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The Washington Post – December 07, 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Partly sunny 51/35 • Tomorrow: Cloudy 44/33 B8
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
Facing more allegations,
Minn. senator expected
to provide update today
KEY RECOGNITION
FOR JERUSALEM
E LISE V IEBECK,
E D O ’ K EEFE
AND K AREN T UMULTY
BY
FRANKEN CONTINUED ON A4
Old story: Male misconduct spans
Sen. Patty Murray’s career. A4
. $2
Trump
orders
Israel
switch
Democrats
call for
Franken
to resign
A majority of Senate Democrats
on Wednesday called for the resignation of Sen. Al Franken (DMinn.) after determining that
they could no longer tolerate his
presence in their midst as a growing number of women accused
him of sexual harassment.
They turned on one of their
party’s most popular figures with
stunning swiftness, led by the Senate’s Democratic women, who
were joined in short order by more
than half of the Democratic caucus.
“Enough is enough,” Sen.
Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) said at
a news conference. “We need to
draw a line in the sand and say
none of it is okay, none of it is
acceptable. We as elected leaders
should absolutely be held to a
higher standard, not a lower standard, and we should fundamentally be valuing women. That is
where this debate has to go.”
Franken’s office said he would
make an announcement about his
future on Thursday. Minnesota
Public Radio reported Wednesday
afternoon that Franken planned
to resign, but Franken’s office
quickly denied it on Twitter. “Not
accurate,” the tweet stated. “No
final decision has been made and
the Senator is still talking with his
family.”
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
U.S. to begin planning
for embassy move
BY
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President was bent on fulfilling vow on Jerusalem’s status
BY
AND
J OSH D AWSEY,
M ISSY R YAN
K AREN D E Y OUNG
During a visit to his Mar-aLago resort in March, President
Trump approached legal scholar
Alan Dershowitz to talk about
the Middle East.
While Trump questioned Dershowitz, a confidant of Israeli
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, about the region, the
president seemed certain about
one thing: where he stood on the
U.S. Embassy in Israel.
“What he said to me was, ‘I’m
going to do it. Every other president has promised, and all of
them didn’t keep their promises,’ ” Dershowitz said, referring
to a controversial proposal to
OZAN KOSE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
TOP: President Trump and Vice President Pence arrive for the
speech in the Diplomatic Reception Room. ABOVE: Protesters
wave Palestinian flags during a demonstration in Istanbul.
move the embassy from Tel Aviv
to Jerusalem. “He said there
would be criticism of him but
that he wanted to keep his
promise.”
In the weeks leading up to his
announcement Wednesday recognizing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, reversing decades of
U.S. policy, Trump heard entreaties for and against the proposed move from advisers inside
and outside the White House.
The decision to shake off
warnings from senior officials
such as Secretary of State Rex
Tillerson and align himself instead with prominent proponents of the move, including
Vice President Pence and major
donor Sheldon Adelson, underTRUMP CONTINUED ON A12
D AVID N AKAMURA
President Trump cast his decision to recognize Jerusalem as
Israel’s capital Wednesday as an
acceptance of reality that could
shake up the stagnant Middle
East peace process by establishing him as an honest broker who
brings “fresh thinking” to old
problems.
But even as Trump sought to
convince Middle East partners
that the move would not derail
his commitment to peace, his
remarks at the White House
revealed an important subtext
that helps explain why the president was willing to buck warnings from U.S. allies and take a
risk over the contested holy city.
“While previous presidents
have made this a major campaign promise, they failed to
deliver,” Trump said in a midday
speech in the Diplomatic Reception Room. “Today, I am delivering.”
As Trump nears the end of his
first year in office, his eagerness
to show progress on his agenda
extends beyond his push to secure a tax bill on Capitol Hill this
month. He heralded his pronouncement on Jerusalem as a
JERUSALEM CONTINUED ON A12
Joy and rage: Israelis celebrate,
while Palestinians protest. A13
As Calif. wildfires rage, threat is forecast to grow GOP steps up criticism
of Mueller, FBI probes
Conditions fueling blazes
in the L.A. area could
intensify, officials warn
Activists, lawmakers try
to curtail what they call
‘biased’ investigation
BY S COTT W ILSON
AND M ARK B ERMAN
BY D EVLIN B ARRETT
AND S EAN S ULLIVAN
ojai, calif. — The flames came
from all sides, tearing across cliffs
and roaring down mountains,
burning through homes and engulfing cars. Entire communities
were evacuated, forcing people to
grab what they could and flee as
raging wildfires spread rapidly
across Southern California on
Wednesday.
Yet even as they scrambled for
shelter from the choking smoke
and flames that shrouded idyllic
communities in apocalyptic imagery, many worried about the
dangers still to come. Officials
warned that the wildfire threat
could increase through the end of
the week, with the same conditions fueling the fires forecast to
WILDFIRES CONTINUED ON A9
MARK RALSTON/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Heavy smoke from a wildfire hangs over Mondos Beach next to Highway 101 in Ventura County, Calif.
For drone footage, visit wapo.st/Firedrone, and for video of the Skirball Fire, go to wapo.st/firehillside.
IN THE NEWS
THE ECONOMY
SPORTS
NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell, under
fire from critics, signed a
five-year extension that
could be worth about
$40 million annually
with incentives. D1
THE NATION
ALEXEI DRUZHININ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Six more years Russian President Vladimir
Putin said he will run for reelection, and his
victory is essentially guaranteed. A11
Strides for gene therapy A clinical trial found
immediate, promising results for men with
hemophilia B after a one-time treatment. A3
Affordable Care Act
enrollment has been
brisk, but a shorter signup season means final
figures are likely to fall
short of last year’s. A3
A Navy chaplain who
died helping sailors escape a sinking battleship
at Pearl Harbor 76 years
ago will be honored with
the Silver Star. A3
Republicans next year
will aim to spend less on
federal health-care and
anti-poverty programs,
House Speaker Paul D.
Ryan said. A17
THE WORLD
Nepal is set to vote in a
landmark election that
could give China more
influence in the region
than India. A10
President Trump
called on Saudi Arabia
to let emergency aid enter war-torn Yemen. A13
While grappling with
Europe over Brexit,
Britain’s Theresa May is
beset by political sniping at home. A13
A bill in Congress
would target forcedarbitration clauses that
companies use in sexual
harassment cases. A14
An investment group
urged Amazon to add
more women to senior
executive ranks following sexual harassment
allegations. A14
THE REGION
Marylanders wanting
to legally buy medical
marijuana in the first
week of the state’s program are finding dispensaries’ supplies running short. B1
A federal appeals
court ruled a detective
violated a teen’s Fourth
Amendment rights in a
Republican activists and lawmakers are engaged in a multifront attack on special counsel
Robert S. Mueller III’s probe of
possible connections between associates of President Trump and
Russian agents, trying to stop or
curtail the investigation as it
moves further into Trump’s inner
circle.
For months, the president and
his allies have been seizing on any
whiff of possible impropriety by
Mueller’s team or the FBI to argue
that the Russia probe is stacked
against Trump — potentially
building the political support
needed to dismiss the special
“sexting” case. B1
Georgetown University refused to recognize
a graduate student
union, saying teaching
and research assistants
are not employees. B1
Ten employees of a
Virginia chicken farm
were fired after a video
appeared to show them
beating chickens to
death. B4
Virginia judges set
dates for three of the
four recounts for critical
House of Delegates races. B5
At least two Montgomery County legislators
were among those arrested at the U.S. Capitol while seeking protection for young undocumented immigrants. B5
counsel.
Several law enforcement officials said they are concerned that
the constant drumbeat of conservative criticism seems designed to erode Mueller’s credibility, making it more politically palatable to remove, restrict or simply ignore his recommendations
as his investigation progresses.
Fox News Channel personality
Sean Hannity, one of the president’s informal advisers as well as
one of his most vociferous defenders, on Tuesday night called Mueller “a disgrace to the American
justice system’’ and said his team
is “corrupt, abusively biased and
political.’’
Several conservative lawmakers held a news conference
Wednesday demanding more details of how the FBI proceeded last
year in its probes of Hillary Clinton’s use of personal email and
MUELLER CONTINUED ON A8
‘Ripped up’: Witness says Flynn
texted about Russia sanctions. A8
Inside
ST YLE
Voices of the year
Time honors not just one
person but the many who
fought harassment. C1
LOCAL LIVING
Yule be happier
How to make your
Christmas more about
joy and less about stress.
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A14
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES..........................A18
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B5
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS ............................ A10
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 2
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
7 5 7 3
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
Trump smash! President’s promises about ‘winning’ fall to pieces yet again.
Dana
Milbank
WASHINGTON
SKETCH
“We’re going to
win so much,
you’re going to be
so sick and tired of
winning. . . . And
I’m going to say,
‘I’m sorry, but
we’re going to keep
winning, winning,
winning.’ ”
— Presidential
candidate Donald
Trump, May 2016
“We don’t have any wins on the
board yet.”
— Secretary of State
Rex Tillerson, Dec. 5, 2017
We are losing, losing, losing.
We are losing with North Korea,
getting closer to nuclear war. We
are losing with Russia and China,
which are expanding their power
unchecked. We are losing in trade
as imports from China and Mexico
hit records. We are losing with
longtime allies that condemn us.
We are losing with our secretary of
state, undercut by his own boss.
We are losing with our former
national security adviser, now a
felon.
I say to President Trump: “I am
so tired of losing. I don’t want to
lose any more.” And Trump says:
“I’m sorry, but we’re going to keep
losing. Now we are going to lose in
the Middle East.”
Earlier this year, Trump
proclaimed that a deal in the
region is “maybe not as difficult as
people have thought over the
years.” As recently as two months
ago he said this of his
administration’s peace plan: “I
want to give that a shot before I
even think about moving the
embassy to Jerusalem.”
So much for giving peace a
“shot.” With Wednesday’s
announcement that he’s
recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s
capital and moving the U.S.
Embassy there, he’s effectively
throwing in the towel on Mideast
peace. He’s inflaming Arab allies,
denying the United States
legitimacy as a broker and putting
already remote hopes of a peace
deal into the category of pipe
dreams.
Not only did he announce the
embassy move, but he also
softened the longtime American
commitment to a two-state
solution (embraced by George W.
Bush in 2002), saying the United
States would support two states “if
agreed to by both sides.”
Trump, squinting into the
camera and chopping the air with
his hands, was both sloppy (“open
our hearts and minds to possible
and possibilities”) and historically
wrong. He claimed Jerusalem has
been Israel’s capital “ever since”
independence in May 1948. In
fact, it wasn’t until December
1949, as the United Nations was
preparing to put Jerusalem under
international control, that David
Ben-Gurion defied the world body
by making Jerusalem the capital.
I think the embassy should be
in Jerusalem, in principle. But
Trump could have used the move
as a leverage for peace. Instead, he
used it to smash crockery in the
region.
In fact, that pretty well
summarizes the Trump Doctrine:
crockery smashing. The “wins” in
foreign policy have been things
Trump has undone (the Paris
climate accord, the Trans-Pacific
Partnership) or is in the process of
undoing (the Iran nuclear deal,
NAFTA). Relations have soured
with Britain, continental Europe
and countries from Mexico to
Australia. He has accelerated
gains against the Islamic State,
though at the cost of giving more
power to Russia — and the
terrorist threat is decentralizing
rather than dissipating.
And what do we have to show
for this? Well, the Commerce
Department reported that the U.S.
trade deficit in October widened
to a nine-month high. Oh, and the
Treasury Department reported
that, as of the end of September,
foreign holdings of U.S. debt were
$6.23 trillion, up from
$5.95 trillion when Trump took
over. China has regained its spot
as the United States’ biggest
creditor.
At home, too, Trump’s “wins”
have been things he has undone.
He’s sabotaged Obamacare, called
an end to the DACA program for
child immigrants, shrunk national
monuments and canceled
regulations. But while destruction
is easy, creation has eluded
Trump. The promised jobs have
yet to return: A mere 1,900 coal
jobs and 126,000 manufacturing
jobs, a tiny sliver of the nearly
1.5 million jobs added under
Trump (those a continuation of
seven years of job growth). Trump
has crowed about the stock
market setting records, but it also
did in each of the past four years,
and about 15-year highs in
consumer confidence, but that has
been trending upward since 2011.
Tillerson, acknowledging in
Europe this week to U.S.
diplomats that “we don’t have any
wins on the board yet,” said he
would announce “quick wins” in
the coming weeks — but these are
items such as updating IT systems
and streamlining the department.
Substantive “wins” are getting
further from the administration’s
grasp. Trump had it right two
months ago when he said he
wanted to give peace a chance
before moving the embassy to
Jerusalem. Now, he’s blowing
things up by rewarding Israeli
hard-liners, empowering Islamist
hard-liners and setting back hopes
for peace. Doesn’t he ever get tired
of losing?
Twitter: @Milbank
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
8:30 a.m.
10 a.m.
1:45 p.m.
Jobless claims for the week ending Dec. 2 are
estimated to come in at 240,000, compared with
238,000 in the week ending Nov. 25. Visit
washingtonpost.com/business for details.
The House Administration Committee holds a hearing
titled “Preventing Sexual Harassment in the
Congressional Workplace: Examining Reforms to the
Congressional Accountability Act.” For developments,
visit washingtonpost.com/politics.
A Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day observance is held
at the World War II Memorial in honor of those killed in a
surprise strike by Japan on Dec. 7, 1941, in Hawaii. For
details, visit washingtonpost.com/national.
KLMNO
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CO R R ECTI O N S
A credit for a photo in the
Dec. 6 Year in Photos section,
showing fleeing civilians walking
past the heavily damaged al-Nuri
mosque in Mosul, Iraq, on July 4,
misidentified the photographer.
The photo was taken by Felipe
Dana of the Associated Press, not
Alice Martins, a freelancer for
The Washington Post.
A Wonkblog column in the
Nov. 30 A-section, about the
Republican tax cut coming as the
economy reaches its potential
capacity, incorrectly described
the rate of growth in gross
domestic product and its time
frame. GDP has grown at an
annualized rate of 2.2 percent,
adjusted for inflation and
seasonality, not 2.2 percent per
quarter, and the rate is for the
period since the recent recession
ended, not since it began.
The Washington Post is committed to
correcting errors that appear in the
newspaper. Those interested in
contacting the paper for that purpose
can:
Email: corrections@washpost.com.
Call: 202-334-6000, and ask to be
connected to the desk involved —
National, Foreign, Metro, Style, Sports,
Business or any of the weekly sections.
Comments can be directed to The
Post’s reader advocate, who can be
reached at 202-334-7582 or
readers@washpost.com.
OYSTER PERPETUAL
ROLEX DEEPSEA
rolex oyster perpetual
and deepsea are ® trademarks.
In Ala., Bannon gives Moore a boost
D I GE S T
CALIFORNIA
Breitbart News chairman
calls allegations against
Senate nominee a ‘setup’
BY
D AVID W EIGEL
fairhope, alabama — In one
week, Alabama Republicans
would learn whether Roy Moore,
their embattled nominee for Senate, could overcome allegations of
sexual assault and win a special
election.
On Tuesday night, Stephen K.
Bannon came to Alabama bearing
good news: Roy Moore had already won.
“This whole thing was a setup,
right?” Bannon said to hundreds
of Moore supporters crammed
into a barn near Alabama’s Gulf
Coast. “Even Chuck Todd of NBC,
of Matt Lauer fame — he said it
looked like a coordinated hit. Because Mitch McConnell’s out 47
minutes later, saying Roy Moore
should drop out. Well, Mitch McConnell said on Sunday, ‘Let the
people of Alabama decide.’ ”
Bannon, President Trump’s former chief strategist, who left the
White House in the summer and
reassumed control of Breitbart
News, described a Washington
that had been humbled by
Moore’s refusal to quit the race
and by Republicans’ refusal to
believe the mainstream media.
In their speeches, Moore, Bannon and the candidates’ most loyal local surrogates demonstrated
how they had reframed the race. It
had become less a contest of candidates and more a way to beat the
“establishment” — by giving
Trump another vote in the Senate.
He hinted at more insurgencies
to come and attacked Mitt Romney for serving as a Mormon missionary “while guys were dying in
rice paddies in Vietnam.” The remark, seemingly prompted by a
Romney tweet criticizing Moore,
pulled Alabama voters into the
potential battle Bannon could
wage to prevent Romney from
seeking a Senate seat in Utah if
Republican Sen. Orrin G. Hatch
retires.
The rally, which had been
planned before Trump officially
endorsed Moore, became an epilogue to Moore’s successful Republican standoff. As Bannon
spoke, with rain beating down on
the barn, the Republican National
Committee was sending $170,000
to the state GOP, reversing a threeweek-old boycott of Moore, who
faces Democrat Doug Jones in the
Dec. 13 special election. (RNC
chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel is Mitt Romney’s niece.)
Tuesday’s rally, which drew several hundred voters to a safely
Republican county, felt more like
a presidential visit than a Senate
rally with the star of Breitbart
News. (Trump, who will visit Florida’s Gulf Coast on Friday, is not
expected to campaign in Alabama.)
A large security perimeter protected Moore and Bannon from
anyone who lacked a “backstage”
badge. U.S. and European TV
crews roamed the grounds of Oak
Hollow Farm, asking voters
whether they believed the women
who accused Moore of pursuing
them when he was in his 30s and
they were teenagers. Some have
accused Moore of unwanted sexual advances.
The TV crews came away with a
familiar answer: that Moore’s accusers could not be trusted or that
they might even have been paid to
slander a decent man. John Sowell, surrounded by cameras as he
and his wife, Abigail, distributed
homemade Moore signs, explained that Alabama residents
simply did not behave as crudely
as Moore’s accusers claim he did.
“They say this happened in the
1970s, and back in those days, a
man would not force a woman’s
head down toward his crotch,”
said Sowell, 69. “We’re not as sexually liberal as a lot of the country.
When one of those women said
that, I knew it was a lie.”
In interviews, Moore’s support-
ers were not just skeptical of the
allegations but aware of theories
that the Moore campaign and
conservative media had circulated to discredit them.
That was a victory for Bannon
and Breitbart News, which had
responded to the story in The
Washington Post in early November about Moore’s first accusers
by dispatching reporters to Alabama to write a counternarrative.
Bannon, who had said he hoped
Moore would become the first in a
wave of insurgent 2018 candidates, did not say much about the
race at first. Throughout November, Breitbart News published stories about Moore’s accusers and
the smaller details of their stories
that the campaign would cite to
blunt the allegations.
On Tuesday night, Bannon,
making explicit what Republicans
had begun to say quietly, said
Moore’s tumble and subsequent
fightback echoed what had happened to Trump in the final month
of the 2016 election.
“Stephen K. Bannon stood with
President Trump. He didn’t jump
ship,” Moore adviser Dean Young
said, clearly referencing the “Access Hollywood” video published
by The Post during the presidential campaign in which Trump
was recorded talking about groping women.
Like Trump, whose fightback
had been led by Bannon, Moore’s
allies took shots at the media lined
up to cover them.
“It’s not working, fake media,”
said Young, pointing to the two
dozen cameras at the back of the
rally.
Bannon went further, joking
that a heckler who briefly interrupted him — only to be marched
out by a large security detail —
was a “CNN producer” who had
come unhinged. In a 30-minute
speech, which included criticism
of Mitt Romney and mockery of a
donation by Republican Sen. Jeff
Flake (Ariz.) to Moore’s Democratic opponent, Bannon put the attacks on the media in a larger
context. The press, he said, would
not cover the president’s clear and
undeniable successes.
“The physical caliphate of ISIS
has been destroyed,” said Bannon,
using a different name for the
Islamic State. “Unemployment,
17-year low. Black unemployment,
16-year low . . . if Barack Obama
had done that, they’d have given
him another Nobel Prize.”
As Obama found out, in two
disastrous midterms, voters can
be hard to sell on the idea of giving
a president more support in Congress. In Washington, Republicans have grown increasingly nervous that Trump’s low approval
ratings and lack of support for the
party’s agenda on taxes and health
care would lead to a midterm
voter backlash.
In Alabama, Bannon and
Moore argued that failing to turn
out would effectively hand power
back to the people Trump was
fighting. Jones, Bannon said, was
a “Hillary Clinton globalist.”
Trump’s Republican critics were
“trying to nullify the 2016 election” by allowing probes of his
campaign to continue.
Moore, who had refused to debate Jones even before becoming
mired in scandal, got loud applause when he attacked congressional Republicans for not being
loyal to voters. Bannon returned
to the theme again and again, as
voters shouted out the names of
Republicans — McConnell, Sen.
Richard C. Shelby (Ala.), House
Speaker Paul D. Ryan (Wis.) —
who had not been faithful to
Trump or Moore.
“You’re not going to be able to
walk away, Mitch,” Bannon said.
“The folks of Alabama were always going to decide this. We
know what changed your mind.
The polls came back.”
L.A. lawmakers vote to
license marijuana sales
david.weigel@washpost.com
— Reuters
Los Angeles is in line to
become the nation’s largest city
with legal recreational marijuana
after the City Council voted
Wednesday to license sales and
cultivation next year.
The landmark vote came after
a hearing in which council
members characterized the rules
as a work in progress almost
certain to be revised next year,
after California launches its
recreational pot industry in
January.
City Council President Herb
Wesson’s office said the city rules
would take effect immediately
after the signature of Mayor Eric
Garcetti, which is expected.
Under the Los Angeles
regulations, residential
neighborhoods would be largely
off-limits to pot businesses, and
buffer zones would be set up
around schools, libraries and
parks. Businesses that want to
participate in the marketplace
need local permits before they
can apply for state licenses
required to operate in 2018.
Some areas have banned all
commercial pot activity, while
others are embracing it.
California is among 29 states
where marijuana is legal, either
for medical or recreational use.
— Associated Press
COLORADO
Police: Lawmaker had
loaded gun at airport
A Colorado lawmaker arrested
for having a gun at Denver
International Airport had a
loaded handgun in her bag that
was discovered by an airport
security officer, police said
Wednesday.
State Rep. Lori Saine
“knowingly brought the handgun
to the checkpoint” at the airport
on Tuesday, according to a police
report written by Denver Police
Officer Gregory Zimmerman. The
report did not explain how
Zimmerman made that
determination.
Saine, a Republican who has
advocated for gun rights, was
arrested on suspicion of
introducing a firearm into a
transportation facility.
A Transportation Security
Administration agent saw the
Kahr Arms 9mm semiautomatic
handgun when a bag belonging
to Saine went through an X-ray
machine, according to the arrest
report. It had four rounds in its
magazine but none in the
chamber.
Saine was elected in 2012 and
represents a largely rural,
agricultural area about 25 miles
north of Denver.
Saine in 2017 co-sponsored a
bill to repeal a ban on the sale,
transfer and possession of largecapacity ammunition magazines.
The ban was enacted after the
2012 Aurora theater and Sandy
Hook Elementary School
shootings.
— Associated Press
Man to run against county clerk
who denied him marriage
license: A gay man who was
denied a marriage license in
Kentucky two years ago by a
county clerk who refused to issue
licenses for same-sex marriages
will run to unseat her next year.
David Ermold, of Morehead, Ky.,
on Wednesday announced his
candidacy as a Democrat against
Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis,
who drew worldwide attention
when she refused to grant the
licenses to same-sex couples,
citing Apostolic Christian beliefs.
Ermold and his partner were one
of four couples who sued Davis.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
Another stride for gene therapies
Major advances seen
in treatment of blood
disorder hemophilia B
BY
L AURIE M C G INLEY
Jay Konduros used to rush home
several times a year after accidentally cutting or bumping himself.
There he would inject himself with
refrigerated blood-clotting factor
to prevent internal bleeding and
extensive bruising and swelling. “I
was walking on eggshells all the
time,” said the former aerospace
engineer who has a blood disorder
called hemophilia B.
Then, last year, Konduros enrolled in a clinical trial, receiving
an experimental gene therapy at
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Almost immediately, he began producing the missing clotting
factor. Several weeks later, after he
dropped a heavy box on his shin, he
watched a bruise develop and
shrink within hours. “Are you kidding me?” he thought. “Life’s easy if
this is what happens.”
Konduros, 53, who runs a bakery and cafe in southeastern Ontario, is one of 10 men in an earlystage trial sponsored by Spark
Therapeutics. (The disorder is
much more common in men than
women.) On Wednesday, researchers reported that a single intravenous infusion of Spark’s novel gene
therapy enabled patients to safely
produce sufficient clotting factor
to prevent dangerous bleeding episodes.
The treatment also “nearly universally eliminated” the need for
preventive infusions of clotting
factor a few times a week, the scientists said. And its effects lasted;
after a year and a half, the longest
patient follow-up, the therapy was
continuing to work.
The results, published Wednesday online in the New England
Journal of Medicine, represent
“another example of the gene-ther-
apy renaissance,” Matthew Porteus, a pediatrician at Stanford
University, wrote in an accompanying editorial. He said the data
suggests that the treatment ultimately might provide an “ideal
cure” for hemophilia B.
Still, he noted, the study has
some limitations. The follow-up
period was relatively short, from
28 to 78 weeks in the new report;
longer-term studies are needed to
prove safety and effectiveness over
extended periods. In addition, he
said, researchers need to find ways
to provide the therapy to a broader
group of people, including children, and to figure out how to
reduce the costs involved.
The hemophilia gene therapy is
one of several being tested for conditions including sickle cell anemia and Huntington’s disease. The
one-time treatments seek to fight
the disease by adding correct copies of a patient’s defective genes. If
approved, such treatments are expected to command stratospheric
prices. For example, a separate
Spark gene therapy for a rare type
of childhood blindness, on track
for Food and Drug Administration
clearance soon, could cost $1 million per patient for infusions in
both eyes, according to some Wall
Street analysts.
Still, the therapies can produce
at least some offsetting savings.
Porteus noted in his editorial that
the hemophilia therapy resulted in
savings of about $200,000 a year
per patient because of the elimination of clotting-factor infusions.
Other experts also were impressed by the results. The hemophilia study “is small but very
promising, and it gives me the
sense that gene therapy for hemophilia B is going to be at our disposal in no time, maybe a few years
from now,” said Aric Parnes, who is
associate director of the Boston
Hemophilia Center at the DanaFarber/Boston Children’s Cancer
and Blood Disorders Center and
was not involved in the study. “One
of the key things is, how long will
the treatment last? Does it wane
over time? So far, with a full year, it
doesn’t look like that is happening.”
Lindsey George, the lead investigator and a hematologist at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia,
said that nine of the 10 men in the
trial did not experience any bleeding episodes after the gene therapy
treatment. The one patient who
needed clotting factor because of
bleeding used 91 percent less than
before, she said.
“People were planning their
lives around hemophilia, and now
they are doing activities that they
weren’t before,” George said. “One
man who came in a wheelchair is
now out of a wheelchair and is
coaching Little League.”
People with hemophilia B inherit a gene mutation on the X chromosome that interferes with their
ability to produce normal levels of
blood-clotting factor IX. (Because
women have two copies of the X
chromosomes, the other one can
compensate.) Bleeding episodes —
which can result from injury or
occur spontaneously — can be lifethreatening.
The therapy developed by Spark,
a biotech company spun off from
the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, involves a bioengineered gene
designed to prompt the body to
produce increased levels of a different clotting factor. The gene is
transported to the liver, where clotting factor is made, by a harmless
virus called an adeno-associated viral vector. For the current trial,
which is being funded by Spark and
Pfizer, researchers used a clotting
factor that is eight to 10 times as
strong as the normal version. The
stronger factor is called Factor IXPadua, because it was discovered in
2009 in an Italian family.
Patients produced clotting-factor levels that were enough to allow blood to clot but not to spur an
undesirable immune-system response, the researchers said.
laurie.mcginley@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
ACA pace brisk, but overall total lags
Shorter sign-up means
final enrollment is likely
to be down from last year
BY
A MY G OLDSTEIN
The number of Americans getting Affordable Care Act health
plans for the coming year accelerated last week in states relying on the
federal insurance exchange, bringing the total to 3.6 million sign-ups
with less than two weeks left in an
abbreviated enrollment season.
The latest federal snapshot,
coming amid fresh political turbulence over the future of insurance
marketplaces created under the
law, is slightly ahead of the first five
weeks’ pace last fall. But compared
with data from two-thirds of the
way through the longer enrollment
seasons of past years, the number
of consumers who have chosen
health plans is lagging far behind.
The 3.6 million figure is half of
the total at the comparable point in
the sign-up period for 2017 coverage, according to an analysis by the
Washington-based consulting firm
Avalere Health. To reach the
9.2 million enrollees that states relying on the federal marketplace
had by the final deadline, a huge
surge of people would need to take
action by the time the season concludes on Dec. 15 or be automatically re-enrolled just afterward.
Last year, about 1.6 million people had their coverage automatically renewed in the 39 states using
the federal HealthCare.gov website. If that number holds steady
this year, it would mean about
4 million consumers would have to
sign up by the end of next week or
the country could see a sharp drop
in how many Americans are insured through the ACA.
Since the health-care law’s marketplaces opened in the fall 0f 2013,
no two-week span has attracted
that many enrollees.
The final gap may not be as wide
as it appears now, because each
enrollment season has had an upsurge as deadlines approach, said
Larry Levitt, senior vice president
of the Kaiser Family Foundation.
Still, he said, “It seems a near-certainty that enrollment will end up
well below last year.”
The last stages of this year’s sixweek sign-up period coincides with
yet another barrage against the law
by congressional Republicans — on
top of steps by the Trump administration to undercut the marketplaces. After failing this summer
and fall to pass various GOP bills
that would have dismantled signifi-
cant parts of the ACA, the Senate
has included in a massive tax bill it
passed late last week a plan to end
enforcement of the law’s requirement that most Americans carry
health insurance.
This provision will now be part
of negotiations with House Republicans to try to resolve differences
between the two chambers’ versions of tax legislation.
In the weeks leading to the signup season, public opinion research
and the ground-level experiences
of enrollment helpers around the
country suggested widespread
public confusion about whether
the marketplaces would still exist.
It is unclear how enrollment might
be affected by the prospect of the
tax penalties for flouting the mandate no longer being enforced.
Democrats and other allies of the
sprawling health-care law contend
that the mandate is a crucial ingredient to keep insurers selling ACA
health plans and to prevent monthly premiums from spiking further.
Since the marketplaces opened,
though, there has been scant study
of how much difference the mandate has made in prompting previously uninsured people to become
covered. Research in Massachusetts, which adopted a health-care
law in 2006 with many similarities
to the ACA, found that its mandate
appeared to motivate some resi-
dents to get a health plan.
Other indications are that, nationally, the bigger influence may
be the federal subsidies available to
more than 80 percent of people
eligible for ACA coverage.
But overall, “it is hard to do reliable projections on what is motivating individual behavior,” said
Caroline Pearson, senior vice president at Avalere.
The nonpartisan Congressional
Budget Office has estimated that
ending enforcement of the individual mandate would translate into
13 million more people without
coverage over a decade, but its analysts also have said they are in the
midst of rethinking the basis of
their calculation.
The latest enrollment snapshot,
issued by the Centers for Medicare
and Medicaid Services, is for the
fifth week of sign-up, through this
past Sunday. The 823,000 people
who enrolled in coverage was about
300,000 more than for the previous
week. It was also 13,000 more than
the same week a year ago, while the
cumulative tally of 3.6 million is
700,000 ahead.
The figures exclude enrollment
in 11 states that operate their own
insurance marketplaces under the
ACA. People choosing health plans
become insured once they begin to
pay the premiums.
Navy chaplain to be honored again
Family of priest who died
saving sailors in Pearl
Harbor to receive medal
BY
M ICHAEL E . R UANE
Seventy-six years after he died at
Pearl Harbor, a Navy chaplain who
helped sailors escape from a sinking battleship is scheduled to be
honored with the Silver Star medal
Thursday in a ceremony at his alma
mater in Iowa.
Lt. j.g. Aloysius H. Schmitt, a
Catholic priest from St. Lucas,
Iowa, will posthumously receive
the third-highest decoration for
valor in combat during a ceremony
at Loras College, in Dubuque.
The Navy’s chief of chaplains,
Rear Adm. Margaret Kibben, will
present the medal to family members during a ceremony on the
campus
Schmitt was buried in a special
crypt there after his remains were
identified last year by experts with
the Defense POW/MIA Accounting
Agency (DPAA).
He had been aboard the USS
Oklahoma when it was torpedoed
and capsized during the attack on
Dec. 7, 1941. His remains were not
accounted for at first, because the
bodies of most of the sailors and
Marines recovered from the ship
were too jumbled and decomposed
to be identified.
Schmitt, 32, had just celebrated
Mass that Sunday morning when
the Oklahoma was hit by at least
nine Japanese torpedoes.
The battleship, with its complement of 1,300, quickly rolled over
in 50 feet of water, trapping hundreds of men below decks.
Thirty-two were saved by rescue
crews who heard them banging for
help, cut into the hull and made
their way through a maze of darkened, flooded compartments to
reach them.
Others managed to escape by
swimming underwater to find
their way out. Some trapped sailors
tried to stem the rushing water
with rags and even the board from
a game. One distraught man tried
to drown himself.
NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION
The USS Oklahoma was torpedoed during the Japanese attack on
Pearl Harbor, and 429 sailors and Marines died when it capsized.
A few managed to escape
through portholes — saved by
brave comrades such as Schmitt,
who is said to have helped as many
as 12 sailors get out of a small
compartment.
In 1942, he was honored with the
noncombat Navy and Marine
Corps Medal. But after recent appeals by supporters and Sen. Joni Ernst
(R-Iowa), the Navy conducted a review and in
October upgraded the
medal to the combat
award.
The citation details his
bravery.
Schmitt
When the ship capsized, he and “other members of
the crew, became trapped in a compartment where only a small porthole provided outlet for escape.
“With unselfish disregard for his
own plight, he assisted his shipmates through the aperture. When
they in turn were in the process of
rescuing him, his body became
tightly wedged in the narrow opening.
“Realizing that other men had
come into the compartment seeking a way out, [he] . . . insisted he be
pushed back into the ship so the
others might escape. Calmly urging them on with . . . his blessing,
he remained behind while his shipmates crawled out to safety. In so
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doing, he gallantly gave up his life
for his country.”
The Oklahoma’s loss of life — a
total of 429 sailors and Marines —
was second only to the 1,100 lost on
the USS Arizona. The attack at
Pearl Harbor plunged the United
States into World War II.
Most of the Oklahoma’s dead were found
in the wreckage during
the months-long salvage
operation and were buried as “unknowns” in a
cemetery in Hawaii.
In 2015, the Pentagon
exhumed the remains of
what are believed to be
388 of them. With the
help of enhanced technology and
techniques, experts have been
gradually making identifications.
Schmitt was identified with the
help of DNA retrieved from a skull
bone and matched with that of a
relative. Last week, the DPAA announced that it had identified its
100th person from the Oklahoma.
“It’s been 76 years,” Steve Sloan, a
great-nephew of Schmitt’s, said
Wednesday from Dubuque. “It’s
pretty overwhelming.”
As for “Father Al,” Sloan said, “I
suspect he wouldn’t want any of
this attention. . . . He was a common guy . . . an eastern Iowa farm
boy.”
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
Women on Capitol Hill want real change on sexual misconduct. Will they get it?
Patty Murray
(Wash.) leapt onto
the national stage
PAUL KANE
25 years ago by
challenging a
fellow Democrat in the wake of
the all-male Senate Judiciary
Committee’s handling of sexual
harassment charges during
Clarence Thomas’s Supreme
Court confirmation hearings
After the incumbent
abandoned the Senate race amid
his own sexual misconduct
scandal, Murray rode to victory in
1992 along with a record number
of women in Congress.
On Wednesday, Murray helped
lead the denunciation of Sen. Al
Franken (D-Minn.), declaring
that an alleged “persistent
pattern” of groping women made
him unfit for office. She made an
all-too-familiar plea for
politicians to live up to their
words.
“Our history, our culture is
changing so dramatically in this
country, so fast,” Murray told
reporters Wednesday. “And I
think it is a time for elected
officials, at all levels, to stand up
and take responsibility for who
we are and what we stand for.”
For Murray and other
lawmakers, the question now is
whether, a quarter century after
the first great reckoning of sexual
harassment on Capitol Hill, the
culture will actually change more
than it did then.
More than 125 women now
serve in Congress. Thousands
more work here as staffers. Most
want fundamental change.
They want misbehavior and
inappropriate advances to be
recognized immediately as
outside the bounds. They want to
be able to raise concerns
immediately without fear of
repercussion. They want the
suppression of stories of
misconduct to become a relic of
the past.
@PKCapitol
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.), front, has been a leading voice against sexual misconduct on Capitol Hill since
winning office in 1992. In the wake of allegations against male lawmakers, she says she expects zero tolerance.
Most of all, they want this
latest period of reckoning to not
give way to the same old behavior
in years to come.
“This is a historic moment,
where women who have been
silenced for far too long are
standing up and speaking out,”
Murray said. “And I think it’s the
time for our culture to change,
and that includes elected
officials.”
Much of the current discussion
has centered on who resigns and
who gets to cling to their seats in
the House and Senate, even if it
means suffering the shame of an
ethics investigation.
Most of his colleagues expect
Franken to resign Thursday after
he announced a major speech
was coming. John Conyers Jr. (DMich.), the dean of the House,
resigned Tuesday after a
prolonged battle against charges
that spanned at least two decades
of propositioning young female
staff.
Others are digging in for a
fight. Rep. Ruben Kihuen (DNev.) has accused Democratic
leaders of knowing about
allegations that he made
inappropriate advances toward
his campaign fundraiser. Rep.
Blake Farenthold (R-Tex.) has
accepted no culpability for an
$84,000 taxpayer-funded
settlement with a former staffer
who alleged that he made
inappropriate sexual remarks.
Now that the settlement has been
revealed, he said he will repay the
Treasury out of his own funds.
Moreover, some lawmakers see
Thomas still holding his lifetime
appointment, while in Alabama,
Republican Roy Moore might win
a special Senate election Tuesday
despite allegations that he
pursued sexual relationships with
teenage girls as a 30-something
local prosecutor.
And, of course, down
Pennsylvania Avenue, President
Trump sits in the Oval Office
despite being caught on tape last
decade bragging about assaulting
women.
“We’re learning a lot about
what happens in workplaces,
including in the White House and
elsewhere,” said Sen. Sherrod
Brown (D-Ohio), shortly after
joining the chorus of Democrats
demanding that Franken resign.
Murray’s entire career arc is
filled with male misconduct.
Much has changed in the culture
of Congress and Washington, but
some things are harder to root
out.
She campaigned in her 1992
Senate race as a “mom in tennis
shoes” — a label that stuck and
came to epitomize a low-wattage
but hard-working style that has
produced a litany of important
bipartisan legislation over the
past five years.
Actually, that label came from
a 1980 interaction with a male
lawmaker in the state capital
when she was lobbying against
proposed education cuts. “You’re
just a mom in tennis shoes,” the
lawmaker said.
Then, after watching Anita
Hill’s testimony in the fall of 1991
against Thomas, Murray jumped
into the primary against thenSen. Brock Adams (D), believing
that only women could change
the Senate culture. By March,
Adams withdrew from the race in
disgrace after allegations that he
had sexual encounters with
women after drugging them.
“Next January, I’m going to
take my tennis shoes back to the
United States Senate,” Murray
told a cheering crowd the night
she won the nomination.
In early 1994, Murray had her
own run-in with sexual
harassment on the Hill, according
to “Women on the Hill,” the Clara
Bingham book about how female
lawmakers dealt with the culture.
Republican Strom Thurmond of
South Carolina, then 91 and the
longest-serving senator, put his
arm around Murray and cupped
her breast in the senators-only
elevator. “Are you married, little
lady?” Thurmond asked,
Other female senators wanted
Murray to expose Thurmond, but,
after staff-to-staff
communication, Thurmond
apologized to Murray, according
to Bingham’s account. In a 1996
interview for that book, Murray
denied that she was accosted. “I
think he was merely hanging on
tighter than he should have
been,” she said at the time.
In 1995, Bob Packwood was
pushed out of the Senate over
similar allegations as those
waged against Adams, but over
the next two decades, the powder
keg of sexual harassment receded
from the headlines.
There were instances of
misbehavior. One senator was
arrested in a sex sting in a men’s
airport restroom. One was
accused of hiring prostitutes.
Another had an affair with his
wife’s best friend. A male House
member was caught sending
explicit instant messages to
underage male pages. Former
House speaker J. Dennis Hastert
served a prison term for paying
hush money to a man that he
sexually abused as a teenager.
But they were isolated and
unique to those accused, giving
the Capitol a false sense that
everything was just fine with the
other congressional offices.
Then came Trump’s campaign.
Then came the reports against
Harvey Weinstein’s sexual
predation in Hollywood. A
bipartisan collection of female
lawmakers — led by Sen. Kirsten
Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) and Reps.
Barbara Comstock (R-Va.) and
Jackie Speier (D-Calif.) — warned
that predators roamed the halls
of Congress, too.
They passed resolutions
demanding mandatory training
for lawmakers and staff. Then the
stories burst into the open — in
both parties and in both the
House and the Senate.
Murray is now the highestranking woman in Senate
leadership. Her voice carries
great weight on most issues,
including this one. This time,
Murray expects zero tolerance to
really mean something.
“It means that we have to hold
people accountable for their
behavior that is not acceptable to
us,” she said.
paul.kane@washpost.com
Female Senate Democrats lead the call for resignation
FRANKEN FROM A1
If he steps down soon, a replacement would be appointed by Minnesota’s Democratic governor to
serve until the 2018 election.
The drive to purge Franken,
coming a day after Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) resigned under
pressure in the House, was a dramatic indication of the political
toxicity that has grown around the
issue of sexual harassment in recent months.
It also stood as a stark — and
deliberate — contrast with how
the Republicans are handling a
parallel situation in Alabama,
where Roy Moore, their candidate
for U.S. Senate in next week’s special election, is accused by women
of pursuing them when they were
teenagers and he was in his 30s.
Although most of the alleged
actions took place before he was a
senator, Franken was becoming a
growing liability to his party, and
Republicans had seized upon the
allegations against him.
At Moore’s Tuesday night rally,
conservative pundit Gina Loudon
declared that Republicans did not
need lectures on morality from
Democrats who had struggled
with their own sex scandals, and
cited both Conyers and Franken.
President Trump, himself the
target of multiple allegations of
sexual assault, has enthusiastically endorsed Moore, and the Republican Party is once again pouring money into the race after pulling back. Leading Senate Republicans have also toned down their
negative comments about Moore,
saying his fate should be up to the
voters of Alabama and — if he is
elected — the Senate Ethics Committee.
“I’m looking for where are the
Republican voices? Where is their
outrage?” Sen. Mazie Hirono (DHawaii) said on CNN.
Republican leaders remained
quiet amid the developments.
Asked about Franken, Senate
GOP Whip John Cornyn (Tex.) said
he would “leave it up to [Democrats] to deal with members of
their own party.”
The move by Senate Democrats
to oust Franken marked a dramatic turnaround in the fortunes of
the onetime “Saturday Night Live”
star. The senator from Minnesota
had emerged as one of the Trump
administration’s sharpest foils on
Capitol Hill — and as a potential
2020 presidential contender.
Over the past three weeks, more
than a half-dozen women have
accused Franken of unwanted advances and touching. He apologized, saying in some cases that he
had not intended to give offense
and in others that he did not recall
events as the women did.
The latest allegation against
Franken came in a report published Wednesday by Politico. A
former congressional aide whose
name was withheld by the publi-
Democratic senators ask Franken to resign
Women
Men
11:25 a.m.
In a span of seven minutes, four
Democratic senators — Kirsten
Gillibrand (N.Y.), Mazie Hirono
(Hawaii), Claire McCaskill (Mo.)
and Maggie Hassan (N.H.) —
publicly ask Sen. Al Franken
(Minn.) to step down.
Sen. Kamala D. Harris (Calif.)
and Sen. Patty Murray (Wash.)
Sen. Tammy Baldwin
(Wis.)
Sen. Robert P. Casey (Pa.)
becomes the first male senator to
join the female senators calling
for Franken to step down.
Sen. Joe Donnelly (Ind.) and
Sen. Sherrod Brown (Ohio)
Sen. Debbie Stabenow (Mich.)
Sen. Edward J. Markey (Mass.) 12:30 p.m.
and Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.)
Franken tweets he “will be
making an announcement
tomorrow.”
Sen. Michael F. Bennet
(Colo.)
ANDREW HARNIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“We as elected leaders should absolutely be held to a higher standard, not a lower standard,” Sen.
Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), center right, said Wednesday at a news conference.
Sen. Maria Cantwell
(Wash.) and Sen. Richard
J. Durbin (Ill.)
Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (Vt.)
Sen. Dianne Feinstein
(Calif.) and Sen. Martin
Heinrich (N.M.)
1:30 p.m.
Sen. Ron Wyden (Ore.)
and Sen. Thomas R. Carper
(Del.)
Sen. Tom Udall (N.M.)
NOTE: Later in the day, other
senators, including independents
Sen. Angus King (Maine) and
Sen. Bernie Sanders (Vt.) also
asked Franken to step down. 2:25 p.m.
Sen. Amy Klobuchar (Minn.) tweets:
“Sexual harassment is
unacceptable. This morning I spoke
with Senator Franken and, as you
know, he will be making an
announcement about his future
tomorrow morning. I am confident
he will make the right decision.”
THE WASHINGTON POST
cation claimed that Franken had
tried to forcibly kiss her after a
taping of his radio show in 2006,
two years before his election to the
Senate.
The woman claimed that Franken had told her, “It’s my right as
an entertainer.”
Franken’s alleged offenses were
arguably less serious than those
attributed to Moore, or to Conyers,
the longest-serving member of
Congress, who was accused of demanding sexual favors from the
women who worked for him. Until
late last week, it appeared that
Franken’s fellow Democrats
would allow his case to work its
way through the Senate Ethics
Committee, a process that would
take months and perhaps years to
reach a resolution.
As recently as Nov. 26, Sen Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.), the Senate’s
second-ranking Democrat, had argued on CNN: “Al Franken has
acknowledged what he did was
wrong, and it was wrong. He has
also submitted his whole case to
the Senate Ethics Committee. I
think that was the right thing to
do. Let’s have a hearing, an investigation. Let’s let this really reach
whatever conclusion it is going to
reach, but through a due process.”
But on Wednesday, Durbin expressed no such forbearance.
“Senator Franken’s conduct was
wrong. He has admitted to it. And
he should resign from the Senate.”
Even as Senate Democrats expressed support publicly for leaving Franken’s fate in the hands of
the Ethics Committee, his female
colleagues were increasingly unsettled as new accusers went public.
“People were at the edge of their
patience with this. They’d had
enough. One more allegation was
going to be it,” said one senior aide,
who spoke on the condition of
anonymity to describe private deliberations.
Another said female Democratic senators had been discussing it
among themselves “on the Senate
floor, even in the ladies’ room.”
“Many people have been talking
about this for some time,” Sen.
Patty Murray (D-Wash.) said. “It
wasn’t coordinated. It just happened.”
Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine),
who has served in the Senate longer than most of her female colleagues, said it was “significant
that the women on his side of the
aisle led the way” and added that
she believed the latest allegation
was “in some ways the final straw
for people.”
Senate Minority Leader Charles
E. Schumer (D-N.Y.), who had
stood by his friend in the wake of
the allegations, called Franken after the Politico story broke early
Wednesday and told him directly
he had to resign, according to a
person familiar with the call.
Schumer also met with Franken
and his wife at the leader’s apartment early afternoon to discuss
resigning. The session ended
without a firm commitment from
Franken to do so, said the source,
who was granted anonymity to
speak frankly about the private
exchange.
In recent days — before
Wednesday’s report — Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), who has
known Franken for nearly two
decades, had also told Franken he
needed to step down, aides familiar with their discussions said. On
Wednesday, Warren issued a short
public statement, saying, “I think
he should resign.”
Franken had staved off public
calls for his ouster last week, according to a person who has been
in touch with the senator and his
staff in recent days.
There was a “mad rush” last
week to call on Franken to resign
when more allegations surfaced,
said the person, who was granted
anonymity to speak frankly about
private discussions. “I think that
people were talked off the ledge at
that point and wanted to recollect
and figure out if the Senate Ethics
investigation should just move
forward.”
But, “I’m pretty sure that Al
should have known that if there
was another story that came out
that there’d be a mass exodus away
from him.”
Outside the chamber, growing
numbers of Democrats had been
making the case that it was untenable for Franken to remain in the
Senate if their party hoped to
maintain the high ground on the
issue.
Among those calling for Franken to step down was Doug Jones,
Moore’s Democratic opponent in
Alabama.
And though she did not mention Franken by name, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) had declared a policy of “zero
tolerance” when she called last
week for Conyers to leave the
House. On Wednesday, Pelosi declared that she was “very proud of
the fact that people are taking this
matter head on and are trusting
women who come forward, what
they have to say.”
More and more lawmakers are
saying their concern over sexual
harassment allegations should
not be overridden by politics, or by
the respect they have for each
other’s records and their shared
positions on important policy
matters.
Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.)
noted on Tuesday that her own
efforts as a civil rights and immigration rights activist could not
have succeeded without the early
work of Conyers.
Despite that legacy, “I also hope
that we can be clear about what
our standard is for sexual harassment and make it very, very clear
to every woman who is out there
that you do not have to put up with
this. It is not right, and most of us
as women — I can tell you — know
exactly what this has all been
about,” she said. “We’ve all been
through various forms of this and I
think it’s essential that if people
come to work in this body that
they know that they have a safe
environment. We have to be clear
about that, whether it’s a Republican, a Democrat, someone we love
or someone we find distasteful.”
Rep. Cheri Bustos (D-Ill.), seen
as a future caucus leader in the
House, said this week’s actions
should serve as a warning to those
who have been or may be accused
of sexual wrongdoing.
“If you are a sexual harasser, go
away. We don’t want you, we don’t
want you as our colleague,” she
said Wednesday. “Our interns
don’t deserve that, our staff
doesn’t deserve it. The women
members of Congress don’t deserve it.”
“Everybody’s got to speak for
themselves,” she added later, “but
this is not a place to be a sexual
harasser.”
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
karen.tumulty@washpost.com
David Weigel in Mobile, Ala., and Sean
Sullivan in Washington contributed to
this article.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
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RE
. THURSDAY,
Once a populist,
Trump governs as
a GOP stalwart
The onetime Democrat’s
Republican critics like
his personnel picks
BY
AND
J OHN W AGNER
J ULIET E ILPERIN
President Trump, a longtime
New York City Democrat who campaigned as a populist with little
loyalty to the Republican Party, is
increasingly choosing to govern as
an unwavering conservative.
His first major legislative victory probably will be a $1.5 trillion
tax cut that primarily benefits corporations and the wealthy. He is
filling the courts with deeply conservative judges who will shape the
legal landscape for generations.
And although Trump has struggled to chalk up wins on Capitol
Hill, his Cabinet departments are
rolling back scores of Obama-era
policies on energy, education, the
environment and law enforcement. Just this week, Trump cut
two of Utah’s national monuments
established by Democratic presidents to a fraction of their original
size and was preparing to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of
Israel, a step long sought by hawks.
At the same time, many of the
more populist proposals that
Trump championed as a presidential candidate — including promises to curb imports and spur $1 trillion in new spending on infrastructure projects — remain stalled.
“For the past year, he’s done
pretty much everything conservatives could have wanted,” said Matt
Schlapp, chairman of the American Conservative Union. “In the
past, Republican presidents have
done conservative things to appeal
to the base and then done
not-so-conservative things to try to
broaden their appeal. They’ve kind
of ping-ponged. Trump has really
doubled down.”
The pattern has become so pronounced that even some of
Trump’s Republican critics acknowledge that — beyond the inflammatory tweetstorms, namecalling and other antics — he is
pushing an agenda friendly to
their interests and has not aggressively pursued anti-trade moves
and other actions that would
alarm them.
“As someone who’s been critical
of Trump, there’s a lot that his
administration is doing that I like,”
said Doug Heye, a Republican con-
sultant and former communications director for the Republican
National Committee, who said he
was particularly pleased with
Trump’s judicial picks and other
personnel choices.
The conservative tilt is explained in part by Trump’s staff
and Cabinet picks, who have been
given freer rein by the White
House to pursue their own agendas than in past administrations.
Those picks — and subsequent policy choices — were heavily influenced by Vice President Pence,
who unlike Trump has a long history of championing conservative
causes.
At a Values Voter Summit in
October, radio host and Republican pundit Bill Bennett declared
that Trump’s Cabinet was more
conservative than that of President
Ronald Reagan. Bennett served in
that Cabinet as education secretary.
Trump has installed the likes of
Environmental Protection Agency
Administrator Scott Pruitt, who
hails from the oil-and-gas state of
Oklahoma. Pruitt used his previous
post as the state’s attorney general
to sue the EPA over its Clean Power
Plan, the principal Obama-era policy aimed at reducing greenhousegas emissions. As EPA administrator, Pruitt is leading the charge to
repeal the measure.
Other conservative Republicans
aggressively pursuing an agenda at
their departments include Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and Attorney General Jeff Sessions.
Although the investigation of
Russian meddling in last year’s
election has been the most visible
aspect of Sessions’s tenure, he has
also been reshaping policies in his
department. Those include a new
charging and sentencing policy
that calls for prosecutors to pursue
the most serious charges possible
and efforts to strip funding from
cities with policies he considers too
friendly toward undocumented
immigrants.
Trump’s marquee efforts with
Congress — the failed attempt to
overhaul the Affordable Care Act
and the ongoing push to cut taxes
— are largely the work of Republican lawmakers cheered on by the
president.
“It’s a White House that has
largely ceded the ground on legislation to Capitol Hill,” said a GOP
consultant close to the White
House, who spoke on the condition
of anonymity to speak candidly.
“So any actions they take are likely
Military to
prepare for
transgender
recruits
President’s ban awaits
court appeal on ruling
that set Jan. 1 start date
BY
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Republicans may criticize President Trump, but “for the past year, he’s done pretty much everything
conservatives could have wanted,” said Matt Schlapp, head of the American Conservative Union.
to be conservative because of the
Republican majorities in the
House and the Senate.”
Just after taking office, Trump
pulled out of the pending Trans-Pacific Partnership — one of
many actions that he promised to
take to crack down on what he saw
as unfair trade deals. But he has
not followed through on threats to
label China a currency manipulator or impose tariffs on imported
Chinese goods. Nor has Trump
made sweeping changes to the
North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico,
although that could still be on the
way.
His campaign rallying cry to invest hundreds of millions of dollars
in infrastructure projects and to
build a southern border wall also
remain distant prospects.
Although the likely success on a
tax bill is leading some Republicans to be more enthusiastic about
Trump, that is hardly a universal
view among his GOP critics.
“If the question is whether I’m
willing to put up with Donald
Trump and the poison he injects
into the office for some judges, the
answer is no,” said Mac Stipanovich, a Florida-based GOP
consultant. “We’re engaged in a
war about the truth and whether
the truth matters. That’s more important than taxes.”
Bill Kristol, editor of the conservative Weekly Standard, said
Trump is doing damage to the conservative cause, regardless of policy victories. He said the fact that
both the GOP health-care bill and
tax plan poll very badly with the
public is a reflection of Trump’s
inability to explain conservative
policy to the nation, which could
have lasting consequences.
“The failure to make an argument has been very damaging,”
Kristol said.
More broadly, Kristol said,
Trump has done little to advance
key principles such as free markets, constitutionalism, limited
government and American leadership in the world. “It looks more
like he’s doing favors for his buddies in the business world than
doing something driven by conservative principles,” Kristol said.
Although Trump did not make
energy and the environment a central focus in his campaign, he and
his deputies have enacted more
concrete policy changes in this arena than almost any other domestic
priority.
Some of them have been dramatic, including the president’s
decision to pull out of the 2015
Paris climate agreement in June on
the grounds that the deal did not
advance American interests.
During the first months of the
administration, the president
signed several bills passed under
the Congressional Review Act that
abolished some of the last rules
issued while Obama was president. He also greenlighted construction of the Keystone XL and
Dakota Access pipelines, two controversial projects Obama had effectively halted while in office.
Trump traveled to Utah on Monday to sign proclamations reducing two monuments, Bears Ears
and Grand Staircase-Escalante, by
85 percent and 46 percent, respectively. The monuments are just the
first of about a dozen protected
areas he plans to shrink or alter on
the grounds that his predecessors
failed to heed concerns raised by
local residents or affected industries.
But it is in the regulatory realm
that Trump’s election arguably has
had the biggest impact. Both Pruitt
and Zinke have begun to reverse
dozens of Obama-era rules on issues ranging from greenhouse gas
emissions to oil and gas drilling.
These include the reversal of
rules limiting carbon emissions
from existing power plants and
methane emissions from oil and
gas operations on federal land, as
well as restrictions on drilling in
national parks and wildlife refuges.
Trump’s efforts to reshape the
federal judiciary have also given
conservative Republicans something to applaud.
During the campaign, Trump
sought to shore up the support of
conservative voters by promising
to pick Supreme Court justices
from a list put together with the
help of the Federalist Society and
the Heritage Foundation. Justice
Neil M. Gorsuch, Trump’s first
pick, was among those on the list.
Since approving Gorsuch, the
Senate has confirmed nine of
Trump’s appellate judges and six
district court judges, many with
the backing of the same conservative groups.
The courts are, for many Democrats, a vital backstop against
many of the changes Trump has
tried to bring about, especially by
executive order. But some in the
party are growing wary of the
speed with which the GOP is insisting on confirming conservative
judges over the objections of Democrats.
With no power to filibuster,
Democrats are stuck watching as
the GOP approves several relatively young and conservative judges
to lifetime appointments on the
federal and appellate courts — appointments that could over time
dramatically swing the political direction of the federal bench.
john.wagner@washpost.com
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
Karoun Demirjian contributed to this
report.
How the House guards secrets in claims of sexual harassment
Lack of disclosure keeps
leaders unaware of
objectionable behavior
BY
M ICHELLE Y E H EE L EE
AND E LISE V IEBECK
In the secretive system that
governs most sexual-harassment
settlements in the House, no single lawmaker or committee has a
full picture of how many complaints were settled or how much
public money was spent to resolve
them.
Neither the speaker of the
House nor party leaders are
briefed on how many offices each
year settle harassment complaints, which members are involved or how much they pay.
Neither are leaders of the
House Ethics Committee, the
body charged with enforcing a
high standard of conduct among
lawmakers.
The secrecy surrounding Capitol Hill is mandated under a law
that shapes how workplace complaints are handled. Confidentiality agreements are routinely
signed as part of the arrangements.
While settling cases does not in
itself indicate wrongdoing, the
lack of disclosure keeps congressional leaders in the dark about
behavior by members or staff that
might be stopped with earlier
intervention.
“There is no transparency,”
said Meredith McGehee, executive director of Issue One, a nonprofit focused on government
ethics. “How would you even
know there was a pattern of misbehavior by either a member or a
staffer?”
Issues with the 20-year-old
Congressional
Accountability
Act, which sets up Congress’s
process for handling complaints,
will come into focus Thursday at a
House hearing on ways to im-
prove the system. Several members have proposed bills that
would rewrite parts of the law,
responding to a public outcry
over sexual harassment and use
of taxpayer funds in resolving
complaints.
Rep. Gregg Harper (R-Miss.),
chairman of the House Administration Committee, said he wants
to improve the process for handling sexual harassment and discrimination allegations.
“Real reforms have not been
made to this law since it was
established in 1995, and our Committee believes reforms are long
overdue,” Harper said in a statement.
Questions about the process
have been building for weeks
since the congressional Office of
Compliance said that it had paid
more than $17 million in settlements through a Treasury Department fund set up to handle
disbursements for harassment
and other workplace complaints
in Congress. But the payments
were hardly a full accounting of
money used to deal with harassment allegations.
Last month, BuzzFeed reported that Rep. John Conyers Jr.
(D-Mich.) had used his office
budget to settle with a former
female aide who accused him of
inappropriate touching and unwanted advances. His office disguised the $27,000 settlement in
his office payroll. Conyers, who
resigned this week, has denied
wrongdoing in that case and other similar ones.
Rep. Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.) in
2015 settled a hostile work environment complaint for more than
$48,000 out of the operating
budget of a committee he oversaw, according to a report in the
Washington Times. Asked for
comment, a committee spokesman pointed to an op-ed piece in
which he wrote that the woman’s
claims about his office were untrue. The two signed a nondisclosure agreement that prevents him
from describing the situation fur-
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
ther, he wrote.
Both lawmakers have said they
acted on advice from the Office of
House Employment Counsel,
which provides confidential legal
advice and representation to lawmakers.
Victims’ advocates and lawmakers pushing to overhaul the
system say there is no systematic
tracking of how often lawmakers
pay employees in exchange for
silence about workplace complaints.
Settlements that come through
the federal Office of Compliance
must then get sign-offs from leaders of the Committee on House
Administration, a panel that
oversees the chamber’s operations.
The committee’s top Republican and Democrat members are
presented with descriptions of
each case, without names of the
accused or accuser. They review
the legal and financial recommendations for each settlement,
and weigh how further litigation
could pose risks to the House.
A request to pay Conyers’s 2015
settlement was apparently rejected by then-Rep. Candice S. Miller
(R-Mich.), who led the Committee
on House Administration from
2013 through 2016 and remembers reviewing a settlement for
about $27,000.
Miller said she rejected three
or four proposed sexual-harassment settlements during her tenure as chairwoman.
If members’ settlements are denied and they decide to pay accusers through their office budgets,
committee leaders are not notified, Miller said.
“My posture on that was pretty
consistent, which was: ‘You have
got to be kidding. You seriously
think we’re going to use taxpayer
money to cover up these behaviors of Congress?’ ” Miller said.
She said she did approve settlements involving other workplace
claims, such as age or disability
discrimination.
Miller said she once inadver-
tently discovered the identity of a
member whose settlement she
had rejected. The member’s aide
followed one of her staffers into a
bathroom to urge a change of
mind. Miller would not identify
the member to The Washington
Post and could not recall specific
details of the case.
“We weren’t supposed to know
who it was, so they didn’t tell us
who it was,” she said.
The few individuals who know
the details and names in each case
are taxpayer-funded House attorneys. They negotiate formal and
informal settlements on behalf of
the member offices, and say they
are duty-bound to keep details
confidential under attorney-client relationships with each office
they represent. But as the recent
cases show, lawmakers can waive
their client protection and disclose their payments publicly.
Lynne Bernabei, an employment lawyer who has represented
congressional employees, said
the majority of her cases involving the House were resolved long
before her client filed a formal
complaint with the Office of Compliance, the office that carries out
the required counseling and mediation process for accusers.
In most cases, Bernabei said,
the settlements came directly out
of the lawmaker’s office budget,
known officially as the Members’
Representational
Allowance
(MRA).
“They were resolved before getting to the official House stage,”
she said of the complaints.
The most detail offered by the
Office of Compliance comes in its
semiannual reports to House and
Senate administrative and appropriations committees. But those
documents provide little clarity.
In its May 2017 semiannual report, obtained by The Post, the
office stated that “miscellaneous
public” funds were paid for
“awards,” without specifying who
received the money or which
members were involved.
“The speaker has made clear
that any report of harassment is
deeply troubling, as all House of
Representatives employees have
the right to feel safe in the workplace,” said AshLee Strong,
spokeswoman for House Speaker
Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.).
Democratic lawmakers are debating provisions in a wide-ranging bill, co-sponsored by Rep.
Jackie Speier (D-Calif.), that aims
to increase transparency, including by making public the names
of member offices that reach settlements and requiring lawmakers to pay settlements out of their
own pockets.
But victims’ advocates have
warned that eliminating public
funds could decrease the amount
of money available to recompense
those harmed. Federal agencies,
for example, also use public funds
in their budgets to pay for settlements, awards or damages.
The proposal aims to prohibit
one-sided agreements that can
bind only the accuser to silence.
But it also aims to allow accusers
to request confidentiality if they
want their cases to remain private.
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif ) “believes there
should be significantly more
transparency in this area, and the
Congress is finally engaging in
significant discussions about how
to provide it, keeping the privacy
concerns of the victims in mind,”
said Drew Hammill, a spokesman
for Pelosi.
Too much disclosure could reveal the identities of victims who
prefer to be anonymous or lawmakers who are falsely accused,
exposing them to unfair consequences, government ethics experts and former committee aides
said.
Attempts to crack down on
“severance” settlements could
also jeopardize the broad authority lawmakers have historically exercised over their office budgets,
experts said.
michelle.lee@washpost.com
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
D AN L AMOTHE
The U.S. military is preparing
to accept transgender recruits for
the first time beginning in January, the Pentagon said Wednesday,
the latest signal that President
Trump’s desired ban may not materialize after all.
Officials are “taking steps to be
prepared” to bring in the first
transgender recruits on Jan. 1, as
required by a federal court order
issued recently, said Army Maj.
David Eastburn, a Pentagon
spokesman. He declined to comment further, citing open litigation, but said that the Defense
Department and Justice Department are consulting on the issue.
The Pentagon’s acknowledgment comes a week after U.S.
District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly in Washington clarified an
October injunction in which she
blocked Trump’s proposed ban on
all transgender personnel serving
in the military. The administration immediately sought to delay
the Jan. 1 deadline by which it
must comply with the order, but
Kollar-Kotelly denied that motion
on Nov. 28.
In the days since, the administration appealed its case to the
U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington. Government lawyers asked
the judge late Wednesday to temporarily put on hold the section of
Kollar-Kotelly’s ruling that requires the military to start accepting transgender recruits on Jan. 1,
until its appeal is resolved.
The court battle stems from
Trump’s July 26 announcement
on Twitter that the U.S. government “will not accept or allow
Transgender individuals to serve
in any capacity in the U.S. Military.” He cited the military’s need
to focus on “decisive and overwhelming victory” without being
“burdened with the tremendous
medical costs and disruption”
that he said having transgender
people in the military would
cause.
Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., the
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, issued a memo the following
day to say that transgender service members who already are
serving would be treated with dignity and respect as the Pentagon
sorted out its new policy, effectively putting any change on hold.
Several people sued the federal
government afterward, including
in Maryland and the nation’s capital. In Washington, Kollar-Kotelly
said in a preliminary injunction
that the policy “does not appear to
be supported by any facts.”
She added: “There is absolutely
no support for the claim that the
ongoing service of transgender
people would have any negative
effect on the military at all. In fact,
there is considerable evidence
that it is the discharge and banning of such individuals that
would have such effects.”
In Maryland, U.S. District
Judge Marvin J. Garbis issued a
ruling last month that went further, blocking the administration’s ability to deny funding for
gender reassignment surgery. In
his ruling, Garbis wrote that
transgender service members
have “demonstrated that they are
already suffering harmful consequences,” including the cancellation of surgeries and the inability
to commission as an officer.
In August, Defense Secretary
Jim Mattis formed a panel of experts to review the military’s
transgender policy, saying then
that the panel’s members would
provide advice and recommendations on the implementation of
Trump’s plan.
Trump said in a memorandum
that he wanted to restore the policy in place before the Obama
administration’s move to overturn the ban on transgender military service. The memo gave Mattis until Feb. 21 to submit a plan to
the White House, with a new policy set to take effect in late March.
A study commissioned by the
Pentagon and cited by the Obama
administration as it lifted the ban
on transgender service in July
2016 found that there was little
impact to military operations by
allowing transgender service.
There already are between 2,500
and 7,000 transgender people
among the 1.3 million troops on
active duty, the study found.
Mattis has questioned whether
those numbers are accurate.
dan.lamothe@washpost.com
Ann E. Marimow and Justin Jouvenal
contributed to this report.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
RE
Trump elevates shutdown threat, even as tensions ease
GOP moves toward
stopgap while president
stokes immigration issue
BY
M IKE D E B ONIS
President Trump raised the
possibility of a government shutdown ahead of a meeting with
Democrats for a second consecutive week on Wednesday, even as
tensions on Capitol Hill appeared
to diminish after hard-line House
conservatives backed off plans to
oppose a short-term stopgap.
“It could happen,” Trump said
about a shutdown before a Cabinet meeting, pointing to Democratic demands on immigration
policy. “The Democrats are really
looking at something that is very
dangerous for our country.”
“They want to have illegal
immigrants pouring into our
country, bringing with them
crime, tremendous amounts of
crime,” he added. “We don’t want
to have that. We want to have a
great, beautiful, crime-free country.”
Top congressional leaders
from both parties are set to meet
with the president Thursday at
the White House as they seek a
deal on lifting spending caps that
would allow more funding for the
military and nondefense programs. Democrats are also expected to bring up a potential
deal on immigration that would
include protections for at least
790,000 “dreamers,” immigrants
brought illegally to the United
States as children.
Plans for a meeting between
the president and leading Democrats scheduled for last week fell
apart after Trump tweeted “I
don’t see a deal” hours beforehand.
The issue then, as now, was
immigration. “Problem is they
want illegal immigrants flooding
into our Country unchecked, are
weak on Crime and want to
substantially RAISE Taxes,”
Trump wrote on Nov. 28.
Responding to Trump’s comment Wednesday, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.)
did not indicate Democrats
would be backing out of Thursday’s meeting.
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Republican leaders meet in the office of House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.), in the background at right, on Wednesday. House GOP
leaders were hoping to make a show of strength this week by passing an extension of government funding with Republican votes alone.
“President Trump is the only
person talking about a government shutdown,” she said in a
statement. “Democrats are hopeful the President will be open to
an agreement to address the
urgent needs of the American
people and keep government
open.”
This week, the bigger issue for
Republicans seeking to avoid a
shutdown has been fellow Republicans.
Leaders of the hard-line House
Freedom Caucus emerged from
meetings Wednesday morning
with House Speaker Paul D. Ryan
(R-Wis.) and House Majority
Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.)
saying they had not decided
whether the group’s three dozen
members would back the twoweek stopgap favored by the GOP
leaders.
But they said they had backed
off pushing for a longer-term
spending bill and were instead
focused on setting up a more
advantageous fight with Democrats shortly before Christmas.
By the end of the day, both
pected to take the House bill and
pass it quickly Thursday or Friday.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) made a trip
across the Capitol on Wednesday
“No one wants a shutdown, including
Freedom Caucus members.”
Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.), chairman of the conservative House caucus
House leaders and Rep. Mark
Meadows (R-N.C.), the Freedom
Caucus chairman, predicted Republicans would be able to pass
the stopgap Thursday before lawmakers leave town for the weekend.
“No one wants a shutdown,
including Freedom Caucus members,” Meadows said.
The Senate, meanwhile, is ex-
afternoon, meeting in McCarthy’s office with several House
members. Two aides familiar
with the meeting but not authorized to discuss it publicly said the
lawmakers discussed the legislative agenda for weeks ahead.
One attendee — Rep. Mark
Walker (R-N.C.), chairman of the
conservative Republican Study
Committee — said House mem-
bers posed “very pointed questions” to McConnell on whether
he would resist Democratic demands to attach unrelated measures to the pre-holiday spending
bill.
“Good questions, weak answers,” Walker said of the exchange.
After a months-long detente
during which they worked alongside House leaders to advance
Republican health-care and tax
bills, conservatives have reasserted their presence this week as
Friday’s shutdown deadline
looms.
They want GOP leaders to take
a firmer stance in negotiations
with Democrats — including opposing efforts to link an increase
in defense spending, supported
by most Republicans, to an increase in nondefense spending,
favored by Democrats.
“They know that Republicans
want to fund the military. Democrats know that,” Meadows said.
“And so what they do is they hold
that hostage in trying to get
things that are not in the best
interest of the American taxpayer, and so it is truly trying to have
a real plan to break that.”
Walker said conservatives
have won assurances from House
leaders that they will pursue a
spending bill later this month
that will provide long-term funding for the military while setting
an early 2018 deadline for other
parts of the government — allowing Republicans to pursue partisan priorities for domestic
spending, such as changes to
entitlement programs.
But none of the promises are
able to change the reality of
legislative math: Republicans
need at least eight Senate Democrats to pass any spending bill.
GOP leaders have pursued a similar tactics in the past, only to end
up striking deadline deals with
Democrats in the end.
Meadows and Rep. Jim Jordan
(R-Ohio), a fellow Freedom Caucus leader, said they are seeking
to make it as difficult as possible
for Democrats to oppose spending bills that hike spending on
the military but not on other
domestic programs.
Democrats have the ability to
demand changes in the spending
bills because Republicans do not
have enough Senate votes to
block a Democratic filibuster in
that chamber. And in the House,
conservative Republicans have
tended to oppose spending bills
in recent years, forcing GOP leaders to solicit Democratic votes to
keep government operating.
The drama comes as House
and Senate negotiators are seeking to finalize a Republican tax
overhaul that would represent a
crowning legislative achievement for the GOP in a year
otherwise devoid of them. Versions of the tax bill have passed
the House and Senate and now
must be reconciled.
Conservative leaders say they
are concerned that GOP leaders
will use the hoopla surrounding a
final vote on the tax bill to
obscure a separate vote on spending legislation that could include
numerous Democratic priorities.
mike.debonis@washpost.com
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A8
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
Witness: Flynn said Russia sanctions would be ‘ripped up’
Then-national security
adviser allegedly texted
about nuclear project
BY
T OM H AMBURGER
As President Trump delivered
his inaugural address on the
steps of the U.S. Capitol in January, his new national security
adviser, Michael Flynn, sent a
text to a former business associate telling him that a plan to
build nuclear power plants in the
Middle East in partnership with
Russian interests was “good to
go,” according to a witness who
spoke with congressional investigators.
Flynn had assured his former
associate that U.S. sanctions
against Russia would immediately be “ripped up” by the Trump
administration, a move that
would help facilitate the deal, the
associate told the witness.
The witness provided the account to Rep. Elijah E. Cummings (Md.), the ranking Democrat on the House Oversight and
Government Reform Committee,
who detailed the allegations in a
letter Wednesday to the panel’s
chairman, Rep. Trey Gowdy
(R-S.C.).
Cummings did not identify the
witness, whom he described as a
whistleblower. But he asked
Gowdy to issue a subpoena to the
White House for documents related to Flynn, saying the committee has “credible allegations”
that Flynn “sought to manipulate
the course of international nuclear policy for the financial gain
of his former business partners.”
Robert Kelner, an attorney
representing Flynn, declined to
comment. White House lawyer Ty
Cobb said, “I respectfully decline
to comment on anonymous information which impacts the Special Counsel investigation.” He
was referring to the ongoing
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
inquiry on Russian interference
in the 2016 presidential campaign.
Gowdy said Wednesday afternoon that “criminal matters are
investigated by the special counsel,” adding that he had pledged
to Robert S. Mueller III that he
would not do anything to interfere with his probe.
“Congress doesn’t investigate a
crime, and I’ve had that conversation with Mr. Cummings, and
we had it privately,” he added.
“And if he wants to write me
letters so you can ask me about it,
and write a story, that’s his prerogative, but the answer won’t
change.”
The episode indicates that
Trump officials had planned to
jettison sanctions that the Obama
administration had imposed on
Russia. Congress later passed a
bipartisan measure that placed
new sanctions on Russia, a bill
that Trump reluctantly signed in
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
According to a witness interviewed by Rep. Elijah E. Cummings (DMd.) of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee,
while President Trump made his inaugural address in January, top,
his then-national security adviser, Michael Flynn, above, texted a
former business associate about a plan to build nuclear power
plants in the Middle East in partnership with Russian interests.
Trump Jr. meets with House panel
The president’s son was
grilled for seven hours
about Russia contacts
K AROUN D EMIRJIAN AND
R OSALIND S . H ELDERMAN
Donald Trump Jr. met behind
closed doors for roughly seven
hours Wednesday with the
House Intelligence committee,
fielding extensive questioning
about contacts he had with
Russians during the 2016 campaign.
Committee members queried
President Trump’s eldest son
about a June 2016 meeting he
held with a Russian lawyer after
he was told she would provide
damaging information about
Democratic candidate Hillary
Clinton. He was also asked
about
his
contact
with
WikiLeaks in October 2016,
around the time the group was
releasing hacked Democratic
emails, according to people familiar with the session.
Trump Jr. told the committee
that he had not informed his
father about his meeting with
the Russian lawyer at the time it
took place. He also said he had
not told Trump that he exchanged private messages with
the WikiLeaks Twitter account,
according to the people.
His day-long interview came
as multiple investigations into
Russia’s interference in the 2016
presidential election focus on
members of Trump’s inner circle.
Trump Jr. had met with investigators for the Senate Judiciary
Committee in September, but
that session took place before
prosecutors working for special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III
filed criminal charges against
former Trump advisers.
His Wednesday session with
the House committee was longer
and more expansive, and was
the first opportunity elected
lawmakers have had to ask
Trump Jr. questions directly,
instead of leaving that to investigative staff.
Trump Jr. told the committee
that he did not speak to the
president directly in July 2017 as
the New York Times prepared to
report his meeting with the
Russian lawyer for the first time.
Instead, he told the committee
he had communicated only with
Trump communications director Hope Hicks to discuss how to
respond to the Times’s inquiries.
At the time, Hicks was on
board Air Force One with
Trump, returning home from
the Group of 20 Summit in
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
A Capitol police officer walks past the hearing room where Donald
Trump Jr. met with a congressional panel and said he had not told
President Trump about his meeting with a Russian lawyer in 2016.
Germany.
The Washington Post has reported that the president dictated the statement Trump Jr. released that day about the meeting. The statement omitted key
facts about the session with the
Russian lawyer, indicating it was
primarily about the adoption of
Russian children by American
families.
Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.)
said Wednesday that Trump Jr.
told the committee he did speak
with his father about the Trump
Tower meeting several days later, after emails showing he had
accepted the meeting after being offered “dirt” on Clinton
were made public. However,
Trump Jr. declined to detail the
conversation to the committee,
indicating a lawyer had been
present and he believed it was
subject to attorney-client privilege.
“In my view there is no attorney-client privilege that protects
a discussion between father and
son,” Schiff said, adding he intended to follow up with Trump
Jr.’s attorneys, who had “asked
for more time to deliberate on
the claim.”
“This particular discussion
revolves around a pivotal meeting,” Schiff said, noting it was “a
central issue that we need to
fully investigate.”
Trump Jr. also told the committee he had been unaware
that national security adviserdesignate Michael Flynn had
discussed sanctions during
phone calls with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak in December 2016. At the time, Trump
Jr. served on the transition
team’s executive committee.
Flynn last week pleaded
guilty to lying to the FBI about
his contact with Kislyak.
Rep. K. Michael Conaway (R-
Tex.), who is leading the House
investigation, told reporters after the session concluded that
Trump Jr. had answered all of
the committee’s questions.
Alan Futerfas, an attorney for
Trump Jr., declined to comment.
While the 39-year-old held no
official role with his father’s
campaign, he was closely involved in internal discussions
and served as a prominent surrogate for Trump.
Trump Jr. also interacted at
least twice with Russians who
had showed interest in Trump’s
campaign — encounters that are
of keen interest to investigators.
In addition to the June 2016
meeting with the Russian lawyer, Trump Jr. also exchanged
greetings at a dinner during a
May 2016 National Rifle Association convention with a former
Russian senator named Alexander Torshin, who is now the
deputy head of the Central Bank
of Russia.
Trump Jr. told the committee
he had been introduced to Torshin by a friend, but said he
could not recall which one.
Since the election, Trump Jr.
has been helping run the Trump
Organization in his father’s absence, while also traveling the
country delivering paid speeches.
He has reacted to the scrutiny
of his Russian contacts with
defiance, taunting critics online.
“Keep coming at me guys!!!” he
wrote on Instagram after his
messages with WikiLeaks became public, declaring the
handful of notes to be “nothing
burgers” advanced as part of a
“false narrative.”
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
rosalind.helderman@washpost.com
Tom Hamburger contributed to this
report.
Cummings told Gowdy in his
letter that he found the witness
“authentic, credible and reliable.”
“Although this individual was
extremely hesitant to come forward — and still fears retaliation
— the whistleblower has decided
to do so now because this individual feels duty bound as a citizen
to make this disclosure,” he
wrote.
Mueller’s office was aware of
the witness’s account and asked
Cummings not to release the
information until the special
counsel had taken “certain investigative steps,” which are now
complete, Cummings wrote.
Flynn was involved in the Middle Eastern nuclear project from
spring 2015 to the end of 2016,
according to recent financial disclosure filings, a period that overlapped with his role as a prominent adviser to Trump’s campaign and transition.
Flynn had served as an adviser
to two Washington-based companies pursuing efforts to build nuclear power plants in the Middle
East: Copson’s company, ACU
Strategic Partners, which proposed a partnership with Russian
interests, and IP3/IronBridge,
which later began a separate endeavor that initially proposed
working with China to build the
infrastructure, according to federal documents and company officials.
In various filings in 2016 and
2017, Flynn did not initially disclose his connection to ACU and
foreign contacts he made while
advising the firm.
After joining the White House,
Flynn forwarded a memo written
by a co-founder of IP3 to develop
a “Marshall Plan” of investment
in the Middle East and told his
staff to fashion it into a policy for
Trump’s approval, The Washington Post reported last month.
tom.hamburger@washpost.com
Carol D. Leonnig, Michael Kranish
and Karoun Demirjian contributed to
this report.
GOP lawmakers, activists step up
criticism of Mueller, FBI, citing bias
MUELLER FROM A1
BY
August.
On Friday, Flynn pleaded
guilty to lying to FBI agents
about conversations he had in
December 2016 with the Russian
ambassador to the United States
about the sanctions, among other
topics.
According to Cummings’s letter, the witness said he met Alex
Copson, Flynn’s former business
associate, at an inaugural event.
Copson is the managing director
of ACU Strategic Partners, a
Washington-based company that
Flynn said he advised from April
2015 through June 2016, according to a financial disclosure he
filed this August.
The witness told Cummings
and committee investigators that
Copson shared a text message he
had just received from Flynn,
who was on stage at the Capitol
during Trump’s speech.
As the president spoke, Flynn
reportedly texted Copson that
the nuclear project was “good to
go,” the witness said Copson told
him.
“Mike has been putting everything in place for us,” Copson
said, according to the witness,
adding: “This is going to make a
lot of very wealthy people.”
Copson showed the witness
the text on his phone. The witness could not read the text, but
he saw that the time stamp was
12:11 p.m., according to Cummings’s letter.
“Mr. Copson explained that
General Flynn was making sure
that sanctions would be ‘ripped
up’ as one of his first orders of
business and that this would
allow money to start flowing into
the project,” Cummings wrote.
The witness told congressional
investigators that he was “extremely uncomfortable” with the
conversation, Cummings wrote,
and took brief notes about the
discussion during the inaugural
event.
Neither Copson nor an attorney for ACU responded to a
request for comment.
Russian election interference.
This week, the conservative group
Judicial Watch released an internal Justice Department email
that, the group said, showed political bias against Trump by one of
Mueller’s senior prosecutors.
Fresh ammunition came this
weekend, when it was revealed
that Peter Strzok, the top FBI
agent on Mueller’s team, had been
removed over politically charged
texts he’d exchanged with another
former member of the Mueller
team, senior FBI lawyer Lisa Page.
The texts appeared to favor Clinton and disparage Trump, according to people familiar with the
matter.
“The question really is, if Mueller was doing such a great job on
investigating the Russian collusion, why could he have not found
the conflict of interest within
their own agency?’’ Rep. Mark
Meadows (R-N.C.) asked at the
news conference. Meadows, leader of the Freedom Caucus, cited a
litany of other issues that he said
show bias on the part of the FBI
and Mueller, including past political donations by lawyers on Mueller’s team.
An FBI spokesman declined to
comment.
Accusations of bias against
Mueller from conservatives have
become commonplace in the public debate about the president and
the Russia probe, and Republicans are expected to grill FBI
Director Christopher A. Wray
about those matters when he testifies Thursday before the House
Judiciary Committee.
The chairman of that committee has been pressing the Justice
Department to appoint a second
special counsel — one to probe
Clinton, as well as the FBI’s handling of past Clinton-related
probes. Law enforcement officials
also expect Wray will be pressed
on that issue again Thursday in
the wake of the Strzok-Page revelations, which are being investigated by the Justice Department’s
inspector general.
Mueller did get a public vote of
confidence Wednesday from Deputy Attorney General Rod J.
Rosenstein, the senior Justice Department official overseeing the
Russia probe — though Rosenstein did not address the Strzok
inquiry. In an interview with
NBC, Rosenstein was asked
whether he was satisfied with
what he had seen so far from the
special counsel’s office, and he
said yes and noted that some
public charges had been filed.
“We’re not in a position to talk
about anything else that may be
going on,’’ he said.
Mueller first became aware in
late July of text messages exchanged between Page and
Strzok, who had been engaged in
an affair, according to people familiar with the matter who, like
others, spoke on the condition of
anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.
Strzok was removed from the
job immediately and transferred
to the FBI’s human resources division, which was widely understood by his colleagues to be a
demotion. Officials have said Page
left the Mueller team two weeks
earlier for unrelated reasons.
Trump tweeted this weekend
that the FBI’s reputation was “in
Tatters.’’
Strzok was a major player in
both the Clinton and Russia
probes, taking part in key interviews, including those of Clinton
and Trump’s former national security adviser, Michael Flynn,
who pleaded guilty last week to
lying to the FBI during that January questioning.
On Wednesday, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles
E. Grassley (R-Iowa) signed letters to the Justice Department
and FBI demanding more information about Strzok’s communications.
“Strzok’s behavior and involvement in these two politically-sensitive cases raises new concerns of
inappropriate political influence
in the work of the FBI,’’ Grassley
wrote in one of the letters.
Matthew Miller, a Democrat
and former Justice Department
spokesman, said Grassley is part
of a Republican effort to undermine Mueller’s credibility over
the long run.
“First, they want to kick up dust
about Hillary Clinton so the conservative press has something to
talk about that isn’t Trump’s misdeeds,’’ Miller said. “The eventual
goal, though, is to delegitimize
Mueller in such a way that he can
either be fired or can be ignored if
he concludes the president broke
the law.’’
A Grassley spokesman called
Miller’s comment “a baseless
charge from a Democratic operative’’ and said the senator has a
“three-decade record of government oversight across administrations.’’
Grassley also called Mueller an
“honorable person” whose investigation should be allowed to
“play out.”
Tom Fitton, the president of
Judicial Watch, has called for the
Mueller probe to be shut down,
saying his prosecutors are simply
too biased against the president
to conduct a credible investiga-
tion.
Fitton said the Justice Department and FBI “covered up’’ the
Strzok issue for months. “That’s a
scandal,” he said. “Rosenstein
needs to explain what he was
doing, what he knew and when,
and Mueller needs to explain himself as well. I think Mueller has
fewer and fewer supporters in the
Republican establishment, because of what he allowed to happen.’’
The email released by Judicial
Watch this week was sent by Andrew Weissmann, now on the
Mueller team, back in January,
when he was a senior Justice
Department official in the criminal division. After then-acting attorney general Sally Yates was
fired for instructing department
employees not to defend Trump’s
first travel ban in court, Weissmann sent her a note saying he
was “so proud and in awe’’ of her.
Judicial Watch said the email
shows Weissmann is biased
against the president.
In Congress, an effort by a Republican lawmaker to ensure
Mueller could not be abruptly
fired has lost steam.
Sen. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.), who
in August unveiled legislation to
prevent Trump from firing Mueller without cause, said Wednesday that he felt no urgency for the
Senate to take it up.
“Based on what’s occurred with
Flynn and some of the reports
over the past week, I’m not overly
concerned that we have to move
quickly,” Tillis said. He called his
bill a “good governance” measure
that lawmakers will continue to
discuss.
Tillis offered a mixed review of
the Mueller probe.
“Some of the questions raised
about some of the people in the
FBI and their behavior and possible biases make you want to go
back and look at the role that they
played and whether or not there
was any bias that was woven into
any results or observations they
made,” Tillis said. “But on the
whole, I’m satisfied with the way
it’s progressing.”
Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (RTenn.), one of his party’s most
outspoken Trump critics, said he
couldn’t envision the president
firing Mueller.
“I can’t imagine him being terminated,” Corker said. “To me,
that would be a step too far.”
As for the way the Mueller
investigation is proceeding, Corker declined to opine. “I have almost no knowledge as to how it’s
proceeding,” he said.
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
SU
Wildfire threat could
increase, o∞cials say
WILDFIRES FROM A1
intensify.
The wildfires in Ventura and
Los Angeles counties have forced
tens of thousands to vacate and
have destroyed hundreds of
structures, emptying homes, hospitals, schools and multimilliondollar mansions alike. In Ventura
County, the Thomas Fire burned
across 90,000 acres on Wednesday evening, spreading through
an area roughly the size of Detroit. Los Angeles County faced
comparatively smaller blazes in
the Rye and Creek fires, both of
which erupted Tuesday north of
downtown Los Angeles.
A new blaze, known as the
Skirball Fire, began burning
Wednesday morning in Bel Air,
shutting down Interstate 405 —
one of the country’s busiest freeways — and forcing evacuations
across the posh neighborhood
and areas near the University of
California at Los Angeles campus. Officials confronted that
growing fire while still facing the
Creek Fire, which had crept into
the city.
“Our plan here is to try to stop
this fire before it becomes something bigger, so that we don’t
have to have . . . a two-front war,”
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti
(D) said at a news briefing.
“These are days that break your
heart. But these are also days that
show the resilience of our city.”
That resilience could face serious tests in coming days. The
National Weather Service said
that increased winds are expected overnight into Thursday,
which could make Southern California vulnerable to new fires and
“extreme fire behavior,” with conditions potentially worsening
throughout the day. The dangerous fire conditions have been
fueled by Santa Ana winds, dry
weather and parched vegetation
— the combination enabling
wildfires that have grown wildly.
Not far from the Skirball Fire,
residents and visitors alike were
weighing whether to stay. Two
roommates who live in the Brentwood area packed their bags and
were “just hanging tight,” said
one of the men, Wes Luttrell, 23.
Montevis Price, who was visiting
Los Angeles from Miami,
promptly checked out of his hotel
when he saw the blaze.
“I saw the little mountain on
fire, and that was it,” Price said.
“You can prepare for a hurricane,
but you can’t prepare for something that happens all of a sudden.”
California Gov. Jerry Brown
(D) declared states of emergency
in Los Angeles and Ventura counties due to the fires, and his office
said the blazes threatened thousands of homes. By Wednesday
afternoon, officials said no deaths
have been recorded as a result of
the blazes, but some areas were
not yet accessible.
Day appeared as night along
the coast, the smoke-masked sun
casting a deep red light. Flames
burned down chaparral-covered
cliffs toward Highway 101 along a
four-mile stretch in Ventura
County, with the blaze blowing
over in nighttime winds from the
valleys to the east.
Officials said the wildfire that
forced evacuations of portions of
Ojai, a popular winter retreat
with about 8,000 residents, began burning toward Santa Barbara County on Wednesday.
For some, the flames had already consumed nearly everything they had.
The fire began beneath David
and Theresa Brock’s house in
upper Ojai about sundown Monday, jumping the road and sprinting up toward them. But a shifting wind pushed it away within a
few hundred yards, and the couple believed their home of 12
years was safe. They stayed up
through the night, smoke covering the grounds around them.
“I thought we were doing
great, real great,” said Brock, a
state-certified operator of public
water systems.
About 4 a.m. Tuesday, the
winds shifted again. The fire
raced toward them, covering five
miles in 15 minutes. Brock turned
to Theresa and said, “Let’s get
outside in the dirt.” The couple
keeps cattle, and the wide grazed
area outside their hilltop home
acted as a natural fire break.
“At least out here,” he told her,
“there’s nothing to catch fire.”
As the couple watched the
JAE C. HONG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A firefighter carries a water hose in the Bel Air neighborhood of Los Angeles, with a large painting saved from a wildfire propped against an
SUV. Several other wildfires are raging through Southern California, and officials warn that more could be on the way.
flames approach, a transformer
exploded adjacent to their home,
igniting a pepper tree. Sparks
were sucked into their attic.
“Then we saw smoke coming
out of the vent,” Brock, 57, said.
“And I thought, ‘Well, that’s it, we
can’t save it now.’ ”
Brock pulled his Ford Torino
and tractor out of the garage,
keeping them in the fire break,
and with the help of firefighters,
managed to pull a few items out
of his house.
“But what do you take?” he
said. He chose a few family photos, but the cedar chest where
Theresa kept the family documents burned.
“Then I just stood back and
watched,” he said. “You see these
people on TV who have lost everything, and you can’t imagine it,
until it’s you. Now I am that
person. I have the clothes on my
back.”
Others felt the fear of what
could come next.
“I’m scared,” said Beth Dorenkamp, a 25-year Ojai resident. “I
saw the fire start at the east end of
town, like a plume, but I never
thought it would end up like this.”
Dorenkamp and Kathe Hanson huddled on a chilly morning
at the Riverview Ranch in the
Meiners Oaks neighborhood,
which had been threatened but
spared Tuesday as the Thomas
Fire grew. The women keep horses at the ranch and spent a mostly
sleepless Tuesday night keeping
watch over them.
“We all have trailers ready to
go, but all of the roads are closed,”
said Hanson, masked against the
falling ash, holding the reins of
her horse, Mozart. “So we’re
sleeping in the barn and waiting
to see what happens.”
Around the property, Ford F250 and Toyota Tundra pickups
were hitched to trailers, ready to
evacuate some of the 80 horses
stabled there. The escape route
had narrowed significantly,
though, with some of the roads
north into Santa Barbara County
threatened by fire.
Word of mouth appeared the
most common form of neighborhood newsgathering, with cellular service spotty in the best of
times in these high canyons, the
power unstable because of the
fire and the Internet out in parts
of the city.
The Carver family fled their
home in Meiners Oak on Tuesday
morning with flames less than
half a mile from their property.
“We’d been up all night watching it,” said Cindy Carver, who
moved to Ojai about eight years
ago with her husband, Thomas,
and their two children, Caleb and
Danika.
Preparations began before
dawn.
Thomas, a family therapist, let
the turkeys, goats and chickens
the family raises loose in their
pens. He and Cindy grabbed the
passports, a couple wedding photos, a little cash and jewelry and
corralled the kids into the camper. They also grabbed Hondo and
Jetta, two rescue dogs, their four
cats and 10 kittens.
“There was a point where I just
thought I was going to lose it, and
then we all said, ‘It’s just stuff,’ ”
Thomas said.
Caleb, 12, and Danika, 8, attend
Ojai Valley School, which was
closed, like the others in the area.
The upper campus was damaged
Tuesday, when a girls dormitory
burned down along with several
other buildings.
But the students had been
evacuated early, a decision that
Cindy Carver praised.
Caleb Carver said he was
amazed that as they left home,
everything around him seemed to
be taking place as it did any other
day — a man riding his bicycle
through the smoke, a hiker on a
nearby nature preserve trail.
“How are people so normal
about this?” he said.
scott.wilson@washpost.com
mark.berman@washpost.com
Berman reported from Washington.
Noah Smith and William Dauber in
Los Angeles and Eli Rosenberg and
Jason Samenow in Washington
contributed to this report.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
The World
As Nepal votes, India and China hope for a win
The two Asian giants are in a tug of war for influence over their neighbor, which wants independence and a balance of power
BY
V IDHI D OSHI
kathmandu, nepal — Nepal
will vote Thursday in a landmark
election that will be closely
watched by neighboring India
and China, each hoping for a win
for their domestic allies in the
small Himalayan nation.
The national election comes as
China is expanding its influence
across Asia, including by ramping up investments in Nepal — a
development that analysts say
has rattled India, long the dominant Asian power in the country.
“Nepal has been liberated
from dependency on only one
neighbor,” Left Alliance leader
Khadga Prasad Sharma Oli said
to a cheering crowd at a recent
campaign rally in the city of
Pokhara.
The Left Alliance has campaigned on a call to counter India’s dominance in Nepal with
Chinese power. On the other side,
incumbent Prime Minister Sher
Bahadur Deuba, who is widely
thought to be pro-India, has
called for balancing Indian and
Chinese power.
India’s influence in Nepal was
unrivaled for decades. The countries share an open border, thriving trade links and common religions and customs. But in the
past several years, China has redoubled investments in Nepal,
building up infrastructure that
could increase trade between the
two countries, and making plans
to expand Nepal’s vast untapped
hydropower
infrastructure,
which could yield large returns —
and displace India’s dominance
here.
Chinese investors have built
roads, hospitals, colleges and
malls, and are drawing up plans
to set up rail links and power
transmission lines. At Kathmandu’s international airport, incoming travelers are greeted by a
large advertisement of a “Made in
China” mall that sells goods as
wide-ranging as rice cookers and
doormats.
In Pokhara, a tourist hotspot in
central Nepal, China is helping
build a new airport, a huge development for the small, landlocked
country of 29 million. Ministerial
visits between Kathmandu and
Beijing have increased in the last
two years, and scholarships and
exchanges to China have created
new opportunities for young Nepalis.
“China has been flooding Nepal with investment,” said Constantino Xavier, an analyst at Carnegie India. “That’s a big gamechanging development. For the
first time, really, in the history of
the country, China is giving Nepal
an alternative to India.”
The option of a second friendly
neighborhood giant gives Nepal a
bargaining chip to resist India’s
dominance in the country — a
prospect that puts new emphasis
on Nepali sovereignty. In election
rhetoric, this new focus on sovereignty is expressed in nationalistic, anti-India terms: restoring
Nepal to a time before foreign
countries dominated internal
politics.
A new emphasis on political
independence is increasingly im-
Ukrainian
protesters,
police clash
over activist
BY
A SSOCIATED P RESS
moscow
NARENDRA SHRESTH/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY-EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
ABOVE: A staff member of Nepal’s election office counts ballot
boxes before distributing them for the general election in
Kathmandu. LEFT: A Chinese construction company operates a
site in Kathmandu. China lavishes Nepal with desperately needed
infrastructure investment.
SARA HYLTON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
portant to Nepalis, said Kathmandu-based political analyst
Achyut Wagle. “The popular definition of nationalism in Nepal is
remaining interconnected with
India and China but retaining
political sovereignty,” he said.
For some voters, the rhetoric of
restoring Nepal to past glory resonates.
“I think the party I feel like
voting [for] is popular because it
strongly claims Nepal as a nation
that is capable of bringing those
golden days of Nepal back, where
Nepal stood economically, socially and politically strong without
aid dependency,” said Jyoti Singh
Bhandari, a lawyer who will cast
her ballot Thursday.
For Nepalis, this election marks a pivotal moment in
the tempestuous transition from
monarchy to republic. Nepal has
changed governments 26 times
in the past 28 years. Many hope
this election will bring political
stability and much-needed development to the country, which
ranks among the poorest in the
world.
A devastating earthquake
struck Nepal in 2015, killing
about 9,000 people and leaving
tens of thousands homeless. In
the aftermath of the quake, India
criticized a new constitution that
diluted powers for New Delhi’s
allies in Nepal. Then Indian
trucks carrying food and fuel
stopped crossing Nepal’s border.
India said the trucks could not
pass because border protests
caused security issues, but many
Nepalis believe the country deliberately imposed a blockade to
strong-arm politicians into
changing the constitution. The
Indian government denies that a
blockade was imposed.
The blockade turned opinion
against India, prompting some
Nepali politicians to change their
tune on foreign affairs. Oli, once
known as the “Man of India” for
his close links to New Delhi’s
establishment, became the country’s most vocal critic.
The Left Alliance, jointly led by
Oli and Pushpa Kamal Dahal, the
leader of the Maoist Communist
Party of Nepal, has also pledged
to renegotiate treaties with India
and increase ties with China.
Even other pro-India politicians,
such as the incumbent prime
minister, are now talking about a
balancing act between Nepal’s
bordering behemoths.
For Nepalis, “India is seen as
overtly trying to influence elections,” said Akhilesh Upadhyay,
editor in chief of the Kathmandu
Post. “Many Nepalis resent that.”
China, on the other hand, conducts diplomacy behind closed
doors, analysts said, and lavishes
Nepal with desperately needed
infrastructure investments.
“India’s traditional strategy to
play politics in Kathmandu, by
facilitating the creation of favorable coalition governments, is becoming increasingly redundant,”
said Xavier, the Carnegie India
analyst. “China’s inroads have
made New Delhi realize the urgency of delivering more, better
and faster on economic assistance and connectivity. There are
no Indian passenger trains to Nepal, not even up the hills to Kathmandu, and meanwhile China is
doing feasibility studies for a railway across the Himalayan mountains.”
Despite strong trading ties, India and China spar over borders
and compete for strategic control
in Asia. Many issues divide the
two countries: China has long
been suspicious of India giving
citizenship to Tibetan exiles, in-
cluding the Dalai Lama, who the
Chinese consider dangerous separatists. Border skirmishes flare
up frequently, most recently in
the Doklam region in the Himalayas when Indian troops moved in
to stop Chinese road building in
territory claimed by Bhutan, a
close ally of India.
As China expands its influence
in Nepal, analysts say India’s
leaders are worried the country’s long-open land border with
Nepal could be used to flood the
country with Chinese exports.
Guarding the border would
strain military resources.
But Nepali politicians’ embrace of China is a cautious one.
The vast majority of Nepal’s international trade is still with
India, and hundreds of thousands of Nepalis have gone to
India for work or study. Even the
Left Alliance manifesto, despite
Oli’s anti-India campaigning,
promises to balance the roles of
India and China in the country,
Wagle said.
For many Nepalis, this will
weigh on their decisions as they
vote Thursday. “We have been
time and again hit by India,” said
Umesh Giri, who will cast his
ballot in the country’s mid-western district of Surkhet, “which is
why it is important to try and
approach different foreign relations.”
vidhi.doshi@washpost.com
Pradeep Bashyal contributed to this
report.
— Supporters of
Ukraine’s top opposition politician clashed Wednesday with police officers who tried to arrest
him for a second time at a tent
camp outside the parliament
building in Kiev.
Ukrainian authorities accuse
Mikheil Saakashvili, a former
president of Georgia who is now
an anti-corruption crusader in
Ukraine, of colluding with Ukrainian business executives to topple
President Petro Poroshenko.
Saakashvili said he would not
turn himself in but prosecutors
were welcome to see him at the
camp outside parliament, where
about 100 of his supporters had
gathered.
“I’m ready to host their investigators here at the camp,” he said.
“From the very beginning, they
refused to register my party, then
stripped me of my citizenship,
then lied. Shame on you.”
It was the police’s second unsuccessful attempt to arrest
Saakashvili in as many days. On
Tuesday, police detained him at
his home, but he escaped with
help from crowds who had gathered to protest.
Protester Igor Ognyov, from the
eastern city of Sumy, said the police stormed the camp before
dawn Wednesday.
“They burst into the tent and
started beating everyone with their
hands and batons,” said Ognyov,
whose head was bandaged and
whose face was covered with blood.
Two protesters and 11 officers
were injured in Wednesday’s scuffles in the Ukrainian capital, police said.
The efforts to detain Saakashvili
have raised fears that Ukraine
could be facing its most acute political crisis since the 2014 revolution.
Poroshenko named Saakashvili
governor of the Odessa region in
2015, but he stepped down the
following year after falling out
with the president. Earlier this
year,
Poroshenko
stripped
Saakashvili of Ukrainian citizenship while he was out of the country, but he returned in September,
helped by supporters.
Saakashvili has won broad popularity in Ukraine with his campaign against corruption, riding a
wave of public frustration over
Poroshenko’s failure to uproot endemic graft. Saakashvili has
staged rallies calling for the president’s resignation, but they haven’t produced any visible result.
Prosecutor General Yuri Lutsenko said his office has evidence that
Saakashvili’s representative received $500,000 from Ukrainian
business executives with ties to
Russia to finance protests.
Saakashvili rejected the accusations and said there has long been
hostility between him and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
When he was president of Georgia, Saakashvili made a failed attempt to reclaim control over
Georgia’s separatist province of
South Ossetia, triggering a short
war with Russia in 2008.
DIGEST
SYRIA
21 reported killed in
airstrikes on village
Russian airstrikes killed 21
people in a village on the eastern
side of the Euphrates River in
Syria, the Syrian Observatory for
Human Rights said Wednesday.
The strikes in the eastern
province of Deir al-Zour were in
support of the Kurdish-led and
U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic
Forces (SDF), which are fighting
the Islamic State militant group,
the war monitor said. The Islamic
State reportedly had attempted to
launch an attack on the town
earlier this week.
Russia has been carrying out
airstrikes in the province mainly
to back up the Syrian army,
which, alongside allied militias,
has been waging its own assault
against the Islamic State on the
western side of the Euphrates.
The separate offensives have
advanced along opposite sides of
the river — which bisects oil-rich
Deir al-Zour — mostly staying out
of each other’s way.
The U.S.-led coalition and the
Russian military have held
deconfliction meetings to prevent
clashes between the two sides.
The Britain-based Observatory
also reported Wednesday that the
Syrian army and its allied forces
had “finished the presence” of the
Islamic State on the western bank
of the river.
On Sunday, the Syrian Kurdish
YPG militia, which spearheads
the SDF, announced that it had
fully captured Deir al-Zour’s
eastern countryside from the
Islamic State.
BOLIVIA
Lawmakers vote to ease
some limits on abortion
— Reuters
ITALY
Neo-fascists target
left-leaning newspaper
A neo-fascist party attacked the
headquarters of the left-leaning
La Repubblica newspaper on
Wednesday and declared “war”
against its publisher, the latest
incident involving extremist,
far-right and anti-immigrant
activists in Italy in recent times.
A dozen masked Forza Nuova
supporters, dressed in black and
carrying the party’s flag, threw
flares at the office housing
La Repubblica; its publisher,
L’Espresso Group; and a weekly
magazine bearing the same name.
La Repubblica has reported
regularly on an escalation of
incidents involving Forza Nuova
and other right-wing and
YVES HERMAN/REUTERS
Ousted Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont visits with supporters in
Brussels. Puigdemont, facing arrest in Spain over an independence
vote in October, said he would stay in Belgium for the time being.
Spain dropped an international arrest warrant for him on Monday.
skinhead movements targeting
migrants. The paper’s editorial
line has favored proposed
legislation to accelerate
citizenship for children born in
Italy to immigrants.
In a statement on its Facebook
page, Forza Nuova said it was
“declaring war” on La Repubblica
and L’Espresso, accusing them of
“carrying out the genocide of the
Italian people” by supporting the
citizenship legislation.
Anti-immigrant sentiment has
been rising in Italy, as in the rest
of Europe, amid the influx of
would-be refugees of many
nationalities arriving on boats
from Libya. Tensions have grown
more acute as Italy heads into a
general election next year.
— Associated Press
Lawmakers voted Wednesday
to ease Bolivia’s tight restrictions
on abortions, shrugging aside
opposition from religious groups.
The Plurinational Legislative
Assembly vote will allow
“students, adolescents or girls” to
have abortions up to the eighth
week of pregnancy. The measure
does not specify ages, but it
appears to apply to girls who are
17 or younger, as well as older
students who still depend on their
parents or guardians.
As of today, abortion in Bolivia
is allowed only when the woman’s
life is in danger, in the case of a
malformed fetus or in cases of
rape or incest. Illegal abortions
carry prison terms of up to three
years.
President Evo Morales has said
he will sign the measure, despite
opposition from Catholic and
evangelical churches in the
country.
Health Minister Ariana
Campero said abortion is the
third-leading cause of maternal
death in Bolivia, and the
government has estimated that
more than 80,000 clandestine
abortions occur each year.
— Associated Press
Honduran leader open to review
of disputed vote: Honduras’s
president said he is open to a
review of a disputed vote count in
his bid for reelection that has
plunged the country into a crisis.
Juan Orlando Hernández called
for the Supreme Electoral
Tribunal to reexamine all the votes
in the Nov. 26 election. He said he
would accept that “because the
people deserve respect.”
Opposition candidate Salvador
Nasralla is urging a recount and
has called for a repeat of the entire
vote. With all the votes counted,
Hernández leads Nasralla
43 percent to 41.4 percent.
Nigeria replaces commander in
fight against Boko Haram:
Nigeria is replacing the military
commander leading the fight
against Boko Haram, an army
spokesman said, after a string of
attacks despite years of official
claims that the Islamist militant
group has almost been defeated.
The conflict with Boko Haram in
northeast Nigeria is in its ninth
year, fueling doubts about the
government’s ability to retain
sovereign integrity in that region.
— From news services
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Putin says he is
seeking reelection
Although 30 others are
running, Russian leader
is all but certain to win
BY D AVID F ILIPOV
AND A NDREW R OTH
moscow — Russian President
Vladimir Putin, he of the perennial 80 percent approval ratings, declared his intention
Wednesday to run for reelection,
essentially guaranteeing a new
six-year term for the Kremlin
leader.
“I will nominate my candidacy
for the post of the president of the
Russian Federation,” Putin said at
a rally and a concert at the Gorky
Automobile Plant (GAZ) in the
Volga River city of Nizhny
Novgorod. “Perhaps there is no
better place and better reason for
announcing this. I’m sure that it
will all work out well for us.”
It is a vote that can have only
one outcome. Although 30 others have declared their candidacy
ahead of the March election,
there was little doubt that the
man Russians call Person
No. 1 would run and that the
Kremlin’s political machine
would not allow an upset.
Shortly after Putin’s announcement, Russia’s main pro-government political party, United Russia, announced its intention to
support his reelection campaign.
Until Wednesday, Putin had
quietly remained above the fray,
portraying himself as a leader
and servant of the state rather
than a political hopeful.
Socialite and television host
Ksenia Sobchak, the daughter of
the St. Petersburg mayor who had
employed Putin in the 1990s, has
gained a lot of headlines with her
campaign as a “candidate against
everyone.”
Anti-corruption crusader Alexei Navalny has been campaigning
for months, although a criminal
conviction that he says was politically motivated disqualifies him
from running.
“He wants to be in power for 21
years,” Navalny tweeted Wednesday, referring to Putin’s years as
president. “In my opinion that’s a
bit much. I suggest that you dis-
agree with him.”
Putin has been the de facto
leader of Russia since Boris
Yeltsin resigned on New Year’s
Eve 1999. Putin stepped down
from the presidency only when
obligated by the constitution’s
limit of two consecutive terms as
chief executive. Putin served as
prime minister between his second and third terms as president,
from 2008 until 2012, and has led
Russia for 18 years.
The only post-imperial Kremlin leader who served a longer
term was Joseph Stalin, who
ruled the Soviet Union for 29
years.
Russian news agencies have
reported that the Kremlin has
tasked itself with keeping both
Putin’s share of the vote and the
country’s turnout at 70 percent, a
“70-70 plan.”
The Kremlin is concerned
about falling interest in elections
among young people, who in the
past year have reemerged on the
political landscape through unpermitted street protests bolstered by high school and collegeage students angry about the lack
of political freedom and reforms
in the country.
Putin could have made the
announcement Wednesday as he
spoke to hundreds of young people at a forum about volunteers.
But he punted when asked
whether he was running.
He chose, instead, to make the
announcement at one of Russia’s
industrial giants, speaking to stoic automakers during GAZ’s 85th
anniversary. Workers, particularly in the automotive industry,
have been pummeled by Russia’s
economic trouble over the
past three years.
The scene at the automobile
plant seemed staged, as a foreman appealed to Putin to “give us
a gift” by announcing his candidacy. “GAZ is for you!” the workers yelled. The automaker employs more than 25,000 people
and is owned by Oleg Deripaska,
one of Russia’s richest men.
A recent poll by the independent Levada Center found
that 58 percent of Russians would
vote if the election were held now,
and 53 percent said they would
vote for Putin.
david.filipov@washpost.com
andrew.roth@washpost.com
Trump donor talked to
Russian banker in Jan.
Transcript of interview
with congressional panel
covers trade, terrorism
BY K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
AND A DAM E NTOUS
Erik Prince, a supporter of the
Trump campaign and the former
head of the security firm Blackwater, told congressional investigators that he discussed trade
relations and countering terrorism with a close associate of
Russian President Vladimir Putin
during a meeting in the Seychelles early this year, according
to a newly released transcript of
the interview.
Prince told investigators last
week that Kirill Dmitriev, the
head of the Russian Direct Investment Fund, told him during the
Jan. 11 meeting that “he wished
trade would resume with the
United States in a normal way.”
Prince responded by telling
Dmitriev that “if Franklin
Roosevelt could work with Josef
Stalin to defeat Nazi fascism,
certainly the United States could
work with Vladimir Putin to defeat Islamic fascism.”
The meeting in the Seychelles
has drawn scrutiny as one of
several interactions Trump associates had with Russian officials
during the presidential campaign
and transition.
Prince told congressional investigators that he was a donor to
Trump’s campaign who later submitted policy papers to members
of the president-elect’s transition
team.
As head of Russia’s sovereign
wealth fund, Dmitriev reports to
Putin.
Prince said his meeting with
Dmitriev came up at the last
minute and at the suggestion of
the crown prince of Abu Dhabi,
Mohammed bin Zayed alNahyan, who Prince said invited
him to the Seychelles — although
he said he could not remember
when or who from Zayed’s staff
extended the invitation.
The crown prince is widely
known as MBZ.
Prince also said he did not
remember when or where he had
a conversation with White House
chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon, during which Bannon told
Prince he had met MBZ in New
York in December, just weeks
before Prince traveled to the Seychelles.
Prince said Bannon vouched
for MBZ during the conversation,
calling him “a great guy.”
Prince said he never told Bannon about meeting Dmitriev.
The Washington Post in April
reported Prince’s meeting in the
Seychelles with an unidentified
Russian close to Putin.
In the House Intelligence Committee interview, Prince alleged
that U.S. intelligence about the
“If Franklin Roosevelt
could work with Josef
Stalin to defeat Nazi
fascism . . . the United
States could work with
Vladimir Putin to defeat
Islamic fascism.”
Erik Prince, on relations with Russia
meeting was leaked to The Post
and claimed that he was improperly “unmasked” by former officials.
The Post attributed its April
report to U.S., European and
Arab officials.
Prince refused during the interview to identify those who he
claimed told him that he had
been unmasked.
The committee’s top Democrat, California Rep. Adam B.
Schiff, complained in a statement
that Prince was “less than forthcoming” with information, concluding that committee Republicans “must compel Prince to
testify on these matters” — particularly because the GOP has
been acutely focused on tracking
down the source of government
leaks.
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
adam.entous@washpost.com
EZ
A11
RE
Russia outraged by Olympics ban over doping
Move delivers body blow
to nation that takes pride
in its sporting prowess
BY
A NDREW R OTH
moscow — Prominent Russians
expressed anger, despair and resentment on Wednesday after the
International Olympic Committee decided to ban the Russian
Federation from the 2018 Winter
Olympics in South Korea.
The ban is a historic act of
punishment for widespread doping among Russian athletes that
Olympic officials say they believe
was supported by the government.
It delivered a body blow to a
nation that prides itself on its
sporting prowess and was ecstatic over its victory in the 2014
Winter Olympics medal count.
Just four years later, the Russian
Federation’s count will be zero,
and the country is considering a
boycott.
Mikhail Gorbachev, the former
Soviet leader who helped end the
Cold War, called the IOC decision
“outrageous.” The decision bans
Russia’s flag and anthem but
allows individual athletes to compete under a special designation,
as Olympic Athlete from Russia
(OAR).
“It’s just bad, and that’s it,”
Gorbachev told the state sport
news agency, R-Sport. “It’s sports,
damn it.”
Russian lawmakers, often the
vanguard of public outrage, demanded punishments. Some
turned on their own. One filed
suit against former minister of
sport Vitaly Mutko for “demeaning the honor of the country.”
(Mutko was also slapped with a
lifetime Olympic ban on
Tuesday.)
Several journalists and commentators, notably far-right author Nikolai Starikov, posted
memes on social media showing
Russian soldiers in unmarked
uniforms, writing, “just as IOC
asked for.” It was a nod toward
the unmarked Russian soldiers
who helped seize Crimea in 2014,
as Russia wrapped up its own
Winter Olympic Games.
Russia claims political grievances with the West, stretching
from Ukraine to Syria, and back
to the 1998-1999 war in Kosovo.
But sports, and the politics surrounding them, still have a special ability to stir up emotions
here, both in the Kremlin and in
homes across the country.
When Russian officials bring
up complaints about the West,
they regularly list the mocking
coverage of the 2014 Sochi Olympics, with articles exposing hastily constructed bathrooms with
two toilets, rather than extolling
the grandeur of a mountain ski
town and seaside sporting mecca
built from scratch with a budget
of $50 billion.
For a time, it appeared that
Russian President Vladimir Putin
would stake part of his legacy on
great sporting events. He personally addressed the International
Olympic Committee in English in
2008 in Guatemala to secure
Russia’s bid for the Games to take
place at the Black Sea resort town
of Sochi. Last week at the Kremlin, he opened the draw ceremony
for the 2018 World Cup, also set to
be held in Russia, and traded
trilingual party banter with FIFA
President Gianni Infantino and
soccer legend Diego Maradona.
The whistleblower
should be “shot like
Stalin would have done.”
Leonid Tyagachev, Olympic official
Now, with Russia on the verge
of a major breach with the West
over an alleged state-sponsored
doping program, the Kremlin is
treading carefully.
“Our main goal is to defend the
interests of our athletes, Russian
athletes,” Dmitry Peskov, Putin’s
personal
spokesman,
said.
Toward Wednesday evening, he
said the country would not entertain a boycott against the Olympics for Russian athletes who
wanted to participate independently but said the findings
against Russia were politically
motivated.
Just a few weeks ago, the honorary head of Russia’s Olympic
Committee, Leonid Tyagachev,
said Grigory Rodchenkov, the
Russian doctor and whistleblower who exposed the doping program, should be “shot like Stalin
would have done.” Now, there are
signs that officials are becoming
more careful in their rhetoric.
“We can be indignant with the
West as much as we want, and,
might I add, justly,” wrote Konstantin Kosachev, a vocal member of Russia’s upper house of
parliament, the Federation Council. “But I am sure that our sports
officials should be held personally liable for failing to notice the
beginning of this campaign and
being clearly unable to deal with
its finish.”
The conflict has polarized society, one sports editor said.
“There is no one left in the
middle,” Dmitry Navosha, head of
Sports.ru, a popular Russian
sports website, said in a telephone interview. Personally, he
said, he believes the government
could have taken measures to
avoid the full ban announced
Tuesday. But many others see a
conspiracy against Russia.
“I think that society is deeply
polarized,” Navosha said. “Some
people are going to use the words
they use on state television; others are going to ask serious questions of the government about
why this happened.”
andrew.roth@washpost.com
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
Trump says move doesn’t alter commitment to peace process
formally recognize Jerusalem as
Israel’s capital today appears to
be driven more by his desire to
fulfill a campaign pledge than to
generate progress towards direct
peace talks,” said Sen. Christopher A. Coons (D-Del.), a member
of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee.
JERUSALEM FROM A1
“long-overdue step” and suggested his predecessors might have
“lacked courage” to make such a
decision.
Yet in ordering the State Department to begin planning to
move the embassy from Tel Aviv
to Jerusalem over the next several years, Trump risked inflaming tensions in the region and
making it more difficult to forge
what he once called the “ultimate
deal” — to bring peace between
Israelis and Palestinians.
A White House team led by
senior adviser Jared Kushner,
Trump’s son-in-law, continues to
work on a peace plan that is
expected to be unveiled next year.
But despite concerns from some
top aides, Trump chose to isolate
the United States from much of
the international community on
another high-stakes diplomatic
issue.
The pronouncement comes after Trump chose this year to
withdraw the United States from
a global climate pact and to
decertify the Iran nuclear deal,
forcing Congress to determine
whether to hit Tehran with new
sanctions.
No other country maintains an
embassy in Jerusalem, and U.S.
allies Germany, Britain and
France objected to the move.
“We cannot solve our problems
by making the same failed assumptions and repeating the
same failed strategies of the past,”
Trump said, noting that a lasting
peace deal between the Israelis
and Palestinians has remained
elusive even as the U.S. Embassy
has remained in Tel Aviv.
Though Trump won plaudits
from congressional lawmakers
who have pushed for a stronger
pro-Israel policy, his announcement was met with widespread
skepticism among Arab nations.
Thousands of Palestinians
demonstrated on the streets in
Gaza City in protest, while the
militant group Hamas predicted
the move would “open the doors
of hell” on U.S. interests in the
region. Palestinian Authority
President Mahmoud Abbas, who
spoke with Trump by phone on
Tuesday, slammed the announcement as “reprehensible” and
called it a “declaration of withdrawal” by the United States
from the peace process.
The move “would lead us into
wars that will never end,” Abbas
said.
In Brussels, international officials chided Secretary of State
Rex Tillerson during a NATO
gathering.
“We think it’s an unwise step
and a counterproductive step,”
Dutch Foreign Minister Halbe
Zijlstra said. “If we want to solve
at some moment the conflict
between the Palestinians and the
Israelis, we need a two-state solution, and a one-sided step is not
going to help.”
Inside the West Wing, Trump
was said to be frustrated by the
“We cannot solve our
problems by making
the same failed
assumptions and
repeating the same
failed strategies of
the past.”
President Trump
MOHAMMED SABER/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh, at lower center with white beard, attends a protest in Gaza City against the U.S. decision to recognize
Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. The militant group predicted the move would “open the doors of hell” on U.S. interests in the region.
slow pace of the peace process
and anxious to move forward on
a declaration on Jerusalem as the
deadline approached for him to
sign another six-month national
security waiver to keep the embassy in Tel Aviv, as outlined in a
1995 law.
Though aides said Trump will
sign the waiver for a second time
to ensure that funding for construction and maintenance is not
cut off, he expects the State Department to begin hiring architects and engineers to design a
new building in Jerusalem for the
1,000 employees now serving in
Tel Aviv.
In his remarks, Trump insisted
he is not putting his thumb on the
scale for Israel, emphasizing that
Jerusalem has long served as the
headquarters for Israel’s parliament, Supreme Court and prime
minister’s offices.
“I want to make one point very
clear: This decision is not intended in any way to reflect a departure from our strong commitment to facilitate a lasting peace
agreement,” Trump said. The decision, he said, does not change
U.S. policy on any “final status
issues” such as the resolution of
contested borders.
“Those questions are up to the
parties involved,” Trump said.
In Israel, officials illuminated
the ancient walls of Jerusalem’s
Old City with Israeli and American flags, and Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu called it “a
historic day.” He said his nation is
Palestinian towns
Israeli settlement inside the West Bank
Ramallah
Med. Sea
LEB.
Damascus
SYRIA
Golan
Heights
ISRAEL
W E S T
B A N K
WEST
BANK
Tel Aviv
Jerusalem
GAZA
Jerusalem
municipal
boundary
(disputed)
Green Line
(under 1949
armistice
accord)
Amman
JORDAN
EGYPT
50 MILES
East
Jerusalem
1 MILE
Mount
Scopus
I S R A E L
U.S. Consulate
General
Old
City
West
Jerusalem
Ma’ale
Adumim
Land once earmarked
for U.S. Embassy
The Consular
Section
Jerusalem municipal
boundary (disputed)
W E S T
B A N K
Bethlehem
Sources: B’Tselem, satellite imagery via Planet
THE WASHINGTON POST
What you need to know: The Post’s Ishaan Tharoor explains the
significance of recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and what it means
for the prospect of peace in the Middle East, at wapo.st/JERUSALEM1207.
“profoundly grateful to the president for his courageous and just
decision.”
In an act of protest, Palestinians turned off the Christmas
lights on a tree outside Bethlehem’s Church of the Nativity and
on another tree in Ramallah.
Trump campaigned on a promise to relocate the embassy to
Jerusalem, a move popular
among evangelical leaders who
offered him crucial support. A
slew of them, including former
Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee and Robert Jeffress, senior
pastor at the First Baptist megachurch in Dallas, released statements of praise on Wednesday.
Trump also drew support on
Capitol Hill from Republicans
and some Democrats.
In a statement, Sen. Marco
Rubio (R-Fla.) called the announcement “an important step
in the right direction” and added
that “unequivocal recognition of
Jerusalem as Israel’s capital will
be complete when the U.S. embassy is officially relocated
there.”
Rep. Eliot L. Engel (N.Y.), the
top Democrat on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said the
decision “helps correct a decades-long indignity.”
But House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) called
Trump’s move premature and
warned of “mass protests” as
other Democrats also criticized
the announcement.
“President Trump’s decision to
Late last month, the State Department sent a memo to embassies in the Middle East warning
of potential unrest.
Robert Richer, a former head
of the CIA’s Middle Eastern division during the 2000s, warned
that the move will encourage
extremists and other U.S. opponents in the region while driving
despairing young Palestinians
into the streets.
“This unilateral decision, without real consultation with the
involved countries outside of Israel, will take away the hope of a
Palestinian state and will again
reinforce the notion that U.S.
interests in the region rest solely
with Israel,” said Richer, who
consults regularly with Arab
leaders in region.
White House aides emphasized that Trump’s decision
would make clear to Middle East
countries that the president
keeps his word, noting he is
fulfilling what he promised to do
during the campaign. One administration official, speaking on
the condition of anonymity, acknowledged that the Palestinians
would likely threaten to reject
peace talks.
But this person said the White
House recognized that peace
deals often are not linear in how
they are negotiated and that they
are often presumed dead more
than once before they reach the
finish line.
“A president who keeps his
word actually has the ability to
walk to other parties in the region and say, ‘Hey, I kept my word
to Israel, and I will keep my word
to you,’ ” said Ron Dermer, the
Israeli ambassador to Washington. “That is the most important
currency one has in the Middle
East.”
david.nakamura@washpost.com
Joby Warrick in Washington, Rick
Noack in Berlin, Loveday Morris and
Ruth Eglash in Jerusalem, and Carol
Morello in Brussels contributed to
this report.
On embassy in Israel, Trump was bent on doing what predecessors had not
TRUMP FROM A1
scored the president’s determination to break with past policy and
keep a key campaign pledge —
despite the potential risks to U.S.
interests in the region and the
goal of Middle East peace.
Announcing his decision at the
White House, Trump said that an
eventual embassy move to Jerusalem would protect American
interests. Most important, he
said, it would acknowledge the
“obvious” reality that Israelis
have made Jerusalem their political seat, despite the Palestinians’
hope to someday claim East Jerusalem as their own capital.
“Today, I am delivering,” he
said.
For two decades, U.S. presidents had promised to do what
Trump did Wednesday, but they
ultimately issued repeated waivers to a law requiring relocation
of the embassy. They said they
were postponing the issue in
hopes that it could be addressed
in an eventual Israeli-Palestinian
peace deal.
This summer, Trump “made
clear that he wasn’t thrilled”
when he signed a waiver of his
own, according to a senior administration official who, like
others, spoke on the condition of
anonymity to discuss internal
deliberations. That decision was
made with advice from the State
and Defense departments. At the
time, an initiative to forge a new
Israeli-Arab peace deal, led by
White House aides Jared Kushner and Jason Greenblatt, was
just getting underway.
At that point, “Jason and Jared
convinced him that they were
just at the beginning of building
relationships” in the region and
that “if we do this now, we won’t
have any relationships to fall
back on,” the official said.
That decision reset the clock to
the next twice-yearly waiver
deadline, which fell this week.
Within the administration,
key voices of support came
from Pence, Kushner and Nikki
Haley, Trump’s ambassador at the
United Nations.
Kushner, the president’s sonin-law, had supported the move
from early in Trump’s candidacy,
and Pence, who is to visit Israel
this month, told Trump that his
base would love the decision,
something the president liked to
hear.
An important outside voice
advising Trump to make the leap
was Adelson’s, according to several people familiar with the two
men’s conversations. At a White
House dinner earlier this year,
Adelson made the issue a main
topic, one person said. In the
months that followed, Adelson
periodically asked others close to
Trump what was causing the
delay and expressed frustration,
these people said.
At the same time, other Trump
advisers were making their case
against the move. Most prominent among them were Tillerson
and Defense Secretary Jim Mattis.
Tillerson, mindful of the death
of four Americans in militant
attacks in Benghazi, Libya, in
2012, “pushed back vocally,” one
White House official said. Already at odds with Trump over
other aspects of the president’s
approach to the Middle East,
Tillerson argued that the move
could unleash a dangerous chain
reaction across the region.
R.C. Hammond, a Tillerson
adviser, said Tillerson and Mattis
requested time to evaluate U.S.
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump, with Vice President Pence looking on, signs an
order Wednesday recognizing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.
outposts and fortify them if necessary.
Some outside confidants, including billionaire Tom Barrack,
urged Trump to hold off, worried
that the move would deepen regional tensions caused by Saudi
Arabia’s political shake-up and
Iran’s growing reach.
“It’s insane. We’re all resistant,” said one Trump confidant
who recently spoke to the president about it. “He doesn’t realize
what all he could trigger by doing
this.”
While Trump appeared to have
made up his mind, he continued
to solicit input, two White House
officials said, even asking random acquaintances about the
Middle East in recent months.
Several advisers said he did
not seem to have a full understanding of the issue and instead
appeared to be focused on “seeming pro-Israel,” in the words of
one, and “making a deal,” in the
words of another.
Once Trump indicated 10 days
ago that he would not sign a
second waiver, national security
adviser H.R. McMaster began
putting together options that officials assessed would result in
the least damage.
The debate came to a head at
a White House meeting Nov. 27 to
hash out the waiver issue. According to people briefed on the
meeting, Trump repeated his earlier assertions that he had to
follow through on his campaign
pledge, seemingly irritated by
objections over security and the
break with previous policy.
“The decision wasn’t driven by
the peace process,” one senior
official said. “The decision was
driven by his campaign promise.”
Chief regional allies including
Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Egypt
— where senior government officials have said they still have little
sense of the parameters of the
broader peace plan being fashioned by the Kushner-led team —
were not told definitively that the
decision had been made until late
last week. All have described the
Jerusalem decision as a step
backward in the peace process.
When Trump made contact
with Arab allies ahead of his
announcement, it was to notify
them, not to discuss the matter.
According to Nabil Shaath, an
adviser to Palestinian Authority
President Mahmoud Abbas,
Trump “just went on saying he
had to do it,” despite the Palestinian leader’s fervent objections.
Trump also notified Jordanian
King Abdullah II, a stalwart ally,
in a similar call. “It was a onesided conversation, with the
president saying, ‘This is what we
are going to do,’ ” said a Washington-based official briefed on details of the call. Trump said his
administration was still pushing
forward on a peace deal but gave
no details.
In the wake of Wednesday’s
statement, U.S. officials say they
expect a cooling-off period with
the Palestinians before any discussion of the peace process can
resume. But they are betting that
Abbas’s team cannot afford to
walk away, and Kushner, in particular, is trying to assure others
that a deal is still possible. White
House officials say a key test will
come later this month: whether
Abbas cancels his planned meeting with Pence.
Even officials with misgivings
sought to look on the bright side
Wednesday, saying that Trump’s
statement did nothing to change
any of the components being
considered by the administration
as parts of a comprehensive
peace agreement.
They repeatedly emphasized
what had not changed after the
president’s announcement, rather than what had. Trump’s statement, according to several officials, was carefully constructed
not to touch on any of the
“final-status” issues of an IsraeliPalestinian peace, including the
possibility of two states, with
borders yet to be determined,
and a Palestinian capital in East
Jerusalem. Kushner and his
team are expected to continue
forming their plan — which
officials say is now more than
just a blueprint.
The president provided a preview of this week’s decision to
major donors last weekend at a
fundraiser at the Manhattan
home of Blackstone chief executive Stephen Schwarzman. After
being showered with praise by
billionaire Ronald Lauder for being more pro-Israel than past
presidents, Trump promised that
within days he would declare
Jerusalem the capital and begin
the process of moving the embassy.
When another donor criticized
the timing of the decision, Trump
seemed taken aback.
“No, this is important to do
now,” Trump said, according to
someone who attended the event.
“This has gone on long enough.
Other presidents have put it off,
put it off. We’re not going to put it
off.”
He added that building an
embassy in Jerusalem might take
three or four years.
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
missy.ryan@washpost.com
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
Carol Morello in Vienna, Anne
Gearan in Berlin and Joby Warrick in
Washington contributed to this
report.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
In Jerusalem, joy and rage entwine
Israelis welcome
Trump’s decision, while
Palestinians see ‘red line’
Trump calls on Saudis
to let aid reach Yemen
BY
BY L OVEDAY M ORRIS
AND R UTH E GLASH
jerusalem — The ancient walls
of Jerusalem’s Old City were lit
up with images of the American
and Israeli flags Wednesday as a
token of appreciation of President Trump’s decision to formally recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s
capital. But in the nearby Palestinian city of Bethlehem, the
Christmas tree lights were
switched off in protest.
Trump’s announcement that
the U.S. Embassy would be
moved to Jerusalem upended a
decades-old Washington policy
and was met in Israel and the
Palestinian territories with
scenes of celebration and of fury.
After days of tense anticipation, Palestinians and Israelis
gathered around television sets
to hear the president lay out the
details of what he called a longoverdue decision.
“He pulled the trigger; Trump
pulled the trigger,” said Majdi
Busaileh, 43, as he watched incredulously at a social club in the
Shufat camp in East Jerusalem,
where the crowd had paused
from snooker and card games to
listen. Another man chimed in
with profanities.
“It’s a joyous occasion,” said
Ruth Lieberman, an Israeli political consultant across town. Lieberman said she had been busy
organizing ways to cheer the
announcement on social media
because rain had put a damper
on planned celebrations.
“We were hoping to dance in
the street, but we are dancing in
our hearts,” she said.
The bad weather also kept
Palestinian protests to a minimum, although some went
ahead in Gaza. An Israeli police
spokesman said the force was
prepared for the potential of
larger protests in Jerusalem on
Friday.
Successive U.S. administrations have held off moving the
embassy from Tel Aviv since the
mid-1990s, in line with an inter-
A13
RE
AHMAD GHARABLI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
U.S. and Israeli flags are projected Wednesday onto a wall of Jerusalem’s Old City in celebration of President
Trump’s decision to formally recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, a move condemned by Palestinians.
national consensus that Jerusalem’s status should be decided in
a final peace agreement between
the Israelis and the Palestinians.
However, Trump said continuing
that policy was “folly.”
His pledge to remain committed to the peace process was met
with derision by Palestinians. In
a televised address immediately
after Trump spoke, Palestinian
Authority President Mahmoud
Abbas said the United States had
signaled an end to its role as a
broker in the peace process.
Abbas said that the U.S. decision rewarded Israel for its occupation of Palestinian territories
and that the “reprehensible” act
undermined all peace efforts. He
described Jerusalem as the “eternal capital” of the Palestinian
people and said that wouldn’t
change.
Hamas, the militant group
that runs the Gaza Strip, described the move as an assault on
Palestinian rights that would
“open the doors of hell,” and
Islamic Jihad, the second-largest
militant group in Gaza, called it a
declaration of war. Thousands of
Palestinians gathered across the
coastal strip after evening
prayers to protest. Some held
banners declaring Jerusalem
a “red line.” Others burned U.S.
flags and pictures of Trump amid
cheers from the crowds.
In the social club, Hamdi Diab,
a camp leader, described the
situation as a “time bomb.”
“This is an unprecedented,
very dangerous escalation from
the president of the United
States,” he said. “It will ignite a
third intifada.”
Israelis see Jerusalem as their
eternal and undivided capital,
while for Palestinians, the eastern part of the city is the future
capital of a Palestinian state.
Abbas said the U.S. move would
galvanize the Palestinian struggle for independence.
Abdullah Alqam, who coordinates Palestinian factions in East
Jerusalem, echoed that sentiment. “This is our land,” he said.
“We will live in it; we will die in
it. This step will only encourage
radicalism.”
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, however, called
Wednesday a “historic day.”
“Jerusalem has been the focus
of our hopes, our dreams, our
prayers for three millennia,” he
said. “Jerusalem has been the
capital of the Jewish people for
3,000 years.”
Some Israelis were more
guarded, greeting Trump’s move
as simply an acknowledgment of
the status quo. Others said they
hadn’t realized the United States
did not already recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.
“This announcement could be
monumental but, at the same
time, very anticlimactic,” said
Yoni Katz, a Jerusalem resident.
But Lieberman, the political
consultant, said she and others
want to make sure Americans
know how they feel about
Trump’s decision.
“We welcome it,” she said. “It is
not something new, but it is an
important but understandable
step by the administration. We
would like to say thank you in a
big way.”
loveday.morris@washpost.com
ruth.eglash@washpost.com
Hazem Balousha in Gaza City and
Sufian Taha in Jerusalem
contributed to this report.
M AX B EARAK
President Trump on Wednesday called on Saudi Arabia to allow food, fuel, water and medicine
to reach the people of Yemen, in a
statement that reflected the growing alarm of relief agencies and
amounted to an unusually harsh
public scolding of one of his administration’s closest allies.
The Saudis have imposed intermittent blockades on Yemen, their
southern neighbor, including one
that was partially lifted last week.
Saudi Arabia’s intervention in
Yemen’s civil war has devastated
the Yemeni economy and infrastructure, leaving millions at risk
of starvation and reliant on humanitarian aid. The United States
sells weaponry and provides intelligence to the Saudis and their
partners in the military offensive.
Since the coalition intervention
began, Yemen has increasingly become a proxy battleground between Saudi Arabia and archrival
Iran, which supports the largely
Shiite leadership of a group
known as the Houthis, who now
control much of the country’s
north and west.
Trump’s statement came after
the second consecutive night of
Saudi airstrikes in Yemen’s capital, Sanaa, as the Saudi-led coalition tried to prevent the Houthis
from consolidating power in the
city. On Monday, rebel fighters
killed Ali Abdullah Saleh, Yemen’s
president from 1978 to 2012.
Saleh’s death occurred days after
he publicly broke off his wartime
alliance with the Houthis while
indicating an openness to negotiations with the coalition.
Saleh’s death has added to
growing concern that Yemen’s war
is entering a new and more destructive phase.
The Saudi-led coalition and allied forces have stated their intention to recapture Sanaa from the
Houthis, raising the possibility of
fierce urban warfare in Yemen’s
most populous city, a place already
suffering severe shortages of electricity and essential goods as a
result of the conflict.
Street skirmishes spread across
Sanaa with news of Saleh’s death,
and the International Committee
of the Red Cross said that 234
people had been killed and nearly
500 injured since Monday.
The street fighting has subsided, and residents have taken the
opportunity to restock basic supplies. Aid workers and locals described the two-day pounding of
the city as among the most intense
since the coalition became involved in Yemen’s civil war nearly
three years ago.
The conflict has created a humanitarian catastrophe in Yemen.
Food, medicine and fuel are scarce
and too expensive for most to afford. Drinking water is hard to
come by. More than 10,000 people
have been killed and 2 million
displaced, and 7 million are totally
reliant on humanitarian aid.
Without that aid, a famine would
immediately break out, international observers say.
This week’s fighting resulted in
the disruption of emergency services in Sanaa.
“Hospitals in Sanaa use fuel for
generators that are their only
source of electricity,” said Iolanda
Jacquemet, a spokeswoman for
the Red Cross. “Any interruption
because of fighting means hospitals essentially stop functioning.”
Saleh was ousted in 2012 during
the Arab Spring, and his death
recalled images of a similar fate
met by Moammar Gaddafi in Libya during the uprising there. But
Saleh survived much longer. After
losing power, he stayed in Yemen,
retained loyal army commanders
and forged an alliance with his
former enemies, the Houthis,
against the current internationally recognized president of Yemen,
Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi.
Together, they took over Sanaa
in 2014, then expanded their control to most of the north and west
of the country, provoking Saudi
intervention. This year, some commanders loyal to Saleh began taking orders from the Houthis,
which may have pushed Saleh
toward his dramatic and fateful
decision to switch sides in the
conflict. Saleh’s son Salah said via
Facebook on Tuesday that he
would not accept condolences for
his father’s death until “after
avenging the blood.”
max.bearak@washpost.com
Kareem Fahim in Riyadh, Saudi
Arabia, and Ali al-Mujahed in Sanaa,
Yemen, contributed to this report.
Messy Brexit unleashes May’s foes
While wrestling E.U.,
British leader is besieged
by critics at home
BY
W ILLIAM B OOTH
london — It is obvious that
Prime Minister Theresa May is no
longer negotiating with just the
Europeans over Britain’s messy
exit from the union. Talks are far
tougher at home — where she
faces blistering arguments on all
sides, including revolt among her
own ministers.
During a question-and-answer
session in Parliament on Wednesday, the leader of the opposition,
the Labour Party’s Jeremy Corbyn, declared that Brexit talks had
become “a shambles.”
More worrying for May, members of her own Conservative Party challenged her, too, wondering
aloud whether she had the resolve
to negotiate a tough, decisive exit
from the European Union or was
getting wobbly under the mounting pressure of deadlines coming
next week.
One of the most insistent Brexiteers, the Tory parliamentarian
Jacob Rees-Mogg, asked in withering diction whether the prime
minister needed to “apply a new
coat of paint to her red lines,
because I fear on Monday they
were beginning to look a bit pink.”
His challenge to his leader was
answered by jeers and harrumphing from the benches on both
sides in the House of Commons.
Rees-Mogg was referring to the
spectacular meltdown on Monday in Brussels, when May was
just hours away from presenting a
preliminary, Phase 1 kind of deal
on exiting the European Union,
only to have it snatched away by
her coalition partner in government, the tiny Democratic Unionist Party of Northern Ireland.
The unionists, who appear to
have been kept mostly in the dark,
rebelled at the last minute against
vague but still meaningful language from May that was designed to maintain an open border between Northern Ireland,
which is part of the United Kingdom, and the Republic of Ireland,
which is in the E.U.
As May was fending off mockery in Parliament, the British political press reported that hardline Brexiteers in her cabinet, led
ANDY RAIN/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY-EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Prime Minister Theresa May has come under fire even from
members of her own Conservative Party over Brexit.
by Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, were expressing “genuine
fear,” according to the Telegraph
newspaper, that May was leading
Britain toward a dreaded “soft
Brexit.”
Citizens of the U.K. approved
leaving the European Union in a
historic referendum in June 2016,
by 52 percent to 48 percent. But
the British public today — and
political leaders most of all —
continue to be divided and very
unclear about the terms of the
split.
There are many who want a
“soft Brexit” — in which many of
the existing arrangements between the U.K. and the continent
are preserved, including the single market and the customs union
— and others who demand a “hard
Brexit,” a decisive snip of the umbilical cord that has joined the two
since 1972. They want a Britain
“sovereign and free,” they say.
There is also a large third group
that considers the whole idea of
leaving the European bloc a catastrophic blunder.
In Parliament, opposition leader Corbyn began his grilling of the
prime minister on Wednesday by
quoting her trade secretary, Liam
Fox, who last summer said Brexit
negotiations would be “the easiest
in human history.”
Corbyn asked, his voice dripping with derision: “Does the
prime minister still agree with
that assessment?”
May replied, “Negotiations are
in progress, and very good progress has been made.” She said that
only “a couple of things” need to
be agreed upon with the Europeans before talks on trade and
future relations can begin.
It was not only May in a harsh
light, but also her Brexit secretary,
David Davis, who on Wednesday
was accused of misleading Parliament after he conceded that his
government had not done a deep
analysis, economic sector by economic sector, on the possible effects of Brexit — even after his
repeated suggestions that such
studies were ongoing.
On the question of what to do
about the Ireland-Northern Ireland border in a post-Brexit
world, confusion continued.
Arlene Foster, the leader of the
Democratic
Unionist
Party
[DUP], had a short telephone conversation with May on Wednesday
morning. According to the Guardian, Foster had refused to take
May’s calls for 24 hours while the
sides haggled.
Foster — who has said that her
party will not accept any form of
“regulatory divergence” that separates Northern Ireland from the
rest of the U.K. — is expected to
travel to London at some point for
face-to-face discussions on the issue of the Irish border.
In Dublin, Irish Prime Minister
Leo Varadkar told lawmakers on
Wednesday that the DUP does not
represent everyone in Northern
Ireland. The DUP backed Brexit in
the E.U. referendum, but the majority of voters in Northern Ireland voted to “remain” in the E.U.
william.booth@washpost.com
Karla Adam contributed to this report.
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
Economy & Business
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Amazon needs diversity
in top ranks, group says
Starbucks bets big in country traditionally known for tea
Call for gender parity in
senior roles comes amid
harassment allegations
BY
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Customers wait for their coffee at the Starbucks Reserve Roastery in Shanghai. At 30,000 square feet, the
newly opened cafe is Starbucks’s largest in the world and features a roastery where visitors can learn about
brewing methods. Although China is traditionally a tea-drinking country, its coffee scene is gaining steam.
A potential path for silenced accusers
Bill would let victims
of workplace harassment
sidestep legal barriers
BY
D REW H ARWELL
New legislation proposed
Wednesday would prevent companies from keeping sexual harassment complaints from employees in private arbitration,
where accusations are kept confidential and companies can influence who adjudicates the case.
The bipartisan bill would allow
victims of sexual harassment or
gender discrimination in the
workplace to take their claims to
court instead.
“If you have been subjected to
sexual harassment or discrimination in the workplace, we think
you, not the employer, should
have the right to choose to go to
court,” said Rep. Cheri Bustos (DIll.), who introduced the bill. “No
more telling women they have to
put up with harassment and stay
silent any longer.”
In a year of broken silence
about sexual harassment, the bill
offered a reminder that accusers’
quest for resolution is often complicated or kept out of reach by
legal restrictions beyond their
control. Forced-arbitration agreements have been repeatedly cited
this year as a barrier for women
seeking to name perpetrators of
sexual misconduct.
Bustos said that she was inspired to pursue the legislation by
a class-action case involving Signet Jewelers, the parent company
of Jared the Galleria of Jewelry,
Kay Jewelers and Sterling Jewelers, whose workers must sign
forced-arbitration agreements as
a condition of their employment.
Roughly 250 former Sterling
employees filed sworn statements
as part of a class-action arbitration case alleging that female
workers in the late 1990s and
2000s were routinely groped, underpaid and pressured to cater to
their bosses’ sexual demands in
order to stay employed. Sterling
has disputed the allegations.
The arbitration was first filed in
2008 by more than a dozen women who accused the company of
widespread gender discrimination. The class-action case is still
unresolved and now includes
69,000 women who are current
and former employees of the company, which operates about 1,500
stores across the United States.
One of the original women who
brought the case, lawyers involved
in the hearing said, died in 2014 as
proceedings dragged on without
resolution.
Heather Ballou, a class member
in the lawsuit and a former Kay
employee who said she was pressured into having sex with a district manager promising to help
her transfer to a better store, said
she was encouraged by the legislation and hoped that it would make
it easier for women to break their
silence.
“That’s the whole reason I
didn’t come forward and a lot of
women haven’t come forward,”
Ballou said in an interview. “You
go to arbitration, and it’s a black
hole of nothing. Why would anyone do that when, in the process of
that, you are getting fired, you’re
ruining your reputation, you’re
getting blackballed by the industry, you’re ruining your life — and
nothing comes of it?”
David Bouffard, Signet’s vice
president of corporate affairs, said
in a statement: “We are currently
reviewing the legislation and
therefore cannot comment further on any specifics. Signet is
committed to maintaining a safe
and inclusive workplace, and we
remain confident that the systems
and practices in place for filing
grievances are fully compliant
with legal requirements.”
A trial in the private arbitration
is scheduled for next year.
Ballou, who left the company in
2009 and is studying to become a
nurse, said it has been difficult to
watch the recent months of highprofile sexual-harassment cases,
sparked by numerous women accusing movie producer Harvey
Weinstein of sexual misconduct.
While perpetrators in several
cases were exposed and quickly
vilified, she feels frustrated by the
arbitration’s private proceedings
and long-running limits on her
ability to speak openly about the
case.
“It felt empowering on one
hand that we aren’t the only ones,
but it scares me a little bit. All of
these celebrities have come out,
and it makes me feel like the little
people like me are going to get
tossed aside,” Ballou said.
“I didn’t have Harvey Weinstein,” she added, “but I had my
district manager, people in power
above me, do those things to me.”
Gretchen Carlson, a former Fox
News anchor who accused the network’s late chairman Roger Ailes
of punishing her for rejecting his
sexual demands, was prevented
by an arbitration agreement from
suing the company. Instead, she
sued Ailes directly and received a
$20 million settlement.
Carlson, speaking alongside
lawmakers at the Capitol Hill
news conference Wednesday,
called forced arbitration “unAmerican” and a “harasser’s best
friend.”
A growing number of U.S. companies require new workers to
sign employment agreements
forcing them to resolve disputes
through arbitration, a private legal system in which companies
often have the upper hand, labor
advocates say.
About 56 percent of private-sector nonunion employees, or more
than 60 million workers, are subject to forced-arbitration agreements, according to research from
the Economic Policy Institute, a
left-leaning think tank.
Sen. Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.), a co-sponsor of the bill,
said he hoped that the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Business
Roundtable and other businesscommunity leaders would speak
out against forced-arbitration
clauses, which he said provided
companies an unfair advantage
over employees. “It may be good
business” now, Graham said, but
“we’re going to make it bad business.”
drew.harwell@washpost.com
DIG ES T
RETAIL
It’s official: Wal-Mart
will now be Walmart
Wal-Mart Stores Inc. is getting
a new name: Walmart.
The change, which will be
official in February, is part of a
years-long effort by the world’s
largest retailer to get customers
to think beyond its 11,600 stores.
The company has spent billions
buying up websites such as
Jet.com and Bonobos, and is
encouraging customers to shop
online and through devices such
as Google Home.
“We felt it was best to have a
name that was consistent with
the idea that you can shop us
however you like as a customer,”
Doug McMillon, the company’s
president and chief executive,
said in a statement.
Roughly 95 percent of
Walmart’s sales are generated in
its stores, but executives say
there are signs that is changing.
The company has invested
heavily in online grocery and
same-day delivery programs, and
says online sales rose 50 percent
in the most recent quarters.
— Abha Bhattarai
AUTO INDUSTRY
VW exec sentenced to
seven years in scandal
A Volkswagen senior manager
was sentenced Wednesday in
federal court to seven years in
prison for concealing software
used to evade pollution limits on
nearly 600,000 diesel vehicles.
Lawyers spent roughly
90 minutes giving arguments
about Oliver Schmidt’s
culpability in the scandal. But
U.S. District Judge Sean Cox in
Detroit sided with prosecutors,
calling Schmidt a “key
conspirator” who saw the
coverup as an opportunity to
“climb the corporate ladder.”
Schmidt led VW’s engineering
and environmental office in
Michigan from 2012 to 2015.
Prosecutors said he misled
investigators and destroyed
documents.
— Associated Press
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Luxury goods companies may
ban sales of their products on
online platforms such as Amazon
to preserve their aura of
exclusivity, the European Union’s
top court said Wednesday. The
Court of Justice ruled in favor of
the German branch of luxury
cosmetics group Coty, whose
brands include Calvin Klein and
Marc Jacobs, which sought to
keep its products from selling on
nonauthorized digital sales
platforms. The court said Coty’s
effort “is appropriate to preserve
the luxury image of those goods.”
American businesses added a
robust 190,000 jobs in November,
according to a private survey, a
sign that hiring is strong enough
to reduce an already-low
unemployment rate. Payroll
processor ADP said Wednesday
that last month’s hiring followed
an even larger gain of 235,000 in
October. Manufacturers helped
drive the increase, adding
40,000 jobs, the largest gain this
year, ADP said. Health care
CURRENCIES
$1=112.27 YEN; EURO=$1.179
added 31,000 positions, and a
category that includes
restaurants and hotels hired
25,000.
U.S. worker productivity rose
3 percent in the third quarter, the
best showing in three years,
while labor costs fell for a second
straight quarter, the Labor
Department said Wednesday. The
increase in productivity in the
July-September period rose from
the 1.5 percent increase in the
second quarter and a scant
0.1 percent rise in the first three
months of the year. Labor costs
fell 0.2 percent after an even
bigger 1.2 percent decline in the
second quarter.
— From news services
COMING TODAY
8:30 a.m.: Labor Department
releases weekly jobless claims.
10 a.m.: Freddie Mac releases
weekly mortgage rates.
3 p.m.: Federal Reserve releases
consumer credit data for October.
J ENA M C G REGOR
In the wake of sexual harassment allegations against a nowformer Amazon executive, a
group that advocates for investors
sent a letter last week to the online
giant, urging it to improve the
diversity of its senior executive
ranks, among other things. The
letter is the second filed by CtW
Investment Group, which works
with union-sponsored pension
funds, and is a sign that some
investors are growing concerned
about the reputation hit companies could face from the recent
flood of harassment headlines.
“We believe that the evidence
suggests that Amazon’s gender
diversity gap creates significant
risks for long-term shareholders,
and that further delays in rethinking Amazon’s approach to human
capital management may have
dire consequences,” the organization’s executive director, Dieter
Waizenegger, said in the letter,
which is addressed to Amazon
chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos.
(Bezos owns The Washington
Post.)
The letter also cites the perception of Amazon as “an excessively
high-pressure workplace” and
calls for the board to take a number of steps, such as setting targets for gender diversity and having a labor-law expert review employment contracts. CtW, which
says the pension funds it works
with hold about 1 million Amazon
shares, or 0.2 percent of its outstanding shares, also plans to submit a shareholder resolution.
It is not clear whether the proposal would become part of Amazon’s next proxy statement, which
is required of a firm when soliciting shareholder votes. Companies
can request that the Securities
and Exchange Commission allow
them to exclude proposals if they
pertain to “ordinary business operations.”
Richard Clayton, CtW’s research director, said one of the
company’s concerns with Amazon
was the time lag between 2015 —
when producer Isa Hackett said
she made complaints to the company about behavior by Amazon
Studios executive Roy Price — and
this October, when Price resigned
from Amazon after being suspended by the company.
“Why was there a two-year delay?” Clayton said. “We’d want to
hear the board explain why that
happened.” (An email to a lawyer
who is reported to represent Price
was not returned.)
The letter also cites the number
of women Amazon has in senior
executive roles, compared with
other tech companies, and asserts
that could have an impact on how
the company addresses allegations. It cited numbers from a
recent New York Times story,
which reported that just one of
the top 16 executives (6 percent)
at Amazon, known as the “Steam,” is a woman. At Apple, five
of the top 19 executives listed on
its website (26 percent) are women. Six of the 13 people (46 percent) on Google chief executive
Sundar Pichai’s team are women,
and three of the 16 executives
listed on Microsoft’s website
(19 percent) are female.
An Amazon spokesman declined to comment on the letter. In
a statement previously reported
by the Hollywood Reporter, where
Hackett described her allegations,
an Amazon spokesman said: “We
take seriously any questions
about the conduct of our employees. We expect people to set high
standards for themselves; we encourage people to raise any concerns and we make it a priority to
investigate and address them.”
A recent report by the technology site Recode about the lack of
women at the top of Amazon
included a statement from a company diversity director, saying
Amazon was “seeking to recruit
more diverse leaders across the
company.”
Women run several of Amazon’s divisions, including Stephenie Landry at Prime Now, Jennifer
Cast at Amazon Books and Elaine
Chang, Amazon’s leader in China.
But these women are not part of
the S-team, which has been described as the core group of senior
executives that leads the company. In the company’s public diversity report, Amazon says 25 per-
cent of managers are women on a
global level.
More than two years ago, Amazon’s culture was the subject of a
lengthy report in the New York
Times that depicted the workplace as hard-charging and
“bruising,” prompting pushback
from the company. In a memo to
employees at the time, Bezos
wrote that “the article doesn’t
describe the Amazon I know” and
called on employees to bring any
stories to human resources or
email him directly. “Even if it’s
rare or isolated, our tolerance for
any such lack of empathy needs to
be zero,” he wrote.
In its letter, CtW urged the
board to “promptly commit” to
greater diversity among senior executives, setting specific targets
for how many senior women it
would add. It also asks Amazon to
create a “Stakeholder Advisory
Council” that would meet on sustainability issues including sexual
harassment, have a labor-law expert review employment agreements, and give more independence and authority to the company’s nine “affinity groups” — networks of employees such as
women in engineering or LGBT
workers.
It asks that the company aim
for gender parity on its board — a
rare feat in corporate America.
While Amazon has a greater percentage of women on the board
(three of Amazon’s 10 directors, or
30 percent, are women) than Apple (24 percent), Facebook
(25 percent) or Alphabet (25 percent), CtW suggests adding more
women would “significantly enhance the credibility of Amazon’s
commitment.”
CtW’s letter to Amazon is the
second it has sent as sexual harassment headlines have piled up
against powerful figures in media
and business. Following the sexual harassment scandal at Fox
News, CtW sent a letter to 21st
“We believe . . .
Amazon’s gender
diversity gap creates
significant risks for
long-term shareholders,
and that further delays
in rethinking Amazon’s
approach to human
capital management
may have dire
consequences.”
CtW in a letter to Amazon
Century Fox in October, charging
that the board failed to “effectively address the longtime ethics
crisis.”
In a response to CtW, the media
giant said in a letter that the
company “has acted swiftly and
decisively to address workplace
civility matters at Fox News,” including installing new leadership
and human resources executives,
changing the reporting structure
and adding an enhanced training
program for 7,000 employees.
Proxy adviser Institutional
Shareholder Services is sending
an email campaign to clients this
week promoting a database that
scans media reports, court records and Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filings for
sexual harassment controversies.
Data from the company’s responsible investing arm, ISS-Ethix,
show there have been 55 reported
sexual harassment controversies
affecting companies in the
S&P 500 this year, up from 27 last
year and 16 in 2012, the year it
began tracking the data.
Some say shareholders could
become more active on the topic.
21st Century Fox reached a settlement with a pension fund in
Michigan that includes establishing a “Workplace Professionalism
and Inclusion Council” and a
$90 million payment made to the
company from outside insurers
(minus fees).
There is not much question,
said Max Berger, a lawyer who
represented the Michigan municipal pension fund in that case,
that “there will be a robust increase in shareholder activism
around the claims of harassment
and discrimination at public companies.”
“It seems to be we’ve opened up
Pandora’s box.”
jena.mcgregor@washpost.com
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
GOP leaders said to be mulling smaller corporate tax cuts
ences that lawmakers are working through. These include the
effective date of the corporate tax
and handling of the alternative
minimum tax for individuals and
corporations.
But the centerpiece of the tax
bill is the corporate tax cut,
which the White House has said
will help spur economic growth,
hiring and investment, and boost
wages. Several Republicans com-
Last-minute changes in
legislation prompt search
for new revenue
BY D AMIAN
AND E RICA
P ALETTA
W ERNER
Leading Republicans are looking at scaling back some of the
corporate tax cuts that they are
trying to usher into law, two
people involved in the tax negotiations said, convinced that they
need to find new revenue to
make last-minute fixes to the
giant package moving through
Congress.
The House and Senate passed
separate tax cut packages in
recent weeks, and both bills
would lower the corporate tax
rate from 35 percent to 20 percent. But GOP negotiators are
openly discussing the possibility
of moving that rate up to 22
percent to free up more revenue,
people familiar with the discussions said. One of those people
said the 22 percent rate is “seriously under discussion.”
The two people spoke on the
condition of anonymity because
they are not authorized to discuss sensitive negotiations. No
decisions have been made. The
White House has been resistant
to making this change, but President Trump said casually on
Saturday morning that the 22
percent corporate rate might be
necessary. Each percentage
point that is added back to the
corporate rate would free up
about $100 billion in revenue
over 10 years. Still, White House
officials have tried to stress to
Congress in the past two days
that their strong preference is to
keep the corporate rate at 20
percent.
Senate Finance Committee
Chairman Orrin G. Hatch (RUtah) said that he, too, was
resistant to raising the rate.
“Not as far as I’m concerned,”
he said. “It’s still 20.”
The House and Senate must
pass matching tax bills before
Trump can sign the package into
law. But there are a number of
changes Republicans want that
would make the legislation more
costly, and the package cannot
add more than $1.5 trillion to the
debt over 10 years.
One of the changes they are
“There are very, very
few people that aren’t
benefiting by it,
but there’s that tiny
little sliver.”
President Trump, on the GOP tax plan
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Sen. Patrick J. Toomey (R-Pa.), center, waits on an elevator before votes on the Senate floor Wednesday. A Finance Committee member,
Toomey said he was not “predicting” that a 22 percent corporate tax rate would be among changes in the Republican plan.
considering would repeal, or at
least severely scale back, an alternative-minimum tax for corporations that tries to limit the
deductions and credits companies can take. Another major
change receiving growing attention would allow Americans to
deduct as much as $10,000 of
state income tax or local property tax from their federal income
tax. The House and Senate bills
would allow Americans to deduct only the property tax component, but lawmakers are looking to give people more flexibility.
Another leading Finance Committee member, Sen. Patrick J.
Toomey (R-Pa.), cited both of
those issues in acknowledging
that Republicans are looking for
new revenue sources to address
lingering problems.
“So we all understand there
are some things that are going to
have to change. So we’re going to
have to figure out how to do
that,” Toomey said. “But I’m not
predicting that we’re going to go
to a 22 percent corporate rate.”
The White House and Republican leaders have heard numerous complaints from wealthy
GOP donors in California and
New York who believe their taxes
could go up under the new
formula because of limitations
on deductions. They are trying to
make changes to address those
concern before the package is
completed.
Trump referenced these complaints Wednesday when he said
that the final Republican tax bill
should take care of the “tiny little
sliver” of people who don’t benefit under the legislation as written.
“I think we’re going to have a
fantastic tax bill. There are very,
very few people that aren’t benefiting by it, but there’s that tiny
little sliver,” Trump said.
The president’s comments
came as House and Senate Republicans worked to iron out
differences between the tax bills
passed by each chamber, with
the goal of sending compromise
legislation to Trump before
Christmas.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) endorsed one
change under consideration,
which would allow a $10,000
property-tax deduction in the
bill to apply to state income taxes
as well. “That sounds like a kind
of reasonable idea,” McConnell
told radio host Hugh Hewitt on
Wednesday.
There is believed to be more
than a “tiny little sliver” of
Americans who will miss out on
benefits from the GOP legislation, according to nonpartisan
analyses that show the bills skew
toward corporations and the
wealthy despite their billing as a
middle-class tax cut.
According to an analysis by
the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center, slightly more than 24 percent
of taxpayers would see a tax
increase by 2027 under the version of the bill passed by the
House.
Under the Senate-passed bill,
48 percent of taxpayers would
pay more by then, largely because of tax breaks that are set to
expire in five years. Republicans
insist those tax would be extended by a future Congress.
Both pieces of legislation feature a massive corporate tax cut
at their center and add more
than $1 trillion to the deficit, but
there are a host of smaller differ-
plained last week that GOP leaders had become obsessed with
holding the line on the 20 percent rate even if it meant bypassing tax cuts for families, but GOP
leaders were able to steer the bill
through both chambers of Congress with this level intact.
GOP leaders hope to settle the
issue soon.
The Senate voted Wednesday
51 to 47 to formally enter conference negotiations with the
House on the legislation, a procedural step needed to move the
process forward.
Ahead of the vote, Democrats
and Republicans delivered floor
speeches alternately excoriating
the legislation or praising it.
Democrats are unanimously opposed to the bill but powerless to
stop it, because Republicans are
employing special rules that allow passage with a simple majority instead of the 60 votes normally required in the 100-seat
Senate.
Trump also declared that “I
cannot wait to sign these giant
tax cuts,” inaccurately asserting,
as he has done repeatedly, that
they would be the largest tax cuts
the nation has ever seen.
And he predicted that gross
domestic product would begin to
grow by as much as 6 percent, a
figure that greatly exceeds — in
many cases even doubles — the
predictions of mainstream economists.
damian.paletta@washpost.com
erica.werner@washpost.com
Tax cuts may leave Washington low on ammunition for next recession battle
Policymakers will face
complex, costly choices
in event of downturn
BY
D AVID J . L YNCH
President Trump predicts that
the $1.5 trillion Republican tax cut
nearing final congressional approval will jolt the U.S. economy
into “high gear.”
He may be right. But despite the
sunny outlook, the nine-year-old
economic expansion, already the
third longest since 1854, will eventually end. And when the inevitable recession arrives, the United
States may find it harder to fight
than previous downturns — especially if it is severe.
An unexpected recession in the
next year or two would catch policymakers still grappling with the
aftereffects of the Great Recession
and lacking some of their traditional ammunition.
Short-term interest rates,
which the Federal Reserve typically cuts to spark a sagging economy,
already are near zero, once infla-
tion is taken into account. The
government’s ability to goose the
economy by cutting taxes or boosting spending also is squeezed by
the proposed tax cut, which the
nonpartisan Joint Committee on
Taxation says will add $1 trillion to
the national debt.
“There’re no tools left in the
toolbox,” says Daniel Alpert, managing partner at Westwood Capital in New York.
Even before Congress embraced plans to cut corporate and
individual income taxes, the federal budget deficit was expected to
rise steadily over the next decade,
reversing progress made in
shrinking the gap since 2009. By
2027, those annual shortfalls are
projected to drive the national
debt to its highest mark, relative to
the size of the economy, since 1947,
according to the Congressional
Budget Office.
Just the annual interest on the
debt in 2027 is expected to be
$818 billion — more than the entire budget that year for Medicaid,
which provides health insurance
for 68 million Americans.
With the United States confronting a mounting tab for the
baby boomers’ retirement and
Study: Richest 1% own
40% of country’s wealth
The wealthiest
1 percent of
CHRISTOPHER American
households own
INGRAHAM
40 percent of the
country’s wealth,
according to a new paper by
economist Edward N. Wolff.
That share is higher than it
has been at any point since at
least 1962, according to Wolff ’s
data, which comes from the
federal Survey of Consumer
Finances.
Since 2013, the share of
wealth owned by the 1 percent
has shot up by nearly three
percentage points. Wealth
owned by the bottom 90 percent,
meanwhile, fell over the same
period. Now, the top 1 percent of
households own more wealth
than the bottom 90 percent
Wonkblog
combined. That gap, between
the ultrawealthy and everyone
else, has only become wider in
the past several decades.
Let’s talk a bit about that
wealth gap. Wealth, often
described as net worth,
describes how much stuff you
actually have: It’s the value of
your assets minus the value of
your debts. If you have a
$250,000 house but you still owe
$200,000 to the bank on it, and
you have no other debts or
financial assets, that means your
net worth is $50,000.
In the United States, the
distribution of that wealth is
even more skewed toward the
top than the distribution of
income. For the sake of
illustration, let’s say that the
United States is a country of 100
health-care costs, the tax cut’s addition to the debt has some analysts warning that the nation is
testing the limits of its creditworthiness.
“You want to have a sound balance sheet so that when emergencies come along, you’re prepared
to fight them,” says Maya
MacGuineas, president of the nonpartisan Committee for a Respon-
sible Federal Budget. “If and when
the next recession arrives, we have
tied one of our hands behind our
backs.”
Still, Fed Chair Janet L. Yellen
has said she does not expect a
repeat of the recent financial crisis
“in our lifetimes,” and most economists say that the United States
could afford the sort of stimulus
measures that have been used to
fight typical downturns.
“The idea that because of the
tax bill we won’t be able to cut
taxes or increase spending during
a recession is incorrect,” says economist Michael Strain of the American Enterprise Institute.
With the economy growing at
an annual rate of 3.3 percent, no
one expects a recession any time
soon. The Federal Reserve projects the expansion to continue
through 2020.
But there are reasons to doubt
the sanguine forecast, including
the fact that recessions historically have taken both Wall Street and
Washington by surprise.
The Senate-passed version of
the massive tax overhaul includes
provisions that may rattle key
markets. Realtors have warned
that new limits on the mortgage
interest and state and local tax
deductions will cause home values
to fall by 10 percent — with bigger
losses in ultraexpensive coastal
markets.
“There is a reasonable shot that
these two provisions set off another systemic crisis,” says Alpert.
“This is something that’s very very
serious.”
At the Fed, the outgoing chair is
people, and all of the wealth in
the country — the homes and
land and financial assets — is
represented by 100 slices of pie.
That works out to an average
of one slice of pie per person,
which is exactly what everyone
would get if we lived in a society
where wealth was equally
distributed.
But that’s not the society we
live in, and indeed that’s not the
society that most of us want to
live in, either. People generally
agree that if you work harder,
you’re entitled to more of the
pie, and that if you don’t work
at all, well, barring certain
circumstances, no pie for you.
In 2010, Michael Norton and
Dan Ariely surveyed more than
5,500 people to find out how
they thought wealth should be
distributed in this country: How
much of the pie should go to the
top 20 percent of Americans,
and to the next 20 percent, and
so on, all the way down to the
bottom of the distribution?
On average, respondents said
that, in an ideal world, the top
20 percent of Americans would
get nearly one-third of the pie,
the second and middle quintiles
would get about 20 percent
each, and the bottom two
quintiles would get 13 and 11
slices, respectively.
In their ideal world, in other
words, the most productive
quintile of society would amass
roughly three times the wealth
of the least productive.
Now, let’s take a look at how
the pie is actually distributed.
These figures come from Wolff ’s
working paper, and he expands
on them further in his new book,
“A Century of Wealth in
America.”
The top 20 percent of
households actually own a
whopping 90 percent of the stuff
in America — 90 slices of pie!
That’s exactly 4 1/2 slices per
person, nearly triple their “ideal”
share according to Norton and
Ariely’s survey respondents.
Their average net worth:
$3 million.
That leaves just 10 percent of
the pie for the remaining
80 percent of the populace. The
next 20 percent of households
(average net worth: $273,600)
help themselves to eight slices,
while the middle 20 percent
($81,700 net worth, on average)
split a measly two slices.
The fourth quintile of
households gets literally
nothing: no pie. But they’re still
doing better than the bottom
20 percent of households, who
are actually in a state of pie
debt: Their net worth is
underwater, meaning they owe
more than they have. Combined,
the average net worth of the
bottom 40 percent of households
is minus-$8,900.
Among rich nations, the
United States stands out for the
extent of its wealth inequality.
The top 1 percent in the United
States own a much larger share
of the country’s wealth than the
1 percent elsewhere. The U.S.
1 percent gobbles up twice as
much pie (40 percent) as the
ZACH GIBSON/GETTY IMAGES
Outgoing Fed Chair Janet L. Yellen is expected next week to raise
the benchmark interest rate for a third time this year.
expected next week to raise the
benchmark interest rate for a
third time this year.
One reason Yellen wants to
raise rates, though inflation remains subdued, is to create room
for the Fed to lower them whenever the next recession arrives. Last
month, she said that the likelihood of interest rates returning to
zero “is uncomfortably high” even
amid an average downturn.
When that happens, the Fed is
likely to resume its unconventional asset-buying program even before it has finished selling off all
the securities it bought to fight the
last recession. That a policy once
regarded as a desperate response
to an epic financial crash might
become a common Fed tool is an
indication of the economic management challenge ahead.
“I think we’ll be all right because I don’t think we’ll get a
shock that big,” says Joseph Gagnon, a former Fed economist now
at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. “But you’d
like to have more room.”
1 percent in France, Britain or
Canada, and more than three
times as much as the 1 percent
in Finland.
This kind of extreme
inequality is bad for the
economy. The Organization for
Economic Cooperation and
Development, which represents
a number of the world’s richest
countries, including the United
States, estimates that inequality
has knocked nearly five
percentage points off the
economic growth in those
countries between 2000 and
2015.
In high-inequality countries,
people from poor households
typically have less access to
high-quality education. This
leads to “large amounts of
wasted potential and lower
social mobility,” which directly
harms economic growth,
according to the OECD.
david.lynch@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
wonkblog
christopher.ingraham@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/wonkblog
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
Google, Amazon put buyers in middle of streaming spat Out-of-pocket costs for
health care rose 3.9%
Two tech giants
are in a messy
streaming video
fight, leaving
HAYLEY
consumers
TSUKAYAMA
squeezed in the
middle.
Google on Tuesday said that it
would pull its YouTube apps from
Amazon.com’s Fire TV and Alexapowered Echo Show starting next
month. Why? Google pointed a
finger at Amazon, which has not
been selling some products from
Google and Nest, which is owned
by Google’s parent company.
Amazon also does not allow
Google products to have access to
its Prime Video streaming service,
the statement said.
(Amazon chief executive Jeffrey P.
Bezos owns The Washington Post.)
“Amazon doesn’t carry Google
products like Chromecast and
Google Home, doesn’t make
Prime Video available for Google
Cast users, and last month
stopped selling some of Nest’s
latest products,” the company
said in a statement to The Post.
“Given this lack of reciprocity, we
are no longer supporting YouTube
on Echo Show and Fire TV. We
hope we can reach an agreement
to resolve these issues soon.”
A statement from Amazon on
Tuesday did not address Google’s
claims but said that the online
retail giant did not block
consumer services and that
Amazon users could still access
YouTube.com on the Web on the
Echo Show and Fire TV.
can hurt consumers. It highlights
how much control the companies
that make devices and run video
services have and how willing they
are to use those products as
bargaining chips with one another.
Meanwhile, another longstanding streaming media tiff is
getting (somewhat) resolved. As of
Wednesday, Apple TV owners are
finally able to add Amazon’s Prime
Video to their devices — about
six months after Apple chief
executive Tim Cook promised the
service was on its way. The two
companies reportedly had trouble
negotiating while wearing the hats
of both partners and competitors.
There is no obligation for
Amazon to carry products of any
kind, and the company has
exercised its editorial decision
over its products before. But it’s
certainly not helping Amazon or
its consumers for the company to
limit its selection — particularly
cutting out such popular
competing products as Apple TV
— without real justification.
When Amazon stopped selling
Apple TV and Chromecast on its
site two years ago, the company
gave the thin excuse that it was
“important that the streaming
media players we sell interact
well with Prime Video to avoid
customer confusion.”
Amazon did not immediately
respond to a request for comment
on whether Apple TV will return
to its online store now that it
supports Amazon Prime.
The
Switch
ELAINE THOMPSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Amid a streaming feud, Google says it plans to pull its YouTube
apps from Amazon’s Fire TV, shown above, and Echo Show.
“Google is setting a
disappointing precedent by
selectively blocking customer
access to an open website,”
Amazon’s statement said. “We
hope to resolve this with Google
as soon as possible.”
These kinds of conflicts can be
confusing for consumers who
probably just want to watch the
things they like on the devices
they own.
“Consumers should not be
harmed in these kinds of business
disputes. Both Amazon and
Google need to put their
customers first instead of putting
them between a rock and a hard
place as a result of corporate
warfare,” said John Bergmayer,
senior counsel at the consumer
advocacy group Public
Knowledge.
This isn’t the first time the two
companies have sparred over
services. Google pulled YouTube
from the Echo Show in
September, saying that the way
Amazon had implemented
YouTube did not comply with
Google’s terms of service.
YouTube returned to the Echo
Show last month, before it was
pulled again on Tuesday. Variety
reported that Amazon’s latest
implementation also had termsof-service issues, which were
related to the way it used voice
commands.
The spat also exposes how the
interdependent state of streaming
media — in which companies often
partner with their competitors in
hopes of reaching more viewers —
hayley.tsukayama@washpost.com
Latest health-care deal reflects insurers’ strategy
BY
C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
lyst at investment firm Jefferies.
“At the end of the day, the beauty
of owning these practices is you
have greater control over a person’s whole health-care picture.”
United’s business segment,
Optum, will acquire DaVita Medical Group, which includes
300 clinics that provide primary
and specialist care, as well as
urgent care centers and half a
dozen surgery care centers.
Those clinics serve 1.7 million
patients each year in California,
Colorado, Florida, Nevada, New
Mexico and Washington. The
acquisition — set to close next
year — will expand the company’s move into clinics and surgical care centers.
The deal “advances our shared
goal of supporting physicians in
delivering exceptional patient
care in innovative and efficient
ways,” Larry C. Renfro, Optum’s
chief executive, said in a statement.
In CVS’s case, the deal joins
The nation's largest insurer,
UnitedHealth Group, announced
Wednesday that it would buy a
network of 300 primary care and
specialist clinics from dialysis
giant DaVita for $4.9 billion in
the latest deal reshaping the
business of health insurance.
The deal, which does not include DaVita’s main kidney-care
business, comes days after CVS
Health agreed to buy health
insurer Aetna for $69 billion.
Both acquisitions reflect strategies to try to own major entry
points into health care, whether
it is primary care doctors or
pharmacists, so that insurers can
better coordinate care, keep people healthy and hopefully control
rising costs.
“If you think about what Aetna
and United are trying to do,
basically, they’re trying to own
the quarterback of care,” said
Brian Tanquilut, an equity ana-
9,700 bricks-and-mortar pharmacies with Aetna’s 22 million
medical members. The idea is
that this nationwide network
could provide an alternative and
cheaper venue for many kinds of
basic health care.
Independent physicians have
expressed reservations about the
CVS deal, worrying that they
may be cut out of the equation
and that patients might get
worse care.
Zack Cooper, a health economist at Yale University, said those
anxieties are to be expected. “We
spend close to 20 percent of GDP
on health care, and most of us say
that shouldn’t be the case. Any
sorts of changes are going to
create turbulence for people who
are purveyors of the status quo,”
Cooper said.
There’s been a growing realization that high-deductible
health plans that shift costs to
consumers are a blunt tool to try
to decrease spending, because
they often deter people from
getting care instead of encouraging them to shop around. The
two deals represent companies
exploring new ways to rein in
costs — and the diversity in
approaches shows that no one
yet knows what will work.
There’s a hope, for example,
that people will substitute
cheaper MinuteClinics for expensive emergency room care in
the CVS deal, but evidence so far
suggests that the blossoming of
convenient walk-in clinics leads
people to utilize medical care
more — perhaps for conditions
that they never would have
sought care for in the past.
“It’s not clear yet which model
is preferable,” Cooper said. “Both
are highlighting the fact that you
need to fix the system to get at
health-care costs; you can’t just
beat consumers over the head
with higher and higher costsharing.”
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
and supplies and decreased
slightly for prescription drugs,
according to the analysis.
The most noticeable change
was a big slowdown in prescription-drug-spending
growth,
which made up 10 percent of the
total spending, or $328.6 billion.
(That spending number does not
include drugs administered by
physicians or hospitals.)
That decrease highlights the
effect that expensive new treatments used by large numbers of
people can have on national
spending. A new generation of
expensive hepatitis C drugs drove
national drug spending 12.4 percent higher in 2014 and 8.9 percent higher in 2015. In 2016, the
prescription drug spending increased by 1.3 percent, closer to
the rates in the years before the
new drugs were approved.
The authors of the report attributed that trend not just to the
hepatitis C drugs. There were also
2016 growth was fastest
in about a decade, but
overall spending slowed
BY
C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
U.S. health-care spending increased to $3.3 trillion in 2016,
with out-of-pocket health care
costs borne directly by consumers rising 3.9 percent — the fastest rate of growth since 2007.
The
findings,
published
Wednesday by Health Affairs, are
considered the authoritative
breakdown of American healthcare spending and are prepared
each year by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.
The overall rate of increase in
health-care spending experienced a slight slowdown over the
previous year, driven in part by
the expected moderation in
growth after the expansion of
insurance coverage through the
Affordable Care Act. There was
also a sharp decrease in the
growth of prescription drug expenditures, as hepatitis C treatment costs have declined and
fewer patients are receiving the
treatments.
But even as spending growth
slowed, health expenditures
swallowed a greater part of the
economy, with health expenditures making up 17.9 percent
share of gross domestic product
in 2016, from 15.9 percent in 2007.
The slowdown in spending
growth — a 4.3 percent increase
in 2016, following a 5.8 percent
growth the previous year —
stemmed from changes in an
array of health-care sectors.
Those include slower growth in
Medicaid spending after the
surge in enrollment caused by the
Affordable Care Act expansion, to
a marked slowdown in prescription drug spending growth that
had been pushed higher by the
approval of an expensive treatment for hepatitis C in 2013.
A shift toward insurance plans
that transfer more of the burden
of health-care costs onto patients
helped fuel the rise in out-ofpocket costs. In 2016, 29 percent
of people who received insurance
through employers were enrolled
in high-deductible plans, up from
20 percent in 2014. The size of the
deductibles also increased over
this time period, a 12 percent
increase in 2016 for individual
plans, compared with a 7 percent
increase in 2014.
Out-of-pocket spending grew
the most on medical equipment
A shift toward
insurance plans that
transfer more of the
burden of health-care
costs onto patients
helped fuel the rise in
out-of-pocket costs.
fewer brand-name drugs approved in 2016 — 22 new drugs,
compared with 45 the previous
year. Another factor was a slowdown in the growth of spending
on insulin, a lifesaving drug for
people with diabetes, in Medicare.
Insulin prices have been under
intense scrutiny as drugmakers
have increased the list prices of
insulin while claiming the true
cost to patients has remained flat
due to discounts and rebates.
Health-care spending has been
buffeted by unusual changes during the past decade. There was a
historic slowdown in growth due
to the Great Recession, and then
the Affordable Care Act’s expansion of health-insurance coverage
fueled spending.
The authors said the trend of
slower growth could be a sign
that normalcy is returning.
“Future health expenditure
trends are expected to be mostly
influenced by changes in economic conditions and demographics, as has historically been
the case,” the authors wrote.
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
THE MARKETS
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Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
25,000
Close
YTD
% Chg
24,140.91
–0.2
+22.2
23,000
21,000
19,000
Nasdaq Composite Index
7000
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
6776.38
+0.2
+25.9
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Diversified Consumer Svcs
Tobacco
Software
Internet Software & Svcs
Beverages
Media
Construction Materials
Energy Equipment & Svcs
Leisure Equipment & Prod
Auto Components
0
–12.0%
+12.0%
10.26
2.07
1.45
1.44
0.85
–1.61
–1.67
–1.69
–1.92
–3.27
5800
5200
S&P 500 Index
2629.27
0.0
+17.4
2675
2550
2425
2300
2175
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
73,268.35
15,910.63
47,000.54
1.0
0.0
–1.0
386.32
5374.35
12,998.85
7348.03
–0.1
0.0
–0.4
0.3
5945.71
4015.82
28,224.80
22,177.04
–0.4
–0.6
–2.1
–2.0
YTD % Chg
–30%
0%
+30%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
238.67
98.21
169.01
278.27
140.34
119.61
37.41
46.45
71.08
82.28
17.66
245.95
180.80
154.10
43.45
0.2
–0.5
–0.4
1.0
0.1
–0.6
0.3
0.4
–0.6
–0.7
–0.6
–1.0
–1.1
–0.8
0.0
33.7
32.6
45.9
78.7
51.3
1.6
23.8
12.0
24.2
–8.8
–44.1
2.7
34.8
–7.2
19.8
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
141.06
104.93
173.48
54.35
82.78
59.72
91.25
35.56
135.36
121.20
219.94
50.68
109.74
97.28
105.46
1.0
–0.7
0.3
–2.5
1.5
–1.2
–0.2
–0.2
0.0
0.8
–0.1
–0.5
1.1
–0.6
–1.6
22.4
21.6
42.5
–7.7
33.2
17.5
8.5
9.5
10.6
10.6
37.4
–5.1
40.7
40.7
1.2
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
Mexico $
1.1794
0.0089
1.3391
0.3090
0.7818
0.0529
0.0076
1.1354
0.2621
0.6629
0.0449
150.3380
34.6986
87.7790
5.9490
0.2308
0.5839
0.0396
EU € per
0.8479
Japan ¥ per
112.2700
132.4100
Britain £ per
0.7468
0.8807
0.0067
Brazil R$ per
3.2353
3.8152
0.0288
4.3325
Canada $ per
1.2790
1.5084
0.0113
1.7127
0.3953
2.5298
Mexico $ per
18.8714
22.2576
0.1680
25.2694
5.8330
0.1715
0.0678
14.7547
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 27,188.06
Russell 2000
1508.88
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 532.65
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
11.02
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
–0.1
–0.5
0.0
–2.7
YTD % Chg
16.8
11.2
19.1
–21.5
$2.9615
$3.5275
$55.96
$1,266.10
$2.92
+0.5
–0.3
–2.9
+0.1
+0.3
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded (Ticker)
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
% Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.5770
$15.96
$10.0275
$0.1445
$4.2525
–2.7
–0.7
–0.6
–3.0
–1.7
day
$900
month
$1100
$1000
–0.9
–0.1
–1.1
–0.1
–2.1
–2.4
0.0
0.3
–0.8
Gainers
Vera Bradley Inc
Aerovironment Inc
DaVita Inc
H&R Block Inc
KLX Inc
Oxford Industries
Brown-Forman Corp
Sucampo Pharma
VASCO
Cross Country Hlth
Cars.com Inc
Buckle Inc
Crane Co
AK Steel Holding
US Steel
Encore Wire Corp
Xperi Corp
Tempur Sealy
Express Inc
Adobe Systems Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$11.03
$54.47
$69.20
$28.99
$59.00
$72.05
$65.85
$14.95
$13.70
$14.10
$26.16
$22.70
$86.32
$5.03
$31.11
$48.50
$20.15
$58.18
$11.05
$173.52
27.7
25.9
13.6
10.3
9.4
8.9
6.2
5.3
5.0
4.9
4.7
4.6
4.6
4.4
4.3
4.1
3.9
3.8
3.8
3.6
Losers
OSI Systems Inc
Bill Barrett Corp
Fred's Inc
Liquidity Services
TimkenSteel Corp
Navigators Group
SRC Energy Inc
Unit Corp
Noble Corp plc
Newfield Expl
eHealth Inc
Francesca's
Chemours Co
CARBO Ceramics
NOW Inc
American Woodmark
Rowan Cos Plc
Superior Enrgy Svcs
USA Mobility Inc
DHI Group Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$59.52
$4.65
$4.14
$4.78
$12.83
$46.35
$8.11
$19.74
$4.18
$28.44
$19.57
$6.52
$46.35
$9.50
$10.10
$117.95
$14.20
$9.06
$16.05
$1.70
–29.2
–18.7
–18.7
–17.0
–14.0
–8.2
–7.2
–7.1
–7.1
–6.9
–6.8
–6.1
–6.0
–5.9
–5.8
–5.7
–5.7
–5.6
–5.6
–5.6
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6400
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.33
0.45
0.80
1.49
2.91
5.39
4.25%
3.83%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.18%
1.25%
Federal Funds
15-Year fixed mortgage
1.52%
LIBOR 3-Month
1-Year ARM
3.27%
10-year note
Yield: 2.33
2-year note
Yield: 1.80
5-year note
Yield: 2.12
6-month bill
Yield: 1.45
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Why so many women are still backing Roy Moore in the Alabama Senate race
The Daily
202
fairhope, ala.
— Roy Moore has
whoever came up with them is an
immoral and ugly person.”
During an appearance Tuesday
on CNN, Moore spokeswoman
Janet Porter noted that the
anchor interviewing her, Poppy
Harlow, is pregnant.
“Doug Jones says you can take
the life of that baby,” Porter said,
referring to Moore’s Democratic
opponent. Moore will “stand for
the rights of babies like yours, in
the womb, where his opponent
will support killing them up until
the moment of birth,” she added.
“Let’s leave my child out of
this,” Harlow replied.
the support of 4 in
10 women who are
likely to vote in
next week’s
Alabama special
election, a relatively strong
showing that explains why the
race is neck and neck.
In Washington, many
conservative women have
expressed varying degrees of
disgust with President Trump’s
decision to give a full-throated
endorsement to the embattled
Senate candidate and the
Republican National Committee’s
move to flood the state with
resources just weeks after cutting
Moore off.
Down in Dixie, though,
83 percent of Republican women
are backing Moore.
To understand the disconnect,
I asked 20 women who attended
Moore’s rally at a barn here last
night why they’re supporting
him. Here were the four most
common answers:
JAMES
HOHMANN
Why women came out to
oppose Moore:
1. They don’t believe Moore’s
accusers.
Five women told The
Washington Post last month that
Moore pursued them when they
were teenagers and he was in his
30s, including one who says he
touched her when she was 14.
Since then, four more women
have alleged that he made
unwanted sexual advances in the
late 1970s and early 1980s. Moore
denies any wrongdoing.
None of the women with whom
I spoke gave any credence to these
accounts. “He’s never been
convicted of anything,” said
Alisha Maddalena, 51, a server at
a restaurant outside Montgomery
and vice president of the
Alabama’s Bikers for Trump.
“Why would [these women] allow
him to sit in public office passing
judgment on people for 40 years if
he had done any of these things?
Why wait 40 years to bring it up?”
2. They want to show support
for the president.
“This election is really a
NICOLE CRAINE/BLOOMBERG NEWS
A woman hands out stickers and buttons on Tuesday before a rally for Roy Moore, the GOP candidate for U.S. Senate from Alabama.
referendum on President Trump,”
said Therese Gilmore, 59, who
owns a hair salon in Mobile. “Is
the swamp winning, or is the tea
party winning?”
After the rally, Gilmore said she
believes that congressional
Republicans betrayed the grass
roots by failing to repeal
Obamacare. She argues that elites
in both parties are trying to
delegitimize the presidency by
investigating Russian
interference in 2016, and she sees
criticisms of Moore as part of that
plot. “They still don’t want an
outsider,” Gilmore said. “They
still haven’t gotten the message,
even a year after we sent
President Trump to Washington.
. . . The Republican Party has
gone too far to the left. . . .
President Trump does things to
appease Mitch McConnell all the
time, and Mitch McConnell gives
the president nothing back in
return. . . . I hate to say this, but I
don’t believe a word of [the
accusers].
3. They want to shock the
system and send a message to
the establishment.
Several of these women hold
Moore in high esteem because he
refused an order to remove the
Ten Commandments from the
Alabama Supreme Court and was
willing to lose his job to take that
stand.
For some, the more he’s
attacked by elites, the more
energized they are about Moore’s
candidacy. Dorothy Basinger
Sanchez, 75, retired here with her
husband. She complained that
cable TV pundits, even on her
beloved Fox News, try to tell her
what she should think. “They
don’t have a clue what we want,”
she said.
“I feel like they’re trying to take
the common folks’ voice away. I
just don’t want my voice taken
away. Roy Moore speaks for folks
like us.”
There was a striking amount of
“us” vs. “them” rhetoric at the
event. Moore was one of those in
the “us” camp.
Former White House chief
strategist Stephen K. Bannon,
making his third trip to Alabama
for Moore, spoke at the rally for
half an hour. “He’s never claimed,
just like Donald Trump, that he’s
perfect,” Bannon said.
Gina Loudon, a conservative
TV personality, warmed up the
crowd for Bannon. She noted that
some are asking how women
could support Moore, and then
she turned the question around:
“Why would you listen to the
party of Bill Clinton, Al Franken
and John Conyers? . . . The
women of Alabama are smarter
than that.”
4. Abortion is a litmus test.
Amanda Martiniere, 30, is a
devout Roman Catholic and stayat-home mom. She praises Moore
for talking about his noexceptions opposition to
abortion. “Abortion is the big
thing,” she said. “I’m pro-life, and
nothing Doug Jones has said on
that is to my liking. . . . I have two
kids of my own, and the fact that
someone would want to end a
child’s life in the womb is horrific.
So I think the allegations against
Roy Moore are horrendous, and
About 70 protesters shouted
“Shame! Shame! Shame! at each
car turning in for the rally, and
two dozen women wore costumes
from “The Handmaid’s Tale.”
“I want the rest of the country
to know that not everyone in
Alabama is ignorant,” said Ginger
Poynter, 49, a local attorney. “We
need to bring decency and honor
back to politics, and it’s not going
to happen as long as Trump is
president.”
Leslie McElderry, a criminal
defense lawyer, said Moore’s
refusal to obey court orders when
he was the chief justice of
Alabama’s Supreme Court shows
that he thinks he’s above the law.
“I hear a lot about the sex abuse.
It was a long time ago. That
doesn’t excuse it, but it was a long
time ago. His abuse of power in
public office is more recent, and
that’s compelling to me,” said
McElderry, 58. I don’t think
they’re familiar with his record.
. . . It’s like watching a car
accident.”
“I think a lot of Southern
women are still stuck in the rut
where they feel like they have to
support their man, and their
husbands are supporting Roy
Moore,” added Marlene Lockett,
60.
“It’s changing, but not quickly
enough.”
james.hohmann@washpost.com
Ryan says Republicans will target health-care, welfare spending next year
House speaker cites need
to reduce national debt
on talk radio show
BY
J EFF S TEIN
Congressional
Republicans
next year will aim to reduce
spending on federal health-care
and anti-poverty programs,
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (RWis.) said Wednesday, citing the
need to reduce the national deficit.
“We’re going to have to get back
next year at entitlement reform,
which is how you tackle the debt
and the deficit,” Ryan said during
an appearance on Ross Kaminsky’s talk radio show. “Frankly, it’s
the health-care entitlements that
are the big drivers of our debt, so
we spend more time on the healthcare entitlements — because that’s
really where the problem lies, fiscally speaking.”
Ryan said that he believes he
has begun convincing President
Trump in their private conversa-
tions about the need to rein in
Medicare, the federal health-care
program that primarily insures
the elderly. As a candidate, Trump
vowed not to cut spending on
Social Security, Medicare or Medicaid. (Ryan also suggested that
congressional Republicans were
unlikely to try changing Social
Security because the rules of the
Senate forbid changes to the program through reconciliation —
the procedure the Senate can use
to pass legislation with only
50 votes.)
“I think the president is understanding that choice and competition works everywhere in health
care, especially in Medicare,” Ryan
said. “This has been my big thing
for many, many years. I think it’s
the biggest entitlement we’ve got
to reform.”
Ryan’s remarks add to the growing signs that top Republicans aim
to cut government spending next
year. Republicans are close to
passing a tax bill that nonpartisan
analysts say would increase the
deficit by at least $1 trillion over a
decade. Trump recently called on
Congress to move to cut welfare
spending after the tax bill, and
Senate Republicans have cited the
need to reduce the national deficit
while improving the economy.
“You also have to bring spending under control. And not discretionary spending. That isn’t the
driver of our debt. The driver of
our debt is the structure of Social
Security and Medicare for future
beneficiaries,” Sen. Marco Rubio
(R-Fla.) said last week.
While whipping votes for the
tax bill, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin G. Hatch (RUtah) attacked “liberal programs”
for the poor and said Congress
needed to stop wasting Americans’ money.
“We’re spending ourselves into
bankruptcy,” Hatch said. “Now,
let’s just be honest about it: We’re
in trouble. This country is in deep
debt. You don’t help the poor by
not solving the problems of debt,
and you don’t help the poor by
continually pushing more and
more liberal programs through.”
Trump has not clarified which
specific programs would be affected by the proposed “welfare reform,” though congressional Republicans are signaling that they
aim to impose work requirements
n
As See h
a
r
p
O
On
e
and Th
Today
Show!
on food stamps and direct cash
assistance for the poor.
“We have a welfare system
that’s trapping people in poverty
and effectively paying people not
to work,” Ryan told Kaminsky on
Wednesday. “We’ve got to work on
that.”
Liberals have alleged that the
GOP will use higher deficits — in
part caused by their tax bill — as a
pretext to accomplish the longheld conservative policy objective
of cutting government health-care
and social-service spending,
which the left says would hit the
poor the hardest.
“What’s coming next is all too
predictable: The deficit hawks
will come flying back after this bill
becomes law,” said Sen. Ron
Wyden (D-Ore.), the ranking Democrat on the finance committee,
during a speech on the tax debate.
“Republicans are already saying
‘entitlement reform’ and ‘welfare
reform’ are next up on the docket.
But nobody should be fooled —
that’s just code for attacks on Medicaid, on Medicare, on Social Security, on anti-hunger programs.”
On the Senate floor during the
tax debate, Sen. Bernie Sanders
(I-Vt.) asked Rubio and Sen. Patrick J. Toomey (R-Pa.) to promise
that Republicans would not advance cuts to Medicare and Social
Security after their tax bill. Toomey said that there was “no secret
plan” to do so, while Rubio said he
opposed cuts to either program
for current beneficiaries. However, neither closed the door to
changing the programs for future
beneficiaries.
“I am not going to support any
cuts to people who are on the
program and need those benefits.
But I want this program to survive,” Toomey said.
Sanders responded: “He just
told you he’s going to cut Social
Security.”
Many conservatives have long
argued for cutting and changing
social safety-net programs, arguing that anti-poverty programs
have failed and that Social Security spending is growing at an
unsustainable rate.
Still, members of both parties
have long been reluctant to cut
benefits, especially for seniors,
partly because of the potential
political cost of doing so. And in
discussing changes, Republicans,
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including Rubio, have largely confined their ideas to plans that
would affect new beneficiaries,
rather than current ones.
But it may be particularly difficult for Republicans to push those
measures ahead of the 2018 midterm elections, in which many in
swing states and districts face
well-funded Democratic challengers hoping to ride an anti-Trump
wave into office.
Ryan said he is optimistic, adding that Republicans could target
the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid next year in addition to
Medicare, despite their failure to
repeal the health-care law in 2017.
“We really need to convert our
health-care system to a patientcentered system, so we have more
choices and more competition.
Choice and competition brings
down prices and improves quality; government-run health care is
the opposite of that,” Ryan said.
“So I think these reforms that
we’ve been talking about, that
we’re still going to keep pushing,
that will help not just make Medicaid less expensive . . . but it will
help Medicare as well.”
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Get the argument right
EDITORIALS
Mr. Trump’s risky move
By recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, the president may score political points, but at what cost?
P
Mr. Trump cast himself as setting aside failed
conventional wisdom — he pointed out there has
been no peace deal — and of offering a fresh
approach. That’s a stance that may play well with his
domestic political base and with many Israelis. But
Mr. Trump is implicitly betting that previous presidents were wrong to worry about blowback in the
Middle East and beyond. That’s a big risk to take for
the scoring of political points.
So far, the president’s decision has been rejected
by every major U.S. ally in Europe and the Middle
East, including Britain, France, Egypt and Saudi
Arabia. It will put considerable pressure on Jordan,
Israel’s fragile neighbor, whose King Abdullah II sees
himself as a protector of Jerusalem’s holy Muslim
sites. It will probably make it harder to promote a
tacit alliance between Israel and Sunni Arab states
against Iran, as Tehran will surely exploit the
Jerusalem issue. It will also virtually ensure that
Palestinian leaders respond unfavorably to the peace
initiative the Trump administration says it is preparing. If violence erupts in Jerusalem or elsewhere in
the Middle East — and extremists will do their best
Undermining
America’s lands
to make that happen — Mr. Trump will be blamed.
Mr. Trump made some effort to mitigate such
damage. He said his administration was “not taking
a position [on] any final status issues, including the
specific boundaries of the Israeli sovereignty in
Jerusalem,” words that leave room for an eventual
settlement in which a Palestinian state would have
its capital on Jerusalem’s eastern side. He did not
refer to the “united Jerusalem” promoted by Israeli
leaders, who aspire to maintain permanent control
over neighborhoods where some 300,000 Palestinians live. He called for maintenance of the status quo
at the city’s holy sites, including Muslim holy places
that are currently controlled by Muslim authorities.
Nevertheless, those caveats had the ring of boilerplate inserted by the president’s advisers. The heart
of Mr. Trump’s speech was his boast that “while
previous presidents . . . failed to deliver” on their
campaign promises about Jerusalem, “I am delivering.” Those who genuinely hope for peace in the
Middle East can only hope that this preening display
will, as the president predicted, produce positive
rather than negative results.
Regarding the Dec. 5 news article “Yemen’s
deposed leader is killed, apparently by rebels”:
The assassination of former Yemeni president Ali
Abdullah Saleh was reminiscent of Libyan dictator
Moammar Gaddafi’s death at the hands of his
opponents. It stands both as a poignant reminder
that the vicious cycle of death and retribution in
this war- and poverty-ravaged country will continue for the foreseeable future and as a lesson to all
Arab despots that they can never escape atrocities
with impunity.
Yemen is in the grip of abject poverty, economic
turmoil and mismanagement, extremism, sectarianism, terrorism, food insecurity and an unprecedented humanitarian crisis. It is regrettable that a
peaceful revolution has turned into an ugly quarrel
for power. Let us hope that peace will prevail and
that Yemenis will gain the freedom and liberty they
aspire to.
Munjed Farid Al Qutob, London
P
Forget sticks. What about guns?
Condemnation of Charlottesville officials following release of the report by former U.S. attorney
Timothy Heaphy fails to give due consideration to
the ominous presence of the heavily armed selfstyled “militia” from Pennsylvania [“Charlottesville
rally study spreads blame,” front page, Dec. 2].
This invitation to violence is but one more reason
that we should all be concerned about the consequences of living in an open-carry state with lax gun
control. The main reason for concern, of course, is
that the Second Amendment’s very first phrase calls
for arms to be “well regulated,” and that is not
happening in Virginia. Forbidding clubs, sticks and
poles at the alt-right “rally” seems pretty specious
when people are flaunting guns at protests and other
public events, as well as in the supermarket.
Virginia S. Dopp, Williamsburg
and benefit nearby towns and cities. But the federal
government owns some lands that are simply too
precious to permanently sully in pursuit of temporary economic gains. Bears Ears, with its spectacular
canyons, buttes and unspoiled archaeological sites,
is one such place. Grand Staircase, a natural wonderland of ancient topology and fossilized prehistory, is
another. When administering such unique places,
the government must err on the side of conservation.
Even as Utah ran an expensive national ad
campaign encouraging Americans to visit the state’s
natural treasures, its congressional delegation
fought Bears Ears and they have cheered
Mr. Trump’s announcement. Yet even for them, the
reduction in size was radical. Utah officials had
previously proposed protecting an area much larger
than the truncated Bears Ears that Mr. Trump left as
he departed Salt Lake City. Now it is their responsibility to fill the conservation gaps that the president
has left.
Russia’s Olympic own goal
The cheating was homemade, and the punishment is justified.
T
HE INTERNATIONAL Olympic Committee’s
decision to ban Russia from the 2018 Winter
Games in South Korea will certainly enrage
and disappoint many Russians. They may
point out, correctly, that sports doping and cheating
exist in the West, too — witness Lance Armstrong.
But what’s important this time, as multiple investigations have revealed, is that doping in Russia was a
state-sponsored activity, under the sports ministry
and with help from the Federal Security Service, a
successor agency to the Soviet KGB. The unprecedented action by the IOC was justified.
Investigations have shown Russian cheating to be
widespread. Richard H. McLaren’s report last December for the World Anti-Doping Agency, based in
part on evidence obtained from the computer of a
Russian whistleblower, found that Russia had carried out an “institutional conspiracy” involving both
summer and winter athletes, the Ministry of Sport
and the FSB “for the purposes of manipulating
doping controls.” Moreover, the “systematic and
centralized cover up and manipulation of the doping
control process” extended from the London
2012 Summer Games to the Sochi 2014 Winter
Games, and for a while after that, too.
Perhaps the most remarkable and brazen corruption took place at Sochi, the extravaganza that
President Vladimir Putin hailed as a symbol of
Russia’s resurgence. Unbeknownst to the world at
the time, the Russian government ran a scheme to
tamper with the urine samples of Russian athletes,
including those who had been given a cocktail of
steroids. According to Mr. McLaren, at a Sochi
laboratory, dirty samples were passed through a
“mouse hole” where they were swapped for clean
ones. In the “well-oiled systemic cheating scheme,” if
any athletes using drugs to cheat were not shielded
from detection by the various field mechanisms
Russia had put in place, they were protected by a
“final fail-safe mechanism” that would falsify their
test results. Mr. McLaren found evidence that the
deputy sports minister was in charge of the process.
Russia’s Olympic gold medals at Sochi have been
revised in light of the findings from 13 to nine; silver
from 11 to four; bronze from nine to eight. All told,
Mr. McLaren reported that more than 1,000 Russian
athletes were either involved in or benefited from
the coverup and manipulation of the doping control
process. In South Korea, individual Russian athletes
who are clean, based on “strict conditions” and a
review by a special panel, are being invited as
“Olympic Athlete from Russia” with a uniform
bearing that name. There will be no Russian flag or
anthem. This seems a reasonable way to avoid
penalizing innocent athletes. Mr. Putin said Moscow
will not boycott the games.
In Russia, the IOC action may provoke howls of
protest that the West is maltreating Russia to gain
some advantage in a new Cold War. But this would be
quite wrong. The Russian cheating was homemade,
and Russian fans ought to be angry at their leadership for such reckless disregard for the integrity of
international sport.
ABCDE
I M M I G R A TI O N
Rein in the economy
Robert J. Samuelson’s Dec. 4 op-ed, “Beware an
economic boom. Really,” set forth some important
points. But it also missed a huge one. Any sensible
family will pay down its debt when it gets extra
income. Congress should be raising taxes to balance
the budget and pay down national debt now that the
economy is humming along. At the same time, the
extra taxes would also help bridle the growing
economy, as Mr. Samuelson rightly advocated doing.
Congress’s tax-cut bills would do the opposite. All
to enrich the rich.
Charles Murn, Washington
Who are the hard workers here?
Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) recently argued for the end of the estate tax as a reward and
incentive for hard work and investment [“Grassley’s
movie moment,” Act Four excerpt, Dec. 5]. In fact, by
definition, an estate tax does not reward hard work
— the hard workers are deceased at the time an
estate tax is imposed. An estate is income the
beneficiary did not work to earn. The imposition of
income taxes on a person’s hard labor, but not their
inheritance (which is gifted), speaks volumes about
what is rewarded in this current tax proposal. Hint:
It’s not hard-working people.
Mr. Grassley’s moralistic formulation about why it
is that some remain in the working class (and
therefore, I suppose, obliged to pay taxes) is also
revealing. But if he would like to do a case study on
differential spending patterns to determine who
among us is worthy of tax exemption, I suggest he
begin locally — 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., perhaps? I
wager that the 5,000 households affected by the
estate tax have spent more than their share on
“booze or women or movies.”
Irit Rasooly, Bala Cynwyd, Pa.
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Immigrants make this country great
I applaud the strong statement in The Post’s Dec. 4
editorial “An attack on America.” I agree that
the “president’s immigration policies are neither an
embrace of legality nor in the national interest.”
This past year, I suffered a mild
stroke, and through the swift actions of staff at the Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington, I have
thankfully recovered. The staff
helped me cope and persist. The
cultural diversity of the staff reflected the America I cherish. We
are already great because of the gifts such people bring
to our shores. Everyone in our country deserves the
care I received, not just those of us who are privileged.
I am deeply appreciative to all who administered
I can always tell when one of my arguments hits
home: My opponents deliberately distort what I
said, create a straw man, then knock it down. That is
precisely what The Post did in its reporting that a
“Dershowitz-Dowd theory” says the president cannot obstruct justice because he is the nation’s chief
law enforcement official [“Lawyer for Trump posits
legal immunity,” front page, Dec. 5].
I have repeatedly made precisely the opposite
point: A president can’t be charged with obstruction
of justice for merely exercising his constitutional
authority under Article II of the Constitution.
Presidents Richard Nixon’s and Bill Clinton’s impeachment articles included obstruction of justice
because they allegedly told witnesses to lie. Nixon’s
White House also paid hush money and destroyed
evidence. These independent and unlawful acts can
be the basis for obstruction of justice.
But a president’s decision to pardon a witness —
as President George H.W. Bush did with Caspar W.
Weinberger — cannot alone be the basis for an
obstruction-of-justice charge.
Nor can a president’s decision to fire any official in
the executive department. There is no
Dershowitz-Dowd argument, because I disagree
with John Dowd, President Trump’s personal lawyer,
on his broad point that a president can never be
guilty of obstruction of justice. Before attacking my
arguments, please present them accurately. Then
feel free to attack them on their merits and demerits.
Alan M. Dershowitz, Miami Beach
The writer is professor emeritus at
Harvard Law School.
May Yemenis eventually gain liberty
TOM TOLES
Mr. Trump has taken a shortsighted
approach to areas in Utah.
RESIDENT TRUMP entered the Oval Office
an avowed enemy of environmental protection. This week the degree of his shortsightedness became clearer, with announcements
suggesting he will aggressively undermine the measures his predecessors took to preserve precious
lands and resources.
In Salt Lake City on Monday, Mr. Trump withdrew
some 2 million acres of spectacular landscape from
two national monuments in southern Utah: Bears
Ears National Monument, which President Barack
Obama declared late last year, and Grand StaircaseEscalante National Monument, which has enjoyed
protection from drilling and other disturbances for
two decades. This single move constituted the
largest ever reduction in protected federal lands.
Then on Tuesday it emerged that Ryan Zinke,
Mr. Trump’s fox-in-henhouse interior secretary, will
recommend paring back or loosening restrictions on
10 more national monuments around the country.
Several environmental and Native American
groups immediately filed suit over Mr. Trump’s
withdrawal, claiming that, while the president can
unilaterally preserve land by creating or expanding
national monuments, the White House cannot on its
own withdraw acreage from existing monuments.
The question has not been tested in court. But the
groups face an uphill fight, considering that the law is
extremely deferential to the president and stipulates
that monuments should be only as large as is
necessary to protect objects of interest requiring
preservation. The administration will argue that Bill
Clinton, George W. Bush and Mr. Obama each abused
their authorities, setting aside vastly more federal
property than necessary to preserve American treasures, such as the ruins scattered around Bears Ears
and the geological wonders in Grand Staircase.
Yet while the legality of Mr. Trump’s move is
debatable, its ill wisdom is less so. In general, public
lands and waters should be open to development,
including drilling, so that the nation’s resources can
drive national growth, enable all sorts of recreation
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
RESIDENT TRUMP’S decision to recognize
Jerusalem as Israel’s capital has a certain
amount of common sense on its side. As a
practical matter, West Jerusalem has been
the seat of Israeli government since 1949, and no
conceivable formula for Palestinian statehood
would change that. Political leaders and diplomats
from around the world already visit government
offices there, even if their embassies remain in Tel
Aviv. As Mr. Trump put it, for the United States
finally to accept that the Jewish state has its capital
in Jerusalem is “nothing more or less than a
recognition of reality.”
At the same time, Presidents Bill Clinton, George
W. Bush and Barack Obama had good reasons for
holding back on such a move, even though they, like
Mr. Trump, had promised while on the campaign
trail to move the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem. They
calculated that what amounted to a mostly symbolic
step could undermine U.S. policy across the Middle
East as well as their hopes of brokering an IsraeliPalestinian settlement — and possibly trigger violence, including against Americans.
. THURSDAY,
compassionate care with skill and consistency at that
hospital and who represent the many sons and
daughters of immigrants to whom we should be
thankful — not only those who
work in our fields, construction
sites, kitchens and bathrooms but
also those in the corridors and labs
in our hospitals and by the bedside
of a frightened patient.
I write this letter also on behalf
of the hundreds of immigrants
who fill the pews each week in the
National Capital Presbytery,
where I am a moderator, and who remind us of their
gifts and deeply religious and faithful commitment to
the well-being of all.
The cultural diversity of
the hospital staff reflected
the America I cherish.
William Plitt, Arlington
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The ‘dreamers’ emergency
Regarding Paul Kane’s Dec. 3 @PKCapitol column, “Republicans savor a win that could be swept
aside by shutdown negotiations”:
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(R-Ky.) said there is no need for action on the
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program
because it is not a crisis or an emergency. Really, is
that his management style?
Maybe that’s why Congress can come up with
money for hurricane recovery but not to help people
to move out of houses that flood repeatedly. Still, it
seems that about 690,000 people not knowing what
is going to happen to them in three months is at least
as much of an emergency as the need for a deficitfinanced tax cut for a nation with a booming
economy and a $20 trillion debt.
Mike Zasadil, Silver Spring
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
Three
magical
little words
E.J. DIONNE JR.
Alabama’s election is a fight
for ‘honor and integrity’
J
ust how disordered have our
politics become? And how offthe-rails is the Republican Party?
The good people of Alabama
will help answer these questions in
next Tuesday’s special election for the
U.S. Senate. The whole world will be
watching them decide whether party
and ideology top decency and moderation; whether there is simply no end
to the extremism Republican voters
are willing to tolerate in their ranks;
and whether a majority in their state
believe that being a credibly accused
sexual predator is better than being a
Democrat.
They will also be telling us what
they think the word “Christian”
means.
The outcome is likely to be determined by the consciences of conservatives, and of a specific kind: those who
see Mitt Romney and Republicans like
him as far more reflective of their
moral sense than is Judge Roy Moore,
the GOP’s ethically defective nominee
whose indifference to the law led him
to be removed from Alabama’s Supreme Court twice.
Stephen K. Bannon, the former
Trump Svengali who proudly peddles
the ideological wares of the extreme
right, inadvertently clarified the
stakes at a Moore rally in south Alabama on Tuesday night with a malicious and spiteful attack on Romney.
The former Massachusetts governor
tweeted this week that having Moore
in the Senate “would be a stain on the
GOP and on the nation.”
Bannon’s response? “Judge Roy
Moore has more honor and integrity
in that pinkie finger than your entire
family has in its whole DNA.”
Yes, he really said that.
For good measure, Bannon not only
accused Romney of avoiding service
in Vietnam. He also trafficked in the
anti-Mormon sentiments common
among some evangelical Christians.
“You hid behind your religion,”
Bannon said of Romney. “You went to
France to be a missionary while guys
were dying in rice paddies in Vietnam.
Do not talk to me about honor and
integrity.” (And never mind that
“while guys were dying in rice paddies
in Vietnam,” the president whom Bannon served also avoided the war,
courtesy of five draft deferments.)
Bannon is many things, but a fool
he is not. It’s no accident he linked his
Vietnam attack to Romney’s missionary work, which underscored the 2012
Republican nominee’s deep commit-
ment to Mormonism.
Thanks to Bannon, we now know
that this is no longer just a race
between Moore and Democrat Doug
Jones, a former U.S. attorney who,
depending on the poll, is either slightly behind or slightly ahead. It is, in
very large part, a decision by Republicans about who they are.
It is also an important choice for
devoted Christians. Do they really
want their faith defined by those who
tried to justify Moore’s alleged relationships with young teenagers by
invoking the Holy Family and saying
that Joseph was older than Mary
(which, besides being absurd, is biblically unfounded)? Or by arguing that
an interest in young girls might be
explained by a desire for “a large
family,” as a professor at Ouachita
Baptist University wrote?
Do those saying such things not
realize that they are helping to discredit the very tradition they claim to
be defending? No atheist could inflict
this much damage to the faith.
This is how haywire politics has
gone in the age of Trump.
Party loyalty can, it’s true, be honorable if it is about the defense of
principles, and Moore’s backers say
they are sticking with him to oppose
abortion and multiply conservative
judges.
But these rationales ring hollow
given Moore’s utterly unconservative
claims as a judge that his theological
predilections overrode the law and his
lies about not profiting from his private charity, which suggest he is a
charlatan exploiting the beliefs of his
supporters for his own purposes.
Both Moore and President Trump
play on the feelings of marginalization experienced by many cultural
conservatives. It would be salutary for
such voters to declare that there are
limits to how much they will allow
themselves to be used by politicians
whose words and deeds are so often at
odds. If Moore is not the limiting case,
there are no limits.
Moore’s promoters, including Bannon, want to convince Alabama Republicans that since a Jones triumph
will be taken as a rebuke to Trump,
they have an obligation to fall into
line. But the long-term harm to the
GOP from a Moore victory will be far
greater than from one lost Senate seat.
Bannon is right to cast the election as
being about “honor and integrity.”
When it comes to these virtues, it is
not a close call.
ejdionne@washpost.com
GEORGE F. WILL
A tax plan worth a try
T
he Republicans’ tax legislation
is built on economic projections that are as confidently as
they are cheerfully made concerning the legislation’s shaping effect
on the economy over the next 10 years.
This claim to prescience must amaze
alumni of Bear Stearns and Lehman
Brothers, which were 85 and 158 years
old, respectively, when they expired
less than 10 years ago in the unanticipated Great Recession.
The predictions of gross domestic
product and revenue growth assume,
among many other things, continuation of the current expansion. It began
in June 2009 and has been notable for
its anemia relative to other post-1945
expansions: Its average annual
growth rate has been 2 percent; theirs,
4.3 percent. But it also has been remarkably durable. It is 102 months
old; the average since after World War
II is 58 months. Unless the business
cycle has been repealed, a recession is
almost a certainty during the 10-year
window for which the tax bill has been
tailored.
What the legislation’s drafters anticipate, indeed proclaim, is that Congress will not allow to happen what
the legislation says, with a wink, will
happen. So, this might mark the historic moment when Washington decided that it no longer will bother to
blush. The legislation says the tax
reductions for individuals will expire
by 2025. Treasury Secretary Steven
Mnuchin, however, says “we have every expectation that down the road
Congress will extend them.” Of course
Congress will. The phantom expiration is an $800 billion fudge, a cooking
of the books in order to cram the tax
bill into conformity with arcane parliamentary procedures that make the
measure immune to filibuster. We
have been down this road before: For
the same reason, some George W.
Bush tax cuts of 2001 were scheduled
to expire at the end of 2010; 82 percent
of them (measured by revenue) did
not.
The Democrats’ denunciation of the
Republicans’ tax cuts because they
especially benefit the wealthy is a
recyclable denunciation of any significant tax cut. The top 1 percent of
earners supply 39 percent of income
tax revenue, the top 10 percent supply
70 percent, the bottom 50 percent
supply 3 percent, 60 percent of households pay either no income taxes (45
percent) or less than 5 percent of their
income, and 62 percent of Americans
pay more in payroll taxes than in
income taxes. So, any tax cut significant to macroeconomic policy — any
that might change incentives sufficiently to substantially change businesses’ and individuals’ behaviors —
must be primarily a cut for the affluent.
Democrats pretend to worry that
Republicans are executing a diabolical
double play, using tax cuts to placate
donors, then citing the cuts’ enlargement of the national debt as an excuse
to cut entitlements. Surely Democrats
know that Republicans are not insubordinate to their president, who has
vowed to oppose any significant (i.e.,
touching Social Security or Medicare)
entitlement reforms. Besides, whenever Republicans run large budget
deficits — the tax legislation probably
means that the next decade’s will be
even larger than they would have been
— they serve the Democrats’ basic
agenda: They legitimize the bipartisan penchant for making big government seem cheap. Republicans, too,
give people $X worth of government
services and charge the recipients $Y,
with Y significantly less than X.
In 2002, when Dick Cheney — a
strict constructionist, but not of economic data — said “Reagan proved
deficits don’t matter,” the publicly
held national debt was 33 percent the
size of GDP; today it is 75 percent. At
some point, the debt’s size matters,
and we seem determined to learn the
hard way where that point is.
This tax legislation, an amalgam of
earnest hoping and transparent
make-believe, is a serious lunge for
sustained 3 percent growth. Without
this, the economy, and hence the entitlement state, will buckle beneath the
strain of 10,000 of the elderly each day
becoming eligible for Social Security
and Medicare. The Republicans purport to know how changed tax incentives will affect corporations’ and individuals’ decisions, and how those decisions will radiate through the economy. Republicans do not know —
nobody, including the Republicans’
equally overconfident critics, does —
but they might be right, and their
wager is worth trying.
Economics is a science of incentives, and like all sciences it is never
“settled.” Both sides, with their
thumping predictions, have given hostages to the future, which will deal
harshly with some. Perhaps most. Possibly all of them.
georgewill@washpost.com
BY
M ITCH D ANIELS
A
ED JONES/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES
An aid worker distributes blankets to Rohingya refugees in the Kutupalong
refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh.
The mantra after every
atrocity, ‘never again’
BY
C HERIE B LAIR
D
uring a recent trip to Bangladesh, I met Israt, whose family
comes from Burma’s Rakhine
state. Last month, the tragedy of
the conflict in her country literally came
home to Israt, when her family arrived in
Bangladesh as refugees fleeing devastation. They had lost their home and, most
horrifically of all, two of their children.
The events unfolding in Burma (also
known as Myanmar) are not without
precedent. The scale of the attacks, the
bloodshed, the alleged use of rape as a
weapon of war, the persecutory basis of
the atrocities, the inability of international institutions to halt the crisis —
these are all components of genocide
that have been seen in Cambodia, Rwanda and Bosnia and experienced by the
Yazidis in Iraq, to name a few. With each
new atrocity, the international community’s promise of “never again” rings ever
more hollow.
Our capacity to prevent mass killings
will be only as robust as our ability to
understand, predict and tackle their
causes. Talk of universal human rights
means little if we do not acknowledge
and act on the warning signs. Our disgust at impunity for these horrendous
crimes can be measured by the strength
and effectiveness of the mechanisms
aimed at bringing justice and reconciliation to the victims and survivors.
This week, as we mark World Genocide Commemoration Day, we must ask
ourselves whether the international justice system is fit for purpose. Sixty-nine
years ago, the U.N. convention on genocide was adopted, declaring that all
countries have an obligation to prevent
and punish genocide. How, then, will we
respond to recent events in Burma?
I visited Rwanda with then-first lady
Laura Bush in July 2005. Eleven years
earlier, in 1994, 100 days of bloodshed
were unleashed by the Hutu majority,
who murdered more than 800,000 in the
genocide against the Tutsi. While there, I
was invited to witness a trial of accused
génocidaires at a session of a gacaca
court, part of a traditional system of
community justice.
The Rwandan government resorted to
gacaca courts because national courts
lacked the capacity to try the 1.2 million
people accused of crimes in the genocide.
The official court system was in shambles, not least because the vast majority
of judges and prosecutors had been
killed or had fled the country. Survivors’
voices were at the heart of the gacaca
process, both as witnesses and accusers.
Sentences reflected the need to achieve
the almost unfathomable: enabling survivors and perpetrators to live together
as neighbors once again and to rebuild
their fractured country.
At the session I attended, survivors —
including widows and orphans of those
murdered — stood face to face with the
alleged perpetrators to seek the truth.
Remembering the victims and establishing what really happened were critically
important then and remains vital now.
These courts were not perfect, but they
played a pivotal role in bringing a sense
of unity and reconciliation to a bloodied
and divided nation. That the country has
not slipped back into conflict, 23 years
on, is testament in part to the contribution of the gacaca courts.
Even so, it was clear that domestic
trials and gacaca sessions had their
limits. In the aftermath of the genocide,
the United Nations established the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.
This internationally supported tribunal
sought the prosecution of “Category 1”
defendants — the alleged architects of
the genocide and those accused of the
most serious crimes. Efforts to set up a
similar mechanism to address the crimes
committed in Burma have already begun. The Yazidis, by contrast, are still
waiting.
My visit to the gacaca court session
took place more than a decade after the
genocide. As much time has passed
again, and yet many suspected génocidaires continue to walk free in the parts of
the world to which they fled. While
Sweden, the Netherlands and Germany
have all extradited suspected génocidaires to Rwanda in recent years, progress
is slow. In Britain, the High Court this
year blocked the extradition of five suspected ringleaders, meaning we may see
them tried in British courts instead. In
France, which has long struggled to come
to terms with its own role in the genocide, attempts to extradite or prosecute
suspected génocidaires have been
thwarted by the state.
Justice delayed is truly justice denied.
The conspiracy of silence around unresolved cases of genocide is a prime
example of international indifference
that perpetuates pain and suffering. It
gives succor to those who would devalue
or destroy human dignity, such as in
Burma, and extinguishes hope for a
world without genocide. Morally and
legally, no country should allow itself to
become a haven for perpetrators of this
crime of crimes.
“Never again,” the mantra repeated
after every atrocity, means delivering
justice for past tragedies. This should be
within the capacity of the international
community. We can start by applying the
lessons we should have learned from
Rwanda. Otherwise, the roll of victims
will only grow.
The writer is chair of Omnia Strategy, an
international law firm that is on Rwanda’s
panel of legal advisers.
RIGHT TURN
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/right-turn
Will Trump’s Jerusalem
move work?
As a practical matter, Jerusalem is the capital
of the Jewish state. The Knesset, the prime
minister’s office and the Israeli Supreme
Court are all located in West Jerusalem.
Moreover, Russia this year recognized West
Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, so it is not
as if the United States would be the lone
country to recognize Jerusalem’s effective
status as the seat of government. That said,
President Trump’s declaration Wednesday
the United States was recognizing Jerusalem
as Israel’s capital is quite different.
The move strikes me as cause neither for
wild celebration nor for apocalyptic talk. A
former senior Senate adviser, strongly supportive of the Jewish state and closely involved in Middle East issues, cautions that it
is “a distraction from far more important
things happening in the region that we
should be dealing with.” The former adviser
observes, “On my list of top 20 things for the
U.S. to do in the Middle East, this wouldn’t
make the cut — but neither do I think it’s
going to bring about the end of days, as a lot
of folks are now fulminating.”
The question on the recognition of Jerusalem is whether it does more harm than good
for U.S. interests and for Israel’s long-term
benefit. As for the former, it’s precisely
because Russia is not seen as an honest
broker for a peace process (albeit a moribund one) that its move was less controver-
sial. And by specifying that it was recognizing only West Jerusalem as the capital,
Russia emphasized that the final status of
the city remains open.
From the U.S. perspective, our decision
gives Arab states reason to rebuke, ignore
and defy our preferences. Grandstanding for
the benefit of Arab states’ domestic audiences may come back in style. If in the long run
we lose influence with Sunni states, whose
cooperation we need these days more than
usual, the move will be seen as counterproductive.
As for Israel, the elected government
plainly wants this recognition. The question
is whether this largely symbolic move will
backfire, making newly improved relations
with Sunni states more difficult. Will they
risk vital cooperation with Israel essential to
their own defense against their main threat,
Iranian aggression? It’s not unknown for an
Arab government to cut off its nose to spite
its face, but it seems that self-interested
security will prevail.
When it comes to Trump, the overriding
preoccupation is with pleasing his base —
which usually means doing the opposite of
what President Barack Obama did. In that
regard, his move “worked.” But Trump lacks
a coherent foreign policy — and grand
one-off gestures are a poor substitute. The
danger is that these symbolic actions —
pushed by reckless right-wing politicians
and hyped-up commentators — have detrimental real-world consequences.
— Jennifer Rubin
recent whim prompted me to
reread Stephen Ambrose’s “To
America,” a collection of reflections on the historian’s craft and
many of the topics and individuals Ambrose wrote about during his prolific
career. The book might have been titled
“Second Thoughts,” because virtually every chapter describes some significant
issue on which the author changed his
mind over the years: his estimation of
presidents such as U.S. Grant, Theodore
Roosevelt and Richard Nixon; Harry
Truman’s decision to use the atomic
bomb; the “robber barons” who built the
transcontinental railroad; the reality of
Soviet tyranny; and several more.
In many cases Ambrose relates how he
came to dispute conclusions that his
university professors and advisers peddled to him in his younger years. Elsewhere, he takes issue with his own
previous views. But in each instance, he
explains the evolution of his thinking,
and the grounds for it, without defensiveness or embarrassment.
When the book appeared, early in this
century, one would not have found such
admissions especially noteworthy. In
2017, they take on a more striking cast,
because ours is an era when it seems no
one ever confesses to being wrong. Moreover, everyone is so emphatically right
that those who disagree are not merely in
error but irredeemably so, candidates
not for persuasion but for castigation and
ostracism.
Social historians will need some time
and perspective to determine exactly
what led to the new closed-mindedness,
but some of the causes seem plain. One is
the effect of narrowcasting, in which
people find the sources of information
(or the sources’ algorithms find them)
that fortify their existing viewpoints and
prejudices. “Confirmation bias” has mutated from a hazard of academic research
to a menacing political and social phenomenon.
Ours is an era
when it seems
no one ever confesses
to being wrong.
Meanwhile, those institutions of higher learning — the adjective now almost
needs quotation marks — that should
cultivate and model openness to debate
and refutation too often have become
bastions of conformity and thought control.
John Maynard Keynes is frequently
credited with the aphorism “When I find
I’m wrong, I change my mind. What do
you do?” Today, the problem may less be
an attitude of stubbornness than that
fewer people than ever recognize their
mistakes in the first place.
In a well-documented fashion, steady
doses of viewpoint reinforcement lead
not only to a resistance to alternative
positions but also to a more entrenched
and passionate way in which thoughts
are held and expressed. When those
expressions are launched in the impersonal or even anonymous channels of
today’s social — or is it antisocial? —
media, vitriol often becomes the currency of discourse and second thoughts a
form of tribal desertion or defeat. Things
people would not say face to face are all
too easy to post in bouts of blogger or
tweeter one-upmanship.
So honest admissions of error are
more eye-catching these days. In recent
years, The Post’s Bob Woodward has
recounted how, a quarter-century later,
he had come to a very different interpretation of Gerald Ford’s pardon of Richard
Nixon. And how he wasn’t the only one;
Sen. Ted Kennedy, who excoriated Ford
at the time of his decision, joined Woodward in that assessment, and conferred
an award for political courage for the act
they had once deemed a corrupt bargain.
A few months back, the world lost Jay
Keyworth, nuclear scientist and presidential science adviser to Ronald Reagan. Keyworth had assembled the evidence to advocate an anti-ballisticmissile (ABM) system, which establishment opinion of the time relentlessly
derided as “Star Wars” — a fanciful and
impractical notion, and one in conflict
with the then-sacred doctrine of mutual
assured destruction.
Now, with one rogue nation perfecting
both weapons and rocketry capable of
annihilating U.S. targets, and another
perhaps only years from joining it, the
conversation is all about the effectiveness of our ABM system and why the heck
the government hasn’t made our national safety more certain. We’re still waiting
for that conversation to include “Thanks,
Jay. You were right, and we weren’t.”
Ambrose wrote his book near the end
of his life. In fact, it is dedicated to his
cancer doctor and nurses. Maybe such
honest introspection comes more readily
under the imminence of the great event.
But our everyday exchanges, and indeed
the life of our republic, would be greatly
improved by the more common utterance of those three magical little words:
“I was wrong.”
Mitch Daniels, a Post contributing columnist,
is president of Purdue University and a former
governor of Indiana.
A20
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
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B
RE
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
THE DISTRICT
OBITUARIES
The nonprofit group Bright
Beginnings gives a helping
hand to a mother learning
to be a parent. B3
About 200 were arrested
at the Capitol after a
protest demanding
“dreamers” legislation. B5
Christine Keeler was a key
figure in the Profumo
Affair, a British political
scandal in the 1960s. B6
Georgetown
declines
to support
union e≠ort
Rights of
teen were
violated,
court rules
School says teaching and
research assistants are
students, not employees
SEARCH IN ‘SEXTING’
CASE AT ISSUE
Detective had warrants
to get genitalia photos
BY D ANIELLE
D OUGLAS- G ABRIEL
Georgetown University this
week refused to support a movement by graduate students to
unionize, arguing that teaching
and research assistants are students, not employees.
The decision arrives a month
after the Georgetown Alliance of
Graduate Employees asked university President John DeGioia to
support their union campaign.
The students said embracing a
union would align with the
school’s Jesuit values affirming
the dignity of labor. University
leaders, however, maintain the
work that graduate students contribute is fundamental to their
studies and should be considered
part of their education.
Georgetown’s decision echoes
opposition to graduate student
unions at other prestigious universities. Yale University, Boston
College and Columbia University
have railed against a 2016 National Labor Relations Board ruling
that granted teaching and research assistants the legal protection to unionize. Yale, Columbia
and Princeton posted information
on their websites warning students that unionizing could alter
their relationship with faculty and
limit their individual rights once a
union becomes their collective
voice.
In a letter sent this week to the
school’s graduate student alliance,
Georgetown Provost Robert M.
Groves and Edward B. Healton,
the school’s executive vice presiUNION CONTINUED ON B4
Blackwater
founder in
courtroom
fight in Va.
Prince denies he owes
an ex-business partner
nearly $1 million
BY
I AN S HAPIRA
Erik Prince, founder of the
notorious and now-shuttered
military contracting firm Blackwater, has faced off against inquisitors of all stripes.
A House oversight committee
once grilled him for four hours
about shootings and other acts of
violence by Blackwater guards
against civilians in the Iraqi war
zone. Just last week, Prince testified before House investigators
that he met an ally of Russian
President Vladimir Putin in the
Seychelles in January to establish
a back channel between President Trump and Moscow. The
meeting, he told reporters afterward, was a “meaningless fishing
expedition.”
But on Wednesday, Prince — a
Trump supporter whose sister
Betsy DeVos is the U.S. education
secretary — testified on matters
far less consequential and on a far
more modest stage: Courtroom
2C of the Loudoun County Courthouse in Leesburg, Va., about 40
miles west of the nation’s capital.
Here, in the historic red-brick
courthouse, Prince testified in a
marathon lawsuit against Robert
Young Pelton, a prominent war
correspondent whom he partPRINCE CONTINUED ON B4
BY
JULIA RENDLEMAN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A battle over 10 votes
builds political tension
Recount is instrumental in deciding control of Va. House of Delegates
newport news — It was “Take
Your State Legislator to School
Day” in this coastal Virginia city.
And two of them showed up.
Del. David Yancey, a Republican who has represented the district that includes Heritage High
School since 2012, barely won reelection last month, eking out a
victory with a margin of just 10
votes. He passed out his General
Assembly business cards to students in a medical skills class.
But his Democratic challenger,
local school board member Shelly
Simonds, hasn’t given up and also
BY
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
appeared at last week’s event. Simonds watched teenagers investigate a fake crime scene in a room
down the hall. She requested a
recount, which the state will conduct Dec. 19.
The rivals barely acknowledged each other, save for an
awkward hello as the three-hour
tour wrapped up.
Tension in Virginia political
circles is building as officials prepare for a recount that could de-
termine whether Republicans
hold their 51-to-49 majority in the
House of Delegates or if Democrats are able to claim Yancey’s
seat and create a rare tie in the
lower chamber.
Republicans headed into the
Nov. 7 elections with an overwhelming 66-seat majority in the
100-member House. But a blue
wave that propelled Democrat
Ralph Northam to the governor’s
mansion also decreased House
GOP ranks.
If Simonds wins the recount, it
the stick high, like a winger. Not
down low, like a goalie. Seven
goals in the first period. It was a
disaster.
When the period ended, as
Leopold headed toward the
bench, a little beat up, he was
intercepted.
Kaiden Whaley, the Bulldogs’
goalie, had skated over and
stopped him.
And right there, on the ice, a
Bulldog and Titan met for a fiveminute goalie clinic.
“Here’s how you hold your
SEXTING CONTINUED ON B2
Medical
marijuana
providers
run short
Demand eclipses
supplies in first days of
Maryland program
F ENIT N IRAPPIL,
A ARON G REGG
AND R ACHEL S IEGEL
BY
stick. Down,” Kaiden said.
And he showed his opponent
how to get back up, how to
defend.
On the Titans’ bench, where
coaches were preparing the buckup-you’re-doing-great-just-enjoythe-game speech, there was a
sense of wonder at what was
unfolding before them.
“I was close to tears during the
first intermission, it was so
humbling,” said Georgetown
team manager Bill Schultheiss.
DVORAK CONTINUED ON B2
MARIJUANA CONTINUED ON B3
9-year-olds give inspiring lesson in sportsmanship
But Leopold Hylton stepped
up. He’d never played goalie
before. Heck, he’d never even
worn the huge pads or held that
mighty stick before. But his team
needed help, and he would be the
one to do it.
It took him so long to figure
out the gear and get it on that he
had no time to practice before
puck drop.
The buzzer sounded, and
wham! Wham! Wham! Leopold
had a hard time getting up in
those huge pads. He kept holding
The teenage “sexting” case that
attracted national attention in
2014 is now enshrined in federal
case law.
A police detective who obtained two search warrants to
photograph a teenager’s genitalia
violated the minor’s Fourth
Amendment right not to be unreasonably searched, a federal
appeals court has ruled, reviving
a lawsuit against the detective
that had been thrown out by a
lower court. A dissenting judge
wrote the ruling could cause police to be less aggressive in their
investigations.
The ruling by the U.S. Court of
Appeals for the 4th Circuit continues the nationally renowned
case of Trey Sims, who was 17
when police in Manassas, Va., and
prosecutors in Prince William
County, Va., began investigating
him for sending a video of his
genitalia to his 15-year-old girlfriend by text message. Manassas
City police Detective David E.
Abbott Jr., the lead investigator,
said he was instructed to obtain
the warrants by Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Claiborne
Richardson, and both were sued
by Sims in federal court last year.
Richardson is still a prosecutor
in Prince William County and
currently a candidate for a Virginia circuit court judgeship. Abbott committed suicide in December 2015 as police attempted
to arrest him on charges of molesting two young boys. His estate
Marylanders interested in buying medical marijuana days after
the launch of a state-sanctioned
program may already be out of
luck.
Five of seven licensed dispensaries that have opened since
Friday said they have completely
or almost run out of flower — the
raw part of the marijuana plant
that is smoked or vaporized —
and have limited supplies of other
cannabis products. The other two
stores are limiting sales to a small
group of preregistered patients.
Kannavis, in Frederick County,
sold out of flower Saturday, its
first day in business, but still has
pre-filled cartridges that can be
attached to vaporizing pens.
Owner Jane Klink said she was
hoping for additional marijuana
shipments before this weekend
and was keeping patients updated through the store’s Facebook
page, website and email list.
“We don’t have confirmation of
anything at this point,” Klink
said.
The slow start was expected by
industry players and regulators.
Advocates are not sounding
RECOUNT CONTINUED ON B2
Del. David Yancey (R) and Democrat Shelly Simonds, above, attend “Take Your State Legislator to
School Day” on Nov. 28 at Heritage High School in Newport News, Va. Yancey leads Simonds by 10
votes in the 94th District contest. The fight could determine issues such as Medicaid expansion.
Wondering
whether we can
still find grace and
honor anywhere
around
Washington?
Petula
Yes, you can. It
Dvorak
was on full display
Sunday afternoon
at a hockey rink.
The Georgetown Titans were
in trouble. Their goalie was sick,
and they had no backup to face
the Hagerstown Bulldogs at their
Maryland rink.
T OM J ACKMAN
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
Pressure building as recount nears
RECOUNT FROM B1
will split control of the chamber
and force Republicans and Democrats to negotiate an awkward
power-sharing agreement, in
which they’ll have to decide who
will chair various committees, set
the legislative agenda and serve as
speaker.
Results from three other House
races are also being challenged.
Two were won by Republicans,
including one race in which more
than 100 voters were given the
wrong ballot. In the third case, a
Democrat won and the Republican conceded before deciding last
week to seek a recount.
But none are as razor-close as
the contest between Yancey and
Simonds.
A race that had focused on local
issues, such as the future of a
riverfront property and school
test scores, has now morphed into
a high-stakes battle that could
determine the prospects of Medicaid expansion, gun control and
other high-profile statewide issues.
“I want to win this thing so I
can be the hero and save the day,”
said Simonds, who has been attending orientation sessions for
new lawmakers. “I do want desperately to win so we can accomplish goals like preventing gun
violence and protecting the environment and giving teachers pay
raises.”
Still, Simonds is wary about
expecting too much. “I feel the
pressure,” she said. “But I’m also
aware of the cycles of elections
and the long run, and I’m confident we’re going to get there
whether it’s this year . . . or in 2019
when people get out to vote
again.”
As Yancey watched students
measure blood pressure as part of
a showcase of career-readiness
programs, he joked that his
should be through the roof. A
normally jovial lawmaker and
high school rugby coach, he
tensed up when asked about the
coming recount.
“Right now, I’m letting the
process work itself out,” he told
The Washington Post as he
walked out of the school. “At this
time, I’d like to just do my official
duty and engage on topics like
education.”
In a follow-up interview, his
former campaign manager said
she’s confident that the results
will hold.
“The rest of Richmond has
moved on and are treating him as
the 51st delegate and have asked
him to sponsor legislation,” said
Gretchen Heal, who is also Yancey’s legislative aide. “He’s the winner in everyone’s minds so far.”
Simonds is not as certain.
“It’s going to be a toss-up,” she
said. “Just like this district.”
Seemingly, the favorite
The 94th District is one of three
crossing Newport News, made up
of expensive homes dotting the
coast line, modest inland neighborhoods near strip malls and the
Christopher Newport University
campus. With nearby shipyards,
naval stations and a joint Army
and Air Force base, the local economy is closely tied to the military.
Democrats have carried the
district in statewide and presidential races, but Yancey, a 45year-old real estate developer, has
. THURSDAY,
PETULA DVORAK
Honor, grace on display
at kids’ hockey game
DVORAK FROM B1
JULIA RENDLEMAN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Democrat Shelly Simonds talks to a former student, Aaron Greco, 17, during “Take Your State
Legislator to School Day” at Heritage High School in Newport News on Nov. 28.
won in low-turnout, off-year elections. He seemed to be the favorite
again after his first Democratic
challenger dropped out in July
and was replaced by Simonds,
who challenged Yancey in 2015
and lost by more than 2,100 votes.
“A lot of people looked at it this
year and said, ‘Well, it’s a repeat of
the last go-around,’ and they
didn’t think it would be very competitive,” said Quentin Kidd, a
political scientist at Christopher
Newport. “What a lot of us didn’t
account for was this wave that
“Local people here
probably didn’t care
about David Yancey or
who he is but wanted to
send a message to
Republicans.”
Bintao Feng, a supporter of Shelly
Simonds and leader of a Newport
News Chinese American group
made it what it is right now, which
is a 10-vote race going into recount.”
As it appeared that the governor’s race was going to drive up
turnout, the Yancey campaign
braced for a close finish, Heal
said.
The wave came as a surprise to
Simonds, a 50-year-old local
Democratic activist and former
Spanish teacher who was elected
to the school board in 2012.
She was hoping for a turnout of
about 35 percent as the best-case
scenario. Instead, roughly 45 percent of eligible voters came to the
polls — mirroring a surge of voters
across the commonwealth, many
of whom were Democrats bent on
sending a message of disapproval
to President Trump.
Simonds had played down the
president during the campaign,
believing that he wasn’t as toxic in
Newport News as he was in the
Northern Virginia suburbs.
Among her reasons for running
again in 2017, Simonds says, was
to force a conversation about cityowned property along the James
River, including a pier and modest beach, that residents fear will
be sold to developers. Heal says
Yancey has been consistently opposed to the sale.
Yancey’s reputation was not of
a hard-line conservative but a
community-minded representative who was more likely to talk
about helping Hampton University’s proton therapy program
than national politics.
But that didn’t matter to Democrats rebelling against Republicans across every level of government.
“GOP leadership is protecting
and enabling Trump,” said Bintao
Feng, a Simonds supporter and
leader of a Newport News Chinese
American group. “Local people
here probably didn’t care about
David Yancey or who he is but
wanted to send a message to Republicans.”
But Heal said Trump rarely
came up as Republican volunteers canvassed homes in Newport News. “There’s one elderly
woman in a nursing home who
occasionally calls to talk about
Donald Trump, and that’s basically it,” she said. “The key factor in
our community — and it’s a bluecollar community — is health
care.”
‘Should I have done more?’
With only 10 votes separating
the candidates, every decision
and development in the campaign has been analyzed, including resources — recent campaign
records show Yancey spent
$100,000 more than Simonds —
and the fact that a Libertarian
candidate, Michael Bartley, won
675 votes.
Zack Wittkamp, the original
Democratic nominee, revisits
whether he would have won had
he not dropped out because the
demands of fundraising were too
taxing as he juggled two jobs.
“I don’t have a crystal ball,” he
said, later grappling with his decision not to actively campaign for
Simonds to give her space to run
her own race. “Looking back,
should I have done more? Could I
have found 10 votes? Of course.”
Del. Jennifer Boysko (D-Herndon) and Attorney General Mark
R. Herring (D), who endured close
races in the past, called Simonds
to offer advice for getting through
a recount.
As Simonds relays it, they suggested she focus on things other
than politics, maintain a positive
outlook and try not to relive the
past. She takes solace in other
Democratic women who narrowly lost delegate races but ran again
and won.
“I’m not going to allow myself
to dwell on what I could have
done,” Simonds said.
That’s easier said than done.
As she showed a reporter the
city-owned riverfront property
that she made a campaign issue,
Simonds pondered whether she
could have won votes from nearby
Republican homeowners had
Yancey not taken the same position
during a debate — leaving no difference between them on the issue.
As she drove past the Christopher Newport campus, she considered dozens of students who
showed up at the polls only to find
out they were registered in other
precincts.
As Simonds finished eating
lunch at an Asian restaurant next
to her old campaign headquarters, a sushi chef asked her how
the election turned out.
“Unfortunately, we are in a recount,” she replied.
And then she started tallying
how many votes she got from
employees at the eatery, because
that’s the sort of mental math
she’s been doing everywhere she
goes. She counted at least a halfdozen.
“How many votes were there in
all?” Zhi Chao Lin, the chef, asked.
“I’m 10 votes shy,” Simonds responded.
“Ten?” Lin grimaced.
Cindy Li, a waitress, piped up to
mention that she voted but that
some of her family members
stayed home.
Simonds forced a weak smile.
“Well,” she said. “There’s next
time.”
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
After the buzzer sounded, the
goalies returned to their goals.
The crowd, at this point, was
giddy. Everyone — Bulldogs fans
and Titans die-hards — cheered
for every save both goalies made.
In the next two periods,
Leopold let only three more goals
in.
These players, who showed the
world the true meaning of grace,
who showed the very definition
of sportsmanship, honor and
righteousness? They are 9 years
old.
Schultheiss tweeted the
moment, which he had
photographed, and it was just
what America needed.
A lesson in humanity, right
there in an under-10 squirtsdivision game.
Kaiden’s dad, Shane Whaley,
was there. And he was proud of
his son.
“I was over there yelling at
them both, telling them to get
their sticks down,” Whaley said.
“And when the period was over, I
told him, ‘Kaiden, go help him!’ ”
Kaiden did. It’s what his
parents taught him to do.
Just like the Braves game back
when they lived in Georgia and
the announcer highlighted a girl
in the stands who was battling
cancer. Kaiden caught a flyball at
that game, and the first thing he
did was hand it over to that girl.
“You’ve just got to start at a
young age and teach them to do
the right thing,” said his dad, a
man of few words who works for
Tractor Supply Co. and had to
head out of town for work right
after the game, missing Kaiden’s
brief moment of national fame.
Whaley’s not a typical hockey
dad. He’d never played before.
He was dragged into the world
of hockey by his 13-year-old
daughter, who started playing inline hockey in Georgia, then hit
the ice as she got older, winning
league awards as a defender. Her
little brother, Kaiden, followed in
her bladesteps.
Remember how we’ve been
talking about the actions and
words of adults and how they
influence children?
Shane Whaley’s LinkedIn page
says a little bit about the words he
chooses to embrace.
Before you get to his jobs and
accomplishments and skills, he’s
posted a motto under his photo.
“Do the ‘right thing’ and
always encourage others to do the
right, honest and ethical things.”
Yup. The dad-effect.
Leopold’s mom was a little
terrified when her son went in
front of that goal for the first
time. And she could feel his angst
with each of those goals that went
past him.
“He was really frustrated in the
middle of the game,” Anna Hylton
said. But then, she also watched
in amazement when the
opposing goalie skated up to her
son to help.
“Gratefulness. I feel so grateful
for the beauty of that moment,”
she said. And by the end of the
game, all the other moms and all
the dads were right there with
her, cheering every one of
Leopold’s saves.
“Leopold felt beautifully at the
end of that game,” she said. “It
was a moment that makes it all
worth it.”
Leopold, however good the
moment was, does not want to be
a goalie again next game. Or ever,
his mom said.
petula.dvorak@washpost.com
Twitter: @petulad
BILL SCHULTHEISS
Leopold Hylton, 9, a player for the Georgetown Titans, left, gets a
quick lesson in being a goalie from Kaiden Whaley, who plays for
the opposing Hagerstown Bulldogs, after the end of the first period
during their game Sunday in Maryland.
Detective’s search of teen in ‘sexting’ case violated rights, appeals court rules
SEXTING FROM B1
remains a defendant in the suit,
while Richardson was dismissed
from the suit by U.S. District
Judge Claude M. Hilton in Alexandria, Va. Sims was not identified in initial articles because he
was a juvenile but is being identified now because he is an adult
and the plaintiff in the lawsuit.
The case sparked an uproar
after The Washington Post reported Abbott and Richardson
had obtained two search warrants, and Abbott already had
executed one of the warrants,
seeking photos of Sims’s erect
penis, to compare with the video
sent to his girlfriend.
The issue of how to handle
“sexting,” particularly between
consenting teens, continues to
vex authorities, with some saying
that it shouldn’t be treated as a
crime — Sims was charged in
juvenile court with the equivalent of a felony — and others
THE DAILY QUIZ
According to this week’s Local
Living story on getting rid of
unwanted Christmas clutter, most
decorations are difficult to sell, but
what are people still buying for $4
to $6?
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click on
“Quizzes” to enter the correct response.
saying full prosecution is needed
to discourage it. A Prince William
juvenile court judge said there
was enough evidence to convict
Sims after a trial in August 2014
but eventually dismissed the case
after Sims completed a year of
probation.
New details of the case
emerged in Sims’s lawsuit,
though. According to the 4th
Circuit’s opinion, in serving the
first search warrant, which
sought “a photograph of the suspect’s erect penis,” Abbott ordered Sims to “manipulate his
penis” to obtain an erection, with
two other uniformed officers present.
That failed, leading Richardson and Abbott to obtain a second
search warrant and threaten to
take Sims to a hospital “to give
him an erection-producing injection,” the opinion written by
Judge Barbara Milano Keenan
noted.
Abbott and Richardson with-
drew the second search warrant
after a flood of publicity about
the case. The Manassas City police issued a statement after The
Post’s first article, saying it was
The issue of how to
handle “sexting,”
particularly between
consenting teens,
continues to vex
authorities.
“not the policy of the Manassas
City Police or the Commonwealth
Attorney’s Office to authorize invasive search procedures of suspects in cases of this nature and
no such procedures have been
conducted in this case.” But when
it comes to defining “invasive,”
the appeals court disagreed with
the police.
“We cannot perceive any circumstance,” Keenan wrote, “that
would justify a police search requiring an individual to masturbate in the presence of others.”
She said the photos Abbott did
take were not introduced into
evidence, and the juvenile court
judge found sufficient cause to
find that Sims possessed child
pornography.
Richardson and Abbott had
argued in district court that they
were entitled to qualified immunity because they were simply
doing their jobs as law enforcement agents, and Hilton agreed.
Hilton said Abbott was also
immune if his conduct did not
“violate clearly established statutory or constitutional rights of
which a reasonable person would
have known.” Hilton wrote, “At
the time of the incident, it was
not clearly established that De-
tective Abbott would violate
[Sims’s] constitutional rights by
seeking photographs” of Sims.
The appeals court strongly disagreed. Keenan said prior case
law “would have placed any reasonable officer on notice that
such police action was unlawful.
. . . Abbott’s conduct affronted
the basic protections of the
Fourth Amendment, which at its
core protects personal privacy
and dignity against unjustified
intrusion by governmental actors.”
The three-judge panel was not
unanimous. Keenan was joined
by Judge Albert Diaz, but Judge
Robert Bruce King issued a
strong dissent. King said Abbott
obtained and served the warrant
only after consulting with his
prosecutor and having it approved by a magistrate. “Where a
police officer has sought and
obtained a search warrant and
acted within its scope,” King
wrote, “the resulting search is
2017 PostPoints Scavenger Hunt
Like Jim Morin’s winning cartoons?
Head to Newseum sometime soon.
On display: the artist’s best work
Leave with a chuckle, smile or smirk
On what level of the Newseum is an exhibit of the 2017
Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoons of Jim Morin?
Browse abstract works, Magnetic Fields
By black women artists like Lovelace O’Neal.
With Dancy, Carter and Alvarez, too
Prints, sculptures and paintings are waiting for you.
(Hint: See Newseum.org for the answer.)
(Hint: See NMWA.org for the answer.)
Browse Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today through
January 21, 2018 at the National Museum of Women in the Arts. What does artist
Maren Hassinger use in her textural floor sculpture, Wrenching News (2008)?
EARN 5 POINTS AND A CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES. Answer our Scavenger Hunt questions, then go to washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click “Quizzes” to enter your responses.
presumptively reasonable.”
King said the ruling “could
lead law officers to second-guess
court orders and avoid judgment
calls in gray areas.”
Abbott’s estate is defended in
the case by attorney Julia Judkins, who said Wednesday she
was still reviewing the ruling.
Sims, now 20, is represented by
Alexandria attorney Vic Glasberg. He said the ruling did not
create new law. “It is settled law,”
Glasberg said, “that the mere
issuance of a warrant by a magistrate — who in Virginia need not
even be a lawyer — does not
immunize an officer who requests or executes an unreasonable warrant. The issue was: Is it
unreasonable for police officers
to force a minor to take down his
pants and manipulate his penis
for a photograph. Most people
agree it is. This is what the court
held, and also that Detective Abbott should have known it.”
tom.jackman@washpost.com
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Bald eagle has
lead poisoning
Animal experts could tell
there was something off with the
adult bald eagle when it was
brought in to City Wildlife, a
rehabilitation center in
Northwest Washington.
The bird wasn’t flying and
wasn’t using its legs properly. It
was also feisty.
All signs, experts said, pointed
to lead poisoning, and a blood
test confirmed that the eagle had
high levels of lead, said Paula
Goldberg, executive director of
City Wildlife.
“There was clearly something
wrong’’ with the bald eagle,
Goldberg said. It was found by
an officer with the Maryland
Natural Resources Police in
Nanjemoy, in Southern
Maryland.
Raptors are susceptible to lead
poisoning because they often eat
dead animals that have been
hunted with ammunition that
contains lead. Goldberg said she
thinks the eagle will live, and her
staff is transferring it to a
wildlife refuge center for further
care.
— Dana Hedgpeth
MARYLAND
Frosh endorses Baker
in bid for governor
Maryland Attorney General
Brian E. Frosh on Wednesday
became the second high-profile
Democrat from Montgomery
County to endorse Prince
George’s County Executive
Rushern L. Baker III in his bid
for Maryland governor.
“Just look at what he did in
Prince George’s County, and I
think it tells you what he can do
for the state,” Frosh said of Baker
in a video released by the
campaign. “When he took office,
the county was struggling. Crime
was up, foreclosures were at a
record high, and the county was
engulfed in a scandal. The
county is now thriving.”
Frosh’s endorsement follows
that of U.S. Sen. Chris Van Hollen
(D-Md.), who announced his
support of Baker (D) last month.
The endorsements are expected
to boost Baker’s name
recognition across the state
before the crowded June 26
primary and help Baker solidify
his profile in voter-rich
Montgomery County.
They also could be a blow to
state Sen. Richard S. Madaleno
Jr. (D), the only gubernatorial
candidate from Montgomery.
— Ovetta Wiggins
Montgomery man, 28,
dies after truck crash
A 28-year-old man died
Wednesday morning after his
pickup truck crashed into
another pickup along Georgia
Avenue in Aspen Hill, officials
said.
The crash prompted police to
close part of Georgia Avenue
during the morning rush hour.
Montgomery County police
said Mario Adalberto Montoya
Flores of Gaithersburg died after
the pickups collided just before
2 a.m. at Georgia and Hewitt
avenues.
Police said Flores and the
driver of the other pickup were
taken to a hospital, where Flores
died. The driver of the Toyota
suffered injuries that were not
life-threatening, officials said.
— Dana Hedgpeth
VIRGINIA
State panel postpones
power lines decision
The Virginia State
Corporation Commission will
hold new hearings on a
Dominion Energy proposal for
power lines in Prince William
County, postponing a decision on
a project opposed by nearby
residents for nearly two years.
Dominion wants to install
230,000-volt lines between
Haymarket and Gainesville to
serve a computer data center
complex.
The commission earlier ruled
the route could go through a
historic African American
enclave.
After officials refused to grant
permission for the utility to use
county-owned land, Dominion
said the route was no longer
feasible.
A hearing examiner will take
new testimony from Dominion
and groups opposed to the
project, then submit a report to
the commission so it can make
its decision.
— Antonio Olivo
MARYLAND
Pr. George’s drafts plan
to improve grading
BY D ONNA S T. G EORGE
AND O VETTA W IGGINS
School leaders in Prince
George’s County say they are
tightening controls on student
records, upgrading technology
and rethinking credit recovery
programs that allow students to
make up for work they have
failed.
The efforts are part of a plan to
address problems cited during
an investigation of alleged gradetampering and fraud in graduation rates in Maryland’s secondlargest school system.
Kevin Maxwell, the system’s
chief executive, sent a letter to
parents late Tuesday with highlights of district improvements
that are in the works. A fuller
presentation is expected Dec. 19.
Prince George’s must submit a
plan to state officials by month’s
end.
On Wednesday, a Prince
George’s school board member
who helped launch an investigation into the allegations of gradetampering and graduation rate
fraud told a state panel that state
officials need to conduct a deeper
probe into the scandal.
“More state intervention is
necessary,” school board member
Edward Burroughs III told the
state Board of Public Works, a
panel made up of Gov. Larry
Hogan (R), Comptroller Peter
Franchot (D) and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp (D).
Burroughs is one of four
school board members who
wrote to Hogan earlier this year
asking the state to investigate the
allegations, which have roiled
the school district.
A report by independent investigators showed grades for nearly
5,500 students in Prince George’s
were changed days before graduation during the past two years.
The 211-page report pointed to
rampant lapses in documentation and nearly 60 instances of
students being ineligible to graduate, but it did not find that
tampering was ordered by the
district’s leadership.
On Wednesday, the Board of
Public Works approved a nearly
$500,000 contract with Alvarez
& Marsal Public Sector Services
to pay for the audit. Appearing
before the panel, Burroughs
called for a deeper probe of
whether top schools officials
knew of the tampering, saying:
“This is not organic.”
donna.stgeorge@washpost.com
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
LOTTER I ES
VIRGINIA
Results from Dec. 6
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Tue.):
Lucky Numbers (Wed.):
DC-4 (Tue.):
DC-4 (Wed.):
DC-5 (Tue.):
DC-5 (Wed.):
2-9-3
6-6-8-3
9-5-6-8-3
4-8-8
0-8-0
1-4-6-3
4-6-9-7
6-4-6-5-5
0-8-2-1-1
Day/Pick-3:
0-4-7
Pick-4:
7-6-2-6
Cash-5:
7-8-14-22-31
Night/Pick-3 (Tue.):
5-7-9
Pick-3 (Wed.):
5-0-4
Pick-4 (Tue.):
9-5-4-9
Pick-4 (Wed.):
4-7-0-8
Cash-5 (Tue.):
2-10-18-30-34
Cash-5 (Wed.):
9-13-19-21-25
Bank a Million:
12-17-20-27-37-40 *33
MULTI-STATE GAMES
MARYLAND
Mid-Day Pick 3:
Mid-Day Pick 4:
Night/Pick 3 (Tue.):
Pick 3 (Wed.):
Pick 4 (Tue.):
Pick 4 (Wed.):
Match 5 (Tue.):
Match 5 (Wed.):
5 Card Cash:
8-3-6
8-0-5-8
7-3-9
5-6-2
3-0-4-2
3-8-6-8
2-9-10-33-38 *13
8-16-22-25-39 *4
JD-AS-7H-AD-7S
Mega Millions:
Megaplier:
Powerball:
Power Play:
*Bonus Ball
B3
M2
For a single mom, help with becoming a good parent
LOCA L D I G ES T
THE REGION
EZ
14-15-37-42-67 **22
4x
19-20-50-55-62 †9
2x
**Mega Ball
†Powerball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
Is it possible to be
a good parent if
your parents
weren’t? If you
never knew your
mother, will you
John
be able to mother
Kelly's
your toddler? How
Washington do you raise a
child if your
childhood
included abuse?
These are some of the things
Marilyn wonders.
“I’ve been that parentless child,
where you just want love and you
don’t have it,” the 20-year-old
single mom said as her 16-monthold son, Dontavious, clambered
in her lap.
Seated nearby was the closest
thing Marilyn has to a parental
role model: LaChé Washington.
Washington, 26, is a home
visitor with Bright Beginnings, a
nonprofit that provides preschool
and day-care services for kids in
District families experiencing
homelessness. Most of the
charity’s clients come to the
Bright Beginnings headquarters
at First and M streets NW. But
some are visited where they live,
like at the apartment in Southeast
Washington that Marilyn and
Dontavious, formerly homeless,
received through the city’s “rapid
rehousing” program.
It was neat as a pin, the
Christmas tree up and decorated.
A dozen framed mother-and-son
photographs were arranged on
the floor as Marilyn pondered
where on the walls to hang them.
She doesn’t remember very
many photos of herself growing
up.
“My mom left me when I was
born,” Marilyn said. She
appreciates that her dad stuck
around, but he had his own issues
with addiction. When she was 14,
Marilyn was placed in foster care
— two homes and a group home
— before living with an aunt for a
while in Southern Maryland.
JOHN KELLY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Marilyn holds her son, Dontavious. Bright Beginnings provides
preschool and day-care help to homeless families in Washington. At
right is LaChé Washington, who visits the family’s home regularly.
“I always felt like a mistake
child, like I wasn’t supposed to be
born,” Marilyn said. “It’s been
really hard. I never thought I
could be a parent.”
That’s where Bright
Beginnings comes in. Washington
visits Marilyn once a week for 90
minutes. She talks with Marilyn
about how to interact with
Dontavious, the games he might
enjoy, child-development
milestones to look for in such
areas as fine and gross motor
skills. She brings 25 diapers to
each visit, an incentive to keep
the appointment.
For Marilyn, it’s a way to learn,
but also to have the sort of human
interaction she was denied as a
child.
“I use this as my venting to
her,” Marilyn said. “Not talking to
anybody, that’s a big thing. You’ve
got to let it out. If it stays bottled,
one day you’re going to explode.”
Bright Beginnings focuses on
parents as well as children. When
Marilyn first went there, she met
with the charity’s workforce
development manager, Jeanay
Bullock. Marilyn had held lowwage jobs at McDonald’s and
Walmart. Bullock wanted to
know if she had grander goals.
Marilyn confessed that she’d
always wanted to be a heart
surgeon. “I grew up all my life not
believing in myself,” she said, “so I
just picked something that not
everyone does, something big,
just to really push myself.”
Bullock was honest with
Marilyn: That would take years of
study. How about starting with a
more modest goal that would
provide Marilyn with real skills
and let her see how she
responded to the sight of blood?
How about training to be an
emergency medical technician?
Said Marilyn: “It was a good
point — don’t waste all your time
in all this schooling to get there
and find you can’t handle it.”
With Dontavious in day care,
Marilyn started an EMT course at
a school near the Rhode Island
Avenue Metro stop, the tuition
funded by the District’s
Department of Employment
Services. Half the class has
dropped out, but Marilyn is on
track to graduate later this month
and then look for a job.
The thick textbook — dogeared and bristling with Post-its
— sat on the coffee table under a
pile of flashcards Marilyn made.
She said the book and EMT
course have been revelatory.
Marilyn has learned that even
little babies are affected by their
environment, by parents who
smoke, drink or abuse drugs, or
are abusive or simply aren’t
around.
“It’s got to be some kind of
truth, because that’s exactly what
happened to me,” she said.
I asked Marilyn what she’s
learned about her son since
starting with Bright Beginnings.
“I definitely learned that he
loves to be sung to,” she said.
“I told you,” Washington said,
approvingly.
“He lights up like a Christmas
tree,” said Marilyn, holding
Dontavious close. “You’re the only
person who likes my singing,
because I don’t know how to
sing.”
I think she’s learning.
You can help
Bright Beginnings is a partner in
The Washington Post Helping
Hand, our annual fundraising
campaign for worthy local
charities. Your tax-deductible
contribution will help families
such as Marilyn’s. To give, visit
posthelpinghand.com and click
where it says “Donate.”
To give by mail, make a check
payable to “Bright Beginnings”
and send it to: Bright Beginnings,
Attn: Helping Hand, 128 M St.
NW, Suite 150, Washington, D.C.
20001.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/johnkelly.
Cannabis providers say shortages aren’t a surprise
MARIJUANA FROM B1
alarms yet but acknowledged the
shortages can be frustrating for
patients who have waited nearly
five years since the first medicalmarijuana legalization bill was
signed into law.
“There have been shortages in
other states just because the demand is so overwhelming, especially initially,” said Kate Bell, a
lawyer for the Marijuana Policy
Project.
Jake Van Wingerden, who
leads a group of growers and
processors as president of the
Maryland Wholesale Medical
Cannabis Trade Association, said
it will take 60 to 90 days before
Maryland’s legal cannabis growers can ramp up to fully meet
supply.
So far, only Curio Wellness, one
of the first growers to receive its
license, has shipped marijuana to
retail sellers, according to interviews with dispensary owners. A
spokeswoman for ForwardGro,
the first cultivator licensed in
Maryland, said it delivered drugs
to processors last month and expects to send flower directly to
dispensaries in the next week.
Van Wingerden and another
grower, Green Leaf Medical of
Frederick County, said they plan
to start shipments in January.
“I think everybody would like
the supply chain to be completely
full right away, but that’s not
realistic when you’re growing a
crop,” Van Wingerden said. “We
have a very big pipeline behind it.
. . . What you’re seeing now is just
the tip of iceberg.”
Christopher Garrett, a spokesman for the Maryland Medical
Cannabis Commission, said that
regulators expected initial supply
issues and that dispensaries will
build up their inventories in the
coming months.
“It’s a snowball rolling down a
hill,” said Andrew Rosenstein, the
chief executive of one of four
independent testing labs that
conduct quality checks on marijuana before its sold.
To buy medical marijuana, patients must register with the state
commission and receive a recommendation from a doctor or other
health-care provider. Nearly 550
health-care
providers
have
signed up to issue recommendations.
Allegany Medical Marijuana
Dispensary, one of the first two
shops to open Friday, has served
about 150 patients and expected
to run out of products Wednesday. Most high-demand products,
including tinctures and creams,
had yet to arrive.
“It’s a very tense situation,”
said general manager Mark Van
Tyne. “It’s a learning curve, and
there’s a lot of growing pains
going on right now.”
In Montgomery County, two
dispensaries ran out of flower
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Clients stand in line for medical marijuana Friday at Potomac
Holistics in Rockville on the dispensary’s first day of sales. The
provider closed temporarily Monday amid supply shortages.
“It’s a learning curve,
and there’s a lot of
growing pains going on
right now.”
Mark Van Tyne, general manager
of Allegany Medical
Marijuana Dispensary
early this week and were awaiting
shipments. Potomac Holistics in
Rockville, which made its first
sales Friday evening, closed temporarily Monday and then reopened Tuesday, stocked with
vape pens and tablets. Rise
Bethesda had received a delivery
of vape cartridges provided by the
processor Chesapeake Alternatives and still had tablets and
elixirs from another company.
The Peninsula Alternative
Health dispensary in Wicomico
County and the Wellness Institute
of Maryland in Frederick County
still had flower because they were
conducting soft rollouts, selling
only to patients who had signed
up with them in advance.
“Every patient that is registered and isn’t being let in is
rightfully upset with us, because
they assumed they were going to
get it first day,” said Michael
Klein, who manages the Wellness
Institute. “But they’d be a whole
lot more upset if they had to stand
out in the cold only to be turned
away.”
Peninsula Alternative Health
was prioritizing sales based on
the severity of conditions and
who signed up first. The dispensary plans to open its doors to the
public Dec. 19.
“We just didn’t open our doors
and have lines of people waiting
for 10 hours,” said Anthony Darby,
the owner. “We tried to have a
very organized opening.”
The dispensaries that have not
yet opened said they are closely
watching the experience of others.
“You don’t always want to be
first,” said Mitch Trellis, an owner
of Remedy Columbia in Howard
County. “Our business model is to
curate the best medicine from
across the state and make that
available to our patients. We don’t
feel there’s enough medicine out
there to be able to do that right
now.”
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
aaron.gregg@washpost.com
rachel.siegel@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Prince in court fight with ex-partner
PRINCE FROM B1
nered with to rejuvenate the
Blackwater brand selling expensive survival gear, such as combat
knives.
Pelton claims that Prince owes
him nearly $1 million in unreimbursed expenses. Prince says Pelton owes him — as much as
$2 million — to recoup his investment in the attempted Blackwater reboot, which never resulted
in significant profits. Prince said
Pelton misspent the money on a
news website devoted to Somalia
that Prince says he had nothing to
do with.
Pelton “claimed he had overdue bills [for the Somalia website] and so he paid money I had
sent him for my Blackwater brand
and instead put it in his own
pocket,” Prince said.
All week, the trial in Loudoun
County has been quietly surreal.
Typically, Prince is a magnet for
the press corps, yet only one
reporter sat in the courtroom.
During breaks, the former Navy
SEAL frequently chatted with his
army of attorneys or his wife,
Stacy DeLuke, a former company
spokeswoman. On Tuesday morning, the trial’s second day, Prince
was even conscripted into technical duties, helping plug cords into
computer screens perched in
front of the jury box.
Although the lawyers occasionally sparred with each other during breaks, Prince and Pelton
kept their distance. They briefly
shook hands right outside the
courtroom doors as the trial got
underway
As business partners, Prince
and Pelton seemed like the perfect match.
Prince, 48, an ex-Navy SEAL
and CIA operative, built Blackwater into a billion-dollar behemoth
during the Iraq and Afghanistan
wars, before selling the firm in
2010. Pelton, 62, whose DPx Gear
sells knives for as much as nearly
$400, has made a career out of
traveling to the world’s most dangerous places. He’d interviewed
Prince for his 2006 book, “Licensed to Kill: Hired Guns in the
War on Terror,” and for a 2010
magazine profile in Men’s Journal.
After the profile, according to
Pelton, the two went into business together. Pelton contends
that Prince summoned him for a
meeting in November 2010 to
Abu Dhabi, the capital of the
United Arab Emirates, where the
former Blackwater chief was living.
At the time, Prince was reportedly helping the U.A.E. organize a
private police force to combat
JACQUELYN MARTIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
piracy off the coast of Somalia and
to protect shipping lanes valuable
to the Persian Gulf nation.
“I was the idea guy,” Prince
testified Wednesday. “It was a
passion project.”
Pelton, for his part, was in the
early stages of building a news
website in Somalia that reported
on the whereabouts of hostages
and pirates. It was called the
Somalia Report.
According to Pelton, Prince
asked him at their Abu Dhabi
meeting whether he would ramp
up the Somalia Report into a 24-7
news operation that would produce multiple stories a day, and
supply information on demand,
exclusively to Prince.
The men, according to Pelton,
signed a contract. The terms:
Prince would have to pay
$133,000 a month, an amount
that Pelton said Prince later orally
agreed to increase to $150,000.
Pelton said the steep fees would
pay editors and a sprawling
ground network of Somalis. Pelton testified that a Prince adviser,
Mike Shanklin, a former CIA station chief in Somalia, witnessed
the meeting at Prince’s office in
Abu Dhabi and Prince’s signing of
the document.
But Prince testified Wednesday
that the signature on the Somalia
Report contract was not his.
“That’s your signature on the
front?” asked Pelton’s attorney,
Brian Riopelle.
“It looks like it,” Prince said,
before saying it wasn’t. “I never
signed a Somalia [Report] sub-
scription agreement with Mr. Pelton, no.”
Besides, Prince said, the signatures are not in the contract’s
signature blocks and are instead
on the cover page. “Could be
photoshopped,” he said.
Nonetheless, Pelton’s company
began receiving wire transfers in
early 2011 from the mysteriously
named entities such as Flying
Carpet S.A.L. and African Minerals Enterprise. Pelton assumed
the money came from Prince — or
was sent at his behest. Prince said
Wednesday that other people involved in the Somali private police force, including the U.A.E.,
were paying Pelton.
By March 2011, Prince had a
new idea. He wanted Pelton’s help
reviving Blackwater’s brand. The
company’s reputation was badly
damaged after several Blackwater guards shot and killed numerous unarmed Iraqi civilians in a
Baghdad traffic circle in 2007.
The two men signed a second
contract, granting Pelton’s firm
the exclusive right for the following five years to develop and
oversee new Blackwater products. Later that year, Prince invited Pelton to a barbecue and asked
him for help on a third project:
his autobiography.
But by early 2012, Pelton testified, Prince stopped financing the
Somalia Report website and was
$720,000 behind in payments. He
sent Prince invoices but heard
nothing back. He suspected that
Prince wanted to keep his involvement in the Somalia Report secret
THE REGION
28 arrested in gun, drug crackdown
BY
R ACHEL W EINER
More than two dozen people
across the Washington region
were charged with drug or gun
offenses, authorities said, as part
of a massive effort within a
24-hour window that extended
through early Wednesday to disrupt networks of armed drug
dealers in the area.
Twenty-two of the 28 were
arrested on federal charges in
the Eastern District of Virginia
as part of what prosecutors in a
statement called “Operation Tin
Panda.” The other six face state
charges in various local jurisdictions.
The joint ATF and FBI investigation of Northern Virginia
street gangs began in the spring
of this year, prosecutors said in a
statement. But court records indicate that the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives began focusing on following armed narcotics dealers
in the area in 2016.
Most of the 22 federal defendants appeared in court Wednesday afternoon on charges that
included lying on a form to buy a
firearm and distributing large
amounts of cocaine, heroine and
methamphetamines.
The amount of drugs and guns
seized Wednesday has not been
tallied. In previous searches as
part of the investigation, federal
agents said that they seized
71 firearms, 1,292 grams of cocaine base, 4,408 grams of cocaine, 23,838 grams of marijuana, 2,152 grams of crystal methamphetamine, 815 grams of heroin and 36,075 grams of THC
gummies.
Law enforcement officials allege that while the accused dealers sometimes used encrypted
messaging apps and coded language for their dealings, they
often posted pictures of drugs
and guns on Instagram and Facebook. Packages of drugs sent
through the U.S. Postal Service
were traced to their destinations
and cooperators also recorded
drug buys and identified top
distributors, according to the
court filings.
Among those ringleaders, according to court filings, is Nasiru
Carew, 35, of Dale City, Va., who
is alleged to spend much of his
time in San Diego and imports
drugs from California.
Searching his Maryland residence after his arrest Wednesday, according to court filings,
federal agents found about 100
pounds of marijuana in duffel
bags.
His organization has shipped
close to 1,000 pounds of drugs
through the Postal Service, according to federal agents.
Carew is working with the
Imperial Gangster Bloods Gang
to distribute marijuana, THClaced gummies, and firearms in
the Northern Virginia area, according to one court filing.
Many of the other suspects
fear him, according to that affidavit.
Tayvon Patterson was working
with Carew and was a high-level
drug dealer, according to the
court filings, telling lower-level
operatives he would improve
their lives and, if they got arrested, pay their bond.
“I got million-dollar dreams
and federal nightmares,” he posted in one video on his Instagram
account, according to an affidavit filed with charges.
Patterson 24, of Elkridge, Md.,
was charged with marijuana possession in connection with a
drug-trafficking crime.
A case filed in September
against Frederick Turner was
unsealed Wednesday. Turner, 36,
of Woodbridge, Va., is accused of
being a major player in the local
meth business, which is described in one court filing as
having a profitable base of gay
customers around Dupont Circle.
So is Marcus Harris, 27, of the
District, who is cooperating with
law enforcement and is set to
plead guilty to drug distribution
charges Friday, court files show.
Several people named in the
charging documents as allegedly
involved in the offenses were
arrested in regional jurisdictions
over the past six months.
Attorneys appointed for the
individuals charged Wednesday
either declined to comment or
could not be reached for comment.
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
Peter Hermann and Tom Jackman
contributed to this report.
because a United Nations monitoring group was investigating
Prince for possibly violating the
U.N. arms embargo on Somalia.
When Prince finally sent Pelton a payment of about $920,000,
Pelton allocated $720,000 to paying off the outstanding debt for
the Somalia news site. Pelton
testified that he told Prince numerous times about the distribution but heard no dissent.
Prince, however, testified that
the $720,000 should have been
spent on one thing only — developing retails products to restore
Blackwater’s luster.
By October 2012, Pelton informed Prince that he’d spent the
$720,000 on Prince’s alleged outstanding debt for the Somalia
website. Shortly afterward,
Prince amended his tax returns to
report $720,000 in income.
“Mr. Prince,” Pelton’s attorney
asked, “isn’t it true that after
Pelton told you about the allocation of the money, you turned
around and got reimbursed by
the donor [to the private police
force in Somalia]?”
Prince said the $720,000 happened to be the amount he earned
as a consultant in the Emirates —
from the same company named
as a party to the Somalia Report
contract.
At one point during his testimony, Prince vented about Pelton, saying that his ex-business
partner “has an obsession” in
“getting stories planted and lots
of nonsense about me.”
ian.shapira@washpost.com
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
VIRGINIA
10 poultry-farm workers
fired after video surfaces
BY
Blackwater founder Erik Prince heads to his appearance last week before the House Intelligence
Committee. This week, he’s appearing on a far more modest stage at the Loudoun County Courthouse.
. THURSDAY,
J USTIN W M. M OYER
Ten employees of a chicken
farm in Virginia affiliated with
the nation’s largest poultry producer were fired Tuesday after an
animal rights group released
graphic video that appeared to
depict workers beating chickens
to death.
The video from Compassion
Over Killing, a Washingtonbased animal rights advocacy
group, appeared to show workers
stabbing, crushing and stomping
on chicks at a Tyson Foods contractor in Temperanceville, Va.,
about three hours southeast of
Washington. In the video, sick or
injured birds appear to be killed,
run over by forklifts or impaled
on nails stuck into pipes, while
dying chickens are thrown into
piles of dead ones.
“You need to kill him?” one
worker asks in the video. “Hit
him on the head, then kill him.”
In a statement, Doug Ramsey,
group president of poultry for
the Arkansas-based company,
said Tyson terminated its contract with the farm and removed
its birds from the facility.
Ten employees of the farm
were fired, he said.
In response to the video, Ramsey said Tyson would conduct a
video conference with senior
managers at poultry facilities to
“stress our cultural commitment
to proper animal handling.”
“We’re outraged by what’s
shown in this video,” Ramsey’s
statement read. “The actions of
these people are egregious, inexcusable and will not be tolerated
by Tyson Foods.”
Tyson wouldn’t identify the
farm where the video was filmed,
but Compassion Over Killing
said the facility where its investigator was employed is Atlantic
Farm, on Virginia’s Eastern
Shore in Accomack County.
A phone number for Atlantic
Farm could not be found in
public records, but a person
linked with Atlantic Farm in
public records provided a number for the business that matched
a number also provided by Compassion Over Killing. A man who
answered the phone at that number Tuesday said the number was
incorrect.
Worth Sparkman, a Tyson
spokesman, said the company
worked with the poultry facility
for less than a year and a half.
Compassion Over Killing
sends its undercover investiga-
tors to meat-processing plants to
get jobs, then films conditions to
document
possible
animal
abuse.
In addition to the birds killed
on camera, the advocacy group
says other chickens in the video
became morbidly obese and suffered heart attacks because they
were genetically modified to be
slaughtered within 45 days
of birth.
“Hundreds of millions of debilitated baby birds languish in
their supply chains,” the video’s
narrator said of Tyson.
Sparkman denied the birds
were genetically modified, saying in a statement, “We grow
several different-sized birds and
we match the breed and feed to
the size of the bird so our chickens are healthy and grow at
appropriate rates.”
A Compassion Over Killing
investigator who filmed the conditions at Atlantic Farm worked
there for six weeks earlier this
year. “My goal is just to improve
the lives of these animals,” said
the investigator, who spoke on
the condition of anonymity for
fear of retribution. “I want them
to have a future free of cruelty.”
This is not the first time Compassion Over Killing has filmed
mistreatment of animals at Tyson-affiliated farms in Virginia.
In 2016, the group released
video of Tyson employees who
appeared to throw, punch and
kick chickens at four Virginia
facilities.
After the release of that video,
10 Tyson workers were convicted
of charges related to animal cruelty. The Accomack County Sheriff ’s Office, which also operates
the Eastern Shore Regional Animal Control Facility, didn’t respond to a request for comment
Tuesday about the group’s most
recent video.
Compassion Over Killing Executive Director Erica Meier said
the graphic video arms consumers with knowledge about conditions inside the facility.
“Our video uncovers the horrific suffering chickens are
forced to endure when Tyson
thinks no one is watching, from
the genetic manipulation of
birds resulting in painful ailments and morbid obesity to acts
of violence so extreme, they fly in
the face of Virginia law,” she said.
justin.moyer@washpost.com
Magda Jean-Louis contributed to this
report.
GU echoes other schools over unions
UNION FROM B1
dent for health sciences, said the
university is “eager” to address
issues that affect graduate students, but not through collective
bargaining.
“Our relationship with the students conducting research and
doing teaching assistantships is
one of faculty and student, mentor
and mentee. This relationship is
not, fundamentally, one of employer and employee,” the pair
wrote. “Because all of these experiences are part of the comprehensive education provided to graduate students, we believe that we
should address issues like financial assistance and health insurance in a holistic way for all graduate students.”
Groves and Healton said
Georgetown will continue to increase stipends and find ways to
enhance graduate student health
insurance. Taking action on those
issues could address student demands for higher pay and comprehensive health insurance, but
members of the alliance say that is
not enough to quell their desire for
a seat at the table.
The union organizers want to
join the American Federation of
Teachers. To do that, they need to
file a petition with the National
Labor Relations Board for an election. Organizers say they wanted
the university’s backing, but will
forge ahead regardless.
“We were hoping to negotiate
with Georgetown administrators
about the terms of the election,
but now we’ll have to proceed on
our own, without their help and
anticipating their active pushback,” said Hailey Huget, a doctoral candidate in philosophy and a
member of the graduate student
alliance. “We hoped that Georgetown would be better than this.”
University leaders say they have
discussed the collective bargaining campaign with the faculty senate, academic departments and
the executive committee of graduate studies, the principal policymaking body for graduate programs. That committee has since
passed a resolution affirming the
position that students enrolled in
JACQUELYN MARTIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A Jesuit statue at Georgetown University. The school refused to
support a movement by graduate students to unionize this week.
degree programs are students and
should be treated as students, not
employees.
“I don’t understand why the
claim that we’re learning to be
teachers or researchers invalidates
the fact that we produce value for
the university that should be understood as employment,” Huget
said. “I’m teaching my own class.
“Undergrads pay the
same amount to take
my class as they do to
take a tenured faculty
member’s class.”
Hailey Huget, a doctoral candidate
and member of the Georgetown
Alliance of Graduate Employees
I’m the instructor of record. Undergrads pay the same amount to
take my class as they do to take a
tenured faculty member’s class.”
Huget said she is disappointed
Georgetown chose to follow in the
footsteps of other prominent universities that have resisted graduate student unions.
Graduate students have argued
that collective bargaining is the
only way universities will take
their demands for better working
conditions seriously. In the past
year, teaching and research assistants at 16 private universities
have filed petitions or participated in elections to form unions,
according to the National Center
for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and
the Professions at Hunter College
in New York.
Many campus groups are worried that a partisan shift on the
labor board, from Democrat to
Republican, signals that last year’s
ruling could be overturned. President Trump named Philip A.
Miscimarra, who was the only dissenter in the graduate ruling,
chairman and filled two of the
five seats on the National Labor
Relations Board. Now, many observers expect the board to revisit
the decision on graduate unions.
With the threat of that ruling
being reversed, universities could
play an outsize role in the future of
graduate worker rights. When the
labor board overturned a ruling
supporting collective bargaining
for graduate students at New York
University in 2000, the university
still chose to recognize the group.
Organizers say that is why voluntary recognition is such a critical
piece of their campaigns.
danielle.douglas@washpost.com
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
RE
B5
KK
THE REGION
VIRGINIA
Md. lawmakers arrested at D.C. immigration rally Dates set for recounts
for House seats that
could tip power balance
BY
R ACHEL S IEGEL
Nearly 200 protesters were arrested Wednesday on the steps of
the U.S. Capitol after thousands
gathered to demand legislation
protecting young, undocumented
immigrants whose work permits
are being revoked by the Trump
administration.
Those arrested after refusing
to disperse included at least two
lawmakers from Montgomery
County: County Council President Hans Riemer (D-At Large)
and state Del. Ana Sol Gutiérrez
(D-Montgomery).
Coordinated by local and national immigrant rights groups,
the protest was the latest effort to
pressure U.S. lawmakers to find a
way to replace Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals, the Obamaera program that allowed some
690,000 immigrants brought to
this country as children to receive
two-year renewal work permits
and shielded them from deportation.
The work permits will expire
starting March 5.
In the House and Senate, at
least four pieces of legislation
have been proposed that could
protect the “dreamers” from deportation and allow them to remain in this country permanently. But lawmakers are divided
over tactics and substance, including whether to include
tougher border protection and
other enforcement as part of any
bill that is approved. An unprecedented 35 members of the House
GOP caucus spoke out Tuesday to
urge legislative action by the end
of the year.
Hoisting signs, raising their
fists and chanting in unison, demonstrators on Wednesday denounced President Trump’s immigration policies and Congress’s
sluggishness in addressing the
DACA repeal.
BY
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Demonstrators protest on the steps of the U.S. Capitol during a rally on Wednesday. They were seeking
legislation granting new protection to young, undocumented immigrants.
Speakers — including DACA
recipients, members of Congress
and community leaders — called
on lawmakers to reject what they
called the administration’s hostility to immigrant groups. Riemer
said it was an urgent local issue
because of the thousands of DACA
recipients who live in Montgomery, Maryland’s most populous jurisdiction.
“There’s a lot of people living in
Montgomery County who really
couldn’t join the protest or get
arrested for fear of their status,”
Riemer said. “I felt like those of us
who can be arrested without fear
of deportation need to stand up
and have a voice for people.”
Karina Ruiz, 33, traveled from
Phoenix to join the rally. Ruiz
emigrated from Mexico City in
1999 at age 15 and has since had
three children, all of them American citizens born in the United
States.
The day after Trump’s election,
Ruiz said, her children — ages 5 to
15 — asked her whether she was
going to be sent back to Mexico.
Her DACA status expires in one
year.
“They’re at an age when they
still need me,” Ruiz said.
Members of Congress who
spoke included Rep. Luis V.
Gutiérrez (D-Ill.) and Rep. Judy
Chu (D-Calif.) — both of whom
were arrested around 2 p.m. — as
well as Sen. Kamala D. Harris
(D-Calif.).
Event organizers said they arranged with U.S. Capitol Police in
advance that the roughly 200 protesters who refused to leave the
Capitol steps would not be de-
tained but would pay a $50 fee.
Although protesters focused
mostly on protecting DACA recipients and other immigrants with
temporary protected status that
could be revoked by the administration, they also used the moment
to call attention to other administration policies they say discriminate against immigrants and refugees.
Specifically, demonstrators decried Trump’s travel ban — which
the Supreme Court said this week
could be fully enforced while legal
challenges continue — and policies
restricting the number of refugees
who can enter the United States.
“History is going to judge us on
this issue,” Harris yelled to the
crowd. “History will judge where
you stood at this moment in time.”
rachel.siegel@washpost.com
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
Local election officials across
Virginia will conduct recounts of
four House of Delegates races
this month that will determine
whether Republicans retain control of the chamber.
Currently Republicans hold 51
seats while Democrats hold 49,
but several of those races were
squeakers. In preliminary hearings this week, judges set dates
for three of the four races heading to recounts, according to
spokesmen for both House Republicans and House Democrats.
The first recount will be
Dec. 13 and 14 in Fairfax and
Prince William counties for the
40th District, where Del. Tim
Hugo (R) narrowly won reelection by a 106-vote margin over
Democrat Donte Tanner.
The closest race heading to
recount is the 94th District in
Newport News, where Del. David
E. Yancey (R) beat Shelly Simonds by 10 votes. That recount will
be held Dec. 19.
The next day, Richmond-area
officials will conduct a recount
requested by Del. G. Manoli
Loupassi (R-Richmond), who lost
to Democrat Dawn Adams by 336
votes.
A preliminary hearing that
would determine the date for a
recount in the 28th District has
not yet been held. In that race,
Republican Bob Thomas leads
Democrat Joshua Cole by 82
votes in the contest to fill the seat
being vacated by retiring Speaker
William J. Howell (R-Stafford).
More than 100 voters in the 28th
District and neighboring 88th
District were given the wrong
ballots, state elections officials
say.
In the 88th District, Del. Mark
Cole (R-Fredericksburg) — no
relation to Joshua Cole — beat
Democrat Steve Aycock by more
than 4,000 votes. No one is questioning the outcome of that race,
even with the misassigned ballots, because the margin was so
wide.
Democrats and Republicans
both say they expect the recount
for the 28th District will be held
Dec. 21.
On Nov. 7, Virginians voted
with paper ballots scanned by
electronic machines. Recounts
consider ballots that were
deemed illegible, but where the
voter intent may be clear, even if
they did not follow the proper
instructions for marking their
choice.
The state pays for recounts in
races where the candidates are
separated by less than half of a
percentage point. The LoupassiAdams race did not fall within
that margin, and Loupassi must
bear the costs.
If Adams prevails in a recount
and Democrats flip two of the
other Republican-held seats after
a recount, Democrats will take
control of the chamber for the
first time since 2000. If Adams
prevails and Democrats pick up
one seat, the chamber will be
split 50-50 with no tiebreaking
mechanism and the parties must
negotiate a power-sharing agreement.
Gov-elect. Ralph Northam is a
Democrat, and Republicans hold
a narrow 21-19 majority in the
state Senate.
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
obituaRies
JOHNNY HALLYDAY, 74
Enduring singer ushered in France’s rock-and-roll era
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
Johnny Hallyday, a singer who
helped bring rock-and-roll to
France, where he sold more than
110 million records, rivaled the
Eiffel Tower in popularity and
acquired the status of an unabashedly Gallic — and consistently inexportable — Elvis Presley, died Dec. 6. He was 74.
His wife, Laeticia Hallyday, announced the death to Agence
France-Presse but did not provide
additional details. Mr. Hallyday
said in March that he had lung
cancer, the latest in a string of
health problems that included
colon cancer and a hernia operation that led doctors to place him
in an artificial coma.
Although Mr. Hallyday was often described as his country’s
Elvis Presley, the most popular of
its rock stars and as swaggering
as the King, he was also France’s
David Bowie, Tom Petty, Bruce
Springsteen and Bono, a chameleonic rocker who endured cultural changes that he alternately
spurned and spurred.
He sang against long-haired
peaceniks one year (“long of hair,
short of ideas”), likened hippies
to Jesus Christ the next, appeared
in more than 30 films and —
decades after his emergence on
the pop music scene — was chosen to perform at an anniversary
concert for the victims of the 2015
Charlie Hebdo terrorist attack in
Paris.
His appeal was a mystery to
many outsiders, who wondered
how a culture that valued the
elusive quality of “Frenchness”
above all could fall for a man who
once moved to Switzerland for tax
reasons, applied for citizenship in
Belgium, Americanized his name
and sought to infuse his music
with the idealism of Norman
Rockwell paintings and Western
films.
Yet while drawn to English-language music and low-tax jurisdictions, Mr. Hallyday remained defiantly French, singing “les blues”
before massive crowds at the foot
of the Eiffel Tower, where he
appeared alongside dancers from
the Moulin Rouge and drove a
motorcycle across the stage.
He harnessed the same youthful energy that had propelled
James Dean to stardom in Eisenhower-era America, displaying
attire and behavior that hardly
differed from those of other leading rockers: tight trousers, leather jackets, guitar-smashing antics, a tumultuous love life and a
cocaine habit that he said he used
to “kick-start my motor” before
EUSTACHE CARDENAS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
French singer Johnny Hallyday, above, performs at the Palais des Sports in Paris in 1971 and below, in Clermont-Ferrand in 2003. He was
the country’s biggest rock star for more than half a century, an icon who appeared in more than 30 films and adopted many of the antics of
other leading rockers: smashed guitars, a tumultuous love life and a drug habit.
performances.
Sporting a bright baritone
voice that switched occasionally
from French to English, he recorded songs that were initially
little more than French variations
on English-language hits, including the Animals’ “The House of
the Rising Sun” (“Le Pénitencier”), Chubby Checker’s “Let’s
Twist Again” (“Viens Danser le
Twist”) and Jimi Hendrix’s “Hey
Joe.”
Although he performed few
original tracks in his early years,
he ushered in a cultural revolution in France, where pop music
had long been dominated by the
gentle ballads of chanteurs Edith
Piaf and Charles Aznavour.
Mr. Hallyday, France’s Le Figaro newspaper once wrote, was
“venerated on the right and the
left, by the people and the intelligentsia, and, above all, recognized for what he has always
been, a sincere artist, a phenomenon on stage, whose every song
sticks like [Marcel Proust’s] madeleine in the memory of millions
THIERRY ZOCCOLAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
“It’s better to be king in one’s own country
than a prince elsewhere.”
French rock star Johnny Hallyday
of French people.”
He was initially condemned by
President Charles de Gaulle and
other political leaders who saw
his rock covers as an expression of
cultural imperialism. But Mr.
Hallyday became a favorite of
French presidents such as
Jacques Chirac, who reportedly
helped him and his wife adopt a
baby, and Emmanuel Macron,
who praised Mr. Hallyday in a
statement for bringing “a part of
America into our national pantheon.”
The cultural exchange seemed
to work only one way, however.
Mr. Hallyday spent decades in
what Britain’s Independent newspaper once called “a ghetto of
francophone idolatry.”
Christened by USA Today as
“the biggest rock star you’ve never heard of,” Mr. Hallyday was
largely unknown in the United
States and attracted about the
same scant attention in England,
where he recorded in the 1960s
and learned from guitarists Jimmy Page and Hendrix.
“My international career? It’ll
happen if it happens,” Mr. Hallyday once told Agence FrancePresse. “But I don’t specially want
to succeed elsewhere. It’s better to
be king in one’s own country than
a prince elsewhere.”
Johnny, as he was known, was
born in Nazi-occupied Paris on
June 15, 1943, with the decidedly
unhip name of Jean-Philippe Leo
Smet. His mother was French,
and his father, an alcoholic who
abandoned the family, was Belgian.
He was raised mainly by an
aunt, a former silent-film actress
who toured Europe with her two
ballerina daughters and a young
Jean-Philippe. The boy began
singing and playing the guitar
under the wing of an American,
Lee Ketcham, in a family act
called the Hallidays. He turned to
rock music after seeing Presley’s
1957 movie musical “Loving You.”
Making his recording debut in
1960, he took the name Johnny
from the western film “Johnny
Guitar” and adopted the last
name Hallyday after a misspelling from his record company
Vogue, according to the New York
Times.
His career took off the following year, when a concert at the
newly built Palais des Sports ended in a riot of leather-jacketed
fans, terrifying cultural critics
who thought Mr. Hallyday was a
negative influence on the country’s youth. The criticism was
somewhat abated after Mr. Hallyday, like his idol Elvis, served
briefly in his country’s military.
Mr. Hallyday was married five
times, including a 1965 marriage
to French pop star Sylvie Vartan
that ended in divorce. He had a
son from his first marriage, singer
David Hallyday, and a daughter,
Laura, from a relationship with
actress Nathalie Baye. He and the
former Laeticia Boudou, his wife
of 21 years, had two adopted
daughters, Jade and Joy. A complete list of survivors was not
immediately available.
Mr. Hallyday was at times open
about his turbulent personal life,
and his 1966 song “Noir C’est
Noir” was often linked to a suicide attempt after the birth of his
son. In recent years, he seemed to
treasure anonymity, living at
times in Los Angeles, in a country
where few people recognized
him.
“I am not 20 years old anymore,” he told the Independent in
2009. “Perhaps, I’m a little tired of
playing Johnny Hallyday. I want
to be Jean-Philippe Smet again.”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
IN MEMORIAM
obituaries
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
DEATH NOTICE
BARKSDALE
KUBISHEN
MAURY I. BARKSDALE (Age 83)
A resident of Leesburg, VA and a native of
Blairs, VA passed away on November 29,
2017. He was a graduate of the Virginia Tech
School of Business in 1956. He served in the
United States Army in Verdun, France from
1956-1959. Employed by Southern Railway
1959-1963 and by RF&P Railroad-CSX Corp
from 1964-1992. He was predeceased by his
parents, Charles and Eva Barksdale and his
sister Nancy Hedrick. He is survived by his wife,
Sarah E. Barksdale, daughter Angela Barksdale
and son in law Barry Cuneo. A memorial service
will be held on January 20, 2018 at 12 Noon at
the Norris Funeral Home, 3995 Franklin Tpke,
Danville VA. In lieu of flowers, donations may
be sent to your favorite charity or to Azalea
Charities Inc., PO Box 579, Dumfries, VA 22026
(www.azaleacharities.org)
www.colonialfuneralhome.com
CHRISTINE KEELER, 75
Central figure in the Profumo A≠air
BY
M ATT S CHUDEL
Christine Keeler, a London
showgirl whose simultaneous relationships with British war secretary John Profumo and a Soviet
military attache produced the
country’s most notorious political
scandal of the 1960s, died Dec. 4
at a hospital in Farnborough,
England. She was 75.
Her son Seymour Platt announced the death on his Facebook page, noting that the cause
was chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
The Profumo Affair, as it became known, has echoed through
the years as one of the era’s most
lurid tabloid scandals, with hints
of espionage, Cold War politics,
class prejudice and sexual hypocrisy.
The case has stayed in the popular imagination in the form of
theatrical plays, including a musical by Andrew Lloyd-Webber, a
feature film and dozens of books
— three of which were written by
Ms. Keeler.
The Profumo Affair made the
strikingly beautiful young woman from the British provinces a
London celebrity and a perennial
staple of headlines and gossip. A
nude photograph of Ms. Keeler
straddling a chair in 1963 became
one of the decade’s most famous
images.
She was often described as the
call girl — a term she adamantly
rejected — who brought down
Britain’s ruling Conservative government. Profumo, a rising political star who held the cabinet post
of secretary of state for war, saw
his career go down in flames.
He and Ms. Keeler met in 1961,
when she was taking a dip in a
swimming pool at the estate of a
British lord. He was 46, married
and wearing a dinner jacket; she
was 19, free-spirited and wearing
a smile.
They began an affair that lasted several months. At the same
time, Ms. Keeler was seeing other
men, including Yevgeny Ivanov,
widely believed to be a Soviet spy.
Profumo, who was married to
film actress Valerie Hobson, tried
to conceal his affair with Ms.
Keeler. But in 1962, another of her
jealous lovers, Johnny Edgecombe, opened fire on the front
door of the house where Ms.
Keeler was living.
When she failed to appear as a
witness at Edgecombe’s trial, people began to wonder why. The full
extent of the scandal came to light
in 1963.
After the press learned that Ms.
Keeler was keeping company
with a Soviet spy, there was concern that she had been wheedling
state secrets from Profumo during pillow talk. She said she had
to devise clever ploys to keep her
SARA K. KUBISHEN
12/13/1943 - 12/07/2002
Dear Sally, you are in our hearts forever.
Andy, Ruth, Beth, Laura, family and friends
Arlene Isabel (Miller) Brown, of Woodbridge,
Virginia, passed away on December 1, 2017
at the age of 90. She was born in Jerome,
Virginia, on July 22, 1927, the daughter of
Charles C. and Blanche E. (Ryan) Miller, and
was predeceased by her beloved husband of
62 years, Franklin B. Brown, in 2012. She
was also predeceased by her three brothers
and two sisters. She is survived by her
daughters, Kathy A. Brown (Theodore Bean)
of Woodbridge, Virginia, and their children,
Morgan and Trent Bean; and Renee Brown
Strain (Charles Strain) of Pasadena, Maryland,
and their children, Bailey and Peyton Strain.
A 1944 graduate of Triplett High School, Mount
Jackson, Virginia, she worked for the War
Department during WWII and afterwards, until
she joined her husband in Yokohama, Japan, in
1953, following his tour of duty in Korea during
the Korean War. His Army career subsequently
led them to Ft. Belvoir, Virginia; Ingrandes,
France; and back to Ft. Belvoir. She returned
to the workforce after raising her daughters,
and retired from the Department of the Navy in
1992 after 25 years of service. In retirement,
she enjoyed family and travel.
IN MEMORIAM
Viewing: Thursday, December 7, from 7 to 9
p.m., Miller Funeral Home, 3200 Golansky
Blvd., Woodbridge, VA.
Memorial Service: Friday, December 8, at 2:30
p.m., St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church, 12351 All
Saints Place, Woodbridge, VA.
Funeral Service and Interment: Saturday,
December 9, at 11 a.m., St. Paul’s Lutheran
Church, 4109 Jerome Road, Edinburg, VA
Contributions in lieu of flowers may be made
in her name to St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church.
LEE
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Christine Keeler arrives at London’s Old Bailey in 1963 in connection with a case involving an ex-lover.
In the early 1960s, Ms. Keeler was simultaneously in relationships with British war secretary John
Profumo and a Soviet spy, and the Profumo Affair became one of the era’s most lurid tabloid scandals.
romantic (and geopolitical) rivals
from bumping into each other.
The disgraced Profumo resigned his cabinet post and his
seat in Parliament. The scandal
also led to the 1963 resignation of
Britain’s Conservative prime minister, Harold Macmillan.
“Christine was no spy,” her
onetime lover, Edgecombe, said
years later after he served a
seven-year prison sentence. “She
was far too scatterbrained. She
was a party girl. A gorgeouslooking woman who liked men,
liked sex and liked to be the
center of attention.”
Ms. Keeler and a friend, Mandy
Rice-Davies, who died in 2014,
acquired a cheeky kind of notoriety, known for their looks and
their airy dismissal of stuffy social standards.
When Lord Astor, the nobleman in whose swimming pool Ms.
Keeler had been cavorting, denied that he was involved with
the teenage Rice-Davies, she
quipped in court, “Well, he would,
wouldn’t he?”
Wherever she turned, Ms. Keeler found herself caught up in legal
trouble. She was convicted of
perjury in the assault trial of
another of her onetime lovers, a
man named Lucky Gordon.
She found her connection to
high society through a wellconnected osteopath named Ste-
phen Ward. In 1963, Ward went
on trial for living off the “immoral
earnings” of Ms. Keeler and RiceDavies — a charge denied by all
three.
“This is a political revenge trial
— someone had to be sacrificed,
and that was me,” Ward said at
the time. Near the end of the trial,
he took an overdose of sleeping
pills. He was found guilty, then
died days later without regaining
consciousness.
The story of Profumo, Ward
and Ms. Keeler was portrayed in
director Michael Caton-Jones’s
1989 film “Scandal,” in which Ms.
Keeler was played by Joanne
Whalley.
“You talk to Christine, and it all
happened the day before yesterday,” the film’s screenwriter, Michael Thomas, told the New York
Times. “She says Ward’s the only
man she ever loved, and you
believe her. It’s a love story between two people who were the
weapons of each other’s destruction.”
Christine Margaret Keeler was
born Feb. 22, 1942, in Uxbridge,
England. Her father left the family when she was young, and she
grew up with her mother and
stepfather in an abandoned railroad car in rural Berkshire, England.
She lived in such fear of her
stepfather, she said, that she kept
a knife under her pillow. She left
home for London when she was
15.
Over the years, she said she had
liaisons with the Beatles’ Ringo
Starr and actors Warren Beatty,
Peter Lawford and George Peppard. Ms. Keeler co-wrote three
autobiographical books and had
two brief marriages, to James
Levermore and Anthony Platt.
Survivors include a son from
each marriage and a granddaughter.
Profumo, once considered a
potential candidate for British
prime minister, reconciled with
his wife and quietly worked on
behalf of the poor and downtrodden. He died in 2006.
In her later years, Ms. Keeler
lived in poverty. She adopted the
name of C.M. Sloane as she struggled to find work in advertising,
in a school cafeteria and as a
receptionist.
“I mean, it’s been a misery for
me, living with Christine Keeler,”
she told Britain’s Observer newspaper in 2001. “Even a criminal
has the right to a new life, but
they made sure I did not have
that. They just didn’t stop calling
me a prostitute for ever and ever
and ever and ever. How can anyone live with that? I took on the
sins of everybody, of a generation,
really.”
matt.schudel@washpost.com
“Even a criminal has the right to a new life, but they made sure I did not have that. They just
didn’t stop calling me a prostitute for ever and ever. . . . How can anybody live with that?”
Christine Keeler, in a 2001 interview
JEAN D’ORMESSON, 92
An ‘immortal’ of the Académie Française
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Jean d’Ormesson, a very public
face among the usually discreet
“immortals” of the prestigious
Académie Française, whom
French President Emmanuel Macron called a “prince of letters,”
died Dec. 5 in Neuilly-sur-Seine,
near Paris. He was 92.
The academy announced the
death of Mr. d’Ormesson, a writer, philosopher and newspaper
commentator. It did not provide
a cause of death.
A dapper man known for his
charm and wit, he appeared regularly on French TV — unlike most
other lifetime members of the
academy. He was among the rare
Académicians who might be recognizable to the French public.
Mr. d’Ormesson wrote about
50 books and essays, starting in
1956. His last work, “Ces moments de bonheur, ces midis
d’incendie” (These Moments of
Happiness, These Fiery Noons),
was published last year. Despite
his prolific writings, he was not
widely translated into other languages.
Mr. d’Ormesson was inducted
into the academy in 1973, sitting
in the 12th of 40 assigned chairs.
“Immortals,” considered as intellectual and literary giants, don
green and gold embroidered
suits, and each carries a sword
for formal meetings.
He worked in journalism early
BROWN
ARLENE ISABEL MILLER BROWN
1976 PHOTO BY AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Jean d’Ormesson won numerous literary prizes, including the
prestigious Pleiade in 2015 and the Grand Prix for a novel, “De La
Gloire de l’Empire” (Of the Glory of Empire), in 1971.
in his career and was the director
general of the conservative daily
Le Figaro in 1974-1977 and then
spent four decades as a commentator at the paper.
In an interview with Le Figaro
to mark his 90th birthday, Mr.
d’Ormesson said he “absolutely
had no vocation as a novelist”
and wrote his first novel,
A dapper man known for his charm and wit, he
appeared regularly on French TV — unlike most
other lifetime members of the academy.
“L’amour est un Plaisir” (Love is a
Pleasure) “to please a girl” — it
didn’t work.
He said he didn’t mind being
catalogued as a writer of the
political right and “detested” the
existentialist Jean-Paul Sartre.
Born in Paris on June 16, 1925,
the son of an ambassador, Mr.
d’Ormesson turned his back on a
career working for the state or in
medicine, despite his father’s
nudging, and ended up as a
commentator and writer. He was
considered highly enough to take
part in an informal TV debate in
1992 with President François
Mitterrand.
He ended up as a must-have
guest on numerous TV shows
throughout his life, even appearing in 2001 alongside comedian
Jamel Debbouze, who helped
him out when he was asked to
make deliberate grammatical errors, a tough task for the erudite
man representing the Académie
Française, which works laboriously on dictionaries of the
French language.
Mr. d’Ormesson won numerous literary prizes, including the
prestigious Pleiade in 2015 and
the Grand Prix for a novel, “De La
Gloire de l’Empire” (Of the Glory
of Empire), in 1971.
Mr. d’Ormesson, who once
called marriage a “nightmare,”
wed Françoise Béghin and had a
daughter.
newsobits@washpost.com
DANIEL E.
MARYJANE
11-2002
12-2016
Celebrating two souls connected by love,
still connected by our love for them.
We miss and love you.
Diane
Family and Friends
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
TIPPETT
JANET ANN TIPPETT (Age 87)
Of Hollywood, MD passed away December
5, 2017 at MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital, surrounded by her loving family.
She was born on November 16, 1930 in
Nebraska to the late Clarence Martin Head
and Ellen Magirl Head.
Janet earned two Master’s degrees in Public
Administration from George Washington.
She spent her career as a dedicated statistician with Census Bureau until her retirement.
In 1951, she married her beloved husband,
James William Tippett. Together they celebrated over 57 wonderful years of marriage
before his passing in April 2008. She enjoyed
travelling and had been to all 50 states. She
was an avid reader and enjoyed crossword
puzzles. She loved to spend time on Tippett
Point and found peace being on the water.
She was family oriented and loved to spend
time with her children and grandchildren.
Her favorite saying was “Faith, Family and
Friends.”
She was a member of NARFE, AARP, Red
Hat Society and St John Francis Regis Church
where she served as a lecturer and Eucharistic Minister.
Janet is survived by he children: Janet Absher
(Greg) of Hollywood, MD, Peggy Tippett of
Annapolis, MD, Jeanne Young (Mark) of Olney,
MD, James William Tippett, Jr. (Cindy) of
Olney, MD, Patrick Joseph Tippett (Pamela) of
Lusby, MD and Karen Tippett-Dillion (Mickey)
of Hollywood, MD; 11 grandchildren and
eight
great-grandchildren
and
many
nephews, nieces and extended family and
friends. In addition to her parents and husband, she is also preceded in death by her
brothers, Robert Head, Patrick Head, and
Daniel Head.
Family will receive friends on Sunday,
December 10, 2017 from 2 to 5 p.m., with
a Prayer Service and Rosary at 4 p.m., at
Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., 22955 Hollywood Road, Leonardtown, MD 20650. A
Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated
by Reverend Raymond Schmidt on Monday,
December 11, 2017 at 11 a.m. St. John
Francis Regis Catholic Church, 3927 St.
John’s Rd., Hollywood, MD 20636. Interment
will be in the church cemetery.
Serving as pallbearers will be her grandsons:
Jason Absher, Jamie Winlack, Justin Winlack,
John Young, Adam Tippett, and Ryan Tippett.
Honorary pallbearers will be grandsons,
Austin Absher and Tabor Absher.
Memorial contributions may be made to St.
John Francis Regis Catholic Church, 43927
St. John’s Rd., Hollywood, MD 20636.
Condolences to the family may be made at
www.brinsfieldfuneral.com.
Arrangements by the Brinsfield Funeral
Home, P.A.
WILSON
MILDRED DUNN WILSON (Age 95)
Of White Post, Virginia, died on November
30, 2017 of heart failure in Charlottesville,
Virginia, where she had traveled three days
before to be with her daughter, Elsie Wilson
Thompson.
Mildred, known as “Midge,” was born in
Paris, France on July 17, 1922 to Mildred Eddy
Dunn and William McKee Dunn, a decorated
American Army officer and combat veteran
who had been serving in occupied Germany
following World War I. Midge’s family later
lived in Washington, DC and Hot Springs,
Virginia, where she and her three sisters
grew up.
Kind, generous, honest, loving and fiercely
independent, Midge lived alone on the family’s cattle and thoroughbred horse farm
in White Post, Virginia for over 26 years
following the death in 1991 of her beloved
husband, Orme Wilson Jr., a retired United
States Foreign Service officer, to whom she
had been married for 41 years. She proudly
served alongside him during his threedecade career in the Foreign Service, which
included posts in Greece, Germany, England,
seven years in the former Yugoslavia, the U.S.
Missions to the UN in New York and NATO
in Belgium, as well as assignments at the
State Department in Washington, DC and the
Air War College in Montgomery, Alabama.
After her husband’s death, she continued his
thoroughbred breeding and racing business.
Over her lifetime, she loved all her animals,
especially her dogs (many of them rescues),
farm cats and racehorses. She reveled in her
thoroughbreds’ successes, and, after their
productive careers had ended, made sure
they could live out their lives in safety and
contentment.
A 1940 graduate of Foxcroft School in Middleburg, Virginia, Midge joined the American
Red Cross during World War II and saw
service in the United States and Europe. After
crossing the Atlantic on the Queen Elizabeth,
packed with thousands of American troops
and hunted by German U-boats, she was
stationed in England, Belgium and France.
An avid reader, Midge followed current
events carefully and never failed to vote.
Intensely patriotic, she believed in American
greatness and decency, and our country’s
role in the world. She felt it was important
to try to understand the world and learn
foreign languages. She spoke French, German, Serbo-Croatian and a little Greek. She
hated cruelty, belittling and bullying. A lifelong Episcopalian, she taught her children to
pray, have faith and be kind to others.
Above all, Midge was devoted to her family
and they to her. She had recently celebrated
her 95th birthday, surrounded by her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren
and other close relatives, and, just one week
before her death, held a festive family
Thanksgiving at her farm. A natural storyteller with a wonderful sense of humor
and great common sense, all her life she
imparted wisdom, advice and “cautionary
tales” to those she loved—often delivered
over excellent meals. She adored strong
coffee, good food—especially desserts—and
considered chocolate one of the three major
food groups and a key to longevity. Her
favorite restaurant was L’Auberge Provencale in White Post, where she treated her
family and close friends to countless terrific
dinners.
Midge was preceded in death by her beloved
parents, husband, and two sisters, Lanier
Dunn Poland and Frances McKee Dunn Cox.
Midge is survived by her daughter, Elsie
Wilson Thompson (William McIlwaine
Thompson Jr.) of Charlottesville, Virginia; her
son, Orme Wilson III (Mary Hilliard Wilson)
of Louisville, Kentucky; and her stepson, Marshall Wilson (Meg Mathes Wilson) of Houston,
Texas, as well as her sister, Hildreth Dunn
Burnett of Cambridge, Massachusetts; five
grandchildren: William McIlwaine Thompson
III (CeCe Barfield Thompson), Alice Haven
Thompson Boothby (Willard Boothby), Anne
Claiborne Thompson and Orme Wilson
Thompson, all of New York City, and Caroline
Wilson McDonald (Ryan McDonald) of Portland, Oregon; two great-grandchildren; and
nine nieces and nephews and their families—all of whom she loved greatly.
Midge will be buried next to her beloved
husband, two sisters and their husbands,
a granddaughter and a niece in the family
cemetery at Gramercy Farm in Hot Springs,
Virginia on Friday, December 8 at 2 p.m.
She will also be remembered in a simple
memorial service the next day, Saturday,
December 9 at 2 p.m. at Christ Church, 809
Bishop Meade Road (Route 255), Millwood,
Virginia, near her farm in White Post. Funeral
arrangements are being handled by
McLaughlin & Young Funeral Home of Hot
Springs, Virginia.
In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory
may be made either to the Foundation of
the State Arboretum of Virginia, 400 Blandy
Farm Lane, Boyce, VA 22620, or to Bath
County Christmas Mother, P.O. Box 292, Hot
Springs, VA 24445. Online condolences may
be sent through the funeral home’s website,
mclaughlinandyoung.com.
Her family would like to thank all her loyal
employees and others who either worked for
or provided farm services to her, as well as
her doctors and caregivers over the last few
weeks of her life, as she slowly weakened.
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CUMMINGS
NOLAN
CALUDIS
McVEIGH
SIMMONS
CAROL K. CUMMINGS
On Saturday, November 26, 2016, of Rockville,
MD. A long-time employee of the Federal
Government. A memorial Service will be held
at Millian Memorial United Methodist Church,
13016 Parkland Drive, Rockville, Maryland on
Thursday, December 8, 2016 at 11 a.m. Inurnment will take place at the Union Chapel
Cemetery in Iowa at a later date. Memorial
contributions may be made to the Montgomery
County Historical Society, the Daughters of
the American Revolution, Janet Montgomery
Chapter, Millian Memorial United Methodist
Church or the Union Chapel Cemetery Association. Please view and sign the family’s online
guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
DOBROW
Survived by his wife of 67 years Joan Nolan,
and children Carol Nolan Klatt (Michael), Kelly
Nolan Spencer (Robert), Richard Nolan (Mary),
Patricia Nolan McNeill (Christopher) and eight
grandchildren David Klatt, Andrew Klatt (Faith),
Elizabeth Spencer, Michael Spencer, John
“Jack” Nolan, Kelly Nolan, John “Nolan”
McNeill, and Henry McNeill. His eldest son
John Nolan died in 1980.
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Saturday, December 9 at St Jane Frances de
Chantel Church, 9701 Old Georgetown Road,
Bethesda, MD 20814.
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The family has requested that in lieu of flowers
that donations be made in his name, John
Nolan, to the Red Cloud Indian School at
the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, the Jewish
Social Service Agency (JSSA/Hospice) or to a
charity of the donor’s choice.
PENDER
Peacefully on Monday, November 27, 2017. He
is survived by one son, Alton T. Pender and a
host of other relatives and friends. A memorial
service will be held on Saturday, December 9,
2017, 3 p.m. at R.N. Horton Co. Morticians, 600
Kennedy St., NW, Washington, DC.
PRIOLEAU
CAROLYN REUBEN PRIOLEAU
On Tuesday, December 5, 2017 of
Bethesda, MD. Beloved mother
of Leslie Dellon (husband, James)
and Olivia Hart (husband, David);
devoted grandmother of Rachel
Dellon Rebstock (husband, John)
and Brian Dellon; also survived by
family friend Lisa Wiessner. Graveside service
will be held at King David Memorial Gardens,
7482 Lee Highway, Falls Church, VA on Friday,
December 8 at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to the
charity of one’s choice. Please view and sign
the family guestbook at:
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
JOHN EDWARD NOLAN
Washington DC lawyer, Marine Corps veteran
and Civil Rights Activist John Edward Nolan,
90, passed away of natural causes in the
early hours of November 18, 2017 at home
surrounded by his family.
ALTON PENDER (Age 67)
DOLORES M. DOBROW (Age 91)
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
On Friday, November 24, 2017. Beloved wife
of the late Silas W. Prioleau; devoted mother
of Sandra P. Crew, Gwendolyn D. Prioleau
and Beverley P. Johnson. She is also survived
by a step-daughter, Anne Ruth Andrews; five
grandchildren and a host of nieces, nephews,
other relatives and friends. Mrs. Prioleau will lie
in state at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1500 9th St.,
NW, Tuesday, December 12 from 10 a.m. until
service at 11 a.m. Interment Lincoln Memorial
Cemetery. Online condolences may be made
at:
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
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JOYCE ANN CALUDIS (Age 75)
STEPHEN JAMES McVEIGH
On Tuesday, December 5, 2017,
of Rockville, MD. Loving sister of
Catherine C. Chaconas and husband, Patrick; sister-in-law of, Carolyn Caludis (late husband, William); aunt of Angelique Margarites (Nick), Nick Chaconas
(Jodi), Helen Campbell (Justin), Catherine Morrison (Dan), Michael and Effrocene Constantine.
Also survived by many cousins and other loving
family and friends. Relatives and friends may
call at Saint Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral,
36th St. & Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC, on Saturday, December 9, 2017, from
10 to 11 a.m. with service at 11 a.m. Interment
Parklawn Memorial Park. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to Montgomery Hospice Casey House, 1355 Piccard
Drive, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20850 or to
the Parkinson's Foundation of the National
Capital Area, 7700 Leesburg Pike, Suite 208,
Falls Church, VA 22043.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
Of Middleburg, Virginia, died on November
22, 2017. He was 70. Born in Quincy, Massachusetts to Thomas A. McVeigh and Eileen
L. McVeigh, he was a graduate of Sacred
Heart High School. After attending Georgetown
University, he worked in Washington, DC, and
traveled extensively throughout the United
States. Moving to Middleburg, he met Sally
Oliver and they married in 1979. From that
time, they owned and operated Wetherburn
Farm, a horse breeding facility. Steve’s love
of horses and dogs was exceeded only by
his love of people. He had a generosity of
humor and spirit that gave people laughter
and ease at the same time. He is survived
by his wife, Sally O. McVeigh, of Middleburg,
Virginia, his brothers, Thomas A. (Cornelia)
McVeigh, Jr., of McLean, Virginia and Mark W.
McVeigh, of New York City, his sister, Anne
F. McVeigh, of Scituate, Massachusetts and
numerous nieces and nephews. A sister, Joan
P. Ferris, of Rutland, Vermont, and a brother,
Francis McVeigh, of Quincy, Massachusetts,
predeceased him.
Internment will be private. A reception, celebrating Steve, will be held on Thursday, December 7, 2017, from noon to 2:30 p.m. at the Red
Fox Inn, 2 East Washington Street, Middleburg,
Virginia, 20117.
FRANK SIMMONS
Frank Simmons, age 78, of Ft. Washington,
Maryland, peacefully transitioned to his eternal home in heaven on Friday, December 1,
2017. Viewing and Homegoing Service will be
held at the Springfield Baptist Church, 508 P
St., NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 on Friday,
December 8, Viewing 9:30 to 11 a.m., The
funeral will begin at 11 a.m. Frank leaves to
cherish his memory a devoted wife, Mary, a
daughter Alethia Tucker (Bertram), grandchildren Kayla and Jordan Tucker, sisters, brothers
and a host of relatives and friends.
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RHEINGOLD
RUTH RHEINGOLD
DUNMORE
LAWRENCE ALFRED DUNMORE, JR.,
M.D., MPH
Lawrence A. Dunmore Jr. transitioned on
Thursday, November 30, 2017, peacefully at
home. He is survived by his devoted wife,
Gloria; loving children, Gwendolyn, Jacquelyn
(Wayman) and Lawrence III (Karen), as well as
eight grandchildren, three great-grandchildren,
and a sister, Margretta. He also leaves to mourn
four sisters-in-law, six brothers-in-law, nieces,
nephews and cousins. Funeral services will be
held on Friday, December 8, 2017 at Plymouth
Congregational United Church of Christ, 5301
N. Capitol St. NE. Viewing 10 a.m., service 11
a.m. Interment at Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
FORGY
RONALD L. FORGY
On November 26, 2017, husband of Latrice
Harris; father of Jailyn, Kaleb, Jordynn and
London; son of Yvonne and Freddie Cook;
brother of Darnise Forgy; uncle of Brittney and
Brandon Forgy; nephew of Kevin and Lawson
Forgy (Johnetta), Carla Coleman and the late
Kim Forgy. Also survived by a host of cousins,
aunts uncles and many friends. On December
7, 2017 at Spirit of Faith Church, 2261 Oxon
Run Drive , Temple Hills, MD 20748. Viewing at
10 a.m., service begins at 11 a.m.
Known to all as Ruthie, died
December 6, 2017 at age 97.
With her sincere and beautiful
smile Ruthie made friends
everywhere. During WWII she
volunteered as a Gray Lady,
she helped out in Blair High School classrooms, and at her synagogue. She lost
her husband, Jack, and her son Robert
but she never lost her faith. She faced
the future with spirit and hope. She is
achingly missed by her daughter, Susan, her
favorite son-in-law Bob Bagshaw, and dear
daugher-in-law Marcia Rheingold, as well as
her grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
She will be remembered as we make her
recipes, as we try to live the kind of life
she lived, and when we quote her sayings,
such as, "we are lucky Jews." Graveside
services will be held Friday, December 8,
1 p.m. at King David Memorial Gardens in
Falls Church, VA.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions
may be made to Capital Caring Hospice
www.capitalcaring.org
www.sagelbloomfield.com
CAROLYN P. GIBSON
On November 21, 2017. Beloved mother of
Nathan A. Neal, Esq., Robert Simon, III
(Annette) and Gregory Gibson (Tillian). Also survived by two sisters, India Bayton and Renee
Ayala; an aunt, Frances D. White; three granddaughters, one great-granddaughter, other relatives and friends. Friends may visit on Friday,
December 8, 2017 from 10 a.m. until time of
the Memorial Service, 11 a.m. at The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 522 Seventh
Street, SE, Washington, DC 20003. Interment
private. Arrangements by JOHN T. RHINES
FUNERAL HOME.
TURNER
Of McLean, VA, passed away on November
25, 2017. Jim will be missed for his cheerful
spirit and commitment to community, church,
friends, and family. Survived by his wife, Marcia
E. Miller; sons James, William, and Graham,
daughter Leslie Fisher, grandchildren Emily,
Noah, and Sarah; and, brother William and
sister Janet Farr. Born in Greenville, SC in
1942, Jim was an honored graduate of the
Citadel, who worked first in the textile industry
and later as a financial advisor. A memorial
service will be held on Sunday, December 10,
at 1 p.m. at Redeemer Lutheran Church in
McLean, VA. Memorial donations may be made
to Redeemer Lutheran Church or a charity of
one’s choice.
HICKS
PATRICIA T. RALSTON "Tricia"
It is with overwhelming sadness that the family
of Patricia “Tricia” T. Ralston of Columbia,
Maryland announces her passing on December
4, 2017. Tricia was the beloved daughter
of Mrs. Patricia Ralston Brigidie and the late
James A. Ralston, Sr.; step-daughter of the
late Aldo P. Brigidie. Trish is survived by her
cherished family members; brothers, James
A. Ralston Jr, and Thomas J. Ralston; sister,
Jane M. Ralston; her devoted companion, Tim
Resch; step-sisters, Susan Ceresini (Gerry) and
Lynne Peters. Also survived by many other
loving family and friends.
A viewing will be held on Friday, from 3 to 5
p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. at Harry H. Witzke’s Family
Funeral Home, 4112 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott
City, MD. A Mass of Christian Burial will be said
on Saturday, 10:30 a.m. at Saint Paul Catholic
Church, 3755 Saint Paul St., Ellicott City, MD.
Interment will follow in Crest Lawn Memorial
Gardens.
In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made
to the Ralston, Brigide, Peters Scholarship
Fund at Mount Saint Mary’s University, 16300
Emmitsburg, MD 21727, Attn. Office of Development.
www.harrywitzkefuneralhome.com
SCOTT
DEATH NOTICE
ASKEW-JOHNSON
Sunrise: April 14, 1947
Sunset: November 28, 2017
Viewing Friday, December 8, 2017, 9 a.m. to
11 a.m., New Chapel Baptist Church, 5601 Old
Branch Ave., Temple Hills, MD 20748. Services
immediately following. Reverend William Hill,
Officiating. Reverend Dr. Kerry A. Hill, Pastor.
Repast immediately following.
Departed this life November 26, 2017. She
leaves to cherish her memory her devoted
mother, Joan Askew; brother, Dennis Askew, III;
nephew, Drew Askew-Black; and many aunts,
uncles, cousins, other relatives and friends.
Viewing will be held on December 9, 2017 from
9 a.m. to 10 a.m., Delta Service 10:15 a.m.,
Funeral Service 11 a.m. at Ebenezer United
Methodist Church, 400 D. St., SE, Washington,
DC 20003. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
DEATH NOTICE
SIBERT
GREGORY L. JONES
JONES
Departed this life on Sunday,
December 3, 2017. Beloved father
of Mary-Alyce Jones. Also survived
by granddaughters, Kimberley,
Kyra and Karen; nephew, James
Harris; a host of other relatives
and friends. Friends may visit with
the family on Friday December 8 from 10 a.m.
until time of services 11 a.m. at Unity Baptist
Church, 2706 Bladensburg Rd. SE, Washington,
DC. Interment Maryland Veterans Cemetery,
Cheltenham, MD on Tuesday, December 12 at
1 p.m. Services by Hodges & Edwards.
LITTLE
HELEN S. LITTLE
On Friday, December 1, 2017, our beloved
Helen S. Little, of Washington, DC, passed
away at George Washington Hospital. She is
survived by her two daughters, Serena Grant,
and Muriel Wilson; one son, Dennis Bell; one
sister, Sylvia Simmons; two brothers, Ralph
Ward, and Reginald Ward; five grandchildren,
and two great-grandchildren. Services will be
held on Friday, December 8, 2017, at
Emmanuel Baptist Church, at 2409 Ainger
Place, SE, Washington, DC. Viewing 10 a.m.
until the start of service at 11 a.m. Interment at
Washington National Cemetery.
www.marchfh.com
JOHN E. CORETTE, III “Shaun”
6/24/1936 - 12/2/2017
On Saturday, December 2, 2017, of Chevy
Chase, Maryland, died at the Washington
Community Hospice. He was 81 years old.
GUSTAV JOSEPH BRAUN JR. (Age 94)
Passed away peacefully at his home in
Greenspring Village, Springfield VA on July
5, 2017 surrounded by his family.
After retirement Gus worked in the computer and financial industry. Gus was known
for his infectious smile, cheerful and giving
nature. He served others through Meals
on Wheels, The Order of St. Andrew, and
more than 45 years of service to St James
Episcopal Church in Alexandria.
Gustav is survived by his daughters, Katherine Braun, Dr. Christina Braun, son in laws
Dr. Steve King and Kirk Beckhorn, his grandchildren, Catherine Braun Beckhorn, Victoria Anne King and William Braun Beckhorn. He is preceded in death by his wife,
Margaret Cauthers Braun and grandson,
Daniel Gustav Braun King.
Relatives and friends are invited to a celebration of Gus’s life at St. James Episcopal
Church, 5614 Old Mill Road, Alexandria,
VA on Monday December 11 at 9 a.m.,
followed by internment with Full Military
Honors at Arlington National Cemetery.
JERRY KENT HOPE (Age 74)
Of Falling Waters, WV and formerly of Rockville,
MD passed away on Tuesday, December 5,
2017 at Meritus Medical Center Hagerstown,
MD. He was born on May 11, 1943 in Amigo,
West Virginia to the late Randall Sayre and
Helen Malcolm Banister. Husband for almost
53 years of Sharon A. Hope and loving father
of Constance Pierce (Douglas), Yvonne Michele
Mergner and Jerry Kent Hope Jr. (Danielle). Also
survived by his two brothers Clyde Hope and
Joe Hope; his eight grandchildren; three great
grandchildren and many nieces and nephews.
He was predeceased by his siblings Maxwell
Hope, David Hope, and Edward Hope. Jerry
worked for McNey Motors as a painter for 15
years and at VOB Auto Body for 37 years. Jerry
was also Vietnam Veteran for the U.S. Army,
Serving his country from 1961-1964. Memorial
Services will be held at a later date. "
Shaun may have become a Washington insider but he never gave up his love for his
home state. After his retirement in 2011, he
spent the summer and fall months at his
home on Flathead Lake. He relished his large,
extended family and friends and supported a
myriad of non-profit educational institutions,
including the University of Montana in Missoula, and Carroll College in Helena, Montana.
This cowboy considered everyone a friend
and was a larger-than-life figure to all who
knew him. He excelled at skiing, golf, tennis,
and storytelling.
He will be missed for
his sage advice, strong opinions, his warmth
and love. He is survived by his wife of 50
years, Mary Ann, his daughters, Erin Corette
(Washington, DC) and Kim Corette (Missoula,
Montana), his son Mike Tierney (San Diego,
CA), Mike’s wife Andrea Migdal, his grandchildren Elyse and Ian, sister Joan Hanley
(Rancho Mirage, CA), and brother Bill Corette
(Rolling Hills, CA).
A celebration of Shaun’s life will take place at
Columbia Country Club, Chevy Chase, MD on
Sunday, December 10 at 5:30 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made
to the Flathead Lakers (flatheadlakers.org ) or
to the Boys and Girls Club of Glacier Country.
SAVINO
Mike was steeped in the belief that the best
things in life were, like him, Italian; from
exquisite food and wine, to vibrant music
and culture, to stylish suits and shoes, to fast
sports cars, Mike thoroughly embraced his
heritage. He was also a big fan of professional
soccer, especially Italian Serie A Team Napoli,
the Italian and Argentine National Teams,
and Buenos Aires-based River Plate. Mike
was also a Formula One aficionado, heartily
cheering Ferrari racing teams and drivers. He
also enjoyed good cigars, the occasional NFL
bet, boating, throwing parties, and travels to
places near and far (from weekend trips to
the beach to longer trips to Italy, Argentina,
and beyond).
MICHELE SAVINO "Mike" (Age 70)
Passed away after a valiant battle with cancer on Friday, December 1, 2017, in Aldie,
Virginia. Mike was a larger-than-life figure
who was at his happiest when surrounded by
his family members and many, many friends.
So it should be no surprise to anyone that, in
his final days, dozens of those he loved – and
who loved him – were by his side.
JONES
RICHARD JONES, JR. (Age 90)
He contributed to the improvement of the
legal profession through his leadership roles
with the American Bar Association and with
Georgetown University Law School as an
adjunct professor. He is fondly remembered
as a mentor to young associates and was
recognized on the list of Washington's top
lawyers by Washingtonian magazine.
FLORENCE JULIA SCOTT
HOPE
Born in Camp Benning Georgia to Lieutenant Gustav J. Braun Sr. and Anne Braun,
he spent his early childhood traveling with
his family to multiple US Army assignments.
These included three years in China, Washington, DC, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas and
The Presidio in California. After entering
the University of California at age 16 he
enrolled in ROTC. When the Japanese
attacked Pearl Harbor his unit was called
into service, he celebrated his 20 birthday
in Officer Candidate School. Gustav (Gus)
landed on Omaha beach 10 days after Dday. One month later Gus volunteered to
join the 6th Armored Division and later
became part of General Patton’s Third
Army. After the World War II, he was
assigned to the Panama Canal where he
met his future wife, Margaret Cauthers.
They were married 58 years. Gus served
thirty-one years in the Army and retired as
a colonel.
DEATH NOTICE
government-owned silver mining company
of Peru against individuals seeking to corner
the silver market.
BRAUN
EARMA V. JACKSON
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
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CORETTE
Shaun's practice spanned the spectrum from
corporate to finance to international trade.
A graduate of the University of Virginia Law
School, he developed an enviable list of longstanding clients, including timber interests
and the snowsport industry's national trade
association. In 1988, after six months of
testimony, he won a famous case for the
On Monday, November 27, 2017, Florence Julia
Scott of Upper Marlboro, MD, passed away
peacefully. Loving mother of Marva Vincent
(Andre'), Sheri Corley, and Victor Scott; devoted grandmother of six; adored great-grandmother of three. She also leaves to cherish
her memory her siblings, Henry Bradley Jr.
(Carrie Ann), William Lawrence (Nell), Charlotte
Watson (the late Roy), Saundra Bradley, and
Linda Williams (Sylvester). Friends may visit
with the family from 11 a.m. until the time of
service, 12 noon, on Saturday, December 9 at
Marshall March Funeral Home, 4308 Suitland
Road, Suitland, MD. Interment at Arlington
National Cemetery will take place at a later
date.
www.mashallmarchfh.com
DANA M. ASKEW-JOHNSON (Age 46)
Peacefully passed away November 22, 2017.
Beloved mother of Darrell Jackson. Family
will welcome friends, Friday, December 8, at
Twelfth Street Christian Church, 1812 12th St.,
NW. Visitation 10 a.m. until time of service at
11 a.m. Interment Glenwood Cemetery.
Officers and members of Local 26
IBEW are hereby notified of the
death of retired Brother Gregory
L. Jones. Born July 31, 1953 died
on November 30, 2017. A celebration of life will be held on
Friday December 8, 2017 from 7
p.,. to 9 p.m. at Bethel Community Center, 49
Kendrick Ford Rd., Front Royal, VA. 22630, 540636-8331.
JF Dabbs FF
On Monday, November 20, 2017.
Son of Stacey L. Peters and Derek
E. Slocum (Tuconya); brother of
Mignon, Kevin, Andrea and Bianca;
grandson of Paula Peters; nephew
of Gabrielle, Alexander, Tracey and
Lynn Preston. Also survived by a close cousin,
David Preston; many other cousins, other relatives and friends.
Visitation Friday, December 8, 11 a.m. until
Mass of Christian Burial, 12 noon at Church
of the Atonement, 5073 East Capital St. SE.
Interment private. Services by Slocum Funeral
Service, PA.
In 1969, Shaun arrived in Washington, DC,
to be General Counsel of the Export-Import
Bank of the United States. After seven years
in that position, he elected to make Washington his home and established a long and
distinguished law career, first at his own
firm (Cole, Corette & Abrutyn) and later as a
partner at DLA Piper.
In Loving Memory of
ROSE HAZEL (Morgan) HICKS
HILTON
JACKSON
CHRISTOPHER EUGENE SLOCUM
(Age 28)
JAMES CRAWFORD TURNER, JR.
GLENDA MARIE HILTON
On Sunday, November 26, 2017, Glenda M.
Hilton of Washington, DC transitioned into
eternal peace. Glenda is survived by her
beloved daughter, Tukisha Hilton-Burns (Herbert); granddaughters, Britnie Hilton and
BryKayla Burns; grandson, Glen Hilton; greatgranddaughter Madisyn Hilton-Hester; mother,
Velez Hilton-Brewton (step-father William
Brewton); sisters, Glenette Hilton (Reginald
Sr.), Glynese Hilton and Glenez Hilton a host
of nieces, nephews and other relatives and
friends. Service will be held, Saturday, December 9, 2017 at New Hope Baptist United Church
of Christ (First Trinity Lutheran Church), 309
E St. NW, Washington, DC. Viewing 9 a.m.
Service 10 a.m.
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
ALONZO SIBERT
B.A., M.B.A., J.D., L.L.M., M.I.P.P., M.S.
Foreign Service Officer (Ret.)
Adjunct Associate Professor,
University of Maryland
University College
Entered into eternal rest on Sunday, November
26, 2017. He is survived by his wife, Dr. Cathy
A. Stratton Sibert; daughter, Laini Sibert Forrest
(Melvin); two grandsons, Melvin Grant Forrest,
Jr. and Brenden Michael Forrest; sister, Cecelia
Sibert Holley; brother, David Sibert and a host
of other relatives and friends. Mr. Sibert will
lie in state at Second Baptist Church SW, 5501
Silver Hill Rd., District Heights, MD, Saturday,
December 9 from 10 a.m. until service at
12 Noon. Officiating Minister, Rev. Dr. Wallis
C. Baxter, III. Interment private. In lieu of
flowers, make donations to H. Joseph Franklin
Scholarship Fund, Attn: Second Baptist Church
of SW.
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
When the need arises,
let families find you in the
Funeral Services Directory.
To be seen in the Funeral Services Directory,
please call paid Death Notices at 202-334-4122.
Mike was born on July 28, 1947, in Flumeri
(Naples) Italy, to parents Rafael and Maria
(née Cipriani). The family later emigrated to
Buenos Aires, Argentina, where Mike lived
until his early twenties. Mike then moved to
the U.S. and settled in Glen Cove, New York,
where he began a career in the construction
and masonry industries. While in New York,
Mike met several individuals that would
become life-long friends. He made a great
life for himself and his family in the U.S. and
often remarked about how grateful he was
for the many opportunities afforded him in
this country.
Mike would later marry Linda Armentrout
and together in Northern Virginia they raised
two children, developed a successful business, and made many friends. Mike and Linda
spent many happy years together before her
untimely passing in 2004. Mike was also
preceded in death by his parents and his
sister Filomena.
Mike had a big, generous heart, and was
always ready and willing to help others. In
addition, he was always up for a challenge.
Whether he was presented with a complex
business issue, a friend who was dealing
with a personal problem, or the most elegant
way to design and lay brick at a property,
Mike used his knowledge, life experience,
and street smarts to strategize, develop
solutions, and find the best way forward.
Survivors include: his sons Raphael and
Michele; his grandsons Evan and Ethan; his
loving and devoted partner of the past 12
years, Judy Damiani (as well as her children,
grandchildren, and extended family); and
numerous other relatives and friends in Italy,
Argentina, and the U.S.
Visitation will be held on Thursday, December
7, 2017, from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. at
Fairfax Memorial Funeral Home, 9902 Braddock Road, Fairfax, Virginia 22032; telephone
(703) 425-9702. Mass of Christian Burial will
be held on Saturday, December 9, 2017,
at 1 p.m., at Holy Rosary Catholic Church,
595 3rd Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001;
telephone (202) 638-0165. An informal celebration of Mike’s life will immediately follow
the Mass at Casa Italiana, the gathering hall
adjacent to the Church. lnurnment will follow
at a later date at Fairfax Memorial Park.
In lieu of flowers: the family requests that
donations be made in memory of Michele
Savino to Holy Rosary Catholic Church.
Because your loved one served proudly...
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
C0979 2x3
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Cool and partly sunny
A frontal zone should sink a bit
farther south and east during the
day, which means we will see at least
partial sunshine. Highs will be in the
mid-40s to near 50. Winds will be
out of the northwest around 10 mph. In the
District, the earliest sunset of the season
occurred Wednesday and will be matched
tonight, according to timeanddate.com.
Today
Partly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Cloudy
Saturday
Partly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Possible snow
Monday
Partly sunny
Tuesday
Mostly cloudy
51° 35
44° 33
42° 30
40° 26
45° 32
42° 26
FEELS*: 49°
FEELS: 40°
FEELS: 41°
FEELS: 31°
FEELS: 40°
FEELS: 37°
CHNCE PRECIP: 10%
P: 20%
P: 20%
P: 30%
P: 10%
P: 30%
WIND: WNW 6–12 mph
W: WNW 6–12 mph
W: SSE 4–8 mph
W: WNW 10–20 mph
W: S 7–14 mph
W: NW 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Hagerstown
45/27
Davis
34/18
M
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
49/28
Dover
49/32
Washington
51/35
Su
Weather map features for noon today.
Philadelphia
48/33
Harrisburg
45/25
Tu
Norfolk
52/40
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Dulles
BWI
57° 1:00 a.m.
42° 8:00 a.m.
50°/35°
78° 1998
11° 1893
54° 12:35 a.m.
38° 8:00 a.m.
49°/29°
74° 2001
9° 2002
56° 1:00 a.m.
39° 9:00 a.m.
48°/31°
77° 1998
13° 2002
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +5.1° yr. to date: +2.9°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 58°
Virginia Beach
51/40
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 53°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
49/39
OCEAN: 54°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.07"
0.10"
0.65"
35.20"
37.34"
0.0"
0.0"
0.09"
0.13"
0.66"
40.02"
39.24"
0.0"
0.0"
0.14"
0.17"
0.71"
37.50"
39.22"
0.0"
0.0"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
2 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, partly sunny, breezy, cold. High 32–37.
Wind west 7–14 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy, cold. Low
19–23. Wind west 6–12 mph. Friday, mostly cloudy, very
cold. High 28–32. Wind west 6–12 mph. Saturday, partly
sunny. High 27–32.
Atlantic beaches: Today, variably cloudy, cool. High
48–52. Wind west 6–12 mph. Tonight, increasingly cloudy.
Low 30–40. Wind southwest 4–8 mph. Friday, cloudy, a little
rain. High 41–46. Wind northwest 6–12 mph. Saturday, rain
possible. High 40–45.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, partly sunny. Wind west
5–10 knots. Waves a foot or less. Visibility unrestricted. • Lower
Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, partly sunny. Wind southwest
5–10 mph. Waves around a foot on the lower Potomac, 1–2 feet on
the Chesapeake. Visibility good.• River Stages: Today, the Little Falls
stage will be near 3.1 feet and it will hold about steady on Friday.
Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
5:38 a.m.
10:42 a.m.
5:45 p.m.
11:00 p.m.
Annapolis
2:08 a.m.
7:33 a.m.
1:47 p.m.
8:35 p.m.
3:47 a.m.
10:11 a.m.
4:43 p.m.
10:37 p.m.
5:51 a.m.
12:17 p.m.
6:41 p.m.
none
3:40 a.m.
9:36 a.m.
4:23 p.m.
11:29 p.m.
Point Lookout
W
Reagan
OCEAN: 52°
Richmond
53/36
Norfolk
FORECAST
Ocean City
50/36
Lexington
46/27
Ocean City
ACTUAL
Cape May
48/32
Annapolis
49/33
Charlottesville
51/32
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
Sa
REGION
AVERAGE
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Immokalee, FL 88°
Low: Stanley, ID –6°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
41/25/pc
37/21/s
35/29/sn
48/34/r
48/26/i
49/28/pc
47/35/pc
49/30/c
37/24/c
34/19/s
45/30/s
34/25/sf
38/26/sf
47/39/r
44/20/pc
52/37/c
34/28/c
29/19/pc
35/17/pc
35/20/c
47/26/pc
38/25/sf
Tomorrow
38/24/pc
47/26/s
33/28/i
42/29/c
58/32/s
43/27/c
54/33/s
42/25/c
41/21/c
36/17/s
41/32/pc
33/25/sn
37/25/pc
48/37/r
36/19/pc
43/31/c
48/34/pc
37/25/pc
36/21/s
34/23/pc
56/36/s
55/30/c
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
31/18/s
35/20/sf
39/23/s
27/21/i
24/19/pc
44/23/s
83/68/s
48/32/r
30/17/pc
52/32/c
55/46/r
34/18/s
61/40/s
44/22/pc
76/52/s
38/23/pc
43/26/c
86/73/pc
29/18/pc
22/17/s
45/24/pc
48/37/r
47/34/s
52/40/c
39/26/pc
34/25/pc
49/27/s
26/15/c
32/16/pc
40/25/pc
83/68/pc
52/32/s
37/24/s
46/25/pc
55/43/r
41/29/pc
63/41/s
47/26/pc
76/53/pc
40/25/s
43/26/pc
86/71/pc
35/24/c
32/18/sn
42/23/pc
44/33/r
40/34/pc
46/35/r
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
39/19/s
32/20/s
79/61/c
48/33/s
66/41/s
37/20/pc
43/24/s
48/30/s
47/28/s
49/37/c
48/20/s
53/36/c
62/33/s
36/20/s
84/75/sh
37/21/s
75/50/s
65/47/s
84/75/sh
51/32/s
33/19/s
37/24/c
80/66/c
36/19/s
51/30/s
41/23/pc
78/57/r
43/31/pc
66/44/s
34/21/pc
40/24/pc
48/31/s
43/30/pc
42/29/c
50/20/s
43/31/c
62/34/pc
43/29/s
84/75/pc
39/23/s
73/51/pc
63/46/pc
84/75/pc
48/34/s
34/21/s
36/22/pc
79/55/r
50/28/s
World
High: Vioolsdrif, South Africa 113°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –63°
Today
Addis Ababa
76/45/s
Amsterdam
46/35/r
Athens
61/47/s
Auckland
76/62/s
Baghdad
61/42/s
Bangkok
93/76/pc
Beijing
41/23/s
Berlin
44/39/pc
Bogota
68/48/r
Brussels
46/35/r
Buenos Aires
88/62/s
Cairo
66/50/s
Caracas
74/65/pc
Copenhagen
44/36/r
Dakar
86/72/s
Dublin
46/31/sh
Edinburgh
46/29/r
Frankfurt
43/36/pc
Geneva
47/39/pc
Ham., Bermuda 75/71/pc
Helsinki
36/34/sh
Ho Chi Minh City 91/74/pc
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75/45/s
40/34/sh
62/49/pc
74/63/pc
61/38/s
92/72/c
47/26/s
41/31/sh
67/49/t
39/30/sh
88/65/pc
66/51/s
75/65/pc
42/35/pc
84/70/pc
38/30/pc
37/29/pc
40/28/sn
44/30/r
75/71/c
40/35/sh
90/67/c
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
75/60/s
74/44/pc
52/47/s
52/39/pc
68/51/t
56/25/s
87/77/pc
80/65/pc
89/78/pc
72/64/pc
57/47/pc
57/34/r
51/33/pc
90/78/r
74/48/pc
34/27/pc
26/18/c
82/70/pc
80/57/pc
75/53/pc
44/34/r
34/21/sn
48/35/r
42/35/s
69/56/c
76/46/s
57/50/s
55/39/s
70/53/t
58/33/pc
84/77/sh
73/66/t
88/78/t
72/64/pc
61/52/c
40/32/pc
54/35/c
88/78/sh
71/38/pc
34/26/sn
23/20/sf
85/75/pc
78/58/pc
78/52/pc
38/28/pc
32/21/pc
42/31/sh
41/28/sh
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
Set
4:46 p.m.
10:53 a.m.
4:17 p.m.
2:21 p.m.
2:58 p.m.
5:41 p.m.
LongRoofing.com
Licensed, Bonded, Insured MHIC 51346, VA 2705048183A, DC 67006785, PA 115431 Expires 1/25/18.
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86/73/pc
79/45/s
57/46/pc
87/66/pc
86/54/s
42/20/pc
40/18/pc
53/38/c
87/75/c
44/35/r
84/67/pc
68/58/r
56/33/r
53/42/pc
33/24/pc
39/27/s
43/34/pc
87/74/sh
62/36/pc
60/45/t
84/67/pc
83/52/s
41/37/pc
31/21/s
46/34/pc
85/76/c
40/33/pc
76/64/t
62/57/r
47/32/s
52/39/r
32/25/pc
40/31/sh
43/30/sh
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
ARCHITECTURAL
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Dec 26
First
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Snow, ice and freezing temps can wreak havoc with your roof causing leaks and
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from
Dec 18
New
Rise
7:13 a.m.
9:30 p.m.
6:36 a.m.
3:21 a.m.
4:28 a.m.
8:10 a.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Your Roof is Most Vulnerable in the Winter.
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t offer
Dec 10
Last
Quarter
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Moon
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Style
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
C
SU
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
THEATER REVIEW
CAROLYN HAX
Shooting the bull with
John Cena after his
reading of “Ferdinand” at
the Library of Congress. C2
Frankly, with “The Last
Night of Ballyhoo’s” terrific
cast, even Rhett Butler
would give a damn. C3
How to placate an anxious
mother about your solo
trip: Tell her about it after
you’ve returned. C8
TIME/TIME
Time for
the Silence
Breakers
Women who spoke up
about harassment named
Person of the Year
BY
AND
GLEN WILSON/COLUMBIA/KOBAL/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Actor Colin Farrell sports a suit in the film “Roman J. Israel, Esq.” Over the years, the power suit has given way to hoodies and casual Fridays.
CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK
NO LONGER A
STRONG SUIT
FOR WORK
Once the power attire, now an option
BY
R OBIN G IVHAN
Justin
Timberlake
wore a suit by
Tom Ford to
the Screen
Actors Guild
Awards in
2012.
CHRIS PIZZELLO/
INVISION/ASSOCIATED
PRESS
D
ouglas Heye wears suits. Like a lot of
men, he gives a fair amount of
consideration to the way those suits
are styled. Unlike a lot of men, he is willing
and able to break down those considerations
into specifics.
“I like a pocket square, but I generally
don’t wear one with a tie,” says Heye, a former
Republican strategist, now a CNN contributor. “If I’m wearing a tie, three out of four
times it’s blue. I like blue and I’ve been told it
works for me. . . . If I’m wearing a jacket and
no tie, I always like a pocket square. I think
it’s a little bit more dressy. It shows a little bit
of effort.”
Effort is important. The whole reason for
wearing the suit, he says, is to set a tone. He
recently attended a meeting where he knew
everyone else would be casual. But he
couldn’t bring himself to show up in khakis
and a golf shirt. A suit, he reasoned, signaled
a certain seriousness.
“But I don’t know,” he says. “Maybe it
means something to me and not the viewer.”
What exactly does the business suit mean
today? For many men, it is formality and
propriety. When cut with skill, it celebrates
the beauty of a well-proportioned physique
and camouflages the imperfections of a
decidedly human one. A suit announces that
a man has grown-up intentions — even if he
is wholly immature. It’s an expression of
personal aesthetics.
But in the world of men’s tailoring —
retailers, designers, shoppers — the suit no
longer represents power. The power suit is
NOTEBOOK CONTINUED ON C3
MUSIC REVIEW
The National adds some grit to its suave repertoire at Anthem
BY
M ARK J ENKINS
A fastidious band that exalts its
own musicmaking process, the
National preceded its Tuesday gig
at the Anthem with a split-screen
video that documented the recording of the quintet’s latest album, provided glimpses of the
musicians backstage and counted
down the minutes until the show
began. For the sellout crowd, the
video prologue was arty, intimate
and overcalculated.
So it was liberating when deepvoiced frontman Matt Berninger
repeatedly flubbed the first lines
of “Santa Clara,” the backcatalogue obscurity that was supposed to open the show. The singer laughed and scrubbed the
song, moving on to “Nobody Else
Will Be There,” from the new
“Sleep Well Beast.”
That album, nearly all of which
was performed during the impassioned two-hour concert, marks a
shift for the Cincinnati-rooted
but now widely dispersed musicians. Though as carefully produced and arranged as its six
predecessors, “Beast” is more raucous. Harsh electronic noises
REVIEW CONTINUED ON C2
KYLE GUSTAFSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Matt Berninger, Bryan Devendorf, Scott Devendorf and Aaron Dessner of the National perform at the Anthem.
L INDSEY B EVER
A BBY O HLHEISER
Time magazine has named
“The Silence Breakers” as its 2017
Person of the Year, recognizing the
women (and some men) who
came forward with stories of sexual harassment and assault and
helped force a nationwide reckoning.
The magazine calls them “the
voices that launched a movement.”
Among them are Ashley Judd
and Rose McGowan, the actresses
whose stunning accusations
against movie mogul Harvey
Weinstein helped lead to his
downfall; and activist Tarana
Burke, creator of the #MeToo
movement, along with the Hollywood star who amplified it on
social media, Alyssa Milano.
“The galvanizing actions of the
women on our cover . . . along with
those of hundreds of others, and of
many men as well, have unleashed
one of the highest-velocity shifts
TIME CONTINUED ON C3
BOOK WORLD
Le Guin, Salter
and character
beyond words
BY
M ICHAEL D IRDA
“No Time to Spare” and “Don’t
Save Anything” collect, respectively, the recent essays and the
freelance journalism of two distinguished, but very different American writers. There are, however, at
least three reasons to link Ursula
K. Le Guin, an outspoken feminist
and award-winning creator of
imaginary lands and ambiguous
utopias, and James Salter, the
courtly chronicler of fighter pilots,
intense love affairs and dissolving
marriages.
First, each writes fiction of wondrous serenity and authority. Just
consider the opening paragraphs
of Le Guin’s “A Wizard of Earthsea”
or the final one of Salter’s “A Sport
and a Pastime.” The language is
limpid, the sentences deliberate
and grave, their cumulative power .
. . immeasurable. Go see for yourself.
Second, both Salter and Le Guin
are moralists. Courage and heroism, the testing of character, doing
the right thing, the acceptance of
responsibility, the getting of wisdom — these themes run through
all their writing.
The third connection is personal: Salter and Le Guin are both
deeply woven into my own bookish life. In one of my earliest reviews, I wrote about Salter’s “Solo
Faces,” concluding that this novel
about mountain climbing “exemplifies the purity it describes.” A
decade later, when Book World’s
editors were settling on titles for
an online book club, I picked “The
Left Hand of Darkness,” Le Guin’s
science fiction classic about a society where everyone is both male
and female. In 1990, I reviewed
her autumnal fantasy “Tehanu,” in
which she enlarged her Earthsea
Trilogy, originally marketed for
young adults, by revealing what
happened to its hero and heroine
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C2
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
HEY, ISN’T THAT . . .?
Sean “Diddy” Combs, dining at
RPM Italian on Tuesday night?
The rapper-actor-producer who
goes by a slew of monikers,
including P. Diddy and Puff
Daddy, arrived about 7 p.m. at the
Italian eatery owned by TV
personality Giuliana Rancic and
husband Bill.
Singer Cassie Ventura (better
known as simply Cassie) joined
her longtime hip-hop mogul
boyfriend and another female
guest. A spy saw the trio seated in a
booth, chowing down on chicken
Parmesan, pomodoro pasta, spicy
king crab spaghetti and a salumi
platter. Uptown Records founder
Andre Harrell also stopped by
and joined them toward the end of
their meal before the group left
about 8:30 p.m. Ventura
mentioned to staff that she and
Diddy would be returning to the
resto in a few weeks on their next
trip to the District.
Diddy was also spotted earlier
in the day by the Sofitel Hotel in
Lafayette Square, dressed in a
dapper black suit with a polka-dot
gray tie.
KEVORK DJANSEZIAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sean “Diddy” Combs was grabbing a bite Tuesday at RPM Italian.
Md.’s Hogan sells waterfront home
Larry Hogan is making real
estate moves: The Maryland
governor sold his sweet
waterfront home in the
Annapolis suburb of Edgewater
for $1.35 million.
The sale of the four-bedroom,
five-bath digs happened quietly
last fall, but local news site
Maryland Matters caught wind
of the transaction and confirmed
it through public records. The
buyers, per the report, are a
public health researcher for
Johns Hopkins University and an
electrical contractor.
Republican Hogan and his
wife, Yumi Hogan, bought the
home in 2004 for $825,000 and
initially listed it last year for
$1.595 million. The Hogans are
hardly homeless now, though —
they reside in the stately
governor’s mansion in Annapolis
and, according to Maryland
Matters, they own a condo in
Ocean City, too.
Five Minutes With: John Cena
There isn’t much that can turn down the
volume on a symphony of excited gradeschoolers. On Wednesday, even Librarian
of Congress Carla Hayden could only press
pause on the giddiness as nearly 400 kids
waited — at times patiently, at times not —
for a very special story time. It’s not every
day that John Cena, WWE champion and
newly minted movie star, shows up at the
Library of Congress to read from an 80year-old copy of “The Story of Ferdinand,”
the source material for Cena’s new movie.
(Guess who he plays?)
Dressed in a navy pinstriped suit that
was all but bursting at the biceps, Cena’s
baritone managed to still a squirming
auditorium of children as he recounted the
tale of a big bull who likes flowers more
than fighting. We caught up with the
wrestling actor (or the acting wrestler?)
after a lightning round of questions from
the kids, including: “When you were first
born what did you want to be?” (“Well first
I opened my eyes . . . ”) and “What do you
practice?” (“Tolerance.”)
Q: Your name came up in a
congressional hearing last spring, when a
congressman asked what took you so long
to propose to fellow wrestler Nikki Bella.
A: I guess I wanted to do my due
diligence and make sure it was the right
choice, and I certainly have. That was the
most nervous I’ve ever been in my entire
life. The uncertainty and the nerves and
the excitement and the environment is
what made it such a wonderful moment.
Q: Speaking of Congress, your WWE
brother Dwayne “the Rock” Johnson has
toyed with a bid for president. Good idea?
And would you be his running mate?
A: I would not run with him because I’m
a lumbering man. I don’t run very well. But
anything — anything — he puts his mind
to, he does with a level of excellence you
rarely ever see. So whether he’s just trying
to stir up the political pot or if he is
genuinely serious, I know that when and if
he does decide, he will make an all-out
commitment.
Q: Others have made the leap from the
wrestling ring to the political ring. What’s
the connection between the two gigs?
A: You get to know people and you get to
know the things they care about. It’s a
politician’s job to govern for the people. I
STUART C. WILSON/GETTY IMAGES
John Cena attends a screening of “Ferdinand” Sunday in London.
can understand the gravity of wanting to
be in that realm because you’re with people
all day. You hear the ups and downs of the
people you perform in front of.
Q: Your dressed up as former secretary
of state Hillary Clinton for the Teen Choice
Awards. Politics and entertainment are
mingling like never before and so many
celebrities are politically outspoken these
days. Why is that?
A: Because of the unfortunate divide
that the nation seems to be going through.
I think the reaction to that is special
because a lot of people are using their
voice. The way this country is built is very
unique, and it’s wonderful because if one
feels the pendulum is ever swinging too far
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to one side, they can stand up. So whether
you have 100 million people following you
or whether you stand on a soapbox and yell
at the top of your lungs, it’s a way to use
your voice.
Q: “The Story of Ferdinand” was really
politicized in its day. Hitler ordered copies
of the book burned. Can the movie’s
message still be politicized today?
A: You can politicize anything. They
base entire channels on it. But [today] the
message is the same and that’s why it’s
been so popular. I love the last line of the
book. [Ferdinand’s] still sitting there
smelling the flowers and the very last line
is “and he is happy.” That doesn’t have a
time period or a political affiliation.
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
Le Guin and Salter cast
long literary shadows
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
PHOTOS BY KYLE GUSTAFSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
From left, Scott Devendorf, Matt Berninger and Aaron Dessner of the National played most of the songs from their latest release, “Sleep
Well Beast,” which features songs that are more raucous than the band’s older, more stately material.
The National gets a little political
REVIEW FROM C1
underpin the music, and blaring
guitar motifs punctuate such
songs as “The System Only
Dreams in Total Darkness.”
That title could refer to various
kinds of systems, but Berninger
has expressed his distaste for the
current president and his party in
interviews and onstage. He acidly
dedicated “Walk It Back” to Republican strategist Karl Rove,
whose alleged words are part of
the song, and “Bloodbuzz Ohio” to
Sen. Ron Portman, the Ohio Republican. A dedication to “all 52”
— Republican senators, presumably — prefaced the new “Turtleneck,” arguably the National’s
punkiest tune ever. It fit into a
series of back-to-back rockers
that dominated the latter part of
the main set. During this stretch,
the band slowed to its usual stately pace only for “Carin at the
Liquor Store,” a song inspired by
Carin Besser, Berninger’s wife
and sometime co-lyricist.
Twin brothers and dual guitarists Bryce and Aaron Dessner
churned their instruments to-
Bryce Dessner shared guitar duties with his National band mate
and twin brother, Aaron Dessner, at the Anthem.
gether during the livelier numbers, but Aaron played keyboards
for about half the show. His somber piano anchored such midtempo brooders as “Guilty Party” and
“I Need My Girl,” delivered by
Berninger with his usual suave
growl. Two multi-instrumentalists supplemented the band’s
sound, although they were seldom noticeable except when they
played their horns.
The former host of “The Apprentice” may not be the only
thing that’s shaken up the National. But the group that might once
have been voted “Least Likely
Alt-Rock Band to Cover a Ramones Song” did just that for its
final encore, and its choice was
“The KKK Took My Baby Away.”
Berninger introduced it by denouncing the Donald, although
without uttering his name. The
vocalist ended the song, and the
show, deep in the crowd. His
unexpected move breached the
divide between performer and
audience and disrupted the National’s elegant reserve. That, too,
was liberating.
style@washpost.com
in old age. When Salter’s correspondence with his friend — and
my mentor — literary journalist
Robert Phelps was published as
“Memorable Days,” I contributed
the introduction. More recently,
I’ve lectured on Le Guin for the
National Endowment for the
Arts’s “Big Read” program, having
written its introductory guide to
“A Wizard of Earthsea.”
All this obviously means that
I’m hardly objective about these
two writers. Nor do I need to be.
Their oeuvres demonstrate their
worth — the 88-year-old Le Guin is
now in the Library of America; as
for Salter, who died in 2015 at age
90 two years after completing his
magnum opus “All That Is,” one
need simply quote novelist Richard Ford: “Sentence for sentence,
Salter is the master.”
“No Time to Spare,” deriving
from Le Guin’s online essays, covers just about anything that crosses her mind, from “lit biz” to cats to
the Oregon landscape. Still, old
age, sexual and national politics
and our dismal future predominate. Here’s Le Guin in 2010:
“When my kids were young I
could still hope we might not totally screw up the environment for
them, but now that we’ve done so,
and are more deeply sold out than
ever to profiteering industrialism
with its future-horizon of a few
months, any hope I have that coming generations may have ease and
peace in life has become very tenuous, and has to reach far, far forward into the dark.”
In a 2012 polemic, “Lying It All
Away,” Le Guin writes scathingly of
“growth capitalism” returning to its
origins and “providing security for
none but the strongest profiteers.”
She notes that “I have watched my
country accept, mostly quite complacently, along with a lower living
standard for more and more people, a lower moral standard. A moral standard based on advertising.”
Can America, she wonders, continue “living on spin and illusion, hot
air and hogwash, and still be my
country? I don’t know.” After all,
our country is now run by corporations “of which Congress is an almost wholly owned subsidiary.”
Might there be truth to the commonplace that science fiction
writers are prophets? All these cris
de coeur were originally produced
in the Obama era, long before our
divisive last election with its appalling consequences. A year ago I
argued that Le Guin deserved a
Nobel Prize in literature. In fact —
what a fantasy! — she ought to be
running the country.
In the essay “Why I Write,” Salter declares that “there comes a
time when you realize that everything is a dream, and only those
things preserved in writing have
any possibility of being real.” In
“Don’t Save Anything,” despite its
paradoxical title, Kay Eldredge
Salter assembles her late husband’s bread-and-butter journalism — yet how delicious good
bread and butter can be! Included
are an introduction to Isaac Babel’s “Red Cavalry” stories, profiles of Vladimir Nabokov,
Graham Greene and Antonia
Fraser, and a long biographical
essay on Gabriele D’Annunzio, finde-siecle Italy’s great poet, lover
and madman:
“He was anything but handsome. He was short, baldheaded,
with bulging eyes and a prominent
nose. . . . And yet, women wrecked
their lives for him and, abandoned, remembered him forever.”
Salter himself recalls how he
nearly crashed as a young Air Force
pilot and outlines, with considerable admiration, Dwight D. Eisenhower’s military career. He spends
time with climber Royal Robbins
and ace skier Toni Sailer (later mining what he learned from them for
“Solo Faces” and the film script
that became “Downhill Racer”),
then reminisces about an incandescent love affair in Rome and his
later years in Aspen and Boulder,
Colo.
As always, Salter emphasizes
simple, vivifying details. To understand the challenge of ascending
the vertical rock face of Yosemite’s
El Capitan, “Imagine a wall more
than twice as high as the Empire
State Building.” Describing a hospital lab technician, he writes,
“She has blond hair and the decent, American face of a girl in the
emergency room who is there
when your eyes open and you love
her from then on.”
I sometimes wonder what these
two
extraordinary
writers
thought of each other. Not that it
really matters: Our literature is
lucky to have them both.
mdirda@gmail.com
Michael Dirda reviews books every
Thursday for The Washington Post.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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THEATER REVIEW
A peachy cast has a ball in ‘The Last Night of Ballyhoo’
BY
C ELIA W REN
To gauge the psychic distance
between gawky Lala Levy and her
domineering mother, Boo, consider their way with a telephone.
Ordered by mom to call an eligible bachelor, the 20-something
Lala does so gingerly, her wide
eyes sullen and apprehensive;
almost immediately, she hangs
up, so swiftly you’d think the
phone were searing hot. Then
Boo takes over, dialing the operator with near-regal assurance;
when the call connects, she
breaks into a steely, driven and
entitled smile.
Such telling moments abound
in the Theater J production of
“The Last Night of Ballyhoo,”
Alfred Uhry’s comedy about an
elite Jewish family in 1939 Atlanta. Director Amber Paige McGinnis’s staging boasts a terrific cast,
including Shayna Blass as Lala
and Susan Rome as Boo. Occasionally, the entertainment veers
between naturalistic and broader
comedy in a manner that’s not
entirely smooth. In general, however, it’s both fun and absorbing
to hang out with these quirky and
sharply etched characters, whose
conflicts and power plays nod at
serious themes.
In December 1939, Boo is crusading to get Lala a date to
Ballyhoo, a formal dance patronized by their social circle, Atlanta’s German Jewish elite. When
marvelous as the jovially sarcastic Adolph, often seen sneaking
food or snoozing in an armchair,
unless he’s gloomily processing
the ominous news out of Europe.
Powell channels Joe’s decency
and smarts, making it clear why
the young man feels impelled to
talk about Jewishness and integrity with Sunny.
Julie-Ann Elliott aces the
sweet flakiness of Sunny’s mother, Reba Freitag, and Josh Adams
is suitably obnoxious as a snobbish visitor from Louisiana. A
restless figure in a tight hairdo,
Rome’s Boo makes every withering quip count. “Clark Gable is
probably not going to ask you to
Ballyhoo,” she observes acidly to
Lala.
Now and then — as when Lala
makes a grand exit, at the end of
Act 1 — the tale seems to lurch
from relatively naturalistic humor to an exaggerated kind.
Some directorial tinkering could
probably fix such matters and
make this “Ballyhoo” yet more
graceful on the dance floor.
TERESA CASTRACANE
Boo’s brother, Adolph Freitag
(Sasha Olinick), introduces his
new employee, Joe Farkas (Zack
Powell), Lala is smitten, but Joe
only has eyes for Lala’s cousin,
Sunny (Madeline Rose Burrows).
In any case, Joe’s future with the
family is dicey, given that the
Ballyhoo set largely looks down
on Jews like Joe, who is of Eastern European heritage.
The swanky mansion-interior
set, with its brilliantly decorated
Christmas tree, speaks volumes
about the assimilated household’s social and cultural as-
Swift took the stand to make a stand
BY
E MILY Y AHR
Taylor Swift was featured on
Time’s Person of the Year cover
on Wednesday, as one of 2017’s
“silence breakers” who spoke out
during this year’s cultural reckoning surrounding sexual harassment and abuse.
At first, some may have been
confused to see Swift — a famously apolitical celebrity who
has been criticized for not taking
any political stance in this divisive year — categorized as one of
“the voices that launched a
movement,” as the magazine put
it. She stood next to figures such
as Ashley Judd, one of the first
stars who went on the record
with allegations against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein,
and lobbyist Adama Iwu, who
helped coordinate a campaign to
stop harassment in California
state politics.
However, while Swift spent
most of 2017 under the radar
until she dropped a new album
last month, she made one very
notable appearance in August
when she showed up in a Denver
courtroom. Two years earlier,
former Denver country radio DJ
David Mueller had sued Swift,
alleging the pop star got him
fired when she said that he lifted
her skirt and groped her during a
meet-and-greet at a 2013 concert.
Swift countersued for a symbolic
$1, accusing Mueller of assault
and battery.
The jury sided with Swift.
(Mueller still denies any
wrongdoing and says he might
file an appeal.) The case received worldwide attention —
but the most-discussed aspect
of the trial was Swift’s very
blunt testimony, as Mueller’s
lawyer, Gabe McFarland, questioned her on the stand about
whether the DJ actually groped
her.
“Gabe, this is a photo of him
with his hand up my skirt — with
his hand on my ass,” Swift said.
“You can ask me a million questions. I’m never going to say
anything different. I never have
said anything different.”
When
McFarland
asked
whether Swift was critical of her
bodyguard for not interfering if
Mueller really reached under her
skirt, Swift responded, “I’m critical of your client sticking his
hand under my skirt and grabbing my ass.” Swift repeatedly
reiterated the same point: “He
stayed attached to my bare asscheek as I lurched away from
him.” “He had a handful of my
ass. I know it was him.”
Time wrote that Swift’s “cleareyed testimony marked one of
several major milestones in the
conversation around sexual harassment this year.” In the weekend following the trial, the Rape,
Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) reported a 35
percent increase for its national
hotline. RAINN’s president,
Scott Berkowitz, told ABC News
that Swift’s case was “a great
demonstration to other victims
that there is strength in coming
forward and pursing justice.”
In a written Q&A with Time,
Swift explained why she spoke so
directly to Mueller.
“I had already been in court all
week and had to watch this man’s
attorney bully, badger and harass
my team, including my mother,
over inane details and ridiculous
minutiae, accusing them, and
me, of lying,” Swift wrote. “I was
angry. In that moment, I decided
Little by little, the power suit lost
its strength in the business world
NOTEBOOK FROM C1
dead.
Slipping on a suit is no longer
a requirement for moving into
the executive suite. It does not
automatically imbue its wearer
with authority. The most important person in the room is probably not wearing a suit. The
president wears something that
can only loosely be called a suit;
it is more of a sack.
The “suits” may still be the
rulemakers. But what are the
rules worth these days?
“Today, the suit of armor has a
different meaning and a different purpose,” says Tom Kalenderian, a 38-year veteran of Barneys New York and the store
executive in charge of menswear.
The power suit did not die a
quick, painless death. It was not
slaughtered with one brisk pen
stroke on a designer’s sketchpad.
Its demise was slow and anguished.
Decades ago, Casual Friday
tried to kill the power suit. The
effort only frustrated powerful
men who didn’t have the time or
the wherewithal to figure out a
dignified alternative to chalkstripes and peak lapels. Casual
Friday gave men Dockers, and
style@washpost.com
Shayna Blass, Zack Powell, Susan Rome and Sasha Olinick in Alfred Uhry’s “The Last Night of Ballyhoo” at Theater J.
men deserved better than that.
The power suit survived.
Then, the entrepreneurs of
Silicon Valley rebelled against
the business suit. They wore
hoodies and jeans while they
built their brands, and they continued wearing these informal
clothes after they became tycoons. They chipped away at the
aesthetic template of power. Designer sneakers and sweatshirts
gained favor and clout.
Still, when Wall Street demanded discipline and focus
from these 21st-century companies, the youthful wizards
brought in suit-wearing business
veterans to corral the chaos.
But then fashion began to
muck around with suits. Thom
Browne made them in gray flannel and shrank them for maximum stylistic effect. J. Crew, Zara
and others took the downsized
“Mad Men” silhouette to the
mass market. The runways disassembled suits. Stylists paired
$3,000 designer suits with limited-edition sneakers.
In 2016, the classic Italian
menswear house Brioni hired a
former street style star in a bid to
boost sales. Justin O’Shea, a lean,
tattooed Australian whose main
retail experience was as fashion
to forgo any courtroom formalities and just answer the questions the way it happened. This
man hadn’t considered any formalities when he assaulted me,
and his lawyer didn’t hold back
on my mom — why should I be
polite?”
She added, “I’m told it was the
most amount of times the word
‘ass’ has ever been said in Colorado federal court.”
Swift, who called the trial
process “demoralizing,” said that
many people didn’t realize that
Mueller had sued her first. “I
spent two years reading headlines referring to it as ‘The Taylor
Swift Butt Grab Case’ with Internet trolls making a joke about
what happened to me,” she
wrote. “There was an audible
gasp in the courtroom when I
was named as the defendant.”
Ultimately, Swift said, she received lots of support during the
trial, and left with this advice for
those who are going through
something similar: “You should
not be blamed for waiting
15 minutes or 15 days or 15 years
to report sexual assault or harassment, or for the outcome of
what happens to a person after
he or she makes the choice to
sexually harass or assault you.”
Swift acknowledged that although she recognizes her privilege (and her financial means to
support an expensive trial), it
was still a “lonely and draining
experience, even when you win.”
After everything, Swift added,
she still hasn’t received the symbolic dollar that she won from
Mueller.
“I think that act of defiance is
symbolic in itself,” she wrote.
emily.yahr@washpost.com
director of a women’s e-commerce site, sought to radically
remake the 72-year-old brand in
his own rebel image. He created
a collection of angular, hypersexy suits. On the runway, models wore them with chinchilla
overcoats. O’Shea aimed to woo
customers with an advertising
campaign featuring the heavymetal band Metallica photographed in shadowy, gothic
glamour.
It was all too much, and
O’Shea was out of a job in six
months. But no matter. His time
at Brioni might have been short
and his vision extreme, but it was
in keeping with the new reality.
Suits had become fully integrated into the fashion ecosystem.
Indeed, for his spring 2018 show,
the avant-garde designer Rick
Owens, who called suits “a classic symbol of civilization,” incorporated them into his menswear
collection alongside his bulbous
bags, tiny shorts and vinyl trousers.
Suits were no longer about
power. They were about style.
“The suit is in a really interesting place. It’s come off very bad
times,” says Mark-Evan Blackman, a menswear specialist at
the Fashion Institute of Technology. “Suits are no longer thought
of as a vehicle for work. Younger
people are much more comfortable looking at the individual
components [of a suit] and how
sumptions. In the background,
behind grand white pillars, hang
“Gone With the Wind” movie
posters and related historic photos — allusions to the film’s 1939
Atlanta premiere, with which
Lala is obsessed. No surprise
when she chooses a Ballyhoo
dress that’s the spitting image of
a Scarlett O’Hara gown. (Daniel
Conway is scenic designer;
Kelsey Hunt designed the costumes.)
The visuals are spiffy, but it’s
the performances that are the
real deluxe items here. Olinick is
The Last Night of Ballyhoo, by
Alfred Uhry. Directed by Amber Paige
McGinnis; lighting design, Colin K.
Bills; sound, Justin Schmitz; props,
Timothy J. Jones. About 2 hours 20
minutes. Tickets: $30-$69. Through
Dec. 31 at Theater J, 1529 16th St.
NW. Call 202-777-3210 or visit
theaterj.org.
Person of the Year: Silence Breakers
TIME FROM C1
in our culture since the 1960s,”
Time’s editor in chief, Edward
Felsenthal, told NBC’s “Today”
show Wednesday.
The media’s endless stream of
sexual misconduct investigations
and the countless #MeToo accounts of harassment, abuse and
worse have ensnared an evergrowing list of public figures —
celebrities, executives, politicians,
business leaders — whose lives
and careers have come crashing
down or are dangerously close to
doing so.
Like Charlie Rose and Matt
Lauer and Mark Halperin and former NPR news chief Michael
Oreskes.
Like Russell Simmons and Louis C.K. and Kevin Spacey and
James Levine and Sen. Al Franken
(D-Minn.).
Like Rep. John Conyers Jr.
(D-Mich.), the erstwhile dean of
the House who resigned Tuesday
amid mounting allegations of sexual harassment.
The barrage of sexual misconduct accusations, from Hollywood
to Capitol Hill, came after the
Weinstein scandal exploded into
public view — with claims from
numerous women who said he
sexually harassed them or even
raped them.
And a social media movement
emerged with the hashtag
#MeToo, which has been used
more than 3 million times on Twitter, according to company data. A
wave of survivors came forward,
some telling wrenching stories of
abuse, harassment and rape for
the first time in public.
The hashtag succeeded in
showing the world the volume of
the problem. But as it grew, #Me-
they fit into their lifestyle.”
Blackman has not completely
given up on suits as an expression of power; but he emphasizes
that they now represent so much
more. Power is overshadowed by
a kind of sex appeal that goes far
beyond old-fashioned, James
Bond allure.
Musicians now wear business
suits during performances — not
the bedazzled blazers and leather pants expected of rock stars,
but Wall Street suits, gloriously
tailored Tom Ford suits. In 2013,
Justin Timberlake recorded an
ode to such tailoring with “Suit &
Tie,” and he wore Ford’s suits on
his subsequent world tour. That
same year, Jay-Z rapped an homage to Ford. By 2017, Gucci was
churning out eccentric suits that
blurred the line between business and pleasure, serious tailoring and silly costume.
Today, suits are fashionable.
Or they are just a habit. Capitol
Hill still loves suits. So do lawyers and TV anchors, whether on
MSNBC or Fox. Is that power or
stasis?
“To me, it’s like putting on a
uniform,” Heye says. “I don’t look
at it as power.”
Not every man loves suits, but
a lot of men do. Made-to-measure tailoring has become increasingly popular as it has become more accessible financially.
There are more modestly priced
brands such as Suitsupply and
Too showed something else, as
well: the burden survivors of sexual and harassment and assault
bear when asked to come forward.
In its first viral days, the hashtag
largely amplified the stories of
white women, following Milano’s
lead. But “Me Too” had been the
mantra of a decade-old fight
against sexual abuse before it became a hashtag, and was originally
conceived by a woman of color.
Burke, a longtime activist and
organizer, first identified the power “Me Too” could have to help
women and girls who survived
sexual abuse.
“What the viral campaign did is,
it creates hope. It creates inspiration,” Burke said in an October
interview with the Washington
Post, “People need hope and inspiration desperately. But hope and
inspiration are only sustained by
work.”
In its Person of the Year 2017
cover story, Time noted that “this
moment is borne of a very real and
potent sense of unrest. Yet it
doesn’t have a leader, or a single,
unifying tenet. The hashtag
#metoo (swiftly adapted into
#BalanceTonPorc, #YoTambien,
#Ana_kaman and many others),
which to date has provided an
umbrella of solidarity for millions
of people to come forward with
their stories, is part of the picture,
but not all of it.”
“This reckoning,” it added, “appears to have sprung up overnight.
But it has actually been simmering
for years, decades, centuries. Women have had it with bosses and
co-workers who not only cross
boundaries but don’t even seem to
know that boundaries exist. . .These silence breakers have
started a revolution of refusal, gathering strength by the day, and in the
past two months alone, their collective anger has spurred immediate
and shocking results: nearly every
day, CEOs have been fired, moguls
toppled, icons disgraced.”
In choosing its Person of the
Year, Time has said it names the
person or people who had the
greatest influence over the past 12
months.
In 2015, Time chose German
Chancellor Angela Merkel; in
2014, it was “The Ebola Fighters”;
and in 2013, Pope Francis — “The
People’s Pope.”
Last year’s choice was President
Trump. In explaining that pick,
Time’s then-editor Nancy Gibbs
wrote: “This is the 90th time we
have named the person who had
the greatest influence, for better
or worse, on the events of the year.
So which is it this year: Better or
worse? The challenge for Donald
Trump is how profoundly the
country disagrees about the answer.”
Trump made the shortlist again
for 2017. The president tweeted
last month that Time had called
“to say that I was PROBABLY going to be named ‘Man (Person) of
the Year,’ like last year, but I would
have to agree to an interview and a
major photo shoot. I said probably
is no good and took a pass. Thanks
anyway!”
“The idea that influential, inspirational individuals shape the
world could not be more apt this
year,” Felsenthal, the Time editor,
said. “For giving voice to open
secrets, for moving whisper networks onto social networks, for
pushing us all to stop accepting
the unacceptable, the Silence
Breakers are the 2017 Person of the
Year.”
Strong Suit making inroads in
the American market and on the
red carpet, not by touting power
and executive elan but by pushing style, panache and flexibility.
By celebrating everything but
power. Or, in the case of Suitsupply, which is headquartered in
Amsterdam, by poking fun at
power suits in an advertising
campaign titled, “Revenge of the
Yuppies.”
What motivates a man to purchase a suit? “I think it’s more of
a confidence thing,” says Nish de
Gruiter, vice president of Suitsupply USA. “Younger customers
see [a suit] as a reflection of their
personality.” They wear a suit
with hiking boots. They choose
knit jersey blazers that feel like
sweatshirts.
“They don’t have to buy a suit;
they just like how they look in a
suit,” Kalenderian says. “They
like how they feel and what
people say about how they look.”
Suits have emerged as a form
of vanity, in the peacock tradition, breaking free of the Master
of the Universe mold. What they
have lost in power, they have
gained in style.
lindsey.bever@washpost.com
abigail.ohlheiser@washpost.com
robin.givhan@washpost.com
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C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
12/7/17
7:00
7:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
8:00
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
◆ News
◆ Football Night
(8:20) NFL Football: New Orleans Saints at Atlanta Falcons (Live)
News
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
◆ Gotham
Mod Fam
(9:01) ◆ The Orville
Fox 5 News at Ten
News
The Final 5
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
◆ J’pardy!
◆ Shrek/Halls ◆ Toy Story
◆ The Great American Baking Show
◆ Kimmel
News
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆ ET
◆ Big Bang
◆ Sheldon
◆ Mom
◆ Life in
◆ S.W.A.T.
◆ Colbert
News
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
◆ Noticiero
Fútbol Central
(8:50) Fútbol Mexicano Primera División (Live)
Noticias
14.1 WFDC (UNI) ◆ La Rosa de Guadalupe
Big Bang
Big Bang
Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ Family Feud ◆ Family Feud Fox 5 News ◆ Page Six
Money
Chesapeake Collectibles
Roy Orbison: Black & White Night 30
Memory Rescue With Daniel Amen, MD
22.1 WMPT (PBS) ◆ Business
The Big Band Years (My Music)
The Carpenters: Close to You & Christmas Memories
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
France 24 Programming
Nestor Burma
The Undertaker
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
Great Performances
Democracy Now!
32.1 WHUT (PBS) Memory Rescue With Daniel Amen, MD
◆
◆
◆
◆ Mom
Supernatural
Arrow
News
Seinfeld
Two Men
50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Goldbergs
Blue Bloods
Blue Bloods
Blue Bloods
Blue Bloods
66.1 WPXW (ION) Blue Bloods
CABLE CHANNELS
PAUL TRANTOW/BRAVO
Top Chef (Bravo at 10) The culinary competition moves to Colorado in
Season 15. Contestants are tasked with making a potluck meal for their
first challenge. Pictured, left to right: Judges Tom Colicchio, Padma
Lakshmi and contestant Claudette Wilkins of San Diego.
The Big Bang Theory (CBS at 8)
Sheldon and Amy turn to math to
make wedding planning less
stressful.
Supernatural (The CW at 8) Jack
enlists the help of a dreamcatcher
named Kaia to help him save Mary
Winchester.
Gotham (Fox at 8) Carmine
Falcone shows up in town and
Tabitha tries to get Grundy to
remember his past.
SPECIAL
Pysch: The Movie (USA at 8) A
holiday movie based on the show,
in which an amateur sleuth tricks a
police force into hiring him after
convincing them that he has
psychic powers.
LATE NIGHT
Conan (TBS at 11) Patton Oswalt,
Andy Serkis, Royal Blood.
Young Sheldon (CBS at 8:30) The
kids think up ways to fix a family
conflict.
Arrow (The CW at 9) Oliver and the
team try to save Quentin Lance
after he’s kidnapped by Black Siren
and Cayden James.
Daily Show (Comedy Central at
11) Tiffany Haddish.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Sarah
Paulson, John Hodgman, Bobby
Flay.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Octavia
Spencer, Dave Franco, Hanson,
Melissa McCarthy.
FINALE
Fallon (NBC at 12:05) James
Franco, Niall Horan.
The Orville (Fox at 9) Ed and Kelly
discuss trying their relationship
again and the crew discovers a
planet in another universe.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Kobe
Bryant, Morgan Freeman, Glen
Keane.
DOCUMENTARY
32 Pills: My Sister’s Suicide
(HBO at 8) Hope Litoff investigates
her sister’s mental illness and
eventual suicide.
Meyers (NBC at 1:07) Wendy
Williams, Mike Birbiglia, Brooks
Wackerman.
— Sarah Polus
The First 48
The First 48
The First 48
The Menendez Murders
The Menendez Murders
A&E
(3:30) The Godfather, Part II Movie: No Country for Old Men ★★★ (2007)
Movie: First Blood ★★★ (1982)
AMC
Monsters Inside Me
Monsters Inside Me
Monsters Inside Me
Monsters Inside Me
Intruders
Animal Planet
Movie: Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son ★ (2011)
Martin
Martin
Rundown
Comedy
BET
Top Chef Junior
Million Dollar LA
Million Dollar LA
Top Chef
Watch
Million LA
Bravo
Gumball
King of Hill
Amer. Dad
Cleveland
Amer. Dad
Burgers
Burgers
Family Guy
Family Guy
Cartoon Network Gumball
Erin Burnett OutFront
Anderson Cooper 360
Anderson Cooper 360
CNN Tonight
CNN Tonight
CNN
Futurama
Drunk History Drunk History Drunk History Drunk History Drunk History Drunk History Daily
Opposition
Comedy Central Futurama
Alaskan Bush People
Alaskan Bush People
Christmas
(10:01) Alaskan Bush People (11:01) Alaskan Bush People
Discovery
Bunk’d
Raven
Andi Mack
Stuck/Middle Bizaardvark Raven
K.C. Under.
Liv-Mad.
Bizaardvark Raven
Disney
E! News
Movie: Jumping the Broom ★★ (2011)
The Platinum Life
E! News
E!
College Football Awards (Live)
Playoff Preview
The Herbies
SportsCenter (Live)
ESPN
SportsCenter (Live)
College Basketball: Iowa at Iowa State (Live)
30 for 30
Globetrotters
ESPN2
Chopped
Chopped
Chopped
Beat Flay
Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby
Food Network
The Story With Martha
Tucker Carlson Tonight
Hannity
The Ingraham Angle
Fox News at Night
Fox News
(6:50) Movie: Elf ★★★ (2003)
Movie: Toy Story ★★★★ (1995)
The 700 Club
Freeform
(5:30) Movie: The Heat ★★ Movie: The Proposal ★★ (2009)
Movie: The Proposal ★★ (2009)
FX
Christmas at Holly Lodge
Movie: With Love, Christmas (2017)
Movie: The Christmas Train (2017)
Hallmark
Movie: Magical Christmas Ornaments (2017)
Christmas in Angel Falls
Hallmark M&M Movie: Journey Back to Christmas (2016)
Bat v Sup
VICE
Movie: 32 Pills: My Sister’s Suicide (2017) Movie: Unforgettable ★★ (2017)
(11:15) Movie: Warcraft ★★
HBO
Flip or Flop
Flip or Flop
Flip/Flop
Flip/Flop
Flip/Flop
Flip/Flop
Hunters
Hunt Intl
Vintage
Vintage Flip
HGTV
The Curse of Oak Island
The Curse of Oak Island
Pearl Harbor: Survivors Remember
The Curse of Oak Island
History
(6:00) Christmas in the City Movie: Christmas With the Kranks ★★ (2004)
(10:01) Movie: My Christmas Prince (2017)
Lifetime
Nationals Classics
ESPNWS
Bensinger
MASports
MASN
Hardball Matthews
All In With Chris Hayes
Rachel Maddow Show
The Last Word
The 11th Hour
MSNBC
Wild ’n Out
Nick Cannon: Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild/Out
Wild/Out
MTV
Running Wild-Bear Grylls
Running Wild-Bear Grylls
Running Wild-Bear Grylls
Running Wild-Bear Grylls
Nat’l Geographic Kingdom of the North
Wizards
Wizards
GameTime NBA Basketball: Washington Wizards at Phoenix Suns (Live)
Extra
NBC SportsNet WA 1-on-1
Thundermans SpongeBob Movie: Megamind ★★★ (2010)
Fresh Prince Fresh Prince Friends
Friends
Nickelodeon
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Movie: Green Lantern ★★ (2011)
Limitless
Spike
Movie: Journey 2: The Mysterious Island ★★ (2012)
Van Helsing
Ghost Wars
Happy!
Syfy
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Conan
TBS
(6:30) Movie: The Mummy
Movie: Words and Music ★★★ (1948)
(10:15) Movie: I’ll See You in My Dreams ★★★ (1951)
TCM
Say Yes
Say Yes
90 Day Fiancé: Extended
Unexpected
90 Day Fiancé: Extended
TLC
NCIS: New Orleans
NBA Basketball: Los Angeles Lakers at Philadelphia 76ers (Live)
NBA Basketball: Rockets at Jazz
TNT
Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries at the Museum
Travel
Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Carbonaro
Carbonaro
Carbonaro
Carbonaro
Carbonaro Carbonaro
Carbonaro
Carbonaro
TruTV
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Mom
Mom
King
King
TV Land
Cosby Show Cosby Show Cosby Show Diff. World
Cosby Show Diff. World
Diff. World
Diff. World
Living Single Living Single
TV One
Chrisley Knows Best
Movie: Psych: The Movie (2017)
Chrisley Knows Best
Movie: Psych: The Movie
USA Network
(5:20) Movie: Purple Rain
Movie: Coming to America ★★★ (1988)
Movie: Ferris Bueller’s Day Off ★★★
VH1
GE Washington
Govt. Matters Value of APIs SportsTalk
ABC News
News at 10pm
Govt. Matters Value of APIs
WNC8
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
WGN
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
HOLIDAY EVENTS
NSO Pops:
“A Holiday Pops!”
Dash through the snow to our merrily adorned Concert Hall
and warm your spirit with fresh takes on comforting classics
and sing-along carols in this annual NSO tradition. Make
an unforgettable holiday memory with your favorite yuletide
tunes sung by Kennedy Center favorite and Tonyj-nominated stage and screen star Megan Hilty (Broadway’s Noises
Off, 9 to 5 and Wicked; NBC’s Smash). If you’ve been good,
jolly Ol’ Saint Nick may even pay a visit!
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
12 Shows
December 14-23
Times vary – with matinees
and evenings to choose
from. Visit manassas
ballet.org for details
MBT presents Northern VA’s favorite family holiday tradition
– the spectacular Nutcracker! Live orchestra, talent from
around the globe and an ensemble cast spread holiday
cheer to all!
Hylton Performing Arts Center
George Mason University,
Manassas
Tickets at hyltoncenter.org or call
(888) 945-2468
Info & discounts at
www.manassasballet.org
Free Parking
Thurs 12/7 @ 8;
Fri 12/8 @ 8;
Sat 12/9 @ 3 (OC);
Sun 12/10 @ 7:30 (OC)
Solo show about a family’s journey starring Mashuq
Mushtaq Deen. Directed by Chay Yew. “Deen’s storytelling
technique and artistry is arresting.” (DCMTA)
Tomorrow at 8
Saturday at 2 & 8
featuring
Megan Hilty
with
The Washington Chorus
Manassas Ballet Theatre
presents
The Nutcracker
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
Tickets start
at $35
Norhern VA’s
premier ballet
company shines at
the peak of the
holiday season!
Live Orchestra
THEATRE
Mosaic Theater
Presents
Draw the Circle
Atlas Performing Arts Center
1333 H St NE
202-399-7993 ext 2
www.mosaictheater.org
$20-$50
ASL-interpreted
discussion after
12/9 matinee.
MUSIC - CHAMBER
Dumbarton Concerts
Presents
Barnes & Hampton
Celtic Consort
A Celtic Christmas
December 9 at 4pm
and 8pm
Linn Barnes and Allison Hampton on lute, guitar, Celtic
harp; Joseph Cunliffe on flute; Steven Bloom with
percussion; Robert Aubry Davis with poetry including
Dylan Thomas’s A Child’s Christmas in Wales.
December 10 at 4pm
Dumbarton Concerts
Dumbarton United
Methodist Church
3133 Dumbarton St. NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-965-2000
$42 Adults
$39 Senior
Dumbarton
concerts.org
MUSIC - CONCERTS
Washington Bach Consort
Celebration:
Christmas Oratorio
Dana Marsh,
conductor
Saturday, December 9,
6:00 pm
Conducted by Artistic Director candidate Dana Marsh,
Bach's narrative account of the Christmas story includes
some of his most lavish and varied writing for chorus,
soloists, and orchestra.
Featuring:
Kate Vetter Cain, soprano
Kristen Dubenion-Smith, alto
Robert Petillo, tenor & Steven Combs, bass
National Presbyterian Church
4101 Nebraska Ave, NW
(202)429-2121
www.bachconsort.org
Single tickets
$25-$69
18 and under
$10
18-38 pay
your age
Free
pre-concert lecture
Free parking
DANCE
The Suzanne
Farrell Ballet:
“Forever
Balanchine”:
Farewell
Performances
Tonight & Tomorrow at 7:30
Saturday at 1:30 & 7:30
This season we celebrate the culmination of our own
ballet company, led by the beloved muse of choreographer
George Balanchine. Throughout her career as a dancer,
Suzanne Farrell created and redefined many of the great
roles of the Balanchine canon. The farewell program is
a pageant of favorites, all handpicked for their special
meaning to Ms. Farrell. Suzanne Farrell, Artistic Director
with the Kennedy Center Opera House Orchestra
Kennedy Center
Opera House
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
HAVE YOU ACCOMPLISHED ANYTHING LATELY?
WE HEAR YOU
GOT RID OF
NO
WHAT IF YOU
GOT RID OF
12 MONTHS
12 YEARS
WORTH OF STUFF AND SOLD
IT FOR DECENT CASH
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
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YES
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Asking others to not post kids’ photos is reasonable
Ask Amy
AMY
DICKINSON
Dear Amy: What
is the etiquette on
taking photos of
other people’s
children and
posting them on
social media?
I am the mother of two small
children. The first time I
encountered this issue was when
my oldest was 2 and my youngest
was a few months old. We
attended a family function, and a
guest at the party took pictures of
me and my children. He proudly
showed me the images and told
me that he had posted them on
his Facebook account.
I kindly told him to please
remove the images off his account.
I was shocked by his reaction; he
became upset and made a huge
scene at the party, but I did not
back down (and my husband
stood by me). I have experienced
versions of this since then.
My social-media accounts are
all private. I feel that my job as a
parent is to protect my children,
and that includes their socialmedia footprint.
I do not post many photos of
my children, and I would never
post a picture of someone else’s
child without the parents’
permission. I go as far as to ask
the parent if it’s okay to take a
picture of their child and then
inform them that I will not be
sharing them on social media.
I know that it will get harder
for me to control this once they
are involved in sports and
activities where group pictures
are taken or where my children
happen to be in the background,
but their faces are very clear. Am I
wrong in thinking a person
should ask the parents’
permission before sharing the
images online?
I cannot imagine I am the only
parent who feels like this. How do
other parents handle this?
Wondering Mom
and then assuring parents that you
won’t post it on social media, is
wise, sound and respectful. Other
parents should not post photos
with your children in them
without asking you. They also
should not tag your kids’ names in
photos.
If someone else doesn’t like
this, then they should be
reminded that they are not
raising these children — you are.
Stand your ground.
Dear Amy: I’m a survivor of
Wondering Mom: The etiquette,
which is also good old-fashioned
common sense, is to always respect
parents’ concerns regarding their
children. Your practice of
maintaining privacy and control of
your children’s images is what all
good and thoughtful parents
should do. Your habit of always
asking if you can take a picture,
childhood incest and fairly certain
I know who perpetrated the abuse.
I’ve suffered the repercussions
throughout my life (nightmares,
sexual dysfunction, multiple failed
relationships, a much lighter
wallet due to years of therapy), but
I have no actual memory of the
abuse aside from brief flashes with
no clear image of the person
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:002:30-5:10-7:45-10:15
Justice League (PG-13) 12:003:00-9:00
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-9:40 Coco (PG) 1:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:00- Wonder (PG) 12:55-3:45-6:452:00-4:00-8:20
9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Coco (PG) 4:05-7:05-10:05
12:45-4:00-7:10-10:15
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
Coco (PG) CC: 1:30-4:30-7:15IMAX Theater
9:15
601 Independence Avenue SW
Murder on the Orient Express
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
(PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:40-7:30-9:10 (NR) 2:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:40 A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
Wonder (PG) CC: 12:40-3:30Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
7:30-10:15
Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Dunkirk: The IMAX 2D Experi1:45-4:30-7:05-10:15
ence (PG-13) 7:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Dream Big: Engineering Our
2:15-5:00-7:45-10:15
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 12:25
Missouri (R) CC: 1:25-4:15Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:257:10-9:55
11:50-2:05-5:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
CC: 5:15
Experience (PG-13)
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
1:15-4:20-7:15-10:10
Lady Bird (R) 1:20-4:00-6:45-9:40
AFI Silver Theatre
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 6:15-10:15
Cultural Center
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
8633 Colesville Road
(PG) 12:30-3:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Pitch Perfect Treble Marathon
Missouri (R) 12:00-2:20-4:40-7:05
2:00-7:00
Little Harbour (Piata lod) (NR)
AMC Loews Uptown 1
5:10
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Let the Sunshine In (Un Beau
Murder on the Orient Express
Soleil Intérieur)7:00
(PG-13) CC: 2:00-4:45-7:30
A Violent Life (Une vie violente)
(NR) 9:20
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Lady Bird (R) 11:20-1:20-3:205:20-7:20-9:40
The Disaster Artist (R) (!) 7:00
You Disappear (Du forsvinder)
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
9:00
1:50-7:30
Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) (NR)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
1:20-4:20-7:20
AMC Academy 8
Coco (PG) (!) 1:10-4:10
6198 Greenbelt Road
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:35(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:15-8:00
2:25-4:15-7:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
2:50
1:00-4:00-7:00
The Man Who Invented Christ- The Star (PG) CC: 3:00-5:15-7:45
mas (PG) CC: (!) 12:30-3:00-5:30 Coco (PG) CC: 1:30-7:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
CC: 4:40
2:00-4:30-7:05
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 7:10
Wonder (PG) CC: 2:30-5:20-8:00
Wonder (PG) 12:00-2:20-5:00Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
7:40
CC: 5:15-8:00
Albert Einstein Planetarium - Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
National Air and Space Museum 1:15-4:05-6:55
6th St and Independence Ave SW
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 4:30
To Space and Back 11:00AM
AMC Center Park 8
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30 Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:00- 12:15-1:30-3:15-6:15-7:15-9:15
1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM 12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
Angelika Pop-Up
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 12:00-6:00
at Union Market
Murder on the Orient Express
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
(PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:30-6:15-9:10
Marshall (PG-13) Open Caption: Wonder (PG) CC: 1:00-3:457:30
6:30-9:30
Wait for Your Laugh 11:15-1:15- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
3:15-5:15-7:15
2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Marshall (PG-13) 11:45-2:15-4:45 Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: 4:15-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:30-2:00-4:20-7:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
12:30-3:20-6:10-9:00
Avalon Theatre
Coco 3D (PG) (!) 3:00-9:00
5612 Connecticut Avenue
AMC Columbia 14
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
Missouri (R) 2:00-4:45-7:30
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-3:15-5:30-7:45 The Disaster Artist (R) 7:05-9:40
Landmark Atlantic Plumbing Justice League (PG-13) CC:
11:30-5:30
Cinema
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
807 V Street, NW
11:40-2:50-6:20-9:40
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
The Star (PG) CC: 10:50-1:2012:05-12:15-2:25-4:50-7:203:50-6:20-9:00
9:50-10:00
Coco (PG) CC: 10:50-12:20-4:20Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:25-7:35-10:10 7:20-10:15
Murder on the Orient Express
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 10:50-1:35-4:25(PG-13) CC: 11:50-2:15-2:407:20-10:05
4:40-5:00-7:10-9:35
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: Wonder (PG) CC: 10:55-1:454:30-7:20-10:05
11:55-2:25-4:55-7:30-10:05
George Takei's Allegiance on
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
Broadway
(NR) (!) 7:30
12:15-3:30-7:00-10:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Landmark E Street Cinema
1:45-4:25
555 11th Street NW
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
God's Own Country 1:15-4:1511:20-2:00-4:40-7:20-9:55
9:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The Divine Order (Die gottliche Missouri (R) CC: (!) 10:55-1:35Ordnung) (NR) 12:45-3:00-5:15- 4:20-7:10-10:10
7:30-9:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R) CC: (!) 2:30-8:30
CC: 4:10
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) 7:30-9:50 (!) 10:50-1:45-4:30-7:20-10:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
Lady Bird (R) (!) 11:10-1:40-4:05
7:00-9:45
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 3:30-6:35-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Missouri (R) CC: 12:30-1:00-3:30- Experience (PG-13) (!) 4:104:00-6:30-9:15
7:10-10:10
The Man Who Invented Christ- Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
mas (PG) CC: 1:20-4:20
(PG) 1:10
The Florida Project (R) CC: 1:10 Pitch Perfect Treble Marathon
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:00-2:15-3:15- 2:00-7:00
5:30-7:45-9:00-9:55
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
10:50-1:30
7:00-9:45
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
MARYLAND
C5
RE
responsible, despite finding
pictures of myself as a child in
clearly compromised positions.
Part of me wants to share my
story — to speak out and let
people know how close #metoo
hits home and that life after
abuse is possible, if not always
pretty, but doing so would bring a
spotlight on other relatives, and
theirs is not my story to tell.
Besides which, how can you
accuse someone of something
when you don’t remember what
happened, and the person can no
longer defend themselves?
Aside from continued therapy
and psychotropic medication, do
you have any advice?
A Friend
Friend: I applaud your strength
and recovery. Keep going.
Your sensitivity regarding this
is commendable.
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(!) 2:15-4:15-7:05-9:55
Justice League: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 6:15-9:05
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 2:20-5:1510:20
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
(PG) (!) 12:20-3:20
Gangster Land(!) 8:15-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
11:15-6:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 2:35-9:05
The Star (PG) 11:55-2:15-4:407:35
Coco (PG) 10:55-2:00-3:05-5:107:10-8:15-9:15-10:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:00-1:50-4:40-7:30AMC Loews
10:15
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
Wonder
(PG) 11:20-2:20-5:15
11115 Mall Circle
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
10:55-1:45-4:30
10:15-4:00-5:00-9:00-10:00
George Takei's Allegiance on
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Broadway (NR) 7:30
11:45-3:00-6:15-9:45
The Star (PG) CC: 10:00-12:30- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:253:20-5:55-8:30-10:10
2:45-5:15-7:45-10:30
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 12:45-6:45-9:45 Jawaan (NR) 11:30-3:00-6:159:45
Murder on the Orient Express
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
(PG-13) CC: 11:45-2:30-5:00Missouri (R) 10:55-1:40-4:307:00-10:15
7:20-10:10
Wonder (PG) CC: 9:30-12:10Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
3:00-6:00-9:15
11:40-5:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11:45-2:15-4:45-7:15-10:30
12:10-3:15-6:20-9:30
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:15
Coco 3D (PG) 12:00-6:10
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
The Swindlers (NR) 1:00-4:00
CC: 11:00-2:00-7:45
Justice League (PG-13) 1:10Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 9:45-3:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: 2:40-4:10-8:40
Coco (PG) XD: 12:40-3:55
10:45-1:45-4:30-7:30-9:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Dust 2 Glory (!) 7:30
11:40-5:40
AMC Magic Johnson Capital Justice League (PG-13) XD:
Center 12
7:05-10:15
800 Shoppers Way
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:152:00-4:00-6:45-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
3:00-6:10-9:05
The Star (PG) CC: 12:40-2:455:00-7:10-9:20
Jigsaw (R) CC: 4:30-9:30
Coco (PG) CC: 12:45-4:45-6:307:45-9:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:15-6:50-9:25
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:10-3:506:25-9:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:10-5:45-8:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: 3:15
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:306:00-9:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
1:00-3:45-6:30-9:20
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 1:45-7:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 5:30-8:30
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 3:45
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
(PG) 2:25
ArcLight Bethesda
7101 Democracy Boulevard
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:1012:55-3:10-4:15-5:30-6:40-7:158:00-9:50-10:15
Justice League (PG-13) 5:007:45-10:25
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 2:55
The Star (PG) 11:00-1:55-4:507:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:35-12:20-3:25-5:457:55-10:10
Coco (PG) 5:20
Wonder (PG) 11:30-1:05-2:455:25-8:10-9:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 7:308:15-9:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:25
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:552:15-4:45-7:05-10:10
Marshall (PG-13) 4:25
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:25-2:30-5:156:00-8:40-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:501:35-5:55-8:30-9:45
The Man Who Invented
Christmas (PG) CC: 11:15-2:004:10-7:25
Coco (PG) 11:20-2:05
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
11:45-2:20-5:10-7:50-10:20
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 12:10
Coco 3D (PG) 12:15-3:05
Lady Bird (R) 11:05-12:00-2:505:05-8:05-9:40
Justice League (PG-13) 11:402:10
Coco (PG) 1:30-4:20-7:10-9:25
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14
1591 West Nursery Road
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
12:20-1:20-2:10-3:10-4:10-5:006:05-6:55-7:45-8:50-9:40-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:30-4:05-6:50-10:25
The Star (PG) CC: 12:00-1:554:30-7:00-9:10
Coco (PG) CC: 1:00-1:55-3:504:45-6:40-7:35-8:45-9:45
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:40-7:20-10:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 12:00-1:403:00-4:20-6:05-7:00-9:30-10:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
12:00-2:20-4:50-7:40-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
12:00-2:15-4:40-7:05-9:30
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) CC: 1:30-4:10-6:45-9:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
12:50-4:00-6:55-9:50
Landmark
Bethesda Row Cinema
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) 7:30-9:50
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
12:55
Last Flag Flying (R) CC: 4:25-9:50
National Theatre Live: Young
Marx 2:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
7:15-9:50
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:40-4:15-7:20
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) CC: 1:20-3:55-7:15-9:45
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
7:00-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 1:00-2:00-4:004:50-7:00-9:35
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:00-1:50-4:406:50-7:45-9:25-9:55
Old Greenbelt Theatre
129 Centerway
Lady Bird (R) 5:45
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
3899 Branch Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) 1:454:30-7:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:004:00-7:00
Coco (PG) 1:40-4:45-7:45
The Star (PG) 12:00-2:15-4:407:30
Wonder (PG) 12:45-3:45-7:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:153:05-5:30-7:50
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
Justice League (PG-13) 1:103:10-4:10-6:10-7:10-9:10-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:254:25-7:25-10:25
The Star (PG) 1:45-5:25-7:0510:25
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
Coco (PG) 1:15-3:15-4:15-6:151020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
7:15-9:15-10:15
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-10:00 Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League (PG-13) 11:15- (PG-13) 1:00-3:55-6:50-9:50
12:10-2:00-5:00-6:00-8:00-10:45 Wonder (PG) 1:30-4:20-7:20Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
10:05
12:00-1:10-3:10-4:10-6:10-7:10- George Takei's Allegiance on
9:20-10:20
Broadway (NR) 7:30
The Star (PG) 12:20-2:40-5:10A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:307:25-9:35
4:20-7:35-10:20
Coco (PG) 12:30-1:30-3:30-4:30- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:506:30-7:30-9:30-10:30
5:20-7:50-10:30
Wonder (PG) 1:20-4:20-7:20Marshall (PG-13) 1:20-4:3010:10
7:40-10:30
Landmark West End Cinema
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:20- My Friend Dahmer (R) 2:45-7:45
2301 M Street NW
The Disaster Artist (R) (!) 7:00- 12:50-1:50-3:40-4:40-7:25-10:15 Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Jane 1:45-7:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
8:15-9:30
4:05-9:25
3:00-9:00
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 1:00Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
3:15-5:30-7:45
11:40-12:45-3:35-4:25-7:15-10:05 Justice League (PG-13) 1:001:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
4:00-7:00-9:50
Thelma 1:15-4:15-7:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
The Square (R) CC: 3:45
11:30-1:00-2:25-4:00-5:20-7:00Bow Tie Harbour 9
Halloween (PG-13) 2:45-5:05
2474 Solomons Island Road
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC 10:00
Regal Germantown Stadium 14
The Star (PG) CC: 2:40-5:1018900 Jefferson Davis Highway
Murder on the Orient Express
20000 Century Boulevard
7:35-9:50
(PG-13) 10:20-1:00-3:40-6:40We, the Marines (NR) 10:00Justice
League (PG-13) 12:4511:00-12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00 Coco (PG) CC: (!) 11:35-1:20-4:20- 9:40
2:15-3:45-5:15-6:45-8:15-9:45
6:20-7:20-9:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:30Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14 Murder on the Orient Express
Missouri (R) 10:50-1:50-5:00701 Seventh Street Northwest
3:45-7:00-10:00
(PG-13) CC: 11:50-2:00-4:457:50-10:30
The Star (PG) 12:00-1:45-4:15Justice League (PG-13) 1:007:30-10:15
Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:30-4:506:45
3:55-6:55-9:55
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
7:20-10:10
Coco (PG) 12:15-2:00-3:30-5:00Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:40- 11:40-3:10-6:40-10:10
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
6:30-8:00-9:30
3:45-6:45-9:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:35-2:102:20-4:40-9:45
Murder on the Orient Express
The Star (PG) 12:30-1:20-2:454:55-7:35-10:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
(PG-13) 12:30-3:15-6:00-8:45
5:00-7:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: 10:30-1:20-4:20-7:30-10:20
Wonder (PG) 11:30-12:45-3:30Coco (PG) 12:00-3:00-6:05-9:05 11:40-2:35-5:15-7:55-10:25
Last Flag Flying (R) 10:20-1:10- 6:15-9:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
4:00-6:50-10:00
George Takei's Allegiance on
(PG-13) 12:05-2:50-5:40-8:35
11:50-2:05-4:40-7:10-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Broadway (NR) 7:30
George Takei's Allegiance on
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (R) 11:40-7:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:15Broadway (NR) 7:30
Missouri (R) CC: (!) 11:30-2:15- The Man Who Invented
4:45-7:15-9:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
5:05-7:50-10:30
Christmas (PG) 11:00-2:00-4:30- Marshall (PG-13) 2:30-5:30-8:30
3:55-10:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
7:10-9:50
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:25- CC: 1:35-2:25
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD 9:15
3:05-5:35-8:05-10:35
The Man Who Invented
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Christmas (PG) CC: (!) 1:55-4:30Justice League (PG-13) 2:40-8:40 Missouri (R) 12:15-3:00-5:45-8:30
9:30
7:20-9:55
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:45Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Lady Bird (R) 11:30-1:50-5:104:30-7:15
1:15-4:10-5:55-10:45
7:45-10:10
8:30-10:00
Snowden Square
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Stadium 14
12:30-3:45
9161 Commerce Center Drive
Lady Bird (R) 1:15-4:00-6:30-9:00
The
Disaster
Artist (R) 7:10-10:00
Mental Madhilo (NR) 10:00
Justice League (PG-13)
Regal Hyattsville Royale
1:00-1:30-4:00-4:30-6:50-7:30Stadium 14
9:30-10:30
6505 America Blvd.
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:50Justice League (PG-13)
12:45-1:30-4:00-4:45-7:00-7:45- 4:10-7:20-10:20
The Star (PG) 12:30-1:20-3:4010:00-10:45
6:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:00Coco (PG) 12:40-1:15-3:40-4:154:15-7:15-10:15
6:40-7:15-9:40-10:15
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-9:45
Murder on the Orient Express
The Star (PG) 1:00-2:00-4:30(PG-13) 1:10-3:50-6:30-9:20
7:00
Coco (PG) 12:30-1:30-3:30-4:30- Wonder (PG) 1:40-4:20-7:00-9:45
George Takei's Allegiance on
6:30-7:30-9:30-10:30
Murder on the Orient Express Broadway (NR) 7:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
(PG-13) 1:30-4:15-7:15-10:15
1:40-4:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:15Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:506:50-10:30
Wonder (PG) 1:00-3:45-6:30-9:45 4:45-7:40-10:10
Marshall (PG-13) 3:30-10:25
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
3:45-6:15-9:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:45- Missouri (R) 2:00-4:50-7:45-10:25
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
8:30
My Friend Dahmer (R) 12:30Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:15-4:15-7:15-10:00
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:50
Marshall (PG-13) 1:00-3:55
Lady Bird (R) 12:30-3:00-5:30Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
8:00-10:30
9:30
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
12:30-3:30-6:45-10:00
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12 Justice League (PG-13) CC:
(!)
11:20-2:10-5:00-6:30-7:5014716 Baltimore Avenue
9:20-10:40
Justice League (PG-13) 12:30- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
4:00-7:50-9:45-10:25
10:20-12:20-1:20-3:30-6:50-10:20
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-9:45 The Star (PG) Open Caption; CC: (!)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:2011:00-1:30-4:10-6:40-9:00
4:30-6:50-10:35
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:00-12:50The Star (PG) 11:55-1:40-4:103:40
7:10
Murder on the Orient Express
Coco (PG) 12:00-1:00-3:10-4:20- (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:05-3:00-6:206:30-7:20-9:40
9:40
Murder on the Orient Express
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 11:10-1:55(PG-13) 12:20-3:00-6:40-9:30
4:35-7:20-10:15
Wonder (PG) 12:50-3:50-7:00Jigsaw (R) CC: 10:50
9:55
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:30- 10:45-1:45-4:50-7:40-10:30
5:10-7:45-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: (!)
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:05- 12:10-2:40-5:30-8:10-10:45
2:10-4:45-7:20-10:10
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:30-3:10Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
6:10-9:10
1:30-4:50-10:40
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
(!) 10:10-10:50-1:00-1:40-3:5012:10-3:30-7:35-10:00
4:30-7:00-8:00-9:50
Lady Bird (R) 1:10-4:40-7:40Justice League (PG-13) CC:
10:20
(!) 11:50-2:50-4:20-5:40-7:10Regal Rockville Center
8:30-10:00
Stadium 13
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:40-11:40199 East Montgomery Avenue
1:50-4:40-7:30-8:50
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00iPic Pike & Rose
9:45-10:30
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) 1:00Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:003:15-4:00-7:00-9:00-10:00
3:15-6:30-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:30- Justice League (PG-13) 1:003:30-7:00-10:00
4:15-7:45-11:00
The Star (PG) 12:15-1:15-2:30Murder on the Orient Express
5:00-8:00
(PG-13) 12:00-3:15-7:30-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:00(PG-13) 1:00-3:45-6:30-9:15
5:00-8:00-11:00
Wonder (PG) 1:00-4:15-7:15Coco (PG) 12:30-3:45-7:15-10:30
10:00
Wonder (PG) 12:15-3:30-7:00George Takei's Allegiance on
10:15
Broadway (NR) 7:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 3:45 Missouri (R) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:15- Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
2:45-5:15-7:45-10:30
12:45-4:00-6:30-10:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:30-3:15-6:45-9:30
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:15-4:00
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
12:15-6:00-10:30
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-9:15
Lady Bird (R) 12:15-2:45-5:157:45-10:30
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:30Coco (PG) 12:15-1:30-3:15-4:30- 4:15-7:00-9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
6:15-7:30-9:15-10:30
1:30-4:20-7:10-10:00
Regal Waugh Chapel
Murder on the Orient Express
Stadium 12 & IMAX
(PG-13) CC: 2:15-4:50-7:30-10:10
1419 South Main Chapel Way
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-9:45 Wonder (PG) CC: 1:30-4:10Justice League (PG-13) 12:15- 6:45-9:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
3:10-6:15-9:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:30- Missouri (R) CC: 2:00-4:407:20-10:00
3:30-6:30-9:50
The Star (PG) 12:00-12:35-2:10- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
4:50-7:10
Coco (PG) 12:00-12:45-3:00-3:50- Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC:
2:30
6:00-7:00-9:00-10:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Murder on the Orient Express
1:40-5:15-8:00
(PG-13) 1:20-4:20-7:15-10:10
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 4:30
Wonder (PG) 12:10-2:45-5:20AMC Hoffman Center 22
8:00-10:40
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:505:30-8:15-10:45
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-9:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:05- Coco (PG) CC: 11:00-12:00-3:002:40-5:15-8:00-10:30
4:00-9:00-10:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
George Takei's Allegiance on
9:40
Broadway (NR) 7:30
Marshall (PG-13) 12:50-3:40
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 1:00-7:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Pitch Perfect Treble Marathon
1:00-4:10-7:20-10:15
12:00-4:00-8:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Coco (PG) 6:00
Experience (PG-13) 7:30-10:20
AMC Potomac Mills 18
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
(PG) 1:30-4:30
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-9:30
Regal Westview Stadium 16 Justice League (PG-13) CC:
& IMAX
1:00-2:10
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-9:45 11:50-3:00-4:40-6:00-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 1:30Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
4:30-8:15-11:15
3D (PG-13) CC: 10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:45- The Star (PG) CC: 11:45-2:10-4:30
4:00-7:15-10:45
Coco (PG) CC: 11:45-5:15-5:45The Star (PG) 12:30-1:00-3:008:15
5:30-8:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Coco (PG) 12:00-1:45-3:15-5:00- (PG-13) CC: 11:20-2:10-5:006:30-8:00-9:45-11:15
7:45-10:25
Murder on the Orient Express
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:15-1:00(PG-13) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
2:00-3:40-4:40-6:20-7:20-9:10Wonder (PG) 12:45-1:45-3:4510:10
4:45-6:45-7:45-9:45-10:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:15- 11:40-2:15-4:45-7:20-9:50
4:15-7:00-9:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:15- 12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
3:00-5:45-8:15-11:00
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:05Marshall (PG-13) 3:45
1:50-7:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00 Missouri (R) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:30The Man Who Invented Christ- 7:15-10:00
mas (PG) 12:00-3:30-6:45-9:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: 12:10-3:00-6:00-8:50
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
10:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
12:25-3:20-6:10-9:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:15-4:30-7:45-10:45
Lady Bird (R) 11:20-1:50-4:206:45-9:10
Lady Bird (R) 12:30-3:30-6:008:30-11:00
Coco 3D (PG) 2:45-8:45
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Justice League: The IMAX 2D ExExperience (PG-13) 7:30-10:30 perience (PG-13) CC: 5:00-8:00
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience Justice League (PG-13) CC:
(PG) 1:00-4:15
11:10-4:00-6:50-9:40
VIRGINIA
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
(PG) 11:00-2:00
Pitch Perfect Treble Marathon
11:00-3:15-7:30
Coco (PG) 12:30-6:30; 3:30-9:25
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:50-3:50-6:50-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:25
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) 1:40-4:40-7:40-10:30
If you believe that other family
members were abused (for
instance, if you also see
compromising photos including
them), you should invite them to
join you in a therapy session. And
yes, if it would further your
recovery (and certainly if it would
protect others), you should
definitely out the people who
didn’t protect you, although you
can’t blame your abuser, if you
don’t know who it was.
You are already sharing your
#metoo story, and thank you for that.
Amy’s column appears seven days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Write to askamy@amydickinson.com or
Amy Dickinson, Tribune Content
Agency, 16650 Westgrove Dr., Suite
175, Addison, TX 75001. You can
also follow her @askingamy.
©2017 by Amy Dickinson distributed by
Tribune Content Agency
Thursday, December 7, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:30-3:20-6:15-9:15
Oxygen (Telugu) (NR) 12:00-2:405:35-8:30
Tumhari Sulu (NR) 12:05-3:206:35-9:45
AMC Shirlington 7
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:25Cinema Arts Theatre
2772 South Randolph St.
4:25-7:25-9:55
9650 Main St
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 9:40- Jawaan (NR) 1:00-4:15-7:10-9:50
4:00-10:15
My Friend Dahmer (R) 2:5012:10-2:40-5:10-7:50-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
5:20-7:50
Murder on the Orient Express
1:45-3:30
Firangi (NR) 12:15-3:20-6:20-9:35
(PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:00-2:30Coco (PG) CC: 4:30-10:00
The
Man Who Invented Christ5:00-7:30-9:50
Murder on the Orient Express
mas (PG) 12:40-3:15-5:50-8:50
(PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00 Wonder (PG) CC: 9:50-12:10Roman
J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
2:25-4:50-7:20-9:40
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:15-4:1512:35-3:45-7:00-10:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
7:15-10:15
Theeran
Adhigaram Ondru (NR)
2:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 3:10-6:35
7:00-9:50
Lady
Bird
(R) 12:15-2:45-5:15Missouri
(R)
CC:
9:45-12:05-2:35Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
8:00
5:05-7:40-9:55
Missouri (R) CC: 1:30-4:15Mental Madhilo (NR) 12:00-2:50Lady Bird (R) CC: 9:55-12:157:00-9:45
5:50-9:00
2:25-4:45-7:10-9:25
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Khakee (Telugu) (NR) 12:00-9:45
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:05CC: 1:00-7:30
Aval (Tamil) (NR) 4:00-9:45
Lady Bird (R) 1:15-4:45-6:30-9:00 12:20-4:35-7:00-9:15
Gruham (NR) 12:45-6:55
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 1:30-6:45
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
Balakrishnudu (NR) 12:00-3:001600 Village Market Boulevard
AMC Tysons Corner 16
6:00-9:20
The Star (PG) 11:50-2:05-4:207850e Tysons Corner Center
Verna 12:20-3:35-6:40-9:50
6:30
Titanic 3D (PG-13) (!) 11:15-3:30
Regal Dulles Town Center 10
The Disaster Artist (R) (!) 7:00- Murder on the Orient Express
21100 Dulles Town Circle
(PG-13) 12:55-3:45-7:05
8:05-9:35-10:35
Wonder (PG) 11:40-2:20-5:00The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-9:30
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
7:35
Justice League (PG-13) 2:0010:25-11:25-1:20-2:15-4:10-5:05A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
4:45-7:30-10:20
6:55-7:50-9:45-10:40
11:55-2:50-5:20-7:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:20Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:05- 3:00-6:30-9:45
10:30-1:25-4:30-7:20-10:30
Coco (PG) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
The Star (PG) CC: 10:30-12:45- 2:35-5:05-7:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Murder on the Orient Express
3:05-5:20
(PG-13) 12:30-3:45-8:15-10:10
Coco (PG) CC: 12:00-3:00-6:00- Missouri (R) 12:45-3:50-7:10
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
7:55-9:10-10:55
Wonder (PG) 12:10-1:45-4:3012:15-3:15-7:25
Murder on the Orient Express
7:15-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:20- A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
(PG-13) CC: 10:40-1:30-4:203:20-7:20
7:05-9:50
1:15-3:15-5:45
Justice League (PG-13) 11:45- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:00Wonder (PG) CC: 10:35-12:051:15-2:45-4:00-5:30-8:15-10:55 1:15-2:25-4:15-5:15-7:15-8:00;
4:15-6:00-8:30-11:00
1:15-4:15-7:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) (!) 8:00Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Coco (PG) 11:45-1:00-2:4011:00
Missouri (R) 2:30-5:15-8:00-10:50
4:00-7:00
George Takei's Allegiance on
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Broadway (NR) (!) 7:30
Manassas 4 Cinemas
12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
8890 Mathis Ave.
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
10:25-12:55-6:15
1:30-4:45-7:45-10:40
Justice League (PG-13) 1:30Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
4:00-6:30
Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
10:20-12:50-3:20-5:50-8:20-10:50 Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:404110 West Ox Road
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 3:20-6:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Missouri (R) CC: 11:10-1:55-4:40- Coco (PG) 1:05-3:40-6:05
(PG-13)
1:15-4:20-7:15-10:00
7:25-10:10
Wonder (PG) 1:25-3:50-6:15
Wonder (PG) 12:30-1:30-3:40Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 4:40-6:40-7:40-9:25-10:25
CC: 3:25-8:50
6201 Multiplex Drive
George Takei's Allegiance on
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Justice League (PG-13) 10:00- Broadway (NR) 7:30
10:45-1:35-4:25-10:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Lady Bird (R) 10:20-12:40-3:15- 1:00-2:10-4:00-5:10-7:00-8:0010:05-10:50
12:10-3:00-5:40-8:15-10:50
5:45-8:25-10:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:15- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:15Coco 3D (PG) CC: 1:05-4:05
1:25-4:30-7:35-10:35
2:55-5:30-8:05-10:40
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
The Star (PG) 10:10-12:25-2:40- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
(PG) 10:50-2:00-5:00
4:55-7:20
Missouri
(R) 1:25-4:30-7:30-10:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) (!)
Coco (PG) 10:20-1:15-1:55-4:10- The Man Who Invented
7:00-9:55
7:05-7:45-10:00
Christmas (PG) 12:05-2:40-5:20AMC Worldgate 9
Murder on the Orient Express
7:55-10:30
13025 Worldgate Drive
(PG-13) 10:50-1:35-4:20-7:30My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:00The Disaster Artist (R) (!)
10:15
3:50-10:45
7:00-9:20
Wonder (PG) 11:10-1:50-4:35Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
7:15-9:55
12:20-3:30-6:30-9:40
12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 9:35 The Swindlers (NR) 12:55-3:55Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:15- 6:55-9:50
12:45-3:50-6:50-9:50
2:45-5:15-7:45-10:25
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
Coco (PG) CC: 12:30-6:30
Jawaan (NR) 3:05-9:20
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Murder on the Orient Express
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Justice League (PG-13) 12:00(PG-13) CC: 12:20-3:20-6:20-9:05 Missouri (R) 10:30-1:10-4:053:00-6:00-9:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:30-4:206:50-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:157:05-10:00
Firangi (NR) 11:50-6:00
4:15-7:15-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
The Star (PG) 12:05-1:45-4:001:20-4:10-6:45-9:15
11:20AM
6:15-8:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Coco (PG) 12:00-1:45-3:00-4:45Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:3010:40-1:45-4:45
7:15-10:00
Coco 3D (PG) 11:00-4:50-10:40 6:00-7:45-9:00-10:45
Murder on the Orient Express
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Rave Cinemas
(PG-13) 12:15-3:15-6:30-9:30
1:00-4:00
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:30Coco 3D (PG) CC: 3:30-9:40
11900 Palace Way
Lady Bird (R) 2:00-4:25-7:00-9:30 The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-9:45 5:00-8:30
Wonder (PG) 12:30-2:15-3:30Alamo Drafthouse Cinema - Justice League (PG-13) 11:155:00-6:30-7:45-9:30-10:30
One Loudoun
2:10-8:00-10:50
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:40- 12:15-2:45-5:15-8:00-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:10- 12:15-1:45-4:50-7:55-10:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:453:40-6:40-11:10
The Star (PG) 10:25-12:403:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-10:00 2:45-5:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Justice League (PG-13) 1:30Coco (PG) 11:10-12:00-2:15-3:05- Missouri (R) 12:45-3:30-6:15-9:15
4:45-8:00; 9:20
8:05-11:00
The Man Who Invented ChristCoco (PG) 11:30-2:45-6:00;
Murder on the Orient Express
mas (PG) 1:00-3:45-6:45-9:15
8:20-9:55
(PG-13) 10:35-1:30-4:40-7:40Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
10:40
Murder on the Orient Express
10:45
Oxygen (Telugu) (NR) 9:00
(PG-13) 1:45-4:40-7:40-10:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Wonder (PG) 10:30-1:20-4:10Wonder (PG) 1:15-4:25-7:201:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
7:15-10:15
10:20
Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:30-4:45Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:50- A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
7:30-10:00
11:05-1:40-4:30-7:30-10:30
2:40-5:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:20- Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience
(PG-13) 7:00-10:00
1:50-4:45-7:35-10:35
Missouri (R) 12:25-3:30-6:208:40-11:40
Firangi (NR) 11:35-2:50-6:10-9:25 Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
(PG)
1:00-4:00
Lady Bird (R) 12:35-3:15-6:05Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Regal Kingstowne
9:30
5:05
Stadium 16 & RPX
Angelika Film Center Mosaic Lady Bird (R) 11:25-1:55-4:555910
Kingstowne Towne Center
7:45-10:05
2911 District Ave
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-9:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 7:45-10:35 Coco 3D (PG) 5:10-6:05
Justice League (PG-13) 6:15-9:10
Thelma (!) 11:30-2:05-4:45-10:20 Mental Madhilo (NR) 3:40
Justice League (PG-13) XD:
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:20The Shape of Water (R) 7:3010:15-1:15-4:15-7:10-10:10
3:20-6:20-9:20
10:45
Coco
(PG)
XD:
10:20-1:25-4:20The Star (PG) 12:15-12:50-2:35Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
4:55-7:50
Missouri (R) 10:00-12:35-3:10- 7:20-10:20
Coco (PG) 12:15-3:15
Regal Ballston Common
5:45-8:20-10:55
Murder on the Orient Express
Stadium 12
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:10-4:00-6:45-9:40
671
N.
Glebe
Road
(PG-13) 10:30-1:15-3:50-6:45Wonder (PG) 12:25-1:30-3:10Justice League (PG-13) 1:009:30
4:30-6:10-7:15-8:50-10:05
2:20-4:00-5:25-7:00-8:30-10:05
The Man Who Invented ChristA Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:10mas (PG) 11:00-1:45-4:30
12:30-3:05-5:35-8:05-10:30
Lady Bird (R) 10:30-12:45-3:00- 4:10-7:15-10:15
The Star (PG) 1:15-2:15-4:45-7:10 Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:155:15-10:00
2:40-5:10-7:35-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Marshall (PG-13) 3:20-6:30-9:30
(PG-13) 1:05-3:45-6:30-9:20
11:20-2:00-5:15-8:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:00- Coco (PG) 1:00-2:05-3:55-5:10- My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:25-4:15
The Man Who Invented Christ6:50-8:15-9:45
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
mas (PG) 12:35-3:30-6:15-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 11:15- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:25Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
6:20-10:00
2:00-5:00
10:25
George Takei's Allegiance on
National Theatre Live: Young
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Broadway (NR) 7:30
Marx 7:00
1:15-4:25-7:30-10:30
Daddy's
Home
2
(PG-13)
2:10Bow Tie
Lady Bird (R) 12:20-2:45-5:154:55-7:45-10:10
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
7:45-10:15
Marshall
(PG-13)
4:35-7:30-10:15
11940 Market Street
Justice League (PG-13) 12:40Justice League (PG-13) 12:10- My Friend Dahmer (R) 2:30
3:50-7:10-10:00
Justice
League
in
3D
(PG-13)
3:10-6:10-9:00
Coco (PG) 1:00-1:45-4:05-4:459:35
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:157:00-7:40-10:05-10:30
Lady
Bird
(R)
1:55-4:40-7:254:15-7:15-10:15
10:00
Regal Manassas
Coco (PG) 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:50
Stadium 14 & IMAX
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
Wonder (PG) 12:30-3:30-6:3011380 Bulloch Drive
45980 Regal Plaza
9:05
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:00- Justice League (PG-13) 12:20- Justice League (PG-13) 1:104:00-6:45-9:40
5:00-8:00-10:35
3:30-6:30-9:40
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:10- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:204:30-7:30-10:30
1:20-4:20-7:20-10:20
3:20-6:30-9:45
The Star (PG) 12:30-1:30-3:45Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:30-4:50The Star (PG) 12:25-2:05-4:306:20
7:15-9:35
7:30-9:50
Justice League (PG-13) 1:10Coco (PG) 12:05-2:00-3:35-5:00- Coco (PG) 12:50-2:50-3:50-6:004:10-7:10-10:00
7:15-9:00-10:15
6:45-8:15-9:55
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:40-3:30-6:15-9:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:206:50-10:20
Wonder (PG) 1:00-3:40-6:30-9:10
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:453:10-5:40-8:15-10:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:40-4:20-7:00-9:50
My Friend Dahmer (R) 2:105:00-7:40
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
8:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:15-4:10-7:10-10:00
Lady Bird (R) 12:30-2:20-5:208:00-10:45
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 7:45-10:40
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
(PG) 1:50-4:50
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) 1:204:15-7:10-10:10
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-9:40
Justice League (PG-13) 12:403:35-6:35-9:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 3:156:15-9:15
The Star (PG) 1:25-6:25
Coco (PG) 1:05-4:05-7:00-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:50-4:00-6:55-9:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:356:05-9:35
Wonder (PG) 1:15-3:55-6:40-9:25
George Takei's Allegiance on
Broadway (NR) 7:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:30-2:55-5:30-8:00-10:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:303:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) 12:45-3:50
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:10-3:45
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) 12:55-3:30-6:10-9:05
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
9:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:40-3:40-6:50-9:55
The Star (PG) 12:30-1:00-4:10
Coco (PG) 12:30-1:40-3:25-4:356:20-7:30-9:25-10:30
Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:00-9:30
Justice League (PG-13)
11:30-1:30-2:30-4:30-5:30-7:308:30-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:103:20-6:40-9:40
The Star (PG) 11:05-12:30-1:203:40-6:20
Coco (PG) 11:40-12:40-2:50-3:506:00-7:05-9:10-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:15-2:00-4:50-7:5010:40
Wonder (PG) 11:00-1:40-4:357:20-10:05
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 9:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:101:35-4:10-6:50-9:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:50-4:00-7:1010:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
3:30-10:15
Lady Bird (R) 11:50-2:20-5:007:40
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
Justice League (PG-13) 7:3010:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:204:20-7:20-10:10
The Star (PG) 1:10-2:10-3:104:50-7:05
Coco (PG) 1:30-4:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:05-3:50-6:30-9:10
Wonder (PG) 1:45-2:45-4:45-5:307:45-8:15-10:20-10:50
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 5:258:00-10:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:155:45-8:10-10:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:50-3:30-6:00-9:10
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
9:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:55-3:55-6:55-9:55
Lady Bird (R) 1:40-4:10-6:45-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 1:154:15-7:00-9:45
Coco (PG) 1:00-3:10-4:00-6:157:15-9:30-10:30
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Pkwy
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10-4:00
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dunkirk: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 7:00
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
2:20
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
12:00-4:50
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13)
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
CC: 12:00-2:15-4:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 7:30-10:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
CC: 12:20-2:35-4:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 4:107:00-10:10
The Foreigner (R) CC: 7:15-9:40
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC:
12:10-2:20
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
NEITHER SIDE VULNERABLE
NORTH
AKJ3
964
J4
Q J 10 7
EAST
Q8652
K 10 7 3
AQ72
None
WEST (D)
94
82
K98653
A42
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
10 7
AQJ5
10
K98653
The bidding:
WEST
NORTH
EAST
West 1 Dbl
2
2 (!)
3
All Pass
Opening lead — 6
SOUTH
1
4
CLASSIC PEANUTS
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
T
his summer I enjoyed a
two-week Irish holiday
with a group led by Randy
Baron, the founder of Baron
Barclay Bridge Supply, now
coordinating overseas trips
especially for bridge players.
(See baronbridgetravel.com.)
At a Belfast club, Baron
was today’s declarer. North
should have passed at her
second turn, but when she
raised to two hearts, Baron
bid game.
Baron ruffed the second
diamond, led a spade to
dummy and returned a
trump to his jack. He next
had to start the clubs; when
trump control is an issue, as
here, declarer should attack
a side suit early.
West won, and when East
discarded, West hastily led
another club. East ruffed and
led a spade, but Baron won
in dummy, picked up all the
trumps and claimed.
The defense slipped.
Declarer’s play suggests that
his trump holding is tenuous, so when West takes the
ace of clubs, he should plug
away at diamonds. Declarer
cannot succeed. The defense
also wins if West leads a
spade or if East refuses to
ruff the second club.
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
10 7 A Q J 5
10 K 9 8 6 5 3
Your partner opens one
diamond. The next player
passes. What do you say?
ANSWER: Your hand is
strong enough to respond
two clubs but not to bid
two hearts next (a new suit,
hence unlimited in strength)
if partner rebids, say, two
diamonds. When you hold
only moderate strength, look
for a major-suit fit. Bid one
heart. If partner rebids two
diamonds, you must leave
your clubs on the shelf and
pass.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | DECEMBER 7
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you
experience smooth
sailing. Stay upbeat,
and try not to fall into
a boring routine. Even if you
stumble into a troublesome
experience, you will land well.
If you are single, you might opt
to change your status. Check
out a potential sweetie with
care, as he or she might not
be as authentic as you would
like. If you are attached, the
two of you benefit from taking
a workshop or class together.
You also might opt to take a
special trip as a couple. Leo
almost always makes you
laugh.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
If you pull back, you will
note that others’ behavior is
excessive and undisciplined.
Could the same be said about
you? Your creativity merges
with a sense of fun, making it
easy to go overboard.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You will be somewhat more
anchored than usual. You feel
good and want to make plans
with others. Use good sense
when making a decision. A
partner seems more upbeat
and easygoing.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You demonstrate the ability to
clear out an enormous amount
of work and process quite a
few issues. You will do well in
situations where you network
WEINGARTENS & CLARK and share more of yourself.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
You will be more realistic about
your budget. Perhaps the
reason you frequently break
it is that you are too hard on
yourself. Opportunities come
in various forms, but they
are likely to demand a bit of
spending.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You naturally seem to indulge
a close loved one. Do not
forget about indulging yourself,
too. Your personality helps
others forget what ails them.
Reward yourself once in a
while. Once you get started,
stopping could be difficult.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Much goes on behind the
scenes, and you might not be
comfortable with it. You could
feel as if certain information
is being withheld from you.
You know how to ask the right
questions to find out more.
Your sense of humor comes
through at odd times.
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Friends surround you, and
they’re determined to have
their way when dealing with
you. You might not be as
easygoing as they would like.
Make yourself a little less
available for the time being.
Use care with spending and
with money decisions.
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Others think you make strong
choices. As a result, you are
in a position of leadership,
whether you like it or not.
You might not realize how
fortunate you are at the
moment, but you can take
risks and land well.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Don’t be tempted to take any
other path than the one that is
clearly right for you. You could
get confused by an adviser,
especially if he or she thinks in
terms of “no pain, no gain.”
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
One-on-one relating becomes
pivotal in a key relationship.
Your ability to connect with
others has been your strong
suit. Listen to what seems like
a good offer from a friend. This
person could become quite
fortunate for you.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You could be in a situation
where you need to defer
to someone else. Your
perspective is appreciated, but
the other party is determined
to make his or her own choice
regardless of what you say.
Don’t take a loved one for
granted.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
You might question some of
the ideas that head your way.
You might not agree with an
associate who is determined
to manage a project or
situation his or her own way.
Knowing when to back off will
be critical to succeeding.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
During an Army-Navy football game on this date in
1963, instant replay was used for the first time on
television. The original machine to replay tape weighed
about 1,200 pounds and was barely operational.
A chilly day, much like Wednesday,
but we should have a good bit of
sunshine and light winds.
Find more of Fred Bowen’s
columns about all your
favorite sports in our online
Score archive.
ILLUSTRATION BY MATTHEW PETRUCCELLI, 6, ARLINGTON
Athletic ability is just part of success in sports
I know that lots of
KidsPost readers dream
of playing pro sports
FRED BOWEN
some day. But not many
kids make it to a major
league sports team.
A more reasonable goal is to play on a
high school team. Millions of kids do it
and have a great experience.
Making any high school team takes
more than just size, strength and speed.
So I asked several experienced and
successful high school coaches what
personal qualities, other than athletic
ability, they look for in their athletes.
Here are their answers.
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
The Score
MARK HUMPHREY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Russian athletes marched behind
their national flag at the Olympics
in 2014. But the country has been
barred from the 2018 Games.
Russia banned
from 2018 Olympics
Stephanie Blake (girls volleyball —
Northwest High School in
Germantown, Maryland): “Someone
who does not give up and who enjoys
competition on a daily basis. They
practice and practice until they can’t get
it wrong. They don’t give up just because
something is hard or because they didn’t
achieve the goal.”
Trey Taylor (football — South Lakes
High School in Reston, Virginia):
“Selflessness. We ask that all our players
know their role on the team. Not
everyone is going to score touchdowns
or get their name in the paper, but
everyone has a job to do which helps us
to be successful on game day. You must
do your job to the best of your ability.”
Amber Beaudoin (field hockey —
Fairfax High School in Fairfax,
Virginia): “The ability to be present.
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Focus on learning at practice while
you’re at practice. There are lots of
distractions for our kids. I ask my
players to stay locked in. Be ready,
willing and mentally prepared to receive
the message your coach is teaching.”
Dan Harwood (boys basketball —
Magruder High School in Rockville,
Maryland): “I want kids who can put
the team first and get along well with
their teammates. Learning how to put
team goals ahead of your personal goals
is difficult to do for many young
athletes. But if they can learn how to do
this, it will help them in all aspects of
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Not insignificant
4 LeBron’s
hometown
9 Pet food brand
13 Discontinued
iPod model
14 Saltine brand
15 Action word
16 Words after
an estimate
17 Divisions
politiques
18 Those, to Pablo
19 *Award-winning
defense unit?
21 Sculler’s blade
23 Capri suffix
24 Trattoria menu
suffix
25 Chaucer offering
27 “Stagecoach,”
for one
29 Birdcage feature
31 *Manchester
hospital
hookup?
34 Multichannel
36 Saturn SUV
37 One of the
Nereids
38 *Either of a
historic PGA
pair?
41 Neatnik’s
opposite
44 Pioneering ISP
45 Warm-weather
wear
49 *Enforcer of
greenhouse gas
restrictions?
52 Three-time
Wimbledon
champ
53 Directive
54 One of the
three bears
56 Mai __
57 Arctic coast
explorer
58 Consume
61 Make smart
remarks ... and a
phonetic hint to
the answers to
starred clues
63 Mosque figure
65 Big name in
craft stores
67 Response to
being slain,
in texts?
68 Khartoum’s river
69 Match
Stephanie Blake, girls volleyball coach at Northwest High School in Germantown, Maryland, says she looks for athletes who
“don’t give up just because something is hard or because they didn’t achieve the goal.”
life.”
academics. Athletes, no matter how
talented, can’t help their team if they are
always behind on their schoolwork.
How do young athletes get better at
the qualities coaches are looking for —
competing, paying attention and being a
good teammate?
The answer is simple: practice. Right
now, before you get to high school.
If something is difficult in sports or in
school, you have to stay with it. You also
can use every opportunity to practice
Whitney Minnis (boys soccer —
Wilson High School in Washington):
“A commitment to excellence. That
means you have to be willing to make
certain sacrifices and not make excuses.
Our tryouts and practices take place at 6
o’clock in the morning. Believe me,
everybody is sacrificing something at 6
in the morning.”
I should also mention that several of
the coaches stressed the importance of
listening to your coaches and your
teachers. In addition, you should
encourage your teammates and
classmates instead of putting them
down.
Who knows, all this practice may help
you make the team.
kidspost@washpost.com
Bowen writes the sports opinion column for
KidsPost. He is the author of 22 sports books
for kids.
Russian athletes will be allowed to
stand on the medal podium at the
Winter Olympics — just not with
their anthem playing or their nation’s
flag rising above them.
The International Olympic
Committee (IOC) barred Russia and
its sports leaders from the upcoming
games in PyeongChang, South Korea,
after its lead investigator found that
members of the Russian government
created a doping scheme at the 2014
Sochi Games that “caused
unprecedented damage to Olympism
and to sports.”
The IOC punishment left room for
many Russians to compete under the
name “Olympic Athlete from Russia,”
or OAR. They would have to pass
drug tests to prove that they were
clean and that they had not benefited
from the Sochi scheme.
If they win, the Olympic flag would
be raised and the Olympic anthem
played to honor their victories. That
is, if Russian President Vladimir
Putin allows them to go to the
Games. He has said it would be
humiliating for Russia to compete
without its national symbols.
— Associated Press
By Mark McClain
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
70
71
72
73
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
20
22
“Would __?”
Notable deed
Saratoga action
PC panic button
DOWN
British
nobleman
Motivate
Mess (up)
Korean sedan to
be discontinued
in the U.S. after
2017
Whistling vessel
Nation
surrounding
10-Down: abbr.
Director
Preminger
“Hidden
Figures” org.
“__ Maria”
Enclaved African
land
Tofu nutrient
Watch
Custom on
some cruises
Multiple-choice
choice
Louis XIV, par
exemple
12/7/17
26 Wrap around
28 “I, Robot” writer
30 Champion
swimmer/actor
Buster
32 Director Van
Sant
33 Where ewes
can hang out
35 __ even keel
39 Biennial games
org.
40 Flightless
birds
41 Making a
touchdown
42 Metro area SSE
of Casper
43 Major
hassles
46 Updates
the plant
47 Rush hour
report topic
48
50
51
55
59
60
62
64
66
WEDNESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Suppress
Vein contents
Plains tribe
Source of
hard and
soft lumber
A bit cracked
Forum attire
Lackawanna’s
lake
Ran into
__ welding
Tell anxious mom about trip afterward
Adapted from a
recent online discussion.
Hi, Carolyn: My
mom was always
strict and
overprotective. I
wasn’t allowed to
do a lot of things
that other kids my age were
doing growing up.
Now I’m 37 and know this
stems from anxiety. I’m planning
my first solo trip and I’m very
excited about it, but I hate the
thought of telling my mom. I
want to give her enough time to
get used to the idea, but I’m
dreading the months of hearing
about everything that could
possibly go wrong and trying to
talk me out of it.
She has serious boundary
issues and will expect me to
manage her anxiety, but I know
it’s not mine to manage. Plus I
have some anxiety of my own and
adding hers on top of it can be
too much. (I’m in therapy.)
I know I can’t change her
reaction, so how do I handle the
next few months? Any advice is
much appreciated!
— Solo
Carolyn
Hax
Solo: Wait a minute. Why do you
have to “give her enough time to
get used to the idea”? It’s not her
trip; it’s not your job to manage
her anxiety, as you say yourself;
and it’s going to cost you dearly
over these next few months to do
so. So, why do that to yourself?
And, why do that to her? For
someone with anxiety, advanced
notice usually means just more
time to worry. Let’s say your trip
is a week long and you tell her
about it the day before you leave
(which I don’t recommend either,
by the way; this is just a
hypothetical). That’s eight days
of stress for your mother and one
lousy conversation for you. Hold
that up beside the months of
mutual agitation and
inappropriate risk-haggling, and
it’s an easy call. Less is more.
If you were traveling with your
mother and your mutual ability
to enjoy the trip hinged on a
carefully managed rollout of the
itinerary and other
arrangements, then, okay — I
could see giving her some
adjustment time.
But you’re a midlife adult and
you’re going by yourself. Sharing
is either need-to-know or just no.
Certainly you’ll want someone
to have your itinerary in case of
emergency, but one’s anxious,
boundary-challenged mama
sounds like the last person you’d
ask to serve in that role.
In fact, I could argue that your
mother doesn’t need to know
anything about your trip until
after you’re back. Have you run
that option by your therapist?
And in general, have you
talked with him or her about the
gap between the healthy things
you say about not being
responsible for what your mother
feels and the things you’re doing
that read like a user manual for
being enmeshed?
You’ve got the right ideas.
You’re taking on solo travel,
which isn’t easy for most people.
Now it’s time to update your
relationship with your mother to
reflect who you’ve become.
Re: Solo Traveler: Go on your
trip. Send you mom a postcard
saying, “I’m here. Wish you were
wonderful.” Share pictures with
her upon your return.
— Anonymous
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
Owners
shell out
to keep
Goodell
Top line is first-rate as Caps roll to win
BY ISABELLE
KHURSHUDYAN
The first goal was a relief,
Nicklas Backstrom’s 21-game
drought finally over after he
completed a tic-tac-toe passing
sequence. The second goal was a
surprise, Tom Wilson’s shot off
the faceoff one that Chicago’s
Anton
Forsberg
probably
shouldn’t have allowed. The
third goal was just showing off,
Alex Ovechkin driving the net
and punching in the rebound
from Wilson’s shot.
That capped Washington’s
first-line offensive outburst, a
CAPITALS 6,
BLACKHAWKS 2
goal from each member in a 3:28
span in the first period. Forsberg
was yanked from net in favor of
Jean-Francois Berube, and the
Capitals rolled to a 6-2 win over
the Blackhawks at Capital One
Arena.
“It was a very good night for
them,” Coach Barry Trotz said of
his top trio. “I thought they came
out with a pretty good focus. I
thought they played quick and
D
M2
they played heavy, and they sort
of took the game over. . . . That
line carried us tonight.”
Washington (17-11-1), which
has won six of its past seven,
extended its winning streak to
three games and is just one point
out of first place in the Metropolitan Division. On Wednesday
night, the Capitals did it without
top-six forward T.J. Oshie, missing his first game with an undisclosed upper-body injury sufCAPITALS CONTINUED ON D6
NICK WASS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rangers at Capitals
Tomorrow, 7 p.m., NBCSW, NHLN
Nicklas Backstrom’s first-period goal ended his 21-game drought
and started a huge night for Washington’s top line Wednesday.
NFL commissioner
signs five-year extension
worth up to $200 million
BY
M ARK M ASKE
NFL Commissioner Roger
Goodell signed a five-year extension offered by the league’s owners to remain in his role through
2024 despite opposition last
month from Dallas Cowboys
owner Jerry Jones that has since
receded.
Under the extension, revealed
Wednesday in a memo sent by
owners on the league’s compensation committee, Goodell’s pay
could top out at nearly $40 million annually, though close to
90 percent would be tied to
incentives.
The extension comes at a turbulent time for the league. TV
ratings for NFL games have
sagged over the past two seasons,
and this season the league and
Goodell have faced intense criticism by President Trump and
some fans about players’ protests
during the national anthem.
When owners met in October,
they declined to enact a rule
requiring players to stand for the
anthem. They said they instead
were focused on discussions with
the players about league support
of players’ community activism.
Those discussions culminated
with an agreement on a socialjustice initiative through which
the league and owners would
contribute about $90 million
between the onset of the deal and
2023 to social causes considered
important to players, particularly in African American communities. Both sides have said the
agreement does not require players to stand for the anthem, and
the issue remains unresolved
because players have continued
to protest in the wake of the deal.
Should the protests endure for
the remainder of the season,
people familiar with the owners’
thinking have said, the league
could change the anthem policy
for next season and keep players
in the locker rooms until after
‘He was godlike’
Smart returns to VCU for the first time since he left for Texas,
and the emotional connection in Richmond remains powerful
GOODELL CONTINUED ON D3
MARK GORMUS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shaka Smart spent six seasons as coach of Virginia Commonwealth before taking the job at Texas in 2015. He brought his Longhorns to Siegel Center this week.
BY
D AN S TEINBERG
IN RICHMOND
“I
love you,” Shaka Smart was
saying, as VCU’s basketball reunion entered its sixth hour.
The object of his affection
this time was Johnny Williams,
VCU’s senior point guard, whom Smart
was hugging because he was hugging
everyone during a bipartisan postgame
party that seemed like it might never end.
Four hours earlier — just before his Texas
team took the court against a Rams program he led to the Final Four — Smart had
strolled to the middle of the Siegel Center
court he once ruled. He was there as part of
a presentation for Dianne Long, the program’s senior secretary, who is now in her
34th season — under a ninth coach.
“He told me that he loved me,” Long
recalled, tears in her eyes. “He told me that
when he left me, too. And it’s sincere. It’s
sincere.”
It probably isn’t enough to call the
emotions mixed during Smart’s first trip
here with a visiting team, a blissfully
raucous December affair that ended with a
71-67 Texas win. The emotions were
swirled. They sloshed together. They piled
on top of each other. Fans who cheered for
Smart before the game also said they
couldn’t remember wanting to beat an
opposing team this badly. Fans who cried
when Smart left Richmond said they were
seeking closure, calling this night the true
end of the Shaka Smart era. Some of
Smart’s friends flew in from Maine for this
game — to cheer against his team. The
father of one former player wore a VCU
jacket over his Texas polo — because that
former player, Darius Theus, now works
for Texas. The coaching staffs are so
stocked with former co-workers and
SMART CONTINUED ON D5
Hall of Fame QB Moon sued for sexual harassment
BY
C RAIG W HITLOCK
A California woman who
worked for a sports marketing
firm led by Hall of Fame quarterback Warren Moon filed a sexual
harassment lawsuit alleging that
the retired football star required
her to wear thong underwear and
share his bed during business
trips.
The lawsuit, filed Monday in
Orange County, Calif., also alleges that Moon, 61, committed
sexual battery by grabbing the
woman’s crotch during a trip to
Seattle this year. The suit further
accuses Moon of pulling off the
woman’s bathing suit after slipping a drug into her drink during
a separate trip to Mexico in October.
A publicist for Moon’s company, Sports 1 Marketing of Irvine,
Calif., did not return phone calls
or an email seeking comment.
The plaintiff, Wendy Haskell,
32, was hired as Moon’s executive
assistant in July and traveled with
him on a weekly basis for speaking engagements, charity events
and personal appearances, according to the lawsuit. She alleges
that she was demoted by the firm
in October after she complained
about Moon’s sexual advances.
After leading the University of
Washington to a Rose Bowl victory in 1978, Moon played six years
in the Canadian Football League
followed by 17 seasons in the NFL.
He starred for the Houston
Oilers from 1984 to 1993, when he
set numerous passing records,
and also played for the Minnesota
Vikings, Seattle Seahawks and
Kansas City Chiefs during his
career before retiring in 2001 at
age 44.
In 1989, he received the NFL’s
Walter Payton Man of the Year
award for his charitable works
and excellence on the field. But
his reputation was later marred
by scandals involving women.
In May 1995, he was sued by a
Vikings cheerleader who accused
him of sexual harassment, alleging that he offered her cash for
sex. The case was settled out of
court days later.
Two months after that, Moon
was arrested in Texas after the
quarterback’s wife, Felicia, told
police that he had slapped and
choked her in their mansion near
Houston.
Moon told reporters that the
couple had an argument and that
he had made “a tremendous mistake.” He reconciled with his wife,
MOON CONTINUED ON D4
PRO FOOTBALL
The Giants were the
first NFL team to fire
its coach. Who else is
on the hot seat? D2
PRO BASKETBALL
Bradley Beal’s 51point eruption tells
him to think less and
shoot a little more. D3
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
John Feinstein on the
importance of local
rivalries, even if they
sometimes boil over. D5
Injuries irk
Reed again,
but resolve
is still strong
BY
M ASTER T ESFATSION
Jordan Reed doesn’t need to be
told. He knows. The Washington
Redskins tight end’s frustration
was written on his face following
Wednesday’s practice, another in
which he did not participate.
“It’s been a rough year, to say the
least,” he said.
Reed probably will miss his
sixth straight game when Washington visits the Los Angeles Chargers on Sunday because of a lingering hamstring injury that has had
multiple setbacks over the past
month. The injury is the byproduct of a toe injury Reed suffered
during the offseason that kept him
out of training camp and forced
him to miss a game during the
season’s first month.
Considered one of the best receiving tight ends in the game
when healthy, Reed will miss his
seventh game if he’s inactive
against the Chargers — the most
since his rookie season in 2013.
With three games left after Sunday, there is no indication from
either Reed or Redskins Coach Jay
Gruden that the team will place
him on injured reserve, but there
isn’t a timeline for his return, either.
“This is the most challenging
time for me right now in my life,
pretty much,” Reed said. “I’ve had
pretty challenging times in my life
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D4
Redskins at Chargers
Sunday, 4:05 p.m., CBS
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
NATIONALS
CAPITALS
Can Cole
earn place
in the Nats’
rotation?
BY
Ovechkin
supports
Russians
in Games
PRO FOOTBALL
J ORGE C ASTILLO
Starting pitching has been the
backbone of the Washington Nationals’ success over the past six
seasons. Since 2012, the Nationals
have not ranked below seventh in
baseball in starters’ ERA. Max
Scherzer, Stephen Strasburg, Gio
Gonzalez and Tanner Roark all
remain in place for the 2018 season, and Washington believes its
rotation is up there with any
other in baseball.
But starting rotations go fivedeep, and Washington has a hole
in the fifth spot. Joe Ross was
supposed to fill the vacancy in
2018, but he underwent Tommy
John surgery in July and is expected to miss at least half of next
season. That leaves the Nationals
in search of a No. 5 starter to
assume the role at least until Ross
returns.
Washington may not have to
look far. A.J. Cole, a onetime
prized prospect whose shine wore
off over the previous two seasons,
impressed Nationals decisionmakers when given the opportunity in 2017. Cole posted a
3.00 ERA in his final eight appearances (five starts) across 36 innings down the stretch. He finished the season with a 3.81 ERA
in 52 innings in the majors — after
pitching to a ghastly 5.88 ERA in
18 starts with Class AAA Syracuse.
Cole’s stuff was better (his average fastball velocity jumped from
91.8 mph in 2016 to 93.2), but he
averaged just 7.6 strikeouts per
nine innings and his 5.20 Fielding
Independent Pitching (FIP) suggests he benefited from plenty of
luck. Regardless, the strong conclusion placed him in contention
for the No. 5 spot next season
alongside fellow internal candidate and top pitching prospect
Erick Fedde. One other factor
boosting Cole’s case: He is out of
options, which means the Nationals would have to expose him to
waivers if he doesn’t make the
Opening Day roster.
Of course, plenty can happen
before the Nationals report for
spring training in mid-February.
But for now, Cole is in the mix.
jorge.castillo@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nationals
QUOTABLE
“Yo, snowflakes. Quit
preaching. The Violent
World of Sam Huff sold
NFL football to the
masses.”
BRENT MUSBURGER,
former broadcaster, tweeting his
disgust with those unhappy with big
hits in the NFL. (Via Early Lead)
BY
NAM Y. HUH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Chicago Bears are 12-32 the past three seasons under Coach John Fox, who may not last in the job beyond this year.
NFL coaches remain on hot seat
BY
M ARK M ASKE
The New York Giants were an unlikely
candidate to become the first NFL team
to fire its coach this season. The Giants
are known for their patience. They
hadn’t fired a head coach during a
season since 1976.
Nevertheless, the Giants put the NFL’s
coaching carousel in motion this week.
They dismissed Ben McAdoo on
Monday, the day after the Giants lost in
Oakland to drop to 2-10 amid a raging
controversy over McAdoo’s sincerescinded benching of quarterback Eli
Manning last week.
McAdoo was the first coach ousted,
but he surely won’t be the last. Here is a
look at the coaches who could be next,
beginning with those whose seats seem
to be the toastiest:
John Fox, Bears: Chicago is 3-9 this
season and 12-32 under Fox as he nears
the end of his third season. Not
everything he has tried has backfired,
but it sure has begun to feel that way. He
was done no favors by the team’s
disjointed offseason approach at
quarterback with the signing of Mike
Glennon and trading up in the draft to
select Mitchell Trubisky. But the desire
to maintain continuity and stability for
Trubisky probably won’t be enough for
Fox to keep his job.
Chuck Pagano, Colts: Owner Jim
Irsay surprised many in the league a
couple of years ago by retaining Pagano
as his coach and Ryan Grigson as his
general manager. Grigson was ousted
last offseason following a second
straight 8-8 season and was replaced by
Chris Ballard. There is an argument to be
made that it would be unfair to judge
Pagano on a 2017 season in which
Indianapolis has been without Andrew
Luck and didn’t have a viable Plan B at
quarterback until it traded for Jacoby
Brissett just before the opener. But that
argument likely is offset by the fact that
Pagano isn’t being judged solely on this
Giants made their move first,
but plenty more firings
could be coming soon
season but on the team’s downward
spiral since it reached the 2014 AFC
championship game.
Hue Jackson, Browns: Cleveland’s
woes are not primarily a coaching issue.
They are primarily a roster-construction
issue. The “Moneyball” approach to
building an NFL team is failing
miserably. No NFL team has gone so far
out of its way, it seems, to avoid drafting
a franchise quarterback as the Browns,
who traded away the opportunities to
choose Carson Wentz and Deshaun
Watson in the past two drafts. This isn’t
all Jackson’s doing, but with a team that
is 1-27 the past two seasons, it’s difficult
to argue that any key football decisionmaker deserves to stay.
Vance Joseph, Broncos: Joseph is a
rookie head coach, and front-office
roster architect John Elway bears the
responsibility for Denver’s quarterback
woes beginning with Peyton Manning’s
final season. But it’s Elway’s call, and he
certainly isn’t going to fire himself.
Dirk Koetter, Buccaneers: Tampa
Bay was supposed to be a playoff team
this year in quarterback Jameis
Winston’s third season. Instead, it has
regressed, and the future is highly
uncertain. The Buccaneers sought to
maintain continuity for Winston when
they promoted Koetter from offensive
coordinator to replace Lovie Smith. But
that stability has not resulted in on-field
progress.
Marvin Lewis, Bengals: Everyone
doing the clamoring for Cincinnati to
move on from Lewis forgets just how
dreadful this team was — and for just
how long — before his arrival in 2003.
But the clamoring is louder than ever
with the Bengals probably headed to
their second straight non-playoff season.
Bill O’Brien, Texans: Houston has
been ravaged by injuries, losing Watson,
their prized rookie quarterback, and
defensive standouts J.J. Watt and
Whitney Mercilus. This is the Texans’
first non-winning season under O’Brien
after three straight 9-7 campaigns. There
probably should be enough goodwill
stored up to buy O’Brien at least one
more season.
Todd Bowles, Jets: New York
actually has exceeded expectations, with
five victories and counting in a season
that began with accusations of tanking
to get the No. 1 pick in the draft. Whether
that is enough to keep Bowles around
remains to be seen.
Jason Garrett, Cowboys: Owner
Jerry Jones’s ire has been aimed at the
league office and NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell for the six-game
suspension of running back Ezekiel
Elliott under the personal conduct
policy. Jones has remained supportive of
Garrett. But the disappointment is great
after the Cowboys began the season with
such a firm conviction that they were
Super Bowl-bound.
John Harbaugh, Ravens: All is well
if Baltimore finds a way to reach the AFC
playoffs as a wild card. But what if the
Ravens have a third straight non-playoff
season? This is a stable organization but
not one accustomed to prolonged
failure.
Jay Gruden, Redskins: Gruden has
done a good job with an injurydecimated Washington team. He
deserves to stay. Does that mean that the
Redskins will agree and do the right
thing?
Bruce Arians, Cardinals: Arians is
in a special category. The decision about
whether to remain will be his.
mark.maske@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
sports
England became the first
country to have five teams in the
knockout stage of the
Champions League after
Liverpool completed a sweep for
Premier League clubs with a 7-0
thrashing of Spartak Moscow on
Wednesday.
Liverpool, which won Europe’s
top competition five times,
clinched Group E after Philippe
Coutinho secured his first hat
trick for the club.
Liverpool was joined in the
final 16 by former champion
Porto, Sevilla and Shakhtar
Donetsk. Napoli lost, 2-1, at
Feyenoord and failed to qualify.
Liverpool was one of four
English teams to top a group,
along with Manchester City,
Manchester United and
Tottenham. Chelsea completed
the sweep, signaling a revival by
English clubs after years of
underachievement since the
west London club was European
champion in 2012.
In other results, Cristiano
Ronaldo helped Real Madrid to
a 3-2 win over visiting Borussia
Dortmund.
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NFL
8:25 p.m.
English teams advance
in Champions League
Washington Capitals captain
Alex Ovechkin said he would support Russian athletes participating in the upcoming Winter Olympics in South Korea, even though
the Russian flag and anthem will
be absent after the International
Olympic Committee decided to
ban the Russian federation as
punishment for widespread doping Olympic officials believe was
supported by the government.
Russian athletes who can prove
their innocence of drug cheating
will be permitted to compete in
PyeongChang under the designation of an “Olympic Athlete from
Russia (OAR).” The Olympic anthem will be played in any ceremony for medals won by these
athletes, and Russia’s official medal count will stand at zero.
“Obviously, it’s hard for athletes,” Ovechkin said. “Some athletes work out for maybe three
years to get ready for the Olympics. It’s hard. It’s tough situation.
I think our athletes have to go and
do their best.”
Ovechkin and other Russian
NHL players were already ruled
out for the Olympics after the NHL
announced this year that it would
not interrupt its season for the
Games in February. The league
also received assurance from the
International Ice Hockey Federation, which oversees international
competitions, that NHL players
under contract won’t be allowed
to participate. Though Ovechkin
initially was outspoken about defying the NHL and representing
Russia anyway, he acknowledged
that dream was dead the night
before Washington’s training
camp.
Ovechkin said he is “pretty
sure” the Russian hockey team
still will compete in the Olympics,
though it will have to do so as a
neutral team, and he agrees with
that decision. The team’s players
will be drawn from the Kontinental Hockey League, and in a tournament field watered down without NHL players, the Russians are
a favorite to win gold. On Tuesday,
former NHL star Ilya Kovaluchuk
emphatically
said
Russians
should still participate, and Russian President Vladimir Putin said
Wednesday that the government
will allow Russians to compete as
neutral athletes.
Russian Capitals forward Evgeny Kuznetsov was asked how it
would feel to compete under a
neutral flag. “Same as if for you
they take a U.S. passport from you,
right? You’re not going to feel comfortable,” he said. “For us, it’s everything.” But he echoed Ovechkin’s sentiment that Russian athletes still should participate.
“There will be Russian fans at
the tournament, and if you win
that medal, they will sing the national anthem for you,” Kuznetsov
said.
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/capitals
DIG ES T
SOCCER
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
Madrid led 2-0 after Borja
Mayoral opened the scoring and
Ronaldo netted his ninth groupstage goal this season. . . .
In Kharkiv, Ukraine, Shakhtar
Donetsk joined Manchester City
in the knockout stage with a 2-1
victory over City. . . .
Fernando Llorente’s wait for
a Tottenham goal ended in his
17th game since he arrived from
Swansea, netting the opener in a
3-0 victory over APOEL in
London. . . .
Feyenoord finally secured its
first points in its last game in
Champions League Group F,
rallying from a goal down to beat
Napoli, 2-1, in Rotterdam. . . .
In Porto, Portugal, Vincent
Aboubakar scored twice to
ensure Porto reached the
knockout stage with a
resounding 5-2 win against
Monaco. . . .
In Maribor, Slovenia, Sevilla
qualified for the knockout phase
with a 1-1 draw with Maribor. . . .
Dave Sarachan will remain
the interim U.S. men’s national
team coach for the Jan. 28
exhibition against Bosnia in
Carson, Calif.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Arkansas had its best back-toback seasons in the Southeastern
Conference when Bobby Petrino
was leading a high-powered
offensive attack during the 201011 seasons.
The Razorbacks have turned
to an up-tempo, offensiveminded coach — albeit one
without Petrino’s scandalous
baggage — to try to rekindle that
level of success.
Arkansas hired SMU’s Chad
Morris, ending nearly two weeks
of uncertainty following Bret
Bielema’s firing moments after
the season ended.
Morris agreed to a six-year
contract worth $3.5 million
annually.
Morris went 14-22 in three
seasons at SMU. He took over a
team that finished 1-11 in 2014,
won two games his first season
and improved to 5-7 in 2016 and
7-5 this year. . . .
Pittsburgh signed Coach Pat
Narduzzi to a new contract that
will keep him with the Panthers
through the 2024 season.
Narduzzi is 21-17 in three
seasons with the Panthers,
including a 5-7 mark in 2017. . . .
Kansas State offensive
coordinator Dana Dimel was
named head coach at UTEP,
where he will take over the only
Division I team that didn’t win a
game this season.
BASEBALL
Giants General Manager
Bobby Evans confirmed on San
Francisco’s flagship radio
station, KNBR, that the club has
reached the parameters of a
potential trade for Miami slugger
Giancarlo Stanton.
Evans said Giants executives
gathered with the NL MVP and
his representatives in “a good
meeting” last week.
Marlins chief executive Derek
Jeter said Tuesday that Miami
has not decided whether to trade
Stanton, still owed $295 million
over the final decade of his
record 13-year, $325 million
contract. When asked
specifically about absorbing the
majority of that contract, Evans
didn’t address it.
Stanton is due to make
$25 million in 2018 after he led
the majors with 59 home runs
and 132 RBI this past season. . . .
The Seattle Mariners and Los
Angeles Angels each acquired
$1 million in international bonus
pool money from the Minnesota
Twins, aiding their pursuit of
Japanese outfielder and pitcher
Shohei Ohtani.
Seattle sent minor league
catcher David Banuelos to
Minnesota, while the Angels
traded minor league outfielder
New Orleans at Atlanta » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11), NFL Network,
WJFK (1580 AM)
NBA
8 p.m.
9 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Los Angeles Lakers at Philadelphia » TNT
Washington at Phoenix » NBC Sports Washington, WFED (1500 AM)
G League: Santa Cruz at Austin » ESPNU
Houston at Utah » TNT
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
Valparaiso at Purdue » Fox Sports 1
Ohio at Maryland » Big Ten Network, WTEM (980 AM)
Iowa at Iowa State » ESPN2
Howard at Georgetown » Fox Sports 1, WJFK (106.7 FM)
GOLF
4:30 a.m.
9 p.m.
Ladies European Tour: Dubai Ladies Masters, second round » Golf Channel
PGA Tour Australasia: Australian Masters, second round » Golf Channel
SOCCER
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
3 p.m.
UEFA Europa League: Lyon at Atalanta » Fox Sports 2
UEFA Europa League: BATE Borisov at Arsenal » Fox Sports 1
UEFA Europa League: Cologne at Red Star » Fox Sports 2
Jacob Pearson to the Twins.
MISC.
Ron Meyer, the football coach
behind SMU’s famed “Pony
Express” and the NFL’s infamous
“Snowplow Game” between the
New England Patriots and the
Miami Dolphins, died at age 76.
Meyer died Tuesday after
collapsing with an aortic
aneurysm while playing golf in
the Austin suburb of Lakeway,
his family said in a statement.
His SMU Mustangs, led by
running backs Eric Dickerson
and Craig James, turned a
middling program into a
Southwest Conference champion
that wound up getting the
NCAA’s “death penalty” for
cheating.
His order to have a stadium
snowplow driver clear a spot for
the game-winning field goal
against the Dolphins in 1982 in
Foxborough, Mass., is legendary.
Meyer spent two-plus seasons
with the Patriots. He also
coached the Colts from 1986 to
1991.
— From news services
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
Deal gives Goodell
up to $200 million
Beal gets out of his own head and speeds past 50
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
portland, ore. — Bradley Beal
hadn’t felt like this since he was a
teenager — when his mother was
still his harshest critic and he was
a sophomore on the cusp of leading Chaminade College Preparatory School to the Missouri basketball state championship. On
that night inside a high school
gymnasium, Beal launched a halfcourt shot at the buzzer, sending
the game into overtime, for his
52nd point. That was the only
time in his basketball life he had
crossed 50 — the coveted threshold that separates mere scorers
from the most skilled players.
Eight years later, Beal stood
inside the Moda Center visitors’
locker room, smiling at those
memories as he experienced the
feeling again.
On Tuesday night, Beal set his
NBA career high with a 51-point
outburst against the Portland
Trail Blazers. Beal made 21 of
37 shots, including 5 of 12 from the
three-point arc, scoring the most
points by an opponent in Portland, topping even Hall of Famers
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (49), Larry
Bird (47) and Michael Jordan (46).
Beal considered the totality of
scoring 50 points — as the targeted man against NBA defenders or
even as a baby-faced baller — and
found the perfect word to sum up
the moment.
“That’s — buckets,” Beal said.
“That’s an accomplishment.
That’s an elite group of guys who
can really score the ball. It’s something I take pride in.”
Before Tuesday night, Beal
couldn’t get out of his own head.
The play-calls, his passes, those
tinted protective glasses — they
all weighed heavy on Beal’s mind
over the past few games.
“Thinking too much,” he said.
“I was trying to think about plays
and get guys shots, to get them
easy ones, and I was myself trying
to make every play, and I can’t
make every play.”
His inner struggle in trying to
be the first unit’s John Wall standin showed whenever one of his
passes turned into a mistake —
Beal averaged 2.4 turnovers in the
five previous games without Wall.
It was especially apparent every
time he tossed his eyewear during
the game. Although Beal listened
to doctor’s orders after taking an
elbow to the face, he never adjusted to the uncomfortable glasses.
In the two previous games, the
GOODELL FROM D1
STEVE DYKES/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bradley Beal helped the Wizards bounce back from a rout in Utah by scoring 51 to vanquish Portland.
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
at Phoenix Suns
Today
9 NBCSW
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3:30 NBCSW
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Tuesday
7:30 NBCSW Plus
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
bespectacled Beal shot 30.7 percent.
“He hadn’t been making shots,”
Blazers star Damian Lillard said.
“So at some point a guy that’s that
skilled and shoots the ball that
well, he’s going to get it going.”
A sleepless night followed the
Wizards’ 47-point shellacking in
Utah on Monday night. Beal
stayed up watching game footage,
mostly highlights that featured
him making shots. He studied his
mechanics and how he worked to
get open, and when he took the
court against Portland, Beal felt
free again — especially after the
first play of the game when he
misjudged center Marcin Gortat’s
positioning and his simple entry
pass landed in an opponent’s
hands. From that moment, Beal
stopped thinking and played his
own game.
“I just put everything on the
table, regardless if I made shots,
missed shots. Regardless of what
happened throughout the game, I
was going to be a better leader,”
Beal said. “Leading by example,
having good body language and
doing whatever it took to get the
win.”
For a scorer with his mind on
buckets, leadership means attack,
attack, attack. And so, Beal scored
in isolation, moved around
screens and bombarded the basket with pull-up jumpers. His singular focus to torment the Blazers
led to several players taking the
defensive assignment and ultimately failing.
“I can’t remember the last time
I saw someone take 37 shots,”
Blazers Coach Terry Stotts said.
“That’s a lot of shots. He had an
outstanding night.”
Even though Beal took plenty
of shots — he played the entire
second half and launched 22 of
the team’s 43 attempts — the volume should not overshadow his
accuracy and efficiency. Beal,
playing on the second night of a
road back to back, never showed
fatigue as he connected on 4 of 8
three-pointers in the final 24 minutes. Yet Beal believed he missed
some easy ones and suspected his
mother, Besta, would point out
that he should have had 60 instead of 51.
“That’s the kind of woman she
is,” Beal said.
Back on that big night in high
school, Beal recalls not scoring in
the five-minute overtime. He remained stuck at 52 points. That
feeling of reaching a milestone yet
being nagged by the thought of
falling just short of a truly special
night has followed Beal throughout his five-plus years in the NBA.
Beal had flirted with breakout
performances before — his previous career high was 42, set last
season — but 50 points remained
elusive. Until Tuesday night.
“I have been stuck on 40 a
couple times, 38s and borderline
40s,” Beal said. “My teammates
even pushed me. They were the
ones to tell me, ‘Go get 50.’ I was
just worrying about playing the
right way, and if I had the shot, I
was going to take it. If I didn’t, I
was going to move it. They were
the ones instilling in me ‘go get 50’
when I had 38, 42.
“I just continued to go, and it’s a
great feeling right now, for sure.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
NBA ROUNDUP
Cavaliers tie franchise mark with 13th straight win
A SSOCIATED P RESS
LeBron James drained a threepointer with 15 seconds left and
finished with 32 points Wednesday night as the Cleveland Cavaliers tied a franchise record with
their 13th straight win, 101-95,
over the visiting Sacramento
Kings.
James also had 11 rebounds and
nine assists, helping the Cavaliers
rally from a 14-point deficit in the
third quarter to remain unbeaten
since Nov. 11.
His decisive three-pointer in
the final minute was in the face of
JaKarr Sampson, who had jawed
with James earlier.
“It’s amazing to have a better
than a front-row seat because I’m
usually on the court next to him
somewhere. I’m glad he’s on my
team,” Cleveland’s Kyle Korver
said of James.
Cleveland also won 13 straight
in the 2008-09 and 2009-10 seasons.
Meanwhile, Cavaliers all-star
point guard Isaiah Thomas played
four-on-four, a significant step in
his recovery from a hip injury.
WARRIORS
101,
HOR-
NETS 87: Kevin Durant had
35 points, 11 rebounds and 10 assists, and Golden State won in
Charlotte without Stephen Curry
and Draymond Green.
It was Durant’s first triple-double of the season and his second
since joining the Warriors before
last season. Golden State has won
five straight overall and seven in a
row against the Hornets.
Curry will be sidelined for
about two weeks with a sprained
right ankle, while Green is nursing
a sore shoulder.
Stephen Silas coached the Hornets with Steve Clifford out indefinitely while dealing with a health
issue.
CELTICS 97, MAVERICKS
90: Kyrie Irving had 23 points and
five assists, and Jayson Tatum
added 17 points and 10 rebounds
to help shorthanded Boston defeat visiting Dallas for its sixth win
in seven games.
Dallas Coach Rick Carlisle said
forward Nerlens Noel will have
surgery for a torn ligament in his
left thumb. Noel is expected to be
out for several weeks.
SPURS 117, HEAT 105: LaMarcus Aldridge scored 18 points,
and host San Antonio had seven
players score in double figures in
winning for the sixth time in seven
games.
KNICKS 99, GRIZZLIES
88: Courtney Lee scored 24 points,
Kristaps Porzingis had 18 after a
slow start in his return to the
lineup, and New York topped visiting Memphis.
BUCKS 104, PISTONS 100:
Giannis Antetokounmpo had
25 points and nine rebounds, and
host Milwaukee won for the
fourth time in five games.
mark.maske@washpost.com
PELICANS 123, NUGGETS
114: DeMarcus Cousins had
40 points, 22 rebounds and four
blocks as host New Orleans won
for the second time in three games
without injured star Anthony Davis.
PACERS 98, BULLS 96: In
Indianapolis, Victor Oladipo
scored 27 points, including a
clutch three-pointer with 31 seconds left, as Indiana handed Chicago its 10th straight loss.
MAGIC 110, HAWKS 106
(OT): Evan Fournier scored
27 points before injuring his right
ankle in overtime as Orlando rallied past visiting Atlanta.
SETH WENIG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Roger Goodell’s new contract is “fully consistent with ‘market’
compensation,” the NFL owners on the committee said in a memo.
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CAVALIERS 101,
KINGS 95
the anthem, similar to the sport’s
approach before 2009.
Goodell was elected by the
owners in 2006 to succeed Paul
Tagliabue and has led the sport
through a turbulent time that
has included a work stoppage
and controversies over matters
as consequential as concussions
suffered by players and domestic violence cases and as seemingly inconsequential as the air
pressure in footballs. He has
drawn sharp criticism for the
league’s handling of player disciplinary cases involving Ray
Rice, Tom Brady and Ezekiel
Elliott.
It is not clear whether the
deal will run into further opposition from Jones, who threatened to sue over Goodell’s extension but rescinded that threat.
Some within the league believed
Jones’s threat stemmed from
Elliott’s suspension.
Owners are scheduled to meet
Dec. 12-13 in Dallas. Jones
sought increased input by owners not on the compensation
committee, which is led by the
Atlanta Falcons’ Arthur Blank,
into Goodell’s contract. He also
sought a final ratification vote
by all owners once the deal was
completed.
The league has maintained
there will not be another vote of
the owners. The owners voted,
32-0, at their May meeting in
Chicago to authorize the compensation committee to negotiate the new deal with Goodell.
Jones served as a nonvoting
member of the compensation
committee, but that arrangement ended after he informed
other members he had hired
attorney David Boies and was
prepared to file a lawsuit opposing Goodell’s extension.
That began a tense standoff
between Jones and other owners. There was a flurry of
threats, accusations and letters
sent back and forth. Jones accused Blank of misleading owners about the negotiations. He
contended that such a significant investment in the commissioner was not justified at a time
when the league was facing
financial hardships.
Others owners, in return, accused Jones of being guilty of
conduct detrimental to the
league. There was talk of potential penalties that could include
a fine, a suspension or the loss
by Dallas of a draft pick or picks.
There were reports about the
possibility of Jones being forced
to sell the Cowboys, a franchise
with an estimated value of more
than $4 billion, but those reports were dismissed by people
familiar with the league’s inner
workings as unrealistic.
Jones subsequently indicated
he would not sue, saying he had
been satisfied that other owners
would have increased input. The
league said there had been no
agreement with Jones for the
threat of a lawsuit to be dropped
in exchange for a final ratification vote by all owners.
Goodell’s extension would
keep him in place through the
league’s negotiations for its next
collective bargaining agreement
with the players’ union and its
next set of television contracts.
Owners locked out the players
before the last labor deal was
struck in 2011. In September,
player leaders voted to retain
DeMaurice Smith as executive
director of the NFL Players
Association while barring other
candidates from vying for the
job during this election cycle.
The memo, a copy of which
was obtained by The Washington Post, also said: “We are
pleased to have resolved this
issue and we appreciate the
strong support received from
our partners. It was particularly
gratifying to hear so many owners commit to being more engaged in League affairs and to
express the desire to work more
closely with the Commissioner
and League staff on matters
critical to the League. We know
that we speak for all of you, as
well as for the Commissioner, in
saying that the NFL is strongest
when our ownership is active
and unified.”
The memo says that owners
were informed by committee
members in recent days of the
contract’s details.
“Our Committee unanimously supports the contract and
believes that it is fully consistent with ‘market’ compensation and the financial and other
parameters outlined to the owners at our May 2017 meeting, as
well as in the best interests of
ownership,” the memo said. “We
also have expressed in those
conversations our strong and
unanimous belief that we
should proceed to sign the
agreement now, consistent with
the unanimous May resolution
and to avoid further controversy
surrounding this issue.
“We are pleased to report that
there is a nearly unanimous
consensus among the ownership in favor of signing the
contract extension now.”
THE PINK PANTHER™ & © 1964-2013
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D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
NFL NOTES
REDSKINS NOTES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
Reasons to shut down
not enough for Brown
Acupuncture. Massage. Heat.
Laser. Stretching. Ankle mobility.
That’s just a sample of the daily
treatments that Redskins inside
linebacker Zach Brown is
undergoing to fend off an
Achilles’ tear and finish the 2017
season strong, even though
Washington (5-7) has virtually no
chance of making the playoffs.
Brown, who’s battling a sore
hamstring and Achilles’ tendon,
was among five ailing Redskins
who didn’t practice Wednesday.
But he said he’s not entertaining
the thought of sitting out
Sunday’s game against the Los
Angeles Chargers (6-6).
Signed to a one-year deal in
April, Brown has started all
12 games for the Redskins. He
leads the NFL in tackles (117) and
has been the biggest asset on an
injury-plagued defense.
“Everybody is playing hurt,”
said Brown, 28. His mind-set is
this: If he can run and lift his
arms, he’s playing.
That doesn’t mean Brown is
oblivious to the risk.
Seattle cornerback Richard
Sherman pushed himself to keep
competing on an Achilles’ injury
that he feared might not hold up,
and the tendon ultimately
ruptured and ended his season in
the Seahawks’ Nov. 9 victory over
the Arizona Cardinals. Just last
week, Baltimore Ravens
cornerback Jimmy Smith was
carted off the field after tearing
his Achilles’ tendon.
“It’s always on my mind,”
Brown said Wednesday. “You’ve
just got to keep getting treatment
on it, and hopefully it’ll get better.
It’s always a concern, but if it’s
going to happen, it’s going to
happen. You could be running up
the stairs, and it could happen.
Nothing I can do about it. All I can
do is keep doing treatment on it.”
As for anyone who tries to
convince him he would be better
served by shutting himself down
for the season, Brown isn’t
listening. The fact that the
playoffs aren’t at stake doesn’t
matter, in his view, nor does the
fact that he’s on a one-year deal,
with no job security in hand.
“At the end of the day, I’m going
out there because I like to play the
game,” Brown said. “I like to play
the game with passion. I hate to
lose. And I’m trying my best to
help some of the young guys. [I
tell them,] ‘You can rest when the
season is over.’ ”
Pride drives Williams
If it were up to Trent Williams, he
would continue playing through
these next four games. Knee pain
be damned.
But even the veteran left tackle
knows the decision isn’t his alone
to make. And if the Redskins find
themselves out of playoff
contention, the front office may
make the call for him.
“At that point, I would
probably leave it up to the guys
upstairs and see if they want me
to continue to push through it,
[and then] I’m going to continue
to push through it,” Williams said
after sitting out Wednesday’s
practice. “If they tell me let’s go
ahead and start this recovery
process, then that’s what I’ll do. I
work for them.
“It’s always my decision, but
whatever they want me to do is
what I would do.”
Williams has been holding off
on season-ending knee surgery as
long as possible. But he can’t
foresee doing things any other
way. The competitor in him won’t
let his body rest. And his
commitment to his teammates —
and his quarterback, Kirk
Cousins, in particular — won’t let
him focus on anything else.
“I take pride in protecting
Kirk,” Williams said. “He’s a good
friend of mine. We’ve played
together for a long time. . . . So,
yeah, it weighs in” the decision.
— Liz Clarke
and Kimberley A. Martin
Weakened by injuries, Reed says resolve is strong
REDSKINS FROM D1
coming to this point that I think
have strengthened me to where I
can get through this right now.”
Reed said it has been difficult
both on and off the field, the latter
of which he declined to discuss.
The tight end is in his fifth year,
and injuries have prevented him
from playing an entire 16-game
season. In 2015, Reed posted
952 yards receiving and 11 touchdowns in 14 games, all career
highs. The 27-year-old has missed
at least four games in four of his
five NFL seasons, which Reed said
was a result of his playing style he
has since attempted to adjust.
“I wasn’t playing the smartest, if
you would say,” early in my career,
Reed said. “I was jumping, diving
and leaving my body open all the
time. It takes a toll on you, man.
After learning that kind of stuff,
you learn you got to play smart to
be available. That’s what I’m looking forward to being when I come
back.”
This past offseason, Reed
bulked up and arrived in Richmond in arguably the best shape
of his life. But he believes he overworked himself in the process,
which caused the toe injury that
landed him on the physically unable to perform list.
Reed received a custom-made
orthotic insert to give extra cushioning for his big toe and started in
the season opener, but he was
never fully healthy. Just as he
started to regain confidence in his
body following a two-touchdown
performance against the Philadelphia Eagles, Reed suffered the
hamstring injury the next week.
“It’s just unfortunate,” Gruden
said. “Jordan is a big-time player
for us, and when he’s not out there,
it has an effect on what we do. . . . I
just hate that people sometimes
label him as injury-prone. It’s just
unlucky. He had a bad toe coming
into camp, and then I think with
that bad toe, he’s tried to just put
too much weight on the other leg,
and I think that’s affected his hamstring. Big thing is to get him back
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Washington tight end Jordan Reed hasn’t played since he hurt his hamstring Oct. 29 against Dallas but still hopes to return this season.
to healthy — whether it’s this
week, next week or the week after
or in the offseason.”
Reed’s belief aligns with
Gruden’s, that the hamstring injury has been unlucky and caused by
overcompensating for his toe injury. Given the multiple setbacks,
Reed and the team have decided to
slow down his recovery process.
He did some on-field work during
Monday’s practice but was held
out Wednesday.
“Injuries suck, and injuries remind you that this is real life,” left
tackle Trent Williams said.
“Watching [Reed] having to fight
through and suffer setback after
setback, it’s frustrating for us. It’s a
Pro Bowl talent that we don’t have
on the field. All of these close
games that we go into, we need
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
everything we can get. Having a
guy like Jordan not there with us,
it really hurts.”
Reed, who has 27 receptions for
211 yards and two touchdowns,
hasn’t entertained the thought of
shutting down his season yet. His
priority is to get his body healthy,
however long that takes.
In the interim, he is counting
his blessings and taking comfort
where he can — particularly in his
family and two young daughters
— to help him get through the
physical and mental tolls of this
year, always with a mind toward
getting back on the field to chase
his dreams and goals.
“I’m just going to keep getting
stronger from this stuff,” Reed
said. “That’s all you can do.”
master.tesfatsion@washpost.com
Chiefs sit
Peters after
flag-tossing
incident
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Marcus Peters chucked an official’s flag into the stands, stalked
off the field wearing a smile, then
ran back onto it without wearing
socks when he realized he hadn’t
been ejected.
Well, he won’t have to worry
about socks Sunday.
Kansas City Chiefs Coach Andy
Reid suspended the volatile young
cornerback for their game against
Oakland after a series of antics
that humiliated not only Peters
but the entire organization.
GIANTS: Two-time Super
Bowl MVP Eli Manning is back as
New York’s starting quarterback.
A week after being benched by
former coach Ben McAdoo, Manning was put back into the starting
lineup for Sunday’s game against
the Dallas Cowboys by interim
coach Steve Spagnuolo.
“My gut right now says Eli
should be the starter,” Spagnuolo
said in explaining the move after
practice Wednesday.
STEELERS: Pittsburgh linebacker Ryan Shazier was transferred from a Cincinnati hospital
to Pittsburgh to continue treatment for a spinal injury suffered
during Monday night’s game
against the Bengals.
Shazier left Paul Brown Stadium on a stretcher less than four
minutes into his team’s 23-20 victory over Cincinnati following a
tackle that left the 25-year-old
writhing on the turf, his legs motionless. He underwent extensive
testing at University of Cincinnati
Medical Center.
BENGALS: Cincinnati safety
George Iloka’s one-game suspension was overturned, leaving him
with a $36,464.50 fine for his hit to
Antonio Brown’s head.
Iloka hit Brown in the head
while trying to break up his gametying touchdown catch.
RAMS: Los Angeles decided
not to practice outdoors because
of the poor air quality around its
training complex in Ventura
County, where a wildfire burned
more than 100 square miles.
The Rams’ complex is about
25 miles from the blaze, but the
resulting smoke caused enough
problems in air quality to persuade the Rams to skip practice in
favor of a walk-through indoors at
nearby Cal Lutheran University.
PANTHERS: Three-time Pro
Bowl tight end Greg Olsen returned to practice and is expected
to play against the Minnesota Vikings.
Coach Ron Rivera said Olsen’s
status will help offensive coordinator Mike Shula with game-planning for Sunday’s game, knowing
“there’s not going to be a pitch
count as far as the number of
plays” when it comes to the tight
end.
Moon is accused of sexual harassment
MOON FROM D1
who declined to press charges.
Authorities in Texas charged
Moon with assault anyway, but he
was acquitted by a jury after his
wife testified that she had provoked the fight. They divorced in
2001.
Moon co-founded Sports 1
Marketing in 2010 and serves as
its president.
According to the new lawsuit,
Moon required Haskell to stay in
his hotel room during business
trips, sleep in the same bed and
wear “skimpy thong lingerie bottoms” as nightclothes. When she
protested, he replied that she had
to comply to keep her job and said
that “his prior assistant accepted
the same arrangement,” the lawsuit states.
Haskell declined to comment
through her attorney, Diana L.
Fitzgerald of Miami. The Washington Post does not ordinarily
name alleged victims of sexual
assault, but Fitzgerald said her
client had agreed to go public.
Fitzgerald said Haskell did not
report any of Moon’s conduct,
including the alleged sexual battery, to police. “I think she was
scared,” she said.
“She was expecting to further
her career in the sports marketing industry,” Fitzgerald added.
“She had no idea that her job
duties were going to involve that
kind of perverse protocol.”
craig.whitlock@washpost.com
TASOS KATOPODIS/GETTY IMAGES
A lawsuit alleges ex-QB Warren
Moon required his assistant to
share his bed on business trips.
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Hokies thrash Highlanders for sixth straight win
VIRGINIA TECH 95,
RADFORD 68
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
The nation’s second-leading
scoring team certainly did little to
hurt its 96.8-point average
Wednesday night.
Justin Bibbs and Kerry Blackshear Jr. scored 20 points each to
carry Virginia Tech to a 95-68 victory over Radford in Blacksburg,
Va.
Bibbs connected on 8 of 10 from
the field and hit four three-pointers for the Hokies (8-1), who won
their sixth straight game and
scored at least 95 points for the
sixth time in nine games. After
being suspended for the first two
games of the season by Coach Buzz
Williams, Bibbs returned to score
in double figures in seven straight
games.
Ed Polite Jr. scored 15 points to
lead the Highlanders (4-4).
GEORGE WASHINGTON
71, PRINCETON 60: Jair Bolden
scored a career-high 25 points,
Yuta Watanabe added 13, and the
Colonials beat the Tigers at Smith
Center for their third straight win.
Bo Zeigler added 10 points with
two blocks for George Washington
(5-4), which made 16 free throws
to Princeton’s three.
Cannady scored 23 points for
his eighth straight game in double
figures for the Tigers (2-6).
WILLIAM & MARY 77,
GEORGE MASON 70: Nathan
Knight scored 27 points with seven rebounds and Matt Milon added 22 points as the Tribe pushed its
winning streak to five with a victory at EagleBank Arena.
The Tribe (6-2) lost two of its first
three games before putting together the winning streak. George Mason (4-5) has lost four of five.
Jaire Grayer led the Patriots
with a career-high 24 points.
NAVY
70, COPPIN STATE
George Kiernan scored
17 points, Tom Lacey and Bryce
Dulin added 13 apiece, and the
Midshipmen beat the winless Tigers in Baltimore to win their
fourth straight.
Hasan
Abdullah
added
10 points with four assists and six
steals for the Midshipmen (8-3),
who shot 51.9 percent from the
field to the Eagles’ 33.3 percent.
Karonn Davis scored 16 points
for Coppin State (0-9).
53:
OLD DOMINION 79, RICHMOND 60: B.J. Stith had
21 points, 10 rebounds and four
assists, Ahmad Caver added
14 points, six boards and 12 assists,
and the Monarchs beat the Spi-
ders in Norfolk.
Richmond led 33-31 at halftime,
but Old Dominion opened the second half on a 20-0 run — with six
points from Caver and capped by
Brandan Stith’s three-point play.
The Monarchs outscored Richmond 48-27 in the second half.
Trey Porter and Randy Haynes
each added 12 points for Old Dominion (6-3).
WESTERN ILLINOIS 69,
AMERICAN 56: Sam Iorio re-
turned to the Eagles’ lineup after
missing two games to score a
game-high 18 points, but the
Leathernecks held AU scoreless
for the final 4:26 to win in Macomb, Ill.
American (2-6) shot just 36 percent from the field to suffer its
third consecutive loss.
Brandon Gilbeck led Western
Illinois (6-2) with 17 points, 13 rebounds and eight blocks.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
college basketball
Local rivalries are important for the game — even if they occasionally boil over
The best rivalries
in college
basketball are
local ones:
Philadelphia’s
Big 5, Duke-North
John
Carolina and
Feinstein
KentuckyLouisville are
prime examples.
There’s also CincinnatiXavier.
The schools are located three
miles apart and play every
season. On Saturday, with both
teams nationally ranked, the
Musketeers beat the Bearcats,
89-76.
During postgame
handshakes, Cincinnati Coach
Mick Cronin had to be dragged
away from Xavier senior J.P.
Macura. Afterward, Cronin said
that Macura had called him “the
f-word” three times during and
after the game and added, “If he
was playing for me, he wouldn’t
play.”
That was a clear shot at
Xavier Coach Chris Mack, who
was unapologetic about
Macura’s behavior. He pointed
out that Cincinnati’s Lance
Stephenson had directed the nword at him during the game
eight years ago and he hadn’t
complained or done anything
other than shake hands after
Xavier won that day. Mack also
defended Macura and called
him “a great kid.”
Let’s be clear here: Mack, 47,
and Cronin, 46, are two of the
most accomplished younger
coaches in the country. Mack
has taken Xavier at least to the
Sweet 16 in four of his first eight
seasons at his alma mater —
including last year when the
Musketeers, without injured
point guard Edmund Sumner,
beat sixth-seeded Maryland,
third-seeded Florida State and
second-seeded Arizona to reach
the Elite Eight in the West
Region.
Cronin has taken Cincinnati
to seven straight NCAA
tournaments and one Sweet 16
and was 30-5 last season before
the Bearcats lost in the second
round to third-seeded UCLA.
Each school has lofty hopes for
this winter.
That’s all good. These are two
good guys who can really coach.
But both need to be given a
good talking-to right about now,
even though the anger in this
rivalry is nothing new.
Six years ago, the hostility got
out of hand when a brawl broke
out with nine seconds left in an
easy Xavier victory. Four players
from each school were
suspended, and the presidents
had to intervene to calm things.
No doubt tempers will cool in
the coming days as well and
both coaches will kiss and make
up. Both, however, need to do
better in the future. If Macura
was directing profanity at
Cronin, the Cincinnati coach
first should have made the
officials aware of it, and if that
didn’t stop it, he should have
made Mack aware of it. Then it
would be up to Mack to let his
player know that was
unacceptable.
Years ago, when North
Carolina Coach Dean Smith
thought Clemson’s Iker Iturbe
was trying to hurt one of his
players in an ACC tournament
game, he began shouting and
pointing at Iturbe. Seeing and
hearing Smith, Clemson Coach
Rick Barnes began stalking in
the direction of the North
Carolina bench. Referee Rick
Hartzell intercepted him and
asked him what he was doing.
“I’m going to tell Dean if he
has a problem with one my
players he needs to tell me and
I’ll take care of it,” Barnes said.
The officials decided to bring
the two coaches together to sort
the matter out. “That was a
mistake,” said Frank Scagliotta,
one of the other officials. “We
should have gotten them as far
apart as possible and told them
both to cool it.”
Smith and Barnes had to be
held apart while Smith yelled at
Barnes — 20-plus years his
junior — “Go ahead and hit me,
Rick.”
It was ugly. But Barnes had
done the right thing. If Iturbe
was playing dirty, Smith should
have told the officials and
Barnes. The same was true of
Cronin on Saturday. Having to
be pulled away from a player is
unacceptable. The coaches are
supposed to be the grown-ups.
Even though things got out of
hand this past weekend, XavierCincinnati remains a
compelling rivalry because it
means so much to everyone
involved.
It is a perfect example of why
local rivalries are always the
best. It is a reminder to all of us
who live here in Washington of
how sad it is that the city’s two
power schools — each a past
national champion — don’t play
each other every season.
Smart returns for an emotional reunion
SMART FROM D1
friends that it’s a wonder the game
ever started, what with all the
necessary pregame handshakes
and hugs.
Love mixed with pain mixed
with a desire for revenge. And it
was
especially
complicated
because Smart wasn’t just a
successful basketball coach
during the six seasons he spent
building VCU into the biggest
sports attraction in town. He was
a civic fixture. He raised funds. He
served on boards. He and his wife,
Maya, became local institutions.
“They were like the king and
queen of Richmond,” said Mat
Shelton-Eide, the co-founder of
VCURamNation.com.
“He was godlike,” said season
ticket holder Mark Cross, one of
the dozens of VCU boosters Smart
hugged as he circled the court
before the game.
“He was The Man in Richmond,
basically,” said Charlotte Hornets
guard Treveon Graham, a
Washington native and former
All-Met from St. Mary’s Ryken
who was one of a half-dozen explayers still milling around the
court long after the game ended.
Smart had stayed put at the
school, even as his name was
linked with cushier jobs at UCLA
and Marquette and North
Carolina
State,
and
fans
wondered
whether
VCU’s
program had graduated from
steppingstone to landing spot.
Then Texas and its $21.7 million
deal arrived in the spring of 2015.
Smart left, and those fans who
had lived through Jeff Capel’s
arrival and departure and
Anthony Grant’s arrival and
departure had to do it again.
“There were some hearts
broken,” said Chris Crowley, one
of
the
best-known
VCU
supporters. “It’s a pretty
passionate fan base, but with that
passion
comes
emotion
sometimes, and it’s not always
happy emotion. There are some
open and hurt feelings there.”
Tuesday offered a chance to let
those feelings out. The school puts
a clause in its head basketball
coach’s contract mandating a
home-and-home series with his
new employer if he leaves. When
Capel decamped for Oklahoma,
he brought his Sooners back to
Richmond and lost. When Grant
headed to Alabama, he suffered
the same fate. “Two of the best
games we’ve ever had at the Siegel
Center,” Crowley said.
So the VCU community had
been looking forward to this game
from the moment Smart left.
Some said it was the most hyped
regular season game they could
remember. Standing-room tickets
started at $75 on the secondary
market, and students began
lining up outside the arena at
10:30 in the morning.
“This is, I think, cathartic for
everyone,” said Greg Burton, a
local sports-radio host, moments
before Smart appeared and
grabbed him in a hug. “See, that’s
what I’m saying,” Burton said as
Smart hugged other well-wishers
in the pregame crowd. “Everyone
just wants to get a glimpse and say
thanks because every memory is
so positive.”
Well, most of them. The
popular question this week was
whether Smart might hear boos
from those who felt betrayed, and
as the coach walked out of the
Maryland and Georgetown
played the past two seasons in
the Gavitt Games, a preseason
challenge series between the Big
Ten and the Big East. It was
their first regularly scheduled
game since 1993. Each game was
compelling. Maryland won both,
the first by rallying late against
an unranked Georgetown team
(Maryland was ranked No. 3) in
a game in which little-known
Hoyas center Bradley Hayes
outplayed ballyhooed Diamond
Stone. A year later, the
Terrapins pulled out a wild
game with a furious last-minute
rally.
And that was that. Maryland
played Butler in this season’s
Gavitt Games, and Georgetown,
playing almost all of its
nonconference games against
cupcakes — to put it mildly —
didn’t participate.
Which is a shame, just as it is
also a shame that Georgetown
has refused to play George
Washington since 1981.
Maryland and GW have played
on occasion in recent years but
only in the BB&T Classic. It
should be automatic that the
local schools play one another
every season, creating
important nonconference games
NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
tunnel for the first time, there was
at least one catcall. That came
from Meade Fitzgerald, a 38-yearold VCU graduate who said his
two favorite teams are now “VCU
and whoever’s playing Texas.”
“I just feel like he left the
program at its peak, and he let a
lot of people down,” Fitzgerald
said. “It’s like if your dad left your
mom and then came back to your
house with a new wife. Would you
cheer that?”
But it seemed easier to find the
other side, the people who wanted
to thank Smart while beating him
— showing that his ex-program
was every bit the equal of a Big 12
school.
“We understand why he
wanted to leave. You do it for your
family. You do it for yourself,”
Melanie Cross said. “We all have
goals, and sometimes you can’t
stay in one place forever.”
Smart’s successor, Will Wade,
stayed just two years before
leaving for LSU, a departure that
made fans appreciate Smart’s six
seasons even more, and that likely
took some of the edge off his
return. So there were mostly
cheers when he came out onto the
court just before the game, raised
his arm and waved to the crowd.
He shared a long hug with VCU
Coach Mike Rhoades, his former
assistant — “I’m not here if it
wasn’t for Coach Smart,” Rhoades
said after the game — and then he
set about trying to earn Texas’s
first road win in two seasons.
Texas surged into an early lead,
the deafening crowd settled
down, and the Longhorns pushed
their lead to 19 midway through
the second half. Then VCU
unleashed the sort of full-court
blitz Smart had seen so many
times from the other end of the
gym, finally taking a one-point
lead and setting off one of the
loudest roars in the building’s two
decades.
The place was sold out for the
105th straight game — complete
with a 24-year-old Smart
impersonator who was invited to
sit directly next to the Texas bench
and a group of adults dressed as a
motorcycle gang and calling
themselves the Rhoades Warriors.
If you weren’t convinced this
night was complicated, you
should have heard the howls
when Smart complained about a
call as fans pleaded for a
technical.
And when you combined all
those emotions with the rabid
comeback, the noise became
outrageous at the end. The din
hovered in the air, crashing
against your skull. Khris Lane,
whose three-pointer gave VCU its
only lead, tried saying something
to himself during that mayhem,
“But I couldn’t even hear what I
said to myself. It was that loud,” he
said.
“That crowd was phenomenal,”
Texas big man Dylan Osetkowski
said.
“We always used to talk about
on the coaching staff here about
how many wins a season this place
is worth by itself,” Smart said of the
7,600-seat arena, which could
have breathed life into a farm bill
committee hearing. “Every once in
a while you take a deep breath, and
you say, ‘Man, this is a special
place, and I was so unbelievably
fortunate to be here for six years.’ ”
Now he is coaching a Texas
team boasting one of the country’s
highest-rated recruiting classes,
with a future lottery pick in center
Mohamed Bamba and enough
talent to outlast his old program,
even in that cauldron. So as the
Longhorns made their free
throws, that tiny bit of revenge
VCU fans had imagined for two
years flitted away.
Some still found what they
were looking for. Like Jennifer
Mullen, such a head-over-heels
Shaka Smart fan that she
displayed a digitally altered
picture of herself with the coach
inside her home on Valentine’s
Day. (“She has an unnatural love
for the man,” joked her husband,
Steve.) When Smart left, she cried.
Before the game, she stood
underneath the arena’s Final Four
display, talking about those tears
and how she needed a night like
this.
“I really did get closure,” she
said after the game. “This breakup
will be easier.”
As for the 40-year-old coach, he
tried to downplay his return, to
treat it like another game. Good
luck with that, unless a normal
game involves 100, 200, 500 hugs.
Long after the game — when the
arena normally would be empty
and the visiting team rolling away
in its bus — Smart was still
grinning, still embracing friends,
still asking people about his
favorite cookies and telling people
how much he loved them. There
were security guards to hug and
parents of former players to hug
and parents of current players to
hug. There were enough photos to
fill an album and those seven or
eight former players huddled in a
corner of the arena.
“Some of those guys are my
favorite guys I’ve ever coached,
and I coached them here, so to
come back here as a visiting coach
is just a strange feeling,” he said,
voice hoarse, as he made his way
toward the exit. “It’s strange. And
in a good way. But that’s what
happens when you spend six years
in a place.”
He chatted with a few more
friends, handed out a few more
hugs and posed for a few more
photos. Then he finally left,
wearing his Texas sweatsuit and
gazing around his former home.
“This place,” he said to no one
in particular, “is special.”
dan.steinberg@washpost.com
For more by John Feinstein, visit
washingtonpost.com/feinstein.
Terps rout Mountaineers
for sixth consecutive win
F ROM
STEVE DYKES/GETTY IMAGES
sports@washpost.com
WOMEN’S ROUNDUP
MARYLAND 97,
MOUNT ST. MARY’S 57
Shaka Smart “was The Man in Richmond, basically,” former VCU player Treveon Graham said.
that players and fans would look
forward to annually.
In Philadelphia, the Big 5
schools play a round robin every
year — regardless of conference
affiliations. VCU and Old
Dominion are no longer
conference rivals, but they still
play each other every season. It
took an order from the state
legislature to get Kentucky to
resume playing Louisville in
1983. They have played every
year since in what is now one of
college basketball’s most
anticipated games.
Maybe the D.C. Council
should intervene in the
Georgetown-GW mess. Maybe
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan and
D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser
should get together on the
Maryland-Georgetown issue.
Because this much is certain:
Even though Xavier and
Cincinnati went over the line
Saturday, everyone involved will
look forward to the teams’
meeting next year. It no doubt
will be a dramatic basketball
game. And, you hope, nothing
more than that.
Reserve Ieshia Small scored
21 points, three starters added
16, and No. 15 Maryland rolled to
a 97-57 win over Mount St. Mary’s
at Xfinity Center on Wednesday
night for its sixth straight win.
Stephanie Jones, Kaila Charles
and Kristen Confroy each scored
16 points and combined for 18for-32 shooting and 23 rebounds.
Blair Watson added 13 points
and seven assists for the Terrapins (8-2).
Watson opened the scoring
with a three-pointer and made a
layup to cap a 15-0 run. After a
basket by Mount St. Mary’s, Confroy had eight straight points,
with two three-pointers, sandwiched between Small baskets in
a 12-0 run.
Maryland closed the opening
quarter with five straight points
to lead 37-6.
The Terps were 14 for 21 and
the Mountaineers were 3 for 13
from the field in the first quarter.
By halftime it was 54-23.
Maryland finished the game
with 35 points off 25 Mount
St. Mary’s turnovers and a 47-31
rebounding advantage.
Katrice Dickson led the Mountaineers (1-7), who shot 34.5 percent, with 16 points.
VIRGINIA
TECH
90,
MARYLAND
EASTERN
SHORE 52: Regan Magarity had
20 points and seven rebounds
and Taylor Emery scored
19 points to lead the Hokies (8-2)
in Blacksburg, Va.
Michelle Berry had a doubledouble (12 points, 12 rebounds)
and Kendyl Brooks also had
12 points for Virginia Tech,
which
pulled
away
with
39 points in the third quarter, the
highest-scoring quarter in program history.
Martha Thompson led the
Hawks (1-6) with 12 points.
NAVY
76, RICHMOND 56:
Taylor Dunham and Hannah
Fenske each scored 17 points as
the Midshipmen improved to 9-0
with a road win.
Laurel
Jaunich
added
10 points and eight rebounds for
Navy, and Sophie Gatzounas had
nine points and 10 boards.
Micaela Parson had 19 points
and 11 rebounds for the Spiders
(5-6).
MERCER 61, GEORGE
WASHINGTON 44: Brianna
Cummings had 15 points and
10 rebounds for the Colonials
(3-6), who couldn’t overcome a
33-point deficit in Macon, Ga.
KeKe Calloway led Mercer
(7-2) with 15 points, and Syndi
Means had a double-double with
11 assists and 10 rebounds, along
with seven points.
Home at last, the Irish cruise
Arike Ogunbowale scored
23 points as No. 3 Notre Dame
beat Michigan State, 90-59, in
South Bend, Ind., in its first
home game in 25 days.
Junior transfer Jessica Shepard had 19 points, Jackie Young
added 13 points and graduate
transfer Lili Thompson had 12
for Notre Dame (8-1). The Irish
went 6-1 on the road, with the
loss coming Sunday at No. 1
Connecticut.
Jenna Allen led Michigan
State (5-3) with 28 points, and
Lexi Gussert had 11.
The Irish shot 80 percent
(8 for 10) in the second quarter
and held the Spartans scoreless
over the final 6:16 to take a 47-16
halftime lead.
Despite shooting just 33 percent in the third quarter, including a 2:23 scoreless streak to end
it, Notre Dame maintained a
63-40 lead heading into the final
quarter.
Notre Dame shot 51.8 percent
from the field while holding
Michigan State to 30.8 and outrebounded the Spartans, 44-34,
as
Thompson,
a
5-foot-7
guard, snared a team-high nine
boards.
Michigan State Coach Suzy
Merchant has work to do with
her squad on both ends of the
floor after Notre Dame shot
64 percent in the first half (16 for
25) while holding the Spartans to
18.8 percent (6 for 32). The
Spartans entered the game
shooting 43.5 percent while
holding their opposition to 39.2.
With Brianna Turner, Mychal
Johnson and Mikayla Vaughn
sidelined for the season with
knee injuries, Notre Dame Coach
Muffet McGraw used mostly a
seven-player rotation in the first
half. An eighth player, freshman
Danielle Patterson, saw limited
action in each half.
ROBERT FRANKLIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Notre Dame’s Arike Ogunbowale, shooting over Michigan State’s
Lexi Gussert, had 23 points and nine rebounds Wednesday.
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 7 , 2017
NHL ROUNDUP
Andersen’s 47 saves help Toronto defeat Calgary
MAPLE LEAFS 2,
FLAMES 1 (SO)
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
CHARLIE RIEDEL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Noah Dickerson, center, had 13 points and 14 rebounds as
Washington beat Kansas for the first time since December 1974.
MEN’S ROUNDUP
Huskies are in the zone,
surprise No. 2 Jayhawks
WASHINGTON 74,
KANSAS 65
A SSOCIATED P RESS
First-year Washington Coach
Mike Hopkins saw how Kansas
dissected Syracuse’s vaunted 2-3
zone defense last week, so he made
a couple tweaks to his version
before facing the Jayhawks on
Wednesday night.
Primarily, Hopkins stretched
the zone to take away the threepointer.
It worked to perfection.
The Huskies frustrated the Jayhawks’ dangerous lineup of deep
threats, Matisse Thybulle hit fivepointers and scored 19 points, and
Washington kept its poise down
the stretch for a 74-65 victory in
Kansas City, Mo., that knocked
No. 2 Kansas from the ranks of the
unbeaten.
“We’ve been very fortunate this
year to play a lot of teams that
shoot 30 and 35 three-pointers. It’s
really the kryptonite of the zone,”
said Hopkins, who spent 22 years
on Jim Boeheim’s staff at Syracuse.
Jaylen Nowell also had 15 points
and Noah Dickerson added
13 points and 14 rebounds as the
Huskies (7-2) beat the Jayhawks
(7-1) for the first time since December 1974.
“We really just didn’t have it
tonight. You have to give them
credit,” the Jayhawks’ Devonte
Graham said. “They made every
shot, and they did a good job of not
letting us get comfortable.”
Lagerald Vick had a career-high
28 points for Kansas, doing almost
all his damage in the middle of the
Huskies’ zone. But he didn’t get a
lot of help as the Jayhawks went 5
for 20 from three-point range.
LOYOLA-CHICAGO
63,
FLORIDA 59: In Gainesville, Fla.,
Aundre Jackson scored 23 points,
Cameron Krutwig added 14, and
the Ramblers handed the fifthranked Gators a third straight
FLYERS
4,
OILERS
2:
Wayne Simmonds had a goal and
an assist and Brian Elliott made
26 saves to help visiting Philadel-
phia defeat Edmonton.
The Flyers won their second
straight game, coming on the
heels of a 10-game losing streak.
Dorsett at ‘peace’ with retiring
When confronted with the possibility of not being able to hug
his two sons, Derek Dorsett knew
he made the right decision to step
away from hockey.
The Vancouver Canucks right
winger announced last week that
he was ending his NHL career
because of health concerns following neck surgery last season.
Dorsett said there have been
“some hard days” over the past
week as he comes to grips with
his decision, but spending time
with his wife and family has
helped him reconcile with his
situation.
“My boys have made it a lot
easier going home and being able
to hug them and play with them,”
Dorsett told the media in Vancouver. “In the long-term aspect, your
health is everything. That’s why I
now have peace with it.”
The 30-year-old Kindersley,
Saskatchewan, native played just
14 games last season before he
underwent surgery to repair a
disk degeneration in his neck.
The procedure left both his arms
numb, and there were suggestions that his playing days might
be over then.
Dorsett returned to the Canucks this season and had seven
goals and two assists in 20 games.
He was on pace to better his
career-high 12 goals set during
the 2011-12 season with the Columbus Blue Jackets.
His last game with the Canucks
was Nov. 18. He left the team
during a road trip after suffering
stiffness in his neck and back.
loss.
Less than 48 hours after Florida
Coach Mike White said his team’s
performance against rival Florida
State was “the epitome of soft,” the
Gators delivered another dud.
This one could knock them out
of the Associated Press top 25 next
week, especially if they lose to
17th-ranked Cincinnati on Saturday. Arizona went from No. 2 to
unranked earlier this season.
The Gators (5-3) shot 36.9 percent from the field, missed 17 of
their 19 three-point attempts and
finished with seven assists.
The Ramblers (9-1) were more
efficient, shooting 52 percent from
the field and making half their
12 shots from behind the arc.
NORTH CAROLINA 104,
WESTERN CAROLINA 61:
Luke Maye had 12 points and
12 rebounds, and the No. 11 Tar
Heels hit a season-high 16 threepointers in Chapel Hill, N.C.
The Tar Heels (9-1) ran off
20 straight points during a 33-3
first-half run that put the game
away early. North Carolina shot
57 percent and made 16 of 22 threepoint attempts overall, coming one
shy of matching the program record for made threes in a game.
Deriece Parks scored 13 points
for the Catamounts (3-7).
XAVIER
96, KENT STATE
Trevon Bluiett scored
26 points — the seventh time he
has had 20 this season — and the
No. 13 Musketeers (8-1) took control with an 18-point run in Cincinnati.
Xavier
has
won
36 straight nonconference home
games. Kent State fell to 5-4.
70:
Fires prompt UCLA to cancel
UCLA canceled Wednesday
night’s game with Montana because of wildfires in the Los Angeles area. The school said all other
team workouts and practices
scheduled for Wednesday also had
been canceled. Several wildfires
are burning throughout Southern
California, including near the
UCLA campus.
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Frederik Andersen stole another two points in the standings
for the Toronto Maple Leafs.
Anderson made 47 saves in
regulation and overtime and
stopped three more shots in a
shootout in the host Maple Leafs’
2-1 victory over the Calgary
Flames on Wednesday night.
“I just want to take it one game
at a time, real important to be
able to flip the page,” Andersen
said.
William Nylander scored the
winner in the fourth round of the
shootout, deking to the backhand
to beat Mike Smith. Morgan Rielly scored in regulation for the
Maple Leafs. Toronto improved to
18-10-1 and moved into second
place in the Eastern Conference,
three points behind Tampa Bay.
“I didn’t think we had very
good legs. We looked like a team
that came back from a road trip,
even though we had days to recover,” Maple Leafs Coach Mike
Babcock said.
“I thought we’d get traction
and take over, but that didn’t
happen. . . . In the end, our goalie
was better.”
Mark Giordano scored for Calgary, and Smith stopped 28 shots.
The Flames have dropped three
in a row.
Calgary forward Jaromir Jagr
sat out the game because of a
lower-body injury.
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PHOTOS BY PATRICK SMITH/GETTY IMAGES
Alex Ovechkin finished with a goal and three assists in Washington’s 6-2 win over Chicago. The goal was his NHL-leading 21st of the season.
Top line sets tone as Caps keep rolling
CAPITALS FROM D1
fered Monday against the San
Jose Sharks. The top line’s scoring onslaught gave Washington a
comfortable 3-0 lead to work
with, and goaltender Braden
Holtby made a whopping
37 saves to keep the Blackhawks
at bay.
This successful stretch for the
Capitals has coincided with the
team’s longest homestand of the
season and the reunion of
Ovechkin
and
Backstrom.
Though the two have complemented each other for more than
a decade in Washington, Trotz
started the season with them on
separate lines. As both settled
into scoring slumps two weeks
ago, Trotz reconfigured his forward trios to have Ovechkin and
Backstrom skating beside each
other again. Their new linemate
was a surprising choice in Wilson, who has never scored more
than seven goals in a season.
The lineup tweak worked
wonders. Since reuniting with
Backstrom, Ovechkin has eight
goals in seven games, riding his
best goal-scoring pace since the
2007-08 season, when he scored
65 as a 22-year-old. Though
Backstrom has steadily been accumulating assists, he entered
Wednesday night’s game without
a goal since Oct. 14, Washington’s
sixth game of the season. Two
games away from tying his career-worst goal drought of
23 games, Backstrom swatted in
Ovechkin’s cross-crease feed
11:54 into Wednesday’s game for
his fourth goal of the season.
“Me and Tom had a chat today
and said, ‘Let’s set up Backy,’ ”
Ovechkin said. “And we did and
he scored a goal.”
“It obviously feels good,” Backstrom said. “But I haven’t really
been thinking about it too much,
even if I probably should be
thinking about it a lot more.”
The last time Wilson had this
extended of a stretch playing
alongside Ovechkin and Backstrom was in November 2014. It
was just his second season in the
NHL, and perhaps he wasn’t
ready, occupying a bottom-six
role for most of his career.
Though Wilson has maintained a
physical style of play, it has
become more refined. He’s
Washington’s best at drawing
penalties. His hard hits create
space for Ovechkin and Backstrom in the offensive zone. Play-
The Capitals’ Tom Wilson, left, had two goals and two assists, and Braden Holtby stopped 37 shots.
C A P I TA L S ’ N E X T T H R E E
vs. New York Rangers
Tomorrow
7 NBCSW,
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at New York Islanders
Monday
7 NBCSW
vs. Colorado Avalanche
Tuesday
7 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
ing against the opponent’s top
forwards and defensemen, Wilson can win board battles and
finish his checks to force turnovers and wear down the opposition.
“He is starting to realize how
he has to play, especially with a
center like” Backstrom, Ovechkin said. “He just does his job,
play physical, stay real calm with
the puck and try to make offense.”
Said Holtby: “You look at a lot
of really good lines, there’s usually that guy doing the hard work,
the gritty work, keeping pucks
alive in the corners and playing
well in the [defensive] zone to
Capitals 6, Blackhawks 2
CHICAGO .................................. 1
WASHINGTON ......................... 3
0
1
1 —
2 —
2
6
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Washington, Backstrom 4 (Wilson, Ovechkin), 11:54. 2, Washington, Wilson 3 (Djoos, Backstrom),
14:53. 3, Washington, Ovechkin 21 (Wilson, Orlov),
15:22. 4, Chicago, Bouma 3 (Murphy, DeBrincat), 17:54.
Penalties: None.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Washington, Connolly 5 (Backstrom, Ovechkin), 18:32 (pp). Penalties: Niskanen, WSH, (hooking),
5:10; Wilson, WSH, (boarding), 10:48; Bouma, CHI,
(interference), 17:19; Hartman, CHI, (high sticking),
18:40; Hartman, CHI, (high sticking), 18:40; Ovechkin,
WSH, (interference), 19:00.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Washington, Kuznetsov 10 (Carlson, Ovechkin), 10:23. 7, Chicago, Toews 8, 16:18. 8, Washington,
Wilson 4 (Niskanen), 17:40 (sh). Penalties: Orpik, WSH,
(hooking), 12:56; Hartman, CHI, (tripping), 15:18; Wilson,
WSH, (roughing), 15:18; Bowey, WSH, (slashing), 17:16.
SHOTS ON GOAL
CHICAGO ................................ 16
16
7 — 39
WASHINGTON ....................... 11
6
8 — 25
Power-play opportunities: Chicago 0 of 4; Washington 1
of 3. Goalies: Chicago, Forsberg 1-4-3 (10 shots-7 saves),
Berube 0-0-0 (14-12). Washington, Holtby 15-6-0 (3937). A: 18,506 (18,277). T: 2:30.
create transition. He’s doing
that. . . . I think he’s coming into
his own as a player, not just a
talent. He’s figuring out how to
create offense at the same time
as being very responsible defensively.”
Less than three minutes after
Backstrom snapped his goal
drought, Wilson followed suit.
His shot off a faceoff beat Forsberg short side for his third goal
of the season and a first in
15 games. It was a soft goal to
give up for Forsberg, pressed
into duty because top goaltender
Corey Crawford is on injured
reserve with an undisclosed
“lower-body” injury.
On the next shift, Wilson sped
toward the net, and Forsberg
saved the shot with his pad, but
Ovechkin had been trailing behind to score on the rebound.
That marked his NHL-best
21st goal. Ovechkin added an
assist to his total when he set up
Brett Connolly’s power-play goal
in the second period, and then he
tallied one more with his primary helper on Evgeny Kuznetsov’s third-period goal.
Wilson later added a shorthanded empty-net goal with 2:20
left in the game for the first
four-point night of his career.
Ovechkin also finished with four
points, while Backstrom recorded three.
“Obviously, we haven’t been
scoring three-, four-point nights
every night, but I feel like we’re
getting better and better every
day,” Backstrom said. “Still, we
have a lot of things to improve,
but right now we’re all right. So
hopefully we can just build off
this.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
SCOREBOARD
FO O T B A LL
BASKETBALL
NFL
NBA
Celtics 97, Mavericks 90
NFC
EASTERN CONFERENCE
DALLAS .............................. 26
BOSTON ............................. 24
EAST
W L
Philadelphia ................ 10 2
Dallas ............................ 6 6
Washington .................. 5 7
N.Y. Giants .................... 2 10
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.833
.500
.417
.167
PF
361
286
272
189
PA
215
284
314
291
SOUTH
W
New Orleans ................. 9
Carolina ......................... 8
Atlanta .......................... 7
Tampa Bay .................... 4
L
3
4
5
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.667
.583
.333
PF
353
269
274
243
PA
243
238
244
288
NORTH
W
Minnesota ................... 10
Detroit .......................... 6
Green Bay ..................... 6
Chicago ......................... 3
L
2
6
6
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.833
.500
.500
.250
PF
285
314
258
191
PA
204
308
281
267
WEST
W L
L.A. Rams ...................... 9 3
Seattle .......................... 8 4
Arizona ......................... 5 7
San Francisco ................ 2 10
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.667
.417
.167
PF
361
290
219
202
PA
222
222
310
298
AFC
EAST
W
New England ............... 10
Buffalo .......................... 6
N.Y. Jets ....................... 5
Miami ............................ 5
L
2
6
7
7
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.833
.500
.417
.417
PF
348
227
266
209
PA
223
283
288
298
SOUTH
W
Tennessee ..................... 8
Jacksonville .................. 8
Houston ........................ 4
Indianapolis .................. 3
L
4
4
8
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.667
.333
.250
PF
266
299
296
205
PA
282
178
309
330
NORTH
W L
Pittsburgh ................... 10 2
Baltimore ...................... 7 5
Cincinnati ...................... 5 7
Cleveland ...................... 0 12
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.833
.583
.417
.000
PF
281
280
219
176
PA
213
207
238
308
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 6
L.A. Chargers ................ 6
Oakland ......................... 6
Denver ........................... 3
L
6
6
6
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.500
.500
.500
.250
PF
303
268
249
206
PA
274
212
278
315
WEEK 14
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................22
Toronto ......................................15
Philadelphia ...............................13
New York ...................................12
Brooklyn.......................................9
L
4
7
10
12
14
Pct
.846
.682
.565
.500
.391
GB
—
5
71/2
9
111/2
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................13
Miami.........................................11
Orlando ......................................11
Charlotte......................................9
Atlanta.........................................5
L
11
13
15
14
19
Pct
.542
.458
.423
.391
.208
GB
—
2
3
31/2
8
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................18
Detroit .......................................14
Milwaukee .................................13
Indiana .......................................14
Chicago ........................................3
L
7
10
10
11
20
Pct
.720
.583
.565
.560
.130
GB
—
31/2
4
4
14
L
4
8
12
16
18
Pct
.818
.680
.520
.333
.280
GB
—
21/2
61/2
11
121/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................18
San Antonio ...............................17
New Orleans ..............................13
Memphis ......................................8
Dallas ...........................................7
NORTHWEST
W
x-Minnesota ..............................14
Portland .....................................13
Denver........................................13
Utah ...........................................13
Oklahoma City ...........................11
L
11
11
11
12
12
Pct
.560
.542
.542
.520
.478
GB
—
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................20
x-L.A. Clippers .............................8
L.A. Lakers ...................................8
Phoenix ........................................9
Sacramento .................................7
L
6
14
15
17
17
Pct
.769
.364
.348
.346
.292
GB
—
10
101/2
11
12
1/
2
1/
2
1
2
x-Late game
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Washington 106, at Portland 92
at Toronto 126, Phoenix 113
at Oklahoma City 100, Utah 94
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
THURSDAY’S GAME
New Orleans (-1) at Atlanta, 8:25
SATURDAY, DEC. 16
Chicago at Detroit, 4:30
L.A. Chargers at Kansas City, 8:25
MONDAY, DEC. 18
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 8:30
Three-point Goals: Chicago 10-26 (Valentine 4-7, Zipser
2-2, Dunn 1-1, Portis 1-3, Holiday 1-4, Markkanen 1-6,
Grant 0-3), Indiana 12-34 (Oladipo 4-10, Bogdanovic 3-6,
T.Young 2-4, Collison 2-5, Joseph 1-3, Turner 0-3,
Stephenson 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Chicago
46 (Valentine 8), Indiana 39 (T.Young 9). Assists:
Chicago 18 (Dunn 6), Indiana 21 (Turner 6). Total Fouls:
Chicago 15, Indiana 14. Technicals: Indiana coach Pacers
(Defensive three second). A: 13,013 (18,500).
CHICAGO ............................ 30
INDIANA ............................. 20
25
19
28
30
13 — 96
29 — 98
CHICAGO: Valentine 5-13 1-1 15, Markkanen 5-15 0-0 11,
Lopez 7-11 2-2 16, Dunn 8-14 1-3 18, Holiday 2-7 2-2 7,
Zipser 2-2 0-2 6, Portis 5-11 1-2 12, Grant 0-4 0-0 0,
Nwaba 5-6 1-4 11. Totals 39-83 8-16 96.
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 6-13 2-2 17, T.Young 4-12 0-0 10,
Turner 4-11 3-4 11, Collison 6-10 0-0 14, Oladipo 10-20
3-4 27, Leaf 0-1 0-0 0, Sabonis 3-5 0-0 6, Joseph 3-6 0-0 7,
J.Young 0-0 0-0 0, Stephenson 3-9 0-0 6. Totals 39-87
8-10 98.
Redskins: DNP: LB Zach Brown (hamstring, achilles), T
Morgan Moses (ankle), S Montae Nicholson (concussion), TE Jordan Reed (hamstring), T Trent Williams
(knee). LIMITED: WR Maurice Harris (concussion), DE
Terrell McClain (toe), C Chase Roullier (hand), LB
Martrell Spaight (ankle). FULL: DE Matt Ioannidis
(hand), DE Anthony Lanier (knee), T Ty Nsekhe (core
muscle), G Brandon Scherff (knee). Chargers: Practice
Not Complete.
BALTIMORE RAVENS
AT PITTSBURGH STEELERS
Ravens: DNP: LB C.J. Mosley (neck), LB Za’Darius Smith
(shoulder). LIMITED: G Jermaine Eluemunor (shoulder),
WR Jeremy Maclin (back). Steelers: DNP: CB Joe Haden
(fibula), LB Tyler Matakevich (shoulder), LB Ryan
Shazier (back). FULL: TE Vance McDonald (ankle), S
Michael Mitchell (ankle).
NCAA
SATURDAY’S GAME
Army vs. Navy, in Philadelphia, 3
SATURDAY, DEC. 16
CELEBRATION BOWL — IN ATLANTA
N.C. A&T (11-0) vs. Grambling State (11-1), Noon (ABC)
NEW ORLEANS BOWL
North Texas (9-4) vs. Troy (10-2), 1 (ESPN)
CURE BOWL — ORLANDO
Georgia State (6-5) vs. Western Kentucky (6-6), 2:30 (CBSSN)
LAS VEGAS BOWL
Boise State (10-3) vs. Oregon (7-5), 3:30 (ABC)
NEW MEXICO BOWL — ALBUQUERQUE
Colorado State (7-5) vs. Marshall (7-5), 4:30 (ESPN)
CAMELLIA BOWL — MONTGOMERY, ALA.
Arkansas State (7-3) vs. Middle Tennessee (6-6), 8
(ESPN)
TUESDAY, DEC. 19
BOCA RATON (FLA.) BOWL
Akron (7-6) vs. FAU (10-3), 7 (ESPN)
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 20
FRISCO (TEX.) BOWL
Louisiana Tech (6-6) vs. SMU (7-5), 8 (ESPN)
THURSDAY, DEC. 21
GASPARILLA BOWL — IN ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
Temple (6-6) vs. FIU (8-4), 8 (ESPN)
SATURDAY, DEC. 23
BIRMINGHAM (ALA.) BOWL
South Florida (9-2) vs. Texas Tech (6-6), Noon (ESPN)
ARMED FORCES BOWL — FORT WORTH
San Diego State (10-2) vs. Army (8-3), 3:30 (ESPN)
DOLLAR GENERAL BOWL — MOBILE, ALA.
Appalachian State (8-4) vs. Toledo (11-2), 7 (ESPN)
SUNDAY, DEC. 24
HAWAII BOWL — HONOLULU
Fresno State (9-4) vs. Houston (7-4), 8:30 (ESPN)
TUESDAY, DEC. 26
HEART OF DALLAS BOWL
West Virginia (7-5) vs. Utah (6-6), 1:30 (ESPN)
QUICK LANE BOWL — DETROIT
Northern Illinois (8-4) vs. Duke (6-6), 5:15 (ESPN)
CACTUS BOWL — PHOENIX
Kansas State (7-5) vs. UCLA (6-6), 9 (ESPN)
26
30
22 — 101
19 — 87
CHARLOTTE: Kidd-Gilchrist 3-11 0-0 6, Williams 3-8 1-1
7, Howard 4-10 6-7 14, Walker 8-21 5-7 24, Batum 6-12
1-2 15, O’Bryant III 0-2 0-0 0, Zeller 3-7 0-0 6, Kaminsky
0-1 0-0 0, Monk 0-1 0-0 0, Carter-Williams 2-9 0-0 4,
Graham 2-3 0-0 5, Lamb 3-11 0-0 6, Bacon 0-1 0-0 0.
Totals 34-97 13-17 87.
Three-point Goals: Golden State 11-30 (Thompson 4-7,
Durant 3-10, Cook 2-4, Young 2-5, Casspi 0-1, Iguodala
0-3), Charlotte 6-19 (Walker 3-7, Batum 2-5, Graham
1-1, Monk 0-1, Carter-Williams 0-1, Lamb 0-1, Williams
0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Golden State 47
(Durant 11), Charlotte 49 (Zeller 8). Assists: Golden
State 26 (Durant 10), Charlotte 17 (Walker 5). Total
Fouls: Golden State 20, Charlotte 13. A: 19,334 (19,077).
33
34
25
30
23 — 114
26 — 123
SACRAMENTO ................... 22
CLEVELAND ....................... 19
35
29
21
25
17 — 95
28 — 101
SACRAMENTO: Temple 2-7 0-1 5, Randolph 8-20 0-0 18,
Sampson 3-6 0-0 6, Fox 3-6 0-1 6, Hill 4-10 0-0 10, Koufos
4-7 0-0 8, Mason 4-6 6-10 15, Carter 2-3 0-0 5, Bogdanovic
2-8 0-0 5, Hield 7-13 1-1 17. Totals 39-86 7-13 95.
CLEVELAND: James 12-18 3-6 32, Crowder 2-6 0-0 4,
Love 7-16 3-3 18, Calderon 0-4 0-0 0, Smith 2-7 0-0 6,
Osman 0-1 0-0 0, Green 6-8 4-4 17, Frye 2-4 0-0 5, Korver
5-9 1-2 15, Wade 1-5 2-6 4. Totals 37-78 13-21 101.
Three-point Goals: Sacramento 10-32 (Randolph 2-3, Hill
2-6, Hield 2-6, Carter 1-2, Mason 1-2, Temple 1-5,
Bogdanovic 1-7, Fox 0-1), Cleveland 14-39 (James 5-8,
Korver 4-8, Smith 2-6, Green 1-1, Frye 1-3, Love 1-6,
Osman 0-1, Wade 0-1, Calderon 0-2, Crowder 0-3).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 45 (Sampson
16), Cleveland 43 (Love 13). Assists: Sacramento 25
(Randolph 6), Cleveland 28 (James 9). Total Fouls:
Sacramento 20, Cleveland 10. Technicals: Cleveland
coach Cavaliers (Defensive three second), Smith. A:
20,562 (20,562).
24
30
25
16
24 — 100
28 — 104
DETROIT: Johnson 0-8 2-2 2, Harris 8-14 1-1 21,
Drummond 12-16 3-8 27, Jackson 5-14 3-4 14, Bradley
5-13 7-8 20, Tolliver 1-8 0-0 3, Moreland 1-2 1-2 3, Smith
2-5 0-0 4, Kennard 2-7 1-2 6. Totals 36-87 18-27 100.
MILWAUKEE: Middleton 7-10 5-5 21, Antetokounmpo
8-16 8-12 25, Henson 5-8 0-0 10, Bledsoe 9-21 2-5 22,
Snell 1-3 0-0 3, Maker 0-2 0-0 0, Brogdon 5-10 0-0 10,
Liggins 1-3 0-0 2, Vaughn 3-6 3-4 11. Totals 39-79 18-26
104.
Three-point Goals: Detroit 10-30 (Harris 4-9, Bradley
3-5, Kennard 1-3, Jackson 1-4, Tolliver 1-5, Johnson 0-4),
Milwaukee 8-22 (Middleton 2-4, Vaughn 2-4, Bledsoe
2-6, Antetokounmpo 1-3, Snell 1-3, Liggins 0-2). Fouled
Out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 45 (Drummond 20),
Milwaukee 41 (Antetokounmpo 10). Assists: Detroit 20
(Drummond 6), Milwaukee 22 (Middleton 6). Total
Fouls: Detroit 20, Milwaukee 21. Technicals: Henson. A:
15,841 (18,717).
Spurs 117, Heat 105
MIAMI ................................ 35
SAN ANTONIO ................... 27
Cavaliers 101, Kings 95
23
30
24
29
23 — 105
31 — 117
MIAMI: Richardson 7-10 2-2 19, J.Johnson 3-6 1-2 9,
Olynyk 2-3 0-0 5, Dragic 3-11 2-2 8, Waiters 8-12 2-2 22,
Winslow 2-9 0-0 5, Adebayo 3-4 0-0 6, Ellington 2-5 0-0 6,
T.Johnson 9-12 2-4 25. Totals 39-72 9-12 105.
SAN ANTONIO: Gay 6-13 3-4 16, Aldridge 7-16 4-4 18,
Gasol 6-10 0-0 12, Parker 5-7 0-0 10, Green 5-7 0-0 12,
Bertans 3-6 0-0 7, Murray 0-0 0-0 0, Forbes 6-8 0-1 17,
Mills 5-11 0-0 13, Paul 1-3 0-0 2, Ginobili 2-6 5-5 10.
Totals 46-87 12-14 117.
Three-point Goals: Miami 18-34 (T.Johnson 5-8, Waiters
4-6, Richardson 3-6, J.Johnson 2-2, Ellington 2-5, Olynyk
1-1, Winslow 1-4, Dragic 0-2), San Antonio 13-25
(Forbes 5-5, Mills 3-6, Green 2-4, Ginobili 1-2, Gay 1-3,
Bertans 1-4, Paul 0-1). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Miami 29 (Olynyk 8), San Antonio 34 (Gay 7). Assists:
Miami 28 (J.Johnson, Dragic 6), San Antonio 30 (Parker
9). Total Fouls: Miami 16, San Antonio 13. A: 18,252
(18,418).
SOCCER
MLS playoffs
Magic 110, Hawks 106 (OT)
ATLANTA ....................... 23
ORLANDO ...................... 31
29
13
27
30
17
22
KNOCKOUT ROUND
10 — 106
14 — 110
ATLANTA: Prince 6-8 4-5 19, Ilyasova 4-10 0-0 9,
Plumlee 4-6 0-0 8, Schroder 10-26 5-6 26, Bazemore 1-9
2-2 4, Bembry 3-6 1-2 8, Babbitt 1-2 0-0 3, Cavanaugh
5-10 1-2 13, Taylor 2-4 0-1 4, Belinelli 4-12 2-2 12. Totals
40-93 15-20 106.
ORLANDO: Simmons 7-17 0-0 15, Gordon 9-15 6-9 24,
Vucevic 9-19 2-2 22, Payton 3-11 0-0 6, Fournier 12-21
1-3 27, Iwundu 0-2 0-0 0, Speights 0-0 0-0 0, Biyombo 1-2
1-2 3, Augustin 3-6 2-2 9, Mack 0-2 0-0 0, Afflalo 2-3 0-0
4. Totals 46-98 12-18 110.
Three-point Goals: Atlanta 11-27 (Prince 3-5, Cavanaugh
2-4, Belinelli 2-7, Bembry 1-1, Babbitt 1-1, Schroder 1-2,
Ilyasova 1-5, Bazemore 0-2), Orlando 6-28 (Fournier 2-3,
Vucevic 2-7, Augustin 1-2, Simmons 1-5, Mack 0-1,
Afflalo 0-1, Gordon 0-4, Payton 0-5). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Atlanta 49 (Belinelli, Ilyasova 7), Orlando 52
(Vucevic 16). Assists: Atlanta 25 (Bazemore, Schroder
7), Orlando 17 (Payton 6). Total Fouls: Atlanta 16,
Orlando 23. A: 16,167 (18,846).
FRIDAY, DEC. 22
BAHAMAS BOWL — NASSAU
Ohio (8-4) vs. UAB (8-4), 12:30 (ESPN)
FAMOUS IDAHO POTATO BOWL — BOISE
Central Michigan (7-5) vs. Wyoming (7-5), 4 (ESPN)
27
20
GOLDEN STATE: Durant 13-28 6-6 35, Bell 0-2 0-0 0,
Pachulia 0-1 0-0 0, Cook 3-7 0-0 8, Thompson 9-14 0-0 22,
Casspi 1-4 0-0 2, Young 3-6 2-4 10, West 3-6 0-0 6,
Looney 1-1 0-0 2, McGee 2-2 0-0 4, Livingston 2-5 0-0 4,
Iguodala 3-8 2-3 8. Totals 40-84 10-13 101.
DETROIT ............................. 27
MILWAUKEE ...................... 30
Pacers 98, Bulls 96
WASHINGTON REDSKINS
AT LOS ANGELES CHARGERS
GOLDEN STATE .................. 26
CHARLOTTE ....................... 18
Bucks 104, Pistons 100
SUNDAY, DEC. 17
Arizona at Washington, 1
Baltimore at Cleveland, 1
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 1
Cincinnati at Minnesota, 1
Houston at Jacksonville, 1
N.Y. Jets at New Orleans, 1
Miami at Buffalo, 1
Green Bay at Carolina, 1
L.A. Rams at Seattle, 4:05
New England at Pittsburgh, 4:25
Tennessee at San Francisco, 4:25
Dallas at Oakland, 8:30
Week 14 injury report
Warriors 101, Hornets 87
Three-point Goals: Denver 16-35 (Mudiay 3-6, Harris
3-7, Barton 3-8, Beasley 2-4, Chandler 2-5, Murray 1-1,
Hernangomez 1-1, Lyles 1-3), New Orleans 12-31
(Moore 4-7, Miller 2-5, Cousins 2-6, Rondo 1-1, Cunningham 1-3, Nelson 1-4, Holiday 1-5). Fouled Out: Plumlee.
Rebounds: Denver 40 (Lyles 11), New Orleans 49
(Cousins 22). Assists: Denver 22 (Lyles, Murray, Harris
4), New Orleans 28 (Rondo, Holiday 7). Total Fouls:
Denver 21, New Orleans 19. Technicals: Barton, Allen,
New Orleans coach Pelicans (Defensive three second).
A: 15,353 (16,867).
Chicago at Charlotte, 7
Cleveland at Indiana, 7
Denver at Orlando, 7
Golden State at Detroit, 7
Dallas at Milwaukee, 8
Sacramento at New Orleans, 8
Toronto at Memphis, 8
Boston at San Antonio, 9:30
Denver at Indianapolis, 8:25
Three-point Goals: Dallas 9-28 (Ferrell 2-4, Barea 2-5,
Nowitzki 2-7, Kleber 1-2, Matthews 1-4, Smith Jr. 1-4,
Harris 0-1, Barnes 0-1), Boston 12-34 (Horford 3-5,
Larkin 3-5, Tatum 2-3, Nader 1-2, Yabusele 1-2, Irving
1-6, Rozier 1-6, Smart 0-1, Theis 0-1, Ojeleye 0-3).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Dallas 45 (Barnes, Ferrell,
Powell 7), Boston 53 (Theis 11). Assists: Dallas 19
(Barea 6), Boston 25 (Horford 8). Total Fouls: Dallas 12,
Boston 15. Technicals: Smith Jr., Matthews, Irving. A:
18,624 (18,624).
NEW ORLEANS: Moore 5-10 0-0 14, Cunningham 2-4 2-2
7, Cousins 12-25 14-21 40, Rondo 5-7 0-0 11, Holiday
12-20 2-3 27, Miller 3-7 1-3 9, Asik 1-2 0-0 2, Nelson 2-6
0-0 5, Allen 4-5 0-0 8. Totals 46-86 19-29 123.
FRIDAY’S GAMES
THURSDAY, DEC. 14
BOSTON: Tatum 5-11 5-6 17, Horford 7-17 0-0 17,
Baynes 1-4 0-0 2, Irving 10-18 2-2 23, Smart 1-5 0-0 2,
Morris 0-0 0-0 0, Nader 1-3 0-0 3, Ojeleye 0-3 0-0 0, Theis
3-6 1-2 7, Yabusele 1-3 0-0 3, Larkin 4-8 0-0 11, Rozier
3-9 5-7 12, Brown 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-87 13-17 97.
DENVER: Barton 6-14 0-0 15, Chandler 3-11 0-0 8, Faried
3-4 0-0 6, Murray 5-11 4-4 15, Harris 8-19 5-8 24,
Hernangomez 1-1 0-0 3, Lyles 3-9 3-4 10, Plumlee 4-5 0-1
8, Mudiay 5-13 4-4 17, Beasley 3-7 0-1 8. Totals 41-94
16-22 114.
Washington at Phoenix, 9
L.A. Lakers at Philadelphia, 8
Oklahoma City vs. Brooklyn at Mexico City, 10
Houston at Utah, 10:30
WEEK 15
NCAA men
17 — 90
27 — 97
DALLAS: Barnes 8-15 3-4 19, Kleber 5-8 2-3 13, Nowitzki
6-15 2-2 16, Smith Jr. 4-16 3-4 12, Matthews 3-7 0-0 7,
Powell 1-4 0-0 2, Mejri 0-0 0-0 0, Barea 3-9 1-2 9, Harris
1-4 2-2 4, Ferrell 3-8 0-0 8, Cleveland 0-0 0-0 0. Totals
34-86 13-17 90.
DENVER .............................. 33
NEW ORLEANS .................. 33
THURSDAY’S GAMES
MONDAY’S GAME
New England (-11) at Miami, 8:30
16
23
Pelicans 123, Nuggets 114
at Orlando 110, Atlanta 106 (OT)
at Indiana 98, Chicago 96
at Cleveland 101, Sacramento 95
at Boston 97, Dallas 90
at New York 99, Memphis 88
at New Orleans 123, Denver 114
at Milwaukee 104, Detroit 100
Golden State 101, at Charlotte 87
at San Antonio 117, Miami 105
Minnesota at L.A. Clippers, Late
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Washington at L.A. Chargers (-6), 4:05
Baltimore at Pittsburgh (-41/2), 8:30
Oakland at Kansas City (-4), 1
San Francisco at Houston (-3), 1
Minnesota (-3) at Carolina, 1
Chicago at Cincinnati (-6), 1
Green Bay (-3) at Cleveland, 1
Detroit at Tampa Bay (OFF), 1
Indianapolis at Buffalo (OFF), 1
Dallas (-41/2) at N.Y. Giants, 1
Tennessee (-3) at Arizona, 4:05
N.Y. Jets (-11/2) at Denver, 4:05
Seattle at Jacksonville (-21/2), 4:25
Philadelphia at L.A. Rams (-21/2), 4:25
31
23
H I GH S C HOOLS
Knicks 99, Grizzlies 88
MEMPHIS ........................... 32
NEW YORK ......................... 23
17
26
18
27
21 — 88
23 — 99
MEMPHIS: Brooks 0-2 0-0 0, Green 2-7 0-0 6, Gasol 5-12
6-7 17, Evans 4-13 4-5 15, McLemore 1-2 0-0 2, Ennis III
2-3 2-2 7, Parsons 5-9 0-0 13, Martin 4-6 0-0 9, Davis 0-1
0-0 0, Harrison 1-6 3-4 5, Chalmers 5-9 3-4 14. Totals
29-70 18-22 88.
NEW YORK: Porzingis 8-19 0-0 18, Thomas 2-2 3-3 8,
Kanter 4-10 4-4 12, Jack 3-5 4-6 10, Lee 10-17 0-0 24,
McDermott 2-4 0-0 5, Dotson 0-0 0-0 0, Beasley 5-7 3-4
14, O’Quinn 0-0 0-2 0, Ntilikina 1-3 6-8 8. Totals 35-67
20-27 99.
Three-point Goals: Memphis 12-28 (Evans 3-7, Parsons
3-7, Green 2-3, Ennis III 1-1, Martin 1-1, Chalmers 1-2,
Gasol 1-4, Brooks 0-1, Harrison 0-2), New York 9-14 (Lee
4-6, Porzingis 2-3, Thomas 1-1, Beasley 1-1, McDermott
1-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Memphis 27 (Gasol
8), New York 42 (Kanter 12). Assists: Memphis 14
(Harrison 5), New York 22 (Jack 10). Total Fouls:
Memphis 24, New York 21. Technicals: Jack, Porzingis. A:
19,812 (19,812).
BOYS' BASKETBALL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Wednesday, Oct. 25: New York 4, at Chicago 0
Thursday, Oct. 26: Columbus 0, at Atlanta 0, Columbus
advanced 3-1 on penalty kicks
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Wednesday, Oct. 25: at Vancouver 5, San Jose 0
Thursday, Oct. 26: at Houston 1, Sporting KC 0, OT
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Home-and-home
FIRST LEG
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Monday, Oct. 30: Toronto 2, at New York 1
Tuesday, Oct. 31: at Columbus 4, New York City FC 1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Sunday, Oct. 29: Vancouver 0, at Seattle 0, tie
Monday, Oct. 30: at Houston 0, Portland 0, tie
SECOND LEG
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Sunday, Nov. 5: New York 1, at Toronto 0; 2-2 aggregate;
Toronto advanced on 1-0 away goals
Sunday, Nov. 5: at New York City FC 2, Columbus 0,
Columbus advanced on 4-3 aggregate
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Thursday, Nov. 2: at Seattle 2, Vancouver 0, Seattle
advanced on 2-0 aggregate
Sunday, Nov. 5: at Portland 1, Houston 2, Houston
advanced on 2-1 aggregate
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
Home-and-home
EASTERN CONFERENCE
FIRST LEG
Tuesday, Nov. 21: Toronto 0, at Columbus 0, tie
SECOND LEG
Wednesday Nov. 29: at Toronto 1, Columbus 0, Toronto
advances on 1-0 aggregate
WESTERN CONFERENCE
FIRST LEG
Tuesday, Nov. 21: Seattle 2, at Houston 0
SECOND LEG
Thursday, Nov. 30: at Seattle 3, Houston 0, Seattle
advances on 5-0 aggregate
MLS CUP
Saturday’s match: Seattle at Toronto, 4
THE TOP 10
MARYLAND
Friendship Tech 72, Westlake 48
SEED 66, Crossland 57
VIRGINIA
Annandale 54, Jefferson 52
Freedom-South Riding 72, Rock Ridge 48
South Lakes 77, Battlefield 70
PRIVATE
Field 43, Model 32
Georgetown Prep 62, Good Counsel 52
McNamara 94, The Heights 36
Paul VI 87, O'Connell 73
Severn School 73, Chapelgate Christian 47
St. Andrew's 72, Baltimore Friends 47
St. John's 51, Carroll 37
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
Albany (NY) 84, Bryant 68
Binghamton 71, Army 66
Buffalo 75, Delaware 72
Duquesne 73, Stetson 59
George Washington 71, Princeton 60
Harvard 47, Fordham 45
Hofstra 85, Monmouth (NJ) 84
Marist 78, Colgate 76
Penn 73, Lafayette 68
Providence 77, Brown 72, OT
Robert Morris 78, Rider 75
St. Peter’s 76, Houston Baptist 74
Temple 59, Wisconsin 55
Towson 82, Morgan St. 78, OT
UMBC 81, Delaware St. 60
UMass 64, Holy Cross 50
Yale 86, Lehigh 77
SOUTH
Alabama 68, Rhode Island 64
Auburn 80, Gardner-Webb 55
Coastal Carolina 85, Hampton 81
Florida St. 96, Loyola (Md.) 71
Louisville 86, Siena 60
Loyola of Chicago 65, Florida 59
Middle Tennessee 66, Vanderbilt 63
Navy 70, Coppin St. 53
North Carolina 104, W. Carolina 61
Old Dominion 79, Richmond 60
South Carolina 80, Wyoming 64
Stephen F. Austin 85, Louisiana Tech 83
Tulane 95, Southern U. 76
Virginia Tech 95, Radford 68
William & Mary 77, George Mason 70
Wofford 63, Georgia Tech 60
MIDWEST
Akron 83, Fort Wayne 79
Dayton 79, Tennessee Tech 66
E. Michigan 95, Oakland 89
Green Bay 59, E. Illinois 57
Ill.-Chicago 76, UW-Parkside 48
Illinois 64, Austin Peay 57
Saint Louis 74, S. Illinois 69
South Dakota 93, Drake 65
Toledo 89, Detroit 86
W. Illinois 69, American U. 56
W. Michigan 78, Cleveland St. 67
Xavier 96, Kent St. 70
SOUTHWEST
Houston 88, Fairfield 66
North Texas 79, Indiana St. 76, OT
Texas State 100, McMurry 50
FAR WEST
Abilene Christian 62, Air Force 58
BYU 80, Illinois St. 68
N. Arizona 79, San Diego Christian 70
S. Utah 94, Long Beach St. 89
Utah Valley 83, Weber St. 56
Ice hockey
Gonzaga sophomore Cole Vallese, who has orally committed to Providence, has three goals and three assists
as the Eagles (3-1-1) have beaten DeMatha and Churchill
in the early going. . . . Between Nov. 10 and Dec. 2,
DeMatha (7-2-1) opened the season with 10 games in 22
days, including a 3-2 win over Peter's Township, which
won the Pennsylvania AAA state title last season. . . .
Churchill has won three straight Maryland Student
Hockey League titles, but this winter it must replace 30
goals and 24 assists from All-Met forward Andrew
Kurapov. . . . Wootton junior John Billingsley has scored
eight goals in three games this season. . . . All records
from last year.
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
DISTRICT
Anacostia 62, Carroll 47
Cardozo 51, Paul Public Charter 10
MARYLAND
Atholton 61, DuVal 30
Douglass 43, Marriotts Ridge 39
Gwynn Park 58, St. Charles 45
VIRGINIA
George Mason 44, Yorktown 29
Jefferson 58, Annandale 32
Loudoun County 51, Musselman (W.Va.) 44
Madison 44, Marshall 40
South Lakes 61, Battlefield 34
PRIVATE
Good Counsel 63, Elizabeth Seton 55
Jewish Day 42, Model 24
McNamara 71, St. Frances 59
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 49, Sandy Spring 26
Wrestling
MARYLAND
Springbrook 81, Kennedy 0
B OY S ’ B A S K E TB A L L
TOP 20
NO. 6 ST. JOHN'S 51, CARROLL 37
SJ (2-1) Morsell 15, Wood 10, Maddox 9, Leggett 8,
Abbott 3, Hunt 2, Dunn 2, Savage 2 Totals 16 7-8 51.
AC (1-1) Mohammed 21, Perkins Cross 8, Barnes 4, Izay
2, Muhammad 1, Keyes 1 Totals 11 6-11 37.
Halftime: St. John's, (22-15).
Three-point goals: AC 3 (Perkins Cross 2, Mohammed 1);
SJ 4 (Wood 1, Leggett 1, Abbott 1, Maddox 1).
CONFERENCE 22
FREEDOM-SOUTH RIDING 72, ROCK RIDGE 48
Radford (4-4)
Polite 5-9 5-7 15, Phillips 2-5 2-2 6, Bradford 2-7 1-1 5,
Hicks 0-3 0-0 0, Cousin 2-5 1-1 6, Holland 4-5 1-1 9, Butts
0-0 0-0 0, Owens 1-1 0-0 2, Bolstad 1-1 0-0 2, Cooper 0-1
0-0 0, Jones 3-8 3-4 9, Saunders 0-0 0-0 0, Fields 2-5 0-0
4, Tanner 2-5 4-4 10. 24-55 Totals 17-20 68.
Virginia Tech (8-1)
Blackshear 4-6 11-11 20, Hill 3-6 2-2 9, Alexander-Walker 1-3 7-9 9, Robinson 5-6 1-2 11, Bibbs 8-10 0-0 20,
Fullard 0-0 0-0 0, Horne 2-5 0-1 4, Bede 3-5 0-0 6,
Ammerman 0-0 0-2 0, Jackson 2-4 2-2 6, Wilson 2-3 0-0
5, Clarke 1-2 2-2 5. Totals 31-50 25-31 95.
Halftime: Virginia Tech 47-30. Three-point goals: Radford 3-20 (Tanner 2-5, Cousin 1-4, Hicks 0-1, Jones 0-2,
Fields 0-2, Bradford 0-3, Polite 0-3), Virginia Tech 8-15
(Bibbs 4-5, Clarke 1-1, Blackshear 1-1, Wilson 1-2, Hill
1-4, Bede 0-1, Jackson 0-1). Fouled out: Holland.
Rebounds: Radford 23 (Polite 8), Virginia Tech 28
(Wilson, Blackshear 6). Assists: Radford 10 (Polite 5),
Virginia Tech 12 (Robinson 9). Total fouls: Radford 21,
Virginia Tech 17. Technical fouls: Jackson. A: 7,265
(10,052).
Navy 70, Coppin State 53
Navy (8-3)
Lacey 5-8 3-5 13, Wieck 1-3 0-0 2, Anderson 3-7 1-3 7,
Abdullah 3-8 3-5 10, Dulin 6-12 0-1 13, Riemersma 0-0
0-0 0, Kiernan 7-11 0-0 17, C.Davis 1-2 0-0 3, Mathis 0-0
0-0 0, Antonelli 0-0 0-0 0, Fox 1-1 1-2 3, Pearson 0-0 2-2
2. 27-52 Totals 10-18 70.
Coppin St. (0-9)
Council 3-8 1-2 8, Traore 1-6 1-2 3, Drummond 0-2 0-0 0,
K.Davis 6-13 3-3 18, Morgan 2-6 0-0 6, Simpson 0-0 0-0 0,
Andrews-Fulton 1-2 4-4 6, Thomas 1-5 0-0 3, Fair 3-7 0-0
9, Brownlee 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 17-50 9-11 53.
Halftime: Navy 35-14. Three-point goals: Navy 6-19
(Kiernan 3-7, C.Davis 1-1, Abdullah 1-5, Dulin 1-5,
Anderson 0-1), Coppin St. 10-28 (Fair 3-7, K.Davis 3-7,
Morgan 2-6, Council 1-2, Thomas 1-3, Traore 0-1,
Drummond 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Navy 31
(Anderson 7), Coppin St. 28 (Council 5). Assists: Navy 14
(Abdullah, Dulin 4), Coppin St. 11 (K.Davis 6). Total
fouls: Navy 12, Coppin St. 19. A: 1,462 (4,100).
RR (3-1)Totals 0 0-0 48.
F-SR (3-1) Collins 16, Johnson 12, Shrestha 10, Cofield
10, Westfall 8, Green 5, Moore 3, Skinner 2, Azzouz 2,
Scruggs 2, Sohn 1, Kemmerer 1 Totals 19 10-16 72.
Halftime: Freedom-South Riding, (34-23).
Three-point goals: F-SR 8 (Collins 3, Green 1, Shrestha 2,
Johnson 1, Cofield 1).
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
Albany (NY) 62, Manhattan 56
Boston College 70, Holy Cross 61
Brown 102, Sacred Heart 77
Columbia 94, St. Francis (Pa.) 81
Delaware 70, Army 59
Duquesne 73, Toledo 54
Hartford 68, CCSU 52
Harvard 79, Northeastern 69
Lehigh 64, NJIT 50
Marist 64, Rhode Island 42
Penn St. 65, Fordham 60
Princeton 53, Lafayette 45
Quinnipiac 62, Providence 36
Rider 76, La Salle 55
Robert Morris 65, Delaware St. 42
St. Francis Brooklyn 64, Loyola (Md.) 47
Syracuse 79, Colgate 39
Villanova 73, Fairfield 44
Yale 77, Stony Brook 71
SOUTH
Elon 75, Davidson 58
James Madison 58, Liberty 47
Marshall 73, Morgan St. 68
Maryland 97, Mount St. Mary’s 57
Mercer 61, George Washington 44
Navy 76, Richmond 56
Ohio St. 103, Florida 77
Tennessee 131, Troy 69
VCU 68, Old Dominion 39
Virginia Tech 90, Md.-Eastern Shore 52
MIDWEST
Bowling Green 63, Xavier 53
Cleveland St. 71, Ohio 64
Iowa 61, Iowa St. 55
Kansas St. 70, Texas-Arlington 56
Miami (Ohio) 96, IUPUI 83
N. Illinois 80, Loyola of Chicago 71
Nebraska 66, Kansas 49
Notre Dame 90, Michigan St. 59
S. Dakota St. 67, Oklahoma 61
Wisconsin 82, Rio Grande 54
SOUTHWEST
Houston Baptist 74, Paul Quinn College 54
Texas A&M 71, TCU 58
FAR WEST
Colorado 70, Colorado St. 67
New Mexico 90, Texas Tech 56
Utah St. 76, BYU 69
No. 15 Maryland 97,
Mount St. Mary's 57
Maryland (8-2)
Jones 6-11 4-6 16, Charles 6-11 4-9 16, Confroy 6-10 0-0
16, Lewis 2-8 1-2 6, Watson 5-9 0-0 13, Ellison 2-2 1-2 5,
Myers 1-5 2-2 4, Small 10-19 1-1 21, 38-75 Totals 13-22
97.
MOUNT ST. MARY'S ............ 6 17 14 20
—57
MARYLAND ........................ 37 17 21 22
—97
Three-point goals: Mount St. Mary’s 6-17 (Dickson 2-3,
Lawless 0-1, Sullivan 0-5, White 2-5, Birkhead 2-3),
Maryland 8-19 (Confroy 4-6, Lewis 1-5, Watson 3-6,
Myers 0-2). Assists: Mount St. Mary’s 12 (Dickson 4),
Maryland 20 (Watson 7). Fouled out: None. Rebounds:
Mount St. Mary’s 31 (Dickson 6), Maryland 47 (Jones 9).
Total fouls: Mount St. Mary’s 16, Maryland 13. A: 3,490.
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Team
Damascus
Battlefield
Robinson
St. John's
Huntingtown
Woodbridge
St. Mary's Ryken
Spalding
Leonardtown
Glenelg
Record
25-0
6-3
17-0
13-4
31-3
19-4
30-15
9-11
27-2
27-3
H OC K E Y
EASTERN CONFERENCE
BF (0-1)Totals 0 0-0 47.
SA (3-1) Bligen 17, Lewis 16, Nwosu 13, Williams 9,
Smalls 8, Davis 4, Merringoff 4, Goldstock 1 Totals 21
12-20 72.
Halftime: St. Andrew's, (29-13).
Three-point goals: SA 6 (Bligen 1, Lewis 3, Smalls 1,
Williams 1).
FRIENDSHIP TECH 72, WESTLAKE 48
W (0-1)Totals 0 0-0 48.
FT (3-0) Miller 32, Tyree 18, Dupree 7, Mcclary 6, Love 5,
Barnes 2 Totals 23 15-18 72.
Halftime: Friendship Tech, (24-18).
Three-point goals: FT 3 (Tyree 1, Miller 1, Love 1).
SEED 66, CROSSLAND 57
C (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 57.
S (2-0) Marr 25, Clark 15, Simmons 14, Riley 12 Totals 16
19-22 66.
Halftime: Crossland, (27-25).
Three-point goals: S 5 (Riley 1, Marr 3, Clark 1).
MCNAMARA 94, THE HEIGHTS 36
BM (3-0) Taylor 16, Marshall 15, Butler 14, Kirkland 11,
Smith 10, Smith 6, Williams 5, Rounds 4, Bell 4, Moore 3,
Cheek 2, Wilkins 2, Womack 2 Totals 34 11-16 94.
TH (0-3)Totals 0 0-0 36.
Halftime: McNamara, (52-18).
Three-point goals: BM 5 (Williams 1, Smith 2, Kirkland
2)
SOUTH LAKES 77, BATTLEFIELD 70
SL (5-0) Savage 18, Aghayere 14, Saunders 12, Johnson
11, Powers 10, Krukowski 6, Adams 4, Dagbe 2 Totals 18
17-34 77.
B (3-1) Pagon 8, Terry 7, Henry 3 Totals 7 1-5 70.
Halftime: South Lakes, (38-29).
Three-point goals: B 1 (Henry 1); SL 8 (Johnson 2,
Saunders 4, Savage 1, Powers 1)
METROPOLITAN
W
New Jersey ................... 16
Columbus ...................... 17
Washington .................. 17
N.Y. Islanders ............... 16
Pittsburgh ..................... 15
N.Y. Rangers ................. 15
Carolina ......................... 11
x-Philadelphia ................. 9
L
7
10
11
9
11
10
10
11
OL PTS. GF
4
36 84
1
35 80
1
35 90
2
34 101
3
33 86
2
32 91
5
27 72
7
25 75
GA
81
70
86
92
95
81
80
83
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay .................... 19
Toronto ......................... 18
Montreal ....................... 13
Boston ........................... 12
Detroit .......................... 11
x-Ottawa ......................... 9
Florida ........................... 10
Buffalo ............................ 7
L
6
10
13
9
12
10
13
17
OL PTS. GF
2
40 101
1
37 101
3
29 81
4
28 69
5
27 79
6
24 74
4
24 79
4
18 60
GA
69
85
90
73
91
86
93
96
W
18
18
17
16
13
12
12
L
7
8
7
11
11
11
12
OL PTS.
3
39
2
38
4
38
1
33
3
29
5
29
2
26
GF
92
92
95
86
80
84
81
GA
80
75
76
81
82
79
86
PACIFIC
W
Los Angeles .................. 18
Vegas ............................ 17
Vancouver ..................... 14
San Jose ........................ 14
Calgary .......................... 14
x-Anaheim .................... 11
x-Edmonton .................. 11
Arizona ........................... 7
L
8
9
10
10
12
11
14
18
OL PTS.
3
39
1
35
4
32
2
30
2
30
6
28
2
24
5
19
GF GA
90 63
94 85
78 77
66 61
81 90
75 86
78 92
73 104
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
Nashville .......................
St. Louis ........................
Winnipeg ......................
Dallas ............................
Minnesota .....................
Chicago .........................
Colorado ........................
x-Late game
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
TOP 20
GOOD COUNSEL 63,
NO. 12 ELIZABETH SETON 55
GC (2-0)Totals 0 0-0 63.
ES (1-2) Cater 13, Wilson 12, Gray 9, Clayborne 9,
Lonergan 6, Addison 4, Brown 2 Totals 20 6-18 55.
Halftime: Good Counsel, (26-20).
Three-point goals: ES 3 (Wilson 3).
NO. 20 MCNAMARA 71, ST. FRANCES 59
SF (0-1)Totals 0 0-0 59.
BM (2-0) Brown-Turner 29, Matharu 19, King 10, Gibson
6, Bell 5, Evans 2 Totals 17 19-23 71.
Halftime: McNamara, (34-29).
Three-point goals: BM 6 (Brown-Turner 4, Bell 1, Gibson
1).
NONLEAGUE
ST. STEPHEN'S/ST. AGNES 49,
SANDY SPRING 26
SSSA (3-1) Holland 20, Griffin 12, Frazier 7, Chamberlain
6, Harding 2, Burke 2 Totals 22 5-7 49.
SS (1-2) Clouse 9, Fenton 7, Brown 6, Baylinson 3,
Broadway 1 Totals 5 10-19 26.
Halftime: St. Stephen's/St. Agnes, (22-9).
Three-point goals: SS 2 (Brown 2).
SOUTH LAKES 61, BATTLEFIELD 34
SL (2-1) Young 14, Benvenuti 10, Cotton 9, Smith 8,
Scott 7, Spears 6, Nielsen 3, Boffman 2, Somer 2 Totals
23 9-15 61.
B (0-2) Jenk 10, Turnbull 6, Beasley 6, Kanti 3, Walsh 2
Totals 10 4-7 34.
Halftime: South Lakes, (37-15).
Three-point goals: B 1 (Jenk 1); SL 2 (Benvenuti 1, Young
1)
CARDOZO 51, PAUL PUBLIC CHARTER 10
(0-1)Totals 0 0-0 10.
C (2-0) Ali 15, Jean 12, Manon-Pacheco 6, Matthews 6,
Ramos 4, Harris 4, Martinez 4 Totals 23 2-9 51.
Halftime: Cardozo, (21-9).
Three-point goals: C 1 (Ali 1).
JEFFERSON 58, ANNANDALE 32
A (0-3) Hatch 14, Reams 6, Yungner 6, Corcoran 4, Irvin 2
Totals 5 10-19 32.
J (1-3) Wilson 23, Brodnik 14, Kim 9, Kale 5, Matharoo 3,
Stewart 2, Trinh 2 Totals 15 13-18 58.
Halftime: Jefferson, (34-16). Three-point goals: J 5
(Wilson 2, Kim 3); A 4 (Reams 2, Yungner 2)
MADISON 44, MARSHALL 40
Mount St. Mary's (1-7)
Dickson 6-14 2-2 16, Hummell 5-9 2-3 12, Lawless 2-4 3-5
7, Sullivan 1-6 0-0 2, White 3-11 5-5 13, Lee 0-0 0-0 0,
Scheuvront 0-0 0-0 0, Birkhead 2-4 1-2 7, Rowson 0-4 0-0
0, Settle 0-3 0-0 0, 19-55 Totals 13-17 57.
Damascus loses just three starters from last season's
Maryland 4A/3A state title team. . . . Brandon Wittenberg, last season's Virginia 6A state champion at
113 pounds, leads a strong group of Battlefield returners
looking to assert their dominance atop the state. . . .
Robinson is confident it can build on last season's
second-place finish at the Virginia 6A state championships with three returning state finalists. . . . After
breaking through for its first Washington Catholic
Athletic Conference title since 1979 a year ago, St. John's
will have a new-look lineup with eight starters gone. . . .
King Sandoval, a three-time all-American 120-pounder,
aims to lead St. Mary's Ryken to a WCAC title as a senior.
. . . Seven Glenelg wrestlers captured individual titles at
last season's Howard County championships, and six of
them are back. . . . All records from last year.
NHL
NONLEAGUE
ST. ANDREW'S 72, BALTIMORE FRIENDS 47
GI R L S ’ B A S K E TBALL
NCAA women
Record
23-9
26-10-2
20-2-3
11-10-1
11-8-1
11-1-1
11-5
15-9-2
12-1
11-2
THE TOP 10
WRESTLING
Virginia Tech 95, Radford 68
Team
Gonzaga
DeMatha
Churchill
O’Connell
Landon
Broad Run
Wootton
Georgetown Prep
West Potomac
Stone Bridge
M (1-1) Sharon 13, Conforti 8, Brusch 7, Makrigiorgos 6,
Miskell 5, Glowasky 5 Totals 10 6-12 44.
M (4-0) Ford 11, Trivisonno 8, Soule 7, Dirkse 6, Grill 4,
South 4 Totals 15 7-15 40.
Halftime: Madison, (16-15). Three-point goals: M 1
(Soule 1); M 6 (Miskell 1, Glowasky 1, Sharon 4)
New Jersey 4, at Columbus 1
at Tampa Bay 6, N.Y. Islanders 2
N.Y. Rangers 4, at Pittsburgh 3
at Detroit 5, Winnipeg 1
St. Louis 4, at Montreal 3
Nashville 5, at Dallas 2
Buffalo 4, at Colorado 2
at Vegas 4, Anaheim 3 (SO)
at Los Angeles 5, Minnesota 2
at Vancouver 3, Carolina 0
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
at Washington 6, Chicago 2
at Toronto 2, Calgary 1 (SO)
Philadelphia at Edmonton, Late
Ottawa at Anaheim, Late
THURSDAY’S GAMES
N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7
Arizona at Boston, 7
Colorado at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Winnipeg at Florida, 7:30
Calgary at Montreal, 7:30
Dallas at St. Louis, 8
Philadelphia at Vancouver, 10
Ottawa at Los Angeles, 10:30
Carolina at San Jose, 10:30
FRIDAY’S GAMES
N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 7
Columbus at New Jersey, 7
Vegas at Nashville, 8
Buffalo at Chicago, 8:30
Minnesota at Anaheim, 10
SATURDAY’S GAMES
St. Louis at Detroit, 1
Edmonton at Montreal, 7
Colorado at Florida, 7
Winnipeg at Tampa Bay, 7
Arizona at Columbus, 7
N.Y. Islanders at Boston, 7
Toronto at Pittsburgh, 7
New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Vegas at Dallas, 8
Ottawa at San Jose, 10
Vancouver at Calgary, 10
Carolina at Los Angeles, 10:30
Maple Leafs 2, Flames 1 (SO)
CALGARY ........................... 1
TORONTO .......................... 0
0
1
0
0
0 — 1
0 — 2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Calgary, Giordano 4 (Brouwer, Monahan),
10:37 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
GEORGE MASON 44, YORKTOWN 29
Scoring: 2, Toronto, Rielly 4, 18:47.
GM (3-1) Short 15, Lacroix 10, Hirsch 8, Bloomgarden 7,
Rund 2, Douglas 2 Totals 14 10-13 44.
Y (2-1) Shipley 21, Hemstreet 1 Totals 5 6-13 29.
Halftime: George Mason, (21-15).
Three-point goals: Y 2 (Shipley 2); GM 2 (Lacroix 2)
SHOOTOUT
GWYNN PARK 58, ST. CHARLES 45
SHOTS ON GOAL
SC (0-1)Totals 0 0-0 45.
GP (1-0) Dublin 18, Bowman 16, Landon 12, Dale 5,
Cardwell 5, Harkley 2 Totals 14 15-28 58.
Halftime: Gwynn Park, (30-26).
Three-point goals: GP 5 (Landon 3, Dublin 2).
CALGARY ......................... 14
12
17
5 — 48
TORONTO ........................ 12
9
7
1 — 29
Power-play opportunities: Calgary 1 of 2; Toronto 0 of 4.
Goalies: Calgary, Smith 12-9-1 (29 shots-28 saves).
Toronto, Andersen 15-8-1 (48-47). T: 2:52.
Calgary 1 (Monahan NG, Tkachuk G, Gaudreau NG,
Backlund NG), Toronto 2 (Matthews G, Marner NG,
Marleau NG, Nylander G).
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for Christmas! 3.2 L, 6-SPD man.
Lots of features, tons of fun!
718-909-5809
1405
1405
Cars
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
EZ
CARS • TRUCKS • SUVS & MORE
Cars
NISSAN
NISSAN 2006 MURANO -white, 4DR,
4x4, 144k mi, excellent cond, fully
loaded, automatic. $3800 or best
offer. 703-891-7396
1405
1405
Cars
TOYOTA
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Cars
SF
TOYOTA 2015 TACOMA- Like new,
still has plastic on the inside, only
2k miles, burgundy, $24,000.
Call 703-597-6460
1405
1405
Cars
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Cars
TOYOTA 2004 AVALON XL,
91,000 miles, silver, MD
inspect,some body damage
$3800. Call 240-372-5282
1447
Autos Wanted
1447
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2017
Autos Wanted
DONATE VEHICLES. Your donation
trains disadvantaged at-risk youths
in auto repairs, also provides vehicle donations to low-income families. Tax-deductible. MVA License#
8000113006823. 301-355-9333
www.auted.org
1447
Autos Wanted
DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S.
LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your
donation helps local families with
food, clothing, shelter, counseling.
Tax deductible. MVA License
#W1044. 410-636-0123 or
www.LutheranMissionSociety.org
EFGHI
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rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
dogs, cats, birds, fish
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apartments.com
washingtonpost.com/
merchandise
washingtonpost.com/pets
To place an ad, go to washingtonpostads.com
355
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
820
Garage Sales, VA
Antiques & Collectibles—3225
Rhode Island Avenue
Mount Rainer, Maryland 20712 Friday & Saturday 12 Noon to 5pm
202-679-0033
360
Estate Sales
Fairfax, VA - 4316 Chancery Park Dr.
Fri- Sun, 10-3. Full House Sale
www.caringtransitionsnova.com
for pics and details.
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them 610
away. Call 571-830-5871
Akita—Newborn Puppies w/ Papers
208
423-605-1178. For More
information, Please Visit:
http://www.proteakennel.com
BISSELL CARPET CLEANER—$25
USED BUT WORKS WELL. AlexanCORSO MIXED PUPPIES 9 weeks old,
dria, VA, 703-941-8206
3 females, 1 male, multi-colors,
HOOVER UPRIGHT VACUUM CLEAN- S/W. Ready to go. $200. Hyattsville.
ER—$25 EXTRA BAGS - Alexandria,
Call Mark 240-460-7009
VA, 703-941-8206
KIRBY Generation Vacuum Clean- french bulldog—akc reg. $3300, m/f,
er—$135 Excel'nt Cond, HEPA fil- 6 wks, some ready to go now other
ready at Christmas time. 540-671tration, Cost $1300. 571-606-0319
9215, owensbullies.webs.com
Dogs for Sale
Appliances
Art
Aluminium Easel—$15.00
Tripod
Telescopic legs. 65" Hgt.. Excellent
cond.rockville 202-215-6644
CaribDomain - NY Fashion Meets DC
Fashion 2017—Holiday Gala at the
Newton White Mansion December
16, 2017 at 6 PM hosted by
Celebrity Jacinth Headlam.
Goldendoodle—$1250, M/F, Health
tested parents, raised underfoot w
kids/cats, gorgeous creams and
reds, ready for xmas 443-480-7572
GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES
AKC, both parents on site, shots &
vet checked. Will be ready Dec 4.
$1000. Call 540-820-0967
Books, Music & Movies
IMPORTED GERMAN SHEPARDSDeclutter Calendar (2018) —$39 ready now. black and tan, champ
Declutter your home using this. blood lines, european papers, 1 M, 1
Fun! N. Beth, MD 240-246-5405
F, med coats $2500 ea703-953-8404
How To Have Your Best Christmas
Ever (book)—$15
"emotional
Cinnabon!" Beth. MD 2402465405
225
Collectibles
AURORA SLOT CARS Wanted—$100
& up, cars/sets. +Atlas, AFX, Tyco,
Cox, Revell, AMT. 703-960-3594
CASSEROLE DISH—$20
VINTAGE.
GREEN/WHITE.
Alexandria, VA,
703-941-8206
CHRISTMAS VILLAGE—$75 4 LARGE
YULETIDE
CERAMIC
HOUSES.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
MOTOROLA RADIO - VINTAGE IN CABINET—$20
DOES NOT WORK.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
TEDDY BEAR TEA SET—$20 VINTAGE
MINIATURE PORCELAIN Alexandria,
VA, 703-941-8206
VERSAILLES MEMOIRS—$75 12 VOL
EXCELLENT COLLECTORS ITEM.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
229
Clothing, Shoes
& Accessories
Men's Cowboy Boots Size 10.5 Like
New—$45.00, Springfield, VA, 571225-5123
St John Knits & Mink Coats—A large
supply of St John Knits
A large supply of Mink Coats
6341 Old Branch Ave,
Camp Springs, Md. 202 320-9301
December 8& 9, 2pm-8pm
237
Firewood
GET READY FOR WINTER! 1 cord $200
2 cords $380. 3 cords $580.
4 cords $600. Call 703-357-2180
JACK RUSSELL PUPS - Smooth,
Broken & rough NKC reg $800. S/W.
Ready now. Donna 301-751-0892
djackrussells@gmail.com
Lab Pups—AKC Chocolate and Yellow
Guaranteed, wormed/1st shot.
Socialized w/kids, 703-203-0702,
540-825-4688, belgianwayfarm.com
Newfoundland—Puppies
Gentle Giants, loving and loyal. Exp.
Breeder. $1,500. 757-617-3932
Purebred Pups—Multiple Breeds.
$700-$1500, m/f, 2-12 weeks old,
now 4 xmas or deposits, white
huskies, panda german shepards,
mini pinschers, poodles, doodles
(lab, goldens & border) some akc,
dewormed, 1st shot. 240-626-9749
ROTTWEILER PUPS AKC, German,
1st shots,, tails docked, hlth guar.,
P.O.P. ready now. Loc in Ruther Glen,
VA. Call /text 210-584-8896
ROTTWEILER PUP - 7 month old
female, playful & energetic,
AKC reg. Must sell to good home.
$1,000. Call 703-221-1593
Shichon—$750, Male, 9 wks, 703472-8760. Home raised. Vaccinated,
dewormed, vet checked. Includes
health warranty, rehoming policy.
Shih Tzu/Bichon—ShiChon TeddyBear Puppies ready for Christmas.
Raised in loving home, local VA 5yr
Fitbit—$100, washington, DC, 630- Health warr 703-577-1069 $750 up
220-4114 popular gadget:great gift!
9wks www.DCDogFinders.com
245
Electronics
Therapy Lamp—NatureBright Light
and Ion Therapy Lamp $33, Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
255
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
POLARIS 500 EFI RANGER 4X4—
$249, Yakima, WA, 563-484-0051
NICE UTV, ONLY 219 HRS
260
Furniture
Student Desk & Chair—$55 24x42
top with drawers, v/good cond.
roller chair, 301-345-1693
265
Home & Garden
Area Rug — $249, 6.7x9.6 reds,
greens, browns, plums. Burke, VA,
703-250-1159
SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPPIES- ACA
reg., blue eyes! perfect xmas gift!
ready for your love, Dec. 18th23rd, health guar., 717-377-3569
Standard Poodle—AKC, $950, M/F, 8
wks, Cr/wh & Red/wh parti, raised
underfoot w dogs, cats, kids. Health
tested parents, 443-480-7572.
BRICK—$249 550 New 10 Hole Bldg
Size, less or more if need (apprx
1500) .45 each, 301-345-1693
WHEATEN PUPS- 8 wks,prebred,
"meet the parents!" soft,no shed,
crt/ppr trnd, home bred, fab, 1.5yr
Car seats—Generic infant $33 or F&M Fursonality.com 540-286-0633
Graco child car seat $44 (70 both)
YORKIE PUPPIES - AKC,
Alexandria, VA 571431-1501
vet checked, shots, wormedhome
raised, parents on premises. 9
CERAMIC WALL HANGING 2 PC
SET—$40 . NO CHIPS. PICS CALL weeks old. $750. Call 540-421-2684
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
CUTLERY SET—$15 KUCHESTOLZ 6
PC SET W/CUTTING BOARD. NEW.
Alexandria VA, 703-941-8206
DISHES—$50 CUNNINGHAMPICKETT
SPRINGVIOLET 6 PLATES/1 PLATTER. Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
TIGER STAINLESS STEEL THERMAL AIR
POT—$20 3.0 LITER HOT/COLD.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
815
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
VALERY ANDRIANARISANDY
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
KALINO VALERY MAKANI
FAMILY LAW: 149287FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
BONTEMPI ORGAN—$40
CHILD'S
SMALL
BATTERY
OPERATED
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Valery Anrianarisandy to Kalino Valery Makani.
The petitioner is seeking a name
change because: It was given from
someone that I have bad relationship with.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
22nd day of December, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 7th day of
December, 2017.
JUNIOR ZITHER—$20 CHILD'S EARLY
60'S HARBERT ITALIANA. ORIG BOX.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
269
Jewelry & Watches
NECKLACES
HANDCRAFTED—$10
UP. VARIETY
STYLES/COLORS.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
275
Merchandise Wanted
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
Old Bottles of Bourbon—50 Seeking
full/sealed bottles of vintage bourbon and rye. Alex 443-223-7669
Radio tubes—WANTED ham radios
huge speakers tube hif amps 202
527 9501, vcvdc@msn.com
280
284
Musical Instruments
Office & Business
Equipment
Medical office—$3975, Bethesda,
MD,
240-988-6885
ECG,phone
sys,steel chart racks,leather sofa &4
chairs, exam rm equip, misc.
291
Sporting Goods
& Services
FOLDING BIKE—$85 20" silver folding
bike in good shape, lv message,
301-345-1693
GOLF CLUB SET—$45 Set of clubs
with Spalding Bag, wood drivers,
also have golf shoes,301-345-1693
Nordic Track Exercise Skier—$50
Folds up for easy transport in your
car. Cost $800 new. 571-606-0319
PILATES POWER GYM—$120, Odenton,
MD,
443-871-4150
Paid $350 make offer must sell
SCUBAGEAR Large—$249
Wetsuit,Fins,Gloves,Boots,Mask/Snrkl,
Wght belt/wghts, 301-345-1693
295
Toys
TOMY TODDLIN TRAIN—$40 OLD.
RIDE ON. TOOTS. EXCELL COND..
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
350
Garage Sales, MD
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
CHAD PATRICK HENSON
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
CHAD HENSON MARTINS
FAMILY LAW: 149410FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Chad Patrick
Henson to Chad Henson Martins.
The petitioner is seeking a name
change because: Marriage to Raymond Catarine Martins
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
22nd day of December, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 7th day of
December, 2017.
Camp Springs—FURS, ST JOHN
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
SALE-6337 Old Branch Ave, Camp
Springs, MD, Pat's Secret Closet,
12/08-09/2017, 2-8 PM,
202-770-6871
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
815
Official Notices
MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF THE
ENVIRONMENT
WATER AND SCIENCE ADMINISTRATION
NOTICE OF TENTATIVE DETERMINATION
Montgomery County
Application for State Discharge Permit 16DP2520,
NPDES Permit MD0025496:
National Institutes of Health, Division of Environmental
Protection, Building 13, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 submitted an application to renew a permit to discharge an average
of 450,000 gallons per day of cooling tower and boiler
blowdown from a medical research facility, located at 9000
Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland, to an unnamed tributary
to Rock Creek (Use I waters).
The Department proposes to issue the permit with limits
on Outfall 001 of temperature difference (based on a 90
OF maximum), total residual chlorine (11 μg/l monthly
average and 19 μg/l daily maximum), pH (range 6.5 to
8.5), dissolved oxygen (5 mg/l daily minimum) and total
copper (16.2 μg/l monthly average and 26.0 μg/l daily
maximum), with a special condition to complete a chemical
translator for further consideration. A special condition
requires applications under the General Permit (12SW) for of
any industrial operations on campus.
If a written request is received by December 27, 2017,
a public hearing on the tentative determination for this
application can be scheduled. The request should be sent
to the Maryland Department of the Environment, Water
and Science Administration, 1800 Washington Blvd.,
Baltimore, Maryland 21230-1708, Attn.: Michael
Richardson, Chief, Industrial and General Permits Division and must include the name, address and telephone
number (home and work) of the person making the request,
the name of any other party whom the person making the
request may represent, and the name of the facility and
permit number. Failure to request a hearing by December
27, 2017 will constitute a waiver of the right to a public
hearing on the tentative determination for this permit.
Written comments concerning the tentative determination
will be considered in the preparation of a final determination
if submitted to the Department, to the attention of Michael
Richardson at the above address, on or before January 8,
2018. Any hearing-impaired person who requests a hearing
may request an interpreter at the hearing by contacting
Mr. Richardson at (410) 537-3654 or 1-800-633-6101, or by
written request to the above address at least ten working
days prior to the scheduled hearing date.
Information supporting the tentative determination, including the draft permit and fact sheet, may be reviewed by
contacting Mr. Richardson at the above telephone number
to make an appointment or by written request to Mr.
Richardson at the above address. Copies of documents may
be obtained at a cost of $0.36 per page.
Labrador Retriever—AKC Yellow Eng
Labs, Vet raised, Good with kids, 815
OFA, Vax UTD, Champ sire,
540 239 1734, Delivery add charge
Mini Poodles Morkies Shorkies—Best
Priced Puppies. 304-904-6289, Cash,
CC, Easy Finance, wvpuppy.com
59 East Rd Martinsburg WV
820
Official Notices
815
Legal Notices
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
MINASSE TOLA
Plaintiff
v.
Case No. FL 143466
FIKIRTE ZELEKE
Defendant
IN THE MATTER OF
TAMARA ANNE STEFFE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
TAMARA ANNE ENGEL
FAMILY LAW: 149472FL
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
PUBLICATION NOTICE
Plaintiff filed a Complaint for Custody with the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland on April
5, 2017. The Complaint alleges:
Plaintiff is the father of YEBSER
TSEGAYE (DOB June 10, 2010) and
that the Defendant in the mother;
the Complaint further alleges that
the child lived with mother since his
birth, but that there is a strong bond
between father and child, and that
this bond should not be allowed
to be permanently destroyed by
Defendant; moreover, there is
already a child support order
against father since 2010; Plaintiff
seeks visitation and joint legal custody.
It is this 28th day of November,
2017.
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Montgomery County, Maryland,
that the Plaintiff cause a copy of
this Notice to be published at least
once a week for three consecutive
weeks in a newspaper of general
circulation published in Montgomery County, Maryland; publication to be completed by December
21st, 2017; Defendant must file a
response on or before January
22nd, 2018; Defendant is warned
that failure to file a response within
the time allowed may result in a
default judgment or granting of the
relief sought.
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Tamara Anne
Steffe to Tamara Anne Engel. The
petitioner is seeking a name change
because: Divorce - taking family
name.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
22nd day of December, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 7th day of
December, 2017.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court for
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
SUZANNA CATHERINE SCHAIRER
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
SCHAI BELAIR - TOUSSAINT
SCHAIRER
FAMILY LAW: 149168FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
IN THE MATTER OF
ZEVART TRENERY
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
ZEVART GHAZARIAN
FAMILY LAW: 149451FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Zevart Trenery
to Zevart Ghazarian. The petitioner
is seeking a name change because:
I would like to return to my former
married name.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
22nd day of December, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 7th day of
December, 2017.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Suzanna
Catherine Schairer to Schai BelairToussaint Schairer. The petitioner is
seeking a name change because:
I was adopted and never felt any
connection to my name that was
given to me.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
22nd day of December, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with
Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file
an objection or affidavit within the
time allowed my result in a
judgement by default or the grant of
the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 7th day of
December, 2017.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
TALBOT COUNTY, MARYLAND
Sitting as a Juvenile Court
IN THE PETITION AND GUARDIANSHIP WITH THE RIGHT TO CONSENT
TO ADOPTION OF
In The Matter of I.B.
IN THE MATTER OF
SARAH HAGOS AHMED
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
SARAH AHMED HAGOS
FAMILY LAW: 149380FL
Hagos Ahmed Aded
Petitioner
Respondent
Case No. C-20-JV-17-000025
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 21st
day of November, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Talbot County, Maryland.
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Sarah
Hagos Ahmed to Sarah Ahmed
Hagos. The petitioner is seeking
a name change because: The last
name switched up with the middle
name (wrong spot & too long).
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
22nd day of December, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
Petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed my result in a judgement
by default or the grant of the relief
sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 7th day of
December, 2017.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
SF
To: Sade Latrice Brown, mother
of an African American male child
born on July 9, 2008 in Washington, DC. The Talbot County Department of Social Services has filed a
Petition for Guardianship with the
Right to Consent To Adoption in
Case No. C-20-JV-17-000025. You
have to file a Notice of Objection
by Dec. 28, 2017 and mail it to
the Juvenile Clerk of the Circuit
Court for talbot County, Maryland
located at 11 N. Washington
Street, easton, Maryland 21601,
410-822-2611. If you fail to file a
Notice of Objection by Dec. 28,
2017, then you will have consented to the termination of your
parental rights. A copy of the Petition, Show Cause Order, Notice
of Objection and Notice of Filing
may be obtained from the Clerk of
the Circuit Court for Talbot County,
Maryland located at 11 N. Washington Street, Easton, Maryland
21601, 410-822-2611.
It is HEREBY ORDERED a copy of
this notice shall also be posted in
a designated place on the front
of the Talbot County Circuit Court.
11 N. Washington Street, Easton,
Maryland, until December 18,
2017..
Mary Ann Shortall
Clerk
Circuit Court for Talbot County,
Maryland
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x1
Antiques
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
ton VA, 12/09/2017, 8-1 CASH ONLY
215
EZ
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
Maywood—2911 N 23rd St, Arling-
210
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2017
the local expert
on local jobs
For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
205
CLASSIFIED
D8
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY
Case No. 439358-V
STATE ROADS COMMISSION OF THE
STATE HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION
Acting for and on behalf of the
STATE OF MARYLAND
Plaintiff
v.
MICHAEL T. KELLY
902 East University Boulevard
Silver Spring, MD 20903
ANY AND ALL KNOWN AND
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF JOSEPH J.
KELLY, DECEASED, IF LIVING; IF
DECEASED,
THEIR
RESPECTIVE
HEIRS, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES
AND ASSIGNS
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND
Executive Office Building,
Third Floor
101 Monroe Street
Rockville, MD 20850
SERVE ON:
Marc P. Hansen
County Attorney
Executive Office Building,
Third Floor
101 Monroe Street
Rockville, MD 20850
WASHINGTON SUBURBAN SANITARY
COMMISSION
14501 Sweitzer Lane
Laurel, Maryland 20707
SERVE ON:
Sheila Finlayson
Corporate Secretary
Front Foot Benefit Charges
14501 Sweitzer Lane, Suite 1240
Laurel, Maryland 20707
Defendants
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
PETITION NO. 439358-V
The object of this Complaint for
Condemnation is to acquire by condemnation that certain unimproved
property located in the Thirteenth
Election District of Montgomery
County, Maryland.
1. The State Highway Administration ("SHA") is a unit in the Department of Transportation, a principal
department of State Government,
Md. State Govn't Code Ann.§ 8-601
et seq.
2. There is a State Roads Commission ("SRC") in the SHA. Md. Trans.
Code § 8-210. The State Roads
Commission, after consultation
with and in cooperation with the
Maryland Transit Administration,
has the authority vested in it by
Article III, § 40B of the State Constitution to acquire for this State by
condemnation any private property
for any highway purpose under Md.
Trans. Code Ann. §§ 8-334 through
8-339 (Part IV. "Quick Take" Condemnation by Commission - Accelerated Procedure.). Md. Trans. Code
Ann. § 8-302 (b), § 8-334 (a).
3. The names of all persons with an
interest in the property sought to
be condemned ("subject property"),
and their respective interest in the
subject property are:
a. Michael T. Kelly is joined as a
party to these proceedings as the
only known heir of Joseph J. Kelly
who was the fee simple owner of
the subject property by virtue of
a deed dated June 9, 1972 and
recorded among the Land Records
of Montgomery County, Maryland,
in Liber No. 4225, folio 573, from
Belen A. Villaroman, also known as
Belan A. Villaroman unto Joseph J.
Kelly and Josephine Kelly as tenants
by the entirety. Josephine Kelly, to
the best of our knowledge and
belief, predeceased Joseph J. Kelly,
who died on or about April 4, 1989,
thereby vesting title in his heirs,
personal
representatives
and
assigns.
Plaintiff joins as parties herto all of
the unknown half and step siblings
of Michael T. Kelly having or claiming to have an interest in the subject
property known as 902 East University Boulevard, Silver Spring, MD
20903.
b. Montgomery County, Maryland.
The subject property is subject to
lien of real estate taxes levied by
and due Montgomery County, Maryland.
c. Washington Suburban Sanitary
Commission. The subject property
is subject to the lien of front foot
benefit charges levied by and due
the Washington Suburban Sanitary
Commission.
4. The subject property is located
in the Thirteenth Election District of
Montgomery County, in the State
of Maryland and is described as
SHA Item No. 900556/MTA Item No.
01681 on State Highway Administration Plat No. 59237 (Rev. 4/3/15)
("SHA Plat No. 59237 (Rev. 4/3/15)").
Pursuant to Md. Trans. Code Ann. §
8-321, and after consultation with
and in cooperation with the Maryland Transit Administration, SHA
Plat No. 59237 (Rev. 4/3/15) was
approved by the State Roads Commission by Resolution dated
December 2, 2015 and electronically recorded with the State Archives.
A reduced copy of SHA Plat No.
59237 (Rev. 4/3/15) is attached to
this Complaint and incorporated
herein by reference.
5. The intrest in the subject property
that the Plaintiff seeks to acquire
by the proposed condemnation is
shown
as
SHA
Item
No.
900556/MTA Item No. 01681 on SHA
Plat No. 59237 (Rev. 4/3/15),
described as follows:
a. TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION
EASEMENT. 494 square feet or
0.011 of an acre of land, more
or less, for a temporary easement
shown hatched thus //////, to be
used only during the period of construction for the purpose of fine
grading and erosion and sediment
control. At the termination of the
construction all rights acquired by
the State Highway Administration,
or its successors or assigns, shall
then terminate and revert to the
property owners.
6. The purpose for which the subject property is sought to be condemned is for the construction,
reconstruction,
improvement,
maintenance and completion of the
State System of Roads and Bridges
and designated as Maryland National Capital Purple Line in Montgomery County, Maryland.
7. That, after consultation with and
in cooperation with the Maryland
transit Administration, Plaintiff has
determined that there is a public
necessity that the subject property
be acquired by condemnation.
8. Plaintiff is unable to make an
agreement to purchase the subject
property, notwithstanding the fact
that Plaintiff has made a reasonable
and bona fide effort so to do.
9. That on March 17, 2016, pursuant
to Md. Trans. Code Ann. § 8-335,
Plaintiff deposited with the Cleerk
of the Circuit Court for Montgomery
County for thr use and benefit of
the Defendants in Case No. 416621V the sum of Two Thousand Fifty
and 00/100 Dollars ($2,050.00). This
sum deposited with the Clerk is
Plaintiff's estimate of the fair market value of the subject property
and damages, if any, done to Defendants' remaining property.
10. That contemporaneous with the
filing of this action, the monies
currently on deposit in Case No.
416621-V shall be docketed to the
benefit of the Defendants in this
Complaint for Condemnation.
IT IS THEREFORE ORDERED by the
Circuit Court for Montgomery County, this 20th day of November, 2017,
that Plaintiff by causing a copy of
this Order to be published in a
newspaper at least once a week
for three consecutive weeks in a
newspaper, Washington Post, of
general circulation published in
Montgomery County Maryland. This
shall give notice to any and all
persons having or claiming to have
an interest in and to the subject
property to appear in this Court,
in person or by attorney, or file
an answer to this Complaint on or
before the 20th day of December,
2017, and to answer, if any they
may have, why said property or said
Defendant's interest should not be
condemned as prayed in said Complaint.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk, Circuit Court for
Montgomery County
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
815
815
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY, MARYLAND
ANDREA O'BRIEN
Plaintiff
v.
Case No. 140599-FL
EDWARD O'BRIEN
Defendant
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
A Complaint for Absolute Divorce
was filed with the Circuit Court for
Montgomery County, Maryland on
November 14, 2016. The Complaint
alleges , in substance: that the parties were married in March 1997
in Howard County, Maryland; that
the Plaintiff has been a resident of
the State of Maryland for at least
one (1) year prior to the filing
of this Complaint; that the parties
voluntarily separated no later than
December 31, 1997, and have continued to live separate and apart
without cohabitation for more than
one year prior to the filing of the
Complaint, and there is no hope or
expectation of reconciliation; that
there are no property issues; and
that no children were born of the
marriage. Plaintiff requests an
Absolute Divorce.
It is this 8th day of November,
2017, ORDERED, that the Plaintiff
cause a copy of this Notice to be
published at least once a week
for four consecutive weeks in a
newspaper of general circulation
published in Washington, DC; publication to be completed by December 7th, 2017; Defendant must file
a response on or before January
8th, 2018; Defendant must file a
response on or before January 8th,
2018; Defendant is warned that failure to file a response within the
time allowed may result in a default
judgment or the granting of the
relief sought.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court for
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE
STATE OF CAROLINA
COUNTY OF PITT
SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION
BEFORE THE CLERK
FILE NO: 16SP 567
DAVID W. SILVER, Guardian of the
Estate For Charles Barber,
Petitioner
v.
Victoria Barber, Diane Barber, Jonah
Barber, Sara Blount, and Charles
Barber, Jr.
Respondents
NOTICE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS
BY PUBLICATION
To: Victoria Barber and Diane Barber
TAKE NOTICE that a pleading seeking relief against you has been filed
in the above entitled action. The
nature of the relief being sought is
as follows: the Petitioner is seeking
to sell Ward's property located at
967 Mizell St. and at W NC 55 Hwy,
New Bern, Craven Couty.
You are required to make defense
to such pleading no later than January 2, 2018, and upon your failure
to do so the party seeking service
against you will apply to the court
for the relief sought.
This the 29 day of November, 2017.
David W. Silver, Petitioner
NC Bar #24525
321 South Evans Street, Suite 200
Greenville, North Carolina 27858
Telephone: (252) 757-3535
Facsimile: (252) 757-3563
IN THE MATTER OF SALAY NATASHA
THOMAS FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO
SALAY NATASHA SINGH-DAVE
BY AND THROUGH HER MOTHER:
SUBRINA KERRY SINGH
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
BALTIMORE COUNTY
CIVIL No. 03-C-16-11062
NOTICE
FREE UNDER $250
815
Legal Notices
(DOM REL 65)
In the Superior Court of the
Virgin Islands Division of St.
Thomas and St. John Government Employees Retirement System of the Virgin Islands, Plaintiff,
vs. Kalaria La Verne Louis and
Dorene Browne-Louis, Defendants. Case No. ST-17-CV-355
Action for Interpleader Notice
to Serve by Publication To:
Dorene Browne-Louis Address:
14613 Cambridge Drive, Upper
Marlboro, MD 20772. You are
hereby summoned and required
to serve upon Government
Employees Retirement Systems,
Plaintiff’s
attorney,
whose
address is shown below, and
answer to the complaint which
is herewith served upon you,
within 20 days after service of
this summons upon you, exclusive of the day of service. If
you fail to do so, judgment by
default will be taken against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint. Give under my hand
and Seal of This Court this 7th
day of November, 2017. Estrella
H. George, Clerk of the Court, by
Donna D. Donovan, Court Clerk
Supervisor. Ishmael A. Meyers,
Jr., Attorney for Plaintiff, Government Employees Retirement System, 3438 Kronprindsens Gade,
Ste 1, St. Thomas, VI 00802-5750
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001293
JUNELLA M. GAINES AKA
JUNELLA MORRIS GAINES
PRO SE
MARY B. MAYNARD
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Freda D. Gaines, whose address is
424 Ingraham St. NW, Washington,
DC 20011, was appointed personal representative of the estate of
Junella M. Gaines aka Junella Morris
Gaines, who died on February 3,
2003 with a will and will serve
without Court supervision.
All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
June 7, 2018. Claims against the
decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before June 7,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001348
BEATRICE JOYNER
Stephen L. Watsky, Esq.
419 7th Street NW Suite 405
Washington, DC 20004
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Edwin John Joyner, whose address
is 1110 Quebec Street, Silver Spring,
MD 20903, was appointed personal representative of the estate of
Beatrice Joyner, who died on June
3, 2017 without a will and will
serve with Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
June 7, 2018. Claims against the
decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before June 7,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Edwin John Joyner
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001307
Notice is hereby given that a petition has been filed in this Court by
Scott Evely on behalf of Quicken
Loan Inc. for standard probate,
including the appointment of one
or more personal representatives.
Unless a responsive pleading in the
form of a complaint or an objection
in accordance with Superior Court
Probate Division Rule 407 is filed
in this Court within 30 days from
the date of first publication of
this notice, the Court may take the
action hereinafter set forth.
In the absence of a will or proof
satisfactory to the Court of due
execution, enter an order determining that the decedent died intestate
appoint a disinterested third-party.
Kenneth Savitz (DC BAR #983167)
8601 Westwood Center Drive,
Suite 255, Vienna, VA 22182
(301) 907-8000
PETITIONER
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2016 ADM 00999
JAMES ANTHONY HINES
Ryan Quinn, Esq. #979081
Slocumb Law Firm
777 6th Street NW #520
Washington, DC 20001
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Iris Hines, whose address is 1361
1st Street, SW, Washington, DC
20024, was appointed personal representative of the estate of James
Anthony Hines, who died on May
16, 2015 without a will and will
serve without Court supervision.
All unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor, Washington,
D.C. 20001, on or before May 30,
2018. Claims against the decedent
shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register
of Wills or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before May 30, 2018,
or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Rosalind Oleinik, whose address is
4310 Cross Country Drive, Ellicott
City, Maryland 21042, was appointed personal representative of the
estate of Mary B. Maynard, who
died on October 9, 2017 with a will
and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor, Washington,
D.C. 20001, on or before May 30,
2018. Claims against the decedent
shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register
of Wills or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before May 30, 2018,
or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Rosalind Oleinik
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Freda D. Gaines
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Iris Hines
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Home delivery
is convenient.
Legal Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001210
NOTICE OF STANDARD PROBATE
The above petitioner has filed a
Petition for Change of Name in
which she seeks to change the
name of a minor child from Salay
Natasha Thomas to Salay Natasha
Singh-Dave. The petitioner is seeking this name and birth certificate
change for the child for the following reasons: Father is not in minor’s
child life, consistency of name with
rest of siblings, adoption.
Any person may file an objection
to the Petition on or before the
20th day of December, 2017. The
objection must be supported by
an affidavit and served upon the
petitioner in accordance with Maryland Rule 1-321. Failure to file an
objection or affidavit within the time
allowed may result in a judgement
by default or the granting of the
relief sought.
A copy of this notice shall be published one time in a newspaper of
general circulation in the county
/city at least fifteen (15) days before
the deadline to file an objection.
1-800-753-POST
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
RICHARD HUDSPETH
PRO SE
(MINOR)
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
SF
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054E 2x2
To: David Jackson
To: Unknown Father
You are hereby notified that a
guardianship case has been filed
in the Circuit Court for Montgomery
County, Maryland, Case No. 6-Z17-0031. All persons who believe
themselves to be parents of a
female child born on June 4, 2006
in Paterson, New Jersey to Tywana
LaShun Wade (DOB: November 28,
1971), and David Jackson (DOB:
June 23, 1968) or the Unknown
Father (DOB: unknown) shall file a
written response. A copy of the
show cause order may be obtained
from the juvenile clerk's office at
50 Maryland Avenue, Rockville, MD
20850 and phone number (240) 7779530. If you do not file written
objection by January 6, 2018, you
will have agreed to the permanent
loss of your parental rights to this
child.
VIRGINIA:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
STAFFORD COUNTY
Case No. CA17-30
by Samuel David Hillmon, Jr. and
Christina Marie Hillmon
(Petitioner's Name (s))
Respondent's name: Toderick Delee
Scypion (Natural Parent)
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
The object of this suit is to adopt
minor children.
And, it appearing by affidavit filef
according to law that diligence has
been used by the plaintiff to determine in what cityor county the
defendant is located without success, it is therefore ORDERED that
the defendant appear on or before
the 18th day of December, 2017,
before this Court and do what is
necessary to protect his interests.
And, it is further ORDERED that this
order be published once a week
for four successive weeks in the
Washington Post, a newspaper of
general circulation in the County
of Stafford; that a copy of this
order be posted at the front door of
the courthouse wherein this court
is held; and that a copy of this
order be mailed to the defendant at
the address shown by the aforesaid
affidavit.
Entered this 2nd day of November,
2017.
Kris Waldron
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Stafford County
VIRGINIA:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY
MEGBAR ZEWDE CHERENET
Plaintiff,
v.
Civil Action No.: CL17-8038-00
MEAZA GETACHEW TILAHUN
Defendant.
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
The object of the above-styled suit
is for a divorce based on the parties
having lived separate and apart,
continuously
without
marital
cohabitation and without interruption, for a period or more than one
year. And it appearing by affidavit
filed according to the law, that
Meaza Getachew Tilahun, the
above named Defendant, is a nonresident individual, other than a
nonresident individual fiduciary
who has been appointed a statutory
agent under § 64.2-1426 of the
Code of Virginia. It is therefore
ORDERED that the Defendant,
MEAZA GETACHEW TILAHUN, appear
on or before the December 28, 2017
before this Court and do what is
necessary to protect her interests
herein; and it is further, ORDERED
that this Order be published once a
week for four (4) successive weeks
in the Washington Post, a newspaper of general circulation in the
County of Prince William; that a
copy of this order be posted at
the front door of the courthouse
wherein this court is held; and that
a copy of this order be mailed to the
defendant at the address shown by
the aforesaid affidavit.
Entered this 8th day of November,
2017
Tammy E. Ramsey
Deputy Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Prince William County
820
Official Notices
ABC LICENSE: Bacchus Importers,
LLC trading as Bacchus Importers,
LLC, 5706 General Washington
Drive, Unit A, Alexandria, (Fairfax
County) Virginia 22312. The above
establishment is applying to the
VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC)
for a Beer Wholesaler, Wine Wholesaler, Beer Importer, Wine Importer,
Out of Bond license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Bruce
Gearhart, President. NOTE: Objections to the issuance of this license
must be submitted to ABC no later
than 30 days from the publishing
date of the first of two required
newspaper legal notices. Objections
should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200
Cellco Partnership and its
controlled affiliates doing
business as Verizon Wireless (Verizon Wireless) proposes to collocate wireless
communications antennas
at a top height of 63 feet on
a 63-foot building rooftop at
the approx. vicinity of 1210
R Street NW, Washington, DC
20009. Public comments
regarding potential effects
from this site on historic
properties may be submitted within 30 days from the
date of this publication to:
Trileaf
Corp,
Kaitlin,
k.abrams@trileaf.com, 8600
LaSalle Road, Suite 301, Towson, MD 21286, 410-8537128.
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
820
851
Official Notices
Notice is hereby given that BB&T
Commercial Equipment Capital
Corp. located at 2 Great Valley Parkway, Suite 300, Malvern, PA 19355
has made application to engage in
the business of loaning money for
the license year ending December
31, 2017 as provided by the Act
of Congress, approved February 14,
1913. Anyone desiring to protest
against the issuance of this license
should do so in writing to the Commissioner of the Department of
Insurance, Securities and Banking,
810 First Street, NE, Suite 701,
Washington, DC 20002, in the manner prescribed by said Act: See DC
Code Title 26, Chapter 9 and 16
DCMR 2.
830
Public Sale Notices
LAWFUL NOTICE
Lawful Notice is hereby given to
Sharon L. Hancock ( acting as )
clerk and all ( acting as ) PUBLIC
OFFICERS, CORPORATE DIRECTORS OF CHARLES COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT INCORPORATION,
Brenda Gimmerion ( acting as )
clerk and all ( acting as ) PUBLIC
OFFICERS, CORPORATE DIRECTORS OF THE CHARLES COUNTY
DISTRICT COURT
INCORPORATION, and John Wobensmith ( acting as ) MARYLAND SECRETARY
OF STATE INCORPORATION and all
( acting as ) PUBLIC OFFICERS,
CORPORATE DIRECTORS, for the
STATE OF MARYLAND INCORPORATION that a Commercial Administrative Breach of Trust is recorded Case no. 08-C-16-001838 in the
Washington Post, November 30,
2017. .CHARLES COUNTY CIRCUIT
COURT INCORPORATION received
certified / registered mail and
failed to file into the public record,
Notice to Agent is Notice to Principal - Notice to Principal is Notice
to Agent ,Writs of Error, Default
Judgments, Show Cause, DE BENE
ESSE, and Commercial Administrative Breach of Trust violating
my 5th amendment rights of due
process. By special appearance I
Charles Arnell Smith-Bey a Moorish American, natural person in full
life in propria persona, Sui juris,
and Heir to the land, Amexen /
America, a Public Minister representative for We the People of the
continent organic united States
Confederation of the Moroccan
Empire, Moorish Nation for proof
of Credentials and Identification
see
[www.affairsofthemoorishcrown.org ]
an authorized
representative for Ex- Relatione
CHARLES ARNELL SMITH JR, natural date of birth October 18, 1984,
a legal fiction corporate person
created by the unclean hands of
others due declare and affirm that
the facts dated herein are true,
correct, complete not misleading
and is hereby served to be read
into the Public Record and on the
Public Record and enter into the
Public Record this is your notice of
the facts, concerning myself and
my estate. This correspondence
shall also stand as and “ Adverse
Claim”. I Charles Arnell Smith-Bey
Heir and sentient man a natural
person in full life , a flesh and blood
human being, Moorish American
, “ I’m NOT also known as for
AKAs anything, I stand on my own
Birthright and see through my own
eyes, I am that I am, and not any
nom -de guerre misnames designated as AKAs as I stated before
I make no claims with respect to
the Title; CHARLES ARNELL SMITH
SR / CHARLES ARNELL SMITH
SENIOR / CHARLES ARNELL SMITH
/ CHARLES SMITH / CHARLES
A.SMITH / Date of Natural Birth
August 28, 1957 / CHARLES
ARNELL SMITH JR / CHARLES
ARNELL SMITH JUNIOR / CHARLES
SMTH / CHARLES A. SMITH / Date
of Natural Birth October 18,1984
( nom -de guerre ) all are design
as deceptive title be foreign estate
and trust. I surrender and assign
any and all ‘ Reversionary Interest
‘ to the united states and the
Owners, Administrators, Trustees,
and subsidiaries for full A
‘ cquain tance Discharge Settlement’ and
closure of my reliance Title 12
United States Code ( USC ) Subsection 95a, part 2 and I do
not assume any liabilities, debts,
promises or “ Surety’’ for any
point, moment in time ( including,
but not limited to, the debt / liability / obligation / performance, etc.
I also notice that the foreign for
profit CHARLES COUNTY CIRCUIT
COURT ( Inc. ) has put ET,AL by
way of deceit next to my free
and national name as plaintiff in
this case, I Charles Arnell SmithBey am the ONLY plaintiff in the
Complaint and suit Case no 08 -C16-001838 with NO other. Charles
Arnell Smith-Bey, Heir and a Natural Person, In Full Life, In Propria
Persona
All Rights Reserved,
Authorized Representative, U.C.C.
1-207/1-308; U.C.C. 1-103, Ralatione: CHARLES ARNELL SMITH JR,
Date of Natural Birth October 18,
1984
Charles Arnell Smith - Bey
( cabey @ affairsofthemoorishcrown.org )
851
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
OLA K PARSONS
ESTATE OF OLA K PARSONS
C/O ADRIENNE PARSONS
(SUCCESSOR)PER REP
ESTATE OF OLA K PARSONS
C/O ADRIENNE PARSONS
(SUCCESSOR)PER REP
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-37271
NOTICE
Special Notices
Lillian M. DeCosimo, M.D. /
About Care GYN Associates, PLLC
Announces the closure of her medical practice effective December 1,
2017. To request a copy of your
medical records please mail your
request to: P.O. Box 220925 Chantilly, VA 220925 or email: drdecosimo
@ outlook.com
835
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 21st
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 5827
Shoshone Drive, Forest Heights, MD
20745, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 21st day
of December, 2017 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 21st
day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $127,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 30, Dec 7, 14, 2017 12145379
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
HAROLD L TURLEY, II A/K/A HAROLD
L TURLEY II
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-15629
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 21st
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 15406
Bennetts Run Court, Brandywine,
MD 20613, and reported in the
above entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 21st day
of December, 2017 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 21st
day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $191,865.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 30, Dec 7, 14, 2017 12145383
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ESTATE OF GAIL M ANDERSON
C/O TONYA JOHNSON
(SUCCESSOR)PER REP
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-20140
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 21st
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 6403
Auth Rd, Suitland, MD 20746, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 21st day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 21st day of December,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $122,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 30, Dec 7, 14, 2017 12145385
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ISIDRO R AGUILAR
ALFREDO AGUILAR
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-24915
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 21st
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 5703
66th Avenue, Riverdale, MD 20737,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 21st day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 21st day of December,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $156,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #544
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 30, Dec 7, 14, 2017 12145377
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Taren Williams
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-15666
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 27th day of November 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 10106 Rolling Green Way, Fort
Washington, Maryland 20744,
made and reported by James E.
Clarke, Renee Dyson, Hugh J.
Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and Brian Thomas,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 27th day of December,
2017, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 27th day of
December, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $364,500.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 7, 14, 21, 2017
12146779
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
OPQRS
HURSDAY DECEMBER 7 20 7
D9
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING ISSUANCE OF BONDS OR OTHER
NOT
CE OF PUB TO
C HEAR
NG CONCERN
NG SSUANCE
OF BONDS
OR OTHER
OBLIGATIONS
FINANCE
RESIDENTIAL
RENTAL HOUSING
PROJECTS
OB GAT ONS TO F NANCE RES DENT A RENTA HOUS NG PRO ECTS
Notice is hereby given that the Community Development Administration (the “Administration”), a unit of the Division of Development Finance of the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development, will conduct a public hearing at 12:00 pm, on Friday
December 22, 2017 at the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development, 7800 Harkins Road, Lanham, Maryland 20706 in Room 364. The public hearing will concern the plan of financing, including the loans funded from the proceeds of private
activity bonds issued by the Administration and/or the State of Maryland (the “State”) acting through its Board of Public Works, for financing the acquisition, construction, renovation, rehabilitation or other costs of the multifamily residential rental housing projects
listed below (the “Projects”) in an amount not to exceed the maximum aggregate amount of private activity bond obligations to be issued for such Projects as set forth below (or refunding of any obligation by other obligations in amounts up to such maximum
aggregate principal amount.) Additional information relating to the bonds to be issued and each Project is available by writing Diane Melton at the above address or calling 301-429-7710
M
m mA
Am
Name Of Project
Number Units in Project
Prospective Location by Street Address
Initial owner or principal user
Maximum Aggregate Amount of
Victory Haven ........................................................... 72..............................9616 Main St., Damascus, MD 20872 – Montgomery County ..........................................................................................................................Victory Housing, Inc.................................................................... $28,000,000
Heritage Crossing II .................................................. 75..............................900-904 (even) W. Franklin St., 500, 501 & 525 N. Fremont Ave., 800, 801, 815, 817, 818-826 (even) George St., ..........................................Enterprise Homes, Inc. ............................................................... $49,000,000
501-507(odd), 508, 600, 611, 705,-717(odd) Brune St., 702 & 703-711 (odd) Edmonson Ave., 612-616
(even), 702, 704, 718-722(even), 732 & 816 Murphy Lane, 700 Harlem Ave., 641, 651 & 652 W. Hoffman St.,
903, 905, 1015 & 1017 Myrtle Ave., 612, 614, 630 & 632-636 McCollough Circle, 627-631 & 633 Perkins St.,
903-906, 908, 910, 1007, 1009 & 1022 Argyle Ave., Baltimore, MD 21201 – Baltimore City
Prospect Place ........................................................ 114.............................3 Hill St., Mt. Airy, MD 21771 – Frederick County ..............................................................................................................................................Foundation Development Group, LLC ........................................ $24,000,000
Adams Crossing Apartments Phase 3 ..................... 48..............................12370 & 12380 Mt. Clare Place, Waldorf, MD 20601 – Charles County..............................................................................................................Castle Development Partners .................................................... $11,000,000
Emersonian Apartments .......................................... 61..............................2502 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, MD 21217- Baltimore City ..................................................................................................................................Roizman Development, Inc. ....................................................... $11,000,000
Temple Gardens Apartments .................................. 146.............................2601 Madison Ave., Baltimore, MD Baltimore City ............................................................................................................................................Roizman Development, Inc. ....................................................... $22,000,000
Sharpe Square.......................................................... 86..............................820 Motter Ave., Frederick, MD 21701 – Frederick County ..............................................................................................................................Pax-Edwards, LLC ....................................................................... $20,000,000
Somerset Extension ................................................. 65..............................700-705, 706-740 (even) & 741-746 Wharton Ct. & 700-705, 707-741 ..............................................................................................................The Woda Group, Inc. &.............................................................. $14,000,000
(odd) & 742-747 Mello Ct., Baltimore, MD 21205 – Baltimore City ....................................................................................................................Housing Authority of Baltimore City
Dorsey Overlook....................................................... 82..............................9562, 9566, 9570, 9580, 9584, 9590 & 9598 Old Route 108, Ellicott City, MD 21042 – Howard County ........................................................J. Kirby Development.................................................................. $28,000,000
Zion Apartments...................................................... 211.............................1100 Pennsylvania Ave., Baltimore, MD 21201 – Baltimore City.......................................................................................................................National Preservation Housing Partners.................................... $39,000,000
Park Square Homes................................................. 262.............................101 & 201 N. Schroeder St., Baltimore, MD 21223 – Baltimore City ..................................................................................................................Park Square Homes I, LLC .......................................................... $51,000,000
Ashland Commons................................................... 78..............................1715 East Eager Street, Baltimore, MD, 21205 - Baltimore City.........................................................................................................................RF Ashland Limited Partnership................................................. $14,000,000
Bladensburg Commons........................................... 100.............................4200 58th Avenue, Bladensburg, MD, 20710 - Prince George’s County.............................................................................................................RF Bladensburg Commons Limited Partnership........................ $16,000,000
Cambridge Commons .............................................. 96..............................1220 Chestnut Place, Cambridge, MD, 21613 – Dorchester County ..................................................................................................................RF Cambridge Commons LP ...................................................... $15,000,000
Highland Commons................................................. 120.............................31 Lincoln Ave, Aberdeen, MD, 21001 – Harford County....................................................................................................................................RF Aberdeen Commons LP ........................................................ $22,000,000
Park View at Ashland Terrace .................................. 74..............................1705 East Eager Street, Baltimore, MD, 21205, Baltimore City ..........................................................................................................................RF Ashland Park View LP ........................................................... $9,000,000
Park View at Bladensburg ....................................... 102.............................4202 58th Avenue, Bladensburg, MD, 20710 - Prince George’s County.............................................................................................................RF Bladensburg LP .................................................................... $18,000,000
Park View at Catonsville.......................................... 101.............................303 Maiden Choice Lane, Catonsville, MD, 21228 - Baltimore County...............................................................................................................RF Catonsville LP........................................................................ $19,000,000
Park View at Colonial Landing................................. 100.............................6391 Rowanberry Drive, Elkridge, MD, 21075 - Howard County ........................................................................................................................RF Colonial LP ............................................................................ $18,000,000
Park View at Columbia ............................................ 104.............................7070 Cradlerock Way, Columbia, MD, 21045 - Howard County..........................................................................................................................RF Columbia LP .......................................................................... $21,000,000
Park View at Ellicott City .......................................... 81..............................8720 Ridge Road, Ellicott City, MD, 21043 - Howard County..............................................................................................................................RF Ellicott LP ............................................................................. $15,000,000
Park View at Emerson .............................................. 80..............................9895 Palace Hall Drive, Laurel, MD, 20723 - Prince George’s County ................................................................................................................RF Emerson LP ........................................................................... $12,000,000
Park View at Fullerton.............................................. 90..............................4300 Cardwell Ave., Baltimore, MD, 21236 - Baltimore County .........................................................................................................................RF Fullerton LP ........................................................................... $18,000,000
Park View at Laurel I................................................ 153.............................9000 Briarcroft Lane, Laurel, MD, 20708 - Prince George’s County ...................................................................................................................RF Laurel LP................................................................................ $29,000,000
Park View at Laurel II............................................... 105.............................9010 Briarcroft Lane, Laurel, MD, 20708 - Prince George’s County ...................................................................................................................RF Laurel II LP ............................................................................ $17,000,000
Park View at Miramar Landing ................................ 100.............................705 Compass Road, Middle River, MD, 21220 - Baltimore County .....................................................................................................................RF Miramar LP ........................................................................... $18,000,000
Park View at Randallstown ..................................... 103.............................3530 Resource Drive, Randallstown, MD, 21133 - Baltimore County.................................................................................................................RF Randallstown LP.................................................................... $21,000,000
Park View at Rosedale............................................. 109.............................1315 Chesaco Avenue, Rosedale, MD, 21237 - Baltimore County .....................................................................................................................RF Rosedale LP .......................................................................... $21,000,000
Park View at Severna Park ...................................... 103.............................180 Ritchie Hwy, Severna Park, MD, 21146 - Anne Arundel County...................................................................................................................RF Severna Park LP ................................................................... $19,000,000
Park View at Snowden River ................................... 100.............................8610 Snowden River Parkway, Columbia, MD - 21045 – Howard County.........................................................................................................RF Snowden River LP ................................................................ $17,000,000
Park View at Towson ............................................... 112.............................20 Dunvale Road, Towson, MD, 21204 - Baltimore County ...............................................................................................................................RF Timothy House LP ................................................................. $22,000,000
The Residences at Highland Commons ................... 22..............................31 Lincoln Avenue, Aberdeen, MD, 21001 – Harford County..............................................................................................................................RF Highland LP ............................................................................ $6,000,000
Westbrook Commons .............................................. 96..............................555 West Rd, Salisbury, MD, 21801 - Wicomico County ....................................................................................................................................RF Salisbury LP .......................................................................... $13,000,000
College Parkway Place............................................ 170.............................570 Bellerive Drive, Annapolis, MD, 21409 - Anne Arundel County...................................................................................................................RF College Parkway LP .............................................................. $51,000,000
Hickory Ridge .......................................................... 108.............................10799 Hickory Ridge Road, Columbia, MD, 21044 – Howard County.................................................................................................................RF Hickory Ridge Village LP ....................................................... $31,000,000
Park View at Bel Air................................................. 101.............................555 South Atwood Road, Bel Air, MD, 21041 – Harford County .........................................................................................................................RF Park View at Bel Air II LP ...................................................... $18,000,000
Park View at Box Hill ............................................... 100.............................20 Box Hill South Parkway, Abingdon, MD, 21009 - Harford County .................................................................................................................RF Abington II LP ........................................................................ $18,000,000
Park View at Coldspring ........................................... 99..............................4803 Tamarind Road, Baltimore, MD, 21209 - Baltimore City.............................................................................................................................RF Coldspring LP ....................................................................... $15,000,000
Park View at Easton ................................................. 80..............................640 Mecklenburg Avenue, Easton, MD, 21601 – Talbot County .........................................................................................................................RF Easton LP ............................................................................. $13,000,000
Park View at Ellicott City II ....................................... 91..............................8700 Ridge Road, Ellicott City, MD, 21043 – Howard County .............................................................................................................................RF Ellicott City II LP .................................................................... $17,000,000
Park View at Furnace Branch.................................. 101.............................7466 Furnace Branch Road, Glen Burnie, MD, 21060 - Anne Arundel County ...................................................................................................RF Glen Burnie LP ...................................................................... $18,000,000
Park View at Taylor.................................................. 100.............................4102 Taylor Avenue, Baltimore, MD, 21236 - Baltimore County .........................................................................................................................RF Parkville LP ........................................................................... $19,000,0004
Park View at Woodlawn .......................................... 101.............................2020 Featherbed Lane, Baltimore, MD, 21207 - Baltimore County ....................................................................................................................RF Woodlawn Apartments LP .................................................... $17,000000
Somerset Commons ................................................ 60..............................12370 Somerset Avenue, Princess Anne, MD, 21853 – Somerset County .........................................................................................................RF Somerset Commons LP ......................................................... $9,000,000
Woodbridge Commons ........................................... 132.............................1307 Gold Meadow Way, Edgewood, MD, 21040 - Harford County...................................................................................................................RF Woodbridge Commons LP ................................................... $26,000,000
The Reserve at Somerset Commons ....................... 75..............................30520 Hickory Road, Princess Anne, MD, 21853 - Somerset County.................................................................................................................RF Somerset Reserve LP ............................................................ $10,000,000
Park Heights Place ................................................... 84..............................5430 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21215 - Baltimore City ....................................................................................................................RF Park Heights Senior Housing LP ............................................ $8,000,000
Ednor Apartments I ................................................. 110.............................1040 E. 33rd Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 - Baltimore City ...............................................................................................................................RF Ednor Apartments I LP .......................................................... $14,000,000
Ednor Apartments II ................................................. 85..............................1050 E. 33rd Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 - Baltimore City ...............................................................................................................................RF Ednor Apartments II LP .......................................................... $8,000,000
Greens at Hammonds Lane ..................................... 90..............................600 Hammonds Lane, Brooklyn Park, MD 21225 - Anne Arundel County..........................................................................................................RF Greens at Hammonds Lane LP ............................................ $13,000,000
Cove Point II ............................................................. 48..............................7795 Peninsula Expressway, Dundalk, MD 21222 - Baltimore County...............................................................................................................RF Cove Point Apartments II LP ................................................. $7,000,000
Evergreen Senior...................................................... 81..............................1600 Evergreen Way, Essex, MD 21221 - Baltimore County...............................................................................................................................RF Evergreen Senior Apartments LP ......................................... $11,000,000
Greens at Rolling Road............................................. 83..............................1505 N. Rolling Road, Catonsville, MD 21228 - Baltimore County......................................................................................................................RF Greens at Rolling Road LP..................................................... $10,000,000
Sierra Woods ........................................................... 158.............................8712 Airybrink Lane, Columbia, MD 21045 - Howard County ............................................................................................................................RF Sierra Woods LP ................................................................... $26,000,000
Cove Point I ............................................................. 100.............................7801 Peninsula Expressway, Dundalk, MD 21222 - Baltimore County...............................................................................................................RF Cove Point Apartments LP.................................................... $15,000,000
Forest Ridge ............................................................ 105.............................5866 Stevens Forest Road, Columbia, MD 21045 - Howard County ..................................................................................................................RF Forest Ridge LP ..................................................................... $20,000,000
Cherrydale............................................................... 186.............................1118 Cherry Hill Road, Baltimore, MD 21225 - Anne Arundel County................................................................................................................RF Cherrydale LP........................................................................ $19,000,000
Greens at Liberty Road............................................ 105.............................9707 Liberty Road, Randallstown, MD 21133 - Baltimore County......................................................................................................................RF Greens at Liberty Road LP..................................................... $15,000,000
Harper House ........................................................... 99..............................5495 Cedar Lane, Columbia, MD 21044 - Howard County ................................................................................................................................RF Harper House LP ................................................................... $23,000,000
Westminster Overlook ............................................. 98..............................30 Locust Street, Westminster, MD 21157 - Carroll County ..............................................................................................................................RF Westminster Overlook LP...................................................... $18,000,000
Greens at Irvington Mews....................................... 100.............................4300 Frederick Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21229 - Baltimore City .........................................................................................................................RF Greens at Irvington Mews LP................................................ $10,000,000
Taney Village............................................................ 130.............................1421 Taney Avenue, Frederick, MD 21702 - Frederick County..........................................................................................................................RF Taney Village LP..................................................................... $32,000,000
Greens at English Consul ......................................... 90..............................4120 Oak Road, Lansdowne, MD 21227 - Baltimore County..............................................................................................................................RF Greens at English Consul LP ................................................. $12,000,000
Greens at Logan Field ............................................. 102.............................3455 Dundalk Avenue, Dundalk, MD 21222 - Baltimore County ........................................................................................................................RF Greens at Logan Field LP ...................................................... $13,000,000
Riverwoods at North East ........................................ 76..............................125 Railroad Lane, North East, MD 21901 - Cecil County...................................................................................................................................RF Riverwoods at North East LP ................................................ $10,000,000
Hollins Station .......................................................... 48 ..............................4374 Hollins Ferry Road, Lansdowne, MD 21227, Baltimore County .................................................................................................................RF Hollins Station LP ................................................................. $10,000,000
Mulberry at Park....................................................... 68 ..............................211 West Mulberry Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 - Baltimore City .....................................................................................................................RF Mulberry at Park LP .............................................................. $13,000,000
Spyglass at Cedar Cove .......................................... 152.............................21620 Spyglass Way, Lexington Park, MD 20653 - St. Mary’s County ................................................................................................................RF Spyglass at Cedar Cove LP ................................................... $33,000,000
Allendale Apartments ............................................. 164.............................3600 W. Franklin Street, Baltimore, MD 21229 - Baltimore City .........................................................................................................................RF Allendale Apartments LP ..................................................... $24,000,000
Ballenger Run .......................................................... 140.............................5341 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick, MD 21703 – Frederick County ...............................................................................................................Homes for America .................................................................... $31,005,000
Monument East....................................................... 170.............................633 Aisquith Street, Baltimore, MD 21202 – Baltimore City...............................................................................................................................Community Builders, Inc. & Housing.......................................... $41,000,000
Authority of Baltimore City
Woodlands at Reid Temple...................................... 252.............................11609 Facchina Place & 11425 Old Prospect Hill Road, ....................................................................................................................................Atlantic Pacific Communities, LLC & Reid.................................. $63,000,000
Glenn Dale, MD 20769 – Prince George’s County...............................................................................................................................................Community Development Corporation
Freetown Village ..................................................... 189.............................Property bounded to the South by Whitaker Street to the East by Shirley Murphy Court, to the West by Levy ..............................................Housing Commission of ............................................................. $58,000,000
Court, to the North by Huff Court & Willing Court, Pasadena, MD 21122 – Anne Arundel County....................................................................Anne Arundel County
Rosemont Tower ..................................................... 203.............................740 Poplar Grove Street, Baltimore, MD 21216 – Baltimore City .......................................................................................................................Rosemont Tower, LLC ................................................................. $30,000,000
Calvert Hills West ..................................................... 96..............................346 Radio Dr., Prince Frederick, MD 20678 – Calvert County ............................................................................................................................Osprey Property Company LLC.................................................. $20,000,000
Homes at Oxon Hill ................................................. 160.............................1313 Southern Ave, Oxon Hill, MD – Prince George’s County ............................................................................................................................Homes for America .................................................................... $26,000,000
Lex-Woods Apartments............................................ 78..............................21284 Lexwood Ct, Lexington Park, MD 20653 - St. Mary’s County .................................................................................................................Lex Woods Preservation, L.P. ..................................................... $21,000,000
Meade Village .......................................................... 231.............................1710 Meade Village Circle, Severn, MD 21144 -- Anne Arundel County ..........................................................................................................Housing Commission of Anne Arundel County ......................... $39,000,000
Paca House............................................................... 92..............................116 North Paca Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 -- Baltimore City ........................................................................................................................Volunteers of America ............................................................... $26,000,000
Patuxent Crossing ................................................... 102.............................21691 Eric Rd., Lexington Park, MD 21691 -- St. Mary’s County ........................................................................................................................Osprey Property Company, LLC ................................................. $28,600,000
Somerset 1 .............................................................. 104.............................500 N. Central Ave., Baltimore, MD 21202 – Baltimore City .............................................................................................................................Somerset Redevelopment, LLC ................................................. $22,000,000
Somerset 2 .............................................................. 197.............................520 Somerset Street, Baltimore, MD 21202 – Baltimore City ............................................................................................................................Somerset Redevelopment S2, LLC ............................................ $34,000,000
Somerset 3 .............................................................. 192 .............................1231 Jefferson Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 – Baltimore City ...........................................................................................................................Somerset Redevelopment S3, LLC ............................................ $34,000,000
Perkins Phase 5....................................................... 195 .............................222, 232, 322, 324, 326, 328, 330 S. Caroline Street, Baltimore, MD 21231 – Baltimore City 1403,1405,1407,................................................Perkins Somerset Oldtown Redevelopment P5, LLC................. $40,000,000
1409 E. Pratt Street 200,202,204,206, 220, 220, 222, 224, 226, 309, 311, 313, 315, 317, 319, 321, 323,
S. Eden Street, Baltimore, MD 21231 – Baltimore City 1400, 1401, 1402, 1403, 1404, 1405, 1406, 1407, 1408, 1409,
1410, 1411, 1412, 1413, 1414, 1415, 1416, 1417, 1418 Stiles Street, Baltimore, MD 21231 – Baltimore City 1401, 1402,
1403, 1404, 1405, 1406, 1407, 1408, 1409, 1411, 1413, 1415 Gough Street, Baltimore, MD 21231 – Baltimore City
1400, 1402, 1404, 1406, 1408, 1410, 1412, 1414, 1416, 1418, 1420, 1422, 1424, 1426 Bank Street, Baltimore, MD 21231 -- Baltimore City
Perkins Phase 4....................................................... 227 .............................221, 231, 306, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 315, 317, 319, 321 S. Bond Street, Baltimore, MD 21231 – .........................................................Perkins Oldtown Somerset Redevelopment P4, LLC................. $43,000,000
Baltimore City 1521, 1604, 1606, 1608, 1610, 1611, 1612 Gough Street, Baltimore, MD 21231 –
Baltimore City 307, 309, 311, 313 S. Caroline Street 1500, 1502, 1504, 1506, 1508, 1510, 1512,
1514, 1516, 1518, 1520, 1522, 1524, 1526, 1600, 1602, 1604, 1606, 1608, 1610,
1612, 1614, 1616 Bank Street, Baltimore, MD 21231 – Baltimore City
Windsor and Main ................................................... 100 .............................150 East Main St., 301-348, 350 & 352 Friendship Rd., Elkton, MD 21921 – Cecil County ................................................................................Elkton Housing Authority ........................................................... $16,000,000
Lakeview at Victoria Park........................................ 108 .............................11080 Weymouth Ct., Waldorf, MD 20603 – Charles County .............................................................................................................................Weymouth Senior, LLC ............................................................... $12,000,000
Kensington Manor ................................................... 125.............................3906 & 3910 Knowles Ave., Kensington, MD 20895 – Montgomery County.....................................................................................................ECO Housing Corporation .......................................................... $25,000,000
Howard Station ....................................................... 227.............................309-311, 313, 315, 317-319, 321, 325, 327 & 329-331 N. Howard St., & 314 N. Tyson St., Baltimore, MD 21201 – Baltimore City ..................Howard Station Partners, LLC .................................................... $97,000,000
Howard Station (Parcel B) ....................................... 200 .............................400, 406-414(even) Park Ave., & 409 Tyson St. Baltimore, MD 21201 – Baltimore City ....................................................................................Park Avenue Partners, LLC ......................................................... $39,000,000
Hopewell Manor....................................................... 64 ..............................11204, 11208, 11218 & 11110 Pepperbush Circle & 16600, 16602, 16606, & 16612 Spice Court, ..................................................................Pax Edwards, LLC ........................................................................ $8,000,000
Hagerstown, MD 21740 – Washington County
Hillwood Manor ........................................................ 96 ..............................1100, 1102, 1106, 1108, 1110 Linden Ave., 1200-1222 (even) & 1201 Myrtle Ave, 1101-1113 (odd) ...............................................................Montgomery Housing Partnership, Inc....................................... $16,000,000
Hillwood Ct., and 7101-7105 (odd) New Hampshire Ave., Takoma Park, MD 20912 – Prince George’s County
Hillbrooke Towers..................................................... 55 ..............................515 Thayer Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20910 – Montgomery County ....................................................................................................................Montgomery Housing Partnership, Inc....................................... $13,000,000
Forest Glen .............................................................. 125 .............................9920 & 9922 Georgia Ave. & 2100-2116 (even) Belvedere Rd., Silver Spring, MD 20902 – Montgomery County .............................................Montgomery Housing Partnership, Inc....................................... $23,000,000
439 N. Frederick Apartments ................................... 33..............................439 North Frederick Ave., Gaithersburg, MD 20877 – Montgomery County......................................................................................................Montgomery Housing Partnership, Inc........................................ $8,000,000
425 N. Frederick Apartments ................................... 45..............................425 North Frederick Ave., Gaithersburg, MD 20877 – Montgomery County......................................................................................................Montgomery Housing Partnership, Inc....................................... $11,000,000
Germantown Residential at UpCounty .................. 115.............................12900 Middlebrook Rd., Germantown, MD 20874 – Montgomery County ........................................................................................................Montgomery Housing Partnership, Inc....................................... $23,000,000
Regional Services Center
Amherst Square Apartments .................................. 125.............................11500-11504 (even), Amherst Ave. & 11500-11506 & 11508 Elkins St., Silver Spring, MD 20902 – Montgomery County................................Montgomery Housing Partnership, Inc....................................... $26,000,000
Amherst Gardens Apartments ................................. 22 ..............................11430 & 11440 Amherst Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20902 – Montgomery County................................................................................................Montgomery Housing Partnership, Inc........................................ $5,200,000
The New Cultural Center ........................................ 192 .............................5900 Symphony Woods Road, Columbia, MD 21044 – Howard County.............................................................................................................Howard County Housing Commission ....................................... $49,000,000
Ellicott Gardens Senior............................................ 100 .............................5511-5513 Waterloo Road, Ellicott City, MD 21043– Howard County ................................................................................................................Howard County Housing Commission ....................................... $25,000,000
Banneker ................................................................. 100 .............................5815 Banneker Road, Columbia MD 21044 – Howard County ...........................................................................................................................Howard County Housing Commission ....................................... $22,000,000
Weinberg Place ....................................................... 231 .............................2500 West Belvedere Ave., Baltimore, MD 21215 – Baltimore City....................................................................................................................Weinberg Place Limited Partnership.......................................... $39,000,000
CHAI Jonestown ....................................................... 80..............................1181 East Lombard St., Baltimore, MD 21202 – Baltimore City .......................................................................................................................CHAI Lombard St. Limited Partnership ...................................... $16,000,000
Calvert Pines 1 Rehabilitation ................................. 50..............................420 West Dares Beach Road, Prince Frederick MD. 20678 – Calvert County ....................................................................................................Osprey Property Company LLC.................................................. $26,000,000
Calvert Pines 2 Rehabilitation ................................. 48..............................470 West Dares Beach Road, Prince Frederick MD 20678 – Calvert County .....................................................................................................Osprey Property Company LLC.................................................. $26,000,000
Southern Pines 1 Rehabilitation............................... 76 ..............................50 Appeal Lane, Lusby, MD 20657 – Calvert County...........................................................................................................................................Osprey Property Company LLC.................................................. $26,000,000
PSH IB ...................................................................... 315 .............................90, 91 & 299 N. Schroeder St., Baltimore, MD 21223 – Baltimore City ..............................................................................................................PSH IB, LLC ................................................................................. $86,000,000
PSH II, LLC................................................................ 502 .............................50, 90, 91, & 101 N. Carrollton Ave, Baltimore, MD 21223 – Baltimore City.......................................................................................................PSH II, LLC.................................................................................. $137,000,000
PSH III ...................................................................... 776 .............................201, 202, 281, 290, & 299 N. Carrollton Ave, Baltimore, MD 21223 – Baltimore City.........................................................................................PSH III, LLC................................................................................. $211,000,000
PSH IV ...................................................................... 998 .............................1051, 1111 W. Saratoga St., & 301 N Schroeder St. Baltimore, MD 21223 – Baltimore City ..............................................................................PSH IV LLC ................................................................................. $272,000,000
Hamilton Park Apartments...................................... 126 .............................33 Hamilton Avenue, Frederick, MD 21701 – Frederick County.........................................................................................................................Frederick Hamilton LLC.............................................................. $32,000,000
St. Anne’s Senior Housing ........................................ 75 ..............................25104 Ridge Rd., Damascus, MD 20872 – Montgomery County .......................................................................................................................St. Anne’s Senior Housing Redevelopment LLC......................... $12,000,000
JoWillis Creek View ................................................. 100 .............................135 North Mechanic Street, Cumberland, MD 21502 – Allegany County ..........................................................................................................Wills Creek View Limited Partnership........................................ $13,000,000
Glenwood High-Rise (Morris H. Blum)..................... 154.............................701 Glenwood Street, Annapolis, MD 21401 – Anne Arundel County................................................................................................................Housing Authority of the City of Annapolis................................ $16,000,000
Catoctin View Renovation....................................... 100.............................800 Motter Ave., Frederick, MD 21701 – Frederick County ...............................................................................................................................Housing Authority of the City of Frederick ................................ $26,000,000
Mulberry Court ......................................................... 62..............................401 N Eutaw Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 – Baltimore City ..............................................................................................................................West Mulberry Partners, LLC....................................................... $9,000,000
Towns at Ashburton ................................................. 54 ..............................1511 Ashburton Street, Baltimore, MD 21216 – Baltimore City .........................................................................................................................Ashburton Street Associates, LLC.............................................. $16,000,000
Aberdeen Senior Apartments .................................. 45..............................34 N. Philadelphia Blvd., Aberdeen, MD 21001 – Harford County ......................................................................................................................Philadelphia Associates, LLC....................................................... $7,000,000
Main Street Apartments........................................... 70 ..............................50 Monroe Place, Rockville, MD 20850 – Montgomery County..........................................................................................................................50 Monroe Place Apartments, LLC ............................................ $22,000,000
Momentum at Shady Grove Metro ......................... 110.............................16011 Redland Road, Derwood, Maryland 20855 – Montgomery County ........................................................................................................SCG Development Partners ....................................................... $28,000,000
Ritchie Baptist Senior Living.................................... 150 .............................1706 Sansbury Road, Upper Marlboro MD 20774 – Prince George’s County ...................................................................................................Community Housing Initiative, Inc ............................................. $19,000,000
Glenarden Senior Living .......................................... 150.............................3600 Brightseat Rd.,Landover, MD 20785 – Prince George’s County.................................................................................................................Community Housing Initiative, Inc ............................................. $19,000,000
Highland Senior Living............................................. 150 .............................6801 Sheriff Rd. Hyattsville, MD 20785 – Prince George’s County ....................................................................................................................Community Housing Initiative, Inc ............................................. $19,000,000
Granite View Senior Living ...................................... 200 .............................7726 Johnnycake Road, Windsor Mill, MD 21244 – Baltimore County ...............................................................................................................Community Housing Initiative, Inc ............................................ $24,000,000
Reserve at Upper Marlboro..................................... 220 .............................15402, 15404, 15406, 15408, 15412, 15312 Marlboro Pike, 4661 & 4671 SW Crain Highway...........................................................................Community Housing Initiative, Inc ............................................. $25,000,000
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772 – Prince George’s County
Brandywine Senior Living........................................ 200.............................12301 Branch Avenue, Brandywine, MD 20613 – Prince George’s County .......................................................................................................Community Housing Initiative, Inc ............................................. $24,000,000
Germantown Senior Living...................................... 125.............................19258 Blunt Road, Germantown, MD 20876 –Montgomery County .................................................................................................................Community Housing Initiative, Inc ............................................. $15,000,000
Vansville Square ....................................................... 80 ..............................11701 Old Baltimore Pike, Beltsville, MD 20705- Prince George’s County.........................................................................................................Vansville Square, LLLP ................................................................ $21,000,000
Hillside Senior Living .............................................. 140.............................200 Skidmore Boulevard, Gaithersburg, MD 20877 - Montgomery County ......................................................................................................MRK Partners, Inc. ...................................................................... $38,000,000
900 Thayer............................................................... 124 .............................8240 Fenton Street, Silver Spring, MD 20910 – Montgomery County................................................................................................................Housing Opportunities Commission of Montgomery County ... $35,000,000
Elizabeth House III ................................................... 267 .............................1315 Apple Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20910 – Montgomery County................................................................................................................Housing Opportunities Commission of Montgomery County ... $78,000,000
Hillendale................................................................. 450 .............................10110 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20903 – Montgomery County.............................................................................................HOC at Hillendale Gateway, LLC................................................. $47,000,000
Upton - Phase II ....................................................... 150 .............................198 East Montgomery Avenue, Rockville, MD 20850 – Montgomery County ....................................................................................................Housing Opportunities Commission of Montgomery County .. $35,000,000
Georgian Court ........................................................ 147 .............................3600 Bel Pre Road, Silver Spring, MD 20906 – Montgomery County .................................................................................................................Georgian Court Silver Spring LP................................................. $17,000,000
Metropolitan............................................................. 92..............................7620 Old Georgetown Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 – Montgomery County ......................................................................................................Metropolitan of Bethesda LP ...................................................... $9,000,000
Oaks at Four Corners .............................................. 120 .............................321 University Boulevard West, Silver Spring, MD 20901 – Montgomery County .............................................................................................Oaks at Four Corners Development Corp.................................. $12,000,000
Shady Grove ............................................................ 144 .............................16100 Crabbs Branch Way, Rockville, MD 20855 – Montgomery County...........................................................................................................Shady Grove Apartments LP ...................................................... $23,000,000
Cider Mill ................................................................. 864 .............................18205 Lost Knife Circle, Montgomery Village, MD 20886 – Montgomery County..............................................................................................Housing Opportunities Commission of Montgomery County .. $150,000,000
Arden Forest Senior Living...................................... 200 .............................2706 Arden Forest Lane, Bowie, MD 20716 – Prince George’s County..............................................................................................................Community Housing Initiative, Inc. ............................................ $24,000,000
Bowie Senior Living ................................................. 200 .............................13910 Old Chapel Road, Bowie, MD 20715 – Prince George’s County ...................................................................................
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All interested parties are invited to submit written comments or present oral comments at the public hearing regarding the issuance of bonds, notes, or other obligations of the Administration and/or the State for the Projects being financed. Written comments
or notice of intent to present oral comments should be received by the Administration on or before Thursday, December 21, 2017 and should be submitted to Diane Melton, Housing Development Programs, 7800 Harkins Road, Lanham, Maryland 20706 or diane.
melton@maryland.gov. Oral comments will be limited to presentations of no more than five (5) minutes per person.
D10
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
851
Prince Georges County
HYATT & WEBER, P.A.
200 Westgate Circle, Suite 500
Annapolis, Maryland 21401
410-266-0626
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND FORECLOSURE SALE
WHEREAS, on January 28, 2005, a certain Deed of Trust was executed
by Patricia Stockton as Grantor(s) in favor of Mercantile Mortgage, LLC
as Beneficiary, and John Burson, Esq. as Trustee(s), and was recorded on
April 11, 2005, in Book 16166, Page 1 in the Office of the Land Records for
Anne Arundel County, Maryland; and
OF
VALUABLE, FEE-SIMPLE PROPERTY IMPROVED
BY A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
Known as
15812 Bald Eagle School Road, Brandywine, Maryland 20613
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Deed of
Trust from Robert S. Ballard, Jr. and Helen R. Ballard dated March 16, 2007,
and recorded in Liber 27420, folio 709, among the Land Records of Prince
George’s County, Maryland, default having occurred under the terms
thereof and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction approximately 21 feet to the
East of the Main Street Entrance (14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro)
to the Duvall Wing of the Court House for the Circuit Court for Prince
George’s County, Upper Marlboro, Maryland on:
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2017 AT 10:30 A.M.
ALL THAT property situated in Prince George’s County, Maryland and
described as follows:
Being part of the land of Roland Lee Early and Joan Dale Early, husband and
wife (Liber 17611, folio 702, part of Parcel One), located in the 4th Election
District, Prince George’s County, Maryland, and being more particularly
described as follows:
PARCEL E
Beginning at a concrete monument found on southeasterly corner of parcel
one of Roland Early (Liber 17611, folio 702), said monument being a common
corner with Russell G. Watson, Sr., et ux (Liber 6803 folio 964) and Robert
D. Arscott, et ux. (Liber 21953 folio 459); thence with the southerly line of
Parcel One of Roland Early and the northerly line of Robert D. Arscott, et ux.,
north 88 degrees 37 minutes 20 seconds west 578.54 feet to an iron pipe
set; thence south 81 degrees 59 minutes 20 seconds west 119.50 feet to an
iron pipe found in a creek; thence with Kenneth E. Bond (Liber 22279 folio
628), north 00 degrees 31 minutes 17 seconds east 410.92 feet to an iron
pipe found; thence along a new line of division through parcel one of Roland
Early, south 79 degrees 46 minutes 37 seconds east 310.00 feet to an iron
pipe set; thence south 34 degrees 46 minutes 37 seconds east 113.14 feet
to an iron pipe set; thence south 88 degrees 37 minutes 20 seconds east
346.62 feet to an iron pipe set; thence with Russell G. Watson, Sr., et ux,
(Liber 6803, folio 964), South 05 degrees 15 minutes 20 seconds west 252.94
feet to the point of beginning, containing 5.00 acres or 217,800 square feet.
Together with a 30’ right of way for ingress and egress and all utilities
leading to Bald Eagle School Road and described as follows: Beginning at a
point, said point being at the end of the above mentioned south 79 degrees
46 minutes 37 seconds east 310.00 feet line; thence contiguous, adjacent
and parallel to the following courses and distances, along the southerly line
of the right of way the next two courses and distances, north 79 degrees 46
minutes 37 seconds west 310.00 feet to a point; thence north 84 degrees 46
minutes 40 seconds west 226.04 feet to a point; thence along the easterly
line of the right of way the next two courses and distances, north 08
degrees 13 minutes 46 seconds west 324.32 feet to a pint; thence north
07 degrees 49 minutes 30 seconds east 68.33 feet to a point; thence with
the northerly line of the right of way the next two courses and distances,
north 78 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds west 294.86 feet; thence south 85
degrees 10 minutes 00 seconds west 564 feet to a point; thence with the
westerly line of the right of way north 07 degrees 29 minutes 40 seconds
east 821.29 feet to the southerly right of way line of Bald Eagle School Road.
The property and any improvements thereon will be sold subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record, or otherwise, affecting
the same, if any. The property and improvements thereon are being sold
without warranty, express or implied, of any kind, in "as is" condition. The
property will also be sold subject to the statutory right of the US Attorney’s
Office and United States of America Internal Revenue Service to redeem
the property for a period of 120 days after the sale.
TERMS OF SALE: A cash deposit or certified check for $92,000.00 required
of the purchaser at the time of sale, balance in cash, certified check or
cashier's check at settlement, which must occur within ten (10) days
following final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George’s
County, unless said period is extended by the Substitute Trustees, their
successors or assigns, in their sole discretion, time being of the essence.
Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 3.25% per
annum from the date of sale to date of settlement. In the event purchaser
fails to proceed to settlement as required herein, in addition to any other
legal or equitable remedies available to them, the Substitute Trustees may,
without further order of the court, declare the aforementioned deposit
forfeited and resell the property at the purchaser’s risk and expense. In
such event, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of
any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales,
reasonable attorneys’ fees, all other charges due, and incidental damages.
The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds
resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements
to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Adjustment of current year’s
real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter
assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any
tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any
recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges
or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive the foreclosure sale,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or
after the sale are to be paid by the purchaser. It shall be the responsibility
of the purchaser to obtain possession of the property. Purchaser assumes
the risk of loss or damage from the date of sale forward. The sale is
subject to the foreclosing lender’s (or servicer’s) post-sale audit of the
status of the loan, including, but not limited to, determination of whether
the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid
off the loan prior to the sale. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer
taxes, title examination, document preparation and title insurance shall
be borne by the purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First
Time Home Buyer. The Substitute Trustees reserve the right to modify
the requirements for bidders' deposits, to withdraw the property from
the sale prior to the termination of bidding and to postpone the sale. If
Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title to the
property, the sole remedy of the purchaser shall be limited to the refund
of the deposit of the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale
shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The beneficiary, or any subsidiary
of beneficiary, named in the deed of trust being foreclosed upon shall be
excused from posting a deposit.
The information contained herein was obtained from sources deemed to
be reliable, but is offered for information purposes only. The Substitute
Trustees do not make any representations or warranties with respect to
the accuracy of this information.
Financing may be available for qualified successful bidder. Please contact
Christie Hambruch at 410-260-2000 for more information.
Alan J. Hyatt, Jonathan M. Wall and Robert D. Miller, Substitute Trustees.
WHEREAS, the Deed of Trust was insured by the United States Secretary of
Housing and Urban Development (the Secretary) pursuant to the National
Housing Act for the purpose of providing single family housing; and
WHEREAS, the Deed of Trust is now owned by the Secretary, pursuant
to an assignment dated October 8, 2014, and recorded on October 29,
2014, in Book 27752, Page 346, in the office of the Land Records for Anne
Arundel County, Maryland; and
WHEREAS, a default has been made in the covenants and conditions of
the Deed of Trust in that the payment due on May 22, 2017, was not made
and remains wholly unpaid as of the date of this notice, and no payment
has been made sufficient to restore the loan to currency; and
WHEREAS, the entire amount delinquent as of October 26, 2017 is
$154,544.02; and WHEREAS, by virtue of this default, the Secretary has
declared the entire amount of the indebtedness secured by the Deed of
Trust to be immediately due and payable;
NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family
Mortgage Foreclosure Act of I 994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part
27, subpart B, and by the Secretary's designation of me as Foreclosure
Commissioner, notice is hereby given that on December 19, 2017 at 10:00
am local time, all real and personal property at or used in connection
with the following described premises ("Property") will be sold at public
auction to the highest bidder:
Commonly known as: 419 M Street Northeast, Glen Burnie, MD 21061
Tax ID: 05-016-15619800
The sale will be held at the courthouse entrance for the Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, Maryland.
The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development will bid $154,544.02.
There will be no proration of taxes, rents or other income or liabilities,
except that the purchaser will pay, at or before closing, his prorata share
of any real estate taxes that have been paid by the Secretary to the date
of the foreclosure sale.
When making their bids, all bidders except the Secretary must submit a
deposit totaling $15,400.00 in the form of a certified check or cashier's
check made out to the Secretary of HUD. A deposit need not accompany
each oral bid. If the successful bid is oral, a deposit of $15,400.00 must
be presented before the bidding is closed. The deposit is nonrefundable.
The remainder of the purchase price must be delivered within 30 days
of the sale or at such other time as the Secretary may determine for
good cause shown, time being of the essence. This amount, like the bid
deposits, must be delivered in the form of a certified or cashier's check.
If the Secretary is the highest bidder, he need not pay the bid amount in
cash. The successful bidder will pay all conveying fees, all real estate and
other taxes that are due on or after the delivery date of the remainder of
the payment and all other costs associated with the transfer of title. At
the conclusion of the sale, the deposits of the unsuccessful bidders will be
returned to · them.
The Secretary may grant an extension of time within which to deliver the
remainder of the payment. All extensions will be for 15-day increments
for a fee of$500.00, paid in advance. The extension fee shall be in the form
of a certified or cashier's check made payable to the Secretary of HUD.
If the high bidder closes the sale prior to the expiration of any extension
period, the unused portion of the extension fee shall be applied toward
the amount due.
If the high bidder is unable to close the sale within the required period,
or within any extensions of time granted by the Secretary, the high bidder
may be required to forfeit the cash deposit or, at the election of the
foreclosure commissioner after consultation with the HUD representative,
will be liable to HUD for any costs incurred as a result of such failure. The
Commissioner may, at the direction of the HUD representative, offer the
property to the second highest bidder for an amount equal to the highest
price offered by that bidder.
There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based upon a right
of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosure
completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure Commissioner
will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire purchase
price in accordance with the terms of the sale as provided herein. HUD
does not guarantee that the property will be vacant.
The scheduled foreclosure sale shall be cancelled or adjourned if it is
established, by documented written application of the mortgagor to the
Foreclosure Commissioner not less than 3 days before the date of sale,
or otherwise, that the default or defaults upon which the foreclosure is
based did not exist at the time of service of this notice of default and
foreclosure sale, or all amounts due under the mortgage agreement are
tendered to the Foreclosure Commissioner, in the form of a certified or
cashier's check payable to the Secretary of HUD, before public auction of
the property is completed.
The amount that must be paid if the mortgage is to be reinstated prior to
the scheduled sale is N/A (full amount due) as of N/A (Full amount due),
plus all other amounts that would be due under the mortgage agreement
if payments under the mortgage had not been accelerated, advertising
costs and postage expenses incurred in giving notice, mileage by the
most reasonable road distance for posting notices and for the Foreclosure
Commissioner's attendance at the sale, reasonable and customary
costs incurred for title and lien record searches, the necessary out-ofpocket costs incurred by the Foreclosure Commissioner for recording
documents, a commission for the Foreclosure Commissioner, and all other
costs incurred in connection with the foreclosure prior to reinstatement.
Tender of payment by certified or cashier's check or application for
cancellation of the foreclosure sale shall be submitted to the address of
the Foreclosure Commissioner provided below.
Date: November 13, 2017
Cohn, Goldberg & Deutsch, LLC
Foreclosure Commissioner
/s/ Richard E. Solomon
Cohn, Goldberg & Deutsch, LLC
600 Baltimore Avenue, Suite 208
Towson, MD 21204
410-296-2550
IF YOU ARE A DEBTOR, OR AN ATTORNEY REPRESENTING A DEBTOR,
THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY
INFORMATION OBTAINED HEREBY WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.
However, if you are either a debtor in a pending bankruptcy case, or
have obtained an order of discharge from a United States Bankruptcy
Court, which discharge includes this debt, or an attorney representing
such a debtor, and you (or your client), has not reaffirmed liability for
this debt, this office is not attempting to obtain a judgment against you
(or your client) nor are we alleging that you (or your client) have any
personal liability for this debt. We may, however, take action against any
property which may have been pledged as collateral for the debt, which
action may include repossession and/or foreclosure of the property, if
otherwise permitted by law and/or order of court.
November 30, December 7, 14, 2017
12145356
872
November 30, December 7, 14, 2017
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
The Estate of Jerry Herring
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-21471
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
v.
The Estate of Gerald Eric Robinson
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-22404
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 27th day of November 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 5011 38th Avenue, Hyattsville,
Maryland 20782, made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Hugh J. Green, Shannon
Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and
Brian Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 27th day of
December, 2017, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 27th day of December, 2017.
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 29th day of November 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 1116 Patriot Lane, Bowie, Maryland 20716, made and reported
by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
Hugh J. Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and Brian
Thomas, Substitute Trustees, be
RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless
cause to the contrary be shown on
or before the 28th day of December, 2017, provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post once in each of three (3)
successive weeks before the 28th
day of December, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $166,441.67.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $163,897.50.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 7, 14, 21, 2017
12146777
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 7, 14, 21, 2017
12146782
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Eric T. Graham and Lolita Graham
Defendant(s)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
The Estate of Patricia R. Quimby
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-15687
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 27th day of November 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 13218 Ronehill Drive, Beltsville,
Maryland 20705, made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Hugh J. Green, Shannon
Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and
Brian Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 27th day of
December, 2017, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 27th day of December, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $298,620.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 7, 14, 21, 2017
12146778
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
Civil No. CAEF17-14822
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 28th day of November 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 1330 Gabes Place, Hyattsville,
Maryland 20785, made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Hugh J. Green and Patrick
M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 28th day of
December, 2017, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 28th day of December, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $144,400.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 7, 14, 21, 2017
12146780
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $420,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.625000% dated
January 27, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 1817, Page
0633, the undersigned appointed
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction all that
property located in the COUNTY
OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse
steps at the front of the Circuit
Court building for the County of
Fairfax located at 4110 Chain
Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on
January 3, 2018 at 2:30 PM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 015-4-06-00-0050
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-270857.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Nov 30, Dec 7, 2017
12145795
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2112 GREEN WATCH WAY,
UNIT 101,
RESTON, VA 20191
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $299,950.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.000000% dated
February 6, 2007, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 19112,
Page 0126, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on December 20, 2017 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0262-05-10101F
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-270404.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
12144064
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-260708.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Nov 30, Dec 7, 2017
12144638
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
877
Spotsylvania County
SF
Membership is rewarding.
www.hwestauctions.com
877
877
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
10021 LANDRUM ROAD,
SPOTSYLVANIA, VA 22553.
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
11001 PLATOON DR,
SPOTSYLVANIA, VA 22551.
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated December 18, 2015,
in the original principal amount
of $491,456.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 150021353 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Spotsylvania County,
9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia on January 11,
2018, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT,
PIECE, OR PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN CHANCELLOR MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT,
SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
AND DESCRIBED AS LOT 290, SECTION 7, PHASE II, ESTATES OF
CHANCELLORSVILLE, ON PLAT OF
SUBDIVISION OF RECORD AS
LR201400010618, IN THE CLERK‘S
OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3227651.
Dec. 7, 14, 2017
12147415
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated December 13, 2006,
in the original principal amount
of $191,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 200600042967 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on January
11, 2018 , at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN PIECE,
PARCEL OR LOT OF LAND SITUATE,
LYING AND BEING IN CHANCELLOR
MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA, CONTAINING 5.000 ACRES, MORE OR
LESS AND BEING SHOWN ON A
PLAT OF "RIVER WILL" PREPARED
BY EVERETT D. GRISSOM, C.L.S.,
DATED MAY 10, 1976, AND DULY
RECORDED IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE
OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA, IN
DEED BOOK 390, PAGE 150, AS
LOT# 19. THERE IS ALSO CONVEYED A RIGHT-OF-WAY FROM
STATE ROUTE #627 THROUGH THE
PROPERTY OF ABRAMS ACQUIRED
FROM ROSA GRAUBE MITCHELL,
ET AL. BY DEED DATED JULY 6,
1960, AND DULY RECORDED IN
THE CLERK‘S OFFICE AFORESAID
IN DEED BOOK 195, PAGE 8, AND
THROUGH
THE
EASEMENT
ACQUIRED FROM VIVIAN EARL
DICKINSON, ET ALS., DATED SEPTEMBER 7, 1976, AND RECORDED IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE AFORESAID IN DEED BOOK 400, PAGE
303.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated April 29, 2011, in
the original principal amount of
$144,369.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. LR 201100006908.
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on February
8, 2018 , at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND WITH ALL BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS THEREON AND ALL RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES APPURTENANT THERETO,
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN
CHANCELLOR MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY,
VIRGINIA, DESIGNATED AS LOT
162, SECTION 16, LAKE WILDERNESS SUBDIVISION, AS SHOWN ON
A PLAT OF SURVEY MADE BY
ELLIOT & ASSOCIATES, DATED
APRIL 1971 AND RECORDED IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA IN PLAT FILE 9, PAGES
109, ET SEQ.
Home delivery is so easy.
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IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054E 2x2
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence. If
the sale is set aside for any reason,
the Purchaser at the sale shall be
entitled to a return of the deposit
paid. The Purchaser may, if provided by the terms of the Trustee’s
Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale,
be entitled to a $50 cancellation
fee from the Substitute Trustee,
but shall have no further recourse
against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
Additional terms to be announced
at the sale. A form copy of the
Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and contract to purchase
real property is available for viewing at www.bwwsales.com. This
is a communication from a debt
collector and any information
obtained will be used for that purpose. The sale is subject to seller
confirmation. Substitute Trustee:
Equity Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson
Blvd., Suite 1004, Arlington, VA
22201. For more information contact: BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003
Executive
Blvd, Suite
101,
Rockville, MD 20852, 301-9616555,
website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3237131.
Dec. 7, 14, 2017
878
Howard County
12144269 NOVEMBER 23, 30, DECEMBER 7, 2017
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
13501 GENERAL HANCOCK COURT,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22407
KLMNO
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
877
857
Howard County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
5067 Columbia Road, Unit 18-12
Columbia, MD 21044
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
HENRY T. GIDDINS JR AND TIFFANY L. PAULEY , dated
November 10, 2006 and recorded in Liber 10371, folio 500
among the Land Records of HOWARD COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case
No.13C17112715; Tax ID No.15-087927 ) the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING,
9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 562432)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 23, 30, DECEMBER 7, 2017
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2017
EZ
857
Howard County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11905 Mekenie Court
Marriottsville, MD 21104
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
SYED Z. ZEESHAN, dated November 16, 2005 and recorded in
Liber 09693, folio 172 among the Land Records of HOWARD
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.13C17111570; Tax ID No.03334678 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD,
COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 560084)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
CLASSIFIED
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $266,690.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.000000% dated
September 18, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number 200609220137304,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on December 19, 2017
at 4:00 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 7892-48-7968
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Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
13110 CANOVA DRIVE,
MANASSAS, VA 20112
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2424 TERRA COTTA CIRCLE,
HERNDON, VA 20171
Nov 30, Dec 7, 2017
Wake up
to home delivery.
873
Fairfax County
857
Howard County
12147412
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3225431.
Dec. 7, 2017, Jan. 3, 10, 2018
12147417
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $217,600.00, dated September
22, 2006 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in
Document No. LR200600035060,
default having occurred in the
payment of the Note thereby
secured and at the request of
the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at
the entrance to the Spotsylvania
County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, on
January 2, 2018 at 12:00 PM the
property described in said deed,
located at the above address and
briefly described as:
Lot 25, Section 1, Stoneybrooke,
with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (53807)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Dec 7, 14, 2017
12147137
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 7, 2006,
in the original principal amount
of $465,600.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 060026082 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
January 11, 2018 , at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN FALMOUTH/HARTWOOD MAGISTERIAL
DISTRICT, STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA SHOWN AND DESCRIBED AS
LOT 3R, MANSFIELD MANOR CONTAINING 1.901 ACRES ON PLAT
ENTITLED, "LOT LINE ADJUSTMENT
LOT 3 MANSFIELD MANOR" BY
DONALD L. KNISELY, L.S. , DATED
APRIL 5, 1999, RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 33, PAGES 156-157 OF THE
LAND RECORDS OF STAFFORD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3237481.
Dec. 7, 14, 2017
12147157
TRUSTEE SALE
3 Thornberry Lane,
Stafford, VA 22556
Stafford County
SF
Frederick County
TRUSTEE SALE
104 Forked Horn Trail,
Winchester, VA 22602
Frederick County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$126,000.00, dated April 9, 2004
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of the Frederick
County, Virginia, in Document No.
040006176, at Page 0332, default
having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Circuit Court of Frederick County, 5
North Kent Street, Winchester, on
December 19, 2017 at 2:15 PM the
property described in said deed,
located at the above address and
briefly described as:
Lot 3, Section O, Shawneeland,
with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (56143)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Nov 30, Dec 7, 2017
12145912
Career Training - Emp Svcs
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$174,480.00, dated June 13, 2003
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of the Stafford
County, Virginia, in Document No.
LR030023551 and modified in Document No. LR170003056, default
having occurred in the payment
of the Note thereby secured and
at the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
at the entrance to the Judicial
Center, 1300 Courthouse Road,
Stafford, on December 19, 2017 at
11:00 AM the property described
in said deed, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
Lot 110, Section 1, Devon Green,
with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (14967)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Nov 30, Dec 7, 2017
12145911
ATTEND AVIATION COLLEGE
- Get FAA approved Aviation
Maintenance training. Financial aid for qualified students.
Job placement assistance.
Call AIM for free information
888-896-7869
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To apply, go to
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(Please press “0”
once connected)
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Roommates
NE DC- double furnished room.
Good bus location. $250/week
and utilities incl. 202-526-8268
NE - Sm furn. rm, shr BA & kit., $450
per month utilities are split 4 ways.
Call 301-523-4772
NW DC- furnished room with bath.
Good bus location. $250 per week
and utilities incl. 301-807-4808
PETWORTH 1 Furn rm, free cable/
int., nr Petw. Sta. $800/mo. all
utils incl. Shirley 202-723-1742
MARYLAND
Roommates
CAPITAL HEIGHTS / SEAT PLEASANTM pref to share house. $160 and up/
week. Good transp. 301-499-6323
Capital Heights room to rent
shared utils, $500, N/P, N/S
240-338-0955
COLLEGE PARK - Furn room in pvt
home. $565/mo, sec dep req. No
smoking. Pref male. 240-423-7923
COLLEGE PARK - Furn rooms for rent,
$550-$650/month plus utilities.
Security dep req. Call 240-422-5191
FORT WASHINGTON- Large house to
share. Free cable. Close to MGM.
W/D. $150/wk. Call 240-882-8973
Home delivery
is convenient.
Germantown-furn1BR, all util incl, wifi, cable. 1st & last mo rent req move
in. 240-671-3783 or 301-916-8158
Landover - Pref Male to share house.
Furn BR. $175/wk inc all utils. No
sec dep. Near Metro. 301-516-1243
1-800-753-POST
SF
LANHAM - 2 Rooms avail in private
home, $560 & $580/mo, Incl Utils,
A/C, Street Prkg, quiet. 240-645-2380
Largo— $700, 1 bedrm, 1 ba,
8941 Town Center Circle, 240425-2873
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
LARGO - Across from PG College,
$675/month incl elect + water.
Call: 301-523-4772
1-800-753-POST
SF
MITCHELLVILLE - Rooms in modern
house, close to Metro & Woodmore
Town Center. $600. 240-601-5199
TEMPLE HILLS- Furnished room for
rent, Shared BA, near subway. Utils
& Cable incl. $180/wk. 301-919-5150
Home delivery
is convenient.
VIRGINIA
Roommates
Alex/Old-Town Furn 1BR. in shr'd 3
story gorgeous TH. garden. laundry.
prkg. utils incl $1500 202-809-7306
1-800-753-POST
SF
Falls Church City— N/S M share quiet
house near Rtes 29&7,unfurn, $750
incl util. 703-244-1942
Falls Church City— N/S M share clean
quiet house near rtes 7&29, unfurn,
$750 incl util. 703-244-1942
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
JOBS
Newspapers carriers
needed to deliver
The Washington Post
in
DC, MD and VA area.
Great part-time
income opportunity!
Transportation
required.
SF
Springfield— $950, furnished basement, 1 ba, 1 1/2ba, 703-912-5616,
Deck, DW, WW Carpet, HSI.
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
To place your
legal notice in the
Classified section:
Call:
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
202-334-7007
e-mail:
legalnotices@washpost.com
1-800-753-POST
SF
TRUSTEE SALE
10700 Bluebird Lane,
Spotsylvania, VA 22553
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
254 GREENBANK ROAD,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22406-5400.
LEGAL NOTICES
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
12144265
Spotsylvania County
882
Stafford County
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
WP 2x2
SF
From dramas and musicals to stand-up and
ballet, discover great ways to save money,
win tickets and have fun at the theater.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
PostPoints takes you to
the best shows in town.
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
S2930 10x3
851
12144226
857
THE WASHINGTON POST
THE DISTRICT EDITION
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2017
Local Living
Simplify the season
How to enjoy the holidays with less stuff, less stress and more joy. PAGE 10
2
INSID E
the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
DC
4
6
8
12
13
16
19
Splurge or Save
Home Front
Gardening
Wellness
Parenting
Crime report
Code violations
ON THE COVER
Illustration by Zoe
Ingram for The
Washington Post
LOCAL LIVING
STAFF
Editor: Kendra
Nichols • Deputy
Editors: Amy
Joyce, Mari-Jane
Williams • Art
Director: Amanda
Soto • Designer:
J.C. Reed • Staff
Writers: Jura
Koncius, Megan
McDonough
• Columnists:
Adrian Higgins,
Meghan Leahy
ADVERTISING
Doug Coffelt,
202-334-4440
• Email
localliving@
washpost.com
• Telephone
202-334-4409
• Mail Local
Living section,
The Washington
Post, 1301 K St.
NW, Washington,
D.C. 20071
Home
HOW TO
Remove algae, mold or mildew from vinyl siding
BY
J EANNE H UBER
Q: I have lived in my house for
25 years. Just in the past couple
of years, some kind of mold or
mildew has formed on the vinyl
siding on the north side of the
house. Why is this happening,
and what do I need to do to
address it? If it is physically
challenging or involves
chemicals, can I hire someone
to remove it?
Rockville
A: Whatever the type of siding,
algae, mold and mildew are
most likely to form on the north
side of a house because it stays
shaded and damp. Several
factors might explain why that
didn’t happen before. Perhaps
trees weren’t as tall? Or it could
be that the vinyl was slicker
when it was new and that bits of
grime that became attached
over the years now give rain a
better grip.
Regardless of the explanation,
the growth should come off
fairly easily if you wash the
wall with a little soap and
water, using a soft cloth or a
long-handled, soft-bristle
brush, like what you’d use to
wash a car. Hardware stores and
home centers carry specialty
cleaners that are gentle and
work well.
The Vinyl Siding Institute, a
trade group (vinylsiding.org),
recommends starting at the
bottom of the wall and working
up, taking care to rinse
thoroughly as you finish each
area. Although it might seem to
make more sense to start at the
top, working up from the
bottom minimizes the chance of
having dirt-laden, soapy water
dry on the siding and stick.
You can probably use a power
washer, although the Vinyl
READER PHOTO
The north side of a house is a prime spot for algae, mold and mildew because it stays shaded and damp.
Siding Institute recommends
checking with the manufacturer
first. But when siding is 25 years
old or older, as in your case, the
likelihood that the company is
still in business, even if you
know the name, is slim.
If you want to hire someone,
the crew will almost certainly
want to use a power washer.
As a rough guide for what it
might cost, Kevco Building
Services (800-391-5291;
kevco1.com), a company that
cleans siding throughout the
Washington area, charges a
minimum of $189 to clean one
or two sides of a house, a
minimum of $229 to clean three
sides, and a minimum of $269
for four sides. The price could
rise if the house is large or
especially tall. Kevco looks
online to see if there is a picture
Morring Jr. and Beatrice E. Edwards
to Matthew Hudson Arnn and Corrie
Schoenberg, $1.39 million.
Channing St., 224-Romeo Canales
and Ana Parada to Aric Lavinthal,
$510,000.
Constitution Ave., 1335, No. A-Neil
E. Laslett and Amelia T. Peltz to
Christopher Sterling Perry and Brian
Hackney, $715,000.
Eads St., 5804-Stanley R. and
Angela Duval to Nichole L.
Blackmon, $325,000.
Gallatin St., 1225-Dilan
Investment Corp. to Nicholas J. and
Samantha B. Ackerson, $626,800.
K St., 414-Mildred Hymes and Clif
Hymes to Saida Frankinburger,
$650,000.
Maryland Ave., 703-John L. Slack
to Deborah Slack, $675,000.
Morton Pl., 628-Robert Dellsy to
Jacqueline M. Leonard, $699,900.
Peabody St., 318-VBS Community
Builders Corp. to Jennifer S. Isaacs
and Bridget Hinkebein, $759,000.
Queen St., 1521-Clifton Langdon
and Kirsi Grigg to Tricia L. Wilkins,
$422,000.
Regent Pl., 594-Barbara A. and
of your house; if there is, the
company can give you a more
precise estimate over the phone.
When necessary, it sends a crew
to take a look and then gives an
estimate.
Have a problem in your home?
Send questions to localliving@
washpost.com. Put “How To” in the
subject line, tell us where you live
and try to include a photo.
Home Sales
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
These sales data recorded by the
D.C. Office of Tax and Revenue were
provided by Black Knight Financial
Services. For information about
other residential real estate
transactions, visit
www.washingtonpost.com/
homesales.
NORTHEAST
Brooks St., 4620-Anthony
Petriccione to Jamal Dinn Hamed
and Lesley A. Stewart, $249,900.
Capitol St. E., 1206-Thomas F.
Brian T. Engelland to Francine A.
and Joseph W. Galassi, $792,000.
11th St., 1004-Joyce C. Williams to
Jason J. Kaldani, $705,000.
18th Pl., 319-Reno Road Corp. to
Christopher and Rosemarie
Connelly, $709,000.
19th St., 765-Christopher E. and
Kathryn M. Douglas to Hannah T.
and Renato Morado, $575,000.
33rd St., 222-Elaine Winston
Kenner and Lettice Peters Sazon to
Scott S. Frick and Jennifer L.
Hadden, $227,500.
HOMES CONTINUED ON 19
3
DC
12/17/17
12/28/17
Cyprus Air Heating and Cooling
157 Reviews as of 12/5/2017
12/17/17
!" #! !$ $% &! '(%)* % +*" ,"%% $-(!.% %'/.0% !" 123 &*$%4*5 6 '%7%
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the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
4.3
4
the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
DC
Home
SPLURGE OR SAVE
$220
Four Royal Copenhagen White Plain
dinner plates (scullyandscully.com)
Set high
expectations
for your
holiday table
$107.80
Four Olivia dinner plates (crateandbarrel.com)
BY MEGAN MCDONOUGH
$300
Four five-piece twig flatware place
settings (neimanmarcus.com)
Entertaining over the holidays? Setting a
festive dining room table is an easy way to
create a warm and joyful setting for your
celebrations.
“In a world of haste, taking the time and
effort to lay a beautiful table adds to the
festive mood of any occasion and makes the
event even more special,” New York-based
textile designer Michael Devine says.
Known for his hand-printed fabrics and
fine home furnishings, Devine recommends
a classic tartan tablecloth as a colorful base
for your holiday table. He plans to use a red
one this holiday season.
“I wanted to do a classical Christmas that
harkened back to Scotland and the
traditions that have been upheld there for
generations,” Devine says. “Tartan prints are
often passed down in families in the U.K.
At Christmastime, I like to think of the
generations upon generations that have
come together to celebrate the season.”
Set a beautiful table for your guests with
his holiday suggestions.
$340
Set of three
Suzanne Kasler
vintage
mini trees
(ballarddesigns.com)
Arbor 20-piece flatware set in silver (pier1.com)
$98
Four Duke dessert plates (ralphlauren.com)
$49
$99.95
Four New Traditional tartan salad/
dessert plates (neimanmarcus.com)
Michael Devine
$28.48
More Splurge
or Save online
Set of three
graduated
bottle brush
trees with
decorations
(qvc.com)
For more of Devine’s picks, go
to washingtonpost.com/home.
megan.mcdonough
@washpost.com
PRODUCT PHOTOS FROM RETAILERS
DC
5
12/22/17
1.888.821.5708
12/22/17
the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
12/22/17
6
DC
Home
HOME FRONT
Advice on gift etiquette, invitations and finding the perfect present
Ashley Bronczek and Candace Ourisman, who own
the gift concierge service
Secretly Gifting, joined
Ashley
staff writer
Bronczek, left, Jura Koncius
and Candace
last week on
Ourisman
our Home
Front online
chat. Here is an edited excerpt.
are not using or displaying the
gift, you should give it away.
Q: My neighbor and I often cat-
sit for each other. What’s a good
gift for him?
A: That’s adorable. What’s a
better gift than a cat gift? You
already know that he loves cats.
We recently saw a funny DJ cat
scratching pad. It’s an actual cat
toy. Google it!
Q: What are some good kids’
gifts this year that aren’t
technology?
A: It depends on the age. We love
a personalized winter hat or
terry-cloth bathrobe. The
parents will always appreciate
something useful. For older
children, we love a great art gift
so that they explore their
creativity.
Q: Should you open your hostess
gifts at the end of your party,
while guests are still there? Do
you have to send texts to
everyone thanking them?
A: Our general rule is to wait
until the end of the party or the
next day to open your gifts
because you will have many
things to tend to during the
event. The exception to the rule
is if you are asked to open the
gift by the giver, in which case
you should do so.
Q: Is it better to send a gift in the
mail or bring it in person?
A: If you are going to see the
person, bring the gift along. If
the busy holiday season doesn’t
have you crossing paths, mailing
the gift is perfectly fine. FedEx is
your friend.
the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
Q: What are some great gifts if
we’re focusing on quality family
time vs. more stuff this year?
A: We love a great board game
that will bring the family
together for some device-free
time. There are even a few
companies that create
personalized board games to
make the gift feel more special.
Q: What would you recommend
Q: I like the Maldon salt gift and
salt cellar you recommended in
The Washington Post Magazine
feature. What else could I add to
those items in a gift basket?
A: We are so glad that you liked
that gift idea. It’s one of our
favorites. There are some
fabulous salt cookbooks. Add
one of those and that gift would
be amazing.
JENNIFER CHASE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The Secretly Gifting duo recommends Maldon sea salt flakes with an acacia salt cellar as a host or
hostess gift.
togethers. If you have a decent
lead time, paper is always best.
Who doesn’t love getting an
invite in the mail?
Q: What if you are having a party
Q: How do you tell a friend to
stop giving you expensive gifts?
It’s unnecessary, and I really
can’t afford to give what she
gives, even though I might like
to.
A: This is a great question that
we get all the time. Your friend
clearly loves giving you the highticket items, so just enjoy. She is
not expecting the same level of
gift in return. A thoughtful
thank-you note is the way to go
on this one.
Q: Do you think sending paper
invitations is nicer than using
the company Paperless Post?
A: Paperless Post has some
fabulous designs, and there are
times that call for an online
invite. We mostly use Paperless
Post for last-minute get-
and don’t want any gifts? Should
you write that on the invite?
A: Absolutely. You can say
something cheeky like “Your
presence is the only present
desired.”
Q: Can you share some of your
favorite shopping destinations in
the Washington area? I’m
looking to find some more
unusual gifts this year.
A: Some of our favorites are
Blush Med Skincare for the
beauty junkie, the Cookery for
the foodie, and A Mano for
housewares and hostess gifts.
something that your friends
would enjoy, feel free to use it.
A: Some people don’t love to
kick back and drink a beer, so
money would be best.
Q: Are gift cards good presents?
They don’t do anything for me,
but I’d like to thank the gym
locker attendant.
A: How thoughtful of you to
thank the gym locker attendant.
If you feel inclined, a delicious
food option would be great. We
included a hot-chocolate-on-astick package by Ticket
Chocolate in our gift guide for
The Washington Post Magazine.
Q: Is it okay to buy 12 of the
same item and give it to
everyone whose party you attend
this holiday season?
A: If the gift is great and fairly
general, why not share it with
everyone?
Q: I’m not trying to cheap out,
Q: The city trash collectors
but I have unused gifts that
would make a perfect hostess
gift. Should I regift them?
A: Absolutely. If the gift is
always beep their horn and
remind us that they deserve a
gift. Is beer or money better? Or
what else can we give them?
as a good Christmas gift for inlaws who have recently
downsized? They truly don’t
need any more stuff, so it’s
getting harder to pinpoint a
meaningful gift.
A: A gift that they would
probably cherish most would be
time spent with you and your
significant other. Plan an
evening at a fabulous restaurant
or a day trip to a vineyard.
Q: I would love to give books as
presents, but how can I find a
good one? Something not
controversial, something the
recipient would gladly read and
not leave lying around to collect
dust.
A: It is always nice to give a gift
that speaks to the recipient’s
interests and passions. If you
keep that in mind, the book is
sure to be a hit. We also love a
great coffee table book.
Assouline has a fabulous
collection.
Q: If a good friend who comes to
your house only about four times
a year gives you a gift, what are
your thoughts on getting rid of
it? I have too much stuff and
don’t love the gift, so can I give it
away? Or do I have to keep it and
put it out when she visits?
A: Our general rule is that if you
Q: What is the appropriate gift
for my cleaning lady? I’d like to
give her cash but also a gift.
A: How about a cute and
functional tote bag? If you are
somewhere that is cold in the
winter, a hat and scarf would be
nice. We recommend giving
something useful.
Q: What are some gift
recommendations for my
children’s teachers? What would
be a great gift for multiple
teachers in the same room (they
are co-teachers, three total) and
a gift for just one teacher?
A: Teachers have lots of notes to
write throughout the year. A
great set of stationery would be a
lovely gift.
localliving@washpost.com
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read the rest of this transcript and
submit questions to the next chat,
Thursday at 11 a.m., at
live.washingtonpost.com.
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Home
Dreaming of a white (or pink) poinsettia?
In the six weeks
leading up to
Christmas, one
plant seems to
come out of the
woodwork to
Adrian
redefine the whole
Higgins
festive landscape.
The red and
GARDENING
green poinsettia is
as timeless as Bing
Crosby crooning “White
Christmas,” though the
appearance of more than 30
million plants is anything but
automatic. Since the spring,
skilled but nervous growers
across the land have been raising
one of their most economically
important, and finicky, crops.
This is only one aspect of
poinsettia dynamics. Since a
canny California cut-flower
grower named Paul Ecke Sr. came
up with the idea of the poinsettia
as a potted plant for the holidays,
breeders have been trying to
perfect it.
Some of the shifts have been
aesthetic: decorator poinsettias
in lime green, ivory or burgundy,
poinsettias whose petal-like
bracts are flecked, marbled,
splashed and otherwise turned
into something that will spur
your Aunt Mabel to wonder what
they will think of next.
Other breeding improvements
are not obvious to consumers but
critical to growers and retailers in
the way the plant can be grown
and shipped and hold up outside
the greenhouse.
As recently as 20 years ago or
so, poinsettias were seen as the
plant you hoped would not break
apart or drop most of its leaves
before Santa arrived.
But over the past two to three
years, consumers have seen a
conspicuous shift in the look of
the poinsettia. The classic
ebullient poinsettias still
predominate, especially the reds,
but you may notice some
curiously different plants. They
are smaller and more compact
but effervescent with spearshaped petals that appear in
whorls layered one on top of the
other. (Poinsettia “flowers” are
botanically bracts that surround
the true flowers.) The range of
varieties is still limited — more
are in the works — but already
they are available in both soft and
vivid pinks, the latter with a neon
glow. They’re so hot, they’re cool.
Another significant color shift
is in a white variety named
Princettia Pure White. It is a clear
bone white, unlike the creamy
whites of other poinsettias. It is a
tint that poinsettia breeders have
been chasing for decades.
To date, all poinsettias were
derived from a single species
Princettia Pure White fulfills a
long-held dream by poinsettia
breeders for a bright white hue.
Luv U Soft Pink is one of several
new hybrids creating a buzz in
the poinsettia world.
PHOTOS BY ADRIAN HIGGINS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Seven of the new hybrids are on display at the U.S. Botanic Garden through Jan. 1 as
part of the conservatory’s “Season’s Greenings” exhibit.
The new varieties are compact but smothered in flowering bracts that
keep on coming because of the sterility of the true flowers. This hybrid is
Luv U Hot Pink from Paul Ecke Ranch in Encinitas, Calif.
found in western Mexico named
Euphorbia pulcherrima. This
grows into a tall, rangy shrub
whose scarlet bracts appear in the
winter.
The smaller and floriferous
new varieties are hybrids between
this species and another, a
summer bloomer named the
dogwood poinsettia (Euphorbia
cornastra). Rarely seen, either in
the wild or in cultivation,
specimens were collected from
Mexico in the early 1990s by
graduate students at the
University of Texas. One of them
was Alice Le Duc, who saw the
potential value of the clear white
flowers in crossbreeding with the
Christmas poinsettia, and she
passed some of her stock to the
breeders at the Ecke Ranch. (The
company has since been sold to a
European breeder, Dümmen
Orange, but maintains its own
breeding program.) The new
hybrids are now reaching
consumers in three separate
brands: Princettia, from Suntory
Flowers; Luv U Pink, from the
Paul Ecke Ranch; and J’Adore,
from Dümmen Orange.
John Dole, who coordinates
North Carolina State University’s
poinsettia trials program, sees the
hybrids as a milestone in the
history of the poinsettia. “It’s
pretty major, and it could be on a
par with some of the other
breakthroughs,” he said. These
include poinsettias that hold their
leaves and grow bushy without
having to pinch stems.
You can view these hybrids at
the U.S. Botanic Garden
conservatory at 100 Maryland
Ave. SW, where a rear gallery is
devoted to a gently didactic
exhibition of the history of the
poinsettia in U.S. floriculture. The
display in the South Transition is
part of the “Season’s Greenings”
holiday exhibit, which runs
through Jan. 1.
The wild Christmas poinsettia
is now hard to find in the United
States, so plant curator William
McLaughlin has bred his own
crosses to approximate it, with
several specimens in red bloom
and one in white. Visitors get to
see what the wildling looks like, a
tall, leggy bush with bract clusters
isolated at the end of long
branches. This gives measure to
how far the breeders and growers
have come in producing the
poinsettias in the 21st century.
A dogwood poinsettia that
McLaughlin grew from seed he
received from Le Duc is central to
the exhibit, though it looks pretty
prosaic — a lanky vase-shaped
shrub with small white bract
clusters. Ironically, it is the rarest
plant in the room. There are far
fewer specimens of this in botanic
9
DC
gardens than the much-hyped
corpse flower, which always draws
TV cameras and crowds.
The exhibit also includes nowdated poinsettia varieties that represented advances through the
years. One is called Annette Hegg,
the first self-branching type. Another is Oak Leaf, one of the first to
hold its leaves. But the ones getting the attention from visitors are
the new hybrids. “People say, ‘How
do you get so many bracts?’ and we
say, ‘That’s how the plant grows,’ ”
said Devin Dotson, the botanic
garden’s spokesman. This trait results from the plants’ sterility, bestowed by the unnatural parentage. The true flowers fail to develop and fall off.
The exhibit features four Princettia hybrids and three Luv U Pink
ones.
Le Duc, who now teaches at
Texas State University, said a wellgrown plant in the house could
keep blooming until April. It is this
stamina and the strong pink colors that prompted Dümmen Orange to pitch the hybrids in Europe as a plant for the Valentine’s
Day and Easter markets. This
hasn’t been successful to date. It
seems breeders will have to work
on more red varieties if the hybrids are to reach their Yuletide
potential. The only red I saw at the
Tip of the Week
Once cut Christmas trees are
brought indoors, they should have
an uninterrupted column of water
to prevent them from drying out
and becoming a fire hazard. Before
setting up and decorating, make a
fresh cut at the base and check
water levels daily. Trees take up a
lot of water in their first 24 hours.
— Adrian Higgins
ADRIAN HIGGINS/THE WASHINGTON POST
As part of the poinsettia display at the U.S. Botanic Garden, visitors see a version of the
original Christmas poinsettia as it looks in the wild in Mexico, where it is a lanky shrub.
show was Princettia Red, a darker
shade of magenta. One asset these
hybrids have is a rich dark-green
leaf, a highly desirable trait in
poinsettias and one bestowed
here by the dogwood poinsettia
parentage.
Meanwhile, the conveyor belt of
traditional poinsettia breeding
continues to whir along.
Gary Vollmer, product manager
for Selecta Poinsettias, said his
company is focusing on improving
traditional red varieties. The
problem with many of the trendy
crimson and maroon varieties is
that they fade gray, he said. “Our
goal is to get that saturated red but
not by bringing in blue,” he said.
Instead it is achieved by breeding
to increase the red pigmentation
in the layers of bract cells. (This is
all done by traditional selective
breeding, not with genetically
modified organisms.) “If you put
enough pigment in there and
make it dense enough, it shifts
toward the crimson,” he said.
An example, he said, is the company’s Christmas Beauty Red,
which came to market two years
ago. “It’s not a traditional dark
red,” he said. “It’s just really, really
red.”
Vollmer sees two encouraging
trends in the marketplace. A dec-
ade ago, poinsettias were swept up
in the retailers’ drive to start the
holiday sales season earlier in November. Poinsettia shipments suggest the season is shifting back to
December.
The other change is a move
away from using the poinsettia as
a loss leader. “If the consumer sees
it as a 99-cent giveaway on Black
Friday, or a beautiful $11.99 gift
item in the floral department,
that’s a different value equation,”
he said. “And I think the retailers
are tired of losing money on the
giveaways.”
adrian.higgins@washpost.com
@adrian_higgins on Twitter
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read past columns by Higgins at
washingtonpost.com/home.
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ZOE INGRAM FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Digging out from the avalanches of past Christmases
BY
J URA K ONCIUS
If you’re feeling like the space in your
basement, closet or garage you’re devoting to
holiday storage is getting out of control, this
may be the year to tame the Christmas creep.
It’s hard not to add something new each year
to your decoration stash. But it is hard to
make time to actually edit.
There are plenty of ways to reduce your
holiday clutter and still be festive.
Donate it
Thrift shops that raise funds for charity are
usually happy to have your donations of
gently used Snoopy tree skirts or elves on
shelves, but it doesn’t hurt to call first. There’s
a spike in donations of holiday merchandise
in December, as Americans unpack holiday
treasures to deck their halls. But charities
report that in recent years, holiday donations
have been brisk throughout the year. What
with baby boomers downsizing and inspiration from HGTV organizing shows and Marie
Kondo’s tidying tips, more Americans are
putting their homes on diets.
The easiest way to lighten up is to bag up
gently used decorations and drive them to a
place that can sell or use them. On a recent
November morning at the Goodwill Retail
Store and Donation Center on Glebe Road in
Arlington, the Christmas department was
well stocked. There were Santa votive holders, strings of blinking lights and pine cone
wreaths. Store executives say drive-through
donations accepted outside the store are
priced and put out within 48 hours. “We used
to hold seasonal merchandise in a warehouse
until the end of the year, but not anymore,”
says Brendan Hurley, chief marketing officer
for Goodwill of Greater Washington. He says
stores in his region usually keep a shelf for
Christmas goods throughout the year.
Sell it
Think your Rudolph mugs are worth cash?
There’s a resale market for only a fraction of
previously owned holiday merchandise. Lisa
Siegrist, consignment manager at Evolution
Home, an Alexandria consignment shop, says
this time of year, her shop is deluged with
holiday items. “Last year, not many sold,” she
says, “and the consignors had to take most of
them back. Interestingly, people still buy
vintage glass ornaments, even if their metallic paint is chipping off. They might sell for $4
to $6.” She says top sellers include nostalgic
wooden sleds or Spode’s Christmas Tree
china, especially the original sets that were
made in England.
Swap it
Holiday swaps are another way to cycle
holiday decorations out of your attic. Check
to see whether your local library or community center hosts a holiday decoration exchange
— but vow not to leave with more ornaments
than you came with. The Silver Spring
Timebank, a services-bartering community,
sponsored an all-holiday swap in October,
featuring not only Christmas but Halloween,
Easter and winter solstice accessories. About
25 people came and dropped off things, and
about 30 came to shop, says Kathy Jentz, an
editor at Washington Gardener magazine and
a volunteer who organized the swap.
“I sorted through my holiday stuff and gave
away some aqua and pale pink ‘Miami
Vice’-colored 1980s ornaments and an assortment of little teddy bears with gold strings for
hanging on a tree,” Jentz says. But could she
resist taking something? Not exactly. “My
neighbor had asked me to look for a menorah.” She found three to choose from. And
then she spotted an item she could not pass
up: a holiday stocking in the shape of the
famous leg lamp from “A Christmas Story.”
How — and when — to do it
Professional organizers say that growing
piles of seasonal adornments seem to be a
problem for many consumers. Consider examining your seasonal stuff as you dismantle
your decorations this year, suggest Ashley
Murphy and Molly Graves, founders of the
Neat Method, an organizing company with 35
locations across the country. “When you are
decorating, you are usually in a rush trying to
find all your lights and ornaments and other
items, and you don’t have a lot of time to
spare,” Murphy says. “We think the best time
to evaluate your decorations is when you are
taking them down.”
They recommend making piles of similar
items. “A good way to start editing is to put
like things together in one spot. You might
find out you had no idea how many Santa
statues you had,” she says.
Murphy says their advice to clients who
want to clean up their holiday act is to start
fresh with a supply of matching storage
bins. They suggest clear plastic bins, though
their favorites are see-through green or red
latching bins by Sterilite, available at Target.
“Keeping the bins all the same will make
your storage space feel less cluttered. They
nest well together and fit nicely, towered or
stacked,” Murphy says. After sorting and
editing out what you might not need anymore, put everything left back and stick on
large labels. List the contents of the box on
the label with a black permanent marker.
“Next year when you unpack, you’ll be
grateful you did,” Murphy says.
jura.koncius@washpost.com
11
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Entertaining doesn’t have to be exhausting
BY
M EGAN B UERGER
ZOE INGRAM FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
“They’re neutral and elegant,” she says, and,
unlike fresh flowers, she doesn’t have to worry
about them dying.
Outsource your tabletop. New start-ups
such as Table + Teaspoon and Borrowed Blu
make it easy to rent and return prearranged
tablescapes so that you can throw a stylish
dinner party without stressing over your dishware. Choose from a menu of dinner party
themes with coordinating flatware, linens,
wine glasses, candles and more, starting at $24
per setting. It’s remarkably easy: Place your
order a week in advance and mail the supplies
back when you’re done. If you need only a few
pieces, such as extra chairs or a buffet table, try
a local event vendor. Basic folding chairs typically cost as little as $1 each, while fancier
chairs can cost between $6 and $8 each. Although it’s perfectly acceptable to mix and
match decor, try not to go overboard. Pattner
hosted 20 guests for Thanksgiving dinner and
opted for black chairs with white cushions. “If
you mix and match everything, it feels like a
hodgepodge,” she said. “Vary the dishware or
the furniture, but not both.”
Visit a local wine shop. When Pattner and
her husband began entertaining regularly, they
worried about their wine choices. So they joined
a wine club run out of a shop in their neighborhood. The owner, who grew up in Napa, offers
suggestions for wines to serve based on Pattner’s planned menu and budget and often orders the bottles, too. Handing off this task saves
her hours in planning. Shop owners “usually
have relationships with local vineyards,” she
says. “You’ve got an on-hand expert.”
Delegate. If a full menu is over your head,
consider having your party catered or delegating dishes to friends for a potluck. Particularly
for a more casual evening, a potluck is a nice
way to make people feel involved. Make it
competitive by asking a few of your most
culinarily inclined friends to bring one of the
same dish, such as spiked eggnog or Christmas
pudding, and then vote on a winning recipe.
Pattner orders pies from a bakery in her neighborhood. “As much as I’d love to be a good
baker, I’m not going to attempt four pies for one
party,” she says. “I make the dishes I love to
make and then order the rest.”
Prepare the room. You’ll never enjoy your
party if you’re on high alert all evening, watching for red wine spills or fragile items breaking.
So try to clear the general area where you’ll be
entertaining. Stow away precious pieces such
as glasses or vases, and protect fabric furniture
with a blanket or slipcover.
Serve the classics. If you aren’t going to hire
help in the kitchen, try to serve roomtemperature-friendly dishes that you can prepare ahead of time. And don’t feel pressured to
drum up a creative menu. Around the holidays,
people tend to expect classic, somewhat sentimental dishes such as mashed potatoes and
stuffing. “Most of us aren’t eating these dishes
regularly, so I make them the oldfashioned way, with whole milk and real butter,”
Pattner says. “There’s nostalgia in those tastes
and smells.”
Hire cleaners. It might feel like a splurge,
but cleaners can be worth every penny even if
you’ve got a tight budget. Most professional
companies will charge between $90 and $150 to
clean a 1,000-square-foot apartment or the
equivalent. “Nothing takes away hosting stress
more than knowing you’ll have a clean house
the next morning,” van Wyck says. “Nurse your
hangover in bed.”
localliving@washpost.com
Chat Thursday at 11 a.m. Former White House
floral designer Laura Dowling joins staff writer Jura
Koncius for our weekly online Q&A on decorating
and household advice. Submit questions at
washingtonpost.com/home.
At Home newsletter Go to the Home & Garden
page to subscribe to our email newsletter,
delivered every Thursday.
the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
Hosting a party can seriously drain your
energy and budget, but it doesn’t have to. Why
should guests have all the fun? Just in time for
holiday hosting season, we asked a lifestyle
expert and a professional event planner for
their stress-free entertaining strategies.
“Forget the idea that a holiday party needs to
be an over-the-top affair,” says Brittany Pattner,
a creative director for the lifestyle brand Goop,
who designs the brand’s retail spaces and oversees its events. “At the end of the day, your guests
are there for you. If you’re in the spirit, they’re in
the spirit.”
New York event planner to the stars Bronson
van Wyck agrees. “The host’s energy is infectious,” he says. “People want to see you having a
good time. They don’t want to see you frazzled,
and they don’t want to not see you because
you’re stuck in the kitchen or behind the bar.”
Here are nine tips to lighten your load so that
you can really let loose.
Be realistic. Too often, hosts bite off more
than they can chew and spend the evening
playing catch-up. So go easy on yourself. If a
three-course dinner feels out of reach, plan
something low-maintenance, such as a champagne brunch before your local holiday parade
or a low-key after-party. That way, you can ride
the adrenaline of a big event without having to
carry it all yourself. Van Wyck’s holiday get-together is more of a late-night blowout. Usually
held the Saturday before Christmas, he doesn’t
get going until 9:30 p.m. so that it feels less like
an obligation and more like a destination for
people. “It’s loud music, strong drinks, low
lighting,” he says. “It’s a proper party. At this
time of year, people want to take the edge off.”
Make a thoughtful guest list. Van Wyck has
thrown parties for Madonna, major art museums and several presidents, and he always
begins with the guest list: “Great guests make a
great party, full stop.” Invite a mix of close
friends and outgoing acquaintances so all you
need to do is make introductions, and welcome
guests to bring a friend so long as it isn’t a
formal dinner. It’ll be easier on you in the end;
nobody likes to babysit. And encourage folks to
leave politics at the door. After a year of high
tensions, most people just want to kick back
and have fun. That’s how it was done when van
Wyck was one of Washington’s go-to planners.
In 2001, after serving as head of events for the
Democratic National Convention, he planned
George W. Bush’s inaugural ball. “Best-case
scenario, a great party reminds us how much
we have in common and sends us back to work
the next day with a little more compassion,” he
says.
Set the mood, simply. Forget spending a
fortune on extravagant decorations, and keep
your focus to lighting and music. Simple string
lights can transform a dull space, making it
glow with warmth and charm. A little background music does wonders to put guests at
ease, so make an inviting playlist and position
your speakers so that the sounds fill the room.
This way, you’ll have control over the mood,
whether you need to turn it up or tone it down.
For a festive touch, Pattner scatters white faux
gourds and pumpkins and clusters of creamcolored taper candles around the room.
12
the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
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Don’t let an occasional indulgence eat you up
BY
C ARA R OSENBLOOM
Every year around holiday time, there’s an
influx of articles about how to stick to your
healthy eating goals and resist temptation.
You may read about how to say no to second
helpings, stop gobbling up fat-laden
appetizers or alternate alcoholic drinks with
sparkling water to combat calories.
That advice is practical, but it focuses too
much on what not to do. It could end up
making you feel guilty if you break the rules
and decide to — gasp — indulge and enjoy
yourself. So, this year, let’s try something
new. Instead of stress, pressure and guilt
associated with family dinners and holiday
get-togethers, let’s create a new narrative
that will empower you to feel good about
yourself and your food choices. Share these
ideas to spread holiday cheer and remove
diet stigma for you and your loved ones.
Here are nine things to tell yourself this
year so you can enjoy family, friends and
food.
1.
I deserve to enjoy holiday meals
without guilt. Yep, it’s just food. You
deserve to take pleasure in it. Food is
part of traditions and memories, so
sample your favorite cookies or mashed
potatoes and take time to really enjoy
every bite of a reasonable portion. Focus
on how your food smells, looks and tastes
without distractions. This is called
mindful eating, and it’s about fully
enjoying what you eat without regret or
shame.
but it doesn’t need to be. Have faith in your
ability to make good choices, and trust your
appetite.
2.
5.
What I eat every day matters most.
Worry less about what you eat over the
holidays and concentrate on what you eat
year-round instead. If you have a healthy
diet in general, a couple of days of
celebratory food won’t be detrimental. If
you don’t usually eat well, make that a goal
in the new year. Remember: The holiday
season is short-lived. In life, there will
always be times when you can’t make your
usual healthy choices — and that’s okay.
Enjoy these special moments focusing on
friends and family.
3.
I have the power to control my
portions. Only you can decide how
much food to eat, and that decision should
be based on listening to your body. Slow
down and notice how your stomach feels
before you start eating. If you’re still
hungry, have another bite. But when you’re
almost full, stop eating.
4.
I have the right to eat seconds or to say
“no thank you” when I’m full.
Remember that you don’t need to make
someone else happy by overeating or by
denying your hunger. It’s the norm to eat
more when a host graciously offers more,
ZOE INGRAM FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
It’s normal if I overindulge during the
holidays. It’s human! Accept that you
did and move on. Try not to become
trapped in punishing self-talk or
restrictive dieting behaviors. When you eat
mindfully and enjoy every bite, it often
takes less food to satisfy cravings. So enjoy
some of your favorite foods with fervor,
but respect your body when it tells you
you’re done.
6.
I will eat when I’m hungry, not when
I’m feeling emotional. Many of us eat
when we’re lonely, bored, sad or stressed,
and those emotions can run wild at holiday
time. Even the stress of being with certain
family members can trigger people to
overeat. There are more effective remedies
for dealing with these feelings than food.
The answer is different for everyone, but
calling a friend, exercising or practicing
meditation can work for some people. Take
time to learn what works best for you.
7.
I don’t need to “healthify” my beloved
and traditional holiday recipe. Enjoy
your favorites as they should be — it’s just
once a year! Really — no one wants
sugarless sugar cookies or eggnog made
from almond milk and flaxseeds.
8.
I promise not to comment on the size,
shape or weight of my friends and
relatives. Their weight is their business, not
yours. The same is true for you — no one
should judge you or comment on your
weight, either. And if you are met with a
rude comment about your appearance, it’s
fine to tell someone why it’s not okay to talk
about your weight.
9.
I will enjoy quality time with people I
love. A very long-term (75-plus years)
study at Harvard has been examining what
makes people happy over the course of their
lives. And guess what? It’s not a number on a
scale or how many cookies they eat. Close
relationships are the key to long-term health
and happiness. So this year, mark the holidays
by spending time with people you love, and
try not to fret too much about what you will
have for dinner. Embrace the joy of festive
meals without feelings of stress and guilt,
which should never be part of healthy eating.
localliving@washpost.com
Registered dietitian Cara Rosenbloom is president of
Words to Eat By, a nutrition communications
company specializing in writing, nutrition education
and recipe development. She is the co-author of
“Nourish: Whole Food Recipes Featuring Seeds, Nuts
and Beans.”
Family
13
DC
Simplify
the
season
ZOE INGRAM FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Instead of a pile of presents, think outside the box
BY
L INDSEY M . R OBERTS
The gift of less
Erin Boyle, creator of the site Reading My
Tea Leaves and author of the book “Simple
Matters,” gets more questions about her posts
on her gifting strategy for children than almost
anything else. She likes to follow the idea of
giving just four presents: one gift kids want,
one gift to read, one gift to wear and one gift
they need. (Substitute a category for “do” if you
want to include an experience.)
“We are [our children’s] guides,” says Boyle,
who lives in New York City. “So if we show excitement over chocolate in a stocking, they’re not
going to look around the room for more things.”
She suggests starting a minimalist gifting
strategy at a young age — her children are 3 and
10 months — and spreading the word to friends
and family.
The gift of experience
While on a mission trip to Africa last Christmas, Jennifer Pepito and her family of nine
decided that they wanted to downsize their
lives and devote more resources to traveling.
The founder of the Peaceful Press, a company
that creates a curriculum for home-school families, Pepito didn’t want to buy her kids even
more toys that she’d step on or need to pick up.
After deciding to focus on experiences rather
than things, she and her husband sold their
house in California and bought a smaller fixerupper. They saved enough money on housing
and property taxes to take a trip again for the
holidays this year, to Italy for two weeks. On
Christmas, she’ll have small gifts for the kids:
pajamas, used books and travel toys, such as
card games and maybe a Kindle or two. But the
real gift is seeing the world together. Her
Christmas budget includes enough room for
“gelato, bread, pizza, more bread, wine and
museum entrance fees,” she says.
And experience gifts don’t have to be big,
costly trips. Karen Pine, a professor at the
University of Hertfordshire in Britain who
studies the psychology of gift giving, says that
“more than anything, kids love attention from
their parents and time together.”
Pool the money spent on gifts and put it
toward an experience that everyone can
enjoy. Try a day hike with dad or a weekend
with mom doing an activity the child chooses. Also consider flipping the giving, encouraging kids to give parents experiences, such
as an outing or a morning of gardening
together.
The gift of giving
Try creating a family ritual around giving.
Jenn Mann, author of “The A to Z Guide to
Raising Happy, Confident Kids,” and her family
celebrate Hanukkah. Their first-night tradition is that each of her children gets three
pieces of paper with a description of a charity
she thinks they might like. They get to choose
which one they want to give to.
“It’s good to get kids thinking outside of their
own wants and needs, especially during the
holidays,” she says. “These kinds of rituals
bring families closer together and send really
positive messages to kids.”
For Christmas, this could be done with a
wrapped box for older kids with a few charities
written on sheets of paper inside for them to
choose from. If you want to give a charitable
gift to others, make sure it’s a cause the recipient cares about. To learn more about a charity
you are considering supporting, check out
Charity Navigator (charitynavigator.org).
The gift of an activity
“Give them something that they can pour
their creativity into,” Payne says. “A toy that is
fairly simple, that doesn’t do very much, that is
in itself fairly plain.”
He likes to give kids a box of five big pieces of
dyed muslin cloth, perhaps including one that
is shiny and another that is dark. Kids turn
these into houses, princess gowns, “all manner
of things . . . that provide hours of play,” he says.
“The plainer the toy, the simpler the toy, the
more creative the play and then the more
collaborative the play.”
It’s an idea that Payne’s simplicity parenting
coaches have seen work well around the world.
For older kids, Payne suggests a guitar, basketball backboard, or even the building materials
and tools to make a bike or skateboard ramp.
It’s normal for kids in other countries to have
tool kits to play and work with, or their own
workshop areas. Gifts such as these have more
longevity than the latest “it” toy or gadget and can
inspire confidence and nurture talent in children.
localliving@washpost.com
the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
When family life counselor Kim John Payne
published “Simplicity Parenting: Using the Extraordinary Power of Less to Raise Calmer,
Happier, and More Secure Kids” in 2009, he
was warning us about how our supersize lives
were affecting our kids. He was seeing kids who
were unable to play by themselves in rooms full
of toys, throwing frequent tantrums caused by
overscheduling, and being diagnosed with behavioral disorders they didn’t have. He knew
something needed to change.
“The too much, too soon, too sexy, too young
— it’s become ubiquitous,” he says.
It turns out he was onto something with that
“less is more” approach, particularly when it
comes to holiday toys. Each year, as minimalism grows in popularity, Payne sees more parents embracing the call for less stuff and more
time together.
For a few ideas on how to give children more
meaningful gifts this year, we talked to Payne,
as well as a lifestyle blogger inspired by simplicity parenting, a mother of seven who recently
downsized her life, an author of parenting
books and a psychologist who studies gift
giving. Here are their suggestions.
“Messaging from the beginning is important, having super-frank conversations with
family and friends, and being willing to be a
little weird. . . . If simplicity is your goal, it’s
possible.” If loved ones don’t adhere to your
plan, you should still be gracious about all gifts
received, she notes.
“Say ‘thank you’ and then decide over time if
it’s something you want to keep in your house,”
she says.
14
the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
DC
Family
lify
Simpe
h
t
on
seas
ZOE INGRAM FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
15
DC
All parents want are a few silent nights
BY
M EGHAN L EAHY
As the holidays approach, I’m feeling a little
Scrooge-y. I love the lights and the anticipation
and seeing family members, but I can get
really bah humbug as December wears on.
Maybe it’s because I’m juggling work and my
children’s schedules, or maybe it’s the change
in time (my gosh, it is dark early). This year, I
am trying to hit the reset button and focus on
what the holidays stand for. I want to see the
best in my fellow humans and spread love.
When I chat with my parent friends, though,
I hear a familiar refrain: “It’s all too much! Too
many parties, too much pressure to decorate
the house and too many gifts. I am exhausted,
and I don’t want to disappoint anyone.” These
parents want to have a nice season, but they feel
overwhelmed, beaten down and, frankly, a little
bullied by the expectations.
It’s a lot. And we could all use more joy and
less stress, right? So let’s unpack how we can
simplify things and get some joy going.
When I chat with my
parent friends, I hear
a familiar refrain:
“It’s all too much!
Too many parties,
too much pressure
to decorate the house
and too many gifts.
I am exhausted,
and I don’t want to
disappoint anyone.”
choosing to own our time and our joy this
holiday season.
Making magic
I admit that I hate the Elf on the Shelf. I
relish websites and Instagram accounts that
poke fun at the extreme measures parents
take to pose this doll. It’s a side of me I am not
always proud of, but I love a good satire site.
I am also adult enough to appreciate that
there are parents who adore this tradition. And
I realize that it is pretty inconsistent for me to
tout Santa while slamming the Elf. Both are
watching your children for “good behavior” (a
horrible idea), and both are creepy.
But it is the daily chore of moving the darn
doll that undoes us, right?
I frequently hear parents complain that
they are exhausted and annoyed by having to
create new and elaborate poses daily, as well as
dream up backstories for this doll. What
started as a cute tradition for your 2-year-old
has turned into one more thing to do for an
entire month. If you are like most parents, you
remember the Elf when your head hits the
pillow after a long day. You sigh and drag
yourself out of bed, just to hang the doll from
the same lampshade where he perched on
Monday. It’s a hack job.
Then on Facebook or Instagram, you see the
Elf in festive outfits and costumes, making
holiday cookies and high-fiving a stuffed
reindeer. The Elf has gotten into mischief that
has required the parents to spill flour all over
the dining room table. You look at your Elf,
sadly hanging from a lampshade like the
afterthought he is, and you start to hate the
doll.
This is where personal responsibility comes
in. You can either get off social media and be
happy with your Elf bouncing among three
locations, or you can retire the Elf. I told my
kids our Elf moved to Florida for more sun.
They were disappointed, but a candy cane
distracted them until they found him shoved
into a box in the attic. Oh well.
You can stop doing this. Or you can pose the
Elf every other year. You can decide that the
children will be the ones to move the Elf. You
can move the Elf once a week. If the Elf is a
burden, lift it from your shoulders. You will not
ruin your kids’ holiday memories.
And if you love the Elf, enjoy yourself. It’s
your life — live it.
In the end, it all comes back to this:
Children want our time, our joy, our eyes and
our attention. They don’t need us embittered,
exhausted and filled with holiday resentment.
Take responsibility for the gift buying, the
holiday events and, yes, the Elf. You can do it.
You don’t need to be perfect. Just try.
Also at washingtonpost.com Read the
transcript of a recent live Q&A with Leahy at
washingtonpost.com/advice, where you can also
find past columns. Her next chat is scheduled for
Dec. 20.
Send questions about parenting to
meghan@mlparentcoach.com.
the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
Gifts
You are all set to enact a less-is-more policy
for gifts, and then you see the Santa letter filled
with the latest toys, technology, on-trend
clothes and sporting goods. A little voice
begins to whisper sweet insecurities in your
ear. Maybe you feel as though you didn’t get
many gifts when you were growing up. Maybe
you were spoiled rotten. Maybe gifts were
given with a dose of guilt. Maybe gifts were
distributed unfairly in your family. Maybe
times were once good and then went bad.
Regardless, we all have stories around giving
and receiving, and most of them aren’t healthy
or helpful.
It may sound strange, but talk to a friend
about it. Say, “I really want to stop the excess, but
this is my worry.” Expressing something aloud
takes away its power. And you will hear that
other people have their own emotional hangups, and that will make you feel better.
To keep yourself honest, hang up a big sheet
of paper. List those four famous gift categories
(something you want, need, wear and read). If
your children can read, have them add their
ideas for gifts. If they can’t read, fill it out with
them. Writing the gift ideas keeps everyone
honest. And when you have purchased your
gifts (one from each category), stop.
If you are reading this and you have already
gone overboard, no worries. It is not too late to
do a course correction. Choose the gifts that you
know will light up your child’s world and bring
true joy. The others can be tucked away and
repurposed as birthday gifts for your child or
even another child.
If you want to be hardcore, you can return
some of the gifts that you didn’t need. Or
better yet, donate them to a family in need to
make their holiday more joyous. The point is:
Unless the holiday has passed, you do not have
to give your children everything you have
bought. But you are going to have to find
some discipline, and be ready to feel uncomfortable.
Obligations
When I ask parents for their favorite holiday
memories, there are common themes: close
friends and family members, a deep feeling of
belonging and warmth, and traditions. Gifts
are less important, and no one mentions overthe-top vacations. The memories even border
on the mundane, but the feelings of belonging
and excitement loom large in their hearts.
Our children are the same. They say they
want stuff, but what they truly want is our time
and attention.
So when the cocktail party invitations are
coming in fast and furious, or the school event
reminders are clogging your email inbox, take
a deep breath, drag out your calendar and get
real. Ask yourself these questions:
1. Does this party bring me joy, or do I feel
obligated to go? (This also goes for hosting.)
2. Does the event create joy in my family?
3. Do I really want to volunteer for that
function, or do I feel obligated because I do it
every year?
4. Can I take a year off from attending the
event or volunteer opportunity?
5. Can I attend a function and leave early?
Here’s the beautiful thing: If you look at your
calendar and ask yourself these questions, you
will begin to make decisions that are right for
yourself and your family.
This decision-making also goes for cookieand gingerbread-decorating activities, white
elephant gift parties, and trips to “Nutcracker”
performances or elaborate light and train
displays. Remember, we are not judging
whether the event is good or bad, worthwhile
and honorable, or silly and frivolous. We are
16
the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
DC
Crime Report
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
These were among incidents
reported by D.C. police. For
information, call 202-727-9099.
NORTHEAST
ASSAULTS
Benning Rd., 1500 block, 10:43
p.m. Nov. 25. With gun.
Bladensburg Rd., 900 block,
6:08 p.m. Nov. 26.
Bladensburg Rd., 2800 block,
9:31 a.m. Nov. 27. With gun.
Dix St., 5300 block, 5 p.m. Nov.
27. With gun.
Hayes St., 4000-4199 blocks,
3:23 p.m. Nov. 23. With knife.
Montello Ave., 1600 block, 12:34
p.m. Nov. 25. With knife.
New York Ave., unit block, 6 a.m.
Nov. 22.
Raum St., 1200 block, 4:55 p.m.
Nov. 23. With gun.
Rhode Island Ave., 1800-1999
blocks, 3:03 p.m. Nov. 25. With
gun.
12th St., 2700 block, 7:23 a.m.
Nov. 25. With gun.
61st St., 1-199 blocks, 11:15 p.m.
Nov. 27. With gun.
ROBBERIES
A St., 1500 block, 10:15 a.m. Nov.
23. With gun.
Benning Rd., 2300 block, 11:06
a.m. Nov. 27. With gun.
Bladensburg Rd., 900 block,
5:15 a.m. Nov. 24. With gun.
Division Ave., 400 block, 2:27
a.m. Nov. 23. With gun.
Douglas St., 2000-2199 blocks,
7:04 p.m. Nov. 25. With gun.
H St., 700 block, 1:29 p.m. Nov.
24. With gun.
Holbrook Terr., 1100 block, 3:24
p.m. Nov. 28.
Market St., 2400 block, 3:23
p.m. Nov. 25.
Minnesota Ave., 3700 block,
9:13 p.m. Nov. 24.
Minnesota Ave., 4000-4121
blocks, 12:23 a.m. Nov. 26. With
gun.
Nannie Helen Burroughs Ave.,
4200-4399 blocks, 9:30 a.m. Nov.
22. With gun.
Nannie Helen Burroughs Ave.,
5200-5355 blocks, 11:51 p.m.
Nov. 25. With knife.
Queens Chapel Rd., 2500 block,
6:42 p.m. Nov. 25. With gun.
Yost Pl., 3000 block, 8:37 a.m.
Nov. 27. With gun.
30th St., 2800 block, 10:55 a.m.
Nov. 27. With gun.
56th St., 600 block, 8:37 a.m.
Nov. 27. With gun.
BREAK-INS
Blaine St., 4900 block, 9:45 p.m.
Nov. 21.
Foote St., 4200-4399 blocks,
8:36 a.m. Nov. 25.
Gales St., 1700 block, 4:40 a.m.
Nov. 22.
Holbrook Terr., 1200 block, 4:53
p.m. Nov. 28.
K St., unit block, 5:09 a.m. Nov.
27.
Maryland Ave., 1900-2099
blocks, 12:44 p.m. Nov. 28.
Rosedale St., 1600 block, 5:30
p.m. Nov. 24.
12th St., 3400 block, 11:29 a.m.
Nov. 25.
THEFTS
A St., 1400 block, 10:51 a.m. Nov.
28.
Abbey Pl., 1100 block, 3:40 p.m.
Nov. 28.
Acker Pl., 600 block, 5:45 a.m.
Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Anacostia Ave., 400 block, 8:52
a.m. Nov. 23.
Benning Rd., 1500-1699 blocks,
11:40 a.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Benning Rd., 1500-1699 blocks,
2:04 p.m. Nov. 28.
Benning Rd., 1500 block, 3:15
p.m. Nov. 25.
Benning Rd., 3900 block, 2:10
a.m. Nov. 27.
Benning Rd., 3900 block, 7:44
p.m. Nov. 28.
Benning Rd., 4500 block, 10:07
a.m. Nov. 26.
Bladensburg Rd., 800 block,
9:20 a.m. Nov. 26.
Bladensburg Rd., 900 block,
9:03 p.m. Nov. 21.
Bladensburg Rd., 1200 block,
3:30 p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Bladensburg Rd., 1800 block,
9:19 a.m. Oct. 27.
Bladensburg Rd., 2100-2299
blocks, 10:22 p.m. Nov. 24. From
vehicle.
Bladensburg Rd., 2800 block,
7:15 p.m. Nov. 26.
Blaine St., 5600 block, 7:26 a.m.
Nov. 28.
Brooks St., 4400 block, 7:05
a.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Buchanan St., 1000-1199 blocks,
2:34 a.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Capitol Ave., 1800 block, 4:20
a.m. Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Channing St., 2200-2399 blocks,
10:17 p.m. Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Channing St., 2800-2999 blocks,
11:04 p.m. Nov. 25.
Corcoran St., 1800 block, 3:31
a.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Dix St., 3400 block, 7:24 a.m.
Nov. 22.
E St., 200 block, 4:39 p.m. Nov.
27.
E St., 400 block, 5:18 p.m. Nov.
28.
Eads Pl., 4500 block, 6:06 a.m.
Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Eastern Ave., 900-1099 blocks,
8:49 a.m. Nov. 27.
Eastern Ave., 1100 block, 1:02
a.m. Nov. 23.
Eastern Ave., 6200 block, 3:53
a.m. Nov. 22.
Eckington Pl., 1500 block, 3:15
p.m. Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Edson Pl., 4200-4399 blocks,
8:37 a.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Edwin St., 1800 block, 11:29 a.m.
Nov. 27.
Florida Ave., 1200 block, 1:19
p.m. Nov. 24.
Franklin D. Roosevelt Pl., 3700
block, 2:55 p.m. Nov. 25.
Franklin D. Roosevelt Pl., 3700
block, 3:11 p.m. Nov. 28.
Franklin St., 2400-2599 blocks,
3:14 a.m. Nov. 28.
Grant Pl., 3800 block, 5:50 p.m.
Nov. 25.
H St., 300 block, 10:27 a.m. Nov.
22.
H St., 600 block, 7:13 a.m. Nov.
26.
H St., 800 block, 6:29 a.m. Nov.
25.
H St., 800 block, 2:04 p.m. Nov.
26.
H St., 1100 block, 9:11 p.m. Nov.
24. From vehicle.
Hamilton St., unit block, 8:15
p.m. Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Hamilton St., unit block, 5:26
a.m. Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Hawaii Ave., 300 block, 5 p.m.
Nov. 22.
Hawaii Ave., 300 block, 7:55 p.m.
Nov. 26.
Hayes St., 3700-3848 blocks,
7:08 a.m. Nov. 27.
Holbrook St., 1600 block, 11:44
a.m. Nov. 25.
I St., 200 block, 12:55 p.m. Nov.
22.
K St., 200 block, 7:17 a.m. Nov.
24. From vehicle.
K St., 200 block, 4:32 p.m. Nov.
28.
Lawrence St., 700 block, 6:24
a.m. Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Lawrence St., 2000-2199 blocks,
10:42 p.m. Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Linden Pl., 1200 block, 8:11 a.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Market St., 2400 block, 3:45
p.m. Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Maryland Ave., 900 block, 10:35
a.m. Nov. 20.
Maryland Ave., 1300 block, 3:50
a.m. Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Maryland Ave., 1600 block,
10:40 p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Maryland Ave., 1800 block, 9:23
a.m. Nov. 27.
Massachusetts Ave., 300 block,
5:47 p.m. Nov. 25.
Michigan Ave., 700-903 blocks,
1:46 p.m. Nov. 28.
Michigan Ave., 1000 block, 4:40
p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Minnesota Ave., 3600-3701
blocks, 1:38 p.m. Nov. 22.
Minnesota Ave., 3700 block, 4:11
a.m. Nov. 26.
Minnesota Ave., 4000-4121
blocks, 6:41 a.m. Nov. 26.
Monroe St., 700 block, 2:25 p.m.
Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Montana Ave., 1500-1699 blocks,
12:14 a.m. Nov. 22.
Montana Ave., 1900 block, 11:14
p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Morse St., 500 block, 4:41 p.m.
Nov. 23. From vehicle.
Morse St., 1200 block, 11:43
p.m. Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Nannie Helen Burroughs Ave.,
4200-4399 blocks, 3:32 a.m. Nov.
28.
Nannie Helen Burroughs Ave.,
4900 block, 2:29 p.m. Nov. 27.
New York Ave., 1800-2299
blocks, 6:45 a.m. Nov. 27.
Orleans Pl., 600 block, 9:07 a.m.
Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Otis St., 1800-1999 blocks, 9:10
a.m. Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Pierce St., unit block, 6:31 a.m.
Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Queens Chapel Rd., 2100 block,
9:01 a.m. Nov. 26.
Queens Chapel Rd., 2500 block,
10:23 p.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Quincy Pl., 100 block, 12:12 p.m.
Nov. 24.
Regent Pl., 500 block, 5:02 p.m.
Nov. 27.
Rhode Island Ave., 1-137 blocks,
7:48 a.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Rhode Island Ave., 500-799
blocks, 6:06 a.m. Nov. 28.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
4:05 a.m. Nov. 24.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
6:07 a.m. Nov. 25.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
6:42 a.m. Nov. 25.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
10:10 a.m. Nov. 25.
Rhode Island Ave., 1400 block,
11:34 p.m. Nov. 27.
Rhode Island Ave., 2200-2399
blocks, 7:33 a.m. Nov. 28. From
vehicle.
Rittenhouse St., 300 block,
11:19 a.m. Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Sheriff Rd., 4900-5019 blocks,
11:13 a.m. Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Summit St., 1100 block, 4:55
a.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Taylor St., 200-399 blocks, 10:11
p.m. Nov. 21. From vehicle.
Trinidad Ave., 1300 block, 8:06
a.m. Nov. 23. From vehicle.
V St., 2300-3099 blocks, 11:05
p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
V St., 2300-3099 blocks, 1:05
a.m. Nov. 27. From vehicle.
West Virginia Ave., 1100 block,
10:56 a.m. Nov. 25.
West Virginia Ave., 2100 block,
12:30 p.m. Nov. 27.
First Pl., 6100 block, 8:28 a.m.
Nov. 27. From vehicle.
First St., 1200 block, 3:25 p.m.
Nov. 23.
First St., 1200 block, 7:59 p.m.
Nov. 24.
First St., 1200 block, 4:45 p.m.
Nov. 28.
Second St., 700-899 blocks, 2:45
p.m. Nov. 22.
Second St., 700-899 blocks, 5:28
a.m. Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Second St., 5600-5744 blocks,
6:22 a.m. Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Third St., 500 block, 2:40 p.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Third St., 5600 block, 4:07 p.m.
Nov. 24.
Fifth St., 700 block, 6:46 a.m.
Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 1000 block, 12:34 a.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 200 block, 9:17 a.m.
Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 3900 block, 7:58
p.m. Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 3400 block, 10:59
a.m. Nov. 28.
10th St., 1000 block, 1:49 p.m.
Nov. 25.
11th St., 700 block, 3:46 p.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
12th St., 3500 block, 9:35 a.m.
Nov. 22. From vehicle.
12th St., 3600 block, 6 a.m. Nov.
25.
14th St., 3600 block, 7:12 a.m.
Nov. 28. From vehicle.
16th St., 100 block, 5:38 a.m.
Nov. 27.
17th Pl., 1000 block, 9:32 a.m.
Nov. 27.
17th St., 900 block, 12:58 p.m.
Nov. 26.
18th St., 2300 block, 9:56 a.m.
Nov. 25.
18th St., 2500 block, 8:03 a.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
19th St., 700 block, 4:41 p.m.
Nov. 24.
24th Pl., 2100 block, 4:58 p.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
25th Pl., 2200 block, 11:35 p.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
42nd St., 1200 block, 7:21 a.m.
Nov. 24.
45th Pl., 1300 block, 6:44 a.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
59th St., 300 block, 7:21 a.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
61st St., 300 block, 7:05 a.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Banneker Dr., 3100 block, 8:33
a.m. Nov. 26.
Benning Rd., 1900-2099 blocks,
8:57 p.m. Nov. 24.
Bladensburg Rd., 2100-2299
blocks, 11:41 p.m. Nov. 24.
Bladensburg Rd., 2800-3200
blocks, 12:52 p.m. Nov. 26.
Capitol Ave., 1900 block, 8:15
a.m. Nov. 28.
Foote St., 5900 block, 8:49 a.m.
Nov. 24.
Fort Totten Dr., 4800-4999
blocks, 2:05 a.m. Nov. 23.
Gales St., 1500 block, 5:21 p.m.
Nov. 26.
H St., 2100-2399 blocks, 4:29
a.m. Nov. 26.
Harry Thomas Way, 100 block,
4:34 a.m. Nov. 28.
Hayes St., 3600-3764 blocks,
1:03 p.m. Nov. 26.
Ponds St., 4300-4499 blocks,
4:20 a.m. Nov. 26.
Rhode Island Ave., 2800-3099
blocks, 12:20 p.m. Nov. 27.
Fifth St., 1200 block, 3:19 a.m.
Nov. 24.
Fifth St., 1200 block, 1:54 a.m.
Nov. 27.
10th St., 700 block, 5:16 a.m.
Nov. 26.
14th St., 200 block, 3:38 a.m.
Nov. 25.
36th St., 300 block, 6:24 a.m.
Nov. 25.
45th St., 200 block, 8:37 a.m.
Nov. 23.
48th St., 900 block, 4:16 a.m.
Nov. 28.
CRIME CONTINUED ON 17
17
Crime Report
CRIME FROM 16
NORTHWEST
ASSAULTS
Blair Rd., 7000 block, 10:56 a.m.
Nov. 27.
Connecticut Ave., 1300-1699
blocks, 10:24 p.m. Nov. 25. With
gun.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block, 6:18
a.m. Nov. 22. With gun.
Hamilton St., 300 block, 8:06
a.m. Nov. 16. With gun.
K St., 1600 block, 12:43 p.m. Nov.
22. With knife.
North Capitol St., 1200-1499
blocks, 6:15 a.m. Nov. 25. With
knife.
Q St., 100-299 blocks, 1:40 p.m.
Nov. 22. With gun.
V St., 200-399 blocks, 10:29 a.m.
Nov. 23. With gun.
Ninth St., 1200 block, 8:25 p.m.
Nov. 27.
18th St., 2200 block, 3:26 p.m.
Nov. 25.
ROBBERIES
BREAK-INS
Delafield Pl., 1200 block, 8:26
p.m. Nov. 25.
Dent Pl., 3400 block, 1:39 a.m.
Nov. 26.
Euclid St., 800-999 blocks, 12:01
p.m. Nov. 27.
Georgia Ave., 3900 block, 3:28
p.m. Nov. 26.
L St., 2000 block, 5:54 p.m. Nov.
26.
Park Pl., 3600 block, 9:05 a.m.
Nov. 22.
Wyoming Ave., 2000 block, 6:19
a.m. Nov. 27.
Yuma St., 3600 block, 12:18 p.m.
Nov. 28.
First St., 1700 block, 9:58 p.m.
Nov. 24.
Ninth St., 2000-2199 blocks,
7:50 a.m. Nov. 27.
11th St., 3500 block, 2:10 p.m.
Nov. 27.
14th St., 1600 block, 8:46 a.m.
Nov. 23.
14th St., 3600 block, 8:09 p.m.
Nov. 22.
16th St., 4400 block, 3 p.m. Nov.
25.
16th St., 4800 block, 6:25 p.m.
Nov. 23.
THEFTS
Adams Mill Rd., 3200 block, 9:35
a.m. Nov. 22.
Arkansas Ave., 4500 block, 4:22
a.m. Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Aspen St., 300 block, 6:42 p.m.
Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Barry Pl., 900 block, 6:21 p.m.
Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Belmont Rd., 1800 block, 9:13
a.m. Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Blair Rd., 6600 block, 8:15 a.m.
Nov. 25.
Blair Rd., 6900 block, 8:03 p.m.
Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Brown St., 3400 block, 5:34 p.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Bryant St., 100 block, 5:37 a.m.
Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Bryant St., 400-599 blocks, 1:58
p.m. Nov. 22.
Buchanan St., 1300 block, 4:24
p.m. Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Calvert St., 2400-2798 blocks,
2:52 p.m. Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Cedar St., 400-599 blocks, 7:03
p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Chesapeake St., 4000 block,
9:30 a.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Chesapeake St., 4100 block,
7:43 a.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Chillum Pl., 6200-6599 blocks,
10:44 a.m. Nov. 24.
Colorado Ave., 5200-5499
blocks, 2:35 a.m. Nov. 23. From
vehicle.
Columbia Rd., 1600 block, 11:56
a.m. Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Columbia Rd., 1700 block, 9:52
a.m. Nov. 25.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
3:43 p.m. Nov. 22.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
3:44 p.m. Nov. 22.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
12:44 p.m. Nov. 26.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
3:48 p.m. Nov. 28.
Connecticut Ave., 1200 block,
7:16 a.m. Nov. 11.
Connecticut Ave., 1200 block,
9:40 a.m. Nov. 24.
Connecticut Ave., 1300-1699
blocks, 12:48 p.m. Nov. 24.
Connecticut Ave., 3000-3199
blocks, 7:41 p.m. Nov. 9. From
vehicle.
Connecticut Ave., 3200 block,
6:30 a.m. Nov. 9.
Connecticut Ave., 3200 block,
10:21 a.m. Nov. 17.
Connecticut Ave., 3300-3499
blocks, 3:41 a.m. Nov. 23.
Connecticut Ave., 3300-3499
blocks, 11:36 a.m. Nov. 25.
Connecticut Ave., 3300-3499
blocks, 1:29 p.m. Nov. 26.
Connecticut Ave., 3300-3499
blocks, 8:17 a.m. Nov. 27.
E St., 600 block, 7:43 p.m. Nov.
22. From vehicle.
Euclid St., 700-898 blocks, 6:16
p.m. Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Euclid St., 800-999 blocks, 4:48
a.m. Nov. 24.
Euclid St., 800-999 blocks, 2:28
p.m. Nov. 27.
Euclid St., 1700 block, 10:41 a.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
F St., 900 block, 5:22 p.m. Nov.
28. From vehicle.
F St., 1000 block, 12:41 p.m. Nov.
27.
F St., 1000 block, 1:48 p.m. Nov.
27.
F St., 1300 block, 2:15 p.m. Nov.
24.
F St., 1900 block, 3:44 p.m. Nov.
28. From vehicle.
G St., 1200 block, 11:14 a.m. Nov.
24.
Gallatin St., 700 block, 4:40 p.m.
Nov. 27.
Garfield St., 3100 block, 3:12
a.m. Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 2000 block, 8:40
a.m. Nov. 24.
Georgia Ave., 3000 block, 6:20
p.m. Nov. 26.
Georgia Ave., 3400-3501 blocks,
6:56 a.m. Nov. 28.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block, 5:09
p.m. Nov. 27.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block, 9:52
a.m. Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 4000 block, 5:02
p.m. Nov. 28.
Georgia Ave., 4100 block, 1:21
p.m. Nov. 24.
Georgia Ave., 4300 block, 2:26
p.m. Nov. 5. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 4600 block, 4:04
p.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 5200 block, 1:29
p.m. Nov. 22.
Georgia Ave., 5200 block, 5:07
a.m. Nov. 23.
Georgia Ave., 5900 block, 5:51
a.m. Nov. 25.
Georgia Ave., 5900 block, 10:06
a.m. Nov. 27.
Georgia Ave., 6600 block, 5:20
a.m. Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Girard St., 600 block, 12:37 p.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Girard St., 700-999 blocks, 12:16
p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Gresham Pl., 500-699 blocks,
7:58 p.m. Nov. 27.
H St., 500 block, 4:16 p.m. Nov.
28.
H St., 600 block, 9:50 p.m. Nov.
22.
H St., 600 block, 12:09 a.m. Nov.
25. From vehicle.
H St., 600 block, 8:06 a.m. Nov.
27. From vehicle.
H St., 1000 block, 4:21 p.m. Nov.
25.
H St., 1200 block, 9:59 a.m. Nov.
22. From vehicle.
H St., 2300 block, 2:29 p.m. Nov.
24. From vehicle.
H St., unit block, 6:18 p.m. Nov.
22.
H St., unit block, 9:41 a.m. Nov.
23.
H St., unit block, 9:42 a.m. Nov.
23.
Harvard St., 1800 block, 8:09
a.m. Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Hobart Pl., 500-699 blocks, 1:03
a.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Holmead Pl., 3400 block, 5:19
a.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
I St., 400 block, 11:08 p.m. Nov.
23. From vehicle.
I St., 1400 block, 9:03 p.m. Nov.
26. From vehicle.
Ingleside Terr., 1800-1999
blocks, 7:18 a.m. Nov. 15.
Ingleside Terr., 1800-1999
blocks, 5:02 p.m. Nov. 18.
Irving St., 1300 block, 1:45 p.m.
Nov. 23. From vehicle.
Juniper St., 800 block, 7:13 a.m.
Nov. 25. From vehicle.
K St., 400 block, 3:43 p.m. Nov.
28. From vehicle.
K St., 600 block, 12:32 p.m. Nov.
24.
K St., 600 block, 3:12 p.m. Nov.
28.
K St., 600 block, 6:25 p.m. Nov.
28.
K St., 1500 block, 7:48 a.m. Nov.
28.
K St., 1700 block, 6:18 a.m. Nov.
27. From vehicle.
K St., 3000 block, 3:34 p.m. Nov.
22.
Kalorama Rd., 1600 block, 3:43
p.m. Nov. 22.
Kalorama Rd., 1700 block, 1:38
p.m. Nov. 23. From vehicle.
Kalorama Rd., 2100 block, 2:45
p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Keefer Pl., 600 block, 4:47 p.m.
Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Kennedy St., 100 block, 7:53
a.m. Nov. 26.
Kennedy St., 700 block, 4:23
a.m. Nov. 28.
Kenyon St., 1100-1299 blocks,
7:20 p.m. Nov. 27.
Kirby St., 1200 block, 7:31 a.m.
Nov. 25. From vehicle.
L St., 400 block, 3:11 p.m. Nov.
23. From vehicle.
L St., 400 block, 3:25 p.m. Nov.
25. From vehicle.
Lamont St., 1000 block, 3:54
p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Lamont St., 1100-1299 blocks,
5:46 a.m. Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Laurel St., 6800 block, 3:54 p.m.
Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Longfellow St., 900 block, 7:42
a.m. Nov. 28.
M St., 1800 block, 8:26 p.m. Nov.
23.
M St., 2100 block, 4:43 p.m. Nov.
27. From vehicle.
M St., 2400 block, 9:31 a.m. Nov.
14.
M St., 3000 block, 7:58 a.m. Nov.
22.
M St., 3000 block, 1:12 p.m. Nov.
24.
M St., 3200 block, 12:49 p.m.
Nov. 22.
M St., 3200 block, 1:16 p.m. Nov.
25.
M St., 3200 block, 10:46 a.m.
Nov. 26.
M St., 3200 block, 10:58 a.m.
Nov. 26.
M St., 3200 block, 2 p.m. Nov. 27.
M St., 3200 block, 8:41 a.m. Nov.
28.
M St., 3600 block, 11:44 p.m.
Nov. 26.
Madison St., 100 block, 1:02 a.m.
Nov. 26.
Massachusetts Ave., 300 block,
4:32 p.m. Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Massachusetts Ave., 300 block,
7:37 p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
1:25 p.m. Nov. 22.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
4:23 p.m. Nov. 26.
Massachusetts Ave., 600 block,
8:34 a.m. Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Massachusetts Ave., 600 block,
12:19 p.m. Nov. 25.
Massachusetts Ave., 2100
block, 9:11 a.m. Nov. 28. From
vehicle.
Missouri Ave., 1200 block, 5:10
p.m. Nov. 27.
Morton St., 700 block, 9:47 a.m.
Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Mount Pleasant St., 3200 block,
9:41 p.m. Nov. 24.
N St., 100 block, 9:30 a.m. Nov.
21.
N St., 800 block, 9:57 a.m. Nov.
25. From vehicle.
N St., 1700 block, 12:31 p.m. Nov.
22. From vehicle.
N St., 1900 block, 11:12 p.m. Nov.
24. From vehicle.
N St., 2200 block, 2:15 p.m. Nov.
25. From vehicle.
New Hampshire Ave., 800 block,
3:14 a.m. Nov. 28.
New York Ave., 1000 block, 3:17
p.m. Nov. 28.
Newton St., 1400-1599 blocks,
6:35 p.m. Nov. 28.
Newton St., 1700 block, 5:46
p.m. Nov. 28. From vehicle.
North Capitol St., 1200-1499
blocks, 5:13 p.m. Nov. 27.
North Capitol St., 1600 block,
7:07 p.m. Nov. 22.
O St., 800 block, 11:17 a.m. Nov.
27.
Ontario Pl., 1800 block, 3:17 a.m.
Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Ontario Rd., 2100-2323 blocks,
9:47 p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Ontario Rd., 2700 block, 3:34
p.m. Nov. 20.
Otis Pl., 800 block, 7:22 a.m. Nov.
23. From vehicle.
P St., 100-299 blocks, 4:25 p.m.
Nov. 22.
P St., 500 block, 5:03 a.m. Nov.
25. From vehicle.
P St., 1400 block, 6:09 p.m. Nov.
22.
P St., 1400 block, 11:53 p.m. Nov.
22.
P St., 1400 block, 9:31 a.m. Nov.
27.
P St., 1600 block, 4:53 a.m. Nov.
25. From vehicle.
P St., unit block, 4:31 a.m. Nov.
CRIME CONTINUED ON 18
the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
Arkansas Ave., 4300 block, 8:12
a.m. Nov. 23.
Champlain St., 2300-2499
blocks, 10:41 p.m. Nov. 24. With
gun.
Colorado Ave., 5800 block, 8:16
p.m. Nov. 21.
Florida Ave., 900 block, 2:17 a.m.
Nov. 23.
Georgia Ave., 4000 block, 5:06
p.m. Nov. 25. With gun.
K St., 1500 block, 11:35 p.m. Nov.
24. With gun.
N St., 2100 block, 9:26 p.m. Nov.
26. With gun.
Park Rd., 1700 block, 3:35 p.m.
Nov. 25. With gun.
U St., 1500 block, 2:22 p.m. Nov.
26.
Van Buren St., 1400-1599 blocks,
7:58 p.m. Nov. 26. With knife.
Wisconsin Ave., 4400 block, 5:37
p.m. Nov. 26.
10th St., 2000 block, 11:37 a.m.
Nov. 22. With gun.
13th St., 3400 block, 6 p.m. Nov.
23.
18th St., 2000 block, 6:37 p.m.
Nov. 25.
DC
18
the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
DC
Crime Report
CRIME FROM 17
28. From vehicle.
Park Pl., 3600 block, 12:29 p.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Park Rd., 500-699 blocks, 8:31
a.m. Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Park Rd., 500-699 blocks, 8:17
a.m. Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Park Rd., 1400 block, 9:37 a.m.
Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Park Rd., 1500 block, 9:42 a.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Pennsylvania Ave., 500 block,
2:30 p.m. Nov. 27.
Pennsylvania Ave., 700-899
blocks, 7:53 a.m. Nov. 27.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1200 block,
1:58 p.m. Nov. 23.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1400 block,
1:45 p.m. Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Pennsylvania Ave., 2100 block,
12:46 p.m. Nov. 22.
Piney Branch Rd., 7000 block,
1:36 p.m. Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Prospect St., 3200 block, 6:12
a.m. Nov. 21.
Q St., 500 block, 8:36 p.m. Nov.
23. From vehicle.
Q St., 1400 block, 7:34 a.m. Nov.
22. From vehicle.
Q St., 2000 block, 10:39 a.m.
Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Quincy St., 800 block, 12:47 p.m.
Nov. 26.
Quintana Pl., 500-699 blocks,
7:25 a.m. Nov. 6.
R St., 1600 block, 4:32 p.m. Nov.
25. From vehicle.
R St., 1600 block, 1:08 p.m. Nov.
28. From vehicle.
R St., unit block, 3:29 a.m. Nov.
26. From vehicle.
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Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
3:41 p.m. Nov. 28.
Rhode Island Ave., 1600 block,
12:20 a.m. Nov. 26.
Rock Creek Church Rd., 500699 blocks, 2:05 a.m. Nov. 22.
S St., 1000 block, 3:24 a.m. Nov.
26. From vehicle.
S St., 1500 block, 2:56 p.m. Nov.
27. From vehicle.
Sedgwick St., 5000 block, 9:12
a.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Sherman Ave., 2200 block, 5:25
a.m. Nov. 27. From vehicle.
T St., 800 block, 7:32 a.m. Nov.
28. From vehicle.
T St., 1200 block, 3:44 p.m. Nov.
27.
U St., 900 block, 5:35 p.m. Nov.
28. From vehicle.
U St., 1000 block, 4:16 p.m. Nov.
24.
U St., 1100 block, 9:33 p.m. Nov.
22.
U St., 1100 block, 3:50 a.m. Nov.
25.
U St., 1200 block, 8:26 p.m. Nov.
27.
U St., 1300 block, 8:17 a.m. Nov.
22.
U St., 1300 block, 6:27 a.m. Nov.
26.
U St., 1300 block, 6:51 p.m. Nov.
26.
U St., 1300 block, 6:05 a.m. Nov.
27.
Upshur St., 300 block, 6:35 p.m.
Nov. 28.
Upshur St., 800 block, 1:22 p.m.
Nov. 25.
Upshur St., 1800 block, 2:03 p.m.
Nov. 27.
Van Buren St., 400 block, 5:26
p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Van Buren St., 400 block, 6:14
p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Van Ness St., 2900 block, 7:56
a.m. Nov. 24.
Varnum St., 1400 block, 1:05
p.m. Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Vermont Ave., 1100 block, 11:18
a.m. Nov. 23.
Vermont Ave., 1100 block, 6:59
a.m. Nov. 25.
Walbridge Pl., 3200 block, 10:54
a.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Wallach Pl., 1300 block, 8:24
a.m. Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Water St., 3300 block, 12:27
p.m. Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Water St., 3300 block, 1:50 p.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Water St., 3300 block, 11:28 a.m.
Nov. 25.
Western Ave., 5200 block, 2:33
p.m. Nov. 28.
Wisconsin Ave., 1200 block, 7:13
a.m. Nov. 22.
Wisconsin Ave., 1200 block,
11:21 a.m. Nov. 26.
Wisconsin Ave., 1200 block,
12:28 p.m. Nov. 26.
Wisconsin Ave., 2200-2318
blocks, 8:11 a.m. Nov. 27.
Wisconsin Ave., 2200 block,
11:19 a.m. Nov. 23.
Wisconsin Ave., 5300 block,
3:55 p.m. Nov. 27.
First St., 300 block, 3:36 a.m.
Nov. 21. From vehicle.
First St., 2200 block, 8:11 a.m.
Nov. 25. From vehicle.
First St., 2300 block, 4:40 p.m.
Nov. 22. From vehicle.
First Terr., 1100 block, 2:17 p.m.
Nov. 27.
Third St., 1700 block, 4:15 p.m.
Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Third St., 1900 block, 9:30 a.m.
Nov. 10.
Third St., 4100 block, 4:16 a.m.
Nov. 15.
Third St., 4800 block, 5:51 a.m.
Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 800 block, 2:51 p.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 1100 block, 10:14
a.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 600 block, 9:51 a.m.
Nov. 27.
Fifth St., 800 block, 11:06 a.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 1500 block, 9:37 a.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 1500 block, 1:35 p.m.
Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 1800 block, 9:07 p.m.
Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 1800 block, 10:34 a.m.
Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 1900 block, 5:55 p.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 700 block, 10:23
a.m. Nov. 24.
Seventh St., 700 block, 2:30 p.m.
Nov. 25.
Seventh St., 700 block, 7:37 p.m.
Nov. 26.
Seventh St., 800 block, 7:27 p.m.
Nov. 26.
Seventh St., 1500 block, 10:43
p.m. Nov. 22.
Seventh St., 1600 block, 5:10
p.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 1600 block, 2 p.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 1600 block, 12:18
a.m. Nov. 25.
Seventh St., 1600 block, 3:36
a.m. Nov. 26.
Seventh St., 1600 block, 6:01
a.m. Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 1700 block, 4:38
p.m. Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 1900 block, 7:22
a.m. Nov. 22.
Seventh St., 1900 block, 10:45
a.m. Nov. 26.
Eighth St., 1300 block, 8:13 p.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 1300 block, 8:39 p.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 1900 block, 7:53 p.m.
Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 2100-2299 blocks,
9:21 p.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 700 block, 7:15 p.m.
Nov. 25.
Ninth St., 800 block, 6:07 a.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 6300 block, 11:01 p.m.
Nov. 25. From vehicle.
10th St., 700 block, 1:28 p.m.
Nov. 28. From vehicle.
10th St., 1100 block, 10:46 a.m.
Nov. 25.
11th St., 600 block, 1:54 p.m.
Nov. 28.
11th St., 2100 block, 5:30 a.m.
Nov. 15.
11th St., 2100 block, 5:55 p.m.
Nov. 15.
11th St., 2100 block, 6:32 p.m.
Nov. 24.
11th St., 2800 block, 5:17 a.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
13th St., 600 block, 1:31 a.m.
Nov. 22.
13th St., 600 block, 2:22 p.m.
Nov. 28.
13th St., 700 block, 10:44 a.m.
Nov. 22. From vehicle.
13th St., 1100 block, 10:05 p.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
13th St., 1800 block, 6:03 a.m.
Nov. 25.
14th St., 1200 block, 6:56 a.m.
Nov. 5.
14th St., 1400 block, 10:03 a.m.
Nov. 27.
14th St., 1600 block, 1:18 p.m.
Nov. 25.
14th St., 1700 block, 7:19 p.m.
Nov. 17.
14th St., 1900 block, 8:39 a.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
14th St., 3000 block, 7:10 p.m.
Nov. 24.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 8:37
a.m. Nov. 22.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 9:33
a.m. Nov. 22.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 5:51
p.m. Nov. 27.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 4:16
p.m. Nov. 28.
14th St., 3700-3813 blocks, 9:36
p.m. Nov. 23. From vehicle.
15th St., 600 block, 9:26 p.m.
Nov. 25.
15th St., 900 block, 8:13 p.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
15th St., 2300 block, 5:22 p.m.
Nov. 28.
16th St., 2000 block, 5:25 a.m.
Nov. 22.
16th St., 2100 block, 4:40 a.m.
Nov. 22.
16th St., 3600 block, 6:44 p.m.
Nov. 25. From vehicle.
17th St., 1100 block, 8:56 p.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
17th St., 1700 block, 6:05 a.m.
Nov. 25.
17th St., 3100 block, 5:11 a.m.
Nov. 22.
19th St., 900 block, 1:34 p.m.
Nov. 22. From vehicle.
19th St., 1300 block, 5:56 p.m.
Nov. 25.
19th St., 1300 block, 5:33 p.m.
Nov. 28.
21st St., 700 block, 8:41 p.m.
Nov. 21. From vehicle.
22nd St., 1200 block, 11:59 a.m.
Nov. 22.
23rd St., 600 block, 9:48 a.m.
Nov. 23.
24th St., 2600 block, 8:59 p.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
25th St., 1200 block, 11:03 a.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
26th and O streets, 6:08 a.m.
CRIME CONTINUED ON 20
19
Home Sales
HOMES FROM 2
NORTHWEST
Allen Pl., 2015-Jean-Paul Dumont
to Grant D. Meyer, $1.36 million.
Buchanan St., 813-Dilan
Investment Corp. to Nils Cousin and
Rasha Bakhit, $861,000.
California St., 2127, No. 402Michele Rocca Wheatley to Sumia
Ahmad and Ryan Michael Cassidy,
$650,000.
Cathedral Ave., 3901, No. 95-Sally
A. Sheperd to Kathleen Ann Malloy,
$241,500.
Cathedral Ave., 5012-Keith and
Katherine Fleming to Joseph F. and
Kari L. Clark, $885,000.
Cherry Hill Lane, 3222, No. A2Corrinne B. Goldman to Carolina
Quiroga Olaya and Victor Gabriel
Martinez, $634,000.
Church St., 1400, No. 201-Sarah
Stephens to Ellen K. and Allan B.
Isbitz, $1.01 million.
Columbia Rd., 1401, No. 410Sarah Ganslein to Samuel Levor,
$451,000.
Connecticut Ave., 3701, No. 309Alexander Fiske to Susan Scott,
$271,500.
Connecticut Ave., 4600, No. 614Paul F. Batchelor Jr. to Joseph J.
Casten, $260,000.
Connecticut Ave., 4740, No. 812Megan Nichols and Peter M. Rosan
to Polson Kanneth and Sandhya
Rani Kotha, $565,000.
D St., 631, No. 831-Natalie L.
Johnson to Jun Gao, $460,000.
Delafield Pl., 620-Pauline
Washington to Anderozzi and David
DC
Muir, $420,000.
Ellicott St., 4308-David S. Martin
to Brian and Carolyn Frederick,
$975,000.
Euclid St., 1300, No. 5-Marta C.
Ribeiro and Makram Talih to Roy
and Michele Perrin, $857,500.
Hamilton St., 645-Irving T. Brown
and Michelene Cole-Brown to
Matthew Tedrow, $700,000.
Harvard St., 750-750 Harvard
Street Corp. to Kristoffer A. and Cola
A. Green, $830,000.
Idaho Ave., 3051, No. 323-Mana
Zarinejo to Alan Cade Holleman and
Andres Camilo Cannon Angee,
$309,000.
P St., 1710-Eric and David Akridge
to Shafer Minnick, $1.77 million.
Park Rd., 1457, No. 502-Julie
Caccamise and Julie Gloss to
Matthew L. Nichols and Herbert
Vern Ladley, $440,000.
Peabody St., 207-Doris E. Hughes
to Candyce J. Hughes and
Drahamane Colubibaly, $386,000.
Quincy St., 703-Joseph Muniz to
Silvia Muzi, $765,000.
R St., 1401, No. 303-Steven Donald
Smith to Jason Theodorson,
$557,500.
Rhode Island Ave., 440, No. 402Timothy N. Miller and Steven T.
Jameson to Lauren A. and Sean K.
Maxwel, $579,000.
Ridge St., 424, No. 4-Andrew W.
Zabroske and Sondra S.
Gawlikowski to Kelsey M. Johnson
and Jon K.L. Miller, $418,000.
Sherman Ave., 3215-Laura Natalia
Rojas Sanchez to Emily Pearl
Goodstein and Ronaldlee Kelly,
$600,000.
Stephenson Pl., 3231-Christopher
E. Babbitt and Claire Prestel to
Brian Jason Rogers and Jennifer
Nicole Beemsterboer, $1.01 million.
Swann St., 1715, No. 8-Jan
Johansson to Ami Wilber,
$500,000.
Tennyson St., 3215-Jonathan S.
Kallmer and Dylana L. Blum to
Sarah Spreitzer and Rohit Mahajan,
$875,000.
Tunlaw Rd., 4000, No. 503-Anne
Frank House Inc. to Julianne
Haggerty, $206,000.
University Ave., 3714-Kevin C. and
Janet T. Conroy to Michael John
Deitemeyer, $3.1 million.
V St., 5017-Joseph Andrew Jackson
to Donald Robert and Mary Katelyn
Depriest, $775,000.
Van Ness St., 3807-Martin R.
Crowson and Judith Coats-Crowson
to Seth Johnson and Pamela Lee,
$1.1 million.
Vermont Ave., 1902, No. C-Brian
Roehrkasse and Megan Gerking to
Jennifer R. Leib, $1.12 million.
W St., 55-55 W Corp. to William
Thornton and Torrey Crowe
Shearer, $1.41 million.
Washington Cir., 3, No. 107-Omar
and Yacoob Noor to Daniel J.
Heidenberg, $345,000.
Western Ave., 7219-Stella P.
Nichols to Claudia Dewindt,
$750,000.
Yuma St., 4337-Maria Luisa
Sanchez to Deepak Seth,
$870,000.
First St., 5408-Jennifer L. Switlick
to Carolina Cid and Scott McCombs,
$456,000.
Third St., 4126-Mary R. Alridge to
Michael E. and Sarah Taylor,
$500,000.
Fourth St., 5506-Todd Richardson
and Kathleen Shannon Gobeille to
Blake William and Hind Haider
Audsley, $715,000.
Seventh St., 777, No. 318-Robert
W. O’Connor and Carol A. Maczka to
Sean L. Stickle and Jill M. Foster,
$445,000.
Eighth St., 4224-Christine Huff to
Alexander Karcher and Theodore
Cohen, $610,000.
39th St., 3770, No. D136-Marylyn
P. Swezey and Isabel Pfeifer to
Alison McKelvie, $230,000.
46th St., 4816-H3ab Partnership to
Vincent H. and Erica Bridgeman,
$950,000.
Home sales online
For more recent home sales, go to
washingtonpost.com/local.
$1.16 million.
Elvans Rd., 2390-Calvin and
Veronica R. Stewart to Robert
James Stukes, $315,000.
Fort Davis St., 2022, No. A-Janafur
Williams to Barbara and William
Baylor, $145,000.
I St., 1009-Adam Michael Keatts
and Lucy Ogg Kea to Matthew David
Zapotosky and Catherine Jean
Wilson, $675,000.
V St., 3809, No. 201-Gertrude J.
Saleh to Kelsi Bracmort, $85,000.
Third St., 316-James S. and Sandra
M. Tarver to Kaixin He and Vladimir
N. Dvornychenko, $925,000.
Eighth St., 221-Mark L. Shlien to
William Marshall and Janice Kay
Adams, $970,000.
14th St., 2120-Caroline M.
Schneider to Joanna K. Knight,
$429,000.
18th St., 2515-Henry L. Jackson Jr.
to Kristel Taylor, $265,000.
SOUTHEAST
Bangor St., 1410-Vincent Alan and
Peggy C. Hill to Karen E. and Edna
Estes, $136,370.
Benning Rd., 4732, No. 302Robert Anthony Jones to Rebecca
Brandon, $60,000.
Burbank St., 368-478 Burns St.
Corp. to Monika L. Adams,
$329,000.
Carolina Ave. S., 1309-Mario A.
Giberti to Andrew James Gorman
and Elisabeth Michelle Liadis,
$884,000.
D St., 1218, No. 1-Diane K.
Rusignola to John-Michael Quinn
Seibler and Ashley Morgan Howe,
$322,500.
E St., 629-Jennifer A. Moyer to
Daniel H. and Erin K. Chow,
SOUTHWEST
Delaware Ave., 753, No. 182-JeanMarie Sylla Jr. and Jean Marie
Mayas to John L. and John Richter,
$612,500.
Fourth St., 800, No. N214-Michael
J. Bow and Angela L. Hinzey to
Diana Finegold, $510,000.
Seventh St., 700, No. 608-Sheila D.
Rawls to Craig Arthur and Cheryl
Steinkamp White, $399,495.
Community News
HEALTH CODE VIOLATIONS
Moe’s Southwest Grill
470 L’Enfant Plaza SW
Closed Friday for operating without
a manager on duty and because of
incorrect food temperatures.
THE DISTRICT
BP
1317 Ninth St. NW
Food service closed Friday for
operating without hot water and
because of insects, rodents and
other pests.
Sunrise Deli
1220 L St. NW
Closed Nov. 20 for operating
without hot water and because of
insects, rodents and other pests.
Reopened last Thursday.
IMM on H Thai and Sushi Bar
1360 H St. NE
Closed Nov. 28 because of
circumstances that may endanger
public health and for operating
without a license. Reopened the
next day.
Modern Liquors
1200 Ninth St. NW
Closed Nov. 28 for operating
without hot water.
Van Ness Wines & Liquors
4201 Connecticut Ave. NW
Closed Nov. 29 for operating
without a license.
West Wing Cafe
5300 Wisconsin Ave NW
Closed Nov. 28 for operating
without a manager on duty.
Reopened that day.
— Compiled by Terence McArdle
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ICE! PRESENTED BY
PRESENTED BY
the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
These food establishments were
closed because of health code
violations. The list, compiled from
health department reports, reflects
actions taken by the departments.
20
the washington post . thursday, december 7 , 2017
DC
Crime Report
CRIME FROM 18
Nov. 28.
28th St., 2500 block, 10:37 a.m.
Nov. 22. From vehicle.
29th St., 2700 block, 6:34 a.m.
Nov. 28.
30th St., 1300 block, 5:18 a.m.
Nov. 24.
31st St., 1000 block, 7:40 p.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
33rd St., 1000-1199 blocks,
12:56 p.m. Nov. 25.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Columbia Rd., 1100-1299 blocks,
4:30 a.m. Nov. 24.
Columbia Rd., 1300 block, 6:03
a.m. Nov. 22.
Columbia Rd., 1300 block, 8:31
a.m. Nov. 25.
Farragut St., 200 block, 9:08
a.m. Nov. 22.
L St., 1900 block, 5:30 p.m. Nov.
27.
Park Rd., 1300 block, 4:33 a.m.
Nov. 27.
Prospect St., 3300 block, 2:09
p.m. Nov. 28.
R St., 1600 block, 5:17 p.m. Nov.
26.
First St., 1700 block, 3:23 p.m.
Nov. 25.
Eighth St., 6900-7009 blocks,
4:41 p.m. Nov. 28.
28th St., 1200 block, 10:40 p.m.
Nov. 24.
29th St., 1300 block, 4:49 p.m.
Nov. 22.
30th St., 1200 block, 11:13 a.m.
Nov. 23.
32nd St., 1600 block, 11:47 a.m.
Nov. 22.
SOUTHEAST
HOMICIDE
Elvans Rd., 2400-2599 blocks, 7
p.m. Nov. 23. With gun.
ASSAULTS
Bellevue St., 800-1099 blocks,
5:20 p.m. Nov. 24. With gun.
Bowen Rd., 2600 block, 7:14 a.m.
Nov. 28.
Douglass Rd., 2600 block, 2:59
p.m. Nov. 27. With knife.
Gainesville St., 1800 block, 8:54
a.m. Nov. 23. With knife.
Jasper St., 2600-2799 blocks,
7:16 a.m. Nov. 25. With knife.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
2600 block, 11:54 p.m. Nov. 26.
With gun.
Tubman Rd., 1800 block, 7:32
a.m. Nov. 27. With gun.
Fourth St., 4200 block, 7:35 p.m.
Nov. 24.
13th Pl., 3400 block, 8:11 a.m.
Nov. 27.
17th St., 1500 block, 5:37 a.m.
Nov. 26. With knife.
ROBBERIES
East Capitol St., 5300 block,
1:28 p.m. Nov. 23. With knife.
G St., 4400 block, 1:48 p.m. Nov.
24. With gun.
Pitts Pl., 2300 block, 6:18 p.m.
Nov. 26.
Southern Ave., 2500-2999
blocks, 11:33 p.m. Nov. 24. With
gun.
Southern Ave., 3600-3711
blocks, 11:46 a.m. Nov. 26. With
knife.
Sumner Rd., 1100-1237 blocks,
12:49 p.m. Nov. 24.
W St., 1300 block, 4:55 p.m. Nov.
26. With knife.
Wagner St., 2300 block, 9:11
a.m. Nov. 24. With knife.
Eighth St., 200 block, 5:13 p.m.
Nov. 28. With gun.
22nd St., 1400 block, 10:39 a.m.
Nov. 26. With knife.
35th St., unit block, 11:39 a.m.
Nov. 27. With gun.
49th St., unit block, 6:31 p.m.
Nov. 28. With gun.
BREAK-INS
A St., 5100-5299 blocks, 10:55
a.m. Nov. 25.
Alabama Ave., 700 block, 3:34
a.m. Nov. 24.
C St., 5400-5599 blocks, 5:12
p.m. Nov. 25.
East Capitol St., 5000-5199
blocks, 10:49 a.m. Nov. 25.
Fitch St., 5100-5300 blocks, 2:56
p.m. Nov. 28.
Good Hope Rd., 2200 block, 1:31
a.m. Nov. 28.
Good Hope Rd., 2300 block,
5:22 p.m. Nov. 27.
Hillside Rd., 4600 block, 7:31
a.m. Nov. 22.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
3100 block, 11:55 a.m. Nov. 27.
Ridge Rd., 500 block, 7:44 a.m.
Nov. 25.
36th St., 2500-2699 blocks,
11:20 a.m. Nov. 25.
51st St., 800 block, 5:06 p.m.
Nov. 23.
THEFTS
A St., 4900 block, 4:45 p.m. Nov.
22. From vehicle.
Alabama Ave., 600 block, 4:32
a.m. Nov. 27.
Alabama Ave., 900 block, 4:26
a.m. Nov. 25.
Alabama Ave., 1500-1699 blocks,
1:49 p.m. Nov. 22.
Alabama Ave., 1500-1699 blocks,
2:05 p.m. Nov. 22.
Alabama Ave., 1500-1699 blocks,
4:40 p.m. Nov. 27.
Alabama Ave., 2800-2999
blocks, 7:53 p.m. Nov. 26.
Alabama Ave., 2800-2999
blocks, 7:09 a.m. Nov. 27.
Alabama Ave., 4400 block, 2:42
a.m. Nov. 24.
Altamont Pl., 2300 block, 3:42
a.m. Nov. 26. From vehicle.
B St., 4600-4899 blocks, 5:36
a.m. Nov. 26.
Buena Vista Terr., 3000-3299
blocks, 5:39 a.m. Nov. 27.
Burbank St., 400 block, 1:16 a.m.
Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Chaplin St., 1000-1199 blocks,
3:39 a.m. Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Congress St., 1300 block, 2:24
p.m. Nov. 27.
D St., 3200 block, 3:47 a.m. Nov.
25. From vehicle.
D St., 3700-3899 blocks, 2:35
p.m. Nov. 28.
Denver St., 3300 block, 8:07 a.m.
Nov. 28. From vehicle.
E St., 1200 block, 11:15 a.m. Nov.
24.
East Capitol St., 1300 block,
4:39 a.m. Nov. 27.
East Capitol St., 1500 block,
6:25 p.m. Nov. 16.
East Capitol St., 1700 block, 8:39
a.m. Nov. 26. From vehicle.
East Capitol St., 1800 block,
3:14 a.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
F St., 4300 block, 4:22 p.m. Nov.
27. From vehicle.
G St., 1100 block, 10:07 a.m. Nov.
26.
I St., 1200 block, 10:36 a.m. Nov.
27.
Independence Ave., 800 block,
4:26 a.m. Nov. 22.
Independence Ave., 1500 block,
10:37 p.m. Nov. 21.
Irving Pl., 2400 block, 3:41 a.m.
Nov. 22. From vehicle.
K St., 1300 block, 6:38 a.m. Nov.
26. From vehicle.
Livingston Rd., 4100-4530
blocks, 8:07 a.m. Nov. 22. From
vehicle.
M St., 400 block, 2:34 p.m. Nov.
22.
M St., 400 block, 11:04 a.m. Nov.
26.
M St., 400 block, 7:37 a.m. Nov.
28.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
2600 block, 6:21 a.m. Nov. 27.
From vehicle.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
2900 block, 11:01 p.m. Nov. 27.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
3100 block, 9:59 p.m. Nov. 22.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
3300 block, 7:04 p.m. Nov. 28.
From vehicle.
Massachusetts Ave., 1700 block,
1:14 p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Mississippi Ave., 600 block,
11:10 a.m. Nov. 24.
Naylor Rd., 1900 block, 2:22 p.m.
Nov. 27.
Naylor Rd., 2500-2649 blocks,
11:15 a.m. Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Naylor Rd., 2700 block, 5:16 a.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
New Jersey Ave., 1000 block,
8:48 a.m. Nov. 26.
New Jersey Ave., 1100 block,
4:43 a.m. Nov. 27.
New Jersey Ave., 1200 block,
8:44 a.m. Nov. 24.
Nicholson St., 2200 block, 5:59
a.m. Nov. 24. From vehicle.
North Carolina Ave., 100 block,
3 a.m. Nov. 23. From vehicle.
North Carolina Ave., 600 block,
2:53 p.m. Nov. 22.
Pennsylvania Ave., 300 block,
3:24 a.m. Nov. 25.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block, 5
p.m. Nov. 24.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
1:27 p.m. Nov. 25.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
6:42 a.m. Nov. 26.
Pennsylvania Ave., 700 block,
8:29 a.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Pennsylvania Ave., 700 block,
3:08 a.m. Nov. 27.
Pennsylvania Ave., 3100 block,
1:09 p.m. Nov. 24.
Ridge Rd., 500 block, 4:43 a.m.
Nov. 26. From vehicle.
South Carolina Ave., 1300 block,
5:17 a.m. Nov. 14.
Southern Ave., 4200 block, 9:05
a.m. Nov. 28.
Stevens Rd., 1100-1399 blocks,
5:08 a.m. Nov. 25.
T St., 2100 block, 1:27 a.m. Nov.
22. From vehicle.
V St., 1600 block, 10:12 a.m. Nov.
27.
Wayne Pl., 100 block, 7:11 a.m.
Nov. 22.
Yuma St., 800 block, 1:47 p.m.
Nov. 13.
Fourth St., 3400-3699 blocks,
4:50 p.m. Nov. 28.
Fourth St., 3900 block, 3:38 p.m.
Nov. 28.
Eighth St., 500-699 blocks, 9:30
p.m. Nov. 25. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 1000 block, 6:52 p.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
12th St., 500 block, 3:12 p.m.
Nov. 27.
12th St., 500 block, 4:37 p.m.
Nov. 27.
15th St., 300 block, 3:12 a.m.
Nov. 22. From vehicle.
17th St., 300 block, 4:11 a.m.
Nov. 28. From vehicle.
17th St., 700 block, 5:21 a.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
17th St., 1600 block, 9:49 a.m.
Nov. 24.
18th St., 2100 block, 1:01 p.m.
Nov. 27.
19th St., 100 block, 2:51 a.m.
Nov. 22.
19th St., 1700 block, 4:45 a.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
22nd St., 1400 block, 9:48 a.m.
Nov. 22.
25th St., 2300 block, 6:46 a.m.
Nov. 27.
34th St., 2000-2199 blocks,
12:31 a.m. Nov. 23. From vehicle.
57th Pl., 100 block, 4:55 a.m.
Nov. 23. From vehicle.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Atlantic St., 100 block, 10:54
p.m. Nov. 27.
B St., 4400 block, 9:33 a.m. Nov.
28.
B St., 5400-5699 blocks, 6:40
a.m. Nov. 25.
Brothers Pl., 3500 block, 7:30
p.m. Nov. 28.
Congress St., 1300 block, 12:34
p.m. Nov. 22.
E St., 800 block, 7:14 p.m. Nov.
24.
Minnesota Ave., 3400-3513
blocks, 4:36 p.m. Nov. 22.
Minnesota Ave., 3600 block,
2:04 a.m. Nov. 25.
N St., 2800 block, 3:01 a.m. Nov.
26.
Southern Ave., 100-499 blocks,
12:09 p.m. Nov. 28.
Stevens Rd., 1100-1399 blocks,
7:38 p.m. Nov. 26.
Wayne Pl., 200 block, 7:35 a.m.
Nov. 27.
Second St., 2900 block, 5:19
a.m. Nov. 23.
12th Pl., 2500 block, 6:20 a.m.
Nov. 24.
18th St., 2100 block, 8:39 a.m.
Nov. 24.
32nd St., 2300 block, 10:57 a.m.
Nov. 27.
SOUTHWEST
HOMICIDE
P St., 300 block, 7 p.m. Nov. 24.
With gun.
ASSAULTS
Galveston Pl., 1-153 blocks, 4:08
p.m. Nov. 27.
First St., 4700 block, 10:06 p.m.
Nov. 23. With gun.
ROBBERY
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
3900 block, 11:15 p.m. Nov. 27.
BREAK-IN
L’Enfant Plaza, 400-999 blocks,
8:28 a.m. Nov. 22.
THEFTS
Frontage Rd., 700-999 blocks,
1:20 a.m. Nov. 28.
G St., 1-299 blocks, 4:02 a.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
G St., 1-299 blocks, 5:41 a.m.
Nov. 24. From vehicle.
G St., 1-299 blocks, 4:12 a.m.
Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Half St., 1300 block, 4:40 a.m.
Nov. 27. From vehicle.
Independence Ave., 1200-1400
blocks, 1:54 p.m. Nov. 26. From
vehicle.
L’Enfant Plaza, 400-999 blocks,
7:18 a.m. Nov. 28.
Maine Ave., 1200 block, 9:29
a.m. Nov. 24. From vehicle.
Maryland Ave., 400-599 blocks,
2:52 a.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
South Capitol St., 1000-1299
blocks, 3:35 p.m. Nov. 24.
South Capitol St., 1300 block,
9:44 a.m. Nov. 22.
First St., 1500 block, 10:14 p.m.
Nov. 23. From vehicle.
First St., 1500 block, 12:35 p.m.
Nov. 28. From vehicle.
Third St., 700-899 blocks, 3:43
a.m. Nov. 22. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 900-1199 blocks, 7:52
a.m. Nov. 24.
Fourth St., 900-1199 blocks,
12:30 p.m. Nov. 25.
Fourth St., 900-1199 blocks, 6:29
p.m. Nov. 27.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Canal St., 1400 block, 12:03 p.m.
Nov. 25.
Delaware Ave., 1200-1399
blocks, 10:18 a.m. Nov. 27.
N St., 100-299 blocks, 3:44 a.m.
Nov. 22.
Sixth St., 1000-1199 blocks, 8:46
a.m. Nov. 27.
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