkin, an
Obama-era holdover and once a
favorite of Trump’s who was fired
by the president March 28. While
Shulkin was an experienced hospital executive who had run VA’s
massive health system, his support from the White House
waned following an internal investigation into his business
travel and clashes over his commitment to outsourcing veterans’ health care, which is among
the administration’s priorities.
From the start, Jackson had
little support from Democrats
and Republicans on Capitol Hill,
where lawmakers were taken
aback by the president’s choice to
run the government’s secondlargest agency. A one-star Navy
admiral, Jackson has served
three administrations as White
House physician. But his résumé
shows little management experience. VA’s sprawling health, benefits and cemetery system has
360,000 employees and an annual budget of $186 billion.
Few Republicans on the committee have committed publicly
to backing Jackson, although
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) has said he
would support him. Senate aides
have said Jackson’s testimony at
the hearing would be crucial to
showing them whether he was up
to the job of running the agency.
Democratic senators oppose
the administration’s push to outsource more medical care out of
concern that it will strip the
agency of funding. Jackson has
tried to assuage those concerns
by pledging privately that he
would oppose such efforts, but
Democrats say they want him to
say that publicly.
In recent weeks, the White
House sent senior career and
political officials from different
VA offices to brief Jackson on
issues confronting the agency.
But the process seemed poorly
coordinated, according to current and former administration
officials.
Jackson is well liked among
senior White House officials,
who had worked with him on a
daily basis. But the administration has not put its full weight
behind his nomination, according to people familiar with the
matter, appointing mid-level
aides to oversee Jackson’s briefing by VA experts and sending a
junior media aide from the White
House to help him make the
rounds on Capitol Hill. With the
recent departure of Darin Selnick, the White House’s most
seasoned expert on veterans’ issues, Trump has few aides with
deep knowledge of how the agency works.
“He was walking into an ambush,” a veterans advocate close
to the White House said of the
Senate hearing. “He is just not
ready.”
seungmin.kim@washpost.com
lisa.rein@washpost.com
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
Amy Gardner, Emily Wax-Thibodeaux
and Alice Crites contributed to this
report.
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A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
‘I was wrong’: Armenian prime minister yields to protests and steps down
BY
A MIE F ERRIS- R OTMAN
moscow — Armenian Prime
Minister Serzh Sargsyan stepped
down Monday amid large-scale
protests against corruption and
his rule, a move that potentially
could alter the former Soviet
republic’s reliance on Russia.
Demonstrations against the
pro-Russian Sargsyan erupted almost two weeks ago when he was
appointed prime minister after a
decade as president, part of a new
transition of governance that bolsters the role of the premier. The
move effectively tightened the
63-year-old’s grip over the country in the South Caucasus.
Sargsyan was quickly replaced
Monday by his close ally, First
Deputy Prime Minister Karen
Karapetyan, who previously
worked for the Russian gas giant
Gazprom. It was not clear whether this move would placate the
protesters, who oppose the ruling
elite as a whole.
Sargsyan’s political opponents
accused him of changing the law
so he could effectively retain
power into a second decade. The
protests, which drew about
100,000 people, including clergy
and unarmed soldiers, paralyzed
the center of the capital, Yerevan,
for 11 consecutive days. They
were led by opposition lawmaker
Nikol Pashinyan, who was arrest-
with you!” Foreign Ministry
spokeswoman Maria Zakharova
wrote on her Facebook page,
praising Armenians for refraining from violence. Under Sargsyan’s rule, Armenia bought
weapons from Moscow and
joined the Eurasian Economic
Union, a Russian-backed economic bloc designed to deter
neighboring countries from trading with Europe.
senior economist for Russia and
the former Soviet Union at IHS
Markit.
The protests contrasted starkly
with those a decade ago, when at
least eight people in Yerevan
were killed in clashes between
police and anti-government demonstrators who alleged that Sargsyan’s presidential victory was
rigged.
Russia’s marginalized opposi-
“The street movement is against my tenure.
I am fulfilling your demand.”
Armenian Prime Minister Serzh Sargsyan
GRIGOR YEPREMYAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
People in Yerevan, Armenia’s capital, celebrate Prime Minister Serzh Sargsyan’s resignation on
Monday. The pro-Russian Sargsyan recently became prime minister after a decade as president.
ed along with hundreds of demonstrators Sunday and released
just hours before Sargsyan resigned.
“The street movement is
against my tenure. I am fulfilling
your demand,” Sargsyan wrote to
his country’s citizens in a statement of resignation on his official
website. “Nikol Pashinyan was
right. I was wrong.”
Upon hearing of his resignation, protesters in Yerevan shouted in jubilation, car horns
honked and Armenian news outlets showed pictures of men
dancing in the streets.
Russia appeared to cautiously
approve of Sargsyan’s resignation.
“Armenia, Russia is always
Joining Russia’s trade bloc four
years ago failed to bring a promised economic boost to Armenia’s
3 million people, about a third of
whom live below the poverty line.
Unlike popular movements in
pro-democracy revolutions in recent years in Ukraine and Georgia, the opposition in Armenia
has not said it wishes to be allied
with Europe. But that could
change.
“For the first time since 1991,
Armenian people are celebrating
domestic political victory, and
this sense of empowerment
could become a force in itself
despite very difficult challenges
ahead,” said Lilit Gevorgyan,
tion on Monday praised the Armenian protesters and repeated
its call for a demonstration
against Russian President Vladimir Putin in two weeks, ahead of
his inauguration for a new sixyear term.
Landlocked and poor, Christian Armenia has been largely
dependent on Russia since the
Soviet Union fell apart just over a
quarter-century ago. A simmering, decades-long conflict with
Armenia’s
Muslim-majority
neighbor, Azerbaijan, over the
breakaway Nagorno-Karabakh
region has only enhanced its reliance on Moscow.
amie.ferris-rotman@washpost.com
U.S. orders embassy staff from Nicaragua amid violence
R EUTERS
managua, nicaragua — The
United States ordered its embassy staff out of Nicaragua and
curbed consular services amid
continued unrest in the country,
where several days of clashes
have claimed at least nine lives
and injured hundreds, according
to the Red Cross.
Police clashed with students
holed up at the Polytechnic University of Nicaragua on Sunday
night, and one person died after
being shot while five were treated for injuries, Lissett Guido, a
Red Cross spokeswoman, said by
telephone Monday.
Guido said the Red Cross had
registered nine deaths since the
At least 9 dead, hundreds
injured in protests over
welfare overhaul plan
protests began Wednesday and
attended to 433 injured. The
Nicaraguan Center for Human
Rights said Monday that at least
25 people had died in the unrest.
Marlin Sierra, the director of the
center, said 120 people had been
arrested.
Protests began last week after
the government of President
Daniel Ortega, a former leftist
guerrilla leader whom critics accuse of trying to build a family
JEFFREY ARGUEDAS/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Nicaraguan expatriates in San Jose, Costa Rica, show solidarity
with protesters in their homeland, where protests have intensified.
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dictatorship, launched a plan to
overhaul the Central American
country’s welfare system.
A police crackdown on protesters and curbs on some media
have fueled broader criticism of
Ortega. On Sunday night, in an
effort to calm the streets, he said
he had canceled the welfareoverhaul initiative.
On Monday, the U.S. State
Department authorized the departure of U.S. government employees. Those will be handled
on a case-by-case basis, according to a State Department official.
The official said the embassy
in Managua, the capital, would
be unable to provide routine
services to the public until fur-
ther notice but would continue to
be available by phone for emergencies and provide services to
U.S. citizens and visa applicants.
Nicaragua has been one of
Central America’s more stable
countries, mostly avoiding the
turmoil caused by gang violence
or political upheaval that has
affected nearby Honduras, El
Salvador and Guatemala.
“Political rallies and demonstrations are occurring daily, often with little notice or predictability. Some protests result in
injuries and deaths,” the State
Department said.
It said the purchase of food
and fuel may become more difficult, and access to the airport in
Managua may be blocked.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
SU
Late jockeying gives Pompeo endorsement of committee
BY
K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
Secretary of state nominee
Mike Pompeo narrowly eked out
an endorsement from the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee on
Monday after President Trump
and a Democratic senator intervened at the last minute, all but
guaranteeing that he will be confirmed by the full Senate later this
week.
Pompeo had seemed unlikely
to secure a majority of the panel’s
support. But Sen. Rand Paul
(R-Ky.), who had pledged to oppose him, tweeted moments before the vote that Trump had
talked with him and changed his
mind.
Paul’s key concern had been
that Pompeo, currently director
of the CIA, would not support
Trump’s campaign pledge to pull
troops out of Afghanistan. The
senator had also called on
Pompeo to support the president’s stated belief that “the Iraq
War was a mistake.”
“Having received assurances
from President Trump and Director Pompeo that he agrees with
the President on these important
issues, I have decided to support
his nomination to be our next
secretary of state,” Paul said.
The panel’s vote was largely
symbolic, since Pompeo had secured enough votes to be confirmed by the full Senate earlier in
the day, when two Democrats
facing difficult reelection challenges in 2018 — Sens. Joe Manchin III (W.Va.) and Joe Donnelly
(D-Ind.) — announced that they
would back his nomination on
the floor.
But Trump’s supporters were
determined to have Pompeo enter
office without the mark of being
the first secretary of state in almost a century to fail a committee
vote.
The committee ultimately vot-
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), left, and the panel’s ranking
Democrat, Robert Menendez (D-N.J.), confer during the panel’s consideration of CIA chief Mike
Pompeo’s nomination to be secretary of state. Pompeo was expected to be confirmed by the full Senate
regardless of the committee’s vote, but a rejection by the panel would have been a blow to his prestige.
ed 11 to 10 along party lines to
endorse Pompeo. But because of a
quirk in the Senate rules, the
panel could not send its recommendation to the full Senate, as
one of those 11 Republicans —
Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.) —
was not present for the vote. He
was out of town delivering a
eulogy at his best friend’s funeral,
senators said.
A negative vote on Pompeo’s
nomination would not necessarily have precluded the full Senate
from taking it up. But for GOP
leaders, time was of the essence:
They want Pompeo to be confirmed in time to attend a meeting of NATO foreign ministers
Friday.
At the urging of panel chairman Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), Democratic Sen. Christopher A. Coons
(Del.) volunteered to change his
vote to “present” — making the
vote 11 in favor, 9 opposed and 1
present, and enabling the committee to quickly push Pompeo’s
nomination to the floor.
“Senator Isakson is one of my
closest friends here . . . and he’s
been through an incredibly hard
day,” Coons told reporters. He
said it would have been “heartless” to shuttle Isakson off his
return flight straight to a delayed
committee vote when the outcome was a foregone conclusion.
The gesture was an increasingly rare one in the politically divided Congress, where it is difficult
for lawmakers to extend personal
gestures without facing political
scrutiny. As Coons explained his
decision to reporters outside the
committee room, a protester
yelled at him: “You care more
about your friend than you do this
country!”
Coons said he still intended to
vote against Pompeo’s nomination on the Senate floor. At this
point, only three Democrats —
Manchin, Donnelly and Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.), who announced her support last week —
have committed to back Pompeo’s
confirmation.
Last year, 14 Democrats voted
to confirm Pompeo as CIA director, but several have already stated that they will not back him to
serve as secretary of state.
On Monday, White House officials again urged Senate Democrats to support Pompeo’s nomination, with White House press
secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders saying on Fox News Channel
that the administration hoped
“that some members will change
their minds.”
Democrats have raised several
objections to Pompeo’s nomination, arguing that his previous
statements favoring the use of
force over diplomatic options, his
record of controversial quips
about American Muslims and
same-sex marriage, and concerns
that he would not challenge
Trump on matters of foreign policy made him unfit to serve as
secretary of state.
Pompeo’s supporters appeared
to be bracing for a negative outcome in the Foreign Relations
Committee, arguing that the panel is not representative of the full
Senate. Last week, Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) told reporters that
“the Senate will set [the panel]
straight” if it refused to endorse
Pompeo’s nomination. Cotton
also issued a threat to Democratic
senators such as Manchin and
Heitkamp who are facing difficult
elections, noting that if they oppose Pompeo “and they’re up for
reelection, they may suffer the
consequences.”
Senate leaders are expected to
put the nomination to a floor vote
later this week.
Trump’s supporters pointed to
the integral role that Pompeo, as
CIA director, has had in advising
the president on national security
and foreign policy matters, including how to approach the Iran
nuclear deal, which is nearing a
critical extension deadline of May
12, and promised denuclearization talks with North Korean
leader Kim Jong Un, with whom
Pompeo met to discuss the terms
of the summit expected next
month.
But politically, the tone for
Pompeo’s tenure will be set in
part by how his floor vote stacks
up against that of his predecessor,
Rex Tillerson, who was ousted
earlier this year. Tillerson was
confirmed as secretary of state by
a vote of 56 to 43, “a remarkably
low level of support,” said Jeff
Rathke, a former career Foreign
Service officer and senior fellow
at the Center for Strategic and
International Studies.
If Pompeo secures more votes
for his confirmation, “it could
suggest marginally greater confidence from the Senate,” Rathke
continued. But he noted that the
strength of Pompeo’s bipartisan
mandate will be “historically low”
and “will mean a reinforcement
of the partisan divide on foreign
policy.”
Others say that Pompeo will
make his reputation once in office
— and that if he helps to rebuild
the relevance of the department,
which flagged in morale and staffing under Tillerson’s stewardship, the politics surrounding his
confirmation vote will not matter.
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
John Wagner and John Hudson
contributed to this report.
Will Trump’s new vetting center be ‘extreme’ enough to end travel ban?
BY
N ICK M IROFF
“Extreme vetting” was a frequent campaign promise of President Trump’s, and within days of
taking office, he ordered broad
restrictions on travelers from several Muslim-majority countries,
measures he deemed necessary
until such a system was in place.
Trump directed Department of
Homeland Security officials to effectuate his ideas, and in February
the White House announced the
creation of a National Vetting
Center, or NVC, that would bring
unprecedented rigor to screening
foreigners.
Since then, however, the administration has not explained
how the center will vet travelers
more extremely than the array of
other federal agencies already
performing the task. It is also
unclear whether the White House
plans to lift the controversial travel restrictions once the NVC is up
and running.
On Wednesday, the Supreme
Court will hear arguments challenging those restrictions, alleging that the ban is a form of
religious discrimination and that
the president exceeded his authority in ordering it.
Trump has given security, intelligence and other agencies until
August to submit proposals for
how they will work with the new
center and share information
with it.
“The Federal Government’s
current vetting efforts are ad hoc,
which impedes our ability to keep
up with today’s threats,” the White
House said in a Feb. 6 memo. “The
NVC will better coordinate these
activities in a central location,
enabling officials to further leverage critical intelligence and law
enforcement information to identify terrorists, criminals, and other nefarious actors trying to enter
and remain within our country.”
Former DHS officials and security analysts agree that this
sounds like a good idea, but they
note that the United States already has a unified, state-of-theart nerve center to screen travelers and share information among
federal databases: the National
Targeting Center in Sterling, Va.
Established after the Sept. 11,
2001, terrorist attacks, the center
is responsible for checking
U.S.-bound cargo and foreign
travelers by gathering information across federal agencies and
assessing security risks.
“I don’t know why you would
want to duplicate something that
has already been built when we
already have the National Targeting Center, which does and is
capable of doing serious vetting
with respect to any foreign national seeking to enter the United
States,” said Robert Bonner, a former U.S. attorney who led U.S.
Customs and Border Protection
under President George W. Bush
and established the center.
The targeting center begins
screening travelers as soon as they
book flights to the United States.
Airlines automatically forward
their reservations to the center, in
part to avoid having their passengers turned back if U.S. customs
agents don’t admit them.
In response to questions about
the NVC’s future role, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection official said the new center will “use
and expand upon some of the
physical infrastructure at CBP’s
National Targeting Center” but
will also use “virtual relationships” to save costs and “overcome
the logistical challenges that required co-location can present.”
The official, who spoke on the
condition of anonymity because
planning for the NVC is not complete, said the new center is not
intended to replicate or supplant
the screening efforts performed
by other federal agencies.
“The threat to American
lives as a result of
vetting failure in
post-9/11 America
is incredibly small.”
David Bier, author of a report
published this month by the
libertarian Cato Institute
Instead, the official said, it will
“improve the connection between
information about potential
threats and the U.S. officials who
have the authority to use that
information to make their own
determinations.”
The NVC will “work closely”
with the National Targeting Center, the Terrorist Screening Center, the National Counterterrorism Center and the intelligence
community, the official added, “to
ensure there is appropriate coordination and minimize duplication of effort.”
When Trump toured the National Targeting Center on Feb. 2
before issuing his order, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen
Nielsen told him it stops “70 terrorists a day” from entering the
country.
Calling it “quite a facility,”
Trump told the staff: “We’ve really
put a lot behind [the National
Targeting Center], and we’re going to be putting a lot more behind
it.”
According to the limited descriptions of the NVC provided by
the White House and the DHS, it
could play a wider role in screening foreigners already present in
the United States who may be
seeking to obtain residency or
citizenship. The Feb. 6 White
House memo said the NVC will
screen those “who seek a visa, visa
waiver, or an immigration benefit,
or a protected status.”
Trump renewed his calls for
“extreme vetting” in October after
Uzbek immigrant Sayfullo Saipov
allegedly plowed a rental truck
into cyclists and pedestrians in a
Manhattan terrorist attack that
killed eight and injured 11.
Weeks later, Akayed Ullah, a
Bangladeshi national, allegedly
attempted to detonate a pipe
bomb in a New York subway tunnel while swearing allegiance to
the Islamic State.
Investigators believe that both
men were radicalized after arriving in the United States, a scenario no form of travel screening
could have prevented. The work of
tracking foreigners who develop
extremist views after living in the
United States is primarily the responsibility of the FBI and other
law enforcement agencies.
Homeland Security officials
have not outlined how those agencies will work with the NVC.
A report published this month
by the libertarian Cato Institute
found that U.S. security agencies
already practice “extreme vetting”
and have been highly successful at
stopping terrorist plots and potential attacks.
“I would argue it’s quite extreme as it currently exists,” said
David Bier, the report’s author. He
said the only post-9/11 instance of
a “vetting failure” was San Bernardino, Calif., attacker Tashfeen Malik, whose extremist views went
unnoticed during her visa application process.
“The threat to American lives
as a result of vetting failure in
post-9/11 America is incredibly
small,” Bier said, “so the idea that
we should invest a billion dollars
in a new center to prevent such a
small risk doesn’t make sense.”
“The more agencies that any
individual has to go through to
receive approval to travel to the
United States, the more we delay
travelers’ entry,” he continued.
“They’re prevented from spending money as a tourist or being
able to work in the U.S. and increase the size of the U.S. economy. Those are costs that need to be
considered when talking about
delaying people’s ability to travel
and immigrate.”
Foreign travelers who need U.S.
visas typically apply through
American embassies and consulates abroad, and the State Department runs their information
through terrorism watch lists and
other security databases. Information considered “derogatory”
is identified and could be forwarded to the DHS and other U.S.
agencies for additional screening
to determine whether the applicant has a criminal background or
potential links to extremists, or
could be planning to immigrate
illegally.
Travelers then submit to biometric screening and the collection of other personal data — all of
which is forwarded to the Transportation Security Administration and centralized through the
National Targeting Center.
When asked to cite specific examples of vetting deficiencies,
Homeland Security officials say
screeners need to do more to
check the social media profiles of
foreigners seeking to enter the
United States or obtain residency.
But skeptics of the administra-
tion’s proposals argue that such
functions do not require the creation of a new screening center and
could be enhanced at existing
DHS and intelligence facilities.
nick.miroff@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
Trump-Macron
relationship may
be put to the test
BY A NNE G EARAN
AND J AMES M C A ULEY
French President Emmanuel
Macron’s long-shot diplomatic
mission to persuade President
Trump to preserve the Iran nuclear deal began Monday with
smiles and, yes, a handshake,
which masked the difficult discussions underlying the first state
visit Trump has hosted.
The three-day trip is a test of
Macron’s year-long effort to cultivate a positive relationship with
Trump.
The 40-year-old political newcomer is the envoy for a European
effort to address Trump’s main
quarrels with the 2015 international pact with Tehran through
smaller side deals and diplomatic
understandings. Trump loathes
the international agreement but
has left a sliver of hope that he
may not junk it.
Macron has always faced long
odds in his effort to convince
Trump to stay the course on the
Iran deal, but that effort has only
become more difficult now that
changes to the president’s national security team have replaced
advisers supportive of the deal
with aides who disdain the pact.
John Bolton is now fully ensconced as Trump’s national security adviser and CIA Director
Mike Pompeo will soon be confirmed as secretary of state. Both
men are more hawkish toward
Iran than their predecessors —
H.R. McMaster and Rex Tillerson
— and Pompeo has flirted publicly with sponsoring regime change
in Tehran.
This leaves Macron with few
allies inside the Trump administration and under greater pressure to use this visit to persuade
Trump not to abandon the nuclear deal when it next comes up
for review, on May 12. The French
president seemed eager to embrace the moment when he arrived in Washington on Monday.
“The United States, like France,
has a very particular responsibility at a moment that today is ours,”
Macron said in brief remarks in
French after he arrived at Joint
Base Andrews outside Washington.
France was swift to answer
Trump’s request for international
backing for airstrikes this month
in retaliation for a chemical
weapons attack on Syrian civilians, helping to launch more than
100 missiles.
In recent weeks — particularly
over Syria — Macron has worked
overtime to burnish his relationship with Trump.
He rarely gives interviews, but
the day before departing for
Washington, he granted an audience with Fox News, his American
counterpart’s favored channel.
During that interview, already
seen as a kind of olive branch,
Macron went even further to emphasize his apparent similarities
with Trump.
“I’m here to serve my people in
my country and make it great
again, as somebody I know very
well could say,” he told Fox’s Chris
Wallace in English.
In France, where Trump remains deeply unpopular, these
types of gestures have often fallen
flat. Earlier this week, for instance, outrage in the French
press amplified after Libération,
a leading French newspaper,
quoted
presidential
palace
sources calling Trump “very intelligent” and “coherent.”
But the common explanation
given — most frequently by Macron himself — is that these overtures are a simple question of
strategy. “Our relationship with
the United States is absolutely
critical, in fact,” Macron said earlier this year. “Fundamental. We
need it.”
If some in French political circles have expressed concern that
Macron may be setting himself up
to be the latest associate humiliated — and discredited — by collaborating so closely with Trump,
some analysts said the French
president has positioned himself
well and does not have as much to
lose as his critics contend.
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron, with Melania Trump and Brigitte Macron, plant a tree on the South Lawn.
“No one can blame him for
trying” with regard to the Iran
deal, said Benjamin Haddad, a
member of Macron’s official
presidential delegation and a fellow at the Hudson Institute. “It’s
going to be blamed on Trump
mostly. At the end of the day, it’s a
U.S. decision.”
Even a failure on Iran may not
be too damaging for Macron if he
leaves the trip still seen as Europe’s best hope of working with
Trump.
“At the end of the day, Macron’s
main objective is not Iran, it’s
Europe,” Haddad said. “If he manages to emerge as the key interlocutor of the U.S., he can leverage
that to push his own agenda.”
Trump has appeared eager to
use the visit to solidify his relationship with Macron.
On Monday, Trump and first
lady Melania Trump showed off
the White House, where the two
presidents’ extended handshake
recalled the first time they met,
which onlookers likened to arm
wrestling. The two leaders and
their wives then participated in a
tree planting on the White House
lawn that was meant to symbolize
the enduring U.S.-French relationship.
They then headed to Mount
Vernon, George Washington’s Virginia plantation home, to honor
France as the United States’s first
ally. Tuesday’s meeting will be
capped off with Trump’s first state
dinner.
The French president is also
addressing a joint session of Congress on Wednesday before heading home.
Macron and his wife, Brigitte
Macron, were chosen as the first
state guests of the Trump White
House largely out of gratitude for
extravagant hospitality Macron
extended to Trump in Paris last
year. The timing, three weeks
before a deadline on the Iran deal,
set up Macron as the best hope for
the deal’s supporters.
White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders would
not discuss the elements of any
potential agreement to save the
nuclear pact, or say whether there
is anything Macron could do to
salvage it.
“We certainly expect that that
will be part of the conversation,”
Sanders told reporters, adding
later that Trump is “the best negotiator at the table” and is well
equipped for the discussions.
“What you do have are two
leaders who have a great deal of
respect for one another, who have
a great friendship,” Sanders said.
“Certainly, both have a great deal
of interest in doing what is best
for their country.”
Asked whether Trump is still
leaning toward withdrawing the
United States from the Iran deal,
Sanders demurred.
“I don’t have any announcements on that front,” she said.
“But the president has been extremely clear that he thinks it’s a
bad deal. That certainly has not
changed.”
Macron is also expected to lobby Trump to keep U.S. forces
engaged in Syria longer — he
recently said the troops are coming home soon — and to suggest
that Trump revisit his decision to
withdraw from the Paris climate
accord.
Sanders did not rule out some
change of heart on those issues.
“The president wants to make
good deals for this country,” she
said. “And if he feels like he can
make a good deal that benefits
this country, he’s certainly going
to engage in those conversations.”
Macron’s previous efforts to
persuade Trump have seldom
fared well, and the two presidents
are most often opposed on matters of policy. The Trump administration’s decision to recognize
Jerusalem as the capital of Israel
was one example of Franco-American disagreement.
Macron had tried to lobby
Trump not to withdraw from the
historic climate change agreement signed in Paris in December
2015 — a hallmark accomplishment of the Obama administration.
“I was elected to represent the
citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris,”
Trump said when announcing the
U.S. withdrawal last June.
anne.gearan@washpost.com
james.mcauley@washpost.com
Ashley Parker in Washington and
Carol Morello in Toronto contributed
to this report.
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.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
Economy & Business
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$1=108.73 YEN; EURO=$1.221
Google’s parent posts
strong quarterly profit
Net income for Alphabet
surged 73% despite
Silicon Valley backlash
BY
SEONGJOON CHO/BLOOMBERG NEWS
A Korean Air aircraft takes off as another sits on the tarmac at Incheon International Airport in South Korea. Protests have grown so
heated over the sisters’ behavior that some people have petitioned the government to ban the airline from using “Korean” in its name.
Korean Air sisters to quit in wake of rages
Their father, the
chairman, apologizes for
executives’ bad behavior
BY
A LLYSON C HIU
Two Korean Air heiresses will
resign from management positions within the family-run conglomerate following a pattern of
behavior that has produced widespread backlash.
Korean Air Chairman Cho
Yang-ho issued a statement Sunday apologizing for his daughters’
behavior and said they would be
resigning, Yonhap News Agency
reported.
Cho Hyun-ah, recently named
president of the airline’s hotel
business, and her younger sister,
Cho Hyun-min, a Korean Air senior executive, will be stripped of
all their responsibilities.
Cho Hyun-ah, also known as
Heather Cho, rose to global infamy in 2014 after an incident at
John F. Kennedy International
Airport that has since been
dubbed “nut rage.”
She was a Korean Air vice
Cho Hyun-min
Cho Hyun-ah
president at the time and was
sitting in first class aboard a
Korean Air flight bound for
Seoul when she was given macadamia nuts in an unopened
package rather than on a plate,
as per the airline’s rules, The
Washington Post reported then.
Cho reportedly flew into a
rage over the nuts, verbally
abusing flight staff and forcing
them to apologize on their
knees. She then ordered the
plane — taxiing and carrying 250
passengers — to return to the
gate and had the offending flight
attendants ejected, according to
The Post.
In the wake of “nut rage,” Cho
Hyun-ah was forced to resign
and was charged with obstructing aviation safety. She was sentenced to a year in prison, but
served only a few months before
returning to the company to
become president of its hotel
business.
Her younger sister, Cho Hyunmin, who also goes by Emily
Cho, followed in her footsteps
last month when she allegedly
verbally abused and threw water
at an employee of the airline’s
advertising agency during a
business meeting, Yonhap reported. The Korea Times reported that she was “enraged” at the
employee’s work performance.
She denied throwing water but
acknowledged shoving the employee.
Cho Hyun-min publicly apologized for the fracas on Facebook,
saying her behavior was “foolish
and reckless.” The incident is being called “water rage.”
“I sincerely apologize for upsetting the general public and
employees at Korean Air over
issues related to members of my
family,” their father said in the
statement.
The apologies have done little
to quell outrage, with many seeing the behavior as another example of leaders of powerful
family-run companies, also
known as chaebol, acting with
unchecked power. Cho Yang-ho
is chairman of the Hanjin
Group, the conglomerate that
owns Korean Air.
Protests have grown so heated
that some people have petitioned
the South Korean government to
prohibit the airline from using
“Korean” in its name.
Police have launched an investigation into the allegations
against Cho Hyun-min. The sisters are also being investigated
for allegedly using the airline to
smuggle luxury goods, furniture
and other personal items into
the country, the Korea Times
reported.
In Sunday’s statement, the father attempted to mitigate the
backlash by announcing the
company would establish a compliance committee to “prevent
reoccurrence of similar incidents,” Korea JoongAng Daily
reported. He also promised to
increase the power of the company’s board of directors.
“As chairman of Korean Air
and head of a household, I can’t
help but feel terrible about the
immature behavior that my
daughter has done,” Cho Yangho said in the statement. “I am to
blame for everything. I apologize to everyone.”
allyson.chiu@washpost.com
H AMZA S HABAN
Google, which dominates online advertising, continues to
thrive amid escalating threats of
regulation in Washington and
a wider backlash against Silicon
Valley and widespread data collection.
In the first quarter, Google parent company Alphabet’s net income grew by 73 percent, to about
$9.4 billion. Revenue rose 26 percent, to $31 billion, beating analyst
estimates. Alphabet’s stock rose
nearly 1 percent in after-hours
trading.
Google is expected to command
more than 37 percent of the U.S.
digital ad market, at about $40 billion this year, according to eMarketer. The company’s closest competitor, Facebook, will claim
roughly 20 percent of the market.
While the two firms are expected
to hold their leading positions,
other tech companies are chiseling
away. Amazon and Snapchat have
achieved rapid growth in digital
advertising, pushing forecasts of
Google’s and Facebook’s collective
market share to 57 percent, compared with 59 percent last year,
eMarketer said.
Monica Peart, senior director of
forecasting at eMarketer, said that
Google’s growth in advertising is
driven by consumers moving to
mobile devices, which Google has
shifted to capture, as well as the
success of the advertising and subscription services for YouTube, the
video platform that belongs to
Google.
YouTube has been the source of
troubled growth for Google. The
popular video service has drawn
scrutiny for questionable and extremist content and potential violations of child privacy online.
Google chief executive Sundar
Pichai said the company remains
focused on ensuring that YouTube
“remains a safe platform with
great content.”
He said YouTube removed
6 million videos last quarter that
were first spotted by its machinelearning tools, and he said more
than 75 percent of them were removed before receiving a single
view.
Pichai also nodded to the shooting at YouTube’s headquarters in
San Bruno, Calif., this month.
A woman shot three people over
her inability to make money from
her YouTube videos and her perception of being censored by
the site.
“It’s been a particularly tough
few weeks for the Google family,
especially at YouTube,” Pichai said.
He thanked employees and said he
was grateful for the support
Google has received from the community and the industry.
Ruth Porat, chief financial officer of Alphabet, said that the company’s non-advertising businesses
have grown substantially, including its cloud storage unit, hardware such as the home speaker and
Pixel phone, and Google's mobile
app store, Play.
Since Facebook chief executive
Mark Zuckerberg’s highly publicized appearances on Capitol Hill
this month, lawmakers from both
parties have pledged to introduce
new data privacy regulations that
would strike at the heart of
Google’s business. In recent weeks,
Facebook has been under the spotlight over its data collection practices and lack of transparency.
Facebook is scheduled to report
earnings Wednesday.
hamza.shaban@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
technology
STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS
Quarterly revenue at Google’s parent company exceeded forecasts.
European regulators probe e≠ects of Apple’s Shazam buy on music rivals
BY
H AYLEY T SUKAYAMA
European regulators said Monday that they’re deepening their
investigation of Apple’s acquisition of the music recognition app
Shazam over concerns that the
deal could limit streaming music
choices and unfairly weaken companies such as Spotify.
Shazam, based in Britain, lets
people use their smartphone microphones to identify songs playing over loudspeakers, television
or the radio within seconds. Currently, the app will identify a song
and then refer people to a streaming music service such as Spotify,
Deezer or Apple Music to purchase access to it.
Regulators in Europe say they
worry that the acquisition could
give Apple an unfair advantage if
it used Shazam “to directly target
its competitors’ customers and
encourage them to switch to Apple Music.” An in-depth investigation, they say, will also examine
how much of an advantage Apple
would receive if it became the only
music service to get referrals from
Shazam.
“The way people listen to music
has changed significantly in recent years, with more and more
Europeans using music stream-
ing services,” said a statement by
Margrethe Vestager, the European Commission official in
charge of competition policy.
“Our investigation aims to ensure
that music fans will continue to
enjoy attractive music streaming
offers and won’t face less choice as
a result of this proposed merger.”
Apple filed for approval of the
deal in Europe on March 15.
Ahead of that filing, seven countries asked the European Commission to review the deal for
possible repercussions for the
music industry; those countries
included Sweden — home to Spotify — and France, where Paris-
based Deezer is headquartered.
Apple announced in December
that it would buy Shazam, with
various news outlets pegging the
price at $400 million. Analysts say
the acquisition is part of Apple’s
renewed push into the music
world, giving the company the
technology to find what songs
people are looking up the most
and to create a close relationship
with the 1 billion people who have
downloaded Shazam’s app.
The European Commission
said it would publish its conclusion about the acquisition by Sept.
4. Apple did not respond to a
request for comment.
Apple revolutionized digital
music with iTunes in the early
2000s, but it fell behind as people
opted to buy access to music
through streaming services rather than purchasing their own
tracks and albums on iTunes.
Apple launched its own streaming service, Apple Music, in 2015,
and it has grown quickly. Analysts
say it is poised to overtake Spotify
as the U.S. market leader within a
year. Apple Music has about
15 million users in the United
States, compared with Spotify’s
18.2 million. (Internationally,
Spotify’s number of active users
is roughly double that of Apple’s.)
Apple Music is also a key component in the marketing of the
HomePod smart speaker, which
relies on Apple Music as its sole
music service.
Shazam is valuable to Apple for
reasons apart from music. The
company has developed a “visual
Shazam” augmented-reality service that can identify posters, ads
and other products. Apple has
invested deeply in adding augmented-reality capabilities to the
iPhone and other products.
content wasn’t reported first by
users but was flagged by its
internal systems, Facebook said.
Facebook didn’t give numbers
for its takedown of content from
white supremacists or other
groups it considers to be linked to
terrorism.
materials seeking to block his
reelection at the company’s
annual meeting on May 16.
Wynn, 75, is the company’s
largest shareholder.
Steve Wynn, 76, stepped down
from the luxury resort operator in
February over allegations of
harassment against employees.
hayley.tsukayama@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
DIGEST
RETAIL
Sears investor offers
to buy Kenmore brand
Sears’s biggest shareholder has
suggested the company sell its
well-known Kenmore brand and
some real estate holdings,
offering itself as a buyer.
Sears has sold off other major
brands as it struggles to stay
afloat, with Kenmore a notable
remainder of the powerhouse
department store chain.
The private equity firm ESL
Investment, headed by Sears
chairman and chief executive
Edward Lampert, said it might
buy the assets — Kenmore, Sears
Home Services’s home
improvement business and the
Parts Direct business — if the
company is willing to sell.
ESL said it also would be open
to making an offer for Sears’s real
estate, including the assumption
of $1.2 billion in debt.
— Associated Press
INTERNET
Facebook says more
ISIS content removed
Facebook said Monday it was
able to remove a larger amount of
content from the Islamic State
and al-Qaeda in the first quarter
of 2018 by actively looking for it.
The company has trained its
review systems — people and
computer algorithms — to seek
out posts from terrorist groups.
The social network took action on
1.9 million pieces of content from
those groups in the first three
months of the year, about twice as
many as in the previous quarter.
Ninety-nine percent of that
— Bloomberg News
— Bloomberg News
CORPORATIONS
Elaine Wynn wants
director ousted
FAROOQ NAEEM/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Pakistani laborers harvest wheat on the outskirts of Islamabad.
Despite water shortages, growers and government officials hope that
good weather will offset any crop loss. Wheat is among the country’s
most important crops, along with sugar cane, cotton and rice.
Elaine Wynn is urging
shareholders to withhold votes
for director John Hagenbuch,
part of a push to remake the
casino company she co-founded
with her disgraced ex-husband.
Saying Hagenbuch was a
legacy director who would hold
back efforts to create a “New
Wynn,” Elaine Wynn filed proxy
ALSO IN BUSINESS
U.S. sales of existing homes rose
1.1 percent on a monthly basis in
March, despite the dwindling
number of properties on the
market. The National Association
of Realtors said that homes sold
last month at a seasonally adjusted
annual pace of 5.6 million, up from
5.54 million in February. This sales
rate is higher than the 2017 total,
but March sales were down
slightly over the past 12 months.
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
Some fear stock sell-o≠
as 10-year note’s yield rises
BY
T HOMAS H EATH
The 10-year U.S. Treasury note
is one of the most closely
watched financial measures in
the world. Its hallowed status is
up there with the U.S. dollar, the
price of gold and the price of oil.
Many view it as a proxy for
longer-term growth and inflation expectations and a thus
signal for where the U.S. economy is headed.
The 10-year has been in the
news in recent months because
its yield — or what it pays its
owner for buying it — has been
flirting with 3 percent. Financial
markets take a deep gulp when
they hear the 10-year yield and
3 percent in the same sentence.
The big worry lately has been
that the 10-year yield will cross
3 percent, making it a better
investment than the riskier stock
market. The thinking goes like
this: Cross 3 percent, and investors will stage a stock market
sell-off and pour their cash into
Treasurys.
And then? Bye-bye, bull market.
“It’s a psychological level for
the markets because we haven’t
seen 3 percent 10-year yields
since 2013,” said Brett Ryan, an
economist with Deutsche Bank.
“The 10-year is potential competition for stocks,” said David
Kass, a professor of finance at the
University of Maryland.
Yield is a simple concept. It is
the return you get for buying a
financial instrument, as measured by a percentage. You buy a
bond for $1,000, and it pays you
$100 upon maturity. That’s a
10 percent yield.
“If we get to 3.25 next
week, then that could
bring dislocation to
equity markets.”
Brett Ryan, Deutsche Bank economist
Money wonks believe the upor-down movement of its yield is
a crystal ball that foretells inflation, recession, bull markets,
bear markets, home prices, corporate profits — maybe even who
will win next year’s Super Bowl.
The 10-year rate landed at
2.975 percent by Monday afternoon.
Wall Street watchers say the
10-year yield will have to climb
beyond 3 percent before the
stock market flinches.
“The 10-year Treasury would
need to move over 4 percent
before it became serious competition for the stock market, given
the level of earnings per share we
are currently seeing for the
S&P 500 companies,” said Daniel
P. Wiener of Adviser Investments, based in Newton, Mass.
“By that time, if earnings are
higher, then the yield would have
to go even higher than 4 percent.”
Stocks on Monday held firm in
the face of the rising yield, with
major market barometers finishing slightly down.
“It’s not like an automatic
trigger for the stock market,”
Ryan said. “Above 3 percent, it
becomes more attractive to own,
but it is still the risk-free asset.
It’s not just the level of the yield,
but the speed. If rates hang out
around 3 percent, that’s fine. If
we get to 3.25 next week, then
that could bring dislocation to
equity markets.”
There are tens of billions of
dollars in 10-year Treasurys
across the planet at any given
day, with banks, mutual funds
and foreigners among the largest
holders. The bonds are traded on
the secondary market. The yields
react to supply and demand,
with yields rising when prices
RICHARD DREW/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Specialist Gregg Maloney works at his post Monday on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. U.S.
stocks were mixed as health-care and industrial companies made gains and energy companies slipped.
decline and yields dropping
when the 10-year gets more expensive.
If investors think that the
economy and inflation will be
agreeable enough over the next
decade that they can park money
in a 10-year Treasury, they will
buy it. That demand will send
yields lower. If, on the other
hand, investors think we are
headed for higher inflation and a
rocky economy, they will put
their money into short-term
Treasurys rather than long-term.
That reduces demand, and the
prices drops, sending yields
higher.
The 10-year’s stature as a
benchmark comes from being
risk-free, which makes it the one
asset to which all others —
stocks, bonds, mortgages, etc.
— are pegged. Stocks are riskier,
so they have a higher expected
return with capital gains and
dividends than Treasurys.
Treasurys are risk-free be-
cause they are backed by the U.S.
government and its ability to tax.
Stocks and corporate bonds can
fail.
“Mortgage rates are closely
linked to the level of the 10-year
yield,” Ryan said. “If the 10-year
ticks higher, mortgage costs are
going to go higher. That impacts
the housing market, and it’s one
of the main channels the 10-year
yield translates into the real
economy.”
thomas.heath@washpost.com
Don’t worry about a recession. Worry about the Federal Reserve raising rates.
The economic
recovery is
chugging along
MATT
almost as fast as
O’BRIEN
ever, but, beneath
the surface, the best recession
predictor we have is starting to
flash yellow.
That indicator is the
difference between interest rates
on 10-year Treasury bonds and
two-year ones. Now, the reason it
tells us so much is that long-term
rates show us what markets
think short-term ones will
average over that time, plus a
little extra to make up for the
risk that inflation ends up being
higher than expected. So when
long-term rates are lower than
short-term ones — what’s known
as an inverted yield curve — it
means that investors think
short-term rates will be lower in
the future than they are today.
And why would that be? The
only reason is if the Federal
Reserve is going to have to cut
them to fight a recession.
The good news, then, is that
the yield curve isn’t inverted yet,
but the bad news is that it might
not be long until it is. Indeed, the
gap between 10-year Treasury
yields and two-year ones fell to
its lowest level since September
2007 when it got down to as little
as 0.41 percentage points during
trading last Tuesday. It has since
widened back a bit to
0.488 points, but the point still
remains: The bond market is
signaling that the economic cycle
may not be far from turning.
Goodbye, slow and steady
recovery, and hello, the only
thing worse than that.
This is really about one thing
and one thing only: Markets still
don’t believe the economy can
grow that fast. Which is to say
that President Trump’s
adherence to the standard
Republican script of tax cuts and
deregulation hasn’t made things
any better. The economy is still
stuck in the same 2 to 2.5 percent
growth range it has been in for
10 years now for the same reason
that the baby boomers are still
retiring.
Who could have known,
except everyone?
The important thing to
understand here is that a slowgrowing economy doesn’t need
high rates to keep inflation in
check and can get derailed even
by low rates. The first part of
that is why 10-year yields are still
so low by historical standards,
and the second is why two-year
yields that are historically low
themselves still aren’t far away
from being a problem for the
economy. Another couple of rate
hikes, which would send twoyear borrowing costs up with
them, might be all it would take
for the whole curve to invert.
Although the real danger is that
the Fed might talk itself into the
idea that this wasn’t that big a
deal. It is true, after all, that
long-term rates are perhaps even
lower than they “should” be right
now because of all the
unconventional policies the Fed
used in the past. It’s therefore
not a stretch to imagine them
telling themselves that this
wouldn’t be as concerning as it
would normally be. The problem
with that, though, is that it’s also
true that what seem like rather
innocuous interest-rate
increases can be a big problem
when the recovery is still so
fragile that rates aren’t much
above zero. Just ask Japan. It has
been stuck there for two decades
now.
The point is that markets are
telling the Fed it doesn’t need to
raise rates that much more to
finish off the recovery, but it will
finish off the recovery if it does
much more than that.
Just in time for the 2020
election, too.
matthew.obrien@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/wonkblog
Speakers include:
2018
WORLD PRESS
FREEDOM INDEX
J. Jesús Esquivel
Washington
Correspondent,
Proceso
Margaux Ewen
North America
Executive Director,
Reporters Without Borders
Jason Rezaian
Global Opinions Writer,
The Washington Post
Margaret Talev
Senior White House
Correspondent,
Bloomberg
Wednesday, April 25
Streamed live from 9:00-10:00 a.m.
The Washington Post and Reporters Without
Borders (RSF) will hold a conversation on
freedom of the press around the world, including
a presentation of RSF’s 2018 World Press
Freedom Index, which examines the degree
of freedom that journalists, news organizations
and citizens enjoy in more than 180 countries.
The presentation will be followed by a panel
discussion with journalists moderated by
Washington Post Pulitzer Prize-winning
reporter, Dana Priest.
To watch the live stream or
see the full list of speakers:
wapo.st/rsf2018
18-0471
Wonkblog
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
26,750
Close
YTD
% Chg
24,448.69
–0.1
–1.1
25,500
24,250
23,000
21,750
20,500
Nasdaq Composite Index
7600
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
7128.60
–0.2
+3.3
Industry Group
Leisure Equipment & Prod
Construction & Engineerng
Textiles & Apparel
Diversified Telecomm
Power Prodct & Enrgy Trdr
Electrical Equipment
Tobacco
Household Products
Semiconductors & Semi Eqp
Metals & Mining
Daily
% Chg
0
–5.0%
+5.0%
4.75
2.00
1.59
1.08
1.00
–0.86
–0.91
–1.20
–1.55
–1.63
6400
5800
2670.29
S&P 500 Index
0.0
–0.1
2890
2780
2670
2560
2450
2340
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
F
M
A
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
85,602.50
15,552.06
48,493.60
0.1
0.4
0.1
383.18
5438.55
12,572.39
7398.87
0.4
0.5
0.3
0.4
5886.01
3766.33
30,254.40
22,088.04
0.3
0.1
–0.5
–0.3
YTD % Chg
–15%
0%
+15%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
215.88
100.61
165.24
338.84
153.99
123.58
44.25
43.98
65.60
79.57
14.52
246.67
177.66
145.86
51.10
–0.9
–0.2
–0.3
0.1
0.5
1.0
0.4
0.5
–0.7
0.7
–0.1
–2.1
0.4
0.7
–0.8
–8.3
1.3
–2.4
14.9
–2.3
–1.3
15.5
–4.1
–7.9
–4.9
–16.8
–3.2
–6.3
–4.9
10.7
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
WalMart
Walt Disney
126.83
110.93
158.99
60.25
95.35
66.88
73.00
36.80
137.23
123.46
234.34
48.66
124.46
86.10
100.15
0.1
–0.5
0.1
2.4
0.4
1.2
–1.1
0.5
0.3
0.3
–0.3
1.6
0.2
–1.0
–0.1
–9.2
3.7
–7.6
7.1
11.5
6.9
–20.5
1.6
1.2
–3.2
6.3
–8.1
9.2
–12.8
–6.8
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.2208
0.0091
1.3943
0.2899
0.7782
0.0528
0.0075
1.1422
0.2374
0.6375
0.0433
151.6000
31.5176
84.6110
5.7437
0.2079
0.5581
0.0379
0.8192
Japan ¥ per 108.7300
132.7300
Britain £ per
0.7172
0.8755
0.0066
Brazil R$ per
3.4497
4.2119
0.0317
4.8106
Canada $ per
1.2851
1.5687
0.0118
1.7918
0.3725
Mexico $ per
18.9300
23.1094
0.1740
26.4018
5.4890
Mexico $
2.6850
0.1822
0.0679
14.7351
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 27,713.10
Russell 2000
1562.12
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 572.17
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
16.34
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
0.0
–0.1
0.4
–3.2
YTD % Chg
0.1
1.7
5.3
48.0
–0.8
+0.5
+0.4
–1.1
0.0
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
(Ticker) % Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.4595
$16.66
$10.3225
$0.1140
$4.7450
+2.0
–3.3
–0.8
–4.0
–0.6
day
$900
month
$1100
$1000
1.3
–0.8
–0.1
1.5
–0.1
1.1
–1.1
0.8
–3.0
Gainers
McDermott
Nautilus Inc
GulfIslandFabricatn
TCF Financial Corp
Vectren Corp
Henry Schein Inc
Tile Shop Holdings
Tennant Co
Mattel Inc
Hanesbrands Inc
AK Air
Hibbett Sports Inc
Old National Bcp
Fluor Corp
HighPoint Resources
Pioneer Energy Svcs
Under Armour Inc
Michael Kors
Hasbro Inc
InstalledBuildngPrd
Daily
Close % Chg
$7.00
$15.00
$9.55
$24.34
$70.31
$73.79
$6.40
$74.45
$13.78
$18.22
$69.11
$26.55
$17.70
$61.48
$6.40
$3.35
$14.61
$67.85
$86.12
$57.45
15.7
11.5
8.5
7.3
7.3
6.8
6.7
6.7
6.3
5.9
5.7
5.6
5.4
5.0
4.9
4.7
4.4
4.4
4.0
4.0
Losers
Flotek Industries
Akorn Inc
Aceto Corp
Clearwater Paper
Lumentum Holdings
Avon Products
RoadrunnerTrans Sys
Lincoln Electric
iRobot Corp
DHI Group Inc
Power Integrations
Century Aluminum
Comty Health Sys
Arconic Inc
Geospace Tech
Skechers USA
Motorcar Parts
Mallinckrodt PLC
Cloud Peak Energy
Harmonic Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$4.15
$13.05
$2.28
$24.45
$54.45
$2.56
$2.03
$86.84
$59.95
$1.70
$66.95
$16.72
$3.81
$22.05
$10.46
$29.12
$19.98
$13.07
$2.98
$3.58
–34.3
–33.8
–9.2
–8.9
–7.5
–7.2
–6.9
–6.2
–6.2
–5.6
–5.5
–5.3
–5.2
–5.2
–5.2
–5.1
–5.1
–5.0
–4.8
–4.7
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
$3.1315
$3.8750
$68.64
$1,324.00
$2.74
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7000
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.36
0.55
0.80
1.68
3.59
6.10
4.75%
Bank Prime
1.75%
Federal Funds
2.36%
LIBOR 3-Month
4.41%
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.81%
10-year note
Yield: 2.98
2-year note
Yield: 2.47
5-year note
Yield: 2.82
6-month bill
Yield: 2.01
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.92%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
Union: Federal contractor underpaid workers by as much as $100 million
BY
D ANIELLE P AQUETTE
One of the country’s largest
federal contractors has been accused of underpaying about
10,000 workers who run help
hotlines for public health insurance programs, including the
Affordable Care Act marketplaces, by up to $100 million over the
past five years, according to four
complaints filed Monday with
the Labor Department.
The complaint brought by the
Communications Workers of
America alleges that General Dynamics Information Technology
(GDIT) misclassified employees
at call centers in Kentucky, Florida, Arizona and Texas to suppress their wages.
The union, which does not
represent the workers, said the
contractor hired or promoted
workers into roles that require
special training but paid them
below government-set rates for
the jobs they performed. The
complaint covers the period
since 2013, when GDIT started a
$4 billion, 10-year contract with
Complaint alleges that
call center employees
were misclassified
the Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services.
GDIT said in a statement:
“The company takes seriously
our obligations under the Fair
Labor Standards Act and Service
Contract Act. Our call center employees are not represented by the Communications
Workers of America. Similar to
other federal contractors, the
company is subject to routine
compliance reviews and as with
any notice received it will engage
with the relevant parties including our employees and the Department of Labor.”
The CWA has previously filed
four similar complaints about
the contractor’s call centers, and
those cases remain under investigation. The New York Times
first reported claims from a Mis-
Insurance plan change
could upend Obamacare
Expansion of short-term
coverage may lead to
premium hikes, some say
BY
C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
The Trump administration’s
proposal to build up short-term
health insurance plans as a “lifeline” for people who can’t afford
Affordable Care Act coverage
could siphon young, healthy people into cheaper, more minimal
plans while pushing up premiums for those who remain.
The comment period ended
Monday on a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services proposal to extend short-term plans
to 364 days from the three-month
limit.
Short-term plans are not required to provide comprehensive
coverage and can exclude people
with preexisting conditions.
Some health policy experts say
they fear that the expansion of
these skimpy plans will encourage healthy people to abandon
the ACA-compliant markets,
which would raise prices for
those who remain. Middle-class
people who make too much money to qualify for generous federal
subsidies that defray the cost of
monthly premiums would be hit
hardest by those price increases.
The Urban Institute projects
that 4.3 million people will join
short-term plans in 2019 — about
half of them by abandoning the
ACA-compliant plans, which
would see premiums increase
18 percent on average. An analysis by the Wakely Consulting
Group commissioned by the Association for Community Affiliated Plans predicted that 1 million
to 1.9 million people could shift to
short-term plans from ACA plans
in the near term.
The Trump administration
predicts that only 100,000 to
200,000 people will be tempted
out of the ACA market into shortterm plans. The proposed rule
projects that the federal government would pay more than
$96 million more in premium tax
credits to protect lower-income
people from premium increases.
Brokers who sell such plans
expect a significant increase in
interest if policy changes are
made. UnitedHealth Group sells
short-term
limited-duration
plans, and Aetna chief executive
Mark Bertolini indicated last year
that his company was interested
in the space.
“I don’t know that we’ll see a
flood, but we’ll definitely see
sissippi center in January.
The union said it filed the new
complaints Monday after hundreds more workers stepped forward, alleging they had been
improperly classified and shortchanged.
“These folks are paid such low
wages that this means an awful
lot to them,” CWA President
Chris Shelton said. “If they were
paid what they were supposed to
be paid, and they got these back
wages, it would change their
lives completely.”
The union said the call center
employees’ roles fit the description of “General Clerk II” or
“General Clerk III,” as the government classifies the roles under the Service Contract Act. The
federal hourly rates for such jobs
in Kentucky are set at $12.08 and
$13.56. But GDIT paid most of
the call center workers $10.52 an
hour, the CWA alleged.
In 2017, General Dynamics
Corp. had $15.3 billion in federal
contracts, or 3 percent of all the
public dollars paid to firms to
handle work for the government.
The only larger recipients were
Lockheed Martin and Boeing.
The firm offers a broad range
of services to government agencies, including health-care IT
and cybersecurity.
Federal outsourcing dipped in
2013 under President Barack
Obama, largely because of budget cuts and decreases in military
operations, according to the National Contract Management Association, which tracks the
spending. Outsourcing began to
rebound in 2014, and analysts
expect spending on contractors
to increase under President
Trump, who has pledged to pour
more money into the nation’s
armed forces.
The CWA’s complaint comes a
month after Trump revoked regulations put in place by
Obama that required federal
contractors to report labor law
violations from the past three
years before starting a new project for a government agency.
The Trump administration
considered the rule unnecessarily burdensome, while supporters
of the 2014 action said it prevented firms with a history of
abusing workers from winning
taxpayer-funded contracts.
Tanya Goldman, former senior
policy adviser to the administrator of the Wage and Hour Division under Obama, said allegations of improperly labeling workers are increasingly
common.
“More employers are misclassifying workers to reduce their
labor costs,” said Goldman, now
a senior policy analyst at the
Center for Law and Social Policy,
a national group that advocates
for low-wage workers.
In 2016, hundreds of Senate
cafeteria workers were awarded
more than $1 million in back
wages after the Labor Department determined that two federal contractors, Restaurant Associates and Personnel Plus, had
illegally underpaid them for six
years.
Alexander Passantino, who
ran the Wage and Hour Division
under President George W. Bush,
said the Service Contract Act,
which sets the minimum pay
requirements for federal contractors, can confuse companies.
“There’s a lot of opportunity
for contractors to make minor
mistakes that have big impact,”
he said.
Passantino advised firms to
carefully study the federal wage
requirements, since a relatively
low-level worker who performed
even one upper-rank duty would
have to be classified in the more
advanced job bracket.
Kelly Grove, who has worked
at GDIT’s call center in London,
Ky., since 2016, was promoted
after one year — going from
reading basic scripts to counseling callers through complicated
medical device questions — but
stayed at her hourly wage of
$10.52.
Her paychecks barely cover
the bills, she said, and her two
teenagers are on Medicaid.
“I work 40 hours a week,” she
said. “Full time. I shouldn’t have
to have my children on state
insurance.”
more carriers — and have already started receiving some calls
from carriers that they plan to get
back in the marketplace if the
rules change the way they expect
it to,” said Sean Malia, senior
director of carrier relations at
eHealth. The broker sold 93,000
short-term plans last year and
has found in surveys that
about half of the people turning
to them had tried to find ACA
coverage first.
Bruce Telkamp, chief executive
of Agile Health Insurance, another online broker, said that he
expects a surge of enrollment in
short-term plans over the next
18 months but that enrollees are
people who would go uninsured
otherwise.
“I don't think the trade-off, for
the vast majority, is short-term
versus ACA; rather, it’s ACA verses uninsured, and uninsured versus short-term,” Telkamp said.
America’s Health Insurance
Plans, a major lobbying group for
insurers, called for the short-term
plans to be limited to six months.
The Alliance of Community
Health Plans said in its comments
that the proposed rule could
“cause more insurers to flee the
market, leaving consumers with
fewer options.”
Health policy specialists said
it’s understandable that people
might find short-term plans attractive, particularly those who
do not qualify for government
subsidies. But they are not
sure consumers will understand
the exclusions that typically come
with such plans, including things
as diverse as injuries during
mountain climbing and maternity care.
“These short-term policy brochures read like an obstacle
course of exclusions,” said Larry
Levitt, a senior vice president at
the Kaiser Family Foundation. “I
think brokers are going to be
selling these policies, pushing
these policies very hard next
year.”
At a news conference in February, CMS Administrator Seema
Verma said, “While in the past
these plans have been a bridge,
now they can be a lifeline.”
danielle.paquette@washpost.com
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
A16
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Macron’s goals could bust the buddy-buddy bit with Trump
Macron-mania
has arrived.
Donald Trump
is the first
JAMES
president since
Calvin Coolidge, a
century ago, not to welcome a
foreign leader for a state visit
during his first year in office.
Fifteen months into his
presidency, Trump is rolling out
the red carpet for French
President Emmanuel Macron.
France’s tricolor flag is flying all
over downtown Washington, and
three days of events are planned
in the capital.
After dinner Monday evening
at Mount Vernon, Trump and
Macron are to meet one-on-one
Tuesday morning in the Oval
Office.
The state dinner is Tuesday
evening, and Macron is to
address Congress on Wednesday
— an event coinciding with the
58th anniversary of Charles de
Gaulle’s 1960 speech to a joint
meeting. Then Macron is set to
hold a town-hall-style meeting
with students at George
Washington University.
Trump is going all out on
pomp and circumstance because
of how much fun the president
seemed to have had in Paris last
July, when Macron invited him to
watch the annual Bastille Day
parade. That trip inspired the
president to order the Pentagon
to plan a military parade in this
country.
Since then, the two have
forged an unexpected bond.
Trump respects strength, so
Macron made a point during
their first meeting at a NATO
summit last May to tightly grip
his counterpart’s hand. It was a
weird moment, but it endeared
him to Trump.
Many Western leaders have
struggled to conceal their disdain
for the neophyte American
president and his disregard for
the postwar, rules-based order,
but Macron has a fantastic poker
face. The former investment
banker has turned on the charm
jets as if he is trying to land a big
The
Daily 202
detailed agreement on some of
the issues that we’ve touched on
is difficult to say at this remove,”
he added, referring to Iran, Syria
and trade.
account.
Macron wants to reestablish
France as a global power and
himself as the leader of Europe.
Cementing a bond with Trump is
part of his strategy to accomplish
this.
Here are five of Macron’s
objectives that could complicate
his chummy rapport with the
president:
4. Saving the Paris climate
accord:
“I was elected to represent the
citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris,”
Trump said last June as he pulled
out of the climate agreement
negotiated by his predecessor.
Minutes later, Macron posted
a video on Twitter in which he
said, in English, “Make our
planet great again!”
This issue will be on the back
burner because there’s no real
action to take right now, but
Macron plans to show his
concern for the environment in
more subtle ways. He’ll bring
Trump an oak tree sapling from
the site of the Battle of Belleau
Wood, where many Americans
died in World War I, and ask him
to plant it in the White House
garden.
1. Stopping Trump from
pulling out of the Iranian
nuclear deal:
France was one of five
countries to co-sign the
agreement with the United States
and Iran in 2015. Trump keeps
threatening to withdraw unless
it’s “fixed.” Macron is trying to
persuade the president not to
follow through on his campaign
promise.
“The U.S. decision deadline is
May 12,” The Washington Post’s
chief diplomatic correspondent
Karen DeYoung reports. “Failure
to work out a compromise
between the United States and its
closest European allies that will
keep the nuclear accord alive
could lead to the most significant
transatlantic breach in decades.
“According to officials involved
in the U.S.-European talks,
significant progress has been
made on addressing concerns
about the deal’s sunset clauses,
its verification rules, and the
absence of restrictions on
Iranian ballistic missile testing
and development,” DeYoung
adds. “For their part, the
Europeans worry that the
mercurial U.S. president . . . will
ultimately decide to trash it even
if his State Department
recommends otherwise.”
On Fox News before his visit,
Macron telegraphed the case he
will make to Trump. He said
there is “no Plan B,” and pulling
out could push Tehran to behave
more like Pyongyang, creating
more headaches down the road.
“Is this agreement perfect? . . .
No. But . . . what do you have as a
better option? I don’t see it,”
Macron said.
2. Keeping U.S. boots on the
5. Protecting the liberal
world order:
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump talks with French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife, Brigitte, on the White
House grounds. Macron’s visit to Washington includes a state dinner and a speech on Capitol Hill.
ground in Syria:
Because of its history as a
colonizer, France feels a special
responsibility for Syria. The
French joined the United States
and Britain this month in
striking Bashar al-Assad’s
chemical weapons facilities, and
Macron wants assurances from
Trump that he won’t follow
through on his pledge to
withdraw U.S. troops from the
country “very soon.”
Macron has suggested on
French television that he has
persuaded Trump to maintain
U.S. forces in Syria for the “long
term.”
“Ten days ago, President
Trump was saying that the
United States would disengage
from Syria,” Macron said. “We
convinced him that it was
necessary to stay there long
term.”
After White House press
Fun for all!
secretary Sarah Huckabee
Sanders pushed back from the
lectern and said that Trump’s
views have not changed, Macron
walked back his comments.
“I did not say that either the
U.S. or France will remain
militarily engaged in the long
term in Syria,” he said.
On Fox, Macron reiterated the
imperative of a U.S. presence in
Syria. He said regime change
would “fuel the new terrorists”
and create a power vacuum that
the “Iranian regime” will fill.
“It’s not automatically U.S.
forces, but that’s U.S. diplomacy
and that’s your presence,”
Macron said. “We will have to
build a new Syria after war, and
that’s why I think the U.S. role is
very important to play.”
3. Exempting Europe from
the Trump tariffs:
Macron met with German
Chancellor Angela Merkel in
Berlin on Thursday to discuss
pushing back against Trump’s
protectionist trade policies.
Europe is especially worried
about the May 1 U.S. deadline for
imposing tariffs on steel and
aluminum imports, and Macron
will try to defuse a trade war. The
European Union has been
preparing a proposal for Trump
to avert the levies.
President Barack Obama
talked with Merkel frequently,
but Trump has a frosty
relationship and famously did
not shake her hand during a
photo op last year. Merkel’s brief
visit to Washington at the end of
this week will get a tiny fraction
of the fanfare, and she’s certainly
not getting a state dinner.
During a background briefing
at the White House on Friday
afternoon, a senior
administration official sought to
tamp down expectations of a
breakthrough this week. Asked
whether there will be any news
announced during the trip, he
said: “Hard to say. Don’t know if
there will be a trade
announcement following the
state visit or not. Just don’t
know.”
“Whether we will actually
solve, or come to closure, or a full
Macron has positioned himself
on the global stage as a champion
of democracy and international
engagement. “Nationalism will
lead Europe into the abyss. We
see authoritarianism rising all
around us,” he said in a speech to
the European Parliament last
week. “The response should not
be authoritarian democracy but
the authority of democracy!”
“But while Macron frets about
the myopia of the populists, he
does not fully reject their
agenda,” The Post’s Ishaan
Tharoor notes in his WorldViews
newsletter. “Under his watch,
authorities have embarked on a
harsh crackdown on asylum
seekers, and Macron himself has
expressed sympathy for public
anxieties over migration.
Macron’s supporters see his
‘radical centrism’ as a more
effective platform to address
some of the same concerns that
animate Trump and his voters.
Meanwhile, Macron’s critics —
especially on the left — see him
not as populist in establishment
clothing but as a leader for the
rich, bent on tightening his
stranglehold on the French
political scene.”
james.hohmann@washpost.com
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S0579 3x10.5
Q
S ARI H ORWITZ
Deputy Attorney General Rod J.
Rosenstein, wearing a formal
morning coat and silver tie, strode
into the Supreme Court chamber
Monday afternoon to fulfill a longtime dream.
On a mahogany table, he set
down several binders filled with
briefs, along with a cardboard
folder that had belonged to his
father. Rosenstein then walked
over to greet some fellow prosecutors who had come early for frontrow seats so they could — silently
— cheer him on. Holding out his
arm, Rosenstein proudly showed
them his new Trump presidential
cuff links, which the White House
counsel had sent to his office for
him to wear.
“Not bad,” he said, smiling, moments before his first Supreme
Court appearance began.
In recent weeks, it was unclear
whether Rosenstein’s big day was
going to happen. The Justice Department’s second-highest-ranking official has been in President
Trump’s sights for months.
Two weeks ago, Trump, angered by the ongoing Russia investigation and Rosenstein’s approval of the FBI’s raid of his
personal attorney’s office, told
senior officials that he was considering firing the deputy attorney
general. Attorney General Jeff
Sessions recently indicated to
White House counsel Donald McGahn that he might have to step
down himself if Trump fires
Rosenstein, whom he chose as his
deputy.
But
Monday,
Rosenstein
walked to the lectern to face eight
of the court’s justices at their
raised bench in front of four marble columns and two American
flags. (Justice Neil M. Gorsuch did
not take part in the argument,
probably because he had some
contact with the case when he was
on the U.S. Court of Appeals for
the 10th Circuit.)
Rosenstein’s Supreme Court
appearance is not unprecedented;
while attorneys in the solicitor
general’s office usually argue cases for the government, other deputy attorneys general, including
one James B. Comey, have appeared before the court.
“General Rosenstein,” Chief
Justice John G. Roberts Jr. said,
looking down at the deputy attorney general.
“Thank you, Mr. Chief Justice
and may it please the court,” said
Rosenstein, who appeared polished and confident, a reflection
of his nearly 30 years as a federal
prosecutor.
Chavez-Meza v. United States,
No. 17-5639, is a low-profile case
from New Mexico involving the
prison sentence of a convicted
drug dealer. But the chamber was
packed because Rosenstein was in
court defending the administration.
“Not bad.”
Deputy Attorney General
Rod J. Rosenstein, describing his
presidential cuff links Monday
At issue was how much a federal court judge is required to explain when ordering a partially
reduced sentence for a defendant
after the sentencing range for the
crime has been lowered by the
U.S. Sentencing Commission.
In 2012, Adaucto Chavez-Meza,
19, and two others were arrested
in Albuquerque in a sting operation when they tried to sell about
four pounds of methamphetamine to an undercover agent. In
2013, Chavez-Meza pleaded guilty
to conspiracy and possession with
intent to distribute methamphetamine. He was sentenced to 11
years and three months in prison,
which was the minimum amount
under the federal sentencing
guidelines.
A year later, the Sentencing
Commission changed its drug-offense guidelines, which lowered
the sentencing range for ChavezMeza’s type of crime. The defendant asked the court to lower his
sentence. The judge did reduce his
sentence by 21 months. But under
the new guideline range, the new
minimum sentence would have
been a reduction of 27 months.
The judge did not explain his
decision, and Chavez-Meza argued that he should have. Federal
courts split on the degree of explanation required of the judge.
“There must be a reason for the
district court’s decision apparent
in the record,” attorney Todd A.
Coberly said, arguing for ChavezMeza. Coberly said he was asking
for the federal court to come to “a
reasoned decision as to why it’s
imposing a particular reduced
sentence.”
Rosenstein argued that no such
explanation from the judge was
necessary. The federal appeals
courts should “presume that district courts know the law and
apply it faithfully,” he said.
“What the district court did
here is more than sufficient,”
Rosenstein said. “The court made
clear on the record that it had
considered the relevant factors.
. . . The court was familiar with
the case by virtue of having handled the original sentencing and
imposed a sentence that is reasonable and for that reason should be
upheld.”
Several justices, including Justice Elena Kagan, raised questions
indicating it might be helpful for
judges to state their reasoning in
sentencing cases.
“Do you think a judge can terminate a period of supervised release and send somebody back to
prison without any statement of
reasons?” Kagan asked.
When the one-hour argument
was over, Rosenstein walked outside with his wife and two teen
daughters. At the top of the white
steps of the Supreme Court building, he posed for a photograph
with his family. He walked over
and shook hands with Coberly,
who was standing with his wife
and little girl.
“He congratulated me and said
‘Great job,’ ” Coberly said. “It was a
great experience to argue against
such a great advocate. I think he
did the best he could with this
case.”
When asked by a reporter how
he thought his argument went,
Rosenstein simply smiled. He
stepped into an SUV with his
family and was whisked away.
sari.horwitz@washpost.com
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
TUESDAY Opinion
Two critical
missteps
for Rosenstein
DANA MILBANK
WASHINGTON SKETCH
We’re not a
nation of laws,
but lawsuits
BY
I
“S
o funny,” President Trump remarked of the Democratic National Committee’s lawsuit
against the Trump campaign,
the Russian government and WikiLeaks.
Hilarious.
Almost as funny as when Trump sued
Palm Beach County, Fla., because of the
“malicious” jet noise above Mar-a-Lago.
Or when Trump sued Bill Maher after
the comedian challenged Trump to prove
he was not the spawn of an orangutan.
Or the time Trump sued the Chicago Tribune for $500 million because its architecture critic said Trump’s idea for the world’s
tallest tower was silly.
Or when Trump sued neighbors of the
Trump National Doral Miami for vandalizing palm trees, or when he sued the town
of Palm Beach because it denied him an
80-foot flagpole. Trump sued New York, he
sued New Jersey, he sued Scotland and he
sued a former Miss Pennsylvania. He sued
the Pequot Indians. He sued two business
executives for using the name “Trump,”
even though their surname was also
Trump.
When he ran for president, he had been
involved in some 4,000 lawsuits, a USA Today tally found, about 40 percent filed by
Trump and his businesses. He brought the
practice with him into politics, threatening to sue, or actually suing: Sen. Ted Cruz
(“for not being a natural born citizen”),
Gov. John Kasich of Ohio, the New York
Times, The Post, Univision, the publisher
of “Fire and Fury,” the Club for Growth,
the Culinary Workers Union, the Republican Party, restaurants that pulled out of
Trump International Hotel in Washington,
the Associated Press, his former ghostwriter, NBC, ABC and women who accused
him of sexual misconduct. Now Trump’s
administration is suing California to stop
its “sanctuary cities” policy, and to stop it
from buying federal land that Trump
wants to privatize.
Litigiousness is contagious. In the early
months of his presidency, Trump was sued
nearly three times as often as his three immediate predecessors — combined — at
the same point, the Boston Globe found.
States and cities have sued Trump over
sanctuaries, the travel ban, “dreamers” and
a citizenship question on the census. Two
hundred congressional Democrats joined
states in suing over Trump’s “emoluments.”
Andrew McCabe, the former acting FBI director, is reportedly preparing to sue
Trump for defamation.
Sometimes lawsuits are the only recourse in a broken political system. The
parents of murdered Democratic National
Committee staffer Seth Rich are suing Fox
News for reporting conspiracy theories
about his death. And parents of children
killed at Sandy Hook sued conspiracy theorist Alex Jones last week for his claims that
the shooting was a hoax. The Supreme
Court is looking at various lawsuits over
partisan redistricting. The president’s
election-fraud panel fell apart after it was
sued by one of its own members.
But others in the political realm are suing each other as casually as they issue
news releases. It is no longer accurate to
say, as John Adams once did, that we are a
nation of laws and not of men. We are now
a nation of lawsuits — thanks in part to the
president, his lawyers and, yes, his lawyers’
lawyers.
One of Trump’s lawyers, Michael Cohen,
filed lawsuits against BuzzFeed and Fusion
GPS over the Trump-Russia dossier. But he
dropped those cases last week and tried to
delay action in another lawsuit against
him by adult-film actress Stormy Daniels
— so Cohen could focus on his other legal
troubles involving federal prosecutors
probing possible financial crimes.
But three Russians continue to sue Fusion GPS over the dossier, and one of them
is the father-in-law of the first person to be
sentenced as part of special counsel Robert
S. Mueller III’s inquiry into Russia and the
Trump administration. Among the former
Trump advisers Mueller has charged is former campaign chairman Paul Manafort —
who in turn sued Mueller and the Justice
Department.
Trump himself has threatened to see the
author of the Russia dossier in court. And
last week he promised a countersuit
against the DNC. But the docket is crowded, so Trump might want to try another
venue — such as Panama, where the Trump
Organization said it would sue a hotel that
ditched the Trump name.
Though filing lawsuits to fight political
battles is nothing new, Trump wouldn’t be
wrong to think he is being hit with more
than usual. His opponents have filed scores
of suits on everything from transgender
rights to presidential records.
But the president is in an awkward position to complain about excessive litigation,
having taken legal action against an author
who claimed Trump overstated his wealth,
Deutsche Bank, Ivana Trump, Merv Griffin,
a Trump University student and a former
campaign aide — and having threatened legal action against Lawrence O’Donnell,
Rosie O’Donnell, Harry Reid, the National
Hispanic Media Coalition, Tom Arnold, an
anti-Trump T-shirt maker, the United
States Golf Association, and the 92-year-old
mother of a Scottish fisherman.
Now the DNC is using the same tactics
Trump popularized. There’s a nonlegal
term for this: rough justice.
Twitter: @Milbank
H ARRY L ITMAN
KOREAN CENTRAL NEWS AGENCY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Pyongyang last September.
What to do if the talks
with North Korea succeed
BY S AM N UNN
AND R ICHARD L UGAR
A
s the United States prepares
for historic discussions between President Trump and
North Korean leader Kim
Jong Un, the Trump administration
and its international partners have a
lot of work ahead of them. A successful summit, if it can be achieved, will
be only the start of a long and
complicated process. Eliminating
the nuclear threat and achieving
stability and security on the Korean
Peninsula will require unconventional thinking and steps that are
much broader than denuclearization. Just as we should prepare for
the summit to go wrong, we should
also prepare for it to “go right.”
The stakes are high. The Korean
Peninsula is the most militarized
region in the world. North Korea has
nuclear weapons and long-range
missiles that can reach the United
States, as well as South Korea and
Japan — two allies the United States
has pledged to defend. The entire
world has an interest in ensuring the
security of North Korea’s nuclear,
chemical and biological weapons
and weapons-usable materials. The
North also has thousands of artillery
tubes located within 30 miles or so of
Seoul, a formidable conventional
threat to the South Korean capital
and its population, including thousands of Americans living there.
Even if the two leaders reach an
agreement, achieving security and
stability and reducing catastrophic
risks on the peninsula will require
intensive, expert-level negotiations
and comprehensive, step-by-step
implementation over many months,
or perhaps years. This cannot be
viewed as a bilateral U.S.-North Korean discussion — it must also
include China, South Korea, Japan
and Russia, and it must address
regional security and the political
concerns of all the parties, including
economic and humanitarian matters.
A successful negotiation requires
that all those involved benefit from
the outcome. It means all sides must
give as well as get. Economic, military and diplomatic pressure helped
bring the North Koreans to the table,
but reaching a successful agreement
will require carrots as well as sticks.
The United States has announced it
will insist that nuclear dismantlement precede economic benefits.
North Korea will likely insist that
substantial economic benefits be
upfront. Can we develop tools that
incentivize dismantlement and verification, as well economic benefits,
to occur concurrently? History
shows the answer is yes.
As the United States and its international partners develop a negotiating strategy and tools for North
Korea, there are vital lessons to be
learned by looking back to the early
1990s following the breakup of the
Soviet Union.
In 1991, as the Soviet Union was
disintegrating, we wrote legislation
to provide technical and financial
assistance for the inventory, destruction, and disposal of nuclear and
chemical weapons and their delivery
vehicles in Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Ukraine. This became law
as the Nunn-Lugar Soviet Nuclear
Threat Reduction Act of 1991 — also
known as the Cooperative Threat
Reduction (CTR) program.
The initiative also helped to fund
productive, peaceful scientific work
for scientists who had worked in the
weapons complex, and also helped
to prevent the proliferation of their
know-how to other states and nonstate actors — including the extraordinary lab-to-lab program in which
Russian and American scientists
worked cooperatively to secure materials usable in nuclear weapons.
The United States and Russia
learned to cooperate on threat reduction by working together in implementing the program from 1991
to 2012. With this valuable joint
experience, if we are going to rebuild
cooperation between Washington
and Moscow, North Korea is a good
place to start.
We believe this concept should be
a critical component of any effort to
verifiably and irreversibly dismantle
North Korea’s nuclear weapons and
related programs, as well as prevent
future proliferation of weapons,
material or know-how. Such cooperation can also be used to engage
thousands of North Korean scientists and engineers, who are now
employed in making weapons of
mass destruction, in peaceful scientific and technical work. This would
also diminish the risk of proliferation of their deadly knowledge to
other states or terrorists.
In the context of a more stable
Korean Peninsula, we can look
broadly to CTR as a model. A broadbased plan for cooperative activities
in North Korea would provide incentives for the Kim regime to comply
with the difficult commitments and
strict verification and monitoring
that will necessarily be part of a
serious denuclearization agreement.
Though there are significant differences between North Korea in
2018 and the former Soviet Union in
1991, the cooperative threatreduction concept could be a powerful tool to support the verifiable
reduction and elimination of North
Korea’s nuclear arsenal, its other
weapons of mass destruction, and
their delivery systems. Such a program could be developed, funded
and implemented jointly with our
allies and other members of the
international community.
There is certainly no guarantee
that there will be a diplomatic breakthrough, but we must be prepared to
seize the opportunity. We hope Congress and the Trump administration
will use the lessons learned from
Cooperative Threat Reduction to
develop a more peaceful and secure
future for the Korean Peninsula.
Sam Nunn and Richard Lugar are former
U.S. senators who serve on the Board of
Directors of the Nuclear Threat Initiative.
RICHARD COHEN
Trump could tweet us into war
I
f President Trump knew anything
about history, he would be worried
about his success with North Korea. Never mind there is no agreement yet, and never mind that no
meeting has been held — the facts
speak to a Trump triumph. Could it be
that Trump’s bluster and belligerence
have persuaded North Korean leader
Kim Jong Un to play ball? It sure must
look like it to Trump.
Whether it looks that way to Kim is a
different matter. The proposed summit
seemed to materialize out of thin air.
Kim proposed, Trump accepted, and
diplomats who like to negotiate the
shape of the table were left out in the
cold. It’s not even clear what denuclearization would mean. Trump used the
term in a recent tweet — “agreed to
denuclearization,” he said of North Korea — but Kim has agreed to no such
thing. In fact, he has agreed to very
little.
North Korea without a nuclear arsenal is like Saudi Arabia without oil.
Without it, the country disappears from
the geopolitical map and becomes just
another developing nation that has a
hard time feeding its own people. The
nuclear program is what gives North
Korea recognition, prestige and — not
just incidentally — security. After
Moammar Gaddafi gave up his weapons, his country went from being a
regional player to a sandbox. When
Ukraine abandoned its program in
1994, it got security guarantees from
Britain, the United States and Russia.
In 2014, that very same Russia invaded
the eastern part of the country, and
Britain and the United States did nothing.
These lessons are not lost on Kim. He
and his father, Kim Jong Il, yearned for
their country to be recognized as an
important power — as important as
that gaudy Korea to the south. They
wanted a seat at the proverbial table.
Nuclear weapons get you to the table.
And now, without conceding very
much, North Korea just got a sit-down
with the United States of America. It
never happened before because previous Washington administrations wanted some guarantee of success in exchange. Kim apparently got it for free.
He must have read “The Art of the
Deal.”
Trump, who in the words of his
past-or-present lawyer and fixer,
Michael Cohen, is “an amazing negotiator, maybe the best ever in the history of
this world,” is likely to go into the talks
with Kim as “Donald Trump in Full.”
That means unprepared, cocky and
splendidly ignorant. (He only recently
discovered that the Korean War ended
with an armistice, not a peace treaty.)
Kim, in contrast, will have done his
homework. The North Koreans have
likely read up on Trump — books about
him and his tweet oeuvre, if it can be
called that. Somewhere along the line,
they are likely to announce a misunderstanding. They will make no more
nuclear weapons, but they will keep the
ones they have.
Trump must feel vindicated. Never
mind the South Koreans and all the
work they’ve done — he has consistently taken credit for any positive development on the Korean Peninsula. Modesty in anything would not be Trump. He
ignored or brushed aside the State
Department types who advocated caution. He leaped into the ring. His
success so far can only affirm his
quasi-religious faith in his own instincts. Should another crisis erupt, it
would be nearly impossible to get him
to listen to experienced hands, such as
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis.
Trump doubtlessly thinks he has a
negotiating skill that is a God-given
talent. Such confidence is dangerous on
the world stage. Foreign affairs is not
like real estate development. History
intrudes. Pride, not profit, can prevail.
In the long term, a greater danger
looms. Trump sees himself as someone
who never fails. But Kim will not give
up his nuclear weapon program — not
the bombs, not the missiles — and
Trump will exit the summit appearing
a failure, with none of his onetime
aides — H.R. McMaster, Gary Cohn,
Rex Tillerson — to mollify him. No
secret preliminary talks will obscure
the result. The president, his prestige
and his leviathan of an ego will be on
the line, and war will be a greater, not
lesser, possibility.
cohenr@washpost.com
n recent weeks, Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein has capitulated
to political pressure from the president and his allies in Congress. He has
yielded to demands from the most rabid
opponents of special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III’s probe in a way that harms the
long-term interests of the Justice Department and likely does little to protect the
probe or Rosenstein’s own job.
To be fair to Rosenstein, he is under
enormous, improper pressure from his
ultimate boss, the president of the United
States, as well as a venomous group of
congressional Republicans, led by
Rep. Devin Nunes (Calif.). And he had
previously safeguarded Mueller’s ability to
complete his mission, resisting political
pressure from the White House.
But now he has made two critical
missteps. First, he permitted Nunes and
Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.), leaders on the House
Intelligence Committee, to review the twopage memo that activated the FBI’s ongoing counterintelligence investigation of
contacts between Russia and the Trump
campaign. It is extremely rare for the
department to share a memo on the
opening of an investigation when that
investigation is still active. The Justice
Department had resisted Nunes’s demand,
which President Trump had endorsed on
Twitter.
Second, and even more worrisome,
Rosenstein on Thursday agreed to release
to Nunes and company former FBI director James B. Comey’s memos of his conversations with Trump. Like the two-page
memo, Comey’s notes are documents pertaining to an active investigation. As expected, within minutes the Comey memos
were then leaked to the public.
While requests from Congress are always
subject to some ad hoc back-and-forth, it is
about as hard-and-fast a rule as there is that
the Justice Department will not hand over
documents relating to a still-active investigation. And for good reason: It could
compromise the investigation, unfairly expose uncharged individuals and provide a
road map for defendants to sculpt their
stories. It is precisely that the practice is
inflexible and long-established that provides department officials the wherewithal
to resist the often urgent saber-rattling calls
from the Hill to provide documents in
pending investigations. Rosenstein departed from the policy for frankly political
reasons. The House Intelligence Committee threatened to hold him in contempt,
with the acrid prospect that the move
would lay the groundwork for Trump to
dismiss him and install a Trump ally atop
the Mueller probe.
This capitulation alters the balance of
power between the Justice Department
and the Hill and makes it substantially
more difficult for department officials to
resist future congressional interference in
active, politically charged investigations.
It may also be that Rosenstein acted to
protect the probe based on considerations
that we don’t know about. Even so, it’s a
miserable day at the Justice Department
when the deputy attorney general is forced
at gunpoint to turn over important evidence in a pending criminal investigation.
What made the decision especially perverse is that Rosenstein knew that his
antagonists aimed to use the material to
discredit the Mueller probe in particular
and further their zealous attack on the
Justice Department and federal law enforcement generally. Sure enough, the
Comey memos leaked almost instantly,
and Trump and his supporters have incorrectly trumpeted that they exonerated
Trump of obstruction of justice.
Rosenstein’s tenure is a testimonial to
the perils of trying to play ball with the
president and his congressional allies.
Rosenstein began his time in office being
manipulated into supplying at the president’s demand a memo arguing for Comey’s firing that the president used, falsely,
to justify the action. Rosenstein wound up
looking like a stooge. Having been burned,
he thereafter put his head down and set his
sail by Justice Department practices and
culture. Starting with the splendid selection of Mueller, he quickly became a
stand-up Justice Department loyalist.
The more recent decisions appear to be
a reversion toward succumbing to political
pressure from the White House and Congress. The problem isn’t simply that these
errors depart from principle. It is also that
they are very risky on their own terms. The
record of those who seek to curry favor
with the president is dismal. Trump seems
to take special relish in belittling former
antagonists who have stooped to kiss his
hem — just ask Chris Christie, Mitt Romney or Jeff Sessions. Trump has already
laid the groundwork for Rosenstein’s discharge, alleging that he is the “most
conflicted of all” the players in the Mueller
probe. And indeed, news reports from last
week quote a source close to Trump as
saying the president hasn’t “cooled off” on
Rosenstein and that Rosenstein may be
“about to be spit-roasted.” He would not be
the first victim, but he would be the most
consequential, of the president’s endless
spite and viciousness.
The writer teaches constitutional law at the
University of California at San Diego. He served
as deputy assistant attorney general in the
Justice Department from 1993 to 1998 and
U.S. attorney for the Western District of
Pennsylvania from 1998 to 2001.
A18
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Mr. White fled from education
EDITORIALS
The price of failed gun policies
The shooting at a Waffle House outside Nashville shows the need for a change in Congress this election year.
T
that allow weapons designed for war to become
everyday commodities.
“Let’s be honest,” said Nashville Mayor David
Briley (D). “Some people see these weapons as
having a purpose of terrorizing other people. It’s
happening too much. Enough is enough.” Indeed.
The same type of weapon was used at Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 people
were killed; it was used in the 2017 slaughter of
25 worshipers at a rural Texas church; it was part of
the arsenal used by the Las Vegas gunman who killed
58, and the shooter who killed 49 at an Orlando
nightclub.These are not weapons needed for selfdefense or hunting. They are designed to kill as
many people as quickly and efficiently as possible.
That they are easy to acquire is made obvious by
the ease and speed with which Mr. Reinking managed to get his guns back. Illinois authorities
transferred ownership of the rifle and other weapons to Mr. Reinking’s father. They said they did so
A blow to the
Putin model
because the father had a legal claim and promised to
keep them away from his son. Clearly the father has
some soul-searching to do. But it is ludicrous that
law and process would not give law enforcement
more authority to keep guns out of the hands of
people who pose a danger. There is no law in
Tennessee, where Mr. Reinking moved from Illinois,
that would have barred him from owning guns.
Better yet: Voters should elect a Congress that will
undertake comprehensive gun law reform. Reinstating the federal ban on assault weapons is a must. So,
too, is restricting magazine capacity. That the
shooter at the Waffle House apparently stopped to
reload gave a quick-thinking patron, James Shaw Jr.,
the chance to disarm him, thus saving countless
lives. In a few months, Americans will have a chance
to vote for candidates for Congress who support
constitutional limits on weapons of war, and against
candidates who remain complicit in letting peaceable Waffle House patrons be terrorized by them.
TOM TOLES
Armenia’s leader attempted to
emulate Mr. Putin. It didn’t work.
S
ERZH SARGSYAN, who ruled Armenia as
president from 2008 until this month, was a
faithful client of Vladimir Putin. In 2013, after
meeting with the Russian president, he
abruptly dropped negotiations with the European
Union and instead joined Moscow-led economic and
security organizations. During a visit to Washington
a couple of years later, he frankly told us that his
small Caucasian country of roughly 3 million people
had little choice, since Armenians working in Russia
supplied one-fifth of the country’s gross domestic
product and Russian companies monopolized its
energy supplies. “Armenian cognac can’t really be
sold in Paris,” he explained.
Mr. Sargsyan underestimated his own citizens,
however, when he attempted to emulate a classic
Putin maneuver. Limited by the constitution to two
terms as president, he pushed through a constitutional amendment transferring most executive powers to the prime minister, and then — having denied
for years that he would do so — had the parliament
name him to that post. The result was 11 days of
mounting mass demonstrations that, on Monday,
prompted Mr. Sargsyan to give up the position. “I was
wrong,” he said in a statement.
It’s not clear whether Mr. Sargsyan’s departure will
prompt a genuine change in Armenia’s government
or its servile stance toward the Kremlin. Thanks to
manipulated elections, the ruling party has a commanding majority in parliament, while the leader of
last week’s protests, veteran dissident Nikol Pashinyan, controls just nine of 105 seats. The popular revolt
nevertheless is a blow to the authoritarian political
model promoted by Mr. Putin, which has spread not
only to other former Soviet Bloc states in Russia’s
orbit but also to Turkey, where ruler Recep Tayyip
Erdogan is hoping to complete the transition from
prime minister to all-powerful president in June.
No doubt Mr. Putin will misunderstand the rebuff.
Consumed by cynicism, the Russian ruler and his
clique are incapable of accepting that spontaneous
political uprisings by outraged publics are possible.
They assume that they must be, like Russia’s own
interventions in Western democratic elections, the
result of state-directed conspiracies. Mr. Putin
blamed the CIA and other intelligence agencies for
the revolts that overturned pro-Moscow governments in Ukraine and Georgia, and when thousands
of Russians protested election fraud and his own
shuttle from prime minister to president in 2012, he
held Hillary Clinton personally responsible.
In truth, it’s safe to say that the Trump administration had nothing to do with events in Armenia.
The only U.S. response to the demonstrations was a
weak statement from the embassy in Yerevan asking
the government for “restraint” while calling on the
protesters to “prevent an escalation of tensions.”
What drove Armenians to the streets was not foreign
the EPA to meet with Mr. Pruitt about Chesapeake
Bay cleanup. That friend, Dennis Treacy, serves on
the board of the Chesapeake Bay Commission, which
advises Mid-Atlantic leaders on revitalizing the nation’s largest estuary. The lobbyist said that he did not
take any money for his time. Maybe these circumstances enable Mr. Hart and Mr. Pruitt to claim no
official lobbying took place between the two. Yet even
if Mr. Hart did not say a word, his presence was still
inappropriate. Mr. Hart should have recognized how
suspicious this would have looked. But Mr. Pruitt was
the one in a position of public trust, and it was on him
to refuse any kind of official meeting with Mr. Hart in
attendance, knowing that he would go home later
that night and sleep in a condo owned by Mr. Hart’s
wife and rented to him on terms so generous they
amounted to a favor. It also would have been seemly
to disclose the meeting in the first place.
This would not be the first time Mr. Pruitt has
benefited from relationships with wealthy notables
provocations but the fact that Mr. Sargsyan’s bet on
Russia failed to deliver. During his decade in office,
the economy stagnated. About 10 percent of the
population abandoned the country, while 30 percent of those who remained fall below the official
poverty line.
Mr. Putin can be expected to squeeze whoever
succeeds Mr. Sargsyan as prime minister; in addition
to its economic levers, Russia maintains a military
base in the country. That, however, won’t improve the
lives of Armenians. More likely it will increase their
resistance to the thuggish, corruption-ridden and
economically failed model that is Putinism.
involved in issues related to his official duties. The
New York Times reported Saturday that, when he
was attorney general in Oklahoma, Mr. Pruitt gave
state contracts to a law firm run by Kenneth Wagner,
an old friend and business partner. The two had
bought a luxurious Oklahoma City house together in
a complicated transaction that involved a major
telecommunications company and ended up profiting them handsomely. That telecommunications
firm won kind treatment from Mr. Pruitt’s office. Mr.
Pruitt also bought a minor league baseball team with
a staffing company boss whose interests he pushed
in the state legislature.
The more Mr. Pruitt’s past and present behavior
comes to light, the swampier it looks. And this says
nothing about the science-denying agenda he has
pursued at the EPA. He should never have been
tapped to lead the agency. Now that he has proved
unethical as well as unwise, it is long past time for
him to leave.
ABCDE
TA K I N G EX C EP TI O N
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Hip-hop isn’t great art. It’s just popular.
Marc Weingarten, in his April 18 op-ed, “Hip-hop,
not rock, is the voice of our era,” and the Pulitzer Prize
Board couldn’t be more wrong. There’s good reason
jazz and classical dominated this award category:
When it comes to excellence, they’re the best. The
Pulitzer board long ago should have expanded its
categories. Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On” and
Stevie Wonder’s “Songs in the Key of Life” are musical
excellence, and there are many others.
As social commentary goes, rock-and-roll was never better than African American artists, who were
dominant in all genres, from the blues to soul.
Rock-and-roll is some of white America’s voice of an
era, not all of America’s.
To say hip-hop “has cornered the market on innovation” is ludicrous. It has cornered the market on
popularity, and it is to music what reality TV is to
The IRS needs revenue
After reading the April 18 front-page article “IRS
extends tax deadline after technology failure,” I felt a
rush of sympathy for this chronically underfunded
agency. Because the Trump White House hasn’t
gotten anyone confirmed to lead it, it was the acting
head who apologized, thus opening the door for
Republican members of Congress to level criticisms
at an Internal Revenue Service that is struggling to
implement the “tax reform” that these same Republicans felt the need to ram through Congress and
implement immediately.
I don’t like to see public servants who do thankless
work having to accept the blame for a crisis that could
have been avoided with adequate funding. This is the
agency, after all, that collects the revenue that funds
our democratic institutions. For this reason, providing the IRS with the resources it needs to carry out its
mission is of utmost importance.
Lori Farnsworth, Alexandria
Another attempt at integration
The more we learn about the EPA chief, the clearer it is that he needs to go.
T
Regarding the April 20 Metro article “Holocaust
Museum tour ends early for White”:
“A gated community” is how one of D.C. Council
member Trayon White Sr.’s (D-Ward 8) staff characterized the walled ghetto of Warsaw where thousands died. “Shocking” is an understatement of the
sentiment this naive statement conveys.
“Remembering the past” is one of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s themes, but you can’t
remember something you never knew. Mr. White’s
staff appears clueless about this history. Mr. White
contradicted a museum expert about a photograph
of a German woman who was being humiliated by
Nazi stormtroopers for being “defiled” by a Jew.
Mr. White insisted the woman in the photograph
was being protected by the Nazis because that
perception is what supported his view of history. He
didn’t stay around long enough to get a correct and
accurate insight into history, which apparently is
sorely needed by Mr. White and his staff.
This event combined with Mr. White’s antiSemitic pronouncements last month indicate that
Ward 8 is in need of adult leadership.
Gary Newman, Washington
The April 21 editorial “The IRS needs help”
properly identified the failing Internal Revenue Service’s computer infrastructure resulting from Republican actions to underfund this vital agency. However, it neglected to identify one of the most egregious
outcomes of these efforts: In 2016, the Committee for
a Responsible Federal Budget identified that the IRS
was able to collect an average of only 84 percent of
taxes due between 2008 and 2010, for an estimated
loss of more than $400 billion per year. Even in 2010
dollars, this lost revenue could go a long way in
paying for our eroding infrastructure or improving
education and health care. This is the epitome of the
adage “penny-wise and pound-foolish.”
Mark Pressman, Owings Mills, Md.
Mr. Pruitt’s swampy past and present
HIS MONTH, Environmental Protection
Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt made it
seem as though there was no official contact
between himself and J. Steven Hart, the
lobbying executive whose wife owned the condo in
which Mr. Pruitt resided for six months in 2017.
“Mr. Hart has no client that has business before this
agency,” Mr. Pruitt insisted on Fox News, attempting
to justify the extremely easy terms on which he
rented his Capitol Hill residence. But Mr. Hart
acknowledged over the weekend that Mr. Pruitt met
with him at the EPA last July, while the administrator
was still living in the condo.
Not only does this revelation enhance the case
that the administrator committed serious ethical
lapses while running a major Cabinet agency, but it
also fits into a broader pattern of advantage-taking
that Mr. Pruitt began before he ever arrived in
Washington.
According to Mr. Hart, he accompanied a friend to
APRIL 24 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
HERE WERE plenty of warning signs about
Travis J. Reinking. He once told police that
music superstar Taylor Swift was stalking
him and hacking into his phone. Another
time, he barged into a community pool, jumping into
the water wearing a woman’s pink housecoat and
challenging lifeguards to a fight. Then there was his
arrest by the Secret Service for breaching White
House security because he wanted to meet with the
president.
Yet there he allegedly was early Sunday morning
— just nine months after his White House arrest — at
a Waffle House outside Nashville, in possession of an
assault-style rifle that authorities say was used to kill
four people and wound several others. That the
AR-15 semiautomatic, along with three other guns,
had once been confiscated from him by Illinois
authorities who recognized the danger only compounds the failure — indeed the absurdity — of
policies that make it far too easy to get guns. And
. TUESDAY,
acting. High school marching bands, orchestras and
jazz bands, thespian societies, debate clubs and more
are gone in far too many American cities, and we lag
way behind all other industrialized countries in
education.
Corporations used to respond to what artists did.
In our era, TV has flipped the script and creates what’s
popular. Hip-hop is irresistible to corporations’ bottom line. Often there are no musicians, studio time,
airfares, hotels, food or anything, and the “artists”
present a finished product recorded in their studio.
I’m not taking anything away from Kendrick
Lamar, but his album is not the best, hip-hop is not the
most innovative, and anyone who spends time at
musical performances in our cultural centers has
heard that.
Jeffrey Michael Bolden, Washington
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Regarding the April 18 World article “France, fighting terrorism, seeks to ‘reform’ Islam”:
The latest calls by French President Emmanuel
Macron and Hakim El Karoui, a leading voice on how
Islamic traditions fit within French culture, to create
a “French Islam” in the name of improved security
indicate the primary goal of religious integration
policy. Since the 1980s, the French Interior Ministry
has launched numerous initiatives to form an officially recognized religious association for Islam. These
initiatives were done in the name of equity and
religious expression to allow Islam to participate in
the institutional fabric of the French Republic. The
prevention of radicalization and terrorism, while
noted as a potential benefit, was not the primary aim
of such attempts.
Beginning in the early 2000s, French integration
policy toward Islam has dramatically shifted to focus
on the prevention of radicalization. In 2004, the
religious-symbol ban in schools was passed based on
evidence that the headscarf indicated potential student radicalization.
The January 2015 Charlie Hebdo attack and the
November 2015 Paris attacks crystallized the notion
that poorly integrated Muslims represented a security concern. Policy doubled down on integration
processes such as the school and the neighborhood to
improve perceived integration gaps and further secure critical social institutions. The latest declarations for a new “blueprint” clearly indicate the troubling view that an unintegrated Muslim will eventually pose a security risk.
Andrew Aguilar, Providence, R.I.
Searching for a good approach
As reported in the April 18 news article “Saudi
Arabia says it’s open to sending troops to Syria as U.S.
draws down,” we have yet to find a good approach to
Syria. Saudi troops alone are not likely to do the job
and bring peace. A broad diplomatic option is better
than adding troops seen as partisan. The key is not
only finding a diplomatic approach but also creating
reality on the ground that forces compromise.
Those with force on the ground can ignore
diplomacy until external strong nonmilitary leverage affects the other key actors, including the Assad
regime, Russia, Iran and Turkey. We need the
strongest sanctions against Russia and Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.
Mr. Assad must go; his remaining in power almost
surely means more deadly conflict unless we can
maintain creditable multilateral forces to prevent
more killing. A cease-fire agreement that is enforceable is required. If we can’t act, we will be held
responsible for the continuing chaos. If Mr. Assad
and Russia think they can kill with impunity, all is
lost.
As for the United States, President Trump’s aboutface on Syria only proves that he has no real strategy,
and he signaled his true colors in reversing the
decision to increase sanctions on Russia and stopping bombing that had no real impact on killing.
Sadly, Mr. Trump showed subservience to Russian
President Vladimir Putin and indicated he won’t do
anything real about mass killings unless he is forced
to do so.
Harry C. Blaney III, Washington
The writer, a retired Foreign Service officer, is
senior fellow at the Center for International Policy.
Letters to the editor: letters@washpost.com
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
CHARLES LANE
CATHERINE RAMPELL
Our very
constitutional
divide
The GOP’s
shiny object is
losing its luster
T
T
he red-blue, rural-urban dichotomy has solidified into a basic fact
of American politics. The Democrats are now the party of diverse,
urban areas, which also constitute the
nation’s hubs of cutting-edge financial,
technological, medical and entertainment activity. The Republicans, meanwhile, dominate “flyover country,” the
ranches, farms and hamlets between the
California coast and the Northeast corridor.
This increasingly sharp partisan divide
corresponds to a divide between the most
and least economically weighty locations
in the United States, as measured by share
of gross domestic product. In 2016, Hillary Clinton carried nearly 500 counties
that generated 64 percent of GDP in 2015.
Donald Trump won about 2,600 counties
that produced just 36 percent of output.
Republicans used to gripe about the
alleged unfair dependence of “takers” on
“makers,” but the 64-36 urban-rural GDP
split, first reported by the Brookings
Institution’s Mark Muro and Sifan Liu, let
the 2016 Democratic standard-bearer flip
that script.
“I won the places that represent twothirds of America’s gross domestic product,” Clinton told an audience in Mumbai
last month. “So I won the places that are
optimistic, diverse, dynamic, moving forward. And [Trump’s] whole campaign,
‘Make America Great Again,’ was looking
backwards.”
Unstated, but clear, was the implication that Trump had not only won the
presidency with fewer votes from actual
citizens, as opposed to presidential electors, but also that the electoral college
magnified the voting power of people
who, on the whole, contribute less to the
country than Clinton’s voters do.
Before other Democrats commit themselves to this line of analysis, they might
want to consider an important fact about
urban areas: They consume far more food
and energy than they produce. And guess
where food and energy come from.
“The US relies extensively on its nonurban regions to provide massive
amounts of food and energy to sustain its
growing urban centers, and to a degree
that sets food and energy apart from
other sectors of the economy,” Michael
Cembalest, chairman of market and investment strategy at J.P. Morgan, writes
in his latest annual survey of the energy
economy. “They provide the life blood to
cities for their survival.”
Each resident of the United States has
an “ecological footprint” of about
20 acres, according to the Oakland,
Calif.-based nonprofit Global Footprint
Network, meaning that it takes the natural resources produced on that much
space to support each person.
Yet that land is almost entirely within
the United States’ borders, since approximately 80 percent of food, refined-oil
products and electricity are domestically
produced, not imported. If this were not
the case, “the U.S. would be highly reliant
on geopolitically insecure and costlier
imports,” Cembalest notes.
Trump counties may produce only
36 percent of GDP, but in a sense it’s the
right 36 percent — the 36 percent without
which those dynamic, productive cities
could not exist.
Of the top 15 food- and energyproducing states, Clinton carried only
five in 2016: California, Illinois, New
Mexico, Minnesota and Colorado.
Cembalest calculates that if electoral
college votes were allocated according to
food and energy production as well as
population, Texas would have 81 electoral
votes instead of its current 38, North
Dakota would go up from three to 14 —
and New York would shrink from 29 to 19.
No one would or should say that flyover
country is actually underrepresented in
the electoral college, but Cembalest’s little
thought experiment does remind us that
the Constitution, by design, protects interests that might not fare so well under a
more majoritarian system.
Notoriously, Iowa punches well above
its weight in national politics, due to its
first-in-the-nation presidential caucuses
and two seats in the Senate, another
institution that disproportionately favors
rural America. We have a wasteful ethanol subsidy for Iowa’s corn farmers as a
result.
On the other hand, we probably
wouldn’t want a political system that
actually empowered a handful of urban
enclaves to exploit the hinterland.
Trump rode flyover country’s grievances against big-city elites to the presidency.
Clinton’s remarks, and similar ones from
other progressive types, imply that Democrats are entitled to respond in kind,
apparently because they are the real
“makers.”
The truth is that the United States’
regions are interdependent, and that interdependence is a good thing. “It’s very
appropriate to note that red, heartland
places generate important agricultural,
energy and manufacturing outputs just
as blue, urban ones produce high-value
technology, services, human capital and
ideas,” Mark Muro of Brookings told me.
One of the Constitution’s many purposes, in fact, was to facilitate economic
interdependence among a diverse population spread across a giant continent.
For more than two centuries, the benefits
of those constitutional arrangements
have generally outweighed the costs.
That’s cause for appreciation, not resentment.
lanec@washpost.com
PAUL MORSE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
George H.W. Bush, front, and, from left, Laura Bush, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Barack
Obama, Michelle Obama and Melania Trump at the funeral for former first lady Barbara Bush in Houston.
EUGENE ROBINSON
Picturing Trump’s absence
S
ometimes a picture is worth
a zillion words. The viral
group photograph from former first lady Barbara Bush’s
funeral speaks volumes about the
state of our democracy, poignantly
illustrating what we have lost and
must at all costs regain.
George H.W. Bush is front and
center in his wheelchair. Behind
him, left to right, we see Laura and
George W. Bush, Bill and Hillary
Clinton, Barack and Michelle
Obama, and Melania Trump. It is an
extraordinary portrait of power,
continuity, legacy, civility and mutual respect — a remarkable tableau
that is made possible only by President Trump’s absence. Imagine him
in the picture, puffed-up and no
doubt scowling, trying desperately
to make himself the center of attention. It’s a good thing he decided to
spend the weekend playing golf and
writing angry tweets at Mar-a-Lago
instead.
I can’t look at that photo without
pondering how destructive Trump
has been — and how much work
and goodwill it will take to put the
pieces together again after he’s
gone.
The elder Bush pursued conservative policies. Clinton was
center-left. The younger Bush took
the country back to the right.
Obama pulled it to the left. These
shifts seemed big and important at
the time, but they pale in comparison with the disruption Trump has
wrought.
Like virtually all of their predecessors, the four presidents in that
picture tried to govern with a generosity of spirit. I disagreed vehemently with many of George W.
Bush’s policies, including the Iraq
War and the brutal torture of sus-
pected terrorists. I was sharply critical of his administration’s botched
response to Hurricane Katrina. Yet
Kanye West was wrong when he
said “George Bush doesn’t care
about black people.” With no regard
for political gain, Bush 43 launched
a program to provide anti-HIV
drugs to victims in southern Africa
— a move estimated to have saved at
least 11 million lives. I try to imagine Trump doing something like
that, and I can’t.
I also can’t see Trump skillfully
managing tectonic geopolitical
change the way George H.W. Bush
handled the fall of the Berlin Wall.
Bush 41 knew that it was important
to lay the groundwork so that Russia and its former satellites could
prosper in the post-communist era.
Trump’s foreign policy is based on
“America first” selfishness and
whether foreign leaders flatter him
or not.
Clinton guided the nation
through tremendous economic expansion, welfare reform and fiscal
belt-tightening that ultimately resulted in a balanced budget. In
doing so, he often angered his Democratic Party base. By contrast,
Trump evidently cares about nothing but his base. Presented with
reasonable compromises on issues
such as immigration and health
care, Trump preferred to leave
problems unsolved rather than risk
his loyal supporters’ anger.
Obama always sought compromise, though he did not always
achieve it; he based the Affordable
Care Act, after all, on Republican
ideas that had first been implemented by Mitt Romney. Seeing
Obama at a funeral was a reminder
of his great eloquence, especially at
moments of tragedy and loss. I was
present when Obama delivered his
indelible eulogy to the victims of
the Charleston, S.C., church massacre. I saw the reaction when he
broke into “Amazing Grace” and the
auditorium erupted with shouts of
“Amen!” I imagine Trump at that
podium, and I weep.
Melania Trump was not out of
place in that photo; she looked
elegant, as always, and paid her
respects to Barbara Bush with
grace. It is easy to see her as an
eventual member of that exclusive
club of former presidents and first
ladies — as long as she leaves her
husband at home to nurse his many
grievances.
When Trump eventually leaves,
we will have much to do — rebuild
the State Department, put the Environmental Protection Agency back
in the business of fighting climate
change, shift tax policy to favor the
middle class rather than the
wealthy, cope with the trilliondollar deficits that arise from irresponsible tax cuts, rebuild relationships with some of our closest allies
. . . the list is long. But perhaps the
biggest task will be reestablishing
the sense of national honor and
tradition that the funeral photograph represents.
An argument can be made that
the Democratic Party and the preTrump Republican Party were too
close, that there were only modest
differences between their policies,
that both had lost touch with the
nation they sought to govern. But if
that was the problem, Donald
Trump was a disastrous solution.
Imagine him standing there in
the picture, between his wife and
Michelle Obama. The image just
falls apart.
early this year, U.S. District Judge Katherine B. Forrest said, “It ought not to be
— and it has never before been — that
those who have lived without incident
in this country for years are subjected to
treatment we associate with regimes we
revile as unjust. . . . We are not that
country.”
Accusations of abuse in ICE custody
are numerous and serious, and they
preexisted the Trump era. An investigation by ProPublica and the Philadelphia
Inquirer reported cases of racial profiling, fabricated evidence and warrantless searches — all given little scrutiny
by overwhelmed immigration courts.
During the past few years, there have
been hundreds of accusations of sexual
abuse, racial slurs, abusive strip searches and verbal harassment in ICE jails,
prisons and detention centers. For an
institution that claims “zero tolerance”
for such practices, it seems to get a lot of
serious complaints. One asylum seeker,
Gretta Soto Moreno, has called the
facilities worse than normal prisons
because ICE “feels like it can treat
immigrants any kind of way.”
This is the bitter fruit of dehumanization — in a facility, in a system, in a
country. It is unclear whether Trump
would even regard such a reputation as
undesirable. He has effectively given
permission for bullying.
This is an issue ripe for more rigorous congressional oversight — even an
independent commission to investigate charges of physical and sexual
abuse in the ICE system. But this would
require a critical mass of elected Republicans to give a damn about the
rights and dignity of migrants. It is a
distant dream.
michaelgerson@washpost.com
crampell@washpost.com
eugenerobinson@washpost.com
The president’s bullying spreads to ICE
T
tine “check-ins” with ICE officials can
end with handcuffs and deportation.
“Sanctuary cities” — a recurring presidential political obsession — are being
targeted with additional personnel.
Hundreds of children have been removed from parents seeking asylum
and detained separately — compounding their terrible ordeal of persecution
and flight. ICE recently announced a
new policy that makes it easier to detain
pregnant women. Asylum seekers have
often been denied “humanitarian parole” while their cases are decided,
effectively jailing them without due
process.
Officials of the agency insist that
their nonpolitical mandate hasn’t
changed. But Homan has praised the
Trump administration for taking “the
handcuffs off law enforcement.” Whatever their intention, ICE agents are
being used by the president to send a
message of callousness. And they are
tying themselves to Trump’s political
fortunes in the process.
The job performed by ICE is essential
to American security, and not easy.
Agents must prevent some truly dangerous people from entering and staying in the country — gang members,
drug dealers and terrorists. But it is also
their job to deal with asylum seekers —
men, women and children fleeing from
gangs, targeted for death by drug cartels
and oppressed by terrorist states. Some
of the worst people in the world, and
some of the most sympathetic people in
the world, are processed by immigration officials. It takes care and discernment to make this distinction.
ICE is not an agency famous for its
care and discernment. In releasing an
immigration activist detained by ICE
The reality is that,
for most people, the tax cut
just wasn’t that noticeable.
The real issue, however, is that even the
president isn’t “making the case.”
This month, Trump was supposed to give
a talk in West Virginia touting his new tax
law. Instead, when he got to the stage, he
tossed his script — literally — and proclaimed that his prepared remarks were
“a little boring.”
He then rambled about some of his favorite conspiratorial hobbyhorses, including
unfounded claims of illegal voting and rapist
immigrants. This past week — Tax Week,
mind you — Trump likewise tweeted more
times about fired FBI director James B.
Comey than he did about his tax plan.
(Nearly all of those tax-related tweets were
retweets, by the way.)
However undisciplined the president’s
tax-related messaging is, Republicans were
counting on the fact that Americans would at
least notice their paychecks swelling as their
withholding fell. But that hasn’t happened,
either.
In a Gallup survey this month, only 18 percent of respondents said they believe the
GOP tax overhaul is lowering their federal
income taxes. This despite the fact
that 80 percent of households should expect
a tax cut this year, according to the Tax Policy
Center.
Why the disconnect? Republicans can
blame Democratic propaganda, but the reality is that, for most people, the tax cut just
wasn’t that noticeable. Spread out over the
course of a year, the amount of reduced
withholding in any given paycheck is likely
to be relatively small. That modest change
may also be masked by all the other factors
that can cause take-home pay to bounce
around, such as changes in wages, hours,
insurance premiums, 401(k) selections and
so on.
This was all entirely predictable.
Tax cuts passed by Presidents George W.
Bush (in 2001 and 2003) and Barack Obama
(in 2009, as part of the American Recovery
and Reinvestment Act) were actually more generous to the middle class than
Trump’s
were.
Yet
when
Americans were surveyed shortly after each of
those cuts was implemented, almost no one
realized their taxes had gone down then,
either.
Today, Americans have also noticed that
the new tax law has blown another huge hole
in the federal budget and is heavily tilted
toward corporations and the rich. That latter
factor is likely to weigh more heavily on their
views of the tax law than whatever they see in
their paychecks. Past surveys have found
that Americans are much more bothered by
the perception that corporations and the
wealthy pay too little than by the feeling they
themselves pay too much.
Given all this, it is difficult to fathom why
House Republicans and the Trump team are
agitating for yet more top-heavy tax
cuts ahead of the midterm elections. Unless,
of course, it’s not the general public they are
trying to impress: Unlike those fickle, fairness-minded voters, you can always count on
donors to appreciate a generous fiscal giveaway.
MICHAEL GERSON
he attitude of President Trump
toward federal law enforcement
is, to put it mildly, mixed. The
FBI refused to bend to his will.
So the special counsel team is composed
of “hardened Democrats” engaged in a
“WITCH HUNT.” The FBI was, according to Trump, too preoccupied with the
Russia investigation to prevent the
Parkland, Fla., school shooting. The
agency’s reputation “is in Tatters —
worst in History!”
But Immigration and Customs Enforcement has passed the loyalty test.
ICE’s enforcement surge “is merely the
keeping of my campaign promise,” the
president tweeted. Referring to ICE
acting director Thomas Homan, Trump
said, “Somebody said the other day, they
saw him on television. . . . ‘He looks very
nasty, he looks very mean.’ I said, ‘That’s
what I’m looking for!’ ”
This is territory more familiar in
political systems of personal rule. The
agency that defies the ruler must be
discredited. The agency that does his
bidding is viewed as a kind of Praetorian Guard.
Most of the professionals working in
ICE would surely deny this characterization, pointing to an important legal
role independent from any individual
president. But they need to understand
that their work is now being conflated
with Trump’s nativism.
ICE’s 40 percent increase in arrests
within the United States after Trump
took office is now closely associated
with the president’s political priorities.
His sweeping executive orders on immigration broadened the focus of enforcement beyond serious threats to public
order. Arrests of immigrants without
criminal convictions have spiked. Rou-
ax cuts were supposed to save the
Republican Party from President
Trump.
Voters would ignore the president’s Twitter outbursts; his Cabinet’s private-jet and redecoration scandals; the Russia investigation; porn star and playmate
payoffs; and many other miscellaneous embarrassments.
Voters were supposed to be so very grateful to have a little extra pocket money that
they would be willing to overlook all that
nonsense and eagerly cast their ballots for
the GOP come November.
Unfortunately for Republicans, this deus
tax machina never arrived.
Just 27 percent of Americans believe the
GOP tax overhaul was a good idea, according
to a recent NBC News/Wall Street Journal
poll. Even among Republican voters, the tax
cuts are not exactly thunderously popular: A
little more than half (56 percent) say they
were a good idea.
Other polls this month found similar
results. And tax cuts are already failing
Republicans on the campaign trail, too.
Take the recent Pennsylvania special congressional election. During the first two
weeks of February, about two-thirds of the
broadcast TV ads supporting the Republican
candidate mentioned taxes, according to an
analysis by Politico. Over subsequent weeks,
taxes were featured in fewer and fewer ads,
until they virtually disappeared. In the end,
of course, the Republican candidate lost.
Today, Hillary Clinton — a private citizen
who is not actually on the ballot — is playing
a more prominent role in Republican campaign messaging than is the party’s one and
only major legislative achievement.
Republicans and Trump surrogates complain that the tax overhaul isn’t resonating with voters because the media is obsessed with the investigation by special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III and won’t cover
tax reform.
“We’re constantly out there making the
case as to how the tax plan is helping
Americans, how deregulation is helping the
economy,” White House director of legislative affairs Marc Short said Sunday on NBC’s
“Meet the Press,” deflecting questions on the
Russia inquiry.
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Privation in
Gaza seen
as a threat
to peace
“W
e are on the edge of economic collapse,” said
Judge Mohammed Nofal, sorting
through a pile of case files in his
courtroom in central Gaza, where
plaintiffs and accused debtors shuffle in and out to have their financial
cases heard.
Nofal’s courtroom, nothing more
than a small office stacked with files,
provides a glimpse into Gaza’s economic hardships. From behind his
desk, he hears about 20 cases a day
and rules on another 80 just from
the paperwork.
Nofal, one of two financial judges
in the Gaza court, said he heard
12,000 cases last year, up 50 percent
from the year before. The value of
checks bounced in the territory
surged to $112 million last year,
according to the Palestine Monetary Authority. In 2016, the figure
was $62 million.
Desperate for small loans, Gazans seek credit wherever they can,
Nofal said. Often, for instance, people turn to electronics stores that
offer products on credit, signing up
to buy televisions or washing machines on installment plans, then
immediately selling those appliances to get cash.
When they fail to pay their credi-
How paid
reviewers
still thrive
on Amazon
AMAZON FROM A1
while, including this month,
Amazon purges shoppers from its
site whom it accuses of breaking
its policies.
But the ban, sellers and experts
say, merely pushed an activity that
used to take place openly into
dispersed and harder-to-track online communities.
There, an economy of paid reviews has flourished. Merchants
pledge to drop reimbursements
into a reviewer’s PayPal account
within minutes of posting comments for items such as kitchen
knives, rain ponchos or shower
caddies, often sweetening the deal
with a $5 commission or a $10
Amazon gift card. Facebook this
month deleted more than a dozen
of the groups where sellers and
buyers matched after being contacted by The Post. Amazon kicked
a five-star seller off its site after an
inquiry from The Post.
“These days it is very hard to sell
anything on Amazon if you play
fairly,” said Tommy Noonan, who
operates ReviewMeta, a website
that helps consumers spot suspicious Amazon reviews. “If you
want your product to be competitive, you have to somehow manufacture reviews.”
Sellers say the flood of inauthentic reviews makes it harder for
them to compete legitimately and
can crush profits. “It’s devastating,
devastating,” said Mark Caldeira,
owner of the baby-products company Mayapple Baby. He said his
product rankings have plummeted
in the past year and a half, attributing it to competitors using paid
reviews. “We just can’t keep up.”
Suspicious or fraudulent reviews are crowding out authentic
ones in some categories, The Post
found using ReviewMeta data. ReviewMeta examines red flags, such
as an unusually large number of
reviews that spike over a short
period of time or “sock puppet”
reviewers who appear to have cut
and pasted stock language.
For example, of the 47,846 total
reviews for the first 10 products
listed in an Amazon search for
“bluetooth speakers,” two-thirds
were problematic, based on calcu-
APRIL 24 , 2018
egy, Abusada said. “Hamas has
realized very late that in military
confrontation, we lose,” Abusada
said. “They are not quitting the
military resistance. They are trying to use nonviolent resistance
alongside.”
Israel, however, argues that the
protests are in no way peaceful,
calling them a cover for Hamas to
carry out attacks. Israeli officials
blame the Palestinians for hostile
activity at the border, including
gunfire and the planting of explosives by militants.
Ahmed Yousef, a former senior
adviser to Hamas political leader
Ismail Haniyeh, said the demonstrations have provided needed relief.
“We are a little bit happier than
before,” Yousef said. “We can see
something with this demonstration
that the issue of Palestine is seen by
the whole world.”
GAZA FROM A1
the Palestine Trade Center.
The Gaza Strip’s economy has
been crippled by a more than
decade-long blockade by Israel,
which maintains tight controls on
trade and movement in and out of
the territory, citing security considerations. But Gazans are also
frustrated with the territory’s rulers, the Hamas organization, for its
failure to provide basic services,
and with the West Bank-based Palestinian Authority for cutting the
salaries of its Gaza employees.
The United Nations is warning
that something has got to give. Even
Israeli security officials have sounded an alarm in recent months, warning that a humanitarian crisis
could set off an explosion of violence, putting Israel itself at risk.
. TUESDAY,
P
WISSAM NASSAR FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Judges hear one of many financial cases spawned by the Gaza Strip’s collapsing economy. To get cash, some people sign up to buy
TVs or washing machines on credit, then immediately sell them. When they fail to pay up, a domino effect of defaults is triggered.
tors, a domino effect of defaults is
triggered, Nofal said.
Nabil Abu Afash, 58, used to sell
furniture on installment. But customers stopped paying him and he
had no way to recoup the losses, he
said. He sold his house to cover
$90,000 of his own debt and now
owes rent to a landlord.
On a recent day, he was in line
outside the courthouse, waiting to
request that his overdue rent be
deferred, when his landlord happened to pass by.
“I owe him $3,000,” Abu Afash
said.
“Four thousand,” countered the
landlord, Hatem Qalaga, who said
he came to court to petition that his
debtors be imprisoned.
“What am I supposed to do?”
Qalaga continued. “I’m owed
$100,000, and now I’m $30,000 in
debt myself.”
“It’s collapsing, collapsing,” he
said of Gaza’s economy.
As they spoke, a man nearby was
bundled off to prison in a police car.
Nofal said prison is a last resort.
But he signed 20 arrest warrants on
his desk that day.
Everyone is feeling the pinch, he
lations using the ReviewMeta tool.
So were more than half of the
32,435 reviews for the top 10 Bluetooth headphones listed.
Diet pills and other supplements also generated large numbers of problematic reviews. Just
33 percent of the reviews for the
top 10 testosterone boosters listed
on Amazon appeared legitimate,
and only 44 percent of reviews for
the top listed weight-loss pills, according to data crunched from
ReviewMeta.
Incentivized reviewers give
higher ratings than nonpaid reviewers, according to ReviewMeta.
The result is that consumers could
unknowingly be purchasing poorer-quality products.
“I don’t like to be taken advantage of,” said Eric Hall, 53, a research chemist in Minneapolis and
an Amazon Prime customer who
no longer trusts five-star reviews.
He sees them as a marker of likely
fraud rather than excellence.
Amazon says it aggressively polices its platform for incentivized
reviews. Amazon has filed five lawsuits since 2015 against people who
write paid reviews and companies
that solicit them.
“We know that millions of customers make informed buying decisions everyday using Customer
Reviews,” an Amazon spokeswoman, Angie Newman, said in a statement. “We take this responsibility
very seriously and defend the integrity of reviews by taking aggressive action to protect customers
from dishonest parties who are
abusing the reviews system. . . . We
take forceful action against both
reviewers and sellers by suppressing reviews that violate our guidelines and suspend, ban or pursue
legal action against these bad actors.”
Ming Ooi, chief strategy officer
for Fakespot, a review auditing site
that analyzes comments, similar to
ReviewMeta, said that “the issue
with fake or unreliable reviews has
not subsided at all but likely is
worsening.”
Problems with the authenticity
of Amazon reviews come at a moment of broad public concern over
the accuracy of information on
platforms built by Silicon Valley.
The spread of Russian disinformation and hoaxes on YouTube and
Facebook has raised questions
about the role of technology platforms in displaying and amplifying
falsehoods, contributing to a climate of distrust and social division.
Amazon has escaped the scrutiny of its peers. But the same socialnetwork effects that enable misinformation also increasingly distort
online commerce. Social media has
accelerated the practice of online
said, acknowledging that his own
salary was cut by the local government by 60 percent, to $800 a
month.
The only solution, he said, is for
Israel to ease border restrictions.
“People need to work,” Nofal said.
B
eleaguered Gazans do not
blame only Israel; pressure is
building against Palestinian leaders, too.
“It’s because of Hamas,” Ahmed
Hamouda, a 25-year-old worker on
Gaza’s seafront, said without missing a beat. “This is the reality. We are
fed up.”
Gaza is suffering because of
Hamas’s isolation from the rest of
the world, he said. The group is
considered a terrorist organization
by Israel, the United States and the
European Union, and it has been
increasingly ostracized within the
Middle East.
Although Hamas’s relationship
with Egypt has warmed somewhat
in recent months, the group’s fortunes took a dive when the Muslim
Brotherhood was ousted from power in Egypt in 2013. Since then,
Egypt has shut down smuggling
reviewing because of its power to
bring together groups of people
who gather for a specific purpose,
such as rating Uber drivers.
A Facebook spokeswoman, Rebecca Maas, said in an email: “We
are committed to increasing the
good and minimizing the bad
across Facebook. . . . There are
many legitimate groups on Facebook related to online commerce,
but the groups identified misuse
our platform.” Facebook would not
disclose which groups it removed.
Sellers say that Amazon’s position as the top e-commerce destination has spawned a race to master — and game — the company’s
systems. More than half of all
online product searches start on
Amazon, according to survey data
by the digital marketing firm
BloomReach. Landing among the
first 10 results on an Amazon
search can drive an explosion in
sales, according to sellers.
Amazon chief executive Jeffrey
P. Bezos first championed the idea
of showcasing customer reviews
on his online bookstore in 1995,
helping spread the notion that
consumers make smarter choices
shopping online than in brick-andmortar stores because tech platforms enable them to instantly
access the opinions of fellow shoppers. That paved the way for review-based sites such as Yelp, Uber
and Airbnb.
But the vision Bezos popularized, of a review and ratings system
that serves as a guide for consumers to make smarter choices, has
given way to a system in which
some consumers are manipulated
and misled. (Bezos is the owner of
The Post.)
Amazon rankings are the new
“battlefield” for online manipulation, said Renee DiResta, policy
lead for the nonprofit Data for
Democracy, a group of technology
researchers dedicated to promoting integrity online. She has conducted research on paid Amazon
reviews by joining some of the
Facebook groups. “There’s a dark
side to the race for the stars,” she
said.
How Amazon comes up with its
star ratings is a closely guarded
secret. On its website, Amazon says
it uses a machine learning model
that takes many factors into account, including the age of a review, helpfulness votes by customers and whether reviews are from
verified purchasers. Reviews are a
minor factor in the overall rating,
Amazon said, but it would not
quantify their weighting.
The company said it uses artificial intelligence to analyze “hundreds of thousands” of Amazon
customers who have been banned
tunnels to Gaza that had generated
taxes for Hamas and breathed some
life into Gaza’s economy.
Meanwhile, the Palestinian Authority has cut wages for its employees in Gaza to squeeze Hamas, a
rival political force.
As economic pressure mounts,
Hamas has tried to hand over the
burden of administering the strip to
the Palestinian Authority, headed
by Mahmoud Abbas. But talks to
mend a long-standing rift have
failed, with Hamas ultimately unwilling to give up its control over
security in Gaza. It has, however,
handed over the main border crossing with Israel, ceding with that
control over the taxes collected
there.
With Hamas cornered and unable to provide basic services, analysts speculate that another war
with Israel could be imminent as
the militant group seeks a way to
divert attention from the internal
crisis.
But Hamas has found another
release valve — for now, at least.
T
he idea for the weekly protests,
dubbed the “March of Return,”
has been widely attributed to Palestinian activist Ahmad Abu Artema,
who disavowed any political affiliation and said he believes in a onestate solution to the conflict, an
arrangement in which Palestinians
are given rights alongside Israelis in
a democratic state.
He said the “hardship of Gaza”
spurred the “revolutionary step” of
peacefully protesting Israel’s occupation and the loss of Palestinian
land when Israel was created in
1948.
Abu Artema said it was important for the protests to have the
backing of the political parties that
rule Gaza. “We cannot deny them,”
he said. “They are part of society.”
But for Hamas, the march —
however it came about — came at
the right moment.
“They decided, I wouldn’t say to
hijack the march, I’d say to lead the
march,” said Mkhaimar Abusada, a
professor of political science at
Gaza’s al-Azhar University. The aim
was to deflect attention to Israel
“instead of anger and frustration
building up against Hamas in
Gaza.”
Hamas is testing a new strat-
On Amazon, questionable customer reviews
are crowding out authentic ones
The majority of customer reviews for the first 10 items* in four
popular product categories on Amazon raised red flags.
PERCENTAGE OF QUESTIONABLE REVIEWS
50.7%
Bluetooth headphones
55.6%
Weight-loss pills
58.2%
Bluetooth speakers
Testosterone booster
67.0%
Most products in our search got a lower star rating when we took the
problematic reviews out of the equation.
Bluetooth
headphones
7/10
Weight-loss
pills
7/10
Bluetooth
speakers
8/10
Testosterone
booster
8/10
had a lower
adjusted rating
* Search conducted in February.
The Washington Post used data from ReviewMeta, a website that analyzes
suspicious reviews on Amazon. ReviewMeta does not claim reviews are fake.
Instead, the site detects questionable patterns, such as large numbers of deleted
reviews, reviews with repeat phrases, or a flood of reviews on a single day.
Source: ReviewMeta
from leaving reviews and uses the
data collected to build computer
models of their behavior to predict
future techniques.
The auditing sites use a software
algorithm that scrapes Amazon’s
website for suspicious patterns or
attributes of the review or the
reviewer. ReviewMeta then gives
the product a new star rating based
only on the reviews its system
deems likely to be authentic. For
example, deleting the suspicious
reviews on a pair of wireless headphones from Atgoin dropped its
rating from 4.4 stars to 2.6.
ReviewMeta and Fakespot say
the ease of detecting potentially
fraudulent reviews makes them
wonder why Amazon isn’t more
stringent.
For two decades, Amazon permitted incentivized reviews, as
long as reviewers disclosed that
they had received a free or discounted product. But it began
cracking down on the practice in
2015, acknowledging its struggles
to control it.
“Despite substantial efforts to
stamp out the practice,” company
lawyers wrote in a lawsuit, “an
unhealthy ecosystem is developing
outside of Amazon to supply inauthentic reviews.”
Around the same time, Amazon
began courting foreign sellers to
sell products directly on its site.
The move drastically worsened the
problem of scamming, experts say,
THE WASHINGTON POST
because competing on price and
padding reviews were a way for
Chinese manufacturers to go up
against entrenched brands that are
well known to American consumers.
Atgoin, an electronics company
based in Shenzen, China, was one
such company that leapfrogged to
the top of Amazon rankings. In
November, its $30 headphones
had just a handful of reviews.
Then, over a five-day period in
December, the product received
nearly 300 reviews, almost all of
which gave five stars.
The ReviewMeta analysis found
that more than 90 percent of all the
reviews for the Atgoin headphones
were suspicious. Many featured
repeat phrases, including “I’ll be
using this for my gym workout
going forward” and “comfortable
to wear.” By early February, the
Atgoin headphones, which had 927
reviews, appeared at the top in
non-sponsored search results.
It is unclear how Atgoin obtained the flood of positive reviews.
Atgoin on its website says it offers
consumers “free and exclusively
discounted samples” in return for
“your valued, honest feedback” —
language that Amazon said broke
its policies. Atgoin did not respond
to a request for comment through
its Amazon seller page or its website. After The Post’s queries, Amazon removed Atgoin as a seller.
Amazon’s ban has not cut down
rotest organizers say they hope
to sustain the demonstrations
until at least mid-May, when Palestinians commemorate what they
call the Nakba, or catastrophe,
marking the flight and expulsion of
an estimated 700,000 Palestinians
seven decades ago upon Israel’s
creation.
The numbers of protesters,
though, are declining with the passing weeks, and the toll of the demonstrations continues to rise. More
than 1,500 Palestinians have been
shot in the past month.
And none of this is kick-starting
the economy.
Wissam Sabah, 34, runs a mechanics shop and imports building
materials in Rafah, a city in southern Gaza.
He pulls out a wad of bounced
checks from people who owe him
money.
“See all this? All paper, no cash,”
he said. He said he was taking the
checks to the police to file a report.
Construction is virtually at a
standstill, he said. International aid
to the territory is declining, and just
over half of the $5.4 billion dollars
pledged for Gaza’s reconstruction in
2014 has been delivered, according
to the World Bank.
Tragically, Sabah and others here
say, another economic solution exists.
“When there’s a war, they pay
attention,” he said. “When there is
destruction, there will be reconstruction.”
loveday.morris@washpost.com
Ruth Eglash in Jerusalem contributed
to this report.
on paid reviews so much as pushed
them into the shadows, say sellers
and researchers.
In February, there were nearly
100 Facebook groups, split up by
geographic region and by product
categories, in which Amazon merchants actively solicited consumers to write paid reviews. One such
group had over 50,000 Facebook
members until Facebook deleted it
after The Post’s inquiry. There are
also Reddit boards and YouTube
tutorials that coach people on how
to write reviews. Websites with
names such as Slickdeals and
JumpSend let merchants give out
discounted products, using a loophole to get around Amazon’s ban.
Merchants seeking to defraud
Amazon have flocked to Facebook
in particular, DiResta said.
Last year, DiResta began studying and joining Amazon reviewer
groups on Facebook. Her first act
in the groups was to write “interested” next to a post describing a
pair of Bluetooth headphones for
$35.99. Almost immediately, a
Facebook user purportedly named
SC Li sent her a direct message,
calling her “dear” and asking for a
link to her Amazon profile. If she
reviewed the headphones, SC Li
said, he would reimburse her via
her PayPal account.
Within an hour of getting SC Li’s
message, DiResta got a slew of
direct messages from other sellers,
asking her to review tea lights,
containers, shower caddies, badge
holders, sanding discs, rain ponchos, pocket-size vanity mirrors
and butterfly knives. The messages
came in so quickly, she said, she
barely had time to respond.
DiResta spent three months
monitoring the groups. She observed the sellers using tactics to
avoid detection by Amazon, such
as focusing on reviewers who have
a long history of writing Amazon
reviews. The sellers asked her for
screen images showing when she
started her profile.
DiResta found that many of the
Facebook accounts had no friends
on the social network. Their only
Facebook posts were about cheap
products, and their profile pictures
included stock photos. A reverse
image search on SC Li’s profile
photo, of a man on a beach, for
example, revealed a stock photo
called “seaside man” that appeared
on various Chinese-language lifestyle websites, an indication of a
fake profile.
Reviewers “just see it as a way to
make extra money,” DiResta said.
“The question is why doesn’t Amazon crack down more? These communities are not a secret.”
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com
craig.timberg@washpost.com
KLMNO
METRO
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
High today at
approx. 2 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
54 57 57 56°
°
°
°
59°
Precip: 65%
Wind: ESE
8-16 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
SU
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
At this monthly music fest
in Hyattsville, the tunes —
and the performers — are
all classics. B3
A little-known state
legislator outraised his
GOP primary rivals in the
U.S. Senate race. B3
Army Gen. Michael D.
Healy became a Special
Forces legend for his
leadership and bravery. B6
Ride
hailing
surges
in D.C.
MAJOR INCREASE IN
TAX REVENUE, TRIPS
Officials see industry as a
Metro funding source
BY
Bearing witness to the Holocaust
Amid rising anti-Semitism, survivors share memories of horror
F AIZ S IDDIQUI
D.C.’s ride-hailing market has
exploded over the past three years,
more than quadrupling since late
2015 as Metro and taxi ridership
have steadily fallen, statistics
show, a sign that Uber and Lyft are
probably creating thousands of
new vehicle trips in the city, officials and analysts say.
New figures provided by the
office of D.C. Mayor Muriel E.
Bowser (D) show that taxi ridership has fallen 31 percent, or about
6 million trips, since the ride-hailing boom began in late 2015.
Metro hired a consultant last
year to build ridership models that
take into account the impact of
ride-hailing services as part of the
agency’s effort to determine the
sources of its ridership decline;
average weekday ridership is
down about 135,000 riders from
peaks a decade ago.
Revenue the city collects from a
ride surcharge shows how quickly
the ride-hailing services have taken off. The app-based services are
generating as much tax revenue
for the city — about $4.5 million a
year — as taxis did in 2015 with a
25-cents-per-ride surcharge. The
1 percent ride-hailing fee generated about $875,570 in 2015. It’s impossible to know how many rides
RIDE CONTINUED ON B2
They have lived so long they are
watching the world forget.
These Holocaust survivors — who
range in age from 79 to 101 — gathered
for an annual brunch Sunday in
suburban Washington, where they were
Petula
honored in the twilight of their
Dvorak
extraordinary lives for what they had
endured and how they had rebuilt in
America. There were white rose corsages and
boutonnieres, bagels and lox, a nice fruit salad.
But the past was not in the past. Hours before the
gathering, a neo-Nazi rally was held in Georgia that
ended with the burning of a giant swastika. In August,
the Holocaust survivors watched white supremacists
and neo-Nazis march in Charlottesville, chanting
chilling anti-Semitic messages right out of the Hitler
playbook: “Jews will not replace us” and “Blood and
soil.”
Edith Mayer Cord, 90, who was born in Vienna and
spent her youth hiding and then escaping while family
members were taken to Auschwitz, said she never
imagined Nazi flags would fly in America in her
lifetime. Or that rising anti-Semitism would be part of
the national conversation.
“No. I never,” Cord said. “Not in this country.”
“I thought it was finished,” she said.
Yet over the weekend, President Trump tweeted
DVORAK CONTINUED ON B2
Pr. William
may raise
tax on data
centers
Plan could hold political
benefits for Stewart in
pursuit of Senate seat
BY
PHOTOS BY OLIVER CONTRERAS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
precautions weren’t enough to
keep her former boyfriend, Donald Hairston, from slipping into
her home early the morning of
June 19, 2016, passing the two
dogs that knew him, walking into
Goodloe’s second-floor bedroom
and shooting her as she lay in bed
in her pajamas.
“Stephanie Goodloe wanted
freedom,” Assistant U.S. Attorney
John Timmer said Monday during the first day of Hairston’s trial
in D.C. Superior Court.
“She wanted freedom for herself, freedom for her little girl,
freedom from this man, Donald
Hairston. And when he didn’t get
Prince William Board of County Supervisors Chairman Corey A.
Stewart wants to sharply raise
taxes on data centers and other
businesses that rely heavily on
computer equipment so that Virginia’s second-largest jurisdiction can fix aging schools and ease
the tax burden for strapped local residents.
The proposal, which targets
one of the state’s most powerful
industries, could also help Stewart shore up his populist credentials as he campaigns for the Republican nomination to take on
Sen. Tim Kaine (D) in November.
It will come up for a vote Tuesday night, when the eight-member county board adopts a $1.2
billion budget for next fiscal
year. County lawmakers appear to
be evenly split on the plan, which
would require a majority vote to
pass.
Prince William’s personalproperty tax rate for “computers
and peripherals” is currently
$1.25 per $100 of assessed value,
roughly a third of the tax rates for
the same category in Fairfax, Loudoun and Arlington counties.
It was set in the 1990s to try to
lure AOL, Stewart said. Any increase in the tax would disproportionately affect data centers, a
growing industry in Prince William County that already gener-
GOODLOE CONTINUED ON B4
TAXES CONTINUED ON B4
TOP: Josiane Traum, 79, shares her story Sunday during a brunch honoring Holocaust
survivors at the Progress Club in Rockville. ABOVE: A map shows where survivors were
born, along with the locations of concentration camps.
Va. teens notch win on mental health Terrified girl’s 911 call
opens D.C. murder trial
Lobbied for by students,
BY
D EBBIE T RUONG
Lucas Johnson’s résumé is
characteristic of any high-achieving high school senior.
There’s the raft of Advanced
Placement classes, a dozen during his four years at Monticello
High School in Virginia’s Albemarle County. There are the extracurriculars — tutoring and
Model United Nations and student council and cross-country.
During his junior year, there
was the stress that accompanied
all of it — stress that, at times,
made him ask: “What is the point
of all of this?” The 18-year-old
witnessed distress among his
peers, too — troubling Facebook
and Instagram posts, bullying
that went unaddressed, students
law requiring instruction
in schools passes easily
without a place to turn.
So Johnson and two other Albemarle County students, Alexander Moreno and Choetsow
Tenzin, sought to fix that. They
lobbied for more mental health
resources in their schools before
setting their aim higher: a law
requiring mental health instruction for Virginia’s ninth- and
10th-graders.
The legislation sailed through
the House and Senate and was
signed into law by Gov. Ralph
Northam (D) last month.
National statistics align with
the students’ experience: Up to
1 in 5 adolescents between the
ages of 13 and 18 live with a
mental disorder, according to the
U.S. Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention. A study published in the March issue of the
Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry found that half of U.S.
children who receive mental
health services get them at
school.
The Albemarle teens hope to
reduce the stigma they said surrounds seeking help for mental
STRESS CONTINUED ON B4
Texting 911: New measure was
Centreville students’ idea. B2
BY
K EITH L . A LEXANDER
Stephanie Goodloe did everything she could to keep herself
and her 11-year-old daughter safe
from a man authorities described
as an obsessive and vengeful
ex-boyfriend.
Goodloe sought a court restraining order. She had the locks
to her Southeast Washington
home changed. She told friends
and family members each time
her former boyfriend allegedly
made a threatening phone call,
sent a text message or came to
her home. And she owned two pit
bulls that barked at everyone.
But prosecutors say Goodloe’s
A NTONIO O LIVO
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
PETULA DVORAK
As Holocaust survivors speak up, we must bear witness
DVORAK FROM B1
about “Sleepy eyes Chuck Todd,”
the NBC “Meet the Press” host
who is Jewish. That is one of
Trump’s favorite insults for Todd
and one of the descriptions that
has been hurled at Jews in the
past. It has been on horrifying
“How to Spot a Jew” lists since
World War II and all over racist,
white nationalist websites.
Trump has been accused of
anti-Semitism before, especially
in the wake of Charlottesville.
Though the president has Jewish
grandchildren, he seems to have
lots of sympathy for virulent antiSemites.
Then there is D.C. Council
member Trayon White Sr. (DWard 8), an elected official right
here in the nation’s capital, who
wondered aloud last month
whether the Rothschilds — a
wealthy Jewish banking family
often accused of controlling
governments — are somehow
controlling the weather, too.
After White was accused of
rank anti-Semitism, he launched
an apology tour and agreed to a
guided visit to the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Museum for some
much-needed education.
During the tour last week,
Washington Post reporter Peter
Jamison saw White insist that a
woman in a 1935 photo being
publicly humiliated and marched
through her German town by
Nazi stormtroopers was being
protected.
One of White’s aides, in front
of a photo of the Warsaw Ghetto,
likened it to “a gated community.”
The patient tour guide told them
it was “more like a prison.”
By then, White had ditched his
tour and his guides and left the
museum without explanation,
halfway through the visit.
Then, The Post’s Fenit Nirappil
OLIVER CONTRERAS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Rising anti-Semitism compelled Holocaust survivors such as Manny Mandel, 81, to speak and share their experiences during Sunday’s
brunch at the Progress Club in Rockville. There is a new urgency in remembering their stories.
learned that White had given a
$500 donation in January at a
Nation of Islam event where
Louis Farrakhan said, “Powerful
Jews are my enemy.”
When Joel Appelbaum began
the survivors’ brunch at the
Charles E. Smith Life
Communities in Rockville eight
years ago, it was in the spirit of
honoring the people and their
remarkable lives.
There were 50 of them, and
very few wanted to talk publicly
about their experiences, but they
gathered and told small snippets
of their stories to tablemates.
That is part of the survival,
packing it away. Because how can
you live a life of paying bills,
doing dishes, raising the kids and
sitting at a desk if you keep
remembering the Nazi
stormtroopers who machinegunned everyone in the house
while you — tiny, terrified you —
hid in the closet during the
bloodbath? If you keep lingering
on the moment when half the
people you were with were
marched out to the freezing river,
shot and thrown into the current
when you were just 5 years old? If
you remember the packed,
hellish train to Auschwitz, during
which 70 people in the train car
died and you were one of 40 who
survived — only to face the
horrors of a death camp?
There is a new urgency in
remembering those stories.
Two-thirds of American
millennials polled did not know
what Auschwitz is, and
22 percent had not heard of the
Holocaust or were not sure if
they had, according to a new
survey conducted by the
Conference on Jewish Material
Claims Against Germany.
In their sunset years, the
incredible Maryland survivors
are opening up.
A handful of them went to the
microphone at the Progress Club
in Rockville on Sunday and told
small stories they had not told
before. Because something has
changed in this country.
Not that it is easier.
Josiane Traum, 79, still choked
up as she talked about the
incredible act of bravery by her
mother, Fanny Aizenberg, who
lived through all the signature
horrors of the Holocaust — from
beatings by the Gestapo, to time
in Auschwitz as a laborer and
medical experiment subject —
after giving her little daughter up
to people who said they would
hide her.
“My mother was so brave,”
Traum said. “My mother gave me
up and didn’t know if she’d ever
see me again. . . . I am really,
really lucky.”
They did see each other again.
They sat next to each other at the
brunch, representing the alpha
and omega of the survivors’ age
range, 79 and 101.
Aizenberg, the grande dame of
the survivor’s group who still
volunteers at the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Museum once a week,
refuses to be called a hero.
“People tell you how they
survived? They always ask me,
‘How did you survive?’ ” she said,
in between brunch bites. “No one
can tell you how they survived.”
“I don’t know how I survived,”
she said.
The horrors are so profound.
The stories grotesque and cruel,
especially when told in a setting
of china and stemmed
water glasses.
The horrors are not gone.
Never has that been clearer with
this group than now.
“Nazism isn’t something that
just happened one day because of
one bad guy,” Cord said. “All of
these ideas were there — all he
had to do was pick them up.”
All of those ideas are still here.
But we must never, ever let
anyone pick them all up.
Never again.
petula.dvorak@washpost.com
Twitter: @petulad
City o∞cials see potential Metro help via ride-hailing tax increase
RIDE FROM B1
the dollar amounts represent, but
they do show sustained growth for
the ride-hail services.
“We are talking about a tale of
two cities,” said Ernest Chrappah,
director of the D.C. Department of
For-Hire Vehicles, which regulates
taxis and ride-hailing services.
“The bulk of the [taxi] trips is no
longer there. . . . Most of the time,
you push your Uber app or your
Lyft app or your Via app.”
The figures at least partly explain why Bowser is turning to the
ride-hailing industry to raise money to fund Metro.
Bowser has proposed increasing
the tax on gross receipts on “forhire” vehicle services, passed on to
customers as city fees on trips,
from 1 percent to 4.75 percent. For
the customer, it would mean that a
dime charge on a $10 trip would
become a 47-cent charge.
The money raised from the tax
would cover about 10 percent of the
$178.5 million in annual funding
the city has pledged for its share of
the $500 million a year in dedicated funding for Metro.
Saesha Carlile, deputy budget
director in the city administrator’s
office, said the District’s revenue
projections are purely mathematical — the city does not have specific
data on how much business ride-
hailing companies are doing on
city streets.
“We know what the tax was, we
knew where the revenues were,
that was the starting point,” Carlile
said. “I think we were interested in
. . . from a policy perspective, making sure we had a dedicated, sustainable and fair way of funding
Metro.”
City budget documents show
that the District is expected to raise
about $17.3 million from the ridehailing tax in the next fiscal year,
with the amount gradually rising
to $19 million by 2022.
And while Chrappah and Carlile
say the District does not have data
on how many trips ride-hailing services are providing, analysts say
the information provides some insight into the extent of their operations.
Researchers and others also
worry about the impact that all the
extra Uber and Lyft vehicles could
have on city traffic, as mounting
evidence shows that ride hailing
increases congestion. One recent
study from a Boston-area planning
agency found that 15 percent of
ride-hailing trips “are adding cars
to the region’s roadways during the
morning or afternoon rush hours.”
“While the services are justifiably popular, their growing use
may result in negative outcomes
for traffic congestion, transit use,
and active transportation,” said
the study from the Boston region’s
Metropolitan Area Planning
Council.
That research mirrored data
compiled from studies in multiple
cities that show that 15 to 30 percent of ride-hailing customers
would have otherwise taken mass
transit if they weren’t using Uber
or Lyft.
The actual average cost of an
Uber or Lyft in the District is unknown; the companies declined to
provide the data. But the figure is a
critical piece of information in trying to determine how many rides
the services are delivering daily.
At 10 cents for a $10 trip, for
example, the $4.5 million in surcharge revenue would reflect that
ride-hailing companies are delivering about 45 million annual trips
in the city.
Bruce Schaller, former deputy
commissioner for traffic and planning in New York, said 45 million
trips would square with expectations for a city the size of Washington, with the number of accessible
jobs and restaurants in the region.
Schaller, who led a study titled
“Unsustainable” on the growth of
ride-hailing services, plugged it
into a model that showed a comparable ratio of trips to demand-driving factors such as jobs and restaurants in New York and San Francis-
VIRGINIA
co, too.
The average trip in New York is
about $18, he said, but Uber and
Lyft have incentivized ride hailing
through steep discounts on their
ride-splitting services, so the District would be expected to be
cheaper — in the $10 to $12 range.
At $10 a trip, Uber and Lyft
would average about 123,000 trips
per day here, about 6 percent of
the 2 million daily motor vehicle
trips that occur within the District, according to the Metropolitan Washington Council of Gov-
vehicle-for-hire transportation in
Manhattan, his data showed,
where ride hailing makes up about
38 percent of the market. The District comes in at more than double
the share of Uber and Lyft trips —
79 percent — based on the ridehailing revenue, while San Francisco is most reliant on the services at 92 percent.
Whether the actual number of
trips is 40 million or 50 million, or
something else, however, Schaller
said the revenue figures illustrate
an obvious reality.
“Nobody knows the truth, except the person who
has the information. The disclosure [of average
fares] for public interest is necessary.”
Ernest Chrappah, D.C. Department of For-Hire Vehicles
ernments, though the figures are
an inexact comparison. That’s
about 28 percent fewer than the
number taken in San Francisco,
the ride-hailing mecca that is also
about 22 percent larger than the
District, population-wise.
Schaller’s model puts the District squarely between New York
and San Francisco in terms of reliance on ride-hailing services. Taxis are still the dominant mode of
“You just see this rocket lift off,”
Schaller said of the ride-hailing
market.
And because the rate of growth
outpaces the losses on the taxi
side, he said, many of the new
rides represent trips that are either cannibalizing transit ridership or would not have previously
been taken at all, a probable concern for transit planners.
Uber has shared limited data
with the District Department of
Transportation through Uber
Movement, an information-sharing platform that showcases insights such as vehicle travel time
and demand. At a joint event with
Bowser in Northeast Washington
this month, the company also announced a unique data-sharing
program called SharedStreets.
Under the pilot, which is beginning in Washington, Uber will
share its data on curb use to help
cities deal with congestion and
sustainability goals.
“Better understanding curb utilization can help cities around the
world prepare for a future where
more and more of us are accessing
transportation through a combination of shared modes, rather
than relying on our own vehicles,”
the company said in a blog post.
District officials welcomed the pilot, which includes DDOT and the
department of for-hire vehicles.
But, Chrappah said, there is
more data to be gleaned from Uber
and Lyft. Asked how many trips
the ride-hailing companies his department regulates are responsible for on D.C. streets, he said:
“Nobody knows the truth, except
the person who has the information,” he said. “The disclosure [of
average fares] for public interest is
necessary.”
faiz.siddiqui@washpost.com
VIRGINIA
Day-care teacher charged with assault Agencies will accept texts to 911 line
BY
J USTIN J OUVENAL
An assistant teacher with a
popular day-care chain in Northern Virginia has been charged
with sexually assaulting children
at a Bristow location, Prince
William County police said.
Taylor Keith Boykin, 27, of
Nokesville, Va., is facing eight
counts of aggravated sexual battery and indecent liberties by a
custodian in connection with
alleged touching of four children over the course of a year at
Minnieland Academy, police
said.
A 5-year-old girl told a parent
that she was assaulted at the
day-care center on March 26,
police said. The parent notified
the center and reported the
alleged incident to Child Protective Services, which opened
an investigation along with police.
During the investigation, police discovered three other children, all 5 years old, who allegedly were sexually assaulted by the
accused beginning in March
2017, police said.
Boykin is being held without
bond, and his next court date is
pending.
The case follows other trouble
for the chain, which has been
operating since the 1970s and
has more than 30 locations
across the outer Virginia suburbs
of the District.
Two other Minnieland workers at the Woodbridge facility
were convicted in 2016 of run-
THE POSTPOINTS HUNT
ning what prosecutors called a
“baby fight club.” The workers
were found to have encouraged kids to fight, fed them
Flamin’ Hot Cheetos, stepped
on their toes and sprayed them
in the face with the full force of
a hose. The abuse occurred in
2013.
Minnieland Academy said
Boykin was no longer working
for the company.
“Minnieland regrets that
this occurred and is cooperating
with local authorities in the
investigation,” a statement from
the day-care center said. “Due to
the nature of the incident and
the continuing investigation we
are limited in our ability to
comment further.”
justin.jouvenal@washpost.com
BY
D EBBIE T RUONG
Local agencies in Virginia
must accept text messages to 911
under a recently passed law that
was the brainchild of four Centreville High School students.
The measure, sponsored by
Sen. George L. Barker (D-Alexandria), emerged as part of a U.S.
government class assignment at
the Northern Virginia school.
Students worked in pairs to
identify and craft proposals that
address problems in the state.
This school year, two groups
joined forces after proposing
identical 911 texting bills. The bill
easily cleared the Senate and
House and was signed last month
by Gov. Ralph Northam (D).
For Daniel Strauch, one of the
students who lobbied for the legislation, the project marked an
awakening — he said he wasn’t all
that politically engaged or interested before.
“It definitely has inspired me
and changed how I feel about my
government,” he said.
Strauch spearheaded the legislation alongside fellow high
school seniors Arko Mazumder,
Thu Le and Rodolfo Faccini.
Mazumder, 17, tracked the legislation as it wound through the
General Assembly. The experience, which included testifying in
front of lawmakers, helped him
gain public speaking confidence
and showed how he could take a
role in government, he said.
“I’m seeing it all unfold in such
a spectacular way,” Mazumder
said.
For nearly a dozen years, Centreville government teachers
have selected a handful of the
most viable proposals and shared
them with Barker. The lawmaker
selects one each year to introduce
as legislation.
In an earlier interview, Barker
said he was drawn to the 911
texting bill because of its relative
simplicity, affordability and the
difference it could make in people’s lives, including those with
hearing impairments.
A few bills pioneered by Centreville students have become
law, including one that required
seat belts for children and another that raised penalties for
texting while driving.
debbie.truong@washpost.com
WHAT WILL YOU FIND?
The band Chaise Lounge is coming to town.
Sit back, relax and enjoy their sound
On May 29 at The Hamilton Live –
“Early stereo” music that’s sparking, alive.
When will the doors open for Chaise Lounge on Sunday, May 29
at The Hamilton Live?
Like historical shows, like Bedlam’s Saint Joan
By George Bernard Shaw? You’re not alone.
Catch it at Folger through June 10 –
A riveting play to see time and again.
How many actors perform over 25 roles in Bedlam’s Saint Joan
through Sunday, June 10 at Folger Theatre?
Most folks agree there’s no place like home
Unless they decide it’s time to roam
To Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C.
For The Wiz starring Scarecrow & Dorothy.
Who is the choreographer for The Wiz through May 12
at Ford’s Theatre?
(Hint: See Live.TheHamiltonDC.com for the answer.)
(Hint: See Folger.edu for the answer.)
(Hint: See Fords.org for the answer.)
E A R N 5 P O I N T S F O R E V E RY C O R R E C T R E S P O N S E : F i n d t h e a n s w e r s , t h e n g o t o w a s h i n g t o n p o s t . c o m / p o s t p o i n t s a n d c l i c k o n “ Q u i z z e s ” t o e n t e r t h e c o r re c t re s p o n s e s .
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
At this monthly music fest, the tunes and the performers are all classics
“It’s better to be
seen than
viewed,” Geneva
“Miss Gee”
Curry says.
Translation:
John
When you’re lying
Kelly's
in your casket, it’s
Washington no fun for
anyone.
But even better
than being seen: being heard.
It’s the fourth Sunday in April
and, like every fourth Sunday of
the month, a crowd has
descended on Gee’s, the club
Curry owns on 52nd Avenue in
Hyattsville, Md. From 4 to 8,
there will be a nearly nonstop
profusion of live oldies music
played by live oldies.
“Don’t call me a dirty old
man,” sings Robert “King
Snake” Joines, in white slacks
and straw fedora, black shirt
and two-tone wingtips. “I’m just
a sexy senior citizen. . . . Age is
just a number. Take my
number.”
Joines, 66, organizes the
monthly event. It started about
a year and a half ago, after the
death of singer Royal “Little
Royal” Torrence, James
Brown’s D.C.-based half
brother. A lot of local R&B
players had backed up Little
Royal over the years, and filling
a room with music and
musicians seemed like an
appropriate way to send him off.
“It’s so we can meet each
other without going to a
funeral,” says Mildred “Millie”
Russell, manager of the
JOHN KELLY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Robert “King Snake” Joines and Geneva “Miss Gee” Curry on Sunday at Gee’s Club, the Hyattsville,
Md., venue that Curry owns. Joines organizes a live music session at Gee’s on the fourth Sunday of
every month. “I just love the music and the atmosphere and the people,” Curry says.
Legendary Orioles.
There’s a $5 donation and a
cash bar. Often, the room is
packed.
“Wink, you going to play?”
Joines asks drummer Lawrence
“Wink” Mitchell, 65, who is
seated at a table near the dance
floor.
“I don’t know,” Mitchell says.
Russell laughs. “ ‘I don’t
know,’ ” she says. “He’s got his
sticks in his pocket.”
A cheer goes up when
“Dancing Tony” arrives. Tony
Artis isn’t a musician, but a
dapper octogenarian music fan
who with his wife, Maggie, still
goes anywhere in search of a
live band with a danceable beat.
Many of the performers are
veterans of the Chitlin’ Circuit,
the network of clubs that once
catered to black audiences.
“What’s special about this
place is there are so many
musicians,” says Greg Bruch,
bass player in the Chicken Head
Band. (“We bring the funkin
blues,” reads their business
card.)
And so many classic songs,
from “Mustang Sally” to “I Will
Survive.”
When it’s Barbara
Washington’s turn at the mic,
she sings a torrid “Let the Good
Times Roll” — “I don’t care if
you’re young or old, let the good
times roll” — before announcing
that she’s going to slow it down
so she can catch her breath.
“I don’t feel no pain when I’m
singing,” Washington, 77, says,
before crooning “At Last.”
Regardless of who’s in the
rotating cast on the bandstand,
they can stop and start on a
dime, reacting to a head flip or a
finger point from the singer.
Do they practice?
“No, no,” Joines says. “They
just come and sit in.”
“We just wing it,” Mitchell
says. “I don’t know what they’re
going to do when I get here.”
Everyone has played long
enough to understand the
musician’s creed: If you screw
up, just keep playing.
Curry is 81. She used to run
the 4400 Club on Rhode Island
Avenue NW, till the rent forced
her to look elsewhere. She’s
been in Hyattsville since 1995.
Now she has a small empire in a
light industrial neighborhood
not far from the BaltimoreWashington Parkway: the
nightclub, an adjoining liquor
store and a Jamaican carryout.
She lives in a house across the
street.
Says Russell: “Gee, she’s the
last of them.”
“I just love the music and the
atmosphere and the people,”
Curry says. “They’re so talented.
There are a few years that have
gotten in there, but the sound is
there. The love is there. . . . We
may not hear as well. We may
not see as well. But we’re still
breathing.”
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/johnkelly.
VIRGINIA
Legislator’s fundraising outpaces veteran challengers in GOP Senate race
Freitas, who announced
bid in January, took in
$343,712 in first quarter
BY
L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond — A little-known
Republican state legislator who
hopes to challenge Sen. Tim
Kaine in November outraised his
two GOP primary rivals in the
first three months of this year.
Del. Nicholas J. “Nick” Freitas
(Culpeper), in his third year in
Virginia’s House of Delegates,
took in $343,712 in the first
quarter, according to the most
recent reports filed with the
Federal Election Commission.
That is more than what Republican contenders Corey A.
Stewart and E.W. Jackson, both
veterans of past statewide races,
took in over the same period.
Stewart, chairman of the
Prince William Board of County
Supervisors who narrowly lost
last year’s GOP gubernatorial
primary to Ed Gillespie, raised
$219,952 between January and
March. Jackson, a Chesapeake
minister who was his party’s
nominee for lieutenant governor
in 2013, raised $137,078.
Freitas, a former Green Beret
who announced his bid in January, also had more cash on hand
than his rivals, with $251,694
going into April.
Stewart was the first of the
three to jump into the race, and
that head start has allowed him
to raise more overall. He has
brought in $608,662 since he
announced his bid in July.
Stewart spent $254,721 in the
first three months of this year,
leaving him $140,502 in the
bank.
Jackson had $35,495 in cash
on hand.
Stewart’s heavy spending represents a shift in strategy since
the gubernatorial primary, when
he was considered the underdog.
With provocative calls to preserve Confederate monuments
and crack down on illegal immigration, Stewart could largely
rely on news coverage and not
advertising to get his message
out in that race.
Now, Stewart is widely seen as
the front-runner, given how close
he came to toppling the betterfunded Gillespie, a former Republican National Committee
chairman who eventually lost the
governor’s race to Ralph
Northam (D).
Whoever wins the June 12
primary is likely to be massively
outspent by Kaine (D), a former
governor and his party’s candidate for vice president in 2016.
Kaine has raised $16 million
for the race, $2 million of it in
the first quarter of 2018. He had
more than $10.3 million on
hand heading into April, even
LOTTER I ES
Jackson drew considerable
support from out-of-state donors, including Lee Roy Mitchell
of Dallas, founder of Cinemark
theaters, who gave $2,500. Paavo Ensio, a retired Arizona mining executive, gave $2,700. He
also received $2,700 from William B. Holtzman, an oil company executive and father of state
Sen. Jill Holtzman Vogel (R-Fauquier), who ran unsuccessfully
for lieutenant governor last
year.
Kaine’s donors included Marilyn W. Bos, a Leesburg teacher
who gave $250, and John V.
Ceriale of Palm Beach, Fla.,
founder of Prospect Hotel Advisors, who donated $2,700.
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
L O C A L D I GE S T
VIRGINIA
Results from April 23
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Sun.):
Lucky Numbers (Mon.):
DC-4 (Sun.):
DC-4 (Mon.):
DC-5 (Sun.):
DC-5 (Mon.):
0-1-6
6-4-6-4
2-4-2-9-7
5-3-9
5-5-6
9-6-0-4
2-7-2-8
7-9-4-8-6
6-5-7-8-9
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5:
Night/Pick-3 (Sun.):
Pick-3 (Mon.):
Pick-4 (Sun.):
Pick-4 (Mon.):
Cash-5 (Sun.):
Cash-5 (Mon.):
9-8-1
6-2-6-5
7-8-2
3-1-9
2-6-1-8
3-3-8-5
3-5-8-11-24-32
1-10-11-12-29 *2
2-8-22-32-35 *37
4S-9H-4H-5C-5H
1-3-3
5-8-9-5
8-10-24-28-31
9-2-1
1-6-6
6-5-4-2
1-2-0-1
6-21-23-27-33
2-14-15-16-24
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
Lucky for Life:
MARYLAND
Mid-Day Pick 3:
Mid-Day Pick 4:
Night/Pick 3 (Sun.):
Pick 3 (Mon.):
Pick 4 (Sun.):
Pick 4 (Mon.):
Multi-Match:
Match 5 (Sun.):
Match 5 (Mon.):
5 Card Cash:
after spending $959,798 in the
first quarter.
Freitas’s donors included
N.W. “Hap” Chalmers, a retired
Dominion Energy employee,
and his wife, Rebecca, a Tidewater Community College professor. They each gave $2,700.
Travis Brown, a Midlothian,
Tex., doctor, gave $2,000.
Stewart’s contributors included L.R. Carr, a stay-at-home
mom from Shenandoah County
who listed her employer as “My
kids.” She gave $50. On the
higher end was Tony Lundy,
owner of a Danville company
that refurbishes commercial
trash bins, and Jongil Kim, a
Manassas developer. They gave
$1,000 and $2,500, respectively.
*Bonus Ball
16-21-22-47-52 ¶3
7-12-20-27-48 ‡13
‡Lucky Ball
¶Cash Ball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
THE DISTRICT
MARYLAND
Man dies 9 days after
collision on moped
3 killed in fire at group
home are identified
A Washington man died
Sunday after he was injured in a
collision this month while riding
a moped, D.C. police said.
The victim was identified as
John Henry Pelham, 59, of
Northwest.
Police said the crash occurred
about 3:40 p.m. on April 13 at
Seventh Street and Missouri
Avenue NW.
They said a car traveling west
on Missouri was turning left onto
Seventh as the moped was
driving the opposite way. The
vehicles collided, and Pelham
ended up in the street, police
said. He died nine days later.
Fire officials identified three
people who died this weekend in
a fire in a group home in Severn,
Md.
About 10:45 p.m. Saturday,
firefighters responded to a home
on fire in the 7900 block of Stone
Hearth Road, the Anne Arundel
County Fire Department said.
Four people escaped without
injury, and three died at the
scene.
The victims were identified
Monday as Walter McCardell, 61,
and William Garcia, 44, residents
of the home, and Barbara Brown,
65, an employee of the home and
a resident of Baltimore’s
Brooklyn neighborhood.
— Martin Weil
The home was operated by
Arundel Lodge, a nonprofit
working with families affected by
mental-health and substanceabuse problems.
Prince George’s County police.
While the mother was briefly
turned away, a man exposed and
touched himself in front of the
girl, police said.
— Justin Wm. Moyer
— Lynh Bui
Man exposed himself
to child, police say
Name of driver killed
in crash is released
Police are searching for a man
accused of exposing himself to a
child at a store in Maryland and
investigating whether the
incident is related to a report
from the same store in March.
The most recent incident
occurred about 7:30 p.m.
Saturday when a women and her
daughter were shopping at a
store in the 2200 block of
University Boulevard East in
Lewisdale, Md., according to
Police identified the man who
died after his car struck several
trees in Adelphi, Md., as Jose
Hernandez-Rojas, 26, of
Baltimore.
Hernandez-Rojas was driving
northbound about 4:30 a.m.
Saturday near the 8500 block of
Adelphi Road when his car left
the road and crashed into trees,
according to Prince George’s
County police.
— Lynh Bui
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THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
Pr. William computer tax proposal targets data centers
TAXES FROM B1
ates about $25.6 million annually
in tax revenue.
Stewart argues that bringing
Prince William’s tax rate closer to
those of neighboring jurisdictions would produce an additional $21 million, allowing the county to lower residential property
taxes by an average of $35 a year
per household, allocate $9 million for county schools and avoid
a slight increase in a levy for
emergency services proposed by
County Executive Christopher E.
Martino.
“We never brought it back up,”
Stewart said. “It’s time to do it.”
Supporters of the idea point
out the steadily rising number of
classroom trailers at some crowded schools. Opponents argue that
a tax increase would chase data
centers out of Prince William after the county has positioned itself as a prime location near Loudoun’s “Data Center Alley” in Ashburn, where nearly 70 percent of
the world’s Internet traffic flows.
Josh Levi, vice president for policy at the Northern Virginia Technology Council, noted that other
Virginia jurisdictions, including Henrico County and Virginia
Beach, have recently lowered
their tax rates for computer
equipment.
“There may be some shortterm gain, but we’d be suffering
some long-term pain because of
it,” said Supervisor Frank J. Principi (D-Woodbridge).
classroom sizes and affordable
homes.
“We’re talking about the citi-
“There are few things in politics more valuable
than making the case that you’re looking out for
the beleaguered taxpayer.”
Stephen J. Farnsworth, political-science professor at
the University of Mary Washington
Stewart shrugs off such arguments, casting his plan as a fight
on behalf of ordinary residents
for basic comforts like smaller
zens versus Amazon and Microsoft and Google and Apple,” Stewart said during a recent board
meeting where supervisors de-
bated the idea.
With the June 12 Republican
primary approaching, the plan is
something of a political gamble
for Stewart. It is opposed by both
the National Taxpayers Union
and Americans for Tax Reform,
key
conservative
advocacy
groups.
But data centers have become
an attractive political target in
Prince William — particularly on
the more conservative western
edges of the county, where residents fought against a Dominion
Energy power line route prompted by a data center complex
planned by a subsidiary of Amazon. (Amazon founder Jeffrey P.
Bezos also owns The Washington
Post).
Stewart may try to distinguish
himself from his primary-election opponents, including Del.
Nicholas J. “Nick” Freitas (R-Culpeper) and evangelical pastor
E.W. Jackson, by touting his effort
to cut taxes for constituents at the
expense of corporate behemoths.
“There are few things in politics more valuable than making
the case that you’re looking out
for the beleaguered taxpayer,”
said Stephen J. Farnsworth, a political-science professor at the
University of Mary Washington in
Fredericksburg. “The proposal is
a win-win. Stewart benefits if it
passes; Stewart benefits if it fails.”
antonio.olivo@washpost.com
Teen lobbyists hope law requiring mental health education reduces stigma
STRESS FROM B1
health. They also want to better
equip students with skills and
resources to cope with mental
health struggles.
“We know how private and
how difficult it can be to deal with
a mental illness, and we know
that people are not going to
always want to talk about what
they’re going through,” Moreno
said. “But we do want to make it
okay for people who are going
through something . . . to go and
seek out resources.”
It will be up to Virginia’s Board
of Education to determine how
the mental health mandate is
carried out, but, under the law,
the board must consult with
mental health experts and update
state standards.
Moreno and Tenzin first tackled the topic at a summer institute for high school students at
the University of Virginia. They
felt the issue was too pressing to
let fade.
“The problem itself is very
real,” said Tenzin, who attends
Albemarle High School. “We deal
with it daily, in our own schools.”
The pair teamed with Johnson,
who also participated in the institute, and worked through the fall
and winter, holing up in coffee
shops to plan.
The students first focused on
countywide initiatives, working
to ensure resources addressing
substance abuse, relationship
violence and other issues were
better publicized.
They pushed Albemarle Public
Schools Superintendent Pam Moran to include $160,000 in next
year’s proposed budget to add a
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam (D), left, addresses lawmakers March 10 at the Capitol in Richmond as they inform him they are ready to
adjourn their 2018 session. Among the laws passed during the session was one requiring mental health education in high schools.
mental health professional to the
school system.
In the fall, the school district
will introduce a freshman seminar intended to help students
navigate issues that may arise
during high school — a seminar
shaped with input from the three
students.
“Mental health is critical in a
day and age where our young
people have all kinds of forces in
play in their lives that can create
levels of stress, anxiety,” Moran
said.
The teenagers caught the attention of state Sen. R. Creigh
Deeds (D-Charlottesville), who
has focused on improving the
state’s mental health system
since he was stabbed by his mentally ill son, who then killed
himself.
Deeds, struck by the students’
empathy, knowledge and research, sponsored a Senate version of the students’ bill. Del. Rob
Bell (R-Albemarle) introduced a
companion bill in the House.
“When young people are at
that age when there’s a lot of
bullying, when they get it and
they understand, I want to encourage that,” Deeds said. “We
focus so much on the physical
health, we forget the brain is part
of the body, too.”
Charles Pyle, an education department spokesman, noted that
the state’s Standards of Learning
already include some mental
health education but also said
that the law provides an opportunity for the state to revisit those
standards and identify gaps.
Johnson, the Monticello student, said the current standards
only touch on mental health and
aren’t comprehensive.
The Albemarle County students have their own ideas for
what they would like to see
emerge from the law. They want
to understand the science behind
mental health, let students know
where they can turn in times of
trouble and shed negative connotations associated with talking
about mental well-being.
“The problem isn’t that students are doing too much,” said
Moreno, a senior at Western Albemarle High School. “The problem is that students are doing too
much, and they don’t have individuals in place that can help
them deal with the stress and
anxiety that come with that. A
bad day turns into a bad week
and turns into a bad month.”
debbie.truong@washpost.com
Murder trial opens with 911 call from victim’s terrified 11-year-old daughter
GOODLOE FROM B1
the control he wanted, it made
him mad,” Timmer said.
Hairston, 51, is charged with
first-degree murder. The trial before Judge Danya Dayson is ex-
pected to be a challenging one for
both federal prosecutors and defense attorneys. Hairston’s attorneys said their client had nothing
to do with Goodloe’s death and
that authorities immediately —
and incorrectly — focused on
Hairston as a suspect without
properly investigating others.
His attorneys stressed there is no
DNA evidence. They told jurors
the revolver that sent four bullets
into Goodloe’s head, back, right
arm and wrist has not been
found. And they said there is no
credible eyewitness.
But prosecutors say Goodloe’s
daughter does convincingly identify Hairston, a man she had
known for years, as the intruder.
In an unusual move during his
opening statement, Timmer
played the 911 call from the girl,
her panicked voice filling the
courtroom as she begged the
operator to send help. She described the “popping” sound
coming from her mother’s bedroom and hearing her mother cry
out for help.
Prosecutors are depending
heavily on the girl’s account.
With Goodloe’s daughter expected to take the witness stand in
the coming days, prosecutors
wanted the jury to hear her
initial fear and grief as well as the
identification she relayed to the
911 operator.
“I’m so scared. I’m scared.
Please come. I heard shots. I
don’t know what to do. I’m only
11,” she said in the 911 call.
After reciting her address, the
girl offered a key statement that
both prosecutors and Hairston’s
DONATE
YOUR CAR
attorneys say was critical.
“I didn’t see anything. My head
was under the covers. I think it
was a man. I think it might have
been my stepfather. Please help
me,” she pleaded. Timmer in his
opening statement said the girl
later told police she peeked out
from under the blanket and saw a
man, wearing a hood, walk past
her bedroom door. She said she
recognized the man as Hairston,
the prosecutor said.
Hairston, sitting next to his
attorneys, wiped his eyes as the
911 call was played.
Goodloe and Hairston began
dating in 2006. In 2015, prosecutors say, the relationship began to
unravel. Hairston began dating
other women, and Goodloe ordered him to leave her home. In
the weeks leading up to Goodloe’s death, Hairston began stalking her, sending her as many as
170 emails within a two-week
period, prosecutors said.
On June 8, 2016, Goodloe went
to D.C. Superior Court and secured a restraining order against
Hairston. In the court documents, Goodloe wrote that on
June 4, Hairston came to her
house, banged on the door and
shouted for her to come outside.
She said he returned three times,
and when she finally left her
house, she found the tires slashed
on her Chevrolet Suburban.
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FAMILY PHOTO
Prosecutors say Stephanie Goodloe of the District was killed by her
former boyfriend, Donald Hairston, who denies the charge.
On June 17, two days before
Goodloe was killed, Hairston
sent a final text with the message
“No more.” Hairston then, according to prosecutors, called
Goodloe at her job and said, “If I
have to go to jail, I don’t care.”
On June 20, just one day after
Goodloe was killed, she was
scheduled to appear in court to
apply for a year-long restraining
order beyond the initial one.
“The evidence will show this
was a meticulously planned execution,” Timmer said.
Hairston’s public defender
Lauren Johnson argued that police failed to investigate other
leads as to who might have had a
motive to kill Goodloe, including
an unidentified person, Johnson
said, who stood to secure a
$30,000 payout as a beneficiary
in Goodloe’s death.
Johnson acknowledged Hairston’s behavior while he was with
Goodloe that resulted in the
restraining order, but insisted
that behavior did not equate to
murder.
“Mr. Hairston did things that
were not acceptable in his relationship with Ms. Goodloe,”
Johnson said. “But he did not kill
her just steps away from the little
girl who he considered his
daughter. The prosecution got
this wrong. Convicting an innocent man for a terrible crime that
he did not commit will not undo
this tragedy.”
keith.alexander@washpost.com
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
THE DISTRICT
No reprimand for lawmaker after donation at event featuring anti-Semitism
BY F ENIT N IRAPPIL
AND P ETER J AMISON
The D.C. Council will not reprimand member Trayon White Sr.
(D-Ward 8), after he donated $500
from his constituent services fund
to a Chicago event where Nation of
Islam leader Louis Farrakhan denounced Jews, Council Chairman
Phil Mendelson (D) said Monday.
Just three of the council’s 13
members called for disciplinary
action against White after The
Washington Post reported Friday
that campaign finance officials
were inquiring about his $500 donation to the Nation of Islam’s
annual convention.
White was already under fire for
a video he posted to his Facebook
page earlier this year in which he
seemed to suggest that the Rothschilds, a Jewish banking family,
controlled the weather. He also
mentioned at a council breakfast
his belief that the Rothschilds control the federal government.
Council member Brianne K. Nadeau (D-Ward 1), one of two Jewish members, said White had
crossed a threshold with his donation to the Nation of Islam and on
Friday called for his censure for
“his misuse of funds in support of
anti-Semitism and homophobia.”
She was soon joined by members Mary M. Cheh (D-Ward 3) and
Jack Evans (D-Ward 2).
White responded with a 35minute Facebook video posted on
Saturday, in which he defended his
donation and vowed that his supporters would pack the District
government building if the council tried to censure him.
By Monday, it was clear he faced
no immediate consequences.
“The contribution is under investigation, and the time to react is
when we understand or get the
conclusion of that investigation,
which I hope is quickly,” Mendelson said. “But I do recognize the
inappropriateness of supporting
anti-Semitic organizations.”
Constituent services accounts
allow lawmakers to raise private
money to help needy residents
with such things as unpaid power
bills or funeral costs. The law requires spending to benefit D.C.
residents.
Nadeau could not be reached
for comment Monday.
Cheh and Evans dialed back
their calls for action. Cheh said the
council needs to make “some kind
of statement” condemning antiSemitism and disavowing White’s
financial support for Farrakhan
but wouldn’t commit to formal
action. Evans said he no longer
supports punishment after speaking with White for a half-hour
Sunday.
“We need to kind of ratchet
down the rhetoric, and all parties
involved need to understand each
other and really increase the dialogue going forward,” Evans said.
Council member Charles Allen
(D-Ward 6) has said the council
should wait for the investigation
into White’s donation to be completed before considering action.
Council member Brandon T. Todd
(D-Ward 4) urged “patience and
understanding” for White.
Council member Robert C.
White Jr. (D-At Large) on Monday
called the Nation of Islam donation “troubling” in a statement but
said nothing about penalties.
Members Anita Bonds (D-At
Large), David Grosso (I-At Large),
Kenyan R. McDuffie (D-Ward 5)
and Vincent C. Gray (D-Ward 7)
had not returned requests for
comment since Friday.
The debate about censure followed an unusual visit White and
his staff made to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum last
week, at the invitation of the Jewish Community Relations Council
as part of an effort to repair his
relations with the Jewish community. But White abruptly left the
tour about halfway through.
D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser
(D) had sharp words for Trayon
White at an unrelated news conference Monday.
“The people of the District of
Columbia don’t tolerate hate or
anti-Semitism in any way, shape or
form, and I believe that the council
member has to make that abundantly clear as well,” Bowser said.
Under council rules, censure is
a “punitive action” reserved for
circumstances in which a member
exhibits a “gross failure to meet
the highest standards of personal
and professional conduct.” Imposing censure requires a two-thirds
vote of the council, or nine members. A less severe reprimand requires a simple majority vote.
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
peter.jamison@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Poll finds wide support for Republican governor in staunchly blue state
BY S TEVE T HOMPSON
AND S COTT C LEMENT
Gov. Larry Hogan remains
highly popular in Maryland, according to a new poll, despite
being a Republican in an overwhelmingly blue state in an election year when Democrats hope
to capitalize on opposition to
President Trump.
Sixty-nine percent of Marylanders approve of the way Hogan is handling his job, an increase from 61 percent in February, according to a Goucher College poll released Tuesday. It’s his
highest approval rating in the
Goucher poll since fall 2016.
He receives praise across party
lines: from 65 percent of registered Democrats, 64 percent of
MARYLAND
Mount
Rainier
police dept.
faces probe
BY
A RELIS R . H ERNÁNDEZ
AND L YNH B UI
Seven Mount Rainier public
safety employees have been
placed on paid administrative
leave as authorities conduct an
investigation into the police department, according to a statement city officials sent to residents
Monday afternoon.
The absence of the employees —
including one patrol officer — has
temporarily closed the police department’s administrative office
but should not affect patrol functions, officials said.
independents and 81 percent of
Republicans.
Hogan is vying to become the
second GOP governor in 60 years
to be reelected in Maryland,
where registered Democrats outnumber registered Republicans 2
to 1. He has repeatedly distanced
himself from Trump and Republicans in Congress.
So far, the strategy seems to
have worked. Seventy percent of
Marylanders
disapprove
of
Trump, nearly the opposite of
Hogan’s approval rating, according to the Goucher poll. But
47 percent of Marylanders polled
say Hogan has distanced himself
“about the right amount” from
Trump. Twenty-seven percent say
he’s distanced himself too little,
and 9 percent say too much.
A 53 percent majority think the
state is heading in the right direction; 28 percent say the state is on
the wrong track.
“If I were Larry Hogan, I’d
probably be doing somersaults,”
Todd Eberly, a political scientist
at St. Mary’s College of Maryland,
said after looking at the poll
results. “If there’s going to be a
blue wave, I think Hogan is in the
best position he could be in a
Democratic state if you were going to withstand that wave.”
Mileah Kromer, director of the
Goucher polling team, cautioned
that there remain plenty of undecided voters and — with the
wide-open Democratic gubernatorial primary still nine weeks
away — a long road to November.
“What probably concerns them
is the fact that approval isn’t
necessarily the same thing as
support for reelection,” Kromer
said. “We’re really far out. It’s not
like he can pack it in.”
If Hogan were pitted now
against one of the contenders in
June’s Democratic primary, between 44 and 47 percent of likely
voters say they would choose
Hogan, according to the poll.
Between 22 and 27 percent of
likely voters say they are undecided.
Hogan holds a 44 percent to
31 percent lead against Prince
George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker III, the Democratic
front-runner in other recent
polls. He leads by an identical
margin against former NAACP
president Ben Jealous.
The governor performed well
in the Goucher poll on the question of whether Marylanders
trust him or Democratic leaders
on several specific issues. Fiftyfive percent of Maryland adults
say they have more confidence in
Hogan to deal with the state’s
budget and finances, vs. 28 percent who had more confidence in
Democrats. He is more trusted on
crime (48 percent to 32 percent),
taxes (47 percent to 35 percent),
economic development (49 percent to 35 percent) and transportation and infrastructure (45 percent to 36 percent).
Democrats have a double-digit
advantage only on the environment (47 percent to 34 percent).
The poll revealed age and gender gaps that show that it is
crucial for Democrats to get millennials and women to the polls.
Hogan has a 24-point advantage over Baker among likely
voters age 55 and older, a higherturnout group in a nonpresidential election year. He trails his top
Democratic rivals by roughly 20
points among likely voters under
35. Hogan leads by about 2 to 1
among men, but is tied with the
Democrats among women.
The Goucher poll was conducted April 14-19 among a random
sample of 617 residents of Maryland. Full results have a margin of
sampling error of plus or minus
3.9 percentage points. The margin of error was 4.6 points among
the subset of 449 likely voters.
City officials did not describe the
nature of the investigation. Two individuals close to city government
said authorities are probing administrative concerns related to department finances and other issues.
The mayor and council of the
Maryland suburb just outside the
District voted unanimously to
place the individuals on leave two
weeks ago, city officials said.
Mount Rainier Vice Mayor
Shivali Shah said different individuals brought information to
the City Council about the police
department that prompted an internal investigation and referral
to state investigative authorities.
She declined to say what specifically caused the council concern.
“When this investigation is
complete, we plan on issuing a
statement to the public about it
because we believe in transparency,” Shah said.
First Sgt. Steve Malley, who has
worked for Mount Rainier police
for more than 30 years, was
named acting police chief, according to the city’s statement, which
did not describe the reason for the
change in leadership.
The city’s statement said the
“Maryland State’s Attorney’s Office” was conducting an external
investigation, but a spokeswoman
for the office said it was not involved in the matter. An investigator with the Office of the State
Prosecutor in Maryland said she
could “neither confirm nor deny”
its involvement.
Monday’s announcementwas
prompted by concerns within the
city that the police department
was closed and patrols had ceased,
Shah said. City leaders wanted to
reassure residents that little has
changed and that the police station is open even though the administrative office is closed.
The investigation sidelines
about one-third of 20 sworn and
civilian positions Mount Rainier
has budgeted for 2017, according
to city budget documents. City officials did not say how many of the
seven on leave are sworn officers.
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———— Trustee Sales & Legal Notices ————
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
3611 WARDER STREET NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20010
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on March 1, 2005, as Instrument
Number 2005028871, and in accordance Judgment filed on
March 14, 2018 in case 2016 CA 002495 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
MAY 22, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
3611 WARDER STREET NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20010, LOT
NUMBERED TWO HUNDRED FIFTY-THREE (253), SQUARE
NUMBERED THIRTY-HUNDRED THIRTY-FOUR (3034).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (5.875%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 31920
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
519 Q STREET NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20001
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on October 15, 2008, as
Instrument Number 2008107204, and in accordance Judgment
filed on March 29, 2018 in case 2015 CA 006728 R(RP) and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
MAY 22, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
519 Q STREET NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20001, LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-NINE (39), IN SQUARE NUMBERED FOUR
HUNDRED SEVENTY-SEVEN (477).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (7% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 31907
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12179352
12179349
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
4647 HILLSIDE ROAD SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on December 14, 2010, as
Instrument Number 2010110551, and in accordance Judgment
filed on March 23, 2018 in case 2015 CA 006462 R(RP) and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
MAY 22, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
4647 HILLSIDE ROAD SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019, LOT 117,
IN SQUARE 5363.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money
at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (4.875%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 25526
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12179356
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
obituaries
MICHAEL D. HEALY, 91
Legendary Green Beret with nerves of ‘absolute steel’
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
Michael D. Healy, an Army major general and highly decorated
counterinsurgency expert who
retired as the top-ranking Green
Beret and a legend in the Special
Forces, died April 14 at a hospital
in Jacksonville, Fla. He was 91.
He suffered a heart attack, said
his wife, Jacklyn Healy. He had
previously undergone two bypass
surgeries, and for years wore dog
tags that boasted an epithet to
ridicule death — which he had
evaded in combat during the Korean and Vietnam wars.
Gen. Healy bore scars on his
neck, face, arms, legs and stomach, many of them from covert
operations in which he parachuted into remote villages or trekked
behind enemy lines in the jungles
of Southeast Asia. The details of
nearly all his operations, which
took him from Cold War Germany
to lucrative oil fields in the Middle East, remain shrouded in secrecy. But his brilliance as a counterinsurgency expert was evident
in a career that saw him become
one of the first Green Berets to
achieve the rank of a general.
“There was always one thing
about Healy,” the novelist and war
chronicler James Jones wrote in
“Viet Journal,” his 1974 book
about the last months of the Vietnam War. “You knew his aggressive physical courage was monumental, and that his nerves were
absolute steel.”
The son of a Chicago police
officer, Gen. Healy enlisted in the
Army at the close of World War II.
He commanded a Ranger company during the Korean War and
became known as “Iron Mike” for
dodging enemy machine-gun fire
while leading an assault on a hill.
Gen. Healy joined the Special
Forces in 1953, one year after the
unit was formally created, and led
guerrilla attacks during the Vietnam War that made him an inspiration for John Wayne’s character
in a patriotic 1968 movie about
the conflict, “The Green Berets.”
He arrived in South Vietnam in
1963, as the United States began
expanding the number of military
advisers in the country, and
served five tours for a total of
eight years — a remarkable duration for a soldier of his rank, said
Keith Nightingale, a retired Army
colonel who served with airborne
and Ranger units in Vietnam.
“There were probably very few
people who understood the war
and its issues better than he,”
Nightingale wrote in an email.
Gen. Healy initially served as
JOHN F. KENNEDY SPECIAL WARFARE CENTER AND SCHOOL
Gen. Michael D. Healy, seen in 1970, was one of the first Green Berets to achieve the rank of a general.
His leadership in Vietnam made him an inspiration for John Wayne’s character in “The Green Berets.”
the operations officer and senior
American adviser to Vietnamese
Special Forces, organizing and
commanding a battalion-size
mercenary unit that bore his
name: The Mike Force, short for
mobile guerrilla strike force.
Mike Forces used indigenous
fighters and deployed in hot spots
across Vietnam, where they were
sometimes outnumbered 4 to 1 by
enemy troops.
He was named commander of
Special Forces in Vietnam in 1970,
in the aftermath of what Time
magazine described as “a Vietnam War scandal second only to
the My Lai killings,” when U.S.
troops massacred 500 unarmed
civilians.
The incident, known as the
Green Beret affair, centered on
the killing of an alleged Vietnamese double agent, who was taken
into custody by the Green Berets
and killed at sea.
The slaying became a national
sensation when the Green Beret’s
commander, Robert B. Rheault,
was arrested and charged with
murder and conspiracy. The
charges against Rheault and seven other Green Berets were dismissed, but resulted in Gen.
Healy’s taking over the Green
Berets at a time when Creighton
Abrams, the general overseeing
U.S. military operations in Viet-
nam, was said to be fed up with
the unit.
Gen. Healy “was able to resurrect [Special Forces] in Abrams’s
view,” Nightingale said, and effectively brought them “back into
the Army” during his nearly 20month tenure as the unit’s commander in Vietnam.
After the last U.S. combat forces were withdrawn from the
country in 1973, Gen. Healy
played a similar role as commander of what was then the
John F. Kennedy Center for Military Assistance at Fort Bragg,
N.C., the training center for Special Forces warriors.
According to the center, now
known as the Kennedy Special
Warfare Center and School, Gen.
Healy was “charged by the conventional Army to dismantle Special Operations.” Instead, he
worked to modernize the unit’s
training regimen, using his experience in Vietnam to create a
new emphasis on counterterrorism operations.
In 2015, Gen. Healy was named
a distinguished member of the
Special Forces Regiment, essentially the unit’s hall of fame.
“This is the highest honor that I
have ever received, but it’s not
really mine,” he said at the time.
“This honor belongs to every soldier I was ever honored and permitted to serve with. . . . They
gave me their hearts and a lot of
them, their lives. I never forget
them. Every night I speak to
them.”
Michael Daniel Healy was born
in Oak Park, Ill., on June 13, 1926.
His father was chief deputy of
detectives for the Chicago Police
Department and a disciplinarian
who insisted Gen. Healy and his
three brothers eat at the dinner
table in coat and tie, seated on the
edge of their chairs. The regimen
of Army life, he later quipped,
“was nothing compared to what
we had at home.”
He graduated from a Catholic
preparatory school in 1945, then
enlisted in the Army at Fort Sheridan, Ill., two months before the
Japanese surrender ended World
War II.
While serving with the Allied
occupation forces in postwar Japan, he met and married Jacklyn
Maddrix, whose father was a U.S.
prosecutor in the military tribunal that tried Japanese leaders for
war crimes. In addition to his wife
of 69 years, of Jacksonville, survivors include six sons; 10 grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.
Gen. Healy’s most renowned
engagement occurred on his first
day of combat during the Korean
War, when he parachuted onto
the roof of a thatched hut and
then rolled into a ditch in the
village of Munsan-Ni during an
assault on a nearby hill. Nine
members of his company were
killed in the first three minutes of
the attack, according to the Chicago Tribune.
Taking charge from a platoon
commander who refused to move,
Gen. Healy took four volunteers
and soon secured the hill.
Gen. Healy said he killed four
or five North Koreans before he
was knocked down by a grenade
blast, which knocked his carbine
from his hands. A North Korean
soldier charged him and lodged a
bayonet in his leg. Weaponless for
the moment, Gen. Healy grasped
the North Korean’s hands to keep
him from striking again. An
American medic subsequently
shot and killed the soldier.
For his actions in the attack,
Gen. Healy was recommended for
the Distinguished Service Cross,
the Army’s second-highest honor.
He received the Bronze Star Medal, in what the Tribune described
as a case of military politicking
over which unit was supposed to
have taken the hill.
His other military honors included three awards of the Distinguished Service Medal, two
awards of the Silver Star, four
awards of the Legion of Merit, and
the Distinguished Flying Cross.
Gen. Healy went on to serve in
the office of the Army’s assistant
chief of staff for intelligence, as
head of the special warfare operations and foreign intelligence
branch. He also held several postings in Vietnam, including brigade commander with the 9th
Infantry Division and finally as
the top U.S. military official in the
country’s rugged Central Highlands.
In one of his last Army assignments, he oversaw joint military
maneuvers in Ankara, Turkey, before breaking his hip while riding
an Arabian stallion.
At the request of Jane Byrne,
Chicago’s first female mayor, he
served briefly in 1981 as the chief
of public health and safety for the
Chicago Housing Authority,
where he was tasked with stemming gang violence at the Cabrini-Green Homes and other housing projects.
He was offered the job within
weeks of being mustered out of
the Army, after reaching the mandatory retirement age for soldiers
who fail to become three-star generals. (“Mike didn’t have the West
Point ring, or the right schools,”
one retired general told the Tribune in 1981. “He’s from the old
school. He’s a fighter, not a manager, not a systems analyst.”)
Gen. Healy said he was angry
that his military career ended
when he was 54, and still felt he
had more to give. He soon got over
that, he told United Press International.
“My only regret is that I can’t
start all over again,” he said. “I’d
like to walk in the back gate at
Fort Sheridan, like I did almost 36
years ago, and say, ‘Yes, sir, I’ll
go.’ ”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
RICHARD JENRETTE, 89
Investment banker helped start trend in New York Stock Exchange
BY
L AURENCE A RNOLD
Richard Jenrette, a co-founder
of the first New York Stock Exchange member to go public, the
investment bank Donaldson,
Lufkin & Jenrette, died April 22 in
Charleston, S.C. He was 89.
The cause was complications
from cancer, according to Margize
Howell, co-president of the Classic
American Homes Preservation
Trust. Mr. Jenrette founded the
trust in 1993 to preserve architecturally significant homes he acquired, including Millford Plantation and Roper House in South
Carolina, Ayr Mount in North
Carolina, and Edgewater in New
York, which he purchased in 1969
from author Gore Vidal.
With William Donaldson and
Dan Lufkin, fellow graduates of
Harvard Business School, Mr. Jenrette opened the firm known by
the shorthand DLJ in 1959.
It first made a name for itself by
providing research on growing
companies not then covered by
most of its Wall Street competitors
— firms such as Xerox, one of its
first “buy” recommendations.
Before long, it had a client base
loaded with pension funds, mutual funds and other institutional
investors. “Institutions were paying massive sums in brokerage
commissions and getting nothing
back for it,” Mr. Jenrette recalled in
Eric J. Weiner’s 2005 book about
Wall Street, “What Goes Up.”
“So we offered them some real
research for their commission
fees. They were so tired of giving
business to Merrill Lynch and other firms that they began to put
business into us.”
DLJ grew as mutual-fund sales
and its attendant commissions
took off in the 1960s. Mr. Jenrette
served as chairman starting in
1974 and as chief executive.
In 1970, the firm sold shares to
the public, allowing the founding
partners to turn some of their
equity into cash. Mr. Jenrette said
RAY LUSTIG/THE WASHINGTON POST
Richard Jenrette, seen in 1996, founded investment bank Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette with fellow Harvard Business School graduates.
becoming a public company was a
goal since the firm’s founding. It
also ran counter to a New York
Stock Exchange rule prohibiting
members from going public. “Big
Board Defied by Member Firm,”
said the New York Times headline
when DLJ announced its plan in
1969.
The NYSE could offer only limited resistance. Its leaders, “while
appalled by DLJ’s gambit,” realized “that in order to continue
financing the growth of the coun-
try’s great businesses, Wall Street
needed more capital,” William D.
Cohan wrote in a 2017 retrospective for Atlantic magazine. “The
easiest and cheapest way for Wall
Street to get the capital it needed
was from the public, just as Wall
Street’s corporate clients had been
doing for more than a century.”
Other small Wall Street firms
followed DLJ by going public in
1970, and a year later, they were
joined by Merrill Lynch, Pierce,
Fenner & Smith, then the world’s
largest investment-banking firm.
When Goldman Sachs Group sold
shares in 1999, Wall Street’s conversion to public ownership was
largely complete.
At DLJ, Mr. Jenrette succeeded
Donaldson as chairman in December 1973 when Donaldson went to
work for Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger in the administration of
President Richard M. Nixon.
Donaldson later chaired the Securities and Exchange Commission from 2003 to 2005.
In 1984, when DLJ was bought
by Equitable Life Assurance Society, Mr. Jenrette was the sole original partner still at the firm.
He rose to chairman and CEO of
Equitable. When the insurer faced
a financial crisis in 1990, Mr. Jenrette cut $150 million in annual
costs, sold 49 percent of the company for $1 billion to Axa SA and
raised $450 million in an initial
public offering that was the biggest demutualization of a U.S. insurance company.
Mr. Jenrette retired in 1996, and
Credit Suisse Group AG bought
DLJ in 2000.
In “The Contrarian Manager,”
his 1997 book, Mr. Jenrette detailed his management philosophy of rendering competitors
moot by doing things differently.
“You are creating your own
market, your own niche where you
can excel on your own terms,” he
wrote.
Richard Hampton Jenrette was
born in Raleigh, N.C., on April 5,
1929. He graduated in 1951 from
the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill. He served in the Army
during the Korean War as a counterintelligence specialist, then
graduated in 1957 from Harvard
Business School.
He went to work in the research
department of Brown Brothers
Harriman, then became a portfolio manager. In his third year
there, he was approached by Donaldson and Lufkin about starting a
new firm. Mr. Jenrette said he was
the “token non-Yalie” with the trio.
At DLJ, Mr. Jenrette became
chief administrative officer, responsible for setting up clearing
and execution procedures. He edited research reports and set up
what became the firm’s investment arm, Alliance Capital Management LP, which in 2000 acquired Sanford C. Bernstein Inc. to
form AllianceBernstein Holding
LP. To help create DLJ, Mr. Jenrette borrowed his share of partnership costs from friends. The
three founders also tapped 10 former classmates to chip in capital.
Mr. Jenrette recalled: “I remember someone I worked with at
Brown Brothers said to me, ‘Dick,
you’re crazy. Don’t you know there
have been no new firms since
1932?’ But I am a contrarian, so the
idea appealed to me.”
Mr. Jenrette’s partner, William
L. Thompson, died in 2013, according to the New York Times. He
had no immediate survivors.
— Bloomberg News
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
GOODMAN
TURNER
Today recalls sad memories of a loved one
gone to rest and those who think of you today
are those who loved you best.
Ellen, Anna Louise, Marguerite and the late
Clinton
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
HEMPHILL
TOMPKINS
MOORE
O'SULLIVAN
JOANNE MOORE "Nana"
January 6, 1949 – April 18, 2018
FRANCES ELAINE O'SULLIVAN
GROOMS
MARY ROBERT MATTINGLY TURNER
11/16/28 - 4/24/99
DEATH NOTICE
FREELAND
WILLIAM KEYSER GROOMS
We love and miss you.
From Your Loving Son
DEATH NOTICE
On Sunday, April 22, 2018, William Keyser
Grooms of White Plains, MD. Loving husband
of Mary Ann Lovejoy DePalma Grooms for 56
years; father of Kathleen Stewart and Anthony
DePalma; grandfather of Michael, Stephen,
Gavreil, Christopher, Cornell and Dakota; greatgrandfather of Lincoln, Sawyer, Anthony and
Shelby. William's Celebration of Life will be
held on Wednesday, April 25, 2018 from 2
to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. at the GEORGE P.
KALAS FUNERAL HOME, 6160 Oxon Hill Road,
Oxon Hill, MD 20745. A Mass of Christian
Burial will be offered at St. Columba Catholic
Church, 7804 Livingston Road, Oxon Hill, MD
20745 on Thursday, April 26, 2018 at 10:30 a.m.
Interment Cedar Hill Cemetery.
www.KalasFuneralHomes.com
On Wednesday, April 18, 2018, Nana, as she
was affectionately known, passed away peacefully in her bed in her home. She is survived
by her husband Calvin Moore; children Connie
(Fred Turner and Leo Watkins) DeeDee (Jeffery
Allen and Kevin London) and Nicole; brother
Marvin Carter (Lilly); sisters Ruth Walker
(Jimmy), Julia Lucas (Mack) She leaves to cherish her memory five grandchildren, nine greatgrandchildren and a host of family, relatives
and friends. Celebration of Life Services, 11
a.m. Monday April 30, 2018 at the VFW Hall,
9800 Good Luck Rd, Lanham, MD 20706. Funeral services provided by Roger J. Mason Funeral
Services.
B7
RE
ALICE G. FREELAND
Entered into eternal rest on Monday, April
16, 2018. Mrs. Freeland may be viewed at
Stewart Funeral Home, 4001 Benning Rd. NE on
Thursday, April 26, from 10 a.m. until service 11
a.m. Interment at Lincoln Memorial Cemetery.
RUTHIE M. GOODMAN
July 13, 1955 - April 24, 2013
EZ
On Saturday, April 21, 2018, Frances Elaine
O'Sullivan of Gaithersburg, MD. Beloved wife
of the late Patrick J. O'Sullivan; loving mother of
Kathleen A. Hurley (Bill) and the late Patrick J.
O'Sullivan (Jennifer). Also survived by six grandchildren. Friends may call at St. John Neumann
Catholic Church, 9000 Warfield Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20882 on Friday, April 27, 2018 from
10 a.m. to 11 a.m.; where a Mass of Christian
Burial will be offered at 11 a.m. Interment
Ft. Lincoln Cemetery, Brentwood, MD. In lieu
of flowers, contributions may be made in her
name to Daughters of Charity, 333 South Seton
Avenue, Emmitsburg, MD 21727, Attn: Rachell
Wivell. Please sign family guest book at:
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
WELDON LEE HEMPHILL, SR.
MORRIS
TANSILL
DIANA M. TANSILL
On Tuesday, April 17, 2018. Sister of Stuart
Pauley “Pete” Tansill; aunt of Elizabeth,
Stuart Pauley “Peter” (Tori), Elizabeth and
Sara; great-aunt of Tyler Krejci, Briar Nolan
and Sailor Newton Tansill. Celebration on
Saturday, April 28, noon to 2 p.m. at
Diana’s home in Fredericksburg, Virginia.
GUADAGNOLI
Entered into eternal rest on Saturday, April 7,
2018. He is survived by four daughters, Senora,
Brenda, Lisa, and Kim; five sons, Weldon Jr.,
Christopher, Darrel, James and Reginald; 21
grandchildren; 22 great-grandchildren; sister,
Anita; two brothers, George and Warren; former wife, Martha and a host of other relatives
and friends. Mr. Hemphill will lie in state at
Victory Christian Ministries, 3911 St. Barnabas
Rd., Suitland, MD on Thursday, April 26 from
10 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. Interment at
Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery at 1:45 p.m.
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
LONG
CONDOLENCE
WILBORN
GREENBERG
RONALD E. MORRIS (Age 87)
SYLVIA GREENBERG
In Memoriam
The United States Holocaust Memorial
Museum mourns the loss of Sylvia
Greenberg, who with her late husband
Harold were among the very first Museum Founders and lead donors who
helped construct the Museum building.
She remained devoted to advancing
the cause of the Museum’s educational
programs.
We send our heartfelt condolences to
her children, Paul Greenberg, Beverly
Halpert and Kenneth Greenberg and the
entire Greenberg family.
Howard M. Lorber, Chairman
Allan M. Holt, Vice Chairman
Sara J. Bloomfield, Director
DEATH NOTICE
BLACK
ROBERT L. BLACK
On Thursday, April 19, 2018, ROBERT L. BLACK
of Fort Washington, MD was called to rest.
Cherishing precious memories of him are his
wife, Linda Ann Black; daughter, LaTonya Watson (David) and son, Robert L. Black, II; sisters,
Dorothy Dixon (Samuel), Gertrude King (David),
Mary Black-Champion (Leonard) and Myria
Giles (Michael); one brother, Ashanti Black;
three grandchildren, Zhane' Black, Laylah and
Malachi Watson; and a host of other relatives
and friends. Family will receive friends on
Thursday, April 26, 2018 at Ebenezer AME
Church, 7707 Allentown Rd., Fort Washington,
MD from 10 a.m. until time of funeral service at
11 a.m. Interment Arlington National Cemetery
at a later date. Arrangements by STRICKLAND
FUNERAL SERVICES.
www.stricklandfuneralservices.com
CLANCY
TYRONE CLANCY (Age 39)
Died suddenly on April 12, 2018 at his home in
Riva, MD. Ty was the devoted father of Daphne,
age 10, and the beloved son of Martin and Mary
Dee Clancy. He was predeceased last year by
his wife, Georgeanna (neé Tsamoutalis).
A former Marine, Ty served with Fox Co., 2nd
Battalion, 5th Marines. His USMC brothers from
Fox Co. will be among his pallbearers.
A Mass of the Resurrection will be offered at
St. Mary’s Church, 109 Duke of Gloucester St.,
Annapolis MD at 9 a.m. on Saturday, April 28.
Interment will be private.
COLLIER
SUSAN R. GUADAGNOLI
(Age 75)
Of McLean, Virginia, passed away peacefully
in her home surrounded by loved ones on
April 18, 2018. She is the beloved wife of
the late Louis George; Loving mother of Merisa
Bainbridge and Amy Briggs; Cherished Nana
of Madeline Sue McFarlin and Jack Brycen
McFarlin; Dear sister of the late George
Chisholm Rush; Loving aunt of many nieces
and nephews.
Sue led a very active life. Through the years
she worked as a teacher, dedicated her time in
volunteering, and loved spending time caring
for her family and in particular, her grandchildren. She was also a very devoted and
active member of St. Luke’s Parish in McLean.
A memorial mass will be held on Friday, April
27, 2018 at 11 a.m. at St. Luke Catholic
Church, 7001 Georgetown Pike, McLean, VA
22101. Memorial gifts in honor of Susan may
be directed to support Dr. Evan Lipson’s
melanoma research at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. Gifts may be mailed indicating designation to the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, PO Box 17029 Baltimore,
MD 21297-1029 or make a gift online. Memories and condolences may be shared at
www.murphyfuneralhomes.com
HASKINS
JEFFREY MILTON HASKINS, MD
(Age 64)
Of Tappahannock, VA passed away at his
residence Monday, April 16, 2018. He was
a urologist for Riverside Health Systems. Jeff
was a graduate of Howard University, GW
Medical School and UNC-Chapel Hill. He was
a father, grandfather, friend, golfer and sailor.
Jeff loved his family and friends. He was a
dedicated physician whose passion was caring
for his patients and giving to the community
of Tappahannock, which he loved and where
he was loved by many. Jeffrey was preceded
in death by his oldest son, Jeffery. He is
survived by his son, Christopher Lyons Haskins
of Washington, DC; two daughters, Julia Haskins of Washington, DC and Patti Swayne of
Maryland and his granddaughter, Eve HaskinsBraden. A Celebration of Life service will be
held 11 a.m., Thursday, April 26 at Chews
Memorial United Methodist Church, 492
Owensville, Rd., Harwood, MD 20776. Faulkner
Funeral Homes, Marks-Bristow Chapel, Tappahannock is assisting the family.
HEMSLEY
ROSCOE L. HEMSLEY
On Friday, April 13, 2018. Loving father of
Roscoe L. Butler, Keesha L. Brown and Kenneth
J. Brown. He is also survived by other relatives
and friends. Mr. Hemsley may be viewed at
STEWART FUNERAL HOME, 4001 Benning Rd.,
NE on Tuesday, April 24 from 10 a.m. until
funeral services at 11 a.m. Interment Historic
Congrestional Cemetery.
LILLIAN E. COLLIER
"Bette" (Age 97)
On April 11, 2018, in Richmond, VA. Devoted
wife of 70 years to Francis W. Collier, (deceased
2012): survived by their son and daughter-inlaw, George and Malinda Collier; daughter and
son-in-law, Jane and Tom Johnson; daughter,
Betsy Diaz; and grandchildren, Emily Johnson,
and Alexander Diaz. Bette Evans was born on a
family dairy farm in Norfolk, MA. She worked as
a draftsman for The Foxboro Company until she
met and married Frank Collier. Through the US
Army Air Corps and then the US Air Force they
traveled to assignments in Germany, Japan,
and the Washington, DC area. She enjoyed
living overseas and began collecting Hummels
while stationed in Germany. No matter where
their travels took them, she always made our
house a home. While living in Springfield, VA,
Bette was an early and frequent volunteer
at ECHO through the Springfield Methodist
Church, which provided food and clothing to
those in need. She was also an excellent
seamstress and baker.
Mom was a very loving mother and grandmother. She always had a smile on her face,
was glad to see you, and was extremely
patient and devoted to her family. For the
past 14 months, she was warmly cared for
at the Hermitage, a retirement and health
care community in Richmond. Until recently,
she spent many happy hours visiting various
nearby gardens, parks, and museums with
family members. Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden was her favorite place to spend time. She
died peacefully, surrounded by her family. We
will miss her always.
There will be a memorial service and burial at
Arlington National Cemetery later in the year.
In lieu of flowers, please send donations to The
Hermitage, 1600 Westwood Ave., Richmond,
VA 23227.
On Sunday, April 22, 2018 of Silver
Spring, MD. Beloved husband of
Gilda Petruccelli Morris; father of
Eugene Morris, Lawrence (Carole)
Morris, Andrew (Lee) Morris,
Claire (Michael) North, James
(Cristina) Morris, Richard (Kathy)
Morris and John Morris. Also survived by 18
loving grandchildren. Relatives and friends may
call at Collins Funeral Home, 500 University
Boulevard West, Silver Spring, MD, 20901 (Valet
Parking), Wednesday, April 25 from 7 to 9
p.m., and at St. Patrick's Church, Norbeck &
Muncaster Mill Roads, Rockville, MD, 20853,
Thursday, April 26, from 10:30 to 11 a.m.,
where Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Little Sisters of the
Poor, 4200 Harewood Road, NE, Washington,
DC 20017.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
MUSSELMAN
RICHARD HERBERT MUSSELMAN
Richard Herbert Musselman passed away on
April 20, 2018. He was born on May 25, 1949 in
Washington, DC to the late George and Louise
Musselman. He was 68 years old. In addition
to his wife, Marcia, he is survived by his sister,
Linda Birkenstock; sons, Kris Musselman, Keith
Musselman, Richie Hartman and Alan Hartman;
and six grandchildren. He also leaves behind
his dog, Sammy, his cat, Kiki, and all of the
squirrels and birds on Dorset Drive, who he
nurtured and cared for with great affection. He
was a lifelong Redskins fan. He was truly one
of a kind, and he will be greatly missed. Rich
was very creative and known to always have
the right tool for any task. If he didn?t have it,
he would make it himself. He could fix anything
and he went out of his way to help others
with his gift. We loved and depended on him
for so much. He was our hero. A visitation will
be Friday, April 27, 2018 from 1 to 2 p.m. at
Moser Funeral Home and a service following at
2 p.m. A burial will follow at Midland Cemetery,
Midland, VA. Arrangements by Moser Funeral
Home 233 Broadview Ave., Warrenton, VA
20186, 540-347-3431, online condolences can
be made at:
moserfuneralhome.com
William Louis Nack died peacefully at
home on April 13, 2018, with his family by
his side. Bill was the beloved husband of
Carolyne Starek, father to Emily, Rachel,
Amy and William, and grandfather to Abigail, Noah, Ayla, Autumn, Jackson and
Marcus, and brother to Dorothy Nack.
A memorial service for family and friends
will be held at St. Columba’s Episcopal
Church, Washington, DC, on May 7 at
12 noon. In keeping with Bill’s love for
the sport of racing, the family suggests
memorial contributions be directed to the
Secretariat Foundation, which supports
equine welfare through research, rescue
and retirement. Contributions can be
mailed to Secretariat Foundation, P.O. Box
4865, Louisville, KY 40204. Learn more:
Secretariat.com/foundation
DEATH NOTICE
At his request no formal arrangements are
being made; informal life celebrations may
take place in several states, at a later date.
It would please Larry to know his family
and friends will support each other and also
continue to support the causes they believe
in, working to make the world better.
To send online condolences, please visit our
website:
www.yanceyfuneralservices.com
LOWERY
BENNIE FOSTER BLAIR
Mr. Lowery was a 1936 graduate of Pennsylvania Avenue High School in Cumberland and a
1940 graduate of Western Maryland College
in Westminster now called McDaniel College.
He had a distinguished career in the Army
Air Corp. during WW II and after the war
was a commercial pilot for several airlines
flying around the world. He retired as a flight
navigator for Northwest Airlines.
Interment will be in Hillcrest Memorial Park. A
celebration of his life will be held at Asbury
Methodist Village at a later date.
Scarpelli Funeral Home, P.A. in Cumberland is
assisting with arrangements.
MICHAEL ALEXANDER COOKER
Michael Alexander Cooker died on April 18,
2018 at just 30 years old, but he packed a
lot of living into his short life. Some people
are content to love the ocean from their
beach chair. Michael loved the ocean from
his surfboard perched on the crest of a wave.
A casual stroll down a neighborhood street
is enough for most, but for Michael only a
careening skateboard would do. And why
would anyone just ride in an airplane when
they could jump out of one like Michael?
Michael lived his youth with joyful enthusiasm. He loved nature, hiking the Appalachian
Trail, music, art, technology, dogs and most
of all his family and friends. His huge heart
poured out love and loyalty. He dreamed big
and lived large.
Michael is survived by many loving family
members and friends. Cherished memories
of Michael will live in their hearts forever.
Services will be held at Galilee United
Methodist Church in Sterling, VA on Friday,
April 27, with visitation from 9:30 a.m. to 11
a.m., a service from 11 a.m. to noon, and a
reception from noon to 1 p.m.
Memorial contributions may be directed to
Galilee United Methodist Church.
Additional information and condolences
www.adamsgreen.com
SMITH
On April 17, 2018, in Bethesda, MD, beloved
wife of the late Thomas Smith; mother of
Linda Ritzenberg (Frank) of Reston, VA; Judy
Sears (John) of Prescott, AZ; Greg Smith
of Savannah, GA; Andy Alderdice (Kirk) of
Silver Spring, MD; and Jenny Nealon (Gene) of
Wimbledon, England. Her husband Thomas
and sons, Brian Smith (Chris) and Peter Smith
preceded her in death. She is survived by
her five children, 12 grandchildren, five greatgrandchildren, and numerous nieces,
nephews and other relatives.
A fourth generation Washingtonian, Pat was
class president at Central High School before
leaving for the University of Alabama and the
University of Maryland, where she graduated
with a business degree. Her first job was
with the Democratic National Committee,
In 2008, Pat and Tom moved back to Bethesda
to the Maplewood Park Place retirement
community, where she again enjoyed being
part of its growth via numerous committees.
Her friends and family will miss her dearly
and are grateful for having been part of her
life.
In lieu of flowers, please consider a gift in
Pat’s name to: Catholic Charities, Attn: Donor
Services, 924 G St., NW, Washington, DC
20001.
Phone: (202) 772-4300
https://www.catholiccharitiesdc.org/
A funeral Mass will be held at St. Jane
Frances de Chantal, 9601 Old Georgetown
Road, Bethesda, MD, at 10:45 a.m. on Friday,
April 27, 2018 with a gathering at 10:30 a.m.
at the church. Burial will be at a later date at
Arlington National Cemetery.
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BESSIE MAE McKELLAR
Born May 9, 1935 to the late Rev. Devine Gore
and Maggie Randall Gore. She departed this
life Friday, April 20, 2018 at her home after a
battle with Alzheimers disease. In addition to
her parents, Bessie is preceded in death by one
brother; two sisters,; and her daughter, Barbara
Ann McKellar. Deaconess Bessie is survived
by her devoted husband, Deacon Thomas L.
McKellar; two daughters, Twiller Collick and
Karen McKellar; two sons, Thomas J. McKellar
and Roderick L. McKellar; two brothers; three
sisters; two grandchildren; three great grandchildren, nieces, nephews, cousins and a host
of family and friends. Services will be held on
Thursday, April 26, 2018 at First Baptist Church
of Highland Park, 6801 Sheriff Rd., Hyattsville,
MD. Viewing 10 a.m., Service 11 a.m. Interment
at a later date.
TAYLOR
Remembering
Mom
on
MOTHER'S DAY
May 13, 2018
Deadline:
Saturday, May 12
2 p.m.
In 1949, Pat married Tom, beginning a happy,
productive and loving marriage of 67 years.
They started a family and a successful business, Security, Inc. An industry and community leader, Pat was the first woman named the
‘Man of the Year’ by the National Burglar and
Fire Alarm Association. and was later elected
as its president. She also held leadership
roles with many associations and charities.
PATRICIA M. SMITH
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
working on the convention that nominated
Harry Truman for President in 1948.
After the sale of their business to Honeywell,
she and Tom retired to Rehoboth Beach
where she enjoyed entertaining, playing
bridge, serving St Edmund’s Church on several committees, and spending time with her
many friends and ever-expanding family.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
McKELLAR
Michael’s untimely death on April 18, 2018
has left those who love him with the terrible
loss of a light burned out way too soon. But
for Michael, that day marks the beginning
of an eternal life of perfect joy with his
Heavenly Father. Michael believed in the Lord
as his personal savior, accepted Him into his
heart and now abides with Him in everlasting
peace.
Michael was born on September 29, 1987
in Arlington, VA. He grew up in Sterling,
VA and studied Digital Arts and Graphics at
Full Sail University in Orlando, Florida. After
college Michael lived in San Diego, CA and
Centerville, VA where he used his Digital
Arts skills in both private industry and as an
entrepreneur. He loved hip-hop and rap and
wrote and recorded numerous songs and
music videos.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
CURRENT 2018 RATES:
( PER DAY)
Mr. Lowery was born February 22, 1918, in
Cumberland, Allegany County, Maryland. He
was the son of Adam E. and Minnie Craze
Lowery. He married Marie Crawford Lowery on
December 26, 1976. She died on June 21, 2001.
Entered into eternal rest on Friday, April 13,
2018. Beloved husband of Rosa Blair. Also
survived by son, Bennie Foster Blair, Jr. (Nicole);
daughter, Kimberle Johnson (Gregory); granddaughter, Bronwynn; three sisters, Betty Ellison, Rosetta Jordan (Kenneth) and Patricia
Davis; and a host of other relatives and friends.
Friends may visit with the family on Thursday,
April 26 from 10 a.m. until time of service
11 a.m. at From the Heart Church Ministries,
5055 Allentown Rd., Suitland, MD. Interment
Maplewood Cemetery, Greensboro, NC on Saturday, April 28, 2018. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to the John A. Cherry
Scholarship Fund, 4949 Allentown Rd., Suitland, MD 20746. Services by HODGES &
EDWARDS.
A memorial service will be held at All Saints
Church in Chevy Chase, MD at 3 p.m. on
Saturday, April 28. In lieu of flowers, donations in his honor to the Southeast White
House (DC Dream Center) are encouraged.
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
COOKER
cer and football with the same group for
about 40 years on Sunday mornings. He
was an adventurer who enjoyed skydiving
(over 200 jumps), geocaching, scuba diving,
basketball, skiing, and hiking with his dog
Molly. He loved music and dancing and was
adored by his canine companions. Larry was
active in Amateur Radio communities and
ran groups in the Washington DC area and
was involved with a local Bakersville,NC
group. He was instrumental in setting up
radio antennas to facilitate emergency communications. He was predeceased by Jingles, Muffin, Arf and Murphy.
Of Burnsville, NC, passed away on Monday,
April 16, 2018 unexpectedly after a brief
illness at Mission Memorial Hospital in
Asheville, NC. A native of Wilmington, IL,
he was born in Joliet, IL to the late Frank
and Winnifred Goodwin. He served in the
Air Force (Montauk NY) during Vietnam and
worked on radars. He received a M.S. in
Computer Science from Binghamton University and worked for many years providing
computer programming support services.
Larry was a passionate political activist and
frequently attended marches in Washington
DC with his wife. He was an avid sports
enthusiast and played Ultimate Frisbee, soc-
On Monday, April 16, 2018.
Beloved mother of Tuulikka
(Myron), Ernest II (Kimberly).
Also survived by four grandchildren, Antwan, Ernest III,
Christian, and Ethan, along
with a host of other relatives
and friends. Friends may call on Tuesday,
April 24, 2018, The Way of The Cross
Church of Christ, 1800 Hazelwood Drive,
Capitol Heights, MD 20747 from 10 a.m.
until time of service at 11 a.m. Interment
Maryland Veterans Cemetery. Services by
POPE.
BLAIR
NACK
GOODWIN
LARRY GOODWIN (Age 70)
SHIRLEY FOSTER LONG
DEATH NOTICE
WILLIAM LOUIS NACK
He graduated from St. Christopher’s School
in 1965 and Virginia Military Institute in
1969, where he was a starting defensive
tackle for the football team. He proudly
served as a Second Lieutenant in the United
States Army and received a Bronze Star in
the Vietnam War. He had a lasting career
in residential real estate and general contracting.
Tremendously supportive, Hugh was happiest surrounded by his wife, daughters,
family, friends, and dogs. He loved tennis,
swimming, skiing, being on the water in
Cape Cod, and music. Hugh was an avid car
enthusiast with a true passion for vintage
car racing. A man to be admired, he was
devoted to his church and giving back to his
community at the Southeast White House
in DC. Hugh was the epitome of charm
and will always be remembered for his wry
sense of humor, his warmth and kindness.
HARRY MOYER CRAZE LOWERY
DEATH NOTICE
Left to cherish his memories, is his loving
wife of 33 years, Karen Kleinsteiber Goodwin; sons, Devin Brock Goodwin of Mt. Airy,
MD and Ryan Logan Goodwin of Burnsville;
his twin sister, Linda Goodwin Traub (Jim) of
Monticello, IL and brothers, John B. Goodwin
of Wilmington, IL and Phil Goodwin (Chris),
also of Wilmington, IL. A number of nieces
and nephews and his beloved hiking companion, Molly, also survive. He was loved by
all and will be greatly missed.
Due to natural causes, Thom went home
to be with the Lord. He peacefully passed
away, surrounded by loving family at the
age of 71.
Born the youngest of seven, Thom grew
up in rural Missouri. After graduating from
Arkansas State, Thom proudly served in
the U.S. Navy, to include a tour in Antarctica. After serving his country he pursued
a career in Journalism working for the
Associated Press, on the Kennedy Assassination Board, and completing his career
serving veterans for the Disabled American Veterans (DAV).
Thom volunteered as Social chair for many
years for DSW (Divorced, Single, Widowed). He met many life long friends
through this group.
Thom loved baseball and when he wasn’t
following his beloved St. Louise Cardinals
you could find him working on his model
railroad.
Thom will be loved and missed by those
he left behind. He is survived by his
wife, Linda; eldest sibling, Helen Baretta;
daughters, Brooke Haiar (Chad), Beth Wilborn (Tom) and step-children, Susan
Wright (Matt), Franklin Nichols and Jim
Nichols (Brenda); and three granddaughters, Caroline Wright, Rebekah Nichols and
Catherine Haiar.
A memorial service for Thom will take
place on Wednesday, April 25 at 11 a.m.
at Money and King Funeral Home, 171
Maple Ave., Vienna, VA 22180. Interment
Arlington Cemetery will be at a later date.
Harry Moyer Craze Lowery of Asbury Methodist
Village in Gaithersburg, Maryland, died on April
18, 2018.
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices
at 202-334-4122.
THOMAS L. WILBORN
June 30, 1946 ~ April 20, 2018
HUGH HARRISON TOMPKINS
Of Key Largo, FL and Bethesda, MD, a
true gentleman loved by all died on April
18, 2018. Born in Richmond, Virginia on
October 21, 1946 to the late Rhoda Davis
Taylor Tompkins and William Fraser Tompkins, Jr. He is survived by his devoted wife
Constance Corby Tompkins; four daughters,
Candice Corby Mulcahy, Laura Corby Tanner, Elizabeth Corby Brooks, and Mary
Corby Wolff; four sons-in-law, Edward
James Mulcahy III, Gregory Charles Tanner,
David Church Brooks, Jr. and Daniel Paul
Wolff; "Grumpy" to 10 grandchildren; and
three brothers, William Fraser Tompkins III
(Dorothy), Seldon Taylor Tompkins (Donna),
and Benjamin Temple Tompkins.
Call:
202-334-4122
Email:
deathnotices@washpost.com
EVELYN FRANCIS TAYLOR (Age 94)
Of Washington, DC, formerly of
Lincoln, VA, entered into eternal
rest on Thursday, April 12, 2018.
She is survived by one loving
daughter, Rachel D. Dorsey
(Roland); one sister, Helen M. Bell;
two grandchildren, Arlene Dorsey
Kidwell and Tonya Ward (Kevin); 13 grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren, and a host
of nieces, nephews and friends. Family will
receive friends on Wednesday, April 25, 2018
at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1500 9th St., NW,
Washington, DC 20001 from 10 a.m. until time
of service at 11 a.m. Services will also be
held on Thursday, April 26, 2018 at Mt. Olive
Baptist Church, 37766 Cooksville Rd., Lincoln,
VA 20160. Viewing 10 a.m. until time of service,
11 a.m. Interment will be held at Grace Annex
United Methodist Church Cemetery, Lincoln,
VA. Arrangements by LYLES FUNERAL SERVICE,
serving Northern Virginia, Eric S. Lyles, Director,
Licensed VA/MD/DC, 1-800-388-1913.
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Rain, rain, all is gray
Today
Rain
It’s going to be a soggy day, as low
pressure slowly tracks up the MidAtlantic coast, drawing in moisture
and chilly air. Temperatures should
hover in the 50s most of the day,
with between a quarter-inch and half an inch of
rain falling. Tonight, another quarter-inch to
half-inch could come down. Lows will be in the
upper 40s and low 50s.
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Wednesday
Rain
Thursday
Partly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Partly sunny
Saturday
Mostly sunny
OFFICIAL RECORD
Sunday
Sunny
Temperatures
59° 55
66° 48
67° 50
68° 53
70° 50
68° 49
FEELS*: 54°
FEELS: 65°
FEELS: 67°
FEELS: 70°
FEELS: 71°
FEELS: 69°
CHNCE PRECIP: 65%
P: 70%
P: 5%
P: 25%
P: 10%
P: 5%
WIND: ESE 8–16 mph
W: NNE 6–12 mph
W: WSW 8–16 mph
W: SW 6–12 mph
W: WNW 8–16 mph
W: NW 8–16 mph
°
°
°
°
°
NATION
Harrisburg
59/51
Hagerstown
55/51
Davis
51/45
F
Sa
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Normal
Philadelphia
61/52
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
59/52
Dover
59/52
Washington
59/55
ACTUAL
FORECAST
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
69° 3:00 p.m.
50° 5:35 a.m.
69°/49°
95° 1960
33° 1933
69° 4:00 p.m.
42° 6:00 a.m.
69°/44°
88° 2001
30° 1989
67° 3:00 p.m.
46° 5:43 a.m.
67°/45°
94° 1960
31° 1982
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –2.0° yr. to date: +0.2°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Cape May
56/51
Annapolis
59/54
OCEAN: 53°
Charlottesville
57/53
Ocean City
55/52
OCEAN: 50°
Lexington
56/50
Richmond
60/55
Norfolk
62/59
Virginia Beach
61/57
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 50°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
63/60
OCEAN: 57°
Pollen: High
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Ozone
Moderate
High
Low
Low
Normal
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
2.09"
2.34"
9.74"
11.25"
0.00"
1.63"
2.65"
9.81"
11.45"
0.00"
1.65"
2.46"
10.20"
12.31"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
2 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, cloudy, rainy. High 46–51. Wind
southeast 7–14 mph. Tonight, periods of rain, drizzle.
Low 43–48. Wind southeast 4–8 mph. Wednesday,
mostly cloudy, showers. High 52–57. Wind west 4–8 mph.
Thursday, partly sunny. High 52–58.
Atlantic beaches: Today, breezy, rain, thunderstorm.
High 55–62. Wind southeast 10–20 mph. Tonight, breezy,
rain, drizzle. Low 51–59. Wind southeast 10–20 mph.
Wednesday, periods of rain north, showers south. High
62–74. Wind south 7–14 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, small craft should exercise
caution, periods of rain. Wind east 7–14 knots, gusts to 25 knots.
Waves a foot. • Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, small
craft should exercise caution, rainy. Wind southeast 12–25 knots,
gusty. Waves 1–2 feet lower Potomac, 2–4 feet on the Bay.• River
Stages: Today, the Little Falls stage will be around 4.5 feet, rising to
4.7 feet on Wednesday. Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
Th
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
3:52 a.m.
10:50 a.m.
4:12 p.m.
11:31 p.m.
Annapolis
1:02 a.m.
7:09 a.m.
1:38 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
10:04 p.m.
Ocean City
3:21 a.m.
9:50 a.m.
3:55 p.m.
Norfolk
5:28 a.m.
11:48 a.m.
6:01 p.m.
none
Point Lookout
3:13 a.m.
9:27 a.m.
4:20 p.m.
9:59 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Needles, CA 99°
Low: Saranac Lake, NY 16°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
66/46/pc
82/47/pc
45/37/r
69/55/c
86/59/s
59/52/r
53/34/s
70/55/pc
59/32/pc
72/47/s
63/48/pc
58/45/c
69/47/s
78/60/c
66/50/r
73/54/r
41/23/c
59/39/c
59/51/r
55/42/r
82/58/s
45/26/c
Tomorrow
58/43/r
71/50/s
45/36/pc
70/54/pc
77/51/t
65/45/r
68/39/pc
72/54/pc
69/41/pc
77/48/s
55/49/r
51/36/sh
57/46/r
79/58/pc
61/39/sh
75/50/pc
61/35/s
52/36/pc
61/41/c
49/36/c
69/47/r
64/37/s
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
73/45/c
57/45/c
91/57/pc
51/31/pc
57/33/pc
66/46/pc
81/70/sh
85/60/s
59/47/r
72/53/pc
81/60/pc
73/50/c
92/70/s
75/53/pc
77/54/pc
63/54/r
70/53/pc
86/70/pc
55/38/r
58/36/c
64/54/sh
79/62/s
62/52/pc
62/59/r
62/42/pc
52/36/sh
78/55/pc
51/28/pc
65/44/pc
58/47/r
81/72/sh
82/56/pc
59/38/c
76/55/pc
81/60/pc
58/42/c
94/69/s
68/51/r
74/54/pc
67/44/c
70/53/sh
87/66/pc
49/34/pc
60/42/s
67/51/c
80/63/s
60/49/r
74/55/pc
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
75/48/s
71/45/c
85/62/pc
61/52/r
97/70/pc
56/47/r
63/45/s
81/54/pc
64/48/pc
68/54/r
77/51/s
60/55/r
84/50/s
67/49/c
85/75/pc
67/45/s
68/56/pc
67/50/pc
84/73/pc
75/50/pc
70/45/s
65/46/pc
81/68/pc
71/45/s
World
High: N'guigmi, Niger 113°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –32°
Apr 29
Full
May 7
Last
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
May 15 May 21
New
First
Quarter
Rise
6:19 a.m.
2:19 p.m.
7:34 a.m.
1:43 a.m.
9:04 p.m.
12:52 a.m.
Set
7:54 p.m.
3:28 a.m.
10:03 p.m.
11:10 a.m.
7:19 a.m.
10:25 a.m.
excludes Antarctica
57/42/r
60/43/pc
84/61/pc
67/46/r
98/70/pc
57/37/c
51/46/r
84/59/s
57/49/r
75/49/c
83/54/s
72/48/sh
83/48/s
62/44/c
85/75/pc
74/51/pc
68/56/pc
66/51/pc
85/75/pc
74/51/s
72/47/s
53/39/r
80/67/pc
56/41/pc
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
76/52/pc
Amsterdam
57/49/r
Athens
81/60/pc
Auckland
64/56/c
Baghdad
85/60/s
Bangkok
97/82/s
Beijing
75/49/pc
Berlin
64/49/sh
Bogota
68/49/t
Brussels
59/53/sh
Buenos Aires
73/64/t
Cairo
81/62/s
Caracas
76/66/pc
Copenhagen
58/44/r
Dakar
74/65/s
Dublin
53/41/sh
Edinburgh
54/40/sh
Frankfurt
70/52/pc
Geneva
73/50/pc
Ham., Bermuda 67/64/pc
Helsinki
52/38/sh
Ho Chi Minh City 94/80/t
Tomorrow
76/55/pc
57/46/sh
83/61/pc
67/52/pc
87/67/pc
96/80/s
78/53/s
64/44/t
65/51/c
60/43/t
76/63/c
76/64/pc
75/66/pc
55/44/r
75/67/s
53/41/sh
53/41/sh
69/47/t
75/51/t
71/67/t
52/35/sh
94/80/t
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
80/72/t
96/68/s
73/58/s
77/57/s
79/51/s
79/51/c
86/77/pc
97/79/t
90/80/pc
75/67/pc
79/56/pc
58/46/r
78/55/pc
95/79/t
75/57/pc
67/47/c
54/42/pc
95/80/pc
72/60/t
104/74/pc
50/34/c
64/44/c
69/52/pc
70/50/pc
79/73/pc
96/68/s
76/57/s
67/53/t
78/51/s
77/48/s
84/77/pc
99/76/t
90/79/t
75/67/pc
71/54/pc
58/44/t
82/56/pc
93/79/pc
77/56/pc
54/47/r
55/43/r
96/81/pc
74/62/t
107/77/pc
55/33/pc
53/41/r
63/43/pc
72/51/pc
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei City
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
84/70/t
89/67/s
73/55/pc
89/68/pc
75/45/s
76/46/pc
63/42/s
62/53/pc
90/78/c
55/41/sh
75/61/s
79/66/t
72/53/s
70/65/c
56/41/c
75/52/pc
67/50/c
85/73/s
86/70/t
74/54/pc
87/70/pc
80/45/s
75/48/t
71/45/s
70/55/s
91/79/sh
56/37/pc
76/63/pc
77/64/pc
74/58/s
73/62/r
51/35/r
81/57/pc
72/49/t
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
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Style
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
RE
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
MUSIC REVIEW
BOOK WORLD
THEATER REVIEW
A look at previous
administrations’ first
state dinners. (Yes, there
will be Salahis.) C2
A worthy tribute that didn’t
stint on the talent: Wolf
Trap fetes composer John
Corigliano at 80. C3
John Hart returns to
Raven County with a
mesmerizing tale of
murder in the South. C3
Think blazing, not
reheated, for Olney
Theater Center’s revival
of “The Crucible.” C4
First lady
prepares
for her first
state dinner
2018 The current “Nancy” comic strip by Olivia Jaimes introduces modern technology and embraces its minimalist roots.
BY
© UFS
Drawn into a new age
‘Nancy’ picks up 21st-century gadgets — and fans — as the strip’s first female creator takes over
BY
M ICHAEL C AVNA
F
or most of its 80 years, “Nancy,” that
hailed masterpiece of formal minimalism, has felt more like stripped comic
than comic strip — a bare-bones visual
enterprise that could have been set nearly any
time in the 20th century.
Now, however, “Nancy” is getting an up-
date. The feature about the precocious, redbowed girl and her layabout ragamuffin pal
Sluggo is suddenly referencing bots and apps,
video games and social media posts. Those
are just some of the dramatic changes that
new writer and artist Olivia Jaimes (the
cartoonist’s nom de toon) has been making to
the Andrews McMeel-syndicated strip since
she took over April 9. The distinct stylistic
C
shift, after Guy Gilchrist shepherded the strip
for two decades, has attracted a bright spotlight of attention, as readers have hotly
debated this new-look “Nancy.”
Jaimes embraces this swarm of fresh readers, telling The Washington Post’s Comic Riffs,
“I’m happy to have all these new eyeballs on a
classic comic strip I love.”
NANCY CONTINUED ON C3
1955 Panels by original “Nancy” creator Ernie Bushmiller also dealt with popular topics of the day and demonstrate a minimalistic art style.
© UFS
E MILY H EIL
When French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife, Brigitte, arrive Tuesday at the White
House, they will be greeted by a
military band playing strains of
brassy notes and a 21-gun salute
in a pomp-filled ceremony that
will be followed by a state dinner.
The first official state visit of
the Trump administration will be
the biggest moment for first lady
Melania Trump to play hostess in
chief, an element of her role that
comes more naturally than some
of the other duties associated
with her position.
State dinners, with all their
protocol and symbolism, are the
highest-profile entertaining any
White House can do, and for
Melania Trump, a state dinner is a
chance
to
showcase
her
strengths,
said
Stephanie
Grisham, the first lady’s spokeswoman.
“Remember, she has a design
background,” Grisham said, referring to Trump’s education in art
and architecture as well as a
career as a fashion model and as
owner of her namesake jewelry
line.
“She has amazing taste, which
makes things very, very easy,”
added social secretary Rickie Niceta.
For her first state dinner,
Trump did not engage the services of an outside event planner
— as most modern administrations have done — to supplement
the White House staff, preferring
to rely on her own choices and
those of Niceta, who before coming to the White House worked
for more than two decades at
catering and design firm Design
Cuisine.
The first lady’s office on Monday released some details about
the dinner, which will feature a
cream-and-gold color scheme
and a performance by the Washington National Opera. The decor
includes 1,200 cherry-blossom
branches and thousands of stems
of white sweet peas and white
lilacs. Using the Clinton and
George W. Bush china, guests will
dine on a menu that includes both
American and French touches
(the rack of lamb will be served
with a Cajun-spiced Carolina
Gold rice jambalaya and the nectarine tart with crème fraiche ice
cream).
Trump chose to hold the dinner
for the French dignitaries in the
State Room, the smallest of the
White House venues used for
such events. The guest list is a
DINNER CONTINUED ON C2
MUSIC REVIEW
BOOK WORLD
Once again, when J. Cole
goes high, we go ‘Whoa’
In all seriousness, read
novels instead of tweets
BY
C HRIS R ICHARDS
Where is rap-Switzerland, and
how much are the flights? Asking
for a friend, and really for all of
our friends, because J. Cole just
dropped a new album on Friday,
which means it’s time for everyone with ears and a Twitter
handle to pick a side in the year’s
hottest fight over the year’s lukewarmest rap music.
At the center of this war zone
stands a man alone, tripling
down on his mythology as a
rapper-producer who doesn’t
need anybody’s help. After his
self-produced, guest-free 2014 album “Forest Hills Drive” moved
a million units, Cole’s most devout vassals blasted their rally
cry across social media — “J. Cole
went platinum with no features”
— until it became scripture. Now
the superfans’ meme is the rapper’s mantra, and on his new
album’s title track, “KOD,” Cole is
quick to remind us that other
rappers “ain’t worthy” of appearing next to him in song. Maybe
that’s just good, old-fashioned,
reflexive braggadocio blab — but
it’s starting to feel a tiny bit
sociopathic.
Plus, if your music is the pure,
unadulterated expression of
your own beautiful mind, you
better have some wild hieroglyphs up on your chalkboard. Instead, Cole’s pontifications on “KOD” continue to fulfill
the world’s most conservative
expectations of what virtuous
rapping should sound like. He
praises women who are “sexy,
but never show too much.” He
knows that money is overvalued because you “can’t take it
when you die.” And when his
friends disappoint him, Cole
promises to “be the bigger man,
just like I always be.” Instead of
plugging the empty spaces between his lines with ad-libs, he
graciously provides moments of
silence for the listener to say,
“Whoa, that’s deep.”
Deep thinkers should give us
the bends, but Cole only ever
MUSIC CONTINUED ON C5
BY
ANTHONY SUPREME/DREAMVILLE RECORDS
Righteous or just wrong? Nobody’s neutral on rapper J.Cole.
R ON C HARLES
“A Book of American Martyrs,”
by Joyce Carol Oates, won a Los
Angeles Times book award Friday
night. I thought the novel was
incredibly powerful, but I was
surprised to see it win in the
Mystery/Thriller category. Although the story begins with a
shooting — the murder of an
abortion doctor — there’s no mystery about who the killer is, and
there’s no thrilling chase to track
him down.
But where we shelve “A Book of
American Martyrs” is the least
interesting thing about this novel. Whether a mystery, a gothic
thriller or a work of literary fiction, it deserves far more readers
than it got when it was published
at the start of 2017, and this prize
from the L.A. Times might help.
What’s so remarkable about
“American
Martyrs,”
which
echoes the 1994 murder of physician John Britton and his guard
in Pensacola, Fla., is the way
Oates dramatizes the deadly
abortion debate in this country.
Over the course of more than 700
pages, she fully sympathizes with
two families on opposite sides of
this incendiary conflict. We get to
know the wife and daughter of
the murdered doctor just as we
get to know the wife and daughter of the fundamentalist Christian who pulled the trigger. They
are all wrecked, grieving people,
struggling to recover from a
shocking act of violence.
I thought of this propulsive,
demanding novel as I read an
essay by Kevin D. Williamson
over the weekend in the Wall
Street Journal. Williamson is a
conservative writer who was
hired last month by the Atlantic
magazine, a decision that
sparked an immediate uproar.
Critics pointed to his suggestion
on Twitter and on a podcast in
2014 that women who have abortions should be hanged. As the
public outrage swelled, Atlantic
Editor Jeffrey Goldberg determined that “the Atlantic is not the
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C3
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
That first state dinner is a taste of things to come
Tuesday night’s state dinner in
honor of French President
Emmanuel Macron and his
wife, Brigitte Macron, will be a
lot of things. A fancy shindig? For
sure. A tangible example of the
first lady’s tastes? Apparently.
Most important, the diplomatic
soiree will serve as a symbol of
the Trumps’ social agenda as a
whole. See, a party — or at least
this level of party — is never just
a party.
In administrations past, the
first diplomatic dinner has been
a sign of how the first couple
interpret their traditional role as
America’s brand ambassadors,
whether intentionally or not. The
starting bell of the White House’s
official party scene has
historically been the opening
note of a larger symphony.
For the Obamas, that note was
famously off-key.
At its first state dinner, the
Obama White House went big. So
big, in fact, that two social
climbers and would-be reality
stars, Tareq and Michaele
Salahi, sneaked into the 2009
affair uninvited. The faux pas
would lead to a congressional
hearing and eventually cost
White House social secretary
Desirée Rogers her job.
The event, which featured 400
guests on the South Lawn, was a
bold affair with Hollywood’s Alist. It was an exclamation point
that said the Obamas had
arrived, but for subsequent
official dinners, milestone
birthdays and private concerts —
they hosted them all — the
Obamas’ strategy was to find a
balance between special and
overblown, a pointed goal after
their first misstep.
The Bushes made it a point to
celebrate the intimate and formal
but not appear flashy. Their first
official state dinner in 2001, in
honor of Mexico’s Vicente Fox,
was held in the colonial State
Dining Room, which seats about
130 VIPs. First lady Laura Bush
left nothing to chance: The earlySeptember event had been in the
works since the spring; the TexMex menu sampled that July.
Instead of a high-end frock, Mrs.
Bush wore a red gown by Arnold
Scaasi, a designer who was a
favorite of her mother-in-law,
former first lady Barbara Bush.
The tone — special, traditional
and intimate — was set.
In contrast, the Clintons,
known for their grandiose
events, regularly hosted official
state dinners in the larger East
Room or on the vast South Lawn.
The couple’s first diplomatic sitdown (not an official “state
dinner”) was just a taste of the
glitz the Clintons had in store.
“We love entertaining,”
Hillary Clinton told the Chicago
Tribune after that first dinner.
“The more the merrier as far as
we’re concerned.” (They might
still hold the record for the
largest affair, with 700 guests at
the couple’s final state dinner.)
So the Trumps, who enjoy a
good party at Mar-a-Lago, the
family-branded “winter White
House” in Palm Beach, Fla., most
likely have more than just menus
on their minds in the lead-up to
Tuesday’s party. While hosting is
fun (and apparently Melania
Trump’s favorite part of the
gig), a bar will be set for parties
to come.
BROOKS KRAFT/CORBIS/GETTY IMAGES
SUSAN WALSH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOP: The Obamas in 2009 at their first state dinner, where the
Salahis crashed the gate. ABOVE: President George W. Bush and
first lady Laura Bush at their first state dinner on Sept. 5, 2001.
Some sly diplomacy will be on
the menu at the White House
BY
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T OM S IETSEMA
Given President Trump’s welldocumented eating habits, the
dishes the White House plans to
serve in honor of French
President Emmanuel Macron
and his wife, Brigitte, may come
as a surprise to an electorate that
knows about his taste for fast
food, Diet Coke, meatloaf and
steaks cooked well-done (and
knocked back with ketchup).
The menu for Tuesday is
decidedly seasonal, featuring
young lettuces as part of the first
course and spring lamb for the
entree.
It’s contemporary, with
buttermilk biscuit crumbles
adding punctuation to a salad
featuring a goat cheese gateau
and a burnt-onion soubise, or
sauce, enhancing the main
course.
The first state dinner of the
Trump administration, executed
by longtime White House
executive chef Cristeta
Comerford, also reveals some sly
diplomacy. The rack of lamb is to
be served with jambalaya, an
iconic Louisiana dish influenced
in part by the French. (“Jambon”
is French for “ham.”) A lovely
nod to the American South, the
side dish will showcase Carolina
Gold, a long-grain rice prized for
its superior flavor and yellow hue
in the fields.
Did POTUS, who has called
the White House “the greatest
restaurant,” sign off on the meal?
No doubt. But the stylish fingers
of first lady Melania Trump
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The hostess
in chief gets
ready for
the Macrons
DINNER FROM C1
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Materials!*
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seem to be all over the menu.
Tomato jam will lend color and
sass to the aforementioned goat
cheese gateau, for instance, and
the finale, a nectarine tart, comes
with ice cream flavored with
creme fraiche. Will the president
get his beloved extra scoop?
Time (and leakers) might tell,
although reports have indicated
he might be cutting back.
While greens and herbs are
said to be plucked from the
White House kitchen garden
planted by Michelle Obama,
there’s no obvious attempt to
incorporate a Trump brand in
the dinner. Even though the
teetotalling Trump owns a
Virginia winery, the dinner will
feature all bottles from the West
Coast. They include the 2015
Domaine Serene Evenstad
Reserve Chardonnay,
incorporating French vines that
take well to Oregon’s volcanic
soil; the 2014 Domaine Drouhin
Pinot Noir Laurene, fermented
in French oak barrels; and
Schramsberg Cremant Demi-sec,
a sparkling wine that will be
familiar to White House
partygoers.
Indeed, the only obvious
Trumpian touch on the meal: a
mere three courses — one course
fewer than at the state dinners
hosted by the Obamas. The
president, who has yet to dine in
a Washington restaurant other
than his own and is known to
annihilate what’s on his plate, is
not the type to linger long at the
table. His house, his rules.
modest 130 to 150, making for a
more intimate soiree than many
state dinners in previous administrations. (For example, the
Obamas’ last state dinner, for
Italy, packed nearly 400 guests
into a tent on the South Lawn.)
It’s a reflection of one of the
first lady’s principles for entertaining, aides said. Trump believes “it should never be too
crowded,” Niceta said. “You
should be able to move; you
should be able to see the White
House and feel special that you’re
here.”
So far, the East Wing has held
several large-scale events, including two Easter egg rolls on the
White House lawn. Other formal
dinners, including black-tie affairs for the White House Historical Association and the nation’s
governors, have featured understated touches such as tapered
candles and streamlined floral
arrangements.
Properly presenting the White
House to visitors is one of Trump’s
preoccupations, said her chief of
staff, Lindsay Reynolds, who was
the associate director of the
White House Visitors Office in the
George W. Bush administration.
Reynolds described the first
lady’s involvement in even the
smallest minutiae.
For example, a crack was recently detected in the door between the Green and Blue rooms
on the State Floor of the White
House. Repairing the historic fixture would take weeks. Trump
was involved with the decision on
whether it would be okay to leave
it until after the state dinner. (It
was fixed and reinstalled just in
time for the dinner.)
“It’s just a constant back and
forth with her on managing the
residence and keeping the residence in a way that she wanted
for folks who come through for
tours and events,” Reynolds said.
Such attention to aesthetics,
whether it’s the exact hue of napkins or the state of the White
House doors, isn’t just about
looks, Grisham said. “She doesn’t
just choose colors or make things
pretty. She really is wanting to
make sure that people feel at
home, that people look comfortable.”
emily.heil@washpost.com
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
BOOK WORLD
John Hart mixes blood and black water
BY
B ILL S HEEHAN
In 2009, John Hart published
“The Last Child,” a national bestseller that went on to win the
Edgar Award. The book also introduced the setting — Raven
County, N.C. — and many of the
characters that populate his ambitious and surprising new novel,
“The Hush.”
At the center of the earlier
novel was Johnny Merrimon, a
13-year-old boy whose life had
recently come undone. Johnny’s
twin sister, Alyssa, had recently
disappeared and was widely presumed to be dead. Shortly afterward, the boy’s father disappeared as well, leaving Johnny
and his mother in increasingly
desperate circumstances. Johnny’s relentless, methodical search
for the sister formed the heart of
the complex narrative. Accompanied by his best friend, Jack
Cross, an abused 13-year-old with
secrets of his own, Johnny explored some of Raven County’s
darkest corners, eventually uncovering the answer to his sister’s
disappearance, and to some larger, unrelated mysteries as well.
Johnny’s investigation took
him into a desolate section of
Raven County known as Hush
Arbor, the eponymous “Hush” of
the current novel. A wild tract
spanning 6,000 acres and composed mainly of forest and impenetrable swamp, Hush Arbor
was the site of the 19th-century
murders of a number of slaves
once owned by a Merrimon ancestor. It’s a haunting and haunted place that exerted an immediate hold on Johnny. Over time,
that influence would only grow.
By the time the new novel begins,
his fascination has reached obsessive levels, and the Hush has
become both his physical and his
spiritual home.
“The Hush” takes place 10
years after the events recounted
in “The Last Child.” By this time,
much has changed. Johnny’s
mother has remarried and rebuilt her life. Jack Cross has
overcome a litany of obstacles
and earned a law degree. The
difficult events of the past have
faded and become part of the
town’s half-forgotten history. And
Johnny (now known as John) has
retreated to the haunted precincts of the Hush, where he
sleeps in a tree, grows his own
food and spends his days protecting his home from unwelcome
visitors. In the course of all this,
he comes to understand the
twisted history of Hush Arbor
and the bizarre, brutal forces that
animate it.
John — the only living descendant of the original slave-owning
Merrimon — is now the sole
owner of the entire 6,000 acres of
Hush Arbor. He patrols his domain
constantly,
guarding
against intruders with an obsessive’s single-mindedness. Having
abandoned the trappings of civilized society, he leads a largely
solitary life. He sees his remaining family from time to time, but
the one constant in his life is Jack
Cross, still his friend despite their
complex, sometimes painful personal history.
But all of John’s human connections take second place to the
one attachment that governs his
life: his relationship with
the Hush. As
the narrative
unfolds, John
will be confronted with
the competing
claims of another
family
with equally
THE HUSH
deep connecBy John Hart
St. Martin’s. 418 tions to the
land.
pp. $27.99
The
rival
claimants are
Luana Freemantle and her
daughter Cree, direct descendants of the original slave population. For Luana, the Hush represents the financial freedom
that has always eluded her, while
her daughter is motivated by a
deep sense of spiritual kinship
with the land. Another figure,
William Boyd, has his own reasons for wanting to own that
land. A billionaire investor and
avid hunter, Boyd believes that
the Hush will offer hunters like
himself pleasures — and challenges — unavailable anywhere
else. And he is right. As these
three — and John Merrimon —
pursue ownership, the violent
history of the Hush comes slowly
into focus, and we come to realize
that what we are reading is, in
fact, a horror story.
Hush Arbor truly is a haunted
place, and the origins of that
haunting go back to the days of
the African slave trade. Hart skillfully weaves that history into the
primary story. Set pieces recounting some of the region’s more
horrific encounters are among
the highlights of an engrossing,
cumulatively disturbing narrative that encompasses murder,
madness, magic, betrayal and obsessive, undying love. The result
is unlike anything Hart has done
before. The intertwining narratives involving John Merrimon,
the Freemantles and their quest
to possess the land and its secrets
are consistently compelling, but
Hart’s central achievement is his
vivid, hallucinatory portrait of
Hush Arbor itself.
The Hush is a harsh, inimical
landscape in which disorientation rules and trees, paths and
familiar landmarks seem to shift
and disappear. It is a self-contained world in which unwelcome visitors are sometimes driven to madness and sometimes
destroyed, and Hart evokes that
surreal landscape with a power
and economy worthy of the great
British horror novelist Ramsey
Campbell. “In that first hour, the
forest was still,” Hart writes, “but
as light strengthened, a dawn
chorus rose around them, a symphony of catbird and Carolina
wren, of mourning dove and cardinal and the deep-throated gunk
of green frogs in the pocosins that
fingered up from the distant
swamp.”
With its supernatural overtones and blurring of genre
boundaries, “The Hush” may well
seem like an anomaly. Regardless, readers should happily follow along into its hypnotic world.
bookworld@washpost.com
Bill Sheehan is the author of “At the
Foot of the Story Tree: An Inquiry into
the Fiction of Peter Straub.”
For serious subjects, novels are better than tweets
Indeed, it’s hard to imagine a
less effective platform than Twitter to discuss the morality of
abortion. Heartfelt conversations
about the meaning of life and the
dimensions of personal autonomy cannot possibly take place in
the hate-filled quips that fire back
and forth on social media. And
yet, as Williamson notes, the distorting miasma of vitriol that
Twitter emits has seeped into
almost every public forum.
Few of us will probably ever
change our minds about abortion
(like Oates, I’m pro-choice), but
many of us may need to change
our minds about our ideological
opponents.
Fortunately, there is an alternative to Twitter, Facebook and
all those indignant op-eds that we
use to confirm the superiority of
our beliefs. It’s a flexible, trollfree, hacker-resistant platform on
which complex social and moral
questions can be carefully explored. It simultaneously engages
our empathy and models the action of empathy for us.
It’s called a novel. And Oates
has written one that will stretch
the affections of readers convinced that abortion is murder
and readers convinced that access to abortion is fundamental to
women’s freedom.
How Oates can do this so effectively is part of the thrilling mystery of a good book.
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
best fit” for Williamson’s talents,
and he was fired just three days
after his first piece appeared in
the magazine.
In Saturday’s WSJ, under the
headline, “When the Twitter Mob
Came for Me,” Williamson
pushed back hard against his
critics. He portrays himself as an
American martyr for truth and
candor, set upon by a shrill gang
of unscrupulous pro-abortion fanatics. His tone is sometimes
wounded and pompous. He’s willing to acknowledge that his earlier comments about hanging were
“trollish and hostile,” but he
clearly feels more sinned against
than sinning.
At the very least, though, he’s
right to call out journalists who
wrote about his views without
bothering to contact him. And no
matter what you think of Williamson’s work in general or the
right to abortion in particular,
toward the end of his essay he
makes a crucial point about
what’s happening to us all:
“What matters more is the issue of how the rage-fueled tribalism of social media, especially
Twitter, has infected the op-ed
pages and, to some extent, the
rest of journalism. Twitter is
about offering markers of affiliation or markers of disaffiliation.
The Left shouts RACIST!, and the
Right shouts FAKE NEWS! There
isn’t much that can be done about
this other than treating social
media with the low regard it
deserves.”
bookworld@washpost.com
THOS ROBINSON/GETTY IMAGES/THE NEW YORKER
Joyce Carol Oates looks at abortion through the prism of a
doctor’s murder in her novel “A Book of American Martyrs.”
Ron Charles is the editor of Book
World and host of
TotallyHipVideoBookReview.com.
‘Nancy’ gets a makeover for the 21st century
NANCY FROM C1
In Monday’s “Nancy,” our
frizzy-haired hero turns an “age
me” app on her slow-to-grow
azaleas. This month, Nancy has
also been expounding on rampant negativity on the Internet
(“It’s probably all bots anyway”)
and on what Sluggo’s “like” on a
social media post really means.
In the strip’s comments section
on GoComics.com, the daily remarks have jumped into the hundreds, as readers react to every
change under the Jaimes administration — from the tone of the
skin (“liver disease”? inquires one
reader) to the tone of the humor.
“Olivia must be channeling her
inner Bushmiller,” wrote one positive commenter on the syndicate’s website, referring to longtime “Nancy” creator Ernie Bushmiller, around whom a cult of top
comics professionals has formed.
Another commenter noted how
Jaimes nods to the comic’s tradition even while including modern touches, writing that “it is
refreshing to see a return to its
original style and humor.” And
wrote another: “Nancy Goes Millennial.”
Others have not been as
pleased. One commenter wrote
on April 16: “This is ridiculous.
You’d never catch Ernie Bushmiller doing a joke about Snap
Chat. Bring back, Ernie!” And a
reader expressed to The Post
that “since the characters have
not aged in 85 years I don’t think
it’s necessary to change them
now.”
One thing is for sure: Controversy and conflict are good for
business.
Before the change in creator,
“Nancy” averaged about 5,000
page views a day, the Kansas City,
Mo.-based syndicate says. Last
week, the Jaimes version of “Nancy” attracted 133,000 page views
on Wednesday, then spiked to
390,000 views the next day, according to Andrews McMeel.
Nancy debuted on the comics
page in 1933 in the United Feature strip “Fritzi Ritz,” which was
launched in 1922 by creator Larry
Whittington. After Nancy appeared as Fritzi Ritz’s niece, the
girl’s popularity increased until,
by 1938, the strip’s title was
changed to “Nancy.”
The gag comic was created for
more than a half-century by
Bushmiller, an Eisner Hall of
Fame cartoonist, under whom
“Nancy’s” client list grew to nearly 900 newspapers.
Beyond the numbers, the syndicate embraces the stylistic shift
of the comic, which is now syndicated to about 75 newspaper clients.
“There’s something warm and
silly and magical in the facial
expressions, the rhythm and the
body language,” says John Glynn,
Andrew McMeel’s president and
editorial director. “Olivia is channeling Ernie Bushmiller while
giving it her own unique, 21stcentury voice.
“I think the fates led us to
Olivia,” Glynn adds about Jaimes,
who previously worked in Web
comics and is the first woman to
create the strip since it debuted.
“She’s got the gift.”
She had forewarned readers
that her version of the strip would
bring technological change. Now,
she says, “Nancy’s going to use all
the social media and technology I
use.
“People will be able to figure
out exactly how behind the times
I am by watching what apps she’s
using,” continues Jaimes, who is
in her 20s. “It took me until last
month to try Spotify, so that
should give you an idea of where
I’m at.”
“Nancy” has also recently featured meta-jokes that seem to
nod to the strip’s change in creator. In one strip, Nancy says her
Aunt Fritzi has removed everything from the strip she doesn’t
love. The effect? This makes it
easier “for the cartoonist.”
“Everything was done more
than a month ago, and all the
meta-ideas were based on me
guessing what the response
would be,” the cartoonist says.
“Those will fade out over the next
couple weeks, as the strip comes
into its own, though they’ll always pop in again here and there.
I love meta-jokes . . . too much.”
So now that she’s several weeks
into her “Nancy,” how does she
feel about the massive reaction —
does all the feedback affect her?
“It’s exciting, but since I’ve also
been avoiding the Internet a lot
over the last couple weeks, it’s not
changed my approach or perspective much,” says Jaimes, noting
that she hasn’t seen the reader
comments and has stayed off
social media since her launch.
Adds Glynn: “I’ve been lucky
enough to see the next few weeks,
and I dare say it just keeps getting
better.”
The online armies following
Jaimes’s every line will certainly
be the judge of that.
michael.cavna@washpost.com
WOLF TRAP
Wolf Trap honored John Corigliano, who turned 80 in February.
MUSIC REVIEW
A talent-laden tribute for
John Corigliano’s 80th
BY
A NNE M IDGETTE
Artists who are successful during their own lifetimes often have
a moment: a period when they
are widely feted. John Corigliano
has had several moments. Winning Grammy Awards for his first
symphony, the “AIDS symphony,”
was one (or two; the piece took
Grammys in 1991 and 1997); triumphing at the Metropolitan Opera with the world premiere of
his “Ghosts of Versailles” in 1991
was another. Corigliano is now
being feted for a different reason:
He turned 80 in February. But a
birthday concert of his music at
the Wolf Trap Barns on Sunday
afternoon showed a body of work
with plenty of reason to celebrate.
The concert was the end of
Wolf Trap’s chamber music season, which was imaginatively curated, this year by the violinist
Lara St. John. It was a worthy
tribute that didn’t stint on the
talent. One highlight was the
radiant young cellist Sterling Elliott, an undergraduate at Juilliard with fingers so long his left
hand seemed to have a life of its
own as it stalked up and down the
fingerboard, now singing out gorgeously, now letting go with animation in “Phantasmagoria,” a
piece based on themes from “The
Ghosts of Versailles,” while the
pianist Martin Kennedy supported him darkly in the background.
St. John herself was dynamic
as ever in “STOMP,” a piece
Corigliano wrote for the Tchaikovsky Competition in 2010 that
actually requires the soloist to
stamp on the floor, and the early
sonata that the composer wrote
in 1963 for his father, who was for
many years the concertmaster of
the New York Philharmonic, and
who, Corigliano said in his engaging remarks from the stage,
didn’t want his son to be a
composer. (The sonata eventually
changed his mind.) St. John, an
energetic player, makes musicmaking seem approachable (at
one point she used the skirt of her
dress to wipe off the chin rest of
her violin), but her presentation
is so busy that sometimes the
music’s line is slightly obscured
by all the energy, and the playing
can grow monochromatic in its
unrelenting intensity. Still, she
was more than up to the challenges of this virtuosic concerto,
which was also one of the happiest works on the program.
CLIVE BARDA
Lara St. John curated and
performed in the concert.
The soprano Melinda Whittington did an excellent job in
four selections from what to me is
Corigliano’s most problematic
piece, the cycle “Mr. Tambourine
Man: Poems of Bob Dylan.”
Corigliano was ahead of his time
in treating Dylan’s texts as pure
poetry years before Dylan won
the Nobel Prize for literature, but
the songs are so well-known that
Corigliano’s music strains against
what the ear expects, and turns
some of them into veritable parodies of the stuffiness of classical
music (like a lugubrious and
melodramatic version of “Blowin’
in the Wind”). Only “Forever
Young” has some of the freshness,
beauty, and sense of inevitability
to truly hold its own.
The evening concluded with
the long string quartet Corigliano
wrote in 1995 for the final season
of the Cleveland Quartet. Like
“Phantasmagoria” and “Mr. Tambourine Man,” this piece is imbued with a sense of nostalgia
and farewell: the quartet defaults, in all five moments, to a
quiet elegiac whisper. It’s also
very difficult to play, with a fugue
that requires the four instrumentalists to play the same music at
four different speeds. The PUBLIQuartet, an able and adventurous
young group of four distinct
looks, played it beautifully,
though I felt the piece could have
stood to be a little shorter. And
the audience moved to the lobby
to share birthday cake with the
composer.
anne.midgette@washpost.com
MUSICAL INSTRUMENT VALUATIONS
Ingles & Hayday are international experts, auctioneers and
consultants to Sotheby’s for musical instruments.
Book an appointment for a free valuation of a violin, viola,
cello or bow with our expert Paul Hayday.
•
•
WASHINGTON
The Mayflower Hotel
1127 Connecticut Avenue
May 1st, 2018
Sotheby’s NEW YORK
1334 York Ave
May 2nd, 2018
Contact Amanda McCabe:
T: 646 480 7038
amanda@ingleshayday.com
www.ingleshayday.com
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
4/24/18
7:00
7:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
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8:00
◆ News
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4.1 WRC (NBC)
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Mod Fam
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
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7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆ ET
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
14.1 WFDC (UNI) ◆ La Rosa de Guadalupe
◆ FamFeud
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ FamFeud
22.1 WMPT (PBS) Farm-Harvest Harbor
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
◆ Old House
32.1 WHUT (PBS) DW News
Goldbergs
50.1 WDCW (CW) Goldbergs
66.1 WPXW (ION) Criminal Minds
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Frasier
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(9:01) ◆ Rise
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ARTICO
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CABLE CHANNELS
KAROLINA WOJTASIK/LIFETIME
Married at First Sight (Lifetime at 9) In the Season 6 finale, Jephte Pierre
and Shawniece Jackson are among the couples who need to decide
whether they will stay together or get a divorce.
The Flash (CW at 8) Cisco
becomes suspicious of Harry.
from the comedian.
The Voice (NBC at 8) The live top12 eliminations.
LA to Vegas (Fox at 9) Dave goes
gambling to raise his spirits after
his breakup with Patricia.
New Girl (Fox at 9:30) Winston
gets mentally prepared to testify in
court.
Chopped (Food at 10) The
contestants compete in a
sandwich battle.
The Real Housewives of Beverly
Hills (Bravo at 9) Reunion.
RETURNING
Genius (Nat Geo at 9) Season 2.
The 100 (CW at 8) Season 5.
LATE NIGHT
Conan (TBS at 11) Zach Braff, Alia
Shawkat, Andrew W.K.
Daily Show (Comedy Central at
11) Jonah Goldberg.
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Kevin
James, Questlove, Sigrid.
PREMIERES
SKAM Austin (Facebook Watch
streaming) The American version
of the Norwegian teen drama
“Skam.” The reality TV plot is told
through short clips released daily,
supplemented by text messages
and social media.
First Civilizations (PBS at 9) A
nine-part series examines the
ancient cultures that began
modern history.
SPECIALS
Kevin James: Never Don’t Give
Up (Netflix streaming) Stand-up
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Hank
Azaria, Ronan Farrow, Grace
VanderWaal.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Mark
Ruffalo, Scarlett Johansson, Tom
Hiddleston, Danai Gurira, Dave
Bautista, Bleachers.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Anthony
Mackie, Judy Greer, Snow Patrol.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) Ice-T,
Sarah Kendzior, Sarah Tomek.
— Sarah Polus
The First 48
The First 48: Love Kills
Marcia Clark Investigates The First 48
A&E
(5:25) Movie: The Last Stand Movie: Escape Plan ★★ (2013)
(10:35) Movie: Batman ★★★ (1989)
AMC
River Monsters
River Monsters
River Monsters
River Monsters
Jeremy-Mighty Rivers
Animal Planet
Bringing D
(7:27) Madea’s Big Happy Family
In Contempt
(11:01) In Contempt
BET
Real Housewives/Beverly
Real Housewives
Real Housewives
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Watch
Housewives
Bravo
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Cleveland
Amer. Dad
Burgers
Burgers
Family Guy
Cartoon Network Craig
Erin Burnett OutFront
Anderson Cooper 360
Anderson Cooper 360
CNN Tonight
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CNN
The Office
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
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Jefferies
Daily
Opposition
Comedy Central The Office
Deadliest Catch
Deadliest Catch
Deadliest Catch
(10:02) Last Outpost
(11:02) Deadliest Catch
Discovery
Bunk’d
Bunk’d
Gravity Falls Gravity Falls Bunk’d
Bunk’d
Stuck/Middle Stuck/Middle Bizaardvark Bizaardvark
Disney
E! News
Movie: The Wedding Ringer ★★ (2015)
Movie: Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Witness Protection ★★
E!
SportsCenter Special (Live)
Rookie
Rookie
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ESPN
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Chopped
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Chopped
Food Network
The Story With Martha
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Hannity
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Fox News Night
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(5:30) Movie: Grown Ups ★ Shadowhunters
(9:01) Movie: Dirty Dancing ★★★ (1987)
The 700 Club
Freeform
Terminator
Movie: Thor: The Dark World ★★ (2013)
Legion
(11:01) Legion
FX
Full House
Full House
Full House
Full House
Full House
Full House
The Middle
The Middle
Golden Girls Golden Girls
Hallmark
Psych
Murder, She Wrote
Murder, She Wrote
Murder, She Wrote
Hallmark M&M Psych
Real Time
VICE
Movie: Atomic Blonde ★★★ (2017)
REAL Sports Gumbel
Fight Game Silicon Valley
HBO
Fixer Upper
Fixer
Hunters
Good Bones
Hunters
Hunt Intl
Hunters
Hunters Int’l
HGTV
Forged in Fire
Forged in Fire
Forged in Fire
Knife or Death
(11:03) Forged in Fire
History
Married at First Sight
Married-Sight Married
Married at First Sight
Married
Love
Lifetime
MLB Baseball: Tampa Bay Rays at Baltimore Orioles (Live)
O’s Xtra
ESPNWS
ESPNWS
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MASN
Hardball Matthews
All In With Chris Hayes
Rachel Maddow Show
The Last Word
The 11th Hour
MSNBC
Jersey Shore--Vacation
Teen Mom: Young
Teen Mom: Young
The Challenge
(11:01) Ex on the Beach
MTV
Genius
Genius
(11:02) Genius
Nat’l Geographic (6:00) Movie: Fury ★★★ (2014)
Redskins 100 Draft
NFL Draft
Redskins 100 Redskins
Best of
NBC SportsNet WA NHL Hockey: Capitals at Blue Jackets
Loud House Loud House Movie: Shaun the Sheep Movie ★★★ (2015)
Fresh Prince Fresh Prince Friends
Friends
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Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Ink Master: Angels
Ink Master
Ink Master: Angels
PARMT
National Treasure: Book
Movie: G.I. Joe: Retaliation ★★ (2013)
Futurama
Futurama
Futurama
Futurama
Syfy
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Last O.G.
Conan
TBS
(6:00) Bhowani Junction
Movie: The Apartment ★★★★ (1960)
(10:15) Movie: Cactus Flower ★★★ (1969)
TCM
My Little Life
Little People, Big World
Little People, Big World
(10:02) My Little Life
Little People, Big World
TLC
(6:00) Movie: I Am Legend
NBA Basketball: Miami Heat at Philadelphia 76ers (Live)
NBA Basketball: Spurs at Warriors
TNT
Bizarre Foods America
Bizarre Foods
Zimmern
The Zimmern Delicious
Delicious
Delicious
Delicious
Travel
Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Ad. Ruins
Chris Gethard Show
TruTV
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Everybody Loves Raymond Raymond
Raymond
Mom
Mom
King
King
TV Land
Cosby Show Cosby Show Living Single Living Single Movie: Soul Food ★★★ (1997)
Movie: Brown Sugar ★★
TV One
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
WWE SmackDown! (Live)
Unsolved-BIG
Law & Order: SVU
USA Network
Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta
Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta
Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta
Teyana
Black Ink Crew
Leave, Stevie
VH1
GE
Washington
Govt.
Matters
On
Your
Side
Sports
ABC
News
News
at
10pm
Govt. Matters On Your Side
WNC8
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Engagement
Engagement
WGN
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
More at washingtonpost.com/tv.
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
THEATER REVIEWS
Rizzolo as Mary Warren, the girl
who tries to resist Abigail’s
scheme.
A fiery ‘Crucible’ revival
and a promising ‘Witch’
BY
N ELSON P RESSLEY
“The Crucible” is one of America’s great protest plays, and Eleanor Holdridge is letting it roar.
There is nothing timid about
the performance, from the big,
abstract set suggesting blazing woods to the epic-scaled,
edge-of-hysteria acting.
If you have any inclination to
revisit Arthur Miller’s McCarthyera parable, see this. Holdridge’s
cast taps into the drama’s fear
and fury from the moment Michael Russotto enters as the Rev.
Parris, freaked out that the girls
in Salem were caught dancing (maybe naked) in the woods.
Russotto does not condescend
to the character — he is worried
and slightly panicked, not hyperrighteous — and the show quickly fills with actors fluent in Miller’s odd, formal version of Puritan New England speech.
The Proctors are especially
good, in both senses. Chris Genebach is tormented as the man
who betrayed his wife with young
Abigail Williams (a perfectly cast
Dani Stoller, who casts a seductive eye at Proctor and subtly
ringleads the “possessed” girls).
Rachel Zampelli is calm and
heartbreaking as Elizabeth Proctor; the complexity of this marriage always feels real as Genebach and Zampelli argue out
their characters’ failings and
then try to defend themselves
against the witch hunt.
The show looks like 1692 before intermission, but Andrew R.
Cohen’s set gets a modern edge
for the second half, with the court
and jail scenes unfolding in front
of tall glass walls and under
fluorescent lights. It works: The
look isn’t jarring, and the characters remain in Sarah Cubbage’s
late-17th-century costumes.
And anyway, there’s no upstaging the acting. Miller was dramatizing a country ablaze, and that’s
how the cast plays it. The passions are at full boil, yet the
actors are clear thinkers: You
STAN BAROUH
Scott Parkinson (the Rev. Hale), Lilian Oben (Tituba) and Michael
Russotto (the Rev. Parris) in “The Crucible.”
hear the logic and the bent reasoning, and you feel the vise
clamping down as church and
state convene their kangaroo
court.
Scott Parkinson plays the uncertain Rev. Hale with compelling concern, and Paul Morella
performs with the force of a
judge’s gavel as the imperious
Deputy Gov. Danforth, twirling
his cape and cross-examining
Salem’s suddenly hapless citizens
with a heady combination of
intellect and zeal. Sharp turns
are also delivered by Brigid
Cleary as the unimpeachable Rebecca Nurse, Jessica Lefkow as
the bitter Ann Putnam (who has
had seven stillborn children),
Lilian Oben as the terrified accused slave Tituba, Craig MacDonald as the likably litigious old
man Giles Corey and Miranda
Seven women demonized
Rebecca Nurse turns out to be
a character in the new Matt
Conner-Stephen Gregory Smith
musical “Witch,” which coincidentally has opened at the intimate Creative Cauldron. Set during the 2017 Women’s March, the
show looks at seven women staging a consciousness-raising act
about women demonized across
the centuries.
That allows for songs about
Joan of Arc, Nurse, and the small
cluster of mothers and daughters
devising this act of resistance. It’s
not always fleshed out; for instance, Nurse’s song, “Innocent,”
gets a lovely melody (Conner
writes the music) but no real
lyrical development (Conner and
Smith write the lyrics).
It’s complicated as the modern
characters overlap with some of
the historical figures they sing
about. Maggie, more or less the
central character, sings about
Margaret Hamilton, trapped by
her image as the Wicked Witch in
“The Wizard of Oz,” and the song
has a beautiful, haunting refrain:
“What a world, what a world.” A
woman named Molly sings about
Moll Dyer, a late-17th-century-
Maryland woman chased out of
town as a witch; the song has a
lovely bluegrass lilt accompanied
by the instrumental trio of keyboards, percussion and fiddle.
Like “The Crucible,” “Witch”
has a terrific cast. Broadway
veteran Florence Lacey (of the
Conner-Smith musical “Kaleidoscope” last year) plays the eldest
of the seven women; Susan Derry, Iyona Blake and Catherine
Purcell are the mothers, and
Arianna Vargas, Sophia Manicone and Samaria Dellorso play
the school-age kids. They are all
fine singers giving this promising
piece — which concludes with a
catchy pop hook to the phrase
“Nevertheless, she persisted” — a
good hearing.
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
The Crucible by Arthur Miller.
Directed by Eleanor Holdridge. About
3 hours. Through May 20 at Olney
Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy
Spring Rd., Olney. $49-$74. 301-9243400 or olneytheatre.org.
Witch Music and lyrics by Matt
Conner; book and lyrics by Stephen
Gregory Smith. Directed by Matt
Conner and Stephen Gregory Smith.
About 70 minutes. Through May 6 at
Creative Cauldron, 410 S. Maple St.,
Falls Church. $30. 703-436-9948 or
creativecauldron.org.
THEATRE
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
This record-breaking interactive solve-the-crime comedy
keeps the audiences laughing as they try to outwit the
suspects and catch the killer. New clues and up to the
minute improvisation deliver “shrieks of laughter night after
night.” (Washington Post)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
Added Shows:
Mon at 8PM
Tue at 5PM
Wed at 5PM
Thu at 5PM
Great Group Rates
for 15 +
EMBASSY EVENTS
Sultan Qaboos Cultural
Center (Oman)
Ziyad al Harbi, Oudist & Wed., April 25, 7:30pm
Friends
Embassy of Singapore
Heegan Lee Shzen,
Thurs., April 26, 7:30pm
Shzen is a rare prodigy, known for his ability to play some
of the most complex pieces written. Rachmaninov, Chopin.
Magnificent embassy!
Fri., April 27, 7:30pm
Unique blend of a rich mezzo-soprano with the innate
language of the Tango language, powerful yet subtle stage
presence in an unforgettable evening of music. Tango and
bolero music sung to perfection.
piano
Embassy of Argentina
Malena Dayen,
mezzo-soprano
David Rosenmeyer, piano
Top caliber Omani artists with captivating oud, percussion,
strings- Oman’s fascinating, award-winning artists. This is
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(202) 625- 2361
or order online at
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Limited tickets.
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
$40,
all
inclusive
$80,
all
inclusive
$90,
all
inclusive
Middle Eastern
buffet reception
Heavy
hors-d’œuvres/
wine
Buffet dinner/
wine
16-2898
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
And the bland played on: J. Cole’s featureless musical landscape
MUSIC FROM C1
gives us clarity, telegraphing his
rhymes, spraying down ambiguity like he’s dusting crops. To his
flock, that certitude must feel
reliable, comforting, centering.
To those who can’t stand him, it
feels inflexible, corny and pedantic. But maybe we can at least
agree on why we all love or hate
J. Cole: His songs mean what
they say, and nothing more.
At least the music itself on
“KOD” has a spongier feel,
with the rapper softening his
articulation to match the elastic contours of his tracks. Unfortunately, the sounds oozing
out of Cole’s mouth are also
words, and too often, they seem
to drip down from some bogus
moral high road.
That drip turns to a fire-hosing when the album reaches its
coda, “1985 (Intro to ‘The Fall
Off ’),” during which Cole calls all
of the boisterous young rappers
blowing out speakers on SoundCloud into the principal’s office.
“I ain’t judging you,” Cole raps at
one point, and then, “I hope for
your sake you ain’t dumb as you
look,” the next.
He sounds energized, sure, but
he ultimately sounds afraid —
just like Jay-Z did in 2009 with
“D.O.A. (Death of Auto-Tune).”
So if you’re into anxious rap
superstars who make music
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
Blockers (R) CC: 2:00-4:457:30-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:30-6:40-9:50
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 12:301:20-6:45
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
3:15-9:45
Ready Player One: An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 1:45
Rampage 3D (PG-13) CC:
4:00-9:30
Rampage: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 5:057:45-10:20
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 2:004:35-7:10-10:15
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
(PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:00-6:309:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC:
12:40-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:20
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: 2:155:00-7:35-10:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 1:304:15-7:00-9:45
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC:
3:50-9:15
Traffik (R) CC: 12:30-2:55-5:257:50-9:40
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) CC:
1:10-6:35
Beirut (R) CC: 1:50-4:30-7:159:55
Ready Player One in 3D (PG13) CC: 6:30
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 1:454:10-6:40-9:00
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Ave N.W.
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
7:00
Ready Player One in 3D (PG-13)
3:40
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
1:30
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 12:002:35-5:30-7:50
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) CC: 5:30-7:55
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 12:252:55-5:30-8:05
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: 12:202:50-5:30-8:10
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 12:002:40-5:00-8:00
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) CC:
12:05-2:45
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air and Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
Angelika Pop-Up
at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
Sweet Country (R) 11:45-2:15
The Endless 12:00-2:20
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:301:30-3:30
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Borg vs. McEnroe (R) 12:00-2:305:00-7:45
The Leisure Seeker (R) 5:30
Final Portrait (R) 1:10-3:20-8:00
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 11:251:45-4:30-7:40-10:15
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
12:15-3:05-7:00-9:50
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:453:45-7:10-10:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 11:401:55-4:15-7:45-10:10
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 11:1511:30-1:15-1:30-3:15-3:30-5:155:30-7:20-7:35-9:30-9:45
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 2:154:45-7:15-9:45
You Were Never Really Here (R)
CC: 2:00-4:30-6:45-9:00
Lean on Pete (R) CC: 1:30-9:40
The Death of Stalin (R) CC: 2:204:50-7:20-9:40
Beirut (R) CC: 1:10-4:10-7:10
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
1:00-4:00-7:00
Love After Love 1:15-3:50-7:10
Itzhak CC: 1:10-3:45-7:05
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14
701 Seventh St Northwest
Blockers (R) 11:55-2:45-5:258:00-10:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:053:15-10:45
Rampage (PG-13) 11:30-7:3010:10
Ready Player One (PG-13) 12:203:20-6:20-9:20
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 11:50-2:305:20-8:15-11:00
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 12:45-3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:4512:45-2:20-3:10-4:40-5:35-7:007:55-9:30-10:30
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:30-2:004:30-7:05-9:35
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:30-2:105:40-8:05-11:00
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 11:352:25-5:15
Love, Simon (PG-13) 12:203:00-8:15
Traffik (R) 11:30-2:15-4:457:15-9:45
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 12:102:50-5:30-8:10-10:50
Fragments of Truth 7:00
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 2:10-4:50
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
IMAX Theater
601 Independence Avenue SW
Ready Player One: An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 6:30
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Seas 3D (NR)
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-1:15-3:35-5:00
Planet Power: An IMAX 3D
Experience (NR) 12:25-2:45
Pandas: An IMAX 3D Experience
(G) 11:00-1:50-4:10
Ready Player One: An IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13)
Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
(PG) (!) 3:25-8:15
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 12:302:45-5:10-7:30-9:45
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: (!)
11:45-2:15-4:45-7:15-9:40
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:152:00-4:40-7:25-10:00
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC:
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr 12:45-3:45-6:30-9:20
8633 Colesville Road
Traffik (R) CC: (!) 11:30-12:40Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:20-2:30- 2:00-3:05-4:35-5:35-7:00-8:004:45-7:05-9:20
9:25
The Crime of Monsieur Lange
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG(Le Crime de Monsieur Lange)
13) (!) 12:20-2:40-5:20-7:45
(NR) 5:30
ArcLight Bethesda
The Grand Budapest Hotel (R)
7101 Democracy Boulevard
7:15
Blockers (R) 11:10-1:40-4:25The Death of Stalin (R) 12:307:25-9:30
2:45-5:00-7:15-9:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:35Blade Runner: The Final Cut
2:10-4:15-6:45-9:35
(R) 9:20
Ready Player One (PG-13)
AMC Academy 8
11:40AM
6198 Greenbelt Road
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 11:25-1:55Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 2:00- 4:55-7:05-10:05
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG5:00-8:00
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 2:30-8:00 13) 11:05-2:40-5:10-7:30-9:10
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 1:15-2:00Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
4:05-5:30-6:05-8:30
3:15-6:30
You Were Never Really Here (R)
Rampage 3D (PG-13) CC: 5:15
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- 12:00-2:45-5:00-8:05-10:15
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:45-2:0513) CC: 3:45-6:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 3:30- 3:15-5:40-7:00-8:00-10:10
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:55-2:206:00-8:20
3:25-4:50-6:00-7:20-8:15-9:45
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 3:00Traffik (R) 11:00-1:20-3:35-5:555:45-8:20
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC: 7:55-10:05
Beirut (R) 11:15-12:40-3:30-5:353:00-5:45-8:30
8:20-9:55
Traffik (R) CC: 2:00-4:30-7:00Rampage (PG-13) 11:50-12:558:25
3:00-4:30-7:35-9:15
AMC Center Park 8
Ready Player One (PG-13)
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
1:45-4:40
Rampage (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:00A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
3:15-4:00-7:00-9:00-10:00
12:45-4:45
Rampage 3D (PG-13) CC: (!)
Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
12:30-6:00
(PG) CC: 1:30-3:40
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:2013) CC: (!) 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
7:40-9:50
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 12:45- Chappaquiddick (PG-13) CC:
3:15-6:00-8:45
11:30-2:25-5:50-7:10-9:40
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: (!) 1:30- Ready Player One (PG-13)
4:10-7:05-10:00
7:15-9:25
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:15Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
3:55-6:30-9:20
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC:
Blockers
(R) 11:15-1:40-4:1012:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
6:50-9:20
Traffik (R) CC: (!) 1:30-4:15Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-4:006:45-9:15
7:00-10:15
AMC Columbia 14
Ready Player One (PG-13)
10300 Little Patuxent Pkwy
12:45-6:40
Blockers (R) CC: (!) 11:00-1:30- Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:25-1:504:20-7:30-8:45-9:55
4:15-6:50-9:25
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:50- Rampage (PG-13) 12:15-3:005:35-8:10-10:45
3:00-6:10-9:20
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PGRampage (PG-13) CC: 11:1013) 11:45-2:20-4:50-7:40-10:05
4:45-10:10
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:10Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
12:25-1:25-2:40-3:40-5:05-6:052:30-9:30
Ready Player One: An IMAX 3D 7:20-8:20-9:35-10:35
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R)
Experience (PG-13) 12:00
3:50-9:50
Rampage 3D (PG-13) CC:
Traffik (R) 12:35-2:50-5:15-7:551:55-7:30
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 11:15- 10:25
Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
4:35-7:05-9:40
Rampage: The IMAX 2D Experi- (PG) 11:05-1:15-3:30-6:30
Rampage (PG-13) 11:00-2:00ence (PG-13) 3:40-7:00-9:40
Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero 4:35-7:10-9:45
(PG) 11:05AM
Bow Tie Harbour 9
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:002474 Solomons Island Road
3:30-6:00-9:00
You Were Never Really Here (R)
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
10:20-12:50-3:00-5:20-7:40-10:10
(PG-13) CC: 11:25-2:05-4:40Finding Your Feet (PG-13)
7:20-10:00
11:20AM
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 11:20- I Can Only Imagine (PG) 2:002:00-4:40-7:20-10:00
4:40-7:20-10:05
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC: (!) The Miracle Season (PG) 1:20
1:25-4:20-7:15-10:05
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 11:10-1:50Chappaquiddick (PG-13) CC:
4:10-6:50-9:20
11:00-4:10
Paul, Apostle of Christ (PG-13)
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: 1:50
10:40-3:50-6:30
Traffik (R) CC: 11:45-2:15-4:45- Final Portrait (R) 10:10-12:307:25-10:05
2:50-5:10-7:30-9:50
Beirut (R) CC: (!) 1:35-9:45
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 10:00-11:00Ready Player One in 3D (PG-13) 12:40-1:40-3:20-4:20-6:00-7:00CC: 11:05-6:00
9:00-10:00
Fragments of Truth (!) 7:00
The Death of Stalin (R) 9:10
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:40-2:00- Beirut (R) 10:50-1:30-4:154:30-7:10-9:50
7:10-9:40
Super Troopers 2 (R) (!) 11:10Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 10:301:40-4:10-6:40-9:20
1:10-4:00-6:40-9:30
MARYLAND
out of their condescension to
another generation’s youthful
hyper-vision, here’s another
track for your funky little playlist. For the rest of us, “1985” only
reinforces what we already
knew: An unimaginative rapper
is primarily an unimaginative
listener.
chris.richards@washpost.com
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
1:05-4:05-7:05-10:05
Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
(PG) CC: 12:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 12:002:15-4:30-7:25-9:40
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) CC: 12:10-2:35-5:00-7:30-9:55
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: 12:052:30-5:05-7:35-10:00
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC:
1:30-4:45-7:40-10:25
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 1:004:15-6:50-9:25
I Can Only Imagine (PG) CC: 1:254:25-7:00-9:35
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) CC:
1:10-4:15-6:40-9:10
Traffik (R) CC: 12:40-1:40-3:004:00-5:30-6:30-7:55-9:05-10:15
Beirut (R) CC: 2:10-5:10-7:5010:25
Landmark
Bethesda Row Cinema
7235 Woodmont Ave
The Death of Stalin (R) CC:
12:50-1:50-4:40-6:30-7:15-9:40
Foxtrot (R) 1:30-6:50
The Rider (R) CC: 1:20-3:507:30-10:00
Beirut (R) CC: 1:10-4:20-7:209:50
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 2:003:30-4:30-7:10-8:50-9:30
Lean on Pete (R) CC: 1:00-4:007:00-9:45
Finding Your Feet (PG-13) CC:
4:10-9:20
Kodachrome 1:40-4:50-7:4010:00
Old Greenbelt Theatre
129 Centerway
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 5:15
Itzhak 7:45
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
3899 Branch Avenue
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:004:05-7:05
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:15-2:304:45-7:00
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 12:002:45-5:30-8:15
Traffik (R) 1:30-3:55-6:20-8:45
Rampage (PG-13) 12:20-2:555:45-8:25
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 12:30-3:00-5:25-8:05
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
15200 Major Lansdale Blvd
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
1:20-4:00-9:35
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:10-4:157:20-10:25
Blockers (R) 2:15-4:55-7:25-10:00
Rampage (PG-13) 1:00-3:45-4:506:30-9:30-10:30
Ready Player One (PG-13) 3:307:00-10:10
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 1:50-7:45
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 2:25-5:10-7:40-10:15
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 1:15-2:254:40-7:25-10:00
Super Troopers 2 (R) 2:00-4:307:10-9:50
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 2:20-5:007:40-10:20
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 1:204:25-7:30-10:30
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 1:003:55-6:40-9:40
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 1:003:55-6:50-9:30
Traffik (R) 2:10-4:40-7:20-9:55
Fragments of Truth 7:00
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Stadium 20 & IMAX
900 Ellsworth Drive
Blockers (R) 12:00-2:45-5:258:15-10:55
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:203:45-6:55-10:15
Sherlock Gnomes (PG) 1:50-4:25
Rampage (PG-13) 4:00-6:457:15-9:25
Ready Player One (PG-13)
12:45-4:05-7:25-10:45
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 1:25-4:006:45-9:25
Ready Player One: An IMAX 3D
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD Experience (PG-13) 1:40-4:50
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:454:35-7:15-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:15- Rampage (PG-13) XD: 11:15Rampage 3D (PG-13) 1:10-9:55
3:20-9:40
4:45-7:35
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 1:00
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 3:25-6:10- Rampage: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 8:05-10:55
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
9:00; 3:25-6:10-9:00
11:30-3:40-6:50-10:00
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 10:55-1:35- Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 12:10-2:50-5:20-8:10-10:45
Ready Player One: An IMAX 3D 4:20-7:00-9:35
Experience (PG-13) 1:30
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:05-12:15- Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
(PG) 1:40-4:10
Rampage: The IMAX 2D Experi- 1:30-2:45-3:55-5:15-6:30-8:00A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:209:10-10:25
ence (PG-13) CC: 10:45-5:001:00-2:55-3:30-5:15-6:00-7:45I
Feel
Pretty
(PG-13)
10:55-1:407:45-10:30
8:20-10:10-11:00
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- 4:25-7:10-10:00
Love, Simon (PG-13) 10:15
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
13) CC: 2:00-4:40-7:10-9:50
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 12:55A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 11:15- 11:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:35-3:30- 3:40-6:50-9:30
2:45-5:20-8:00-10:20
Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:00-2:40I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:00- 7:00-10:10
5:20-8:00-10:40
Rampage (PG-13) 12:00-12:401:45-4:30-7:30-10:10
1:25-2:45-4:05-5:30-7:00-8:15-9:35 I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:15-4:00Rampage (PG-13) 7:00
6:45-9:40
Ready Player One (PG-13)
AMC Loews
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 1:002:30-9:05
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
4:05-7:05-10:05
Rampage 3D (PG-13) XD:
11115 Mall Circle
Traffik (R) 12:25-1:50-3:05-4:202:00-10:20
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:30- Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
5:35-7:00-8:15-9:35-10:50
3:00-9:00
Beirut (R) 1:25-4:15-6:55-9:40
(PG) 11:00-1:15-3:20
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 11:00Fragments of Truth 7:00
Beyond the Clouds (Hindi) (NR)
1:45-4:45-7:30-10:15
Héctor 'El Father' Conocerás
12:35-3:35-6:45-9:50
Rampage 3D (PG-13) CC: 10:15- A Quiet Place (PG-13) 5:45-8:25 la verdad (NR) 12:40-3:251:00-3:45-9:45
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:25-2:15- 6:15-9:05
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- 4:45-7:30-10:15
13) CC: 11:30-2:00-4:30-7:15-9:45 Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 10:55- Regal Germantown Stadium 14
20000 Century Boulevard
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC:
12:30-1:45-3:30-5:00-8:00-10:10 Blockers (R) 1:25-3:55-4:2510:30-11:45-12:45-2:15-4:30-6:15- Bharath Ane Nenu (NR) 11:307:00-10:00
7:00-9:30
1:25-3:30-5:30-7:30-9:30
Rim: Uprising (PG-13) 9:50
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: (!)
Traffik (R) 11:40-2:25-5:00-7:40- Pacific
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:45-4:5010:45-1:30-4:15-7:00-9:30
10:20
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:30- Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 11:00- 7:55-11:00
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 1:30-6:55
1:15-4:00-6:45-9:45
4:10-9:25
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC: The Miracle Season (PG) 1:40-6:55 Rampage (PG-13) 12:30-2:003:05-5:45-7:15-8:20-11:00
2:45-6:00-9:00
Beirut (R) 11:40-2:20-5:05-7:45- Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R)
Traffik (R) CC: (!) 11:45-2:30-5:15- 10:25
7:45-10:30
Ready Player One in 3D (PG-13) I4:05-9:30
Can Only Imagine (PG) 1:50
Rampage (PG-13) 7:00
11:10-5:50
Ready Player One (PG-13) 12:40Fragments of Truth 7:00
AMC Magic Johnson
3:55-7:05-10:15
Blockers (R) 11:50-2:25-5:05Capital Ctr 12
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 4:40-9:55
7:55-10:30
800 Shoppers Way
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PGBlack Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:15- Rampage (PG-13) 12:00-12:4013) 2:05-4:45-7:20-9:50
2:45-5:30-8:15
3:10-6:15-9:15
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:35-1:20Blumhouse's
Truth
or
Dare
(PGRampage (PG-13) CC: (!)
3:00-3:45-5:20-6:15-7:45-8:4013) 11:10-12:30-2:00-3:10-4:302:25-7:40
10:05-11:00
6:05-7:15-8:45-9:45
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
Super Troopers 2 (R) 2:30-5:00Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14 7:35-10:05
12:00-3:00-6:05-9:10
1591 West Nursery Road
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 2:10-4:5012:50-5:40
Blockers (R) CC: 12:00-2:25-4:50- 7:30-10:10
Rampage 3D (PG-13) CC: (!)
Bharath Ane Nenu (NR) 12:007:20-9:45
11:50-5:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:50- 3:30-7:00-10:30
Rampage: The IMAX 2D Experi- 4:10-7:10-10:10
Traffik (R) 12:00-2:35-5:10-7:35ence (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:00-1:30- Rampage (PG-13) CC: 12:30-4:40- 10:10
7:15-9:50
4:00-6:45-9:30
Fragments of Truth 7:00
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Stadium 14
6505 America Blvd.
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:401:50-3:00-4:15-5:20-6:50-7:409:10-10:10
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:45-3:156:00-8:30
Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:30-3:005:30-8:00-10:25
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:20-4:007:00-9:40
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 9:30
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 12:503:20-6:10-8:45
Traffik (R) 1:30-4:20-7:10-9:50
Fragments of Truth 7:00
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
1:00-6:15
Rampage 3D (PG-13) CC: 12:353:30-9:40
Blockers (R) 2:10-4:45-7:20-10:05
Rampage: The IMAX 2D ExperiBlack Panther (PG-13) 12:45ence (PG-13) CC: 11:00-4:553:50-6:55-10:00
7:45-10:15
Rampage (PG-13) 1:10-4:10-4:50Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 1:057:10-7:40-9:50
3:55-6:30-9:15
Ready Player One (PG-13) 12:50Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
4:00-7:10-10:25
(PG) 11:00AM
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:50-4:40Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG7:30-10:20
13) CC: 11:10-12:00-1:55-2:30Rampage 3D (PG-13) 2:00-10:30
4:30-5:10-6:55-7:35-9:20-10:05
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 1:30-4:056:40-9:15
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14 A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 12:303:00-5:30-8:00-10:15
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG7710 Matapeake Business Dr
13) 1:35-4:20-7:00-9:50
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: 11:45A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:35-1:05- Blockers (R) CC: (!) 11:05-1:35- 2:15-3:45-5:00-7:45-9:05-10:15
4:10-6:40-9:10
2:55-3:25-5:15-5:45-7:35-8:05I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 11:15Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:20- 2:00-4:50-7:30-10:10
10:00-10:25
Super Troopers 2 (R) 2:25-4:55- 1:20-4:25-7:40-10:40
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC:
Rampage
(PG-13)
CC:
(!)
7:25-10:00
1:10-4:20-7:10-10:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 2:15-4:55- 11:50-2:50-5:30-8:10-10:50; (!)
Traffik (R) CC: 11:05-1:30-4:1010:30-1:30-4:50-7:10-9:30
7:35-10:15
7:00-9:30
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 2:20- Sherlock Gnomes (PG) CC:
Beirut (R) CC: 12:50-3:35-6:2010:45-1:15
5:10-8:00-10:50
9:00
A
Wrinkle
in
Time
(PG)
CC:
10:00Traffik (R) 12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00Ready Player One in 3D (PG-13)
12:50-4:05-6:50
10:30
CC: 12:40-4:00-6:50-9:45
Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:20-1:50Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12 (PG) CC: 10:10-12:40-3:30-6:00
4:15-6:45-9:25
14716 Baltimore Avenue
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
Blockers (R) 12:45-3:20-6:30-9:15 (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:40-2:40-5:10- Rampage (PG-13) 7:05
AMC Shirlington 7
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:008:00-9:50-10:30
2772 South Randolph St.
3:15-6:40-10:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: (!)
Rampage (PG-13) 1:00-2:45-4:10- 10:40-1:10-3:00-5:20-7:50-10:10 Blockers (R) CC: 1:40-4:15-7:10
7:00-8:05-9:50
Rampage (PG-13) CC: (!) 4:45
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
Ready Player One (PG-13) 11:50- 11:30-3:10-6:20-9:35
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
3:00-6:15-9:30
1:00-4:00-7:00
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: (!)
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 12:00Rampage 3D (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:20-2:00-4:30-7:20-10:00
5:30-10:45
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: 11:00- 2:00-7:30
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 1:45-4:25- 1:40-4:20-7:00-9:40
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 1:009:40
Traffik (R) CC: 9:50-12:30-3:40- 3:15-5:30-7:50
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- 6:10-8:30-9:00-11:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: (!) 2:1513) 11:30-2:05-4:35-7:05-9:40
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC: 5:00-7:40
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:15-2:50- 10:50-1:50-3:50-4:40-6:30-7:30- Chappaquiddick (PG-13) CC:
7:10-10:45
1:50-4:30-7:20
9:20-10:20
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:40-2:15Beirut (R) CC: 1:30-4:10-6:45
iPic Pike & Rose
5:00-7:45-10:30
AMC Tysons Corner 16
11830 Grand Park Ave
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 12:307850e Tysons Corner Center
Blockers (R) 12:15-3:00-5:45-8:45
3:30-6:50-9:45
Blockers (R) CC: 11:20-2:00-4:45I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:30-4:45- Black Panther (PG-13) 11:307:35-10:05
2:45-6:00-9:30
7:30-10:15
Traffik (R) 11:30-2:00-4:30-7:20- Rampage (PG-13) (!) 12:45-3:45- Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 10:001:05-4:20-7:25-10:30
10:00
6:45-9:40
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 10:15Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13 Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- 12:55-2:20-3:45-8:00-9:15
13) (!) 11:45-2:30-5:30-8:30
199 East Montgomery Ave
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 1:30-4:30- Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
Blockers (R) 12:15-2:40-5:159:35
7:15-10:00
7:50-10:25
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) (!) 1:00-4:00- Sherlock Gnomes (PG) CC:
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:1511:10-1:40
7:00-10:15
3:30-6:40-10:00
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 12:00- Ready Player One: An IMAX 3D
Rampage (PG-13) 12:20-1:30Experience (PG-13) 10:05-1:153:15-6:30-9:50
3:00-4:10-7:00-8:05-9:50
4:25-7:40-10:55
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:10-2:55- Traffik (R) (!) 1:45-4:45-7:30-10:30 Rampage 3D (PG-13) CC: 11:355:35-8:05-10:40
5:15-10:35
Ready Player One (PG-13) 12:30Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC:
3:40-6:50-9:55
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
11:00-4:50
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 5:25-10:45
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:30-2:50- Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:00- (PG) 10:05AM
5:30-5:40-8:00-8:10-10:20-10:30 4:00-7:00-10:00
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- Rampage (PG-13) CC: 1:45-2:45- (PG-13) CC: 10:10-12:40-3:1513) 12:15-2:45-5:20-8:00-10:30
5:45-8:15-10:45
4:15-6:45-7:45-9:15
Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:00-2:30- Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 10:205:00-7:35-10:05
12:50-3:10-5:35-8:05-10:25
1:30-7:00-9:15
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 12:00-2:40- Rampage 3D (PG-13) CC:
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: (!)
5:20-8:00-10:40
11:30-2:10-4:40-7:15-9:45
5:15-10:15
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 1:00A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 1:15- I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:403:50-9:45
12:05-1:20-2:45-4:00-5:25-6:55I Can Only Imagine (PG) 12:00- 3:30-5:45-8:00-10:15
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- 8:20-9:40-11:00
2:45
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC:
Traffik (R) 12:45-3:15-5:45-8:15- 13) CC: 1:00-4:45-7:30-10:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:30-4:00- 1:45-10:15
10:45
Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: 4:05
7:30-10:15
Fragments of Truth 7:00
Traffik (R) CC: (!) 10:00-12:25Chappaquiddick (PG-13) CC:
Regal Waugh Chapel
2:50-5:20-7:45-10:20
2:30-5:00-6:45-10:15
Stadium 12 & IMAX
Ready Player One in 3D (PG-13) Chappaquiddick (PG-13) CC:
1419 South Main Chapel Way
12:20-2:55-5:30-8:10-10:50
CC: 3:30
Beirut (R) CC: 10:55-1:50-4:35Blockers (R) 12:30-3:00-5:30AMC Hoffman Center 22
7:20-10:10
8:00-10:30
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Fragments of Truth (!) 7:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:35Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13)
Rampage (PG-13) 7:00
3:40-6:50-9:55
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:25-1:55Rampage (PG-13) 12:10-2:45-7:55 CC: 8:15
Ready Player One (PG-13) 12:10- Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:10- 4:15-6:45-9:10
4:40-7:10-10:20
3:20-6:40-10:00
AMC Worldgate 9
Ready Player One: An IMAX 3D Blockers (R) CC: 12:00-2:35-5:2513025 Worldgate Dr
7:55-10:25
Experience (PG-13) 12:40-3:50
Blockers
(R) CC: 2:15-5:10-8:00
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 5:20-10:30 Rampage (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:45Black
Panther
(PG-13) CC: 2:001:30-4:15-7:15-8:00-10:00
Rampage: The IMAX 2D Experi5:00-7:20
Sherlock Gnomes (PG) CC: 12:55ence (PG-13) 7:00-9:40
Rampage (PG-13) CC: 2:00-2:40Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:15-2:45- 3:20-6:00
Ready Player One: An IMAX 3D 4:40-5:15-7:15-8:00
5:15-7:45-10:10
Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- Experience (PG-13) 12:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:10-3:00 4:50-7:15
13) 12:15-2:45-5:15-7:55-10:20
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PGA Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:20-2:40- Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
13) 2:10-4:40-7:50
7:05-10:30
5:00-7:30-9:50
A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 2:00Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:00-2:35- Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC: 9:50
4:20-6:40
Rampage 3D (PG-13) CC: (!)
5:10-7:50-10:25
Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: (!)
2:15-5:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 12:00-2:352:15-4:45-7:10
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) CC:
5:10-7:50-10:30
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: (!) 2:00Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 1:20- 1:40-6:55
4:40-7:45
Rampage: The IMAX 2D
4:10-7:10-10:05
Traffik (R) 12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00- Experience (PG-13) CC: (!) 3:30- Ready Player One in 3D (PG-13)
CC:
2:00
6:15-9:00
10:25
Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Regal Westview
One Loudoun
(PG)
(!)
1:20
Stadium 16 & IMAX
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 2:0520575 East Hampton Plaza
5243 Buckeystown Pike
4:35-7:45-10:15
Blockers
(R)
11:20AM
Blockers (R) 11:45-2:20-5:10A Quiet Place (PG-13) CC: 12:30- Black Panther (PG-13) 10:00AM
7:50-10:40
3:00-5:35-7:55-10:15
Rampage
(PG-13)
10:25-1:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:25Super Troopers 2 (R) CC: 12:00- Ready Player One (PG-13)
4:00-7:20-10:25
2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
11:50AM
Sherlock Gnomes (PG) 11:10AM I Feel Pretty (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:15Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 11:15AM
Rampage (PG-13) 12:00-2:40-8:10 4:00-6:45-9:30
You Were Never Really Here (R)
Ready Player One (PG-13) 11:40Love, Simon (PG-13) CC: 3:4012:15
2:50-6:20-9:40
Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:35AM
Ready Player One: An IMAX 3D 6:40-9:25
Finding Your Feet (PG-13) CC:
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 10:30-1:35
Experience (PG-13) 12:25-3:35
(!) 4:05
Beirut (R) 1:20
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:40Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) CC: Buddha's Palm (NR) 7:40
3:20-6:10-9:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 4:15-10:50
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 5:20-10:50 1:35-4:25-7:35-10:25
Rampage: The IMAX 2D Experi- Bharath Ane Nenu (NR) (!) 3:05- Blockers (R) 2:30-5:30-8:30-11:20
6:35-10:10
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 10:10-1:00
ence (PG-13) 7:10-9:50
Rampage (PG-13) 4:20-7:15-10:10
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:50-3:50- Traffik (R) CC: (!) 2:00-4:457:30-9:55
Ready Player One (PG-13) 2:456:40-10:00
6:05-9:35
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- Chappaquiddick (PG-13) CC:
1:30-6:50-9:35
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 2:15-5:1013) 11:50-2:45-5:50-8:20-10:55
The
Miracle
Season
(PG)
CC:
8:15-11:05
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:204:20-9:40
You Were Never Really Here (R)
1:50-3:00-4:30-5:30-7:00-8:00Beirut (R) CC: 2:30-5:10-7:503:00-5:45-8:35-11:20
9:30-10:30
Super Troopers 2 (R) 3:20-6:20Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:20-2:00- 10:30
Ready Player One in 3D (PG-13) 9:05
4:45-7:30-10:15
Beirut (R) 7:40
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:05-2:15- CC: 3:45
Fragments of Truth 7:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 4:40-7:455:00-7:45-10:45
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 12:30- A Quiet Place (PG-13) 1:55-4:30- 10:30
7:00-9:45
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 4:003:40-6:30-9:20
Traffik (R) 12:10-3:30-6:00-8:30- Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- 6:55-9:50
13) (!) 12:05-1:45-2:45-4:15-5:1511:00
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
6:45-7:45-9:20-10:20
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 1:002911 District Ave
4:10-6:50-10:10
AMC Potomac Mills 18
The Rider (R) 10:10-12:35-3:00Beirut (R) 1:10-4:40-7:40-10:35
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
5:30-8:00-10:30
UA Snowden Square
Blockers (R) CC: 12:55-3:50You Were Never Really Here (R)
Stadium 14
6:35-9:10
10:45-1:10-3:35-6:00-8:30-10:55
9161 Commerce Center Dr
Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13) CC: I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 10:40-1:304:15-7:00-9:45
Blockers (R) 2:00-4:40-7:15-10:00 6:00-9:55
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:15- Black Panther (PG-13) 10:55Black Panther (PG-13) 12:303:20-6:25-9:50
1:55-4:55-7:55-10:55
3:30-6:20-9:45
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 10:30-12:55Rampage (PG-13) 1:10-1:40-3:50- Rampage (PG-13) CC: 1:204:10-8:45
3:25-5:50-8:15-10:40
6:30-7:15-9:20
Lean on Pete (R) 11:00-1:40A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 1:00-3:40 Ready Player One (PG-13) CC:
4:30-7:15
Ready Player One (PG-13) 1:00- 6:05
Sherlock Gnomes (PG) CC: 11:05- A Quiet Place (PG-13) 10:004:10-7:20-10:30
12:15-2:40-5:05-7:30-9:55-11:00
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 4:30-10:20 1:15-3:30
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- Ready Player One: An IMAX 3D Ready Player One (PG-13) 10:451:45-4:45-7:45-10:00
13) 2:10-4:50-7:30-10:05
Experience (PG-13) 1:40
VIRGINIA
Bow Tie
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
11940 Market St
Rampage (PG-13) 4:00-9:20
Blockers (R) 12:00-2:30-5:107:40-10:10
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:203:20-6:20-9:20
You Were Never Really Here (R)
1:40-4:20-6:45-9:25
Ready Player One (PG-13)
12:05-3:10-6:30-9:40
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 3:306:10-9:10
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:30-4:307:10-9:50
The Death of Stalin (R) 3:509:20
Beirut (R) 1:10-4:10-7:00-9:35
Rampage (PG-13) 1:20-4:107:20-10:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:302:50-5:20-7:50-10:05
Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
(PG) 12:50
Chappaquiddick (PG-13)
1:00-6:40
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 1:20-6:50
Cinema Arts Theatre
9650 Main St
The Leisure Seeker (R) CC:
12:20-2:25-4:55-7:50-9:30
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) CC: 9:502:40-4:40-9:45
Lean on Pete (R) CC: 9:4012:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:55
Finding Your Feet (PG-13) CC:
9:40-12:10-7:10-10:00
The Death of Stalin (R) CC:
9:45-12:05-2:35-5:05-7:40-9:50
Beirut (R) CC: 9:55-12:15-2:304:50-7:20-9:40
Lives Well Lived CC: 12:00-4:00
Itzhak CC: 10:00-2:00-6:00-8:00
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
1600 Village Market Boulevard
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:004:00-7:05
Ready Player One (PG-13) 1:254:25-7:25
Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero
(PG) 11:20-2:20
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 11:50-2:25-5:20-7:50
I Can Only Imagine (PG) 11:352:10-4:50-7:20
Beirut (R) 11:50-4:40-7:30
Blockers (R) 12:10-2:50-5:157:45
Rampage (PG-13) 11:30-12:302:00-3:00-4:30-5:30-7:00-8:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 12:00-1:102:35-4:10-5:10-6:50-7:40
Rampage (PG-13) 12:30-3:005:30-8:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:2012:20-1:30-2:45-3:45-5:00-6:007:15-8:15
Manassas 4 Cinemas
8890 Mathis Ave.
Ready Player One (PG-13)
6:15-9:00
I Can Only Imagine (PG)
1:45-4:00
Rampage (PG-13) 2:00-4:156:30-8:45
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 2:00-4:006:00-8:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:45-4:006:15-8:30
KAMAU HAROON/DREAMVILLE RECORDS
J. Cole’s “KOD” was dropped
from on high Friday.
Tuesday, April 24, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Bharath Ane Nenu (NR) 9:00
Traffik (R) 1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30
Beirut (R) 4:10-9:20
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 7:00
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
Blockers (R) 12:30-3:00-5:308:00-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00Blockers (R) 11:10-1:40-4:15- 4:10-7:10-10:20
Rampage (PG-13) 12:45-3:207:00-9:40
Rampage (PG-13) 11:50-4:20- 5:00-6:00-8:00-8:30
Ready Player One (PG-13) 1:505:20-7:05-8:05-9:45
4:50-7:50-10:50
Ready Player One (PG-13)
12:15-3:30-6:40-9:55
Ready Player One: An IMAX 3D
Sherlock Gnomes (PG) 11:40- Experience (PG-13) 1:10-4:20
1:55
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 2:20Rampage 3D (PG-13) 2:3510:45
10:35
Rampage: The IMAX 2D ExperiBeyond the Clouds (Hindi) (NR) ence (PG-13) 7:30-10:10
11:15-1:50-4:30-7:20-10:15
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 6:50-9:30
Baaghi 2 (NR) 12:35-3:40Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
6:45-9:50
(PG-13) 2:00-4:40-7:20-9:50
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:35(PG-13) 12:10-2:40-5:15-7:40- 1:40-2:50-4:15-5:10-6:40-7:4010:10
9:00-10:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:35Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:402:10-4:45-7:10-9:35
3:10-5:40-8:10-10:40
Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:30I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:30-4:203:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:45-2:25- 7:00-9:40
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R)
5:05-7:45-10:25
12:50-3:40-6:30-9:20
Mercury (Tamil) (NR) 11:05I Can Only Imagine (PG)
1:35-4:00-6:35-9:05
1:20-4:00
Rangasthalam (NR) 1:00Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 12:304:35-8:20
Bharath Ane Nenu (NR) 11:30- 3:30-6:20-9:10
3:00-6:30-10:00
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
October (Hindi) (NR) 12:00-2:303575 Potomac Avenue
5:00-7:35-10:05
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 11:20- Blockers (R) 12:00-2:30-5:057:40-10:25
2:05-4:50-7:30-10:20
The Miracle Season (PG) 11:00- Black Panther (PG-13) 12:153:20-6:45-9:55
1:30-3:55
Sherlock Gnomes (PG) 1:20Beirut (R) 11:25-2:00-4:403:45-7:15-9:40
7:15-9:50
A Wrinkle in Time (PG) 12:25Subedar Joginder Singh
(Punjabi) (NR) 6:25-9:25
3:40-6:30-9:25
Cake 12:20-3:10-6:05-8:45
Rampage (PG-13) 12:05-1:15Krishnarjuna Yudham (NR)
2:35-5:20-7:10-7:50-10:30
12:05-3:15-6:20-9:30
Ready Player One (PG-13)
Blackmail (Hindi) 11:55-2:50- 12:20-3:35-6:55-10:20
6:00-9:00
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 4:00-9:50
Regal Dulles Town Center 10 A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:051:00-2:35-4:40-5:15-7:05-7:4521100 Dulles Town Circle
9:45-10:15
Blockers (R) 12:50-3:30-6:00Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 1:108:30-11:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00-4:00- 3:55-9:40
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
7:00-10:00
Rampage (PG-13) 12:30-1:30(PG-13) 12:00-2:30-4:55-7:355:30-6:30-8:15
10:05
Ready Player One (PG-13) 12:10- Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 1:303:15-6:15-9:30
4:50-7:40-10:30
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 3:00-10:50 Super Troopers 2 (R) 1:00-3:40Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 1:45-4:20- 6:20-8:50-11:30
6:45-9:15
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:15-4:05Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- 7:00-9:50
13) 11:50-2:10-4:45-7:15-9:40
Traffik (R) 12:10-2:35-5:10A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:20-2:45- 7:35-10:00
4:10-5:10-7:30-9:00-9:50
of Truth 7:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 12:00-2:30- Fragments
Héctor 'El Father' Conocerás la
5:20-8:00-10:40
Traffik (R) 12:00-2:20-5:00-7:45- verdad (NR) 1:25-4:20-6:50-9:20
Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
10:20
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
45980 Regal Plaza
Regal Fairfax Towne Center 10
4110 West Ox Road
Blockers (R) 1:10-4:00-7:00-10:10
Sherlock Gnomes (PG) 12:00-2:20
Rampage (PG-13) 12:05-2:305:10-7:50-10:30
Ready Player One (PG-13) 12:503:50-6:40-9:45
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 4:40-7:20Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 10:00
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG6201 Multiplex Drive
Blockers (R) 11:55-2:30-5:00- 13) 12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:10-2:457:30-10:05
Black Panther (PG-13) 10:25- 5:05-7:30-9:55
Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:30-3:001:30-4:40-7:45-10:45
Rampage (PG-13) 10:05-11:15- 5:30-8:10-10:40
1:50-3:15-4:25-7:10-8:25-9:50- I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 12:00-2:405:20-8:00-10:40
11:00
Paul, Apostle of Christ (PG-13)
Ready Player One (PG-13)
1:00-3:55-9:30
10:00-1:05-4:10-7:15-10:35
Gonjiam: Haunted Asylum 12:00Rampage 3D (PG-13) 12:402:25-4:50-7:15-9:40
5:50
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:00-2:25- Fragments of Truth 7:00
4:55-7:25-10:20
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
22875 Brambleton Plaza
(PG-13) 11:45-2:10-4:35-7:00- Blockers (R) 11:50-2:20-5:009:25
7:30-10:00
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 10:20Black Panther (PG-13) 1:15-4:2011:20-12:35-1:35-2:55-4:057:20-10:20
5:15-6:25-7:40-8:40-10:15
Rampage (PG-13) 1:00-1:50-4:30I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:05-1:45- 6:20-7:10-9:50
4:20-6:55-9:30
Ready Player One (PG-13) 11:50Bharath Ane Nenu (NR) 10:15- 3:00-6:10-9:30
11:30-1:55-3:00-5:30-6:30Ready Player One: An IMAX 3D
9:15-10:00
Experience (PG-13) 1:00-4:30
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 3:40-9:00
Rave Cinemas
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme Rampage: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 8:00-10:40
11900 Palace Way
Blockers (R) 11:55-2:35-5:10- Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 11:45-2:154:45-7:15-9:45
7:55-10:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:40- Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 12:10-2:40-5:10-7:40-10:10
2:55-6:50-10:40
Rampage (PG-13) 11:25-12:05- A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:00-1:102:15-2:45-4:55-5:25-7:30-8:05- 2:20-3:30-4:40-5:50-7:00-8:109:20-10:30
10:50
Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:15-2:45Ready Player One (PG-13)
5:15-7:45-10:15
12:30-3:45-7:25-10:45
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:45-2:30Rampage 3D (PG-13) 10:05
5:15-8:00-10:45
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
(PG-13) 11:20-1:50-4:25-7:20- I Can Only Imagine (PG) 1:404:15-10:00
10:15
Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 1:20A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:304:00-6:40-9:20
2:20-4:40-7:50-10:35
The Miracle Season (PG) 12:40Super Troopers 2 (R) 11:153:10-5:40-8:15-10:45
1:45-4:20-7:05-9:55
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:10-2:00- Beirut (R) 1:15-3:50-6:30-9:15
4:50-7:35-10:20
Regal Kingstowne
Bharath Ane Nenu (NR) 11:00Stadium 16 & RPX
2:40-6:15-9:45
5910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
Traffik (R) 11:45-2:10-4:35Blockers (R) 12:35-3:10-5:407:10-10:10
8:05-10:30
Beirut (R) 10:55-1:35-4:15Black Panther (PG-13) 12:257:00-9:50
3:30-6:30-9:30
A Quiet Place (PG-13) XD:
Rampage (PG-13) 12:50-1:5010:50-1:20-3:40-6:55-9:35
4:25-6:00-7:05-9:40
Bharath Ane Nenu (NR) XD:
Ready Player One (PG-13) 1:0012:20-4:05-8:15
4:05-7:20-10:25
Regal Ballston Common
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 3:25-8:35
Stadium 12
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:25-2:55671 N. Glebe Road
5:20-7:50-10:20
Blockers (R) 2:00-4:40-7:10-9:40 Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG13) 12:15-2:35-5:00-7:30-10:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:10A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:15-2:304:10-7:20-10:25
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 4:00-9:20 4:50-7:00-9:20
Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:30-3:00Rampage (PG-13) 1:15-1:455:30-8:05-10:30
4:30-6:45
Ready Player One (PG-13) 1:20- I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 12:15-2:505:20-7:55-10:30
4:20-7:25-10:35
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare (PG- Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) 12:403:35-6:25-9:15
13) 1:40-4:15-7:00-9:30
Traffik (R) 12:20-2:45-5:10-7:40Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 1:40
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 1:00-1:30- 10:10
3:15-3:45-5:30-6:00-7:50-8:20- Chappaquiddick (PG-13) 1:103:45-6:20-9:05
10:10-10:40
Super Troopers 2 (R) 2:15-5:00- Beirut (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15-9:55
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 12:457:45-10:30
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 1:50-4:40- 1:30-3:05-3:50-5:25-6:10-7:458:30-10:05
7:30-10:20
6500 Springfield Town Ctr
Blockers (R) 12:10-2:50-5:308:10-10:50
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:553:10-6:20-9:30
Rampage (PG-13) 11:40-1:552:35-5:20-7:20-8:00-10:50
Ready Player One (PG-13)
12:20-3:40-6:50-10:30
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 11:104:40-10:20
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 12:403:50-9:10
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
(PG-13) 10:55-1:30-4:00-6:409:20
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 11:502:40-5:10-7:40-10:10
Super Troopers 2 (R) 12:002:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 11:00-1:404:20-7:00-9:40
Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R)
10:55-1:50-4:50-7:50-10:40
Traffik (R) 11:30-2:00-4:306:30-9:50
Fragments of Truth 7:00
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Pl
Blockers (R) 2:25-5:05-7:3510:05
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:504:50-7:50-10:50
Sherlock Gnomes (PG) 1:203:20
Rampage (PG-13) 2:30-4:005:00-6:30-7:30-10:00
Ready Player One (PG-13) 1:004:05-7:10-10:10
Rampage 3D (PG-13) 1:30-9:00
Isle of Dogs (PG-13) 1:45-4:156:45-9:15
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 1:153:45-5:30-6:00-8:00-8:30-10:15
Blumhouse's Truth or Dare
(PG-13) 1:05-3:30-5:55-8:1510:40
A Quiet Place (PG-13) 2:004:30-7:00-9:30
Super Troopers 2 (R) 2:15-4:457:15-9:45-10:45
I Feel Pretty (PG-13) 2:10-5:107:55-10:30
Traffik (R) 2:20-5:15-7:45-10:20
The Miracle Season (PG) 1:103:40-6:15-9:10
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Pkwy
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
(NR) 2:20
Ready Player One: An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 4:15
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of
the Seas 3D (NR) 10:20-3:10
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:05
Planet Power: An IMAX 3D
Experience (NR) 12:40
Pandas: An IMAX 3D Experience
(G) 11:10-1:30
Ready Player One: An IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 7:00
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
The Greatest Showman (PG)
CC: 12:00-2:30-4:45-7:15-9:35
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:152:15-4:20
Early Man (PG) CC: 12:302:40-4:35
Tomb Raider (PG-13) CC:
7:30-9:50
Game Night (R) CC: 7:40-9:50
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
Q875
J
AJ
AQJ864
EAST
10
A Q 10 6 3
Q874
K92
WEST (D)
9
K9875
K 10 9 6 5
75
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
AKJ6432
42
32
10 3
The bidding:
WEST
NORTH
Pass
1
4
4
5
Pass
All Pass
Opening lead — EAST
SOUTH
1
Pass
Pass
1
Pass
5
CLASSIC PEANUTS
7
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
A
s the players at the
Mad Hatter’s took a tea
break, the Red Queens, who
were kibitzers, kept up their
bickering.
“I’m the most powerful
card in Wonderland,” the
Queen of Hearts boasted.
“No ace or king dares capture me.”
But the Queen of
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
Diamonds insisted that losing a trick could be better
than winning one.
Against the Hatter’s five
spades, West, the Dormouse,
led the seven of hearts. Alice,
East, played the queen.
“Good!” the Queen of
Hearts crowed.
The defense surely needed
a diamond and a club. But
because dummy’s clubs
would provide discards,
LIO
Alice had to lead a diamond
quickly. Giving the Queen of
Diamonds a nod, Alice led ...
the queen. The Hatter took
the ace and drew trumps,
but when Alice took the king
of clubs, she led a diamond
to West for down one.
If Alice leads a low diamond to the king and ace at
Trick Two, declarer succeeds.
He draws trumps, ruffs his
last heart in dummy and
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
exits with a diamond. When
Alice wins, she is end-played.
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
10 A Q 10 6 3
Q874K92
Your partner opens one
spade, you bid two hearts, he
rebids two spades and you
try 2NT. Partner next bids
three diamonds. What do you
say?
ANSWER: Partner suggests
BLONDIE
six spades, four diamonds
and minimum values. If he
held A K 8 7 5, 4, K J 9 3,
Q 10 3, he would have no
reason to disturb 2NT. With
A K 9 8 5 3, 4, A K 10 5, Q 3,
his second bid would have
been two diamonds or three
spades. Pass and accept a
plus.
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
BIRTHDAY | APRIL 24
This year you have
the advantage of luck
and high sensitivity.
Used together,
these qualities will help you
avoid making any errors. If
you are single, the next six
months could become a very
significant period for you,
as you could meet someone
special. Do not commit unless
you feel as if you have met
Mr. or Ms. Right. If you are
attached, the two of you could
enter a very romantic period.
You also might welcome a new
addition to your family! Leo
likes your energy, even if you
rarely agree with him or her!
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You’ll make an effort to
energize a key person in
your life. Know that you are
an excellent cheerleader,
but everyone has free will.
Excitement rises quickly, which
could affect your interactions
with others.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You are more in touch with
a domestic matter than you
realize. Be careful about how
much you choose to share. You
understand a loved one better
than he or she does. You gain
insights that others don’t.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Make calls early in the day.
Honor the need to complete
a certain facet of work in the
morning. Use recent success
WEINGARTENS & CLARK to energize you. Use your high
energy and great ideas. Oneon-one relating draws positive
results.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Balance your checkbook
with care. Handle your
finances with strength and
understanding. You don’t
want a situation to get out of
control. Understand what is
happening with a loved one.
Make an important call in the
afternoon.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Understand that you might
be pushing someone away
without intending to. You could
be too distracted for your own
good, and might be missing
an important detail or two.
Recognize your limits.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Listen to news openly. Your
finances will be affected if you
don’t simplify how you handle
money. Stay away from any
wild risks, unless you are sure
you can take a loss. Extremes
punctuate your day.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Relate directly to others.
Understand your limits and
what is needed. If you’re
having an identity crisis, or are
a victim of confusion, detach
and try to look at the big
picture.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You are in the spotlight most
of the day. You might prefer to
be elsewhere, but you must
remain where you are for now.
Toward the late afternoon, a
meeting could evolve into a
celebration.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Eye the big picture before
taking any action. You also
might want to do some
research in the morning. By
midafternoon, you probably
will feel more secure about
your choices.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You know how to deal with
a partner, especially when
speaking about matters that
pertain to both of you. You
have unusual drive, which
helps you accomplish key
goals. Before you act, detach
and decide if this situation is
worth the effort.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You will see a loved one quite
differently once you sweep
away your innate prejudices.
A personal matter could
change as a result. Allow
your sensitivity to come out.
A loved one adores how you
demonstrate your caring
attitude.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Dive into work. You will
accomplish a lot in a short
period. Calls, emails and texts
demand your attention as the
day comes to a close. Enjoy
your popularity. Be careful
when dealing with a friend who
has a crush on you.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
Presidents also receive gifts in the mail from
regular Americans. When Ronald Reagan was
president, he once received a teddy bear with
first lady Nancy Reagan’s face on the head.
May flowers are around the corner,
but you know what comes first.
Take along an umbrella.
ILLUSTRATION BY MARJAN SALASOVICH, 6, ARLINGTON
These presidential presents are a little peculiar
BY
D ARA E LASFAR
W
hat kind of gift do
you give the leader
of the free world?
French President
Emmanuel Macron,
who arrived in Washington on
Monday for a state visit, gave President Trump an oak tree sapling
from the Belleau Wood, the site of a
1918 World War I battle where
9,000 Americans died. The gift was
an appreciation for U.S. sacrifice.
Throughout history, when foreign leaders visited our presidents, they gifted them with something symbolic and often personal. But there have been times when
the gifts have been a bit odd.
During a 2011 visit to Australia,
President Barack Obama received
crocodile insurance from the head
of the Northern Territory. You
know, in case the president got in a
terrible accident while visiting the
croc hot spot.
“I have to admit, when we reformed health care in America, crocodile insurance is one thing we left
out,” Obama said with a chuckle.
President George W. Bush got a
stuffed dead lion and leopard
from Tanzania. In 1984, President
Ronald Reagan received a baby
elephant on the White House lawn
dressed in traditional clothing
NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION
CLOCKWISE FROM
TOP: President Ronald
Reagan, right, receives a
baby elephant from the
president of Sri Lanka,
second from right, in
1984. In 1962, John F.
Kennedy was given a
brass sculpture of a
crane from the country
of Dahomey, in presentday Benin. This chew toy
was a gift for Barack
Obama’s dog Bo from the
British prime minister.
The first lady of Peru
gave this mother-andchild doll to Kennedy’s
daughter, Caroline.
Reagan received this
gold mask from Japan’s
prime minister.
RONALD REAGAN PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY/
NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS
ADMINISTRATION
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 __ jacket: soldier’s protection
5 Reeded
woodwinds
10 Like some
humor
13 NASA prefix
14 Grow fond of
16 Elisabeth who
played Finlay
on “CSI”
17 Video game
preview
19 Window section
20 Naturally bright
21 College sr.’s test
22 Elevator name
23 Exemplary
27 Commercial cow
30 Before, in verse
31 Many Louvre
paintings
32 Columnist
Maureen
33 End of most
work wks.
34 Arresting image?
37 Boxing legend
38 Romantic
jewelry item
40 “A Wrinkle in
Time” director
DuVernay
41 Sewer entrance
43 Past its prime
44 “My turn!”
45 Soccer score
46 Mineo of film
47 Muse of memory
48 Latin phrase
about certain
effects of
alcohol
52 Johns, to Elton
53 Finish in front
54 Long look
58 Riga resident
59 Social sin ...
and what 17-,
23-, 38- and
48-Across are
guilty of?
62 Significant
others, in
modern slang
63 __ Creed
64 Windy City daily,
familiarly
65 Take a wrong
turn, say
66 “Spider-Man”
actor Willem
67 Racy Snapchat
message
when Sri Lanka’s president visited. While that may be over-thetop, the animal represented the
friendship and similarities between the countries. The elephant
is the symbol of Reagan’s political
party (Republican) and was the
same for the Sri Lankan ruling
political party at the time.
“She is a cute little thing only 34
inches high,” Reagan noted in a
1984 diary entry.
Just like on birthdays and anniversaries, the official exchange of
gifts symbolizes the friendship and
journey shared between countries.
JOHN F. KENNEDY
PRESIDENTIAL
LIBRARY
JOHN F. KENNEDY
PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY
By Bruce Haight
BARACK OBAMA PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY/
NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION
kidspost@washpost.com
The meaning behind ‘hoping for a son’
Adapted from a
recent online discussion.
you’ll want to talk — and listen —
about with your kids.
Just a thought: Maybe Kate
was trying to rationalize her
husband’s bias as the province of
“everybody.” As in: She could be
struggling, too.
Hi, Carolyn: My
husband’s sister,
“Kate,” is
expecting her
second child.
They have a 3year-old girl. My husband and I
have two girls, 8 and 6. At our
house this week, Kate talked
extensively about her hopes that
this next baby is a boy. Some of
her reasons are cultural — her
husband comes from an ethnic
background known for valuing
maleness highly — but otherwise
all she says is, “Of course,
everybody wants one of each.”
We didn’t feel that way — we
just wanted healthy kids and
were excited to welcome
whoever came our way.
Our 8-year-old overheard the
conversation and has passed
what she heard along to her
sister in daily chitchat. I am
wondering how to talk to her
about what she overheard and
help her to make sense of it in a
way that doesn’t vilify her aunt
and uncle. Any ideas? She doesn’t
seem to be insulted or even have
any personal reaction, she’s just
generally interested in the topic.
— Explaining
Carolyn
Hax
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
DOWN
1 Passing fancies
2 Oniony soup
ingredient
3 Military force
4 Powdered
drink mix
brand
5 Be a debtor of
6 Place for
mixed drinks
7 Surgery ctrs.
8 Political
refugee
9 Shop
10 “Such sad
news!”
11 Written in
mystical,
ancient
letters
12 “Holy moly!”
15 Candy box size
16 Thread holders
18 Vague sense
24 Liveliness
25 Of the Great
Lakes, only
Ontario is
smaller than it
26 Diana of “Game
of Thrones”
27 Mild cheese
28 Kinks title
woman with
“a dark brown
voice”
29 Campaign
ad target
33 Naturally
evolving
34 Pop’s __ Vanilli
35 Fertility
clinic egg
36 Sticky strip
It’s part of diplomacy, the managing of international relationships
in a respectful and thoughtful way.
Through diplomacy, the United
States has been able to fix international relationships that may have
started on the wrong foot.
“We fought a revolution with
England, but now we refer to them
as a ‘special friend.’ And we exchange wonderful gifts with them
back and forth between the queen
and several presidents,” says Stewart McLaurin, the president of the
White House Historical Association.
But let’s face it: It must be difficult coming up with a cool present
for someone who has it all. Leaders
from Bermuda might have had a
hard time when they gave President John F. Kennedy a multicolored statue of a tropical fish in 1961.
He also got a drinking horn from
the leader of the Soviet Union.
When George W. Bush was in office,
he received a vocabulary-building
game from the sultan of Brunei.
“There are often gifts that are
interesting,” says Kirstin Holm, a
registrar of the Presidential Materials division at the National
Archives. “Sometimes it’s not
quite clear what the message was
with the gifts given. But we treat
everything as an artifact.”
Technically, all gifts given to the
president from foreign nations
are dedicated to the people of the
United States. Each president can
keep and use the presents until
the next president is inaugurated.
The National Archives picks up
the gifts at noon, before the next
president takes their new job at
the White House. You can see the
gifts presidents receive from foreign leaders at their presidential
libraries across the country.
The Archives isn’t picking up
the new tree, however. The oak
was to be planted late Monday at
the White House. Trump and future presidents won’t have to look
far for a reminder of France’s
friendship.
4/24/18
38 Interlibrary __
39 Strong sound
from the
savanna
42 Raises, as a sail
44 Newspaper
extras
46 New York lake
named for a Five
Nations tribe
47 Yucatán native
48 “Gee!”
49 Musical
shortcoming
50 Brightly colored
51 Snicker
55 Send packing
56 Computer operating system
57 Pride Month
letters
60 NBA official
61 __ Balls: Hostess
treats
MONDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Explaining: The biggest risk is
probably of making too much of
an inane remark.
That’s why your best recourse
is to rebut such generalizations
lightly in the moment. E.g. “Hey,
don’t speak for ‘everybody’ — I
would have been happy with any
combination of girls and boys.”
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Same goes for when you
overheard your kids talking
about what Kate said. It would
have been fine just to jump in. “I
heard her say that, too! What did
you think?” Then, in the course
of the conversation, you’d get
your chance to say you didn’t
have any preference. And you
could even talk a little bit, in an
age-appropriate way, about how
hard it is to say things about
“everybody” when everyone has
different opinions. Ahem. No
names need to be named.
This is the kind of stuff you get
to talk about over your kids’
entire childhood, so it doesn’t
need to be a big deal that Kate
may have sold your kids one little
idea that you yourself don’t buy.
Just use this as a reminder that
things you care enough about to
register concern are the ones
Home delivery is so easy.
Re: One of each: When my
parents were dating, my father
was very clear he didn’t want
kids, and if he had kids, he
definitely didn’t want girls. He
has three daughters and I have
never felt, for a second, that he
wished one of us were a boy, even
when he told me this story. I
wouldn’t really be concerned
about [what Kate said] — if you
clearly love your kids for who
they are, they’re not going to
fixate on one throwaway remark
they heard.
— Anonymous
Anonymous: Right, as long as
parents walk the walk of loving
and respecting the kids they
have.
If such a parent then openly
and frequently remarked that
boys would have been so much
easier because girls are all drama
— and who has not heard
someone say this? — then the
remark becomes less of a
throwaway and more of an
expression of gendered
worldview. Which neither boys
nor girls need at this point.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
1-800-753-POST
washingtonpost.com/subscribe
SF
KLMNO
SPORTS
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS
All the way back
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Ovechkin delivers for Washington,
has ‘huge opportunity’ vs. Pittsburgh
columbus, ohio
— We can debate
whether it’s fair —
and it’s probably
not — but it
doesn’t alter the
Barry
reality of the
Svrluga
situation.
Whatever the
Washington Capitals’ fate, in this
or any postseason for the past
dozen years, it is tied to the
legacy and reputation of one
Alex Ovechkin.
For a night and a series, let’s
allow the issue to rest. This
Capitals’ run in the Stanley Cup
playoffs staved off
disappointment, for now, in part
because Alex Ovechkin is on this
team. These Capitals — again,
they are Ovechkin’s Capitals
until they aren’t — are alive
because when he had a chance
to push Washington to the
second round, he did. He scored
the goal that put the Capitals
ahead. He scored the
trademarked power-play marker
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D7
The point god returns to form,
giving the Wizards hope — and a snarl
Before he reclaimed his
throne, John Wall
announced his intentions.
He warned all who
needed to be warned: the
Toronto Raptors, the
Jerry
Capital One Arena crowd,
Brewer
the detractors who felt
safe roaming the streets
during his flaw-exposing, injury-plagued
regular season.
The point god was back. Not just the
all-star point guard. D.C.’s point god, as he
is declared before every home game. He
Game 5: Wizards at Raptors
Tomorrow, 7 p.m., NBATV, NBCSW
Series tied, 2-2
Inside: Bradley Beal is frustrated with the
officials in this series. D3
started with a wicked crossover to ditch
Kyle Lowry and a ferocious left-handed
dunk over Jonas Valanciunas early in the
first quarter.
“This is my city!” Wall barked in
celebration. “I don’t play that [expletive]!
I don’t play that [expletive]! I don’t play
Give Your Deck
New Life
With a makeover from
Deck Wizard
BREWER CONTINUED ON D3
CAPITALS 6,
BLUE JACKETS 3:
Alex Ovechkin scored twice
in the second period to help
the Capitals beat Columbus in
Game 6. Washington won four
straight to win the series after
losing the first two games on
home ice.
More coverage online at
washingtonpost.com/sports
Capitals win series, 4-2
Capitals vs. Penguins
Schedule to be announced
Inside: Chandler Stephenson
breaks out at the right time. D6
BASEBALL
The Nationals trade
pitcher A.J. Cole to the
Yankees for cash
considerations. D5
BOXING
Local fighter Jarrett Hurd’s
fast ascent includes a rare
unification in 154-pound
weight class. D5
ON THE WEB
The Nats’ game against
the Giants ended late.
Visit WAPO.ST/SPORTS
Capitals finish o≠ Blue Jackets,
set up another meeting with Penguins
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
columbus, ohio — The Wash-
ington Capitals celebrated like it
was any other victory. Goaltender
Braden Holtby straightened in net
as his teammates calmly left the
bench and skated over to hug him
one-by-one. The mood in the locker room was happy but subdued.
Washington beat the Columbus
Blue Jackets, 6-3, in Game 6 to win
the first-round Stanley Cup playoff series between the teams, four
games to two. For a team that
seemed to accomplish so much,
the Capitals merely met their own
high expectations.
“I think we accomplished what
we believed we could from the
start of the series,” Holtby said
nonchalantly. “Obviously, enjoy it
for a bit, rest up and prepare for
the next one.”
After falling into an early twogames-to-none series hole, losing
both of the first two games at
home, the Capitals won four
straight playoff games, three of
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D6
ROAD TO THE NFL
The job interview of his life
Before draft, Texas A&M’s Kirk has his work cut out
BY J ESSE D OUGHERTY
IN COLLEGE STATION, TEX.
Christian Kirk counted the number of
steps inside his head — one, two, three all
the way to 12 — before he faked to the
sideline, froze for a millisecond, then
flashed to the middle of the field, where a
soaring football awaited him.
But it was too high, climbing well
above his head instead of dropping
toward his chest, and Kirk had to adjust.
Nobody Does What We Do!
t8F4BOE'JYBOE3FOFX
t3PUUFE8PPE3FQMBDFE
t1MVTDPBUTPG1BUFOUFE
8FBUIFSBOE8FBS1SPUFDUJPO
t'3&&&45*."5&4
$"--50%":
He slowed to gather his weight and met
the ball at the height of his vertical leap,
plucking it out of the air before carrying
it toward the end zone.
There were no defenders in his way.
There were none on the field. Kirk’s only
true opponent, on this morning in late
March and all the weeks surrounding it,
was himself.
“He looks good, doesn’t he? Right?”
asked Melissa Kirk, Christian’s mother,
KIRK CONTINUED ON D8
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
WINTER OLYMPICS
EARLY LEAD
Pro chef
dies after
marathon
collapse
M ATT B ONESTEEL
Matt Campbell, a 29-year-old
professional chef who reached the
semifinals on the most recent season of the BBC’s “MasterChef: The
Professionals,” died after collapsing during Sunday’s London
Marathon, race organizers announced Monday.
“Everyone involved in the organisation of the London Marathon would like to express our
sincere condolences to Matt’s family and friends,” officials said in a
statement that noted the cause of
death hadn’t been determined.
The 40,000-runner marathon
took place in the warmest conditions in race history — about
75 degrees, according to the BBC.
Campbell, who had completed the
Greater Manchester Marathon in
less than three hours just two
weeks earlier, collapsed at the
22.5-mile mark and received immediate medical attention before
being taken to a hospital.
Hugh Brasher, the London
Marathon’s event director, told the
BBC that more water was distributed to the runners — 41/2 liters per
person — than at any mass-participation event in the world. But he
also said organizers ran out of
water at Miles 8, 9 and 10.
Campbell was running the race
to support the Brathay Trust, a
youth charity in England’s Lake
District. He also said he was running in memory of his father, who
was involved with the charity before he died 18 months ago.
“As many of you know, I lost my
father Martin 18 months ago suddenly,” Campbell wrote. “The past
year & a half have been the toughest of my life but his spirit and
energy live on in me.
“He was the most inspirational
man in my life and was the one
who said — ‘Go on, why don’t you
give it a go? I know you can do it!’
and entered me into my first marathon; Brathay 2016 along with my
brother, Josh,” Campbell continued. “It was maybe the proudest
day of my life standing at the finish
line having achieved something I
never imagined possible with my
Dad & my Brother by my side.”
matt.bonesteel@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“Those things were full.
What a waste. Guess
they have to be full
to throw them that far.”
SIDNEY CROSBY,
Pittsburgh Penguins captain,
on Philadelphia Flyers fans
throwing beer cans onto the ice
near the end of Sunday’s
season-ending loss in the
Stanley Cup playoffs. (Via Early Lead)
BY
GRIGORY DUKOR/REUTERS
The U.S. women’s hockey team, which claimed its first gold medal since 1998, will meet with President Trump on Friday.
White House honors — for some
BY
R ICK M AESE
Shaun White has a wedding to
attend. So does fellow snowboarder
Chloe Kim. Some, like freeskier Gus
Kenworthy and Alpine racer Lindsey
Vonn, said long ago they were staying
away. Figure skater Mirai Nagasu is
among four Olympians busy taping
“Dancing with the Stars.” Most of the
top
skaters
also
have
other
commitments, so they can’t come,
either.
Winter Olympians will descend on
Washington for festivities this week,
capped with a visit to the White House
on Friday. While many of the biggest
American stars from the PyeongChang
Games — from Mikaela Shiffrin to
Adam Rippon — will not be present,
about 200 U.S. Olympians and
Paralympians are expected to make the
trip and meet President Trump.
Even without some of the U.S.
Olympic team’s most recognizable
names, the contingent will feature
many of the most significant medal
winners from this year’s Winter Games,
including the U.S. women’s hockey
team, the men’s curling squad,
bobsledder Elana Meyers Taylor and
snowboarders Red Gerard and David
Wise. In all, about two-thirds of the
Olympians and Paralympians who
competed in PyeongChang as part of
Team USA are expected to visit the
White House this week.
Many of the figure skaters can’t
attend because they’re locked into a
Stars on Ice tour, and luger Chris
Partial yet sizable contingent
to include men’s curling team,
women’s hockey squad
Mazdzer and snowboarder Jamie
Anderson will join Rippon and Nagasu
on the “Dancing With the Stars”
television competition, which debuts
Monday. Figure skaters Vincent Zhou
and Alexa and Chris Knierim are
expected at the White House, while
Bradie Tennell and Karen Chen will be
in Washington earlier in the week but
will leave before Friday’s trip down
Pennsylvania Avenue.
The White House visit has been a
staple for championship teams and
Olympic athletes, though Trump’s
comments and policies have drawn
more scrutiny to what was usually a
routine, nonpolitical matter. While
teams such as the Houston Astros,
Pittsburgh Penguins and New England
Patriots have visited Trump’s White
House, the president rescinded an
invitation to the Golden State Warriors
last year. The Warriors instead spent
their off day in Washington visiting the
National Museum of African American
History and Culture with local children.
Most recently, the Alabama football
team visited this month, and several
members of the Philadelphia Eagles
have said they will skip the trip, if it
takes place.
Friday will mark the first time
Olympians have visited since Trump
took office in January 2017. Many of the
PyeongChang competitors decided
long before this year’s Winter Games
that they’d pass on any White House
invitation.
“The things that Trump has done
during his campaign and since he’s
been in office that so intensely go
against the things that I believe in, I
have no desire to go and shake his
hand,” Kenworthy said last year.
“I want to represent our country
well. I don’t think that there are a lot of
people currently in our government
that do that,” Vonn told CNN last year.
The White House visit is the last of
three events planned by the U.S.
Olympic Committee this week. On
Tuesday, about 100 athletes will
participate in an education and career
summit, a full day of workshops and
seminars intended to ease the
transition to post-Olympic life.
And Thursday, more than 200
athletes will gather for the Team USA
Awards, where the USOC will recognize
its top athletes, teams and coaches from
PyeongChang. Kristi Yamaguchi will be
presented that night with the Jesse
Owens Olympic Spirit Award, which
honors someone who has served as “a
powerful force for good in society,
inspiring others by contributing to a
better world, uniting people or leading
a cause,” according to the USOC.
rick.maese@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
sports
Saints decline to match
Ravens’ offer for Snead
Wide receiver Willie Snead
bid farewell to the New Orleans
Saints, who informed him that
they would not be matching the
contract the Baltimore Ravens
offered the restricted free agent,
according to multiple media
reports Monday.
Snead will now join the
Ravens, with the Saints getting
no compensation in return.
Eager to add a target for
quarterback Joe Flacco,
Baltimore on Friday offered
Snead a two-year, $10.4 million
contract. New Orleans had five
days to match the deal, but it
didn’t need that much time.
Snead, 25, is the Ravens’ third
veteran wide receiver addition
this offseason, joining Michael
Crabtree and John Brown. . . .
Coach Pete Carroll said the
Seattle Seahawks have not closed
the door on possibly adding
quarterback Colin Kaepernick
to their roster, but how much
further they pursue it might
depend on the NFL draft. . . .
Police in Frisco, Tex., are
investigating a domestic violence
New England Patriots tight
end Rob Gronkowski was brimming with his usual ebullience
after it was announced last week
that he had bought a minority
share in a Kentucky Derby qualifier named Gronkowski.
“This horse is a winner, and I
love a winner,” Gronkowski the
human said in a statement.
“When I heard about the racehorse being named after me, I
started watching and got really
stoked when he started winning.
He’s won his last three races and
is now headed to the Derby. I’m
all in: Welcome to the Gronk
Family, Gronkowski the Horse!”
But now comes word that
Gronkowski the horse will not
make it to Churchill Downs after
all. The colt had “a minor setback,” British trainer Jeremy
Noseda told RacingPost.com on
Monday, before the horse’s ownership group made a more serious announcement.
“We very much regret that
Gronkowski will miss the Kentucky Derby after spiking a fever
over the weekend and being
treated with antibiotics,” the
Phoenix Thoroughbred ownership group announced. “He can’t
make the long journey to Louisville but is doing well.”
Gronkowski the horse had accrued enough qualifying points
for the Kentucky Derby and had
been scheduled to arrive in Kentucky this weekend. He had always been a long shot to compete
at the Derby; he has never run on
dirt, with all of his races coming
on turf or all-weather surface. He
also has never run longer than a
mile, making it questionable
whether Gronkowski had the
stamina to compete in the 11/4mile Derby. Plus, since the Kentucky Derby points system was
introduced in 2013, no horse has
won the race with fewer than 100
qualifying points. Gronkowski
has only 50.
Still, he figured to attract popular money based on his extremely popular namesake and
part-owner. Monday’s news ended that possibility.
“To have a Derby contender
with our first group of 3-yearolds was a dream come true, and
to have had New England Patriots star Rob Gronkowski join us
on that journey made it even
more exciting,” said Tom Ludt,
Phoenix Thoroughbred’s director of international operations,
according to the (Louisville)
Courier Journal. “But we must
put the welfare of the horse first,
and we will look forward to the
colt recovering quickly and to his
future races.”
Combatant and Instilled Regard moved into the Kentucky
Derby field, according to the
Courier Journal, after Quip also
dropped out.
matt.bonesteel@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA PLAYOFFS, FIRST ROUND
DIG ES T
PRO FOOTBALL
M ATT B ONESTEEL
complaint against Dallas
Cowboys defensive lineman
David Irving from a woman who
later recanted. . . .
The Pittsburgh Steelers
exercised the fifth-year option on
outside linebacker Bud Dupree,
a move that will keep him under
contract for the 2019 season. . . .
San Francisco General
Manager John Lynch said the
team will be patient through
linebacker Reuben Foster’s legal
issues in a domestic violence
case but stressed that he won’t
remain on the 49ers if the team
determines he hit a woman. . . .
The Oakland Raiders signed
cornerback Daryl Worley just
more than a week after his
release by the Philadelphia
Eagles following an arrest.
The Raiders also announced
that they exercised the fifth-year
option on wide receiver Amari
Cooper, keeping him under
control through 2019. . . .
The New York Giants acquired
punter Riley Dixon from the
Denver Broncos for a conditional
seventh-round draft choice in
2019. . . .
Bennie Cunningham, a
versatile tight end who starred at
Clemson and won two Super
Bowls with the Steelers, has died.
He was 63.
Clemson said Cunningham
died of cancer Monday at the
Cleveland Clinic. . . .
Former North Carolina allAmerican defensive tackle Dee
Hardison, who played 11 seasons
in the NFL, has died. He was 61.
Hardison died Saturday at
UNC Hospitals in Chapel Hill.
SOCCER
Theo Walcott’s second-half
strike helped host Everton beat
Newcastle, 1-0, and move up to
eighth in the English Premier
League, its highest position since
August.
The result ended Newcastle’s
four-match winning streak and
prevented Rafael Benitez’s side
from leapfrogging the Toffees in
the standings. . . .
Daniel Bessa might have
helped relegate his club as he
scored in Genoa’s 3-1 home
victory over Hellas Verona in the
Italian Serie A league.
Bessa, on loan from Verona,
was sent in at 1-1 and broke the
tie 12 minutes from time.
The result put Verona six
points from safety with four
matches left.
Genoa is almost assured of
safety as it moved 12 points clear
of 18th-place Spal. . . .
With two free kick goals by the
same player from nearly the
same spot just two minutes
apart, visiting Levante came
from behind to beat Athletic
Bilbao, 3-1, and move a step
closer to avoiding relegation in
the Spanish league.
Midfielder Enis Bardhi scored
on very similar free kicks in the
42nd and 44th minutes, and
Jose Luis Morales capped
Levante’s victory in the final
minutes with a goal.
It was the fifth win in the past
seven matches for the club from
Valencia, which opened a ninepoint gap between it and
Deportivo, the first team inside
the relegation zone.
Athletic dropped to 14th place.
MISC.
Defending IndyCar Series
champion Josef Newgarden
won the Indy Grand Prix of
Alabama for the third time in
four years, starting on the pole in
Birmingham and leading almost
the entire way in taking the raindelayed race that had been
pushed back because of heavy
rain Sunday.
Newgarden, who took the
series points lead in winning for
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Eastern Conference, Game 5: Milwaukee at Boston » NBA TV
Eastern Conference, Game 5: Miami at Philadelphia » TNT
Western Conference, Game 5: San Antonio at Golden State » TNT
MLB
6:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
10 p.m.
Minnesota at New York Yankees » MLB Network
Tampa Bay at Baltimore » MASN, WTEM (980 AM)
Washington at San Francisco » MASN2, WJFK (106.7 FM)
GOLF
7 p.m.
World Long Drive Tour: Clash in the Canyon » Golf Channel
TENNIS
5 a.m.
ATP: Barcelona Open, early-round play » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
UEFA Champions League, semifinal: Roma at Liverpool » Fox Sports 1
COLLEGE BASEBALL
6 p.m.
7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
Coastal Carolina at North Carolina » ESPNU
Mississippi vs. Mississippi State » SEC Network
Creighton at Nebraska » Big Ten Network
VS
Tonight @ 9:30pm
the second time in the first four
races of the season, finished
10 seconds ahead of Ryan
Hunter-Reay, followed by
James Hinchcliffe. . . .
North Carolina junior Luke
Maye declared for the NBA draft
but isn’t hiring an agent. The
forward was a third-team
Associated Press all-American
last season. . . .
Point guard Rakym Felder, a
ADVERTISEMENT
BY
Derby run
scrapped
for Gronk
the horse
key reserve for South Carolina’s
Final Four team in 2016, was
dismissed from the program by
Coach Frank Martin. . . .
U.S. Figure Skating and NBC
announced a new agreement for
domestic and international
events through 2026.
The deal includes coverage of
the U.S. championships and the
world championships.
— From news services
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
JERRY BREWER
Return of their point god
gives Wizards needed jolt
BREWER FROM D1
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
In Washington’s 106-98 victory over Toronto on Sunday, Bradley Beal fouled out of a postseason game for the first time in his career.
Cry foul? Beal bites his tongue on calls.
Frustrated by officiating, Washington guard and teammate Morris choose to keep quiet on the subject
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
As soon as Bradley Beal heard
the magic words, his smile disappeared and he began to shake his
head. In Game 4 of the Eastern
Conference first-round playoff series between the Toronto Raptors
and Washington Wizards, Beal
fouled out of a postseason game
for the first time in his six years as
a professional. Although the Wizards went on to win, and Beal was
a delight to watch on the sideline
during the final 4:58, some hard
feelings lingered into the following day.
After the Wizards’ practice
Monday, Beal listened closely to
the beginning of a question.
When the topic of “officiating”
came up, Beal’s silent expression
said everything.
“He doesn’t want to get fined,”
a team staffer who was standing
near the exchange joked.
Beal has collected 14 personal
fouls through the first four games
of this physical and often testy
series. While his sixth and final
foul Sunday provoked an unexpected rage from the usually calm
and collected Beal — the call
against him was suspect at best —
he has battled against the interpretation of what is and what is
not a foul throughout the series.
After Beal shot 8 for 17 from the
field but attempted only one free
throw in the series opener, he
evaluated the Raptors’ defense as
a “hold-and-grab” strategy. Beal
was forced to sit and watch much
of Game 2 because of four personal fouls. He did not agree with the
three times he was called for
fouling a shooter in the act of
attempting a three-pointer and
said so as the series shifted to
Washington. Then, in Game 4,
when Beal experienced a career
first, he was adamant that he did
nothing wrong on the last foul.
For Beal, the series has encouraged him not to predict how the
officials’ whistles will blow.
“Every game is different because every ref is different. Every
level of play, every level of physicality, is different. I never come in
with the mind-set that every call
is going to be the same,” Beal said
Monday. “I expect them to be
different.”
Beal did not break down video
footage of his six fouls in Game 4.
The review would have been
pointless, he said.
Wizards vs. Raptors
Series tied, 2-2
Game 1: Raptors 114, Wizards 106
Game 2: Raptors 130, Wizards 119
Game 3: Wizards 122, Raptors 103
Game 4: Wizards 106, Raptors 98
Tomorrow: at Toronto, 7, NBA TV,
NBCSW
Friday: at Washington, TBD, NBCSW
Sunday*: at Toronto, TBD
* If necessary
“At the end of the day, I know if
I fouled a guy or not. If I fouled
him, I fouled him. I know how to
keep myself out of those situations moving forward,” Beal said.
“But if I didn’t foul him and they
called me for a foul, I know I
didn’t foul him [and] I’m not
going to change anything.”
Even so, teammate John Wall
expressed after Game 4 that the
Wizards must find a balance between playing aggressively and
avoiding fouls.
On Sunday, three Wizards
starters had three or more fouls.
Toronto point guard Kyle Lowry
remained on the fringes of the
game and picked up five fouls,
while the Raptors’ starting front-
court of Jonas Valanciunas, OG
Anunoby and Serge Ibaka totaled
nine.
“We got to do a better job of
just not getting in foul trouble,”
Wall said. “It’s kind of easier said
than done, but we’re playing so
aggressively and playing so hard.
You’re going after every loose ball,
and every possession counts. It
matters in the playoffs. You [are]
kind of put in bad situations.
“I feel like the last two calls
[Beal] had were the same type of
thing. In Game 3, [Markieff Morris] got in foul trouble early, but
we just got to go out there and
play hard.”
When asked how the Wizards
overcame the calls, Morris, much
like his teammate Beal, wanted
no part in directly discussing the
officiating. Morris, who entered
Monday in a three-way tie for
drawing the second-most fouls
during the postseason (16), was
fined $25,000 for making contact
with official Ken Mauer and escalating an incident in Game 3.
Instead of risking another financial hit, Morris faux-smiled and
heaped praise on the referees.
“They did a great job,” he said.
candace.buckner@washpost.com
NBA ROUNDUP
Third-quarter eruption carries Houston to 3-1 lead
ROCKETS 119,
TIMBERWOLVES 100
A SSOCIATED P RESS
James Harden gave Houston
quite the jump-start with 22 of
the team’s 50 points in the third
quarter as the Rockets cruised
past the host Minnesota Timberwolves, 119-100, on Monday night
to take a 3-1 lead in their firstround playoff series.
Chris Paul scored 15 of his 25
points in the near-record third
for the Rockets, who turned a
50-49 halftime edge into a 31point advantage after the torrid
12-minute span. The only team in
the history of the NBA playoffs
with more points in one quarter
was the Los Angeles Lakers, who
scored 51 points in the fourth on
March 31, 1962, in a loss to the
Detroit Pistons.
Harden finished with 36 points
on 12-for-26 shooting, Clint Capela added 14 points and 17 rebounds, Eric Gordon finally got
going with 18 points off the bench
and the Rockets easily recovered
from their rough start.
Karl-Anthony Towns had 22
points and 15 rebounds for the
Timberwolves, who were dominated on both ends of the floor
during the decisive third and
missed 14 of 21 shots over several
panicked possessions.
The Wolves were in front by as
much a 36-29, but with as poorly
as the Rockets were shooting
they needed a larger lead than
that. They went 21 for 44 from the
Rejuvenate
in your
new
field (47.7 percent) in the first
half, but with all the layups and
putbacks in the mix they easily
could have made more.
Trevor Ariza made the first
three three-pointers tried by the
Rockets, who then missed on 13
of their next 14 tries from behind
the arc. Harden didn’t make a
basket until 5:57 remained in the
second quarter. He then swished
one of his signature step-back
three-pointers on the next possession, and Houston was right
back in front to sow the seeds for
the staggering third quarter.
Just like in Game 2, the Rockets raced out of the gate after the
half. Harden scored 17 of their
first 20 points.
Gordon tacked on another
three-pointer at the buzzer for
the 100-69 lead.
SUNROOM
UP TO
5,600
$
OFF
Pelicans sticking with Gentry
A person familiar with the
situation said Pelicans Coach Alvin Gentry’s contract option for
next season has been exercised by
the club.
The person spoke to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the club has not
announced the move. The person
said Gentry was informed of the
decision before the Pelicans
swept their first-round playoff
series against third-seeded Portland.
ESPN first reported the move.
Gentry is in his third season
with the Pelicans and has gone
116-134, including four victories
in this season’s playoffs, a sweep
of the Portland Trail Blazers in
their first-round series.
that [expletive]!”
Wall is as loud as he is fast. He
does not do subtle. For most of
this season, as he suffered
through knee problems, missed a
career-high 41 games and seemed
to impede the team’s progress
when he did play, it became
popular, even necessary, to wish
Wall would tone down his game
and his big-dog act. Bradley Beal
had graduated to all-star. The
entire team had improved. The
Wizards didn’t need a savior
anymore. They needed Wall to be
a better leader and distributor. He
scoffed at the notion that his style
was suddenly a problem.
Then the Wizards ended the
regular season dragging,
exhausted from having to qualify
for the playoffs without Wall and
in need of his exuberance.
Through four games of this firstround NBA playoff series with
Toronto, Wall has given the
Wizards that jolt and reiterated
his importance to the franchise.
He is averaging 26.8 points,
13 assists, 4.8 rebounds and
2.8 steals against the Raptors.
If you watch Wall regularly, you
can see that he is still rusty. He
didn’t return to action until March
31, and he played only four warmup
games before the postseason
began. His feel is off just a tad, and
you see it during shaky moments
dribbling and missed shots that are
normally easy for him.
Nonetheless, Wall is playing at an
elite level, and with every game, he
is becoming more of a force.
In fact, Wall has been the NBA’s
most prolific offense generator so
far this postseason, according to
the Elias Sports Bureau. With his
scoring and distributing, he has
created 57 points per game for the
Wizards. That is 4.7 more points
than LeBron James. The others in
the top five — James Harden
(45.3), Russell Westbrook (45) and
Ben Simmons (43.5) — trail Wall
by double figures. When you talk
about the league’s most influential
creators, don’t forget about Wall.
In Game 4, he provided the
quintessential “Wall is back”
performance. He had 27 points
and 14 assists. He posterized
Valanciunas and backup Raptors
center Jakob Poeltl. He barked, he
scowled and, despite playing all
24 minutes of the second half, he
had more energy than anyone on
the court in the final five minutes.
The Wizards needed every ounce
of stardom from Wall after Beal
fouled out with 4:58 remaining.
The score was tied at 92 then, and
Wall had eight points and an assist
during a game-closing 14-6 run.
Wall’s smooth baseline jumper
with 58.1 seconds left proved to be
the dagger in a 106-98 victory.
“Just go in attack mode,” Wall
said of his mentality after Beal
fouled out. “Even when Brad’s in
the game, he’s telling me, ‘Be
aggressive.’ At the same time, I’m
trying to find him. I’m trying to
keep him going and play my game.
That gets my teammates involved
and makes the job easier for those
guys. They are knocking down
shots and cutting for me, and I’m
going to get my opportunities to
score the ball. When Brad went
out, I knew I had to do whatever it
took: guarding DeMar DeRozan,
making plays, scoring the ball and
passing the ball. I just wanted to
do whatever, so that we could
advance to Game 5 tied 2-2.”
Despite his defiant exterior,
Wall has done some deep
thinking this season about what
he can do better or differently to
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For more by Jerry Brewer, visit
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elevate the Wizards. He wants to
remain the biggest star on the
team; he always will. But he is
starting to see that his impact can
be greater than averaging
20 points and 10 assists. He is
starting to buy into the obvious:
Beal is clearly the team’s best
scorer, and Wall should be doing
everything possible to enhance
his teammate’s effectiveness.
Wall still possesses the
mentality that the two of them
should take turns being an
aggressive 1-2 punch, but in the
third quarter of Game 4, he was
more willing to foster better ball
movement, and the results were
eye-opening. The Wizards scored
40 points in that quarter after
being held to 40 in the entire first
half. It was the first time since
Wall returned that the Wizards
had a prolonged period in which
the ball zipped around the court
to all five players.
Asked about his halftime
offensive adjustments, Coach
Scott Brooks said: “Easy. Just pass
it to the open man. Make each
other scorers.”
For all his greatness and
unselfishness, Wall loves to
dribble and probe the defense
and pass not for the sake of ball
movement but to set up
teammates for shots. He is an
exceptional creator that way.
However, the style can become
predictable and too exclusive. It
can limit some of his teammates
who are capable of scoring more,
such as Otto Porter Jr.
Now, as the Wizards prepare to
return to Toronto for Game 5 on
Wednesday, they truly seem as
complete as they have been all
season. In the past two home
victories, Wall and Beal have
played their best basketball at the
same time. Marcin Gorat is back in
his pick-and-roll groove. The rest
of the rotation is contributing on
offense. And the Wizards are
playing postseason defense, finally.
At the center of it all is Wall, the
point god again. He looks healthy
and confident. He looks to have
regained all of his explosiveness.
His mind is right, too. He is focused
on dominating, not proving
himself. You know he can put up
numbers, but Wall is the only
Wizard who can control a game
without scoring. Even during his
quiet moments, when his shot isn’t
falling or he is deferring to Beal,
Wall is still making his presence
felt with his court sense, speed,
athleticism and fiery attitude.
Markieff Morris is often given
credit for the Wizards’ toughness.
It should be noted, however, that
Wall’s ornery temperament is just
as important. All playoff series
eventually turn into physical
showdowns, and the Wizards
haven’t just been up to the
challenge. They have encouraged
the fight.
“I mean, it’s just about
knuckling up now,” Raptors
forward CJ Miles said. “It’s a real
street fight now both ways, and
you can see it out there.”
The difference for the Wizards:
Wall is dictating the rules of
engagement. He is making this
series a street fight and a street
race. It seems an odd
combination, but not to him.
So there are no cries for Wall to
change right now. There can’t be.
He has emerged from the depths
of injury and imperfection and
returned to greatness, snarling all
the while.
FredBaths.com
A DIVISION OF
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
Baseball
National League
American League
EAST
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
CENTRAL
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
WEST
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
EAST
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
CENTRAL
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
WEST
W
L PCT GB L10 STR
New York
14
6 .700
— 5-5 L-1
St. Louis
13
8 .619
— 8-2 W-3
Arizona
15
6 .714
— 7-3 W-2
Boston
17
4 .810
— 8-2 L-2
Cleveland
12
8 .600
Houston
16
8 .667
— 6-4 L-1
Philadelphia
14
7 .667
1/
2
8-2 W-4
Milwaukee
14
9 .609
— 7-3 W-6
Colorado
12 12 .500 41/2 5-5 L-2
Toronto
13
8 .619
4 6-4 L-2
Minnesota
8
Los Angeles
15
8 .652
1/
2
Atlanta
12
9 .571 21/2 6-4 L-1
Pittsburgh
12 10 .545 11/2 3-7 L-4
x-Los Angeles
10 10 .500 41/2 6-3 W-2
New York
12
9 .571
5 7-3 W-3
Detroit
9 11 .450
Seattle
11 10 .524 31/2 4-6 L-2
Chicago
10
x-San Fran.
9 12 .429
Tampa Bay
8 13 .381
9 5-5 W-4
Chicago
5 14 .263 61/2 2-8 W-1
Oakland
12 11 .522 31/2 7-3 W-3
San Diego
9 15 .375 71/2 5-5 W-1
Baltimore
6 17 .261 12 1-9 L-3
Kansas City
5 15 .250
Texas
x-Washington 10 12 .455
5 4-5 L-2
5 16 .238 91/2 2-8 L-4
x-Miami
9 .526
2 5-5 W-1
4 18 .182 91/2 2-8 W-1
Cincinnati
6 4-6 W-1
— 7-3 W-3
9 .471 21/2 4-6 L-4
3 5-5 L-1
7 2-8 W-1
8 16 .333
5-5 W-1
8 4-6 L-1
x-Late game
x-Late game
NO T E S
TOD AY
NL games
FARQUHAR IMPROVING
AFTER ANEURYSM
NATIONALS AT GIANTS, 10:15
White Sox officials say
reliever Danny Farquhar
“is progressing well” after
undergoing surgery
Saturday to address the
ruptured aneurysm he
suffered Friday in the
dugout at Guaranteed
Rate Field.
W-L
ERA TEAM
Roark (R)
1-1
3.24
1-3
Blach (L)
1-3
4.10
1-4
BRAVES AT REDS, 6:40
McCarthy (R)
3-0
2.91
4-0
Mahle (R)
1-3
5.14
1-3
DIAMONDBACKS AT PHILLIES, 7:05
Ray (L)
2-0
4.98
3-1
Velasquez (R)
1-2
3.80
2-2
METS AT CARDINALS, 8:15
“Farquhar has use of his
extremities, is responding
appropriately to
questions and commands
and is speaking to doctors
and his family,” the White
Sox said in a statement
released Monday.
Twins second baseman
Brian Dozier set a team
record with a 16-game
hitting streak to begin a
season, then extended it
to 17 in Monday’s game
against the New York
Yankees. Dozier passed
the 15-gamers by Kirby
Puckett (1994) and Josh
Willingham (2012). Dating
from last year, Dozier has
a hit in 24 straight games.
STAR OF THE DAY
Yankees slugger
Giancarlo Stanton busted
out of a 2-for-22 slump by
going 4 for 4 with a home
run in a 14-1 win against
the Twins.
TODAY’S GAME
TO WATCH
Angels at Astros,
8:10 p.m.
All eyes will be on Los
Angeles two-way star
Shohei Ohtani, who left
his last start on April 17
with a blister after two
innings, having allowed
three runs in an eventual
loss to the Red Sox. But
few pitchers have been
more effective this
season than Houston’s
Charlie Morton, who his
3-0 with a 0.72 ERA in four
starts.
AL leaders
Through Sunday’s games
BATTING
Betts, Bos ........................................ .366
Machado, Bal ................................... .356
Lowrie, Oak ...................................... .351
Correa, Hou ...................................... .351
Altuve, Hou ..................................... .344
Smith, TB ......................................... .344
Gregorius, NY .................................. .333
Cano, Sea ......................................... .329
Judge, NY ......................................... .324
Gordon, Sea ..................................... .321
1-1
4.22
2-2
TBD ( )
0-0
0.00
0-0
Freeland (L)
0-3
5.85
1-3
Peters (L)
2-2
6.98
2-2
Maeda (R)
2-1
3.77
2-1
NL scores
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
L.A. Dodgers 4, Washington 3
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, ppd.
Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 2, 11 innings
Milwaukee 4, Miami 2
St. Louis 9, Cincinnati 2
Chicago Cubs 9, Colorado 7
Arizona 4, San Diego 2
Davey Nelson, a
Milwaukee Brewers
broadcaster and former
all-star infielder who also
coached in the majors,
died Monday after a long
illness. He was 73.
17
2.77
2-1
MARLINS AT DODGERS, 10:10
BROADCASTER DIES
BY THE NUMBERS
1-1
Weaver (R)
PADRES AT ROCKIES, 8:40
Farquhar, 31, remains a
patient at Rush University
Medical Center after
suffering a brain
hemorrhage.
He became an analyst
with Fox Sports Wisconsin
in 2006 and took a frontoffice role with the
Brewers organization.
Wheeler (R)
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Washington at San Francisco, Late
at Cincinnati 10, Atlanta 4
San Diego 13, at Colorado 5
Miami at L.A. Dodgers, Late
AL games
JOHN MINCHILLO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
RAYS AT ORIOLES, 7:05
W-L
ERA TEAM
Hamilton wins this duel
Faria (R)
1-1
5.82
1-3
Reds speedster Billy Hamilton, right, steals second base against Braves shortstop Dansby Swanson to help Cincinnati snap a five-game skid with a 10-4 win.
Cobb (R)
0-2
15.43
0-2
MARINERS AT WHITE SOX, 5:10
Indians 2, Orioles 1
Reds 10, Braves 4
Yankees 14, Twins 1
Angels 2, Astros 0
CLEVELAND AB
Lindor ss .............3
Kipnis 2b.............4
Ramirez 3b .........4
Brantley lf ..........4
Encarnacion dh ...4
Alonso 1b............3
Gomes c ..............3
Zimmer cf ...........3
Guyer rf ..............3
TOTALS
31
R
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 1 0 .224
0 0 0 2 .173
1 0 0 0 .237
0 0 0 1 .320
1 0 0 0 .149
1 2 0 1 .225
0 0 0 1 .245
0 0 0 1 .236
0 0 0 1 .129
4 2 1 7 —
BALTIMORE AB
Beckham 2b ........4
Alvarez dh ..........3
Mancini ph-dh.....1
Machado ss.........2
Jones cf ..............4
Davis 1b ..............4
Valencia 3b .........4
Sisco c.................4
Santander rf .......3
Gentry lf .............3
TOTALS
32
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 1 .179
0 0 0 1 .200
0 0 0 1 .280
1 0 2 0 .360
1 0 0 0 .240
1 0 0 2 .169
1 0 0 3 .152
1 1 0 3 .256
0 0 0 0 .153
1 0 0 0 .200
7 1 2 11 —
Jesse Winker’s basesloaded single provided Cincinnati’s first lead in six
games, and the Reds — off
to the worst start in their
history at 4-18 — matched
their season high in runs
and rallied for their first
victory under interim manager Jim Riggleman.
Rookie Miguel Andujar
homered and doubled to
extend his barrage of extra-base hits, Didi Gregorius had a grand slam and
New York hammered Minnesota for its first threegame winning streak under Manager Aaron Boone.
Yuli Gurriel was thrown
out at third by C Martin Maldonado to end the game after an original safe call was
reversed on replay, and Los
Angeles ended Houston’s
six-game winning streak.
With runners on first and
second, Middleton threw a
slider in the dirt to Max Stassi that bounced off Maldonado’s leg. The catcher
pounced on the ball and
threw to third, where Luis
Valbuena tagged Gurriel.
CLEVELAND.... 020 000 000 — 2 4 0
BALTIMORE.... 010 000 000 — 1 7 0
LOB: Cleveland 3, Baltimore 6. 2B:
Ramirez (1), Valencia (2). HR: Alonso
(5), off Gausman. RBI: Alonso 2 (13),
Sisco (5). SB: Gentry (5).
CLEVELAND
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Carrasco ........... 7.1 6 1 1 2 7 2.31
Miller ................ 0.2 1 0 0 0 1 0.00
Allen .................... 1 0 0 0 0 3 0.00
BALTIMORE IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Gausman ............. 8 4 2 2 1 7 4.66
Bleier ................... 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.57
WP: Carrasco (4-0); LP: Gausman (1-2);
S: Allen (4). Inherited runners-scored:
Miller 1-0. T: 2:21. A: 10,614 (45,971).
ORIOLES LEADERS
Through Sunday’s game
Batters
Machado
Mancini
Sisco
Jones
Schoop
Alvarez
Gentry
Beckham
Davis
Pitchers
Hart
Bleier
Bundy
Scott
Castro
Cashner
O'Day
Avg
.356
.284
.256
.239
.230
.214
.189
.175
.164
AB R H HR RBI
87 13 31 8 17
81 10 23 2 7
39 3 10 0 4
92 6 22 3 12
61 7 14 1 3
42 6 9 2 7
37 4 7 0 1
80 8 14 1 4
73 3 12 2 6
W
0
2
1
0
0
1
0
L ERA
0 0.00
0 0.61
2 1.42
0 2.46
1 3.29
3 3.60
1 4.15
Sv SO
0
1
0
7
0 40
0
2
0 10
0 28
1 11
ATLANTA
AB
Inciarte cf ...........4
Albies 2b.............4
F.Freeman 1b......4
Markakis rf .........4
Suzuki c ..............4
Tucker lf..............4
Swanson ss ........3
Flaherty 3b .........4
Foltynewicz p .....2
Culberson ph.......1
TOTALS
34
R
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
4
H BI BB SO AVG
2 0 0 0 .253
0 0 0 1 .289
1 0 0 0 .293
3 3 0 0 .301
0 0 0 0 .300
1 0 0 2 .262
0 0 1 0 .329
0 0 0 2 .339
0 0 0 2 .125
0 0 0 0 .120
7 3 1 7 —
CINCINNATI AB
Schebler rf ..........5
Peraza ss ............4
Votto 1b..............3
Gennett 2b..........4
Duvall lf ..............3
Barnhart c...........5
Pennington 3b ....3
Romano p............2
Winker ph ...........1
Peralta p .............1
Hamilton cf.........3
TOTALS
34
R
3
2
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
2
10
H BI BB SO AVG
2 3 0 0 .292
2 1 1 0 .247
1 1 2 2 .247
1 2 1 2 .270
1 2 2 0 .178
1 0 0 2 .250
0 0 1 1 .111
0 0 0 1 .000
1 1 0 0 .296
0 0 0 1 .000
1 0 1 2 .179
10 10 8 11 —
MINNESOTA AB
Dozier 2b ............4
Mauer 1b ............3
Adrianza 1b ........0
Sano 3b...............4
Rosario lf-cf........4
Morrison dh ........4
Grossman lf ........0
Escobar ss...........4
Kepler rf..............4
LaMarre cf-p.......2
Castro c...............2
Garver ph ............1
TOTALS
32
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
H BI BB SO AVG
1 1 1 0 .307
0 0 0 2 .298
0 0 0 0 .250
0 0 0 1 .200
1 0 0 2 .246
1 0 0 1 .107
0 0 0 0 .121
0 0 0 1 .255
1 0 0 0 .286
0 0 1 1 .471
1 0 1 0 .159
1 0 0 0 .188
6 1 3 8 —
NEW YORK
AB
Gardner lf ...........3
Judge rf ..............3
Gregorius ss .......5
Torreyes ss .........0
Stanton dh..........4
Sanchez c............4
Hicks cf ...............4
Austin 1b ............5
Andujar 3b ..........5
Torres 2b ............4
TOTALS
37
R
2
2
1
0
3
1
2
1
1
1
14
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 2 0 .237
1 0 2 1 .325
1 4 0 1 .324
0 0 0 0 .417
4 2 1 0 .224
1 2 1 1 .192
1 1 1 2 .286
2 4 0 2 .296
2 1 0 1 .316
1 0 0 0 .125
13 14 7 8 —
ATLANTA........ 001 100 020 — 4 7 0
CINCINNATI .... 000 025 03X — 10 10 1
MINNESOTA... 000 010 000 — 1 6 0
NEW YORK ..... 310 010 36X — 14 13 0
E: Duvall (2). LOB: Atlanta 4, Cincinnati
8. 2B: Tucker (5), Duvall (5). HR: Markakis (3), off Romano; Schebler (2), off
Foltynewicz.
LOB: Minnesota 9, New York 6. 2B: Kepler (5), Garver (1), Judge (4), Sanchez
(6), Austin (5), Andujar (8). HR: Andujar (3), off Odorizzi; Stanton (5), off
Odorizzi; Gregorius (7), off Kinley; Austin (4), off LaMarre.
ATLANTA
IP
Foltynewicz...... 4.2
S.Freeman ........ 0.1
Moylan ............. 0.2
Biddle ............... 1.1
Socolovich ........... 1
H
3
1
2
1
3
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 4 7 2.77
3 3 2 1 5.59
2 2 0 1 3.00
0 0 1 1 0.00
3 3 1 1 9.00
CINCINNATI
IP
Romano ............... 6
Peralta.............. 1.2
Iglesias ............. 1.1
H
4
3
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 1 1 5 4.78
2 2 0 1 1.59
0 0 0 1 0.93
WP: Romano (1-2); LP: S.Freeman (0-1);
S: Iglesias (3). S.Freeman pitched to 3
batters in the 6th. Inherited runnersscored: S.Freeman 1-0, Moylan 3-2, Biddle 3-3, Iglesias 1-0. T: 3:11. A: 9,463
(42,319).
MINNESOTA IP
Odorizzi ............ 4.2
LaMarre............ 0.2
Hildenberger .... 1.2
Busenitz ........... 0.2
Kinley ............... 0.1
H
5
1
2
2
3
R ER BB SO ERA
5 5 3 5 4.50
1 1 0 0 13.5
1 1 1 2 4.66
2 2 1 1 6.75
5 5 2 0 24.3
NEW YORK
IP
Tanaka.............. 6.2
Green................ 0.1
Hale ..................... 2
H
3
0
3
R ER BB SO ERA
1 1 2 5 5.28
0 0 1 0 1.74
0 0 0 3 0.00
WP: Tanaka (3-2); LP: Odorizzi (1-2). Inherited runners-scored: Busenitz 1-1,
Green 1-0. HBP: Tanaka (LaMarre). T:
3:38. A: 39,249 (54,251).
L.A.
AB
Kinsler 2b ............4
Trout cf................3
Upton dh..............4
Pujols 1b..............3
Valbuena 3b ........4
Cozart ss .............3
Calhoun rf............3
Young lf...............3
Maldonado c........3
TOTALS
30
R
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 1 .256
1 0 1 1 .307
1 1 0 2 .236
0 0 1 1 .258
1 0 0 2 .243
0 0 1 1 .221
1 1 0 1 .188
0 0 0 0 .211
0 0 0 0 .182
4 2 3 9 —
HOUSTON
AB
Springer rf-cf ......4
Altuve 2b.............4
Correa ss .............4
Gurriel 1b ............3
Bregman 3b.........3
Gonzalez lf ..........4
Gattis dh .............4
McCann c.............2
Stassi ph-c ..........1
Marisnick cf ........2
Reddick ph-rf ......1
TOTALS
32
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 0 .240
2 0 0 0 .351
1 0 0 1 .346
1 0 1 0 .278
0 0 1 0 .244
2 0 0 2 .215
0 0 0 1 .205
0 0 0 1 .304
0 0 0 0 .294
0 0 0 1 .125
0 0 0 0 .246
7 0 2 6 —
L.A. .................. 000 011 000 — 2 4 0
HOUSTON ....... 000 000 000 — 0 7 0
LOB: Los Angeles 4, Houston 7. 2B: Upton (4), Correa (7).
L.A.
IP
Skaggs ................. 7
Anderson ............. 1
Middleton ............ 1
H
4
2
1
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 3 2.96
0 0 0 1 0.00
0 0 1 2 1.93
HOUSTON
IP
Cole ...................... 7
Rondon................. 1
McHugh ............... 1
H
4
0
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 2 2 8 1.29
0 0 1 0 1.93
0 0 0 1 0.93
WP: Skaggs (3-1); LP: Cole (2-1); S: Middleton (6). WP: Cole, Middleton. T: 2:59.
A: 29,606 (41,168).
White Sox 10,
Mariners 4
Athletics 9, Rangers 4
Jose Abreu had four hits
that included a pair of
home runs, Yoan Moncada
was a single shy of the cycle and Chicago ended a
seven-game losing streak.
Chicago became the
first big league team to
open a game with seven
straight hits since Colorado against the Los Angeles
Dodgers on Sept. 17, 2014.
SEATTLE
AB
Gordon cf ............4
Segura ss............2
Cano 2b ...............4
Cruz dh................4
Seager 3b............4
Haniger rf ...........4
Vogelbach 1b ......4
Zunino c ..............4
Gamel lf ..............3
TOTALS
33
R
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
1
4
H BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 0 .306
1 1 1 0 .307
1 0 0 0 .324
0 0 0 1 .255
1 0 0 1 .220
2 1 0 0 .324
1 0 0 1 .220
2 2 0 1 .154
1 0 0 0 .154
9 4 1 4 —
CHICAGO
AB
Moncada 2b ........5
Garcia rf..............2
Thompson rf .......3
Abreu 1b .............5
Delmonico lf .......5
Castillo c .............5
Sanchez dh .........4
Davidson 3b ........4
Anderson ss........4
Engel cf...............4
TOTALS
41
R
3
0
0
3
1
1
2
0
0
0
10
H BI BB SO AVG
3 1 0 1 .240
1 1 0 0 .233
1 0 0 1 .200
4 3 0 0 .308
1 0 0 1 .241
2 1 0 1 .250
2 1 0 0 .292
1 1 0 1 .210
2 0 0 0 .254
1 1 0 2 .163
18 9 0 7 —
SEATTLE ......... 000 020 110 — 4 9 0
CHICAGO......... 520 111 00X — 10 18 0
LOB: Seattle 4, Chicago 7. 2B: Segura
(8), Seager (5), Haniger (5), Gamel (1),
Moncada (5), Davidson (3), Thompson
(1). 3B: Moncada (1), Anderson (1). HR:
Zunino (1), off Fulmer; Haniger (8), off
Beck; Abreu (5), off Leake; Moncada (4),
off Leake; Abreu (6), off LeBlanc.
SEATTLE
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Leake ................ 3.1 12 8 8 0 1 6.59
LeBlanc............. 4.2 6 2 2 0 6 5.40
CHICAGO
IP H R ER BB SO ERA
Fulmer ................. 6 3 2 2 1 3 6.00
Beck..................... 3 6 2 2 0 1 6.00
WP: Fulmer (1-1); LP: Leake (2-2); S:
Beck (1). Inherited runners-scored: LeBlanc 1-0. WP: Leake. T: 2:56. A: 13,614
(40,615).
Marcus Semien hit a tiebreaking homer on the first
pitch of the ninth inning,
and surging Oakland went
on to its third straight victory. It has won seven of its
last eight games.
OAKLAND
AB
Semien ss ............ 6
Piscotty rf............ 4
Lowrie 2b ............. 4
Davis dh ............... 3
Chapman 3b ......... 4
Olson 1b............... 4
Canha cf-lf ........... 4
Pinder lf ............... 2
Joyce ph-lf ........... 1
Smolinski ph-cf.... 2
Lucroy c................ 4
TOTALS
38
R
2
1
1
0
1
1
2
0
0
1
0
9
H BI BB SO AVG
2 1 0 0 .270
0 0 1 1 .277
2 0 1 0 .357
1 2 2 0 .272
1 1 0 2 .282
2 0 1 0 .282
2 1 1 1 .351
2 1 0 0 .267
0 0 0 0 .236
1 2 0 0 .125
1 1 1 0 .254
14 9 7 4 —
TEXAS
AB
DeShields cf .......4
Choo dh...............4
Mazara rf ............4
Beltre 3b.............4
Gallo lf ................3
Profar ss .............3
Chirinos c ............4
Guzman 1b..........3
Kiner-Falefa 2b...3
TOTALS
32
R
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
4
H BI BB SO AVG
2 0 0 0 .200
0 0 0 2 .237
0 0 0 2 .294
1 0 0 1 .298
1 1 1 0 .213
1 0 1 0 .255
1 2 0 2 .159
0 0 0 1 .207
1 0 0 1 .293
7 3 2 9 —
OAKLAND ....... 002 100 006 — 9 14 1
TEXAS............. 001 200 001 — 4 7 0
E: Lucroy (1). LOB: Oakland 10, Texas 3.
2B: Lowrie (7), Davis (7), Canha (3),
Beltre (8), Gallo (4), Kiner-Falefa (2).
3B: Chapman (3), Smolinski (1). HR:
Semien (3), off Jepsen; Chirinos (3), off
Cahill.
Gonzales (L)
1-2
5.94
2-2
TBD ( )
0-0
0.00
0-0
TWINS AT YANKEES, 6:35
Berrios (R)
2-1
1.63
3-1
Sabathia (L)
0-0
2.70
1-2
RED SOX AT BLUE JAYS, 7:07
Porcello (R)
4-0
1.40
4-0
Happ (L)
3-1
4.50
3-1
ATHLETICS AT RANGERS, 8:05
Triggs (R)
1-0
5.82
3-1
Hamels (L)
1-3
4.76
1-4
ANGELS AT ASTROS, 8:10
Ohtani (R)
2-1
3.60
2-1
Morton (R)
3-0
0.72
3-1
AL scores
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Cleveland 7, Baltimore 3
N.Y. Yankees 5, Toronto 1
Kansas City 8, Detroit 5
Tampa Bay 8, Minnesota 6
Houston 7, Chicago White Sox 1
Texas 7, Seattle 4
Oakland 4, Boston 1
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Cleveland 2, at Baltimore 1
at N.Y. Yankees 14, Minnesota 1
Oakland 9, at Texas 4
L.A. Angels 2, at Houston 0
at Chicago White Sox 10, Seattle 4
Interleague games
OAKLAND
IP
Cahill ................... 5
Dull ...................... 1
Petit ................. 1.2
Buchter............. 0.2
Hatcher............. 0.2
H
4
0
1
0
2
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 2 6 2.25
0 0 0 1 9.00
0 0 0 0 2.51
0 0 0 1 1.74
1 1 0 1 11.3
CUBS AT INDIANS, 6:10
TEXAS
IP
Moore .................. 5
Leclerc .............. 1.2
Bush ................. 0.1
Claudio.............. 0.2
Jepsen ................. 1
Chavez .............. 0.1
H
7
0
0
1
3
3
R ER BB SO ERA
3 3 2 2 5.55
0 0 2 1 0.00
0 0 1 0 5.06
0 0 1 0 7.59
4 4 1 1 4.63
2 2 0 0 6.28
TIGERS AT PIRATES, 7:05
WP: Buchter (1-0); LP: Jepsen (0-3).
Moore pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Leclerc 1-0,
Bush 2-0, Jepsen 1-0, Chavez 2-2. HBP:
Moore (Chapman). WP: Cahill. T: 3:20.
A: 17,060 (49,115).
W-L
ERA TEAM
Chatwood (R)
0-3
4.60
0-3
Tomlin (R)
0-2
8.00
1-1
Zimmermann
(R)
1-0
7.71
2-2
Kuhl (R)
2-1
4.57
2-2
BREWERS AT ROYALS, 8:15
Davies (R)
1-2
4.84
1-3
Kennedy (R)
1-2
2.35
1-3
Interleague Scores
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
San Francisco 4, L.A. Angels 2
MONDAY’S RESULTS
No games scheduled.
NL leaders
Membership is rewarding.
Through Sunday’s games
BATTING
Flaherty, Atl .................................... .362
Villanueva, SD ................................. .355
Cabrera, NY ...................................... .354
Grandal, LA ...................................... .349
Arenado, Col .................................... .344
Swanson, Atl ................................... .342
Herrera, Phi ..................................... .329
Martinez, StL .................................. .329
Hoskins, Phi ..................................... .323
Bryant, Chi ....................................... .319
PostPoints takes you to the best shows in town.
HOME RUNS
HOME RUNS
Trout, LA ............................................... 9
Machado, Bal ........................................ 8
Gallo, Tex .............................................. 7
Haniger, Sea ......................................... 7
Ramirez, Cle ......................................... 7
Betts, Bos ............................................. 6
Davis, Oak ............................................. 6
Gregorius, NY ....................................... 6
Judge, NY .............................................. 6
Lowrie, Oak ........................................... 6
Moustakas, KC ..................................... 6
Blackmon, Col ....................................... 8
Harper, Was ......................................... 8
Baez, Chi ............................................... 7
DeJong, StL .......................................... 7
Thames, Mil .......................................... 7
Villanueva, SD ...................................... 7
Albies, Atl ............................................. 6
Molina, StL ........................................... 6
Belt, SF ................................................. 5
Braun, Mil ............................................. 5
LeMahieu, Col ....................................... 5
Polanco, Pit ........................................... 5
Pollock, Ari ........................................... 5
RBI
Lowrie, Oak ......................................... 23
Haniger, Sea ....................................... 22
Gregorius, NY ..................................... 20
Correa, Hou ......................................... 19
Davis, Oak ........................................... 19
Devers, Bos ......................................... 17
Machado, Bal ...................................... 17
Moustakas, KC ................................... 17
Span, TB ............................................. 17
Trout, LA ............................................. 17
RUNS
Betts, Bos ........................................... 23
Gardner, NY ........................................ 19
Springer, Hou ..................................... 19
Judge, NY ............................................ 18
Semien, Oak ....................................... 18
Trout, LA ............................................. 18
Chapman, Oak .................................... 17
Correa, Hou ......................................... 17
Gregorius, NY ..................................... 17
HITS
Lowrie, Oak ......................................... 33
Altuve, Hou ........................................ 31
Machado, Bal ...................................... 31
Correa, Hou ......................................... 27
Moustakas, KC ................................... 27
Betts, Bos ........................................... 26
Gordon, Sea ........................................ 26
Segura, Sea ........................................ 26
Trout, LA ............................................. 26
Castellanos, Det ................................. 25
RBI
Baez, Chi ............................................. 23
Harper, Was ....................................... 19
Hoskins, Phi ........................................ 19
Cespedes, NY ...................................... 18
Tucker, Atl .......................................... 18
Franco, Phi .......................................... 17
Grandal, LA ......................................... 16
Martinez, StL ..................................... 16
Molina, StL ......................................... 16
Pollock, Ari ......................................... 16
Villanueva, SD .................................... 16
From dramas and musicals to stand-up and ballet, discover
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RUNS
Albies, Atl ........................................... 21
Harper, Was ....................................... 20
Blackmon, Col ..................................... 18
Baez, Chi ............................................. 18
Pham, StL ........................................... 18
Bellinger, LA ....................................... 16
Cabrera, NY ......................................... 16
Goldschmidt, Ari ................................ 16
Marte, Pit ........................................... 16
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HITS
S2930 4x5
Cabrera, NY ......................................... 28
Swanson, Atl ...................................... 27
Albies, Atl ........................................... 26
Herrera, Phi ........................................ 26
LeMahieu, Col ..................................... 26
Castro, Mia ......................................... 25
Martinez, StL ..................................... 25
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
Single mistake sinks Baltimore’s Gausman in loss
INDIANS 2,
ORIOLES 1
BY
J ON M EOLI
baltimore — Kevin Gausman’s
seventh inning was immaculate —
nine pitches, nine strikes and
three strikeouts. He was nearly
spotless otherwise, too.
But his one mistake proved too
many in Monday night’s series finale against the Cleveland Indians, a 2-1 loss in which the righthander found the fastball velocity
that had eluded him all season but
served up an early home run ball
to Yonder Alonso that was more
than the Orioles (6-17) and their
barren bats could muster themselves.
That home run came in the
second inning, but for the rest of
the night, Gausman looked far
more likely to accomplish the rare
feat that came in the seventh. He
allowed just those two runs on
four hits in eight impressive innings.
His fastball was back, averaging
93.8 mph after averaging no better
than 93 mph this year and 95.8
mph last year. He had thrown just
11 pitches at or above 95 mph in
four prior starts. He was practically living above that Monday, but it
PATRICK SEMANSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Orioles starting pitcher Kevin Gausman had a stellar outing
Monday but was let down by Baltimore’s continued lack of offense.
took a while to grow into it.
After walking the leadoff man
in the first inning, he struck out
Jason Kipnis and Michael Brantley around an athletic play to help
his own cause on a swinging bunt
to get out of it. But he hung an 0-2
slider to Edwin Encarnacion for a
single to open the second inning,
then an outside fastball to Alonso
caught too much of the plate and
was hit out to center field for a
two-run home run.
The Orioles strung together
three singles — by Adam Jones,
Chris Davis and Chance Sisco — in
the home half of that inning before
the type of misfortune that becomes common for a team 11
games below .500 befell them.
Rookie right fielder Anthony Santander’s low line drive up the middle had RBI single written all over
it, but instead, Carlos Carrasco
snagged it on the mound and doubled off Sisco at first to end the
threat.
The Orioles got just four hits
afterward, but Gausman did the
same to the Indians. Jose Ramirez
doubled in the third inning, Francisco Lindor singled in the fifth,
and that was it. Gausman retired
the last 10 batters he faced, and 21
of his last 23, including that immaculate inning in the seventh.
There, Gausman struck out
Alonso swinging on an 85 mph
splitter, Yan Gomes swinging at a
95 mph fastball and Bradley Zimmer looking at a 95 mph fastball.
All were on three pitches.
According to Baseball-Almanac, Gausman’s was the 90th instance of that in modern baseball,
with the first coming on June 4,
1889, by John Clarkson of the Boston Beaneaters and the most recent by the Boston Red Sox’s Rick
Porcello on Aug. 9.
The Orioles have three in their
history — beginning with Jimmy
Key on April 14, 1998. Less than a
month later, Mike Mussina did it
to the Tampa Bay Devil Rays on
May 9, and on Sept. 5, 1999, B.J.
Ryan posted the club’s most recent
against the Indians.
Gausman struck out the last
batter he faced — Kipnis — on a
96.4 mph fastball to give him seven on the day and lower his ERA to
4.66. The Orioles put two on in the
eighth inning but came away with
nothing to show for it.
— Baltimore Sun
ERIK VERDUZCO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“We’re just beginning, still have much more to conquer,” trainer Ernesto Rodriguez said of Jarrett Hurd, who beat Erislandy Lara on April 7.
Hurd: Once green and now golden
Accokeek boxer’s ascent includes undefeated record and rare unification in 154-pound class
BY
G ENE W ANG
As the doors opened to the
Prince George’s County Council
meeting room, dozens of family
members and friends spilled into
the seating area for prime viewing of a ceremony recognizing
one of the most promising fighters in boxing.
Council member Mel Franklin
stepped to the lectern and declared of the freshly minted unified champion seated in the front
row with his parents and trainer,
“If Seat Pleasant has Kevin Durant, then Accokeek has Jarrett
Hurd.”
Hurd has yet to reach the
heights of the Golden State Warriors superstar with well-known
ties to the D.C. area, but the
comparison is hardly as farfetched as the trajectory of
Hurd’s career. A would-be firefighter and former Safeway delicounter staffer who didn’t fight
professionally until age 22 is — a
little more than five years later —
just the seventh boxer to unify
title belts in the history of the
154-pound weight class.
“It’s definitely life-changing.
It’s overwhelming,” Hurd said
after the festivities last week at
the county administration building in Upper Marlboro. “It’s a lot
to take in, but at the end of the
day, the guy I am, I’m ready for
it.”
Hurd defended his International Boxing Federation super
welterweight belt and added the
World Boxing Association title
with a dramatic victory over
Erislandy Lara on April 7 in Las
Vegas. Lara was making his sixth
title defense. Hurd entered the
12th and final round trailing on
all three of the judges’ scorecards, but he scored a knockdown on a devastating left hook
with 37 seconds remaining and
won by split decision.
That made Hurd the latest in a
distinguished line of unified
champions with ties to Prince
George’s County, following the
likes of Sugar Ray Leonard, who
grew up in Palmer Park, and Fort
Washington’s Riddick Bowe.
He also banked his largest
payday to date: a tidy $500,000, a
portion of which he said might
go toward a new house. Hurd has
been living at his parents’ residence since the days when his
mother agreed to provide financial assistance for his boxing
career until he turned 25.
An auspicious beginning
That Hurd (22-0, 15 knockouts) has ascended this briskly to
the pinnacle of his division is all
the more improbable given his
relatively late start in the sport.
But his father, Fred Hurd Sr., who
introduced his son to the sport,
recalled thinking Jarrett could be
special the first time he stepped
into a ring for a sparring session
roughly a decade ago.
The sparring partner was
none other than Gary Russell Jr.,
the Capitol Heights featherweight who holds the World
Boxing
Council
belt
at
126 pounds and whose only loss
came to Vasyl Lomachenko, who
is considered among the top
pound-for-pound fighters in the
world. With trainer Tom Browner looking on, Hurd more than
held his own against Russell, an
episode his mother, Brenda, still
beams about when recounting.
“He went through the whole
rounds without getting knocked
down or anything,” Brenda Hurd
said, emphasizing her son was
going toe-to-toe with a former
Olympian, “and Tom was like,
‘Okay, I definitely want to work
more with him.’ ”
Said Fred Hurd Sr., who
worked in The Washington Post
mailroom for three decades, “We
knew then Jarrett had a talent.”
Browner trained Jarrett Hurd
during his initial foray into boxing, but by his admission, Hurd
didn’t work as hard at the craft as
he should have and eventually
stopped fighting for a brief period following his graduation from
Gwynn Park High.
During the interlude, Browner
died at age 70. Shortly thereafter,
Hurd decided to give the sport
another crack and turned to
Ernesto Rodriguez, one of
Browner’s associates whose fulltime job is with the Metro Transit
Police Department.
“He was relatively green, but
we knew he had heart,” Rodriguez said of Hurd’s early years in
boxing. “That’s one of the things
you look for in a young fighter:
Does he have the heart and the
dedication and the commitment
to compete in this sport?”
Hurd has shown indefatigable
spirit and a granite jaw during
his ascent. In his first defense of
the IBF title, against Austin
Trout on Oct. 14, Hurd absorbed
repeated blows and was trailing
on two of three scorecards
through seven rounds. He continued to move forward, demonstrating little if any sign of damage, and punished Trout to such a
degree that Trout’s trainer was
lobbying to end the fight before
the ringside doctor recommended the same thing — and referee
Eddie Claudio obliged — following the 10th round. It was Hurd’s
seventh consecutive victory by
knockout or his opponent failing
to answer the bell.
“I believe there’s still a lot of
Jarrett that people haven’t seen,”
Rodriguez said. “He’s still learning on the job. It’s something that
we work on at the gym every day.
With the new fights coming up,
depending on the opponents we
have, you’ll be able to see a
different Jarrett Hurd, and the
sky’s the limit. I think we’re just
beginning, still have much more
to conquer.”
The next step
After dispatching Lara, Hurd
can turn to his next professional
aspiration: taking the WBC
championship from Jermell
Charlo. Coincidentally, Charlo’s
twin brother, Jermall, had an
indirect role in Hurd’s transformation from obscure fighter to
champion: In February 2017, a
little more than a week before
Hurd was to fight Tony Harrison,
Jermall Charlo moved up in
weight class and vacated his IBF
title at 154 pounds. That made
Hurd vs. Harrison a title fight,
which Hurd won with a ninthround TKO.
Still, Hurd and his team aren’t
in any particular hurry to get a
contract signed to fight Jermell
Charlo. Rodriguez indicated he
and Team Hurd instead are looking perhaps to Kell Brook as the
next opponent. Brook is the former IBF welterweight champion
who recently moved up to
154 pounds after consecutive
losses, both by knockout, to Gennady Golovkin and Errol Spence
Jr. at 147.
“It’s definitely a fight that’s
going to happen,” Rodriguez said
of facing Jermell Charlo (30-0,
15 KOs). “Is it going to happen
the very next fight? Probably not,
but I think it may be after the
next fight. Kell Brook was one of
the fighters that called us out. In
the last four fights, we had three
southpaws, so we need to go
ahead and start working on
right-handed and get proficient
again. Going into a fight with a
guy like Charlo, you want to be at
your best. You don’t want to be
working on proficiency.”
With his next fight not likely
until the fall, Hurd has plenty of
time to search for a prime piece
of real estate.
But no matter where he lives,
he’ll always call Accokeek home.
“I was just looking for a starter
home. Now I’m picturing maybe
I should get an even bigger
house,” he said, triggering a
laugh from his mother. “At the
end of the day, I’m just blessed,
and let’s see what the future
holds.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
A.J. Cole made his first Opening Day roster this season but
struggled in both starting and relief roles for the Nationals.
NATI ONALS NOTE S
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nationals
NATIONALS ON DECK
at San Francisco Giants
Nationals trade Cole
to Yankees for cash
The Washington Nationals
announced Monday night that
they have traded right-hander
A.J. Cole to the New York
Yankees for cash considerations,
officially ending Cole’s second
stint with the organization after
he had been designated for
assignment Friday.
A former premier pitching
prospect, the 26-year-old Cole
made his major league debut
with the Nationals in 2015 — he
allowed nine runs in two innings
in that first appearance — but
didn’t make an Opening Day
roster until this season. He broke
camp in March as the team’s fifth
starter and allowed 10 runs
across 31/3 innings in his first
start. He rebounded in his
second, limiting the Atlanta
Braves to two runs in 51/3 innings,
but that wasn’t enough to stop
the club from moving him to the
bullpen to make room in the
rotation for Jeremy Hellickson
last week.
Cole gave up runs in his two
relief appearances. On
Wednesday against the New York
Mets, he was charged with one
run in one-third of an inning but
allowed a grand slam to Yoenis
Cespedes after entering the game
with the bases loaded. The
outing inflated his ERA to 13.06.
Two days later, he was designated
for assignment and right-hander
Carlos Torres was called up. The
Nationals were forced to
designate him for assignment —
running the risk of exposing him
on the waiver wire if they didn’t
trade him within seven days —
because he didn’t have any minor
league options remaining.
It’s the second time
Washington has traded Cole.
After the Nationals selected him
in the fourth round of the 2010
draft, they included him in a
four-player package they shipped
to the Oakland Athletics for Gio
Gonzalez and a minor leaguer in
December 2011. He returned to
the franchise as part of a three-
Today
Tomorrow
10:15 MASN2
3:45 MASN
vs. Arizona Diamondbacks
Friday
7:05 MASN
Saturday
4:05 MASN, FS1
Sunday
1:35 MASN
vs. Pittsburgh Pirates
Monday
7:05 MASN
May 1
7:05 MASN
May 2
7:05 MASN
May 3
1:05 MASN
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
team trade that sent him, Blake
Treinen and Ian Krol to the
Nationals.
Barring another return to the
organization, Cole completed his
Nationals career with a 5.32 ERA
in 110 innings across 26 games,
including 19 starts.
Injury updates
While the Nationals are in the
Bay Area to close out their ninegame road trip with three against
the Giants, Murphy and Brian
Goodwin, two members of the
Nationals’ long disabled list, are
working out in West Palm Beach,
Fla. Martinez said Murphy, who
is rehabbing from microfracture
knee surgery, took Sunday off but
was working again Monday.
Goodwin, meanwhile, recently
took swings and reported his left
wrist was still sore. He hurt the
wrist diving for a ball April 11 but
wasn’t placed on the 10-day
disabled list until April 17 — after
pinch-hitting two days earlier,
which only allowed Washington
to backdate the stint one day.
“When he’s ready, we’ll
welcome him back,” Martinez
said. “He’s another guy people
don’t talk about, but he’s big for
us, big part of the team.
— Jorge Castillo
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
Stanley Cup Playoffs
PHOTOS BY TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Goalie Braden Holtby, one of the heroes of Washington’s first-round triumph, stops Columbus’s Alexander Wennberg. Holtby continued his postseason excellence with 35 saves in the Game 6 clinching victory.
Capitals oust Blue Jackets to set up another Penguins series
CAPITALS FROM D1
which were on the road, for the
first time since 1990 to advance to
the second round for the fourth
consecutive season, a first in franchise history.
The journey to this point was
rockier with a roster that is less
talented and less experienced, but
after experiencing growing pains
throughout the season, Washington is back to exactly where it was
last season, preparing for a second-round series against the defending Stanley Cup champion
Pittsburgh Penguins. As they were
in this series and throughout this
season, the Capitals are confident
in the face of external doubt.
“Obviously, you never know
what’s going to happen, but we
just believed in each other,” said
captain Alex Ovechkin, who
scored two goals. “There was no
panic. We knew that we’d have to
take one game at a time. . . . We
started believing more. We could
see everybody stepping up and
playing great hockey and give us
success.”
In the six games against Columbus, Washington rode its stars on
a power play that scored in every
game, a goaltender who had initially been beaten out for the starting job, and secondary scoring
that came through in the timeliest
of moments. Game 6 was a culmination of all three, as the Capitals
answered every Blue Jackets push
with one of their own.
Washington had struggled to
protect leads in this series, and
Blue Jackets center Pierre-Luc
Dubois’s slap shot cut Washington’s two-goal lead to one within
the first three minutes of the third
period. The Capitals responded
quickly, once again deflating the
crowd at Nationwide Arena.
Third-line winger Devante SmithPelly scored his second goal of the
series with a clear shot from the
left faceoff circle on a rush to make
it 4-2. Defenseman Christian
Djoos was called for interference
4:39 into the period, but within a
minute, Chandler Stephenson
scored on a shorthanded breakaway to give the Capitals a threegoal cushion.
Washington then had to withstand a furious Columbus push for
the final 14:30, what Holtby called
the hardest period of hockey he
had played. Blue Jackets captain
Nick Foligno scored his second
goal of the game with 11:38 to play,
and an interference penalty by
Evgeny Kuznetsov gave Columbus
a late power play. The Capitals
killed their 17th straight penalty
in the series. Blue Jackets goaltender Sergei Bobrovsky was pulled
for an extra attacker with three
minutes left, and Washington survived that, too, capping the win
with an empty-net goal by Lars
Eller. Holtby finished with 35
saves.
“We’ve had lots of different adversity through this year than
maybe in the past,” Capitals Coach
Barry Trotz said. “We’ve grown up
a little bit in some ways that we
understand our core group is really, really strong. They believe in
each other.”
After Washington had fallen
into its 2-0 series deficit, Ovechkin
matter-of-factly said the team
would return to Capital One Arena with the series tied. The Capitals then won Games 3 and 4 in
Columbus to back up Ovechkin’s
word. Trotz acknowledged that
Columbus was the better team in
Washington’s Game 5 overtime
win, and Blue Jackets Coach John
Capitals vs. Blue Jackets
Washington wins series, 4-2
Game 1: Blue Jackets 4, Caps 3 (OT)
Game 2: Blue Jackets 5, Caps 4 (OT)
Game 3: Caps 3, Blue Jackets 2 (2 OT)
Game 4: Caps 4, Blue Jackets 1
Game 5: Caps 4, Blue Jackets 3 (OT)
Game 6: Caps 6, Blue Jackets 3
Capitals 6, Blue Jackets 3
WASHINGTON ......................... 1
COLUMBUS .............................. 0
2
1
3 —
2 —
6
3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Washington, Orlov 1 (Stephenson, Niskanen), 12:12. Penalties: None.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Columbus, Foligno 1 (Murray, Cole), 8:40. 3,
Washington, Ovechkin 4 (Orpik, Djoos), 12:50. 4, Washington, Ovechkin 5 (Carlson, Kuznetsov), 18:23 (pp).
Penalties: Backstrom, WSH, (hooking), 1:16; Jenner,
CBJ, (interference), 3:18; Anderson, CBJ, (high sticking),
4:47; Jones, CBJ, (holding), 17:10; Stephenson, WSH,
(roughing), 19:53.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Columbus, Dubois 2 (Calvert), 2:25. 6,
Washington, Smith-Pelly 2, 3:56. 7, Washington, Stephenson 1 (Beagle, Orpik), 5:30 (sh). 8, Columbus,
Foligno 2 (Jenner, Bjorkstrand), 8:22. 9, Washington,
Eller 2 (Beagle), 19:46. Penalties: Djoos, WSH, (interference), 4:39; Kuznetsov, WSH, (interference), 12:56;
Wilson, WSH, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 19:46;
Dubois, CBJ, (roughing), 19:46.
SHOTS ON GOAL
Chandler Stephenson, left, gave the Capitals a three-goal cushion on a shorthanded breakaway goal.
Tortorella was so confident in his
group that he twice said Columbus would return to Capital One
Arena for Game 7.
After the Capitals closed out the
series in Game 6, Tortorella repeatedly commented on how
fiercely Washington had defended. For most of the season, that
appeared to be the team’s greatest
weakness because offseason roster turnover forced the Capitals to
part with three blue-liners. The
pairing of Dmitry Orlov and Matt
Niskanen suffocated Columbus’s
top players, especially Artemi
Panarin, who had seven points in
the first three games and none
after that. Djoos was a healthy
scratch in the first two games and
shined in the final four, assisting
on Ovechkin’s first goal of the
game for his first point. Washington blocked 23 shots Monday.
“The better team won,” Tortorella said. “Give them credit. I
thought they played a complete
game. We thought we might be
able to get to them offensively, but
they were stingy.”
The defensive turning point in
the series seemed to come with a
change in net. The Capitals started goaltender Philipp Grubauer in
the first two games, and after he
had allowed eight goals in the two
losses, Trotz turned to Holtby, the
Vezina Trophy winner just two
years ago. Though his struggles in
the second half of the regular season caused him to lose the starting
job to Grubauer, Holtby has the
second-best all-time career save
percentage in the playoffs. He entered Monday’s game with an impressive .936 save percentage and
1.66 goals against average in this
series, and he was Washington’s
best player as the team reeled off
three straight wins to move to the
verge of advancing.
Until the final second ticked off
the clock Monday, Holtby was in
position, his eyes on the puck. As
WASHINGTON ....................... 10
12
6 — 28
COLUMBUS .............................. 7
14
17 — 38
Power-play opportunities: Washington 1 of 3; Columbus
0 of 4. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 3-1 (38 shots-35
saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 2-3 (27-22). A: 18,667
(18,500). T: 2:28.
Eller’s empty-net goal sent fans to
the exits in disappointment, Holtby took a knee with his mask lifted
up, perhaps appreciating what he
and his team had just pulled off.
And then he pushed his mask back
down and continued to go about
his business.
“I think we’ve had a quiet confidence to ourselves that we just
take it game by game this year,”
Holtby said. “That’s what we did in
the series. We didn’t get too high
or low. We just focused on the next
game and believed we could win.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
After difficult start to career, Stephenson has breakout moment in clincher
BY
R OMAN S TUBBS
columbus, ohio — Washington
Capitals rookie Chandler Stephenson peered over his shoulder
and watched his shorthanded
goal glide underneath the legs of
Columbus Blue Jackets goaltender Sergei Bobrovsky, who was
twisted up so badly on the third
period breakaway that he ended
up on his back. A disgruntled fan
in the upper deck of Nationwide
Arena threw a bottle of water onto
the ice. Boos rang out. The Capitals had a three-goal lead and were
well on their way to clinching this
first-round Stanley Cup playoff series in Game 6 with a 6-3 win,
denying the Blue Jackets a chance
at their first playoff series win and
continuing Bobrovsky’s tortured
postseason history.
But Stephenson’s postseason
history is only beginning, and it
continued with another promising performance. He not only polished off his first playoff series
with the most aesthetically pleasing goal Monday night, but he also
provided a glimpse of what he can
provide the Capitals’ second line
as they turn their attention to
their second-round series against
the powerful Pittsburgh Penguins.
After he was called upon to
expand his role in the wake of the
series-ending injury to Andre
Burakovsky, Stephenson was determined not to be just another
inexperienced player plugging a
hole in the lineup. He has instead
flashed what Washington Coach
Barry Trotz has trumpeted all
along — most notably speed,
which has helped him flourish on
the second line alongside mainstays Nicklas Backstrom and T.J.
Oshie. He recorded a pair of assists in a Game 5 overtime win
Saturday that gave the Capitals
the upper hand in the series.
He followed with another assist
on a Dmitry Orlov goal in the first
period in Game 6 on Monday, and
despite starting the third period
in the penalty box, he capped the
performance with his first postseason goal on the shorthanded
breakaway. Bobrovsky — considered one of the league’s best goaltenders but also one that has developed a reputation for wilting in
the playoffs — poked at Stephenson as he approached the crease
and was left exposed.
“I just tried to get him to make
the first move. He’s good. He’s
quick. He doesn’t give you much.
. . . I tried to bring it over, and
there was a little hole there,” Stephenson said at his locker after-
ward.
Stephenson, 24, has essentially
been a rookie for three seasons —
he played a combined 13 NHL
games in the prior two years —
and was cut in training camp after
being beat out for a roster spot last
fall. That led to a humbling trip
back to the team’s minor league
affiliate in Hershey until he was
called up again because of an early-season injury to Burakovsky.
Stephenson scored his first NHL
goal in his season debut, and he
stayed on the NHL roster for the
rest of the season. Burakovsky’s
latest injury in these playoffs created an opportunity for Stephenson to move up to the second line
with Backstrom and Oshie.
With Oshie laboring with what
appears to be an undisclosed lower-body injury — he has not participated in practice over the past
week but has pushed through during games — Stephenson’s speed
has become especially important
on the second line. But he has also
been able to flash his entire skillset on the penalty kill, where he is
one of the first over the boards
alongside Jay Beagle. That was
evident in the third period as Columbus went on the power play
and pressed to cut the lead to one
goal. A loose puck led to Stephenson’s breakaway.
“He can fly. He’s one of those
guys that is just a natural, powerful, speedy skater. He can back a
defense up, he can clear out space
for us to make plays underneath
him, and as you saw tonight, chip
pucks by and do it on his own,”
Oshie said. “I’ve always been a big
fan of [Stephenson’s] game since
I’ve seen him when he’s kind of
come up and down the last couple
of years.”
There hadn’t quite been a
breakthrough moment in the
NHL for Stephenson like Monday
night, which was all the more
rewarding for what he had endured through his difficult preseason. It has made him appreciate his ascension more. A player
who every NHL team passed on
when he was put on waivers last
October has seized his chance and
blossomed into the kind of secondary option that Washington
will need if it is to finally break
through in the postseason.
“Trotz and the coaching staff
has put a lot of trust in me,”
Stephenson said. “I’m just trying
to do the best that I can, and just
be myself as much as I can, and not
think too much about the position
that I’m in.”
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
Stanley Cup Playoffs
PHOTOS BY TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Dmitry Orlov celebrates with Matt Niskanen after Orlov’s first-period goal opened the scoring Monday night in Game 6. The Capitals never trailed in a 6-3 win over the Blue Jackets that clinched the first-round series.
BARRY SVRLUGA
Ovechkin delivers when it matters and now gets ‘huge opportunity’ vs. Pittsburgh
SVRLUGA FROM D1
that gave them a cushion. He
was a force.
What the Capitals’ 6-3 victory
over the Columbus Blue Jackets
in Game 6 of their first-round
Stanley Cup playoff series gave
the hockey world is what the
hockey world wants, another
matchup between Ovechkin’s
Capitals and their chief nemesis,
Sidney Crosby’s Pittsburgh
Penguins. Nationally, that
matchup may set up for
punchlines at the Capitals’
expense, because they have met
three times before and the
results have been Penguins in
seven, Penguins in six and
Penguins in seven — the last two
in each of the last two years,
perhaps leaving the deepest,
darkest scars on both Ovechkin
and a Caps fan base that so
desperately wants its captain
and hero to break through that
wall.
So here, there’s another
chance. Ovechkin, fresh off a
series in which he had eight
points in six games — and a
game in which he scored the
50th and 51st playoff goals of his
career — is ready.
“I said it before: I can’t wait,”
Ovechkin said Monday night.
“It’s a huge opportunity for us to
take a step forward. Obviously,
it’s the Stanley Cup champion
back-to-back. They know how to
play. They know how to handle
the pressure.”
Forget the line about how the
Caps don’t know those things.
Maybe it will come into play.
Maybe not. But save it. It’s not
for now. Because now is an
opportunity. For the Capitals.
And for Ovechkin.
“We look to ‘O’ to set an
example,” forward T.J. Oshie
said.
The example, too, isn’t so
much that unstoppable blast
from the left circle, the one that
makes the jump to hyperspace
before the Empire is even aware
it has been launched. That’s how
Ovechkin’s second goal came
Monday night, the one that put
Washington up 3-1. But the first
one, the rebound off a Brooks
Orpik shot from the point. That’s
the goal that Ovechkin scored
again this season, the goal in
which he puts his big rig of a
body in front of the net, the goal
that makes a difference in
playoff games.
“Just adding layers to his
game,” Coach Barry Trotz said.
This season, in a way, has
been about adding those layers,
or re-adding layers he once had
but abandoned. That, in turn,
allowed Ovechkin to enhance —
and elongate — his legacy.
When last year ended in the
same, miserable way it always
seems to end — a brutal home
loss in the playoffs, this one in
the seventh game of the second
round, again to hated Pittsburgh
— I laid a lot of the loss at
Ovechkin’s feet. It wasn’t just
The Capitals’ Alex Ovechkin, who scored two goals Monday, gets
ready to fire a shot as the Blue Jackets’ Seth Jones defends.
that game or that series, but the
fact that he is the common
thread through all the pain over
almost a decade.
The truth is, the Caps were
outplayed in net in that series;
Marc-Andre Fleury, who would
be the Penguins’ backup by the
time they won the Cup, was
better than Braden Holtby.
But in those playoffs, Trotz
dropped Ovechkin from his
customary, nearly permanent,
spot on the first line down to the
third. Ovechkin was on the ice
for both of the Penguins’ Game 7
goals. And as the offseason
turned into 2017-18, Capitals
General Manager Brian
MacLellan was frank about what
his star needed to do not just to
maintain his customary level of
production but to remain
relevant in a league that is
skewing younger: Ovi,
MacLellan said, had to improve
his speed and return to being a
force at even strength, not just
the guy who sets up in his
Barcalounger on the power play,
content to launch missiles and
rack up numbers there.
It was an alarming way to
speak about the player who is
arguably the most important in
the history of the franchise. But
none of it was exaggerated. It
was a simple, honest, harsh
assessment of one of the sport’s
pillars as he turned 32, as he
headed toward what seemed like
it might be the twilight of his
career. But it was all true.
So how did Ovechkin
respond? With a hat trick on
opening night, then four goals in
the second game of the year.
Further flipping off his critics,
six of those goals came at even
strength. And by the end of the
year, what did he have but a
league-best 49 goals? The only
player to score more than
Ovechkin’s 32 at even strength:
Edmonton Oilers wunderkind
Connor McDavid.
And yet through it all, in the
run to a third straight
Metropolitan Division title that
would not have happened had
Ovechkin not been a force, he
returned to a theme he has hit
on with increasing frequency as
the years move on. He brought it
up again Monday night.
“It’s all about team,” Ovechkin
said.
That’s an easy thing to say, a
tougher thing to display. And yet
there was Ovechkin, late in the
third with the Capitals nursing a
two-goal lead, the time in a
playoff game when each second
seems to take five to click off the
clock. In that time when games
are decided, Ovechkin sold out
to block a shot.
“That gets the boys going on
the bench when you see him
doing stuff like that,” Oshie said.
“That’s full commitment,”
Trotz said. “. . . That’s where you
get your street cred with your
teammates. It’s those details,
those necessary details, that
allow you to win.”
By this point, at the end of his
13th NHL season, should
Ovechkin need to earn street
cred with his teammates? Put
that discussion down. The
Penguins are on the way to
Washington. Ovechkin’s Capitals
have never pushed through this
team, pushed through this
round, to get to the Eastern
Conference finals. He knows it.
We all know it.
“We’ve been struggling in the
second round, and we just have
to believe in each other,” he said.
“Don’t look what’s happened in
previous years. It’s this year. It’s
new season. It’s new series.”
Maybe a new result. When the
final horn sounded Monday,
Ovechkin led the Capitals over
the boards to greet Holtby. This
wasn’t a mob scene. It was a
business-like handshake on
what was, at its most basic, a
business trip.
We have no idea what the rest
of these playoffs will deliver. The
mere existence of them brings
the possibility of more pain. But
we know the next week and a
half brings Washington vs.
Pittsburgh, one more time. And
if Alex Ovechkin wasn’t around,
it’s doubtful that treat would
await us all.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
NHL ROUNDUP
On emotional night in Toronto, Maple Leafs force Game 7 against Boston
MAPLE LEAFS 3,
BRUINS 1
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Frederik Andersen stopped 32
shots to lead the Toronto Maple
Leafs to a 3-1 win over the visiting
Boston Bruins on Monday night,
forcing a decisive Game 7 in the
first-round series.
William Nylander, Mitch
Marner and Tomas Plekanec
scored for the Maple Leafs, who
trailed the series 3-1 before winning two straight. They also
trailed 1-0 early in the second
period of this one. Nikita Zaitsev
added two assists, and Marner
and Plekanec each had one.
Jake DeBrusk scored for the
Bruins, and Tuukka Rask —
pulled in Game 5 at home, finished with 27 saves.
Game 7 is Wednesday night in
Boston with the winner advanc-
ing to face Tampa Bay in the
Eastern Conference semifinals.
There was a moment of silence
before the opening faceoff at Air
Canada Centre to honor the 10
people killed Monday when a van
mounted a sidewalk in Toronto’s
north end and struck multiple
pedestrians. Fifteen others were
injured.
Scoreless after an end-to-end
first period, the Bruins grabbed a
1-0 lead 1:02 into the second
when David Krejci won a faceoff
after an icing against Auston Matthews right to DeBrusk, beat Andersen between his arm and body.
Toronto responded just 35 seconds later when Nylander buried
a rebound of Jake Gardiner’s shot
from the point for his first goal of
the playoffs.
The Leafs appeared to go
ahead at 3:04 when Zach Hyman
beat Rask with a no-look backhand as he fell to the ice. The
Bruins challenged the play for
goalie interference, and replays
showed the forward knocked the
stick out of Rask’s hands as he
cruised through the crease just
before scoring.
Boston appeared to control the
play after that as Toronto could
barely get out of its own zone or
complete a clean breakout. Andersen — who recorded 42 stops
in a 4-3 victory in Game 5 on
Saturday — made great saves off
Rick Nash, Brad Marchand and
Patrice Bergeron to keep things
level.
The Maple Leafs, however,
went ahead with 6:35 left in the
period when Marner was quickest to a loose puck in the slot and
beat Rask with a backhand to the
far post after Marchand couldn’t
clear.
Toronto killed off its first penalty early in the third, and was
then left fuming when David
Backes elbowed Andersen in the
mask, but was only assessed an
offsetting roughing minor when
Roman Polak came to his goalie’s
defense.
The Leafs couldn’t connect on
their third power play moments
later, and Andersen stoned Sean
Kuraly with under 10 minutes to
go.
Rask then robbed Nylander off
a great feed from Auston Matthews.
The Bruins went back to the
power play with under six minutes left, but the best chance
came when Rask stopped Kasperi
Kapanen on a two-on-one that
turned into a breakaway before
Andersen stoned Krejci on a onetime shot that brought the towelwaving crowd to its feet.
Rask followed that up by stopping Matthews on another twoon-one off a pass from Plekanec
before Plekanec sealed the win
with an empty-netter with 1:14 to
play.
Flames hire Peters as coach
The Calgary Flames hired Bill
Peters as the team’s head coach,
introducing him at a news conference at Scotiabank Saddledome.
The 53-year-old from Three Hills,
Alberta, resigned as head coach of
the Carolina Hurricanes on Friday after four seasons and a year
remaining on his contract.
The Flames fired Glen Gulutzan and assistants Dave Cameron
and Paul Gerrard last week after
missing the playoffs with a 37-3510 record.
In his NHL head coaching debut, Peters went 137-138-53 with
the Hurricanes but wasn’t able to
get the team into the playoffs.
Carolina was looking for a new
general manager as Ron Francis
was reassigned within the organization, so Peters’s tenure there
would have eventually been subject to the new GM’s approval.
Peters is Calgary General Manager Brad Treliving’s second head
coaching hire after Gulutzan and
the fourth coach of the Flames in
nine years after Gulutzan (201617) Bob Hartley (2012-16) and
Brent Sutter (2009-12).
“I think it’s a very good team
and I think it’s a team that’s set up
to win and play the modern
game,” Peters said.
Calgary has finished outside
the playoffs seven of the past nine
years.
WILD: Minnesota split with
General Manager Chuck Fletcher
after nine seasons with only two
playoff series wins.
Wild owner Craig Leipold met
with Fletcher to tell him the club
was not renewing his contract.
He then addressed the players.
The Wild has six straight postseason appearances, matching
the longest-running streak in the
Western Conference, but it has
not reached the second round
since 2015.
Minnesota lost in five games in
the first round to the Winnipeg
Jets, after being ousted in five
games in 2017 by the St. Louis
Blues. Last year, Leipold declined
to extend Fletcher’s deal.
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
NFL draft hopefuls must, quite simply, trust the process
KIRK FROM D1
as dozens of NFL scouts also
stood inside Texas A&M’s indoor
practice facility to consider that
very question. They all gathered
here for Texas A&M’s pro day, one
mile marker of each player’s predraft journey, along with the
scouting combine, private workouts and, after months of evaluation and anticipation, the NFL
draft that starts Thursday.
At the root of this swirling
buildup, after stripping away the
hundreds of mock drafts and
thousands of tweets and roughly
a million predictions, are players
trying to answer questions about
themselves. Some are simple,
such as whether Penn State running back Saquon Barkley is
worth a top-five pick in a crowd of
talented quarterbacks. Others
are more nuanced, such as how
Kirk will translate to the NFL
after playing three years in Texas
A&M’s spread offense.
Kirk, a 5-foot-11 wide receiver
with a shot to be selected in the
draft’s first round, knows how
detailed the NFL evaluation process is. So the 21-year-old has
taken an equally measured approach, treating each media appearance like a job interview and
each pass pattern like the most
important of his life. He knows
how little separates the first wide
receiver drafted from the second,
and the second from the third,
and so on. One extra tenth of a
second on a 40-yard dash. One
stupid social media post. One
drop too many. Or one drop at all.
One play after making the
over-the-head catch, Kirk darted
up the seam and turned his head
to find the football. This pass was
too low for any adjustment to
save, and it splashed into the turf
in front of him. The incompletion
wasn’t his fault. The NFL personnel filling the sideline, at least
one representative from each of
the league’s 32 teams, scribbled
on notepads and typed into iPhones.
“Damn it,” whispered Uche Anyanwu, Kirk’s marketing agent,
standing a few paces behind Melissa in the indoor facility. “Every
rep matters here. Every single
one.”
Challenging evaluations
Perhaps even more complicated than being a draft prospect in
2018, with all the tasks to complete and unending Internet
noise, is being an evaluator trying
to project a college wide receiver
to the NFL.
The 32 teams watching Kirk at
A&M’s pro day have had trouble
with receivers lately. ESPN draft
analyst Todd McShay notes that
56 wideouts have been taken in
the first or second rounds of the
past seven drafts. Seven of those,
McShay estimates, have fulfilled
the expectations of a player selected that early, and that is after
being studied by two scouts from
a given franchise, its college
scouting director, wide receivers
coach, offensive coordinator,
head coach and general manager,
in most cases.
One reason for this, cited by
McShay and others, is the increased use of the spread offense
in college football. Variations of
this scheme, which has produced
prolific offenses but complicated
the draft process, often allow
receivers to put up impressive
statistics while only running a
few types of pass patterns, and
not having to learn the nuances
required of a successful NFL
wideout. That leaves teams
guessing and frequently falling
into the trap of favoring players
with strong athletic traits who
then never develop into consistent route runners in the pros.
“Clearly, it’s become a difficult
thing to do,” McShay said of
projecting wide receivers to the
NFL. “Offensive tackles and receivers are the hardest positions
to evaluate now because of the
influx of spread offenses and how
defenses are having to play.”
Kirk falls into that category as
a spread receiver who ran the
majority of his routes from the
slot. He earned a reputation as
one of the country’s best playmakers and finished each of his
three seasons with at least
900 yards, despite playing with a
new quarterback in each one, and
had a career-high 10 touchdown
catches as a junior. But the
“spread receiver” label becomes a
knock once the draft process
starts, and skeptics wonder
whether Kirk has the routerunning ability to play both the
slot and outside in the NFL.
Kirk is jockeying with Alabama’s Calvin Ridley, Maryland’s
D.J. Moore and Southern Methodist’s Courtland Sutton to be one
of the top wideouts selected. But
Kirk and former coaches insist
that he is more versatile than the
“typical slot receiver.” Jason
Mohns, who coached him at Saguaro High in Scottsdale, Ariz.,
says Kirk often played outside for
PHOTOS BY RODOLFO GONZALEZ FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
him and can stretch the defense
from any spot on the field. David
Marsh, who was on the Texas
A&M staff and is now the offensive coordinator at Campbell,
notes that the Aggies’ version of
the spread offense required Kirk
to run pro-style routes.
“You hear a lot that you can’t
do something, like run a certain
route or play outside, and it can
get a little frustrating,” Kirk said.
“But I can do those things, and I
know that. I just wasn’t asked to a
lot in college. You have to prove it
every chance you get.”
So Kirk designed his pro day as
a response to that criticism. As
his former teammates went
through physical testing to start
the morning, he stayed in sweatpants and bobbed his head to
music blaring through headphones. He felt comfortable with
the athletic numbers he put up at
the NFL Scouting Combine —
4.47-second 40-yard dash, 35.5inch vertical jump, 20 reps on the
bench press — which came after
close to three months of training
at EXOS in Phoenix.
The week of the combine in
early March, the entire EXOS
training staff followed their players to Indianapolis. They rented
out a hotel ballroom across the
street from Lucas Oil Stadium,
where the combine is held, and
created a simulated 40-yard dash
setting to work on starts and
whittle down times. The company’s nutritionists were also there
providing the right snacks to
players, thinking that even the
slightest break from their curated
diet could add a fraction of a
pound and affect speed and, possibly, draft positioning. Even the
final pick of the first round will
receive roughly twice as much
guaranteed money in his rookie
contract as the average secondround selection.
Once testing at pro day was
finished, Kirk readied to catch
passes from former NFL quarterback and Texas A&M Heisman
Trophy winner Johnny Manziel
and Luis Perez from nearby Texas
A&M-Commerce. Kirk ran about
20 routes, and almost all of them
were as an outside receiver, including short comebacks, slants
and a deep post that left a few
scouts nodding their heads in
appreciation.
He was also pulled aside by
Philadelphia Eagles wide receivers coach Gunter Brewer who,
using two tennis balls stashed in
the front pocket of his windbreaker, tested Kirk’s ability to
adjust while looking over his
shoulder.
“Oh, look, look, look,” said Anyanwu, Kirk’s marketing manager, as the two split off from the
crowd. “The Eagles love him at
number 32, last pick of the first
[round]. I just think he may not
drop that far.”
Not everyone agreed that
morning. While pro day unfolded
at Texas A&M, McShay’s latest
mock draft was published on
ESPN.com. Ridley from Alabama
was the only wide receiver listed
in the first round.
Nailing the interviews
“This is the last interview,
Christian, I promise,” said one of
Texas A&M’s public relations
staffers as he shepherded Kirk
through a crowd of players and
reporters and scouts.
“No worries at all, man,” Kirk
answered, dishing out a few highfives as he wove his way into a
clearing inside Texas A&M’s practice facility. “I’ll do whatever you
guys got for me.”
Pro day ended like this, with
television cameras fixed on Kirk
and reporters asking him questions about the teams looking at
him, the next steps of his process,
and what it was like catching
passes from Manziel, a 2014 firstround pick who is no longer in
the league. Manziel was here
both as a favor to Kirk and as part
of his last-ditch effort to return to
the NFL. His well-documented
behavioral issues, which eventually led to his departure from
the Cleveland Browns, are a reminder of why prospects’ offfield habits are so heavily scrutinized.
One AFC scout, who spoke on
the condition of anonymity to
freely discuss the evaluation process, said most franchises have a
small team of staffers dedicated
to collecting every article and
video clip of the prospects they
are interested in. Mohns, Kirk’s
high school coach, had close to a
dozen teams ask for Kirk’s transcript and game film. The Oakland Raiders asked for his high
school attendance records.
“I hate to compare my son to an
animal or something, but it really
does seem like horse trading to an
extent,” Melissa Kirk said. “They
could be making a multimillion
dollar investment into the player
they are picking, so I don’t blame
them for doing such heavy research and turning over every
stone.”
The last interview of the day is
with the SEC Network’s Jordan
Rodgers, the brother of Green
Bay Packers quarterback Aaron
Rodgers made famous by his
appearance on “The Bachelorette.” Before the combine, Kirk
worked with former general manager Charley Casserly on how to
best interview with coaches and
executives. But he did not need
extensive media training, as he
first started receiving attention
when he was offered a scholarship by UCLA at age 14. He thrives
in this setting, one centered on
him projecting the image detailed at the start of his Twitter
bio: “Calculated, Conscious, Confident.”
Rodgers lifted his microphone
to start the conversation, Kirk
turned to smile into the camera,
and then started laying out everything he wants NFL teams to
hear.
What did he want to show at
pro day? “That I can run every
route in the route tree.” Calculated.
What is going to be his first
purchase after the draft? “I’m
going to put a lot of it away.” Conscious.
Is he the best wide receiver in
the draft? “I believe so. I’d be
wrong not to think that.” Confident.
“That was great, man,” Rodgers said, offering a swinging
handshake once the interview
ended. “You’re already a professional at this.”
“Doing my best, man,” Kirk
said, still standing straight up,
staring right into the camera as if
it were still rolling. “Always doing
my best.”
Trust the mock process?
That ended Kirk’s pro day just
before noon, checking another
box, nudging him one step closer
to the NFL draft. And while a
handful of teams will analyze
“I hate to compare
my son to an
animal or
something, but it
really does seem
like horse trading
to an extent. They
could be making a
multimillion dollar
investment into the
player they are
picking. I don’t
blame them for
doing such heavy
research and
turning over every
stone.”
Melissa Kirk
Texas A&M wide
receiver Christian
Kirk, considered one
of college football’s
top playmakers, had
to make plenty of
good impressions,
including with Eagles
wide receivers coach
Gunter Brewer, top,
and Cowboys special
teams coordinator
Keith O’Quinn, above
right, at his school’s
pro day.
everything Kirk did and said over
the past few hours, he does not
search for what is being said
about him.
The mock drafts come one
after another, and it seems like
the only tool needed to be an
“analyst” these days is an Internet connection. In seven mock
drafts from the morning of
March 20 to the evening of
March 23, Kirk was listed as
falling out of the first round in
three, going No. 26 to the Atlanta
Falcons, No. 32 to the Eagles,
No. 22 to the Buffalo Bills and
No. 29 to the Jacksonville Jaguars. He will be compared to NFL
wide receivers Golden Tate,
Pharoh Cooper, Odell Beckham
Jr. (with the nickname “Baby
Beckham”), Larry Fitzgerald, Ted
Ginn Jr. and Randall Cobb,
among others.
And, soon, he will find out the
one team that just wants him to
be Christian Kirk.
“It’s pretty simple with Christian. If you get the ball in his
hands, he is going to make something happen,” said Marsh, who
coached Kirk at Texas A&M. “Everyone wants to talk about
spreads and all these different
knocks on him, but that’s really
just to stir things. He’s just a great
football player.”
As Texas A&M’s practice facility emptied out, Kirk powered on
his iPhone. There were hundreds
of tweets about him working out
with Manziel. He was tagged in a
handful of Instagram posts.
Friends had already texted him
about McShay’s new mock draft.
He swiped those messages aside
and then saw that the New England Patriots want to meet with
him, like, right now.
“Hey, Mom, I have to go meet
with the Patriots but I’ll call you
later,” Kirk said, slinging his
backpack over his shoulder like a
teenager rushing out the door to
high school.
“Okay, well . . . good luck!”
Melissa answered while her son
hustled out of earshot.
“Thanks! Love you!” he yelled
over his shoulder, and then he
squeezed through a side door, on
to 30 more days of meetings and
workouts and interviews, where
even the smallest details will
count.
jesse.dougherty@washpost.com
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D9
M2
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS’ LACROSSE
In clash of area’s top programs, Gladiators win one for the public schools
GLENELG 13,
BISHOP IRETON 6
BY
C ALLIE C APLAN
Amid clanging sticks and celebratory shouts, the conversation
in Glenelg’s huddle during halftime against Bishop Ireton on
Monday was raucous with surprise.
“Oh. My. Gosh,” one Gladiator
yelled, pausing after each word
for extra emphasis.
“I’m speechless,” another said.
“I’m flabbergasted,” a third
replied before assistant coach
Alex Pagnotta raised his voice to
grab the attention of a team that
had just scored three goals in the
final 22.3 seconds of the opening
period.
Pagnotta didn’t talk for long
because there wasn’t much to fix.
No. 3 Glenelg had used a clinical
first half to dominate No. 1 Bishop Ireton for an eventual 13-6
victory in a clash of perhaps the
best public school girls’ lacrosse
team and best private school
girls’ lacrosse team in the Washington area.
As the players broke the huddle, one cry embodied the Gladiators’ mission on their home field
in Howard County.
“Let’s go show them,” midfielder Anna Callahan bellowed,
“what a public school is all
about.”
In that highlight-filled run to
close the first half, senior Rachel
Scheinberg scored one of her
career-best six goals.
There was also a cross-field
assist that capitalized on a Bishop Ireton turnover in Glenelg’s
defensive zone, and efficient ball
movement off a draw that ended
with junior Sarah Cipolla netting
a feed from senior Georgia Esmond with 1.1 seconds left.
That goal had Gladiators
Coach Nicole Trunzo meeting
Pagnotta for an airborne hug on
the sideline.
“It was just crazy,” Scheinberg,
a Johns Hopkins commit, said of
Glenelg’s 8-2 halftime lead.
“It was a proud, proud moment for them,” Trunzo said.
“These girls are so awesome, and
they work so hard at this every
day.”
The Gladiators (9-2) had a 9-1
advantage on draws in the open-
ing period, with junior Jenny
Giampalmo taking the sets and
Callahan and junior Emily Nalls
battling for groundballs around
the circle.
But the Cardinals (13-3) countered with better possession success — and more offensive production — in the second half.
Attacker Alexis LeDoyen led the
Cardinals with two goals, helping
her team twice pull within three.
Despite losing starting goalkeeper Ashley Bowen to a thumb
injury after halftime, Bishop Ireton allowed Glenelg to score only
once more until the final four
minutes.
The Gladiators, though, closed
on a 4-0 run to seal a coveted win.
They viewed the victory as proof
of improvement after a pair of
early-season losses against top
competition as they prepare to
play for a third straight Maryland state championship next
month.
“We like to play teams out of
county to test ourselves before
we get to playoffs,” Callahan said.
“It shows we’re the real deal and
we’re here to play and we’re not
here to mess around.”
callie.caplan@washpost.com
SCOREBOARD
BA S KETBA L L
NBA playoffs
Through Sunday’s games
FIRST ROUND
Best of seven; x-If necessary
SCORING
G
Davis, NOR .......................... 4
James, CLE .......................... 4
Durant, GOL ........................ 4
Harden, HOU ....................... 3
DeRozan, TOR ..................... 4
Antetokounmpo, MIL ......... 4
Holiday, NOR ...................... 4
Wall, WAS .......................... 4
George, OKC ........................ 3
Mitchell, UTA ...................... 3
Middleton, MIL ................... 4
McCollum, POR ................... 4
Brown, BOS ......................... 4
Oladipo, IND ........................ 4
Thompson, GOL .................. 4
Aldridge, SAN ..................... 4
Beal, WAS ........................... 4
Westbrook, OKC ................. 3
Rubio, UTA .......................... 3
Dragic, MIA ......................... 4
Paul, HOU ............................ 3
Simmons, PHL .................... 4
Saric, PHL ........................... 4
Lillard, POR ......................... 4
Mirotic, NOR ....................... 4
Redick, PHL ......................... 4
Belinelli, PHL ...................... 4
Wade, MIA .......................... 4
Butler, MIN ......................... 3
Aminu, POR ........................ 4
Horford, BOS ....................... 4
Wiggins, MIN ...................... 3
Rozier, BOS ......................... 4
Bogdanovic, IND ................. 4
Lowry, TOR ......................... 4
Anthony, OKC ..................... 3
Teague, MIN ....................... 3
Gobert, UTA ........................ 3
Morris, BOS ........................ 4
Turner, IND ......................... 4
EASTERN CONFERENCE
RAPTORS AND WIZARDS TIED, 2-2
Game 1: at Toronto 114, Washington 106
Game 2: at Toronto 130, Washington 119
Game 3: at Washington 122, Toronto 103
Game 4: at Washington 106, Toronto 98
Wednesday’s game: Washington at Toronto, 7
Friday’s game: Toronto at Washington, TBA
x-Sunday’s game: Washington at Toronto, TBA
CELTICS AND BUCKS TIED, 2-2
Game 1: at Boston 113, Milwaukee 107 (OT)
Game 2: at Boston 120, Milwaukee 106
Game 3: at Milwaukee 116, Boston 92
Game 4: at Milwaukee 104, Boston 102
Tuesday’s game: Milwaukee at Boston, 7
Thursday’s game: Boston at Milwaukee, TBA
x-Saturday’s game: Milwaukee at Boston, TBA
76ERS LEAD HEAT, 3-1
Game 1: at Philadelphia 130, Miami 103
Game 2: Miami 113, at Philadelphia 103
Game 3: Philadelphia 128, at Miami 108
Game 4: Philadelphia 106, at Miami 102
Tuesday’s game: Miami at Philadelphia, 8
x-Thursday’s game: Philadelphia at Miami, TBA
x-Saturday’s game: Miami at Philadelphia, TBA
PACERS AND CAVALIERS TIED, 2-2
Game 1: Indiana 98, at Cleveland 80
Game 2: at Cleveland 100, Indiana 97
Game 3: at Indiana 92, Cleveland 90
Game 4: Cleveland 104, at Indiana 100
Wednesday’s game: Indiana at Cleveland, 7
Friday’s game: Cleveland at Indiana, TBA
x-Sunday, April 29: Indiana at Cleveland, TBA
WESTERN CONFERENCE
ROCKETS LEAD TIMBERWOLVES, 3-1
Game 1: at Houston 104, Minnesota 101
Game 2: at Houston 102, Minnesota 82
Game 3: at Minnesota 121, Houston 105
Game 4: Houston 119, at Minnesota 100
Wednesday’s game: Minnesota at Houston, 9:30
x-Friday’s game: Houston at Minnesota, TBA
x-Sunday’s game: Minnesota at Houston, TBA
WARRIORS LEAD SPURS, 3-1
Game 1: at Golden State 113, San Antonio 92
Game 2: at Golden State 116, San Antonio 101
Game 3: Golden State 110, at San Antonio 97
Game 4: at San Antonio 103, Golden State 90
Tuesday’s game: San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30
x-Thursday’s game: Golden State at San Antonio, TBA
x-Saturday’s game: San Antonio at Golden State, TBA
PELICANS ELIMINATED TRAIL BLAZERS, 4-0
Game 1: New Orleans 97, at Portland 95
Game 2: New Orleans 111, at Portland 102
Game 3:at New Orleans 119, Portland 102
Game 4: at New Orleans 131. Portland 123
JAZZ LEAD THUNDER, 2-1
Game 1: at Oklahoma City 116, Utah 108
Game 2: Utah 102, at Oklahoma City 95
Game 3: at Utah 115, Oklahoma City 102
Game 4: Oklahoma City at Utah, Late
Wednesday’s game: Utah at Oklahoma City, 9:30
x-Friday’s game: Oklahoma City at Utah, TBA
x-Sunday’s game: Utah at Oklahoma City, TBA
Rockets 119, Timberwolves 100
Houston .............................. 21
Minnesota .......................... 21
HOUSTON
Ariza
Tucker
Capela
Harden
Paul
Gordon
Anderson
Green
Nene
Black
Johnson
Jackson
TOTALS
29
28
50
20
19 — 119
31 — 100
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
33:00 4-10 4-4 0-2 3 4 15
24:27
1-3 0-0 0-4 0 1
3
31:54 6-11 2-4 7-17 3 2 14
33:15 12-26 7-7 0-4 3 4 36
33:53 9-17 4-4 1-6 6 1 25
29:48 6-14 2-2 0-1 2 0 18
17:04
0-3 0-0 0-1 1 2
0
16:29
0-3 2-2 1-4 0 1
2
14:04
1-3 2-3 1-5 2 1
4
2:02
0-0 0-0 0-1 0 0
0
2:02
1-1 0-0 0-0 0 0
2
2:02
0-1 0-0 0-1 0 1
0
240 40-92 23-26 10-46 20 17 119
Percentages: FG .435, FT .885. 3-Point Goals: 16-43, .372
(Harden 5-11, Gordon 4-10, Paul 3-5, Ariza 3-8, Tucker
1-2 Anderson 0-3, Green 0-3). Team Rebounds: 5. Team
Turnovers: 6 (5 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Capela 4, Harden,
Tucker). Turnovers: 6 (Green 2, Capela, Harden, Nene,
Paul). Steals: 11 (Paul 5, Harden 4, Ariza, Gordon).
MINNESOTA
Gibson
Wiggins
Towns
Butler
Teague
Rose
Crawford
Bjelica
Dieng
Georges-Hunt
Brooks
TOTALS
HOCKEY
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
20:16
1-1 0-0 1-3 0 1
2
29:14 5-14 3-4 0-3 1 2 14
31:53 9-15 4-6 5-15 2 3 22
38:06 7-17 4-5 2-9 5 2 19
28:04
1-7 0-0 0-1 5 4
2
32:25 7-11 1-2 0-6 4 2 17
23:36 4-10 1-2 0-2 4 3 10
16:15
2-4 1-2 1-3 1 3
7
16:07
1-2 0-0 0-5 1 2
3
2:02
0-1 0-0 1-1 0 0
0
2:02
2-2 0-2 0-0 0 0
4
240 39-84 14-23 10-48 23 22 100
Percentages: FG .464, FT .609. 3-Point Goals: 8-22, .364
(Bjelica 2-2, Rose 2-2, Crawford 1-2, Dieng 1-2, Butler
1-4, Wiggins 1-5, Towns 0-2, Teague 0-3). Team
Rebounds: 10. Team Turnovers: 16 (19 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 1 (Dieng). Turnovers: 16 (Towns 5, Rose 4,
Teague 3, Crawford 2, Butler, Wiggins). Steals: 4
(Crawford 3, Bjelica).
Cavaliers 104, Pacers 100
Late Sunday
CLEVELAND ....................... 30
INDIANA ............................. 24
30
26
20
28
24 — 104
22 — 100
CLEVELAND: Smith 4-12 0-0 12, James 12-22 8-9 32,
Love 2-10 1-2 5, Calderon 2-4 0-0 5, Korver 4-9 6-7 18,
Green 3-5 1-2 8, Nance Jr. 2-4 2-2 6, Thompson 0-1 0-0 0,
Hood 1-2 4-4 6, Clarkson 5-9 0-0 12. Totals 35-78 22-26
104.
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 4-13 0-0 10, T.Young 5-12 1-4 12,
Turner 7-9 0-0 17, Collison 5-14 1-1 12, Oladipo 5-20 4-5
17, Booker 0-0 2-2 2, Sabonis 9-12 0-1 19, Joseph 0-2 0-0
0, Stephenson 5-11 0-0 11. Totals 40-93 8-13 100.
Three-point Goals: Cleveland 12-34 (Korver 4-9, Smith
4-10, Clarkson 2-3, Calderon 1-2, Green 1-2, Love 0-3,
James 0-5), Indiana 12-33 (Turner 3-4, Oladipo 3-8,
Bogdanovic 2-8, Sabonis 1-1, T.Young 1-2, Stephenson
1-4, Collison 1-5, Joseph 0-1). Rebounds: Cleveland 44
(James 13), Indiana 48 (T.Young 16). Assists: Cleveland
17 (James 7), Indiana 25 (Collison 8). Total Fouls:
Cleveland 18, Indiana 19. Technicals: James.
B A SE B A LL
Collegiate Baseball Poll
Record
1. Stanford............................ 30-5
2. Florida............................... 34-8
3. N.C. State ......................... 31-8
4. UCLA ............................... 25-10
5. Oregon State .................... 29-6
6. North Carolina ................ 27-13
7. Michigan ......................... 24-11
8. Mississippi........................ 32-9
9. Duke................................ 31-10
10. Arkansas....................... 28-13
11. Texas Tech ...................... 32-9
12. Vanderbilt..................... 24-16
13. Georgia.......................... 27-13
14. Clemson ........................ 29-11
15. East Carolina .................. 30-9
16. St. John's ...................... 26-10
17. Oklahoma State......... 23-14-1
18. Oklahoma...................... 27-15
19. Florida State................. 29-12
20. Tennessee Tech .............. 34-5
21. Auburn .......................... 29-12
22. Texas A&M ................... 29-11
23. Texas............................. 28-15
24. Louisville ...................... 26-13
25. South Carolina .............. 23-17
Pts
495
493
490
487
486
484
482
480
478
476
475
472
469
467
465
463
460
457
455
453
451
449
448
445
442
Prv
5
1
2
4
7
8
11
10
3
6
15
9
12
13
23
24
—
14
—
21
—
19
21
20
—
SOCCER
Stanley Cup playoffs
NBA PLAYOFF LEADERS
FIRST ROUND
FG
49
46
40
26
40
44
46
37
26
30
40
40
38
30
35
29
31
22
20
29
22
29
27
25
28
24
24
27
17
27
23
20
20
23
20
17
16
15
20
24
FIELD GOALS
Gobert, UTA ....................................
Valanciunas, TOR ............................
McGee, GOL .....................................
Scott, WAS .....................................
Gortat, WAS ...................................
Capela, HOU ....................................
Antetokounmpo, MIL ......................
Middleton, MIL ................................
Adams, OKC ....................................
Turner, IND ......................................
Favors, UTA .....................................
Horford, BOS ...................................
Mirotic, NOR ...................................
Davis, NOR ......................................
Holiday, NOR ...................................
Johnson, MIA ..................................
Young, IND ......................................
Sabonis, IND ...................................
James, CLE ......................................
Thompson, GOL ...............................
Teague, MIN ....................................
Morris, WAS ...................................
Ilyasova, PHL ..................................
McCollum, POR ...............................
Aminu, POR .....................................
Simmons, PHL .................................
Brown, BOS .....................................
Paul, HOU ........................................
Porter Jr., WAS ...............................
Wiggins, MIN ..................................
FT PTS. AVG.
31 132 33.0
32 130 32.5
27 116 29.0
22
85 28.3
25 112 28.0
20 111 27.8
12 111 27.8
30 107 26.8
10
77 25.7
10
77 25.7
7 102 25.5
10 101 25.2
6
95 23.8
17
89 22.2
4
89 22.2
27
88 22.0
13
87 21.8
15
62 20.7
14
61 20.3
14
78 19.5
9
58 19.3
19
77 19.2
9
75 18.8
15
74 18.5
5
73 18.2
17
73 18.2
13
72 18.0
18
72 18.0
11
52 17.3
2
69 17.2
20
69 17.2
6
51 17.0
15
65 16.2
6
63 15.8
11
62 15.5
6
46 15.3
10
46 15.3
15
45 15.0
12
59 14.8
6
59 14.8
FG
15
22
16
20
20
17
44
40
12
24
15
23
28
49
46
21
18
16
46
35
16
17
21
40
27
29
38
22
16
20
FGA
21
31
23
29
31
27
71
65
20
41
26
40
49
86
81
37
32
29
85
65
30
32
40
77
52
56
74
43
32
40
PCT.
.714
.710
.696
.690
.645
.630
.620
.615
.600
.585
.577
.575
.571
.570
.568
.568
.562
.552
.541
.538
.533
.531
.525
.519
.519
.518
.514
.512
.500
.500
REBOUNDS
G OFF. DEF. TOT. AVG.
Capela, HOU ........................ 3
13
26
39 13.0
Towns, MIN ......................... 3
9
29
38 12.7
Davis, NOR .......................... 4
12
36
48 12.0
James, CLE .......................... 4
9
38
47 11.8
Gobert, UTA ........................ 3
14
20
34 11.3
Westbrook, OKC ................. 3
3
30
33 11.0
Simmons, PHL .................... 4
11
32
43 10.8
Love, CLE ............................. 4
14
28
42 10.5
Mirotic, NOR ....................... 4
2
36
38 9.5
Durant, GOL ........................ 4
2
35
37 9.2
Green, GOL .......................... 4
10
27
37 9.2
Ibaka, TOR .......................... 4
6
31
37 9.2
Aminu, POR ........................ 4
12
24
36 9.0
Ilyasova, PHL ...................... 4
12
24
36 9.0
Mitchell, UTA ...................... 3
3
24
27 9.0
Favors, UTA ........................ 3
12
14
26 8.7
Aldridge, SAN ..................... 4
10
24
34 8.5
Antetokounmpo, MIL ......... 4
5
29
34 8.5
Rubio, UTA .......................... 3
3
22
25 8.3
Davis, POR .......................... 4
5
27
32 8.0
Nurkic, POR ......................... 4
12
20
32 8.0
Young, IND .......................... 4
13
19
32 8.0
Valanciunas, TOR ............... 4
4
27
31 7.8
Rondo, NOR ......................... 4
2
28
30 7.5
Horford, BOS ....................... 4
9
20
29 7.2
Saric, PHL ........................... 4
13
16
29 7.2
Baynes, BOS ....................... 4
12
16
28 7.0
Anthony, OKC ..................... 3
1
19
20 6.7
ASSISTS
Rondo, NOR .......................................
Wall, WAS .........................................
Westbrook, OKC ................................
Simmons, PHL ...................................
Lowry, TOR ........................................
Green, GOL ........................................
James, CLE ........................................
Rubio, UTA ........................................
Harden, HOU .....................................
Rozier, BOS .......................................
Antetokounmpo, MIL ........................
Holiday, NOR .....................................
Paul, HOU ..........................................
Collison, IND .....................................
Teague, MIN ......................................
Oladipo, IND ......................................
Durant, GOL ......................................
DeRozan, TOR ...................................
Johnson, MIA ....................................
Lillard, POR .......................................
Dragic, MIA .......................................
Bledsoe, MIL .....................................
Middleton, MIL ..................................
Iguodala, GOL ....................................
Lawson, WAS ....................................
Covington, PHL .................................
McCollum, POR .................................
Richardson, MIA ...............................
G
4
4
3
4
4
4
4
3
3
4
4
4
3
4
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
4
4
4
AST.
53
52
30
39
34
33
32
24
22
28
26
26
18
23
17
22
21
20
19
19
18
17
16
15
11
14
14
14
AVG.
13.2
13.0
10.0
9.8
8.5
8.2
8.0
8.0
7.3
7.0
6.5
6.5
6.0
5.8
5.7
5.5
5.2
5.0
4.8
4.8
4.5
4.2
4.0
3.8
3.7
3.5
3.5
3.5
STEALS
Richardson, MIA ...............................
Wall, WAS .........................................
Simmons, PHL ...................................
Anthony, OKC ....................................
Crowder, UTA ....................................
Rubio, UTA ........................................
Westbrook, OKC ................................
Oladipo, IND ......................................
Tatum, BOS .......................................
Brewer, OKC ......................................
Gay, SAN ...........................................
Harden, HOU .....................................
Lowry, TOR ........................................
Wright, TOR ......................................
Young, IND ........................................
Davis, NOR ........................................
Ginobili, SAN .....................................
Green, GOL ........................................
Mirotic, NOR .....................................
Ariza, HOU ........................................
Mitchell, UTA ....................................
Paul, HOU ..........................................
G
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
4
4
3
4
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
STL.
11
11
10
7
7
7
7
9
9
6
8
6
8
8
8
7
7
7
7
5
5
5
AVG.
2.75
2.75
2.50
2.33
2.33
2.33
2.33
2.25
2.25
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.67
1.67
1.67
BLOCKS
Maker, MIL ........................................
Davis, NOR ........................................
Mirotic, NOR .....................................
Gobert, UTA ......................................
Ibaka, TOR .........................................
Capela, HOU ......................................
Young, IND ........................................
Towns, MIN .......................................
Tucker, HOU ......................................
Covington, PHL .................................
Green, GOL ........................................
Horford, BOS .....................................
Mahinmi, WAS ..................................
Nurkic, POR .......................................
Olynyk, MIA ......................................
Parker, MIL ........................................
Porter Jr., WAS .................................
Whiteside, MIA .................................
Bledsoe, MIL .....................................
Brewer, OKC ......................................
Dieng, MIN ........................................
Favors, UTA .......................................
G
3
4
4
3
4
3
4
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
STL.
10
11
10
6
7
5
6
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
4
3
3
3
AVG.
3.33
2.75
2.50
2.00
1.75
1.67
1.50
1.33
1.33
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
Best of seven; x-If necessary
EASTERN CONFERENCE
CAPITALS ELIMINATED BLUE JACKETS, 4-2
Game 1: Columbus 4, at Washington 3 (OT)
Game 2: Columbus 5, at Washington 4 (OT)
Game 3: Washington 3, at Columbus 2 (2OT)
Game 4: Washington 4, at Columbus 1
Game 5: Washington 4, Columbus 3 (OT)
Game 6: Washington 6, at Columbus 3
LIGHTNING ELIMINATED DEVILS, 4-1
Game 1: at Tampa Bay 5, New Jersey 2
Game 2: at Tampa Bay 5, New Jersey 3
Game 3: at New Jersey 5, Tampa Bay 2
Game 4: Tampa Bay 3, at New Jersey 1
Game 5: at Tampa Bay 3, New Jersey 1
BRUINS AND MAPLE LEAFS TIED, 3-3
Game 1: at Boston 5, Toronto 1
Game 2: at Boston 7, Toronto 3
Game 3: at Toronto 4, Boston 2
Game 4: Boston 3, at Toronto 1
Game 5: Toronto 4, at Boston 3
Game 6: at Toronto 3, Boston 1
Wednesday’s game: Toronto at Boston, 7:30
EASTERN
W
New York City FC .............5
Atlanta United FC ............5
Orlando City .....................4
New England ....................3
Columbus .........................3
New York .........................3
Chicago ............................2
Montreal ..........................2
D.C. United .......................1
Philadelphia .....................1
Toronto FC .......................1
L
1
1
2
2
3
3
3
5
3
3
4
T PTS
2
17
1
16
1
13
2
11
2
11
0
9
1
7
0
6
2
5
2
5
0
3
GF
16
17
14
12
11
14
9
9
6
3
4
GA
9
8
12
8
9
8
10
17
10
8
11
WESTERN
W
Sporting KC ......................5
Los Angeles FC ................4
Dallas ...............................3
LA Galaxy .........................3
Real Salt Lake ..................3
Vancouver ........................3
Houston ...........................2
Colorado ...........................2
Portland ...........................2
Minnesota United ............2
San Jose ...........................1
Seattle .............................1
L
1
2
0
3
3
4
2
2
3
5
3
3
T PTS
2
17
0
12
3
12
1
10
1
10
1
10
2
8
2
8
2
8
0
6
2
5
1
4
GF
20
16
9
8
9
8
14
9
12
9
11
5
GA
11
13
3
10
14
17
9
8
14
15
13
8
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
PENGUINS ELIMINATED FLYERS, 4-2
Sporting KC 6, Vancouver 0
Game 1: at Pittsburgh 7, Philadelphia 0
Game 2: Philadelphia 5, at Pittsburgh 1
Game 3: Pittsburgh 5, at Philadelphia 1
Game 4: Pittsburgh 5, at Philadelphia 0
Game 5: Philadelphia 4, at Pittsburgh 2
Game 6: Pittsburgh 8, at Philadelphia 5
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Los Angeles FC 5, Montreal 3
Houston 5, Toronto FC 1
Chicago 2, New York 1
New England 2, Columbus 2, tie
Orlando City 3, San Jose 2
Dallas 2, Philadelphia 0
Real Salt Lake 3, Colorado 0
Atlanta United FC 2, LA Galaxy 0
WESTERN CONFERENCE
PREDATORS ELIMINATED AVALANCHE, 4-2
Game 1: at Nashville 5, Colorado 2
Game 2: at Nashville 5, Colorado 4
Game 3: at Colorado 5, Nashville 3
Game 4: Nashville 3, at Colorado 2
Game 5: Colorado 2, at Nashville 1
Game 6: Nashville 5, at Colorado 0
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Seattle 3, Minnesota United 1
Portland 3, New York City FC 0
JETS ELIMINATED WILD, 4-1
FRIDAY’S MATCH
Game 1: at Winnipeg 3, Minnesota 2
Game 2: at Winnipeg 4, Minnesota 1
Game 3: at Minnesota 6, Winnipeg 2
Game 4: Winnipeg 2, at Minnesota 0
Game 5: at Winnipeg 5, Minnesota 0
Real Salt Lake at Vancouver, 10:30
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
D.C. United at Philadelphia, 3:30
Montreal at Atlanta United FC, 1
Chicago at Toronto FC, 3
San Jose at Columbus, 7:30
Sporting KC at New England, 7:30
Houston at Minnesota United, 8
New York at LA Galaxy, 10:30
GOLDEN KNIGHTS ELIMINATED KINGS, 4-0
Game 1: at Vegas 1, Los Angeles 0
Game 2: at Vegas 2, Los Angeles 1
Game 3: Vegas 3, at Los Angeles 2
Game 4: Vegas 1, at Los Angeles 0
SHARKS ELIMINATED DUCKS, 4-0
Game 1: San Jose 3, at Anaheim 0
Game 2: San Jose 3, at Anaheim 2
Game 3: at San Jose 8, Anaheim 1
Game 4: at San Jose 2, Anaheim 1
SUNDAY’S MATCHES
Orlando City at Colorado, 4
Dallas at New York City FC, 6:30
Seattle at Los Angeles FC, 9
NWSL
Maple Leafs 3, Bruins 1
BOSTON ................................... 0
TORONTO ................................ 0
GO L F
MLS
1
2
0 —
1 —
1
3
Scoring: 4, Toronto, Plekanec 2 (Zaitsev, Marner), 18:46.
W
North Carolina .................4
Chicago ............................2
Portland ...........................2
Seattle .............................2
Washington .....................1
Orlando ............................1
Utah .................................0
Houston ...........................0
Sky Blue FC ......................0
SHOTS ON GOAL
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
BOSTON ................................. 17
9
7 — 33
TORONTO .............................. 10
12
8 — 30
Power-play opportunities: Boston 0 of 2; Toronto 0 of 3.
Goalies: Boston, Rask 3-3 (29 shots-27 saves). Toronto,
Andersen 3-2 (33-32). A: 19,604 (18,819). T: 2:43.
North Carolina 1, Seattle 0
Chicago 3, Houston 0
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Boston, DeBrusk 3 (Krejci), 1:02. 2, Toronto,
Nylander 1 (Kadri, Zaitsev), 1:37. 3, Toronto, Marner 2
(Plekanec, Hainsey), 13:25.
THIRD PERIOD
L
0
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
T PTS
1
13
2
8
1
7
0
6
1
4
1
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
GF
9
8
6
3
6
3
2
1
1
GA
4
5
5
2
7
5
3
5
3
FRIDAY’S RESULT
Washington 1, Portland 1, tie
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Utah 2, North Carolina 2, tie
Sky Blue FC 1, Chicago 1, tie
NHL PLAYOFF LEADERS
Through Sunday’s games
SUNDAY’S RESULT
GOALS
Name Team ................................................GP
Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh ............................ 6
Jake Guentzel Pittsburgh ............................ 6
Sean Couturier Philadelphia ........................ 5
Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay......................... 5
Filip Forsberg Nashville ............................... 6
Alex Killorn Tampa Bay................................ 5
Evgeny Kuznetsov Washington................... 5
Gabriel Landeskog Colorado ........................ 6
David Pastrnak Boston ................................ 5
Mark Scheifele Winnipeg............................. 5
Austin Watson Nashville............................. 6
Matt Calvert Columbus................................ 5
Tomas Hertl San Jose .................................. 4
Nathan MacKinnon Colorado ....................... 6
Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh ............................ 5
T.J. Oshie Washington................................. 5
Alex Ovechkin Washington.......................... 5
Bryan Rust Pittsburgh ................................. 6
Colton Sissons Nashville ............................. 6
Orlando 1, Houston 0
G
6
6
5
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
A
7
7
7
7
7
6
6
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
4
SINGLES
FIRST ROUND
ASSISTS
Name Team ...............................................GP
John Carlson Washington ............................5
Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh ............................6
Jake Guentzel Pittsburgh.............................6
Torey Krug Boston........................................5
David Pastrnak Boston.................................5
Nicklas Backstrom Washington...................5
Kris Letang Pittsburgh.................................6
Patrice Bergeron Boston ..............................4
Dustin Byfuglien Winnipeg ..........................5
Brian Dumoulin Pittsburgh ..........................6
Mattias Ekholm Nashville............................6
Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay.........................5
Brad Marchand Boston.................................5
Mitchell Marner Toronto..............................5
Artemi Panarin Columbus ............................5
Morgan Rielly Toronto .................................5
Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay ........................5
Phil Kessel Pittsburgh..................................6
POWER PLAY POINTS
Name Team ............................................... GP
John Carlson Washington............................5
Nicklas Backstrom Washington ..................5
Torey Krug Boston .......................................5
Alex Killorn Tampa Bay................................5
Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay ........................5
T.J. Oshie Washington.................................5
Alex Ovechkin Washington .........................5
Artemi Panarin Columbus............................5
Joe Pavelski San Jose ..................................4
Will Butcher New Jersey .............................5
Logan Couture San Jose ..............................4
Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh ............................6
Jake DeBrusk Boston...................................5
Taylor Hall New Jersey ................................5
Mikko Koivu Minnesota ...............................5
Evgeny Kuznetsov Washington...................5
Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh ............................5
Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay........................5
Blake Wheeler Winnipeg .............................5
James van Riemsdyk Toronto......................5
PPP
7
6
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
SHP
1
1
1
1
1
PLUS/MINUS
Name Team................................................ GP
Jake Guentzel Pittsburgh.............................6
Mattias Ekholm Nashville ............................6
Nick Bonino Nashville...................................6
Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh.............................6
Brian Dumoulin Pittsburgh ..........................6
Olli Maatta Pittsburgh .................................6
Austin Watson Nashville .............................6
Sean Kuraly Boston ......................................5
Kris Letang Pittsburgh .................................6
Bryan Rust Pittsburgh..................................6
Justin Schultz Pittsburgh.............................6
Matt Calvert Columbus ................................5
Braydon Coburn Tampa Bay .........................5
Brenden Dillon San Jose...............................4
Jack Roslovic Winnipeg ................................4
Tim Schaller Boston .....................................5
WEDNESDAY, MAY 3
Orlando at Chicago, 7:30
TENNIS
WTA
TENNIS GRAND PRIX
At Porsche-Arena in Stuttgart, Germany
Purse: $816,000 (Premier)
Surface: Clay-Indoor
Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, def. Daria Kasatkina,
Russia, 6-2, 6-2.
DOUBLES
FIRST ROUND
Nicole Melichar, United States, and Kveta Peschke,
Czech Republic, def. Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, and
Andrea Sestini Hlavackova (2), Czech Republic, 7-6 (4),
3-6, 11-9.
ATP
HUNGARIAN OPEN
At BudaPart-Kopaszi gat in Budapest, Hungary
Purse: $615,900 (WT250)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
SINGLES
FIRST ROUND
John Millman, Australia, def. Radu Albot, Moldova, 6-4,
7-5; Marco Cecchinato, Italy, def. Mirza Basic, BosniaHerzegovina, 6-3, 6-4; Aljaz Bedene (5), Slovenia, def.
Marius Copil, Romania, 6-7 (7-3), 7-5, 6-3; Lorenzo
Sonego, Italy, def. Hubert Hurkacz, Poland, 6-7 (7-2), 7-6
(10-8), 6-4.
DOUBLES
FIRST ROUND
Ben Mclachlan, Japan, and Jan-Lennard Struff (2),
Germany, def. Hans Podlipnik-Castillo, Chile, and Andrei
Vasilevski, Belarus, 7-6 (7-5), 6-1.
BARCELONA OPEN
SHORT HANDED POINTS
Name Team................................................. GP
Matt Calvert Columbus .................................5
Blake Coleman New Jersey ...........................5
Valtteri Filppula Philadelphia........................6
Seth Jones Columbus ....................................5
Jori Lehtera Philadelphia...............................6
Chicago at Washington, 7
North Carolina at Houston 3:30
Seattle at Orlando, 7:30
Portland at Utah, 9
+/10
9
7
7
7
7
7
5
5
5
5
4
4
4
4
4
At Real Club de Tenis Barcelona 1899 in Barcelona, Spain
Purse: $3.08 million (WT500)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
H I GH S C HOOLS
LPGA Tour
THE TOP 10
LA OPEN
Baseball
At Wilshire Country Club in Los Angeles
Purse: $1.5 million
Yardage: 6,450
Sunday’s Final scores
Riverdale Baptist cruised to a 13-1 win over Delaware’s
Newark Charter School. . . . Paul VI fell to DeMatha but
bounced back against Good Counsel to move to 10-2 in
the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference. . . . Sherwood came close to losing its perfect record, needing
extra innings to get past Blair, 6-5. . . . After three
straight games of double-digit runs, St. John’s was shut
down by St. Mary’s Ryken in a 3-2 loss. . . . Woodgrove’s
bats have kept the Wolverines undefeated: They have
scored 31 runs in their past three games. . . . Dominion’s
only losses are against No. 5 Riverside and No. 6
Woodgrove. . . . Behind Hartford commitment Tremayne
Cobb Jr., C.H. Flowers has dominated Prince George’s
County, with its only losses coming to Howard County
opponents.
Moriya Jutanugarn, $225,000 ....... 68-66-70-68
Inbee Park, $120,105 ..................... 66-71-69-68
Jin Young Ko, $120,105 ................. 71-67-66-70
So Yeon Ryu, $78,125.................... 71-65-73-68
Emma Talley, $57,166 ................... 68-72-71-67
Eun-Hee Ji, $57,166....................... 68-69-70-71
Morgan Pressel, $40,397............... 71-68-73-67
Minjee Lee, $40,397 ...................... 69-73-66-71
Sherman Santiwiwatthanaphong,
70-72-69-69
$33,919 ..........................................
Pernilla Lindberg, $29,726............. 68-76-66-71
Caroline Inglis, $29,726 ................. 68-71-69-73
Jeong Eun Lee, $22,409 ................. 70-75-69-68
Carlota Ciganda, $22,409............... 74-69-71-68
Lexi Thompson, $22,409................ 68-71-74-69
Austin Ernst, $22,409.................... 73-71-67-71
Shanshan Feng, $22,409 ............... 74-67-70-71
Mi Hyang Lee, $22,409 .................. 71-70-70-71
Marina Alex, $22,409 .................... 67-68-72-75
Charley Hull, $16,921 .................... 75-69-68-71
Nasa Hataoka, $16,921 ................. 71-73-68-71
Katherine Kirk, $16,921................. 69-71-72-71
Bronte Law, $16,921 ..................... 70-72-68-73
Aditi Ashok, $16,921 ..................... 68-73-69-73
Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $14,291 ......... 70-75-69-70
Ariya Jutanugarn, $14,291............ 71-71-72-70
Chella Choi, $14,291 ...................... 72-71-70-71
Jessica Korda, $14,291 .................. 71-71-69-73
Brianna Do, $12,449 ...................... 71-74-72-68
Lizette Salas, $12,449 ................... 70-72-73-70
Azahara Munoz, $12,449............... 69-70-73-73
Cristie Kerr, $10,004...................... 73-73-71-69
Lydia Ko, $10,004 .......................... 70-75-72-69
Christina Kim, $10,004 .................. 74-71-71-70
Wichanee Meechai, $10,004 ......... 73-72-71-70
Lindy Duncan, $10,004 .................. 70-74-72-70
Georgia Hall, $10,004 .................... 71-69-76-70
Caroline Masson, $10,004 ............. 75-70-70-71
Brittany Altomare, $10,004 .......... 70-74-69-73
Mariah Stackhouse, $7,927........... 74-71-71-72
Sydnee Michaels, $7,927............... 72-72-72-72
Yu Liu, $7,927 ................................ 70-70-74-74
Natalie Gulbis, $6,275 ................... 69-76-76-68
Brittany Lincicome, $6,275 ........... 72-71-75-71
Amy Olson, $6,275 ........................ 73-71-73-72
Madelene Sagstrom, $6,275 ......... 74-72-69-74
Beatriz Recari, $6,275 ................... 72-71-72-74
Pornanong Phatlum, $6,275 .......... 71-72-72-74
Candie Kung, $6,275 ...................... 74-72-68-75
Kelly Shon, $6,275 ......................... 72-72-70-75
Lindsey Weaver, $6,275 ................ 69-72-72-76
Hee Young Park, $4,954 ................ 74-72-74-70
Haeji Kang, $4,954......................... 73-72-73-72
Paula Creamer, $4,954 .................. 71-73-73-73
Mi Jung Hur, $4,954 ...................... 72-70-72-76
Danielle Kang, $4,192.................... 77-69-73-72
Tiffany Chan, $4,192 ..................... 71-72-76-72
Megan Khang, $4,192 .................... 73-72-71-75
Jenny Shin, $4,192 ........................ 75-70-69-77
Kris Tamulis, $4,192...................... 72-72-70-77
Michelle Wie, $4,192 ..................... 73-70-71-77
Sun Young Yoo, $3,582.................. 71-74-72-75
Cydney Clanton, $3,582 ................. 71-72-74-75
Robynn Ree, $3,582 ....................... 78-67-71-76
Lee-Anne Pace, $3,582 .................. 74-70-72-76
Ayako Uehara, $3,582.................... 71-69-76-76
Mo Martin, $3,354 ......................... 75-71-75-72
Kassidy Teare, $3,201 ................... 70-73-77-74
Jaye Marie Green, $3,201.............. 70-75-74-75
Peiyun Chien, $3,201 ..................... 70-74-75-75
Anne-Catherine Tanguay, $3,049.. 76-67-74-78
Jennifer Song, $3,011......................... 73-69-76
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WD
World Golf Ranking
Through Sunday
1. Dustin Johnson...........................USA
2. Justin Thomas ............................USA
3. Jordan Spieth .............................USA
4. Jon Rahm .................................... ESP
5. Justin Rose .................................ENG
6. Rickie Fowler ..............................USA
7. Rory McIlroy ................................NIR
8. Hideki Matsuyama ..................... JPN
9. Brooks Koepka............................USA
10. Sergio Garcia ............................ ESP
11. Patrick Reed..............................USA
12. Tommy Fleetwood....................ENG
13. Paul Casey ................................ENG
14. Jason Day..................................AUS
15. Henrik Stenson........................SWE
16. Marc Leishman .........................AUS
17. Alex Noren ...............................SWE
18. Bubba Watson ..........................USA
19. Phil Mickelson ..........................USA
20. Tyrrell Hatton...........................ENG
21. Matt Kuchar..............................USA
22. Pat Perez ..................................USA
23. Brian Harman ...........................USA
24. Kevin Kisner .............................USA
25. Rafael Cabrera Bello................. ESP
26. Ian Poulter ................................ENG
27. Satoshi Kodaira ........................ JPN
28. Charley Hoffman ......................USA
29. Xander Schauffele ....................USA
30. Louis Oosthuizen...................... SAF
31. Francesco Molinari .................... ITA
32. Kiradech Aphibarnrat ...............THA
33. Tony Finau ................................USA
34. Patrick Cantlay .........................USA
35. Branden Grace .......................... SAF
36. Gary Woodland .........................USA
37. Daniel Berger............................USA
38. Matthew Fitzpatrick ................ENG
39. Si Woo Kim ...............................KOR
40. Cameron Smith.........................AUS
Team
Riverdale Baptist
Paul VI
Sherwood
St. John’s
Riverside
Woodgrove
Lake Braddock
Severna Park
Dominion
C.H. Flowers
Record
23-1
18-3
13-0
17-4
10-2
11-0
10-3
11-2
13-2
11-2
THE TOP 10
Softball
Madison recorded 14 hits and allowed just two in a 14-1
blowout of then-No. 7 Stone Bridge on Wednesday. . . .
Woodgrove senior outfielder Taylor Donches launched a
home run in the eighth inning to lift the Wolverines to a
1-0 victory against Loudoun Valley on Thursday. . . .
Undefeated Northwest has won its nine games by an
average margin of 10.4 runs. The Jaguars defeated
seven of those nine opponents by double digits. . . . In a
Maryland 4A North battle Saturday, Sherwood bested
Blair, 9-7, in eight innings. . . . Lexi Mann and Taylor
Beach hit home runs and Tori Fletcher struck out 16 to
lead Huntingtown to a 3-1 win over Northern on
Wednesday.
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Team
Madison
Woodgrove
Northwest
Sherwood
Huntingtown
McLean
Blair
Stone Bridge
Freedom-South Riding
Chopticon
Record
13-0
11-0
9-0
9-0
13-1
14-1
10-1
9-1
8-2
11-2
BASEBALL
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Wilson 20, Phelps 0
MARYLAND
Bethesda-Chevy Chase 13, Wheaton 1
Damascus 5, Poolesville 4
La Plata 11, St. Charles 1
Leonardtown 11, Calvert 8
Magruder 10, Seneca Valley 0
Whitman 9, Churchill 4
VIRGINIA
Stone Bridge 6, Broad Run 4
Stuart 9, Edison 6
PRIVATE
Bishop Ireton 10, St. Mary’s Ryken 3
Gonzaga 7, McNamara 5
Riverdale Baptist 11, Sidwell Friends 0
SOFTBALL
9.64
9.52
8.63
8.61
7.42
7.19
6.62
6.50
5.62
5.52
5.48
5.39
5.37
5.34
5.29
4.88
4.80
4.58
4.42
4.41
4.07
4.01
3.86
3.79
3.79
3.44
3.43
3.42
3.39
3.34
3.23
3.23
3.19
3.12
3.10
3.03
2.93
2.90
2.87
2.86
LPGA Money Leaders
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Wilson 15, School Without Walls 0
MARYLAND
Eleanor Roosevelt 17, Suitland 2
Northern 6, Chopticon 5
Paint Branch 3, Quince Orchard 2
VIRGINIA
Woodgrove 10, Freedom-South Riding 0
PRIVATE
Elizabeth Seton 4, St. John’s 2
St. Andrew’s 14, Madeira 4
GIRLS’ LACROSSE
MARYLAND
Glenelg 13, Bishop Ireton 6
VIRGINIA
W.T. Woodson 12, Leonardtown 9
PRIVATE
Paul VI 15, Elizabeth Seton 9
BOYS’ SPRING SOCCER
VIRGINIA
Broad Run 7, Briar Woods 2
Hayfield 3, South County 2
Park View 3, Riverside 1 (- )
Stone Bridge 1, Rock Ridge 1
GIRLS’ SPRING SOCCER
VIRGINIA
Battlefield 8, Osbourn 0
James Madison 8, Riverbend 1
Stone Bridge 2, Rock Ridge 1
Tuscarora 3, Freedom-South Riding 2
BOYS’ TENNIS
PRIVATE
DeMatha 9, Bishop Ireton 0
Gilman 4, Sidwell Friends 3
SPRING GOLF
PRIVATE
Episcopal 218, Georgetown Prep 196
St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes 269, Landon 213
The Heights 6, McNamara 3
Through Sunday
Trn
1. Inbee Park............................................ 6
2. Moriya Jutanugarn.............................. 9
3. Pernilla Lindberg ................................. 9
4. Brooke M. Henderson.......................... 9
5. Ariya Jutanugarn ................................ 9
6. Jin Young Ko........................................ 7
7. Jessica Korda ...................................... 5
8. Eun-Hee Ji ........................................... 7
9. Michelle Wie ....................................... 8
10. Shanshan Feng.................................. 7
11. Brittany Lincicome............................ 7
12. Azahara Munoz ................................. 8
13. Lizette Salas ..................................... 8
14. Minjee Lee ......................................... 7
15. Jennifer Song .................................... 7
16. Lexi Thompson .................................. 6
17. Cristie Kerr ........................................ 8
18. Marina Alex ....................................... 8
19. Charley Hull....................................... 8
20. Nelly Korda........................................ 7
21. So Yeon Ryu ...................................... 8
22. Wei-Ling Hsu .................................... 6
23. Danielle Kang .................................... 7
24. Caroline Masson................................ 8
25. Amy Yang .......................................... 6
26. Hannah Green.................................... 7
27. Jeong Eun Lee ................................... 7
28. Jenny Shin......................................... 8
29. Bronte Law ........................................ 7
30. Austin Ernst ...................................... 8
Money
$707,089
$533,701
$508,996
$496,619
$480,346
$448,206
$428,111
$394,000
$362,915
$325,141
$312,053
$291,796
$280,959
$267,249
$265,029
$237,130
$233,567
$229,065
$220,451
$212,561
$202,629
$188,062
$184,270
$169,208
$159,704
$150,151
$143,366
$143,066
$141,889
$135,462
L O C AL GOLF
SINGLES
FIRST ROUND
Benoit Paire, France, def. Nicolas Jarry, Chile, 7-6 (7-4),
6-7 (7-3), 6-4; Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, def. Tennys
Sandgren, United States, 6-4, 6-4; Marcel Granollers,
Spain, def. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 6-2, 6-2;
Dusan Lajovic, Serbia, def. Pedro Martinez, Spain, 6-4,
6-7 (7-5), 6-3; Rogerio Dutra Silva, Brazil, def. Jared
Donaldson, United States, 6-3, 6-1; Stefanos Tsitsipas,
Greece, def. Corentin Moutet, France, 6-4, 6-1; Guillermo
Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Yuichi Sugita, Japan, 7-6 (7-5),
7-6 (7-5); Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, def. Tommy Robredo,
Spain, 6-7 (7-5), 7-6 (10-8), 6-4; Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay,
def. Ricardo Ojeda Lara, Spain, 6-0, 6-4; Leonardo Mayer,
Argentina, def. Mischa Zverev, Germany, 6-3, 6-0.
JEFFERSON DISTRICT
DOUBLES
FIRST ROUND
In the Hickory Golf Club tournament, Steve Herron was
the low gross male with 41 and Susan Maraghy was the
low gross female with 50. Rob Holden was the low net
male with 40 and Tina Gibson was the low net female
with 39.
Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah, Colombia, def.
Inigo Cervantes and David Marrero, Spain, 6-3, 7-5.
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Ed Sumner won in flight A with a net score of 28, and Rex
Reed won in flight B with a net score of 25. Raj Sharma
was closest to the pin on hole No. 2, and Vijay Rathore
was closest to the pin on hole No. 7. Jim Jacobs had the
low gross score of 35.
PAINT BRANCH
Rodney Jones won first place net in the senior men’s
league. Richard Woodard was closest to the pin on hole
No. 3.
FAIRFAX
TR ANS AC TI ONS
MLB
Boston Red Sox: Traded LHP Roenis Elias to Seattle for a
player to be named or cash.
Chicago White Sox: Placed RHP Miguel Gonzalez on the
10-day DL, retroactive to April 19. Selected the contract
of RHP Chris Beck from Charlotte (IL). Transferred RHP
Danny Farquhar to the 60-day DL.
Detroit Tigers: Designated RHP Drew VerHagen for
assignment. Recalled OF Mike Gerber from Toledo (IL).
Minnesota Twins: Optioned LHP Gabriel Moya to Rochester (IL). Reinstated RHP Phil Hughes from the 10-day
DL.
Atlanta Braves: Sent C Tyler Flowers to Gwinnett (IL)
for a rehab assignment.
Colorado Rockies: Selected the contract of LHP Harrison
Musgrave from Albuquerque (PCL). Placed LHP Chris
Rusin on the 10-day DL. Transferred RHP Carlos Estevez
from the 10- to the 60-day DL.
Milwaukee Brewers: Assigned RHP Alec Asher outright
to Colorado Springs (PCL).
NBA
NBA: Named Derek Chang CEO of NBA China.
NFL
Arizona Cardinals: Signed DE Benson Mayowa to a
one-year contract.
Denver Broncos: Traded P Riley Dixon to the N.Y. Giants
for a conditional 2019 seventh-round draft pick.
New York Giants: Waived WR Darius Powe.
Oakland Raiders: Exercised their fifth-year option on WR
Amari Cooper. Signed CB Daryl Worley.
Pittsburgh Steelers: Exercised their fifth-year option on
LB Bud Dupree.
NHL
Calgary Flames: Named Bill Peters coach.
Minnesota Wild: Announced the contract of general
manager Chuck Fletcher will not be renewed.
COLLEGES
Clemson: Named Shimmy Gray-Miller assistant women’s basketball coach.
North Carolina: Junior F Luke Maye declared for the NBA
draft.
Providence: Signed women’s volleyball coach Margot
Royer-Johnson to a contract extension.
South Carolina: Dismissed G Rakym Felder from the
men’s basketball program.
EFGHI
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Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1501 Southern Avenue
Oxon Hill, MD 20745
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to PAUL SIMONSON AND RON DIVINE,
Trustee(s), dated December 10, 2015, and recorded among
the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 37728, folio 183, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MAY 10, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED DECEMBER 30, 2015 IN LIBER 37728, FOLIO
183.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 10% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (56745)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
852
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS:
GMU-1450-18
Prince Georges County
12175462
852
Anne Arundel County
Anne Arundel County
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Searching for Willette Louise Groves
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852
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY,
MARYLAND
ERIN M. SHAFFER
Substitute Trustee
Versus
Estate of William H. Roberts
Defendant
No. C-02-CV-002386
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby issued this Monday, April 9, 2018 that the sale of
the property in the proceedings
mentioned, made and reported by
Erin M. Shaffer, Substitute Trustee
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof
be shown on or before the 9th
day of May 2018 next; provided, a
copy of this Notice be inserted in
some newspaper published in Anne
Arundel County, once in each of
three successive weeks before the
9th day of May 2018 next. The report
states that the amount of sale of the
property at 1904 WAYLENE DRIVE,
HANOVER, MD 21076 to be
$285,000.00.
Robert P. Duckworth
Clerk Circuit Court
for Anne Arundel County
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BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
6403 Blue Sage Lane
4988 KEPPLER ROAD
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Temple Hills, MD 20748
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in
Deed of Trust to RONALD S. DUETCH, Trustee(s), dated May a certain Deed of Trust to COMMONWEALTH LAND TITLE
25, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee(s), dated January 10, 2006,
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 22661, folio 276, the and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 24621, folio 270, the holder
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
APRIL 26, 2018 at 11:30AM
MAY 3, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED ONE-HUNDRED SIX (106) IN A SUBDIVISION described as follows:
KNOWN AS "LOT 103 TO LOT 106, WOODLANE", AS PER PLAT LOT 25, IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "CROOM STATION",
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 35 AT PLAT 66 AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN
MARYLAND AND HAVING A PROPERTY ADDRESS OF 4988 PLAT BOOK VJ 186 AT PLAT 30.
KEPPLER ROAD, TEMPLE HILLS, MD 20748 AND BEING The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOW: BEGINNING without either express or implied warranty or representation,
AT AN IRON PIPE ON THE NORTHERN MOST CORNER OF LOT including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
106 AND RUNNING ON A DIVISION LINE BETWEEN LOT 105 particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
AND LOT 106, S 42 DEG. 30 MIN. 53 SEC. E, 109.10 FEET TO construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
AN IRON PIPE; THENCE WITH THE OUTLINE OF LOT 106, S liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer71 DEG. 22 MIN. 00 SEC, W, 73.41 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
THENCE THROUGH LOT 106 ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
LINE OF THE NEW CAPITAL BELTWAY (SRC PLAT N. 26741) subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
108.70 FEET ON THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
A RADIUS OF 3424.05 FOOT, A LONG CHORD DISTANCE OF subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
108.69 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING OF N 85 DEG 36 MIN. record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
38 SEC W TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE WITH THE SOUTHEAST assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
SIDE OF KEPPLER ROAD, N. 47 DEG29 MIN 07 SEC. E
141.39 FOOT TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $45,500.00 payable in certified
9,241 SQUARE FEET MORE OR LESS. BEING THE FEE SIMPLE check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
PROPERTY WHICH, BY DEED DATED OCTOBER 29, 1996, time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
AND RECORDED IN THE LAND RECORDS OF THE COUNTY OF ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
PRINCE GEORGE'S, MARYLAND, IN LIBER 11105, FOLIO 584, COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
WAS GRANTED AND CONVEYED BY CARL AUGUST HANSON unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
AND CAROLE JOANNE HANSON UNTO ROBERT WOODROW The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
MURPHY AND CRYSTAL D. MURPHY
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
Said property is subject to a 120 day IRS Right of purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
Redemption.
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
without either express or implied warranty or representation, resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 payable in certified deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 10.999% shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-03069)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
Substitute Trustees
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
www.hwestauctions.com
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to APRIL 17, 24, MAY 1, 2018
12177202
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
12174414 provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (13-24593)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner,
I WISH THEY
Robert M. Oliveri, David M. Williamson,
Membership is rewarding.
Substitute Trustees
WOULD STAY
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
529 Rosier Road
Fort Washington, MD 20744
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE
COMPANY, Trustee(s), dated September 20, 2006, and recorded
among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND in Liber 27681, folio 555, MODIFIED: JANUARY
16, 2014, LIBER 35552, FOLIO 486 the holder of the
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
APRIL 26, 2018 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE IN THE 12TH
ELECTION DISTRICT OF THE COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGES
AND STATE OF MARYLAND, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED
AS FOLLOWS: LOT NUMBERED 28 IN BLOCK LETTERED "G"
IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "RIVER BEND", AS PER
PLAT BOOK WWW 31, PLAT NUMBER 33, AS RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $32,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-02315)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Brennan Ferguson, Jessica Elliott,
Substitute Trustees
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APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
April 17, 24, May 1, 2018 12177439
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BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
16403 HALLOWAY COURT
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to NETCO INC, Trustee(s), dated January
19, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34552, folio 157,
RERECORDED SEPTEMBER 17,2013 IN LIBER 35216, FOLIO
17 & ODIFIED JANUARY 29, 2015 IN LIBER 36992, FOLIO
490 the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
APRIL 26, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FIFTY-FOUR (54), BLOCK 11, SECTION
THREE, PART OF BLOCKS 7,8,10,11, MARIBORO MEADOWS,
AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN
PLAT BOOK 64 AT PLAT 97. BEING LOCATED IN THE
3RD ELECTION DISTRICT OF SAID COUNTY. BEING THE
SAME PROPERTY OR A PORTION OF THE SAME PROPERTY
CONVEYED TO DEAN R. BRITTER BY INSTRUMENT DATED
MAY 09,2011 FROM DEAN R. BRITTER AND VERNESSA
W. BRITTER FILED ON JUNE 29,2011 IN BOOK 32792 AT
PAGE 581 IN THE PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY RECORDS.
COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 16403 HALLOWAY COURT, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 IN THE COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGES
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $15,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.375%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-26301)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine
Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
14936 ASHFORD COURT
Laurel, MD 20707
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY,
Trustee(s), dated July 3, 2012, and recorded among the Land
Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
35180, folio 181, RE-RECORDED MAY 5, 2014 IN LIBER
35963, FOLIO 455, MODIFIED DEC 29, 2016 IN LIBER
38899, FOLIO 453 the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED
AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 3, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY SITUATE IN PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND, DESCRIBED AS: BEING KNOWN
AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 58, AS SHOWN ON THE
PLAT ENTITLED, "LOTS 45 THROUGH 97, A RESUBDIVISION
OF "PART OF PLAT A, LARIUM ESTATES, SECTION TWO,
ASHFORD", WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE PLAT
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN
PLAT BOOK NLP 114, FOLIO 21. BEING ALL AND SAME
PREMISES CONVEYED TO SAID MORTGAGORS IN DEED
RECORDED IN BOOK 29505, PAGE 466 IN THE GEORGE'S
COUNTY REGISTRY OF DEEDS.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $24,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-20142)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
APRIL 17, 24, MAY 1, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1640 BROOKSQUARE DRIVE, UNIT 66
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to CLAUDE BARRINGTON & ROY B. MOSS JR,
Trustee(s), dated October 28, 2010, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 32158, folio 640, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
APRIL 26, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
UNIT NUMBERED SIXTY-SIX (66) IN PHASE EIGHT (8),
BUILDING 1B, BROOKSQUARE, A CONDOMINIUM, AS
DEFINED AND SET FORTH IN A DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM DATED NOVEMBER 5, 1990 AND RECORDED
NOVEMBER 7, 1990 IN LIBER 7805 AT FOLIO 524 AND
DELINEATED ON PLAT CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK VJ 158 AT
PLAT 53 THRU 55; SAID PLAT REFERENCE ERRONEOUSLY
OMITTED FROM PRIOR DEED RECORDED IN LIBER 8843,
FOLIO 304, TOGETHER WITH ITS UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE
INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS THERETO RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $6,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.875%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-16482)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson,
Substitute Trustees
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1913 Forest Park Drive
District Heights, MD 20747
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DEBORAH CURRAN OR LAURA O SULLIVAN,
Trustee(s), dated December 6, 2006, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 27013, folio 140, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MAY 3, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 327, BLOCK
B, AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT ENTITLED "PLAT 2, SECTION
THREE, PART OF BLOCK "B" FORESTVILLE PARK", WHICH
PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY IN BOOK 96, PAGE 67, BEING IN
THE MELLWOOD (15TH) DISTRICT OF PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $19,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.58% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-06803)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Robert
M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
12176807
12165737
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4815 Parkmont Lane
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to JEFFREY S. YABLON, Trustee(s), dated
November 17, 2004, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 21180,
folio 232, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 3, 2018 at 2:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SIXTEEN (16), IN THE BLOCK LETTERED
"J", (ERRONEOUSLY REFERRED TO AS "3"), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION FOUR, NORTH ROBLEE ACRES",
AS PER PLAT RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK WWW
64, AT PLAT 69.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.375% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (59028)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2227 Houston Street
Suitland, MD 20746
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION, III,
Trustee(s), dated March 26, 2007, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 27592, folio 097, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
MAY 3, 2018 at 2:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 25, BLOCK C, DUPONT VILLAGE, PLAT WWW18/6. BEING
MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN A DEED DATED 05/16/1988
AND RECORDED 05/17/1988, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF THE COUNTY AND STATE SET FORTH ABOVE, IN DEED
VOLUME 6972 AND PAGE 661.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (58619)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
12174103 APRIL 17, 24, MAY 1, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
Prince Georges County
851
D11
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5916 BOST LANE
Clinton, MD 20735
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to VINH PHAM, Trustee(s), dated November
24, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26670, folio 650, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
APRIL 26, 2018 at 11:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWELVE (12), IN BLOCK LETTERED "D", IN
THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT ONE, CLINTON-DALE
ESTATES", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
IN PLAT BOOK NLP 147 AT PLAT NO. 95. TAX ID: 09-0851287
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $30,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-02078)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jenna McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 10 17, 24, 2018
12171399
12177201
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
12168425
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
11501 William Beanes Road
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to RONALD S. DUETCH, Trustee(s), dated
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
December 20, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27109,
SUITE 100
folio 409, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
KNOWN AS
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
11110 Cranford Drive
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
APRIL 26, 2018 at 11:30AM
Deed of Trust to DIANA R. HARRISON, Trustee(s), dated October
13, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26240, folio 001, the thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having described as follows:
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-THREE (33), IN THE SUBDIVISION
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having KNOW AS "SECTION TWO, FEDERAL SPRINGS ESTATES", AS
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S NLP 135, AT PLAT 21, AND CORRECTED IN PLAT BOOK NLP
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER 137, AT PLAT 63; BEING IN THE 15TH ELECTION DISTRICT OF
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
SAID COUNTY.
MAY 10, 2018 at 10:00 AM
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements without either express or implied warranty or representation,
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-TWO (32) IN A BLOCK LETTERED construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
"I" IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION FIVE, NORTH liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merROBLEE ACRES (ERRONEOUSLY REFERRED TO AS NORTH chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
ROBLES ACRES)" AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARY- subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
LAND IN PLAT BOOK NLP 95 AT PLAT 56.
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
without either express or implied warranty or representation, assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $84,000.00 payable in certified
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 6.25% on
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
of the purchase price with interest at 5% per annum from the including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
association dues and assessments that may become due after any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (13-22510)
Trustee's File No. (41332)
Keith M. Yacko, Robert E. Frazier, James J. Inabinett Jr,
Gene Jung, Jason L. Hamlin, Thomas J. Gartner,
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12173896 APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
851
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 17, 24, MAY 1, 2018
Prince Georges County
APRIL 17, 24, MAY 1, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
851
www.hwestauctions.com
12175497 APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4511 KEPPLER PLACE
Temple Hills, MD 20748
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JULIA L. GREENFIELD, Trustee(s), dated May
18, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 22389, folio 615, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
APRIL 26, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED ELEVEN (11) IN BLOCK LETTERED "A", IN
THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "WRATHALL'S ADDITION TO
WOODLANE", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK WWW 38 AT PLAT 73, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $27,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.75% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-16086)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Brennan Ferguson, Jessica Elliott,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
12173850 APRIL10, 17, 24, 2018
12173788
D12
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
EZ
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2018
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Pardo & Drazin, LLC
Russell S. Drazin, Attorney
4400 Jenifer Street, NW, Suite 2
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
Washington, DC 20015
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
202-223-7900
SUITE 100
SUITE 100
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE,
MARYLAND
20852
ROCKVILLE,
MARYLAND
20852
ROCKVILLE,
MARYLAND 20852
TRUSTEE’S SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
11511 Dyrham Lane
Glenn Dale, MD 20769
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
ACCOUNT ID NO. 14-1696368
13501 Belle Chasse Blvd., Unit 411
9906 Stall Avenue
208 Bonhill Drive
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust
Lanham, MD 20706
Fort Washington, MD 20744
Laurel, MD 20707
("Deed of Trust") from Roderick O’Savio, as grantor, to Daniel Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Huertas, as trustee, dated November 24, 2015 and recorded certain Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE INSURANCE CORP., Deed of Trust to MARY PAPAGJIKA, Trustee(s), dated June Deed of Trust to ALAN J. HYATT, Trustee(s), dated August
on March 28, 2017 in Book 39318 at Page 324 among the Trustee(s), dated October 26, 2006, and recorded among the 23, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE 26, 2015, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
Land Records of Prince George’s County, Maryland, with Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 25634, folio 626, the GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 37432, folio 106, the
an original principal balance of $234,000.00, default having in Liber 26666, folio 633, the holder of the indebtedness holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
occurred under the terms thereof, and pursuant to a Deed of secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
Appointment of Substitute Trustees dated December 27, 2017 Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
and recorded on January 31, 2018 in Book 40517 at Page 435 aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
among the Land Records of Prince George’s County, Maryland terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby, party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
appointing Russell S. Drazin and Jason A. Pardo (collectively, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
“Trustee”) as substitute trustees under the Deed of Trust, Trustee auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
will sell at public auction at the front entrance of the Circuit LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
Court for Prince George’s County, located at 14735 Main Street, ON,
APRIL 26, 2018 at 10:00 AM
MAY 3, 2018 at 2:30 PM
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772, on
APRIL 26, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
APRIL 25, 2018 AT 9:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND ANY IMPROVE- thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and described as follows:
described as follows:
MENTS THEREON situated in Prince George’s County, Maryland, described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWO (2), IN BLOCK LETTERED "C", IN A LOT NUMBERED NINE (9), IN BLOCK LETTERED "N", IN THE
commonly known as 11511 Dyrham Lane, Glenn Dale, MD
SUBDIVISION
KNOWN
AS
"PLAT
FIVE,
GLENN
ESTATES",
AS
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT SEVEN, TANTALLON HILLS",
ALL
THAT
PROPERTY
CONVEYED
BY
DEED
OF
TRUST
20769, and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust,
as well as ALL PERSONAL PROPERTY encumbered by the Deed RECORDED DECEMBER 20, 2006 IN LIBER 26666, FOLIO PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NLP 154, AT AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 75,
PLAT 72
AT PLAT 83.
633.
of Trust (collectively, "Property").
The Property will be sold in an "AS IS" condition and subject The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without
either
express
or
implied
warranty
or
representation,
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
without
either
express
or
implied
warranty
or
representation,
to recorded covenants, conditions, restrictions, agreements, and
senior liens, if any, and with no warranty of any kind (except as including but not limited to the description, fitness for a including but not limited to the description, fitness for a including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular
purpose
or
use,
structural
integrity,
physical
condiparticular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiparticular
purpose
or
use,
structural
integrity,
physical
condition,
required by the Deed of Trust).
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mate- tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateTERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $30,000.00 by cashier's check liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
will be required of the purchaser at the time and place of sale. chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
The balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash or certified laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
funds within ten (10) days of final ratification of the sale by the subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
Circuit Court for Prince George’s County. Interest to be paid on which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
the unpaid purchase money at the rate in effect under the debt subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
instrument secured by the Deed of Trust from the date of sale to record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
the date of settlement. Secured Party, if a bidder, shall not be assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
required to post a deposit or to pay interest.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
Purchaser shall settle within ten (10) days of final ratification of certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
the sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George’s County. TIME NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
SHALL BE OF THE ESSENCE WITH RESPECT TO SETTLEMENT the purchase price with interest at 4.125% per annum from of the purchase price with interest at 7.8% per annum from of the purchase price with interest at 4% per annum from the
BY PURCHASER. Cost of all documentary stamps (recordation the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
taxes), transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
purchaser. Taxes, ground rent, water, and sewer, if applicable, on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
are to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale and will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
assumed thereafter by purchaser.
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
In the event purchaser does not settle as required for any reason, association dues and assessments that may become due after association dues and assessments that may become due after association dues and assessments that may become due after
purchaser shall be in default. Upon such default, Trustee may the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
file a motion to resell the Property at the risk and expense Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
of defaulting purchaser. Purchaser hereby consents to entry of taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
such resale Order without further notice. Defaulting purchaser are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
from any resale of the Property, and the deposit shall be property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
forfeited to the Trustee and all of the expenses of this sale purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
(including attorneys' fees and full commission on the gross sale mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
price) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
deposit. Purchaser shall pay all attorneys' fees and costs, and Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
all other damages of any kind or nature, incurred by Trustee Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
and the secured party, and their respective agents, employees, the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
successors and assigns, in connection with any such default.
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
If Trustee is unable to convey title, purchaser's sole remedy at purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
law and in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit Trustee's File No. (54898)
Trustee's File No. (39777)
Trustee's File No. (58565)
and the sale shall be considered null and void and of no effect.
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
of the Property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to
the Property from the date of sale forward.
Trustee reserves the right, in his sole discretion, to reject any
and all bids, to withdraw the Property from sale at any time
before or at the auction, to extend the time to receive bids, to
waive or modify the deposit requirement, to waive or modify the
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www.hwestauctions.com
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requirement that interest be paid on the unpaid purchase money, APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
12172230 APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
12172477 APRIL 17, 24, MAY 1, 2018
12173895
and/or to extend the period of time for settlement.
Additional terms may be announced at the sale. Purchaser will
be required to execute and deliver to Trustee a contract of the
sale at the conclusion of the bidding.
Neither the Trustee nor the secured party, nor their respective
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
agents, employees, successors, and assigns, make any represen611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
tations or warranties, express or implied, with respect to the
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SUITE
100
SUITE
100
SUITE 100
APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
12175532 Property, or any tenancies or parties in possession, including,
ROCKVILLE,
MARYLAND
20852
ROCKVILLE,
MARYLAND
20852
ROCKVILLE,
MARYLAND 20852
without limitation, the value, description, use, structural integriSUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
ty, physical condition, construction, extent of construction,
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
workmanship, materials, habitability, subdivision, zoning, environmental condition, compliance with building codes or other
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
laws, ordinances, or regulations, fitness for a particular purpose
4411 38th Street
911 Elfin Avenue
532 Harry S. Truman Drive
or merchantability of all or any part of the Property.
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
Brentwood,
MD
20722
Capitol
Heights,
MD
20743
Upper
Marlboro,
MD 20774
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
The information contained herein was obtained from sources
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
deemed reliable (including public records) and believed to be Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
accurate, but is offered for informational purposes only. Said Deed of Trust to GLEN TOURTELLOT, Trustee(s), dated October Deed of Trust to DAVID SILVERMAN, Trustee(s), dated June Deed of Trust to DAVE VACH, Trustee(s), dated January 2, 2009,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
information includes, without limitation, the street addresses 8, 2004, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE 13, 2014, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
referenced herein, which may vary from information available GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 21000, folio 502, the GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 36160, folio 244, the COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 30755, folio 491, the holder
KNOWN AS
from certain other public sources. No express or implied holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
9613 Glenkirk Way
representations or warranties are, or may be, inferred with appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
Bowie, MD 20721
respect to the accuracy of such information. Interested bidders duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain are urged to conduct such independent due diligence as they occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
Deed of Trust to SUELLEN WOHLFARTH, Trustee(s), dated May may deem appropriate.
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
26, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
Russell S. Drazin and Jason A. Pardo, Substitute Trustees
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 25469, folio 166, the
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
APRIL 26, 2018 at 10:00 AM
APRIL 26, 2018 at 10:00 AM
MAY 10, 2018 at 10:00 AM
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
described as follows:
described as follows:
described as follows:
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offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
12175871 LOT NUMBERED EIGHTEEN (18), IN THE SUBDIVISION LOT NUMBERED (18), NINETEEN (19), AND TWENTY (20), LOT NUMBERED SEVENTEEN (17), IN THE SUBDIVISION
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
KNOWN
AS
"DR.
S.A.
CZARRA'S
ADDITION
TO
BENTWOOD",
IN
BLOCK
NUMBERED
(27),
IN
THE
SUBDIVISION
KNOWN
KNOWN AS "LOTS 1 THRU 41 AND PARCEL A, SECTION BMARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, AS PER PLAT AS "GREATER CAPITAL HEIGHTS", AS PER PLAT OF SAID 4, "NORTHHAMPTON", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
APRIL 26, 2018 at 11:30AM
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A, AT FOLIO 11
SUBDIVISION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK EDS 1, AT PLAT 60.
PLAT NLP AT PLAT 17.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
without either express or implied warranty or representation, without either express or implied warranty or representation, without either express or implied warranty or representation,
described as follows:
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a including but not limited to the description, fitness for a including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 7 IN BLOCK F
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS BALK HILL AS PER PLAT
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK AT PLAT AMONG THE
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
ENROLL IN EASY PAY TODAY
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
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record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
or
call
202-334-6100.
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merTERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
S0447B
2x1.5
certified
funds,
shall
be
required
at
the
time
of
sale.
CASH
WILL
certified
funds,
shall
be
required
at
the
time
of
sale.
CASH
WILL
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
of the purchase price with interest at 2% per annum from the the purchase price with interest at 4.375% per annum from of the purchase price with interest at 5.25% per annum from
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
Membership is rewarding.
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $65,500.00 payable in certified
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
association dues and assessments that may become due after association dues and assessments that may become due after association dues and assessments that may become due after
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 7.75% on
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
Trustee's File No. (40398)
Trustee's File No. (27484)
Trustee's File No. (35296)
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
12172235 APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
12173351 APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
12175491
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (14-08843)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Membership is rewarding.
From slam dunks and home runs to
Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri,
touchdowns and goals, discover great
David M. Williamson, Keith M. Yacko,
Substitute Trustees
ways to save money, win tickets and
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3802 ENDERS LANE
Bowie, MD 20716
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to PATRICK J. FLANAGAN, Trustee(s), dated July
18, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 25897, folio 324, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
APRIL 26, 2018 at 11:30AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 217 AS
SHOWN ON PLAT ENTITLED "PLAT THIRTY-FOUR COVINGTON", WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK
VJ 180 AT PLAT 88.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $26,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (14-17902)
Keith M. Yacko, Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Jason L.
Hamlin, Gene Jung, Glen H. Tschirgi,
Substitute Trustees
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save money, win tickets and have fun
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APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
12173851
S2935 2x6
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TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
EZ
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
112 Gray Street
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JAMES H. HUDSON,III, Trustee(s), dated May
29, 2012, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 33695, folio 383, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 10, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 23, IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS REVISION OF PM
233/17, PLAT THREE, VILLAGES AT PEPPER MILL, PER PLAT
BOOK PM 233/93.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (57775)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3701 Forest Glen Court
Suitland, MD 20746
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust, dated March 30, 2007, and recorded among
the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 27636, folio 360, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
APRIL 26, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SEVENTY-EIGHT (78), IN THE SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "WOOD CREST," AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK VJ 161, AT PLAT 96
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.5% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (50228)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
851
Prince Georges County
851
D13
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
14309 Indian Head Highway
Accokeek, MD 20607
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to TITLE STREAM, Trustee(s), dated July
16, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28491, folio 599, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 10, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED AUGUST 29, 2007 IN LIBER 28491, FOLIO 599.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 2.06% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (52793)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
12174901 APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
13216 Fox Bow Drive, Apt. 107
Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to CARRIE WARD, Trustee(s), dated May 9, 2012,
and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34565, folio 439, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
APRIL 26, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
UNIT NUMBERED 107, IN BUILDING 11, IN "CAMERON
GROVE CONDOMINIUM XI", AS PER PLAT BOOK PM 220, AT
PLAT 6 & 7
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4.5% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (48782)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3422 Memphis Lane
Bowie, MD 20715
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JEFF TRUSHEIM, Trustee(s), dated November
30, 2015, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 37690, folio 350, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
MAY 10, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED DECEMBER 16, 2015 IN LIBER 37690, FOLIO
350.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.125% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (45744)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
12172231 APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
12174737
12172436
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7801 Vanity Fair Drive
Greenbelt, MD 20770
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE SERVICES, INC. , Trustee(s),
dated August 4, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 23083,
folio 375, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
APRIL 26, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY (20), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN
AS "PLAT ONE- BELLE POINT", AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK N.L.P 143, AT PLAT NO. 55.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 5.5% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (58278)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
855
Charles County
855
Charles County
855
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2334 LOVE PLACE
Waldorf, MD 20601
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE INSURANCE CORP, Trustee(s),
dated October 31, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records
of CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 06533, folio 0295,
MODIFIED: JUNE 12, 2017 IN LIBER 9920, FOLIO 273 the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE CHARLES COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 200 CHARLES STREET ( IN THE
BREEZEWAY BETWEEN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS ), LA
PLATA, MD 20646 ON,
APRIL 26, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CHARLES COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
ALL THAT PARCEL OF LAND KNOWN AS LOT NUMBERED
NINETY-SIX (96) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SOMERSET PLAT FOUR", PER PLAT WHICH IS RECORDED AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND IN
PLAT BOOK 47, PAGE 55.
Said property is subject to a 120 day IRS Right of Redemption.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $31,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CHARLES COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.5% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-18392)
Charles County
855
Charles County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
10709 Alyssa Lane
Waldorf, MD 20603
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to REBECCA W. SHAIA, Trustee(s),
dated December 22, 2004, and recorded among the Land
Records of CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 05055,
folio 0639, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE CHARLES
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 200 CHARLES STREET
( IN THE BREEZEWAY BETWEEN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT
COURTS ), LA PLATA, MD 20646 ON,
APRIL 26, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CHARLES COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT NUMBERED ONE HUNDRED FORTY-THREE (143) IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT ONE, PARCEL A, B, AND
LOTS 2 THRU 8 AND LOTS 142 THRU 148, SECTION TWO,
STREAMVIEW", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK DGB 46 AT PLAT 255, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND; BEING IN THE 6 TH ELECTION
DISTRICT OF SAID COUNTY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $35,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CHARLES COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.0% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-17010)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine
Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
12167647
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
856
Frederick County
12170793
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
1844 MILLSTREAM DR.
FREDERICK, MD 21702
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
11537 TANEYTOWN PIKE
EMMITSBURG, MD 21727
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
November 23, 2012 and recorded in Liber 9272, Folio 244 among the
Land Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance
of $207,676.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick
County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701,
on
APRIL 27, 2018 AT 10:50 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
November 13, 2015 and recorded in Liber 10865, Folio 277 among the
Land Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance
of $292,111.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick
County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701,
on
APRIL 27, 2018 AT 10:51 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $19,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 322257-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 309998-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Apr 10, Apr 17 & Apr 24
12174657
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Apr 10, Apr 17 & Apr 24
12174659
www.hwestauctions.com
12174405 APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
12173223
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D14
856
Frederick County
OPQRS
856
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
2513 SHELLEY CIR., UNIT #3C
FREDERICK, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated February
19, 2013 and recorded in Liber 9424, Folio 168 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $203,250.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MAY 4, 2018 AT 10:55 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and described as
Unit 9-3C, Phase 9, Ridgeview II Condominium and more fully described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 201540-2)
857
12176388
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
8010 HOLLOW REED CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated June 28,
2006 and recorded in Liber 6175, Folio 101 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $240,000.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
MAY 11, 2018 AT 10:51 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $26,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 322314-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Apr 24, May 1 & May 8
12178279
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
922 EAST D ST.
BRUNSWICK, MD 21716
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
December 9, 2005 and recorded in Liber 5758, Folio 60 among the Land
Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of
$162,000.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick
County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701,
on
MAY 11, 2018 AT 10:50 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $13,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title.
If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied
by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law
or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 319254-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Apr 24, May 1 & May 8
12178278
Fairfax County
872
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
7614 OLD OX ROAD,
FAIRFAX STATION, VA 22039
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
5108 WOODLAND WAY,
ANNANDALE, VA 22003
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $375,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.715000% dated
September 30, 2004, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 16550,
Page 1104, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on May 23, 2018 at 2:30 PM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 0962 01 0007
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $289,275.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.750000% dated
April 25, 2008, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the County of Fairfax
as Deed Book 19918, Page 149,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the County of Fairfax,
on the courthouse steps at the
front of the Circuit Court building
for the County of Fairfax located
at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on May 23, 2018 at
2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 069-4-03-0005
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 14-244390.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
April 17, 24, 2018
12177623
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
18-273660.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
April 17, 24, 2018
12177621
857
Howard County
857
Howard County
TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2018
EZ
857
Howard County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6144 Gatsby Green, Columbia, MD 21045
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6144 Gatsby Green, Columbia, MD
21045. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
Deed of Trust, dated October 31, 2006, and recorded in Liber
10344 at Page 106 among the land records of the COUNTY
OF HOWARD, in the original principal amount of $379,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building,
located at 9250 Bendix Rd., Columbia MD 21045, on April 26,
2018 at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 16-120987
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-270598.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
857
Howard County
872
Howard County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7247 Dockside Lane, Columbia, MD 21045
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 7247 Dockside Lane, Columbia, MD
21045. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
Deed of Trust, dated September 30, 2011, and recorded in Liber
13507 at Page 043 among the land records of the COUNTY
OF HOWARD, in the original principal amount of $311,888.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building,
located at 9250 Bendix Rd, Columbia MD 21045, on May 10,
2018 at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 16-154180
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 18-272132.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
872
Fairfax County
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
12175403 APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
12173827
TRUSTEE'S SALE
9733 Cypressmede Drive, Ellicott City, MD 21042
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 9733 Cypressmede Drive, Ellicott City, MD
21042. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
Deed of Trust, dated January 14, 2008, and recorded in Liber
11065 at Page 563 among the land records of the COUNTY
OF HOWARD, in the original principal amount of $298,388.29.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building,
located at 9250 Bendix Rd Columbia MD 21045, on April 26,
2018 at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 02-195992
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-267691.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6554 Pennacook Court, Columbia, MD 21045
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6554 Pennacook Court, Columbia, MD
21045. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated June 20, 2017, and recorded in Liber 17673 at
Page 11 among the land records of the COUNTY OF HOWARD,
in the original principal amount of $202,268.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building, located at
9250 Bendix Rd, Columbia MD 21045, on May 10, 2018
at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 16-096148
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-270806.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
12176933
TRUSTEE'S SALE
11920 Meadow Vista, Clarksville, MD 21029
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 11920 Meadow Vista, Clarksville, MD
21029. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated July 22, 2005, and recorded in Liber 09412 at
Page 089 among the land records of the COUNTY OF HOWARD,
in the original principal amount of $650,000.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building, located at
9250 Bendix Rd, Columbia MD 21045, on May 10, 2018
at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 05-409047
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.25% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-265825.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
12446 FALKIRK DRIVE,
FAIRFAX, VA 22033
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust
dated August 13, 2007, and recorded at Instrument Number 2007024680,
Book 19522 Page 1182 in the Clerk's Office for the Circuit Court for
Fairfax County, VA, securing a loan which was originally $101,000.00. The
appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, S&T Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Fairfax County,
4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, VA 22030 on:
May 7, 2018 at 1:30 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All
that certain lot or parcel of land with improvements thereon and
appurtenances thereto appertaining, lying and being situate in the County
of Fairfax, Virginia and more particularly described as follows: Lot 15,
Section 1, DARTMOOR WOODS, as the same appears duly dedicated,
platted and recorded in Deed Book 4239, at Page 705, among the Land
Records, of Fairfax County, Virginia, and as more fully described in the
aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: PROPERTY BEING SOLD SUBJECT TO SENIOR LIEN DATED
02/28/2007 IN THE ORIGINAL AMOUNT OF $1,000,000.00 RECORDED AT
INSTRUMENT NUMBER 2007019547, BOOK 19437 PAGE 400. The property
will be sold "AS IS," WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY
KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions, restrictions, reservations, easements,
rights of way, and all other matters of record taking priority over the Deed
of Trust to be announced at the time of sale. A deposit of $6,000.00, or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is lower, in cash or cashier's check payable to
the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price, with interest at the rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date said funds are received
in the office of the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15)
days of sale. In the event of default by the successful bidder, the entire
deposit shall be forfeited and applied to the costs and expenses of sale
and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other public charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, whether incurred prior to or after the sale,
and all other costs incident to settlement to be paid by the purchaser. In
the event taxes, any other public charges have been advanced, a credit
will be due to the seller, to be adjusted from the date of sale at the
time of settlement. If Purchaser requests counsel for Substitute Trustee
to draft any settlement documents including but not limited to a deed,
a fee of $350.00 shall be paid. Seller shall not be responsible for any
costs incurred by the purchaser in connection with their purchase or
settlement, including, without limitation, state and local recording fees,
title insurance or research, or any other costs of purchaser’s acquisition.
Trustee shall have no duty to obtain possession for purchaser. All risks
of casualty pass to the successful bidder at conclusion of bidding. In the
event the sale is legally null and void, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of the Purchaser’s deposit without interest.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding. The
Substitute Trustee is S&T Trustees, LLC, 6802 Paragon Place, Suite 410,
Richmond, VA 23230. For information contact: Diana C. Theologou at
301-468-4990.
April 24, May 1, 2018
884
City of Charlottesville
TRUSTEE SALE
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $64,475.00, dated October 14,
1999 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
City of Charlottesville, Virginia, in
Document No. 005208, in Book No.
767, at Page 701, default having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Circuit Court, 315 East High Street,
Charlottesville, on May 16, 2018 at
3:15 PM the property described in
said deed, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
Lot 26L, Block D, Orangedale, with
improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (57004)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
April 17, 24, 2018
12176997
MARYLAND
12175402
TRUSTEE'S SALE
4978 Dorsey Hall Dr Unit B4, Ellicott City, MD 21042
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 4978 Dorsey Hall Dr Unit B4, Ellicott City,
MD 21042. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated June 30, 2003, and recorded in Liber
07485 at Page 366 among the land records of the COUNTY
OF HOWARD, in the original principal amount of $151,050.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building,
located at 9250 Bendix Rd, Columbia MD 21045, on May 10,
2018 at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 02-349515
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-260206.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
APRIL 10, 17, 24, 2018
12167396 APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
878
TRUSTEE'S SALE
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
6225 Deep River Canyon, Columbia, MD 21045
218 SPRING KNOLL CIRCLE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22405.
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6225 Deep River Canyon, Columbia, MD In execution of a certain Deed
21045. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated January 10, 2005,
the original principal amount
of Trust, dated May 5, 2008, and recorded in Liber 11300 at in
of $100,000.00 recorded in the
Page 084 among the land records of the COUNTY OF HOWARD, Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instruin the original principal amount of $312,620.00. Upon default ment No. LR050004006 . The
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale undersigned Substitute Trustee
offer for sale at public auction
at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building, located at will
in the front of the Circuit Court
9250 Bendix Rd., Columbia MD 21045, on May 10, 2018 building for Stafford County, 1300
Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virat 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust ginia on May 3, 2018 , at 2:00
PM, the property described in said
including but not limited to:
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
Tax ID# 16-207772
described as follows: PARCEL I: ALL
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and THAT
LAND, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, IN FALMOUTH DISTRICT, STAFFORD
COUNTY,
VIRGINIA, AND KNOWN
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may AND DESIGNATED
AS LOT NO. 77
ON THE MAP AND PLAT OF SECaffect same, if any.
TION TWO OF SPRING VALLEY SUBTERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash DIVISION, MADE NOVEMBER, 1965
CARROLL KIM AND ASSOor certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The BY
CIATES, PROFESSIONAL ENGIbalance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum NEERS AND LAND SURVEYORS, A
COPY OF WHICH PLAT IS DULY
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
COUNTY, VIRGINIA IN
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments STAFFORD
PLAT BOOK 3 AT PAGE 88 ALONG
THE DEED OF DEDICATION
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed WITH
OF SAID SECTION TWO OF SPRING
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners VALLEY SUBDIVISION DATED FEB7, 1966 AND DULY RECORDassociation dues and assessments that may become due after RUARY
ED IN SAID CLERKS OFFICE IN DEED
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. BOOK 165 AT PAGE 276. PARCEL II:
ALL
THAT
LOT OR PARCEL
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer OF LAND,CERTAIN
SITUATE, LYING AND
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement BEING IN FALMOUTH DISTRICT,
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for CONTAINING 0.606 ACRE SHOWN
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 7B-A
SECTION TWO ,2, OF SPRING
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting OF
VALLEY SUBDIVISION ON THAT
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees CERTAIN PLAT OF SURVEY BY
HENRY W CROPP, JR., C.L.S. DATED
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms JUNE, 1976. THE PROPERTY HEREof sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. IN CONVEYED IS THE NORTHERN
ONE-HALF ,1/2, OF LOT 78 OF SECTrustee's File No. 17-263139.
TION TWO,2, OF SPRING VALLEY
SUBDIVISION AS THE SAME IS DULY
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
PLATIED AND RECORDED IN THE
CLERKS OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, COURT OF STAFFORD COUNTY,
VIRGINIA, IN PLAT BOOK 3, AT PAGE
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
88.
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 24, MAY 1,8, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
872
12174965
872
12175808
872
Fairfax County
Fairfax County
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3309 WYNDHAM CIRCLE #2172,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22302
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $326,700.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.125000% dated
April 8, 2005, recorded among the
land records of the Circuit Court
for the City of Alexandria as Deed
Instrument Number 050012221,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the City of Alexandria,
on the courthouse steps at the
front of the Circuit Court building
for the City of Alexandria located
at 520 King Street, Alexandria, Virginia on May 23, 2018 at 11:30 AM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 30-0214213
Home
delivery
is
convenient.
Home
delivery
is
convenient.
Wake up
to home
delivery.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: PMI. Reference Number 18273528.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
April 17, 24, 2018
12177622
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3253282.
April 11, 17, 24, May 1, 2018
12173802
SF
City of Fredericksburg
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
218 HARRIS STREET,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22401
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated November 14, 2001,
in the original principal amount of
$50,400.00 recorded in the Clerk’s
Office, Circuit Court for Fredericksburg City, Virginia as Instrument
No. 010002433 . The undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction in the front
of the Circuit Court building for
the City of Fredericksburg, 701
Princess Anne St., Fredericksburg,
Virginia on May 17, 2018, at 3:00
PM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
WITH IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
AND APPURTENANCES THERETO
LYING, BEING AND SITUATE IN THE
CITY OF FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA (BUT FORMERLY IN SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA), DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 13, BLOCK 8, ON
PLAT OF L.R.R. CURTIS, C.S., DATED
JUNE 23, 1952, AND RECORDED
IN DEED BOOK 167 AT PAGE 246,
ENTITLED "FIRST ADDITION TO AIRPORT SUBDIVISION", IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA. LESS AND EXCEPT
THEREFROM THAT CERTAIN FIVE
FOOT STRIP CONVEYED TO THE
CITY OF FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA, BY DEED DATED JANUARY
12, 1988, RECORDED IN DEED
BOOK 219 AT PAGE 730, IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE CITY OF FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3275541.
Apr 17, 24, 2018
12177249
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
GERMANTOWN- MBR, prof fem pref.
Clean, quiet. No smkg. Light kitchen.
$660 inc utils+sec dep. 301-515-0267
HYATTSVILLE - Lg Rooms. Close to
Metro. No pets/smoking. $575/mo.
utilities included. 410-476-1665
Landover - Pref Male to share house.
Furn BR. $150/wk inc all utils. No
sec dep. Near Metro. 301-516-1243
F1B Labradoodle—$1,200 3 Males, 3
Females; 7 wks. old; all shots/worming uptd. dbl. and tri-color patterns
choc/blk/white/tan 540-672-8664
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES
AKC registered, black & tan,
German bloodlines, 10 weeks old.
$400. Call 540-879-2051
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES
Gorgeous, AKC, $1500.
Hurry before they are all gone!
Alexandria VA or
Louisa VA location. 703-338-3644
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS AKC.
$685. Vet checked and shots.
Great watch & family dogs.
Ready! 301-481-4943, 301-542-6154
GERMAN SHEPHERDS
Gorgeous, AKC registered puppies.
excellent bloodline.
$700. Call 757-593-1974
Goldendoodle—& f1b Labradoodle
pups rdy now! vet chkd, S&W $1200
wavy
&
curly
540-729-6365
www.doodledogpups.com
Husky, Yorkies & more—Sale. 304904-6289. Call for Discounts/Info. 59
East Rd Martinsburg wv. CC, Cash
or Finance at www.wvpuppy. com
ITALIAN CANE CORSO PUPPIES
Males & females.
Tails docked. Shot records.
Call 202-957-7458
LAB PUPS - AKC, vet checked,
1st shots & wormed.
$400. Call 540-820-9512
LAB PUPS - AKC, OFA, top champ
lines, S/W, written warr, yellow,
parents on site. 10 weeks old.
301-246-9116
or
301-751-6846
Labradoodle—Puppies. Our adorable
first generation labradoodles will be
de-wormed, vet checked. Both,
6 wks old, $875, 540-810-4639
Labrador Retrievers—$700 purebred
chocolate and black labs raised on a
Shenandoah Valley farm.
Call Cheyenne at 540-487-0303
LABS- YELLOW, AKC born 2/26/18,
shots, dewormed. Female $1,200,
Males $1,000. Call or text for
pictures 434-808-3602
PUGS - Fawn & black, AKC,
S&W, vet checked,
taking deposits, ready 4/21
301-246-9116 or 301-751-6846
ShihTzu Bichon—ShiChon Teddybear
puppies! Cuteness Overload Puppy
In home Local 703-577-1069 9wks
$750up www.DCDogfinders.com
SHIH TZU PUPPIES- Will have shots
and wormed Well socialized,
mother and father on premises. Will
be ready 4/22/18. 540-406-0740
SF
OXON HILL- In nice house, cable
avail, close to shops, on bus line,
M pref. Call 202-549-0060
ROCKVILLE- Share SFH. near
trans/shops. N/S, N/P, Small rm w/
lge window, furnshd or unfurnshd,
Clean, quiet hse. Avail to individual
$599 inc utils. Dep req. Leave voice
msg for response 240-351-5150
1-800-753-POST
SILVER SPRING - Furn. room, pvt
BA. $780/mo. util. + int. incl., close
to Metro, free pking, in room cbl,
Amazon Alexa, rec. park access,
clng serv. incl. W/D. 202-286-8516
Silver Spring Lg room w/ prvt ba, use
of w/d, kitch, & cbl tv. Located in prvt
home. $800/mo. 301-860-7260
SF
SILVER SPRING/ASPEN HILL- Dean Rd.
Wlk-out bsmt w/pvt BA, inrnt $650
inc utl, nr bus & shops. 301-946-9322
SILVER SPRING - Room ($600),
Bsmt ($950). Incl utils. Sec dep req.
No pets. Call 301-439-0468
TEMPLE HILLS - 23rd Pl. Nr trans/
shops. Quiet, clean, furn. N/S. Spacious bsmt/ 2rm w/BA. pref M,
$800/$200dep.
301-390-5608
TEMPLE HILLS- Single family
senior home, rooms available.
$650 & up. W/D, all utils included.
Call 202-607-9538
UPPER MARLBORO - Lg furn BR w/
BA, cable, wifi, utils inc, no-smk, fem
pref. $700 + $200 dep. 301-390-5608
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
UPPER MARLBORO - 1 Bsmnt Rm w/
BA. Shared Kitchen. No Smoking,
No Pets. $750 inc utils. 240-893-1473
VIRGINIA
Roommates
SPRINGFIELD / FT. BELVOIR /
WOODBRIDGE - Responsible person
to share 3 bedroom house.
$600 util & cable incl. 703-919-4381
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
DELAWARE New Move-In Ready
Homes! Low Taxes! Close to
Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. New
Homes from low $100’s. No HOA
Fees. Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
1-800-753-POST
Collectibles
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
275
Merchandise Wanted
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
REDSKINS TICKETS WANTED—
Call 1-800-296-3626 X3
350
Garage Sales, MD
1-800-753-POST
GPE/WFP—YARD SALE Sat. 5/05,
You, too, could have
home delivery.
SF
8a-1p. Rockville Pike & Strathmore.
jwlry,furntr,clothes&more.rain/shine
Tickets, Wanted
REDSKINS
SF
Home
delivery
is
convenient.
LAUREL - Room for rent, F pref
$600 cable & utils incl, W/D,
shared bath. Call 240-281-1535
If only you had home delivery. 416
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
Eskimo,Spitz,Dachshund & more.Sale
304-904-6289. Call for Discounts. 59
East Rd Martinsburg WV. CC, Cash
or Finance at www.wvpuppy.com
LARGO- Share furn lux 2MBR TH w/
ceramic flrs, nr shopping/Metro/MD
Campus & Medical Ctr. $800-$1000
inc deposit. Curtis 301-641-3035
buyer will pick up, pay CASH. Cylinders and cans. Call 312-291-9169
You, too, could have
home delivery.
SF
Gaithersburg-2 furn rooms, shr kit &
BA, pvt ent. $700 & $750 + utils.
1st, last & sec req. 240-447-8870
Freon R12 WANTED—Certified
SF
1-800-753-POST
Dogs for Sale
Doberman Pinscher—Pure 7 puppies
$800 born 2/28 1st puppy shot dewclaw removed tail docked Richmond
TEXT 301 442 5348
ANDREWS AFB Area- Nice furn room,
int. & cbl, kit privs. w/w. $550/mo
+ $50 sec dep. Call 301-395-6738
225
1-800-753-POST
SF
12178997
610
CLINTON- TH to shr, nice area, upper
lvl rm w/pvt BR&BA. Nr AAFB. $650
utils incld + sec dep. 202-492-9219
1-800-753-POST
You, too, could have
home delivery.
SF
12175811
880
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Roommates
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
Fairfax County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
604 Bailey Road,
Charlottesville, VA 22903
City of Charlottesville
APRIL 24, MAY 1, 8, 2018
Apr 17, Apr 24 & May 1
872
857
TRUSTEE'S SALE
8250 MORRIS PLACE, UNIT 52, Jessup, MD 20794.
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 8250 MORRIS PLACE, UNIT 52, Jessup,
MD 20794. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated June 16, 2010, and recorded in Liber
12589 at Page 231 among the land records of the COUNTY
OF HOWARD, in the original principal amount of $304,152.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building,
located at 9250 Bendix Rd, Columbia MD 21045, on May 10,
2018 at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-591671
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or
certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-271200.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-97978
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Howard County
Season Tickets Wanted.
Buying all locations. Top $ paid.
Please call 1-800-786-8425
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
KLMNO
HEalth&Science
TUESDAY , APRIL 24 , 2018 . WASHINGTONPOST.COM/HEALTH-SCIENCE
EE
life with disabilities
in a special russian place
P HOTOS AND TEXT BY M ARY G ELMAN
In Russia, people with developmental disabilities usually live isolated lives,
unable to study, work or socialize. They encounter widespread discrimination,
and families often keep the disabled out of sight, made to feel shame about
their circumstances. Few services are available for them. But there is a place
where everything is different. ¶ Svetlana Village is an unusual community
near Lake Ladoga, east of St. Petersburg, where about 40 people live in four
large houses on a sprawling farm. About half of the residents are disabled and
the other half are volunteers, living and working together in a relationship that
resembles a large extended family.
SVETLANA CONTINUED ON E6
ABOVE: Raya and Julia walk through the woods at Svetlana Village.
RIGHT: Tatiana and Minya, who have Down syndrome, met at the village and fell
in love. They call each other husband and wife.
BY
R EBECCA T IMLIN- S CALERA
Not long ago, I returned from a weekend in Paris with seven amazingly supportive female friends wearing a vintage
black wool hooded Chanel coat with
white satin lining. Today, one of those
wonderful friends, Casey, drives me,
wrapped in that gorgeous coat, to a
cancer center for the clinical trial that is
keeping my Stage-4-incurable-cancerridden self alive.
My white blood cell counts, depressed
because of the meds I have been taking
for more than two years, have risen just
enough to allow me to resume the poisonous oral chemo regimen I follow in
Phase 2 of this clinical trial. I take these
three weeks out of every month, and I
will do so for the rest of my life as long as
the meds keep working and my white
Birds that can’t stand the heat
of a warming world grow smaller
BY
Ohio begins with
kindergartners
to fight opioids
M ARLENE C IMONS
B
iologist Simon Griffith began his
research career in his home country
of Britain studying sparrows on
Lundy Island, off the coast of England, “a
particularly cold and windy place, where
the sparrows would spend weeks huddling inside the barns to keep out of the
horrible weather.”
When he moved to Australia in 2003, he
embraced the warm weather, especially
the opportunity to make long road trips to
his lab’s remote desert field site in the hot
and arid center of the continent, about
800 miles west of Sydney. Each time he
stopped for gas along the way, he noticed
atop the service stations clusters of sparrows that “looked smaller and sleeker
compared to the puffed-up cold birds of
England,” he recalls.
He was curious about the size variance,
“although realistically it’s difficult to
judge a difference by eye,” he says. Still,
aware that climate change is causing
many plants and animals to change to
adapt to rising temperatures, he wondered whether it also was causing birds to
shrink. Griffith, a scientist in the department of biological sciences at Sydney’s
Macquarie University, decided to find out.
He launched several studies, and his
results thus far suggest that his instincts
COAT CONTINUED ON E4
BIRDS CONTINUED ON E5
BY
ISTOCK
One woman’s
unusual method
for defying cancer
S ARAH V ANDER S CHAAFF
Ohio, a state where 4,329 people died of
drug overdoses in 2016, a death rate second only to neighboring West Virginia, is
taking the fight against the opioid epidemic into the classroom with a new style
of drug-abuse-prevention education.
Ohio’s plan, controversial in a state
that prizes local control over schools,
features lessons that begin in kindergarten. Instead of relying on scare tactics
about drug use or campaigns that recite
facts about drugs’ toll on the body, teachers are encouraged to discuss real-life
situations and ways to deal with them
and to build the social and emotional
skills that experts say can reduce the risk
of substance abuse.
Joy Edgell, principal of Belpre Elementary School in southeastern Ohio, said
DRUG CONTINUED ON E4
ENVIRONMENT
GEOLOGY
MEDICINE
NUMBERS
The huge amount of food we
throw away, and its impact. E2
Could intelligent life have existed on
Earth millions of years ago? E2
His face transplant failed. He got a
second one and now feels young. E3
How to evaluate survival odds
when the diagnosis is bad. E3
E
E2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
S C I E NC E NE WS
Getting to know you
This spider crab is among more
than a dozen new species
discovered in a deep-sea
expedition off the Indonesian
island of Java. Other finds
include a hermit crab, a shinyeyed shrimp and a crab with
fuzzy spines. A team from the
National University of
Singapore and the Indonesian
Institute of Sciences carried out
the expedition in March and
early April.
SOUTH JAVA DEEP SEA BIODIVERSITY EXPEDITION 2018/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Zookeepers hatched the egg of a rare magpie.
Now they’re trying to raise it using a puppet.
Zookeepers in Prague have
turned into puppeteers in an
effort to save the critically endangered Javan green magpie.
Zoo officials saved one precious egg after the parents threw
a second egg out of their nest.
The magpie chick that hatched a
month ago is being kept in a box
and is being fed using a puppet
that imitates a parent bird.
Bird keeper Antonin Vaidl said
the puppet is needed to make
sure the bird will be capable of
breeding, which it won’t be if it
gets used to people.
“It is a critically endangered
taxon; every individual is important,” Vaidl said. “This way we
can eliminate the possibility that
the bird would not be able to
breed . . . it will grow into a
healthy individual that is able to
reproduce.”
Vaidl said the puppet doesn’t
have to be a perfect imitation of
an adult bird because the baby
responds to certain signals, such
as a red beak, black patches
around the eyes and a bright
green background.
The rare Javan green magpie
and other birds are popular as
status-symbol pets in the magpie’s native Indonesian island of
Java and elsewhere in Asia.
The green magpies are one of
the most endangered birds on
Earth. It is estimated that only
about 50 of them are living in the
wild while another 50 are in
captivity in a few zoos. In Europe, about 30 of them are in
Britain and Prague.
A zoo in the British city of
Chester brought six pairs of them
from Asia in 2015, giving one pair
to Prague and another to a zoo in
Jersey as part of a coordinated
effort to save the species.
“To save it from extinction —
that’s the reason we have been
doing this,” Vaidl said.
— Associated Press
How much food do we waste? A pound a day, maybe.
BY
C HRIS M OONEY
The mass quantities of food
Americans waste every year has
staggering environmental consequences, according to a study published last week.
“Our data suggest that the average person in the United States
wastes about a pound of food per
day,” said the University of Vermont’s Meredith Niles, who authored the study along with researchers at the U.S. Department
of Agriculture and the University
of New Hampshire.
That totals about 25 percent of
all food, by weight, available for
consumption in the United States
— or about 30 percent of all available calories, the researchers estimate — a figure that’s larger than
previous attempts to measure
food waste.
The environmental costs of that
wasted food are tremendous:
30 million acres of cropland
(about the land area of Pennsylvania), 4.2 trillion gallons of water
and nearly 2 billion pounds of
fertilizer. Fertilizer contains compounds that can run off farm fields
and compromise water quality.
The study, published in the
journal PLOS One, did not calculate the resulting greenhouse gas
emissions. But prior research has
suggested that wasted food, like
all food production, contributes to
the warming of the planet because
agriculture is a key source of the
fast-warming gases methane and
nitrous oxide.
The report is the latest evidence
that if the world is to manage a
growing population and the massive changes that population is
making to the global climate, it
will have to significantly reshape
its food system to use fewer resources to feed more people —
efficiency that probably would require wasting far less food.
The new research is based on a
massive survey of Americans’ eat-
“Higher-quality diets
actually result in higher
amounts of food waste
and that largely has to
do with the fact that
those diets have more
fruits and vegetables.”
Meredith Niles, University of Vermont
ing habits, cross-referenced with
other federal data sets and amplified by modeling tools, to determine how much food we waste
and how much environmental input that makes.
The amount of food wasted is
undoubtedly larger than the researchers calculated, given that
the study focused only on waste by
consumers at home or when eat-
ing out. Waste within the agricultural system before food reaches a
home or restaurant was not included, nor was food wasted at
supermarkets.
“What we’re reporting is about
25 percent of the food that’s available for consumption gets wasted,” said the Agriculture Department’s Zach Conrad, the study’s
lead author. “And there are some
other data sets that are showing
that across the entire food system,
it’s about 30 to 40 percent.”
“Food waste is a big deal,” said
Timothy Searchinger, a senior fellow at the World Resources Institute and a Princeton University
researcher who reviewed and
commented on the study by email.
“It results in large increases in
land use demands, other inputs,
and greenhouse gas emissions.”
If anything, Searchinger said,
he was puzzled that the estimates
for the amount of land used to
grow wasted food were not higher.
The research also contains a
potentially controversial finding
among those who focus on promoting healthier diets — as well as
among environmental advocates
who regularly attack the beef industry for its large environmental
footprint.
Namely, the research finds that
the most-wasted foods are also the
healthiest: fruits and vegetables.
These represented 39 percent of
the food wasted per person.
“Higher-quality diets actually
result in higher amounts of food
waste, and that largely has to do
with the fact that those diets have
more fruits and vegetables in
them,” Niles said. “And it is the
most wasted food that we found in
our study.”
Dairy and beef were the secondand third-most wasted foods, respectively.
Searchinger partly questioned
this finding, noting that “fruits
and vegetables have high weight
(due to the water content) and
high loss and waste rates, due to
spoilage and imperfections in appearance.”
“One element of a healthier diet
is less beef consumption,” he
wrote. “Because there is also significant wastage of beef and because beef uses so much land (although mostly pasture), there is a
good chance that if you factored in
pasture savings, the healthy diet
would waste less land. ”
Although the study did not present explicit public opinion data
on why people waste food, for
fruits and vegetables in particular
it is often the perception that they
are flawed, or have gone bad. For
other types of food, Niles cited
issues ranging from large portion
sizes to confusion about expiration dates.
Niles and Conrad said solutions
to food waste include educating
people — for instance, teaching
that a bruised banana can still be
eaten — and more meal planning.
chris.mooney@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
Could intelligent life have existed on Earth before us?
BY
C HARLES Q . C HOI
Reptilian menaces called Silurians evolved on Earth before humankind — at least in the “Doctor
Who” rendition of the universe.
But, science fiction aside, how
would we know if some advanced
civilization existed on our home
planet millions of years before
brainy humans showed up?
This is a serious question, and
serious scientists are speculating
about what traces these potential
predecessors might have left behind. And they’re calling this possibility the Silurian hypothesis.
When it comes to the hunt for
advanced extraterrestrial civilizations that might exist across the
cosmos, one must reckon with the
knowledge that the universe is
about 13.8 billion years old. In
contrast, complex life has existed
on Earth’s surface for only about
400 million years, and humans
have developed industrial civilizations in only the past 300 years.
This raises the possibility that
industrial civilizations might
have been around long before
human ones ever existed — not
just around other stars, but even
on Earth itself.
“Now, I don’t believe an industrial civilization existed on Earth
before our own — I don’t think
there was a dinosaur civilization
or a giant tree sloth civilization,”
said Adam Frank, an astrophysicist at the University of Rochester
and a co-author of a new study on
the topic. “But the question of
what one would look like if it did
[exist] is important. How do you
know there hasn’t been one? The
whole point of science is to ask a
question and see where it leads.
That’s the essence of what makes
science so exciting.”
Artifacts of human or other
industrial civilizations are unlikely to be found on a planet’s surface
after about 4 million years, wrote
Frank and study co-author Gavin
Schmidt, director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies.
For instance, they noted that urban areas currently take up less
THANASSIS STAVRAKIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Antikythera mechanism, perhaps the earliest surviving
mechanical computing device. Such items are only rarely found.
than 1 percent of Earth’s surface
and that complex items, even
from early human technology, are
very rarely found. A machine as
complex as the Antikythera
mechanism — used by the ancient
Greeks, it is considered the
world’s first computer — remained unknown when elaborate
clocks were being developed in
Renaissance Europe.
One may also find it difficult to
unearth fossils of any beings who
might have lived in industrial
civilizations, the scientists added.
The fraction of life that gets fossilized is always extremely small: Of
all the many dinosaurs that ever
lived, for example, only a few
thousand nearly complete fossil
specimens have been discovered.
Given that the oldest known fossils of Homo sapiens are only
about 300,000 years old, there is
no certainty that our species
might even appear in the fossil
record in the long run, they add-
ed.
Instead, the researchers suggested looking for more-subtle
evidence of industrial civilizations in the geological records of
Earth or other planets. The scientists focused on looking at the
signs of civilization that humans
might create during the Anthropocene, the geological age of today, characterized by humans’ influence on the planet.
“After a few million years, any
physical reminder of your civilization may be gone, so you have to
look for sedimentary anomalies,
things like different chemical balances that just look wacky,” Frank
said.
One sign of industrial civilization may have to do with isotopes
of elements such as carbon.
For instance, humans living in
industrial civilizations have
burned an extraordinary amount
of fossil fuels, releasing more than
500 billion tons of carbon from
coal, oil and natural gas into the
atmosphere. Fossil fuels ultimately derive from plant life, which
preferentially absorb more of the
lighter isotope carbon-12 than the
heavier isotope carbon-13. When
fossil fuels get burned, they alter
the ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-13
normally found in the atmosphere, ocean and soils — an effect
that could later be detected in
sediments as hints of an industrial civilization.
In addition, industrial civilizations have discovered ways to artificially “fix” nitrogen — that is,
to break the powerful chemical
bonds that hold nitrogen atoms
together in pairs in the atmosphere, using the resulting single
nitrogen atoms to create biologically useful molecules. The largescale application of nitrogenous
fertilizers generated via nitrogen
fixing is already detectable in sediments remote from civilization,
the scientists noted.
The Anthropocene is also triggering a mass extinction of a wide
variety of species that is probably
visible in the fossil record. Human industrial activity may also
prove to be visible in the geological record in the form of longlived synthetic molecules from
plastics and other products, or
radioactive fallout from nuclear
weapons.
One wild idea the Silurian hypothesis raises is that the end of
one civilization could sow the
seeds for another. Industrial civilizations may trigger dead zones
in oceans, causing the burial of
organic material (from the corpses of organisms in the zones) that
could, down the line, become fossil fuels that could support a new
industrial civilization. “You could
end up seeing these cycles in the
geological record,” Frank said.
All in all, thinking about the
impact that a previous civilization has on Earth “could help us
think about what effects one
might see on other planets, or
about what is happening now on
Earth,” Frank said.
— Live Science
PETR DAVID JOSEK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
This magpie chick is being fed using a puppet that imitates a parent
bird. An official said the puppet is needed to make sure the bird will
be capable of breeding, which it won’t be if it gets used to people.
S C I E NC E S C AN
BOTANY
Now you seed them, now you don’t? Book revels
in diversity of seeds, though some are in danger.
Chances are, you’ve never given seeds much thought.
Maybe you strew them around
your garden each spring. Maybe
you pour them into your salad.
But seeds are more than
snacks — they’re little repositories of the genetic information
that makes the plant world tick.
And they’re on display in all their
compact complexity in “The
Book of Seeds,” edited by Paul
Smith, secretary general of Botanic Gardens Conservation International. The Britain-based
nonprofit organization, which
links more than 500 botanic gardens in 96 countries, works to
conserve plants and the seeds
from which they sprout in an
effort to safeguard Earth’s diversity of plants.
That diversity is on full display
in “The Book of Seeds.” It covers
seeds from around the world,
many of them threatened. There
are beloved spices such as cinnamon and cardamom, the predecessors of common trees such as
sycamores and maples, and more
unusual specimens, too.
Some seeds, like those of birches, waft on the wind; others, like
the pigeon pea, are floaters that
drift, raftlike, to other continents. And those journeys are
just the beginning. Once they’re
in the ground, seeds must germinate.
If conditions aren’t ideal,
they’ll stay dormant — sometimes for as long as 2,000 years,
as when ancient date palm seeds
found in 2005 in a fortress in
Israel sprouted millennia later.
As population growth and climate change challenge the survival of seeds and plants, their
fate is increasingly in human
hands. Smith, who used to head
up the Royal Botanic Gardens’
Millennium Seed Bank, is all too
aware of those risks. He includes
plenty of information on seed
conservation, storage and plant
diversity.
Like any good coffee-table
book, “The Book of Seeds” contains plenty of eye candy. The
seeds, presented in captivating
photographs, are at once familiar
and foreign. As the fate of more
than 100,000 plants hangs in the
balance, it’s worth pausing to
appreciate the seeds from which
they spring.
— Erin Blakemore
The Book of Seeds
Edited by Paul Smith
PHOTOS BY NEAL GRUNDY/
COURTESY OF IVY PRESS
A new book features, from top,
seeds of the castor-oil plant, the
longleaf jointfir, the pong-pong
tree and the king protea flower.
H E ALTH & S C I E NC E
Editor: Laura Helmuth • Assistant Editors: Kathy Lally, Margaret Shapiro
• Art Director: Alla Dreyvitser • Advertising Information: Ron Ulrich,
202-334-5289, ronald.ulrich@washpost.com • To contact us: Email:
health-science@washpost.com Telephone: 202-334-5031 Mail: The
Washington Post, Health, 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
With a second face transplant replacing his first,
patient declares, ‘I’ve become 20 years younger’
E LI R OSENBERG
Jérôme Hamon is the first person in the world to receive two face
transplants.
A few months after receiving his
second transplant in January, he
spoke to reporters and told them
that he was feeling well.
“I still have moments when I’m
exhausted, but overall I feel well,”
he said.
Doctors removed Hamon’s first
transplanted face last November
after it began to show signs that it
was being rejected by his body,
reports said. Those signs arose
after he took antibiotics to fight a
cold. The antibiotics conflicted
with the immunosuppressive
treatment he was being given to
prevent the face’s rejection, the
BBC reported, and the face had to
be removed because of necrosis,
or a die-off of body tissue.
Hamon stayed at the GeorgesPompidou hospital in Paris without a face, unable to see, hear or
speak until the second transplant
took place, the news service reported.
Hamon
underwent
months of blood treatment before
the operation to try to stave off a
rejection of the new face. The face
donor was 22 years old.
“I’m 43,” Hamon told French TV,
according to the Associated Press.
“So I’ve become 20 years younger.”
French media reports have
dubbed Hamon “the man with
three faces.” Doctors have praised
the forthrightness with which he
has faced his difficult medical journey. Hamon has a condition called
neurofibromatosis Type 1, which
can cause skin tumors on the face
and elsewhere.
Anesthetist Bernard Cholley
told Agence France-Presse that
medical staff were “blown away by
Jérôme’s courage, his will, his
strength of character in a tragic
situation.”
“While he was waiting he never
complained, he was even in a good
mood,” Cholley said.
Doctors will wait to see the results of Hamon’s second transplant.
“Today, we know that a double
transplant is feasible. It’s no longer in the field of research,” Laurent Lantieri, who performed
Hamon’s first surgery in 2010, told
Le Parisien, according to the BBC.
Other doctors, too, described the
procedure as a breakthrough.
“The fact that Professor Lantieri was able to save this patient
gives us hope that other patients
can have a backup surgery if necessary,” Cleveland Clinic plastic surgeon Frank Papay told the Associated Press. Doctors expect facialtransplant procedures, of which
there have been 40 since the first
was performed in France in 2005,
to become more common.
Plastic surgeon Bohdan Pomahac of Harvard University told the
Associated Press that doctors still
do not know how long face transplants last but have forecast about
10 to 15 years, which is similar to
kidneys.
“The more we see what’s happening with patients, the more we
have to accept that chronic rejection is a reality,” Pomahac said.
“Face transplants will become essentially nonfunctional, distorted, and that may be a good time to
consider re-transplanting.”
Hamon said he has accepted his
new face.
“The first transplant I accepted
immediately. I thought, ‘This is my
new face,’ and this time, it’s the
same,” he said. “If I hadn’t accepted
this new face, it would have been
terrible. It’s a question of identity.”
He added: “But here we are, it’s
good, it’s me.”
Do you need an MD, a PA, a DO or an NP?
I
t used to be so simple: You
made an appointment with a
doctor and would almost certainly see an MD, someone
who spent four years in medical school and then had at least
three years of additional training,
usually in a hospital.
But today you’re likely to encounter a veritable alphabet soup
of health-care degrees: DO, PA, NP
and ND, to name a few. Who are all
these people? What training do
they have? Which one is best for
you? And where’s your good-old
MD, anyway?
The truth is, you may not always
need a traditional physician — and
may have a difficult time finding
one. The United States is short on
doctors, especially those practicing primary care, who typically
earn less than specialists. We now
have fewer primary-care physicians per person than many other
developed nations. Canada, for example, has 1.2 per 1,000 people;
the United States, just 0.3.
Because there are fewer primary-care doctors, it’s more difficult
to get an appointment. The average wait time for a new patient in a
big city to see a family-medicine
physician, for example, is now 29
days, compared with 19.5 days in
2014, according to physician recruiting firm Merritt Hawkins.
At the same time, doctors today
are feeling pressure to work faster.
Because of competitive forces in
the marketplace, including many
hospitals buying up physician prac-
BY
PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
H EA LTH S CA N
HEALTHY LIVING
Seriously, you may need more levity in your life.
TED videos show the value of having fun.
TED ‘play’ list
Talks about the importance of fun
ted.com/playlists/383/
the_importance_of_play
feel that much fun.
Stuart Brown, a physician and
psychiatrist whose talk is included
on the list, is so sure it’s worth
studying that he founded the National Institute for Play, a nonprofit
organization dedicated to fostering
and better integrating play research. Adults are designed to play
their entire lives long, he says in the
talk.
He encourages them to revisit
their most lighthearted moments
and give in to their impulse to
laugh, roughhouse, dance and
make light of life as a matter of
neurological survival.
Covering the health benefits of
fantasy and flirtation, prompts that
spark playful ideas and a manifesto
on how we might incorporate play
into our culture, the “play” list
might even make you wonder why
you’re spending so much time in
front of your computer. No worries:
With episode lengths ranging from
five minutes to a half-hour, you’ll
have plenty of time to play hooky.
It’s for your health, after all.
— Erin Blakemore
MLADEN ZIVKOVIC/GETTY IMAGES
ISTOCK
tices, doctors are now more likely to
work for large networks than for
themselves. And those employers
often set daily patient quotas — 16
to 25 per day is typical — that can
limit your time with a doctor.
That time crunch, combined
with growing demands to document all their encounters in often
cumbersome electronic health
records, is taking a toll on doctors.
More than half of primary-care
doctors report feeling burned out,
according to a 2017 Medscape survey. And that could undermine the
care they provide, make them less
willing to work collaboratively
with patients and drive even more
out of the profession.
A team of providers
Enter “advanced practice providers.” These are the NPs (nurse
practitioners) and PAs (physician
assistants) you may run into at a
doctor’s office.
They don’t have as much training as MDs, but they are licensed
to do many of the same things.
And their ranks are growing fast.
The share of physicians with these
clinicians on their team has risen
from 25 percent in 1999 to more
than 60 percent now.
But is seeing one of them as
good as seeing a medical doctor?
In most cases, yes, says Ateev Mehrotra, an associate professor of
health-care policy at Harvard
Medical School.
His January 2017 study in the
journal Medical Care found that
practices with more NPs and PAs
had fewer specialist referrals, hospitalizations and ER visits. And
other research has found that
when it comes to high blood pressure, diabetes, respiratory infections and other common problems, there’s little difference in
treatment from MDs and advanced practice providers.
The team approach is also efficient, allowing each clinician to
focus on what he or she does best.
And it can mean shorter wait
times and better patient education, according to a 2016 analysis
by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
In addition to NPs and PAs, you
may also be more likely to encounter other health-care professionals now.
They include reputable ones,
such as doctors of osteopathic
medicine (DOs). Their education
is similar to an MD’s, with special
training in muscle and skeletal
issues, and their numbers have
been growing.
But you may also encounter
some more-controversial providers, such as naturopathic doctors,
or NDs.
A Consumer Reports guide, at
cr.org/healthproguide, explains
who’s who, gives advice on how to
get the most of your precious time
with each of them and identifies
those you should consider steering clear of.
© Copyright 2018, Consumer Reports Inc.
Consumer Reports is an
independent, nonprofit organization
that works side by side with
consumers to create a fairer, safer,
and healthier world. CR does not
endorse products or services, and
does not accept advertising. CR has
no financial relationship with
advertisers in this publication. Read
more at ConsumerReports.org.
How to assess your survival odds for a bad disease
eli.rosenberg@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/news/
to-your-health
Surgeon Laurent Lantieri with Jérôme Hamon, who was given a
second transplanted face after his first, which he received in 2010,
began to show signs that it was being rejected by his body.
Want to feel better, smarter
and healthier?
It might be time to get serious
about play. TED’s list of talks
about the importance of play is a
good place to start. It includes
nine talks that might persuade
you to take a more lighthearted
approach to life — and help you
reap the health benefits of your
new attitude.
The free videos offered by TED
have a reputation for tackling
serious subjects — topics such as
work, technology, psychology.
This collection is a bit different.
Each expert approaches play with
TED’s signature smarts but keeps
the focus on fun.
That’s a good thing. Researchers are increasingly convinced
that play promotes health, even
in adults. They’ve documented
associations between play and
improved mood, reduced stress
and better relationships, and as
time goes on, so does research
into how the human mind and
body reacts to games and imaginative interactions.
Play can act like therapy and
help people relate better to others. Fun can also improve brain
function. In turn, adults can
transfer those skills to challenging situations when things don’t
E3
EE
FROM CONSUMER REPORTS
H EA LTH NEW S
BY
EZ
S TEVEN P ETROW
“So how long do I have to live?”
A reader with cancer recently
sent me a letter with this question,
which on its face seems simple
enough: “My oncologist told me
that the five-year survival rate for
my cancer is 45 percent. What
does this actually mean for me?”
I am familiar with this question
from my own cancer diagnosis
three decades ago, when a doctor
gave me 10-year survival odds that
were dismal. The first two questions racing through someone’s
mind after getting a cancer diagnosis are “Is this terminal?” and
“How long do I have?”
There’s much to be unpacked
when confronted with survival
odds — including statistics, the
medical treatments available, disease progression and existential
queries about life. Tackling them
requires a combination of math and
science, and the answers are not
completely satisfying, in part because statistics won’t tell an individual patient what really lies ahead.
Researcher Melissa Troester, coleader of the cancer epidemiology
program at the University of North
Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center in Chapel Hill,
addressed the reader’s question
this way: “Either they will be surviving at five years or they won’t be.
It’s yes or no, not 45 percent.”
But she said the math can provide some starting guidelines that
can be helpful. For instance, a
45 percent five-year survival rate,
said Donald Berry, a biostatistician at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, means that out of
100 patients historically diagnosed with a cancer “apparently
the same” as the letter writer’s, 45
would be expected to be alive after
five years. It’s a generalized prognosis, though, which Berry says
may not take into account tumor
type, personal genomics, health
history, diet, level of physical activity and much more. In other
words, it’s a big bucket that an
individual may or may not fit into.
As Berry put it, “Time of survival
cannot be predicted perfectly.”
Which leads us to the science.
Doctors can be “very bad at prognosis, at guessing how long people
will live,” explained Andrew Vickers, a biostatistician at Memorial
Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in
New York, whose work centers on
assessing the clinical value of predictive tools. “That’s because they
rely on their clinical experience
instead of the data.”
Berry said that “a disease may
have a subgroup [of patients] that
survives much longer” than statistics would suggest, usually for reasons not well understood. Pancreatic cancer, for example, he said,
has an overall five-year survival
rate of less than 10 percent. But
Apple founder Steve Jobs learned
he had a rare neuroendocrine type
of the disease, which has a fiveyear survival rate of about 60 percent. Jobs lived eight years after
his diagnosis.
Historical survival rates are
also group trends that don’t account for patient individuality.
Many other variables — such as
age, overall health and how well
an individual cancer responds to
treatment — will affect a person’s
chances of survival. They also
don’t take into account how a recent scientific breakthrough can
dramatically improve odds in a
way that a 10-year average cannot
show. That was definitely the case
for me. The discovery of a highly
effective chemotherapy cocktail
not long before I began my treatment for testicular cancer dramatically shifted prospects in a way
that the 10-year survival odds
hadn’t yet accounted for.
As much as we say we
want to know more,
are we ready to live
with what we learn?
When I asked Vickers the reader’s question, he quickly replied:
“How individualized is that? How
much does it take into account
tumor characteristics and general
health? How far has it spread?”
Vickers has built a set of prediction tools called “nomograms”
that he says “can be used to predict
cancer outcomes or assess risk
based on specific characteristics of
a patient and of his or her disease.”
The online tools cover more
than a dozen cancers. Take colorectal cancer, for which seven
data points predict survival following surgery. Among them: gender, age, staging and the number of
positive (cancerous) lymph nodes.
The result is pure math: Given
your input, there is an “X” percent
chance you’ll be alive in five years.
But here’s the crapshoot: A patient’s survival odds may be better
or worse when individual criteria
and characteristics are considered. As much as we say we want to
know more, are we ready to live
with what we learn? That’s a highly personal decision.
With that I went back to
Troester, who is a critic of the Memorial Sloan Kettering model’s reliance on clinical data. What about
someone’s body mass index, diet,
overall health and physical activity? These are “all things that interact together to determine someone’s prognosis,” she said. (“I’m
sure every single model we have in
medicine could be improved because there are other things that it
could take into account. However,
when making a prediction for an
individual patient, you don’t have
the luxury of saying, ‘Well, let’s do
some more research and come up
with something better in the future,’ ” Vickers replied. “You have
to make a prediction now, and the
best way to do that is to use whatever happens to be the most accurate tool around.”)
Troester also pointed out that
“at the five-year mark, that whole
prediction process starts anew.” By
that she means that the longer you
live, the longer you are likely to live.
Troester also raised one last important point: Patients are likely
to get the highest-quality treatment at a designated comprehensive cancer center, and higher
quality translates into longer survival. A 2015 study by Memorial
Sloan Kettering researchers found
“large survival differences” between patients treated for cancer
at specialized cancer centers vs.
those treated at community hospitals. To boost your odds with a
cancer diagnosis (especially a rare
or complicated cancer), it’s worth
trying to get to a comprehensive
cancer center — or at least to a
hospital that does a high volume
of cancer cases, especially of the
sort of cancer that you have.
In the end, here’s what I know:
Some of us want to predict the
future. Others prefer to stay in the
here-and-now. Some of us will be
statistical outliers. Others will die
of another cause. I’m reminded of
Stephen Jay Gould, the noted evolutionary biologist, who was diagnosed with abdominal mesothelioma in 1982. As he famously
wrote: The disease was “incurable,
with a median mortality of only
eight months after discovery.”
Gould lived another two decades,
dying of an unrelated cancer.
In other words: Plan for the
worst. Hope for the best. Don’t
expect stats to predict your future.
And most important, live your life
to the max.
This is part of an occasional series
that answers patient questions. Send
queries to stevenpetrow@gmail.com.
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E4
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THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
After a rough day at the hospital, a little luxury goes a long way
COAT FROM E1
blood cells keep cooperating. If
not, well, it could be game over —
so today is good news. Congratulations to me.
Mostly, though, I just feel angry
at the cancer. It is in defiance of it,
perhaps, that I wear my new/used
Chanel coat to the cancer center.
It is definitely out of place in the
sad, sick, anxious waiting room.
It is absolutely too fancy for the
occasion, and it is completely and
utterly inconsistent with the tank
top, gym leggings and sneakers I
have on underneath. It is also totally impractical, as it keeps getting
crumpled and risks catching splatters of blood on the lining when I
remove half of it for vitals and to
receive needles in my left arm.
I know this. I wear it anyway.
Coco Chanel was born one day
and 89 years before me. A fellow
Leo, she was born on Aug. 19,
1883, I on Aug. 20. She died in
1971, a year before I was born.
After Coco’s mother died, she was
raised in an orphanage by nuns
who taught her how to sew. Before
using those skills to create the
fashion empire known simply as
“Chanel,” she performed as a singer in clubs where she acquired the
nickname “Coco” — short for “cocotte” or “kept woman.”
Her unique combination of fiery grit, pride, scrappy survivor
instinct, dignity and elegance is
something I strive to achieve myself, especially since being ravaged, body and soul, by this heinous disease. However, beyond
the classic simplicity of her killer
style, I live by her legendary statements that have saved me from a
lifetime of over-accessorizing,
such as “Before you leave the
house, look in the mirror and take
one thing off.” I also admire how
her groundbreaking designs were
made with the specific intent of
getting women out of corsets and
into comfort without sacrificing
quality or aesthetics: “Luxury
must be comfortable, otherwise it
is not luxury,” she said.
Last October, I returned home
from a day at my cancer hospital to
find a package lying on the kitchen
table. I had just learned that my
breast cancer had progressed to
Stage 4 and, because even my
cancer is an overachiever, it had
mutated to the dreaded, triplenegative type of metastatic breast
cancer for which there is not only
no cure but also no treatments
available on the market and for
which the average prognosis is just
18 months from reoccurrence.
I opened the package and
pulled out a sweater I had somewhat impulsively purchased from
a catalogue a few weeks earlier. It
was a fitted knit black V-neck
sweater with subtle metallic gold
and silver bands on the sleeves. In
the catalogue it looked both sexy
and kind of cool, and my head
filled immediately with images of
me looking svelte at a holiday
cocktail party over the black velvet pants I pull out once a year for
such an occasion.
Now, though, instead of feeling
excited, I felt sickened. I detected
the faint smell of chemicals on
the garment, from whatever factory in whatever country on
whatever machine it had been
made. I got a mental image of
workers lined up, in poor conditions, making this sweater and a
zillion others just like it. I thought
of my closet and dresser drawers
— just upstairs — already filled
with plenty of perfectly acceptable outfits to wear for any occasion outside of my exciting hospital ventures. I got an involuntary
and morbid image of my husband
and children going through all
my stuff one day if this disease
does take me out. All that stuff, all
that energy and time purchasing
gone, and for what? Suddenly,
adding one more unnecessary
item to the pile I had accumulat-
TOM SCALERA
“My new/used Chanel coat . . . is definitely out of place in the
sad, sick, anxious waiting room,” writes Rebecca TimlinScalera. “I know this. I wear it anyway.”
ed over the past 45 years just
seemed completely and utterly
. . . wrong.
I decided right then that my
New Year’s resolution would be
not to buy a new item of clothing
in 2018. Used? Well, maybe. Even
though I was completely sure this
was the right thing for me, it still
felt oddly terrifying to commit to.
I am a total sucker for a wellheeled mannequin. I’ll buy the
entire outfit if it looks great on
her, without even trying it on.
How would I ever do this?
Within the month, I got my
answer. On a trip to Bogota, Co-
lombia, Casey and I strolled past a
storefront that made us both stop
in our tracks, wordlessly do an
about-face and head inside. Every
single item in this shop would
have been welcome and treasured
in either one of our closets. The
clothes were literally the definition of cozy and sexy, and we
dubbed the line “Cozexy.” And it
was still 2017, so I could buy them
without violating my resolution.
Yet I quickly became overwhelmed by the accumulation of
stuff in the dressing room. Coco’s
mantra “luxury must be comfortable, otherwise it is not luxury”
ran through my mind as I tried to
channel my Chanel. It was then
that I saw it: a soft, machinewashable pale-gray long-sleeve
pantsuit romper: basically an
adult onesie. I put it on. Effortless, it had an adjustable rope belt
to cinch the waist on days I might
feel skinny and to loosen on the
days I might feel fat. It had a
V-neck low enough to be feminine, dare I say even a little sexy,
on the days I might feel like
forgetting that the beautiful
round breasts that cancer took
from me had been replaced by
significantly smaller and much
less shapely lumps of flesh from
my lower back. I put it on and felt
as though I were wearing a blanket, an embrace, manna from
heaven. I found my new uniform
and, as Coco advised, it was comfortable, simple, beautiful, flattering and luxurious.
I can dress it up or down, I can
gain or lose 10 pounds and still fit
comfortably in it. I can throw it on
post-surgery (I had just had my
eighth cancer-related operation),
after a rough day at the hospital
(of which there are many), to play
with my kids or when I’m home
writing. Beyond all that, I
couldn’t care less if anyone thinks
it looks weird, or hip, or great, or
frumpy. I am rocking this romper
for me, no matter what.
It also just so happens to look
fabulous with that beautiful —
and used — black coat with white
satin lining I picked up in Paris. I
think Coco would agree.
that, until recently, kindergarten
safety efforts typically focused on
stranger danger and on avoiding
household hazards. But three
years ago, a first-grader brought a
heroin needle to school in her
backpack. She explained how her
father used the needle and said
that she brought it to school to
keep a younger sibling from stepping on it.
“I gave her a hug,” Edgell said.
Then she called the police.
“This is here. This is real,” Edgell told her staff.
This year, Belpre began a pilot
of the Health and Opioid Prevention Education, or HOPE, program, developed by Kevin Lorson,
a health and physical education
professor at Wright State University and a team of educators with a
grant from the Ohio Department
of Higher Education.
In one lesson, 25 children sat on
a carpet and helped their teacher
make a chart.
“What is an adult?” the teacher
asked, writing responses on a
large notepad affixed to the wall.
“What does the word ‘trusted’
mean?”
Finally, she put the two key
words together and asked pupils
to brainstorm about people who
could help them make healthy
choices and feel safe, people they
could identify as “trusted adults.”
A second lesson emphasized
the importance of never taking or
touching medicine “unless a trusted adult helps you.” That prompted one child to tell the class about
the time he fell, and his thirdgrade sister offered him pain med-
ication she had been prescribed
for an injured arm. “I told her I
couldn’t take her medication!” the
boy announced.
From the mouth of this “smart
cookie,” as his teacher called him,
came one of the core goals of
HOPE: to instill in children at an
early age the ability to make
healthy choices and ultimately
curb what Ohio Attorney General
Mike DeWine called “the worst
public-health crisis in our lifetime.”
HOPE also fulfills a practical
need, one created in 2014 when
the Ohio legislature passed a bill
requiring schools to teach the connection between prescription opioid abuse and heroin addiction.
“You do know no one is doing
this, right?” Lorson told state leaders in 2016 during a discussion of
the bill’s requirement. Schools
lacked the tools to follow through,
he said.
The signs that drug misuse was
affecting some children in Belpre,
a city of 6,500 separated from
West Virginia by the Ohio River,
had been appearing with more
and more regularity, school officials said.
More kindergartners exhibited
trouble regulating emotions and
outbursts. In some cases, grandparents and other relatives served
as primary caregivers, stepping in
because a parent was struggling
with addiction. And in 2015,
Hunter Burkey, a popular senior
at Belpre High School, died of a
heroin overdose.
In response, the district added
training to recognize signs of trauma and adverse childhood experiences. Educators learned to look
at the circumstances that might
8th Annual Sara and Samuel J. Lessans Healthcare
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Keynote: William D. Novelli, Co-Founder and Co-Chair,
Coalition to Transform Advanced Care (C-TAC), Professor,
McDonough School of Business, Georgetown University
Friday, May 4, 2018 | 7 a.m. – 2 p.m.
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Registration and information: www.smithlifecommunities.org/events
COURTESY OF WRIGHT STATE UNIVERSITY
Wright State University professor Kevin Lorson helped develop
HOPE: the Health and Opioid Prevention Education program.
be affecting a student with behavior problems.
Edgell described what might
happen to a boy whose father was
in jail. “He’s living with Grandma.
Grandma is sick. He’s going to
have a rough week.”
With the drug epidemic affecting their small community, carving out time from core subjects to
teach HOPE “wasn’t a hard sell,”
Assistant Principal Elizabeth
Braun said.
The lessons have helped illuminate complicated home lives.
Fourth-graders doing a role-playing exercise to practice standing
up for themselves and refusing
drugs wanted to make sure the
teacher knew a parent “was still a
good person” even if he or she had
trouble with addiction.
And a few sixth-graders “got
emotional,” teachers said, while
thinking about misusing prescription
and
over-the-counter
drugs.The reality at Belpre Elementary and other Ohio schools
in the state is that some children’s
ADHD medication — Adderall is
an easily misused stimulant — is
taken or stolen by family members.
“We want our kids to know they
are not alone. We want them to
know that we really are a safe
place. Your parents didn’t make a
good decision. You are still going
to be okay,” Braun said. Teacher
feedback about HOPE has been
positive, particularly because the
20-minute lessons are developmentally appropriate, easy to implement and do not feel like “one
more thing,” Braun said.
But while early prevention education sounds good in theory, the
state can’t force its more than 600
school districts to follow a specific
approach. Ohio is “a very strong
local-control state,” said Kenna
Haycox, senior policy consultant
at the Ohio School Boards Association. “Boards have the authority
to determine their academic curriculum.”
Ohio law prohibits the State
Board of Education from establishing health-education stan-
dards. It is the only state in the
country that lacks such standards.
“You have the state with the
opioid epidemic and a state without health-education standards,”
said Wright State University’s Lorson, former president of the Ohio
Association for Health, Physical
Education, Recreation, and
Dance.
The extent of opioid abuse in
Ohio has galvanized the state’s
leaders to take the fight into the
classroom.
Vernon Sykes, the ranking
“We want our kids to
know they are not
alone. We want them to
know that we really are
a safe place.”
Elizabeth Braun, an assistant
principal in Belpre, Ohio
Democrat on the Ohio state Senate’s education committee, has
spent a year and a half working on
a bill that would allow for state
health education standards. He
has been trying to overcome resistance from legislators who are
concerned it will affect the state’s
abstinence-only approach to sex
education.
Bumper stickers on state vehicles tout Start Talking!, a campaign Republican Gov. John Kasich championed to connect communities with resources for discouraging misuse of drugs. The
initiative also promotes HOPE on
its website. DeWine, the attorney
general, led a committee that last
year endorsed prevention education beginning in kindergarten.
“We teach reading and writing
every year,” he said in a telephone
interview. “What makes us think
we can wait until the fourth or
fifth year to do something about
the drug problem? If this is as
APRIL 24 , 2018
Customized
vaccine for
cancer of
the ovaries?
BY
M ELISSA H EALY
important as I think it is, we need
to get serious about it.”
“Prevention is not about one
drug,” said Michelle Miller-Day, a
professor of communication studies at Chapman University in Orange, Calif., and an expert on prevention curriculum. “It is about
social, emotional development in
kids so that when they are faced
with stressors or boredom or a
quick fix for pain or ‘I need to stay
up late to study,’ ” they can deal
with emotions naturally.
Social context is important, she
said, and telling kids to simply say
“no” is not enough when “the
good-looking captain of the football team is offering me a beer,”
said Miller-Day.
Knowing how to make effective
decisions (assessing options, reflecting on what will happen)
should start long before hearing
messages such as “Don’t do drugs.
This is what it does to your brain
and liver,” she said.
Reaching kids when they are 6
or 7 and forming habits and behavior is important, said Melanie
Lynch, an award-winning health
teacher in the North Allegany
school district in Pennsylvania. By
the time students are in high
school, Lynch said, “I’m not doing
a whole lesson on vaping. I can’t
afford that kind of time.”
HOPE also relies on the classroom teacher rather than an outside guest or a special assembly.
“The teacher is so important.
They are there every day. They are
an insider. We trust that person,”
Lorson said.
The long-term effects of drug
education are difficult to measure.
Tim Bruckner, an associate professor of public health at the University of California at Irvine who
has analyzed prevention programs in other states but is not
familiar with Ohio’s efforts, said
effectiveness is based on many
conditions, including funding, enforcement of best practices and
engaging, interactive delivery.
“It’s really hard to change people’s behavior or delay initiation of
adverse behavior,” he said. Only 10
percent of substance-abuse-prevention programs used in middle
and high schools show evidence of
effectiveness, he said.
But the stakes are visible every
day in Washington County, where
Belpre sits near Ohio 177, a highway for heroin and cheap methamphetamines from Mexico, according to Josh Staats, a lieutenant with the Washington County
sheriff’s office.
Earlier this year, 11 high school
students in the region tested positive for methamphetamine. And a
lab reported a batch laced with
fentanyl. Crystal methamphetamine is cheap and abundant.
“I don’t know if HOPE is the
magic bullet,” Lorson said. “But
the focus on these key concepts
and skills has given folks a place to
rally around.”
In early research that involved marshaling the body’s
own immune system, a personalized vaccine helped patients
with ovarian cancer mount a
stronger defense against their
tumors than standard therapy
and substantially improved
their survival rate.
The vaccine was tested in a
preliminary clinical trial and
used with standard chemotherapy and an immune-boosting
agent. The experimental therapy, described recently in the
journal Science Translational
Medicine, weaves together a
number of approaches that are
collectively driving innovations
in cancer treatment.
Because the treatment uses
the patient’s immune cells as a
sort of T-cell training force, it is
an immunotherapy. Because it
uses the distinctive proteins on
a patient’s own tumor as homing beacons, it is a targeted
therapy. And because a patient’s
cells are harvested and returned
to her, it is personalized therapy.
Rather than round up a patient’s T cells and re-engineer
them in a lab to find cancer, this
treatment harvests a class of
immune “helpers” called dendritic cells. Using ground-up
cells from a patient’s tumor,
researchers trained the dendritic cells to recognize and attack
that specific malignancy. When
these fortified cells were reintroduced into the patient, they
passed on their training to the
immune system’s army of killer
T cells and sent them into battle.
Among 10 women with advanced ovarian cancer who got
injections of the personalized
vaccine once every three weeks
— with the medications cyclophosphamide and bevacizumab
(marketed as Avastin) — eight
showed a strong immune response and were still alive after
two years.
In a comparison group of 56
patients who got standard chemotherapy alone, only half were
still alive at the two-year mark.
Among a second cohort of 10
patients who got bevacizumab
and dendritic cell vaccine alone
(but no cyclophosphamide),
only 30 percent survived to the
two-year mark.
The study’s primary aim was
to test the safety of the vaccine
in combination with the other
drugs.
Among these study subjects,
as well as in subsequent cohorts
of research subjects, the vaccine
has been “so safe it’s unbelievable,” said study leader Janos L.
Tanyi, a gynecologist at the
University of Pennsylvania. At
worst, subjects have reported
brief bouts of tiredness or flulike symptoms, he said.
The same approach may also
prove helpful in combating solid
tumors in different organs,
Tanyi said.
If ever there were a cancer
ripe for a more effective new
treatment, it’s ovarian cancer.
The fifth-leading cause of cancer death in the United States
and the most deadly of gynecological cancers, it killed more
than 14,000 American women in
2014, according to the Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention.
Because there is no effective
screening mechanism for ovarian cancer, it’s often not detected
until it has reached an advanced
stage. For 85 percent of women
in whom it is diagnosed, a
combination of surgery and chemotherapy does not succeed in
driving the malignancy into remission, and it recurs.
A personalized ovarian cancer vaccine is probably years
away from widespread use. Scientists will probably have to
find a way to make larger supplies of vaccine with a limited
supply of tumor cells, Tanyi said.
Meanwhile, researchers are already finding new ways to enhance the vaccine’s effectiveness, he said.
As in other immunotherapy
trials, Tanyi has found that some
patients were able to stop the
cancer’s progression with continued booster shots of vaccine.
For some women, the vaccine
appears to have driven the cancer into remission entirely.
Tanyi said he is eager to
explore whether the dendriticcell vaccine might also be used
as a first-line treatment for
women who are newly diagnosed with ovarian cancer. To
supply tumor cells for the vaccine, such patients would still
have to undergo surgical removal of their tumors.
health-science@washpost.com
— Los Angeles Times
health-science@washpost.com
Timlin-Scalera, a neuropsychologist
and the founder of the Cancer Couch
foundation, which funds research on
metastatic breast cancer, is a writer,
comedian and lifelong athlete. She
was living a full, healthy life in
September 2015 when she received
a diagnosis of advanced breast
cancer and was told she had perhaps
three years to live.
Ohio goes into classrooms to try to stem epidemic of drug deaths
DRUG FROM E1
. TUESDAY,
TUESDAY, APRIL 24 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E5
EE
With climate change, birds find it’s a smaller world after all
BIRDS FROM E1
were correct.
But it’s complicated.
After studying birds that don’t
migrate in the winter — meaning
they live through both hot and
cold temperatures during the year
— his research found that exposure to hot weather apparently
affects body size, much more than
cold. But this occurs only when
birds are nestlings and still maturing. Developing during a hot summer, before leaving the nest, turns
them into small adults — and they
stay that way.
Griffith and colleagues have
studied only house sparrows and
zebra finches, but they suspect the
phenomenon is widespread.
“Many species might get smaller,” Griffith says. “This might be an
adaptive response and may make
animals better able to cope with
changing conditions. The key thing
is to understand why it is happening and what the fitness consequences are likely to be for animals
— that is, are they better off or
worse off [evolving into smaller
sizes] in a warming world?”
Doctoral student Samuel Andrew, who collaborated with Griffith, agrees. “If these changes in
size are an important part of
adapting to warmer climates, then
birds that don’t change their size
in response to temperature
change could be more vulnerable,”
Andrew says.
Their research adds to a growing body of evidence indicating
that numerous plant and animal
species are undergoing physical
and behavioral changes in response to global warming. It’s affecting their breeding and migration patterns, which are shifting,
for example, among monarch butterflies, songbirds and bats. And
many species are moving to higher
elevations, where it is cooler, to
escape the heat.
This almost certainly is related
to winters becoming shorter and
warmer, prompting earlier-thannormal, or “false,’’ springs, and sporadic, hot summerlike days during
winter months as well as extraordinary heat waves. These climate
variations can throw ecosystems
off balance, making it difficult for
nature to adjust. Ecosystems are
complex and connected; when one
component changes, it has a ripple
effect on the rest of the system.
Body size appears to be among
the factors affected, and not just in
birds. Last summer, researchers in
Canada reported that many species of fish were shrinking — some
by as much as 30 percent — because the warming ocean water
makes it difficult for them to absorb oxygen — necessary for
growth — through their gills.
“One of the big challenges for
biodiversity generally is that the
speed with which the climate is
changing is faster than ever before,” Griffith says. “That means
that the capacity of different species to respond is going to be key to
determining the extent to which
they can cope.”
The notion that temperatures
influence body size isn’t new. Biologist Carl Bergmann first proposed in 1847 that cold climates
give rise to bigger bodies and that
animals that live in warm places
“We just don’t know yet
which species can and
can’t adapt to a wide
range of climates.”
Doctoral student Samuel Andrew,
who has studied variations in the size
of birds
typically are smaller. This makes
sense because bigger bodies preserve heat more efficiently than
smaller ones. But global warming
has turned “Bergmann’s rule” into
something not as simple as it was
then.
“The overall pattern between
temperature and body size has
been seen in lots of organisms,”
Griffith says. “What we are suggesting is that more people need to
consider that it may be driven by
problems caused by developing in
very hot weather. We know that
heat waves are increasing in severity and intensity, and therefore
this could be driving the shrinking
of animals.”
For the sparrows study, Andrew
and his team captured and measured about 40 adult house sparrows at each of 30 locations across
Australia and New Zealand. They
found that maximum temperatures during the summer, when
the birds breed, were a better predictor of adult body size at each
location than winter minimum
temperatures.
Because house sparrows are
sedentary birds that live among
humans, “this means you can
compare the size of birds from
different locations across a large
distribution,” Andrew says.
Some sparrows live in the arid
center of Australia, where it gets
very hot during the summer but
also cold during the winter, while
others live where changes between
the seasons are milder. “We expected that the hottest temperatures
during the summer, or the coldest
temperatures during the winter,
would be most relevant to the survival of the birds,” Andrew says.
But that’s not what they found.
“We found that house sparrows
are more likely to be smaller in
locations with hot summers and
that there was no significant relationship between winter temperatures and size,” Andrew says.
The reduction in body size
probably has to do with their ability to regulate development in response to environmental changes.
The nestlings “could be reducing
the amount of resources they use
to grow larger to more effectively
lose excess heat as adults,” Andrew
says.
In a second study, the researchers found the same was true for
zebra finches. They showed that in
the wild, zebra finches that developed in hotter months were smaller, and then tested the idea experimentally by breeding zebra finch
families either in cool rooms or
hot rooms in a laboratory.
“Even though we used the same
pairs to breed in the two different
conditions — and therefore were
able to compare full siblings — we
showed that those grown in a hot
room were smaller than those
grown in a cool room,” Griffith
says. “This was the first experimental test of the idea we demonstrated in the sparrow study.”
What the size question means
for future species is unclear. “We
just don’t know yet which species
can and can’t adapt to a wide range
of climates,” Andrew says. “If we
can understand the traits that allow species to be successful, we
can do a better job evaluating
which ones will need the most help
when it comes to climate change.”
health-science@washpost.com
LAURA HURLEY
Finches perch in a cage in Australia during a study of how temperature affects the size of birds. “Those
grown in a hot room were smaller than those grown in a cool room,” one of the researchers said.
With warmer water, fish need more oxygen than their gills can supply
F
ish could be shrinking,
too.
As climate change
continues to heat up the
oceans, many species of fish
are expected to decrease in
size, some by as much as
30 percent, according to a
study by scientists in Canada
released last summer. Fish
can’t grow without oxygen,
and it will be difficult for them
to get enough of it from the
warming waters, according to
the research.
Being coldblooded, fish
can’t regulate their body
temperature. When ocean
water becomes warmer, fish
metabolism speeds up. When
this happens, they need more
oxygen to sustain bodily
functions. They breathe
through their gills, which
extract dissolved oxygen from
the water and then excrete
carbon dioxide. But the
surface area of the gills doesn’t
grow at the same pace as the
rest of a fish’s body.
“There is a point where the
gills cannot supply enough
oxygen. . . . So the fish just
stops growing larger,” says
study co-author William
Cheung, science director of the
Nereus Program, a
collaboration between Japan’s
Nippon Foundation and the
University of British
Columbia.
Co-author Daniel Pauly, a
scientist with Sea Around Us, a
University of British Columbia
research initiative, explains
that fish are constrained by
their gills in the amount of
oxygen they can extract from
the water. “With increasing
temperatures, fish require
more oxygen but get less,” he
says.
This could hit the fishing
industry hard, resulting in the
loss of an estimated
3.4 million metric tons of
potential catch for each degree
Celsius (1.8 degrees
Fahrenheit) of atmospheric
warming, according to
Cheung. “Some parts of the
world, such as in the tropics,
are going to see even larger
decreases,” he says. “This will
have substantial impacts on
the availability of fish for
people,” he says.
For an opinion piece
published in 2013, researchers
in Britain analyzed long-term
data on fish in the North Sea
and found that species such as
haddock and sole had
decreased in maximum body
size in the past few decades,
“and such shrinkage of size
was significantly related to
ocean warming in that region,
even after correcting for the
effects of fishing,” Cheung
says.
The oxygen shortage will
hurt the entire ocean
ecosystem, in particular larger
species at the top of the food
chain, he adds. “Big fish eat
small fish,” Cheung says.
“They’re affected because their
prey are affected.”
— Marlene Cimons
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THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
APRIL 24 , 2018
in a russian
village, no
one is seen
as abnormal
SVETLANA FROM E1
PHOTOS BY MARY GELMAN
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Minya celebrates his 50th birthday
at Svetlana Village, where about 40 people live in four large
houses on a sprawling farm. Raya, who works in a bakery, loves
dressing up and trying cosmetics. Two men watch some of the
village’s goats. The residents grow their own vegetables and
fruit, raise cows, chickens and pigs, bake bread, and make
cheese and yogurt to feed themselves, with some left over to sell.
The residents grow their own
vegetables and fruit, raise cows,
chickens and pigs, bake bread,
and make cheese and yogurt to
feed themselves, with some left
over to sell. They cook for one
another: blinis, the Russian pancake; soup, the heart of the afternoon meal; and other favorites.
Twice a day they have a break in
the bakery to drink tea together
and eat cakes or other sweets.
The community is part of the
worldwide Camphill Movement,
which emphasizes developing potential through community, arts
and working on the land. The
movement was started in Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1939 by Karl
Koenig, an Austrian doctor and
writer who had fled the Nazis. He
was inspired by the spiritually
oriented philosophy of Rudolf
Steiner, the Austrian social reformer who started the first Waldorf School.
Today there are 100 Camphill
communities in 20 countries.
Svetlana was started with financial help from the Norwegian
Camphill Movement, which was
inspired by a Russian mother
named Svetlana who had a child
with special needs. The mother
died in 1991, the year before the
village was started, and the community was named in her honor.
The village gives its residents
with disabilities the opportunity
to learn and work freely. Volunteers from Russia and elsewhere
in Europe live and work with
them. Financial assistance comes
from other Camphill communities, grants and donations from
family members.
Life follows the seasons, revolving around agriculture in the
warm months and carpentry and
other activities in the winter. The
villagers have a sauna for weekends, and they produce plays on
holidays. Diagnoses are not discussed. Residents are not classified as “healthy” or “unhealthy,”
“normal” or “abnormal.”
They are all individuals, working to their potential.
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/In-sight
As telemedicine evolves rapidly, doctors are scrambling to make the most of it
BY
F
D HRUV K HULLAR
or years, doctors have
been told to look at the
patient — not the computer — when providing medical care. What we haven’t been
told is what to do when there’s
only a computer.
Telemedicine is perhaps the
most rapidly evolving area in
health care. About 15 million
Americans receive some form of
remote medical care every year.
Investment in on-demand healthcare services is estimated at
$1 billion annually, according to
Accenture Consulting. Kaiser Permanente, the nation’s largest integrated delivery system, provides more visits virtually than it
does in person.
All of which raises an important but overlooked question: Do
doctors know how to use telemedicine?
As is often the case with technological change, our capacity to
generate innovation has exceeded
our capacity to understand its
implications. With telemedicine,
we’ve done what we generally do:
Introduce a new treatment, technology or care model, and assume
doctors will figure out how to use
it.
But as telemedicine moves
from a technology used to manage minor ailments — coughs,
rashes, sore throats — to one that
affects nearly every field of medicine, it’s important to consider
whether its increasingly complex
application is being matched with
increasingly sophisticated training.
Misdiagnosis, for example, re-
mains a fundamental problem in
medicine, and it’s not clear
whether telemedicine will ameliorate or exacerbate it. Much of
medical diagnosis remains clinical gestalt: an integrated assessment based on labs, history and
exam. But how should this evaluation vary by the medium in which
a patient is cared for? Should
doctors feel comfortable making
some diagnoses remotely, but not
others? Should they adjust their
threshold for ordering more tests,
or dismissing minor complaints,
when caring for patients on a
screen instead of in an office?
Building rapport with patients
remotely is also more difficult
than in person. The subtle cues
that bond doctor and patient are
largely absent during a virtual
visit, and some argue we should
teach not just bedside manner
but also “webside manner.”
Clinical rapport is no small
thing. It can help patients lose
weight, control blood pressure
and manage pain. It has sometimes been found to have as large
an effect on disease prevention as
commonly used medications.
And it’s a central driver of patient
satisfaction.
“Today, telemedicine usually
means a video chat,” said Eric
Topol, digital health expert and
executive vice president of the
Scripps Research Institute in La
Jolla, Calif. “But soon, telemedicine will be a data-exchange platform, in which patients are generating and transmitting data —
vital signs, genetic scores, microbiome information — in real time
to doctors. Are we preparing physicians for that kind of future?”
The case of “telestroke” services is illustrative. By some estimates, patients going to rural hospitals with stroke symptoms are
only 10 percent as likely as certain
patients in urban areas to get the
clot-busting drug tPA. (A tissue
plasminogen activator, or tPA,
must be given within hours of
symptom onset.) This has
prompted growth of telestroke
programs around the country.
The decision to administer tPA
is not easy. A neurologist must
review images remotely, evaluate
subtle changes in patients, consult with on-the-ground physicians and nurses, and manage
delicate conversations with patients and families about complex
trade-offs. (A tPA treatment can
rapidly dissolve clots, but it can
also cause catastrophic brain
bleeding.)
But there are few formal ways
to evaluate neurology trainees or
to help them manage telestroke
consultations. Those who do receive formal training report
marked increases in their comfort
with telestroke care.
“It’s different caring for patients on screen, especially when
it comes to stroke,” said Amanda
Jagolino-Cole, an assistant professor at McGovern Medical
School at the University of Texas
Health Science Center at Houston
and a member of the teleneurology team. “How do you
build trust? How do you get clinicians in the room to help with
exam maneuvers? It all needs to
be taught and practiced. These
are life-changing events for patients.”
Rahul Sharma, emergency
“Soon, telemedicine will
be a data-exchange
platform, in which
patients are generating
and transmitting data —
vital signs, genetic
scores, microbiome
information — in real
time to doctors. Are we
preparing physicians for
that kind of future?”
Eric Topol, executive vice president
of the Scripps Research Institute
physician in chief at New York
Presbyterian-Weill Cornell Medical Center, thinks we need not just
more training but a new medical
specialty entirely: the “medical
virtualist.” Medical virtualists
would be doctors who spend most
or all of their time caring for
patients remotely and who receive dedicated training and certification. He argues that specialties such as intensive care, interventional radiology and surgical
subspecialties were born from advances in medical knowledge and
technology, and the same should
now hold true for telemedicine.
Sharma helped launch one of
the country’s first telemedicine
programs based in an emergency
department. When patients with
minor complaints enter the emergency department, they’re given a
standard in-person triage evaluation, but then they are offered the
option to be seen virtually. Those
who accept the offer enter a room
with a computer monitor through
which they videoconference with
a physician who can order X-rays
and prescriptions, and, if necessary, ask an in-person clinician to
assist with minor procedures
such as removing stitches. Wait
times for those with non-urgent
conditions have dropped from
more than two hours to less than
40 minutes, and fewer than 2 percent of patients have had to return to the hospital unexpectedly.
“Patients love it,” Sharma said.
“And not just millennials. Twenty
percent of our telemedicine visits
are for patients over 65. We’ve
even treated people over 100. If
you can get them to buy in, you
can get anyone to buy in.”
To train doctors to provide virtual care, the program enlisted
consultants who specialize in presentation and public speaking
and held workshops on best practices. It also taught them methods
for examining patients remotely.
Physicians can, for example, ask
patients with sore throats to take
a photo with their smartphone, or
ask family members to help with
basic physical exam maneuvers.
Medical students at Weill Cornell can also now take a two-week
telemedicine and digital health
elective in which they learn to
interview patients virtually, participate in telestroke and telepsychiatry visits, and understand
the legal and regulatory issues
around telemedicine.
We often assume that if we get
the finances and regulation right,
telemedicine will be incorporated
into clinical practice and create
positive health outcomes for patients. But its integration and
effectiveness may depend in part
on whether doctors feel comfortable using it: Providing medical
care virtually is fundamentally
different from providing it in person — in ways we haven’t examined carefully or sought to address.
Going forward, more-effective
telemedicine may require moreeffective telemedicine training.
health-science@washpost.com
Khullar is a physician and researcher
at Weill Cornell Medicine and director
of policy dissemination at the
Physicians Foundation Center for
Physician Practice and Leadership.
Follow him on Twitter at
@DhruvKhullar.
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