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The Washington Post – December 13, 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Partly sunny 36/26 • Tomorrow: Partly sunny 45/27 B8
Trump
attacks
Gillibrand
in tweet
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
Jones wins in Democratic upset
MOORE REFUSES
TO CONCEDE
Race seen as bellwether
for 2018 contests
S EAN S ULLIVAN,
M ICHAEL S CHERER
AND D AVID W EIGEL
BY
birmingham, ala. — In a stun-
J OHN W AGNER,
E D O ’ K EEFE
A SHLEY P ARKER
AND
President Trump on Tuesday
attacked Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand
(D-N.Y.) in a tweet widely criticized as being sexually suggestive,
sparking outrage at a time when
the nation is reeling from a wave
of accusations about improper
behavior by powerful men — including Trump himself.
In his morning tweet, Trump
referred to Gillibrand as a “lightweight” and a “total flunky” and
said that, when he was a New York
real estate developer, she “would
come to my office ‘begging’ for
campaign contributions” and
“would do anything for them.”
The tweet, targeting a female
senator who has called on Trump
to resign for his alleged past behavior, came as the president faces renewed scrutiny of claims of
sexual harassment and assault
that surfaced during the campaign. Trump has denied all the
claims, accusing the women of
lying.
His attack on Gillibrand
prompted a swift backlash on social media and on Capitol Hill,
where Democratic calls increased
Tuesday for Trump to either resign or face congressional investigations of his alleged actions.
Gillibrand, who is often mentioned as a potential 2020 Democratic presidential candidate,
called Trump’s tweet “a sexist
JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES
Doug Jones greets cheering supporters at a victory celebration in Birmingham after becoming the first Democrat elected to the Senate
from Alabama since 1992. “At the end of the day, this entire race has been about dignity and respect,” Jones told the crowd.
Result scrambles
GOP legislative
agenda, security
in Senate
BY
M IKE D E B ONIS
Senior Republican negotiators
were moving closer to a deal Tuesday to reduce the top tax rate for
high-income households from
39.6 percent to 37 percent, blowing
by political concerns about aiding
the rich in order to ease passage of a
$1.5 trillion tax package.
The move, which needs to gain
the support of a broad swath of Republicans in the House and Senate,
would lower taxes for top earners
throughout the country, potentially
addressing the concerns of two GOP
constituencies about separate tax
legislation passed by the House and
Senate.
Wealthy individuals in New
York, California and other high-tax
states had complained that their
taxes might go up under the plan,
which curtails the ability of taxpayers to deduct state and local
taxes. And conservative House Republicans had said it did not go far
enough to bring down top rates —
long a principle of Republican eco-
Doug Jones’s odds-defying
victory in Alabama — handing
Democrats a vanishingly rare
Senate win in the Deep South —
scrambles President Trump’s
legislative agenda for the coming year, threatens to heighten
Republican infighting and
sounds an alarm for the GOP’s
prospects in November’s midterm elections.
Any dent in the advantage
Republicans hold in the Senate
would carry major governing
consequences, but the loss of
what had been considered one of
the party’s safest seats carries a
special sting for the GOP.
One consequence is Democrats’ much more plausible path
to the Senate majority next year.
The 2018 map was widely seen to
favor Republicans, with 10 Democrats seeking reelection in
states President Trump won last
year and only two Republican
seats clearly at risk.
Now, if Democratic incumbents can survive in Indiana,
Missouri, North Dakota, West
Virginia and elsewhere in what
is shaping up to be a favorable
environment, GOP losses in Arizona and Nevada could allow
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) to
unseat Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.)
as Senate majority leader.
Some Republicans view the
Alabama seat once held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions as the
first casualty in an internecine
GOP battle that has pitted establishment Republicans personified by McConnell against populist insurgents led by former
White House strategist Stephen
K. Bannon.
TAXES CONTINUED ON A20
GOP CONTINUED ON A9
GILLIBRAND CONTINUED ON A4
GOP nears
deal to cut
top tax rate
for wealthy
BY
AND
. $2
ALABAMA SPECIAL ELECTION
Senator from N.Y. is
targeted in post many see
as sexually suggestive
BY
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
E RICA W ERNER
D AMIAN P ALETTA
JONES CONTINUED ON A8
Jubilant
Democrats
freshly confident
about midterms
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore (R) prepares to walk onstage and speak at a watch party in
Montgomery, Ala., after losing the election. He has faced accusations of sexual misconduct.
President over party
President Trump gambled and
lost on Moore, bucking GOP
leaders in the process. A11
48.4
percentage of votes cast
for Roy Moore (R).
Tuesday’s special U.S. Senate
election in Alabama was never
destined to bring good news for
the Republican Party, no matter
the outcome. But the stunning
victory by Democrat Doug
Jones was a devastating blow to
a party wracked by divisions
and intraparty rivalries and a
humiliating defeat for President
Trump.
For some Republicans, the
fact that the controversial and
flawed Roy Moore will not be
their new senator from
Texts between two FBI
officials involved in the
probe of Hillary Clinton’s emails and possible connections between
Trump associates and
Russia show the pair
discussed their intense
dislike of candidate
Donald Trump. A4
Former heads of the
National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration criticized President Trump’s pick over
his financial conflicts. A2
The head of the DEA
office that regulates opioids told senators that a
2016 law has made enforcement tougher and
should be revised. A3
THE WORLD
French President Emmanuel Macron sought
to take a leadership role
on climate change amid
the U.S. government’s
withdrawal. A14
THE ECONOMY
UPS and other carriers
said holiday deliveries
Alabama came with some
measure of relief. But the
consequences of that outcome
will reverberate over the
coming months in one
legislative battle after another.
An already razor-thin margin in
the Senate becomes even more
tenuous for the party in power.
Beyond that, the tumultuous
election served to expose
further the fissures, fault lines
and rivalries that have only
widened in the 13 months since
Trump captured the White
are falling behind because of a high volume
of online purchases. A16
Most Americans oppose a plan to repeal net
neutrality rules for Internet providers, a poll
found. A16
An inspector general’s
report urged the Office
of Federal Student Aid
to process a backlog of
tens of thousands of
debt relief claims. A20
THE REGION
After tense hearings,
a Virginia state panel
unexpectedly delayed
enacting the water per-
R OBERT C OSTA
House. The election provided
the capstone to a year of tumult
inside the GOP, and at a time
when the party controls the
levers of power in Washington
and states across the country,
the Alabama campaign was one
more reminder that this is a
party facing a major identity
crisis and no easy answers for
how to resolve it.
In the face of results that
showed Jones leading by
20,000 votes and by more than
TAKE CONTINUED ON A11
DEMOCRATS CONTINUED ON A9
Republican miscalculation
Strategists thought Moore’s
antiabortion stance would
counter accusations. A12
A lousy night for Republicans and a big defeat for Trump
THE NATION
Terrorism charges in N.Y. Federal prosecutors
said the bombing suspect posted a taunt about
President Trump online before the attack. A6
49.9
percentage of votes cast
for Doug Jones (D).
BY
The Democrats’ seismic victory
Tuesday in the unlikely political
battleground of Alabama brought
jubilation — and a sudden a rush
of confidence — to a party that has
been struggling to gain its footing
since Donald Trump won the presidency 13 months ago.
Democrat Doug Jones’s triumph, the result of a vigorous
turnout of the party’s traditional
voters and of Republican splintering in a deeply conservative state,
sent a thunder clap across the
national political landscape that
Democrats hope will signify an
emerging comeback at the start of
the 2018 midterm election campaign.
In the immediate aftermath,
Democratic leaders are eager to
leverage a narrowed Republican
majority in the Senate to try to
stall the Trump agenda, including
the GOP’s $1.5 trillion tax package.
And they plan to use the defeat
of firebrand Republican Roy
Moore, who faced allegations of
sexual misconduct, to escalate
THE TAKE DAN BALZ
IN THE NEWS
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
ning setback for the Republican
Party, Democrat Doug Jones was
elected Alabama’s next senator
Tuesday, flipping a deeply red
state after a campaign that showcased the increasing power of sexual misconduct allegations and
the limits of President Trump’s
political influence.
Jones’s victory in a part of the
Deep South that has not elected a
Democratic senator since 1992
was a dramatic repudiation of his
opponent, Roy Moore, a former
state judge twice removed from
office. Moore responded to allegations that he made sexual advances on teenagers years ago by describing his campaign as a “spiritual battle” against a conspiracy of
Republican and Democratic leaders in Washington.
“I was on the Moore bandwagon at first, years back, before you
really knew what was going on
with him,” said Scott Medders, 32,
who voted for Jones and then attended a watch party in Gadsden,
Ala., Moore’s home town. “When
Jones gets there, I hope he
strengthens the military and
helps with the wall. But I could not
vote for Moore.”
After the race was called by the
Associated Press, Moore declined
to concede defeat, saying he believed that the margin of victory
could narrow enough to trigger an
automatic recount. “Realize that
when the vote is this close that it’s
not over,” he said. “We also know
that God is always in control.”
The Alabama Republican Party
said it would not support Moore’s
push for a recount.
mits for a $5 billion natural gas pipeline. B1
D.C. Mayor Muriel E.
Bowser has raised
$1.4 million since September for her reelection bid and so far has
no challenger. B5
OBITUARIES
Ed Lee, 65, became the
first Asian American
mayor of San Francisco
and was known as a defender of civil rights. A15
Bruce Brown, 80, created an international hit
with the 1966 surfing
documentary “The Endless Summer.” B5
Inside
FOOD
SPORTS
Mass appeal
The All-Met lineup
Our critic ranks the Top
10 chain restaurants. (He
liked a folksy one with
rocking chairs a lot.) E1
The Post highlights the
best local high school
athletes for the fall
season. D9
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A16
COMICS........................................C7
OPINION PAGES ......................... A22
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B5
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS ............................ A13
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 8
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
1 3 8 2
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
NOAA nominee’s financial conflicts
draw rare criticism from past chiefs
BY
R OBERT O ’ H ARROW J R.
Three former administrators of
the agency responsible for the government’s vast weather forecasting system have serious concerns
about the businessman President
Trump has nominated to be its
next leader, and two of them say
the nominee has conflicts of interests that should disqualify him,
documents and interviews show.
It is the first time in the halfcentury history of the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, that former
administrators have voiced such
strong opposition, agency veterans
say. The nominee, Barry Myers, is
among a growing number of controversial figures Trump — who
has promised to disrupt and downsize the federal government — has
selected for key posts.
Myers, 74, is chief executive of
AccuWeather, a private forecasting firm he and two brothers have
turned into a multimedia weather
and marketing powerhouse, using
free data gathered by NOAA’s glob-
al network of satellites and sensors. Myers earned more than
$900,000 last year at AccuWeather, based in State College, Pa., and
his holdings in the firm are worth
up to $50 million, according to
financial disclosure forms and other documents filed with the Senate.
Over the past two decades, Myers has been a determined force
behind efforts to persuade Congress to curb free initiatives by
NOAA’s National Weather Service
that overlap with services provided by AccuWeather and other private weather firms, while at the
same time pressing the government to give AccuWeather expanded access to weather-related data.
He has opposed such initiatives
as the expanded use of social media by the National Weather Service to spread tornado and other
severe weather alerts, saying the
agency should focus on core services such as data collection and
modeling. Reviews by agency officials and others have found government warnings on social me-
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
8:30 a.m.
The Labor Department releases November’s consumer
price index, estimated at a monthly rate increase of
0.4 percent. For more, go to washingtonpost.com/
business.
10 a.m.
Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein testifies to
the House Judiciary Committee about possible collusion
between Russia and President Trump’s campaign. Visit
washingtonpost.com/politics for developments.
2 p.m.
House and Senate conference members meet to resolve
differences between the chambers’ versions of the
Republican tax plan. For details, visit
washingtonpost.com/politics.
7 p.m.
The Washington Wizards take on the Memphis Grizzlies
at Capital One Arena. Follow the action at postsports.com.
KLMNO
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CO R R ECTI O N S
A Dec. 10 Arts & Style article
about the year’s best art exhibits
misidentified the organization
that invited artist Glenn Ligon to
curate an exhibition beginning
with a single work, Ellsworth
Kelly’s “Blue Black.” It is the
Pulitzer Arts Foundation, not the
Pulitzer Center for the Arts.
A Dec. 1 Weekend article about
noteworthy events for the month
misidentified the auditorium
where the Repeal Day Ball was
held. It is the Andrew W. Mellon
Auditorium, not the Andrew C.
Mellon Auditorium.
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dia can save lives by spurring people to take protective measures,
documents show.
Although Myers has also received support from other former
NOAA officials and weather industry executives, the criticism from
the three former administrators
presents a startling departure for
an agency where transitions are
typically uncontroversial.
The three, who served in Democratic administrations, decided to
air their concerns publicly after
being contacted by a Washington
Post reporter.
“The many and clear conflicts of
interest give me grave concerns
about whether this nominee will
truly serve the public’s interests,”
said Kathryn Sullivan, a retired
NASA astronaut and former chief
scientist at NOAA who served as
the agency’s administrator in the
Obama administration from 2014
to 2017. “It strains credulity.”
D. James Baker, NOAA administrator for eight years in the Clinton
administration, said he doubts
whether Myers can eliminate the
financial conflicts because the
family-owned firm would still
stand to benefit from decisions
made by NOAA’s administrator.
“You’ve got the potential of decisions being made on the basis of
money rather than what’s best for
the country,” Baker, a physicist,
told The Post.
Jane Lubchenco, an environmental scientist who served as the
agency’s administrator in the
Obama administration from 2009
to 2013, said she strongly opposes
the nomination because of “his
egregious conflicts of interest,”
“his lack of scientific training,” and
his “aggressive and sustained actions to undermine” the National
Weather Service.
“In short,” she said, “I have grave
concerns about the potential damage that Mr. Myers could do to
jeopardize the core ability of
NOAA to provide lifesaving and
other vital services to Americans.”
Among Myers supporters is former administrator Conrad C. Lautenbacher Jr., a retired vice admiral
who ran the agency in the George
W. Bush administration for seven
years. Lautenbacher has helped
rally support for the Myers nomination, sending letters and making
phone calls to lawmakers and former government officials, documents and interviews show.
Lautenbacher, who described
himself as a friend of Myers, has
been a paid member of AccuWeather’s board for most of the
past decade. In an interview with
The Post, he downplayed the pay,
saying “I get a couple of bucks.”
Lautenbacher also is a start-up
federal contractor whose firm,
GeoOptics, plans to build a network of satellites to gather atmospheric and weather data. It received a small contract from NOAA
last year as part of a pilot program
exploring possible uses of commercial weather satellites, contracting documents show.
The firm uses the same lobbyist
as AccuWeather — a weather industry lobbyist who has worked
with Lautenbacher to promote
Myers nomination, according to
documents and interviews.
In a letter to lawmakers on
GeoOptics letterhead, Lauten-
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bacher said, “I view Barry as an
ideal candidate for this assignment.” It did not disclose their
business ties, according to a copy of
the letter reviewed by The Post.
Myers and other AccuWeather
executives declined to comment
for this article. A spokeswoman
referred questions to the White
House.
On Nov. 29, Myers told a Senate
panel he would take steps to address concerns about conflicts. In a
prepared statement to the panel,
he said he and his wife, an AccuWeather manager, would resign
from “every company, board and
organization that could be in conflict with my new role.”
“We have also agreed to sell ALL
of our ownership interests —
shares and options — in AccuWeather and all related companies,” he said in the statement,
adding later: “If confirmed as
NOAA Administrator, I pledge to
carry out the wishes of Congress
with vision, accountability and effective management — for the public good. I will ensure that the
agency is staffed with top management and scientists and with talented, experienced and capable
people.”
The Senate Commerce, Science,
and Transportation Committee is
set to vote on his nomination on
Wednesday.
If approved by the full Senate,
Myers would become Undersecretary for Oceans and Atmospshere
at the Department of Commerce,
as well as administrator of NOAA,
one of the government’s premier
science operations.
Myers would be responsible for
a $5.7 billion science operation,
including a global meteorological
network of satellites, radar, aircraft and buoys that collect weather data ceaselessly.
NOAA has about 12,000 employees, including nearly 6,800 scientists and engineers.
In a statement, deputy White
House press secretary Lindsay
Walters defended the nomination,
saying Myers has the business
background needed to help the
agency meet mandates in new legislation requiring NOAA to collaborate more closely with the private
sector. The legislation, the Weather
Research and Forecasting Innovation Act of 2017, was passed by
Congress in April.
“Myers was a strong supporter
of that bill and testified in support
of the legislation,” Walters said.
“His experience in the private sector will be useful in carrying out
those directives.”
Since its formation 55 years ago
by Myers’s brother Joel, a meteorologist, AccuWeather has become
one of the world’s most widespread
sources of weather information.
The company estimates nearly
2 billion people worldwide view its
weather reports on television, in
newspapers, on computers, and on
mobile phones and other smart
devices. (The Washington Post is
an AccuWeather customer.)
A key to the company’s business
model is advertisements and other
forms of marketing that accompany its weather content on digital
platforms.
Myers has worked at the firm
part and full time since 1964, working as the firm’s lawyer, digital
strategist and in other executive
positions. As an undergraduate, he
enrolled in meteorology but “was a
horrible student” who was “never
interested in learning,” according
to a Wall Street Journal interview
in 2014. He studied business at
Pennsylvania State University and
received a law degree from Boston
University.
Myers and his brothers have
been aggressive in pressing the
government on weather-related
programs that could affect AccuWeather’s bottom line, according
to documents and interviews.
Over the past 14 years, the firm
has spent more than $400,000 on
lobbyists, according to disclosure
forms filed in the Senate.
In 2005, Barry and Joel Myers
supported legislation proposed by
then-Sen. Rick Santorum, a Republican from Pennsylvania, that
would have prohibited the federal
government from performing services that might compete with services offered by AccuWeather, the
Weather Channel and other companies. The two also contributed to
Santorum and his political action
committee. The legislation was not
approved.
In 2007, Myers became AccuWeather’s chief executive. He expanded the firm’s presence on the
Web — while also stepping up his
pressure to thwart government
initiatives that might compete
with AccuWeather services.
Myers has complained repeatedly about National Weather Serv-
ice initiatives that duplicate private sector services.
In 2013, he told a congressional
panel that NOAA and the government Weather Service “should focus on core infrastructure (satellites, radars, remote sensing tools,
data networks of sufficient density,
research, modeling, warning improvement, and operational warnings).” He said the “weather industry already handles forecasts and
services for business and industry
and the general public.”
“Many functions that were only
government functions at the dawn
of the development of America’s
weather industry 50 years ago —
such as media weather forecasting,
business-targeted weather forecasting, and general public weather forecasting — have been subsumed by America’s weather industry,” he said. “This is a positive
trend saving government expenditures, and we can expect to see
privatization of other remote sensing platforms such as satellites.”
Though his aggressive approach
has rankled some weather industry and government officials, Myers is held in high regard by some
in the private sector. In 2014, the
American Meteorological Society
gave him its Kenneth C. Spengler
Award for “outstanding, highly
principled leadership of the American weather industry.”
After his nomination in October, four former NOAA and National Weather Service officials
spoke highly about him in an October letter to the Commerce Committee.
“Through our experience working with Mr. Myers, we have seen a
person capable of leading a large
enterprise underpinned by complex science and technologies required to meet demanding mission needs,” retired Air Force brigadier generals John J. (Jack) Kelly
and David L. Johnson and two
others wrote in the Oct. 25 letter.
Andrew Rosenberg, a former
NOAA scientist who now directs
the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned
Scientists, said he believes the appointment reflects a lack of concern in the Trump administration
about conflicts of interests.
“As a civil servant or political
appointee, your sole purpose is to
promote the public interest,” he
said.
robert.oharrow@washpost.com
Great Red Spot storm is 200 miles deep, Juno finds
BY
All is
bright.
MARK WILSON/GETTY IMAGES
Nominee Barry Myers has become wealthy as head of family-owned AccuWeather, which uses free
NOAA data, and has tried to persuade Congress to curb initiatives that overlap with AccuWeather’s.
S ARAH K APLAN
new orleans — Jupiter’s Great
Red Spot is a storm like nothing
this world has ever seen. This
crimson-hued anticyclone features winds three times as fast as
the jet stream and is big enough to
swallow Earth whole. It is almost
surely older than any living human — 187 years at least — and
could well still rage across the gas
giant’s surface after all of us are
gone.
Scientists do not know what
makes the Great Red Spot so longlasting. Nor can they explain the
chemistry behind its brilliant color. But thanks to NASA’s Juno
spacecraft, now on its second year
of orbiting Jupiter, they know that
the storm's roots go deep: The well
of hot, swirling gas that powers
the Great Red Spot extends some
217 miles into the interior of Jupiter, a gas giant planet made mostly
of helium and hydrogen.
The finding was announced
Monday at the annual meeting of
the American Geophysical Union,
along with other results from
Juno’s first eight flights past the
solar system’s largest planet. The
spacecraft arrived in orbit around
Jupiter in summer 2016 and has
since performed looping orbits
that take it skimming between
Jupiter’s cloud tops and the planet’s radiation belts once every 53
days.
On Earth, a storm as high as the
Great Red Spot would almost
graze the orbit of the International
Space Station. The highest clouds
of our planet’s worst hurricanes
top out at around 10 miles.
But understanding the behavior of the Great Red Spot could
improve scientists’ understanding
of weather on Earth, said California Institute of Technology planetary scientist Andy Ingersoll, one
of the lead scientists for the Juno
spacecraft. He called Jupiter’s giant storm a good “stress test” for
Earth-based weather models.
It isn’t clear what the new find
means for the future of the storm
— Ingersoll said the spot already
has stretched traditional weather
models to their limits. But the spot
has been shrinking steadily since
the Voyager 2 spacecraft visited
Jupiter in 1979; it used to be big
enough to engulf two Earths.
High above the cloud tops, Jupiter is enveloped in radiation belts
formed by charged particles that
get trapped by the planet's magnetic field. On Monday, scientists
said that Juno had discovered a
new area of radiation just above
the planet’s atmosphere at the
equator. The high-energy particles in this region are even more
intense than those that make up
the radiation belt. But none of the
eight spacecraft that preceded
Juno at Jupiter had spotted it.
Juno’s orbit meant “we literally
flew through it,” said Heidi Becker,
a physicist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory who leads Juno’s
radiation investigation team.
The radiation in this region is
thought to stem from fast-moving
atoms of hydrogen, oxygen and
sulfur. These particles are produced in the gas clouds around
Jupiter's moons, Io and Europa,
but are stripped of electrons and
become charged as they interact
with Jupiter’s atmosphere.
The spacecraft found another
area of high-energy particles in
Jupiter’s inner radiation belt,
where electrons move at nearly
the speed of light. Becker and her
colleagues are still studying the
exact nature of these particles.
Juno’s other discoveries at Jupiter include clusters of 600-milewide cyclones at the planet’s poles
and an uneven magnetic field that
is weak in some places but in
others is 10 times as strong as
anything found on Earth. The
spacecraft’s high-resolution camera has also taken thousands of
detailed images, revealing a planet that looks like a cross between a
Van Gogh painting and the world’s
most elaborate latte foam art.
In a lecture, project scientist
Scott Bolton pulled up one of
Juno’'s images of Jupiter’s bluetinged polar storms and burntsienna gas clouds.
“If you had shown us that five
years ago, we couldn’t have
guessed what planet it was,” he
said.
sarah.kaplan@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
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Enforcement has become
harder during opioid
epidemic, senators told
BY L ENNY B ERNSTEIN
AND S COTT H IGHAM
The head of the Drug Enforcement Administration office that
regulates pharmaceutical opioids told senators Tuesday that a
2016 law has made enforcement
more difficult in urgent circumstances and should be revised.
Demetra Ashley, who leads the
agency’s Diversion Control Division, said Congress should
choose between repealing and
amending the law. But she said
the DEA agrees with the Justice
Department that it should be
altered to help curb the ongoing
opioid epidemic.
Since passage of the law, Ashley said, DEA investigators have
faced a greater challenge showing that a company’s conduct
poses an immediate danger of
death or harm to shut down
shipments of painkillers from a
distributor to a pharmacy. That
burden has moved the agency
away from its traditional posture
of preventing harm, she said.
“The DEA, along with the
Department of Justice, believes
that has to change,” she said.
During an oversight hearing,
Ashley told members of the Senate Judiciary Committee that the
agency continues to do its job,
relying on tools other than the
“immediate suspension orders”
reserved for the most egregious
cases.
Those tools include forcing
doctors, pharmacists and others
to surrender their DEA licenses,
bringing them to hearings and
seeking civil penalties.
Senators broke down largely
— but not completely — along
party lines about whether changes are needed. “In my view, this
bill has done harm,” said Sen.
Dianne Feinstein (Calif.), the
committee’s ranking Democrat.
“It seems to me that we should
look very closely at repeal.”
But Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (RUtah), who led negotiations over
the law in the Senate, was openly
skeptical of what he called a rush
to “rewrite history” in the wake
of reports by The Washington
Post and “60 Minutes” that highlighted the legislation’s effect.
“This wasn’t some effort to
help drug companies kill people.
Give me a break,” Hatch said.
“This was an effort to ensure that
DEA’s efforts . . . didn’t end up
hurting legitimate patients.”
The Post and “60 Minutes”
reported in October that a small
group of lawmakers allied with
drug companies pushed the Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act
through Congress. The measure
curbed the DEA’s powers to use
its most potent weapons against
drug companies that do not
report suspicious orders of prescription painkillers from pharmacies.
The reports revealed that an
early version of the legislation
was written by a drug company
lawyer and shepherded through
Congress by Rep. Tom Marino
(R-Pa.) in the House and Hatch in
the Senate.
By amending the Controlled
Substances Act of 1970, the new
law made it almost impossible
for the DEA to use immediate
suspension orders against drug
distributors, according to a law
review article written by the
DEA’s chief administrative law
judge.
The orders had allowed the
DEA to instantly stop shipments
of controlled substances to drugstores suspected of diverting prescription narcotics to the black
market. Another provision of the
new law allows companies to
submit “corrective action plans”
that the DEA must consider
before bringing sanctions.
Ashley called that provision
“redundant and unnecessary”
because the DEA holds lengthy
discussions with drug distributors before it decides to penalize
them.
Hatch and others, however,
have said the law does not weaken the DEA, noting that it was
passed by unanimous consent in
Court approves mine
near Grand Canyon
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Demetra Ashley, who leads the DEA’s Diversion Control Division,
said during a Senate hearing that Congress should repeal or amend
the Ensuring Patient Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act.
both houses of Congress and
signed by President Barack
Obama.
Some lawmakers and officials
in the Obama White House said
they were not made aware of the
legislation’s import before they
approved it. Overdoses of prescription drugs killed nearly
“This was an effort to
ensure that DEA’s
efforts . . . didn’t end up
hurting legitimate
patients.”
Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah)
200,000 people between 2000
and 2016.
Two days after the reports,
Marino withdrew his nomination to become the nation’s drug
czar. Since then, Democratic lawmakers, 44 state attorneys general and U.S. Attorney General Jeff
Sessions have called for repealing or amending the law to
restore some of the DEA’s authority.
On Tuesday, one of those attorneys general, Brian E. Frosh of
Maryland, told the panel that the
new law “handcuffs” the DEA.
Challenged by Hatch to offer
data to support that assertion,
Frosh acknowledged that it is too
early to prove the law’s impact
numerically.
But he said that Republican
and Democratic attorneys general had analyzed the new standard for immediate suspension
orders and found that the DEA
must now meet an “extraordinarily” high threshold to use that
tool.
“Any lawyer can tell you it
makes a big difference,” Frosh
said.
Hatch, committee Chairman
Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) and
others pointed to a sharp drop in
immediate suspension orders between fiscal 2011 and 2015 as
proof that the 2016 law could not
be responsible for loss of that
authority.
However, The Post and “60
Minutes” reported that the decline stemmed from a separate,
voluntary slowdown in the use of
immediate suspension orders by
DEA attorneys, who imposed a
strict new standard of proof on
investigators during that period,
even as the opioid crisis mushroomed.
leonard.bernstein@washpost.com
scott.higham@washpost.com
The U.S. Court of Appeals for
the 9th Circuit on Tuesday
upheld a 20-year ban on
uranium mining around Grand
Canyon National Park but ruled
in a separate case that a uranium
firm could open a mine nearby.
The two unanimous rulings by
the three-judge panel came as
the Trump administration
considers lifting the ban, in place
since 2012, as part of a broader
effort to boost domestic energy
production and promote the
mining of critical minerals in the
United States. The House
Natural Resources Committee
held a hearing Tuesday, titled
“Examining Consequences of
America’s Growing Dependence
on Foreign Minerals,” during
which Republicans warned
against putting federal lands off
limits to mining.
One of the companies scoring
a legal victory in the appeals
court was Energy Fuels
Resources USA, which the judges
said can open its Canyon Mine in
Kaibab National Forest, six miles
south of the Grand Canyon.
“This is not a partisan issue,”
spokesman Curtis Moore said in
an email. “We demonstrate
through our actions each and
every day that we operate
responsibly in providing the fuel
for clean, carbon-free electricity.”
Canyon Mine received a
federal permit to open in 1986,
and while its development
stopped in the 1990s, the 9th
Circuit ruled that Energy Fuels
Resources did not have to engage
in tribal consultations or
undergo a new federal
environmental review to start
operations there.
— Juliet Eilperin
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Owner of 84 dogs
guilty of animal cruelty
A woman who had dozens of
filthy and sick Great Danes living
in her New Hampshire mansion
was found guilty Tuesday of 10
animal cruelty charges.
Eighty-four dogs were seized
from Christina Fay’s Wolfeboro
home in June. Authorities said
the animals were living in filth
and suffering from health
problems.
Fay pleaded not guilty, saying
she loved the dogs and compared
them to an art collection. She
said she wanted to be the
primary U.S. collector of
European Great Danes, which
she had been acquiring to breed
and sell since 2014.
Fay initially was charged with
12 misdemeanor charges, but
Judge Charles Greenhalgh
dismissed two last month. In his
ruling, he found the evidence
showed Fay didn’t provide
proper care or shelter for the
dogs.
Fay is to be sentenced within
30 days. The New Hampshire
chapter of the Humane Society
of the United States said
Greenhalgh would determine the
dogs’ care at that time. For now,
the organization is caring for
them.
— Associated Press
NEW YORK
‘Son of Sam’ killer
transferred to hospital
The “Son of Sam” serial killer
who terrorized New York City 40
years ago is in the hospital.
New York state prison officials
said Tuesday that David
Berkowitz, 64, was transferred to
a hospital from the upstate
maximum-security prison where
he is serving a life sentence.
Officials would not comment
on why he was in the hospital,
but the New York Post and the
Times Union of Albany reported
that he was transferred to
undergo heart surgery.
Berkowitz, who called himself
“Son of Sam,” set the city on edge
with late-night shootings that
killed six people and wounded
seven. He primarily targeted
young women sitting in cars
before his arrest Aug. 10, 1977.
Berkowitz now says he is a
born-again Christian and is “very
sorry for what happened.”
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© 2017 University of Maryland University College
— Associated Press
A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
More Democrats urge investigation of Trump
Sen. Kirsten
Gillibrand (D-N.Y.)
said President
Trump’s tweet was
“a sexist smear
attempt to silence
my voice.”
Gillibrand, who is
talked about as a
possible
presidential
contender in 2020,
has previously
called on Trump to
resign over
allegations of
sexual misconduct.
GILLIBRAND FROM A1
smear attempt to silence my
voice.”
“You cannot silence me or the
millions of women who have gotten off the sidelines to speak out
about the unfitness and shame
you have brought to the Oval
Office,” she said in reply to Trump
on Twitter, later reiterating to
reporters her call for Trump to
resign.
White House spokeswoman
Sarah Huckabee Sanders disputed the characterization of
Trump’s tweet as sexually suggestive, telling reporters that “there’s
no way that this is sexist at all”
and later adding: “I think only if
your mind is in the gutter would
you have read it that way.”
Sanders said Trump was trying
to make a point about the corrosive nature of money in politics
and characterized Gillibrand as
“a wholly owned subsidiary of
people who donate to her campaign.”
“He’s used that same terminology many times in reference to
men,” Sanders said of the language in Trump’s tweet.
By Tuesday afternoon, six Democratic senators had called on
Trump to step down, and more
than 100 House Democrats had
signed onto a letter calling for a
congressional investigation.
Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii),
the latest senator to call on Trump
to resign, cited the president’s
tweet as part of her reasoning,
calling the president “a misogynist, compulsive liar, and admitted sexual predator.”
“Attacks on Kirsten are the latest example that no one is safe
from this bully,” Hirono added.
“He must resign.”
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.)
was among the other Democratic
senators to rally around Gillibrand, asking Trump on Twitter
whether he was trying to “bully,
intimidate and slut-shame” Gillibrand.
“Do you know who you’re picking a fight with?” Warren wrote.
“Good luck with that, @realDonaldTrump.”
A Republican consultant close
to the White House declined to
defend the content of Trump’s
tweet but said it was drafted with
the aim of becoming the watercooler conversation of the day
and diverting attention from his
accusers.
“It’s a better conversation for
him than for the women who are
accusing him to be dominating
the conversation,” said the consultant, who requested anonymity to speak more candidly. “He’s
drowning out those voices.”
Trump’s tweet also largely overshadowed a White House event at
which he signed a $700 billion
defense budget that seeks to in-
day, renewing their public push to
gain attention for their stories.
Gillibrand was attending a bipartisan Bible study Tuesday
morning when Trump’s tweet
landed, and her phone was immediately filled with supportive
and befuddled messages, wondering just what the president was
thinking, a Gillibrand aide said.
In his tweet, Trump offered no
evidence to support his claim that
Gillibrand had gone to him “begging” for campaign donations
“and would do anything for
them.” According to Open Secrets,
a nonprofit website that tracks
campaign contributions, since
1996, Trump has donated $8,900
to Senate Minority Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) and
$5,850 to Gillibrand.
Gillibrand met with Trump
once in 2010, the Gillibrand aide
said, and Trump’s oldest daughter, Ivanka, who has tried to cast
herself as a champion of women,
attended the meeting as well.
Asked about her interactions
with the president, Gillibrand
told reporters that Trump was
“just a supporter — a supporter of
my first campaign.”
Tuesday afternoon, Gillibrand
cited the president’s tweet in an
email solicitation to raise money
for her 2018 reelection campaign.
Over her nearly nine years in
the Senate, Gillibrand has focused on issues of equal rights —
for gay men and lesbians, transgender people and women.
Trump’s attack plays right into
her portfolio. Her reelection campaign has drawn no serious oppo-
nent, and with speculation that
she will renege on her vow not to
run for president in 2020, the
attack may do her more political
good than harm.
In a tweet, Brian Fallon, a
spokesman for Hillary Clinton’s
2016 presidential campaign,
called Trump’s tweet “disgusting”
but also noted, “It will make the
Gillibrand folks ecstatic,” implying that the sparring with Trump
would raise her profile among
what is expected to be a crowded
field of Democratic contenders in
2020.
Gillibrand, however, does have
detractors within the party. After
she said in November that Bill
Clinton should have resigned as
president following his affair with
White House intern Monica
Lewinsky, longtime Hillary Clinton adviser and confidant
Philippe Reines excoriated her on
Twitter for being ungrateful and
two-faced.
“Hypocrite. Interesting strategy for 2020 primaries. Best of
luck,” Reines wrote.
Trump’s attack on Twitter coincided with a previously scheduled
event Tuesday led by 59 female
House Democrats, who formally
called on the House Oversight
and Government Reform Committee to launch an investigation
into allegations of sexual misconduct by the president.
The oversight panel has the
broadest subpoena power and investigatory mandate of any congressional committee. The female
lawmakers had requested the investigation in a letter to the com-
White House
press secretary
Sarah Huckabee
Sanders was
ASHLEY
shocked —
PARKER
shocked! — to
find that
President Trump had sent a
tweet Tuesday that many viewed
as sexually suggestive and
demeaning to women.
After Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand
(D-N.Y.) called on Trump to
resign over sexual harassment
allegations, Trump attacked her
in an early-morning Twitter
missive — calling her a
political “lightweight” who
“would come to my office
‘begging’ for campaign
contributions not so long ago
(and would do anything for
them).”
Sanders said the president
was merely delivering a critique
of a corrupt political system.
“There’s no way that this is sexist
at all,” she said. “This is simply
talking about a rigged system
that we have that is broken, in
which special interests control
our government.”
When pressed on the
widespread interpretation that
Trump’s tweet at the very least
contained “sexual innuendos,”
Sanders issued a resolute
denial. “I mean, only if your
mind is in the gutter would you
have read it that way,” she said.
The problem for Trump and
his team, however, was that
much of official Washington
opted for the gutter
interpretation.
After all, the president has
displayed the flexibility and
precision of a Russian gymnast
when it comes to dancing on the
balance beam of outlandish
statements, using innuendo and
a verbal wink-and-nod to say
something — and then claim he
meant nothing of the sort.
His attack on Gillibrand fits a
familiar pattern. After Gillibrand
became the first woman to add
her name to the growing list of
Democratic senators calling on
Trump to resign because of
sexual misconduct allegations
from more than a dozen women,
Trump weaponized his preferred
social media against her.
“Lightweight Senator Kirsten
Gillibrand, a total flunky for
Chuck Schumer and someone
who would come to my office
‘begging’ for campaign
contributions not so long ago
(and would do anything for
them), is now in the ring fighting
against Trump,” he wrote. “Very
disloyal to Bill & CrookedUSED!”
By setting aside “begging” in
quotation marks and noting, in
parentheses, that she “would do
anything” for campaign
donations, he seemed to offer a
sly virtual grin of
acknowledgment that what his
critics accused him of saying
was, in fact, just what he was
saying.
Kathleen Hall Jamieson, the
director of Annenberg Public
Policy Center at the University of
Pennsylvania and an expert on
political rhetoric, said there
were striking parallels between
Trump’s Tuesday tweet and his
comments in the “Access
Hollywood” tape revealed during
the campaign in which Trump
boasts about grabbing women’s
genitals.
“In the ‘Access Hollywood’
tape, he says, ‘You can do
anything,’ and in the tweet
attacking Gillibrand, he says, she
‘would do anything,’ ” Jamieson
said. “What that
language suggests is that the
language for Trump is sexual
language. We know he uses that
language in a sexual context.”
The backlash was swift and
forceful. Sen. Elizabeth Warren
(D-Mass.) accused Trump in a
tweet of trying to “bully,
intimidate and slut-shame”
Gillibrand.
Despite the clamor, Sanders
SALWAN GEORGES/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump has often relied on innuendo to attack his political
adversaries, and on Tuesday, he called Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.)
a “lightweight” who “would do anything” for campaign contributions.
claimed the meaning of
president’s tweet was “obvious.”
“This is the same sentiment
that the president has expressed
many times before when he’s
exposed the corruption of the
entire political system,” she said.
The president, however, has a
history of such tweets and
statements in which he
effectively — if not technically —
asserts something controversial
or false.
During the presidential
campaign, after a feisty primary
debate exchange with then-Fox
News anchor Megyn Kelly,
Trump said that she had “blood
coming out of her eyes, blood
coming out of her wherever.” Yet
because Trump never fully
articulated the insinuation —
that Kelly asked Trump tough
questions because she was
menstruating — he was able
later to deny it when pressed on
CNN. “Do you think I’d make a
statement like that?” he said.
“Who would make a statement
like that? Only a sick person
would even think about that.”
He also during the campaign
implied, without stating
outright, that the father of Sen.
Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) may have been
involved in the assassination of
President John F. Kennedy. “You
know, his father was with Lee
Harvey Oswald before Oswald’s
being — you know, shot,” Trump
said in a phone interview with
Fox News. “What was he doing
with Lee Harvey Oswald shortly
before the death, before the
shooting? It’s horrible.”
More recently, he hinted —
with no evidence — that
MSNBC “Morning Joe” host Joe
Scarborough was involved in the
2001 death of a young female
staffer in his Florida office when
he was a member of Congress.
Sanders dodged questions about
Trump’s tweeted allegations,
saying simply that she had
nothing to add.
The president also employs
another favorite rhetorical trick
to float unsubstantiated claims
without personally taking
responsibility, quipping
that “many people are saying”
something outlandish or
offensive.
Timothy Naftali, a
presidential historian at New
BY
D EVLIN B ARRETT
York University, called it “the
non-assertion assertion or the
non-allegation allegation.”
“But it’s not cute — it’s
actually cowardly,” Naftali said.
“If you really believe such
nonsense, he should be
straightforward and tell people
he believes it, and then we can
adjudicate the truth of the
matter.”
Sometimes, the president uses
a degree of remove — passing on
something specious from
someone else as a means of
plausible deniability. Early on in
the 2016 campaign, for instance,
he retweeted a racist image
showing a dark-skinned masked
man wielding a gun, complete
with a set of false homicide data
by race.
“There’s a big difference
between a tweet and a retweet,”
Trump said when asked about it
afterward. “It’s for other people.
Let them find out if it’s correct
or not.”
And on his first foreign trip in
May, speaking in front of the
North Atlantic Treaty
Organization’s new
headquarters in Brussels, Trump
pointedly refused to affirm the
United States’ commitment to
Article 5 of the agreement,
which states that an attack on
one allied country is an attack
on all.
Afterward, then-press
secretary Sean Spicer sought to
play down the controversy,
saying reporters were
overreacting.
“We’re not playing cutesy with
this,” Spicer said. “He’s fully
committed.”
In fact, Trump had blindsided
his own national security team
by deliberately cutting the
27 words he was supposed to
utter in support of Article 5 and
the NATO alliance.
So Spicer was wrong. It was
the president, yet again, who
was playing cutesy.
ashley.parker@washpost.com
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
mittee Monday.
Late Tuesday, Rep. Trey Gowdy
(R-S.C.), chairman of the oversight committee, said in a letter
back that most of the allegations
against Trump would constitute
state-level crimes and that his
committee does not have jurisdiction to prosecute crimes. He said
he was forwarding the letter to
the Justice Department.
Besides Gillibrand and Hirono,
four male senators have called on
Trump to resign: Cory Booker
(D-N.J.), Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.),
Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Bernie
Sanders (I-Vt.).
Speaking to reporters, Schumer defended his New York colleague, calling Trump’s attack
“nasty” and “unbecoming” of the
presidency.
But he declined to join other
Democrats in calling for a formal
investigation of allegations of sexual misconduct by Trump. Schumer added that the president
should “cut it out with the tweeting. He ought to stop tweeting
and start leading.”
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) declined to say
whether Congress should investigate the allegations against
Trump, saying that “we’re focused
on the Senate” and that his chamber’s ethics committee can investigate only allegations against
senators.
“What we’re in charge of here is
the Senate,” McConnell told reporters.
john.wagner@washpost.com
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
ashley.parker@washpost.com
White House denies that Trump’s attack on Gillibrand is sexist
The
Debrief
FBI texts
reveal
contempt
for Trump
Texts between two senior FBI
officials involved in both the probe
of Hillary Clinton’s emails and
possible connections between
Trump associates and Russia
show the pair frequently discussed their political views, their
intense dislike of candidate Donald Trump and their fear he might
win.
A review of the texts between
senior FBI agent Peter Strzok and
senior FBI lawyer Lisa Page were
sent to lawmakers Tuesday night.
The texts are the subject of an
ethics investigation by the Justice
Department’s inspector general,
and they show the senior officials
repeatedly offering harsh opinions about political figures.
Among many other comments,
the two called Trump “an idiot.”
The Washington Post reported
recently that Strzok, the deputy
head of counterintelligence at the
FBI, was removed from his position in late July as top FBI agent on
special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III’s team when his bosses learned
about the texts between him and
Page.
Page had also worked on Mueller’s team — which is investigating
possible coordination between
Trump associates and Russian
agents — but left that position
earlier in July for what officials
have said were unrelated reasons.
Strzok and Page were key players in the investigation into Clinton’s use of a private email server
to do government work as secretary of state, as well as the probe
into possible coordination between the Trump campaign and
Russia in the 2016 election.
During the Clinton investigation, Strzok was involved in a romantic relationship with Page,
who worked for Deputy Director
Andrew McCabe, according to
people familiar with the matter
who spoke on the condition of
anonymity because of the sensitivity of the issue.
The texts were sent to Congress
the night before Deputy Attorney
General Rod J. Rosenstein was set
to testify before the House Judiciary Committee, where the messages between the two FBI officials
could fuel Republican calls for a
second special counsel to be appointed to investigate how the FBI
handled the Clinton investigation.
One of the earliest texts, from
2015, shows Strzok calling Sen.
Bernie Sanders (Vt.), Clinton’s rival in the race for the Democratic
nomination, “an idiot like Trump.
Figure they cancel each other out.’’
On March 4, 2016, Page texted,
“God, Trump is a loathsome human,’’ to which Strzok replied, “Yet
he may win.’’ Strzok then added,
“Good for Hillary,’’ to which Page
replied, “It is.’’
That conversation, which takes
place after 2 a.m., includes Strzok
texting, “God, Hillary should win
100,000,000-0.’’
While defenders of Page and
Strzok have said that their comments were harmless and that the
issue was overblown, the two repeatedly expressed strong political opinions.
On March 16, 2016, Page texted
Strzok: “I can not believe Donald
Trump is likely to be an actual,
serious candidate for president.’’
The next month, she texted: “So
look, you say we text on that phone
when we talk about Hillary because it can’t be traced, you were
just venting bc you feel bad that
you’re gone so much but it can’t be
helped right now.’’
During the Republican National Convention, Page texted, “wow,
Donald Trump is an enormous
d*uche.’’
Responding to Trump’s public
fight with a Gold Star family in
August 2016, Page texted, “Trump
should go f himself.’’
On July 27, 2016, Page texted
Strzok: “She just has to win now.
I’m not going to lie, I got a flash of
nervousness yesterday about
Trump.’’
Most of the exchanges are backand-forths about the pair’s disgust
with Trump. As they get closer to
Election Day, they watch at least
one Clinton-Trump debate, and
their feelings are clear.
“Oh hot damn,’’ Strzok texted.
“HRC is throwing down saying
Trump in bed with russia,” then
adding: “She could do SO MUCH
BETTER... but she’s just not getting traction... Jesus.”
On Election Day, he texted:
“OMG this is F*CKING TERRIFYING,’’ forwarding a story saying
Clinton could lose, to which Page
replied, “Yeah, that’s not good.’’
Days after the election, Page
texted to say she bought “All the
President’s Men,’’ a book about
Nixon and Watergate, because “I
needed to brush up on Watergate.’’
JIM LO SCALZO/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY-EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
crease military spending and operational capabilities, a major priority for his administration. And
it came on the eve of a tax speech
that the president plans to deliver
Wednesday about what could be
his first big legislative win.
Trump began Tuesday with a
separate tweet accusing Democrats of focusing renewed attention on his alleged misconduct
out of their supposed frustration
that investigations into Russian
meddling in the 2016 presidential
election are not harming him.
“Despite thousands of hours
wasted and many millions of dollars spent, the Democrats have
been unable to show any collusion with Russia — so now they
are moving on to the false accusations and fabricated stories of
women who I don’t know and/or
have never met. FAKE NEWS!”
Trump posted.
Trump has repeatedly denied
the accusations against him, but
the idea that he does not know or
has not met any of the women
who have accused him of sexual
misbehavior is false. The list of
women includes a former contestant on his reality show “The
Apprentice,” a former business
partner, a woman who has a photo of the two of them together, a
contestant in one of his pageants
and a People reporter who interviewed him.
During her White House briefing, Sanders said Trump’s denial
of knowing the accusers was limited to three women who appeared in a joint television interview and news conference Mon-
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
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Critics rail, but Trump bonds with Russia probe lawyers
BY P HILIP R UCKER,
J OSH D AWSEY AND
R OSALIND S . H ELDERMAN
Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III and his team of a dozen-plus
lawyers and investigators have
proved stealthy in their wideranging Russia probe. They have
surprised the White House with
one indictment after another and
summoned President Trump’s
confidants for lengthy interviews.
In the case of former campaign
chairman Paul Manafort alone,
court filings show, they have collected more than 400,000 documents and 36 electronic devices.
Mueller and his deputies are, in
the fearful word of some Trump
loyalists, “killers.”
Trump’s response, by contrast,
is being directed by John M.
Dowd, the president’s personal
lawyer retired from a large firm
who works essentially as a oneman band, and Ty Cobb, a White
House lawyer who works out of a
small office in the West Wing basement, near the cafeteria where
staffers get lunch.
Dowd and Cobb, along with attorney Jay Sekulow, serve not only
as Trump’s lawyers but also as his
strategists, publicists, therapists
and — based on Dowd’s claim that
he wrote a controversial presidential tweet — ghostwriters.
When Mueller requests documents, they provide them. When
Trump reacts to new twists in the
Russia saga, they seek to calm him
down. When he has questions
about the law, such as the Logan
Act or Magnitsky Act, they explain
it. And when the president frets
that Mueller may be getting too
close to him, they assure him he has
done nothing wrong, urge him to
resist attacking the special counsel
and insist that the investigation is
wrapping up — first, they said, by
Thanksgiving, then by Christmas
and now by early next year.
On Tuesday, Trump’s legal team
sought to gain the offensive when
Sekulow called for the appointment of a second special counsel,
to investigate alleged corruption at
the FBI and Justice Department.
As lawyers for the world’s
highest-profile client, Dowd and
Cobb have come under scrutiny for
their every move and utterance —
and the criticism has been harsh.
Many in the Washington legal
community chide them as being
indiscreet, error-prone and outmatched. They say public blunders
— such as Dowd and Cobb casually
chatting about their legal strategy
on the patio of a downtown Washington steakhouse in September
within earshot of a reporter — suggest a lack of discipline.
Critics also question why, seven
months into Mueller’s investigation of Russian interference in the
2016 election, they have not assembled a battalion of lawyers as
President Bill Clinton had when
he was being investigated by independent counsel Kenneth W.
Starr. And some Trump loyalists,
spoiling for a fight, say the president’s lawyers should be combat-
BRENDAN MCDERMID/REUTERS
JERRY CLEVELAND/THE DENVER POST
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM TOP: John Dowd, Ty Cobb and Jay Sekulow
serve as President Trump’s legal team in the Russia probe as
well as his strategists, publicists and — based on Dowd’s claim
that he wrote a presidential tweet — ghostwriters.
ive rather than cooperative with
Mueller.
“There certainly have been
gaffes,” said Alan Dershowitz, a
criminal defense attorney and Harvard Law School professor who has
won praise from Trump for his
television appearances defending
a president’s constitutional prerogative to fire his FBI director.
“These are not the kinds of
things that one would expect from
the most powerful man in America, who has a choice of anybody to
be his defense counsel,” Dershowitz said. “Well — almost anybody,”
he added, saying that he is not
interested in the job.
This portrait of Trump’s legal
team and defense strategy is based
on interviews with more than two
dozen White House officials, lawyers and other people connected
to the Russia probe, most of whom
spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the
subject.
The chorus of criticism may be
growing louder, but Trump is not
singing along. By most accounts,
the president is satisfied with his
representation — and talks to Cobb
several times a day — though advisers say he has occasionally discussed bringing on new lawyers.
Trump, 71, connects with Dowd,
76, and Cobb, in his mid-60s, as
contemporaries. He appreciates
their no-nonsense old-school
style, and likes that neither appears on television, believing their
absence from the airwaves deprives what he calls the Russia
“witch hunt” of oxygen, according
to Trump’s advisers.
A former Marine Corps captain,
Dowd has a gruff demeanor and
has proved able at times to cool
Trump’s temper and convince him
of the virtues of pragmatism over
pugnacity, aides said.
Some Trump advisers dismiss
Cobb’s predictions that the Mueller probe is nearing its conclusions as misleading happy talk,
but the president has internalized
it as reality. One reason for
Trump’s faith is his belief that his
lawyers are plugged in. Cobb tells
him he is in frequent, and sometimes daily, contact with the special counsel’s office, according to
people familiar with the dynamic.
Over Thanksgiving at Mar-aLago in Palm Beach, Fla., Trump
boasted to friends that Cobb was
“brilliant” and that he was certain
Mueller would soon exonerate
him.
Cobb declined to comment, and
Dowd responded to an email inquiry with two words: “No,
thanks.”
White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders said,
“The president is happy with his
legal team.”
Cobb works as a White House
lawyer whose salary is paid by the
government, and his duty is to the
office of the presidency, whereas
Dowd and Sekulow are employed
by Trump and represent him personally. Dowd and Sekulow enjoy
attorney-client privilege, but Cobb
does not — meaning that Mueller
could seek access to Cobb’s notes
or ask to interview him about his
interactions with the president.
Mark Corallo, a Justice Department official under President
George W. Bush, served as spokesman for Trump’s legal team earlier
this year. Corallo is no longer involved, but he praised Dowd and
Cobb as “titans.”
“They’ve been at the top of their
profession and were on the shortlist of the top 10 attorneys you
would call if you got your knickers
in a twist,” Corallo said. He added:
“One thing I like is Cobb and Dowd
are of the same generation as the
president. They are contemporaries. There is a comfort that
comes with being able to talk with
somebody who shares your experience in the world.”
Still, there have been moments
of tension. On Dec. 5, anxiety ran
high early in the morning because
of a report out of Germany that
Mueller’s office had subpoenaed
Deutsche Bank for records related
to the transactions of Trump and
people close to him.
Trump was unnerved, but his
lawyers tried to soothe his irritation and scrambled to determine
whether the report was accurate,
aware that if Mueller were digging
into Trump’s finances, he would be
crossing a red line the president
had publicly set, according to
three people familiar with the discussions. After the lawyers consulted with the special counsel’s
office, Sekulow issued a statement
that afternoon saying that Trump’s
team had confirmed there was no
subpoena for Trump’s records.
The Trump administration’s
key people in the Russia investigation — including the president’s
son Donald Trump Jr. and son-inlaw, Jared Kushner — are represented by different attorneys. But
some of the various lawyers, along
with Dowd and Cobb, cooperate
by sharing information on regular
conference calls about questions
their clients have been asked and
documents they have turned over.
Witnesses in Mueller’s probe
and their lawyers have reported
back to Cobb and Dowd that the
special counsel’s team has asked
detailed questions about Trump’s
May firing of James B. Comey as
FBI director, leading them to believe that Mueller may be gathering evidence of obstruction of
justice, according to one witness.
But Cobb and Dowd have told
Trump he has no vulnerability, officials said. Dowd went so far as to
posit last week to Axios that a president cannot obstruct justice because of his constitutional powers
as the chief law enforcement officer — an interpretation that was
mocked by some legal scholars.
On Dec. 2, Trump tweeted that
he fired Michael Flynn as national
security adviser in part because he
had lied to the FBI — an admission
that could become evidence in an
obstruction investigation. Dowd
claimed he drafted the tweet, and
fellow lawyers privately said they
could not believe a statement so
careless was written not by the impulsive president but by his lawyer.
One of Trump’s advisers told the
president that weekend: “The first
job of a lawyer is to shut up. The
second job of a lawyer is to keep
their client’s mouth shut. I don’t
know why they’re tweeting and
talking and trying to explain the
tweet,” according to someone with
knowledge of the conversation.
People close to the Trump legal
team argue that additional lawyers could result in a more proactive and careful approach. “It’s
amazing the stress and magnitude of representing the president of the United States,” said
one person familiar with the inner workings. “You’d have to be
super human to do it alone. You’ve
got 16 of the best lawyers in the
country going up against you.”
For Trump, being under the
glare of a legal investigation is
familiar territory. A real estate developer and reality-television star
before becoming a politician, he
has spent much of his professional
life enmeshed in litigation.
When Mueller’s Russia investigation began in May, Trump hired
as his lead attorney Marc Kasowitz,
a litigator from New York with a
brawler reputation who had represented Trump and his companies
off and on for years in divorce,
bankruptcy and other proceedings.
In the early weeks of the Mueller
probe, the hard-charging Kasowitz
would scurry in and out of the Oval
Office and the adjoining dining
room in what aides described as a
running — and at times frenzied —
commentary with Trump about all
things Russia.
But Kasowitz had scant experience in Washington and with investigations like Mueller’s. After he
caused a kerfuffle by sending an expletive-laced and disparaging email
to a stranger who had criticized him,
Kasowitz departed the Russia legal
team. He continues to represent
Trump in some other matters.
Trump tried to hire or has considered hiring more than a half
dozen top litigators to help manage the Russia probe, including
William A. Burck, Mark Filip, Emmet Flood, Robert J. Giuffra, Ted B.
Olson and Brendan V. Sullivan Jr.,
according to several people with
knowledge of the president’s deliberations. For various reasons,
none took the job.
“If you’re the president of the
United States, typically the top
lawyers are lining up to pitch
you,” said one person close to the
White House and familiar with
the legal team’s dynamics. “Here,
you have the opposite.”
Bob Bauer, who was President
Barack Obama’s White House
counsel, said in assessing the
Trump legal team: “Some people
may want to blame the lawyers,
but my principal question is, ‘How
do you represent a client like
Trump?’ And at what point do
these lawyers decide they’re so
hemmed in, so compromised by
his behavior, his impulses, his
tweets, that they just can’t represent him effectively?”
The face of the legal team has
been Sekulow, who has deep ties to
the Christian right, though he has
adopted a lower profile since the
spring and summer when he was a
frequent television presence.
Cobb, who had been a partner
at Hogan Lovells, enjoys a reputation as a seasoned white-collar
advocate whose last high-stakes
legal case involving Washington
politics was in the 1990s. Dowd
has been a higher-profile criminal defender and represented
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) during a 1990 ethics investigation
into whether McCain had improperly intervened in a savings
and loan probe. He is perhaps
best known for representing the
commissioner of baseball in the
late 1980s and producing the
“Dowd Report,” a document that
resulted in Pete Rose’s lifetime suspension from the sport.
Dowd was widely perceived by
other lawyers to be in the twilight
of his career, having formally retired in 2015 from Akin Gump,
where he had worked since 1990.
Dowd lost one of his most recent big cases when his client,
hedge fund manager Raj Rajaratnam, was convicted in 2011 on
insider trading charges in New
York. Preet Bharara, the U.S. attorney prosecuting Rajaratnam,
reflected on facing Dowd in that
trial in an episode last week of his
podcast, “Stay Tuned with Preet.”
“John Dowd said a lot of — how
shall I put it? — ludicrous, silly
things,” said Bharara, who was
fired as U.S. attorney two months
into the Trump administration.
At one point, Dowd was filmed
swearing at and flashing his middle finger at reporters covering the
trial. It garnered him unflattering
press coverage — but it was the
kind of dramatic move that a client like Trump could see as an
attribute.
philip.rucker@washpost.com
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
rosalind.helderman@washpost.com
Sari Horwitz and Tom Hamburger
contributed to this report.
Authorities file terrorism charges against N.Y. subway bombing suspect
Officials: Suspect posted
taunt online aimed at
Trump before attack
BY D EVLIN B ARRETT
AND M ARK B ERMAN
Federal prosecutors filed terrorism charges Tuesday against
the suspected New York City subway bomber, Akayed Ullah, saying
he posted a taunt online aimed at
President Trump before the attack
in a tunnel beneath Times Square
and then proclaimed “I did it for
the Islamic State.’’
A criminal complaint filed in
federal court in Manhattan charges Ullah with providing material
support to a terrorist group, using
a weapon of mass destruction,
bombing a public place, destruction of property by means of fire or
explosive, and use of a destructive
device during a crime of violence.
The 27-year-old is an immigrant
from Bangladesh who came to the
United States in 2011, fueling the
Trump administration’s argument
that Monday’s attack is proof the
country is too lax in how it allows
immigrants to enter. According to
the criminal complaint, Ullah’s
radicalization began in at least
2014, as he viewed Islamic State
propaganda, including a video
urging followers to carry out attacks close to home if they were
unable to go overseas.
Police say Ullah detonated a
pipe bomb affixed to his clothes
while walking down a crowded
commuter tunnel in Times Square
during the Monday morning rush
hour. “The location and timing of
his planned attack was no accident, and his motivation was no
mystery,” Joon H. Kim, the acting
U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, said at a news
conference about the charges
Tuesday.
The 10-page criminal complaint also reveals some of what
Ullah told investigators after the
attack. While in Bellevue Hospital
receiving treatment for his injuries, Ullah declared he acted on
behalf of the Islamic State, and
investigators found a passport in
his name with handwritten notations, including: “O AMERICA,
DIE IN YOUR RAGE,’’ according
to the complaint.
Those statements are just a
fraction of the incriminating comments Ullah has made to investigators, according to law enforcement officials.
Ullah, who remains hospitalized, told police he was angry
about decades of U.S. policies
toward Muslim countries, officials
said. Investigators believe he built
the bomb at his home and used
Christmas lights and a battery to
detonate the device, according to
the complaint.
On Monday morning, Ullah
was on his way to carry out the
attack when he opened Facebook
and posted a message for the president, federal authorities alleged.
“Trump you failed to protect your
nation,” Ullah wrote, according to
the complaint. Kim declined to
elaborate on whether there was
anything specific the president
had said or done that Ullah found
objectionable.
Ullah also posted a statement
on Facebook aimed at telling other
Islamic State supporters that he
was carrying out the attack in the
group’s name, the complaint continued.
Police officials in Bangladesh
said Ullah is married to a woman
A.M. AHAD/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A man in Bangladesh reads a newspaper that features a photo of Akayed Ullah, the suspected New
York subway bomber. Ullah, 27, came to the United States in 2011 from Bangladesh.
who lives in Dhaka with their
child. Saiful Islam, a counterterrorism official in Bangladesh, said
Ullah’s wife and in-laws were
questioned and released Tuesday.
Police officials and neighbors
said Ullah had returned to Bangladesh twice in the past few years.
The first visit, in 2015, was for his
wedding, according to people who
live in the same building as his
in-laws in Dhaka. He returned
again in September 2016, leaving
in October, according to Soheli
Ferdousi, police spokeswoman.
She did not elaborate on the reason for his second visit.
Abul Hossain, a lawyer and
neighbor of Ullah’s in-laws, recalled the wedding two years ago
as a “a simple ceremony.”
“I saw him in the mosque several times,” Hossain said. “He
looked gentle to me.”
When Ullah’s homemade bomb
exploded Monday, it inflicted far
more harm to him than anyone
else, according to officials. Three
commuters suffered minor injuries, police said.
Ullah’s family issued a statement saying they are “heartbroken
by this attack on our city today,” but
also criticizing law enforcement’s
treatment of the family.
“Today we have seen our children, as young as 4 years old, held
out in the cold, detained as their
parents were questioned,” the
family said in its statement, which
was released through the Council
on American-Islamic Relations of
New York. “One teenage relative
was pulled out of high school
classes and interrogated without a
lawyer, without his parents. These
are not the actions that we expect
from our judicial system.”
Officials said Ullah came to the
United States on a type of visa for
relatives of people already living
legally in the country, prompting
Trump to repeat his call for legislative changes.
“There have now been two terrorist attacks in New York City in
recent weeks carried out by foreign nationals, here on green
cards,” he said Tuesday, referring
to a deadly truck attack in Manhattan on Oct. 31. “The first attacker
came through the visa lottery and
the second through chain migra-
tion. We’re going to end both of
them. The lottery system and
chain migration — we’re going to
end them fast.”
L. Francis Cissna, the head of
the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, told reporters at the
White House that visa lotteries are
vulnerable to exploitation by terrorists and susceptible to fraud,
and “for that reason, regardless of
when the person became radicalized, I just want that door shut.’’
Trump has endorsed legislation, introduced over the summer
by Republican Sens. Tom Cotton
(Ark.) and David Perdue (Ga.), that
seeks to reduce — from 1 million to
500,000 — the annual distribution of green cards. As part of that,
they want to create a point system,
based on factors such as job skills,
education and English proficiency, for ranking those who apply for
green cards. It also would end the
visa diversity lottery that awards
about 50,000 green cards each
year.
Speaking Tuesday in Baltimore,
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
also blamed Monday’s incident on
“failed immigration policies.”
The attorney general said current U.S. immigration policies had
allowed 1 million or more people
to enter the United States from
what he called “terrorism-based
countries, where terrorism exists.”
“This overwhelms the ability of
the FBI to monitor them,” Sessions
said. “It’s a myth out there that we
have the power and unlimited resources to surveil hundreds of
thousands of people, even know
who to surveil.”
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
mark.berman@washpost.com
Azad Majumder in Dhaka,
Bangladesh, and Nick Miroff and Anne
Gearan contributed to this report.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
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alabama special election
Democrat’s victory portends trouble for the GOP in 2018
JONES FROM A1
Secretary of State John Merrill
said after Moore spoke that even
though the margin of victory
stood at more than 1 percent, an
automatic recount could still be
ordered, if a review of write-in
votes and military ballots narrowed the margin to less than 0.5
percent.
Barring an unforeseen shift in
ballots, the outcome was not likely
to change, cheering Democrats
who saw hope in their effort to
regain government control, coming just a month after a historic
Republican wipeout in the battleground state of Virginia. With
Jones in office, Democrats will
have a credible, if still difficult,
path to retake control of the Senate two years into Trump’s term.
Jones’s victory portended the
head winds facing Republicans in
the 2018 midterm elections, coming just a month after a historic
Republican wipeout in the battleground state of Virginia. With
Jones in office, Democrats will
have a credible, if still difficult,
path to retake control of the Senate two years into Trump’s term.
The result could also become a
factor in upcoming legislative battles, as Republicans will have one
less vote in the narrowly divided
Senate in 2018. Although Senate
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(R-Ky.) — who opposed Moore’s
candidacy after the allegations
emerged — has said that the GOP
tax overhaul will be completed
before the end of the year, when
Jones is sworn into office, the impact of Tuesday’s outcome on the
ongoing debate is unknown.
The Alabama secretary of
state’s office said Tuesday that the
election will be certified between
Dec. 27 and Jan. 3, giving Republicans as little as two weeks to pass a
federal budget and the tax legislation with their current 52-to-48
majority.
Trump tweeted his congratulations to Jones for his victory. “The
write-in votes played a very big
factor, but a win is a win,” wrote
Trump. “The people of Alabama
are great, and the Republicans
will have another shot at this seat
in a very short period of time.”
Trump won Alabama with 62
percent of the vote in 2016. He
attempted to lead a late rally for
Moore in the closing weeks of the
election, recording a robo-call,
hosting a rally in Florida near the
state line and repeatedly warning
Republicans to avoid electing a
Democrat.
The president’s former chief
strategist, Stephen K. Bannon, all
but adopted Moore as the public
face of his insurgent effort to topple
the congressional leadership of the
Republican Party. Bannon appeared at both of Moore’s rallies in
the final week, and he deployed the
full force of his Breitbart News operation to support the campaign.
It did not work. In the end,
Jones won about 50 percent of the
vote compared with about 49 percent for Moore, with Jones benefiting from strong African American turnout and a white share of
the vote about twice as large as
Barack Obama won in 2008. Fiftysix percent of women voted for
Jones, according to exit polls,
while 58 percent of men voted for
Moore. Just under 2 percent of
voters in the state wrote in a third
candidate.
“Bannon’s war on the GOP
backfired, ricocheted and hit the
president,” said Scott Reed, a Republican political strategist at the
U.S. Chamber of Commerce, who
opposed Moore in the primary.
Exit polls showed a steep drop
in support for Trump since his
victory in 2016. Just 48 percent of
voters approved of the president’s
job performance, higher than the
national average but well below
the levels of 2016, when Trump
adopted Alabama as one of his
favorite locations for large rallies.
It was the second time in two
months that the state flouted
Trump’s endorsement. Republican primary voters also rejected
Sen. Luther Strange, the president’s choice in the September
runoff.
Jones, a former federal prosecutor who made his mark convicting Ku Klux Klan members for
the 1963 bombing of the 16th
Street Baptist Church, cast his
campaign as an opportunity for
the state to turn the page on the
divisive politics of its past. He
supported protecting entitlements such as Medicare and Medicaid, defended Obamacare, and
said he broadly supported abortion. A gun owner, he supported
strengthening the backgroundcheck system.
“At the end of the day, this entire
race has been about dignity and
respect,” Jones said at his victory
rally, a raucous celebration in Birmingham. “This campaign has
been about the rule of law. This
campaign has been about com-
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Roy Moore, the Republican candidate in Alabama’s Senate race, rides off on his horse after voting at the Gallant Volunteer Fire
Department in Gallant, Ala. Moore did not concede defeat Tuesday night, suggesting that a recount could be possible.
Preliminary exit poll results
How different groups
voted in Alabama
As of 11:30 p.m.
Who won each group
Percentage-point lead in select groups
Doug Jones (D)
Female +16
Roy Moore (R)
Black +92
Decided in December +12
White, no college degree +55
Identify as independent or something else +8
Under age 30 +22
Believe abortion should always be illegal +62
Disapprove of Trump +87
Approve of Trump +80 White women +29
Jones benefited from near-unanimous
support from black voters, historically
large support from whites
Alabama voters more likely to say
abortion should be illegal
The finding underscores Alabama’s more conservative leaning on the
issue than the country as a whole. A July national poll by the Pew
Research Center asking a similar question found that 57 percent said
abortion should be legal in most cases, while 40 percent said it
should be mostly illegal.
Fully 96 percent of African Americans supported Jones, similar to
President Barack Obama’s 95 percent support among this group in
2012. But Jones fared much better than Obama among white voters,
garnering 30 percent of their votes, twice the 15 percent who voted for
Obama. Jones made particularly large gains among white women and
those with college degrees.
Abortion should be:
Legal in
all cases
86%
15% of voters
Race
Jones (D)
White
66% of voters
Black
29%
Write-in
30%
Moore (R)
68%
2%
96
4
Race, gender and education
White college
graduate women
14% of voters
White non-college
graduate women
17%
White college
graduate men
16%
White non-college
graduate men
19%
45%
3%
35
19
73
3
62
2
79
Female
51%
2%
57
2
215
64
80
2
White evangelical Christians showed slight signs of slippage, making
up 44 percent of voters compared with 47 percent of the state’s
electorate in the 2012 and 2008 presidential elections.
White
evangelical
Christians
44% of voters
Everyone else
56%
42%
1
Illegal in
34
most cases
25%
Illegal in all cases
18
27%
Gender
Male
49% of voters
Legal in
most cases 77
27%
52%
2
25
1% 13%
18%
76
2%
80%
2
22
56%
1
41
More Alabamians wanted Republicans to
control Senate instead of Democrats
By a 50 percent to 45 percent margin, more Alabama voters said they
want Republicans to control the Senate instead of Democrats.
Young voters backed Jones by wide margin
Alabama voters ages 18 to 44 supported Jones by a roughly 20-point
margin over Moore, marking a stark shift from 2012, when Mitt
Romney won voters under 45 by a small margin.
18-29
60%
13% of voters
2%
30-44
61
22%
1
45-64
47
41%
65+
40
23%
2
1
More than 9 in 10 voters who favored a party supported their party’s
respective candidate in Tuesday’s Senate race, but the level of
unanimity was not equal.
Would you rather see the U.S. Senate
controlled by:
38%
Democratic Party
45% of voters
99%
1%
385
Republican Party
50%
6 2
91
51
59
SOURCE: Preliminary exit poll results based on 2,387 interviews of randomly selected
voters as they exited polling places across the state of Alabama on Tuesday, Dec. 12. The
poll was conducted by Edison Media Research for the National Election Pool, The
Washington Post and other media organizations. The National Election Pool is a consortium
including ABC News, CBS News, CNN and NBC News. Typical characteristics have a margin
of sampling error of plus or minus four percentage points; the error margin for smaller
voting groups is larger. Percentages may not add up to 100 because of rounding.
mon courtesy and decency and
making sure that everyone in this
state, regardless of which Zip code
you live in, is going to get a fair
shake.”
At a Democratic watch party in
Gadsden, where several of Moore’s
accusers lived, multiple women
who knew the accusers broke
down in tears when the result was
called. “There was a movement,
the resistance movement, the day
Donald Trump was sworn in,” said
Ann Green, the chair of the
Etowah County Democratic Party.
“It didn’t just happen on the
coasts. It happened in Alabama.”
Democrats were aided by senior congressional Republicans
who dropped their endorsements
of Moore after the allegations of
misconduct surfaced, including
hard-line conservatives such as
Sen. Mike Lee (Utah) and Sen. Ted
Cruz (Tex.). McConnell had promised to open an ethics investigation if Moore won.
The Republican National Committee also pulled out of the race
after the allegations surfaced,
with Trump’s initial blessing, but
then reengaged in the final week
of the campaign at the president’s
direction.
Six women told The Washington Post that Moore pursued them
in the late 1970s and early 1980s.
Five were teenagers at the time,
and one was 22. Moore, who denied misconduct but admitted to
possibly dating high school girls,
was in his early 30s at the time.
One woman, Leigh Corfman, said
she was 14 and Moore was 32 when
he took her to his house, gave her
alcohol and touched her sexually.
Exit polls showed that voters
were divided on the credibility of
the accusations, with 51 percent
saying they were definitely or
probably true, compared with 44
percent who said they were definitely or probably false.
Alabama’s senior senator, Richard C. Shelby, a Republican, announced that he could not support
Moore, and the former holder of
the seat, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, declined to make his vote
public.
The outcome could have a major impact on Senate primaries in
Arizona and Nevada, where Bannon and conservative activists are
pushing insurgent candidates
whom establishment Republicans
also fear will be unelectable statewide. These strategists will now
step up their argument that candidate quality matters.
“I’m remembering Missouri
and Indiana in 2012 — two can’tlose states where we nominated
crap candidates and lost,” said Steven J. Law, president of the Senate
Leadership Fund, a group affiliated with McConnell that opposed
Moore in the primary.
Bannon’s allies struck back,
blaming McConnell’s lack of support for handing the seat to a
Democrat. “Mitch McConnell and
the Republican establishment got
what they wanted tonight in Alabama,” said Andy Surabian, a former Trump White House political
aide who works with Bannon.
“They handed this seat over to a
liberal Democrat.”
Jones was aided by a massive
infusion of late fundraising,
which allowed his campaign and a
supportive outside group to dominate television, radio, direct mail
and digital ad spending. Highway
31, a super PAC supporting Jones,
spent $4.1 million in the final
weeks of the campaign, compared
with about $1.3 million from two
outside groups backing Moore —
most of which came from America
First Action, a group that supports
Trump’s agenda.
The Jones campaign also outraised the Moore campaign by 5 to 1
in the general election, bringing in
more than $10 million in total, as
liberal donors around the country
grew excited about a possible upset.
Jones also highlighted the
ground game that his campaign
ran in the lead-up to the race,
citing 1 million phone calls, more
than 200,000 doors knocked on
and thousands of volunteers who
braved an early Alabama snow to
participate in last-minute get-outthe-vote efforts.
Joe Reed, the chairman of the
black Alabama Democratic Conference, said worries about low
black turnout had been refuted by
what he had seen on the ground.
Operatives turning out votes in
African American areas had coordinated with the Jones campaign,
something less-well-funded Democrats had struggled to make happen.
“It’s a high turnout,” Reed said.
“The Jones campaign gave us everything we asked them for.”
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
michael.scherer@washpost.com
david.weigel@washpost.com
THE WASHINGTON POST
Scherer reported from Washington.
Weigel reported from Gadsden. Jenna
Johnson in Montgomery, Ala.,
contributed to this report.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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alabama special election
African Americans seen as critical to Jones’s victory
DEMOCRATS FROM A1
their criticism of Trump’s character, believing the Alabama race
may show that even the president’s core voters are growing
wary of political figures dogged by
claims of inappropriate behavior.
Trump, who endorsed Moore, has
been accused by more than a dozen women of groping or touching
them without their consent,
which he has denied.
More than anything, there was
joy. After more than a year of
partywide bickering in the wake of
Hillary Clinton’s defeat and
months of uncertainty over how to
win back voters who abandoned
the party in 2016, Democrats
found solace in a stunning feat —
beating a Trump-style Republican
in one of the most ruby-red states
in the nation.
“The recriminations have been
tough and stupid, the Bernie
Sanders people arguing with the
Hillary people has been counterproductive. Jones sends a powerful signal not to do that,” said
Robert M. Shrum, a longtime
Democratic consultant who
teaches at the University of Southern California. “It was a repudiation of Trump, despite the special
circumstances, and we’re looking
at a wave election next year.”
Amid the celebration, however,
there were notes of caution in
casting Jones’s success as a harbinger of the Democrats’ chances
in next year’s elections, when
many Senate Democrats will face
difficult reelection contests.
Veteran strategists described
the result as a crucial if fleeting
thrill, and a crippling moment for
a fractured Republican Party that
is straining to hold its congressional ranks together.
“It’s a hard thing to generalize
since Moore was such a singular
figure,” said David Axelrod, a former senior adviser to President
Barack Obama. “The practical implication in the Senate is that the
Republicans’ margin slips to 51
seats, and it’s now very difficult for
[Majority Leader] Mitch McConnell to navigate. Democrats will
certainly have a role to play in
moderating any legislation that
comes through.”
Pointing to last month’s elections in Virginia, where Democrat
Ralph Northam was elected governor and Democrats made surpris-
JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES
A Doug Jones supporter near the polling station at the Bessemer Civic Center in Bessemer, Ala., on Tuesday. Jones, a Democrat, defeated
Republican Roy Moore for a U.S. Senate seat in deeply conservative Alabama. Democrats saw in his turnout emphasis a model.
ing gains in the state legislature,
Axelrod said that the “exodus of
voters in suburban areas away
from Republicans” remains the
biggest takeaway from the elections in Alabama and Virginia this
year. “Was it because of resistance
to Trump? That’s what we’ve got to
figure out before we know if the
pattern will continue.”
Trump’s vulnerability in the
fallout dominated Democrats’ discussions late Tuesday, especially
on the issue of conduct. Exit polls
in Alabama showed that most
women and independents considered the allegations against Moore
to be true, making Democrats
wonder whether the resurgence
this week of the accusations
against Trump could damage the
president’s political standing and
burden the GOP.
“This shows that the president
is a huge drag on Republicans,”
Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.)
said in an interview. “Suburban
voters and moderate Republicans
have had it — from New Jersey to
Virginia to Alabama.”
A crowd of Democrats in recent
days has called on Trump to leave
office because of the allegations
“Flipping a red seat
energizes and excites
the base. It fuels
fundraising and it puts
races that people
weren’t thinking about
playing in on the map.”
Chris Kofinis, Democratic strategist
against him.
Lifting Democratic spirits nationally were the glimmers of a
lurching electorate on Tuesday.
Even white Republican voters in
Alabama demonstrated that they
were uneasy with Moore and perhaps with the Republican Party’s
direction generally. Exit polls
showed Jones won far more white
voters than recent Democratic
presidential nominees in Alabama, nearly 3 in 10 statewide.
“There is an incredible opportunity in some of these red states
to compete,” said Chris Kofinis, a
Democratic strategist and former
chief of staff to Sen. Joe Manchin
III (D-W.Va.). “Flipping a red seat
energizes and excites the base. It
fuels fundraising and it puts races
that people weren’t thinking
about playing in on the map and
makes states like Arizona more
important as people look ahead.”
Kofinis said Jones’s campaign
also exposed unexpected GOP
weaknesses.
“They showed how the Republican brand is more broken than
people thought,” Kofinis said.
Jones’s mobilization of African
American voters was critical to his
victory, and Democrats saw in his
turnout emphasis a model for how
the party must mobilize its essential voter coalitions in the coming
year. In the final weekend of the
campaign, Sen. Cory Booker (N.J.)
and other prominent black Democrats rallied for Jones.
Geoff Garin, a pollster who advised Northam and worked on
past Clinton campaigns, said “it’s
arithmetic. Midterms in the past
haven’t always been good for
Democrats, and they’ve lost seats
because good Democratic voters
stayed home. Simply having a
strong ground game isn’t enough.
You can’t only look at swing voters.
In the age of Trump, you have to
get out your base.”
That includes women, said Boston-based Democratic consultant
Mary Anne Marsh, who said she
expects a “flood” of women to run
for office next year.
“You see this building from the
women’s march in January to
[Sen. Kirsten] Gillibrand [D-N.Y.]
to the Jones win,” Marsh said.
“Women are taking control, and
that includes politics. You’re looking at a tidal wave in 2018, with the
Senate and House poised to be
taken over by Democrats if this
trend keeps on building.”
Jones repeatedly appealed to
women in the closing stretch of
the race, courting them on the
issue of decency in light of the
allegations against Moore, even if
they did not share his support for
abortion rights. That stance remained an obstacle for him in his
outreach to Republicans.
“I want to make sure that when
my granddaughters grow up, they
don’t have to endure the kinds of
things that those girls in Etowah
County did and sit silent for 30 or
40 years. I want to make sure that
we send a message of who we are
and what we are, because we’re
much better than that,” Jones said
Sunday in remarks at Progressive
Union Missionary Baptist Church
in Huntsville. He was joined by
Rep. Cedric L. Richmond (D-La.),
chairman of the Congressional
Black Caucus.
Trump allies acknowledged
that Jones’s victory was a blow and
blamed Republican infighting as
much as Moore’s controversies. A
key Moore backer, for instance,
was former Trump adviser and
Breitbart executive Stephen K.
Bannon, who is vowing to undercut establishment Republican
leaders in Congress.
“You’ve got to have a good candidate and unified party. You can’t
have Steve Bannon going one way
with Trump and the Republican
Senate committee going another
way,” said Ed Rollins, an adviser to
the pro-Trump Great America Alliance super PAC. “It’s going to
make everything more difficult.
Everyone is going to start panicking.”
robert.costa@washpost.com
Philip Rucker contributed to this
report.
Senate Republicans face a trickier 2018 — but dodge a discomfiting colleague
GOP FROM A1
“It should be a hurricane siren
for every Republican,” said Josh
Holmes, a former top aide to McConnell. “This is what the death of
a party looks like, and without an
immediate course correction and
rejection of the Steve Bannon view
of the world, you can lose races in
states like Alabama.”
Jones’s victory over Roy Moore,
who was dogged by allegations of
sexual misconduct, comes after an
improbable series of decisions
and revelations that together put
the GOP’s grasp on the seat at risk
— starting with Trump’s decision
to tap Sessions, one of his most
loyal campaign supporters, for a
key Cabinet position.
Scandal-tarred
Gov. Robert
Bentley (R) filled the vacancy in
the interim with Luther Strange,
the state attorney general who
was investigating Bentley. That
appearance of an unseemly bargain gave an opening to Moore,
the former chief justice of the
Alabama Supreme Court whose
defiant antics had twice resulted
in his removal from office but won
him a fervent following among
Alabama conservatives.
With Bannon’s backing, Moore
overcame not only Strange’s establishment support but also
Trump’s intervention to emerge
from the Republican primary and
face Jones on Tuesday. But in November, the race was upended
when The Washington Post published the account of a woman
who accused Moore of having
propositioned and groped her
when she was 14 and he was in his
30s.
More accusations of misconduct followed, and the former
state judge faced the desertion of
national Republican support and
a pressure campaign led by McConnell to force him to end his
campaign. But Moore instead
turned the tables, casting the attacks as an effort by Washington
elites and out-of-town media outlets to drive him from the race.
Jones, meanwhile, spent November and much of early December watching as Republicans —
including the state’s GOP senior
senator, Richard C. Shelby —
abandoned Moore while national
Democrats and grass-roots do-
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Surrounded by his fellow brass, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) answers media questions Tuesday about Alabama’s vote.
nors rallied on his own behalf,
giving him a massive spending
advantage in the race’s final
weeks.
If there is any solace for Republicans, it is in the path not taken:
Had Moore won, he would have
joined the Senate under an unprecedented cloud that would itself have distracted from the
GOP’s legislative agenda.
Moore faced the prospect of an
immediate investigation by the
Senate Ethics Committee into the
allegations that he sexually harassed and in some cases abused
teenage girls three decades ago.
Even a swift-moving probe, by
Senate standards, would have
lasted months, and Moore’s dealings with his colleagues would
have been fraught, to say the least.
Many of his potential fellow
Republican senators, led by McConnell, called on Moore to drop
out of the race. One, Jeff Flake of
Arizona, went so far as to donate
to Jones. In the days before the
election, many Republican senators refused to even speculate
about a Moore victory.
“My hope is that the people of
Alabama don’t send him here,”
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska)
said before polls closed Tuesday.
But neither a lack of collegiality
nor an ethics probe would have
prevented Moore from casting
votes on the Senate floor for Republican bills. While there was
some question about how reliable
Moore’s support might have been
for GOP priorities, there is no
expectation that Jones will be in
the habit of taking cues from Republican leaders.
In the immediate aftermath of
Jones’s victory late Tuesday,
Moore’s Republican critics unloaded on Bannon. “This is a brutal reminder that candidate quality matters regardless of where you
are running,” said Steven Law,
president and chief executive of
the Senate Leadership Fund, a
well-funded super PAC tied to McConnell. “Not only did Steve Bannon cost us a critical Senate seat in
one of the most Republican states
in the country, but he also dragged
the president of the United States
into his fiasco.”
Bannon, for his part, as recently
as Monday fingered the party elite
for undermining Moore.
“What they’re doing is trying to
shut up President Trump and
Judge Moore,” he said. “They
would rather see Roy Moore beaten tomorrow, you know that.”
While Congress remains on
track to clear a sweeping tax bill
before Jones arrives, any hiccup
could suddenly throw the GOP
plan to deliver $1.5 trillion in tax
cuts into question. And other big
potential Republican priorities
for 2018 — including potential
bills to boost infrastructure
spending and cut back on entitlement programs — are now in limbo as every last vote comes under
the election-year spotlight.
Barring a new effort at bipartisan dealmaking that has been
largely absent so far under the
Trump administration, the GOP
appears on track to head into the
November midterms with only
one major accomplishment to
tout: a tax-cut bill that has polled
poorly and delivers most of its
direct benefit to corporations and
the wealthy.
Democratic congressional leaders are under tremendous pressure
from their party’s left flank to resist
Trump at every juncture. And
ahead of Tuesday’s results, moderate Democrats said they were not
especially hopeful that a surprise
Jones victory would spur a new
atmosphere of bipartisanship.
“I’m not holding my breath,”
said Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-Va.),
who added that a Jones victory on
the heels of a strong Democratic
showing in Virginia’s state races
last month “would be a message
that people are rejecting the kind
of venom-filled rhetoric that
comes out of this White House.”
The few Senate Republicans
who would even contemplate
serving alongside an Alabama
Democrat before the returns came
in were not eager to discuss what
that outcome might portend. “If
Mr. Jones wins, that’s going to
mean Mr. Jones has gotten more
votes than Mr. Moore,” said Sen.
John Neely Kennedy (R-La.).
Other GOP sages, meanwhile,
are left to wonder how this ever
happened in the first place — and
whether a reprise can be avoided.
Other primary battles await:
Bannon and Trump-aligned political organs are backing populist
candidates in the Arizona and Nevada primaries that party honchos
in Washington fear cannot win a
general election. And the shade of
politics in Arizona and Nevada,
they warn, is nowhere near as Republican red as Alabama crimson.
“If I had the top five Republican
minds in politics and we spent
three months attempting to conceive of a way to lose an Alabama
Senate race, I’m not sure that we
could come up with it,” Holmes
said. “You could literally take any
name out of a phone book except
Roy Moore’s and win by double
digits. And we managed to get the
only guy in Alabama that could
lose to a Democrat.”
mike.debonis@washpost.com
Paul Kane, Michael Scherer, David
Weigel and Erica Werner contributed
to this report.
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alabama special election
Roy Moore’s loss in a deep-red state was a self-inflicted wound by Senate GOP
Roy Moore’s
stunning collapse
in Alabama
PAUL KANE
represents a selfinflicted wound by
Senate Republicans, however
unintentional.
Facing what they believed were
few good options, the GOP’s top
strategists tried to execute a
complicated play in a three-way
race for the party’s nomination to
succeed Jeff Sessions, who left the
seat to become attorney general.
The path to victory for the
establishment favorite, appointed
Sen. Luther Strange, was to
ignore Moore on the initial ballot,
assuring him a spot in the
Republican runoff in late
September in the belief that
Strange would defeat him and
cruise to victory in Tuesday’s
general election.
As we all now know, that didn’t
happen. Moore, a controversial
former judge, ran away with the
Republican nomination, only to
fall apart in the general election
amid allegations of sexual
misconduct with teenagers when
he was a local prosecutor in his
30s.
Now, Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and his
top lieutenants are left with few
options other than to contain the
damage of this brutal defeat. They
will soon hold a perilously thin
@PKCapitol
majority, 51 to 49, in the Senate —
and more perilous prospects of
losing it altogether in the
November 2018 midterm
elections.
Senate Minority Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)
needs a net pickup of two seats
next year, and although that
would seem like a high hurdle —
Democrats are defending almost
three times as many seats as
Republicans are, and 10 of them
are in states that Trump won last
year — Doug Jones has opened
that path.
The Jones victory in Alabama
might encourage other
Democrats to make long-shot
bids in Republican states such as
Nebraska, Utah and Wyoming.
GOP incumbents are considered
overwhelming favorites in those
places, but if a Democrat can win
in Alabama, it will provide
encouragement to others.
Republicans placed the blame
squarely on the shoulders of
Moore. Some compared the race
to the Louisiana governor’s
campaign in 2015, when thenSen. David Vitter (R) lost in a
deeply conservative state because
the race turned into a referendum
on “his activities,” in the words of
Sen. John Neely Kennedy (R-La.).
Those included allegations that
Vitter was connected to two
prostitution rings years ago.
In Alabama, the race turned
entirely into a referendum on
Moore.
“My sense is that Mr. Moore is
the issue. It just happens in a lot
of races that one candidate can
become the de facto incumbent,
and that’s what Mr. Moore is
here,” Kennedy said.
This is exactly what McConnell
has been trying to prevent since
the 2012 Senate campaign in
Missouri. Then, Republican Todd
Akin lost after claiming, in an
effort to explain his opposition to
abortion even in cases of assault,
that pregnancy rarely results
from a “legitimate rape.” Ever
since, Senate Republicans have
forcefully tried to defeat
candidates they consider on the
fringes of public opinion to
protect themselves from being
damaged by out-of-step views.
Until the Alabama campaign,
McConnell’s team had a morethan-four-year run in successfully
thwarting those types of
insurgent Republicans in primary
races. The strategy helped
Republicans end the 2014 and
2016 elections with the majority.
But the run ended this year in
Alabama, in the unpredictable
era of President Trump. And now,
Republicans are unsure about
how to proceed.
“I guess you can do a
postmortem on anything and
dissect it, I don’t know,” Sen.
Richard C. Shelby (R-Ala.), who
opposes Moore’s candidacy, said
Monday evening. He then added,
perhaps philosophically: “We’re
where we are today. I wish we
weren’t where we were, but we
are.”
This is now the sixth Senate
seat that Republicans have lost
since 2010 with deeply flawed
candidates winning contested
primaries, but it is easily the
biggest upset given how
conservative Alabama is.
In 2014, seven statewide races
appeared on the Alabama ballot.
Strange, easily winning reelection
to his previous post as attorney
general, was the only Republican
to receive less than 60 percent. He
received 59 percent.
There are no well-known,
proven public polls in Alabama.
RealClearPolitics has no public
surveys available for the 2016
presidential campaign or for
Shelby’s reelection last year.
The only benefit of Tuesday’s
outcome, for Republicans, is that
they will not have to face an
endless flow of questions about
an ethics investigation into
Moore or any other statements
that he would have made as a
senator.
“We’re all fielding these
questions about, whether it’s
Judge Moore or the latest tweet of
the day, it is more than a
distraction from the very
significant work that goes on
around here,” Sen. Lisa
Murkowski (R-Alaska) said
Tuesday, before the polls had
closed. She did not endorse Jones,
but she was open in hoping
Moore would lose.
Back in the summer — what
seems like several lifetimes ago —
Republicans cooked up the early
strategy to try to knock out two
GOP candidates who were not in
step with establishment views.
Interim governor Kay Ivey (R)
called for the contest this year
because of a backlash against
Strange getting appointed by the
outgoing governor, Robert J.
Bentley, whom Strange had been
investigating for corruption as
state attorney general.
The oddly timed race allowed
anyone to jump in without giving
up their current seat, including
Rep. Mo Brooks (R-Ala.).
The McConnell-affiliated super
PAC, Senate Leadership Fund,
mounted a multimillion-dollar
campaign to tear down Brooks to
ensure that Strange would face
Moore in the runoff. One TV ad
showed Brooks slamming Trump,
early in the 2016 campaign, when
he was backing another
candidate.
Brooks is a member of the
rabble-rousing House Freedom
Caucus, giving him credentials
with deeply conservative voters,
but he also enjoyed inroads more
traditional business-friendly
interests. The thinking of Senate
leaders was that if Strange’s allies
took out Moore in the initial vote,
Brooks would win the runoff in a
rout because Moore’s past
controversies would doom him.
So they buried Brooks’s
campaign in that initial threeway race. But Moore, 70, defeated
Strange by a wide margin, and
last month The Washington Post
broke the first story about
Moore’s alleged pursuit of
teenage girls nearly 40 years ago.
McConnell tried to force Moore
to step aside, but he refused and
the race turned into a nail-biter
against Jones.
On Monday, Strange, in office
just a few months, acknowledged
that he was unaware of the
custom for outgoing senators to
escort their successors into the
well of the Senate to be sworn in
by the vice president.
Strange presumed that he will
not fulfill that role. “That’s a good
question, I assume that’s up to
Shelby, that’s kind of what I’m
guessing,” he said Monday. “That
will be his responsibility.”
And McConnell’s responsibility
will be protecting a narrower
majority.
paul.kane@washpost.com
WINNERS/LOSERS
Blue gains
and red
pains after
Ala. race
BY
A ARON B LAKE
After what seems like years,
the Alabama special election is
over. The race to replace Attorney
General Jeff Sessions in the Senate spanned nearly four full
months, featured one bizarre
turn after another and ended
Tuesday night with Democrat
Doug Jones pulling off the upset
over Roy Moore, who faced allegations that he sexually harassed
and assaulted teenage girls while
he was in his 30s.
Let’s break down the whole
thing via winners and losers.
Winners
Democrats’ Senate majority
hopes
At the start of the cycle, the
math for Democrats’ winning the
Senate majority in 2018 — even in
a very good environment — appeared prohibitive. They only
had two bona fide pickup opportunities, they needed three pickups, and they had to defend 10
swing and red states Trump won.
The map was brutal.
But since then, they’ve gotten
the news they need to at least put
the Senate in play. Potential takeovers in Arizona and Nevada look
increasingly promising. An open
seat popped up in Tennessee
where last week they landed popular former governor Phil Bredesen as a candidate, and now they
nabbed 1 of the 3 pickups they
needed a year early in Alabama.
The math is still tough, but it’s
clearly within the realm of possibility now.
The #MeToo movement
As I argued earlier Tuesday, I
don’t think the results in Alabama say much about how voters
would treat similar allegations in
any other state. Alabama is just
that uniquely polarized and rubyred. The fact that Moore still had
a fighting chance — and that so
many Alabama Republicans
clearly believed him when he said
his female accusers were making
it up — showed the downside of
going public with these things.
But Jones’s win has to be a
shot in the arm for the #MeToo
movement. A year after sexualharassment accusations failed to
bring down Trump, they were
able to bring down a Republican
in a dark-red state.
Democrats’ pulse in the
Deep South
To be clear: This is a stunning
result — no matter what preceded it. Before Tuesday, a Democrat
had not won a U.S. Senate seat in
Alabama in nearly three decades.
The party is practically extinct in
the Deep South and has been for
a few years now, with their gains
there gradually rolling back during the Obama presidency. Racial
polarization has made the region
practically impenetrable for the
blue team, which basically holds
majority-black congressional districts and nothing else.
I wouldn’t say this ushers in a
Democratic revival by any means
JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES
Supporters of Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Doug Jones celebrate as Jones is declared the winner during his election night gathering on Tuesday.
— absent the allegations against
Moore, Jones very likely would
have lost — but the fact that Democrats could even capitalize on
the right opportunity in a tough
region has to warm the hearts of
party officials and supporters.
The gender gap
The 2016 election featured the
largest gender gap in a presidential race in modern history, with
men going for Trump by 11 points
and women going for Hillary
Clinton by 13 points. Well, the
gender gap in Alabama was even
bigger, with men going for Moore
by 17 points (57 to 40) and women
going for Jones by 15 (57 to 42).
That should reinforce the idea
that men and women process allegations of sexual harassment
and assault differently.
African American turnout
Perhaps the biggest story line
heading into special Election Day
was whether black voters would
turn out to vote enough for Jones.
Given how racially polarized Alabama is, Jones could only count
on so many votes from white Alabamians, who usually go about 4
to 1 or more for the GOP.
Well, black voters turned out —
in about the same numbers they
did for Obama in 2008 and 2012,
in fact. Exit polls show that 28
percent of the electorate was
black, which is slightly higher
than the state’s black population
(27 percent) and especially good
considering Obama wasn’t on the
ballot.
Losers
President Trump
Trump stuck his neck out by
backing Moore even when other
members of the GOP establishment wouldn’t, apparently be-
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Supporters of Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore pray as results come in and before Moore
speaks at the RSA Activity Center in Montgomery, Ala., on Tuesday.
lieving Moore had regained momentum and perhaps wary of losing a vote in a closely divided
Senate. Whatever the case, it
backfired — and in an extremely
pro-Trump state, no less.
Dating back to the October primary runoff in which he backed
Luther Strange over Moore,
Trump has now supported the
loser in three straight statewide
contests in three consecutive
months (the third being Ed
Gillespie’s Virginia governor campaign in November). Trump loves
to point out how well Republicans
have done in House special elections, which all happen to have
been in conservative districts, by
the way. By that same logic, he’s
now on quite the losing streak.
Senate Republicans
As The Post’s Paul Kane astutely pointed out Tuesday morning,
either result was difficult to call a
victory for Senate Republicans.
Losing the seat would mean their
Senate majority was narrowed by
half and more imperiled come
2018, but winning it would mean
they have to deal with Moore.
Even before all the sexual allegations, that was something Senate
Republicans really preferred
wouldn’t be the case, given
Moore’s uniquely extreme politics and penchant for fashioning
himself a martyr.
Layer on top of that the fact
that Republicans said they’d call
for an ethics investigation and
even, in some cases, Moore’s expulsion, and Moore’s being in the
Senate might be a bigger headache than a Democrat.
In the end, Republicans got
Option A.
Mitch McConnell
This may seem redundant given the above, but there was nobody who took a beating worse in
the entire Alabama campaign
than the Senate majority leader.
Moore decided to make him the
boogeyman from the very start,
sending hyperbolic emails saying
McConnell was trying to stop
him. When the allegations came
to light, McConnell clearly did try
to stop Moore, urging him to step
aside in favor of a GOP write-in
candidate.
Well, none of it worked. Not
only did McConnell fail to nudge
Moore aside, but by the end of the
race, exit polls showed that just
16 percent of Alabama voters had
a favorable opinion of the GOP
leader, vs. 67 percent unfavorable
— in a red state. Expect plenty of
insurgent GOP primary challengers to use this exact same playbook next year. It sure seemed to
pay dividends here.
Roy Moore’s surrogates
They took to the media to defend Moore when nobody else
would, and they repeatedly
showed exactly why nobody else
would. They compared Moore’s
alleged relationships with teenagers to Mary and Joseph in the
Bible. They compared unwanted
sexual touching of a 14-year old to
stealing a lawn mower. Even on
special Election Day, they took to
the cable news airwaves to suggest public officials were required to swear oaths of office on
the Bible (they’re not).
It was painful, and now, thankfully, it’s over.
aaron.blake@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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alabama special election
THE FALLOUT
Heeding Bannon in contest, Trump gambles and loses
BY
AND
J OSH D AWSEY
A SHLEY P ARKER
President Trump lost in Alabama on Tuesday. Again.
This time, Trump threw his
support behind Roy Moore, a polarizing, wounded Republican accused of dating and making sexual advances on teenagers — and
found himself presiding over a
stunning repudiation of Republicans in the Deep South that could
have wide reverberations for his
agenda and the party he leads.
With the Tuesday night victory
of Doug Jones, Democrats captured an elusive seat in Alabama,
slashed the already razor-thin
margin for Republicans in the
United States Senate — now 51 to
49 — and embarrassed a president who bucked many in his
party to back Moore.
“If you take the five best consultants in politics and tell them
to lose the Alabama Senate race,
I’m not sure they could do it,” said
Josh Holmes, a longtime adviser
and former chief of staff to Senate
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.).
The president watched the race
unfold Tuesday night after a
quick holiday party at the White
House, devouring the results on
television and receiving updates
from his political team. He was
joined by Chief of Staff John F.
Kelly, who stayed with the president at the White House well into
the evening and took updates
from the staff to pass along, a
White House official said.
Trump had obsessed over the
race in recent days, including
asking associates last weekend at
his Mar-a-Lago resort about
Moore and his chances.
By late Tuesday night, aides
had already begun guessing
where the mercurial Trump
would hurl the blame — and how
he would distance himself from
Moore, a man he had privately
criticized for weeks even as he
backed him.
Noting that Trump’s attorney
general, Jeff Sessions, previously
held the seat, one senior White
House official said, “Now Trump
hates him and a Democrat is in
the Senate.”
In a tweet Tuesday night, the
president congratulated Jones on
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Former White House strategist Stephen K. Bannon speaks before Senate candidate Roy Moore at a “Drain the Swamp” campaign rally Monday
in Midland City, Ala. Bannon had backed Moore in the Republican primary, and Trump followed suit in the run-up to Tuesday’s election.
his win, and the White House
official said that, so far, Trump
had not erupted at anyone. “He
knew this was not a sure thing, we
all told him that,” this person said.
The latest internal White
House polls showed the race
nearly tied — with Moore losing
by less than two points.
Senior White House officials —
who had crowed about the president’s endorsement and political
instincts earlier in the day —
began to criticize Moore and his
campaign Tuesday night even before the results were in. One
White House aide said simply
trying to ride a populist, anti-establishment wave, as Trump did
in 2016, is not enough for victory;
the candidates also need to be
quality candidates and Moore fell
far short, this person said.
The election was also a devastating blow for former White
House chief strategist Stephen K.
Bannon, who saw Moore winning
in the Republican primary,
jumped to lead the parade and
continued to back him even amid
the allegations while urging
Trump to do the same. Bannon
was at Moore’s victory party Tuesday night and had been crowing
to associates the Republican was
going to win.
“Not only did Stephen K. Bannon cost us a critical Senate seat
in one of the most Republican
states in the country, but he also
dragged the president of the United States into this fiasco,” said
Steven Law, a top McConnell ally
who leads the Senate Leadership
Fund.
Trump’s decision to jump into
the race was a divisive one in
Washington, and it is unclear if
the polarizing president — popular in his own party but deeply
unpopular outside — helped. According to exit polls, Trump’s
stock has fallen in the Yellowhammer State, with almost half of the
state now disapproving of his job
performance.
The president put his own reputation and instincts on the line,
recording a robo-call for Moore,
heaping praise on him at a Friday
night rally and disregarding concerns from party stalwarts and
some of his own advisers that
Moore could do the unthinkable:
lose as a Republican in Alabama.
To many, Trump’s decision
looked like a self-inflicted mistake: The Republican Party had
already pulled support from
Moore after The Washington Post
reported accusations in early November that Moore had made
sexual advances toward teenagers, including one 14-year-old
girl, while in his 30s.
Other Republicans had already
extricated themselves from the
race. For example, McConnell
tried to orchestrate a political
Kabuki show to remove Moore.
Ivanka Trump, the president’s
daughter, said there was “a special place in hell” for those who
prey on children. And Sen. Richard C. Shelby (R-Ala.) said he
wrote in the name of a “distinguished Republican.”
The backstory for Trump was
complicated. After initially agreeing for the Republican National
Committe to pull its support,
Trump returned from a lengthy
trip to Asia and began rethinking
his decision.
He began questioning the accusations — and reminding advisers about his own experience after the explosive “Access Hollywood” tape emerged showing
him boasting about groping
women’s genitals.
“The election was almost a
carbon copy of what happened in
2016 with President Trump,” Andrew Surabian, a top Bannon
aide, said before the polls closed
Tuesday. “All of President’s Trump
supporters felt they were under
siege. If anyone understands
what a pile-on looks like, it’s
President Trump.”
Counselor Kellyanne Conway
told Trump those who wanted
Moore out were the same people
who wanted him to leave the
presidential race, and his political team showed him polls with
Moore on the verge of winning.
Trump grew convinced that
McConnell had overplayed his
hand by so fervently pushing
Moore to withdraw. The two men
came to an agreement last week
to no longer discuss the race,
according to a McConnell adviser. And Trump told aides that if he
didn’t have enough votes in the
Senate, he wouldn’t get his own
agenda passed.
Trump was also concerned that
his base was eroding and listened
to Bannon and others, who said
he should eschew governing
toward the middle and remember
who elected him.
As the results rolled in, some
aides worked to ready talking
points. One White House aide
suggested that the West Wing
would try to immediately pivot to
tax reform, arguing that with an
even thinner majority in the Senate, every vote was even more
critical.
But many of Trump’s advisers
who were skeptical of Moore were
at Il Canale in Georgetown, attending a holiday party thrown by
Gary Cohn, Trump’s chief economic adviser and a registered
Democrat.
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
ashley.parker@washpost.com
THE TAKE DAN BALZ
Alabama’s U.S. Senate race highlights fractures within GOP
TAKE FROM A1
a percentage point, Moore
signaled late Tuesday that he had
not given up the fight. He refused
to concede the race and said he
would seek a possible recount.
That decision will produce more
heartburn among establishment
Republicans, who would prefer to
see him fade quickly and quietly
into obscurity.
Trump suffered mightily after
fully embracing Moore in the
final weeks of the campaign,
despite credible allegations that
Moore had engaged in sexually
improper behavior with teenage
girls when he was in his 30s.
It was the second such setback
for the president in a state he won
by 28 points just a year ago. In the
GOP primary earlier this year, he
had endorsed, with limited
enthusiasm, Sen. Luther Strange,
who had taken the seat of Jeff
Sessions when Trump made
Sessions his attorney general. For
Trump, nothing good has come
from that appointment — from a
special counsel investigation into
Russia’s role in the 2016 election
to a pair of losses in the Alabama
races.
The outcome was a bad
moment as well for Stephen
K. Bannon, once the president’s
White House strategist and a man
with the expressed commitment
of bringing down the GOP
establishment. More than Trump,
Bannon was all in for Moore,
campaigning on his behalf while
railing against those in the
establishment who had been
overtly critical of the GOP
nominee.
Bannon has threatened a year
of turmoil for the GOP, but in this
high-profile test, both he and the
president proved to have limited
ability to transfer Trump’s
popularity to another candidate.
This won’t be the last the party
hears from Bannon, but he will be
viewed differently as a result of
what happened on Tuesday.
For those reasons, many
Republicans will privately be
pleased to see Bannon and even
Trump get their comeuppance.
But that doesn’t resolve the split
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore walks out to speak at a watch party in Montgomery, Ala., after his opponent, Democrat Doug
Jones, was announced to be the winner of the race late Tuesday. Moore refused to concede the race and said he would seek a recount.
within the party over the
direction it should take. As long
as Trump is president, this is the
division and the reality that
Republicans will live with — an
uneasy coalition at best.
Moore brought to the race a
history of defiance to the rule of
law, twice having been removed
from the state Supreme Court for
defying orders. He was hardly
popular despite defeating Strange
in the primary, but in channeling
Trump’s outsider, drain-theswamp rhetoric, he appealed to
many in the Trump and GOP
coalition who wanted to stick the
party’s congressional leadership
in the eye.
His candidacy took a damaging
hit after the primary, when The
Washington Post reported the
accusation that he had initiated a
sexual encounter with a 14-yearold girl when he was in his 30s as
well as accounts of other women
who said he preyed on them as
teenagers. The race turned from
an almost-certain victory for the
Republicans to a competitive
contest that would leave the party
with no good outcomes, win or
lose.
The fact that he will not be in
the Senate spares Republicans
from what could have been a
spectacle of controversy—a likely
ethics investigation that could
have led to Moore’s expulsion but
that even if it did not, would keep
him and the allegations against
him in the forefront of the
political conversation — to the
detriment of the GOP.
A number of Republicans said
Tuesday they had feared the
worst from a Moore victory, that
with him as a sitting senator,
supported by the president and
the Republican National
Committee in his campaign, the
party would have put itself on the
side of a candidate with racial
and other views anathema to
most Americans and on the
wrong side of the issue of sexual
harassment at a moment when
the ground is shifting
dramatically toward zero
tolerance for such behavior.
These Republicans expressed
concerns that the GOP could lose
the support of young voters for a
generation as well as declining
support from suburban women
who have been part of their
coalition in their rise to power.
The preliminary exit polls
showed the validity of some of
those fears, as voters under age 45
went overwhelmingly for Jones
against Moore. Women also
backed the Democrat’s candidacy,
although white women
supported Moore.
However contentious the
campaign proved to be during the
final weeks, the aftermath could
be similarly destabilizing for the
Republicans. Party leaders will
attempt to put the election
behind them and return to their
efforts to pass a tax bill and deal
with other pending legislative
issues.
But recriminations are likely,
especially with a president who
hates to lose and has a record of
lashing out when things have not
gone his way. The president was
opposed in this contest by Senate
Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.), who had
called for Moore to withdraw
after the allegations of sexual
misconduct. Though the two will
try to come together over the tax
cut bill, the ill will that has long
existed will remain.
Trump faces his own
accusations of sexual misconduct,
and as the national debate about
those issues rises, Democrats are
becoming more aggressive in
pushing to have Trump held
accountable. Moore’s defeat will
be seen as a sign that the public is
becoming far less tolerant of such
behavior.
The president’s allies have said
voters took the charges against
him into account and elected him
anyway. But Moore’s defeat could
be read as a shift in the public
mood and Democrats likely will
push the issue at every
opportunity. Trump’s Twitter
blast Tuesday morning at Sen.
Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) as
someone willing to “do anything”
for campaign contributions
further inflamed the issues of
sexual misbehavior.
Beyond that are questions
about how much the addition of
one seat to the Democrats’
column changes the calculus for
control of the Senate in 2018. The
map remains difficult for the
Democrats, and they are still in
need of a genuine renewal. But
with control of the House already
in play, the Alabama race, coupled
with the results in Virginia last
month, suggest there is energy
among rank-and-file Democrats
that could put the Republicans at
a big disadvantage next year.
It’s always easy to overstate the
importance of a single election
and no doubt that’s the case even
for Alabama. But this is one
contest that seemed to bring
together much of what is in the
forefront of the political debates,
from the popularity and influence
of the president to the fractured
Republican Party to the issue of
sexual harassment. For
Republicans, it was a bad night,
no matter how it was measured.
The question is where they go
now.
dan.balz@washpost.com
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alabama special election
For Moore, antiabortion stance lacks the punch it once had
Misconduct allegations,
shifting views contribute
to Republican’s loss
BY
M ARC F ISHER
Roy Moore’s campaign had one
weapon that seemed to offer his
supporters a counterweight to the
allegations that he had pursued
teenage girls when he was in his
30s: abortion.
In the run-up to Tuesday’s special election for U.S. Senate, the
Alabama Republican denied any
improper sexual behavior but also
went on the offensive against Democrat Doug Jones for being a prochoice radical, a supporter of abortion at any time, for any reason.
Republican strategists believed
that for Alabama’s antiabortion
hardliners, a vote for Jones would be
a bridge too far. They were wrong.
Jones’s unlikely victory, the
first by a Democratic Senate candidate in Alabama in a quarter-century, was driven in part by
revulsion over the allegations
against Moore, but also by resistance against a torrent of TV ads
that urged voters to make abortion a defining litmus test.
After she voted in the southern
suburbs of Birmingham, Jennifer
Greer, a 61-year-old business consultant, said she had tired of seeing TV spots arguing that conservatives should make their
choice based on Moore’s antiabortion credentials.
“A lot of what you’re seeing with
that conservative white church
element is that they’re not informed,” said Greer, who voted for
Jones. “How pro-life is not funding” health insurance for children? “They focus on one woman’s
health procedure, and they make
that the focus of the campaign.”
In the annals of the culture
wars, abortion has long been a
clear marker, an issue that packs
an emotional wallop and lets both
sides see themselves as occupying
the moral high ground.
But Tuesday’s election added a
new level of complexity to the
abortion debate, pitting antiabortion supporters of Moore against
those who believed that accusations of sexual misconduct disqualified him from elective office.
“In both cases, it’s about women’s sexuality, the sexual revolution and feminism,” said Leslie
Reagan, a historian of the abortion battles who teaches at the
University of Illinois. For both
Moore voters and those who
crossed over to support Jones,
abortion became a useful shorthand, a way to place themselves
on one or the other side of a
national clash in world views.
Jones’s victory demonstrated
once again that even in the conservative Deep South, abortion
has become an accepted, if still
controversial, practice. Southerners have abortions at about the
same rate as do women in the rest
of the country, and Southerners
have rejected some efforts to move
toward a hard ban on the procedure.
In 2011, Mississippi voters overwhelmingly rejected a proposed
constitutional amendment that
would have declared that life begins at fertilization. Planned Par-
JOE RAEDLE/GETTY IMAGES
Voters in Birmingham, Ala., wait to cast their ballots at a polling station set up at St. Thomas Episcopal Church on Tuesday. Although conservative Christians were an
essential element of President Trump’s winning coalition, the focus on abortion in Roy Moore’s campaign was apparently insufficient to motivate Trump voters this election.
enthood and medical societies argued that such a declaration
would undermine access to infertility treatments.
“There’s a lot more going on in
the South than people may think,”
Reagan said.
Many on the right thought that
voters with a long history of supporting traditional values would
put Moore over the top. “Abortion
is a galvanizing issue in Alabama,”
said Matt Barber, general counsel
of Christian Civil Rights Watch, a
conservative legal group, and a
former dean at Liberty University.
“President Obama said the social
issues were so ’90s, but in flyover
country, the desire not to be complicit in abortion homicide remains one of the top concerns.”
Barber said the abortion debate
brings Trump voters together because it signals a moral standard
for people who believe that “people in government, the media, academia, entertainment and the
halls of Congress are trying to recreate America in their secular,
Euro-socialist image. The nation is
divided between two incompatible
worldviews. We don’t see minds
being changed. There is no political solution. The only solution is a
spiritual one, a Christian revival.”
And some voters did see it that
way. At a Moore rally in Midland
City on the eve of the vote, Jack
Reynolds, a 63-year-old who lives
on a farm in Alabama’s southeast
corner, said he stuck with Moore
because “He’s defending . . . our
core values about love of life.” Reynolds said he doesn’t expect abortion to become illegal again, but “I
just love the unborn far too much
to ever vote for a national Democrat.”
For many conservative voters,
abortion is a core identifier, a way
to show that they are part of
Trump’s “forgotten men and women.”
But although conservative
Christians were an essential element of Trump’s winning coalition
last year, the focus on abortion in
Moore’s campaign was apparently
not sufficient to motivate Trump
voters to take part in an unusual
mid-December special election.
Moore’s campaign injected the
issue into the race as a time-tested
way of painting Democrats as extremists, said Drew Halfmann, a
sociologist at the University of
California at Davis who focuses on
the politics of abortion.
“The Republicans used abortion as a very effective signaling
device,” Halfmann said. “For a
time, they used same-sex marriage to keep the pot boiling but
now that that controversy has
been resolved, they’re back to
abortion.”
The tactic had worked in the
past. “This outsider sensibility has
been a real vote-getter, from 1970,
when Time magazine declared
Middle Americans ‘Man and
Woman of the Year,’ to Trump’s
election and Moore’s support,”
said Stacie Taranto, a historian at
Ramapo University who studies
the abortion debate.
But most Alabama voters did
not put abortion atop their list of
defining issues, according to a
Washington Post-Schar School
poll in late November. The survey
found that 41 percent of voters
thought a candidate’s views on
health care were most important,
followed by moral conduct at
26 percent. Abortion trailed well
behind at 14 percent.
Abortion remains one of the
few issues that most voters call an
absolute litmus test; that is, along
with health care, same-sex marriage and immigration, abortion
is a rare issue on which a majority
of voters say they could not bring
themselves to vote for a candidate
who disagrees with them.
But in Tuesday’s vote, many did
exactly that — an indication, some
scholars said, that as Americans,
even in the Deep South, become
more secular, abortion politics no
longer wields the same sway it
once did.
Moore’s campaign injected the
issue into the campaign, arguing
in TV ads and speeches that Jones
favored “full-term abortions.”
Jones did say in a September TV
appearance that he supported
“late-term abortions . . . if preg-
nancy threatens the health of the
mother,” but he subsequently said
he opposed such procedures.
For many Christian conservatives, the sense of being on the
wrong side of the law of the land
on abortion’s legality fed a growing sense of feeling disrespected
or excluded from the mainstream.
Being antiabortion has become
part of the emerging identity politics of the right, as expressed in
the nationalist, populist appeal
that Trump and his former chief
strategist, Stephen K. Bannon,
crafted in last year’s campaign.
The nation’s divide over abortion has remained relatively stable
through recent decades. Support
for the idea that abortions should
be legally available to women for
any reason has remained within a
few points of 40 percent of Americans for more than 30 years, and
support for keeping abortion legal
if a woman’s health is seriously
endangered has remained above
80 percent for nearly half a century,
according to the General Social
Survey, which has studied Americans’ perspectives since 1972.
But there’s been no such stability when it comes to how attitudes
on abortion line up with Americans’ political affiliation. From the
late 1970s through the early 1980s,
Democrats and Republicans were
equally likely to say they supported women’s rights to an abortion
for any cause. It was only in 1998
that the percentage of Republicans supporting abortion collapsed, remaining at or below 30
percent ever since. And it wasn’t
until this decade that a majority of
Democrats embraced that stand.
From the start of the abortion
reform movement in the 1960s
until at least Ronald Reagan’s
1980 campaign, many Republicans were pro abortion rights, seeing legalized abortion as an expression of individual rights and
therefore a traditionally GOP issue, Taranto said.
“Abortion and family values
weren’t political issues until the
modern women’s movement
made the personal political,” she
said.
Only in the 1980s did a conservative backlash over feminism
persuade many GOP politicians
that there was a strategic advantage to joining abortion and family values to law and order and
anti-communism as core elements of what it meant to be a
Republican.
“In the ’70s, the focus on abortion and homosexuality brought
together groups that previously
despised each other — evangelicals, Mormons and Catholics,”
Leslie Reagan said.
marc.fisher@washpost.com
David Weigel in Birmingham, Jenna
Johnson in Dothan, Ala., and Scott
Clement contributed to this report.
With Moore’s unexpected defeat, #MeToo movement forces a reckoning
Sexual abuse accusations
against the president
move to the foreground
BY
K AREN T UMULTY
Republican Roy Moore’s stunning defeat in Alabama marked a
watershed moment for the national movement around the issue of sexual abuse.
The allegations that Moore
had made sexual advances on
girls as young as 14 decades ago,
when he was in his 30s, had
created a real contest out of what
should have been an easy victory
for any Republican candidate in
ruby-red Alabama.
“Women really do seem to be
wanting to make their collective
voices heard on this issue, and
they don’t want to see it swept
under the rug one more time,”
said Jessica Leeds, one of those
who stepped forward last year to
accuse Donald Trump, then the
GOP presidential nominee, of
having committed sexual misconduct.
With Trump’s election, that
kind of reckoning seemed to have
been pushed backward.
But the sense of grievance
remained, and gained force this
fall with the toppling of movie
producer Harvey Weinstein and
the once-revered figures in media
and politics who have been taken
down in his wake.
Democrat Doug Jones’s unlikely victory may also be a sign that
the formula for winning in a
deeply polarized political climate, perfected by Trump, may
not be so reliable as it seemed.
“I think the politics may be at a
real turning point,” said author
Taylor Branch, best known for his
trilogy of volumes about the civil
rights era. “Anti-government, obstructionist politics are being reduced to having to be explicitly
backward and tribal. That works
for Trump, but I just don’t think
that it’s going to keep working.”
As the #MeToo movement
takes hold and matures, it is
moving beyond the stage of rooting out individual bad actors to
“seeking a different level of accountability,” said Fatima Goss
Graves, president of the National
Women’s Law Center.
“They want individuals to be
held accountable, but really they
are seeking institutions to
change,” she said. “There is a new
pressure for institutions to finally
get this right.”
In an interview conducted before the Alabama polls closed,
Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.)
had said that a win by Jones
would be “a huge political victory,
and it’s a victory for women
across the country to not have a
pedophile in the U.S. Senate. But
it’s not like we’re done with the
question. There are still going to
be a lot of issues that we have to
resolve, a lot of questions that are
going to come up.”
She noted that many Republican leaders in Washington had
also opposed Moore, and said, “In
some ways, Roy Moore is the
easiest of all the questions in
front of us for the #MeToo movement.”
One of those questions is how
to deal with lingering accusations against the president. He
and his allies continue to insist
that all the women who have
accused him are politically motivated liars, and that their claims
were litigated in the 2016 election.
But the matter has been revived.
Even as Alabama voters were
going to the polls on Tuesday, the
president was engaged in a Twitter battle with Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), who has been a
leading voice on the issue and
who has called upon him to
resign.
Trump called her “a light-
weight,” a “total flunky,” and
“someone who would come to my
office ‘begging’ for campaign contributions not so long ago (and
“I think the politics may
be at a real turning
point.”
Taylor Branch, author and historian
of the civil rights era
would do anything for them).” In
that parenthetical, some saw sexual innuendo.
Gillibrand retorted with her
own tweet: “You cannot silence
me or the millions of women who
have gotten off the sidelines to
speak out about the unfitness and
shame you have brought to the
Oval Office.”
As the country was watching
the political saga unfold in Alabama, it was easy for many in
other parts of the country to
dismiss the Moore supporters as
simply backward, without recognizing some of those sentiments
in more elitist circles.
“We shouldn’t beat up on folks
in some gas station in Selma as
being different from Weinstein’s
enablers,” said historian and author David J. Garrow, who has
chronicled the civil rights movement.
That is why some of the most
important conversations may be
the ones that are taking place
more quietly.
In Michigan, Democratic attorney general candidate Dana Nessel has made the issue of sexual
harassment a centerpiece of her
campaign — even releasing a
satirical campaign ad, which
quickly went viral, in which she
told voters to ask themselves:
“Who can you trust most not to
show you their penis in a professional setting?”
At a campaign event Tuesday
night, Nessel said in an interview,
a woman pulled her aside and
shared her experiences being harassed on the job in the 1980s,
“how demeaning and dehumanizing it was.”
“The fact that we’re having
these conversations now, in such
an audible way, means there are
great changes in our future,” Nessel said. “I think that time is
coming to an end.”
Though Moore will not be a
member of the U.S. Senate, Democrats plan to make sure that he
is not forgotten as the country
moves into the midterm election
season.
Alabama “soundly rejected the
new Republican Party of Roy
Moore and Donald Trump and
their toxic agenda,” Sen. Chris
Van Hollen (Md.), chairman of
the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, said in a statement after media organizations
projected Jones the winner.
“President Trump, Republican
Senate candidates and the Republican National Committee
showed us exactly who they are
by standing with Roy Moore —
and we will make sure voters do
not forget it.”
As it happens, Lyndon B. Johnson was also talking about Alabama 52 years ago when he said:
“At times, history and fate meet at
a single time in a single place to
shape a turning point in man’s
unending search for freedom.”
It is too early to know what
kind of significance history will
attach to the pivot point that a
special election for a Senate seat
in that state represents in a 21stcentury civil rights struggle. But
it does indicate that forces beyond the pull of party loyalty and
ideology still have the power to
shape the state of politics and
potentially society itself.
karen.tumulty@washpost.com
Ed O’Keefe contributed to this report.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
The World
E.U. faulted
over abuse
of migrants
in Libya
R EUTERS
said the entire electoral reform
effort had been an utter failure.
Some blamed the president for
overreaching or even trying to
sabotage the election to stay in
power. Others said he had failed to
push harder as the government
grappled with other problems, letting deadlines slip and institutional credibility fade.
“A lot of money has been spent
on electoral reforms. A lot of studies have been done and proposals
made, and still we are worse off
than 10 years ago,” said Davood
Moradian, president of the Afghan
Institute for Strategic Studies. “Every pillar of the state is based on
politics, not the constitution. The
Taliban can’t topple the government, nor can corruption, but
there has to be a political transition. It is not the date that matters,
it is the process, and there is no
light at the end of the tunnel.”
There is, however, a backup
plan — albeit one that the Ghani
government and its foreign backers strongly oppose. Some Afghans, notably former president
Hamid Karzai, have called for a
loya jirga, or traditional gathering
of elders, to select a new leader or
political path by consensus. But
many others see that as a regressive step and an unacceptable substitute for the modern electoral
process, no matter how flawed.
“This time the election will be
very difficult, but it has to happen,”
said Sediq Siddiqi, a senior spokesman for the Ghani government,
dismissing any possibility of a loya
jirga. “The conditions are not ideal, and there may be fraud and
other problems, but this is the
people’s will in our new Afghanistan.”
brussels — European governments are complicit in grave
human rights violations in Libya,
Amnesty International said
Tuesday.
Amnesty said up to 20,000
people are held in Libyan detention centers for migrants and are
subject to “torture, forced labor,
extortion, and unlawful killings.”
Other human rights organizations have leveled similar accusations in recent months.
The European support for Libyan authorities is part of a plan
to cut African immigration
across the Mediterranean. Italy
has spearheaded the plan, in
particular, by training and
equipping the Libyan coast
guard and spending heavily to
back U.N. agencies working on
relief efforts in Libya.
“European governments have
not just been fully aware of these
abuses; by actively supporting
the Libyan authorities in stopping sea crossings and containing people in Libya, they are
complicit in these crimes,” said
John Dalhuisen, Amnesty International’s head for Europe.
On Tuesday, Italian Prime
Minister Paolo Gentiloni defended the European Union’s policy
in a speech to Parliament ahead
of this week’s meeting of the
bloc’s leaders in Brussels.
“It’s thanks to us that a light is
being shone on human rights in
Libya,” he said, referring to the
millions of euros that the E.U.
has spent on improving conditions for people stuck there.
A spokesman for the bloc’s
executive arm, the European
Commission, said: “We are aware
of the inhumane and terrible
conditions some face. We share
the same objective as Amnesty:
saving lives.”
The commission said that the
bloc’s funding helped the International Organization for Migration, a U.N. agency, send more
than 15,000 people in Libya to
their home countries in Africa.
At the same time, it said the bloc
has also been slowly taking in
“genuine refugees.”
Libya is the main gateway for
migrants trying to cross to Europe by sea, though numbers
have dropped sharply since July
as Libyan factions and authorities have begun to block departures under pressure from Italy,
the main landing point. More
than 600,000 have made the
journey over the past four years.
The E.U. backs Libya’s coast
guard in its efforts to intercept
people heading to Europe, but
Amnesty International said that
the coast guard works closely
with human traffickers who torture people for money.
“By supporting Libyan authorities in trapping people in Libya
. . . European governments have
shown where their true priorities
lie: namely, the closure of the
central Mediterranean route,
with scant regard to the suffering
caused,” Dalhuisen said.
pamela.constable@washpost.com
foreign@washpost.com
RAHMAT GUL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Afghan President Ashraf Ghani speaks to reporters in April at the presidential palace in Kabul. Ghani critics say his efforts at electoral reform have failed.
Disputes putting critical Afghan elections at risk
Electoral reforms are in disarray ahead of key polls in July — worrying many that Afghanistan’s democracy could be in jeopardy
BY
P AMELA C ONSTABLE
kabul — The last time Afghanistan held national elections, in
2014, the result was a disaster. So
widespread were charges of fraud
and so tainted was the outcome
that the country reached the brink
of civil war. Then-Secretary of
State John F. Kerry finally intervened, forcing the two main contenders to form a temporary government that has been racked by
internal divisions ever since.
In the wake of that debacle,
elaborate efforts were made to
avoid repeating it. Electoral reforms were proposed, debated and
passed.
Biometric
voteridentification cards and electronic
balloting methods were studied
and tested. Discredited electoral
officials were replaced. Finally a
date was set: July 2018 for parliamentary elections, followed by a
presidential contest.
But with the vote still
eight months away, preparations
have become poisoned by charges
of political manipulation, ethnic
bias, technical incompetence and
endless delay. If the election falls
apart, many Afghans fear that
both the viability of their new
democracy and the confidence of
their international supporters will
be in jeopardy.
“We still have not been able to
build an effective democratic system. Every time we have an election, we have to reinvent it,” said
Mohammad Naeem Ayubzada, director of the Transparent Election
Foundation of Afghanistan, an independent watchdog group. “The
process has lost all credibility, but
this election is the last card we can
play. If we fail, we will lose everything we have worked for in the
past 16 years.”
President Ashraf Ghani and his
aides insist that the parliamentary
vote will take place as planned,
although some concede the date
may slip. They are desperate to
preserve the aid that pays for
much of the national budget and
defense, and foreign donors view
credible elections as a litmus test
for future support.
But the longer elections are
postponed, the longer both the
executive and legislative branches
will remain in legal limbo and
political disarray. The national
unity government’s mandate expired last year, and the current
parliament’s term has been extended twice since elections were
supposed to take place two years
ago.
The absence of institutional legitimacy has opened the door to a
frenzy of pre-election backbiting,
strong-arming
and
fingerpointing by self-interested leaders.
They include familiar names from
past ethnic and political battles,
disgruntled defectors from the
Ghani government and founders
of new political parties — some
barely more than a leader and his
best friends.
This phenomenon has become
so destructive that in October, a
surprisingly broad array of political groups, including former communists and conservative Islamists, formed a coalition and demanded that the government take
solid steps to hold fair and transparent elections. They warned
that unless a credible power transition takes place, the country
could collapse.
“Nobody wants to go back to
chaos. There is a great fear of a
crisis like 2014 or worse, and this
time no one would trust a Kerry
kind of deal,” said Rahmatullah
Nabil, a former national intelligence chief who spearheaded the
coalition and heads a new political
party. “The government is weak,
there is no balance of political
forces, and the regional situation
has totally changed. If we have
another election like 2014, no one
will be able to control it.”
Echoes of 2014
Concerns intensified in the past
several months, when the election
machinery became snarled in
technical, political and bureaucratic problems. Leaked memos
and abrupt firings embarrassed
the government and revealed how
ill-prepared it was to stage elections, despite significant foreign
investment in attempts to make
the process fraudproof.
One drama was a dispute over
the performance of the national
election commission and a second
panel to oversee election complaints. Members were appointed
a year ago, but reports persisted
that they were making little progress and consumed by internal
bickering. There were also allegations of pressure on members by
Ghani’s aides — a worrisome echo
of 2014, when charges of biased
commissioners tainted the process even before the vote.
The conflict came to a head in
October when the election commission chairman, Najibullah
Ahmadzai, was forced out for incompetence at strong international urging. In turn, Ahmadzai publicly accused aides to Ghani of
trying to persuade the other commissioners to get rid of him. He
also declared that no election
could be held in July because the
public had lost faith in the process.
“What happened was illegal
and unjustified,” Ahmadzai said in
an interview. He said several panel
members told him they had been
pressured to vote for his resignation. “We were a good team, and
our aim was to hold transparent
elections and restore the trust that
was lost in 2014.
“I am a technocrat with no
political ties, and I have done
nothing wrong,” he said. “We are
working to build a democracy, but
this is not democratic. Public trust
is only going down and down.”
A second long-simmering issue
was whether and how to use technology to insulate the next election
from fraud and error. Although
there was a well-intentioned effort
that fit with Ghani’s technocratic
reform agenda, it eventually succumbed to political disputes, unrealistic expectations and lack of
technical capacity.
The first plan was to produce
biometric national ID cards, but
that died last year amid battles in
parliament over whether to include ethnicity on each person’s
card, which might challenge various groups’ claims of larger population share and importance.
A later proposal was to introduce electronic voter registration,
polling and possibly votecounting, after the 2014 tally was
so marred by accusations of ballotstuffing that all 7 million votes had
to be recounted. But that idea
proved too ambitious and costly,
and in October the company that
won the bid for biometric voter
cards declared that it could not do
the job after all.
‘It has to happen’
Critics of the Ghani government
DIGEST
SYRIA
Government impeding
talks, opposition says
The Syrian opposition said
Tuesday that the government
delegation to the Geneva peace
talks refuses to negotiate with it
directly and insists on discussing
only terrorism.
Opposition spokesman
Yahya Aridi said the Damascus
delegation told U.N. envoy
Staffan de Mistura that it will
not negotiate directly with the
opposition, making it difficult to
move forward in the eighth round
of indirect negotiations aimed at
ending the civil war.
Syrian opposition and
government delegates are back in
Geneva after a short break in talks
that de Mistura has hosted since
early 2016. The government
delegation has protested the
opposition’s insistence that
President Bashar al-Assad play
no role in any future transition.
The opposition has been calling
for the “indirect” peace talks —
with de Mistura’s team shuttling
between the delegations — to
become direct.
Another opposition official in
Geneva, Ahmad Ramadan, said
the government delegation has
also refused to discuss three of the
four main topics proposed by
de Mistura — a new constitution,
governance, elections and
combating terrorism. Ramadan
said the government is insisting
on discussing only terrorism.
— Associated Press
CONGO
UNICEF: 400,000 kids
severely malnourished
The U.N. Children’s Fund said
Tuesday that at least 400,000
children younger than 5 in
Congo’s troubled Kasai region
are severely malnourished.
UNICEF said that more than
a year and a half of violence,
displacement and reduced
agricultural production are
contributing to the problem. It
said the children could die next
year if they do not receive aid soon.
Tajudeen Oyewale, the agency’s
acting representative in Congo,
said the true scale of the problem
is becoming clear as security
improves in some areas and
families return home.
UNICEF says about 220 health
centers have been destroyed or
damaged, crops neglected and
MOHAMMED SABER/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Palestinians stand at sunset in eastern Gaza City near the border
with Israel during a protest over President Trump’s decision last week
to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Four protesters were
wounded Tuesday, one seriously, in clashes with Israeli troops.
1.4 million people displaced in the
region.
— Associated Press
GERMANY
Soldier accused of plot
against political figures
A military officer in Germany
has been indicted over allegations
that he plotted to kill prominent
political figures and blame the
attack on refugees, prosecutors
said Tuesday, in a case that raised
concerns about extremism in the
country’s military.
Federal prosecutors charged
the 28-year-old, identified only as
1st Lt. Franco Hans A. in line with
German privacy rules, with
planning an act of violence as
well as violating weapons and
explosives laws. The soldier,
stationed with a Franco-German
brigade in Illkirch, just across the
border in France, also is charged
with theft and fraud.
Prosecutors allege that the
soldier, whom they described as a
“right-wing nationalist,” posed as
a Syrian refugee and planned to
carry out his attack under that
identity so that asylum seekers
would be blamed.
They say that his targets
included Justice Minister Heiko
Maas and that he had stockpiled
four firearms, more than 1,000
rounds of ammunition and more
than 50 explosive devices, some
stolen from military stores.
He was arrested in February
while going to retrieve a pistol he
had stashed in a Vienna airport
bathroom, authorities said. He
was freed, but Austria informed
Germany. When the soldier’s
fingerprint matched the one he
had given when he registered as a
refugee, it triggered the current
investigation.
Two other soldiers also were
investigated but were released
for lack of evidence.
— Associated Press
Le Pen’s party charged with
misusing E.U. funds: The party
of French far-right leader Marine
Le Pen has been charged with
misusing European Parliament
funds to pay parliamentary aides
who did political work for the
National Front. A judicial official
said the party was charged as a
legal entity with complicity in
breach of trust, five months after
Le Pen was charged. Investigators
suspect that other National Front
lawmakers used legislative aides
for the party’s political activities
while they were on the European
Parliament payroll.
Liberia sets Dec. 26 date for
runoff election: Liberia’s election
commission has set Dec. 26 as the
date for the presidential runoff
vote. The second-round vote
between former soccer star
George Weah and Vice President
Joseph Boakai had been on hold
after the Liberty Party alleged
first-round voting irregularities.
The high court last week cleared
the way for the runoff, saying
there was not enough evidence to
support the allegations. Voters
are choosing a successor to
President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf,
Africa’s first female leader.
— From news services
A14
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
Tillerson acts to alter narrative about him Australian senator
to resign over ties
In town hall at State,
secretary gives no sign
to Chinese executive
of an imminent exit
BY
C AROL M ORELLO
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
isn’t acting like a man who’s planning to leave his job anytime soon.
Speaking to State Department
employees Tuesday in a town hall
televised throughout the building
and to U.S. missions around the
world, Tillerson said he plans to
travel to Canada next week and to
Africa and Latin America early
next year.
He acknowledged widespread
concern about a planned reorganization that has contributed to
flagging morale and staff defections. But he rebutted rumors that
embassies would be closed, and he
roused applause by saying he
would lift a widely disliked hiring
freeze for family members at overseas posts — although a broader
freeze will remain in place.
Over the next week, between
attending internal holiday parties,
he will meet with Capitol Hill committees dealing with foreign policy to explain his reorganization
plans, about which lawmakers
have complained that they are being kept in the dark.
Tillerson’s outreach efforts
mark an attempt to reverse criticism that the former ExxonMobil
chief executive is aloof from his
employees and is presiding over
the decline of U.S. diplomacy. Rumors have circulated for months
that he is on the verge of resigning
or being fired, which he has consistently denied. The speculation
about his future even spawned a
name, “Rexit.” Tillerson has
seemed particularly vexed over reports last month that the White
House intended to replace him.
Now, the State Department is
making a change in strategy
aimed at turning the narrative
around. It is a tacit acknowledgment that Tillerson’s previous approach of limited engagement
with employees, Congress and the
news media is not working and
has only hurt him.
“We have to do a better job of
communicating broadly to our external audiences and our internal
audiences,” said Steve Goldstein, a
former communications and marketing executive who is the department’s new undersecretary
for public diplomacy.
“You’re going to see more of
this,” he said.
Tillerson’s town hall is only his
second since he arrived in February. During the event, he answered
unscreened questions from employees. Wearing a gray suit with a
pale-blue tie, Tillerson spoke extemporaneously as he shunned
the lectern to roam the stage for an
hour and 40 minutes.
The first half of the session was
dedicated to what Tillerson called
a “trip around the world” highlighting what he considers the
State Department’s accomplishments this year.
In Asia, he said it remains a goal
for the Korean Peninsula to be
denuclearized, and he lauded U.S.
efforts to persuade other countries to downgrade their diplomatic presence in North Korea
and support sanctions designed to
starve Pyongyang of the currency
needed to develop missiles and
nuclear arms. The pace of North
Korea’s missile tests has accelerated dramatically this year.
On Iran, he said the Obama
administration had focused all its
attention on securing the 2015 nuclear deal, while the Trump administration was getting allies to
talk about ways to counter Iran’s
missile testing and its support for
groups such as Hezbollah in Lebanon and Hamas in the Gaza Strip.
The task, however, is not a victory
for U.S. policy, since many allies
have publicly urged the United
States to stay in the nuclear deal
and insist that other issues must
be determined separately from
the agreement.
“For the time being, we are in
the agreement,” Tillerson said, not
mentioning President Trump’s
threat to withdraw.
Standing before a screen with
the logo “Our Journey: Redesign
Update,” Tillerson said 35,000 employee questionnaires and 300 interviews had produced plans for
some “quick wins.”
Employees smiled and applauded when he announced an
end to the hiring freeze he imposed for “eligible family members,” mostly spouses who are given preference for jobs that become
vacant in embassies and other
missions.
He also announced technological updates such as merging email
lists and putting communications
in the cloud, allowing more teleworking and streamlining the
processes for transfers, travel and
bidding for jobs.
Tillerson is still unfamiliar to
many employees, and he offered
small glimpses of his personality.
He said that when he came to the
State Department, despite being
an international businessman
who negotiated deals around the
world, he did not know a single
U.S. diplomat. He described himself as “beginning” to enjoy the
job, although he said he wakes
every morning asking himself
how to keep people from being
killed somewhere in the world.
“This is a hard job,” he said.
He acknowledged that while he
seeks “win-win” scenarios, it has
not worked out that way yet.
“Do we have any wins to put on
the board?” he said. “No. That’s
not the way this works. Diplomacy
is not that simple.”
Tillerson reinforced that view
later Tuesday during remarks at
the Atlantic Council, when he offered to start negotiations with
North Korea with no preconditions. He suggested that the two
sides could start with small talk,
paving the way for a road map. All
he demanded was a period when
no missiles are fired.
“We need a period of quiet,” he
said. “You’ve got to tell us you’re
ready to talk. The door’s open, but
we’ll show up when you tell us
you’re willing to talk.”
carol.morello@washpost.com
France moves to take lead on climate without U.S.
Summit seeks funding
for climate solutions
amid Trump withdrawal
BY
J AMES M C A ULEY
paris — The United States may
have withdrawn from the Paris
climate change accord, but on
Tuesday dozens of world leaders
and philanthropists met to find
solutions to the swiftly warming
planet — and send a message of
resolve to the White House.
More symbolic than policydriven, Tuesday’s summit comes
two years after the landmark
“COP21” conference in Paris,
where 196 participating countries — including the United
States — vowed to keep this century’s global temperature increase below 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit. In one of the most controversial moments of his young presidency,
President
Trump
announced in June that the United States would leave the Paris
accord.
The United States is now the
only nation on Earth to have
rejected the global pact.
Although the rest of the world
— and much of the United States
— has continued working to meet
the Paris commitments, French
President Emmanuel Macron
called Trump’s decision “very bad
news” and cautioned against
complacency. In opening remarks
Tuesday, he minced no words.
“We’re losing the battle,” he said.
“We’re not moving quickly
enough. We all need to act.”
The “One Planet” summit focused on practical ways to continue meeting climate goals without
the participation of the U.S. government. The main emphasis was
private financing for climate initiatives in the United States and
elsewhere. A major goal of the
summit was to encourage private
investors to fill the annual gap of
$210 billion needed to meet the
requirements of the Paris agreement.
IAN LANGSDO/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
French President Emmanuel Macron, left, greets philanthropist
Bill Gates at the Elysee Palace as part of a Paris climate event.
Toward that end, the summit
did secure some major commitments. The Gates Foundation, for
instance, announced Tuesday
that it would pledge $300 million
over the next three years to support farmers in Africa and Asia
struggling with the effects of climate change: diminished soil fertility, extreme weather and crop
pests, among others. Earlier this
year, the foundation had pledged
a separate $300 million to benefit
public health and poverty reduction programs in Tanzania.
AXA, the world’s third-largest
insurance company, announced
further reductions of coal investments by an additional $2.8 billion. And the World Bank — to
meet its Paris commitments faster — said it would stop financing
projects involving upstream oil
and gas beginning in 2019. Other
U.S. philanthropic organizations
also supported the cause. On
Monday, the Hewlett Foundation
pledged $600 million over five
years to nonprofits working on
climate change issues.
On the U.S. front, former New
York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, a billionaire and leading
climate change advocate, vowed
to persuade more companies to
change their practices. Bloomberg emphasized the business incentives behind addressing cli-
mate change. “Clean energy is
now cheaper than coal, energy
efficiency saves money and improves your bottom line, and talented people want to work for
companies that care about the
planet,” he said.
The biggest challenge to persuading more companies to go
green, Bloomberg added, is that
“reliable data doesn’t exist.” To
solve that problem, he has
chaired the Task Force on
Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD), an organization
that seeks to communicate financial risk related to climate
change.
“Together we are going to meet
the goal that this country set in
Paris by reducing emissions by at
least 26 percent. There isn’t anything Washington can do to stop
us,” he said.
Since Macron’s election, climate change has been among his
signature issues. When Trump
announced that the United States
would drop out of the Paris accord,
Macron
immediately
launched a campaign called
“Make Our Planet Great Again,” a
riff on Trump’s campaign slogan.
As part of that campaign, Macron
offered research grants for 18 foreign scientists studying climate
change to pursue their work in
France. On Monday, he an-
nounced the winners, including
13 Americans.
For political analysts, Tuesday’s summit provided further
evidence of Macron’s desire to
assert France as a principal mediator in virtually every important
global deliberation, especially on
climate change.
“There is an element of prestige here, because France and
President Macron want to play a
leading role in the global climate
governance, and I think there are
just two leaders who are credible
there: Macron and [Chinese President] Xi Jinping,” said Marc Antoine Eyl-Mazzega, director of the
Center for Energy at the French
Institute for International Relations, a Paris-based think tank.
Xi — who was not in attendance at Macron’s second Paris
summit, although Chinese representatives were — also has been a
supporter of the Paris agreement,
even if China remains the largest
emitter of greenhouse gases on
Earth. He, too, has been critical of
Trump on the issue of climate
change.
“Some countries have become
more inward-looking and less
willing to take part in international cooperation, and the spillovers of their policy adjustments
are deepening,” Xi said in September, stopping short of mentioning the United States by
name.
But some see Chinese emissions as the potential thorn in
Macron’s plans.
“The exit of the U.S. from climate credibility leaves a gap. The
U.S. has traditionally played the
role of bad cop with China, forcing them to reduce their emissions. Now that role may fall to
Macron,” said Paul Bledsoe, a
former Clinton White House climate adviser, now with the Progressive Policy Institute.
“I think Macron recognizes the
urgency of climate action in a way
that maybe older generations
don’t, but he’s got to realize that
global emissions can’t peak until
Chinese emissions do. And Chinese emissions are still growing.”
james.mcauley@washpost.com
Announcement comes
amid rising tension over
Beijing’s influence efforts
BY
S IMON D ENYER
beijing — Australia’s attempt to
curb China’s growing influence in
its political system claimed its first
scalp on Tuesday, as a prominent
opposition lawmaker pledged to
quit over allegations that he was
bought by Chinese money.
Relations between Australia
and China have nose-dived in the
past week, since Prime Minister
Malcolm Turnbull’s government
moved to ban foreign political donations, citing “disturbing reports
about Chinese influence” on Australian politics.
The row between Canberra and
Beijing comes at a time of heightened concern about covert attempts by the Chinese Communist
Party to influence politics and academia around the globe, from the
United States and Germany to Singapore and New Zealand.
China has responded fiercely to
events in Australia. The Foreign
Ministry pronounced itself “astounded” by the Australian prime
minister’s remarks, which it said
lacked principle and had poisoned
the relationship between the two
countries.
The People’s Daily newspaper,
mouthpiece of the ruling Communist Party, went even further Monday, accusing the Australian media of “hysterical paranoia” and
racism for its role in exposing the
Communist Party’s covert actions.
As the fight played out, influential opposition politician Sam
Dastyari vowed Tuesday to quit for
the good of his party after becoming embroiled in a scandal over his
links to a wealthy Chinese business executive.
The Labor Party senator was
accused of endorsing China’s controversial actions in the disputed
South China Sea, against his party’s platform, in return for support
from donor Huang Xiangmo. He
was also reported to have given
Huang advice on how to evade
Australian surveillance and to
have unsuccessfully tried to pressure Labor’s deputy leader not to
meet a Hong Kong pro-democracy
activist in 2015.
Australian cabinet minister Peter Dutton accused Dastyari on
Monday of being a “double agent”
of China, although he had not
broken any laws in accepting foreign money at that time.
Experts said Australia’s moves
to close a legal loophole that had
allowed foreign donations reflected a belated realization of China’s
growing influence, after years of
complacency when the Australian
economy benefited hugely from
Chinese demand for natural resources.
“It’s a necessary correction, but
it has played out at quite a shrill
pitch,” said Euan Graham, director of the international security
program at the Lowy Institute in
Sydney. “The government didn’t
want to confront this situation
until it had to, and now it’s playing
catch-up.”
Graham said Chinese influence
should not be overstated: Chinese
money may have made up the
majority of foreign donations to
Australian political parties, but it
represented only about 2 percent
of total donations in recent years,
he said, and there was no indication that the money had changed
the platforms of the government
or the opposition over issues such
as the South China Sea.
Nevertheless, the concerns are
keenly felt in Australia as China
becomes more assertive internationally, notably in defense of
what it sees as its key interests
regarding Tibet, Taiwan, Hong
Kong and the South China Sea.
Evidence of Russian attempts
to influence last year’s U.S. election has also heightened concerns
in Australia.
David Kelly, research director
at the China Policy analysis firm in
Beijing, said China is becoming
more proactive internationally in
the wake of last month’s Communist Party Congress, which officially granted President Xi Jinping another five years in power.
But China has not handled the
dispute well, he said.
“China appears to be unable to
accept a criticism of its government” without calling it racist,
Kelly said. “China speaks a great
deal about having the right to be
heard internationally. But it is not
doing much in the way of listening
carefully.”
China has also been accused of
organizing its citizens studying in
Australia to support its foreign
policy positions and protest academics perceived to be “anti-China.” Critics say Beijing tries to
silence Chinese dissidents who
have taken Australian citizenship.
China is easily Australia’s biggest trading partner, buying
$70 billion worth of its goods and
services last year. Kelly said he did
not expect a lasting impact on the
RUSHTON/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/
EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Sam Dastyari, a Labor Party
senator, is accused of being
swayed by a wealthy donor.
relationship between the two
countries because economic and
trade tries “have a lot more momentum than people think.”
Alan Dupont, founder of the
Cognoscenti Group consultancy,
argued that Australia needs to
avoid becoming overly reliant on
China, in part because of Beijing’s
“well-documented propensity to
use economic coercion” to threaten or punish countries for resisting its geopolitical demands.
Elsewhere, concerns about Chinese influence over academia
erupted in August after Britain’s
Cambridge University Press announced that, at the request of
Beijing, it had removed 300 articles and book reviews from a version of the China Quarterly website available in China. It reversed
Cabinet minister Peter
Dutton accused
Dastyari of being a
“double agent” of China.
the decision after a backlash.
On Sunday, the head of Germany’s domestic intelligence
agency accused China of using
fake accounts on the LinkedIn
networking site to gather personal
information about thousands of
German officials and politicians
with the aim of cultivating them as
sources. China’s Foreign Ministry
called those claims baseless.
simon.denyer@washpost.com
Amber Ziye Wang contributed to this
report.
CHARLES JENKINS, 77
U.S. soldier defected to N. Korea, was kept 4 decades
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
tokyo — Charles Jenkins, the
U.S. Army sergeant who defected
to North Korea in 1965 and was
compelled to remain there for
almost four decades, has died in
Japan at the age of 77.
Jenkins had been living on
Sado Island, off Japan’s west
coast, with his wife, Hitomi Soga,
since he was freed in 2004. A
Japanese citizen, Soga had been
abducted by North Korea in 1978.
Japan’s Kyodo News agency
and broadcaster NHK reported
his death Tuesday, but the cause
was unknown.
Since gaining his freedom, Jenkins had lived a quiet life on Sado
Island, not far from where his
wife was taken by the North
Koreans, working in the gift shop
at the local museum and becoming something of a celebrity.
Their 34-year-old daughter,
Mika, lives at home and teaches
at a nearby kindergarten, while
32-year-old Brinda lives on the
closest mainland city, Niigata.
“I’d like to go back to the U.S.,
but my wife don’t want to go, and
I have no means to support her
there,” Jenkins told the Los Angeles Times in an interview this
summer, retaining his thick
North Carolina accent. “So I figure, might as well stay where I’m
at.”
One night in 1965, when he
was 24 and serving in the U.S.
Army in South Korea, Jenkins
drank 10 beers and stumbled
across the world’s most heavily
militarized border and into
North Korea.
“I was so ignorant,” he told The
Washington Post in an interview
in 2008. He had deserted the
Army for what became a sentence
in a “giant, demented prison.”
He was taken into the North
Korean system, playing a ruthless
American in propaganda movies
and teaching English. He memorized the teachings of President
Kim Il Sung and killed rats that
crawled out of his toilet.
Then in 1980, his North Korean minders brought him a
woman who had been kidnapped
from Sado Island when she was
18 years old, stuffed in a black
body bag and taken by boat to
North Korea.
They got married in North
Korea and had two daughters
who, Jenkins said in 2008, were
in training to become multilingual spies for North Korea.
Then, in 2002, under a deal
between the Japanese and North
Korean governments, Soga was
released, along with four other
Japanese abductees. In 2004, Jenkins hobbled off the plane with a
walking stick, looking much older than his years, with their
daughters.
Later that year, Jenkins was
found guilty of desertion during a
court-martial on a U.S. Army base
in Japan. He was sentenced to 30
days in prison but was released
early.
He told his story in an autobiography, “The Reluctant Communist,” released in 2008.
U.S. ARMY/GETTY IMAGES
Charles Jenkins, seen here in 2004 in Japan, likened his nearly 40
years in North Korea to living in a “giant, demented prison.”
Another American soldier who
defected to North Korea died late
last year but in Pyongyang.
James Joseph Dresnok, who
was 21 when he ran through the
demilitarized zone and into
North Korea in 1962, died of a
stroke at the end of 2016, his two
sons said in an interview broadcast in August by the state-run
Uriminzokkiri website.
anna.fifield@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
‘Historic’ trial results may lead to treatment for Huntington’s
Early testing shows drug
dramatically curtails
disease’s bad proteins
BY
A MY E LLIS N UTT
The discovery of a drug that
may treat the fatal disease known
as Huntington’s is being hailed as
“historic” by Louise Vetter, president of the Huntington’s Disease
Society of America, and “phenomenal” and “fantastically promising” by Huntington’s researchers,
including the woman who discovered the genetic mutation that
causes the disease.
“I’m ecstatic,” said Nancy Wexler, who in 1993 identified the
mutation. “Huntington’s is horrible, one of the worst diseases
known to mankind, and certain
death. . . . We know it’s a bad gene,
making a bad protein, that makes
people sick, that kills your brain
cells. Anything that could impact
that, we knew that that could be a
cure.”
The research, supported by Ionis Pharmaceuticals in Carlsbad,
Calif., was conducted by scientists
at more than half a dozen locations in Europe and Canada. This
international team collaborated
to create IONIS-HTTRx, the first
drug to directly target the cause of
Huntington’s.
The Huntington’s gene sends
instructions via RNA for cells to
create a protein. In people with the
mutation, the protein is a toxic
form that kills nerve cells and
damages the brain. The new drug
works by delivering a small piece
of genetic material that sticks to
the RNA and prevents it from
building proteins.
The early phase clinical trial
involved three dozen subjects
with the disease and was conducted to establish the safety and tolerability of IONIS-HTTRx. It did
that, and it also showed that the
drug dramatically curtailed the
nerve-cell-killing protein, with
larger reductions at successively
higher doses for all subjects. There
were no reported side effects.
Huntington’s was first described in 1872 by 22-year-old
American physician George Huntington. The pernicious, hereditary disease usually starts causing
symptoms between ages 30 and 50
and progresses over one to two
decades until it proves fatal. One
of the early physical signs is involuntary tremors. The death of certain brain cells most vulnerable to
the disease renders a person unable to walk, talk or reason, although he or she retains the ability
to understand language and recognize friends and family.
Patients and doctors often say
Huntington’s is like having Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis and Parkinson’s
disease — all at the same time.
Around 30,000 people in the United States have symptoms of Huntington’s, and many more people
have the mutation and will develop the disease. Children of people
with the mutated gene have a
50 percent chance of inheriting it.
The development of a genetic
test for the disease in 1994 allowed
children of a parent with Huntington’s to know whether they will
ED LEE, 65
Lawyer became San Francisco’s
first Asian American mayor
BY J . F REEDOM DU L AC
AND C LEVE R . W OOTSON J R.
Ed Lee, the son of Chinese immigrants who rose to become the
first Asian American mayor of
San Francisco in 2011, died early
Tuesday after a heart attack.
Former mayor Willie Brown
told the San Francisco Examiner
that Mr. Lee was shopping at his
neighborhood Safeway when he
suffered the attack. Mr. Lee died
just after 1 a.m. at Zuckerberg
San Francisco General Hospital,
with friends, family and colleagues by his side, the city said.
The 65-year-old Democrat — an
affordable-housing advocate who
led the city during a time of ballooning rents and explosive real estate prices — was remembered
by political leaders as a
defender of civil rights.
This year, Mr. Lee
clashed with President
Trump over the city’s
protections of undocumented immigrants.
Ed Lee
California Gov. Jerry Brown (D) called Mr. Lee “a true
champion for working people.”
Mr. Lee, an activist lawyer before he began working for city
agencies, was “one of America’s
most passionate champions for
climate action,” former New York
mayor Michael Bloomberg said in
a statement.
San Francisco Board of Supervisors President London Breed, who
is now acting mayor, said Mr. Lee
lived “a life of service . . . cut short
far too soon.” At a City Hall news
conference on Monday, she said,
“Ed Lee fought against discrimination, working on the front lines
to keep tenants from being evicted. He was, from the dawn of his
career, an advocate for the powerless, a voice for the overlooked.”
The San Francisco Chronicle
editorial board remembered
Mr. Lee as “a mayor who calmed
S.F. City Hall.” “For a man who
entered City Hall’s Room 200 with
no particular appetite for the
rough and tumble of elective office, Ed Lee proved remarkably
adept at navigating and bridging
the divisions,” the Chronicle said.
“He set a temperate tone for a city
that desperately needed it.”
Under Mr. Lee, who became
mayor when his predecessor,
Gavin Newsom, left to become
California’s lieutenant governor
in January 2011, the city pushed
through the 2011 “Twitter tax,”
which sliced payroll taxes for businesses that relocated to San Francisco’s Mid-Market district. The
business-friendly policies helped
lure tech companies, bringing a
wave of new, wealthy residents.
Mr. Lee spent the rest of his time as
mayor trying a variety of measures
to make housing affordable for all
San Franciscans, as housing costs
soared to heights only attainable
by the wealthy.
He also accomplished what he
referred to as his “legacy project,”
convincing the NBA’s Golden State
Warriors to relocate from Oakland
to a billion-dollar arena in
San Francisco in 2019.
“His love and passion for sports,
including the Warriors, defined
him as much as his witty humor
and engaging personality,” the
team said in a statement.
Edwin Mah Lee was born to
immigrant parents who came to
the United States from the Chinese province of Guangdong and
settled in Seattle. He told the
Northwest Asian Weekly that he
was the fifth of six children in a
home where both parents worked
— his father in local restaurants,
his mother doing odd jobs around
Seattle. When Mr. Lee was 15, his
father died of a heart attack, and
Mr. Lee worked in restaurants to
help support his family.
Mr. Lee was the first
member of his family to attend college and graduated
from Bowdoin College in
Maine in 1974. Four years
later, he received a law degree from the University of
California at Berkeley,
where he also became interested in politics.
Mr. Lee worked for the
San Francisco Asian Law Caucus,
advocating for immigrant rights
and affordable housing. He later
joined city government, leading
the Human Rights Commission
and the Department of Public
Works, among other agencies.
He was serving as city administrator when he was appointed by
the Board of Supervisors to replace Newsom.
More than a third of San Francisco’s roughly 870,000 residents
are Asian American, according to
census data, and Mr. Lee said his
election in November 2011 was a
stride toward equality. “I am able
to make a link to the Asian communities,” he told Northwest
Asian Weekly. “Being mayor helps
them to know that they no longer
are second-class citizens.”
Before the 2011 election, the
San Francisco Chronicle reported
that “there are roughly 10,000
Lees in San Francisco, an expected
boost for the mayor at the ballot
box.” Mr. Lee won in a crowded
field of 16 candidates, then coasted to reelection in 2015.
“Mayor Lee took deep pride in
serving as the first Asian American mayor of San Francisco,” said
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D), who represents San
Francisco in Congress. “His greatest source of joy was his beloved
family, and our city owes a debt of
gratitude to his wife, Anita, and
his daughters, Brianna and Tania,
for sharing this exceptional, lovely
person with us.”
Mr. Lee became known as one of
the most progressive mayors in
the United States, who clashed
with Trump over San Francisco’s
designation as a “sanctuary city.”
Under the policy — one of the most
expansive in the country — local
police won’t cooperate with federal immigration officials in all but
the most extreme cases.
j.dulac@washpost.com
cleve.wootson@washpost.com
ANDREW MEDICHINI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pope Francis greets a woman at the Vatican during an audience
with people with Huntington’s disease and their families in May.
eventually show signs of the disease. Between 7 and 9 percent
choose to find out, according to
the National Institutes of Health.
“When people get tested, there’s
nothing we can give them. Zero,”
Wexler said. “You can’t give them
hope, you can’t give them medicine. If this therapy can reverse or
prevent it, the minute people get
the test, we can immediately give
them this drug before they get
sick.”
Those with Huntington’s or at
risk of the disease have been waiting a long time for a breakthrough.
“I was so thrilled to have something, such a dramatic treatment,”
said Christopher O’Brien, 44, who
is in the disease’s middle stages.
“This is the most exciting thing
ever, being a patient.”
O’Brien lives in Rochester, N.Y.,
and has a medical degree and PhD.
He was hoping to study Huntington’s, which killed his mother
when he was a child. But in 2000,
in the middle of his residency at
Baylor University Medical Center
in Texas, he had trouble passing
his neurology boards no matter
how hard he studied. Suspecting
his cognitive problems were an
early sign of Huntington’s, he tested himself, then sent a blood sample to a lab to confirm the results.
O’Brien had the mutated gene,
which would also take the lives of
two sisters.
Important progress in identifying the gene came from Wexler’s
study of a village in Venezuela
where she and a team of researchers, over the past four decades,
have identified 18,149 people with
Huntington’s spanning 10 generations. These Venezuelan kindreds
(related families sharing a common ancestor) make up the
world’s largest genetically related
Huntington’s disease community.
Researchers suggest that this
method of targeting the central
cause of Huntington’s by “silencing” the mutant gene might have
applications in the treatment of
other neurodegenerative diseases.
The new study holds out hope
that the drug might even reverse
the progression of the disease in
people who are already suffering
symptoms.
“What’s really interesting in animal studies, if you stop the production of the mutant protein, not
only does progression stop, but
the brain starts to heal itself,” said
Christopher Ross, director of the
Huntington’s Disease Center at
Johns Hopkins Medicine, who was
not involved in the research.
“Which means there might be improvement.”
As insidious as Huntington’s
disease is medically, it is also psychologically complex and emotionally fraught for affected families.
Meghan Donaldson is 50 and
one of O’Brien’s six siblings. She
chose to be tested at 28 because
she had lived with the specter of
Huntington’s her entire life. She
does not carry the mutant gene. “I
was 6 when my mother was diagnosed,” she said. “I don’t know if
there was a time when I didn’t
know I was at risk. . . . I grew up
thinking the worst, that I would
get it in my 30s, so I knew I had to
live my life now.”
When Donaldson found out she
did not carry the mutant gene, she
felt gratitude and relief.
“I rolled the genetic dice and I
won,” she said.
Blair Leavitt, a researcher at the
University of British Columbia
and the lead investigator for the
North American group that conducted the study, said: “This is the
culmination of 20 years of work
for all of us. To see that result and
to know what it means — it means
we’ve taken a really good promising step.”
Leavitt expects the Phase 3 clinical trial to start next year and that
in three years, they might be able
to establish proof of the drug’s
effectiveness.
“I think we’re at the end of the
beginning and the start of the
end,” he said. “This approach is
going to make a difference in the
very near future.”
amy.nutt@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
Economy & Business
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UPS and others warn that holiday deliveries are falling behind
BY
A BHA B HATTARAI
If it seems like your online orders are arriving later than expected, you’re not alone.
An influx of online purchases —
particularly during Cyber Monday, the busiest online shopping
day in U.S. history — is testing the
limits of carriers such as UPS and
FedEx, despite their heavy investment in new warehouses and seasonal employees. Americans spent
a record $6.59 billion online on
Cyber Monday, according to data
from Adobe Analytics.
The number of late deliveries
typically doubles during the holidays, leading to headaches for
shoppers and retailers alike, according to data from LateShipment.com, an Orlando-based
start-up that tracks shipment delays.
UPS, the world’s largest deliv-
ery company, warned last week
that some deliveries will be delayed by one or two days, as staffers worked extended hours to
manage the rush. UPS expects its
holiday load to rise 5 percent, to
750 million packages, this season,
while FedEx says it’s planning for
up to 400 million parcels.
And pilots who deliver for DHL
and Amazon.com’s Prime Air say
they are already experiencing delays that will probably grow worse
in coming weeks. (Jeffrey P. Bezos,
founder and chief executive of
Amazon, owns The Washington
Post.)
“It looks like the next three
weeks are going to be challenging,
particularly with serving Amazon,” said Robert Kirchner, a pilot
for Atlas Air Worldwide Holdings
and executive council chairman of
Teamsters Local 1224, a union that
represents pilots and crew mem-
bers from 11 airlines. “Amazon is
already expecting delay problems
— we know this from UPS and
certainly from our own flight
problems — and we’re expecting
that it’s going to get worse in the
next two weeks leading up to
Christmas.”
Atlas, he said, has 12 cargo
planes devoted to Amazon deliveries, up from two last year. But
morale is low among pilots, with
one-third of them looking for employment elsewhere, according to
a recent union survey. About 220
pilots have quit this year, leaving
the company with about 1,500 active pilots. A spokesman for Atlas
Air disputed those claims: “We
disagree with the union’s commentary,” Dan Loh said in an
email. “We are fully staffed and
fully committed to meeting our
customers’ expectations.”
“Working conditions are get-
ting worse, which means pilots are
getting sick, they’re dealing with
fatigue,” Kirchner said, adding
that the union is in contract negotiations with Atlas. “When a pilot
calls in sick this time of year, there
are very few replacements available.”
UPS said it has staffers working
extended hours to manage the
rush. About 89 percent of UPS
Express packages were delivered
on time between Nov. 27 and
Dec. 2, compared with 99 percent
at FedEx, according to ShipMatrix,
a Pennsylvania-based company
that tracks deliveries.
UPS, which had plans to hire
95,000 temporary workers this
holiday season, recently implemented a 70-hour, eight-day work
schedule for its drivers. (They previously worked 60 hours over seven days.) A spokeswoman for the
company said UPS workers will
process nearly double the company’s daily average of 19 million
packages and documents between
Thanksgiving and Christmas.
On Monday, the company said
last week’s delays had been resolved.
“UPS’s operations have returned to the peak operating plan
after the initial cyber week surge,”
spokeswoman Natalie Godwin
said in an email. “The vast majority of packages will be delivered in
accordance with the service commitments for the specified timein-transit.”
Retailers are increasingly taking matters into their own hands
by encouraging shoppers to buy
online and pick up in the store.
Walmart offers discounts to customers who collect their own orders. Sears, meanwhile, allows
shoppers to pick up items curbside, without getting out of their
cars.
Those types of arrangements
are increasingly important to retailers, analysts say, because they
afford them greater control over
customers’ deliveries. One late
Christmas delivery can be enough
to ward off shoppers, says Sriram
Sridhar, chief executive of LateShipment.com, who advises retailers to preemptively inform
customers if it looks like their
items will be delayed.
Sridhar added that UPS and
FedEx, which generally offer refunds to retailers on delayed deliveries, make no such guarantees
during the holidays.
“The holiday rush typically
translates into an automatic reduction in on-time deliveries,” he
said. “If merchants aren’t proactive, it’s an almost guaranteed way
of losing that customer.”
abha.bhattarai@washpost.com
Plan to kill rules
on net neutrality
deeply unpopular
POLL FINDS MOST AMERICANS OPPOSE MOVE
FCC voting to lift restrictions on Internet providers
BY
B RIAN F UNG
On the eve of a pivotal vote that
would deregulate the broadband
industry, a fresh survey from the
University of Maryland shows
that large majorities of Americans — including 3 out of 4
Republicans — oppose the government’s plan to repeal its netneutrality rules for Internet providers.
The results paint the picture of
an electorate that is largely at
odds with the GOP-led Federal
Communications Commission,
whose chairman, Ajit Pai, plans to
vote Thursday to lift key restrictions on corporations such as
AT&T, Comcast and Verizon. The
move would permit such companies to speed up some websites
and slow down or block others, as
Internet providers seek new business models in a rapidly changing
media and technology environment.
The survey by the university’s
Program for Public Consultation
(PPC) and Voice of the People, a
nonpartisan polling organization, concluded that 83 percent of
Americans do not approve of the
FCC proposal. Just 16 percent
said they approved.
Americans in the survey were
far less likely to find the FCC’s
arguments for repeal persuasive
and far more likely to agree with
arguments for keeping the regulations. While 48 percent said
they found the government’s case
convincing, 75 percent said they
found the contrasting arguments
of consumer groups and tech
companies convincing.
About 1 in 5 Republicans said
they were in favor of the FCC’s
proposal.
The PPC survey highlights a
significant consensus between
members of both political parties
at a time when much of the
country is divided on other social
and economic issues. It also differs from previous polling on the
subject of net neutrality in methodology and approach.
Unlike polls that solicit respondents over the Internet on an
opt-in basis — a tactic that polling
experts say is problematic because the resulting sample can be
unscientific — PPC relied on a
focus group of respondents that
had been assembled randomly
using traditional mail and telephone techniques by the market
research firm Nielsen Scarborough.
In addition, rather than asking
survey-takers their opinion on
net neutrality without much prior context, PPC prepared respondents ahead of time with a policy
briefing laying out the case from
both sides of the debate. The
survey content was reviewed by
experts in favor and against the
net-neutrality rules, including by
a government official who represented the administration’s position, according to Steven Kull,
PPC’s director.
“We think that’s critical to getting a meaningful response,” Kull
said. “I think its fine to do a poll
that just says, ‘There's this thing
called net neutrality; what do you
think?’ That tells you something
— it tells you the politics of it. But
our orientation is, how do you
bring the public to the table in a
way that gives them a real meaningful input?”
The FCC cast doubt on the
ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Supporters of net neutrality stage a protest in Washington against a plan by the Federal Communications Commission to repeal the rules
for Internet providers. The FCC criticized a poll finding widespread opposition to allowing faster Internet speeds for some companies.
survey results in a statement
Tuesday.
“This is a biased survey that,
among other things, makes no
mention of the role that the Federal Trade Commission will play
in policing anti-competitive or
unfair conduct by Internet service providers. Earlier polling by
Democratic pollster Peter Hart
showed that most Americans believe that utility-style regulation
of the Internet is harmful, and
this is the regulation that the
Restoring Internet Freedom order will eliminate,” the statement
said.
The Hart poll asked 800 adults
in 2015 by telephone whether
they thought it would be helpful
for the government to “regulate
and oversee the Internet similar
to how it oversees the electric or
gas public utility industry” and
found more adults believed this
would be harmful than helpful.
(Critics of the rules tend to characterize them as direct regulation
of the Internet, whereas supporters tend to describe the rules as
regulations applied to Internet
providers.)
That same study found that
75 percent were unfamiliar with
the term “net neutrality” and
what it meant. The survey was
conducted on behalf of the Progressive Policy Institute, which
two months later published a
study supporting the broadband
industry’s claim that net-neutrality rules have prevented Internet
providers from investing in and
upgrading their networks.
Questions surrounding the
wording of polling questions is
what drove PPC to equip surveytakers with fleshed-out arguments from supporters and opponents of the FCC rules.
In its report, PPC did not outline the full battery of questions it
asked of respondents. The other
questions, Kull said, dealt with
issues such as national monuments and a proposed Senate
health-care bill. But the arguments for and against the FCC
proposal tracked the positions
put forward by Internet providers, tech companies, trade groups
and consumer advocacy organizations.
One question asked respondents to consider that the rules
currently stifle innovation and
“hold back the development of
the Internet in the United States.”
It also made a case that some
companies might be better off if
they could access faster speeds
from their Internet providers
than they can today and that it
could lead to lower Internet prices for consumers. And it also
argued that as long as Internet
providers are required to tell consumers about their network prac-
tices, “the market will make sure
that the ISPs do not overreach.”
Another question asked respondents to consider that the
FCC plan could lead to higher
broadband prices for consumers
“and make it harder for websites
to get the necessary traffic to be
profitable.” Large, wealthy businesses would have an advantage
over small ones that could not
afford to pay for faster download
speeds, it said, and Internet providers could block websites for
any reason they liked, including
to harm competitors.
Americans in both parties
found the latter arguments more
convincing than the former —
Democrats by a 42-point margin,
Republicans by a 13-point margin.
brain.fung@washpost.com
Scott Clement and Emily Guskin
contributed to this report.
DIGEST
AIRLINE INDUSTRY
Spirit moves up on
flights’ punctuality list
Spirit Airlines rose to third
place in the Department of
Transportation’s monthly tally of
U.S. airlines’ on-time
performance in October, with
87.2 percent of its flights arriving
within 14 minutes of their
scheduled times.
That placed it ahead of larger
Alaska Air, which was No. 4.
Hawaiian Airlines and Delta Air
Lines were first and second,
respectively, in on-time
performance.
Overall, the airline industry
posted an 84.8 percent on-time
rate in October and 79.7 percent
for the past year.
While Spirit is making
headway, it remains the industry
leader in terms of customer
complaints, with 3.84 nasty notes
per 100,000 passengers; in
October, the industry average was
at 1 per 100,000 passengers.
At the back of the punctuality
pack is Virgin America, which
came in at 73.3 percent for
October.
— Bloomberg News
ECONOMY
Record tax collection,
spending in November
The U.S. government collected
a record amount of tax income for
November and also had a record
level of spending for the month,
producing a budget deficit of
$138.5 billion, up slightly from a
year ago.
The November deficit was
1.4 percent higher than a year
ago, the Treasury Department
reported Tuesday.
The spending increases
pushed total outlays in November
to $346.9 billion, a record for the
month, while receipts totaled
$208.3 billion, also a record for
the month.
The rise in revenue in
comparison with a year ago was
led by an $11 billion increase in
individual income tax
around the world who have called
for greater visibility over the
revenue associated with locally
supported sales in their
countries,” chief financial officer
David Wehner said in a
statement.
withholding and payroll taxes for
Social Security.
The increase in outlays
compared with a year ago
reflected a $5 billion spending
hike by the Department of
Homeland Security, primarily for
hurricane relief, and a $9 billion
rise in interest payments on the
debt.
— Bloomberg News
— Associated Press
CORPORATE TAXES
Facebook says it will
pay taxes locally
Facebook is changing its tax
structure so it will pay taxes in
the country where sales are made,
rather than funneling everything
through its Irish subsidiary, the
company announced Tuesday.
Facebook shifted its
international business operations
to Ireland in 2010. The company
has since come under pressure
from the United States and
Europe for its tax practices. Last
year, Facebook said it would stop
routing U.K. sales through
EDGAR SU/REUTERS
Business owner Veronica Faye Foo prepares ice cream with 24-karat
edible gold leaf at her Small Potatoes Ice Creamery shop in Singapore.
Ireland after public outcry over
news that Facebook paid only
$6,128 in taxes in 2014.
In the United States, where
Facebook is headquartered, the
company is locked in a battle with
the Internal Revenue Service that
may cost it more than $5 billion,
related to global operations
reported by the Irish unit.
“We believe that moving to a
local selling structure will
provide more transparency to
governments and policymakers
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Prices at wholesale level rose
0.4 percent in the past month and
3.1 percent over the past year. It
was the biggest annual jump in
nearly six years and reflected a
spike in the price of gasoline and
other energy products. Last
month’s rise in the producer price
index, which measures inflation
pressures before they reach the
consumer, marked the third
straight month that wholesale
prices have risen by 0.4 percent,
the Labor Department reported
Tuesday. Core inflation, which
excludes volatile energy and food
prices, rose 0.3 percent in
November, reflecting an increase
of 4.6 percent in energy costs.
— From news reports
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
24,700
Close
YTD
% Chg
24,504.80
+0.5
+24.0
23,700
22,700
21,700
20,700
19,700
Nasdaq Composite Index
7000
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
6862.32
–0.2
+27.5
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Diversified Telecomm
Metals & Mining
Commercial Banks
Divers Financial Svcs
Capital Markets
Multiline Retail
Leisure Equipment & Prod
Power Prodct & Enrgy Trdr
Multi-Utilities
Electric Utilities
0
–3.0%
+3.0%
2.80
1.89
1.31
1.19
1.12
–1.20
–1.39
–1.39
–1.69
–1.73
5800
5200
S&P 500 Index
2664.11
+0.2
+19.0
2670
2560
2450
2340
2230
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N D
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
73,813.53
16,114.03
47,699.04
1.4
0.1
0.3
391.63
5427.19
13,183.53
7500.41
0.7
0.7
0.5
0.6
6013.20
4016.02
28,793.88
22,866.17
0.2
–1.3
–0.6
–0.3
YTD % Chg
–40%
0%
+40%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
236.58
99.37
171.70
289.94
143.42
119.68
37.91
45.29
70.79
82.76
17.91
257.68
181.80
156.74
43.33
–1.1
0.4
–0.6
2.4
–0.2
–0.6
–0.1
–0.1
0.0
–0.3
1.5
3.0
–0.2
0.9
–0.8
32.5
34.1
48.2
86.2
54.6
1.7
25.4
9.2
23.7
–8.3
–43.3
7.6
35.6
–5.6
19.5
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
142.60
106.85
172.23
57.07
85.58
62.17
89.85
36.58
134.35
123.48
222.49
53.19
113.46
96.70
107.43
1.0
1.2
–0.6
1.3
0.4
0.4
–0.4
1.0
0.9
0.1
–0.1
2.6
1.0
–0.2
0.6
23.8
23.8
41.5
–3.1
37.7
22.3
6.9
12.6
9.7
12.6
39.0
–0.4
45.4
39.9
3.1
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
0.8513
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1746
0.0088
1.3319
0.3025
0.7772
0.0521
0.0075
1.1339
0.2566
0.6616
0.0444
151.2400
34.3400
88.2520
5.9226
0.2271
0.5835
0.0392
2.5695
0.1731
Japan ¥ per
113.5500
133.3800
Britain £ per
0.7508
0.8819
0.0066
Brazil R$ per
3.3192
3.8963
0.0291
4.4037
Canada $ per
1.2867
1.5113
0.0113
1.7137
0.3892
Mexico $ per
19.1716
22.5194
0.1690
25.5349
5.7980
Mexico $
0.0671
14.9001
Consumer Rates
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 27,533.39
Russell 2000
1516.12
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 533.95
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
9.92
Daily % Chg
0.1
–0.2
–0.2
6.2
YTD % Chg
18.3
11.7
19.4
–29.3
$3.0230
$3.4775
$57.14
$1,241.70
$2.68
+0.4
–0.4
–1.5
–0.4
–5.3
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded (Ticker)
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
% Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.4995
$15.67
$9.8725
$0.1377
$4.1075
–0.7
–0.7
–0.7
–1.3
–0.7
day
month
$1200
$1000
$800
–1.7
0.0
0.2
1.3
–0.5
–0.4
–0.7
–3.7
–0.7
Gainers
Tenet Healthcare
Barnes & Noble Edu
Avon Products
Impax Laboratories
Taubman Centers
Veeco Instruments
QuanexBuilding Prod
iRobot Corp
DHI Group Inc
Ensign Group Inc
Maiden Holdings Ltd
MiMedx Group Inc
Macerich
Medicines Co
Cree Inc
Freeport-McMoRan
Mosaic Co
Seagate Technology
Mallinckrodt PLC
Coty Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$14.91
$8.42
$2.13
$17.85
$62.59
$13.30
$22.30
$70.40
$1.95
$23.86
$7.10
$12.25
$66.47
$27.26
$36.12
$15.71
$24.82
$42.12
$24.06
$18.62
8.5
7.7
7.6
7.2
6.5
6.4
6.2
6.1
5.4
5.2
5.2
5.2
5.0
4.8
4.6
4.6
4.1
4.1
4.0
4.0
Losers
Casey's Gen Stores
JC Penney
Bill Barrett Corp
Iron Mountain
Fossil Group Inc
Consolidated Comm
RH
Edison Intl
Tailored Brands Inc
Select Medical
Guess? Inc
Electro Scientific
Vicor Corp
Mattel Inc
Fred's Inc
DSW Inc
Southwestern Energy
Murphy USA Inc
Kirkland's Inc
Cardtronics PLC
Daily
Close % Chg
$107.18
$2.87
$4.38
$37.80
$6.47
$12.42
$96.88
$68.58
$19.46
$16.75
$16.05
$19.49
$20.95
$14.62
$3.77
$21.06
$5.54
$76.66
$12.41
$17.52
–11.6
–10.3
–8.4
–7.1
–6.6
–6.5
–6.0
–6.0
–5.9
–5.4
–5.2
–5.0
–5.0
–4.9
–4.8
–4.7
–4.6
–4.4
–4.3
–4.3
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6400
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.34
0.45
0.80
1.49
3.04
5.39
4.25%
Bank Prime
1.25%
Federal Funds
1.56%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.83%
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.15%
10-year note
Yield: 2.40
2-year note
Yield: 1.83
5-year note
Yield: 2.17
6-month bill
Yield: 1.48
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.29%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
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How are your investments looking? Find out at washingtonpost.com/markets
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
Avoid the awkward office holiday party. Employees prefer money or time off.
In the era of
pushback against
sexual
harassment, a lot
of office parties
will be different.
Michelle
At least we should
Singletary hope they are.
No sexual
THE COLOR
innuendo. No
OF MONEY
leaning in too
close after
partaking of generously poured
drinks provided at an open bar.
No pressuring a fellow colleague
— male or female — for a chance
at romance.
But here’s another reason the
holiday party isn’t always well
received. Employees consider the
cost and conclude that they
would rather the company take
the money and give it to them
instead.
Ninety percent of workers
would prefer a bonus or extra
vacation days over a holiday
party, according to a poll this
year by the staffing firm
Randstad USA.
During a recent online
discussion, a reader wrote: “I
work for a social services agency.
This year, there is no expensive
holiday party. We have
thousands of employees, so [in
previous years] it wasn’t lavish,
but it was expensive. Instead,
[this year] eligible employees
sent in their information and
management will draw 10
names. Those winners will get
$5,000 paid directly toward their
student loans. Since most people
hated the party, nobody will miss
it. Plus, some people will get a
really nice gift!”
I thought this was a wonderful
idea given the great impact it
could have on those selected.
Others in the forum weighed in,
and a debate ensued.
A reader named Kathleen
thought it was a fantastic idea,
too. “I was fortunate to not have
student loans (went to state
school when it was really cheap
and had parents who paid), so I
would not be eligible, but would
be so excited for those who are
facing massive student loan debt
to win a chunk of money that
would help pay that down,” she
wrote. “This seems so in the
spirit of the holidays and would
make such a difference.”
Alas, we were in the minority.
“Much as I hate debt and
empathize with the crippling
debt young adults are saddled
with nowadays, only employees
with loans are even eligible to vie
for the prize,” Marilyn wrote.
“Older employees, those who
never went to college, those with
parents that saved, get nothing.
Not even a shot at the prize. It’s
basically implying that only
some employees are valued.”
Others shared similar views.
“I don’t have a student loan,”
wrote Jacquie Bokow from
Maryland. “What if I had huge
medical bills instead? She
suggested divvying up the
$50,000 the company is
spending among all of the
employees.
Anne August from
Massachusetts thought a lottery
for employees with student loans
“is blatantly discriminatory.”
The word “unfair” came up a
lot.
Megan from Indiana said her
company held a holiday
sweepstakes and gave out gift
cards, with more than 100
employees getting $25 gift cards
and six receiving $100 gift cards.
“Seeing six people getting
$100 was really exciting,” she
wrote. “I was delighted to see a
name I knew, and I was thinking
about how she deserves it as a
hard-working single mom with a
heart of gold and great sense of
humor.”
But Megan admitted that not
finding her name on the longer
$25 winners’ list “felt a little
crummy.”
She also didn’t like limiting
the giveaway to folks with
education debt: “It doesn’t quite
seem fair that a 22-year-old firstyear employee could be eligible
for a benefit that a 45-year-old
veteran employee with perhaps
some medical debt isn’t. Or even
another 22-year-old first-year
employee that busted her butt to
work through college without
getting a loan. Office politics
could get snarky.”
“I think it’s a recipe for
disaster,” wrote Jeffrey, who
added, “I really don’t like office
holiday parties. Frankly,
canceling the holiday party
The driverless-car debate: How safe is ‘safe enough’?
Rollout of autonomous
vehicles may depend on
response to crashes
BY
A SHLEY H ALSEY III
There’s a number that is all the
buzz these days in the world of
autonomous vehicles: 94 percent. That’s the percentage of car
crashes caused by driver error.
The implication: Once cars become driverless, there will be
hardly any crashes at all.
Not so.
As fully autonomous cars become a reality, there will be
collisions between them, and
there will be collisions with conventional cars. Fewer than before? Yes, but there will be crashes nevertheless.
The speed with which driverless cars are accepted by the
public may well be determined
by this question: How safe is safe
enough?
“Is ‘safe enough’ 10 percent
safer than where we are by
manually driving?” asked Bryan
Reimer, associate director of the
transportation center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
“One thing that I think is really
going to limit our ability to see
this technology proliferate is a
societal acceptance on the definition of what is safe enough.”
Without a generally accepted
definition of what constitutes a
sufficiently safe driverless car,
the industry could suffer from
setbacks caused by a combination of public apprehension and
news headlines.
When a truck backed into a
self-driving bus in Las Vegas last
month, one headline mirrored
many others: “Las Vegas’ selfdriving bus crashes in first hour
of service.”
When a driver using Tesla’s
TEMPE POLICE DEPARTMENT VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Uber self-driving SUV flipped on its side in a collision in Tempe, Ariz. Accidents involving
driverless cars have made headlines, stoking public apprehension about their introduction.
autopilot died in a Florida crash
last year, a British magazine ran
the headline “Tesla driver dies in
first fatal autonomous car crash
in U.S.” and a later headline in
Scientific American lamented
“Deadly Tesla Crash Exposes
Confusion over Automated Driving.”
“I think it’s important to clear
up a possible misconception,”
said Robert Sumwalt, chairman
of the National Transportation
Safety Board, after his agency
completed its Tesla crash investigation. “The automobile involved in the collision was not a
self-driving car.”
The Tesla’s “Autopilot” system
is designed to perform limited
tasks and functioned as designed, the investigation concluded. However, the system is
meant to augment, not replace
the driver. The vehicle’s human
driver and his overreliance on
the system were at fault, the
NTSB concluded.
“Unless we have defined
how safe is safe enough
— and we are in
agreement — the nature
of politics is that fingers
will point at each
other.”
Bryan Reimer of the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology
“If consumers are looking at
robots as being almost perfect,
they can’t be,” Reimer said.
They can’t be and they
shouldn’t be, a Rand Corp. report
says. “Requiring autonomous vehicles to be nearly flawless before putting them on the road
could cost hundreds of thousands of lives,” the report says.
According to the National
Safety Council, 40,000 people
were killed in crashes last year,
or about 110 each day. More than
1 million have died since 1990.
With the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) concluding that “94 percent
of serious crashes are due to
dangerous choices or errors people make behind the wheel,” the
stage would seem set for fully
autonomous cars.
Except for the politics.
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would be gift enough for me.”
Having read all the concerns,
I’ll walk back some of my
enthusiasm. Perhaps a lottery for
just a certain set of employees
could cause resentment among
the staff. But I’ll leave you with
this from reader Katie:
“If I were at the office holding
the loans lottery and still had
loans, I would like to believe that
I’d have a charitable and
cheerful attitude even if I wasn’t
one of the lucky selected
winners. After all, can you be too
upset over a prize you were
never entitled to or that you
could in no way work to improve
your odds of receiving? A
random raffle isn’t based on
merit. If you won, that’s an
amazing windfall, but if you
didn’t, you’re not at any more of
a loss and shouldn’t feel
slighted.”
michelle.singletary@washpost.com
Republicans in
House criticized
after attacking
Patagonia suit
“Unless we have defined how
safe is safe enough — and we are
in agreement — the nature of
politics is that fingers will point
at each other,” Reimer said. “If
you think about Congress now,
everybody’s going to look at
everybody else and say, ‘I don’t
want to be responsible.’ You
cause mass pandemonium. That
sets the potential viability of
these technologies back by decades.”
The Transportation Department and Congress are seeking
to balance the desire of automakers to develop driverless cars
without burdensome restrictions
with the need for regulatory
guidance. Since several companies have test vehicles on the
road, that effort at balance becomes even more precarious as
states step in to fill what they
fear is a growing federal vacuum.
“Given all the ways in which
autonomous vehicles could affect society, it’s possible that
regulators, lawmakers and the
industry collectively may not be
able to deal with all these issues
before autonomous vehicles become road-worthy,” said David
Groves, a researcher who co-authored the Rand report.
Groves and Nidhi Kalra developed a model to estimate how
many lives would be lost or saved
in the coming decades under
various scenarios of driverless
car deployment.
“How important is it that
autonomous vehicles are safe
when they’re introduced versus
how quickly they improve?” Kalra asked. “Do we allow them on
the road when they’re like teenage drivers or do we wait for
them to be as good as professional drivers?”
They present two of the some
500 different scenarios in their
paper, along with a template that
allows people to enter various
elements to create their own
model.
In one model, autonomous
cars are marketed in 2020 when
they are 10 percent safer than the
average human. With steady improvement over 15 years — the
result of widespread use by the
public — they reach the point of
being 90 percent safer than humans. By 2070, the Groves-Kalra
report estimates, autonomous
cars will have saved 1.1 million
lives.
In another scenario, the introduction of driverless cars is delayed until 2040 because regulations require them to be close to
perfect. By 2070, autonomous
cars will have saved 580,000
lives, 420,000 fewer than under
the first scenario.
“Waiting for the cars to perform flawlessly is a clear example
of the perfect being the enemy of
the good,” Kalra said.
As Reimer sees it, “if the goal is
to be able to say, ‘We need to be
able to justify these vehicles are
25 percent safer than legacy
systems today before they are
market-viable at any number
great than X,’ hey, that’s realistic.
But how are we going to prove it?
“The likelihood of seeing a
crash with an automated vehicle
is very, very high. The likelihood
of someone dying at the expense
of a highly automated vehicle is
for certain,” Reimer said.
When that moment arises, the
question of how safe is safe
enough will be addressed once
more, this time underscored by a
tragedy.
“A major backlash against a
crash caused by even a relatively
safe autonomous vehicle could
grind the industry to a halt,”
Kalra said, “resulting in potentially the greatest loss of life over
time. The right answer is probably somewhere in between introducing cars that are just better than average and waiting for
them to be nearly perfect.”
A group of House Republicans
took to social media last week to
attack the outdoor goods retailer
Patagonia in what amounted to a
public rebuke for the company’s
decision to speak out against President Trump’s policies.
The rebuke, from a congressional committee’s official Twitter
and email accounts, triggered
complaints that the elected officials were improperly using government resources to squelch free
speech.
The attacks came in response to
Patagonia’s decision to sue the
president over his decision to
withdraw the protected status of
some 2 million acres of land that
make up national monuments in
Utah. Before filing the suit, the
environmentally conscious retailer took to the web to voice its
dismay: “The president stole your
land,” Patagonia said on its website and on Twitter. “This is the
largest elimination of protected
land in American history.”
The House Natural Resources
Committee was quick to respond:
“Patagonia is lying to you,” the
Republican-led committee tweeted on its official account last week.
It also accused the company of
speaking out in an attempt “to sell
more products to wealthy elitist
urban dwellers from New York to
San Francisco.” Interior Secretary
Ryan Zinke retweeted the committee’s post.
The panel led by Rep. Rob Bishop (R-Utah) also sent out an email
to a list of subscribers. “Patagonia:
Don’t buy it,” the subject said.
“We’re not urging a boycott of
Patagonia,” said Parish Braden, a
spokesman for the committee.
“Instead we’re calling on Patagonia to stop selling a false narrative
and to refrain from distributing
misleading statements.”
Ethics experts and lawyers,
though, said the tweets and email
appeared to walk a fine line.
“There’s a principle in government ethics that it’s improper to
use public office for private gain,”
said Kathleen Clark, a law professor at Washington University,
“This appears to be the flip side of
that: Officials using government
resources to condemn a company.’
Walter Schaub, the former director of the Office of Government
Ethics, also weighed in on Twitter.
“The federal govt officially and
publicly calling a company a liar
for political reasons is a bizarre
and dangerous departure from
civic norms,” he tweeted Friday.
A spokeswoman for Patagonia
called the committee’s tweet “obviously inappropriate” but said
the company would “stay focused
on protecting our national monuments.”
In a lawsuit filed last week in
U.S. District Court in Washington,
the company alleges Trump does
not have the legal authority to
scale back public lands created by
his predecessors. It also said
shrinking the Bears Ears National
Monument in Utah would keep its
employees, customers and sponsored athletes from using the public land “for various purposes, including . . . product testing, marketing, professional training, fitness, education, recreation,
spiritual and aesthetic enjoyment,
and other purposes.”
“Patagonia will suffer direct
and immediate injury from the
revocation of the designation of
the landmarks, structures, and objects of the Bears Ears National
Monument,” the lawsuit says.
Trump has taken to Twitter a
number of times to speak out
against retailers and other companies. He has also called for boycotts of CNN and the National
Football League.
ashley.halsey@washpost.com
abha.bhattarai@washpost.com
BY
A BHA B HATTARAI
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
Fox had a big day at the Golden Globes, but suitor Disney barely registered
What will happen
to winning productions
in combined company?
BY
S TEVEN Z EITCHIK
When the Golden Globes announced its nominations Monday, it offered a tale of two cities.
In one camp was 21st Century
Fox. The company had nothing
less than a dominating performance. The three most nominated
movies of the day — “The Shape
of Water,” “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” and “The
Post” — all came from Fox units.
(The most-nominated among
them was “The Shape of Water,”
the Guillermo del Toro 1950s-era
genre mash-up, with seven.) The
studio also scored three nominations for the Hugh Jackman
circus musical “The Greatest
Showman.”
Collectively, Fox had 27 film
nominations — more than twice
as many as the nearest competitor, Sony, with 12. Sister company
FX had eight nominations on the
TV side, driven primarily by
“Feud” and “Fargo.” That was
good enough for third place, behind just HBO and Netflix. And
that’s not counting a show like
this “This Is Us,” which is produced by Fox’s TV studio division
and had three nominations of its
own. A company that was an
awards also-ran a few years ago
was now an unassailable leader.
In a very different camp sat
Disney. The entertainment giant
didn’t, well, have much of anything at all. It’s not really in the
awards business anymore.
The company landed just two
nominations on the film side and
three, via ABC, in TV.
This isn’t an idle contrast, of
course. Disney is poised to buy
much of Fox — the entire film
studio operation and FX. That
means the 2017-2018 Golden
Globes powerhouse is about to
undergo a major transformation.
And it raises the question: What
would happen to productions
such as these in a combined
company?
The generous read would be
that they’d do just fine because
Fox has movies and shows that
Disney doesn’t traffic in. Disney
could take advantage of Fox’s
foothold in this area to beef up its
offerings with original intellectual property.
More realistically, though, say
analysts and insiders, Disney
would take long and close looks
at productions such as these.
Many of them would struggle to
exist in a studio focused on global
blockbusters, or tentpoles, as Disney does.
That’s because most original
movies, though costing a lot less
than the sequels and branddriven productions Disney specializes in, come with much
greater uncertainty.
Disney executives, for example, would have loved “Hidden
Figures,” the 2016 box-office phenomenon that had a lot of awards
traction, too. But would they
want “Battle of the Sexes” or
“Patti Cakes,” two highly touted
2017 Searchlight releases that fizzled with voters and at the box
office? Prestige filmmaking is a
dice toss even in the best of years.
A company such as Disney that
seeks safety in brands might not
want to bother.
The last time the firm was
seriously in the specialty film
game was more than a decade
ago, with Miramax. And that
didn’t end so well.
Fox’s resurgence has been driven by Stacey Snider, the Universal
and DreamWorks veteran who
has restored Twentieth Century
Fox’s luster with the kind of
mainstream but award-friendly
material embodied by “The Post.”
She also has continued to offer
broad support to Fox Searchlight,
the long-standing specialty division run by Nancy Utley and
Steve Gilula that has regained its
awards momentum of a few years
ago with “The Shape of Water”
and “Three Billboards.”
But where will this be in a
combined Disney-Fox? Experts
say Snider would probably leave
in a merger; she wouldn’t have the
necessary latitude with Disney
chief Alan Horn already in place.
How much Twentieth Century
Fox would even exist as a separate
studio remains up in the air.
Searchlight, one of the longest
running and most successful of
Hollywood’s specialty divisions,
could continue, though with
what staff and mandate also remains an open question.
The dozens of Golden Globe
nominations offer one of the best
arguments for why Fox is so
desired by Disney.
Or they could be the studio’s
last hurrah.
steve.zeitchik@washpost.com
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A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
GOP tax negotiators face blowback on proposed changes
TAXES FROM A1
nomic orthodoxy.
But there were signs of immediate resistance to the idea from at
least two Senate Republicans, and
the GOP can only afford to lose the
support of one if they want to pass
the bill.
Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) said
she didn’t want to lower the top
income tax rate. “I don’t think lowering the top rate is a good idea,” she
said as word circulated about the
plan.
And Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.)
expressed frustration with the idea
in a Twitter post, writing that it was
wrong for negotiators to reject his
plan to expand tax benefits for working families as “anti-growth” when
they were fine “to cut tax for couples
making $1 million.”
Talks remained extremely fluid
Tuesday night as the move to reduce
the top rate emerged as the most
prominent, and most controversial,
of the changes being seriously considered by lawmakers as they sought
to reconcile House and Senate tax
bills by the end of the week.
It was not immediately clear
whether the negotiations might be
affected by Democrat Doug Jones’s
projected victory over Republican
Roy Moore in a special U.S. Senate
race in Alabama.
Republicans insisted Jones’s upset win Tuesday night would make
no difference. Jones is not expected
to be seated until after Christmas,
and until that happens the Senate
seat is occupied by appointed Republican
incumbent
Luther
Strange, a reliable GOP vote.
Yet given Republicans’ already
razor-thin margin on the tax legislation, it was possible that the Jones
win could buoy Democrats or empower wavering Republicans. If
nothing else, the unexpected outcome seemed likely to increase the
GOP’s determination to wrap up by
the end of next week as planned.
Amid GOP negotiations earlier
Tuesday, the other most significant
change under consideration was to
the corporate tax rate, which lawmakers now plan to reduce to 21 per-
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.), right, with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.),
said Tuesday that he wanted to “deliver real tax relief before Christmas.”
cent instead of 20 percent. The corporate tax rate is currently 35 percent.
Lawmakers also planned to find a
middle ground between how the
House and Senate bills treat the
mortgage-interest deduction. The
new legislation appears likely to allow taxpayers to deduct up to
$750,000 in new mortgage interest
on homes.
Lawmakers on Tuesday evening
stressed that key elements, including the top tax rate, could shift as
Republican leadership seeks to deliver a majority of votes in the House
and Senate under an aggressive plan
to pass a final tax bill by early next
week, sending it to President Trump
for his signature by Christmas.
Republican leaders were being
cautious Tuesday to ensure that the
changes would not drive away the
support of any members, particularly in the Senate, where they hold a
slim majority and narrowly passed
an earlier version of the tax bill with
just one vote to spare.
Republicans are grappling with
sensitive demands from their members. Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) is
pushing for big tax cuts for partnerships and sole proprietorships. And
Collins also wants for a vote on
health-care legislation that would
strengthen the Affordable Care Act
marketplaces.
During Senate debate earlier this
month, Rubio proposed raising the
corporate tax rate to 20.94 percent
in exchange for expanding the child
tax credit. His effort was rejected by
many Republicans at the time, as
they alleged raising the corporate
tax rate in such a way would hurt
economic growth.
Rubio must now decide whether
to follow through on his repeated
threats and oppose the bill, potentially standing in the way of Trump’s
top legislative priority. Or he can go
along with the rest of Republicans
and risk having his complaints dismissed during future political fights.
Democrats, for their part, lashed
into the bill Tuesday evening.
“It’s hard to believe the Republicans can make this bad bill even
worse, but behind closed doors,
that’s exactly what they seem to be
doing,” said Senate Minority Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.).
In the current tax code, income
above $470,700 is taxed at a 39.6 percent rate for a married couple who
file their taxes jointly. Only one in
200 taxpayers pay the top tax rate
today, according to the Tax Policy
Center.
The tax bill passed by House in
November would keep the 39.6 percent rate but only use it for income
above $1 million. The Senate bill
would apply a 38.5 percent top rate
to people earning over $1 million.
It could not be learned at what
income level Republicans were
considering attaching a new
37 percent rate.
Lawmakers plan to hold their
only public, official event to discuss
the bill Wednesday, and Trump
plans to deliver a closing argument
in favor of it at the White House.
Most polls have shown a lack of
support among voters for the tax
plan, with many Americans saying it
is designed in a way that disproportionately benefits the wealthy.
Independent nonpartisan analysis shows the tax plans passed by the
House and the Senate would benefit
most Americans, at least in the near
term, but the wealthiest would see
the most gains.
But Tuesday, a senior White
House official argued these views
would evolve as people personally
felt the impacts of the tax cut.
These polls are “not a reflection of
what the American people think
about what we are doing,” the official
said, speaking on the condition of
anonymity under the terms of a
White House briefing. “Does anyone
on the planet actually believe that
hard-working Americans don’t
want lower taxes and a simple, easyto-understand tax code?”
The White House and GOP leaders had originally envisioned lowering the top rate to 35 percent, but
they relented after concerns the tax
bill might be seen as tilting too
strongly toward the wealthy.
Former White House chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon had recommended internally that they consider a 44 percent tax bracket for income over $5 million, but his idea
was shot down by others in the
White House who said all tax rates
needed to come down, even for the
wealthy, to spur more economic
growth.
After the House and Senate
passed their versions of the tax bill,
complaints from wealthy Americans — particularly in New York —
grew louder. Trump has received an
earful from friends and supporters
in New York, and last week signaled
that he could support changes that
he said would help a “sliver” of people.
People familiar with the negotiations said House Republicans also
pushed for the lower individual rate.
They could have been sympathetic
to complaints from the wealthy and
conservatives that these changes
were necessary to boost economic
growth and investment.
Both bills included as their central feature a massive reduction in
the corporate tax rate, from 35 per-
cent down to 20 percent. Trump had
insisted for weeks that he would not
allow anything above a 20 percent
rate, but in recent days the White
House has showed more flexibility.
“We are entering another huge
week for tax reform,” House Speaker
Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) said Tuesday.
“Tax reform is what people need
right now, and I am so thrilled that
we are so close to the finish line. We
are going to keep at it so we can
deliver real tax relief before Christmas.”
Once House and Senate GOP
leaders reach an agreement on the
design of the tax compromise, they
must submit the package to each
chamber for votes. There were a
number of other decisions that remained in flux.
They were discussing the possibility of allowing the corporate tax
cuts to take effect in 2018 instead of
the 2019 date set in the Senate bill.
They were also discussing the estate
tax for inheritances, which the
House bill repeals fully and the Senate bill only limits.
House conservatives have been
pushing to keep full repeal, but
House Ways and Means Committee
Chairman Kevin Brady (R-Tex.) indicated openness to the Senate approach.
Beyond the estate tax, the Senate
bill retains seven income-tax brackets for individuals and families,
while the House bill collapsed those
brackets to four.
Congressional leaders have signaled how they plan to resolve some
differences between the two bills.
For example, the Senate bill would
repeal the individual mandate of the
Affordable Care Act, while the
House bill would not. But House
leaders have suggested they like that
change to the health-care law.
“We’re narrowing those differences, we’re trying to take things off
the table so we can narrow those
differences,” Sen. John Cornyn (RTex.) said.
erica.werner@washpost.com
damian.paletta@washpost.com
Heather Long and Jeff Stein contributed
to this report.
GAO: Funds for energy program wrongly withheld Report targets backlog of
student debt relief claims
Move on innovation unit
went against Congress
BY
S TEVEN M UFSON
The Trump administration
violated the law by wrongly withholding funds for a popular Energy Department program supporting innovation, the Government Accountability Office said
Tuesday.
The GAO said the Trump administration had violated the Impoundment Control Act by failing to spend $91 million budgeted for the Energy Department’s
Advanced Research Projects
Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). The
program supports research and
development of novel energy
technologies.
The GAO said the administration has since released the funds,
which were part of the fiscal 2017
budget, but the report points to a
tactic that Democrats worry
could be used again for the nullification of spending already approved by Congress.
In another dispute over federal
energy spending, the administration is urging Congress to abolish
the Energy Department’s loan
guarantee programs aimed at
giving projects a boost for com-
mercial development. The current drafts of spending bills in
the House and Senate would cut
about $22 million needed to administer $41 billion in available
funds under the Energy Department’s Title XVII and advanced
vehicle program.
However, the administration
has made an exception by awarding Southern Co. and its partners
loan guarantees of $3.7 billion to
help finish building a pair of
nuclear reactors in Georgia. The
big loan guarantee for the nuclear reactors — as well as one for
a chemical plant in Louisiana
that the administration supports
— would be the last ones to
squeeze in before the loan program’s final deadline.
Dozens of other projects are in
the pipeline awaiting approval
and would likely be left out unless Congress restores the money
needed.
The GAO report addresses
worries that the Trump administration could cut programs that
have the support of Congress and
have lines in the federal budget.
The Impoundment Control
Act was adopted in 1974 because
of fears in Congress that President Richard M. Nixon was abusing his power by withholding
funding for programs that he
opposed but that Congress had
adopted. The act required the
president to notify Congress if he
wanted to rescind certain items
of budget authority — and Congress would then have to act to
block him.
“When Congress provides
money for the executive branch,
the President must spend that
money,” the GAO’s deputy general
counsel Emmanuelli Perez said
in a statement. “An agency violates the law if it intentionally
slows down or halts spending in
response to legislative proposals
to reduce or eliminate a program.
Agencies generally cannot halt a
program because an administration doesn’t support the program.”
Sen. Maria Cantwell (Wash.),
the ranking Democrat on the
Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, who wrote a
letter about the issue in May
signed by 27 of her colleagues,
said she was “deeply troubled” by
the GAO’s report. “These actions
ignore Congressional intent, and
are explicitly prohibited by law,”
she said. “The President cannot
ignore statutory requirements or
funding direction provided by
Congress.”
In the case of ARPA-E, the
administration planned to simply cancel half of the unspent
$91 million and use the other half
to shut down the program, which
was not its legislated purpose.
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“Agencies may only withhold
budget authority from obligation
if the President has transmitted a
special message to Congress,” the
GAO said.
The Trump administration’s
opposition to federal loan guarantees could also deal a blow to
efforts to commercialize new energy technologies.
Lobbyists for the program say
the Trump administration is
making a mistake because its cost
is minimal.
Despite the failure of a handful
of firms, including the infamous
bankruptcy of solar panel maker
Solyndra, the loan guarantee program has made about $2 billion
and created jobs while improving
the nation’s energy infrastructure.
The loan programs, designed
to bridge the gap between research and private financing,
have also been used to aid Tesla’s
electric vehicles, Ford’s drive for
more efficient internal combustion engines, and energy storage
for renewables.
“The appropriate function of
government is to support new
technologies, even though some
could fail, so that society would
benefit while creating jobs and
improving competitiveness,” said
Craig “CJ” Evans, a lobbyist and
managing director of America
First, an energy consulting service.
Mick Mulvaney, the Trump administration’s budget director
and a former House member, has
long been a foe of the Energy
Department’s loan guarantee
program. “I’m tired of people
coming to the government as
part of their business plan,” he
said at a House hearing in 2012.
“As someone who came from the
private sector, I’m sick of it.”
The glaring exception is Southern’s Georgia Power subsidiary
and its partners, whose project
has been buffeted by delays and
cost overruns and by the bankruptcy of the nuclear project’s
main contractor, Westinghouse.
The administration’s offer of
loan guarantees would substantially reduce borrowing expenses,
a critical part of the entire project’s cost.
The money would come from
the Energy Department’s nuclear
loan program. The Obama administration gave this same project $8.3 billion in loan guarantees.
The Trump administration has
also made an exception for up to
$2 billion in loan guarantees for
Lake Charles Methanol to construct the first methanol production facility to employ carboncapture technology in Lake
Charles, La.
steven.mufson@washpost.com
Education watchdog calls
on agency to clear tens of
thousands of applications
BY D ANIELLE
D OUGLAS- G ABRIEL
The U.S. Education Department’s inspector general issued a
report this week urging the Office
of Federal Student Aid to take
action on tens of thousands of
debt forgiveness applications languishing at the agency.
The report puts a fine point on
the criticism student advocates
and liberal lawmakers have directed toward Education Secretary Betsy DeVos for refusing to
process debt relief claims submitted by federal student loan borrowers who were defrauded by
their colleges. The inspector general said that while the procedure
for processing claims could be improved, the system works well
enough that there’s no excuse for
the Education Department failing
to clear the backlog of pending
claims.
The department has the authority to discharge federal student loans when a college uses
illegal tactics to persuade a student to borrow money, under a
federal statute known as borrower
defense to repayment. The team of
attorneys working on the applications have flagged nearly 12,000
claims for approval and about
7,200 for denial. But acting undersecretary James Manning has refused to sign off on any of those
claims, saying the new administration needed time to review the
policies put in place by its predecessor, according to the report.
In a letter responding to the
inspector general’s report, Wayne
Johnson, who heads the student
aid office, said his team is working
with other units within the department to strengthen protocols
so that work on the claims can
proceed. He said the discharge of
some of the claims flagged for
approval is “imminent,” but he
failed to provide a timeline.
Johnson agreed with many of
the inspector general’s recommendations, including the need to
streamline the management of
claims and set time frames for
processing them. But he took issue
with the inspector general’s insistence that the department is putting applicants at risk of accumulating interest and paying more on
their loans while awaiting a decision. Johnson said borrowers
waiting more than a year for a
response will get a break from the
department on the interest accumulated on their loans.
“The report fails to recognize
that the change in administrations necessarily required time for
the secretary and acting under
secretary and their staffs to familiarize themselves with the history
of the borrower defense claim review process in order to determine and advise [the Office of
Federal Student Aid] as to any
policy changes that would be
made,” Johnson wrote.
Though the borrower defense
statute has been on the books
since 1995, the department had
received only five claims until Corinthian Colleges closed in 2015.
The for-profit school spent its last
few years battling state and federal lawsuits over alleged fraud, deceptive marketing and steering
students into predatory loans —
charges that mirror the allegations that brought down ITT Technical Institutes.
Former students hoped the evidence compiled against those forprofit schools would create a clear
path to loan discharges, but they
have endured a long wait that for
many started under the Obama
administration. Obama officials
granted relief to Corinthian students in waves, with the vast majority of approvals issued toward the
end of the administration. By then,
the department had created a more
full-throated approach to handling
claims, according to the report.
From July 1, 2016, through President Trump’s inauguration, the
department approved more than
half of the 46,274 claims it received. In contrast, the Trump administration has received 25,991
claims for loan discharges, and
denied two and approved none.
“Hundreds of thousands of students were defrauded and cheated
by predatory colleges that broke
the law, but today’s report confirms
Secretary DeVos tried to shirk her
responsibility to these students
and shut down the borrower defense program, leaving them with
nowhere to turn,” said Sen. Patty
Murray (Wash.), ranking Democrat
on the Senate Committee on
Health, Education, Labor and Pensions.
Monday’s report arrives as DeVos has convened a committee to
rewrite the borrower defense statute, a year after the Obama administration revised the rule to simplify the claims process and shift
more of the cost of discharging
loans onto schools. DeVos suspended the changes before they
were scheduled to take effect in
July and announced plans to overhaul the law.
danielle.douglas@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
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New DGA chief has a 2018 strategy, and it doesn’t involve calling out Trump
The Daily
202
philadelphia —
Jay Inslee, the new
chairman of the
Democratic
JAMES
Governors
HOHMANN
Association, says
President Trump
will be so toxic by next November
that down-ballot Democrats will
not need to mention him by name
to ride a wave of backlash.
In fact, the governor of
Washington state — who
previously spent eight terms in
the U.S. House — is encouraging
candidates across the country to
stay focused as much as possible
on core economic issues.
“We need to talk about jobs,”
Inslee said in an interview here.
“People will figure out for
themselves that they have to
stand up to Donald Trump.
They’re doing that without us
saying a word. That’s not our
communications strategy. We
want to communicate about jobs
and the economy. The other thing
just happens organically.”
One of Inslee’s three sons got
married in Philadelphia the
Saturday before last. The
governor had some down time
while he was in town, so I took the
train up to have lunch with him.
As he ate a pulled-pork sandwich
and sipped a Diet Pepsi at the
Logan hotel, Inslee outlined his
theory of the case for the
midterms.
He dubs it the “double-P”
strategy: The personality of the
president will create the climate
for a change election, and then
Democrats will focus on
prosecuting the case that GOP
policies are hurting middle-class
families.
Not talking about Trump by
name can be challenging. Almost
inevitably, most of our
conversation wound up being
about the president. Inslee said
that’s exactly the point: “No
Democrat running for governor
anywhere has to say, ‘Did you
notice that Donald Trump has
caused nothing but division,
hatred and chaos?’ You don’t have
to say that because he’s showing it
himself. Our people are going to
lead with an economic message
. . . and we’re not going to be
distracted by his divisiveness. . . .
It’s not ideological. It’s just a
rejection of chaos.”
There are 36 gubernatorial
elections next year, including 26
in states held by Republicans.
Because the 2014 midterms were
so disastrous for Democrats, they
control just 16 of the 50
governorships. Trump’s
historically low approval rating of
35 percent, according to Gallup’s
national tracking poll, gives them
additional pickup opportunities.
“I see no reason that trend will
not continue, unless the president
has an epiphany or a personality
transplant,” said Inslee. “And
there’s no evidence of that.”
Inslee expressed confidence
that Democrats can knock off the
Republican incumbent in Illinois
and pick up GOP-held open seats
in New Mexico and Maine. He
thinks Trump’s low approval
rating will potentially put South
Carolina, Kansas, Tennessee and
Oklahoma in play.
The DGA is putting special
emphasis on nine states where
Barack Obama won in 2012, and
the governor has a role in the
redistricting process. Whoever
wins in these places in the
midterms will have a hand in the
once-a-decade redrawing of
congressional boundaries. That
could make it easier for
Democrats to win the House.
Ralph Northam’s gubernatorial
victory in Virginia last month
gives Inslee confidence that 2018
will be a banner year for
Democrats. White collegeeducated women in the suburbs
swung hard in their direction,
rank-and-file Democrats were
highly motivated, and young
people turned out for an off-year
election. “Democrats are going to
crawl out of their sick bed to go
vote next year,” Inslee said. “The
polling did not pick up this
energy.”
Inslee argues that if
Democratic candidates can focus
on rolling out policy white
TED S. WARREN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, chairman of the Democratic Governors Association, says, “We want to
communicate about jobs and the economy.” Standing up to President Trump “just happens organically.”
papers, Republicans will be stuck
twisting themselves into pretzels
over Trump in purple states. They
can’t alienate the president’s base,
but they will need to woo
independents who are
disillusioned with his
performance. He points to Ed
Gillespie, the failed GOP nominee
in Virginia, as an example of the
challenge.
“They can run, but they cannot
hide from him,” said Inslee. “The
Virginia race demonstrated that
they have no escape hatch from
this. They’re trying to straddle a
barbed wire fence. You can’t do it
successfully.”
There are a handful of
Republicans, however, who look
insulated from anti-Trump
backlash at this point. Polls show
that the GOP governors in the
blue states of Massachusetts,
Maryland and Vermont are
among the most popular chief
executives in the country. They’ve
successfully threaded the needle
so far.
Inslee noted that Robert
Ehrlich was a popular Republican
governor of Maryland going into
2006 — he was even viewed more
favorably than unfavorably on
Election Day — but he still lost to
Democratic challenger Martin
O’Malley that year because
George W. Bush was so
unpopular.
“All bets are off in this
situation,” Inslee said. “There’s no
lifeboat here for them to get into.”
Inslee’s real frame of reference,
though, is more 1994 than 2006.
He was elected to the House in
1992 and swept out two years
later as part of the blowback
against Bill Clinton. (He returned
to Congress in 1998 and stayed
until he ran for governor in 2012.)
This ’94 defeat was the defining
moment of his political career,
and he talks about it all the time.
“I’m not an expert in very many
things. I used to know how to
shoot a jump shot in the old days.
But I am an expert in wave
elections because I went through
one in 1994,” Inslee told me.
“What I learned in 1994 is: You
cannot escape being shackled to a
president who is being rejected by
the American people in double
digits. You just cannot escape it.
There is no way. Lord, I tried
different approaches. I know
exactly what these Republicans
are going through.”
In Washington state, the
congressional delegation went
from having eight Democrats and
one Republican to seven
Republicans and two Democrats.
One of the losers was House
Speaker Tom Foley.
“These are referendums on the
president, and you cannot escape
that,” Inslee said. “You cannot
minimize it. You cannot put on a
different hat or a happy face. You
are just tied to that smell. And
that’s what they’re stuck with.
There’s no soap that can erase it.
. . . The guy [voters] wanted to
drain the swamp fed the
alligators instead.”
Asked to reconcile this with the
Democratic civil war that’s
broken out since Obama left
office, Inslee replied: “I do not
believe it is something to lose two
minutes of sleep over, and
Virginia proves that.”
Indeed, there was lots of anxiety
on the left and second-guessing
from liberal interest groups in the
run-up to the election. It looked
stupid when Northam won by
nine points. The lieutenant
governor also faced a credible
challenger from his left in Tom
Perriello, but the party’s rank-andfile mostly rallied behind him
after the June primary.
“The unifying force of Donald
Trump cannot be overstated
here,” Inslee said. “You can have
the biggest ideological debate in
the Democratic Party, and it will
be forgotten in a nanosecond.”
If 2018 goes as well as Inslee
predicts, the 66-year-old could be
well positioned to seek the
Democratic nomination in 2020.
He would run as an accomplished
progressive governor from a state
with a robust economy. It’s
plausible that he could emerge as
a consensus figure who is
acceptable to dueling factions of
the Democratic coalition.
On the same night Northam
prevailed in Virginia, Democrats
won a special election to take
control of the Washington state
Senate. Inslee hopes to capitalize
on this during a short legislative
session that starts in January.
Asked about running for
president, Inslee smiled. “I’ve got
two great jobs right now,” he said,
referring to being governor and
DGA chairman. “I do believe this
is a generational opportunity for
the Democrats to advance
progressive policies by winning
governor’s races. I think it’s a 50year opportunity, or a lifetime
opportunity, given the
combination of circumstances
here. I know you’ve heard this
before, but it’s honest: I’m
focused on the job that I’ve got.”
This, of course, is exactly the
answer that someone planning to
run always gives . . .
james.hohmann@washpost.com
GOP higher-ed bill moves ahead in the House, despite pleas to slow down
BY D ANIELLE
D OUGLAS- G ABRIEL
House Republicans are pressing
ahead with a sweeping overhaul of
the federal law that governs almost
every aspect of higher education,
without hearings and despite
mounting pressure to provide
more time for analysis and input.
On Tuesday, the House Committee on Education and the
Workforce considered amendments to the Promoting Real Opportunity, Success, and Prosperity
through Education Reform Act,
introduced by Rep. Virginia Foxx
(R-N.C.), the committee’s chairwoman, and Rep. Brett Guthrie
(R-Ky.). The process known as
“markup” is expected to take two
days as Democrats and Republicans plan to introduce nearly 60
amendments, according to congressional staffers.
The legislation is the first significant step in the reauthorization of
the Higher Education Act of 1965,
which has remained largely untouched for nearly a decade. As a
result, university, student and consumer groups are pleading with the
committee to slow down. Barely
two weeks have passed since Foxx
released the 542-page bill, a tome
that would change a spectrum of
issues, including the way families
finance education, the way colleges
are held accountable for their performance and much more.
On the eve of the markup, Republicans tucked in more provisions, including giving the education secretary greater flexibility to
cut off federal grants to students
and barring campuses from regulating fraternities and sororities.
“Despite the fact that reauthorization is already several years behind schedule, this bill is suddenly
being rushed through committee,”
Ted Mitchell, president of the American Council on Education, wrote to
committee leaders Monday in a letter also signed by 36 other organizations. “This expedited time-frame
limits the ability to analyze the bill
and consult with affected parties,
leaving the committee in the position of asking its members and the
public to support legislation before
knowing its full impact.”
Mitchell, who served as undersecretary of education during the
Obama administration, said the
organizations have significant reservations about the legislation, although there are elements they
support — a position echoed
throughout the higher-education
community.
Many have praised the legislation for simplifying the financial
aid application, using grants to
provide incentives for students to
graduate in four years, eliminating student loan origination fees
and expanding work-study opportunities for low-income students.
But some worry the bill could
raise the cost of college for those
who can least afford it by ending
the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant and no
longer paying the interest on lowincome students’ loans while they
are in school. The grant provided
$732 million in aid to 1.6 million
students in the 2014-2015 academic year, according to the Department of Education.
“Eliminating the supplemental
grant without channeling the funds
directly into another need-based
grant program, like the Pell Grant,
is simply a cut to students trying to
pay for college,” Michelle Asha Cooper, president of the nonprofit Institute for Higher Education Policy,
said in a review of the legislation.
And ending the interest subsidy,
she said, “ultimately means that
students will pay more for college.”
A preliminary analysis by the
American Council on Education,
which represents colleges and
universities, supports Cooper’s
observation about abolishing the
subsidy. The council said an undergraduate
who
borrows
$19,000 over four years and makes
all payments on time would see a
44 percent increase in the cost of
the loan if subsidized loans go
away. A student who attends for
five years and borrows $23,000
would see a 56 percent increase.
By most estimates, nearly 6 million students would be affected.
Mary Clare Amselem, an education policy analyst at the conservative Heritage Foundation, says
taxpayers will benefit if the federal
government reduces its role in financing higher education.
“Students and taxpayers win in
the scenario where you have private lenders actually competing in
the market, and ultimately we
would hope that puts more pressure on inflated tuition prices,”
Amselem said. “The federal role in
education should only be to lend
to students that the private markets wouldn’t.”
She applauded provisions to
end subsidized loans and Public
Service Loan Forgiveness, a program that wipes away federal student debt for people in the public
sector after they have made 10
years’ worth of payments. But in-
stead of House Republicans imposing borrowing caps for parents
and graduate students, Amselem
said she hoped lawmakers would
end all government lending to
both groups. Banks and other private lenders, she said, are wellequipped to meet their needs. Advocacy groups have argued that
private loans lack adequate consumer protections.
Critics of the federal Parent and
Graduate PLUS loan programs say
they are in part responsible for the
rising cost of college. They say
colleges and universities have little incentive to keep costs down as
long as people can access unlimited amounts of money from both
programs, a claim that has been
disputed by some education researchers.
The graduate program in particular has been blamed for the
explosion in student debt, with
roughly 40 percent of student
loans held by people with advanced degrees. Conservatives
also have called for caps on the
amount of graduate student debt
eligible for loan forgiveness in a
federal income-based repayment
program designed to lower the
skyrocketing costs of discharging
debt. As it stands, borrowers can
restrict their monthly student
loan payments to 10 percent of
their discretionary earnings, with
the remaining balance of the debt
forgiven after 20 to 25 years.
Instead of limiting eligibility,
House Republicans would end loan
forgiveness
altogether,
raise
monthly payments to 15 percent of
income and eliminate the fixed
number of years for repayment. But
in exchange, the plan caps interest
payments so that after 10 years, borrowers are paying only principal.
Preston Cooper, an education
analyst at the conservative American Enterprise Institute think
tank, said he has mixed feelings
about the provision.
“Some of the loan-forgiveness
programs are shaping up to be
really expensive, and having a cap
on interest will give students
peace of mind,” Cooper said. “But
one of the negatives is getting rid
of loan forgiveness, which is a big
subsidy, but you’re kind of introducing this new subsidy for people
who take a long time to pay off
their loans.”
House Republicans also would
require people in an income-based
plan to pay at least $25 a month,
ending a practice that allows struggling borrowers to pay nothing. An
analysis released Tuesday by the
Center for American Progress, a
liberal think tank, said restructuring the repayment plan could increase monthly debt bills for borrowers — and the amount they pay
overall — without a fixed number
of years for repayment.
House Democrats are introducing nearly 40 amendments to
combat changes to loan forgiveness, financial aid and accountability measures for colleges.
Democrats say they were not consulted on any aspect of the legislation, despite drafting bipartisan
bills addressing elements of the
Higher Education Act in the last
Congress. Members plan to paint
the GOP bill as a continued attack
on American families, according
to a Democratic committee aid.
Democrats are especially concerned about the repeal of regulations targeting for-profit colleges.
The legislation would end the
“90/10” rule, which bars for-profit
colleges from getting more than
90 percent of their operating revenue from federal student aid.
It also would get rid of the
gainful-employment regulation
that threatens to withhold student
aid from vocational programs that
have graduates who consistently
end up with more debt than they
can repay.
House Republicans are also
proposing to limit loan discharges
afforded to students defrauded by
their colleges through a statute
known as “borrower defense to
repayment.”
“The House GOP proposal guts
key safeguards designed to protect students and taxpayers from
predatory schools, like the
gainful-employment rule and the
90/10 provision. And then to make
matters worse, it eliminates protections around the borrower defense process, making it far more
difficult for students to get relief
on their debt when they get
scammed by those schools,” said
Jen Mishory, a senior fellow at the
Century Foundation.
danielle.douglas@washpost.com
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EDITORIALS
Alabama picks an honorable man
The election of Mr. Jones to the Senate is good news not just for the state but also for the entire country.
T
HANK YOU, Alabama.
In Tuesday’s special election, the state by a
narrow margin chose to spare the nation the
indignity of seating an accused child molester in the U.S. Senate. Though the stain of electing
Republican Roy Moore would have sullied Alabama,
seemingly confirming every negative stereotype
about the Deep South state, the shame would have
been national. Instead, Alabama voters chose Democrat Doug Jones to represent them until 2021.
Mr. Jones is not in perfect sync with many
Alabama voters on some issues, most notably abortion. But he is an honorable man with an admirable
record of public service who ran a respectful
campaign. His behavior suggests he will serve with
decency and care in the Senate. He should make his
state proud. None of these fine things could have
been said of Mr. Moore. It is beyond heartening that
Alabamians refused to overlook or forgive
Mr. Moore’s misshapen character.
Even before woman after woman shared stories of
Mr. Moore preying on them when they were teen-
agers and he was in his 30s, Mr. Moore had
disqualified himself from serving in public office. As
Alabama’s Supreme Court chief justice, Mr. Moore
twice flouted federal court rulings simply because he
did not like them. He had long stood for lawlessness
and disorder. He called for “homosexual conduct” to
be outlawed, said a Muslim should not be seated in
Congress and waxed nostalgic for the era of slavery.
But most egregious were the tales of traumas
Mr. Moore inflicted on teenage girls.
Mr. Jones’s victory shows that, while partisanship
might be extreme, it still has limits. Even in deep-red
Alabama, enough voters refused to succumb to lies
about how negative stories on Mr. Moore were
merely fake news cooked up by a hostile media.
Americans do not send senators to Washington
merely to vote mechanically on a few hot-button
issues, but to exercise judgment when cameras are
not rolling, on issues that are important but not
headline-grabbing. Good lawmakers also protect the
nation’s democratic institutions, preserve the independence of their branch of government and work
Protect the
‘dreamers’ now
with people with whom they disagree. It takes
character to fulfill these responsibilities. Mr. Jones
seems ready to do such work. Mr. Moore did not.
Mr. Jones’s victory also suggests that the nation’s
recent awakening on sexual harassment and assault
is spreading across the country. Enough Alabamians
believed the women.
If Americans should feel grateful to Alabama
voters, so should the Republican Party, much of
which debased itself by following President Trump
into the gutter of support for Mr. Moore. Its majority
in the Senate will be slightly narrower, but the
dignity of the Senate GOP caucus will be at least
partially salvaged. Alabama voters spared the Senate
Ethics Committee the dilemma of how to handle a
senator who was clearly unfit but who nevertheless
won a popular election. Instead of inviting controversy and chaos, they elected Mr. Jones, a man who
deserves the honor.
Thanks to Alabama, Americans can wake up
Wednesday morning feeling hopeful about the decency and dignity of their democracy.
A necessary health-care upgrade
Regarding the Dec. 9 editorial “Prince George’s
health care at last on the mend”:
The county, the state and the University of
Maryland Medical System deserve credit for fixing
“the hospital problem” in Prince George’s County. The hospital building had for 40 years been
deprived of the ability to make the substantial
upgrades that modern medicine requires.
But fixing the hospital will not automatically fix
health care in the county, which has suffered for
want of a vibrant organization to lead change. There
is a shortage of primary-care physicians and a
minimal network of outpatient services. The hospital will thrive only when it becomes a resource to a
robust community-based care system.
Effort and resources must be directed to building
stronger community organizations. Montgomery
County presents a model for what this comprehensive care system could accomplish. The two counties,
while adjacent, could not be more different in the
structure of their care systems and the resulting
measures of the health of their residents.
Despite the financial and policy inadequacies of
the Prince George’s Hospital Center, recognition is
due the employees and physicians who make extraordinary efforts to serve their community. I have
never seen people do more with less to ease
suffering. The successes of the emergency and
trauma programs are but two examples of what the
hospital staff accomplishes every day for Prince
George’s County and all of Southern Maryland.
John A. O’Brien, Hyattsville
The writer was president of Prince George’s
Hospital Center from 2004 to 2014.
Is this the way the world ends?
the Senate, that has led some Democrats to consider
demanding a DACA fix as the price for their support
on the spending bill — and avoiding a shutdown.
Why should it come to that? In the House, a bill
introduced by Rep. Carlos Curbelo (R-Fla.) and with
34 Republican co-sponsors would set dreamers on a
10-year pathway to citizenship. In the Senate, a
measure with three Republican backers would set a
15-year timetable. Why not take a vote — now?
One answer is Mr. Trump, whose ever-shifting
stance on extending protections for the dreamers has
had a self-neutering effect. In January, citing his “big
heart,” he said they “shouldn’t be very worried,” and in
September he urged Congress to act to protect them.
More recently, under the influence of anti-immigra-
tion hard-liners such as Attorney General Jeff Sessions and White House aide Stephen Miller, he has
switched to demanding an array of border-security
measures, including construction of a wall on the
frontier with Mexico, that are deal-killers for Democrats.
The dreamers, it seems, should in fact be very
worried by what is happening in Washington. Under
the deadline set by Mr. Trump, nearly 1,000 dreamers
will lose their protection from deportation each day
beginning March 5. At that point, a cohort of youngsters raised in this country will stop being bargaining
chips; they will become part of an unfolding American tragedy. Congress should act now to forestall that
completely avoidable, and inexcusable, outcome.
Mr. Kim may be accumulating equipment and expertise.
nology disciplines.
By its very nature, biological technology is dualuse; the machines needed to create lifesaving treatments or pesticides can also be used to create lethal
agents to be delivered in wartime. A fermenter not
connected to any pipes, vents or ductwork could be an
innocent start to manufacturing medicines, or signify
that Mr. Kim is getting ready for something darker. In
the case of the largest biological weapons program
ever attempted, in the Soviet Union from 1975 to 1991,
much of the industrial base was created first, capable
of producing anthrax by the ton, to be ready if and
when the orders came to mobilize for war.
Biological weapons are tricky from a military
point of view. They can be more easily hidden than
nuclear missiles or conventional forces. Attacking
them preemptively could risk unwanted dispersal of
the germs. They are difficult to handle and store for
long periods. If dispersed in the air for an attack,
germs can shift with winds and weather, endanger-
ing troops and civilians, friend and foe alike. But
tests in the 1950s and 1960s carried out by the
United States and Britain showed that in some
conditions, biological weapons can also be deadly
over wide swaths of territory. The United States gave
up biological weapons in 1969, and an international
treaty banning them took effect in 1975. North Korea
joined the treaty in 1987,but the treaty’s verification
requirements are weak. Despite serious obstacles at
home, North Korea has demonstrated an ability to
evade sanctions and scale up military industrial
plants when it wants to.
If Mr. Kim is creating the foundations for a
biological weapons program, it should serve as one
more warning of the escalating threat he poses.
Preemptive war could risk millions of casualties. But
his malign intent cannot be tolerated forever.
Through sanctions, diplomatic pressure and other
means, the burden of Mr. Kim’s despotic and reckless
reign must be brought to an end.
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Being anti-union is contrary to Georgetown’s social justice roots
As a 1990 graduate of Georgetown University’s law
school and the father of an undergraduate, I was
disappointed to read that the university is attempting to thwart the unionization efforts of working
graduate students [“Georgetown declines to support
union effort,” Metro, Dec. 7]. Georgetown insists that
helping professors research or teach is a student
“experience” — as opposed to mere work — that
forms “part of the comprehensive education” the
university provides to advanced degree candidates.
This position is illogical and, perhaps worse, negates
Georgetown’s Catholic and Jesuit identity.
Graduate students are not required to assist a
professor or department. If providing such assistance were indeed a crucial aspect of a Georgetown
graduate education, then it would be mandatory.
Moreover, the labor that the graduate students
letters@washpost.com
The Dec. 9 editorial “Before a final vote on taxes”
had a point that the hypocrisy of the Republicans’
tax plans is staggering and releasing President
Trump’s tax returns would help make that clear. But
this hypocrisy runs deeper. Investors will get as
much as $6 trillion out of the tax plan. That’s how
much the Wilshire 5000 market capitalization has
risen since Election Day. While some of this trickles
down via pension funds and some reflects economic
growth pure and simple, a sizable chunk reflects
anticipation of lower corporate taxes and ends up
lining the pockets of the rich and super-rich.
Also, note that this past week Home Depot, United
Airlines and T-Mobile all announced stock buybacks. In fact, since the Senate voted on its tax bill,
buybacks have been running at about two a day,
something that is great for shareholders (and management) but is not investing in the economy or
employment. Tax cuts for rich Republican donors
don’t create jobs. They just make rich Republican
donors richer.
Charles Taylor, Washington
A new and troubling North Korean threat
N
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
Making the rich richer
Q
ORTH KOREA has already provided plenty
of evidence that the dynastic regime led by
Kim Jong Un threatens the world and its
own people. He has developed and tested
nuclear weapons; built intercontinental ballistic
missiles; brewed chemical weapons such as VX (a
nerve agent reportedly used to kill his own half
brother) and forced untold thousands of people into
concentration camps. Now comes news that he is
collecting the capabilities and know-how for biological weapons that could be used for germ warfare.
The Post’s Joby Warrick reports that North Korea
has been acquiring the essential machinery and
seeking the know-how to produce large amounts of
germ-warfare agents rather quickly. So far, Mr. Kim
has not deployed germs into weapons. But U.S.
officials are alarmed at signs that technology, barred
by sanctions, has been identified within the country,
while at the same time Pyongyang has exhibited an
interest in genetic engineering and other biotech-
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
TOM TOLES
Congress should not wait to create
a path to citizenship.
UICK, NAME a major public policy issue on
which overwhelming numbers of Americans
are united. Stumped? (Granted, it’s a short
list.) Here’s one answer: allowing “dreamers”
— young undocumented immigrants brought
to this country as children — to remain in the United
States if they pass background checks, go to school
and fulfill other basic requirements. In a dozen polls
this fall, including one released Tuesday, respondents
who favor permitting dreamers to stay in the United
States generally outnumber those who would deport
them by at least 3-to-1, and often by 4-to-1 or 5-to-1.
The support for dreamers is bipartisan, and it
shows up clearly and almost identically in surveys
conducted by Fox News and CNN, among other media
outlets, including The Post. Despite that, an array of
bills that would protect dreamers from deportation,
either by granting them a form of legal status or by
putting them on short- or long-term pathways to
citizenship, remain stalled in Congress.
The legislative inertia is all the more stupefying
given the fact that a clear majority of lawmakers in
both chambers on Capitol Hill would vote today to
grant dreamers legal status or a route to citizenship.
Last week, 34 Republicans in the House of Representatives wrote to Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) endorsing a “permanent legislative solution” for the nearly
700,000 immigrants whose protection from deportation, granted by the Obama administration under the
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, will lapse starting in March owing to a decision
by President Trump. That’s more than enough GOP
votes to ensure passage of a House bill to address the
problem, given overwhelming Democratic support
for such a move.
So far, though, Mr. Ryan seems to prefer a strategy
of delay, deferral and dithering. He says he wants
Congress to address the issue next year, free from the
entanglements of other pressing year-end legislative
business, including a spending package whose defeat
would mean a government shutdown. But to many in
Congress, his prescription sounds like a recipe for
inaction — and, potentially, the deportation of thousands of dreamers as their DACA permits expire. In
. WEDNESDAY,
perform — research and teaching — furthers the
school’s mission. It does not, except incidentally,
coincide with the goals of the students themselves.
Georgetown’s position violates its express “commitment” as a Catholic and Jesuit university “to
social justice.” Echoing the words of Pope Leo XIII in
1891’s Rerum Novarum, Pope John Paul II explicitly
linked unions to the struggle for social justice.
“Catholic social teaching,” he wrote in 1981’s Laborem Exercens, holds unions to be “a mouthpiece
for the struggle for social justice, for the just rights of
working people in accordance with their individual
professions.”
The university should follow both secular and
canon law by withdrawing its opposition to the
efforts of working graduate students to unionize.
Hal Ginsberg, Kensington
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Jeffrey Lewis’s Dec. 10 Outlook essay, “How the
nuclear war begins,” brought forth a memory fixed in
my brain at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point
in the early 1960s. A small group of us were in a
classroom in Thayer Hall, when in walked Wernher
von Braun. I have no recollection of why we were
there, but I remember one of my classmates asking,
“Sir, how large is our nuclear weapons stockpile?”
Von Braun answered, “Ours alone, not including
that of the Soviets, is large enough to remove the
Earth’s crust.” Said crust runs from three to more
than 40 miles deep.
Mutual assured destruction was the term at the
time (and MAD the perfect acronym). Someone
should come up with one pertinent to today’s
extraordinary situation: Kim Jong Un, programmed
to fear us, has developed a nuclear capability that
could level the District and its suburbs. Our erratic
commander in chief periodically sticks a tweet in
Mr. Kim’s eye, daring him to do so.
Bill Little, Arlington
You can do it, Mr. Mnuchin
The Dec. 10 front-page article “Trump’s tax vow
taking a U-turn” quoted Treasury Secretary Steven
Mnuchin as saying, “When you’re cutting taxes across
the board, it’s very hard not to give tax cuts to the
wealthy with tax cuts to the middle class.” This is true
under either one or both of two conditions: you are
seeking to benefit lobbyists and campaign contributors or you are a political and economics ignoramus.
Dividends are taxed at a lower rate than ordinary
income: 20 percent vs. 39.6 percent for the wealthy.
Simply make dividends taxable at the same rate as
other income. Because the returns of individuals in
the top 10 percent of adjustable gross income receive
upward of 70 percent of all dividends, this adjustment alone would do the job nicely. And, because
these top 10 percent of taxpayers can avoid the tax
altogether by investing in corporations that retain
their earnings, induce corporations to distribute
their earnings as dividends.
But how do we reduce the tax burden on corporations? The Republican caucus should consider eliminating the corporate income tax for those corporations distributing all of their net income as dividends as a massive tax cut for every American served
by these corporations: customers, owners, employees and communities. Come on, Mr. Mnuchin: It’s
not as hard as you think.
Bruce Herbert, McLean
Ms. Solo tells it like it is
Reading the Dec. 10 Sports headline, “U.S. Soccer
President Hope Solo? She’s game,” I thought it was a
Sunday-morning joke. Then, I read that Hope Solo
announced that she is running for president of the
U.S. Soccer Federation. She is the only candidate
whom I have heard tell the truth — very refreshing.
Ms. Solo related that the vast majority of youth
soccer players cannot afford the $3,000 to $5,000 it
costs per season to play on a club or travel team.
I coached high school and boys club soccer for
more than 40 years, and none of my players were able
to afford that money, so they were never considered
good enough to play travel. I’d vote for Ms. Solo.
Thomas Walsh, Edgewater
Letters can be sent to letters@washpost.com.
Submissions must be exclusive to The Post and should
include the writer’s address and day and evening
telephone numbers.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A23
M2
DAVID VON DREHLE
DAVID IGNATIUS
Why Doug Jones’s victory is a big deal
The GOP’s
haste will
make waste
L
et’s be honest: Doug Jones is likely
to be a three-year senator.
I don’t want to rain on the
winner’s parade. The former U.S.
attorney, lifted from hopeless to victory by
the accumulating flaws of his opponent, is
the first Democrat in a generation to win a
Senate seat in Alabama. That’s an
achievement. Jones showed enough discipline to avoid a gaffe that might have
saved his self-defeating opponent, Roy
Moore, a cosplay cowboy and scofflaw
who says life was better when we had
slavery and women couldn’t vote.
Jones recognized the political maxim:
When your opponent is digging his own
grave, don’t grab the shovel.
But his victory is not about him. On one
level, it’s about his bizarre opponent.
Even before we learned about the mall
police who allegedly kept an eye out for
him approaching teenage girls by the
Orange Julius, there was something badly
off about Moore. He had weird obsessions
and a messianic complex. He put the
creep in creepy.
The entire vibe was on display as
Moore capped his disastrous campaign by
riding to the polling place on Tuesday on a
horse. That might be a good idea for a
candidate who can ride a horse. Ronald
Reagan might have won some votes by
riding up to the polls, after a career in
Hollywood.
But Moore looked like Billy Crystal’s
incompetent understudy for “City Slickers.” He looked like the rodeo clown who
pretends to know how to ride a horse.
What gets into a man’s mind to think: I
would look strong riding a horse, so I will
— even though I don’t know how to ride
one?
And the Jones victory is about a rising
tide of Americans who won’t swallow the
bilge President Trump is pushing. Make
no mistake: If Trump and his would-be
Pygmalion, Stephen K. Bannon, can’t sell
their mix of cultural resentment and
paranoia in Alabama, they will be hardpressed to sell it anywhere. I say this with
love: Folks in Alabama do loyalty and clan
as well as anyone in America. That’s a
virtue — up to a point. They would go over
the falls in a barrel with George Wallace.
But they hopped onto the shore when
Moore asked them to strap in, and that
ought to give pause to the polarizer in
chief.
Doug Jones’s victory is not a big deal
because of Doug Jones. It’s a big deal
because Alabama is a one-party state.
Pretty much always has been. For generations going back to Andrew Jackson, it
was “yellow dog Democrat” country —
meaning Alabamians would vote for a
yellow dog over a Republican. The realignment wrought by the civil rights era
and the culture wars has reversed the
picture.
For a Democrat to win here says nothing about the Democrat and everything
about the Republican. You can go too far.
There’s a point where decent people step
off the crazy train. Bannon — the angry
populist from Goldman Sachs, Hollywood
and Washington — thought he could blow
past that point with a head of steam from
the Demagogue Express.
Now he’s off the rails.
Even one-party states have their limits.
There was a Louisiana politician in the
politically incorrect days of 1983, a man
equal parts corrupt and quotable named
Edwin Edwards, who said the only way he
could lose an election “is if I’m caught in
bed with either a dead girl or a live boy.”
Horrible. Pushed to the wall, Alabama
Republicans responded with Moore’s
Law: Getting caught with live girls is fatal,
too.
Congressional leaders should feel nervous. After responding with appropriate
disgust to the first reports of Moore’s
mall-walking, they waffled and quailed in
the face of Trump’s supreme amorality.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(R-Ky.) — who seems not to realize he is
fighting for his life against Bannon and
only aggressive moves will win — backed
away from his initial condemnation of
Moore. They have been placating the right
wing, and the danger to Republican majorities appears to be bubbling in the
other direction.
And Trump should be nervous. A scandal playbook dating back to the 1990s has
lost its magic. When faced with his
“Access Hollywood” tapes, Trump went to
school on Bill Clinton. And when Moore’s
teen-stalking became public, he followed
in step. Moore’s bald denial (“I do not
know Miss Corfman”) was a perfect echo
of Clinton’s (“I did not have sexual relations with that woman, Miss Lewinsky”).
The Clintonistas blamed “a vast rightwing conspiracy” while the Mooreists
demonized “a liberal establishment” and
“deep-state RINOs.”
Deny and attack didn’t work in Alabama. And if it doesn’t work there, it
might not work anywhere. Jones may not
get much done in three years as a senator,
but his victory Tuesday can accomplish
something important — if we let it. We’ve
been asking ourselves: Where do we hit
bottom and start back up?
This can be it.
The tweet heard ’round a world
already agog about events in Alabama launched yet another cultural
moment, at least along the Washington-New York corridor. On
MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” a female
guest said the tweet made her
“blood boil,” while co-anchor Mika
Brzezinski wagged her finger at the
screen and launched a soliloquy of
scold at Ivanka Trump and other
White House women.
It was her own version of a
special place in hell for women,
even a daughter, who persist in
supporting Donald Trump.
It wasn’t always thus, Mr. Irony
interrupts. For months during the
campaign, Brzezinski and her nowfiance, Joe Scarborough, gave
Trump free rein on their show.
“Morning Trump,” some dubbed it.
In recent months, perhaps in penance for helping Trump get elected
with free airtime, the couple has
become his morning nightmare.
Perhaps, too, Trump’s personal
insults of Brzezinski have turned
her into a feminist avenger. On
Tuesday, she peered piercingly into
the camera, singeing the cameraman with her gaze, and schooled
press secretary Sarah Huckabee
Sanders.
“Today is your day” (to stop supporting the president), she told
Sanders, who wasn’t present or anywhere listening, as far as anyone
knew. “This has got to stop. Do the
right thing.” Whereupon, Trump
chortled with the glee of a schoolyard bully who delights in making
the girls cry.
Brzezinski’s moment wasn’t
quite Walter Cronkite’s “mired in
stalemate” declaration of U.S. failure in Vietnam, but she clearly
decided to part with journalistic
tradition and make Trump’s takedown her personal mission. As her
message intensified, her male
guests remained stoic while Scarborough had the look of a boy trying
not to do anything that would attract Momma’s attention.
If Trump, in his strange way, had
hoped for such a reaction, Alabamians likely enjoyed the distraction
after months under the microscope.
Media attention has been so intense
not only because of the tawdriness
of the campaign but also because
the stakes were so high. Would
Alabama go backward or forward?
This shouldn’t have been a tough
choice, but Bannon, Trump and
Moore have effectively convinced
voters that what is true is false and
what is false is true. There is surely a
special place in hell for such as
these.
kathleenparker@washpost.com
Twitter: @IgnatiusPost
david.vondrehle@washpost.com
R I G H T TU R N
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/right-turn
Democrats’ miraculous
victory in Alabama
The consequences of Democrat Doug Jones’
upset of Republican Roy Moore in Tuesday’s Alabama Senate race will play out
through the 2018 midterms and possibly
beyond. We should keep our eye on five
possible consequences.
First, President Trump, having been rebuffed twice by Alabama voters (after backing Luther Strange, who lost in the Republican primary, and then Moore) emerges
weakened. In a state he won with more than
60 percent of the vote, his approval in exit
polling was 48 percent, with disapproval at
47 percent. His party rebuked him on
Obamacare repeal and now failed to carry
his candidate over the finish line. In Alabama, of all places. With political impotence may come a Trumpian outburst — or
string of outbursts — and a greater willingness among Republicans in the House and
Senate to defy him.
Second, the defeat of Moore amid credible allegations of sexual predation will
intensify the focus on Trump and his
accusers, as well as miscreants in Congress.
With the resignations of Rep. John Conyers
Jr. (D-Mich.) and Sen. Al Franken (DMinn.), the tide had clearly turned. Given
the swift and fierce reaction to Trump’s
demeaning tweet about Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), watch for emboldened
Democrats to demand an investigation of
Trump’s alleged sexual misconduct. The
president may have more to fear from
female senators than from Robert S. Muller
III.
Third, the GOP is spared the ordeal of
seating Moore in the Senate, but at the price
of narrowing their majority to 51-to-49.
This makes passage of the tax bill that much
dicier and puts Sen. Susan Collins (RMaine) in a precarious position. Does she
swallow the phony spin and the bogus
analyses or stand firm in support of the
Obamacare exchanges and fiscal prudence?
Fourth, this may be the beginning of the
end of Stephen K. Bannon’s self-perpetuated myth that he’s a brilliant strategist. He
managed to lose a Senate seat in Alabama.
As a result, his efforts to primary mainstream GOP incumbents may fall flat and
suffer from a shortage of funding. The GOP
establishment lives to fight another day.
Fifth, we pray the defeat of Moore initiates some soul-searching in the GOP, a
determination to hold to moral and intellectual standards. If pure, undistilled
Trumpism is a dud in a deep-red state,
perhaps Republicans will conclude it is a
failed political philosophy for the country
at large.
The country and the GOP should breathe
a sigh of relief, while Democrats are entitled to a victory lap. A political debacle has
been avoided. We’re all the better for it.
— Jennifer Rubin
MICHAEL GERSON
It’s America’s turn
to ‘fight on the beaches’
T
he Winston Churchill biopic “Darkest Hour” is a movie that should be
seen, but not entirely believed. Gary
Oldman’s alternately fierce and vulnerable Churchill is a triumph of both acting
and the cosmetician’s art. Just hearing him
deliver snippets of Churchill’s speeches is
worth the ticket price. (Am I the only one
who tears up at the words “We shall fight on
the beaches”? My wife: “Probably.”)
But the central conceit of the film — that a
deflated, defeated Churchill required bucking up by average Brits — is fiction. Very
nearly the opposite was true. The policy of
appeasement was broadly popular in Britain
during the early to mid-1930s. In 1938, a
majority supported Neville Chamberlain’s
deal at Munich (which ceded much of
Czechoslovakia to Nazi Germany in return
for . . . nothing). It is more accurate to say
that Churchill summoned British courage
and defiance by his intense idealization of
British character. He saw heroic traits in his
countrymen that even they, for a time, could
not see.
This is not to say that May and June of
1940 weren’t dark times, even for Churchill.
As resistance in France collapsed and Italy
seemed destined to enter the war on Germany’s side, Churchill asked his chiefs of
staff if it was possible to continue the war at
all. (They gave a conditional “yes.”) The
despair implied in that question still startles.
But on June 3, even as British troops were
being evacuated at Dunkirk, Churchill’s private secretary Jock Colville wrote in his
diary: “Winston is tired of our always being
on the defensive and is contemplating raids
on the enemy. ‘How wonderful it would be,’
he writes to [Gen. Hastings] Ismay, ‘if the
Germans could be made to wonder where
they were going to be struck next instead of
forcing us to try to wall in the Island and roof
it over.’ ” In the midst of catastrophe,
Churchill was dreaming of Normandy (and
North Africa and Italy). Not the thoughts of a
defeated man.
Where “Darkest Hour” shines is in presenting the alarming, inspiring contingency
of great events. In the spring of 1940, Europe
was being shaken by massive, impersonal,
world-historic forces — the apparent failure
of liberal democracy and free markets, the
rise of communism and fascism, the un-
leashing of anti-Semitism. Millions
marched, line by line, to the “Horst Wessel”
song or the “Internationale.”
And yet, in saving the remnants of the
British Army at Dunkirk, it fell to 665 private
British boats (along with 222 British warships) to rescue their country from (likely)
capitulation or invasion. All the powerful,
impersonal forces funneled down and down
to 665 volunteer captains in pleasure craft
and fishing trawlers. The future of freedom
was determined by the choices and courage
of a few hundred free people.
And, of course, the choices and courage of
one man. A New York Times review of
“Darkest Hour” sneered at the movie’s “great
man fetish.” But is there really any doubt
that history would be darker if Churchill had
truly lost his nerve, or had died when hit by a
car in New York in December of 1931? (He
escaped with two cracked ribs and a severe
scalp wound.) History can hinge on a single
life.
From Churchill, we learn to resist pessimistic extrapolation. May 1940 was terrible,
but not permanent. We learn the power of
unreasonable optimism — the value of planning for revival in the midst of defeat. We see
the possibility of leadership that can not
only ride the tide but summon it.
Many of us view this example not only
with appreciation, but with longing. The
problem of our time is not only arrogance
without accomplishment or swagger without success. These are common enough in
politics. Rather, it is the arrival of leadership
that survives by feeding resentment, hatred
and disorienting flux. Leadership urging us
— at angry rallies, in ethnic stereotyping,
through religious bigotry — to forget who we
really are as a people. Leadership that has
ceased to believe in the miracle at our
country’s heart — the inclusive, unifying
power of American ideals.
But the moment is not permanent. Many
are looking for a place to invest their hope.
And some leader, we trust, will rise who calls
his or her countrymen to choose decency
and civic friendship above the destructive
pleasures of hatred and blame. Who can see
and summon the best in American character, even if, for the moment, it is hidden.
In the meantime, we shall fight on the
beaches.
michaelgerson@washpost.com
JACQUELYN MARTIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) listens during a news conference on
sexual harassment on Capitol Hill.
KATHLEEN PARKER
Women’s rage unleashed
T
hat special place in hell
everyone keeps talking
about is getting mighty
crowded.
The ball got rolling last year
when former secretary of state
Madeleine Albright quipped that
there was a “special place in hell for
women who don’t help each other.”
At the time, she was introducing
Hillary Clinton at a New Hampshire
campaign event.
More recently, Ivanka Trump
said the special place was reserved
for “people who prey on children.”
She was referring to allegations
against then-Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore that he had pursued and/or made sexual advances
toward teenage girls when he was in
his early 30s.
Next came Stephen K. Bannon,
Trump-adviser-turned-freelanceprovocateur, who seemed to be
mocking the first daughter when he
said during a pro-Moore rally that
hell’s special spot was reserved for
Republicans “who should know better” but weren’t supporting the former judge in the special election.
Whew. Is it just me, or is it getting
humid down here?
Bannon referred specifically to
native Alabamian Condoleezza
Rice, another former secretary of
state, who had written of the election: “These critical times require
us to come together to reject bigotry, sexism and intolerance.” Without naming anyone, she urged voters to seek leaders who “are dignified, decent and respectful of the
values we hold dear.”
This would seem to have disqualified a raft of current and aspiring
officeholders but was clearly aimed
at Moore, who has said that the
country was better off before the
last 17 constitutional amendments,
which, among other things, gave
women and African Americans the
right to vote.
While Bannon railed, and Alabamians voted, the president tweeted. This time, Trump even outdid
himself by insulting a female U.S.
senator with sexual innuendo. Apparently miffed that Sen. Kirsten
Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) had called for
his resignation because of the
charges of sexual misconduct leveled against him, Trump tweeted
that Gillibrand “would do anything” when she previously had
come to him “begging” for campaign contributions.
One doesn’t need a translator or a
dirty mind to understand that he
was suggesting that Gillibrand
would have exchanged sexual services for cash. It was, as we say, a
cultural moment.
O
f all the follies of 2017, the most
tawdry may be the GOP’s
headlong rush to pass a tax bill
that even its proponents don’t
understand. What’s especially sad is
that otherwise sensible Republicans
seem to be capitulating to the tax-cut
frenzy.
Political desperation is the mother of
this legislation. Despite Republican
control of both houses of Congress, the
Trump administration has failed in its
first year to enact legislation that deals
with major problems, such as health
care and immigration. So at year end,
we have the spectacle of Trump & Co.
bellowing a populist message about
lower taxes, even as special-interest
lobbyists drive the legislation toward a
chaotic conference and final passage.
The tax bill is a Rubik’s Cube of
potential problems, but the difficulties
begin with the fact that it has been
pushed through Congress in two
months without hearings or careful
analysis. The provisions were crafted
in secret and passed on party-line
votes, without a chance for assessment
or analysis.
This haste guarantees confusion later. Without a clear legislative history,
tax lawyers at the Internal Revenue
Service won’t have adequate guidance
when they try to write regulations
implementing the law. Courts won’t
have a record of congressional intent,
other than news conferences, tweets,
and hurried floor and committee statements.
The centerpiece of the legislation is a
big cut in corporate taxes, down from
35 percent to roughly 20 percent. The
theory is that this will encourage companies to invest in job-creating plants
and equipment. But there’s little evidence to support this assumption, and
lots to challenge it. Companies may
instead use the windfall to buy back
their own stock, boosting stock prices
and inflating executives’ personal compensation, as Steven Clifford explains
in his recent book, “The CEO Pay
Machine.”
The premise is that by stimulating
growth, the tax cuts will pay for themselves. But there’s no good evidence for
this claim, either. Congress’s bookkeeper, the Joint Committee on Taxation, predicts that over 10 years, the tax
law would balloon the deficit by roughly $1 trillion, even assuming that it
stimulates new growth. An even more
pessimistic estimate was issued this
week by the Wharton School, which
President Trump is always bragging
about having attended.
The Treasury Department on Monday offered a one-page rebuttal asserting that Trump administration policies, including the tax cuts, would
grow the economy by 2.9 percent annually over the next 10 years (much higher
than most other forecasters have projected) and reduce the deficit by $300
billion. Take a bow, Rosy Scenario.
The capricious effects of the bill are
becoming clearer as Congress races to
marry the House and Senate versions.
Tech companies are howling that they
will lose the benefits of research credits
if they have to pay an alternative
minimum tax (as in the Senate version). Homeowners will be hurt by new
limits on the deductibility of interest
payments; but landlords, meanwhile,
will benefit from new breaks for passthrough companies, argues a Bloomberg analysis. How is that fair?
An analysis by 13 law professors last
week warned that the legislation will
produce “tax games, roadblocks and
glitches” as companies, individuals,
and state and local governments try to
manipulate the new system. “Congress
should immediately reconsider its approach,” the tax lawyers pleaded.
One of the trickiest games ahead was
explained in a research report published Tuesday by Goldman Sachs. The
tax bill implicitly punishes high-tax
“blue states” by limiting the deductibility of state and local taxes. But Goldman analyst Alec Phillips noted that
affected states might “change their
own tax systems to reflect the new
federal system” by reducing personal
income taxes and adding more statelevel value-added taxes or property
taxes. That could reduce federal revenue.
One more hidden danger: Existing
tax law is mildly countercyclical (in
that tax receipts increase when times
are good and decline when they’re
bad). But the Goldman analyst notes
that provisions in the new law “look
likely to move the tax code in a more
procyclical direction.” That’s dumb
economics.
Robert Crandall, the former chief
executive of American Airlines and one
of the smartest business executives
around, described the tax bill last week
as “particularly stupid because there is
a broad consensus of bipartisan agencies and economists who agree it cannot increase growth by anywhere near
enough to offset the revenue losses.”
He’s right.
Responsible Republicans seem to
have adopted a fatalistic view that it’s
too late to clean up this mess. They’re
wrong. Voters will remember who tried
to slow the rush toward passage of this
ill-considered legislation and who
jumped on the bandwagon.
A24
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
KLMNO
METRO
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
High today at
approx. 2 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
36°
8 p.m.
26 33 36 33°
°
°
°
Precip: 0%
Wind: WNW
12-25 mph
BY D AN
D ONNA
M ORSE
S T. G EORGE
For more than 14 hours — in
his car and on foot — Frank
Sepehri had been looking for his
17-year-old son, Navid. He’d last
seen him the night before and
knew he had gone to a nearby
party in Bethesda but not come
home.
Just before 5 p.m. Sunday,
Sepehri had made his way to a
wooded ravine. On one side,
above him, was a row of nice
suburban homes. On the other,
the parking lot of a swim club.
And in the gap, he saw his
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
SU
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
A shelter run by N Street
Village in Chinatown
offers women more than
just a bed for the night. B3
Fairfax County supervisors
ask the FBI to release
video of a fatal shooting
by the U.S. Park Police. B2
Bruce Brown’s surfing
documentary “The
Endless Summer” was a
global phenomenon. B5
Search for son ends in frigid water
AND
.
MD. TEEN HAD GONE
TO BETHESDA PARTY
Body cameras capture
encounter with police
son’s body, floating faceup in a
patch of frigid water.
“Navid!” he screamed — so
loud that a nearby resident came
running to help.
He pulled his son from the
water, sat next him and spoke by
phone with his wife, Nasrin.
“He’s gone,” he said. “I found
him.”
The discovery answered the
most pressing questions about
the missing Maryland teenager
— was he alive and where? — but
leaves investigators with Montgomery County police continuing to piece together what happened to the Walt Whitman High
School senior.
On Tuesday night, police officials spoke in detail about what
they’ve learned in the case, in
part from information pulled
from video captured by officers’
body cameras. Police officials
said officers had crossed paths
STUDENT CONTINUED ON B4
Va. pipeline foes claim partial victory
BY
G REGORY S . S CHNEIDER
richmond — Opponents of a
natural gas pipeline planned
across some of Virginia’s wildest
terrain declared a partial victory
Tuesday when a state panel delayed enacting water permits for
the controversial project.
The State Water Control Board
approved permits for the $5 billion Atlantic Coast Pipeline,
which is backed by Dominion
Energy, but took the unusual
step of delaying the effective date
until several environmental impact reports are completed.
The action came unexpectedly
State panel holds off on
enacting water permits
for natural gas project
after a day and a half of tensionfilled hearings, leaving supporters and opponents alike scrambling to determine exactly what
had happened. The bottom line
seemed to be that the project is at
least temporarily on hold.
“They cannot start construction until the final erosion and
sediment control plans are ap-
proved,” state Department of Environmental Quality spokesman
Bill Hayden said.
Dominion has said it hopes to
begin work on the 600-mile
pipeline by the end of the year.
But Hayden said that some of the
required reports are not expected to be completed until March
or April.
Dominion praised the board’s
action and said the permit approval was “a very significant
milestone for the project and
another major step toward final
approval.”
Asserting that the pipeline
PIPELINE CONTINUED ON B4
Hospital
panel calls
for bailout
United Medical Center
says it needs $17 million
from D.C. to stay afloat
BY
P ETER J AMISON
A taxpayer bailout of at least
$17 million will be needed if the
District’s only public hospital is
to stay afloat, the hospital’s finance committee has concluded,
in the latest setback to afflict
United Medical Center.
Hospital board members plan
to discuss the recommended subsidy request when they meet
Wednesday. If approved by Mayor
Muriel E. Bowser (D) and the D.C.
Council, it would be the largest
investment of District tax dollars
to prop up the hospital’s operating
UMC CONTINUED ON B4
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
21 years of devotion for Harriet’s Harem
A Potomac woman fell seriously ill. Friends set up a care circle and have visited every weekday.
I
t’s been 40 years since Harriet Fridkin has
had full use of her body. Multiple sclerosis slowly has seized her, leaving her
unable to move any part of herself except
her head. So, five nights a week in her
Potomac, Md., home, Fridkin, 75, plays gracious host to her friends. They arrive to visit,
always on schedule, sometimes to give her a
therapeutic massage, sometimes to feed her,
sometimes to unload about their day and get
her time-tested advice for an hour or two.
It has been this way for 21 years.
“I like to talk to people,” said Fridkin, her
voice softer than it used to be. “If people have
problems, I like to help solve them.”
Her friends, who have called themselves
Harriet’s Harem since 1996, have created a
support group remarkable in its loyalty and
BY
A LLISON K LEIN
longevity. A calendar goes out once a month,
each day is assigned to a friend, and there is
never a day that is left open.
If her nose itches, they will scratch it. If
she is thirsty, they will give her a drink of
water. Mostly, they enjoy her company and
marvel at her happy outlook on life and
unflinching humor.
“I only keep the good friends,” Fridkin said
with a big smile. “The other ones, I don’t
keep around.”
The harem started with 12 members, and
people have come and gone through the
years. Some have died, some have moved
away, some have left and rejoined as their
O∞cer says
he was
entrapped
FBI investigated Young
for terrorism for 6 years
BY
schedules allowed. Now, there are nine loyalists, three of whom turned 75 this year, who
cover the month.
“She gives so much more to all of us than I
can tell you,” said Judy Feldman, 83, one of
the original organizers of Harriet’s Harem.
“She gives us the inspiration to go on, to
overcome anything.”
Fridkin, who has three children and six
grandchildren, lives in Potomac with her husband of 54 years, Jerry Fridkin. She has a
caregiver who assists her during the day. But it
is difficult for her to leave the house, which is
where Harriet’s Harem comes in.
“It helps her keep up with the outside
world,” said her daughter Marjorie Fridkin, 43.
One of Harriet Fridkin’s favorite nights of
R ACHEL W EINER
In the years Nicholas Young
went to work patrolling Washington’s Metro system, a federal
prosecutor said, an FBI agent was
lying awake at night worrying
about what he might do.
As the first police officer to face
terrorism charges in the United
States goes to trial in federal
court this week, FBI special
agents and undercover operatives
explained to jurors how they began investigating Young in 2010
— and why he was not arrested
until August 2016. It was then
YOUNG CONTINUED ON B2
FRIENDS CONTINUED ON B2
Harriet Fridkin, at left with friend Susan Bloom and husband Jerry Fridkin, has hosted her friends at her home in Potomac, Md., every
weekday since 1996. The care group, dubbed Harriet’s Harem, plays bridge or otherwise entertains the 75-year-old.
Courtland
Milloy
He is away. His
column will resume
when he returns.
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
VIRGINIA
Fairfax County o∞cials
ask FBI for answers,
video in Ghaisar killing
BY
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
An enduring circle of friendship
FRIENDS FROM B1
the week is Monday, when her
bridge group comes over to play
cards twice a month, just as they
did before she became immobile.
A helper puts down her cards for
her. She also is an avid Sudoku
player, memorizing the entire
grid before painstakingly instructing someone — often a
member of her harem — where to
write in each number. And she’s a
book lover and devoted QVC
shopper.
“She is living, she’s not just
existing,” Feldman said. “It’s astounding.”
The idea for an organized caregiving circle started in 1996, when
Fridkin’s mobility was getting
worse. She could no longer walk,
and Feldman and another friend
were pitching in, taking her to
appointments, preparing food
and staying with her so she
wouldn’t be alone before her husband got home from his job in the
Department of Justice’s tax division. But the commitment became something of a time challenge.
“We couldn’t keep up with it,”
Feldman said. “Jerry is such a
proud man and did not want to
accept any help, so we put it on us
and said we needed help.”
They came across a piece in
Parade Magazine about a woman
named Cappy Capossela who had
written a book titled “Share the
Care: How to Organize a Group to
Care for Someone Who Is Seriously Ill.” It was about a group of
women who had taken care of a
friend who was dying of cancer
and in desperate need of help as a
single mother of two girls.
The care circle was highly coordinated, efficient and loving. The
book detailed how the three-year
Harriet Fridkin, left, and Susan Bloom laugh at Jerry Fridkin’s
stories at the Fridkins’ home in Potomac, Md., this month. The
long-standing support group is “a tribute to her, it shows you what
a special person she is,” Jerry Fridkin said of his wife.
experience was transformative
for the women, giving them purpose and direction, and they believed it vastly improved their
friend’s end-of-life experience.
The women in the book called
themselves the “Funny Family.”
“I thought the alliteration was
fun,” Feldman said. “So I came up
with ‘Harriet’s Harem,’ and it
stuck.”
Fridkin’s daughter Marjorie,
who is a general surgeon at Garrett Regional Medical Center in
Western Maryland, said she has
explained to patients and families
over the years about her mother’s
harem and how helpful it is. But
she has never seen it even close to
replicated.
“Without social interaction,
people are like a plant that doesn’t
get watered,” Marjorie Fridkin
said, looking at her mother. “The
world comes to you. It has kept
you who you are.”
Before Fridkin got sick, she was
a gourmet cook, which was a great
irony because her husband has
always preferred frozen dinners, a
dynamic that caused some friction and endless amusement in
their marriage. So she would cook
elaborate meals and feed her
neighbors, either when they
stopped by or by passing a pot
over the fence.
“If they walked in, they’d walk
out with something,” Fridkin said
of her friends and neighbors.
She laughed, recalling homemade pasta “hanging all over the
kitchen” and having an early version of the Cuisinart to use for
special recipes.
When she was younger, her
house was always filled with her
children, their friends and the
smells of the kitchen.
“When it was lunch time, I
would feed them,” Fridkin said.
“They always knew they could
stop here.”
Fridkin had several jobs
through the years, working as an
elementary school teacher in the
District and Montgomery County,
and she also worked with an Alzheimer’s organization coordinating care and support groups.
She continued working for a while
after her body started giving out.
“I got paid to talk,” she said.
“You don’t have to move to talk.”
Her daughter recalls that when
she was younger, her mother was
in constant motion, cooking, knitting, beading or entertaining
friends.
So when Fridkin got sick, her
“Without social interaction, people are like
a plant that doesn’t get watered.”
Marjorie Fridkin, Harriet’s daughter
friends and neighbors were the
first to jump up and offer help.
While the problems were very
serious, none of the women ever
took themselves too seriously.
Feldman remembered one day
when Fridkin was still going out
to restaurants but could not feed
herself. It was Feldman’s job to
feed her, but they gabbed so much
that Fridkin barely got to eat.
When it was time to go, Feldman
pushed the wrong button on the
wheelchair and sent her friend
careening into the table, knocking
it over. Mortified, she looked
down at her friend.
“I was horrified and terrified,”
Feldman said. “And she was just
howling laughing.”
Years ago, Jerry Fridkin set up
their home for maximum ease for
his wife and her wheelchair.
While she has always been the
more social spouse, and Jerry
Fridkin is a man of fewer words,
he deeply appreciates what the
harem has brought and continues
to bring even though he retired
years ago.
“I like to see Harriet having
outside friends and interacting
with friends. I like to see my wife
happy,” he said. “It’s a tribute to
her, it shows you what a special
person she is.”
Fridkin said she hopes the story
of her harem will touch someone
like the story of Capossela’s “Funny Family” touched her and her
friends years ago. She attributes
her good-humored disposition in
great part to her friends.
“It’s a lot easier to concentrate
on somebody’s else’s problems
and somebody else’s life than just
think about your own problems,”
she said. “I really hope it’s helpful
to let people know they can form a
group like this.”
allison.klein@washpost.com
T OM J ACKMAN
With more than three weeks
having elapsed since U.S. Park
Police officers fatally shot Bijan
Ghaisar and no information
about the slaying forthcoming,
the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors has sent a letter to the
FBI calling for “complete transparency” and asking the bureau
to release the in-car video of the
incident as soon as those involved
have been interviewed.
In another development, the
U.S. attorney’s office for the Eastern District of Virginia recused
itself from the case, an attorney
for the Ghaisar family said Monday. The U.S. attorney’s office in
Washington and the Civil Rights
Division of the Justice Department will handle the investigation, Roy L. Austin Jr. said. Austin
did not know why the federal
prosecutors in Alexandria bowed
out of the case, and a spokesman
for the office could not be
reached. The Ghaisar family met
with federal officials and FBI
agents last week, Austin said.
Ghaisar, 25, was shot as he sat
in his Jeep Grand Cherokee in the
Fort Hunt area of Fairfax County
on Nov. 17. His family said he was
unarmed and was shot three
times in the head, though both the
Park Police and the FBI, which
took over the investigation on
Nov. 20, have declined to confirm
that. Ghaisar, an accountant who
lived in Tysons Corner, died 10
days later.
Fairfax County police were not
involved in the shooting. But a
Fairfax officer who followed the
Park Police officers as they pursued Ghaisar on the George
Washington Memorial Parkway
and then Alexandria Avenue recorded the scene with his in-car
camera as two Park Police officers
exited their vehicle and shot
Ghaisar. Neither the Park Police
nor the FBI have explained why
Ghaisar was shot, how many officers shot him or the names of the
officers. The Park Police said
Ghaisar had left the scene of a
crash involving another car in
Alexandria, but they have also
refused to provide details about
that incident.
Fairfax police and the Board of
Supervisors were criticized for a
lack of transparency in the August
2013 police-involved fatal shooting of John Geer, in which names
and details were withheld for 17
months, and they are determined
not to follow that path again.
Fairfax Police Chief Edwin C.
Roessler Jr. held a news conference on Dec. 4 to call on the FBI to
release the in-car video in the
Ghaisar shooting as soon as all
witnesses had been interviewed,
and the Board of Supervisors
agreed the next day to draft a
letter to the FBI.
“The Board of Supervisors is
concerned with the lack of information being provided to the public to date,” said the letter to FBI
Director Christopher A. Wray,
which was signed by the board’s
chairman, Sharon Bulova (D). She
said the supervisors believed “the
public, especially the family and
friends of Mr. Ghaisar, needs to
know as quickly as possible what
happened.” Bulova said that “incidents like these, when shrouded
in secrecy, potentially undermine
the trust our community has
worked so hard to build.”
Daniel G. Storck (D-Mount Vernon), the supervisor for the district where Ghaisar was killed,
said in a message to his constituents: “While the Board is sensitive
to not jeopardizing the investigation, we believe swift action is
necessary to increase transparency and community confidence.
Particularly, we are urging the FBI
to release the Fairfax County Police in-car video that captured the
incident, as soon as the FBI has
completed its interviews of those
involved, and not wait until the
investigation is complete.”
Austin, the Ghaisar family attorney, said, “We absolutely agree
that there needs to be greater
transparency.” He said no new
information had been provided to
the family about the shooting
since it occurred.
An FBI spokeswoman did not
respond to requests for comment.
tom.jackman@washpost.com
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
A supporter of Bijan Ghaisar, who was fatally shot by U.S. Park
Police officers on Nov. 17, holds a photo of him at a vigil on Dec. 5.
Former o∞cer facing terrorism charges says FBI pushed him to commit crime
YOUNG FROM B1
that Young bought Google Play
gift cards that prosecutors say he
thought would be used by Islamic
State recruits to download encrypted messaging applications.
During the years-long investigation of the Alexandria native,
several law enforcement officials
testified, Young repeatedly made
violent remarks that were concerning but did not prompt immediate action. Prosecutors said
a sting operation involving the
gift cards was necessary to get a
dangerous radical not just off the
streets, but also out of law enforcement.
An FBI agent will testify that
“he didn’t sleep at nights because
[Young] had talked about torturing and killing an FBI agent,”
Assistant U.S. Attorney Gordon
Kromberg told the judge Tuesday.
But Young’s attorneys countered, saying his arrest was an
overreach born of frustration that
a six-year investigation had yielded nothing of value.
In private exchanges, defense
attorney Linda Moreno said in
her opening statement, agents
wrote they “hit the case with a
defibrillator,” saying “let’s hope
he goes one step further” and
breaks the law.
“The FBI induced Nicholas
Young, a police officer who had
served with distinction, to commit a crime where none existed,”
she said.
Young, 37, who worked for the
Metro Transit Police, hopes to be
the first person since the Sept. 11,
2001, attacks to win a terrorism
trial by arguing that he was entrapped by law enforcement.
In his opening statement,
Kromberg pushed back against
that defense, telling jurors the
government would show that
Young had long-standing inclinations toward terrorism and believed in an alliance between
white supremacists and Muslim
extremists against Jewish people.
“Young’s hatred of Jews was
quite extraordinary,” Kromberg
said.
THE DAILY QUIZ
When was the earliest
known American brandy
distilled in New York?
(Hint: The answer can be found in today’s Food section.)
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
Young participated in reenactments as an SS officer — “one of
the most vicious terrorist groups
that ever existed,” Kromberg said.
He said jurors would see a picture
of the SS tattoo on Young’s arm,
showing that the police officer
didn’t just dress up as a Nazi —
“he saw himself as that.” Kromberg also said Young had a framed
photograph of Hitler at his house
and used an Israeli flag as a
doormat.
Moreno told jurors that Young
is no neo-Nazi but a libertarian
with an interest in politics who
was committed to his job in law
enforcement and his country. “A
six-year investment . . . and what
they have to show for it are gift
cards,” Moreno said. “That’s why
they’re talking about Hitler.”
An undercover officer first met
Young in 2010 while tracking suspected extremists in Northern
Virginia, under the guise of being
a recent convert to Islam and a
U.S. Marine from Boston.
They hit it off right away, said
the officer, who testified behind a
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father’s ghost appears and demands vengeance, the increasingly desperate Danish
prince must decide: submit or resist. Accept or avenge. Live or die. See details at
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screen and used the pseudonym
Khalil Sullivan.
“We had good conversations”
about work, politics and dating,
Sullivan said.
Young was also part of conversations about terrorism, Sullivan
testified, and spoke of his “animosity” toward the FBI. He believed he was being watched, and
he talked about how he could take
on agents at his home or how
someone could attack federal
buildings.
“There were times we were
joking, times we were not joking,”
Sullivan said. He said Young’s
descriptions of potential clashes
with federal agents were “hypothetical.”
While the level of detail Young
gave in describing a potential
attack on a federal building was
“a little alarming,” Sullivan said,
“I didn’t take it as a plan.”
Sullivan ultimately cut ties
with Young at his bosses’ direction; he was told to focus on
another investigation.
There was no apparent FBI
intervention when Young in 2011
twice went to fight against
Moammar Gaddafi in Libya, but
when he came back he was questioned by agents at Dulles International Airport.
In the summer of 2014, an
undercover informant targeted
Young more directly after meeting him at the All Dulles Area
Muslim Society Center in Chantilly, Va.
Identified in court only as Mohammed, or “Mo,” the informant
posed as a military reservist of
Palestinian descent. He told
Young that, like him, he had gone
to George Mason University, had
religious conflicts at work and
had clashed with his father.
The FBI paid him $34,000 to
befriend Young, Mo testified.
Over Sprites and Afghan food,
Mo said, he and Young discussed
religion and politics.
Mo acknowledged Young
asked him why he wanted to join
the Islamic State, saying: “It’s
kind of nice here in the U.S., isn’t
it? . . . No one restricts us from
practicing our religion here.”
Young once said the militants
“sound like a bunch of criminals
who are hungry for power and
money,” Mo said.
But then Young gave Mo extensive advice for joining the Islamic
State undetected, and he sent Mo
a text message suggesting he
thought his friend was on vacation, according to the recorded
conversations introduced in
court.
Mo actually traveled to Turkey
because the FBI was worried that
Young, as a police officer, “had
access to government records and
would be able to check” if the
informant had not actually left
the country, FBI Special Agent
John Minchello testified.
Young was by his own admission “paranoid,” as he repeatedly
told Mo in conversations played
in court.
“The people that do this,” he
said of informants, “are going to
be nice guys; they’re going to be
great guys.”
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
In Chinatown, Patricia Handy Place offers more than just a bed for the night
Here’s how things
work at Patricia
Handy Place, a
women’s shelter
on Fifth Street
NW, two blocks
John
east of the
Kelly's
Chinatown arch:
Washington Sometime before
4 p.m., two lines
start forming
outside. The line to the left of the
door is for women who spent the
previous night at the shelter and
are returning. The line to the
right of the door is for women
who didn’t but are hoping there
will be space for them that night.
The women come from all
over the city, drawn because
they’ve been told, or know from
experience, that the shelter, run
by a charity called N Street
Village, is a clean, safe and
welcoming place.
What they may not know at
first is that a simple concept
masks a more complex one: If all
you want is a place to sleep for
the night, you can find it at “Pat
Handy.” But if you want to start a
journey that culminates with
never again having to stand in
line for a place to sleep, you can
find that there, too.
On a recent weekday evening,
both lines comprised a diverse
group of women. There were 20somethings. There were senior
citizens. A few women looked as
if they were prepared to sleep in
a park if they had to. Some were
armored in puffy nylon coats,
hoods cinched tight around their
faces. Other women were
carefully turned out and
fashionably dressed: your
daughter, your sister, your
mother.
At exactly 4 o’clock, the front
doors opened, and the line to the
left started moving. The women
walked past a bulletin board
papered with classified ads for
housing programs and
apartment rentals. They put any
bags they had on a table to be
inspected.
Women are not allowed to
bring in weapons, drugs or
alcohol. Also prohibited: hair
dye. (It’s a mess when it spills.)
“Don’t forget your cane,” one
of the security guards — all are
female — said to a woman in a
long black dress.
As the women came in, staff
member Imani Grant wrote
down their names. She
recognized most of them. Some
women went into an office where
Nicole Coates sat. She handed
out towels and washcloths to any
clients whose evening plans
included taking a shower.
Across the compact lobby, a
screen provided privacy for
clients waiting to see a medical
professional from Unity Health
Care. (Eight women would that
night.)
The shelter is named for a D.C.
Department of Human Services
outreach worker, Patricia
Handy, who died in 2012. It was
dedicated in April 2016. The
building is five stories high and
can accommodate 213 women.
Each floor is a little different.
The top floor houses 13 clients in
the senior temporary program,
for women 62 or older. The
fourth floor is for women
younger than 62 who are in the
Woman found fatally
stabbed in Northeast
A woman who had been
reported missing last month
was found fatally stabbed
Tuesday in Northeast
Washington, the D.C. police
said.
Police said Joni S.
Rockingham, 53, of Northeast,
was found in the 300 block of
34th Street NE.
She had been reported
missing the day after
Thanksgiving and was the
subject of an active missing
persons case, the police said.
She had been stabbed “multiple
times,” they said.
Before the woman had been
officially identified, police had
considered the possibility that
the victim may have been
Rockingham. “It’s very sad for
her family to lose somebody
over the holiday season,” said
Police Chief Peter Newsham.
— Lynh Bui and Martin Weil
MARYL AND
Wrong-way driver
dies in Beltway crash
A driver who was traveling
the wrong way Monday night on
the Capital Beltway in Prince
George’s County was killed in a
crash, Maryland State Police
said. A second driver was
seriously injured.
The crash occurred about
9:15 p.m. and involved a driver
who was traveling the wrong
way on the outer loop of the
Beltway, police said.
Police identified the man who
died as Nicholas O’Neil Clarke,
36, of Greenbelt, Md. Clarke was
driving a Toyota southbound in
the northbound lanes of the
Beltway before striking a white
pickup truck, police said.
— Martin Weil
VIRGINIA
Police seek suspect
in fatal stabbing
Fairfax County police said
Tuesday that they were seeking
an Alexandria man with tattoos
on both sides of his neck who is
a suspect in the fatal stabbing of
a man found in the woods this
month.
Endless Taylor, 24, is wanted
on charges of murder and
robbery in the killing of Luis
Bonilla, 24, police said in a
statement.
Officers on routine patrol
Dec. 1 found Bonilla’s remains
about 11:15 p.m. in the
7100 block of Fairchild Drive in
the Alexandria section of Fairfax
County, police said.
Taylor and Bonilla knew each
other and were in a
disagreement in the weeks
before Bonilla’s body was found,
police said.
Authorities ask anyone with
information about Taylor to call
703-246-7904 or submit a tip
anonymously through
fairfaxcrimesolvers.org.
— Lynh Bui
LOTTER I ES
VIRGINIA
Results from Dec. 12
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Mon.):
Lucky Numbers (Tue.):
DC-4 (Mon.):
DC-4 (Tue.):
DC-5 (Mon.):
DC-5 (Tue.):
4-0-5
1-4-4-2
9-6-8-1-6
7-1-3
7-0-4
6-2-5-3
8-7-4-2
8-9-0-3-8
0-3-9-7-9
MARYLAND
Day/Pick 3:
0-8-9
Pick 4:
1-5-5-3
Night/Pick 3 (Mon.):
1-7-0
Pick 3 (Tue.):
5-5-1
Pick 4 (Mon.):
1-6-8-1
Pick 4 (Tue.):
3-2-3-2
Multi-Match (Mon.): 11-15-18-33-34-39
Match 5 (Mon.):
2-4-18-19-28 *29
Match 5 (Tue.):
1-2-28-31-34 *4
5 Card Cash:
6H-4D-6S-KS-7D
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5 (Tue.):
Night/Pick-3 (Mon.):
Pick-3 (Tue.):
Pick-4 (Mon.):
Pick-4 (Tue.):
Cash-5 (Mon.):
Cash-5 (Tue.):
3-3-9
9-7-4-0
4-18-25-29-31
8-5-8
9-1-8
5-1-7-5
2-2-0-6
3-17-19-25-26
4-7-12-14-17
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
Mega Millions:
Megaplier:
Lucky for Life:
*Bonus Ball
‡Lucky Ball
COURTESY OF N STREET VILLAGE
Patricia Handy Place, a five-story shelter in Chinatown, can accommodate 213 women experiencing
homelessness. The facility is run by N Street Village, a partner in The Washington Post Helping Hand.
temporary program.
There’s a distinction between
the temporary program and
what’s called the low-barrier
program. The former is for
women making strides with
education or employment. They
typically stay for 18 to 24
months, each in her own room,
with a shared bathroom. The
latter program provides a bed for
a night in a more dormlike
setting.
The second and third floors
are all low-barrier. There are
some low-barrier beds on the
first floor, too, along with a
dozen “medically enhanced”
beds. This is a unique program
for women who are recovering
from surgery or a medical crisis.
Women in the temporary
programs don’t have to arrive
until 10 p.m., but those returning
to a low-barrier bed — those who
were there the previous night —
must check in by 7 p.m. If a
woman doesn’t — if she shows
up at 7:01 — her bed will be given
to one of the women in line to
the right of the door.
The vast majority of women
do come back. They come back
because of what Leslie
Brettschneider, manager of
temporary programs for N Street
Village, calls the charity’s
“special sauce.” Said
Brettschneider: “We aren’t just
We need your help
N Street Village is a partner in
The Washington Post Helping
Hand. To support the work it
does at Patricia Handy Place and
elsewhere in Washington, visit
posthelpinghand.com and click
where it says “Donate.” To give by
mail, make a check payable to N
Street Village and send it to N
Street Village, Attn: Helping
Hand, 1333 N St. NW,
Washington, DC 20005.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/johnkelly.
THE DISTRICT
LOCA L D I G ES T
THE DISTRICT
providing our residents with a
bed. We’re providing them with a
community that we hope and
endeavor to make safe and
welcoming and dignified and
respectful.”
A woman who comes for a bed
may stay for counseling, may see
a nurse to deal with a chronic
health problem, may accept help
securing her benefits. At least
she’ll stay for dinner, which that
night was turkey meatballs with
whole-wheat pasta and collard
greens.
At 7 p.m., all of the low-barrier
beds were filled. There were six
women left waiting in the line to
the right. There wasn’t room for
them at Pat Handy. The city had
declared a hypothermia
emergency, which meant they
could go to a rec center that had
been opened for people who are
homeless.
The next day, at a little before
4 p.m., two lines would start
forming on Fifth Street NW. . . .
2-16-30-40-53 ¶3
8-23-24-25-27 **9
2x
16-37-46-47-48 ‡9
**Mega Ball
¶Cash Ball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
Witnesses vouch for inauguration-riot defendants
BY
K EITH L . A LEXANDER
Friends and employers of six
people accused of rioting on the
day of President Trump’s inauguration took the witness stand
Tuesday to portray the defendants
as peaceful people not prone to
violence.
The witnesses echoed one another as each described the defendant they knew as calm, helpful
and cooperative.
The stream of character witnesses marked the end of testimony in the case of the first people to
face trial in Inauguration Day protests in the District that turned
violent, with participants dressed
in black smashing store windows
with bricks, hammers and crowbars.
During about three weeks of
testimony in D.C. Superior Court,
prosecutors questioned police officers and store employees caught
up in the vandalism. They showed
jurors video of the chaos from
security cameras, police body
cameras and cellphones. Al-
though there is no evidence the
defendants on trial caused any of
that damage directly, prosecutors
argue that the entire group of
protesters bears responsibility.
Defense attorneys contend that
their clients were peacefully protesting Jan. 20 and that police
unfairly rounded up a large group
when only a handful of people had
become violent.
One defendant, Alexei Wood,
sat with his co-defendants Tuesday as his boss of 3½ years, Michael Nye, was called to the stand.
Nye told jurors that Wood works
as a photographer and audio specialist for Nye’s San Antoniobased company.
“I have never heard of him
being non-peaceful or aggressive.
He’s exemplary,” Nye said.
Also charged with Wood are
Michelle Macchio, 26, of Naples,
Fla.; Jennifer Armento, 38, of Philadelphia; Christina Simmons, 20,
of Cockeysville, Md.; Oliver Harris, 28, of Philadelphia; and Brittne Lawson, 27, of Pittsburgh.
Lawson’s boss, Valerie Hess, an
oncology nurse at the University
of Pittsburgh Medical Center,
testified that she hired Lawson
last year. Hess said Lawson
worked with cancer patients,
many of whom become aggressive
and confused. Hess said she often watched Lawson “calmly deescalate” situations with frightened and disoriented patients.
“I have never experienced her
to be violent in any capacity” Hess
testified.
Under cross-examination, Assistant U.S. Attorney Jennifer
Kerkhoff asked Hess whether she
had seen any video of the riots.
Hess said she saw video of a limousine engulfed in flames. Prosecutors allege that the limousine
was damaged by the group
charged with rioting but set on
fire by another group later in the
day.
Kerkhoff asked Hess whether
she would consider someone who
participated in such riots violent.
“I would have a comment with
them to understand more about
their behavior,” Hess responded.
Armento’s boss, Robert Sataloff, a surgeon at Drexel University’s College of Medicine who
has also been involved with a
Philadelphia-area
Republican
group, testified via videoconference that he has known Armento,
his family’s personal assistant, for
nine years. Sataloff said Armento
has “always been exceptionally
peaceful and nonviolent and cooperative.”
In all, prosecutors charged 212
people in connection with the
riots. So far, 20 people have pleaded guilty, and prosecutors have
dropped cases against another 20.
An additional 166 co-defendants
are scheduled for trial through
2018.
In the ongoing trial, prosecutors rested their case Tuesday afternoon, and the defense presented their evidence over the next
few hours.
Closing arguments could be as
early as Wednesday, and the jury
could begin deliberations as soon
as Friday.
keith.alexander@washpost.com
MARYLAND
NAACP seeks audit of Prince George’s curriculum
BY
O VETTA W IGGINS
The Prince George’s County
NAACP told Gov. Larry Hogan
(R) on Tuesday that it wants to
initiate an audit of the county
school curriculum and overturn
a state law that gave County
Executive Rushern L. Baker III
(D) the power to select the
schools superintendent.
Bob Ross, president of the
county branch of the NAACP,
said the organization is also considering filing a civil rights lawsuit against the school district,
which is the second-largest in the
state.
Ross met for nearly an hour
with Hogan, Lt. Gov. Boyd Rutherford (R) and members of the
governor’s executive staff to discuss the state’s probe of alleged
grade-tampering and fraudulent
graduation rates in Prince
George’s.
Ross said the NAACP asked
Hogan to meet with the group to
discuss “what [the governor] can
do at his level” to address their
concerns.
In the end, they were told: not
much.
Hogan told the members of the
NAACP and several parents who
joined their meeting that he
supports them and their efforts.
He suggested they contact their
state representatives and local
officials and urge them to take
seriously the findings of a recent
state audit, which found that
grades were changed days before
graduation for nearly 5,500 students during the past two years.
County and school officials are
scheduled to release a corrective
plan next week.
The governor has repeatedly
criticized Baker, one of eight
Democrats seeking the nomination to run against him next
November, over what he says is a
lackluster response to the audit.
On Tuesday, after several parents called for the removal of
Kevin Maxwell, Baker’s handpicked schools chief, Hogan said,
“They have lost confidence in
leadership.”
MD: 301-637-2870
VA: 703-382-8505
A spokesman for Baker said
Maxwell and his staff “have been
working diligently to correct”
problems identified in the audit.
“We take our children and
their futures very seriously,
which is why we are working to
correct any deficiencies,” Scott
Peterson said.
Hogan declined to say whether
he thought Maxwell should be
ousted, calling it a decision for
Baker.
Ross said his members, who
sought the meeting with the
governor, planned to meet him in
Annapolis but instead were told
Hogan would come to Prince
George’s, Baker’s home area.
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
In permits’ delay, pipeline opponents claim a partial victory
PIPELINE FROM B1
had received “the most thorough
environmental review of any infrastructure project in Virginia
history,” Dominion spokesman
Aaron Ruby said the company
recognizes the new conditions
and will work with the state “to
complete all remaining approvals in a timely manner and
ensure we meet all conditions of
the certification.”
The Water Control Board had
approved a similar project just
last week — the Mountain Valley
Pipeline, which is planned for
the far southwest corner of Virginia. Environmentalists and
land rights activists had protested that pipeline during two days
of hearings, and they came to the
Atlantic Coast Pipeline hearings
in greater numbers and with
greater fury.
Warned at the outset against
loud displays, scores of opponents snapped their fingers to
show support for speakers or
stood and turned their backs on
those they disliked. Some speakers made angry personal attacks
on board members — “I see
through your well-groomed hair
and know who you are,” one
young man rumbled angrily —
and on Monday night, an opposition group claimed credit for
draping an anti-pipeline banner
from one board member’s house.
The raw emotion of the crowd
drew a heavy police presence.
More than two dozen state police cruisers lined the parking
lot of the suburban community
center where the hearings were
held, joined by Henrico County
police, emergency vehicles and a
mobile command center, not to
mention plainclothes private security personnel deployed by
Dominion.
But it was the sometimestechnical testimony of environmental experts and landowners
that seemed to give the board
members second thoughts.
The DEQ had recommended
approving the permits and then
reviewing plans along the way
for several specific factors that
impact water quality, including
storm-water management, ero-
PHOTOS BY TIMOTHY C. WRIGHT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
sion control and efforts to monitor a complex limestone geography called karst. That geography
features caverns and sinkholes
and is extremely sensitive to
groundwater disruption.
Speaker after speaker warned
the board against approving the
permits without a better understanding of those factors. Tuesday afternoon, just as the board
was preparing to take a vote
that all the opponents thought
was a mere formality, board
member Timothy G. Hayes
moved that the certification be
amended so that it would not go
into effect until all those reports
are completed.
He said the move was intend-
ed so the board could “at least
have the opportunity to have one
more swing at it if we have to.”
Department officials scrambled to figure out the impact of
such a move. The project’s fundamental approval came in October from the Federal Energy
Regulatory Commission. If the
state does not follow up on water
permits within a certain period
of time, federal officials can step
in and greenlight the project
themselves, Hayden said.
But he added that it is not
clear what that time frame is, nor
what control the state will really
have if it does not like the
environmental reports.
Even so, pipeline opponents
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP
LEFT: Sue Rucker of Roseland,
Va., lets her attire show her
disapproval of the $5 billion
Atlantic Coast Pipeline at a
Monday meeting of the State
Water Control Board in
Richmond. (A close-up of a
button like hers is inset above.)
Supporters of the construction
hold handmade signs outside
the session, which was full of
tension.
Montgomery police still piecing incident together
STUDENT FROM B1
with Navid on Saturday night
and had crossed paths with his
father about five hours later,
when he was searching.
“We want to determine exactly
what the actions of our officers
were,” Montgomery Police Chief
J. Thomas Manger said in an
interview Tuesday.
He said his heart went out to
the Sepehri family. “I just can’t
imagine the pain they’re going
through,” he said.
Autopsy results are pending.
Police said they do not suspect
foul play.
The account police know so
far shows that on Saturday night,
officers were called for a report
of a possible teen-drinking party
in a home along Elgin Lane in
Bethesda.
When they arrived, they saw
kids running away. They also
found a group of teenagers in the
street, including — as investigators would later learn from
watching the body cameras —
Navid.
The officers spoke with the
teens in the street, who said they
were not driving and were waiting for their parents to pick them
up.
Navid appeared to have been
drinking but was upright and
responding to officers, police
officials said.
Officers at the scene learned
that there had been a party at the
house.
Homeowners found out that
uninvited guests — who likely
heard about the party on social
media — had brought alcohol,
officials said. The homeowners
asked the teens to call their
parents for rides home and to
leave, officials said.
The officers did not have any
reason to take anyone into custody and left the house, according to police.
At Navid’s home along Radnor
Road — about one mile east —
Navid’s parents grew worried
when they hadn’t heard from
him. His father began driving the
neighborhood, trying to spot
him, and at 3:23 a.m., Navid’s
father pulled into a parking lot of
the county police department’s
district station in Bethesda.
He spoke with at least one
officer, did not file a missing
person’s report and went on his
way.
In an interview, Navid’s father
said he was told by an officer in
the lot that his son was probably
at a friend’s house.
Navid’s father said he re-
took the outcome as a measure of
vindication.
“The board today acknowledged what we’ve been saying all
along, that this process is
flawed,” said David Sligh, who is
retired from the DEQ and works
as conservation director of Wild
Virginia, a nonprofit organization. “This is an advance over
what we thought we might get
today.”
A coalition of environmental
groups filed a federal lawsuit
Friday against the board’s decision on the Mountain Valley
Pipeline, but members said Tuesday that they needed time to
digest the action on the Atlantic
Coast Pipeline before deciding
what to do next.
As the board shut down the
meeting and lines of state troopers began herding the audience
out, Sharon Ponton of Nelson
County sang out: “People gonna
rise like the water,” she began,
and others joined in: “Shut this
budget since 2010, when the city
took over the facility.
UMC’s dire financial situation
comes after the D.C. government
has spent more than $5 million on
a consulting firm, Veritas of Washington, whose job was to financially stabilize the hospital.
The firm, which was recommended to the hospital board by
Bowser’s health-care finance director, has been managing UMC
since 2016. But last month, the
D.C. Council voted not to extend
the company’s contract, citing
concerns about mismanagement
and patient safety. Veritas is running the facility under a month-tomonth extension while the hospi-
DAN MORSE/THE WASHINGTON POST
FAMILY PHOTO
Navid Sepehri’s father drove
through the family’s neighborhood looking for his son.
turned home, hoping to hear
from his son, but still couldn’t
get any response on his cellphone. About 8 a.m. Sunday, he
said, he started searching again,
At 12:46 p.m., police finally
received an official missing person’s report from someone they
have not named. Police searched
for Navid near the area where he
was last seen.
Navid’s father was later told by
police that investigators who
searched Navid’s clothing found
a bottle of vodka in his pocket.
Navid, who had a younger
sister, grew up in Bethesda, enjoyed soccer and karate as a
youngster, and was to graduate
this spring from Whitman. He
planned to study computer science at the University of Maryland at College Park, according
to his father.
“He was always happy, always
smiling,” Frank Sepehri said.
And smart: Two months ago,
he persuaded his father to buy
shares of bitcoin, which have
since shot up in value.
Sepehri said he last saw his
son alive at 7 p.m. Saturday,
when he left home. He didn’t
want to drive the new Mazda his
parents had bought for him,
according to his father.
As his father would later learn
from bank records, he said,
Navid also withdrew $20 Saturday night from an ATM.
Frank Sepehri said his son
may have used the money to buy
vodka and, if so, wants to find
out whether a store sold it to
him.
Friends described the teenager as well-liked, giving and
hilarious, the one who always
cracked them up. He was about
to turn 18 in January and was in
the stretch of senior year when
students savor the months they
have left with high school friends
before they head off to college.
Colleen Harkins Carter, whose
daughter Madeline Kostopulos
was a close friend of Sepehri’s,
spent part of Tuesday afternoon
with Sepehri’s mother, as the
woman shook with grief and
cried in the parking lot outside
the Bannockburn Swim Club, not
far from the site where the teen
died.
More than two dozen of the
teen’s friends gathered with her,
standing in the cold, sobbing,
heads down and hands jammed
in their pockets, she said. They
were devastated.
Carter said she told the students that the loss was every
mother’s nightmare.
“This could be any of us,” she
said. “Don’t leave each other
alone, and don’t encourage binge
drinking.”
She also said: “He didn’t get in
a car and drive. He walked — and
he still didn’t get home.”
Navid’s parents were also at
the scene Tuesday, speaking with
their son’s friends and finding
comfort in their fond memories
of him.
“It’s a disaster right now. I
can’t believe it’s happening to us,
happening to anybody,” Frank
Sepehri said. He said his daughter has been helpful to him and
his wife over the past two days:
“She says, ‘Stay strong. He’s with
us.’ ”
And near the woods, as they
stood, their daughter, who also
was there, ran up and hugged her
mother.
dan.morse@washpost.com
donna.stgeorge@washpost.com
Jennifer Jenkins and Julie Tate
contributed to this report.
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
Hospital subsidy would
be city’s largest to date
UMC FROM B1
Montgomery County police say that the body of Navid Sepehri was found in this wooded area in the
Bannockburn neighborhood of Bethesda on Sunday. Friends and family have created a memorial there.
pipeline down.”
The opponents — from large
groups such as the Sierra Club
and the Southern Environmental Law Center, as well as activists from rural counties, artists
and college students — said they
were ready to take the fight
against both pipelines into the
field. In the fall, some groups
staged a training camp to practice resistance efforts carried
out nationally against projects
such as the Keystone XL pipeline near the Standing Rock
Sioux Tribe’s reservation in the
Dakotas.
“Many people in Virginia are
ready to take the next step. We
will not allow this pipeline to be
built,” said Mara Robbins, a
member of the Preserve Floyd
group from Floyd County. “The
next step is direct action. At this
point, if they exhaust us of
legitimate means, then we take
it into our own hands.”
“They did what we
asked them to do . . .
put a system in place
that allows physicians
to do their jobs.”
Wayne Turnage, director of the Health
Care Finance Department and board
member at United Medical Center
tal board seeks a new operator.
Veritas said in a statement that
of the $17.1 million recommended
subsidy request, $15.1 million was
needed for new expenses — including about $2 million in repayments to Medicare, $5.6 million to
settle an outstanding contract dispute with the hospital’s nurses
and $7.5 million for a new contract
with GW Medical Faculty Associates, a group associated with
George Washington University.
The remaining $2 million is
needed to cover revenue shortfalls
resulting from declining admissions driven by “recent media stories” about UMC and regulators’
shutdown of the hospital’s obstetrics ward, the statement said.
“This new subsidy request reflects the work of Veritas to address long-outstanding issues predating Veritas, including medical
documentation and disputes with
the nurses’ union, as well as our
efforts to enhance and improve
the quality of medical staff, equipment and patient care of UMC,”
said David Boucree, a Veritas employee who is serving as the hospital’s interim chief executive.
Council member Elissa Silver-
man (I-At Large), who voted
against extending the Veritas contract, said the probable subsidy
request “makes me wonder what
Veritas did” during its 18-month
stint at the hospital. “They were
sold as financial experts,” she said.
Wayne Turnage, director of the
city’s Health Care Finance Department, said Veritas was not responsible for the hospital’s financial
woes. He attributed the problems
to media attention that he said
had damaged UMC’s reputation
beginning in August, when the
District’s Health Department shut
down the facility’s nursery and
delivery rooms because of dangerous medical errors in the care of
pregnant women and newborns.
“I don’t think they’re responsible for it at all,” Turnage said.
“They did what we asked them to
do — stabilize the hospital, put a
system in place that allows physicians to do their jobs.”
Turnage, who sits on the hospital’s board, said the $17 million
subsidy does not include money to
reopen the obstetrics ward.
Should the hospital board decide
to reopen the nursery and delivery
rooms, the subsidy request will be
larger, he said.
LaToya Foster, a spokeswoman
for the mayor, declined to say
whether Bowser would support a
subsidy. “We look forward to seeing what action the board takes,
and we will work with them to
ensure the hospital is available to
those who use it,” Foster said.
UMC has long struggled with
the grim financial reality of serving its poor and heavily Medicaidreliant patient base in Southeast
Washington and Prince George’s
County, Md. The District has subsidized the hospital, which is supposed to be financially independent, every year since it assumed
ownership of the facility in 2010.
In 2016, after the hospital needed an extra $10 million from the
District to cover its payroll, Bowser directed Turnage to identify a
turnaround firm that could contract with the city and prevent the
need for future cash infusions.
Turnage recommended that the
hospital board hire Veritas, a company whose executive chairman
was Corbett Price. Price’s wife,
Chrystie Boucree, owns the firm.
She and David Boucree are cousins. Turnage has said he made the
recommendation independently
based on Price’s track record and
that the mayor had no role in the
selection process.
peter.jamison@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
MARYLAND
Lawmakers order the collection of data on sexual misconduct allegations
BY
AND
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
O VETTA W IGGINS
Legislative leaders in Maryland on Tuesday ordered officials
to start collecting data on sexual
misconduct complaints against
state lawmakers or their staff
members, the latest fallout from
a tidal wave of harassment allegations that have toppled elected
officials and industry leaders nationwide.
“This is a watershed moment
in time, and we need to make
certain that everyone is treated
fairly and that there’s a place they
can go,” Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. (D-Calvert)
said shortly before the Legislative Policy Committee — chaired
by him and House Speaker Michael E. Busch (D-Anne Arundel)
— approved the changes.
The General Assembly’s human resources department will
begin tallying harassment complaints and will brief the Legislative Policy Committee annually
on the nature and outcomes of
investigations. The identities of
accused harassers will not be
included in the report, regardless
of whether the claims are found
to have merit.
The report will be considered
a public record, though it is
unclear whether people who
want to see it will have to file a
public-information request.
“That type of data is better
than nothing, so that the public
can get a sense of how big of a
problem is this and what types of
steps are taken to address it,” said
Avi Kumin, a Washington lawyer
who represents sexual harassment victims.
But he and other experts on
sexual harassment issues said the
General Assembly should name
those who are found to have
acted inappropriately.
“I understand the need to be
sensitive for due process and for
privacy, but if a complaint is
substantiated, don’t the voters
have a right to know about the
malfeasance and misbehavior of
their elected officials?” said Jennifer A. Drobac, a law professor
at Indiana University who studies sexual harassment. “These
elected officials answer to the
people.”
Miller and Busch, through
their aides, did not respond to
this criticism.
Under the current process, alleged victims of sexual harassment can file complaints with the
legislature’s human resources di-
PATRICK SEMANSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) said he was surprised that the
legislature hadn’t already been tallying sexual harassment
complaints against lawmakers and their staff members.
rector or with staff members of
Busch and Miller. The human
resources director investigates
the cases. The presiding officers
are informed of cases involving
lawmakers, have a role in deciding disciplinary measures and
handle appeals.
Complaints may be referred to
the Joint Committee on Legislative Ethics, a panel of lawmakers
that can punish colleagues with
public reprimands or provide victims with written findings that
the victims can choose to make
public.
Neither scenario has occurred
in connection with harassment
allegations in recent memory.
Experts on sexual harassment
investigations said the involvement of legislative leaders has
both benefits and drawbacks.
“The pro, of course, is it’s
handled at a higher level and
there is some sense of greater
accountability than it just disappearing into an HR reporting
system,” Kumin said. At the same
time, he added, knowing that
Busch and Miller will be told if
allegations are made against a
sitting lawmaker could discourage people from coming forward.
“One of the reasons that people
are fearful now is that they are
concerned about possible retaliation,” he said.
Debbie Dougherty, a professor
at the University of Missouri who
studies institutional harassment,
said having only one person designated to investigate complaints
can also be problematic.
“The standard reasons why
people don’t report usually come
back to the people they are reporting to,” she said. “I would be a
lot more comfortable if multiple
people investigated, even independently.”
Del. Shelly L. Hettleman (DBaltimore County) said she believes that many victims are reluctant to come forward. “I know,
talking with people, that the issue is more prevalent than what’s
reported,” she said.
Sen. Cheryl C. Kagan (D-Montgomery), one of 11 women in the
47-seat state Senate, said the
decision to track complaints reflects “encouraging progress, but
I suspect we can do more” in
terms of transparency and accountability.
Asked at a news conference
about the policy change, Gov.
Larry Hogan (R) said he was
surprised that the legislature
wasn’t already compiling data on
sexual harassment.
“The legislature obviously
doesn’t fall under our purview,
but it’s surprising to me that they
haven’t had any kind of policy
before and a good idea for them
to do,” he said.
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Bowser raises $1.4 million in first 80 days of her bid to be reelected mayor
BY
P ETER J AMISON
D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser
has raised more than $1.4 million
since she announced her reelection bid in late September, campaign finance records show, a formidable early haul that could
make challengers think twice
about entering what is so far an
uncontested race for mayor in
2018.
With the money she has raised
over just 80 days, the Democrat is
easily on track to meet or exceed
her 2014 total of approximately
$3.6 million in contributions. Her
campaign chairman, Bill Lightfoot, attributed the fundraising
success to energetic involvement
from the mayor, who he said has
attended about 40 campaign
fundraising events since declaring.
“It really was her. She was energized,” Lightfoot said. “She had a
vision that she wanted to raise this
money from individuals and not
from corporations.”
About 85 percent of Bowser’s
contributions came from individuals, who under District law are
limited to giving $2,000 in citywide races. The rest came from
corporations, corporation-sponsored political action committees
and LLCs, according to a report
filed Monday by Bowser’s campaign.
While most of Bowser’s donations came from individuals,
many of those people are affiliated
with prominent D.C. businesses.
For example, 16 employees of the
A Washington Post
poll in June found
that Bowser
had a 67 percent
approval rating among
District residents.
energy company Pepco Holdings
donated a combined $10,250,
campaign finance records show,
while 12 employees of the law firm
Holland and Knight gave a combined $17,100. Eleven employees
of real estate company WC Smith
gave $6,900.
Lightfoot said the campaign
does not yet have a specific fundraising goal but will adapt according to whether any serious challengers emerge for the Democratic primary in June — which typically decides elections in the
District — or for the general election.
“There’s not an absolute number in mind,” he said. “It depends
on the level of competition and
the resources the mayor needs to
communicate her message in a
competitive race.”
Bowser’s campaign committee
has so far spent about $68,000.
With six months until the primary, the outlook for the mayor is
mostly positive.
A June poll by The Washington
Post found that she had a 67 percent approval rating among District residents. That support,
while broad, was not universally
strong. Some 20 percent of Washingtonians surveyed said they
strongly approved of her performance, while 47 percent “somewhat” approved.
The poll also found that in a
hypothetical three-way Democratic mayoral primary, she would
capture 50 percent of the support
among registered Democratic
voters, followed by former mayor
and current D.C. Council member
Vincent C. Gray (D-Ward 7) with
27 percent and Attorney General
Karl A. Racine (D) with 10 percent.
Racine has since announced
that he will not enter the mayor’s
race and will instead seek reelec-
tion as attorney general.
The competitiveness of the
mayoral election could hinge on
whether Gray — whom Bowser
defeated in 2014 — seeks a rematch. Gray returned to city hall
this year after winning the Ward 7
council seat and has had a highprofile run as chairman of the
council’s health committee.
However, he could still face lingering distrust citywide from a
federal investigation into illegal
financing of his 2010 mayoral
campaign. Gray was not charged
in that probe, which led to guilty
pleas by six people, including
some of his associates.
Gray has said he is considering
a mayoral run but has not reached
a decision.
peter.jamison@washpost.com
obituaries
BRUCE BROWN, 80
Documentarian’s ‘Endless Summer’ sought the perfect wave
BY
E MILY L ANGER
Bruce Brown, a filmmaker
whose scrappy 1966 documentary
“The Endless Summer” became
an international phenomenon,
introducing surfing to the world
not as a frivolous fad but as a
sacred search for the perfect
wave, died Dec. 10 at a hospital in
Santa Barbara, Calif. He was 80.
He had heart ailments and
complications from a broken hip,
said his son Dana Brown, also a
documentarian.
Hailed as “the Bergman of the
boards” and “the Fellini of the
foam,” Mr. Brown brought next to
no professional training but an
abundance of passion to his art
form, which he used to popularize
surfing far beyond the coastlines
of California.
He had learned the sport growing up in Southern California before he hit his teens. At the time,
surfing did not enjoy the reputation that it would acquire in later
years — in large part thanks to
“The Endless Summer” — as a
refuge for pure seekers of the
purest thrill.
Surfers had long been perceived as “silly and mindless,”
Matt Warshaw, creator of the Encyclopedia of Surfing, said in an
interview. Contributing to that
impression was Hollywood fare
such as the “Gidget” films of the
late 1950s and 1960s, featuring a
parade of actresses as the quintessential beach bunny. Neither did
“Beach Blanket Bingo” (1965),
with Frankie Avalon and Annette
Funicello, do much to help.
Mr. Brown began to experiment with film during his Navy
service in Hawaii — a felicitous
posting for a surfer — working
with rudimentary equipment and
improvised techniques. His first
production, “Slippery When Wet”
(1958), was for surfboard manufacturer Dale Velzy.
On its heels came five more
surfing documentaries: “Surf Crazy” (1959), “Surfin’ Shorts” and
“Barefoot Adventure” (both
1960), “Surfing Hollow Days”
(1961)
and
“Water-Logged”
BRUCE BROWN FILMS/SHACC COLLECTION
Undated photographs of
filmmaker Bruce Brown from
the Surfing Heritage and
Culture Center. Mr. Brown
made six low-budget surfing
documentaries in the late 1950s
and early 1960s before his
seminal film “The Endless
Summer” (1966) became an
international sensation.
BRUCE BROWN FILMS/SHACC COLLECTION
“The thing you can’t
show is the fantastic
speed and that feeling
you get in the pit of
your stomach.”
Bruce Brown
in “The Endless Summer,”
filming a wave in South Africa
(1962).
They were low-budget affairs,
featuring no soundtracks, and
presented in theaters with Mr.
Brown delivering live narration.
Sometimes an as-yet unknown
musical group, the Beach Boys,
would play at intermission.
Mr. Brown burst to the fore
with “The Endless Summer.” The
film featured two young surfers,
Robert August and Mike Hynson,
who embark in 1963 on a sojourn
around the globe, hopscotching
across the equator and back several times over, to follow the sun
and chase the waves.
“It’s kind of like a pipe dream,”
Mr. Brown said, according to the
Orange County Register. “If you
traveled around the world just
right, you’d be in the middle of
summer everywhere you went.”
The trip took the surfers to
Africa, Australia, New Zealand
and Tahiti, among other locales,
with Mr. Brown filming on a
handheld 16mm camera and providing narration. The final product, film reviewer Stephen Holden later wrote in the New York
Times, had the “perky ingenuousness of an early Beach Boys anthem.”
Mr. Brown presented “The
Endless Summer” in California
before renting a theater during
the winter in Wichita, where the
movie was a blockbuster.
“We thought that would prove
the film to the distributors in New
York, and of course it didn’t,” he
told the Times in 2002. “So we
rented a theater in New York our-
selves, hoping that the distributors would drive by the theater
and see the crowd, which they did.
It was the surfer guys against the
New York establishment.”
“The Endless Summer,” whose
budget had been $50,000, became a sensation. It grossed
$30 million, making it one of the
most commercially successful
documentaries in film history.
“What it did was show the
world the idyllic lifestyle that still
resonates with people to this day,
even though surfing as a sport has
progressed,” said Barry Haun, curator and creative director of the
Surfing Heritage and Culture
Center in San Clemente, Calif.
“You don’t have to be a surfer to
watch this and enjoy it. I think
anybody who watches it wishes
they surfed, if they don’t already.”
Bruce Alan Brown was born in
San Francisco on Dec. 1, 1937. His
mother was a schoolteacher, and
his father owned a small toy store
chain. He grew up in Long Beach,
where, according to surfing writer Drew Kampion, he said he
“majored in not going to school.”
After his Navy discharge, he
was working as a lifeguard when
Velzy offered him $5,000 to make
“Slippery When Wet.”
He made few films after “The
Endless Summer,” in part because
he found it difficult to tear himself
away from surfing. “I didn’t want
to go to Hollywood,” Mr. Brown
told the Los Angeles Times. “I’d
rather live in a [trailer] on a perfect surf break than live in Beverly
Hills in a mansion with 50 servants and Rolls-Royces.”
The most notable of his subsequent films was “On Any Sunday”
(1971), a documentary about motorcycle racing that featured movie star and motorbike enthusiast
Steve McQueen and that was
nominated for an Academy
Award. Mr. Brown also made a
sequel to his seminal film, “The
Endless Summer II” (1994), with
his son.
Mr. Brown’s wife of 46 years,
the former Patricia Hunter, died
in 2006. In addition to Dana
Brown, of Los Angeles, survivors
include two other children, Wade
Brown and Nancie Brown, both of
Gaviota, Calif.; eight grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.
For all the drama and beauty
that his surfing documentaries
captured, there was something
that Mr. Brown said he could not
catch on film.
“The thing you can’t show is the
fantastic speed and that feeling
you get in the pit of your stomach,” he said in “The Endless Summer,” filming a wave at Cape St.
Francis in South Africa. “I
couldn’t help but think of the
hundreds of years these waves
must have been breaking here. . . .
Think of the thousands of waves
that went to waste, and the waves
that are going to waste right now.”
emily.langer@washpost.com
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
IN MEMORIAM
obituaries
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
PRICE
COULTER
FLOOD
Dr. CHARLES L. COULTER
DR. JUDITH DUNCAN FLOOD "Judy"
Of Gaithersburg, MD, died on December 3,
2017. A Memorial Service will be held Saturday,
January 6, 2018, 3 p.m. at The Guild Memorial
Chapel, Ashbury Methodist Village, 211 Russell
Avenue, Gaithersburg, MD. Donations can be
made in his name online to http://stmarkscityheights.org
On Monday, December 11, 2017. The beloved
wife of CDR Robert Flood and the late John
R. Finch; mother of Jeffrey Finch of York, PA
and Jason Finch of Columbia, SC; sister of
Carolyn Quatraro of Hamilton, VA; stepmother
of Elizabeth Flood, Mimi Mack and Verone
Flood, grandmother of Cameron, Sarah, Anjali
and Moira Finch, Courtney and Brittany Mack,
great-grandmother of Olivia Gray. A memorial
service will be held on Monday, December 18
at 10 a.m. at the U.S. Naval Academy Chapel,
Annapolis, MD. Inurnment will follow at The
United States Naval Academy Columbarium. In
lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to
the American Cancer Society, 7500 Greenway
Ctr. Dr., Ste 300, Greenbelt, MD 20770. Online
guestbook at www.KalasFuneralHomes.com
DEATH NOTICE
AKER
GRACE EVANJAYLN AKER
Departed this life on December 2, 2017,
at the age of 88, in St. Louis, MO. She
was born in Washington, DC on March
6, 1929. She was preceded in death by
her husband, Jean Francois Aker (19231988), her parents, George Linwood Fentress (1880-1949) and Catharine Susan Fentress (1887-1954), many siblings and son,
Franklin Leslie Aker (1950-1994). Survivors
include children, Andrew Wallace Aker of
St. Louis, MO, Catharine Simmons (Michael)
Pickard of Charlotte, NC and Jean Francois
(Cherie) Aker Jr. of Gaithersburg, MD,
numerous nieces, nephews, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren. Grace spent her
working life at many vocations, including
telephone operator for Bell, head cashier
for Safeway and alarm monitor for a local
home security provider. She was very
fond of crossword puzzles, and loading her
minivan and heading off to visit friends and
family. Interment services will be held at
Arlington National Cemetery, VA at a date
to be determined.
ANDERSON
JAMES EDWARD ANDERSON, SR.
COURTESY OF BOB SEIDEMANN
Bob Seidemann, left, poses with airplane designer Robert Sandusky in 1991. Seidemann photographed
aging planes and aviation figures in a 15-year series, but he was best known for his images of rock stars.
Took iconic photographs
of Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
Bob Seidemann, a Haight
Street hipster who cared little for
rock music but loved the freewheeling cultural scene of 1960s
San Francisco, where he photographed Janis Joplin and the
Grateful Dead and went on to
design more than 50 album covers, including a controversial image of a shirtless 11-year-old girl
for the supergroup Blind Faith,
died Nov. 27 at his home in Vallejo, Calif. He was 75.
He had Parkinson’s disease,
said his wife, Belinda Seidemann.
Mr. Seidemann was working
on commercial photo shoots in
New York — herding sheep into
freight elevators and posing baby
chickens for barnyard-themed
calendars — when he heard that
people were dropping LSD and
embracing free love in San Francisco.
He soon headed west to join
them, immersing himself in what
he called the “freak” scene of the
city’s Haight-Ashbury and North
Beach neighborhoods, where he
befriended and soon began photographing members of the
Grateful Dead and Joplin’s band,
Big Brother and the Holding
Company.
“To be honest with you, I wasn’t
very interested in the music,” he
told the website Collectors Weekly in 2015. “It was the scene, you
know? I didn’t intend to become a
documentarian; I was just hanging out, a friend of these people. I
had a little bit of skill with the
camera, able to do stuff that did
not require a lot of expertise. As
their work progressed, so did
mine.”
Mr. Seidemann went on to photograph album covers for acts
including singers Randy Newman and Gladys Knight, jazz musician Herbie Hancock, and rock
music’s Bob Seger and Neil Young.
He also spent 15 years taking
artistic black-and-white photos of
aging airplanes and historic figures in aviation, including World
War II aviator James H. Doolittle
and test pilot Chuck Yeager.
But he remained best known
for his highly conceptual late-’60s
rock photos, which captured the
brazen sexuality of the Summer of
Love and what Mr. Seidemann
later described as “the golden calf
of the moment” — the American
rock star.
He took one of the best-known
photos of the Grateful Dead, positioning guitarist Jerry Garcia and
other band members on a sloping
stretch of cookie-cutter houses in
Daly City, Calif., in 1967. Police
broke up the first attempt at a
photo, but on a second try Mr.
Seidemann applied a red filter to
darken the sky and employed five
mirror-wielding assistants to
shine light into the faces of the
Dead.
The result was an eerie juxtaposition of strait-laced suburbia
and five men who looked, Mr.
Seidemann said, like “mutant
transplants from Jupiter, fresh
out of their flying saucer.” It was
On Wednesday, December 6, 2017 of Arlington, VA. Survived by his loving wife, Shirley
T. Anderson; children, Cynthia Butler, Julie
Anderson, Jeffery Anderson and Crashawn
Morand; and a host of other relatives and
friends. Life Celebration will be held on December 14, 2017 at Mt. Olive Baptist Church, 1601
South 13th Rd, Arlington, VA. Visitation 10
a.m. until time of service 11 a.m. Interment
Pleasant Valley Memorial Park. Services by K.J.
Robinson Funeral Service.
BOWELL
CLARE ELIZABETH KROGMANN
BOWELL
Betty Bowell passed peacefully on November 30 2017 in Pittsburgh PA. A native of
Washington DC, born September 6, 1920,
she was the widow of CAPT John H. Bowell,
USN (Ret., Dec; USNA '40). She is survived
by her sister Patricia K. Dunn and sisterin-law Marge Krogmann, and her children:
Clare B. Ellis (Philip, dec.), Katherine B. Ball
(CMDR John C., USN, Ret.; USNA '71), and
John H. Bowell, Jr. (Beverly) (LCDR, USN;
USNA '74). Also, six grandchildren, eight
great-grandchildren, and one great-greatgrandchild.
CROWLEY
DONNA LEE CROWLEY
Graduated this life to her eternal home in
Heaven on December 7, 2017. Funeral service
on Thursday, December 14, 2017 from 1 p.m. to
2:30 p.m. at LOUDOUN FUNERAL CHAPEL, 158
Catoctin Circle SE, Leesburg, VA with graveside
burial at Union Cemetery in Leesburg, VA.
DORNEY
Of Silver Spring, MD, peacefully passed away
December 3, 2017.
GERTRUDE DORNEY "Penny"
(Age 99)
Born July 26, 1934 in Philadelphia, PA, a son to
the late Charles and Julia Gaidurgis.
Gertrude “Penny” passed away in the company
of her family on December 9, 2017. A resident
of Montgomery County, MD for 65 years, Penny
was a registered nurse. A devout Roman
Catholic, she was a founding parishioner at
St. Catherine Laboure Catholic Church in
Wheaton, MD.
The family matriarch, Penny is survived by
three sons, a stepdaughter, 13 grandchildren
and 17 great-grandchildren.
Services will be held in Alexandria, VA, date
and time of service to be provided at:
www.jeffersonfuneralchapel.com
Donations in her memory may be made to:
Catholic Charities, PO Box 1900, Merrifield, VA
22116.
On December 7, 2017 of Silver Spring, MD.
Born February 27, 1926, one of five children of
the late William H. and Rose M. (Case) Downs.
Survived by her beloved sister Hilda Downs
Thompson; loving nieces and nephews Gilbert
Thompson, Brenda Scott and Sharon Purcell;
and cherished great nieces and nephews, Ross
Thompson, Emma Thompson, Cheryl Hill, Tina
Fleece, Leo Hollar III, Jason Stevens, Katie
Carroll and Sean Purcell.
Relatives and friends will be received at
PUMPHREY’S COLONIAL FUNERAL HOME, 300
W. Montgomery Ave. (Rt. 28 just off I-270),
Rockville, MD on Friday, December 15, 2017
from 12 Noon to 1 p.m. followed by a Funeral
Service at 1 p.m. Interment in Darnestown
Presbyterian Cemetery. Please view and sign
the family online guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
DEATH NOTICE
harrison.smith@washpost.com
Mr. Seidemann’s highly conceptual late-1960s rock photos
captured the brazen sexuality of the Summer of Love.
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices
at 202-334-4122.
It is with regret that we notify
the members of Steamfitters
Local #602 of the death of Brother
Jonathon Goldman. Services held
by family.
Notice #1645
Daniel W. Loveless, FST
GREENEBAUM
STEWART J. GREENEBAUM
On December 10, 2017, Stewart J.
Greenebaum; beloved husband of Marlene
Greenebaum; devoted father of Amy (Steve)
Burwen, and Michael (Adele) Greenebaum;
loving brother of Edwin Greenebaum, and the
late Lawrence Greenebaum; dear brother-inlaw of Ingrid and Barbara Greenebaum; adored
son of the late Harry and Laura Greenebaum;
cherished grandfather of Robert Greenebaum
(fiancee Amy Rifkin), Heather Greenebaum,
and Samantha Greenebaum; former father-inlaw of Nona Greenebaum.
Funeral services will be held at Temple Oheb
Shalom, 7310 Park Heights Ave, Baltimore, MD
21208 on Wednesday, December 13, at 2:30
p.m. Interment is private. Please omit flowers.
Contributions in his memory may be sent
to The University of Maryland, Marlene and
Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer
Center, 110 S. Paca Street, Baltimore, MD
21201. In mourning at Temple Oheb Shalom,
7310 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore, MD
21208, immediately following the funeral with
shiva services at 5 p.m., and on Thursday
from 1 to 4 p.m. with shiva services at 5 p.m.
Arrangements by SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC.
www.sollevinson.com
Jack continued his naval service after the
war. He was a graduate of the Naval War
College, served as the senior U.S. naval
officer at Nova Scotia, Canada, was a Navy
ROTC instructor at Harvard University and
culminated his sea-going career as Commanding Officer of USS Coolbaugh, a
destroyer escort out of Norfolk, Virginia.
During his 21 year naval career his decorations and campaign ribbons included; Navy
Commendation Medal - Okinawa, EuropeanAfrican-Middle East Campaign Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, World War II
Victory Medal and the Korean Service Medal.
BUTLER
grassy hillside holding a spaceshiplike object in her hand.
For the girl, Mr. Seidemann
sought someone with “that singular flare of radiant innocence” — a
young woman who was not too
old to be “cheesecake,” and not
young enough that her nudity
meant “nothing.”
Mr. Seidemann eventually
found Mariora Goschen, whose
parents gave their permission
and who had only one stipulation.
For payment, she wanted “a
young horse.” Years later, Goschen told Britain’s Independent
newspaper that she received 40
pounds but was “still waiting for
Eric Clapton to ring me about the
horse.”
Robert Emett Seidemann was
born in Manhattan on Dec. 28,
1941, and grew up in Queens, near
what is now LaGuardia Airport.
He struggled to read because of
learning disabilities and graduated from a vocational school, the
Manhattan High School of Aviation Trades.
A delivery job at a Manhattan
photo lab led him to develop an
interest in photography.
In addition to his wife of 37
years, the former Belinda Bryant
of Vallejo, survivors include a
younger brother.
Mr. Seidemann described his
aviation series, “Airplane as Art,”
part of the collection of the J. Paul
Getty Museum in Los Angeles, as
his greatest achievement. But he
also acknowledged an “almost
miraculous quality” in his Blind
Faith image.
“When I saw it on the retoucher’s table I felt a shock as if I had
been struck by somebody,” he told
the Independent, “a sense of detachment that was almost transcendental.”
GOLDMAN
JONATHON F. GOLDMAN (Age 36)
CASSIDY
JOHN A. BUTLER "Jack" (Age 90)
May 20, 1927 - December 9, 2017
soon turned into a top-selling
poster, plastered on telephone
poles and storefront windows
across the Bay Area.
That same year, Mr. Seidemann
took a pair of widely replicated
portraits of Joplin, showing her in
the first image wearing nothing
but a cape and long strings of
beads. “At the end of the photo
session she wanted to take her
clothes off,” Belinda Seidemann
said. The resulting seminude image, with an earnest, bead-draped
Joplin standing with her hands
positioned over her groin, became a defining photo of the
singer when it was published in
Rolling Stone after Joplin’s death
in 1970.
Mr. Seidemann maintained a
close friendship with rocker Eric
Clapton, who encouraged him to
move to London in the late 1960s
and commissioned him to devise
an album cover for his new super
group, a then-nameless outfit
that featured Ginger Baker, who
had played with Clapton in
Cream, alongside Steve Winwood
of Traffic and Ric Grech of Family.
The band didn’t last, breaking
up after one tour and a single
record in 1969. Yet the cover art of
its self-titled record — “Blind
Faith,” a name coined by Mr.
Seidemann — proved enduring,
in part for the surrealistic quality
of its image and for the criticism it
engendered from those who saw
phallic imagery and child pornography. For the record’s second
printing, the image was replaced
with a photo Mr. Seidemann had
taken of the band at Clapton’s
apartment.
Mr. Seidemann later wrote that
he had intended the artwork to
evoke childlike innocence and optimism toward new technologies,
symbolized by a naked girl on a
The Gaidurgis family is especially grateful to
Tony Gaidurgis, Camille Honaker & Angel for
Mike’s final loving care and comfort.
DOWNS
BROWN
Bob Seidemann, seen in 2012, worked on commercial photo shoots
in New York before stories about life in the West lured him there.
He is preceded in death by his wife of 45 years,
Delores Dye Gaidurgis and second wife, Anne
Ankersmith; his daughter, Julie; and grandchildren, Lisa Gaidurgis, and James Taylor; brother,
Donald; and sister, Charlotte Gaidurgis.
VIOLET A. DOWNS "Bobbie"
(Age 91)
MARIA LUISA BROWN (age 91)
Longtime resident of Potomac, MD., born
in Cambridge, MA (1927), died peacefully in
his sleep on December 9, 2017. After 35
years at IBM in marketing and education,
he retired in 1991. He was instrumental
in introducing the personal computer into
wide area network communications as one
of the key players in IBM’s Washington,
DC location. A graduate of Massachusetts
Maritime Academy (1947) and the College
of the Holy Cross (1950), he served in the
Merchant Marine and U.S. Navy during the
Korean War. An avid sailor, long interested
in nautical history and proceedings, he
wrote three books on maritime history:
Strike Able Peter: The Stranding and Salvage of the USS Missouri (1995); Sailing on
Friday: The Perilous Voyage of America’s
Merchant Marine (2000); and Atlantic Kingdom: America’s Contest with Cunard in the
Age of Sail and Steam (2001). Perplexed by
changing research methods and wanting to
learn more, he published an early book on
internet research, CyberSearch: Research
Techniques in the Electronic Age (1997).
He attended mass daily as a member of
St. Raphael’s parish in Rockville, MD and
served as a lector there for 45 years. He
is survived by his wife of nearly 57 years,
Elinor T. (Boule) Butler; his five children,
Stephanie Butler of Annapolis, MD; Andrew
Butler of Florence, MA; Jennifer Levine, and
husband Jim Levine, of Chagrin Falls, OH;
Christopher Butler, and wife Jennifer Haines
Butler, of Arlington, MA; and Allison Butler,
and Andy Lobenstine, of Easthampton, MA;
and his seven grandchildren: Jacob, Sarah,
and Eva Levine; Jasmin Butler; and Charlotte, Annabelle, and Madeline Butler. Jack
was an enthusiastic reader, faithfully
devouring the Washington Post and New
York Times daily and New Yorker weekly. He
kept a robust and well-catalogued library of
well over 1000 books and could generally
be found reading multiple books across
many genres, while simultaneously completing the Washington Post crossword
puzzle. Jack led family vacations for more
than five decades to both Cape Cod and
Nantucket, MA, encouraging strong family
bonds among his children and grandchildren. Funeral mass will be held Wednesday,
December 27, at 10:30 a.m., at St. Raphael’s
Church in Rockville, MD. Interment will be
at Holyhood Cemetery, in Brookline, MA. In
lieu of flowers, please consider a donation
in Jack’s name to Catholic Charities.
Mike is survived by his sons, Perry, Jerry,
Larry, Andrew, Tony, and Tim; daughter, Janice
Rawlings; a sister, Viola McKenna; and brotherin-law, Howard Dye; 22 grandchildren, and
numerous great grandchildren.
A visitation and memorial service be held
Thursday December 14, 2017 from 6 to 8 p.m.
at Trinity Assembly of God Church, 7800 Good
Luck Rd., Lanham, MD.
In lieu of flowers, the family invites donations in Betty's name to the US Naval
Academy Alumni Association, Wounded
Warriors or Fisher House.
Went to be with the Lord on Friday,
December 8, 2017. Wife of the
late Eldridge Brown for 47 years;
mother of Eldridge E. Brown, Marilyn Brown, Charlotte (Thomas)
Abney, Barbara (Marty) Slack, and
the late Susan Diller. Grandmother of Evan,
Christina, Eldridge II, Zachary, Russell, and
Katie. Great-grandmother of Aubrey, Jack, Felix
and Oliver. Daughter of the late Maria Morales
y Pabon and Juan Jose Lugo y Toro. Memorial
service will be held at Mowatt United
Methodist Church, 40 Ridge Rd., Greenbelt,
MD 20770 on Monday, December 18, at 7 p.m.
Interment private.
www.borgwardtfuneralhome.com
GAIDURGIS
MICHAEL CHARLES GAIDURGIS
(Age 83)
Visitation and Prayer Service: December
20, 2017, 10 a.m. to 12 Noon, at Murphy
Funeral Home, 1102 Broad St., Falls Church.
Burial at Arlington National Cemetery at a
later date.
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
LEONARD W. PRICE, II "Dickey"
December 13, 1955 ~ October 3, 1993
Unconditional Love.
Your Family, Price and Lewis
BOB SEIDEMANN, 75
. WEDNESDAY,
JOHN RICHARD LANCE CASSIDY
June 8, 1915 to December 9, 2017
John “Jack” R. L. Cassidy returned to his Lord
and Savior on December 9, 2017, reuniting
with his wife of 62 years and the love of his
life, Josephine Rose Anne Cassidy.
Jack was born June 8, 1915 in Bridgeport,
Connecticut, delivered on a kitchen table by
a mid-wife. He was the only child of Anne
Bayus and John Cassidy. In the first years of
his life he was raised in a Catholic convent
by his Aunt, Mother Superior Sister Mary
Salome. He learned to speak Slovak with
his grandparents before learning English.
In his high school years he lived with his
mother and became a lifeguard during the
summers for the New York Metropolitan Athletic Association to earn money for college
and starting on his path to become an athlete
for life. During high school he played football,
baseball and basketball and was involved
in swimming and boxing. His passion was
baseball.
In 1936 he attended the University of Alabama majoring in Physical Education and Mathematics and becoming very involved in the
evolution of the schools sports programs.
He was a key participant in beginning the
swimming program at the university, he
was on the boxing team with teammate
and future Governor of Alabama, George
Wallace, and was assigned as a personal
trainer to Alabama assistant football coach,
Bear Bryant. As a senior on the University
of Alabama baseball team he batted .317
and was signed by the Chicago White Sox
baseball organization upon graduation.
In 1940, Jack graduated from Alabama, met
his future wife Josephine Rose Anne McHale
at the World’s Fair in New York, and was
commissioned as an Ensign in the U.S. Navy.
Josephine and Jack married in New York City
on January 17, 1943. Beginning his naval
service at Officer Candidate School at Northwestern University and as a midshipmen
on USS New York (BB 34) just prior to the
outbreak of the Second World War, Jack saw
action on cruisers and destroyers in both
the Pacific and European theaters. His at sea
service during the war included participation
in the invasion of Africa in Operation Torch,
and in the Marianas and Philippines Campaigns in the Pacific, culminating with his
being in combat in the invasion of Okinawa.
At Tokyo Bay on September 2, 1945, Lieutenant Jack Cassidy, Aide to Rear Admiral
McCormick, joined his admiral onboard USS
Missouri for the Japanese surrender.
Following his retirement from the Navy as
a Commander in 1961, Jack became a high
school administrator and coach in both Virginia and Maryland. During a six year break
between high school positions, he became
the head of training at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in
Greenbelt, Maryland with extensive involvement in the Apollo program, and in particular,
the first moon landing with Apollo 11.
Outside his military and work, Jack earned
Masters Degrees in Business Administration
from the University of Virginia and George
Washington University. He served as the
senior baseball umpire for Fairfax County
for seventeen years. He was an usher at
All Saints Catholic Church in Manassas for
twenty years and was an active member of
the church starting in 1971. He was also
active in the Park West Lions Club in Manassas.
Jack was a member of the gym at Freedom
GMU Center through his 99th birthday, working out and swimming five days a week. His
lifelong devotion to athletics is epitomized by
his incredible successes while participating
in the Northern Virginia Senior Olympics
through the age of 98 where he was awarded
hundreds of medals in track and field events
and swimming. He still holds age group
records in the Men’s Shot Put and Discus
(age groups 80-84, 85-89, 95-99), the Javelin
throw (95-99), the 50-yard backstroke (9599) and the 50-yard freestyle swim (85-99,
90+).
Jack is survived by his sons John Michael
(wife Judy), Jeffrey James, James Kevin (wife
Adele), and Jerald Randolph (wife Denise);
and his daughter Jo-Anne Christine. Additionally his three grandchildren John Patrick
Cassidy, Cassidy Danielle Burton, and McKenzie Cassidy
A mentor, father, grandfather… a loving and
faithful husband… a friend to many.
Pierce Funeral Home, 9609 Center St, Manassas, VA will host a viewing on Thursday,
December 14, 2017, from 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral
Mass will be held at All Saints Catholic
Church, 9300 Stonewall Road, Manassas on
Friday, December 15, 2017 at 10 a.m., followed by internment at Quantico National
Cemetery at 12pm.
A special thanks to the certified nursing
assistants who have taken care of Jack at his
home the past two years, in particular Isaiah,
Charity and Alima.
The family requests that in lieu of gifts and
flowers, contributions be made in Jack’s
name to the Prince William SPCA with checks
made payable to “PWSPCA”: Prince William
SPCA, PO Box 6631, Woodbridge, VA 22195.
Because your loved one served proudly...
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
C0979 2x3
B6
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
DEATH NOTICE
HAWKINS
JANET TREVETTE BABCOCK
HAWKINS
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
KITSMILLER
NOWOTNY
ROSS
BROWN
SMITH
MICHIKO YOSHIMURA KITSMILLER
Departed this life on Sunday, December 3, 2017
in Flagstaff at the age of 91. Graveside Services
will be held at 10 a.m., Wednesday, December
13, 2017, at the Denton Cemetery, with Rev.
David Leu officiating. Services by CallawaySmith-Cobb Funeral and Cremation Services.
Trevette is survived by her son, William
M. Hawkins, III; her daughter-in-law, Maria
Luisa; her granddaughter, Angelica Lisa; her
sister, Marguerite Babcock; and her brother,
Michael Babcock. She is preceded in death
by her husband, William M. Hawkins, Jr.
JOSEPH PETER LORENZ
Trevette’s love for her family was unsurpassed. She shared a strong bond with
her son and adored her granddaughter
Angelica. She is remembered as the ideal
complement to her beloved husband Bill,
to whom she remained eternally dedicated
during his life. Trevette was passionate
about the visual and fine arts. She began
designing at an early age and throughout
her life created decorative works employing her refined techniques, particularly in
textile arts. With inimitable taste, Trevette
revisited old-style designs with innovative
form. She enjoyed teaching her skills to
family and friends.
Trevette’s funeral will be at 1 p.m. on
December 16, 2017 at Holy Trinity Episcopal
Church in West Palm Beach, FL, followed by
committal at nearby Woodlawn Cemetery.
All are welcome to attend and celebrate
Trevette’s life. In lieu of flowers, please
send donations to The Phillips Collection,
Washington, DC.
HAYES
JARVIS
CAROL A. ROSS
LORENZ
Passed away on December 10, 2017 in
Potomac, Maryland after sustaining life with
Alzheimers’ for more than a decade.
Joe was born June 12, 1931 in New York
City to Joseph Lorenz and Katherine Broderick
Lorenz. He graduated from Pomfret School. He
attended Harvard College, where he was on
the editorial board of the Harvard Crimson. He
graduated cum laude in 1953. Joe joined the
Marines, becoming a first lieutenant. He joined
the Foreign Service in 1959 after receiving a
masters degree in public policy from Columbia
University.
Joe married Gary Craig Cunningham in October,
1954. Joe and Gary were married for 64 years.
Joe’s Foreign Service career took him and his
family to Iran, Cyprus, Egypt and Algeria, as
well as the U.S. Mission to the United Nations
in New York. Upon retirement, Joe wrote two
books about the Middle East, and he enjoyed
long walks through the woods of his farm in
Poolesville, MD and in the beautiful mountains
of Montana.
Joe will be buried in a family plot in Pennsylvania. He is preceded in death by his daughter,
Andrea Wallace Lorenz. He is survived by his
wife Gary Lorenz, his daughter Jeanne Lantry
Lorenz as well as his grand-daughters Juliette
Katherine Lorenz of Bethesda Maryland,, and
Margarita Makeda Cunningham Lorenz of Calgary, Canada.
McKOY
ELOISE McKOY (Age 83)
On December 2, 2017. She is survived by her
husband, James McKoy and children. Visitation
Thursday, December 14, from 10 a.m. until
hour of service at 11 a.m. at Pilgrim AME
Church, 1612 17th St, NE, Washington, DC
20019. Services by McLaughlin Funeral Home.
CHARLES J. HAYES (Age 86)
Of Jeffersonton, VA on November 30, 2017.
He obtained his J.D. at Catholic University,
Columbus School of Law in 1967. He is survived
by his wife of 55 years, Peggy; his daughter,
Rebecca Prosser (Ted) of Arlington, Virginia;
a granddaughter, Madeline; three brothers,
James Hayes (Barbara) of New York, John
Hayes of Arizona, and Gerald Hayes (Mary) of
New York.
A funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Peter
Church, Washington, Virginia on Saturday, January 6, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. Inurnment will follow
at a later date at Arlington National Cemetery.
Memorial contributions may be directed to The
Culpeper Food Closet, P.O. Box 343, Culpeper,
VA 22701. Online condolences at
www.moserfuneralhome.com
MARY CATHERINE NOWOTNY (Age 93)
On December 4, 2017, Mary Catherine Nowotny of Olney, MD passed away. A memorial
service to be held at Oakdale Church, 3425
Emory Church Road, Olney, MD on Saturday,
December 16, 2017 at 10:30 a.m. A reception
will immediately follow. At a later date, Mary
will be interred alongside her husband at
Arlington National Cemetery. Mary is survived
by her son, James Nowotny; and long time
significant other, Teresa Ward; and her daughter, Mary Nowotny, and her husband, Brian
White; her grandchildren, John Davidson
(Cheyenne Mattu), Amy White and Kayla White.
She is preceded in death by her husband, John
“Jack” Nowotny, and her daughter, Jacalyn
Nowotny.
Of Clinton, MD (Miller Farms) passed peacefully
while surrounded by family on Thursday,
December 7, 2017 at the age of 98. Husband
of Edna M. (Sellner) Miller; Father of Barbara
D. Hunter, Margaret L. Thornton, Brenda M.
Gooslin, Sandra L. Oursler, Anton S. Miller, Jr.,
Richard V. Miller and Gayle E. Padgett. Also
survived by his Brother, John T. Miller and Sister
Gertrude Goodson, 18 grandchildren, 24 greatgrandchildren and one great-great grandchild.
A Memorial Gathering will be held at Lee
Funeral Home, Inc., 6633 Old Alexandria Ferry
Rd. on Friday, December 15 from 3 to 6 p.m.
A Memorial Mass will be held on Saturday,
December 16 at St. John the Evangelist Catholic
Church, Clinton, MD at 11 a.m. Online condolences may be made at
www.leefuneralhomes.com
JOHNSON
BOOKER T. JOHNSON, SR.
Was called home on Monday,
December 4, 2017 in the presence
of his family. He is survived by
five daughters, two sons, a host
of grandchildren, great-grandchildren. On Thursday, December 14
services will be held at First Baptist Church of Glenarden, 3600 Brightseat Rd.,
Landover, MD, Viewing 10 a.m. until time
of service 11 a.m. Interment Smyrna Baptist
Church Cemetery, Springfield, SC.
KANE
Reverend Monsignor WILLIAM J. KANE
February 27, 1934 - December 8, 2017
Born in Washington DC.
He is survived by his
niece, Patricia W. Newhall
of Salem, MA. He studied at Maryknoll Seminary
and then Our Lady of
Angels Seminary, Niagara,
New York. He was ordained to the Priesthood
on May 28, 1960 at the Cathedral of Saint
Matthew the Apostle, Washington, DC. His
first assignment as Parochial Vicar was at St.
Bartholomew Parish, Bethesda, MD in 1964,
he was appointed Associate Chaplain at the
Catholic Student Center at the University of
Maryland, and then as Chaplain in 1967. In
1973, Monsignor Kane was Director of Campus
Ministry and then to Director of Priest Personnel in 1986. Monsignor Kane was appointed
Vicar General, Moderator of the Curia and
Chancellor of the Archdiocese in 1988. In
1994, he was appointed Pastor at Little Flower
Parish, Bethesda, MD, where he served until
his retirement in 2004 and continued there in
residence until his death.
The Vigil will be held on Wednesday, December
13, from 3 p.m. until 6:45 p.m., followed by
Vigil Mass at 7 p.m. at Church of the Little
Flower, 5607 Massachusetts Ave., Bethesda,
MD 20816 and where Mass of Christian Burial
will be offered on Thursday, December 14 at
10 a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be made to Church of the Little Flower Parish.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
KENEALY
Dr. STEPHEN J. KENEALY
Passed away on December 10, 2017, at Alexandria Hospital, surrounded by his loving family.
He was an adored Poppop to Ryan, a treasured
father to James and Meghan, father-in-law to
Natalie, brother to Larry and a loving husband
to Joanne for 46 years. Born on October
25, 1948, in Plymouth, MA to Edward and
Elizabeth Kenealy, Dr. Kenealy attained the
rank of Captain in the U.S. Coast Guard, served
at the Government Accountability Office and
was CEO at GRA, Inc. Dr. Kenealy served on
the Alexandria School Board where he was
instrumental in opening the new building for
T.C. Williams High School. He also taught at the
University of Maryland University College. Dr.
Kenealy loved the ocean, was an avid golfer,
reader, and motorcycle rider. Services will be
held at the Everly-Wheatley Funeral Home in
Alexandria, VA on Friday, December 15, 2017
with visitation beginning at 10 a.m. followed
immediately by a service at 11 a.m. In lieu of
flowers, the family requests that donations be
made to the Scholarship Fund of Alexandria in
Memory of Stephen J. Kenealy.
TUCKER
On Monday, December 11, 2017,
of Chevy Chase, MD. Beloved husband of Deanna H. Paprzycki; loving father of Deborah Nelson
(Stephen), Kim Bejeck and William Bejeck
(Beth). Also survived by six grandchildren and
two great-grandchildren. Relatives and friends
may call at the HUNTT FUNERAL HOME, 3035
Old Washington Rd., Waldorf, MD, Thursday,
December 14, 2017 from 3 to 7 p.m., where
funeral service will be held Friday, December
15, 2017 at 10 a.m. Interment Fort Lincoln
Cemetery, Brentwood, MD. In lieu of flowers,
the family requests donations be made to the
charity of your choice.
www.hunttfunerals.com
PAYNE
KATHY L. PAYNE
Entered into eternal rest on Wednesday,
December 6, 2017 following a long battle with
cancer. She is survied by her beloved niece,
Crystal Sharpe. She was preceded in death by
her parents, Vincent and Stella Payne; and a
sister, Bonnie Sharpe. She leaves to cherish
her memory, a host of relatives and friends.
Visitation will be held on Friday, December 15,
at 10 a.m.; followed by funeral services at 11
a.m. at First Mt. Zion Baptist Church, 16622
Dumfries Rd., Dumfries, VA 22025.
RAY
MORLEY
SARAH E. BROWN
Sarah E. Brown, of Washington, DC, passed
peacefully while at home under hospice
care on December 1, 2017. She was born
August 25, 1934 in Houston, TX, where she
also grew up. Sarah was a retired science
teacher who taught in DC Public Schools for
over 20 years.
She was preceded in passing by her oldest
daughter, Kirsten V. Brown. She leaves
behind her loving husband, Dr. William
Brown, Jr.; two daughters, Kecia Brown and
Kolette Brown, M.D.; one son, Karlton W.
Brown; two granddaughters, Sarah Nia R.
Coleman and Kiara E.P. Coleman; and many
other relatives and friends.
STEPHANIE MURIEL SMITH
Peacefully passed away on December 6, 2017
at home in Seat Pleasant, Maryland after a
strong battle with ovarian cancer at the age of
59. Stephanie was born on September 1, 1958
in Washington, DC to Mary Irene Smallwood
Smith and the late Charles Elwood Smith.
Left to cherish her memory are her mother,
Mary Irene Smith; daughter, Reena Smith; sisters, Carolyn Smith and Gail Smith Alexander
and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, and a
lifetime of good friends.
A Memorial and reception will be held on
Sunday December 17 from 1 to 4 p.m. at
Advent Funeral Home, 9013 Annapolis Rd.,
Lanham, MD 20706.
www.adventfuneral.com
The family will receive friends on December
16, 2017 from 10 a.m. until time of service,
11 a.m., at Grace Episcopal Church, 1607
Grace Church Rd., Silver Spring, MD.
PAPRZYCKI
MILLER
ANTON S. MILLER, SR. "Bud"
Resident of Annapolis MD, passed away
on December 6, 2017 at age 83. Carol
was born in Massillon Ohio and lived in
Falls Church, VA for 42 years. Carol is
preceded in death by her parents Grace
and Edward Vogt; sisters Ellen and Janet;
and by her second husband Henry Ross.
Carol is survived by her sons Douglas Irvin
of Annapolis, MD and Bruce Irvin of Davidsonville, MD; and five grandchildren, Storrie, Alders, Isla, Jack and David. Visitation
will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. on Thursday,
December 14 at the Hardesty Funeral
Home, 12 Ridgely Avenue, Annapolis, MD.
Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. on
Friday, December 15 at St. Anne’s Episcopal
Church, Church Circle, Annapolis, MD. A
reception will follow the funeral. In lieu of
flowers, memorial donations can be made
to St. Anne’s Episcopal Church, 199 Duke
of Gloucester St., Annapolis, MD 21401.
Online condolences may be placed at
www.hardestyfuneralhome.com
A Scholarship fund has been established
in Sarah E. Brown's name through Maine
Avenue Ministries. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the scholarship in her
name through Maine Avenue, Inc., PO Box
70234, Washington, DC 20024.
www.mcguire-services.com
EDWARD EUGENE PAPRZYCKI
VIVIAN IOLA JARVIS
Passed away quietly December 6, 2017 from
congestive heart failure at the age of 88.
Vivian was born December 16, 2017, 1928 near
Charlottesville, Virginia. Vivian worked for the
U.S. Post Office until she retired.
She was preceded in death by her husband
Martin B. Jarvis, Sr. and daughter Marsha Kay
Jarvis-Rorer.
She is survived by her sons Martin B. Jarvis,
Jr. and Gregory L. Jarvis, also daughter Dawn
Marie Jarvis-Cain. She is also survived by her
three grandchildren and five great grandchildren. Also, her brother Archie Crawford and
numerous family members.
Services will be held at Fairfax Memorial Funeral Home, 9902 Braddock Rd., Fairfax VA 22032.
A visitation for family and friends will be held
on Friday December 15, 2017 from 5 p.m.
to 8 p.m. The funeral service will be held
on Saturday December 16, 2017 at 10 a.m.
Following the service, entombment will take
place at Fairfax Memorial Park where she will
be joining her beloved husband.
For further information please visit:
www.fairfaxmemorialfuneralhome.com
B7
RE
DEATH NOTICE
Janet Trevette Babcock Hawkins, who went
by Trevette, died peacefully in her home
on December 6, 2017, in Manassas Park,
Virginia. She was 75.
Trevette was born on July 19, 1942, in
Jacksonville, Florida, to Allen Seaman Babcock and Emilie May Lockwood. She graduated from Palm Beach High School in West
Palm Beach, Florida, and attended the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida. She
married at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in
West Palm Beach, Florida, in 1963 and the
couple welcomed their only child, Billy, in
1964. The family lived in South Florida and
Northern Virginia.
EZ
FRANCENIA ELIZABETH TUCKER
On Monday, December 4, 2017. Loving wife of
Freddie Tucker, Jr.; devoted mother of Deitra
Tucker, Monica Johnson, Leslie Rexrode (Kenneth), Tameesha Tucker and Malawi Tucker
(Devan). Also survived by one brother, four
sisters, 12 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends.
Preceded in death by her parents, Emma and
Emmett Swayne, two sons, Freddie Tucker,
III and Gilbert Tucker; and brother, Ronald
Swayne. Services will be held on Friday,
December 15 at the First Baptist Church of
Glenarden, 3600 Brightseat Rd., Landover, MD.
Visitation, 10 a.m.; service, 11 a.m. Interment
Harmony Memorial Park.
WHITE
HARRISON
YVONNE OCTAVIA WHITE (Age 76)
WUERTHNER
CARL WALTER WUERTHNER
On Monday December 4, 2017. Beloved husband of the late Rose Marie Wuerthner. Loving
father of Catherine Rose (Eric) Schmader,
Stephen Christian (Dorina) Wuerthner, David
Alan Wuerthner and Matthew Wayne Wuerthner; dearest grandfather of Zachary, Valerie,
Lauren, Wayde and Lindsay. Visitation will be
held at Ft. Lincoln Funeral Home, 3401 Bladensburg Rd., Brentwood, MD. on Friday December
15 at 12:30 p.m. until time of service 1:30
p.m. Interment Ft. Lincoln Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers Memorial Contributions may be made
to Meals on Wheels of Takoma Park 7410
New Hampshire Ave., Takoma Park, MD 20912.
IN MEMORIAM
NICKENS
JOWAVA M. LEGGETT HARRISON
Departed this life on Friday, December 8, 2017.
She is survived by her husband, Nathaniel F.
Harrison, Jr.; two children, Yaminah LeggettWells and Kamuzu Saunders; two sisters, two
brothers, five grandchildren and a host of other
relatives and friends.
Services will be held on Thursday, December
14, visitation, 10 a.m.; funeral service to follow,
11 a.m. at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1500 - 9th
St., NW. Further services and interment will be
held in Greenwood, LA.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be made to the Dr. Jowava Morrow Scholarship,
www.federalcityfoundation.org. Services provided by JOHN T. RHINES FUNERAL HOME.
Departed this life on Tuesday, November 28,
2017. She leaves to cherish her memory her
husband, Tyrone, and four children, Samuel,
Debra, Yvonne and Kevin. Viewing will be
held at FORT LINCOLN FUNERAL HOME, 3401
Bladensburg Rd., Brentwood, MD on Thursday,
December 14 from 12;30 p.m. until time of
service, 1:30 p.m. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
www.fort-lincoln.com
ZIEPOLT
HUMPHREY
THOMAS WILLIAM RAY
WILLIAM EVERETT MORLEY "Bill"
(Age 74)
Of Silver Spring, Maryland, passed away peacefully at home on November 5, 2017, after a year
long battle with cancer.
Born in Chicago on November 14, 1942, and
raised from the age of 2 in Arden, Delaware,
Bill attended the Arden School and P.S. DuPont
high school before graduating from the University of Maryland in 1964. After earning both
a JD and MBA at the George Washington
University, Bill spent 30 years as an attorney
with the Securities and Exchange Commission,
where he was recognized numerous times
for his work, particularly as a mentor to new
attorneys. He retired in 1999.
Unique in his equal devotion to sport and
the arts, Bill was a long time athletic booster
and season ticket holder at the University of
Maryland as well as a regular patron of theater
in Washington, New York and London. He
enjoyed European travel with special interest
in Great Britain, followed Formula One racing
and was an avid reader—his favorite reading
spot being a beach chair on annual family
vacations to Long Beach Island, New Jersey.
Thomas W. Ray “Tommy”, 95, of Germantown,
MD died Saturday, December 9, 2017 at Morning Glory Asbury. Born March 28, 1922, in
Gaithersburg, MD, son of the late Bessie Ridgely Ray and William Ray. He was the beloved
husband to the late Hazel Ray for 62 years.
Thomas is survived by his sister Louise Ray
residing in Gaithersburg and longtime friends
Sandra K. Wills and Frances Kennedy. He is
predeceased by his siblings Guy, John, Herb
Ray, and Isabelle Powell.
Tommy graduated from Richard Montgomery
High School, served in the U.S. Navy, and retired
from C&P Telephone Company.
A memorial service will be held at The Wilson
Health Care at the Ebinger Chapel, 301 Russell
Ave, Gaithersburg, MD, Friday, December 15,
2017 at 11 a.m. Interment will be private at
Parklawn Memorial Park. In lieu of flowers
memorial contributions may be made to Montgomery Hospice Casey House or Asbury
Endowment Fund in Gaithersburg. Please view
and sign family guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
RICHARDSON
ROBERT CHARLES ZIEPOLT "Bob"
(Age 100)
AUDREY S. HUMPHREY
TYJUANA G. NICKENS
June 13, 1952 ~ December 13, 2012
Our hearts were shattered,
the day God called your name.
Five years have come upon us,
and we still feel the same.
Death leaves a heartache, no one can heal,
Love leaves a memory, no one can steal.
We love you and miss you,
Your Family
DEATH NOTICE
BAUGHMAN
Peacefully was called home to be with the
Lord on Friday, December 8, 2017.She was the
beloved mother of Theodore R. Lewis. She is
also survived by three grandchildren; six greatgrandchildren; one sister, Mary L. Lewis; one
son-in-law, nieces; nephews; her Grace Apostolic Church family; other relatives and friends.
Visitation will be held on Saturday, December
16, 2017 from 9 a.m. until hour of service 11
a.m. at Grace Apostolic Church, 4417 Dix St.,
NE, Washington, DC. Interment will take place
on Monday, December 18, 2017 at 11 a.m. at
Mt. Olivet Cemetery, 1300 Bladensburg Road
NE Washington, DC. Services by BIANCHI.
JACKSON
Bill was the son of William Arthur Morley and
Cosette Groff Morley of Arden, Delaware, who
predeceased him along with his sister, Cosette
Morley. He is survived by brothers, Kenneth
Morley (Virginia) and Roger Morley (Irene), both
of Wilmington, Delaware. He is also survived
by his four nieces, Erin Stancill (Shawn), Jill
Briggs (Brandon), Megan Morley and Lynn Zeien
(Christopher); his nephews, Andrew Morley
and Christopher Morley (Danielle) as well as
cousins Sherod Cooper (Janet), Everett Cooper
(Karen) and George Morley (Pat). Special recognition is deserved by Sherod and Janet Cooper,
who became a second family to Bill from the
time he attended the University of Maryland.
A thoughtful and generous son, brother and
uncle whose birthday cards were always on
time, Bill will be missed. Services will be private
with interment at the Arden Memorial Garden.
In lieu of flowers, contributions to your favorite
charity are a welcome way to honor Bill’s
memory.
NOLAN
EILEEN PATRICIA NOLAN (Age 78)
Died on December 5, 2017, as a result
of Alzheimer’s, in Raleigh, North Carolina,
where she had been living since 2015.
Eileen was born on June 4, 1939 in Bronx,
New York to Patrick and Beatrice Colleran.
She attended Sacred Heart grade school
and; Aquinas High, in the Bronx and graduated from St. Thomas Aquinas College in
Sparkill, New York in 1963 where and took
her holy vows with The Dominican Sisters
of Sparkill Community. She served as an
elementary school teacher and served as
a group mother for the boys of St. Agnes
Home and School during her time as a
Sister until 1972.
After leaving Sparkill and religious life,
Eileen moved to Washington DC where she
resided for more than 40 years on Capitol
Hill in Seward Square S.E. She was active
in the community and had a smile for all
she met. Eileen retired as the Director of
Food Services for The Dominican House of
Studies in Washington, DC in 2010, after 29
years of service, where she was a friendly
face and faithful servant to many living at,
and passing through the House of Studies.
Eileen was a long-time active parishioner
at Saint Peter’s Catholic Church, where she
served as a lector. For many years, along
with her friends, she also organized and ran
the annual Saint Patrick’s Day Irish Dinner,
celebrating her beloved Irish heritage and
providing food and fun for all who attended.
With friends in Washington and beyond,
Eileen travelled to many places, including
Ireland, and made wonderful memories.
She also took annual trips with her sisters,
cousins and other family members. Eileen
graciously welcomed frequent out of town
visitors of family and friends to her home.
Eileen is survived by her two sisters Catherine Nolan of North Kingstown, Rhode Island,
and Maureen Weyrauch (Sonny) of Marco
Island, Florida. She is also survived by her
husband Eugene Nolan of Owego, New
York, ten nieces and nephews and 21 great
nieces and nephews.
A Pontifical Mass of Christian Burial will be
held Saturday, December 16, 2017 at 11
a.m. at Saint Peters Catholic Church, 313
2nd St. SE, Washington, DC 20003 [saintpetersdc.org] with a visitation before the
Mass from 10 to 11 a.m.
In lieu of flowers memorial donations can
be made to The Dominican Sisters of
Sparkill: www.sparkill.org
On Monday, December 11, 2017.
Beloved husband of the late Emily
A. Ziepolt; loving father of Robert
A., James A., and Elsie M. Ziepolt;
brother of the late Viola Jewell;
grandfather of Charles, Patrick,
and the late Stephanie. Relatives
and friends may call at Bogwardt Funeral
Home, 4400 Powder Mill Road, Beltsville, MD
Friday, 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral will be held
at St. John Episcopal Church, 11040 Baltimore
Avenue, Beltsville, MD on Saturday, December
16, at 11 a.m. Interment church cemetery.
Memorials made to Arc of Prince George’s
County, 1401 McCormick Drive, Largo, MD
20714 or Hospice of the Chesapeake.
www.borgwardtfuneralhome.com
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
HARRY A. RICHARDSON, SR.
Departed this life on Friday, November 10,
2017. Born in Washington, DC on January 9,
1927, he was the son of the late Julian and
Mary Richardson.
He was an Army veteran and worked for
many years in law enforcement. He retired as
the Chief of the Protective Services Branch
at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in
Washington, DC.
He is survived by his wife of 30 years, Joy;
his three sons, Michael, Sr. (Valencia), Donald
(Nora) and Harry, Jr. "Buddy" (Natasha); five
grandchildren, Michael, Jr., Michael C. (Lanette), Tosha, Christian and Marley; and three
great-grandchildren, Kamal, Gabriel and Nia;
and two sisters, Rosemary Gleaton and Ernestine Doby.
A Masonic Service will be held at 9 a.m.
on Thursday, December 14 at the MarshallMarch Funeral Home, 4308 Suitland Road,
Suitland, Maryland. Following by the interment
at 11 a.m. at the Maryland Veterans Cemetery,
11301 Crain Highway, Cheltenham, Maryland.
www.marshallmarchfh.com
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
CHARLES ALFRED BAUGHMAN (Age 96)
Of Oakton, VA, passed away on Friday, December 8, 2017. Beloved husband of the late
Ruby F. Baughman; devoted father of Sharon
E. O’Connor (Bryan) and Cheryl Stull; brother
of Christine Malone (Mahlon); grandfather of
Amy O’Connor, Kari Huber, Tim Stull and Megan
Stull. Also survived by four great-grandchildren. He was a lifelong resident of Fairfax
County and a graduate of Fairfax High School
and was born on a farm on Blake Lane in
Oakton. He was a World War II Veteren serving
in the 8th Airforce.
Funeral services will be held at Fairfax Baptist
Church, 10830 Main St., Fairfax, VA on Friday,
December 15, 2017 at 1 p.m. Interment will
follow at Flint Hill Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to the Wounded
Warrior Project. The online guestbook is available at
www.moneyandking.com
PRINCE
BLACKWELL
CURRENT 2017 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
Color
3" - $502
4" - $545
5" - $680
-----SUNDAY
Color
3" - $535
4" - $621
5" - $770
6"+ for ALL color notices
$160 each additional inch wkday
$186 each additional inch Sunday
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
TED PRINCE
LTC, U.S. Army (Ret.)
CAROLYN C. BLACKWELL (Age 69)
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices
at 202-334-4122.
DIANE JACKSON
On Saturday, December 9, 2017 Diane Jackson
of Forestville, MD. She leaves to cherish her
memory a devoted sister, Brenda Wooten; one
brother, Carroll Jackson; four special nieces,
Carnation Wooten, Jacqueline Chase, Quatishia
Jones (Roderick) and Angela Gaymon-Wilson
(Mark); a special sister, Jeannette Sampson; a
special cousin, Bishop Herbert Jackson (Patricia). She is also survived by a host of other
relatives and friends. Family will receive friends
on Friday, December 15, 2017 at Bibleway
Temple, 1100 New Jersey Ave., NW, Washington, DC from 10 a.m. until time of funeral
service at 11 a.m. Bishop Ronald Demery, Eulogist. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery, Brentwood, MD. Arrangements by Strickland Funeral
Services.
www.stricklandfuneralservices.com
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
Peacefully on Friday, December 8, 2017 at Fair
Oaks Hospital, Fairfax, VA. She survived by her
husband, Edwin Blackwell, Warrenton, VA; two
daughters, Kim (Lester) Parker and Cathy Blackwell of Remington, VA; three sisters, Pamela
Bridgett and Eunice Kim Moore of Warrenton,
VA and Charlotte Slaughter of Remington, VA;
three brothers, J.P. Carter III of Warrenton,
VA, Steve Carter of Bealeton, VA and Earl M.
Carter of Clinton, MD and three grandchildren.
Family will receive friends on Friday, December
15 from 11 a.m. until 12 noon service time
at Faith Christian Church, 6472 Duhollow Rd.,
Warrenton, VA. 20187 Rev. George Coghill,
eulogist. Interment Bright View Cemetery, Warrenton, VA. Online condolences may be made
to:
www.joynesfuneralhome.com
On Sunday, December 10, 2017 of Alexandria,
VA. Beloved husband of Margie Sue Prince;
father of Larry Ray Prince (Billie Jo), Charles
Steven Prince, Vicki Lynn Prince-Johnson
(Michael) and Jeffery Lee Prince (Patty); brother
of Charles Ray Prince (Barbara) and Winnie
Mattheiss (Bill); grandfather of Megan, Jennifer,
Savana-Sue, Kimberly, Dakota, Jacob, Jenny,
Hunter and the late Alex; great-grandfather
of Jaxon and Shayna. Relatives and friends
may call at Jefferson Funeral Chapel, 5755
Castlewellan Dr. Alexandria, VA on Friday,
December 15, 2017 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6
to 8 p.m. Funeral service at Groveton Baptist
Church, 6511 Richmond Hwy., Alexandria, VA
on Saturday at 11 a.m. Interment Arlington
National Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contributions may be made
to Groveton Baptist Church. Please view and
sign the guestbook online at:
www.jeffersonfuneralchapel.com
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque.
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
B8
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
A chilly day in store
We are likely to have wind chills in
the single digits to start the day, and
winds remain strong and gusty in
the morning. Skies are partly to
mostly clear, with high temperatures
ranging from near 30 to the mid-30s. Wind chills
should rise to the mid-20s by late afternoon as
the winds weaken. Temperatures are likely to be
below freezing shortly after sunset, and lows
reach the mid-teens to low 20s in most spots.
Today
Partly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Thursday
Partly sunny
Friday
Mostly cloudy
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Saturday
Partly sunny
Sunday
Mostly cloudy
OFFICIAL RECORD
Monday
Cloudy
Temperatures
36° 26
45° 27
40° 30
43° 30
45° 39
54° 39
FEELS*: 24°
FEELS: 37°
FEELS: 36°
FEELS: 38°
FEELS: 41°
FEELS: 52°
CHNCE PRECIP: 0%
P: 25%
P: 25%
P: 5%
P: 15%
P: 35%
WIND: WNW 12–25 mph
W: NW 8–16 mph
W: S 4–8 mph
W: SSW 7–14 mph
W: ESE 6–12 mph
W: SSE 4–8 mph
°
°
°
°
°
NATION
Harrisburg
31/23
Hagerstown
33/27
Davis
26/23
Su
High
Low
Normal
Philadelphia
32/28
Charlottesville
39/31
Sa
Weather map features for noon today.
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
34/24
Dover
35/26
Cape May
Annapolis
35/32
36/30
OCEAN: 53°
Washington
36/31
ACTUAL
FORECAST
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
49° 1:46 p.m.
41° 1:00 a.m.
48°/33°
71° 1873
13° 1987
46° 1:47 p.m.
37° 8:00 a.m.
47°/28°
72° 1979
9° 1988
47° 2:12 p.m.
39° 5:00 p.m.
46°/29°
71° 2015
10° 1988
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +2.2° yr. to date: +2.9°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Ocean City
34/30
OCEAN: 45°
Lexington
37/30
Richmond
39/30
Norfolk
41/31
Virginia Beach
40/33
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 49°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
40/35
OCEAN: 49°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
0.28"
1.30"
35.38"
37.99"
0.0"
2.0"
Trace
0.34"
1.30"
40.23"
39.88"
Trace
4.0"
0.00"
0.42"
1.41"
37.75"
39.92"
0.0"
2.8"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
2 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, cold, partly sunny, a flurry. High 26–30.
Wind west 15–25 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy, up to an inch
of snow late. Low 19–23. Wind west 10–20 mph. Thursday,
partly sunny, flurries. High 26–30. Wind west 7–14 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny, windy, cold. High
34–41. Wind west 12–25 mph. Tonight, partly cloudy,
cold, a snow shower. Low 29–35. Wind west 10–20 mph.
Thursday, partly sunny, not as cold. High 43–52. Wind west
12–25 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, partly sunny, colder,
breezy. Wind west 8–16 knots. Waves 2 feet or less. • Lower Potomac
and Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly sunny, breezy, cold. Wind west
12–22 knots. Waves 1–2 feet on the Potomac, 2–3 feet on the
Chesapeake.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls will be
around 3.0 feet and holding nearly steady Thursday. Flood stage at
Little Falls is 10 feet.
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
F
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
4:08 a.m.
10:58 a.m.
4:35 p.m.
11:39 p.m.
Annapolis
1:06 a.m.
7:26 a.m.
2:10 p.m.
8:08 p.m.
Ocean City
3:48 a.m.
10:05 a.m.
3:59 p.m.
10:12 p.m.
Norfolk
5:51 a.m.
12:03 p.m.
6:09 p.m.
none
Point Lookout
3:34 a.m.
10:01 a.m.
4:36 p.m.
9:49 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Camarillo, CA 87°
Low: Embarrass, MN –15°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
25/17/sf
54/30/s
42/29/c
49/36/s
65/41/pc
34/24/pc
47/34/pc
53/35/s
41/29/c
30/24/c
31/21/pc
22/12/sf
22/8/sn
52/37/s
38/33/pc
48/32/s
47/25/pc
36/18/sn
42/23/pc
27/23/sn
74/41/s
54/26/pc
Tomorrow
24/10/sf
49/24/s
33/23/c
55/34/s
64/37/s
41/20/pc
47/34/s
54/30/s
37/24/c
34/24/c
31/18/s
22/15/sf
18/6/c
62/38/s
37/21/c
55/31/s
35/23/pc
30/22/c
32/19/pc
27/11/sf
59/35/s
42/20/sf
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
43/22/c
26/10/sn
61/38/s
35/17/c
32/14/sf
29/20/pc
80/69/pc
63/43/pc
44/21/pc
62/37/s
58/41/s
55/26/s
65/45/s
63/33/s
81/53/s
49/29/pc
57/35/s
70/48/s
33/16/sn
32/15/sn
53/33/s
63/45/s
32/27/pc
41/31/pc
37/25/c
22/11/sf
63/33/s
22/18/pc
28/18/c
29/10/s
79/69/s
66/42/s
34/22/sf
62/34/s
70/48/pc
42/28/c
67/39/s
50/29/s
79/53/s
40/25/pc
48/30/s
72/57/s
29/20/c
27/16/sf
45/26/pc
68/44/pc
34/22/sf
52/31/pc
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
67/34/s
48/25/pc
62/42/s
32/28/pc
75/47/s
29/21/sn
29/13/pc
47/34/pc
30/21/s
43/33/s
50/24/s
39/30/s
60/34/s
55/28/pc
83/75/pc
39/24/c
76/49/s
61/45/s
86/74/pc
47/35/pc
33/23/c
22/13/sn
63/52/s
63/30/s
49/28/pc
40/24/sf
72/55/pc
39/22/sf
76/48/s
29/15/sf
28/9/s
48/33/pc
33/16/s
52/28/s
50/23/s
51/24/pc
64/35/s
39/27/pc
84/75/pc
38/23/c
72/50/s
64/45/s
87/75/pc
49/36/pc
32/26/c
19/13/sf
74/63/pc
47/27/pc
World
High: Argyle, Australia 109°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –39°
Dec 18
New
Dec 26
First
Quarter
Jan 1
Full
Jan 8
Last
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:18 a.m.
2:45 a.m.
6:49 a.m.
3:16 a.m.
4:10 a.m.
7:50 a.m.
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
81/70/pc
72/47/s
57/44/sh
83/61/pc
82/53/s
47/33/sh
26/10/s
51/44/pc
85/77/t
36/32/c
85/71/s
67/62/r
53/35/s
48/37/s
21/6/c
40/31/pc
37/29/pc
Set
4:46 p.m.
2:21 p.m.
4:21 p.m.
2:07 p.m.
2:37 p.m.
5:20 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
74/42/s
Amsterdam
44/37/r
Athens
66/53/s
Auckland
73/62/sh
Baghdad
69/43/s
Bangkok
92/78/pc
Beijing
33/18/pc
Berlin
38/35/c
Bogota
67/49/r
Brussels
45/36/r
Buenos Aires
89/62/pc
Cairo
72/55/pc
Caracas
73/65/pc
Copenhagen
38/35/sh
Dakar
77/67/pc
Dublin
43/35/r
Edinburgh
41/29/r
Frankfurt
40/37/sh
Geneva
40/39/sh
Ham., Bermuda 72/63/sh
Helsinki
36/30/c
Ho Chi Minh City 87/74/pc
Tomorrow
77/44/pc
41/33/c
66/50/pc
75/61/pc
68/42/s
89/75/pc
33/20/c
40/33/sh
69/44/r
42/34/sh
92/62/s
71/56/pc
75/64/pc
40/34/sh
76/68/c
41/33/sh
39/29/c
43/34/sh
46/40/sn
73/69/pc
34/29/c
90/74/pc
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
70/66/pc
59/39/sh
61/55/s
63/50/pc
76/55/pc
40/23/pc
81/76/sh
85/64/pc
89/77/pc
74/66/pc
57/53/pc
47/37/r
50/39/pc
88/76/pc
72/45/pc
17/3/sn
39/28/c
82/69/pc
79/55/s
72/50/pc
28/24/sf
12/0/sn
48/39/r
36/32/pc
72/62/c
63/39/pc
60/53/pc
60/49/pc
82/55/s
35/21/c
83/77/sh
85/61/s
88/76/pc
74/66/pc
61/55/pc
43/35/c
53/47/pc
88/73/pc
74/44/pc
11/2/pc
33/30/sn
85/70/pc
81/58/s
75/50/pc
29/25/sf
9/–4/s
46/37/sh
40/33/sh
85/70/s
78/44/pc
58/51/r
85/64/pc
89/57/s
44/39/pc
31/18/pc
49/44/c
88/76/pc
37/30/c
96/71/t
69/63/c
50/34/s
50/38/s
22/15/c
46/35/sh
40/32/c
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
MARYLAND
Horse farms join state’s e≠ort to court S. Korean businesses
BY P AMELA W OOD
AND D OUG D ONOVAN
John William Boniface Sr. bent
down and ran his fingers through
the grass at his Bonita Farm in
Harford County.
“Maryland has as good a grass as
Kentucky,” he told a group from
South Korea.
Boniface boasted that Maryland
held its first thoroughbred horse
race in 1721, when Kentucky was
still open prairie.
“Maryland is the place to buy
and breed horses,” he said. “When
they tell you all that you’ve got to be
in Kentucky, that’s [nonsense].”
Boniface is one in a group of
Maryland horse industry boosters
who spent several days this month
wooing the South Korean horse
farm owners and breeders. They
have been trying to persuade the
South Koreans to buy Maryland
horses — and to build lasting relationships with the state’s equestrian industry.
That mission, highlighted by a
tour of horse farms in Harford
County last week, is part of a larger
effort by Maryland officials to bolster economic ties with South Korea. To promote the initiative, they
have used the help of Yumi Hogan,
the South Korean-born wife of Gov.
Larry Hogan (R).
It was during a trade mission in
September with other state officials that Yumi Hogan persuaded
South Korean horse owners to visit
Maryland and explore the state’s
racing industry.
She also promoted other Maryland businesses — wearing clothes
from Baltimore’s Under Armour,
staying at a hotel managed by
Bethesda-based Marriott International and delivering Old Bay seasoning from Sparks-based McCormick & Co. to troops who guard the
South Korean side of the demilitarized zone. She met with South
Korea’s first lady, the prime minister and the speaker of the National
Assembly.
Yumi Hogan, a native of Naju,
South Korea, has become a valued
asset in the governor’s efforts to
expand international opportunities for Maryland companies and
to attract foreign firms and investors to create jobs in the state.
“She is the first Korean first lady
in the nation’s history,” said Benjamin Wu, the state’s deputy secre-
PHOTOS BY KENNETH K. LAM/BALTIMORE SUN
ABOVE: South Korean horse breeder Chul-Ro An, left, and livestock agent Jae-Hyong Yoo look at horses at Bonita Farm in Harford
County, Md. BELOW: Hyu-Gyun An, 9, right, and friends look at a horse at Murmur Farm in Darlington, Md., during a tour.
tary of commerce, who was part of
the delegation to South Korea in
September. “So she carries a lot of
celebrity status, especially in Korea.”
Montgomery County Executive
Isiah Leggett (D) led a delegation to
South Korea and China in October.
He returned with an agreement
between Montgomery College and
two Korean universities.
“Having her as a strong person
to lead the way really helps,” he
said. “She’s a great asset.”
The Hogans and other officials
also made a trip to South Korea in
2015. The itinerary included talks
with Asiana Airlines about flights
to Maryland and events to promote
a relationship between the University of Maryland and Hyundai Motor Co.
Maryland could use the help.
State exports declined from a record high of $12.2 billion in 2014, the
year before Hogan took office, to
$9.7 billion in 2016, state and federal figures show. Neighboring states
suffered similar but smaller declines as part of a national slowdown in exports in 2015 and 2016,
according to the Brookings Institu-
tion.
State officials consider South
Korea an ideal trade partner for
Maryland, in part because the
country has an export-heavy economy and robust government sup-
port for firms attempting international trade.
Seventeen people from South
Korea spent last week in Maryland.
On Dec. 5, they attended the FasigTipton horse sale at the Maryland
State Fairgrounds in Timonium,
buying eight mares.
They visited thoroughbred
farms in Harford County last
Wednesday, with more farm tours
in Howard and Carroll counties the
following day. Most of the funding
for the trip came from U.S. Livestock Genetics Export, a trade association.
South Korea is an expanding
market for thoroughbreds, and
Maryland wants to take part, said
Cricket Goodall, executive director
of the Maryland Horse Breeders
Association.
“The Korean market has grown,”
Goodall said. “The racing industry
has improved and gotten better.”
Jae-Hyong Yoo, president of a
South Korean company that helps
broker horse sales, said his country’s thoroughbred racing industry
is growing. Breeders look to buy
horses from the United States, Australia and England.
“We import 400 to 500 racing
horses to Korea,” he said.
The country has racetracks in
the capital of Seoul, the port city of
Busan and on the island of Jeju.
Some of the visitors to Maryland
were breeders from Jeju, Yoo said.
He said Maryland horses are
recognized as good for middledistance thoroughbred racing.
South Korean breeders had visited Maryland to attend a horse
sale in conjunction with the Preakness Stakes, but they had never
before been to the winter sale,
which included a mix of brood
mares, weanling horses that were
born this year and some racing-age
horses.
At Bonita Farm in Darlington,
workers walked three new stud
horses into the sunshine while
Boniface extolled their virtues. The
guests snapped cellphone pictures
and took notes. They marveled at
Dortmund, a tall and broad stallion with a striking chestnut coat
and a record of nearly $2 million in
winnings.
They also toured Murmur Farm,
where owner Audrey Murray
showed off stallions available for
stud and the barn where breeding
takes place. Her stallions include
Petionville, a 25-year-old that bred
with 25 mares last year, and
Blofeld, a 5-year-old horse named
for a James Bond villain that just
retired from racing.
Murmur Farm has sold about 25
horses to South Korean buyers
over the years. Murray said she has
some reservations about selling to
overseas buyers — mainly because
Maryland offers bonuses to breeders when their horses’ offspring
win races in Maryland.
Plus, Murray said, she likes
keeping some horses to race.
“We like to race,” she said. “It’s
much more exciting.”
Boniface, likewise, said the incentives for Maryland breeders
keep him focused primarily on
Maryland buyers.
Nevertheless, he has sold about
a half-dozen horses to Korean owners, plus a few others to buyers in
England, Brazil and Chile.
— Baltimore Sun
KLMNO
Style
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
SU
C
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
BOOK WORLD
MOVIES
CAROLYN HAX
Alec Baldwin may take his
version of President
Trump from Studio 8H all
the way to Broadway. C2
Before “Ferdinand” the
movie was the classic
book — a children’s story
that resonates today. C3
The National Film Registry
of the Library of Congress
adds “Superman” and 24
other movies. C6
Balancing home life as a
mom and work life as a
career woman can make
you feel stuck. C10
Chef turned abusive when alcohol flowed, workers say
BY M AURA J UDKIS
AND E MILY H EIL
The theme of the party was
Magic, Martinis and Mario, and
there was an awful lot of the latter
two. It was at Mario Batali’s buzzy
Los Angeles restaurant Osteria
Mozza, the week of the Oscars in
March 2010. Vanity Fair publisher
Edward Menicheschi was hosting
a private dinner for advertisers,
Former magazine staffers, restaurant employees
allege inappropriate actions by Mario Batali
and the restaurateur and chef was
the main attraction.
Holly Gunderson, the restaurant’s special events director, was
in charge of making sure the
night went smoothly. It was a
difficult task, she says, considering that Batali had arrived late,
bleary-eyed, off-kilter in his gait,
slightly slurring his words and
more ruddy-faced than usual —
apparently drunk.
As she escorted the chef to
greet his guests, he turned to
Gunderson, she alleges, and
“looked me up and down, and he
said, you know, with a twinkle in
his eye, ‘I want to see you naked in
my hot tub back in the hotel.’ ” She
said a few people nearby “looked
at me like, ‘Oh, my God, I can’t
believe he said that about you.’ ”
When he walked inside, he
took selfies with guests, who were
enjoying a magic act and martinis. She said she had brushed off
the comment and tried to avoid
him the rest of the night, but he
found her later, while she was
leaning over a high-top table.
Batali, she alleges, walked by and
grabbed her in the crotch.
He put his hand “between my
legs, up and under, so his hand
went on my vagina outside of my
clothes. And then he moved his
hand backward. So, you know,
under my butt. And then continued walking.”
She said that no one else
seemed to notice the assault, and
she was so surprised that she did
nothing. A friend in whom she
had confided the same week confirmed details of her account to
The Washington Post.
Ever since he cooked his way
BATALI CONTINUED ON C2
BOOK WORLD
Elif Shafak’s
timely tale
of a wife in
Istanbul
BY
R ON C HARLES
Elif Shafak’s new novel reveals
such a timely confluence of today’s issues that it seems almost
clairvoyant. Sexual harassment,
Islamist terrorism, the rising tension between the faithful and the
secular, and the gaping chasm
between the rich and the poor —
all play out in the pages of “Three
Daughters of Eve.” That hyperrelevance is one of the reasons
Shafak is so popular in her native
Turkey and around the world.
The
author,
who now lives
in
London,
speaks in a
multivalent
voice that captures the roiling tides of diverse cultures.
And, of course,
as
readers
THREE
know from her
previous novDAUGHTERS
els “The ArchiOF EVE
tect’s ApprenBy Elif Shafak
tice” and “The
Bloomsbury.
Bastard of Is384 pp. $27
tanbul,”
it
helps that she’s
a terrifically engaging storyteller.
“Three Daughters of Eve” is an
ingenious act of compression
that works several decades into a
single evening. It takes place in
2016 on a spring day in Istanbul.
A wife and mother named Peri is
stuck in traffic on the way to a
fancy dinner party. A lifetime of
disappointment has rendered
her infallibly well-behaved. But
“like a magic wand in the wrong
hands,” Shafak writes, “the traffic
turned minutes into hours, humans into brutes and any trace of
sanity into sheer lunacy.” It’s the
kind of infuriating, enforced immobility that can drive a person’s
thoughts in strange directions.
Sitting behind the wheel, Peri
realizes “that she was capable of
killing someone.”
And then suddenly a suitable
candidate appears: A beggar
reaches through the car’s open
window and grabs her purse.
Without thinking, Peri dashes
out and pursues the thief — a
EDEL RODRIGUEZ FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Last call for the
boozy office bash
T
his year, you could arrive at your
company holiday party to find a
woman from human resources distributing drink tickets, two per head,
as if it’s communist Russia and we’re rationing trash red wine now.
Of course, you shouldn’t be surprised. Not
in the era of Harvey Weinstein.
Weinstein and the tidal wave of other bad
men accused of sexual harassment and assault have cast a long, dark shadow over the
American workplace. As party season descends, companies are nervously wondering
whether any of us can truly come together
After recent sexual
harassment scandals,
holiday parties become
more demure
BY
L AVANYA R AMANATHAN
and drink spiked egg nog without someone
who means to pat a colleague on the back
accidentally putting his hands inside her
blouse instead. (Which happened to Garrison Keillor. Even though it’s impossible.
Right, ladies?)
Weinstein and all the others — so, so many
others — are why corporate clients of all sizes
have been calling Tracy Billows, a Chicagobased labor and employment lawyer specializing in sexual harassment. Their questions:
“Should I have a holiday party? Alcohol or no
alcohol? Spouses or no spouses?”
HOLIDAYS CONTINUED ON C9
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C3
MUSIC REVIEW
In 2017, even the Jingle Ball is heavy
BY
KYLE GUSTAFSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Kesha, who performed at Hot 99.5’s Jingle Ball 2017 on Monday, declared, “I’m proud of who I am.”
C HRIS R ICHARDS
Kesha’s “Praying” is a gutsy,
gusting power ballad about surviving abuse — but when a
swarm of teens sang along to it at
Monday night’s Jingle Ball inside
Washington’s Capital One Arena,
it threatened to change shape.
“I’m proud of who I am,” Kesha
bellowed at the top of the second
verse, the context transforming
her testimony into a self-esteem
anthem for kids who haven’t
survived anything yet.
Or maybe they have. As much
as it pains us to think about it,
children live alongside us in this
cruel and unusual world, and
during Kesha’s big refrain, thousands upon thousands of young
voices joined in, as if they had
Solemn messages from
Kesha, Logic nonetheless
underline loving oneself
each been through something,
too. Childhood is hard. Girlhood
is harder.
And, sure, it’s easy to dismiss
the Jingle Ball — an annual
radio-pop revue hosted by Washington’s Hot 99.5 and its parent
company, iHeartRadio — as a
night of fluffy fa-la-la-la-la, but it
has always been deeply meaningful to its youngest attendees. And
that felt more apparent than ever
Monday night as a cast of rising
singers encouraged these young
listeners to get comfortable in
their own bodies.
For Julia Michaels, that meant
dancing through her sure-footed
hits as if she had accidentally
stepped into a bouncy castle. For
Camila Cabello, it meant strumming an electric guitar without
making much fuss about it. For
Halsey — who recently began
speaking up about her struggles
as a “white-passing” black woman — it meant swinging her new
braids to her surging hooks. All
together, it felt like a shift away
from the dazzling affirmations
popularized by Lady Gaga. You
no longer need a superstar to
dress like a space alien to tell you
that it’s okay to be yourself.
Was Charlie Puth finally being
MUSIC CONTINUED ON C4
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Alec Baldwin could take
his Trump to Broadway
“At some point,
we’ve got to
stop looking
like idiots to
the nation. I
love Alabama,
but we’ve got
to draw a line
in the sand.
We’re not a
bunch of
damn idiots.”
Donald Trump has been very good for
Alec Baldwin. Impersonating the president
has won the actor an Emmy, a book deal and
now maybe even a Broadway show.
In an interview with Howard Stern on
Monday, Baldwin revealed that his pouty
portrayal of Trump (of which the president,
as you know, is not a fan) could work on stage
as well as it has in Studio 8H and in his
satirical book about the Donald, “You Can’t
Spell America Without Me.”
“We may take the book and make it into a
one-man show on Broadway,” Baldwin said.
The actor added that longtime “Saturday
Night Live” head honcho Lorne Michaels
technically owns the rights to Baldwin’s
impersonation but that Michaels gave his
blessing for the book — and could do the
same for a Broadway version. Michaels is
producing SNL alumna Tina Fey’s Broadwaybound “Mean Girls.”
This wouldn’t be the first time a “Saturday
Night Live” interpretation of a U.S. president
has debuted on the Great White Way. Will
Ferrell famously took his bumbling version
of President George W. Bush to the New
York stage in 2009 in his one-man show,
“You’re Welcome America: A Final Night with
George W. Bush.” The play, penned by Ferrell
and writing partner Adam McKay, scored a
Tony nod.
J. LAWLER DUGGAN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The door whose lock was picked in the break-in into Suite 600 of the Watergate complex in 1972.
On the block: Watergate lock that was picked
I
t’s the lock that launched a twoyear investigation and took down a
president. And now more than
four decades later — and for a starting
bid of $50,000 — it can be a really
wonky conversation piece.
Nate D. Sanders Auctions will
auction off the four-pound brass lock
Thursday that burglars picked to bust
into the Democratic National
Committee’s headquarters at the
Watergate complex in 1972. The Nixon
administration’s attempt to cover up
the plot to bug the DNC offices would
come to be known as Watergate,
spawning the “-gate” trend of scandalnaming for generations to come.
Where has the lock been all this
time? Locksmith James Rednowers
first got hold of it in 1972, according to
the Los Angeles-based auction house
handling its sale. Rednowers had been
called in to replace the busted lock the
day after the break-in and decided to
keep the original — for the culture, we
assume.
Hall of Fame
basketball player
Charles Barkley,
urging Alabamians
not to vote for
Republican Senate
candidate Roy
Moore while
speaking at a final
campaign rally for
Democratic opponent
Doug Jones on
Monday night.
A few years later, Watergate
superintendent Jim Herrald asked
Rednowers for the lock as a memento.
Now the piece of history will head to
the highest bidder.
“Americans’ fascination with
Watergate has continued for nearly
five decades,” Nate Sanders, the
auction house owner, said in a
statement. “Historians and collectors
will be intrigued by this lock, which
symbolizes the downfall of the Nixon
administration.”
WILL HEATH/NBC
Alec Baldwin may give his impersonation of
President Trump a new platform.
Charles Barkley
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
Restaurant workers say
chef Batali groped them
BATALI FROM C1
into the rarefied ranks of celebrity
chefs, Batali, 57, has cultivated a
larger-than-life persona: the hedonistic master of excess who’s
always up for a good time. Even as
he opened dozens of restaurants
and racked up lucrative TV and
book deals (including for two
cookbooks he co-wrote with Post
multiplatform editor Jim Webster), partying was always part of
the job. After all, no one expects
the orange-Crocs-wearing “Molto
Mario” to work a crowd with the
demeanor of a teetotaling accountant. But the blurred lines
between the businessman and
the bon vivant might have been
his downfall: After four anonymous allegations of sexual misconduct were published by the
website Eater on Monday morning, Batali’s brand was thrown
into turmoil.
ABC asked him to step back
from co-hosting duties at his daytime talk show, “The Chew,” and
he no longer has managerial oversight of his 26 restaurants around
the world, though he remains a
co-owner. In the wake of the allegations, the Food Network announced it is putting plans to
relaunch his show, “Molto Mario,”
on hold.
In the statement to The Post,
Batali said: “I apologize profoundly to the people I have mistreated and hurt. The entire day
of events surrounding the party I
was the personification of idiocy,
a drunken and idiotic fool, with
no respect for the staff at Osteria
Mozza, the guests nor for the
restaurant itself. That behavior
was horribly wrong, shameful
and degrading and there are no
excuses. I wish I could have the
day back and do it right. I take full
responsibility for my deplorable
actions and am deeply sorry for
any pain, humiliation or anguish
I caused.” In a statement responding to the Eater allegations on
Monday, he seemed to acknowledge that, for him, the boundary
between work and play became
fuzzy. “We built these restaurants
so that our guests could have fun
and indulge, but I took that too
far in my own behavior,” he said.
M
agic, Martinis and Mario
has been a theme of Batali
parties, including some
that were fundraisers for his
foundation, for many years. At
the Vanity Fair party in March
2010, Batali had apparently started drinking hours before it started. Early in the afternoon, Vanity
Fair’s merchandising assistant at
the time, Ben Peryer, was tasked
with going to the Sunset Marquis
hotel to drop off cookbooks for
Batali to inscribe as gifts for the
guests. When he arrived, he says,
he found Batali poolside, apparently intoxicated — he “consumed
multiple drinks” in the 30 minutes Peryer spent with him — and
uninterested in signing any cookbooks. Peryer says the chef asked
him if he wanted a mojito, and he
demurred.
Again, he says, Batali pressured him, and he again declined.
And then, he says, the chef issued
what seemed like an ultimatum,
albeit a funny one: “He very forcefully screams, ‘Drink or die!’ ”
The young staffer realized he
wasn’t going to get his books
signed unless he followed the
command, so he ordered a mojito
and had a few sips, before leaving
the books, still unsigned, by Batali’s pool chair. Melanie Altarescu,
then the associated director of
integrated marketing for Vanity
Fair, and a supervisor recounted
that Peryer told them his story.
Later, Altarescu was waiting
for Batali to arrive. She was in
charge of organizing transportation for the VIPs that night and
was poised to greet the celebrity
chef when his car finally pulled
up. Batali “basically somersaulted out of the car,” Altarescu said.
“He just clearly was a disaster. But
having a great time.”
At the end of the night, Altarescu had the job of wrangling
him into his car, and when he did,
she says, he called out to her:
“You’re gonna get in the car, and
we’re gonna make out.” When she
declined, she says, he grabbed her
sleeve from the window and said,
“You’re making a big mistake. You
should get in the car, and we
should make out.” His grip wasn’t
hard enough to hurt her arm, she
says, and she broke away. She told
colleagues about the about the
experience, and Peryer and the
supervisor confirmed her account to The Post.
“It was super leery,” Altarescu
said. “It was not like a joke. It was
gnarly, and he seemed super-seri-
HENRY S. DZIEKAN III/GETTY IMAGES
From left, chef Anthony Bourdain, restaurateur Joe Bastianich and chef Mario Batali in 2010.
ous about it.”
Neither of the Vanity Fair employees complained formally
about Batali’s behavior, but they
say they did tell the supervisor.
“There was no formal complaint,
and this is the first we’re hearing
about it,” a spokeswoman for Vanity Fair said to The Post. Gunderson also did not complain (“If
there had been an HR department, I was not aware of it”) and
left the job a few weeks later
because she was offered a better
position at another restaurant. A
spokesman for B&B Hospitality
Group, the parent company of
Mozza and the other restaurants
Batali co-owns with Joe Bastianich, said the company at the time
had an HR director and a “strong
sexual harassment policy then in
place for reporting complaints.”
In a statement to The Post, the
company also said: “These accounts are appalling. . . . Mr. Batali is no longer involved in operations, and he has agreed to stay
away from the restaurants. The
company is reinforcing for our
employees that everyone deserves respect and a workplace
free of discrimination and harassment. In light of these reports, we
are continuing to assess our practices to make sure we have the
best policies in place to offer our
employees that environment.”
I
n addition to the people involved in the Vanity Fair party,
The Post spoke to two former
restaurant employees who allege
that Batali made inappropriate
and unwelcome physical contact
with them. “I apologize to the
people I have mistreated and
hurt,” Batali said in a statement to
The Post about each of the allegations. “Though I don’t remember
this specific account, there is no
question I have behaved terribly.
There are no excuses. I take full
responsibility and am deeply sorry for any pain, humiliation or
discomfort I have caused.”
One woman who worked for
Batali in the late 1990s and early
2000s said one incident occurred
in his New York restaurant Babbo, when the chef approached her
from behind. “As he walked by
me, he grabbed my ass hard,
squeezed, and kept [walking] and
didn’t say anything,” said the
woman, who worked then for
Batali in a management role and
spoke on the condition of anonymity because she still works in
the restaurant industry and fears
reprisal.
She confronted Batali about it
later, she said, and he brushed her
off. “He said, ‘What are you, a
lesbian?’ ” the woman recalled.
A second incident happened
when she was in a confined space
with Batali and needed him to
move so she could use the restroom. When she asked him to
allow her to get by, he stayed put.
“He said something to the effect
of, ‘If you want to get out, you
have to go over me,’ ” she said. She
wound up having to climb over
her boss, an awkward maneuver
that required her to straddle his
lap, she said.
She told her sister shortly after
each incident, and her sister confirmed the woman’s description
of the incidents to The Post.
Batali’s fame and his clout
within the restaurant industry
may explain why the women
didn’t speak out earlier about his
alleged behavior. Freelance food
writer Andrea Strong recalled
writing a feature story in Time
Out New York in the early 2000s
that Batali perceived to be a slight
to him. “He called me on my cell,
and he was in a rage,” she said.
“He was yelling and cursing at
me. He said, ‘I am waging a jihad
against you — you will never eat
in my restaurants. I am going to
take you down.’ ”
Her then-editor recalled that
Strong told her about the call
shortly after she said it happened
and described it similarly to The
Post.
The call left her shaken,
Strong said, though Batali never
followed through on his threats.
“I remember being very intimidated at the time,” she said. “I
remember how afraid I was,
thinking, ‘What does this mean
for my career?’ He’s a very powerful guy.”
T
o Batali, employees weren’t
just people on his payroll.
According to several former
workers, they were the drinking
buddies he expected to pal
around with the boss.
“Being willing and able to
drink and hang was an unofficial
job description,” said the woman
who alleged that Batali groped
her at Babbo.
Because he lives in New York,
Batali didn’t spend much time at
Mozza, Gunderson said, but when
he did, employees were expected
to stay after hours for drinks. Her
manager “basically said, ‘When
Mario Batali comes to town, it
would look bad if the managers
didn’t hang out with him and
drink with him.’ ”
A shift drink, or after-work
cocktail, is commonplace at many
restaurants, and employees fraternize at their own bars after
closing. But Batali is known for
excess. In Bill Buford’s “Heat,” a
look inside the restaurant Babbo,
a friend of the author’s reflected
on going out with the chef.
“This guy knows no middle
ground,” the friend told Buford.
“It’s just excess on a level I’ve
never known before — it’s food
and drink, food and drink, food
and drink, until you feel you’re on
drugs.”
In addition to his own restaurants, Batali liked to party at the
Spotted Pig, a West Village restaurant in which he has an ownership stake. A Tuesday report in
the New York Times detailed allegations against restaurant coowner Ken Friedman and included accounts of Batali’s hard-partying nights there. One manager
told the Times she saw, on a
security camera, Batali grope and
kiss a woman who appeared to be
unconscious.
Another woman, who worked
at the Spotted Pig in 2004, told
The Post she was working late one
night when Batali rolled in with
the DJ/musician Fatboy Slim,
also an investor in the restaurant,
for drinks. (Slim’s representative
did not respond to a request for
comment.) The woman’s thenroommate confirmed to The Post
that the woman told her about the
incident as soon as she got home.
“He said, ‘Have one of your
boys go get us cigarettes.’ He
meant a food runner,” said the
woman, who spoke to The Post on
the condition of anonymity because she feared career repercussions. When the runner fetched
the cigarettes, she presented
them to him. She says Batali
“looked at me, and smiled, and
dropped the cigarettes” — deliberately, she believes. She bent
over to pick them up.
“He grabbed my underwear,”
which was a thong, “and pulled
straight up. … I stood up really
quickly and I laughed nervously.”
She turned to Friedman, who told
The Post through a representative
that he did not recall the incident.
“I said, ‘Ken, Mario’s sexually harassing me!’ ” Friedman’s response, she said: “Get in f---ing
line.”
maura.judkis@washpost.com
emily.heil@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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RE
book world
‘Three Daughters’ is ripe for our times
believers,” Shafak writes, “she
would remain stuck in between.”
That metaphysical stasis
might sound cerebral or even
dull, but Shafak takes a passionate, athletic approach to the
novel of ideas. “Three Daughters
of Eve” illustrates Peri’s predicament in dramatic episodes that
eventually bring her to study at
Oxford. There she’s befriended by
two fellow students who compete
for her allegiance just as her
parents once did back home.
These three daughters from different parts of the world jokingly
refer to themselves as “the Sinner, the Believer, the Confused.”
Despite their differences,
they’re all captivated by a handsome religion professor, Dr.
Azur, who imagines he can inspire a new-old conversation
about faith that will transcend
sectarian conflicts. “A bit like
God himself,” Dr. Azur is determined to shift away from dogmatic arguments toward epistemological questions about the
very nature of divinity. For a
time, the story skirts close to
Rebecca Newberger Goldstein’s
brilliant novel “36 Arguments
for the Existence of God,” but I
kept wanting more depth from
Dr. Azur’s presentations. Finally,
I realized that’s the point: He’s a
classic master teacher in the
“Dead Poets Society” mode:
iconoclastic but gimmicky,
glazed with intellectuality but
essentially narcissistic. He’s just
the sort of magnetic figure to
enchant a naive young woman
like Peri, who writes in her
journal, “I would love to change
God. . . . Wouldn’t everyone in
the world benefit from that?”
What happens in Oxford and
how that idealistic student becomes, 15 years later, a dutiful
wife and mother in Istanbul is
the mystery that unfolds as we
shift between those two distinct
periods of Peri’s life toward a
crisis as shocking as it is revelatory. And in the process, Shafak
explores the precarious state of
Turkish politics, the evolving position of women in Islam, the
sexual ambiguities of college life,
and the most profound questions
of faith.
There are novels you want to
cherish in the sanctity of your
own adoration, and then there
are novels you feel impatient to
talk about with others. Press
“Three Daughters of Eve” on a
friend or your book club for a
great conversation about this
flammable era we live in now.
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
crazy, humiliating sprint that results in her getting attacked and
almost raped. But nothing about
that ordeal affects her like seeing
an old Polaroid fall out of her
purse during the chase. “It was
one of the few photos from her
time at Oxford,” Shafak writes.
“She could not afford to lose it.”
That opening — a strange mixture of slapstick and peril, immediacy and reminiscence — gives
way to a story structured in alternating chapters. In the present
day, we follow Peri on to the
dinner party, where she arrives
stained and disheveled but determined to dismiss everyone’s concern. That’s easy because the other guests are extraordinarily
wealthy and wholly self-absorbed.
With well-practiced restraint, Peri
listens to them
complain
about the poor,
the religious fanatics,
the
democratic reformers — in
other words,
about anyone
who might imElif Shafak
peril the fragile
privilege of their lives.
We soon learn that the pose of
being simultaneously within and
without has been Peri’s natural
state for most of her life. Every
other chapter draws us back to
Peri’s adolescence, when she was
growing up in a house torn
between her mother’s strict Muslim faith and her father’s equally
strident skepticism. But rather
than take sides in that familial
battle, Peri seeks a grand resolution. “She had come to believe
through some twisted logic of her
own that if she were to bring
together her mother’s Creator
and her father’s Creator, she
might be able to restore harmony
between her parents,” Shafak
writes. “With some kind of agreement as to what God was or was
not, there would be less tension
in the Nalbantoglu household,
even across the world.”
Spoiler alert: She does not
succeed.
But the story that develops
keeps circling around that struggle, moving from her parents’
domestic squabbles to the central
conundrum of theodicy: the challenge of reconciling an all-good,
all-powerful God with an oftenevil and chaotic world. Peri is
such a fascinating heroine because she remains intensely engaged in this debate but resolutely disinterested. “While some
people were passionate believers
and others were passionate non-
bookworld@washpost.com
THE WASHINGTON POST ILLUSTRATION/IMAGES BY ISTOCK
Ron Charles is the editor of Book
World.
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
BY
The quest for good books is
eternal, and with the hundreds of
books published each year, it’s
easy to overlook a few. This
month we feature three notable
titles that didn’t get the spotlight
when they hit shelves this year —
but shouldn’t be missed.
T
he narrator of Robin Sloan’s
Sourdough (MCD) is Lois, a
programmer at a San
Francisco start-up. Her company’s
goal is to make robotic arms so
good at tasks that they replace
workers. One day, sick of her daily
meal of slurry
— a liquid
dinner meant
to energize you
without all
those pesky
things like
carbs — she
orders spicy
soup and
sourdough
from a takeout place. For a time,
the food, and her relationship
with the two brothers who run the
business, are a small kernel of joy.
When visa problems cause the
brothers to return to Europe, Lois
is devastated. Their parting gift to
her is a culture of their special
sourdough starter and
instructions to keep it alive by
feeding it and playing it music.
With email guidance from her
friends, Lois begins to bake and
soon ends up in a secret world that
merges food and technology.
Sloan’s prose is sharp, and his
critiques of capitalism, Silicon
Valley and foodie culture are
finely cut.
K
arin Tidbeck’s Amatka
(Vintage) starts as so much
dystopian fiction does:
bleak, gray, disaffected. Vanja, a
government worker, travels from
Essre to a sister colony called
Amatka to do
consumer
research for
hygiene
products. Her
introduction to
her new city
and roommates
is slow and
heavy with
foreboding,
and it is here that we learn what
makes this world so. People must
engage in a ritual where they label
the objects around them; if not,
the fabric of reality could come
apart. Vanja, seemingly resigned
to her dull life, finds her curiosity
awakened in Amatka as she comes
to love and care for the people
around her. She soon learns about
a threat to the colony, and her
investigation and newfound
individualism could destroy
everything. Tidbeck excels in
drawing small details that send a
chill up the spine — and turn this
dystopian novel into a fine piece
of horror-weird fiction.
A
The masterful book behind the film ‘Ferdinand’ still resonates
BY
K AREN M AC P HERSON
The project began as a lark, an
author’s hasty effort to write a
children’s book manuscript for
his artist friend to illustrate. Yet
the resulting picture book, “The
Story of Ferdinand,” became an
immediate bestseller and cultural touchstone.
Both Adolf Hitler and Francisco Franco banned it. Gandhi and
Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt
admired it. Published in 1936, the
story of the peaceful, flower-sniffing bull written by Munro Leaf
and illustrated by Robert Lawson
is considered a classic of American children’s literature and has
never been out of print.
The book is now the basis for
the animated film “Ferdinand,”
which opens Friday in theaters,
with the main character voiced by
the wrestler-actor John Cena. (A
1938 Disney film adaptation won
an Academy Award.) There are
new characters, plot twists and
some slapstick humor, but the
film retains the “stay true to
yourself” message at the core of
the book. Perhaps it helps that
one of the screenwriters is Tim
Federle, who is an award-winning
children’s book author.
“ ‘The Story of Ferdinand’ is
one of several examples of how a
children’s book went out into the
pop culture and had an impact
far beyond the library world,”
said Leonard S. Marcus, children’s literature historian and
author of “Minders of Make-Believe: Idealists, Entrepreneurs,
and the Shaping of American
Children’s Literature.”
“It was an appealing story that
people could project their own
fantasies on.” And, Marcus added,
it “proved to be one of those rare
books openly appreciated by
adults as well as by children.”
Leaf wrote “The Story of Ferdinand” in less than an hour one
rainy fall afternoon as a gift to his
good friend Lawson. Contending
that “dogs, rabbits, mice and
goats had all been done a thousand times,” Leaf focused his
story on a Spanish bull named
Ferdinand who eschews fighting
for flower-sniffing, refusing to
fight even when forced to face the
matador in the ring. Instead,
Ferdinand sits down to enjoy the
fragrance of the flowers adorning
the hair of women spectators.
“It was one of those brainstorm
books,” said Anita Silvey, a children’s literature expert and au-
thor of “The Essential Guide to
Children’s Books and Their Creators.” “Leaf was the ideal picture-book writer. In the best
picture-book tradition, he keeps
it simple and allows both room
for the child’s imagination and
for the artist’s imagination.”
Illustrator Lawson’s masterful
black-and-white drawings perfectly complement Leaf’s text,
adding energy and humor to the
tale. In one famous example,
Lawson depicts Ferdinand’s favorite cork tree with bunches of
wine corks hanging among the
leaves. “That’s part of what works
so well — there is a complete
interplay between words and illustrations,” Silvey added.
The timing of the book’s publication — just months after the
start of the Spanish Civil War —
proved a boon to sales as both
sides excoriated it, while Hitler
called it “degenerate democratic
propaganda.” Others, including
the Roosevelts, were fans of the
book. Anne Carroll Moore, the first
president of the New York Public
Library’s children’s division, called
it an “effortless, happy collaboration . . . designed for sheer entertainment of the ageless.”
Leaf insisted he had written
the story of the gentle bull simply
to amuse children. In a New York
Times interview, Leaf said that
Ferdinand’s aversion to violence
merely manifested his “good
taste and strength of character,”
demonstrating that he was “just a
superior soul, a philosopher.”
Within a year of its publication, “The Story of Ferdinand” hit
the bestseller list, which also
included “Gone With the Wind.”
In 1938, Walt Disney Studios won
an Academy Award for its cartoon adaptation, “Ferdinand the
Bull.”
Leaf and Lawson collaborated
on two other books, including
“Wee Gillis,” winner of a Caldecott Honor in 1939. “The Story of
Ferdinand” never won an award,
but it remains a timeless favorite.
“Controversy sells books, but it
doesn’t keep a book in print,”
Silvey noted. “It’s not the controversy that made this book a classic. It’s a just a fabulous story, one
that children can really embrace,
the idea that ‘I need to be who I
am, not who others think I should
be.’ ”
bookworld@washpost.com
Karen MacPherson is the
children’s and teen services
coordinator for the Takoma Park,
Md., library.
E VERDEEN M ASON
fter the Flare, by Deji Bryce
Olukotun (The Unnamed
Press), starts as hard
science fiction but develops into
something more mythical. The
novel follows Kwesi Bracket, one
of the head engineers of the
Nigerian space
program.
Kwesi has a lot
to prove after a
solar flare
scrambled the
world order,
with South
America and
Africa the only
places with any
sort of sustained cyber prowess
and thousands of satellites about
to plummet to Earth. He lost his
wife and his job at NASA, and his
daughter is at Yale University,
which has been relocated to the
Caribbean. Bracket is responsible
for making sure the space
program can complete its
mission: rescuing a group of
astronauts trapped on an
international space station
plummeting to Earth. Beyond the
technological difficulties, Bracket
must navigate a political
conspiracy, a rebranded Boko
Haram and the emergence of a
mysterious and dangerous
creature. Though billed as a
sequel to the 2014 novel
“Nigerians in Space,” the book
stands on its own for new readers.
bookworld@washpost.com
“The Story of
Ferdinand,” first
published in
1936, has
inspired a new
animated film,
“Ferdinand.”
Everdeen Mason reviews science
fiction and fantasy every month for
The Washington Post.
LITERARY CALENDAR
TODAY 1 P.M. | Robert Dallek will
discuss “Franklin D. Roosevelt: A
Political Life” with historian Rebecca
Erbelding at the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Museum. 100 Raoul
Wallenberg Pl. SW. 202-488-0400.
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
12/13/17
7:00
7:30
8:00
◆ News
◆ Access
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
Mod Fam
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
◆ J’pardy!
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆
ET
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
14.1 WFDC (UNI) Enamorándome
◆
◆
Family
Feud
Family Feud
20.1 WDCA (MNTV)
◆ MotorWeek
22.1 WMPT (PBS) ◆ Business
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
32.1 WHUT (PBS) The Rock Newman Show
50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Goldbergs
66.1 WPXW (ION) Law & Order
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
The Wall
◆ Empire
◆ Goldbergs
◆ Speechless
◆ Survivor
Rey David
Fox 5 News ◆ Page Six
◆ Nature
Nature
France 24 Programming
Live From the Artists Den
◆ Riverdale
Law & Order
◆
10:00
10:30
Golden Globe 75th Anniversary Special
(9:01) ◆ Star
Fox 5 News at Ten
◆ Mod Fam
◆ Housewife ◆ Designated Survivor
◆ SEAL Team
◆ Criminal Minds
Mi marido tiene familia
Caer en tentación
Big Bang
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◆ NOVA
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NOVA
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Blue Eyes
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◆ Dynasty
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News
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◆
11:00
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◆ J. Fallon
News
News
The Final 5
◆ Kimmel
News
◆ Colbert
News
◆ Noticiero
Noticias
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Smiley
Finding Your Roots
The Churchmen
Democracy Now!
◆ Mom
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Law & Order: SVU
CABLE CHANNELS
RICHARD KNAPP/LIFETIME
Little Women: Terra’s Big House (Lifetime at 10) Home renovation
experts Cory McCrummen and Stephanie Ballard help Terra Jolé and her
husband, Joe Gnoffo, create their dream home on this new series.
Riverdale (CW at 8) Veronica
figures out Hiram has been hiding a
big secret from her and tensions
increase between Jughead and FP.
It’s the show’s midseason finale,
like the three others on this list.
Dynasty (CW at 9) Two new arrivals
throw the Carrington’s holiday
plans into disarray.
Modern Family (ABC at 9) Luke
and Alex come up with a business
scheme.
Designated Survivor (ABC at 10)
President Kirkman sends Emily and
Aaron to deal with extremists who
refuse to evacuate during a forest
fire.
SPECIALS
Golden Globes 75th Anniversary
Special (NBC at 9) “Will & Grace”
stars Eric McCormack and Debra
Messing highlight the award show’s
best moments.
The Fake News with Ted Nelms
(Comedy Central at 10) Former
“Daily Show” correspondent Ed
Helms delivers a fake news
broadcast full of satire.
RETURNING
The Librarians (TNT at 8) The
show about a group who protects
ancient artifacts is back for season
4.
Little Women: Atlanta
(Lifetime at 9) Season 4 premiere.
FINALES
Mr. Robot (USA Network at 10)
Elliot’s attempt to save Darlene hits
a snag.
The A-Word (Sundance TV at 10)
The family comes together for an
end-of-the-year show at Joe’s old
school.
LATE NIGHT
Conan (TBS at 11) Owen Wilson,
Noah Gardenswartz.
Daily Show (Comedy Central at 11)
Satya Nadella.
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Michael
Shannon, Alison Brie, Jaboukie
Young-White.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Nick Jonas,
Dennis Rodman, Jeezy, Tory Lanez.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Terry
Bradshaw, Yvette Nicole Brown,
John Legend, Sheila E.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Dwayne
Johnson, Jack Black, Tim Minchin.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) Sarah
Paulson, Judd Apatow, Grant
Morrison.
— Sarah Polus
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage
Storage
Ozzy & Jack’s
Storage Wars Storage Wars
A&E
(5:00) Movie: The Notebook Movie: This Christmas ★★ (2007)
Movie: A Christmas Carol ★★ (1984)
AMC
Big Fat Follow Ups
Big Fat Follow Ups
Big Fat Follow Ups
Big Fat Follow Ups
My Big Fat Pet Makeover
Animal Planet
(7:03) Movie: Madea’s Witness Protection ★★ (2012)
Movie: Peeples ★★ (2013)
BET
Housewives/NJ
Housewives/NJ
Housewives/NJ
Housewives/NJ
Watch
Housewives
Bravo
Gumball
King of Hill
Amer. Dad
Cleveland
Amer. Dad
Burgers
Burgers
Family Guy
Family Guy
Cartoon Network Gumball
Erin Burnett OutFront
Anderson Cooper 360
Anderson Cooper 360
CNN Tonight
CNN Tonight
CNN
Movie: The Hangover Part III ★★ (2013)
Fake News-Ted Nelms
Daily
Opposition
Comedy Central South Park
Homestead Rescue
Homestead Rescue
(10:06) Moonshiners
(11:06) Homestead Rescue
Discovery
Bunk’d
Raven
Andi Mack
Stuck/Middle Bizaardvark Raven
K.C. Under.
Liv-Mad.
Bizaardvark Raven
Disney
E! News
Total Divas
Total Divas
Total Divas
E! News
E!
NBA Basketball: Oklahoma City Thunder at Indiana Pacers (Live)
NBA Basketball: Charlotte Hornets at Houston Rockets (Live)
ESPN
College Basketball: Villanova at Temple (Live)
Fantasy
Boxing
SC Feat.
SportsCenter (Live)
ESPN2
Iron Chef America
Iron Chef: Behind
Iron Chef Showdown
Iron Chef Showdown
Iron Chef America
Food Network
The Story With Martha
Tucker Carlson Tonight
Hannity
The Ingraham Angle
Fox News at Night
Fox News
(6:40) Movie: The Santa Clause ★★★ (1994)
(8:50) Movie: The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause ★
The 700 Club
Freeform
Jack Reacher Movie: Thor: The Dark World ★★ (2013)
Movie: Taken 3 ★★ (2014)
FX
(6:00) My Christmas Dream Movie: Switched for Christmas (2017)
Movie: Christmas at Holly Lodge (2017)
Hallmark
Movie: Christmas in Angel Falls (2017)
Magical Christmas
Hallmark M&M Movie: The Christmas Secret (2014)
(5:45) Get Out VICE
Movie: Why Him? ★★ (2016)
Michelle Wolf: Nice Lady
Fight
Def Comedy
HBO
Property Brothers: Buying
Property Brothers
Property Brothers
House
Hunt Intl
Property Brothers
HGTV
Pawn Stars
Pawn Stars
Vikings
Vikings
(10:01) Knightfall
(11:03) Knightfall
History
Little Women: Atlanta
Little Women: LA
Little Women: Atlanta
Little Women: LA
(11:02) Little Women: LA
Lifetime
Nationals Classics
Pro Football Plus
Coach K
MASN
Hardball Matthews
All In With Chris Hayes
Rachel Maddow Show
The Last Word
The 11th Hour
MSNBC
Teen Mom OG
Floribama Shore
Floribama Shore
Are You the One?
Catfish: The TV Show
MTV
Titanic: 20 Years Later
Dian Fossey: Secrets In
Locked Up Abroad
Locked Up Abroad
Nat’l Geographic Save Titanic-Bob Balllard
Extra
Wizards Overtime (Live)
Wizards
Redskins
NBC SportsNet WA NBA Basketball: Memphis Grizzlies at Washington Wizards (Live)
The Thundermans
Full House
Full House
Full House
Full House
Fresh Prince Fresh Prince Friends
Friends
Nickelodeon
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Movie: The Day After Tomorrow ★★ (2004)
Spike
(7:15) Movie: Shooter ★★ (2007)
Happy!
(10:48) Movie: Shooter ★★
Syfy
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Full
Conan
TBS
(6:00) Yours, Mine and Ours Movie
TCM
My 600-Lb. Life
My 600-Lb. Life
My 600-Lb. Life
TLC
(5:30) Movie: The Blind Side The Librarians
The Librarians
The Librarians
The Librarians
TNT
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Travel
Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes
TruTV
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Everybody Loves Raymond Raymond
Raymond
Mom
Mom
King
King
TV Land
Cosby Show Cosby Show Unsung
Unsung
Unsung
Unsung
TV One
WWE NXT
(7:55) Movie: Thor ★★★ (2011)
Mr. Robot
Law & Order: SVU
USA Network
Black Ink Crew
Black Ink Crew
Black Ink Crew
Black Ink Crew
Movie: White Chicks ★★
VH1
GE Washington
Govt. Matters IBM Innov
SportsTalk
ABC News
News at 10pm
Govt. Matters IBM Innov
WNC8
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Movie: Batman Returns
WGN
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
Heavy on meaning but light on its feet
MUSIC FROM C1
himself up on that Jingle Ball
stage? Let’s hope. The singersongwriter has always seemed
tightly wound and eager to
please, but on Monday, he was
easy-breezy, allowing the curves
of his voice to sink into the
pillowy softness of his songs.
Even the rousing stuff — “One
Call Away,” “See You Again” — felt
refreshingly smooth and smartly
undersung.
It bears repeating that the
format for this concert remains
absolutely perfect. Each act gets
only enough time to dash
through a few songs, so the good
performances leave you wanting
more, the just-fine ones feel just
right, and the clunkers are mercifully brief.
Too bad, then, that the flow of
Monday night’s Jingle Ball got
clogged by the bill’s three outliers — a barely there DJ, a tired
rock band and a rapper with a
fever.
“I want to be alive! I’m
gonna be alive!”
The promises that Maryland rapper
Logic asked concertgoers to repeat
The DJ was Zedd, whose lustrous brand of EDM continues to
forfeit much of it’s club-friendly
thump, therefore making him a
guy who quite literally plays hit
singles on his computer. The
band was Fall Out Boy, a group of
low-energy emo-men who appeared too exhausted to fully
inhabit their high-energy rock
fare. And the rapper was Logic, a
Maryland native whose suicide
prevention ballad, “1-800-2738255,” has become a surprise
national hit.
Soldiering through the flu,
Logic apologized for shrinking
his headlining set down to this
one song alone, but his short
time onstage managed to summarize the lightness and heaviness of the entire gathering.
Before the lights went up, he
asked the crowd to repeat a vow
that underscores the spirit of pop
itself: “I want to be alive!” Then
he asked everyone to make a
more solemn promise: “I’m gonna be alive!”
chris.richards@washpost.com
KYLE GUSTAFSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Hot 99.5’s Jingle Ball 2017 at Capital One Arena had Charlie Puth singing easy-breezy.
THEATRE
Mosaic Theater Presents
Draw The Circle
12/13 @ 8 PM;
12/14 @ 11 AM;
12/16 @ 8 PM;
12/17 @ 3 PM
“Fresh…Striking…Big-Hearted” (WP) solo show about a
family’s journey to acceptance. Written by and starring
Mashuq Mushtaq Deen. 85 minutes.
Atlas Performing Arts Center
1360 H St NE
202-399-7993, mosaictheater.org
$20-$50
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
Valet Parking
Available at
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16-2898
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
The Disaster Artist (R) 1:10-3:456:40-9:10
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:154:25-6:20-7:20-9:15-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:50-4:00-7:10-10:10
Coco (PG) CC: 12:30-1:45-3:157:00-9:40
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:30-7:30-9:30
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:25-4:107:15-10:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
2:00-4:40-7:05-10:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
4:20-10:05
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
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Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 1:00-3:506:45-9:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
1:20-7:10
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 4:20
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:35-4:156:50-9:15
Pitch Perfect Treble Marathon
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The Disaster Artist: The IMAX
2D Experience (NR) 2:15-5:007:45-10:15
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
IMAX Theater
601 Independence Avenue SW
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
(NR) 2:40
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
12:25
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-2:05-5:15
MARYLAND
AFI Silver Theatre
Cultural Center
8633 Colesville Road
The Workshop (NR) 9:20
The Shop Around the Corner
(1940) (NR) 3:00
Afterlov (NR) 5:15
Armoton maa (NR) 9:30
Summer 1993 (Verano 1993)
(NR) 7:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:00-2:20-4:40-7:15
Lady Bird (R) 11:20-1:20-3:205:20-9:30
Miami (NR) 7:00
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:002:15-3:45-5:00-7:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
1:00-4:00-7:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
The Mountain Between Us (PG1:40-4:30-7:30
2:00-4:40-7:20
13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
The Star (PG) CC: 1:30
1:20-4:20-7:20
Coco (PG) CC: 1:45-7:45
The Disaster Artist (R) 4:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Murder on the Orient Express
2:00-4:30-7:30
(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:10-6:50
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:15-4:00-6:45
Coco (PG) CC: 2:00-4:30
Wonder (PG) CC: 2:20-5:00-7:40 Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner CC: 6:30
50th Anniversary (1967) present- Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
3:45-6:35
ed by TCM (NR) (!) 2:00-7:00
The Man Who Invented Christ- Coco 3D (PG) CC: 4:45
mas (PG) CC: 3:00
AMC Center Park 8
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 7:05
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 12:30- Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:155:30-8:00
4:00-6:45-9:30
Albert Einstein Planetarium - Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
National Air & Space Museum 2:30-5:30-8:45
6th Street and Independence Ave SW Coco (PG) CC: (!) 1:10-6:30
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Murder on the Orient Express
Dark Universe Space Show (NR) (PG-13) CC: 1:40-4:20-7:05-9:50
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30 Wonder (PG) CC: 1:30-4:15Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:00- 7:00-9:45
1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Angelika
2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
Pop-Up at Union Market
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
(!) 2:00-4:20-6:50-9:10
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R) Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
11:00-1:20-3:45-6:15-8:35
1:00-3:50-6:40-9:30
The Florida Project (R) 12:00Coco 3D (PG) (!) 9:00; (!) 3:45
3:40-6:00-8:15
AMC Columbia 14
Wait for Your Laugh 11:15-1:1510300 Little Patuxent Parkway
3:15-5:15-7:15
The Disaster Artist (R) 10:30Avalon Theatre
1:10-3:40-6:20-9:00
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 6:30
An Angel of the Lord 2 (Andel
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Páne 2) (NR) 8:00
11:40-2:50-6:20-9:40
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-3:10-5:20-7:45 The Star (PG) CC: 11:40-2:00-4:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Coco (PG) CC: 4:35-7:35
Missouri (R) 2:00-4:45
Murder on the Orient Express
Landmark
(PG-13) CC: 10:50-1:35-4:25Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
7:20-10:15
807 V Street, NW
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:50-1:45Justice League (PG-13) CC:
4:40-7:35-10:15
12:05-2:25-4:50-7:20-9:50
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
(!) 11:35-2:00-4:30-7:20-9:45
12:00-2:30-3:00-5:00-7:35-10:10 A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Murder on the Orient Express
10:10
(PG-13) CC: 11:50-12:30-2:15Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
4:40-7:10-9:00-9:35
50th Anniversary (1967) preRoman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: sented by TCM (NR) 2:00-7:00
11:55-2:25-4:55-7:30-10:05
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
11:20-2:00-4:50-7:40-10:25
12:15-3:30-7:00-10:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Landmark E Street Cinema
Missouri (R) CC: 10:50-1:45-4:40555 11th Street NW
7:30-10:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:00- Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
2:00-4:00-7:00-9:40
CC: 9:30
Tom of Finland (NR) 1:05-4:05- Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
7:05-9:35
11:05-2:00-4:50-7:35-10:25
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:10-1:40Missouri (R) CC: 1:00-4:004:05-6:40-9:10
7:00-9:40
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) CC:
Experience (PG-13) CC: 4:3012:45-3:00-5:15-7:30-9:45
7:30-10:15
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:10-3:20-4:30- Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
5:30-7:40-9:50
(PG) 1:30
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
Pitch Perfect Treble Marathon
12:45-1:45-3:45-4:45-6:45(PG-13) 2:00-7:00
7:45-9:30
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Landmark West End Cinema 10:50-1:40
2301 M Street NW
Coco (PG) CC: 11:00-9:45
Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) (NR)
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
1:30-4:30-7:30
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 1:00The
Disaster Artist (R) CC: (!)
3:15-5:30
11:40-1:45-3:00-4:15-5:30-6:45God's Own Country 4:30-7:30
8:00-9:15-10:25
The Florida Project (R) CC:
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
1:15-7:15
11:50-12:55-2:45-3:45-6:40-9:30
Medal of Honor Theater Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
NMMC
11:50-2:20-4:20-7:20-10:20
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
The Mountain Between Us (PGWe, the Marines (NR) 10:0013) CC: 12:00-9:45
11:00-12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
The Star (PG) CC: 10:05
Regal Gallery Place
Coco (PG) CC: 11:30-1:50-4:25Stadium 14
6:05-7:00-8:40-9:35
701 Seventh Street Northwest
Murder on the Orient Express
The Disaster Artist (R) 1:25-3:50- (PG-13) CC: 11:45-2:25-4:106:15-8:45
7:10-9:55
Justice League (PG-13)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
12:00-1:30-2:45-4:15-5:30-7:00- 2:40-6:15
8:15-10:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:30-2:10Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:30- 4:55-7:40-10:20
3:25-6:20-9:15
Coco (PG) 12:00-4:50-7:25-10:00 A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
1:30-4:05-7:05-9:40
Murder on the Orient Express
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
(PG-13) 12:10-2:50-5:25-8:002:00-5:05-7:35-10:15
10:35
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
Wonder (PG) 12:00-2:35-5:10(!) 11:45-1:40-5:10-7:30-9:50
7:45-10:20
Just Getting Started (PG-13) 2:35 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner Missouri (R) CC: 11:35-2:15-4:307:15-10:00
50th Anniversary (1967) preThe Man Who Invented Christsented by TCM (NR) 2:00-7:00
mas
(PG) CC: 2:15-6:50
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
12:55-3:20-5:45-10:40
4:00-9:25
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:25Lady Bird (R) 11:35-1:55-5:203:00-5:45-8:20-10:45
7:45-10:10
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Justice League: The IMAX 2D Ex12:45-3:45-6:45-9:50
perience (PG-13) CC: 7:40-10:25
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:15Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
2:40-5:05-7:30-10:00
(PG) 12:05-2:40-5:10
Coco (PG) 3:10-9:30
Unexpectedly Yours (!) 1:20-4:35Just Getting Started (PG-13)
7:25-10:15
12:50-5:45-8:15-10:35
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
AMC Loews
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
11115 Mall Circle
Unexpectedly Yours 11:50-2:505:45-8:40
Justice League (PG-13) 11:00The Disaster Artist (R) (!) 10:30- 2:00-3:30-5:00-8:00-9:30
1:45-4:15-6:45-9:35
Coco (PG) XD: 12:40-3:55
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 11:00- Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
2:00-4:45-6:45-7:30-9:15-10:15
12:30-6:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Justice League (PG-13) XD:
11:30-2:45-6:00-9:00
7:10-10:15
The Star (PG) CC: 11:45-2:15-4:30
Hoyt's West Nursery
Murder on the Orient Express
Cinema 14
(PG-13) CC: 10:45-1:00-4:001591 West Nursery Road
7:00-9:45
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Coco (PG) CC: 11:45-3:00-6:15-9:30 1:00-2:00-3:45-4:45-6:30-7:30Wonder (PG) CC: 10:30-1:309:15-10:15
4:30-7:15-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
1:10-4:05-7:00-9:55
10:45-2:30-5:15-7:45-10:15
The Star (PG) CC: 1:55-4:25Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: 6:40-9:10
11:30-1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Coco (PG) CC: 1:00-2:00-3:354:35-6:20-7:10-8:55-9:45
AMC Magic Johnson
Murder on the Orient Express
Capital Center 12
(PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:40-7:20-10:00
800 Shoppers Way
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:15- Wonder (PG) CC: 1:40-4:207:00-9:40
2:00-4:00-6:45-9:30
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
1:20-4:00-6:50-9:25
3:30-6:25-9:35
The Mountain Between Us (PG- A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
2:20-4:50-7:40-10:10
13) CC: 4:40-7:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
The Star (PG) CC: 12:40-2:40
2:15-4:40-7:05-9:30
Jigsaw (R) CC: 4:30-9:30
Coco (PG) CC: 12:30-3:30-4:45- The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) CC: 1:30-4:10-6:45-9:20
6:15-7:45-9:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:15-6:50-9:25 1:00-4:00-6:55-9:50
Lady Bird (R) CC: 2:10-5:00Wonder (PG) CC: 1:10-3:507:35-9:55
6:25-9:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Landmark
Bethesda Row Cinema
12:45-3:10-5:45-8:15
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
2:15-4:45-7:15-9:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:00-3:20-5:40Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: 7:45-9:55
1:00-3:45-6:30-9:20
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:20
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 1:45-7:00 Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:10Justice League: The IMAX 2D Ex- 2:00-3:55-5:00-7:10-8:00-9:50
perience (PG-13) CC: 5:30-8:30 National Theatre Live: Follies7:00
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience The Shape of Water (R) CC:
12:50-1:30-3:40-4:10-6:30-7:20(PG) 2:30
9:30-10:00
ArcLight Bethesda
Wonder
Wheel (PG-13) CC: 1:507101 Democracy Boulevard
4:00-7:00-9:20
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:40Three
Billboards
Outside Ebbing,
2:50-4:00-5:35-6:35-7:05-9:35
Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:40Justice League (PG-13) 11:10- 7:30-10:00
2:10-5:20-7:55-10:15
Old Greenbelt Theatre
The Star (PG) 12:05
129 Centerway
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:30Lady
Bird
(R) 3:00-5:30-7:45
2:20-5:10-8:05-10:00
Coco (PG) 12:10-2:40-5:15
Paragon Kentlands
Murder on the Orient Express
Stadium 10
(PG-13) 11:20-2:05-4:55-7:40629 Center Point Way
9:50
Justice League (PG-13) 5:00-7:35
Wonder (PG) 11:25-12:50-2:00- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
3:00-4:40-7:20-9:15
4:30-7:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:00The Star (PG) 4:55-7:00
12:15-1:45-2:15-3:30-4:30-5:00- Coco (PG) 4:55-7:20
6:30-7:15-8:15-9:30-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:05- (PG-13) 5:10-7:45
1:55-4:05-7:10-10:20
Wonder (PG) 5:10-7:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Missouri (R) 11:15-1:50-4:455:20-7:25
7:25-9:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 5:05
Coco 3D (PG) 4:20-6:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13)
The Disaster Artist (R) 8:00-10:25 5:10-7:25
Coco (PG) 11:35-1:10-3:35Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
7:45-9:55
7:25
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: Lady Bird (R) 5:20-7:30
1:15-4:25
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 12:45
3899 Branch Avenue
The Man Who Invented ChristJustice League (PG-13) 1:45mas (PG) CC: 1:40
4:30-7:15
Lady Bird (R) 11:55-2:25-4:50Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:056:00-8:10-9:10
4:00-7:00
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
Coco (PG) 12:15-3:15-6:15
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
The Star (PG) 12:00-2:15-4:40The Disaster Artist (R) 11:107:30
12:50-1:50-3:40-4:40-6:20-7:20- Wonder (PG) 12:45-3:45-7:10
9:00-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:15Justice League (PG-13) 12:00- 3:05-5:30-7:50
1:00-4:00-6:00-7:00-9:45
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:1015200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
3:00-4:10-7:10-9:10-10:20
Justice
League (PG-13) 1:40The Star (PG) 12:20-2:40-4:503:10-4:40-6:10-7:40-9:10-10:30
7:25-9:50
Thor:
Ragnarok
(PG-13) 3:50Coco (PG) 12:30-1:30-3:30-4:307:10-10:10
6:30-7:30-9:05-10:05
The
Star
(PG)
3:20-5:50-8:20Wonder (PG) 1:20-4:20-7:2010:30
10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League (PG-13) 2:003:25-6:20-9:30
(PG-13)
5:00-8:00-10:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:00- Coco (PG) 1:20-2:50-4:10-5:307:00-8:10-9:45
1:40-4:05-6:50-9:20
Wonder (PG) 1:10-4:20-7:25Coco (PG) 11:30AM
10:15
Bow Tie Harbour 9
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
2474 Solomons Island Road
2:30-4:55-7:20-10:00
Vienna State Opera: The NutGuess Who's Coming to Dinner
cracker 7:00
50th Anniversary (1967) preJust Getting Started (PG-13)
sented by TCM (NR) 2:00-7:00
10:30-12:50-3:10-5:30-7:50-10:20 A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:054:00-6:30-9:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
2:00-10:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:40The Man Who Invented Christ- 5:15-7:50-10:30
mas (PG) 11:00-4:30-7:10-9:50
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:30-4:307:30-10:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11:10-4:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:10
Last Flag Flying (R) 1:40
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Lady Bird (R) 12:10-2:30-4:50Halloween (PG-13) 10:25
7:20-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
Regal Cinemas Majestic
(PG-13) 10:20-1:00-3:40-6:40-9:40
Stadium 20 & IMAX
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
900 Ellsworth Drive
Missouri (R) 10:50-1:50-5:00The Disaster Artist (R) 12:007:40-10:30
2:30-5:10-7:50-10:20
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD Justice League (PG-13) 12:103:45-7:00-10:05
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:15The Disaster Artist (R) 10:553:25-6:50-9:50
1:45-4:15-7:05-9:50
Justice League (PG-13) 3:30-9:30 Coco (PG) 12:00-1:00-2:45-3:455:30-7:30-8:15-10:40-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
Murder on the Orient Express
11:15-6:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital (PG-13) 12:30-3:30-6:40-9:35
Wonder (PG) 12:25-3:20-6:153D (PG-13) 2:30-9:05
9:10
The Star (PG) 11:25-2:05
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Coco (PG) 11:45-1:30-4:4512:00-2:45-5:10-7:40-10:35
6:15-7:55
Dunkirk: The IMAX 2D ExperiMurder on the Orient Express
ence (PG-13) 12:25-3:05
(PG-13) 11:00-1:50-4:40-7:30Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:3010:15
3:15-5:50-8:25-11:00
Wonder (PG) 11:20-2:20-5:15Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
8:25
Missouri
(R) 12:05-3:30-10:15
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11:10-2:15-5:00-7:35-10:05
12:15-3:35-6:45-9:55
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 4:30The Disaster Artist: The IMAX 2D
7:15-10:05
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:05- Experience (NR) 5:50-8:25-11:00
Regal Germantown Stadium 14
1:45-4:25-7:05-10:00
20000 Century Boulevard
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 10:55-1:40-4:30Justice League (PG-13) 12:157:20-10:10
1:45-3:15-4:45-6:15-7:45-9:15Jawaan (NR) 9:30
10:45-10:50
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:3012:30-6:30
3:45-7:00-10:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
The Star (PG) 1:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
12:10-3:15-6:40-9:45
Coco (PG) 12:00-1:30-2:45-4:155:30-7:00-8:15-9:45
Coco 3D (PG) 3:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Wonder (PG) 2:15-5:00-7:4510:30
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
50th Anniversary (1967) presented by TCM (NR) 2:00-7:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:154:45-7:15-9:45
Marshall (PG-13) 12:30-3:306:30-9:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
10:30
Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:30-5:007:15-9:45
NO
WANT TO SELL IT?
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
9:45
Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:30-5:007:45-10:15
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 7:45-10:45
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
(PG) 11:30-2:15-5:00
Unexpectedly Yours 11:05-1:554:40-10:10
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 12:303:00-5:30-8:00
November Criminals 1:35-6:50
AMC Potomac Mills 18
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:45UA Snowden Square
12:45-2:15-3:15-4:45-5:45-7:15Stadium 14
8:15-9:45-10:45
9161 Commerce Center Drive
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:3011:30-12:10-2:35-3:20-4:30-5:453:00-5:30-8:00-10:25
8:45-10:00
Justice League (PG-13) 1:40Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
4:30-7:30-9:50-10:20
11:45-2:45-6:00-9:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:45- The Mountain Between Us (PG4:15-7:20-10:20
13) CC: 12:25-7:20
The Star (PG) 1:50-4:10
The Star (PG) CC: 11:30-3:10-5:25
Coco (PG) 12:30-1:30-3:10-4:20- Coco (PG) CC: 11:40-2:30-7:30Regal Hyattsville Royale
6:00-7:00-8:40-9:40
8:45-9:45
Stadium 14
Murder on the Orient Express
Murder on the Orient Express
6505 America Blvd.
(PG-13) 12:40-3:20-6:00-8:50
(PG-13) CC: 11:50-3:00-6:00-9:00
Justice League (PG-13)
Wonder (PG) 9:00-1:15-4:00Wonder (PG) CC: 11:35-1:3012:30-1:40-3:30-4:45-6:30-7:45- 6:50-9:30
2:20-4:30-5:15-8:15-10:10
9:30-10:45
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
The Disaster Artist (R) 1:15-4:00- 1:50-4:40-7:10-9:30
10:00
7:00-9:45
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
11:40-2:00-4:20-6:45-9:20
50th Anniversary (1967) preThor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:15sented by TCM (NR) 2:00-7:00
4:30-7:30-10:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:00- 12:05-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
The Star (PG) 12:45-3:15-6:003:30-6:15-9:00
8:25-10:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:10- Missouri (R) CC: 12:50-3:45Murder on the Orient Express
6:30-9:25
3:40-6:15-9:10
(PG-13) 1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:15Missouri (R) 1:20-4:30-7:15-10:00 CC: 1:45
6:55-10:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Wonder (PG) 12:45-3:30-6:157:35-10:25
6:30-9:50
9:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:30-3:05Lady
Bird
(R)
12:30-2:55-5:20Coco (PG) 12:30-2:00-3:15-5:005:40-8:05-10:30
7:45-10:10
6:15-7:45-9:00-10:30
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 5:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:30Xscape Theatres
Justice League: The IMAX 2D Ex4:30-7:15-9:45
Brandywine 14
perience (PG-13) CC: 7:45-10:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:307710 Matapeake Business Drive
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
2:00-4:45-7:30-10:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
(PG) 1:15-4:30
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
(!) 11:10-2:10-5:00-6:30-7:50Pitch Perfect Treble Marathon
1:30-4:15-6:45-9:15
9:20-10:40
(PG-13) 12:00-4:15-8:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
10:20-12:20-3:30-4:20-6:50-9:40 Coco (PG) 12:15-6:50; 3:30
AMC Shirlington 7
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12 The Star (PG) Open Caption; CC: (!)
2772 South Randolph St.
11:00-1:30-4:10-6:40-9:00
14716 Baltimore Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) 12:50- Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:50-1:20-3:50 Coco (PG) CC: 4:10
Murder on the Orient Express
Murder on the Orient Express
4:05-7:25-10:25
(PG-13) CC: 10:10-3:10-6:20-9:50 (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:00-7:00
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:20Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 11:50-3:20- Wonder (PG) CC: 2:00-4:45-7:15
2:50-5:20-7:55-10:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: (!)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:05- 6:10-8:50
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC: 1:30-3:00-4:30-6:00-7:30
3:20-6:30-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The Star (PG) 1:10-3:50-6:25-9:00 11:20-2:30-5:10-7:30-10:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Missouri (R) CC: 1:45-4:30-7:30
Murder on the Orient Express
10:30-1:45-4:50-7:40-10:30
Lady Bird (R) 1:45-4:15-7:00
(PG-13) 12:15-3:30-6:40-9:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: (!) Coco 3D (PG) CC: 1:15-7:20
Coco (PG) 1:40-4:20-7:00-9:45
12:10-2:40-5:30-8:10-10:45
Wonder (PG) 1:50-4:30-7:20AMC Tysons Corner 16
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:40-8:00
10:10
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
The Disaster Artist (R) (!) 12:30CC:
10:00-10:40-12:50-3:40-4:3012:00-2:40-5:10-8:00-10:35
3:00-5:35-8:00-10:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:50- 7:00-10:10-10:50
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
2:30-4:55-7:35-10:00
11:40-12:30-1:10-2:50-5:40-7:10- 10:30-11:30-2:20-4:00-5:20-8:10Just Getting Started (PG-13)
9:25-10:55
8:30-10:00
1:30-4:10-6:50-9:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:05-11:30Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
10:55-12:45-4:05-7:25-9:45
2:20-4:50-7:20-9:10
12:30-3:40-7:10-10:20
The Star (PG) CC: 10:25-4:35
Lady Bird (R) 11:55-2:20-4:45iPic Pike & Rose
Coco (PG) CC: 11:00-12:35-2:007:15-9:50
11830 Grand Park Avenue
4:45-5:55-7:20-8:30-9:55
Justice League (PG-13) (!) 12:45- Murder on the Orient Express
Regal Rockville Center
4:15-7:45-11:00
Stadium 13
(PG-13) CC: 10:40-1:20-4:10Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:00- 7:05-9:50
199 East Montgomery Avenue
3:00-6:15-9:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:45-1:35The Disaster Artist (R) 12:30Murder on the Orient Express
4:20-7:10-10:00
3:15-6:00-8:45
Darkest Hour (PG-13) (!) 10:20Justice League (PG-13) 12:45- (PG-13) 12:00-3:15-6:45-10:00
Coco (PG) (!) 12:30-3:45-7:151:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
3:45-6:45-9:45
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:30- 10:30
Wonder (PG) (!) 12:15-3:30-7:00- CC: (!) 10:35-1:00-3:20-5:403:30-6:45-10:00
10:15
8:20-10:40
The Star (PG) 4:30-9:30
Coco (PG) 12:30-1:00-3:15-3:45- A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:00- Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
5:00-8:00-10:50
50th Anniversary (1967) present6:00-6:30-8:45-9:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) (!)
ed by TCM (NR) (!) 2:00-7:00
Murder on the Orient Express
12:15-3:00-6:30-9:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
(PG-13) 1:00-4:00-6:45-9:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) (!) CC: 1:25
Wonder (PG) 12:45-3:30-6:3012:30-4:00-7:30-10:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
9:30
11:10-1:50-4:30-6:50-10:05
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
1:15-3:45-6:15-8:45
Missouri
(R) CC: 11:05-1:55-4:40Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
7:35-10:20
50th Anniversary (1967) pre2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Roman
J.
Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
sented by TCM (NR) 2:00-7:00
The Disaster Artist (R) 3:00CC: 10:35
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
5:30-8:00
Lady
Bird
(R) 10:25-12:45-3:104:15-9:45
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
5:30-7:55-10:25
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:00- 1:30-4:15-7:00
Coco
3D
(PG)
CC: 3:15-11:00
3:30-6:00-8:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
The Disaster Artist: The IMAX 2D
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 1:50-4:40-7:30
Experience
(NR)
(!) 11:15-1:45Missouri (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15 Murder on the Orient Express
4:25-6:55-9:30
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:30-7:00 (PG-13) CC: 2:15-5:00-7:45
Darkest
Hour
(PG-13)
(!) 11:45Lady Bird (R) 12:30-3:00-5:45Wonder (PG) CC: 1:45-4:30-7:15 2:45-5:45-8:45
8:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
AMC Worldgate 9
Regal Waugh Chapel
Missouri (R) CC: 2:30-5:15-8:00
13025 Worldgate Drive
Stadium 12 & IMAX
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 4:30
The Disaster Artist (R) (!) 12:001419 South Main Chapel Way
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
3:15-5:45-8:15
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:403:25-5:55-8:25-11:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: Justice League (PG-13) CC:
12:05-3:00-6:00-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 12:25- 1:45-7:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
3:35-6:25-9:10
AMC Hoffman Center 22
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:30206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Coco (PG) CC: 12:30-6:30
3:30-6:30-9:50
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:45Murder on the Orient Express
The Star (PG) 12:15-2:30-4:502:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
(PG-13) CC: 12:20-3:20-6:20-9:05
7:10-9:40
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:30-4:20Coco (PG) 12:00-2:20-4:4011:30-1:00-2:45-4:00-7:00-10:00 7:15-9:55
7:00-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Murder on the Orient Express
12:15-3:15-6:30-9:30
2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
(PG-13) 1:20-4:20-7:15-10:10
The Mountain Between Us (PG- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Wonder (PG) 12:10-2:45-5:2013) CC: 11:10-9:50
Missouri (R) CC: 12:10-3:108:00-10:50
The Star (PG) CC: 12:25-2:356:15-9:05
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
4:50-7:05-9:20
Lady Bird (R) CC: (!) 12:15-2:5512:20-3:00-5:35-8:15-10:45
Coco (PG) CC: 11:15-1:45-4:15- 5:20-7:45-10:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
5:45-6:45-8:30-9:15
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 3:30-9:40
12:50-3:15-5:40-8:10-10:35
Murder on the Orient Express
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:05- (PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:45Alamo Drafthouse Cinema One Loudoun
2:40-5:05-7:50-10:30
7:25-10:05
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:351:00-4:10-7:20-10:20
National
Lampoon's
Christmas
6:05
The Disaster Artist: The IMAX 2D It (R) CC: 3:05-9:35
Vacation (PG-13) 8:00
Experience (NR) 12:10-2:50-5:20- Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:40The Disaster Artist (R) 11:257:55-10:25
3:15-7:20-10:00
7:10-9:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:50Regal Westview
Jigsaw (R) CC: 9:05
Stadium 16 & IMAX
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC: 2:10-5:25-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 10:255243 Buckeystown Pike
11:25-1:45-4:10-6:35-9:00
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:45A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: 1:30-7:45; 4:55
Coco (PG) 11:00-1:55-3:40-4:402:30-5:15-8:00-10:30
2:10-4:50-7:25-9:55
Justice League (PG-13) 12:45- Guess Who's Coming to Dinner 6:00-9:30
3:45-6:45-10:00
50th Anniversary (1967) present- Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:25-2:20-5:20-8:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:00ed by TCM (NR) (!) 2:00-7:00
Wonder (PG) 12:40-1:30-4:25-8:20
4:45-8:00-11:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The Star (PG) 11:45-2:15-4:4511:45-2:35-5:05-7:40-10:10
7:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (R) 12:10-3:10-6:20Coco (PG) 12:15-1:15-3:00-4:00- Missouri (R) CC: 11:10-1:50-4:30- 10:00
Lady Bird (R) 10:50-1:20-4:005:45-7:00-8:30-9:45-11:15
7:20-10:05
Murder on the Orient Express
The Man Who Invented Christ- 6:40-9:20
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
(PG-13) 1:00-4:00-6:45-10:00
mas (PG) CC: 11:05-4:05-9:10
2911 District Ave
Wonder (PG) 12:30-1:30-3:30Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
4:30-6:15-7:30-9:30-10:30
11:20-1:30-4:20-7:10-10:00
Breakfast at Tiffany's (NR) 7:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Last Flag Flying (R) CC: 11:50- Darkest Hour (PG-13) (!) 11:0012:45-3:30-6:30-9:15
3:00-6:05
11:45-1:45-4:30-5:15-7:15-10:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:40-2:05The Shape of Water (R) (!)
11:30-2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
4:25-6:45-9:20
10:45-1:30-2:30-4:15-7:00-8:00Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:00- Justice League: The IMAX 2D Ex- 9:45-10:45
2:45-5:30-8:15-11:00
perience (PG-13) CC: 6:15-9:15 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience Missouri (R) 10:00-5:30-8:00Missouri (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15 (PG) 1:00-3:30
10:30
The Man Who Invented Christ- Pitch Perfect Treble Marathon
National Theatre Live: Young
mas (PG) 12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
(PG-13) 12:00-4:00-8:15
Marx 2:00
VIRGINIA
IS YOUR OLD CAR HOLDING UP?
YES
C5
RE
NO
NO
YES
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) (!) 10:0012:20-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:30-1:15-3:50-6:459:30
Lady Bird (R) 11:00-1:20-3:406:00-8:30-10:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:251:15-4:05-10:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:104:50-8:30
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
1:00-3:30-6:00-8:20
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
50th Anniversary (1967) presented by TCM (NR) 2:00-7:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:404:20-6:50-9:25
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:25-4:00Bow Tie
6:45-9:30
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX
Lady Bird (R) 2:10-4:45-7:20-9:50
11940 Market Street
Haldaa (NR) 1:35-4:55-8:15
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:20Regal Countryside
3:00-5:35-7:55-10:20
Stadium 20
Vienna State Opera: The Nut45980 Regal Plaza
cracker 7:00
Justice League (PG-13) 12:20Justice League (PG-13) 1:103:30-6:30-9:25
4:10-8:00-10:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:15Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:303:15-6:30-9:40
4:30-7:30-10:30
The Star (PG) 12:15-2:55-5:30Coco (PG) 2:10-5:10-7:00-9:40
8:00-10:30
Wonder (PG) 12:30-3:30-6:30Murder on the Orient Express
9:30
1:45-4:30-7:30-10:10
(PG-13)
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Coco (PG) 1:40-4:15-6:45-9:15
12:00-2:40-5:20-7:50-10:40
Tumhari
Sulu (NR) 12:00-3:20Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:456:40-9:50
3:45-10:15
Oxygen
(Telugu)
(NR) 12:50-3:45Lady Bird (R) 12:10-2:45-5:306:35-9:30
7:55-10:25
Daddy's
Home
2
(PG-13) 12:25Justice League (PG-13) 7:003:15-6:05-8:50
10:00
Just
Getting
Started
(PG-13)
Coco (PG) 1:00-4:00
12:10-2:40-5:15-7:45-10:15
Murder on the Orient Express
My
Friend
Dahmer
(R)
2:15-4:45(PG-13) 12:50-3:50-6:55-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 7:35-9:55
The
Man
Who
Invented
ChristMissouri (R) 1:20-4:20-7:20-10:10
mas (PG) 1:30-4:05-7:00-9:45
Cinema Arts Theatre
Jawaan (NR) 12:05-3:05-5:45-8:45
9650 Main St
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Murder on the Orient Express
12:30-3:50-7:20-10:20
(PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:00-2:30Fukrey Returns (NR) 12:00-3:105:00-7:30-9:50
6:15-9:20
Wonder (PG) CC: 9:50-12:10Lady Bird (R) 2:00-4:20-7:05-9:35
2:25-4:50-7:20-9:40
Firangi (NR) 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:25
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Mental Madhilo (NR) 12:05-3:002:20
6:00-9:05
The Divine Order (Die gottliche Gruham (NR) 12:05-2:55-5:50Ordnung) (NR) CC: 9:40-12:10- 8:35
2:40-5:10-7:50-9:55
Khakee (Telugu) (NR) 12:00-3:20Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 6:50-10:00
Missouri (R) CC: 9:45-12:05-2:35- Verna12:10-3:20-7:00-10:15
5:05-7:40-9:55
Regal Dulles Town Center 10
Lady Bird (R) CC: 9:55-12:1521100 Dulles Town Circle
2:25-4:45-7:10-9:25
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:30Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:053:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
12:20-4:35-7:00-9:15
Justice League (PG-13) 12:15Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
4:15-7:15-10:15
1600 Village Market Boulevard
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:45The Star (PG) 12:25-2:40-4:553:45-6:45-9:45
7:20
Coco (PG) 1:30-4:30-7:00-9:30
Murder on the Orient Express
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:10-2:50-7:30
(PG-13) 12:30-2:30-5:15-8:00Wonder (PG) 11:50-2:30-5:0510:50
7:45
Wonder (PG) 1:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
12:05-2:20-4:45-7:10
1:00-4:45-7:30-10:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:15-2:45-5:20-7:50
3:30-9:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:55- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
2:35-5:00-7:25
Missouri (R) 2:15-3:15-6:00-9:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:00Missouri (R) 12:30-3:10-7:40
4:00-6:30-8:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:20- Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
3:20-7:05
1:45-6:15
Justice League (PG-13) 11:45Regal Fairfax Towne Center 10
1:15-2:25-4:15-5:15-7:15-8:00;
4110 West Ox Road
1:15-4:15-7:15
Coco (PG) 12:00-1:00-3:00-4:00- Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13)
1:15-4:15-7:05-10:00
6:00-7:00
Wonder (PG) 12:30-1:30-3:35Manassas 4 Cinemas
4:35-6:40-7:40-9:25-10:25
8890 Mathis Ave.
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13) 1:3012:00-2:25-4:35-7:25-9:40
4:00-6:30
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:40- 50th Anniversary (1967) pre3:20-6:00
sented by TCM (NR) 2:00-7:00
Coco (PG) 1:05-3:10-5:15-7:25
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Wonder (PG) 1:25-3:50-6:15
4:45-9:55
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:152:55-5:30-8:05-10:40
6201 Multiplex Drive
Justice League (PG-13) 10:25- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:40-3:30-6:30-9:15
1:20-4:15-7:25-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:15- My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:20-7:30
The Man Who Invented
1:25-4:35-7:40-10:45
Christmas (PG) 12:05-2:40-5:20The Star (PG) 12:00-2:15-4:30
7:55-10:30
Coco (PG) 10:10-11:00-1:05-1:55Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
4:05-4:50-7:00-7:45-10:40
4:20-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
The Swindlers (NR) 12:55-3:55(PG-13) 10:50-1:35-4:20-7:306:55-9:50
10:15
Regal Fox
Wonder (PG) 11:10-1:50-4:35Stadium 16 & IMAX
7:15-9:55
22875
Brambleton Plaza
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13) 1:1512:10-2:30-4:50-7:10-9:45
4:45-7:45-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:15- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:154:15-7:15-10:15
2:45-5:10-7:55-10:25
The Star (PG) 12:00-1:30-3:45Jawaan (NR) 6:45-9:35
6:00-8:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Coco (PG) 12:30-2:00-3:00-4:30Missouri (R) 10:30-1:10-4:005:30-8:00-10:30
6:50-9:30
Fukrey Returns (NR) 11:55-3:25- Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13)
12:15-3:15-6:30-9:30
6:30-9:35
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:30MalliRaava (NR) 10:00-12:554:30-8:30
3:50-6:40-9:50
Wonder (PG) 12:30-2:15-3:30Rave Cinemas
5:00-6:30-7:45-9:30-10:30
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
11900 Palace Way
12:15-2:45-5:15-8:00-10:30
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:35Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:452:10-4:50-7:50-10:40
3:15-5:45-8:15
Justice League (PG-13) 11:30- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
2:15-8:10-11:00
Missouri (R) 12:45-3:30-6:15-9:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:40- Just Getting Started (PG-13)
1:45-4:55-7:55-10:55
11:50-2:00-4:30-6:45-9:00
The Star (PG) 11:40-2:05-4:30The Man Who Invented Christ7:10-9:55
mas (PG) 1:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
Coco (PG) 11:25-2:25-5:30-8:35 Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Murder on the Orient Express
10:30
(PG-13) 10:50-1:30-4:15-7:40Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:30-4:4510:30
7:30-10:00
Wonder (PG) 10:45-1:35-4:25Justice League: The IMAX 2D
7:30-10:20
Experience (PG-13) 6:15-9:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
11:15-2:00-4:40-7:25-10:35
(PG) 1:15-3:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:10- Coco (PG) 7:00-9:30
1:55-4:35-7:35-10:10
Regal Kingstowne
Fukrey Returns (NR) 11:50-3:05Stadium 16 & RPX
6:20-9:30
5910 Kingstowne Towne Center
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) 5:05
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:15Lady Bird (R) 11:45-2:30-5:002:45-5:30-8:00-10:30
7:15-10:00
Justice League (PG-13) 1:25Justice League (PG-13) XD:
4:20-7:30-10:20
10:30-1:15-4:20-7:20-10:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:45Coco (PG) XD: 10:35-1:40-4:45- 3:50-6:45-9:50
7:45-10:25
The Star (PG) 12:30-2:40-4:50-7:05
Regal Ballston Common
Coco (PG) 1:00-2:00-3:45-4:30Stadium 12
6:15-7:15-8:45-10:00
671 N. Glebe Road
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League (PG-13) 1:20(PG-13) 1:10-4:05-6:50-10:05
4:10-7:00-9:55
Wonder (PG) 12:55-1:50-3:35Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:054:45-6:20-7:45-9:20-10:30
4:05-7:10-10:05
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
The Star (PG) 4:40-9:35
12:20-2:45-5:15-8:00-10:25
Coco (PG) 1:15-2:20-3:50-5:00- Just Getting Started (PG-13)
6:30-7:40-9:10-10:10
1:15-4:00-6:30-9:15
Murder on the Orient Express
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:353:00-5:25-8:00-10:30
(PG-13) 1:50-4:30-7:30-10:15
Marshall (PG-13) 9:30
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) 12:40-3:20-6:05-9:05
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:30-3:30-6:35-9:35
Lady Bird (R) 12:15-2:35-5:007:40-10:15
The Disaster Artist (R) 1:30-4:207:00-9:45
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
Justice League (PG-13) 10:0012:50-3:45-6:30-9:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:151:20-4:30-7:30-10:30
The Star (PG) 11:00-1:15-3:406:15
Coco (PG) 10:00-10:50-12:301:30-3:20-4:20-6:00-7:00-8:459:45
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:30-1:10-4:10-7:1010:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:30-6:50
Wonder (PG) 10:15-1:00-3:506:45-9:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 9:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
11:15-1:50-4:40-7:15-9:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:1012:40-3:10-5:40-8:15-10:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:20-2:00-4:507:40-10:20
My Friend Dahmer (R) 11:302:10-5:10-8:00-10:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
4:00-10:15
Lady Bird (R) 10:20-12:45-3:305:50-8:30-10:50
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 7:45-10:40
Coco: The IMAX 2D Experience
(PG) 11:50-2:20-5:00
Regal Potomac Yard
Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:403:05-5:30-7:55-10:20
Justice League (PG-13) 1:204:15-6:35-7:10-9:40-10:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:303:30-6:30-9:35
The Star (PG) 12:30-1:10-3:45
Coco (PG) 12:30-1:00-1:30-3:103:40-4:10-6:00-7:00-8:50-9:40
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:50-4:00-6:55-9:55
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:456:15-9:45
Wonder (PG) 1:15-3:55-6:40-9:20
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
12:30-2:50-5:10-7:30-9:50
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
50th Anniversary (1967) presented by TCM (NR) 2:00-7:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:303:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) 12:45-3:506:45-9:30
My Friend Dahmer (R) 6:25-10:05
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) 12:55-3:35-6:10-9:05
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:40-3:40-6:50-10:00
Regal
Springfield Town Center 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:302:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Justice League (PG-13) 1:104:20-6:50-7:30-9:50-10:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:103:10-6:40-9:40
The Star (PG) 11:00-1:20-3:406:20-9:10
Coco (PG) 10:55-12:20-1:30-3:204:10-6:10-9:00
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 11:15-2:05-4:50-7:50-10:35
Wonder (PG) 11:05-1:40-4:357:20-10:05
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
11:40-2:40-5:20-8:00-10:35
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:101:35-4:05-6:45-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:50-4:00-7:1010:00
Lady Bird (R) 11:50-2:20-5:007:40-10:20
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
Justice League (PG-13) 6:00-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:154:20-7:20-10:20
The Star (PG) 1:40-4:00-6:15
Coco (PG) 1:00-3:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:10-3:50-6:30-9:10
Wonder (PG) 1:20-2:20-4:10-5:107:00-8:00-9:40-10:40
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
1:30-4:30-7:15-9:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:155:15-7:50-10:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:105:30-8:15-10:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:50-3:45-6:40-9:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
9:00
Lady Bird (R) 2:05-4:40-7:1010:10
Justice League (PG-13) 2:004:45-7:45-10:30
Coco (PG) 1:45-2:30-4:15-5:006:45-7:30-9:15-10:00
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10-4:00
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our World:
An IMAX 3D Experience 2:20
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
12:00-4:50
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
CC: 12:00-2:15-4:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle
(R) CC: 9:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
CC: 12:20-2:35-4:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 4:107:00-10:10
The Foreigner (R) CC: 7:15-9:40
Elf (PG) 12:10-2:20-7:30
STILL LOVING YOUR HOUSE?
YES
HE MEANS
Wednesday, December 13, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
WANT TO SELL IT
FOR TOP DOLLAR?
NO
HELLO!
YES
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C054E 3x3.25
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C6
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
National registry
adds ‘Superman,’
24 other films
BY
M ICHAEL O ' S ULLIVAN
L
ibrarian of Congress Carla Hayden has announced the
addition of 25 films to the library’s National Film
Registry, selections deemed worthy of preservation for
their “cultural, historic and/or aesthetic” significance. This
year’s collection brings the number of registry films to 725
and includes such beloved mainstream movies as the
historical romance “Titanic” (1997) and “Die Hard” (1988).
Other popular works include “Dumbo” (1941), “Superman” (1978), “The Goonies” (1985), “Field of Dreams” (1989)
and “Memento” (2000). Among this year’s more esoteric
fare is “The Sinking of the Lusitania,” a 1918 short by
cartoonist and animator Winsor McCay about the German
submarine attack that contributed to the United States’
entry into World War I, and an archive of amateur home
movies from the 1920s and ’30s about life in the Mexican
American community of Corpus Christi, Tex.
Hayden selected the films with input from members of
the National Film Preservation Board and other specialists
at the library. The public also was invited to weigh in.
As timely as it may be to see this honor bestowed on
“Titanic” — now celebrating its 20th anniversary — or “Die
Hard” — a holiday staple — there could be no more
opportune selection than “4 Little Girls.” Nominated for a
best documentary feature Oscar, Spike Lee’s 1997 film about
the Birmingham church bombing of Sept. 15, 1963, was met
by a reopening of the long-dormant criminal case by the FBI
— a case that just so happens to have been subsequently
prosecuted — successfully — by an Alabama lawyer named
Doug Jones. At press time, Jones was locked in a close race
for the U.S. Senate with the controversial former judge Roy
Moore.
On Tuesday — Election Day in Alabama — Lee phoned
from New York to say that he always cherishes the National
Film Registry honor. (Two of his narrative features were
previously selected: “Do the Right Thing” and “Malcolm X.”)
Lee also said he wanted to dedicate the film’s selection to the
murdered girls: Addie Mae Collins, Carol Denise McNair,
Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley.
But mostly, the filmmaker took the opportunity to unleash a torrent of unfiltered invective about Moore. After
making a few circumspect comments about the power of
storytelling to “hold a mirror up to the ugliness that we have
become,” Lee acknowledged that he was troubled by what’s
happening in America today, epitomized by the Alabama
election, before acknowledging that the word “troubled”
was probably too mild.
But Lee said current affairs had not caused him to lose
hope, as a human or as a filmmaker. “Like my man Jesse
[Jackson] says, you’ve got to keep hope alive,” he said. Never
modest, the cinematic bombthrower said he thinks that this
latest honor may not be the last time one of his films enters
the registry and that his 2006 Hurricane Katrina documentary “When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts”
could be the next.
Then there’s Lee’s drama “Black Klansman,” a fact-based
biopic, due out next year, about a black Colorado police
officer who infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan.
“Just wait until you see that one,” Lee said. “It’s set in the
early 1970s, but you can’t watch it without thinking of
today.”
WARNER BROS.
Films selected for the 2017 National Film Registry:
Ace in the Hole (a.k.a. “Big Carnival”) (1951)
Boulevard Nights (1979)
Die Hard (1988)
Dumbo (1941)
Field of Dreams (1989)
4 Little Girls (1997)
Fuentes Family Home Movies Collection (1920s and 1930s)
Gentleman’s Agreement (1947)
The Goonies (1985)
Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967)
He Who Gets Slapped (1924)
Interior New York Subway, 14th Street to 42nd Street (1905)
La Bamba (1987)
Lives of Performers (1972)
Memento (2000)
Only Angels Have Wings (1939)
The Sinking of the Lusitania (1918)
Spartacus (1960)
Superman (1978)
Thelonious Monk: Straight, No Chaser (1988)
Time and Dreams (1976)
Titanic (1997)
To Sleep With Anger (1990)
Wanda (1971)
With the Abraham Lincoln Brigade in Spain (1937-1938)
michael.osullivan@washpost.com
TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX/PARAMOUNT PICTURES
HBO AND 40 ACRES AND A MULE FILMWORKS
SONY
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Films selected for the 2017 National Film Registry include “Superman,” starring Christopher Reeve;
“Titanic,” starring Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio; “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner,” starring Sidney Poitier, Katharine
Houghton and Spencer Tracy; and “4 Little Girls,” by filmmaker Spike Lee, here on a movie set.
Merriam-Webster’s word of the year largely has Kellyanne Conway to thank
BY
K RISTINE P HILLIPS
This is the year when a sea of
pink dominated the streets of
several American cities, the year
when #MeToo became a symbolic
driving force against sexual misconduct by men, and when a
group of women — “The Silence
Breakers” — graced the cover of
Time as the voices that launched
that movement.
These events, says MerriamWebster, are the reasons 2017
was a big year for feminism — at
least literally.
The online dictionary has
dubbed “feminism” its word of
the year, meaning it is the mostsearched word on MerriamWebster’s website. Lookups for
the definition of feminism increased by 70 percent over last
year. There were also several
major spikes that coincided with
major news events, said Peter
Sokolowski, Merriam-Webster’s
editor at large.
“No one word can ever encapsulate all the news, events, or
stories of a given year, particularly a year with so much news and
so many stories,” Sokolowski
said. “But when a single word is
looked up with great volume, it
also stands out as one associated
with several different important
stories. We can learn something
about ourselves through the
prism of vocabulary.”
Sokolowski said the first such
spike happened in January, when
thousands of women packed the
streets of several cities in the
United States and beyond in a
massive act of defiance against a
newly inaugurated president.
Discussions on what the word
meant to attendees and organizers of the Women’s March, and
whether the protest was a show
of feminism, fueled the spike, he
said.
Searches for the word spiked
again the following month, when
Kellyanne Conway, counselor to
President Trump, distanced herself from the term.
“It’s difficult for me to call
myself a feminist in the classic
sense because it seems to be very
anti-male, and it certainly is very
pro-abortion, and I’m neither
anti-male or pro-abortion. So,
there’s an individual feminism, if
you will, that you make your own
choices. . . . I look at myself as a
product of my choices, not a
victim of my circumstances,”
Conway said during the annual
Conservative Political Action
Conference at National Harbor
in Maryland last February.
Conway praised Trump for
hiring women and encouraged
women to run for president. She
also decried the “presumptive
negativity” about women in positions of power.
“You know, this whole sisterhood, this whole ‘let’s go march
for women’s rights’ and, you
know, just constantly talking
about what women look like or
what they wear or making fun of
their choices or presuming that
they’re not as powerful as the
men around,” she said.
Conway did not respond to an
email requesting comment Tuesday morning about MerriamWebster crediting her statement
for the popularity of the word
“feminism.”
Merriam-Webster said the
storm of revelations in the latter
half of 2017 and the emergence of
#MeToo, a hashtag that myriad
women used on social media to
say that they have been victims of
some form of sexual misconduct
or harassment, resulted in a
steady increase in searches for
what feminism is.
The news cycle during the
latter half of 2017 was dominated
by reports about sexual assault
and sexual harassment. The public watched the fall from grace of
one popular and powerful man
after another — Harvey Weinstein, Sen. Al Franken, Rep. John
Conyers Jr., Matt Lauer, Charlie
Rose, Louis C.K. and several
others.
Allegations of sexual misconduct against Republican Senate
candidate Roy Moore, as first
revealed by The Washington
Post, rocked the special election
in Alabama, where voters on
Tuesday are selecting a candidate to fill the Senate seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions.
Movies also played a role.
Merriam-Webster said curiosity about the definition of feminism spiked after the release of
“Wonder Woman,” headlined by
Jewish actress Gal Gadot and
created by the first woman to
direct a big-budget superhero
movie, and the Hulu series “The
Handmaid’s Tale,” based on a
novel about a dystopian and
totalitarian society where women are stripped of their rights
and forced into sexual servitude.
The definition of feminism has
evolved since it was first entered
in the English dictionary by
Noah Webster in 1841. Once defined as simply “the qualities of
females,” feminism is now “the
theory of the political, economic,
and social equality of the sexes”
and “organized activity on behalf
of women’s rights and interests,”
according to Merriam-Webster.
Another word that became
popular this year is “complicit,”
which ranks No. 2 in MerriamWebster’s top 10 list and was
recently declared word of the
year by Dictionary.com. Both online dictionaries said spikes in
searches for the word involved
Ivanka Trump, the president’s
older daughter and a current
White House adviser. MerriamWebster said the word spiked in
March when Ivanka Trump responded to accusations that she
was being complicit in her father’s decisions.
“I don’t know that the critics
who may say that of me, if they
found themselves in this very
unique and unprecedented situation that I am now in, would do
any differently than I am doing,”
Ivanka Trump said. She added
later: “I don’t know what it
means to be complicit. But you
know, I hope time will prove that
I have done a good job and, much
more importantly, that my father’s administration is the success I know it will be.”
She was later parodied by
“Saturday Night Live,” when
Scarlett Johansson, dressed in a
glittery gold gown, glided into a
gilded room as she modeled for a
fragrance called Complicit.
Other words that made
Merriam-Webster’s top 10 are:
recuse, popularized by Sessions’s
decision to recuse himself from
investigations involving Russia
and the presidential election;
dotard, an old-fashioned word
that North Korean leader Kim
Jong Un used to described President Trump; and gaffe, specifically, the envelope fiasco that led
to the announcement of the
wrong winner for Best Picture at
the Academy Awards.
Merriam-Webster has become
popular over the past two years
for its viral trolling of Trump.
The dictionary mocked Trump
several times in 2016, when the
then-presidential candidate misspelled words in his tweets (unpresidented, honer, leightweight
and chocker).
amy.wang@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C7
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
BOTH SIDES VULNERABLE
NORTH
Q
AKQ
K Q 10 9 5 4
J63
EAST
10 7 5 4 3
8643
76
54
WEST (D)
AJ92
72
A8
A 10 8 7 2
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
K86
J 10 9 5
J32
KQ9
The bidding:
WEST
NORTH
EAST
1
1
Pass
Pass
3
Pass
All Pass
Opening lead — Choose it
SOUTH
1 NT
3 NT
CLASSIC PEANUTS
ook at today’s West hand
and the auction. Choose
your opening lead against
3NT.
“I’ll admit my dummy play
isn’t sharp,” Cy the Cynic
told me, “and my bidding can
be slapdash. But I’ll match
my opening leads against
anyone’s.”
Cy went off to prove his
point in a Chicago game and RHYMES WITH ORANGE
soon faced a lead problem
as today’s West. He opened
one club, but North-South bid
strongly to game. Cy led ... a
club. South won and forced
out the ace of diamonds, and
all the Cynic could do was
cash his other aces. Making
four.
“What about your knack
for finding a killing lead?” I
asked mildly.
LIO
Cy must have thought
“fourth from the longest and
strongest” was automatic.
But South appeared to have
the clubs well stopped, and
North had shown a good
hand with long diamonds. Cy
needed fast tricks; his best
hope lay with the spades.
Since East was marked with
nothing, Cy had no cause to
lead low to keep communication. He should lead the ace
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
of spades — a big success in
this deal.
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
L
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
AJ9272
A 8 A 10 8 7 2
Your partner opens one
heart, you respond two
clubs, he bids two diamonds
and you try two spades.
Partner then rebids three
hearts. What do you say?
ANSWER: Your partner
suggests six hearts, four
diamonds and better than
minimum values. If he had
a minimum, he would have
rebid two hearts to limit his
strength. Bid six hearts. That
will be a good spot if partner
holds 8, A Q J 10 8 6, K Q 6
5, K 5.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C8
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | DECEMBER 13
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
This year a whole
group of new
possibilities emerges.
In many ways, you
could have a variety of new
beginnings to choose from. A
certain situation might not be
as easy as it looks. Consider
what you are doing before
taking the leap. If you are
single, you could find yourself
in a heavy relationship. Be
sure you want this type of
bond. If you are attached, you
are likely to make a dramatic
change in the course of your
relationship. Make solid
choices. Be careful when
dealing with a Scorpio!
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You know exactly what to do to
get someone else’s attention,
but is it worth it? You might
need to deal with an unusually
difficult person. One-on-one
relating is highlighted. Know
that you can come to terms
with anyone, given some time.
Listen to your gut.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Others seem to be in your
face as they try to get past a
problem in the most effective
way possible. You don’t mind
figuring out the best path, as
you know you’ll make a strong
decision. Recognize when you
need to hold back.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Focus on getting the job done.
You have a unique perspective,
WEINGARTENS & CLARK and others often want to
initiate a discussion with you.
You like understanding other
people’s views. Be as direct as
you can be with an associate;
do not hesitate to express your
thoughts.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
You might feel as if you can’t
disagree with a partner. You’ll
do whatever is necessary to
keep the peace. If a certain
matter is very important to
you, don’t hesitate to start
a conversation. Assume
responsibilities graciously.
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Tension seems to run high
right now. You will do your
best to be agreeable and fulfill
the various requests made by
others. Feel free to say “no,”
if need be. You seem to be
juggling too many things at
once right now.
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Reach out to someone close
to you. You could hear some
interesting news, to say the
very least. You might choose
to take in all the information,
even if some of it is merely
gossip.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You might feel overextended in
some way, and it could create
a ripple effect in other areas
of your life. Trying to control
this situation could be close to
impossible, but in time you will
be able to root out the cause
and start healing.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You feel particularly good right
now, and others are picking
up on your mood. Enjoy the
reactions of close friends and
loved ones. You might have
too much energy for your own
good.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You might feel as if you can’t
share some special news just
yet. As a result, others could
view you as being closed off.
Rein in your temper, as it is
likely to flare up at some point.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
Reconsider your plans. You
might feel as if you can’t refuse
an invitation or special project.
You will get several friends
involved, who will only add to
the positive outcome. You will
enjoy hours of brainstorming
with others.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You could be flying high and
attempting to accomplish
much more of what you want.
Others seem responsive, but
don’t be surprised if someone
turns around and stabs you in
the back.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Use your imagination to fill in
any gaps that you see when
trying to identify with someone
else. By imagining what it feels
like to be this person, you’ll
open up to better relating, and
will make your interactions
more relevant.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C9
RE
After Weinstein et al., o∞ce parties take a sober approach
[we’ll allow you, dear reader, to
fill in this blank] look great.’ ”
The worst case of all? An alleged rape.
HOLIDAYS FROM C1
Don’t cancel outright, she’s telling them, but set a respectful
tone. And, yeah, bring the partner.
Nothing like the evil eye from the
S.O. to keep a harasser in check.
Still, many companies have already decided that the whiskeyfilled well of the open bar, that
mainstay of the corporate shindig, has finally dried up.
That’s what human resources
staffers said in an informal poll
conducted this fall by placement
firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas — in the midst of allegations
about Weinstein and Kevin Spacey and Al Franken and Louis C.K.
et al.
Only 49 percent of companies
said they planned to serve alcohol
at their soirees. That’s compared
with nearly 62 percent last year.
That’s if they were having a
party at all.
This year, 11 percent said “pass”
to a holiday event. Last year, only
4 percent skipped it.
After conducting the poll for
10 years, vice president Andrew
Challenger was caught off guard
by this year’s responses. “When
unemployment is low, when the
economy is moving at a good
pace” as it is today, he says, companies are more likely to have
holiday parties, spend more on
them and offer more alcohol.
What else could the booze-free
approach reflect, Challenger
wonders, but “the Weinstein Effect?”
A
A
PARAMOUNT/EVERETT COLLECTION
s American traditions go, the
office holiday party is decidedly odd: It’s a collegial,
company-sponsored get-together
with free-flowing vodka.
“Let loose a little!” an off-site
setting can imply. But the invitations also suggest, “Decline at
your own career peril.”
Can any good come of this?
“The holiday function is supposed to be the unifying event of
the year, for jobs well done. It’s
also supposed to be a morale
boost for the employees,” says
Ross J. Peters, who specializes in
sexual harassment at his Illinoisbased employment law firm.
And yet. All the booze and informality add up to scenarios
where employees and management can misplace their moral
compasses.
“Sometimes, men feel it’s an
opportunity to make themselves
more familiar in a party atmosphere. Harassers use it for intimate conversation,” says Peters,
frustration creeping into his
voice. “You should not be asking
about people’s boyfriends or girlfriends!”
“People tend to feel more comfortable away from the workplace,” Billows adds. The lines are
blurred, and management and
employees begin to convince
themselves, “ ‘I’m at a social gathering. The rules don’t apply anymore.’ ”
Which is why the office holiday
party-related cases have stacked
up for Peters, who represents harassment victims. Over the years,
he has had a case of servers working a company event who found
themselves groped by partygoers.
“I’ve had cases,” he says, “where
men said, ‘That outfit makes your
MICHAEL YARISH/AMC
PARAMOUNT/EVERETT COLLECTION
The holiday office party has long provided fodder for Hollywood. Abbey Lee and Karan Soni, above right, dance in a scene from
“Office Christmas Party, ” which, as one can see from the top photo, doesn’t serve as a good blueprint for planning a workplace
soiree. Jon Hamm and Elisabeth Moss, above left, in a scene from a “Mad Men” episode that featured a party with sexual high jinks.
“Sometimes, men feel it’s an opportunity to make themselves more familiar
in a party atmosphere. Harassers use it for intimate conversation.”
Ross J. Peters, whose Illinois-based employment law firm specializes in sexual harassment
ttention, employers: This did
not begin in 2017.
Peters says the cases he
has worked in his decades practicing in the field have proved how
rampant harassment is. For him,
the scandals of the past year show
only that “sexual harassment has
finally taken its place in social
discourse.”
Not that everyone has learned
the lessons of the past months.
Bloomberg reports that in Silicon Valley, where Uber endured
an ugly avalanche of sexual-harassment firings this year, some
unnamed tech companies are hiring models to attend their holiday
parties and bring cheer to the
mostly male staffs. (One agency
said that a client asked for those
models to wear “Pink Pantherthemed latex bodysuits.”)
Bad behavior at office holiday
parties is so pervasive that Hollywood — home of Harvey Weinstein — has long had a field day
depicting the debauchery.
A Christmas episode of “Mad
Men” featured the slick New York
ad execs and their nubile young
secretaries mingling on a smoky,
boozy night involving Santa hats,
a conga line and cringe-worthy
boss-secretary sexual high jinks.
One particularly cruel attendee
forced underlings to sit on Santa’s
lap and then kept the photographic evidence.
Then there’s the 2016 Jennifer
Aniston movie, “Office Christmas
Party,” in which a “nondenominational mixer” at a Chicago firm
becomes a frat-house rager, complete with this mid-party announcement: “Babies are not getting made tonight. Not here on
company property. If you are going to have intercourse, please go
beyond the floodlamps at the perimeter of the plaza and into the
Rite-Aid parking lot!”
Perhaps a lawyer can offer a
better way to phrase that.
A company statement, pithy
but firm, just before the festivities
is a very smart idea, Peters says.
He suggests: “There is zero tolerance for sexual harassment. Zero.
Zero. Zero.” (Got it?)
And if it happens? “They have
to fire that person,” he says.
“That’s the only thing a harasser
will understand. It’s got to cost
him his job.”
Some companies are already
making substantial changes.
Media company Vox, which recently fired its editorial director
over sexual harassment accusations, informed employees that
they would receive just two drink
tickets a person at the company
party this week. Any further imbibing would be of the nonalcoholic variety.
“We recognize that even
though alcohol isn’t always the
reason for unprofessional behavior,” a leaked internal memo
cheerily noted, “creating an environment that encourages overconsumption certainly contributes to it.”
Okay, we’ve gotten that ugly
stuff out of the way. Now, who’s
ready to party?
lavanya.ramanathan@washpost.com
Call me. Don’t be afraid to just phone moi. Call me, and I’ll be around.
Miss
Manners
Dear Miss
Manners: When I
run into someone
I have not seen
recently, we
usually have a
little chat that
invariably ends
with my saying
“Nice to see you’’
and the person saying I should
call him/her. This happens with
acquaintances, people with
whom I have lost contact, even
sometimes a person I purposely
have not contacted.
I am always at a loss as to how
to answer this invitation.
JUDITH
MARTIN,
NICHOLAS
MARTIN AND
JACOBINA
MARTIN
Usually, I just nod and say I will
call, knowing full well that I will
not.
Do these people really mean
that I should call them? Is there
a polite way to respond without
lying (I do not like to lie)? If a
person actually wants to renew
an acquaintance, shouldn’t he/
she call me rather than exhorting
me to make the call? (I am afraid
I am often tempted to say so.) Is
there a part of modern
communication that I am
missing?
To answer your questions, in
order: No. Yes. Yes. Yes.
Miss Manners realizes it is
possible that she is
overconfident by saying no, these
people do not want you to call.
They may simply be indifferent
and, therefore, unwilling to
expend the minimal energy
required to call themselves.
The advantage of short answers
is, strangely, their ambiguity: By
saying yes to a suggestion that you
should call, you may be lying, or
you may simply be agreeing that,
in an ideal world, yes, you should
call. What you are missing about
modern communication is that
although technology has made it
easier, human nature has not
always made it more desirable.
There may be a reason you lost
touch.
Dear Miss Manners: My son will
marry soon after the first
anniversary of his beloved dad’s
death. Instead of the usual guest
favors, I would like to have small
printed cards on the table that
say: “In lieu of guest favors, we
have made a donation to (charity
name), (father’s name)’s favorite
charity.’’
I don’t want to dampen our
son’s happy day, but I hate to
think of celebrating without
some thoughtful remembrance
of his devoted father.
As an opponent of guest favors,
other than for single-digit
birthday parties, Miss Manners
would not mourn their absence.
But the “bait and switch’’ nature
of what you propose troubles
her: “No swag for you’’ strikes
her as a less gentle way to
remind guests of a deceased
father than mentioning (father’s
name) in a toast.
Dear Miss Manners: If the
restaurant hostess is leading my
wife and me to a table, who
should follow behind the
hostess, and who should bring
up the rear? Not an earthshaking
question, just curious what the
“rules’’ say.
This being an entrance, at least
metaphorically, the rules for
passing through a door apply.
Ladies first, gentlemen second.
Miss Manners notes that the
rules allow an exception for
particularly crowded restaurants
where a lady may require a
blocker to clear the way.
New Miss Manners columns are
posted Monday through Saturday on
washingtonpost.com/advice. You can
send questions to Miss Manners at
her website, missmanners.com.
© 2017, by Judith Martin
Reader reminds Heloise about the cookie recipe that literally takes the cake
Dear Heloise:
Hints from You have a recipe
Heloise
for cookies from
cake mixes that
I’ve always loved. Sadly, when
we moved to a new house, I
must have lost the recipe. Could
you reprint it for me?
Ada F., Sparks, Nev.
Ada F.: It’s one of my favorite
recipes, and it’s so easy to make.
Here it is:
Heloise’s Cookies From Cake
Mix
Choose any flavor of cake mix
you’d like, and add up to 1/4 cup of
nuts, raisins or chocolate chips,
or any combination of those
three ingredients.
1 (18.25-ounce) box of cake mix
1/4 cup mix-ins (see above)
2 eggs
1/2 cup of vegetable oil
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Mix only the above
ingredients in a large bowl until
blended. Drop the batter by
spoonfuls onto an ungreased
baking sheet about 2 inches
apart. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes.
You must watch carefully, because they brown very quickly.
Ovens vary, so stand by for the
first batch.
If you like simple, easy-tomake recipes that are tasty,
healthful and give you more free
time, you’ll love my All-Time
Favorite Recipes pamphlet. To
get a copy, send $5, along with a
stamped (70 cents), self-addressed, long envelope, to: Heloise/All-Time Favorites, P.O. Box
795001, San Antonio, TX 782795001. With the holidays already
here, why spend hours in the
kitchen when you can use recipes
that give you more time with
your friends and family?
Dear Heloise: Both my husband
and I love fresh carrots from the
garden. However, my husband is
English, and he believes that
carrots should be boiled until
they are very soft, just as his
mother fixed them when he was
a boy. I think they lose most of
their nutrients and are just plain
unappetizing prepared that way.
How should carrots be cooked?
Lucy R., Falmouth, Maine
Lucy R.: The way carrots are
cooked depends in part on
personal preference. Some
people like carrots soft, but I
like mine steamed. I cut up
young carrots to about 1/4- to 1/2inch pieces, then I steam them
for about five to six minutes.
This way, they retain some of
their crunchy texture and there
is less vitamin C loss. If you
want a softer carrot, steam them
for about 10 to 12 minutes. I also
like carrots baked, because it
brings out a nutty/smoky taste
when they are roasted about 20
minutes. Try one of these
methods and see how you and
your husband like carrots
cooked some way other than
boiling.
steak to your own tastes.
Because there are so many
illnesses caused by bacteria, the
U.S. Department of Agriculture
recommends cooking meat to an
internal temperature of at least
145 degrees Fahrenheit. You
might prefer a higher internal
temperature, but again, it all
depends on your personal
preference.
Dear Heloise: When I see a
commercial about steak, it’s
always half-raw in the middle. Is
that the proper way to cook a
steak?
Gina W., Bossier City, La.
Gina W.: You should cook your
Heloise’s column appears six days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Send a hint to Heloise, P.O. Box
795000, San Antonio, TX 782795000, or email it to
Heloise@Heloise.com.
© 2017, King Features Syndicate
C10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
Ewoks are modeled after the Brussels Griffon, the
type of dog that George Lucas, creator of the Star
Wars series, owned at the time he was making
“Return of the Jedi.”
Winter has arrived: Temperatures
may rise above freezing, but it will
feel colder than that.
How much do you know
about the Star Wars
universe? Take our online
quiz to find out.
ILLUSTRATION BY KESHAV PARIKH, 9, BURKE
Cuddly characters can be a force of their own
BY
H AU C HU
I
n a toy meeting far, far away . . . . So
the story goes for how some of the
creatures that inhabit the world of
Star Wars came to life.
The popular movie franchise has
another chapter in its saga when “Star
Wars: The Last Jedi” premieres Friday.
The films have provided some of the
most iconic figures in pop culture, including Han Solo and Darth Vader, but
sometimes these movies also have a
scene-stealer.
In trailers for the new movie, one
character has captured the imagination
of fans: porgs.
Porgs appeared for only a split second
in the trailer, but one glimpse of the
creatures was enough to stir up a frenzy.
A Google search produces more than 3
million results for porgs, many of them
revolving around one question: What
are they?
The birdlike creature was inspired
by puffins on Skellig Michael, an
island off the southwest coast of
Ireland. That island was the filming location for Ahch-To, the planet where Luke Skywalker appears
at the end of “Star Wars: The Force
Awakens.”
“You fall into those deep, soulful
eyes. I think a lot of people are going
to want a porg as a pet,” said Pablo
Hidalgo, creative executive for Lucasfilm, the company that has produced the
Star Wars movies.
Because plot details of the new movie
are kept secret, very few can say for sure
what porgs will contribute to the Star
Wars universe. But fans have speculated
that they might be more than cute
window dressing.
Fans of the franchise are familiar with
a character that, while serving a purpose
in the story, can attract kids to buy toys
and other merchandise. “Star Wars: The
Force Awakens” had BB-8, and “Return
of the Jedi” most famously had Ewoks,
little furry creatures that save Luke,
Princess Leia and Han Solo from danger.
ACROSS
1 Brainiac
8 Campus eatery,
for short
11 Flying Solo?
14 Brewpub brew
15 Auburn University home
17 #2 on Rolling
Stone’s 100
Greatest
Guitarists
of All Time
18 Burger bun
flavorings
19 Out-of-date
20 Usual people
in a roundup?
22 Small dogs
24 Trafficking org.
25 Insisted on it
29 Gaming rookie,
in slang
31 “Treasure Island”
author’s initials
33 Cape
34 Six-sided state
36 Steinbeck’s
“__ of Eden”
38 Simple card
game
39 Pal of Sleepy
41 “Taras Bulba”
novelist Gogol
43 Org. with
Thunder and
Heat
44 Eggs in a lab
45 Amino __
46 Chew (on)
48 Male
bodybuilder
50 Uncle, in Mexico
52 Homecoming
figure
54 Rock show
venues
56 U.K. country
58 Palm
smartphone
60 Welcomers at
the church door
63 Car seller’s
employer: abbr.
64 Like some
celebrity
memoirs
67 Desperate
69 Salaries
70 Composer
Puccini
71 28-Down,
essentially
72 Solid __ rock
73 Steams up
Ewoks, above, were popular with kids in an
earlier Star Wars movie. For the film opening this
week, birdlike creatures called porgs, below and
at left, may also inspire affection and toy sales.
PHOTOS BY DISNEY/LUCASFILM 2017
MIKE ELIASON/SANTA BARBARA COUNTY
FIRE DEPARTMENT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A Christmas tree stands outside a
house as a wildfire blazes nearby.
Thousands flee as
California fire grows
The fifth-largest wildfire in California history expanded this week, ripping through dry brush while crews
struggled to keep flames from roaring
into neighborhoods.
Firefighters protected foothill
homes northwest of Los Angeles, making progress in residential areas while
the fire spread through forest land to
the north, Santa Barbara County Fire
Department spokesman Mike Eliason
said Tuesday.
Red-flag warnings for fire danger
caused by Santa Ana winds and a
critical lack of moisture have been
extended through at least Wednesday.
“It doesn’t get much drier than this
folks,” the National Weather Service
tweeted.
Tens of thousands of people remain
evacuated from the seaside areas of
Summerland, Carpinteria and Montecito, a community that’s home to
stars such as Oprah Winfrey, Ellen
DeGeneres and Drew Barrymore.
Poor air quality kept dozens of
schools closed. As ash rained down
and smoke blew through streets, people were urged to stay inside.
The blaze — known as the Thomas
Fire — has destroyed more than 680
homes, officials said.
kidspost@washpost.com
— Associated Press
By Brian Gubin
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
MICHAEL BUCKNER/GETTY IMAGES
Star Wars fans are sharply divided on
the credibility of Ewoks because a squad
of furballs seems unlikely to be able to
defeat a galactic army. Others have loved
them because they’re fun and adorable,
and they add laughs to the movie. Many
of these fans grew up with Ewok action
figures and plush dolls.
According to J.W. Rinzler, a former
executive editor at Lucasfilm and the
author of several books about the making of the original Star Wars trilogy,
Ewoks came about because of a thought
that series’ creator George Lucas had
about his daughter. Lucas wanted her —
and all kids — to have a character that
would appeal specifically to them.
“He wanted her to have a teddy
bearlike Star Wars toy, and there wasn’t
really anything for girls specifically,”
Rinzler told KidsPost.
Lucas has said that selling toys wasn’t
the reason he created Ewoks. The inspiration, he said, came from his desire to
give the intergalactic space saga a Stone
Age touch.
The forest moon Endor would be the
setting for a battle between the rebels
and the Empire. It was supposed to be
the home of Wookiees, including Chewbacca.
But Chewbacca’s character was a
skilled pilot and mechanic. Lucas realized it wouln’t make sense for him or
other Wookiees to live on Endor. So he
dreamed up Ewoks to serve as the simple
creatures to take down the laser-blasting
army of clones.
Debates will continue about the intentions of creating porgs, Ewoks or any
characters that seem geared toward
kids. But Rinzler says he believes that,
beyond the business of toys, what has
allowed Star Wars to stick for decades
with viewers of all ages is the action,
energy and message of the movies and
how good people feel after watching
them.
Lucas “told me the greatest thing
about making these movies was the
reaction of kids — always,” Rinzler said.
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
How best to balance career and kids?
Hi, Carolyn:
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
DOWN
1 Spaceship Earth
locale
2 Unit at the
pumps
3 *Friendly words
to departing
guests
4 Old-school “cool”
5 Has
6 Spoken
7 More heavily
populated
8 Attorney’s
assignment
9 Smart guys?
10 *Like medicine
that works
quickly
11 Smoked meat
12 Zion Church
letters
13 “One Mic”
rapper
16 Pasta sauce herb
21 *Extremely retro
food regimen?
23 Drunkard
26 Common yoga
pose ... and a
hint to hidden
names in the
answers to
starred clues
12/13/17
27 Former Swedish
automaker
28 Southern veggie
30 *“Cruel
Summer” band
32 Mineo of
movies
35 Hyphenated
fruit drink brand
37 Droop
39 Qatar’s capital
40 Done
42 Young fox
47 Hotel lobby
hangings
49 Prefix with
Saxon
51 Nervous
53 Remove calcium
deposits from
55 Tennis great
Monica
57 Area below the
abdomen
59 Cookie bits
in some
Milka chocolate
bars
61 “Born Free”
lioness
62 Fly high
64 Gratuity
65 Rock producer
Brian
66 HDTV choice
68 HDTV brand
TUESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Since my kids
were born, my job
basically covered
the cost of day
care. The kids
Carolyn
came home
Hax
overtired and
overstimulated.
As they became preschool age,
I restructured my work to
freelance so I could drop off and
pick up from school, take them
to extracurricular activities and
be home more with them. They
seem to be thriving in all areas
but one: I’m not.
I just can’t get enough time to
myself, to do all the things that
keep me (and my household)
humming. I think my mental
and physical health has suffered
because of my decision. I don’t
know how at-home parents do
this.
After my second was born, I
cried almost every day near the
end of my maternity leave
because I couldn’t wait to go
back to work. I thought that was
just because having a toddler
and an infant was so demanding.
But now with two preschoolers,
here I am again.
I am so torn. I want to do
what’s best for my kids and for
myself. But the two options seem
mutually exclusive.
Am I missing something? Is
there a way of doing things or
changing my perspective to
make this more bearable?
— Worksick
Worksick: You feel stuck, so try
the universal unstick: Stop
treating things as either-or.
It’s not working parent or athome parent, stressed kids or
thriving kids, your happiness or
theirs.
At least, child rearing is not
these things automatically and
not in perpetuity, because they
and you change. You might have
to make trade-offs like that at
certain times — and, in fact,
children’s health hinges on
parents’ willingness to make
such sacrifices when needed —
but if you’re staring down 1.5
decades in a fixed state of nearunbearability just to make your
household work, then it’s time to
rethink your household.
Look at the pieces
individually:
You said your kids came
home from day care overtired
and overstimulated. Possible
solutions include not just the one
you chose but also having the
other parent (yes?) make career
adjustments, changing day cares,
seeking a more family-friendly
job, switching to in-home care or
a nanny share. Or you make the
choice you did for a year or two
until your kids are old enough to
be enriched by their care instead
of drained by it, then return to
work outside the home.
Your pay just covered day
care. Also pretty common. But
it’s not just about money in,
money out. It’s about your kids’
health, your health, your career’s
health, the health of your
partnership. If you’re as
miserable as you sound, then
breaking even might be well
worth it — plus, you’ll avoid the
career (and therefore income)
erosion that slows so many stayat-home parents’ return to the
workforce.
How do at-home parents do
this? Some love it, hate it, feel
torn. Some could but refuse to do
it; some would love to but can’t.
We all make this up as we go
along, no? And as our and our
kids’ temperaments dictate?
Accordingly, some see being
home as right for now. Knowing
kids change, needs change,
finances change, opportunities
change.
Maybe you made a for now
decision, and maybe its time is
up.
Meantime: Find some parent
“colleagues.” Isolation is often
what tips a tough job into an
unbearable one.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
BASEBALL
2 01 7
Could former Cy Young Award
winner Jake Arrieta become the
latest Scott Boras client to find his
way onto the Nationals? D3
FA L L
The area’s best high school athletes
in football, soccer, field hockey,
volleyball and cross-country are
honored. D9-12
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
A L L - M E T
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
In what became a forgettable win
for Maryland, Division III Catholic
has a night to remember in College
Park. D8
Capitals
avenge
Mile High
low point
“What would it be
CAPITALS 5,
AVALANCHE 2
like for this to be the
day for people to find
BY
out you’re not here?”
LARRY JOHNSON
ANDREW INNERARITY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
There’s nowhere to run
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
A December game between the
Washington Capitals and Colorado Avalanche would hardly move
the needle most years, with the
teams playing each other just
twice a season. But the Capitals
saw Tuesday night’s matchup at
Capital One Arena as their opportunity to prove something to
themselves: that they’re not the
same team that got walloped by
the Avalanche a month ago.
That game has been described
as both Washington’s low point
and turning point so far this
season. In their opportunity for
redemption, the Capitals beat
the Avalanche, 5-2, and extended
an impressive run since the first
meeting with Colorado, climbing
the Metropolitan Division standings and now moving into a tie
for first place.
“You have a pretty prideful
group that wants to respond,”
Coach Barry Trotz said. “These
guys handed us our lunch last
time, so I think they wanted to
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D8
Capitals at Bruins
Tomorrow, 7:30 p.m., NBCSW
Convinced he is living with CTE, former NFL star Larry Johnson battles self-destructive impulses
BY
H
K ENT B ABB IN
MIAMI
e inches forward, with jets overhead and the ground 50 stories
below. Larry Johnson can feel it
happening: the arrival, he calls it,
of the demons.
They push him toward the barrier of a
rooftop deck of an apartment building
where he sometimes comes to visit a
friend, and, in moments like these, there’s
a strengthening urge — an almost overwhelming curiosity, he describes it — to
jump.
“One is telling you to do it; one is telling
you don’t,” says Johnson, a former NFL
running back. “One is telling you it’d be
fun.”
It is early November, less than two
weeks before his 38th birthday. He played
his last game in 2011, and he now believes
he suffers from chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the degenerative brain disorder
linked to more than 100 former football
players. For now, CTE can be confirmed
only after death, but Johnson says his
symptoms — anxiety, paranoia, the occasional self-destructive impulse — are con-
sistent with those of past victims.
On this afternoon, he shuffles closer to
the ledge, past the drainage fixture a foot
or so from the glass barrier. His body is
tingling, he says; his thoughts are filled
with static.
“They say when you die,” Johnson says,
looking down toward Southeast 1st Avenue, “you feel that euphoric feeling.”
Closer now. He’s frightened, less of the
fall than the direction of his own mind.
“What would it be like,” he says, “for this
to be the day for people to find out you’re
Wizards
fall short,
but Wall
may return
NETS 103,
WIZARDS 98
JOHNSON CONTINUED ON D6
Johnson says he has already begun to feel the effects of CTE, among them severe mood swings and forgetfulness. He fears that
by age 50 — a dozen years from now — he won’t know his own name. For now, his young daughter keeps him grounded.
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
new york — The final game of
the Washington Wizards’ long
road trip Tuesday night also represented what might be their last
game without John Wall.
While the Wizards lost, 103-98,
to the Brooklyn Nets, Wall sat in his
familiar spot as the first player on
the bench next to the four coaches.
Wall, who has missed nine consecutive games after having plateletrich plasma and viscosupplementation injections in his left knee,
recently returned to team practices and has shown progress. Depending on how Wall’s knee responds by Wednesday, he could
“very likely” play on the second
night of a back-to-back set against
the Memphis Grizzlies at Capital
One Arena, according to a person
familiar with the situation.
Wall’s impending return pro-
Gruden taking blame sounds all too familiar
It was midDecember, and
the head coach of
the Washington
Redskins stood
behind a podium
Barry
to address the
Svrluga
latest humblingif-not-humiliating
loss, and he actually said, with
some emphasis: “I just feel like
the worst coach in America to
have to lose the way we’re
losing.”
Careful about that word
choice, Coach, because it turns
out you’re just a couple of
swinging gates away from being
the undisputed owner of that
title.
We mention this midDecember development from
nine years ago because it applies
to mid-December right now,
because the current head coach
of the Redskins is saying, quite
plainly: “I’ve regressed. I’ve not
gotten this team ready to play. So
it’s on me.”
Now, Jay Gruden, who said
Sunday that he had gone
backward, isn’t Jim Zorn, who
uttered those worst-coach-inAmerica words in 2008. And
really, the situations can’t be the
same, because when Zorn said
what he said after a humiliating
loss to the one-win Cincinnati
Bengals, Chris Cooley was a
Washington tight end and not a
Washington radio analyst, Kirk
Cousins was a backup
quarterback for Michigan State
and not the most interesting
potential free agent in the NFL,
and Gruden was finishing his
final season as an offensive
assistant with Tampa Bay and
not the head coach for a onceproud NFL pillar.
The deck chairs have been
rearranged. That low-slung strip
mall of a headquarters in
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D5
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D20
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Cardinals at Redskins
Sunday, 1 p.m., Fox
Jay Gruden walks off the field after Sunday’s loss to the Chargers.
The Redskins have been outscored 68-27 in their last two games.
Grizzlies at Wizards
Today, 7 p.m., NBCSW
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
BASEBALL
Concussion
fears cause
MLB ump
to retire
BY
Ohtani has
an injured
ligament in
his elbow
PRO FOOTBALL
C INDY B OREN
For veteran baseball umpire
Dale Scott, the possibility of suffering another concussion just isn’t
worth the risk anymore.
Scott, who missed the rest of the
2017 season after a foul ball off the
bat of Baltimore’s Mark Trumbo
struck him in the face mask in
April, told the Associated Press of
his decision. The concussion was
his second in nine months and
fourth in five years.
“It was pretty easy,” he said of
his decision. “I wasn’t planning on
this year being the last one, but I
thought this is a sign.”
Like many people, Scott has
new awareness of the long-term
dangers of repeated hits to the
head and concussions, which can
lead to cognitive disorders and
chronic traumatic encephalopathy.
“[Doctors] said, ‘We just don’t
know,’ ” Scott said, “but they told
me that the more times you get hit,
the more probability that you’ll
have issues.”
Scott, 58, spent half his career as
a crew chief and worked 3,897
regular season games as well as
three World Series, three All-Star
Games and 91 postseason games.
Scott may be best known for a
decision he made in 2014, when he
revealed that he is gay in an interview with Referee magazine that
contained a photo of his husband.
Scott and Michael Rausch have
been together since 1986 and were
married in 2013. Spending more
time with his husband near their
Portland, Ore., home was another
factor in his decision to retire. He
is healthy and hopes that sharing
his experience with concussions
helps other umpires. Baseball offers long-term disability for those
who cannot work because of concussions and other injuries, but
Scott worried about what happens
after umps clear concussion protocol and return to work.
“That needs to be addressed,”
he said. “Maybe my situation can
be a catalyst for that.”
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“It is hurtful to read
comments where
people are hoping I
break my neck or that
God is punishing me
for being ‘anti-Trump.’”
LINDSEY VONN,
U.S. Alpine skier, in an Instagram post
discussing backlash she has received
for saying she would not visit the
White House (via Early Lead)
BY
lake buena vista, fla. — Japa-
STEVE MITCHELL/USA TODAY SPORTS
Tom Brady struggled against Miami on Monday night, but he has gotten the better of the Steelers throughout his career.
Patriots-Steelers will be decisive
BY
ADAM KILGORE
Two weeks ago, Pittsburgh Steelers
Coach Mike Tomlin spoke as though he
was looking ahead to the SteelersPatriots showdown Sunday. On
Monday night, New England played
like it.
This week’s edition of “Monday
Night
Football”
provided
an
unexpected prelude to the most
anticipated regular season game of the
year. The Miami Dolphins were not
supposed to be part of the discussion
this week, as hype mounted for the
collision of AFC powerhouses. But here
we are. The Dolphins manhandled the
Patriots, beating them up more
thoroughly than the 27-20 final score
indicated and altering the tenor and the
stakes for this coming weekend’s clash.
The AFC became the Steelers’ for the
taking in clearer fashion. If they can
beat the Patriots at Heinz Field on
Sunday, they will clinch home-field
advantage for the duration of the
playoffs. New England will have to play
its regulars through Week 17 now, even
if the Patriots beat the Steelers and take
the inside track to the top seed.
It would be unwise to downgrade the
Patriots over Monday night’s result.
They played without their best pass
rusher (Trey Flowers), best offensive
weapon (Rob Gronkowski) and most
versatile defensive player (Kyle Van
Noy). They played in Miami, a special
kind of hell for Tom Brady his entire
career. Brady fell to 7-9 at Miami, a
bizarre outlier — 16 percent of his
career regular season losses have come
in South Florida.
Still, the way the Dolphins throttled
New England could have only inspired
confidence in Pittsburgh. The Patriots
failed to convert a single third down.
The Dolphins overwhelmed the
Patriots’ offensive line, and their
Home-field advantage
for potential playoff rematch
is on the line this weekend
cornerbacks suffocated the Patriots’
wide receivers, even the explosive
Brandin Cooks. The Patriots played
terribly, but a fair amount of credit
belonged to Miami. Jay Cutler was
efficient. Cornerback Xavien Howard
looked like a future star. Running back
Kenyan Drake, explosive and elusive,
gained 193 total yards.
That the Patriots had a relevant
onside kick with a minute left is a
testament to their sturdiness. But the
Dolphins physically dominated them.
Brady played for much of the night as if
he prioritized not getting hurt over
advancing the ball. The Steelers
received a fresh lesson in how to beat
Brady: create pressure up the middle
without blitzing. After the night left
guard Joe Thuney had, Steelers
defensive tackle Cameron Heyward
seems like a key figure.
Whatever questions swirl around
New England this week, the Steelers
will feel more pressure Sunday. The
Patriots thrashed Pittsburgh, 36-17, in
last year’s AFC championship game
after leading by 27 late in the fourth
quarter. The Steelers have known all
offseason and all fall a potential Super
Bowl would run through the Patriots. In
his career, Ben Roethlisberger is 4-7
against New England. He has lost four
straight, and his last win came in 2011.
The game means more to Pittsburgh,
and the Steelers aren’t hiding from it.
Two weeks ago, Tony Dungy asked
Tomlin, in an NBC interview, to assess
the matchup against the Patriots. For
NFL coaches, looking ahead to lunch at
11:15 a.m. is verboten. But Tomlin felt
comfortable with Dungy, a longtime
friend and mentor, and acquiesced with
honesty.
“Man, I’m going to embrace the
elephant in the room,” Tomlin said. “It’s
going to be fireworks. It’s probably
going to be part one, and that’s going to
be a big game. But, probably, if we’re
both doing what we’re supposed to do,
the second is really going to be big. And
what happens in the first is going to set
up the second one, and determine the
location in the second one.”
The Steelers will have to make a
massive adjustment from their 39-38
victory over the Ravens. The health and
well-being of Ryan Shazier, recovering
from spinal surgery after a frightening
hit two weeks ago, is everybody’s first
priority. From a football standpoint,
Shazier’s absence made the Steelers’
linebacking corps look slow and
helpless against the run. The Ravens
rushed for 152 yards, gaining 5.8 yards
per carry. The Patriots could similarly
gash the Steelers behind the tandem of
Dion Lewis and Rex Burkhead, with
help from James White.
Then again, the Steelers simply could
try to outscore the Patriots. Given
Carson Wentz’s season-ending injury,
lackluster performances from Brady
and Russell Wilson, and Antonio
Brown’s 200 yards receiving this past
weekend, Brown may have nudged his
way into the MVP conversation. A wide
receiver has never claimed the award,
but with a big game in a victory, Brown
will thrust himself into the forefront.
Steelers-Patriots will decide so much.
If the game that preceded it is any
indication, nobody can predict how it’s
going to go.
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
sports
nese two-way superstar Shohei
Ohtani, whose signing with the
Los Angeles Angels last week was
hailed as a game-changer for that
franchise, reportedly has an injured ligament in his pitching elbow that, while not considered
immediately dire, required a
platelet-rich-plasma shot in October and could portend more serious problems down the road.
According to a report late Tuesday by Yahoo Sports, which cited
the results of a physical exam
Ohtani underwent in Tokyo in late
November, the injury is characterized as a first-degree sprain of his
right ulnar collateral ligament. Although a first-degree sprain is
considered mild, further damage
could require Tommy John ligament-replacement surgery.
For now, Ohtani is not considered a candidate for surgery. The
PRP shot, in which centrifugespun blood is returned to the body
to promote healing, was performed Oct. 20, according to Yahoo. While elbow injuries are common among pitchers, a PRP shot
indicates a higher level of concern.
In addition, Yahoo reported,
Ohtani has a “small free body”
floating near his UCL.
Ohtani, a 23-year-old who is
both a right-handed pitcher and
left-handed slugger with impeccable credentials in Japan in both
disciplines, was posted by his
Japanese team, the Nippon Ham
Fighters, earlier this month, and
after a thorough vetting process,
last week chose to sign with the
Angels. Because of MLB’s international-signing rules, the Angels
signed Ohtani for just a $2.3 million bonus — plus a $20 million
posting fee to the Ham Fighters.
Ohtani missed much of the 2017
season in Japan with a right ankle
injury that ultimately required
surgery in October and was expected to sideline him for three
months this winter.
The baseball industry was full
of whispers of a problem with
Ohtani’s elbow. But Tuesday’s
news is not seen as catastrophic,
both because of the mild damage
indicated in the physical exam and
because, even in a worst-case scenario, the Angels’ minimal financial outlay and the six years of
control they have over his rights
means they can be conservative
with his health.
“Shohei underwent a thorough
physical with MRI scans to both
his elbow and his shoulder,” Angels GM Billy Eppler told Yahoo.
“Those are scans we conduct
whenever we sign a pitcher. Based
on the readings of those MRIs,
there are not signs of acute trauma
in the elbow. It looks consistent
with players his age. We are
pleased with the results of the
physical and we are very happy to
have the player.”
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
Chelsea Janes contributed to this
report.
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
DIG ES T
BASEBALL
Miguel Andujar compete for
Yankees deal Headley
and Mitchell to Padres
third base in spring training. . . .
Baltimore Orioles third
baseman Steve Wilkerson was
suspended for 50 games after
testing positive for amphetamine,
a banned stimulant, under
baseball’s minor league program.
Wilkerson is on the roster of Class
AAA Norfolk.
The Yankees traded third
baseman Chase Headley and
pitcher Bryan Mitchell and
$500,000 to the San Diego Padres
on Tuesday, giving New York
added payroll flexibility and room
for infield prospects.
New York received 28-year-old
outfielder Jabari Blash, who
made his big league debut in 2016
and has played in 99 big league
games over two seasons.
A day after finalizing the
acquisition of National League
MVP Giancarlo Stanton from
Miami, the Yankees dealt with
their infield logjam and cut their
payroll to about $167 million for
luxury tax purposes. Yankees
owner Hal Steinbrenner is intent
on getting under the $197 million
tax threshold next year, and New
York still may attempt to re-sign
left-hander CC Sabathia or add
another starting pitcher.
Headley, who turns 34 in May,
lost his third base job and shifted
to first when the Yankees
acquired Todd Frazier this past
summer. While Frazier became a
free agent, the Yankees appear
intent on letting 21-year-old
D AVE S HEININ
SOCCER
Two seasons after Leicester’s
improbable title triumph,
another soccer fairy tale might be
unfolding in the English Premier
League.
They are unlikely to emulate
Leicester in winning the league,
but the players and coach of
unfashionable northwest club
Burnley are starting to dream of
playing in the Champions League
next season.
Burnley scored an 89th-minute
goal to beat visiting Stoke, 1-0,
and climb into the top four of
England’s top flight for the first
time since March 1975.
A supposed candidate for
relegation after selling two of its
best players in the offseason,
Burnley has won nine of its 17
games, conceded just 12 goals and
currently sits above Liverpool,
Arsenal and Tottenham with
nearly half the season gone.
Burnley has already beaten
Chelsea away and drawn at
Tottenham and Liverpool.
“Leicester blew the roof off the
dreams of football,” Burnley
Manager Sean Dyche said. “Now,
no bold statements from me
about that, by the way, I must
make that clear. But there’s an
open-mindedness to the group.
“If you are going to dream, you
have to be prepared to make the
dreams come true. That’s what we
are trying to do.”
A founding member of the
Football League in 1888 and the
English champion in 1921 and
1960, Burnley hasn’t finished a
season higher than sixth place
since 1974. A downturn saw the
club drop out of the top division
for 33 years and, in 1987, almost
fall out of the pro leagues.
Elsewhere, Willian scored one
goal and set up two others as
visiting Chelsea overwhelmed
Huddersfield, 3-1, moving the
defending champion into a tie
with second-place Manchester
United.
Crystal Palace scored two goals
from the 89th minute to beat 10man Watford, 2-1, and climb out
of the relegation zone for the first
time this season. . . .
Borussia Dortmund finally
ended its winless streak in the
German Bundesliga by beating
Mainz, 2-0, in Peter Stoeger’s first
game in charge.
It was Dortmund’s first league
win at the ninth attempt since
September, and only its second in
14 games across all competitions.
The side’s slump led to the
firing of Peter Bosz on Sunday,
when Stoeger took over.
Elsewhere, Leipzig dropped
points for the fourth consecutive
game in a 1-1 draw at Wolfsburg,
giving Bayern Munich the chance
to go even further ahead. Bayern
is already seven points clear and
hosts Cologne on Wednesday.
Freiburg surprised Borussia
Moenchengladbach, 1-0, thanks
to Nils Petersen’s penalty. . . .
Seattle goalkeeper Tyler Miller
was the Los Angeles Football
Club’s first pick in the MLS
expansion draft.
LAFC also chose Sporting
Kansas City forward Latif
Blessing, San Jose forward
Marco Urena, Columbus left
back Jukka Raitala and Toronto
defender Raheem Edwards. The
club then traded Raitala and
Edwards to Montreal for Laurent
Ciman.
MISC.
Wyoming quarterback Josh
Allen said his injured throwing
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
Memphis at Washington »NBC Sports Washington, WFED (1500 AM)
Oklahoma City at Indiana » ESPN
Charlotte at Houston » ESPN
NHL
8 p.m.
Boston at Detroit » NBC Sports Network
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
8 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
Villanova at Temple » ESPN2
Longwood at Illinois » Big Ten Network
Western Kentucky at Wisconsin » Fox Sports 1
Kennesaw State at Texas Tech » MASN2
Houston at LSU » SEC Network
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6 p.m.
7 p.m.
Princeton at Rutgers » Big Ten Network
Oregon at Mississippi State » SEC Network
GOLF
Midnight
(Thurs.)
Asian Tour: Indonesian Masters, first round » Golf Channel
SOCCER
12:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
3 p.m.
Bundesliga: Stuttgart at Hoffenheim » Fox Sports 2
Bundesliga: Koln at Bayern Munich » Fox Sports 1
Bundesliga: Augsburg at Schalke » Fox Sports 2
English Premier League: Arsenal at West Ham » NBC Sports Network
BOXING
6:30 a.m.
Jeff Horn vs. Gary Corcoran (welterweights) » ESPN
shoulder is better than 90 percent
recovered, but it’s still too early to
say whether he will be able to play
in the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
on Dec. 22.
Allen has been mentioned
among the top quarterback
prospects in next year’s NFL
draft. He sprained his right
shoulder Nov. 11 against Air Force
and missed Wyoming’s final two
regular season games. . . .
Two-time former champion
Victoria Azarenka was awarded
a wild card for the Australian
Open.
Azarenka, who won the
Australian Open in 2012 and
2013, has been involved in a
custody dispute involving her
son, who was born last Dec. 19.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
Could Arrieta be headed to Nationals? Orioles seem ready to shop Machado
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
lake buena vista, fla. — An
annual tradition commenced
Tuesday morning, when rumors of
Scott Boras trying to engage the
Washington Nationals on one of
his biggest free agent clients began to swirl around the halls of
baseball’s winter meetings.
Boras sent Nationals owner Ted
Lerner his extensive binder of arguments for signing right-hander
Jake Arrieta, one of two elite starters on this year’s market. Jerry
Crasnick of ESPN.com first reported the arrival of the lengthy binder, which was sent to other owners, too. A person familiar with the
situation confirmed the team has
had contact with Boras about Arrieta but described its interest in the
right-hander as “tepid.”
As explosive as it might sound,
Boras trying to sell the Nationals
on Arrieta was all but a foregone
conclusion. As someone with direct knowledge of the Nationals’
plans said, “We’ve seen this dance
before.” Boras’s relationship with
Lerner has facilitated more than
one deal for an expensive player
the Nationals did not initially pursue with much gusto, something
that has happened often enough
to qualify as a tradition.
General Manager Mike Rizzo
did not pursue closer Rafael Soriano but suddenly found himself
signing the reliever before the
2013 season. The Nationals had
the best rotation in baseball before the 2015 season, then signed
Max Scherzer to the biggest contract in team history. The Nationals had traded for an everyday
catcher in Derek Norris last winter, then inked Matt Wieters to a
two-year deal before spring training. As more than one industry
insider has said this week about
the Nationals and Arrieta, given
Boras’s relationship with the
Lerners, “You can never rule it
out.”
But unlike the cases of Wieters
or even Scherzer, when the Nationals had no glaring need for
either, they do have a hole in the
rotation this winter. Rizzo has
used the word “depth” when describing what he is looking for, but
what he really needs is a fifth
starter — or someone to slot in the
middle of the rotation and bump
Gio Gonzalez and Tanner Roark
down a spot. Gonzalez’s contract is
up after the 2018 season, meaning
DILIP VISHWANAT/GETTY IMAGES
Jake Arrieta is represented by
Scott Boras, with whom the
Nationals are very familiar.
the Nationals will have to fill another spot in 2019, too. Joe Ross
should be healthy by then, and
Erick Fedde should be ready. But
Rizzo has never been one to add
mediocre options just to add
them, or one to rely on unproven
options when he can find proven
ones. Whether because of his
plans or ownership’s tendency to
bet on Boras players, these Nationals have established themselves as
more likely to reach for a big name
before a need emerges than to
settle for a lesser one in the meantime. Arrieta would fit that mold.
Yet Arrieta is a greater risk than
Scherzer, or even Wieters. Crasnick’s report suggested Boras is
asking for $200 million for Arrieta, who is 31 and showed signs of
decline in 2017. If the Nationals
were to sign him, they would have
committed $210 million to Scherzer, $175 million to Stephen Strasburg and another $200 million or
so to Arrieta. That would be more
than half a billion dollars for three
starters, two of whom (Scherzer,
who dealt with a variety of ailments last season, and Arrieta)
have shown signs that demand
concern, and all of whom are represented by Boras. The Nationals
would have three starters with
massive contracts heading into
their mid-to-late 30s — a major
risk with the potential to cripple
them financially.
The Nationals crossed the competitive tax threshold for the first
time this season and have more
than $170 million committed to
2018 payroll already, according to
Cot’s Baseball Contracts. Rizzo
said Monday that he does not expect the Nationals to be restricted
financially this offseason, but
signing Arrieta would almost cer-
tainly guarantee they cross the
threshold again, thereby incurring greater penalties than the
eminently tolerable ones levied on
first-time offenders. Plus, the Chicago Cubs made Arrieta a qualifying offer this winter. Under the
new Collective Bargaining Agreement, because the Nationals
crossed the competitive balance
threshold last season, they would
surrender their second- and fifthhighest picks in the 2018 draft, as
well as $1 million in international
bonus pool money. The Nationals
treasure their draft picks, particularly as they try to restock their
system with young pitching, and
would be unlikely to part with two
lightly.
Arrieta certainly would help for
the short term. With Bryce Harper, Daniel Murphy and others entering their final seasons before
free agency, 2018 might represent
the last chance for this core group
of Nationals to push for the World
Series. Arrieta, the 2015 National
League Cy Young Award winner
who bounced back with a 2.28
second-half ERA last season,
would slide behind Scherzer and
Strasburg to create the kind of
super rotation the Nationals built
before the 2015 season, too. Gonzalez could be their fourth starter,
and Roark their fifth, a formidable
short-term setup, despite the financial risks it would present long
term.
The Nationals could get a
younger, more cost-effective third
or fourth starter on the trade market. Pittsburgh Pirates righthander Gerrit Cole and Detroit
Tigers right-hander Michael Fulmer are among those available
and would cost prospects, not
long-term financial instability.
The Nationals have not been explicitly linked to either yet. Less
expensive free agents such as
Lance Lynn and Alex Cobb could
also be available.
Then again, Arrieta has a long
history with new Nationals Manager Dave Martinez, who was his
bench coach in Chicago. More importantly, Boras has a long history
of engaging the Nationals on his
big-name clients, regardless of
whether the Nationals would have
looked at them otherwise. Discussion was inevitable. A deal is far
from it. But with Boras, Lerner
and the Nationals, you just can’t
rule it out.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
BY
D AVE S HEININ
lake buena vista, fla. — The
trajectory of Manny Machado’s
Baltimore Orioles career has always appeared clear and obvious,
almost from the day in August
2012 when the preternaturally talented kid with the big smile and
the big bat showed up at Camden
Yards to stay.
The Orioles were never going to
have much hope of signing their
superstar to a long-term contract
extension; in recent years, they haven’t even tried. Nor were the Orioles ever going to seriously consider trading their best player since
Cal Ripken Jr. for a bunch of prospects, even when that looked like
the smart play. Instead, they were
destined to milk Machado for every
ounce of his ability over the course
of the six years before he would
reach free agency after 2018, make
one last ill-fated stab at re-signing
him, then watch him walk away.
But something has changed
this week, and it is enough to have
sent the baseball industry into the
sort of feeding frenzy that only
accompanies the sudden and unexpected availability of a gamechanging talent: The Orioles, for
the first time, are talking and acting as if they are prepared to trade
their 25-year-old franchise cornerstone one season before he hits
free agency.
“We’re going to continue to explore the market and see where it
takes us,” Orioles General Manager Dan Duquette said Tuesday at
baseball’s annual winter meetings, when asked specifically
about trade talks involving
Machado.
That may not sound like much
of a statement of purpose, but it is
a far cry from the Orioles’ past
stance in regards to Machado,
which was essentially: We’re not
trading him, period.
“Manny’s an Oriole,” Duquette
said Tuesday when asked about
the chances Machado is still with
the team on Opening Day. “I really
don’t think we need to speculate
about something like that. If
something happens and we have a
trade, of course we’re going to
address the issues. I’ve said all
along this is an important year for
the Orioles in a lot of different
areas.”
Suddenly, and seemingly out of
nowhere, the sport was awakened
to the notion that Machado could
be dealt before the winter meetings are over on Thursday. The
co-headliner of next winter’s free
agent class — along with Washington Nationals right fielder Bryce
Harper — Machado, like Harper,
could be in line for a contract that
would eclipse the record-setting
$325 million deal signed by Giancarlo Stanton in 2014.
There was already speculation
as to which uniform Machado
would be wearing in 2019; now,
the same question can be asked for
2018, with teams such as the Philadelphia Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals, Texas Rangers and even the
division-rival New York Yankees
all expected to be in the mix. Major
roadblocks still exist — beginning
with the essential question of how
much a team can be expected to
give up for just one guaranteed
year of Machado — but the switch
in the Orioles’ philosophy regarding him has energized the offseason talent market.
Duquette, pressed Tuesday
about what a trade of Machado
would signal to the team’s fans,
refused to entertain talk of a “rebuild” in Baltimore: “We’re going
to try to put the best team on the
field that we can put on the field
and be as competitive as we can,”
he said. “That’s what we’ve always
done. I don’t see any other rebuilding in the American League East.”
When the Orioles were surprise
buyers instead of sellers at last
year’s trade deadline, they explained the decision as reflecting
the organization’s confidence
about the team’s ability to contend
in the second half of 2017 and
again in 2018.
But, clearly, circumstances
have changed. For one thing, the
Orioles collapsed during a 7-20
September to land themselves in
the AL East cellar for the first time
in six years, a sobering realitycheck.
For another, while the Boston
Red Sox won a second straight AL
East title, the Yankees reemerged
as an elite financial and competitive force in the division, coming
within one win of the World Series
— then bolstering their roster by
trading for Stanton, the reigning
NL MVP, this week.
The Orioles, it is clear, need two
or maybe three solid starting
pitchers to even begin to think
about fielding a respectable team
again, and they’re not going to
sign big-name free agents, they
don’t have the prospects to package in a trade and they aren’t close
to developing any homegrown impact starters. Trading Machado, at
least in theory, could be their best
— or only — path to making a
major upgrade to their rotation.
“The market’s thin on pitching
. . . because there’s so many clubs
looking for starting pitching,” Duquette said. “So it’s generally a
good idea to know what the value
of the market is for your team.”
The Orioles might have been
better served arriving at such an
awakening five months ago.
Machado is now entering his final
year before free agency — Duquette said the team hasn’t even
broached the idea of a long-term
extension over the past couple of
years — as are teammates Zach
Britton, Brad Brach and Adam
Jones. As potential trade chips, the
value of those assets is now perhaps half what they were in July,
when contenders could have acquired those players for two postseason runs, instead of one.
It’s fair to ask why a team would
give up good young players in a
trade for one guaranteed year of
Machado when they could wait
another year and sign him as a free
agent without sacrificing talent? A
team could always attempt to pull
off a sign-and-trade deal contingent upon reaching agreement
with Machado on a long-term contract extension, but it is unlikely
he would consider such an agreement when he is this close to free
agency, and Duquette said such a
scenario hasn’t been discussed.
There is perhaps some unquantifiable value in having Machado
for a full season before he hits free
agency, in hopes the acclimation
process helps sway him to stay, but
not necessarily enough to justify
trading away young, controllable
assets.
On Sept. 24 at Camden Yards, in
the Orioles’ final home game of the
year, Machado flied out to center
to end the eighth inning of what
would be a 9-4 win. When he
walked off the field at game’s end,
there was every expectation
Machado would be back in Baltimore in 2018. Maybe by the end of
that season, there would be a
chance to say goodbye.
Instead, there is now reason to
believe Machado’s farewell to Baltimore, such as it was, has already
happened.
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
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DECEMBER 13 , 2017
nfl rewind
NFC East
AFC East
DALLAS (7-6)
PHILADELPHIA (11-2)
BUFFALO (7-6)
NEW ENGLAND (10-3)
September
10: N.Y. Giants, 19-3
17: at Denver, 17-42
25: at Arizona, 28-17
October
1: L.A. Rams, 30-35
8: Green Bay, 31-35
15: Bye
22: at San Fran., 40-10
29: at Washington, 33-19
November
5: Kansas City, 28-17
12: at Atlanta, 7-27
19: Philadelphia, 9-37
23: L.A. Chargers, 6-28
30: Washington, 38-14
December
10: at N.Y. Giants, 30-10
17: at Oakland
24: Seattle
31: at Philadelphia
September
10: at Washington, 30-17
17: at Kansas City, 20-27
24: N.Y. Giants, 27-24
October
1: at L.A. Chargers, 26-24
8: Arizona, 34-7
12: at Carolina, 28-23
23: Washington, 34-24
29: San Fran., 33-10
November
5: Denver, 51-23
12: Bye
19: at Dallas, 37-9
26: Chicago, 31-3
December
3: at Seattle, 10-24
10: at L.A. Rams, 43-35
17: at N.Y. Giants
25: Oakland
31: Dallas
September
10: N.Y. Jets, 21-12
17: at Carolina, 3-9
24: Denver, 26-16
October
1: at Atlanta, 23-17
8: at Cincinnati, 16-20
15: Bye
22: Tampa Bay, 30-27
29: Oakland, 34-14
November
2: at N.Y. Jets, 21-34
12: New Orleans, 10-47
19: at L.A. Chargers, 24-54
26: at Kansas City, 16-10
December
3: New England, 3-23
10: Indianapolis, 13-7 (OT)
17: Miami
24: at New England
31: at Miami
September
7: Kansas City, 27-42
17: at New Orleans, 36-20
24: Houston, 36-33
October
1: Carolina, 30-33
5: at Tampa Bay, 19-14
15: at N.Y. Jets, 24-17
22: Atlanta, 23-7
29: L.A. Chargers, 21-13
November
5: Bye
12: at Denver, 41-16
19: at Oakland, 33-8
26: Miami, 35-17
December
3: at Buffalo, 23-3
11: at Miami, 20-27
17: at Pittsburgh
24: Buffalo
31: N.Y. Jets
NEW YORK (2-11)
WASHINGTON (5-8)
MIAMI (6-7)
NEW YORK (5-8)
September
10: at Dallas, 3-19
18: Detroit, 10-24
24: at Philadelphia, 24-27
October
1: at Tampa Bay, 23-25
8: L.A. Chargers, 22-27
15: at Denver, 23-10
22: Seattle, 7-24
29: Bye
November
5: L.A. Rams, 17-51
12: at San Fran., 21-31
19: Kansas City, 12-9 (OT)
23: at Washington, 10-20
December
3: at Oakland, 17-24
10: Dallas, 10-30
17: Philadelphia
24: at Arizona
31: Washington
September
10: Philadelphia, 17-30
17: at L.A. Rams, 27-20
24: Oakland, 27-10
October
2: at Kansas City, 20-29
8: Bye
15: San Fran., 26-24
23: at Philadelphia, 24-34
29: Dallas, 19-33
November
5: at Seattle, 17-14
12: Minnesota, 30-38
19: at N. Orleans, 31-34 (OT)
23: N.Y. Giants, 20-10
30: at Dallas, 14-38
December
10: at L.A. Chargers, 13-30
17: Arizona
24: Denver
31: at N.Y. Giants
September
17: at L.A. Chargers, 19-17
24: at N.Y. Jets, 6-20
October
1: New Orleans, 0-20
8: Tennessee, 16-10
15: at Atlanta, 20-17
22: N.Y. Jets, 31-28
26: at Baltimore, 0-40
November
5: Oakland, 24-27
13: at Carolina, 21-45
19: Tampa Bay, 20-30
26: at New England, 17-35
December
3: Denver, 35-9
11: New England, 27-20
17: at Buffalo
24: at Kansas City
31: Buffalo
September
10: at Buffalo, 12-21
17: at Oakland, 20-45
24: Miami, 20-6
October
1: Jacksonville, 23-20 (OT)
8: at Cleveland, 17-14
15: New England, 17-24
22: at Miami, 28-31
29: Atlanta, 20-25
November
2: Buffalo, 34-21
12: at Tampa Bay, 10-15
19: Bye
26: Carolina, 27-35
December
3: Kansas City, 38-31
10: at Denver, 0-23
17: at New Orleans
24: L.A. Chargers
31: at New England
JOE SARGENT/GETTY IMAGES
Ben Roethlisberger rallied the Steelers past the Ravens, 39-38, on Sunday night. Pittsburgh hosts New England next.
NFC North
CHICAGO (4-9)
GREEN BAY (7-6)
September
10: Atlanta, 17-23
17: at Tampa Bay, 7-29
24: Pittsburgh, 23-17 (OT)
28: at Green Bay, 14-35
October
9: Minnesota, 17-20
15: at Balt., 27-24 (OT)
22: Carolina, 17-3
29: at New Orleans, 12-20
November
5: Bye
12: Green Bay, 16-23
19: Detroit, 24-27
26: at Philadelphia, 3-31
December
3: San Fran., 14-15
10: at Cincinnati, 33-7
16: at Detroit
24: Cleveland
31: at Minnesota
September
10: Seattle, 17-9
17: at Atlanta, 23-34
24: Cincinnati, 27-24 (OT)
28: Chicago, 35-14
October
8: at Dallas, 35-31
15: at Minnesota, 10-23
22: New Orleans, 17-26
29: Bye
November
6: Detroit, 17-30
12: at Chicago, 23-16
19: Baltimore, 0-23
26: at Pittsburgh, 28-31
December
3: Tampa Bay, 26-20 (OT)
10: at Cleve., 27-21 (OT)
17: at Carolina
23: Minnesota
31: at Detroit
DETROIT (7-6)
MINNESOTA (10-3)
September
10: Arizona, 35-23
18: at N.Y. Giants, 24-10
24: Atlanta, 26-30
October
1: at Minnesota, 14-7
8: Carolina, 24-27
15: at New Orleans, 38-52
22: Bye
29: Pittsburgh, 15-20
November
6: at Green Bay, 30-17
12: Cleveland, 38-24
19: at Chicago, 27-24
23: Minnesota, 23-30
December
3: at Baltimore, 20-44
10: at Tampa Bay, 24-21
16: Chicago
24: at Cincinnati
31: Green Bay
September
11: New Orleans, 29-19
17: at Pittsburgh, 9-26
24: Tampa Bay, 34-17
October
1: Detroit, 7-14
9: at Chicago, 20-17
15: Green Bay, 23-10
22: Baltimore, 24-16
29: at Cleveland, 33-16
November
5: Bye
12: at Washington, 38-30
19: L.A. Rams, 24-7
23: at Detroit, 30-23
December
3: at Atlanta, 14-9
10: at Carolina, 24-31
17: Cincinnati
23: at Green Bay
31: Chicago
NFC South
ATLANTA (8-5)
NEW ORLEANS (9-4)
September
10: at Chicago, 23-17
17: Green Bay, 34-23
24: at Detroit, 30-26
October
1: Buffalo, 17-23
8: Bye
15: Miami, 17-20
22: at New England, 7-23
29: at N.Y. Jets, 25-20
November
5: at Carolina, 17-20
12: Dallas, 27-7
20: at Seattle, 34-31
26: Tampa Bay, 34-20
December
3: Minnesota, 9-14
7: New Orleans, 20-17
18: at Tampa Bay
24: at New Orleans
31: Carolina
September
11: at Minnesota, 19-29
17: New England, 20-36
24: at Carolina, 34-13
October
1: at Miami, 20-0
8: Bye
15: Detroit, 52-38
22: at Green Bay, 26-17
29: Chicago, 20-12
November
5: Tampa Bay, 30-10
12: at Buffalo, 47-10
19: Wash., 34-31 (OT)
26: at L.A. Rams, 20-26
December
3: Carolina, 31-21
7: at Atlanta, 17-20
17: N.Y. Jets
24: Atlanta
31: at Tampa Bay
CAROLINA (9-4)
TAMPA BAY (4-9)
September
10: at San Fran., 23-3
17: Buffalo, 9-3
24: New Orleans, 13-34
October
1: at New England, 33-30
8: at Detroit, 27-24
12: Philadelphia, 23-28
22: at Chicago, 3-17
29: at Tampa Bay, 17-3
November
5: Atlanta, 20-17
13: Miami, 45-21
19: Bye
26: at N.Y. Jets, 35-27
December
3: at New Orleans, 21-31
10: Minnesota, 31-24
17: Green Bay
24: Tampa Bay
31: at Atlanta
September
17: Chicago, 29-7
24: at Minnesota, 17-34
October
1: N.Y. Giants, 25-23
5: New England, 14-19
15: at Arizona, 33-38
22: at Buffalo, 27-30
29: Carolina, 3-17
November
5: at New Orleans, 10-30
12: N.Y. Jets, 15-10
19: at Miami, 30-20
26: at Atlanta, 20-34
December
3: at Green Bay, 20-26 (OT)
10: Detroit, 21-24
18: Atlanta
24: at Carolina
31: New Orleans
NFC West
ARIZONA (6-7)
SAN FRANCISCO (3-10)
September
10: at Detroit, 23-35
17: at Indy, 16-13 (OT)
25: Dallas, 17-28
October
1: San Fran., 18-15 (OT)
8: at Philadelphia, 7-34
15: Tampa Bay, 38-33
22: at L.A. Rams, 0-33
29: Bye
November
5: at San Fran., 20-10
9: Seattle, 16-22
19: at Houston, 21-31
26: Jacksonville, 27-24
December
3: L.A. Rams, 16-32
10: Tennessee, 12-7
17: at Washington
24: N.Y. Giants
31: at Seattle
September
10: Carolina, 3-23
17: at Seattle, 9-12
21: L.A. Rams, 39-41
October
1: at Arizona, 15-18 (OT)
8: at Indy, 23-26 (OT)
15: at Washington, 24-26
22: Dallas, 10-40
29: at Philadelphia, 10-33
November
5: Arizona, 10-20
12: N.Y. Giants, 31-21
19: Bye
26: Seattle, 13-24
December
3: at Chicago, 15-14
10: at Houston, 26-16
17: Tennessee
24: Jacksonville
31: at L.A. Rams
LOS ANGELES (9-4)
SEATTLE (8-5)
September
10: Indianapolis, 46-9
17: Washington, 20-27
21: at San Fran., 41-39
October
1: at Dallas, 35-30
8: Seattle, 10-16
15: at Jacksonville, 27-17
22: Arizona, 33-0
29: Bye
November
5: at N.Y. Giants, 51-17
12: Houston, 33-7
19: at Minnesota, 7-24
26: New Orleans, 26-20
December
3: at Arizona, 32-16
10: Philadelphia, 35-43
17: at Seattle
24: at Tennessee
31: San Fran.
September
10: at Green Bay, 9-17
17: San Fran., 12-9
24: at Tennessee, 27-33
October
1: Indianapolis, 46-18
8: at L.A. Rams, 16-10
15: Bye
22: at N.Y. Giants, 24-7
29: Houston, 41-38
November
5: Washington, 14-17
9: at Arizona, 22-16
20: Atlanta, 31-34
26: at San Fran., 24-13
December
3: Philadelphia, 24-10
10: at Jacksonville, 24-30
17: L.A. Rams
24: at Dallas
31: Arizona
AFC North
NFL power rankings
Each week, national NFL writer Mark Maske provides his ranking and commentary on all 32 teams. Dive deeper daily on
washingtonpost.com/sports.
1. Steelers, 11-2 PREVIOUS: 2
Remember when QB Ben Roethlisberger wondered whether he
could get it done anymore? No one was wondering that after his
506-yard passing game in Sunday night’s win over the Ravens.
2. Patriots, 10-3 PREVIOUS: 1
The Patriots suffered their nearly annual loss in Miami on
Monday night. But if they go to Pittsburgh on Sunday and prevail,
they will leapfrog the Steelers for the AFC’s top playoff seed.
3. Panthers, 9-4 PREVIOUS: 8
The surgically repaired foot of TE Greg Olsen continues to be a
concern. But the Panthers’ win over the Vikings was impressive.
4. Vikings, 10-3 PREVIOUS: 3
Case Keenum’s outing vs. Carolina was an issue. So, too, were the
performances of an offensive line that allowed him to be sacked
six times and a defense that gave up 216 yards on the ground.
5. Jaguars, 9-4 PREVIOUS: 12
The crowd’s behavior at the end of Sunday’s game was not
acceptable. It’s the Jaguars’ responsibility to ensure that things
like that don’t happen in their stadium. As for the game, beating
the Seahawks counts as a very good victory.
6. Falcons, 8-5 PREVIOUS: 13
Matt Ryan’s non-MVP-like season continued with his threeinterception performance Thursday night against the Saints. But
the Falcons still found a way to win a game they had to have.
16. Chiefs, 7-6 PREVIOUS: 20
Kansas City got back into the win column but had plenty of help
from Oakland. The competition will be tougher vs. the Chargers.
17. Titans, 8-5 PREVIOUS: 11
There’s no excuse for the feeble loss in Arizona.
18. Bills, 7-6 PREVIOUS: 22
Buffalo found the perfect cover for playing rookie QB Nathan
Peterman: Have it snow so hard that even if Peterman throws an
interception (or five), no one can actually see it.
19. Dolphins, 6-7 PREVIOUS: 23
Miami played well and earned its win Monday vs. New England.
QB Jay Cutler was superb. RB Kenyan Drake was a workhorse.
The pass rush bothered Tom Brady, and CB Xavien Howard
intercepted him twice while shutting down WR Brandin Cooks.
20. Cardinals, 6-7 PREVIOUS: 24
It will be interesting to see whether Bruce Arians wants to keep
coaching in Arizona beyond this season. He has done a pretty
good job to keep this Cardinals team near .500.
21. Raiders, 6-7 PREVIOUS: 14
Did anyone tell Oakland it was playing for first place Sunday?
The Raiders looked like they were going through the motions.
22. Broncos, 4-9 PREVIOUS: 31
Either the Broncos haven’t quit or the Jets are awful. Maybe both.
23. Jets, 5-8 PREVIOUS: 15
Josh McCown’s broken hand forces the Jets to give Bryce Petty
another look at QB. Why not get some playing time for Christian
Hackenberg as well? It certainly can’t hurt.
7. Saints, 9-4 PREVIOUS: 6
The late-game mistakes by QB Drew Brees and Coach Sean
Payton in Atlanta were as surprising as they were damaging.
8. Eagles, 11-2 PREVIOUS: 4
It is still a very good team around fill-in QB Nick Foles. But you
can’t believe on one hand that Carson Wentz was the NFL’s MVP
and then believe on the other that Philadelphia can keep this up
now that Wentz is out with a torn ACL.
9. Rams, 9-4 PREVIOUS: 5
The Rams are 1-2 thus far during their four-game, late-season
test against the Vikings, Saints, Eagles and Seahawks. That
stretch concludes Sunday in Seattle.
10. Chargers, 7-6 PREVIOUS: 10
Could there actually be an argument by season’s end about
which of L.A.’s two winning NFL teams is better? Few could have
seen that coming at the outset of the season.
11. Seahawks, 8-5 PREVIOUS: 7
Seahawks players receive their share of the blame for the chaos
at the end of the loss in Jacksonville. The fans should have
behaved better. So, too, should have Seattle’s players.
12. Ravens, 7-6 PREVIOUS: 9
Baltimore cannot afford to waste an offensive performance such
as the one it got Sunday night in Pittsburgh. Even the passing
game was productive.
13. Cowboys, 7-6 PREVIOUS: 16
Dallas finally figured out how to play without suspended RB
Ezekiel Elliott, winning its past two games. Unfortunately, it took
the Cowboys three losses without Elliott to figure it out.
14. Packers, 7-6 PREVIOUS: 17
Green Bay likely won’t reach the NFC playoffs, with or without
Aaron Rodgers back at QB. The wise move might be to protect
Rodgers from himself and keep him out the rest of the season.
15. Lions, 7-6 PREVIOUS: 19
QB Matthew Stafford’s toughness and late-game mettle were on
vivid display in Sunday’s gritty victory in Tampa.
NFC Statistics
Rush
135.5
143.0
121.1
114.7
116.8
105.7
91.5
76.3
137.5
97.6
100.8
134.5
81.2
106.8
90.1
124.5
Pass
265.2
247.5
248.2
252.9
246.6
256.2
262.0
268.2
200.8
240.7
233.2
195.4
241.3
201.8
206.1
167.2
DEFENSE
Yards
Minnesota .......................... 293.4
Philadelphia ....................... 294.2
Carolina .............................. 302.1
Atlanta ............................... 319.8
Arizona .............................. 320.6
Chicago .............................. 325.5
Seattle ............................... 329.1
New Orleans ...................... 331.1
Dallas ................................. 341.6
L.A. Rams ........................... 342.8
Washington ....................... 351.5
San Francisco ..................... 351.8
Green Bay .......................... 354.1
Detroit ............................... 363.3
Tampa Bay ......................... 389.3
N.Y. Giants ......................... 395.7
Rush
88.3
71.2
89.5
108.3
96.8
108.9
102.8
114.3
107.4
124.1
122.0
121.3
113.8
116.3
113.2
130.0
Pass
205.1
223.0
212.6
211.5
223.8
216.6
226.3
216.8
234.2
218.7
229.5
230.5
240.3
247.0
276.1
265.7
PASSING
ATT-CMP
Brees, NOR .............. 442/317
A. Rodgers, GBY ...... 193/128
Wentz, PHL ............. 440/265
Goff, LA ................... 418/260
Stafford, DET .......... 468/307
Cousins, WAS ......... 440/290
Keenum, MIN .......... 404/270
R. Wilson, SEA ........ 473/293
M. Ryan, ATL ........... 417/275
Prescott, DAL .......... 399/252
Winston, TAM ......... 329/206
PCT YDS TD INT RATE
71.7 3,569 19 6 104.2
66.3 1,385 13 3 103.2
60.2 3,296 33 7 101.9
62.2 3,383 22 6 99.2
65.6 3,683 23 9 97.9
65.9 3,440 22 9 97.7
66.8 2,983 18 7 96.2
61.9 3,527 29 11 95.5
65.9 3,278 17 11 92.4
63.2 2,752 21 9 91.6
62.6 2,475 14 8 89.7
24. Bears, 4-9 PREVIOUS: 29
Mitchell Trubisky has put up the two most efficient passing
games of his rookie season the past two weeks.
25. 49ers, 3-10 PREVIOUS: 28
So does Coach Kyle Shanahan deserve credit for waiting until
Jimmy Garoppolo was ready — really ready — to play before
putting him in the lineup? Or does he deserve blame because
Garoppolo should have been playing sooner?
26. Bengals, 5-8 PREVIOUS: 18
The physical and emotional toll of last Monday’s loss to the
Steelers was evident in Sunday’s listless defeat to the Bears.
27. Redskins, 5-8 PREVIOUS: 21
The Redskins’ regression over the past couple of weeks
undercuts the argument that Coach Jay Gruden has gotten the
most out of his injury-depleted team and kept his players
competing. Even so, it says here that he should stay as coach.
28. Buccaneers, 4-9 PREVIOUS: 25
It isn’t looking particularly promising for Coach Dirk Koetter.
29. Texans, 4-9 PREVIOUS: 26
Coach Bill O’Brien probably should return despite this year’s woes.
30. Colts, 3-10 PREVIOUS: 27
The NFL’s TV ratings woes undoubtedly are about to end with a
scintillating Colts-Broncos game on tap Thursday night.
31. Giants, 2-11 PREVIOUS: 30
A dreary season keeps getting drearier.
mark.maske@washpost.com
RECEIVING
NO YDS AVG
Thielen, MIN .......................... 80 1,161 14.5
Ju. Jones, ATL ....................... 73 1,161 15.9
Mic. Thomas, NOR ................ 85 992 11.7
Fitzgerald, ARI ...................... 87 922 10.6
M. Jones, DET ....................... 51 885 17.4
Baldwin, SEA ......................... 66 860 13.0
Tate, DET ............................... 79 852 10.8
D. Adams, GBY ...................... 69 828 12.0
Kupp, LA ................................ 56 783 14.0
M. Goodwin, SNF .................. 41 783 19.1
LG TD
65 4
53 3
35 4
37 5
46 8
54 5
45 4
55 9
64 4
83 1
RUSHING
Gurley, LA ............................
J. Howard, CHI .....................
Ingram, NOR ........................
E. Elliott, DAL ......................
Hyde, SNF ............................
Blount, PHL .........................
D. Freeman, ATL .................
Stewart, CAR ......................
LG TD
36 10
53 7
72 9
30 7
61 5
68 2
44 6
60 6
NO YDS AVG
236 1,035 4.4
235 1,032 4.4
192 971 5.1
191 783 4.1
188 771 4.1
152 696 4.6
152 680 4.5
180 634 3.5
Rush
113.2
99.7
99.5
116.6
149.9
114.9
91.5
117.7
105.5
103.2
108.2
130.1
118.3
87.4
104.0
79.4
Pass
287.2
281.5
273.2
254.7
210.8
231.1
237.8
197.5
206.5
208.2
203.2
168.1
179.8
210.5
186.7
197.8
DEFENSE
Yards
Denver ................................ 280.5
Jacksonville ....................... 291.6
Pittsburgh .......................... 303.8
Tennessee .......................... 323.3
L.A. Chargers ..................... 325.1
Cleveland ........................... 328.3
Baltimore ........................... 329.2
Miami ................................. 332.8
Cincinnati ........................... 345.5
Houston ............................. 346.3
N.Y. Jets ............................ 347.3
Oakland .............................. 350.8
Buffalo ............................... 351.2
Kansas City ........................ 373.4
New England ...................... 374.6
Indianapolis ....................... 375.3
Rush
89.5
117.4
102.9
90.0
124.8
96.0
108.5
109.5
132.1
104.5
116.9
109.5
123.7
124.8
120.7
117.5
Pass
191.1
174.2
200.8
233.3
200.3
232.3
220.7
223.4
213.4
241.8
230.4
241.2
227.5
248.5
253.9
257.8
September
10: Pittsburgh, 18-21
17: at Baltimore, 10-24
24: at Indianapolis, 28-31
October
1: Cincinnati, 7-31
8: N.Y. Jets, 14-17
15: at Houston, 17-33
22: Tennessee, 9-12 (OT)
29: Minnesota, 16-33
November
5: Bye
12: at Detroit, 24-38
19: Jacksonville, 7-19
26: at Cincinnati, 16-30
December
3: at L.A. Chargers, 10-19
10: Green Bay, 21-27 (OT)
17: Baltimore
24: at Chicago
31: at Pittsburgh
CINCINNATI (5-8)
PITTSBURGH (11-2)
September
10: Baltimore, 0-20
14: Houston, 9-13
24: at Green Bay, 24-27 (OT)
October
1: at Cleveland, 31-7
8: Buffalo, 20-16
15: Bye
22: at Pittsburgh, 14-29
29: Indianapolis, 24-23
November
5: at Jacksonville, 7-23
12: at Tennessee, 20-24
19: at Denver, 20-17
26: Cleveland, 30-16
December
4: Pittsburgh, 20-23
10: Chicago, 7-33
17: at Minnesota
24: Detroit
31: at Baltimore
September
10: at Cleveland, 21-18
17: Minnesota, 26-9
24: at Chicago, 17-23 (OT)
October
1: at Baltimore, 26-9
8: Jacksonville, 9-30
15: at Kansas City, 19-13
22: Cincinnati, 29-14
29: at Detroit, 20-15
November
5: Bye
12: at Indianapolis, 20-17
16: Tennessee, 40-17
26: Green Bay, 31-28
December
4: at Cincinnati, 23-20
10: Baltimore, 39-38
17: New England
25: at Houston
31: Cleveland
HOUSTON (4-9)
JACKSONVILLE (9-4)
September
10: Jacksonville, 7-29
14: at Cincinnati, 13-9
24: at New England, 33-36
October
1: Tennessee, 57-14
8: Kansas City, 34-42
15: Cleveland, 33-17
22: Bye
29: at Seattle, 38-41
November
5: Indianapolis, 14-20
12: at L.A. Rams, 7-33
19: Arizona, 31-21
27: at Baltimore, 16-23
December
3: at Tennessee, 13-24
10: San Fran., 16-26
17: at Jacksonville
25: Pittsburgh
31: at Indianapolis
September
10: at Houston, 29-7
17: Tennessee, 16-37
24: Baltimore, 44-7
October
1: at N.Y. Jets, 20-23 (OT)
8: at Pittsburgh, 30-9
15: L.A. Rams, 17-27
22: at Indianapolis, 27-0
29: Bye
November
5: Cincinnati, 23-7
12: L.A. Chargers, 20-17 (OT)
19: at Cleveland, 19-7
26: at Arizona, 24-27
December
3: Indianapolis, 30-10
10: Seattle, 30-24
17: Houston
24: at San Fran.
31: at Tennessee
INDIANAPOLIS (3-10)
TENNESSEE (8-5)
September
10: at L.A. Rams, 9-46
17: Arizona, 13-16 (OT)
24: Cleveland, 31-28
October
1: at Seattle, 18-46
8: San Fran., 26-23 (OT)
16: at Tennessee, 22-36
22: Jacksonville, 0-27
29: at Cincinnati, 23-24
November
5: at Houston, 20-14
12: Pittsburgh, 17-20
19: Bye
26: Tennessee, 16-20
December
3: at Jacksonville, 10-30
10: at Buffalo, 7-13 (OT)
14: Denver
23: at Baltimore
31: Houston
September
10: Oakland, 16-26
17: at Jacksonville, 37-16
24: Seattle, 33-27
October
1: at Houston, 14-57
8: at Miami, 10-16
16: Indianapolis, 36-22
22: at Cleveland, 12-9 (OT)
29: Bye
November
5: Baltimore, 23-20
12: Cincinnati, 24-20
16: at Pittsburgh, 17-40
26: at Indianapolis, 20-16
December
3: Houston, 24-13
10: at Arizona, 7-12
17: at San Fran.
24: L.A. Rams
31: Jacksonville
AFC West
32. Browns, 0-13 PREVIOUS: 32
New GM John Dorsey inherits a team with a 1-28 record since
the start of last season but also with two first-round picks and
three second-rounders in the upcoming draft.
OFFENSE
Yards
New England ...................... 400.5
Pittsburgh .......................... 381.2
L.A. Chargers ..................... 372.7
Kansas City ........................ 371.3
Jacksonville ....................... 360.8
Houston ............................. 346.0
Oakland .............................. 329.4
Tennessee .......................... 315.2
Denver ................................ 312.1
N.Y. Jets ............................ 311.4
Cleveland ........................... 311.4
Buffalo ............................... 298.2
Baltimore ........................... 298.1
Miami ................................. 297.9
Indianapolis ....................... 290.7
Cincinnati ........................... 277.2
CLEVELAND (0-13)
September
10: at Cincinnati, 20-0
17: Cleveland, 24-10
24: at Jacksonville, 7-44
October
1: Pittsburgh, 9-26
8: at Oakland, 30-17
15: Chicago, 24-27 (OT)
22: at Minnesota, 16-24
26: Miami, 40-0
November
5: at Tennessee, 20-23
12: Bye
19: at Green Bay, 23-0
27: Houston, 23-16
December
3: Detroit, 44-20
10: at Pittsburgh, 38-39
17: at Cleveland
23: Indianapolis
31: Cincinnati
AFC South
AFC Statistics
OFFENSE
Yards
New Orleans ...................... 400.7
Philadelphia ....................... 390.5
Minnesota .......................... 369.3
L.A. Rams ........................... 367.6
Atlanta ............................... 363.5
Seattle ............................... 361.9
Tampa Bay ......................... 353.5
Detroit ............................... 344.5
Dallas ................................. 338.3
Washington ....................... 338.3
San Francisco ..................... 334.1
Carolina .............................. 329.9
Arizona .............................. 322.5
Green Bay .......................... 308.6
N.Y. Giants ......................... 296.2
Chicago .............................. 291.6
BALTIMORE (7-6)
PASSING
ATT-CMP
Brady, NE ................ 481/324
Al. Smith, KC ........... 436/293
D. Watson, HOU ...... 204/126
Rivers, LAC .............. 462/290
McCown, NYJ .......... 397/267
Roethlisberger, PIT . 502/318
Dalton, CIN .............. 389/236
D. Carr, OAK ............ 420/268
Ty. Taylor, BUF ........ 326/206
Bortles, JAC ............ 410/247
Cutler, MIA .............. 340/218
PCT YDS TD
67.4 3,865 27
67.2 3,507 23
61.8 1,699 19
62.8 3,611 23
67.3 2,926 18
63.3 3,744 24
60.7 2,747 21
63.8 2,942 18
63.2 2,090 12
60.2 2,821 16
64.1 2,100 18
INT RATE
6 105.2
5 104.4
8 103.0
7 97.2
9 94.5
13 91.1
9 90.4
10 88.8
4 88.6
8 85.8
11 85.4
RECEIVING
NO
A. Brown, PIT ........................ 99
D. Hopkins, HOU .................... 88
K. Allen, LAC ......................... 83
T. Hill, KC ............................... 64
A. Green, CIN ......................... 65
Kelce, KC ................................ 73
Cooks, NE .............................. 54
Gronkowski, NE ..................... 55
R. Anderson, NYJ .................. 52
T. Hilton, IND ........................ 43
YDS
1,509
1,233
1,143
986
950
945
924
849
848
811
AVG
15.2
14.0
13.8
15.4
14.6
12.9
17.1
15.4
16.3
18.9
LG TD
57 9
72 11
51 5
79 6
77 8
44 7
64 5
53 7
69 7
80 4
RUSHING
Bell, PIT ...............................
K. Hunt, KC ..........................
McCoy, BUF .........................
Fournette, JAC ....................
M. Gordon, LAC ...................
A. Collins, BAL .....................
L. Miller, HOU ......................
Gore, IND .............................
YDS AVG
1,105 3.9
1,046 4.8
1,007 4.2
923 4.0
853 3.7
825 5.1
764 3.6
762 3.6
LG TD
27 7
69 5
48 5
90 8
87 6
50 5
21 3
21 3
NO
283
218
239
231
229
162
211
210
DENVER (4-9)
LOS ANGELES (7-6)
September
11: L.A. Chargers, 24-21
17: Dallas, 42-17
24: at Buffalo, 16-26
October
1: Oakland, 16-10
8: Bye
15: N.Y. Giants, 10-23
22: at L.A. Chargers, 0-21
30: at Kansas City, 19-29
November
5: at Philadelphia, 23-51
12: New England, 16-41
19: Cincinnati, 17-20
26: at Oakland, 14-21
December
3: at Miami, 9-35
10: N.Y. Jets, 23-0
14: at Indianapolis
24: at Washington
31: Kansas City
September
11: at Denver, 21-24
17: Miami, 17-19
24: Kansas City, 10-24
October
1: Philadelphia, 24-26
8: at N.Y. Giants, 27-22
15: at Oakland, 17-16
22: Denver, 21-0
29: at New England, 13-21
November
5: Bye
12: at Jacks., 17-20 (OT)
19: Buffalo, 54-24
23: at Dallas, 28-6
December
3: Cleveland, 19-10
10: Washington, 30-13
16: at Kansas City
24: at N.Y. Jets
31: Oakland
KANSAS CITY (7-6)
OAKLAND (6-7)
September
7: at New England, 42-27
17: Philadelphia, 27-20
24: at L.A. Chargers, 24-10
October
2: Washington, 29-20
8: at Houston, 42-34
15: Pittsburgh, 13-19
19: at Oakland, 30-31
30: Denver, 29-19
November
5: at Dallas, 17-28
12: Bye
19: at N.Y. Giants, 9-12 (OT)
26: Buffalo, 10-16
December
3: at N.Y. Jets, 31-38
10: Oakland, 26-15
16: L.A. Chargers
24: Miami
31: at Denver
September
10: at Tennessee, 26-16
17: N.Y. Jets, 45-20
24: at Washington, 10-27
October
1: at Denver, 10-16
8: Baltimore, 17-30
15: L.A. Chargers, 16-17
19: Kansas City, 31-30
29: at Buffalo, 14-34
November
5: at Miami, 27-24
12: Bye
19: New England, 8-33
26: Denver, 21-14
December
3: N.Y. Giants, 24-17
10: at Kansas City, 15-26
17: Dallas
25: at Philadelphia
31: at L.A. Chargers
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
SU
professional football
Cravens can resume football activities
Safety looks to 2018,
but there’s no guarantee
it will be with Redskins
BY
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
Reed is placed on IR,
ending his season
K IMBERLEY A . M ARTIN
Washington Redskins safety
Su’a Cravens plans to play football next season.
In a statement released Tuesday, Cravens’s agent, Fadde
Mikhail, said his client “has received medical clearance to resume all football activities.”
The question now is: Will he be
suiting up for the Redskins in
2018?
The organization placed the
second-year safety on the reserve/left squad list in September after Cravens abruptly informed the Redskins over Labor
Day weekend that he planned to
retire. The team had initially
talked Cravens out of retirement,
giving him 30 days to contemplate his future while he was
placed on the exempt/left squad
list. But the organization ultimately believed its 2016 secondround pick needed more time to
resolve his personal and healthrelated matters.
Now, the bizarre Cravens saga
has taken another surprising
turn.
Mikhail disclosed in his statement that the 22-year-old defender has been dealing with
“post-concussion syndrome” and
has since undergone “targeted
treatment and rehabilitation.”
The former Southern California
player suffered a concussion in
the Redskins’ Week 4 win over
the Cleveland Browns during the
2016 season and missed the next
two games.
“He is now asymptomatic and
cleared to return back to ALL
THINGS FOOTBALL,” Mikhail
wrote. “Su’a is excited and looking forward to the 2018 NFL
season and the many years to
follow.”
Cravens, who initially started
out at inside linebacker in then-
R E D S K I NS NOTE S
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Redskins safety Su’a Cravens has been dealing with “post-concussion syndrome,” his agent said.
defensive coordinator Joe Barry’s
system, ended his rookie season
with 34 tackles, five passes defensed, a sack and an interception in 11 games.
Despite
undergoing
arthroscopic knee surgery in the
preseason, Cravens was expected
to return by Week 1 and start at
strong safety. Instead, he never
suited up for the Redskins during
the regular season and his NFL
future seemed murky at best.
Cravens hinted at his possible
return this week on social media,
writing on Instagram: “Truth will
be out soon I never just walk
away come on now this all calculated thinking.”
But it remains to be seen
whether he ultimately will return
to the Redskins.
Reached for comment Tuesday, a Redskins spokesman issued the following statement on
the Cravens announcement: “We
are focused on the Arizona Cardinals [this week’s opponent]. He is
on the reserve/left squad list for
the season.”
It also is unclear whether Cravens would be welcomed back by
his teammates.
His decision to walk away from
the team not only surprised but
angered some Redskins players,
sources told The Washington
Post at the time. His indecision
regarding whether he wanted to
continue playing also raised
questions internally about his
commitment to the team and the
game itself.
In mid-September, multiple
people within the organization
told The Post that Mikhail met
with the Redskins’ senior vice
president of football operations/
general counsel, Eric Schaffer, in
California to discuss the safety’s
potential return. But the two
sides never reached an agreement.
A few days later, the organization determined it was best for
Cravens to be placed on the
reserve/left squad list, effectively
ending his 2017 season. Although
the Cravens camp maintained its
desire to return to the Redskins’
facility, the front office believed it
was best for all parties involved if
Cravens took a year off from
football while taking advantage
of the Redskins’ medical team.
kimberley.martin@washpost.com
Jordan Reed’s season is officially
over.
The Washington Redskins
tight end was put on injured
reserve Tuesday, ending his
disappointing season after he
played in a career-low six games.
The oft-injured Reed last
played in Week 8 against the
Dallas Cowboys and has missed
the Redskins’ past six games
with a hamstring injury. He
finishes the season with just
27 catches for 211 yards and two
touchdowns.
Despite Reed’s size and
superior talent, his availability
— or lack thereof — was a
constant concern throughout
the season for Coach Jay
Gruden, who was forced to
game-plan without his best
offensive weapon.
“It’s just unfortunate,” Gruden
told reporters last week. “Jordan
is a big-time player for us, and
when he’s not out there it has an
effect on what we do. . . . I just
hate that people sometimes label
him as injury-prone. It’s just
unlucky. He had a bad toe
coming into camp, and then I
think with that bad toe, he’s
tried to just put too much weight
on the other leg, and I think
that’s affected his hamstring. Big
thing is to get him back to
healthy — whether it’s this week,
next week or the week after, or
in the offseason.”
Reed missed all of training
camp with the toe injury but was
activated from the physically
unable to perform list for the
start of the regular season. He
missed Week 3 with a rib/
sternum injury as well.
“It’s been a rough year, to say
the least,” Reed, who hasn’t
played an entire 16-game season
in his five-year NFL career, said
recently.
The Redskins also placed
linebacker Chris Carter and
running back Byron Marshall on
injured reserve.
Carter suffered a fractured
fibula in Sunday’s 30-13 road
loss to the Los Angeles Chargers.
Marshall left the game with a
hamstring injury.
In corresponding moves,
Washington signed running
back Kapri Bibbs and
linebackers Pete Robertson and
Otha Peters to the active roster
and added linebacker Alex
McCalister, running back Dare
Ogunbowale and safety Orion
Stewart to the practice squad.
Bibbs, who was signed to the
practice squad late last month,
joins rookies Samaje Perine and
LeShun Daniels in the backfield.
— Kimberley A. Martin
MATT ROURKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tight end Jordan Reed, here diving in for a TD on Oct. 23 against
the Eagles, finishes the season with a career-low six games played.
BARRY SVRLUGA
Gruden taking all the blame for the Redskins’ woes is reminiscent of Zorn days
SVRLUGA FROM D1
Ashburn is still the same
building, but just about every
office — save one — has had at
least one new occupant since
then, some several.
Still, bringing up the Zorn era
— 2008 to 2009, and man, those
were heady times, R.I.P. — still
kind of represents, at least
viscerally, the low point in
modern Washington football
history. When people start to
talk about how insane it was that
Mike Shanahan threw Robert
Griffin III back out there in the
Seattle playoff game, or that the
team borderline-slandered the
outgoing GM because of
substance abuse, just counter
with, “They once hired a bingo
caller to be the offensive
coordinator with a week’s
preparation,” and that usually
ends the argument as to which
seasons brought the most chaos.
So we mention Zorn here not
as a direct comparison but to get
your attention. Because even if
Washington couldn’t get your
attention during its dismal 30-13
loss to the Los Angeles Chargers
on Sunday — be honest, who
didn’t switch over to EaglesRams at some point in the
second half? — Gruden’s words
are worthy of your time.
To start, immediately after the
game, facing reporters in
Carson, Calif.
“We have not been
competitive, and we weren’t
ready to play . . . today,” Gruden
said. “And that’s on me and the
staff. We have to do a better job
of getting these guys ready to
play.”
Now, let’s not dismiss the
admirable elements here. This is
a coach playing with an offense
that has lost its starting center,
one guard, its playmaking
running back, its best-in-theleague-when-healthy tight end
and one key free agent wide
receiver. He could put his team’s
struggles — a cumulative score
of 68-27 over the past two weeks,
including the loss to the
Chargers for which he had
10 days to prepare — on the
injuries, and there would be
truth in that. He does not hang
his players on a clothes line and
say, “See, look what he did
wrong.” He stands there and
takes his lumps. Bravo.
But we’re at a worrisome
point now because Gruden
pointing his index finger directly
at himself isn’t a new
development. It’s beyond a
trend, even. It’s something of a
character trait. Take a listen.
“They just outcoached and
outplayed us.”
“We were flat outcoached,
there’s no question about that.
We weren’t as ready as I would
have liked to have been. We
didn’t execute like I would like
to have seen. That falls on my
shoulders.”
“I feel like we underachieved
today, and that’s very
frustrating.”
And, when asked whether his
team was ready to compete: “I’d
like to think so, but obviously
the results say otherwise, so
what can you say?”
What can you say? Well, one
reasonable response could be:
Get better. Fix it. Have you not
grown, yourself, as a coach?
Each one of these quotes is
from last season. In your matchthe-words-to-the-game contest,
they came, in order, after the
season-opening loss to
Pittsburgh; a crucial loss to
Carolina in December; a loss to
Arizona that was part of a 2-4
finish; and, finally, the seasonending 19-10 loss to the New
York Giants, when a victory
would have put Washington in
the playoffs.
There is accountability, and
the coach should be commended
for being forthright. But when
thinking about Gruden’s current
situation — with three games to
play in what will be the eighth
season in the past 10 without a
playoff berth — it’s instructive to
think back on the chaotic
seasons under Zorn.
Let’s be clear: Vinny Cerrato
isn’t the general manager, and
the current GM doesn’t have a
radio show on which he can
express his vision. (Man, those
were the days.)
But that day Zorn walked in
front of the cameras at Redskins
Park and outlined a process in
which he would turn the
spotlight on himself, he did so
because owner Daniel Snyder
wanted him to. He needed Zorn
to fall on the sword because any
other assessment would have
meant a more thorough
examination of the roster
Cerrato and Snyder had
assembled — not to mention
further wondering why they had
hired this guy as head coach in
the first place.
We can tell ourselves that the
structure in Ashburn is more
stable now, more normal, and
that might be the case. Maybe
Scot McCloughan’s ouster was
really about his personal
problems, and maybe Doug
Williams is the perfect person to
guide the personnel department
in evaluation and acquisition.
And, given Gruden’s penchant
for blaming himself — and,
therefore admirably taking
blame off his players — this
doesn’t feel like an ownershipordered edict for public
humiliation. It feels like a coach
taking the heat, of which there’s
plenty.
But what we have here is the
same tired franchise, all these
seasons later with more
questions than hope.
“To me, it’s all about me,” Zorn
said all those years ago.
The truth is, it wasn’t all about
Zorn back then, and it’s not all
about Gruden now. But those
words, the phrases in which the
coach blames himself time and
again, they can’t go unnoticed.
They might not represent the
whole truth of why this season
will end with three meaningless
games, and they might not
indicate that the franchise is in
the complete disarray it once
was. But they can’t be dismissed
either. The head coach is not
only responsible for assigning
blame to himself when it’s due,
but he’s responsible for fixing it,
too, and that hasn’t happened.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
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D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
Johnson believes CTE is root of violent urges, memory loss
JOHNSON FROM D1
not here?”
Fading memories
At a red light back on terra
firma, Johnson glances into the
back seat. “Let me see the homework,” he tells Jaylen, his 7-yearold daughter. He flips through the
stapled pages: math problems
and reading comprehension
about bicycles and roller coasters.
The light changes, and Johnson
hands the papers back and hits
the gas on his Porsche SUV. For the
next half-hour, Johnson — prone
to fits of volatility, jarring mood
swings, extreme periods of silence
— will say almost nothing.
Johnson says father and daughter have many things in common,
including a quiet personality and
a running stride that made Johnson a 2002 Heisman Trophy finalist at Penn State and a two-time
Pro Bowl honoree. He was a rusher so durable and fierce that, while
playing for the Kansas City Chiefs
in 2006, he set an NFL record with
416 carries. That same year,
groundbreaking neurologist Bennet Omalu published additional
concussion research that linked
football-related head injuries
with degenerative brain trauma,
the beginning of an NFL crisis
that still rages and one of the
reasons Johnson’s carries record
probably will never be broken.
Jaylen doesn’t know much
about that part of her Papi’s life, in
part because Johnson thinks his
daughter is too young to understand how football brought him
both glory and ruin. But it’s also
because there are widening
chunks of his career that he can’t
remember: Two full NFL seasons
have disappeared from his memory, he says, and even some of his
most memorable plays have
grown hazy.
Which is why, in the past few
years, Johnson has begun making
video compilations of his football
highlights, in part as reminders to
himself that he was involved in
them — but also, when she’s ready,
as a time capsule for Jaylen.
Johnson fears that, by the time
he’s 50, he won’t remember his
own name. If that proves to be the
case, Johnson is taking steps for
Jaylen to watch her Papi run, to
learn who he was, to maybe understand why he was so unpredictable — even, on occasion, with
her.
“If I can’t remember who I was,
I’ve got YouTube; I’ve got music
videos that I’m making for myself,
so when I watch these things I can
remember,” he says. “I’m trying to
get these things in order so she
knows who I am and what I came
from.”
The project became urgent a
few months ago, after a particularly severe case of CTE was discovered in the brain of Aaron Hernandez. The former New England
Patriots tight end, with a history
of erratic and explosive behavior,
was convicted of first-degree murder in 2015 before hanging himself in his prison cell in April.
“I could be Aaron Hernandez,”
Johnson says, and indeed he sees
the former Patriots star as a kindred spirit as much as a cautionary tale.
Like Hernandez, Johnson has a
history of erratic behavior and
violence: He has been arrested six
times, and several of the incidents
involved Johnson physically assaulting women. The ex-running
back says his decision to publicly
describe his darkest thoughts is
meant not as a way to excuse his
past but rather a way to begin a
conversation with other former
players who Johnson suspects are
experiencing many of the same
symptoms.
Johnson says he frequently gets
brief but intense headaches, often
triggered by bright lights or noise,
and is increasingly jittery and forgetful. He has no idea how the
Porsche’s passenger-side mirror
got smashed, nor can he remember the full sequence that led to
the cluster of dents in the vehicle’s
rear hatch.
“Blank spots” are what Johnson
calls the empty spaces in his memory, and there are seemingly more
of them every year. But there’s
another similarity with Hernandez that scares him most.
Johnson says he has considered
violence toward others and himself, and perhaps the only reason
he hasn’t acted on these impulses
is sitting quietly in the back seat,
looking out the window at the
South Florida flatlands.
“Chicken, steak or spaghetti?”
Johnson asks, and Jaylen chooses
spaghetti. Her voice is soft as a
whisper. Her father believes it’s
also the only one, when the demons push him to the edge, strong
enough to pull him back.
‘Sometimes he was the reason’
Almost three decades ago, on a
youth field in Oxon Hill, a 9-yearold kick returner caught the ball
and sped toward the sideline.
Hoping he’d be tackled quickly
PHOTOS BY ANDREW INNERARITY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Larry Johnson helps his 7-year-old daughter, Jaylen, with her homework. Johnson has custody of Jaylen most weekends and is
often fearful of what he will do when he has nights to himself. ABOVE: Johnson's Porsche SUV has a broken mirror, and the vehicle’s
rear hatch features several dents. He can’t remember how the car got that way. “Blank spots” are what he calls such memory lapses.
and painlessly, young Larry kept
running and tried to get out of
bounds — but then an opponent
crashed into him from the side,
spinning his helmet sideways.
The boy got up, dizzy and with
no idea where he was, and spent
the rest of the game on the sideline with a headache. Though it
was never diagnosed as a concussion — Johnson says, in 23 years of
football, he was never diagnosed
with one — he now suspects this
was his first of many.
But more than the impact, he
now says, he felt then that he had
let his father down. Larry Johnson
Sr., at the time a well-known high
school coach in Maryland, was in
the bleachers, and the boy felt he
had shown everyone that the
coach’s son was soft.
“I didn’t know how to redeem
myself,” Johnson says, though
soon he was going into the family’s basement for extra blocking
drills, studying footage of prodigious NFL hitters Ronnie Lott and
Mike Singletary, looking for any
chance to prove his toughness.
He grew, and by middle school
he was researching which opponents came from broken homes;
those were the kids he’d taunt
before plays and, for an extra psychological advantage, the ones
he’d tackle from behind. If Johnson was benched, he’d blow up at
coaches; if an opponent or teammate challenged him, Johnson
wasn’t above the cheap shot.
Then he’d look to the bleachers.
“I’d be like: ‘Dad, you saw that?’
It was a point of pride,” he says
now, and he came to believe, in an
era that glamorized masculinity
and intimidation, that “this is
what tough means.”
Larry Johnson Sr., now an assistant head coach at Ohio State, says
that wasn’t exactly the intention.
“He ran with rage, and it was
just his way of saying, ‘I’m not
going to let this opportunity get
away,’ ” the coach says. “It might
have taken him to places he didn’t
think he would go.”
“He ran with rage,
and it was just his
way of saying, ‘I’m
not going to let this
opportunity get
away.’ It might have
taken him to places
he didn’t think he
would go.”
LARRY JOHNSON SR.
Some of those places, as Johnson became a college player and
eventually a pro, included the
backs of police cars or disciplinary
meetings with coaches. He says he
began experiencing symptoms of
depression in college, and he
sought to prove his toughness in
nightclubs and fights with women. He tried to numb himself with
alcohol, which took him deeper
into the shadows.
Months after Kansas City selected him in the first round of the
2003 draft, Johnson was arrested
for aggravated assault and domestic battery for an incident involving a woman. A misunderstanding, Johnson would say. Less than
two years later, he was arrested
again for shoving a different woman to the floor of a bar. An overly
aggressive local law, he’d say.
“There’s always a reason” for
Johnson’s mistakes, says Tony
Johnson, the ex-player’s brother
and his day-to-day manager during his NFL career. “And sometimes he was the reason.”
Johnson could be cheerful and
social at times, sullen and isolated
at others. He collected slights and
bad habits, to say nothing of the
JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY IMAGES
Johnson rushed for 3,539 yards in a two-year stretch for the
Chiefs, who handed off to him an NFL-record 416 times in 2006.
guns he kept strapped to his
shoulders at high-end restaurants
or under the seat of his white
Bentley. Some nights he’d fire
rounds into strangers’ lawns or
palm a pistol at a gas station, he
says, hoping someone would challenge him for a late-night lesson in
toughness.
“Me against everybody,” he
says, and on and off the field that
became his code, driving him to
rush for a combined 3,539 yards in
2005 and ’06. His dominance and
persona made him an A-list celebrity and opened doors to a friendship with Jay-Z and dates with
R&B singer Mýa.
Whether it was brain injuries,
immaturity, celebrity or some
combination, Johnson says, aggression became “a switch I
couldn’t shut off.” After a while
Jay-Z cut him off via email for
being arrested so often, Johnson
says, and Mýa once stopped him
from jumping from a window.
After two more arrests and a
suspension, the Chiefs released
Johnson in 2009 after he insulted
his head coach on Twitter and for
using gay slurs toward a fan and
reporters. Years after trying to
adapt his personality to an unforgiving game, Johnson found himself too volatile for the NFL. Over
his final two seasons, with Washington and Miami, he carried the
ball six times.
“Those two combinations, of
being angry and not being able to
shut that switch off, started to
disrupt who I really was,” he says.
“And it was just waiting to eat me
up.”
Sound and fury
They’re in the living room now,
Papi and Jaylen, surrounded by
walls undecorated but for the
blotchy spackling compound behind them. That’s where, a few
years ago, Johnson punched
through the drywall.
Jaylen was there, and Johnson
says he sent her upstairs before
making the hole. The way he de-
scribes it, the best he can do sometimes is to shield her view.
“Did you think it was something that you did?” Johnson recalls asking Jaylen afterward, and
the girl nodded. “I had to explain
it: It’s never your fault.”
But her little mind is expanding
quickly, and he worries that these
will be some of her earliest memories. And so he tries. It might not
seem like it, he admits, but he
tries.
On this afternoon, father and
daughter play a racing game on
Xbox — bright colors, loud sound
effects, rapid movement — and
after a few minutes, Johnson
pauses the game and walks onto
his balcony. He stands alone for a
minute or two, hands clasped behind his head; he’ll say later he felt
the onset of a headache and needed to step away.
He returns, and now it’s homework time. Johnson has high expectations for Jaylen, and he believes the universe was making a
point when it gave him a daughter. How better to punish him for
shoving or choking women than
to assign him a girl to shepherd
through a world filled with Larry
Johnsons?
“My greatest fear is my daughter falling in love with somebody
who’s me,” he’ll say, and he believes if he’s honest and tough
with Jaylen, she’ll never accept
anyone treating her the way her
father treated women.
With the sun filtering between
the blinds, Johnson plays with her
curly hair as she slides a finger
across her sentences.
“All people,” Jaylen reads aloud,
and her father interrupts.
“No,” he says. “Why would it say
‘all people?’ It . . .”
He stops, sighs and presses two
fingers into his eyelids. She looks
back at him, and he tells her to
keep reading. He rubs his hands,
massages his forehead, checks his
watch. He’ll say he sometimes forgets she’s only in second grade.
They move on to her page of
math problems: 27 plus seven.
“How many tens?” he asks her.
“Two.”
“And how many ones?”
“Seven.”
“No,” he says, visibly frustrated
until Jaylen reaches the answer.
Next: 57 plus seven. She stares at
the page.
“So count,” he says. “Count!”
Thirteen plus eight. Again staring at the numbers. Johnson’s
worst subject was math, another
trait Jaylen inherited. But his empathy is sometimes drowned out
by more dominant emotions.
“You start at thirteen and count
eight ones,” he tells her, and in the
kitchen, a watch alarm begins to
beep. Jaylen counts her fingers.
“No,” her dad tells her, again
rubbing his face. The beeping continues in the next room. “No!”
Abruptly, he stands and stomps
out of the room without saying
anything. Jaylen’s eyes follow
him, eyebrows raised, and she listens as her father swipes the beeping watch from a table, swings
open the back door and throws it
into the courtyard.
In the minds of both father and
daughter, it is impossible to know
what’s happening. Will she remember this, or has Johnson
shielded her from something
worse? Is he managing his impulses as well as he can, and even if he
is, will Jaylen someday come to
view moments such as these as
emotional milestones?
JOHNSON CONTINUED ON D7
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
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D7
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JOHNSON FROM D6
For now, when her Papi returns, Jaylen’s eyes dart back to
the page.
“So what’s the answer?” he says.
‘A bittersweet thing’
Nighttime now, and Johnson
takes a pull off his Stella longneck
and hits play on the remote.
There he is, or more precisely
there he was: a wrecking ball in
Penn State blue, highlights of
Johnson overpowering defenders
interspersed with pictures of Jaylen. The background music,
which he selected, is the Imagine
Dragons song “I’m So Sorry.”
“This is who I really am,” he
says is the intended message of his
self-produced video. “I can’t
change who I am, regardless of
who you are.”
He points the remote again,
and next is a video of some of his
best moments in the NFL: cheers
and chants and line-of-scrimmage assaults that, in this era of
increased awareness, are both exciting and devastating. The background song is “War Pigs” by
Black Sabbath.
In the fields the bodies burning
As the war machine keeps turning.
Death and hatred to mankind
Poisoning their brainwashed
minds.
Johnson lifts the remote again.
“This may . . .” he says, choking up.
“I get emotional.”
He hits play.
“I did this for her,” he says, and a
moment later the piano begins.
A few years ago, Johnson woke
into a hangover and felt drawn to
his computer, spending hours
navigating a video-editing program. What emerged was more
than a gift for Jaylen’s second
birthday, Johnson says; these next
5 minutes 17 seconds were meant
to say goodbye.
Back then, the demons could be
overpowering. Johnson, drifting
in the months and years after his
NFL career ended, went searching
for a new identity. He was arrested
again for an incident with an exgirlfriend, and he cycled among
peddling bootleg makeup kits on
South Beach, being turned down
for a job stocking shelves, researching how to join the military.
Usually it was just easier to go to a
nightclub and chase salvation
down the neck of a tequila bottle.
Trying to spend his way into
new friends or purpose, Johnson
says he sometimes dropped
$50,000 in a night, torching his
savings. In 2007, he signed a contract with the Chiefs that included
$19 million in guaranteed money,
but now, he says, he has enough
for Jaylen’s college and for himself
to get by, and not much more.
Then, he says, he sometimes
began evenings with the intention
of starting trouble. Other times,
he could feel himself losing control — an approaching cloud, he
says, impossible to stop. Alcohol
and noise were kerosene on his
smoldering patience, and friends
became used to Johnson turning
into, as one friend put it, the
Incredible Hulk.
“You could see the mood
swings, and they were drastic,”
says Chantel Cohen, who has
known Johnson for most of the
past decade. “He could be super
happy one moment, and an hour
later, he’s just ready to blow up.
You’re like: What just went
wrong?”
Once, Johnson says, he sat with
a group at a crowded table, and a
man he’d just met was being loud.
Johnson says he asked, profanely,
for the man to shut up; a second
later they both stood, and Johnson says he experienced one of his
blank spots.
“When I came to, he was already on the ground, like, leaned
over, and I’m kind of like: ‘Damn, I
must have did that,’ ” he says. As
Johnson tried to get away, the
man went after him with a chair,
and that’s where the dents in the
back of his Porsche came from.
He would call his parents at all
hours, cursing and making
strange accusations. Tony Johnson woke to so many worried texts
from his brother’s friends that he
stopped checking his phone in the
morning and made peace with
how his brother’s story might end.
And so did Johnson himself.
Working on that video for Jaylen
years ago, he was aware he was
about to go destroy himself. Like
the time he punched through the
wall, he explains, he could delay
the explosion, but he couldn’t
avoid it.
Now re-watching the video in
his living room, he says he wasn’t
exactly considering suicide but
that he was preparing to go away
to stay. Prison was a possibility,
and so were a few others, considering he’d decided that if he did
something to get himself arrested,
he wasn’t planning on going quietly.
There was, he recalls, something calming about it.
“A bittersweet thing: I’m going
to be free of everything that’s
holding me down,” Johnson says
now, and he wonders whether
Hernandez experienced similarly
intense feelings in his final days.
PHOTOS BY ANDREW INNERARITY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Johnson, a two-time Pro Bowler for the Kansas City Chiefs, lives in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and
works for a nonprofit that uses the arts to mentor disadvantaged children. When his daughter is a
teenager, Johnson plans to tell her his whole story. For now, she just sees the good side of “Papi.”
“The same way Aaron thought:
I’m going to be gone from this
world, but I’m still going to be able
to take care of my child, because
that’s all I care about.”
A moment later, he continues.
His voice cracks.
“When you’re that down deep
in it,” he says, “you don’t want to
be talked out of it.”
And so that day a few years ago,
he worked on the video until it
was perfect, the music and images
and sequence just right. A text
banner — “I will always Love you,”
it reads — flutters past near the
beginning, and with the Christina
Perri song “A Thousand Years” in
the background, it closes with a
photograph of Johnson kissing
Jaylen. It pans out before fading.
Then he posted the video on
Instagram before loading his
pockets with painkillers and ecstasy, he says, and set off into the
space beneath a dropping curtain.
‘He definitely has something’
A few weekends ago, friends
invited Johnson to join them at a
bar, have a few drinks, meet a
woman he might like.
He agreed, and indeed he was
drawn to her. They talked, and so
did the friends — a little too much,
maybe — and after a while Johnson could feel the shadow falling.
The Hulk was coming, so at one
point he excused himself and,
without explanation, just left.
Distrustful of his own mind,
Johnson says now that he wasn’t
just annoyed by his chatty friends.
He noticed himself staring at one
of them, feeling a growing urge to
punch him. Almost in a heartbeat,
Johnson went from sociable and
joyful to deeply angry and potentially violent — frightening, at
least this time, only himself.
“Something so easily dismissed,” he says. “But it’s just —
once I get in that mood, I can’t
stop it. And it comes out of nowhere.”
Even so, is this truly a look at
CTE’s corrosive effects in real
time? Or has Johnson, with his
history of blame deflection and
self-validating reasons, simply
found an unimpeachable — and
unprovable — excuse?
“Do I think he’s a special breed?
Yes,” says Tony Johnson, who sug-
gests the family will consider donating Larry’s brain for study after his death. “Do I think he might
have CTE? I just can’t say.”
Others, who point out the
brain’s frontal lobe is the portion
that regulates judgment and behavior — and the region most
under attack during on-field collisions — see it more Johnson’s way.
“I’m pretty sure that he definitely has something going on,”
says longtime friend Cohen, who
claims she knew Junior Seau, the
Hall of Fame linebacker who in
2012 shot himself in the chest so
that his brain could be studied;
indeed, CTE was discovered in
Seau’s brain. Cohen sees some
similarities in the behavior of
Johnson and Seau.
Johnson says years ago he was
diagnosed with type-1 bipolar disorder, a condition he blames on
head injuries. Though this cannot
be confirmed in Johnson’s case,
brain injury experts have found
possible links between bipolar
symptoms and mid-life behavior
issues and CTE.
“Certain things
happen in your life
that you just can’t
come back from.”
LARRY JOHNSON
“Certain things happen in your
life,” he says, “that you just can’t
come back from.”
After making the video for Jaylen a few years back, Johnson says,
he spent the next 72 hours cycling
from one party to the next, daring
bar patrons or police or even
death to bring him down. When
nothing did, he kept going.
At one point he sat on a sidewalk, exhausted and struggling to
breathe, and thought of his
daughter. She was living with her
mother at the time; Jaylen’s parents now share custody.
Johnson went home, slept it off,
and not long afterward, he says,
he sold his ownership stake in a
club on South Beach and reduced
his intake of hard liquor. He still
found trouble sometimes, including a 2014 arrest for aggravated
battery involving another man,
and Johnson says he has since
made more changes.
He moved out of a trendy highrise in Miami and into a quiet
townhouse in Fort Lauderdale,
got rid of his guns, took a job with
a nonprofit that uses the arts to
mentor disadvantaged children.
Johnson also quit therapy and
refused to take his prescribed
medication; he says it’s because
he’s better equipped to manage
his impulses himself. All these
years later, it’s still Johnson
against everybody — even himself.
He has, more recently, filled his
bookshelf not with reminders of
his playing career but with photographs of Jaylen and her paintings. If friends invite him out,
more and more he turns them
down.
“You kind of create your own
prison,” Johnson says. “I’ve kind
of barricaded myself in my surroundings [with] certain things
that I can handle. That’s kind of
how I beat it.”
That’s easy when his daughter
is here — Jaylen spends most
weekends with her father and
weekdays with her mother in a
nearby town — and a challenge
when she’s not. On the nights he’s
alone, Johnson is more likely to
sulk or drink or venture into the
depths of his restless mind. If she’s
here, bedtime is at 8:30, and they
play games or watch television or
draw.
“She’s, like, a good distraction I
have,” he says. “She sees something in me that most people will
never see.”
Occasionally they watch football together, Jaylen in her Penn
State or Kansas City jersey, and
she asks why the announcers
sometimes say his name. He explains some of it, and very carefully he has begun to explain some of
the rest.
“Papi,” he says he tells her,
“used to be really bad.”
He doesn’t offer much more,
and though he’s uncertain what
the future will bring, Johnson says
he wants to tell her his whole story
eventually.
Johnson figures that in seven
more years, or when she’s 14 or so,
Jaylen will be old enough to absorb the paradoxical nature of her
father: the life of the party and the
introvert, a man capable of violence and tenderness, the person
he actually is and the one he wants
to be.
He wants his mind to hang out
at least that long. Jaylen might not
like what she learns, but he wants
to be present for those conversations.
His biggest fear, if he were to
disappear now, is that Jaylen
wouldn’t remember him; his second biggest is that she would.
“That scares me more than anything,” he says. “Sometimes it
scares me to tears.”
Back to the unknown
He’s driving again, steering the
Porsche south on a highway not
long after sunrise. Jaylen, who
like her Papi is not a morning
person, is dozing off in the back
seat.
Earlier, the vehicle’s back latch
wouldn’t close, and in the 20 or so
minutes since, Johnson hasn’t
said a word. He weaves through
traffic, occasionally touching 90
mph, and a radio commercial
plays a doorbell sound. The tone
repeats again. And again. Johnson jabs his finger into the preset
button to change the station.
He cracks his knuckles, sighs
loudly, checks his phone.
He looks behind him occasionally, Jaylen napping or drawing
imaginary circles on the glass.
She’s spending the next few days
with her mother, and Johnson is
already nervous about the upcoming time by himself. What if
friends call and ask him to go
drinking? Or if someone crosses
him at the wrong moment?
How will he react this time if
the demons come?
For now, she’s with him a few
more minutes, so Johnson parks
the Porsche and lifts her from the
back seat. He carries her toward
the elementary school and kisses
her cheek as they cross the driveway and fall into a line of students.
The line starts moving, and he
tucks in her shirt and kisses her
again. “I’ll see you this weekend,
okay?” he says, and then he turns
toward the crosswalk.
He’s alone again, left to face the
next few days — and whichever
emotions and impulses are waiting — with his mind as his only
company. He looks behind him to
see Jaylen toddling toward the
entrance, and with little more
than uncertainty ahead, Johnson
stands on the curb and waits for
her to drift out of sight before
stepping, finally, off the edge.
kent.babb@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
NFL NOTES
Packers’ Rodgers given green light to return to action
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Aaron Rodgers was “medically
cleared to return” to action after
missing seven games with a broken right collarbone, the Green
Bay Packers quarterback announced on Instagram on Tuesday
night.
Rodgers was hurt during a loss
to Minnesota on Oct. 15 and had
surgery four days later. He returned to practice Dec. 2 and is
eligible to rejoin the 53-man roster
Friday, which means the two-time
MVP could suit up for Green Bay’s
game at Carolina on Sunday.
“It’s been a long road . . . but I’m
happy to say I’ve been medically
cleared to return,” Rodgers wrote.
“Thanks for all the love, support,
prayers and well wishes over the
past 8 weeks and a big thank you to
Dr. (Pat) McKenzie and our incredible training staff.”
The Packers (7-6) likely need to
win their final three games to
make the playoffs.
Hester announces retirement
Devin Hester, the spectacular
speedster who holds the NFL record for kick return touchdowns
with 20, announced his retirement from the NFL.
In a post on social media, the
35-year-old said it was time.
“Good news: Commissioner
Goodell, you can put the kickoff
back at the 30,” Hester wrote. “Bad
news: Y’all will have to find a new
favorite returner.”
JETS: New York placed quar-
terback Josh McCown, 38, on injured reserve, two days after he
broke his left hand in a 23-0 loss at
Denver.
STEELERS: Cornerback Joe
Haden will attempt to practice for
Pittsburgh this week, barely a
month removed from a fractured
left leg that appeared to put his
season in jeopardy. . . .
Linebacker Ryan Shazier was
placed on injured reserve because
of a spinal injury suffered in a
victory over Cincinnati on Dec. 4.
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Capitals defenseman John Carlson, center, scored in the second period Tuesday night against the Avalanche, his first goal since Nov. 10.
Making up for last time, Caps rout Avs
CAPITALS FROM D1
have a good response.”
It’s not that the Capitals had
this game against the Avalanche
circled on the calendar, but with
how the first meeting between
the teams went, Washington
players admitted to feeling a
little extra motivation. The Capitals were torched in a 6-2 loss in
Denver on Nov. 16, one of the
team’s most humiliating defeats
of the season. Trotz didn’t hold
back his frustration in the locker
room after the game, and the
team’s disappointment in its
lackluster effort sparked a 9-3-0
stretch since.
Entering Tuesday night’s rematch, the Capitals were eager to
show they are better than how
they played that night.
“I guess we do better at this
altitude than over there,” defenseman John Carlson said. “It
was a tough point of the season
for us, and it’s been going pretty
good since then.”
With the teams knotted at one
goal apiece late in the second
period, Carlson broke the stalemate, sneaking into the offensive
zone late after a line change and
catching a puck near the blue
line on a failed clear by Colorado.
Carlson’s slap shot got past goal-
C A P I TA L S ’ N EX T TH R EE
at Boston Bruins
Tomorrow
vs. Anaheim Ducks
8 NBCSW
at Dallas Stars
Tuesday
COLORADO .............................. 0
WASHINGTON ......................... 1
1
1
1 —
3 —
2
5
FIRST PERIOD
7 NBCSW
Saturday
Capitals 5, Avalanche 2
8:30 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
tender Semyon Varlamov, and
Washington then added to the
lead with goals from Brett Connolly and Matt Niskanen in the
third period. Evgeny Kuznetsov
finished with three assists.
Ironically, it was a player not
in the lineup that night in Denver
who got Washington going Tuesday. Rookie Jakub Vrana was a
healthy scratch the first time the
Capitals played the Avalanche. At
the time, Vrana’s production had
been slumping and Trotz criticized the 21-year-old for being in
“participation mode” and not
involved enough in the game.
Trotz’s message was received,
and Vrana has five goals in the 12
games since as he has worked his
way back into the top-six forward
Scoring: 1, Washington, Vrana 9 (Bowey, Kuznetsov),
5:25.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Colorado, C.Wilson 3 (Nieto, Barberio), 4:13.
3, Washington, Carlson 3, 17:42.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Washington, Connolly 6 (Bowey, Kuznetsov),
5:15. 5, Washington, Niskanen 2 (Burakovsky, Kuznetsov), 16:19. 6, Colorado, Jost 2 (Rantanen, Soderberg),
18:57. 7, Washington, Smith-Pelly 5 (Stephenson, Beagle), 19:15.
SHOTS ON GOAL
COLORADO .............................. 7
6
11 — 24
WASHINGTON ......................... 7
10
10 — 27
Power-play opportunities: Colorado 0 of 4 Goalies:
Colorado, Varlamov 9-8-1 (26 shots-22 saves). Washington, Holtby 17-7-0 (24-22). A: 18,506 (18,277). T:
2:19.
corps. On a three-on-two rush in
the first period Tuesday, Vrana
elevated Kuznetsov’s slick feed
past Varlamov 5:25 into the
game. With nine goals already,
Vrana is well on his way to a
20-goal campaign in his first full
NHL season.
“I did a pre-scout on the goalie,
so I kind of knew where I was
going to shoot it,” Vrana said. “It
[paid] off.”
The Capitals were also looking
to rebound quickly from a 3-1
loss to the New York Islanders on
Monday night, when goaltender
Braden Holtby was pulled in the
first two minutes of the second
period. He had allowed three
goals, but Trotz said the decision
was related to changing “the
mojo” of the team after some
sloppy defensive-zone play and
not an indictment of Holtby. But
because his night was cut short,
Holtby was back in net against
the Avalanche, a chance for a
personal bounce-back performance.
With both teams playing their
second game in as many nights,
Holtby faced just 13 shots
through two periods. After Niskanen lost a battle along the end
boards, Colorado’s Matt Nieto
was able to get off a centering
pass, and Colin Wilson roofed a
backhand to tie the game 4:13 in
the second period.
That seemed to jolt the Capitals, who were determined to
have a different result in this
game against the Avalanche.
“I thought it was a real good
team win,” Trotz said. “There
wasn’t a line I wasn’t really
happy with. They had their moments where the other team had
a push and you might be blocked
in our end a little bit, but we had
a pretty good push. We had good
puck possession. We had some
real good looks. Over time, they
wore down, and we didn’t.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
NHL ROUNDUP
New Jersey ends L.A.’s eight-game winning streak
DEVILS 5,
KINGS 1
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Taylor Hall scored twice and the
New Jersey Devils ended the Los
Angeles Kings’ eight-game winning streak with a 5-1 victory Tuesday night in Newark.
Travis Zajac, Brian Boyle and
Brian Gibbons also scored for the
Devils, who snapped a two-game
skid. Cory Schneider made 16
saves.
The Kings were beaten for the
first time since losing, 3-2, in overtime to Arizona on Nov. 24. Their
winning streak was the longest in
the NHL this season.
OILERS
7, BLUE JACKETS
2: Connor McDavid had a goal and
three assists, and Laurent Brossoit
stopped 28 shots as visiting Ed-
monton routed Columbus.
Mark Letestu, Matt Benning
and Jesse Puljujarvi each had a
goal and an assist for the Oilers,
who chased Vezina Trophy-winning goaltender Sergei Bobrovsky
from the game at the end of the
second period.
FLYERS 4, MAPLE LEAFS
2: Sean Couturier scored the tie-
breaking goal with 2:55 left as host
Philadelphia beat Toronto for its
fourth straight victory.
Couturier and Claude Giroux
each had a goal and an assist, and
Travis Konecny also scored as Philadelphia snapped a six-game
home losing streak.
Patrick Marleau and James van
Riemsdyk scored for the Maple
Leafs, whose three-game winning
streak was ended in the opener of
a three-game road trip.
The Maple Leafs played without star center Auston Matthews
(upper body) for the second con-
secutive game.
SABRES
3, SENATORS 2:
Evander Kane, Kyle Okposo and
Benoit Pouliot scored in the second period, leading host Buffalo
past sliding Ottawa.
Rasmus Ristolainen had two assists as Buffalo extended its season-best point streak to four
games at 2-0-2. Robin Lehner
made 24 saves against his former
team.
Cody Ceci and Derick Brassard
scored for the Senators, who have
lost six in a row.
Ottawa dropped to 1-10-2 in its
last 13 games.
Vasilevskiy’s third shutout of the
season and seventh of his career.
Jake Allen made 22 saves for St.
Louis, which had won four in a
row.
WILD
2, FLAMES 1 (SO):
Mikael Granlund scored the winning goal in a shootout as Minnesota edged Calgary in St. Paul,
Minn.
The shootout reached the fifth
round before Granlund beat Mike
Smith. Alex Stalock stopped Michael Ferland to give Minnesota
its third straight victory, the first
two coming in overtime.
3, BLUES 0:
BLACKHAWKS 3, PANTHERS 2 (OT): Patrick Kane
Nikita Kucherov and Brayden
Point scored, Andrei Vasilevskiy
stopped 32 shots and Tampa Bay
won in St. Louis in a matchup of
the NHL’s top two teams.
Tyler Johnson added an empty
netter as Tampa Bay (22-6-2)
earned its fifth straight win. It was
scored 2:24 into overtime to lift
Chicago past Florida at home for
its third consecutive win.
Kane gained a step on Florida’s
Mike Matheson, broke in on
James Reimer and beat the goalie
with a high shot on the stick side
for his 11th goal.
LIGHTNING
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
For Cardinals, it’s
a half to remember
MARYLAND 76,
CATHOLIC 59
BY
R OMAN S TUBBS
Maryland paid Division III
Catholic University $15,000 to
visit College Park on Tuesday
night, which seemed like an absurd amount of money given how
lethargic the Terrapins played in
the first half. It didn’t help that
Maryland was missing three of its
top players to ailments — sophomore Justin Jackson was sidelined with a sore shoulder, junior
Dion Wiley was ill and freshman
Bruno Fernando is still nursing a
sprained right ankle — but the
effort in the first 20 minutes was
so lackluster that Terrapins Coach
Mark Turgeon sent in walk-on
freshman Reese Mona to provide
a spark.
Maryland’s talent won out in a
forgettable 76-59 win, but it was a
night to remember for the Cardinals. The team also received a
complimentary 100 tickets in the
lower bowl of Xfinity Center as
part of the contract, but Tuesday
was about much more than cash
and seats. Catholic (2-5), which
had entered the night with losses
this season against schools called
DeSales, Drew and Stevens, led
for all but 33 seconds in the first 10
minutes of the game.
“I think I should have asked
one of the assistants to pinch me
at the end of the second media
timeout, because I thought I was
dreaming a little bit,” Catholic
Coach Steve Howes said.
By the time senior guard Jay
Howard, who entered the night
averaging 24.7 points, finished a
layup with two seconds remaining in the first half, Maryland
(10-3) led just 37-31 and Turgeon
looked extremely agitated walking back to the locker room.
“I just think they were much
more excited and prepared to play
the game than our guys were,”
Turgeon said.
Howard is considering a career
in the Marine Corps after his basketball playing days are over, and
he said earlier this week that he
has tried to treat “every game like
our Super Bowl” during his senior
season. But there was a reason
that he posted a reminder of Tuesday night’s game on Instagram
back in August. He hit his first five
shots of the game, and he flashed
a smirk at Maryland’s bench after
a pull-up jumper to put his team
up by three less than three minutes in. None of the Cardinals are
on athletic scholarships, but for a
while, they looked like the more
confident team on the floor.
“I was just trying to put the ball
in the basket,” said Howard, who
finished with 20 points, seven
rebounds and five assists.
Turgeon prefers to have a nonDivision I team on the schedule
every year, he said earlier this
week, because it doesn’t affect the
team’s RPI. Howes had grown up
in Olney and has long been a
die-hard Maryland fan; over the
course of his 14-year tenure, he
has sometimes visited Maryland
practices to absorb as much as he
can as a coach.
He still records Terrapins
games on his DVR, watching each
one when he gets home after
coaching his own team. This may
have been one of the most familiar
teams Catholic will play all season; he knew his team wouldn’t be
able to play man-to-man against
Maryland’s talent, so he ordered
zones all night. The Terrapins finally made his team pay in the
second half — they hit 11 of 24
from three-point range, with Jared Nickens hitting four from deep
en route to 14 points — and Howes
also knew his team would have a
difficult time stopping sophomores Anthony Cowan Jr. (18
points) and Kevin Huerter (14).
But Howes also could revel in
the fact that his small team was
only outrebounded 40-33 and its
hustle was enough to wreak havoc, which in part led to 15 turnovers by Maryland.
“Somebody said to me when we
walked on the floor, ‘You have a
very diminutive team,’ ” Howes
said. “But our heart was pretty
large tonight.”
Howes needed one more game
to schedule this past summer and
was about to pencil in defending
Division III national champion
Babson when he received a call
from Maryland’s director of basketball operations, Nima Omidvar.
The game would have to be
played on the first day of finals at
Catholic, something Howes’s
team had never done, but he knew
it was an opportunity he couldn’t
pass up. His team won 17 games a
year ago, but he viewed a December matchup against the Terrapins as a potential springboard to
making a run to the NCAA Division III tournament.
Catholic had played what
Howes had considered perhaps
one of the toughest Division I
schedules of any Division III team
over the past decade; it had traveled for exhibitions to Florida and
Notre Dame and had visited Davidson during the regular season,
but when his players hopped on
the bus for the short ride to College Park on Tuesday, it had a
completely different feel.
Howes had brought up the
game during the first team meeting this fall but then didn’t talk
about it again until this week.
Now he will use it as a reference
point for the rest of the season as
Catholic resumes its Division III
schedule Saturday against Gallaudet. Tuesday night’s game will
not be one that Howard and his
teammates soon forget.
“It’s definitely going to be
memorable,” Howard said.
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP
Eagles extend hot start
at expense of Patriots
GA. SOUTHERN 74,
GEORGE MASON 51
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
Tookie Brown scored 17 points
with four assists, Quan Jackson
added a career-high 16 points off
the bench, and Georgia Southern
beat George Mason, 74-51, on
Tuesday night at EagleBank Arena
to open a six-game road trip with
its third straight win.
The Eagles (8-2) are off to their
best start since the 1992-93 season, when they started 9-2.
AJ Wilson scored 13 points and
grabbed 10 rebounds and Justin
Kier added 12 points for George
Mason (5-6).
Jackson’s layup sparked a 14-5
run capped by B.J. Gladden’s
jumper, and the Eagles led by 20
early in the second half. Two free
throws by Brown capped a 7-0 run,
and Georgia Southern led 57-35.
Jake Allsmiller’s three-pointer
with 7:56 left put the Eagles up by
23, and they cruised from there.
Mike Hughes scored 14 points
with four three-pointers and Allsmiller added 12 with four threes
for the Eagles, who held the Patriots to 16-of-56 shooting (28.6 percent) from the field and forced 21
turnovers.
Desi Rodriguez scored 17 points
and Khadeen Carrington added 11,
and Seton Hall (9-1) raced out to
an early lead and never looked
back to win for the 20th time in the
last 21 meetings against the Peacocks (4-5). Davauhnte Turner
scored 13 points and Nick Griffin
had nine to pace Saint Peter’s.
CINCINNATI 65, MISSISSIPPI ST. 50: In Highland
Heights, Ky., Jacob Evans III had
24 points and eight rebounds as
the No. 25 Bearcats recovered
from back-to-back losses and
handed the Bulldogs their first
defeat.
The Bearcats (8-2) were coming
off losses to crosstown rival Xavier
and Florida that dropped them
from No. 11 to the fringe of the
rankings. They ended the slump
with a solid defensive showing
against the Southeastern Conference’s last unbeaten team, blocking 11 shots.
Mississippi State (8-1) was off to
its best start since 2003-04.
Hokies women move to 10-2
Taylor Emery hit 5 of 6 shots in
the first quarter and went on to
score 25 points as Virginia Tech
overwhelmed Monmouth, 84-34,
in West Long Branch, N.J.
The Hokies (10-2) shot 49 percent and made 12 three-pointers
for the second time in three
games. The Hawks fell to 2-8.
SETON HALL 84, SAINT
PETER’S 61: Angel Delgado had
LOUISVILLE 95, TENNESSEE ST. 56: Asia Durr, Jazmine
18 points and 11 rebounds, his 57th
career double-double, leading the
No. 15 Pirates to the win at oncampus Walsh Gym in South Orange, N.J.
Jones and Sam Fuehring each
scored 12 points to lead a balanced
offense for the No. 3 Cardinals
(12-0) in a rout of the visiting
Tigers (1-6).
KLMNO
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2017
20 17
ALL-ME T
PHOTOS BY MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
FALL
D10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
ATHLE TES
O
Compiled by The Pos
AJ Lytton
Maliah Morris
Football — Defense: The shutdown senior corner and constant big-play threat flexed his
versatility late in the Maryland 4A state final when he sealed Wise’s win over Quince
Orchard with an interception on one play and a 39-yard touchdown run off a doublereverse on the next. Lytton anchored the back end of a defense that allowed double-digit
points just 10 times in 42 straight wins over the past three seasons.
Verbally committed to Florida State.
Girls’ soccer: A dynamic attacking player with explosive speed and exceptional dribbling ability,
the junior was the catalyst behind the run St. John’s made to Washington Catholic Athletic
Conference and D.C. state titles. As dangerous one-on-one as she is combining with
teammates, the Clemson recruit — who has spent time with U.S. youth national teams — tallied
a team-best 24 goals and 21 assists this season, including a dramatic sudden-death overtime
strike to lift the Cadets past Sidwell Friends for their second straight DCSAA trophy.
Mackenzie Karl
Sam A≠older
Field hockey: Westfield’s senior captain capped an illustrious high school career with 40 goals
and 19 assists, leading the Bulldogs to an undefeated season and the Virginia Class 6 state
championship. She recorded at least one point in every game to earn Virginia player of the
year honors. She played four varsity seasons under her mother, Coach Starr Karl, who rushed
to the hospital in 1999 after a field hockey game in which she coached to give birth to
Mackenzie. Will play for Louisville next season.
Boys’ cross-country: In his first year at Loudoun Valley, Affolder led the line of five Vikings boys
who swept the Virginia 4A state championship race. The junior transfer from Carlisle High in
Pennsylvania was the only area runner to break 15 minutes in the 5K, a feat he accomplished
in 14 minutes 58.1 seconds for second place at the Nike Southeast regional in Cary, N.C.
T
.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2017
O F
TH E
EZ
D11
SU
YE AR
st’s high school sports staff
Siron Hardy
Justin Gielen
Volleyball: The senior outside hitter was the best player on the best team in the area this
season, leading Flint Hill to a perfect 35-0 record and wins in the Independent School League
AA tournament, Virginia Independent Schools Athletic Association Division I tournament and
Metro City championship. A George Mason recruit, Hardy averaged 4.1 kills per set and
finished the year with 412. In a balanced offensive attack she stepped up on the biggest
stages, going for 15 kills in the VISAA title game and 19 in the Metro City championship.
Boys’ soccer: The Maryland commit was DeMatha’s only returning starter this fall and scored
23 goals in 20 games to lead the Stags back to the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference
final. Gielen, who is a guard on the basketball court for the Stags in the winter, is a complete
forward with the speed to run by defenders in the open field and the size to win headers in the
box. Gielen was a consistent finisher during his four years in Hyattsville, scoring 52 goals and
dishing out 22 assists.
Kevin Doyle
Page Lester
Football — offense: Philadelphia native transferred to St. John’s for his senior season to give the
Cadets a much-needed downfield passing game. He led them to their first Washington Catholic
Athletic Conference title since 1989 by completing 61 percent of his passes and throwing for 22
touchdowns. Will play for Michigan.
Girls’ cross-country: National Cathedral’s Princeton-bound senior finished the regular season
undefeated, highlighted by a victory at DCXC Invite in a personal-best 17 minutes 34 seconds.
She cruised to her second straight Independent School League title in 17:56 before repeating
as D.C. state champion in dominant fashion at Kenilworth Park. A national-caliber triathlete,
Lester booked her second straight trip to Foot Locker Nationals by finishing fifth at the
Northeast regional.
D12
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
FO O T B A L L
F I R S T
. WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 13 , 2017
T E A M
Compiled by The Post’s high school sports staff
O≠ense
From left: Dillon Spalding, WR, South County; Player of the Year Kevin Doyle, QB, St. John’s; Jordan Houston, RB, Flint Hill; Michael Jurgens, OL, Damascus; Rafael Checa, K/P, St. John’s; Jordan Funk, OL,
Damascus; Brian Cobbs, WR, Hayfield; Rasheed Walker, OL, North Point; Doc Bonner, QB, Quince Orchard; Aidan Rafferty, OL, Gonzaga; Ricky Slade, RB, Hylton; Evan Gregory, OL, DeMatha; Daniel
George, WR, Oxon Hill.
Defense
PHOTOS BY MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
From left: Spencer Alston, DB, South Lakes; Ryan Kearney, LB, Howard; Nolan Cockrill, DL, Westfield; Mychale Salahuddin, KR, H.D. Woodson; Jamree Kromah, DL, C.H. Flowers; A.J. Felton, DB, FreedomWoodbridge; Durell Nchami, LB, Paint Branch; Cam Goode, DL, St. John’s; Dashaun Jerkins, LB, Woodbridge; Player of the Year AJ Lytton, DB, Wise; Jalen Green, DL, Good Counsel; Raymond Boone, DB,
Eleanor Roosevelt; Jalen Williams, DB, Landon; Coach of the Year Kyle Simmons, Westfield.
FA L L
Girls’ cross-country
COACH OF THE YEAR
Josh Dawson, Northern
FIRST TEAM
Olivia Beckner, Sr., South Lakes
Anna Coffin, Jr., Annapolis
Julia Ghiselli, Fr., Annandale
Abbey Green, Sr., Walter Johnson
Heather Holt, Sr., Marshall
Natalie Morris, Sr., Loudoun Valley
Emma Wolcott, Sr., Tuscarora
SECOND TEAM
Ahmed Hassan, Sr., Oakton
Zach Holden, Sr., Madison
Patrick Howley, Sr., Georgetown Prep
Derek Johnson, Sr., Tuscarora
Jonathan Johnson, Sr., Parkdale
Jonah Lane, Sr., Severna Park
Silas Mathew, Jr., Robinson
John Moxley, Sr., Flint Hill
Kai Muniz, Sr., Reservoir
Tre Simmons, So., Episcopal
Benjamin Smith, Jr., Marshall
Garrett Suhr, So., Richard Montgomery
Mark Unger, Jr., Richard Montgomery
Daniel Weiss, Sr., Jewish Day School
Connor Wells, Jr., Loudoun Valley
Chamberlain Zulauf, Sr., Madison
Ashley Plaza, L, Jr., Battlefield
Rachel Richardson, OH, Fr., St. John’s
Laila Ricks, MB, So., Flint Hill
Laila Rogers, MB, So., Richard Montgomery
Devin Ruble, OH, Sr., La Plata
Maya Scott, OH, So., Magruder
Kelsey Smith, OH, Sr., Madison
Rachel Stephens, OH, Sr., West Springfield
Nicole Tabenske, L, Sr., Mount Hebron
Michelle Tai, L, Jr., Churchill
DJ Taylor, OH, Jr., Holton-Arms
Katie Thompson, S, Sr., Oakton
Sydney Trotto, OH, Sr., West Springfield
Cat Vaccaro, OH, Sr., Yorktown
Andersen Vaughan, S, Sr., Loudoun County
Lisa Zoch, OH, Jr., Atholton
A L L- ME T S
Katie Keane, F, Jr., Arundel
Quinn Kindbom, MF, So., River Hill
Carter Leahy, F, Sr., Stone Ridge
Emma Logue, MF, Jr., Stone Bridge
Alyssa Maynard, MF, Jr., Marshall
Madeline McGaughey, MF, So., Langley
Payton Moore, GK, Sr., Westfield
Maddy O’Brien, D, Sr., Glenelg
Sara Pique, D, So., Arundel
Tori Raulin, F, Sr., Atholton
Paige Richbourg, F, Sr., Centreville
Kelly Rose, MF, So., Broad Run
Olivia Rummel, D, Jr., W.T. Woodson
Gabby Salisbury, F, Sr., South County
Abby Smith, D, Sr., Clarksburg
Alexandra Sperling, F, Jr., Churchill
Rachel Williams, MF, Sr., W.T. Woodson
Sarah Daniels, Sr., Lake Braddock
Genevieve DiBari, Sr., Stone Ridge
Kamryn Eveleth, Jr., Severna Park
Ava Hassebrock, Jr., Tuscarora
Cady Hyde, So., St. John’s
Abby Sweeney, Sr., Northern
Laura Webb, Jr., Woodbridge
Volleyball
Stephanie Blake, Northwest
Field hockey
COACH OF THE YEAR
HONORABLE MENTION
FIRST TEAM
COACH OF THE YEAR
Kyle Simmons, Westfield
Emily Beyer, Sr., Mount Hebron
Tess Brinkman, Fr., O’Connell
Sarah Coleman, Jr., West Springfield
Heather Delaplaine, Sr., Damascus
Ellie Desmond, So., Broad Run
Ricky Fetterolf, Fr., Loudoun Valley
Isabelle Gulgert, Jr., South Lakes
Ryley Howard, Sr., O’Connell
Olivia Janke, Sr., Broadneck
Chase Kappeler, Jr., West Springfield
Yasmine Kass, Sr., Paint Branch
Allie O’Brien, Sr., Wilson
Brielle Perry, Sr., Lake Braddock
Nelle Ray, Fr., Leonardtown
Nicole Re, Jr., Chantilly
Nandini Satsangi, Jr., Poolesville
Janet Scott, Sr., Walter Johnson
Jasmine Tiamfook, Sr., River Hill
Seneca Willen, Jr., Robinson
Elizabeth Wu, Sr., Madison
Claire Farrell, OH, Sr., Bishop Ireton
Rebecca Frye, S, Sr., St. John’s
Maddie McArthur, OH, Sr., McLean
Jenaisya Moore, OH, Jr., Northwest
Jade Parchment, OH, Sr., Holy Cross
Lilly Reilly, L, Sr., Middleburg Academy
Anne Louise Seekford, OH, Sr., Tuscarora
Elena Shklyar, S, Sr., Langley
Lynn Powell, Patuxent
FIRST TEAM
FIRST TEAM
Spencer Alston, DB, Sr., South Lakes
Raymond Boone, DB, Sr., Eleanor
Roosevelt
Nolan Cockrill, DL, Sr., Westfield
A.J. Felton, DB, Sr., Freedom-Woodbridge
Cam Goode, DL, Sr., St. John’s
Jalen Green, DL, Jr., Good Counsel
Dashaun Jerkins, LB, Sr., Woodbridge
Ryan Kearney, LB, Sr., Howard
Jamree Kromah, DL, Sr., C.H. Flowers
Durell Nchami, LB, Sr., Paint Branch
Jalen Williams, DB, Jr., Landon
Mychale Salahuddin, KR, Sr., H.D. Woodson
Boys’ cross-country
COACH OF THE YEAR
John Ausema, Gonzaga
FIRST TEAM
Colton Bogucki, Sr., Loudoun Valley
Garrison Clark, Jr., Severna Park
Justin Diehl, Jr., Calvert
Ryan Lockett, Sr., Poolesville
Yared Mekonnen, Sr., Edison
Peter Morris, Sr., Loudoun Valley
Adam Nakasaka, Sr., Bethesda-CC
SECOND TEAM
Edward Cerne, Jr., Lake Braddock
Nicholas Deamer, Sr., Howard
Max Greczyn, Jr., O’Connell
Jacob Hunter, Jr., Loudoun Valley
Gavin McElhennon, So., Gonzaga
Ben Nibbelink, Sr., Tuscarora
Luke Tewalt, So., Washington Latin
HONORABLE MENTION
Luke Armbruster, Sr., St. Andrew’s
Andrew Delvecchio, Sr., Lake Braddock
Julian Dixon, Sr., Sidwell Friends
Football — defense
COACH OF THE YEAR
SECOND TEAM
Marianna Bertolone, OH, So., Wilson
Megan Bukala, OH, Jr., Loudoun County
Amanda Chew, OH, Sr., Northern
Grace Cozad, OH, Sr., Oakton
Alicia Eldredge, S, Sr., Arundel
Alana Harris, MB, Sr., Patriot
Janiece Jefferies, S, Sr., Northwest
Sydney Reed, OH, So., Flint Hill
HONORABLE MENTION
Anjali Amazigo, MB, Jr., Heritage
Nina Askew, MB, Sr., Paul VI
Fatima Bouzid, S, Sr., Wootton
Madison Bowser, MB, Jr., Colgan
Nicole Dao, S, Jr., Holy Cross
Stephanie Der, L, Jr., Chantilly
Maya Elassal, MB, Sr., Oakton
Thandie Eversley, L, Jr., Georgetown Day
Olivia Fagan, OH, Sr., Damascus
Noelle Foster, OH, Jr. Stone Bridge
Allison Franke, OH, Sr., Langley
Olivia Franke, MB, So., Langley
Rebecca Frey, L, Sr., Loudoun County
Morgan Gibbs, S, Jr., Forest Park
Chyna Gubbings, OH, Sr., Arundel
Sara Hunsberger, S, Sr., School Without
Walls
Kirah Johnson, MB, So., Westfield
Sara Khatouri, S, Sr., West Springfield
Celia Larson, OH, Jr., Good Counsel
Jessica Lee, S, Sr.,Walter Johnson
Frankie Littleton, OH, Sr., Bishop Ireton
Nalani Lyde, OH, Jr., Sidwell Friends
Colleen McAuley, MB, Sr., Glenelg
Mackenzie Meehan, Jr, MB, Arundel
Kaliyah Moss, MB, So., Magruder
Kaelyn O’Brien, S, Jr., Woodbridge
Georgia Ohmke, MB, Sr., Stuart
Krissy O’Malley, S, Jr., Flint Hill
Eleni Panagopoulos, OH, Sr., Wootton
Brett Pearson, S, Sr., National Cathedral
Anna Bertrand, MF, Jr., Clarksburg
Darcy Clement, F, Jr., South River
Margaret Ellington, MF/D, Sr., Good
Counsel
Rachel Fleig, F, Jr., Chesapeake
Delaney Golian, D, Sr., Westfield
Taylor Henriksen, GK, Sr., St. Stephen’s/
St.Agnes
Sydney Keating, D, Sr. Fairfax
Margot Lawn, F, Jr., Spalding
Clara Morrison, F, Jr., St. John’s
Paige Reese, MF, Sr., Glenelg
Eleanor Winants, D, Sr., Episcopal
SECOND TEAM
SECOND TEAM
Logan Beal, D, Sr., Chesapeake
Mackenzie Dinopoulos, MF, Jr., Patuxent
Abby Fusca, D, Sr., Madison
Faith Kean, MF, Sr., Churchill
Skye Joegriner, GK, Sr., Quince Orchard
Nicki McNamara, F, Sr., Westfield
Megan Munley, F, Jr., Broadneck
Keely O’Keefe, F, Sr., Bethesda-Chevy
Chase
Lisa Saffin, F, Sr., Robinson
Mallary Sellars, D, Sr., Severna Park
Ciara Weets, GK, Sr., Lake Braddock
Julio Ayamel, LB, Jr., Good Counsel
Bryan Bresee, DL, So., Damascus
Juwon Farri, KR, Sr., Northwest
Vincent Flythe III, DB, Sr., H.D. Woodson
Lavonte Gater, DB, Jr., Ballou
Jake Hagy, DL, Sr., Georgetown Prep
Joey Hunt, DB, Sr., Sherwood
Jalund Johnson, LB, Sr., Gwynn Park
Jack Kosko, DL, Sr., Stone Bridge
Demetri Morsell, DB, Sr., Wise
Caleb Okechukwu, DL, Sr., St. John’s
Antoine Sampah, LB, So., Woodbridge
Joseph Wete, DL, Jr., Gonzaga
HONORABLE MENTION
HONORABLE MENTION
Abby Asuncion, MF, Jr. Potomac Falls
Ashleigh Bathras, GK, Sr., Old Mill
Megan Brannen, MF, Sr., Severna Park
Carly Britt, F, Sr., Langley
Beth Cornelius, F, Sr., St. John’s
Annie Dyson, MF, Sr., St. Stephen’s/St.
Agnes
Ava Edwards, F, Sr., Blake
Kailey Fitzgerald, MF, Jr., Georgetown
Visitation
Jenna Garden, M, Sr., Spalding
Anna Gruber, MF, Sr. Paint Branch
Gabrielle Hamburger, F, Sr., River Hill
Sophia Hartman, D, Jr., Broadneck
Bella Hite, MF, Jr., W.T. Woodson
Stephanie Heffron, D, Sr., St. John’s
McKenzie Jamison, D, Jr., South River
Sophie Johnson, MF, Sr., T.C. Williams
Amanda Jordan, GK, Sr., Wootton
Keenan Anunay, DB, Sr., Centreville
Tola Banjoko, DL, Sr., Episcopal
Noah Barnett, LB, Jr., Springbrook
Tyler Baylor, LB, Sr., Good Counsel
John Birchmeier, LB, Jr., Broad Run
Noah Boykin, DB, Sr., H.D. Woodson
D.J. Brown, DB, Sr., St. John’s
Malik Bridgeman, DL, Sr., Gonzaga
Darius Buchanan, DB, Jr., Theodore
Roosevelt
Ryan Carroll, DB, Sr., Potomac (Md.)
DeAndre Clifton, DL, Sr., Wise
Ron Cook, KR, Jr., St. John’s
Joseph Dagbe, DB, So., South Lakes
Aaron Derwin, DB, Sr., Quince Orchard
Dean Ferguson, LB, Jr., Potomac Falls
Jake Galli, LB, Sr., Gonzaga
Kenny Gardner III, DB, Sr., Blake
DeAndre Jules, DL, Jr., Northwest
Josh King, LB, Sr., Battlefield
Kellis Martin, DL, Sr., Stone Bridge
Javino Matthews, DL, Sr., Phelps
Tre Maxwell, LB, Jr., Centreville
Micah McNeil, DB, Sr., Good Counsel
Ricky Miezan, LB, Sr., Episcopal
Grant Misch, LB, Sr., Potomac Falls
John Morgan, DL, Sr., DeMatha
Taylor Morin, DB Jr., Westfield
Tre’Mon Morris-Brash, DL, Jr., St. John’s
Spencer Newman, LB, Sr., Sherwood
Rudy Ngougni, DL, Sr., Blair
Vincent Notzon, LB, Sr., Episcopal
Sammy Obiang, DL, Sr., Woodbridge
Ike Onwuka, KR, Sr., Patriot
Jayde Pierre, DL, Sr., Dominion
Christopher Rhodes, LB, Sr., Wise
Mekhail Sherman, LB, So., St. John’s
Nicholas Snyder, LB, Sr., Chopticon
Makye Smith, LB, Sr., Douglass
Chris Thompson, DL, Sr., Lackey
Daymon Williams, DB, Sr., Riverdale Baptist
Kareem Williams, DL, Sr., Theodore
Roosevelt
Football — offense
FIRST TEAM
Doc Bonner, QB, Sr., Quince Orchard
Rafael Checa, K/P, Sr., St. John’s
Brian Cobbs, WR, Sr., Hayfield
Jordan Funk, OL, Sr., Damascus
Daniel George, WR, Sr., Oxon Hill
Evan Gregory, OL, Sr., DeMatha
Jordan Houston, RB, Jr., Flint Hill
Michael Jurgens, OL, Sr., Damascus
Aidan Rafferty, OL, Sr., Gonzaga
Ricky Slade, RB, Sr., Hylton
Dillon Spalding, WR, Sr., South County
Rasheed Walker, OL, Sr., North Point
SECOND TEAM
Justin Allen, QB, Jr., Tuscarora
Henry Chibueze, OL, Sr., Woodbridge
Dontay Demus, WR, Sr., Friendship Collegiate
Jaden Faulkner, QB, Sr., Eleanor
Roosevelt
Austin Fontaine, OL, Sr., DeMatha
Carl Garmon III, RB, Sr., Champe
Devonte Gordon, OL, Sr., Maret
Christian Haynes, OL, Sr., Bowie
Ed Hendrix, WR, Sr., H.D. Woodson
Lamar Horner, OL, Jr., Centreville
Colton Spangler, K/P, Jr., Chesapeake
Antwan Squire, RB, Sr., Suitland
Daniel Thompson, WR, Sr., Stone Bridge
HONORABLE MENTION
Spencer Anderson, OL, Sr., McNamara
Roberto Argueta, K/P, Sr., Falls Church
Nick Barts, QB, Jr., Loudoun County
Alonzo Beverly, RB, Sr., Theodore
Roosevelt
Norval Black, WR, Sr., Northwest
KaDarrian Booker, RB, Sr., Long Reach
Kevan Bowen, OL, Sr., Good Counsel
Gabe Brinson, OL, Sr., South County
Terrlonta Buchanan, QB, Sr., Ballou
Ben Castellano, WR, Jr., Woodgrove
Julius Chestnut, RB, Sr., Spalding
Reese Crounse, QB, Sr., Northern
Shane Davis, QB, Sr, Broadneck
Devin Dawkins, RB, Jr., Howard
Lovell Djieya Jr., RB, Sr., Wheaton
Justin Duenkel, K/P, Jr., Flint Hill
David Dupree, RB, Sr., DuVal
Mike Fierstein, OL, Sr., Quince Orchard
John Geppert, QB, Sr., Landon
Jesus Gibbs, OL, Sr., Potomac (Va.)
Jamal Glenn, RB, Sr., Maret
Cam Hart, WR, Jr., Good Counsel
Isaiah Hazel, WR, Jr., Wise
DeMarcco Hellams, WR, Jr., DeMatha
Troy Hettinger, K/P, Sr., Marriotts Ridge
Darius Hunter, RB, Sr., Arundel
Rakim Jarrett, WR, So., St. John’s
Josh Jefferson, OL, Sr., St. John’s
Jemichael Jones, QB, Sr., North Point
Perris Jones, RB, Sr., Episcopal
Bassie Kanu, RB, Sr., Centreville
Marco Kemp, K/P, Jr., Gonzaga
Noah Kim, QB, So., Westfield
Malik Lawrence, WR, Jr., North Point
Jelani Machen, RB, Jr., Landon
Connor Madden, K/P, Sr., South Lakes
Dakwandre Marshall, RB, Jr., Falls Church
Tyler Matheny, WR, Sr., Lake Braddock
Michael Mbony, QB, Sr., Sherwood
Elisha McDonald, RB, Sr., Eleanor
Roosevelt
Teyonte McKenzie, RB, Sr., Bell
Robert Middleton, QB, Jr., Lackey
Noelly Miller, WR, Jr., Wootton
Darrien Newton, RB, Sr., Mount Vernon
John Oliver, RB, Sr., Wise
Wande Owens, RB, Jr., Glenelg
Latrele Palmer, RB, Jr., Good Counsel
Keilan Robinson, RB, Jr., St. John’s
Zamon Robinson, WR, Sr., Blair
Andre Ross Jr., WR, Sr. National Collegiate
George Richardson III, WR, Sr., Dominion
Grant Saylor, QB, Sr., Wootton
Ben Bell, OL, Jr., Stone Bridge
Bryson Shaw, WR, Jr., Bullis
Ronnell St. John, QB, Jr., Bell
Kamau Stith, WR, Jr., Theodore
Roosevelt
Tucker Strachan, QB, Sr, Bullis.
Charles Thompson, WR, Jr., St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes
Miles Thompson, QB, Jr., Flint Hill
Adam Tounkara, OL, Sr., Richard Montgomery
Elijah Trent, WR, Sr., Wootton
Davis Walker, K/P, Sr., Landon
Tanner Wall, WR, Sr., Yorktown
Leron West, RB, Jr., Tuscarora
Caleb Williams, QB, Fr., Gonzaga
Ethon Williams, WR, Jr., Broadneck
Quinton Williams, QB, Jr., Wise
Boys’ soccer
COACH OF THE YEAR
Guillermo Melendez, Bethesda-CC
FIRST TEAM
Silas Baker, F, Jr., Meade
Drew Belloff, MF, Sr. Severna Park
Sam Farrell, GK, Sr. Severna Park
Nico Kenary, D, Sr., Landon
Anderson Mejia-Marroquin, F, Sr., Hammond
Isaiah Price, F, Sr., Bowie
Primo Josep Fogam, MF, Sr., Bell
Dylan Reid, D, Sr., Whitman
Darius Siahpoosh, MF, Sr., Churchill
Eli Sturm, MF, Sr., Bethesda-Chevy Chase
Ryan Teuschl, D, Sr., Gonzaga
SECOND TEAM
Alexander Abril, D, Sr., O’Connell
Keaton Bathras, MF, Sr., Severna Park
Theo Biddle, D, Sr., Wilson
Cameron Coates, D, Sr., River Hill
Paul Egan, MF, Sr., The Heights
Lucas Kokolios, MR, Sr., Leonardown
Yann Kouemi, F, Sr., Watkins Mill
Ronald Little, F, Sr., Sherwood
Garrett Lyons, MF, Sr., Georgetown Prep
Jack Rosener, MF, Jr., Potomac School
Bennett Schwartz, GK, Jr., BethesdaChevy Chase
Zach Wittlinger, F, Sr., Grace Christian
Academy
HONORABLE MENTION
Shane Angel, GK, Sr., Chopticon
Lekan Anifowose, MF, Sr. McKinley Tech
Edgar Ayala, D, Sr., Bell
Toby Baldwin, GK, Sr., Oakland Mills
Vincent Broccolino, MF, Jr., Mount Hebron
Liam Brocker, MF, Sr., Bethesda-Chevy
Chase
Andrew Colebrook, D, Sr., Chesapeake
Carlos Contreras, MF, Sr., Magruder
Seth Depriest-Kessler, MF, Sr. La Plata
Keelan Fedison, MF, Sr., Meade
Caleb Fernandez, MF, Sr., Damascus
Alex Freed, GK, Sr., Landon
William Garner, MF, Sr., McNamara
Nick Gerlach, GK, Sr., Gonzaga
Zach Hosseinian, MF, Sr., Paul VI
Justin John-Longbah, F, Sr., Bowie
Alex Keppler, F, Sr., Centennial
Giacomo Mecagni, D, Sr., St. Albans
Jake Miklovic, D, Sr., Bishop Ireton
Hector Moreno, MF, So., Paul Public Charter
Rodrigo Moreno, MF, Sr., Bladensburg
Bryce Orsini, F, Sr. Rockville
Stephen Orsini, D, Sr., Rockville
Antonio Paz Cruz, GK, Jr., International at
Langley Park
Jasper Pearson, D, Sr., Washington International
Tucker Protzman, D, Jr., Great Mills
Noah Raphael, F, Sr., Calvert
John Reed, MF, Sr., Good Counsel
Ismar Reyes, MF, Sr., Capital City Public
Charter
Natan Rosen, F, Jr., Whitman
Alex Shahmirzadi, MF, Sr., Flint Hill
Patrick Sherlock, GK, Jr., River Hill
Christopher Simpson, D, Sr. North Point
Emmett Stern, D, Sr., Sidwell Friends
Alden Sullivan, MF, Sr., South River
Alexander Thompson, GK, Sr., Georgetown Day
Trevor VanVeldhuisen, MF, Jr., Washington Christian
Ben Wetcheme F, Sr., Crossland
Evan Young, F, Jr., Lackey
Girls’ soccer
COACH OF THE YEAR
Brian Song, River Hill
FIRST TEAM
Courtlynne Caskin, F, Sr., Potomac School
Megan Chun, MF, Sr., River Hill
Katie Coritz, D, Sr., Paul VI
Talia Gabarra, MF, Jr., Broadneck
Sarah Gellert, F, Sr., Severna Park
Heather Hinz, GK, Jr., Good Counsel
Makenna Morris, MF, So., St. John’s
Molly Olcott, D, Sr., Churchill
Micah Reid, D, Sr., Bishop McNamara
Grace Sherman, MF, Jr., Potomac School
Victoria Tran, MF, Sr., River Hill
Grace Walsh, MF, Sr., St. John’s
SECOND TEAM
Cailynn Adelman, D, Jr., Northwest
Jenna Buto, MF, Sr., Broadneck
Chelsea Cahill, MF, Sr., Whitman
Beth Ellinport, MF, Sr., Quince Orchard
Leyah Hall-Robinson, F, Jr., Bullis
Jameese Joseph, F, Jr., Good Counsel
Nicole Lopez, D, Sr., Walter Johnson
Cameron Mangold, D, Sr., Southern
Tracey Mills, MF, Sr., Potomac School
Megan Nayak, F, Sr., Georgetown Visitation
Hanna Sellinger, GK, Jr., Holy Child
Brigette Wang, F, Jr., River Hill
Whitney Wiley, MF, Jr., Flint Hill
HONORABLE MENTION
Lili Barret, F, Sr., Bethesda-Chevy Chase
Gretchen Bennett, GK, Jr., Paul VI
Julianna Bonner, F, Jr., Wilde Lake
Brooke Boyd, MF, Sr., Blake
Carli Boyer, GK, Sr., Bethesda-CC
Chloe Chapman, F, Jr., Good Counsel
Makenna Dean, F, Jr., Broadneck
Rachel Deresky, F, Fr., Northern
Lily Dunbar, MF, Jr., Wilde Lake
Sammi Ferguson, MF, Sr., Holy Cross
Jessie Gomez, MF, So., Bethesda-CC
Jillian Gonzales, MF, Sr., Wootton
Jenna Hutchison, GK, Jr., Wilde Lake
Victoria Huxtable, MF, Sr., Atholton
Mia Isaac, MF, Jr., Huntingtown
Emily Kavanaugh, MF, Sr., Paul VI
Alex Konzmann, GK, Sr., Blake
Lila Lingo, F, Fr., Wilson
Caroline MacDonald, F, Jr., Whitman
CJ Maloney, F, Sr., Walter Johnson
Kendall McBride, MF, So., O’Connell
Abby McGuire, D, Sr., Severna Park
Sophia Michalski-Cooper, MF, So., South
River
Michelle Money, MF, Sr., Severn
Gabriella Nastasi, MF, Jr., St. John’s
Meaghan O’Donovan, MF, Jr., St. John’s
Jane Olcott, MF, Jr., Churchill
Tatiana Ortega, F, Sr., Stone Ridge
Kaitlyn Parks, GK, Jr., Northern
Danielle Poindexter, D, Jr., River Hill
Ariana Reyes, MF, So., Bell
Annie Riley, D, Jr., Watkins Mill
Danielle Satola, D, Jr., Good Counsel
Jillian Savageau, GK, Jr., Spalding
Catherine Scamurra, F, Sr., South River
Jenna Snead, MF, Jr., Spalding
Katie Stender-Moore, GK, Jr., Whitman
Mary Twetten, MF, Sr., Northern
Adrienne Vaughn, F, Sr., Atholton
Kayleigh Venis, F, So., Calvert
Mary Wari, F, Jr., Quince Orchard
Camryn Williams, MF, Sr., Calvert
Nicole Willing, F, Sr., Sidwell Friends
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D13
M2
scoreboard
BA S KETBA L L
HOCKEY
H I GH S C HOOLS
NBA
Warriors 111, Trail Blazers 104
NHL
Wild 2, Flames 1 (SO)
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Late Monday
EASTERN CONFERENCE
CALGARY ........................... 0
MINNESOTA ...................... 1
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................23
Toronto ......................................17
New York ...................................14
x-Philadelphia............................13
Brooklyn.....................................11
L
6
8
13
13
15
Pct
.793
.680
.519
.500
.423
GB
—
4
8
81/2
101/2
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................14
Miami.........................................13
Orlando ......................................11
Charlotte....................................10
Atlanta.........................................6
L
13
13
17
16
21
Pct
.519
.500
.393
.385
.222
GB
—
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................20
Milwaukee .................................15
Indiana .......................................16
Detroit .......................................14
Chicago ........................................6
L
8
10
11
13
20
Pct
.714
.600
.593
.519
.231
GB
—
31/2
31/2
51/2
13
1/
2
3
3
1/
2
1/
2
8
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................21
San Antonio ...............................19
New Orleans ..............................14
Memphis ......................................8
Dallas ...........................................8
L
4
9
14
19
20
Pct
.840
.679
.500
.296
.286
GB
—
31/2
81/2
14
141/2
NORTHWEST
W
x-Minnesota ..............................16
Denver........................................15
Portland .....................................13
Utah ...........................................13
Oklahoma City ...........................12
L
11
12
13
14
14
Pct
.593
.556
.500
.481
.462
GB
—
1
21/2
3
31/2
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................22
L.A. Clippers...............................10
L.A. Lakers .................................10
x-Phoenix.....................................9
x-Sacramento ..............................8
L
6
15
16
19
18
Pct
.786
.400
.385
.321
.308
GB
—
101/2
11
13
13
x-Late game
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Charlotte 116, at Oklahoma City 103
at Chicago 108, Boston 85
at Houston 130, New Orleans 123
Miami 107, at Memphis 82
at Golden State 111, Portland 104
at L.A. Clippers 96, Toronto 91
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
at Brooklyn 103, Washington 98
at Cleveland 123, Atlanta 114
Denver 103, at Detroit 84
at New York 113, L.A. Lakers 109 (OT)
at Dallas 95, San Antonio 89
Philadelphia at Minnesota, Late
Phoenix at Sacramento, Late
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Memphis at Washington, 7
L.A. Clippers at Orlando, 7
Oklahoma City at Indiana, 7
Denver at Boston, 7:30
Portland at Miami, 7:30
Milwaukee at New Orleans, 8
Utah at Chicago, 8
Toronto at Phoenix, 9
Charlotte at Houston, 9:30
19
33
28
33
29 — 104
18 — 111
PORTLAND: Turner 3-8 4-4 10, Aminu 1-6 2-2 4, Leonard
2-5 0-0 4, Lillard 12-28 10-11 39, McCollum 8-14 4-4 21,
Layman 3-9 2-2 8, Collins 4-9 1-2 9, Vonleh 2-4 0-0 4,
Davis 0-1 0-0 0, Swanigan 0-0 0-0 0, Connaughton 2-4 0-0
5. Totals 37-88 23-25 104.
GOLDEN STATE: Durant 11-21 4-4 28, Casspi 4-6 2-4 11,
Bell 5-6 1-2 11, Livingston 2-4 2-2 6, Thompson 9-21 2-2
24, Young 5-8 0-0 12, Looney 0-0 0-0 0, West 5-6 0-0 10,
Cook 1-2 1-1 3, Iguodala 2-6 1-2 6, McCaw 0-0 0-0 0.
Totals 44-80 13-17 111.
Three-point Goals: Portland 7-28 (Lillard 5-13, McCollum
1-3, Connaughton 1-3, Turner 0-1, Collins 0-2, Aminu 0-2,
Layman 0-4), Golden State 10-20 (Thompson 4-10,
Young 2-2, Durant 2-4, Casspi 1-1, Iguodala 1-2, Cook
0-1). Fouled Out: Collins. Rebounds: Portland 39 (Vonleh
9), Golden State 42 (Durant, Casspi 9). Assists: Portland
14 (Turner 4), Golden State 26 (Iguodala, Durant 5).
Total Fouls: Portland 18, Golden State 16. A: 19,596
(19,596).
NCAA men
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
Arcadia 72, Scranton 56
Army 76, St. Francis Brooklyn 64
Boston College 81, Columbia 66
Colgate 87, NJIT 76
Farmingdale 80, Yeshiva 71
Hofstra 84, Stony Brook 81
Iona 83, Yale 67
Princeton 69, Monmouth (N.J.) 58
Rutgers 75, Fordham 63
Seton Hall 84, St. Peter’s 61
UMBC 81, Coppin St. 74
SOUTH
Alcorn St. 77, Fisk 69
Bethune-Cookman 67, Cal Poly 53
Catawba 76, St. Augustine’s 73 (OT)
Ga. Southwestern 78, Albany (Ga.) 71
Georgia Southern 74, George Mason 51
Georgia St. 90, Point 70
Louisiana-Lafayette 75, Louisiana Tech 71
Louisiana-Monroe 59, Grambling St. 57
Maryland 76, Catholic 59
Morehead St. 85, Kentucky Christian 57
S.C. State 91, Charleston Southern 88 (OT)
Tennessee St. 63, Alabama St. 45
UCF 61, SE Louisiana 53
MIDWEST
Cincinnati 65, Mississippi St. 50
Davenport 110, Great Lakes Christian 80
Indiana St. 85, Green Bay 63
N. Dakota St. 101, Valley City St. 58
S. Dakota St. 99, North Dakota 63
Saint Louis 69, Murray St. 55
SOUTHWEST
Michigan 59, Texas 52
FAR WEST
New Mexico St. 84, Eastern New Mexico 62
San Diego 69, Colorado 59
Wyoming 93, E. Washington 88, OT
Cavaliers 123, Hawks 114
ATLANTA ........................... 31
CLEVELAND ....................... 31
17
31
29
32
37 — 114
29 — 123
ATLANTA: Prince 8-10 6-6 24, Ilyasova 3-11 0-0 7,
Cavanaugh 4-9 2-2 11, Schroder 6-15 0-0 14, Bazemore
7-13 0-0 20, Bembry 4-8 1-1 10, Babbitt 3-7 0-0 7,
Plumlee 3-4 0-0 6, Taylor 1-3 3-4 5, Delaney 1-2 0-0 2,
Belinelli 3-10 0-0 8, Dorsey 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 43-92 12-13
114.
CLEVELAND: James 11-13 1-2 25, Crowder 5-10 1-1 13,
Love 6-13 1-3 17, Calderon 5-7 0-0 14, Smith 1-5 0-0 3,
Green 7-12 3-3 17, Osman 3-8 0-0 7, Frye 3-4 0-0 6,
Thompson 0-0 0-0 0, Zizic 1-2 0-0 2, Perrantes 0-1 0-0 0,
Korver 6-11 1-1 19. Totals 48-86 7-10 123.
Three-point Goals: Atlanta 16-36 (Bazemore 6-10,
Prince 2-4, Belinelli 2-5, Schroder 2-5, Bembry 1-1,
Babbitt 1-3, Cavanaugh 1-3, Ilyasova 1-4, Taylor 0-1),
Cleveland 20-38 (Korver 6-9, Calderon 4-5, Love 4-5,
James 2-3, Crowder 2-6, Smith 1-2, Osman 1-5, Green
0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Atlanta 37 (Cavanaugh 9), Cleveland 37 (Love 12). Assists: Atlanta 26
(Prince 6), Cleveland 35 (James 17). Total Fouls: Atlanta
17, Cleveland 18. Technicals: Atlanta coach Hawks
(Defensive three second). A: 20,562 (20,562).
Nuggets 103, Pistons 84
DENVER .............................. 26
DETROIT ............................. 18
23
22
31
20
23 — 103
24 — 84
DENVER: Barton 2-5 0-0 4, Chandler 6-11 4-4 18, Plumlee
5-7 0-0 10, Murray 11-19 2-2 28, G.Harris 3-10 2-2 8,
Hernangomez 0-0 0-0 0, Arthur 2-6 0-0 5, Lyles 7-7 3-4
20, Mudiay 0-2 2-2 2, Morris 0-1 0-0 0, Beasley 4-11 0-0 8.
Totals 40-79 13-14 103.
DETROIT: Bullock 3-5 0-0 6, T.Harris 0-7 2-2 2, Drummond 1-4 3-4 5, Jackson 4-10 3-3 12, Bradley 2-10 2-2 6,
Johnson 0-3 0-0 0, Ellenson 3-6 0-0 7, Tolliver 1-2 0-0 3,
Moreland 0-0 0-0 0, Marjanovic 4-6 6-8 14, Smith 4-14
0-0 8, Galloway 5-9 3-3 18, Kennard 1-3 0-0 3. Totals
28-79 19-22 84.
Three-point Goals: Denver 10-30 (Murray 4-8, Lyles 3-3,
Chandler 2-4, Arthur 1-5, Morris 0-1, Barton 0-2, Mudiay
0-2, Beasley 0-2, G.Harris 0-3), Detroit 9-25 (Galloway
5-7, Ellenson 1-1, Tolliver 1-2, Kennard 1-2, Jackson 1-5,
Smith 0-1, Bullock 0-1, Bradley 0-1, Johnson 0-1,
T.Harris 0-4). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Denver 44
(Plumlee 13), Detroit 40 (Drummond 10). Assists:
Denver 27 (Barton 10), Detroit 17 (Smith 5). Total Fouls:
Denver 15, Detroit 16. A: 15,480 (21,000).
Knicks 113, Lakers 109 (OT)
22
25
28
26
20
23
10 — 109
14 — 113
L.A. LAKERS: Nance Jr. 2-4 1-1 5, Ingram 2-12 1-1 5,
Lopez 5-13 2-2 14, Ball 6-13 2-3 17, Caldwell-Pope 8-20
4-4 24, Brewer 0-1 0-0 0, Kuzma 8-17 0-0 19, Randle 6-11
1-3 13, Clarkson 5-11 1-1 12, Hart 0-0 0-0 0. Totals
42-102 12-15 109.
NEW YORK: Porzingis 14-26 4-5 37, Thomas 1-2 2-2 5,
Kanter 7-10 0-0 14, Jack 1-6 1-2 3, Lee 5-17 0-0 10,
Beasley 6-13 1-2 13, McDermott 5-11 0-0 10, O’Quinn 4-4
0-0 8, Ntilikina 5-11 0-0 13, Baker 0-1 0-0 0. Totals
48-101 8-11 113.
Three-point Goals: L.A. Lakers 13-35 (Caldwell-Pope
4-14, Ball 3-6, Kuzma 3-6, Lopez 2-6, Clarkson 1-2,
Ingram 0-1), New York 9-22 (Porzingis 5-8, Ntilikina 3-4,
Thomas 1-2, Baker 0-1, Jack 0-1, McDermott 0-2, Lee
0-4). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 52 (Nance
Jr. 9), New York 49 (Kanter, Porzingis 11). Assists: L.A.
Lakers 24 (Ball 6), New York 25 (Jack 10). Total Fouls:
L.A. Lakers 19, New York 16. A: 19,359 (19,812).
Mavericks 95, Spurs 89
SAN ANTONIO ................... 23
DALLAS .............................. 30
21
16
25
21
20 — 89
28 — 95
SAN ANTONIO: Leonard 6-12 0-0 13, Aldridge 9-23 5-6
23, Gasol 0-2 0-0 0, Parker 3-9 0-1 6, Green 1-6 0-0 3, Gay
8-11 3-4 21, Bertans 0-0 0-0 0, Lauvergne 2-2 0-0 4, Mills
3-8 0-0 8, Murray 0-1 0-0 0, Forbes 2-8 1-2 6, Ginobili 1-5
3-4 5, Paul 0-0 0-2 0. Totals 35-87 12-19 89.
DALLAS: Barnes 8-17 0-0 17, Kleber 2-5 0-0 5, Nowitzki
1-8 4-4 6, Ferrell 7-14 0-0 16, Matthews 7-15 0-0 16,
Powell 5-7 2-4 12, Mejri 1-1 0-0 2, Harris 1-9 2-2 5, Barea
6-11 2-2 16, Cleveland 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 38-89 10-12 95.
Three-point Goals: San Antonio 7-28 (Gay 2-2, Mills 2-5,
Green 1-4, Leonard 1-4, Forbes 1-5, Gasol 0-1, Aldridge
0-1, Parker 0-2, Ginobili 0-4), Dallas 9-24 (Ferrell 2-3,
Matthews 2-5, Barea 2-5, Kleber 1-3, Barnes 1-3, Harris
1-3, Cleveland 0-1, Nowitzki 0-1). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: San Antonio 49 (Aldridge 13), Dallas 49
(Powell 12). Assists: San Antonio 20 (Forbes 4), Dallas
17 (Barea 6). Total Fouls: San Antonio 11, Dallas 19.
Technicals: Gay, Mejri. A: 19,874 (19,200).
Clippers 96, Raptors 91
Late Monday
TORONTO ........................... 30
L.A. CLIPPERS .................... 19
23
32
21
19
17 — 91
26 — 96
TORONTO: Anunoby 1-4 0-0 3, Ibaka 7-17 1-2 17,
Valanciunas 8-10 6-6 23, Lowry 4-13 6-8 14, DeRozan
5-13 7-10 17, Miles 5-9 0-0 13, Siakam 0-1 0-0 0, Poeltl
0-1 0-0 0, Brown 0-0 0-0 0, VanVleet 1-6 0-0 2, Powell 1-6
0-0 2. Totals 32-80 20-26 91.
L.A. CLIPPERS: W.Johnson 1-7 3-4 5, Wilson 0-3 0-0 0,
Jordan 6-9 2-2 14, Teodosic 4-12 2-2 12, Rivers 6-14 0-2
15, Dekker 4-11 4-5 12, Harrell 6-9 5-5 17, Evans 1-4 0-0
2, L.Williams 6-18 2-2 17, C.Williams 0-1 2-2 2,
Thornwell 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 34-91 20-24 96.
Three-point Goals: Toronto 7-29 (Miles 3-4, Ibaka 2-7,
Valanciunas 1-1, Anunoby 1-2, Siakam 0-1, Powell 0-3,
VanVleet 0-3, Lowry 0-8), L.A. Clippers 8-36 (Rivers 3-8,
L.Williams 3-8, Teodosic 2-9, Evans 0-1, Dekker 0-3,
Wilson 0-3, W.Johnson 0-4). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Toronto 42 (Valanciunas 15), L.A. Clippers 57
(Jordan 17). Assists: Toronto 18 (DeRozan 8), L.A.
Clippers 18 (L.Williams 5). Total Fouls: Toronto 22, L.A.
Clippers 20. A: 16,658 (19,060).
Columbia (1-10)
Tape 0-1 0-0 0, Smith 10-22 2-2 25, Adlesh 4-9 0-0 11,
Hickman 3-9 0-0 7, Hunter 1-3 0-0 2, Faulds 4-8 0-0 8,
Brumant 0-0 0-0 0, Stefanini 2-4 0-0 5, Barba 0-3 0-0 0,
Bibbs 1-2 0-0 2, Hanson 2-4 0-0 6. 27-65 Totals 2-2 66.
Boston College (8-3)
Popovic 4-8 4-5 13, Mitchell 3-6 3-7 10, Bowman 4-12 2-2
13, Chatman 8-16 0-0 20, Robinson 5-11 9-9 21, Kraljevic
1-2 0-0 2, Baker 0-1 0-0 0, Reyes 1-1 0-0 2, Wilson 0-0 0-0
0. Totals 26-57 18-23 81.
Halftime: Boston College 43-35. Three-point goals:
Columbia 10-32 (Adlesh 3-7, Smith 3-10, Hanson 2-4,
Stefanini 1-2, Hickman 1-5, Hunter 0-1, Barba 0-3),
Boston College 11-25 (Chatman 4-8, Bowman 3-7,
Robinson 2-5, Popovic 1-1, Mitchell 1-3, Baker 0-1).
Fouled out: Tape. Rebounds: Columbia 27 (Faulds 7),
Boston College 41 (Bowman 12). Assists: Columbia 12
(Smith 6), Boston College 16 (Bowman 6). Total fouls:
Columbia 17, Boston College 9. A: 3,989 (8,606).
OL PTS. GF GA
2
46 113 74
1
41 108 92
4
32 78 75
4
30 85 99
5
29 92 108
6
28 81 99
7
25 79 101
6
22 67 104
W
21
18
18
16
17
15
14
L
9
8
7
11
13
11
14
OL PTS. GF GA
2
44 104 81
5
41 107 87
4
40 95 84
3
35 89 88
1
35 91 90
5
35 93 84
2
30 94 100
Blackhawks 3, Panthers 2 (OT)
PACIFIC
W
Los Angeles .................. 20
x-Vegas ......................... 19
San Jose ........................ 16
Calgary .......................... 16
Anaheim ....................... 13
Vancouver ..................... 14
Edmonton ..................... 13
Arizona ........................... 7
L
9
9
10
12
11
13
16
21
OL PTS. GF GA
3
43 98 73
1
39 103 91
3
35 79 69
3
35 89 96
7
33 83 91
4
32 82 90
2
28 93 101
5
19 75 114
Scoring: 2, Florida, Bjugstad 8 (Barkov, Pysyk), 11:12.
EAST
Chestnut Hill 81, Mercy 76
Farmingdale 91, Sarah Lawrence 26
Fordham 67, St. John’s 64
Old Westbury 75, New Rochelle 48
Virginia Tech 84, Monmouth (NJ) 34
Yale 70, St. Peter’s 49
SOUTH
Brescia 72, Asbury 62
Chowan 82, Shaw 70
Ga. Southwestern 101, Albany (Ga.) 97
Jacksonville St. 49, Alabama A&M 33
Lee 86, Lane 64
Louisville 95, Tennessee St. 56
Mississippi 68, Southern Miss. 59
Norfolk St. 86, Towson 76
Union (Ky.) 94, Voorhees 49
W. Kentucky 87, MVSU 48
MIDWEST
Calvin 70, Aquinas 62
Michigan 79, North Florida 34
North Dakota 82, Mayville St. 54
Wis.-Whitewater 64, Milwaukee Engineering 32
SOUTHWEST
Sam Houston St. 74, Jackson St. 68
FAR WEST
Nevada 81, CS Stanislaus 60
Wyoming 62, Colorado Christian 33
CENTRAL
St. Louis ........................
Winnipeg ......................
Nashville .......................
Minnesota .....................
Dallas ............................
Chicago .........................
Colorado ........................
RECORD
8-0
9-1
9-0
11-0
9-1
8-1
10-0
7-1
8-1
10-0
9-0
7-2
9-2
8-2
10-2
9-1
5-4
6-2
9-0
7-2
8-2
8-2
10-0
8-1
10-1
FLORIDA ............................ 0
CHICAGO ............................ 1
1
0
1
1
0 — 2
1 — 3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Chicago, Saad 11 (DeBrincat, Toews), 16:49.
SECOND PERIOD
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Florida, McGinn 5 (Trocheck), 3:53. 4, Chicago,
Toews 9 (Saad, DeBrincat), 13:58.
OVERTIME
Scoring: 5, Chicago, Kane 11 (Anisimov), 2:24.
SHOTS ON GOAL
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Scoring: 4, Anaheim, Shaw 2 (Vermette, Welinski), 1:52.
5, Carolina, Rask 7 (Skinner, van Riemsdyk), 17:20.
THIRD PERIOD
SHOTS ON GOAL
CAROLINA ............................... 9
6
15 — 30
ANAHEIM ................................ 4
8
11 — 23
Power-play opportunities: Carolina 0 of 3; Anaheim 0 of 2.
Goalies: Carolina, Darling 7-9-6 (23 shots-20 saves). Anaheim, Gibson 9-10-3 (30-28). A: 16,198 (17,174). T: 2:24.
FOOTBALL
NFC
Sabres 3, Senators 2
0
3
2 —
0 —
2
3
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Buffalo, Pouliot 8 (Ristolainen, Scandella),
4:13. 2, Buffalo, Okposo 5 (Gorges, O’Reilly), 5:25. 3,
Buffalo, Kane 14 (Eichel, Ristolainen), 12:33 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Ottawa, Ceci 3 (Stone, Thompson), 6:43. 5,
Ottawa, Brassard 7 (Hoffman, Karlsson), 19:08.
SHOTS ON GOAL
OTTAWA .................................. 6
13
7 — 26
BUFFALO ................................. 5
10
10 — 25
Power-play opportunities: Ottawa 0 of 3; Buffalo 1 of 2.
Goalies: Ottawa, Condon 2-3-4 (25 shots-22 saves).
Buffalo, Lehner 7-12-4 (26-24). A: 17,454 (19,070). T:
2:20.
Flyers 4, Maple Leafs 2
1
0
0 —
3 —
2
4
EAST
W L
zPhiladelphia .............. 11 2
Dallas ............................ 7 6
Washington .................. 5 8
N.Y. Giants .................... 2 11
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.846
.538
.385
.154
PF
404
316
285
199
PA
250
294
344
321
SOUTH
W
New Orleans ................. 9
Carolina ......................... 9
Atlanta .......................... 8
Tampa Bay .................... 4
L
4
4
5
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.692
.692
.615
.308
PF
370
300
294
264
PA
263
262
261
312
NORTH
W
Minnesota ................... 10
Detroit .......................... 7
Green Bay ..................... 7
Chicago ......................... 4
L
3
6
6
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.769
.538
.538
.308
PF
309
338
285
224
PA
235
329
302
274
WEST
W L
L.A. Rams ...................... 9 4
Seattle .......................... 8 5
Arizona ......................... 6 7
San Francisco ................ 3 10
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.692
.615
.462
.231
PF
396
314
231
228
PA
265
252
317
314
L
3
6
7
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.769
.538
.462
.385
PF
368
240
236
266
PA
250
290
318
311
SOUTH
W L
Jacksonville .................. 9 4
Tennessee ..................... 8 5
Houston ........................ 4 9
Indianapolis .................. 3 10
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.692
.615
.308
.231
PF
329
273
312
212
PA
202
294
335
343
NORTH
W L
y-Pittsburgh ............... 11 2
Baltimore ...................... 7 6
Cincinnati ...................... 5 8
Cleveland ...................... 0 13
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.846
.538
.385
.000
PF
320
318
226
197
PA
251
246
271
335
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 7
L.A. Chargers ................ 7
Oakland ......................... 6
Denver ........................... 4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.538
.538
.462
.308
PF
329
298
264
229
PA
289
225
304
315
AFC
L
6
6
7
9
WEEK 14
THURSDAY’S RESULT
at Atlanta 20, New Orleans 17
Scoring: 3, New Jersey, Hall 13, 15:42. 4, New Jersey,
Boyle 7 (Hayes, Noesen), 17:04.
MONDAY’S RESULT
at Miami 27, New England 20
1
5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, New Jersey, Zajac 3 (Coleman, Gibbons),
13:44. 2, New Jersey, Hall 12 (Bratt, Butcher), 16:14
(pp).
WEEK 15
Scoring: 5, Los Angeles, Mitchell 2 (MacDermid, Martinez), 12:04. 6, New Jersey, Gibbons 13, 19:49 (sh).
THURSDAY’S GAME
Denver (-21/2) at Indianapolis, 8:25
SHOTS ON GOAL
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Chicago at Detroit (-51/2), 4:30
L.A. Chargers (-11/2) at Kansas City, 8:25
LOS ANGELES .......................... 5
6
6 — 17
NEW JERSEY ........................... 9
12
5 — 26
Power-play opportunities: Los Angeles 0 of 3; New
Jersey 1 of 2. Goalies: Los Angeles, Quick 15-10-1 (26
shots-21 saves). New Jersey, Schneider 13-6-3 (17-16).
A: 13,275 (16,514). T: 2:24.
Oilers 7, Blue Jackets 2
EDMONTON ............................. 1
COLUMBUS .............................. 0
4
0
2 —
2 —
7
2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Edmonton, Kassian 3 (Slepyshev, Letestu),
5:55.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Edmonton, Nugent-Hopkins 12 (Cammalleri,
Benning), 6:27 (pp). 3, Edmonton, Benning 4 (Brossoit,
McDavid), 16:41. 4, Edmonton, Lucic 7 (McDavid, Draisaitl), 19:09 (pp). 5, Edmonton, Letestu 7, 19:59 (sh).
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Arizona at Washington (-4), 1
Baltimore (-7) at Cleveland, 1
Philadelphia (-71/2) at N.Y. Giants, 1
Cincinnati at Minnesota (-101/2), 1
Houston at Jacksonville (-101/2), 1
N.Y. Jets at New Orleans (-16), 1
Miami at Buffalo (OFF), 1
Green Bay at Carolina (-51/2), 1
L.A. Rams at Seattle (-2), 4:05
New England (-3) at Pittsburgh, 4:25
Tennessee at San Francisco (-2), 4:25
Dallas (-3) at Oakland, 8:30
MONDAY’S GAME
Atlanta (-6) at Tampa Bay, 8:30
SOCCER
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Columbus, Bjorkstrand 6 (Harrington, Nutivaara), 6:28. 7, Columbus, Johnson 2 (Bjorkstrand,
Calvert), 8:59. 8, Edmonton, Puljujarvi 5 (McDavid,
Nurse), 13:44. 9, Edmonton, McDavid 12 (Puljujarvi),
17:46.
SHOTS ON GOAL
EDMONTON ............................. 8
18
12 — 38
COLUMBUS .............................. 9
6
15 — 30
Power-play opportunities: Edmonton 2 of 4; Columbus 0
of 2. Goalies: Edmonton, Brossoit 3-6-1 (30 shots-28
saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 16-8-1 (26-21), Korpisalo
3-3-0 (12-10). A: 14,767 (18,500). T: 2:26.
Lightning 3, Blues 0
TAMPA BAY ............................ 1
ST. LOUIS ................................. 0
0
0
2 —
0 —
3
0
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Tampa Bay, Point 13 (Killorn, Johnson),
19:15.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 21 (Sergachev), 13:37.
3, Tampa Bay, Johnson 7 (Hedman, Point), 19:38.
SHOTS ON GOAL
TAMPA BAY ............................ 6
12
7 — 25
ST. LOUIS ................................. 6
12
14 — 32
Power-play opportunities: Tampa Bay 0 of 3; St. Louis 0
of 1. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 20-4-1 (32
shots-32 saves). St. Louis, Allen 17-7-2 (24-22). A:
18,290 (19,150). T: 2:20.
DISTRICT
Paul Public Charter 57, Ballou 13
MARYLAND
Bladensburg 53, Potomac (Md.) 43
Chesapeake 56, Annapolis Area Christian 54
Chesapeake Math and IT 51, Surrattsville 38
Holy Child 55, Whitman 34
Northwest 53, Magruder 49
Oakland Mills 59, Glenelg 51
Poolesville 50, Bethesda-Chevy Chase 36
Richard Montgomery 66, Paint Branch 52
Walter Johnson 54, Damascus 38
VIRGINIA
Centreville 52, McLean 32
Marshall 70, Edison 66
Oakton 61, Annandale 32
South Lakes 60, Fairfax 57
Stuart 51, Lee 45
Tuscarora 71, Heritage 56
Wakefield 47, Jefferson 46
Washington-Lee 57, Mount Vernon 50
West Potomac 44, West Springfield 41
PRIVATE
Christ Chapel Academy 42, Fairfax Christian 6
Elizabeth Seton 68, Carroll 50
Grace Brethren 63, Oakcrest 60
Holton-Arms 42, Madeira 33
Maret 31, Sandy Spring 18
McNamara 71, O'Connell 52
Potomac School 70, National Cathedral 55
Sidwell Friends 60, Georgetown Day 32
Champions League
SECOND ROUND
FIRST LEG
TUESDAY, FEB. 13
Basel (Switzerland) vs. Manchester City (England), 2:45
Juventus (Italy) vs. Tottenham (England), 2:45
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 14
Real Madrid (Spain) vs. Paris Saint-Germain (France),
2:45
Porto (Portugal) vs. Liverpool (England), 2:45
TUESDAY, FEB. 20
Bayern Munich (Germany) vs. Besiktas (Turkey), 2:45
Chelsea (England) vs. Barcelona (Spain), 2:45
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 21
Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine) vs. Roma (Italy), 2:45
Sevilla (Spain) vs. Manchester United (England), 2:45
SECOND LEG
TUESDAY, MARCH 6
Liverpool (England) vs. Porto (Portugal), 2:45
Paris Saint-Germain (France) vs. Real Madrid (Spain),
2:45
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7
Manchester City (England) vs. Basel (Switzerland), 2:45
Tottenham (England) vs. Juventus (Italy), 2:45
TUESDAY, MARCH 13
Manchester United (England) vs. Sevilla (Spain), 3:45
Roma (Italy) vs. Shakhtar Donetsk (Ukraine), 3:45
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14
Besiktas (Turkey) vs. Bayern Munich (Germany), 1
Barcelona (Spain) vs. Chelsea (England), 3:45
LAKE BRADDOCK 96, YORKTOWN 71
Y (1-2) Stroup 15, Patterson 14, Coulom 11, Van Kirk 10,
Franco 7, McCoskrie 5, Dickson 3, Cornfield 3, Andersen 3
Totals 16 9-14 71.
LB (3-1) James 17, Cullen 16, Hassett 11, Cobb 10,
O'Grady Walsh 9, Dunn 9, Kim 8, Margraf 7, Grable 5,
Ellis 3, Fanfon-Yengo 1 Totals 20 5-10 96.
Halftime: Lake Braddock, (46-35).
Three-point goals: LB 17 (James 1, Dunn 3, Grable 1,
O'Grady Walsh 3, Cullen 4, Hassett 3, Kim 1, Ellis 1); Y 10
(Cornfield 1, Stroup 5, Coulom 3, Franco 1)
PAINT BRANCH 71, RICHARD MONTGOMERY 61
PB (2-1) Dudley 26, Etuaful 15, Reaves 6, Yomba 6, Sume
5, Lawrence 4, Mayaka 4, Bell 2, Alphonso 2, Miller 1
Totals 21 20-26 71.
RM (2-0) Alexander 15, Galley 15, Harris 10, Brown 8,
Lewis 7, Orcev 3, Bandi 2, Thoman 1 Totals 18 13-25 61.
Halftime: Paint Branch, (33-28). Three-point goals: RM 4
(Orcev 1, Lewis 1, Galley 2); PB 3 (Dudley 2, Sume 1)
POTOMAC FALLS 78, GEORGE MASON 48
PF (4-1) Anderson 15, Asbury 12, Hawes 11, White 9,
Robinson 7, Misch 6, Elsea 4, Anthony 4, Qasimyar 3,
Birch 3, Cox 2, Hawes 2 Totals 21 15-17 78.
GM (2-3) Ashton 14, Smith 10, Fletchall 5, Chatterjee 5,
Creed 4, Goodwin 4, Rosenberger 2, Fletchall 2, Lejlic 2
Totals 10 7-9 48.
Halftime: Potomac Falls, (37-28). Three-point goals: GM
7 (Ashton 4, Smith 2, Fletchall 1); PF 7 (Qasimyar 1,
Hawes 1, Robinson 1, Asbury 1, White 3)
EINSTEIN 65, KENNEDY 57
K (0-2) Nyamey 26, Jarrett 13, Regnis 7, Johnson 4,
Kamden 4, Ntam 3 Totals 15 12-15 57.
E (0-1) Ashby 19, Curtin 13, Brown 12, Remoe-Doherty
11, Douglas 10 Totals 14 10-15 65.
Halftime: Kennedy, (27-22).
Three-point goals: E 9 (Ashby 5, Brown 2, Douglas 2); K 5
(Nyamey 3, Jarrett 2)
CENTREVILLE 79, MCLEAN 56
M (1-5) Senft 18, Lopez 15, Leggett 6, Balistrere 6, Hale
6, Stout 3, Legg 2 Totals 17 7-7 56.
C (3-1) Douglas 15, Hunter 15, O'Shea 14, Shanton 11,
Emeogo 8, Porter 8, Martin 4, Douglas 2, Murray 2 Totals
21 10-14 79.
Halftime: Centreville, (39-26).
Three-point goals: C 9 (Shanton 1, Hunter 5, Emeogo 2,
O'Shea 1); M 5 (Senft 4, Stout 1)
LANGLEY 51, CHANTILLY 43
L (3-3) Carton 15, Beckett 12, Hoeymans 9, Vasiliadis 7,
Derminassian 6, Muir 2 Totals 15 9-15 51.
C (4-2) Hinz 16, Smith 8, Maison 7, McHugh 7, Parana 5
Totals 15 10-17 43.
Halftime: Langley, (30-21). Three-point goals: C 1
(Smith 1); L 4 (Vasiliadis 1, Beckett 2, Carton 1)
GI R LS ' BA S K E TBALL
TOP 20
NO. 8 HOLY CHILD 55, WHITMAN 34
W (0-1) Lowet 11, McGloon 4, Gumataotao 3, Witt 2
Totals 3 5-6 34.
HC (3-2) Yantsos 18, Dapaa 15, Ambrosi 10, Welbon 7,
Hortin 3, Strittmatter 2 Totals 19 8-10 55.
Halftime: Holy Child, (24-18).
Three-point goals: HC 3 (Yantsos 1, Welbon 1, Hortin 1);
W 3 (Lowet 2, Gumataotao 1).
NO. 12 ELIZABETH SETON 68, CARROLL 50
B OY S ' B A S K E TB A L L
G (6-0) Dread 17, Williams 15, Harris 14, Dread 13, Blunt
10, Stute 7, Watts 6, Marshall 4, Hardy 4 Totals 22 22-25
90.
SMR (0-0) Tabbs 17, Eackles 8, Kurnaz 6, Tang 4, Sumner
3, Jasper 2 Totals 15 7-14 40.
Halftime: Gonzaga, (36-14).
Three-point goals: SMR 1 (Tabbs 1); G 8 (Williams 1,
Dread 1, Stute 1, Harris 2, Dread 3).
NO. 6 ST. JOHN'S 77, GOOD COUNSEL 36
GC (3-3) Carter 10, Mbeng 5, Melton 4, Curtis 3, Graham
3, Walker 3, Nwosu 2, Margarites 2, Baylor 2, Flood 2
Totals 9 6-18 36.
SJ (4-2) Abbott 22, Wood 8, Naboya 8, Savage 7, Leggett
6, Maddox 4, Njoku 4, Spooner 4, Dunn 4, Hunt 3, Etris 3,
Thomas 2, Morsell 2 Totals 19 15-19 77.
Halftime: St. John's, (31-7).
Three-point goals: SJ 8 (Abbott 3, Leggett 2, Spooner 1,
Savage 1, Etris 1); GC 4 (Carter 2, Curtis 1, Walker 1).
NO. 17 STONE BRIDGE 76, ROCK RIDGE 55
RR (3-1) Fitch 21, Sanderson 10, Wright 9, Conrow 8,
Larsen 4, Bhakta 3 Totals 16 11-17 55.
SB (1-1) Buckley 22, Rhodes 16, DiLuigi 12, Jerome 6,
Kling 6, Ware 4, Thokala 3, Mason 3, Warden 2, Martin 2
Totals 12 1-1 76.
Halftime: Stone Bridge, (40-22). Three-point goals: SB
17 (Kling 2, Buckley 3, DiLuigi 4, Rhodes 4, Jerome 2,
Thokala 1, Mason 1); RR 4 (Bhakta 1, Fitch 1, Conrow 2).
S (3-0) Rucker 26, Whitney-HaWkins 23, Jessup 15,
Rifidi 12, Deruisseau 11, Germain 6, McDaniels 2, Harris
1 Totals 26 17-30 96.
B (0-2) Kanu 20, Whitmore 20, Gaima 17, Hetherington
10, Ellis 9, Samuels 7, Hill 6, Raheem 2, Sawo 2 Totals 20
17-25 93.
Halftime: Springbrook, (44-39).
Three-point goals: B 12 (Ellis 3, Gaima 1, Hetherington 2,
Kanu 3, Whitmore 3); S 9 (Rifidi 4, Deruisseau 1,
Whitney-HaWkins 2, Rucker 2).
WCAC
O'CONNELL 90, MCNAMARA 83
BM (4-1) Williams 19, Marshall 19, Kirkland 15, Wilkins
13, Womack 8, Joyner 4, Smith 3, Moore 2 Totals 16 9-12
83.
O (3-1) Johnson 25, Becht 16, Weber 12, Banks 10, Teel
9, Prophett 9, Peterson 9 Totals 16 22-30 90.
Halftime: O'Connell, (47-36).
Three-point goals: O 12 (Johnson 1, Teel 1, Becht 3,
Prophett 3, Peterson 1, Banks 2, Weber 1); BM 14
(Williams 5, Wilkins 2, Womack 1, Smith 1, Kirkland 5)
y-Clinched division
SECOND PERIOD
1 —
1 —
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
NO. 18 SPRINGBROOK 96, BLAKE 93
EAST
W
New England ............... 10
Buffalo .......................... 7
Miami ............................ 6
N.Y. Jets ....................... 5
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
at L.A. Chargers 30, Washington 13
at Pittsburgh 39, Baltimore 38
Dallas 30, at N.Y. Giants 10
at Carolina 31, Minnesota 24
Chicago 33, at Cincinnati 7
at Kansas City 26, Oakland 15
Detroit 24, at Tampa Bay 21
at Buffalo 13, Indianapolis 7, OT
Green Bay 27, at Cleveland 21, OT
San Francisco 26, at Houston 16
at Denver 23, N.Y. Jets 0
at Arizona 12, Tennessee 7
at Jacksonville 30, Seattle 24
Philadelphia 43, at L.A. Rams 35
0
2
DISTRICT
Theodore Roosevelt 99, SEED 85
MARYLAND
Einstein 65, Kennedy 57
Gaithersburg 54, Northwood 48
Northwest 65, Magruder 58
Paint Branch 71, Richard Montgomery 61
Seneca Valley 78, Wheaton 52
Springbrook 96, Blake 93
Thurgood Marshall 82, DuVal 75
VIRGINIA
Annandale 54, Oakton 47
Brentsville 62, Riverside 52
Briar Woods 82, Champe 70
Centreville 79, McLean 56
Edison 69, Marshall 66
Forest Park 62, Osbourn Park 57
Lake Braddock 96, Yorktown 71
Langley 51, Chantilly 43
Madison 59, Broad Run 42
Osbourn 55, Gar-Field 52
Potomac Falls 78, George Mason 48
Robinson 62, Herndon 60
South County 66, Hayfield 44
South Lakes 50, Fairfax 40
Stone Bridge 76, Rock Ridge 55
Stuart 58, Lee 53
Tuscarora 82, Heritage 72
Washington-Lee 62, Mount Vernon 60
West Potomac 58, West Springfield 57
PRIVATE
Georgetown Day 70, Washington Latin 49
Gonzaga 90, St. Mary's Ryken 40
O'Connell 90, McNamara 83
Saint Anselm's 72, Grace Brethren 61
St. Andrew's 64, St. Albans 60
St. John's 77, Good Counsel 36
Whitman 62, Landon 59
TOP 20
NO. 5 GONZAGA 90, ST. MARY'S RYKEN 40
NFL
Dallas at New Jersey, 7
Carolina at Buffalo, 7
Los Angeles at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Toronto at Detroit, 7:30
San Jose at Vancouver, 10
LOS ANGELES .......................... 0
NEW JERSEY ........................... 2
2
3
Scoring: 3, Anaheim, Silfverberg 7, 19:25.
FRIDAY’S GAMES
TORONTO ................................ 1
PHILADELPHIA ........................ 1
1 —
1 —
SECOND PERIOD
Washington at Boston, 7
Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7
N.Y. Islanders at Columbus, 7
New Jersey at Montreal, 7:30
Chicago at Winnipeg, 8
Anaheim at St. Louis, 8
Toronto at Minnesota, 8
Florida at Colorado, 9
Tampa Bay at Arizona, 9
Nashville at Edmonton, 9
San Jose at Calgary, 9
Pittsburgh at Vegas, 10
OTTAWA .................................. 0
BUFFALO ................................. 0
0
1
Scoring: 1, Carolina, Williams 6 (van Riemsdyk), 1:37. 2,
Anaheim, Grant 6 (Shaw), 5:55.
Devils 5, Kings 1
Others receiving votes: New Mexico 38, DePaul 21,
California 19, Oklahoma State 18, Georgia Tech 14,
Miami 9, Mississippi 8, Southern Cal 6, Virginia Tech 5,
Kentucky 4, Rice 4, South Dakota State 3, Florida Gulf
Coast 2, Oklahoma 1, Troy 1.
CALGARY ......................... 10
10
4
3 — 27
MINNESOTA ...................... 4
10
7
1 — 22
Power-play opportunities: Calgary 0 of 3; Minnesota 0 of
2. Goalies: Calgary, Smith 13-9-3 (22 shots-21 saves).
Minnesota, Dubnyk 12-8-2 (10-10), Stalock 4-3-1 (1716). A: 18,767 (18,064). T: 2:36.
FIRST PERIOD
TORONTO ................................ 6
7
9 — 22
PHILADELPHIA ........................ 7
14
18 — 39
Power-play opportunities: Toronto 1 of 1; Philadelphia 0
of 1. Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 17-8-1 (38 shots-35
saves). Philadelphia, Elliott 9-6-6 (22-20). T: 2:23.
PVS
1
2
3
5
6
8
13
4
9
10
11
7
12
14
14
17
18
19
20
16
21
22
24
25
—
SHOTS ON GOAL
CAROLINA ............................... 1
ANAHEIM ................................ 1
THIRD PERIOD
PTS
800
745
720
719
681
611
564
562
544
515
481
445
442
372
359
279
236
232
202
166
155
142
124
96
55
Calgary 1 (Gaudreau G, Monahan NG, Tkachuk NG,
Bennett NG, Ferland NG), Minnesota 2 (Coyle NG,
Stewart G, Koivu NG, Staal NG, Granlund G).
Late Monday
SHOTS ON GOAL
The top 25 teams in the USA Today women’s college
basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through Monday, points based on 25 points for a
first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote
and previous ranking:
SHOOTOUT
at Washington 5, Colorado 2
Edmonton 7, at Columbus 2
at Buffalo 3, Ottawa 2
at Philadelphia 4, Toronto 2
at New Jersey 5, Los Angeles 1
Tampa Bay 3, at St. Louis 0
at Minnesota 2, Calgary 1 (SO)
at Chicago 3, Florida 2 (OT)
Carolina at Vegas, Late
Scoring: 4, Philadelphia, Leier 2 (Konecny, Hagg), 5:36. 5,
Philadelphia, Couturier 15 (Simmonds, Giroux), 17:05. 6,
Philadelphia, Laughton 5 (Raffl), 19:44.
USA TODAY COACHES POLL
Scoring: 2, Calgary, Ferland 12 (Giordano, Gaudreau), 18:57.
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
THIRD PERIOD
Monmouth (N.J.) (2-8)
Spooner-Knight 2-9 0-0 4, Balman 3-7 1-2 7, Barker 1-5
0-0 2, Graham 1-5 0-0 2, Shaw 2-8 0-0 6, Arfinengo 0-0
0-0 0, Carbone 0-2 0-0 0, Dockery 0-1 0-0 0, Middleton 2-8
1-2 5, Nason 2-2 2-3 6, Zelaya 1-2 0-0 2, Jarnot 0-7 0-0 0,
Quintana 0-2 0-0 0, 14-58 Totals 4-7 34.
VIRGINIA TECH .................. 24 24 13 23
—84
MONMOUTH (N.J.) .............. 7 12
6
9
—34
Three-point goals: Virginia Tech 12-25 (Magarity 1-3,
Brooks 3-9, Emery 4-5, Sheppard 4-8), Monmouth (N.J.)
2-17 (Barker 0-1, Graham 0-2, Shaw 2-6, Carbone 0-2,
Dockery 0-1, Zelaya 0-1, Jarnot 0-3, Quintana 0-1).
Assists: Virginia Tech 20 (Hicks 8), Monmouth (N.J.) 7
(Barker 2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Virginia Tech 49
(Berry 11), Monmouth (N.J.) 32 (Middleton 7). Total
fouls: Virginia Tech 10, Monmouth (N.J.) 15. A: 980.
SECOND PERIOD
Ducks 3, Hurricanes 2
Scoring: 3, Toronto, van Riemsdyk 15 (Rielly, Marner),
16:50 (pp).
Virginia Tech (10-2)
Berry 3-8 1-2 7, Magarity 4-11 1-2 10, Brooks 3-9 0-0 9,
Emery 9-13 3-3 25, Hicks 4-7 3-6 11, Camp 3-6 0-0 6, Kinder
1-2 0-0 2, Sheppard 5-9 0-0 14, 32-65 Totals 8-13 84.
Scoring: 1, Minnesota, Cullen 2 (Eriksson Ek, Suter), 17:24.
FLORIDA ............................ 9
17
8
3 — 37
CHICAGO ............................ 9
5
12
2 — 28
Power-play opportunities: Florida 0 of 2; Chicago 0 of 3.
Goalies: Florida, Reimer 6-7-3 (28 shots-25 saves).
Chicago, Crawford 13-7-2 (37-35). T: 2:38.
SECOND PERIOD
Virginia Tech 84,
Monmouth (N.J.) 34
FIRST PERIOD
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Scoring: 1, Philadelphia, Giroux 13 (Couturier), 9:21. 2,
Toronto, Marleau 11 (Hyman, Hainsey), 9:48.
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
U-Conn. (32)
Notre Dame
Mississippi State
Louisville
South Carolina
Baylor
Tennessee
Texas
Oregon
Florida State
West Virginia
UCLA
Ohio State
Duke
Maryland
Missouri
Stanford
Oregon State
Villanova
South Florida
Michigan
Texas A&M
Syracuse
Green Bay
Iowa
L
6
11
9
14
14
13
13
17
FIRST PERIOD
NCAA women
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay .................... 22
Toronto ......................... 20
Boston ........................... 14
Montreal ....................... 13
Florida ........................... 12
Detroit .......................... 11
Ottawa ............................ 9
Buffalo ............................ 8
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Boston College 81, Columbia 66
0 — 1
0 — 2
OL PTS. GF GA
1
39 88 80
1
39 100 93
4
38 94 92
3
37 108 100
3
35 99 89
3
35 94 104
7
31 87 88
7
29 80 91
Dallas at N.Y. Islanders, 7
N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa, 7
Boston at Detroit, 8
Nashville at Vancouver, 10
Halftime: Maryland 37-31. Three-point goals: Catholic
University 6-19 (Golaszewski 3-7, Howard 1-1, Mitchell
1-4, Godwin 1-6, Hartmann 0-1), Maryland 11-24 (Nickens 4-6, Huerter 3-6, Cowan 2-7, Bender 1-1, Tomaic 1-1,
Terrell 0-1, Morsell 0-2). Fouled out: Bender. Rebounds:
Catholic University 28 (Howard, Golaszewski 7), Maryland 35 (Tomaic 8). Assists: Catholic University 15
(Howard, Godwin 5), Maryland 18 (Cowan 7). Total
fouls: Catholic University 16, Maryland 16. A: 12,540
(17,950).
0
0
L
11
12
9
10
11
13
11
11
at N.Y. Islanders 3, Washington 1
Colorado 2, at Pittsburgh 1
Dallas 2, at N.Y. Rangers 1 (SO)
Florida 2, at Detroit 1 (OT)
at Winnipeg 5, Vancouver 1
at Anaheim 3, Carolina 2
Maryland (10-3)
Bender 2-3 1-2 6, Cekovsky 3-5 0-0 6, Morsell 3-7 2-4 8,
Cowan 5-15 6-6 18, Huerter 5-8 1-2 14, Tomaic 3-4 0-0 7,
Obi 0-0 0-2 0, Mona 0-0 3-4 3, Terrell 0-1 0-0 0, Tostado
0-0 0-1 0, Nickens 5-8 0-0 14. Totals 26-51 13-21 76.
1
0
W
19
19
17
17
16
16
12
11
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Catholic University (0-1)
Howard 9-18 1-2 20, Hayes 6-12 2-2 14, Godwin 1-13 0-0
3, Mitchell 2-10 2-3 7, Golaszewski 3-7 2-2 11, Wade 1-1
0-0 2, Turner 1-2 0-0 2, Barnes 0-0 0-0 0, Foust 0-0 0-0 0,
Beckett 0-0 0-0 0, Pryor 0-0 0-0 0, Bra.Easton 0-0 0-0 0,
Hartmann 0-1 0-0 0, Bry.Easton 0-0 0-0 0. 23-64 Totals
7-9 59.
Detroit at Atlanta, 7:30
New York at Brooklyn, 7:30
L.A. Lakers at Cleveland, 8
Sacramento at Minnesota, 8
Dallas at Golden State, 10:30
METROPOLITAN
Columbus ......................
Washington ..................
New Jersey ...................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
N.Y. Rangers .................
Pittsburgh .....................
Philadelphia ..................
x-Carolina .....................
x-Late game
Maryland 76,
Catholic University 59
THURSDAY’S GAMES
L.A. LAKERS .................. 29
NEW YORK .................... 25
PORTLAND ......................... 28
GOLDEN STATE .................. 27
BOYS' BASKETBALL
NATIONAL DISTRICT
STUART 58, LEE 53
L (0-5) Hunt 16, Samuels 10, Sulieman 7, Whitaker 6,
Lynch 6, Mulatu 5, Wickliffe 3 Totals 14 7-14 53.
S (2-3) Hussein 21, Mohamed 9, Kwarteng 8, Damtew 8,
Easley 5, Goode 4, Griffin 3 Totals 15 19-23 58.
Halftime: Stuart, (32-23).
Three-point goals: S 3 (Griffin 1, Damtew 1, Hussein 1); L
6 (Sulieman 2, Mulatu 1, Hunt 2, Samuels 1)
EDISON 69, MARSHALL 66
M (4-1) Lampman 18, Deaver 16, Robinson 11, Gamble 7,
de Walque 6, Wilcox 3, Haase 3, Schlaffer 2 Totals 18
12-14 66.
E (1-1) Washington 17, Clawson 16, Williams 12, Hester
8, Coffman 8, Clawson 7, Hussein 1 Totals 23 11-18 69.
Halftime: Marshall, (40-30).
Three-point goals: E 4 (Clawson 3, Williams 1); M 6
(Wilcox 1, Robinson 1, Gamble 1, de Walque 2, Haase 1)
NONLEAGUE
SOUTH LAKES 50, FAIRFAX 40
SL (6-0) Savage 21, Aghayere 8, Johnson 6, Powers 6,
Williams-Baffoe 4, Adams 3, Krukowski 2 Totals 13
12-19 50.
F (3-3) Mbangue 18, Abousam 6, Peters 5, Colbert 3,
Abtew 2, Napper 2, Ackerman 2, Pelczynski 2 Totals 15
4-15 40.
Halftime: South Lakes, (25-17). Three-point goals: F 2
(Mbangue 2); SL 4 (Adams 1, Savage 3)
WHITMAN 62, LANDON 59
L (1-2) Reynolds 15, Larosiliere 14, Patterson 10, Davis
9, Lilly 4, Anglin 3, Ford 2, Camphausen 2 Totals 24 11-14
59.
W (1-1) Squeri 20, Sanson 16, Shaver 16, Ruiz 4, Jensen
3, Smith 2, Diouf 1 Totals 15 11-16 62.
Halftime: Landon, (34-30).
Three-point goals: W 7 (Shaver 2, Sanson 4, Squeri 1).
ROBINSON 62, HERNDON 60
R (3-3) Rowson 26, Douglas 19, Schnizer 10, LaPlante 3,
Delgado 2, Rowson 2 Totals 20 10-15 62.
H (3-0) Myers 18, Varone 11, Cole 9, Rehnstrom 9, Hart 6,
Castagno 4, Snead 3 Totals 15 15-22 60.
Halftime: Robinson, (28-26). Three-point goals: H 5
(Cole 3, Rehnstrom 1, Snead 1); R 4 (Rowson 4)
FOREST PARK 62, OSBOURN PARK 57
FP (2-1) Johnson 17, Lewis 11, Johnson 10, Smith 6,
Garib 6, Johnson 5, Cobb 4, Collins 3 Totals 19 12-25 62.
OP (1-5) Wilson 4, Turay 14, Cheek 14, Morina 10, Banks
5, Agyei 2, Clayton 2, Giallo 1 Totals 8 23-31 57.
Halftime: Forest Park, (33-21).
Three-point goals: OP 6 (Turay 1, Cheek 2, Morina 3); FP
4 (Johnson 1, Johnson 2, Johnson 1)
ANNANDALE 54, OAKTON 47
O (4-1) Smith 11, Johnson-Parrotte 9, Johnson 7,
Jaquette 6, Digby 6, Schulz 4, Fink 2, Campo 2 Totals 14
7-13 47.
A (5-1) Lotongo 15, Abdalla 10, Kanu 9, Anderson 7,
Casquino 7, McKiver 2, Aburish 2, Gill 2 Totals 15 15-22
54.
Halftime: Oakton, (28-21).
Three-point goals: A 3 (Lotongo 1, Kanu 1, Abdalla 1); O 4
(Johnson-Parrotte 1, Johnson 2, Smith 1)
GEORGETOWN DAY 70, WASHINGTON LATIN 49
GD (3-2) Kongoli 26, Boles 16, Rayford 14, Collins 7,
Koenig 5, Margolis 2 Totals 19 17-26 70.
WL (0-1) Smith 18, Obodo 8, Bridgeman 8, Dixon 7,
Motirayo 5, Smith 3 Totals 13 17-28 49.
Halftime: Georgetown Day, (36-21).
Three-point goals: WL 2 (Smith 1, Bridgeman 1); GD 5
(Collins 1, Kongoli 1, Boles 2, Koenig 1)
SENECA VALLEY 78, WHEATON 52
SV (3-0) Price 32, Blake 14, Dotson 10, Whitsett 6,
Dogbo 6, Goldsberry 4, Joaquin 4, Clyburn 2 Totals 22
10-12 78.
W (1-1) Ogunde 18, Wye 13, Getahun 11, Tedesse 6,
Aggrey 3, Sedgwick 1 Totals 14 12-22 52.
Halftime: Seneca Valley, (36-27).
Three-point goals: W 4 (Getahun 1, Tedesse 1, Wye 2);
SV 8 (Price 5, Blake 2, Dotson 1)
AC (1-4) Jones 14, James 13, Sterling 13, Gakdeng 7,
Lewis 3 Totals 12 14-30 50.
ES (2-2) Wilson 18, Cater 16, Brown 8, Baldwin 8,
Addison 6, Clayborne 3, Gray 3, Ming 3, Robinson 3 Totals
20 4-8 68.
Halftime: Elizabeth Seton, (25-22).
Three-point goals: ES 8 (Ming 1, Robinson 1, Wilson 6);
AC 4 (James 3, Jones 1).
NO. 13 POOLESVILLE 50,
BETHESDA-CHEVY CHASE 36
P (2-0) Lee 15, Green 13, Thompson 11, Hobbs 6, Mullikin
3, Haddaway 2 Totals 14 7-14 50.
B-CC (1-2) McGloon 11, Clendenin 9, Lowndes 7, Howell
6, Cowles 3 Totals 6 9-10 36.
Halftime: Poolesville, (29-17).
Three-point goals: B-CC 5 (McGloon 3, Lowndes 1,
Cowles 1); P 5 (Thompson 3, Mullikin 1, Green 1).
MARSHALL 70, NO. 17 EDISON 66
M (4-1) Grill 8, Trivisonno 17, Soule 12, Dirkse 2 Totals
24 16-27 70.
E (2-2) Miller 26, Jewell 20, Johns 6, Harris 5, Bagsby 4,
Lee 4, Gray 1 Totals 21 21-31 66.
Halftime: Edison, (36-22).
Three-point goals: E 1 (Johns 1); M 2 (Soule 2).
NO. 20 MCNAMARA 71, O'CONNELL 52
O (4-2) Hovis 16, Hayashi 10, James 8, Perpignan 7,
Simmons 5, Woods 5, Mills 1 Totals 17 6-10 52.
BM (4-0) Brown-Turner 31, Matharu 29, King 4, Scott 4,
Bell 2, Evans 1 Totals 22 6-10 71.
Halftime: McNamara, (31-26).
Three-point goals: BM 7 (Matharu 3, Brown-Turner 4); O
4 (Hayashi 3, Woods 1).
ISL AA
SIDWELL FRIENDS 60, GEORGETOWN DAY 32
SF (5-0) Boasberg 17, Pickens 14, Lyde 12, Assimakopoulos 5, Penn 4, Johnson 3, Stewart 2, Willing 2, Biden 1
Totals 23 5-9 60.
GD (2-3) Griffith 19, Forman 5, Ratnapouri 3, Zinn 3,
Asher 2 Totals 5 4-4 32.
Halftime: Sidwell Friends, (30-8).
Three-point goals: GD 6 (Ratnapouri 1, Zinn 1, Griffith 4);
SF 3 (Pickens 1, Boasberg 1, Assimakopoulos 1)
HOLTON-ARMS 42, MADEIRA 33
M (1-0) Williams 13, Eley 12, Nshanji 2, Grohowski 2,
Newton 2, Johnson 2 Totals 11 5-5 33.
HA (2-1) Rymsza 19, McCormick 11, Edmunds 6,
Dematatis 4, Daggitt 2 Totals 17 2-8 42.
Halftime: Holton-Arms, (18-6).
Three-point goals: HA 2 (Edmunds 2); M 2 (Eley 1,
Williams 1)
POTOMAC SCHOOL 70,
NATIONAL CATHEDRAL 55
PS (3-2) Caskin 27, Park 21, Moran 12, Garibaldi 4,
Swigart 2, Germanis 2, McAulliffe 2 Totals 17 15-23 70.
NCS (1-3) Davy 11, Skoff 9, douki 8, Conaghan 8, Keller 6,
Gasho 4, giambi 4 Totals 17 10-18 55.
Halftime: Potomac School, (44-31).
Three-point goals: NCS 2 (Keller 1, Davy 1); PS 7 (Park 2,
Caskin 5)
PVAC
GRACE BRETHREN 63, OAKCREST 60
GB (4-4) Justice 40, Benjamin 11, Blake 6, Young 6 Totals
18 18-21 63.
O (0-3) Beatty 21, Kilmer 19, Kilmer 5, Rudy 5, Friddle 4,
Kiara 4, Baird 2 Totals 24 9-24 60.
Halftime: Oakcrest, (26-25).
Three-point goals: O 1 (Beatty 1); GB 3 (Justice 3)
NONLEAGUE
WALTER JOHNSON 54, DAMASCUS 38
WJ (1-1) Lucas 17, Tavik 10, Kemp 8, Wagar 6, Martin 5,
Assaker 3, Sarnowski 3, Schell 2 Totals 15 3-4 54.
D (1-1) Dunathan 15, DiLeo 8, Bradshaw 6, Tomlinson 5,
Stone 2, Jensen 2 Totals 12 8-14 38.
Halftime: Walter Johnson, (28-16).
Three-point goals: D 2 (DiLeo 2); WJ 7 (Martin 1, Lucas 3,
Tavik 1, Assaker 1, Sarnowski 1)
OAKTON 61, ANNANDALE 32
A (1-5) Irvin 13, Reams 8, Yungner 6, Corcoran 2,
Gonzalez 2, Hatch 1 Totals 4 12-18 32.
O (4-2) Vietmeyer 14, Coleman 9, Perine 7, Mori 6, Smith
5, Good 5, Kaloi 4, Meshanko 4, McMarlin 3, Goins 2,
Vietmeyer 2 Totals 23 9-15 61.
Halftime: Oakton, (28-11).
Three-point goals: O 2 (Smith 1, Coleman 1); A 4 (Reams
1, Irvin 1, Yungner 2)
WEST POTOMAC 44, WEST SPRINGFIELD 41
WS (1-2) White 17, Laychak 9, Meiller 5, Ellsworth 4,
Sharman 4, Grieve 2 Totals 14 7-10 41.
WP (2-3) Redfearn 14, Terwilliger 13, Mackey 8, Eby 6,
Mackie 2, Hopper 1 Totals 9 20-43 44.
Halftime: West Springfield, (16-11). Three-point goals:
WP 2 (Eby 1, Redfearn 1); WS 2 (Meiller 1, Laychak 1)
CENTREVILLE 52, MCLEAN 32
C (4-1) Squirewell 16, Garrett 12, Doyle 11, Naderi 5,
Martin 4, Gambone 2, Hott 2 Totals 13 14-19 52.
M (2-3) Auza 11, Dufrane 9, Moskowitz 4, Pilewski 4,
Jones 2, Buday 2 Totals 7 12-16 32.
Halftime: McLean, (18-17).
Three-point goals: M 2 (Moskowitz 1, Dufrane 1); C 4
(Squirewell 1, Garrett 1, Naderi 1, Doyle 1)
RICHARD MONTGOMERY 66, PAINT BRANCH 52
PB (1-1) Ngwafang 20, Myers 10, Anumgba 10, Kaur 7,
Bruce 4, Stewart 1 Totals 19 11-27 52.
RM (3-0) Osborne 23, Williams 17, Rashad 10, Tounkara
8, Schuck 4, Yan 2, Sherman 2 Totals 20 23-30 66.
Halftime: Richard Montgomery, (38-24).
Three-point goals: RM 1 (Williams 1); PB 1 (Kaur 1)
BLADENSBURG 53, POTOMAC (MD.) 43
B (1-0) Brooks 22, Hardin 15, Crawford 9, Kamani 7
Totals 14 7-10 53.
P (2-0) Harewood 15, Taylor 12, Pegues 4, Scott 3 Totals
5 12-26 43.
Halftime: Bladensburg, (33-22). Three-point goals: P 4
(Harewood 2, Taylor 2); B 6 (Hardin 5, Crawford 1)
SOUTH LAKES 60, FAIRFAX 57
F (2-4) George 31, McNaughton 11, Heslep 7, Stanford 4,
Napper-Braxton 4 Totals 20 11-14 57.
SL (2-1) Smith 21, Young 11, Benvenuti 8, Somer 8,
Spears 5, Cotton 5, Scott 2 Totals 18 12-25 60.
Halftime: Fairfax, (30-27).
Three-point goals: SL 4 (Benvenuti 2, Somer 2); F 2
(Heslep 1, George 1)
MARET 31, SANDY SPRING 18
M (3-2) Mustaf 16, Lalor 6, Brown 4, Cameron-Rice 3,
Dowd 2 Totals 15 1-8 31.
SS (1-2) Fenton 15, Broadway 3 Totals 4 4-5 18.
Halftime: Maret, (18-5).
Three-point goals: SS 2 (Broadway 1, Fenton 1).
EFGHI
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Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Veda C. Joy
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-12496
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 4th day of December 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 6501 Farmer Drive, Fort Washington, Maryland 20744, made and
reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Hugh J. Green, Shannon
Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and
Brian Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 4th day
of January, 2018, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 4th day of January, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $164,000.00.
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C
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2017
Official Notices
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 13, 20, 27, 2017
12147187
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Debra D. Bailey
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-18635
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 1st day of December 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
374 Possum Court, Capitol Heights,
Maryland 20743, made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Hugh J. Green, Shannon
Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and
Brian Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 2nd day
of January, 2018, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 2nd day of January, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $136,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 13, 20, 27, 2017
v.
Dwayne G. Dowtin and
Lawanna Dowtin
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-12482
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 4th day of December 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 5906 Old Croom Station Road,
Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772,
made and reported by James E.
Clarke, Renee Dyson, Hugh J.
Green, Shannon Menapace, Khalid
D. Walker, Christine M. Drexel and
Brian Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 4th day
of January, 2018, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 4th day of January, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $369,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 13, 20, 27, 2017
Notice is hereby given that BB&T
Commercial Equipment Capital
Corp. located at 2 Great Valley Parkway, Suite 300, Malvern, PA 19355
has made application to engage in
the business of loaning money for
the license year ending December
31, 2017 as provided by the Act
of Congress, approved February 14,
1913. Anyone desiring to protest
against the issuance of this license
should do so in writing to the Commissioner of the Department of
Insurance, Securities and Banking,
810 First Street, NE, Suite 701,
Washington, DC 20002, in the manner prescribed by said Act: See DC
Code Title 26, Chapter 9 and 16
DCMR 2.
Notice is hereby given that the
following named company Scratch
Financial, Inc. at the address listed
herewith as 815 Colorado Blvd,
Suite 450 Los Angeles, CA 90041
has made application to engage in
the business of loaning money for
the license year ending December
31, 2018 as provided by the Act
of Congress, approved February 14,
1913. Anyone desiring to protest
against the issuance of this license
should do so in writing to the Commissioner of the Department of
Insurance, Securities and Banking,
810 First Street, NE, Suite 701,
Washington, DC 20002, in the manner prescribed by said Act: See DC
Code Title 26, Chapter 9 and 16
DCMR 2.
12147190
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Khalid D. Walker
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
12147188
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Erin M. Cohen
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Eric O. Aigbedion and
Yewande O. Aigbedion
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF15-16914
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 4th day of December 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 5200 Ashleigh Glen Court, Glenn
Dale, Maryland 20769, made and
reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Brian Thomas, Erin M.
Cohen, Hugh J. Green and Patrick
M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 4th day
of January, 2018, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 4th day of January, 2018.
Home delivery is so easy.
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SF
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $311,000.00.
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 13, 20, 27, 2017
12147191
840
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
ATTORNEY FOR THE MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF A COMMERCIAL BUILDING known as 106 13th St., SE Washington, D.C. 20003.
By virtue of a certain Mortgage, Assignment of Leases
and Rents and Security Agreement duly recorded October
8, 2015 as Instrument No. 2015103182 (the "Mortgage")
among the Land Records of the District of Columbia (the
"Land Records"), and in accordance with Public Law 90566 notice recorded October 25, 2017, a default having
occurred in the payment of the indebtedness secured
thereby and the covenants contained therein, and at the
request of the party secured thereby (the "Noteholder"),
the undersigned Attorney for the Mortgagee, will sell,
at public auction, within the office of ALEX COOPER
AUCTIONEERS, INC., 4910 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE,
N.W., SUITE 100, WASHINGTON, D.C. on
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2017 at 11:15 AM
the following described land and premises situated in the
District of Columbia and known as Lot 60 in Square 1036 in
the subdivision made by Henry M. Baker of the original Lot
10, 12 per plat recorded in Liber the Office of the Surveyor
for the District of Columbia
TOGETHER WITH any and all buildings, structures, improvements or appurtenances now erected on the abovedescribed land, including, without limitation, all equipment,
apparatus, machinery and fixtures of any kind or character
forming a part of said buildings, structures, improvements
or appurtenances, and any furniture, furnishings, equipment, machinery and other personal property owned and
located in, upon or about the above-described land and
any buildings thereon all as more particularly described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust (the "Property").
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. The bid which yields the
highest price for the Property will be accepted by the
Attorney for the Mortgagee (unless the sale is postponed or
cancelled) and all bids will be provisional until acceptance.
Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Attorney for the Mortgagee absolutely reserves the right to postpone the sale
and/or cancel the sale at any time until the auctioneer
announces that the Property is "sold" and the deposit in
the required amount and form is received by the Attorney
for the Mortgagee. A deposit in the amount of $75,000 will
be required at the time of sale. Such deposit must be by
cashier's check or certified check or in such other form as
the Attorney for the Mortgagee may determine in her sole
discretion. The Noteholder secured by the Deed of Trust
(or any related party) shall be exempted by the Attorney
for the Mortgagee from submitting any bidding deposit.
The Attorney for the Mortgagee will, as a condition of the
sale, require all potential bidders except the Noteholder to
show their deposit before any bidding begins. The retained
deposit of the successful purchaser shall be applied,
without interest, to the successful purchaser's credit at
settlement, provided, however, that in the event the
successful purchaser fails to consummate the purchase in
accordance with the terms of sale as herein provided, such
deposit, at the option of the Attorney for the Mortgagee,
will be forfeited. The terms of sale must be complied with
and settlement consummated thereon within 30 days from
day of sale unless extended at the sole discretion of the
Attorney for the Mortgagee. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. The
balance of the purchase price over and above the retained
deposit, with interest thereon at a rate of 8.00% per annum
from the date of sale through the date of receipt of the
balance of the purchase price, will be due at settlement
in cash or certified funds; and if not so paid, the Attorney
for the Mortgagee reserves the right to retain the deposit
and resell the Property at the risk and cost of the defaulting
purchaser, after such advertisement and on such terms
as the Attorney for the Mortgagee may deem proper, and
to avail themselves and the Noteholder of any legal or
equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser.
The Property is sold subject to the rights, if any, of
parties in possession, if such rights have priority over the
Deed of Trust, and to any and all covenants, conditions,
restrictions, easements, rights of way, and limitations of
record. The Property will be sold "WHERE IS" and in "AS
IS" condition without any warranty as to condition, express
or implied, and without any representation or warranty as
to the accuracy of the information furnished to prospective
bidders by the Attorney for the Mortgagee or any other
party and without any other representations or warranty
of any nature. Without limiting the generality of the
foregoing, the Property will be sold without representation
or warranty as to (i) title to the Property, (ii) the nature,
condition, structural integrity, or fitness for a particular
use of any improvements, fixtures or personal property
included within the Property, (iii) the environmental condition of the Property or the compliance of the Property
with federal, state and local laws and regulations concerning the presence or disposal of hazardous substances,
(iv) compliance of the Property with the Americans with
Disabilities Act or any similar law, or (v) compliance of
the Property with any zoning laws or ordinances and any
and all applicable safety codes, and acceptance of the
Deed to the Property by the successful purchaser shall
constitute a waiver of any claims against the Attorney for
the Mortgagee or the Noteholder concerning any of the
foregoing matters. The successful purchaser recognizes
that any investigation, examination or inspection of the
Property is within the control of the owner or other parties
in possession of the Property and not within the control of
the Attorney for the Mortgagee or the Noteholder.
Conveyance shall be by Deed, without covenant or warranty, express or implied. The risk of loss or damage by
fire or other casualty to the Property from and after the
date of sale will be upon the successful purchaser. The
Property will be sold subject to all taxes, ground rents,
public charges, assessments, sewer, water, drainage and
other public improvements whether assessments have
been levied or not. The Noteholder and Attorney for
the Mortgagee assume no liability for fuel, gas, electricity,
utilities and other operating charges accrued before or
after the sale and all such charges shall be the sole
responsibility of the purchaser from the date of sale.
All costs incident to the settlement and conveyancing
including, without limitation, examination of title, conveyancing, all recordation taxes and charges, all transfer
taxes and charges, title insurance premiums, notary fees,
settlement fees and all other costs incident to settlement
shall be at the cost of the successful purchaser. If
the Attorney for the Mortgagee cannot convey title, the
purchaser's sole remedy is a return of deposit. Further
particulars may be announced at the time of sale. For
further information, please contact Lisa D. Sparks, Esq. at
410-659-1322 lsparks@wcslaw.com.
THIS SALE WAS ORIGINALLY SCHEDULED FOR TUESDAY,
NOVEMBER 28, 2017 at 1:00 PM AT 5301 WISCONSIN AVE.,
NW, WASHINGTON DC
Lisa D. Sparks
Attorney for the Mortgagee
Washington Post
Dec. 4, 6, 8, 11, 13, 2017
12145965
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Erin M. August
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Dennis A. Eichler
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF16-42445
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 30th day of November 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 6807 96th Place, Lanham, Maryland 20706, made and reported
by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
Brian Thomas, Erin M. August,
Hugh J. Green and Patrick M. A.
Decker, Substitute Trustees, be
RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless
cause to the contrary be shown on
or before the 2nd day of January,
2018, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 2nd day of
January, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $190,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 13, 20, 27, 2017
12147189
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
ESTATE OF GWENDOLYN
A. DICKSON
AMY M. DICKSON, PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF16-01698
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 4th day
of December 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 9915 Worrell
Avenue, Glenn Dale, MD 20769, will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 4th day
of January, 2018, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
4th day of January, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$181,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 13, 20, 27, 2017
12147403
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home delivery.
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SF
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
ALEX COOPER AUCTIONEERS, INC.
4910 MASSACHUSETTES AVE. NW, #100
WASH. DC 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
ALEX COOPER AUCTIONEERS, INC.
4910 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., NW #100
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20016
202-364-0306
www.alexcooper.com
851
Trustees Sale - DC
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
SF
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1-800-753-POST SF
Pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage
Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart
B, and the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner, I
will conduct a COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 3308 D Street SE, Washington,
DC in execution of a certain deed of trust by Annie C. Vailes dated July 17,
2002, in the original principal amount of $213,000.00 recorded in the Land
Records of the District of Columbia, as Instrument No. 2002083209, and
the Assignment recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia
in favor of the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development recorded on
July 25, 2013 as Instrument Number 2013086694, default having occurred
in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at the request of the
holder, the undersigned Foreclosure Commissioner will offer for sale at
public auction in the front of the building housing the Superior Court for
the District of Columbia located at 500 Indiana Avenue, NW, Washington,
DC 20001 on December 29, 2017 at 3:10 P.M., the property described in
said deed of trust, located at the above address, with improvements
thereon and more particularly described as follows: 3308 D Street SE,
Washington, DC 20019, for which further legal description is attached to
the Deed of trust. This property is also presently known for assessment
and taxation purposes as Lot numbered Fifty-six in Square numbered
Fifty-four Thirty-one.
TERMS OF SALE: Neither the FORECLOSURE COMMISSIONER nor the
holder of the note secured by the deed of trust will deliver possession of
the property to the successful bidder. The purchaser at the sale will be
required to pay all closing costs. Real estate taxes, water/sewer fees and
other public charges will be prorated as of the date of sale. The risk of
loss or damage to the property passes to the purchaser immediately upon
the conclusion of the sale. Terms: A bidder's deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price in the form of certified funds payable to the Secretary
of Housing and Urban Development and must be present at the time of
sale. The balance of the purchase price will be due within 30 days at the
office of the Foreclosure Commissioner. Time is of the essence as to the
closing date and the payment of the purchase price. If payment of the
balance does not occur within thirty days of the sale date, the deposit will
be forfeited. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based
upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a
foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure
Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of
the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as
provided herein. Foreclosure Commissioner shall have no duty to obtain
possession for purchaser. The property and the improvements thereon
will be sold "AS IS" and without representation or warranties of any kind.
The sale is subject to all liens, encumbrances, conditions, easements and
restrictions, if any, superior to the mentioned deed of trust and lawfully
affecting the property. Sale is subject to post-sale confirmation that the
borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior
to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination
of whether the borrower(s) reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.
In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser's
sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the Purchaser's
deposit without interest. Additional terms to be announced at the sale.
HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant. Anderson Law,
Foreclosure Commissioner, 2492 N. Landing Rd, Ste 104, Virginia Beach,
VA 23456, 757-301-3636 Tel, 757-301-3640 Fax. Add to run December 6,
2017, December 13, 2017, and December 20, 2017.
12146596
Pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage
Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart
B, and the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner,
I will conduct a COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1232 Trinidad Avenue NE,
Washington, DC in execution of a certain deed of trust by Marguerite S.
Turner dated April 25, 2011, in the original principal amount of $750,000.00
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, as Instrument
No. 2011047850, and the Assignment recorded in the Land Records
of the District of Columbia in favor of the Secretary of Housing and
Urban Development recorded on March 8, 2016 as Instrument Number
2016022607, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby
secured and at the request of the holder, the undersigned Foreclosure
Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction in the front of the
building housing the Superior Court for the District of Columbia located
at 500 Indiana Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20001 on December 29,
2017 at 3:00 P.M., the property described in said deed of trust, located
at the above address, with improvements thereon and more particularly
described as follows: 1232 Trinidad Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002,
for which further legal description is attached to the Deed of trust. This
property is also presently known for assessment and taxation purposes as
Lot numbered Seventy-one in Square numbered Forty Sixty-six.
TERMS OF SALE: Neither the FORECLOSURE COMMISSIONER nor the
holder of the note secured by the deed of trust will deliver possession of
the property to the successful bidder. The purchaser at the sale will be
required to pay all closing costs. Real estate taxes, water/sewer fees and
other public charges will be prorated as of the date of sale. The risk of
loss or damage to the property passes to the purchaser immediately upon
the conclusion of the sale. Terms: A bidder's deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price in the form of certified funds payable to the Secretary
of Housing and Urban Development and must be present at the time of
sale. The balance of the purchase price will be due within 30 days at the
office of the Foreclosure Commissioner. Time is of the essence as to the
closing date and the payment of the purchase price. If payment of the
balance does not occur within thirty days of the sale date, the deposit will
be forfeited. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based
upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a
foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure
Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of
the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as
provided herein. Foreclosure Commissioner shall have no duty to obtain
possession for purchaser. The property and the improvements thereon
will be sold "AS IS" and without representation or warranties of any kind.
The sale is subject to all liens, encumbrances, conditions, easements and
restrictions, if any, superior to the mentioned deed of trust and lawfully
affecting the property. Sale is subject to post-sale confirmation that the
borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior
to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination
of whether the borrower(s) reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.
In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser's
sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the Purchaser's
deposit without interest. Additional terms to be announced at the sale.
HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant. Anderson Law,
Foreclosure Commissioner, 2492 N. Landing Rd, Ste 104, Virginia Beach,
VA 23456, 757-301-3636 Tel, 757-301-3640 Fax. Add to run December 6,
2017, December 13, 2017, and December 20, 2017.
December 6, 13, 20, 2017
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
FREE UNDER $250
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S AUCTION OF
UNIT OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION SALE OF VALUABLE CONDOMINIUM
UNIT CONTAINED WITHIN PREMISES at 1457 Park Road, N.W.,
Unit #206, WASHINGTON, D.C. 20010. Pursuant to District of
Columbia Condominium Act of 1976, Section 313 and under
the power of sale contained in the Declaration and Bylaws of
the Condominium, recorded on August 25, 2006 as Instrument
Number 2006117023 and recorded on August 25, 2006 as
Instrument Number 2006117024, and as amended, and in
accordance with Public Law 90-566 and D.C. Code Section 421903.13, as amended, notice filed November 1, 2017, and at the
request of the Attorney for the Unit Owners’ Association, we
shall sell at public auction on Thursday the 14th day of December
2017, at 10:45 AM, within the office of Alex Cooper Auctioneers,
4910 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Suite 100, Washington, DC
20016.
Unit 206 of the Parkade Condominium Unit Owners’ Association,
Inc. designated on the Records of the Assessor of the District of
Columbia for assessment and taxation purposes as Lot 2053 in
Square 2676.
Terms of sale: Sold Subject to the provisions, restrictions,
easements and conditions as set forth in the Declaration of
Condominium, the By-laws relating thereto, and any and all
amendments thereto existing deed(s) of trust and real estate
taxes, as applicable; the purchase price above said trust(s) to
be paid in cash. Also sold subject to any other prior liens,
encumbrances and municipal assessments, if any, as applicable,
further particulars of which may be announced at time of sale.
A deposit of $10,000.00 will be required at time of sale, such
deposit to be in cash, certified check, or in such other form
as the attorney for the Owners’ Association may require in her
sole discretion. All conveyancing, recording, recordation tax,
transfer tax, etc. at purchaser’s cost. All adjustments made as
of date of sale. The balance of the purchase price, together
with interest at the rate of 10% per annum from date of sale
to date of receipt of the balance of the purchase price, must
be paid in cash or by cashier’s or certified check and all other
terms to be complied with within 30 days, otherwise deposit
is forfeited and the property may be re-advertised and sold at
the discretion of the Owners’ Association and at the risk and
cost of the defaulting purchaser. Association shall convey a
deed pursuant to D. C. Code Section 42-1903.13 (c) (1) and (3) as
amended, and make no further representations or warranties as
to title. The Association reserves the right in its sole discretion
to rescind the sale at any time until conveyance of the deed. In
the event of failure on the part of the Association to convey such
deed, the purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of deposit.
Anthony R. Champ, Esq.
Attorney for Owner’s Association
Kass Legal Group, PLLC
Washington Post
Dec. 4, 8, 13, 2017
12145824
December 6, 13, 20, 2017
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
12140045
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C054E 2x2
6 UNIT MULTI FAMILY
APARTMENT BLDG
“Dea
anwood”
(Kn
nown
n As
s)
4900 QUARLES STREET NE
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in that certain Deed
of Trust from 4900-4902 Quarles Street, LLC to Claude O. Barrington and
John Gamble, Trustees, dated December 30, 2010 recorded among Land
Records of the District of Columbia (“Land Records”) as Instrument No.
2000046937 (the “DOT”), the holder of the indebtedness secured by said
Deed of Trust having appointed Paul J. Cohen, Substitute Trustee for
the purpose of foreclosure, default having occurred, demand having
been made for payment of the obligations secured thereby, and notice
having been filed in accordance with applicable law, at the request of
the holder of the indebtedness secured by the DOT (the “Noteholder”),
the Trustee, or either of them, will offer for sale at public auction, on the
premises, on
THUR
RSDAY DECEMBER 21, 2017 AT 12
2:00 P.M.
(NOON)
ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND WITH THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON being known as 490
00
Quarlles street, NE, Washing
gton,, DC
C 200
019
9 and more fully described in the DOT as follows:
Lots numbered 39 and 40 in a subdivision made by Allen W. Mallery and Lawrence O. Mallery, Trustee’s subdivision
of lots in block numbered Eight (8) as per plat recorded in liber county 10 at folio 17 in the office of the surveyor for
the District of Columbia.
ROPER
RTY: The property is believed to be improved by a 3 story 6 unit apartment building.
DESCRIPTION OF PR
TERMS OF SALE—A deposit of Twenty-Five Thousand Dollars ($25,000.00) will be required of the purchaser at
time and place of sale, such deposit to be in cash, cashier’s check, or certified check, drawn on a banking institution
acceptable to the Trustee, or such other form as the Trustee may determine in his sole discretion. The deposit must
be increased to equal ten percent (10%) of the purchase price by noon on, Wednesday, December 27, 2017 at the
Auctioneer’s office. The Noteholder, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a deposit or pay interest. The Trustee
will, as a condition to the sale, require all potential bidders, except the Noteholder, to show their deposit before any
bidding begins. If the Noteholder bids, it shall be entitled to debt bid and, the Auctioneer shall be entitled to bid on
the Noteholder’s behalf. The balance of the purchase price, together with interest thereon at the rate of (6.00%) per
annum from the date of the sale to the date that the funds are received by the Trustee, shall be due in cash or
certified funds within thirty (30) days of the date of sale unless extended at the sole discretion of the Trustee. TIME
IS OF THE ESSENCE. If payment of the balance does not take place within thirty (30) days of sale (or such extended date as may be approved in writing by the Trustee as provided above), in addition to any other legal or equitable
remedies available, the Trustee may declare the deposit forfeited, retain the deposit, resell the Property at the risk
and cost of the defaulting purchaser, and avail themselves and the Noteholder of any legal and equitable rights
against the defaulting purchaser. In the event of such default, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorneys’ fees (including full
commission on the gross sale price) and all other charges incurred by the Trustee or the Noteholder including, but
not limited to, all incidental damages. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason and the Property is purchased by someone other than the Noteholder, there shall be no abatement of interest caused by the delay. All
taxes, ground rent, water rent, homeowner association charges, condominium fees, and all other public and private
charges and assessments, including, without limitation, paving, sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges that are
owed against the Property shall be borne by the purchaser and paid for by the purchaser at settlement. In addition,
the cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, document preparation, title insurance, title examination costs,
survey costs, and all other settlement expenses incidental to conveyance of the Property, shall be borne by the
purchaser and paid for by the purchaser at settlement. To the extent not extinguished by operation of law by the
sale, the Property is being sold subject to the following: the rights of any parties in possession, if such rights have
priority over the DOT; encumbrances, easements, equitable servitudes, conditions, rights of way, restrictions, rights
of redemption, covenants, declarations, restrictions and limitations of record affecting the Property, as well as, all
recorded and unrecorded agreements referred to therein that pertain to the ownership, operation or use of the
Property; all nuisances, housing code violations, building code violations, zoning code violations, critical area and
wetland violations, and environmental problems, conditions and hazards, whether latent or observable, which may
exist on or with respect to the Property; and, such state of facts that an accurate survey or physical inspection of the
Property might disclose. The Property will be sold “WHERE IS” in an “AS IS” condition and without any recourse,
representations or warranties, either express or implied, as to its nature, condition, value, use or description. The
Trustee, the Noteholder or Auctioneer do not make any warranty or representation of any kind or nature, including,
without limitation, the physical condition of, description of, or title to the Property, or as to the accuracy of the information furnished to the prospective bidders by the Trustee or any other party. The successful purchaser recognizes
that any investigation, examination or inspection of the Property is not within the control of the Trustee or the Noteholder. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the Property following conveyance of
the Property by the Trustee to the purchaser. The purchaser shall assume the risk of loss for the Property immediately after the sale. The Noteholder and Trustees assume no liability for fuel, gas, electricity, utilities, rents, or any
other cost or expense whatsoever, under recorded or unrecorded documents and agreements and other operating
charges accrued before or after the sale and all such charges shall be the sole responsibility of the purchaser from
the date of the sale (whether payable before or after the date of sale). If the Trustees are unable to convey title to
the Property, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to the refund of its deposit, without
interest thereon. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no
further claims against the Trustee, Noteholder or Auctioneer. The conveyance of the Property by the Trustees to the
purchaser at settlement shall be by Trustees’ Deed without covenant, warranty or representations whatsoever
expressed or implied. NOTE: The information contained herein was obtained from sources deemed to be reliable,
but is offered for information purposes only. The Trustee, Noteholder or Auctioneer do not make any representations or warranties whatsoever with respect to the accuracy of the information contained herein. All square footage,
acreage, and other measurements, if any, are approximate. Prospective purchasers are urged to make their own
inspection. Until an offer is finally accepted by the Trustees, it is subject to higher and better offers. The Trustee
reserve the right in their sole discretion to reject any and all bids or withdraw the Property from sale at any time
before the Auctioneer announces that the Property is “sold” and the deposit in the required amount and form is
accepted by the Trustee. The Trustee may adjourn and/or continue the sale at any time and close the sale. The
parties’ respective rights and obligations regarding the terms of the sale and conduct of the sale shall be governed
and interpreted under the laws of the District of Columbia. Further particulars may be announced at the time of sale.
For info call MARIE (410) 366-5555 or go to www.mdauctioneers.org and click on auctions.
Paul J. Cohen, Substitute Trustee
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
Axelson, Williamowsky, Bender & Fishman, P.C.
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT LAW
1401 Rockville Pike, Suite 650. Rockville, MD 20852
TELEPHONE (301) 738-7657. TELECOPIER (301) 424-0124
SUBSTITUTE, Trustee's sale
of valuable Improved real estate Improved by premises
known as
20113 Cider Barrel Drive, Unit #21,Germantown, MD 20876-2708
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust
from GIFTY MARION ASMAH-DICKERSON, dated December 21, 2006
and recorded in Liber 33968 at Folio 072 among the land records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Maryland, upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse
door, 50 Maryland Avenue, Rockville, Maryland on Thursday, December
14, 2017 at 9:30 a.m. all that property described in said Deed of Trust as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED as Condominium Unit No. 21, as shown on
Condominium Phasing Plat-Phasing Plan, Orchard Run Condominium, Phase
4, recorded among the Land Records of Montgomery County, Maryland as
Plat Nos. 9404, 9405 and 9406.
The improvements thereon being known as 20113 Cider Barrel Drive.
Said property is improved by A Dwelling and Is SOLD IN "AS IS CONDITION"
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $22,000.00 in the form of cash, certified
check, or in any other form suitable to the substitute Trustees in their
sole discretion, shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest at 3.625%
per annum from the date of
sale to the date of payment will be paid within ten days after the final
ratification of the sale.
Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by
purchaser.
Front Foot Benefit charges are to be adjusted for the current year to
date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Title examination,
conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes and all other costs
incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the
essence for the purchaser, otherwise the property will be resold at the
risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The purchaser agrees to pay the
Substitute Trustees fees plus all costs incurred if the Substitute Trustee
have filed the appropriate pleadings with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the court in
connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the
Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order
by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the
purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by purchaser at the
time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser
3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not
required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement
the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute Trustee and all expenses of
this sale (including attorney fees or full commission on the gross sales price
of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit.
In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to
any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property
regardless of any improvements made to the real property.
In the Event this property is sold and for any reason the sale is not ratified
the liability of the Substitute Trustees shall be limited to a refund of the
deposit. Upon refund of the deposit the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees either at law or in equity.
JEREMY K. FISHMAN,
SAMUEL D. WILLIAMOWSKY, and ERICA T. DAVIS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES,
by virtue of instrument recorded among the land records of MONTGOMERY County, Maryland.
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13201 WRIGHT PL.
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20774
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Otis
R. L. Lindsey a/k/a Otis L. Lindsey dated May 5, 2015 and recorded in
Liber 37040, folio 468 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 19, 2017 AT 10:55 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-3581170.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $32,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67705.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
Brenda DiMarco, Auctioneer
14804 Main Street
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Phone#: 301-627-1002
Auctioneer's Number #A00116
November 21, December 6, 13, 2017
851
12141389
LEGAL NOTICES
12142640
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x1
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
CLASSIFIED
D14
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2017
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
OPQRS
EZ
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
2549 ALABAMA AVENUE, SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20020
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on July 5, 2006, as Instrument
Number 2006088743, and in accordance Judgment filed on
November 6, 2017 in case 2017 CA 000959 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
JANUARY 23, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
2549 ALABAMA AVENUE, SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20020, LOT
NUMBERED SEVENTY-TWO (72) AND THE SOUTH 5-1/2 FEET
FRONT OF ALABAMA AVENUE BY THE FULL DEPTH OF LOT
NUMBERED SEVENTY-FOUR (74)
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (2.05%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 46743
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
900 BURNS STREET SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on July 10, 2013, as Instrument
Number 2013080518, and in accordance Judgment filed on
October 3, 2017 in case 2015 CA 000515 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034, on January
23, 2018 at 3:00 PM, the land and premises situated in the
District of Columbia and more particularly described in the above
referenced Deed of Trust and as of the date hereof designated
on the Records of the Assessor of the District of Columbia for
assessment purposes as:
900 BURNS STREET SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019, LOTS
NUMBERED SEVENTY-SEVEN (77) AND SEVENTY-EIGHT (78),
IN SQUARE NUMBERED FIVE THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED
AND EIGHTY-TWO (5382).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (4.25%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 31699
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
59 CRITTENDEN ST NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20011
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on March 26, 2010, as Instrument
Number 2010026678, and in accordance Judgment filed on
July 18, 2017 in case 2015 CA 001844 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
January 23, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
59 CRITTENDEN ST NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20011, LOT
NUMBERED FIFTY-EIGHT (0058), IN SQUARE NUMBERED
THIRTY-SIX HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIVE (3685).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (5.56%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 22454
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
512 59TH STREET, NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on August 31, 2000, as
Instrument Number 2000078367, and in accordance Judgment
filed on October 25, 2017 in case 2015 CA 006385 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
January 23, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
512 59TH STREET, NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019, PARTS OF
LOTS NUMBERED 31 AND 32, IN SQUARE NUMBERED 5259
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (8.5% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 26196
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
DECEMBER 13, 20, 27, 2017, JANUARY 3, 2018
DECEMBER 13, 20, 27, JANUARY 3, 2018
12146918
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
3459 25TH STREET SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20020
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on November 29, 2007, as
Instrument Number 2007149047, and in accordance Judgment
filed on October 18, 2016 in case 2016 CA 001935 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
JANUARY 23, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
3459 25TH STREET SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20020, LOT
NUMBERED EIGHTY-ONE (81) IN SQUARE NUMBERED AND
LETTERED WEST OF SQUARE NUMBERED FIFTY-SEVEN HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR (5724-W)
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (4% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 37768
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
DECEMBER 13, 20, 27, 2017, JANUARY 3, 2018
12148361 DECEMBER 13, 20, 27, JANUARY 3, 2018
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
3504 18TH STREET, N.E.
WASHINGTON, DC 20018
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on October 10, 2007, as
Instrument Number 2007130188, and in accordance Judgment
filed on November 6, 2017 in case 2015 CA 007460 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
JANUARY 23, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
3504 18TH STREET, N.E., WASHINGTON, DC 20018, LOT
NUMBERED FORTY-THREE IN H. R. HOWENSTEIN'S SUBDIVISION OF LOTS IN SQUARE NUMBERED FORTY-ONE
HUNDRED FORTY-SEVEN (4147).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (7% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 23829
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
DECEMBER 13, 20, 27, JANUARY 3, 2018
12147627
DECEMBER 13, 20, 27, JANUARY 3, 2018
12146917
Trustees Sale - DC
840
D15
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
3011 CENTRAL AVENUE, NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20018
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on September 27, 2013, as
Instrument Number 2013112168, and in accordance Judgment
filed on October 25, 2017 in case 2017 CA 000755 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
JANUARY 23, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
3011 CENTRAL AVENUE, NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20018, LOT
0804, SQUARE 4319
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (3.024%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 42807
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12146105 DECEMBER 13, 20, 27, 2017, JANUARY 3, 2018 12147460
12147520
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
2839 27TH STREET NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20018
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on January 17, 2007, as
Instrument Number 2007007247, and in accordance Judgment
filed on June 7, 2017 in case 2015 CA 000846 R(RP) and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
JANUARY 23, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
2839 27TH STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20018, LOT
NUMBERED TWENTY-ONE (0021), IN SQUARE NUMBERED
FORTY-THREE HUNDRED FORTY-ONE (4341).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (4% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 25908
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
DECEMBER 13, 20, 27, 2017, JANUARY 3, 2018
840
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
604 17TH STREET, NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20002
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on February 18, 2010, as
Instrument Number 2010013082, and in accordance Judgment
filed on November 2, 2017 in case 2016 CA 002831 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
JANUARY 23, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
604 17TH STREET, NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20002, LOT
NUMBERED TWO HUNDRED EIGHTY-TWO (282), IN SQUARE
FORTY-FIVE HUNDRED FORTY (4540).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (0% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 22449
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12146104 DECEMBER 13, 20, 27, JANUARY 3, 2018
12147521
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
3876 9TH STREET, SE, APT. 103
WASHINGTON, DC 20032
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on June 10, 2013, as Instrument
Number 2013066265, and in accordance Judgment filed on
October 26, 2017 in case 2017 CA 000834 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office
of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 WISCONSIN
AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC 20015-2034 on,
JANUARY 23, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
3876 9TH STREET, SE, APT. 103, WASHINGTON, DC 20032,
LOT 52, IN SQUARE 5925.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (4.375%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 6459
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
DECEMBER 13, 20, 27, 2017, JANUARY 3, 2018
12145800
OPQRS
D16
850
Montgomery County
850
851
Montgomery County
LAW OFFICES
Shulman, Rogers, Gandal, Pordy & Ecker, P.A.
12505 Park Potomac Avenue, 6th Floor
Potomac, MD 20854
(301) 230-5241
File No. 113852.00460
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
of
Two Valuable Fee Simple Properties
located in Montgomery County, Maryland,
known as
TAX ID NO. 05-00272438
TAX ID NO. 05-03552453
(collectively the “Property”)
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust
and Security Agreement (the “Deed of Trust”) from Elderhome
Land, L.L.C., and Burtonsville Crossing, LLC, to Ryan Riel and
Laurence E. Bensignor, Trustees, bearing the date of June 14,
2013, recorded in Book 47084, at Page 013 among the Land
Records of Montgomery County, Maryland, and at the request
of the party secured thereby, default having occurred in the
terms and conditions thereof, the Substitute Trustees having
been substituted for the Trustees named in said Deed of Trust,
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery
County, at 50 Maryland Avenue, Rockville, MD on December
15, 2017 at 3:00 p.m., some or all of the Property described in
said Deed of Trust.
All these Fee-Simple lots of ground and the improvements, if any, thereon identified as Tax ID No. 0500272438 and 05-03552453 and more fully described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
Each lot will be offered separately, bids reserved, and then
offered in the aggregate and will be sold in the manner producing
the greater amount of proceeds.
TERMS OF SALE
The bid which yields the highest price for the Property will
be accepted by the Substitute Trustees. Notwithstanding the
foregoing, the Substitute Trustees absolutely reserve the right
to postpone the sale and/or cancel the sale at any time until
the auctioneer announces that the Property is "sold" and the
deposit in the required amount and form is received by the
Substitute Trustees. A deposit in the amount of $150,000.00
will be required at the time of sale if the Property is sold in
the aggregate. Deposits in the amount of $75,000.00 will be
required for each parcel in the event the Property is sold in
individual parcels. Such deposit(s) must be by cashier's check
or certified check or such other form as the Substitute Trustees’
may determine in their sole discretion. The Noteholder secured
by the Deed of Trust (or any related party) shall be exempted
by the Substitute Trustees from submitting any bidding deposit.
The Substitute Trustees will, as a condition of the sale, require
all potential bidders, except the Noteholder, to show their
deposit before any bidding begins. The retained deposit of the
successful purchaser shall be applied, without interest, to the
successful purchaser's credit at settlement, provided, however,
that in the event the successful purchaser fails to consummate
the purchase in accordance with the terms of sale as herein
provided, such deposit, will be forfeited. The terms of sale
must be complied with and settlement consummated thereon
within 30 days from date of final ratification of the sale by the
Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland unless extended
at the sole discretion of the Substitute Trustees. There will
be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the
event settlement is delayed for any reason. TIME IS OF THE
ESSENCE. The balance of the purchase price over and above
the retained deposit, with interest thereon at a rate of 8% from
the date of sale through the date of receipt of the balance of
the purchase price, will be due at settlement in cash or certified
funds; and if not so paid, the Substitute Trustees reserve the
right to retain the deposit and resell the Property at the risk and
cost of the defaulting purchaser, after such advertisement and
on such terms as the Substitute Trustees may deem proper, and
to avail themselves and the Noteholder of any legal or equitable
rights against the defaulting purchaser.
The Property is sold subject to the lawful rights, if any, of
parties in possession, if such rights have priority over the Deed
of Trust, and to any and all covenants, conditions, restrictions,
easements, rights of way, encumbrances, liens, agreements and
limitations of record having priority over the Deed of Trust. The
Property will be sold “WHERE IS” and in “AS IS” condition
without any warranty as to condition, express or implied, and
without any representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the
information furnished to prospective bidders by the Substitute
Trustees or any other party and without any other representations
or warranty of any nature. Without limiting the generality of
the foregoing, the Property will be sold without representation
or warranty as to (i) title to the Property, (ii) the nature,
condition, structural integrity, or fitness for a particular use of
any improvements, fixtures or personal property included within
the Property, (iii) the environmental condition of the Property
or the compliance of the Property with federal, state and local
laws and regulations concerning the presence or disposal of
hazardous substances, (iv) compliance of the Property with
the Americans with Disabilities Act or any similar law, or (v)
compliance of the Property with any zoning laws or ordinances
and any and all applicable safety codes, and acceptance of the
Deed to the Property by the successful purchaser shall constitute
a waiver of any claims against the Substitute Trustees or the
Noteholder concerning any of the foregoing matters. Purchaser
shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
Property.
Conveyance shall be by Trustee’s Deed, without covenant or
warranty, express or implied, specifically including marketability
or insurability (hazard or title), unless otherwise required by
statute, court rule or the Deed of Trust. The risk of loss or damage
by fire or other casualty to the Property from and after the
date of sale will be upon the successful purchaser. Adjustment
of all taxes, ground rents, public charges, assessments, sewer,
water, drainage and other public improvements will be made as
of the date of sale and are to be assumed and paid thereafter
by the successful purchaser, whether assessments have been
levied or not. Any condominium fees, homeowners association
dues, assessments or capital contributions, if any, payable with
respect to the Property shall be assumed after the date of sale
by the successful purchaser. All costs incident to the settlement
and conveyancing including, without limitation, examination
of title, conveyancing, all recordation taxes and charges, all
transfer taxes and charges, title insurance premiums, notary
fees, settlement fees and all other costs incident to settlement
shall be at the cost of the successful purchaser. In the event
the Substitute Trustees are unable for any reason to convey
title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be to
request and receive a return of the deposit. Upon return of the
deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
This advertisement, as amended or supplemented by any oral
announcements during the conduct of the sale, constitutes the
entire terms upon which the Property shall be offered for sale.
Stephen A. Metz and Benjamin P. Smith
Substitute Trustees
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13008 BLAIRMORE ST.
BELTSVILLE, MD 20705
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Yvonne M.
Davis dated January 9, 2007 and recorded in Liber 27337, folio 205 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 19, 2017 AT 10:56 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-0013755.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $60,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65442.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
12144723
851
Prince Georges County
851
EZ
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3323 Pumphrey Drive
District Heights, MD 20747
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to FRIEDMAN & MAC FAYDEN PA, Trustee(s),
dated July 20, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26199,
folio 644, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THREE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-SIX (376),
IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "OLE LONGFIELD", PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK BB 6 AT FOLIO 54, ONE OF
THE LAND RECORDS OF SAID PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $9,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-08792)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
9602 LINWOOD AVENUE
Lanham, MD 20706
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to SUSAN M. PESNER, Trustee(s), dated May
31, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 25681, folio 620, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOTS NUMBERED TWO HUNDRED SIXTY (260) AND TWO
HUNDRED SIXTY-ONE (261), IN BLOCK NUMBERED EIGHTEEN (18), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SHERMAN
PARK", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN
PLAT BOOK JWB 5, AT PLAT 642, AND RE-RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK A, AT PLAT 103, BEING IN THE 20TH ELECTION
DISTRICT OF SAID COUNTY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
www.hwestauctions.com
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
12145170
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,500.00 payable in certified
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.625%
KNOWN AS
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
6223 Gothic Lane
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
Bowie, MD 20720
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS Deed of Trust to WILLIAM A. MARKWAT, Trustee(s), dated
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the December 30, 2004, and recorded among the Land Records
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 21615,
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. folio 076, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
All other public charges and private charges or assessments, of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against described as follows:
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED THIRprovisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, TY-SIX (36) IN BLOCK LETTERED "A" IN THE SUBDIthis sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser VISION KNOWN AS "PLAT TWO, HIGHBRIDGE", AS PER
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT NLP 142 AT
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered PLAT 99, BEING IN THE 14TH ELECTION DISTRICT.
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without Said property is subject to a 120 day IRS Right of Redemption.
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-17617)
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris,
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merSubstitute Trustees
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
www.hwestauctions.com
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
12141924
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
851
851
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
Prince Georges County
Prince Georges County
www.hwestauctions.com
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13 2017
12144128
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $29,500.00 payable in certified
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
v.
v.
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
LATOYA JOHNSON
JENNIFER JONES GEORGE
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.875%
Defendant(s)
Defendant(s)
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
Membership is rewarding.
Civil Action No. CAEF1705319
Civil Action No. CAEF17-18644
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
NOTICE
NOTICE
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
Notice is hereby given this 4th day
Notice is hereby given this 4th day
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
of December 2017, by the Circuit
of December 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Court for Prince George's County,
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
Maryland, that the sale of the propMaryland, that the sale of the propof the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
erty mentioned in these proceederty mentioned in these proceedings and described as 1309
ings and described as 4504 Weldon
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
Asheville Road, District Heights, MD
Drive, Temple Hills, MD 20748, will
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
20747, will be ratified and conbe ratified and confirmed unless
firmed unless cause to the concause to the contrary thereof be
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
trary thereof be shown on or
shown on or before the 4th day
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
before the 4th day of January, 2018,
of January, 2018, provided a copy
provided a copy of this NOTICE be
of this NOTICE be published at
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
published at least once a week in
least once a week in each of three
each of three successive weeks
successive weeks in some newstransfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
in some newspaper of general cirpaper of general circulation pubshall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
culation published in said County
lished in said County before the
before the 4th day of January, 2018.
4th day of January, 2018.
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
The Report of Sale states the
The Report of Sale states the
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
amount of the sale to be
amount of the sale to be
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
$175,500.00.
$235,600.00.
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
Prince George's County, Maryland
Prince George's County, Maryland
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
Dec 13, 20, 27, 2017
12147192
Dec 13, 20, 27, 2017
12147402
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
Home delivery
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
is convenient.
Home delivery
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
1-800-753-POST
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
is convenient.
SF
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
1-800-753-POST
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
Home delivery
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
SF
is convenient.
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-15560)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Jason L. Hamlin,
Glen H. Tschirgi, Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung,
Home delivery starts
1-800-753-POST
Substitute Trustees
your day off right.
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851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6600 Queens Chapel Road
Hyattsville, MD 20782
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to DAVID G. SWEIDERK AND ROBERT
BYSTROWSKI, Trustee(s), dated July 22, 2005, and recorded
among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND in Liber 22718, folio 603, the holder of the
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 1, BLOCK 23, AS
SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED "SECTION 6-B, UNIVERSITY
PARK," AS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF THE
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK
6, PAGE 55.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.25% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-10152)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis
Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
S2931 2x5
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13 2017
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4913 HEATH STREET
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to REALTY TITLE SERVICES INC, Trustee(s),
dated June 24, 2014, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 36154,
folio 313, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED THREE
(3) AND FOUR (4) IN BLOCK SEVENTY-TWO (72) IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "GREATER CAPITOL HEIGHTS",
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN LIBER
B.D.S. NO. 1 FOLIO 63, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $21,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.875%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-14306)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Jason L. Hamlin, Glen H.
Tschirgi, Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
12141792
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
11813 HEARTWOOD DRIVE
Beltsville, MD 20705
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to WAYNE LEE, Trustee(s), dated January
12, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 22330, folio 649, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWO (2) IN BLOCK NUMBERED TWO 92)
IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT OF CORRECTION,
PLAT TWO, BELTSVILLE HEIGHTS" AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK VJ164 AT PLAT 57.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $32,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 6.2% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-06819)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2017
Prince Georges County
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
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1-800-753-POST
851
www.hwestauctions.com
12144146 NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
12145177
852
Anne Arundel County
852
12138135
Anne Arundel County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
ASSIGNEES' SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
7931 PIPERS DALE
GLEN BURNIE, MD 21061
Pursuant to the power of sale contained in a Mortgage from Thomas E.
Gadd and Glenda L. Gadd dated July 26, 1996 and recorded in Liber 7561,
Folio 647 among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default
having occurred thereunder, the undersigned appointed Assignees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the
Court House Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
JANUARY 2, 2018 AT 9:36 AM
ALL THAT LEASEHOLD LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Mortgage. Tax ID #03-430-13676000. The
property will be sold subject to an annual ground rent of $180.00, payable
on the 24th day of March and September.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $27,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be paid
on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Mortgage
from the date of sale to the date funds are received in the office of the
Assignees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional
funds are tendered before settlement or if settlement is delayed for
any reason. The mortgage holder shall not be obligated to pay interest
if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER.
Adjustment of all real property taxes, including agricultural taxes, if
applicable, and any and all public and/or private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges and ground rent, to be adjusted to
date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Assignees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Assignees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses
of this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the
gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of
the forfeited deposit. The Assignees may then re-advertise and resell
the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may
avail themselves of any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting
purchaser without reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the
defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any,
even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said
defaulting purchaser and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the
Assignees and secured party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses
incurred in connection with all litigation involving the Property or the
proceeds of the resale. Assignees' file number 62196.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Dec 13, Dec 20 & Dec 27
12146226
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MOVING OUT?
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washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x4
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2017
852
Anne Arundel County
852
OPQRS
EZ
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
852
D17
Anne Arundel County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1406 SAYBROOKE CT.
PASADENA, MD 21122
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2705 SAVOY CT.
CROFTON, MD 21114
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3005 LOST CREEK BLVD.
LAUREL, MD 20724
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Chuck
Rollins and Heather Rollins dated June 20, 2006 and recorded in Liber
17981, folio 406 among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the
Court House Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
DECEMBER 19, 2017 AT 9:29 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Gary J.
Hickman and Marianne Hickman dated August 20, 2007 and recorded in
Liber 20182, folio 390 among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County,
at the Court House Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
JANUARY 2, 2018 AT 9:30 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Barbara
L. Penn dated November 16, 2009 and recorded in Liber 22000, folio 497
among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House
Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
JANUARY 2, 2018 AT 9:35 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #03-792-90109783.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $83,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 61898.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-647-90072692.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $39,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65043.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #04-675-90083496.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $30,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 48110.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
12143965
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Dec 13, Dec 20 & Dec 27
12145896
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Dec 13, Dec 20 & Dec 27
12146003
853
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1828 WOODS RD.
ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Wayne
S. Simmons dated March 30, 2007 and recorded in Liber 18947, folio 438
among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House
Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
DECEMBER 19, 2017 AT 9:28 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-145-90099365.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $100,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 58896.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
12144726
853
Calvert County
Calvert County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3378 ARUNDEL ON THE BAY RD.
ANNAPOLIS, MD 21403
12632 WESTERN CIR.
LUSBY, MD 20657
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Phillip
B. Wilson dated December 29, 2006 and recorded in Liber 18693, folio
1 among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House
Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
JANUARY 2, 2018 AT 9:32 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-597-03958755.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $33,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 61207.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Edward J.
Ruzicka and Theresa A. Ruzicka dated June 19, 2007 and recorded in Liber
3024, folio 722 among the Land Records of Calvert County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Calvert County, at the Court House
Door, 175 Main St., Prince Frederick, MD 20678, on
JANUARY 2, 2018 AT 1:26 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Calvert County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-082949.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $23,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Calvert County. Interest to
be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the
Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 58587.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 13, Dec 20 & Dec 27
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Dec 13, Dec 20 & Dec 27
12145900
12147643
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
8320 CASSIDY CT.
CHESAPEAKE BEACH, MD 20732
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6414 JEFFERSON PL.
GLEN BURNIE, MD 21061
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Nakeidra
D. Tyler dated December 22, 2015 and recorded in Liber 4692, folio 288
among the Land Records of Calvert County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Calvert County, at the Court House Door, 175 Main St.,
Prince Frederick, MD 20678, on
JANUARY 2, 2018 AT 1:25 PM
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Tyemesha
C. Smith dated February 28, 2007 and recorded in Liber 18878, folio 394
among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House
Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
JANUARY 2, 2018 AT 9:31 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and
described as Unit No. 6414, Building No. 40, in the horizontal property
regime known as "Heritage Hill, Condominium II" and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-394-06279200.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66066.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Dec 13, Dec 20 & Dec 27
12145898
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Calvert County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #03-191419.
120 N. LONGCROSS RD.
LINTHICUM, MD 21090
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Burton L.
Phebus, Jr. and Bonnie M. Phebus dated August 10, 2004 and recorded in
Liber 15240, folio 704 among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County,
at the Court House Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
JANUARY 2, 2018 AT 9:34 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-486-18013100.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $12,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67983.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Dec 13, Dec 20 & Dec 27
12146002
LEGAL
NOTICES
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The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $31,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Calvert County. Interest to
be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the
Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66885.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 13, Dec 20 & Dec 27
12147641
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853
Calvert County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
377 Rachaels Way
Prince Frederick, MD 20678
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to MARK H. FRIEDMAN AND KENNETH J. MAC
FADYEN, Trustee(s), dated March 1, 2005, and recorded among
the Land Records of CALVERT COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
02759, folio 332, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE
CALVERT COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 175 MAIN ST,
PRINCE FREDERICK, MD 20678 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CALVERT COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-NINE (39), IN THE SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "FINAL PLAT, PLAT THREE, SYMPHONY WOODS",
AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF CALVERT COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK
ABE 4, AT PLAT 68; BEING IN THE 2ND ELECTION DISTRICT
OF SAID COUNTY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $14,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CALVERT COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 8.3% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (15-12246)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
855
855
Charles County
Charles County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
12369 SANDSTONE ST.
WALDORF, MD 20601
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Raquel
Punter a/k/a Raquel Y. Punter dated July 9, 2014 and recorded in Liber
8612, folio 176 and re-recorded in Liber 8743, folio 67 among the Land
Records of Charles County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court
for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale will be held
in the breezeway between the Circuit Court and the District Court), on
JANUARY 2, 2018 AT 12:15 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-352593.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $32,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68341.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al.,
Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 13, Dec 20 & Dec 27
12147445
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6750 Barney Drive
Hughesville, MD 20637
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to GEORGE MANTAKOS, Trustee(s), dated March
27, 2012, and recorded among the Land Records of CHARLES
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 07770, folio 0049, MODIFIED:
NOVEMBER 1, 2015 IN LIBER 09158, FOLIO 0004 the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE CHARLES COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 200 CHARLES STREET ( IN THE
BREEZEWAY BETWEEN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS ), LA
PLATA, MD 20646 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 1:30PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CHARLES COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-SEVEN (27), AS SHOWN ON A PLAT
ENTITLED PLAT 3, BLOCK "B", SECTION TWO, "BENEDICT
PLANTATION", DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
FOR CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK DGB 46 AT
FOLIO 292.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
www.hwestauctions.com
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
12145226 which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
855
855
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
Charles County
Charles County
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,000.00 payable in certified
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
10500 LYNNEWOOD CT.
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CHARLES COUNTY,
WALDORF, MD 20603
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.75% on unpaid
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from William R.
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
Hogans, IV and Joy Amos-Hogans dated September 19, 2005 and recorded
in Liber 5458, folio 569 among the Land Records of Charles County, MD,
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles
St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale will be held in the breezeway between the
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
Circuit Court and the District Court), on
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
DECEMBER 19, 2017 AT 1:03 PM
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-232418.
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $54,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
be announced at the time of sale.
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postIf the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
sale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
No. (16-12638)
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris,
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
Erin M. August, and Gene Jung,
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
Substitute Trustees
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 54375.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
12144727
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
16224 AND 16195 WILKERSON PL.
BRANDYWINE, MD 20613
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from James
R. Wilkerson and Christine J. Wilkerson dated May 4, 2004 and recorded
in Liber 4725, folio 24 among the Land Records of Charles County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles
St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale will be held in the breezeway between the
Circuit Court and the District Court), on
DECEMBER 19, 2017 AT 1:05 PM
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64872.
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
legalnotices@washpost.com
Calvert County
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-011994 and Tax ID
#09-000968.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $31,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
legal notice in the
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853
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
12144730
12144736
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S2931 2x5
OPQRS
D18
855
855
Charles County
856
Charles County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3272 GREEN COVE PLACE
Waldorf, MD 20601
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to THOMAS DORE, Trustee(s), dated August 31,
2015, and recorded among the Land Records of CHARLES
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 09087, folio 0340, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE CHARLES COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 200 CHARLES STREET ( IN THE
BREEZEWAY BETWEEN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS ), LA
PLATA, MD 20646 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 1:30PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CHARLES COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT 61 AS SHOWN AND SET OUT ON A PLAT ENTITLED
"RECORD PLATS 1 THROUGH 5 ADAMS CROSSING PHASE B
SECTION 1," AS PER PLATS THEREOF RECORDED AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND IN
PLAT BOOK 58 AT PLATS 575 THROUGH 579. BEING PART
OF THE SAME PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN DEED RECORDED
AMONG THE AFORESAID LAND RECORDS IN LIBER 8843
FOLIO 251.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $30,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CHARLES COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.75% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-09833)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
871
872
City of Alexandria
12138121
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
301 N BEAUREGARD ST UNIT #308,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22312
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6135 CINNAMON CT,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22310
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $171,652.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.250000% dated
January 18, 2013, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the CITY OF
ALEXANDRIA as Deed Instrument
Number 130002099, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, on
the courthouse steps at the front
of the Circuit Court building for
the City of Alexandria located at
520 King Street, Alexandria, Virginia on January 17, 2018 at 11:30
AM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 037.03-0A-0308
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $492,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
October 12, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 17846,
Page 0658, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on January 10, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 091-1-26-0126-A
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-270690.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-254052.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec. 13, 20, 2017
12147451
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 13, 20, 2017
12147878
Frederick County
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
857
Frederick County
Tucker Arensberg, P.C.
1500 One PPG Place
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
412-566-1212
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1413 WILLOW OAK DR.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
(Case No.: 10-C-17-002163 in the Circuit Court for Frederick County)
ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property and improvements will be sold in an “AS IS” condition and
subject to conditions, restrictions, existing buildings and/or environmental
violations, agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no
warranty either expressed or implied as to the description of the condition
of the property or improvements.
The property will be sold subject to a prior mortgage, the amount to be
announced at the time of sale.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $5,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s
check or money order, at the time of sale will be required of all purchasers
other than the holder of the Deed of Trust. Balance of the purchase price
is to be paid in cash within ten (10) business days of the final ratification of
sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County. If payment of the balance
does not take place within ten (10) business days of ratification, the
deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and
expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting purchaser shall not
be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale
of the property. Interest to be paid on unpaid purchase money at the
rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust note from date of sale to the date
funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, in the event
the property is purchased by someone other than the note holder. In
the event the settlement is delayed for any reason and the property is
purchased by someone other than the note holder, there shall be no
abatement of interest caused by the delay. Taxes, water rent, ground rent,
condominium fees, and/or homeowners association dues, if applicable, to
be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
All other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis,
including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges to be adjusted for
the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be borne by the
purchaser.
If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title,
the purchaser's sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund
of the deposit. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and
of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the
Substitute Trustees. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume
the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale.
Brett A. Solomon, Geoffrey L. Forman, W. Scott Tinney, IV,
Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
DEC. 13, 20 & 27
12141682
872
872
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
8700 FLOWERING DOGWOOD
LANE,
LORTON, VA 22079
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 14-243189.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 6, 13, 2017
Fairfax County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $350,400.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.000000% dated
March 16, 2007, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 19196, Page 1312,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on January 10,
2018 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0884-07-0168A
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-269011.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 13, 20, 2017
12147887
12146756
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
8315 COTTAGE ST,
VIENNA, VA 22180
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
904 ROYAL ELM CT,
HERNDON, VA 20170
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $540,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.750000% dated
September 20, 2004, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 16525,
Page 1172, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on January 10, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0113-24-0007
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-266756.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 13, 20, 2017
12147884
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $531,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 10.500000% dated
June 15, 2005, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 17418, Page 740,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on January 10,
2018 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0491 09E 0006
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-253585.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 6, 13, 2017
12146755
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Home delivery
is convenient.
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Home delivery
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ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Howard County, MD and described as
Unit 304, in the Condominium regime known as "Lakeside at Town Centre
Condominium" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
Tax ID #15-138041.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $31,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Howard County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67077.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
Prince William County
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12143967
873
Pursuant to the terms and provisions of a certain Deed of Trust
from Joseph J. Garlick, Jr., party
of the first part, to George W.
Connors, Trustee, dated January
5, 2007, and recorded on January
8, 2007, as Instrument Number
200701080003560 (the “Deed of
Trust”), among the land records
of Prince William County, Virginia,
the holder of the Note evidencing
the indebtedness secured by said
Deed of Trust having declared an
event of default and instructed
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee to proceed with this
Trustee's Sale, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee (having been
appointed a Substitute Trustee by
virtue of a Deed of Appointment
of Substitute Trustee recorded
prior hereto in said Clerk’s Office
as
Instrument
Number
201711300090049) will offer for
sale at public auction to the highest bidder, on December 14, 2017,
at 1:00 p.m., on the front steps of
the Prince William County Courthouse, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, Virginia, all of those certain
lots or parcels of land, together
with all improvements located
thereon and rights and privileges
appurtenant thereto, situated,
lying and being in the County of
Prince William, Virginia, and more
particularly described of record as
follows:
ALL of Lot 103, Section 5, Dale
City, as the same is duly dedicated, platted and recorded among
the land records of Prince William
County, Virginia, in Deed Book 427
at page 626.
The within described property is
sold in “as is” condition and without any warranties either express
or implied and subject to encumbrances, conditions, restrictions,
rights-of-way, easements, and
agreements, if any, contained in
the deeds forming the chain of
title thereto. It shall be the
responsibility of the successful
bidder to obtain possession of the
property.
TERMS OF SALE: The property
as hereinabove described will be
sold in the manner producing the
highest bid. A cash deposit of at
least NINE THOUSAND DOLLARS
($9,000.00) by certified or
cashier's check will be required of
the successful bidder at the time
of sale with balance due within
fifteen (15) days from the date
of said sale. The deposit shall
be applied to the credit of the
successful bidder at settlement;
or, in the event of the failure
to complete settlement within fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale, the deposit shall be applied
to pay the cost and expense of
sale and the balance, if any, shall
be retained by the Substitute
Trustee as his compensation in
connection with this sale.
Notwithstanding the foregoing,
the Substitute Trustee reserves
the right to waive the requirement of said deposit.
All costs of the conveyancing,
which shall be by Special Warranty Deed, examination of title,
recording charges, notary fees,
settlement fees, including preparation of deed and grantor's tax
thereon, etc., to be at the cost of
the purchaser. Real estate taxes
for the year 2017 to be adjusted
to the date of settlement.
In the event the Substitute
Trustee deems it best for any
reason at the time of the sale
to postpone or continue this sale
from time to time, such notice
of postponement or setting over
will be announced in a manner
deemed reasonable by the Substitute Trustee.
Written notice of this Trustee's
Sale, as required by Section 5559.1 of the Code of Virginia, 1950,
as amended has been given to
Corona Lane, LLC, the present
owner of the property described
herein, by certified mail, at its last
known address, as such owner
and address appear on the
records of the Noteholder.
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Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
13325 MAPLE LEAF LANE,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22191
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
3825 Corona Lane
Woodbridge, Virginia 22193
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE
Eric A. Anderson, Esq.
5313 Lee Highway
Second Floor
Arlington, Virginia 22207
(703) 975-6795
12-6, 8, 11, 12, 13-2017 12147143
1-800-753-POST
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Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Lucie M.
Lynch dated June 11, 2005 and recorded in Liber 9327, folio 518 among
the Land Records of Howard County, MD, default having occurred under
the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction, AUCTION
SALE TO BE HELD AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD,
COLUMBIA, MD 21045, on
DECEMBER 18, 2017 AT 9:30 AM
873
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $185,600.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.850000% dated
September 6, 2002, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number 200209090116140,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on January 2, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 000000039201
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 14-242972.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 6, 13, 2017
12144063
875
Fauquier County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
5214 SWAIN DRIVE ,
WARRENTON, VA 20187.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated July 14, 2006, in
the original principal amount of
$540,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Fauquier County, Virginia, in Book
1224 at Page 2323 as Instrument
No. 2006-00011106 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Fauquier County, 40 Culpeper
Street, Warrenton, Virginia on January 11, 2018, at 12:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL OF LOT
FIFTEEN (15), PHASE ONE (1),
EMERALD OAKS, AS THE SAME
IS SHOWN ON PLAT OF SURVEY
PREPARED BY CARSON, HARRIS &
ASSOCIATES, L.L.C., DATED JULY
20, 1998 AND ENTITLED "EMERALD
OAKS, PHASE ONE, SCOTT MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, FAUQUIER COUNTY, VIRGINIA", AND DULY RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 813, AT PAGE
370, IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF FAUQUIER
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3173961.
Dec. 6, 13, 2017
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2017
EZ
Howard County
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
7301 GOLDEN IRIS COURT,
SPRINGFIELD, VA 22153
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $782,397.48, with an annual
interest rate of 7.320000% dated
December 13, 2007, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 19762,
Page 0373, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on January 10, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 107-1-05-0052
Howard County
857
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
10205 WINCOPIN CIR., UNIT #304
COLUMBIA, MD 21044
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Yichai Lin
and Qiao Lin dated October 8, 2004 and recorded in Liber 4917, folio 691
among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction
at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W.
Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
DECEMBER 29, 2017 AT 10:55 AM
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856
12145133
875
876
Fauquier County
877
Loudoun County
877
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
7290 JOFFA CIRCLE,
WARRENTON, VA 20187
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
46612 DRYSDALE TER RD 103,
STERLING, VA 20165
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
10702 BRADFORD STREET,
SPOTSYLVANIA, VA 22553
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated December 11, 2006,
in the original principal amount
of $616,850.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Fauquier County, Virginia, in Book
1245 at Page 645 as Instrument
No. 2006-00018940 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Fauquier County, 40 Culpeper
Street, Warrenton, Virginia on January 11, 2018, at 12:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF
LAND WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON AND ALL APPURTENANCES THERETO BELONGING,
LOCATED AND BEING IN THE
COUNTY OF FAUQUIER COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA AND BEING
DESIGNATED AS FOLLOWS:
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $204,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.475000% dated
September 25, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN as Deed Instrument
Number 200610050085392, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN, on the courthouse
steps in front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of
Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on
January 10, 2018 at 9:30 AM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 011-45-1027-007
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated July 6, 2015, in
the original principal amount of
$252,310.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 150011174 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Spotsylvania County,
9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia on January 11,
2018, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND, WITH ALL BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS THEREON AND ALL RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES THERETO APPURTENANT,
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN
SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
AND
MORE
PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS LOT 78, SECTION
TWO, HOLLEYBROOKE, ALL AS
SHOWN ON PLAT OF SURVEY
MADE BY SULLIVAN, DONAHOE
AND INGALLS, DATED JANUARY 12,
1987, AND RECORDED IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA IN PLAT FILE 1, AT
PAGES 138 AND 139.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence. If
the sale is set aside for any reason,
the Purchaser at the sale shall be
entitled to a return of the deposit
paid. The Purchaser may, if provided by the terms of the Trustee’s
Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale,
be entitled to a $50 cancellation
fee from the Substitute Trustee,
but shall have no further recourse
against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
Additional terms to be announced
at the sale. A form copy of the
Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and contract to purchase
real property is available for viewing at www.bwwsales.com. This
is a communication from a debt
collector and any information
obtained will be used for that purpose. The sale is subject to seller
confirmation. Substitute Trustee:
Equity Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson
Blvd., Suite 1004, Arlington, VA
22201. For more information contact: BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003
Executive
Blvd, Suite
101,
Rockville, MD 20852, 301-9616555,
website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3188821.
Dec. 6, 13, 2017
12145357
LOT 24, PHASE 6, BROOKSIDE, AS
THE SAME IS SHOWN ON A PLAT
PREPARED BY THE ENGINEERING
GROUPE, INC. DATED MARCH 25,
2005, AS REVISED THROUGH FEBRUARY 1, 2006 ENTITLED "PLAT
SHOWING SUBDIVISION AND EASEMENTS, PHASE 6, BROOKSIDE",
RECORDED FEBRUARY 13, 2006 IN
DEED BOOK 1203, PAGE 485,
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
FAUQUIER COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3225421.
Dec. 6, 13, 2017
12145134
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
4300 RINGWOOD ROAD,
NOKESVILLE, VA 20181.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated October 31, 2006,
in the original principal amount
of $679,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Fauquier County, Virginia, in Book
1240 at Page 1070 as Instrument
No. 2006-00017017 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Fauquier County, 40 Culpeper
Street, Warrenton, Virginia on January 11, 2018, at 12:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: LOT 3, S.S.
WEAN ESTATE, CEDAR RUN DISTRICT, CONTAINING 3.4786 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS, AS SHOWN ON
PLAT AND SURVEY OF JAMES G.
BUTLER, JR., INC., DATED AUGUST
23, 1978, ATTACHED TO THE DEED
OF PARTITION RECORDED IN DEED
BOOK 377, AT PAGE 347, AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF FAUQUIER
COUNTY, VIRGINIA. LESS AND
EXCEPT ALL THAT CERTIN STRIP OF
PARCEL OF LAND CONVEYED TO
CHARLES T. SULLIVAN, JR. IN DEED
BOOK 382, PAGE 567.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3218341.
Dec. 6, 13, 2017
12146762
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-270652.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 13, 20, 2017
12148192
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
38591 STEVENS RD,
LOVETTSVILLE, VA 20180
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $719,200.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
January 26, 2007, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN as Deed Instrument
Number 20070130-0008064, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN, on the courthouse
steps in front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of
Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on
January 10, 2018 at 9:30 AM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 403-36-4023-000
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-254412.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 6, 13, 2017
12146751
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
22625 SETTLERS
TRAIL TERRACE, #132,
ASHBURN, VA 20148
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $400,930.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.750000% dated
June 26, 2013, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN as Deed Instrument
Number 201307020055505, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN, on the courthouse
steps in front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of
Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on
January 10, 2018 at 9:30 AM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 158270245006
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: PMI. Reference Number 17265378.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 13, 20, 2017
12148195
Wake up
to home
delivery.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 15, 2006,
in the original principal amount
of $220,800.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 200600029735 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on January
11, 2018 , at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL
OR PLOT OF LAND LYING AND
BEING IN THE LEE HILL MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT OF SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY AND MORE ACCURATELY
DESCRIBED AS LOT 6 OF SECTION
2 OF WILDE ACRES SUBDIVISION,
CONTAINING 1.1497 ACRES AND
ALL AS SHOWN ON PLAT BY
CORBIN SURVEYS, INC., DATED
OCTOBER 2, 1976, AND RECORDED
IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY IN DEED BOOK 369 AT
PAGE 483. THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON BEING KNOWN AS 9896
WILDWOOD COURT, FREDERICKSBURG; VIRGINIA 22408.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3094902.
Dec. 6, 13, 2017
12144646
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
How about some
home delivery?
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3227291.
Nov. 29, Dec. 6, 13, 2017 12142374
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 18, 2015, in
the original principal amount of
$251,853.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 150009846 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Spotsylvania County,
9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia on January 11,
2018, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND, TOGETHER WITH
IMPROVEMENTS THEREON, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE
COUNTY OF SPOTSYLVANIA, COMMONWEALTH
OF
VIRGINIA,
DESCRIBED AS LOT ONE HUNDRED
ELEVEN (111), THE GLEN, SECTION
9D, SALEM FIELDS, AS THE SAME
APPEARS DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED IN DEED
BOOK 1886 AT PAGE 303 (PLAT
FILE 8, PAGES 87-89) AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (57288)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Dec 6, 13, 2017
12146854
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $163,937.00, dated September
29, 2011 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in
Document No. 110015781 and
modified in Document No.
160022135,
default
having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, on January 3, 2018 at
12:00 PM the property described
in said deed, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
Lot 137, Section 2-B, Lancaster
Gate, with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
TRUSTEE SALE
8605 Oldham Road,
Fredericksburg, VA 22408
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
6609 HOT SPRING LANE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22407
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
9896 WILDWOOD COURT,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22408
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
Spotsylvania County
SF
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
IS YOUR OLD CAR HOLDING UP?
YES
NO
NO
8"/5504&--*5
)&.&"/4
YES
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
NJMMJPOSFBEFSTDBSTIPQQFSTJODMVEFEttXBTIJOHUPOQPTUDPNDMBTTJmFEt0QFO0SQMBDFZPVSBEJO&YQSFTTPVSEBJMZDPNNVUFSSFBEBOESFBDISFBEFST
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
C054E 10x2
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S0833-2 10x3
877
Spotsylvania County
878
873
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
2708 FRANCIS COURT,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22408.
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
240 HOPE ROAD,
STAFFORD, VA 22554.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated March 25, 2013,
in the original principal amount
of $302,421.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 130006756 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Spotsylvania County,
9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia on January 11,
2018, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: LOT 59, SECTION 1, PELHAMS
CROSSING SUBDIVISION, AS MORE
PARTICULARLY
SHOWN
AND
DESCRIBED ON THAT CERTAIN
PLAT OF PELHAM‘S CROSSING,
SECTION ONE, MADE BY SULLIVAN,
DONAHOE AND INGALLS, DATED
SEPTEMBER 11, 2001, REVISED
NOVEMBER 8, 2001, RECORDED
IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, IN PLAT FILE 8,
PAGES 402-406.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-1747101.
Nov. 6, 13, 2017
12141240
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated January 16, 2008,
in the original principal amount
of $267,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR080001143 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Stafford County, 1300
Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on January 11, 2018, at 2:00
PM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN
AQUIA MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT,
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
SHOWN AS "T. M. 30-126 0.9672
ACRES" ON PLAT ENTITLED
"BOUNDARY LINE ADJUSTMENT
PLAT ON THE PROPERTY OF BRUCE
W. CONOVER" BY H. AUBREY
HAWKINS, LAND SURVEYOR DATED
OCTOBER 19, 2004, AND RECORDED IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE COUNTY
OF STAFFORD, VIRGINIA, AS
INSTRUMENT
NUMBER
PM040000272.
878
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
16 CLEAR SPRING LANE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22405
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated February 5, 2016,
in the original principal amount
of $483,092.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 160002173 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
January 11, 2018, at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF
LAND, WITH ALL IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON AND ALL APPURTENANCES THERETO BELONGING,
LOCATED AND BEING IN THE
COUNTY OF STAFFORD, COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, AND BEING
DESIGNATED AS FOLLOWS: LOT
141, SECTION 1B, SOUTHGATE, AS
THE SAME IS DULY DEDICATED IN
INSTRUMENT
NUMBER
130017585, AND AS SHOWN ON
A PLAT AT INSTRUMENT NUMBER
130000139, BOTH RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3227781.
Dec. 6, 13, 2017
12146593
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3234171.
Dec. 6, 13, 2017
12145369
TRUSTEE SALE
114 Hope Road,
Stafford, VA 22554
Stafford County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $75,000.00, dated October 17,
2006 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Stafford County, Virginia, in Document No. 060036912, default having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse
Road, Stafford, on January 9, 2018
at 11:00 AM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 2, as shown on Plat of survey
recorded in Plat Book 13, Page 128,
with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted,