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The Washington Post – December 12, 2017

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Partly sunny 50/23 • Tomorrow: Partly sunny 35/28 B8
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
. $2
Bomb
targets
subway
in NYC
National
figures
focus on
Ala. race
Obama and Biden record
robo-calls for Democrat;
Bannon joins Moore
POLICE: ATTACKER
WAS INSPIRED BY ISIS
Blast from crude device
hurts suspect, 3 others
SEAN SULLIVAN,
DAVID WEIGEL
AND MICHAEL SCHERER
BY
D ANIELLE P AQUETTE,
L INDSEY B EVER
AND D EVLIN B ARRETT
BY
birmingham, ala. — National
ALABAMA CONTINUED ON A5
Times
Detail Square
8T
HA
VE
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BROADWA
Y
Port Authority
Bus Terminal
Underground passage
connecting subway stations
E
AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Akayed Ullah strapped a
primitive pipe bomb to
his body, police say.
as
t
River
1 MILE
Approximate site
of explosion
W4
1ST
ST.
Manhattan
Times
Square
W4
4TH
ST.
Port Authority
Station
BROA
DWAY
7TH
AV
E.
9TH
AV
E.
Central
Park
W4
2N
DS
T.
8TH
AV
E.
ANDRES KUDACKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hudson Riv
er
political leaders, a Hollywood actress and a retired basketball star
made last-ditch efforts Monday to
woo voters in Alabama’s U.S. Senate race, as the candidates gave
their final arguments in a pivotal
special election that has attracted
more than $41 million in spending.
Former president Barack
Obama and former vice president
Joe Biden recorded robo-calls for
Democrat Doug Jones, while President Trump recorded an appeal for
Republican Roy Moore.
“If Alabama elects liberal Democrat Doug Jones, all of our progress will be stopped cold,” Trump
said in his recorded message.
For his last event of the campaign, Moore brought in a raft of
out-of-state conservative activists,
including former White House adviser Stephen K. Bannon, Rep.
Louie Gohmert (R-Tex.), and former Milwaukee County sheriff David Clarke.
“They tried to destroy Donald
Trump, and they’re trying to destroy Roy Moore,” Bannon said.
“There’s no bottom for how low
they’ll go.”
The stakes were high for both
parties, as the outcome is likely to
set the stage for the 2018 midterm
elections. A win in the Deep South
for Democrats, the first in a Senate
race in Alabama since 1992, would
be a rebuke to Trump and Bannon,
who have promoted Moore over
the objections of establishment
Republicans.
The victory would also lend
credibility to Democratic efforts to
regain control of the Senate next
year. “The Democratic path to a
Subway
entrance
Times
Square
Station
400 FEET
Sources: Maps4News/HERE, Project Subway NYC
THE WASHINGTON POST
BOMB CONTINUED ON A2
3 women reassert sexual harassment allegations against Trump
A SHLEY P ARKER,
M ARK B ERMAN
F RANCES S TEAD S ELLERS
BY
AND
The #MeToo sexual harassment movement roiling the nation reached the doors of the
White House on Monday, when
three women who last year accused President Trump of sexual
misconduct began a renewed
public push to gain attention for
Push occurs amid shift
in national atmosphere
their allegations.
The three accusers were
among more than a dozen who
had initially come forward during the 2016 presidential campaign. The three reinvigorated
their stories this week with an
appearance on Megyn Kelly’s
NBC show — their first joint
interview — and a subsequent
news conference in Manhattan,
in which they also called on Congress to investigate their claims.
Their appeal occurs on the eve
of a closely fought special U.S.
Senate election in Alabama,
where Roy Moore, the Republican
nominee whom Trump has en-
For Kashmiri teen hit in the eye by a police pellet, ‘life is over’
BY ANNIE GOWEN
IN KARIMABAD,
INDIAN-ADMINISTERED KASHMIR
dorsed, is facing multiple accusations of sexual misconduct, and as
four Senate Democrats have
called on Trump to resign amid
the allegations of harassment
against him.
The White House dismissed the
allegations in a morning statement and an afternoon news conference, saying the president has
previously denied any improprieties and arguing that the ques-
tions were already litigated as
part of his ascension to the presidency. Several White House officials also said the West Wing was
not particularly panicked, in part
because none of the accusations
WOMEN CONTINUED ON A4
Batali off the air: Co-host of “The
Chew” faces misconduct claims. C1
Conservative women: Why they
stand by accused GOP men. A4
Shared-parenting bills
may reshape custody battles
Fathers’ rights groups have urged new standard
I
BY
t was months before Faisal
Ahmed Dar finally stepped
back on the cricket field.
He had been his team’s top
batter. But Faisal, 16, was recovering from a pellet wound that
robbed him of 93 percent of sight in
his left eye. As he healed, playing
was out of the question.
One July evening, he decided to
try. His teammates were on the
dusty school field, as always. The
wobbly wooden wickets had been
set up, as always. The sun was
turning the clouds behind the Himalayas a rosy pink.
He slowly raised the bat.
It has been well over a year since
more than 70 died and thousands
of others were injured in antigovernment protests in Indianadministered Kashmir — where
BLINDING CONTINUED ON A8
A massive police response shuts
down 42nd Street in midtown
Manhattan on Monday after an
explosion in a tunnel
connecting subway stations
resulted in the evacuation of
nearby stations. Police initially
feared a broader attack, but
they later said the wounded
suspect told them that he acted
alone with a single bomb.
Federal charges are expected to
be filed soon against the
27-year-old Bangladeshi
immigrant.
new york — A 27-year-old man
detonated a crude pipe bomb
strapped to his body inside a
crowded Manhattan subway passage Monday morning, according
to police — sending terrified commuters running for the exits and
counterterrorism officials racing
to unravel the second terrorist
attack in the city in less than two
months.
Authorities identified the suspect as Akayed Ullah, an immigrant from Bangladesh who came
to the United States in 2011. The
attack — which left the suspect
wounded but otherwise caused
only minor injuries to three commuters — immediately rekindled
public debates about terrorism,
public safety and immigration.
The pipe bomb, affixed to Ullah’s clothes with Velcro and zip
ties, detonated about 7:20 a.m. as
SHOWKAT NANDA FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Faisal Ahmed Dar was his cricket team’s top batter before losing 93 percent of sight in his left eye.
IN THE NEWS
THE NATION
BILAL HUSSEIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Protest in Beirut Thousands demonstrated as
Hezbollah’s leader condemned President
Trump’s decision about Jerusalem. A7
Delay denied A federal judge rejected the
Trump administration’s request for a stay in
accepting transgender military recruits. A3
President Trump offered lofty ambitions
but few specifics in signing a new space policy
directive. A2
Documents show a
change to Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s
travel plans cost taxpayers nearly $2,000. A3
Senate Republicans
are divided over whether they should use the
time before next year’s
elections to cut social
programs. A3
A Treasury Department analysis said the
Senate tax plan would
pay for itself — but it
makes some big
assumptions. A11
The CDC’s director
has financial holdings
that pose potential conflicts of interest. A13
THE WORLD
Warring sides in Yemen must let more aid get
through to 8.4 million
people who are “a step
away from famine,” a
U.N. official said. A6
Russian President
Vladimir Putin exhibited his growing diplomatic clout with a lightning tour through the
Middle East. A7
THE ECONOMY
French President Emmanuel Macron lured 13
climate scientists working in the United States
to his country through a
“Make Our Planet Great
Again” competition. A10
Apple bought Shazam,
an app that can identify
a song by hearing a
snippet of it. A12
Verizon announced a
deal with the NFL to allow viewers to watch
virtually all games online, no matter their Internet provider. A12
M ICHAEL A LISON
C HANDLER
The every-other-weekend dad,
born from two generations of
soaring divorce rates, was once a
conventional part of American
culture. In recent years, more
couples have been agreeing to
parent after divorce as they did
in marriage: collaboratively.
Now lawmakers are accelerating this trend toward co-parenting, with legislatures in more
than 20 states this year considering bills that would encourage
shared parenting or make it a
legal presumption — even when
parents disagree.
Kentucky this year passed a
law to make joint physical custody and equal parenting time
standard for temporary orders
after allegedly disciplining a high school student for refusing to
stand for the Pledge of
Allegiance. B1
Gov. Terry McAuliffe
introduced a measure to
curtail a teacher shortage in Virginia. B1
while a divorce is being finalized.
Florida’s legislature overwhelmingly approved a bill last year to
presume equal time for child
custody plans, but it was vetoed
by the governor. And in Michigan, lawmakers are considering a
bill that would make equal parenting time the starting point for
custody decisions.
The legal push for custody
arrangements is in large part a
result of years of lobbying by
fathers’ rights advocates who say
men feel alienated from their
children and overburdened by
child-support obligations. These
groups, including the National
Parents Organization, are gaining
new traction, with support from
across the political spectrum, as
more lawmakers respond to this
PARENTING CONTINUED ON A9
Inside
HEALTH & SCIENCE
Aging well
Some seniors take too
many pills, spurring scary
side effects. E1
ST YLE
Women-centered
OBITUARIES
Clarence Beavers, 96,
was a pioneering black
paratrooper and smoke
jumper during World
War II. B6
Such shows and films
lead the Golden Globe
nominations. C1
THE REGION
A nonprofit group is
collecting DNA samples
to help relatives find
migrants who disappeared while coming to
the United States. B1
A Fairfax County
teacher was punished
SPORTS
As part of the NBA’s
push to market “reunion
games,” the league is
hyping the return of
Thunder star Paul
George to Indiana to
face the Pacers. D1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A10
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES ......................... A14
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS .............................. A6
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 7
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
1 5 2 2
A2
EZ
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
Alabama’s special election for U.S. Senate decides the
contest between Democrat Doug Jones and Republican
Roy Moore. Visit washingtonpost.com/politics for
developments.
8:30 a.m.
The Labor Department releases producer price index
figures for November, estimated as rising 0.3 percent. See
details at washingtonpost.com/business.
3:30 p.m.
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson addresses a forum in
Washington on U.S.-South Korea relations. For details, visit
washingtonpost.com/world.
7 p.m.
The Washington Capitals host the Colorado Avalanche
at Capital One Arena. Follow the action at
washingtonpost.com/sports.
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CO R R ECTI O N S
The Reliable Source column in
the Dec. 11 Style section
incorrectly said that Joanne
Lipman was the first woman to
head USA Today’s newsroom.
Karen Jurgensen was the
company’s first female top
editor, from 1999 to 2004.
BY M ICHAEL K RANISH
AND T OM H AMBURGER
An official with a company
that former national security adviser Michael T. Flynn advised on
a proposal to build nuclear power
plants in the Middle East denied
that Flynn communicated with
the firm’s managing director
about the project on Inauguration Day.
Thomas B. Cochran, senior scientist at ACU Strategic Partners,
described the charges by a congressional witness as “patently
false and unfounded” in a letter
sent Friday to Rep. Elijah E.
Cummings (Md.), the ranking
Democrat on the House Committee on Oversight and Government Affairs.
Last week, Cummings released
the account of the witness, who
said that Alex Copson, ACU’s managing director, claimed he received
a text message from Flynn during
President Trump’s inaugural address telling him that the nuclear
plan was “good to go.”
Flynn had also assured Copson
that U.S. sanctions against Russia
would immediately be “ripped up”
by the Trump administration, a
move that would help facilitate the
deal, Copson claimed, according to
the witness.
Cochran wrote in his letter to
Cummings that the firm had
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
Trump vows a return to moon, with few specifics
BY
C HRISTIAN D AVENPORT
Once again, the Trump administration has pledged to restore
America’s leadership in space by
teaming with the private sector
and returning to the moon. Speaking at a White House ceremony
Monday, President Trump offered
high ambitions but few specifics in
signing a new space policy directive that had no timeline and
promised no funding for future
missions.
With Apollo astronaut Harrison
“Jack” Schmitt in attendance on
the 45th anniversary of Apollo 17’s
landing on the moon, Trump said
NASA would not only return to the
lunar surface but use it as a
steppingstone to explore even
deeper into the cosmos.
“The directive I’m signing today
will refocus America’s space program on human exploration and
discovery,” he said. “It marks an
important step in returning American astronauts to the moon for
the first time since 1972 for longterm exploration and use. This
time, we will not only plant our
flag and leave our footprint, we
will establish a foundation for an
eventual mission to Mars and
perhaps, someday, to many worlds
beyond. This directive will ensure
America’s space program once
again leads and inspires all of
humanity.”
His remarks mimicked those by
Vice President Pence in October
when he said in reconstituting the
National Space Council: “We will
return American astronauts to the
moon, not only to leave behind
footprints and flags, but to build
the foundation we need to send
Americans to Mars and beyond.”
The policy directive marks the
official reversal of the Obama
administration’s plan to visit an
asteroid and fly to Mars by the
mid-2030s. It also makes it clear
that the Trump administration
wants to explore the moon in
partnership with the private
sector and other countries. The
directive says that “the moon is
of interest to international partners and is within reach of
America’s private space industry.”
Moon Express, which intends to
launch a robotic lander to the
moon’s surface as early as next
year, praised the announcement.
So did industry groups the Coalition for Deep Space Exploration
and the Commercial Spaceflight
Federation, whose president, Eric
Stallmer, said that commercial
companies have “invested hundreds of millions of dollars in
private capital to develop innovative capabilities for lunar transport, operations and resource utilization.”
But presidents have promised Apollo-like ambitions for
generations, and Trump is now
the third consecutive Republican president to vow a return
to the moon. Both George H.W.
Bush and George W. Bush gave
lofty speeches about space exploration, and President Barack Obama promised a “journey to Mars.” But a lack of
funding and a clear, sustained
direction has hampered those
efforts, for decades preventing
any human exploration beyond
low Earth orbit.
While Trump offered scant specifics about how NASA would
return to the moon or how much
such an endeavor would cost, the
difference this time is that his
administration would attempt to
leverage the growing private sector for the mission.
In addition to Moon Express,
several commercial companies, including the United Launch Alliance, SpaceX and Blue Origin,
have announced plans to return to
the moon. (Blue Origin’s founder
Jeffrey P. Bezos owns The Washington Post.)
Some think they will be the key
that could give Trump a space
triumph.
“For all of this goal-setting, the
real test of Trump administration’s
space plan is simple: Is it a giveaway to special interests, or an
actual space strategy that will
push us ahead?” said Phil Larson,
an assistant dean at the University
of Colorado Boulder’s college of
engineering. “We don’t know the
answer to that yet. But we do know
a commercially led approach is the
best deal for U.S. taxpayers.
“The moon is great, but the
plans and partnerships matter
more than dates and destinations.”
christian.davenport@washpost.com
A headline in the Dec. 11
Sports section misstated the
nickname of the Arizona State
basketball team that defeated
Kansas on Dec. 10. Arizona
State’s team is the Sun Devils,
not the Wildcats.
A Letter From Russia article in
the Dec. 10 A-section misstated
the date of the inaugural session
of the first post-Soviet Duma. It
was in January 1994, not
December 1993.
The Date Lab column in the
Dec. 10 Washington Post
Magazine incorrectly attributed
a quote. It was Jordan
Monaghan, not Dylan
Morpurgo, who said: “I was so
excited to try the carpaccio,
however he doesn’t eat meat. I
felt so bad for suggesting it. I’m
not a calamari fan, but since he
couldn’t eat meat I said yes.”
In some editions of the Dec. 10
Arts & Style section, a photo of
actress Tiffany Haddish with an
article about actors with scenestealing moments in secondary
roles was missing a caption
because of a production error.
The caption should have read:
“Tiffany Haddish cuts loose in
‘Girls Trip.’ ”
The Washington Post is committed to
correcting errors that appear in the
newspaper. Those interested in
contacting the paper for that purpose
can:
Email: corrections@washpost.com.
Call: 202-334-6000, and ask to be
connected to the desk involved —
National, Foreign, Metro, Style, Sports,
Business or any of the weekly sections.
Comments can be directed to The
Post’s reader advocate, who can be
reached at 202-334-7582 or
readers@washpost.com.
Former Flynn associate
calls contact claim false
Inauguration Day
communication alleged
by congressional witness
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
examined Copson’s mobile phone
bill and found no text messages
from Flynn, an absence he said
contradicted “the core allegation” of the witness.
In an interview Monday, Cochran added that Copson did not
have an encrypted texting app or
any other means of receiving
texts. Asked whether Copson
would agree to an interview by
committee officials, Cochran said
that “we would be receptive to
briefing the full committee if
requested.”
Flynn, who briefly served as
Trump’s national security adviser
before being fired, has said he
was an adviser to ACU and traveled with company officials in
2015 to Egypt and Israel to promote their plan to build nuclear
power plants.
Cummings said in a Monday
letter that he wanted Copson to
agree to a transcribed interview
to explore the matter, noting it
was possible that Copson was
“not being truthful” during his
exchange with the witness on
Inauguration Day.
While Cummings has sought
support from Republicans on the
committee for such a briefing,
GOP Chairman Trey Gowdy of
South Carolina has denied the
request, and has instead forwarded the information to special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III.
Flynn’s lawyer, Robert Kelner,
declined to comment. Flynn
pleaded guilty this month to lying to FBI agents about his interactions with the Russian ambassador to the United States.
michael.kranish@washpost.com
tom.hamburger@washpost.com
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
Bombing is
second N.Y.
attack in
two months
BOMB FROM A1
he walked in an underground passageway from the subway station at
42nd Street and Eighth Avenue to a
nearby station at Seventh Avenue,
police said. The attack brought
Monday’s morning commute in
crowded Times Square to a standstill as a massive police response
locked down the area while authorities searched for other bombs.
Ullah told investigators that he
was inspired by propaganda from
the Islamic State terror group, according to law enforcement officials. The FBI and the New York
Police Department were investigating, and charges in federal court
were expected to be filed against
Ullah soon.
Security video shows a man
walking down the crowded tunnel,
seemingly just another passer-by
until a giant puff of smoke knocks
him to the ground. For a moment
he is still and then starts to move
his leg, clearly in pain.
Ullah sustained burns and cuts
to his hands and abdomen, authorities said. The three people who
suffered minor injuries complained of ringing in their ears and
headaches, and they took themselves to hospitals.
Police rushed to secure the scene
and evacuate pedestrians. Ullah
began talking to authorities as he
lay on the ground, according to law
enforcement officials. He has told
investigators that he acted alone,
and in those first moments after
the explosion, police focused on
ruling out the possibility that he
might have planted other bombs in
the city’s subway system, officials
said.
Investigators were able to determine he meant to detonate the
bomb at that spot in the tunnel, in
part because that is where he surreptitiously connected a small battery to a set of Christmas lights in
the pipe bomb, officials said.
Sam and Patricia Sladnick, who
STEPHANIE KEITH/GETTY IMAGES
TOP: People evacuate a subway station as police stand guard after
Monday’s explosion. ABOVE: New York police officers investigate
the Brooklyn home where they say 27-year-old Akayed Ullah lived.
The Bangladeshi immigrant has lived in the country for six years.
had been in town visiting relatives,
were entering the Port Authority
bus terminal when they heard an
explosion and saw people start to
run.
“I heard something, but didn’t
know what it was,’’ said Sam. At
first, Patricia froze, and Sam had to
pull her out of the way. “I guess I
should have stopped to help other
people, make sure they got out
okay, but I didn’t know whether
there was going to be another explosion or what so we left.’’
Ullah was taken to Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan, where he again
spoke to investigators, law enforcement officials said.
Officials said he came to the
United States on a type of visa for
relatives of people already living
legally in the country. President
Trump said the incident was another example of why the United
States needs to curb immigration.
“Today’s attempted mass murder attack in New York City — the
second terrorist attack in New York
in the last two months — once again
highlights the urgent need for Congress to enact legislative reforms to
protect the American people,” the
president said in a statement, also
referring to a deadly truck attack in
Manhattan on Oct. 31. “America
must fix its lax immigration system,
which allows far too many dangerous, inadequately vetted people to
access our country. Today’s terror
suspect entered our country
through extended-family chain migration, which is incompatible
with national security.”
He also said that people convicted of terrorism charges “deserve
the strongest penalty allowed by
law, including the death penalty in
appropriate cases.”
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
also weighed in, saying “the 20year-old son of the sister of a U.S.
citizen should not get priority to
come to this country ahead of
someone who is high-skilled, welleducated, has learned English, and
is likely to assimilate and flourish
here.’’
New York officials focused their
remarks on how quick thinking by
police and poor craftsmanship by
the suspect saved lives.
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) called an
attack on the subway system “incredibly upsetting. And let’s also be
clear, this was an attempted terrorist attack. Thank God the perpetrator did not achieve his ultimate
goals.”
New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo (D) called the attacker’s weapon
an “effectively low-tech device,”
saying: “Anyone can go on the Internet and download garbage and
vileness and how to put together an
amateur-level explosive device,
and that is the reality that we live
with. The counter-reality is that
this is New York and we all pitch
together and we are a savvy people.”
The explosion Monday came just
weeks after a man driving a truck
plowed through pedestrians and
bicyclists on a path along Manhattan’s West Side, killing eight people
and wounding a dozen others.
Prosecutors have charged that driv-
er with murder, saying he confessed to carrying out the attack in
the name of the Islamic State.
“This is a fact of life, whether
you’re in New York or London or
Paris,” said John Miller, who leads
counterterrorism work at the
NYPD. “The question is can it happen here, and the answer is it can
happen anywhere.”
Miller said investigators have
collected remnants of the bomb to
better understand its construction.
The NYPD and the FBI appealed for
any witnesses to the explosion to
come forward, and said commuters
should expect to see additional security around the city’s transportation network.
While there were no immediate
assertions of responsibility for the
explosion, a pro-Islamic State media group, Maqdisi Media, suggested that it was carried out in response to Trump’s recent statement
recognizing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, according to the SITE
Intelligence Group, which monitors extremist activity.
Ullah also told investigators he
was angry about U.S. policies
toward Muslim countries stretching back more than a decade, including the Obama and George W.
Bush administrations, according to
law enforcement officials.
At the Brooklyn home where officials say Ullah lived with relatives,
neighbors said the young man had
worked as a cabdriver and seemed
quiet.
Police also searched a nearby
apartment where one of Ullah’s relatives was believed to live.
Across the street was Iskandar
Voseev, 16, who said he has lived in a
neighboring building in Kensington with his family for eight years.
“This place is a really peaceful
place, you know?” the teen said,
watching the commotion. “It’s really messed up what happened. I’m
scared.”
Voseev said the residents of his
block are mostly immigrants from
Uzbekistan and Yemen. He is worried people will blame all Muslims
for the actions of someone with
roots in his community.
“In one tree, if an apple is bad, it
doesn’t mean all the apples are
bad,” the teen added.
danielle.paquette@washpost.com
lindsey.bever@washpost.com
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
John Wagner, Renae Merle and Julie
Tate contributed to this report.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
Medicare cuts
divide Senate GOP
Republicans eager to
overhaul entitlements
acknowledge obstacles
BY
J EFF S TEIN
Senate Republicans are divided over whether they should use
the months before the 2018 elections trying to cut spending on
social programs, including Medicare.
Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), the
third-ranking Republican in the
Senate, said that Congress
should consider reducing longterm spending on those federal
programs next year.
“If we’re going to do something about spending and debt,
we have to get faster growth in
the economy — which I hope tax
reform will achieve. But we have
also got to take on making our
entitlement programs more sustainable,” including Medicare,
Thune said Thursday. “I think
there is support, generally, here
for entitlement reform.”
The White House and Republicans in Congress have not decided on their top priority after
passing their tax plan, leaving a
big and unusual void at the top of
the legislative agenda, according
to Politico. (A conference of the
House and Senate is expected to
hammer out the discrepancies
between the two chambers’ tax
bills before Christmas.)
In his public statements, President Trump has suggested Republicans should overhaul antipoverty programs, such as food
stamps and direct cash assistance for the poor, and return to
trying to repeal the Affordable
Care Act. And Sen. Ted Cruz
(R-Tex.), who is up for reelection
next year, dismissed the possibility of targeting Medicare. “I’m
not aware of anyone who is
talking about cutting Medicare,
other than in Democratic talking
points,” Cruz said Thursday.
Last week, House Speaker
Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) said that
Congress should try passing a
reconciliation package in 2018 to
target Medicare, Medicaid and
the Affordable Care Act. But in
the Senate, many Republicans
sounded wary of the prospect of
taking on Medicare, the popular
health-care program that primarily insures the elderly, according to interviews with more
than a dozen Republican senators Thursday. Although none of
the Republican senators disagreed with the need to cut
spending on the social programs,
even those most eager to do so
recognized they faced steep political obstacles.
As Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.)
put it: “We’re talking about Medicare, and that’s a pretty big bite
in the middle of an election year.
I’m not saying no, but there are
other things that could happen.”
Several Republican senators
said they knew Trump had called
on Congress to move next to
tackle “welfare reform,” which
conservatives in the House, including Ryan, have also expressed interest in pursuing.
Several — including Sens. Rob
Portman (R-Ohio), John Boozman (R-Ark.) and Richard C.
Shelby (R-Ala.) — also suggested
that the party may want to first
try passing an infrastructure and
transportation bill, rather than
return to the divisive issue of
health care. The White House is
expected to announce an infrastructure package next month.
The senators most eager to
push the GOP toward entitlement cuts come from the conservative wing of the caucus. Sen.
Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), who voted for
the tax bill that is projected to
increase the deficit by at least
$1 trillion, said that he was “big
time” in favor of tackling entitlements, including Medicare, in
2018. Sens. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.),
Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) and Ron
Johnson (R-Wis.) agreed, and
Sens. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah)
and Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) have
also talked in recent weeks about
constraining America’s spending
on social welfare programs.
“We all know the contours of it
— it’s means-tested, it’s chained
CPI,” Flake said, referring to
policies that would require higher-income Americans to pay
more for entitlements. “We all
know what we have to do. We just
have to do it.”
During his presidential campaign, Trump promised not to
touch Social Security, Medicare
or Medicaid. Last week, Ryan
said he thought he was making
progress in private conversations trying to convince Trump
to overhaul Medicare. Johnson
and Flake said they hoped that
report was true.
“All we do is slightly slow the
rate of increased spending, but if
you do that — and block-grant it
— I think it will be supported by
the American people,” Johnson
said Thursday about overhauling
Medicare. “It depends on how
you do it, but I think there’d be a
fair amount of support to send
those dollars [for Medicare and
Medicaid] back to the states.”
But other Senate Republicans
cautioned that attempting to repeal the Affordable Care Act had
exposed serious divisions in the
GOP ranks and that it would be
difficult to take on a more popular federal program in an election year. Only 5 percent of
Democratic voters and 15 percent of Republican voters support cuts to Medicare, according
to a May survey by the Pew
Research Center.
Portman and Boozman expressed a desire to reduce longterm Medicare spending but said
that the party shouldn’t tackle
the program unless their plans
for doing so also had support
from congressional Democrats.
“I see a lot of other things
coming first,” Portman said. “It
has to be bipartisan.”
They’re unlikely to find votes
from across the aisle, and Democrats have vowed to block any
GOP-led attempts to cut Medicare.
“I would support a fierce,
unyielding resistance to what the
speaker is trying to do,” Sen.
Robert P. Casey Jr. (D-Pa.) said.
“If they want a fight, we’re ready
to fight.”
Republicans aiming to cut
spending on social programs
next year will also face criticism
after passing a tax bill that has as
its biggest winners corporations
and the wealthy. “After providing
a trillion dollars in tax breaks to
the top 1 percent and large
corporations, they will now attempt to cut Social Security,
Medicare, Medicaid, nutrition
programs and help for the poorest and most vulnerable Americans,” Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)
said.
jeffrey.stein@washpost.com
Change to Zinke’s travel plans increased costs
Documents show update
to interior secretary’s trip
added nearly $2,000
BY
J ULIET E ILPERIN
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s
decision in April to change his
travel plans for a fact-finding trip
to Channel Islands National Park
in California added nearly
$2,000 in costs when he left from
Santa Barbara, Calif., where his
wife owns a second home, according to emails sent among Interior
Department officials.
The documents, obtained by
the advocacy group Western Values Project under the Freedom of
Information Act, show the extent
to which National Park Service
staff had to rearrange transportation to accommodate Zinke. The
two-day trip — which included
Zinke’s wife, Lolita, as well as her
aunt, Beatrice Walder — was
originally scheduled to depart
out of Ventura Harbor aboard a
Park Service vessel, the Ocean
Ranger.
It is unclear what prompted
the change in plans for the
April 17-18 trip. The Zinkes had
just spent the weekend in Santa
Barbara and decided to attend an
evening town hall event there on
the 17th that the conservative
group Young America’s Foundation hosted.
Deputy Inspector General Mary
Kendall is probing several aspects
of Zinke’s travel, including his
trips to political gatherings and
the extent to which his wife reimbursed the government for costs
stemming from her attendance on
multiple journeys. In a memo last
month, Kendall warned the secretary and his aides that they needed to provide documentation to
“distinguish between personal,
political and official travel” and
that management of his trips had
KEVIN LAMARQUE/REUTERS
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke steps out from Air Force One in Salt
Lake City on Dec. 4. Emails obtained by an advocacy group showed
the price increase after Zinke’s plans for a trip in April changed.
been “deficient.”
Interior press secretary Heather Swift said in an email Monday
that the visit “was part of a
multiday visit” to department
sites from Sacramento south to
the Channel Islands. Zinke always planned to meet with the
team at the national park, “and
the office of scheduling reached
out to the superintendent’s office
as soon as it was clear when he
could go.”
For the boat, Swift added, the
Zinkes paid via check for Lolita’s
fare and her aunt’s fare. “No costs
were incurred due to Mrs. Zinke’s
presence.”
Still, the emails chronicle how
costs rose after Zinke’s staff
stressed he wanted to go in and
out of Santa Barbara rather
than Ventura.
Russell Galipeau, the Channel
Islands superintendent, wrote in
an April 7 email that while he was
working with National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Administration
officials to use a vessel it had in
Santa Barbara, “I urge against it.”
A week later, Galipeau wrote
that “to accommodate” Zinke’s
request, the crew would need to
be paid three hours of overtime
each, adding $300, and the government would have to add fuel
for an additional eight hours of
running time at a price of $1,440.
The group ultimately used the
Park Service’s boat.
In a phone interview Monday,
Western Values Project Executive
Director Chris Saeger said the
fact that government employees
had to go to such lengths and that
taxpayers incurred a higher bill
suggests a broader problem.
“This pattern of behavior is not
just a problem for the people who
are making the schedule changes,” he said. “The influence
they’re exerting over leadership
decisions at Interior is sloppy and
ethically deficient.”
Swift countered that Saeger’s
group is “a classic dark money
group which is run by current
and former Democratic Party
members and campaign staff.”
Channel Islands National Park
is the site of a major restoration
effort undertaken by the Nature
Conservancy with the Park Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service to bring back native habitat and endemic species such as
the island fox, the island scrubjay and the Santa Catalina Island
ironwood tree. Thousands of
sheep, cattle and feral pigs were
killed as part of the effort to
eliminate invasive species on the
network of eight islands.
Zinke was billed $142 on April
25 for the travel costs associated
with his wife and her aunt, which
grew by mid-June to $152 with
late fees. It was paid that month.
The Zinkes were accompanied
by Nita Vail, a political supporter
of Zinke who had hosted a fundraiser for him in 2014 in Carpinteria, a seaside community about
15 minutes east of Santa Barbara.
Vail is a great-granddaughter of
the rancher who bought Santa
Rosa Island in 1901 and established the Vail & Vickers ranch
there. The family, which sold
Santa Rosa Island to the federal
government for $30 million in
1986, ran cattle on the island
until 1998 and operated a commercial hunting business there
until 2011.
The National Parks Conservation Association sued in the mid1990s to end both ranching and
big-game hunting on Santa Rosa,
arguing that they were degrading
crucial habitat. The Vail family
closed its hunting business as
part of a settlement in that suit.
After touring Santa Rosa with
Vail on April 18, Zinke said he
would “like to highlight the significant ranching heritage on the
island with a working demonstration ranch,” Galipeau said in
an email. “At this point it is not
clear how this idea will be implemented.”
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
Judge rejects delay of trans military recruiting
Trump administration’s
request based on ‘vague
claims,’ ruling says
BY
AND
S PENCER S . H SU
A NN E . M ARIMOW
A federal judge on Monday
denied the Trump administration’s request to delay an order
requiring the military to begin
accepting transgender recruits
starting Jan. 1, saying the argument for more time seemed
based on “vague claims.”
“The Court is not persuaded
that Defendants will be irreparably injured by” meeting the New
Year’s Day deadline, U.S. District
Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly
wrote.
The ruling from Kollar-Kotelly
of the District of Columbia follows her earlier opinion blocking
the president’s ban on military
recruitment of transgender men
and women that possibly would
have forced the dismissal of current service members starting in
March.
“With only a brief hiatus, Defendants have had the opportunity to prepare for the accession
of transgender individuals into
the military for nearly one and a
half years,” since the policy was
initially issued in June 2016, she
wrote. “Especially in light of the
record evidence showing, with
specifics, that considerable work
has already been done, the Court
is not convinced by the vague
claims in [the government’s] declaration that a stay is needed.”
A second federal judge in Baltimore also issued a preliminary
injunction in November that goes
further, preventing the administration from denying funding for
sex-reassignment surgeries once
the order takes effect.
Justice Department spokeswoman Lauren Ehrsam said in a
statement that “we disagree with
the Court’s ruling and are seeking
to stay the Defense Department’s
obligations under that ruling as
we evaluate next steps.”
In July, President Trump surprised military leaders and members of Congress when he announced the proposal in a series
of tweets. Trump’s order reversed
an Obama-era policy allowing
transgender people to serve
openly and receive funding for
sex-reassignment surgery.
In October, Kollar-Kotelly
found challengers likely to prevail in asserting that the president’s order violates equalprotection guarantees in the Constitution. The administration has
appealed the ruling and in the
meantime had asked the judge to
temporarily postpone the recruitment requirement.
On Monday, Kollar-Kotelly
noted that the government waited three weeks to appeal her
Oct. 30 order barring the military
from implementing a transgender ban, did not file its motion to
stay the Jan. 1 deadline until
Wednesday and has not sought
any sort of expedited review of
her initial decision.
“The Court notes that Defendants’ portrayal of their situation
as an emergency is belied by their
litigation tactics,” the judge
wrote, adding, “If complying with
the military’s previously established January 1, 2018 deadline to
begin accession was as unmanageable as Defendants now suggest, one would have expected
Defendants to act with more alacrity.”
In a statement, the Pentagon
said it will comply with the
court’s order, while pursuing its
appeal, writing that “DoD and the
Department of Justice are actively pursuing relief from those
court orders in order to allow an
ongoing policy review scheduled
to be completed before the end of
March.”
After the Jan. 1 start was
cleared Monday, former Navy secretary Raymond Edwin Mabus Jr.
said in a statement that allowing
transgender candidates to enlist
is not a complicated process and
that nearly all the necessary
preparation had been completed
by the time he left office more
than a year ago. “It is inconsistent
with my understanding of the
status of those efforts and the
working of military personnel to
conclude that the military would
not be prepared almost a year
later — and six months after the
date on which the policy was
originally scheduled to take effect,” Mabus wrote.
Forcing the military to accept
transgender applicants and implement such a significant
change in policy may “negatively
impact military readiness,” government lawyers had said in asking for the delay.
Attorneys for the plaintiffs said
in court filings that the military
had already been preparing to
accept transgender recruits. Before the change in administration, the Defense Department
was gearing up to accept transgender applicants starting in July
2017 and had started training and
other preparations.
“The government cannot credibly claim that it will be irreparably harmed by implementing a
policy that it was on track to
implement almost six months
ago,” according to the filing from
the plaintiffs.
“This administration needs to
stop creating fake problems and
get on with it,” GLAD transgender rights project director Jennifer Levi said after Kollar-Kotelly’s
decision Monday.
According to court documents
accompanying Hamlett’s plea
agreement, he used Trump’s
Social Security number and
other personal information to
open an online application for
federal student aid on Sept. 13,
2016. After obtaining a user
name and password, he tried to
use an Internal Revenue Service
data retrieval tool to obtain
Trump’s tax information.
Hamlett, a Lafayette resident,
was indicted in November 2016.
Federal agents confronted
Hamlett two weeks before last
November’s election and
questioned him in a Baton
Rouge hotel lobby.
days after a winter snowstorm
snapped power lines across the
region.
At least 18,500 homes and
businesses in Georgia were still
in the dark Monday, according
to Georgia Power and Georgia
Electric Membership Corp.
Metro Atlanta got several inches
of snow Friday and Saturday,
while some areas farther north
saw up to a foot of snowfall.
Utilities in Louisiana reported
at least 1,000 customers were
still waiting for power to be
restored. Mississippi had about
700 outages and Alabama
roughly 500.
Several school systems closed
Monday in Georgia because of a
lingering threat of icy road
conditions.
The unusually heavy
December snowstorm brought
flurries to New Orleans and
dumped several inches in
Mississippi and Alabama.
ann.marimow@washpost.com
spencer.hsu@washpost.com
DIGEST
LOUISIANA
Man admits trying to
access Trump tax data
A Louisiana private
investigator pleaded guilty on
Monday to misusing Donald
Trump’s Social Security number
in repeated attempts to access
the president’s federal tax
information before his election
last year.
Jordan Hamlett, 32, faces a
maximum sentence of five years
in prison and a $250,000 fine
after his guilty plea in federal
court.
Authorities have said Hamlett
failed in his attempts to get
Trump’s tax information
through a U.S. Department of
Education financial aid website.
Trump has refused to release
his tax returns, bucking an
American tradition honored by
every president since Jimmy
Carter.
— Associated Press
WEATHER
BEN GARVER/BERKSHIRE EAGLE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A family planning to buy a Christmas tree visits Chanticleer Christmas Tree Farm in Pittsfield, Mass.
The National Christmas Tree Association said prices for cut trees are 5 to 10 percent higher than last year.
Thousands still lack
electricity in South
Thousands remain without
electricity across the Deep South
— Associated Press
A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
Conservative women stand by GOP men accused of misconduct
Responses shaped by
party loyalty, rejection of
gender-driven politics
BY
V ANESSA W ILLIAMS
Conservative women, shaped
by a mixture of party loyalty and a
rejection of gender-driven politics, have shown little evidence
that they will follow the example
of their Democratic sisters and
publicly cut ties with men in their
political camps who have been
accused of sexual misconduct.
After female Senate Democrats
prompted the resignation of Sen.
Al Franken (D-Minn.) last week,
saying they could no longer ignore
the growing number of women
who alleged he had kissed or
groped them against their will,
Republican women mostly have
responded with shrugs or silence
to accusations against men in
their party.
President Trump, the highest
profile Republican who has been
accused of sexual misconduct,
faced new attention Monday
when three women held a news
conference calling for Congress to
investigate the allegations. U.N.
Ambassador Nikki Haley, in a
marked break from the White
House, said Sunday that Trump’s
accusers “should be heard.”
But few Republican women
have spoken out against Trump
since he became president or
have called for the party to abandon the candidacy of Roy Moore,
the Alabama Republican running for the state’s open U.S.
Senate seat in Tuesday’s special
election, despite accusations
that he pursued or sexually
touched teenage girls as young
as 14 when he was an assistant
district attorney in his 30s.
Party loyalty plays a big role in
why more Republican women
have not demanded that GOP men
accused of sexual harassment be
held accountable. But a fundamental disagreement about the
relevance of sexual harassment as
a symptom of gender inequality is
also a factor.
Ronnee Schreiber, chair of the
political science department at
San Diego State University, said
many conservative women think
the current conversation about
sexual harassment has been “overblown” by feminists on the left. To
them, women’s daily lives are less
affected by sexual harassment and
assault than by the economy and
national security.
Democratic women, on the oth-
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
White House counselor Kellyanne Conway listens to President Trump speak at the Thanksgiving-week
turkey pardoning ceremony in Washington on Nov. 21. Conway has wavered in her response to
allegations of sexual misconduct by U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore of Alabama.
er hand, could call for Franken’s
resignation without appearing to
betray their party’s fundamental
values, Schreiber said. “It’s consistent with the ideology of Democrats to be opposed to sexual harassment,” Schreiber said.
Franken resisted giving up his
seat until Wednesday, when Sen.
Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) publicly called for his resignation. She
was quickly joined by several other female senators, followed by
several male Democrats. Eventually, more than 30 Democrats
urged Franken to step down,
which he did in a combative
speech, noting that Moore was
still on the ballot and President
Trump was still in the Oval Office.
Americans show a large political divide when asked whether
sexual harassment is a serious
problem. In a recent Washington
Post-ABC News poll, 92 percent of
Democratic women and 86 percent of Democratic men said sexual harassment in the workplace
is a problem for women. Among
Republican women, 61 percent
said sexual harassment of women
in the workplace is a problem, as
did 56 percent of Republican men.
The issue of sexual harassment in the workplace exploded
two months ago when several
actresses publicly reported that
movie mogul Harvey Weinstein
had sexually assaulted them. It
also has made its way back to the
political arena, with three members of Congress, including Fran-
ken, announcing their resignations last week. Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.), who had been
the longest-serving member of
Congress, stepped down after
former staffers said he had sexually harassed them. Rep. Trent
Franks (R-Ariz.) resigned Friday
amid allegations that he asked
female employees to bear children as surrogates, including
one woman who said he offered
her $5 million.
Moore, however, has dismissed
calls to end his campaign. Initially,
more than a dozen Republican
Senators, including Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.),
said Moore should step aside. McConnell now says the decision is
up to the voters of Alabama.
Alabama’s senior senator, Richard C. Shelby, has not changed his
position; he has said he wrote in the
name of another Republican on his
absentee ballot. “I think the Republican Party can do better,” he said on
CNN’s “State of the Union” Sunday
morning.
But most Republican members
of Congress have said Moore
should step aside only if the allegations are true. Of the five Republican women in the Senate, only one
has emphatically said Moore
should drop out of the race.
“Because we have this crazy
two-party system, to make sure
there is Republican dominance in
the Senate they’re going to overlook it,” Schreiber said. “That’s
why they overlooked Trump.”
When the “Access Hollywood”
tape of Trump bragging about
grabbing women’s crotches became public in the 2016 presidential race, and several women came
forward to accuse him of sexual
misconduct, “conservative women’s organizations basically said,
‘We don’t want him, but we want
party dominance,’ ” Schreiber
said, referring to groups like the
Independent Women’s Forum and
Concerned Women for America.
Two of Alabama’s most prominent Republican women —
Gov. Kay Ivey and Terry Lathan,
the chair of the state GOP — have
consistently supported Moore.
Ronna McDaniel, the female
chairman of the Republican National Committee, which withdrew its support from Moore
shortly after the allegations arose,
cited the president’s desire to keep
the U.S. Senate seat in the GOP as
the party’s reasons for reversing
itself and resuming to help the
embattled candidate.
Sen. Susan Collins of Maine and
Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers of
Washington are the only female
GOP members of Congress who
have unequivocally said Moore
should drop out of the election.
“I believe for the sake of this
country that Roy Moore should
step aside. There are others that
can fill that seat,” Rodgers said in a
local TV interview Thursday.
“Members of Congress, House
and Senate are held to a higher
standard. . . . We’ve got to walk the
talk,” she said after Franken announced his resignation.
Rodgers, who is chair of the
House Republican Caucus, criticized Trump’s comments on the
“Access Hollywood” tape but did
not withdraw her support. Asked
about her response to the women
who spoke out about Trump on
Monday, Olivia Hnat, a spokeswoman, said Rodgers “believes
that no one should be afraid to
speak up and share their story.
Every accusation of harassment
deserves its due attention and
should be taken seriously, whether it is in Hollywood, in the media,
in government or in the congressional workplace.”
White House counselor Kellyanne Conway has wavered in her
response to the allegations against
Moore. In an interview with ABC
News soon after The Post published the first accusations, she
said that the behavior Moore’s accusers described “offends me
greatly as a woman, as a mother of
three young girls,” and that it
should be “disqualifying, if true.”
But more recently, she defended
Republicans’ continued support
for Moore, saying Trump needs his
vote to pass tax legislation.
She has taken to Twitter to jab
Democratic women who vacillated in their response to the accusations against Franken, noting that
Gillibrand had seemed ambivalent on the question just a day
before she called for him to resign.
After the release of the “Access”
tape last year, she accused some of
Trump’s detractors of being on a
“high horse,” suggesting they had
in the past engaged in behavior
similar to what Trump described.
“I would talk to some of the members of Congress out there,” she
said in an October 2016 MSNBC
interview. “When I was younger
and prettier, them rubbing up
against girls, sticking their
tongues down women’s throats
uninvited who didn’t like it.”
In an interview with The Post,
Conway said no one listened to
her at the time because she was
Trump’s campaign manager. She
argued that the issue of sexual
harassment has become too politicized. “We cannot have an
honest conversation or full and
fair resolution of sexual misconduct in this country unless and
until we stop discriminating
against those coming forward
based on their politics or any
other factor,” she said.
The Independent Women’s Forum honored Conway at a gala last
month with its “Woman of Valor”
award. During her remarks, Conway boasted about how she responded when Anita Hill accused
then-Supreme Court justice nominee Clarence Thomas of sexual
harassment. “I proudly brought
this button in that said, ‘I believe
him,’ ” she said, describing a pin
she wore to classes at George
Washington University’s law
school during the 1991 hearings.
The IWF sprang from those
hearings, founded by women
who thought Thomas was being
unfairly maligned because of his
conservative
beliefs.
They
chafed at the news media’s tendency to go to groups like the
National Organization for Women for commentary on women’s
issues.
Carrie Lukas, president of the
IWF, said women on both sides of
the political divide agree sexual
harassment is a problem.
“But there is also a sense that we
know that the accusation is also a
political weapon,” she said. “These
allegations can be incredibly damaging if you wanted to derail a
candidate.”
Lukas stopped short of saying
Moore should drop out of the race.
Patrice Onwuka, a senior policy
analyst with the IWF, said she saw
no cause for women on the right to
take a stand against Moore.
“Judge Roy Moore has not
been elected to the Senate, so his
situation is not the same as Senator Al Franken or Rep. John Conyers,” she wrote in an email. “If
the allegations are proven true
then he is not fit to serve as a U.S.
senator, but that is for the voters
of his state to decide. Victims
deserve to have their allegations
investigated, but we should not
rush to judgment on every allegation without more information.”
Michelle Bernard, a former
president of the IWF, said she is
disappointed to see so many conservative women waffling over
Moore in the name of preserving a
governing majority in the Senate.
She was similarly disappointed
that women like Conway provided
political cover for Trump.
“If these people were not so
powerful, they would have restraining orders against them and
be on some sex [offenders] list,
ordered to keep 100 feet away
from children,” Bernard said.
“I have a very difficult time
believing that people, deep in
their hearts, believe this crap,”
she continued. “They say it because they also fear they have
something to lose — a powerful
donor or they will lose the Senate
or the White House — so they toe
the party line in public, but they
go home and shut the door and
say, ‘My God, that man is sick.’ ”
vanessa.williams@washpost.com
White House says renewed misconduct accusations are ‘false’
WOMEN FROM A1
were new.
But some Trump aides, advisers and outside confidants are
privately grappling with how to
navigate the charged national environment over sexual misconduct, which may not pass anytime
soon, and an increasingly aggressive Democratic Party.
Some outside Republicans
close to the president said they
are increasingly uneasy about
his ability to withstand a revived
spotlight on his behavior toward
women amid the dramatic attitude shift happening nationwide in response to accusations
of sexual misconduct against
men from Hollywood to Capitol
Hill. A number of Trump associates are also wary of the potential political costs if the president goes on a sustained attack
against his accusers.
“These false claims, totally disputed in most cases by eyewitness
accounts, were addressed at
length during last year’s campaign, and the American people
voiced their judgment by delivering a decisive victory,” the White
House said in a statement Monday. “The timing and absurdity of
these false claims speaks volumes,
and the publicity tour that has
begun only further confirms the
political motives behind them.”
In a contentious media briefing — in which White House press
secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders was asked if she had ever been
sexually harassed and if she could
empathize with victims of harassment — Sanders said, “The president has addressed these accusations directly and denied all of
these accusations.”
The allegations against Trump
were made public after The Washington Post published an “Access
Hollywood” recording last year
capturing Trump boasting about
ANDREW KELLY/REUTERS
From left are Rachel Crooks, Jessica Leeds and Samantha Holvey, who Monday reasserted their claims
of sexual misconduct against President Trump. The three women were among more than a dozen
accusers who came forward during the 2016 presidential campaign. Their appeal occurs as four Senate
Democrats have called on Trump to resign amid the allegations of harassment against him.
grabbing women by the genitals.
But since his election, the president has occasionally privately
cast doubt on the tape, at times
suggesting it was doctored or inauthentic.
One official said the White
House largely views the newfound attention as a media and
public relations issue. Once the
West Wing realized the three
women were giving an interview
and news conference Monday, an
aide who worked on the campaign and was familiar with the
allegations circulated counterpoints from last year and later
pointed out small inconsistencies
between some of the women’s
previous statements and what
they said on Monday.
In phone calls and meetings
in recent days, people in Trump’s
orbit have deliberated over how
best to defend against more than
a dozen women who have leveled specific claims against
him — while also taking seriously claims of sexual assault and
harassment and not seeming to
dismiss women, according to
two people who spoke on the
condition of anonymity to talk
frankly about the private discussions. There have also been conversations about how the issue
could linger through next year’s
midterm campaign season and
Home delivery makes good sense.
1-800-753-POST
how to handle that possibility,
one outside adviser said.
“As the president said himself,
he thinks it’s a good thing that
women are coming forward,”
Sanders said in her Monday news
conference. “But he also feels
strongly that a mere allegation
shouldn’t determine the course.”
On Sunday, Nikki Haley, the
ambassador to the United Nations and one of the most highprofile women serving in the administration, said that women
who have accused Trump “should
be heard,” offering what appeared
to be a sharp break from the
official White House position.
“They should be heard, and
they should be dealt with,” Haley
said when asked on CBS’s “Face
the Nation” about the allegations
other women have made against
Trump. “And I think we heard
from them before the election.
And I think any woman who has
felt violated or felt mistreated in
any way, they have every right to
speak up.”
Democrats have been quick to
jettison several members of their
party accused of harassment, including pushing both Sen. Al
Franken (Minn.) and Rep. John
Conyers Jr. (Mich.) to resign.
Democratic lawmakers and strategists believe they can seize the
moral high ground and use the
issue to bludgeon Trump and his
fellow Republicans.
On Monday, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (N.Y.), widely viewed as a
potential 2020 presidential candidate, became the fourth Democratic senator to call for Trump to
resign over the allegations.
But some in Trump’s orbit believe the latest bout of negative
publicity over the president’s alleged misbehavior will probably
pass. One Republican strategist in
frequent touch with the White
House said the West Wing
was “generally dismissive” of the
latest flare-up.
“They think he’s invincible on
this issue, because he survived the
‘Access Hollywood’ tape,” said the
strategist, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to recount
private conversations. “He was
literally caught on tape saying he
does this — it was a big deal — and
he still won.”
The Republican added that if
Moore prevails in Tuesday’s election, the White House will only
feel more emboldened. Moore is
facing allegations from multiple
women that he made sexual advances toward them when they
were teens and he was in his 30s.
One of the accusers said she was
14 at the time. Moore has denied
the allegations.
The three women who retold
their stories Monday were Samantha Holvey, a former Miss
USA contestant who in October
2016 said Trump inappropriately
inspected pageant participants;
Jessica Leeds, a New York woman
who said Trump groped her on a
plane; and Rachel Crooks, who
said he kissed her on the lips at
Trump Tower.
The news conference was organized by Brave New Films, a nonprofit group launched by producer Robert Greenwald with the
goal of promoting activism
around liberal causes through
short low-budget documentaries.
The group has a budget of about
$2.6 million, according to Jim
Miller, its executive director.
“I didn’t want to go through it
all again,” Holvey said in an
interview after the news conference, recalling the backlash a
year ago and the feeling that she
hadn’t been heard. But the idea
of getting together with other
women who had similar experiences interested her.
“As a group, there might be
more of an impact,” she said. And
she was also noticing a change in
her Facebook feed, with people
asking: “What about Trump?”
Holvey suggested it made sense
for Trump’s accusers to speak to
the public again given the way the
country’s atmosphere — and response to alleged sexual misconduct — has shifted over the past
year.
“Let’s try round two,” she said.
“The environment’s different, let’s
try again.”
ashley.parker@washpost.com
mark.berman@washpost.com
frances.sellers@washpost.com
Sellers reported from New York.
Robert Costa in Washington also
contributed to this report.
washingtonpost.com/subscribe
SF
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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A5
M2
Obama and
Trump give
final pleas
in Ala. race
ALABAMA FROM A1
Senate majority in 2018 involves a
miracle somewhere,” said Kyle
Kondik, a political analyst at the
University of Virginia Center for Politics. “And we may be on the cusp of a
Democratic miracle in Alabama.”
A win for Moore, in contrast,
would weaken the hand of mainstream Republicans, who have
struggled to broaden the party’s appeal heading into the midterms.
Moore, a former state Supreme
Court judge, has campaigned on a
platform of opposing Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.).
Former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice, a Republican who was
born in Alabama, released a statement encouraging people to vote
that seemed to rebuke Moore but
stopped short of naming him.
“These critical times require us to
come together to reject bigotry, sexism, and intolerance,” she wrote, before adding that voters should insist
on leaders who “are dignified, decent, and respectful of the values we
hold dear.”
Meanwhile, a Republican national committeewoman from Nebraska, Joyce Simmons, announced that
she had resigned her post in protest
of her party’s continued support for
Moore, who has been accused by
multiple women of sexual misconduct when they were teenagers and
Moore was in his 30s.
“I strongly disagree with the recent RNC financial support directed
to the Alabama Republican Party for
use in the Roy Moore race,” Simmons said in an email to party leaders, who were first informed Friday
of her decision. “There is much I
could say about this situation, but I
will defer to this weekend’s comments by Senator Shelby.”
Sen. Richard C. Shelby (R-Ala.),
who voted for a write-in candidate, said Sunday that he found
Moore’s accusers to be “believable” and that Moore would not
represent the state well.
“I think Alabama deserves better,” Shelby said Sunday on CNN’s
“State of the Union.”
Alabama Secretary of State
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore and his wife, Kayla, leave a “Drain the Swamp”-themed campaign rally in Midland City, Ala. “We
dare defend our rights,” Moore declared onstage, quoting the Alabama motto that was used by segregationist state leaders in the 1960s.
John Merrill said he expects about
25 percent of eligible voters to cast
a ballot in the special election,
making the race difficult to predict. Three new polls released
Monday showed dramatically different results, based on different
projections of who would vote.
An automated poll from Emerson
College showed Moore with a ninepoint advantage, while a poll from
Fox News showed Jones with a 10point lead. A Monmouth University
Poll showed the race about even.
“I’m hearing everything,” said Brian Walsh, president of America First
Action, an outside group that has
spent more than $1.1 million on
mail, television and digital ads to
support Moore. “Nobody knows
what the hell is going on right now.”
Reports of the robo-calls from
Obama and Biden created some
awkwardness for Jones, who has
tried to project distance from the
national party as he closes out his
campaign. Although his campaign
confirmed the calls, the candidate
said he was not aware of them.
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“I know that there have been a
lot of robo-calls that have been
recorded. I don’t know what’s being used. That is just not something I’m doing,” Jones said at a
campaign stop at a local restaurant, where members of the media
outnumbered customers.
Giles Perkins, chairman of the
Jones campaign, said about 30 different calls have gone out to voters
and “most of them are local.”
A political group overseen by
Biden sent out a fundraising email
to supporters Monday, asking for
money to help the Jones campaign.
Throughout his campaign, Jones
has tried to thread a needle, portraying himself as an independent figure
who is unbeholden to party leaders
in an attempt to win over Republicans. At the same time, he has relied
on marquee national names to help
boost Democratic turnout.
Jones is waging a vigorous effort
to try to turn out African American
voters, who Democratic officials believe will be critical to his chances.
American Possibilities, the politi-
cal group overseen by Biden, sent
out a fundraising appeal Monday
promising to help “support more
candidates like Doug Jones.”
“We don’t need another extremist
in Washington,” Biden wrote in the
appeal.
Moore, who had not held a campaign event since Dec. 5, spoke in
Midland City, Ala. Explaining why
he didn’t campaign this weekend,
Moore told the crowd: “I took approximately two and a half days to
take my wife out of this mess and
relax with my son at West Point.”
The entrance to a flag-draped
barn was decorated with plastic
alligators and greenery, meant to
evoke the Washington “swamp,”
and gates were set up to separate
several hundred Moore supporters from special guests who’d
flown in for the final stretch.
“What they’re doing to Judge Roy
Moore, they’re going to try to do to
every Trump supporter running for
Congress next year,” said Corey
Stewart, a Prince William County
supervisor who is running for the
Republican nomination against
Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) in 2018.
“We dare defend our rights,”
Moore declared when he took the
stage, quoting the Alabama motto
that was used by state leaders in the
1960s, during the fight against desegregation. He spoke after his wife,
Kayla Moore, defended his commitment to diversity.
“My husband appointed the very
first black marshal to the Alabama
Supreme Court,” she said. “Fake
news will tell you that we don’t care
for Jews. One of our attorneys is a
Jew.” The media, she added, needs to
be “held accountable” for how it has
covered the race.
Bannon, meanwhile, making his
third trip to Alabama to endorse
Moore, drew boos when he mentioned Shelby and “little Bobby
Corker,” a reference to regular
Trump critic Sen. Bob Corker (RTenn.). Bannon suggested that Republican leaders might try to take
out Trump “as soon as they get that
tax cut” — and he even took an
apparent shot at Trump’s daughter,
Ivanka, who has criticized Moore.
“There’s a special place in hell for
Republicans who should know better,” Bannon said, reworking a comment that Ivanka Trump had made
about the misconduct allegations
against Moore — one that was quickly turned into an ad by Jones.
Jones, who is focused on turning out African American voters,
held a final campaign rally in Birmingham on Monday night,
where he was joined on stage by
basketball Hall of Famer Charles
Barkley, actress Alyssa Milano and
the city’s newly elected mayor,
Randall Woodfin, among others.
Barkley, an Alabama native, attacked Trump, Bannon and Moore
in his brief opening remarks. Moore,
he said, was appealing to “the same
people who’ve been holding us back
for many, many years.”
In a 10-minute speech, Jones
framed the election as a momentous
chapter in Alabama’s history. “This
election is going to be one of the
most significant in our state’s history
in a long time,” he said. “And we’ve
got to make sure that at this crossroads in Alabama’s history, we take
the right road.”
He also encouraged voters to put
“decency” ahead of party loyalty and
urged them to consider how Alabama will be viewed by business
leaders as a result of the election.
Trump campaigned for Moore
over the weekend from a distance.
After touting him at a Friday evening rally just across the border in
Florida, he recorded a phone call for
him Saturday.
Senate Republican leaders withdrew their support of Moore in the
wake of the women’s allegations.
McConnell has said he expects
Moore will face an immediate investigation by the Senate Select Committee on Ethics if he is elected.
A review of campaign finance records by Issue One, a group that monitors spending in political campaigns, found that $41.5 million had
been spent on the Alabama special
election, including funds spent on
the primary and primary runoff.
Voters have been flooded with
television ads about the campaign
in the past few days. During one
five-minute stretch on a local network Monday morning, three proJones commercials and one proMoore ad aired.
michael.scherer@washpost.com
david.weigel@washpost.com
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
Scherer reported from Washington.
Weigel reported from Midland City, Ala.
Philip Rucker and Scott Clement in
Washington contributed to this report.
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A6
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
The World
New face of Pakistan’s battered Bhutto dynasty
His grandfather was executed, his mother assassinated. Now Bilawal Bhutto Zardari hopes to restore their party to power.
BY S HAIQ H USSAIN
AND P AMELA C ONSTABLE
islamabad, pakistan — It
seemed like a moment from
another era.
Thousands of exuberant supporters gathered in a field outside the capital on a chilly evening last week, dancing to music,
waving banners and cheering
loudly as leaders from the Pakistan People’s Party called for democracy and tolerance.
But there was a hollow, haunted tone to the event, held to
commemorate the 50th anniversary of a party that once galvanized poor and working-class
Pakistanis, championed socialist
causes under its charismatic
founder and later fought to restore civilian rule under his
equally famous daughter.
They are both long gone now:
Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, the revolutionary prime minister, imprisoned and hanged by a military
dictator in 1979; Benazir Bhutto,
twice premier, exiled and then
assassinated in 2007 as she tried
to make a political comeback
under another army ruler.
Today, the People’s Party is a
shadow of its former tumultuous
self, a once-mighty political force
that held power repeatedly during three decades but has fallen
precipitously in popularity under
the leadership of Bhutto’s widower, Asif Ali Zardari.
The party suffered a crushing
defeat in the 2013 national elections, handing power to its longtime rival, the Pakistan Muslim
League-Nawaz. Today, its influence in Parliament has been reduced to its longtime stronghold,
Sindh province. It also faces new
competition from the Pakistan
Justice Movement, led by cricket
star Imran Khan, which has siphoned off much of the youth and
labor vote.
A parade of PPP leaders spoke
from an outdoor stage on Dec. 5,
trying to recapture the party’s
past glory and energy. Zardari,
who after his wife’s death served
as Pakistan’s president from 2008
to 2013, was there, but all eyes
were on the couple’s son, Bilawal
Bhutto Zardari, 29, the PPP’s new
chairman and rising political
heir.
Tall, handsome and brimming
with confidence, the younger
Zardari smiled and waved to the
crowd as he stood next to his
father, who introduced him and
said he believed party members
“will be loyal to my children the
way you were to Benazir and me.”
Bilawal Zardari vowed that the
PPP would not allow Pakistan to
move toward Islamic extremism
and would carry on the mission
of making Pakistan “a true socialdemocratic state.”
Supporters
seemed
starstruck.
“We are here for Bilawal, and
we believe he will recover the lost
destiny of the PPP,” said Yasmeen
Bibi, 29, who was dressed in the
party’s colors — bright green, red
and black. “Look at this huge
crowd. Once people were dejected and frustrated, believing the
party had met its death. But
Bilawal has given us new hope,
and God willing, in the next
elections, the PPP will win.”
U.N. sees
dire threat
of famine
in Yemen
R EUTERS
geneva — Warring sides must
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
JOHN MOORE/GETTY IMAGES
B.K. BANGASH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOP: Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, center, then Pakistan’s president, and his daughter, Benazir Bhutto, second from right, meet with Indian
leaders, including Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, in 1972. ABOVE LEFT: Benazir Bhutto prepares to address supporters minutes
before being assassinated in 2007 during an attempt at a political comeback. ABOVE RIGHT: Bilawal Bhutto Zardari flashes a victory
sign at a recent rally. Next to him is his father, Asif Ali Zardari, a former Pakistani president and the widower of Benazir Bhutto.
The People’s Party was founded in 1967 by Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto,
who ruled for most of the 1970s
before Gen. Mohammed Zia ulHaq ousted and executed him.
The party’s guiding principles
were Islam, democracy and economic socialism, and its idealistic slogan was “Food, shelter and
clothing” for all. The party remained popular for years.
But Benazir Bhutto’s assassination 10 years ago, just after she
had returned from exile to join
the fight against military rule
and run for office again, effectively marked the death of the old
PPP.
Asif Zardari, widely viewed as
a corrupt and aloof tycoon, had
neither his wife’s charm nor her
common touch. His most positive
legacy was turning power over to
his rival and elected successor,
Nawaz Sharif, in 2013, with no
controversy or military intervention.
Bilawal Zardari, although
struggling to resurrect a nowtarnished legacy, appears to have
a keener and perhaps more genuine knack for politics. The golden
jubilee rally came just days after
violent religious protests that
shocked the country and overwhelmed the government, leaving the army to step in and
negotiate an end to the confrontation.
In his speech Dec. 5 and elsewhere last week, the young PPP
leader talked about the threat of
Islamist extremism, the importance of reestablishing state authority and the need to shore up
democracy. Although his party
stands little chance of winning
elections next year, he declared,
“We will establish the writ of the
state after coming to power” and
listed reforms a PPP government
would pursue.
Many observers, though, expressed doubts about whether
the young Zardari can revive the
fading party, let alone transform
it into a vibrant political force
again, especially with Khan’s Justice Movement leading the
charge against the Muslim
League for the 2018 elections.
Newspaper columnist Zahid
Hussain last week called the PPP
“a tragic spectacle of a dying
legacy” whose leaders have become alienated from their longtime grass-roots base. It will take
more than “dynastic appeal” and
regional popularity, he wrote, to
lift the party up.
Some old party hands, such as
Safdar Ali Abbasi, said the PPP
would have a hard time overcoming the indifferent legacy of
Asif Zardari and “getting back to
its roots.” But others, such as Sen.
Sherry Rehman, said they believe
this may be an opportune moment for a new PPP to emerge.
The 50th anniversary, Rehman
said, “gives us a chance to amplify
our message to the new generation of Pakistanis, who look
toward a party with no space for
hate.” She conceded that the party had made mistakes but called
it “the only political force standing in the way of extremist ideologies. That is a challenge neither
we nor Pakistan can walk away
from.”
pamela.constable@washpost.com
let more aid get through to
8.4 million people who are “a
step away from famine” in Yemen, a senior U.N. official said
Monday.
A Saudi-led military coalition
fighting Iran-aligned Houthi rebels in Yemen’s civil war blockaded ports there last month after a
missile was fired toward Riyadh,
the Saudi capital.
Jamie McGoldrick, the U.N.
humanitarian coordinator for
Yemen, said that the blockade
has been eased but that the
situation remains dire.
“The continuing blockade of
ports is limiting supplies of fuel,
food and medicines; dramatically increasing the number of
vulnerable people who need
help,” McGoldrick said in a statement.
“The lives of millions of people, including 8.4 million Yemenis who are a step away from
famine, hinge on our ability to
continue our operations and to
provide health, safe water, food,
shelter and nutrition support,”
he added.
That marked an increase from
past U.N. estimates of about
8 million people on the brink of
famine.
The coalition accuses Iran of
sending weapons to its Houthi
allies, including missile parts,
through Hodeida, Yemen’s most
vital port and where most food
supplies enter.
Saudi state television said
Monday that a U.N. delegation of
experts has arrived in Riyadh to
meet the coalition and the embattled Yemeni government.
The United Nations says food
shortages caused by the warring
parties blocking supplies have
created the world’s worst humanitarian crisis.
The Saudis intervened in
neighboring Yemen in 2015 after
the Houthis advanced on the
southern port of Aden and forced
President Abed Rabbo Mansour
Hadi and his government into
exile.
The conflict has killed more
than 10,000 people, displaced
more than 2 million and triggered a cholera epidemic that
has infected about 1 million
people.
The U.S. government on Friday called on the Saudi-led coalition to facilitate the free flow of
humanitarian aid to all of Yemen’s ports and through the airport in Sanaa, the Yemeni capital.
“We have called on both sides
to stop the fighting and seek a
political solution to the problem,” a senior State Department
official told reporters in Geneva
on Monday.
He said the United States had
made its position clear to its
allies to end the blockade and
called on the Houthis to allow
access for humanitarian supplies
as “there are shocking shortages
of food, fuel and medicines that
are causing great suffering.”
DIGEST
IRAN
Briton’s case to be
raised with judiciary
Iran’s Foreign Ministry said
Monday that it will raise the case
of a detained British Iranian
woman with the judiciary “out of
humanitarian concerns” after a
visit by Britain’s foreign
secretary.
Ministry spokesman Bahram
Ghasemi said the final decision
on whether to release Nazanin
Zaghari-Ratcliffe, who is serving
a five-year sentence for allegedly
plotting to overthrow the
government, rests with the
judiciary.
Zaghari-Ratcliffe “is
considered an Iranian national
and should serve her prison
conviction according to the
judicial system of Iran,” he
added.
British Foreign Secretary Boris
Johnson raised the case during
a two-day visit to Iran that
concluded Sunday. ZaghariRatcliffe, a charity worker, was
detained in April 2016. Her
family has denied the allegations
against her.
Iran’s judiciary and security
forces are dominated by anti-
Western hard-liners. It is unclear
whether Foreign Minister
Mohammad Javad Zarif, a
relative moderate, can secure her
release.
— Associated Press
UKRAINE
Saakashvili freed, calls
for government change
Mikheil Saakashvili, a former
Georgian president turned
opposition leader in Ukraine,
walked free Monday after a court
in the Ukrainian capital refused
to sanction his arrest. He vowed
to push for a peaceful
government change.
Saakashvili was arrested
Friday on allegations that he
colluded with Ukrainian
business executives tied to Russia
to topple Ukrainian President
Petro Poroshenko, accusations
Saakashvili rejected.
“I consider myself a prisoner of
Ukrainian oligarchs,” he said in
an apparent reference to the
business background of
Poroshenko.
Prosecutors had asked to keep
Saakashvili under house arrest,
but the judge ruled otherwise.
The court’s verdict marked a
KHALED ELFIQI/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Relatives of the victims of a deadly bombing at Cairo’s Coptic
cathedral complex attend a Mass on the first anniversary of the
attack. Twenty-nine people were killed and 47 injured in the suicide
blast at Botrosiya Church, or the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul.
defeat for Poroshenko, who has
faced mounting criticism over his
inability to uproot corruption.
Saakashvili said he will
coordinate with other political
forces in Ukraine to push for a
peaceful change of government.
— Associated Press
IRAQ
Shiite cleric Sadr urges
militias to disarm
An influential Iraqi Shiite
cleric on Monday urged his
fighters to hand state-issued
weapons back to the government,
after Iraq declared victory over
the Islamic State militant group.
In a speech broadcast on Iraqi
television, Moqtada al-Sadr also
called on his forces to hand over
some territory to other branches
of Iraq’s security forces but said
his men would continue to guard
a Shiite shrine in Samarra, north
of Baghdad.
Sadr commands one of several
mostly Shiite militias that
mobilized after the Islamic State
swept across northern and
central Iraq in the summer of
2014. The paramilitaries are
sanctioned by the state.
Prime Minister Haider alAbadi declared victory over the
Islamic State in anl address
Saturday, saying Iraqi forces had
driven the militants from their
last strongholds in the western
desert.
Sadr commanded a powerful
militia that battled U.S. troops in
the years after the 2003 invasion
of Iraq.
In his address Monday, Sadr
warned members of the
paramilitary forces against taking
part in elections set for May.
— Associated Press
Romanian lawmakers back
changes that may hurt graft
fight: Romanian lawmakers have
approved changes that critics say
will weaken the European Union
member’s efforts to root out highlevel corruption. Parliament’s
lower house voted to change a
law that obliges public officials to
declare their assets and regulates
conflicts of interest. Lawmakers
banned from office because of
rules violations could now see
the ban lifted. Lawmakers also
approved a measure obliging
judges and prosecutors to pay
damages for judicial errors made
“in bad faith or grave negligence.”
The upper house must still vote
on the changes, which are
opposed by the European
Commission.
American escapes from prison
on Bali: An American inmate has
escaped from an overcrowded
and understaffed prison on the
Indonesian resort island of Bali.
Chrishan Beasley, 32, is believed
to have sawed through a ceiling
and then climbed over a 20-foot
wall behind the prison. He was
arrested in August in the Kuta
area with a package containing
5.7 grams of hashish. Jailbreaks
are common in Indonesia.
— From news services
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Judge: N. Korea prisons
as brutal as Nazi camps
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
tokyo — North Korea’s political
prisons are just as bad as — and
perhaps even worse than — the
Nazi concentration camps of the
Holocaust, a renowned judge and
Auschwitz survivor has concluded after hearing from former
North Korean prisoners and
guards.
Thomas Buergenthal, who
served on the International Court
of Justice, is one of three jurists
who have concluded that North
Korean leader Kim Jong Un
should be tried for crimes against
humanity for the way his regime
uses brutal political prisons to
control the population.
“I believe that the conditions in
the [North] Korean prison camps
are as terrible, or even worse,
than those I saw and experienced
in my youth in these Nazi camps
and in my long professional career in the human rights field,”
said Buergenthal, who was in
Auschwitz and Sachsenhausen as
a child, as well as the ghetto of
Kielce, Poland.
He was part of a panel that also
included Navi Pillay, a South African judge who presided over the
International Criminal Tribunal
for Rwanda and then became the
United Nations high commissioner for human rights, and Mark
Harmon, an American judge who
worked on the Yugoslavia and
Cambodia war crimes cases.
The three heard evidence from
former prisoners, prison guards
and experts as part of an inquiry
initiated by the International Bar
Association.
The resulting report, which
will be published Tuesday, found
that there was ample evidence to
charge the Kim regime with 10 of
the 11 internationally recognized
war crimes — including murder,
enslavement, torture and sexual
violence — because of its use of
political prison camps.
“There is not a comparable situation anywhere in the world,
past or present,” Pillay said. “This
is really an atrocity at the maximum level, where the whole population is subject to intimidation.”
Three generations of Kims
have ruled North Korea as a totalitarian state defined by an all-encompassing personality cult that
treats the leaders as demi-gods.
Anyone who questions the leaders or the system is liable to be
thrown in a penal labor colony —
often for life, and often together
with three generations of their
families to eliminate the “seed” of
“enemies of the state.”
Experts estimate there are as
many as 130,000 North Koreans
held in four huge camps, where
they are forced to do hard labor,
DIGITALGLOBE/SCAPEWARE3D/GETTY IMAGES
A prison camp in North Korea. Three jurists examining the camps
said Kim Jong Un should be tried for crimes against humanity.
often in mines, and receive very
little in the way of food, clothing
or heating. The regime also operates “reeducation” camps for lesser offenses. They are just as brutal, but prisoners there generally
serve fixed terms.
North Korea’s extensive human rights abuses were documented in a landmark U.N. Commission of Inquiry report in 2014.
Following on from that, the International Bar Association decided
to conduct an inquiry specifically
into the political prison camps.
The three judges heard testimony and read affidavits from
former prisoners and prison
guards in North Korea, covering a
period from 1970 to 2006.
The panel heard about starving
prisoners who were executed after being caught scavenging for
food and about the deaths of
A7
RE
countless prisoners from malnutrition and overwork, sometimes
a result of 20-hour days in the
mines.
The judges also heard about
rapes and the forced abortions of
resulting pregnancies, sometimes
leading to the women’s deaths.
One prison camp survivor, a
doctor who had been caught trying to escape to China, said he was
stripped and hung upside down,
beaten, tortured with fire or water, and had water mixed with
spicy pepper poured into his nose
and mouth.
Although the most recent firsthand testimony the judges heard
was from 2006, the panel received
an affidavit from Thae Yong-ho, a
senior North Korean diplomat
who escaped from his nation’s
embassy in London last year.
Thae said he personally knew
several senior officials who were
sent to political prison camps in
2013 during the purges that followed Kim Jong Un’s execution of
his uncle, Jang Song Thaek.
The bar association’s war
crimes committee — which includes veterans of the Saddam
Hussein and Slobodan Milosevic
trials — together with the Washington office of the law firm Hogan Lovells, put together the case
for charging the North Korean
regime.
Of the 11 crimes against humanity listed in the International
Criminal Court’s statute, there
was evidence that the North Korean regime had committed all of
them except apartheid, they
found.
There is ample reason to believe that the political prison
camps are still in operation, they
said, with the four main camps
clearly visible in satellite images
of North Korea.
As the “supreme leader” of
North Korea, Kim is ultimately
responsible for allowing these
crimes against humanity to be
perpetuated in the prison camps,
the report concluded. But it also
said officials in the ruling Workers’ Party and in the State Security
Department were liable.
“Given North Korea’s tightly
controlled leadership structure,
Kim Jong Un and his inner circle
warrant prosecution under the
principle of command responsibility,” the report found.
North Korea has resolutely denied running any forced-labor
camps for political criminals,
with a senior diplomat in North
Korea’s mission to the United Nations saying in 2014, after the U.N.
Commission of Inquiry report,
that they were normal prisons.
Pyongyang would take “countermeasures” against any effort to
refer Kim to the International
Criminal Court, as the commission recommended, a North Korean ambassador to the United
Nations, Jang Il Hun, said at the
time.
His successor, Pak Song Il,
sharply criticized the findings.
“I totally reject and deny this
report as it is fabricated and baseless,” he said. By writing about the
report, The Washington Post
showed that it had “become the
blind followers of the hostile policy of the U.S. administration
against the DPRK,” he said, using
the official abbreviation for North
Korea.
Such reports do not help resolve the “current tense situation,” Pak said.
Previous efforts to hold North
Korea’s leaders to account have
not gone anywhere, in no small
part because referral to the ICC
requires the approval of the five
permanent members of the U.N.
Security Council. China and Russia have made clear they would
veto any such move.
Pillay said that should not stop
the international community
from trying to hold the North
Korean regime accountable.
“This is especially horrendous.
It’s been sustained for so long,
with no help to the people of
North Korea from the world,” she
said.
anna.fifield@washpost.com
Hezbollah rally jams Beirut streets as Trump’s Jerusalem fallout continues
BY L OUISA L OVELUCK
AND S UZAN H AIDAMOUS
beirut — Thousands of Hezbollah supporters joined a fiery rally
in Beirut on Monday as the movement’s leader urged Palestinians
to rise up after President Trump’s
decision to recognize Jerusalem
as the Israeli capital.
Demonstrators packed the
streets of Beirut’s southern suburbs in a carefully managed
march. Crowds chanted “Death to
America, death to Israel!” and
waved Palestinian and Hezbollah
flags.
Israel’s military, meanwhile, reported that two rockets were fired
at its territory from the Gaza Strip
on Monday, the third volley since
Trump said last week that he
would break with decades of U.S.
foreign policy to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. That announcement has sparked protests
across the Arab world.
Hundreds of protesters clashed
with Lebanese security forces
near the U.S. Embassy in Beirut
on Sunday, hurling rocks and bottles toward the compound as the
army beat back the crowd using
tear gas and water cannons.
But so far, more-serious violence has not materialized, and
Palestinian concerns about Jerusalem have failed to energize most
Arab governments. Many leaders
here seem more focused on con-
flicts in Syria, Yemen and elsewhere that are roiling the region.
Addressing the crowd Monday
via video link, Hezbollah leader
Hasan
Nasrallah
described
Trump’s policy change as a “foolish decision” that would mark the
“beginning of the end” of the
Jewish state.
“The most important response
will be to announce a third Palestinian intifada on all occupied
Palestinian territories,” he said,
using an Arabic term that evokes
earlier uprisings.
Lebanon harbors more than
500,000 Palestinian refugees,
many of whom fled their homes in
what is now Israel and the West
Bank during the wars of 1948 and
1967. The Lebanese state has never formally recognized their status as refugees, and Palestinians
are barred from dozens of professions.
Sitting on the sidewalk during
Nasrallah’s speech Thursday was
Alia Shahata, born in 1948 to
parents who she said left Palestinian territories after being expelled from their home.
“Trump is humiliating all Arabs with his decision,” she said.
“My family has no rights here in
Lebanon. Our boys all work on
coffee stalls inside the refugee
camp. Know that we would all go
back to Palestinian territories tomorrow if we could.”
As she spoke, a group of boys no
older than 10 posed for photographs in the street, dressed in
military fatigues and raising their
hands in Hezbollah salutes.
Founded in response to Israel’s
1982 invasion of Lebanon, Hezbollah, a Shiite militia backed by
Iran, has also played a key role in
turning the tide of Syria’s civil war
in favor of President Bashar alAssad.
Trump’s decision to officially
recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s
capital has drawn widespread
condemnation from allies around
the world, many of whom had
seen the city’s eventual status as a
matter to be settled in a peace
agreement between the Israelis
and Palestinians.
European Union foreign policy
chief Federica Mogherini said
Monday that the 28-member bloc
delivered a “clear and united”
message to Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu on a visit to
Brussels, and that the only “realistic” solution is for two states, with
Jerusalem as their shared capital.
She rejected Netanyahu’s public statement that he expects European nations to follow the U.S.
lead and move their embassies as
well. “He can keep his expectations for others,” she said.
In his speech, Netanyahu said
Trump had put “facts on the table”
with the recognition of Jerusalem, which he said makes peace
possible by recognizing reality.
Putin visits Syria, lauds ISIS defeat
BY
A NDREW R OTH
moscow — Russian President
Vladimir Putin exhibited his
growing diplomatic clout with a
lightning tour through the Middle East on Monday, surprising
Russian troops with his first visit
to a Russian air base in Syria
before skipping across the region
to discuss bilateral ties in Cairo
and Ankara.
Along the way, he announced a
withdrawal of Russian troops
from Syria, presided over the
signing of a $21 billion plan to
build a nuclear power plant in
Egypt, and called President
Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel
“counterproductive” and “destabilizing,” a criticism he leveled
without mentioning Trump by
name.
The decision could “provoke
conflict,” he said during a news
conference following a meeting
with Egyptian President Abdel
Fatah al-Sissi.
Putin, who declared last week
that he would run for a fourth
term as president, has largely
staked his legacy on Russia’s revival as the dominant military
power in its region and a counterweight to the West in the Middle
East. His tour to shore up bilateral
ties comes at a time when U.S.
policy in the Middle East is in flux,
amid Trump’s decision on Jerusalem and apparent support for the
rise of Crown Prince Mohammed
bin Salman in Saudi Arabia, as
well as growing questions about
the future role and mission of the
U.S. military in Syria.
The trip began with a surprise
visit to Russia’s Khmeimim air
base in Syria, where Putin an-
nounced an imminent drawdown
of Russian forces in the wake of
his declaration of victory in Moscow’s intervention in the Syrian
war. Russian warplanes secretly
flew to Syria in late 2015. It was
Putin’s first known visit to Syria.
At the air base, Putin ordered
his defense minister, Sergei
Shoigu, to begin the “withdrawal
of Russian troop contingents” to
their permanent bases.
But he left open the door to a
continued Russian presence in
Syria, saying that Russia’s air base
at Khmeimim and naval base at
Tartus would keep operating. He
promised further strikes “if terrorists raise their head again” —
an apparent reference to forces in
Syria’s long civil war that sought
to topple the regime of President
Bashar al-Assad.
“We will deliver such strikes on
them that they have not seen yet,”
he told military personnel at the
air base in remarks carried by
Russian news services.
Russia’s military intervention
in Syria bolstered Assad’s government and gave Syrian forces a
critical edge against rebel factions
backed by the West and its Middle
Eastern allies. Iran, another key
supporter of Assad, provided military advisers and other aid.
U.S. defense officials cast doubt
Monday on Putin’s announcement of a troop withdrawal. Similar pronouncements in the past —
including one in March 2016 and
another in January — “don’t often
correspond with actual troop reductions,” said Col. Rob Manning,
a Defense Department spokesman.
The deployment of troops to
Syria marked Moscow’s first major overseas military campaign
since the invasion of Afghanistan
in late 1979 under the Soviet
Union. In July, Russia extended its
lease of the Khmeimim air base
for 49 years, giving Moscow a
military foothold in the region for
generations.
Putin met at the air base with
Assad, whose regime appeared
close to defeat in the summer of
2015 before the Russian intervention. At the time, it appeared that
Assad would be forced to step
down.
“I have come, as I promised,”
Putin told him. While hailing the
fall of the Islamic State, Putin also
noted the rebuke to Western
plans in the region. “Syria has
been preserved as a sovereign
independent state,” he said.
In Cairo, Putin met with Sissi
and discussed the conflicts in Syria and Libya, a possible resumption of direct air travel after a 2015
terrorist attack aboard a Russian
charter jet, and Trump’s decision
on Jerusalem. The contract
signed during a meeting between
Putin and the Egyptian president
calls for the construction and a
supply of nuclear fuel for Egypt’s
Dabaa power plant, scheduled to
begin operating in 2026. Russia
has also signed agreements to
build nuclear plants in Turkey
and Jordan.
Putin arrived in Ankara, Turkey, on Monday evening for talks
with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The leaders discussed developments in Syria and elsewhere in the region as well as
relations between their countries,
Turkish officials said.
andrew.roth@washpost.com
Alex Horton in Washington
contributed to this report.
But at home in Israel, the fallout continued with the rocket
attacks from Gaza.
The Israeli military said it was
not sure whether the first rocket
reached its territory but responded by bombing two Hamas military posts. No casualties were reported in the exchange.
Hours later a second rocket was
fired, the roar of the launch audible from Gaza City, indicating that
it may have had a larger payload.
The rocket was intercepted by
Israel’s Iron Dome defense system
in the region of Ashkelon. Shortly
afterward, bombing could be
heard in Gaza. The Israeli military
said it had targeted Hamas mili-
tary posts in northern Gaza.
The rocket fire came just hours
after Iranian media reported that
Qasem Soleimani, the commander of Iran’s elite Quds Force, had
reaffirmed support for the Gaza
militant groups Islamic Jihad and
Hamas during phone calls with
their military leaders.
He “urged all resistance movements in the region to boost their
readiness to defend the al-Aqsa
Mosque,” Press TV reported, referring to the Jerusalem mosque.
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani also spoke with Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh on Monday, it
said.
No one immediately asserted
responsibility for the rocket fire,
but Israeli officials say they hold
Hamas responsible for all such
firings from Gaza.
Hamas has called for an uprising against Israel in the wake of
the Jerusalem announcement.
Two of its militants were killed
after Israel responded to rocket
fire last week, while two protesters who Israel said were rolling
burning tires and throwing rocks
were also fatally shot near the
border.
louisa.loveluck@washpost.com
Loveday Morris in Jerusalem and
Hazem Balousha in Gaza City
contributed to this report.
A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
Teen hit
by pellet
struggles
to see
BLINDING FROM A1
Pakistan-backed Muslim militants
have long fought for independence
from India.
During the conflict, India’s security forces used 12-gauge shotguns
loaded with pellet cartridges for
crowd control — spraying mobs
with millions of 2-millimeter metal
pellets. Ultimately, more than
6,000 people were injured, including more than 1,100 with permanent eye damage. A representative
to the United Nations from Pakistan called it “the first mass blinding in human history.”
Faisal is just one victim in the
latest bloody chapter in the striferidden, Muslim-majority territory
that has been a source of dispute
between India and Pakistan for
decades. Many fear that deepening
anger against Indian security forces could prompt more young men
to join Kashmir’s small but dangerous militancy.
In Karimabad — a village of
3,500 apple growers and farmers
whose residents have long been
sympathetic to militants — nearly a
dozen young men have suffered
permanent eye damage from pellets, including five from Faisal’s
cricket team. The graffiti on a nearby overpass tells the story: “Stop
Blinding Us.”
The pitch was slow and gentle.
Faisal swung, expecting to feel the
familiar “thwack” of the ball hitting
the sweet spot of the bat. But the
ball hit the wicket and bounced
away. Nearly blind in his left eye,
Faisal didn’t see the ball. His teammates froze in place, gazing at him
sorrowfully. He turned away so
they wouldn’t see him cry.
S
PHOTOS BY SHOWKAT NANDA FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Faisal Ahmed Dar prays at a mosque in Karimabad — a village long sympathetic to militants. ABOVE LEFT: The road that leads to where Faisal was among those hit
with pellets by Indian security forces in what witnesses say was a chaotic scene during unrest in 2016. ABOVE RIGHT: Faisal adjusts his skullcap as his friends play cricket.
Detail
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operational commander of the Hizbul Mujahideen terrorist group.
His death set off months of protests
on the Indian side of Kashmir,
which sits partly in India, partly in
Pakistan.
Wani, 22, son of a school principal, made his name on social media, posing with assault rifles on
dozens of Facebook fan pages that
chronicled his every move. Yet it
was a deadly business: Wani commanded a group that had killed
more than 300 people, including
100 police officers, during the past
decade, according to one estimate,
and he had called for attacks on
police convoys and military housing.
His funeral on July 9, 2016, drew
thousands. In Karimabad, protests
went on for days. Security forces
largely kept their distance. Karimabad is so dangerous that police
enter it only in moments of “urgent
need,” Aslam said.
Nearly two dozen young men
have left the village to join the
militancy since 1990, elders say,
and some returned as corpses. The
bloody insurgency in Indiancontrolled Kashmir gave way to
sporadic violence the following
decade, with Indian paramilitary
forces and state police first using
pellet cartridges in 2010.
Pellet cartridges are so dangerous that many countries have
banned them, and they are not
used widely in India outside Kashmir. But the scale of the protests
following Wani’s death triggered a
security and public-health crisis,
with poorly trained officers firing
into crowds at close range. Along
with the injured, at least 14 people
died from pellet injuries, according
to Amnesty International’s Sep-
FE
D.
AD
MI
N.
TR
IB
N.W.
AL
F RO
AR
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E
ER
omeone was shaking Faisal
awake. The teen emerged
from sleep to see his mother
next to him, screaming, “The village is going to be destroyed!”
Accounts from villagers, Faisal
and his family of that summer
morning in 2016 depict a chaotic
scene.
Security forces had circled the
village with armored vehicles hoping to ferret out militants. The men
searched house to house, breaking
windows, shooting guns in the air
and launching tear gas that filled
the air with smoke.
Residents pelted them ferociously with stones — probably
helping the militants escape, police
said. Under siege, the security forces had returned fire with pellets as
a “last resort,” said Mohammad
Aslam, superintendent of police.
A neighbor appeared and said
Faisal’s older brother, Aamir, 20,
had been picked up for throwing
stones. Faisal ran in time to see a
smear of blood on the road and his
brother being hauled off in a police
van.
Desperate, he ran after it, hoping he could persuade police to let
his brother go. He was stopped by a
hail of pellets, stinging his arms,
torso and legs. And then, in his left
eye, nothingness.
His first thought, Faisal recalled,
was the single word “khatam” — it’s
over. I’m gone.
His legs gave out, and he crumpled to the ground bleeding. A
cousin rushed to help. Soon Faisal
was on a metal cot in the operating
room of the state’s government
hospital. Out of his good eye, he
could see other pellet victims being
stitched up around him, like an
operating theater in a war. The
doctor numbed his eye and sutured
the wound.
“Am I going to see again?” Faisal
asked.
Sure, the doctor said jovially, in
about two to three months. But
Faisal knew he did not mean it.
Several weeks earlier, Indian
forces had killed Burhan Wani, the
P A K I S TPUNJAB
A N Sialkot
Dera Ismail
Khan
100
MILES
Faisalabad
Lahore
INDIA
THE WASHINGTON POST
tember report “Losing Sight in
Kashmir.”
After two surgeries, Faisal
stayed inside. His friends crept up
the mud-and-brick staircase to sit
in his room and console him. At
night he was restless, unable to
sleep. During the day, he snapped
at his mother when she called him
to supper or when she chided him
to stop staring at his phone because
he was hurting his eyes. Even unrolling the small quilt for bed was a
chore. “It’s hard to watch,” said
Aamir, a scarf weaver.
Last December, Faisal and his
uncle traveled to Dr. Daljit Singh
Eye Hospital in another state to see
a specialist. Although Faisal retained sight in his right eye, he has
lost depth perception and suffers
from blurred vision and headaches. Rehabilitation facilities are
nonexistent, and his family can’t
afford a good pair of glasses.
The doctor, Indu Singh, a retina
specialist and eye surgeon, said she
thought another surgery might
help. Then, a few weeks later, more
good news: Aamir was released
from custody, the charges of stonepelting dropped for lack of evidence.
Singh said she has been treating
pellet patients from Kashmir for
more than 15 years, long before
security forces admitted to using
them. “I don’t know why all this is
happening, why the situation is so
bad,” Singh said. “I’m not a politician. I just know that human beings are being damaged.”
In May, Faisal went back to
school, walking cautiously through
the hallway of the government secondary school, its green walls emblazoned with graffiti of guns.
Although it cheered him to see
his classmates, he grew despondent. He was behind, and it was
difficult for him to make out many
of the Urdu words on the white-
In latest reform, Saudis will allow movie theaters
BY
KAREEM FAHIM
manama, bahrain — Saudi Arabia said Monday that it would
allow cinemas to operate in the
strictly conservative kingdom for
the first time in decades, in the
latest sign of a broader government push to relax some social
restrictions.
In a statement, the Saudi Ministry of Culture and Information
said that the process of licensing
commercial movie theaters —
banned since the early 1980s —
was underway and that the first
theaters would open early next
year.
The move is part of a social and
economic reform program led by
Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, 32, who is increasingly at the
helm of the kingdom’s planning
even though his father, King Salman, remains the ultimate authority.
Under the crown prince, officials have recently announced
they would end a ban on women
driving, allow public concerts and
curb the authority of “religious
police” tasked with enforcing the
country’s strict social codes.
But Saudi Arabia has also arrested hundreds of business executives, princes and former government officials as part of an anticorruption drive that also appeared aimed at consolidating the
crown prince’s authority as well as
filling the state’s coffers.
While the changes have been
broadly welcomed by young Saudis as long overdue, they have
risked angering ultraconservatives, including powerful clerics
who give the monarchy legitimacy
to rule over Islam’s holiest sites.
The limits of the crown prince’s
reforms reflect this delicate balancing act. The social shifts have
not included any broadening of
political freedoms or the repeal of
“guardianship” laws that require
women to gain the consent of a
male relative to travel abroad or
work. Yet the arrests over the last
few months have included some
influential clerics as well as government opponents — suggesting
the crown prince could be testing
how much the religious establishment will push back.
The emerging model in Saudi
Arabia — of diversifying the economy and encouraging social re-
forms, rather than political liberalization — follows the example of
the United Arab Emirates, a neighboring state that has emerged as
the Saudi leadership’s closest regional ally. Still, Saudi Arabia is
unlikely to follow the UAE in allowing the consumption of alcohol and free mingling of genders,
for instance.
Awwad Alawwad, the Saudi
minister of culture and information, called the return of movie
theaters “a watershed moment in
the development of the cultural
economy of the kingdom,” according to the government statement.
The opening of cinemas also
clears the way for a potentially
huge market for foreign investors,
according to John Fithian, president of the Washington-based Na-
board. His friends whispered to
him what the lessons said.
“He is a completely changed person,” said Waseem Shameem Bhat,
17. “He has become so handicapped, he can’t even express his
emotion if he gets angry. He can’t
even marry. He’ll have to marry a
girl who is also blind.”
State officials say assistance programs for the pellet victims will be
launched, and they recently awarded a small group of them government jobs. So far, the state has
provided financial assistance to 22
victims, about $3,000 to those
blinded in both eyes and $1,500 to
those blinded in one eye. Faisal’s
family has not received any assistance.
Not long after the first day of
school, Faisal and a friend drove
about half an hour to see Wani’s
grave. Wani has become a cult hero
since his death, and supplicants
come to the open field where he is
buried to take handfuls of soil, believing it has magical powers. Faisal felt a “strong urge” to see the
place.
He has been drawn to militants
since his injury and, like his
friends, has saved pictures of Wani
and others on his cellphone.
“A militant is a kind of shield for
the violations the security forces
can unleash on women and children,” Faisal said. “If there are 1,000
teenagers in a village, 990 of them
would want to become a militant.”
In January, India’s Supreme
Court is expected to address a special petition filed by the Jammu
and Kashmir High Court Bar Association challenging the use of pellets. But for now, the government of
India has said security forces will
continue to use them if other mea-
sures such as chili shells and tear
gas fail to disperse rioters. The
main government hospital continues to see several pellet injuries a
week.
“We are very sensitive about the
use of force,” said S.N. Shrivastava,
special director general for India’s
paramilitary force in Kashmir.
“The whole purpose is to cause
minimum damage to the protesters.”
Security forces are experimenting with a number of crowdcontrol measures that would be
less harmful, Shrivastava said, and
they have added deflectors to guns
to control the angle of the pellet
dispersal, away from the eyes.
On a recent sunny day, Faisal
climbed the hill to the small brick
mosque with green arched windows, and unrolled his prayer mat.
He prayed as he always does, he
said: “God, you are the doctor of
doctors. Please help me recover.”
But he isn’t sure what will happen,
and the family can’t afford the operation the doctor suggested.
Later he joined his old cricket
teammates playing a pickup match
in the schoolyard. They called him
to join in, but he shook his head and
sat on the sidelines. He swapped
glasses with another pellet victim,
Adil Riyaz Bhat, 20, who also can
no longer play. When an errant ball
came his way, he flinched.
The match wasn’t over, but Faisal decided to leave early. These
days, with his hampered vision, it’s
hard for him to be out after dark.
“My life is over,” he said, before
heading home.
tional Association for Theater
Owners, which led a delegation
that met with Saudi officials before the announcement Monday.
“This could be a billion-dollar
market down the road” and employ more than 20,000 people,
Fithian said in an interview last
week. Companies from the United
Arab Emirates as well as the United States were bidding for a slice of
the anticipated windfall, he said.
But there are also regulatory
and logistical issues ahead. They
include how strictly men and
women would be segregated in the
new theaters, and what kind of
films would be permitted. The
Saudi authorities heavily censor
film content on TV, including love
scenes, women’s bodies or scenes
that depict alcohol or drug use.
Saudi officials have also discussed plans to better support the
kingdom’s indigenous film industry. Saudi filmmakers have pro-
duced several critically acclaimed
features in recent years, including
the feature-length “Wadjda,” but
they have been overshadowed by
more seasoned and better-supported regional competitors, including Egyptian, Palestinian and
Iranian filmmakers.
Saudi filmmakers have faced
special challenges because of society’s red lines as well as fuzzy
regulations governing their profession. Sources of funding have
also remained a concern.
The Saudi announcement said
the country seeks to have more
than 300 cinemas in operation by
2030 — a target date for many of
the crown prince’s reform plans
that include efforts to move the
Saudi economy away from its dependence on oil revenue.
annie.gowen@washpost.com
Ishfaq Naseem contributed to this
report.
kareem.fahim@washpost.com
Brian Murphy in Washington
contributed to this report.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
States consider a new starting point in custody disputes
respond if they have a good
relationship with their mom and
dad or if they are caught in the
middle of a war zone.”
Rather than giving courts the
power to make these changes,
Emery and others recommend
alternative resolution strategies.
Many states are promoting
mediation and the creation of
parenting plans in lieu of custody litigation. Such plans spell
out in minute detail how each
parent will take responsibility
for the care of each child. Studies
show that this process usually
leads to a more equitable division of parenting time.
Many states, including Virginia, have also changed the
vocabulary of child custody to
promote a less adversarial outcome, with “decision-making”
and “parenting time” replacing
“legal custody” and “physical
custody.”
PARENTING FROM A1
appeal for gender equality and,
among some conservatives, the
frustration of a newly emboldened constituency of men who say
they are being shortchanged.
Critics of the bills, including
women’s rights groups and some
legal associations, say that stricter laws will roll back important
protections against abusive or
controlling former spouses and
take discretion away from judges
who are tasked with deciding
what is in the best interest of
children. They also say that the
bills, which would directly apply
to only the 10 percent or so of
divorcing parents who cannot
come to an agreement, are unnecessary because more divorcing parents are already choosing
shared custody.
Laws that require joint physical custody could also lead to the
elimination of child support in
some states, women’s advocates
say, disrupting a system that was
designed to help women, who
have historically been paid less
in the workforce while performing more unpaid labor at home.
“That disparity in assets and
earning power doesn’t simply
disappear at separation,” said
Molly Dragiewicz, an associate
professor at Queensland University of Technology in Australia
who wrote a book about domestic abuse and divorce.
Proponents emphasize that
the bills overwhelmingly address
parents who are otherwise fit
and not abusive. They say that
family courts are out of step with
modern families and that the
current system benefits highly
paid lawyers while depriving
millions of children of the
chance to build meaningful relationships with their fathers.
“The way the system is set up
now, two parents enter the courtroom. When they leave, one is a
parent, and the other is a visitor,”
said Christian Paasch, 37, chair of
the National Parents Organization of Virginia, a fathers’ rights
group.
A presumption of shared parenting would replace the “winner takes all” approach currently
embedded in the law, he said,
and replace it with a new message: “You will both still be
parents, and you both matter to
your children.”
Moms as natural caregivers
For more than a century, court
decisions were guided by the
“tender years doctrine,” a vestige,
legal scholars say, of the cult of
domesticity that put women on a
pedestal as instinctive caregivers.
That began to change in the
1960s and 1970s, as more women
joined the workforce and as
no-fault divorce laws ushered in
a wave of divorces.
The guiding principle in custody rulings changed to a more
flexible and gender-neutral “best
interest of the child” standard,
and states overturned previous
rules that disallowed joint custody.
But despite changing laws,
judges continued to use their
discretion to award primary
physical custody overwhelmingly to mothers in many places,
reflecting a lingering bias, many
say.
Fathers’ rights groups have
worked to make the laws stronger.
Statutes in the District of Columbia include a presumption
that joint custody is in the best
interest of a child, except in cases
of abuse or neglect.
ASTRID RIECKEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Christian Paasch, with his wife, Kristen, is chair of a Virginia fathers’ rights group. He fought a long court battle for shared custody
of his son with his ex-wife. If the laws had given fathers more explicit rights, he says, the process would have been less contentious.
In Maryland, fathers’ rights
groups have promoted bills that
would create a presumption of
joint legal decision-making and
equal parenting time, but they
have not made it out of committee.
In Virginia, Sen. Barbara A.
Favola (D-Arlington) is introducing a bill that would require
judges to communicate in writing the rationale for their custody decisions.
This “baby step” might open
the door to more joint custody
decisions, she said, because a
written ruling could give parents
something to use for appeals and
provide a chance to evaluate
whether bias is influencing decisions. Favola said she sees both
sides of the issue: She wants to
make a statement that children
benefit from having two involved
parents, she said, but she also
believes that the existing “best
interest” legal standard makes
sense, since joint custody is considered best practice unless
there are mitigating circumstances.
Paasch, who has been advocating for a stronger shared-parenting law in Virginia, said he
believes that judicial bias played
a role in his custody case. When
the Air Force veteran and federal
employee got divorced a decade
ago, his soon-to-be ex-wife was
planning to move out of state,
and he was afraid he would lose a
connection to his son, then a year
old.
He and his son’s mother could
not agree on a custody arrangement, so they went to court,
where Paasch asked for primary
custody. A court-appointed investigator tasked with representing the interests of his child
recommended equally shared
custody.
A judge in southern Virginia
instead gave primary custody to
the mother and granted Paasch
visitation, he said.
He appealed and in a settlement worked out an agreement
to have physical custody for
almost half the time.
Today, he talks with his son
almost every day and has physical custody about 30 percent of
the time, when his son has
breaks from school.
Maintaining close contact and
being involved in important decisions has required frequent
court intervention. If the laws
had given fathers more explicit
rights, he believes, the process
would have been less contentious.
“It took us eight years and
eight or nine times in court and
about 15 attorneys to get to this
point,” said Paasch, who has
remarried and whose new wife,
Kristen, has also become involved in the fathers’ rights
movement.
The benefits of co-parenting
Extensive social-science research shows that children benefit from having an involved
father. Children with active fathers tend to have higher self-esteem and better academic records.
A meta-analysis of research on
the effects of shared parenting
on children in 15 countries also
showed benefits across a range of
emotional, behavioral and physical health measures.
“The custody laws in our country were based on the sexist
belief that mothers are better
than fathers at raising children,”
said Linda Nielsen, a professor of
adolescent and educational psychology at Wake Forest University. “. . . Well, the research does
not support that.”
Fathers’ rights advocates frequently cite a broader set of
statistics showing worse outcomes, such as a greater risk of
incarceration or dropping out of
high school, for children raised
in any single-parent households,
including those in which parents
never married, a category that
represents 40 percent of all U.S.
births today.
This can be misleading, some
academics say, because nevermarried parents are far more
likely to be very poor, which by
“The way the
system is set up
now, two parents
enter the courtroom.
When they leave,
one is a parent,
and the other
is a visitor.”
Christian Paasch, chair of the
National Parents Organization
of Virginia
itself can lead to negative outcomes for children.
Some researchers question
what conclusions can be drawn
from studies that show benefits
from shared parenting, since
children being raised in joint
custody arrangements probably
have parents who get along better — a situation that would not
necessarily extend to those compelled to adopt shared custody.
“It’s not the amount of parenting time but the quality of parenting and the quality of co-parenting that matter,” said Robert
Emery, a professor of psychology
at the University of Virginia and
the author of “Two Homes, One
Childhood.”
“Kids don’t count the minutes
and the percents, but they sure
Unhappy fathers
But for many fathers, a gradual approach to change is unsatisfying if they are separated from
their children now.
Many become politically involved through local divorcesupport groups, where they go to
receive legal counsel, vent frustrations and get support from
other men, although some of
these fathers’ groups have drawn
heavy criticism for promoting
the notion that false claims of
domestic abuse are widespread.
A growing number of stay-athome dads and younger dads are
also pushing for family court
changes because they are committed to caregiving and want to
redefine gender roles.
Shared parenting can be a
boon to women, they say, giving
them a chance to return to school
or invest in work or new relationships, just as it can help men
break out of their previous roles.
“If we are going to create a
new generation of men who view
caregiving and work at home as
meaningful work, we have to be
willing to let them into spaces we
traditionally don’t let them into
and create protections for them
in the event that their marriages
don’t last,” said Mark Greene, a
divorced father and writer who
has shared custody of his son.
michael.chandler@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
Economy & Business
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2 nonprofit hospital chains reportedly discuss merger
BY
C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
Two large nonprofit Catholic
hospital chains are discussing a
possible merger, according to the
Wall Street Journal. If a deal is
struck, it would create the largest
hospital system in the country,
reflecting an ongoing wave of
consolidation in the health-care
industry.
One hospital system, Ascension, runs 141 hospitals in 22
states and the District. The other,
Providence St. Joseph Health,
runs 50 hospitals in seven states.
Spokesmen from both hospitals
declined to comment on the WSJ
report. If combined, the entity
would be bigger than the largest
Providence St. Joseph,
Ascension could create
nation’s largest system
for-profit health system today,
HCA, which includes 177 hospitals in 20 states and in Britain.
The reported talks are the latest
sign of an industry in flux. Last
week, Colorado-based Catholic
Health Initiatives and California-based Dignity Health announced they had agreed to
create a joint system with 139
hospitals across 28 states. Chicago-based Advocate Health Care
and Milwaukee-based Aurora
Health Care also announced
plans to merge to create what
they said would be the 10th-largest not-for-profit health system,
with 27 hospitals and more than
3,300 doctors.
“It feels like a land grab on the
part of some systems, seeking to
get larger,” said Leemore Dafny, a
professor of business administration at Harvard Business
School. “Once a couple of these
are announced, then more start
to get underway, because people
don't want to be left out. . . .
There’s a widely held belief
among health system executives
that costs are lower when you
have a bigger enterprise.”
The announcement comes at a
time when insurers are increasingly integrated with care providers. Last week, CVS agreed to
acquire Aetna for $69 billion,
and the country's largest insurer,
UnitedHealth Group, agreed to
acquire a large network of medical clinics, DaVita Medical
Group.
Hospitals generally argue that
such deals provide greater scale
— and could drive better deals on
medical devices or drugs. Melinda Hatton, the general counsel
for the American Hospital Association, said that hospitals are
facing pressures from decreasing
reimbursements — as well as a
health system increasingly re-
warding providers not for the
number of services they provide,
but the quality of their care. A
study published in the Journal of
Health Economics found that
after hospitals were acquired,
they experienced cost savings of
between 4 and 7 percent. Whether cost savings trickle down to
patients through lower prices,
however, is a topic of debate.
Dafny's work has shown that
when hospitals acquire systems
in other states, there is, on average, no effect on prices. But when
hospitals acquire systems in
their own state, prices rise.
There is little geographic overlap in the potential deal between
Ascension and Providence St.
Joseph Health.
John Hanley, a managing director at Ziegler, a health-care
investment bank, said the latest
deals show a shift away from
larger hospitals buying up smaller regional players toward mergers of large health systems in
different geographic areas — and
more might be around the corner.
“It’s like a domino,” Ziegler
said. “If you’re a multi-state system now and you see these
multistate systems getting bigger, how do we respond? How do
we react? The easiest reaction is
. . . some will jump into this and
get bigger.”
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
Macron invites scientists to a different climate
As Trump bids to slash science budgets and antipollution efforts, French president uses grants to lure 13 U.S. researchers to work in his country
BY
S TEVEN M UFSON
What initially looked like an
impish dig at President Trump by
French President Emmanuel Macron over climate policy has turned
into a concrete plan.
First, when the Trump administration proposed slashing federal
science budgets and then, on
June 1, when Trump pulled the
United States out of the Paris climate accord, Macron took to social
media to urge worried climate scientists, engineers and entrepreneurs to see France as a “second
homeland” and to come work there
because “we all share the same
responsibility: make our planet
great again.”
Now the French government is
unveiling a list of 18 “laureates” —
13 of them working in the United
States — who have won a “Make
Our Planet Great Again” competition for research grants awarded
for as long as five years. They include professors and researchers at
Cornell University, Columbia University, Stanford University and
other institutions.
“For me, the chance to work on
some very exciting science questions with my French colleagues
and not be so dependent on the
crazy stuff that goes on in Congress
and with the current administration is honestly very attractive,”
Louis A. Derry, a leading professor
of earth and atmospheric sciences
at Cornell, said in an interview.
Derry lamented a “devaluing of
science by this administration.”
And he said the tax plan Congress is
considering would have a “catastrophic” effect on graduate students. “I don’t think the country is
well served by this,” he said.
The French government’s offer
attracted 1,822 applications, nearly
two-thirds of them from the United
States. France’s research ministry
pruned that to 450 “high-quality”
candidates for long-term projects.
Corinne Le Quéré, a professor of
climate change science and policy
and director of the Tyndall Center
for Climate Change Research at
Britain’s University of East Anglia,
helped the French government
choose this round of grant winners.
PHILIPPE WOJAZER/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
French President Emmanuel Macron announces the winners of his climate grant competition at Paris’s Station F campus.
About half of the applicants had
been working for more than 12
years after earning their PhDs, Le
Quéré said. The average age was 45,
she said, and “most are in the middle of productive careers.”
“I jumped at the promise of a
5-year contract!” said Alessandra
Giannini, a veteran professor at
Columbia University’s Earth Institute who studies the effects of
warming oceans on Africa’s Sahel
region. “I am a midcareer scientist
almost entirely supported by federal research grants. My contract
with the university is renewed yearly contingent on funding,” she
wrote in an email.
Macron’s Monday announcement came at Station F, a converted
rail station that bills itself as the
world’s largest start-up facility.
Many of the climate scientists
moving from the United States
have spent time in France or are
from Europe originally. Crucially,
many already have some degree of
facility with the French language.
Some will split their time to keep
their academic chairs in the United
States.
Derry, a former mineral and petroleum exploration geologist, has
been at Cornell since 1994 and will
split his time between there and the
Institute of Earth Physics of Paris,
part of the French National Center
for Scientific Research. He studied
in France in the early 1990s and has
returned for six-month stints before.
He is engaged in “critical zone”
research, which integrates studies
of a variety of biological, chemical
and geological changes from
Earth’s surface through the top of
the tree canopy. He plans to focus
his efforts on how water moves
through a watershed.
Derry is the director of the National Science Foundation office for
nine Critical Zone Observatories.
But it is unclear how the sites will
be funded beyond mid-2018.
“That’s a big concern for all of us,”
he said. People working on the projects “are quite naturally looking
elsewhere for work.”
Camille Parmesan, a biologist
who teaches at Britain’s Plymouth
University and the University of
Texas at Austin, also won a grant
and will move her research to an
ecology center in Moulis, France.
She is exploring the effects of
climate change on wild plants and
animals. This has included fieldwork on butterfly species and communities as well as analyses of global effects on a variety of plants and
animals. She has also co-authored
assessments of climate change’s effects on agricultural insect pests
and on human diseases.
“Plants and animals have been
moving towards the poles and up
mountains — and flowering or
breeding earlier in springtime — as
they attempt to track a shifting
climate,” she said in an email. “This
research has provided independent
biological support of the warming
trends shown in climate data, and
has helped shape the international
determination of 2°C as a threshold
for ‘dangerous’ climate change.”
In Moulis, Parmesan plans to
study “how these movements of
animals out of the tropics and into
Europe may be bringing tropical
diseases into countries, and medical systems, that have not had them
historically.”
Another winner in the French
grant contest was Núria Teixidó
Ullod, a visiting scientist at Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford
University and a scientist at Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn in Naples. Her research is sponsored by
the European Research Program.
“The research project that I will
perform in France seeks to investigate how climate and acidification
affects marine biodiversity as well
as the potential of species to adapt
to these changes in their environment,” she wrote in an email.
Giannini’s research has demonstrated that the persistent drought
that afflicted Africa’s Sahel in the
1970s and 1980s could be tied to
rising sea surface temperatures
worldwide. Recently she has examined what portion of temperature
changes can be ascribed to fossil-fuel burning. “In the case of the Sahel,
it’s looking more and more like the
combination of greenhouse gases
and aerosols specific to the second
half of the 20th century played an
important role in drought,” she
wrote.
Giannini plans to do an additional 15 to 20 years of research —
but over the past 15 to 20 years, it
has become harder to obtain federal funding, “meaning many more
proposals to submit and resubmit,
which ultimately fragments work
into bits too small to be able to find
some cohesion, and time to think
about the big picture questions.”
Now, with budget pressures and
the prioritizing of defense spending over discretionary spending,
and “the savage tax cuts for the rich
that are making the rounds of Congress,” she said it wasn’t hard to see
“blood and tears coming our way.”
steven.mufson@washpost.com
James McAuley in Paris and Chris
Mooney in New Orleans contributed to
this report.
DIGEST
MEDIA
Comcast drops Fox bid
as Disney negotiates
Comcast said Monday that it
had abandoned its bid for most of
the assets of 21st Century Fox,
leaving Disney as the sole suitor
in pursuit of the $40 billion-plus
deal.
“When a set of assets like Fox’s
becomes available, it is our
responsibility to evaluate if there
is a strategic fit that could benefit
our company and our
shareholders. That is what we
tried to do and we are no longer
engaged in the review of those
assets,” Comcast said in a
statement.
Disney and Fox did not
immediately respond to requests
for comment.
— Reuters
nearly 20 years ago imposing the
ban and brushing aside
conservationists’ warnings that
the measure will lead to
devastating pollution.
The governor signed the
GOP-authored bill during a
midday stop at the RhinelanderOneida County Airport in
Rhinelander. The bill’s
supporters say lifting the
moratorium will reenergize
mining in northern Wisconsin
and boost the region’s economy.
Lawmakers from both parties
put the ban in place in 1998 out
of concerns about sulfide mining
polluting Wisconsin’s waters.
Walker’s spokesman, Tom
Evenson, has said the governor
believes that mining can be done
without harming the
environment, but he hasn’t
offered anything more to explain
the governor’s change of heart.
— Associated Press
MINING
Walker lifts Wis. ban
despite critics’ fears
Gov. Scott Walker (R) signed a
bill Monday lifting Wisconsin’s
moratorium on gold and silver
mining, reversing his vote from
TECHNOLOGY
Apple removes
MyEtherWallet app
Apple said Monday that it had
removed a paid iOS application
from its App Store after
Jordan Spence, spokesman for
MyEtherWallet, said that the
developer had not detected signs
that the iOS app was used to steal
from people who had
downloaded it but that the team
was still investigating.
— Reuters
ABDUL MAJEED/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A shopkeeper makes garlands with currency notes at a flower
market in Peshawar, Pakistan. Currency garlands are popular in
South Asia for occasions such as weddings, pilgrimages, and other
religious and political activities.
MyEtherWallet, a free service for
storing digital currencies,
complained that the program
was improperly using its name.
“This is NOT US,”
MyEtherWallet said Sunday from
its official Twitter account.
The statement was a response
to a tweet by someone identified
as @ChrisLundkvist, who posted
an image of a $4.99 app dubbed
MyEtherWallet in which it was
listed as the third-most popular
finance app in the App Store.
Apple spokesman Tom
Neumayr said MyEtherWallet
had been removed from the store.
He declined to say how many
customers had bought the app or
if Apple would provide refunds.
ALSO IN BUSINESS
U.S. employers posted slightly
fewer job openings in October
than in the previous month, but
the number of people being hired
improved, the Labor Department
said Monday. Nearly 6 million
jobs were available at the end of
October, down from 6.18 million
in September. Manufacturers,
retailers, wholesalers and the
information sector advertised
fewer jobs — an indicator of their
possible intentions in the coming
months. Total hires rose
4.4 percent to 5.55 million.
U.S. Trade Representative
Robert E. Lighthizer said
Monday that the World Trade
Organization is “losing its
essential focus on negotiation
and becoming a litigationcentered organization.”
Lighthizer also said some
members try to gain concessions
through lawsuits that they could
never get at the negotiating table.
He spoke Monday at the WTO’s
ministerial meeting in Argentina.
Mattel warned of slumping
holiday sales Monday after its
debt was downgraded by the
major credit-rating firms. The
toymaker said in a securities
filing that its fourth-quarter sales
would be “negatively impacted”
because of “certain
underperforming brands” and
because retailers were tightly
controlling their inventories this
holiday season. Those issues are
why S&P Global and Fitch
Ratings further downgraded
Mattel’s debt, which already was
below investment grade.
— From news reports
COMING TODAY
8:30 a.m.: Labor Department
releases the Producer Price Index
for November.
2 p.m.: Treasury releases the
federal budget for November.
All day: Federal Reserve
policymakers begin a two-day
meeting to set interest rates.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
RE
Treasury uses rosier numbers to negate Senate tax plan’s impact on deficit
even after taking into account
economic growth. The PennWharton Budget Model predicts that the tax measure
would still add $1.5 trillion to
$1.8 trillion to the national
debt after factoring in growth.
“Even with assumptions favorable to economic growth, the
Senate [bill] still increases debt
by over $1.5 trillion over the next
decade,” said economist Kent
Smetters, director of the Penn
Wharton Budget Model.
The Tax Foundation, which
supports the GOP tax plan, says
it would cost about $500 billion. Treasury is by far the most
optimistic of all.
Scott Greenberg, a senior
analyst at the Tax Foundation,
tweeted Monday that what
Treasury posted “is not an
analysis of the economic effects
of the Senate tax bill.”
Senior administration officials said that different economists could come to different
conclusions, but that they
wanted to offer some transparency in their perspective. The
analysis states, “We acknowledge that some economists predict different growth rates.”
Kevin Hassett, the chair of
Trump’s Council of Economic
Advisers, defended the higher
growth projections in several
TV appearances Monday.
“We are going into next year
with momentum. It’s our view
at CEA that all of the capital
spending that’s going to be
drawn back to the U.S. next year
is a reason for optimism that we
can sustain 3 percent growth
for a good long time,” Hassett
said on Fox Business.
One Republican senator —
Bob Corker (Tenn.) — voted
against the tax bill because of
concerns about how much money it would add to the deficit.
The White House has tried to
persuade other GOP lawmakers
that the Joint Committee on
Taxation is wrong and that the
bill would not increase the
debt.
Senate Minority Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)
called the analysis “fake math”
that shows Republicans are
“grasping at straws.”
Math relies on welfare
reform, sustained growth
of nearly 3% per year
BY
H EATHER L ONG
For months, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has said
the Republican tax plan
wouldn’t add a penny to the
national debt, pledging that
more than 100 people in his
agency were “working aroundthe-clock” to calculate how
much additional growth would
come from the plan. On Monday, the Treasury Department
released the fruit of those efforts: a one-page document asserting that the $1.5 trillion
Senate tax plan would generate
more than enough to pay for
itself.
The proposal relies on two
big — and controversial — assumptions: that it will generate
economic activity well in excess
of what independent analysts
project, and that the rest of the
administration’s
economic
agenda, including regulatory
reform, infrastructure spending and an overhaul of the
welfare system, will take effect.
Treasury’s Office of Tax Policy
says the U.S. economy would
grow by an average of 2.9
percent a year for the next 10
years, much higher than the
nonpartisan
Congressional
Budget Office’s projection of
just 1.9 percent per year.
“One percentage point of
higher growth sounds like a
little bit, but it’s the equivalent
of me being one foot taller and
able to dunk a basketball,” said
Mark Mazur, an economist who
served as assistant secretary for
tax policy at the Treasury during the Obama administration.
Treasury says half of the
increased growth would come
from the massive cuts to business taxes. The tax plan proposes cutting the corporate rate
from 35 percent to 20 percent.
The office attributes the rest
of the increased growth to
multiple factors, including
some that have yet to happen
and are not part of the tax bill.
As the analysis says, “We expect
the other half to come from
JOSHUA ROBERTS/REUTERS
An analysis by an office under the purview of Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin supports his assertion that the Senate’s tax bill would
pay for itself. But it relies on the passage of other parts of President Trump’s economic agenda and on ambitious projections of growth.
changes to pass-through taxation and individual tax reform,
as well as a combination of
regulatory reform, infrastructure development and welfare
reform as proposed in the
[Trump] Administration’s Fiscal Year 2018 budget.”
Treasury estimates that, all
told, the tax-code changes and
other policy efforts would lift
economic growth so much that
it would generate $1.8 trillion
in new revenue over 10 years, as
a bigger economy leads to bigger tax bills.
It is an analysis far different
from those produced by other
groups.
A recent analysis by the Joint
Committee on Taxation (JCT),
Congress’s nonpartisan score-
keeper, predicted that the Senate tax bill would add about 0.1
percentage point more a year to
growth over the next decade,
far less than what Treasury
says. The JCT took into account
the economic effects of the tax
cuts to individual and business
taxes, but not other policy
changes advocated by the administration such as welfare
reform.
The JCT says the bill’s total
cost would be $1 trillion after
considering growth effects.
Many economists and taxpolicy experts slammed the
Treasury memo as half-baked.
There was no supporting documentation with the statement,
making it impossible for independent economists to re-cre-
ate Treasury’s work. Independent analysts have forecast that
the bill would add $500 billion
to nearly $2 trillion to the debt.
“Treasury has released a onepage [analysis] which will be
used by tax cut advocates to
claim that the tax cut pays for
itself. It’s a joke and no substitute for the career staff running
the full macro model they have
to analyze effects,” New York
University tax-law professor
David Kamin tweeted.
Some former Obama administration officials say they don’t
think Treasury ran a model at
all. They note that the 2.9 percent growth estimate is what
President Trump’s budget assumed in the spring.
“First, the staff DID NOT
Fear of running out of money to live
Damian Paletta contributed to this
report.
LIMITED TIME!
SHERFY PHOTO COURTESY OF JOE SHERFY;
TUNNELL PHOTO COURTESY OF MARY PAGEL
Randy Sherfy and Cecilia “Sis”
Tunnell need intensive care.
tax rate for corporations from
35 percent to 20 percent, as the tax
plan does.
An ‘extraordinary’ deduction
The medical deduction started
in 1942 to help Americans deal
with what lawmakers at the time
called the “extraordinary” costs of
medical care, the kind that hit
when someone in the family has
cancer or needs round-the-clock
care. Anyone can deduct medical
expenses that account for more
than 10 percent of their adjusted
gross income (income after certain adjustments). The Senate bill
would expand that to 7.5 percent of
income for this year and next.
In 2015, 8.8 million Americans
used the deduction.
As soon as Hammer, a former
university administrator and
MetLife compliance manager,
read about the House plan, she
realized it would alter not just her
taxes but possibly her life. She has
income from Social Security, a
modest pension and private retirement accounts. She pulls in
about $55,000 a year, enough to
pay for her retirement community
and her medical bills.
But if she loses the medical deduction, her taxable income would
jump — and so would her taxes. Her
home state of Maryland bases its
taxes off the federal ones, so losing
the medical deduction at the federal
level would lead to more taxes at the
state level, as well. The more money
that goes to taxes, the less she has to
live on later in life.
“It’s very, very scary,” Hammer
says. It would be even worse if her
medical costs go up. She anticipates
‘Freaks me out’
Losing the deduction is especially burdensome for families caring
for someone with a chronic disease.
Cecilia “Sis” Tunnell is 88 and has
Alzheimer’s. Her daughter Mary Pagel runs a thriving accounting practice in San Luis Obispo, Calif., and
moved her mom to a nursing home
nearby. The facility, specialized care
and a nurse cost more than
$130,000 last year, a hefty sum the
family can pay because of years of
careful planning.
Pagel handles her mother’s taxes and estimates that Tunnell
would go from paying less than
$23,000 in taxes last year to paying more than $50,000 if the
House plan went into effect and
the medical deduction went away,
because her mother’s taxable income would jump by six figures.
“It freaks me out,” Pagel says.
“The costs of medical care are not
going to go down, and you just don’t
know how long someone will need
care with Alzheimer’s or another
chronic illness.”
‘Victim of an accident’
Although most of the focus has
been on the elderly, Americans of all
ages would be affected if the tax
deduction were lost.
Randy Sherfy was a former college athlete and a rising star at a law
firm when he left his home on a
Saturday morning in 1992 to go on a
bike ride with friends. A driver hit
him a few miles from his home. He
was 41.
Many surgeries later, his body
has been mostly repaired, but Sherfy never recovered from the brain
injury. He has been living in a traumatic care facility in Texas that costs
more than $60,000 a year. He pays
for it from income from a settlement
with a driver and from disability
insurance he had from his law firm.
His brother, an accountant, estimates Sherfy’s taxes would go up
substantially without the medical
tax deduction. In most years from
2007 to 2014, he paid almost no
taxes because of the medical deduction, his brother Joe says. Under the
House bill, he would suddenly have
taxable income of $60,000 a year.
“Most of the people in nursing
homes don’t have a lot of choice of
how they’re spending their dollars,”
Joe Sherfy says. “He was the victim
of an accident.”
heather.long@washpost.com
the apy with
capital bank
1.45% APY
ON YOUR MONEY
1
5X
1
12-MONTH CD
2
$10,000 MINIMUM BALANCE1
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ANNUAL PERCENTAGE YIELD (APY)
H EATHER L ONG
Anne Hammer is one of millions
of elderly Americans who could face
a substantial tax hike in 2018 depending on the final negotiations
over the Republican tax plan.
In her retirement community in
Chestertown, Md., it’s the big topic
of conversation.
Hammer is 71. Like many seniors,
her medical bills are piling up.
There are doctor visits, insurance
premiums, drugs, a colonoscopy, a
heart scan, an unexpected trip to the
emergency room that lasted three
days, ongoing monitoring for breast
and ovarian cancer that run in her
family and the costs of medical staff
at her retirement community. Her
out-of-pocket medical expenses
vary, but she estimates they are
about $20,000 a year.
Under the law, she can take a big
medical deduction on her taxes.
Last year, she was able to reduce
her total taxable income by
$16,000 because of the medical
deduction alone, saving her more
than $3,000 on her tax bill.
The House tax bill would eliminate the deduction, while the Senate bill would make it a bit more
generous. It’s a key difference that
must be reconciled before the final
legislation goes to President Trump.
“I have enough money to last
until I’m 95,” says Hammer, who has
carefully saved for decades. “But if I
have to pay that much more in taxes,
I might run out of money by 85.”
House Republicans have argued
that their tax overhaul would be so
beneficial to families that individual provisions such as the medical
deduction would no longer be necessary. But more recently, they acknowledged the significant impact
of eliminating this particular tax
break.
Rep. Kevin Brady (R-Tex.), the
lead author of the House bill, said
last week that the medical deduction is on his radar heading into the
conference committee.
“That issue is being raised a lot by
our lawmakers as very important,”
Brady said.
Eliminating the medical deduction raises $10 billion a year — about
7 percent of the cost of reducing the
heather.long@washpost.com
eye surgery and a dental procedure
next year.
Millions of Americans
face a big tax hike if GOP
scraps medical deduction
BY
model the tax reform. Paper
simply assumes a growth rate —
the crazily optimistic one from
the budget. And says that, yes,
~3 percent [annual] growth
would more than pay for tax
cuts,” David Kamin, who
worked in the White House
budget office under President
Barack Obama, wrote on Twitter.
The nation’s leading think
tanks that analyze tax and
budget policies have all released detailed analyses showing that the tax bill would not
fully pay for itself.
In a new analysis of the
Senate GOP tax bill that was
also released Monday, the Tax
Policy Center found that the bill
would still cost $1.5 trillion,
0.75
national
average
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
24,500
Close
YTD
% Chg
24,386.03
+0.2
+23.4
23,250
22,000
20,750
19,500
Nasdaq Composite Index
7000
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
6875.08
+0.5
+27.7
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Power Prodct & Enrgy Trdr
Energy Equipment & Svcs
Computers & Peripherals
Media
Software
Distributors
Real Estate Mgmt & Dev
Household Durables
Air Freight & Logistics
Construction Materials
0
–2.5%
+2.5%
2.12
2.01
1.80
1.45
1.18
–0.62
–0.62
–0.72
–1.01
–2.43
5800
5200
2659.99
S&P 500 Index
+0.3
+18.8
2670
2560
2450
2340
2230
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N D
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
72,800.04
16,103.51
47,661.01
0.1
0.0
0.2
389.05
5386.83
13,123.65
7453.48
–0.1
–0.2
–0.2
0.8
5998.28
4069.50
28,965.29
22,938.73
0.1
1.7
1.1
0.6
YTD % Chg
–40%
0%
+40%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
239.30
99.00
172.67
283.16
143.77
120.42
37.96
45.33
70.81
83.03
17.65
250.13
182.25
155.41
43.66
0.5
0.5
1.9
–1.0
–0.1
0.4
0.9
0.0
0.1
0.4
–0.3
–0.1
–0.6
0.4
0.7
34.0
33.6
49.1
81.9
55.0
2.3
25.6
9.3
23.8
–8.0
–44.1
4.5
35.9
–6.4
20.4
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
141.14
105.62
173.25
56.34
85.23
61.91
90.23
36.21
133.16
123.30
222.77
51.84
112.37
96.93
106.83
0.4
–0.3
0.1
1.4
1.3
1.0
–0.2
1.3
–0.4
0.4
–0.5
1.5
–0.2
0.4
2.5
22.5
22.4
42.3
–4.3
37.2
21.8
7.3
11.5
8.8
12.5
39.2
–2.9
44.0
40.2
2.5
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
0.8498
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1768
0.0088
1.3342
0.3027
0.7778
0.0524
0.0075
1.1337
0.2568
0.6609
0.0446
151.4950
34.3672
88.3220
5.9585
0.2269
0.5829
0.0393
Japan ¥ per
113.5500
133.6200
Britain £ per
0.7495
0.8820
0.0066
Brazil R$ per
3.3038
3.8941
0.0290
4.4092
Canada $ per
1.2857
1.5129
0.0113
1.7153
0.3892
Mexico $ per
19.0553
22.4252
0.1680
25.4279
5.7660
Mexico $
2.5703
0.1734
0.0675
14.8211
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 27,508.61
Russell 2000
1519.84
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 534.92
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
9.34
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
0.3
–0.1
–0.2
–2.5
YTD % Chg
18.2
12.0
19.6
–33.5
+1.1
–1.1
+1.1
–0.1
+2.0
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
(Ticker) % Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.5100
$15.79
$9.8250
$0.1395
$4.1350
–1.2
–0.2
–0.7
–0.7
–1.3
day
month
$1200
$1000
$800
–1.8
1.3
–1.0
–1.3
0.6
0.3
–0.2
1.9
–0.2
Gainers
CONSOL Energy Inc
DHI Group Inc
Century Aluminum
Kindred Healthcare
NIC Inc
CenturyLink Inc
Lumentum Holdings
Consolidated Comm
Pioneer Energy Svcs
Blucora Inc
OFG Bancorp
Southwestern Energy
Digi International
Tailored Brands Inc
Fred's Inc
NOW Inc
Gulfport Energy
Veeco Instruments
Flotek Industries
Cloud Peak Energy
Daily
Close % Chg
$29.50
$1.85
$15.76
$8.55
$17.80
$15.87
$53.50
$13.28
$2.20
$21.55
$9.90
$5.81
$10.00
$20.67
$3.96
$10.57
$13.13
$12.50
$4.84
$4.38
16.3
15.6
11.9
8.9
8.9
8.2
7.9
7.7
7.3
6.7
6.5
5.8
5.8
5.8
5.6
5.4
5.4
5.0
5.0
4.8
Losers
Progenics Pharma
SCANA Corp
eHealth Inc
Era Group Inc
Aaron's Inc
Avon Products
Cross Country Hlth
HealthEquity Inc
QuinStreet Inc
Mercury Systems Inc
US Concrete Inc
Cubic Corp
Spectrum Pharma
Cytokinetics Inc
Macerich
Ulta Beauty Inc
Myriad Genetics Inc
Griffon Corp
Aerovironment Inc
Granite Constr
Daily
Close % Chg
$5.64
$42.38
$17.85
$9.50
$37.08
$1.98
$13.54
$43.69
$8.74
$49.06
$81.85
$57.85
$18.21
$7.70
$63.29
$216.14
$32.48
$21.05
$53.73
$63.32
–8.6
–7.4
–6.0
–5.2
–4.9
–4.8
–4.5
–4.4
–4.3
–4.1
–4.0
–4.0
–3.8
–3.8
–3.7
–3.7
–3.7
–3.7
–3.5
–3.4
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
$3.0115
$3.4900
$57.99
$1,246.90
$2.83
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6400
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.34
0.45
0.80
1.49
3.66
5.39
4.25%
Bank Prime
1.25%
Federal Funds
1.55%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.80%
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.14%
10-year note
Yield: 2.39
2-year note
Yield: 1.82
5-year note
Yield: 2.16
6-month bill
Yield: 1.43
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.42%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
Unregulated bitcoin surges in first day of futures trading
Price going up ‘despite
fears by many of the
bubble popping’
BY
T HOMAS H EATH
Bitcoin prices surged Monday
after futures contracts for the
cryptocurrency began trading
Sunday evening on CBOE Global
Markets, the first traditional platform serving the currency.
Bitcoin futures contracts
opened at $15,000, and 890 contracts were traded in the first two
hours and 15 minutes Sunday evening, according to the Chicagobased CBOE. The number of contracts had grown to 3,200 by
around noon Monday.
CBOE reported two trading
halts overnight of CBOE Bitcoin
Futures (XBT) because of heavy
demand. One halt lasted two minutes, the other for five, according
to a CBOE spokesman. There were
no trading halts Monday.
“We are very pleased with the
results so far,” said Michael Mollet, director of product development at CBOE. “The trading has
been orderly. We hit a couple of
our circuit-breaker halts, but
those were due to price movement
in futures and not due to any
systems issues. We halted like our
rules said we would and opened
back up.”
Bitcoin values skyrocketed
more than 15-fold in 2017, and the
digital currency has been on a
tear, topping $17,000 a coin last
week before settling back around
$15,000.
It has risen $5,000 in the past
week.
The currency was back trading
around $17,300 at 4 p.m. Monday,
a 12.6 percent increase in 24
hours.
The CBOE Futures Exchange
(CFE) daily settlement price for
January bitcoin futures was
$18,545 when the market closed
Monday.
Bitcoin has become part of the
KIN CHEUNG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A man uses a bitcoin ATM in Hong Kong. Bitcoin is the world’s
most popular virtual currency. It is not tied to a bank or
government and allows users to spend money anonymously.
national conversation, dominating Wall Street, the financial press
and its broadcast arms. It even
was included in a “Saturday Night
Live” skit on Saturday.
“Despite fears by many of the
bubble popping, so far the price is
going up,” said JR Lanis, an attorney with Drinker Biddle. “The demand seems to be real. It is beyond just technologist speculators. You now have institutional
investors participating in the
market and keeping the price
high. We will see if that continues.”
As bitcoin goes mainstream, industry observers say people
should be cautious about investing.
“Digital currencies are volatile
and the prices can go up and
down,” Brian Armstong, chief executive at digital currency exchange Coinbase, said in a blog.
“Due to the rapidly changing price
of digital currencies, some customers may not have sell limits
that are sufficient relative to the
value of total digital currency they
are storing on Coinbase. Sell limits are one of the many measures
Coinbase takes to protect client
accounts and assets.”
Bitcoin was created by an unknown person in 2009 under the
alias of Satoshi Nakamoto. It can
be used to buy merchandise
anonymously without a middleman and involving lower or no
fees and no banks.
The currency is traded on “bitcoin exchanges,” where people can
buy and sell using various currencies. Bitcoin is a product of something called “blockchain technology,” and is stored in digital wallets that exist in the cloud or on
people’s computers.
The currency is unregulated,
and its future is uncertain. No one
owns the bitcoin network. It is not
tied to any government or country.
The larger CME Group has announced its intention to trade bitcoin in the next few days. Nasdaq
will begin trading the futures in
2018.
Monday’s bitcoin trade “is an
excellent sign for the digital currency industry,” said Jay Blaskey,
digital currency specialist at BitIRA, which helps people purchase
bitcoin for retirement accounts.
“What is interesting from our perspective is the volume being transacted as shown on a number of
websites, including CoinMarketCap.com. The 24-hour volume
trading over the past week has
remained remarkably consistent.”
thomas.heath@washpost.com
Verizon to stream NFL games online Apple buys smart music app Shazam
BY
B RIAN F UNG
Football fans who want to
watch National Football League
games online are about to catch a
big break. Starting next year,
they’ll be able to watch virtually
all live games, including the upcoming playoffs, on the Web — no
matter which Internet provider
or wireless carrier they have.
The news was announced
Monday by Verizon as it sealed a
deal with the NFL for an estimated $2 billion over the next five
years. The move highlights the
telecom giant’s pivot toward digital media and online advertising
amid massive changes in the TV
and Internet industries.
Monday’s deal makes it possible for Verizon to connect customers of even rival Internet providers with must-see content
hosted on websites that Verizon
owns — such as AOL, Yahoo,
Yahoo Sports and go90, the telecom giant’s proprietary online
video app.
The agreement between Verizon and the NFL will let football
fans stream their local team’s
games, as well as nationally televised games and league highlights. Games that air on Mondays, Thursdays and Sundays are
covered under the deal. Even the
Super Bowl will be widely
streamed to anyone with an In-
Telecom giant’s deal
allows viewers to watch
regardless of provider
ternet connection, Verizon said.
Before the deal, watching NFL
games online could be difficult.
Internet audiences were limited
to viewing games on select days of
the week — as in the case of
“Thursday Night Football,” which
was streamed exclusively on Twitter in 2016 and then on Amazon a
year later. (Amazon chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos also owns The
Washington Post.) Or football
fans could become customers of
Verizon, which enjoyed the
broadest freedom to put games
online but whose rights did not
extend to customers of AT&T or
other carriers and home Internet
providers.
The focus on mobile and highly
trafficked websites underscores
how Verizon is trying to build a
broad-based entertainment empire, aiming to match traditional
distributors of sports programming as well as advertising titans
such as Google and Facebook.
“Wireless carriers and the
growing variety of pay-TV providers all want the same access for
their customers,” said Jeff Kagan,
an independent media and technology analyst. “This is setting up
a growing war, a battle between
providers.”
Live sports continues to be one
of the few attractions propping
up the cable bundle — the legacy
product that such companies as
Comcast and Spectrum depend
on for revenue. As more Americans have shifted to streaming
alternatives, the business model
supporting the traditional bundle has buckled, and many consumers say that live sports is the
only thing keeping them tied to
their cable subscriptions.
By making professional football games widely accessible online for the first time, Verizon
may be beginning to chip away at
that argument for keeping cable.
The NFL is the country’s biggest
professional sports league, raking
in $14 billion in the 2016 season.
Other professional leagues, such
as Major League Baseball, have
taken steps to expand the online
streaming of their games.
But football is still just a slice of
the overall market for live sports,
meaning there’s a whole wide
world of sports rights for Internet
providers, tech giants and cable
companies still to fight over.
brian.fung@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
BY
H AYLEY T SUKAYAMA
Apple on Monday confirmed it
has bought Shazam, the music
app that can identify a song by
hearing just a snippet of it. The
acquisition boosts Apple’s position in the music world and
advances its artificial intelligence
efforts.
Shazam, launched in 1999,
claims that at least 1 billion people have downloaded its app and
used it to identify songs at least
30 billion times. Its service was
one of the first AI products to be
used by a broad audience. As
Apple faces other tech giants in
this increasingly competitive arena, analysts say Shazam could
add significant value not only
with its own service but also by
making Apple’s AI products —
namely Siri — smarter about
music.
“We are thrilled that Shazam
and its talented team will be
joining Apple. Since the launch of
the App Store, Shazam has consistently ranked as one of the
most popular apps for iOS,” Apple
said in a statement Monday. “We
have exciting plans in store, and
we look forward to combining
with Shazam upon approval of
today’s agreement.”
Shazam confirmed the acquisition in a statement of its own,
which seemed to open the possi-
Service can identify
a song by hearing just
a fragment of it
bility that the service would continue after the acquisition. “Shazam is one of the highest-rated
apps in the world and loved by
hundreds of millions of users,
and we can’t imagine a better
home for Shazam to enable us to
continue innovating and delivering magic for our users,” the
statement said.
Apple did not share further
details about the agreement.
TechCrunch reported that the
deal is valued at $400 million and
that Snap and Spotify were also
potential buyers.
Music is an important part of
Apple’s business, particularly as
the company prepares to launch
its HomePod smart speaker. The
speaker was originally slated for
release this year, but Apple said
last month that it would delay its
debut until early next year.
The tech giant also continues
to build out Apple Music, its
subscription streaming music
service. Apple Music has roughly
30 million subscribers and gives
users access to an on-demand
library of songs, plus recommen-
dations and radio stations.
The purchase also dovetails
with Apple’s interest in augmented reality — blending the digital
world with the real one. Shazam
was a pioneer in audio identification. But it has also developed
visual recognition technology,
which lets smartphone users scan
a logo or code to bring up digital
content on their phones. Shazam
has partnered with companies
including Target and Disney on
advertising campaigns that use
this technology.
The acquisition is similar to
one that Spotify, which leads
Apple in the streaming music
market, made in 2014 when it
purchased a music intelligence
firm called The Echo Nest. The
Echo Nest creates technology
that generates music recommendations. Some saw the Shazam
acquisition as an answer to that
deal.
“Shazam is Apple’s answer to
Spotify’s Echo Nest,” wrote music
industry analyst Mark Mulligan
in a blog post. “Now Apple will be
hoping that Shazam will provide
it with the tools to start playing
catch-up. And that’s not even
mentioning the user acquisition
potential Shazam could have
when it switches to exclusively
pointing to Apple Music. Game
on.”
haley.tsukayama@washpost.com
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
New CDC head faces questions about financial conflicts
BY L ENA H . S UN
AND A LICE C RITES
atlanta — After five months in
MELISSA GOLDEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Brenda Fitzgerald, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says that she has been following the directions of ethics
officials at the Department of Health and Human Services regarding investments that she is legally obligated to hold.
“Any particular thing that is a particular conflict, we have people who will step in
and do that little tiny piece.”
Brenda Fitzgerald, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
gia’s public health chief in 2011,
Fitzgerald championed early
child development, tobacco control and obesity prevention. She
has been criticized for accepting
funds from the Atlanta-based
Coca-Cola Foundation for a
childhood obesity program.
Her husband, Thomas Fitzgerald III, is an emergency medicine
physician. The couple live in
Carrollton, about 60 miles west
of Atlanta.
During a 36-minute interview
with The Washington Post — one
of only a few interviews she has
given since taking the job — in
the conference room outside her
office at the CDC’s sprawling
headquarters in Atlanta, Fitzgerald said she has spent most of her
first three months listening and
learning about the agency. She
said she is strictly abiding by
what ethics officials have directed.
Financial disclosure forms
show that she and her husband
have combined assets worth
$3.8 million to $16 million. A
48-page document shows that
the couple’s portfolio has included a wide variety of health-care,
pharmaceutical, food and tobacco holdings through companies
and investment funds that, for
the most part, are widely traded.
“My husband and I, you know,
we have worked for 30 years,” she
said, noting her time in the
private sector. “And, you know,
this is our retirement accounts.
And so we have a diversified
portfolio.”
She and her husband have
holdings in two limited-liability
companies they are not able to
divest because of legal and contractual obligations that are not
spelled out in her ethics agreement, dated Sept. 7, two months
after she was appointed.
Those companies invest in two
other entities: Greenway Health,
a health information technology
company, and Isommune, a biotech start-up focusing on early
cancer detection, according to
the agreement.
Fitzgerald says she will “continue to be alert” to sell or
transfer those holdings in the
future. But until then, she is
required to recuse herself from
“many particular matters” in
cancer detection and health information technology, including
electronic health records and
software to help medical practices manage revenue, the agreement states. The document does
not list additional specifics.
Murray’s letter says Fitzgerald
has an “apparent conflict with
regard to opioids” and, specifically, to state-based electronic
databases known as prescription
drug monitoring programs, or
PDMPs. These databases contain
information on controlled-substance prescriptions dispensed
by pharmacies and prescribers
and are used to track opioid use.
Her ethics agreement does not
mention opioids or PDMPs. But
the recent White House report on
combating drug addiction and
the opioid crisis recommends
more support and funding for
incorporating PDMPs with electronic health records and increased use of electronic pre-
scribing, both of which are components of Greenway Health.
Greenway Health was listed
among 20 prescribing software
vendors working with Ohio’s prescription drug monitoring program during a CDC town hall
teleconference for state and local
officials in July. The event, titled
“Promising Interventions to Improve Prescribing Practices
Within States,” included talks
from CDC officials and presentations from Ohio and Oregon
officials.
Fitzgerald has also agreed to
avoid participating in government business involving her husband’s consulting company,
Thomas E. Fitzgerald III MD
Inc., or any of his clients.
In the interview, Fitzgerald
said she has no recusals regarding opioids or prescription drug
monitoring programs. She added
that any potential conflicts on
her part will be handled by
others at the agency. “Any particular thing that is a particular
conflict, we have people who will
step in and do that little tiny
piece,” she said.
A CDC spokeswoman later issued a clarification. “Dr. Fitzgerald is able to speak about PDMPs
as a tool in the opioid response,
and she will continue to speak
about the opioid public health
emergency in general,” Katherine
Lyon-Daniel wrote in an email.
Don Fox, acting director and
general counsel at the Office of
Government Ethics during President Barack Obama's administration, reviewed Fitzgerald’s financial disclosure and ethics
agreement and the CDC’s response at The Post’s request.
The wording suggests that
HHS ethics officials “have concluded that right now, she has to
recuse herself from dealing with
a particular policy or strategy on
either PDMPs or on the opioid
crisis,” Fox said in an interview.
“The important thing here is
what the ethics officials are not
saying,” he added. “They’re not
saying she can work on anything
to do with PDMPs or the opioid
crisis.”
Based on his federal government ethics experience, he said it
was unusual that “you would go
ahead and appoint someone who
had significant parts of the job
that they were unable to do, and
where there is no visibility as to
how long that situation would
persist.”
The CDC has a budget of about
$7 billion and more than 12,000
employees working around the
globe on everything from food
and water safety to heart disease
and cancer to infectious-disease
outbreak prevention.
At her all-staff meeting Nov. 17,
Fitzgerald alluded to her low
profile and explained that she
had been learning about the
agency and holding one-on-one
meetings with staff members.
She also outlined a plan to
streamline programs around a
common focus within four major
areas: noninfectious disease, infectious disease, public health
science and public health service.
Unlike other Trump administration officials who have tried to
clear their agencies of longtime
staffers, Fitzgerald has made few
changes among the senior staff at
the CDC. She hired her former
chief of staff at the Georgia
Department of Public Health and
a new acting director in the
CDC’s Washington office. But
Anne Schuchat, a highly regarded CDC veteran who served as
acting CDC director after Frieden’s departure in January, remains the principal deputy.
Fitzgerald said she has been
impressed by the passion of CDC
scientists, their rigorous pursuit
of science and the world-class
work done there. Referring to
scientists researching the neglected tropical illness known as
Guinea worm disease, she said,
“There are people who have studied that one worm for 30 years,
and I don’t mean that derogatorily.”
But deep pursuit of science
can result in silos that slow down
the ability to respond to new
lena.sun@washpost.com
alice.crites@washpost.com
Jonathan O’Connell and Steven Rich
contributed to this report.
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
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S1560 3x10.5
office, President Trump’s new
director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has
been unable to divest financial
holdings that pose potential conflicts of interest, hindering her
ability to fully perform her job.
Brenda Fitzgerald, 71, who
served as the Georgia public
health commissioner until her
appointment to the CDC post in
July, said she has divested many
stock holdings. But she and her
husband are legally obligated to
maintain other investments in
cancer detection and health information technology, according
to her ethics agreement, requiring Fitzgerald to pledge to avoid
government business that might
affect those interests. Fitzgerald
provided The Washington Post
with a copy of the agreement.
Last week, Sen. Patty Murray
of Washington, the senior Democrat on the Senate committee
that oversees the CDC, wrote that
Fitzgerald is raising questions
about her ability to function
effectively.
“I am concerned that you cannot perform the role of CDC
director while being largely recused from matters pertaining to
cancer and opioids, two of the
most pervasive and urgent
health challenges we face as a
country,” Murray wrote.
By her reading of the ethics
agreement, Murray wrote, Fitzgerald is unable to engage in “key
matters relating to cancer,” the
second-leading cause of death in
the United States. Murray said
Fitzgerald may also be unable to
respond to the opioid crisis, “given your apparent conflict with
regard to opioids” and, specifically, with state-based electronic
databases used to track and monitor the use of opioids.
In an interview, Fitzgerald dismissed those concerns, saying
she was following ethics rules
laid out by the Department of
Health and Human Services,
which oversees the CDC. While
her ethics agreement requires
her to recuse herself from “many
particular matters” in cancer detection and health information
technology, those recusals are
“very limited,” she said.
“I’ve been assured that I can
participate in broad policy work,”
Fitzgerald said. “I’ve done everything the ethics office said that I
should do.”
The ethics issue comes amid
broader questions about Fitzgerald’s leadership at the agency, a
critical bulwark against disease
that has been targeted for deep
budget cuts by the Trump administration. Congress has restored
most funding for next year. But
over the next two years, the
CDC’s work helping other countries detect and control disease
outbreaks is slated to fall dramatically, with ground staff reductions of about 80 percent.
Since
her
appointment,
Fitzgerald has made few public
statements, even while visiting
Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin
Islands after back-to-back hurricanes struck the Caribbean. She
waited 133 days before holding
her first agencywide staff meeting, on Nov. 17. And in early
October, the CDC had to cancel
her first scheduled appearance
before Congress, on the opioid
epidemic, because she had not
finished shedding financial assets that could pose a conflict of
interest, a process she has since
completed, aside from the remaining investments questioned
by Murray.
Murray has also complained
that Fitzgerald has on at least
three occasions sent deputies
rather than appear herself to
testify on the federal response to
the opioid crisis at congressional
hearings alongside the heads of
other government agencies.
Fitzgerald’s relatively low profile is in sharp contrast to that of
her predecessor, Tom Frieden.
Frieden testified frequently on
Capitol Hill, led regular media
briefings on public health issues,
from obesity to Zika, and was a
prominent public face of the
fight against infectious diseases
in the United States and abroad.
Frieden constantly checked
messages and often answered
emails while talking on the telephone. CDC researchers said it
was not unusual for him to call
them directly, prompting some
to ask whether he was too deep
into the weeds.
“Frieden was, at heart, a scientist, and [Fitzgerald is] a clinician, and there is a difference
between the two,” said one senior
CDC official, who requested anonymity because officials are prohibited from making such judgments publicly.
An obstetrician-gynecologist
for 30 years, Fitzgerald served as
a major in the Air Force and ran
unsuccessfully for Congress
twice in the 1990s. Named Geor-
health threats that require working together between areas of
expertise, she said. One of her
priorities will be to “reach across
the entire agency” to improve
communication within the CDC
and to the broader public.
Fitzgerald defended her decision not to use her Caribbean trip
to deliver public-health messages. “I went to Puerto Rico to do a
job,” she said. “I just think when
we do routine work, we don’t
necessarily send out a press release.”
Supporters inside and outside
the agency describe her as engaged and personable and someone who asks good questions.
“When you talk to her, she’s very
there, and she is very smart,” the
senior CDC official said.
Fitzgerald, who likes to be
called “Dr. F,” prefers to get
in-person briefings, is more comfortable in small groups and has
asked staff members not to interrupt her during her lunch break,
officials said.
Fitzgerald is viewed by some
senior CDC officials as more
attuned to politics than Frieden
was. Given the polarized climate
in Washington, the official said,
“that may be a really good thing
for a CDC director right now.”
In an email, Frieden said that
Fitzgerald’s approach appears
reasonable and that she has “put
excellent people in key positions.” But he added: “The key
issue for CDC will be whether it
has the budget support from the
Administration and Congress to
continue protecting the United
States, and whether it continues
to have scientific independence.”
Of her potential conflicts of
interest, he said: “My impression
of Dr. Fitzgerald is that she is
committed to serving the American people, whether she is directly involved or delegates to the
excellent staff at CDC. I am
optimistic these issues will be
resolved and that the agency will
continue protecting the American people from health threats.”
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Uphold net neutrality
EDITORIALS
A hasty, sloppy repeal
Revamping Obamacare’s individual mandate as part of the tax bill is unwise.
O
everyone to join the insurance pool.
Striking the mandate endangers insurance markets because fewer young and healthy people would
buy into the system. Insurers would raise premiums
to offset this effect, driving more people out of the
market and potentially leading to even higher premiums over time. The scale of the potential damage is a
matter of hot debate. But the prospect of more
uncertainty and further-weakened health-care markets might scare more insurers out of the Obamacare
system. If Republicans are set on repealing this
important element of Obamacare, they should at
least have ready a replacement policy designed to
achieve similar effects, spurring the young and
healthy to buy insurance and balance out the pool.
Instead, they have a bill that Sens. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.) negotiated
that would restore for two years subsidy payments to
insurers participating in Obamacare, payments that
were halted at Republican insistence. Restoring these
payments could lower premiums for insurancebuyers in some states. But in many places regulators
have found ways to effectively restrain premiums in
the absence of the federal payments, so temporarily
Away from
freedom
restoring them would in fact not help as many people
as one might have imagined. Also in the bill are some
permanent regulatory reforms, but their effects are
still a matter of uncertain speculation.
Ms. Collins also pointed to a proposal she hashed
out with Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.), which would
provide money to help insurers pay for very high-cost
patients. With the federal government bearing more
risk, insurers could lower premiums and attract
more customers. Unfortunately, the bill would not
devote enough money to this “reinsurance” program,
and the funding would dry up after two years.
To be clear, each of these bills is worth passing on
its own merits. But trading them for the permanent
loss of the individual mandate is a bad exchange. If
the reinsurance plan were larger and perpetual,
Ms. Collins would have a better argument. If
Republicans had spent months examining the effectiveness of the mandate, waited for a new assessment from the Congressional Budget Office and
drafted a stand-alone bill that included replacement
policies, they would have more credibility in making
such a large and risky change in the Obamacare
system. But this is not what happened.
I loved Bloomington, Ind., Mayor John Hamilton’s
(D) statement in his Dec. 8 op-ed, “No city would
pass this tax bill,” that the proposed federal tax bill, if
done at a smaller scale, “would never survive a local
city council discussion.”
But it just might if the mayor and council were
dependent on local businesses and wealthy local
families for their positions and possible future
employment. And if those entities didn’t really need
or care about the welfare of the undereducated, the
poor or anyone else, what is going on in Washington
would be going on in Mr. Hamilton’s city as well.
Craig Hoogstra, Washington
Lawmakers in Poland embrace
anti-democratic changes.
A
Rethinking Robin Hood
forcing TVN24 to adopt a pro-government line, or
else be sold or shut down.
Poland’s actions clearly violate the democratic
norms of the European Union, and its ruling commission has begun a disciplinary process that could, in
theory, lead to fines or the loss of voting rights. But
both E.U. and Polish leaders know those actions are
likely to be stymied; they must be taken by a consensus of the bloc’s 28 members, and Hungarian strongman Viktor Orban, who is guilty of the same offenses,
will object. Some European officials have talked
about trimming E.U. budget funds for Poland. That
might get the attention of Mr. Kaczynski, who has
long been hostile toward the union but wants to keep
its cash coming.
Mr. Kaczynski is not an accountable ruler. He
declines to take a government job, instead shuffling
subordinates in and out of the prime minister’s office.
He does value Poland’s traditionally strong alliance
with the United States and has courted President
Trump, who visited Warsaw in July. Mr. Trump had
nothing to say then about the rule of law or media
freedom. If he remains silent now, Poland’s counterrevolution will be further encouraged.
A journalist’s life hangs in the balance
E
and family, and eked out a meager living in the United
States operating a food truck in El Paso. Nonetheless,
after years of pleadings and postponements, this past
summer a federal immigration judge denied his
asylum claim; an appeal was rejected in November.
Last week, he seemed on the verge of deportation
when an 11th-hour stay was issued by the Board of
Immigration Appeals.
As he awaits his fate in a remote Texas jail,
Mr. Gutierrez, 54, remains convinced of the peril he
faces if deported to his native country. “My life
depends on this [appeal],” he said by telephone in a
news conference organized Monday by the National
Press Club. “I’m terrified to set foot in Mexico.”
The judge who denied asylum in the case, Robert S.
Hough, pointed to an absence of documentary and
testimonial corroboration of Mr. Gutierrez’s claim.
The woman who relayed word of the alleged death
threat did not come forward; neither did Mr. Gutierrez’s former boss at the newspaper for which he
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Tolls: HOT or not?
Regarding the Dec. 8 Metro article “As commuters
fume, lawmakers urge suspension of ‘outrageous’
tolls”:
I’m relieved to see the outrageous new tolls on
Interstate 66 have gained the attention of some Virginia politicians. I hope they also turn their focus to the
impending Interstate 395 high-occupancy-toll lanes,
which will create even more chaos on our region’s
roads.
Currently the high-occupancy-vehicle restrictions
are in place only during peak travel times, but unlike
the I-66 HOT lanes, the 395 version will include 24/7
tolling. While creating a new option for solo drivers to
use the HOV lanes during peak hours, it will make
them pay for something they’re currently getting for
free during non-peak hours. This will mean fewer cars
in the southbound HOV lanes at 3 p.m. every day, for
worked in Chihuahua. Much of Mr. Gutierrez’s case
comes down to his word.
Nonetheless, the judge’s cut-and-dried application
of the law fails to take into account conditions in
Mexico generally and the peril faced there by journalists in particular. It’s not surprising that Mr. Gutierrez
cannot recover copies of his articles, written more
than a decade ago for a regional newspaper. Nor is it
unusual that witnesses are reluctant to come forward, given the fear with which many Mexicans
regard the security forces.
As a U.N. report published this month concluded,
citing the deaths, disappearances and attacks on
dozens of journalists tallied by Mexico’s Human
Rights Commission, “The data . . . presents a picture
for the situation of journalists in Mexico that cannot
be described as other than catastrophic.” Against that
background, it seems cavalier to dismiss the threat
Mr. Gutierrez faces should he be deported to Mexico.
He should be granted asylum.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
example, and more cars in the regular lanes.
It’s clear that Virginia has rushed headlong into
these HOT-lane projects with the assumption that
what seemingly worked for Interstate 495 is a one-sizefits-all solution for every roadway. I don’t think its
assumptions will mesh well with reality.
Andy Walko, Springfield
I fail to understand the angst over the Interstate 66
tolls. Until last Monday, if you were a solo driver, you
were banned from I-66 during rush hour. Now solo
drivers have the option to use the highway, for a price.
Instead of whining about the tolls, why can’t the solo
drivers just return to their previous routes or try
carpooling or, heaven forbid, public transit? Lowering
the tolls will only return I-66 to the parking lot it was.
Pam Kincheloe, Manassas
News pages:
MARTIN BARON
Executive Editor
CAMERON BARR
Managing Editor
EMILIO GARCIA-RUIZ
Managing Editor
TRACY GRANT
Deputy Managing Editor
SCOTT VANCE
Deputy Managing Editor
BARBARA VOBEJDA
Deputy Managing Editor
George F. Will didn’t say “trickle down” in his Dec. 7
op-ed, “A tax plan worth a try,” though he is more of a
Reaganite than he admits. Thus “how changed tax
incentives will affect corporations’ and individuals’
decisions” is the key to the Republicans’ tax “wager”
that he described, and that is tantamount to trickle
down.
Wasn’t this a smoothly stated argument implying
that without the GOP’s tax bill, Social Security and
Medicare will be invaded, curtailed or decimated?
How does the GOP defend taxing graduate students’
financial aid as ordinary income? Who paid for the
education of those members of Congress who now
would tax the constituents of our educational future?
Draconian are such GOP reprisals, directed against
President Barack Obama’s intelligent humanism.
In our government the highwayman has defrocked
Robin Hood in the hierarchy of America’s favorite
English folk tales. The History.com feature “The Real
Robin Hood” reports: “In 14th-century England,
where agrarian discontent had begun to chip away at
the feudal system, [Robin Hood] appears as an antiestablishment rebel.” Today, this would be met with a
high alert, perhaps leading to building border walls,
expanding safety plans or raising ethnic bans. Who
will write the stanzas describing the 2017 demise
of “taking from the rich to give to the poor,” as
symbolized by Robin Hood and his band of Merry
Men in Sherwood Forest? No less talent than that of
Mr. Will, for perpetuating and palatizing such mythical feasts as voodoo economics and Reaganomics, will
be required.
Gerald Cooper, Norfolk
Mr. Franken’s punishment
Deportation to Mexico could mean death for Mr. Gutierrez.
XCLUDING COUNTRIES at war, few places
are as dangerous for journalists as Mexico,
where 73 members of the profession have
been killed since 2010, including at least
11 this year. Drug cartels and organized crime, as well
as corrupt government security forces, have played a
role in the carnage, which has forced some journalists
into hiding and others to flee the country. Impunity is
the rule; few of the murders are solved.
Among those who fear for their lives is Emilio
Gutierrez, who, with his then-teenage son, crossed into
the United States in 2008 after writing critical stories
about abuses committed against civilians by the Mexican army in prosecuting its war on drugs in Chihuahua, then Mexico’s most violent state. Mr. Gutierrez’s
hurried departure was prompted by the news, conveyed to him by a friend with contacts in the security
forces, that a military officer had ordered him killed.
Mr. Gutierrez’s account is credible. By leaving
Mexico, he sacrificed his home, livelihood, friends
In his Dec. 1 Washington Forum essay, “No, the
FCC is not killing the Internet,” Federal Communications Commission commissioner Brendan Carr argued that alarm over net neutrality repeal is overblown because the FCC’s “Restoring Internet Freedom” order, scheduled for a vote on Thursday,
simply returns the Internet to the way the FCC used
to treat it.
This is flatly untrue.
The order does invoke the previous Title I law, but
it brings no net neutrality rules with it. None. It
bucks 22 years of consensus under Republican and
Democratic FCC chairmen that Americans have a
right to access all legal content and the FCC has a
duty to enforce that right. At every stage, including
the “four freedoms,” the 2005 Internet policy statement, and the 2010 and 2015 open Internet orders,
the FCC reaffirmed its role as steward of open
Internet principles.
FCC Chairman Ajit Pai now is taking the unprecedented step of abandoning that decades-long duty
by eliminating the cop on the beat. Internet service
providers will now have the unfettered ability to
control the Internet. Mr. Pai will kick authority over
to the Federal Trade Commission, which is not an
expert rulemaking agency and can act only after
harms occur.
The Restoring Internet Freedom order restores
nothing and is a willful abdication of the FCC’s
historic duty to protect consumers and the public
interest.
This march to folly should be abandoned.
Anna G. Eshoo, Washington
The writer, a Democrat, represents
California’s 18th District in the House.
Why the tax bill succeeds in D.C.
TOM TOLES
GENERATION ago, Poland led the struggle
to replace totalitarianism in central Europe
with liberal democracy. Now, unfortunately,
it has joined the vanguard of a counterrevolution that would dismantle the core institutions of a
free society. In the past few days, its right-wing
nationalist government has struck major blows
against judicial independence and independent media. It appears to believe that neither the European
Union nor the United States has the means or will to
hold it accountable — and it may be right.
The first step by the ruling Law and Justice party
was the passage through the lower house of Parliament on Friday of laws that would radically change the
composition of the Supreme Court. The retirement age
for judges would be lowered from 70 to 65, compelling
perhaps 40 percent of the more than 80 sitting members to step down — unless the president, a Law and
Justice partisan, gave them an exemption. Meanwhile,
the body that nominates new judges would be changed
so that a majority of its members would be chosen by
Parliament, rather than by other judges.
A report by the Venice Commission of the Council
of Europe rightly concluded that the law, expected to
be quickly approved by Parliament’s upper house,
would “enable the legislative and executive powers to
interfere in a severe and extensive manner” in the
courts. Among other things, Law and Justice would
be able to appoint a majority in a new Supreme Court
chamber judging electoral matters.
The second strike came Monday, when a government-controlled media authority leveled a $420,000
fine on the country’s most important independent
news broadcaster. Its offense was covering a protest
demonstration earlier this year. That follows a dubious $30 million tax bill the television channel,
TVN24, was handed in July. The station, owned by
Scripps Networks Interactive, is one of the largest
U.S. investments in Poland. But Law and Justice
leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski, following a playbook
pioneered by Vladimir Putin, appears intent on
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
F ALL the votes for the Senate GOP tax bill,
those of Sens. Susan Collins (R-Maine), John
McCain (R-Ariz.) and Lisa Murkowski (RAlaska) were perhaps the most puzzling.
These lawmakers killed an Obamacare repeal bill
last summer because it was hastily drafted and
poorly designed. Yet they each just endorsed a tax
bill that contains a hastily drafted and poorly
designed repeal of a key piece of Obamacare, the
law’s “individual mandate” requiring all Americans
to carry health-care coverage.
When pressed Sunday, Ms. Collins insisted that
repealing the mandate would not damage healthcare markets, in large part because she received
assurances from congressional leaders and the
White House that two bipartisan fix-Obamacare bills
would come up next. But Ms. Collins is wrong in her
certainty that these bills, if passed, would fill the gap
that repealing the individual mandate would leave.
The Obamacare system guarantees that insurers
cannot turn away sick and old people. To keep costs
down, this, in turn, requires that young and healthy
people do not refuse to buy insurance until they need
care. The individual mandate is meant to spur
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In her Dec. 8 op-ed, “Is Al Franken’s punishment
fair?,” Ruth Marcus was right to question the
fairness of Sen. Al Franken’s (D-Minn.) punishment.
As she wrote, “If senators have the patience to let the
ethics process proceed in the [Bob] Menendez case,
why not with Franken?”
The cases are different in that Sen. Bob Menendez
(D-N.J.) was indicted on federal corruption charges,
including bribery, fraud and making false statements; Mr. Franken faces accusations of sexual
harassment. But there’s another big difference: Many
governors have the power to replace senators from
their home states who resign or are removed. The
governor of Mr. Franken’s home state of Minnesota is
a Democrat; the governor of New Jersey at the time of
Mr. Menendez’s indictment was a Republican.
So the question emerges: Do Democratic senators
consider sexual harassment — even the buffoonish
sort allegedly practiced by Mr. Franken — more
serious than political corruption, or is this a matter
of expediency? And if the former, will they remove a
Democratic senator facing harassment allegations
even if he could be replaced by a Republican? Not
doing so would look like hypocrisy. Doing so would
unconscionably weaken the opposition to a government that many of their constituents regard as a
threat to the country.
Gary Norton, Charlottesville
Contrary to the Dec. 8 editorial “Mr. Franken
steps down,” the senator’s resignation suggests that
as a society we have lost the ability to address serious
issues in a rational and proportionate manner.
Societies under stress, such as ours, experience a
kind of mass hysteria that distorts how they deal
with threats, whether real or perceived. Examples
such as the Salem witch trials and McCarthyism
come to mind.
It is important that safeguards be strengthened so
that no one is importuned for sexual favors in the
workplace, fears violence or suffers a hostile work
environment. Basic fairness, however, should have
allowed Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) to respond to the
accusations. The facts and their seriousness could
have been evaluated in the Senate Ethics Committee
and ultimately by his constituents. Instead, we
are on a slippery slope in which puritanical zeal is
likely to become the political weapon of choice.
Stuart Endick, Burke
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
Yes, the Senate can
investigate Roy Moore
BY
R OBERT L . W ALKER
I
f Roy Moore wins Tuesday’s special
election for U.S. Senate in Alabama, after he takes the oath of
office the Senate will have the
authority to begin an ethics investigation into allegations that Moore engaged in nonconsensual or assaultive
sexual conduct going back to the
1960s. No rule or precedent would
stand in the way of the Senate investigating and adjudicating the allegations against Moore through its bipartisan Select Committee on Ethics. No
rule or precedent would prevent the
full Senate from imposing a sanction
commensurate with any proven offense. If he is elected and seated, the
Senate will have the power — if it
chooses to exercise it and if the evidence established through the ethics
process supports the outcome — even
to expel Moore.
The Senate may not “exclude” Moore
— that is, refuse to swear him in and
seat him — if he is elected. The Supreme Court stated in Powell v. McCormack in 1969 that, “in judging the
qualifications of its members” to be
sworn and seated “Congress is limited
to the standing qualifications prescribed in the Constitution.”
Whether Moore would keep his seat
once sworn in would be subject to the
Senate’s application of a much more
open-ended standard of conduct. Any
ethics inquiry concerning Moore
would examine whether he engaged in
“improper conduct which may reflect
upon the Senate.” This is a flexible,
expansive standard applied, as the
Senate Ethics Manual states, to improper conduct “so notorious or reprehensible that it could discredit the
institution as a whole, not just the
individual, thereby invoking the Senate’s inherent and constitutional right
to protect its own integrity and reputation.”
But before senators reach that step,
they would have to confront two fundamental questions. First, does the
Senate have jurisdiction over pre-Senate conduct? Yes, it does. In the expulsion case of Sen. John Smith in 1808,
Sen. John Quincy Adams described the
Senate’s power to expel as “discretionary” and as being “without any limitation other than that which requires a
concurrence of two-thirds of the votes
to give it effect.” More recently, in
2008, the Senate Ethics Committee
addressed a complaint alleging misconduct by Sen. David Vitter prior to
his Senate service. The timing of the
alleged misconduct was one of several
factors in the “totality of the specific
circumstances” cited by the Ethics
Committee in its public letter dismissing the complaint; but, by also explicitly reserving its right to reopen the case
should new evidence arise, the committee was careful not to foreclose its
jurisdiction over pre-Senate allegations.
The second, and harder, question is
whether the Senate should exercise its
ethics authority in a matter where the
allegations were known to the voters
before they cast their votes. This is
where an understanding of regular
order in a Senate ethics case becomes
essential.
No matter how thoroughly the allegations about Moore have been reported in the media, the factual record put
before the public through the press is
not as extensive, reliable, credible or
tested — from all sides — as the record
developed by the Senate Ethics Committee in a preliminary inquiry and,
possibly, in a public adjudicatory hearing would be. The Ethics Committee
would subpoena all relevant witnesses
and materials, and the Senate could
compel compliance with these subpoenas through contempt proceedings.
Witnesses before the committee — in
the non-public preliminary inquiry
phase and in any later, trial-like, adjudicatory phase — would be deposed or
would testify under oath. Although not
foolproof, the power of a potential
perjury prosecution to elicit truthful,
reliable and complete testimony
should not be minimized. At any adjudicatory hearing, witnesses would be
subject to exhaustive questioning by
committee members and committee
counsel; counsel for Moore would have
a full opportunity to cross examine
each witness.
Finally, the finders of fact in a Senate
ethics inquiry — the six members of the
Ethics Committee — would have the
same exhaustive record before them
before deciding whether to charge
Moore with any violation and, if the
matter gets to the adjudicatory phase,
whether any charge is proven by clear
and convincing evidence. Among the
electorate on Tuesday, the extent and
sources of knowledge about the allegations against Moore will vary widely
from voter to voter.
If Moore is elected, his fellow senators will have the discretionary authority and power to commence ethics
proceedings against him as soon as he
takes his seat among them.
The writer, an attorney with the D.C. firm
Wiley Rein, is a former chief counsel and
staff director of the Senate and House
ethics committees.
RICHARD COHEN
Kelly must be exhausted
I
n August, President Trump asked
for a certain newspaper clipping,
thus throwing the White House
into the Trump version of Defcon 2. Chief of Staff John F. Kelly
assigned two aides to investigate how
the clip made its way to the president
without being “cleared.” These aides,
anonymous but clearly brave, determined that Keith Schiller, a former
New York City police officer and
Trump’s longtime body man, had
slipped the “contraband newsprint” to
the commander in chief. Soon, Schiller
was gone from the White House. Kelly,
a retired Marine general but an American sniper at heart, had picked off
another.
This account of the “contraband
newsprint” comes from Sunday’s New
York Times and was written by three of
the paper’s top reporters. Their reporting brings to mind Napoleon on
St. Helena — his newspapers coming
three months late and his days so
empty that he took four hours’ worth of
baths. Trump’s newspapers arrive
promptly, but the rest of his reading is
censored and, instead of taking fourhour baths, he devotes at least as much
time to watching TV.
We also learned from the Times that
Trump consumes about 12 Diet Cokes
per day. A new book by former Trump
campaign staffers added other culinary details. On the road, the future
president typically ate for dinner two
McDonald’s Big Macs, two Filet-O-Fish
sandwiches and a chocolate shake.
Because the McDonald’s delivery system is both quick and direct, this diet
poses a greater threat to the nation
than the North Korean nuclear program.
But it is not, apparently, what the
president eats that concerns Kelly. It is
what he sometimes reads. Understandably, Kelly is constantly on the
alert for a presidential friend slipping
Trump a highly unauthorized news
article. This happened over Thanksgiving at Mar-a-Lago. Some of Trump’s
guests “passed him news clips that
would never get around Kelly’s filters,”
the Times reported.
These guests were probably Trump’s
old pals from New York and Palm
Beach, billionaires with a nose for the
oncoming socialist apocalypse who
fear the president does not know how
crooked Hillary Clinton really is or that
the press is still insisting that Trump
lost the popular vote or maintaining
that it was his voice on that “Access
Hollywood” tape when, upon repeated
hearing, it just could be Arnold
Schwarzenegger.
Trump himself begins the day commendably early. (It’s the farmer in
him.) The Times says he rises at 5:30
and turns on the TV. For some reason,
he watches CNN — monitoring fake
news, no doubt — and then self-medicates with “Fox & Friends.” Later, in an
updated version of “hate week” from
George Orwell’s “1984,” he clicks on
MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.” His friends
suspect the program’s critical approach “fires him up for the day.”
Thus stoked, our commander in
chief sallies forth to meet with probably the most illustrious collection of
aides since Groucho hooked up with
Chico and Harpo. The group includes
Ivanka Trump, of the world of fashion;
Jared Kushner, late of New York real
estate; Hope Hicks, formerly of the
Trump Organization; and, for some
reason, H.R. McMaster, the national
security adviser. What he knows about
real estate or fashion is not at all clear.
Then the president resumes a day of
strenuous TV viewing. The Times interviewed 60 advisers, associates,
friends and members of Congress for
the article and reported that Trump
spends four to eight hours a day
watching cable news. Since the shows
are mostly about him, he must recognize cable news as an extension of his
old reality show, only he cannot fire
Kim Jong Un. He can, however, insult
him.
At the White House, Trump controls
the remote control. This, it turns out, is
the true “football” of this administration — comparable to the one that
accompanies the president everywhere and contains nuclear codes. “No
one touches the remote control except
Mr. Trump and the technical support
staff,” the Times reported.
I confess that by the end of the
article, I found myself feeling sorry for
the harried Kelly. He spends 14 hours
of his day at his task, reining in a White
House staff that once felt free to just
drop in on the Oval Office, possibly
interrupting “Hannity” or something
equally important. As the Times also
reported, Kelly not only monitors
Trump’s phone calls but sometimes
listens in. I finished the article no
longer thinking of Napoleon in exile
but of Jack Valenti, Lyndon Johnson’s
aide, who said he slept better at night
“because Lyndon Johnson is my president.”
It’s a wonder Kelly sleeps at all.
cohenr@washpost.com
CATHERINE RAMPELL
A tax report
that reads
like fan fiction
U
FRED SWEETS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Simeon Booker at an interview in Washington in 1982.
EUGENE ROBINSON
Remembering
the ‘man from Jet’
T
he great Simeon Booker, one of
the bravest journalists of our
time, faced dangers far worse
than a petulant president’s social media feed. Booker refused to be
cowed — and ultimately helped change
the nation. His life’s work should be a
lesson to us all about the power of truth
to vanquish evil.
Booker died Sunday at 99. At the
height of his career, few could have
imagined he would live so long.
As Washington bureau chief for Chicago-based Johnson Publications, publisher of the newsweekly Jet and the
monthly magazine Ebony, Booker went
to the Deep South to cover the most
tumultuous events of the civil rights
movement — life-threatening work for
an African American journalist.
In 1961, he accompanied the Freedom Riders on a bus journey from
Washington to New Orleans, testing
whether Southern states would comply
with a federal mandate against segregated interstate travel. In Alabama, the
protesters were firebombed once and
beaten twice by white mobs before
federal officials, acting on orders from
attorney general Robert F. Kennedy,
flew them to safety.
Booker covered the seminal 1965
march from Selma to Montgomery. He
was there when Alabama state troopers
savagely attacked demonstrators with
billy clubs and police dogs — images
that shocked the nation and helped
shift public opinion outside of the
South from indifference to outrage.
As The Post reported in its obituary,
Booker returned many times to the
South to report on the struggle: “For his
safety, he sometimes posed as a minister, carrying a Bible under his arm.
Other times, he discarded his usual suit
and bow tie for overalls to look the part
of a sharecropper. Once, in an incident
retold when Mr. Booker was inducted
into the National Association of Black
Journalists’ Hall of Fame in 2013, he
escaped a mob by riding in the back of a
hearse.”
Booker was The Post’s first full-time
black reporter, hired by publisher Philip Graham, who gave him an admonition similar to the one Brooklyn Dodgers General Manager Branch Rickey
had given to Jackie Robinson: “If you
can take it, I’m willing to gamble.”
Washington was a segregated city in
1952 — Booker recalled that when he
went out to cover a robbery, “they
thought I was one of the damn holdup
men” — and ultimately, he found the
work unsatisfying. In 1954, Johnson
Publications offered him the bureau
chief job, and he took it. He kept it for
five decades.
Booker is best known for the story he
wrote for Jet about Emmett Till, the
Chicago teenager brutally slain in Mississippi in 1955 for allegedly whistling
at a white woman. In Chicago at the
time, Booker tracked down Till’s mother, Mamie Till-Mobley, and was with
her when Till’s mutilated body arrived.
Booker wrote: “Her face wet with
tears, she leaned over the body, just
removed from a rubber bag in a Chicago funeral home, and cried out, ‘Darling, you have not died in vain. Your life
has been sacrificed for something.’ ”
Jet photographer David Jackson
took photographs of Till’s brutalized
body that remain among the most
searing and indelible images of the
century.
Booker’s death comes at a moment
when journalism and the civic necessity it seeks to provide — truth — are
under assault. President Trump and his
amen chorus are cynically trying to
delegitimize news organizations whose
work they find inconvenient. They seek
to deny the existence of objective, ascertainable fact. Trump goes so far as to
use his Twitter feed, with its millions of
followers, to attack individual reporters and demand they be fired.
Journalism’s response must be to tell
the president — politely, with all due
respect to the office — to stuff it.
There are facts. There is truth. We try
our best to get everything right, but of
course we sometimes make errors.
When we do, we must correct them
promptly and fully — and move on. The
only “fake news” is the self-serving
rubbish Trump tries to peddle through
insistent repetition. No matter how
often he lies, it is our job to call him on
his lying. Every single time.
One of the media’s most important
roles in our democracy is to hold public
officials accountable, and if they don’t
like it, too bad. When they lash out at us
viciously and unfairly, as Trump so
often does, we should remember all the
brave journalists who have faced much
worse.
More than once, Simeon Booker had
to escape from Southern towns where
white vigilante mobs were on the prowl
to “get that man from Jet.” We should be
able to withstand a few nasty tweets.
eugenerobinson@washpost.com
GLOBAL OPINIONS
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/global-opinions
The Polish government
latches on to ‘fake news’
If you have become numb to President
Trump’s constant attacks on the media, if
you have lost interest in which networks
he currently considers to be “fake news,” if
you have grown tired of hearing him call
journalists “enemies of the people” — well,
that’s unfortunate, because plenty of others are paying attention. Around the
world, dictators and would-be authoritarians have picked up his attitude and his
terminology. From Syria to Venezuela to
Burma, authoritarians now dismiss legitimate criticism as “fake news.” The Libyan
government has denounced a CNN report
on human trafficking as “fake news”: If the
U.S. president disdains the network, why
should anybody else listen? And, with
Trump at his side, Philippines President
Rodrigo Duterte recently dismissed a gaggle of reporters as “spies.”
Now the Polish government has been
emboldened to take a step in the same
direction. On Monday, the national media
council slapped an extraordinary fine on
TVN24, the largest and most important
private television channel in the country.
Declaring that the channel had been “promoting illegal activities and encouraging
behavior that threatens security,” the council demanded 1.5 million zlotys
($420,000). In a brief statement, the council related the charge to the channel’s
coverage of anti-government demonstrations a year ago. No details were provided.
But the message was perfectly clear: Private media should be very, very careful
about broadcasting any opposition to the
government.
If the message was clear, the nuances
were interesting. For TVN24 is owned by
Scripps Networks Interactive, an American company, which is in turn owned by
Discovery Communications. Its investment in the TVN group of channels is the
largest U.S. investment in Poland, worth
well over $1 billion. Rumors of government
pressure on the company have been swirling for months, and this is the second time
the company has been fined. In July, the
government demanded an unexpected
$30 million in curiously calculated “back
taxes.”
The Polish government may be hoping
that Discovery gets cold feet, and sells the
channel to one of its friends. It may also be
counting on the U.S. government to stay
out. After all, the American president
doesn’t like independent television reporters either.
The Polish authorities may have also
been sending a message. For the decision
was taken on the very day that the ruling
party swapped its dour, angry prime minister, Beata Szydlo, for a slicker, smoother
replacement, Mateusz Morawiecki. If anyone needed it, the TVN24 fine was proof
that the change is superficial. Morawiecki
may speak English better than his predecessor, but pressure on the courts, journalists, the civil service and the army will
continue.
It all makes for an odd conundrum for a
U.S. government whose own messages to
Europe in general, and to Poland in particular, have been far less clear. Does the
Trump administration back the Polish
government in its attack on a television
station because it also hates “fake news”?
Or does the Trump administration back an
American company being threatened
abroad?
— Anne Applebaum
nable to produce an actual analysis
of its tax plan, the Trump administration has resorted to cooking the
books.
Again.
White House officials and Republican
lawmakers have repeatedly claimed that
their tax plan will unleash such tremendous
growth that the bill will pay for itself.
Of course, no one remotely credible backs
this up. Not the Tax Policy Center, not
the Tax Foundation (which uses relatively
rosy assumptions about growth), not
the Penn-Wharton Budget Model, not Goldman Sachs, not the usual gang of Republican economists.
Not even the Joint Committee on Taxation, Congress’s nonpartisan internal scorekeepers on such matters, has found that the
bill would be self-financing. Its most recently available analyses determined that even
after accounting for economic effects, both
the Senate and House bills would still cost
about $1 trillion over the coming decade.
And that’s assuming many of the tax cuts
actually expire after a few years, as the bills
are currently written. If you take out the
budget gimmicks and instead assume these
tax cuts will be extended by future Congresses — as Trump officials and House
Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) have promised — the price would be closer to $2 trillion, according to the Committee for a
Responsible Federal Budget.
Faced with such dismal assessments of
their party’s signature policy proposal,
Trump officials have scrambled to find
counterevidence.
In November, Treasury Secretary Steven
Mnuchin claimed that the administration
had already published a study proving that
the bill paid for itself, though Treasury could not actually point to any
such study. If anything, the department had
removed research from its website that
proved inconvenient for its claims about
trickle-down economics.
But finally, on Monday, Treasury produced a report that purported to support
the administration’s conclusions.
Well, “report” is a strong word. It was, in
fact, a one-page news release containing no
actual analysis or data, just fairy dust.
Rather than calculating the growth rate
produced by the Senate tax plan, or any tax
plan at all, the release merely . . . assumed a
big growth rate. Then it said that if that
growth rate happened to materialize, the
plan would produce a whole lotta revenue.
Enough to plug a big budget hole, even!
Which is a pretty big if.
“If I can assume I could serve at 150 mph, I
could derive the conclusion that I could
compete with Roger Federer,” Harvard economist and former Obama administration
official Lawrence H. Summers cracked on
Twitter.
Treasury assumes the economy would
grow at 2.9 percent, which is much higher
than what officials at the Federal Reserve and the Congressional Budget Office expect under current law. (Both project
closer to 1.8 percent.) In other words, the
Treasury one-pager suggests an enormous
boost from the Trump agenda.
This 2.9 percent figure is pretty specific,
though, giving it a veneer of precision. How
exactly did the Treasury Department
choose that number from all the possible
numbers in the world, you ask?
It lifted it from a forecast in the President’s Fiscal 2018 Budget, a sloppy, errorriddled document that came out in May.
There are, oh, a few problems with this
sourcing.
First, that budget was released before a
tax bill was ever even written. The president’s budget did vaguely describe a taxreform proposal, but it departed in critical
ways from the ones the Senate and the
House passed.
Second, the 2.9 percent figure in the
president’s budget was supposed to reflect
the effects of the president’s entire policy
agenda, including infrastructure development, welfare reform and deregulation. In
other words, it includes the economic effects
of policy proposals that are not only unrelated to taxes but also don’t even yet exist.
Despite months of teases, the Trump
administration has released neither an infrastructure plan nor a comprehensive welfare-reform package. Deregulation has, of
course, begun, though you’d be hardpressed to find a deregulatory action so far
that — whatever its effects on the public’s
well-being — is likely to have major effects
on national economic growth. (Does anyone believe that allowing airlines to continue hiding baggage fees, or even rescinding
the Clean Power Plan, will trigger an economic renaissance?)
And third, even those comprehensive
economic growth effects may be plucked
from thin air.
As I wrote in February, in putting together estimates for the budget, Trump transition officials directed staffers to assume
growth rates of about 3 percent, and then
backfill the other numbers in their models
to get the final numbers to add up.
To be clear, none of this is how policy
projections usually work.
Sure, previous administrations have selectively cited studies or assumptions that
favor their pet projects. But this kind of
stuff? It’s fan fiction, not economics.
crampell@washpost.com
C OR R E C TI ON
Josh Rogin’s Dec. 11 op-ed, “A new
stealth threat from China,” incorrectly
identified Glenn Tiffert. He is a visiting
fellow at the Hoover Institution.
A16
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. TUESDAY,
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DECEMBER 12 , 2017
ADVERTISEMENT
“ THE PEBBLE MINE IS THE
WRONG MINE IN THE WRONG PLACE.”
T
he question of whether to build a massive open pit
giant Rio Tinto abandoned the project in 2014. Anglo-
copper and gold mine in the heart of the planet’s
American withdrew its 50 percent stake in the project
largest wild sockeye salmon fishery has a simple
in 2013, taking a $500 million loss in the process.
answer. The Pebble Mine is the wrong mine in absolutely
Mitsubishi Corporation sold out in 2011.
the wrong place, and the answer is no.
Understanding the project’s risks, and at the request
As proposed, Pebble would produce billions of tons
of Alaskan tribes, the Environmental Protection Agency
of mining waste in the headwaters of the streams and
pledged to use the federal Clean Water Act to protect
rivers that flow into Alaska’s Bristol Bay. The 40 to 60
Bristol Bay. Unfortunately, the last remaining company
million sockeye salmon that return each year to spawn
in the Pebble Limited Partnership sued to stop the
in the Bristol Bay watershed support the largest
Clean Water Act process, falsely claiming the EPA
commercial salmon fishery in the world, fueling
was acting outside of its authority.
a $1.5 billion economy and 14,000 jobs.
LANDSCAPE © ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM; WOMAN KISSING SOCKEYE SALMON © MICHAEL MELFORD/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE; BRISTOL BAY FISHING FLEET ©ACCENTALASKA.COM/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; BROWN BEAR © MARK EMERY/ALASKASTOCK.COM
This year, before the lawsuit was resolved but within
Scientists recently completed a thorough, four-year
months after the Trump Administration began, the EPA,
review of the mine and its impacts on the watershed.
now under the direction of Administrator Scott Pruitt,
The study found that the mine would destroy pristine
agreed behind closed doors to reverse course, settling
wetlands, that roads and pipelines would slice through
the Pebble Partnership’s lawsuit and abandoning the
salmon-spawning streams, and that toxic chemicals
science-based Clean Water Act process intended to
would threaten Bristol Bay’s waters.
protect the Bristol Bay region and its fishery.
Alaska Native communities have assessed the mine’s
We oppose the Trump Administration’s efforts to sweep
impacts on their livelihoods and way of life and have
nearly a decade of science and Clean Water Act review
reached the same conclusions. Commercial fishermen
under the rug. The record is clear: The Pebble Mine
in Alaska say that “large-scale mineral development
is fundamentally flawed — it’s the wrong mine in the
activities present serious risks for the Bristol Bay salmon
wrong place.
fishery.” They are among the 65 percent of Alaskan voters
who believe the Pebble Mine poses an unacceptable
And the choice is simple. Protect the greatest salmon
threat to the state’s fishing industry.
fishery on the planet. Protect Alaskans and the Bristol
Bay watershed.
Even the mining companies initially backing the Pebble
Mine have concluded it’s a losing proposition. The mining
Signed,
William D. Ruckelshaus
William K. Reilly
Bruce Babbitt
Christine Todd Whitman
EPA Administrator,
Presidents Richard Nixon
and Ronald Reagan
EPA Administrator,
President George H.W. Bush
Secretary of the Interior,
President William J. Clinton
EPA Administrator,
President George W. Bush
www.nrdc.org/savebristolbay
KLMNO
METRO
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
High today at
approx. 1 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
40 48 44 33°
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°
°
50°
Precip: 25%
Wind: W
10-20 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
RE
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
“Robust” or just
ridiculous? It’s time again
to survey area commuters
about their treks. B3
Charlottesville officials
deny a permit for a rally
on the anniversary of the
Unite the Right protest. B5
Clarence Beavers was the
last surviving member of
the nation’s first black
parachute unit. B6
Student: Sitting for pledge led to ejection
Va. teacher disciplined
after allegedly throwing
15-year-old out of class
BY
D EBBIE T RUONG
A Fairfax County teacher who
allegedly disciplined a high
school student for refusing to
stand for the Pledge of Allegiance
breached system rules and will
not be returning to the classroom, school district administrators decided following an investigation.
The episode was reported to
officials at Centreville High
School by the student, who said
the teacher yelled for him to
stand and then yanked him from
his seat when he wouldn’t.
“The incident at Centreville
High School is unacceptable behavior by a classroom instructor
and directly violates an existing
and
long-standing
[Fairfax
County Public Schools] policy,”
Fairfax School Superintendent
Scott Brabrand said in an
emailed statement.
Brabrand’s statement did not
identify the student or teacher,
but the student said in an interview that the teacher is Richard
Ferrick. An attorney for Ferrick,
James K. Freeman, said in an
email that the “allegations are
without merit” but declined to
comment further.
The student, Eric Trammel,
recalled that the November
morning began like so many
before, with a familiar morning
ritual at Centreville.
Students around Trammel
rose for the Pledge of Allegiance.
But the sophomore did as he has
for more than a year: He remained seated.
This time, Ferrick ordered the
15-year-old to rise, Trammel reSTUDENT CONTINUED ON B4
Eric Trammel, 15, said he sits
during the pledge to protest
unequal racial treatment.
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Federal
probe
sweeps
in 47
DNA samples collected from relatives can aid in the identification of missing migrants
INFORMANT AIDED
IN GANG TAKEDOWN
Virginia groups tied
to killings, robberies
BY R ACHEL W EINER
AND C LARENCE W ILLIAMS
PHOTOS BY KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
FINDING A WAY TO HELP
BY
M ARIA S ACCHETTI
when she disappeared in 2013.
Their hopes rest with the Colibri
Center for Human Rights, a Tucsonbased nonprofit organization that is
traveling across the country to collect
genetic material from family members
of the missing.
Thousands of migrants have died in
drownings and of heat exposure and
other causes over the past two decades
after slipping into the United States
from Mexico illegally. More than 1,600
T
he relatives carried photographs, identification cards,
anything that might help find
the missing. Inside a redbrick church in the nation’s
capital, in a small room near a sparkling Christmas tree, they opened their
mouths so workers could scrape a
sample of their DNA.
Three brothers, in black jackets and
matching jeans, sought the fate of a
sister who vanished in the Arizona
desert two years ago. Maryland housecleaner Olga Gonzalez was searching
for her daughter Mirna, who was 31
MIGRANTS CONTINUED ON B2
Plea to the federal government
Montgomery resolution urges protection
of undocumented immigrants. B2
In the pre-dawn Wednesday,
hundreds of federal agents and
police officers waited on alert outside 20 homes in the Washington
area for the clock to hit 6 a.m.
Once the hour arrived, law enforcement officers simultaneously shattered the morning quiet as
they knocked down doors and
tactical teams tossed flash-bang
grenades in several homes to arrest targets of a months-long investigation into the activity of a
gang and another armed group
and gun and drug trafficking.
“All 20 houses got hit at the
same time,” said Special Agent in
Charge Thomas L. Chittum III of
the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives’ Washington field office. “Those are
GUNS CONTINUED ON B4
McAuli≠e
acts to ease
teacher
shortage
Va. governor signs order
to let aspiring educators
get into classrooms faster
BY
TOP: Using a suitcase they call their mobile office, Colibri Center for Human Rights workers, seated from left, Robin Reineke, Mirza Monterroso and
Arturo Magaña, and Ben Clark wrap up a day of collecting 19 DNA samples in Washington. ABOVE: A binder maintained by the human rights
organization allows people to record their thoughts and feelings about the lost loved ones they are seeking.
A daily refrain amid misconduct accusations: Who will be next?
Who will it be
today?
Every morning
we brace
ourselves before
looking at our
Petula
news feeds.
Dvorak
Which beloved or
respected public
figure will be accused of
harassing or assaulting women?
On Twitter and Facebook, the
outraged, depressed and weary
are pleading: “Please, please
don’t let it be _____,” inserting
the name of a favorite movie
star, admired politician, holy
man or even the boss we adore.
Because it’s starting to feel as if
it could be just about anybody,
right?
This week’s Advent Calendar
of Horrors opened to show chef
Mario Batali, who is admired for
his cooking but adored for his
jolly demeanor and ridiculous
footwear. He apologized for
behavior that included grabbing
women’s breasts and buttocks.
“Although the identities of
most of the individuals
mentioned in these stories have
not been revealed to me, much
of the behavior described does,
in fact, match up with ways I
have acted,” Batali wrote in a
statement to The Washington
Post. He has taken a leave of
absence from his restaurants
and been removed from his role
on ABC’s “The Chew.”
And last week it was the
respected U.S. Appeals Court
Judge Alex Kozinski, who has
now been accused by six former
clerks or junior staffers of
inappropriate sexual conduct,
including showing two of them
porn in his chambers.
Before that, it was “Today”
show star and everydad Matt
Lauer, who was promptly fired,
and high-minded television host
Charlie Rose, also shamed and
exiled.
Three men have resigned
from Congress amid allegations
of sexual misconduct: Sen. Al
Franken (D-Minn.), Rep. John
Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) and Rep.
Trent Franks (R-Ariz.), who
asked two former female
staffers to bear his child as a
surrogate.
Meanwhile, an accused
groper who once bragged on an
“Access Hollywood” tape about
grabbing women by their
crotches occupies the Oval
Office. In between calling all his
accusers liars, President Trump
has been urging the voters of
Alabama to elect to the Senate a
man who allegedly preyed on
teenage girls when he was a
prosecutor in his 30s.
Who’s next?
Let’s call this the #NotYouToo
part of the movement.
DVORAK CONTINUED ON B3
D EBBIE T RUONG
In a bid to curtail Virginia’s
teacher shortage, Gov. Terry
McAuliffe took emergency action
Monday to get aspiring instructors into classrooms faster by
streamlining education requirements.
McAuliffe ordered the Virginia
Board of Education to implement
an emergency regulation that
would allow the state’s public colleges and universities to start offering undergraduate students a
major in education by March 1.
“The teacher shortage is a
growing crisis that we have to
stop and reverse if we are serious
about the commonwealth’s economic future,” McAuliffe said in
an emailed statement. “High
quality teachers are the key to
unlocking the potential in our
children.”
Most public colleges and universities in Virginia require that
teaching candidates first complete a bachelor’s degree in a
subject area such as math, science
TEACHERS CONTINUED ON B5
B2
EZ
Grant lets
nonprofit
expand
services
MIGRANTS FROM B1
bodies were found by the Border
Patrol alone in the past five years.
Many are unidentified.
Law enforcement officials who
normally investigate cases involving missing people — and
ensure that relatives’ DNA samples are sent to an FBI database
in case human remains are found
— often refuse to take reports on
migrants, partly because it is
unclear which agencies along the
nearly 2,000-mile border have
jurisdiction. In other cases, family members of the missing reside
outside the United States or are
also undocumented and afraid to
come forward.
Until a year ago, Colibri’s main
focus was to take reports of
missing people, create their own
database, and help families
search. But late last year the
organization received a threeyear, $865,000 grant from the
Howard G. Buffett Foundation to
start collecting DNA in spaces
loaned by churches and other
nonprofit groups nationwide.
“It’s ridiculous that it’s taken
them so long to get sampled for
DNA,” said Robin Reineke, the
executive director of the Colibri
Center, sitting in the lobby of the
church in the District’s Takoma
neighborhood. “It’s very painful
to lose a family member, but at
least they would know.”
Colibri calls relatives from its
database and schedules appointments to take DNA at locations
the group does not disclose publicly, to protect people’s privacy.
The group has held clinics in San
Francisco, Los Angeles, New
York, Tucson, Phoenix and Washington. More are planned for
Chicago, Seattle and the Carolinas.
They have collected more than
370 samples that led to the
identification of 32 people this
year, with 21 findings still pending final approval.
When they visited the District
in early December, they got 19
more DNA swabs. Tests are free
and confidential, and the names
of those tested are not shared
with police.
Buffett, the son of Warren
Buffett, one of the world’s
wealthiest men, said he is funding the effort because families
deserve to know what happened
to their missing relatives — regardless of how they crossed the
border.
“It’s past the point whether
they entered our country illegally
or not,” said Buffett, who, in
addition to directing the foundation, is also sheriff of Macon
County, Ill. “If you lost a son or a
daughter, or a mother, cousin,
and you have no idea if they’re
alive or not. . . . People need to
know that.”
Among those searching for
answers at the D.C. church were
the three brothers from Central
America, who said they last
heard from their sister in a phone
call that lasted less than 30
seconds. She was lost, and her
cellphone battery was running
out.
Arturo Magaña, a Colibri
worker, asked a series of questions in hopes of narrowing their
search.
Did she wear sneakers? Converse?
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: Mauro Lopez, a Webb
County sheriff ’s deputy,
recovers a skull found along a
ranch road in Laredo, Tex., in
2016. Unidentified remains are
sometimes buried in pauper’s
graves in Texas. In Arizona,
many bodies have been
cremated. LEFT: Mirza
Monterroso, DNA project
manager, collects a sample from
a Guatemalan woman whose
son is missing.
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Did she have tattoos? Earrings?
“You never ask that,” the oldest
brother said with a sad smile.
“You never think they’re going to
get lost.”
In a gentle voice, Magaña told
the brothers that they may never
recover their sister’s complete
remains. Many bodies have been
buried in pauper’s graves in Texas; in Arizona, many bodies have
been cremated.
Finally, Magaña asked them to
open their mouths. He scraped
the inside of their cheeks with a
plastic stick resembling a nail
file.
The samples would be sent to a
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
private laboratory in Lorton, Va.,
to be compared with samples
provided by the Pima County
medical examiner’s office in Arizona, the main government agency working with Colibri to identify remains. The lab also has a few
cases from Texas — a state that
accounts for more than half the
deaths discovered in recent years
— and they hope to include more
in the future. Bruce Anderson, a
forensic anthropologist at the
Pima County office, said Colibri
and other nonprofit groups are
“doing something that in a perfect world should be done by the
government.”
Gonzalez, the housecleaner
who came to the D.C. church, said
she paid $2,000 about three
months after her daughter disappeared to a caller who claimed to
have her. After she made the
payment, she never heard from
the man again. And so she came
to the church to have her cheek
scraped.
“I feel I am going to have an
answer,” said Gonzalez, who is
also from Central America.
Karen Flores, a young immigrant who lives in New Jersey,
told a panel at the United Nations in October that she could
not get law enforcement to help
her when her mother, Nancy, a
Peruvian citizen, disappeared in
2009 in Arizona after crossing
the border.
She hired a private investigator, posted fliers and interviewed
witnesses herself.
When Colibri came to New
York this year, Flores gave a DNA
sample. Last week, the Flores
family learned that the DNA
matched a cranium found in
Arizona. They wept, Reineke
said, when she delivered the
news.
“But they kept saying, ‘Thank
you,’ ” Reineke said. “ ‘Finally, we
have answers.’ ”
maria.sacchetti@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Montgomery set to pass resolution defending undocumented immigrants
Symbolic legislation
asks federal government
to let them stay in U.S.
BY
R ACHEL S IEGEL
Though the legislation may be
largely symbolic, members of the
Montgomery County Council are
expected to take a stand Tuesday
in favor of county residents who
under the Trump administration
could lose the deportation protections they have enjoyed for
years.
The administration has indicated that it will end temporary
protected status (TPS) for some
immigrants who fled war or
natural disaster to find a haven
in the United States. The administration also plans to end the
Obama-era program known as
Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals, or DACA, that allows
undocumented
immigrants
brought to the country as children to legally remain in the
United States. Both groups could
face deportation if their status is
revoked.
The all-Democratic council is
expected to unanimously pass a
resolution to urge the federal
government to allow the immigrants — thousands of whom live
in Montgomery County — to
remain in the country.
Although the resolution carries no legal authority, lawmakers and activists say it is an
important symbolic step for the
state’s most populous jurisdiction and one of its most diverse.
“Without question, there is
strong support for immigrant
reform that provides a path to
citizenship, that lifts the threat
of deportation from these families in our community,” said
council President Hans Riemer
(D-At Large), who was arrested
last week alongside 200 others
demanding that Congress enact
legislation to grant DACA recipients permanent citizenship. “It’s
important in times like these for
the community to take a stand,
and that’s what we’re trying to do
with this resolution.”
There are more than 325,000
immigrants with temporary
protected status across the
country and Maryland is home
to the second-largest share, according to the resolution. Those
include about 19,800 Salvadorans with 17,100 U.S.-born children, as well as 1,900 Hondurans with more than 1,300
U.S.-born children. The program
protects them from deportation
and allows them to work legally
in the United States. Those
protections have to be renewed
by the federal government every
two years.
DACA has allowed about
690,000 immigrants — including
more than 9,700 in Maryland —
brought to the United States as
children to be shielded from
deportation and receive two-year
renewal work permits.
Gustavo Torres, executive director of CASA de Maryland, said
that even though the council
doesn’t have the power to change
federal policy, the resolution is a
way of supporting residents who
“are very scared about what’s
going to happen.”
Torres said several DACA and
TPS holders have established
businesses in the county and
have set down roots, and are
anxiously awaiting a solution
from Congress before their protections expire.
“The message from the county
is saying: You are welcome. You
are making a contribution, and
we are with you,” Torres said.
Montgomery is a liberal
stronghold where legislators and
activists have long been supportive of undocumented immigrants.
Yet there is an undercurrent of
anti-immigrant sentiment. One
of the starkest examples is Help
Save Maryland, a Rockvillebased organization that describes itself as “dedicated to
preserving Maryland’s counties,
cities and towns from the negative effects of illegal aliens.”
Some critics also say the council is wasting energy on issues
beyond its control. Mark Uncapher, chair of the Montgomery
County Republican Central Committee, said the council could
better serve the county by focusing attention on local issues such
as finding a solution to the
county’s budget shortfall.
“I’m not sure how helpful or
useful the council’s resolution is
since that’s really a compromise
that is going to need to be
worked out at the congressional
level,” Uncapher said.
Work permits for DACA recipients will expire starting March 5.
Members of both the House and
Senate are still divided over the
details behind a solution, including whether to include stricter
border protection. Last week, 35
members of the House GOP caucus urged a consensus by the end
of the year.
“There are thousands of people who live in Montgomery
County who are able to work
without fear, to live without fear
of deportation, thanks to DACA
and TPS,” Riemer said. “Unfortunately, this administration has
put a cloud over their future.”
rachel.siegel@washpost.com
VIRGINIA
Outspoken preacher launches GOP bid for Senate with an attack on Stewart
Jackson attempts to
out-insult chief rival in
contest to unseat Kaine
BY
J ENNA P ORTNOY
In announcing he will seek the
GOP nomination for U.S. Senate
from Virginia, outspoken preacher E.W. Jackson said Monday that
his chief Republican rival, Corey
Stewart, is a tax-and-spend politician who doesn’t understand the
threat the country faces from Sharia law and radical Islam.
Jackson joins Stewart and a
state lawmaker, Del. Nicholas J.
“Nick” Freitas (Culpeper), in the
Republican contest for the chance
to challenge Sen. Tim Kaine (D),
who is seeking reelection to a second term in 2018.
Out of the gate, Jackson attempted to out-insult the provocative Stewart, saying he “has had
some dealings” with the Muslim
Brotherhood, a transnational Islamic group, and “has never seen a
tax increase . . . he didn’t like.”
Jackson did not elaborate but
may have been referring to decisions earlier this year by the Prince
THE DAILY QUIZ
When locking eyes with a cute and cuddly baby,
don’t panic! Gazing into a baby’s eyes has the
following benefits, except:
A) Sync’d brain waves
B) Improved communication
C) More vocalizations in the baby
D) World domination
(Hint: The answer is in today’s Health and Fitness
section.)
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click on
“Quizzes” to enter the correct response.
William Board of County Supervisors, which Stewart chairs, to issue a permit for the construction
of a mosque in Nokesville and to
raise property taxes.
He made the comments on the
syndicated John Fredericks radio
show before holding a news conference in Chesapeake.
Reached in Alabama, where he
was campaigning for U.S. Senate
candidate Roy Moore, Stewart offered a terse response to Jackson’s
claims. “E.W. knows I’m a Catholic,” Stewart said through a
spokesman. “It’s over the top. He
must be off his meds.”
Stewart, who fashions himself
after President Trump, recorded a
Facebook live segment from Eufaula, Ala., where he admired the
town’s Confederate statue. He will
be competing with Jackson for
support from conservative evangelical voters. Last week, Stewart
got the endorsement of Jerry Falwell Jr., the influential president
of Liberty University.
Asked about that endorsement
during the radio interview, Jackson said Falwell told him that he
regretted not supporting Stewart
in the Republican gubernatorial
primary that he lost to Ed
Gillespie earlier this year.
Falwell wanted to make it up to
NIKKI KAHN/THE WASHINGTON POST
E.W. Jackson claims Corey Stewart “has had some dealings” with
the Muslim Brotherhood. Stewart said he “must be off his meds.”
Stewart in the Senate race, Jackson said.
“It’s not to say that he does not
like or would not support E.W.
Jackson, it’s just that Corey got
there first,” Jackson said, adding
he plans to speak at Liberty.
“My friend Corey is a perennial
candidate,” Jackson said. “He just
runs for everything that moves.”
The barbs come after state Republicans spent the weekend at
their annual retreat discussing
ways to rebound from the disastrous election results last month.
Jackson had planned to attend but
tweeted that bad weather prevented his travel.
Jackson dismissed Kaine — a
popular former governor and
mayor who helped deliver Virginia for Democrat Hillary Clinton last year as her running mate
— as “little Timmy Kaine” and “not
a person of gravity.”
Jackson, the GOP’s 2013 nomi-
nee for lieutenant governor, has a
history of making discriminatory
comments, such as when he suggested people who want to be referred to with gender-neutral pronouns are possessed by demons
and said gay people “are very sick
people psychologically and mentally and emotionally.”
Democrats said the campaigns
of Freitas, Jackson and Stewart
show that an extreme ideology has
taken over the state GOP.
“Jackson is notorious for his
offensive, disgusting views,” Virginia Democratic Party Chairwoman Susan Swecker said in a
statement. “Simply put, we can’t
trust someone with this twisted
worldview to fight for all Virginians in the Senate.
In the radio interview, Jackson
said the winner of the GOP primary will need to turn out an
unprecedented number of evangelical voters and promised to visit churches throughout the state.
Jackson, who is African American, also said he will court the
black vote.
Jackson ran unsuccessfully in
the GOP primary for Senate in
2012 but the following year, he
won the GOP nomination for lieutenant governor in a convention.
He lost that race in the general
2017 PostPoints Scavenger Hunt
Like the piano? Prepare to go
To the Kennedy Center for Anderson & Roe
To hear classical music and Let It Be
By The Beatles’ Lennon & McCartney.
Washington Performing Arts (WPA) will present Anderson & Roe on
Saturday, February 3 at the Kennedy Center. When will the show start?
Someone hard to buy for? Need a slam-dunk?
Give seats to a play by Felonious Munk.
The standup comic stars in a show
With The Second City from Chicago.
What reviewer refers to Nothing to Lose (But Our Chains) at
Woolly Mammoth as “a hilarious work of art”?
(Hint: See WashingtonPerformingArts.org for the answer.)
(Hint: See WoollyMammoth.net for the answer.)
EARN 5 POINTS AND A CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES. Answer our Scavenger Hunt questions, then go to washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click “Quizzes” to enter your responses.
election by 10 points to Democrat
Ralph Northam, who was elected
governor last month.
On policy differences, Jackson
called himself a fiscal hawk, while
“Corey has never seen a tax or an
increase in spending in Prince
William County that he hasn’t
liked.” He said they also differ over
the threat of “radical Islam and
sharia law.”
“My understanding is that
Corey has had some dealings with
some of the members of the Muslim Brotherhood,” Jackson said.
“If that proves to be the case, then
we’re going to clearly draw that
distinction.”
Fredericks, the radio host, noted Stewart has said blocking the
mosque would have opened the
county to litigation.
Jackson also took a jab at Freitas, suggesting he is the establishment candidate and had met with
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) — something Freitas
denies. Freitas said the only senators advising him are conservative
favorites Rand Paul (Ky.) and Mike
Lee (Utah).
Ivan Raiklin, an Army veteran,
has also filed the paperwork to run
in the GOP primary for Senate,
which is scheduled for June 2018.
jenna.portnoy@washpost.com
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
‘Robust’ or just ridiculous? Time again to survey commuters about their treks.
I like the word
Robert Griffiths
uses to describe
commuting in the
Washington area:
“robust.” It makes
John
commuting sound
Kelly's
like a rich, fullWashington bodied coffee
rather than the
hellscape we face
every time we step outside.
Griffiths is a data guy, so he
chooses his adjectives with care.
When he says “robust,” he means
complex, with lots of options,
options that weren’t around
even a decade ago. As a numbers
cruncher with the Metropolitan
Washington Council of
Governments (COG), Griffiths
spent more than 40 years
studying area commuting
patterns. He retired in 2016, but
he’s back as a consultant on a
megaproject that may be coming
soon to a mailbox near you: the
Regional Travel Survey.
The undertaking is so huge —
polling 15,000 households from
Southern Maryland to West
Virginia at a cost of $3 million —
that COG does it only once every
10 years.
The first time was in 1968, the
year of “Rosemary’s Baby” and
“In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida.” D.C.
streetcar had stopped running
six years earlier. The Beltway
had been completed only four
years earlier. A typical work
commute resembled
spermatozoa trying to fertilize
an egg: Everyone was headed to
Washington.
Back then, COG survey crews
went door to door, asking
questions in person. Today,
letters are mailed out asking
randomly selected households to
register on a website and enter
super-detailed commuting
information for the single day in
question. (COG contemplated
using a smartphone app that
tracked respondents’
movements, but the technology
isn’t quite there. Also: creepy.)
What has COG learned over
the years? Well, the average work
commute has crept up, from
about 32 minutes in the 1980s to
38 minutes the last time the
survey was done. Workers don’t
flood downtown from the
suburbs but go suburb to suburb.
Metro ridership has risen — and
then dipped. More people
telecommute.
And over the years there’s
been an increase in what’s called
“trip chaining”: tacking a
number of intermediate stops
onto a commute.
“That’s one of the ways we’ve
seen household travel adjust to
increased congestion in the
region,” Griffiths said. “[People]
METROPOLITAN WASHINGTON COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS
A Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments crew
conducts a survey in the 1960s.
have to plan their travel more
carefully and do multiple things
other than just getting between
home and work.”
And here’s a quirky fact: The
average number of daily social
and recreational trips taken by
16- to 24-year-olds dropped by
50 percent between the 19971998 survey and 2007-2008
survey.
“That’s huge,” Griffiths said.
“You don’t see declines in that
level of trip-making in these
surveys.”
So what happened? “It was
Facebook, it was email and, for
young males, it was video
games,” Griffiths said. “They
were staying home. They weren’t
traveling.”
Most of us don’t have that
option. The obvious question:
Why is D.C.-area commuting so
awful these days?
“I think part of it is our
growth has expanded at a much
faster pace than our ability to
provide the infrastructure to
support that growth,” Griffiths
said. “More and more of our
transportation dollars are going
into maintaining our existing
system, both roads and public
transit.”
The survey mailings started
going out in October and will
continue into the summer.
Respondents get a $20 gift card.
Griffiths and Kenneth Joh —
COG’s senior statistical survey
analyst, who is overseeing the
survey for the first time — start
each morning eagerly checking
how many surveys have been
completed. The preliminary
findings will be ready in early
2019. The data will be eagerly
sifted through to help with
planning.
We probably shouldn’t get our
hopes up too much.
“I think it would be virtually
impossible to eliminate traffic
congestion completely,” Joh said.
“Traffic congestion is in some
respects a sign of a strong
economy.”
That 1968 survey was
undertaken before Metro’s birth.
The 2007-2008 survey didn’t
have any questions on bikesharing or ride-hailing services
such as Uber and Lyft, the
biggest change in the robust
commuting landscape. They
simply weren’t around then.
It makes you wonder what
will be around in 2028 that isn’t
around now. Me, I’m hoping for
jet packs.
Helping Hand
Boy, wouldn’t it be nice if
homelessness wasn’t around in a
decade? Each of the partners in
The Washington Post Helping
Hand is working to get us closer
to that day.
Bright Beginnings is a
preschool that helps homeless
children in the District and their
parents. N Street Village is a
shelter and support network for
women experiencing
homelessness. So Others Might
Eat offers everything from meals
to housing to addiction services.
To read stories about how
each of these groups works —
and the people they help — visit
posthelpinghand.com. That’s
also where you can make a taxdeductible contribution.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/johnkelly.
THE DISTRICT
PETULA DVORAK
It’s hard not to feel as though all men are harassers Man charged in death
of shuttle bus driver
claims self-defense
DVORAK FROM B1
There’s a whole list of men
we’re hoping and praying aren’t
creeps, right? And a deeply
disturbing question about what
percentage of men in this
country are harassers and
predators? Is it 10 percent?
20 percent? Higher?
While the national reckoning
on sexual harassment and
assault is shocking to some, it’s
hardly a surprise to the huge
population of women who have
been betrayed by a mentor, a
caregiver, a family member or a
friend.
The numbers, after all, show
that most women — 6 out of 10
— who report being sexually
assaulted knew their attacker,
according to the Bureau of
Justice Statistics.
And sexual assault is hugely
underreported in the United
States. According to the 2015
Crime Victimization Survey
conducted by the Justice
Department, the number of
violent sexual assaults that
weren’t reported that year were
more than double the ones that
were reported.
When we talk about sexual
harassment in the workplace,
we confront the same
phenomenon of underreporting.
As the #MeToo outpouring
demonstrates, it’s way bigger
than anyone thinks.
“Common workplace-based
responses by those who
experience sex-based
harassment are to avoid the
harasser, deny or downplay the
gravity of the situation, or
attempt to ignore, forget, or
endure the behavior,” an Equal
Employment Opportunity
Commission task force on
workplace harassment reported
last year.
The folks who handled nearly
7,000 sexual harassment
complaints last year estimate
that 3 out of 4 harassment
victims never report it.
Does this all mean everyone’s
a harasser? At times, it sure
feels like it.
Some men are responding to
the onslaught of allegations by
avoiding interacting with
women in the workplace. Vice
President Pence, for instance,
doesn’t dine alone with a
woman who isn’t his wife or
attend any event where alcohol
is served without her. He’s been
ridiculed for it — the Onion
reported that Pence asked for
the removal of Mrs. Butterworth
from his breakfast table — and
justifiably so.
This rule immediately limits
women’s access to powerbrokering, networking or any
other interactions men are
allowed to have with one
another, and it turns women
into little more than tempting
sex objects.
But let’s be real about this.
Take a good look around you —
your workplace, your house of
worship, your neighborhood,
your home. For every crotchgrabber, flasher and creep to
make headlines, there are good
men who don’t harass. And who
don’t need Pence’s rule to
remain respectful of the women
around them.
They’ve been following —
perhaps unbeknown to them —
the Dwayne “The Rock”
Johnson rule.
It’s not complex, tricky or
confusing, this issue of sexual
harassment.
Simply treat every woman
you come across the way you
would treat Johnson.
Would you put your hand on
The Rock’s knee, massage his
shoulders while talking about a
work issue, ask him up to your
hotel room, fondle his behind,
lock the door from your desk or
drop your pants and show him
your junk? No?
Congratulations, it’s
#NotYouToo.
petula.dvorak@washpost.com
Twitter: @petulad
L O C A L DIG ES T
VIRGINIA
One dead in house fire
in Loudoun County
One person died in a house
fire in Loudoun County on
Sunday night, authorities said.
A person living in the home in
the 12000 block of Taylorstown
Road in Lovettsville called 911
about 8:30 p.m. Sunday. Part of
the house collapsed, and when
fire crews entered, the victim
was found inside. Officials said
Monday that the victim had not
been identified. The cause of the
fire remains under investigation.
Another fire, in the Broad Run
section of Ashburn, was caused
by a malfunctioning fireplace,
fire officials said. According to
officials, 17 people were
displaced.
— Dana Hedgpeth
THE DISTRICT
Man shot at Metro
station in Northeast
A man was shot and wounded
Monday night at the Minnesota
Avenue Metro station in
Northeast Washington.
A Metro spokeswoman said
his condition was not believed to
be life threatening.
A knowledgeable person,
speaking on the condition of
anonymity because they were
not authorized to speak publicly,
said it appeared that the man
was hit once or twice in the
lower back and may have been
on the platform when shot.
The circumstances of the
shooting were not immediately
known, but the Metro Transit
Police said they were trying to
identify two persons of interest.
— Martin Weil
Woman sexually
assaulted by driver
A woman was sexually
assaulted early Sunday in
Southeast Washington by a man
she thought worked for a car-
sharing service, D.C. police said.
The incident occurred about
4 a.m. in the 400 block of East
Capitol Street, four blocks from
the U.S. Capitol grounds and the
Supreme Court.
Police said the woman was
being driven by the man when
he pulled over. A police report
said the driver touched the
woman inappropriately and
tried to unbuckle her pants belt.
The report said the driver then
put his hands around the
woman’s neck in an apparent
attempt to choke her as she
screamed and punched back.
The woman escaped and was
treated at a hospital, police said.
Police put out a description of
the vehicle and the driver,
indicating that they did not have
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the man’s identity. The driver
was described as Hispanic, about
32 to 36 years old, with slickedback hair, thick eyebrows, and
moles or freckles on his face.
— Peter Hermann
MARYLAND
Police identify man
killed in Seat Pleasant
Police have identified a 30year-old man who was fatally
shot in Seat Pleasant on Friday.
Jerry Merritt of Seat Pleasant
was killed about 12:45 p.m. in
the 400 block of 69th Place,
according to Prince George’s
County police.
— Dana Hedgpeth
Gunfire followed
a dispute between
colleagues, police say
BY
PETER HERMANN
A shuttle bus driver who police said fatally shot a colleague
Friday at the former Walter
Reed Army Medical Center told
authorities that the victim had
moments earlier punched him
so hard that several of his teeth
fell out, according to newly filed
court documents.
The suspect, Wright Koonce,
59, who has addresses in Silver
Spring and Falls Church, said
that after he was struck, he
grabbed a .38-caliber revolver
and shot the victim as he ran
“with his back to him,” the
arrest affidavit says.
Police said Koonce then stood
over Brian Andre Gibson, 45,
and fired another shot. He reloaded his revolver but did not
fire again because the victim
was not moving, the affidavit
says.
Koonce told police that he
feared for his life and fired at
the fleeing Gibson “because he
did not know what the decedent
was going to do,” according to
the affidavit.
Koonce was charged Saturday with second-degree murder
while armed. A D.C. Superior
Court judge ordered him detained until a preliminary hearing Jan. 4.
In a statement Friday, police
had reversed the order of the
suspect’s name, erroneously
identifying him as Koonce
Wright.
The shooting occurred about
8 a.m. Friday just inside the
gated entrance to the old Army
complex on Georgia Avenue between Brightwood and Shepherd Park in Northwest Washington.
Police said in the affidavit
that Koonce and Gibson worked
for G&M Limo Service, which
shuttles workers from a parking
lot near the Georgia Avenue
entrance to a construction site.
Walter Reed is being redeveloped into a residential and retail complex. Representatives
for the limo company could not
immediately be reached for
comment.
Relatives of Koonce and Gibson could not be reached for
comment Monday. Koonce’s attorney did not respond to messages. Gibson lived in an apartment across the street from the
Walter Reed complex.
Police said without elaborating that the men had argued
about transporting the construction workers.
Koonce told detectives, according to the affidavit, that he
retreated to his vehicle in the lot
but that Gibson followed,
opened the driver’s side door
and beat him. Koonce said he
grabbed his gun, got out of the
vehicle and shot Gibson as he
fled.
The two were about seven
feet apart when the first shot
was fired, according to police.
A witness told police that he
saw Koonce walk to a guard
shack and “just stood by and
waited for the police to arrive,
without uttering any words,”
the affidavit says.
Police said Koonce was bleeding from the mouth and missing
teeth.
peter.hermann@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
Violence in the D.C. area sparked months-long drug and gun investigation
trafficking, killings, robberies
and home invasions across
Northern Virginia.
That top gang source and other
confidential informants infiltrated the crew and used cash provided by law enforcement to buy
large quantities of crack cocaine,
cocaine, marijuana and firearms
and, at times, wore recording devices to capture transactions
from the spring until the fall.
The complex effort, dubbed
Operation Tin Panda, targeted 50
people in response to a tide of
bloodshed in Prince William
County and to stop the gang’s
activity in other parts of the area.
Authorities allege the activities
have been linked to six killings
and more than 20 shooting incidents, multiple home invasions
and at least two carjackings.
Agents and officers seized
more than 70 guns before
Wednesday’s raids and over 20
more Wednesday, in addition to
thousands of dollars in cash and
illicit drugs.
GUNS FROM B1
some pretty tense moments while
you are waiting for them all to
check in.”
Hundreds of pages of court
filings detail how agents tracked
drug packages between Virginia
and California and did surveillance on men and women who are
alleged to have moved drugs
through the homes and businesses of a loose network of dealers.
The stakes were so high for one
suspected dealer that he chewed
off his own fingerprint to keep
investigators from using it to unlock his phone, court filings state.
More than a dozen targets of
the takedown appeared in federal
court in Alexandria on Monday
and were held without bond.
The cases against dozens of
defendants sprouted from information provided by a cooperating
gang member named “Platinum,”
who told law enforcement that a
Bloods-affiliated group was responsible for drug and firearm
“These 100 guns off the streets,
these particular targets off the
streets, these trigger pullers off
the streets, mean safer communities,” Chittum said.
The killings connected to the
investigation include an August
double homicide in Lorton, Va.,
stemming from a dispute over the
marijuana business; a shooting at
a hotel in Alexandria in May; a
2015 slaying in the District; and a
gang dispute in Fredericksburg
this year, according to court documents and law enforcement.
Forty people were charged in
federal court as part of the operation, along with another seven in
Virginia state courts. While many
of the accused have long felony
records, some — including Tarvell
Vandiver, identified as a highranking regional leader in the
Imperial Gangsta Bloods gang —
have none.
Platinum was not named in
court documents, but he held a
rank in the gang as “4-Star General” in charge of finances.
It was Platinum who named
Vandiver as the local disciplinary
officer and meeting organizer for
the gang, according to court records, and he pointed to Vandiver’s
stepfather, Rashourn Niles, as a
supplier of heroin, cocaine, marijuana and MDMA. Court records
show Nasiru Carew was described
as a main supplier of marijuana
and THC gummies produced in
California and shipped to a network of homes and other locations around Northern Virginia.
Investigators tracked parcels
mailed by the U.S. Postal Service
from the San Diego area, where
officials say Carew had connections, and were flagged by postal
inspectors when drugs were detected.
Platinum began cooperating
after an arrest in Maryland on
drug and gun charges, and he
recorded dozens of drug buys and
the distribution of illegal firearms, court filings show. He recorded gang meetings where Imperial Gangsta Bloods talked
about smuggling guns to New
York, the filings state.
In May, investigators followed
a shipment to an auto repair shop
in Fredericksburg, which led the
Stafford County Sheriff’s Office to
arrest Robert Evans for conspiracy to distribute controlled substances, court document say. Authorities believe he had received
packages of THC gummies and
was selling them out of the shop.
While investigating the Imperial Gangsta Bloods, agents
came across an unrelated armed
group in Prince William County
dealing large amounts of crystal
meth, disproportionately to the
D.C. gay community, and that
group became part of the takedown, according to law enforcement officials.
Court files say that defendants
used encrypted chat and video
apps for conversations. The documents said that after Evans was
arrested, he chewed off his own
fingerprint in an attempt to keep
law enforcement from using it to
unlock his cellphone.
The filings show the alleged
gang members were also flaunting guns and drugs on social media, which investigators used to
track their activities and movements. Vandiver chatted online
about selling crack, according to
the court documents, while
Carew directed the sale of THC
gummies over Instagram. One felon was charged with illegal possession of a firearm after he posted a video of himself at a shooting
range on Facebook.
Carew, Evans, Niles and Vandiver were those held without
bond Monday.
Chittum said investigators
faced two major challenges during the extended operation: taking targets off the streets as the
case unfolded and coordinating
the logistics of using more than
300 law enforcement officers and
support staff to safely strike 20
homes at once.
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
clarence.williams@washpost.com
Student says he was thrown out of class because he didn’t stand for the pledge
came one of the country’s most
polarizing sports figures when,
as a quarterback for the San
Francisco 49ers, he took a knee
during the national anthem in
protest of police violence against
black people.
Kaepernick gained renewed
attention this year after President Trump, during a campaign
rally in Alabama for Republican
Sen. Luther Strange, went off
topic and said, “Wouldn’t you
love to see one of these NFL
owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, ‘Get that
son of a bitch off the field right
now, out. He’s fired. He’s fired!’ ”
Unlike the animated national
discourse ignited by Trump’s remarks and subsequent tweets,
Trammel’s display drew little fuss
until Nov. 14, he said. It was his
second day in driver’s education
class, he said, when Ferrick spotted him sitting for the Pledge of
Allegiance during first period.
After being thrown out of
class, Trammel said, he spent 20
minutes outside in the cold before knocking and asking Ferrick
whether he could return. The
teacher allegedly refused unless
Trammel agreed to stand for the
pledge.
“This isn’t the NFL,” Trammel
recalled the teacher saying.
“This has nothing to do with
the NFL,” Trammel said he responded, adding that he explained to Ferrick that he had the
STUDENT FROM B1
called. When he refused, Ferrick
pulled Trammel by the arm and
sent him outside, the teenager
said.
“He was really angry when he
grabbed my arm,” Trammel said.
“I just never really saw it coming.”
Employees in Fairfax County
Public Schools are forbidden to
discipline students who do not
participate in the pledge, according to district policy. Students
who abstain are expected to sit or
stand quietly, the policy states.
The school district declined to
say whether the teacher was fired
because it does not publicly discuss personnel matters.
Trammel hasn’t stood for the
morning recitation since encountering the Black Lives Matter movement on Twitter during
the eighth grade. He views the
quiet demonstration as his way
of drawing attention to unequal
racial treatment and other forms
of inequality, he said.
“The country is in a very
divided place right now, and
there’s a lot of injustices around
the U.S. I feel like me sitting can
spread awareness to that,” Trammel said. “I don’t believe in
forcing other people to sit. . . .
That’s just a personal decision.”
Similar actions have captured
national attention.
In 2016, Colin Kaepernick be-
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Attorneys Maxwelle Sokol, left, and Victor M. Glasberg with their client Eric Trammel, 15. In 1943, the
U.S. Supreme Court established that students cannot be forced to recite the Pledge of Allegiance.
right to sit through the pledge.
When the teacher refused to
let Trammel return, the teen said,
he went to school administrators, who walked with him back
to class.
The administrators, whom
Trammel declined to name,
spoke with Ferrick as Trammel
returned to class and quietly
took notes. The teacher, Trammel
said, pulled him aside after class.
“He told me that our relationship had drastically changed,
that what he thought of me was
different,” Trammel said. “He
also moved me to the back of the
classroom.”
Trammel detailed the encounter in a text message to his
mother, Angela Trammel, soon
after.
“I was respectful and said it is
a right I have to sit in class and he
basically tried to say his class
rules override that,” Trammel
said her son wrote.
The mother said she was unaware her son felt so fiercely
about the Pledge of Allegiance.
“I’m pretty proud of his courage. I’m more proud that he
behaved well throughout his
courage,” she said. “As a mother, I
want Eric to know he’s going to
be protected and he doesn’t have
to make any concessions when
he’s been mistreated, ever.”
In 1943, the U.S. Supreme
Court established in West Virginia State Board of Education v.
Barnette that students cannot be
forced to recite the pledge.
The family is looking into legal
options. Victor M. Glasberg, one
of the attorneys representing the
family, described Trammel’s refusal to back down as admirable.
“In this political climate, any
time anybody stands up to say no
is important,” Glasberg said.
“Particularly when it’s done politely, with appropriate deference
and respect.”
Trammel’s father, Ernest
Trammel, stood by his son.
“He has the right to voice his
opinion and do his thing, as long
as he’s peacefully doing it,” Trammel said. “When we, as Americans, stop standing up for what
we believe is right, we basically
accept the injustice.”
Eric Trammel said he hasn’t
since encountered other issues in
his driver’s education class,
where he has an A.
debbie.truong@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Police arrest several people in pizza delivery robberies and other crimes
BY
DANA HEDGPETH
held on to the inside of the car
through the passenger-side window while still pointing the gun
at the victim, according to the
police report. He lost his grip
and fell after about a block.
Tyrone Hawkins, 16, of Southeast Washington was arrested
and charged as an adult with
armed robbery in the case, according to police. It was not clear
whether Hawkins was the one
who held on to the car door,
police said. The pizza delivery
man was not injured.
Another delivery man, who
worked for Pizza Boli’s, was
robbed about 7:10 p.m. Nov. 20 in
the Woodmont Crossing apart-
D.C. police made several arrests over the weekend, including of teenagers suspected of
robbing pizza delivery men in
various parts of the city.
Several youths robbed a Papa
John’s pizza delivery man about
10:15 p.m. Nov. 20 near Edson
Place and 47th Street in Northeast Washington, police said.
According to a police report, one
of them pulled a handgun on the
driver and said, “Turn the car off
and get out — you don’t want to
die for no pizza.”
The delivery man tried to
drive off as one of the youths
ment complex on Good Hope
Court in Southeast, police said.
Two teens — a 17-year-old and
a 14-year-old — were arrested
and charged in that case. Their
names were not released because
they are juveniles.
The teenagers are also
thought to be connected to another robbery, which occurred
around noon on Nov. 24, according to police.
In that incident, a man had
arranged to sell a Samsung
phone on a website called OfferUp. When the man arrived at the
agreed-upon spot — the 2300
block of Wagner Street SE — two
people met him. One of them
stole the phone while the other
pulled a knife, according to a
police report.
In another robbery, a man was
attacked while walking his dog at
about 9:30 p.m. Oct. 24 in the
5000 block of Ames Street NE.
According to a police report,
two men approached the dog
owner, and one of them said,
“You look like the dude who
kicked my dog.” They then started to punch and kick the man.
They stole the keys to his
Toyota Camry and drove off,
according to police. On Friday,
police said they arrested a 16year-old in that case. His name
was not released because he is a
juvenile, police said. The case is
under investigation.
Police also arrested and
charged three people in a burglary in Southeast.
Police said the burglars got
into a home about 5:20 p.m. in
the 3100 block of Buena Vista
Terrace SE near Southern Avenue SE and stole a TV and a
cellphone before they fled. Police
arrested and charged Tiffany
Foye, 40, of Southeast Washington; Shaquille Simmons, 22, of
no fixed address; and a 17-yearold girl of Southeast Washington, whose name was not released because she is a juvenile.
In another incident, police
arrested and charged a 51-yearold man from Southeast Washington in an assault.
The incident occurred about
8:40 p.m. Saturday in the 5100
block of Ayers Place SE. Police
said the victim and another person got into a fight inside a
home.
Police said the person grabbed
a knife and cut the victim. The
victim suffered injuries that
were not life threatening and
was treated at the scene, police
said.
Lawrence Leon Ellis was
charged with assault with a dangerous weapon.
dana.hedgpeth@washpost.com
D.C.
D.C.
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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
MARYLAND
Legislature plans to track harassment complaints against lawmakers, staff
Data would be compiled,
with General Assembly
briefed annually
BY
AND
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
O VETTA W IGGINS
Maryland’s legislature is set to
start tracking sexual harassment
complaints against lawmakers
and their staff members, as statehouses across the country confront mounting allegations of sexual misconduct and examine their
policies for dealing with them.
The General Assembly plans to
update its sexual harassment policy to require the legislature’s human resources director to keep
track of the number and type of
complaints and how they were
resolved. Lawmakers would be
briefed on this information every
year — but would not be given the
identities of the alleged harassers.
The changes are expected to
win approval from a legislative
policy committee meeting Tuesday, said Alexandra Hughes, chief
of staff to Speaker Michael E.
Busch (D-Anne Arundel). The
committee sets rules for the General Assembly.
“The speaker and the Senate
president have tried to be ahead of
the curve and have tried to make
sure we have as professional of a
workplace as we can,” Hughes
said. “They felt this is an important step forward.”
Currently, Human Resources
Director Lori Mathis investigates
complaints of inappropriate behavior but does not track the
number of complaints or their
outcomes or report that data to
lawmakers.
“Because of the wide array of
reporting and resolving mechanisms for alleged incidents of ha-
rassment, no agency of the MGA
maintains summary statistics of
workplace harassment reports or
complaints; nor are such summary statistics kept of sexual harassment reports,” Mathis told The
Washington Post in response to a
public-records request.
“All individual cases of harassment, including sexual harassment investigations conducted by
the MGA, are personnel matters.
No aspect of any personnel file is
available under the Public Information Act.”
People who say they have been
sexually harassed by Maryland
lawmakers or employees of the
legislature can lodge complaints
with the staffs of the presiding
officers, Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr.
(D-Calvert), or with the human
resources department.
Mathis notifies Busch and Miller when her office receives allegations against lawmakers. Busch
and Miller — who play a role in
deciding how to discipline lawmakers found to have behaved
inappropriately — also handle
any appeals of Mathis’s findings.
“The speaker and the
Senate president have
tried to be ahead
of the curve.”
Alexandra Hughes, chief of staff to
House Speaker Michael E. Busch
(D-Anne Arundel)
Some cases involving lawmakers may be referred to the Joint
Committee on Legislative Ethics,
whose investigative records are
kept confidential under state law.
Allegations of sexual assault or
other suspected criminal conduct
would be referred to prosecutors,
Mathis said.
Mathis said the General Assembly has not used taxpayer money
to settle any claims of workplace
harassment.
Such settlements have come
under scrutiny in Congress in recent weeks, after reporters unearthed taxpayer-funded payments to accusers of Rep. John
Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.), who resigned last week, and Rep. Blake
Farenthold (R-Tex.).
Harassment allegations have
also made waves in state capitals,
with accused lawmakers in California, Mississippi, Minnesota
and Kentucky giving up their
seats.
The Maryland General Assembly’s sexual harassment policy
was created in the early 1990s,
after a former lawmaker’s judicial
nomination was derailed by women who came forward to allege
inappropriate behavior.
Legislative leaders updated the
policy last year to clarify that it
applied to harassment of transgender individuals and that witnesses to sexual harassment —
not just victims — may report it.
Officials also designated a male
staffer to receive reports of harassment, in addition to a female
staffer.
Hughes said the legislature
made those changes following the
harassment allegations against
then-candidate Donald Trump
during the 2016 presidential campaign.
In Virginia, the clerk of the
state Senate told The Post last
month that she has not received a
sexual harassment report since
starting her job in 1990. The Virginia House of Delegates investigated a harassment complaint
against a staff member in 2012, its
human resources director said.
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
VIRGINIA
Charlottesville denies permit for rally on anniversary of deadly protest
Organizer Jason Kessler
says he will sue, pledges
event ‘is still happening’
BY
J OE H EIM
Charlottesville officials Monday denied a request to hold a
rally in August marking the first
anniversary of a protest by white
supremacists that turned violent,
saying it would endanger public
safety.
In a three-paragraph decision
signed by City Manager Maurice
Jones, the city said the request
for a permit “cannot be accommodated with the area applied
for, or within a reasonable allocation of city funds and/or police
resources.”
Jason Kessler filed the request
for a permit last month to hold a
“rally against government civil
rights abuse and failure to follow
security plans for political dissidents,” and to memorialize “the
sacrifices made by political dissidents in Lee Park August 12,
2017.” Kessler was the primary
organizer of the Aug. 12 Unite the
Right rally that drew neo-Nazis
and white nationalists to Charlottesville, leading to bloody
clashes in the streets with counterprotesters.
On Monday, the city said Kessler’s application for a rally next
year “likely underestimates the
number of participants” and declared that the city does not have
the police resources to identify
opposing groups and keep them
separated.
“The applicant requests that
police keep ‘opposing sides’ separate and that police ‘leave’ a ‘clear
path into event without threat of
violence,’ but city does not have
the ability to determine or sort
individuals according to what
‘side’ they are on, and no reasonable allocation of city funds or
resources can guarantee that
event participants will be free of
any ‘threat of violence,’ ” the city
stated.
Charlottesville officials also
said Kessler had included no
information on how he would be
responsible for the behavior of
participants or how he could be
held accountable for their adherence to city regulations.
Kessler blasted the city’s ruling, threatened legal action and
vowed he would not be deterred.
“The decision is bogus and
should be reversed in court,” he
wrote in an email. “We’re going
to be suing Charlottesville for
this and many other civil rights
violations starting early next
year. And the rally is still happening.”
Citing similar public safety
constraints and insufficient police and financial resources, the
city denied four other permit
requests from opponents and
supporters of Kessler to hold
events in public parks on the
anniversary weekend.
The violence that marked the
rally worsened when James Alex
Fields Jr., a 20-year-old Nazi
sympathizer from Ohio, allegedly
drove his Dodge Challenger into
a crowd of counterprotesters,
killing Heather Heyer, 32, and
injuring 19 others. Two Virginia
state troopers who had been
monitoring the events from the
air died later that day when their
helicopter crashed.
In a post on his blog last
month announcing the permit
request, Kessler blamed police
for not breaking up fights between rallygoers and counterprotesters, and for not providing
adequate protection to allow the
rally to proceed.
Charlottesville’s handling of
the Unite the Right rally, particularly its police response, was
uniformly criticized in a 207page independent review released Dec. 1.
joe.heim@washpost.com
Order will let Va.’s public colleges o≠er
an undergraduate education major
TEACHERS FROM B1
or social studies, said Jim Livingston, president of the Virginia
Education Association, one of the
state’s confederation of educators. Then, aspiring educators
must enter a teacher preparation
program, which often requires a
fifth year of school, Livingston
said.
Livingston said McAuliffe’s order would reduce the cost of pursuing a career in education. Some
students, he said, opt not to enter
teaching programs because of the
cost.
“We think this is a bold move
on the part of the governor. We
anticipate the State Board of Education will take the charge seriously,” Livingston said. “This is
not going to solve the problem.
This is the first step.”
Robert C. Pianta, dean of the
Curry School of Education at the
University of Virginia, said the
change would streamline a process that can require two degrees
and five or more years into requirements that take just four
years.
That change will mean education students will get more exposure to the classroom sooner, he
said.
That experience, Pianta said, is
“essential to their success.”
“Allowing teacher preparation
programs to develop four-year
models, in my view, has the potential to create stronger preparation
and more effective teachers in a
shorter time frame than the cur-
rent master’s focused approach,”
Pianta wrote in an email.
State Board of Education regulations do not permit undergraduate majors in teaching, said
Heather Fluit, McAuliffe’s deputy
communications director. The
Board of Education will eventually have to replace the emergency
regulations with long-term policies, she said.
“The teacher shortage is
a growing crisis that we
have to stop and reverse
if we are serious about
the commonwealth’s
economic future.”
Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe
Teacher shortages have afflicted much of the nation. A 2016
report by the nonprofit Learning
Policy Institute found that teacher education enrollment dropped
from 691,000 to 451,000 nationally, a 35 percent reduction, between 2009 and 2014.
In Virginia, teacher vacancies
increased by 40 percent in the
past decade, according to McAuliffe’s executive directive. In 2016,
more than 1,000 teaching positions remained unfilled two
months into the academic year,
according to Virginia Department of Education data.
Last year, McAuliffe took the
extraordinary step of sending letters to more than 500 retired
teachers around the city of Petersburg, asking them to consider
returning to work in the city’s
schools. A state law passed in 2001
permits retired teachers to return
to areas of need and still draw
their pensions while being paid.
Del. R. Steven Landes (RWeyers Cave), chairman of the
state’s House Education Committee, issued a statement saying the
teacher shortage has affected rural and urban areas.
“Virginia’s teaching shortage is
one of the most pressing challenges we face in public education,” he
said, adding that he is confident
that legislation in the 2018 General Assembly session will work to
address the issue.
In addition to his executive
directive, McAuliffe announced
funding initiatives on Monday intended to further alleviate teacher shortages.
A proposed budget scheduled
to be unveiled next week is expected to set aside $1.1 million to
automate the teacher licensure
process, according to a news release. And $1 million would go
toward recruiting and retaining
principals in school districts with
significant needs.
The proposed budget would
also set aside money to offer incentives for teachers who are in
struggling school districts.
debbie.truong@washpost.com
NORM SHAFER FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) aims to tackle a critical shortage of teachers in the state by
streamlining the education requirements for undergraduates at public colleges and universities.
LYNH BUI/THE WASHINGTON POST
Standing near where her nephew was shot to death two years before in Landover Hills, Renita
Clayton-Smith handed out fliers in September with information about Carlos Clayton’s killing.
MARYLAND
Two years of grief, searching
BY
L YNH B UI
Clutching a stack of fliers with
her nephew’s smiling face on the
front, Renita Clayton-Smith
pressed one into the hand of a
stranger passing the busy strip
mall along Annapolis Road.
“He was killed right here,”
Clayton-Smith told the stranger
while pointing to a blue trash bin
nearby. “He was killed by the
dumpster. We’re still looking for
justice.”
Two years after Carlos Clayton was gunned down during
his early-morning walk in
Landover Hills, his family still
does not know who is behind his
killing. With balloons, posters
and prayers, they have kept up
the profile of his case in the
hope of renewing interest, including at the gathering at the
intersection.
“There’s not a day that goes
past that he does not come across
my heart or my mind,” ClaytonSmith said.
Clayton, 46, was shot Sept. 9,
2015, and found in a parking lot
about 5 a.m. near Copper Lane
and Annapolis Road.
His family believes he was
killed during one of his daily
walks but remain baffled as to
who would go after the man they
called a “walking Bible.” Clayton,
who suffered from some mental
health issues, led a simple life,
his family said. He did chores for
his aunt, studied Scripture and
watched the Washington Redskins.
“I just want to make sure
Carlos gets justice,” said another
aunt, Barbara Clayton. “He did
not deserve to be murdered on
the street like an animal.”
“There’s not a day that
goes past that he does
not come across my
heart or my mind.”
Renita Clayton-Smith,
on her nephew Carlos Clayton
Prince George’s County police
say they are investigating the
case.
“We continue to urge anyone
with information on this case to
please call us,” said Christina
Cotterman, a spokeswoman for
the department. “No piece of
information is too small. We
want to be able to provide answers to the victim’s family.”
Carlos Clayton is missed not
only among his family members
but also by people in the community, including those who regu-
larly saw him on his daily or
even twice-daily walks through
Landover Hills.
“I’d walk Sunday and clean
litter along the road,” said Donnie Arrington, who had walked
by Clayton’s family the day of
their fall vigil at the intersection and recognized Clayton on
the fliers. “He’d stop and thank
me.”
Arrington said he still thinks
of Clayton when he comes by the
intersection.
“It was sad,” Arrington said.
“He wasn’t one of those being a
problem to the community. If it
could happen to someone like
him, it could happen to any one
of us.”
Charlette Clayton said her
brother was a good uncle who
always made sure the family said
their blessings at each meal before anyone touched a bite of
food.
“I never thought he would get
killed on the street,” she said. “It
hurts so much.”
Clayton’s family said they are
pressing for a resolution in his
case and still keep hope.
“We don’t want another family
to endure what we have been
going through,” Barbara Clayton
said. “It’s painful to have a loved
one depart this earth. We’re still
grieving.”
lynh.bui@washpost.com
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
obituaries
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
BOUIC
HILL
. TUESDAY,
DEATH NOTICE
PONTICELLI
MATTHEW BARRY PONTICELLI
(Age 35)
JAMES W. BOUIC
A former senior Cryptologic staff officer who
retired in 1988 from Research and Engineering
at the National Security Agency died of natural
causes on December 9, 2017.
Mr. Bouic, born in Washington, DC, attended
DC public schools and the Edmond A.Walsh
School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. An enlisted man in the Army Security
Agency, Mr. Bouic was posted in Okinawa.
After discharge, Mr. Bouic joined the Office of
Communications at the CIA before moving to
Maryland and joining the NSA.
Mr.Bouic was a member of the Phoenix Society,
the NSA Retirement Association, and the
National Cryptologic Museum Foundation. He
enjoyed bird watching, beach going, and puzzles of all kinds.
Survivors include his wife, Sharlie, and his
daughters from a previous marriage, Cynthia,
Kathryn, and Jerelyn.
Mr. Bouic requested not to have a funeral or
memorial services.
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
CURTIS HILL
Passed away on December 2, 2017. Funeral
service will be held 11 a.m. on Wednesday,
December 13, 2017 at Our Lady of Perpetual
Help Church, 1600 Morris Rd., SE, Washington,
DC.
CAHILL
THOMAS M. CAHILL
Passed away on December 6, 2017. Funeral
Mass will be held at St. Agnes Catholic Church,
1910 N Randolph St., Arlington, VA 22207, on
Thursday, December 21, 2017 at 12 Noon.
On Saturday, December 2, 2017
in Lake Worth, FL. beloved son
of Barry and Mary Linda Ponticelli and cherished brother of
Laura Hogan (Scott) of Santa
Monica, CA. Matthew is survived by several aunts and
uncles, including godparents, Catherine Statuti
(Frank) of Sparks, NV and Ward Ponticelli (Barbara) of Manchester, CT, in addition to Christina
Canfield and Philip D Rinaldi (Deborah) and
Michael J Rinaldi of Olney, MD. Matthew is also
survived by loving cousins, Alexandra Marsh
(Jason), Peter Ponticelli (Corey) and Eric Ponticelli (Jessica) of Coventry, CT., Sarah, Ryan and
Victoria Canfield, Gina, Philip and Jason Rinaldi.
The family will receive friends on Monday,
December 11, 2017 from 2 to 4 p.m. and from
7 to 9 p.m. at PHILIP D RINALDI FUNERAL
SERVICE, 9241 Columbia Blvd. Silver Spring,
MD 20910. Mass of Christian Burial will be
offered on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 at
12:30 p.m. at St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church, 12319 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver
Spring, MD 20904. Entombment Gate of Heaven Cemetery Mausoleum, 13801 Georgia
Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20906. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be made to a scholarship fund in Matthew’s memory at Our Lady
of Good Counsel High School, 17301 Old Vic
Blvd., Olney, MD 20832 or Angels at Risk, 115
Barrington Walk, Los Angeles, CA. 90049
PORTER
CHAPPELLE
ANTHONY DWIGHT PORTER
On December 3, 2017. Memorial Service will be
held at the Asbury United Methodist Church,
926 11th St., NW, Friday, December 15 at 10:30
a.m. Repast to follow.
MARCUS E. CHAPPELLE
On Tuesday, November 28, 2017. Family will
receive guess from 10:30 a.m. until time of
Memorial Service (Mass) at 11 a.m. on Thursday, December 14 at the Church of the Incarnation, 880 Eastern Ave., NE, Washington, DC
20019. Services by H. S. Washington & Sons.
RICHARDSON
FERREIRA
MICHAEL J. FERREIRA "Micky"
Of Silver Spring, MD, died June 17, 2017. He
leaves his mother, Joan Ferreira of Palm Bay,
FL; cousins, Cheryl Ann Rossi of Lake Mary,
FL and Carol A. Brinkley of Newburn, NC.
Micky was loved and admired by all for his
knowledge and talents. Visitation from 6 to 7
p.m. on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 at Collins
Funeral Home, 500 University Blvd. W, Silver
Spring, MD. Mass, Wednesday, December 13,
2017, 8:45 a.m. at Fort Myer Old Post Chapel.
Interment Arlington National Cemetery.
FORMAL
SAMUEL BERNARD FORMAL (Age 94)
COURTESY OF THE 555TH PARACHUTE INFANTRY ASSOCIATION
Clarence Beavers, second from right, in a C-47 transport plane during training in 1944 at Fort
Benning, Ga. In 1945, his unit worked with the Forest Service on a mission called Operation Firefly.
CLARENCE BEAVERS, 96
Paratrooper and smoke jumper
served during World War II
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
Clarence Beavers, the last surviving member of America’s first
black parachute unit, a World
War II “test platoon” that went on
to battle fires caused by Japanese
bombs and paved the way for
black paratroopers in the postwar
integrated military, died Dec. 4 at
his home in Huntington, N.Y. He
was 96.
The cause was congestive heart
failure, said a daughter, Charris
Beavers.
Mr. Beavers, who served in the
Army, never came under enemy
fire. But for one summer at the
close of the war, he repeatedly
leapt toward smoke and flames,
jumping from a C-47 transport
plane to steer his parachute
toward remote stretches of the
Pacific Northwest.
His unit, which formed the
original core of the 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion or Triple
Nickles, was never as well known
as the Tuskegee Airmen or Buffalo Soldiers. Yet the 17-member
group played a seminal role in the
integration of the military and
the development of smoke jumping, a novel firefighting method
in which remote forest fires —
sparked by Japanese bombs carried by balloons — were fought by
men who protected themselves
with modified football helmets
and willfully landed in trees.
“Nobody in those days figured
that black folks had either the
courage or the intelligence to do
anything white folks would do,”
said Joe Murchison, a retired Triple Nickles paratrooper who now
heads the 555th Parachute Infantry Association. “Our first paratrooper had one of the white
trainers bet his house that he
wouldn’t jump out of the airplane. Well, he jumped out of the
plane. He didn’t get the house.”
In an era when segregation still
reigned, black soldiers were prohibited from serving as paratroopers when the U.S. airborne
took flight in 1940. Three years
later, after a military advisory
committee recommended the
creation of a black parachute battalion, Mr. Beavers was among
the first to volunteer, leaving behind his Army maintenance platoon in Pennsylvania to travel to
the parachute school at Fort Benning, Ga.
He was met with surprise from
the school’s commanding officers
and shock from its white soldiers,
including the man who drove him
from the train station to the fort.
“Every time we came past one of
them streetlights, he would glare
over and look at me,” Mr. Beavers
told the New York Daily News in
2000. “I said, ‘I’m colored. Now,
will you please drive this damn
Jeep before you kill us both?’ ”
Mr. Beavers was the first volun-
teer of what was known as the test
platoon of black paratroopers, a
unit that was meant to decide the
fate of African Americans in the
airborne. In what he later recalled
was “extremely rough and extremely personal training,” he
and his fellow black soldiers slept
two-to-a-bunk in a cramped, unheated hut and ate separately
from their white peers in the mess
hall. German prisoners of war
experienced better conditions at
the base, platoon members later
said.
Still, 17 of the unit’s 20 original
members successfully earned
their wings, becoming the founding members of the all-black
555th.
Mr. Beavers and his fellow
paratroopers had assumed they
would soon see combat in Europe, where their white counterparts were participating in battles that would later be memorialized in the book and television
series “Band of Brothers.”
Instead, they were sent to
Pendleton, Ore., where in 1945
they worked with the U.S. Forest
Service on a secret mission called
Operation Firefly. Mr. Beavers
and more than a hundred members of the 555th were tasked with
extinguishing fires started by
Japanese bombs that had floated
over to the U.S. mainland, carried
aloft by balloons.
“It was really a kind of terrorism operation,” said Lincoln
Bramwell, chief historian for the
Forest Service, who noted that six
people were killed from one of the
bombs in 1945, the only reported
World War II combat casualties in
the Lower 48 states.
The Triple Nickles responded
to about three dozen fire calls and
performed more than 1,200 individual jumps, putting out fires
started by bombs as well as by
lightning or other natural causes.
Working with crosscut saws,
shovels and a combination digging-cutting tool called a Pulaski,
they sought to starve fires using
similar methods to those of contemporary smoke jumpers.
Contrary to their training,
when they practiced landing in
open fields, they avoided the risk
of landing in a rock-strewn meadow or prairie and aimed for the
trees themselves — wearing a
protective helmet that mixed elements of a football helmet and
mesh-faced fencing mask to
guard against stray branches.
Nearly every jump ended with
an injury, said Mr. Beavers. One
paratrooper, Malvin L. Brown,
became the first reported smoke
jumper to die when he fell after
landing in a tree in 1945. Mr.
Beavers himself suffered a back
injury that ended his Army career
that same year, his daughter
Charlotta Beavers said, after
strong winds forced him to land
upside down.
“At first we were bitter,” Mr.
Beavers told Newsday in 2004,
describing his feelings after
learning that he and his battalion
would not be sent into combat.
“We thought: ‘They’ve taken away
our rifles and given us picks and
shovels.’ But as we learned about
the dangers involved and the lives
we could save, we began to take
real pride in our work.”
Clarence Hylan Beavers was
born in Manhattan on June 12,
1921, the 15th of 16 siblings. His
maternal grandfather was a former slave who fought for the
Union in the Civil War, and his
father was a commercial artist for
Ringling Bros. who fled to New
York from Alabama, where according to his son he had helped
protect all-black Talladega College from being burned by the Ku
Klux Klan.
Mr. Beavers enlisted in the New
York National Guard after graduating from high school in 1939
and two years later was drafted
into the Army. A brother, Leo
Beavers, was a signal corpsman in
North Africa and Italy.
Mr. Beavers was discharged
from the Army as a staff sergeant
after his injury, and his battalion
was deactivated and became part
of the 82nd Airborne Division.
The military was integrated in
1948 following an executive order
from President Harry S. Truman.
Mr. Beavers later worked on
computer systems for the Veterans Administration, and for many
years he lived in Germany while
developing a computerized payroll system for the Defense Department. He retired in 1978 and,
in a landbound twist on his earlier occupation, served as a volunteer firefighter in Upstate New
York.
Survivors include his wife of 59
years, the former Edolene Davis
of Huntington; six children, Patricia Merritt of Washington, Dawn
Hargrove of Orlando, Charlayne
Beavers of Lawrenceville, N.J.,
and Charris Beavers, Charlotta
Beavers and Clarence Beavers II,
all of Huntington; three grandnephews whom he raised, Delwyn Davis of the Bronx and Dion
Davis and Dwayne Davis, both of
Brooklyn; 18 grandchildren; 22
great-grandchildren; and 10
great-great-grandchildren.
Mr. Beavers and his test platoon received relatively scant recognition from the military until
2010, when he and two other
since-deceased paratroopers in
the unit were honored at the
Pentagon.
“These three gentlemen,” said
Michele S. Jones, a retired paratrooper and Defense Department
official, “opened the door, they
kicked open the door, they took
the door off the hinges.”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
On Sunday, November 19, 2017,
of Silver Spring, MD. Beloved
husband of Rosamond A. Formal;
father of Christopher (Debra),
David (Carol) and James (Joanne)
Formal; brother of the late Ruth
Formal Wagner. Also survived by
seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. He was born in Providence, Rhode Island.
He enlisted in the Navy during World War
II, and served at Iwo Jima and Okinawa. He
subsequently studied microbiology and
immunology, and his career included work at
the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research.
A Memorial Service will be held at Maryland
Hall in Montgomery Station Clubhouse at Riderwood Village, on Saturday, January 13, 2018
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Riderwood Village can
be entered at the intersection of Clover Patch
Drive and Gracefield Road in Silver Spring.
RSVP to joformal@gmail.com by December 29
if you will be attending. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to Riderwood Scholarship Fund, Attn: Philanthropy,
Riderwood Village, 3110 Gracefield Rd., Silver
Spring, MD 20904, or to the LCI National
Association at http://usslci.org/.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
GAIDURGIS
MICHAEL CHARLES GAIDURGIS
(Age 83)
Of Silver Spring, MD, peacefully passed away
December 3, 2017.
Born July 26, 1934 in Philadelphia, PA, a son to
the late Charles and Julia Gaidurgis.
Mike is survived by his sons, Perry, Jerry,
Larry, Andrew, Tony, and Tim; daughter, Janice
Rawlings; a sister, Viola McKenna; and brotherin-law, Howard Dye; 22 grandchildren, and
numerous great grandchildren.
He is preceded in death by his wife of 45 years,
Delores Dye Gaidurgis and second wife, Anne
Ankersmith; his daughter, Julie; and grandchildren, Lisa Gaidurgis, and James Taylor; brother,
Donald; and sister, Charlotte Gaidurgis.
The Gaidurgis family is especially grateful to
Tony Gaidurgis, Camille Honaker & Angel for
Mike’s final loving care and comfort.
A visitation and memorial service be held
Thursday December 14, 2017 from 6 to 8 p.m.
at Trinity Assembly of God Church, 7800 Good
Luck Rd., Lanham, MD.
DEATH NOTICE
KANE
Reverend Monsignor WILLIAM J. KANE
February 27, 1934 - December 8, 2017
Born in Washington DC.
He is survived by his
niece, Patricia W. Newhall
of Salem, MA. He studied at Maryknoll Seminary
and then Our Lady of
Angels Seminary, Niagara,
New York. He was ordained to the Priesthood
on May 28, 1960 at the Cathedral of Saint
Matthew the Apostle, Washington, DC. His
first assignment as Parochial Vicar was at St.
Bartholomew Parish, Bethesda, MD in 1964,
he was appointed Associate Chaplain at the
Catholic Student Center at the University of
Maryland, and then as Chaplain in 1967. In
1973, Monsignor Kane was Director of Campus
Ministry and then to Director of Priest Personnel in 1986. Monsignor Kane was appointed
Vicar General, Moderator of the Curia and
Chancellor of the Archdiocese in 1988. In
1994, he was appointed Pastor at Little Flower
Parish, Bethesda, MD, where he served until
his retirement in 2004 and continued there in
residence until his death.
The Vigil will be held on Wednesday, December
13, from 3 p.m. until 6:45 p.m., followed by
Vigil Mass at 7 p.m. at Church of the Little
Flower, 5607 Massachusetts Ave., Bethesda,
MD 20816 and where Mass of Christian Burial
will be offered on Thursday, December 14 at
10 a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be made to Church of the Little Flower Parish.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
MERZ
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
ALBERT HENRY MERZ, JR.
Albert Henry Merz, Jr., of Alexandria, Virginia, passed away on December 3, 2017
at the age of 74, after a battle with cancer.
He was born in 1943, the son of Albert
Henry Merz, Sr. and Ruth Allen Merz. He
was predeceased by his wife Mari Gibson
Merz in May 2017. He is survived by his
brother Carl A. Merz of Cold Spring Harbor,
NY. He graduated from the Eastman School
of Music of the University of Rochester in
1964, and holds advanced degrees from
Catholic University. Al was a percussionist
and played with the United States Marine
Band after graduating from college. He
also played with numerous organizations,
including the National Symphony Orchestra, as well as teaching percussion at several local universities.
Funeral Services will be held at 2 p.m. on
Friday December 15, 2017 at St. Marks’s
Episcopal Church, 6744 South Kings Highway, Alexandria, Virginia. Contributions in
lieu of flowers may be made in his name to
the St. Mark’s Episcopal Church.
GREENEBAUM
MICHALIK
STEWART J. GREENEBAUM
THOMAS EDWARD MICHALIK (Age 87)
On December 10, 2017, Stewart J.
Greenebaum; beloved husband of Marlene
Greenebaum; devoted father of Amy (Steve)
Burwen, and Michael (Adele) Greenebaum;
loving brother of Edwin Greenebaum, and the
late Lawrence Greenebaum; dear brother-inlaw of Ingrid and Barbara Greenebaum; adored
son of the late Harry and Laura Greenebaum;
cherished grandfather of Robert Greenebaum
(fiancee Amy Rifkin), Heather Greenebaum,
and Samantha Greenebaum; former father-inlaw of Nona Greenebaum.
Funeral services will be held at Temple Oheb
Shalom, 7310 Park Heights Ave, Baltimore, MD
21208 on Wednesday, December 13, at 2:30
p.m. Interment is private. Please omit flowers.
Contributions in his memory may be sent
to The University of Maryland, Marlene and
Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer
Center, 110 S. Paca Street, Baltimore, MD
21201. In mourning at Temple Oheb Shalom,
7310 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore, MD
21208, immediately following the funeral with
shiva services at 5 p.m., and on Thursday
from 1 to 4 p.m. with shiva services at 5 p.m.
Arrangements by SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC.
www.sollevinson.com
HEILE
DONALD HENRY HEILE (Age 92)
1925 - 2017
Captain, U.S. Navy (Ret.)
Donald Henry Heile of McLean, VA died into
peace during the early morning of December 7,
2017.
Don grew up in Fort Thomas, Kentucky where
he met and married his wife of 70 years, Jane.
His satisfying 31 year career in the Navy as
an aeronautical engineer and comptroller took
their family into a life of travel and enduring
friendships.
Don’s participation in fellowship was centered
at St. John’s Episcopal Church in McLean.
He was an active resident of Vinson Hall
Retirement Community.
Seeds of greatness and humility were placed
in this man. His son, his daughter and his
five grandchildren reflect the love, learning,
and care for others that he had shared with
them. He reaped what he sowed; a devoted
family, deep friendship, generosity, gratitude
and commitment. Everyone will miss him.
A celebration of his life is scheduled December
15, 2017, 11 a.m. at St. John’s Episcopal
Church, Georgetown Pike, McLean, VA. In lieu
of flowers memorial gifts can be made to
Vinson Hall Retirement Community, McLean,
VA.
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
HARRY A. RICHARDSON, SR.
Departed this life on Friday, November 10,
2017. Born in Washington, DC on January 9,
1927, he was the son of the late Julian and
Mary Richardson.
He was an Army veteran and worked for
many years in law enforcement. He retired as
the Chief of the Protective Services Branch
at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in
Washington, DC.
He is survived by his wife of 30 years, Joy;
his three sons, Michael, Sr. (Valencia), Donald
(Nora) and Harry, Jr. "Buddy" (Natasha); five
grandchildren, Michael, Jr., Michael C. (Lanette), Tosha, Christian and Marley; and three
great-grandchildren, Kamal, Gabriel and Nia;
and two sisters, Rosemary Gleaton and Ernestine Doby.
A Masonic Service will be held at 9 a.m.
on Thursday, December 14 at the MarshallMarch Funeral Home, 4308 Suitland Road,
Suitland, Maryland. Following by the interment
at 11 a.m. at the Maryland Veterans Cemetery,
11301 Crain Highway, Cheltenham, Maryland.
www.marshallmarchfh.com
On Friday, December 8, 2017 Thomas Edward
Michalik of Rockville, MD, passed peacefully
with his family at his side. Beloved husband of
55 years to the late Darlene Michalik; loving
father of Gregory and daughter-in-law Anne,
Jeffrey and daughter-in-law Leslie, Mark, Anne
and son-in-law Charles Oswald, Jeanne and
son-in-law Joel Arias, Thomas and daughterin-law Renee, James, Timothy and daughter-inlaw Tonya, and Kathryn and son-in-law Panagiotis Siarkas. Cherished grandfather to 22
grandchildren and great grandfather to five.
Survived by his brother Paul and by many other
loving relatives and friends.
Tom, a devout Catholic, was born in Oklahoma
City and graduated from St. Joseph High School
in Oklahoma City, OK. He served in the Army
National Guard of Oklahoma and The United
States Army. Tom was a veteran of the Korean
War serving as Sergeant First Class. He was
employed by International Business Machines
(IBM) for 38 years. Tom was an active member
of Holy Cross Church in Garrett Park and a
member of the Respect for Life Committee, the
Knights of Columbus Senior Club and the Over
50 Club.
Friends will be received at Holy Cross Catholic
Church, 4900 Strathmore Ave, Garret Park,
MD 20896 on Monday, December 18, 2017
from 10 to 11 a.m. Mass of Christian Burial
immediately to follow. Interment to Gate of
Heaven cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made by mail to Wounded Warrior Project, PO Box 758516, Topeka, KS
66675-8516 or on their website: www.woundedwarriorproject.org. Please view and sign
family guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
PITTS
MICHELE RENEE PITTS (Age 51)
To place a notice, call:
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Peacefully on Monday, November 27, 2017.
Family will receive friends at the Spirit of Faith
Christian Center, 2261 Oxon Run Dr., Temple
Hills, MD on Tuesday, December 12 from 10
a.m. until time of service, 11 a.m. Interment
Lincoln Memorial Cemetery.
DEATH NOTICE
BERGMANN
EVERETT A. BERGMANN, JR. (Age 86)
Of Front Royal, Virginia passed away peacefully on December 7, 2017 surrounded by the
love of his family.
Everett was born in Washington, DC on
August 20, 1931. He graduated from Fishburne Military School and Benjamin Franklin
University. He also served in the US Army
during the Korean War.
Thompson (Rob) of South Riding, VA, 31
grandchildren, and nine great-grandchildren.
He is also survived by his brothers, Carl
Kenzig Bergmann and Dennis P. Bergmann
and a host of cousins, nieces and nephews.
Everett is preceded in death by his parents
Everett A. and Anna Mae Bergmann, his
brother James R. Bergmann and his beloved
wife Carole Ruth.
Everett was married to Carole Ruth Murtaugh
on November 26, 1955. They raised their
nine children in Falls Church, VA and were a
part of the St. James and Bishop O’Connell
communities.
He had a long life full of family memories,
trips, adventures, laughs and joy. He left a
legacy of faith, family and love and he will be
missed dearly.
Everett spent his career working for the
family business, Bergmann’s Cleaning and
Laundry of the Washington, DC area that
just celebrated its 100 year anniversary in
July, 2017. After his retirement he enjoyed
traveling and continued supporting and
working in the family business. He loved
the cleaning business but his family was his
joy. He also enjoyed spending time at the
Bergmann family place on the Rhodes River
off the Chesapeake Bay.
Visitation will be held on Thursday, December
14, 2017 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Maddox
Funeral Home in Front Royal, VA. The Mass
of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m.
on Friday, December 15, 2017 at St. John
the Baptist Catholic Church in Front Royal,
VA. There will also be a visitation from
9:45 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. at St. John before
the Mass. Burial will follow at Prospect
Hill Cemetery, Front Royal, VA immediately
following the Mass. Funeral arrangements
are being handled by Maddox Funeral Home.
Everett is survived by his children, Christopher Bergmann (Kathy) of Houston, TX, E.
Peter Bergmann (Kim) of Leesburg, VA, Susan
Lucas (Michael) of Front Royal, VA, William
Bergmann (Rosina) of Front Royal, VA, Patrick
Bergmann (Terri) of Stevensville, MD,
Jeanette Engel (Stuart) of Ashburn, VA, Debbie Magnuson (Don) of Ashburn, VA, Mary
Beth Fischer (Dwight) of Leesburg, VA, Anna
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be
given to the Adler Center for Caring at 24419
Millstream Drive, Aldie, VA 20105. The family
of Everett Bergmann wishes to thank Sunrise
Independent Living in Sterling, VA for their
care and support and are forever grateful to
Hospice that provided end of life love, care
and support for both parents.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B7
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DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
ROUSE
CERULLO
HARRISON
KITZES
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
BROCK
IRENE MUNSON ROUSE
Antiquarian bookseller, artist and poet, Irene
Munson Rouse died at home in Alexandria on
December 6, 2017 at the age of 89. Raised
in Arlington, Rouse graduated from James
Madison College in 1950. In her 2009 poetry
collection, Petty Street, ("We lived on South
Petty Street / those years with all our kin/ and
their quarrels"), Rouse evoked the Depression
years of her childhood: "Beggars with bleeding
feet/ and broken shoes", and, "the hobo jungle/
far below Columbia Pike, where campfires/
flickered by the Potomac River."
Briefly an English teacher and later a children's
librarian, Rouse married, and raised a family in
an eighteenth-century farmhouse in Burke. To
cover college expenses for her five children,
she took up a new career in the book business.
A succession of bookshops---in Fairfax, Falls
Church, Alexandria, and the Eastern Shore-- brought her friendships with other artists
and writers. "Positively Prince Street", her
poetry reading series in Alexandria, launched
a stream of Washington area authors in the
1980's, and a Chincoteague shop became a
popular destination for visitors to the town.
In later life, now retired, Rouse turned to
painting. Her expressive, often mythical landscapes were essentially visual poems: "vivid
blossoms in the garden/ alive and red and
swaying."
She is survived by her husband of 64 years,
William Dashiell Rouse; her daughters, Anne
Rouse, Mary Root, Katherine Rouse, and Elizabeth Brokamp; and two sisters, Marylou
Woodruff and Grace Nichols. She is predeceased by a son, William Dashiell Rouse, Jr, and
her sisters, Winnie Preusser and Betty Jeavons.
A private family service will be held at a later
date.
SCOTT
JOHN W. SCOTT
Passed away on Tuesday,
December 5, 2017. He is survived by his devoted wife, Teresa Scott; loving daughter, Jonnetta D. Scott; mother, Carolyn
Scott; sister, Monique Harmon
and a host of relatives and
friends. He is preceded in death by his father,
Monte Johnson. Family and friends will unite
on Thursday, December 14, 2017 from 10
a.m. until time of service 11 a.m. at New
Macedonia Baptist Church, 4115 Alabama Ave
SE, Washington, DC. Interment following at
Washington National Cemetery, Suitland, MD.
www.briscoe-tonicfuneralhome.com
THOMAS
was instrumental in reimagining the campus
and student life with the addition of several
buildings and a student center.
At Eastern Virginia Medical School, he helped
create the M. Foscue Brock Institute for
Community and Global Health, named for his
father. In Virginia Beach, he and Joan made
the lead gift in establishing the Chesapeake
Bay Foundation’s Brock Environmental Center, and took pride in the dramatic structure’s
certification as “a living building” with the
highest environmental standards in accordance with The U.S. Green Building Council's
Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design.
ROBERT J. CERULLO (Age 74)
JOWAVA M. LEGGETT HARRISON
Of Washington, DC, and Bethany Beach, DE,
passed away at his Capitol Hill home in Washington on December 7, 2017, following a long
illness. Bob was born in Masontown, Pennsylvania, the son of John and Lucy Cerullo. He
was devoted to his family, and is survived by
his beloved sisters, Dolores Cerullo Santella
(husband William deceased) and Carol Cerullo
Del Grosso (husband John); his aunt, Violet
Schnatterly; and seven nieces and nephews,
their spouses, children and grandchildren.
Bob’s brother, Richard Cerullo, predeceased
him. Bob graduated from the University of
West Virginia, served in the Air Force National
Guard, and received a law degree from American University. He practiced real estate law
with Houlon Berman for many years and, in
retirement, enjoyed renovating and reselling
houses throughout DC. Bob reveled in watching his favorite sports teams, the Steelers,
Pirates and Penguins, and was a dedicated
foodie who prided himself on being the first
of his friends to try every new restaurant. He
also loved to travel, and was famous for always
running into someone he knew, no matter what
continent he was on. However, Bob’s favorite
pastime was simply connecting with people,
and he was extraordinarily good at it. He
was known for his kindness, warmth, hilarious
(and often self-deprecating) wit, generosity and
amazing talent for making lifelong friends. He
was generous in every sense of the word – with
money, time and friendship. His friends often
joked about how many weddings, bar mitzvahs
and other celebratory events he went to – but
Bob always showed up for his friends, and he
always had fun. All who knew Bob considered
him to be their best friend. He treasured his
countless best friends, and they all adored him.
Bob made life better for all who knew him, and
he will be deeply missed. A memorial service
will be planned for some time after the end
of the year. Memorial contributions may be
made to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society or
a charity of your choice.
Departed this life on Friday, December 8, 2017.
She is survived by her husband, Nathaniel F.
Harrison, Jr.; two children, Yaminah LeggettWells and Kamuzu Saunders; two sisters, two
brothers, five grandchildren and a host of other
relatives and friends.
Services will be held on Thursday, December
14, visitation, 10 a.m.; funeral service to follow,
11 a.m. at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1500 - 9th
St., NW. Further services and interment will be
held in Greenwood, LA.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be made to the Dr. Jowava Morrow Scholarship,
www.federalcityfoundation.org. Services provided by JOHN T. RHINES FUNERAL HOME.
DEATH NOTICE
HAWK
On December 9, 2017, Nettie
Sherr Kitzes, 97, of Rockville,
MD, passed away peacefully
surrounded by loving family.
Adored wife of the late Dr.
George Kitzes, and devoted
sister to the late Jessie Wallerich and the late William
Sherr, Nettie is survived by her loving
daughters, Julie Kitzes Herr and husband,
Donald, Janet Kitzes Priset Sandino, and
Marjorie Kitzes, and cherished grandchildren, Peter Alexandre Kitzes and wife, Julie,
Jared Shane Priset, and Rachel Isabella Herr.
A graduate of Hunter College High School
and Hunter College in New York, with MAs
from the University of Wisconsin, Nettie
aspired to be a French teacher from an
early age. In 1959 she received a Fulbright
scholarship to study at the Sorbonne in
Paris, and in 2009 she was inducted into the
Hunter College Alumni Association Hall of
Fame. As an exceptional high school French
teacher for decades, she inspired a legion
of her students at Fairview High School
in Dayton, OH and Bethesda-Chevy Chase
High School in Bethesda, MD with her
love of the French language and literature.
Memorial contributions may be made to
the Hunter College Scholarship & Welfare
Fund or JSSA Hospice. Funeral Services will
be held at B'Nai Israel Congregation, 6301
Montrose Rd., Rockville, MD on December
11, 2017 at 11 a.m. Interment will take
place at Sharon Gardens, Kensico Cemetery, Valhalla, NY. The family will observe
Shiva at the home of Nettie Kitzes,
Rockville, MD on December 13 and 14 from
4 to 8 p.m. with Minyan on Wednesday
at 7 p.m. Memorial contributions may be
made to The Hunter College Schorlarship
and Welfare Fund or JSSA Hospice.
WWW.SAGELBLOOMFIELD.COM
GEORGE ALVIN THOMAS, III
Peacefully on Tuesday, December 5, 2017.
Family will receive friends on Thursday, December 14, 2017 at Spirit of Faith Christian Center,
2261 Oxon Run Dr., Temple Hills, MD, Visitation,
10 a.m., Celebration of Life Service, 11 a.m.
Interment Heritage Cemetery, Waldorf, MD.
CROWLEY
TAMARI
FREDERICK L. HAWK
On Saturday, December 2, 2017 at Southern
Maryland Hospital Center, Burdella L. Walker,
departed this earthly life and entered into
eternal rest. A Celebration of Life will be held
on Thursday, December 14, 2017, visitation,
9:30 a.m.; services will commence at 10:30
a.m. at J.B. JENKINS FUNERAL HOME, 7474
Landover Rd., Hyattsville, MD 20785. Interment
Lincoln Memorial Cemetery, 4001 Suitland Rd.,
Suitland, MD.
DONNA LEE CROWLEY
WETHERILL
DIANE RITA (McMeel) WETHERILL
Passed away peacefully on December 5, 2017.
Diane lived a full life and will be forever missed
by her family and friends. She was born on
September 21,1935 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa to
Lucile (Barta) and John McMeel. She graduated
in 1953 from Bethesda Chevy Chase High
School, then attended University of Maryland
where she was a Pi Beta Phi. In 1957, Diane
married her sweetheart, John Price Wetherill,
IV. Together they raised two boys and played
many rounds of tennis at Edgemoore Club.
She worked in the Department of Pediatric
Epidemiology at NIH for 25 years.
Diane enjoyed needlework, playing bridge and
hosting her annual New Year’s Eve party. Diane
volunteered extensively in her neighborhood,
community and church. She was blessed with
a group of lifelong girlfriends whom she cherished. Her energy, generosity and kindness
infused everything she did and her endless
love touched the lives of all she met.
Diane was preceded in death by her beloved
husband John Price Wetherill, IV and her granddaughter, Haley Wetherill. She was mother to
her adoring children, John Price (Amy) Wetherill, V and Wallace Prescott (Beth) Wetherill;
and grandmother to, Matthew, Lucy, Timothy
Wetherill and Justin Grondine. She is also
survived by her brother and his wife, Dr. and
Mrs. Wallace McMeel.
A dessert reception will be hosted by her
family at Ingleside at King Farm, 701 King Farm
Blvd., Rockville, MD 20850, on December 15,
2017 at 7 p.m. Interment will occur at St.
Paul’s Rock Creek Cemetery in Washington, DC
on December 16, 2017 at 11 a.m. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contributions may be made
in her name to the Haley Wetherill Memorial
Fund (c/o Fort Wayne Community Foundation)
or the Ingleside at King Farm Residence Fund.
DEATH NOTICE
BROWN
Donna Lee Crowley of Bluemont, Virginia graduated this life from her home here to her
eternal home in Heaven on December 7, 2017.
She was the daughter of the late Robert
J. Gath and Betty (Brumfield) Mcgraw. She
grew up in Suitland, Maryland with her sisters
Debbie (Billy) Lineberry and Dana (Jim) McGee.
In later years she was blessed with brother
Tom McGraw and sister Carroll Wilson. She
attended Suitland High and earned her teaching degree at Shepherd College. Her heart's
desire was to be a stewardess and she persevered. She flew for Eastern but due to the strike
there started her 12 year teaching career. She
taught multiple grades in Maryland and for
DOE in Germany and then Virginia, mostly in
Aldie and Hillsboro. She was "firm but fair" and
was much loved by her students and parents.
Her last assignment came after gaining her
Master's Degree and she was the Assistant
Principal at Sully Middle School. She loved
to write and clean which led to avocations
of calligraphy then a handy-girl service. She
added her artistic talents with her "Jesus
Cards" under the business name of His Heart
Art. Her last profession was in constituent
service for Congressman Frank Wolf, mostly
in the Winchester office. She served well and
loved the work and the people of the Valley
for 25 years. She was married to her husband
Mark Crowley for 44 years. Together they
were blessed to love and encourage their
nephews Jacob and Joey Lineberry and Tim
Mcgraw: and nieces Megan and Emily Mcgraw
and Colleen Crowley and great-niece Eden
Rhema Showalter. Though not a mother she
has a mother's heart and was Aunt Donna
unofficially to Adrian Figgins, Michael Wuertz
and the five Bowen children, Phinehas, Caleb,
Elijah, Morgan, Beth and Noah. She was the
proud God-mother to Karis and Hosanna
Roberts and always included their brothers,
Lucas, Liam, and Judah. During her three year
adventure with cancer she was encouraged
by the support and prayers from the Church
of the Holy Spirit family. During her treatment
,mostly at Memorial Sloan Kettering in New
York city ,she often lifted up the other patients
and staff and even those at her "second
home" at the Midtown Marriott Manhattan. Her
beauty and smile attracted people ...and her
encouragement sealed the deal. She leaves a
legacy of love. Visitation will be on Wednesday,
December 13 from 6 to 8 p.m. and her celebration funeral service from 1pm until 2:30
at the funeral home with graveside burial at
Union Cemetery in Leesburg. Loudoun Funeral
Chapel 158 Catoctin Circle SE Leesburg, VA
20175 is handling the arrangements. In lieu
of flowers gifts may be made to Planet Hope
Sailing Ministry, PO Box 550 ,Deale, Maryland
20751 or anyplace else that is important to
you in her honor. Online condolences maybe
expressed at
www.loudounfunerachapel.com
DUNCAN
SARAH E. BROWN
Sarah E. Brown, of Washington, DC, passed
peacefully while at home under hospice
care on December 1, 2017. She was born
August 25, 1934 in Houston, TX, where she
also grew up. Sarah was a retired science
teacher who taught in DC Public Schools for
over 20 years.
She was preceded in passing by her oldest
daughter, Kirsten V. Brown. She leaves
behind her loving husband, Dr. William
Brown, Jr.; two daughters, Kecia Brown and
Kolette Brown, M.D.; one son, Karlton W.
Brown; two granddaughters, Sarah Nia R.
Coleman and Kiara E.P. Coleman; and many
other relatives and friends.
The family will receive friends on December
16, 2017 from 10 a.m. until time of service,
11 a.m., at Grace Episcopal Church, 1607
Grace Church Rd., Silver Spring, MD.
A Scholarship fund has been established
in Sarah E. Brown's name through Maine
Avenue Ministries. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the scholarship in her
name through Maine Avenue, Inc., PO Box
70234, Washington, DC 20024.
www.mcguire-services.com
Passed away Thursday, December 7, 2017
surrounded by family and friends. Fred was
born at Sibley Hospital and educated at the
VA School for the Blind in Hampton, VA.
Fred lost his eyesight shortly after birth but
saw the beauty in everyone and everything
around him. Fred was a Corporate Receptionist at ServiceSource where he worked
for 37 years. Fred was always the first
person you met when you walked in or
called. After meeting you once, he remembered you. Fred was an exceptional advocate for people with disabilities. He spoke
on Capitol Hill and throughout Virginia on
behalf of people with disabilities. He is
predeceased by his loving parents Frederick Hume Hawk and Phyllis Carpenter Hawk
and great niece Avery Marie. He is survived
by his sister Helen Michaely-Shobe; his
niece Lindsay Nichols and nephew Anthony; great niece and nephews; his extended
family, numerous friends and his ServiceSource family. Viewing will be Thursday,
December 14 from 1 to 3 and 5 to 7
p.m. at Money and King Funeral Home,
Vienna, VA. A Mass of Christian Burial
will be celebrated on Friday, December 15
at 10 a.m. at Our Lady of Good Counsel
Church, Vienna, VA. In lieu of flowers, the
family asks that donations be made to
The ServiceSource Foundation’s Community Assistance Endowment Fund in Fred’s
name. Donations will be matched $1 for $1.
ServiceSource 10467 White Granite Drive
Oakton, VA 22124-2763 www.servicesource.org/donate. Online condolences
and fond memories may be made at
www.moneyandking.com
WILLIAMS
Macon served in Vietnam as a Marine captain
in 1966-67. Upon completion of his service,
he worked as a Naval Intelligence officer
before joining his father-in-law, Kenneth
Perry, in Mr. Perry’s variety retail business, a
former Ben Franklin store at Ward’s Corner
in Norfolk. Along with his brother-in-law, he
expanded the business into K&K Toys, which
grew into a chain of 136 stores in 15 states.
In 1986, he, Doug Perry and partner Ray
Compton founded a sideline business that
many in the retail industry scoffed at: a
chain of small stores offering quality goods
at a single, impossibly low price-point—one
dollar. Five years later, with the seemingly
loopy idea quickly becoming a mercantile
juggernaut, he and his partners sold K&K
Toys, using the proceeds to further nourish
the company now known as Dollar Tree.
As
the
company’s
merchandiser,
Macon—often with Joan at his side—traveled throughout Asia, Europe and South
America in search of the products that soon
drew customers to Dollar Tree stores by the
millions.
Admiral Hernandez was the highest ranking
Hispanic on active duty for several years
in the 1980's and served as the US Navy's
ambassador to the many military figures and
institutions of Latin America. His military
awards included the Silver Star and the
Distinguished Flying Cross.
As the Reagan Administration built up America's military power, the Secretary of the
He is survived by his wife of 53 years,
Joan Perry Brock; children Kathryn Everett
and husband Tony Everett of Chevy Chase,
Maryland, Christy Miele and husband Donaldson Miele of San Juan Capistrano, California, and Macon Brock III and wife Kristen
Brock of Newport Beach, California; sisters
Pat Robertson and Sally White and husband
Hal White; and six grandchildren—Lucy and
Will Everett, Kate and Jacqueline Miele, and
Chloe and Braden Brock.
A memorial service for Macon will take place
at 1 p.m. Saturday, December 16, 2017 at the
First Presbyterian Church of Virginia Beach
on Atlantic Avenue, followed by a reception
celebrating his life at Princess Anne Country
Club. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made to the Hampton Roads
Community Foundation to support scholarships to Randolph Macon College. (Hampton Roads Community Foundation, 101 West
Main St., Norfolk, VA 23510.
The family would like to thank the Lung
Transplant Program at the Cleveland Clinic,
led by Dr. Marie Budev; and doctors Charles
Lisner, Thomas Alberico, Fletcher Pierce and
Michael Ryan of Hampton Roads. They thank
Jodi Cutler and Danielle Lorenz, too, for their
compassion and care during Macon’s illness.
H.D. Oliver Funeral Apts., Laskin Rd Chapel is
handling arrangements. Online condolences
may be made to the family at hdoliver.com.
Bob was recognized by President Ronald
Reagan for his work organizing the Executive
Coalition for the National Initiative on Technology and Disabilities and was the fourth
recipient of the HHS Dignified Public Service
Award.
Bob was a loyal and proud member of
Conquistadores del Cielo (Conquerors of the
Sky) and served as El Presidente in 1996-97.
ROBERT L. KIRK
A retired executive and leader in the aerospace and transportation industries, died
December 3, 2017, surrounded by dear
friends at his home in Telluride, Colorado.
Robert L. Kirk was born in Charleston, WV
on January 4, 1929 to William and Lillian
Dunnigan Kirk. Bob attended St. Anthony
Grade School and Charleston Catholic High
School. In 1952, Bob graduated from Purdue
University with a BS in Mechanical Engineering. He later received an honorary doctorate
from Purdue in 1993. Bob’s best friend
was fellow Purdue alumnus, Neil Armstrong.
Bob commissioned and was the fundraising
leader of the Neil Armstrong sculpture on
Kirk Plaza at Purdue University. Bob also led
fundraising efforts for the Purdue Armstrong
School of Engineering building and sponsored the Director Chair of the Birck Nanotechnology Center at Purdue.
CATHELEEN WILLIAMS (Age 67)
Peacefully passed away at home,
surrounded by family and friends
on Saturday, December 2, 2017.
She is survived by her husband,
James Williams; one son, Andre
(Sylvia); three daughters, Lakisha,
Kathleen and Tiffany; six brothers, two sisters, 10 grandchildren, two greatgrandchildren, a host of nieces, nephews and
friends. Viewing 9 a.m., followed by 11 a.m.,
service at Berean Baptist Church, 924 Madison
St., NW on Wednesday, December 13, 2017.
Interment Quantico National Cemetery. Services entrusted to R.N. Horton Co. Morticians,
Inc.
Admiral Hernandez' final posting was as
Deputy Commander-in-Chief of United States
Space Command as well as Vice Commander
of NORAD, based in Colorado. He oversaw
the massive and successful efforts to employ
sophisticated U S satellites to detect the
many Iraqi missiles launched against U S and
allied nations during the Gulf War.
Vice Admiral Diego ("Duke") Hernandez, 83,
passed away quietly at his Miami Lakes
home on July 7, 2017, and will be laid to rest
with full military honors at Arlington National
Cemetery on Tuesday, December 12, 2017.
A brief burial service will be held at the Fort
Myer Old Chapel at 12:45 p.m. before the
procession to the burial site. Please arrive
early.
Macon lived life fully. He threw himself into
both work and leisure with great joie de
vivre and humor. Whether riding his Harley
across the West, hiking or skiing the Tetons,
captaining a whitewater raft down the Snake
River, or roasting oysters with friends and
family on the beach in Corolla, he lived
adventurously. No matter the occasion, he
had the right words at the right time, and he
was the life and driver of every party.
Most recently, Bob was a resident of Telluride and Washington, DC. He was an
accomplished photographer with a keen
and patient eye for capturing that special
moment in time. He had a strong love for
Telluride and the desert southwest where he
was able to explore his love of photography.
Bob Kirk is survived by three children and
five grandchildren, Harris Kirk, Waltham,
MA and daughter, Samantha; Colleen Kirk
(Manfred Roeschel), Croton-on-Hudson, NY
and sons, Patrick and Brendan; and Karen
Kirk (Anamitra Bhattacharyya), Evanston, IL
and children, Kobi and Maia. Bob is also
survived by his brother, Thomas, and many
nieces and nephews, including his caregiver,
Margaret Reagan. His sister, Helen Grace Kirk
Reagan, and brothers, William and Frank,
predeceased him. His first marriage to Elise
Kirk ended in divorce and his second wife,
Mary Jo Kirk, predeceased him.
Catholic services will be held December 19,
2017 at 10 a.m. at St. Patrick's Church,
Telluride, Colorado with Deacon Doehrman
officiating. Burial will be at historic Lone Tree
Cemetery.
Memorials may be directed to the Neil Armstrong Statue Fund at Purdue University.
RAGAN
Navy selected Admiral Hernandez in 1986 to
command the US Third Fleet in the Pacific
and to transform it into a combat fleet facing
the Siberian coast of the former Soviet Union.
Admiral Hernandez was also instrumental in
an important change that moved Alaskabased military forces into the Pacific Command. He was awarded the Navy Distinguished Service Medal for his successful
efforts.
DIEGO E. HERNANDEZ
Vice Admiral, USN (Ret.)
Macon was dedicated to his community and
worked to make it a better place. For his
consistent leadership and community support, Macon was honored by the Virginia
Beach Jaycees as the First Citizen of Virginia
Beach in 2009. Later in 2015, the Brocks
received The Darden Award for Regional
Leadership from the Civic Leadership Institute and were nationally recognized as Philanthropists of the Year by the Association of
Fundraising Professionals.
of many corporations including Allied-Signal
(now Honeywell), CSX Transportation, Inc.
and British Aerospace (now BAE Systems).
Bob served on the boards of numerous
charitable organizations, including the
National Gallery of Art. He also served on the
Defense Industry Advisory Council Commission on Military Experts and was a charter
member of the NATO Industrial Advisory
Group.
Bob's civilian career in military, space and
civilian aviation began in 1955 with North
American Aviation (now Rockwell International) and continued with his service as
an executive, director, CEO, or chairman
PAUL A. INTERDONATO
Of Potomac, MD, passed away on Sunday,
December 3, 2017. He was 33 years old. Born
in 1984 to Andrew and Beverly Interdonato,
he was a graduate of Gonzaga College High
School in Washington, DC and attended Barry
University in Miami, Florida. Paul was the
proprietor of a successful vapor device store
and lounge in Silver Spring, MD. He wrote
lyrics for songs for local bands and enjoyed
music in many forms. He also excelled at
designing house plans and elevations for his
father's home building company. Paul was
a generous person in character and spirit,
and often donated his time and funds to
charitable causes. He is survived by his parents,
his brother Jeffrey Thomas, numerous aunts,
uncles, nieces, nephews, and cousins. Friends
may visit at Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Church,
9200 Kentsdale Drive, Potomac, MD on Friday,
December 15, 2017, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.,
where Mass of Christian Burial will be offered
on Saturday, December 16, 2017, at 10 a.m.
Interment will follow at Gate of Heaven Cemetery. In lieu of flowers or gifts, it is asked
that donations be sent in Paul’s name to
Gonzaga College High School, 19 I Street, N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20001. Please view and sign
the family’s online guestbook at:
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
Primarily, they were champions of higher
education, and gave transformative gifts to
Longwood University, Joan’s alma mater, Old
Dominion University, and Virginia Wesleyan
College, where they established the Center
for Religious Freedom. Macon was instrumental in bringing the College Access Foundation program to Virginia Beach which provides college tuition monies to Virginia Beach
students.
KIRK
After graduation Bob served for three years
as an officer in the US Navy.
REGINA JACKSON DUNCAN
GHI
Born in Norfolk on April 11, 1942, Macon was
the youngest of three children, and the only
son, born to Dr. M. Foscue Brock and Clara
Prichard Brock. He graduated from Granby
High School in 1960, and from RandolphMacon College four years later. He married
Joan Elizabeth Perry, whom he’d known since
eighth grade, while on liberty from Marine
Corps officer training on November 28, 1964.
LUDWIG WAHBE TAMARI
Born in Jaffa, Palestine on July 7, 1927,
passed away peacefully at his home in
Potomac, Maryland on December 7, 2017,
surrounded by his loving family.
Devoted husband of Myr Hanania Tamari;
loving and proud father of Wahbe, Rula and
Marwan; dear brother of Abdullah, Joseph,
Diana, Nina and Farah; his greatest joy was
being the loving grandfather of Marwan,
Farrah, Ludwig, Yasmeen, Noor, Alex and
Kareem; beloved father-in-law of Vanda,
Omar and Nadine.
A church service will be held on Tuesday,
December 12, 2017, at 10:30 a.m., in Saints
Peter and Paul Antiochian Orthodox
Church, 10620 River Road, Potomac, MD,
20854, followed by a private interment.
Condolences will be received 2:30 p.m.
onwards at the Tamari home in Potomac,
MD. Burial private.In lieu of flowers, the
family requests that contributions in his
memory be made to St. Jude’s Research
Hospital or to the Antiochian Orthodox
Church of Saints Peter and Paul.
Condolences may be sent by signing into:
www.josephgawlers.com
INTERDONATO
Peacefully on December 6, 2017, surrounded by loved ones. Regina Jackson Duncan
mother of Dr. Loretta L Duncan and the late
Wilma Rose Duncan. Also survived by many
relatives and friends. The late Mrs. Duncan
will lie in state at the Lomax AME Zion
Church, 2704 South 24th Road, Arlington,
Virginia 22206 from 9 a.m. until time of
funeral at 10 a.m. The Ivy Beyond the Wall
ceremony will start at 9 a.m. Rev. Samuel
Whittaker, Pastor. Interment Calvary Cemetery, Norfolk, VA. Arrangements by CHINNBAKER FUNERAL SERVICE, 703-979-1666.
Now death notices on
washingtonpost.com/obituaries allow you
to express your sympathy with greater ease.
Visit today.
His death ends a seven-year battle with
pulmonary fibrosis, which he waged while
remaining adventurous, social and physically
active. He was 75.
Macon shared his good fortune, becoming
a leading benefactor to the causes he held
dear. He was a longtime champion of his
alma matter, Randolph-Macon: He chaired
the Board of Trustees for ten years, and
HERNANDEZ
POST YOUR
CONDOLENCES
MACON FOSCUE BROCK, JR.
Virginia Beach philanthropist Macon Foscue
Brock Jr., who cofounded the nation’s largest
chain of fixed-price variety stores, then gave
away millions of dollars to Virginia colleges,
arts organizations and environmental causes, died Saturday morning, December 9,
2017 in the Oceanfront home he shared with
his wife, Joan.
In 1995, when Dollar Tree went public, Macon
was named president and CEO, and oversaw
the chain’s rapid expansion. He became
chairman of the company’s board in 2001,
and served in that capacity until October
2017—by which time Dollar Tree was a Fortune 200 company with 13,600 stores in 48
states and Canada. He chronicled the story
of the company’s founding and ascent in his
book One Buck At a Time, co-authored with
Earl Swift.
WALKER
BURDELLA L. WALKER
He and Joan shared a passion for American
art, an interest that propelled them to support several campaigns at the Chrysler Museum of Art, and to chair its Board of Directors.
NETTIE SHERR KITZES
Flying carrier-based F-4 Phantoms over
North Vietnam, Admiral Hernandez was shot
down on two separate occasions but managed to maneuver his crippled aircraft out
to sea and was rescued both times by Navy
rescue helicopters in the Gulf of Tonkin,
earning a Purple Heart. Later, he served as
Commander Carrier Air Wing 7 aboard USS
Independence. Admiral Hernandez became
the first Hispanic to serve as Commanding
Officer of a Navy aircraft carrier, taking command of USS John F Kennedy in 1980. He
was promoted to Flag rank the following
year.
After retiring from the Navy in 1991 in a
ceremony aboard a Navy ship in his native
San Juan, PR, he was instrumental in finalizing the status of the island of Vieques
and returning it to the control of the Puerto
Rico government.
He is survived by his
wife Sherry and daughters Selena Haines
and Dolores Lane as well as granddaughter
Angelina Haines.
GAIL RINKER RAGAN
A former resident of University Park, MD
died on Sunday, December 10, 2017, from
complications of Alzheimer’s and vascular
dementia. She was born on March 18, 1935,
in Alexandria, VA to James T. and Grace
Mahon Rinker. Following her graduation from
Alexandria’s George Washington High School
in 1954, she attended Madison College (now
James Madison University). Married after her
freshman year, she remained committed to
getting her degree. She moved numerous
times with her husband’s career while raising
a family and continuing her education at
Boston University, the University of Vermont
and the University of Maryland. She received
her BS from the University of Maryland in
1974.
After receiving her degree, she worked for
several years with the disadvantaged youth
programs of Montgomery County before
becoming a professional tour guide in Washington, DC. She guided tours in Washington
and along the east coast. Her tour guiding
activities took her to Greece, Cyprus, Mexico
and South Africa. Very active in the Washington Guild of Professional Tour Guides, she
served on and chaired a number of their
committees and was in the first group of five
guides awarded the title Master Guide by the
Guild.
A resident of University Park, MD for over
30 years, she was a Girl Scout leader and
served the Riverdale Presbyterian Church as
Sunday school teacher, deacon, elder and
chaired numerous committees. She loved
sports. Voted outstanding athlete (as well as
homecoming queen) in high school, she was
a five-foot-two-inch freshman starting guard
on the Madison College basketball team.
She was an avid skier, tennis player, golfer.
Always up for an adventure, Gail climbed
the Pyramid of the Sun in Mexico; hiked in
the Alps and Andes; made a bobsled run
on the Olympic Track at Lake Placid, NY;
was detained by a mob at a communist
rally after taking a wrong turn in Lima,
Peru; piloted a one-man submarine -- among
other things. Avidly interested in history and
culture, her travels always included the local
museums, historic sites, art galleries and
evening performances. Gail and her husband
traveled to fifty-four countries and most
states combining work, exploring and playing
golf. They were married 62 years.
Gail retired with her husband in 1998 and
moved to Heritage Harbour in Annapolis.
She and her husband immediately became
members of the Calvary United Methodist
Church. She continued her interest in tour
guiding for several years by serving as a
docent at the Paca House in Annapolis. She
was a long-time member of the Annapolis
women’s golf group, “Hole-in-a-Hundred,”
that played on courses around the region.
Gail is survived by her husband Dr. Robert
M. Ragan; son Mark K. Ragan and daughterin-law Elizabeth Simmons of Edgewater, MD;
son Bruce E. Ragan of Monroe, MI; daughter
Kathleen Childs of Centennial, CO; twin
brother Richard Rinker of Franklyn, TN; sister
Robin McFarland of Alexandria, VA; two
grandchildren, Dr. Rachel Green of Highlands
Ranch, CO and Gabe Ragan Childs of Denver,
CO; great-granddaughter Violet Grace Green
and some wonderful nieces and nephews.
A memorial service will be held on Thursday,
December 14 at 1 p.m. at the George P.
Kalas Funeral Home, 2973 Solomons Island
Rd., Edgewater, MD where a gathering will
follow until 3 p.m. Inurnment will be at the
Westminster Presbyterian Columbarium in
Alexandria, VA at a later date. In lieu of
flowers, make a donation to the Alzheimer’s
Association, 1850 York Rd., Ste. D, Timonium,
MD 21093. On line condolences can be made
at:
www.KalasFuneralHomes.com
When the need arises, let families find you in
the Funeral Services Directory.
To be seen in the Funeral Services Directory,
please call paid Death Notices at 202-334-4122.
B8
EZ
. TUESDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Blustery and cold
The day starts off somewhat mild
and relatively tranquil, but that
won’t last as a powerful cold front
passes through. Highs will approach
50 during the first half of the day
before falling back before sunset on strong winds
from the northwest. A brief snow shower or
flurry is possible. Overnight, lows will plunge
into the upper teens and low 20s, with windchills
in the single digits and teens.
Today
Partly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Wednesday
Partly sunny
Thursday
Snow
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Snow possible
Saturday
Partly sunny
Sunday
Mostly cloudy
50° 23
35° 28
42° 30
37° 27
43° 31
47° 39
FEELS*: 43°
FEELS: 21°
FEELS: 38°
FEELS: 36°
FEELS: 38°
FEELS: 42°
CHNCE PRECIP: 25%
P: 5%
P: 60%
P: 40%
P: 5%
P: 25%
WIND: W 10–20 mph
W: WNW 12–25 mph
W: N 6–12 mph
W: SE 4–8 mph
W: SSW 7–14 mph
W: SSW 7–14 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
45/19
Hagerstown
43/20
Davis
34/10
F
Sa
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Normal
Philadelphia
47/23
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
47/18
Dover
50/21
Washington
50/23
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
49° 1:30 p.m.
35° 8:00 a.m.
48°/34°
68° 1979
12° 1917
48° 2:35 p.m.
30° 6:40 a.m.
47°/28°
71° 1979
3° 1968
47° 2:51 p.m.
34° 4:00 a.m.
46°/29°
69° 1979
9° 1968
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +2.0° yr. to date: +2.9°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 53°
OCEAN: 45°
Richmond
52/20
Norfolk
55/26
Virginia Beach
56/27
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 47°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
56/30
OCEAN: 50°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
0.28"
1.19"
35.38"
37.88"
0.0"
2.0"
0.00"
0.34"
1.19"
40.23"
39.77"
0.0"
4.0"
0.00"
0.42"
1.30"
37.75"
39.81"
0.0"
2.8"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:17 a.m.
1:46 a.m.
6:47 a.m.
3:17 a.m.
4:13 a.m.
7:53 a.m.
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
79/70/r
74/42/s
64/52/sh
82/61/pc
77/51/pc
52/43/pc
24/10/s
50/39/pc
85/76/t
34/20/sn
80/68/s
65/63/r
52/33/s
50/37/pc
28/13/sn
47/33/sh
52/31/c
1 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly sunny, breezy. High 30–34. Wind
west 12–25 mph. Tonight, blustery, colder, snow showers
accumulating 1–3 inches. Low 4–8. Wind west 15–25 mph.
Wednesday, mostly cloudy, windy, cold. High 20–24. Wind
west 15–25 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny, breezy, shower.
High 50–55. Wind southwest 12–25 mph. Tonight, windy,
colder, partly cloudy. Low 22–27. Wind west 20–30 mph.
Wednesday, partly sunny, windy, colder. High 34–40. Wind
west 15–25 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, partly sunny, breezy.
Wind west 10–20 knots. Waves 2 feet or less. • Lower Potomac and
Chesapeake Bay: Today, partly sunny, breezy. Wind southwest 10–20
knots. Waves 1–2 feet on the lower Potomac, as high as 2–4 feet on
the Chesapeake.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls will be
around 3.0 feet and holding nearly steady Wednesday. Flood stage
at Little Falls is 10 feet.
Annapolis
FORECAST
Ocean City
51/24
Lexington
44/16
Washington
ACTUAL
Cape May
50/27
Annapolis
49/24
Charlottesville
51/20
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
Th
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
3:10 a.m.
10:06 a.m.
3:41 p.m.
10:43 p.m.
12:15 a.m.
6:38 a.m.
1:13 p.m.
7:08 p.m.
Ocean City
2:51 a.m.
9:03 a.m.
3:06 p.m.
9:23 p.m.
Norfolk
4:55 a.m.
11:06 a.m.
5:16 p.m.
11:21 p.m.
Point Lookout
2:51 a.m.
9:02 a.m.
3:32 p.m.
8:59 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Camarillo, CA 86°
Low: West Yellowstone, MT –6°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
Tomorrow
42/23/sn
54/28/s
40/33/sh
48/28/pc
62/32/s
47/18/pc
55/35/pc
50/26/pc
49/29/c
28/21/c
46/28/i
31/16/sn
35/21/sn
60/29/s
37/15/sf
53/21/pc
60/35/s
25/15/pc
29/15/sf
30/17/sn
59/38/s
66/35/s
25/15/sf
56/28/s
39/28/i
48/36/s
67/37/pc
34/21/pc
49/32/pc
52/36/s
45/29/c
32/23/c
32/21/pc
22/13/sf
22/9/sn
51/35/s
35/29/pc
46/32/s
48/26/pc
34/21/sn
37/29/pc
27/20/sf
73/42/s
57/30/pc
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
38/27/s
24/10/c
61/33/s
29/22/pc
34/24/c
44/21/sn
83/68/sh
63/35/s
28/16/sf
57/30/s
68/34/s
44/30/s
64/43/s
53/29/s
83/53/s
35/22/sf
48/28/s
74/52/s
23/12/pc
25/20/pc
42/24/pc
61/38/s
48/26/c
55/26/pc
48/27/c
26/13/sf
62/37/s
33/16/c
35/22/c
30/18/pc
80/68/pc
63/41/pc
39/24/pc
61/38/s
58/37/s
56/31/s
66/42/s
63/36/s
81/51/s
43/32/pc
56/37/s
69/49/s
29/19/sn
33/21/c
50/35/pc
62/46/s
32/24/pc
40/30/pc
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
54/32/s
45/29/pc
73/40/s
47/23/pc
79/51/s
34/15/sf
45/31/sn
46/31/s
50/24/sn
52/20/pc
50/19/s
52/20/pc
62/33/s
39/27/s
83/75/pc
41/23/s
78/49/s
64/45/s
85/73/pc
47/36/s
30/23/c
38/17/sn
74/46/pc
54/31/s
67/33/s
50/28/r
61/41/s
35/25/pc
75/47/s
28/19/sf
32/13/pc
49/33/pc
31/20/s
40/28/s
50/21/s
38/25/s
62/34/s
52/32/pc
83/74/pc
41/24/pc
76/49/s
63/45/s
86/74/pc
46/35/pc
33/24/c
21/14/sn
63/50/s
63/33/s
World
High: Victoria River Downs, Australia 109°
Low: Verkhoyansk, Russia –61°
Dec 18
New
Dec 26
First
Quarter
Jan 1
Full
Jan 8
Last
Quarter
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
75/41/c
Amsterdam
37/32/pc
Athens
64/51/s
Auckland
75/63/pc
Baghdad
66/42/s
Bangkok
91/78/pc
Beijing
28/12/pc
Berlin
42/30/c
Bogota
66/44/c
Brussels
36/32/pc
Buenos Aires
84/62/pc
Cairo
77/58/pc
Caracas
72/62/pc
Copenhagen
38/33/sf
Dakar
80/69/pc
Dublin
43/37/r
Edinburgh
40/34/pc
Frankfurt
41/31/sn
Geneva
40/26/sh
Ham., Bermuda 71/67/pc
Helsinki
37/28/sn
Ho Chi Minh City 89/73/pc
Tomorrow
74/42/s
43/36/r
66/52/s
73/62/pc
69/40/pc
92/77/pc
33/18/s
38/35/c
67/47/r
45/36/r
90/62/pc
73/55/pc
72/65/pc
38/35/sh
78/67/pc
42/35/r
41/30/r
40/38/sh
40/38/pc
73/64/sh
36/30/c
90/75/pc
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
68/64/pc
60/41/r
60/54/pc
70/49/c
82/60/t
47/24/s
82/76/sh
84/65/pc
87/76/pc
75/65/c
57/45/s
39/37/pc
49/30/s
88/77/pc
69/38/s
26/16/sn
33/31/pc
83/68/pc
79/54/s
72/54/pc
24/12/sf
23/10/sn
41/36/pc
40/28/c
68/65/c
62/39/c
60/53/s
64/49/s
77/55/c
40/24/pc
81/76/sh
84/64/pc
88/78/pc
75/66/pc
58/52/pc
47/37/r
51/40/pc
87/75/pc
72/45/pc
17/5/sn
38/20/r
81/69/pc
79/56/s
73/50/pc
27/26/sf
11/0/sn
48/40/r
37/32/pc
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59/42/sh
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Set
4:46 p.m.
1:50 p.m.
4:20 p.m.
2:09 p.m.
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5:24 p.m.
KLMNO
Style
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
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WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
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Celebrity chef is facing sexual misconduct allegations
BY M AURA J UDKIS
AND E MILY H EIL
Monday’s episode of “The
Chew,” the daytime food talk
show on ABC, had a notable
absence: Mario Batali, the co-host
who had just been removed from
his duties after four women accused him of sexual harassment.
Batali also stepped back from
operations of the 26 restaurants
he co-owns around the world
after the website Eater published
an article Monday morning about
the allegations.
While Batali’s future at ABC is
uncertain, the allegations threw
some of his other projects into
limbo, too. The Food Network
announced that it is putting on
hold plans to relaunch his show
“Molto Mario” next year.
Batali is the latest high-profile
man to be taken down by allegations of sexual misconduct, and
to be suddenly absent from his
seat on a daily television show.
4 WOMEN ACCUSE BATALI OF HARASSMENT
He is taken off TV show, steps back from restaurants
When other notable TV hosts,
such as Matt Lauer and Charlie
Rose, were forced to step down
after sexual harassment allegations, their co-hosts grappled on
air with their colleague’s alleged
behavior.
On Monday’s episode of “The
Chew,” however, the remaining
hosts — Carla Hall, Michael Symon and Clinton Kelly — did not
mention their colleague’s absence. Instead, they were dressed
in leis and Hawaiian shirts for a
Christmas luau-themed show.
An ABC spokeswoman told
The Washington Post that the
show was recorded last week.
Batali has not been on the show
since Dec. 4.
“It’s all over the Internet,” Kelly
said, but he was not talking about
Batali. Instead, it was “a Christmas pineapple!” he said, telling
his co-hosts about a party trend.
“Do you want to decorate one
right now?”
Symon and Hall tested a pair of
hand-holding mittens. The trio
BATALI CONTINUED ON C2
BRENT N. CLARKE/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Women spoke of inappropriate
touching by Mario Batali.
BOOK WORLD
How fiction
can relate
to the facts
of today
BY
S IBBIE O ’ S ULLIVAN
Teaching fiction is no protection from the real world, which
comes crashing into the classroom whether we want it to or not.
The last time I taught Lucinda
Rosenfeld’s “What She Saw . . .,” a
novel about a young woman’s sexual experiences during and beyond college, the Rolling StoneUniversity of Virginia rape story
fiasco was in full swing. If today I
were to teach J.M. Coetzee’s “Disgrace,” a novel about a man whose
sexual encounters with women
are anything but edifying, I might
direct my class to this CNN headline, “Reconciling love and admiration for men who behave badly,”
and let the pundits take over. Or
the students. The last time I
taught “Fifty Shades of Grey,” one
of my female undergraduates protested, claiming that the author
got it all wrong about S&M relationships. No one disputed her.
Why even teach novels full of
sex? Given all the pressures students already face, why go there,
to the uncomfortable terrain of
sexual experience?
Good questions. To which I
would answer: Fiction shouldn’t
soothe us; it should make us think,
expand our range of feelings and
possibly reshape our worldview.
Sexual experience does that, and
so does reading about sex. A wellwritten novel can really shake us
up. Perhaps the ones I taught my
undergraduates can still do that
for us.
“Did he just rape her?” “Why
didn’t she just say no?” “I would
never do that.” “What a slut!” “He’s
weird, crazy.”
Possible responses to today’s
headlines? Yes. They’re also responses from my past students
about specific fictional characters.
Rosenfeld’s Phoebe Fine is upset over a bad experience with a
stranger, and her nice live-in boyfriend is trying to comfort her by
listening to her while stroking her
back and legs. She’s crying, and he
is getting aroused. She puts her
hands over her eyes. He speaks
soothing words to her. They have
sex.
Did he just rape her? Why didn’t
she say no? He certainly would
have stopped. Many of my female
students had already cast Phoebe
as a slut, and this scene was one
more example of how passive and
foolish she was. The men were less
sure of how they read Phoebe;
some failed to understand the implications of Phoebe’s body language (covering her eyes), but
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C4
HILARY BRONWYN GAYLE/HBO
The truths of the Golden Globes
Films and TV programs
centered on women
lead award nominations
BY S TEPHANIE M ERRY
AND E MILY Y AHR
When the Golden Globes nominations were
announced Monday morning, one surprising
title kept popping up: “All the Money in the
World,” which received three nods, for best
director, best actress and best supporting
actor.
It’s not that the movie doesn’t have an
excellent pedigree and a star-studded cast.
Four-time Oscar nominee Ridley Scott directed the film, which revisits the real-life saga of
John Paul Getty III’s 1973 kidnapping. But the
movie has been most buzz-worthy because
portions of it were very recently reshot. After
actor Anthony Rapp and others alleged that
Kevin Spacey sexually harassed or abused
them, Scott recast the actor’s role as billionaire tycoon J. Paul Getty — the grandfather of
the kidnapped teenager — even though the
movie was already essentially finished. Instead of Spacey, viewers will see another Oscar
The Hollywood Foreign Press Association
showed love for women-centric stories on both
the big and small screens during the Golden
Globe nominations Monday morning. HBO’s
“Big Little Lies” and FX’s “Feud: Bette and
Joan” led the television nominees, not to mention Guillermo del Toro’s grown-up fairy tale
“The Shape of Water” and Frances McDormand’s tour-de-force performance in “Three
Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”
“The Shape of Water,” which stars nominee
Sally Hawkins as a mute cleaning lady who falls
for a soulful, otherworldly beast, led all movies
with seven nominations, including best director, best screenplay and best motion picture
(drama). The film is followed closely by “Three
Billboards” and “The Post,” which received six
nods apiece. “Three Billboards” is a pitch-black
comedy by writer-director Martin McDonagh
(“In Bruges”) that follows a mother (McDormand) who unleashes her fury over her daughter’s unsolved murder on the town’s sheriff. In
addition to nominations for McDormand and
supporting actor Sam Rockwell, the movie is
also up for best director, best screenplay, best
original score and best drama.
Steven Spielberg’s “The Post” focuses on The
Washington Post during the chaotic days leading up to the publication of the Pentagon
Papers in 1971. Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks —
both nominees — play Post publisher Katharine Graham and editor Ben Bradlee as they
grapple with whether to go up against the U.S.
government. The movie is also nominated for
'MONEY' CONTINUED ON C3
GLOBES CONTINUED ON C3
FABIO LOVINO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Movie that replaced
Spacey at last minute
is the big surprise
BY
S TEPHANIE M ERRY
ABOVE: Michelle Williams and Mark
Wahlberg in “All the Money in the World,”
a surprise nominee for three awards.
TOP: Shailene Woodley, left, and Reese
Witherspoon in “Big Little Lies,” which
was nominated for best TV limited series.
NETFLIX/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Snubs and the usual
curveballs on the
list of nominees
BY
B ETHONIE B UTLER
Monday’s Golden Globe nominations announcement was dominated by expected
names such as HBO’s “Big Little Lies,” FX’s
“Feud: Bette and Joan” and Guillermo del
Toro’s film “The Shape of Water.” But as it does
every year, the Hollywood Foreign Press
Association threw some curveballs our way.
These are the biggest snubs and surprises:
Film snubs
“Get Out” was left out of both the
best-screenplay and best-director categories,
though it did land a nod for best motion
picture in the comedy/musical category. Jordan Peele’s buzzed-about directorial debut
had already generated Golden Globe controversy after it was announced that the satirical
horror film would compete as a comedy. Given
the film’s incisive commentary on racism,
many felt the film was worthy of recognition
SNUBS CONTINUED ON C3
ABOVE: Mary J. Blige received an acting
nomination for “Mudbound,” but the film
was shut out of the best-picture category.
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
THEATER REVIEWS
CAROLYN HAX
KIDSPOST
Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah isn’t too old for
a visit with Santa Claus. C2
Two plays by the prolific Lauren
Gunderson are on area stages. C4
A reader has a lot to sort out before
contacting her biological father. C3
Singers, dancers, bakers and others are
offering tempting holiday treats. C8
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Actress Connie Britton endorses
Doug Jones in Alabama Senate race
Actress Connie Britton, also
known as fictional countrymusic megastar Rayna James
from the TV drama “Nashville,” is
pulling out her megaphone in
support of Democratic candidate
Doug Jones in the contentious
Alabama Senate race.
The actress tweeted “an
important message” Saturday
about Tuesday’s election between
Jones and his Republican
opponent, Roy Moore, who is
facing multiple allegations of
sexual misconduct.
“I’m supporting Doug Jones
because he has always stood up
for justice,” Britton says in a brief
video message. The actress goes
on to list the issues that she says
Jones would fight for in
Washington, including
education, lower health-care
costs, an increased minimum
wage and equal pay for women.
“Please go out on December 12
and make your voice heard and
vote for Doug Jones,” says
Britton, a Boston native living in
HEY, ISN’T THAT . . .?
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (DN.Y.) celebrating her birthday
with a big group of pals on
Saturday?
A spy spotted Gillibrand
ringing in 51 at Penn Quarter’s
Rasika, a favorite high-end
restaurant among several A-list
politicos. The party of about a
dozen guests enjoyed dinner and
celebrated for more than three
hours, we’re told.
Gillibrand has been the vocal
center of the current maelstrom
over the sexual misconduct
allegations taking down powerful
men. Last week, the senator
called for the resignation of her
colleague and “friend” Al
Franken (D-Minn.).
“We are in a moment of
reckoning — and the silence from
Republicans is deafening,”
Gillibrand tweeted Sunday, the
If Weinstein is not convicted in court, this movement
may be in jeopardy of derailing.”
Actor Alec Baldwin, on the need for Harvey Weinstein to be charged criminally
for the legitimacy of the #MeToo anti-sexual-assault movement to remain intact
Alec Baldwin
VALERIE MACON/
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Connie Britton is speaking out.
California.
The “Friday Night Lights”
actress is no stranger to politics.
Britton was a staunch supporter
of Barack Obama and a regular
name on the marquee during
Hillary Clinton’s stops on the
presidential campaign. Other
outspoken actors, including
Keegan-Michael Key, Mark
Ruffalo, Alyssa Milano and
Patton Oswalt, have also come
out in support of Jones.
PHOTO VIA STEVEN MUFSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah) found time to visit Santa on Saturday at a family party thrown by a GOP consultant.
No word on whether Hatch has been naughty or nice
ZACH GIBSON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand
(D-N.Y.) celebrated at Rasika.
day after her party. “It is long past
time for them to join Democrats
in holding members of their own
party accountable,” she wrote in
tweets referencing President
Trump, Alabama Senate
candidate Roy Moore (R) and
Rep. Blake Farenthold (R-Tex.).
You’re never too old to sit on
Santa’s lap. Who better to prove this
Christmas truism than Sen. Orrin G.
Hatch (R-Utah)?
On Saturday, Hatch, 83, and Old St.
Nick had an Instagram moment
during longtime Republican
consultant Rick Hohlt’s annual
family holiday party. No word on
what Hatch wanted from Santa (it
has to be a secret, right?), but we’re
thinking something pretty wonky. A
colleague pointed out that the
congressional conference committee
on the GOP tax plan is set to begin
debating Wednesday. Hatch,
chairman of the Senate Finance
Committee, and his colleagues could
certainly use a sprinkle of holiday
cheer to muscle through.
Among the more than 300 guests
spreading the Christmas spirit at
Hohlt and his lobbyist wife
Deborah’s Alexandria home were
former White House chief of staff
Reince Priebus and his family;
Republican Ed Gillespie, who
recently lost the Virginia
gubernatorial race, and his wife,
Cathy; Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) and
his family; Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.);
Fox News Channel’s Bret Baier and
his family; and Tom Shannon, an
undersecretary at the State
Department. You get it. It was festive
and filled with big names.
We’re told the party featured
costumed carolers and hundreds of
nutcrackers. Christmas trees, wreaths
and canned goods were later donated
to the United Community Ministries
of Alexandria, a nonprofit group.
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
Batali’s future on ABC talk show ‘The Chew’ is uncertain
BATALI FROM C1
made crafts and giggled. The
authors of “Trap Kitchen” showed
up to cook salmon and pineapple.
It progressed into a pig roast.
There was no indication that
anything was amiss.
In response to the allegations
of harassment, Batali apologized
in a statement to The Post, the
same statement he provided to
Eater.
“I apologize to the people I
have mistreated and hurt. Although the identities of most of
the individuals mentioned in
these stories have not been revealed to me, much of the behavior described does, in fact, match
up with ways I have acted. That
behavior was wrong and there are
no excuses. I take full responsibility and am deeply sorry for any
pain, humiliation or discomfort I
have caused to my peers, employees, customers, friends and family.”
An ABC representative did not
answer questions about how
Batali’s absence will be addressed
on future episodes of “The Chew,”
but the network issued a statement earlier Monday saying that
the company “takes matters like
this very seriously as we are
committed to a safe work environment. While we are unaware
of any type of inappropriate behavior involving him and anyone
affiliated with the show, we will
swiftly address any alleged violations of our standards of conduct.”
In the Eater article, one woman described two instances in
which Batali made inappropriate
and unwelcome physical contact
with her, while the others alleged
that Batali groped their breasts
and buttocks at industry parties.
Three of them worked for him,
while the fourth has not but
works in the restaurant industry.
Batali is one of the most famous chefs in the country, and he
is known for his red hair and
affection for orange Crocs. His
first restaurant, Po in New York
City, earned him a show, “Molto
Mario,” on the then-burgeoning
Food Network. He went on to host
other shows, including “Mario
Eats Italy” and “Ciao America,”
and he has appeared on numerous others, including “Iron Chef
JON VACHON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Mario Batali and Carla Hall in 2011 on the set of “The Chew.” Monday’s show was recorded before the revelations in the Eater story.
America.” He has published 11
cookbooks (including two cowritten with Jim Webster, a multiplatform editor at The Post) and
has a charitable foundation in his
name. The James Beard Foundation named Batali as the nation’s
Outstanding Chef in 2005.
The hospitality group coowned by Batali and Joe Bastianich also released a statement that
noted the company has had policies against sexual harassment,
along with training, in place for
10 years and that it would take
additional measures to make it
easier for employees to raise complaints about higher-ups.
“We have decided to take a
further step beyond our current
policies and practices to ensure
all employees feel comfortable
and empowered to report issues,”
the statement read. “If employees
have claims they want to make
against any corporate officers or
owners specifically, they may now
contact the outside corporate investigations firm T&M Protection
Resources, LLC, who has discretion to independently investigate
complaints and report to outside
counsel.”
It’s not the first time Batali’s
name has come up in conjunction
with sexual harassment. News
reports over the years indicate
that his restaurants, like much of
the rest of the industry, were a
place where sexual comments
and behavior went unpunished.
Employees of the Manhattan restaurant Babbo, in particular, have
been the source of several complaints.
In May, Babbo pastry chef
“You need a
workplace free of
fear, that harbors
an excellent feeling
of the potential for
collaboration and
creativity.”
Mario Batali, in a video
addressing how to combat
sexual harassment in the
workplace
Isaac Franco Nava filed a lawsuit
alleging that he was harassed
because of his sexual orientation.
The lawsuit names the New York
restaurant as well as Batali individually. Nava, who is gay, alleges
that colleagues called him a
“f----t” and “girly,” and that Batali
should have done more to stop
the abuse. Nava was eventually
fired, he alleges, when he was
accused of stealing a single pork
chop that another employee had
told him he could cook for himself.
“Isaac was subjected to vicious
discrimination including antigay, racial and sexual slurs and
ridicule,” his lawyer, Eric M.
Baum, said in a statement to The
Post. “He had the utmost respect
for upper management, but when
he complained about his mis-
treatment they turned a blind
eye.”
In a 2011 lawsuit, Babbo server
Eugene Gibbons alleged that employees (other than Batali) would
regularly hit him on the buttocks
and grab his genitals, while Batali
and Bastianich did nothing. Gibbons declined to comment to The
Post, citing his settlement from
the lawsuit.
Another server, Stephanie Capsolas, who led a $5.25 million
wage lawsuit against Batali, filed
a separate suit alleging that she
was sexually harassed at Babbo.
Her suit accused executive chef
Frank Langello — not Batali — of
making crude comments and
lewd gestures “several times a
week,” the New York Post reported.
In Bill Buford’s 2006 book
“Heat,” a behind-the-scenes look
at Babbo, chef Elisa Sarno complained that a prep chef was
harassing her and spoke crudely
in the kitchen, calling broccoli
rabe, or rapini, “rape,” and talking
about visits with prostitutes.
“But Mario told her there was
nothing he could do. ‘Really, Elisa. This is New York. Get used to
it,’ ” Buford wrote.
Gossip columns have also hinted at Batali’s behavior far before
the current #MeToo moment
gained momentum. One 2007
New York Post article reported
that female servers at Babbo were
“fed up with getting pinched as
they pass through the kitchen,”
and that one server was “furious
that chef Mario Batali called her a
piece of ‘hot ass,’ ” the paper
reported.
In an Oct. 26 Page Six item
lauding Batali for having an allfemale kitchen at Babbo, the chef
said: “It’s not because they have a
vagina. It’s because they’re the
smartest people for the job.”
On Oct. 30, he offered up his
views on how to combat sexual
harassment in the workplace for
a video for Fast Company: “You
need a workplace free of fear, that
harbors an excellent feeling of the
potential for collaboration and
creativity,” he said. “And if you
want to keep really talented people around, you need to create an
environment for them that harbors excellence.”
maura.judkis@washpost.com
emily.heil@washpost.com
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
New series ‘Mrs. Maisel’
has a marvelous morning
SNUBS FROM C1
WARNER BROS./ASSOCIATED PRESS
From left, Harry Styles, Aneurin Barnard and Fionn Whitehead in “Dunkirk,” which will vie for the best motion picture (drama) award.
‘Big Little Lies’ scores 6 nominations
GLOBES FROM C1
best director, best screenplay, best
original score and best drama.
Rounding out the best-drama
category was the indie romance
“Call Me By Your Name” and
Christopher Nolan’s World War II
thriller “Dunkirk.”
Jordan Peele’s horror movie
about race relations, “Get Out,” is
up for best motion picture (musical
or comedy), against Greta Gerwig’s
“Lady Bird,” the Tonya Harding
biopic “I, Tonya,” James Franco’s
“The Disaster Artist” and the Hugh
Jackman-starring P.T. Barnum
biopic “The Greatest Showman.”
The big surprise of the morning
was the three nominations for “All
the Money in the World,” Ridley
Scott’s drama about the J. Paul
Getty III kidnapping. The nods
included one for Christopher
Plummer, who replaced Kevin
Spacey in the role of Getty’s grandfather after allegations of sexual
abuse surfaced against the original actor, Spacey.
On the television side, the starstudded HBO miniseries “Big Little Lies” led the way with six nomi-
FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sally Hawkins, left, with Octavia Spencer, earned a best-actress
nomination for her role as a mute cleaning lady in “The Shape of
Water,” which led all movies with seven nominations.
nations, including acting nods for
Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman, Laura Dern, Shailene Woodley and Alexander Skarsgard. It
was followed by “Feud: Bette and
Joan,” the FX series that retells the
drama between Bette Davis and
Joan Crawford on the 1962 set of
“What Ever Happened to Baby
Jane?,” with four nominations. Susan Sarandon, who played Davis,
and Jessica Lange, who played
Crawford, were nominated for
best actress in a TV movie/limited
series and go up against Witherspoon and Kidman, along with
Jessica Biel of USA’s murder mystery “The Sinner.”
NBC, which will broadcast the
Globes ceremony, was surely
thrilled that its sobfest “This Is Us”
earned three nominations, thanks
to standouts Sterling K. Brown
and Chrissy Metz, along with a
best-drama nod. The best-drama
category is stacked with critical
favorites, including Netflix’s
“Stranger Things” and “The
Crown,” HBO’s “Game of Thrones,”
and Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale.”
The nominations for best TV
series (musical or comedy) were
the new series “The Marvelous
Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon.com) and
SMILF (Showtime), plus ABC’s acclaimed “Blackish,” the second
season of Aziz Ansari’s Netflix series “Master of None” and NBC’s
revival of “Will & Grace.”
Seth Meyers will host the
awards ceremony Jan. 7 on NBC.
emily.yahr@washpost.com
stephanie.merry@washpost.com
beyond that (or perhaps any existing) genre. “ ‘Get Out’ is a
documentary,” the director declared in a wry tweet last month.
The film is still a strong contender for best screenplay at the
Academy Awards, which offer
10 nomination slots (across two
categories, adapted and original)
instead of five.
Greta Gerwig was also left
off the best-director list, though
her acclaimed dramedy “Lady
Bird” was nominated for best
motion picture (comedy/musical) and for her screenplay. Gerwig and Peele would have added
excitement to the best-director
category, which has historically
been dominated by white men.
Barbra Streisand is the only
woman to win best director (for
1983’s “Yentl”) at the ceremony,
which celebrates its 75th anniversary in January. No black director
has taken home the award, although Ava DuVernay (“Selma”)
and Barry Jenkins (“Moonlight”)
were nominated in recent years.
Kumail Nanjiani’s well-reviewed romantic comedy “The
Big Sick” received zero nominations.
Netflix’s
“Mudbound,”
which topped Washington Post
film critic Ann Hornaday’s list of
best movies of 2017, was shut out
of the best-picture category, although Mary J. Blige landed a
nod for best supporting actress.
Perhaps the HFPA isn’t ready to
recognize films produced by
streaming services?
If you loved this summer’s
box-office smash “Girls Trip,”
you’ll probably agree that breakout star Tiffany Haddish was
snubbed for a best-supportingactress nomination, although
that category heavily favors dramas.
Film surprises
Ridley Scott’s “All the Money
in the World” received three
nominations, including one for
best director and another for
Michelle Williams. The drama,
about the 1973 kidnapping of
16-year-old J. Paul Getty III, originally starred Kevin Spacey as the
billionaire oil tycoon J. Paul Getty. Last month, Spacey was removed from the project after
multiple allegations of sexual
misconduct. Veteran actor Christopher Plummer took on the role
as the elder Getty and, despite
having reshot scenes in the span
of a month, landed a nomination
for best supporting actor.
“The Boss Baby,” which features Alec Baldwin as the voice of
a petulant, infant businessman,
was a surprise nomination in the
best animated feature film category, which overlooked one of
the year’s critical darlings, “The
Lego Batman Movie.”
TV snubs
Amazon.com’s “Transparent”
and HBO’s “Veep” were noticeably absent from the top categories this year. (Amazon chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos owns The
Post.) Accolades for “Transparent” would have been tricky to
navigate in the wake of sexual
misconduct allegations against
actor Jeffrey Tambor. He appeared to announce his departure from the show last month,
but the New York Times reported
last week that Tambor may return
to the dramedy after all. “Veep”
has long been a HFPA favorite,
but it was edged out this year by
two newcomers . . .
TV surprises
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” earned a nod for best TV
comedy, as well as a best-actress
nomination for Rachel Brosnahan. Amazon’s delightful new comedy — about a housewife turned
aspiring comedian in 1950s New
York — has received favorable
reviews, but it’s still surprising to
see it here since the show has
been streaming for less than two
weeks.
Showtime’s “SMILF” also
was nominated for best TV comedy, with creator-writer-director
Frankie Shaw earning a bestactress nod.
Jessica Biel, who led USA’s
suspenseful limited series “The
Sinner,” earned a best-actress
nod, putting her up against “Big
Little Lies” stars Nicole Kidman
and Reese Witherspoon, as well
as “Feud’s” Susan Sarandon and
Jessica Lange. “The Sinner” also
got a best-limited-series nod.
It’s also pretty shocking to see
newcomer Katherine Langford,
the star of Netflix’s “13 Reasons
Why,” in the best-actress category
alongside prestige-drama stars
including Elisabeth Moss (“The
Handmaid’s Tale”) and Claire Foy
(“The Crown”). “13 Reasons Why”
certainly got people talking, but
the drama was controversial because of its graphic depiction of
suicide.
bethonie.butler@washpost.com
For the full list of nominations, go to
wapo.st/globes-2018.
A big haul for a movie that few critics have seen
'MONEY' FROM C1
winner, Christopher Plummer.
Scott reshot Spacey’s scenes
Nov. 20-29 while simultaneously
editing those bits into the finished movie. As he told Entertainment Weekly, “I move like lightning.” He was convinced that he
would still have the drama ready
for its scheduled Dec. 22 release.
In the end, he had to push things
back, but only a bit — the movie is
to be released on Christmas.
That’s important for awards purposes: He needed to have the
movie finished in time for a 2017
release to be considered for this
season’s trophies.
Still, it’s amazing that a movie
that finished shooting less than
two weeks ago is up for three
Golden Globes, including nods
for Scott, Plummer and his costar Michelle Williams. Apparently, the Hollywood Foreign
Press Association members got
rush copies of the finished product. On social media, some wondered if HFPA members were just
rubbing it in about getting a
sneak preview.
Vanity Fair film critic Richard
Lawson tweeted that it felt “like
the HFPA was just bragging” that
they’d seen the movie, while Variety editor Kristopher Tapley
tweeted that it seemed as if the
voting organization was teasing
the Globes audience: “HFPA like
‘nah nah nah nah boo boo we saw
All the Money in the World.’ ”
Still others questioned whether the voters actually saw the
film. “I’m not saying [that] the
HFPA voters only watched a sizzle reel of ‘All the Money in the
World’ and voted for that. NOT
saying that. Nor do I secretly
believe it based on no proof,”
Decider.com writer Joe Reid posted with a hint of suspicion on
Twitter.
What’s clear is that the buzz
around Scott’s choice to tear up
his movie was great for generating interest. Had he not, would he
have edged out other worthy directors such as Dee Rees (“Mudbound”), Paul Thomas Anderson
(“Phantom Thread”), Greta Gerwig (“Lady Bird”) and Luca Guadagnino (“Call Me By Your
Name”)? We’ll never know, but he
certainly sent a powerful message.
“You can’t tolerate any kind of
behavior like that,” Scott told
Entertainment Weekly, drawing a
line in the sand. “We cannot let
one person’s action affect the
good work of all these other
people. It’s that simple.”
Scott has gotten plenty of
praise for his choice, including
from Williams, who called the
reshoots “our little act of trying to
right a wrong.” By nominating
both the director and Plummer
for awards, the HFPA also sends
its own message — intentionally
or not — that the director’s decision was the right one.
stephanie.merry@washpost.com
NICOLE RIVELLI/AMAZON.COM/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rachel Brosnahan stars as aspiring comedian Midge Maisel in
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” which was nominated for best TV
comedy. Brosnahan was nominated for best actress in a comedy.
Tread carefully when making this first contact
Adapted from a
recent online discussion.
Dear Carolyn:
When I was 18,
my mother
revealed that the
father I grew up
with was not my
biological father. She claimed
she didn’t even know my biofather, and that she never
contacted him again after their
brief weekend fling at his college.
The conversation we had was
very emotional.
Fast-forward 12 years, without
any further conversation about
this. I broached the subject again
with her. This time, she
eventually admitted she did
know who he was. She showed
me his Facebook profile, saying,
“One of his daughters looks just
like you.”
She has known the entire time
but did not want to tell me
because she feared I would
contact him.
He was apparently in a
relationship with his now-wife
when I was conceived, and they
Carolyn
Hax
have four children.
I want to contact him, but I’m
getting a lot of pushback from
my mother’s family. I feel like it’s
a human right for a person to
know if they’ve sired a child.
Please help.
— Pushed Back
Pushed Back: So much to sort
out.
First, I’m sorry this is how
your mom handled the news. It
is obviously complicated,
involving her own shame for
having such a secret, her impulse
to protect the father you grew up
with, her impulse to protect your
bio-father and the family he
created with his then-girlfriend.
There are a few decks of cards
involved in the house these
trysters built.
Second, you’re the heir to this
house. Please tell all backpushing relatives that this is
your biology, your father and
your decision now. Assure them
you’ll take into account the
potential consequences, but this
is not about them anymore. You
don’t owe anyone anything
except compassion and care.
Third, you hint at some
unproductive reasoning when
you suggest it’s your bio-dad’s
right to know. Whatever you
decide needs to be mindful of
him, yes — but not
presumptuous. Only he knows
what he needs. Since the secrecy
means he’s unable to decide for
himself, you can only decide
what your values require. And do
so, again, while being mindful of
everyone’s consequences.
This involves some higherorder hairsplitting, but I think
it’s an important hair to split. If
you forge ahead with certainty
you’re doing him a moral or
cosmic favor, then this could
backfire on you quickly and
hard.
So. Find the most morally
defensible use of this
information you can — whatever
that entails.
You don’t mention being
angry at your mom, but in case
that’s an element of your
confusion right now: Anger
would be a natural, valid
response, and one to deal with
head-on so it doesn’t control you.
It would be so easy for
indignation over the lies and
secrecy to push you toward
blowing everything up.
Take any anger to a good
therapist first — or just go
anyway to sort things out — and
don’t rush to decide what to tell
whom, how, when and why.
There’s an old saying, “Marry
in haste, and repent at leisure,”
and this seems like an “Act in
haste, repent at leisure”-type
opportunity.
Re: Bio-dad: What does “Pushed
Back” hope to get out of
contacting the biological father.
A relationship? Answers?
Acknowledgment? It seems
important to figure out before
contacting him.
— Anonymous
Anonymous: Essential, in fact,
thank you.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com.
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
Television
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12/12/17
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PAUL DRINKWATER/NBC
Gwen Stefani’s You Make It Feel Like Christmas (NBC at 9) Stefani’s
modern take on traditional Christmas specials features guests such as
Blake Shelton, Seth MacFarlane, Ne-Yo, Ken Jeong and Chelsea Handler.
The Voice (NBC at 8) Three
contestants compete in the Instant
Save for the last spot in the finale
after two are sent home.
Fresh Off the Boat (ABC at 8:30)
In the midseason finale, Jessica
threatens to end neighborhood
caroling after a failed performance
the year before.
Blackish (ABC at 9) Dre is
diagnosed with diabetes and vows
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Brooklyn Nine-Nine (Fox at 9)
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The Mayor (ABC at 9:30) Courtney
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Judd Apatow: The Return (Netflix
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the fifth season of the reality show
following the staff of a luxury yacht.
RETURNING
Chopped (Food Network at 10)
Season 36 kicks off with a
challenge focused on duck.
LATE NIGHT
Conan (TBS at 11) James Franco,
Ari Graynor, Noomi Rapace, Gary
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Daily Show (Comedy Central at 11)
Bob Odenkirk.
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Corden (CBS at 12:37) Owen
Wilson, Jane Krakowski, Joel
Edgerton, Seal.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) Seth
Rogen, Jenna Coleman, Clean
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— Sarah Polus
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
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THEATER REVIEWS
Playwright’s laugh-and-think formula on view in ‘Book of Will,’ ‘Revolutionists’
BY
N ELSON P RESSLEY
Lauren Gunderson is the mostproduced living playwright in
America this season, and if you
catch “The Book of Will” or “The
Revolutionists,” this is what you
will find:
Whip-smart historical figures, hyper-literate and talking
fast. “Will,” now at Round House
Theatre and around the country,
is about the loyal members of
Shakespeare’s troupe who painstakingly gathered his scattered
scripts for the First Folio after the
Bard died. A madcap adventure,
that.
“The Revolutionists,” now at
Baltimore’s Everyman Theatre
and around the country, finds
the real-life playwright Olympe
de Gouges besieged by Marie Antoinette, Jean-Paul Marat’s assassin Charlotte Corday and Caribbean revolutionary Marianne Angelle as the Paris guillotine lops
heads during the Reign of Terror.
“That’s no way to start a comedy,” Olympe quips in the play’s
typically irreverent style. Each
woman needs Olympe’s writing
talents — but for plays, or pamphlets?
Laughter. The in-jokes get
pushy in “Will,” which is overlarded with thespian bombast
and twisted Bard references. I
mean, running jokes about “Pericles”? Gunderson has a theater
geek’s tendency to be super-meta.
On the other hand, Mitchell
Hébert gets to chew the scenery
as Shakespeare’s leading man
Richard Burbage and then create
a dry, bitter and very funny portrayal of rival playwright Ben
Jonson. Kimberly Gilbert makes a
Fiction that
makes us
rethink our
worldview
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
many didn’t even remember reading that detail. Hands over the
eyes! How could they miss that?
Only by carefully rereading the
scene did the full meaning of
Phoebe’s gesture register. But she
didn’t say no, and bad sex ensued.
We can reread a fictional scene,
turn it over in our minds, allow it
she generates a screwball pace
(wonderfully nailed by her acting
quartet) that leaves room for the
second act’s slashes of drama. The
feminist echoes ring out: You
cheer along as these modernsounding women erupt in profane defiance.
You also sense a hollow spot in
these exercises, a potential untapped. The prolific Gunderson
may continue in a productive,
produce-able key for seasons to
come. You wonder if she might
also slow down and write something that’s not just witty and
interesting and hero worship-y,
but complicated, truly gnarly and
maybe great.
sparkling appearance as Shakespeare’s “dark lady,” who bristles
with inside knowledge and suggestiveness.
In the less-predictable “The
Revolutionists,” Charlotte Corday, of all people, is a flat-out riot.
Emily Kester is a manic presence
from the instant her Corday appears in frightening navy blue
lipstick and frosty blond hair,
matching her spectacular dress
(David Burdick’s high-style costumes are terrific).
“You can write my line while I
practice my stabbing and scary
eyes,” Corday tells Olympe as Kester’s wild gaze briefly stops the
show.
Beth Hylton gets punchlines by
the dozen, too, as a megawatt
Marie Antoinette with a nightlight brain, and Dawn Ursula
likewise nails jokes as Angelle
(this merry history’s only composite character) critiques Olympe and cuts down whoever needs
cutting down with the drippingly
intoned phrase “I mean . . .”
Sentimentality. It’s the Achilles’ heel of “Will,” especially,
which repeats over and over how
important it is that Shakespeare’s
plays are preserved for posterity.
“Will” aims to share an executive
suite with the brand-name
“Shakespeare in Love,” the Oscarwinning film that’s now the mostproduced play in regional theaters. But “Will” is more fawning
than frisky.
That general sense of awe dogs
“The Revolutionists,” too. Is art
really any practical use as political resistance? The discussion
gets dry, and of course the pro-art
script stacks the deck. The constant campaigning celebrates cre-
ativity, yet also feels nervous
about art’s minority status then
and now.
Gunderson’s characters are always on high boil with sharp
things to say, but they’re not
always given genuine conflict to
play. (The hand-wringing “It can’t
be done!” as actors track down
scripts in “Will” doesn’t cut it as
a plot.) Gunderson’s “Emilie:
La Marquise du Chatelet Defends
Her Life Tonight,” staged this fall
by WSC Avant Bard, is an intensely explanatory portrait of yet another historical figure (in this
case a physicist), and in the title
role Sara Barker was as fired up
by the possibilities of science as
Megan Anderson’s Olympe is by
the power of writing. The plea-
sure of “Miss Bennet: Christmas
at Pemberley,” co-written with
Margot Melcon and staged last
year at Round House, was the
beloved characters, chatty and
whispery as ever, and the sparkling imitation Jane Austen language. The plot was the platform
for the performances, not vice
versa.
“You’re a writer-y kind of writer,” a character says of Olympe in
a line that sounds like Gunderson
glimpsing herself in the mirror.
Her smart, fact-driven, sciencefriendly characters — especially
women past and present — give
Gunderson a definite silhouette,
even when she departs in more
contemporary-set plays such as “I
and You” (a surprise-ending two
character drama of teens studying Walt Whitman) and “Exit,
Pursued By a Bear” (a “revenge
comedy” about a wife strapping
her husband to a chair and teaching him about his mistakes). Her
plays are an education, reveling
in knowledge and detail. “Will” is
at its very best when it hacks
cleanly through the weeds of how
exactly publishing and printing
was done in the early 17th century.
Ryan Rilette directs the
audience-friendly “Will” on a big
two-story Elizabethan set with
winning lead turns from Todd
Scofield and Maboud Ebrahimzadeh as the actors on a hunt. Casey
Stangl has more tones to work
with in “The Revolutionists,” and
to teach us — possible good preparation for any future dicey off-thepage real-time experiences. (Is
there a novel out there that could
prepare us for Louis C.K.? If so,
please let me know.)
Surprisingly, my female students fared no better in understanding why Phoebe didn’t say
no. To determine how easy it is for
a woman to actually say “no,” I
went around the room asking all
my female students to say aloud
the word like they mean it. The
first time around, none of them
could do it. Instead, there were
whispers and even some giggles.
So we went around again, and
again, until everyone was practically yelling “no.” Saying “no”
takes a lot of effort, and reading a
woman’s body language takes
practice. Suddenly, Phoebe’s character isn’t so cut and dried. Suddenly the students aren’t so sure
what they’d do if they were in her
place.
“Disgrace” offered different
complications: David is an egocentric teacher who sleeps with
his student, visits prostitutes and
has a daughter who refuses to call
the authorities after she’s been
gang-raped. Everyone in the novel
behaves against expectations, but
Bev, an unattractive married
woman who instigates a sexual
affair with David knowing full
well his reputation, really perplexed the students.
“But Bev’s married,” the cry
went up. “Sleeping with anyone
but her husband is wrong. Why
did she do it?” Never one to miss
an opportunity to rough up the
discussion, I suggested they ask
their mothers. A more serious
question is: How did sleeping with
Bev help David to become a better
man? In real life we may never
come in contact with the Davids of
the world, but in the classroom
our job is to understand them
despite their sexual behavior.
Michel Houellebecq’s social satire “The Elementary Particles”
may share the most with our current headlines. Houellebecq’s
character Bruno, an unattractive,
overweight man prone to inappropriate sexual behavior toward
women, seems awfully close to a
certain Hollywood mogul, with
important exceptions: Bruno is
not a rich, successful man, and he
is, from time to time, capable of
gestures of tenderness, even if
they are rebuffed. Many of my
students didn’t “get” Houellebecq’s novel; they just thought the
characters were jerks. As fiction
often does, the novel forces us to
consider all possible aspects of a
person, which is the same thing as
considering all possible aspects of
ourselves, right? Looks like that
CNN article is more useful than I
first thought.
If I were still teaching, I don’t
know what novels I would put on
my syllabus, and I sometimes worry our culture may be too far gone
to be contained between the covers of a book, something novelist
Philip Roth, famous for his own
libidinous books, predicted in
1961, when he wrote that “actuality is continually outdoing our tal-
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
KALEY ETZKORN
In “The Book of Will,” Mitchell Hébert plays Richard Burbage, above, as well as another character.
The Book of Will, by Lauren
Gunderson. Directed by Ryan Rilette.
Set design, Paige Hathaway; lights,
Jesse Belsky; costumes, Kendra Rai;
sound design/composer, Matthew M.
Nielson. With Katie Kleiger, Marni
Penning, Brandon McCoy, Michael
Russotto, Christopher Michael
Richardson and Cody LeRoy Wilson.
About 2 hours and 20 minutes.
Through Dec. 24 at Round House
Theatre, 4545 East-West Hwy.,
Bethesda. Tickets $36-$65. Call 240644-1100 or visit
roundhousetheatre.org.
The Revolutionists, by Lauren
Gunderson. Directed by Casey
Stangl. Set and projection design,
Daniel Ettinger; lights, Elizabeth
Harper; sound design, C. Andrew
Mayer. About 2 hours and
20 minutes. Through Jan. 7 at
Everyman Theatre, 315 W. Fayette
St., Baltimore. Tickets $43-$65. Call
410-752-2208 or visit
everymantheatre.org.
ents, and the culture tosses up
figures almost daily that are the
envy of any novelist.” I hope not.
Many of the students who read
the books I taught are now in their
30s. I wonder if they remember
our class discussions, or if the
books made a lasting impression. I
taught these books in the spirit of
hope — and information. Now, I
wonder: How can we bring back
the exultant Yes Yes Yes of Molly
Bloom if we’re teaching women to
say No!, and too many men haven’t a clue?
bookworld@washpost.com
Sibbie O’Sullivan, a former teacher
in the Honors College at the University
of Maryland, has recently completed a
memoir on how the Beatles have
influenced her life.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
2 girlfriends, 2 babies and 2 very di≠erent presentations on social media
Ask Amy
Dear Amy: My
boyfriend and I
have been on/off
AMY
for the past five
DICKINSON
years.
During the time
we were apart, he had another
girlfriend. I didn’t know about
her. He and I maintained a
“friends with benefits”
relationship during our breaks.
After I became pregnant with
his child, I found out that they
were very serious. I learned that
she was pregnant, too. Our sons
were born nine days apart.
They are no longer together,
and he and I are trying to work
things out, but I can’t seem to let
their relationship go.
I know that Facebook isn’t
“life,” but it bothers me that their
entire relationship was broadcast
on Facebook, and that he won’t
even acknowledge us as being in a
relationship.
He has never posted a picture
of us or of our son.
He says he’s ashamed of himself
(not of me), but I can’t help but
feel like he’s not being truthful. I
think he’s ashamed of me.
He tells me all the time that
“you’re not her,” which makes me
feel like he wishes he wasn’t with
me. He says I’m being insecure
and that he’s never going to care
about Facebook.
I just don’t get why he could
care about his Facebook status
when he was with her, but not
with me?
Am I being stupid?
Worried
Worried: When you ask me if
you’re being “stupid,” you run the
risk of supplying me with a
descriptor I’d rather not apply to
a woman with a young child.
However, this whole situation is
unfortunate — because Rome is
burning and you’re worried about
your Facebook status.
I do agree that this status is a
sign of where your guy’s priorities
are, and while I’m not inclined to
side with him, I do appreciate his
embarrassment over fathering
two babies (days apart) with two
different women. Yes, he should
feel embarrassed. He deceived
both women (I imagine), and now
his ability to be a good parent to
both of his sons is compromised
because one baby’s mother is
insecure and threatened by the
other. This impedes his ability to
be present in his sons’ lives.
Your guy is not in charge of
Facebook. You should post
whatever photos you want the
world to see. When people start to
realize that your partner has two
sons the same age with different
women, he (and you) will face
some questions.
Please understand that
parenthood will not magically
change your guy’s character. You
should get all of your legal,
custodial and financial ducks in a
row regarding the child.
Encourage this man to be a good
father to both of his children, but
understand that he may not
intend to lead a monogamous life.
Dear Amy: My “adult” 23-year-
old son is home for the holidays.
He leads a more liberal lifestyle
than my husband and I, and
suffice it to say that not only do
our politics not match up, but
neither do our hygiene practices.
To be blunt, his body odor is
MOVIE DIRECTORY
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Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
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Dream Big: Engineering Our
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AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr
Coco (PG) CC: 12:30-1:45-3:158633 Colesville Road
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Miracle on 34th Street (1947)
Murder on the Orient Express
3:00
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Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
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Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC: On Body and Soul (Testrol es
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A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Ice Mother (Baba z ledu) 5:15
Lover for a Day (L'Amant d'un
4:20-10:05
jour) 9:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Lady Bird (R) 11:20-1:20-3:202:15-4:50-7:35-10:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 5:20-7:20-9:30
Gutland 9:20
Missouri (R) CC: 1:00-3:506:45-9:30
AMC Academy 8
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
6198 Greenbelt Road
1:20-7:10
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:00Coco 3D (PG) CC: 4:20
2:15-3:45-5:00-7:45
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:35-4:15Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
6:50-9:15
1:00-4:00-7:00
Pitch Perfect Treble Marathon
The Mountain Between Us (PG2:00-7:00
13) 2:00-4:40-7:20
The Disaster Artist: The IMAX
The Star (PG) CC: 1:30
2D Experience (NR) 2:15-5:00Coco (PG) CC: 1:45-7:45
7:45-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
AMC Loews Uptown 1
2:00-4:30-7:30
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:15-4:00-6:45
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
(PG-13) CC: 4:40-7:30
CC: 6:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
AMC Mazza Gallerie
3:45-6:35
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 4:45
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
AMC Center Park 8
1:40-4:30-7:30
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
1:20-4:20-7:20
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:15Murder on the Orient Express
4:00-6:45-9:30
(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:10-6:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Coco (PG) CC: 2:00-4:30
2:30-5:30-8:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 2:20-5:00-7:40 Coco (PG) CC: (!) 1:10-6:30
The Man Who Invented Christ- Murder on the Orient Express
mas (PG) CC: 2:40-5:20-7:50
(PG-13) CC: 1:40-4:20-7:05-9:50
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 7:05
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:30-4:15The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 12:30- 7:00-9:45
3:00-5:30-8:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Albert Einstein Planetarium - 2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
National Air and Space Museum Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
6th Street and Independence Ave SW (!) 2:00-4:20-6:50-9:10
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR) 1:00-3:50-6:40-9:30
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30 Coco 3D (PG) (!) 9:00; (!) 3:45
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:00AMC Columbia 14
1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM The Disaster Artist (R) 11:10Angelika Pop-Up
1:50-4:20-7:00-9:40
at Union Market
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 6:30
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R) 11:40-2:50-6:20-9:40
The Star (PG) CC: 11:40-2:00-4:15
11:00-1:20-3:45-6:15-8:35
Coco (PG) CC: 4:35-7:35
The Florida Project (R) 11:10Murder on the Orient Express
1:30-3:40-6:00-8:15
Wait for Your Laugh 11:15-1:15- (PG-13) CC: 10:50-1:35-4:257:20-10:15
3:15-5:15-7:15
Wonder (PG) CC: 2:25-5:10Avalon Theatre
7:50-10:30
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-3:10-5:20-7:45 (!) 11:35-2:00-4:30-7:20-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Missouri (R) 2:00-4:45-7:30
6:40-10:30
Landmark
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
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11:20-2:00-4:50-7:40-10:25
807 V Street, NW
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 10:50-1:45-4:40Justice League (PG-13) CC:
7:30-10:20
12:05-2:25-4:50-7:20-9:50
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
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Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
10:00-10:10
11:05-2:00-4:50-7:35-10:25
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:50-2:15-3:00Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:10-1:404:40-7:10-7:45-9:35
4:05-6:40-9:10
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: Coco 3D (PG) CC: 3:00
11:55-2:25-4:55-7:30-10:05
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
Experience (PG-13) CC: 4:3012:15-3:30-7:00-10:15
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Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
Landmark E Street Cinema
1:30
(PG)
555 11th Street NW
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:00- Pitch Perfect Treble Marathon
2:00-7:00
2:00-4:00-6:30-7:00-9:40
Tom of Finland (NR) 1:05-4:05- Justice League (PG-13) CC:
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7:05-9:35
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Coco (PG) CC: 11:40-9:35
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
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9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) CC:
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The Disaster Artist (R) CC: (!)
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:10-3:20-4:30- 11:40-1:45-3:00-4:15-5:30-6:455:30-7:40-9:15-9:50
8:00-9:15-10:25
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
12:45-1:45-3:45-4:45-6:4511:50-12:55-2:45-3:45-6:40-9:30
7:45-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Landmark West End Cinema 11:50-2:20-4:20-7:20-10:20
The Mountain Between Us (PG2301 M Street NW
13) CC: 12:00-9:45
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 1:00The Star (PG) CC: 10:05
3:15-5:30-7:45
Coco (PG) CC: 11:30-1:50-4:25God's Own Country 1:30-4:306:05-7:00-8:40-9:35
7:30
The Florida Project (R) CC: 1:15- Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:45-2:25-4:104:15-7:15
7:10-9:55
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 2:40
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:30-2:10We, the Marines (NR) 10:004:55-7:40-10:20
11:00-12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00 A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14 1:30-4:05-7:05-9:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
701 Seventh Street Northwest
The Disaster Artist (R) 1:25-3:50- 2:00-5:05-7:35-10:15
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
6:15-8:45
(!) 11:45-1:40-5:10-7:30-9:50
Justice League (PG-13) 12:00Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
1:30-2:45-4:15-5:30-7:00-8:15Missouri (R) CC: 11:35-2:15-4:3010:00
7:15-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:30The Man Who Invented Christ3:25-6:20-9:15
mas
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Coco (PG) 1:50-4:40-7:15-9:55
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
4:00-9:25
13) 12:10-2:50-5:25-8:00-10:35
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:45- Lady Bird (R) 11:35-1:55-5:207:45-10:10
3:10-5:35-10:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:25- Justice League: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 7:40-10:25
3:00-5:45-8:20-10:45
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
(PG) 12:05-2:40-5:10
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:50
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:15-2:40- Unexpectedly Yours (!) 1:20-4:357:25-10:15
5:05-7:30-10:00
Coco (PG) 12:15-3:00-5:35-8:10- Wonder (PG) 7:00
10:45
AMC Loews
Wonder (PG) 12:00-2:35-5:10St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
8:05-10:45
11115 Mall Circle
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
The Disaster Artist (R) (!) 10:3012:00-2:20-4:45-7:05-9:45
1:45-4:15-6:45-9:45
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin Justice League (PG-13) CC:
IMAX Theater
11:00-2:00-4:45-6:45-7:30-9:15601 Independence Avenue SW
10:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
11:30-2:45-6:00-9:00
(NR) 2:40
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
The Star (PG) CC: 11:45-2:15-4:30
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
MARYLAND
killing us! I didn’t raise him this
way, and I absolutely can’t stand
it.
I just can’t embrace not
showering daily and not using a
daily dose of antiperspirant.
How do you address an
awkward and difficult topic with
a person who is also awkward and
difficult?
Mother of the Smelly Kid
Mother of the Smelly Kid: I
assume you have heard the term
“adulting.” This is a recently
minted verb to describe the
process that people in their 20s
are undertaking to finally exit
their lengthy childhoods.
Adulting refers to assuming some
life skills, such as doing dishes,
paying bills, and — yes, cleaning
oneself.
I’m assuming that you did
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 10:45-1:00-4:007:15-9:45
Coco (PG) CC: 11:45-3:00-6:159:30
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Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
10:45-2:30-5:15-7:45-10:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
11:30-1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Wonder (PG) 7:00
AMC Magic Johnson
Capital Ctr 12
800 Shoppers Way
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:152:00-4:00-6:45-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
3:30-6:25-9:35
The Mountain Between Us (PG13) CC: 4:40-7:30-10:05
The Star (PG) CC: 12:40-2:40
Jigsaw (R) CC: 4:30-9:30
Coco (PG) CC: 12:30-3:30-4:456:15-7:45-9:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:15-6:50-9:25
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:10-6:25-9:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:10-5:45-8:15
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
2:15-4:45-7:15-9:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
1:00-3:45-6:30-9:20
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 1:45-7:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 5:30-8:30
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
(PG) 2:30
Wonder (PG) 3:50
ArcLight Bethesda
7101 Democracy Boulevard
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:402:50-4:00-5:35-6:45-10:05
Justice League (PG-13) 11:102:10-5:20-7:55-10:15
The Star (PG) 12:05
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:302:20-5:10-8:05-10:00
Coco (PG) 12:10-2:40-5:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:20-2:05-4:55-7:409:50
Wonder (PG) 11:25-12:50-2:003:00-4:40-6:20-7:25-9:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:0012:15-1:45-2:15-3:30-4:30-5:006:30-7:20-8:15-9:30-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:051:55-4:05-7:10-10:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:15-1:50-4:457:25-9:20
Coco 3D (PG) 4:20-6:40
The Disaster Artist (R) 8:00-10:25
Coco (PG) 11:35-1:10-3:35-7:459:00-9:55
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
1:15-4:25
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 12:45
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) CC: 1:40
Lady Bird (R) 11:55-2:25-4:506:00-8:10-9:10
It's a Wonderful Life (1946)
(PG) 7:15
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:1012:50-1:50-3:40-4:40-6:20-7:209:00-10:10
Justice League (PG-13) 12:001:00-4:00-6:00-7:00-9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:103:00-4:10-7:10-9:10-10:20
The Star (PG) 12:20-2:40-4:507:25-9:50
Coco (PG) 12:30-1:30-3:30-4:306:30-7:30-9:05-10:05
Wonder (PG) 1:20-4:20-7:2010:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:001:40-4:05-6:50-9:20
Justice League (PG-13) 2:005:00-8:00-10:45
Coco (PG) 11:30AM
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
10:30-12:50-3:10-5:30-7:50-10:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
2:10-10:30
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) 11:00-4:30-7:10-9:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11:10-4:40-7:30
Last Flag Flying (R) 1:40
Lady Bird (R) 12:10-2:30-4:507:20-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:20-1:00-3:40-6:409:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 10:50-1:50-5:007:40-10:30
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
The Disaster Artist (R) 10:551:45-4:15-7:05-9:50
Justice League (PG-13) 3:30-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
11:15-6:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 2:30-9:05
The Star (PG) 11:25-2:05
Coco (PG) 11:45-1:30-4:45-7:55
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:00-1:50-4:40-7:3010:15
Wonder (PG) 11:20-2:20-5:158:25
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
11:10-2:15-5:00-7:35-10:05
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 4:307:15-10:05
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:051:45-4:25-7:05-10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 10:55-1:40-4:307:20-10:10
Jawaan (NR) 10:20
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:30-6:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:10-3:15-6:40-9:45
Coco 3D (PG) 3:00
Unexpectedly Yours 11:50-2:505:45-8:40
Justice League (PG-13) 11:002:00-3:30-5:00-8:00-9:30
Coco (PG) XD: 12:40-3:55
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:30-6:30
Justice League (PG-13) XD:
7:10-10:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Wonder (PG) 2:15-5:00-7:4510:30
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
1:00-2:00-3:45-4:45-6:30-7:30Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:159:15-10:15
4:45-7:15-9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Marshall (PG-13) 12:30-3:301:10-4:05-7:00-9:55
6:30-9:30
The Star (PG) CC: 1:55-4:25Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
6:40-9:10
Missouri (R) 12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
Coco (PG) CC: 1:00-2:00-3:35Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
4:35-6:20-7:10-8:55-9:45
1:15-4:30-7:30-10:30
Murder on the Orient Express
Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:30-5:00(PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:40-7:20-10:00 7:15-9:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:40-4:20Regal Hyattsville Royale
7:00-9:40
Stadium 14
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
6505 America Blvd.
1:20-4:00-6:50-9:25
Justice
League
(PG-13)
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
12:30-1:40-3:30-4:45-6:30-7:452:20-4:50-7:40-10:10
9:30-10:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
The Disaster Artist (R) 1:15-4:002:15-4:40-7:05-9:30
The Man Who Invented Christ- 7:00-9:45
mas (PG) CC: 1:30-4:10-6:45-9:20 Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:15Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: 4:30-7:30-10:45
The Star (PG) 12:45-3:15-6:001:00-4:00-6:55-9:50
8:25-10:45
Lady Bird (R) CC: 2:10-5:00Murder on the Orient Express
7:35-9:55
(PG-13) 1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
Landmark
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:15Bethesda Row Cinema
6:55-10:30
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Wonder (PG) 12:45-3:30-6:15Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:00-3:20-5:40- 9:00
7:45-9:55
Coco (PG) 12:30-2:00-3:15-5:00Murder on the Orient Express
6:15-7:45-9:00-10:30
(PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:30Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:20- 4:30-7:15-9:45
2:00-3:55-5:00-7:10-8:00-9:50
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:30National Theatre Live: Follies
2:00-4:45-7:30-10:00
7:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) CC: 1:50- 1:30-4:15-6:45-9:15
4:00-7:00-9:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
12:50-1:30-3:40-4:10-6:30-7:20Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
9:30-10:00
14716 Baltimore Avenue
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Justice
League (PG-13) 12:50Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:404:05-7:25-10:25
7:30-10:00
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:20Old Greenbelt Theatre
2:50-5:20-7:55-10:30
129 Centerway
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:05Lady Bird (R) 5:30-7:45
3:20-6:30-9:40
Paragon Kentlands Stadium 10 The Star (PG) 1:10-3:50-6:25-9:00
Murder
on the Orient Express
629 Center Point Way
(PG-13) 12:15-3:30-6:40-9:30
Justice League (PG-13) 11:50- Coco (PG) 1:40-4:20-7:00-9:45
2:25-5:00-7:35-10:10
Wonder (PG) 1:50-4:30-7:20Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:4510:10
4:30-7:15-10:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
The Star (PG) 12:45-2:50-4:5512:00-2:40-5:10-8:00-10:35
7:00-9:05
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:50Coco (PG) 12:05-2:30-4:552:30-4:55-7:35-10:00
7:20-9:45
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Murder on the Orient Express
1:30-4:10-6:50-9:20
(PG-13) 12:00-2:35-5:10-7:45Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
10:20
12:30-3:40-7:10-10:20
Wonder (PG) 12:10-2:40-5:10Lady Bird (R) 11:55-2:20-4:457:40-10:10
7:15-9:50
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13
1:10-3:15-5:20-7:25-9:30
199 East Montgomery Avenue
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:45The Disaster Artist (R) 12:305:05-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:40- 3:15-6:00-8:45
Justice League (PG-13) 12:452:55-5:10-7:25-9:40
3:45-6:45-9:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:3012:00-7:25
3:30-6:45-10:00
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-3:10-5:20The Star (PG) 1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30
7:30-9:40
Coco (PG) 12:30-1:00-3:15-3:45Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
6:00-6:30-8:45-9:15
3899 Branch Avenue
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League (PG-13) 1:45(PG-13) 1:00-4:00-6:45-9:45
4:30-7:15
Wonder (PG) 12:45-3:30-6:30Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:05- 9:30
4:00-7:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Coco (PG) 12:15-3:15-6:15
1:15-3:45-6:15-8:45
The Star (PG) 12:00-2:15-4:40A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
7:30
4:15-9:45
Wonder (PG) 12:45-3:45-7:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:00Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:15- 3:30-6:00-8:30
3:05-5:30-7:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:30-7:00
15200 Major Lansdale Blvd
Lady Bird (R) 12:30-3:00-5:45Justice League (PG-13) 1:403:10-4:40-6:10-7:40-9:10-10:30 8:30
Regal Waugh Chapel
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 3:50Stadium 12 & IMAX
7:10-10:10
1419 South Main Chapel Way
The Star (PG) 3:20-5:50-8:2010:30
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:40Murder on the Orient Express
3:25-5:55-8:25-11:00
(PG-13) 3:25-6:20-9:30
Justice League (PG-13) 12:25Coco (PG) 1:20-2:50-4:10-5:30- 3:35-6:25-9:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:307:00-8:10-9:45
3:30-6:30-9:50
Wonder (PG) 1:10-4:20-7:25The Star (PG) 12:15-2:30-4:5010:15
7:10-9:40
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Coco (PG) 12:00-2:20-4:402:30-4:55-7:20-10:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:05- 7:00-9:30
Murder on the Orient Express
4:00-6:30-9:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:40- (PG-13) 1:20-4:20-7:15-10:10
Wonder (PG) 12:10-2:45-5:205:15-7:50-10:30
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:30-4:30- 8:00-10:50
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
7:30-10:30
12:20-3:00-5:35-8:15-10:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:10
12:50-3:15-5:40-8:10-10:35
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:05Halloween (PG-13) 3:00-5:252:40-5:05-7:50-10:30
8:00-10:25
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Regal Cinemas Majestic
1:00-4:10-7:20-10:20
Stadium 20 & IMAX
The Disaster Artist: The IMAX 2D
900 Ellsworth Drive
Experience (NR) 12:10-2:50-5:20The Disaster Artist (R) 12:007:55-10:25
2:30-5:10-7:50-10:20
Regal Westview
Justice League (PG-13) 12:10Stadium 16 & IMAX
3:45-7:00-10:05
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:15The Disaster Artist (R) 11:453:25-6:50-9:50
Coco (PG) 12:00-1:15-2:40-4:00- 2:30-5:15-8:00-10:30
Justice League (PG-13) 12:455:25-6:45-8:05-9:30-10:40
3:45-6:45-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:00(PG-13) 12:30-3:30-6:40-9:35
4:45-8:00-11:15
Wonder (PG) 12:25-3:20-6:15The Star (PG) 11:45-2:15-4:459:10
7:15
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Coco (PG) 12:15-1:15-3:00-4:0012:00-2:45-5:10-7:40-10:35
5:45-7:00-8:30-9:45-11:15
Dunkirk: The IMAX 2D ExperiMurder on the Orient Express
ence (PG-13) 12:25-3:05
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:30- (PG-13) 1:00-4:00-6:45-10:00
Wonder (PG) 12:30-1:30-3:303:15-5:50-8:25-11:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 4:30-6:15-7:30-9:30-10:30
Missouri (R) 12:05-3:30-6:30-9:25 A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:45-3:30-6:30-9:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
12:15-3:35-6:45-9:55
The Disaster Artist: The IMAX 2D 11:30-2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Experience (NR) 5:50-8:25-11:00 Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:002:45-5:30-8:15-11:00
Regal Germantown Stadium 14 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
20000 Century Boulevard
Missouri (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Justice League (PG-13) 12:15- The Man Who Invented Christ1:45-3:15-4:45-6:15-7:45-9:15mas (PG) 12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
10:45-10:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:30- 9:45
3:45-7:00-10:15
Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:30-5:00The Star (PG) 1:45-4:15-6:45-9:15 7:45-10:15
Coco (PG) 12:00-1:30-2:45-4:15- Justice League: The IMAX 2D
5:30-7:00-8:15-9:45
Experience (PG-13) 7:45-10:45
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14
1591 West Nursery Road
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
(PG) 11:30-2:15-5:00
UA Snowden Square
Stadium 14
9161 Commerce Ctr Dr
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:303:00-5:30-8:00-10:25
Justice League (PG-13)
12:50-1:40-3:50-4:30-6:40-7:309:30-10:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:454:15-7:20-10:20
The Star (PG) 1:50-4:10
Coco (PG) 12:30-1:30-3:10-4:206:00-7:00-8:40-9:40
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:40-3:20-6:00-8:50
Wonder (PG) 1:15-4:00-6:50-9:30
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
1:50-4:40-7:10-9:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:003:30-6:15-9:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:103:40-6:15-9:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:20-4:30-7:15-10:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
6:30-9:50
Lady Bird (R) 12:30-2:55-5:207:45-10:10
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
(!) 11:10-2:10-5:00-6:30-7:509:20-10:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
10:20-12:20-3:30-4:20-6:50-9:40
The Star (PG) Open Caption; CC: (!)
11:00-1:30-4:10-6:40-9:00
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:50-1:20-3:50
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 10:10-3:10-6:20-9:50
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 11:50-3:206:10-8:50
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
11:20-2:30-5:10-7:30-10:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
10:30-1:45-4:50-7:40-10:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: (!)
12:10-2:40-5:30-8:10-10:45
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:40-8:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
CC: 10:00-10:40-12:50-3:40-4:307:00-10:10-10:50
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
11:40-12:30-1:10-2:50-5:40-7:108:30-10:00
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:05-11:302:20-4:50-7:20-9:10
iPic Pike & Rose
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) (!) 12:454:15-7:45-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:003:00-6:15-9:45
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:00-3:15-6:45-10:00
Coco (PG) (!) 12:30-3:45-7:1510:30
Wonder (PG) (!) 12:15-3:30-7:0010:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:005:00-8:00-10:50
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) (!)
12:15-3:00-6:30-9:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) (!)
12:30-4:00-7:30-10:40
VIRGINIA
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
11:30-12:10-2:35-3:20-4:30-5:458:45-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
11:45-2:45-6:00-9:15
The Mountain Between Us (PG13) CC: 12:25-7:20
The Star (PG) CC: 11:30-3:10-5:25
Coco (PG) CC: 11:40-2:30-6:058:45-9:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:50-3:00-6:00-9:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:35-1:002:20-4:00-5:15-8:15-10:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
10:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
11:40-2:00-4:20-6:45-9:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
12:05-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 12:50-3:456:30-9:25
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: 1:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
7:35-10:25
Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:30-3:055:40-8:05-10:30
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 5:30
Justice League: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 7:45-10:40
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
(PG) 1:15-4:30
Pitch Perfect Treble Marathon
12:00-4:15-8:30
Coco (PG) 12:15-6:50
Wonder (PG) 7:05
Coco (PG) 3:30
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
Coco (PG) CC: 4:10-10:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:00-7:00-9:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 2:00-4:457:15-10:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: (!)
1:30-3:00-4:30-6:00-7:30-9:0010:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 1:45-4:307:30-10:10
Lady Bird (R) 1:45-4:15-7:00-9:30
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 1:15-7:20
AMC Tysons Corner 16
7850e Tysons Corner Center
The Disaster Artist (R) (!) 12:303:00-5:35-8:05-10:35
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
10:30-11:30-2:20-4:00-5:20-8:109:25-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
10:50-1:50-4:50-7:50-10:50
The Star (PG) CC: 10:25-12:403:05-5:25
Coco (PG) CC: 11:00-12:35-2:004:45-5:55-7:20-8:30-9:55
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 10:40-1:20-4:107:05-9:50
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:45-1:354:20-9:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) (!) 10:201:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
CC: (!) 10:35-1:00-3:20-5:408:20-10:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
1:25-6:50
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
10:20-12:55-3:25-5:50-8:25-10:55
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 11:10-1:55-4:407:35-10:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
7:45-10:45
Lady Bird (R) 10:25-12:45-3:105:30-7:55-10:25
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 3:15-11:00
The Disaster Artist: The IMAX 2D
Experience (NR) (!) 11:15-1:454:25-7:10-9:40
Darkest Hour (PG-13) (!) 11:452:45-5:45-8:45
Wonder (PG) 7:00
The Disaster Artist (R) 3:005:30-8:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
1:30-4:15-7:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
1:50-4:40-7:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 2:15-5:00-7:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:45-4:30-7:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 2:30-5:15-8:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 4:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
AMC Worldgate 9
3:15-5:45-8:15
13025 Worldgate Drive
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
1:45-7:00
The Disaster Artist (R) (!) 12:002:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
AMC Hoffman Center 22
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
12:05-3:00-6:00-9:00
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:45Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45-10:10
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:50
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
11:30-1:00-2:45-4:00-7:00-10:00 Coco (PG) CC: 12:30-6:30
Murder on the Orient Express
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
(PG-13) CC: 12:20-3:20-6:20-9:05
12:15-3:15-6:30-9:30
(PG) CC: 1:30-4:20The Mountain Between Us (PG- Wonder
7:15-9:55
13) CC: 11:20-2:00-4:40-7:15-9:55 Daddy's
Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
The Star (PG) CC: 12:20-2:352:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
4:50-7:05-9:20
Three
Billboards
Outside Ebbing,
Coco (PG) CC: 11:15-1:45-4:15- Missouri (R) CC: 12:10-3:105:45-6:45-8:30-9:15
6:15-9:05
Murder on the Orient Express
Lady Bird (R) CC: (!) 12:15-2:55(PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:455:20-7:45-10:00
7:25-10:05
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 3:30-9:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:35Alamo Drafthouse Cinema 6:05
One Loudoun
It (R) CC: 3:05-9:35
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:407:10-9:50
Love Actually (R) 7:00
Jigsaw (R) CC: 9:05
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:10AM
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC: Justice League (PG-13) 11:50AM
11:25-1:45-4:10-6:35-9:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:30AM
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Murder on the Orient Express
2:10-4:50-7:25-9:55
(PG-13) 10:15-1:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Wonder (PG) 12:35
11:45-2:35-5:05-7:40-10:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (R) 11:35AM
Missouri (R) CC: 11:10-1:50-4:35- Lady Bird (R) 10:25-1:00
7:20-10:05
The Disaster Artist (R) 2:00-5:00The Man Who Invented Christ- 8:00-10:55
mas (PG) CC: 11:05-4:05-9:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 2:15Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: 7:40-10:55
11:20-1:30-4:20-7:10-10:00
Justice League (PG-13) 2:55Last Flag Flying (R) CC: 11:50- 4:20-8:20; 10:35
3:00-6:05
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 3:45
Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:40-2:05Coco (PG) 11:25-12:50-1:45-5:304:25-6:45-9:20
6:00-9:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D Ex- Murder on the Orient Express
perience (PG-13) CC: 6:15-9:15 (PG-13) 4:40-7:20-10:30
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience Wonder (PG) 3:30-6:40-9:45
(PG) 1:00-3:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Pitch Perfect Treble Marathon
Missouri (R) 2:35-5:35-8:40
12:00-4:00-8:15
Lady Bird (R) 3:35-10:10
Unexpectedly Yours 11:05-2:15Angelika Film Center Mosaic
4:40-7:30
2911 District Ave
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 12:30Darkest
Hour (PG-13) (!) 11:003:00-5:30-8:00
November Criminals 1:35-6:50 11:45-1:45-4:30-5:20-7:15-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) (!)
AMC Potomac Mills 18
10:45-1:30-2:30-4:15-7:00-8:002700 Potomac Mills Circle
9:45-10:45
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:45Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
12:45-2:15-3:15-4:45-5:45-7:15- Missouri (R) 10:00-12:35-3:108:15-9:45-10:45
5:45-8:20-10:55
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) (!) 10:0012:20-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:30-1:15-3:50-6:459:30
Lady Bird (R) 11:00-1:20-3:406:00-8:30-10:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:301:20-4:30-7:30-10:30
Bow Tie
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
11940 Market Street
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:203:00-5:35-7:55-10:20
Justice League (PG-13) 8:0010:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:304:30-7:30-10:30
Coco (PG) 2:10-5:10
Wonder (PG) 12:30-3:30-6:309:30
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
12:00-2:40-5:20-7:50-10:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:453:45-6:40-9:25
Lady Bird (R) 12:10-2:45-5:307:55-10:25
Justice League (PG-13) 7:0010:00
Coco (PG) 1:00-4:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:50-3:50-6:55-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:20-4:20-7:20-10:10
teach your son these skills, but
your fear of mentioning this now
indicates that you are actually
afraid to relate to him both as a
parent and as a fellow adult.
(This doesn’t have anything to
do with your politics — or his —
by the way.)
Tell your son: “We love having
you home. But you’ve got to wash
yourself — and your clothes —
while you’re here. Let me show
you how to use the washer, and
let’s put in a load.”
Amy’s column appears seven days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Write to askamy@amydickinson.com or
Amy Dickinson, Tribune Content
Agency, 16650 Westgrove Dr., Suite
175, Addison, TX 75001. You can
also follow her @askingamy.
©2017 by Amy Dickinson distributed by
Tribune Content Agency
Tuesday, December 12, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:50-4:30-7:30-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:104:50-8:30
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
1:00-3:30-6:00-8:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:404:20-6:50-9:25
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:25-4:006:45-9:30
Lady Bird (R) 2:10-4:45-7:20-9:50
Haldaa (NR) 1:35-4:55-8:15
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) 12:40-3:20-6:05-9:05
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:30-3:30-6:35-9:35
Lady Bird (R) 12:15-2:35-5:007:40-10:15
The Disaster Artist (R) 1:30-4:207:00-9:45
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Dr
Regal Countryside Stadium 20 Justice League (PG-13) 12:503:45-6:30-9:20
45980 Regal Plaza
Justice League (PG-13) 12:203:30-6:30-9:25
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:203:20-6:35-9:45
The Star (PG) 12:15-2:55-5:308:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:45-4:30-7:30-10:10
Coco (PG) 1:40-4:15-6:45-9:15
Tumhari Sulu (NR) 12:00-3:206:25-9:40
Oxygen (Telugu) (NR) 12:50-3:456:35-9:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:253:15-6:05-8:50
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
12:10-2:40-5:15-7:45
My Friend Dahmer (R) 12:102:35-5:05-7:35
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) 1:30-4:05-7:00-9:45
Cinema Arts Theatre
Jawaan (NR) 12:05-3:05-5:459650 Main St
8:45
Murder on the Orient Express
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
(PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:00-2:3012:30-3:50-7:00-10:00
5:00-7:30-9:50
Fukrey Returns (NR) 12:00-3:10Wonder (PG) CC: 9:50-12:106:15-9:00
2:25-4:50-7:20-9:40
Lady Bird (R) 2:00-4:20-7:05-9:35
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Firangi
(NR) 12:05-3:20-6:35-9:45
2:20
The Divine Order (Die gottliche Mental Madhilo (NR) 12:05-3:00Ordnung) (NR) CC: 9:40-12:10- 6:00-9:05
Gruham (NR) 2:05-5:00-8:15
2:40-5:10-7:50-9:55
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Khakee (Telugu) (NR) 12:00-3:20Missouri (R) CC: 9:45-12:05-2:35- 6:50-10:00
Verna 12:15-3:25-7:05-10:20
5:05-7:40-9:55
Lady Bird (R) CC: 9:55-12:15Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10
2:25-4:45-7:10-9:25
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:05The Disaster Artist (R) 12:3012:20-4:35-9:15
3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
Justice League (PG-13) 12:151600 Village Market Boulevard
4:15-7:15-10:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:45The Star (PG) 12:25-2:40-4:553:45-6:45-9:45
7:20
Coco (PG) 1:30-4:30-7:00-9:30
Murder on the Orient Express
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:10-2:50-7:30
(PG-13) 12:30-2:30-5:15-8:00Wonder (PG) 11:50-2:30-5:0510:50
7:45
Wonder (PG) 1:15-5:00-7:45Just Getting Started (PG-13)
10:30
12:05-2:20-4:45-7:10
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
1:00-4:45-7:30-10:00
12:15-2:45-5:20-7:50
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:55- A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
3:30-9:15
2:35-5:00-7:25
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:004:00-6:30-8:45
Missouri (R) 12:30-3:10-7:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:20- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 2:15-3:15-6:00-9:00
3:20-7:05
Justice League (PG-13) 11:45- Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:45-6:15
1:15-2:25-4:15-5:15-7:15-8:00;
1:15-4:15-7:15
Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
Coco (PG) 12:00-1:00-3:00-4:004110 West Ox Road
6:00-7:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Manassas 4 Cinemas
(PG-13) 1:15-4:15-7:05-10:00
8890 Mathis Ave.
Wonder (PG) 12:30-1:30-3:35Justice League (PG-13) 1:304:35-6:40-7:40-9:25-10:25
4:00-6:30-9:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:40- 12:00-2:25-4:50-7:15-9:40
3:20-6:00-8:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Coco (PG) 1:05-3:10-5:15-7:25
12:10-3:00-5:40-8:15-10:50
Wonder (PG) 1:25-3:50-6:15-8:40 Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:15Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 2:55-5:30-8:05-10:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
6201 Multiplex Drive
(R) 12:40-3:30-6:30-9:15
Justice League (PG-13) 10:25- Missouri
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:20-7:30
1:20-4:15-7:25-10:30
The
Man
Who
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:15- Christmas (PG)Invented
12:05-2:40-5:201:25-4:35-7:40-10:45
7:55-10:30
The Star (PG) 12:00-2:15-4:30
Roman
J.
Israel,
Esq. (PG-13)
Coco (PG) 10:10-11:00-1:05-1:554:20-10:10
4:05-4:50-7:00-7:45-10:40
The
Swindlers
(NR)
12:55-3:55Murder on the Orient Express
6:55-9:50
(PG-13) 10:50-1:35-4:20-7:30Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
10:15
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Wonder (PG) 11:10-1:50-4:357:15-9:55
Justice League (PG-13) 1:15Just Getting Started (PG-13)
4:45-7:45-10:30
12:10-2:30-4:50-7:10-9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:15A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:00 4:15-7:15-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:15- The Star (PG) 12:00-1:30-3:452:45-5:10-7:55-10:25
6:00-8:15
Jawaan (NR) 6:45-9:35
Coco (PG) 12:30-2:00-3:00-4:30Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 5:30-8:00-10:30
Missouri (R) 10:30-1:10-4:00Murder on the Orient Express
6:50-9:30
(PG-13) 12:15-3:15-6:30-9:30
Fukrey Returns (NR) 11:55-3:25- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:306:30-9:35
4:30-8:30
MalliRaava (NR) 10:00-12:55Wonder (PG) 12:30-2:15-3:303:50-6:40-9:50
5:00-6:30-7:45-9:30-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Rave Cinemas
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme 12:15-2:45-5:15-8:00-10:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:4511900 Palace Way
3:15-5:45-8:15
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:35Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
2:10-4:50-7:50-10:40
Missouri
(R) 12:45-3:30-6:15-9:15
Justice League (PG-13) 11:30Just Getting Started (PG-13)
2:15-8:10-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:40- 11:50-2:00-4:30-6:45-9:00
The Man Who Invented Christ1:45-4:55-7:55-10:55
mas (PG) 1:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
The Star (PG) 11:40-2:05-4:30Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
7:10-9:55
Coco (PG) 11:25-2:25-5:30-8:35 10:30
Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:30-4:45Murder on the Orient Express
7:30-10:00
(PG-13) 10:50-1:30-4:15-7:40Justice League: The IMAX 2D
10:30
Experience (PG-13) 6:15-9:00
Wonder (PG) 10:45-1:35-4:25Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
7:30-10:20
(PG) 1:15-3:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Coco (PG) 7:00-9:30
11:15-2:00-4:40-7:25-10:35
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:10Regal Kingstowne
1:55-4:35-7:35-10:10
Stadium 16 & RPX
Fukrey Returns (NR) 11:50-3:055910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
6:20-9:30
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:15Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
2:45-5:30-8:00-10:30
5:05
Justice League (PG-13) 1:25Lady Bird (R) 11:45-2:30-5:004:20-7:30-10:20
7:15-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:45MalliRaava (NR) 12:05-3:153:50-6:45-9:50
6:15-9:15
The Star (PG) 12:30-2:40-4:50Justice League (PG-13) XD:
7:05
10:30-1:15-4:20-7:20-10:15
Coco (PG) 1:00-2:00-3:45-4:30Coco (PG) XD: 10:35-1:40-4:45- 6:15-7:15-8:45-10:00
7:45-10:25
Murder on the Orient Express
Regal Ballston Common
(PG-13) 1:10-4:05-6:50-10:05
Stadium 12
Wonder (PG) 12:55-1:50-3:35671 N. Glebe Road
4:45-6:20-7:45-9:20-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Justice League (PG-13) 1:2012:20-2:45-5:15-8:00-10:25
4:10-7:00-9:55
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:051:15-4:00-6:30-9:15
4:05-7:10-10:05
The Star (PG) 2:25-4:40-7:15-9:35 Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:35Coco (PG) 1:15-2:20-3:50-5:00- 3:00-5:25-8:00-10:30
6:30-7:40-9:10-10:10
Marshall (PG-13) 9:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:204:30-7:30-10:30
The Star (PG) 1:15-3:40-6:15
Coco (PG) 12:30-1:30-3:20-4:206:00-7:00-8:45-9:45
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:10-4:10-7:10-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:306:50
Wonder (PG) 1:00-3:50-6:45-9:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 9:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
1:50-4:40-7:15-9:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:403:10-5:40-8:15-10:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 2:00-4:50-7:40-10:20
My Friend Dahmer (R) 2:10-5:108:00-10:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
4:00-10:15
Lady Bird (R) 12:45-3:30-5:508:30-10:50
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 7:45-10:40
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
(PG) 2:20-5:00
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Ave
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:403:05-5:30-7:55-10:20
Justice League (PG-13) 1:204:15-6:35-7:10-9:40-10:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:303:30-6:30-9:35
The Star (PG) 12:30-1:10-3:45
Coco (PG) 12:30-1:00-1:30-3:103:40-4:10-6:00-7:00-8:50-9:40
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:50-4:00-6:55-9:55
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:456:15-9:45
Wonder (PG) 1:15-3:55-6:40-9:20
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
12:30-2:50-5:10-7:30-9:50
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:35-3:05-5:35-8:05-10:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:303:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) 12:45-3:506:45-9:30
My Friend Dahmer (R) 6:25-10:05
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) 12:55-3:35-6:10-9:05
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:40-3:40-6:50-10:00
Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
6500 Springfield Town Ctr
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:302:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Justice League (PG-13) 1:104:20-6:50-7:30-9:50-10:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:103:10-6:40-9:40
The Star (PG) 11:00-1:20-3:406:20-9:10
Coco (PG) 10:55-12:20-1:30-3:204:10-6:10-9:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:15-2:05-4:50-7:5010:35
Wonder (PG) 11:05-1:40-4:357:20-10:05
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
11:40-2:40-5:20-8:00-10:35
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:101:35-4:05-6:45-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:50-4:00-7:1010:00
Lady Bird (R) 11:50-2:20-5:007:40-10:20
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Pl
Justice League (PG-13) 6:00-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:154:20-7:20-10:20
The Star (PG) 1:40-4:00-6:15
Coco (PG) 1:00-3:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:10-3:50-6:30-9:10
Wonder (PG) 1:20-2:20-4:10-5:107:00-8:00-9:40-10:40
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
1:30-4:30-7:15-9:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:155:15-7:50-10:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:105:30-8:15-10:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:50-3:45-6:40-9:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
9:00
Lady Bird (R) 2:05-4:40-7:1010:10
Justice League (PG-13) 2:004:45-7:45-10:30
Coco (PG) 1:45-2:30-4:15-5:006:45-7:30-9:15-10:00
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Pkwy
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10-4:00
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
2:20
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
12:00-4:50
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
CC: 12:00-2:15-4:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle
(R) CC: 9:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
CC: 12:20-2:35-4:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 4:107:00-10:10
The Foreigner (R) CC: 7:15-9:40
Elf (PG) 12:10-2:20-7:30
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
NEITHER SIDE VULNERABLE
NORTH (D)
J94
AQ9
Q87
AJ74
EAST
Q 10 7 3
10 8 7 2
K92
86
WEST
K65
J43
A63
10 5 3 2
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
A82
K65
J 10 5 4
KQ9
The bidding:
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
1
Pass
2 NT
3 NT
All Pass
Opening lead — 2
WEST
Pass
T
he player we call “Second
Hand Rose” was at the
club today. When the lesson on “second hand low”
was being taught, Rose was
out on a date with Jiggs the
plumber.
Rose was West. South won
her club opening lead with
the nine and led the four of
diamonds. Most Wests would
have played low, but Second
Hand Rose ... with the ace!
Rose then led a low spade,
and East covered dummy’s
nine with the 10. Declarer
held up his ace twice and
won the third spade, but
when he led a second diamond, East took the king and
cashed his last spade. Down
one.
Rose defended well. She
knew the defense was unlikely to prevail without spade
tricks. If East had four cards
in spades (based on South’s
2NT response) plus an entry,
Rose needed to grab her
ace of diamonds, preserving East’s entry, and shift to
spades.
If Rose plays “second
hand low” on the first diamond, South makes 3NT. If
East takes the king, his entry
to the 13th spade is gone. If
East ducks, South has nine
tricks.
CLASSIC PEANUTS
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
Q 10 7 3 10 8 7 2
K9286
Your partner opens 1NT.
The next player passes. What
do you say?
ANSWER: You can respond
two clubs, Stayman, and all
will be well if partner bids
a major suit. You can pass
there. But if he bids two diamonds, you will have to risk
leaving him there when his
pattern is 3-3-2-5 or bid 2NT
and risk reaching a hopeless
game. Pass. Though partner
is likely to have a four-card
major, maybe he will make
1NT.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
BIRTHDAY | DECEMBER 12
This year you open
up new doors and
experience life from a
renewed perspective.
If you are single, someone
quite exotic could enter your
life soon. Do not push this
person too hard -- let the
relationship evolve at its own
pace. If you are attached,
the two of you will make a
commitment that will recharge
your life together. You are
likely to draw a Libra into your
life; his or her friendship could
become very important to you.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Focus on a key person. You
relate to others easily. You
could meet someone today
and feel as if she or he has
been in your life forever.
Communication activates both
professionally and emotionally.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Your patience appeals to many
people who want to work with
you or be part of your life.
You have a lot to juggle and
handle. You will manage to
clear out a lot and not lose
your easygoing attitude.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Keep communication moving,
even if you feel overwhelmed
at times. Just continue as
you have been, as the finish
line is much closer than you
might realize. Ask for what you
need in order to keep such an
intense pace. Don’t give up!
BARNEY AND CLYDE
WEINGARTENS & CLARK
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
You might want to cocoon at
home. You have a fun style
that draws people toward you;
however, you can screen your
calls and be unfindable, if you
so choose. You have a lot to
do, and you need some extra
time to handle what you must.
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Others find you easy to talk to.
The biggest problem you might
face is having enough time
to socialize. You want what
you want, and you’ll settle for
nothing less. Vital discussions
and intense feelings mark your
day.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Indulging others happens
naturally. Gifts you buy for
someone are likely to make
quite an impression. You also
are likely to indulge yourself
with a new gift! Be careful
when making any money
agreements, as plans might
backfire.
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Back away from an ongoing
issue, and you’ll be much
happier as a result. A loved
one could be even more
unpredictable than usual.
Refuse to take this person’s
critique personally.
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Instead of starting a fight to
relieve some of the tension,
face facts. You are known as
the Scrooge within your group
of friends, at least for now.
Take good care of yourself and
get some extra sleep, and you
will see your mood change in a
few days.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Others might wonder why
you are constantly doing your
happy dance. Whether you
sense that a major change is
about to head your way or you
simply are happy to see Saturn
leave your sign in a few weeks,
you feel great.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
Step up to the plate. You might
not see a situation as clearly
as you think you do. Be open
to listening more and speaking
less. You will catch more
details about a key matter
close to your heart. Know that
you might need to stop to
gather more information.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You might like a better
friendship to evolve with
someone who is quite different
from you. Understanding and
acceptance will be key. Expect
the unexpected today. Others
might be getting uptight with
the holiday season in full force.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
One-on-one relating takes
you down a new path. Stay
mellow, even in the face of an
unanticipated event. You will
need to ground the situation.
What seems difficult to grasp
now will become easier once
you get out of your own head.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
The Vienna Boys Choir started performing in
1498 as part of the king’s choir. The famous
composer Franz Schubert was a member of
the choir in the early 1800s.
Cloudy and cold, with a small
chance of snow. It could get pretty
windy, so dress warmly.
Find details about the
year’s best toys, video
games and books on our
website.
ILLUSTRATION BY NATHAN HODGE, 9, BURKE
A feast for the senses, no matter your taste in holiday fun
BY
‘I
M ARYLOU T OUSIGNANT
An interactive ‘Nutcracker’
t’s the most wonderful time of the year . . . the happiest
season of all.” So says a popular holiday song. Everywhere you
look, singers, dancers, bakers and others are offering
tempting holiday treats for the eyes, ears, tummies and
curious minds. Here are a few that caught our attention.
Ornament workshop
Make your own paper holiday
ornaments at this free family
event. Your hosts supply the
paper and other materials; you
supply the creativity. If you have
special paper you want to use,
bring it.
No registration is required.
The more the merrier!
Saturday at 2 p.m. Brentwood
Arts Exchange, 3901 Rhode Island Avenue. wapo.st/ornament
workshop.
‘Christmas in Vienna’
For tradition, you can’t top the
Vienna Boys Choir, which began
singing for Austrian royalty
more than 500 years ago. Today’s
choir, 100 boys ages 9 to 14, is
split into four touring groups
that together give 300 performances each year around the
world.
One of these groups will sing
at George Mason University’s
Center for the Arts. The choirboys come from 12 countries and
include a 12-year-old from Pennsylvania who is on his first major
tour.
Each choir travels for up to
11 weeks a year and then returns
to Vienna, where the boys live in
a 200-year-old palace that is also
their school. Classes are taught
in German, and the 10-hour
school day includes at least two
hours of instruction in all types
of music.
Sunday at 2 p.m. George Mason University’s Center for the
Arts, 4373 Mason Pond Drive,
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 1960s presidential monogram
4 Gremlins and
Pacers
8 Lands’ End rival
14 World Cup cry
15 Naked
16 Crossreferencing
phrase
17 Potato __:
61-Across dish
19 Items in a
59-Across lit for
61-Across
20 Novelist Ferber
21 Key with four
sharps
23 Wife of Jacob
24 Fervor
25 Rebecca of
“Risky Business”
27 Relaxed
condition
29 “¿__ pasa?”
32 One lacking
manners
34 Cowboy boot
attachments
36 Pack in
cartons
37 Traditional
61-Across
surprise, aptly
boxed, and
spelled with
the only four
letters of the
alphabet that
don’t appear
elsewhere in
this grid
38 Range dividing
Europe and Asia
39 “You gotta
be kidding”
40 Rx items
41 Coffee server
42 Long-finned
tunas
49 Nash priest,
not beast
50 Roughly
54 Make __
dash for
57 Expired
58 Contented
sounds
59 61-Across
centerpiece
61 Two-millenniaold tradition
that begins at
sunset tonight
Fairfax. Kids $16.50-$27.50,
adults $33-$55. cfa.gmu.edu/
calendar/2506.
Something for everyone
Kwanzaa, Hanukkah, Christmas, Ramadan, Diwali, Las Posadas . . .
Learn about other people’s
celebrations, and maybe expand
your own, at Discovery Theater’s
“Seasons of Light.” This popular
hands-on event is in its 19th
season. It’s geared toward ages 5
to 10, but older kids and even
adults will enjoy the cultural
bridge-building.
Weekdays through December
21. Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson
Drive Southwest. Kids $3-$6,
adults $8. discoverytheater.org.
MARYLAND SCIENCE CENTER
Seasonal science
The Maryland Science Center
has more holiday activities than
Santa has reindeer. Its 12 Days of
Science event runs from December 21 to January 1. Tundra
games, flip-flop fun and an indoor Olympics are some of the
cool events planned.
Also, the Gingerbread Lane
stroll-through village is open until January 7. Weekend visitors
can check out the Science Is
Sweet activity and see whether
their gingerbread house can
withstand a pretend earthquake.
Open Tuesday through Sunday. Maryland Science Center,
601 Light Street, Baltimore. Kids
$18.95, adults $24.95. (Imax
movies are an additional charge.)
mdsci.org.
Visitors to the Maryland Science Center can stroll through chef Jon Lovitch’s Baltimore-themed
Gingerbread Lane before testing their own custom-built gingerbread house in a pretend earthquake.
ARTECHOUSE
SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES
Who hasn’t wanted to dance
as the Sugar Plum Fairy or the
evil Mouse King in “The Nutcracker”? The magical Russian
ballet is celebrating its 125th
anniversary this year. It’s a fixture of the holidays around the
globe, performed by everyone
from children dressed as mice to
world-acclaimed ballerinas. The
grand entrance to the White
House even has a “Nutcracker”
theme this year.
Now comes a twist on the
classic tale: an interactive digital
show called “Imaginary World of
the Nutcracker.” Powerful projectors surround visitors with images of toys, snowflakes and characters from the ballet. It’s “The
Nutcracker” as you’ve never seen
it.
Daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through
January 7. Artechouse, 1238
Maryland Avenue Southwest.
Age 12 and younger $8, students
$12, adults $15. wapo.st/
imaginaryworld.
kidspost@washpost.com
LUKAS BECK
FROM LEFT: In Discovery Theater’s “Seasons of Light,” kids can learn about the holidays that other people celebrate. An interactive
digital show at Artechouse is based on “The Nutcracker.” The globe-trotting Vienna Boys Choir will sing at George Mason University.
By Bruce Haight
MUSIC REVIEW
A dynamic duo at Phillips Collection
BY
C HARLES T . D OWNEY
The Phillips Collection presented two dynamic musicians of
the millennial generation, violinist Tessa Lark and pianist Roman
Rabinovich, in an excellent recital Sunday at the Cosmos Club.
Both have won major competitions as performers, and both
offered their own compositions
on this program.
The duo made a stellar combination in two slightly older pieces, beginning with a richly interpreted, smoldering performance
of the first violin sonata of
Brahms. Lark is playing on the
exceptionally
full-bodied
ex-Gingold Stradivarius, loaned
to her after a victory at the International Violin Competition of
Indianapolis. Moderate tempo
choices in the first two movements allowed both musicians to
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
63 Football rushing
plays
64 Greek love god
65 December 24,
e.g.
66 Figured (out)
67 Suffix with
ransom
68 Org. with narcs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
16
18
22
26
DOWN
Pop icon
Jennifer
Razor insert
Barbara Bush’s
twin sister
Legal org.
Manage
somehow
Sweet liqueurs
Bagel seed
Finds out
Actor Cariou
In a shoddy way
She, in Paree
On an ocean
liner
Quick snack
Music for
a film
Hardhearted
Actor Voight
Take for granted
28 Annie, notably
29 Campus
hangout
30 Addresses
beginning
with “http://”
31 Letter
before tee
32 Dutch South
African
33 Plow-pulling
team
12/12/17
35 Washing
machine cycle
36 Mormon sch.
43 University
founder
Stanford
44 Malaise, with “the”
45 Swiss peak
46 Kidney-shaped
nut
47 1998 Masters
champ Mark
48
49
51
52
53
54
55
56
60
62
MONDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Philadelphia suburb
Smells
Gathered leaves
Trim whiskers
Actor Milo
Home of Iowa
State
Diner handout
Added
stipulations
Regret
“__ as directed”
Rabinovich
Lark
explore the dreamy sides of the
piece. The folk-infused finale was
equally gorgeous.
Another work imbued with a
study of folk music — Bartok’s
first violin sonata, which brought
out the more explosive side of
both performers — ended the
program. While the second movement turned slightly soporific,
the finale was a raucous tour de
force, making the encore, Clara
Schumann’s sedate “Romance
No. 1,” a much-needed return to
calm.
Rabinovich seems the more accomplished composer, represented in the world premiere of “Twodot Wings,” written for Lark. The
spiky dissonance of Bartok seems
to influence this work, although
Rabinovich’s melodic writing is
more lyrical than jagged. Displaying an ear-diverting variety of
textures and moods, this is a
compositional voice to watch.
Lark had to shelve her own
planned world premiere (“Impermanessence”) for her first composition, “Appalachian Fantasy.”
Drawn from her childhood in
Kentucky, this piece combines
classical and bluegrass idioms
more naturally than the work of
her mentor, Mark O’Connor.
Lark’s easy-listening arrangement of “En la Orilla Del Mundo”
by Martin Rojas might have
worked better as an encore.
style@washpost.com
Keep a couple of things in mind when buying gift cards
Readers:
wants or needs, and that is appreciated during the holiday season.
fect gift for that
special someone. What might be
a good choice? How about a gift
card. Here are some hints about
gift cards:
Make sure that both you and
the recipient understand the fine
print. The law says that gift cards
must remain valid for at least five
years from the date of purchase.
Some cards may charge a monthly fee, which can cause their value
to dwindle. If you buy a prepaid
card from the major credit card
companies, you might pay a small
fee for the card.
Buying discounted gift cards,
or a card sold for less than face
value from a third party, isn’t a
good idea — scammers are out
there.
Department store gift cards
can be used at that particular
store, on its website and often at
any sister companies.
Always give the receipt along
with a store gift card. If the card is
lost, the store should replace lost
funds from the card if proof of
purchase is shown.
Some may feel that gift cards
are impersonal and lack thoughtfulness, but the recipient can
purchase exactly what he or she
Dear Heloise: Here’s a request
for cereal manufacturers: Please
put resealable bags inside the
cereal box so we can keep the
cereal fresh (like a zippered
bag)!
Also, when I’m trying to take
off my socks, I grab the heel
instead of the toe, and they slide
right off.
Doris R., Middletown, Ohio
Dear
Hints from Time is running
Heloise
out to get the per-
Dear Heloise: I take quick
overnight trips, and these hints
help me save time and money.
First, old contact-lens cases
can hold rings, earrings and
lotions.
Another storage idea for
lotion is to squeeze some into a
straw, then pinch and tape the
ends closed. Headache medicine
capsules can fit into a straw, too,
as well as even a portion of
laundry detergent.
Old cases for sunglasses can
hold phone chargers, ear buds,
manicure necessities, necklaces,
and odds and ends.
To protect hair dryers and
curling irons, I pack them in
potholders and oven mitts.
Thanks for your column!
Melissa G. in Chicago
Dear Heloise: Businesses that
mop their floors during
operating hours? This is a fall
risk, especially for the elderly — I
am concerned for my safety.
Setting down a cone does not
guarantee that I will not fall.
D.S., Portage, Ind.
D.S.: Good point, but keep in
mind that stores must clean up
spills immediately, and mopping
may be involved in that process.
General maintenance, you are
right, should be done after
closing. Thanks for writing in!
Dear Heloise: I’m so glad
oversize watches are in fashion
— thank goodness. Now I can
actually see what time it is!
Betty S., Fort Wayne, Ind.
Betty S.: Yes, big watches are in
style; shop the men’s watch
section for a better value — they
can be priced lower than the
women’s oversize watches — or
borrow your hubby’s!
Heloise’s column appears six days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Send a hint to Heloise, P.O. Box
795000, San Antonio, TX 782795000, or email it to
Heloise@Heloise.com.
© 2017, King Features Syndicate
KLMNO
SPORTS
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
COMING TOMORROW
PRO FOOTBALL
PRO FOOTBALL
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Our All-Met section will honor the D.C.
area’s best high school athletes from the
fall season in football, soccer, volleyball,
field hockey and cross-country.
The Eagles confirm that quarterback
Carson Wentz has a torn ACL and will
miss the rest of the season, leaving Nick
Foles as the starter for the 11-2 team. D4
In a stunning 27-20 victory, Jay Cutler
throws three touchdown passes and
the Dolphins force the Patriots into an
0-for-11 showing on third down. D5
The No. 15 Maryland women receive a
career-best 24 points from Blair Watson
and collect a school-record 37 assists in
rolling to a win over Loyola (Md.). D6
Gruden has provided stability,
but now he needs some himself
Nine months ago,
when the
Washington
Redskins were in
self-destruction
mode (again),
Jerry
they did what any
Brewer
clueless franchise
would do. They
panicked, cozied up to the most
stable person available and made
a questionable commitment to
send a message that no one
believed.
On March 4, Coach Jay Gruden
received a most lucrative 50th
birthday present: an agreement
on a premature two-year contract
extension from team President
Bruce Allen. Gruden still had two
years remaining on his original
five-year deal, but it didn’t
matter. Allen was desperate.
Washington was being mocked
for the NFL Scouting Combine
no-show of Scot McCloughan, its
soon-to-be-fired general
manager. Free agency was about
to start. The team needed a
symbol of stability, and there was
Gruden, the ultimate good
soldier, a well-liked team
representative who had done
solid work coaching around the
organization’s dysfunction.
Even though Allen’s
motivations were laughably
obvious, the franchise was able to
get through the offseason by
BREWER CONTINUED ON D4
Redskins players question
team direction, preparation
BY
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
In the immediate aftermath of Sunday’s defeat, Coach Jay Gruden
shouldered the blame for his team’s decline: “I’ve regressed.”
KIMBERLEY A. MARTIN
Jay Gruden remains focused
on the here and now, the next
step in the process, the next
game at hand. While frustration
continues to emanate from his
locker room, the Washington
Redskins coach merely is trying
to hold everything together for a
few more weeks.
“It’s a tough pill to swallow,
but we have to swallow it and we
have to move on to Arizona,”
Gruden said on a conference call
with reporters Monday, referring
to the team’s 30-13 loss to the Los
Angeles Chargers on Sunday in
Carson, Calif.
But after two crushing losses,
questions about their gameweek preparation and the overall
direction of the franchise have
been raised by Gruden’s own
players.
The Redskins, now 5-8 after
losing four of their past five
games, appear to be unraveling.
Mental mistakes continue to
mount, while poor execution
plays out each week. And shortly after they were blown out by
the Chargers, a team that improved to 7-6 after starting the
season 0-4, Redskins players
sounded off.
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D4
Cardinals at Redskins
Sunday, 1 p.m., Fox
Capitals’
streak is
snapped
at four
ISLANDERS 3,
CAPITALS 1
Holtby pulled after
yielding three goals
BY
N B A’ s ‘ reun i o n ’ s h o w s
Paul George’s return to Indiana is part of league’s push to market clashes featuring stars vs. former teams
BY
T IM B ONTEMPS
For seven years, Paul George was an essential part of
the Indiana Pacers. Blossoming from a raw prospect
into a four-time all-star and three-time all-NBA selection, George was the face of a team that made it to
back-to-back Eastern Conference finals and fell to
LeBron James and the Miami Heat in three straight
postseasons.
Those seven years, however, came to an end June 30,
when the Pacers struck a deal with the Oklahoma City
Thunder to trade George — who, with one year
remaining before he could hit unrestricted free agency,
had made it clear he wasn’t re-signing with Indiana —
Like LeBron James’s
return to Cleveland
in 2010 and
Shaquille O’Neal’s
first matchup with
Kobe Bryant in
2004, Paul George is
the latest NBA star
to have his first trip
to his old stomping
grounds pumped up.
Thunder at Pacers
Tomorrow, 7 p.m., ESPN
for Victor Oladipo and Domantas Sabonis.
In an instant, those seven years, six playoff appearances and 309 wins were gone, to be replaced by a
single date: Dec. 13.
That day — Wednesday — marks George’s first time
back in Indianapolis since the trade. He and his
Thunder teammates will face the Pacers at Bankers
Life Fieldhouse in a nationally televised game on
ESPN.
It also marks the latest example — in a season full of
them — of the NBA and its broadcast partners going
out of their way to hype up the occasion of a star player
being reacquainted with his former team.
REUNION CONTINUED ON D6
JOE MOORE/WASHINGTON POST ILLUSTRATION; CHRIS CARLSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS, J PAT CARTER/GETTY IMAGES, GREGORY SHAMUS/GETTY IMAGES
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
new york — Perhaps Capitals
Coach Barry Trotz wanted to
spare his goaltender, one of the
few Washington players who
hadn’t taken the evening off in
the defensive zone. After the New
York Islanders scored their third
goal less than 22 minutes into the
game, Braden Holtby was yanked
from net in favor of Philipp
Grubauer.
Thanks to some shoddy defensive play, the Capitals’ four-game
winning streak was snapped in a
3-1 loss to the Islanders on Monday night at Barclays Center.
“We weren’t sharp around
Holts,” Trotz said.
“That, amongst other things,”
forward Lars Eller said. “Sloppy
coverage in the zone, coming
back into the zone off the rush,
just little things that should be
easily correctable going forward.”
This marked Washington’s first
road game in more than two
weeks, and it got off to a rough
start. Just 2:36 into the game,
Holtby made a pad save on a shot
by Cal Clutterbuck, but Brock
Nelson snuck onto the ice after a
change, left alone on the opposite
side to swat in the rebound. The
Islanders entered the game with
the Eastern Conference’s best record at home (8-1-2), and they
improved to 10-0-0 when leading
after the first period.
New York nearly made it a
two-goal lead through 20 minutes
when forward Anders Lee appeared to score with 4:36 left in
the opening frame. But the goal
was wiped off the board because
Lee was ruled to have pushed
Holtby’s pad, along with the puck,
across the goal line. Before Monday night’s game, Washington
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D5
Avalanche at Capitals
Today, 7 p.m., NBCSW
Martinez already talks a good game
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
lake buena vista, fla. — In the
lobby of the Swan and Dolphin
hotel, bustling with the exuberance that accompanies the first
day of baseball’s annual winter
meetings, a few members of the
Washington Nationals’ public relations staff huddled behind a monitor, leaning their ears into a tiny
speaker to hear what new Manager
Dave Martinez was saying on live
television.
Martinez said all the right
things about his opportunity with
the Nationals, successfully avoided committing to an Opening Day
lineup, and dodged any of the pitfalls a PR staff fear from a rookie
New Nats skipper mixes
candor, company line
manager. Then MLB Network host
Harold Reynolds brought up one
of those dime-a-dozen stories
about the time he and Martinez
were in a Caribbean casino as it
was robbed at gunpoint. Martinez
chuckled and confirmed the story,
raising more questions than answers, but successfully steered the
interview to a conclusion without
having to go any further.
No one can prepare Martinez
for all the questions his duties as
Nationals manager will raise.
Much of his success will lie in the
moments that leave him to think
on his feet and shoulder the spotlight after a decade in Joe Maddon’s shadow. Martinez is known
for his ability to relate to players,
but much of his reputation will
depend on his ability to mix authenticity with the official message, to mix the pleasant personality for which he is known with the
need to maintain the message for
an entire organization.
Martinez met with local reporters for the first time since his introductory news conference, talking
BRUCE BENNETT/GETTY IMAGES
MARTINEZ CONTINUED ON D3
WILLIE J. ALLEN JR./ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rizzo seeks ‘value’ and ‘fit’
Nats’ GM discusses wish list. D3
Nationals Manager Dave Martinez says he will emphasize “having
fun” while embracing the pressure that comes with the job.
Braden Holtby was removed in
favor of Philipp Grubauer in the
second period Monday night.
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
FANCY STATS
EARLY LEAD
Cowboys’
lonely road
to a spot in
the playo≠s
BY
Via video,
Steelers get
Shazier into
celebration
FANCY STATS
N EIL G REENBERG
The Dallas Cowboys kept their
playoff hopes alive with a 30-10
win over the New York Giants on
Sunday, improving to 7-6. They
join the Atlanta Falcons (8-5), Detroit Lions (7-6) and Green Bay
Packers (7-6) as NFC teams with
records above .500 that aren’t in
playoff position.
But wins by Atlanta, Detroit
and Green Bay made the road to
the playoffs tougher. Heading into
Week 14, Dallas had a 14 percent
chance of making the playoffs.
Now, the odds are longer.
First, the Cowboys have to win
out. That means beating the Oakland Raiders on the road, the
Seattle Seahawks at home and the
NFC East champion Philadelphia
Eagles at Lincoln Financial Field.
That takes care of one of the
scenarios: Seattle must lose one of
its remaining games to finish no
better than 10-6, with the Cowboys owning the head-to-head tiebreaker. But the Cowboys would
still need help, including the Falcons losing two games in addition
to the Packers and Lions losing at
least once.
The toughest game on Atlanta’s
schedule is at New Orleans in Week
16 (32 percent win probability).
The Falcons are heavily favored
against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
(68 percent) and a slight favorite
against the Carolina Panthers (51
percent). The chances of Atlanta
losing two of these three range
from 15 percent to 33 percent.
The Lions are favored in all
three of their games, which includes a Week 17 clash with the
Packers. That game, unless it ends
in a tie, gets one obstacle out of the
way for Dallas, but it would still
need the winner of that game to
lose at least one more before then.
In all, Dallas’s best chance —
winning out, plus the Falcons losing to the Saints and Panthers, the
Lions losing to Cincinnati, and the
Packers losing to the Lions —
comes in at about 1 percent —
roughly 103-to-1 odds against.
neil.greenberg@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/news/
fancy-stats
QUOTABLE
“I just feel like,
from ownership,
they have to look
at that coach and see
if he’s the right one
for the future.”
SANTANA MOSS,
former Redskins wide receiver,
on Jay Gruden following Sunday’s
lopsided loss at the Chargers
(via D.C. Sports Bog)
BY
WILFREDO LEE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Giancarlo Stanton hit 59 homers in 2017 while playing home games in a stadium not so friendly to right-handed sluggers.
In this deal, Yankees hit home run
BY
N EIL G REENBERG
Giancarlo Stanton, the reigning
National League MVP and one of the
best right-handed power-hitters in the
game, has found a new home in the
Bronx as a member of the New York
Yankees. The Bombers now have both
leagues’ leading home run hitters from
2017: Stanton, who hit 59 home runs for
the Miami Marlins — the most in MLB
since 2001, when Sammy Sosa hit 61
and Barry Bonds set the single-season
record with 73 — and American League
rookie of the year Aaron Judge, who hit
52.
Stanton will be a great fit in Yankee
Stadium. According to Baseball
Prospectus’s park factors, Marlins Park
was the seventh-most-difficult home
run park for right-handed batters last
season. Yankee Stadium, on the other
hand, was tied as the second-mostfavorable park in baseball for righthanded home run hitters. If you adjust
Stanton’s 2017 results, using Yankee
Stadium in place of Marlins Park, the
28-year-old slugger would be projected
to hit 62 home runs.
Stanton is not merely a home run
hitter — he is the epitome of a slugger.
He hit .281 with an on-base-plusslugging percentage of 1.007 in 2017,
creating runs at a rate that was
56 percent higher than average after
adjusting for league and park effects
(156 wRC+). He averaged an exit
velocity of 92 mph last season (seventh)
with the third-highest rate of balls hit
on the sweet spot, also known as a
barrel,
per
plate
appearance
(11 percent). New teammate Judge led
the majors at 13 percent.
Even with that huge contract,
Stanton looks like a bargain
for the Bronx Bombers
The Yankees’ Opening Day lineup
card next season could be one of the
most fearsome handed in by a manager.
Stanton and Judge are projected to
combine for 10 FanGraphs.com Wins
Above Replacement in 2018, which, if
fulfilled, would be one of the six best
duos in the majors next season. Based
on early projections, New York’s 2018
lineup could score an average of 5.4
runs, slightly more than New York
scored in 2017 (5.3). Don’t let the
minimal improvement fool you: If the
Yankees can duplicate last year’s
efforts, they should have a phenomenal
season.
New York produced the second-best
run differential (plus-198) in 2017,
suggesting it should have finished the
regular season with 100 wins rather
than their actual record of 91-71. If the
Yankees win their fair share of games
and get some good luck for a change,
they could run away with the AL East
and be the prohibitive World Series
favorite.
The biggest question: How much will
Stanton contribute to the Yankees
going forward, and what will that be
worth relative to the $295 million
remaining on his contract, which runs
through 2027?
The answer: A bargain.
Stanton is nearing his prime and
produced a career-high 6.9 WAR last
season, which is worth $55.5 million on
the open market, per FanGraphs. The
latest estimates from Dan Szymborski
see Stanton producing 7.2 WAR for New
York in 2018, with declines in each
subsequent year. Using his WAR
projections and inflating the cost of a
win by 5 percent each season has
Stanton’s value topping $450 million by
2027.
Steamer projections are less
optimistic for 2018, estimating Stanton
to be worth 5.9 WAR in 2018. Using that
projection, and reducing that by a halfwin each year while still inflating the
cost of a win by 5 percent each season,
has Stanton’s value close to
$400 million over the next 10 years. If
you use Steamer’s projections but
adjust them for just 120 games played
each season — tweaks that reflect
Stanton being on the disabled list every
season from 2012 to 2016 — his value
would be close to $300 million over the
next decade. In other words, Stanton
could be injured every year and still
provide value to the Yankees over the
life of the contract.
According to the Westgate Las Vegas
SuperBook, the Yankees’ odds are 6-1 to
win the 2018 World Series, the second
choice behind the Los Angeles Dodgers
(9-2) and tied with the Houston Astros
and Cleveland Indians. But once Judge
and Stanton start hitting balls out of the
yard, expect those odds to shorten
quickly, with everyone looking to catch
the Yankees as the best offensive team
in baseball.
neil.greenberg@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
news/fancy-stats
Villanova hits No. 1;
Arizona State is fifth
Villanova’s unbeaten start now
includes a No. 1 ranking in the
Associated Press Top 25, while
Arizona State is making a rapid
rise into the top 10 under thirdyear Coach Bobby Hurley.
After a tumultuous week in
which unanimous No. 1 Duke and
No. 2 Kansas lost, the Wildcats
(10-0) earned 41 of 65 first-place
votes Monday to hop over
Michigan State and reach the top
for the third straight season.
Villanova and Michigan State
were the favorites to take over at
the top after the Blue Devils’
weekend loss at Boston College,
though there was far less
certainty for voters about who
was now the nation’s top team.
The Spartans (9-1) earned 19
first-place votes to climb from
third to second, while the other
five first-place votes went to the
Sun Devils — who rose 11 spots to
No. 5 after upsetting Kansas.
Arizona State (9-0) is off to its
best start since the 1974-75 season
and has its highest ranking since
reaching third during the 1980-81
season.
Wichita State climbed three
Ryan Shazier was never far
from the thoughts of his Pittsburgh Steelers teammates as they
clinched the AFC North title with
a come-from-behind, 39-38 win
over the Baltimore Ravens on
Sunday night.
Shazier, the 25-year-old linebacker who suffered a serious
injury in last Monday’s win over
the Cincinnati Bengals, watched
Sunday’s game from his hospital
bed, where he continues to recover from spinal stabilization surgery. ESPN reported last week
that Shazier continues to show
“gradual improvement,” but it’s
unclear whether he’ll play football again.
Several Steelers players wore
cleats bearing the message
“Shalieve” on Sunday, and linebacker James Harrison warmed
up shirtless, despite the 35-degree weather, as Shazier often
does.
On an emotional evening at
Heinz Field, Pittsburgh trailed
the Ravens by nine points with
6:44 remaining but rallied to win
on Chris Boswell’s 46-yard field
goal in the final minute.
“We got a ‘W’ today,” Shazier
said in a video posted on the
Steelers’ Twitter account after the
game. “It got scary, but hey, we
knew how to pull it out, baby.
Here we go, Steelers.”
Steelers quarterback Ben
Roethlisberger, who became the
first player in NFL history with
three 500-yard passing games,
carried Shazier’s No. 50 jersey off
the field after the win. The Steelers made sure Shazier was able to
partake in the locker-room celebration after the team clinched
its third division title in four
years. They also dedicated the
game ball to him.
“A very emotional group in
there,” Coach Mike Tomlin said.
“We had Ryan Shazier on FaceTime. He had an opportunity to
share that moment with the team.
That’s a special thing.”
“I’m glad we could get this win
for Shay,” Roethlisberger said. “It
was really tough. I went and saw
Shay on Thursday after practice.
Guys are starting to go visit him.
When you walk in and see him
and give him a hug, it makes you
breathe a little easier. We love our
brother, and we are glad we got
this win for him.”
“We knew in spirit, he was all
there with us,” said wide receiver
Antonio Brown, who had 11 catches for 213 yards against the Ravens. “And for us to get it done
and the way we got it done today
and being able to FaceTime him,
to see the joy from him . . . it’s
special. We don’t take it for granted. He’s our brother. I know he
wasn’t out there with us, but he
was there in spirit. And I know he
was our biggest supporter, watching us fight together today.”
scott.allen@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
DIG ES T
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
S COTT A LLEN
spots to No. 3, followed by Duke
and ASU. Miami climbed four
spots to No. 6, followed by North
Carolina, Kentucky, Texas A&M
and Xavier. . . .
Wisconsin freshman guard
Kobe King will miss the rest of
the season following left knee
surgery. King is eligible to apply
for a medical redshirt. . . .
The George Mason women’s
basketball team defeated
Maryland-Baltimore County, 5838, in Fairfax to improve to 10-2
for its best start since 1987-88.
Graduate transfer Natalie
Butler scored her 1,000th career
point and notched her 11th
straight double-double with 16
points and 13 rebounds.
Sophomore Sarah Kaminski and
freshman Nicole CardanoHillary each scored 14 points.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Mississippi quarterback Shea
Patterson said he will transfer to
Michigan.
Patterson made his
commitment in a tweet after
visiting the Ann Arbor, Mich.,
campus last weekend. Patterson
is recovering from a knee injury
that cost him the final month of
last season, but he should be
ready to compete in 2018.
In seven games, Patterson
passed for 2,259 yards and 17
touchdowns with nine
interceptions. The sophomore
was one of the top recruits in the
2016 class. Ole Miss was hit with
NCAA sanctions two weeks ago
that included a bowl ban. . . .
SMU hired former California
and Louisiana Tech coach Sonny
Dykes as its new coach, replacing
one Texan with a reputation for
potent offenses for another.
Dykes will replace Chad
Morris, who left SMU last week
to become Arkansas’s coach. . . .
Willie Simmons is the new
Florida A&M coach. He has been
head coach at Prairie View A&M
the past three seasons.
GOLF
Players no longer will be
penalized two shots for an
incorrect scorecard if they were
not aware of a rules violation
when they signed their card.
The USGA and R&A also will
no longer respond to most TV
viewers’ calls during an event.
The changes are part of a local
rule effective Jan. 1. Rescinding
the scorecard penalty, famously
applied to Lexi Thompson at the
LPGA Tour’s first major in April,
is part of a broader standard for
using video. . . .
Shubhankar Sharma won his
first European Tour title by a
shooting a 3-under-par 69 in the
final round of the weatherdelayed Joburg Open in
Johannesburg.
BASEBALL
Tracy Stallard, the pitcher
who gave up Roger Maris’s
record 61st home run in 1961, has
died. He was 80.
He was on the mound for
Boston in 1961 when Maris broke
the single-season record that
Babe Ruth had held since 1927.
The record stayed until 1998.
Stallard went 30-57 with a 4.17
career ERA while pitching for the
Red Sox (1960-62), New York
Mets (1963-64) and St. Louis
Cardinals (1965-66). . . .
Free agent relief pitcher Pat
Neshek is returning to the
Philadelphia Phillies on a twoyear, $16.5 million contract. The
37-year-old Neshek was an allstar last year in his first season in
Philadelphia before being traded
to the Rockies in late July.
BASKETBALL
When LiAngelo Ball withdrew
from UCLA last week, reports
emerged that his father, LaVar,
wanted both the 19-year-old and
his 16-year-old brother, LaMelo,
who was pulled out of high
7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
Los Angeles Lakers at New York » ESPN
Washington at Brooklyn »NBC Sports Washington Plus, WFED (1500 AM)
Philadelphia at Minnesota » ESPN
NHL
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
Colorado at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Tampa Bay at St. Louis » NBC Sports Network
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
Catholic at Maryland » WTEM (980 AM)
Mississippi State at Cincinnati » ESPN2
Fordham at Rutgers » ESPNU
St. Peter’s at Seton Hall » Fox Sports 1
Michigan at Texas » ESPN2
Albany at Memphis » ESPNU
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
North Florida at Michigan » Big Ten Network
SOCCER
12:20 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
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2:55 p.m.
Bundesliga: Leipzig at Wolfsburg » Fox Sports 2
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Premier League: Chelsea at Huddersfield Town »NBC Sports Network
school in October, to play
professionally in Europe. That
appears set to happen early next
year, as the two teenagers have
reportedly signed one-year
contracts with a club in the
Lithuanian League.
The club, Vytautas Prienai,
also plays in the Baltic League,
which features a lower level of
competition that could be key to
both the Balls getting appreciable
playing time. LiAngelo, who
barely played for UCLA before
getting suspended, along with
two teammates, after a
shoplifting incident in China,
was not expected to make much
of an impact for the Bruins, while
LaMelo is viewed as a far better
prospect but obviously has
further to go in his overall
development.
— Des Bieler
Las Vegas’s WNBA franchise
will be known as the Aces. The
team was located in San Antonio
and known as the Stars.
— From news services
and staff reports
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
Stanton’s seismic move rattles the game
On
Baseball
lake buena
vista, fla. — Just
as the aftershocks
across baseball
from last week’s
seismic trade of
slugger Giancarlo Stanton from
the Miami Marlins to the
New York Yankees were finally
subsiding, the ground trembled
anew Monday, its epicenter the
Hemispheres Ballroom at the Walt
Disney World Dolphin resort.
When Stanton’s towering form
appeared from behind a black
curtain and donned the Yankees’
pinstripes — and especially when
he opened his mouth to speak —
everyone in the industry knew:
This was indeed the Big One.
When the most storied
franchise in the game acquires its
most prolific home run
champion, as the Yankees did
Friday, its impact is best
measured on a Richter scale. But
when that home run champion’s
unveiling comes amid the media
frenzy of baseball’s annual winter
meetings, and when he proceeds
to publicly torch his former team
with barely concealed rancor, it is
enough to break the scale
altogether.
Eventually, baseball will get
back to other business — free
agent signings, trades and the
other mundane tasks of rosterbuilding, with spring training
looming some two months away
— but for now it is difficult to view
the sport’s 29 other teams in any
terms other than how far away
from the Stanton epicenter they
were, and how much damage
each sustained.
The Marlins, it almost goes
without saying, were reduced to a
pile of rubble. Not only did they
suffer the inherent indignity of
essentially giving away their
franchise player — sending the
28-year-old Stanton and
$30 million in salary relief to the
Yankees for second baseman
Starlin Castro, whom the Marlins
may spin off in another costcutting move, and two low-level
prospects — but then they had to
hear him blast them on the way
out the door.
He called the organization an
“unprofessional circus” in an
Instagram post. He advised
Marlins fans to “hang in there”
but “maybe watch from afar.” And
he criticized the franchise for
having “no structure.”
“You’ve seen what’s gone on
down there,” Stanton said. “It’s a
different direction every spring
training. You’ve got to learn
something new. Every spring a
different manager.”
What became clear is that two
different Marlins ownerships
erred badly in their handling of
DAVE SHEININ
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
GM Mike Rizzo’s Nationals have particular needs: right-handed relief, starting depth and the bench.
Rizzo still hunting for ‘value’ and ‘fit’
BY
J ORGE C ASTILLO
lake buena vista, fla. — Mike
Rizzo didn’t divulge any juicy developments to the ravenous horde
of media members crowding the
Washington Nationals’ suite at
Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort on Monday afternoon. He arrived at the winter
meetings just 90 minutes earlier.
He had time to settle into his club’s
headquarters and not much else.
“Getting here was my biggest
activity today,” the Nationals general manager said as assistant
general manager Bob Miller and
Manager Dave Martinez sat at a
table a few feet away.
Rizzo said team officials were
slated to meet after he addressed
the media. Appointments, presumably with agents and other
clubs, were scheduled for after
that. On the Nationals’ agenda:
acquiring bench pieces, righthanded relievers and starting
pitching depth. Not on the Nationals’ agenda, at least according to
Rizzo: acquiring a catcher to supplant Matt Wieters, prioritizing a
middle infielder with everyday experience to fill in if Daniel Murphy
misses time after October microfracture knee surgery or making
any sort of a splash.
We’ll “just kind of do our stuff
on the periphery of the roster,”
Rizzo said.
The modest plan, Rizzo insisted, is not a product of any financial
constraints from ownership even
after the Nationals crossed the
competitive tax threshold for the
first time last season and are not
far from doing so again for 2018.
“There’s no hindrance of us improving our club in any way we
think possible,” Rizzo said. “Obvi-
ously, we’re going to be prudent
about what we spend and who we
spend it on. We haven’t had a
mandate to spend under a certain
number and we don’t going into
this season.”
One area in which the Nationals
are certain to spend is the righthanded reliever sweepstakes,
which has been the liveliest slice of
the market. The Nationals have
Ryan Madson, Koda Glover,
Shawn Kelley, Wander Suero and
Austin Adams on their 40-man
roster, but Madson is considered
the only reliable right-handed relief option of the bunch.
Brandon Morrow, Luke Gregerson and Pat Neshek are among the
righties who have secured multiyear contracts. More are expected
to find homes in the next couple of
days.
Washington has expressed interest in re-signing Brandon Kintzler, who is drawing interest from
a variety of other clubs, although
none have made offers, according
to a person with knowledge of the
situation. They also checked in on
Hector Rondon when he wasn’t
tendered a contract by the Chicago Cubs earlier in the month and
have asked about Addison Reed,
according to people with knowledge of the situation. Matt Albers
would like to return but the Nationals haven’t indicated a desire
to bring him back, though that
could always change.
Greg Holland and Wade Davis,
considered the two best righthanded relievers on the market,
are also still available. They would
come at steeper prices as proven
closers but would give the Nationals a formidable three-headed relief monster comparable with other contending clubs’ threesomes.
“We’re going to look for the best
value we can get,” Rizzo said.
“We’ll identify guys that we like
and if we can get a value that we
think fits our club.”
As for the starting rotation, Rizzo emphasized he has confidence
in his internal options for the fifth
spot, which will be vacant for at
least a good chunk of the season as
Joe Ross recovers from Tommy
John surgery. Those options are
Erick Fedde, who finished his season on the disabled list, and A.J.
Cole, who finished his season with
his best stretch as a big leaguer.
“A.J. Cole threw the ball extremely well in his last seven starts
last year,” Rizzo said. “Stuff was
good. It upticked at the end of the
season and, of course, we love
Fedde. He’ll be healthy and have
some major league time under his
belt, so we feel good with where
we’re at. What we need to look for
is depth because it’s a long season
and very few seasons you go
through with five starters.”
But Rizzo doesn’t have an extensive history of adding mediocre starters merely for rotation
depth. He tends to aim higher, and
the possibilities include Jake Arrieta in free agency and Gerrit Cole
via trade.
Behind the plate, Rizzo said he
views Wieters, who was one of the
worst everyday players in baseball
last season, as a “bounce-back
candidate.” He confirmed the Nationals plan to have him play fewer games. Pedro Severino will pick
up the slack as the backup.
But everything is subject to
change. Rizzo and the Nationals
were just settling in for what
should be a hectic week across the
sport.
jorge.castillo@washpost.com
WILLIE J. ALLEN JR./ASSOCIATED PRESS
In pinstripes for the first time,
Giancarlo Stanton had some
blunt words about the Marlins.
Stanton, from the ill-conceived,
13-year, $325 million contract —
with full no-trade privileges and a
player opt-out near the midpoint
— that the Jeffrey Loria regime
gave him in 2014, when the
franchise’s finances never
supported such a massive
expenditure, to the bungled trade
process the Bruce Sherman/Derek
Jeter regime put Stanton through
this month. Once the new owners
rejected Stanton’s pleas to beef up
the pitching staff in hopes of
contending in 2018, it seemed
almost certain he would be dealt.
“I thought our lineup was legit
and we needed help with our
pitchers, and we needed to add
rather than subtract,” Stanton
said. “The way they wanted to go
was to subtract, so I let it be
known that I didn’t want to be
part of another rebuild.”
But that’s where things got ugly.
The Marlins struck agreements
with the St. Louis Cardinals and
San Francisco Giants last week,
even though neither team was on
Stanton’s short list of acceptable
destinations. (“Those,” he said
Monday, “were not my teams.”)
Then, as Stanton confirmed, they
tried to threaten him into
accepting one of those deals by
presenting him with an
alternative of spending the rest of
his career on a bare-bones Marlins
roster.
“It was said, so it was definitely
a thought I had to be ready to deal
with,” Stanton said. “But . . . I’m
not going to be forced to do that.
You can’t say that and expect me
to jump at what’s there, if that’s
not the right situation for me.”
Jeter, the Marlins’ chief
executive, was notably absent
from baseball’s annual gathering,
but on a conference call with
reporters Monday, he defended
the team’s handling of Stanton.
“No,” he said, “there isn’t
anything I would do differently.”
But the Marlins weren’t the
only team having to assess the
damage left by the Stanton deal.
There are also the Yankees’ four
division rivals in the American
League East Division, who now
face the prospect of 19 games per
year against New York’s new
Murderer’s Row lineup, centered
around the only two players in
baseball — Stanton and Aaron
Judge — to surpass 50 home runs
in 2017. The former hit 59 homers
and was the NL MVP in 2017; the
latter hit 52 and was the AL rookie
of the year.
The Boston Red Sox, who
edged the Yankees for the division
title in 2017, will almost certainly
make their own splashy roster
addition(s); President of Baseball
Operations Dave Dombrowski is
considered one of the most
aggressive GMs in the game.
But the presence of Stanton in
the Bronx has raised the stakes
for every contender in the league,
from the World Series champion
Houston Astros to the Central
Division champion Cleveland
Indians to the resurgent Los
Angeles Angels, who last week
added Japanese two-way ace/
slugger Shohei Ohtani to a roster
that already included the
consensus best player in the
game, center fielder Mike Trout.
At the opposite end of the
damage spectrum were the four
NL East teams that were thrilled
to get Stanton out of their
division. “I’m glad I don’t have to
see him 19 times this year,”
Washington Nationals GM Mike
Rizzo said. “He’s been a great
player against us.”
But if the fallout from the
Stanton deal has divided the
game into winners and losers, no
team was a bigger winner than
the Yankees. In one monumental
move that all but fell into their
laps, they added the majors’ home
run champ to a lineup that
already led the majors in homers
and another superstar to a roster
that came within one win of
making it to the World Series.
And they did so at a minimal
cost in talent and at a price — they
will owe Stanton $265 million
over the next 10 years, if he
doesn’t opt out after 2020 — that
constitutes a bargain relative to
the prices top free agents such as
Bryce Harper and Manny
Machado could command next
winter. Not that the Stanton trade
necessarily eliminates the
Yankees from those markets.
Even with the Stanton trade, the
Yankees have room to acquire a
starting pitcher or two and still
remain under the $197 million
luxury tax threshold.
In other words, if you thought
the Stanton trade was an
earthquake, imagine what next
winter might bring.
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
New Nats skipper Martinez hasn’t managed a game, but he’s talking a good one
MARTINEZ FROM D1
roster and injuries and all the
things he’ll need to talk about on a
daily basis. He passed the first test.
Unlike his predecessor, whose
Nationals debut at the 2015 winter
meetings ended in sudden controversy, Martinez navigated the
questions without much intrigue.
In a jacket and plaid button-down,
he seemed comfortable if guarded, jovial if calculated, and stuck
to the script.
“Best piece of advice I got was
from [Cubs Manager Joe Maddon], obviously, and he told me
just to be myself,” Martinez said.
“You know what you’re doing.”
Martinez said later he was
comfortable with the media. He
talked to reporters throughout
MD: 301-637-3644
VA: 703-382-8488
his career, first as a player, then
on days when Maddon just needed a break. People who have spent
time with Martinez speculate
that part of what took him so long
to get a managerial job was that
he is not a natural conversationalist like Maddon. Sometimes he
cuts sentences short, loses a word
here or there, or pauses to regroup when a sentence gets away
from him.
But Monday, his message was
once again clear: He will be a
players’ manager, one who wanders the clubhouse and communicates as much as possible, one who
will emphasize “having fun” and
embracing the pressure — and
one who will try new things, at
least as far as the Nationals’ veteran clubhouse will tolerate them.
“It’s really important to build
that relationship and start getting
to know these guys and what
makes them tick and let them
know that, hey, I’m there not only
to be your manager, but to help
you in any way I can,” Martinez
said. “And it’s good to know that
they’re open-minded, they want
to win and they also want somebody that can believe in them.”
As a bench coach, the ability to
relate to players was all that mattered, and Martinez has started
that more familiar process already. He talked to Max Scherzer,
who this offseason welcomed the
arrival of his and his wife’s first
child. He talked to Anthony Rendon, who got married. He talked
to Daniel Murphy and Adam
Eaton and Matt Wieters, all of
whom he’ll meet in person at Winterfest in Washington this weekend. And, of course, he talked to
Bryce Harper, who is entering
what might be his final season as a
National.
“Can I lobby right now?” Martinez asked reporters. “I can’t wait
to work with him and I hope we
get to work together for a lot of
years. He’s a tremendous player.”
Martinez spent the afternoon
in the Nationals’ suite, glasses on,
discussing plans with the rest of
the Nationals’ contingent. He will
be a part of the baseball decisions,
in on all the discussions about
roster construction, though General Manager Mike Rizzo likes to
leave the use of that roster to his
manager.
Lineup decisions largely will be
Martinez’s to make. For example,
Martinez said he called Eaton,
who said he would be 100 percent
ready for spring training after
tearing an anterior cruciate ligament in April. Martinez said he
told Eaton to calm down, that he’d
rather have him ready for Opening Day than spring training. And
if Eaton is ready, Martinez said, he
will lead off and play left field.
Martinez also said he sees Ryan
Madson as his setup man and
Sean Doolittle as his closer. He
said Murphy’s rehab process is “on
schedule,” perhaps foretelling a
tenure full of vague injury updates
— a well-honed Nationals tradition. As for the rest of his lineup
plans, Martinez dodged.
“We got to keep some things a
secret, you know,” he said with a
smile. When someone informed
him that the Nationals were, in
fact, under no obligation to secretkeeping at all, Martinez just
praised the versatility of his roster,
a veteran managerial maneuver.
After a few such dodges and
weaves, all made in good humor,
someone asked Martinez if the
reality of his new job had hit him
yet. After all those years of waiting
for a chance, has it sunk in that he
finally has one? He couldn’t help
but devolve into candor.
“Oh, it hit me,” he said, nodding
vigorously.
“I really believe this feels right,”
he said. “ . . . I feel lucky to be part
of such an unbelievable organization and a winning organization,
so I think this is the moment.”
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
301-645-2220 MD | 703-740-9566 VA | 202-816-8850 DC
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
professional Football
NFL NOTES
R E D S K I NS NOTE S
ACL tear
o∞cially
ends year
for Wentz
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/redskins
Carter and Brown
among latest injured
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Carson Wentz got the Eagles
this far. Now it’s up to Nick Foles to
deliver Philadelphia its first Super
Bowl title.
Wentz has a torn left anterior
cruciate ligament, suffered diving
into the end zone on a scramble
late in the third quarter Sunday at
Los Angeles, and will miss the rest
of the season and playoffs, forcing
the NFC East champions to turn to
a familiar backup who once had
one of the greatest statistical seasons in NFL history.
“The reason we got Nick Foles is
for situations like this. I’m excited
for Nick,” Coach Doug Pederson
said Monday. “I hate it for Carson
Wentz. I hate it for the season that
he’s been having. But at the same
time, it’s been the next-man-up
mentality and that’s how we approach it.”
Wentz was a favorite in the NFL
MVP race during a breakout sophomore season. He threw for 3,296
yards and set a franchise singleseason record with an NFL-leading 33 touchdown passes while
only tossing seven interceptions.
SEAHAWKS: Seattle players
will not face any suspensions for
the melee that broke out at the
conclusion of Sunday’s loss to
Jacksonville.
The league is still reviewing the
fracas that broke out in the closing
moments of Jacksonville’s 30-24
victory for potential discipline,
but no suspensions will be coming. Michael Bennett, Sheldon
Richardson and Quinton Jefferson were all flagged for personal
fouls. Jefferson and Richardson
were both ejected, and all three
should face hefty fines for their
involvement in the ugly conclusion. Jefferson attempted to climb
into the stands after fans threw
what appeared to be bottles at him
as he was leaving the field. He was
pulled back by team staff.
The Jaguars issued a statement
that they were reviewing video
and were conducting interviews
with spectators and security staff
in the area to identify those involved. The team said those involved may lose the right to purchase future tickets or have their
season tickets revoked.
PACKERS: Green Bay’s team
doctor is evaluating tests on Aaron
Rodgers’s surgically repaired right
collarbone to determine if the
quarterback can return for Sunday’s game against Carolina.
Coach Mike McCarthy said
there’s no timeline on when medical staff will decide on potentially
clearing Rodgers. McCarthy said
he would like to know as soon as
possible, but Rodgers’s availability
is a medical decision.
The two-time NFL MVP returned to practice Dec. 2 on what
McCarthy called a “trial return.”
Rodgers ran the scout team last
week.
JETS: The best season of Josh
McCown’s career has come to an
abrupt and painful end.
The New York quarterback who
established himself as a respected
leader will miss the team’s final
three games with a broken left
hand that will require surgery.
Coach Todd Bowles also announced that Bryce Petty will start
in McCown’s place for New York at
New Orleans this week. Petty
started four games for the Jets last
season.
McCown was injured when he
was hit by Denver’s Shane Ray in
the third quarter of New York’s
23-0 loss on Sunday.
TITANS: Tennessee Coach
Mike Mularkey said he doesn’t
think quarterback Marcus Mariota’s sprained left knee or left tackle
Taylor Lewan’s sore back should
keep either out of the Titans’ game
with San Francisco this weekend.
Mariota was hurt Sunday when
he started to slide too late and was
hit. The quarterback didn’t miss a
snap and finished the game. Lewan went out of the game in the
second quarter after having back
spasms, but Mularkey said that is a
short-term issue.
BEARS: After eight surgeries
and nearly losing his left leg, Chicago tight end Zach Miller still
refuses to rule out a return to the
football field.
In his first visit to Halas Hall
since his Oct. 29 injury, Miller
expressed thanks for the support
he received from the Bears, teammates and fans after vascular surgery to repair a torn artery resulting from a knee injury.
“I’ve been a football player my
whole life,” Miller said. “I would
love to play football. We’ll cross
that road when it’s time.”
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Hunter Henry, catching a touchdown pass Sunday, and the Chargers had their way with Deshazor Everett and the Redskins’ secondary.
Swearinger is critical of the Redskins’ readiness
REDSKINS FROM D1
“It’s blah. Blah,” safety D.J.
Swearinger said of their practices. “. . . We got to practice better.
I’ve been saying it all year. It’s not
surprising at all to me. At all. If
you don’t prepare well, you’re
going to fail.”
As of Monday afternoon,
Gruden said he hadn’t seen video
of Swearinger’s postgame comments. “I’ll talk to D.J. about it
[Tuesday] when I see him,” he
said. “If he felt that way, then it’s
on us as coaches to make sure
these guys are fully ready to play
and it’s on the players also to
make sure they study the plays
and make sure they’re well-prepared, when they walk into the
game, they know exactly what’s
coming and make the necessary
adjustments.”
In the immediate aftermath of
Sunday’s defeat, Gruden shouldered the blame for his team’s
decline, adding: “I’ve regressed.
I’ve not gotten this team ready to
play. So it’s on me.” But when
pressed Monday about the play-
er criticisms of their preparation, Gruden initially didn’t
seem to think how they practiced was the issue. “Obviously,
if I felt like we were lacking
preparation, I’d fix it before the
game would start,” he said. “I
don’t think we’re lacking preparation; I just think, for whatever
reason, we’re not taking our
preparation to the game-day
field. . . . And there’s not much
more we can do from a preparation standpoint.”
But he later conceded that
“Friday’s practice wasn’t as crisp
as [Swearinger] would probably
want it as far as red zone. We had
a period that wasn’t quite as
crisp, we repeated some plays,
but then you watch the film and
you correct them and you move
on. That’s just the way it is.”
Swearinger’s comments aren’t
the only rumblings coming from
the Redskins’ locker room.
In an interview last Wednesday, cornerback Josh Norman
said he signed with Washington
last offseason because he saw
“promise” in a young team, but
he also admitted: “We still have
work to do. And I didn’t perceive
it taking this long. I didn’t.”
At the time, though, Norman
stressed that the Redskins’ season was far from over and that
they still had an opportunity to
win the remaining games on the
schedule.
That was just four days before
Washington was blown out by
the Chargers.
Before Norman boarded the
team bus at StubHub Center on
Sunday, he vented even more
about the state of the Redskins.
“I’m not going to be a part of
something that’s not going to go
forward and win a championship,” Norman said. “That’s serious. I don’t care about the money, I don’t care about the fame, I
don’t care about anything. The
only thing I care about is that
ring. . . . If I don’t win a
championship, that means it’s all
for nothing.”
He also was irritated that he
wasn’t lined up against the Chargers’ top wide receiver, Keenan
Allen, who caught six passes for
111 yards, including a 51-yard
completion on a flea-flicker that
set up another Los Angeles score.
“Anybody in the top position
where I’m at, that’s what you do,
that’s what you want. . . . But
there’s more that you can get out
of me,” said Norman, who was
burned on Chargers quarterback
Philip Rivers’s 75-yard touchdown pass to wide receiver Tyrell
Williams.
Gruden said Monday that Norman was supposed to have help
from the safety on that touchdown play and on the flea-flicker.
“His role is fine,” Gruden said
of Norman. “ . . . The majority of
NFL teams have two or three
really good receivers and a lot of
times you start trying to run
around and matching with one
guy, then everybody else has to
get set on their guys and it
creates confusion. We’re trying
to keep this basic for some guys
and if you’re not playing man-toman on every snap, you’re playing some zone, then it’s easier for
everybody to play right and left.”
kimberley.martin@washpost.com
JERRY BREWER
Gruden has plenty on the line during last three games
BREWER FROM D1
rewarding Gruden and elevating
his importance. It was an
expensive Band-Aid, but for a
poor strategic thinker, indulging
in a temporary high is easy.
Nine months later, as the 2017
season drifts toward an upsetting
conclusion, as an entire four-year
rebuilding process drifts toward
worthlessness, Gruden hasn’t
been able to motivate his players
for two straight miserable weeks.
It’s December, and the
conversation is about a lack of
focus, preparation and effort.
Washington has a 5-8 record and
will end the year playing three
games without any hope of
making the playoffs, a
predicament it hasn’t faced since
Gruden’s first season in 2014.
Nearing the end of his fourth
season, Gruden has a 26-34-1
record. He has one postseason
appearance and zero playoff
wins. Beneath the surface, there
are many reasons to support
Gruden being the first coach in
Daniel Snyder’s 18 years as owner
to receive a fifth season: posting
back-to-back winning seasons a
year ago for the first time in 19
years, developing Kirk Cousins to
provide life after Robert Griffin
III’s flameout and the reality
that, more than anything,
injuries have hindered this
season.
Still, Gruden should be on the
hot seat because he is responsible
for the team’s inconsistent focus
and effort, the sloppy
performance of late and the
frequent egg-laying throughout
his tenure. It’s just standard in
professional sports to put
Gruden through a complete
evaluation at this point. The last
three games mean more to him
than anyone on this team. He
knows to expect it, just as his
players know they will be
critiqued similarly.
“We’re all getting judged at the
end of the day,” left tackle Trent
Williams said, shunning the
suggestion that the final three
games are meaningless.
“Everybody’s job is going to be.
They’re going to take a closer
look at everybody and what
everybody puts on film towards
the end of the year. So it’s no
reason to think that mediocre
play is okay. Obviously, when
they go into the offseason and
make decisions, this part of the
year has a lot to do with it.”
Williams speaks like a player
who has been here for eight
seasons. Washington may have
committed to a methodical
rebuilding process several years
ago, but this is still a year-to-year
franchise. This time, with about
40 percent of the team on
expiring contracts, Cousins’s
future in doubt and no clear
evidence of progress, another
teardown has to be on the table.
But in the case of Gruden, how
can the franchise justify the
expense of recommitting to him
nine months ago and then firing
him with three years and at least
$15 million left on his contract?
Allen thought he saved face
and buried the “What’s going on
with McCloughan?” story by
giving Gruden that extension.
Smart business would have been
to wait until about now before
adding years to Gruden’s deal. He
could have been patient, learned
more about the coach and still
been ahead of the curve if
Gruden had proved himself
further this season. He could
have kept options open and
avoided making money such a
huge part of this decision now.
I’m not sure what the right
decision on Gruden is. My sense
is that he will get another season
because, until recently, he did an
underrated job of guiding this
team through its injury trauma.
But in the NFL, you’re always left
to make grand judgments on
small sample sizes. The past two
weeks, in which Washington has
been outscored 68-27, represent
just two games. But two games
represent 12.5 percent of the
season. And the three remaining
games — against foes with a
combined record of 12-27 —
account for nearly 20 percent of
the schedule. There isn’t a lot left
to accomplish, but there’s plenty
to lose.
Gruden can’t have any more
games in which he says what he
did Sunday: “It’s hard to say if
anybody played good or bad or
indifferent. I think, as a team, as
a coaching staff, we didn’t do
anything good enough. Nobody,
in any way, shape or form.”
For most of his four years,
Gruden has been the franchise’s
sanity. He is refreshingly
accountable. He is a professional
who always tries to make the
organization look good, even
when its incompetence is
apparent. He can manage up and
keep together a front office
notorious for creating factions.
That’s why Allen was so quick to
reward Gruden during a difficult
time. From a standpoint of offfield credibility, Washington
looks better with Gruden serving
as a face of the franchise.
But the future involves a
complicated question. Which is
harder to tolerate: The franchise
slogging through some of
Gruden’s on-the-job training as a
first-time NFL head coach? Or
the danger of venturing into the
unknown again?
The franchise is less chaotic
with Gruden as its coach, and
Allen used that to quell
controversy in March. But it’s
December now, and Gruden just
admitted that he has “regressed.”
It’s possible that Washington
always will be a little disheveled
with Gruden in charge. It’s
possible that Washington always
will be inept on defense while
Gruden is busy designing clever
offensive plays.
Allen didn’t have clear answers
about Gruden nine months ago,
but he did what felt right in the
moment. That’s a greater offense
than anything Gruden has done
wrong. Put it with Allen leading
the Cousins contract debacle and
his shoddy handling of
McCloughan’s dismissal, and the
team president is on another
losing streak. Allen, owner of a
.404 winning percentage since
his first full season with
Washington, should have the
hottest seat in the organization.
There’s a chance this month
could result in a bloodbath. But
this is when Gruden has been a
savior during his tenure. Can he
be a stabilizing influence again?
Is that better than a return to the
unknown?
For three bad football games,
there’s so much drama.
jerry.brewer@washpost.com
For more by Jerry Brewer, visit
washingtonpost.com/brewer.
The Washington Redskins
endured a number of additional
injuries in their 30-13 blowout
loss to the Los Angeles Chargers,
which also impacted Redskins
Coach Jay Gruden’s
aggressiveness late in the game.
Gruden said Monday that
outside linebacker Chris Carter
will need surgery after suffering a
fractured fibula. Carter, a Los
Angeles native, suffered the
injury while on punt coverage
and was carted off the field in the
fourth quarter.
Inside linebacker Zach Brown
had an MRI exam on his foot
Monday, though the team was
awaiting the results as of Monday
afternoon. Brown entered the
game with a hamstring and
Achilles’ injuries, and he left the
game on crutches and with a
walking boot on his right foot.
“We’ll just have to wait and
see,” Gruden said. “With him
limping around here, [Martrell]
Spaight will have to get some
more [reps] and Josh HarveyClemons will have to step up his
game there, too, if [Brown] can’t
go. Add another to the list of
questionable guys.”
Running back Byron Marshall
will be day-to-day following a
hamstring injury that occurred
while fielding a kickoff in the first
quarter. Marshall stumbled on
the field while tracking the ball
and grabbed his right leg after
kneeling for a touchback.
Running back Samaje Perine
(illness) and wide receiver Ryan
Grant (ankle) had also left the
game with injuries, while the
Redskins opted to sideline Trent
Williams (knee) during the fourth
quarter.
Cousins talks report
Washington’s offense had
perhaps its poorest performance
of the season in Sunday’s loss to
the Chargers, with Kirk Cousins
throwing for just 151 yards, easily
the lowest total since he was
installed as the team’s starter
before the 2015 season. That
followed a week in which Dan
Patrick caused a minor local stir
by reporting on his podcast that
“the behind-the-scenes intel” he
had received indicated that “Kirk
Cousins is not well-liked by his
wide receivers.”
After just about every D.C.
sports-radio program chewed
over this declaration, Patrick later
said more: that he was told “some
of the receivers have a problem
with [Cousins] because he throws
them into positions where they
could get hurt,” and that he was
told this by somebody who
attended the Redskins-Cowboys
Thursday night game who is not
affiliated with the Redskins.
This is all a bit odd, but it
comes from the host of NBC’s
prime-time “Football Night in
America” program, someone who
has a national platform and
plenty of national listeners. And
so Cousins on Monday was finally
asked to respond to this report.
“I didn’t hear it,” the
quarterback told Grant Paulsen
and Danny Rouhier on 106.7 The
Fan. “I certainly would never
want to lead a receiver into
trouble. I think if it’s a problem,
people would come and talk
about it in the building. So if it is
something that people are saying,
I don’t know that it’s coming from
our building or from our locker
room. It’d be coming from outside
of that.
“I don’t know,” Cousins went
on. “You know, I’m sure I’ve led
people into traffic. I know I led
Pierre Garcon into some big hits
in the past. But I think it also is a
part of playing the receiver
position, and it’s tough. And I told
Jamison Crowder late in the game
[Sunday]: Some of the catches he
made in tight windows, some of
the hits he takes and punt returns
and the way he plays, I mean, it’s
impressive, even in a loss.
“I said [to Crowder], ‘Just the
toughness and the way you
compete and just keep playing,
it’s impressive. It’s a joy to watch,
and it’s fun to play with and an
honor to play for you.’”
Cousins also spoke to the
suggestion that the Redskins had
a bad week of practice last week
that foretold Sunday’s loss.
“I don’t know; I think that
every player kind of sees practice
or sees the game or the week from
their own perspective and what
their process was,” he said.
“Whether or not practice was
sharp last week, I think the focus
is now what can we do now, what
can we do going into Tuesday and
Wednesday.
— Master Tesfatsion
and Dan Steinberg
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
Miami pulls o≠ surprise vs. Patriots
DOLPHINS 27,
PATRIOTS 20
BY
S TEVEN W INE
miami gardens, fla. — Tom
Brady was intercepted twice by
Xavien Howard and held without
a third-down conversion Monday
night, and the Miami Dolphins
snapped the New England Patriots’ eight-game winning streak
with a surprising 27-20 victory.
The Dolphins (6-7) were 11point underdogs at home, but they
kept the Patriots (10-3) from
clinching their ninth consecutive
AFC East title — at least for another week.
Brady went 24 for 43 for 233
yards and one touchdown. Miami
sacked him twice and hit him five
times, and held the Patriots to 25
yards rushing. New England was 0
for 11 on third down.
The Dolphins’ Jay Cutler threw
for 263 yards and three scores,
including two to Jarvis Landry.
Kenyan Drake had 114 yards rushing and 79 receiving.
A Brady touchdown pass cut
the deficit to 10 points with 13
minutes left, but the Patriots’ next
three possessions netted five
yards. After a New England field
goal, Miami sealed the victory by
recovering an onside kick with 53
seconds to go.
The Dolphins wore the uniforms from their perfect 1972 season and looked the part. For the
first time in four prime-time appearances this season, they rose to
the occasion.
Miami tried to turn the game
into a laugher in the third quarter
when Landry caught a touchdown
and then set the ball down in the
end zone and pumped it repeatedly — an apparent reference to the
Patriots’ Deflategate scandal.
Coach Adam Gase beat New
England for the first time in four
tries. His team snapped the Patriots’ 14-game road winning streak,
second-best ever behind San Francisco’s 18 in a row from 1988-90.
Gase threw a lot of wrinkles at
the Patriots early, with tight end
MarQueis Gray and receivers Landry and Jakeem Grant taking
turns lining up in the backfield.
Cutler spun out of the grasp of
blitzing safety Jordan Richards to
throw a completion that kept Miami’s first touchdown drive going.
The Patriots sputtered without
tight end Rob Gronkowski, who
served a one-game suspension.
— Associated Press
MIKE EHRMANN/GETTY IMAGES
Miami’s Charles Harris, left, and Ndamukong Suh (93) are among a
group of Dolphins celebrating a sack of Tom Brady Monday night.
NHL ROUNDUP
Colorado breaks slump
with second straight win
AVALANCHE 2,
PENGUINS 1
A SSOCIATED P RESS
BRUCE BENNETT/GETTY IMAGES
Braden Holtby, yielding a goal to the Islanders’ Brock Nelson, allowed all three against New York and was pulled during the second period.
Washington’s winning streak snapped at four games
CAPITALS FROM D1
(18-12-1) had scored the first goal
in six straight contests.
But what was a manageable
one-goal deficit after the first
period quickly devolved into a
rout. On the first shift of the
second period, Islanders defenseman Calvin de Haan skated up
the right side and toward the goal
line, backhanding the puck to
Andrew Ladd in front, who easily
tapped in a goal as Nicklas Backstrom got to Ladd just a little too
late to tie up his stick.
“We didn’t seem to have the
legs in order to compete against
them tonight,” forward Tom Wilson said. “. . . When you come out
and you don’t have the legs, in the
system that we play, sometimes if
a guy gets beat, we have to make
sure that secondary [player is
there as] kind of a safety blanket.
We didn’t have that on numerous
occasions tonight.”
The Capitals were caught out
of position again less than a minute later. Islanders captain John
Tavares, who is third in the NHL
in goals, skated behind the net all
alone, left wide open at the side
for Josh Bailey’s pass. He scored
his 18th goal of the season, beating a lunging Holtby to put the
Islanders up 3-0 less than two
minutes into the second period.
Holtby had faced 12 shots to that
point.
“There’s always people in the
high-danger scoring areas, but
the problem was today we weren’t
there to cover them most of the
time,” Eller said.
Grubauer was scheduled to
start Tuesday night against the
Colorado Avalanche, but because
he was in net for the last two
periods against the Islanders, it’s
likely Holtby will be the starter
again in the second game of this
back-to-back set. Grubauer saved
all 17 shots he saw Monday.
“I don’t know. We’ll talk about
it right now,” Trotz said. “Just
based on performance, we’ll see
where we are.”
When the Capitals did start to
show signs of life in Brooklyn —
Trotz tried every line combination imaginable in the second
half of the game — it was arguably
too late with the team already in a
three-goal hole. New York goaltender Jaroslav Halak was sharp;
he has long been a thorn in
Washington’s side, single-handedly beating the Capitals when he
stopped a barrage of shots as
Montreal’s goaltender in the first
round of the 2010 playoffs. He
made 25 saves before Washington
got its first goal Monday, when
Dmitry Orlov capitalized on a
two-on-one with Chandler Stephenson in the third period.
Before this loss to the Islanders, the Capitals had won seven of
their previous eight games,
climbing the Metropolitan Division standings. Had Washington
defeated New York, it would have
kept pace with the Columbus
Blue Jackets in a tie for first atop
the division. Instead, the Capitals
are tied with the Islanders, just
four points separating the top six
teams in the Metropolitan, meaning there’s little room for error.
“I think overall, everybody
needs to be a little bit better,”
Grubauer said. “But we played the
right way a bunch of games ago,
we got onto a little streak and we
lost one. Now we get going again
and have got to get back to the
way we played before.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
Jonathan Bernier stopped 39
shots, and Mark Barberio scored
in the third period to help the
Colorado Avalanche top the Penguins, 2-1, on Monday night in
Pittsburgh.
Blake Comeau added an emptynetter against his former team as
Colorado, which will visit Washington to play the Capitals on
Tuesday night, won its second
straight after a string of six losses
in seven games. It was Comeau’s
seventh of the season.
Barberio put the Avalanche
ahead to stay 6:17 into the third.
His slap shot off the rush hit Pittsburgh forward Riley Sheahan in
front and got past goaltender
Tristan Jarry.
“You’re going to go through
some ups and downs throughout a
season, as a team and individually,” said Barberio, who was a
healthy scratch last week against
Buffalo. “The key is not to get too
high with the highs and too low
with the lows. That’s the way hockey goes and I’m just happy to
contribute a bit.”
Bernier was on track for his
second shutout of the season before Phil Kessel scored his teambest 15th goal for Pittsburgh at
19:48. Bernier beat the Penguins
for just the second time in 10
career games.
Kessel has points in 25 of 32
games this season and eight
straight home games, his longest
streak since joining the Penguins.
Jarry, making his eighth
straight appearance, stopped 26
shots in the finale of a season-long
five-game homestand. Pittsburgh
lost for the third time in four
games following a four-game winning streak.
STARS 2, RANGERS 1 (SO):
Jason Spezza scored in the shootout, and Dallas snapped a threegame losing streak by defeating
New York.
Kari Lehtonen made 24 saves
for Dallas in the opener of its
four-game East Coast road trip
against the Metropolitan Division.
The Stars had a 1-0 lead before
Rick Nash tied it for the Rangers
when he tipped in Brady Skjei’s
wrist shot with 3:41 left in regulation. Nash made contact with Lehtonen, but the Stars goalie was
well outside the blue paint. Coach
Ken Hitchcock challenged the
play, but the referees ruled there
was no goaltender interference.
Julius Honka drove a slap shot
past Ondrej Pavelec at 6:30 of the
second for his first of the season.
The 2014 first-round pick rejoined
the lineup after sitting for the previous three games.
Pavelec finished with 44 saves,
keeping New York in the game.
The Rangers also killed off three
power plays in the second period.
New York generated very little
offensive pressure for most of the
night. J.T. Miller had a breakaway
opportunity at 8:46 of the second,
but came up empty.
PANTHERS 2, RED WINGS
1 (OT): In Detroit, Mike Matheson
scored his first goal of the season
as Florida won in overtime for the
first time this season.
Matheson drove the rebound of
a Nick Bjugstad shot into the net
behind Detroit goalie Jimmy
Howard at the 2:02 mark of the
overtime period for the winner.
Florida improved to 1-2 in overtime, rallying from a 1-0 third-period deficit for the victory.
Vincent Trocheck also scored
for the Panthers, while Henrik
Zetterberg scored for the Red
Wings, who are 0-5 in overtime.
JETS 5, CANUCKS 1: Mathieu Perreault scored two goals
and added an assist to help Winnipeg halt a three-game overall losing streak. It was the Jets’ seventh
straight victory at home, and they
have points in their past 11 games
in Winnipeg.
Vancouver has lost three
straight in regulation for the first
time this season.
C A P I TA L S ’ N EX T TH R EE
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Islanders 3, Capitals 1
WASHINGTON ......................... 0
N.Y. ISLANDERS ...................... 1
0
2
1 —
0 —
1
3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, N.Y. Islanders, Nelson 9 (Chimera, Clutterbuck), 2:36. Penalties: Eller, WSH, (cross checking),
10:17.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, N.Y. Islanders, Ladd 8 (Eberle, de Haan), 0:36.
3, N.Y. Islanders, Tavares 18 (Bailey, Lee), 1:34. Penalties: Lee, NYI, (slashing), 4:22; Backstrom, WSH, (slashing), 8:29; Backstrom, WSH, (tripping), 15:01.
EVERY TIME IT RAINS
THIRD PERIOD
F LO O D
Scoring: 4, Washington, Orlov 3 (Stephenson, Beagle),
8:23. Penalties: Tavares, NYI, (tripping), 5:00.
SHOTS ON GOAL
WASHINGTON ......................... 7
15
10 — 32
N.Y. ISLANDERS .................... 10
10
9 — 29
Power-play opportunities: Washington 0 of 2; N.Y.
Islanders 0 of 3. Goalies: Washington, Grubauer 2-5-1
(17 shots-17 saves), Holtby 16-6-0 (12-9). N.Y. Islanders, Halak 8-7-1 (32-31).
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Islanders teammates Cal Clutterbuck, Jason Chimera and Brock
Nelson (29) celebrated after Nelson opened the scoring Monday.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
Scott’s stability stands out
While Wizards have struggled with consistency, they’ve been able to count on backup forward
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
my left. It’s just always in the back
of your mind: ‘I don’t want to go
too hard on it,’ or ‘It’s hurting a
little bit.’ Now, there’s no pain. It
doesn’t hurt. It feels good.”
Aside from those physical barriers, Scott has remained a constant
even when his minutes were not
consistent. Beginning in the middle of November, Scott sat three
games as a “DNP-CD” (Did Not
Play — Coach’s Decision). After
every game in which he was
benched, however, Scott bounced
back the next night by shooting at
least 62.5 percent from the field.
He said the benching did not bother him, especially because he
knew Brooks’s roster management had nothing against him.
“Same thing happened in Atlanta,” Scott said. “Some days I
wouldn’t play. Some days I would.
Just stay ready. Scott Brooks came
to me in Charlotte and said, ‘Stay
ready, you’re not doing anything
wrong.’ So that was encouraging to
hear from him. Just stay ready.”
new york — When the Washington Wizards look back at many of
their 12 losses this season, a common frustration arises: A team
with core stability still plays unpredictably. Despite being loaded
with talented scorers, stagnation
on offense and occasional noshows on the defensive end have
led to inconsistent efforts and often losses, as the Wizards experienced in their fourth game of this
long road trip Saturday against
the Los Angeles Clippers.
“It takes five guys to get a good
defensive stop. It takes five guys to
get a good shot on offense, and you
can’t have four. You can’t have
three doing it. You have to have all
five guys doing it,” Coach Scott
Brooks said. “We have it, but we
don’t have it consistently and you
have to have it consistently and
that’s the mind-set of being disciplined and playing with toughness
and keeping it for the team and not
about your individual success.”
In this up-and-down season,
forward Mike Scott has recently
been the picture of consistency.
“He’s been giving us everything,” Wizards point guard John
Wall said. “Sometimes he doesn’t
play, sometimes he does, but he’s
always ready whenever his number is called. But the most important thing, he knows how to play
this game the right way.”
During the Wizards’ 113-112 loss
to the Clippers, Scott hit his 12th
straight field goal, which was the
longest active streak in the NBA
before he finally missed his first
shot in three games. Overall, Scott,
whose 22 points Saturday marked
his most since April 2014, has connected on 17 of his last 19 shots, a
stunning .895 field goal percentage.
In his role as a career backup,
Scott takes pride in coming off the
bench and making the smart basketball play. Above everything else,
his league-leading percentage over
the last three games shows the
consistency in his vast game.
“I’m not going to say that I’m
going to come out and go 12 for 12
or 9 for 11, but I’m always going to
play the right way,” Scott said.
“Play unselfish on both ends and
be a great teammate. Play hard. Be
a competitor. If I do that and stay
MARK J. TERRILL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wizards forward Mike Scott has served as a valuable piece off
Washington’s bench, scoring a season-high 22 points Saturday.
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
at Brooklyn Nets
Today
7:30 NBCSW Plus
vs. Memphis Grizzlies
Tomorrow
7 NBCSW
vs. Los Angeles Clippers
Friday
7 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
healthy, I like my chances.”
Scott, 29, signed a one-year deal
with the Wizards as a bit of an
enigma. He had crafted a stretchfour role in his first four seasons in
the NBA with the Atlanta Hawks,
but surgery to remove bone spurs
in his left ankle had limited him so
significantly through his fifth season that Scott pretends as if last
year never happened. The lost
fifth year allotted time to recover
from the procedure — the same
one Scott had in college that
forced him to redshirt his fourth
year at Virginia.
When he arrived in Washington
this past summer, Scott proclaimed to be 100 percent healthy,
though a year after the surgery, he
still felt limited. It wasn’t until last
month, Scott said, that he began to
feel like his old self.
“I haven’t felt like that in a long
time, like a year and a half,” Scott
said. “You know with an injury like
that, it’s mental.
“I’m a one-foot jumper,” Scott
explained, “and I like to jump off
Wall practices; Mahinmi sits
On Monday, Wall participated
in his second full practice but will
likely not return to action when
the Wizards close their five-game
road trip against the Brooklyn
Nets on Tuesday night.
“I can’t commit that he’s going
to play tomorrow,” Brooks said,
“but he’s definitely moving in the
right direction.”
Though Wall is progressing,
backup center Ian Mahinmi has
returned to the injury list.
Mahinmi did not practice because of a right knee strain he
suffered Saturday. The team wanted to see how he responded
through light layup drills at the
start of the session, but he was
removed from the court. Mahinmi
is questionable for Tuesday.
“Not so sure about tomorrow.
Just going to see how he feels after
another day of treatment, but he
did not practice today,” Brooks
said. “It’s definitely sore. We’ll see
how he feels tomorrow.”
Mahinmi’s soreness has disrupted his best offensive stretch
this season. On Saturday, Mahinmi made 4 of 6 shots for a seasonbest 14 points, and Thursday in
Phoenix, he notched 10 points and
eight rebounds.
candace.buckner@washpost.com
NBA ROUNDUP
Mirotic, Portis lead Chicago to surprise blowout
BULLS 108,
CELTICS 85
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Nikola Mirotic scored 24
points, Bobby Portis added a career-high 23 and the Chicago
Bulls blew out Boston, 108-85, on
Monday night at United Center
with Celtics star Kyrie Irving sidelined because of a bruised left
quadriceps.
Owners of the NBA’s worst record, the Bulls built an 18-point
lead in the second quarter against
the Eastern Conference leaders.
And when Boston cut it to 12 in
the fourth, the Bulls pulled away
for their third straight win.
Mirotic made his first start of
the season with leading scorer
Lauri Markkanen sidelined because of back spasms. The 6-foot10 forward hit 9 of 14 shots and
grabbed eight rebounds in his
third appearance.
Portis made 10 of 15 shots including all three of his threepointers.
Before Monday night, Mirotic
and Portis had only made headlines together this season for the
wrong reasons. Mirotic missed
the first 23 games with facial
fractures he suffered in a fight at
practice with Portis.
Al Horford scored 15 points for
Boston. Jaylen Brown, Marcus
Smart and Terry Rozier added 13
apiece.
ROCKETS 130, PELICANS
123: Clint Capela had a career-
high 28 points, and James Harden
scored 12 straight for Houston in
the fourth quarter as the hosts
rallied for a victory to extend their
winning streak to 10 games.
After scoring 48 points in the
Rockets’ previous game, Harden
finished with 26 Monday, but he
tied a career high with 17 assists,
finding the 6-10 Capela under the
basket again and again.
Jrue Holiday had a season-high
37 points for the Pelicans. Moore
had a career-high 36 points and
made a career-best six threepointers on a night New Orleans
set a franchise record with 18.
HORNETS 116, THUNDER
103: Dwight Howard scored 23
points to help Charlotte win in
Oklahoma City.
Kemba Walker had 19 points
for the Hornets, who had lost
seven of eight. Marvin Williams
scored 18, and Michael Kidd-Gilchrist finished with 17 points.
It was Charlotte’s second road
win of the season in 12 tries.
Russell Westbrook had 30
points and seven assists, and Paul
George scored 20 points for the
Thunder after missing the previous two games with a right calf
contusion.
HEAT 107, GRIZZLIES 82:
Goran Dragic scored 19 points,
and visiting Miami pulled away
from lowly Memphis.
Miami shot 56.1 percent from
the field and had seven players
score in double figures in its second straight win. Josh Richardson had 17 points, and reserves
Tyler Johnson and Bam Adebayo
finished with 14 apiece.
Memphis lost for the 15th time
in 16 games.
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
NBA’s ‘reunion games’
put the spotlight on hype
REUNION FROM D1
“It’s a must-see,” George said.
“It’s my back against the wall,
against the team that I played for.
I think, more than anything, it’s a
story that’s being told, and [the
NBA and its broadcast partners]
just want to document it.”
On that point, everyone is in
agreement.
The NBA has exploded in
growth in recent years. That
growth has, not coincidentally,
been connected to the combination of increased player movement and increased visibility on
television. The two have worked
hand in hand, with the increased
player movement turning the
league into a 12-month-long soap
opera and the increase in television windows the NBA is occupying requiring an ever-growing
number of story lines to keep
them filled.
That combination has made
the “reunion game” — a star
player like George heading back
to his former city for the first time
— an intoxicating option for the
league and its television partners
to capitalize on.
“At some point, Oklahoma City
has to go to Indiana, right?” said
Tom Carelli, the NBA’s senior vice
president of broadcasting. “So
you try and look at it and go,
‘Well, all right. That’s a good
story.’ ”
While games like this have
happened throughout the history
of the league — it’s not as if star
players only started changing
teams in the past handful of
seasons — everyone involved
agrees the beginning of the modern practice of hyping up such
occasions came on Christmas Day
in 2004. That’s when Shaquille
O’Neal, who had been traded
from the Los Angeles Lakers to
the Miami Heat the previous offseason, returned to Los Angeles
to face Kobe Bryant and the
Lakers for the first time since the
deal occurred.
It turned out to be a remarkable game, with O’Neal finishing
with 24 points, 11 rebounds, three
assists and three blocks (but fouling out) while Bryant scored 42
points as Miami emerged with a
104-102 overtime victory. And
while it was several years before a
reunion that memorable — when
LeBron James returned to Cleveland for the first time in 2010 —
took place again, it laid the
groundwork for the familiar formula NBA fans have grown accustomed to seeing on a regular
basis.
“I think it has picked up momentum,” said Scooter Vertino,
senior vice president of programming for Turner Sports. “But even
if you have some games that look
compelling, they need to be competitive.”
Vertino cited James’s return to
Cleveland — which seemed like a
gold mine when the network
landed it — as one example of
this. While it remains one of the
most talked-about games of the
past decade for the amount of
vitriol hurled in his direction
during the game, the Heat had a
19-point lead at halftime and a
30-point lead after three quarters, rendering the outcome of
the game a formality long before
it ended.
“On paper, it looked great, and
we had a good pregame, and then
the game was a blowout,” he said.
“Those are the games that are
attractive, but you hope both
teams are somewhat evenly
matched up when it comes to
talent.”
Even if the game doesn’t live up
to the hype that proceeds it,
there’s still plenty of value in
having occasions like these to
hype up in the first place. Games
like George going back to Indianapolis or Kevin Durant going
back to Oklahoma City are accompanied by several days of
buildup and anticipation, stoking
the flames of interest in the contest regardless of how it eventually turns out.
It’s one unexpected benefit —
at least in terms of the health of
the league’s television ratings —
to the increased amount of player
movement in recent seasons.
Since James switched teams in
2010, a host of stars — including
Chris Paul, Carmelo Anthony,
James Harden, Dwight Howard,
LaMarcus Aldridge and Durant —
have switched teams via trade or
free agency to huge fanfare, creating instant story lines for the
league to capitalize upon each
time.
This season alone there are
seven such occasions: Kyrie Irving going back to Cleveland and
Paul Millsap to Atlanta, both of
which happened in October;
George returning to Indianapolis
and Anthony going back to New
York, which will both happen this
week; Paul going back to Los
Angeles and Isaiah Thomas to
Boston in January; and Jimmy
Butler returning to Chicago in
February.
There would have been an
eighth as well, but Gordon Hayward will almost certainly miss
what would’ve been his return to
Utah in March after his gruesome
injury on opening night.
“It’s not just the on-the-court
matchups but what other compelling story lines have evolved in
the offseason that we should look
to focus on,” said Matt Volk,
director of programming and acquisitions for ESPN. “These reunion games are becoming one of
those.
“I think, when you think about
a lot of these matchups, they tend
to be a pretty dominating story
line from a news and information standpoint, because NBA
fans are going to care about this
stuff.”
That will be the case Wednesday, when George returns to Indianapolis to face a surprising Pacers team that has won several
more games than George’s Thunder — something no one would’ve
predicted when the trade was
made.
Not only that, but Indiana has
seen Oladipo look like a potential
all-star this season, and both he
and Sabonis have played dramatically better than they did last
season in Oklahoma City.
All of that has combined to give
a game that was already ticketed
to have plenty of emotion, excitement and anticipation around it
into an even more fascinating
contest.
In other words, the NBA is
getting exactly the kind of show it
hoped for when it put this game
on the schedule back in August.
“I think it’s meant to be seen,”
George said. “It’s a game that’s
meant to be televised, and it’s a
story that’s meant to be told.”
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
Terrapins pour it on, race past Greyhounds for their eighth consecutive win
MARYLAND 114,
LOYOLA (MD.) 45
BY
A VA W ALLACE
With the start of the Big Ten
season approaching, the Maryland women’s basketball team
turned Xfinity Center into its
own personal showcase Monday
night against Loyola (Md.),
flaunting its many offensive
weapons and strutting its way to
its most dominant game of the
season, a 114-45 blowout win.
In their eighth consecutive
victory this season and 18th
straight overall against the Greyhounds (2-8), who haven’t
notched a win since Nov. 21,
Coach Brenda Frese’s 15thranked Terrapins improved to
10-2 this season in their most
complete game all year.
“We can do a lot of exciting
things together when we play
and allow the game to come to
us, to read what the defense has
given us,” Frese said.
The win stood out even among
eight double-digit victories so far
this season: The 69-point scoring
margin edged Maryland’s 62point win over Howard in November to become the team’s
biggest blowout this year. The
Terps shot 61.3 percent from the
field overall and 58.8 percent
from the three-point line to record their best shooting percentages in both categories this season. They set a program and
conference record with 37 assists, passing Maryland’s previous mark of 32 and the conference’s previous record of 35.
They did all that and committed
just six turnovers, by far their
fewest this season.
Frese viewed Monday’s win as
steady progress when combined
with Friday’s 80-54 victory over
George Washington, during
which the Terps locked up a
victory in the first half thanks to
stifling defense and a sharp,
unselfish offense — similar to
Monday’s game.
For the second game in a row,
sophomore Blair Watson led the
team, which had five of its nine
scorers in double figures, in
scoring. She set a career high
with 24 points on 9-for-17 shooting, including 6 for 11 on threepointers. Junior Brianna Fraser
wasn’t far behind with 20 points,
and Ieshia Small and Stephanie
Jones tied to lead the squad with
seven rebounds each.
Maryland had practically
sealed the outcome by halftime
thanks to aggressive defense and
the potent combination of Watson and Kaila Charles, who finished with 18 points. Watson
worked the perimeter in the first
half for 15 points, including three
three-pointers, while Charles
missed just one of her seven field
goal attempts for 12 points.
“Extremely pleased. I thought
it was a dominating performance where we put our foot on
the gas and never took it off,”
Frese said. “I thought we’ve really been talking about playing
both ends of the floor, defensively and offensively. I thought
we’ve now put back-to-back
games between tonight’s game
and [the GW] game, where I
think we’ve taken a major step
forward. Especially offensively, I
love the unselfishness that we
played with today.”
Freshman Channise Lewis had
a career-best 11 assists to help
Maryland break the previous
school record of 32 assists, which
was set in 1999 and matched
once in 2002. The Terps committed just three turnovers before
the intermission.
“I was joking with them at
halftime,” Frese said. “We
thought it was a misprint.”
The Terps asserted themselves
on defense early on and smartly
deployed a full-court press to
rattle Loyola.
They held the Greyhounds’
leading scorer, Stephanie Karcz,
who entered Monday averaging
16.7 points, to eight points on
4-for-12 shooting from the field.
Izzy Therien led Loyola, instead,
with 13 points. She was the only
Greyhounds scorer in double
figures and also committed five
turnovers.
“Our full-court press, that was
an area we’ve been repping in
practice, and I see it paying off,”
Frese said. “It is fun with this
group. It feels like whatever [the
coaches] find as a weakness, they
turn it into a strength. We can do
some really big things if they
keep having that mentality of
staying humble and hungry.”
Maryland now takes an eightday break during exams before
facing Coppin State in Baltimore
on Dec. 20 and then starting
conference play against Illinois
at home the week after.
The Coppin State game also
will be Florida transfer Eleanna
Christinaki’s first with Maryland, after she becomes eligible
that week. The Terps can expect
an injection of scoring when the
Greece native finally comes off
the bench; Christinaki averaged
17.6 points and 4.7 rebounds in
nine games with the Gators last
season and earned all-Southeastern Conference freshman team
honors in 2016.
Christinaki will join a young
squad that showed its potential
Monday.
“We’re not the same team that
we were the first game of the
season. We’re getting better each
day, and I’m just excited to see
what we bring to the table when
conference does start,” Small
said. “Just to see the growth of
where we are as a team now
[compared with] where we were
three, maybe two games, even
the last game, I thought we got
better. It’s great to see progress.”
ava.wallace@washpost.com
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
T H E PO ST T O P 20
BY
SCOREBOARD
D ILLON M ULLAN
For the third time in four seasons, a Maryland public school
finished atop The Post’s high
school football rankings. In 2014,
it was Douglass. In 2015, it was
Damascus. And now, undefeated
Wise is No. 1 at season’s end.
In September, Washington
Catholic Athletic Conference
champion St. John’s, The Post’s
No. 2 team, lost to California
powers St. John Bosco and De La
Salle. A two-loss team has finished No. 1 in our rankings just
once since 1992 (Good Counsel in
2010).
On Sunday in Hampton, Tuscarora and Westfield played for
Virginia state titles. In Class 5,
Richmond-area school Highland
Springs won its third straight
championship by beating Tuscarora, 40-27. In Class 6, Westfield
won, 28-21, against Chesapeake’s
Oscar Smith for its third straight
title.
1. Wise (14-0) Last week: 1
Senior defensive back A.J. Lytton
said he is still committed to Florida State after the departure of
coach Jimbo Fisher.
2. St. John’s (9-2) LW: 2
Senior defensive tackle Cam
Goode, who is committed to Virginia Tech, posted 14 sacks and 29
tackles for loss.
3. Damascus (14-0) LW: 3
The Swarmin’ Hornets have not
lost since Dec. 4, 2014.
4. Westfield (15-0) LW: 4
The Bulldogs defeated Oscar
Smith, 28-21, on Sunday for their
third consecutive Virginia Class 6
state championship.
5. Quince Orchard (12-2) LW: 6
F O O TB A L L
NFL
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
EAST
W L
zPhiladelphia .............. 11 2
Dallas ............................ 7 6
Washington .................. 5 8
N.Y. Giants .................... 2 11
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.846
.538
.385
.154
PF
404
316
285
199
PA
250
294
344
321
SOUTH
W
New Orleans ................. 9
Carolina ......................... 9
Atlanta .......................... 8
Tampa Bay .................... 4
L
4
4
5
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.692
.692
.615
.308
PF
370
300
294
264
PA
263
262
261
312
NORTH
W
Minnesota ................... 10
Detroit .......................... 7
Green Bay ..................... 7
Chicago ......................... 4
L
3
6
6
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.769
.538
.538
.308
PF
309
338
285
224
PA
235
329
302
274
WEST
W L
L.A. Rams ...................... 9 4
Seattle .......................... 8 5
Arizona ......................... 6 7
San Francisco ................ 3 10
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.692
.615
.462
.231
PF
396
314
231
228
PA
265
252
317
314
AFC
EAST
W
New England ............... 10
Buffalo .......................... 7
Miami ............................ 6
N.Y. Jets ....................... 5
L
3
6
7
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.769
.538
.462
.385
PF
368
240
236
266
PA
250
290
308
311
SOUTH
W L
Jacksonville .................. 9 4
Tennessee ..................... 8 5
Houston ........................ 4 9
Indianapolis .................. 3 10
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.692
.615
.308
.231
PF
329
273
312
212
PA
202
294
335
343
NORTH
W L
zPittsburgh ................. 11 2
Baltimore ...................... 7 6
Cincinnati ...................... 5 8
Cleveland ...................... 0 13
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 7
L.A. Chargers ................ 7
Oakland ......................... 6
Denver ........................... 4
L
6
6
7
9
T
0
0
0
0
PF
320
318
226
197
PCT.
.538
.538
.462
.308
PF
329
298
264
229
PA
251
246
271
335
PA
289
225
304
315
9. Tuscarora (12-3) LW: 5
The Huskies lost to Highland
Springs, 40-27, in the Virginia
Class 5 state final Sunday.
Pct
.793
.708
.500
.500
.400
GB
—
31/2
81/2
81/2
11
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................14
Miami.........................................13
Orlando ......................................11
Charlotte....................................10
Atlanta.........................................6
L
12
13
17
16
20
Pct
.538
.500
.393
.385
.231
GB
—
1
4
4
8
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................19
Milwaukee .................................15
Indiana .......................................16
Detroit .......................................14
Chicago ........................................6
L
8
10
11
12
20
Pct
.704
.600
.593
.538
.231
GB
—
3
3
41/2
1/
12 2
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................21
San Antonio ...............................19
New Orleans ..............................14
Memphis ......................................8
Dallas ...........................................7
L
4
8
14
19
20
Pct
.840
.704
.500
.296
.259
GB
—
3
81/2
14
15
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota..................................16
Denver........................................14
x-Portland..................................13
Utah ...........................................13
Oklahoma City ...........................12
L
11
12
12
14
14
Pct
.593
.538
.520
.481
.462
GB
—
11/2
2
3
31/2
PACIFIC
W
x-Golden State...........................21
L.A. Lakers .................................10
x-L.A. Clippers .............................9
Phoenix ........................................9
Sacramento .................................8
L
6
15
15
19
18
Pct
.778
.400
.375
.321
.308
GB
—
10
101/2
121/2
121/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
x-late game
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Dallas 30, N.Y. Giants 10
Carolina 31, Minnesota 24
Chicago 33, Cincinnati 7
Kansas City 26, Oakland 15
Detroit 24, Tampa Bay 21
Buffalo 13, Indianapolis 7, OT
Green Bay 27, Cleveland 21, OT
San Francisco 26, Houston 16
Denver 23, N.Y. Jets 0
Arizona 12, Tennessee 7
L.A. Chargers 30, Washington 13
Jacksonville 30, Seattle 24
Philadelphia 43, L.A. Rams 35
Pittsburgh 39, Baltimore 38
Charlotte 116, Oklahoma City 103
Chicago 108, Boston 85
Houston 130, New Orleans 123
Miami 107, Memphis 82
Portland at Golden State, Late
Toronto at L.A. Clippers, Late
Atlanta at Cleveland, 7
Denver at Detroit, 7
L.A. Lakers at New York, 7
Washington at Brooklyn, 7:30
San Antonio at Dallas, 8:30
Philadelphia at Minnesota, 9:30
Phoenix at Sacramento, 10
MONDAY’S RESULT
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
L.A. Clippers at Orlando, 7
Memphis at Washington, 7
Oklahoma City at Indiana, 7
Denver at Boston, 7:30
Portland at Miami, 7:30
Milwaukee at New Orleans, 8
Utah at Chicago, 8
Toronto at Phoenix, 9
Charlotte at Houston, 9:30
THURSDAY’S GAME
Denver at Indianapolis, 8:25
SATURDAY’S GAMES
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 1
Cincinnati at Minnesota, 1
Houston at Jacksonville, 1
Arizona at Washington, 1
N.Y. Jets at New Orleans, 1
Miami at Buffalo, 1
Green Bay at Carolina, 1
Baltimore at Cleveland, 1
L.A. Rams at Seattle, 4:05
New England at Pittsburgh, 4:25
Tennessee at San Francisco, 4:25
Dallas at Oakland, 8:30
Detroit at Atlanta, 7:30
New York at Brooklyn, 7:30
L.A. Lakers at Cleveland, 8
Sacramento at Minnesota, 8
Dallas at Golden State, 10:30
BOSTON ............................. 29
CHICAGO ............................ 28
PATRIOTS ................................ 0
DOLPHINS ................................ 6
10
7
0
14
10 — 20
0 — 27
FIRST QUARTER
Miami: FG Parkey 30, 9:01.
Miami: FG Parkey 44, 3:49.
PVS
4
3
6
1
16
10
11
8
7
13
18
12
2
20
19
15
21
9
—
24
23
5
—
—
17
Others receiving votes: Creighton 79, Oklahoma 72,
Texas 52, Louisville 19, Arkansas 17, Virginia Tech 15,
Minnesota 15, Nevada 13, Mississippi St. 8, UCLA 6,
SMU 6, Loyola of Chicago 5, Alabama 4, Georgia 3,
Houston 3, N Iowa 3, Towson 3, Syracuse 2, Boise St. 2,
USA TODAY COACHES POLL
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
RECORD
10-0
9-1
8-1
11-1
8-1
9-0
9-1
8-0
9-1
8-1
9-1
7-2
8-2
10-0
8-1
8-1
10-2
8-2
9-0
7-1
7-2
6-3
7-3
7-1
7-2
Villanova (22)
Michigan State (10)
Wichita State
Duke
Kentucky
Arizona State
North Carolina
Miami
Xavier
Texas A&M
West Virginia
Kansas
Gonzaga
TCU
Seton Hall
Virginia
Purdue
Notre Dame
Florida State
Tennessee
Baylor
Florida
Arizona
Oklahoma
Creighton
PTS
790
768
675
667
609
604
593
569
529
495
477
378
374
373
360
355
303
247
209
153
150
111
106
86
75
PVS
4
3
6
1
7
17
10
11
14
9
16
2
13
20
19
12
21
8
—
—
22
5
—
—
—
13
28
21
22
22 — 85
30 — 108
BOSTON: Tatum 1-7 2-4 4, Horford 6-14 3-3 15, Baynes
5-6 0-0 10, Smart 5-12 0-0 13, Brown 5-12 0-0 13, Ojeleye
0-1 0-0 0, Nader 2-6 0-1 5, Theis 1-3 2-2 4, Yabusele 0-1
0-0 0, Allen 0-1 1-2 1, Larkin 2-5 1-2 5, Rozier 5-12 0-0 13,
Bird 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 33-83 9-14 85.
CHICAGO: Valentine 1-7 0-0 2, Mirotic 9-14 3-6 24, Lopez
3-7 1-2 7, Dunn 6-14 0-0 12, Holiday 3-10 0-0 8, Zipser 2-3
2-2 8, Felicio 0-0 3-4 3, Portis 10-15 0-1 23, Felder 0-1 0-0
0, Grant 2-3 2-2 8, Nwaba 3-6 7-8 13, Pondexter 0-1 0-0 0.
Totals 39-81 18-25 108.
Three-point Goals: Boston 10-40 (Smart 3-6, Brown 3-7,
Rozier 3-7, Nader 1-5, Allen 0-1, Theis 0-1, Ojeleye 0-1,
Bird 0-1, Yabusele 0-1, Larkin 0-2, Horford 0-4, Tatum
0-4), Chicago 12-29 (Portis 3-3, Mirotic 3-7, Zipser 2-2,
Grant 2-2, Holiday 2-6, Pondexter 0-1, Valentine 0-4,
Dunn 0-4). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Boston 46
(Tatum 10), Chicago 46 (Mirotic 8). Assists: Boston 22
(Horford, Rozier 5), Chicago 23 (Grant 9). Total Fouls:
Boston 19, Chicago 18. Technicals: Chicago coach Bulls
(Defensive three second). A: 19,617 (20,917).
Drake (5-5)
McGlynn 1-7 2-2 4, Timmer 1-8 5-5 8, Woodward 4-9 2-2
14, Rivers 0-3 0-0 0, McMurray 5-12 0-0 12, Schlatter 2-4
0-0 4, Kuenstling 0-0 0-2 0, Arogundade 6-10 0-0 15,
Thomas 3-7 0-0 8, Gibbs 0-0 2-2 2. 22-60 Totals 11-13 67.
Minnesota (9-3)
Murphy 11-14 2-3 24, Lynch 3-7 1-2 7, McBrayer 2-11 0-0
5, Coffey 5-9 5-6 16, Mason 4-13 1-2 12, Diedhiou 1-1 0-0
2, Hurt 0-1 0-1 0, Fitzgerald 0-0 0-0 0, Washington 1-3
0-0 2. Totals 27-59 9-14 68.
15. DeMatha (6-5) LW: 15
After finishing No. 1 last season,
the Stags completed the season
outside the top 10 for the first
time since they were unranked in
2011.
16. Flint Hill (11-0) LW: 16
The Huskies capped an undefeated season with their first Virginia
Independent Schools Athletic Association Division I state title.
17. Landon (9-1) LW: 17
The Bears finished in the top 20
for the first time since 1994.
18. Theodore Roosevelt (11-2)
LW: 18
After a 2-2 start, the Rough Riders
closed the season with nine
straight wins and the DCSAA
Class A championship.
19. C.H. Flowers (10-1) LW: 19
Senior Jamree Kromah, who is
committed to Old Dominion, recorded 27 sacks.
20. Friendship Collegiate (8-4)
LW: 20
The Knights lost three straight
games early before rallying to
make the DCSAA Class AA final,
where they lost, 39-28, to Ballou.
Dropped out: None
On the bubble: Freedom-Wood-
bridge (11-1), Howard (11-2), Gwynn Park (11-2)
dillon.mullan@washpost.com
27
18
20 — 123
34 — 130
Three-point Goals: New Orleans 18-33 (Moore 6-8,
Holiday 4-7, Rondo 3-5, Cousins 2-3, Miller 2-7, Clark
1-3), Houston 17-45 (Gordon 5-6, Harden 4-10, Ariza 3-9,
Paul 3-9, Tucker 1-3, Anderson 1-4, Mbah a Moute 0-4).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: New Orleans 41 (Cousins
14), Houston 36 (Paul 9). Assists: New Orleans 32
(Rondo 12), Houston 30 (Harden 17). Total Fouls: New
Orleans 19, Houston 15. Technicals: Cousins. A: 18,055
(18,055).
Heat 107, Grizzlies 82
New England: Amendola 6-76, Lewis 5-50, Burkhead
5-45, White 3-11, D.Allen 2-10, Cooks 1-38, Develin 1-2,
Hogan 1-1.
Miami: Landry 8-46, Drake 5-79, Parker 4-40, Grant
2-42, Stills 2-18, J.Thomas 2-11, Fasano 1-17, Gray
1-10.
MISSED FIELD GOALS
MIAMI ................................ 21
MEMPHIS ........................... 23
24
19
25
18
37 — 107
22 — 82
MIAMI: Richardson 5-9 4-5 17, J.Johnson 4-7 3-4 11,
Olynyk 1-3 2-2 5, Dragic 7-12 4-4 19, Waiters 4-5 2-4 10,
Winslow 2-6 0-0 5, Mickey 0-0 0-0 0, Haslem 0-0 0-0 0,
Adebayo 5-6 4-5 14, Ellington 4-8 0-0 12, T.Johnson 5-10
0-0 14. Totals 37-66 19-24 107.
MEMPHIS: Brooks 0-2 0-0 0, Green 4-6 1-2 10, Gasol 5-14
7-10 19, Evans 5-17 0-0 11, Harrison 5-6 4-4 16, Parsons
3-8 2-5 9, Ennis III 1-5 3-4 6, Martin 0-1 0-0 0, Hunter 1-1
0-0 2, Rabb 0-1 0-0 0, Davis 3-5 1-2 7, Chalmers 0-1 0-0 0,
McLemore 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 28-72 18-27 82.
None.
REDSKINS LEADERS
Passing
Cmp
Cousins ............... 290
Team ................... 290
Opp ...................... 258
35
43
Att Yds
440 3440
440 3440
424 3178
TD
22
22
22
Int Rtg
9 97.7
9 97.0
13 88.0
Rushing
Att Yds Avg Lg
Perine .................................... 142 510 3.6 30
Thompson ............................... 64 294 4.6 61t
Kelley ...................................... 62 194 3.1 21
Cousins .................................... 41 159 3.9 18
Crowder ..................................... 6 35 5.8 11
Marshall .................................... 9 32 3.6 11
M.Brown ................................... 8 29 3.6 11
Daniels ...................................... 2 12 6.0
8
Paul ........................................... 2
4 2.0
5
Team ..................................... 336 1269 3.8 61t
Opp. ....................................... 365 1586 4.3 36t
TD
1
2
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
9
11
Receiving
No. Yds
Crowder ................................... 54 662
Thompson ............................... 39 510
V.Davis .................................... 37 568
Grant ....................................... 37 445
Doctson ................................... 27 388
Reed ........................................ 27 211
Pryor ........................................ 20 240
Perine ...................................... 17 132
Paul ......................................... 11 83
Marshall .................................... 6 36
Quick ......................................... 5 67
Harris ........................................ 4 62
Kelley ........................................ 4 18
M.Brown ................................... 1 11
Sprinkle ..................................... 1
7
Team ..................................... 290 3440
Opp. ....................................... 258 3178
TD
1
4
2
4
5
2
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
22
22
Avg
12.3
13.1
15.4
12.0
14.4
7.8
12.0
7.8
7.5
6.0
13.4
15.5
4.5
11.0
7.0
11.9
12.3
Lg
41
74
69
40t
52t
20
44t
25
32
12
31
36t
9
11
7t
74
75t
INTs
No. Yds TD Sacks
No.
Fuller ....................... 4
4 0 Kerrigan
9.0
Swearinger ............. 3 32 0 Smith
5.0
Breeland .................. 1 96 1 Ioannidis
4.5
Kerrigan .................. 1 24 1 Lanier
3.0
Foster ...................... 1 10 0 Z.Brown
2.5
Compton ................. 1
2 0 Galette
2.0
Dunbar .................... 1
0 0 McClain
2.0
Nicholson ................ 1
0 0 Allen
1.0
Foster
0.5
Harvey-Clemons 0.5
Hood
0.5
Swearinger
0.5
Team
13 168 2 Team
31.0
Opp.
9 166 2 Opp.
37.0
Punting
No.
Way .................................... 63
Team .................................. 63
Opp. .................................... 60
Avg.
44.5
44.5
44.6
Net
37.4
37.4
41.8
In20
26
26
21
Three-point Goals: Miami 14-27 (Ellington 4-6, T.Johnson 4-7, Richardson 3-4, Winslow 1-2, Olynyk 1-3, Dragic
1-3, Waiters 0-1, J.Johnson 0-1), Memphis 8-27 (Harrison 2-2, Gasol 2-5, Green 1-1, Ennis III 1-3, Parsons 1-5,
Evans 1-7, Chalmers 0-1, McLemore 0-1, Brooks 0-2).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Miami 35 (T.Johnson,
Richardson, Dragic, Winslow 5), Memphis 31 (Davis 7).
Assists: Miami 24 (Dragic 5), Memphis 17 (Parsons 5).
Total Fouls: Miami 22, Memphis 23. Technicals: Miami
coach Heat (Defensive three second). A: 14,857
(18,119).
Hornets 116, Thunder 103
CHARLOTTE ....................... 34
OKLAHOMA CITY ............... 26
18
26
40
22
24 — 116
29 — 103
CHARLOTTE: Kidd-Gilchrist 8-9 1-3 17, Williams 5-8 4-5
18, Howard 9-13 5-7 23, Walker 6-13 4-4 19, Lamb 6-17
0-0 14, O’Bryant III 0-1 0-0 0, Kaminsky 3-8 1-2 8, Monk
1-4 0-0 2, Carter-Williams 0-1 1-2 1, Bacon 1-2 0-0 2,
Graham 4-5 1-1 12. Totals 43-81 17-24 116.
OKLAHOMA CITY: George 7-14 4-4 20, Anthony 5-12 0-0
11, Adams 5-6 1-2 11, Westbrook 10-22 9-9 30, Abrines
2-9 6-6 12, Huestis 2-3 0-0 5, Grant 0-3 2-2 2, Singler 0-0
0-0 0, Collison 0-0 0-0 0, Patterson 1-3 2-2 5, Johnson 0-0
0-0 0, Felton 1-10 0-0 3, Ferguson 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 35-85
24-25 103.
Three-point Goals: Charlotte 13-25 (Williams 4-5,
Graham 3-3, Walker 3-5, Lamb 2-7, Kaminsky 1-3, Monk
0-1, O’Bryant III 0-1), Oklahoma City 9-26 (George 2-4,
Abrines 2-7, Westbrook 1-2, Patterson 1-2, Huestis 1-2,
Anthony 1-3, Felton 1-4, Ferguson 0-1, Grant 0-1).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Charlotte 41 (Howard,
Williams 7), Oklahoma City 39 (Adams 10). Assists:
Charlotte 22 (Walker 9), Oklahoma City 16 (Westbrook
7). Total Fouls: Charlotte 20, Oklahoma City 19. Technicals: Anthony. A: 18,203 (18,203).
NBA LEADERS
Through Sunday
SCORING
G
Harden, HOU..................... 24
Antetokounmpo, MIL ....... 24
James, CLE ....................... 27
Curry, GOL ........................ 23
Cousins, NOR.................... 27
Lillard, POR....................... 25
Durant, GOL...................... 22
Porzingis, NYK.................. 22
Davis, NOR........................ 23
Oladipo, IND...................... 26
FG
237
262
295
192
244
207
208
199
209
229
FT
195
181
119
139
159
167
94
122
144
109
PTS AVG
775 32.3
716 29.8
764 28.3
606 26.3
708 26.2
652 26.1
563 25.6
561 25.5
577 25.1
638 24.5
GI R LS ' BA S K E TBALL
x-late game
TOP 20
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
NO. 18 ANACOSTIA 62, BELL 25
Chicago 3, Arizona 1
St. Louis 3, Buffalo 2 (OT)
Toronto 1, Edmonton 0
Minnesota 4, San Jose 3 (OT)
A (2-2) Moye 25, Coates 14, Leonard 12, Banks 4,
Hawkins 4, Cathcart 2, Simmons 1 Totals 21 8-15 62.
B (1-1) Seymour 15, Mesa 9, Brown 1 Totals 7 8-14 25.
Halftime: Anacostia, (44-7).
Three-point goals: B 1 (Seymour 1); A 4 (Moye 2,
Leonard 2).
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Colorado 2, Pittsburgh 1
Dallas 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 (SO)
N.Y. Islanders 3, Washington 1
Florida 2, Detroit 1 (OT)
Winnipeg 5, Vancouver 1
Carolina at Anaheim, Late
DCIAA
CARDOZO 59, SCHOOL WITHOUT WALLS 25
C (3-1) Manon-Pacheco 20, Ali 18, Martinez 5, Carter 4,
Matthews 4, Jean 3, Ramos 3, Harris 2 Totals 16 9-13 59.
SWW (0-1)Totals 0 0-0 25.
Halftime: Cardozo, (28-14).
Three-point goals: C 6 (Ali 1, Manon-Pacheco 5)
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Edmonton at Columbus, 7
Ottawa at Buffalo, 7
Toronto at Philadelphia, 7
Colorado at Washington, 7
Los Angeles at New Jersey, 7
Calgary at Minnesota, 8
Tampa Bay at St. Louis, 8
Florida at Chicago, 8:30
Carolina at Vegas, 10
PVAC
MCLEAN SCHOOL 34, EDMUND BURKE 10
EB (0-1)Totals 0 0-0 10.
MS (4-0) Hawley 11, Lewis 6, Baskett 5, Zimmerman 4,
Gilinson 3, Taishoff 3, Smalls 2 Totals 9 1-4 34.
Halftime: McLean School, (22-2).
Three-point goals: MS 5 (Gilinson 1, Hawley 3, Taishoff
1).
SC (4-2) San Diego 15, DeBrosse 14, Schwab 11, Razo 6,
Taylor 6, Sy 2 Totals 14 11-17 54.
M (5-1) Conforti 19, Brusch 10, Miskell 9, Trotter 4,
Sharon 3 Totals 12 9-13 45.
Halftime: South County, (26-20).
Three-point goals: M 4 (Miskell 2, Trotter 1, Sharon 1);
SC 5 (San Diego 2, Schwab 3)
WESTFIELD 61, BRIAR WOODS 43
BW (0-2) Hartnett 17, Keilholtz 7, Caufield 6, Duffie 6,
Larson 5, Nathan 2 Totals 17 3-7 43.
W (4-1) McNamara 19, Johnson 14, Wardak 11, Reed 7,
Knox 3, Agee 2, Riedl 2, Mackmin 2, Yoham 1 Totals 18
16-28 61.
Halftime: Westfield, (32-20).
Three-point goals: W 3 (Knox 1, Wardak 2); BW 2
(Keilholtz 1, Hartnett 1)
Jets 5, Canucks 1
VANCOUVER ........................... 1
WINNIPEG ............................... 1
0
2
0 —
2 —
1
5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Winnipeg, Kulikov 2 (Connor, Scheifele), 1:28.
2, Vancouver, Boeser 16 (D.Sedin, H.Sedin), 6:53.
Late Sunday
Gonzaga (8-2)
Power-play opportunities: Vancouver 0 of 2; Winnipeg 1
of 3. Goalies: Vancouver, Markstrom 8-9-3 (24 shots-19
saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 15-3-4 (26-25). T: 2:20.
Scoring: 3, Winnipeg, Perreault 8 (Armia, Little), 4:55. 4,
Winnipeg, Ehlers 14 (Myers, Perreault), 14:09 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Winnipeg, Morrissey 4 (Copp, Lowry), 11:38.
6, Winnipeg, Hendricks 4, 19:16.
Williams 9-14 5-9 23, Tillie 4-7 2-2 11, Norvell 6-16 7-8
21, Melson 4-7 0-0 11, Perkins 4-5 3-3 14, Kispert 1-5 0-0
3, Hachimura 5-10 2-2 12, Jones 0-0 0-0 0, Larsen 0-1 2-2
2, Wade 0-0 0-0 0, Beach 0-0 0-0 0. 33-65 Totals 21-26 97.
Washington (7-3)
7
11
9 — 26
9 — 24
FLORIDA ............................ 0
DETROIT ............................ 1
0
0
1
0
1 — 2
0 — 1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
UConn (32)
Notre Dame
Louisville
South Carolina
Mississippi St.
Baylor
Tennessee
Texas
Oregon
West Virginia
UCLA
Florida St.
Ohio St.
Duke
Maryland
Missouri
Oregon St.
Stanford
Texas A&M
Villanova
Green Bay
South Florida
Michigan
California
Iowa
Others receiving votes: Oklahoma St. 54, New Mexico
39, Syracuse 22, Oklahoma 12, Arizona St. 10, Marquette
8, Southern Cal 8, Kentucky 7, South Dakota St. 3.
No. 15 Maryland 114
Loyola (Md.) 45
Loyola (Md.) ......................... 8
Maryland ............................ 22
LOYOLA (MD.)
(2-8)
Connolly
Therien
Vannoy
Gray
Karcz
Hunter
Jakaitis
McDonald
Barazotti
Gelbaugh
Kilcullen
Niles
Omdahl
Taylor
TOTALS
MIN
FG
17
0-2
28 5-11
10
0-0
36 2-11
26 4-12
17
1-6
7
1-3
5
0-1
2
1-1
14
2-4
2
0-1
3
1-1
16
0-5
17
1-3
200 18-61
12
32
FT
Scoring: 2, Florida, Trocheck 13 (Huberdeau, Barkov),
10:09 (pp).
FLORIDA .......................... 12
DETROIT .......................... 11
6
12
8
11
B OY S ' B A S K E TB A L L
3 — 29
1 — 35
Power-play opportunities: Florida 1 of 2; Detroit 0 of 3.
Goalies: Florida, Reimer 5-7-3 (35 shots-34 saves).
Detroit, Howard 9-9-4 (29-27). A: 19,515 (20,000). T:
2:46.
DCIAA
EASTERN 57, COOLIDGE 51
C (1-2)Totals 0 0-0 51.
E (0-4) Israel 19, Johnson 16, Robins 9, Thompkins 9,
Bryant 2, Olivere 2 Totals 20 14-23 57.
Halftime: Eastern, (0-0).
Three-point goals: E 1 (Johnson 1).
Stars 2, Rangers 1 (OT)
DALLAS .............................. 0
N.Y. RANGERS ................... 0
1
0
0
1
0 — 2
0 — 1
SECOND PERIOD
PVAC
JEWISH DAY 52, WASHINGTON CHRISTIAN 41
Scoring: 1, Dallas, Honka 1 (Benn, Lindell), 6:30.
Scoring: 2, N.Y. Rangers, Nash 8 (Buchnevich, Skjei),
16:19.
JD (3-3) Offer 22, Gordon 17, Bitton 4, Galitzer 3, Silber
2, Swagel 2, Landy 2 Totals 19 8-12 52.
WC (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 41.
Halftime: Jewish Day, (29-23).
Three-point goals: JD 2 (Offer 1, Gordon 1)
SHOOTOUT
MCLEAN SCHOOL 82, EDMUND BURKE 44
Dallas 2 (Radulov G, Seguin NG, Spezza G), N.Y. Rangers
1 (Zuccarello G, Desharnais NG, Shattenkirk NG).
EB (0-5)Totals 0 0-0 44.
MS (4-2) Leta 18, Collins 8, Kerr 4, Diallo 3, Rah 2, Morris
1, Frye 25, Kalinowski 4, Diallo 1 Totals 25 20-27 82.
Halftime: McLean School, (40-18).
Three-point goals: MS 4 (Kerr 1, Leta 1, Kalinowski 1,
Frye 1).
THIRD PERIOD
SHOTS ON GOAL
DALLAS ............................ 16
17
8
4 — 45
N.Y. RANGERS ................... 5
5
9
6 — 25
Power-play opportunities: Dallas 0 of 3; N.Y. Rangers 0
of 0. Goalies: Dallas, Lehtonen 4-4-1 (25 shots-24
saves). N.Y. Rangers, Pavelec 2-4-1 (45-44). A: 17,667
(18,006). T: 2:33.
NONLEAGUE
GWYNN PARK 93, CALVERT 48
14
26
11 — 45
34 — 114
O-T A PF PTS
0-0 1-3 0 2
3-3 0-4 1 2
0-0 2-3 0 0
0-0 0-0 2 1
0-2 2-8 3 2
0-0 4-6 1 3
0-0 0-0 0 1
0-0 0-0 0 0
0-0 0-0 0 0
2-3 1-2 2 0
0-0 0-0 0 0
0-0 1-3 1 1
0-0 0-0 0 1
0-0 0-1 0 1
5-8 12-32 10 14
0
13
0
5
8
2
2
0
3
7
0
2
0
3
45
Avalanche 2, Penguins 1
COLORADO .............................. 0
PITTSBURGH ........................... 0
2 —
1 —
2
1
Scoring: 1, Colorado, Barberio 2, 6:17. 2, Colorado,
Comeau 7 (Johnson), 18:31. 3, Pittsburgh, Kessel 15
(Malkin, Guentzel), 19:48.
SHOTS ON GOAL
COLORADO .............................. 6
11
11 — 28
PITTSBURGH ......................... 13
11
16 — 40
Power-play opportunities: Colorado 0 of 4; Pittsburgh 0
of 3. Goalies: Colorado, Bernier 4-6-1 (40 shots-39
saves). Pittsburgh, Jarry 5-1-2 (27-26). T: 2:30.
Wild 4, Sharks 3 (OT)
SECOND PERIOD
O-T A PF PTS
0
0
THIRD PERIOD
MARYLAND
(10-2)
Jones
Charles
Confroy
Lewis
Watson
Ellison
Fraser
Myers
Small
TOTALS
FT
JD (4-0) Cohen 20, Armon 8, Marks 7, Handloff 6,
Bernstein 4, Alter 2 Totals 17 4-13 47.
WC (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 41.
Halftime: Washington Christian, (26-22).
Three-point goals: JD 3 (Cohen 1, Armon 2)
PF (3-2) Brennan 10, Deker 6, Swarm 5, Suchoski 4,
Anderson 2, Palmer 2 Totals 11 4-6 29.
WTW (1-5) Pesansky 18, Pacheco 12, Shurberg 6, Wilson
5, Henry 2 Totals 16 8-14 43.
Halftime: W.T. Woodson, (20-14).
Three-point goals: WTW 1 (Pacheco 1); PF 1 (Swarm 1)
THIRD PERIOD
Late Sunday
FG
S (1-1) Nnabue 20, Bliss 14, Bidwick 12, Boykin 11, Chidel
3, St. Laurent 3, Mathis 1 Totals 17 9-20 64.
C (3-0) Howson 23, Paul 19, Klock 18, Mcinnis 5, Wright 2
Totals 18 13-24 67.
Halftime: Sherwood, (30-29).
Three-point goals: C 6 (Howson 5, Mcinnis 1); S 7
(Bidwick 3, Bliss 3, Chidel 1)
W.T. WOODSON 43, POTOMAC FALLS 29
Percentages: FG .295, FT .625. 3-Point Goals: 4-24, .167
(Gray 1-8, Barazotti 1-1, Gelbaugh 1-2, Taylor 1-3,
Connolly 0-1, Therien 0-4, Karcz 0-1, Kilcullen 0-1,
Omdahl 0-3) Blocked Shots: 2 (Connolly 1, Hunter 1)
Turnovers: 24 (Therien 5, Gray 3, Omdahl 3, Connolly 2,
Karcz 2, Gelbaugh 2, Taylor 2, Vannoy 1, Hunter 1,
Jakaitis 1, McDonald 1) Steals: 3 (Karcz 1, Gelbaugh 1,
Taylor 1) Technical Fouls: None.
MIN
C (1-0) Martin 20, Testa 8, Beiser 6, Rubino 5, Stanish 4,
Correa 4, Cuthbert 2, Baker 2, Hill 2 Totals 17 16-21 53.
WM (0-2)Totals 0 0-0 27.
Halftime: Churchill, (24-14).
Three-point goals: C 1 (Martin 1)
Scoring: 1, Detroit, Zetterberg 5 (Daley), 18:27.
SHOTS ON GOAL
PVS
1
3
4
5
6
8
11
2
9
10
7
13
12
14
15
17
19
18
21
22
23
16
24
25
—
CHURCHILL 53, WATKINS MILL 27
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Florida, Matheson 1 (Bjugstad), 2:02.
PTS
800
749
736
685
664
625
620
593
519
504
459
443
439
390
354
293
226
221
180
177
147
141
116
98
55
B (2-1) Turner 20, Tucker 12, Dawson 8, Fletcher 6,
Washington 5, Hinkle 1 Totals 13 23-32 52.
IC (0-1)Totals 0 0-0 44.
Halftime: Broadneck, (22-20).
Three-point goals: B 1 (Turner 1)
JEWISH DAY 47, WASHINGTON CHRISTIAN 41
Panthers 2, Red Wings 1 (OT)
OVERTIME
RECORD
8-0
9-1
11-0
9-1
9-0
8-1
10-0
7-1
8-1
9-0
7-2
10-0
9-2
8-2
9-2
9-1
6-2
5-4
8-2
9-0
8-1
7-2
8-2
7-2
10-1
BROADNECK 52, INDIAN CREEK 44
CLARKSBURG 67, SHERWOOD 64
VANCOUVER ......................... 10
WINNIPEG ............................... 4
NCAA WOMEN’S AP TOP 25
RECEIVING
OL PTS. GF GA
3
43 97 68
1
39 103 91
3
35 79 69
2
34 88 94
4
32 82 90
7
31 80 89
2
26 86 99
5
19 75 114
SHOTS ON GOAL
HOUSTON: Ariza 3-9 4-4 13, Anderson 2-6 0-0 5, Capela
13-14 2-4 28, Paul 8-16 1-2 20, Harden 8-16 6-9 26,
Tucker 1-4 0-0 3, Mbah a Moute 0-5 0-2 0, Nene 4-6 0-0 8,
Gordon 9-12 4-4 27. Totals 48-88 17-25 130.
New England: Brady 24-43-2-233.
Miami: Cutler 25-38-0-263.
L
8
9
10
12
13
11
16
21
No. 12 Gonzaga 97,
Washington 70
NEW ORLEANS: Moore 15-20 0-0 36, Miller 4-10 0-0 10,
Cousins 8-17 6-11 24, Rondo 5-12 0-0 13, Holiday 16-21
1-2 37, Cunningham 0-0 0-0 0, Davis 0-0 0-0 0, Asik 0-0
0-0 0, Cooke 0-0 0-0 0, Clark 1-4 0-0 3, Jones 0-1 0-0 0.
Totals 49-85 7-13 123.
NEW ORLEANS .................. 41
HOUSTON ........................... 35
PASSING
PACIFIC
W
Los Angeles .................. 20
Vegas ............................ 19
San Jose ........................ 16
Calgary .......................... 16
Vancouver ..................... 14
x-Anaheim .................... 12
Edmonton ..................... 12
Arizona ........................... 7
GA
78
87
84
90
87
82
95
SECOND PERIOD
PATRIOTS
First Downs .......................................... 14
Total Net Yards ................................... 248
Rushes-Yards ................................. 10-25
Passing ................................................ 223
Punt Returns ..................................... 5-37
Kickoff Returns ................................. 3-49
Interceptions Ret. ............................... 0-0
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 24-43-2
Sacked-Yards Lost ............................ 2-10
Punts .............................................. 7-47.7
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 0-0
Penalties-Yards ................................ 9-78
Time Of Possession ......................... 23:51
After their first trip to the Maryland state semifinals, the Eagles
finished the season ranked for the
first time since the school opened
in 2005.
OL PTS. GF
2
44 104
5
41 107
4
40 95
1
35 91
3
33 87
5
33 90
2
30 92
Halftime: Drake 28-24. Three-point goals: Drake 12-31
(Woodward 4-8, Arogundade 3-4, Thomas 2-5, McMurray 2-5, Timmer 1-5) Minnesota 5-18 (Mason 3-8, Coffey
1-3, McBrayer 1-5) Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Drake
29 (Rivers 7), Minnesota 40 (Murphy 18). Assists: Drake
17 (McMurray 5), Minnesota 17 (Mason 5).
Timmins 2-2 1-1 5, N.Carter 1-5 1-2 3, Dickerson 7-10 2-6
18, Crisp 5-12 2-4 16, Thybulle 2-7 0-0 5, Wright 1-1 2-2
4, Green 1-5 0-1 2, Johnson 3-3 0-0 6, Nowell 4-10 3-3 11.
Totals 26-55 11-19 70.
Halftime: Gonzaga 47-33. Three-point goals: Gonzaga
10-28 (Perkins 3-4, Melson 3-6, Norvell 2-11, Tillie 1-2,
Kispert 1-4) Washington 7-19 (Crisp 4-7, Dickerson 2-2,
Thybulle 1-5). Rebounds: Gonzaga 34 (Williams 12),
Washington 22 (Nowell 5). Assists: Gonzaga 20 (Perkins
8), Washington 13 (Nowell
14. North Point (12-1) LW: 14
L
8
8
7
13
11
11
13
CENTRAL
St. Louis ........................
Winnipeg ......................
Nashville .......................
Dallas ............................
Minnesota .....................
Chicago .........................
Colorado ........................
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Anacostia 62, Bell 25
Cardozo 59, School Without Walls 25
Dunbar 69, Ballou 17
Theodore Roosevelt 53, IDEA 36
MARYLAND
Broadneck 52, Indian Creek 44
Churchill 53, Watkins Mill 27
Clarksburg 67, Sherwood 64
River Hill 66, Glen Burnie 34
VIRGINIA
Patriot 64, Christ Chapel Academy 30
South County 54, Madison 45
W.T. Woodson 43, Potomac Falls 29
Westfield 61, Briar Woods 43
PRIVATE
Jewish Day 47, Washington Christian 41
McLean School 34, Edmund Burke 10
Seton (Va.) 91, Fredericksburg Christian 44
Washington International 51, Grace Brethren 29
SOUTH COUNTY 54, MADISON 45
Rockets 130, Pelicans 123
New England: Lewis 5-17, Burkhead 5-8.
Miami: Drake 25-114, Cutler 4-4, Gray 1-2.
W
21
18
18
17
15
14
14
WESTERN CONFERENCE
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
NONLEAGUE
New England: White 3 pass from Brady (Gostkowski
kick), 13:05.
New England: FG Gostkowski 33, :53.
Attendance: 65,548.
RUSHING
OL PTS. GF GA
2
44 110 74
1
41 106 88
4
32 78 75
4
30 85 99
4
28 90 105
6
28 81 99
7
25 77 98
6
20 64 102
Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7
Washington at Boston, 7
N.Y. Islanders at Columbus, 7
New Jersey at Montreal, 7:30
Chicago at Winnipeg, 8
Anaheim at St. Louis, 8
Toronto at Minnesota, 8
Florida at Colorado, 9
Tampa Bay at Arizona, 9
Nashville at Edmonton, 9
San Jose at Calgary, 9
Pittsburgh at Vegas, 10
Senior wide receiver Daniel
Thompson led the area in receiving yards (1,454) and touchdown
catches (21).
Senior quarterback Jaden Faulkner
rushed for 1,382 yards and had 27
total touchdowns.
L
6
10
9
14
14
13
12
17
THURSDAY’S GAMES
FOURTH QUARTER
13. Eleanor Roosevelt (9-3) LW: 13
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay .................... 21
Toronto ......................... 20
Boston ........................... 14
Montreal ....................... 13
Florida ........................... 12
Detroit .......................... 11
Ottawa ............................ 9
Buffalo ............................ 7
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Central 72, Washington Latin 45
Eastern 57, Coolidge 51
Wilson 62, Phelps 42
MARYLAND
Clarksburg 64, Sherwood 48
Gwynn Park 93, Calvert 48
Indian Creek 65, Broadneck 54
Meade 63, Chopticon 33
VIRGINIA
Westfield 70, Briar Woods 46
PRIVATE
Jewish Day 52, Washington Christian 41
Maret 74, John Paul the Great 63
McLean School 82, Edmund Burke 44
Severn School 74, Calvert Hall 51
Louisville (7-2)
Adel 6-10 3-3 17, Spalding 4-8 3-4 11, Mahmoud 8-10 1-2
17, King 3-7 0-0 7, Snider 6-8 1-2 17, Sutton 3-5 0-0 8,
Nwora 1-5 0-0 2, Thomas 4-5 2-4 10, Williams 2-4 0-0 4,
McMahon 1-3 0-0 2, Redding 1-1 2-2 5, Perry 0-3 2-2 2,
Griffin 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-70 14-19 102.
11. Stone Bridge (12-1) LW: 11
Senior Spencer Alston scored 33
total touchdowns.
OL PTS. GF GA
1
39 86 73
3
37 108 100
1
37 95 91
4
36 89 91
3
35 99 89
3
35 94 104
7
29 78 88
7
29 83 86
Dallas at N.Y. Islanders, 7
N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa, 7
Boston at Detroit, 8
Nashville at Vancouver, 10
New England: Burkhead 3 run (Gostkowski kick), 6:18.
Miami: Landry 5 pass from Cutler (Parkey kick), 3:33.
New England: FG Gostkowski 46, :02.
12. South Lakes (11-2) LW: 12
L
10
10
12
9
11
13
10
11
Bryant (1-10)
Townes 6-13 0-0 12, Carroll 4-9 2-2 10, McHugh 1-4 2-2 5,
Ndugba 4-16 7-10 17, Kostur 1-3 2-2 5, Urmilevicius 2-2
0-1 4, Riley 0-1 0-0 0, Layman 2-4 0-0 4, Johnson 0-4 2-2
2, Ware 0-2 0-0 0. 20-58 Totals 15-19 59.
Senior quarterback Terrlonta Buchanan received a scholarship
offer from Bowie State on Thursday.
DOLPHINS
21
362
30-120
242
2-9
3-47
2-29
25-38-0
2-21
7-45.0
1-0
8-102
36:09
W
19
17
18
16
16
16
11
11
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
SECOND QUARTER
Miami: Grant 25 pass from Cutler (Parkey kick), 11:03.
Miami: Landry 4 pass from Cutler (Parkey kick), 4:43.
METROPOLITAN
Columbus ......................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
Washington ..................
New Jersey ...................
N.Y. Rangers .................
Pittsburgh .....................
x-Carolina .....................
Philadelphia ..................
Louisville 102, Bryant 59
10. Ballou (9-4) LW: 10
THIRD QUARTER
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Minnesota 68, Drake 67
Bulls 108, Celtics 85
Dolphins 27, Patriots 20
Villanova (41)
Michigan St. (19)
Wichita St.
Duke
Arizona St (5)
Miami
North Carolina
Kentucky
Texas A&M
Xavier
West Virginia
Gonzaga
Kansas
TCU
Seton Hall
Virginia
Purdue
Notre Dame
Florida St.
Tennessee
Baylor
Florida
Arizona
Texas Tech
Cincinnati
HI GH S C HOOLS
NHL
PTS
1598
1561
1402
1362
1316
1272
1237
1227
1072
1044
972
805
760
718
704
690
568
564
452
342
281
261
252
191
145
Halftime: Louisville 51-35. Three-point goals: Bryant
4-19 (Ndugba 2-7, McHugh 1-3, Kostur 1-3)Louisville
10-26 (Snider 4-6, Sutton 2-3, Adel 2-4, Redding 1-1,
King 1-2) Rebounds: Bryant 27 (Carroll 6), Louisville 46
(Spalding, Mahmoud 9). Assists: Bryant 6 (Ndugba 4),
Louisville 21 (Adel, Perry 4).
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 8:30
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
RECORD
10-0
9-1
8-1
11-1
9-0
8-0
9-1
8-1
8-1
9-1
9-1
8-2
7-2
10-0
8-1
8-1
10-2
8-2
9-0
7-1
7-2
6-3
7-3
7-1
7-2
Others receiving votes: Cincinnati 74, Texas Tech 58,
Virginia Tech 41, Texas 26, Louisville 25, Arkansas 21,
Rhode Island 14, Minnesota 10, Mississippi State 10,
Syracuse 10, Loyola of Chicago 9, Boise State 8, Houston
8, Middle Tennessee 7, Alabama 6, Saint Mary’s 4, UCLA
4, Georgia 3, Georgetown 2, Missouri 2, Nevada 1,
TUESDAY’S GAMES
MONDAY’S GAME
Junior Jalen Green set a school
record with 15 sacks.
L
6
7
13
13
15
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Chicago at Detroit, 4:30
L.A. Chargers at Kansas City, 8:25
8. Good Counsel (8-3) LW: 9
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................23
x-Toronto ...................................17
New York ...................................13
Philadelphia ...............................13
Brooklyn.....................................10
Atlanta 20, New Orleans 17
THURSDAY’S RESULT
HOCKEY
NCAA MEN’S AP TOP 25
Toronto 102, Sacramento 87
Boston 91, Detroit 81
Indiana 126, Denver 116, OT
Minnesota 97, Dallas 92
New Orleans 131, Philadelphia 124
New York 111, Atlanta 107
z-clinched division x-late game
6. Gonzaga (8-4) LW: 7
Lineman Henry Chibueze, wide
receiver Andrew Hardin and allpurpose player Dashaun Jerkins
were selected to the Virginia Region 6C first-team offense.
PCT.
.846
.538
.385
.000
T
0
0
0
0
Senior quarterback Doc Bonner,
who is committed to Dartmouth,
had 42 total touchdowns.
7. Woodbridge (12-2) LW: 8
BASKETBALL
NFC
Miami 27, New England 20
Eleven former Gonzaga players
were in the college postseason
across FBS, FCS and Division II.
D7
M2
MINNESOTA ...................... 2
SAN JOSE .......................... 0
1
1
0
2
1 — 4
0 — 3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Minnesota, Murphy 1 (Staal, Zucker), 4:19
(pp). 2, Minnesota, Staal 11 (Granlund, Suter), 10:27.
1 16
2 18
0
8
2
5
0 24
0
2
0 20
0
8
1 13
6 114
Scoring: 3, Minnesota, Staal 12 (Murphy, Granlund),
4:58. 4, San Jose, Burns 3 (Hertl, Thornton), 19:07 (pp).
Percentages: FG .613, FT .750. 3-Point Goals: 10-17, .588
(Watson 6-11, Confroy 2-2, Lewis 1-1, Myers 1-3)
Blocked Shots: 2 (Watson 1, Ellison 1) Turnovers: 6
(Charles 1, Confroy 1, Lewis 1, Ellison 1, Fraser 1, Myers
1) Steals: 13 (Charles 4, Lewis 2, Watson 2, Jones 1,
Confroy 1, Ellison 1, Fraser 1, Myers 1)
MINNESOTA ...................... 7
8
7
2 — 24
SAN JOSE ........................ 10
9
14
1 — 34
Power-play opportunities: Minnesota 1 of 3; San Jose 2
of 7. Goalies: Minnesota, Stalock 3-3-1 (34 shots-31
saves). San Jose, Jones 11-7-2 (24-20). A: 17,205
(17,562). T: 2:36.
19
7-7 2-3 1-7 0
18 8-11 2-2 2-4 4
26
3-5 0-0 2-5 5
29
2-4 0-0 0-2 11
23 9-17 0-0 1-3 6
8
1-2 0-0 2-6 0
26 8-11 4-5 1-2 2
23
2-5 3-4 0-3 4
28 6-13 1-2 2-7 5
200 46-75 12-16 11-42 37
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, San Jose, Burns 4 (Pavelski), 2:41 (pp). 6, San
Jose, Hertl 7 (DeMelo, Heed), 14:59.
OVERTIME
Scoring: 7, Minnesota, Niederreiter 10, 3:26.
SHOTS ON GOAL
GP (3-0) Morrow 22, Slade 17, Hayes 16, Jean-Pierre 12,
Freeland 11, Morgan 5, Stonework 4, Talley 3, Bullock 2,
Green 1 Totals 20 17-20 93.
C (0-1)Totals 0 0-0 48.
Halftime: Gwynn Park, (44-27).
Three-point goals: GP 12 (Hayes 2, Jean-Pierre 2,
Morrow 4, Slade 2, Morgan 1, Talley 1)
INDIAN CREEK 65, BROADNECK 54
B (2-1) Davis 11, Datko 10, Colbert 10, Vican 6, Cantrell 5,
Gatton 4, Atkinson 3, Williams 3, McKercher 2 Totals 16
13-16 54.
IC (2-0)Totals 0 0-0 65.
Halftime: Broadneck, (30-29).
Three-point goals: B 3 (Datko 1, Davis 1, Atkinson 1)
CENTRAL 72, WASHINGTON LATIN 45
WL (0-1)Totals 0 0-0 45.
C (1-0) Frager 14, Mitchell 13, Kirkland 13, Exum 4,
Morton 4, Rivers 5, Calloway 3 Totals 24 12-18 72.
Halftime: Central, (37-29).
Three-point goals: C 4 (Frager 1, Mitchell 1, Kirkland 1,
Rivers 1).
MARET 74, JOHN PAUL THE GREAT 63
JPG (1-2)Totals 0 0-0 63.
M (3-1) Bowens 21, Williams 5, Jarvis 23, Ayers 8,
Downing 7, Allen 5 Totals 18 8-13 74.
Halftime: Maret, (33-26).
Three-point goals: M 10 (Bowens 5, Williams 1, Rice 1,
Ayers 2, Downing 1).
WESTFIELD 70, BRIAR WOODS 46
W (1-1) Hairston 20, Reed 15, Gregory 8, Scruggs 8,
Opoku 7, Summey 5, Weaver 4, Cho 3 Totals 19 11-17 70.
BW (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 46.
Halftime: Westfield, (27-22).
Three-point goals: W 7 (Cho 1, Hairston 3, Summey 1,
Reed 2)
CLARKSBURG 64, SHERWOOD 48
C (3-0) Armstrong 24, Hanna 14, Thompson 9, Bullington
8, Behzadi 7, Okafor 2 Totals 17 24-38 64.
S (2-1) Long 11, Lacey 8, Johnson 7, Long 6, Jordan 5,
Salzar 4, Riley 3, Lacey 3, Martella 1 Totals 10 13-27 48.
Halftime: Clarksburg, (28-19).
Three-point goals: S 5 (Riley 1, Jordan 1, Long 1, Long 2);
C 2 (Thompson 1, Armstrong 1)
EFGHI
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ALEX COOPER AUCTIONEERS, INC.
4910 MASSACHUSETTES AVE. NW, #100
WASH. DC 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
COURT APPOINTED TRUSTEE
JUDICIAL SALE OF REAL PROPERTY
2829 11th St., NW
Washington, DC 20001
In execution of the Superior Court for District of Columbia's
Order/Decree in Case #2015 CA 004574 R(RP) the Trustees will
offer for sale at public auction the real property located at
2829 11th St., NW, Washington, DC, 20001, designated as being
Square 2857, Lot 0051, and as more fully described in the Deed
of Trust dated April 13, 2007, which is recorded as Instrument
#2007103852 in the Land Records of the District of Columbia.
The sale will occur within the offices of Alex Cooper Aucts., Inc.,
4910 Massachusetts Ave., NW #100, Washington, DC 20016,
202-364-0306 on
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 03, 2018 AT 12:04 PM
The property, in fee simple, together with all improvements
thereon, will be sold by Trustee’s deed, in “as is” condition,
subject to conditions, restrictions, and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. The
sale will be subject to ratification by the Court.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $45,000 or ten percent
(10%) of the winning bid amount, in the form of a certified
check, cashier's check, or money order, will be required of the
purchaser at the time and place of sale. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
amount owed on the Note plus all costs and expenses of sale
on credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee, which
shall be announced at sale. The sale is subject to ratification
by the Court. The balance of the purchase price, along with
interest on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 6.95%
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Trustees, to be paid in certified funds within 60 days of final
ratification of the sale by the Court. There will be no abatement
of interest for the purchaser in the event additional funds
are tendered before settlement, or in the event settlement is
delayed for any reason whatsoever. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. If purchaser fails or refuses to settle within
the aforesaid time frame, the deposit will be forfeited and the
Trustees may apply the deposit toward costs, fees, and their
compensation associated with the initial auction and the resale
process, with any remaining amount credited to the underlying
debt. Additionally, if the purchaser fails to timely settle, the
Trustees may file a motion to resell the property, and the
purchaser agrees to pay the Trustees’ reasonable attorney fees
as ordered by the Court in connection with said motion. The
purchaser also waives personal service of any paper and Show
Cause Order in connection with a motion to resell, expressly
agrees to accept service by certified mail and regular mail sent
to the address provided by the purchaser on the documents
executed at the time of the sale, and agrees that such service is
complete upon mailing and that actual receipt of said mailings is
not required. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes
are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed
by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs
of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is
responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent
such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer
charges, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid
by the purchaser. All transfer taxes and recordation taxes shall
be paid by purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or
damage to property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to
post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to, determination of whether the
borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated, or
paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale
shall be null and void, and the purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest.
BWW#: 185135-1
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al.,
Court Appointed Trustees
Washington Post
Dec. 5, 12, 19, 26, 2017
12146856
1405
1480
Cars
DODGE
Trucks
CHEVROLET 2009 AVALANCHE Z71
Black w/ black lthr, 112k miles,
loaded, new tires, good cond.
$14,800. Please call 301-526-9780
Dodge 2002 Intrepid SE - silver, 4 door
automatic, 64k miles, MD inspected,
AC, stereo, heat, clean and runs well. 1485
asking $2000 OBO 240-645-6767
TOYOTA 1999 RAV4 - 4X4, Automatic.
good condition, 126k mi,
301-422-6927
Vans
FORD
1490
FORD 2014 FUSION ENERGI- Fully
equip., 22k mi., exc. cond.,
$16,250. Call 703-759-5883 or
email dhall47@verizon.net
MERCURY
MERCURY 1978 COUGAR SEDAN
V8 Fully loaded, 38k mi. $7,000
OBO. For more details Please Call:
202-338-3765
SUBARU
SUBARU 2008 OUTBACK - 45776 mi,
1 owner, garage kept, new tires,
$11,950 703-969-3149
TOYOTA
TOYOTA 2015 TACOMA- Like new,
still has plastic on the inside, only
2k miles, burgundy, $24,000.
Call 703-597-6460
1408
Antiques & Classics
PLYMOUTH 1963 VALIANT2-dr, HT, 1 owner, 45k mil, recent
paint & flr boards, runs OK, needs
interior refurb. Estate Sale, $4,000
Rockville, MD 205-546-0018
1447
Autos Wanted
DONATE VEHICLES. Your donation
trains disadvantaged at-risk youths
in auto repairs, also provides vehicle donations to low-income families. Tax-deductible. MVA License#
8000113006823. 301-355-9333
www.auted.org
DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S.
LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your
donation helps local families with
food, clothing, shelter, counseling.
Tax deductible. MVA License
#W1044. 410-636-0123 or
www.LutheranMissionSociety.org
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Sports Utility Vehicles
CADILLAC 2005 SRX- Exc cond.,
$3199, gold color., 4WD
Please call:
443-900-5702 or 202-841-1070
CHEVY ’05 Equinox AWD 3 in Stk,
Lthr, Roof, Pre-Strike Prices Starting
@ $17,777.
dudleymartin.com
888-634-9211
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
847 NALLEY ROAD
CHEVERLY, MD 20785
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to EDWARD W. PERRY AND TIMOTHY J. GOUGH,
Trustee(s), dated May 5, 1997, and recorded among the Land
Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
11419, folio 312, RE-RECORDED ON JUNE 13, 2008 IN
LIBER 29766 AND FOLIO 661, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
DECEMBER 14, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED NINE (9), IN BLOCK LETTERED "G", IN
THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION IV, CAPITAL VIEW
TOWNHOUSES", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK NLP 133, PLAT 2.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 6.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (37060)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Career Training - Emp Svcs
JOBS
To apply, go to
deliverthepost.com
or call
202-334-6100
(Please press “0”
once connected)
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
122 Cree Drive
Oxon Hill, MD 20745
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to VERTICAL LEND, INC. , Trustee(s), dated June
27, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28619, folio 196, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 28, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SIXTEEN (16) IN BLOCK ONE HUNDRED
TWENTY-TWO (122), IN SECTION NUMBERED FOURTEEN
(14), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "FOREST HEIGHTS",
AS PER PLAT RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK
W.W.W. NO. 22 AT PLAT 79.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 2.56% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (54665)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
FREE UNDER $250
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
9107 LIVE OAK LANE
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to RONALD S. DEUTSCH, ESQ. , Trustee(s),
dated June 18, 2009, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 30899,
folio 210, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 21, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED ONE HUNDRED FOURTEEN (114) IN BLOCK
NUMBERED TWENTY-ONE (21) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN
AS "SECTION ONE "B" BRANDYWINE COUNTRY", AS PER
PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 73, PLAT NUMBERED
72
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 3.745% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (44705)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
DECEMBER 5, 12, 19, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
JEEP 2002 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO
109K mi MD Insp 6cyl lthr 4x4. $7,000 820
Auto
Plaza
301-340-1390
Newspapers carriers
needed to deliver
The Washington Post
in
DC, MD and VA area.
Great part-time
income opportunity!
Transportation
required.
Prince Georges County
DECEMBER 12, 19, 26, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 28, DECEMBER 5, 12, 2017
ATTEND AVIATION COLLEGE
- Get FAA approved Aviation
Maintenance training. Financial aid for qualified students.
Job placement assistance.
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888-896-7869
851
850
Official Notices
Notice is hereby given that
the Washington Suburban
Transit Commission will hold
a regular meeting on Tuesday, December 19, 2017 at
9:30 A.M. The meeting will
be conducted in open session at 4351 Garden City
Drive, Suite 305, Hyattsville,
MD 20785. For additional
information, contact Mr. Pat
Pscherer, Jr., 301-577-2063.
Special Notices
Neeraja C. Mattay, M.D. announces
the sale of the assets of her medical
practice
Dr. Neeraja Mattay announces the
sale of the assets of her medical
practice, Dermatology Associates
of Northern Virginia, Inc. to U.S.
Dermatology Partners on December
13, 2017. U.S. Dermatology Partners is continuing the practice at
the existing Sterling and Centreville,
Virginia locations, and will have possession of the patient records. Upon
receipt of written authorization
from the patient or authorized representative, requested patient
records will be transferred to the
designated like-regulated provider
or the patient, as requested, for
a processing charge that includes
a processing fee of $5.00, a document fee of $0.50 per document,
and a postage charge by weight.
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
Montgomery County
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
RICHARD YOUNG SWEET
A/K/A RICHARD Y. SWEET
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. 430342V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 6th day
of DECEMBER, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 20412
Shore Harbour Drive, Apt. 7-B, Germantown, MD 20874 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause
to the contrary thereof be shown
on or before the 5th day of JANUARY, 2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper
of general circulation published in
said County before the 5th day of
JANUARY, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$175,500.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Dec 12, 19, 26, 2017
12147955
Arlington County
SF
871
City of Alexandria
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3000 MANNING ST,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22305
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$76,950.00, with an annual interest rate of 6.425000% dated June
13, 2006, recorded among the
land records of the Circuit Court
for the COUNTY OF ARLINGTON
as Deed Book 3991, Page 1135,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
ARLINGTON, at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Arlington located at
1425 N. Courthouse Road, Arlington, Virginia on January 3, 2018
at 12:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 18-014-229
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $273,750.00, with an annual
interest rate of 5.500000% dated
March 31, 2006, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the CITY OF ALEXANDRIA as Deed Instrument Number
060008835, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction all
that property located in the CITY
OF ALEXANDRIA, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the City
of Alexandria located at 520 King
Street, Alexandria, Virginia on January 10, 2018 at 11:30 AM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 13881000
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-270163.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-266819.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 5, 12, 2017
12146744
Dec 5, 12, 2017
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
870
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
1201 NORTH GARFIELD STREET,
APARTMENT 801,
ARLINGTON, VA 22201
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
Notice of Public
Meeting
Washington
Suburban Transit
Commission
830
12142033
12146337
12144062
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
872
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
851
Prince Georges County
Prince Georges County
www.hwestauctions.com
12143630 DECEMBER 5, 12, 19, 2017
872
Fairfax County
851
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6803 FORBES BOULEVARD
LANHAM, MD 20706
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JASON HOROWITZ , Trustee(s), dated March
20, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34615, folio 263, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 21, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY (20) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN
AS "STANCLIFF'S ADDITION TO WOODSTREAM EAST", AS
PER THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN
PLAT BOOK VJ 175 AT PLAT 76
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.25% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (56115)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
Ford 2004 Explorer XLT 4X4, 94K, 3rd
seat, MD insp, blk, very clean. $7000
Auto
Plaza
301-340-1390
C
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
872
Fairfax County
12143627
872
Fairfax County
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
12664 BRADDOCK FARMS CT,
CLIFTON, VA 20124
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2604 ROSWELL COURT,
FALLS CHURCH, VA 22043
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3111 MADISON HILL CT,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22310
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2312 HUNTERS SQUARE COURT,
RESTON, VA 20191
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $825,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.750000% dated
October 31, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 17923,
Page 1589, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on January 10, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 066-2-06-0022
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $440,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
January 22, 2007, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 19068,
Page 0824, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on January 10, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0492 15 0012
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $565,600.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
November 30, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 18981,
Page 1491, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on January 10, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0824 30 0019
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $324,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.125000% dated
November 15, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 17974,
Page 0042, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on January 10, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 026-1-21-0139
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-263077.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-261467.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-252228.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-269657.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 12, 19, 2017
Dec 12, 19, 2017
Dec 12, 19, 2017
Dec 5, 12, 2017
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S0833-2 10x3
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2017
851
Prince Georges County
851
OPQRS
EZ
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
13512 Livingston Road
Clinton, MD 20735
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated September
14, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27496, folio 250, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 28, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED MARCH 28, 2007 IN LIBER 27496, FOLIO 250.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.99% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (53701)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4115 CLARK STREET
CAPITOL HEIGHTS, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to OPTIMUM TITLE, LLC. , Trustee(s), dated
December 28, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29212, folio
691, RE-RECORDED ON JULY 9, 2015 IN LIBER 37200 AND
FOLIO 537, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 21, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED NINE (9), IN BLOCK LETTERED "D", IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "CEDAR VALLEY", AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK BB 12 AT PLAT NO. 19
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4.25% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (39731)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 12, 19, 26, 2017
12145158
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 5, 12, 19, 2017
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2309 LAKEWOOD STREET
SUITLAND, MD 20746
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JOAN H. ANDERSON, Trustee(s), dated June
14, 2008, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29974, folio 091, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 14, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED NINETY-TWO (92) IN BLOCK LETTERED "O"
IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "DUPONT VILLAGE", AS
PER PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 24 AT PLAT 21
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 6.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (42941)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 28, DECEMBER 5, 12, 2017
12142094
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1115 Lake Heron Drive #3B
Annapolis, MD 21403
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to ROSENBERG AND ASSOCIATES LLC,
Trustee(s), dated January 24, 2017, and recorded among the
Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
30748, folio 252, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8
CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
DECEMBER 21, 2017 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND AS
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN A DEED RECORDED AT
DEED BOOK 18465, PAGE 357 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $38,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of ANNE ARUNDEL
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.125%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-13425)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
16140 Kenny Rd
DECEMBER 5, 12, 19, 2017
12145209
Laurel, MD 20707
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to 1111, Trustee(s), dated December 24, 2012,
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34814, folio 592, the holder
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
KNOWN AS
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
210 4th Avenue Southwest
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
Glen Burnie, MD 21061
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
Deed of Trust to LEO W. DUNN III, Trustee(s), dated November
DECEMBER 14, 2017 at 10:00 AM
21, 2014, and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27940, folio 140, the
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
described as follows:
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
RECORDED JUNE 6, 2013 IN LIBER 34814, FOLIO 592.
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
without either express or implied warranty or representation, COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a 21401 ON,
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
DECEMBER 21, 2017 at 10:00AM
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and described as follows:
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 14 OF BLOCK
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold 40, AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT ENTITLED "PLAT OF PROPERTY
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of OF CURTIS CREEK MINING, FURNACE AND MTG. COMPANY,
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA AMENDED PLATS OF GLEN BURNIE, PLAT NO. 3", WHICH IS
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK NO. 6, PAGE 15.
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of without either express or implied warranty or representation,
the purchase price with interest at 4.375% per annum from including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiTEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateon all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
association dues and assessments that may become due after and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $29,500.00 payable in certified
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of ANNE ARUNDEL
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.75% on
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
Trustee's File No. (11540)
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 28, DECEMBER 5, 12, 2017
12142056 adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-09222)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
ARE YOUR
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MOVING OUT?
1. Coffee
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3. Bills
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S0833-2 2x3
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
Democracy Dies in Darkness
12143374
852
D9
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
13722 HILLSIDE AVE.
THURMONT, MD 21788
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
November 17, 2006 and recorded in Liber 6360, Folio 44 among the Land
Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of
$225,000.00 and a current interest rate of 2%, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick
St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
DECEMBER 29, 2017 AT 10:44 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $24,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 124109-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 12, Dec 19 & Dec 26
12146822
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
103 WATER LAND CT.
A/R/T/A 103 WATERLAND CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated June
19, 2007 and recorded in Liber 6658, Folio 578 among the Land Records
of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $303,300.00
and a current interest rate of 3%, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for
Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick,
MD 21701, on
DECEMBER 22, 2017 AT 10:47 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $21,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 313706-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 5, Dec 12 & Dec 19
12144866
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
831 DUNBROOKE CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
November 14, 2008 and recorded in Liber 7661, Folio 309 among the Land
Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of
$625,500.00 and a current interest rate of 2.42%, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick
St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
DECEMBER 29, 2017 AT 10:45 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $40,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 309134-2)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 12, Dec 19 & Dec 26
856
12146823
14043 HARRISVILLE RD.
MOUNT AIRY, MD 21771
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated July 12,
2007 and recorded in Liber 6682, Folio 66 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $264,000.00
and a current interest rate of 3.57%, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit
Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St.,
Frederick, MD 21701, on
DECEMBER 29, 2017 AT 10:41 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $27,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 300751-2)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 12, Dec 19 & Dec 26
12146817
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
3600 SINGLETON TERR.
FREDERICK, MD 21704
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
6595 FELLINGWOOD CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated March
31, 2006 and recorded in Liber 5945, Folio 365 among the Land Records
of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $315,920.00
and a current interest rate of 4%, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for
Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick,
MD 21701, on
DECEMBER 29, 2017 AT 10:43 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated April
23, 2010 and recorded in Liber 7812, Folio 380 among the Land Records
of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $224,852.00
and a current interest rate of 3.875%, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit
Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St.,
Frederick, MD 21701, on
DECEMBER 29, 2017 AT 10:42 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $32,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 301819-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 12, Dec 19 & Dec 26
12146819
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 151850-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 12, Dec 19 & Dec 26
12146818
LEGAL
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C054F 2x3
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
DECEMBER 5, 12, 19, 2017
12145167
legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x3
CLASSIFIED
C054B 2x3
OPQRS
D10
856
Frederick County
856
872
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
116 KEY PKWY.
FREDERICK, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
November 17, 2005 and recorded in Liber 5717, Folio 619 among the
Land Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance
of $180,000.00 and a current interest rate of 3.125%, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door,
100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
DECEMBER 15, 2017 AT 10:50 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 316927-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 28, Dec 5 & Dec 12
12144271
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
425 OLD OAK PL.
THURMONT, MD 21788
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
September 14, 2012 and recorded in Liber 9121, Folio 436 among the
Land Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance
of $151,899.00 and a current interest rate of 4.125%, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door,
100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
DECEMBER 22, 2017 AT 10:46 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $14,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 207329-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 5, Dec 12 & Dec 19
857
12144865
Howard County
857
Howard County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
9918 Whiskey Run, Laurel, MD 20723
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 9918 Whiskey Run, Laurel, MD 20723. By
virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated May 25, 2011, and recorded in Liber 13288 at Page 308
among the land records of the COUNTY OF HOWARD, in the
original principal amount of $177,386.00. Upon default and
request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale at
public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building, located at 9250
Bendix Rd., Columbia MD 21045, on December 21, 2017
at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-461549
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-261904.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
12143232
Easy Pay keeps you in-the-know.
(And your subscription up-to-date.)
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
16037 Hayes Lane
Woodbridge, VA 22191
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $568,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 7.375000% dated
May 10, 2007, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 19327, Page 0882,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on January 10,
2018 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0344 21 0022
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$200,250.00, dated June 19, 1998,
recorded among the land records
of the Circuit Court for Prince William County on June 25, 1998,
as Instrument Number 71161, in
Deed Book 2591, at Page 1831, the
undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on January 12,
2018 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: LOT 505, SECTION 5D, NEWPORT, AS THE SAME
APPEARS DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED IN DEED
BOOK 1827, AT PAGE 121, AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
WILLIAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA.. Tax
ID: 8390-44-4221.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $11,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: Conv/FNMA (Trustee #
542674)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0066
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-249546.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 5, 12, 2017
12146750
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
14502 PICKET OAKS RD,
CENTREVILLE, VA 20121
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $250,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.250000% dated
October 5, 2006, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 18892, Page 0263,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on January 3, 2018
at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 065-1-07-00-0195
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-266375.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 5, 12, 19, 26, 2017
12144058
873
Prince William County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
10058 Moxleys Ford Lane
Bristow, VA 20136
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$263,900.00, dated September 30,
2005, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on September 30, 2005, as Instrument Number 200509300169681, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on January 12,
2018 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: Unit 2204,
BARRHILL AT INVERNESS VILLAGE
CONDOMINIUM, Phase XVII, as
shown on the plat attached to
the Declaration, recorded in Deed
Book 2440 at Page 1638, as
amended by instrument recorded
in Deed Book 2456 at Page 1670,
as further amended by instrument
recorded in Deed Book 2505 at
Page 1153, as further amended
by instrument recorded in Deed
Book 2511 at Page 1348, as further
amended by instrument recorded
in Deed Book 2518 at Page 457,
as further amended by instrument
recorded in Deed Book 2550 at
Page 733, as further amended by
instrument recorded in Deed Book
2566 at Page 77, further amended
in Deed Book 2579 at Page 86,
further amended in Deed Book
2592 at Page 292, further amended by instrument recorded in Deed
Book 2625 at Page 164, further
amended by instrument recorded
in Deed Book 2717 at Page 255,
further amended by instrument
recorded in Deed Book 2741 at
Page 1396, among the land
records of Prince William County,
Virginia. TOGETHER WITH an undivided percentage interest appurtenant to the Unit in all Common
Elements of said Project as
described in said Declaration and
subsequent
amendments.
TOGETHER WITH the right of
ingress and egress from said property and right to use for all proper
purposes in common with Declarant, its successors and assigns,
and all other occupants from time
to time, any and all portions of
the condominium designated by
statute and the Declaration as general Common Elements. SUBJECT
TO the reservation on use and
all covenants and obligations set
forth in said Declaration recorded
in Deed Book 2440 at Page 1638,
among the said land records, and
set forth in the By-Laws of the
Unit Owners Association attached
thereto, as it may be amended
from time to time all of which
restrictions, conditions, assessments and all other covenants are
incorporated herein by reference,
and which shall be binding on
said grantees and their successors, heirs and assigns. Tax ID:
7495-92-1999.01.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $11,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: Conv/Conv (Trustee #
569419)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0656
12/12/2017, 12/19/2017 12147645
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Dem
12/12/2017, 12/19/2017 12147693
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
3825 Corona Lane
Woodbridge, Virginia 22193
Pursuant to the terms and provisions of a certain Deed of Trust
from Joseph J. Garlick, Jr., party
of the first part, to George W.
Connors, Trustee, dated January
5, 2007, and recorded on January
8, 2007, as Instrument Number
200701080003560 (the “Deed of
Trust”), among the land records
of Prince William County, Virginia,
the holder of the Note evidencing
the indebtedness secured by said
Deed of Trust having declared an
event of default and instructed
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee to proceed with this
Trustee's Sale, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee (having been
appointed a Substitute Trustee by
virtue of a Deed of Appointment
of Substitute Trustee recorded
prior hereto in said Clerk’s Office
as
Instrument
Number
201711300090049) will offer for
sale at public auction to the highest bidder, on December 14, 2017,
at 1:00 p.m., on the front steps of
the Prince William County Courthouse, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, Virginia, all of those certain
lots or parcels of land, together
with all improvements located
thereon and rights and privileges
appurtenant thereto, situated,
lying and being in the County of
Prince William, Virginia, and more
particularly described of record as
follows:
ALL of Lot 103, Section 5, Dale
City, as the same is duly dedicated, platted and recorded among
the land records of Prince William
County, Virginia, in Deed Book 427
at page 626.
The within described property is
sold in “as is” condition and without any warranties either express
or implied and subject to encumbrances, conditions, restrictions,
rights-of-way, easements, and
agreements, if any, contained in
the deeds forming the chain of
title thereto. It shall be the
responsibility of the successful
bidder to obtain possession of the
property.
TERMS OF SALE: The property
as hereinabove described will be
sold in the manner producing the
highest bid. A cash deposit of at
least NINE THOUSAND DOLLARS
($9,000.00) by certified or
cashier's check will be required of
the successful bidder at the time
of sale with balance due within
fifteen (15) days from the date
of said sale. The deposit shall
be applied to the credit of the
successful bidder at settlement;
or, in the event of the failure
to complete settlement within fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale, the deposit shall be applied
to pay the cost and expense of
sale and the balance, if any, shall
be retained by the Substitute
Trustee as his compensation in
connection with this sale.
Notwithstanding the foregoing,
the Substitute Trustee reserves
the right to waive the requirement of said deposit.
All costs of the conveyancing,
which shall be by Special Warranty Deed, examination of title,
recording charges, notary fees,
settlement fees, including preparation of deed and grantor's tax
thereon, etc., to be at the cost of
the purchaser. Real estate taxes
for the year 2017 to be adjusted
to the date of settlement.
In the event the Substitute
Trustee deems it best for any
reason at the time of the sale
to postpone or continue this sale
from time to time, such notice
of postponement or setting over
will be announced in a manner
deemed reasonable by the Substitute Trustee.
Written notice of this Trustee's
Sale, as required by Section 5559.1 of the Code of Virginia, 1950,
as amended has been given to
Corona Lane, LLC, the present
owner of the property described
herein, by certified mail, at its last
known address, as such owner
and address appear on the
records of the Noteholder.
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE
Eric A. Anderson, Esq.
5313 Lee Highway
Second Floor
Arlington, Virginia 22207
(703) 975-6795
12-6, 8, 11, 12, 13-2017 12147143
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
4405 HARTFORD COURT,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22193
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $338,300.00, with an annual
interest rate of 7.500000% dated
July 12, 2006, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM as Deed Instrument
Number 200607190107136, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on January 9, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 8192-46-7144
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
1-800-753-POST
SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
SF
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-269451.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 12, 19, 2017
12147889
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
S0833-1 6x2
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3728 RENOIR TERRACE,
CHANTILLY, VA 20151
1-800-753-POST
DECEMBER 5, 12, 19, 2017
873
Fairfax County
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054E 2x2
873
Prince William County
879
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
12703 LOTTE DRIVE #304,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22192
Culpeper County
882
Frederick County
882
Frederick County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $292,500.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.250000% dated
May 18, 2007, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM as Deed Instrument
Number 200708060090398, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on February 6, 2018 at
4:00 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 8393-61-4770.04
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-269825.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 12, 19, 2017
12147890
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3659 STONEWALL MANOR DRIVE,
TRIANGLE, VA 22172
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $647,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.050000% dated
December 2, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number 200512060207855,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on January 9, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 239334
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-249116.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 12, 19, 2017
12148180
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
10654 HERON RIDGE COURT,
MANASSAS, VA 20112
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $530,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.500000% dated
April 24, 2006, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM as Deed Instrument
Number 200604280065844, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on January 9, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 7894180857
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-270167.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 12, 19, 2017
12148179
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2400 FORECASTLE COURT,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22192
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $409,500.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
January 11, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number 200601170008047,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on January 9, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 8293-93-8813
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-256560.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 5, 12, 2017
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2017
VIRGINIA
EZ
879
Culpeper County
12146753
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
14253 HUNTERS RUN WAY,
GAINESVILLE, VA 20155
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $303,750.00, with an annual
interest rate of 7.250000% dated
April 12, 2006, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM as Deed Instrument
Number 200604130058417, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on January 9, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 7398-40-7958
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-263059.
2017 Golf Drive,
Culpeper, VA 22701
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND, WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON AND ALL APPURTENANCES THERETO BELONGING, LOCATED
AND BEING IN THE COUNTY OF CULPEPER, COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA,
AND BEING DESIGNATED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 76, PHASE 2, COUNTY CLUB
ESTATES, AS THE SAME IS DULY DEDICATED IN DEED BOOK 494, PAGE 774
AND AS SHOWN ON A PLAT RECORDED PLAT CABINET 2, SLIDES 260 AND
261, BOTH AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF CULPEPER COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of
redemption by the Internal Revenue Service. The property will be sold
“AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND
SUBJECT TO conditions, restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of
way, and all other matters of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust
to be announced at the time of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of
the sale price, whichever is lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to
the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price, with interest at the rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date said funds are received
in the office of the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15)
days of sale. In the event of default by the successful bidder, the entire
deposit shall be forfeited and applied to the costs and expenses of sale
and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other public charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, whether incurred prior to or after the sale,
and all other costs incident to settlement to be paid by the purchaser. In
the event taxes, any other public charges have been advanced, a credit
will be due to the seller, to be adjusted from the date of sale at the time of
settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay the seller's attorneys at settlement,
a fee of $445.00 for review of the settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
December 12, 19, 2017
878
12144749
881
Stafford County
TRUSTEE SALE
114 Hope Road,
Stafford, VA 22554
Stafford County
TRUSTEE SALE
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (58487)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Dec11, 12, 13, 2017
12147581
TRUSTEE SALE
1 Ashbrook Road,
Stafford, VA 22554
Stafford County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $389,612.00, dated September
4, 2015 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Stafford County, Virginia, in Document No. 150015831, default having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse
Road, Stafford, on January 9, 2018
at 11:00 AM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 75, Section 24, The Colonies
at Park Ridge, with improvements
thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (58218)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Dec 5, 12, 2017
12146366
Home delivery
is convenient.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 5, 12, 2017
12146754
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
is convenient.
Orange County
14739 Porterfield Drive,
Orange, VA 22960
Orange County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $75,000.00, dated October 17,
2006 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Stafford County, Virginia, in Document No. 060036912, default having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse
Road, Stafford, on January 9, 2018
at 11:00 AM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 2, as shown on Plat of survey
recorded in Plat Book 13, Page 128,
with improvements thereon.
SF
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $145,155.00, dated May 9, 2016
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of the Orange
County, Virginia, in Document No.
160003154,
default
having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Circuit Court of Orange County,
110 North Madison Road, Orange,
on January 17, 2018 at 3:30 PM the
property described in said deed,
located at the above address and
briefly described as:
Lot 10, Porterfield Place, with
improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (55912)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Dec 12, 19, 2017
12147582
883
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
9892 OBANNONS MILL ROAD,
BOSTON, VA 22713.
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated December 19, 2014,
in the original principal amount
of $320,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Rappahannock County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 140001126 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Rappahannock County,
238 Gay Street, Washington, Virginia on January 10, 2018 , at 4:30
PM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN TRACT OR PARCEL OF
LAND, TOGETHER WITH ALL BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS THEREON AND PRIVILEGES AND APPURTENANCES THEREUNTO BELONGING, SITUATED, LYING AND BEING
ON THE WEST SIDE OF STATE SECONDARY ROUTE NUMBER 650, IN
STONEWALL MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, RAPPAHANNOCK COUNTY,
VIRGINIA AND ACCORDING TO A
SURVEY BY BRAIN THROSSELL, LS,
ON NOVEMBER 10, 1989, A PLAT
OF WHICH IS ATTACHED TO AND
RECORDED WITH THAT CERTAIN
DEED RECORDED IN DEED BOOK
177, PAGE 810, SAID TRACT OR
PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINS 4.500
ACRES, MORE OR LESS. AND ALL
THAT CERTAIN TRACT OR PARCEL
OF LAND, TOGETHER WITH ALL
BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON AND PRIVILEGES AND
APPURTENANCES
THEREUNTO
BELONGING, SITUATED, LYING AND
BEING IN STONEWALL MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, RAPPAHANNOCK
COUNTY, VIRGINIA AND ACCORDING TO A SURVEY BY BRIAN
THROSSELL, LC, DATED JUNE 29,
2001, ATTACHED TO THAT CERTAIN
DEED RECORDED AS INSTRUMENT
NUMBER 01-925, SAID PARCEL OF
LAND CONTAINS 0.094 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3210801.
Dec. 12, 19, 2017
12148160
MARYLAND
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
By virtue of and pursuant to the terms of a Leasehold Deed of
Trust, Assignment of Rents and Security Agreement dated March 13,
2007, recorded on March 16, 2007, as Instrument Number 070004372,
among the land records of Frederick County, Virginia (the "Deed of
Trust"), executed by Professional Jet Services, Inc. (hereafter "Owner"),
originally to TRSTE, Inc., Trustee, and Stephen K. Christenson (the
"Substitute Trustee") having been substituted as trustee pursuant to a
Deed of Removal of Trustee and Appointment of Substitute Trustee dated
November 1, 2017, and recorded in the land records of Frederick County,
Virginia, on November 9, 2017, as Instrument Number 170011747, and
default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by
the Deed of Trust, and having been requested to do so by the holder of the
note evidencing the indebtedness (the "Noteholder") secured by the Deed
of Trust, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the front of the Frederick County Courthouse located at 5 N.
Kent Street, Winchester, Virginia, at:
11:00 a.m., on December 18, 2017 (the "Sale Date")
the following described leasehold property with improvements thereon
(the "Property"), situate, lying and being in the County of Frederick, State
of Virginia, and being more particularly described as follows:
All of that certain Leasehold Estate located a short distance north of
Airport Road (Virginia Secondary Route 645) at the Winchester Regional
Airport, Shawnee District, Frederick County, Virginia, containing 54,000
square feet, together with the right of ingress and egress to the same
and further being described as being located upon a portion of the land
conveyed to the Winchester Regional Airport Authority by Deed dated July
1, 1987 from C. Douglas Adams and Fern L. Adams, his wife, of record
in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of Frederick County, Virginia, in
Deed Book 653 at Page 853. The depicted tract of land is shown on the
Exhibit drawn by Painter Lewis, P.L.C., attached to Memorandum of Lease
recorded on March 16, 2007 as Instrument No. 070004371.
The Leasehold Estate contains the further right that the Lessee shall have
the right of ingress and egress to and from the demised premises over,
and upon and to the taxiways, aprons and runways of Lessor, Winchester
Regional Airport Authority, together with the use in common with others
of the landing area, entrances, exits, parking areas and other facilities of
the Winchester Regional Airport, provided that such right shall be subject
to the rules and regulations of the authorities which administer said
airport and shall be subject to the general laws of the United States of
America and the State of Virginia.
Street Address of the Property:
509 Airport Road
Winchester, Virginia
Parcel Identification Number:
64-A-40B1, a portion of 64-A-40B
This sale is subject to all conditions, rights-of-way, easements, and
reservations contained in the deeds forming the chain of title to the
Property, and subject to any and all liens, including, but not limited to filed
and unfiled mechanics' and materialmens' liens, to the extent that any
of the foregoing may lawfully apply to the Property or any part thereof
and take priority over the liens and security interests of the Deed of Trust.
SPRINGFIELD / FT. BELVOIR /
WOODBRIDGE - Responsible person
to share 3 bedroom house.
$630 util & cable incl. 703-919-4381
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
110
Lost
Lost Blue Opal Ring- Likely Mass
Ave or DuPont area. Reward for
return. Sentimental family ring.
703-587-4422
210
Art
CaribDomain - NY Fashion Meets DC
Fashion 2017—Holiday Gala at the
Newton White Mansion December
16, 2017 at 6 PM hosted by
Celebrity Jacinth Headlam.
225
Collectibles
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
WANTED: $ FOR MILITARY: WWI,
WWII, VN. Jackets, Hats, Knives,
Medals, ETC. $100/MORE FOR SOME
OLD HELMETS, 301-657-8994
237
Firewood
Seasoned Hardwood 1/2 cord $110,
1 cord $200, 2 cord $380 Free
Delivery Call 703-520-3869
265
Home & Garden
WARRANTIES: THE PROPERTY AND ALL THE IMPROVEMENTS LOCATED
THEREON, IF ANY, WILL BE SOLD IN THEIR "AS IS, WHERE IS" CONDITION
WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION,
THE PHYSICAL CONDITION, CONSTRUCTION, EXTENT OF CONSTRUCTION,
STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY, WORKMANSHIP, HABITABILITY, FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE, MERCHANTABILITY, MATERIALS, ZONING OR ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITION.
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
275
The purchaser recognizes and agrees that any investigation, examination,
or inspection of the Property is within the control of the Owner or other
parties in possession and their agents and not within the control of
the Substitute Trustee, the Noteholder, or their successors or assigns.
of east india company trunk from
recent estate sale. will buy more
than you paid. please call Arun
240-731-8846
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. Purchaser shall pay for all recording charges,
settlement fees and all costs of conveyancing. Transfer of title of the
Property to the purchaser shall be by special warranty deed of bargain
and sale. To bid on the Property, a bidder's deposit of $120,000.00 must
be delivered by each bidder other than the Noteholder to the Substitute
Trustee prior to the commencement of the sale. The deposit shall be by
certified or cashier's check drawn on a financial institution acceptable
to the Substitute Trustee and the Noteholder. The deposit, without
interest, will be applied to the purchase price at settlement or returned
to the unsuccessful bidders, as applicable. The balance of the purchase
price will be due by certified check or immediately available funds at
settlement. Settlement in full shall be made within thirty (30) days from
the date of the foreclosure sale, time being of the essence, and shall occur
in the offices of the Substitute Trustee or such other place as mutually
agreed upon. The Substitute Trustee reserves the right to extend the
date of settlement as may be necessary to complete arrangements of
settlement. Risk of loss or damage to the Property shall be borne by the
purchaser from the time of the foreclosure sale. Real estate taxes and
other public charges will be pro-rated to the date of the foreclosure sale,
and the purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of such taxes and
charges beginning as of the date of the foreclosure sale. The Substitute
Trustee will not deliver possession of all or any part of the Property being
sold.
Written one-price bids may be received by the Substitute Trustee from
the Noteholder or any other person for entry by announcement by the
Substitute Trustee at the sale. The Property will be offered for sale
to the highest bidder, subject however to the Substitute Trustee's right
to reject any bid that the Substitute Trustee deems inadequate and/or
unacceptable.
In the event the Substitute Trustee deems it best for any reason at the
time of sale to postpone, suspend, or continue the sale from time to time,
he may do so in accordance with the terms of the Deed of Trust and/or
applicable law, and thereafter may sell the Property as therein provided.
In the event of default, the Property may be sold at the expense (which
expense shall include a trustee's fee and costs of sale) of the defaulting
purchaser, and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for any amount by
which the ultimate sale price for the Property is less than the defaulting
purchaser's bid. In addition, the deposit shall be forfeited and applied to
the costs of the sale and to the secured indebtedness, subject however, to
any agreement between the Noteholder and the Substitute Trustee with
respect to the Substitute Trustee's commission. After any default and
forfeiture of deposit, such Property may, at the discretion of the Substitute
Trustee, be conveyed to the next highest bidder on such Property whose
bid was acceptable to the Substitute Trustee. Should the Substitute
Trustee be unable, for any reason, in his reasonable discretion, to convey
marketable title, the successful bidder's sole remedy in law or equity shall
be the return of his deposit. Upon return of the deposit, the sale shall be
void and of no effect.
Merchandise Wanted
LOOKING FOR PURCHASER
284
Office & Business
Equipment
Medical office—$3975, Bethesda,
MD,
240-988-6885
ECG,phone
sys,steel chart racks,leather sofa &4
chairs, exam rm equip, misc.
610
Dogs for Sale
Akita—Newborn Puppies w/ Papers
423-605-1178. For More
information, Please Visit:
http://www.proteakennel.com
Bernedoodles—M/F, 8wks,
Vacs/
wormed. Brindle, Bi color, Black/
White, Tri color, sure to be show
stoppers, $1200+, 301-639-3808
BOUVIER PUPS - 2 females from
outstanding European working
lines. 8 weeks old, ready to go
home. Carla 757-426-1223. See
info at www.DutchEastDogs.com
Cavachons Yorkies more—Puppy
Sale. 304-904-6289,Cash, CC,Easy
Finance, wvpuppy.com, 59 East Rd
Martinsburg WV, exit 16E
Cavapoo puppies—$500-750, m/f,
non-shed, ruby. Vet check, shots.,
8 wks on 12/23; Home raised w/ kids
& pets. 240-838-1361
french bulldog—akc reg. $3300, m/f,
6 wks, some ready to go now other
ready at Christmas time. 540-6719215, owensbullies.webs.com
The purchaser shall be required to sign a Contract of Sale at the
foreclosure sale. A copy of the Contract of Sale is available from the
Substitute Trustee upon request.
The Substitute Trustee reserves the right to amend or supplement the
terms of the sale by verbal announcements during the sale, to modify the
requirements for bidders' deposits, to withdraw all or part of the Property
from the sale prior to the commencement of bidding and to conduct such
other sales as the Substitute Trustee may determine in his discretion.
Stephen K. Christenson
Substitute Trustee
French Bulldogs - 9 weeks,2 F,
1 M. fawn, tan&white, brindle &
white. $2,500 each.
301-252-9213 or visit:
www.windsoroakfarm.com
For further information, contact:
Andrea Campbell Davison
BEAN, KINNEY & KORMAN, P.C.
2300 Wilson Boulevard, 7th Floor
Arlington, Virginia 22201
adavison@beankinney.com
703-525-4000
December 9, 12, 14, 2017
MARYLAND
Rappahannock County Roommates
Roommates
1-800-753-POST
Springfield— $950, furnished basement, 1 ba, 1 1/2ba, 703-912-5616,
Deck, DW, WW Carpet, HSI.
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE AND IMPROVED LEASEHOLD REAL ESTATE
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
June 5, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 070008609 and a Loan
Modification recorded on June 7, 2016 at Instrument Number 160003126,
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Culpeper County, VA, securing
a loan which was originally $396,200.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction
at Courthouse Building, 135 West Cameron Street, Culpeper County, VA
22701-3097 on:
January 2, 2018 at 11:00 AM
Roommates
12147642
MARYLAND
Roommates
CAPITAL HGHTS Newly reno house to
share. Hi-end close to shops, metro,
must see $180/wk 301-674-9278
COLLEGE PARK - Furn rooms for rent,
$550-$650/month plus utilities.
Security dep req. Call 240-422-5191
COLLEGE PARK - Furn room in pvt
home. $565/mo, sec dep req. No
smoking. Pref male. 240-423-7923
SILVER SPRING/ROCKVILLE - 3 rooms.
Near shops & trans. N/P, N/S. $500$600 + sec, utils incl. 301-343-6198
TEMPLE HILLS- Furnished room for
rent, Shared BA, near subway. Utils
& Cable incl. $180/wk. 301-919-5150
Germantown-furn1BR, all util incl, wifi, cable. 1st & last mo rent req move
in. 240-671-3783 or 301-916-8158
UPPER MARLBORO - Unfurn room on
2nd floor.. No smoking. Work refs.
$550+ deposit. Call 301-789-3771
LANHAM - 2 Rooms avail in private
home, $560 & $580/mo, Incl Utils,
A/C, Street Prkg, quiet. 240-645-2380
Roommates
VIRGINIA
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IS YOUR OLD CAR HOLDING UP?
YES
NO
NO
8"/5504&--*5
)&.&"/4
YES
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
NJMMJPOSFBEFSTDBSTIPQQFSTJODMVEFEttXBTIJOHUPOQPTUDPNDMBTTJmFEt0QFO0SQMBDFZPVSBEJO&YQSFTTPVSEBJMZDPNNVUFSSFBEBOESFBDISFBEFST
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
C054E 10x2
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HEalth&Science
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2017
AGING
Weird ideas in
history about
why we get old
BY J OSEPH
AND L UKE
HISTORY CONTINUED ON E4
SECTION E
BY
C
EZ
EE
WELL
The other big drug problem:
Seniors taking too many pills
C OUGHLIN
Y OQUINTO
The idea of “older people” as a standalone population, complete with its own
distinct set of stereotypes in terms of
behavior, appearance and mind-set,
seems like somePERSPECTIVE thing that has been
around forever. But
in reality, our current narrative of aging
— the story we tell ourselves about the
normal progression of life, including its
second half — is a relatively recent
invention.
Growing old was once something experienced on an individual basis: not at a
set age for everyone and not according to
a single set of rules. However, in the
second half of the 19th century, a more
monolithic idea of “the aged” began to
.
S ANDRA G . B OODMAN
onsider it America’s other prescription drug epidemic.
For decades, experts have
warned that older Americans are taking
too many unnecessary drugs, often prescribed by multiple doctors, for dubious
or unknown reasons. Researchers estimate that 25 percent of people ages 65 to
69 take at least five prescription drugs to
treat chronic conditions, a figure that
jumps to nearly 46 percent for those
between 70 and 79. Doctors say it is not
uncommon to encounter patients taking
more than 20 drugs to treat acid reflux,
heart disease, depression or insomnia or
other disorders.
Unlike the overuse of opioid painkillers, the polypharmacy problem has attracted little attention, even though its
Mom wanted
to live on her
own forever
BY
M ELANIE P . M ERRIMAN
hazards are well documented. But some
doctors are working to reverse the trend.
At least 15 percentof seniors seeking
care annually from doctors or hospitals
have suffered a medication problem; in
half of these cases, the problem is believed to be potentially preventable. Studies have linked polypharmacy to unnecessary death. Older patients, who have
greater difficulty metabolizing medicines, are more likely to suffer dizziness,
confusion and falls. And the side effects of
drugs are frequently misinterpreted as a
new problem, triggering more prescriptions, a process known as a prescribing
cascade.
The glide path to overuse can be
gradual: A patient taking a drug to lower
My mother’s words sounded harsh —
“I never want to live with either one of my
girls” — but I didn’t take offense. It was
her way of saying she never wanted to be
dependent on us, or anyone.
After our father died, my sister Barbara and I knew that Mom would need
our help as she aged. We also knew
exactly how Mom felt about it. “I just
don’t want to be a burden,” she said
anytime the subject came up.
The last five years of my mother’s life,
when she declined both mentally and
physically, were difficult for all of us. This
fiercely independent woman needed assistance, and both Barbara and I rearranged our lives to make sure she got it.
Paradoxically, whatever burden there
was in caring for her came not from her
PRESCRIPTIONS CONTINUED ON E4
LESSONS CONTINUED ON E5
MORE AGING WELL If you’re 59, can it be called a midlife crisis? E6 End-of-life care is better in some places than others. E6
AND INSIDE Which is smarter: Dog, cat or . . . raccoon? E2 Contraceptives and breast cancer. E3 Why you should gaze into your baby’s eyes. E3
ILLUSTRATION BY MIKEL JASO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
E2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
Cats can outsmart
dogs? Think again.
BY
J ASON B ITTEL
Cat people and dog people have
long sparred over which species
possesses the best brains.
Team Cat points to the felines’
self-reliance as a sign of intelligence. The animals can hunt,
which isn’t so great for wildlife but
does showcase the cunning predator still lurking within lap kitties.
Cats also clean themselves, relieve
themselves in tidy litter boxes — or
even toilets — and are generally
better at food-portion control
than their canine housemates.
Team Dog cites the canines’
ability to learn complex tasks, especially those that benefit humans. Dogs guide the blind, herd
livestock, sniff out explosives and
help find survivors buried beneath earthquake rubble. They
also have strong memories and an
impressive capacity to understand human language.
But as it turns out, comparing
résumés may be unnecessary. According to a new study published
in Frontiers in Neuroanatomy, the
best way to measure cognitive
ability is to tally each animal’s
neurons.
Neurons are cells that communicate via electrical charge and
populate the brain and central
nervous system. They are the units
that process information. Although measuring intelligence is
an incredibly difficult affair, Suzana Herculano-Houzel, a Vanderbilt University neuroscientist, and
her colleagues believe their method of quantifying neurons in an
animal’s brain, especially in the
cerebral cortex, is the most accurate tool for judging its capacity
for complex thought.
So which animal comes out
ahead in the Great Neuron Cen-
sus? Brace yourselves, Team Cat.
“Dogs have about twice as many
neurons as cats,” said HerculanoHouzel, who wrote a book about
brains called “The Human Advantage.”
But wait: The average dog is
larger than the average cat. Isn’t it
a given that dogs would have larger brains and therefore more neurons? This is where things get
interesting.
The study found that the overall
mass of one’s gray matter is not
what’s important. In addition to
the dog and the cat, the team examined brains from a domestic ferret,
a banded mongoose, a raccoon, a
striped hyena, an African lion and
a brown bear. Although the brown
bear’s brain was three times as
large as the dog’s, the dog’s had
more neurons. In fact, the brown
bear’s neuron count was similar to
that of the cat, whose brain is about
a tenth its size.
To put some numbers in play
here, a cat has 250 million neurons
in the cerebral cortex to a dog’s
530 million. Both species are
dwarfed by the average human,
who clocks in at 16 billion cortical
neurons.
But one of the more surprising
insights from the research has
nothing to do with cats, dogs or
people. It’s about raccoons, those
“trash pandas” that have long
been dismissed as vermin or vectors for the rabies virus. Within
the raccoon’s cat-size brain lurks a
doglike number of neurons. So
many, in fact, that if you were to
look only at neuron count and
brain size, you might mistake the
raccoon for a small primate.
“And that is saying a lot,” Herculano-Houzel said. “Because something that we found previously is
that there’s a huge difference be-
LINDA DAVIDSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Within the raccoon’s cat-size brain lurks a doglike number of neurons. But that doesn’t mean raccoons
are inclined to share the contents of a bird feeder, as a tufted titmouse discovered last year.
tween how many neurons you find
in a primate or in a non-primate
brain of the same size.”
Jessica Perry Hekman, a veterinary geneticist at MIT and Harvard’s Broad Institute, said there
are a number of reasons to be
cautious in interpreting the
study’s results. For one, she said,
the link between neuron numbers
and intelligence is anything but
proven.
“Which isn’t to say it’s wrong,”
Hekman said, “but that it’s definitely something that they’re just
starting out with and collecting
information on.”
The study also had a small sample size. With the exception of
dogs, which contributed two
brains to the study, each of the
other species was represented by
just one brain. (Good brains are
hard to come by, Hekman acknowledged.)
The study’s comparison of domesticated, wild and zoo animals
may also have had an important
influence on the results, Hekman
said. Researchers have found that
experience affects brain development, especially in early life: Rats
raised in pens with lots of enrichment, such as toys or complicated
territory to explore, develop more
synapses, or connections between
neurons, than rats raised in barren pens. So it’s possible that the
life history of the analyzed hyena
or mongoose played a role in its
brain anatomy. Hekman said she
thinks an animal’s number of synapses, rather than neurons, might
be a more accurate measure of its
S CI EN C E N EW S
intelligence.
But the biggest problem, and
the one Hekman and HerculanoHouzel are trying to solve, is that
intelligence is a tough nut to crack.
In fact, it may be several different
nuts. Each species has distinct
skills and challenges.
“I’m not even really sure we
should call intelligence one trait,”
Hekman said. “It’s a lot of different
things.”
Even if this paper is not the
definitive guide to animal intelligence, it reveals some interesting
data. For instance, why did the
larger carnivores such as the lion
and the bear have fewer neurons
than we’d expect, given their size?
According
to
HerculanoHouzel, it’s not that larger predators can get away with being stu-
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
pid. At the study’s outset, she and
her team guessed that predators
would have significantly more
neurons than the prey they hunted, reasoning that hunting is a
more challenging way of life. Most
lion hunts end in failure, for instance, and every day is a battle to
consume sufficient calories to
make it to the next kill. A wildebeest, on the other hand, can fill
up on plants at its leisure and form
large herds that minimize its
chances of turning into lion lunch.
Instead, the team found that
lions and hyenas had similar ranges of neurons as prey animals of
relative size, including the blesbok
and the kudu.
But wouldn’t it make sense for
evolution to produce increasingly
brainy predators, whose cunning
would translate into catching
more prey? Well, yes, but even
evolution has to work on a budget.
“Neurons, especially neurons in
the cerebral cortex, are extremely
energetically expensive,” Herculano-Houzel said. “There is a point
where you cannot afford both a
huge body and a large number of
neurons.”
The science of comparing animals is still evolving, and
Herculano-Houzel said it would
be great to consistently incorporate neuronal information with
studies of behavior. It would also
be valuable to count the neurons
of many brains from the same
species to get a better range, as
Hekman suggested. The neuron
counts for the two dog brains
came from a mixed breed and a
golden retriever. Who knows what
sorts of differences one might find
between Chihuahuas, mastiffs
and corgis?
For the moment, it seems that
the jury is still out on whether
dogs or cats are smarter — not that
a few million neurons would
change a pet owner’s mind.
Now, who wants to start rooting
for Team Raccoon?
health-science@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/animalia
S C I E N C E S C AN
Human ancestor lived
3.6 million years ago
Museum displays artifacts from ancient urban center in Mexico
Researchers in South Africa
have unveiled what they call “by
far the most complete skeleton of
a human ancestor older than 1.5
million years ever found.”
The University of the Witwatersrand displayed the virtually
complete Australopithecus fossil
last week.
The skeleton dates back
3.6 million years. Its discovery is
expected to help researchers better understand the human ancestor’s appearance and movement.
The researchers say it has
taken 20 years to excavate, clean,
reconstruct and analyze the fragile skeleton.
Dubbed Little Foot, the skeleton was discovered in the Sterkfontein caves, about 25 miles
northwest of Johannesburg,
when small foot bones were
found in rock blasted by miners.
The discovery is a source of
pride for Africans, said Robert
Blumenschine, chief scientist
with the organization that funded the excavation, the Paleontological Scientific Trust.
“Not only is Africa the store-
More than a thousand years
ago, Teotihuacan was one of
Mesoamerica’s most powerful urban centers.
Now it’s one of the world’s most
important archaeological sites,
its pyramids and plazas just as
impressive as they must have
been then.
Teotihuacan’s time as the ancient Americas’ most densely
populated city is long gone, but
the city’s splendor is still alive at
San Francisco’s de Young Museum, which is hosting a major
exhibition on the ancient city.
“Teotihuacan: City of Water,
City of Fire” takes visitors through
recent archaeological discoveries,
including a sculpture-packed
tunnel that provides clues to the
city’s significance. It also delves
into the history and culture of
what was once North America’s
most majestic city. (It lies about
25 miles from Mexico City.)
The pyramids that still stud the
UNESCO World Heritage site take
center stage, represented by objects that showcase their ritual
ARCHAEOLOGY
THEMBA HADEBE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Researchers needed 20 years to excavate, clean, reconstruct and
analyze the fragile skeleton they dubbed Little Foot. The discovery
was made when foot bones were found in rock blasted by miners.
house of the ancient fossil heritage for people the world over, it
was also the wellspring of everything that makes us human,
including our technological
prowess, our artistic ability and
our supreme intellect,” Blumenschine said.
Adam Habib, vice chancellor
of the university, hailed the assembly of the full skeleton.
“This is a landmark achievement for the global scientific
community and South Africa’s
heritage,” Habib said. “It is
through important discoveries
like Little Foot that we obtain a
glimpse into our past, which
helps us to better understand our
common humanity.”
—Associated Press
significance to the city’s residents. But daily life is on display,
too, in the form of jaw-dropping
murals that once adorned the
apartments of the elite and obsidian blades produced by workingclass people.
Curators collaborated with the
Mexican Institute of Anthropology and History to bring to California many objects that have never
been shown in the United States.
The exhibit will stay in San Francisco through Feb. 11, then head to
the Los Angeles County Museum
of Art.
It’s a rare chance not just to
view ancient items but also to
understand their context within
the history, anthropology and archaeology of a city that fell from
greatness centuries before Europeans reached the area. And given
Teotihuacan’s fiery end — the
city’s religious centers were ransacked around A.D. 550 — it’s
pretty amazing that there’s a tale
to tell.
Want a look? The de Young has
a free, interactive digital story
Mollusk museum is tiny,
but it does include slime
BY
S ARAH K APLAN
When I told my roommate that I
was headed to the world’s smallest
mollusk museum, she laughed out
loud.
“World’s smallest?” she repeated. “I could put some shells in a
shoe box, and then I’d have the
smallest mollusk museum.”
Luckily for the museum’s creators, Amanda Schochet and
Charles Philipp, my roommate
seems to be their sole competition.
As far as they are aware, theirs is
not simply the smallest collection
dedicated to the natural history of
mollusks — the phylum of spineless creatures that includes octopuses, clams, snails and slimy sea
worms. It’s the only one.
“Which is too bad,” noted
Schochet, a computational ecologist who used to work for NASA.
“Mollusks really are amazing.”
“Museum” is perhaps a generous term for the structure — it’s
the size of a vending machine —
that was installed at the Brooklyn
Public Library’s central branch in
November. It was built in a rusty
shipping container and contains
shells scavenged from seafood restaurants. Each exhibit-like “chapter” could fit into one of my roommate's shoe boxes.
But Schochet and Philipp
achieve quite a lot in very few square
inches. The museum features,
among
other
artifacts,
a
3-D-printed octopus brain and a liter of slime (the amount required by
a snail to cross the Brooklyn Bridge).
Its base contains slanting panes of
glass onto which holograms of various species are projected: a cuttlefish, a nudibranch, a nautilus.
And it explores the bizarre and
often gross details of mollusk biology with unabashed glee. The
chapter on invertebrate sensory
systems features tiny human figurines with smell receptors on their
arms and legs and with eyes on
their backs — an invitation for
viewers to consider what it might
be like to sense the world as mollusks do. Another display about
deaths of and by mollusks shows a
bivalve shell with a hole drilled in
it. The caption reads: “A moon
snail used its radula” — a tonguelike appendage covered in sharp,
tiny teeth — “to scrape this hole,
then secreted a digestive enzyme
inside and drank up the partially
digested prey like a protein shake.”
The museum exists because of a
misunderstanding. Philipp, a designer, had told Schochet he was
going to New York’s “smallest museum” — an eclectic collection of
everyday artifacts displayed in an
elevator shaft — but Schochet misheard “smallest” as “mollusk.”
“I got really excited,” she recalled, and then was crestfallen to
learn that no such museum existed — in New York or elsewhere.
So the duo decided to open their
MICRO
The museum has figurines representing what humans would look like if we had the same sensory
organs as mollusks.
own.
Two years, several grants and
countless buckets of slime later,
the project has morphed into a
nonprofit they call MICRO. It’s not
an acronym, but they insist on
using capital letters anyway. “It’s
just our belief that small things
can have big repercussions,”
Philipp said.
MICRO’s ambition is to build
dozens of miniature, modular museums about surprising scientific
subjects and install them in unlikely locations around the country: libraries, lobbies, subway stations, the Department of Motor
Vehicles. Schochet said such sites
are “unexploited ecological niches”: accessible (unlike many expensive and hard-to-reach tradi-
tional science museums) and sorely lacking in distractions. Amid
the tedium of a DMV waiting
room, even slugs start to seem
compelling.
Next year, MICRO plans to install three more mollusk museums
at locations around New York. The
nonprofit organization will also
launch a physics-oriented “Perpetual Motion Museum” focused on
the law of conservation of energy.
The Brooklyn Public Library’s
museum, which can be broken down
to fit in the back of Philipp’s Honda
Element, will circulate through several of the system’s branches.
For now it sits in the central
library’s high-ceilinged foyer,
where, on a blustery afternoon in
late November, several unsuspect-
ing visitors found themselves in its
thrall. A computer technician who
had stopped by to do some research
about the stock market spent several long minutes staring at the
tentacled and many-eyed figurines.
“Everything is designed to experience the world a certain way,” he
said thoughtfully. A woman wearing a long wool coat and boots that
clacked loudly on the library’s granite floor took her headphones from
her ears to focus on a section about
environmental threats. A high
school student clutching a stack of
books goggled at the gory description of sea slug sex.
A boy stood on tiptoe to gaze
through an eyepiece at an image of
the world as a baby octopus would
see it: dark, blue and utterly emp-
Teotihuacan: City of Water,
City of Fire
De Young Museum, San Francisco
ALEXANDRE MENEGHINI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Pyramid of the Sun in
Teotihuacan, once one of
Mesoamerica’s most powerful
urban centers.
about the city on its website, and
has even virtually rebuilt Teotihuacan in Minecraft.
— Erin Blakemore
ty. Mollusks, the label explained,
grow up entirely on their own.
Schochet and Philipp have
grand ambitions for their creation. Perhaps the woman with the
headphones will think about
where her waste water goes and be
inspired to install water-saving
appliances. Perhaps the computer
technician will have a greater appreciation for the diversity of life.
Perhaps the high school student
will have more fun in her biology
class. Perhaps the little boy, having
seen the world through another
creature’s eyes, will show more
empathy toward all species.
If that seems like a lot to ask
from a six-foot box of spineless,
mostly brainless animals — well,
Philipp doesn’t disagree. But, he
said, “the museum itself, we view
it as this portal.” It’s an invitation
to learn more.
The MICRO website features an
audio guide and a nine-chapter
“book” about the exhibits in the
museum. It also includes suggestions of actions that fans can take
to protect mollusks and their environment.
“Hopefully, this museum is just
the beginning,” Schochet said.
Which might explain why she
and Philipp weren’t bothered
when I told her about my roommate’s plan to challenge them for
their title.
“We would love for there to be
more small museums around the
world,” Philipp said.
Schochet laughed. “Tell her:
‘Bring it on.’ ”
sarah.kaplan@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Even lower-dose contraceptive pills appear to
increase the risk of breast cancer, at least a bit
This study
The researchers analyzed data
on 1,797,932 women younger than
50 who did not have cancer and
had not undergone fertility treatment. About 60 percent of the
women used some type of hormonal contraception, and about
40 percent did not. In about an
11-year span, 11,517 women got a
breast cancer diagnosis. The
study found that those using
hormonal contraception of any
sort were 20 percent more likely
to have developed breast cancer
than were women who did not
use it. The longer women had
used hormonal contraception,
the greater their risk — increasing from a 9 percent heightened
risk with less than one year of use
to a 38 percent greater risk after
more than 10 years of use.
Risk fell rapidly once women
stopped using hormonal contraception, except among women
who stopped after having used it
for five years or longer. Their
likelihood of developing breast
cancer remained elevated for at
least five more years. Risk varied
some among the different types of
contraception, but major differences were not found. An editorial
that accompanied publication of
the study noted that “these results
do not suggest that any particular
preparation is free of risk.”
Who may be affected?
Women who use hormonal
contraception, which includes
patches, implants, injections,
vaginal rings and intrauterine
devices as well as birth control
pills. It also includes various hormones and combinations, though
generally at lower dosages than
decades ago. In the United States,
about 10 million women use oral
contraceptives, and more than
4 million others use IUDs or
implants.
Caveats
Despite the finding of increased risk, breast cancer is
fairly rare among younger women. The study estimated that for
every 100,000 women, hormone
contraceptive use causes an additional 13 breast cancer cases a
year overall but just 2 for every
100,000 women younger than 35.
That means that while the percentage increases look substantial, in fact they reflected a fairly
small increase in actual cases.
The risk analysis did not take
into account some factors — such
as physical activity, alcohol consumption and breast-feeding history — that can affect the risk for
breast cancer. The study also did
not include women 50 or older,
who are the most likely to develop
breast cancer. The study was
funded by the Novo Nordisk
Foundation.
Find this study
Dec. 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (nejm.
org).
Learn more
Information on birth control is
available at womenshealth.gov
and
plannedparenthood.org
(click on “Learn”).
— Linda Searing
The research described in Quick
Study comes from credible, peerreviewed journals.
Delaying hospice care can limit its value
M
any people who are
near the end of life
wait too long to enter hospice care, according to a recent
study published in the Journal of
the American Geriatrics Society.
In hospice care, attempts to
cure a disease are usually replaced with treatments solely for
pain and suffering, delivered by a
specialized team. It usually includes medical and nursing care,
counseling and social services,
and it can be given at home, in a
nursing home or in a hospital
facility.
People who put off hospice
care might spend months in and
out of hospitals, with their families struggling to attend to them.
“At some point, patients and
their families and doctors realize
that hospice is appropriate, but
that happens perhaps later than
it should,” says study author
Thomas Michael Gill, a professor
of medicine, epidemiology and
investigative medicine, and the
Humana Foundation professor
of geriatric medicine at Yale
University. “When folks are referred to hospice only in the last
days of their life, it’s difficult to
have a meaningful benefit.”
For nearly 16 years, Gill and a
team of researchers followed 754
people, all age 70 and older when
the study began. More than
40 percent of the 562 people who
died during the study entered
hospice care during the last year
of their lives, but the median
time spent in hospice was less
than two weeks.
Many of their most debilitating symptoms — including pain,
nausea, depression and shortness of breath — decreased substantially only after hospice be-
RICH PEDRONCELLI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the United States, about 10 million women use oral
contraceptives, and more than 4 million others use IUDs or
implants.
H EA LTH S CA N
NEUROSCIENCE
Harvard brain experts offer a tour of the
amazing organ that makes us who we are
ISTOCK
gan. So, many might have been
suffering needlessly for months,
says Diane Meier, director of the
Center to Advance Palliative
Care and a professor of geriatrics
and palliative medicine at Mount
Sinai Hospital in New York.
Health crises, emergencyroom visits and hospitalizations
can become routine toward the
end of life, “a very distressing
and stressful experience for patients and family members,”
Meier says. “Remaining in your
own home, a familiar place with
familiar people, is safer and
offers better quality of life.”
What to know about hospice
Hospice has been covered by
Medicare since 1982. Health-care
providers have to certify that a
patient is terminally ill (with six
months or less to live) — which
can be difficult to predict, Meier
and Gill say. People can leave
hospice at any time — because
their condition stabilizes, for example, or they want to pursue
curative treatments again. Hospice care can also be extended
beyond six months.
“Many people are fearful that
if they choose hospice, they won’t
be able to return to mainstream
medicine should they improve or
new treatments become available — that’s not true,” Meier
says. “Hospice is not a one-way
street.”
And some evidence suggests
that hospice patients live just as
long as or even longer than
similarly ill patients who are not
in hospice.
When is it the right time?
People with terminal illnesses
and their doctors should be having ongoing discussions about
goals and priorities, Gill says —
ideally long before hospice is
broached.
“Often, patients will say, ‘I’m
more interested in the quality
rather than the quantity of my
remaining life,’” he says, and that
can help inform future discussions about end-of-life care.
If you have not discussed hospice with a doctor, for yourself or
a loved one, two signs suggest
when it might be time to raise
the topic, Meier says.
The first is when someone is
having increasing difficulty with
self-care, struggling with tasks
such as walking, getting out of a
chair, bathing, dressing and using the toilet. Hospice care is
designed to help with all of those
activities. The second is the presence of symptoms such as severe
pain, shortness of breath, hopelessness, depression and profound fatigue. In hospice, “most
of them can be improved or
eliminated,” Meier says.
“It’s challenging to have honest discussions with patients and
families about death and the
dying process,” Gill says. “But
leaving the conversation until
the very end makes it more
difficult.”
© Copyright 2017, Consumer Reports Inc.
Consumer Reports is an
independent, nonprofit organization
that works side by side with
consumers to create a fairer, safer,
and healthier world. CR does not
endorse products or services, and
does not accept advertising. CR has
no financial relationship with
advertisers in this publication. Read
more at ConsumerReports.org.
Patient couldn’t speak for himself. His DNR tattoo did.
BY
Your brain may be the most
miraculous thing about you.
Think about it: Its processing
power would put the most powerful computer to shame.It’s the
control center for a dizzying number of physical tasks. And it
makes you you — not bad for a big
lump of grayish matter.
So why not feed your brain by
learning more about it? It’s easy,
thanks to the Harvard Brain Tour,
a virtual journey through brains’
innate capacities and the discoveries they’ve prompted throughout the century.
Designed by the Harvard Brain
Science Initiative and the Harvard Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, the tour is
part museum, part classroom.
You can read the weird story of
Phineas Gage, who lived through
history’s most famous brain injury when a javelin-like tamping
iron sliced through his skull during an explosion at a railroad site.
He lived, though he experienced
some pretty dire psychological
and physical effects, and now his
skull is part of Harvard’s Warren
Anatomical Museum.
If scientific discoveries are
more your style, the tour offers
in-depth information on what is
called the “brainbow,” developed
E3
EE
FROM CONSUMER REPORTS
QUI CK S TUD Y
The question
The association between birth
control pills and breast cancer
was identified years ago. However, many women and their doctors have assumed that newer,
lower-dose pills — and other hormonal delivery methods beyond
the pill — were much safer. Is
there still a risk?
EZ
L INDSEY B EVER
Doctors in Miami faced an unusual ethical dilemma when an
unconscious, deteriorating patient was brought into the emergency room with the words “Do
Not Resuscitate” across his chest.
The 70-year-old man was taken
to Jackson Memorial Hospital,
where doctors made their startling discovery: a “DNR” chest
tattoo that seemed to convey the
patient’s end-of-life wishes. The
word “Not” was underlined, and
the tattoo included a signature.
It left the medical team grappling with myriad ethical and
legal questions. Was it an accurate representation of what the
patient wanted? Was it legally
sound? Should they honor it?
The case was detailed recently
in the New England Journal of
Medicine, in a report that laid out
the medical team’s struggle for
answers.
“This patient’s tattooed DNR
request produced more confusion than clarity, given concerns
about its legality and likely unfounded beliefs that tattoos
might represent permanent re-
minders of regretted decisions
made while the person was intoxicated,” the paper’s authors wrote.
Gregory Holt, a critical-care
physician and lead author of the
paper, said in an interview, “I
think a lot of people in medicine
have joked around about getting
such a tattoo — and then when
you finally see one, there’s sort of
this surprise and shock on your
face. Then the shock hits you
again because you actually have
to think about it.”
Holt said the patient, who had
a history of pulmonary disease,
lived at a nursing home but was
found intoxicated and unconscious on the street and brought
to Jackson Memorial.
He arrived with no identification, no family or friends, and no
way to tell doctors whether he
wanted to live or die. Holt said the
man had an infection that led to
septic shock, which causes organ
failure and extremely low blood
pressure.
When his blood pressure started to drop, emergency room doctors called Holt, who specializes
in pulmonary disease — and they
first agreed not to honor the
tattoo, “invoking the principle of
not choosing an irreversible path
when faced with uncertainty,” according to the case study.
They gave the man intravenous
fluids, blood-pressure medica-
“I really wanted to talk
to him to see whether
that tattoo truly
reflected what he
wanted for his
end-of-life wishes.”
Gregory Holt, critical-care physician at
Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami
tion and antibiotics to buy themselves more time to make the
life-or-death decision. The medical team used a breathing mask
on the man, Holt said, but struggled the most with the decision to
hook him up to a machine that
would breathe for him.
“We had a man I couldn’t talk
to,” Holt told The Washington
Post, “and I really wanted to talk
to him to see whether that tattoo
truly reflected what he wanted for
his end-of-life wishes.”
For situations that arise outside hospitals, Florida requires
DNR orders to be printed on
yellow paper and signed by a
physician and by the patient or a
surrogate. But inside hospitals,
doctors can talk to a patient or to
the patient’s family and friends to
determine what the end-of-life
wishes are.
Because the patient was unconscious and doctors at Jackson
Memorial had never seen a DNR
tattoo, they called an ethics consultant, who determined that
doctors could presume the tattoo
was an accurate reflection of the
patient’s wishes. (Social workers
were later able to track down the
man’s proper DNR paperwork,
leaving doctors relieved, Holt
said.)
The man, who was never publicly identified, died the next
morning.
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
Why it’s gratifying to gaze into your baby’s eyes
Harvard Brain Tour
braintour.harvard.edu
BY
ISTOCK
when neuroscientists figured out
how to illuminate the wirelike
dendrites and axons that connect
neurons to one another inside the
brain.
Or maybe you’d like to become
more, well, brainy. No problem:
In addition to videos from Harvard brain experts, there’s a free
fundamentals of neuroscience
course that will teach you about
everything from anatomy to the
chemical signals that make the
brain tick.
Heady stuff? Sure. But your
brain’s so cool, it deserves the
spotlight.
— Erin Blakemore
H EA LTH & S CI EN CE
Editor: Laura Helmuth • Assistant Editors: Kathy Lally, Margaret Shapiro
• Art Director: Alla Dreyvitser • Advertising Information: Ron Ulrich,
202-334-5289, ronald.ulrich@washpost.com • To contact us: Email:
health-science@washpost.com Telephone: 202-334-5031 Mail: The
Washington Post, Health, 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071
L AURA S ANDERS
When you lock eyes with a
baby, it’s hard to look away. For
one thing, babies are fun to look
at. They’re so tiny and cute and
interesting. For another, babies
love to stare back. I remember my
babies staring at me so hard, with
their eyebrows raised and unblinking eyes wide open. They
would have killed in a staring
contest.
This mutual adoration of staring may be for a good reason.
When a baby and an adult make
eye contact, their brain waves fall
in sync, too, a new study finds.
And those shared patterns of
brain activity may actually pave
the way for better communication between baby and adult:
Babies make more sweet, little
sounds when their eyes are
locked onto an adult who is looking back. The scientists reported
the results online Nov. 28 in the
Proceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences.
Psychologist Victoria Leong of
the University of Cambridge and
Nanyang Technological University in Singapore and colleagues
invited infants into the lab for two
experiments. In the first, the team
outfitted 17 8-month-old babies
with EEG caps, headwear covered
with electrodes that measure the
collective behavior of nerve cells
across the brain. The infants
watched a video in which an
experimenter, also outfitted in an
EEG cap, sang a nursery rhyme
while looking either straight
ahead at the baby, at the baby but
ISTOCK
with her head turned at an angle
of 20 degrees, or away from the
baby and with her head turned at
a 20-degree angle.
When the researcher looked at
the baby (either facing the baby
or with her head slightly turned),
the babies’ brains responded,
showing activity patterns that
started to closely resemble those
of the researcher.
The second experiment moved
the test into real life. The same
researcher from the video sat
near 19 different babies. Again,
both the babies and the researcher wore EEG caps to record their
brain activity. The real-life eye
contact prompted brain patterns
similar to those seen in the video
experiment: When eyes met,
brain activity fell into sync; when
eyes wandered, brain activity
didn’t match as closely.
The baby’s and the adult’s
brain activity appeared to get in
sync by meeting in the middle.
When gazes were shared, a baby’s
brain waves became more like the
researcher’s, and the researcher’s
more like the baby’s. That finding
is “giving new insights into infants’ amazing abilities to connect to, and tune in with, their
adult caregivers,” Leong says.
What are simpatico brain
waves actually good for, you
might ask. Well, researchers don’t
know exactly, but they have some
ideas. When high school students’
brain waves were in sync with one
another, the kids reported being
more engaged in the classroom, a
recent study found. And when
two adults reach a mutual understanding, their brains synchronize, too, says another study.
These findings hint that such synchronization lets signals flow easily between two brains, though
Leong says that much more research needs to be done before
scientists understand synchronization’s relevance to babies’ communication and learning.
That easy sending of signals is
something that happened between the babies and the adult,
too. When the experimenter was
looking at the babies, the babies
made more vocalizations. And in
turn, these sweet sounds seemed
to have made the experimenter’s
brain waves even more similar to
those of the babies.
It’s a beautiful cycle, it seems,
when eyes and brains meet. And
that meeting spot is probably
where some interesting learning
happens, for both adult and baby.
— Science News
E4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
aging well
‘Vital energy’ was
once key to aging
HISTORY FROM E1
take form, shaped in great part by
a medical theory that has long
since been debunked.
During this period, doctors believed that old age occurred when
the body ran out of “vital energy”
— which was no mere metaphor.
The stuff was thought to be tangible, literally present in the body
and its fluids. Everyone had a
finite reservoir of vital energy
that gradually became depleted
over a lifetime. When you began
to run low on vitality, you were
old; death followed when the
tank was empty.
For the era’s doctors, the concept conveniently solved the mystery of why illness seemed far
more curable in the young than
the old. Physicians supposed that
the loss of vitality created a “predisposing debility,” as one historian has put it, making the older
body vulnerable to a host of
secondary maladies. The theory
also fit with American religious
thought as influenced by the Second Great Awakening, which
peaked in the 1830s. The amount
of vitality you were endowed with
at birth was simply your lot.
Whether you used it well or
squandered it, however, was your
personal responsibility.
And which activities spent vitality most profligately, leading to
premature disability and death?
All the fun ones, of course. The
specifics varied depending on
which expert you consulted.
“Some endorsed the use of wines;
others demanded abstinence;
still others debated the merits of
vegetables or red meat,” writes
historian Carole Haber. Regardless of whom you asked, moderation was always the key: “If death
resulted from an exhausted supply of energy, then the goal was to
retain it at all cost . . . by eating
the correct foods, wearing the
proper clothes, and performing
(or refraining from) certain activities.”
Sex — specifically, sex of nonprocreative or self-pleasing varieties — was to be avoided at all
costs. For men in particular, it
was evident when one’s vitality
was on the wane: Things stopped
working as they once had in the
marital bed. Doctors inevitably
told these poor fellows that it was
all their fault. Personal indiscretions — whether of recent vintage
or way back in semi-forgotten
youth — had added up.
In continental Europe in the
1850s and 1860s, vitality theory
began to wane as French and
German pathologists realized
that the lesions, fibrous tissue
and calcium deposits they discovered in older people’s cadavers
could provide an explanation for
some of the complaints of old age.
But in the United States and
Britain, many of those aware of
these continental findings simply
doubled down on their existing
beliefs: Any wasting observed in
cadavers was simply due to the
loss of vital energy.
Perhaps the best evidence for
that point of view was the moment in a patient’s life when
vitality began to appreciably decline, which English-speaking
physicians named the “climacteric period,” or “climacteric disease.” In women, the climacteric
period was believed to begin between ages 45 and 55 and was
associated with menopause; in
men, it took place between 50 and
75 and was indicated by such
signs as wrinkles, white hair and
complaints of feebleness.
In some cases, this “extraordinary decline of corporeal powers,” as one physician termed it,
according to the book “Beyond
Sixty-Five: The Dilemma of Old
Age in America’s Past,” seemed to
progress rapidly, even violently —
surely the result of vitality levels
reaching dangerous lows. If you
were in the right age bracket and
betrayed any signs of the climacteric, the implication was clear:
You needed to immediately drop
whatever you were doing to conserve what was left of your energy
— avoiding “excesses and undue
exertions,” as one doctor wrote in
1853. And unfortunately, if you
were a living, breathing human,
you probably exhibited several of
the warning signs. “Headache,
vertigo, faintness, ‘heat flushes,’
emotional waves, phases of moral
perversity, irritability, querulous
impatience, even intellectual disturbance (especially of memory
and of attention) prevail,” a doctor catalogued in 1899.
Insanity was the most troubling possible climacteric diagnosis, in part because it was
loosely defined. Earlier, at the
start of the 19th century, physicians had attempted to differentiate abnormal dementia from the
more standard, benign cognitive
effects of aging, but by century’s
COURTESY OF THE PUBLISHER
EDDIE WORTH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sigmund Freud insisted in
1904 that “old people are no
longer educable” and that
those “near or over the age
of fifty lack . . . the plasticity
of the psychic processes
upon which the therapy
depends.” He was 48 years
old at the time.
end, most agreed (incorrectly)
that almost all older adults experienced the same sort of insanity,
differing only in degree.
As oldness became synonymous with the loss of mental
flexibility, joie de vivre and selfcontrol, the centuries-old vision
of the aged as fonts of wisdom
went out the window. One writer
blamed the Crédit Mobilier scandal — a massive case of railroad
graft that rattled American politics in 1872 — on the advanced
age of the participants.
Even Sigmund Freud, who was
otherwise busily upending all
conventional wisdom about the
human mind, insisted in 1904
that “old people are no longer
educable” and that those “near or
over the age of fifty lack . . . the
plasticity of the psychic processes
upon which the therapy depends.” Tellingly, he was 48 years
old at the time.
By the dawn of the 20th century, once you’d become visibly
old, no matter your apparent
health, no matter how sharp your
mind seemed, all you could hope
to do was withdraw and rest,
saving your vitality for that final
sprint. Crucially, you could no
longer work; old age now
changed you from an economic
producer to a consumer, from
healthy-as-a-default to a patient-
despite-health.
Eventually, insights from the
medical field of pathology discredited vital-energy theory, but
only after it molded the development of a long-lasting set of
social, cultural and economic institutions. The first dedicated
old-age homes, the rise of public
and private pensions, the normalization of retirement both as
something bad your boss could
do to you and also a new stage of
life — these all marinated in
vital-energy theory for decades
before emerging fully baked into
the 20th century, complete with
implications for what it meant to
be an “older person.”
Of the resulting notion of oldness we still hold onto, perhaps
the most inaccurate aspect is its
specificity. “The old” make up a
population so diverse that it almost defies characterization. Depending when you decide old age
begins, the group can be said to
account for people found anywhere along a 50-plus-year span
of life, with every imaginable
level of physiological health, cognitive ability and wealth represented, along with every type of
personality; ideologies of every
stripe; and every race, nationality, creed, gender and sexual identity to be found on this blue
Earth. The notion that there exists one single state of older being
defies all logic.
Today, populations around the
world are aging rapidly, and the
need to jettison misconceptions
from history is becoming urgent.
It’s long past time to build a
better old age: one that is less
arbitrary and more intentional
than our past.
health-science@washpost.com
This is an excerpt from Coughlin’s
book “The Longevity Economy:
Unlocking the World’s FastestGrowing, Most Misunderstood
Market” published by PublicAffairs
Books. The excerpt was adapted for
The Washington Post by Yoquinto.
More doctors embrace the notion that ‘deprescribing’ drugs can help patients
PRESCRIPTIONS FROM E1
blood pressure develops swollen
ankles, so a doctor prescribes a
diuretic. The diuretic causes a
potassium deficiency, resulting in
a medicine to treat low potassium. But that triggers nausea,
which is treated with another
drug, which causes confusion,
which in turn is treated with
more medication.
For many patients, problems
arise when they are discharged
from the hospital on a host of new
medications, layered on top of old
ones.
Alice Cave, who divides her
time between Alexandria, Va.,
and Tucson, discovered this when
she traveled to Cheyenne, Wyo.,
after her 87-year-old aunt was
sent home following treatment
for a stroke in 2015.
Before her hospitalization,
Cave said, her aunt, a retired
telephone company employee
whose vision is impaired by glaucoma, had been taking seven
drugs per day. Five new ones were
added in the hospital, Cave said.
“She came home and had a
huge bag of pills, half of which she
was already taking, plus pages
and pages of instructions,” she
said. Some were supposed to be
taken with food, some on an
empty stomach. Cave said she
spent several hours sorting the
medications into a giant blue pill
box. “It was crazy — and scary.”
Cave said she felt helpless to do
much; her aunt’s doctors didn’t
question the need for more drugs.
When Shannon Brownlee’s
mother was taken to an emergency room recently to determine
whether her arm pain might signal a heart attack (it didn’t) a
cardiologist prescribed five new
drugs — including an opioid — to
the small dose of a diuretic she
had been taking to control her
blood pressure.
Brownlee, senior vice president of the Lown Institute, a
Boston-based group that seeks to
improve health-care quality by
reducing unnecessary treatment,
said that when her brother questioned the necessity of so many
new drugs for a woman in her late
80s, the specialist replied frostily,
“I don’t see anything wrong with
prescribing lots of medication to
older people.”
Bring the pill bottles
“This problem has gotten
worse because the average American is on a lot more medications
than 15 years ago,” said cardiologist Rita Redberg, a professor of
medicine at the University of California at San Francisco.
Studies bolster Redberg’s contention: A 2015 report found that
the share of Americans of all ages
who regularly took at least five
prescription drugs nearly doubled between 2000 and 2012,
from 8 percent to 15 percent.
University of Michigan researchers recently reported that the
percentage of people older than
65 taking at least three psychiatric drugs more than doubled in
the nine years beginning in 2004.
Nearly half of those taking the
potent medications, which include antipsychotic drugs used to
treat schizophrenia, had no
mental-health diagnosis.
Redberg and other doctors are
trying to counter the blizzard of
prescriptions through a grass-roots
movement called “deprescribing”— systematically discontinuing medicines that are inappropriate, duplicative or unnecessary.
Interest in deprescribing,
which was pioneered in Canada
and Australia, is growing in the
United States, bolstered by physician-led efforts, such as the fiveyear-old Choosing Wisely campaign. The Beers Criteria, a list of
overused and potentially unsafe
drugs for seniors first published
in 1991, has been followed by
other tools aimed at curbing unnecessary drug use.
“Lots of different medications
get started for reasons that are
never supported by evidence,”
said Redberg, editor in chief of
JAMA Internal Medicine. “In general, we like the idea of taking a
pill” a lot better than non-drug
measures, such as improved eating habits or exercise.
“That’s what we were taught as
physicians: to prescribe drugs,”
said Ranit Mishori, a professor of
family medicine at Georgetown
GETTY IMAGES
“This problem has
gotten worse because
the average American is
on a lot more
medications than
15 years ago.”
cardiologist Rita Redberg
University and a proponent of
deprescribing. “We are definitely
not taught how to take people off
meds.”
Kathryn McGrath, a Philadelphia geriatrician, said she tries to
begin every appointment with a
review of medications, which she
asks patients to bring with them.
“I think having the pill bottles” is
much more powerful than a list,
said McGrath, who has written
about how to deprescribe safely.
Although support is growing,
deprescribing faces formidable
obstacles.
Among them, experts say, is a
paucity of research about how
best to do it, relentless advertising that encourages consumers to
ask their doctors for new drugs,
and a strong disinclination —
baked into the culture of medicine — to countermand what another physician has ordered.
Time constraints play a significant role. So do performance
measures that are viewed as a
mandate to prescribe drugs even
when they make virtually no
sense, such as giving statins to
terminally ill patients.
A reluctance to overrule
“There’s a reluctance to tinker
or change things too much,” said
University of Michigan geriatric
psychiatrist Donovan Maust, who
labels the phenomenon “clinical
inertia.” When inheriting a new
patient, Maust said, doctors tend
to assume that if a colleague
prescribed a drug, there must be a
good reason for it — even if they
don’t know what it is. Maust said
he tries to combat inertia by
writing time-limited orders for
medication.
He recently began treating a
man in his 80s with dementia
who was taking eight psychiatric
drugs — each of which can cause
significant side effects and most
of which had been prescribed for
undetermined reasons.
“It’s very typical to see a patient
who has a few episodes of reflux
and is then put on a [proton pump
inhibitor, or PPI] and a few years
later are still taking it,” said Georgetown’s Mishori. Many experts say
the heartburn drugs are overprescribed, and studies have linked
their long-term use to fractures,
dementia and premature death.
“This is a cultural problem and
an awareness problem exacerbated by the fragmentation of care,”
said Brownlee, the author of
“Overtreated: Why Too Much
Medicine is Making Us Sicker and
Poorer.” Many doctors, she added,
have never heard of deprescribing.
Before his death several years
ago, doctors advised Brownlee’s
father, a hospice patient, to continue taking a statin, along with
several other medications. None
would improve or extend his life,
and all had potentially harmful
side effects.
Rx: What for?
Older people taking lots of
medication was what Canadian
pharmacist Barbara Farrell encountered when she began working at a geriatric hospital in Ottawa nearly two decades ago. Her
experience, she said, was a catalyst for the Canadian Deprescribing Network, a consortium of
researchers, physicians, pharmacists and health advocates she
co-founded. The group seeks to
drastically reduce inappropriate
medication use among Canadian
seniors by 2020.
Farrell, a clinical scientist at
the Bruyere Research Institute,
has also helped write guidelines,
used by doctors in the United
States and other countries, to
safely deprescribe certain classes
of widely used drugs, including
PPIs and sedatives.
“I’ve found a lot of receptivity”
to the guidelines among physicians, Farrell said. “We know
there are pockets around Canada
and the world where they’re being implemented.”
One of Farrell’s most memorable successes involved a woman in
her late 70s who was used a wheelchair and was nearly comatose.
“She would literally slide out of
her chair,” Farrell recalled. The
woman was taking 27 drugs four
times per day and had been diagnosed with dementia and a host
of other ailments.
After reviewing her medications, Farrell and her colleagues
were able to weed out duplicative
and potentially harmful drugs
and reduce the doses of others. A
year later, the woman was “like a
different person”: She was able to
walk with a cane and live mostly
independently, and she reported
that her doctor said she did not
have dementia after all.
When Farrell asked another
patient why she was taking thyroid medication, the woman replied that her doctor had prescribed it for weight loss after her
last pregnancy — in 1955.
“The patients I see are the tip of
the iceberg,” Farrell said.
One way to facilitate deprescribing, Farrell said, is to require
doctors to record why a drug is
being prescribed, a proposal the
deprescribing network has made
to Canadian health officials. A
recent study by a team from the
Boston VA Healthcare System
found strong support among doctors for this concept.
While some doctors are reluctant to discontinue medications,
patients can be wary, too.
“They may say, ‘I tried stopping
my sleeping pill and I couldn’t
sleep the next night, so I figured I
needed it,’ ” Farrell said. “Nobody
explained to them that rebound
insomnia, which can occur after
stopping sleeping pills, lasts
three to five days.”
Mishori said that she deprescribes only one medication at a
time so she can detect any problem that arises from that change.
And, she adds, “I never take people off of a medication without
doing something else.” In the case
of heartburn drugs, she might
first recommend taking the drug
only when needed, not continuously. Or she might suggest a
safer alternative, such as an overthe-counter antacid tablet.
Maust, the geriatric psychiatrist, recommends that doctors
actively focus on “the big picture”
and carefully weigh whether the
benefits of a drug outweigh its
risks.
“In geriatrics,” he said, “less is
more.”
health-science@washpost.com
Boodman is a regular contributor to
Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit
health news service that is an
editorially independent part of the
Kaiser Family Foundation.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E5
EE
aging well
Yoga can be great as you age, but watch out for injuries
BY
C AROL K RUCOFF
such as “Yoga Over 50,” “Gentle
Yoga” or “Senior Yoga.”
Y
oga may hold a key to
aging well, suggests a
growing body of research
into its potential benefits
for body and mind — benefits that
include reducing heart rate and
blood pressure, relieving anxiety
and depression, and easing back
pain. One recent study even
raised the possibility of positive
changes in biological markers of
aging and stress in people who do
yoga.
So it’s no surprise that the number of yoga practitioners in the
United States has more than doubled to 36.7 million over the last
decade, with health benefits the
main reason people practice, according to the Yoga in America
Study conducted last year on behalf of Yoga Journal and the Yoga
Alliance.
While yoga enthusiasts are often pictured as young and bendy,
the reality, according to the Yoga
in America study, is that 17 percent are in their 50s and 21 percent are age 60 and older.
Along with this upsurge of interest has been an upsurge in
injuries, particularly among older
practitioners. “Participants aged
65 years and older have a greater
rate of injury from practicing
yoga when compared with other
age groups,” researchers wrote
last year in a study of nearly
30,000 yoga-related injuries seen
in U.S. hospital emergency departments from 2001 to 2014.
“While there are many health
benefits to practicing yoga, participants and those wishing to
become participants should confer with a physician prior to engaging in physical activity and
practice only under the guidance
of certified instructors.”
As a yoga therapist who has
been teaching in medical settings
for nearly 20 years, I have found it
distressingly common to hear
about the negative experiences
and injuries people have sustained in yoga classes. The stories
my students relate suggest classes
that were too difficult for them
and/or were taught by an inexperienced or poorly trained instructor. Even instructors who are
trained to teach able, young students typically have a limited understanding of safety considerations that are essential when
working with middle-aged and
older bodies and people with such
health challenges as rotator cuff
injuries, arthritis, glaucoma, hypertension and heart disease.
Fortunately, there is a growing
recognition of the importance of
safe yoga practice along with professionalization of the field. To
practice yoga while reducing the
risks, here are five strategies to
Hatha yoga is the name for any
type of yoga that teaches physical
postures. This means that virtually all yoga classes in the West are
hatha yoga. But when a class is
marketed as hatha yoga, it generally signifies a non-gimmicky approach to basic postures and
breathing, which may be a good
starting place. Viniyoga and Kripalu yoga are relatively gentle
styles that may be appropriate for
people with health concerns. Restorative yoga involves using supports (such as blankets and yoga
blocks or bolsters) to prop students into passive poses that promote profound rest. Hospitalbased wellness and integrative
medicine centers may offer classes designed for people with specific ailments such as cancer or
back pain.
Find a well-trained, experienced teacher. Ask prospective
NADEZHDA1906/GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
How to find a yoga instructor who has had the training needed to serve students well
W
hile yoga’s roots are
ancient, the modern
yoga class is a
relatively recent phenomenon,
as is the concept of a yoga
teacher-training program. But
as yoga has become big
business: With nearly
$17 billion spent on yoga
clothing, equipment, classes
and accessories in the United
States in 2016, the number of
yoga teachers, training
programs and practice
options has skyrocketed.
There are two main
organizations that provide
credentials for yoga teachers
and yoga therapists:
The Yoga Alliance
represents 83,000 teachers
and 5,500 schools. Founded in
1999, the nonprofit operates a
registry that lists its teachers
and training programs. The
group’s most basic instructor
credential, RYT, can be earned
after completing a 200-hour
training at a registered yoga
school, or RYS. Teachers can
add an “E” for “experienced”
to this title (E-RYT) after
having two years of experience
and at least 1,000 hours of
teaching. For more
information, visit
yogaalliance.org.
The International
Association of Yoga Therapists
has 5,700 members in more
than 50 countries. Yoga
therapy typically involves oneon-one instruction geared to
empowering an individual to
progress toward improved
health. Last year, the
association established a
certification program with the
credential IAYT-Certified Yoga
Therapist, or C-IAYT, which
requires at least 800 hours of
training beyond the
prerequisite 200-hour yoga
teacher training. To learn
more, go to iayt.org.
In addition to these broadly
based groups, a growing
number of specialty programs
offer advanced trainings for
yoga teachers who want to
work with special populations.
These include Yoga for
Arthritis (arthritis.yoga), Yoga
for Cancer and Yoga for
Chronic Pain (both at
mindfulyogaworks.com/
teacher-training) and Yoga for
Seniors (yoga4seniors.com).
Full disclosure: I am codirector of Yoga for Seniors.
Graduate-level yoga studies
are offered at a few colleges,
including the Maryland
University of Integrative
Health, which offers a master
of science in yoga therapy, and
Loyola Marymount University
in California, which offers a
master of arts in yoga studies.
instructors about their credentials [see sidebar about yoga credentials], how long they’ve taught
yoga and whether they’ve had
special training and/or experience teaching older people. Ask to
watch a class to see if it’s suitable,
which is also a good way to assess
the instructor. A good yoga teacher will act as a guide, helping
students explore what works best
for them as they try each posture.
For people with health challenges, working one-on-one with a
certified yoga therapist can be
ideal.
Talk to your care provider. If you
have medical issues, get guidance
about specific movement precautions. For example, people with
glaucoma may be advised to avoid
“head-down” positions, which
may increase pressure in the eye.
Hot yoga may be problematic for
people with heart conditions because high temperatures can increase cardiac workload. Recognize, however, that many doctors
know little about yoga and may
assume you’re planning to stand
on your head. Tell your provider
that you’d like to try gentle yoga
consisting of simple movements,
stretches and breathing practices.
— Carol Krucoff
Let go of excuses that you’re too
old. You don’t have to be young or
help older adults — as well as
people with health challenges —
age well with yoga:
Start where you are, not where
you think you should be. If you
are new to yoga, try a beginner’s
class — even if you’re fit and active
— because yoga is not just about
what you do, it’s about how you do
it. Unlike Western exercise, the
yogic approach is to balance effort with relaxation, which can be
surprisingly difficult for many
people used to our culture’s emphasis on striving, competing and
being “in it to win it.” In fact,
learning not to push yourself, or
rush, or be ambitious to look a
certain way, can be one of the
most challenging (and therapeutic) parts of the practice. Give
yourself time to learn how to
move into a posture to a point
where you feel challenged but not
strained.
Recognize that styles of yoga
vary widely. Yoga classes range
from vigorous and athletic to relaxing and restorative — with a
confusing array of trendy hybrids
such as yoga with goats and kittens, and yoga offered on a paddleboard. To find a class designed
for mature bodies, look for names
fit or flexible to try yoga. If you can
breathe, you can practice yoga.
health-science@washpost.com
Krucoff is a yoga therapist at Duke
Integrative Medicine in Durham, N.C.,
and co-author of “Relax Into Yoga for
Seniors: A Six-Week Program for
Strength, Balance, Flexibility and
Pain Relief.”
Mom dug in her heels at the thought of accepting help from her daughters
LESSONS FROM E1
need for help but from her heelsdug-in resistance to accepting it
and my own resistance to usurping her autonomy.
Desperate to stay in her Florida
condominium where she had
lived for 35 years, my mother
pretended to be doing well on her
own, even after she started to
slow down. She never told me
that a neighbor was bringing her
dinner several times a week or
that she had stopped going to
book club. I pretended, too —
telling her I was coming to visit
because of a business meeting
nearby when really I just wanted
to check on her, and then accepting her apparent well-being at
face value even as she edged into
her late 80s.
Eventually, as Mom approached 90, her best friend, who
saw her several times a week,
wrote to me and made me face the
truth. My mother could not live
on her own forever, and it wasn’t
fair or even possible to expect her
friends, who were also getting
older, to step in. She would need
to move somewhere closer to
either Barbara or me.
Mom’s reaction to the idea was
heartbreaking. “I’m too old to
start over somewhere new,” she
said, and I knew we had waited
much too long to have this discussion. My mother’s condo and the
surrounding community had become a comfortable cocoon. She
couldn’t seem to understand that
staying there, even with some
kind of in-home help, would have
been a true burden on Barbara
and me; that in case of a fall or
some other health crisis, one of us
would have to fly in, leaving our
own families and work.
My insistence that we preserve
Mom’s autonomy for her sake, not
ours — so that she would not feel
like a burden — only made things
worse. I refused to acknowledge
that her overwhelming sadness
and fear made it impossible for
her to assess the situation clearly. I
wanted her to make the choice,
and I prolonged everyone’s agony
by exploring unrealistic options in
my desire to let her have her way.
I looked for services that would
allow Mom to stay in her condo —
things like personal care, meal
preparation, car/van transportation. At that time, in 2006 and
2007, there were fewer options. I
also considered an assisted living
facility near her condo so that she
could, at least, stay in her own
community. But her friend told
me this would only isolate her
more as still-active senior friends
would not be likely to visit. Also,
this option still kept Mom too far
from either me or Barbara.
My mother’s friend again provided the necessary dose of reality. “You and Barbara will have to
make this decision,” she wrote.
With a mixture of relief and sadness, we chose Mom’s new home
— an “independent” apartment in
an adult congregate living facility
near Barbara’s house in North
Carolina.
My mother “let” me handle the
packing up and selling of her
Florida condo. I was, honestly,
grateful. Whenever she asked for
help or willingly accepted the
help that Barbara and I offered,
that’s when any burden lifted.
Mom immediately loved her
North Carolina home. She made
friends and joined all the activities offered. Our new normal lasted about a year, until the day she
fell and cut her arm. The deep
wound required surgery and a
two-day hospital stay, and it heralded a steeper curve of decline.
Her reflexes slowed, and simple
tasks of daily living — bathing,
dressing, even walking — grew
FAMILY PHOTO
Melanie P. Merriman with her
mother, Mary Eleanor Pratt, in
1996.
Desperate to stay in her
Florida condominium
where she had lived for
35 years, my mother
pretended to be doing
well on her own.
perilous. Still she resisted every
accommodation — the medicalalert lanyard I installed over her
objections, the walker she needed
to stay upright, and the home
health aide to assist with showering and dressing. And again, as
much as Barbara and I wanted
her to accept help so that we
could have peace of mind, we
couldn’t and wouldn’t force her.
Although Mom gradually consented to some assistance and
was always delighted with the
way it improved her quality of
life, her resistance to additional
care never lessened. She refused
an evening home health aide,
and, as usual, we were reluctant
to force the issue. The result was
every adult child’s nightmare:
Mom fell before getting into bed
and lay on the floor, bruised and
disoriented, until morning. She
spent eight days in the hospital
and eight weeks in inpatient rehabilitation.
At this point, Barbara and I had
learned our lesson. We presented
Mom’s next move, to the memory
unit at the assisted living facility
across the parking lot from her
apartment, as “what everyone,
including your doctor, thinks is
best.” We decorated the room
with her favorite things, and
breathed a sigh of relief when she
declared it “lovely.” Six months
later, with us by her, she died
right there in her own bed.
Maybe, as Shakespeare wrote,
“All’s well that ends well,” but if I
could do it over again, there are
things I would do differently.
First, I would pay better attention to the signs that my mother
needed help as she got older: her
growing isolation as she stepped
back from community activities
and stopped driving except to
places she went often, her weight
loss and her forgetfulness. I
would see that her ability to
manage alone in her condo did
not mean that she could thrive
there.
Second, I would be more realistic about the overall trajectory
and consequences of aging. I had
worked with hospices. I had studied aging and illness. I knew my
mother would decline both physically and mentally. Still, the longer she seemed to do well, the
easier it was to engage in magical
thinking, also known as denial.
Finally, I would talk to her
about a plan for her future long
before either of us felt it was time.
I now know that when everyone is
ready to talk, it’s already too late
to be proactive.
Barbara and I each have our
own ideas about what did and
didn’t constitute a burden during
my mother’s years on what I call
the tightrope of aging — the stage
between active independent living and end-of-life. What I do
know is that given all our frailties
as human beings, Barbara and I
did the best we could — and so did
Mom.
health-science@washpost.com
Merriman is the author of “Holding
the Net: Caring for My Mother on the
Tightrope of Aging,” winner for
autobiography/memoir in the
American Book Fest’s 2017 Best
Book Awards.
E6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
aging well
Where you die can a≠ect how you die
A NDREW M AC P HERSON
AND R AVI B . P ARIKH
Where do you want to die?
When asked, the vast majority of
Americans answer with two
words: “At home.”
Despite living in a country that
delivers some of the best health
care in the world, we often settle
for end-of-life care that is inconsistent with our wishes and administered in settings that are
unfamiliar, even dangerous. In
California, for example, 70 percent of individuals surveyed said
they wish to die at home, yet
68 percent do not.
Instead, many of us die in
hospitals, subject to overmedication and infection, often after
receiving treatment that we do
not want. Doctors know this,
which may explain why 72 percent of them die at home.
Using data from the Dartmouth Atlas — a source of information and analytics that organizes Medicare data by a variety
of indicators linked to medical
resource use — we recently
ranked geographic areas based
on markers of end-of-life care
quality, including deaths in the
hospital and number of physicians seen in the last year of life.
People are accustomed to ranking areas of the country based on
availability of high-quality arts,
universities, restaurants, parks
and recreation and health-care
quality overall. But we can also
rank areas based on how they
treat us at an important moment
of life: when it’s coming to an end.
It turns out not all areas are
created equal. Critical questions
abound. For example, why do
71 percent of those who die in
Ogden, Utah, receive hospice
care, while only 31 percent do in
Manhattan? Why is the rate of
deaths in intensive care units in
Cedar Rapids, Iowa, almost four
times that of Los Angeles? Why
do only 12 percent of individuals
in Sun City, Ariz., die in a hospital,
while 30 percent do in McAllen,
Texas?
Race and other demographics
in a given area certainly matter.
One systematic review of more
than 20 studies showed that African American and Hispanic individuals utilize advance-care planning and hospice far less than
whites. More research is needed
to explore these differences and
to close these gaps and demand
high-quality, personalized care
for people of all races.
But race and demographics
don’t provide all the answers. For
instance, Sarasota and St. Petersburg, Fla., are only 45 miles apart
and have similar ethnic demo-
TABITHA RHEA PHOTOGRAPHY
Andrew MacPherson of the
National Partnership for
Hospice Innovation
COURTESY OF RAVI PARIKH
Ravi Parikh, senior clinical
adviser at the Coalition to
Transform Advanced Care
U.S. regions differ in quality of end-of-life care
A study ranked nearly 300 regions of the country based on seven
factors, such as hospice use and number of deaths in the hospital.
Best Places to Die
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Appleton, Wis.
Sarasota, Fla.
Ogden, Utah
Dubuque, Iowa
Asheville, N.C.
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Petoskey, Mich.
Green Bay, Wis.
St. Joseph, Mich.
Worst Places to Die
Las Vegas
Miami
Stockton, Calif.
East Long Island
Honolulu
Newark
McAllen, Tex.
Bronx
Manhattan
St. Petersburg, Fla.
Source: MacPherson and Parikh, 2017
graphics. Yet we found that they
score quite differently on several
key quality metrics at the end of
life.
A variety of factors probably
contribute to our findings. Hospice, which for 35 years has provided team-based care, usually at
home, to those nearing the end of
life and remains enormously successful and popular, is underutilized. Most people enroll in
hospice fewer than 20 days before
death, despite a Medicare benefit
that allows patients to stay for up
to six months. Hospice enrollment has been shown to be highly
dependent on the type of doctor
that you see. In fact, one study
among cancer patients with poor
prognoses showed that physician
characteristics (specialty, experience with practicing in an inpatient setting, experience at hospitals, etc.) mattered much more
than patient characteristics (age,
gender, race, etc.) in determining
whether patients enrolled in hospice. For example, oncologists
and doctors practicing at non-
profit hospitals were far more
likely than other doctors to recommend hospice.
Also, physicians in a given
geographic area are likely to have
similar approaches to health
care. They may collectively differ
from physicians in another area
in their familiarity and comfort
with offering hospice care to a
patient. This may explain why
hospice enrollment significantly
varies among geographic regions.
Palliative care, which focuses
on alleviation of suffering, is often misunderstood by doctors as
giving up. Health professionals’
lack of longitudinal, substantive
training in end-of-life care only
compounds the problem.
Perhaps most important, fewer
than half of Americans have had a
conversation about their end-oflife wishes — a process known as
advance care planning — and
only one-third have expressed
those wishes in writing for a
health-care provider to follow
when they become seriously ill. If
people do not have a clear sense
of their end-of-life wishes, it is
easy to imagine that they may be
swayed by a physician’s recommendation.
The private sector has led the
way in addressing the underutilization of hospice and improving end-of-life care. For instance, health insurers such as
Aetna have devised programs integrating nurse-led case management services for seriously ill
individuals, reducing costly and
undesired emergency room visits
while increasing appropriate
hospice referrals. And start-ups
including Aspire Health are
working with communities to
provide palliative care in people’s
homes while devising algorithms
to help payers and providers
identify individuals who might
benefit from palliative and hospice care.
Congress also is considering
bipartisan solutions consistent
with best practices. Congressional leaders have recently introduced several pieces of legislation that would test new models
of care for those facing advanced
illness, support health professionals in training for end-of-life
care and ensure that barriers are
removed for consumers to access
care.
And Medicare, via its Innovation Center, has led the way in
testing promising care models to
support those at the end of life,
including the Medicare Care
Choices Model, which allows individuals to receive hospice care
alongside traditional, curative
treatment.
But the secret sauce may be a
shift in culture. We will not improve the death experience until
we demand that our public- and
private-sector leaders act and
that our local health professionals encourage person-centered
end-of-life care.
As with any social change,
progress will be driven by a growing awareness and a desire for
justice among families and patients. There are good and bad
places to die in America. However, to ensure a better death for all,
we must confront not just geographic disparities but also our
resistance to thinking about
death.
health-science@washpost.com
MacPherson is a principal at
Healthsperien and serves as senior
policy adviser to the Coalition to
Transform Advanced Care and the
National Partnership for Hospice
Innovation. Parikh is a physician at
the University of Pennsylvania and
senior clinical adviser at the
Coalition to Transform Advanced
Care.
Statistics aside, you’re never too old for a midlife crisis
BY
S TEVEN P ETROW
“I’m having a midlife crisis,” I
wistfully told my friend Amy earlier this year, shortly before my
husband and I decided to divorce.
I finally understood what W.B.
Yeats meant when he wrote,
“Things fall apart; the center cannot hold.” Without even taking a
breath, she replied: “You’re too
old. Unless you’re planning to live
to 120, you’ve aged out.”
For the record, I was 59 (and
she 56) at the time. But the bluntness of her retort took me down a
rabbit hole of questions, the first
of which was “When is midlife,
exactly?”
A statistician would probably
say midlife is the midpoint of our
expected life span, which has
grown by decades over the past
century. My grandparents, born
around 1900, faced a life expectancy of 49 years, according to the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention. By that statistician’s
definition, midlife began six
months after their 24th birthdays. Jeez.
As for me, I was born in 1957,
with a life expectancy of 70; my
midlife came (and went) in 1992,
when I turned 35. For a baby
boomer who came of age not
trusting anyone older than 30,
this is particularly galling. The
statistician’s definition of midlife
is clearly not for me.
Other experts have weighed in
with other definitions of this
thing we call middle age, most
concurring with the American
Heritage Medical Dictionary,
which says it’s “usually reckoned
as the years between 40 and 60.”
“What we think of as old has
changed over time,” said Sergei
Scherbov, the lead researcher of a
2015 study that recalculated the
math based on new data. “Someone who is 60 years old today,” he
said in a news release, “is middle-
BRYAN REGAN
“Middle age is a question not of math but of state of mind” Steven
Petrow writes. “My impending divorce jump-started my crisis.”
aged.”
All of which is how I came to
believe that middle age is a question not of math but of state of
mind, as is its eponymous crisis.
My impending divorce jumpstarted my crisis, this new search
for meaning and purpose. Friends
also told me that their midlife
crises started after a disruptive
milestone: Perhaps they became
empty-nesters, or a parent died,
or they became widowed.
Writers have much to say about
midlife. “We suddenly or gradually find ourselves slowing down or
unable to move our lives forward
in familiar ways” is how Jett
Psaris, author of “Hidden Blessings: Midlife Crisis as a Spiritual
Awakening,” explained the middle ages in a phone interview.
Ramona DeFelice Long, an author and editor who is 58, agreed:
“From a woman’s and parent’s
point of view, midlife is after
children are grown and before
retirement.”
That
certainly
doesn’t peg it to any specific age
these days.
DECEMBER 12 , 2017
Teens are a concern as
adults win access to pot
PERSPECTIVE
BY
. TUESDAY,
Mark S. King, 56, a long-term
survivor of the AIDS epidemic in
Baltimore, piqued my curiosity
when he told me that he felt his
middle age had begun at 30,
which is when he learned he was
HIV-positive. This was the era
when just about everyone who
had AIDS died. “My life’s timeline
had been accelerated by the AIDS
crisis. Everything compressed,”
he wrote in an email. “I faced the
Big Questions in life then: What is
it all about? What happens when
we die? Is there a god?”
King’s response hit home. I’d
been in my mid-20s and a grad
student when I was diagnosed
with testicular cancer, which certainly provoked similar Big Questions for me.
Before my cancer diagnosis, I
thought I was invulnerable, if not
invincible. I was a smart-ass, a
jerk, a smarty pants en route to a
PhD who thought he knew so
much about everything. Faced
with a life-threatening illness,
however, I became less certain.
Wobbly. My previous identity
melted away in the face of an
uncertain future.
I don’t think I entered middle
age then, but my illness changed
how I thought about my life’s
trajectory. It kicked off the beginning of what I’d call my “muddled
years” — that time that novelist
Judith Podell, 70, said is “like
being in the middle of a large
body of water and unable to see
either shore.”
That, it later dawned on me, is
the central challenge of middle
age, and of most midlife crises:
reassessing your goals; redefining yourself without definition to
others; finding an identity without a job or absent good health.
In the years after cancer, I
found a new self. I was more
vulnerable, less of a jerk, and
increasingly humbled by how little I really knew. I could look back
on my life while simultaneously
looking forward, which seems the
very definition of the middle. It
was a hard redefinition of self at
times.
I wish I could say that it was all
smooth sailing once I got past
those years, but it wasn’t. My
divorce, I realized, was a manifestation, and not the root cause, of
another midlife disruption. After
a dozen years together as partners, my sense of “me” had
morphed into “we,” and then my
identity imploded as the “we”
disintegrated. On top of that, my
parents had recently died, and my
role as a son no longer existed.
As Psaris explained: “The
whole point of midlife is to allow
the construct of who you are and
the life you have created to fail.
It’s not just an opportunity for a
fresh start; it’s a mandate for one.”
I’ve decided that, far from aging out of my midlife crisis, I’m
going to embrace it. And my new
mantra? Never trust anyone over
120.
health-science@washpost.com
BY
A NNA G ORMAN
westminster, calif. — After
Yarly Raygoza attended the drug
prevention program at the Boys &
Girls Club here last year, she used
what she learned to talk a few
friends out of using marijuana.
The 14-year-old took the class
again this year but worries that
counseling her friends will become more difficult.
Recreational marijuana is now
legal in California, which could
bring a massive boom in drug
sales and advertising when stores
can begin selling the drug to
adults without a prescription in
January.
Raygoza believes that as more
people 21 and older use marijuana legally, teenagers will have
trouble understanding that they
shouldn’t use it. Teens may also
have easier access to the drug as
recreational pot shops start to
open, she said. Raygoza already
sees many places selling medical
marijuana.
“Now that there are so many
shops . . . kids have a better
chance of getting their hands on
it,” she said. “And having a discussion with them like this could be a
“The changing legal
landscape has a lot to
do with adolescents’
changing perceptions.
That’s why we really
need to change the
conversation around
this drug.”
Elizabeth D’Amico, a senior
behavioral scientist at Rand
little harder.”
Make no mistake: Marijuana is
still illegal for youths.
Last November, voters approved Proposition 64, the Adult
Use of Marijuana Act, making
California one of eight states — in
addition to the District — to legalize the drug for recreational use.
The measure immediately made
it legal — for those 21 and older —
to possess up to an ounce, or
about 28.5 grams, of cannabis. It
delayed legal pot sales from licensed stores until January 2018.
The legalization of recreational
marijuana for adults in California
and other states poses an added
challenge for drug education and
prevention programs. Teachers
are trying to explain the risks of
marijuana just as stores are preparing to open and marketers are
planning campaigns.
Medical marijuana has been
legal in California for more than
20 years, but experts say the new
law on recreational marijuana
could prompt more youths to
believe that the drug is safe.
“That is an unintended consequence of legalization,” said Pam
Luna, a consultant with the Rand
Corp., a nonpartisan research organization. “They think that if it’s
legal, it must be okay.”
Luna, who trains teachers on
drug prevention education, said
legalization has also prompted
questions and confusion among
young people. They may be getting misinformation — and peer
pressure — through social media,
she said.
While evidence shows that
medical marijuana can help ease
chronic pain and other conditions, use of the drug is linked to
poor respiratory health and increased car accidents. Among adolescents, marijuana use can have
negative effects on their cognitive
and mental health.
Recent studies show that teens
who use marijuana frequently exhibit lower cognitive performance and brain function than
those who don’t. They also perform worse in school. Despite
that, teen perception of the harms
of marijuana has dropped over
time, and many think it’s safer
than alcohol, according to Elizabeth D’Amico, a senior behavioral
scientist at Rand. Currently, more
than half of 10th- and 12th-graders believe that smoking marijuana isn’t dangerous, according to a
recent Rand report.
Adolescents in states with legal
medical marijuana are less likely
to believe the drug is harmful,
research shows.
“The changing legal landscape
has a lot to do with adolescents’
changing perceptions,” D’Amico
said. “That’s why we really need
to change the conversation
around this drug.”
That conversation should remind young people about its potential harms and that recreational marijuana in California is
still illegal for those younger than
21, she said.
The state Department of Public
Health recently unveiled a website called “Let’s Talk Cannabis”
to explain the law. Young people
who are caught smoking, buying
or possessing marijuana will have
to complete community service
and undergo drug education or
counseling, the website says.
Advertising is another factor
that may complicate drug prevention education for young people,
said Stanton Glantz, a professor
at the University of California at
San Francisco School of Medicine. Exposure to marijuana advertising is associated with a
higher likelihood of using marijuana a year later, according to
research.
“It’s just everywhere now, and
the market hasn’t been fully
opened,” Glantz said. “It’s the
same thing as alcohol and cigarette advertising. It is all directed
at normalizing it and presenting
it as a fun thing to do.”
D’Amico said she and her children see the ongoing changes
near their house in the San Fernando Valley. “It just creates a
conversation pretty much every
day because a new billboard pops
up on our way to school,” she said.
To provide most middle school
students with up-to-date information about alcohol, marijuana
and smoking, D’Amico developed
a voluntary program called Project Choice, which is used by such
after-school programs as the Boys
& Girls Club. In five sessions,
participants role-play and discuss
how to make healthful choices.
They also talk about the pros and
cons of marijuana and the differences between medical and recreational use.
During the first session at the
Boys & Girls Club of Westminster
recently, facilitator Jeovan Davila
asked the group of students what
percentage of eighth-graders they
believed used marijuana over the
past 30 days. The guesses ranged
from 10 percent to 60 percent.
When Davila told them the correct answer was about 7 percent,
the group looked surprised.
Davila said he doesn’t lecture
teens about what’s right and
wrong. Rather, he gives them
facts to help them make their own
decisions in the future. For example, if they know that most of
their peers don’t use marijuana,
perhaps they will be less likely to
use it.
With the legalization of marijuana and the discussion on social media, Davila has seen young
people talking about the drug
more. During the class, some said
teens might want to use it because they see their family members using marijuana legally.
“The kids do bring it up,” he
said. “We’ve just got to be ready,
letting them know the facts.”
Gorman is a writer for Kaiser Health
News, a national health policy news
service that is an editorially
independent program of the Henry J.
Kaiser Family Foundation.
ANNA GORMAN/KAISER HEALTH NEWS
Facililtator Jeovan Davila leads a discussion about marijuana at
the Boys & Girls Club of Westminster, Calif.
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