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The Washington Post – December 16, 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Partly sunny 48/34 • Tomorrow: Cloudy 51/40 B6
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
TWO HOLDOUTS SAY
THEY’LL VOTE YES
First big legislative win
for President Trump
D AMIAN P ALETTA,
E RICA W ERNER,
J EFF S TEIN
AND M IKE D E B ONIS
BY
MOHAMAD TOROKMAN/REUTERS
A Palestinian demonstrator passes a barricade of rocks and burning tires near the West Bank city of Nablus on Friday during violent
confrontations between Israeli troops and Palestinians angered by President Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of
Israel. Four Palestinians — two in the Gaza Strip and two in the West Bank — were killed in the clashes. Story, A9
Trump’s judicial picks hit first head winds
President Trump’s aggressive
push to fill scores of federal court
vacancies with conservative
judges hit severe turbulence this
week, as he was forced to withdraw two nominees and an embarrassing video went viral
showing a third struggling to
answer rudimentary questions
about the law.
White House forced to withdraw two nominees, while
a third struggles to answer senator’s legal questions
The White House said Friday
that it is standing by the nomination of Matthew Petersen, a nominee for the U.S. District Court
for the District of Columbia,
despite a clip from his confirmation hearing posted on Twitter in
which Petersen was unable to
answer questions about legal
and courtroom terms posed by a
Republican senator.
The episode offered more ammunition to Democrats, who
have accused Trump of tapping
inexperienced nominees in a
rush to reshape the federal judi-
ciary. Even some Republicans
have suggested they’ve felt pressured by the White House to
move forward with his picks.
White House spokesman Hogan Gidley defended the qualifications of Petersen, a member of
the Federal Election Commission since 2008 with no trial
experience, saying the regulatory
panel handles “the very kinds of
issues” the court decides.
“It is no surprise the PresiJUDGES CONTINUED ON A7
BY
MATT ZAPOTOSKY
Nine more women say that
Alex Kozinski — a high-profile
judge who sits on the U.S. Court
of Appeals for the 9th Circuit —
subjected them to sexual comments or other conduct, including four who say he touched
them inappropriately.
Kozinski, known for his libertarian views and colorful written
opinions, already had been accused of subjecting several women to a range of inappropriate
sexual conduct or comments,
and the circuit’s chief judge on
Thursday took the first step in
launching an investigation into
his behavior. The matter was
assigned Friday to the 2nd Circuit judicial council.
The new allegations — which
span decades and include not
just those who worked for Kozinski but also those who encountered him at events — bring the
total number of women accusing
the judge of inappropriate behavior to at least 15.
One recent law student at the
University of Montana said that
Kozinski, at a 2016 reception,
pressed his finger into the side of
BENJAMIN OLSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Frigid agricultural fields in St. Vincent, Minn., that lie along an entry route into Canada.
Migrants’ perilous path to Canada
U.S. crackdown drives asylum seekers into winter’s harsh embrace
BY T IM C RAIG
IN NOYES, MINN.
Chad Cosley tracks them as if they were deer.
He looks for footprints and frequently checks
his network of trail cameras, which had been
documenting wildlife along the U.S.-Canada
border but now also capture would-be refugees
fleeing the United States under President
Trump.
KOZINSKI CONTINUED ON A7
“I was up there hunting just on November 4,
and we had fresh snow,” said Cosley, 45, who
owns a parcel delivery service. “The following
morning, we had four sets of footprints walking
all the way up to the border with Canada, and
there was a glove laying there on the ground —
brand new, with perfume on it — so it was
definitely a gal.”
MIGRANTS CONTINUED ON A10
IN sunday’s post
A tax cut for most people, but
especially the wealthy The bill
would reduce the top tax rate from
39.6 percent to 37 percent while
also lowering rates in other tax
brackets. These changes expire at
the end of 2025.
A giant tax cut for corporations
The corporate tax rate would drop
to 21 percent from 35 percent in
the most significant part of the bill.
This change does not expire.
Key deductions remain The bill
would preserve the deduction for
mortgage interest up to $750,000
and the state and local tax
deduction up to $10,000.
The end of a health-care
rule The bill would end the
Affordable Care Act provision that
everyone must have health
insurance or pay a penalty, a
change that could lead an
estimated 13 million people to
drop their coverage.
A big deficit hit The Joint
Committee on Taxation estimated
that the Senate version of the bill
— similar to the final plan — would
cost $1 trillion over a decade.
mostly written by Republicans
behind closed doors and with little public debate.
If passed, the measure would
represent Trump’s first major legislative victory. It includes an
overhaul of the tax code and a
targeted change to the Affordable
Care Act, the Obama-era healthcare law Republicans have long
sought to dismantle.
On net, Republicans believe
that the bill would lower most
people’s taxes. But many Americans — particularly those in hightax states such as New York, New
Jersey and California — would see
TAX PLAN CONTINUED ON A5
ERICA WERNER
As GOP tax legislation nears
final passage on Capitol Hill, Sen.
Susan Collins is approaching the
moment for a mighty leap of faith.
The Maine Republican extracted key concessions in exchange for
her support for the bill, including
commitments from the Trump administration and Senate leaders to
back two pieces of legislation
pumping money into the healthcare system.
The problem is, House Republicans largely oppose the healthcare bills. And while Collins anticipates that the commitments will
be included in must-pass spending
legislation to keep the government
open, the tax package is scheduled
for a final vote next week, before
the spending measure.
That means Collins will have to
cast her vote on the tax bill without
knowing for certain that commitments made to her will be honored, leading critics to say she’s
getting played for a fool.
If she prevails, Collins will have
been responsible for the passage of
significant legislation that could
help make insurance coverage
more affordable for tens of thousands of Americans.
And if not?
“I’m counting on the administration to make sure that does not
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Sen. Susan Collins extracted
concessions on health care, but
critics say she is being played.
happen,” Collins said in an interview. “I would consider it a very
serious breach of a promise to me.”
“And,” Collins added with a
laugh, “they don’t want to do that.”
Indeed, with the fourth-term
senator poised to play an even
more pivotal role in the Senate
next year, she might be among the
last people President Trump or
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(R-Ky.) wants to alienate.
One of the few remaining moderate Republicans in the Senate,
the 65-year-old Collins has repeatedly used her vote to sway outcomes and shape the debate on
issues from nominations to health
care to the environment. She
passed up a run for Maine governor earlier this year even though
COLLINS CONTINUED ON A5
Inside
Reflections Those who
loved — and lost — this year
look back at the lives of their
loved ones who died in 2017.
Magazine
Harassment on a global
scale Women who travel to
see the world share a
universal issue: sexual
harassment. Here’s what
they can do to protect
themselves. Travel
GREG KAHN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Congressional Republicans secured enough support Friday to
pass their massive tax plan, a
measure that would deliver a major legislative victory to President
Trump and his GOP allies and
make tax changes affecting nearly
every American family and business.
Passage appeared certain after
two critical holdouts, Sens. Marco
Rubio (R-Fla.) and Bob Corker
(R-Tenn.), said they would vote
for the bill next week.
Rubio was the key piece of a
complicated and shifting political
puzzle that the White House and
GOP leaders spent months trying
to solve, as all Democrats vowed
to oppose the bill and a handful of
Republicans made strident demands.
The Florida Republican insisted on an expansion of the child tax
credit in exchange for his vote,
and GOP leaders relented, growing a benefit for working-class
families. Corker’s support was unexpected, as he had opposed an
earlier version of the tax bill two
weeks ago amid concerns about
its additions to the deficit.
But Friday he said that he
viewed the bill as a “once-in-ageneration opportunity” that,
combined with changes to immigration and trade policy, would
help the economy.
The bill would push into law a
$1.5 trillion tax package that was
Highlights
Sen. Collins taking leap of
faith with tax-bill support
9 more women
accuse Kozinski
of inappropriate
sexual behavior
BY
. $2
GOP tax measure
garners enough
support to pass
A deadly Friday in Gaza and West Bank
BY JOHN WAGNER,
ROBERT O’HARROW JR.
AND KAROUN DEMIRJIAN
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
NIKO TAVERNISE/TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX
‘The Post’ In 1971, The
Washington Post’s publisher
decided to print articles
based on the Pentagon
Papers at a time when the
U.S. government was trying
to restrain the media. Meryl
Streep portrays Katharine
Graham in a movie that
discovered new relevance
during its production. Plus,
the 10 best journalism films.
Arts & Style
REAL ESTATE
THE NATION
A step-by-step guide
Battle over net neutrality
Entering the world of real estate
investment by becoming a landlord
requires a close look at your
options, as well as a sound
strategy.
The Federal Communications
Commission’s vote to repeal its net
neutrality rules marked the end of
a brief experiment. Here is what’s
next. A11
BUSINESS NEWS..............................................A11
COMICS ............................................................. C5
OPINION PAGES...............................................A13
LOTTERIES.........................................................B3
OBITUARIES.......................................................B4
TELEVISION.......................................................C3
WORLD NEWS....................................................A8
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B6
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 11
8 7 0 7
A2
EZ
I N CA S E Y OU M I S S ED I T
Some reports that you may have missed. Read more at washingtonpost.com.
Omarosa Manigault
leaves White House
Saudis will allow
movie theaters
Omarosa Manigault, the
former reality-TV star who
joined President Trump’s White
House as one of his most
prominent African American
supporters, resigned under
pressure after a confrontation
with the chief of staff that ended
when she was escorted from the
premises, officials said.
Saudi Arabia said Monday
that it will allow cinemas to
operate in the strictly
conservative kingdom for the
first time since the 1980s, in the
latest sign of a broader
government push to relax some
social restrictions. The Saudi
Ministry of Culture and
Information said the first
theaters will open early
next year.
washingtonpost.com/national
Soldier who defected
to North Korea dies
Charles Jenkins, the U.S. Army
sergeant who defected to North
Korea in 1965 and was compelled
to remain there for almost four
decades, has died in Japan at the
age of 77. He had been living on
Sado Island, off Japan’s west
coast, with his wife, Hitomi Soga,
since he was freed in 2004.
washingtonpost.com/world
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Celebrity chef accused
of sexual misconduct
Celebrity chef Mario Batali
stepped away from his
restaurant empire and cooking
show “The Chew” on Monday
after four women, all unnamed,
accused Batali of sexual
harassment.
washingtonpost.com/style
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
Ex-DEA o∞cials lament new drug law
It is tougher to stop
questionable shipments
of opioids, they say
BY S COTT
AND L ENNY
H IGHAM
B ERNSTEIN
A new law supported by opioid
distributors and manufacturers
is making it increasingly difficult
to hold companies accountable
when they run afoul of the nation’s drug laws, according to
recently retired Drug Enforcement Administration investigators on the front lines of the war
against opioids.
They join a chorus of voices —
including Attorney General Jeff
Sessions, 44 state attorneys general and the head of the DEA
office that regulates pharmaceuticals — who are calling for
changes to the law.
The field investigators said the
new law is hurting efforts to halt
suspicious shipments of prescription pain pills and slowing
the agency’s investigative efforts.
Morale within the ranks of the
DEA’s field divisions has plummeted, they said in interviews
with The Washington Post and
“60 Minutes” for a joint investigation that will be published and
broadcast Sunday.
“The law makes it much harder for us to do our jobs,” said
James Rafalski, who retired in
June after a 39-year career in law
enforcement, the last 13 years
with the DEA.
The Ensuring Patient Access
and Effective Drug Enforcement
Act of 2016 was pushed through
Congress by a small band of
lawmakers backed by a powerful
array of drug companies. The law
has undermined the DEA’s most
potent tools in the war against
the opioid epidemic, according to
agency investigators, agents, lawyers and the DEA’s chief administrative law judge.
The legislation was the subject
of a joint investigation by The
Post and “60 Minutes” in October. On Sunday, a follow-up investigation will examine the obstacles investigators encountered during the biggest case the
DEA has ever pursued against a
drug distributor.
The law was sponsored by Rep.
Tom Marino (R-Pa.) in the House.
Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah)
negotiated a final version with
the DEA in the Senate.
After the October report, Marino withdrew his nomination to
become drug czar, which would
have put him in charge of the
White House Office of National
Drug Control Policy. Attorney
General Jeff Sessions said that he
was “dubious” about the law
when he was a senator and has
since come to the conclusion that
it should be changed. Forty-four
state attorneys general, as well as
Democratic lawmakers in Congress, have called for its repeal.
During a Senate Judiciary
Committee hearing Tuesday, the
head of the DEA office that
regulates the pharmaceutical industry said the law has made
enforcement more difficult in
urgent circumstances and should
be revised.
“The DEA, along with the Department of Justice, believes that
has to change,” said Demetra
Ashley, acting assistant administrator in charge of the agency’s
Diversion Control Division.
John Parker, a spokesman for
the Healthcare Distribution Alliance, the leading industry group
for drug distributors, said the law
has not hampered DEA’s enforcement actions, which he pointed
out had fallen before the law was
enacted. Parker said the DEA has
other tools to combat the epidemic, including controlling
quotas for opioid production,
punishing pharmacists and doctors, and tracking drug distribution data.
“The DEA is the only entity
that has the full picture and
scope of controlled substances
across the supply chain,” Parker
said.
The Post has previously reported that DEA enforcement
actions began dropping in 2013
after agency attorneys began requiring higher standards of proof
to bring cases, as the DEA pursued a path of greater cooperation with industry.
DEA investigators and agents
said in recent interviews with
The Post and “60 Minutes” that
the law has further hobbled their
efforts at the height of the prescription opioid epidemic, which
claimed nearly 200,000 lives between 2000 and 2016.
Previously, the agency had
broad authority to freeze drug
shipments that posed an “imminent danger” to the community
in an action called an immediate
suspension. Under the new law,
the DEA must demonstrate that a
company’s actions represent “a
substantial likelihood of an im-
PHOTOS BY MARK ABRAMSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Jim Geldhof, who spent 43 years with the DEA, says the law is “outrageous” because it takes off the
table immediate action against a drug distributor or manufacturer.
mediate threat,” a much higher
bar. The law also allows companies to submit “corrective action
plans” before the DEA can sanction them.
“This Marino-Hatch bill is outrageous,” said Jim Geldhof, a
DEA program manager who retired in 2015 after 43 years with
the DEA. “It basically takes any
kind of action DEA was going to
do with a distributor or manufacturer as far as an immediate
suspension off the table. And
then the other part of that really
infuriates me is that corrective
action plan.”
Geldhof now works as a consultant to lawyers suing drug
companies over the opioid crisis.
Supporters of the new law
defend it as a means of protecting patients while not damaging
the DEA’s mission.
“This was an effort to ensure
that DEA’s praiseworthy efforts
to stem abuse don’t end up
hurting legitimate patients,”
Hatch said during Tuesday’s Senate hearing. He noted that the
law was an effort “to provide
clearer guidance to supply chain
members and to encourage
greater cooperation between
that permits companies to submit corrective plans a “get out of
jail free card” because those
plans slow the DEA in taking
action against companies and
allow them to continue to distribute drugs.
“I had young investigators that
were enthusiastic. They were excited. They wanted to turn the
world upside down,” Kaupang
said.
Since the passage of the law,
she said, morale has plummeted.
“It’s a very sad state of affairs,”
she said.
The October investigative report revealed that an early version of the law was written by a
drug company lawyer who once
worked at the DEA, according to
a government email. The law was
part of a multifaceted industry
campaign to blunt enforcement
efforts against drug companies.
Congress approved the bill by
unanimous consent, a parliamentary procedure that does not
require a recorded vote. President Barack Obama signed it into
law in April 2016. Former administration officials said afterward
that the White House was unaware of the bill’s import. A
“What I am looking for from the pharmaceutical
industry is a true recognition that their product has
fueled an addiction that is killing people and that
they have an actual responsibility to do something
about it. And I’m not seeing it.”
Sen. Maggie Hassan (D-N.H.)
DEA and the registrant community.”
Marino defended the law in a
statement issued Tuesday.
“Throughout the entire process my office and Senator Hatch’s
office worked closely with the
Department of Justice and the
Drug Enforcement [Administration] to find acceptable language,” he wrote. “When the
legislation was finalized in the
Senate, both the DOJ and the
DEA had signed off on the final
language. After the legislation
was passed, there was no objection by the White House or any
Agency and the bill was signed
into law.”
DEA investigators and agents
said Hatch is misinformed.
“I could not disagree more,”
said David Schiller, who recently
retired as the DEA’s assistant
special agent in charge of the
Denver division after a 30-year
career. “If somebody makes that
statement, they don’t have all the
facts.”
Helen Kaupang, who was a
DEA investigator and supervisor
for 29 years before she retired in
September, said the law has
made it more difficult to bring
cases against companies suspected of violating the nation’s drugs
laws. She called the provision
senior DEA official said the bill
was “completely unnecessary”
and “would have passed with us
or without us.”
Rafalski, the recently retired
DEA investigator, said he was
particularly incensed by the provision of the law that allows a
company suspected of wrongdoing to submit a corrective action
plan before it can be sanctioned.
He is now working as a consultant to lawyers suing drug companies.
In August 2016, after the law
took effect, Rafalski was examining the documents of a drug
company that was failing to
properly monitor the controlled
substances it handled.
On the third day of a scheduled
three-week audit, the company
notified Rafalski that it had filed
a corrective action plan.
Rafalski said a less-experienced or aggressive investigator
might have backed off at that
point. But he said he persisted
and demanded to see the company’s records anyway. As he continued to conduct his audit, he
said company officials realized
that they would not be able to
defend the number of violations
he had found. The company voluntarily surrendered its DEA registration to handle controlled
James Rafalski, a retired DEA investigator, was incensed by a
provision that allows a drug company to submit a corrective action
plan before it can be sanctioned.
substances, he said.
“The attitude by investigators
at the field level is there is no
basis for this law,” he said.
Democratic members of Congress, led by Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), have called for repealing the legislation. So far, no
Republican senators have signed
on.
Sen.
Joe
Manchin
III
(D-W.Va.), who is co-sponsoring
the repeal bill, said members of
Congress were fooled by the legislation. He said it was “camouflaged” by carefully crafted legal
language and carried a misleading title that promised access to
drugs for patients who truly need
them and tougher drug enforcement efforts against those who
violate the law.
Manchin, whose state suffers
from the highest prescription
drug overdose rate in the nation,
said he and his colleagues relied
on the word of a handful of
lawmakers that the legislation
was noncontroversial and should
be quickly passed by unanimous
consent.
“When you get duped as we
did, then it’s our responsibility to
fix it immediately,” Manchin said.
“We’re going to overturn that bill.
It has to be overturned. The
power has to be back to the DEA.
The DEA has to be held responsible for the job they’re supposed
to do, and we’ve got to make sure
that’s done and done immediately. There shouldn’t be any
hesitation.”
Two days after The Post/
“60 Minutes” report, Sen. Maggie
Hassan (D-N.H.) confronted Elizabeth Gallenagh, general counsel
and senior vice president for
government affairs at the Healthcare Distribution Alliance. The
alliance has said the law does not
undermine the DEA’s enforcement powers.
Hassan questioned Gallenagh
about a law review article written
by Chief DEA Administrative
Law Judge John J. Mulrooney II
that was sharply critical of the
Marino-Hatch bill.
“The point is that your organization — which lobbied aggressively for this law last year —
claimed that it does not decrease
the DEA’s enforcement against
distributors,” she told Gallenagh
during an Oct. 17 congressional
hearing. “The DEA chief administrative law judge says you’re
wrong — that the law completely
eliminates the DEA’s ability to
take certain enforcement actions. It’s his job to interpret the
law. So is the judge wrong? Or
was your organization’s statement misleading?”
“I believe that the judge’s statement was misleading,” Gallenagh
said. “And I stand behind our
organization’s statement.”
Hassan said in a recent interview that she was stunned to
hear one of the nation’s most
influential drug industry groups
attack the integrity of the DEA’s
chief judge.
“She accused the administrative law judge of misleading the
public, of misleading us. And I
thought that was astounding,”
Hassan said. “What I am looking
for from the pharmaceutical industry is a true recognition that
their product has fueled an addiction that is killing people and
that they have an actual responsibility to do something about it.
And I’m not seeing it.”
Responding on behalf of Gallenagh, Parker pointed to a recent comment by Ashley, the
DEA diversion chief, that agency
employees have not been “hamstrung in a manner that we
cannot continue to do our jobs.”
Parker added that the alliance
“would welcome the opportunity
to meet with Sen. Hassan to
discuss the law and its effect on
enforcement in greater detail.”
scott.higham@washpost.com
leonard.bernstein@washpost.com
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
politics & the nation
DeVos is sued over
Soot compounds health risks of largest Calif. fire
federal loan forgiveness Some flee, others stay as
officials warn vulnerable
people about air quality
Claims pile up from
students at shuttered
for-profit schools
BY M AX U FBERG,
C HRIS M OONEY
AND M ARK B ERMAN
BY D ANIELLE
D OUGLAS- G ABRIEL
Pressure is mounting on Education Secretary Betsy DeVos to
take action on thousands of languishing federal student-loan forgiveness applications.
On Thursday, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (D)
sued DeVos and the Education
Department for failing to process
more than 50,000 debt relief
claims submitted by former Corinthian Colleges students. The
case is similar to a lawsuit filed the
same day by the attorneys general
of Massachusetts, New York and
Illinois alleging that the Trump
administration is violating federal law by refusing to hand down
decisions on pending claims.
The Education Department
can discharge federal student
loans when a college uses illegal
tactics to persuade students to
borrow money. The agency acts
under a federal statute known as
“borrower defense to repayment.”
The agency has been inundated
with applications from students
of defunct for-profit chains Corinthian Colleges and ITT Technical
Institute. Both spent their final
days enveloped in state and federal investigations and lawsuits
over alleged fraud and deceptive
marketing and its alleged steering
of students into predatory loans.
One of those investigations in
2015, a collaboration between California authorities and the
Obama administration, found
that Corinthian widely misrepresented job placement rates for
graduates of its Everest and WyoTech schools. As a result, the department agreed to expedite loan
discharges for students who attended those schools, a slow-going process that started to make
headway at the end of the Obama
administration. But not a single
claim has been approved since
Donald Trump came into office.
“It’s time for Secretary DeVos to
do the work that was done by the
previous secretary of education to
help students seeking debt relief,”
Becerra said on a call with reporters Thursday. “We know that the
department is holding a pot of
money that was made available
through the settlement of lawsuits to provide relief to these
students.”
The Education Department declined to comment on the lawsuits. The agency has in the past
described other lawsuits filed by
Democratic attorneys general as a
partisan attack on the Trump administration. The same prosecutors involved in Thursday’s lawsuits were among 19 state attorneys general who sued DeVos in
July for delaying an overhaul of
the borrower defense rule and 18
attorneys general who took legal
action against her in October for
dismantling a rule to regulate
career-training programs.
DeVos and the department
have faced criticism from advocacy groups, liberal lawmakers and
TED S. WARREN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Betsy DeVos speaks at an event
in Washington state in October.
a federal watchdog for letting defense claims pile up.
This week, the department’s inspector general said that while
the procedure for processing
claims could be improved, the
system works well enough that
there is no excuse for the department failing to clear the backlog
of claims.
A team of lawyers working on
the applications have flagged
nearly 12,000 for approval and
about 7,200 for denial. The inspector general said that because the
new administration needed time
to review the policies put in place
by its predecessor, acting undersecretary James Manning has refused to sign off on those claims.
Wayne Johnson, who heads the
student aid office, told the inspector general that the discharge of
some of the claims flagged for
approval is “imminent.”
The Washington Post first reported in October that there are
more than 87,000 applications for
debt relief pending, according to
people in the department who
were not authorized to speak publicly. About two-thirds of those
claims come from Corinthian students, some of whom have been
waiting for years.
Applicants with pending
claims are accruing interest on
their loans while they wait. Many
have placed their loans in forbearance, a grace period they can extend while waiting for approval.
But in July, Manning informed
Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.)
that the forbearance period was
almost up. At least 31,000 applicants were at risk of their forbearance period expiring in the next
six months without an extension.
If those loans fall back into repayment and the borrowers cannot
afford to cover the monthly bill,
the borrowers could become delinquent, end up in default and
have their wages garnished.
Attorneys general argue that
even if a Corinthian student has
not filed a claim or sought forbearance, the federal government
cannot legally collect on that debt,
because the Education Department found evidence of fraud. But
the federal government had
seized the tax refunds, government benefits or wages of more
than 30,000 Corinthian borrowers as of last year, according to the
Massachusetts complaint.
“Students will never be made
fully whole from their experiences
at these schools, but this is what
they’re owed under federal law,”
Massachusetts Attorney General
Maura Healey (D) said during a
call with reporters Thursday.
“We’re going to keep continuing
to fight as long as the department
ignores its obligations and ignores what is right.”
danielle.douglas@washpost.com
montecito, calif. — Casa
Dorinda, a majestic 48-acre multiunit retirement community,
peers up over a carefully manicured treetop canopy here, its
outdoor pool, wooded pathways
and full-service private medical
center part of an oasis along the
Southern California coast.
But with the Thomas Fire
burning nearby for a second
week, Casa Dorinda was eerily
quiet on Friday morning as the
region continued to choke on
smoke and ash.
“The place is empty,” said one
resident,
90-year-old
Sam
Fordyce. “A lot of people left.”
With fire crews continuing
their battle against the fourthlargest wildfire in modern California history, smoke inhalation
has become a major concern for
residents in Santa Barbara and
Ventura counties. Though the
skies cleared a bit on Friday,
officials warn that erratic Santa
Ana winds could make conditions difficult to forecast. It could
mean more smoke and the potential for fire in residential areas.
Authorities said Thursday that
a firefighter died during the response to the Thomas Fire, the
second casualty linked to the
blaze.
Authorities identified the man
as 32-year-old Cory Iverson, who
had been with Cal Fire for eight
years. Iverson’s wife, Ashley, is
pregnant, and they have a 2-yearold daughter, according to the
governor’s office.
Scott McLean, a spokesman for
Cal Fire, said Iverson was an
engineer with Cal Fire’s San Diego unit and would have been in
charge of the fire engine and the
engine crew. Iverson died Thursday, McLean said, though further
details were not immediately
available.
“His bravery and years of committed service to the people of
California will never be forgotten,” Gov. Jerry Brown (D) said in
a statement.
Iverson’s death came as the
Thomas Fire burned northwest
of Los Angeles for an 11th day.
The fire in Ventura and Santa
Barbara counties had burned
across nearly 380 square miles by
Thursday. Officials said it was 35
percent contained Friday.
Dangerous air quality in the
region persisted, forcing some
from their homes and others to
stay inside much of the time.
Speaking at the annual American Geophysical Union meeting
in New Orleans this week, a
group of scientists suggested
wildfires might be responsible for
thousands of deaths in the United
States each year due to the tiny
particles they put into the atmosphere.
Wildfires fill the air with the
byproducts of combustion, including dangerous small particles called PM2.5, which can get
into the lungs and bloodstream.
A growing body of research has
STUART PALLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The Thomas Fire chars a forest near Ojai, Calif., last week. Tiny particles produced by the 380-squaremile fire have created health dangers for elderly people, children and those with heart or lung diseases.
demonstrated that these particles degrade health and can become fatal by causing respiratory,
cardiovascular and other health
problems.
“If this is the new norm for
California . . . and people in California are being exposed to these
smoke events regularly, then we
would expect this to have an
impact on the average lifetime of
people in California,” said Jeffrey
Pierce, a professor of atmospheric science at Colorado State
University who presented his
preliminary results at the meeting.
Casa Dorinda in Montecito has
been in voluntary evacuation for
about a week. According to Chief
Executive Brian McCague, about
150 of the 225 independent-living
residents have left the premises,
compared with just a few of the
assisted-living or skilled-nursing
residents. Given the heavy
smoke, those with serious respiratory issues have been moved to
the medical center, where they
can be more closely monitored,
McCague said. In addition to
safety, he has made sure to keep
residents informed — and entertained.
“Every other day we’ve been
holding town hall meetings with
our residents to keep them apprised,” McCague said. “We’re
suggesting it’s best just to stay in.
We bring movies, games into the
building. We do our best to keep
them busy.”
Fordyce, the Casa Dorinda resident, said he has been occupying
his time in the exercise room.
“Usually I play tennis, but I
haven’t been playing in this bad
weather,” Fordyce said. “And I
gamble on the stock market.”
Life elsewhere in Montecito
was beginning to get back to
normal, with many local businesses opening up shop on Friday
for the first time since the fire hit.
“Some people are just carrying
on,” said Vivien Alexander, 50.
Alexander originally headed
north to escape the smoke — to
Pismo Beach — with her husband
and two sons. But the smoke
eventually made its way up to
them. So they put their children
on a flight to see family in South
Africa and she and her husband
returned home.
While the blaze is being steadily contained, the air quality in the
region is still rated by AirNow as
“unhealthy for sensitive groups,”
meaning elderly people, children,
and anyone suffering from heart
or lung disease. It’s a feeling to
which Alexander can relate.
“You can just feel it burning in
your chest,” she said. “The air
quality is so bad, it’s like being in
a war zone. The people walking
around
with
masks,
the
firetrucks marching down the
streets, ash falling from the sky.
It’s so surreal.”
chris.mooney@washpost.com
mark.berman@washpost.com
Mooney reported from New Orleans
and Berman reported from
Washington.
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DELAWARE
Prison riot lawsuit is
settled for $7.5 million
State officials have agreed to
pay more than $7.5 million to
settle a lawsuit stemming from an
inmate riot at Delaware’s
maximum-security prison that
left a correctional officer dead.
Under the settlement
announced Friday, 11 plaintiffs,
including six Department of
Correction employees and
relatives of slain officer Steven
Floyd, will share $7.55 million.
In settling the lawsuit, state
officials did not acknowledge any
wrongdoing in the Feb. 1 riot, and
claims against individual current
and former state officials were
dismissed.
The plaintiffs alleged that state
officials deliberately ignored
security and staffing problems at
James T. Vaughn Correctional
Center in Smyrna for years,
leaving poorly trained and
overworked correctional officers
at risk.
Eighteen inmates have been
charged for their alleged roles in
the riot, including 16 charged
with first-degree murder in
Floyd’s death. The siege ended
when tactical teams used a
backhoe to breach the building
and rescue a female counselor.
— Associated Press
ALASKA
Lawmaker quits amid
misconduct claims
CALIFORNIA
Sea lion attacks put
two men in the hospital
An Alaska state lawmaker who
was accused by several women of
inappropriate behavior said
Friday that he will resign.
Staff for state Rep. Dean
Westlake handed his resignation
letter to the House speaker’s
office three days after Westlake
rejected calls from House and
party leaders to step down.
Pressure increased on the
freshman Democrat from
western Alaska after a growing
number of women came forward
claiming that Westlake acted
inappropriately or made them
feel uncomfortable.
Westlake’s resignation letter
thanked the women who came
forward, and it contained an
apology to them and his
constituents.
The letter was dated Friday and
did not specify a date for
Westlake’s resignation. Under
Alaska state law, if no date is
specified in a lawmaker’s
resignation, it becomes effective
10 days after it is sent.
Two unusual sea lion attacks in
a San Francisco Bay cove led
authorities to close the popular
area to swimmers Friday as
officials try to determine the
reason for the aggressive
behavior.
A sea lion bit a man in the groin
area as he swam in the waters off
San Francisco Maritime National
Historical Park, park spokesman
Lynn Cullivan said. The man was
taken to a hospital.
The cove hosts swimming and
rowing clubs and is a favorite spot
for dedicated swimmers. It’s
usually a transit area for sea lions
heading to Pier 39, where they
normally congregate, Cullivan
said.
The area just off Ghirardelli
Square, a popular area with shops
and restaurants, will be closed to
swimmers until Monday, Cullivan
said.
Another swimmer was
seriously injured Thursday after a
sea lion bit him on the arm.
The aggressive behavior is so
unusual for sea lions that officials
believe the same animal attacked
both swimmers, Cullivan said.
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
FBI officials texted about Trump and Clinton to hide an affair, sources say
BY
D EVLIN B ARRETT
Two senior FBI officials who
texted each other about President Trump and Hillary Clinton
relied on work phones to try to
hide their romance from a
spouse and made the bureau’s
probe of Clinton’s private email
server their cover story for being
in such close contact, according
to people familiar with the matter.
The two officials, senior FBI
lawyer Lisa Page and senior
counterintelligence agent Peter
Strzok, are the subjects of an
internal investigation that has
roiled the FBI and emboldened
its Republican critics who have
accused the bureau of political
bias. Had Page and Strzok used
personal phones instead, people
close to case say, it’s unlikely
their text messages would have
come to the FBI’s attention.
The texts, a trove of which
were released by the Justice Department this week, have raised
questions about the FBI’s investigation into Clinton’s use of a
private email server while she
was secretary of state and special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s
probe of whether any Trump
associates coordinated with Russian officials to interfere with the
presidential election. Page and
Strzok, who have declined to
J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRES
Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) has asked the Justice Department for more
information about communications between the two FBI officials, Lisa Page and Peter Strzok.
comment, were involved in both.
At a congressional hearing this
week, several Republicans on the
House Judiciary Committee
seized on one message in particular, a text Page sent to Strzok in
April 2016. At the time, both
played key roles in the Clinton
investigation. Lawmakers have
called the exchange suspicious.
“So look,” the text from Page to
Strzok reads, “you say we text on
that phone when we talk about
Hillary because it can’t be traced,
you were just venting [because]
you feel bad that you’re gone so
much but it can’t be helped right
now.”
Sen. Charles E. Grassley (RIowa), chairman of the Senate
Judiciary Committee, wrote to
Deputy Attorney General Rod J.
Rosenstein demanding a fuller
explanation for Page’s message,
saying, “The mention of ‘Hillary’
may refer to Secretary Clinton
and therefore could indicate that
Mr. Strzok and Ms. Page engaged
in other communications about
an ongoing investigation on a
different phone in an effort to
prevent it from being traced.’’
People familiar with the matter said that, although Page’s
message may appear to suggest
that she and Strzok used a separate communications channel for
discussing the Clinton case, the
point of her text was to advise
Strzok how to explain to his wife
why the two of them had been
texting each other.
Page and Strzok used their
work on the Clinton case as a
cover story for the affair, these
people said, adding that there
was not a separate set of phones
for untraceable discussions of
the Clinton case. The text had
nothing to do with the Clinton
investigation, these people said.
What’s striking to many FBI
veterans is how two senior members of the bureau seem to have
forgotten or ignored basic rules
and facts about using internal
communications. Strzok, they
say, should have been aware that
messages from one FBI phone to
another would be saved in gov-
ernment computers and retrievable. Page, they noted, should
have known internal investigators could review them later.
The FBI’s legal office, called
the Office of General Counsel,
has warned FBI agents for years
to exercise good judgment when
texting because those messages
can be found later by internal
investigators or defense lawyers.
Page works in the general counsel’s office.
“What people are forgetting is
the human foible of a having an
affair — they forget that the
system itself will betray you and
your texts,” said David Gomez, a
former FBI counterterrorism official. “Using language like that is
something a lot of people who
have affairs do, but it does create
problems with people who are
conspiracy minded.’’
The issue has come up before.
In 2014, an FBI agent was caught
texting on the witness stand at a
trial and then lied under oath
about it. She killed herself hours
after the incident. Law enforcement officials said her texts were
innocuous messages exchanged
with her husband while passing
time in court.
Investigators’ texting also has
created legal problems in at least
one FBI terrorism probe, according to officials.
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
Trump calls FBI actions ‘disgraceful’ before Quantico stop
At bureau academy,
president saves praise
for local police forces
BY A NNE G EARAN
AND D EVLIN B ARRETT
quantico, va. — President
Trump said Friday that there is
tremendous anger over what he
called the FBI’s “disgraceful” behavior, taking aim at the bureau
just before he appeared at its
training facility to praise the nation’s police officers.
“It’s a shame what’s happened
with the FBI,” the president told
reporters as he prepared to depart
the White House for a ceremony at
the FBI’s National Academy in
Quantico, where more than 200
law enforcement officers graduated from a program that imparts
FBI expertise and standards.
“We’re going to rebuild the
FBI,” Trump said. “It’ll be bigger
and better than ever. But it is very
sad when you look at those documents, and how they’ve done that
is really, really disgraceful, and
you have a lot of very angry people
that are seeing it.”
The president appeared to be
referring to revelations that senior FBI officials exchanged antiTrump and pro-Hillary Clinton
text messages while working on
last year’s probe of Clinton’s use of
a private email server while she
was secretary of state and again
during special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III’s investigation into
Russian interference in the presidential election, including the
possibility of coordination with
the Trump campaign.
The remarks come at a fraught
time in the White House’s relationship with the FBI and the
Justice Department. Trump has
said the FBI’s reputation is “in
tatters” over its handling of politically sensitive cases.
His comments also highlighted
what has become a recurring
theme during his presidency:
Trump’s tendency to criticize the
FBI, the nation’s premier law enforcement agency, and extol the
JONATHAN ERNST/REUTERS
President Trump delivers remarks at a graduation ceremony at the FBI National Academy on Friday in Quantico, Va. “I want you to know
that with me as your president, America’s police will have a true friend and loyal champion in the White House,” Trump said
local police officers who have become central to his law-and-order
agenda. Police departments,
Trump said while at Quantico,
“are totally underappreciated, except by me.”
Trump made the group a promise.
“I want you to know that with
me as your president, America’s
police will have a true friend and
loyal champion in the White
House,” Trump said, “more loyal
than anyone else can be, I tell you.”
While the event was held at a
well-known FBI facility, the audience did not include many FBI
personnel. The graduating class
was composed of law enforcement
officials from elsewhere, so the
crowd was mostly those individuals and their families.
There were some FBI instructors and officials on hand but few
rank-and-file agents, according to
people involved in the event. A
last-minute invitation went out to
FBI personnel, but almost immediately FBI personnel were
told there was no room for additional attendees, according to
these people.
Trump appeared on a stage
alongside FBI Director Christopher A. Wray and Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who introduced
the president by calling him “our
nation’s highest law enforcement
official.” That title carries possible
implications for the ongoing crim-
inal probe into whether Trump
attempted to obstruct justice leading up to the firing of FBI Director
James B. Comey in May.
The president’s defenders say
that, as the nation’s top law enforcement official, he cannot obstruct justice by firing the head of
the FBI. However, in past administrations that phrase has been
used to describe the attorney general, not the president.
During a news conference at
the Justice Department later Friday, Sessions spoke positively
about the FBI but suggested the
agency might have problems that
need fixing.
“You can have arrogance sneak
into, sometimes, an institution,”
he said. “I don’t share the view
that the FBI is not functioning at a
high level.”
When Trump took the lectern
Friday, he did not mention or allude to any of his problems with
the bureau, instead focusing on
the police and other law enforcement officers present.
“We as a country must do a
better job showing our police officers our respect and gratitude that
you have earned, and we will do
that,” the president said.
Trump said immigration and
crime in Chicago, specifically,
were among his greatest concerns
when it comes to police work.
“What the hell is happening
there?” he asked, to some ap-
plause from the graduates.
Chicago has struggled with a
spike in gun violence and murders
in recent years, but police say
homicides and shootings there
have decreased from last year,
which was the deadliest in two
decades.
He repeated his call to prevent
terrorism by changing immigration policies, including the issuance of visas to relatives of U.S.
citizens, a practice that critics call
“chain migration.”
In stark language, he denounced the MS-13 street gang,
which is active in Central America
and many parts of the United
States. He called its members “savages’’ who should be jailed or sent
back to their native countries.
“We don’t want them. We don’t
want them,” the president said.
“Our cities should not be sanctuaries for criminals. They should be
sanctuaries for America.”
He linked the two recent terrorist attacks in New York City to
what he called the nation’s “dysfunctional immigration system.”
“One came through chain migration — chain migration — the
other, visa lottery,” Trump said of
the alleged terrorists.
“They have a lottery. You pick
people. Do you think the country
is giving us their best people? No,”
he said to laughter. “What kind of
a system is that?”
“They come in by lottery. They
give us their worst people. They
put them in a bin,” Trump went on,
apparently comparing the system
to televised lottery drawings that
use a barrel or bin.
“In his hand, when he’s picking
them is, really, the worst of the
worst,” Trump continued. “Congratulations! You’re going to the
United States!”
The audience laughed.
Trump drew more laughter
when he pointed out journalists
there to cover his remarks.
“There’s the fake news back
there. Look, everybody,” Trump
said. “Fake news. No, actually,
some of them are fine people,” he
said, smiling. “About — let’s see,
who’s back there? Yeah, about
30 percent.”
anne.gearan@washpost.com
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
CDC gets a list of forbidden words, including ‘diversity’ and ‘transgender’
BY L ENA H . S UN
AND J ULIET E ILPERIN
The Trump administration is
prohibiting officials at the nation’s top public health agency
from using a list of seven words
or phrases — including “fetus”
and “transgender” — in any official documents being prepared
for next year’s budget.
Policy analysts at the Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta were told of the
list of forbidden words at a
meeting Thursday with senior
CDC officials who oversee the
budget, according to an analyst
who took part in the 90-minute
briefing. The forbidden words
are “vulnerable,” “entitlement,”
“diversity,” “transgender,” “fetus,”
“evidence-based” and “sciencebased.”
In some instances, the analysts
were given alternative phrases.
Instead of “science-based” or
“evidence-based,” the suggested
phrase is “CDC bases its recommendations on science in consideration with community standards and wishes,” the person
said. In other cases, no replacement words were immediately
offered.
The question of how to address
such issues as sexual orientation,
gender identity and abortion
rights — all of which received
significant visibility under the
Obama administration — has
surfaced repeatedly in federal
agencies since President Trump
took office. Several key departments — including Health and
Human Services, which oversees
the CDC, as well as Justice,
Education, and Housing and Urban Development — have
changed some federal policies
and how they collect government
information about lesbian, gay,
bisexual and transgender Americans.
In March, for example, HHS
dropped questions about sexual
orientation and gender identity
in two surveys of elderly people.
HHS has also removed information about LGBT Americans
from its website. The department’s Administration for Children and Families, for example,
archived a page that outlined
federal services that are available
for LGBT people and their families, including how they can
adopt and receive help if they are
the victims of sex trafficking.
At the CDC, the meeting about
the banned words was led by
Alison Kelly, a senior leader in
the agency’s Office of Financial
Services, according to the CDC
analyst, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the
person was not authorized to
speak publicly. Kelly did not say
why the words are being banned,
according to the analyst, and told
the group that she was merely
relaying the information.
Other CDC officials confirmed
the existence of a list of forbidden
words. It’s likely that other parts
of HHS are operating under the
same guidelines regarding the
use of these words, the analyst
said.
At the CDC, several offices
have responsibility for work that
uses some of these words. The
National Center for HIV/AIDS,
Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB
Prevention is working on ways to
prevent HIV among transgender
people and reduce health disparities. The CDC’s work on birth
defects caused by the Zika virus
includes research on the developing fetus.
The ban is related to the
budget and supporting materials
that are to be given to the CDC’s
partners and to Congress, the
analyst said. The president’s
budget for 2019 is expected to be
released in early February. The
budget blueprint is generally
shaped to reflect an administration’s priorities.
Federal agencies are sending
in their budget proposals to the
Office of Management and Budget, which has authority about
what is included.
Neither an OMB spokesman
nor a CDC spokeswoman responded to requests for comment
Friday.
The longtime CDC analyst,
whose job includes writing descriptions of the CDC’s work for
the administration’s annual
spending blueprint, could not
recall a previous time when
words were banned from budget
documents because they were
considered controversial.
The reaction of people in the
meeting was “incredulous,” the
analyst said. “It was very much,
‘Are you serious? Are you kidding?’ ”
“In my experience, we’ve never
had any pushback from an ideological standpoint,” the analyst
said.
News of the ban on certain
words hasn’t yet spread to the
broader group of scientists at the
CDC, but it’s likely to provoke a
backlash, the analyst said. “Our
subject matter experts will not
lay down quietly — this hasn’t
trickled down to them yet.”
The CDC has a budget of about
$7 billion and more than 12,000
employees working across the
nation and around the globe on
everything from food and water
safety, to heart disease and cancer, to infectious disease outbreak prevention. Much of the
CDC’s work has strong bipartisan
support.
Kelly told the analysts that
“certain words” in the CDC’s
budget drafts were being sent
back to the agency for correction.
Three words that had been
flagged in these drafts were “vulnerable,” “entitlement” and “diversity.” Kelly told the group the
ban on the other words had been
conveyed verbally.
lena.sun@washpost.com
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
SU
Tax bill is on track to pass as final holdouts pledge their support USDA
shifts rule
on animal
welfare
TAX PLAN FROM A1
their taxes go up.
The House and the Senate plan
to vote on the bill next week,
clearing the way for Trump to sign
it into law. Many of its changes —
lower rates and fewer deductions
— would go into effect in January,
though it would probably take
some time for the economy to
adjust.
The tax plan has enormous
benefits for many businesses,
with a permanent and sharp reduction in tax rates that Republicans promise would trigger more
economic growth, new hiring and
higher wages.
It also would change the tax
system for households, temporarily lowering rates and creating
new limits on deductions; this is
expected to reduce taxes for most
Americans but could still lead
millions to owe the government
more.
The plan would also add at
least $1 trillion to the debt over
10 years, according to numerous
economic forecasts, an issue that
is likely to intensify policy debate
in Washington into 2018 as both
parties square off over how to deal
with the deficit.
The bill was originally pitched
as a sweeping tax cut for the
middle class, but it changed over
the course of several months as
Republicans demanded a variety
of alterations.
Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) extracted more tax cuts for businesses whose owners file their
taxes through the individual income tax code.
Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine)
and other East Coast Republicans
demanded changes that would
allow Americans to deduct up to
$10,000 in state and local taxes,
restoring some of the deduction
after the Senate initially sought to
scrap it entirely.
House Republicans tried to cap
the mortgage interest deduction
to the interest paid on up to
$500,000 in new home loans, but
they acquiesced eventually to a
$750,000 cap — still lower than
the current limit of about $1 million.
A number of GOP donors complained that the bill could push
their taxes up, so Republicans
agreed to a late change that would
cut the top tax rate to 37 percent
(down from 39.6 percent) for income above $600,000 for a married couple filing jointly. Earlier
proposals called for consolidating
the seven tax brackets into three,
with a top rate of 35 percent, but
the final deal stuck with seven
brackets and a 37 percent top rate.
BY
erica.werner@washpost.com
peter.whoriskey@washpost.com
JOSHUA ROBERTS/REUTERS
change would take effect in 2019
under the bill.
Many of the changes made late
in the negotiations would benefit
businesses and the wealthy, but
Rubio’s last-minute demands
pulled the package back a bit
more toward its working-class
roots.
Republicans had proposed to
expand the child tax credit from
$1,000 to $2,000, but the benefits
formula they’d planned to use
would have capped it for many
low- and moderate-income families at $1,100. Rubio demanded
that the credit be raised, and Republicans at first believed he
would balk, in part because he
voted for the Senate bill even after
the party denied his effort to expand the child tax credit in that
measure.
But when he threatened Thursday to block the bill and appeared
to have the backing of Sen. Mike
Lee (R-Utah), Republican leaders
agreed to expand the tax credit up
to $1,400 for those families. The
credit would begin to phase out
for households that earn more
than $400,000.
Lee late Friday said that he
looked “forward to reading the
full text of the bill and, hopefully,
supporting it.”
Republicans had passed an earlier version of the bill through the
Senate with a 51-to-49 vote, and
losing two more senators could
have proved fatal, though the
GOP now appears firmly in control of the votes it needs.
Many of the changes to the tax
code that Republicans initially
sought were dialed back or removed.
They had proposed allowing
multinational companies to bring
cash held overseas back to the
United States at a 12 percent tax
rate, but they raised the rate to
15.5 percent in the final agreement as a way to generate more
revenue.
They opted against imposing
taxes that would have hit graduate students, and they did not
strip away tax benefits for families who adopt children.
They had proposed to eliminate the estate tax and the alternative-minimum tax for individuals, but those changes proved too
costly, and the final plan would
exempt more families from these
taxes but not get rid of them.
Democrats have blasted the
bill, saying it would shower corporations with lower taxes at the
Collins
trusts GOP,
Trump to
keep vows
COLLINS FROM A1
she would have been the instant
front-runner, saying she believed
her influence was best wielded
from the Senate floor.
Because of the upset win by
Democrat Doug Jones in a special
election for Senate in Alabama on
Tuesday, the GOP’s already slim
52-to-48 Senate majority will
dwindle to 51 to 49 next year. That
will only increase Collins’s influence, giving the diligent lawmaker
a pivotal role in every legislative
fight for the remainder of Trump’s
first term and beyond.
“The closer your margins between majority and minority,
there is a greater role for those who
are very deliberate in how they’re
moving forward, who are working
with both sides of the aisle in a very
clear and demonstrated way,” said
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska),
Collins’s close friend who sometimes joins with her to oppose
fellow Republicans. “And I think
that Sen. Collins does exactly that.”
Collins, Murkowski and Sen.
John McCain (R-Ariz.) were the
three Republicans who killed the
GOP’s efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act earlier this year,
driving a stake through seven
years of their party’s promises to
undo former president Barack
Obama’s signature legislative
achievement.
When she returned home to
Maine after casting that pivotal
vote, Collins was greeted as a hero.
Passengers in the Bangor airport
broke into applause when she
stepped off her plane, a scene Collins later described as “heartwarming and affirming.”
The reaction at home to her
stance on the tax legislation has
been quite different. The tax bill,
which increases the deficit while
delivering huge benefits to corporations and the wealthy, polls
poorly and has sparked repeated
from critics who note that she has
already backed off her call for the
health legislation to pass before
the tax bill. Instead, she now says
the health bills must pass by the
end of this year, pointing to a
written pledge from McConnell
and to verbal commitments from
administration officials including
Vice President Pence and Trump.
Some Democrats argue that
those promises will not amount to
much.
“How any senator — much less
one who has served as long as Sen.
Collins has — ever agreed to such a
deal is beyond me,” said Jim Manley, a Democratic consultant and
former high-ranking Senate aide.
“The promises she extracted were
never, ever going to be binding on
rank-and-file House Republicans,
and now she has nothing to show
for all of this. She got rolled big
time.”
Whether that’s the case remains
to be seen. A must-pass year-end
spending bill presents the only
realistic vehicle to carry the health
bills, but it’s uncertain whether the
final maneuvers on that legislation will play out as Collins would
wish. Democratic votes will be
needed in the Senate, but Democrats have not committed to supporting her priorities, nor have
House Republicans, many of
whom oppose the health bills and
Collins’s attempts to push them
into law over their objections.
“You’ve got individual senators
that think, in my view arrogantly,
that they are entitled to disproportionate representation of the
country,” said Rep. Dave Brat
(R-Va.), a member of the conservative Freedom Caucus. “I mean, the
American people ought to be
ticked off.”
In the end, Collins may have
little recourse if the bills she’s touting don’t become law, other than
making known her displeasure
with the Trump administration
and her party’s leadership in Congress.
Yet given the pivotal position
she occupies, that may just be
enough to push GOP leaders from
the president on down to do everything they can to keep her happy.
Senate Republicans seem to
know that.
“It’s good,” said Sen. Pat Roberts
(R-Kan.), “to have Susan in the
tent.”
The Trump administration
ruled on Friday that livestock
deemed “USDA Organic” need not
be treated any more humanely
than the animals in conventional
farming.
The decision reverses years of
policy at the Agriculture Department, which, through the “USDA
Organic” label, dictates what may
be sold as “organic” food in the
United States.
For years, the USDA had been
developing organic requirements
guaranteeing animals a minimum
amount of space, light and access
to the outside. Many consumers
expect that products bearing the
“USDA Organic” label come from a
farm with higher animal-welfare
standards.
But with the new administration, the USDA has changed tack,
arguing that the 1990 law creating
the “USDA Organic” label does not
allow “broadly prescriptive,
stand-alone animal welfare regulations.” In effect, the new approach suggests that “organic”
farmers need not treat their animals any better than conventional
ones do.
This decision “is going to be
destructive to the whole organic
field,” said Jesse Laflamme, coowner and chief executive at Pete
and Gerry’s Organics, an egg company that requires farmers to
meet higher standards. “What’s so
upsetting is that there is such a
gap between what organic consumers expect and what these factory farms are producing.”
The immediate cause of the
USDA’s shift on animal welfare
was a proposed rule, more than
seven years in gestation, that
would have required “organic” egg
farms to give hens at least a square
foot of space inside as well as
access to the outdoors. The rule
would have prohibited the largescale “organic” egg farms that The
Washington Post wrote about in
July, in which the birds were kept
in barns containing 180,000 at a
time, at a density of three per
square foot of floor space, and
never allowed to set foot outside.
Consumers pay more for organic eggs, and they expect that those
eggs are produced more humanely than conventional eggs. Indeed,
according to a March survey by
Consumer Reports, more than
80 percent of consumers who regularly buy organic products say it
is important that organic eggs
come from chickens that are allowed outside.
But the USDA withdrew the
proposed rule for poultry, arguing
that it could discourage the development of new practices within
organic farming.
In a statement, USDA officials
said they were concerned that the
proposed rule “may hamper
market-driven innovation and
evolution and impose unnecessary regulatory burdens.”
Nevertheless, the decision to
withdraw the rule is expected to be
broadly unpopular, and it drew
immediate backlash from organic
farmers, animal rights advocates,
the Organic Trade Association and
consumer groups.
The proposed rule had elicited
47,000 comments, and of those,
only 28 supported withdrawing
the rule, according to the Organic
Trade Association.
Advocates for the rule blamed
the outsize influence of large “factory farms” for the USDA’s decision to withdraw it. Those farms,
they argue, use the “USDA Organic” label to fetch higher prices for
their products, but without conforming to consumer expectations
for organic practices.
“The current administration is
doing a tremendous service for the
conventional agribusiness interests that has invested in giant livestock factories,” said Mark Kastel,
of the Cornucopia Institute, which
seeks stricter standards and stricter enforcement from the USDA.
The administration “is throwing
out 25 years of precedent in terms
of developing organic regulations
and enforcing them.”
Kastel and others blamed those
large, nominally “USDA Organic”
farms for fooling consumers regarding animal welfare at their
facilities.
“They are trying to trick the
public and sell their products at a
premium under a deficient organic label,” said Wayne Pacelle, president and chief executive of the
Humane Society of the United
States. “They want the profit that
comes from the halo effect of the
organic label but they don’t want
to adhere to common-sense
animal-welfare standards. I don’t
think consumers think that organically raised animals are living in a
giant confinement shed.”
Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), who voted against an earlier version of the tax bill two weeks ago, says he will vote in favor of the final measure.
Corker’s attempts to change the
bill were rejected by GOP leaders
— he had tried to put in place a
mechanism that would limit the
plan’s impact on the debt if it
didn’t lead to the type of economic
growth that Republicans had
promised. He voted against the
legislation in early December, but
he was the only defection at the
time, and Republicans were able
to pass the bill without him.
Republicans had to soften a
number of their proposed tax
changes so that the bill fit within
congressional budget rules.
Trump originally wanted to
lower the corporate tax rate from
35 percent to 15 percent, but Republicans eventually settled on a
21 percent rate.
They also decided to make
those tax cuts permanent and
lock in reductions for families and
businesses only through 2025 to
limit the cost. They have promised that a future Congress will
extend those tax cuts, though the
outcome for such a political decision is uncertain.
The bill would repeal enforcement of a provision of the Affordable Care Act that penalizes many
Americans if they don’t have some
form of health insurance. This
J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) has demanded a pledge from President Trump that he honor subsidies for
low-income people participating in the ACA in exchange for her commitment to support the tax bill.
protests against Collins. Students
have staged sit-ins while religious
leaders were arrested after occupying one of her offices.
After Collins’s votes against the
repeal of the ACA, also known as
Obamacare, some Maine residents
have struggled to understand why
she would support a tax bill that
slashes corporate rates while repealing the ACA’s mandate for
most Americans to carry health
insurance or pay fines. The individual mandate repeal is expected
to result in 13 million more uninsured Americans, and health-care
advocates say that even if they do
end up becoming law, the health
bills Collins supports will not
make up for that.
“It’s the last vote that counts.
You can say ‘no’ 53 times in a row
but if the 54th is the ‘yes’ that puts
the thing over the line, that’s going
to be your legacy,” said Steve Butterfield, policy director of Consumers for Affordable Health Care
in Augusta, Maine.
In this case, Butterfield added,
Collins’s legacy would be millions
of Americans losing their health
insurance.
“It’s absolutely unbelievable,”
he said.
Collins counters that she has
never liked the individual mandate, because it forces consumers
to buy a product they may not
want, and the fines on abstainers
fall disproportionately on people
who make less than $50,000 a
year. She draws a distinction between the individual mandate repeal in the tax legislation and the
earlier GOP health bills that she
opposed, which in addition to the
mandate repeal also kicked millions of people off Medicaid, which
serves the poor, among other
changes.
“There’s a big difference between forcing someone to buy insurance that they deem unaffordable versus taking away from people insurance that they already
have, need and want,” Collins said,
“which is what the health-care
bills last summer would have
done.”
Nonetheless, Collins opposed
including the mandate repeal in
the tax legislation, saying the issues should be addressed separately. Once Republican leaders
decided to include it, partly because it raised nearly $340 billion
in revenue they could use to lower
taxes for corporations and make
other changes, Collins began arguing that other health-care legislation would be needed to stabilize
insurance markets and keep premiums from spiking. The Congressional Budget Office estimated
that the individual mandate repeal would lead to premiums ris-
ing 10 percent in the individual
insurance market.
One of the bills Collins supports, authored by Sens. Lamar
Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Patty
Murray (D-Wash.), restores “costsharing” reduction payments that
help insurers reduce costs for lower-income Americans under the
ACA. Congressional Republicans
had challenged the federal payments in court during the Obama
administration, and Trump decided in October to stop making
them.
The other bill is one Collins
co-authored with Sen. Bill Nelson
(D-Fla.) to create a $10 billion “reinsurance” program that states
could draw on over two years to set
up high-risk pools that lower costs
for patients who are particularly
hard to insure.
In addition to pushing for the
health-care bills, Collins negotiated several other changes to the tax
legislation, including preserving
taxpayers’ ability to deduct medical expenses and allowing them to
deduct up to $10,000 in state and
local taxes from their federal tax
bill. Those changes were included
in the tax legislation itself, instead
of relying on the promise of future
action by Congress.
Collins’s moves on the health
bills have been met with skepticism, if not downright ridicule,
P ETER W HORISKEY
expense of driving up the debt
and giving only temporary and
uneven benefits to the middle
class. The tax-rate cuts for individuals and households would expire after eight years, while most
of the cuts for corporations would
be permanent.
“It’s daylight robbery,” said
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.). “And with every
iteration, the GOP tax scam becomes even more cowardly, outrageous, dishonest, brazen theft
from middle-class families, giving
money from them to the richest
people in our country and to corporations. It’s a monumental con
job.”
Public opinion polls show that
Americans broadly think the bill
favors corporations and the
wealthy, but Republicans have
persisted, with many predicting
that it would lead to a surge in
economic growth and buoy their
prospects going into the 2018
midterm elections.
damian.paletta@washpost.com
erica.werner@washpost.com
jeffrey.stein@washpost.com
mike.debonis@washpost.com
Heather Long contributed to this
report.
A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
Tax plan would erase vestige of a di≠erent business era
BY
PETER WHORISKEY
The corporate behemoths of
postwar America — General Motors, General Electric, DuPont,
IBM and the like — behaved in
markedly different ways than
those of today. They provided pensions for retirees. What they paid
workers was a small percentage of
what executives got, but it was not
an infinitesimal fraction. And they
paid a much bigger cut in federal
taxes.
The corporations were, or at
least aspired to be, part of the
American bedrock.
“For years I thought that what
was good for our country was good
for General Motors, and vice versa,” a GM chief famously told Congress in 1953.
The Republican tax plan moving toward passage in Congress
promises to erase one of the last
remnants of that era, pushing the
corporate tax rate to its lowest
point since the 1930s.
The higher corporate rate was a
holdover from a time when companies not only paid a larger share
of taxes but provided more for
workers, too. They put a larger
portion of corporate income into
paychecks and were much more
likely to provide pensions.
“The notion of the corporation
as a social institution was a defining feature of the mid-20th century — but that has been fading,”
Higher rate was once
linked to expectations of
corporate responsibility
said Benjamin C. Waterhouse, a
historian of business and politics
at the University of North Carolina
and the author of “The Land of
Enterprise,” a history of American
business. “These days, the broader
trend has been that corporations
have experienced an increase in
political rights and a decrease in
social responsibility.”
The bill before Congress sets
the corporate tax rate at 21 percent, down from 35 percent, and
Republican leaders are aiming to
shepherd the proposal through
the necessary votes as early as next
week.
Cutting the tax rate will make
the United States a more attractive
place for new business ventures,
they argue, and that will stimulate
investment and create American
jobs. As for whether corporations
should cater to broader social
mandates, supporters of the tax
cut simply reject the question. In a
competitive global economy, they
say, tying up U.S. corporations
with social obligations is simply
not viable.
In this view, the increasing flow
of goods and investments around
the world, begun in the 1970s and
1980s, forces U.S. corporations to
streamline their operations to
compete with companies elsewhere; if they don’t, investors will
turn to other, thriftier businesses.
Economists on both sides of the
political divide cite globalization
as a key constraint on the oncebroader notions of corporate responsibility.
“What the last few decades have
shown us is that corporations are
quicker to pull the trigger on layoffs, less likely to pay workers as
much and less likely to contribute
taxes,” said Josh Bivens, research
director at the Economic Policy
Institute, a left-leaning think tank.
“I don’t think they got mean overnight. But changes in external conditions — globalization and the
assault on unions — meant that
they could claim a bigger piece of
the pie.”
Aparna Mathur, resident scholar in economic policy studies at
the American Enterprise Institute, a right-leaning think tank,
similarly linked globalization to
the diminished expectations of
corporate social responsibility.
“There are larger forces at play
today,” Mathur said. “We can hope
corporations will do the right
thing by workers. But they are
competing with companies from
around the world.”
In the long run, she said, cutting
the corporate tax rate will help
workers because it will attract
more corporate investments in the
United States, boost productivity
and, in turn, lift wages. She emphasized, however, that such effects will not happen immediately.
Any wage boost would have to
offset significant losses incurred
by workers as companies have focused less on their well-being.
Today, for instance, about 75
percent of corporate income goes
to workers, as opposed to shareholders. For generations, that
number was closer to 80 percent,
according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis.
Meanwhile, as late as the early
1990s, about 60 percent of fulltime workers at medium and large
companies had traditional pension coverage, according to figures
from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. But today, about 24 percent of
workers at midsize and large companies have it, according to the
data, and that number is expected
to continue to fall as older employees exit the workforce.
And companies pay less in taxes, making it more difficult for the
federal government to pick up
where corporations have scaled
back their roles. During the 1950s
and ’60s, corporate taxes amounted to between 3 and 6 percent of
gross domestic product, according
to figures from the Office of Management and Budget; that has fallen over time to less than 2 percent,
even as corporate profits have
grown.
The notion that companies
have social responsibility was never a unanimous one. Influential
conservative economists have for
generations argued that corporations that aimed for anything beyond profits were guilty of theft —
from shareholders.
Among the earliest and most
famous of the critics was Nobel
Prize-winning economist Milton
Friedman, who in 1970 published
an article titled “The Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits,” in which he
mocked executives he had heard
speaking of the “social responsibilities of business,” chastising
them for preaching “pure and unadulterated socialism.”
Friedman turned out to be the
prophet of what would be called
the “shareholder revolution,”
when investors forced corporate
managers to focus on maximizing
returns for shareholders.
But while Friedman provided
the intellectual impetus, at least
some of the change was largely a
practical matter. The competition
posed by globalization of trade
and investment forced corporations to change course.
Today, the effects of heightened
global competition have spilled
over into the realm of governments. They, too, are competing to
make shareholders happy.
Over a recent 10-year period,
nine nations in the Group of 20 cut
corporate tax rates by at least five
percentage points, according to a
March report from the Congressional Budget Office.
That wave of cutting has left the
United States looking like a relatively expensive place for a corporation.
The U.S. statutory corporate tax
rate ranked as the highest in the
CBO report. It was 39 percent,
including state taxes.
But that’s just the rate printed
in the law — not what businesses
actually pay — and that, too, is
relatively high in the United
States. The average U.S. corporate
tax rate was 29 percent, according
to the CBO, ranking third behind
Argentina and Indonesia.
“The U.S. is kind of late to the
tax rate competition,” said Mathur
of the American Enterprise Institute. “These economies have felt
that doing this would provide a
boost.”
Whatever happens, the old era,
by most accounts, is gone.
“One of the cruel ironies of
American business is that, for all
our big talk, we have been most
successful when the international
competition was weakest,” Waterhouse said. “Simply longing for
the ‘good old days’ when corporations took care of the general public is unrealistic.”
peter.whoriskey@washpost.com
A rush to enroll in ACA
before Friday deadline
About 4.7 million enroll
in health plans during
shortened signup period
BY
A MY G OLDSTEIN
Consumers jammed call centers and enrollment offices in the
final sprint toward the Friday
deadline in most of the country
to get Affordable Care Act health
plans for 2018, defying months of
naysaying by President Trump
about the law’s insurance marketplaces.
In several states, enrollment
helpers reported a crush of interest in recent days. Some navigator organizations, which help
people sign up, received more
requests for appointments than
they could accommodate — a
consequence of an enrollment
season that is half as long as the
past three years’ time frame and
large cuts by federal officials in
grants to those groups.
“I could have really used the
extra $900,000,” said Jodi Ray,
project director of Florida Covering Kids and Families, which
received $5.8 million a year ago,
more than any other organization. “We could have used the
extra staff.”
Julia Holloway, who directs
the navigator program at Affiliated Service Providers of Indiana,
said: “You hang up from one call,
and you get another.” The state
lost 82 percent of its anticipated
funding, more than anywhere
else. And with in-person assistance now scarce, Holloway said
that one of her only remaining
navigators was staffing the
phone line to try to resolve as
many callers’ questions as possible.
Since Thursday, people contacting federal call centers in the
39 states that use the HealthCare.gov website consistently got
a message asking them to leave
their contact information and
await a call back, according to
officials of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
(CMS). They will be allowed to
complete their insurance applications, even if they are contacted after the deadline of midnight
Pacific time.
By late Friday afternoon, however, HealthCare.gov itself had
not become so crowded that
consumers were being diverted
into online waiting rooms — as
had occurred on the deadline day
for ACA coverage each of the
federal insurance exchange’s
past four years.
Navigators said the website
functioned relatively smoothly
this year, with sporadic and minor glitches and slowdowns —
nothing like the profound defects that stymied insurance
shoppers when the law’s marketplaces first opened in the fall of
2013.
This fifth year posed a test of
the marketplaces’ staying power,
as the boosterism of the Obama
administration gave way to
Trump’s vocal hostility and persistent efforts by a Republican
Congress to dismantle many core
features of the 2010 health-care
law.
On the final day, CMS tweeted
encouragement for Americans to
sign up by the deadline. By the
most recent count released by
the agency, nearly 4.7 million
people had signed up as of last
weekend in the states using
HealthCare.gov. That number
did not include current ACA
customers who will be automatically renewed by the government
after the enrollment period or
people signing up in 11 states,
plus the District, that operate
their own insurance exchanges.
The Senate repeatedly failed to
pass ACA-repeal legislation over
the summer and fall, but a big
sideswipe to the law could be
imminent. A compromise between the House and Senate over
the biggest federal tax overhaul
in decades contains a provision
that in 2019 would end enforcement of the ACA’s requirement
that most American carry health
insurance. The two chambers
plan to vote on the tax agreement
next week.
Debate long swirled within
both political parties over whether such a mandate is necessary to
reach close-to-universal health
coverage, but the idea of eliminating the law’s tax penalties for
people who flout the requirement has become part of GOP
orthodoxy. Congress’s nonpartisan budget analysts estimate that
doing so would lead to 13 million
more uninsured Americans within a decade and drive up health
plans’ premiums.
The ACA marketplaces were
created to make coverage more
accessible for people who cannot
get affordable health benefits
through a job. The high point for
enrollment was the 12.7 million
consumer who had signed up for
2016 coverage by the end of that
enrollment period.
This season, most of the staterun marketplaces will allow customers to keep signing up for
health plans until late December
or January.
And residents of a few states in
the federal insurance exchange
have a special enrollment period
until Dec. 31 because their communities were damaged by hurricanes this fall. According to CMS
officials, the extra time is available to people in Florida, Texas,
Louisiana, South Carolina and
Georgia — and others who lived
in those states during the storms.
Fred Ammons, chief executive
officer of the navigator organization Health Care Central Georgia, said he has been trying to
play down the extension to encourage as many people as possible to enroll before the regular
deadline. After Friday, he pointed
out, “people will not just be able
to go to HealthCare.gov and have
it magically work.” They will
need to telephone a federal call
center, although navigators can
still help them decide on a plan.
The Georgia group has been
functioning with 15 percent of
the federal navigator grant it had
last year, with a reduced cadre of
paid staff and a score of volunteers. “Our remaining staff put
their heart and soul in this,”
Ammons said. Even though the
grant is intended for work yearround, “we will have some significant contraction of staff.”
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
White House senior adviser Jared Kushner has complained to friends about the constant attention he receives from the news media.
Kushner shopping for crisis public relations firm
BY
J OSH D AWSEY
Senior White House official Jared Kushner and his legal team are
searching for a crisis public relations firm, according to four people familiar with the matter.
Kushner’s lawyer, Abbe Lowell,
has quietly called at least two
firms, these people said. The inquiries have occurred in the past
two weeks, and officials at the
firms were asked not to discuss
the conversations with others.
In a statement, Lowell confirmed he was looking for a firm
that would handle media for all
high-profile clients who receive
attention from the press. His other clients include Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.), whose monthslong corruption trial ended last
month when jurors deadlocked.
The Justice Department has not
announced whether it plans to
retry Menendez.
“My law firm and I are considering hiring an outside consultant
to handle the time-consuming incoming inquiries on the cases in
which I am working that receive
media attention,” Lowell said in a
statement to The Washington
Post. “This inquiry from you about
whether I am doing this is a good
example of why we need one.”
Investigators for special counsel Robert S. Mueller III have
asked witnesses questions about
Kushner’s interactions with former national security adviser
Michael T. Flynn as part of Mueller’s larger investigation into Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election, according to people familiar
with the probe. Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law, has been
identified by people familiar with
his role as the “very senior member” of the Trump transition team
who directed Flynn in December
to reach out to the Russian ambassador and lobby him about a United Nations resolution on Israeli
settlements, according to court
documents. Federal prosecutors
in the Eastern District of New
York have also subpoenaed documents about his family company’s
use of the EB-5 visa program at a
planned Jersey City development.
Crisis PR firms are often retained to handle a negative development or an avalanche of media
inquiries. Kushner has been in the
headlines almost daily, and he has
complained to friends about the
nonstop negative attention from
the news media. White House officials have speculated for months
that Kushner and his wife, Ivanka
Trump, would return to New York,
but he has told associates over the
past month that he plans to stay.
At least one firm, Mercury Public Affairs, passed up the opportunity to work with Kushner’s team,
people familiar with the discussions said. Mercury’s lobbying
work has also come under scrutiny by Mueller, which could have
complicated its ability to represent Kushner.
Michael McKeon, a partner at
Mercury, declined to comment.
The firm, which has not been
accused of wrongdoing by Mueller’s team, has said it is cooperating with investigators.
Kushner is largely represented
in the White House by Josh Raffel,
who joined the administration
this year to handle media inquiries to the Office of American
Innovation, which Kushner leads.
joshua.dawsey@washpost.com
U.S. judge suspends Trump contraception rule
BY
S ANDHYA S OMASHEKHAR
A federal judge on Friday temporarily blocked a Trump administration rule that allows virtually
any business to cite religious or
moral objections and opt out of a
federal requirement that they cover contraception as part of employee health plans.
In a 44-page opinion, U.S. District Judge Wendy Beetlestone in
Philadelphia sided with the plaintiff, the state of Pennsylvania,
which argued that the rule was
harmful to working women and
would force the state to shoulder
the costs of their birth control and
unplanned pregnancies.
“The Commonwealth’s concern
is . . . women will either forgo contraception entirely or choose
cheaper but less effective methods
— individual choices which will
result in an increase in unintended pregnancies,” Beetlestone
wrote, calling the potential harm
to women there and nationwide
“enormous and irreversible.”
She detailed how the rule could
play out. “It would allow an employer with a sincerely held moral
conviction that women do not
have a place in the workplace to
simply stop providing contraceptive coverage,” she wrote. “It is
difficult to comprehend a rule that
does more to undermine the Contraceptive Mandate or that intrudes more into the lives of women.”
The ruling stems from a longrunning legal and political conflict over a provision of the Affordable Care Act, the health-care law
passed under President Barack
Obama, requiring most employers
to cover as part of their workers’
health plans any birth control approved by the Food and Drug Administration, without a co-pay.
Reproductive-rights advocates
cheered the rule, saying it recognizes birth control is integral to
women’s health care and critical to
their ability to control their futures.
Some religious groups objected
to the rule because of their opposition to certain forms of birth control, particularly intrauterine devices and the morning-after pill.
Both, they say, are akin to abortion
because they may halt a pregnancy after an egg has been fertilized.
In 2014, the Supreme Court
ruled that certain closely held corporations with religious objections could opt out of the contraception mandate. Many entities
still had objections, and the
Trump
administration
announced in October that it would
give organizations and businesses
a broad right to opt out.
Religious-liberty groups, which
have lauded President Trump’s efforts to protect people of faith,
said they were confident the latest
judicial ruling would not withstand scrutiny by other courts.
“We are confident that the appeals court or the Supreme Court
will overturn this ruling and ensure that the government can do
the right thing and continue to
protect religious groups,” Lori
Windham, senior counsel at the
Becket Fund for Religious Liberty,
said in a statement.
But Beetlestone’s ruling was applauded by lawmakers and other
officials who oppose Trump’s efforts to dismantle the ACA and
hard-won victories on issues of
reproductive rights.
“Today is a critical victory for
millions of women and families
and for the rule of law,” said Josh
Shapiro, attorney general of Pennsylvania, one of the several states
challenging the Trump administration rule. “The harm from this
rule was immediate. Women need
contraception for their health because contraception is health care,
pure and simple.”
sandhya.somashekhar@washpost.com
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
SU
Trump’s push to seat conservative judges encounters sudden turbulence
JUDGES FROM A1
dent’s opponents keep trying to
distract from the record-setting
success the President has had on
judicial nominations, which includes a Supreme Court Justice
and twelve outstanding circuit
judges in his first year,” Gidley
said in a statement.
Until this week, Trump’s record of getting judicial nominees
confirmed by the Senate stood
out as a bright spot for a president who has struggled for big
wins on Capitol Hill. In addition
to Supreme Court Justice Neil M.
Gorsuch, the Senate has confirmed 12 circuit court judges
and six district court judges.
In a news release this week,
Senate Republicans touted their
work with Trump as “the sleeper
story of the year.” But that release came just a day after the
nominations for two district
court judgeships began to run
aground, as Republicans on the
Judiciary Committee registered
strong objections to the nominees’ credentials and character.
This year is the first since
2006 in which the GOP has
controlled both the presidency
and Senate, presenting a prime
opportunity to fill lifetime appointments to what are currently
143 vacancies on the federal
bench.
Only one GOP senator — John
Neely Kennedy of Louisiana —
has voted against a Trump judicial nominee. But this week demonstrated a new willingness by
Senate Judiciary Chairman
Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) and
others to derail Trump’s picks.
Grassley on Tuesday told the
White House to “reconsider” the
nominations of Jeff Mateer and
Brett Talley, both of whom were
reported to have endorsed positions or groups that embrace
discrimination. A day later, both
nominations were pulled.
Talley, Trump’s nominee for a
U.S. district court seat in Alabama, originally had received
the endorsement of the Judiciary
Committee, despite the fact that
he had never litigated a case and
was one of two Trump picks
whom the American Bar Association had found “not qualified”
for the federal bench.
Mateer was nominated to
serve on the bench in the Eastern
District of Texas, but the committee never received his paperwork.
Mateer, according to reports,
had said in 2015 that transgender children are part of “Satan’s
plan,” while Talley was reported
to have posted a defense of “the
first KKK” in an online comment
in 2011.
Neither disclosed those comments during the vetting process. Talley also did not tell the
CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump, seen speaking to journalists Friday at the White House, is facing 143 vacancies on the federal bench. Until this week, his
record of getting judicial nominees confirmed by the Senate stood out as a bright spot as he has struggled for big wins on Capitol Hill.
committee that he is married to
the chief of staff for White House
counsel Donald McGahn.
For Grassley, those transgressions were enough to yank his
support. But he refused to condemn the White House for nominating Talley — or voice any
concerns with its vetting process.
“There’s no way to have an
absolutely perfect way of vetting,” Grassley said. “With all this
social networking, how do you
keep track of everything that
everybody does?”
A Harvard Law School graduate, Tally had once belonged to a
paranormal research group in
Tuscaloosa, Ala., that hunted for
ghosts, according to a biography
submitted to the Senate. He also
drew fire from critics for hardright blog posts, some of them
strongly opposing restrictions
on gun ownership.
Objections by Democrats to
his résumé did not initially appear to faze Republicans, who in
recent weeks have instead lashed
out at the ABA, accusing it of
being politically biased in its
rankings.
Republicans also have accused
Democrats of inventing excuses
to try to block qualified nominees with whom they disagree
politically from ascending to the
bench. This complaint is at the
heart of the GOP’s decision this
year to waive the traditional
“blue slip” consensus process —
named for the piece of paper
senators from a potential federal
judge’s state must sign to indicate their approval — in some
cases where only Democrats are
objecting to the consideration of
cycle,” said the official, who was
not authorized to speak publicly
and spoke on the condition of
anonymity to be candid.
The video of Petersen that
went viral Thursday captured
five minutes of brutal questioning by Kennedy at Petersen’s
confirmation hearing the day
before. It was posted on Twitter
by Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse
“I have supported nearly every one of President
Trump’s picks, but I don’t blindly support them. I
ask questions that I expect them to be able to
answer.”
Sen. John Neely Kennedy (R-La.), after grilling nominee Matthew Petersen
circuit court judges.
A White House official acknowledged that Trump had a
bad week on judicial nominations but said the president remains undeterred in following
through on a campaign promise
to appoint conservative judges —
a pledge that is particularly important to his political base.
“Our efforts are not going to
be deterred by a negative news
(D-R.I.), who wrote that it
showed Kennedy asking Petersen “basic questions of law & he
can’t answer a single one.”
“Hoo-boy,” Whitehouse wrote.
During Wednesday’s hearing,
Kennedy started by asking Petersen, whom the ABA rated as
qualified for a judgeship, and
four other nominees who appeared with him, “Have any of
you not tried a case to verdict in a
courtroom?”
Petersen alone raised his
hand. Kennedy then bore down.
Had Petersen ever handled a
jury trial? “I have not,” the nominee responded.
Civil? No. Criminal? No.
Bench trial? No. State or federal
court? No.
How many depositions had he
taken — fewer than five?
“Probably somewhere in that
range,” Petersen said.
Had he ever argued a motion
in state court? Federal court? No
on both counts.
Kennedy then asked the last
time Petersen had read the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure —
the standards that govern civil
cases in U.S. district courts.
“In my current position,” Petersen stuttered, “I obviously
don’t need to stay as invested in
those on a day-to-day basis, but I
do try to keep up to speed.”
The inquisition continued for
a few more minutes.
Last month, Kennedy complained that the White House
was trying to strong-arm nominees through the Senate without
taking senators’ opinions into
consideration.
His
complaint
revolved
around Kyle Duncan, Trump’s
choice to fill an empty seat on the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th
Circuit. Instead of consulting
him, Kennedy said, White House
counsel McGahn told him in a
“very firm” tone that Duncan
would be the nominee, “to the
point that he was on the scarce
side, in one conversation, of
being polite.”
A spokeswoman for Kennedy
said Friday that he has not
decided if he will vote against
Petersen’s nomination. Kennedy
backed out of a scheduled interview with The Post. In a statement, he defended his questioning.
“I enthusiastically supported
President Trump for president,
and I still do,” Kennedy said. “In
the past year, I have supported
nearly every one of President
Trump’s picks, but I don’t blindly
support them. I ask questions
that I expect them to be able to
answer. In doing so, I’m just
doing my job.”
A statement issued by Whitehouse’s office said Petersen’s testimony “speaks for itself.”
“Mr. Petersen has been nominated to one of the busiest courts
in the country but he’s never
tried a case,” the statement said.
“He’s never argued a motion. He
cannot recall the basic legal
procedure and doctrine he
would be charged with applying.”
Petersen, a graduate of the
University of Virginia Law
School, has served on the FEC for
nearly a decade. His tenure there
overlapped with that of McGahn,
before he was White House
counsel, for about five years.
Current and former FEC officials described Petersen as amiable, bright, well liked by his
colleagues and deeply devoted to
anti-regulatory principles. A
study of the commission’s voting
patterns found that Petersen voted in virtual lockstep on key
issues for years with other Republicans on the commission,
including McGahn.
In an interview, Ann Ravel, a
former Democratic commissioner who served with Petersen for
more than three years, questioned Petersen’s assertion that
he gained legal experience
through oversight of FEC lawyers, saying the commission had
little direct responsibility for litigation, legal techniques or strategy.
“I do not believe it qualifies
one to be a federal judge,” said
Ravel, who is now a professor at
the University of California at
Berkeley Law School.
john.wagner@washpost.com
robert.oharrow@washpost.com
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
Derek Hawkins contributed to this
report.
Chief judge launches investigation into Kozinski’s conduct
KOZINSKI FROM A1
her breast, which was covered by
her clothes, and moved it with
some “deliberateness” to the center, purporting to be pushing
aside her lapel to fully see her
name tag.
Another lawyer said Kozinski
approached her when she was
alone in a room at a legal community event around 2008 in
downtown Los Angeles and —
with no warning — gave her a
bear hug and kissed her on the
lips.
A University of California at
Irvine law professor said Kozinski pinched her at a dinner this
year, and he also joked that he
had just had sex with his wife
and she or others at the table
would be “happy to know it still
works.”
A former U.S. Court of Federal
Claims judge said Kozinski
grabbed and squeezed each of
her breasts as the two drove back
from an event in Baltimore in the
mid-1980s, after she had told
him she did not want to stop at a
motel and have sex.
The Washington Post reported
on Dec. 8 that six women — all
former clerks or more junior
staff members known as externs
in the U.S. Court of Appeals for
the 9th Circuit — alleged that
Kozinski had subjected them to
inappropriate sexual conduct or
comments, including two who
said the judge showed them
pornography in his chambers.
Soon after that account became public, two others made
allegations of impropriety in
published, firsthand accounts
that included their names. Dahlia Lithwick, who clerked for
another judge in the 9th Circuit
in the mid-1990s, wrote in Slate
about how Kozinski, upon learning she was in a hotel room, had
asked her what she was wearing.
Nancy Rapoport, special counsel
to the president of the University
of Nevada at Las Vegas — wrote
in a personal blog post how the
judge had invited her to drinks
during her clerkship for another
9th Circuit judge and remarked:
“What do single girls in San
Francisco do for sex?”
Seven more women have since
described their experiences to
The Washington Post, three of
them in on-the-record interviews.
In a statement read by one of
his lawyers, Susan Estrich of the
firm Quinn Emanuel Urquhart
and Sullivan, Kozinski said:
“Many of the things that are
being said about me are simply
not true, but I deeply regret that
my unusual sense of humor
caused offense or made anyone
uncomfortable. I have always
treated my male and female law
clerks the same.”
After The Post published its
first report, Kozinski told the Los
Angeles Times, “If this is all they
are able to dredge up after 35
years, I am not too worried.”
The review of possible misconduct that Kozinski now faces
could lead to his being reprimanded, asked to retire or
blocked from taking new cases
for a period of time. On Thursday, Assistant Circuit Executive
David Madden said in a statement that “one or more” of
Kozinski’s clerks had resigned.
The reason was unclear.
A 33-year-old woman said that
when she was a student at the
University of Montana Law
School in 2016, Kozinski came to
speak at an event. She said she
encountered Kozinski at a reception afterward, and Kozinski —
in an apparent attempt to see her
name tag, which was partially
obscured by her lapel — “very
deliberately put his finger on the
other side of my breast, and
moved it, with some pressure”
toward the center.
“It was shocking to me,” the
woman said, adding: “I thought
it was wrong. I thought it was
inappropriate, and it felt ex-
J. DAVID AKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The total number of women who now accuse Alex Kozinski — a
judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit — of some
kind of inappropriate comment, touching or other behavior is 15.
tremely entitled.”
Four of the woman’s friends,
two men and two women, said
she told them about what had
happened soon after the incident. One friend, Kathryn Ore,
31, then a fellow Montana student who was also at the event,
said Kozinski “spent the whole
time staring at my breasts” — for
likely a minute or two — during a
conversation they had.
“It was long enough and the
context was weird enough that it
kind of threw me,” Ore said,
adding that, although it was
possible his gaze meant something else, “I don’t think I misinterpreted.”
Leah Litman, 33, a law professor at the University of California
at Irvine, said she, similarly,
encountered Kozinski when they
appeared together on a panel at
her school in July to discuss
Supreme Court issues. Litman
said that at a dinner at the Italian
restaurant Canaletto the night
before their panel, Kozinski
talked of having just had sex and
pinched her side and her leg, just
above the knee, with his thumb
and middle finger. She said he
also tried to feed her with a
utensil.
“I felt uncomfortable and just
wanted to leave,” Litman said.
Rick Hasen, a University of
California at Irvine professor
who was at the dinner, said he
recalled Kozinski making a comment similar to what Litman
described, and the experience
was “surreal.” Hasen said he
would not have been able to see
any touching of Litman’s leg or
side.
Three friends also confirmed
that Litman had previously told
them about various parts of the
interaction not long after it occurred, and Litman provided
screenshots of text messages exchanges with two of them. In one
exchange, she indicated she was
touched repeatedly, remarking,
“It was gross.” The friend who
received that message, University of Michigan Law professor
Gil Seinfeld, confirmed the texts
were authentic and that he and
Litman had discussed Kozinski
touching her.
Christine O.C. Miller, 73, a
retired U.S. Court of Federal
Claims judge, said that around
early 1986 — shortly after Kozinski was appointed to his seat in
the 9th Circuit — he invited her
to attend a legal community
function in the Baltimore area.
As the two drove back together, Miller said, Kozinski asked if
she wanted to stop at a motel and
have sex.
Miller, then in her early 40s
and married, said she had considered Kozinski, who had
served as chief of the Claims
Court, “an ally and a professional
friend” but harbored no romantic feelings for him.
“I told him, no, I wasn’t interested and didn’t want to be
involved in anything like that,”
she said. Kozinski, she said, persisted.
“He said if you won’t sleep
with me, I want to touch you, and
then he reached over, and — this
was the most antiseptic — he
grabbed each of my breasts and
squeezed them,” Miller said. She
said she stared straight ahead,
and he soon dropped her off at
her home.
Miller said she told a friend
and her husband at the time —
both of whom are now deceased.
Her current husband, Dennis
Miller, said that when he started
dating Miller decades ago, she
also told him of an incident in
which Kozinski “tried to grope
her.”
Many of Kozinski’s accusers
have talked only on the condition
that their names and other identifying information not be published, out of fear that he might
retaliate against them or the
institutions for which they work.
One lawyer said that Kozinski
approached her when she was
alone in a room at a legal community function in downtown
Los Angeles in 2008 and planted
a kiss on her lips. The woman
was then in her 50s and said she
was hardly even an acquaintance
of Kozinski.
“It was really disgusting,” the
woman said. “It would have been
disgusting if I were young, but it
was particularly gross and unwelcome.”
The woman’s husband confirmed that his wife had told him
about the episode and they felt
they were unable to do anything,
given Kozinski’s position.
A former Kozinski clerk said
Kozinski, in his chambers,
showed her an “open-legged image of a male figure that was
naked,” although it did not have
the “intent” of typical porn. Still,
the former clerk said she was
startled and soon went to talk to
another 9th Circuit clerk about
what had happened.
“I was pretty shaken about it,”
the former clerk said. The other
former clerk confirmed their
conversation.
The former Kozinski clerk,
who is the third to have described the judge showing her an
explicit image in chambers, said
the judge must have seen the
dismay on her face, because he
soon came to her to apologize
and ask if she was okay.
“I said I was okay but that was
not the kind of thing I wanted to
be exposed to, and he never
showed me anything like that
again,” the former clerk said.
A former 9th Circuit clerk said
that at a dinner with other
clerks, Kozinski brought up a
movie that contained a topless
woman, talking about her “voluptuous” breasts. The woman,
who spoke on the condition of
anonymity, said she made a face
to signal her disbelief at what he
was saying, and Kozinski turned
to her and said something like,
“What? I’m a man.” Another
person who was at the table said
he recalled the dinner and that
he apologized to the clerk afterward, as he had brought her to
Kozinski’s table.
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
Julie Tate contributed to this report.
A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
The World
BY
S IMON D ENYER
IN BEIJING
L
i Chunke began carving
ivory after leaving school
as a 15-year-old boy.
Today, at 68, this master
craftsman is working until the
early hours of every morning,
trying to finish a 20-inch statuette of Buddha on an unforgiving
deadline — before China implements a total ban on ivory sales at
the end of this month. The art of
ivory carving survived even the
tumult of China’s Cultural Revolution, but he’s worried it may
soon die out.
“What makes China great is
that its traditional culture still
exists,” he said. “If it disappears in
China, it will be a loss for the
whole world.”
Yet China’s commitment to put
craftsmen like Li out of business
and close down its ivory industry
has thrown a lifeline to African
elephants and brought new hope
in the battle to end the poaching
of tens of thousands of animals
every year for their tusks.
The Chinese government shut
down 67 ivory-carving workshops and retail outlets in March,
and will have closed the remaining 105 by the end of this year,
honoring a commitment President Xi Jinping first made alongside President Barack Obama in
2015.
“China’s ban is one of the most
important things that has happened to elephants in the last
10 years,” said Iain Douglas-Hamilton, one of the world’s leading
elephant conservationists and
founder of Save the Elephants.
“It’s a highly significant step,
and I think the impact is increasingly being felt in parts of Africa.
But although the net is tightening, the battle is not won at all,” he
said.
Poaching levels have dropped
slightly in each of the past five
years, according to research for
the Convention on International
Trade in Endangered Species
(CITES), and stronger law enforcement efforts have pushed
ivory seizures to a record high.
But the total number of elephants
in Africa is still thought to be
declining because of illegal killings.
However, the looming prospect of China’s ban appears to
have pricked the speculative bubble that had contributed to the
poaching crisis. The wholesale
price of raw ivory in China is
reported to have fallen by almost
two-thirds in the past three years,
from $2,100 per kilogram in 2014
to $730 in February 2017.
China had been the world’s
biggest ivory market. Until this
year, craftsmen were legally allowed to work with ivory from a
stockpile imported in 2008 — but
that business provided cover for a
vast illegal trade.
Rising wealth, a growing appreciation of ivory as part of
Chinese cultural heritage, its value as a status symbol and popular
gift, a sense that it was an
inflation-proof investment, and
its use in Buddhist beads, pendants or figurines had all combined to create a boom in the
industry, experts say — and a
huge opportunity for global
crime syndicates to exploit.
At the peak of the ivory boom,
from 2010 to 2012, more than
30,000 elephants were slaughtered every year, research
showed.
But the global conservation
movement fought back: Instead
of pointing fingers, advocates
made China feel part of a joint
effort to end the trade, involving
source countries, transit countries and destination countries,
said John Scanlon, secretary general of CITES.
It helped that Xi wanted to
curb corruption. Ivory was a popular gift to woo an official or
PHOTOS BY YAN CONG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Li Chunke carves a likeness of Gautama Buddha from ivory this month at his Beijing workshop, also shown below. China’s ban
on the trade of elephant ivory could threaten Li’s traditional practice in a way not seen since Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution.
Traditional art is casualty as China
protects elephants from ivory trade
Conservationists praise breakthrough, but carvers fear the end of an ancient custom
grease a business deal. Poaching
was also damaging China’s image
in Africa, where it has been investing and gaining influence.
Within China, a public awareness campaign was crafted by the
San Francisco-based group WildAid, backed by state media and
fronted by former National Basketball Association player Yao
Ming and other Chinese celebrities. Most Chinese people had not
been aware before then that elephants had to die for their ivory
to be harvested.
With a total ban in place, the
job for law enforcement will be
much easier: Any sales of elephant ivory anywhere in China
will soon be illegal.
Yet the battle to win over the
Chinese consumer is far from
over.
A survey released Wednesday
by two affiliated wildlife organizations, TRAFFIC and the World
Wildlife Fund, found that less
than half of consumers surveyed
recalled having heard of the ivory
ban. After being told of the ban,
most people said they would support it, and many said they had
already stopped buying ivory. But
the survey found a “die-hard”
19 percent of consumers who
were inclined to keep buying ivory, even after it is banned.
In Beijing, shopkeepers are offering heavy discounts to shift
stock before the ax falls. An intricately carved tusk in one outlet
was recently reduced from nearly
$1 million to around $600,000,
and other items were offered with
similar discounts.
But just outside China’s borders, ivory is still openly on sale
and is still being eagerly snapped
up by some Chinese consumers.
A study by Save the Elephants
released in September found that
Laos was the fastest-growing ivory market in the world, with
Chinese tourists buying up
80 percent of the ivory on sale
there at prices significantly lower
than in China.
Vietnam is another big market,
with ivory openly on sale and
smugglers crossing back and
forth across the border to supply
Chinese consumers, said Zhou
Fei, head of the China wildlife
programs for TRAFFIC. The
Golden Triangle, a lawless opiumproducing region straddling Burma, Thailand and Laos, is another region where Chinese-run
businesses supply Chinese consumers with African ivory, experts say.
Cambodia has become another
transit point for the illegal trade.
Earlier this month, officials there
seized nearly 1.1 tons of ivory
hidden in hollowed-out logs.
“When you tighten the screws
in one place, criminal groups will
target another place,” Scanlon
said. “The last thing we want to
do is let the pressure off and think
we’ve won yet.”
Peter Knights, chief executive
at WildAid, applauds China’s
leadership, but he laments that
“Britain is dragging its feet” and
that Japan is the only major
consumer still unwilling to join
the global effort.
Under Obama, the United
States tightened federal laws to
ban cross-border and interstate
trade; seven states have enacted
their own intrastate bans.
“China took the first step, and
it needs to feel that other countries are supporting it and also
stepping up to the plate,” said
Grace Ge Gabriel, Asia director
for the International Fund for
Animal Welfare.
In November, the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Authority set alarm bells
ringing in the conservation community by announcing it would
reverse a ban on trophy-hunting
imports from Zimbabwe and
Zambia. Two days later, Trump
tweeted that elephant hunting is
a “horror show” and put the move
on hold.
“There were leaders on the
Republican side in Congress and
Fox News hosts pleading with
him not to allow elephant trophy
hunting,” said Iris Ho, wildlife
program manager for the Humane Society International in
Washington. “On the elephant
protection issue, there is strong
bipartisan support, especially on
the Republican side.”
Yet, despite the global concerns, Knights and Ho say China
is unlikely to waver.
“Don’t forget, this ban came
from the top,” Knights said. “Once
these things happen, they don’t
tend to get reversed. China sees
this as a matter of pride.”
Ivory carving in China traces
its origins to the Ming and Qing
dynasties, from the 14th to the
early 20th centuries, when the
craft’s main consumers came
from the imperial court and elite
scholar-officials.
It was revived after the communist takeover in 1949 but soon
ran into trouble. Master carver Li
remembers well the chaos of the
Cultural Revolution, a decade of
upheaval unleashed by Mao Zedong in 1966, when Red Guards
mounted frenzied attacks against
the Four Olds — old ideas, customs, culture and habits — and
destroyed books and art and ransacked museums and temples.
At first, Li said, ivory carvers
were banned from traditional
subjects and had to focus instead
on “modern” art, including
scenes from revolutionary ballets
like “The Red Detachment of
Women.”
But revolutionary art didn’t
sell, and Mao’s government needed foreign currency. By 1968, Li
and his fellow carvers were ordered to return to more traditional subjects, carving pieces that
would be sold abroad to earn
foreign exchange.
“Outside, they were destroying
the Four Olds. Inside, we were
creating the Four Olds,” he said.
Today, he loves carving people
and conveying emotion in his
figures, as well as creating impossibly intricate images of flowers,
birds, mountains and rivers. Every piece of ivory he carved, he
insists, came from approved and
certified sources, and never from
poachers.
simon.denyer@washpost.com
Liu Yang contributed to this report.
DIGEST
INDONESIA
6.5-magnitude quake
shakes Java island
A strong earthquake shook the
Indonesian capital Friday night
and other cities on the country’s
most populous island of Java,
killing at least one person amid
reports of more deaths and
collapsed houses.
The quake struck at 11:47 p.m.
and triggered a tsunami warning
for parts of Java’s coastline that
was lifted about two hours later.
People ran out of buildings
in panic in many areas, and
Indonesian TV showed heavy
traffic on roads as people left
coastal areas.
A 62-year-old man was
confirmed dead in the Ciamis
region of western Java and there
were reports of more deaths in
the same region, said National
Disaster Mitigation Agency
spokesman Sutopo Purwo
Nugroho. Strong tremors were
felt for about 20 seconds in
Jakarta, the capital, and in other
cities and towns, he said.
The U.S. Geological Survey
said the earthquake had a
magnitude of 6.5 and was about
56 miles deep and just inland.
— Associated Press
NETHERLANDS
Knife-wielding man
shot by airport police
A man was shot in the leg at
Amsterdam’s busy Schiphol
Airport on Friday after he
walked into a military police
office and threatened staff with
a knife, a spokesman for the
military police said.
The incident, which sparked a
brief evacuation of parts of the
airport, was not being treated as
an extremist attack.
“The circumstances are telling
us that it has nothing to do with
terrorism,” said Stan Verberkt, a
spokesman for the Marechaussee
military police service, whose
armed officers patrol Schiphol.
The man was arrested and
taken to an Amsterdam hospital
as police began investigations at
the scene and travelers who had
been ushered outside were
allowed back into the airport.
Verberkt said the suspect
would be interrogated once he
had received treatment.
— Associated Press
PERU
Opposition moves to
force out president
Opposition lawmakers began
an effort to force Peruvian
President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski
out of office after he rebuffed
calls to resign over his ties to
companies that received
payments from disgraced
Brazilian builder Odebrecht.
Congress members from three
parties signed a motion Friday
to remove the center-right
president on the grounds of
moral incapacity.
Peru’s currency and bonds
have slumped amid concerns
that the 79-year-old Wall Street
veteran might be forced out of
office after only 16 months
heading one of Latin America’s
fastest-growing economies.
Since Brazil-based Odebrecht
admitted bribing officials in
several nations in the “Carwash”
case, a corruption investigation
has rocked Peru’s establishment
and damped economic growth.
— Bloomberg News
Austrian conservatives,
nationalists reach deal:
Conservative and nationalist
parties in Austria say they have
reached a deal on creating a
coalition government that will
make 31-year-old Sebastian Kurz
the new chancellor and Europe’s
youngest leader. Kurz’s
conservative Austrian People’s
Party finished first in the
country’s Oct. 15 election. It then
embarked on coalition talks with
the right-wing Freedom Party.
Kurz and the Freedom Party’s
Heinz-Christian Strache gave few
details as they announced their
agreement, which will shift the
country to the right.
Communist alliance pulls off
surprise win in Nepal: An
alliance of former communist
parties pulled off a surprise
victory in Nepal this week. The
Left Alliance, a coalition of
former Maoist fighters and the
Nepal Communist Party, says it
has won 113 of 165 parliamentary
seats in what is seen as a
stunning defeat of Prime
Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba’s
ruling Nepali Congress party.
The coalition, which has close
ties to neighboring China, won
most of the contested seats in
both the Parliament and
Provincial Assembly.
Opposition blocks highways
over Honduras vote: Thousands
of opposition supporters built
burning barricades to block
highways in Honduras in protest
of the country’s Nov. 26
presidential election. Police and
troops dismantled the barricades
only to see them rebuilt as
masses gathered to reject the
slim lead held by President Juan
Orlando Hernández, who has
been accused of electoral fraud
by opposition candidate
Salvador Nasralla. Honduras’s
electoral court has finished a
hand recount of votes, but has
still not declared a winner.
— From news services
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
Iraq’s top Shiite cleric
backs Abadi with call to
reduce militia influence
BY T AMER E L- G HOBASHY
AND M USTAFA S ALIM
baghdad — Iraq’s top Shiite cler-
MOHAMMED SABER/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Protesters in Gaza carry an injured man Friday near the boundary with Israel. Protests in Gaza and the West Bank continued a pattern of
demonstrations that have pitted Palestinians against Israeli forces since President Trump said on Dec. 6 that Jerusalem is Israel’s capital.
Four Palestinians killed in protests
Friday’s violence was the
bloodiest since Trump’s
Jerusalem declaration
BY L OVEDAY M ORRIS
AND H AZEM B ALOUSHA
jerusalem — Four Palestinians
were killed Friday during violent
clashes with Israeli security forces, marking the bloodiest day of
demonstrations since President
Trump sparked outrage across
much of the Middle East by declaring Jerusalem the capital of
Israel.
Two demonstrators were shot
dead in clashes along the fence
that separates Gaza from Israel,
according to Gaza’s Health Ministry, which identified one as a disabled 29-year-old who had previously lost his legs. The Israeli
military said it had fired “selectively towards main instigators.”
Two others were killed during
confrontations in the occupied
West Bank. One had stabbed an
Israeli officer, according to Israeli
police.
Trump’s announcement last
week that the United States recognizes Jerusalem as the capital of
Israel and will move the U.S. Embassy to the city from Tel Aviv has
triggered regular outbursts of violence over the past week. The
decision has been followed by the
most sustained period of rocket
fire from Gaza into Israel since
the devastating 2014 war between
Israel and Hamas, the militant
group that controls the coastal
enclave.
Thousands filled the streets of
Gaza for large demonstrations after Friday prayers, where leaders
of the main militant factions
urged residents to keep alive their
intifada, or uprising, against Israel. “We are heading to Jerusalem,”
they chanted, waving Palestinian
flags.
After the demonstrations,
many headed to the border fence,
with some young men loading
donkey carts with tires to burn.
Israeli forces used tear gas, rubber bullets and live ammunition
to keep protesters away from the
fence.
The Israeli army said about
3,500 people had participated in
the clashes along the Gaza border.
About 2,500 Palestinian “rioters”
demonstrated in the West Bank,
throwing rocks and firebombs
and burning tires, the army added. There, Palestinian factions
had called for another “day of
rage” to protest Trump’s announcement on the status of Jerusalem.
In Ramallah, a man stabbed an
Israeli police officer twice and
was shot, police said. A video
circulated online showed the
young man backing away before
officers opened fire. Soldiers and
paramedics approach him, then
scatter, apparently having spotted what appeared to be a suicide
belt. Police said they were investi-
gating whether the device was
real.
Another Palestinian died of injuries sustained in clashes near
Jerusalem, the Associated Press
reported.
Jerusalem is holy to Christians,
Muslims and Jews and is at the
heart of the decades-old conflict
between Israelis and Palestinians.
The U.S. declaration was considered by Palestinians as a denial of
their claims to a section of the city.
The United Nations considers the
Israeli annexation of the eastern
half of the city as illegal.
Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has said that the
United States can no longer be
considered an honest broker in
the peace process and is refusing
to meet Vice President Pence
when Pence visits the region this
month. Christian and Muslim
leaders also have said they will
not meet Pence.
loveday.morris@washpost.com
Balousha reported from Gaza.
A masked
Palestinian
stands amid
heavy smoke
from burning
debris during
clashes with
Israeli troops at
the Huwwara
checkpoint near
the West Bank
city of Nablus.
Two of four
Palestinian
fatalities during
clashes with
Israeli forces on
Friday occurred
in the West Bank.
ALAA BADARNE/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
ic on Friday called on the powerful
Shiite militias that helped reconquer the Islamic State’s territory to
choose between politics and arms,
backing a key demand of the
prime minister.
Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani
stopped short, however, of rescinding a religious edict he made
in June 2014 urging Iraqi citizens
to join security forces at a time
when the Islamic State was sweeping through the country, eventually taking over about a third of
Iraq’s territory.
Instead, he said that all weapons should be under the control of
the state and that armed groups
should steer clear of political participation — marking a major step
in Iraq’s move from a war footing
now that major combat against
the Islamic State has ended.
Sistani’s call, made during a
weekly prayer sermon delivered in
the city of Karbala by a representative of the reclusive cleric, comes
ahead of elections next spring in
which Prime Minister Haider alAbadi is expected to face challenges from leaders of Shiite militias,
whose influence and visibility
have grown during the three-year
battle against the militants of the
Islamic State. Many of the militias
are backed by Iran.
Maintaining Abadi’s hold on
power is a major priority for the
United States, which worked
closely with the Iraqi prime minister in the Islamic State conflict.
Abadi is seen by Washington and
many Iraqis as a reliable check on
Iranian influence in Iraq and a
figure who could lead a national
reconciliation between Sunnis
and Shiites.
Sistani’s comments are likely to
bolster Abadi, who has said that
reining in the many armed Shiite
militias is an immediate imperative to stabilize the country as it
reckons with the physical and social damage of the Islamic State
occupation. In an interview with
The Washington Post in October,
Abadi said the militias must join
the formal Iraqi security forces or
disband and separate their political and military activities. Those
that refuse will become “outlaws,”
he warned.
On Friday, Sistani did not call
out the militias by name but
hewed to Abadi’s line, raising the
possibility that the militias could
lose popular support if they disobey him.
He said Iraq still needs the manpower of the volunteers but exclusively within Iraq’s regular security forces.
“It is necessary to make continued use of this important energy
within the constitutional and legal frameworks that restrict arms
to the state,” Sistani’s representative said.
He added that the volunteers,
known as the popular mobilization units, earned a reputation
exceeding any political force in
Iraq and that exploiting their popularity for political purposes
would sully their “holy status.”
Sistani’s words resonate deeply
in majority-Shiite Iraq. His 2014
edict prompted a stampede to join
Iraq’s security forces. Although he
had urged Shiites to sign up for
Iraq’s police and army, the majority raced to join established and
newly formed militias that were
hungrily recruiting under a banner of religious obligation.
Sistani’s call helped swell militia ranks to about 100,000. They
operate under the umbrella of the
popular mobilization units, which
were legally incorporated into
Iraq’s security apparatus in 2016,
ostensibly commanded by the
prime minister’s office. But the
legislation left their mandate
vague and did not touch their
command structure.
The legislation did, however,
bring 100,000 fighters under
Iraq’s strained municipal budget.
Dismantling or reducing the force
would leave many unemployed.
The deputy commander of the
popular mobilization units is Abu
Mahdi al-Muhandis, who the
United States has designated a
terrorist and who maintains close
ties with Maj. Gen. Qasem Soleimani, commander of the elite
Quds Force of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps.
The largest and most powerful
militias — the Badr Organization,
al-Nujaba, Asaib Ahl al-Haq, the
Peace Brigades and Kitaeb Hezbollah — all have charismatic
commanders, and most rely on
Iran financially and ideologically.
They actively fought American
troops after the 2003 invasion.
Their interests have aligned
with the Iraqi government’s over
the past three years, but they have
shown repeated disregard for
Abadi’s orders. Despite Iraq’s
pledge not to interfere in regional
conflicts, thousands of militia
fighters have participated in battles in Syria on the side of Iran,
Russia and Syrian President
Bashar al-Assad.
The popular mobilization units
have fought in nearly every major
battle against the Islamic State, to
the chagrin of the United States
and many Iraqi Sunnis who see
them as a sectarian force. In the
early years of the war, they were
implicated in the summary executions and disappearances of Sunni
civilians seen by the militias as
Islamic State sympathizers.
More recently, the militias’ participation in the swift campaign to
reclaim Kirkuk from Kurdish
control after a failed Kurdish effort to secede has alarmed Kurdish Iraqis, who accuse the groups
of being Iranian proxies.
They also are deeply enmeshed
in Iraq’s governing structure. The
Badr Organization, which was created in Tehran in the 1980s, holds
seats in parliament, and successive interior ministers have been
senior leaders of the group.
This week, several prominent
militia commanders, including
the Peace Brigade’s Moqtada alSadr and Badr Organization leader Hadi al-Amiri, said they would
be willing to disarm or decouple
their political activities from their
armed wings. This is the clearest
signal yet that these commanders
intend to participate in national
elections next year.
Experts doubt that the move
would actually weaken either
group and see it as a public relations maneuver that cannot be
fully carried out.
Ahmed al-Mayali, a political science professor at Baghdad University, said some of the popular mobilization units that mustered after Sistani’s call will be easy to
disband because they are loyal to
the cleric. But those with close
links to Iran will never realistically
give up their weapons, he said,
setting the stage for a protracted
political or armed struggle.
“One of the games that Iran is
playing is they will do their best to
keep these groups strong in Iraq to
use them in case there is pressure
against them from the West,” he
said. “That will put the Iraqi government in a critical situation that
might escalate to armed battles to
disarm these groups.”
tamer.el-ghobashy@washpost.com
In reversal, Tillerson says N. Korea must ‘earn’ way back to talks
BY
C AROL M ORELLO
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
on Friday vowed to keep squeezing North Korea with sanctions,
warning it faces economic ruin if
it continues to pursue nuclear
weapons, after he had a sharp
exchange with Pyongyang’s envoy
to the United Nations.
Speaking at the U.N. Security
Council in a session called for
foreign ministers, Tillerson said
North Korea must demonstrate
its interest in serious negotiations by stopping its missile tests
for an undefined period of time.
“North Korea must earn its way
back to the table,” he said. “The
pressure campaign must and will
continue until denuclearization
is achieved.”
Tillerson’s remarks backpedaled from more conciliatory language he adopted earlier this
week, when he asserted that the
United States would start talks
with no preconditions. His over-
ture was undercut a few hours
later by the White House, which
said the administration’s position
remains that Pyongyang must
start to move toward denuclearization before earning a seat at
the negotiating table.
On Friday, Tillerson laid down
what were in essence two preconditions: a “sustained cessation of
North Korea’s threatening behavior,” and accepting that the ultimate outcome would be for North
Korea to abandon its nuclear
weapons program.
The Security Council meeting
was called amid rising concerns
about nuclear conflict. North Korea has boasted its missiles are
now capable of striking anywhere
in the continental United States.
The Trump administration has
responded by saying it is prepared for military action, if necessary, even while Tillerson continues to try to isolate North Korea
diplomatically and economically
by getting more countries to fully
implement strict U.N. sanctions
to starve it of the cash it needs to
develop its weapons programs.
North Korea insists it will never give up its nuclear weapons,
which it says are meant to deter a
U.S. attack.
“In order to get such talks
going, the U.S. side as well as
North Korea must demonstrate
more restraint and cease making
further reckless threats,” said
Daryl Kimball, executive director
of the Arms Control Association,
a nonpartisan group for armscontrol policies. “For North Korea
that means a halt to all nuclear
and ballistic missile tests, and for
the United States, refraining from
military maneuvers and overflights that appear to be practice
runs for an attack on the North.
“If such restraint is not forthcoming, we can expect a further
escalation of tensions and a growing risk of a catastrophic war.”
Tillerson insists diplomatic
and economic measures are still
viable tools. He called on Russia
and China to increase pressure on
Pyongyang, going beyond the
stringent U.N. sanctions already
in place. He suggested that their
failure to do so meant they
weren’t fully committed to resolving the crisis.
“Continuing to allow North Korean laborers to toil in slave-like
conditions inside Russia in exchange for wages used to fund
nuclear weapons programs calls
into question Russia’s dedication
as a partner for peace,” Tillerson
said. “Similarly, as Chinese crude
oil flows to North Korean refineries, the United States questions
China’s commitment to solving
an issue that has serious implications for the security of its own
citizens.”
As Tillerson spoke, he was
watched intently from across the
table by North Korea’s representative at the United Nations, Ja
Song Nam. Under U.N. rules,
countries being discussed at the
Security Council are invited to
attend, but North Korea usually
boycotts.
“The DPRK has a choice,” Tillerson said, using the acronym for
North Korea’s official name, the
Democratic People’s Republic of
Korea. “It can reverse course, give
up its unlawful nuclear weapons
programs and join the community of nations, or it can continue to
condemn its people to poverty
and isolation.”
Tensions in the room seemed
to rise further when it was Ja’s
turn to speak. Reading from prepared remarks, he defended his
country’s nuclear program as selfdefense against a U.S. invasion or
what he termed U.S. “nuclear
blackmail.” He accused the Security Council of being a tool of
Washington and said it had ignored Pyongyang’s repeated requests to denounce joint military
exercises conducted by U.S. and
South Korean troops.
“Our possession of nuclear
weapons is in self-defense,” he
said, “to defend our sovereignty
and right of resistance from the
U.S. nuclear threat. If anyone is to
blame for it, the U.S. is the one
who must be held accountable.”
Tillerson sounded indignant
when he was given a few minutes
to respond.
“They alone are responsible for
these tensions,” he said of the
regime led by Kim Jong Un. “They
alone must take responsibility for
these tensions. And they alone
can solve these tensions.”
Speaking to reporters afterward, Tillerson said his remarks
were a warning for Pyongyang to
consider “whether it’s possible for
them to even sustain an economy
if they continue on the path.”
“Our communications channels remain open,” he said. “North
Korea knows they’re open. They
know where the door is. They
know where to walk through the
door when they want to talk.”
carol.morello@washpost.com
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
Fears for
migrants
braving
winter
MIGRANTS FROM A1
The journey to Canada
For many migrants fleeing the
Midwest, the fields here in Kittson
County, Minn., have become the
favored entry into Canada. Just
west of the county line, Interstate 29 in North Dakota leads to
an official border crossing.
After arriving by car from cities
across the Midwest, asylum seekers drive on the highway to the last
exit before the Canadian border,
Pembina, N.D.
From there, some follow the
twisting Red River on foot about
five miles north into Canada. Others wander through Kittson County farms and marshes until they
arrive near St. Vincent, which has
a population of just 64, or here in
Noyes.
Noyes has a railroad yard but is
largely abandoned. There are just
three inhabited houses — two of
which are owned by one family,
according to local residents. But
the town abuts Emerson, Canada,
once a bustling entryway to the
Canadian frontier but now home
PHOTOS BY BENJAMIN OLSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: The view north along the Red River into Canada from the
boundary of Minnesota and North Dakota. ABOVE: An abandoned
outbuilding in Noyes, Minn., which has just three inhabited
houses. LEFT: Farmer Shane Stewart, 60, left, chats with Chale’s
Oil owner Wayne Chale, 54, in St. Vincent, Minn.
to just 700 residents.
Crossing the border illegally
here is perilous, especially at night
and during the winter. If migrants
do not align their planned route to
lead directly into Emerson, a city
of just eight square miles, they
could wander for days in vast,
desolate stretches of the Canadian
prairie, authorities said.
The Ghanaian woman who
died near Noyes this year apparently became disoriented in a field
and stumbled into a drainage
ditch, according to the Kittson
County Sheriff’s Office. The 57year-old woman had been living
illegally in the United States and
was trying to reunite with relatives in Toronto, the Canadian
Broadcasting Company reported.
In December 2016, a truck driver in Manitoba province found
two men from Ghana wandering
along a highway and suffering
from frostbite. The men, each of
whom had to have several fingers
amputated, told Canadian media
that their U.S. visas had expired
and that they feared the Trump
presidency.
Doug Johnston, a council member and firefighter in the combined Canadian municipality of
Emerson-Franklin, said local rescue squads now are called out
several times a month after receiving emergency calls from lost or
disoriented asylum seekers.
“It seems the worse the weather, the more people we can get,”
said Johnston, noting that temperatures can drop to minus-20
degrees Fahrenheit in the winter.
“They are calling 911, but it can get
so cold their phones go dead.”
He said that families sometimes become separated as they
cross the border.
“We are not always finding
them together, but we seem to
eventually catch up and find
them,” Johnston said, pausing to
look out over a snowy field extending beyond the line of sight. “At
least to my knowledge.”
Many of those fleeing to Canada are Africans or Haitians, according to local officials.
The outflow of Haitians began
late last year, when community
concerns first surfaced that
Trump was going to rescind temporary residency permits issued
in the wake of Haiti’s 2010 earthquake.
The Department of Homeland
So she paid someone $600 to
drive her to the Canadian border,
she said.
“I am hoping here in Canada, I
can live without fear, and in peace,
and nobody is going to look for
me,” she said.
MANITOBA
CANADA
Detail
N.D.
MINN.
U.S.
S.D.
200 MILES
West
Lynne
Emerson
CANADA
U.S.
Noyes
29
NORTH
DAKOTA
Red
Ri
v
Since the start of the year, more
than 1,000 people have made similar journeys through this tiny
community in far northwestern
Minnesota in an attempt to enter
Canada by avoiding official border crossings, part of a nationwide
surge as Trump advances his campaign pledge to make life uninviting for undocumented immigrants and some aspiring refugees. The exodus, also playing out
in border towns in the Northeast
that lead to Quebec and Ontario,
is rattling local officials on both
sides of the border who are now
angry about being shoved onto
the front lines of America’s divisive immigration debate.
A Ghanaian woman’s body was
found in a ditch near this small
Minnesota town in May. She was
an asylum seeker who succumbed
to hypothermia while trying to
cross the border. Residents fear
there will be calamities in coming
months as travelers encounter
winter here, when a frigid northwestern wind scours barren fields
separating Minnesota from Canada’s Manitoba province, making
the traverse through blizzards
and across frozen swamps a harrowing and life-threatening trip.
The concern has intensified,
with county officials publicly calling on the Trump administration
and Canada to waive a policy that
prevents would-be refugees from
passing through official border
crossings. That plea has been met
with silence.
Although rural Minnesota
overwhelmingly
supported
Trump in last year’s election, some
residents are troubled by his hardline immigration policies, given
the impact on their towns.
“For us, it’s a shocker to see
these people wandering around,”
said Leroy Clow, 73, a retired
farmer and electrician. “It’s nicedressed families — like they could
be your neighbor — but they are
scared and don’t know what else
to do.”
According to the Canadian government, 9,335 people made asylum claims at land ports of entry
between January and October, including those picked up after
crossing the border from the United States at unauthorized locations. That is more than double
the average of annual claims
made from 2011 through 2016.
Counting asylum requests at
airports, marine terminals and
immigration offices, the Canadian government processed more
than 41,000 applications this year
through Oct. 31, nearly double the
total processed in all of 2016.
The influx overwhelmed Canadian immigration authorities,
who scrambled to open temporary shelters during the summer,
including briefly converting part
of Montreal’s Olympic Stadium
into temporary housing.
By hiking through rural communities, the migrants to Canada
are largely bypassing a 2002
agreement between the United
States and Canada that was designed to manage movement between the countries.
The Canada-U.S. Safe Third
Country Agreement requires migrants to claim asylum in the first
safe country they reach, unless
they are minors or have family ties
at their next destination. The
agreement means those who try to
cross from the United States into
Canada at official border posts are
turned away; a loophole permits
asylum claims to be made by individuals who enter Canada covertly.
er
Location where
body was found
MINNESOTA
Approximate routes
taken by refugees
Pembina
St. Vincent
75
1 MILE
Sources: Maps4News/HERE, Digital Globe via Google Earth
Security this month finalized the
policy change ending temporary
protected status for an estimated
60,000 Haitians but set an 18month window for them to depart
voluntarily.
Temporary protected status for
more than 370,000 people from
Honduras, Nepal, El Salvador, Somalia, South Sudan, Syria and
Yemen remains in place, although
the Department of Homeland Security has signaled that those
groups’ protected status is under
aggressive review. Temporary
protection for 263,000 citizens of
El Salvador could expire as soon
as March.
U.S. and Canadian officials say
the rate of asylum seekers crossing the border into Canada appears to have slowed in November
and so far this month. But local
officials in this sparsely populated
area and activists from immigrant-heavy communities say
they fear the slowdown might be
temporary.
Abdullah Kiatamba, executive
director of African Immigrant
Services in suburban Minneapolis, said such worries are well
founded as U.S. policy shifts.
“A lot of people are concerned
and think that it’s better in Canada, and they can create a new life
THE WASHINGTON POST
instead of waiting hopelessly and
endlessly that something will
change here,” Kiatamba said.
“There are three layers to this — a
new anti-immigrant bias, unpredictably and the trauma of waiting to see if there will be more
cancellations” of protected status.
Jacques LeBlanc, president of
the Haitian American Community Association in Chicago, said
thousands of Haitians now live
“day by day.”
“Everyone is leaving their options open . . . like a bird,” LeBlanc
said. “What does a bird do? When
it’s cold, they migrate someplace
warmer.”
One
48-year-old
woman
crossed the border into Quebec
this spring with her husband, son
and brother after they said local
police and federal immigration
agents began harassing undocumented immigrants in suburban
Atlanta. She had been living in the
United States for 13 years.
“When Trump first got elected,
all the police would go around to
the apartments and say, ‘Come
over here,’ banging on the doors,”
said the woman, who is Honduran
and asked not to be identified
while her case for protected status
in Canada is pending. “I got scared
and scared for my son.”
‘I didn’t vote for this’
Worried about the safety of the
migrants, local officials in Kittson
County and Emerson-Franklin
sent a joint letter in August asking
Trump, Canadian Prime Minister
Justin Trudeau, Minnesota’s congressional delegation and U.S.
and Canadian immigration and
border patrol agencies to address
the matter.
The letter said the Canada-U.S.
Safe Third Country Agreement
should be suspended so that migrants can claim asylum at official
border crossings.
“Our woods have large populations of wolves and bears, which
could present a danger to those
wandering around,” the letter
said. “Correcting this problem
should easily be within the power
of both federal governments.”
Officials in both municipalities
said they have not received a response.
“We don’t know why they
haven’t gotten back to us,” said
Betty Younggren, chair of the Kittson County Board of Commissioners. “This is a whole new subject
for us, and it was very surprising
for us . . . and we just don’t want
these people to suffer.”
U.S. Customs and Border Protection declined to address the
letter directly but said in a statement that it advises that all border
crossings occur at official ports of
entry, suggesting that all other
travelers will be stopped.
“If it is determined that the
subject being questioned has valid immigration status, the subject
is released and is allowed to continue with their travels,” the agency statement said.
But Eric Christensen, Kittson
County’s administrator, worries
that tens of thousands of people
could decide to flee north if the
Trump administration starts deporting Haitians or removes protected status from others.
“I don’t think there is enough of
Haiti left to suddenly hold 60,000
people, so Canada is the only option for the people pushed off,”
Christensen said. “And if he ever
pulls the protection for Honduras
or El Salvador, we would have a
flood.”
Tom Denton, executive director
of Hospitality House Refugee
Ministry in Winnipeg, Canada,
which has mentored and cared for
some of the asylum seekers crossing the border from Minnesota,
said that forecasting future arrivals “all depends on what’s happening in the United States.”
American “politics is so volatile
right now, every day we wonder
what is going to happen next,”
Denton said, adding that he
thinks the Canadian government
ultimately will grant asylum to
about half of the refugee claimants who recently fled the United
States.
Here in northwestern Minnesota, the prospect of even moreheated debates over immigration
policy is dividing local residents.
Once a Democratic-leaning
county, Kittson went for Trump in
last year’s election by more than
20 points after voters here concluded that he was more attuned
to rural American concerns about
population loss and stagnant local
economies, residents said. Kittson
County has lost half of its population since 1960; it now has 4,300
residents.
But at the Chale’s Oil service
station, where locals gather to socialize while buying gas for farm
equipment and waiting to have
tires replaced on trucks and tractors, some residents wondered
whether Trump’s immigration
crackdown has gone too far.
“Some of them have been here
so long, and they have families,”
said Matt Chale, 27, whose father
owns the century-old service station. “Why would you take the dad
away from kids and send him to
Mexico? That is just wrong, and I
didn’t vote for Trump for this.”
Shane Stewart, who owns a
500-acre farm nearby and also
voted for Trump, is not as sympathetic.
“I can’t even figure out why we
have all of these refugees, or whatever you call them, and I am not in
favor of them being here,” Stewart
said.
Johnston said Canadians want
to be neighborly but worry that
unpredictable policy in Washington will keep manifesting itself in
migrant flows through their sugar
beet and wheat fields.
“Is it going to stop tomorrow? Is
it going to stop five years from
now?” said Johnston, noting that
various studies estimate 11 million to 12.5 million undocumented immigrants are living in the
United States. “Are they all coming to Canada? What if even 1 percent comes?”
tim.craig@washpost.com
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
RE
Economy & Business
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FX could be a victim of Disney-Fox consolidation
Network’s boutique fare
might not sit well with
Disney’s mass strategy
BY
S TEVEN Z EITCHIK
To its fans, FX has offered some
of the most compelling television
of recent years, with “The Americans,” “Atlanta,” “Justified” and
that O.J. dramatization everyone
couldn’t stop talking about.
To watchers of the Disney-Fox
merger, the cable network offers
something else: a giant enigma.
With FX among the 21st Century Fox assets sold to Disney, a
question has percolated through
Hollywood: Can the network and
its beloved programs survive?
“FX has been responsible for
some really great television, but
these are shows that, relatively
speaking, don’t get a lot of viewers,” said Cory Barker, a popculture writer and expert who
closely follows the cable space.
“And it seems everything Disney
continues to do is move toward its
big-property, profit-maximization
strategy,” he added. “It’s hard to
see where FX fits in.”
Disney on Thursday announced it was spending
$52.4 billion to buy nearly all of
Rupert Murdoch-led 21st Century
Fox besides the Fox broadcast network and its news and sports operations.
Many Fox divisions are expected to be consolidated under Disney in the new structure, and executives could be looking for new
jobs. Some of Fox’s film operations, including top executive Stacey Snider, may not remain in the
new combined company.
Conversely, its television studio, responsible for such hits as
“Modern Family” and “This Is Us,”
is thought to be safe, given that it
regularly churns out the broad
hits Disney covets.
And FX? No one seems to know
where it will fall.
Under its longtime president,
John Landgraf, FX owns one of the
most eminent track records in all
of cable — a point underscored by
its eight Golden Globe nominations this week and 18 Emmy wins
last year, the most ever for a basiccable network.
But it is also a niche channel
that rarely scores more than a few
million viewers for its shows and
regularly engages in the kind of
critic- and award-friendly material for which Disney has shown
little appetite.
The network helped usher in
the era of original cable programming with early 2000s hits such as
“The Shield” and “Nip/Tuck.” It
drove a renaissance of subversive
comedy with “It’s Always Sunny in
Philadelphia” and (before controversy engulfed its creator) “Louie.”
And it launched the modern anthology craze with such franchises
as “American Horror Story.”
In recent years it has lost a little
luster but has remained sharp
with the first year of Donald Glover’s much-admired “Atlanta,” and
“American Crime Story,” the franchise whose first season about O.J.
Simpson was a significant hit —
and Emmy winner — for the network in 2016. It will be followed
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Demonstrators gather before a hearing at the Federal
Communications Commission on Thursday in Washington. The
FCC voted Thursday to repeal its net neutrality rules.
Net neutrality fight is
probably far from over
BRENDAN MCDERMID/REUTERS
Traders work at the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday, the day Disney announced it would spend
$52.4 billion to buy nearly all of 21st Century Fox. Many Fox divisions are expected to be consolidated.
next year with a new installment
about the 1997 murder of designer
Gianni Versace.
These kind of upscale shows
could come in handy for Disney,
experts and analysts say. The Fox
deal is partly motivated by Disney’s desire to compete with Netflix and Amazon in “over-the-top”
content that goes directly to consumers; it will launch a streaming
service in 2019. FX could be instrumental in this effort, they say,
since both Netflix and Amazon
first made their bones with highend programming.
“If I’m Disney, I want to overinvest in FX because of who they
are,” said Ross Fremer, a finance
specialist at the independent entertainment company Cinetic Media. “What the network can do
with Disney’s money and scale
would be huge.”
At the same time, he acknowledged that moving toward something bigger might mean FX losing
at least some of its identity. “I don’t
know that they exist as a cable
brand known as FX anymore.”
Fremer and other close observers say that even as FX’s development pipeline might be preserved
in some way, the shows could be
changed to find more mass appeal. Disney’s intense craving for
blockbusters, they say, would
mean many of the high-prestige
shows from FX’s past 15 years
wouldn’t survive in the new arrangement.
At least for now, executives are
saying the right things. Disney
Chairman Robert Iger alluded to
FX among a range of 21st Century
Fox properties that “we think will
be of great use” in selling directly
to consumers.
Lachlan Murdoch, 21st Century
Fox’s executive co-chairman, touted FX’s “inventive originality” to
analysts on a call announcing the
deal Thursday and said he hoped
it would “flourish under Disney
ownership.” Neither Disney nor
FX executives would comment for
this report.
FX is unique in several ways. It
is very small — just a few dozen
key employees in a building on
Fox’s westside Los Angeles lot —
given the shows it produces and
cultural impact it has. It also sits
on ad-driven basic cable, where
very little of the prestige-television revolution has occurred.
And it handles much of its development and production inhouse rather than rely on large
outside providers, making it a
kind of self-contained entity that’s
rare in today’s cable world.
That makes knowing its true
value difficult. Some banks have
valued it high: Wells Fargo recently put the number at $8 billion,
more than half of Fox’s entire film
operation. But other analysts
aren’t so sure.
“It’s difficult to evaluate this
“It’s hard to see where
FX fits in.”
Cory Barker, a
pop-culture writer
deal because evaluating the
[Disney-Fox] deal means knowing
what you’re getting,” said Brian
Wieser, an analyst at New Yorkbased Pivotal. “And what is FX
really worth?”
The network has virtues in its
favor. Not least is Landgraf himself, who could be seen as the
prestige-television equivalent of
Marvel’s Kevin Feige, finding and
then peddling a very particular
aesthetic. Promoted to president
in 2005, Landgraf has become
known for taking chances on
shows and creators that fit his
refined taste and hoping a wellheeled audience will follow.
Landgraf also has been a media
darling for his almost philosophical takes on the business in conversations with reporters, often
accompanied by a strong shot of
candor. At the gathering of journalists known as the Television
Critics Association tour in 2015, he
gained notoriety for asking
whether there was simply too
much TV, both an admission of
responsibility and a jab at his newfangled competitors.
FX also has strong relation-
ships with several valued creators.
The top-tier writer-producer Ryan
Murphy, for instance, has made
some of his biggest hits at FX,
including “Nip/Tuck,” “American
Horror Story” and current hit series “Feud.”
The network did invest heavily
in and profit from Louis C.K. with
programs such the buzz-building
“Louie,” which the comedian oversaw in almost every regard, and
Pamela Adlon’s emerging hit “Better Things,” on which C.K. was
executive producer. FX has taken
the comic’s name off all of its
shows in light of sexualmisconduct allegations against
him. While the absence of a hit
such as “Louie” is hardly welcome,
FX’s fortunes aren’t tied up in
C.K., and “Better Things” is expected to come out mostly unscathed when its third season debuts next year.
That could be one more show
Disney takes a look at and decides to
invest in, hoping to supercharge
FX’s audience with more production and marketing dollars. Under
Disney, experts say, FX may not have
to lose out to better-capitalized competitors, as it did when it sought
comedy hit “Master of None” and
eventual royals smash “The Crown”
only to lose both to Netflix.
But some past efforts to go bigger have faltered. “The Strain,” a
genre exercise that was the network’s answer to “The Walking
Dead,” received modest praise and
viewership and ended this year.
And FX’s ratings have slipped —
by double digits in the most recent
quarter, as it faces competition
from a wide range of streamers
and premium channels.
Even with a bright programming future, FX may remain
doomed. It has been a unicorn: a
basic-cable network at a time of
subscription services, and a place
of boutique autonomy at a moment
of scale and corporate oversight.
“In some ways, we’ve been waiting for places like FX to feel the
contraction for a while,” said Barker, the pop-culture writer. “[The]
Disney acquisition might just accelerate it.”
steven.zeitchik@washpost.com
DIG ES T
RAIL
CSX chief takes
sudden medical leave
Shares of CSX slid Friday after
the railroad company said that
chief executive Hunter Harrison
will take a medical leave “due to
unexpected complications from
a recent illness.”
Chief operating officer James
Foote will serve as acting CEO.
Harrison, who has engineered
turnarounds at three railroads,
was hired in March after activist
investors pressured CSX for
changes.
But questions have emerged
about his health. In May, the
Wall Street Journal reported
that Harrison often works from
home and occasionally uses
oxygen because of an
undisclosed health issue.
Harrison told the Journal that
doctors had cleared him to work.
Shares of CSX fell 7.6 percent
to close at $52.93 Friday.
— Associated Press
ALSO IN BUSINESS
U.S. industrial production rose
0.2 percent in November
because of a rebound in
extracting oil and natural gas
after a stoppage caused by
Hurricane Nate, which made
landfall in October. The Federal
Reserve said Friday that mining
activity climbed 2 percent last
month, while manufacturing
activity rose 0.2 percent.
Production of machinery and
primary metals contributed to
gains in the factory sector, while
the overall growth for industrial
output largely came from
restarting oil and natural gas
drilling.
Airbus chief executive Tom
Enders will step down in 2019,
the European airplane maker
said Friday, as it shakes up
management amid multiple
corruption investigations.
Airbus said Enders, who has led
Airbus and the defense firm
EADS for 14 years, will not seek
another term when his current
term expires. The 59-year-old
was quoted Friday as saying that
the Boeing rival needs “fresh
minds for the 2020s.”
Professional drivers looking to
buy Tesla cars to shuttle paying
customers should consider this:
ARMEND NIMANI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A vendor sells nuts at a booth on Mother Teresa Square as rain falls
Friday in Pristina, Kosovo’s capital and largest city. Mother Teresa, a
charity worker made Catholic saint, was born in nearby Macedonia.
After Friday, vehicles used for
commercial purposes will not be
allowed to use the company’s
Superchargers anymore,
according to an updated policy.
The change applies to vehicles
being deployed as taxis —
including by drivers for Uber or
Lyft — as well as cars used for
commercial deliveries or
government purposes. The shift
is intended to keep the highspeed chargers available for
other customers who do not
have immediate access to home
or workplace charging, Tesla
said in a statement.
— From news reports
After FCC repeal,
already-long legal battles
could continue for years
BY
B RIAN F UNG
The Federal Communications
Commission’s vote Thursday to
repeal its net neutrality rules
marked the end of a brief experiment by the network regulator to
rein in the tremendous power of
Internet providers by treating
them like the highly regulated
telecoms.
Now, providers will be allowed
to speed up some websites — and
block or slow down others — as
long as they disclose it to the
public, and violations will largely
be handled after the fact by the
Federal Trade Commission, not
the FCC.
Far from settling the matter,
the Republican-led FCC has simply opened a new chapter in a
bruising Washington battle that
stretches back nearly as far as the
dot-com boom itself. Those on
both sides who have watched the
policy seesaw wildly have but
one emotion to report — exhaustion.
“For the last decade, we’ve
been on a regulatory roller coaster,” said Jack Nadler, a partner at
the law firm Squire Patton Boggs
who blames a chronic case of net
neutrality whiplash on Washington’s “recurring bureaucratic
convulsions.”
That dynamic threatened to
play out once more this week as
the FCC voted to dismantle the
Obama-era network rules put
into place just two years ago.
Even before the agency’s meeting
had concluded, supporters of the
regulations quickly vowed to sue
the FCC in an effort to stop it.
“We will fight the FCC’s decisions in the courts, and we will
fight it in the halls of Congress,”
said Sen. Edward J. Markey (DMass.), who promised Thursday
to introduce legislation along
with more than a dozen other
lawmakers to overturn the FCC
vote.
New York Attorney General
Eric Schneiderman (D) announced Thursday he intends to
file a multi-state lawsuit against
the FCC.
Meanwhile, state lawmakers
in California and Washington
have said they will try to write
their own legislation to replace
the federal rules — though that
effort could be swiftly quashed.
The FCC’s decision Thursday explicitly sought to preempt states
from going around the federal
rules, and agency officials made
clear they would act against such
attempts.
Any new litigation could lead
to the second time the FCC has
gone to court over net neutrality
in as many years.
“I’m shocked — shocked! —
that people are going to challenge this decision in court,” FCC
Chairman Ajit Pai said sarcastically to reporters after the vote.
The net neutrality zigzag is a
byproduct of the fact that the
FCC is an independent agency;
its levers over industry change
hands every time a new party
takes the White House. In an era
of extreme polarization in Washington, that has led to Republicans and Democrats seeking to
overturn one another’s policies
at every opportunity.
“The net neutrality vote has
taken on a back-and-forth quality as it has become more partisan,” said Randolph May, president of the right-leaning Free
State Foundation.
Other longtime participants in
the debate say the fight has
continued this long only because
Internet service providers refuse
to concede.
“It has seesawed back and
forth because the ISPs won’t be
satisfied until they’ve completely
neutered the FCC for all time,”
said Gigi Sohn, who was an
adviser to Tom Wheeler, the former FCC chair.
A legal battle could drag on for
months if not years, analysts say,
adding to a saga that has put
powerful Washington lobbyists
and sophisticated lawyers at
each others’ throats over the past
dozen years.
Under President George W.
Bush, the FCC concluded that all
consumers deserved to enjoy
four fundamental freedoms online — the freedom to access any
Web content of their choice, as
long as it is legal; the freedom to
use any online application; the
freedom to use their home
broadband connections on any
device; and the freedom to get
subscription information from
their providers.
First unveiled in a speech in
2004 by then-FCC Chairman Michael Powell, a Republican, those
principles were formalized as an
“Internet policy statement” in
2005. Those provisions were
nonbinding and did not have the
force of regulation.
That changed in 2010, when
the FCC approved its first net
neutrality rules. The new rules
were a direct result of the FCC
trying — and failing — to use the
earlier Internet policy statement
to punish Comcast’s alleged
blocking in 2007 of peer-to-peer
file-sharing traffic. The new rules
banned the blocking of Web
content by Internet providers, as
well as the slowing down of
websites.
But the 2010 regulations were
soon challenged by Verizon,
which argued the FCC had overstepped the authority given to it
by Congress. After three years of
litigation, a federal appeals court
finally sided against the FCC in
2014, striking down the most
important provisions of the
agency’s regulation. The court
explained the FCC had tried to
regulate Internet providers in
the same way it regulates traditional telecommunications companies, but without first identifying broadband as a telecom service.
Having been rebuked for essentially failing to show its work,
the FCC approved new rules in
2015 that took the extraordinary
step of classifying Internet providers as telecom providers, before imposing some of the same
bans on blocking and slowing as
it had before. Broadband companies opposed the decision, seeing
it as opening the door to further
regulation in the future, including the possibility of government
price controls.
An industry coalition sued the
Democratic-led FCC, leading to
yet another court battle. This
time, the agency won handily,
with a three-judge panel in 2016
upholding the regulations in
light of the edits.
Then came President Trump,
and along with him, Republican
control of the FCC. GOP officials
felt they had been railroaded by
Democrats on net neutrality, and
Pai — who had been sharply
critical of the 2015 rules — vowed
to undo his predecessor’s legacy.
That effort culminated in
Thursday’s vote, with broadband
companies again emerging on
top and tech companies on the
defensive.
brian.fung@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
5 crazy things that happened as the FCC voted to undo its net neutrality rules
Security said that around
12:35 p.m., officials received an
anonymous phone call saying
two bombs had been planted at
the agency — one in the meeting
room and another elsewhere —
that were primed to explode
within half an hour. The call
prompted the sudden
evacuation and a sweep by
bomb-sniffing dogs.
Telecom policy
fights rarely lead to
much excitement.
They usually
BRIAN FUNG
AND HAMZA involve lawyers
tossing such
SHABAN
provocative words
at each other as “common
carrier” and “business data
services.” But these days, if you
so much as whisper the phrase
“net neutrality,” all sorts of crazy
things begin to happen.
Don’t believe us? Just take a
survey of the past 48 hours.
The
Switch
Hackers threatened FCC staff
In an email claiming to be from
the hacking group Anonymous,
hackers said they had obtained
the personal information of
many FCC staff, including all of
the commissioners.
The authenticity of the email,
which was sent to The
Washington Post and other
media outlets and agency
officials, is unclear. But a Twitter
account also claiming to be
associated with the group had
earlier tweeted that Anonymous
would “make these men realize
what a terrible mistake they
made,” threatening to “come
after” FCC Chairman Ajit Pai
and his allies.
The same email also claimed
that Anonymous had wired the
FCC with explosives. It is unclear
whether that threat was linked
to the bomb scare DHS
responded to. An FCC
The FCC got an anonymous
bomb threat
Moments before members of the
Federal Communications
Commission voted Thursday to
repeal its own net neutrality
rules, security guards stormed
the room where the meeting was
taking place. Alluding cryptically
to a security situation, the
guards forced everyone out of
the room — officials, activists
and journalists.
The hallways outside the
room quickly grew packed with
confused people — many agency
officials themselves looked
bewildered. It soon became clear
that security was taking the
situation very seriously.
Later, a spokesman for the
Department of Homeland
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
Rally organizers carry away part of the “Net Neutrality Wake Up
Call” clock following a protest outside the Federal Communications
Commission building in Washington.
spokesman declined to comment
on the email.
over.
Pai made a video for the Daily
Caller
On the eve of the vote to repeal
net neutrality, the FCC chairman
starred in an eccentric video
published by the conservative
news site the Daily Caller that
featured him dressed as Santa
Claus, wielding a lightsaber and
clutching a fidget spinner to
defend the repeal and mock the
criticism against it.
A congressman was clocked
by a clock
The Washington Free Beacon
posted footage Thursday of Rep.
José E. Serrano (D-N.Y.) getting
knocked offstage at a net
neutrality rally by a giant prop
clock. The words “Net Neutrality
Wake Up Call” were written on
the clock, which appeared to
catch a gust of wind and topple
In one bit, Pai created his own
version of the viral Internet
video meme “Harlem Shake.” But
the musician who created the
song for “Harlem Shake” was not
pleased.
In a tweet Thursday, Mad
Decent, the record label behind
the song, said that neither it nor
the producer and DJ Harry
Rodrigues gave permission to
the Daily Caller to use the music
and do not agree with Pai’s video
message. “We have issued a
takedown [and] will pursue
further legal action if it is not
removed,” the tweet said.
While the YouTube video
appeared to have been taken
down Friday morning, it was
back online later in the day. In a
post on the Daily Caller website,
publisher Neil Patel said Google
“had censored the video based
on a bogus claim from a
politically motivated man.”
YouTube is owned by Google,
whose parent company is
Alphabet.
YouTube responded Friday,
saying: “YouTube doesn’t
determine who owns the rights
to what content. . . . We act
quickly to remove content when
notified as is required of us by
law and, when we see that there
is a potential case for fair use, we
ask the claimant to make sure
they’ve conducted that analysis.”
Late night roasts Pai
Late-night comedians took aim
Thursday at Pai and the telecom
corporations that stand to gain
under the repeal.
On the “Late Show With
Stephen Colbert,” host Colbert
compared Verizon’s and
Comcast’s promises not to block,
slow down or prioritize Web
traffic to the “shark lobby”
promising not to eat people,
despite pushing regulators to
reclassify their mouths as
“sleeping bags.”
On “Jimmy Kimmel Live!”
Kimmel called the FCC’s actions
“despicable,” adding, “Big
corporations are about to take
full control of the Internet, so
merry Christmas everybody.”
Pai responded to his critics
Friday morning on “Fox and
Friends,” saying, “Those on the
other side have literally nothing
other to peddle than hysteria
and misinformation and fear
about the light-touch approach
that we had for most of the
Internet’s existence.”
brian.fung@washpost.com
hamza.shaban@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/news/theswitch
What the latest Facebook dust-up says about social media’s future
ture capitalist whose career was
launched by his fortune and reputation as Facebook’s head of
growth, made the comments at a
Stanford University summit a
month ago. The comments began
circulating widely when they
were published on a technology
website, the Verge.
Palihapitiya’s
statements
struck a nerve with Facebook,
which originally responded with
what some saw a personal attack.
Executives then published a long
blog post on Friday morning addressing long-standing questions
about the harms of social media
and describing the company’s extensive investments in researching the impact of the platform on
the psychological well-being of its
2 billion monthly users.
Facebook broadly acknowledged the harm of social media
use — one of the few times the
company has done so. At the
same time, it made the case that
the social network has good effects and that it cares about more
than just likes, shares and clicks.
“Like everything in life, there
are good ways to engage with
Former executive softens
his criticism, but others
echo his concerns
BY
E LIZABETH D WOSKIN
Facebook is worth half a trillion dollars, but even when you’re
on top, an insult can really sting.
On the heels of a surprisingly
personal and revealing exchange
between the company and a
prominent former executive, the
former executive has softened
some of his criticisms, and Facebook has made what is perhaps
its fullest acknowledgment to
date of the negative consequences of its massive global platform.
Facebook found itself scrambling this week after former employee Chamath Palihapitiya said
he felt “tremendous guilt” about
the products he built for Facebook because they were addictive
and were “ripping apart” the social fabric. Palihapitiya, a prominent and usually outspoken ven-
something, and there are less
good,” David Ginsberg, Facebook’s director of research and a
co-author of the post, said in an
interview. “What we’ve learned is
that when you’re actively engaging with people you’re close to,
having meaningful social interactions, that can actually lift your
well-being, but if you’re just passively and endlessly scrolling on
for the world. Former Facebook
president Sean Parker also recently said the platform was engineered to exploit human psychology by providing “a little dopamine hit every once in awhile.” A
former early investor and the
company’s former privacy chief
also have publicly expressed regrets.
“The short-term, dopamine-
“The short-term, dopamine-driven
feedback loops we’ve created
are destroying how society works.”
Chamath Palihapitiya, discussing social media in a talk at Stanford
your news feed, and not engaging, that is not associated with
higher well-being.”
In a tumultuous year in which
Facebook has faced scrutiny for
its role in enabling Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. election,
Palihapitiya is the latest executive to voice doubts about whether the products he built are good
driven feedback loops we’ve created are destroying how society
works,” said Palihapitiya, speaking of Facebook and other socialmedia companies, during the
Stanford talk. “No civil discourse,
no cooperation; misinformation,
mistruth. And it’s not an American problem — this is not about
Russians ads. This is a global
problem.” Palihapitiya declined
to comment for this report.
Facebook has struggled to address these criticisms. First, the
company shot back at Palihapitiya in strikingly personal terms,
releasing a statement pointing
out that he had not worked at
Facebook for more than six years.
The jab also included an admission. “Facebook was a very
different company back then,” it
said. “As we have grown we have
realized how our responsibilities
have grown too.”
The intensity of the back-andforth shows the particular weight
that Silicon Valley companies,
and particularly Facebook, place
on loyalty and a shared sense of
mission.
Facebook is flush with cash but
fears it could lose the hearts and
minds of its workers and the favor
of lawmakers and the public. Like
many Facebook users, the company wants to be liked. In the blog
post Friday, titled “Is social media
bad for us?”, Facebook described
extensive efforts to design products and features that promote its
users’ well-being.
Facebook also cited academic
researchers — some external and
some working in partnership
with the company — who found
that people who passively and
compulsively consume large
amounts of information, such as
scrolling through a Facebook
news feed and liking more posts
than the average person, report
worse mental health than average.
Behind the scenes, in an exchange that played out during the
week, executives told Palihapitiya
that they were disappointed by
his statements and encouraged
him to learn more about the
company’s recent efforts, according to two people familiar with
the discussions.
In a remorseful Facebook post,
Palihapitiya said he did not intend to unleash a tide of anger.
“My comments were meant to
start an important conversation,
not to criticize one company —
particularly one I love,” he said.
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
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Nasdaq Composite Index
6945
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
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% Chg
6936.58
+1.4
+27.1
Weekly
% Chg
Industry Group
Metals & Mining
Personal Products
Diversified Telecomm
Media
Textiles & Apparel
Household Durables
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Distributors
Construction & Engineerng
Construction Materials
–6%
0%
+6%
5.0
5.0
4.0
3.6
3.5
–1.8
–1.8
–2.4
–2.5
–4.2
6895
6870
6845
2675.81
S&P 500 Index
+0.9
+18.3
2680
2670
2660
2650
Mon.
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Fri.
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Weekly
% Chg
72,607.70
16,041.98
48,132.87
–0.2
–0.3
1.2
388.19
5349.30
13,103.56
7490.57
–0.3
–0.9
–0.4
1.3
5996.97
3980.86
28,848.11
22,553.22
1 Year % Chg
–40%
0%
+40%
Close
Weekly
% Chg
1 Year
% Chg
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
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Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
238.00
98.52
173.97
293.94
146.69
119.73
38.19
46.19
70.00
83.03
17.82
257.17
182.58
152.50
44.56
–0.1
0.0
2.7
2.8
2.0
–0.2
1.5
1.9
–1.0
0.4
0.6
2.7
–0.5
–1.5
2.8
35.2
31.5
50.2
91.2
55.2
2.3
24.7
11.2
20.0
–8.6
–43.0
5.8
34.4
–9.2
21.1
Company
Close
Weekly
% Chg
1 Year
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
142.46
106.14
174.06
56.24
86.85
64.79
91.89
37.20
134.89
126.17
221.82
52.67
113.82
97.11
111.27
1.3
0.2
0.5
1.2
3.2
5.7
1.7
4.1
0.9
2.7
–0.9
3.1
1.1
0.6
6.8
22.9
23.4
42.3
–9.8
38.8
26.3
8.5
13.6
12.0
16.7
38.1
1.7
43.2
36.6
6.6
US $
EU € per
0.8507
0.0
–0.6
0.7
–1.1
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1755
0.0088
1.3324
0.3028
0.7760
0.0522
0.0076
1.1335
0.2575
0.6602
0.0445
150.0350
34.1001
87.3750
5.8886
0.2273
0.5825
0.0392
2.5598
0.1727
Japan ¥ per
112.6100
132.3700
Britain £ per
0.7505
0.8822
0.0067
Brazil R$ per
3.3024
3.8825
0.0293
4.3894
Canada $ per
1.2888
1.5149
0.0114
1.7171
0.3902
Mexico $ per
19.1228
22.4788
0.1700
25.4790
5.8050
Mexico $
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 27,656.76
Russell 2000
1530.43
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 539.56
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
9.42
1 Year % Chg
17.7
12.0
19.6
–26.3
Orange Juice
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Weekly
% Chg
$1.4450
$16.06
$9.7800
$0.1366
$4.1825
–5.5
+1.5
–1.2
–2.8
–0.2
week
$600
$1000
year
$1400
–2.0
5.2
–1.5
2.6
–0.2
–2.6
0.5
–4.2
1.4
0.0674
Company
Urban One Inc
Primus
VSE Corp
Community Financial
Intelsat SA
Emergent Biosol
GTT Communications
Lightbridge Corp
Intrexon Corp
Rexahn Pharma
Gladstone Capital
Altimmune Inc
Iridium Comm
Argan Inc
CASI Pharma
Intersections Inc
Close
Weekly
% Chg
$1.65
$5.96
$51.22
$39.99
$3.47
$46.80
$42.95
$1.06
$12.64
$1.92
$9.20
$1.61
$11.23
$43.25
$3.06
$1.94
13.4
10.6
9.9
9.9
7.8
7.5
7.1
7.1
–4.8
–6.8
–7.1
–7.5
–8.4
–8.6
–11.6
–12.2
$0
week
year
$1000
$2600
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Consumer Rates
Weekly % Chg
0.8
0.6
0.6
–1.7
+5.2
–1.5
–0.1
+0.7
–5.8
Close
14.8403
Interest Rates
Other Measures
$3.1345
$3.4750
$57.30
$1,257.50
$2.61
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
Cross Currency Rates
US $ per
Weekly
% Chg
Local Gainers and Losers
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6920
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.34
0.46
0.80
1.49
3.04
5.31
4.50%
3.92%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.15%
1.50%
Federal Funds
15-Year fixed mortgage
1.60%
LIBOR 3-Month
1-Year ARM
3.31%
10-year note
Yield: 2.35
2-year note
Yield: 1.84
5-year note
Yield: 2.15
6-month bill
Yield: 1.46
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
Free For All
Put ‘Dustin’ in the dustbin
Fake news
While this may seem trivial compared with all of the
depressing news going around these days, I had to
shudder in disbelief upon reading the seemingly benign
Dec. 7 comic strip “Dustin,” written by not one but two
men (no surprise), both of whom must have been
sleeping for the past two months.
In the strip, a science teacher says to a class of what
looks like third-graders, “The sun is the hottest body in
the solar system, isn’t that right, Kurt?” To which Kurt
replies, “My dad says it’s Kate Upton.”
Is this objectification of women, passed down by men
to boys at a very young age, supposed to be amusing?
Women are sick of hearing and seeing sexist, racist
and clearly insidious slurs. The Post should make sure its
comic strips abide by a higher ethical code.
Sally Brucker, Takoma Park
The Post’s willingness to use the
expression “fake news” troubles
me [“Harnessing populism and
fake news, the 1920s Klan became
mainstream,” Book World, Dec. 3].
Although it’s true that Pamela
Newkirk, reviewing Linda Gordon’s book “The Second Coming of
the KKK,” used the term (accurately) to describe the Ku Klux Klan’s
media fabrications, I wish The Post
would avoid such usage. “Fake
news,” whether or not coined by
President Trump, has been weaponized by him to attack the press, a
pillar of our democracy. The Post is
a great advocate for press freedom,
so it should not normalize or legitimize the expression “fake news” by
using it, except when quoting.
Paul Reinstein, Rockville
Did he deserve to get canned?
I get the whole journalistic-standards thing with
regard to Garrison Keillor’s non-disclosure of the
accusations against him when he
wrote his op-ed on Sen. Al Franken
(D-Minn.), but did that really require
silencing his absolutely unique voice
for all time [“After firing, Garrison
Keillor hasn’t stayed mum,” Style, Dec.
2]? A temporary suspension wouldn’t
have sufficed?
When the dust settles from the
sexual harassment frenzy, I hope The
Keillor
Post will have the courage to acknowledge the wrong it committed against an imperfect man
who still had a lot to say that’s worth hearing.
Jeff Coomer, Chestertown, Md.
The writer is a poet whose work was read
on Garrison Keillor’s radio program
“The Writer’s Almanac.”
Now or never
In his Dec. 5 op-ed, “What is Trump trying to cover
up?,” Eugene Robinson stated, “We know that Trump has
apparently obstructed justice to try to halt investigation
into what happened.” This statement is incorrect
because Robinson, as with virtually every other thoughtful political writer, used the wrong tense of the verb
“obstruct.”
If President Trump’s actions obstructed justice in the
beginning of his presidency, his continued public
dialogue regarding the FBI investigation means that he
is still obstructing justice. Even if we generously assume
he did not obstruct justice early on, and that he was
unaware of his campaign staff ’s dealings with Russia,
do we think that 11 months later, Trump remains
unaware? This would mean that a man whose preternatural temperament demands that he know what
every pundit says about him would also have the ability
to allow his staff to keep their campaign actions secret
from him.
Only by being completely ignorant of the events
surrounding the Russians and Trump’s former national
security adviser, Michael Flynn, could Trump not intend
to obstruct justice with his recent public interactions. It
seems much more likely that Trump is continuing to
obstruct justice.
Craig Merrill, Kitty Hawk, N.C.
Real news
AMANDA VOISARD FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
People gather for the Women’s March on Washington on Jan. 21.
2017 wasn’t all frowns
I was disappointed in The Post’s “The Year in Photos”
special section [Dec. 6]. It contained 40 photographs and, by
my count, about 100 human faces, none of which were
smiling.
The front page of the section claimed, “The images that
defined 2017 came from an administration marked by,
turmoil, terrorism abroad and at home, and refugee crises
worldwide.” Was this special section a product of The Post’s
anti-administration editorial board or its unbiased news
departments? If the former, it should have been labeled as
opinion. If the latter, then some joyous smiling people should
have been included and the front-page foreword left out.
Over the year, the paper did print news articles with
people smiling in the accompanying photographs. Don’t be
the newspaper Grinch that stole 2017. How about another
special photo section devoted to all the joyous smiling faces
that were photographed in 2017?
Dave Palmer, Rockville
I was shocked and disappointed to see that the “Year
in Photos” special section left out a huge event that not only
reflected the year and our times but also has had a serious
impact on the country since. Estimates vary, but at least
3 million people showed up and took to the streets of
Washington and cities all over the country for the Women’s
March in January. The number grows even larger if you
count the people who marched all around the world.
Marilyn Schuman, Gaithersburg
Memorializing the memorial
ASTRID RIECKEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A security guard at the Sixth & I Historic Synagogue
in Washington in 2013.
Nothing new for Jews
The Dec. 3 Metro article “Prayer meets precaution,”
about the “heightened concern for safety at places of
worship,” exclusively focused on churches. Heightened
concern is not a new phenomenon, even in this country.
For generations, Jews here and across the world have
feared and experienced assaults on synagogues and
other places identified with Jews, such as the Kansas
community center attacked in 2014 and the Philadelphia
cemetery attacked this year.
Anti-Semitism is on the rise: Jews are victims of more
reported hate crimes than any other group in our nation.
In metropolitan Washington, many temples hire security officers for all worship services and even for secular
activities conducted on site, such as weeknight bridge
games that are open to all.
Andrea L. Bridgeman, McLean
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Frederick Hart works on a statue in Washington in 1983.
I was taken aback by Philip Kennicott’s tone and blind assertions expressed about my since-deceased husband Frederick Hart and Hart’s sculpture “The Three Soldiers” in his review
of James Reston Jr.’s book “A Rift in the
Earth: Art, Memory, and the Fight for a
Vietnam War Memorial” [“The ugly
battle over Vietnam’s fallen,” Book
World, Dec. 3]. Hart’s opinion of Maya
Lin’s design was not motivated by race
and gender. Hart and Lin represent
different aspects of the art spectrum. Hart did not direct his criticism at
Lin personally. He voiced his criticism
in the context of opposing views of art.
The assertion that Hart “demanded” more compensation than the competition award Lin received is unfair
and incorrect. Hart’s negotiated contract with the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund reflected the fact that
Hart was employed to produce a
design concept, complete months of
work in clay and plaster on three
larger-than-life-size figures and bear
the costs and responsibility for the
bronze casting.
At a time when the notion of compromise struggles for air in our nation’s
polarized atmosphere, perhaps it is
worth looking afresh at that divisive
time when, despite a roiling controversy, a memorial was built to heal
divisions precisely because compromise prevailed.
ans Memorial, and I take issue with
Philip Kennicott’s generally favorable
review of James Reston Jr.’s deeply
flawed book, “A Rift in the Earth: Art,
Memory, and the Fight for a Vietnam
War Memorial.”
Despite having as a resource my own
2015 book, “Creating the Vietnam Veterans Memorial — The Inside Story,” Reston
made at least three dozen factual errors.
The errors range from the stupid —
getting the names of the Commission of
Fine Arts and the memorial itself wrong
— to the egregious — the idea that some
were given an “inside track” to design the
memorial. I would have been happy to
help him get it right had he contacted me.
Reston also never talked with Maya
Lin, and the worst aspects of the book
are his ad hominem attacks on her: “her
uncooperative, hostile behavior” and
“Maya did not walk away from Washington with a single friend.” I worked
closely with her and did not perceive her
behavior as uncooperative. Her strongwilled perseverance kept the design true
to what she had intended.
Reston’s chief reasons for undertaking this project appear to be his grief
over losing a friend in Vietnam and his
guilt for not serving there himself. He
should have stuck with those issues
rather than exploiting his fame and
name to muddy the waters of the
memorial’s historiography.
Lindy Hart, Chevy Chase
The writer was executive director
and project director of the
Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund
from 1979 to 1983.
I was in charge of obtaining the
design and building the Vietnam Veter-
Letters can be sent to letters@washpost.com.
Submissions must be exclusive to The Post and should include
the writer’s address and day and evening telephone numbers.
Robert W. Doubek, Washington
A feather in his cap
The Dec. 8 letters “Shrinking Bears Ears” were
insightful regarding the role Theodore
Roosevelt played in moving for the preservation
of landmarks all across the United States.
It is particularly important as Roosevelt originally exploited wildlife as a big-game trophy
hunter. The needless slaughter of birds in Florida was a turning point for Roosevelt. These birds
had highly desirable plumage used extensively
for ladies’ hats. Douglas Brinkley’s book “The
Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and
the Crusade for America” suggested that once
Roosevelt became aware of the carnage of these
beautiful birds, he began a campaign against
such activities and even brought about the
initial negative social pressure that eventually
stopped most of the bird slaughter for natural
ornamentation for ladies’ hats.
James R. Cole, Westminster, Md.
Fire proof
The Dec. 2 Free for All letter by Eli Lehrer, “Faster but
not more,” may have given the dangerous impression that
fire is of low risk today. While he was correct in saying that
the risk per capita has diminished over the past several
decades, fires still kill an average of more than 3,000 people per year, mostly at home in ones and twos, and more
than from all natural disasters combined.
Fires also continue to cause the most horrible injuries
imaginable, especially to young children. People must not
let their guard down. The most important thing to do to be
safe from fire at home is have an adequate number of
working smoke alarms with 10-year batteries, to give the
early warning needed to get out when fires are still small
and escapable, especially at night, when most fire fatalities occur.
Philip Schaenman, Potomac
The writer is a fellow with the Institution
of Fire Engineers, the managing member of TriData LLC
of Maryland, which provides research and consulting
on fire and emergency management issues, and a
member of the steering committee of the American branch
of the Institution of Fire Engineers’s Vision 20/20,
which is devoted to improving fire prevention
and community risk reduction.
Although I generally enjoy and
agree with Dana Milbank, his Dec.
3 Sunday Opinion essay, “Get ready
for Trump’s fireworks,” was off-target. Milbank blamed newspaper
readers for paying more attention
to sensational, less important news
items than to more critical issues,
one of which he rightfully identified as the tax bill in the Senate.
However, The Post and other papers could have easily deemphasized the stories that Milbank
thinks have much less importance.
They could have focused more attention on those stories the public
should be paying more attention to.
Perhaps Milbank should discuss
these issues within The Post. After
all, no one is forcing The Post and
other newspapers to spend so
much effort reporting every detail
of each of President Trump’s tweets
and comments.
Bert Spilker, Bethesda
UNIVERSAL IMAGES GROUP/GETTY IMAGES
Theodore Roosevelt makes a speech in this undated photograph.
No winter chicken, either
In her Dec. 1 letter, “Don’t stereotype older adults,”
Susan Peschin of the Alliance for Aging Research
stated that “when Theodore Roosevelt became president in 1901 at 42 years old, the average life expectancy for white men in the United States was only
47 years. Although he was the youngest man ever to
assume the U.S. presidency, Roosevelt was no spring
chicken.” Her statement implied that Roosevelt was
no spring chicken because he could be expected to
live only five more years. But life expectancy at birth
(47 years in this case) is irrelevant for an adult. Life
expectancy for white men who reached the age of
42 in 1901 was an additional 27 years of life, not five.
Their expected age at death was 69, not 47.
Life expectancy has a mathematical value that
changes as an individual gets older. Today, life
expectancy at birth for males is 77. But men at age 65
can expect to live to age 84, primarily because they
have already made it through high-mortality childhood. The increase in life expectancy since
Roosevelt’s time comes more from early-childhood
disease prevention than from advances in health
care of older people. When policymakers, legislators
and journalists get these life expectancy concepts
wrong, bad public policy — from infant and childhood health care to Social Security and Medicare —
may result.
John A. Commito, Frederick
But not in his
Many people must have
noted the irony of the photograph of a portrait of Andrew
Jackson hanging over a ceremony at the White House to
honor Navajo code talkers as
shown with the Dec. 9 Free
for All letter “The Post’s Indian removal act.” Jackson was
responsible for Indian re- Jackson
moval itself. One must also
wonder how that location in the White House
was picked.
Neal Krucoff, Washington
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
End the free ride for motorcyclists
EDITORIALS
Republican priorities made clear
The fight over Mr. Rubio’s plan to expand the child tax credit for low-income families lays bare GOP values.
I
expensive, one-sided legislative power play animated by ideological misconceptions rather than a sober
assessment of the country’s real needs. This process
is nearly complete, with the conclusion this week of
negotiations among GOP lawmakers reconciling
House and Senate versions into a final tax bill, set to
be voted on early next week.
In a bill slanted toward the wealthy, Mr. Rubio’s
idea to expand the child tax credit for low-income
families would make the overall tax plan a bit more
progressive, diverting a little more money toward
those who could really use the help. By contrast, the
GOP plan to lower the top income tax rate to
37 percent would sharply and unexpectedly increase
incomes at the top. As with previous iterations of the
GOP plan, the overall picture is still of a tax reform
that offers little benefit to many ordinary people
while handing huge benefits to the rich at the
expense of the country’s long-term fiscal health.
A tax cut for corporations would be warranted
under different circumstances — particularly if it
were paid for. But many of the bill’s provisions are
simply unjustifiable. Obamacare’s crucial individual
mandate should not be repealed. Wealthy heirs do
not require relief from the estate tax. High earners do
not need a lower top tax rate.
Republicans claim that the bill’s provisions will
spur economic growth and Americans will share
broadly in the resulting prosperity. In fact, the
growth effects will probably be mild, and the price
tag will probably be a trillion-plus dollars in new
debt, according to nonpartisan projections. This
debt will further burden low- and middle-income
Americans in future generations as their government loses the means to invest in research, education, health care and infrastructure.
Independent analysis after independent analysis
concluded that the GOP tax framework would exacerbate economic inequality and add massively to the
debt — well more than the Obama stimulus Republicans attacked as an irresponsible monstrosity — for
relatively little in return. The Republican response
has been to ignore the experts, attack the messengers
and double down on bad policy.
A half-step on
sexual harassment
M
MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. (D-Calvert), Maryland Senate president, and Michael E. Busch (D-Anne
Arundel), Maryland House speaker, in Annapolis in 2013.
For better or worse, the most potent disincentive for
would-be harassers and abusers is not discreet
inquiries from human resources personnel but the
threat of public disgrace.
Under Maryland’s new system, reports of sexual
harassment may be referred to ethics officials, who
might recommend that lawmakers be publicly censured or even expelled from office. Then again, they
might not be if deemed insufficiently serious. And
shouldn’t it be up to voters, not legislative insiders or
officials, to decide the fate of the people they hire in
elections — namely, lawmakers?
To its credit, the Maryland legislature does
welcome reports of misconduct from witnesses as
well as victims, a change made in the wake of
accusations against Donald Trump during the presidential campaign last year. Its policy does seem to go
beyond that in Virginia, where, despite a recent
assertion by House Republican Majority Leader M.
Kirkland Cox (Colonial Heights) describing his
chamber’s “zero tolerance” policy on sexual harassment and other abuse, no systematic, publicly
available documentation of such incidents is in
place.
Maryland’s Mr. Miller was correct when he
described the current national revelations as “a
watershed moment.” But if that’s what it is, how is
anonymity an adequate response?
It’s past time for public campaign financing in D.C.
A bill before the city council would level the playing field and engage more people in the political process.
“T
HE MOMENT has come for comprehensive campaign finance reform.” So wrote
D.C. Council member David Grosso
(I-At Large) in support of public financing of political campaigns. That was in 2013, and
nothing happened. Ditto in 2014 and 2015 and 2016,
when similar efforts were made to establish a system
aimed at ridding the political process of corrupting
big money. The legislation is now again up for
consideration — and this time we hope council
members look past their own self-interest and adopt
this needed reform.
The Fair Elections Amendment Act of 2017 got
unanimous approval from a council committee
Wednesday and is set to to be taken up next week by
the full council for the first of two votes. Under the
bill, candidates for office in the District could receive
limited public matching funds if they meet certain
conditions. This includes raising a certain amount of
money from small donors and forgoing corporate or
political action committee contributions. The program would be voluntary and is modeled after
public-financing systems that have been put in place
in other jurisdictions, including New York City,
Connecticut, Maine and Maryland’s nearby Montgomery and Howard counties.
“At the core of the bill,” said Council member
Charles Allen (D-Ward 6), a bill co-sponsor and
chair of the committee that gave its approval, is
“amplifying the voices of our small-dollar donors.”
That results in more people engaged in the political
process and a leveling of a playing field that now
gives lopsided advantage to corporations and
special interests. It also widens the pool of people
able to run for office by freeing candidates from
having to rely on big-money donors. Some officeholders may not see that as a particular benefit,
because it only increases their competition and
undercuts the advantage of their incumbency in
raising funds. No doubt that is one reason previous
efforts to implement public financing in the District have failed.
That a supermajority of the council signed on as
co-sponsors this time is an encouraging indication
that the public’s interest will take precedence. The
council should give its approval, and Mayor Muriel
E. Bowser (D) should sign the legislation into law so
it can take effect for the 2020 election cycle.
ABCDE
LOCAL OPINIONS
Let’s commute a mile in each other’s shoes
Regarding Jason Neuringer’s Dec. 10 Local Opinions essay, “Let’s really open up Montgomery’s roads”:
Mr. Neuringer and I agree that our community
faces a traffic crisis, but we disagree about how to
address it. Research demonstrates that we can’t pave
our way out of traffic.
• Other metropolitan areas offer quality regional
rail. Why not suburban Maryland? We should work
toward all-day, week-long MARC service from Frederick to the District.
• We also need to give commuters more options for
connecting to rail in the first place, as well as to
nearby employment and commercial centers. Bus
rapid transit (BRT) has proved a popular option in
other cities. In fact, 30 percent of additional trips
generated by BRT in car-centric Los Angeles served
customers who were new to transit.
The Dec. 11 editorial favoring the new system of
tolls on Interstate 66 during rush hours, “Va. should
stick with its I-66 express lanes — tolls and all,”
conceded that adjustments might be needed to
improve operation. One such adjustment that seems
to have received little attention is the treatment of
motorcycles, which are permitted to travel toll-free.
The reason for this exemption is by no means
apparent because motorcycles need as much length
on the highway as a car for safety and possibly more
under adverse conditions but, for the most part,
carry only one person.
I am a motorcyclist, but I am unable to see that the
objective of optimizing the use of the road is served
by this concession, which should be reconsidered, if
only in fairness to car drivers under the obligation to
double up.
Malcolm Keen, Fairfax Station
Elite control of the Internet
Regarding the Dec. 13 Economy & Business article
“Plan to kill rules on net neutrality deeply unpopular”:
Founder James Madison said a concern in formulating the Constitution was to “protect the minority
of the opulent against the majority.” History shows
this idea as a constant struggle from below to break
through what can be economic slavery, as before
World War I when a majority of our employment had
very little security.
The Federal Communications Commission’s action amounts to a flashback to that time, allowing
the elite to control what amounts to a modern-day,
hugely important utility. This action will allow
domination coming from above and demonstrate
again elite capture of the bureaucracy, contrary to
majority rule. In the 1700s ignorance was rampant.
Today that is not so.
Ken Thrasher, Alexandria
Just one voice of many on Bears Ears
If Maryland wants to be transparent,
why keep complaints anonymous?
ANY STATE legislatures suffer from comparisons to fraternity houses, where
(mostly) male lawmakers, often on
months-long leaves from their families
and regular jobs, do the taxpayers’ business in
settings where some decide that the normal rules
don’t apply. The profusion of free liquor and fawning
lobbyists, combined with a sense of entitlement and
privilege, sometimes add up to ignominious conduct
— grist for the scandal mill of many a statehouse
reporter.
As incidents of sexual harassment and assault
continue to engulf the rich and famous from coast to
coast, state legislators have been the subjects of a
drumbeat of allegations. A survey last month by the
USA Today Network found that at least 40 of them,
nearly all men, had been accused of some form of
sexual misconduct in the course of the past year. On
Wednesday night, Dan Johnson, a Republican state
lawmaker in Kentucky, died in an apparent suicide
after having been accused of assaulting a teenage
girl. Four other GOP lawmakers in Kentucky have
been implicated in a recent sexual-harassment
scandal; one of them, Jeff Hoover, resigned his
position as the state’s House speaker.
Mindful of the furor, Maryland’s two top legislative leaders have ordered legislative officials to begin
systematically keeping track of sexual-misconduct
complaints and producing an annual report on the
number, nature and resolution of allegations. That’s
a welcome initiative with one glaring shortcoming:
The data that will be compiled and, presumably,
available to the public will exclude the names of
alleged perpetrators, including any members of the
General Assembly, as well as legislative staffers.
As a personnel matter, it may be that House
Speaker Michael E. Busch (D-Anne Arundel) and
state Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr.
(D-Calvert) believed their hands were tied. As a
practical matter, collecting information on the
alleged transgressions of lawmakers who remain
anonymous is likely to have little real-world effect.
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
N A tax-bill saga full of clarifying moments, there
was one particularly eloquent expression of Republican priorities. First, Republicans refused to
fund Florida Sen. Marco Rubio’s plan to expand
tax benefits for low-income families because he proposed paying for it by dropping the corporate tax rate
to merely 21 percent rather than 20 percent. Then, in
final negotiations on the bill, they adopted the 21 percent rate Mr. Rubio had sought, after all — and used
the savings not to help needy families or to lessen the
bill’s impact on the national debt but to lower the top
income tax rate for the highest wage earners.
After some last-minute theatrics, a smaller version
of Mr. Rubio’s plan was added to the final package.
But it is telling how easy it was for Republicans to
drop top income tax rates, how hard it has been for
Mr. Rubio to secure even a limited victory for
low-income people and how irrelevant concerns
about ballooning the national debt have been for
most in the GOP.
What started as a bipartisan push for smart
tax-code reform mutated over the past year into an
. SATURDAY,
• Nationwide, the majority of vehicle trips are less
than 10 miles. Smart-growth policies that foster
neighborhoods where people live, work and play are a
vital component of congestion relief.
• Finally, we should consider adding two reversible
lanes to Interstate 270 and give priority to carpools
and buses. Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s (R) four
lanes would pave over neighborhoods and cost an
untenable amount.
I’d be happy to accept Mr. Neuringer’s invitation to
join him for a commute over the American Legion
Bridge. In turn, I hope he would join me on the MARC
train from Union Station to Rockville to witness the
untapped potential of our region’s rail network.
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
News pages:
Editorial and opinion pages:
MARTIN BARON
FRED HIATT
Executive Editor
Editorial Page Editor
CAMERON BARR
JACKSON DIEHL
Managing Editor
Deputy Editorial Page Editor
EMILIO GARCIA-RUIZ
RUTH MARCUS
Managing Editor
Deputy Editorial Page Editor
TRACY GRANT
JO-ANN ARMAO
Deputy Managing Editor
Associate Editorial Page Editor
SCOTT VANCE
Deputy Managing Editor
BARBARA VOBEJDA
Deputy Managing Editor
Vice Presidents:
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L. WAYNE CONNELL..........................................................................Human Resources
ELIZABETH H. DIAZ ................................................. Audience Development & Insights
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Ben Shnider, Rockville
The writer, a Democrat, is a candidate
for Montgomery County Council District 3.
The Washington Post
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071 (202) 334-6000
Regarding the Dec. 9 Politics & the Nation article
“Uranium firm sought Bears Ears cut”:
There may be an impression that my company
played a significant role in the decision to reduce the
size of Bears Ears National Monument. That is not the
case. Indeed, we are not opposed to the creation of
national monuments, including Bears Ears, and support increased protection of areas that contain unique
cultural, scientific and environmental resources.
On May 11, the Interior Department solicited public
comments on the effects the designation of Bears Ears
may have on land beyond the monument’s boundaries.
We submitted a two-page comment, describing how it
might affect two of our operations located near the
monument. Ours was one of about 2.8 million comments. On advice from the local Bureau of Land
Management office, we had a 30-minute meeting with
Interior Department officials to discuss many issues,
including Bears Ears’s boundaries near our operations.
We were only one voice among many. We support a
consensus approach to public-lands policy that protects areas with special scientific, environmental and
scenic resources; allows Native Americans to manage
and protect valuable cultural and religious sites; and
allows us to operate our facilities in a responsible
manner.
Mark Chalmers, Lakewood, Colo.
The writer is president of Energy Fuels Inc.
The Saudi Arabia of NATO
The Dec. 12 editorial “Away from freedom” and
Anne Applebaum’s PostPartisan blog excerpt, “The
Polish government latches on to ‘fake news,’ ” argued
for a more vociferous U.S. critique of Poland’s
embrace of “anti-democratic” measures against judicial independence and independent media.
But don’t expect more vocal criticism from Washington, let alone downgraded bilateral relations as
with Viktor Orban’s Hungary — for two reasons.
First, President Trump is unconcerned about democratic checks and balances and labels much of
the media “fake news.” He is much more interested in
cutting business deals with any foreign country regardless of political or ideological orientation. Under
its 10-year, $36 billion military-modernization program, Poland has become the Saudi Arabia on the
eastern flank of NATO because of its massive purchase of advanced American military equipment, including missile defense systems and aircraft.
Second, under A. Wess Mitchell, the new assistant
secretary of state in charge of the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, a policy shift is expected
to take place toward a more security-focused cooperation with Central and Eastern Europe. His
2016 book, “The Unquiet Frontier” (co-written with
Jakub J. Grygiel), argues that the United States
should take “a less publicly critical stance of states
underperforming in democratic governance in order
to advance pragmatic security cooperation against
Russia. Democratic values continue to matter, but
security must come first. . . . All other policy objectives are secondary.” This must be music to Polish
leaders’ ears given their country’s central role on
NATO’s eastern front as an anti-Russian bulwark.
Istvan Dobozi, Gaithersburg
Safeguarding Filipinos’ future
The Dec. 9 editorial “Police state terror in the
Philippines” flowed from the misperception that the
Philippines has become a lawless place. Nothing
could be further from the truth. More than 80 percent
of Metro Manila residents say they feel safer because
of the government’s campaign against illegal drugs.
The anti-drug campaign aims to restore law and
order in our country. The administration of President
Rodrigo Duterte is delivering on his campaign promise to end the scourge of illegal drugs, which has
already destroyed millions of lives and corrupted our
country’s institutions. A great number of Filipinos
put their faith in this promise, tired as they were of the
“business as usual” attitude that allowed this problem to fester and worsen through the years.
It behooves any sovereign state to do everything in
its power to ensure the security and safeguard the
future of its citizens. The Philippine National Police
has the expertise and resources needed to eradicate
the drug problem. More important, the police are
duty-bound to enforce the law. This includes the strict
observance of the rule of law and ensuring accountability in legitimate police operations.
Jose Manuel G. Romualdez, Washington
The writer is the ambassador of the
Republic of the Philippines to the United States.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
COLBERT I. KING
EZ
A15
RE
Ryan’s economic
remedy: Have
more babies.
DRAWING BOARD
Roy Moore
is still in
the White House
BY
“G
C HRISTINE E MBA
T
od showed up and showed out last
night in Alabama,” an old college
friend exclaimed in a phone call on the
morning after Republican Senate
hopeful Roy Moore’s surprising and ignominious
special-election defeat. That Moore took down with
him the arrogant but hapless President Trump, his
chief cheerleader and rally sponsor, delighted my
caller all the more. Email and social media across
the country lit up with cries of jubilation.
Whether divinely inspired or voter driven, Democrat Doug Jones’s victory Tuesday night should have
been the moment for Moore to realize that his
self-depiction as Christ’s chief crusader, waging a
holy war against a backsliding and sinful America,
was finished.
He now faces his inevitable destination: political
irrelevancy, not Washington
Alabamians cannot be thanked enough for keeping Moore at home. They, as great Americans, did all
they could. The awful truth, however, is that
Tuesday’s voting went only so far. It kept Moore out
of the U.S. Senate. But keep that glee in check.
Tuesday’s result did not rid Washington of Moore.
He remains ensconced within the fence and barricades that circle 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Yes,
beloved: Roy Moore is in the White House.
Moore is all there in Trump: the pomposity and
overweening egotism, the predatory behavior that
causes women to line up to tell their stories about
sexual misconduct and abuse. In Trump, as in
Moore, can be found the inability to come clean
about anything, the ability to tell bald-faced lies, the
harboring of racism and religious bigotry. Their
capacity to pander to base instincts has no equal.
Neither does their meanness.
Though Trump may have a slight edge in the vice
of cruelty.
How much worse can it get when the president
of the United States publicly tweets that a U.S.
senator is a “lightweight” and “flunky” and slyly
insinuates that she would trade her body for
campaign donations?
That is the smear Trump slimed Sen. Kirsten
Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) with this week.
Is that rock bottom, even for Trump? A large slice
of Gillibrand’s congressional colleagues thought so,
along with longtime observers of American politics.
The revulsion at Trump’s attack reached a peak,
however, that I never expected to be scaled by the
editorial board of a major newspaper such as USA
Today.
I say this as a former Post editorial writer who
worked for several years with a small but plucky
stable of colleagues carefully assembled by legendary editorial page editor Meg Greenfield. We were
known to turn a remarkable phrase or two from
time to time.
But I have difficulty recalling anything that got
quite to the heart of our disgust with a public figure
as well as the members of USA Today’s editorial
board did. Taking note of Trump’s implying that
Gillibrand would trade sexual favors for cash, USA
Today declared: “A president who would all but call
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand a whore is not fit to clean the
toilets in the Barack Obama Presidential Library or
to shine the shoes of George W. Bush.”
Editorial boards across the country are probably
muttering, “We wish we had said that.” I know I do.
But that gets us to the centrality of the problem
with Trump’s presidency: As with Moore, most of
the country doesn’t like him. Not his policies or
decisions, though many are just awful. But him,
who he is, and for some, what he has turned out to
be.
We have a president who is not trusted. He is
thought to be unethical and morally unmoored. He
scores points with his shrinking base when he sticks
it to people of color and those outside the cloak of
Christianity.
And he deludes himself into thinking he is
beloved when he finds himself on a stage with
thousands of adoring fans eating out of his hand —
ignoring the fact that they, despite their fervor, do
not represent how the majority of the country feels
about the job he’s doing or the conduct of his
presidency.
But why should I, a critic of Trump’s policies,
decisions and personal conduct, care about his low
standing with most of the electorate? Am I not
seeing Judgment Day for Trump unfolding as I
wished in an October column?
It’s one thing for a president to be estranged from
a few members of his party, or even occasionally
from party leaders themselves.
But estranged from his country, when rumbles of
war are heard offshore, when Americans are
polarized by race, class and religion, with creeping
uncertainty in our political institutions?
Today’s America, with an out-of-control president, is a toxic brew. Moore didn’t win a ticket to
Washington, but he’s with us because Trump is still
here. That’s why I care.
BY BAGLEY FOR THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE
BY SHENEMAN
BY OHMAN FOR THE SACRAMENTO BEE
BY LUCKOVICH FOR THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION
kingc@washpost.com
he year draws to a close. “Feminism”
has been declared the word of the
year. And House Speaker Paul D. Ryan
has just urged women to have more
babies for the good of the state.
A joke? An outtake from “The Handmaid’s
Tale”? Alas, neither. At his weekly news briefing Thursday, Ryan (R-Wis.) suggested that
the most important way to shore up the
economy was for Americans to have bigger
families.
“This is going to be the new economic
challenge for America: People. . . . I did my part,
but we need to have higher birth rates in this
country,” he said as part of a riff on how
Republicans planned to tackle entitlement reform in 2018. “We have something like a
90 percent increase in the retirement population of America but only a 19 percent increase in
the working population in America. So what do
we have to do? Be smarter, more efficient, more
technology . . . still going to need more people.”
And we all know whose job that is.
It’s not that Ryan is wrong, exactly. The
United States is in the middle of a baby bust,
perhaps one more dire than we realize. Last
year saw a record-low fertility rate, and an
even sharper drop is predicted for 2017. To
blithely instrumentalize the miracle of life in
homage to the House speaker: We’ll need
more bodies to keep the economy humming.
Even so, Ryan’s comments are shocking in
their hypocrisy, not to mention obliviousness
— at best — to the context in which they’ll be
received.
To be clear: The prospect of having more
children is not necessarily off-putting to women. True, Ryan’s comments feel particularly ill
considered at this moment, given the creepy
Congressional Surrogacy Surprise that
emerged from the office of former House
Republican Trent Franks (Ariz.) last week.
And it is more than a little insulting to
insinuate that to “do their part,” women need
to lie back and think of America. That said,
research has shown that many women in the
United States have fewer children than they
would like to have and begin having them
later than they would prefer.
But this suboptimal situation is directly
related to policies the speaker and his party
have pursued. If Ryan wants more babies to
prop up the United States, maybe he and the
rest of the GOP should consider making it
easier to live in America with one.
The reasons for delaying family formation
are often economic. When those of childbearing age spend their entire stagnant incomes on rent, debt and health care, the
prospect of having a baby recedes into the
distance. The effect is most acute for women,
who are often least able to afford housing,
whose incomes are likely to sink after breaks
for childbearing, and whose health risks
increase with motherhood. (Maternal mortality is on the rise in the United States, yet the
GOP’s proposed — and mercifully failed —
health-care reform considered cuts to pregnancy-related benefits.)
Yet rather than promoting policies that
might ease the economic pressure, Ryan and
his party are peddling a “tax reform” bill that
prioritizes fiscal favors for corporations,
which cannot have children, over everyday
citizens who can. And once passed, the bill will
cripple our country’s ability to pay for the sort
of safety net that could make a new baby a
cause for celebration rather than alarm.
If we must have tax reform, why not at the
very least implement a more effective child
tax credit that is fully deductible for those at
the lowest income brackets? That would give
those citizens generously contributing new
“people” to our economy some support to help
make ends meet. Or why not promote a real
paid-leave proposal that encompasses both
maternal and paternal leave, to make it easier
to combine child care and work? The paltry
provision attached to the bill is a gift for
corporations, not parents.
Of course, maybe Ryan does really care
about our demographic difficulties but
doesn’t want to go about fixing them through
economic means. If so, there is the obvious
solution of liberalizing immigration, yet Republicans from top to bottom have refused to
consider it.
When it comes down to it, there is a raft of
policies that could help mitigate the problem
of falling birth rates. The fact that they remain
unimplemented suggests that maybe Ryan
hasn’t “done his part” as well as he thinks.
Christine Emba is a Post opinions writer and editor.
ALEXANDRA PETRI
Net neutrality is gone. Feel the freedom coursing through your veins.
“T
oday is a great day for consumers, for
innovation and for freedom.” That is
what Commissioner Brendan Carr of the
Federal Communications Commission
said as he voted to strip net neutrality protections.
Whenever people tell me that we are on the verge
of new, undiscovered freedom for consumers, I
always feel a little nervous. “Unprecedented freedom
for consumers” is usually what people say right
before placing rabid hedgehogs in the stocking
stuffer display. Before, you only had the choice of
things you wanted that would make appropriate
gifts. Now, you might also get a rabid hedgehog!
What a day this is for the consumer.
I’m sorry, all I have are bad analogies that will not
cheer us in the face of this news. But it is bad news.
“The Internet has functioned without net neutrality rules far longer than with them,” said FCC
Commissioner Michael O’Rielly. “This decision will
not break the Internet.” (Also, O’Rielly was annoyed
that certain people who will remain nameless had
used the Internet to say he looked like a potato, but I
am sure this did not factor into his decision. He may
have wanted to throttle them, but not their Internet
service, surely.) O’Rielly points out that Internet
service providers such as FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s
former employer, Verizon, say these restrictions are
strangling their ability to grow and innovate, and we
so want to unleash them to innovate.
To O’Rielly’s point that, for years, there were no
such restrictions and the Internet blossomed and
grew, consider the following analogy:
It may not be technically illegal to bring a bear into
a maternity ward, but we have, I think, started to live
our lives with the expectation that nobody will do
this. So if we put forth a rule saying, just so we’re
clear, No Bears in the Maternity Ward, I would not
expect anyone to complain that this was stifling
innovation. In fact, if someone said “Hey, let’s get rid
of that rule about not bringing bears into hospitals so
we can restore the wonderful, competitive environment we had before,” I would wonder, “What exactly
are you PLANNING that you need us to get rid of this
relatively basic protection?”
The good news is that, according to the FCC, the
free market frowns on people releasing large numbers of bears into hospitals, so it probably will not
happen. Even if people are lobbying hard to get rid of
the No Bears in the Maternity Ward rule. So we can
rest easy, in our hospitals, with the steak on our
pillow — was there always steak? Lord, this is
terrifying.
“The only future to fear is the one we never
discover because we gave up on the approach that
already has brought us so far,” Pai reassured us in
quoting tech analyst Ben Thompson. This is also why
we cannot ever regulate firearms. Besides, think of
the consumer, hungry for more options. Now, he has
the option of getting worse service unless he pays
more money, an option he did not (well, legally) have
before! Woohoo.
Congress can still fix this, I start to type, before
having to stop to double over with hysterical laughter that swiftly turns into tears.
On the bright side, Pai made a video, either to lift
our spirits or to make us want to leave the Internet
forever. In it, he points out that with the new rules,
nothing will change for you goofballs online — you
can still “ ’gram food” and do the Harlem Shake, and
enjoy your favorite memes. Ha, that is all the Internet
is for, dumb things! It is not a portal to all information in the world and the place where the vast
majority of communication lives, access to which is
basically fundamental to modern life.
Without recourse to bear analogies, FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel made this point: “Our
existing net neutrality policies . . . are wildly popular.” With the new rules, Internet service providers
“will have the power to block websites, throttle
services and censor online content. They will have
the right to discriminate.” Also, “the FCC’s own data
shows that our broadband markets are not competitive . . . so if your broadband provider is blocking
websites, you have no recourse.” In conclusion, “This
is not good.”
Not good? Today is a great day for the consumer.
Before, we had the option to have recourse, but now,
thanks to the FCC’s prompt action, we have the new,
exciting option of having NO OPTIONS OF RECOURSE!
“The sky is not falling, consumers will remain
protected, and the Internet will continue to thrive,”
Pai said. Well, I’m reassured.
Alexandra Petri writes the ComPost blog at
washingtonpost.com/blogs/compost.
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Rule to protect students of color may be delayed
BY
M ORIAH B ALINGIT
Education Secretary Betsy
DeVos wants to delay an Obamaera rule designed to protect children of color from being disproportionately sent to specialeducation classrooms or from being unfairly disciplined.
The Education Department on
Thursday posted a notice online
signaling that it wants to postpone
the regulation, called the significant disproportionality rule, for
two years, meaning it would take
effect in 2020 instead of 2018. But
in the interim, DeVos could decide
to scrap the rule altogether.
“Through the regulatory review
process, we’ve heard from states,
school districts, superintendents
and other stakeholders on a wide
range of issues, including the significant disproportionality rule,”
said Elizabeth Hill, a spokeswoman for the department. “Because of
the concerns raised, the department is looking closely at this rule
and has determined that, while
this review takes place, it is pru-
dent to delay implementation for
two years.”
The rule, drawn up at the end of
the Obama administration, stems
from a 2004 change to the Individuals with Disabilities Education
Act, which governs special education in schools across the nation.
Congress, responding to concerns
that students of color were overrepresented in special education,
began requiring school districts to
collect data on the demographics
and treatment of specialeducation students.
Congress wanted states to track
whether black special-education
students were more likely to be
removed from mainstream classrooms, for example, or whether
Hispanic special-education students faced harsher discipline.
If states identified problematic
disparities, they could set aside
federal special-education funds to
help schools improve.
But advocates said the law did
not go far enough because it allowed states to decide when a
problem exists. A 2013 report from
the Government Accountability
Office found that states identified
2 percent of districts nationwide
as having problems with disparities. Advocates suspect the problem is far more widespread.
So in January, the Obama administration put in place the significant disproportionality rule,
which more clearly defines how
states should identify problematic
school systems.
“This rule is important, because
we know and we have clear data
that indicates that African American kids are not treated the same
as other children in special education,” said Diane Smith Howard, a
senior staff attorney with the Na-
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tional Disability Rights Network.
But the American Association
of School Administrators applauded the move to delay the
rule, saying it could be costly to
implement.
“AASA supports the decision to
roll back Obama-era regulations
. . . that would impose significant
costs and administrative burdens
on half of the school districts
throughout the country,” Executive Director Daniel A. Domenech
said. “This heavy-handed and aggressive regulation by the Obama
administration should be pulled
back given the enormous financial
consequences for districts.”
moriah.balingit@washpost.com
KLMNO
METRO
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
High today at
approx. 3 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
32 43 46 41°
°
°
°
48°
Precip: 5%
Wind: SW
7-14 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
SU
MARYLAND
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
Gov. Larry Hogan appears
to reject a request for
scheduling flexibility for
Montgomery schools. B3
Gov. Terry McAuliffe will
not pardon convicted
killer Jens Soering, who
says he didn’t do it. B4
Mundell Lowe was an
understated guitarist who
played with Charlie Parker
and Marilyn Monroe. B4
Chancellor
testifies on
absences
at Ballou
He says some D.C. grads
missed too many classes
but were still qualified
BY
PHOTOS BY TIMOTHY C. WRIGHT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Journalism students at Liberty University aspire to apply the truth of the gospel in newsrooms
J ULIE Z AUZMER
lynchburg, va. — What do you do when
everyone around you thinks the media is “fake
news” — and you want to work for the media?
That’s the question professor Amy Bonebright needs to help her students answer. This
is Liberty University, the world’s largest evangelical Christian school. Most students come
from politically and religiously conservative
families and churches inclined not to trust the
news — and, indeed, the president of the
university is Jerry Falwell Jr., a fervent advocate of President Trump, who throws around
the term “fake news” to refer to much of the
reporting in the mainstream media.
So when Bonebright teaches a room full of
aspiring reporters in her Community Journalism class, she needs to teach them more than
just how to craft a story’s lead — the opener —
and conduct an interview. “Now, everyone’s
down on the media,” she says to her class.
“Maybe you go home over break and see your
parents’ friends. And they say, ‘Remind me
what you’re studying.’ ”
A nervous giggle rises from many of the
students. They have had that conversation
before.
“You say journalism, and they go, ‘Hmm,’ ”
Bonebright says. “What should our response
be, as a Christian going into a field like that?”
For these college students, the answer to that
LIBERTY CONTINUED ON B2
D.C. Public Schools Chancellor
Antwan Wilson acknowledged
Friday that the school system
graduates a high number of
chronically absent students, a
practice that “doesn’t align” with
city policy.
But Wilson, appearing before
the D.C. Council, also sought to
defend the system, saying that
students who graduate have
earned their diplomas — even
amid attendance concerns.
“I believe that our students
earned their diplomas by reaching a level of mastery deemed
appropriate by our teachers,”
Wilson testified.
D.C. Council member David
Grosso (I-At Large) called a
marathon, eight-hour hearing to
BALLOU CONTINUED ON B2
Faith and the ‘fake news’
BY
P ERRY S TEIN
Guilty plea
for former
liquor board
o∞cial
Represents 7th person to
admit to crimes in Prince
George’s bribery scandal
BY
TOP: The editors of the Liberty University student newspaper, the Liberty Champion, work in their
office at the evangelical school in Lynchburg, Va. ABOVE: A page proof pinned to a bulletin board in
the newsroom tells about students showing the “fruit of the spirit.” Journalism students at Liberty
often encounter skepticism from conservative friends and family about the field they aspire to join.
L YNH B UI
A former Prince George’s County liquor board commissioner arrested earlier this year on federal
bribery charges pleaded guilty in
the case Friday afternoon, the seventh of eight people netted in the
wide-ranging scandal to admit
wrongdoing.
Anuj Sud, 39, admitted to violating the Travel Act, going between Maryland and Washington,
to collect cash kickbacks — which
prosecutors said he referred to as
“wedding gifts” — in exchange for
official favors.
Sud’s plea leaves only former
state Del. Michael Vaughn set to
go to trial in the federal investigation authorities dubbed “Operation Dry Saloon.”
Earlier this year the former
BRIBE CONTINUED ON B6
Broader paid parental
Mock trial recalls ’69 ruling on student free speech
leave on Va. GOP agenda
BY SHIRA STEIN
BY
L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond — Virginia’s House
Republican leader is backing
plans to offer generous paid
parental leave for employees of
the chamber and all of state
government, a stance widely
seen as an effort to rebrand the
party in the era of President
Trump.
House Majority Leader M.
Kirkland Cox (Colonial Heights)
said he would set the plan in
motion “immediately after being
sworn in” as speaker — something that would happen if Republicans hold the House majority after a handful of election
recounts next week.
Cox would direct the clerk of
the House of Delegates to develop a policy to provide 12 weeks of
paid leave to all full-time House
employees following the birth or
adoption of a child. He also
would support legislation to ex-
tend that benefit to all state
employees.
The benefit would be among
the most generous in the nation
for public employees, according
to data compiled by the National
Partnership for Women & Families.
Currently, employees must use
personal leave, sick time and
then short-term disability, which
provides only a fraction of their
normal pay.
Only about 10 states and the
District provide paid family leave
for some or all public employees.
Among them, Washington
state offers 12 weeks. The District
and New York offer eight; California and New Jersey, six; and
Rhode Island, four.
“Family is the bedrock of our
society, and there’s nothing more
important to a family than those
first few months at home as they
welcome and share joyous moPAID LEAVE CONTINUED ON B4
As she stood before local students in a federal courtroom in
Washington, Mary Beth Tinker
held aloft a replica of the black
armband that had brought her notoriety — and students like them
protections of their freedom of expression.
On Thursday, nearly 50 years after Tinker wore an armband to her
Iowa school to protest the Vietnam
War — and was suspended — she
appeared at a mock trial reenacting
her case before students from the
Washington area.
In the past year, local students
have walked out of class to protest
election results and to draw attention to the plight of undocumented
immigrants.
And their rights to those protests
are bolstered by the 1969 Supreme
Court decision in Tinker’s case,
when a majority of justices ruled
that students and teachers do not
“shed their constitutional rights to
freedom of speech or expression at
the schoolhouse gate.”
MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
Washington students watch a reenactment of a Vietnam-era case
that allowed a teen to wear an armband to school in protest.
It was interesting to see that
“something that happened so long
ago . . . is still so relevant today,” said
Soracha McGrath, a 17-year-old senior at the School Without Walls in
Foggy Bottom.
In a case brought by the American Civil Liberties Union over Tinker’s suspension, the Supreme
Court ruled the First Amendment
applied to public schools and that
school officials could not censor
student speech unless it disrupted
the educational process. A black
armband, judges ruled, was not disruptive.
“It’s not just history. The decision
in this case governs how students
and school officials deal with expression in schools today,” Judge
David S. Tatel of the U.S. Court of
Appeals for the D.C. Circuit said
Thursday.
Tatel, along with Judge Sri Srinivasan, also of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, and Judge
Ketanji Brown Jackson of the U.S.
District Court for the District of
Columbia, presided while experienced lawyers reenacted Tinker v.
Des Moines Independent Community School District before about
200 students.
Some in the audience in the ceremonial courtroom of the appeals
court were eighth-graders, the
same as Tinker when at 13 she wore
the armband in 1965.
“These kids need to speak up for
themselves, and it is powerful when
they do that,” Tinker, 65, said ThursFREE SPEECH CONTINUED ON B6
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
RELIGION
Evangelical students have faith they can counter ‘fake news’
LIBERTY FROM B1
question is deeply rooted in their
faith. Because while they might
not always see the news media as
truthful, they do believe in the
truth of the gospel — and they
think that’s a principle they can
apply in the newsroom just as they
do in the pews.
“As Christians, we believe in
truth,” senior Timothy Cockes
raises his hand to say. “Christians
actually should be the best journalists there are, because we believe there is truth out there.”
Newsrooms aren’t known as
very religious places. While statistics on the faith of professional
journalists are hard to come by, in
2007 the Pew Research Center reported that 17 percent of national
journalists and 26 percent of local
journalists go to worship services
every week or almost every week,
while 29 percent of national journalists and 27 percent of local journalists never go to church or other
services. (Among the general public that year, 39 percent went at
least once a week and 27 percent
seldom or never attended services,
according to Pew. Those percentages have since changed to 36 percent and 30 percent, respectively.)
At Liberty, by contrast, nearly
all the students are evangelical
Christians. They are fairly uniform politically, as well. Falwell,
who runs the university, which his
evangelist father founded, appears frequently on television and
Twitter as one of Trump’s most
vocal supporters in the religious
realm. While not all students
agree with Falwell’s support for
the president, they are overwhelmingly conservative: In Virginia’s recent gubernatorial election, Falwell proudly tweeted the
vote tally at Liberty’s precinct was
1,213 votes for Republican Ed
Gillespie to 51 for Democrat Ralph
Northam. Over the entire state,
Northam won almost 54 percent
of the vote.
Liberty is a place where the ads
in the student newspaper promote theology graduate programs
and the gospel choir gets a frontpage story. Bonebright starts class
flipping through the issue, high-
TIMOTHY C. WRIGHT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Erin Covey, assistant news editor for the Liberty Champion, makes revisions to plan the next edition of the paper. “Christians actually
should be the best journalists there are, because we believe there is truth out there,” one student said in a journalism class.
lighting her students’ work. “Katie, a football story? Nice! Did you
sit in the press box and everything? Is this your first time?”
Meanwhile, two students are
quietly chatting in their seats
about the sexual harassment scandal embroiling comedian Louis
C.K. “I wish this was a regular
school so that I could talk about it,”
one young man jokes; apparently
masturbation is not to be discussed in Liberty classrooms.
What they do discuss, proudly,
is the interaction between their
chosen profession and their faith.
TJ Davis, a senior from Leesburg, raises his hand. “Anytime I
mention journalism and people,
especially older people, say, ‘That’s
such a terrible, dark field,’ it just
encourages me to pray: ‘God, use
me as your vessel to bring You
glory,’ ” he says.
In the view of many conservative Christians he knows, Davis
says after class, the media “seems
to be contributing a lot of bad in
the world right now.”
He doesn’t disagree entirely —
he thinks a lot of journalists just
look for a quick quote without
caring about getting the complete,
accurate story, and he suspects
BuzzFeed and other outlets post
articles before verifying they are
true. He sees a flawed newsroom
as a sort of mission field.
“I want to go into these dark
places and be the light in that
place, use that as an opportunity
to bring God’s glory,” he said. “You
can go into a place that’s riddled
with people who are out there
with ulterior motives, or people
who don’t have those same standards as you.”
He says one of the outlets he
would love to work for is the New
York Times.
Davis is exactly the sort of student Bruce Kirk wants to send out
of the journalism program at Liberty. Before becoming dean of the
school of communications, Kirk
worked at local television stations
across the country. In his wideranging career, he says, he saw
reporters who let their liberal bias
creep into their news coverage.
Now, he tells students they
might encounter the same thing.
“I had a student a couple years ago
who interned at CNN. You know
CNN’s reputation has really gone
down the toilet,” he said. He thinks
that a diversity of voices in editorial meetings would improve the
channel’s coverage, and his student could someday provide that.
“Some of these claims of ‘fake
news’? If there were more people
who were questioning and challenging, I suspect some of that
‘fake news’ would go out the door,”
he says.
Current student William Collier says he’s experiencing a mission field of that sort as an intern
right now in the sports section at
the News & Advance in Lynchburg. “It’s just a matter of trying to
hold on to who you are. . . . The
newsroom is definitely different.
It’s not a bubble of just super-devout Christians,” he says.
Collier says he wants to conduct
himself as a Christian should,
even when conversations in the
newsroom get racy. “I don’t know
if this is going to sound too left
wing. But I don’t want to be a
Christian journalist. I just want to
be a journalist that’s a Christian,”
he says.
Others have decided they
would rather write for religious
publications than work in the secular media. A common ambition
in this class is to work in communications for a nonprofit agency
that does missionary work
abroad, so they can write promotional copy to drum up donations.
All of the students say again and
again that they’re committed to
objectively airing all sides of a
debate — the ethic at the heart of
any journalism, religious or not —
even though most of them have
strong views about political and
moral issues. “We believe the truth
is so powerful [that] we’re not
afraid to share the other side
[that] we believe is wrong,” Bonebright puts it.
In fact, some students say, the
complete truth is what God demands. “If you truly believe you’re
being held to a divine standard,
think about how much more
worthwhile it is to hold yourself to
an ethical standard,” Sydney Jones
says.
It’s another reason evangelical
Christians belong in newsrooms,
these students say, even as their
families and friends sometimes
warn them to steer clear.
When class ends, they rush out
of the room, many of them clutching notebooks. They have stories
to file.
julie.zauzmer@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Teen found dead in creek drowned while drunk, medical examiner finds
BY
D AN M ORSE
The Bethesda teenager found
dead in a frigid stream last weekend died of acute alcohol intoxication, complicated by hypothermia and drowning, an official
at Maryland’s Office of the Chief
Medical Examiner said Friday.
The death was ruled accidental, said Bruce Goldfarb, a spokesman for the office.
The findings are consistent
with what police and family
members have said about what
was known of the final hours of
Navid Nicholas Sepehri, 17, who
went to a party Saturday night,
drank vodka, set off walking and
never came home.
Navid’s father, Frank Sepehri,
found his son’s body in a patch of
water the next day. Police officials
have been looking at their officers’ interactions with the teen
and his father, who each crossed
paths with police during a fivehour window Saturday night and
into Sunday morning.
“We want to determine exactly
what the actions of our officers
were,” Montgomery County Po-
lice Chief J. Thomas Manger said
this week.
He said his heart went out to
the family of the senior at Walt
Whitman High School. “I just
can’t imagine the pain they’re
going through,” the chief said.
Around 7 p.m. Saturday, Navid
Sepehri left his home in Bethesda
— the last time his family saw
him alive. He apparently met up
with friends and at some point
headed to a teenage party at a
house on Elgin Lane in Bethesda.
Police said the homeowners
grew concerned that uninvited
teenagers had shown up with
alcohol. The homeowners asked a
group of teens to call their parents for rides home.
Around the same time, police
received a call about noise from
the party. Officers arrived to find
youths scurrying off into yards,
police said. Officers spoke with a
small group of teens who stayed
outside the home on the street,
including Navid Sepehri. The
teens told the officers they were
waiting for rides, according to a
police statement, and officers
had found no evidence the home-
owners had provided alcohol.
Later, after Sepehri didn’t return home, his father began driving to search for him as the night
grew colder.
In the first hour of Sunday,
temperatures in the region were
around 31 degrees with a wind
chill of 25 degrees.
At about 3:23 a.m. Sunday,
Frank Sepehri drove into the
parking lot of a county police
station in Bethesda and spoke
with an officer, according to his
account and a police account.
For reasons that are still not
clear, the officer did not take a
missing-person report, and Frank
Sepehri returned to his search.
The information released Friday by the Medical Examiner’s
Office did not address at what
time the 17-year-old died.
Police received a missingperson report about Navid
Sepehri at 12:46 p.m. Sunday, and
searched for the teenager. His
father also kept searching, and
found his son just before 5 p.m.
Sunday in the stream in a wooded
ravine behind some homes.
dan.morse@washpost.com
D.C. Council holds hearing after report on Ballou graduates’ attendance
BALLOU FROM B1
investigate the state of high
school graduation in the nation’s
capital amid allegations that Ballou High School in Southeast
improperly graduated seniors
who were chronically absent and
didn’t grasp basic reading skills.
An article published last
month by WAMU and NPR reported that Ballou awarded diplomas to seniors who did not
meet graduation requirements
and that administrators pressured teachers to pass students.
The school system and the Office
of the State Superintendent of
Education are conducting investigations, and the chancellor said
he would take appropriate action
once the probes are concluded.
D.C. council members said
they do not believe that attendance and grading issues are isolated to Ballou, and they pledged
to determine how widespread
they are. One teacher who testified before the council said she
thought Ballou was being used as
a “scapegoat” for broader, systemic issues.
Council members grilled Wilson and other school officials
about attendance and graduation
policies, and questioned why
there was not more oversight of
the credit recovery program — an
initiative that allows students to
retake a class they previously
failed.
Council Chairman Phil Mendelson (D) said the school system
was cheating students by graduating them without meeting city
requirements.
“We have cheated the students
who were promoted, ultimately
graduated, but do not qualify,”
Mendelson said. “And we are
cheating the students who graduated — properly — because the
“I believe that educators
did what they needed to
do based on the
circumstances that they
are in.”
D.C. Schools Chancellor
Antwan Wilson
value of their diploma has been
degraded.”
D.C. policy states that students
should fail a class if they are
absent for more than 30 classes
in a school year. Wilson testified
that about half of students who
graduated from Ballou last year
missed more than 30 days of at
least one class that was required
to graduate. The chancellor, who
took over the D.C. school system
in February, said chronic absenteeism is more pervasive in D.C.
public schools than in other urban systems where he has
worked.
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
D.C. Schools Chancellor Antwan Wilson told the D.C. Council that Ballou High School, whose students
are predominantly black and low-income, is being unfairly maligned for absenteeism.
Still, the chancellor, teachers
and students who testified Friday
conveyed a more complicated
portrait of Ballou than the dysfunctional image portrayed in
the media report. They said the
predominantly black and low-in-
come school is being unfairly
maligned. Students said they are
often absent because they are
responsible for taking siblings
and other young family members
to school. They said that they are
on track to go to college and that
their teachers have prepared
them to succeed.
Students said teachers become
involved in their lives and work
with them to ensure that they
learn material and graduate, despite potentially high absentee
rates. And they credited the leadership of Ballou Principal Yetunde Reeves with improving
academics and the school’s culture. Reeves was reassigned from
her post pending the investigation, though Wilson said she
could return to the school if the
investigation finds she did nothing wrong.
“Ballou has provided me with
a sense of love outside of my
household,” said Ballou junior
Charles Thornton. “For once in
my life, I just feel like I have love
and care from a school that I
attend.”
Wilson, teachers and students
criticized what they dubbed the
“80/20” rule — a city attendance
regulation that says students
who miss 20 percent of the day
are considered absent for the
entire day. Students said their
truancy records can be misleading because they often miss only
one period, not all of their classes.
In an interview after his testimony, Wilson would not say
whether he thought students
who missed more than 30 days of
a class should have been allowed
to graduate.
“I believe that educators did
what they needed to do based on
the circumstances that they are
in,” Wilson said, adding that
administrators must make sure
teachers are aware of policies and
follow protocol if they think they
need to change a student’s grade.
perry.stein@washpost.com
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
MARYLAND
L O C AL D I GE S T
School calendar request is cast aside
BY
D ONNA S T. G EORGE
MARYL AND
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan
appeared to reject a request from
Montgomery County’s school
board to allow more flexibility in
setting the last day of classes,
suggesting that county officials
have more pressing matters than
“continuing to engage in this debate.”
Hogan’s letter Thursday said
that an overwhelming majority of
parents, teachers and students
support starting the school year
after Labor Day, as Hogan required in an executive order he
signed in 2016.
The school district has struggled to meet Hogan’s mandate,
which also requires that classes
end by June 15 — creating a calendar crunch that officials say has
forced tough choices about days
off for holidays and spring break.
Montgomery’s school board
wrote Hogan (R) this month, urging that he change his executive
order so that the third Friday in
June is the end of the school year.
The change would allow for fluctuations in the calendar. For example, June 15 is the third Friday
in 2018. But in 2020, the third
Friday falls on June 19.
The board said it was not asking for a change in when schools
open.
But Hogan appeared not to be
swayed. He wrote that Montgomery, the state’s largest school system, had recently approved a calendar that allows days off on religious holidays, while providing
for spring break and two full professional days for teachers.
“Montgomery County accomplished all of this with a school
calendar including 182 instructional days, two more than what is
required,” Hogan wrote in the letter, addressed to board President
Michael Durso.
Hogan suggested that Durso
“may have overlooked” a previous
letter the governor wrote in
March, rejecting a request from
Montgomery. In that letter, Durso
had more generally asked for a
reexamination of the requirement that school end by June 15.
Durso said in an interview
Thursday that he was fully aware
of Hogan’s previous letter, which
Hogan enclosed in his response.
“We were hoping he might be
willing to be a bit flexible on the
end date,” he said. “He’s made his
point clear, and we’ll do our best
to work out the calendar and
future calendars within those
constraints, but it really is a bit of
a challenge.”
In his earlier letter, dated
March 29, Hogan swiped at the
board, saying its true motivation
appeared to be “protecting teachers union contracts” that require
“an unreasonable number” of
professional days. He suggested
the board consider shifting its
focus “from arguing over which
180 days class is in session to
ensuring that students are safe in
your schools.”
The letter was written about
two weeks after Montgomery
County police charged two students with raping a 14-year-old
classmate in a bathroom stall at
Rockville High School. But those
charges, prosecutors would later
say, could not be supported by
evidence. Prosectors dropped the
rape charges in May.
Montgomery’s school board adopted a calendar for the 2018-2019
academic year that cuts spring
break by two days, designates two
full teacher professional days and
continues its practice of closing
schools on the Jewish holidays of
Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah.
School is scheduled to start
Sept. 4, after Labor Day, and end
June 13. In the 2018-2019 year,
June 14 is a snow make-up day
and June 15 is a Saturday.
Patricia O’Neill, chairman of a
board committee that considers
the calendar, said the panel was
seeking relief only at the end of
the school year as it balanced
competing priorities. She described Hogan’s reaction as
“knee-jerk.”
EPISCOPAL
EPISCOPAL
UNITED METHODIST
ChristmasEveExtravaganza
donna.stgeorge@washpost.com
Robbers target guards
loading cash into ATM
Prince George’s County police
are looking for at least two
people who stole more than
$200,000 outside a Bank of
America in an armed robbery
Friday morning.
The robbers pointed guns at
armed guards outside their
armored vehicle as the guards
loaded money into an ATM in
the 10600 block of Baltimore
Avenue in Beltsville around
10:30 a.m. The thieves stole the
money and left in a van, police
said. There were no reports of
injuries.
Prince George’s police
spokeswoman Jennifer Donelan
called the heist a “brazen
robbery” that “was obviously
orchestrated and calculated.”
A third guard in the armored
vehicle triggered an alarm,
individuals inside the bank
sounded another alarm, and
police arrived in minutes.
By then, the thieves had
abandoned the car they used in
the robbery, police said. When
asked how the robbers were
able to get away and what
weapons were used, police
declined to comment, citing the
ongoing investigation.
Police are reviewing camera
footage and have not released
descriptions of the robbers.
UNITED METHODIST
8710 Old Branch Avenue • Clinton, MD
www.christchurchclinton.org • 301-868-1330
3:00
2:00 pm
6:00
4:30 pm
6:30
5:00 pm
7:00
5:30 pm
Holy Eucharist
Children’s Pageant
Choir Concert
Holy Eucharist
EPISCOPAL
Christ Episcopal Church
Rockville, MD
109 S. Washington St. (near Town Center)
www.christchurchrockville.org
(301) 762-2191
Christmas Eve: 4 pm family service,
8 pm, 11 pm (10:30 carols)
BAPTIST
MT. PLEASANT BAPTIST
215 R.I. Ave., N.W., Wash., D.C. 202-332-5748
Office Hours: M-F 8:30-5 pm
Rev. Terry D. Streeter, Pastor
EPISCOPAL
Corner of 31st and O Street, N.W.
(202) 333-6677
www.christchurchgeorgetown.org
ADVENT III
8:00 a.m.
9:00 a.m.
11:15 a.m.
5:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
Holy Eucharist
Holy Eucharist
Holy Eucharist
Holy Eucharist (Chapel)
A Traditional Service of
Nine Lessons and Carols
The Rev. Timothy A. R. Cole, Rector
December 17, 2017
7:45 am A Strategy for Righteous Living
II Timothy 3:14-15
LUTHERAN
Sunday School Christmas Play
Visit our website at www.MPBCDC.org
Christmas Eve – Candlelight
6:00 pm Family Communion
8:00 pm Christmas Concert
8:30 pm Festival Communion
Christmas Day – 10:45 am
Sundays – 8:15 & 10:45 am
11200 Old Georgetown Rd N. Bethesda, MD
301.881.7275
www.TrinityELCA.org
BAPTIST
UKRAINIAN CATHOLIC
10:30 am
Baptism
10:45 am
Show Me Your Glory
Exodus 33:18-23
4:00 pm
Christmas Concert
Eric Waddell and the
Abundant Life Singers
Shiloh
Shiloh Baptist Church
9th & P Streets, N.W.
Wallace Charles Smith
Senior Minister
Sunday, December 17, 2017
7:45 AM
Rev. George E. Mensah, Sr.
Preaching
9:30 AM
Church School Christmas Program
10:55 AM
Rev. Wallace Charles Smith
Preaching
Thursday, December 21, 2017
7:00 PM
On-Line Prayer and Praise Service
1/857-232-0155; access: 428058.
Interpreting Service for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing
#ShilohDC
www.shilohbaptist.org
BAPTIST
Nineteenth Street
4606 16th Street, NW
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Rev. Darryl D. Roberts, Ph.D., preaching
Be sure to visit www.everyblessing.org
The Ukrainian Catholic National
Shrine of the Holy Family
4250 Harewood Road NE
Washington, DC 20017
Brookland-Catholic University
Red line Metro Station
202-526-3737
www.ucns-holyfamily.org
Sunday Divine Liturgies
9:00 a.m. (English) 11:30 a.m. (Ukrainian)
Christmas-Theophany
Schedule 2017-2018
Christ is Born
Христос Раждається
All are welcome! The Ukrainian Catholic
Church is one of the Eastern Catholic
Churches in full communion with the
Roman Catholic Church. Please join us
for our services during Christmas and
Theophany. Experience the diversity,
fullness, unity, and universality of the
Catholic Church by worshiping with us.
Christmas Eve Sunday December 24
4:00 p.m.
Children’s procession
with Christmas Divine
Liturgy (Eng.) (All are
Welcome and Families are
encouraged to attend)
10:00 p.m. Christmas Divine Liturgy
(Ukr. and Eng.)
Children’s Christmas Play
Sunday, December 17 at 9:00 & 11:15 AM
Celebrate the season as Foundry’s children help tell the story
of some common Christmas symbols and how they remind
us of the anticipation of Jesus’ birth!
Upcoming Services
12/21, 7:00 PM: Longest Night Service
12/24 Christmas Eve:
9:00 AM Gospel Celebration, 11:15 AM Traditional Worship
6:00 PM Children’s Christmas Pageant, 8:00 PM Candlelight Service
1500 16th Street NW | (202) 332-4010 | foundryumc.org
A Reconciling Congregation
We welcome everyone!
UNITED METHODIST
UNITED METHODIST
Please Join Us For Christmas Eve
5 p.m. Sunday, December 24
Carols
The Christmas Story
Candle Lighting
Concord-St. Andrews UMC
5910 Goldsboro Road
Bethesda, Maryland
301-229-3383
UNITED METHODIST
METAPHYSICAL
Everyone is welcome!
DIVINE SCIENCE CHURCH
OF THE HEALING CHRIST
2025 35th St. NW, Washington, DC 20007
202/333-7630 or Dial for Meditation 202/338-1240
Sunday, Dec. 17 - 11:00 am divinescience.org
Annandale UMC
6935 Columbia Pike
Annandale, VA 22003
www.annandale-umc.org
Christmas Eve, Dec. 24
4 p.m. family worship
7 & 11 p.m. Communion
Celebrate in candlelight!
A CHRISTMAS STORY
Rev. J. Friedline
Metaphysical Book Store, Tues.-Thur., 10 am-3 pm
Theophany Saturday January 6
10:30 a.m. Divine Liturgy and Blessing
of Water (Ukr. and Eng.)
Sunday after Theophany January 7
10:30 a.m. Divine Liturgy
(Ukr. and Eng.)
Prosfora – Parish Christmas Dinner
to follow
Maryland has announced a
new plan for oyster restoration.
The Maryland Department of
Natural Resources intends to
— Associated Press
LOTTE R I E S
VIRGINIA
Results from Dec. 15
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Thu.):
Lucky Numbers (Fri.):
DC-4 (Thu.):
DC-4 (Fri.):
DC-5 (Thu.):
DC-5 (Fri.):
8-6-5
0-9-9-5
0-4-3-8-8
9-9-3
8-0-5
3-6-7-0
5-4-7-8
5-9-6-9-9
2-1-7-5-8
MARYLAND
Day/Pick 3:
6-1-9
Pick 4:
9-1-1-8
Night/Pick 3 (Thu.):
7-2-2
Pick 3 (Fri.):
6-4-6
Pick 4 (Thu.):
8-3-1-7
Pick 4 (Fri.):
1-5-5-7
Multi-Match (Thu.): 13-17-28-33-38-43
Match 5 (Thu.):
3-17-24-38-39 *25
Match 5 (Fri.):
10-11-16-19-35 *4
5 Card Cash:
2S-QH-AS-3C-4C
ROMAN CATHOLIC
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5 (Fri.):
Night/Pick-3 (Thu.):
Pick-3 (Fri.):
Pick-4 (Thu.):
Pick-4 (Fri.):
Cash-5 (Thu.):
Cash-5 (Fri.):
4-4-2
3-0-8-7
2-6-9-29-34
3-5-4
4-3-3
1-3-9-9
0-7-4-9
3-8-12-24-29
7-15-20-28-33
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
Mega Millions:
Megaplier:
Lucky for Life:
*Bonus Ball
¶Cash Ball
7-24-32-44-52 ¶3
4-12-36-44-57 **19
4x
17-21-25-30-48 ‡10
**Mega Ball
‡Lucky Ball
For late drawings and other results,
check washingtonpost.com/local/
lottery
ROMAN CATHOLIC
PRESBYTERIAN
PRESBYTERIAN
Chritmas
itmas Eve
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship
5:00 P.M. Family Nativity Service
9:00 P.M. Candlelight Worship
4101 Nebraska Ave NW
Washington, DC 20016
nationalpres.org (202) 537-0800
ABSOLUTE MONISM
Self-Revelation Church
of Absolute Monism
Golden Lotus Temple Yoga Philosophy
Swami Premananda of India, Founder
“ADORATION OF LIGHT”
Church and Sunday School Services, 11 AM
WWW.SELFREVELATIONCHURCH.ORG
301-229-3871, 4748 Western Ave., Bethesda, MD
17 December 2017
Third Sunday of Advent
Masses 5:15 (Vigil)
7:30 , 9 , 10:30 12 (Choir)
& 1:30 (Spanish)
Advent Vespers
4:00 Upper Church
Blessing of the Bambinelli
and Lighting of the Christmas Tree
4:30 Mass Great Upper Church
Bring the Baby Jesus from your Nativity scene to be blessed at the
National Shrine before the blessing and lighting of the Christmas Tree.
Confessions 10 - 12 _____________
, 12:30 - 1:30 (Spanish) & 2 - 4 21-24 December 2017
Pre-Christmas Confession Schedule
10 - 6 _____________
Daily Masses 7 , 7:30 , 8 , 8:30 , 12:10 & 5:15 Daily Confessions 7:45 - 8:15 , 10 - 12 3:30 - 6 400 Michigan Avenue Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia
202-526-8300 www.nationalshrine.com Brookland-CUA Metro
Free Parking Bookstore Gift Shop Cafeteria Guided Tours
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST
Join us to Celebrate Peace, Hope and
Love this Holiday Season
Season of Light Spirit Experience: December 16 at 7 pm
Celebrate Hope & Joy: December 24 at 10 am
Christmas Eve Multigenerational Services: December 24 at 4 pm,
6 pm and 10 pm
Cedar Lane is a community where love works. Know that whoever
you are, whomever you love, wherever you are on your spiritual
journey, whatever your immigration status or gender identity,
you are welcome here.
Cedar Lane Unitarian Universalist Church
9601 Cedar Lane, Bethesda MD 20814 • www.cedarlane.org
ALL SOULS CHURCH, UNITARIAN
Child care available for 7 p.m. service.
10:30 a.m. Christmas Divine Liturgy
(Ukr. and Eng.)
10:30 a.m. Divine Liturgy (Ukr. and Eng.)
Tributaries picked for
oyster restoration
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST
Christmas Day Monday December 25
New Year’s Day Monday January 1
Circumcision and St. Basil
— Ellie Silverman and Lynh Bui
recommend Breton Bay and the
upper St. Mary’s River as the
fourth and fifth tributaries to
satisfy the state’s commitment
to restoring native oyster
habitat and populations in five
tributaries by 2025.
The department says the
selection complements ongoing
large-scale oyster restoration
activities in Harris Creek, the
Little Choptank River and the
Tred Avon River.
Reverend Monsignor Walter R. Rossi, Rector
12/20, 6:30 PM: Advent Wednesday Night Communion
CHRIST CHURCH, GEORGETOWN
Deputy Chief Sammy Patel
said, “These guys are out there.
We’re confident in our ability to
catch them, so it’s best for them
to turn themselves in.”
Basilica of the National Shrine
of the Immaculate Conception
Christ Episcopal Church
9:30 am
B3
M2
December 17 9:30 AM & 11:15 AM (ASL interpretation @ 11:15) n
"All Souls Christmas Pageant"
Rev. Dr. Robert M. Hardies and All Souls Children
16th & Harvard NW; 202.332.5266; all-souls.org
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
RELIGIOUS SERVICES
DIRECTORY
Don't miss our special Christmas Issues!
Advertise Christmas Eve and Christmas Day
services and events in our Special Christmas
Church Services Directory appearing in
Express newspaper
Wednesday, Dec. 20
Washington Post Metro Section
Saturday, Dec. 23
Call Melissa Abell 202-334-7024
ReligionAdvertising@washpost.com
B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
VIRGINIA
McAuliffe won’t pardon Soering on his way out
BY
L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond — Gov. Terry McAuliffe will leave office without pardoning Jens Soering, a German
diplomat’s son convicted of a 1985
double murder that he and a
growing number of supporters
claim he did not commit.
In television interviews Thursday looking back on his four-year
term, the outgoing governor said
the state is still investigating Soering’s claim that DNA evidence
shows that someone else killed
his girlfriend’s parents in the
central Virginia town of Bedford.
“Mr. Soering’s request is still
awaiting an investigation by the
Virginia Parole Board, after
which it will be forwarded to the
Governor for his consideration,”
McAuliffe spokesman Brian Coy
said via email. “We do not expect
that the investigation . . . will be
complete before the Governor
leaves office.”
Soering is serving two life sentences for the deaths of Derek and
Nancy Haysom. At the time of the
murders, he and his girlfriend,
Elizabeth Haysom, were honors
students at the University of Virginia.
Soering initially confessed to
the crime but later said he was
only trying to protect Elizabeth
Haysom from the electric chair
under the mistaken belief that he
had diplomatic immunity because of his father’s position. He
was convicted in a sensational
1990 trial that drew international
media and gavel-to-gavel coverage on local cable television.
Haysom pleaded guilty to being an accessory before the fact,
contending that she helped plan
the murders but did not physically take part. She is serving a
90-year sentence at Fluvanna
Correctional Center for Women
near Charlottesville. She has insisted over the years that she was
not at the murder scene and that
they both belong in prison.
Soering’s supporters have
raised questions about the case
for decades, noting that Soering
got some details of the crime
scene wrong in his confession.
They dismiss as “junk science” a
bloody sock print that prosecutors said tied him to the case.
Soering also has gained attention and supporters for writing a
string of books behind bars. German Chancellor Angela Merkel
has pressed for his release. NowSen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.), at the
urging of the German Embassy
and Richmond’s Catholic bishop,
MARYLAND
No bond for mom held in baby’s death
BY
D AN M ORSE
A Maryland mother accused of
shaking and throwing her 2month-old daughter to death was
ordered held without bond Friday
as details of the injuries emerged
in a Montgomery County case.
“The acts alleged, at least in the
statement of the charges, are incredibly egregious and aggravating and abusive,” District Judge
John Moffett said in court.
Moments earlier, Assistant
State’s Attorney Debbie Feinstein
had listed injuries that she alleged
Rebecca Briones, 31, had inflicted
on her child, Lissana Briones.
Those included, the prosecutor
said, trauma to different parts of
the child’s brain, three fractured
ribs and six broken bones in her
legs, including both femurs.
“We’re talking about extensive,
extensive abuse that caused these
injuries,” Feinstein said.
Feinstein alleged that Briones
abused her child in separate incidents and that when detectives
interviewed her, she demonstrated how forcefully she had shaken
the girl and banged her head
against a mattress.
“Babies don’t break in this way
unless significant forces are exerted upon them,” Feinstein said.
In court Friday, prosecutors
said Briones is seven months
pregnant. “The state has serious
concerns about the health of that
child and what bodes for that family going forward,” Feinstein said.
Lissana died in February,
prompting a lengthy investigation that led to the arrest of Briones this week.
She
was
charged with
second-degree
murder
and
first-degree
child abuse resulting
in
death.
Assistant
Rebecca
Public DefendBriones, 31
er John Lavigne did not address the specific
allegations against Briones. He
did argue for bond conditions that
could let her leave jail pending
further court hearings.
“She has absolutely no prior
record,” Lavigne said, adding that
Briones has held jobs at car dealerships. “I don’t think she’s a
threat to the public in general.”
Briones’s family members
could not be reached for comment.
Ten months ago, at 5:15 p.m.
Feb. 18, Briones and her husband
picked their daughter up from a
caregiver, court files state.
“Both parents agreed the victim
was in good health at that time,”
Detective Randy Kucsan wrote in
court papers.
The family made two stops before arriving at their home on
North Adams Street in Rockville
about 6:30 p.m.
Briones put the baby down to
sleep while her husband tended to
other matters, police said. A short
time later, after the husband went
to check on the girl and found her
unresponsive, Briones called 911,
according to the court filings.
After police and paramedics arrived, the child was taken to a
hospital in Rockville and then airlifted to MedStar Georgetown
University Hospital in the District, where she died three days
later.
Autopsy results were finalized
Sept. 25, with the manner of death
ruled a homicide.
On Monday, detectives interviewed Rebecca Briones at the
department’s headquarters, and
she was arrested two days later.
“Whatever justice she receives
won’t bring that baby back,” said
Capt. Paul Starks, a Montgomery
Police spokesman.
dan.morse@washpost.com
agreed when he was governor in
2010 to transfer Soering to a
German prison. But his Republican successor, Robert F. McDonnell, stopped the transfer because, once in Germany, Soering
could have been freed after two
years.
The push to release Soering
picked up steam more recently, as
new blood analysis performed in
the summer of 2016 indicated
that a man other than Soering
was the source of the type O blood
found at Haysom’s home. The
blood was the only physical evidence to tie him to the scene
besides the disputed sock print.
Also last year, German filmmakers released a sympathetic
documentary about Soering. Titled “The Promise,” it suggested
Haysom committed the murders,
perhaps with help from a drug
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jens Soering, son of a former German diplomat, is serving life in
prison for killing two people in 1985. He maintains his innocence.
dealer or two.
The film, now updated with the
blood analysis findings, is getting
a limited theatrical release in U.S.
theaters and video on demand
starting Friday, under a new title:
“Killing for Love.”
Actor Martin Sheen, a longtime supporter of Soering’s, is
slated to appear at the opening in
Los Angeles.
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
Push comes amid GOP regrouping
PAID LEAVE FROM B1
ments with their new child,” Cox
said. “As a society, we have to do
more to strengthen families and
encourage women to remain in
the workplace. Strong parental
leave policies improve morale
and reduce turnover, two things
critical in public sector workplaces.”
The announcement comes as
Virginia’s GOP tries to recover
from devastating losses in November. Democrats swept all
three statewide offices on the
ballot — governor, lieutenant
governor and attorney general.
And they picked up at least 15
seats in the House in a wave
fueled by antipathy toward President Trump.
Rifts within the party — over
whether to embrace or distance
itself from the president in a
swing state where he is deeply
unpopular — promise to deepen
this year, as Trumpian and establishment candidates battle for
the opportunity to take on Sen.
Tim Kaine (D) in November.
Even as that nomination fight
plays out, Republican leaders in
Richmond appear determined to
present a more practical, less
ideologically driven party at
work.
When the first bills for the
2018 session landed in late November, the GOP trumpeted
them under this banner: “Practical Solutions to Everyday Issues.”
They included a measure to recognize out-of-state teaching licenses for the spouses of military
personnel stationed in Virginia
and a bill aimed at making sure
high school students who take
“dual
enrollment”
courses
“Strong parental leave
policies improve morale
and reduce turnover.”
House Majority Leader
M. Kirkland Cox
through community colleges can
transfer those credits toward college degrees.
So far, not a single antiabortion bill has been filed.
Cox also issued a strong statement against sexual harassment
in November, calling on legislators and other members of the
“Capitol Square community” to
set an example for the state “by
maintaining a safe and welcoming environment for all Virginians.”
He also said, “We can empow-
er women and encourage their
continued involvement by ensuring our workplace is respectful
and actively rejects any unwanted behavior, guaranteeing that
everyone who steps foot on Capitol Square will be treated with
the dignity and respect he or she
deserves.”
“Clearly it’s an effort . . . to
begin to rebrand the party in a
way that can regain the trust of
Virginians,” said Bob Holsworth,
a former political science professor at Virginia Commonwealth
University and longtime observer of Richmond politics. “Given
the tsunami that occurred, what
became evident is the Republican brand is becoming increasingly toxic, and it’s imperative for
Republicans to regain a foothold
in the policy debate.”
Gov.-elect Ralph Northam (D),
who during the campaign called
for providing incentives to private companies to offer expanded family leave, welcomed Cox’s
announcement on that issue.
“As a pediatric neurologist and
a public servant, Governor-elect
Northam has long supported giving families the flexibility they
need after the birth of a child or
an adoption,” said Ofirah
Yheskel, a Northam spokeswoman.
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
obituaries
MUNDELL LOWE, 95
Versatile jazz guitarist played with greats Billie Holiday, Charlie Parker
BY
M ATT S CHUDEL
Mundell Lowe, a jazz guitarist
whose versatility and understated elegance led to assignments
accompanying such performers
as Billie Holiday, Charlie Parker,
Frank Sinatra and even Marilyn
Monroe, died Dec. 2 at his home
in San Diego. He was 95.
He had cancer and complications from a broken hip, said a
daughter, Debbie Lowe.
During a remarkably varied
career that spanned eight decades, Mr. Lowe appeared at
Nashville’s Grand Ole Opry in
the 1930s, performed with jazz
giants Parker and Holiday in the
1940s, accompanied Sinatra,
Monroe and the Everly Brothers
in the 1950s and later composed
music for a Woody Allen movie.
Mr. Lowe recorded more than
15 albums as a leader — most
recently in 2015, when he was 93
— and appeared on hundreds of
others as a sideman. He was a
member of NBC’s staff orchestra, which performed on the
“Today Show” in the 1950s and
early 1960s. He later became a
fixture at film and television
studios in California, writing
music for such shows as “Hawaii
Five-O,” “Starsky & Hutch” and
“The Wild Wild West” and for
Allen’s 1972 film “Everything
You Always Wanted to Know
About Sex (But Were Afraid to
Ask).”
Mr. Lowe’s deepest musical
love was always jazz, which he
first heard as a child on the
streets of New Orleans.
“He was, along with Barney
Kessel, one of the most sophisticated guitarists in jazz,” pianist
Mike Wofford told the San Diego
Union-Tribune. “Mundy was
more interested in harmonic
creativity than just traditional
jazz soloing. He was also a
wonderful arranger who did a
lot of writing for big bands.”
Mr. Lowe had a subtle approach that meshed well with
scores of performers, including
singers Dinah Washington, Peggy Lee and Carmen McRae,
bandleader Charles Mingus and
entertainers Sammy Davis Jr.
and Marlene Dietrich.
Mr. Lowe was featured on
many recordings, including several by Johnny Ray, a singer
whose overwrought performances of sobbing ballads such as
“Cry” and “The Little White
Cloud That Cried” made him a
huge star in the early 1950s.
Mr. Lowe was credited with
discovering jazz pianist Bill Evans when the latter was a college
student in Louisiana in the
1940s. Evans and Mr. Lowe later
MICHAEL OLETTA
Jazz guitarist Mundell Lowe during the KSDS Jazz 88.3 show at San Diego’s Saville Theatre in 2012.
Lowe’s career spanned eight decades and started at the Grand Ole Opry before moving into jazz.
performed in a trio; its bestknown composition, “Waltz for
Debby,” was named in part for
Mr. Lowe’s daughter.
In 1959, Mr. Lowe performed
on Monroe’s vocal album, “Some
Like It Hot,” which he considered a forgettable experience.
“All those movie stars think they
can sing,” he told the Los Angeles Times in 1990, “but I don’t
think they really can.”
James Mundell Lowe was
born April 21, 1922, in Laurel,
Miss. His father was a farmer
and Baptist preacher.
He grew up in a musical
family and began playing a fourstring guitar when he was 8,
then switched to a full-size sixstring guitar at 10. He was
entirely self-taught.
“Living on a farm when you’re
a kid, I discovered there were no
teachers around,” he told the
Union-Tribune last year, “so you
had to kind of create things
yourself.”
He began performing professionally at 13 and left home by 16
to work at the Grand Ole Opry
and later in nightspots in New
Orleans. For many years, his
daughter Sharon Lowe said, he
enrolled in schools to continue
his education in music and other
fields.
During World War II, Mr.
Lowe served in an Army engineering unit in the Pacific and
performed in officers’ clubs in
his off-hours. After his discharge, he joined drummer Ray
McKinley’s band and honed his
skills as a composer and arranger.
He settled in California in
1965 and, in later years, taught
film composition and served as
the musical director of the
Monterey Jazz Festival. He often
worked with jazz pianist Andre
Previn, who is also a renowned
classical conductor and film
composer. One of Mr. Lowe’s
final performances was in April.
His first marriage, to Marjorie
Hyde, ended in divorce. His
second wife, Barbara Kahn, died
in 1975.
Survivors include his wife of
42 years, jazz singer Barbara
Bennett of San Diego (she was
previously married to Previn); a
daughter from his first marriage, Sharon Lowe of Whiting,
N.J.; three children from his
second marriage, Debbie Lowe
of Frazier Park, Calif., Jessica
Lowe of Santa Cruz, Calif., and
Adam Lowe of San Diego; two
stepdaughters, Alicia Previn and
Claudia Previn Stasny, both of
San Diego; two brothers; a sister; three grandchildren; two
great-grandchildren; and one
great-great-grandson.
Mr. Lowe was known for his
easygoing manner and his vast
store of musical lore. He got to
know the alluring but troubled
Holiday while playing at a New
York jazz club in the 1940s.
“Billie came in wearing a big
mink coat, and as we were
talking a little head pushed out
of her coat pocket and looked up
at me,” he recalled in a 2008
interview with the website JazzWax.com. “It was her Chihuahua. She took that dog everywhere.”
In the early 1950s, Mr. Lowe
recalled in a 2008 interview with
JazzWax.com, he received a call
from Parker, the innovative and
volatile saxophonist known as
“Bird,” who hired him to be part
of his band at a concert.
“I must confess I was scared to
death,” Mr. Lowe said. “Bird
wanted to see what I could do.
When I was done, he smiled
wide, exposing that gold tooth.
When you saw that tooth, you
knew Bird was real happy.”
Mr. Lowe remained on friendly terms with Parker, Mingus
and other musicians many people found difficult. But one person he could never get along
with was the demanding clarinetist and bandleader Benny
Goodman.
“I worked with him five
times,” Mr. Lowe said. “He fired
me three times, and I quit twice.”
matt.schudel@washpost.com
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
RE
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
ARMSTRONG
GILLICK
MELENDEZ
RIOS
CHASE
LAMADE
JOSEPH BARRETT RIOS (Age 40)
WILLIAM T. CHASE
Suddenly on Wednesday, December 13, 2017, of Riva, MD. Beloved
husband and best friend of Kimberly Rios; devoted father of
Matthew,
Kristen,
Elizabeth,
Alexander and Gabriel. Also survived by his mother, Frances Rios;
three sisters; two brothers, mother and fatherin-law, Isabelle and John Buchanan and numerous other family and friends. Relatives and
friends may call at Collins Funeral Home, 500
University Boulevard West, Silver Spring, MD,
(Valet Parking), Sunday, December 17 from 2 to
4 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be offered at
Our Lady of Lourdes Church, 7500 Pearl Street,
Bethesda, MD on Monday, December 18, 2017
at 10 a.m. Interment Parklawn Memorial Park.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
Entered into eternal rest on Saturday, November 25, 2017. Beloved
father of Algeria D. Chase, Alicia
E. Chase and the late Derrick T.
Chase. Also survived by three
grandchildren, Tarik, Niah and
Noah Frazier; two brothers, Ronald W. Chase
and Mark A. Chase (Veda); one sister, Brenda
E. Chase; sister-in-law, Sue Chase and a host of
other relatives and friends. He was preceded
in death by his wife, Mary Alice Chase; one
sister, C. Frances Chase; three brothers, Henry
E., George F. and Lawrence F. Chase. Friends
may visit with the family on Monday, December
18 from 10 a.m. until time of service, 11 a.m. at
First Baptist Church of Deanwood, 1008 - 45th
St., NE, Washington, DC. Interment private.
Services by Hodges and Edwards.
JOHN E. GILLICK, JR.
RYAN E. ARMSTRONG
July 6, 1986 – December 16, 2012
In loving memory to a
wonderful son and brother.
We’re ever thankful for the 26 years of
memories. You’re now our Guardian Angel.
Love you forever, Mom, Dad, and Sister
John E. Gillick, Jr., died suddenly following
treatment for multiple myeloma on Sunday,
December 10, 2017. He is survived by his
loving wife of 48 years, Patricia (VanDyke);
daughters Megan McGovern Gillick and
Moira Gillick Duggan (Travis); grandchildren
Oliver John and Maeve McGovern; brother
William Peter Gillick (Stella); mother-in-law
Ann VanDyke Gordon; three nephews and
a niece; predeceased by brother Arthur
McGovern Gillick (Ann Duffy).
Friends may call at Murphy Funeral Homes
of Arlington, December 15, 2017 from 6
to 8 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be
offered Saturday December 16, 2017 at
Holy Trinity Catholic Church, 35th and O
streets, NW, Washington, DC 20007. The
family will receive visitors beginning at 9:30
a.m. at the church. Interment private. In
lieu of flowers, donations may be made to:
The Arthur M. Gillick '70 Endowed Scholarship at Colgate University, Hamilton, NY
13346 or the Dr. and Mrs. Gillick Scholarship
Fund at Georgetown Law Center, 600 New
Jersey Ave., NW, Washington, DC 22201.
DEATH NOTICE
ARBERG
GIOVINAZZO
ELAINE M. ARBERG
(Age 64)
On Tuesday, December 12, 2017 of Alexandria,
VA. Beloved wife of Bob Arberg for 36 years.
Loving mother of Katie Arberg (Joe Steinberg)
and Alison Arberg (Jeff Snyder); grandmother of
Jackson Steinberg; daughter of Dorothea and
the late Frederick Murphy; sister of Jim Murphy,
Mary Irvin, Jeanne Knight, Paul Murphy, Joe
Murphy, Richard Murphy, Tricia Finamore, and
the late Freddie Murphy. Relatives and friends
may gather from 3 to 7 p.m. on Thursday,
December 28 at Everly Wheatley Funeral
Home, 1500 W Braddock Rd., Alexandria, VA
22302. Memorial Mass at 2:30 p.m. on Friday,
December 29 at St. Mary’s Catholic Church,
310 S. Royal St., Alexandria, VA 22314. Inurnment private in Massachusetts. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to
Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer
Center. Please view and sign the family guestbook at:
www.everlywheatley.com
AYERS
CECIL F. AYERS
Entered into eternal rest on Friday, December
8, 2017. He leaves to mourn loving sister,
Vera Johnson; two sons, John Ayers (Ann) and
Phillip Ayers (Charlotte); two grandsons, John
R. Ayers, Jr. (Angelique) and Allen P. Ayers
(Kara); two great-granddaughters, Deja Ayers
and Jaidah Wise; devoted niece, Valora Neal
(Larry); loving nephew, Ben Fort (Nychola);
along with a host of family and friends. Mr.
Ayers may be viewed at STEWART FUNERAL
HOME, 4001 Benning Rd., NE on Monday,
December 18 from 1 p.m. until service at
2 p.m. Interment at Maple Grove Cemetery,
North Lewisburg, OH on Thursday, December
21, 2017.
CANTREL
Formerly of Bethesda and Montgomery Village,
MD, currently of Hagerstown, MD, passed away
peacefully on December 14, 2017. Survived by
her loving husband of 67 years, Joseph P.
Cantrel, daughter Catherine (Michael) McDonald, grandson, Timothy (Precious) McDonald,
and great-granddaughter, Zoe McDonald.
Funeral arrangements are private. Donations in
her memory may be made to the Alzheimer's
Association or Hospice of Washington County,
MD.
ELROD
CLEVE MILTON ELROD (Age 73)
Of Martinsburg, WV died Wednesday, December 13, 2017. Loving husband of Shirley J. Elrod;
devoted father to Cleve Franklin, Christopher
Milton, David Edward, Robert Charles Elrod,
Carol Jean Berry and Kathie Ann Arnold; brother to Jon Robin Hood and Phillip Harrison Hood,
and brother in-law to Alice Jean Goodfellow.
Funeral service will be Monday, December 18
at 1 p.m. at Brown Funeral Homes' South
Berkeley Chapel in Inwood, WV. Interment will
be Tuesday, December 19, 2017, 12 Noon,
Quantico National Cemetery.
Online condolences may be offered at:
www.BrownFuneralHomesWV.com
When the need arises,
let families find you in the
Funeral Services Directory.
To be seen in the Funeral Services
Directory, please call paid Death Notices
at 202-334-4122.
DEATH NOTICE
FOLEY
Entered into eternal rest on Tuesday, December 5, 2017. He is survived by his wife, Jelyn
Newton; two sons, Anthony B. Newton and Eric
B. Newton, Jr.; parents, Ivory V. and Carolyn
J. Newton; two sisters, Lori Chatman and Lisa
Smith; brother, Marcelus Newton and a host of
other relatives and friends. Mr. Newton will lie
in state at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, 2020
St. Joseph's Dr., Upper Marlboro, MD, Tuesday,
December 19 from 10 a.m. until service at 11
a.m. Interment Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery at 1:45 p.m.
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
Of Woodbridge, VA on December 14, 2017.
The family will receive friends December 18
from 5 to 8 p.m. at Miller Funeral Home,
3200 Golansky Blvd., Woodbridge. Services
will be held December 19 at 11 a.m. at Dale
City Baptist Church with interment to follow
at Stafford Memorial Park. Arrangements by
Miller Funeral Home.
EDWIN CALVIN SIMPSON
On Wednesday, December 13, 2017, at Liberty
Medical Center in Southport, NC, beloved husband, father, grandfather, and friend, Ed Simpson passed away peacefully. He was surrounded by family in his final days. Born on January
17, 1927, Ed was predeceased by his wife of
more than 51 years, Genevieve, and son, E.C.
He is survived by daughter Mary Beth Mount
and her husband, Jeff Mount, of Southport,
NC, and son, Mark, and his wife, Ginny, and
grandchildren, William, Lindley and John Perry,
of Ponte Vedra Beach, FL.
DANIEL H. DIEHL
Daniel Henry Diehl, 63, died December 4,
2017. Born October 27, 1954, in Killeen, TX
to Ralph and Genevieve Diehl, Dan grew up
in New Jersey, Pennsylvania and West Virginia
and lived most of his adult life in Woodbridge,
VA. Dan was a talented musician, playing
saxophone in Beckley, WV in the band Natural
High. Dan was an avid reader and loving father
and grandfather. He retired from Verizon after
19 years as a cable splicer. He was preceded
in death by his life partner, Jenna Davis,
and his parents. Dan is survived by his son,
Joseph Davis-Diehl, Joseph's wife, Jaline, and
Dan's grandson, Jack. Dan is also survived
by his brother, Jeff, Jeff's wife, Donna, his
brother, Nic, Nic's wife, Layne, his sister, Sally
Parsons, Sally's husband, Ernie and seven
nieces and nephews who loved him very
much. A celebration of his life was held on
December 15 at 3 p.m. at Colony Club in
Washington, DC. Donations to the Capital Area
Food Bank are encouraged in lieu of flowers
GRANT
Also known as “Pupa,” “Chief,” and “Sharpie,”
Ed was one of eight children from Rainelle, WV.
He served his country honorably in WWII and
after earning a degree in electronics, came to
Arlington, Virginia in the early 1950’s where he
owned and operated Simpson’s TV Service, Inc.
for over 30 years, until his retirement in the
mid 1980’s. His wit, warmth, and charm will be
missed by all who knew and loved him.
WALKER
JOHN M. WALKER
(Age 82)
On Saturday, December 9, 2017, resident of
Bethesda, MD. Survived by loving wife,
Charlotte Walker, children, William Walker,
Elizabeth Bosch, three sisters, Sara Filemyr,
Harriet Harrison, Kathy Tubb, 15 grandchildren,
seven great-grandchildren. Celebration of life
will be held at North Bethesda United
Methodist Church, 10100 Old Georgetown
Road, Bethesda, January 6, 12 p.m. Interment
Robert A. Pumphrey Funeral Home, Bethesda.
CEMETERY LOTS
FT LINC - Garden of Ascension, long crypt for
2, plot #1394; Nego. Best offer. 240-475-4794
GENNIE HARRIS (Age 67)
Peacefully passed away on Saturday, December 9, 2017. She is survived by her mother,
Gloria Mathis; her three children, Nina, Gennie
and John, and five granddaughters. Funeral
Services will be held at Union Temple Baptist
Church, 1225 W Street, SE, Washington, DC on
Tuesday, December 19, 2017 at 10 a.m.
SMITH
SHIRLEY A. SMITH
HASKINS
JUNIUS LEE HASKINS
Entered into eternal rest on Wednesday,
December 6, 2017. He is survived by his
loving wife, Nathalee K. Haskins; two daughters, Robyn Haskins and Patricia Duckett; son,
Mark Haskins; seven grandchildren, a host
of great-grandchildren, other relatives and
friends. Mr. Haskins may be viewed at STEWART FUNERAL HOME, 4001 Benning Rd., NE,
Monday, December 18 from 10 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
LOMAX
MILTON RAY LOMAX (Age 89)
Passed away Wednesday, December 13, 2017.
A graveside service will be held at 11:30 a.m.,
Monday at the Lomax Family Cemetery in
Lexington, NC.
Mr. Lomax was a graduate of the FBI National
Academy. He served in the U.S. Navy from
1945-1947, receiving two medals from the
Dept. of Defense; the WWII Victory Medal and
the Asiatic Medal. After the War, he relocated
to serve as a U.S. Park Police officer for 25
years. After retiring as Deputy Chief of Park
Police, he relocated to Lexington, NC. His wife,
Elda Jane Murray Lomax, preceded him in
death.
He is survived by three sons, Thomas R. Lomax
(Korinna), David Allen Lomax and Robert Lee
Lomax (Jane); two granddaughters, Heather
Danielle Jones and Erin Marie Lomax; and his
sister, Joy Lomax Koontz.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in
his memory to Heroes, Inc., 1200 29th St., N.W.,
Washington, DC 20007, or visiting the website
at www.Heroes.org.
Online condolences may be made at:
www.davidsonfuneralhome.net
MARTIN
DARVINE J. NOËL
Born in New York City on June 6, 1923 to the
late Melville and Theodosia Noel of Grenada,
W.I.
A graduate of New York University, she retired
from the NYS Department of Labor: Division of
Unemployment Insurance as a Senior Supervisory Claims Examiner after 33 years of service.
She moved to Washington, DC to help raise
her granddaughters. She was a Docent at the
Smithsonian and the National Gallery of Art;
overcame her fear of water and became an
excellent swimmer. She attended Christ the
King Catholic Church, Silver Spring, MD.
Returning to NYC in 2003, she frequented
Yankee Stadium; was an active member of
the Hope of Israel Senior Center where she
enjoyed creative writing and poetry.
On December 1, 2017 at 94, she died peacefully
at the Methodist Church Home for Rehabilitation and Nursing. She is survived by her
only daughter, Elizabeth A. Noel-Cushenberry
“Betty, the former People’s Counsel for the
District of Columbia; adoring granddaughters,
Erica and Catherine Cushenberry; former Sonin-Law, Harold L. Cushenberry (Judge, Ret.), and
a host of admiring family and friends.
Her Family gathered for a Prayer Vigil in the
Lady Chapel of St. Patrick's Cathedral. A private
memorial service is planned.
In lieu of cards and flowers, the family requests
that Contributions be made “In Honor of
Darvine J. Noel” to the Methodist Church
Home, 4499 Manhattan College Parkway,
Riverdale, New York.
OLIVER
GLORIA ANN OLIVER
Peacefully passed on December 7, 2017.
Beloved mother of Jeannette Barnes; loving
daughter of Eula Moore. Also survived by
her siblings Catherine Moore, Betty J. Gibson,
James Moore and Julius Moore and a host
of other relatives and friends. On Monday,
December 18, 2017 friends may visit with the
family from 10 a.m. until time of funeral service
11 a.m. at Marshall-March Funeral Home 4308
Suitland Rd., Suitland, MD Interment National
Harmony Memorial Cemetery.
On Thursday, December 14, 2017. The beloved
wife of John J. Vinciguerra; mother of Kenny
and the late Ronald C. Smith; grandmother
of Matthew, David, Valerie and Kelley Smith;
stepmother of Gina Barrett, Lisa Williams, Mark
and Paul Vinciguerra and mother-in-law of
Phyllis Smith. Friends are invited to celebrate
Shirley's life at the George P. Kalas Funeral
Home, 2973 Solomons Island Rd., Edgewater,
MD on Tuesday, December 19 from 1 p.m.
until her memorial service begins at 2 p.m. In
lieu of flowers, contributions may be made,
in Shirley's name, to the Seasons Hospice
Foundation, 8537 Solution Center, Chicago, IL
60677 (seasonsfoundation.org). Condolences
may be made online at:
KalasFuneralHomes.com
TOWNSEND
GEORGE EDWARD MARTIN
On Thursday, December 7, 2017,
GEORGE EDWARD MARTIN of Landover, Maryland entered peacefully into eternal life. Loving husband
of Wanda Martin; devoted father
of George (Aspen), and Italy Martin
and Denise Jackson. He is also
survived by his mother, Barbara Martin; one
brother, Saleem (Aisha) Abdul-Mateen; two
sisters, Faye Howell and Barbara (David) Wells;
five grandchildren; many other relatives and
friends. He was preceded in death by his
father, Clement Martin. Family will receive
friends on Monday, December 18, 2017 from
9 a.m. until the time of Funeral Service at 11
a.m. at First Baptist Church of Highland Park,
6801 Sheriff Road, Landover, MD. Interment
Maryland National Cemetery.
www.wisemanfuneralhome.net
After a rich and happy life, Walter H.G. Paul
passed away on Friday, December 8, 2017 at
the age of 82. He was born and raised in
Germany and received his PhD in Engineering
at the Technischen Hochschule, Hannover. He
spent most of his professional life working in
the United States, concluding his career at
the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, in
the Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering
Department, from which he ultimately retired.
Walter loved sailing, particularly on the North
Sea, classical music, travel, and was a voracious reader. He is survived by his wife, Ruth
Paul; his daughters, Natasha Paul along with
her husband, Chris Johansen and Tanya Paul
and her husband, Eric Défort. Services are
private and for family only. In lieu of flowers,
the family asks that donations be made to
the Walter Paul Buoy Workshop Fund at the
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Funds
donated will be used to help defray travel
costs for MIT/WHOI Joint Program students
wishing to attend the Buoy Workshop, which
Walter was instrumental in creating and deeply
passionate about. Any donations (checks made
out to: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
can be sent to: Walter Paul Buoy Workshop
Fund, 266 Woods Hole Rd., MS 40, Woods Hole,
MA, 02543. For online guestbook and obituary,
visit www.ccgfuneralhome.com
DEBORAH GRANT
“Debbie”
Passed away on Thursday,
December 14 2017. She was the
loving wife of the late Alan Grant
and the beloved mother of Leslie
(Moses) Albert, Marlene (Marc)
Eden; sister of Alan (Claire) Sherman and the late Ruthi (Irwin)
Kroskin. She adored her four granddaughters,
Michelle (Andy) Knutsen, Lauren Eden, Katherine Albert and Danielle Eden and her greatgranddaughter, Eloise. Services will be held
Sunday at 1 p.m. at Beth El Synagogue 8215 Old
Georgetown Road, Bethesda, MD, 20814 with
interment to follow at Garden of Remembrance
14321 Comus Road, Clarksburg, MD 20871.
Shiva will be observed Sunday and Monday
evening at 7 p.m. at the home of Marlene
and Marc Eden. Arrangements by Hines-Rinaldi
Funeral Home, LLC. under Jewish Funeral Practices Committee of Greater Washington Contract.
From Alexandria, VA died Thursday, December
7, 2017 after a brief illness. He was preceded in
death by his parents Frank E. Townsend, Jr. and
Michiko Hayashi Townsend. Survivors include
sister Cathie (Danny); brothers Rick (Karen)
and Steve (Teri); niece Alyssa Revell (Carlton);
nephews Matt (Sydney), Eric, Joe, Troy and
Liam. He was a self employed remodeler
whose attention to detail and craftmanship
were unmatched. He enjoyed fishing, his Nats
and Redskins, and listening to his collection of
Jazz records. He was a friend to all who knew
him, a warm, gentle soul. A celebration of his
life will occur sometime in January.
KAY
JOAN BOUVIER WEISSLEADER
Joan Bouvier Weissleader, of Gaithersburg, MD,
passed away on November 30, 2017. She
was born February 16, 1934, in Oceanside, NY,
graduated from Allegheny College, and lived in
Rochester, NY, before moving to Derwood, MD,
in 1970. Joan retired in 1996 after 20 years
with Montgomery County Public Libraries.
IN MEMORIAM
BRADY
To place a notice, call:
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She was preceded in death by her husband
of 47 years, Howard Weissleader, in 2009.
She leaves behind daughters Leslie (Richard)
Jones and Pamela (Gregory) Kott; granddaughter Michelle Kott, grandson Devin Kott; sister
Sue Lamphier; brother Bob Bouvier; and many
other relatives and friends.
A service will be held on December 30, 2017,
at 1 p.m. at the Guild Chapel on the Asbury
Methodist Village campus in Gaithersburg. Visitors should enter the gatehouse at 301 Odendhal Avenue and follow signs to the chapel.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
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DEATH NOTICE
WEISSLEADER
PARK LAWN CEMETERY, ROCKVILLE, MDBlock 4, lot 427, 2 sites, valued at $9,195, will
sell for $7,000 each. Call 301-938-9885
CURRENT 2017 RATES:
( PER DAY)
JOHN E. TOWNSEND (Age 61)
A reception will follow. In lieu of flowers,
donations can be made to Friends of the
National Zoo or the American Cancer Society.
WALTER H.G. PAUL
On Thursday, December 14, 2017.
Beloved husband of the late Patsy
“Pat”; loving father of Susan
Perez, Kathy Perez (Roger), and
Terri Scafone (Dan); grandfather
of Freddie (Kelly), Dustin and
Anthony; step-grandfather of Roger (Vicki) and
Lisa Perez; great-grandfather of Sofia, Caiden
and Rylie; step-great-grandfather of Alec, Derrick and Paige; brother of Michael Foley
(Janet). Relatives and friends may call at BORGWARDT FUNERAL HOME, 4400 Powder Mill
Road, Beltsville, MD on Sunday from 2 to 4 and
7 to 9 p.m., where a funeral service will be held
on Monday at 1 p.m. Interment Fort Lincoln
Cemetery. Donations may be made to a charity
of your choice.
www.borgwardtfuneralhome.com
SCOTT
MICHAEL K. SCOTT
(Age 53)
A celebration of life will be held in spring 2018
in Arlington, Virginia. In lieu of flowers, the
family requests that you make a donation to
the charity of your choice in Ed’s memory.
PAUL
THOMAS FOLEY “Tom”
SHEILA RENEE ROACH
Sheila Renee Roach, of Washington, DC,
departed this life on Friday, December 8, 2017.
She is survived by her parents; two sons,
Monta Ray and Tyrone Roach; five brothers,
three grandchildren, Asharr Knight, Taeja Ray,
Jaylen Roach and a host of other relatives and
friends. She was preceded in death by two
sisters.
SIMPSON
NOËL
FINE
HYMAN FINE
HYMAN FINE (age 99) of
Bethesda, MD died at home on
December 13, 2017. Devoted
husband of Leah Green and
loving father to Madeleine
Perlin and Andrea Carey. He
had a stellar career as Lieutenant Commander in the Navy during WWII, budget
analyst for the Air Force at the Pentagon,
and professional staffer for the U.S. Senate
Armed
Services
Subcommittee
on
Research and Development. He is survived
by his two daughters, four grandchildren,
and eight great-grandchildren. Funeral service will be held on Sunday, December
17, 12:30 p.m., in the chapel at Judean
Memorial Gardens, Olney, MD. In lieu of
flowers, contributions may be made in
his memory to Montgomery Hospice or
Hadassah.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
DIEHL
BARBARA WHITE LAMADE (Age 97)
Died on December 4, 2017 of natural causes. She was the only child of Walker and
Catherine White.
Barbara, better known as Bobby, was born
in Orange, New Jersey in 1920 and raised
in Douglaston, New York. She married Lieutenant John Erickson in 1939, a graduate of
the Naval Academy and an aviator who was
killed in the Pacific during World War II. In
1945 she married John D. Lamade; also, an
aviator and Academy graduate who died in
1985.
Bobby had one son from her marriage
to John Erickson (Walker Gibson Erickson);
two stepsons from John D. Lamade's prior
marriage (John Steele Lamade and the late
Stephen Hull Lamade), and her youngest
son Lawrence Lewis Lamade, from her
marriage to John D. Lamade. She also had
five grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.
Bobby was active, outgoing and vivacious.
She valued her friends highly and surrounded herself with many of them. Besides
socializing with her friends, she enjoyed
gardening and golf. In addition, she found a
love in investing and following the progress
of the companies in which she owned
stock.
Bobby will be buried in Arlington Cemetery
alongside her second husband at a private
ceremony for family only. Contributions
may be made to the Alzheimer's Association through the following website
http://act/alz.org/goto/larrylamade.
MITCHELL
FANNIE THERESA BEARS MITCHELL
Entered into eternal rest on Saturday, November 25, 2017. She is survived by her husband,
Anthony Q. Mitchell; three brothers, William H.
Beards (Queen), James Bears (Lisa) and Bobby
Lloyd; three sisters, Ruby Pearson, Victoria
Richardson (Derrick) and Betty Bryant; and a
host of other relatives and friends. On Monday,
December 18, a Celebration of Life Service
will be held at FORT LINCOLN FUNERAL HOME,
3401 Bladensburg Rd., Brentwood, MD with a
viewing from 12:30 p.m. until time of service at
1 p.m. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery
www.fort-lincoln.com
ERIC B. NEWTON
HARRIS
ROACH
Memorial Services will be held on Monday,
December 18, 2017 at 10 a.m. at Mount
Calvary Catholic Church, 6700 Marlboro Pike,
Forestville, MD 20747.
NEWTON
ERVEN E. BOETTNER
(Age 100)
WILMA R. CANTREL
Was a very loved man. Survived by his older
sister, Diana; his wife, Mary; four children,
Angel, Orlando, Marie and Margie. As well as
his five grand children, Emma, Orlando, Ronan,
Lorelai and Jasper.
Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico and raised in
the infamous Calle Luna Calle Sol. He also
spent part of his youth in New York. A very
educated and smart man, he always new what
he wanted and was always able to figure out a
way to get there.
As a young adult, he did not want to get drafted
so instead he decided to join the Navy of his
own volition. He figured if he was going to be in
the military then he may as well choose rather
than have it chosen for him. He spent six years
in the Navy making the rank of radio operator
third class (if I do not have the exact rank I
apologise, I was never in the armed forces).
After his time in the Navy, he went on to
college where he got his Masters in Accounting. Around this time, he met his wife Mary and
they started dating, eventually getting married
and having four children. He eventually statrted working for the social security department
in the Office of Appellate Court and Appeals
where he eventually retired from.
He was a man very devoted to his faith and
was very involved with his church, St. Ann's
Roman Catholic Church. He wore many hats,
from lector to catechism teacher and many
others. He was also very devoted to his family;
his children and grand children. When the
grandkids would visit his face would light up
with joy every single time even if he had seen
them the day before.
Unfortunately, his health failed him due to a
smoking habit he picked up at a very young age
and was not able to kick until it had already
done lasting damage. Even with his illness, he
remained an active man for as long as he was
able, going to church and participating in family
events.
Born on Decmber 29, 1945, he left this earth
in the early evening of December 12, 2017 just
barely missing his 72nd birthday.
He was greatly loved and will be missed dearly
by any and all who ever had the pleasure of
having known him.
Visitation will be held 11 a.m. to 12 Noon,
Monday, December 18 immediately followed
by the funeral mass at 12 Noon at St. Ann’s
Roman Catholic Church of Arlington, VA. The
Murphy Funeral Home of Arlington entrusted
with arrangements.
MARY AGNES GIOVINAZZO (Age 89)
A twenty year resident of Annapolis, MD and
formerly of Temple Hills, MD, died on Wednesday, December 13, 2017 at her home. Born on
June 7, 1928 in Washington, DC, Mary enjoyed
dancing and gardening. She was the beloved
wife of the late Alfred Giovinazzo; mother of
Christina Giovinazzo of Columbia, MD, Thomas
Giovinazzo of Herndon, VA and Steven Giovinazzo of Davidsonville, MD; grandmother of
Jessica, Christopher, Samantha, Gabrielle and
Tyler and great-grandmother of Tyler, Amber
Leigh and Hunter. Friends are invited to celebrate Mary's life at the George P. Kalas Funeral
Home, 2973 Solomons Island Rd., Edgewater,
MD on Thursday, December 21 from 6 to
8 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be
offered at Holy Family Catholic Church, 826
W. Central Ave., Davidsonville, MD on Friday,
December 22 at 11 a.m. Interment will follow
at Maryland Veterans Cemetery in Crownsville,
MD. Condolences may be made online at:
KalasFuneralHomes.com
BOETTNER
Peacefully passed away on Sunday,
November 26, 2017, in Cary, NC.
He was a 63 year resident of Silver
Spring, MD. He is survived by three
sons, Terry (Raleigh, NC), Robert
(Davidson, NC) and William (Mt. Airy,
MD), three grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife of 69
years, Shirley (Smith), his brother, Orval and his
sister, Ruth McKay.
Born on March 2, 1917, in Roca, NE, and
educated at the University of Nebraska. He
was a WWII veteran, retired US Army Colonel,
retired IRS agent and Real Estate agent .
Funeral Services will be held on February 21,
2018 at the Ft. Myer Chapel in Arlington, VA,
followed by procession and burial at Arlington
National Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to
the National Cancer Society or local Hospice
organization.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
ANGEL MELENDEZ
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque.
MARY L. KAY (Age 93)
Mary L. Kay, our beloved grandmother, passed
away on Thursday, December 7, 2017. She was
proceeded in death by her husband Luther
Kay; daughter and son-in-law, Regina (Robert)
Brown; granddaughter, Geraldine Francis, great
great grandson, Karter DeBerry, and sisters
Dorothy Wimbush and Mattie Ferrell. She
leaves to cherish her fond memories; three
granddaughters, Juanita, Veronica and Mary
(Roy); two grandsons, Joseph (Phyllis) and
Charles; one grandson-in-law, Bobby and a
host of other relatives and friends. Homegoing
service will be held on Monday, December 18,
2017, Viewing 9 a.m. until service time at 11
a.m. at Marshall-March Funeral Home Chapel,
4217 9th St. NW, Washington, DC 20011.
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
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POST YOUR
CONDOLENCES
MARY D. BRADY
May 12, 1921 – December 16, 2011
In loving memory of Mary D. Brady
Devoted wife, mother, and grandmother
and avid Redskins fan.
You are always in our hearts.
Love from your daughter, Cathy and your
grandchildren, Jim and Mary
Now death notices on
washingtonpost.com/obituaries allow you
to express your sympathy with greater ease.
Visit today.
GHI
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Sunny, then cloudy this weekend
Saturday should start off mostly
sunny and brisk but give way to
partly cloudy skies. Highs are in the
mid-40s, approaching the upper 40s.
Winds are out of the west and
northwest, around 10 mph. On Sunday, skies
again start off rather sunny but colder. Clouds
will increase again as a weak system moves in,
but it shouldn’t amount to much more than a
sprinkle or flurry.
Today
Partly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Cloudy
Monday
Cloudy
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Tuesday
Partly sunny
Wednesday
Sunny
OFFICIAL RECORD
Thursday
Sunny
Temperatures
48° 34
51° 40
56° 45
62° 42
51° 37
50° 42
FEELS*: 43°
FEELS: 50°
FEELS: 55°
FEELS: 60°
FEELS: 46°
FEELS: 48°
CHNCE PRECIP: 5%
P: 10%
P: 5%
P: 25%
P: 0%
P: 10%
WIND: SW 7–14 mph
W: SSE 4–8 mph
W: SSW 4–8 mph
W: SW 7–14 mph
W: NW 8–16 mph
W: SE 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
NATION
Hagerstown
46/31
Davis
37/27
Charlottesville
52/31
W
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
46/28
Dover
45/30
Cape May
Annapolis
45/30
47/31
OCEAN: 52°
Washington
48/34
Tu
Weather map features for noon today.
Philadelphia
42/29
Harrisburg
43/28
Norfolk
49/33
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
31° 2:00 a.m.
28° 3:00 p.m.
47°/33°
71° 1971
6° 1904
29° 10:00 a.m.
22° 4:38 a.m.
46°/27°
71° 1971
5° 1989
29° 10:00 a.m.
23° 4:32 a.m.
45°/28°
70° 1971
6° 1962
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –0.3° yr. to date: +2.8°
Precipitation
Virginia Beach
49/32
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 46°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
47/37
OCEAN: 47°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.01"
0.29"
1.59"
35.39"
38.28"
0.2"
2.2"
0.02"
0.36"
1.58"
40.25"
40.16"
0.2"
4.2"
0.10"
0.53"
1.74"
37.86"
40.25"
Trace
3.1"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
2 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, partly sunny, snow shower. High 34–40.
Wind west 10–20 mph. Tonight, mostly clear. Low 26–32.
Wind west 4–8 mph. Sunday, mostly cloudy, afternoon rain
across the south. High 40–46. Wind west–southwest 6–12
mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny. High 44–50. Wind
west 8–16 mph. Tonight, mostly clear. Low 28–34. Wind
west 6–12 mph. Sunday, partly sunny, then increasingly
cloudy. High 45–55. Wind southwest 6–12 mph. Monday,
variably cloudy. High 51–61.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, partly sunny. Small
craft advisory. Wind west 10–20 knots. Waves 1 foot. Visibility
unrestricted. • Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, partly
sunny. Small craft advisory. Wind southwest 10–20 knots. Waves
1–2 feet. Visibility unrestricted.• River Stages: Today, the stage at
Little Falls will be around 2.9 feet and holding nearly steady Sunday.
Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
1:21 a.m.
6:39 a.m.
1:21 p.m.
6:56 p.m.
Annapolis
3:21 a.m.
9:34 a.m.
4:27 p.m.
10:37 p.m.
Ocean City
5:58 a.m.
12:28 p.m.
6:09 p.m.
none
Norfolk
1:38 a.m.
8:07 a.m.
2:23 p.m.
8:22 p.m.
Point Lookout
5:25 a.m.
12:24 p.m.
7:13 p.m.
none
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
World
High: Marble Bar, Australia 113°
Low: Verkhoyansk, Russia –59°
Yesterday's National
High: Fullerton, CA 82°
Low: Morrisville, VT –16°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
32/12/sf
48/29/pc
36/23/sn
56/37/s
52/39/r
46/28/pc
33/19/sn
56/39/pc
43/21/c
33/21/pc
35/19/pc
27/13/sf
28/9/sf
58/35/s
50/31/s
54/31/s
41/21/pc
45/29/pc
50/33/s
38/24/sf
65/45/pc
50/23/pc
Tomorrow
28/21/pc
45/29/sh
27/17/sn
58/52/t
67/48/c
48/34/pc
36/28/pc
55/52/r
45/29/s
31/28/pc
31/24/pc
30/27/pc
20/12/c
65/51/c
49/39/r
58/45/c
36/25/s
44/35/c
44/36/r
41/34/c
68/48/pc
39/25/c
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
54/30/pc
33/25/sn
57/42/s
27/7/s
35/23/c
34/14/pc
78/70/pc
59/46/c
49/33/s
60/45/pc
63/45/pc
59/41/pc
59/41/s
60/40/pc
70/49/s
55/37/s
57/41/s
81/67/s
40/32/c
32/21/c
56/37/s
60/54/pc
38/27/pc
49/33/s
44/28/c
38/32/c
56/37/sh
13/9/sn
36/21/s
31/22/pc
82/69/sh
69/56/pc
45/37/r
66/56/r
73/57/pc
51/37/r
58/36/pc
59/41/c
70/46/s
49/41/r
60/46/r
82/70/pc
42/33/pc
33/21/c
53/45/r
73/63/r
36/33/pc
55/43/pc
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
62/43/s
53/25/pc
72/54/pc
42/29/pc
69/50/pc
42/27/sf
31/12/sf
45/40/c
36/18/pc
52/31/s
39/20/s
50/30/s
61/42/s
60/41/s
85/76/pc
36/24/sf
66/48/s
61/48/s
85/78/pc
45/40/c
29/25/pc
27/10/sf
76/58/pc
61/39/s
57/33/pc
42/25/c
80/59/pc
41/34/pc
62/45/sh
44/35/r
27/14/pc
45/43/c
33/24/pc
57/43/pc
43/22/pc
54/40/pc
64/37/s
50/43/r
86/76/pc
34/25/s
68/47/s
62/44/s
86/77/pc
48/43/r
33/30/sf
26/21/c
81/64/pc
51/29/c
MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
Mary Beth Tinker speaks to students Thursday following a mock trial in Washington. Tinker, 65, was
the plaintiff in a 1969 Supreme Court case that set a precedent for student freedom of expression.
Alice Deal Middle School in Tenleytown. “It was amazing to learn
about a part of history from someone who was there.”
Before starting a career speaking
to students, Tinker was a nurse at
Prince George’s Hospital Center.
She decided to travel the country
and talk to students about their
right to express themselves, she
said, because “I thought, maybe I
can be an inspiration.”
When Tinker travels to speak as
in Thursday’s reenactment, she
tells stories of other young people
who spoke up throughout history.
Telia Walton, a 17-year-old senior
at the School Without Walls, said
the event was “not just teaching us
about the case,” it was “inspiring us.”
Tinker and the case “made us feel
like we could do the same thing,”
Walton said.
shira.stein@washpost.com
A seasonal first for D.C.: Snow falls on a workday
As flakes fell through the air,
coating the ground in white,
Washington went through a major stage Friday in its annual
winter-familiarization program:
It was our first workday snow,
and it came as temperatures
stayed below freezing all day.
It was only a dusting, or a thin
veneer of winter, so far as snowfall went, but it was clearly winter
when joined to the season’s first
day on which the mercury here
never climbed to 32 degrees.
THE DAILY QUIZ
The Real Estate cover story
highlights tips on becoming a
landlord. According to the story,
investment home purchases rose
by how much in 2016?
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
Dec 26
First
Quarter
Jan 1
Full
Tomorrow
74/45/pc
44/38/pc
66/49/sh
75/65/sh
69/43/s
84/62/s
41/25/s
35/28/pc
71/42/s
40/35/pc
73/54/pc
76/61/pc
73/65/pc
36/33/pc
79/71/pc
52/38/c
48/32/sh
39/32/pc
37/26/pc
70/65/pc
32/23/c
89/67/s
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
65/52/r
64/39/pc
64/56/pc
62/46/s
82/60/s
42/20/s
87/77/s
79/55/pc
87/78/s
73/66/pc
57/41/s
41/33/s
51/31/pc
76/74/c
70/46/pc
20/4/c
41/39/r
89/75/pc
80/58/pc
68/44/pc
26/14/pc
17/–2/pc
42/33/pc
36/29/c
In that wintry frigidity, firefighters from Company 30 in
Prince George’s County rescued a
cold brown dog from a very cold
creek, according to fire department spokesman Mark E. Brady.
Roads seemed passable. Early
school dismissals helped get traf-
MEMBER EXCLUSIVES
Joy: Free Tickets to the Frank McComb, Kenya
& Deborah Bond Soul & Jazz Holiday Show on
December 21 at Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper Club
Together for one spectacular performance: international recording artist,
pianist, producer and composer Frank McComb; soul singer Kenya; and R&B,
funk and British soul singer Deborah Bond. Prepare for one Holy Night. See
details at washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Events & Contests.
Jan 8
Last
Quarter
Rise
7:20 a.m.
5:37 a.m.
6:55 a.m.
3:14 a.m.
4:02 a.m.
7:39 a.m.
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
89/76/s
67/43/s
56/39/sh
86/66/pc
79/54/s
48/32/r
27/12/pc
46/27/pc
85/77/pc
34/21/sf
86/72/pc
67/54/r
54/34/s
59/42/pc
25/10/pc
40/30/c
35/29/c
Set
4:47 p.m.
4:02 p.m.
4:23 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
2:27 p.m.
5:10 p.m.
fic on the roads early, contributing to a “lighter traditional rush
hour,” the Maryland highway administration said.
People also practiced winter
venting. A Washington woman
said in a tweet: “I hate the snow.”
martin.weil@washpost.com
61/52/c
67/43/s
63/45/sh
65/52/s
85/62/pc
46/25/c
87/77/s
77/56/pc
88/78/pc
72/66/pc
55/40/s
49/39/sh
50/29/s
82/75/r
72/49/pc
12/6/pc
43/28/c
91/74/pc
77/59/pc
70/47/pc
22/19/pc
10/2/pc
44/38/pc
35/28/c
93/76/s
65/42/s
53/33/s
89/67/pc
89/55/s
35/27/sh
29/20/s
40/30/s
84/76/sh
25/21/c
79/72/c
59/56/c
54/35/pc
48/37/pc
25/22/pc
39/28/c
35/27/c
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
Sud asked for ‘wedding
gifts’ in bribery scheme
BRIBE FROM B1
THE REGION
M ARTIN W EIL
Today
Addis Ababa
76/45/s
Amsterdam
42/34/sh
Athens
66/59/r
Auckland
75/65/c
Baghdad
71/42/s
Bangkok
91/69/s
Beijing
34/18/s
Berlin
37/31/c
Bogota
69/47/pc
Brussels
41/33/sn
Buenos Aires
93/61/t
Cairo
72/56/s
Caracas
74/65/s
Copenhagen
37/29/c
Dakar
80/71/pc
Dublin
43/40/pc
Edinburgh
37/30/pc
Frankfurt
39/32/c
Geneva
39/30/c
Ham., Bermuda 74/65/sh
Helsinki
35/28/sf
Ho Chi Minh City 90/71/pc
FREE SPEECH FROM B1
day.
Unlike typical court proceedings, where the audience in a courtroom is hushed, students were animated, amused by some of the questions asked by the judges during
oral arguments, including about
how many students were punched
every day in the Des Moines
schools.
Tinker, a retired nurse who lives
in Van Ness, arrived Thursday to
court wearing a pin of the late Supreme Court Justice Thurgood
Marshall, a relentless voice for minorities and civil rights in a sixdecade legal career, and a red ribbon for Yoselis Region Barrios, a
16-year-old student of Capital City
Charter School who was killed last
month in the District.
Students didn’t take their eyes off
the lawyers and judges during the
arguments, listening intently to the
case and how it led to their right of
expression in school.
After the reenactment finished,
students crowded around Tinker as
she asked them what they wanted
to change in the world. Tinker had
described how she was raised in a
family headed by her Methodist
minister father and a mother who
urged their children to act on their
religious ideals.
Tinker “fought for something
she believed in,” said Eliora BrownEgue, a 13-year-old eighth-grader at
Dec 18
New
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
50 years ago, court case protected student speech
BY
FORECAST
OCEAN: 41°
Richmond
50/30
Washington
ACTUAL
Ocean City
45/32
Lexington
48/30
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
M
REGION
AVERAGE
Prince George’s County liquor
board director, liquor store owners, lobbyists and lawmakers
were arrested in the probe. Federal authorities allege liquor store
owners paid former state delegates Vaughn and Will Campos,
both Democrats representing
Prince George’s, thousands of dollars in exchange for favorable
votes on legislation that would
help their businesses.
Sud was not accused in the
larger scheme involving the expansion of liquor sales in exchange for cash, but was arrested
in a related bribery investigation.
Sud did not speak at the hearing
other than to answer “yes” or “no”
questions from the judge. His attorney, William Brennan, declined to comment after the hearing in federal court in Greenbelt,
but in a letter to the court said his
client “is profoundly remorseful
for his conduct.”
Sud, an attorney, was appointed
to the Prince George’s liquor board
in 2015 and almost immediately
began shopping around to sell his
votes, according to prosecutors.
“How can I start getting paid?”
Sud was accused of asking someone who represented businesses
with matters before the liquor
board on Sept. 25, 2015.
“Tell your boys you got somebody on the board that can f-----make s--- happen,” the government said Sud told the man who
turned out to be a confidential
source for the FBI. “I can influence
the votes now.”
About two months later, Sud
agreed to vote favorably in two
hearings involving the confidential source.
On Dec. 2, 2015, Sud voted to
reduce the penalty for a business
found in violation of a liquor
board summons. About two weeks
later, Sud voted in favor of grant-
ing a liquor license to another one
of the informant’s clients.
Sud was paid $1,000 for each
vote, court documents state.
A year later, Sud asked the informant for a “wedding gift,”
which the government said was
code for a bribe in exchange for
help on liquor board matters.
When the informant and Sud
talked about helping one of the
informant’s clients, Sud suggested
the informant bring payment for
the bribe to an auto repair shop
Sud owned as a way to hide the
transactions, the government asserts in court filings.
“Actually, you know what I was
“How can I start
getting paid?”
Anuj Sud, ex-liquor board official,
allegedly asked FBI informant
thinking?” the government states
Sud told the informant Nov. 9,
2016, at Sud’s gas station and repair shop in Silver Spring. “Any
time you want to drop off a gift,
bring your car in. Do the oil
change and then when you pay, I
can just give you a receipt . . . That
way it’s a legitimate transaction.”
Later that month, court files
state, the informant gave Sud
$1,000 after Sud had voted favorably on a decision affecting one of
the informant’s clients and the
client was “real happy,” the informant said before handing over
cash.
“Speaking of good,” the informant told Sud, according to the
recounting in court filings. “Look.
I got a little, what’s it called, wedding gift for the, uh . . . deal.”
Sud faces up to five years in
prison at sentencing scheduled for
April 5.
lynh.bui@washpost.com
DID YOU KNOW?
A Mouthful: Free Tickets to Start Making Sense – A Tribute
to Talking Heads on December 27 at The Hamilton
If David Byrne is one of the geniuses of modern times, then Start Making Sense is
a tribute to genius. The musicians in this 7-piece Talking Heads tribute take pride
in faithfully recreating the music of Talking Heads, playing songs Talking Heads
never performed live. With front man Jon Braun as a spot-on David Byrne, some
have said this is the closest thing you’ll get to seeing Talking Heads again, since
the real-deal is never on tour. See details at washingtonpost.com/postpoints,
Events & Contests.
Not a PostPoints member yet?
It’s free. Sign up and get rewarded.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
KLMNO
Style
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
SU
C
BOOK WORLD
Austen’s
#MeToo
sense and
sensibility
Omarosa’s
long
goodbye
BY E MILY M IDORIKAWA
AND E MMA C LAIRE S WEENEY
MANUEL BALCE CENETA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Omarosa Manigault’s exit as director of communications for the White House Office of Public Liaison — and how it possibly transpired — was fodder for chatter.
The departure of the
former ‘Apprentice’
star from the White
House was abrupt,
but the news
coverage wasn’t
BY
K RISSAH T HOMPSON
A
ture from the relatively inconsequential job of
director of communications at the White
House Office of Public Liaison kept the story
going. Anonymous White House officials
shared details of her exit with political reporters. Manigault gave an exclusive morningshow interview. White House correspondents
kept trying to get to the bottom of the story.
“Why are the taxpayers continuing to pay
her salary for another month if she resigned?”
CNN’s Jeff Zeleny asked press secretary Sarah
Huckabee Sanders at the White House press
briefing.
“The president likes Omarosa,” Sanders
said. She confirmed again that Manigault had
resigned but would be paid until Jan. 20 because “there’s a lot of different protocols that
take place in the government.”
Other White House sources were quoted in
gossipy stories detailing how Manigault had
“tripped the alarm” while trying to barge into
the White House residence to take up her case
with President Trump before she was escorted
out. The New York Post ran an illustration on
OMAROSA CONTINUED ON C3
Refrain at ‘The Post’ screening: ‘It couldn’t be more timely’
E MILY H EIL
You know it’s not your typical
celebrity-laden movie screening
when the first guy down the red
carpet is an octogenarian in a
loosefitting navy suit that’s hardly
Hollywood-approved.
“Mr. Ellsberg!” someone calls.
Aha, it’s Daniel Ellsberg, the
whistleblower who leaked the
Pentagon Papers — certainly not
your usual glittery A-lister. But at
a Thursday-night showing of
“The Post,” the upcoming Steven
Spielberg-directed movie about
The Washington Post’s 1971 publication of the secret government
documents, he was an honorary
member of the elite club.
Ellsberg stopped to talk about
why the big-screen homage to an
embattled Fourth Estate taking
on a White House bound to suppress it feels necessary at the
moment. “It couldn’t be more
timely,” he said. His wife, Patricia, gave her stamp of approval,
too, only her rationale was sweetly personal — actor Matthew
Rhys, who plays Ellsberg, visited
their home to research his role,
she said. “He has the same blue
SOURCE CONTINUED ON C2
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C2
TV REVIEW
s the unspooling drama of Omarosa Manigault’s White House departure spun into its 36th hour,
Washington began asking itself:
“Does it actually matter whether
Omarosa quit or was fired?”
“Dumbest story ever,” tweeted John Harwood, a CNBC reporter.
His message was liked more than 26,000
times, but still the saga of her dramatic exit
Tuesday night from the Trump administration
churned on through Thursday — a reality television show that just couldn’t find its way to
the closing credits.
“Omarosa” continued trending on social
media. The name crawled across cable news
chyrons and resurfaced at the White House
daily press briefing. It more than held its own
in a pair of news cycles already plenty busy
with the Alabama Senate race upset, the troubled tax reform plan and the massive DisneyFox deal.
Omarosa. Omarosa. Omarosa.
All the players in the meta-soap opera surrounding the former reality TV star’s depar-
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
BY
This week in 1815, Jane Austen
was preparing for her 40th birthday on Dec. 16. But rather than
looking forward to the gifts she
might receive, her thoughts were
occupied by what she was in a
position to give. “Emma” would
soon be published, and Austen
was entitled to complimentary
copies. Feeling obliged to offer
most of these dozen books to
relatives, she was left with only
three. These she earmarked for
wildly different recipients: an
amateur-writer friend, Anne
Sharp; the best-selling novelist
Maria Edgeworth; and the
prince regent, who had already
sent a request to the author for a
copy. What’s more, he wanted
Austen to dedicate her novel to
him.
The stories behind Austen’s
choice of these three recipients
reveal moral dilemmas that still
speak with uncanny resonance to
women today.
Austen was distressed by the
demands of the prince regent, a
man she’d long despised for his
famed womanizing. A few years
earlier, when a royal sex scandal
swept the nation, her sympathies
had rested with his estranged
wife. “Because she is a woman,”
the novelist explained privately
to a female friend, “& because I
hate her Husband.”
But then, as now, it was dangerous to stand up publicly to a
powerful man — especially once
he had set his sights on you. On
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Meryl Streep, who portrays legendary Washington Post publisher Katharine Graham in the movie “The Post,” poses
for photographers at the film’s premiere. “The Post” is about the decision to publish the Pentagon Papers in 1971.
Errol Morris
peers into
the fog of
black ops
BY
HANK STUEVER
There’s always time to see what
Errol Morris has been up to lately.
Best known for his documentaries, especially 1988’s “The Thin
Blue Line” and 2003’s Oscar-winning “The Fog of War,” Morris’s
stylistic influence on the genre is
still widely seen in such highgrade, psychologically layered
documentaries as “The Keepers”
and “The Jinx.” It’s also evident in
today’s glut of true-crime shows
on cable and streaming services.
Podcasters, too, are indebted to
Morris for making the world safe
for intelligent meandering, in
which a storyteller diligently
chisels at a complicated and even
arcane subject with no guarantee
of a satisfying conclusion.
Morris’s new project is a mildly
intriguing if somewhat overwrought docu-series for Netflix
called “Wormwood,” which takes
an old and previously covered
story — the CIA’s connection to
the 1953 death of germ-warfare
scientist Frank Olson, who either
jumped or was thrown from the
window of a Manhattan hotel
room — and tries to bring its
darkest and still-uncertain elements out into the light of day.
The 69-year-old director also
gets to indulge his love of classic
noir films, devoting a large chunk
of the series to scripted reenactments and other supposed
events, starring actor Peter Sarsgaard as Olson.
“Wormwood” is presented as a
stylish hybrid of many forms —
documentary, “Mad Men”-era
noir, art collage and clip-job —
none of which comes through
with total success. The better
story here, which Morris devotes
nominal attention to near the
end, is the singular and even
heartbreaking obsession of Olson’s son Eric, who was a boy
when his father died. Eric has
spent the better part of five decades trying to pry more details
loose, even as most of those with
firsthand knowledge have died.
If told in a straightforward
TELEVISION CONTINUED ON C4
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Austen understood
the value of solidarity
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
Plenty of
free speech
exercised at
screening
praised her literary peer.
In contrast, Austen’s response
to the work of her contemporary
offers inspiration to ambitious
women today. Using one of the
few outlets available to her, she
publicly complimented Edgeworth’s work within the pages of
one of her own novels,
“Northanger Abbey.” This sisterly
act demonstrates the importance
of talented women amplifying
each other’s achievements.
Austen’s behavior feels particularly relevant in the current
climate, since it is only by working together that women will
overturn the threatening behavior that still too often prevails
among powerful men. The littleknown story behind Austen’s
class-defying friendship with
Anne Sharp — an amateur play-
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
SOURCE FROM C1
eyes,” she said. “He’s very handsome — he reminds me of my
husband back then!”
The screening, held at the
Newseum, was the ultimate
mash-up of Fictional Washington
and Real Washington: boldface
actors who play Posties and government types on the big screen
jostled alongside real-life Washington journalists and officials.
Jeffrey P. Bezos, the Amazon
founder and chief executive who
owns The Post, and Post Publisher Fred Ryan passed by with
smiles and nods, as did other
locals, including CBS’s Major
Garrett, Chris Wallace of Fox
News and Sen. Patrick J. Leahy
(D-Vt.).
But for them, it was a night off,
spent at the movies — it was the
imported stars who were really
working the carpet, offering their
thoughts about the flick, the parallels between the Nixon-era drama and that of the Trump administration, and how the movie tries
to get the historical details just
right. Bob Odenkirk, the “Better
Call Saul” actor who plays Ben
Bagdikian, the reporter who argued that the paper should publish the Pentagon Papers, says he
relied on Bagdikian’s autobiography and some video footage to
capture his vocal patterns. But
. SATURDAY,
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Elizabeth “Lally” Weymouth, Katharine Graham’s daughter and
Post senior associate editor, with C. Boyden Gray at the screening.
the more important portrayal, he
said, was of how journalists actually work. “This is about a bunch
of journalists who were very serious about the effort,” he said. “You
get to see, in this movie, people
doing this job.”
Tom Hanks, who plays legendary Executive Editor Ben Bradlee, said he was inspired by Jason
Robards, the actor who famously
fixed Bradlee in the pop-culture
universe by playing him in that
other Post-centric movie, the 1976
classic “All The President’s Men.”
But Hanks said he drew his characterization primarily directly
from Bradlee, whom he had gotten to know before the newsman
died in 2014.
“A nod to the great Jason Robards, and no one will ever give a
better performance — but I had
Bradlee himself,” he said.
Others had slightly less to go
on. David Cross, who plays Post
Managing Editor Howard Simons, said he didn’t have the
advantage of such source material, so he had to rely mostly on old
photos. “Every picture of him, he’s
got his arms crossed, so you’ll see
me doing that,” he said. “And at
least we got the comb-over right.
That’s very important.”
But forget reaching into the
past. “The Post” is being lauded
for its very current themes, including women in leadership
(Meryl Streep stars as Post Publisher Kay Graham), exposing
government secrets, and the importance of the embattled-butindependent free press.
Spielberg says that shouldn’t
be interpreted as explicitly partisan, even though President
Trump is waging a daily Twitter
war against the mainstream media. “It’s a patriotic film,” Spielberg says. “I don’t think patriotism is partisan.”
And actor Bradley Whitford,
who plays a Post executive (and
who is eerily coming to resemble
his onetime “West Wing” co-star
Martin Sheen, with his silvery
mane and pearly smile), offered a
similar rallying cry: “It’s the First
Amendment — it’s not number
seven,” he said. “It’s shown in the
movie that the press works for the
governed, not the government.”
emily.heil@washpost.com
recently receiving a royal command to visit one of the prince’s
residences, Austen had felt dutybound to attend. It was in these
lavishly decorated chambers,
heavy on crystal and gilding, that
she had been invited to dedicate
“Emma” to His Royal Highness.
Austen abhorred the prospect
of associating herself with a
philanderer who flaunted his
wealth when most of the country
was struggling to make ends
meet, and so she’d dared to ask
the court librarian whether she
might avoid making the requested dedication. Since his response
failed to offer reassurance, Austen grudgingly concluded that
she could not risk spurning the
ruler of the land.
Nonetheless, she could console herself that such a dedication might help her leverage
greater financial security and
literary acclaim — aims she was
not shy to admit. And she could
at least reserve her final copies of
“Emma” for two fellow female
writers, although her reasons for
choosing each of them could not
have been more different.
Maria Edgeworth, then one of
Britain’s most famous novelists,
was far better known than Austen. A resulting endorsement
from this established author
could have brought Austen improved sales and greater recognition. But Edgeworth failed even
to acknowledge receipt of the
gift. She would later confess to
admiring Austen’s novel, but —
perhaps protecting her space at
the top — she never openly
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
wright who’d worked as one of
the family’s governesses — suggests that these two women understood the importance of female solidarity in the face of
male entitlement. By selecting
Sharp as the final recipient of a
precious copy of “Emma,” Austen
chose to favor this unlikely
friend over her own brother,
Sharp’s former employer.
By this stage, Sharp had confided in Austen about the trials
she had endured over the course
of her working life. In one home,
she had suffered the advances of
a man who held power over her
— a common problem for governesses, who, as neither typical
servants nor family members,
were vulnerable to predatory
upper-class men. Austen, long
aware of her friend’s isolation,
had always gone out of her way to
help. This included looking for
alternative employment for
Sharp and inviting her to stay to
get her out of harm’s way. And
Austen accepted without question the governess’s allegations
of sexual harassment.
Sharp would have made a far
more fitting dedicatee for
“Emma” than the licentious
prince regent. She would have
understood the predicament of
the heroine, who finds herself
trapped in a carriage with a man
who repeatedly takes hold of her
against her will. When he ignores
her quiet attempts to rebut his
advances, Emma summons the
courage to speak — her voice a
gift of resistance to all who read
of this struggle today and dare to
say, “Me Too.”
bookworld@washpost.com
JOHNSON WILSON & CO. PUBLISHERS/LIBRARY OF
CONGRESS PRINTS AND PHOTOGRAPHS DIVISION
Novelist Jane Austen hesitated
in dedicating “Emma” to the
prince regent.
Emily Midorikawa and Emma
Claire Sweeney are the authors of
“A Secret Sisterhood: The Literary
Friendships of Jane Austen,
Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, and
Virginia Woolf.”
When the in-laws roll their eyes at your food choices, just go with your gut
Adapted from a
recent online discussion.
from scratch for dessert. My inlaws keep kosher, and my
mother-in-law is an avid baker, so
suggestions to eat at a restaurant
where we can all pick our foods
are met with confusion.
I get looks and occasional
comments about declining those
foods, such as how annoying the
gluten-free trend is. I’m already
anxious about this vacation and
having either to join in and suffer
the stomachache or decline and
get eye rolls about fad diets. Do
you have a suggestion for how to
handle this?
— Lifestyle Choices Burn
Hi, Carolyn: I’m
going on vacation
soon with my inlaws, siblings-inlaws and their
spouses. Over the
past few years, I’ve been working
on eating fewer unhealthy foods
such as bread and dairy, and as a
result, I feel much better. This
hasn’t resulted in visible weight
loss but has resolved many
stomach issues I’ve dealt with.
Every time I am with my
husband’s family, the mood is
“vacation” or “celebration” and
the foods they serve are always
those I try to avoid, such as pasta
for dinner and chocolate cake
Carolyn
Hax
Lifestyle Choices Burn: Yes, the
commentary and eye rolls are
annoying and pushy — not to
mention the fact that a
welcoming family would make at
least a minimal effort to provide
food everyone can eat.
But they’re saying a lot about
themselves and virtually nothing
about you, because they’re
butting into something that just
doesn’t affect them. You’re taking
personally what isn’t personal.
That makes their eye-rolling a
“so what” waiting to happen.
Through trial and error, you
learned that you could resolve
your stomach issues by not
eating bread and dairy. Okay
then! So you don’t eat them,
that’s a good start. Now finish the
job by responding just as matterof-factly to your in-laws: You’re
you and they aren’t, so let’s move
on:
“Yes, thank you, the glutenfree thing is annoying — I’d give
anything to eat cake without
feeling sick. Oh, and bread . . .
don’t get me started.” Right? It
can annoy you and the family
commentariat for completely
different reasons, but it’s still
true that both parties are
annoyed.
You can use shorter answers
after that — “Eyes say yes,
stomach says no”; “[sigh] Aren’t
my food reactions old news yet?”;
and eventually to, “_____.” As in,
you just do what you do without
feeling the need to respond to
commentary about it. Cut to the
last step right away if you feel
game.
I do take issue with one
remark you make here, and it
might point to why this family
isn’t more sympathetic: When
you refer to “unhealthy foods like
bread and dairy,” you reveal
judginess of your own, no? Bread
and dairy are not unhealthy,
they’re just fine for . . . people for
whom they’re just fine. If you
want to be left alone to your food
choices, then the most
productive thing you can do is
leave others to their food choices,
too.
In fact, for your own and
others’ health, please break
anything close to a habit of
vilifying this or that food or food
choice. Your gut, your business,
the end.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
HOLIDAY EVENTS
A Quebec
Christmas
Revels
Dec 15-17, 2017
matinee & evening shows
21st Century Consort
An Evening of
Carols”
Sat. Dec 16, 5pm
4pm pre-concert
discussion
Join our cast of over 100, ages 8-85! Journey into the
magic of the Quebec winter holidays and enjoy traditional
tunes, toe-tapping dances, foot-stomping instrumentals, a
spirited story with a flying canoe, sing-along carols and
more. Welcome Yule!
Jon Deak’s contemporary classic “The Passion of Scrooge
or A Christmas Carol” performed by William Sharp and
the Consort, with the Cathedral Choir Girls Choristers in
Benjamin Britten’s “Ceremony of Carols”. The event at
St. Mark’s will be filmed live in performance for future
release.
GW Lisner Auditorium
730 21st Street NW
Washington, DC 20052
$12-60
www.revelsdc.org
St. Mark’s Episcopal Church
Capitol Hill
301 A Street, DE
Washingon, DC
Last weekend -2 matinees & 2 night
shows left! Family
friendly!
Free
21stcentury
consort.org
Dumbarton Concerts
Dumbarton United
Methodist Church
3133 Dumbarton St. NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-965-2000
$42 Adults
$39 Senior
Dumbarton
concerts.org
Live at 10th & G
First Congregational UCC
945 G St. NW
Washington, DC 20001
$30 at the
door
$25 in
advance
www.TheThirteen
Choir.org
$36
Discounts available
for groups of 10 or
more.
Call 202-312-1427
MUSIC - CHAMBER
Dumbarton Concerts
Presents
Washington
Symphonic
Brass Quintet
December 16 at 4pm
and 8pm
The WSBQ is Phil Snedecor, Matthew Harding, Amy Horn,
Peter Ellefson, Stephen Dumaine, and Bill Richards.
Holiday classics performed will include "God Rest Ye Merry
Gentlemen", and "Trepak" from The Nutcracker.
December 16, 2017
7:30PM
Join the all-star professional choir, The Thirteen, in a
candlelit concert with works by Scandinavian, Baltic, and
Northern composers.
Fridays & Saturdays
at 7:30pm
A musical, political satire.
We put the MOCK in Democracy!
Info: 202.312.1555
www.capsteps.com
Sounds of the Season
MUSIC - CHORAL
Northern Lights
COMEDY
Orange is the
New Barack
Ronald Reagan Building
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Tix available at ticketmaster.com
202.397.SEAT
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
Advertise in The Guide to the Lively
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16-2898
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
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EZ
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Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
12/16/17
7:00
7:30
8:00
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
◆ Will & Grace ◆ Superstore
◆ Dateline NBC
◆ Saturday Night Live
The Redskins Redskins
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
◆ UFC Fight Night: Lawler vs. Dos Anjos (Live)
Fox 5 News at 10
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Ten Days in the Valley
Paid Program Paid Program I Want a Dog for Christmas ◆ Ten Days in the Valley
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆ S.W.A.T.
◆ 48 Hours
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Men’s Health Paid Program ◆ NCIS: Los Angeles
Vecinos
Premios Bandamax
14.1 WFDC (UNI) ◆ Crónicas de Sábado
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ Family Feud ◆ Family Feud Fox 5 News On the Plus
Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow
22.1 WMPT (PBS) Great Performances
Great Performances
26.4 WETA (PBS) Memory Rescue With Daniel Amen, MD
France 24 Programming
The Weissensee Saga
Anatomy of Evil
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
Get Down Tonight: The Disco Explosion
Live From the Artists Den
32.1 WHUT (PBS) Alabama: Hymns-Gospel
◆ Seinfeld
Two Men
Two Men
Friends
Friends
News
50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Goldbergs
Movie: A Christmas Cruise (2017)
66.1 WPXW (ION) Movie: A Husband for Christmas (2016)
11:00
11:30
◆ SNL
News
◆ Hell’s Kitchen
News
News
Ravens
◆ Sing Like
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Perspectiva Noticiero
◆ Anger Mgt
◆ Anger Mgt
Memory Rescue
The Truth About Retirement
Yakov Smir
Elementary
How Sarah Got Her Wings
CABLE CHANNELS
MICHAEL MORIATIS/FOOD NETWORK
Eat, Sleep, BBQ (Food at 9) Rashad Jones seeks out authentic barbecue
as well as, unexpected ways of making it, on the Saturday series premiere.
Fox News Sunday (Fox at 9 a.m.)
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin
and Sen.-elect Doug Jones (D-Ala.).
White House Chronicle
(WETA at 9) President of the
Chamber of Digital Commerce
Perianne Boring and Jim McTague,
contributing editor of Barron’s.
This Is America & the World
(WETA at 10 and WHUT at 7:30 p.m.)
President Barack Obama’s former
speechwriter David Litt.
Face the Nation (CBS at 10:30)
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin,
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Sen
James Lankford (R-Okla.).
SPECIALS
A Christmas Story Live! (Fox at 7)
This live production of the Tonynominated show “A Christmas
Story: The Musical” (based on the
cult favorite film) features Maya
Rudolph, Jane Krakowski and
others.
Interview With a Monster: The
Scott Peterson Case (Fox
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
1
11
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19
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21
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32
33
34
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52
54
55
56
ACROSS
Overwhelming
place for many
country folk
Once-a-week
mantra
Early secondmillennium
style
Modern-day
carpe diem
’80s scandal
Pro shop
purchase
Remove fluff
from, perhaps
Blond, in many
cases
Moved
to another
table
Dispatch
to the cutting
room floor
Easy money,
in theory
Some
retirement
purchases
Pinkberry
competitor
Hardened,
as concrete
Layers
Make a mild
romantic
overture to
Eastern way
Causes to be
Anka hit with
a Spanish
influence
Iron-__
Era, perhaps
Place for a pin
Opening
Facts and
figures
Physical pros
“Right,
understood”
Fig. at
the state’s
courtroom
table
“Odyssey”
fruit
They have
small roles
Unlike
narrators,
usually
Duty-__
Could
conceivably get
Last Tango in Halifax: Holiday
Special (WETA and MPT at 8)
A family moves to a rundown
farmhouse ahead of the Christmas
holiday in this two-part special,
concluding Dec. 24.
FINALES
Good Behavior (TNT at 10) Letty
and Javier must quickly sort out the
mess she made.
Search Party (TBS at 10) Dory is
left to figure out a plan to keep the
gang out of jail.
PRIME TIME
Alaska: The Last Frontier
(Discovery at 9) The Kilcher family
plays secret Santa on a special
Christmas episode.
Shameless (Showtime at 9) Ian
brings an “Occupy Fiona” protest to
her front door.
Madam Secretary (CBS at 10)
Daisy returns from maternity leave
and decides to reveal the truth to
Joe’s mother.
— Sarah Polus
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
Much ado about Omarosa’s exit
By Pete Wentz
OMAROSA FROM C1
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
58 Hazzard County
deputy
59 “Is it safe
to talk?”
60 Calls the
game
61 Plot markers
DOWN
1 Strained, e.g.
2 Large mass
3 Modern box
filler
4 Went back
and forth
5 Business issue
6 Natural
history
museum
objects
7 “Ohio” group,
initially
8 Educational
placement aids
9 Double-stuffed
holiday dish
10 Pro’s call
11 Generally
unstressed
12 Stiff-legged
stride
13 Twitchy
14 Chair accessory
21 Big name
in aluminum
history
23 Pilot’s ideal
outcome?
25 MLB stats
29 FedExCup
seeker
30 Subject of
the biography
“Stormy
Weather”
12/16/17
31 Notwithstanding
32 “Big deal”
35 Let out
for a
time
37 Jazz club
highlight
40 Sail
44 Ordinary
people
46 One may be
educated
48 Western
Wyoming
county
49 Revolutionary
diplomat Silas
50 Opening
stakes
53 “Oh mah __!”
56 “Unlikely!”
57 Banded
Wonderland
wear
FRIDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
its cover of Manigault being
dragged from the executive mansion.
Manigault disputed those stories in her interview on ABC’s
“Good Morning America,” saying
she left of her own volition but
hinting that certain aspects of
her 11-month stay made her
“unhappy.”
“When I have my story to tell
as the only African American
woman in this White House, as a
senior staff and assistant to the
president, I have seen things that
have made me uncomfortable,
that have upset me, that have
affected me deeply and emotionally, that has affected my community and my people,” Manigault said. “And when I can tell
my story, it is a profound story
that I know the world will want
to hear.”
The political narrative on her
time in the White House has
already been written — and it
doesn’t reflect well on her. Story
after story described her wandering the halls of the White
House aimlessly or ineffectively
representing Trump before the
groups she was hired to cultivate.
Her appearance during a panel
at the National Association of
Black Journalists convention devolved into a screaming match,
for instance.
She seemed cast in the same
role in the White House that she
had on “The Apprentice,” where
she was the show’s elegant and
icy villain competing for Trump’s
favor against 15 other contestants. “I’m not here to make
friends,” she said then, and butted heads with almost everyone
else on the show.
Manigault has long disputed
her depiction as an anti-hero.
“What you see on the show is a
gross misrepresentation of who I
am,” she told The Washington
Post in 2004. “This show is about
ratings,” she noted, and she was
pitted against the other female
contestants because it was “dramatic.”
Still, at different points during
her White House tenure Manigault has referred to herself as
“the Honorable Omarosa Manigault” and “Lady Newman,” in
reference to her married name,
which prompted cackles in
Washington. And she seemed to
make few friends during her
time in the West Wing. On
Thursday, she complained of
White House Chief of Staff John
F. Kelly’s “militaristic style.”
She returned to the airwaves
for a “Nightline” interview that
aired in the wee hours Friday
morning on ABC to defend her
former boss, saying Trump “is
not a racist” despite his repeated
conflicts with people of color.
“Yes, I will acknowledge many
of the exchanges, particularly in
the last six months, have been
racially charged,” Manigault
said. “Do we then just stop and
label him as a racist? No.”
As the story of her exit wore
on, annoyance grew in many
corners. The usually upbeat
GMA co-host Robin Roberts
looked exasperated to even have
to discuss the matter. “She said
she has a story to tell, and I’m
sure she’ll be selling. . . . Bye,
Felicia,” said Roberts, using a
catchphrase from the movie “Friday” to summarily dismiss Manigault.
Roland Martin, the host of a
morning news show on TV One,
arrived in the studio to tape his
show Thursday morning and
learned his producers had reserved a segment to assess her
resignation. Martin cut it down
to three minutes and began the
conversation by saying three
times: “I don’t give a damn.”
“Here we were the day after
black women in particular were
on the ground in Alabama helping to raise money and get out
the vote to defeat Roy Moore,
[and] I simply was not going to
debase myself by having a backand-forth over what happened to
Omarosa,” Martin said later. “I
was choosing to bask in the glory
of what black folks did in Alabama.”
3BEST PICTURE
But Manigault’s friend Monique Pressley called the entire
episode “a shame.” Pressley, who
was a bridesmaid in Manigault’s
wedding and her friend of
20 years, sees racism and sexism
in both the gawking fascination
and backlash that has greeted
the story.
“We see the highest-ranking
African American female in our
current administration being
disrespected, dehumanized and
minimized — not just by people
at large, but by first and foremost
other African Americans,” said
Pressley, an attorney. “I wonder if
it were Kellyanne Conway [who
resigned]. . . if she would have
gotten a ‘Later Becky’ the way
Omarosa received a ‘Bye Felicia,’
or do we just reserve these
guttural colloquialisms for people who look like us?”
Missing in the conversation,
said Pressley, is a larger concern
about representation in the
Trump administration.
“Now, I look at a table of 30
senior staffers and there are no
people of color,” she said. “She
was in the room, [but] now
what? She’s someone who has
served in the National Guard,
has been a professor; she’s someone who has multiple degrees, a
member of the clergy. I just
refuse to see her as some ‘Celebrity Apprentice’ person. . . . I
don’t have a doubt that she’ll be
fine.”
Manigault might agree. “The
White House is not my ceiling,”
she told “Nightline’s” Deborah
Roberts. “It’s just the beginning.”
krissah.thompson@washpost.com
Paul Farhi contributed to this report.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
‘Wormwood’ burrows into a scientist’s death
TELEVISION FROM C1
manner, a review of the Olson
case might hold a viewer’s interest for a 75-minute film — after
all, who doesn’t love a cautionary
tale about unchecked powers
within the intelligence world?
Morris, however, delivers six
episodes of roughly 40 minutes
each, peeling this onion as slowly
and artfully as possible, taking
repeat laps around the story in
hopes that multiple perspectives
and resonant mantras of facts
and findings (as well as metaphorical snips from Laurence Olivier’s 1948 film version of “Hamlet”) will help the viewer become
similarly obsessed. It’s possible
that some will; as a binge-watch,
“Wormwood” is painless but not
nearly as captivating as it attempts to be. The case has simply
gone too cold.
Some viewers may recall the
news coverage that accompanied
a presidential commission’s 1975
findings that Frank Olson, who
was working on bioweapons research at Fort Detrick, Md., had
been dosed with LSD by CIA
operatives nine days before he
died. The family received an official apology, a meeting with President Gerald Ford and a financial
settlement. But Eric Olson kept
pressing for more information,
the start of a long journey of
obfuscated twists and turns.
The story comes with just the
sort of eerie coincidences on
which Morris’s techniques normally thrive. The reenacted flash-
backs are beautifully filmed, providing infinite choreographic options for Olson’s plunge (initially
ruled a suicide) from his hotel
room. Sarsgaard is in his element,
portraying a normally reserved
government employee and family
man who wigs out on acid and
then experiences the paranoid
feelings (and justified anxiety)
that hound him right up until the
instant he hits the sidewalk.
But what is Morris after here?
New evidence? Answers? Is Morris
invested in solving the mystery or
more intrigued by Eric’s lifelong
obsession and possibly misdirected grief? Near the end, the story
turns to famous investigative journalist Seymour Hersh, who at one
point agreed to help Eric. Hersh
apparently found some new infor-
mation but decided not to publish
it. (Hersh says doing so might
reveal the identity of his anonymous source.)
An easily irritable Hersh tells
Morris that he and Eric are no
longer speaking, but his initial
advice to Eric still holds: Let it go.
For someone like Morris, “let it
go” is merely an invitation to
delve deeper, even at the risk of
ending up with little to no payoff.
But when all is said and done,
even Morris seems to be telling
Eric, in a very elaborate way, to let
it go.
“I feel like I’ve let it go,” Eric
says. “But it hasn’t let me go.”
hank.stuever@washpost.com
Wormwood (six episodes) is
streaming on Netflix.
MOVIE DIRECTORY
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3111 K Street N.W.
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 11:202:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 10:5012:10-1:55-5:00-8:00-11:00
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Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
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Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
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AMC Loews Uptown 1
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Wonder (PG) 10:35-1:10-3:456:20-9:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13) 1:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:00-1:00-4:10-7:30-8:00-11:00;
12:20
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: (!) 10:454:30-10:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 11:452:45-6:00-9:00
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 11:152:00-4:30-7:15-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
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AFI Silver Theatre
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The Shape of Water (R) 11:00-1:304:30-7:05-9:40
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Justice League (PG-13) CC: 11:255300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
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Ferdinand (PG) CC: (!) 10:00-12:30- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC:
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CC: (!) 9:15-12:30-3:45-7:00-10:15
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7:10-10:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:45-1:35-4:15Wonder (PG) CC: 11:10-1:50-4:407:00
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Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 2:40Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
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Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
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Albert Einstein Planetarium - Justice League (PG-13) CC: 10:30National Air & Space Museum 1:30-4:30-7:15-10:15
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Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 9:4511:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
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One World, One Sky: Big Bird's
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Angelika
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:15-3:45-9:00
Pop-Up at Union Market
Wonder (PG) CC: 9:30-12:15-3:15550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
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Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R) 1:45- 8:45-2:45
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 1:00-6:30
4:15-6:45-9:15
Wait for Your Laugh 11:15AM
AMC Columbia 14
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
The Florida Project (R) 11:15-1:303:45-6:00-8:15
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:10-12:50-6:50
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: 3:45-9:40
Avalon Theatre
The Disaster Artist (R) 9:20-3:305612 Connecticut Avenue
5:20-10:30
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-3:10-5:20-7:45
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 9:05Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
12:00-3:00-6:00-9:15
Missouri (R) 2:00-4:45-7:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:35-2:25Landmark
6:05-9:20
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC:
807 V Street, NW
(!) 10:00-11:00-11:30-2:00-2:30-3:35Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 11:15- 5:30-7:00-7:15-9:00-9:45-10:25
1:45-4:30-7:15-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- CC: (!) 6:15
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Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX 3D
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8:00-11:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC: Coco (PG) 10:40-1:20-4:10-6:50-9:30
11:00-11:45-12:30-2:00-3:00-3:45Murder on the Orient Express (PG5:00-6:30-7:00-7:20-8:00-9:30-10:15- 13) CC: 11:10-1:50-4:50-7:40-10:30
10:30-11:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:35-1:25-4:057:45-10:40
Landmark E Street Cinema
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC: 1:15
555 11th Street NW
The Other Side of Hope (Toivon tuolla Lady Bird (R) CC: 9:40-12:00-5:207:40-10:05
puolen)12:40-2:50-7:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:1012:00
1:10-4:10-7:10-9:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:20-2:00Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 10:05-12:50-3:50- 4:40-7:20-10:05
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) 2:45
6:50-9:30
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) CC: 10:15- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) (!)
9:00-12:30-4:00-7:30-10:45
5:00-9:45
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:40-1:10-3:20AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
5:30-7:40-9:15-9:50
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
The Room (R) 11:59
Ferdinand (PG) CC: (!) 11:10-2:00Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: 10:00- 7:20
10:45-1:00-1:45-4:00-4:45-7:00-7:45- The Disaster Artist (R) CC: (!) 10:0010:00-10:45
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:30- Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: (!) 4:35-9:55
12:30-1:30-3:30-4:30-6:30-7:30-10:15 Justice League (PG-13) CC: 10:25Landmark West End Cinema 1:20-4:10-7:00-9:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 9:552301 M Street NW
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:45-1:00- 1:05-4:05-7:25-10:25
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC:
3:15-5:30-7:45-9:55
Tom of Finland (NR) 11:00-1:30-4:30- (!) 10:05-10:30-11:20-12:10-1:50-3:053:30-5:10-6:50-8:30-10:10
7:30-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
The Florida Project (R) CC: 10:45CC: (!) 11:45-1:25-2:40-4:45-6:00-8:051:15-4:15-7:15-9:50
8:55-9:20
Medal of Honor Theater Coco (PG) CC: 9:35-11:40-2:20-4:55NMMC
7:30-10:05
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
Murder on the Orient Express (PGWe, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:00- 13) CC: 10:35-1:40-4:30-7:15-10:45
12:00-1:00-2:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:50-1:35-4:25The Polar Express (G) (!) 3:00
7:10-10:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: 6:25
Regal Gallery Place
Stadium 14
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 11:00701 Seventh Street NW
1:30-4:15-7:05-9:45
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) 12:05-2:45Elf (PG) 12:00
5:40-8:15-10:50
Ferdinand (PG) 10:15-1:10-3:55Lady Bird (R) 9:50-12:25-2:50-5:156:45-9:35
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:15-1:40- 7:45-10:15
The Thousand Faces of Dunjia (NR)
4:05-6:30-8:55-11:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 2:15-5:15- (!) 10:55-1:45-4:40-7:35-10:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The IMAX
8:10-11:05
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13) 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:401:00-4:20-7:40-11:00
10:40-2:00-5:20-8:40
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- Unexpectedly Yours (!) 11:15-2:105:00-7:50-10:40
13) 9:25-11:55-2:30-5:10-7:45-10:35
Just Getting Started (PG-13) 10:00AM
AMC Loews
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:15-11:00
11115 Mall Circle
Justice League (PG-13) 9:45-12:303:15-6:05-8:50
Ferdinand (PG) CC: (!) 1:30-7:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
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Ferdinand (PG) CC: 11:00-4:00-6:30
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Justice League (PG-13) CC: 11:152:05-5:00-7:45-10:30
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7:30-10:45-2:00-8:30
Coco (PG) 7:35-9:50-11:00-2:15-4:057:10-10:55-12:45
Wonder (PG) 8:50-11:20-1:55-4:107:25-10:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 7:45-8:5510:35-11:40-1:20-2:25-4:35-5:057:45-10:35-1:20
Call Me by Your Name (R) 7:10-8:3010:10-11:25-1:05-2:20-4:00-5:207:20-8:20-10:20-11:20-1:15
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 9:10-11:35-2:104:40-7:05-9:35
Ferdinand 3D (PG) 3:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
4:45-11:15
Lady Bird (R) CC: 7:25-9:00-12:103:50-6:20-8:10-10:25-12:25
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: 1:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
8:00-8:45-9:15-9:45-11:15-12:0012:30-1:00-2:30-3:15-3:45-5:45-6:307:00-7:15-7:30-9:00-9:30-9:45-10:1510:30-12:15-12:30-1:00; 1:30AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
5:15-11:45; 7:00-10:15-1:30-8:00;
4:15-10:45
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
9:55-11:05-1:25-2:35-6:05-8:259:35-12:05
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:30-6:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) XD:
8:45-3:45-7:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 9:35-12:152:55-5:35-8:20-10:55
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 9:20-12:05-2:50-6:008:55-11:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) 9:0012:00-6:10-9:10-12:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The IMAX
Hoyt's West Nursery
2D Experience (PG-13) 12:05
Cinema 14
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
1591 West Nursery Road
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:10-1:15-4:00- 9:00-10:00-11:00-12:30-1:30-2:002:30-4:00-4:30-5:00-5:30-5:55-7:306:40-9:10
8:00-8:30-9:00-9:30-11:00-11:30Justice League (PG-13) CC: 10:45- 11:55-12:15-12:30-1:00-1:15; 1:45AM
1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45-11:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 10:15- 3D Experience (PG-13) 3:35-7:001:10-4:05-7:15-10:10-11:35
10:30-2:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC: Star Wars: The Last Jedi The IMAX
10:00-11:00-11:50-12:45-1:35-2:35- 2D Experience (PG-13) 8:45AM
3:25-4:15-6:05-7:00-7:50-8:45-9:35- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:30-11:20
2:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
Regal Hyattsville Royale
CC: 5:05
Stadium 14
The Star (PG) CC: 10:00-2:40
6505 America Blvd.
Coco (PG) CC: 10:30-1:00-3:35Elf (PG) 12:00
6:20-8:55
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:30-1:30Murder on the Orient Express
4:30-8:00-11:15
(PG-13) CC: 10:50-1:45-4:40-7:20Ferdinand (PG) 10:15-1:00-4:0010:00-11:35
6:45-9:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:20-1:00-3:40The Disaster Artist (R) 10:45-2:306:30
5:00-7:30-10:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
Justice League (PG-13) 10:30-1:3011:15-3:50-6:05-8:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: 1:55- 4:45-7:45-10:45
The Star (PG) 1:15-3:45-6:15-8:454:25-9:10-10:35
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 11:45- 11:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
2:15-4:40-7:05-9:30
The Man Who Invented Christmas 12:00-12:30-1:20-1:55-3:30-4:004:40-5:15-7:00-7:30-8:00-8:35(PG) CC: 12:10-4:50
10:30-11:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
6:55-9:50
10:00-11:00-11:30-2:30-3:00-6:00Lady Bird (R) CC: 7:35-9:55
6:30-9:30-10:00-11:30
Landmark
Coco (PG) 10:45-11:15-2:00-5:00Bethesda Row Cinema
7:45-10:45
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Wonder (PG) 11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:30- 10:15
10:50-1:30-2:00-4:20-6:50-7:20Just Getting Started (PG-13) 10:00AM
9:35-10:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:15Wonder Wheel (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:15-5:45-8:15-11:00
10:00-4:35
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:2014716 Baltimore Avenue
11:00-1:10-2:00-3:55-5:00-7:10Elf (PG) 12:00
8:00-9:50
Ferdinand
(PG) 8:55-12:00-3:20Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
6:50-9:40
10:00-10:20-12:50-1:20-3:40-4:10The
Disaster
Artist (R) 10:30-1:106:30-7:00-9:30-9:50
3:55-7:05-10:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Justice
League
(PG-13) 10:45-5:10Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:40-7:30-10:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:25-1:00-3:20- 8:10-11:20
Thor:
Ragnarok
(PG-13) 9:005:40-7:45-9:55
11:40-6:20
Old Greenbelt Theatre
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
129 Centerway
8:50-11:15-1:30-1:40-2:45-3:00-3:45Murder on the Orient Express (PG- 5:05-6:00-6:40-7:15-8:30-10:1513) (!) 3:00-8:00
10:45-12:00
Bill Nye: Science Guy 12:30-5:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
9:30-10:20-12:15-1:00-2:00-4:30Paragon Kentlands
5:40-8:00-9:20-9:50-11:30
Stadium 10
Coco (PG) 10:10-1:20-4:15-7:00-9:55
629 Center Point Way
Ferdinand (PG) 10:00AM; 12:30-2:50- Wonder (PG) 9:40-12:40-3:306:30-9:30
5:10-7:30-9:50
Justice League (PG-13) 11:50-2:25- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 9:152:35-9:45
5:00-7:35-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:45-4:30- Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
10:15AM
7:15-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Regal Rockville Center
Stadium 13
11:00-1:00-2:05-4:00-5:10-7:00199 East Montgomery Avenue
8:15-10:00
The Star (PG) 1:10-3:15-5:20
Elf (PG) 12:00
Coco (PG) 12:05-2:30-4:55-7:20-9:45 Ferdinand (PG) 10:30AM
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- The Disaster Artist (R) 11:45-2:3013) 2:15-4:50-7:25
5:15-8:00-10:45
Wonder (PG) 12:10-2:40-5:10-7:40- Justice League (PG-13) 1:30-7:4510:10
10:45-11:45
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:45-5:0012:10-10:00
8:15-11:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 7:25-9:40 Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:00-12:30-3:30-4:00-7:30-10:30Lady Bird (R) 1:00-3:10-5:20-7:3011:00
9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
10:00-10:30-11:30-1:30-2:00-3:003899 Branch Avenue
5:00-5:30-6:30-8:30-9:00-10:00
Ferdinand (PG) 11:30-2:05-7:15-10:00 Coco (PG) 10:30-2:15-5:15-8:00-10:45
Ferdinand 3D (PG) 4:40
Wonder (PG) 11:15-2:45-6:15-9:45
Justice League (PG-13) 11:05-2:00- Lady Bird (R) 1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
4:45-7:45-10:35
Youth (Fang Hua) (NR) 10:30-11:30Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
2:45-4:30-6:00-9:30
11:40-12:30-2:15-2:55-3:45-6:10Ferdinand (PG) 10:00-1:00-3:457:00-8:45-9:40-10:15
6:30-9:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13) Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:00-5:30
7:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:15-3:05Regal Waugh Chapel
5:30-7:55-10:15
Ferdinand (PG) 10:40-11:40-1:302:30-4:20
Elf (PG) 10:30AM
Ferdinand (PG) 7:00-9:50
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:15-1:504:40-7:20-10:10
Justice League (PG-13) 12:403:40-9:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 6:40-11:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
9:00-12:10-3:40-7:10-10:40
The Star (PG) 9:30AM
Coco (PG) 10:30-1:05-3:45-6:20-8:50
Wonder (PG) 10:00-1:00-4:00-7:1510:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:20AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:10-11:30-12:50-1:40-3:00-4:10Regal Bowie Stadium 14
5:10-5:30-6:30-7:40-8:40-9:0015200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
10:00-11:10
Ferdinand (PG) 11:15-1:55-4:35Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13) 7:25-10:15
10:50-2:20-5:50-9:20
Justice League (PG-13) 10:15-1:10Bow Tie Harbour 9
4:05-7:10-10:05
2474 Solomons Island Road
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:45-1:454:45-7:45-10:45
It's a Wonderful Life (1946) (PG)
The Disaster Artist (R) 10:05-12:3511:00AM
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- 3:05-5:35-8:15-10:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
13) 10:20-1:00-3:40-6:40-9:10
Just Getting Started (PG-13) 1:40- 10:00-10:30-11:30-12:30-1:00-4:004:30-5:00-6:30-7:30-8:00-8:30
4:30-9:50
The Shape of Water (R) 9:30-12:30- The Star (PG) 10:35AM
3:20-6:10-7:10-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
11:00-12:00-2:30-3:00-3:30-6:00Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
7:00-9:30-10:00-10:30-11:00
Missouri (R) 10:50-1:50-4:207:00-9:40
Murder on the Orient Express (PGLady Bird (R) 10:00-12:20-2:40-5:00- 13) 10:10-1:05-3:55-6:50-9:40
7:20-10:20
Coco (PG) 10:10-12:50-3:35-6:20-9:20
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) 9:40-12:00- Just Getting Started (PG-13) 2:15
2:30-5:10-7:40-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:30-4:25Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD 7:05-9:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) 10:207000 Arundel Mills Circle
Ferdinand (PG) 9:00-2:40-8:20-11:10 1:20-4:20-7:20-10:20
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Ferdinand 3D (PG) 11:50-5:30
Stadium 20 & IMAX
The Disaster Artist (R) 10:15900 Ellsworth Drive
1:15-4:10
Elf (PG) 12:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 6:10
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital 3D Ferdinand (PG) 10:20-1:35-4:257:15-10:05
(PG-13) 9:10-3:35
The Disaster Artist (R) 9:15-11:45Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
2:20-5:15-7:50-10:25
10:30-2:00-5:30-9:00-12:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13) Justice League (PG-13) 10:05-1:154:10-7:20-10:20
XD: 12:15-10:50
Coco (PG) 11:10-1:55-4:45-7:45-10:30 Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:25-1:55Murder on the Orient Express (PG- 5:10-8:15-11:25
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
13) 10:45-1:50-4:40
Wonder (PG) 10:20-1:30-4:25-7:25- 9:30-11:30-1:00-3:00-6:30-10:00-1:30
Coco (PG) 9:05-10:55-11:30-3:1010:25
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 8:55-11:30- 6:45-9:35-12:45
Murder on the Orient Express (PG2:00-4:30-7:20-10:40
Unexpectedly Yours 10:00-1:05-4:00 13) 10:10-12:55-3:50-6:40-9:40
Wonder (PG) 9:50-12:40-3:35Justice League (PG-13) 8:506:25-9:25
3:15-9:20
Just Getting Started (PG-13) 9:10Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
9:20-10:30-11:40-11:45-12:50-2:00- 2:20-4:55-7:35-10:15
3:10-4:20-4:55-5:30-6:40-7:00-7:25- Darkest Hour (PG-13) 9:05-10:3012:10-1:45-3:10-4:40-6:15-7:457:50-8:10-9:00-10:00-10:10-10:359:20-10:50
11:00-11:20-11:40-12:35
Stadium 12 & IMAX
1419 South Main Chapel Way
Elf (PG) 12:00
Ferdinand (PG) 8:50-11:00-2:00-4:457:45-10:40
The Disaster Artist (R) 9:40-12:403:15-5:45-8:15-10:50
Justice League (PG-13) 9:10-12:002:50-6:00-9:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:10-1:104:10-7:15-10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
5:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
9:30-11:30-1:00-3:00-4:30-8:00-9:0010:00-11:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 8:30-3:307:00-10:30
The Star (PG) 8:45-11:05
Coco (PG) 9:20-1:20-3:40-6:45-9:30
Wonder (PG) 8:30-11:10-1:50-4:307:15-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 8:404:00-6:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
9:00-10:00-12:30-1:30-4:00-6:307:30-8:30-11:00-12:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 12:00
Regal Westview
Stadium 16 & IMAX
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Elf (PG) 12:00
Ferdinand (PG) 10:00-12:45-3:456:45-9:45
The Disaster Artist (R) 10:30-1:454:45-7:15-9:45-12:30
Justice League (PG-13) 10:15-1:154:15-7:15-10:15-1:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:00-1:154:30-7:45-11:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
1:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
11:30-3:00-3:30-6:30-10:00-12:0012:30-1:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 12:30-4:007:30-11:00
The Star (PG) 10:45AM
Coco (PG) 10:30-1:45-4:45-7:45-10:30
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 9:15-12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Wonder (PG) 9:30-12:30-3:30-6:309:30-12:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:152:15-5:30-8:15-11:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13) 10:151:30-4:00-6:45-9:15-11:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 9:15-3:156:00-8:45-11:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) 9:00AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
9:30-11:00-12:00-1:00-2:30-4:305:00-6:00-7:00-8:00-8:30-9:30-10:3011:30-1:00-2:00
UA Snowden Square
Stadium 14
9161 Commerce Center Drive
Elf (PG) 12:00
Ferdinand (PG) 10:20-1:20-4:106:50-9:40
The Disaster Artist (R) 9:30-12:205:30-8:10-10:50
Justice League (PG-13) 10:45-1:454:45-7:45-10:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:15-1:154:15-7:15-10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:00-11:30-12:00-1:30-2:30-3:005:00-6:30-7:00-8:30-9:00-9:30-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
9:00-9:30-12:30-1:00-3:30-4:00-4:307:30-8:00-10:30-11:00-11:30
Coco (PG) 9:15-12:10-3:20-6:00-9:10
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 9:40-3:10-6:00-11:20
Wonder (PG) 10:10-12:50-3:506:40-8:40
Just Getting Started (PG-13) 9:15AM
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 9:00-11:40-2:50-6:1511:15
Lady Bird (R) 10:30-1:10-3:406:15-8:50
Xscape Theatres
Brandywine 14
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
Ferdinand (PG) CC: (!) 9:50-10:3011:10-11:50-12:30-1:10-1:50-3:103:50-4:30-6:00-7:10-9:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 12:403:40-7:00-10:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC:
(!) 9:30-12:50-4:10-7:30-10:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
CC: (!) 12:10-3:30-6:50-10:10
The Star (PG) Open Caption; CC: (!)
10:20AM
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
11:00-1:40-4:20-6:40-9:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
6:30-10:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 11:152:40-5:10-7:40-10:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
9:40-5:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 12:203:20-6:20-8:30-9:50-11:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC:
(!) 10:10-10:50-11:30-1:30-2:10-2:504:50-5:30-6:10-7:50-8:10-8:50-9:3011:10-11:30
Coco (PG) CC: 11:20-2:00-4:407:20-9:20
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) 10:00-12:253:05-5:35-8:20-10:50
Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:40-2:05-4:256:45-9:20
Unexpectedly Yours 10:20-1:10-4:006:50-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
Beyond Skyline (R) 1:25-7:35
AMC Potomac Mills 18
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 9:45-3:15-4:108:45-9:40
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: 12:30-6:00
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 11:452:15-4:40-7:15-9:40
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 2:208:15; 10:30-1:20-6:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 9:3012:40-3:40-6:40-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC:
10:00-1:30-2:00-3:00-5:00-5:30-6:308:30-9:15-10:00-12:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
CC: 11:00-1:00-2:30-4:30-6:159:45-10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 9:00-12:304:00-7:45-11:15
The Star (PG) CC: 10:00-12:20
Coco (PG) CC: 11:20-1:30-7:00
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) CC: 10:10-1:10-4:10-7:10-10:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:00-12:50-3:306:10-9:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
10:30-7:50
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 11:302:15-5:00-7:30-10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 9:25-12:10-3:106:10-9:10
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
11:30-5:15-11:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:15-12:45-3:205:50-8:15-10:40
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 4:15-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
8:30-12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC:
(!) 10:00-2:30-4:00-9:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
CC: (!) 11:30-1:00-5:30-7:00-10:15
Coco (PG) CC: 10:00-12:30-6:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:301:30-4:30-7:30-10:20
The Shape of Water (R) (!) 10:1511:45-1:15-3:00-4:15-6:00-7:159:00-10:15
Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:15-1:45-4:156:45-9:30
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 3:00-9:10
AMC Tysons Corner 16
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Ferdinand (PG) CC: (!) 10:30-1:157:00
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: (!) 4:00-9:40
The Disaster Artist (R) (!) 9:25-12:052:35-5:15-7:50-10:25-12:55
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 10:151:25-4:40-7:40-10:50-12:35-1:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 10:404:55-7:55-10:55-12:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC:
(!) 10:00-11:15-12:20-1:30-3:45-5:00iPic Pike & Rose
6:10-7:15-8:30-9:45-10:45-11:5511830 Grand Park Avenue
12:20-1:05
Ferdinand (PG) (!) 12:15-3:45-7:15- Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
10:45
CC: (!) 11:45-2:40-3:15-6:45-10:15Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) (!) 12:50
8:45-10:30-11:00-11:30-12:30-2:00- Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
2:30-3:00-3:30-4:30-6:00-6:30-7:30- 3D Experience (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:158:30-10:00-10:30-11:00-11:30
12:45-4:15-7:45-11:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13) The Star (PG) CC: 10:10AM
(!) 12:00-4:00-8:00-12:00
Coco (PG) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:25Coco (PG) 11:15-2:45-6:15-9:30
7:10-9:55
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 10:00AM
13) CC: 10:35-1:20-4:10-6:55-9:50
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:05-1:05-4:057:05-10:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) (!) 10:20-1:35AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
1:40-4:30-7:30-10:30-12:45
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:00-6:30-9:00 Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 9:4012:15-2:50-5:20-8:05-10:35
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: 1:30-4:00
Lady Bird (R) 12:25-2:45-5:10Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
7:35-10:10
10:00-1:30
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 9:30AM
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 8:45Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) (!)
12:45-2:00-4:00-6:30-9:00
10:45-2:15-5:45-9:15-12:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
AMC Worldgate 9
CC: 9:30-1:00-4:30-8:00-9:15-11:1513025 Worldgate Drive
11:20-11:30
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- Ferdinand (PG) CC: (!) 4:00-6:40
13) CC: 11:15-1:45-4:20-7:15-10:00 Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: (!) 10:50Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-3:15-5:001:25-9:20
7:40-10:20
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: (!) 12:20Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13) 3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
CC: 8:30-10:15-12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30 Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 10:10Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
1:15-4:35-7:35-10:35
Missouri (R) CC: 10:45-1:15-4:20Justice League (PG-13) CC: 10:156:15-10:45
1:40-4:30-7:20-10:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC:
AMC Hoffman Center 22
(!) 9:15-11:00-12:30-2:30-3:45-4:45206 Swamp Fox Rd.
6:00-7:00-8:15-9:30-10:15
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 9:30-10:15Coco
(PG) CC: 10:05-12:50-3:303:45-9:15
6:20-9:00
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: 1:00-6:30
Murder
on the Orient Express (PGThe Disaster Artist (R) CC: 11:3013) CC: 11:15-2:00
12:15-2:00-3:00-4:30-5:30-7:00-8:00Wonder
(PG) CC: 12:10-3:20-6:30-9:10
9:30-10:40
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Justice League (PG-13) CC: 11:30One Loudoun
2:30-5:15-8:15-11:05
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 10:15Coco (PG) 9:15-12:10-3:30-6:20-9:35
1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
The Disaster Artist (R) 8:40-11:25Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
2:15-5:00-7:45-10:10
CC: 9:45-11:15-12:20-1:30-2:453:50-5:00-6:15-7:20-8:30-8:50-9:45- Ferdinand (PG) 9:50-1:00-3:506:40-11:00
10:50-12:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13) Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
8:25-12:20-8:00-11:50
CC: 10:30-2:15-5:45-9:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX 3D Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
Experience (PG-13) CC: 9:00-12:45- 4:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
4:15-7:45-11:15
8:55-9:30-10:10-11:20-12:40-1:20The Star (PG) CC: 10:50-1:20
Coco (PG) CC: 9:15-11:50-2:30-5:15- 2:00-3:10-4:35-5:25-6:00-7:00-8:309:10-9:50-10:50
8:00-10:45
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
13) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:45-7:25-10:10 10:35-7:20-11:10
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 9:40Angelika Film Center Mosaic
2911 District Ave
4:00-10:10
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:40-4:20Flash Gordon (Rocektship) (1936)
7:10-9:50
(NR) 11:45
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC: 3:40 Call Me by Your Name (R) (!) 10:00A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
11:00-12:55-2:00-3:50-5:00-6:456:00-10:40
8:00-9:55-10:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 10:00- The Shape of Water (R) (!) 10:45-1:304:20-7:00-8:15-10:00-10:55
12:30-3:15-5:40-8:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) (!) 11:00-11:45Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
1:45-4:30-5:15-7:15-10:15
Missouri (R) CC: 9:50-12:35-3:206:20-9:05
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) (!) 9:45-2:40
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Lady Bird (R) (!) 10:30-1:15-3:306:00-8:30
10:45-1:35-4:40-7:30-10:20
VIRGINIA
Saturday, December 16, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
(!) 9:45-4:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) (!)
12:05-1:00-3:15-6:30-7:30-9:45-10:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
12:00-1:45-3:25-5:15-6:50-8:45-10:15
Coco (PG) 10:25-1:05-3:45-6:208:50-11:20
Just Getting Started (PG-13) 9:40AM
Bow Tie
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX The Shape of Water (R) 9:45-11:0012:50-2:20-4:00-5:25-7:00-8:3011940 Market Street
10:05-11:25
It's a Wonderful Life (1946) (PG)
Lady Bird (R) 10:00-12:30-3:00-5:4511:00AM
8:15-11:15
Elf (PG) 10:30AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Ferdinand (PG) 10:20-1:20-4:201:00-4:30-8:00-11:30
7:20-9:55
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
The Disaster Artist (R) 1:50-4:509:30-11:15-2:45-6:15-9:45
7:50-10:50
Regal Countryside
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 4:30-11:10
Stadium 20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
45980 Regal Plaza
3:30-10:30
Coco (PG) 10:30-1:00-3:50-6:50-9:20 Justice League (PG-13) 10:25-1:204:15-7:15-10:25
Wonder (PG) 10:40-1:40-4:40-8:05
Just Getting Started (PG-13) 12:50 Ferdinand (PG) 9:45-11:00-1:45-4:35Lady Bird (R) 11:20-2:20-5:20-11:00 7:20-10:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 2:00-5:05Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
8:05-10:55
11:00-2:30-3:00-6:00-6:30-7:40Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
9:30-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13) 10:00-11:30-12:30-1:00-4:00-4:305:00-6:30-7:30-8:00-8:30-10:00-11:00
10:00-1:30-5:00-8:30
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) 10:10-1:10- Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
10:30-12:00-3:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
4:10-7:10-10:10
The Star (PG) 10:20-12:45-3:10-5:30Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
8:15-10:45
12:00-7:00
Coco (PG) 11:20-1:50-4:25-7:05-9:50
Cinema Arts Theatre
Oxygen (Telugu) (NR) 10:00-12:509650 Main St
3:50-6:40-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC: Just Getting Started (PG-13) 2:15
10:00-1:00-4:00-7:10-10:00
Tumhari
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- 6:00-9:15Sulu (NR) 11:15-2:3013) CC: 7:50-10:05
Jawaan (NR) 10:15-12:55-3:35Wonder (PG) CC: 9:50-12:10-2:256:15-9:30
4:50-7:20-9:40
The Man Who Invented Christmas
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 9:40(PG) 11:05-1:35-4:10-6:45-9:45
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:55
Fukrey Returns (NR) 10:35-1:40-4:45The Divine Order (Die gottliche
7:50-10:50
Ordnung) (NR) CC: 9:40-2:40
Firangi (NR) 9:50-1:10-4:20-7:35Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
10:35
Missouri (R) CC: 9:45-12:05-2:35Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) 9:55AM
5:05-7:40-9:55
Lady Bird (R) CC: 9:55-12:15-2:25- Lady Bird (R) 10:55-1:15-3:456:05-9:00
4:45-7:00-9:20
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 12:10-5:10 Wonder Wheel (PG-13) 10:50-1:554:50-7:45-10:40
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
Mental Madhilo (NR) 10:45-1:551600 Village Market Boulevard
4:50-7:45-10:40
Ferdinand (PG) 2:20-4:55-7:30
Gruham (NR) 10:05-1:05-3:55Ferdinand 3D (PG) 11:00-9:45
6:50-10:05
The Star (PG) 11:40-1:50-4:00Regal Dulles Town Center 10
6:30-8:40
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Murder on the Orient Express (PGElf
(PG) 12:00
13) 12:10-5:20-10:30
Wonder (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:45-7:25- Ferdinand (PG) 10:15-1:15-4:007:00-9:45
10:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13) 12:00- The Disaster Artist (R) 3:15-6:30-8:30
Justice
League (PG-13) 10:45-1:302:30-4:50-7:10-9:50
4:30-7:15-11:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:35
Thor:
Ragnarok
(PG-13) 9:00-12:00Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:50-8:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:50-1:45- 10:30
Star
Wars:
The
Last
Jedi (PG-13)
4:40-7:40
Justice League (PG-13) 1:00-5:00- 9:30-9:45-10:30-1:00-1:45-3:00-4:155:00-6:15-7:30-8:15-9:30-10:457:55-10:40
11:30-11:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13) Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
11:45-9:30
9:00-11:00-12:15-2:15-3:30-5:30Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
6:45-8:45-10:00-12:00
10:45-12:30-1:15-2:00-3:00-3:454:30-5:15-6:15-7:00-7:45-8:30-10:15 Coco (PG) 9:15-12:30-2:45-5:157:45-10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
Wonder (PG) 9:45-12:45-3:4511:45-9:30
6:00-9:00
Coco (PG) 11:15-1:30-4:15-7:15-10:05
Regal
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Fairfax Towne Center 10
3:00-6:15
Manassas 4 Cinemas
8890 Mathis Ave.
4110 West Ox Road
Elf (PG) 12:00
Ferdinand (PG) 10:30-1:30-4:20Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
7:00-9:40
11:30-2:30-5:30-8:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Ferdinand (PG) 11:00-1:15-3:3010:00-12:00-12:30-2:00-4:10-4:555:45-8:00
7:15-7:45-8:20-10:40-11:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
11:00-2:00-5:00-8:00
10:50-11:30-2:30-3:10-3:40-6:15Coco (PG) 11:00-1:05-3:10-5:15-7:25 6:45-9:45-10:15
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 Wonder (PG) 11:15-2:00-4:45-7:356201 Multiplex Drive
10:30
Ferdinand (PG) 11:15-4:25-7:00-9:35 Just Getting Started (PG-13) 10:40AM
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Ferdinand 3D (PG) 1:50
Justice League (PG-13) 11:10-2:05- Missouri (R) 2:20-5:15-8:00-10:50
The Man Who Invented Christmas
4:55-7:45-10:50
(PG) 2:15-4:50-7:30-10:05
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 9:45The Swindlers (NR) 6:35-9:30
4:00-7:05
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
1:30
8:55-12:20-12:40-1:25-3:45-6:156:35-7:10-8:15-9:55-10:10-10:35Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
11:20-11:40-12:05
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13) Ferdinand (PG) 10:30-1:15-4:002:00-4:50-5:25-8:50
6:45-9:30
The Star (PG) 10:15-12:30-2:45-5:00 Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:45-1:45Coco (PG) 9:00-10:00-11:55-1:004:45-7:45-10:45
2:50-3:55-5:45-8:40
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:00-1:45Murder on the Orient Express (PG- 4:15-6:45-9:15
13) 9:55-12:45-3:30-10:20
Justice League (PG-13) 3:30Wonder (PG) 10:55-1:45-4:40-7:25- 6:15-9:00
10:05
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 7:25-10:25 9:30-11:30-12:30-1:00-3:00-4:00Aruvi 9:25-12:35-3:40-6:45-9:55
4:30-6:30-7:00-7:30-8:00-10:0011:00-11:30
Rave Cinemas
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
11900 Palace Way
10:00-12:00-1:30-3:30-5:00-8:30-10:30
Ferdinand (PG) 11:15-1:55-4:35-7:20 Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 2:30-6:00-9:30
Ferdinand 3D (PG) 10:10
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:25-2:05- The Star (PG) 10:30-12:45-3:15-5:458:15-10:30
4:45-7:55-10:40
Murder on the Orient Express (PGJustice League (PG-13) 11:1013) 11:15-2:00-4:45-7:30-10:15
2:15-5:25
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:40-1:45- Coco (PG) 9:45-10:45-12:15-1:152:45-3:45-5:15-6:15-7:45-8:455:00-8:00-10:55
Coco (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:55-7:45-10:45 10:15-11:15
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- Wonder (PG) 10:15-1:00-3:456:30-9:15
13) 1:50-7:30
Wonder (PG) 10:50-1:30-4:20-7:50- Just Getting Started (PG-13) 10:15AM
Lady Bird (R) 11:45-2:15-4:3010:35
7:15-9:45
Maayavan (NR) 8:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The IMAX
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 6:25
The Shape of Water (R) 10:45-11:35- 2D Experience (PG-13) 11:00AM
1:35-2:25-4:30-5:15-7:25-8:05Regal Kingstowne
10:15-11:00
Stadium 16 & RPX
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:205910 Kingstowne Towne Center
4:40-10:25
Elf (PG) 12:00
Lady Bird (R) 11:00-1:25-4:15Ferdinand (PG) 9:35-10:30-1:15-4:007:15-9:55
7:00-9:40
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) 1:40-4:25Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 9:30-12:307:35-10:20
3:30-6:30-9:30
Justice League (PG-13) XD: 10:30- Justice League (PG-13) 4:40-7:351:15-4:10-7:05-10:05
10:30
Aruvi 9:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Coco (PG) XD: 10:35-1:20-4:059:30AM
7:00-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
12:50-4:15-7:45-11:10
Regal Ballston Common
Stadium 12
The Star (PG) 9:45AM
671 N. Glebe Road
Coco (PG) 11:00-2:00-4:30-7:30-10:20
Ferdinand (PG) 9:30-10:50-1:50-4:40- Wonder (PG) 9:40-12:25-3:05-6:008:50-11:30
7:30-10:20
Justice League (PG-13) 10:45-1:55- Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 4:20-7:20-11:05
4:50-7:45-11:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 9:35-12:35- A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:401:00-3:50-6:50-9:20
3:30-6:30-9:35
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:30-5:00Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
8:00-10:30
10:15-12:30-3:55-7:20-10:45
The Man Who Invented Christmas
(PG) 12:45
The Disaster Artist (R) 10:05-3:205:50-8:30-11:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:00-10:45-11:30-11:45-12:15-1:202:15-3:15-3:45-4:45-5:45-6:45-7:158:15-9:15-10:15-10:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
10:00-10:30-11:15-1:50-2:45-5:156:15-8:45-9:45-11:35
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
Ferdinand (PG) 10:20-1:10-4:307:15-10:00
The Disaster Artist (R) 9:00-11:202:40-5:40-8:15-10:40
Justice League (PG-13) 10:30-1:304:20-7:10-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:40-1:404:50-7:45-11:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
9:30-10:50-11:40-12:50-1:50-2:003:10-4:10-5:10-6:30-7:30-8:30-9:209:50-10:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
10:00-1:20-2:30-4:40-6:00-8:00-11:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 12:20-3:407:00-10:20
The Star (PG) 9:15-11:30
Coco (PG) 9:50-12:40-3:50-6:45-9:30
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 10:10-1:00-4:00-6:50-9:40
Wonder (PG) 9:40-12:30-3:306:15-9:10
Just Getting Started (PG-13) 9:10AM
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 9:20-11:505:20-7:50-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) 9:00AM
Regal Potomac Yard
Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
Elf (PG) 12:00
Ferdinand (PG) 10:00-11:00-1:404:30-7:10-9:55
The Disaster Artist (R) 10:00-12:252:50-5:25-8:00-10:35
Justice League (PG-13) 10:35-1:354:40-7:40-10:40-11:55
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:40-3:406:50-10:00-11:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:40-11:10-1:20-2:10-2:40-3:504:00-5:40-6:10-6:40-7:20-8:20-9:109:40-11:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
10:00-11:40-12:20-12:50-1:50-3:104:20-4:50-5:20-7:50-8:50-10:1010:50-11:20
The Star (PG) 10:00AM
Coco (PG) 10:45-1:30-4:10-6:45-9:30
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 10:00-12:10-3:05-6:00-8:55
Wonder (PG) 10:55-1:45-4:35-7:3010:20
Just Getting Started (PG-13) 10:00AM
The Man Who Invented Christmas
(PG) 11:50-7:45-10:25
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) 10:503:35-6:30-9:35
Regal
Springfield Town Center 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
Elf (PG) 12:00
Ferdinand (PG) 9:10-11:10-1:50-4:407:20-10:10
The Disaster Artist (R) 1:40-4:207:10-9:50
Justice League (PG-13) 5:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:10-4:107:40-10:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 9:0010:00-10:30-11:00-2:30-3:00-4:00-6:007:30-9:30-10:00-10:50-11:00-11:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
9:30-11:30-12:00-1:00-2:45-3:304:30-6:15-6:30-7:00-8:00-9:4510:30-11:30
Coco (PG) 9:20-12:20-3:20-6:20-9:10
Wonder (PG) 9:40-12:40-3:406:40-9:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 8:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:30AM; 2:00
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
Elf (PG) 12:00
Ferdinand (PG) 10:30AM
The Disaster Artist (R) 9:10-11:502:20-5:30-8:15-10:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 8:00-12:252:15-6:10-9:10
Justice League (PG-13) 12:20-3:206:45-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:15AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
1:30-4:45-8:00-11:15
The Star (PG) 8:10AM
Coco (PG) 8:30-11:15-1:45-4:307:15-9:50
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 9:40-3:30-6:20-9:40
Wonder (PG) 9:30-1:50-4:40-7:5010:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 3:50-6:209:05-11:40
Ferdinand (PG) 2:30-5:00-7:45-10:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
8:15-8:45-10:45-11:00-11:30-12:001:00-2:45-3:15-4:15-6:00-6:30-7:007:30-8:30-9:15-9:45-10:45-11:4512:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG-13)
9:15-9:45-11:00-12:30-3:00-3:4510:15
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 10:30-4:30-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) 1:30-7:30
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 7:15-9:3512:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
12:00-2:15-4:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
12:20-2:35-4:40
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) CC: 7:00-9:25
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 7:309:45-12:00
Elf (PG) 12:10-2:20-4:45
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (R)
12:00AM
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C5
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
A943
10 6 2
Q 10 8
A 10 9
WEST
Q J 10 8 2
K75
K65
52
EAST
K65
84
732
K7643
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
7
AQJ93
AJ94
QJ8
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1
1
1 NT
2
Pass
3
4
All Pass
Opening lead — Q
EAST
Pass
Pass
CLASSIC PEANUTS
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
W
hen I watched today’s
deal in a penny game,
Unlucky Louie was declarer
at four hearts, and West led
the queen of spades. Louie
took dummy’s ace and let
the 10 of trumps ride, losing.
He ruffed the next spade and
drew trumps.
Louie next led the queen
of clubs to finesse. East won
and led his last spade, and
Louie ruffed with his last
trump. He then led a club to
dummy and returned the 10
of diamonds. West produced
the king — and took two
spades. Down two.
“I should have known that
three finesses would lose,”
Louie grumbled. “If the game
were hockey, I would have
scored a hat trick.”
“If your luck is that bad,”
I said, “at least attack your
side suits in the proper
order.”
After Louie draws trumps,
he should lead the ace and
another diamond. West wins
and leads a third spade, and
Louie ruffs and then finesses
in clubs. Even when East has
the king, Louie is safe since
East won’t have another
spade. East must return a
minor suit, and Louie wins
the rest.
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
7AQJ93
AJ94QJ8
You open one heart, your
partner responds one spade,
you bid two diamonds and he
rebids two spades. What do
you say?
ANSWER: Partner will typically have a six-card spade
BLONDIE
suit but at most nine highcard points. Pass. You should
resist the urge to bid 2NT,
which would suggest more
strength and game interest.
Game is unlikely, and partner’s hand will produce a
few tricks only if spades are
trumps.
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C6
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | DECEMBER 16
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you express
a unique kind of
creativity. Others
often seek you out for
advice or for help sleuthing
through problems. If you are
single, you could meet many
different potential suitors.
Know that Mr. or Ms. Right
could be right around the
corner! If you are attached, the
two of you happily hop around
to different sets of friends with
totally diverse interests. You
might decide to plan on taking
a series of courses together. A
fellow Sagittarius adds more
excitement to your life!
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
A thought is likely to go from
a fantasy to a materialized
concept. You will enjoy the
surprises you encounter along
the way. You get into what
is happening, despite any
obstacles that get in your way.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Relate on a personal level.
Your ability to get your point
across to others might not be
as powerful as you would like.
State the same core message,
perhaps in a different way,
in order to help convey your
message.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Communication might be off.
Even with the best intentions
and a willingness to go over
what you are thinking several
times, you might not be able
WEINGARTENS & CLARK to get your message across.
Worry less about this glitch
for now, and try again another
time.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
You like being the cook, the
baker and the decorator.
Though you might want to
complain at times, don’t. Know
that there are alternatives
to your lifestyle and choices.
Consider playing out the next
holiday season differently.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You’ll want to pull back a bit in
order to review an emotional
situation. Events seem to
occur at a pace that takes your
breath away. It might seem as
if you are putting out all kinds
of fires today. Don’t fight the
inevitable.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
A responsibility calls that could
force a change of plans. You
might not feel as if you have a
choice. You would like to kick
back and get into the holiday
spirit after a gift-wrapping
frenzy and perhaps a lengthy
nap.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You might want to change your
choices. This is a workable
plan, as long as you don’t
upset the apple cart for
several loved ones. Choose to
stay on course, and know that
everything will work out in your
favor.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You will opt to do some lastminute holiday shopping,
whether it be for food or for
whatever else you might need.
If you are in the process of
completing your gift list, you
might find online buying easier
and less of a hassle.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Take the lead. You have a lot
to do, but you’ll help motivate
others to pitch in too. You
won’t mind having a few
people join you on your various
last-minute errands.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You could be overly worried
about shopping, gift wrapping
and everything else that is
important in making your
holiday run smoothly. Play it
low-key today, especially if you
want to keep a big surprise
under wraps.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
A friend proves to be a major
distraction. You often grumble
about this person, but if you
are honest with yourself, you
enjoy being around him or
her. As long as this person is
around, try to make the most
of the moment.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
You are likely to make
important choices for you as
well as a loved one. You might
prefer to be with just this
person and no one else. Reach
out to a friend at a distance
whom you don’t often get to
see.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
KLMNO
SPORTS
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
Dukes have
maintained
their success
by ignoring it
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
A season dimmed
by fallen stars
harrisonburg,
va. — The sports
world is rife with
disrespect, and as
James Madison
Coach Mike
Dan
Houston gathered
Steinberg his team in a circle
after practice
Tuesday afternoon, he suspected
he had found another case. This
weekend’s opponent, he told his
team, believes the Dukes play in
an inferior conference. This
weekend’s opponent, he said,
thinks what the Dukes
accomplished last year was a
fluke. The doubt, it burned —
even in the middle of a pop-up
snowstorm.
It felt almost rude to remember
that James Madison has been the
top-ranked Football
Championship Subdivision team
all season, unanimously so for
much of the fall. That the Dukes
are the No. 1 seed in the FCS
tournament and three-point
favorites in Saturday’s home
semifinal matchup with South
Dakota State. That they’re the
defending national champions
and have yet to lose to an FCS
opponent in Houston’s two
seasons in Harrisonburg. (His
only loss came against North
Carolina in September of last
season.) That they’re working on
Injuries have further hurt a game already dealing with off-field issues
D
M2
Scott stays
on target as
Wizards top
the Clippers
WIZARDS 100,
CLIPPERS 91
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
Before last summer, when
Mike Scott officially signed with
Washington, the Wizards had
something of a love-hate relationship with him.
They loved Scott’s game — his
long-range shooting, the way he
could score in isolation and his
ability to defend, whether as a
power forward or a point guard.
And they loathed Scott’s game
— specifically Bradley Beal, who
still has bad memories from one
particular play two years ago
when Scott dunked on him so
hard that the NBA’s official YouTube account highlighted it as a
“Nasty Jam.”
But on nights such as Friday,
when Scott sparked the Wizards
to a 100-91 win over the Los
Angeles Clippers, his new teammates had nothing but love for
him. Scott continued the best
stretch of his career by scoring
22 points on 9-for-10 shooting.
“I just keep my same routine,
take the same shots,” said the
former Virginia star, a secondround pick by Atlanta in the 2012
draft. “I don’t try to force any
shots. I just take what the defense
STEINBERG CONTINUED ON D3
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D5
S. Dakota St. at James Madison
FCS semifinals
Today, 4:30 p.m., ESPNU
Cavaliers at Wizards
Tomorrow, 6 p.m., NBCSW
The face, job
of big league
managers
have changed
Hoyas’ sleepy
early schedule
lifts confidence
but little else
BY
D AVE S HEININ
lake buena vista, fla. — When
the 15 American League and 15
National League managers, clad
in designer sport coats and expensive shoes, assembled Wednesday
afternoon for their annual group
pictures at the baseball winter
meetings, someone who didn’t
know any better might have wondered whether they were actually
players gathering for their team
pictures, with all those youthful
faces and bodies interspersed
with a few older ones.
Some familiar faces were absent from the photo lineups this
year, among them Dusty Baker,
John Farrell and Joe Girardi, all of
them fired by teams — the Washington Nationals, Boston Red Sox
and New York Yankees, respectively — that made the playoffs
this fall and replaced by managers who are, on average, 12 years
younger. All told, six teams
changed managers this offseason,
and all but one hired someone
significantly younger than his
predecessor.
As a result, the fraternity of
current big league managers is
MANAGERS CONTINUED ON D2
BASEBALL
The Nationals leave the
winter meetings thinking
about their next step. D2
PRO FOOTBALL
WASHINGTON POST STAFF ILLUSTRATION
BY
M ARK M ASKE
Aaron Rodgers is returning to
the field Sunday, but he said he’s
not coming back to save the
season for the Green Bay Packers.
The Packers can only hope he
does both. And while he’s at it, the
rest of the NFL could use some
help, too.
Amid a trying season in which
the NFL’s leadership keeps talking about the need to diminish
the focus on the off-field controversies that continue to plague
the league, the on-field product
has suffered because of the absence of some of the best and
most popular players. The season
has been more about those who
aren’t playing than those who are.
Rodgers, the Packers’ standout
quarterback, is expected to be in
Aaron Rodgers
Expected back
tomorrow from a
broken collarbone
Richard Sherman
Out for season with a
ruptured right
Achilles’ tendon
Redskins LB Zach Brown,
the NFL’s leading tackler,
is ruled out for Sunday. D2
J.J. Watt
Out for season with a
tibial plateau fracture
in his left leg
Deshaun Watson
Out for season with a
torn anterior cruciate
ligament in right knee
the lineup Sunday against the
Carolina Panthers in Charlotte
after being sidelined for two
months because of a broken collarbone. Other NFL teams wish
they were as fortunate.
The list of star players who
have been sidelined by injuries
includes not only Rodgers but
fellow quarterbacks Carson
Wentz of Philadelphia and Deshaun Watson of Houston, New
York Giants wide receiver Odell
Beckham Jr., Texans defensive
standout J.J. Watt and Seattle
cornerback Richard Sherman.
Indianapolis quarterback Andrew Luck hasn’t played all season, and Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill’s season
ended with a knee injury in the
preseason. The Dallas Cowboys
NFL CONTINUED ON D3
The Hoya Snaxa
convenience store
at the south end
of Georgetown’s
football field has
the “S” in its name
Barry
X’d out in red
Svrluga
tape, the sign with
the “Hours” has
been reduced to “Hour,” and
they’re not open “Sat-Sun” but
“ at- un.” The letter S is verboten
on the Georgetown campus this
week, crossed out everywhere.
Syracuse will face the Hoyas in
men’s basketball Saturday
afternoon at Capital One Arena.
Why not hype the matchup? Why
not have some fun?
“I think everybody knows the
magnitude of this game,”
Georgetown junior Jessie Govan
said.
Which is to say, at least it has
some magnitude.
You may have missed it, but
Georgetown has opened the
Patrick Ewing era — the
coaching era, that is — by
winning its first eight games of
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D4
Syracuse at Georgetown
Today, 12:30 p.m., CBS
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Today’s Celebration Bowl is
a great matchup with 125
years of HBCU history. D4
HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
No. 2 DeMatha gets a win
at No. 6 St. John’s in a
WCAC showdown. D6
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D2
EZ
D I G ES T
BASEBALL
Phillies reach deal
with slugger Santana
Carlos Santana is bringing his
big bat and playoff experience to
the Philadelphia Phillies.
The 31-year-old first baseman
became the first of the offseason’s
big-name free agents to find a
new home, agreeing Friday to a
three-year, $60 million contract
with the Phillies, two people
familiar with the deal said. They
spoke on the condition of
anonymity because the
agreement is contingent on
Santana passing a physical.
Santana became the first to
reach a deal among the nine free
agents who last month rejected
$17.4 million qualifying offers
from their former teams. He hit
23 home runs with 79 RBI last
year for the Cleveland Indians,
with whom he spent all eight of
his big league seasons.
Philadelphia also traded
shortstop Freddy Galvis to the
San Diego Padres for minor
league pitcher Enyel De Los
Santos. . . .
Left-hander Matt Moore was
traded from the San Francisco
Giants to the Texas Rangers for
minor league right-handers
Israel Cruz and Sam Wolff. The
Rangers also received $750,000 in
international signing bonus pool
allotment from the Giants.
Moore, 28, was 6-15 with a 5.52
ERA in 1741/3 innings last year. . . .
All-star infielder Zack Cozart
agreed to a three-year,
$38 million contract with the Los
Angeles Angels. Cozart, 32, hit
.297 with 24 home runs last year
with the Cincinnati Reds. . . .
The Colorado Rockies finalized
three-year, $27 million contracts
with right-hander Bryan Shaw,
30, and lefty Jake McGee, 31, that
they hope will fortify their
bullpen. . . .
Outfielder Melvin Upton Jr.
agreed to a minor league contract
with Cleveland, pending a
successful physical. . . .
A defamation lawsuit filed by
Pete Rose last year against John
Dowd, the lawyer who got him
kicked out of baseball, was
dismissed, according to federal
court documents. . . .
Frank Lary, the star Detroit
Tigers pitcher who was called the
Yankee Killer because of his
success against New York’s bighitting lineup, died at 87.
He died Wednesday night after
being hospitalized in Tuscaloosa,
Ala., with pneumonia, nephew
Joe Lary said.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Bruce Anderson scored five
touchdowns — four in the first
half — and North Dakota State
rolled up 642 yards of offense in
crushing Sam Houston State, 5513, in Fargo, N.D., to advance to
the Football Championship
Subdivision title game.
The second-seeded Bison will
face the winner of Saturday’s
game between defending
champion James Madison and
South Dakota State on Jan. 6 in
Frisco, Tex. . . .
Mount Union won its 13th
Division III national
championship with a 12-0 victory
over defending champion Mary
Hardin-Baylor in Salem, Va. . . .
Louisiana Lafayette hired
Arizona State offensive
coordinator Billy Napier as the
Ragin’ Cajuns’ next coach.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Sexual assault charges won’t be
filed over a report that a 16-yearold girl was raped in December
2016 in the dorm that houses the
Kansas men’s team, Douglas
County District Attorney Charles
Branson’s office announced,
citing insufficient evidence. . . .
The NCAA placed the
University of Northern Colorado
men’s basketball program on
three years’ probation among
other sanctions after finding
academic fraud and recruiting
violations by former coach B.J.
Hill and some of his assistants.
MISC.
Gymnastics Canada’s women’s
national team director faces
multiple sex-related charges.
Dave Brubaker was charged
with one count of invitation to
sexual touching, three counts of
sexual interference, three counts
of sexual exploitation and three
counts of sexual assault, Sarnia,
Ontario, police said. . . .
Justin Rose completed the last
two holes of his second round
early Saturday for a 3-under-par
69 and a one-stroke lead in the
Asian Tour’s Indonesian Masters
in Jakarta. . . .
Kurt Busch will return to
Stewart-Haas Racing for the 2018
NASCAR Cup Series season with a
new crew chief, Billy Scott.
— From news services
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NFL
4:30 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit » NFL Network, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Los Angeles Chargers at Kansas City » NFL Network
NBA
7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at New York » NBA TV
NHL
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
Montreal vs. Ottawa » NBC Sports Network
Anaheim at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, WJFK (106.7 FM)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
1 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
6 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
8 p.m.
Celebration Bowl: Grambling State vs N.C. A&T » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
New Orleans Bowl: Troy vs. North Texas » ESPN, WTEM (980 AM)
Cure Bowl: Western Kentucky vs. Georgia State » CBS Sports Network
Las Vegas Bowl: Boise State vs. Oregon » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
New Mexico Bowl: Marshall vs. Colorado State » ESPN, WTEM (980 AM)
Division II, championship: West Florida vs. Texas A&M Commerce » ESPN2
New Mexico Bowl: Marshall vs. Colorado State » ESPN, WTEM (980 AM)
FCS, semifinals: South Dakota State at James Madison » ESPNU
Camellia Bowl: Middle Tennessee vs. Arkansas State » ESPN,
WTEM (980 AM)
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
As winter meetings end, Nats’ work just beginning
BY
J ORGE C ASTILLO
Officials
from
baseball’s
30 front offices fled Lake Buena
Vista, Fla., on Thursday, congregating throughout the afternoon
at Orlando International Airport
to catch flights back home from
the winter meetings. Most of the
Washington Nationals’ contingent, including General Manager
Mike Rizzo, already had left for the
District, where the club will host
its annual Winterfest this weekend. A few officials stayed behind
for the morning’s Rule 5 draft.
The Nationals’ representatives
were bleary-eyed. Hours earlier, in
the wee hours of the morning, the
Nationals hammered out a twoyear contract with Brandon Kintzler in their suite at the Swan and
Dolphin. The Nationals want
right-handed relievers. They retained one with whom they are
familiar. It was a frenetic conclusion to an otherwise tranquil
week.
Kintzler’s signing is the Nationals’ only major league roster addition this offseason. They have
been operating far from the spotlight in a market that had been
slow-moving until a spurt of action Friday, highlighted by the
Major league
manager role
transformed
by analytics
MANAGERS FROM D1
younger on average than perhaps
at any other time recently. Seven
managers, including four of the
new hires, are the same age as or
younger than Ichiro Suzuki, the
free agent outfielder who intends
to play this season at 44, and an
eighth, Dave Roberts of the Los
Angeles Dodgers, is just a year
older.
The new managers don’t sound
much like the older ones they
replaced. Sometimes they say
things such as: “All of the various
departments around a baseball
organization are the soil, and our
players are the plants and the
trees that are going to grow in
that soil. . . . So as I think about
managing a ballclub, I think
about being really nutrient-dense
soil.”
That was Gabe Kapler of the
Philadelphia Phillies, a 42-yearold first-time manager who replaced 66-year-old Pete Mackanin. Two of the Phillies’ rivals in
the NL East also changed managers, with the Nationals going
from 68-year-old Baker to 53year-old Dave Martinez and the
New York Mets pivoting from
Terry Collins, who is 68, to Mickey
Callaway, who is 42.
Meanwhile, the two AL East
titans, the Red Sox and Yankees,
both replaced their veteran managers with untested rookies —
Alex Cora, 42, and Aaron Boone,
44, respectively — whose primary
post-playing careers had been as
Philadelphia Phillies agreeing to
sign Carlos Santana to a threeyear, $60 million deal. The dam
finally burst, and the Nationals
eventually will dip into the rushing waters. They still want to bolster their right-handed relief
corps, need to figure out who will
assume the vacancy in their starting rotation and are said to be in
the market for a catcher.
The Nationals were poised to
add another right-handed reliever
Friday, but Hector Róndon chose
the Houston Astros over them and
the Tampa Bay Rays, according to
a person familiar with the situation. Róndon agreed to a two-year
deal that was roughly the same as
the Nationals’ and Rays’ offers.
Róndon is the latest on a long list
of right-handed relievers to come
off the board. Of the 23 free agents
to sign major league deals as of
early Friday afternoon, 12 were
right-handed relievers.
Wade Davis and Greg Holland,
the top two free agent closers, are
still available. The Nationals have
been interested in both in the past
and are particularly keen on Davis
this time around. Davis, 32, has
been one of baseball’s most dominant relievers since moving to the
bullpen in 2014 and posted a
2.30 ERA in 582/3 innings for the
Cubs last season.
The Nationals have some inside
information on Davis with new
Manager Dave Martinez and bullpen coach Henry Blanco, both of
whom spent last season with him
in Chicago. Davis’s addition would
probably push Sean Doolittle
down to a setup role alongside
Ryan Madson and Kintzler. That
quartet would give the Nationals a
bullpen comparable to baseball’s
best. Among players available in
the next tier, the Nationals are
known to have inquired about Addison Reed, a 28-year-old who had
a 2.84 ERA in 76 innings between
the New York Mets and Boston
Red Sox.
In the catching department,
Rizzo said he’s “cool with” Pedro
Severino partnering with Matt Wieters, but the Nationals have discussed signing Alex Avila, who
finished the 2017 season as the
Cubs’ backup. Avila, 30, has publicly said he is willing to take a
backup role, but the Nationals’
plan to play Wieters less in 2018
would give him ample playing
time.
As for starting pitching, the Nationals and Jake Arrieta, to nobody’s surprise, have been con-
nected. Arrieta is a Scott Boras
client, and the mega-agent, who
represents a significant portion of
Washington’s roster, met with Rizzo and Nationals ownership in
Palm Springs, Calif., last month.
But the Nationals seem likely to
exhaust cheaper options before seriously engaging Boras on Arrieta.
Not only would Arrieta’s contract
be expensive, he was offered a
qualifying offer by the Cubs, which
means the Nationals would forfeit
their second- and fifth-highest
picks in the upcoming draft plus
$1 million in international bonus
pool money because they eclipsed
the competitive balance tax
threshold last season. The price is
stiff.
Instead, a trade for a No. 3 starter seems more likely. Gerrit Cole,
Chris Archer, Michael Fulmer and
Jake Odorizzi are reportedly available. Then again, Nationals ownership’s relationship with Boras —
and history of working directly
with him — suggests Arrieta will
remain a possibility for Washington until he is off the board.
That could come much later in
the offseason. The winter meetings are over, but the offseason
frenzy is just getting started.
television announcers. (Cora did,
however, spend 2017 as the Houston Astros’ bench coach.)
“There’s a saying in the industry that you have to pay your dues
to get to the big leagues. Maybe
we pay our dues through [working in] the media,” Cora said.
“People think that that’s an easy
job, [that] it’s just, ‘Get behind
that desk and put that tie on and
just talk baseball.’ It doesn’t work
that way, man. The way I see it,
that prepares us for [managing].
. . . You had to be prepared. You
only have an hour to let the
[viewers] know what you know
about the game, how you feel
about certain situations. I think it
was good school for us.”
The new wave of managers this
offseason also has altered the
sport’s racial makeup in the dugout. Four of the six new hires were
white, but the hirings of Cora and
Martinez tripled the number of
Latino managers (they join Rick
Renteria of the Chicago White
Sox). Meanwhile, the dismissal of
Baker by the Nationals leaves the
Dodgers’ Roberts as the sport’s
only African American manager.
Cleveland Indians skipper Terry Francona, 58, said some of the
new, fresh-faced managers — including two, Boston’s Cora and
Tampa Bay’s Kevin Cash, 41, who
played under him and who count
him as a mentor — are “shortcutting” the traditional pathways to
getting those jobs, but he doesn’t
hold a grudge about it.
“You know, it’s not necessarily
the route that some of us took,”
said Francona, who managed in
the minors for five years and
spent one year as the Detroit
Tigers’ third base coach before
getting his first big league managing job in 1997. “But it doesn’t
mean they won’t be really good,
because they’re obviously really
qualified.”
It’s no coincidence that so
many teams this offseason sought
younger managers from nontraditional pathways. It has been an
industry trend for several years
now — fueled largely by front
offices that are increasingly led by
analytics-driven general managers — and one that undoubtedly
accelerated after 43-year-old A.J.
Hinch led the Astros to the World
Series title in October, beating the
Dodgers and skipper Roberts, 45.
Hinch, a former catcher with a
psychology degree from Stanford,
may have been the prototype for
this trend when he was named
manager of the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2009 at the age of
35 — a move widely criticized at
the time because Hinch, who had
been working in the Diamondbacks’ front office but who had no
coaching or managing experience, was seen as someone who
hadn’t paid his dues.
The trend toward younger, less
traditionally groomed managers
has been fueled by a fundamental
change in the way front offices
view that job. With more teams’
baseball operations now headed
by analytics-driven general managers, strategic decisions that
once belonged to the field manager — such as making out the
lineup, shifting the defense and
even deciding when to lift the
starting pitcher — have been taken over by the “quants” in the
analytics department.
As a result, the job of manager
is increasingly viewed as that of a
clubhouse custodian — some in
the industry deride the role as
“middle management” — whose
primary attributes are a sunny
personality, a natural manner
with the media and a knack for
relationship-building and whose
primary duty is to receive the
front office’s strategic initiatives
and sell them to the players. And
if the idea is to be relatable to the
players, it stands to reason a
younger manager would be better
at that.
“I think that’s one of the reasons that you’re seeing some
younger managers — that maybe
some of the older school guys
[were] reluctant to adapt to some
of the analytics,” said Oakland A’s
Manager Bob Melvin, 56. “And
now I think maybe some of the
organizations are bringing in
some younger guys that they can
[mold] along those lines. [The
job] now is looked at as you’ve got
to have good relationships with
the players.”
Indeed, the days of the crusty,
old, iron-fisted skipper, holed up
in his office amid a cloud of
cigarette smoke, are long gone. In
Melvin’s rookie year as a player,
with the 1985 Detroit Tigers, his
manager was the late Sparky Anderson, perhaps the purest distillation of the nearly extinct oldschool skipper.
“When I was a rookie, I didn’t
go up to Sparky and sit down next
to him and talk to him for 15 or
20 minutes before the game,”
Melvin said. “He was kind of a guy
that I kind of stayed away from.”
It’s difficult to imagine someone such as Anderson speaking
openly with his players about
“loving and sharing and feelings,”
as Arizona’s Torey Lovullo, 52,
said he does, or making a point of
visiting with all 25 players on his
team before every game, as Roberts does with the Dodgers. It’s
also safe to assume Anderson
never equated his players with
plants or himself with “nutrientdense soil,” as Philadelphia’s Kapler did.
At the same time, you can only
wonder what Anderson would
have said to a youthful, Ivy
League-educated GM who tried
to dictate his batting order or tell
him when to pull his starting
pitcher. But it is fun to imagine.
jorge.castillo@washpost.com
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
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R E D S K I N S N O TE S
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
Brown, Nicholson
ruled out vs. Cardinals
Washington Redskins linebacker
Zach Brown on Friday was
officially ruled out for Sunday’s
game against at the Arizona
Cardinals. The team’s leading
tackler has been sidelined all
week with toe, ankle, Achilles’
tendon and hip injuries.
Brown, who has been
hampered by the Achilles’ injury
for about a month, left in the
second half of Sunday’s 30-13
loss to the Los Angeles Chargers
in Carson, Calif. Afterward, he
was spotted wearing a walking
boot and referred to the
StubHub Center field as “crap.”
Martrell Spaight and Zach
Vigil should see the bulk of the
playing time in Brown’s absence,
with Josh Harvey-Clemons and
Otha Peters “up and ready to go,”
according to Coach Jay Gruden.
Safety Montae Nicholson will
miss his fourth straight game
with a concussion. It will be the
sixth game missed this season
for Nicholson, who also sat out
in Weeks 9 and 10 with a
shoulder injury.
The statuses of offensive
linemen Trent Williams (knee),
Morgan Moses (ankle) and
Chase Roullier (hand),
linebacker Ryan Anderson
(ankle) and wide receiver Ryan
Grant (ankle) for Sunday are all
questionable.
Meanwhile, cornerback Josh
Norman, who was limited
DENIS POROY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Linebacker Zach Brown, shown here leaving Sunday’s loss to the
Chargers, is battling several injuries, including one to his Achilles’.
Thursday with a sore knee,
celebrated his 30th birthday
with a pair of interceptions in
practice, Gruden said.
After losing four of their past
five games, the Redskins (5-8)
say they’re focused on finishing
the season on a positive note,
starting Sunday against the
Cardinals (6-7) at FedEx Field.
“It would get us out of the
doldrums a little bit,” Gruden
said of a victory over Arizona.
Small crowd Sunday?
Amid plummeting ticket prices,
online expressions of
dissatisfaction and predictions
that FedEx Field’s crowd might
be less than robust Sunday, one
Redskins official stepped up to
offer an alternative viewpoint.
Voice of the Redskins Larry
Michael — the team’s chief
content officer and a senior vice
president — said in an interview
on ESPN 980 that “everybody
can have their opinion” in this
social media era but that the
situation might not be as dire as
some would suggest.
“The silent majority of the
Redskins fans like going to the
games,” Michael said. “Really, it’s
a big majority. They love
tailgating. I’ve had all these
tailgate invitations since the last
Thanksgiving game. I’ve got all
these friends now that want to
feed me before a game. And I’ll
be willing to bet that place is
going to be packed [Sunday],
and it’s going to be rockin’.”
Much of this is
noncontroversial, and if the
team plays well Sunday, fans will
cheer — and loudly. But it would
appear that many observers are
willing to take the other side of
this hypothetical wager, even
with “packed” being a subjective
word. It’s hard to imagine
Sunday’s game won’t be the least
attended of this season: It’s cold,
it’s the holiday season, the
Cardinals don’t have a large local
fan base, and the Redskins have
been eliminated from the playoff
chase and are coming off one of
their worst TV ratings of the
century.
The offseason seems certain to
bring at least a few changes to
the team, if not a complete
reshuffling. But Michael also
urged followers to stay focused
on Sunday’s game and to save
the offseason for the offseason.
“If you can get a win this
week, everybody’s going to feel a
lot better,” he said.
— Kimberley A. Martin
and Dan Steinberg
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
DAN STEINBERG
Unbeaten,
top-ranked
JMU is still
proving worth
STEINBERG FROM D1
a 25-game winning streak —
that’s the second-longest in FCS
history, if you were counting, and
you better not have been.
“We never talk about it,”
Houston said moments later. “We
never talk about the streak. We
never talk about any of that.”
“Can’t talk about the streak,”
defensive lineman Simeyon
Robinson agreed. “We let each
other know that that’s not what
we’re looking to. We’re looking at
the bigger picture.”
“Around here, we don’t talk
about things. We let the play do
the talking,” said quarterback
Bryan Schor, the program’s career
leader in passing yards,
completions and TD passes.
Okay fine, but when you’ve
been the consensus No. 1 team in
the country since August, it must
be hard to . . . what’s that?
“Sometimes we actually forget
that we’re number one,”
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
linebacker Kyre Hawkins noted.
Forget? Sometimes I forget to
turn down the thermostat.
Sometimes I forget to put away
the Cheetos. I don’t know that I
could forget if I were the world’s
top-ranked sportswriter, though.
“Sometimes you just overlook
it,” Hawkins insisted. “You’re just
so focused on beating that team
that week that you throw all the
records out.”
I drove down I-81 trying to
figure out how to describe this
James Madison team that has yet
to stumble since winning its
second title last winter, a team
that’s finished second in the
country in FCS attendance two
years in a row, that has the longest
winning streak in all of Division I
football, more than twice as long
as Central Florida’s. The Dukes
have the best scoring defense in
FCS, allowing 10.3 points a game.
They’ve won their six playoff
games over the past two seasons
by a combined score of 232-95.
They’ve hosted ESPN’s “College
GameDay” twice in three seasons,
as sure a mark of the big time as
you could invent. This feels bigger
than a hot streak.
’Bama of the Valley seemed like
one possibility, and while there’s a
whole lot of hyperbole in that
suggestion, there might be some
similarities in the approach. I
kidded Houston this week about
his insistence on blotting out the
noise, maintaining tunnel vision
EZ
and ignoring the sort of grand
story lines that attract people
such as me.
“We do it. It’s not just coachspeak. That’s all we talk about,” he
said. “I told ’em, ‘You can’t listen to
your mom; you can’t listen to your
girlfriend, because they don’t
know what the crap they’re
talking about. They love you; they
think you’re the best thing in the
world, but you can’t listen to them,
because they don’t know what it
takes to win.’ Everybody makes
fun of [Nick] Saban because he
says that, but it’s the truth.”
’Bama of the Valley indeed.
Houston and his staff spent this
year nagging the Dukes about
every college football upset they
could think of — both from this
year and the past. When Clemson
lost at Syracuse as a threetouchdown favorite in October,
that game was brought up in JMU
team meetings. “Extensively,”
Houston said. (The Dukes won
their next four games by a
combined score of 135-25.)
“And so I think we just go so
overboard in preaching that
message, and to their credit, they
believe what we tell ’em,” Houston
said with a grin. “I could tell ’em the
sky’s green, and they’d believe me.”
He has not, in fact, told his
players that the sky is green. On
the day I visited campus, the sky
was dark, and snow poured down,
and players shivered as they
talked about their latest chance to
prove these hypothetical doubters
wrong. If the doubters existed,
they must have been briefly
thrilled during last weekend’s
quarterfinals, when the host
Dukes trailed Weber State by
eight points with a bit more than
three minutes on the clock. The
best-case scenario figured to be a
desperate touchdown drive and
two-point conversion to force
overtime. Instead, the Dukes tied
the game in 66 seconds, held on
defense, and then won it on a 46yard field goal as time expired.
“I can’t say that we ever had
doubts,” Hawkins said. “Because I
feel like that’s how you end up
with the season being over.”
Three days after that win, the
school announced a new 10-year
deal with Houston, who said he
didn’t chase higher-profile (and
higher-salaried) jobs because
“there’s a lot to being happy, and
this is a place where you can be
happy.” The deal also was meant
to assure recruits the coach
wouldn’t jump to a Football Bowl
Subdivision school. Those three
letters — FBS — come up plenty, of
course, whenever you discuss this
program: whether the school
should attempt to climb up a level,
whether its long-term future
involves competing for bowl
berths rather than national titles.
“I definitely see this place
becoming FBS one day,” said
running back Marcus Marshall, a
transfer from Georgia Tech and
NFL is unsure
injury data
will reveal
any trends
NFL FROM D1
are about to play their sixth
straight game without suspended
running back Ezekiel Elliott.
When it comes to the injuries,
those within the league can’t
believe the amount of misfortune.
“Well, it’s certainly been frustrating to us,” Packers President
Mark Murphy said this week at
the NFL owners’ meetings in
Dallas.
But Murphy, a former safety
for the Washington Redskins,
knows it’s about more than his
own team. It’s about the entire
league.
“You look at J.J. Watt, Odell
Beckham Jr.; Andrew Luck hasn’t
played a down,” Murphy said. “I
don’t know. Every year, because
you’re in it, seems like more. I
don’t know how it compares to
previous years in terms of marquee players.”
The league gathers and analyzes injury data each season. NFL
officials said this week that they
weren’t ready to say whether the
injury rate is any higher this
season. But they certainly know
that the impact of the injuries has
been problematic given the caliber of the players involved.
“Deshaun was getting ready to
have what looked like it was going
to be a ridiculous rookie year,”
said Atlanta Falcons President
Rich McKay, the chairman of the
NFL’s rulemaking competition
committee. “Wentz was playing as
good as any player playing in our
game today. And Aaron Rodgers
is now coming back. We’ll see.
High-profile injuries always are
upsetting because they do drive a
lot of the popularity and focus of
the game. But as far as is it
different than years past? I don’t
know yet.”
The Packers at least can look
forward to Rodgers’s return Sunday. They probably would have
KELVIN KUO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Carson Wentz may have been an MVP favorite before a torn anterior cruciate ligament ended his season.
been one of the league’s top teams
if Rodgers had been available all
season. Instead, they are 7-6 and
clinging to long-shot hopes to
reach the playoffs.
“Obviously I think there’s an
expectation of the way I play on
Sunday and how I’m going to
play,” Rodgers said when he met
with reporters this week. “I enjoy
those expectations. I enjoy meeting those or exceeding those. . . .
Hopefully it gives a lift to some of
the guys. But I’m not coming back
to save this team. I’m coming
back to play quarterback the way
I know how to play it. And
hopefully we all raise the level of
our play collectively and find a
way to win these three games.”
The Eagles have been the
league’s best and most complete
team for most of the season as
Wentz, in his second year, elevated his play to MVP caliber. But
after he tore the anterior cruciate
ligament in his left knee Sunday,
Philadelphia must try to win a
Super Bowl with fill-in Nick
Foles. Watson was well on his way
to being the NFL’s offensive rookie of the year and establishing
himself as one of the league’s
next-generation headliners at
quarterback before tearing an
ACL.
The dimming of the on-field
star wattage comes at the worst
possible time for the NFL. It is a
season that has been dominated
by off-field issues.
President Trump and some
fans have criticized players who
have protested during the national anthem before games and the
league’s handling of the matter.
Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who
began the players’ protest movement last season, filed a grievance accusing teams of colluding
to keep him out of the league.
Cowboys owner Jerry Jones
threatened to sue to block the
five-year contract extension for
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. Attendance is down about
1 percent from last season, Goodell said this week, and the league
has had to deal with sagging TV
viewership.
“Our world is changing dramatically in terms of fans and
how they’re receiving our content
and the experience they’re having
in the stadiums,” Falcons owner
Arthur Blank said Wednesday in
Dallas. “And obviously player relationships are critical, and player safety is critical. The view of
the outside world of the league is
very important to us.”
After the season, the NFL’s
leadership will review the injury
Carolina Panthers founder and
owner Jerry Richardson is under
investigation for allegations of
workplace misconduct.
The team said Friday that former White House chief of staff and
minority owner Erskine Bowles is
overseeing the investigation by a
Los Angeles-based law firm.
Team spokesman Steven Drummond said in a release that the
Panthers and the 81-year-old Richardson take these allegations seriously and are committed to a full
investigation and taking appropriate steps to address and remediate any misconduct.
“The entire organization is fully
committed to ensuring a safe, comfortable and diverse work environment where all individuals, regardless of sex, race, color, religion, gender, or sexual identity or orientation, are treated fairly and equally,”
Drummond said in the release. “We
have work to do to achieve this
goal, but we are going to meet it.”
CARDINALS: Adrian Peter-
$10,000 for improperly going on
the field during the game.
JAGUARS: Jacksonville running back Leonard Fournette
missed practice for the third consecutive day and was listed as
questionable for Sunday’s game
against Houston.
CHIEFS: Kansas City placed
center Mitch Morse on injured
reserve with a left foot injury and
elevated cornerback Keith Reaser
from the practice squad heading
into an AFC West game against the
Los Angeles Chargers.
VIKINGS: Minnesota probably will be without left tackle
Riley Reiff (ankle) and tight end
Kyle Rudolph (ankle) on Sunday
against the Cincinnati Bengals.
Both were listed as doubtful on the
team’s official injury report.
SAINTS: New Orleans ruled
out starting linebacker A.J. Klein
(groin) and defensive end Trey
Hendrickson (ankle) for Sunday’s
game against the New York Jets.
JETS: New York benched defensive end Muhammad Wilkerson for Sunday’s game.
right now. We’d much prefer to
make sure that whatever the
future would hold for us — if we
were to move or do something
different from what we’re doing
now — that we’re walking into an
environment where we can
compete at the very top.”
That’s a much broader
discussion, though, one with little
to do with Saturday’s task. The
visiting Jackrabbits play in the
mighty Missouri Valley
Conference, along with FCS
power North Dakota State, which
won its semifinal game Friday
against Sam Houston State.
North Dakota State had won five
straight national titles before
getting upended by the Dukes in
the semifinal round a year ago;
the Bison’s only loss this season
came against South Dakota State,
which has the third-highest
scoring offense in FCS.
So maybe the Dukes and their
25 straight wins really are
punching up at this Dakota
domination. Maybe they are
expected to fall back.
“We came out of kind of
nowhere last year,” Houston said.
“And so, to a degree, I think that
we still have a lot to prove.”
It was snowing still, but I can’t
promise that the sky didn’t show a
hint of lime.
data and try to determine whether there are any trends. Representatives of the league and the NFL
Players Association meet each
year at the NFL Scouting Combine in Indianapolis. The competition committee deliberates and
proposes rule changes to the
owners for consideration at the
annual league meeting in March.
Player safety is an annual focus of
that process.
“I’ve been in it a long time,”
McKay said this week at the
owners’ meetings. “So I’ve seen
plenty of years when there’s been
a lot of high-profile injuries. Every year that I kind of think, ‘Boy,
the injury numbers are higher
than usual,’ I’m surprised at the
end of the year that they’re not. So
I am one that says withhold
[judgment] until you see the final
numbers.
“And then I think you do go
back and you look by position of,
‘Is there some trend there? Is it
quarterbacks? Is it lower-leg inju-
ries to quarterbacks? Did it happen inside the pocket? Outside
the pocket?’ Because I think all
that data can lead you to a point
where sometimes you say, ‘You
know, we need to change something because a certain type of
injury is happening to a certain
type of player in a certain type of
play.’ I don’t know. I haven’t seen
anything that says that yet. And
so I think I’d just want to be one
that says, because I’ve been
burned before [by jumping to
conclusions about injuries], I
want to wait and see.”
In the meantime, there’s not
much for the NFL to do other
than lament its bad luck.
“We’ve put such a focus on
improving the health and safety
of the players in the game,” Murphy said. “It’s just frustrating that
even though we’ve taken steps
and I think we’re making progress, there’s still a lot of work to
do.”
dan.steinberg@washpost.com
For more by Dan Steinberg, visit
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog.
mark.maske@washpost.com
and
A GREAT TIME TO BUY
A NEW FORD AT
UPPER MARLBORO FORD
Panthers looking into owner’s conduct
son was placed on injured reserve
because of a neck injury, ending
the running back’s season after
only six games with Arizona.
Acquired from New Orleans on
Oct. 10, Peterson ran for 448 yards
and two touchdowns on 129 carries.
RAIDERS: Oakland will be
without wide receiver Amari Cooper for Sunday night’s game
against the Dallas Cowboys.
Cooper aggravated a left ankle
injury during Sunday’s loss to
Kansas City after sitting out the
previous game because of the
same injury and a concussion.
SEAHAWKS: Seattle offensive lineman Germain Ifedi was
fined $24,309 by the NFL for verbal
abuse of a game official in a 30-24
loss at Jacksonville on Sunday.
Sheldon Richardson and Quinton Jefferson were both fined
$9,115 for unnecessary roughness
penalties that got them ejected
from the game in the final minute.
Seahawks Coach Pete Carroll
and Jaguars assistants Pat Flaherty
and Keenan McCardell were fined
the son of Dukes legend Warren
Marshall. “I mean, if you just look
at the way we’re kind of trending,
one day you’re going to have to.”
Scores of debates are woven
into that question, including a
pretty basic one: Is it more
rewarding for a program and its
fans to win a national
championship than it would be to
play in the Raycom Media
Camellia Bowl, if you were lucky
enough to get sent to
Montgomery, Ala.? Would
“College GameDay” still come to
Harrisonburg if the Dukes were a
middling FBS program? Would
football-specific donations spike
the way they did after last season?
“Winning a national
championship is a very powerful
thing. We talked last year: Are you
better off going to a smaller bowl
game or winning a national
championship? Well, from the
branding standpoint, it’s the
national championship,” Athletic
Director Jeff Bourne said. “You
want to be an institution that has
national acclaim, a very strong
academic record, an institution
that people will support. And
right now, our fans are
supporting us winning national
championships in football.
“I would be a little reluctant to
get into a situation where we
went to an FBS league and we
ended up competing in the
middle of that league. I’m not
sure that’s really healthy for us
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
Celebration Bowl honors the past of HBCU football with a present-day classic
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
Atlanta’s new Mercedes-Benz
Stadium looks futuristic enough
that it wouldn’t come as a
100 percent shock if it lifted off
and began zipping around the
Milky Way. On Saturday around
midday, that look will become
evocative for anyone who juxtaposes it with what happened
125 years ago.
Three weeks and two days before it stages the College Football
Playoff national championship
game, the four-month-old wonder, with its otherworldly video
board and gargantuan windows
on the downtown skyline, will
stage the third Celebration Bowl,
which christens the bowl season
and throws back at once. Per
custom, it will pit the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference champion (North Carolina A&T)
against the Southwestern Athletic Conference champion (Grambling), and it will sort out a
national champion among historically black colleges and universities.
This being almost 2018, the
game will have “high-tech uniforms and cleats and more footballs than you know what to do
with,” said John Grant, the bowl’s
BARRY SVRLUGA
Hoyas remain
unbeaten, but
they have little
to show for it
SVRLUGA FROM D1
the season. The Hoyas (8-0) are
one of just six Division I men’s
teams without a loss. Those two
sentences can be simultaneously
true and totally meaningless
because Georgetown’s schedule
has been so bad — and we’ll get
to quantifying that momentarily
— that the Hoyas have both won
games and achieved nothing of
substance.
What, Coach Ewing, could you
have possibly learned about your
team thus far?
“Everyone is getting
confidence,” Ewing said.
“Everyone is working hard and
getting better, getting ready for
the Big East.”
Now, it is Ewing’s prerogative
— not to mention his
responsibility — to get his team
ready for conference play in the
way he feels is best. But let’s list
those eight opponents to this
point, shall we?
Jacksonville, Mount
St. Mary’s, Maryland Eastern
Shore, Richmond, Maine, Coppin
State, Howard, North Carolina
A&T. After what might be a
compelling matchup with the 8-1
Orange come dates with North
Texas and Alabama A&M.
Really? You get the feeling
that if Ewing could set up a
quick two-game tournament by
inviting Texas Southern,
Arkansas Pine Bluff and
Mississippi Valley State to the
District, he would. Those are
three of the remaining six
Division I teams yet to win a
game — and the Hoyas have
already beaten one of the others
(Coppin State) and have another
forthcoming (Alabama A&M).
So what we have learned is,
perhaps, that Georgetown has an
early lead in the Mid-Eastern
Athletic Conference.
This is dreadful.
“Georgetown’s schedule will
end up being the worst
nonconference schedule for as
long as I have been tracking . . .
power conference or not,” none
other than Ken Pomeroy wrote
in an email Thursday. Pomeroy’s
rankings at KenPom.com are
somewhere between guidelines
and gospel in college basketball.
He began evaluating teams
based on who they had beaten
and who they had lost to —
strength of schedule — in 2002,
and his site includes loads of
interesting metrics about how
efficient teams are at various
aspects of the game.
Sift through that, and trust
this: If Ken Pomeroy says it’s
bad, it’s bad. There are 351 teams
playing Division I ball this year.
Georgetown’s strength of
schedule ranks 351st. Richmond,
which counts as the Hoyas’ only
road game, was also the only
opponent in the top 300 in
Pomeroy’s rankings entering
Friday. The others: 328, 301, 343,
335, 344, 339, 323.
Not inspiring enough to X out,
say, the “H” in Hoya Snaxa when
Howard came downtown.
And apparently, this isn’t just
for Ewing as he gets his battered
program up off the canvas.
“My scheduling philosophy is
the same way as the way it was
this year,” he said. “Going to play
Celebration Bowl
Grambling vs. N.C. A&T
Today, noon, ABC
executive director. It also will
come almost precisely 125 years
since that game with one waterlogged football, when Biddle University of Charlotte traveled
43 miles to Livingstone College of
Salisbury, N.C., when 43 miles
was so much longer than today.
That game, in snowfall on Livingstone’s front lawn Dec. 27,
1892, became the first between
historically black colleges, and
Grant thinks of it repeatedly. He
thinks of the “fans who came by
wagons, who walked, who came
on horseback.” He thinks of the
fans who “came and stood around
the field in snow to watch this
game that they had never seen
people like them play.” He said,
“They had to be cold and wet.”
They saw a game for which
players equipped their street
shoes with cleats. They played in
uniforms sewn by the women in
Livingstone’s industrial department. Their football realities mirrored those around the country in
a sport that began in 1869: They
wore no helmets. They wore no
pads. They attempted no passes.
To appear upon the front lawn
whatever game I see fit.”
Now, this is not new at
Georgetown, where John
Thompson Jr. — who coached
Ewing to three national title
games and the 1984 national
championship on the Hilltop —
shared the current coach’s
scheduling philosophy.
Essentially, that’s, “Why get your
brains beat in in December?”
And that’s fine and that’s fair. To
each his own.
But even Ewing’s freshman
year, when Thompson was really
getting the Hoyas going, there
was a trip to the Great Alaska
Shootout and a matchup with
Ohio State, as well as games
against UNLV and Missouri. The
following year, the Hoyas played
No. 1 Virginia, Wisconsin,
Alabama and DePaul out of
conference. It can be done. It has
been done. And there are real
ramifications to making Hoyas
fans — and all local college
basketball fans, really — wait till
mid-December for the one (and
only) palatable game on the
nonconference schedule.
First, is this the best way to
awaken a slumbering fan base,
by playing Maine on a Tuesday
night followed by Coppin State
on a Sunday? The largest crowd
of Ewing’s tenure came in that
opener against Jacksonville,
9,212 — which still leaves Capital
One Arena (capacity for
basketball: 20,356) feeling
cavernous, half-full (or halfempty, depending on your life
view). The other home crowds:
an average of 5,247, with none
even reaching 6,500. If the
Hoyas are gaining confidence,
they’re doing so in near solitude.
Second, this is just a shame for
college basketball fans that this
national brand right in our back
yard isn’t taking on all comers —
or at least some comers. When
Ewing and the Hoyas decided to
drop out of the 16-team PK80
tournament last month in
Portland, Ore., maybe he saved
himself three losses and some
measure of humiliation. Maybe.
But he also squandered an
opportunity to remind the
nation that, “Hey, isn’t that
Patrick Ewing coaching the
Hoyas? That’s intriguing. Let me
see how he does.”
Finally, there is a real impact
on the Hoyas’ NCAA tournament
chances, not that this group is
favored to get there anyway. Still,
in the future, that’s supposed to
be a bare minimum of a goal.
The committee that chooses and
seeds the 68-team field has put a
premium on playing at least
something of a schedule, relying
heavily on the Rating Percentage
Index, which consists of a team’s
winning percentage against
Division I opponents, its
opponents’ winning percentage
(which counts twice as much)
and its opponents’ opponents’
winning percentage.
Georgetown’s opponents’
winning percentage through
Friday night? That would be .273
(24-64).
So, then, bring on the Big East,
starting with Butler on Dec. 27?
“I would guess 12-6 in
conference would be completely
safe,” Pomeroy wrote in regards
to the Hoyas’ NCAA chances. “117 would be an interesting case.”
What would be better than an
interesting case would be
interesting basketball. We’ll have
that Saturday — or, make that
“aturday” — at Capital One
Arena. Syracuse is coming, and
it’s a reason to get hyped. Too
bad it’s the only one.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
in Salisbury, the team from Biddle (which would become Johnson C. Smith University) traveled
by segregated train car, then by
horse-led wagons from the train
station. The teams had pitched in
for the regulation football. Grant
tries to picture the fans, huddled
around in the cold, surely wearing hats. “Fans carry a sport,” he
said. “My hat goes off certainly to
the young men who played, but
my hat really goes off to the fan
who made the journey. . . . They
had to stay in houses with friends
and family. Today we fill up hotels.”
For this third edition that happens around the 125th anniversary, the Celebration Bowl hit upon
a doozy. It matches an 11-0 team
(North Carolina A&T) with an 11-1
team (Grambling), and it matches
a coach who used to coach at
Grambling (North Carolina A&T’s
Rod Broadway) with a coach
(Grambling’s Broderick Fobbs)
whose father (Lee Fobbs Jr.)
coaches his running backs but
used to coach North Carolina
A&T.
It teems with players profoundly unaccustomed to losing,
with Grambling unbeaten since
its opener at Tulane and North
Carolina A&T among only two
unbeaten teams (alongside James
Madison) in the second division
of college football, the Football
Championship Subdivision. For
the second straight year, North
Carolina A&T defeated a Football
Bowl Subdivision opponent, this
time Charlotte, after it beat Kent
State in 2016.
“I think it’ll be a long time now
[for another MEAC unbeaten
team], the way college football is
going, having to play those money
games,” Broadway said in Greensboro this week, referring to those
familiar games in which smaller
schools collect larger checks by
playing at FBS schools. “I don’t
know if you’ll ever see that again
in this conference, unless you get
a team that’s not playing the
money games.”
His seventh Aggies team, so
dominant that its average game
ended 36-12, will carry that unbeaten blessing/burden, and it
will hover over the match. His
quarterback, Lamar Raynard, a
Walter Payton Award nominee
with a touchdown-interception
ratio of 26-5, will play opposite
quarterback DeVante Kincade, a
Walter Payton Award nominee
who started off at Mississippi and
whose touchdown-interception
ratio sings at 21-3. (The Walter
Payton Award, for the top offensive player in FCS, will be presented Jan. 5.)
Broadway, 62, who played defensive line at North Carolina, is
the only coach to win HBCU
national titles at three places
(counting North Carolina Central, Grambling and North Carolina A&T at the 2015 Celebration
Bowl). He just accompanied Raynard to New York for an award
and said this week in Greensboro:
“You know what? For an old
country boy like me, too many
buildings, too many people and
too many cars and too many
horns on those cars.” Fobbs, 43,
who played running back for Eddie Robinson at Grambling,
called it “a matchup of all matchups and a matchup for the ages. I
wouldn’t have it any other way. I
want to play the best, and I’m sure
they do as well.”
Grant, overseeing the whole of
it, said, “We couldn’t have asked
for a better situation than what
we have,” and, “No, you can’t
script it any better than this,” and,
“I can’t wait.”
It has the winning programs
from the first two Celebration
Bowls, in this toddler bowl that
tries to follow where bowls such as
the Pelican (1970s, three games)
and Heritage (1990s, nine games),
matching MEAC and SWAC
teams, went dormant. By the stat
sheets, the Celebration drew
35,528 in 2015, when North Carolina A&T beat Alcorn State, 41-34,
and 31,096 in 2016, when Grambling beat North Carolina Central,
10-9. Grant yearns that the Celebration will become an enduring
part of Atlanta’s burgeoning fabric, that it might lure spectators
with no ties to either team.
For this time, he will think of
the past, of the end of 1892, when
Biddle got a sole touchdown and
won, 5-0, and an apparent gametying touchdown by Livingstone,
on a fumble return, was overruled
because the snow had occluded
the sideline, which lent the game
another aspect Americans would
relish ever since: a refereeing
controversy.
“I get touched by thinking
about 125 years,” Grant said. “This
is my motivation. It’s a story I
believe is important to constantly
be told and repeated and reiterated, for fans to understand how
powerful their role is . . .
“Hopefully,” he said, “when you
talk about that, in your mind,
you’ll have a vision of what it
looked like.”
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
Georgetown embraces hype of Syracuse matchup
BY
A VA W ALLACE
For the first time since before
Patrick Ewing’s first game as men’s
basketball coach at Georgetown,
Hoyas center Jessie Govan spoke
into a television camera before
practice Thursday morning. He
was facing a media contingent
about double its normal size. Beyond the walls of the John Thompson Jr. Intercollegiate Athletic
Center, all of the S’s in signs on
campus had been taped over with
a bright red “X.” Govan had even
X’d out the S’s on his Twitter account in anticipation.
“I think everybody knows the
magnitude of this game,” Govan
said. “Georgetown-Syracuse, one
of the biggest rivalries of college
basketball, so everybody’s excited.
Everybody’s just trying to walk out
of Saturday with a win.”
Excitement around Saturday’s
Georgetown-Syracuse game has
been palpable this week as the
Hoyas have prepared to reignite
the storied rivalry, this time with
Ewing on the sideline. The game is
easily Georgetown’s biggest test of
the season so far after it has racked
up an 8-0 record against the lowest-rated nonconference schedule
in Division I, and that Syracuse
(8-1) is expected to be the Hoyas’
most competitive opponent until
conference play gets underway is
only adding to the hype.
It’s a buildup, Govan said, that
the players are fully embracing.
“I think it’s good that the game
is hyped up as much as it is,” he
said Thursday. “Then guys are trying to come out and really play
smart. They know they can’t make
many mistakes, because they’re
going to capitalize on the mistakes
we make.”
The Hoyas will have to be at
their sharpest Saturday. The Orange’s overall schedule strength is
just 196th out of 351 Division I
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
“Everybody knows the magnitude of this game,” Hoyas center Jessie
Govan, middle, said of facing the Orange. “. . . Everybody’s excited.”
teams, according to KenPom.com,
but has included matchups with
No. 13 Kansas, Maryland and Connecticut. Syracuse has shot poorly,
making 44.1 percent of its field
goal attempts (221st nationally),
but has been one of the best rebounding teams in the nation, averaging 42.1 rebounds per game
and a margin of plus-12.1.
Compare that with the season
statistics of Georgetown’s past
three opponents: Coppin State
(33 percent shooting, 30.6 rebounds per game), Howard (39.3,
32.4) and North Carolina A&T
(47.1, 38.2). The Hoyas beat North
Carolina A&T, which looked the
best on paper, by nine points.
Syracuse, the tallest team in college basketball by average height,
according to KenPom.com, also
will be the first opponent this season the Hoyas haven’t dwarfed.
Govan, listed at 6 feet 10 and the
Hoyas’ leader with 20.6 points and
13 rebounds per game, will face off
against 7-2 center Paschal Chukwu. Both of the Orange’s starting
forwards, Oshae Brissett and Mat-
thew Moyer, are listed at 6-8.
Guards Tyus Battle and Frank
Howard are 6-6 and 6-5, respectively.
“They’re one of the tallest teams
in college basketball right now,”
Ewing said Thursday. “I think
their wingspan and their length is
the biggest thing that hurt people.”
The challenge Syracuse presents the Hoyas — one of six undefeated teams left in Division I, no
matter what their strength of
schedule says — only adds to the
thrill.
“We just got to be ready to go
into a dogfight,” Govan said.
“I think it should be close to sold
out by Saturday, so yeah, I’m excited. I’m always excited when Capital One Arena is loud and energetic. . . . Hopefully our fans outnumber theirs and we have a nice
home-court advantage.”
The historic rivalry, of course,
provides the foundation for the
emotion surrounding Saturday’s
game.
Syracuse holds a 49-43 all-time
lead in the series, which was de-
fined when they were Big East
archrivals from the 1979-80 season until 2013, but Georgetown
has won four of the past five meetings. Govan, a junior, and Georgetown have defeated Syracuse every year he has been at the school:
The Hoyas won, 79-72, in Washington in 2015 and prevailed, 78-71,
last year at the Carrier Dome in
Syracuse, N.Y.
That Ewing will be coaching
against Jim Boeheim adds a new
dynamic to the rivalry. Govan said
players watched highlights of those
Syracuse-Georgetown games Ewing was a part of in the 1980s, in
part to educate the freshmen on
the team about the meaning of
series. The Hoyas have watched
tape from those games on the TVs
in the hallways at the Thompson
Center, which have an option to
play a Georgetown-Syracuse highlight reel on the touch screen.
“I’ve seen highlights of a few of
them,” Govan said. “I know he’s
gotten into a few altercations with
a few of their players, but back
then, I think it was such a more
physical game.
“We could watch it to see how
[hyped] the rivalry was between
Georgetown and Syracuse. . . . It
wasn’t as intense as it was back
when he was playing, but it’s still a
good rivalry.”
Ewing said he hasn’t taken part
in hyping up Saturday’s game. It’s
exam week at Georgetown, and he
said any time outside of practice
has been spent focusing on his
team’s academics. But Govan said
the Hoyas coach has shared a
memory or two from the heyday of
the rivalry, and he isn’t above talking smack.
“He talks about how he used to
dominate them and things like
that,” Govan said with a smile.
“Hopefully I can continue [and] I
can dominate them, too.”
ava.wallace@washpost.com
Hokies get to measure themselves vs. Kentucky
BY
G ENE W ANG
Virginia Tech guard Ahmed Hill
was born and raised in Georgia,
but throughout his high school
career, the redshirt junior recalls
keeping tabs on Kentucky.
Little did Hill anticipate when
he committed to the Hokies that
he would be part of the first team
in program history to face the
eight-time national champions at
Rupp Arena.
“Growing up, you always wanted to play there,” Hill said.
“They’ve always been a great team,
so it’s going to be a great day for
competition.”
The Hokies’ debut at the storied
venue in Lexington, Ky., set for
Saturday afternoon at 2, is also a
significant step up in competition.
Virginia Tech has ripped off a 9-1
start with, by some statistical measures, the most prolific offense in
the nation. But the Hokies haven’t
faced a team close to the size and
talent level of the eighth-ranked
Wildcats, nor have they played in
an environment like 23,500-seat
Rupp Arena.
“It’s as good of an environment,
in my opinion, as there is in the
country, but I think it’s comparable to others within our league,”
said Hokies Coach Buzz Williams,
who won twice at Rupp in the 2013
NCAA tournament when he was at
Marquette. “To the veterans, I
would just say it’s similar to other
places. For our new guys, it’ll be
their first opportunity to play in
that type of an environment.”
It will be Virginia Tech’s first
game in six days and its most
challenging nonconference opponent following an early-season
schedule that began Thursday
ranked 339th out of 351 Division I
teams, according to KenPom.com.
Entering Thursday, their opponents had a combined record of
43-55, with only three of them
above .500.
The Wildcats (8-1) are the first
ranked team and the fourth from a
Power Five conference Virginia
Tech will have faced this season.
The Hokies coasted past Washington, 103-79, in the 2K Classic in New
York; handily defeated Iowa, 79-55,
in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge; and,
in their only true road game before
the visit to Kentucky, outlasted
Mississippi in overtime, 83-80.
Based on KenPom.com metrics,
the victory over the Rebels is Virginia Tech’s most impressive this
season. Mississippi is 77th in the
advanced statistical website’s ratings, which are among several
used by the NCAA selection committee to evaluate a school’s tournament profile.
Kentucky, ranked 14th by KenPom.com, starts five freshmen,
four of whom are projected to be
first-round picks in next year’s
NBA draft. The Wildcats are also
one of the tallest teams in the
nation, with six players listed at 6
feet 9 or taller. The Hokies have
one regular player that tall: 6-10
starter Kerry Blackshear Jr.
“I think the only chance you
have at beating Kentucky is limiting their second shots and doing
everything possible regardless of
your scheme to try to force them to
take shots outside the paint,” Williams said. “They’re just so, so
long.”
Despite all the preseason talk in
Blacksburg about a renewed commitment to defense, the Hokies
are scoring at the highest clip in
the country, averaging 96.2 points
per game. They’ve reached 100
points three times and outscored
their opponents by an average of
25.5 points, tops in the country.
Virginia Tech also ranks second
nationally in three-point field goal
shooting percentage (46.8) and
fourth in assists (19.9) as well as
first in advanced metrics such as
offensive efficiency (1.24 points
per possession); effective field
goal percentage (64.2), which
gives added weight to three-pointers; and true shooting percentage
(134), which accounts for free
throws as well as all field goal
attempts.
In their most recent game, a
93-40 win against visiting Maryland Eastern Shore on Sunday, the
Hokies made 15 of 27 three-point
attempts and shot 55 percent. Virginia Tech has made at least 10
three-pointers in a game five times
this season.
Four Hokies scored in double
figures against UMES, led by Chris
Clarke’s season- and game-high 18.
The junior guard-forward made 7
of 9 field goal attempts and a career-high three three-pointers.
Clarke was Virginia Tech’s
third-leading scorer last season
but missed the final nine games
with a torn anterior cruciate ligament. He has scored in double
figures in three of the past four
games.
“We’re excited, definitely, because we know this is a big test,”
Clarke said of Kentucky. “But we’re
not trying to make it a bigger deal
than it is. We’re still going to go in
there and do what we do, Hokies
basketball.”
Virginia Tech last played the
Wildcats in the 1996 NCAA tournament, an 84-60 loss in the second round. The schools have
played four times overall, with
Kentucky owning a 3-1 advantage.
Kentucky is coming off a 93-76
win against visiting Monmouth
this past Saturday in which the
Wildcats committed 19 turnovers.
The Wildcats were outscored in
the second half 45-39, leaving
Coach John Calipari somewhat
apprehensive heading into their
matchup with Virginia Tech.
“I worry because we’re going to
get into league play, and every
game’s going to be up or down
five,” Calipari said. “It’s not going
to be 20. They’re all going to be
wars, and I’m not sure we’re ready
to play a 40-minute game. The
games we have with Virginia Tech,
with UCLA, with Louisville, we’ve
got tough games coming up.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
Oshie won’t play, and Orpik is a question mark for Capitals against Ducks
BY
C ALLIE C APLAN
Capitals right wing T.J. Oshie
will not return from his undisclosed upper-body injury Saturday night against the visiting Anaheim Ducks, Washington Coach
Barry Trotz said after practice
Friday.
Oshie, who has missed the past
five games, skated for more than
an hour before practice but left
the full-team workout with trainers, as planned, after about
20 minutes.
“Until he does a full practice
and all that, he will not play,” said
Trotz, who noted he is hopeful
Oshie could return to the Capitals’ next practice Monday.
Defenseman Brooks Orpik also
missed Friday’s practice because
of an injury. Trotz said the team
would evaluate his status for the
Ducks game during Saturday’s
morning skate, though it’s rare
that a player suits up for a game
without practicing the day before. After practice, Trotz first
deemed Orpik’s injury a lowerbody one; a team spokesman
later corrected him, noting it’s an
upper-body injury.
“Depends on where he holds
it,” Trotz quipped.
Trotz said the Capitals don’t
plan to recall an extra forward or
defenseman — they don’t have
the salary-cap space to do so — so
Oshie’s sixth straight missed
game means Trotz will have another chance to evaluate his forwards before finding a spot for
Oshie.
The second line has been especially productive in his absence.
Evgeny Kuznetsov had three assists against the Colorado Avalanche on Tuesday, and Jakub
Vrana has six goals in his past
11 games, including the Capitals’
first in a 5-3 win at the Boston
Bruins on Thursday night.
Alex Chiasson, meanwhile, has
filled Oshie’s spot on the line’s
right wing, and he had two goals
in the third period against the
Bruins (although one came shorthanded). Once Oshie returns,
Chandler Stephenson, Devante
Smith-Pelly and Brett Connolly
are among those who might be
scratched from the lineup.
“That’s what you want: You
want internal competition,” Trotz
said. “I don’t know who would
come out yet when T.J. does come
in.”
Oshie suffered his injury in a
4-1 victory against the San Jose
Sharks on Dec. 4. After he hit the
Sharks’ Logan Couture in the
corner, Oshie fell to his knees,
leaving his head, neck and upper
body vulnerable to Sharks center
Joe Thornton’s incoming hit.
Thornton’s backside pushed Oshie’s head into the glass, and he
was facedown on the ice before a
trainer attended to him.
When Oshie returns, the Capi-
C A P I TA L S ’ N E X T T H R E E
vs. Anaheim Ducks
Today
8 NBCSW
at Dallas Stars
Tuesday
8:30 NBCSW Plus
at Arizona Coyotes
Friday
9 NBCSW Plus
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
tals may be in line to have a
healthy lineup for the first time
since the season’s first five games.
Last season, the Capitals had
good luck with their health, losing just 49 man-games to injury.
This year, the team has lost 66
man-games, with Oshie’s absence
— and Orpik’s uncertainty — expected to add to that total Saturday night in Capital One Arena.
callie.caplan@washpost.com
Wizards lose Porter but hold o≠ the ailing Clippers
WIZARDS FROM D1
gives me, make the extra pass,
play the right way. Good things
happen when you play the right
way.”
Since Dec. 5, Scott has connected on 34 of 43 from the field,
and his 79 percent shooting
ranks as the best in the NBA over
the past six games. Although the
Wizards (16-13) shot poorly as a
team at 44.3 percent, Scott’s
searing numbers led a bench unit
that produced 46 points.
“He’s great, man, and he continues to get better every time
he steps on the floor,” Beal said.
“We need him to shoot the ball.
Not only want him but need him
to.”
Scott capably filled in when
the Wizards’ frontcourt lost Otto
Porter Jr. at the 8:56 mark of the
first quarter after he picked up
his second foul. Porter did not
stay on the bench long and
walked to the locker room along
with a member of the team’s
medical staff. The team later
announced that Porter had a
right thigh bruise, and he did not
return. The Wizards expect to
have a better sense of his availability for Sunday’s game against
LeBron James and Cleveland
after the team practices Saturday.
Also, Markieff Morris missed
long stretches with foul trouble.
As the Wizards built an 18-point
lead in the second quarter, Scott
played alongside a mix of starters and reserves. When Scott
viciously dunked at the 6:47
mark, the slam extended Washington’s lead to 39-21 and conjured flashbacks for Beal.
“I was a fan of him, but I
didn’t like him,” Beal said of
Scott’s previous five years in
Atlanta. “He dunked on me a
couple years ago. Now I got to sit
next to him and deal with him
all the time.”
Scott scored seven points in
that second quarter, hitting all
three of his shots. In the third
quarter, Scott stretched to the
three-point arc and hit the Wizards’ only three in the frame as
Washington’s bench opened a
75-64 lead entering the fourth.
Overall, Washington missed
24 three-point attempts, but
Scott connected on two of three.
“I liked Mike a lot when he was
in Atlanta. I didn’t know why he
stopped playing a lot, but he was
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Cleveland Cavaliers
Tomorrow
6 NBCSW
vs. New Orleans Pelicans
Tuesday
7 NBCSW
at Brooklyn Nets
Friday
7:30 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
Wizards 100, Clippers 91
L.A. Clippers ....................... 18
Washington ........................ 25
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Bradley Beal finished with 20
points and 11 rebounds against
C.J. Williams and the Clippers.
the person that would always kill
us when he played,” John Wall
said. “I didn’t know he could
shoot the ball that well. The way
he moves the ball and plays on
both ends of the floor helps our
team out a lot, and it’s giving
Keef a boost until he finds his
rhythm.”
Morris, who missed Wednesday’s game with a sore right hip,
felt stiff by spending so much
time on the bench in foul trouble.
When he returned at the start of
the fourth quarter, the Clippers
quickly erased the 11-point deficit and drew even twice in the
final seven minutes.
The turn of events continued a
season-long trend of the Wizards
struggling to put away lesser
opponents.
In an injury-plagued season,
the Clippers have employed
11 starting lineups. The team has
grown so adept at updating its
injury list and losing players that
Coach Doc Rivers quipped that
he would play cards before the
game and give a start to whomever got the ace.
Although the Wizards improved to 9-7 against Western
Conference foes, five of those
losses have come against teams
currently out of the playoff picture (Utah, Phoenix, Dallas, the
Los Angeles Lakers and these
Clippers on Dec. 9). After many
of these bad losses, players have
admitted that the Wizards have a
knack for playing down to their
competition.
L.A. CLIPPERS
W.Johnson
Wilson
Jordan
Thornwell
L.Williams
Evans
C.Williams
Dekker
Harrell
B.Johnson
Reed
TOTALS
25
23
21
27
27 — 91
25 — 100
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
19:59
1-7 1-2 0-5 1 1
3
22:30 4-10 1-2 0-2 2 4 10
33:47 5-11 2-7 6-16 1 2 12
19:21
1-3 3-4 0-2 1 2
5
32:52 5-14 10-10 1-5 4 0 23
40:24 7-18 0-0 1-6 6 4 15
26:20
4-9 0-0 2-3 1 5 10
21:04
3-7 0-0 0-3 0 1
6
15:35
2-4 1-2 2-3 1 0
5
5:53
1-2 0-0 0-1 0 0
2
2:13
0-0 0-2 0-0 0 1
0
240 33-85 18-29 12-46 17 20 91
Percentages: FG .388, FT .621. 3-Point Goals: 7-24, .292
(L.Williams 3-8, C.Williams 2-3, Evans 1-3, Wilson 1-4,
Thornwell 0-1, Dekker 0-2, W.Johnson 0-3). Team
Rebounds: 14. Team Turnovers: 21 (23 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 6 (Wilson 3, C.Williams, Jordan, W.Johnson).
Turnovers: 21 (L.Williams 4, Jordan 3, Evans 2, Harrell 2,
Thornwell 2, W.Johnson 2, Wilson 2, B.Johnson, C.Williams, Dekker, Reed). Steals: 12 (Evans 5, B.Johnson,
C.Williams, Harrell, Jordan, L.Williams, Thornwell,
W.Johnson). Technical Fouls: None.
WASHINGTON
Morris
Porter Jr.
Gortat
Beal
Wall
Oubre Jr.
Scott
Satoransky
Meeks
Mahinmi
Smith
Frazier
McCullough
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
21:10
4-9 0-0 1-2 4 4
8
3:04
1-2 0-0 1-1 0 2
2
27:17
3-6 3-5 1-6 1 3
9
36:59 9-18 0-0 2-11 4 3 20
29:37 5-16 4-7 0-6 5 3 15
34:08
2-9 3-3 1-7 1 4
8
23:44 9-10 2-4 2-4 0 2 22
19:30
4-6 2-2 0-3 3 0 11
18:31
0-3 0-0 0-1 1 1
0
17:05
1-2 1-2 1-6 1 2
3
4:30
1-5 0-0 1-1 0 2
2
3:18
0-2 0-0 0-0 1 0
0
1:07
0-0 0-0 1-1 0 0
0
240 39-88 15-23 11-49 21 26 100
C.J. Williams), and yet, as Beal
noted, they are still professional
basketball players, and five players scored in double figures Friday night. Despite shooting
35.6 percent through three quarters, Los Angeles drew even
when Lou Williams made a
three-pointer with 5:30 remaining.
A few moments later, Morris
snapped a tie by stealing an
inbounds pass and throwing in a
layup from the left block. Less
than a minute later, he defended
Wilson at the rim and forced a
miss that the Wizards quickly
converted into a jumper from
Beal (20 points on 9-for-18 shooting).
Wall inched closer to the 30minute mark in his second game
back in the starting lineup after
an extended absence because of a
knee injury and finished with
15 points, six rebounds and five
assists. But the night belonged to
Scott, even as Beal still remembers the time Scott made him
into a poster.
“The dunk he had tonight, I
told him,” Beal joked, “you got to
get a new dunk.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Capitals right wing T.J. Oshie is expected to miss his sixth straight
game Saturday night with an undisclosed upper-body injury.
NHL ROUNDUP
Nash’s go-ahead goal gives
New York another home win
and Nick Lappin also scored for
the Devils. Martin Hanzal and
Alexander Radulov had the goals
for Dallas.
RANGERS 4,
KINGS 2
HURRICANES 5, SABRES
4 (OT): Jaccob Slavin scored 2:15
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Rick Nash scored the tiebreaking goal with 3:27 remaining to
lead the host New York Rangers
to a 4-2 victory over the Los
Angeles Kings on Friday night.
Chris Kreider, Kevin Hayes and
J.T. Miller also scored for New
York, and Henrik Lundqvist
stopped 33 shots. Miller had an
empty-netter with 54 seconds remaining to seal New York’s 11th
win in its past 13 at home (11-1-1).
Marian Gaborik and Torrey
Mitchell scored for Los Angeles,
which lost its second straight
after an eight-game win streak.
Jonathan Quick had 24 saves.
DEVILS 5, STARS 2: Brian
Boyle broke a tie with his 100th
career goal and added an emptynetter and an assist to give New
Jersey a boost in Newark.
Steven Santini, Blake Coleman
into overtime to give Carolina a
victory in Buffalo.
Jordan Staal, Derek Ryan, Elias
Lindstrom, Justin Williams and
Slavin each had a goal and an
assist to help the Hurricanes win
their second in a row. Cam Ward
made 37 saves.
Jack Eichel had his first career
hat trick and assisted on Jake
McCabe’s goal for the Sabres.
RED WINGS 3, MAPLE
LEAFS 1: Trevor Daley had a
go-ahead, shorthanded goal in the
second period for host Detroit.
Jimmy Howard had 25 saves
for the Red Wings, who had won
one of their previous 11 games.
The Maple Leafs lost their
third straight, matching a season
high. Andreas Borgman scored
for Toronto, which was without
Auston Matthews (upper-body
injury) for a fourth straight game.
Percentages: FG .443, FT .652. 3-Point Goals: 7-31, .226
(Scott 2-3, Beal 2-6, Satoransky 1-3, Oubre Jr. 1-4, Wall
1-6, Morris 0-1, Porter Jr. 0-1, Frazier 0-2, Smith 0-2,
Meeks 0-3). Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 19 (16
PTS). Blocked Shots: 7 (Oubre Jr. 2, Wall 2, Beal, Gortat,
Mahinmi). Turnovers: 19 (Wall 5, Scott 4, Satoransky 3,
Mahinmi 2, Meeks 2, Morris 2, Beal). Steals: 13 (Morris
3, Beal 2, Gortat 2, Scott 2, Wall 2, Oubre Jr.,
Satoransky). Technical Fouls: None.
A: 15,442 (20,356).
“Being complacent, being
lackadaisical and just thinking
that the game is going to come
easy,” Beal said. “We got to
respect every opponent and
know that everybody’s a pro.
There are only 450 jobs. They
deserve it just as well as we do.
We got to go come out with
respect to each opponent. . . . We
have to make sure we’re prepared each game no matter
who’s on the floor.”
The Clippers started a rookie
(Sindarius
Thornwell)
and
played a pair of NBA G League
players on two-way contracts in
the rotation (Jamil Wilson and
WA S H I N G T O N R E D S K I N S V S . A R I Z O N A C A R D I N A L S
NBA ROUNDUP
DECEMBER 17
/
1:00 PM
/
FEDEXFIELD
Westbrook, OKC outlast Philadelphia
THUNDER 119,
76ERS 117 (3OT)
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
Russell
Westbrook
had
27 points, 17 rebounds and 15 assists, and Oklahoma City and the
host Philadelphia 76ers went basket for basket in a three-overtime
thriller before the Thunder pulled
out a 119-117 victory Friday night.
Andre Roberson scored the
winning basket with 10 seconds
left for the Thunder. But one of the
early contenders for NBA game of
the year belonged to Joel Embiid
and Westbrook.
Embiid had 34 points and eight
rebounds in 48 minutes and rallied the Sixers from a 17-point hole.
Oklahoma City’s Carmelo Anthony warmed up for his New York
homecoming with 24 points.
ROCKETS 124, SPURS 109:
Chris Paul had 28 points, eight
assists and seven steals to lead
Houston to its 12th straight victory, a win over visiting San Antonio.
Paul became the first player in
NBA history to post 28 points,
eight assists and seven steals in a
game against the Spurs. In the
past 10 years, that stat line has
been achieved just 10 times — Paul
has done it six of those times.
JAZZ 107, CELTICS 95:
Ricky Rubio had 22 points, Donovan Mitchell added 17 points, nine
assists and five rebounds, and
Utah won at Boston.
Jonas Jerebko and Rodney
Hood also finished with 17 points
for the Jazz, which ended a fourgame skid. It was Utah’s first victory in Boston since 2008.
Jazz center Rudy Gobert left the
game early in the first quarter
with a left knee injury.
In the second quarter, Celtics
forward Daniel Theis left with a
facial injury and Boston guard Jaylen Brown caught Utah forward
Derrick Favors with an elbow, leaving him bleeding from his left eye.
Kyrie Irving led the Celtics with
33 points.
BULLS 115, BUCKS 109:
Bobby Portis had a career-high 27
points and added 12 rebounds as
visiting Chicago won its fifth
straight game, beating Milwaukee.
The Bulls’ winning streak coincides with the return of center
Nikola Mirotic (22 points), who
missed the start of the season because of facial fractures suffered
in a fight with Portis.
NUGGETS 117, PELICANS
111 (OT): Will Barton had 11 of his
GAME PRESENTED BY
19 points in overtime as host Denver defeated New Orleans.
DeMarcus Cousins scored 29
for the Pelicans.
PISTONS 104, PACERS 98:
Andre Drummond finished with
23 points and 13 rebounds, and
Detroit withstood a late rally to
beat Indiana in Indianapolis.
GRIZZLIES 96, HAWKS 94:
Tyreke Evans scored 22 points, including a go-ahead layup with 1:03
left, as host Memphis ended a fivegame skid with a win over Atlanta.
TRAIL BLAZERS 95, MAGIC 88: Damian Lillard scored
21 points, C.J. McCollum added 20,
and Portland withstood a late rally
to defeat host Orlando.
HEAT 104, HORNETS 98:
Tyler Johnson and Wayne Ellington scored 16 points each, and
visiting Miami beat Charlotte.
RAPTORS 120, NETS 87:
Kyle Lowry had his 11th career
triple-double, and host Toronto
routed Brooklyn.
JANUARY 20
0T
STREAMING LIVE ON REDSKIN
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
WINTER SPORTS ROUNDUP
Taylor Morris’s eyes filled with
tears, and for good reason.
For four years, he had carried a
burden. He had missed qualifying
for the 2014 U.S. Olympic team by
a ridiculously small margin: four
one-thousandths of a second. And
over the past four years, he has
dealt with injuries and doubt.
No more. He’s an Olympian.
On Friday in Lake Placid, N.Y.,
Morris claimed one of 10 spots on
the U.S. Olympic luge team for the
PyeongChang Games, making
him one of four first-timers on the
roster. He did it in style, finishing
fifth in a World Cup race on the
Americans’ home track — more
than enough to clinch the berth
that eluded him four years ago.
“It’s a long time coming,” he
said. “My family’s out here. My
wife’s out here; she came out from
Salt Lake. It means the world to
me to have them here. It’s as much
of a burden on me as it is for my
family. They put as much effort
into this as anybody else, so I’m
really excited to bring this victory
to my family and my friends and
the community back home.”
Seven of the 10 spots came
down to the final day of competition that capped a weeks-long
process to make the team. Olympic veterans Tucker West and
Chris Mazdzer joined Morris on
the men’s team. Matt Mortensen
and Jayson Terdiman were one of
the two U.S. doubles teams heading to PyeongChang; Justin
Krewson and Andrew Sherk
grabbed the other spot.
The women’s luge spots were
already decided: 2014 bronze
medalist Erin Hamlin, Summer
Britcher and Emily Sweeney will
represent the United States.
Hamlin clinched her spot last
month, and Britcher and
Sweeney got theirs Thursday
night without even racing — they
were locked into berths when
Raychel Germaine, the only other
U.S. woman who could have
caught them, failed to qualify for
Saturday’s World Cup race.
SPEEDSKATING:
JohnHenry Krueger qualified for his
first Olympic team, and Lana
Gehring made her second nearly
eight years apart at the U.S. shorttrack speedskating trials in
Kearns, Utah.
Krueger won the 1,500-meter
final after two-time Olympian J.R.
Celski crashed with a lap to go on
the first night of competition.
Gehring swept the women’s
1,500 finals, both of which were
marred by crashes.
SNOWBOARDING:
The
most surprised guy on the halfpipe was Jake Pates. He also
happened to be the winner of the
Dew Tour and might have to clear
his schedule for Feb. 14, the day of
the men’s halfpipe final at the
PyeongChang Olympics.
The 19-year-old out of Eagle,
Colo., came from nowhere to win
the second of four U.S. qualifying
events in Breckenridge, Colo.,
putting himself in position to be
on the team heading to the Olympics in two months.
“I never thought in a million
years I’d have won this event
today,” Pates said. “All I wanted
was to land that run. I’d been
dreaming about that all week.”
In the women’s event, Chloe
Kim won her second straight
qualifier to score an Olympic spot.
FOOTBALL
B A S K E TB AL L
NBA
NCAA men
NHL
NFC
EASTERN CONFERENCE
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
EAST
W L
y-Philadelphia ............. 11 2
Dallas ............................ 7 6
Washington .................. 5 8
N.Y. Giants .................... 2 11
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.846
.538
.385
.154
PF
404
316
285
199
PA
250
294
344
321
SOUTH
W
New Orleans ................. 9
Carolina ......................... 9
Atlanta .......................... 8
Tampa Bay .................... 4
L
4
4
5
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.692
.692
.615
.308
PF
370
300
294
264
PA
263
262
261
312
NORTH
W
Minnesota ................... 10
Detroit .......................... 7
Green Bay ..................... 7
Chicago ......................... 4
L
3
6
6
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.769
.538
.538
.308
PF
309
338
285
224
PA
235
329
302
274
WEST
W L
L.A. Rams ...................... 9 4
Seattle .......................... 8 5
Arizona ......................... 6 7
San Francisco ................ 3 10
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.692
.615
.462
.231
PF
396
314
231
228
PA
265
252
317
314
L
3
6
7
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.769
.538
.462
.385
PF
368
240
236
266
PA
250
290
318
311
SOUTH
W L
Jacksonville .................. 9 4
Tennessee ..................... 8 5
Houston ........................ 4 9
Indianapolis .................. 3 11
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.692
.615
.308
.214
PF
329
273
312
225
PA
202
294
335
368
NORTH
W L
y-Pittsburgh ............... 11 2
Baltimore ...................... 7 6
Cincinnati ...................... 5 8
Cleveland ...................... 0 13
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.846
.538
.385
.000
PF
320
318
226
197
PA
251
246
271
335
AFC
EAST
W
New England ............... 10
Buffalo .......................... 7
Miami ............................ 6
N.Y. Jets ....................... 5
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 7
L.A. Chargers ................ 7
Oakland ......................... 6
Denver ........................... 5
L
6
6
7
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.538
.538
.462
.357
PF
329
298
264
254
PA
289
225
304
328
y-clinched division
WEEK 15
THURSDAY’S RESULT
Denver 25, at Indianapolis 13
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Chicago at Detroit (-5), 4:30
L.A. Chargers (-1) at Kansas City, 8:30
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Arizona at Washington (-4), 1
Baltimore (-7) at Cleveland, 1
Philadelphia (-71/2) at N.Y. Giants, 1
Cincinnati at Minnesota (-11), 1
Houston at Jacksonville (-11), 1
N.Y. Jets at New Orleans (-151/2), 1
Miami at Buffalo (-3), 1
Green Bay at Carolina (-3), 1
L.A. Rams at Seattle (-21/2), 4:05
New England (-3) at Pittsburgh, 4:25
Tennessee at San Francisco (-11/2), 4:25
Dallas (-3) at Oakland, 8:30
MONDAY’S GAME
Atlanta (-6) at Tampa Bay, 8:30
SATURDAY, DEC. 23
Indianapolis at Baltimore, 4:30
Minnesota at Green Bay, 8:30
SUNDAY, DEC. 24
Denver at Washington, 1
Cleveland at Chicago, 1
Atlanta at New Orleans, 1
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 1
Miami at Kansas City, 1
L.A. Rams at Tennessee, 1
L.A. Chargers at N.Y. Jets, 1
Detroit at Cincinnati, 1
Buffalo at New England, 1
Jacksonville at San Francisco, 4:05
N.Y. Giants at Arizona, 4:25
Seattle at Dallas, 4:25
MONDAY, DEC. 25
Pittsburgh at Houston, 4:30
Oakland at Philadelphia, 8:30
Week 15 injury report
ARIZONA CARDINALS AT
WASHINGTON REDSKINS
DOUG KAPUSTIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Wise’s Sherwyn Devonish dishes to a teammate Friday night in
helping the Pumas come back to beat Bladensburg, his old team.
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
No. 2 Stags show chemistry
in road win over No. 6 Cadets
BY
C ALLIE C APLAN
Just before the DeMatha basketball team started its season
this month, Stags players gathered in a big room in one of the
buildings on the Hyattsville campus for a retreat.
The purpose of the get-together was to generate chemistry. The
Stags lost a few key seniors to
graduation and added three
transfers during the summer.
Team-building exercises were
meant to be fun, but conversations, guard Jahmir Young said,
kept turning back to basketball.
Such focus is the norm for No. 2
DeMatha, Coach Mike Jones said,
after a 69-51 victory at No. 6
St. John’s (4-3, 2-1) on Friday
night. Jones lauded his team’s
depth and selflessness as reasons
DeMatha (5-0, 2-0 WCAC) had
three players score in double figures.
Junior guards Justin Moore
and Young dictated the pace in
the beginning. Young, a transfer
from St. Mary’s Ryken, had nine
of his 15 points by halftime, while
Moore had eight of his 12 to help
DeMatha open a 26-15 lead at the
break.
In the second half, DeMatha
looked to center Hunter Dickinson, a 7-foot-1, five-star sophomore rated as one of the 2020
class’s top prospects, down low.
Dickinson finished with a gamehigh 16 points, 12 coming in the
last two periods.
St. John’s guard Casey Morsell
and center Richard Njoku tied for
the team high with nine points,
but the Cadets failed to generate
runs to match DeMatha’s production; all eight Stags who took the
court scored at least three points.
Devonish helps Wise rally late
Peeling himself up from midcourt after assisting on a transition basket that gave Wise a
10-point lead late in the fourth
quarter, Sherwyn Devonish
turned to the suddenly quiet
Bladensburg bench and held a
mean glare.
Devonish, a senior who transferred from the Mustangs to the
Pumas before this season, had
been heckled by his former team
earlier, but ultimately it was Devonish and the No. 8 Pumas who
walked away from Upper Marlboro with the 68-52 victory over
the No. 14 Mustangs.
“It felt good to get that ‘W,’ ”
Devonish said.
The point guard said he decided to transfer because Wise presented him with more exposure
to play at the next level. He told
Bladensburg Coach Antonio Williams of his decision shortly after
the team’s 43-42 loss to Parkdale
in last season’s Maryland 4A
South region semifinals.
“He wasn’t satisfied with it,”
Devonish said of Williams. “But
at the end of the day, I have to do
what’s best for me.”
Wise trailed by one at the start
of the fourth when Devonish approached Wise Coach Rob Garner
with a suggestion. The Pumas had
been playing in a 2-3 zone, forcing
the Mustangs to launch threepointers and double-teaming 6foot-7 Daniel Oladapo on the
block. Devonish suggested Wise
switch to man-to-man.
Bladensburg (0-2, 0-1 Prince
George’s County 4A) began the
fourth with a 45-44 lead, but
within minutes Wise (2-1, 1-0)
broke off a 12-2 run and reclaimed
the lead for good.
The Pumas forced turnovers
and capitalized with easy fastbreak layups. The Mustangs’ momentum fell flat.
— Joshua Needleman
H OC K E Y
NFL
WEEK 16
DEMATHA 69,
ST. JOHN’S 51
DECEMBER 16 , 2017
S C O R E B O AR D
Morris makes the cut as
U.S. luge team is finalized
A SSOCIATED P RESS
. SATURDAY,
Cardinals: OUT: WR John Brown (toe), LB Gabe Martin
(hamstring), RB Adrian Peterson (neck), G Earl Watford
(ankle). QUESTIONABLE: TE Jermaine Gresham (illness), DT Josh Mauro (ankle), DT Corey Peters (ankle).
Redskins: OUT: LB Zach Brown (illness/toe/achilles/
hip), S Montae Nicholson (concussion). QUESTIONABLE: LB Ryan Anderson (ankle), WR Ryan Grant
(ankle), WR Maurice Harris (concussion), DE Terrell
McClain (toe), OT Morgan Moses (ankle), C Chase
Roullier (hand), OT Trent Williams (knee).
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................24
Toronto ......................................19
New York ...................................15
Philadelphia ...............................14
Brooklyn.....................................11
L
7
8
13
14
17
Pct
.774
.704
.536
.500
.393
GB
—
3
71/2
81/2
111/2
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................16
Miami.........................................14
Orlando ......................................11
Charlotte....................................10
Atlanta.........................................6
L
13
14
19
18
23
Pct
.552
.500
.367
.357
.207
GB
—
11/2
51/2
51/2
10
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................21
Milwaukee .................................15
Indiana .......................................16
Detroit .......................................16
Chicago ........................................8
L
8
12
13
13
20
Pct
.724
.556
.552
.552
.286
GB
—
5
5
5
121/2
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................23
San Antonio ...............................19
New Orleans ..............................15
Memphis ......................................9
Dallas ...........................................8
L
4
10
15
20
21
Pct
.852
.655
.500
.310
.276
GB
—
5
91/2
15
16
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota..................................17
Denver........................................16
Portland .....................................15
Oklahoma City ...........................14
Utah ...........................................14
L
12
13
13
14
15
Pct
.586
.552
.536
.500
.483
GB
—
1
11/2
21/2
3
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................23
L.A. Clippers...............................11
L.A. Lakers .................................10
Sacramento .................................9
Phoenix ........................................9
L
6
16
17
19
21
Pct
.793
.407
.370
.321
.300
GB
—
11
12
131/2
141/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
Detroit 105, at Atlanta 91
New York 111, at Brooklyn 104
at Cleveland 121, L.A. Lakers 112
at Minnesota 119, Sacramento 96
at Golden State 112, Dallas 97
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
at Washington 100, L.A. Clippers 91
Detroit 104, at Indiana 98
Miami 104, at Charlotte 98
Portland 95, at Orlando 88
at Toronto 120, Brooklyn 87
Utah 107, at Boston 95
Oklahoma City 119, at Philadelphia 117 (3OT)
at Memphis 96, Atlanta 94
Chicago 115, at Milwaukee 109
at Denver 117, New Orleans 111 (OT)
at Houston 124, San Antonio 109
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Portland at Charlotte, 7
Oklahoma City at New York, 7:30
Utah at Cleveland, 7:30
L.A. Clippers at Miami, 8
Milwaukee at Houston, 8
Phoenix at Minnesota, 8
Dallas at San Antonio, 8:30
Boston at Memphis, 9
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Cleveland at Washington, 6
Sacramento at Toronto, 3:30
Orlando at Detroit, 4
Indiana at Brooklyn, 6
Trail Blazers 95, Magic 88
26
23
25
23
20 — 95
22 — 88
PORTLAND: Turner 3-6 2-2 8, Aminu 6-9 0-0 15, Nurkic
4-11 1-1 9, Lillard 7-16 4-4 21, McCollum 8-20 4-4 20,
Davis 1-3 0-0 2, Vonleh 0-1 1-2 1, Collins 2-8 0-0 4, Napier
4-7 0-0 8, Connaughton 2-5 1-2 7. Totals 37-86 13-15 95.
ORLANDO: Hezonja 0-2 4-4 4, Gordon 4-10 3-6 13,
Vucevic 12-20 0-0 26, Payton 3-6 0-0 6, Simmons 6-15
2-3 15, Iwundu 1-4 0-0 2, Speights 1-9 0-0 3, Biyombo 1-3
1-2 3, Augustin 4-10 2-2 14, Mack 0-5 2-2 2. Totals 32-84
14-19 88.
Three-point Goals: Portland 8-18 (Aminu 3-5, Lillard 3-6,
Connaughton 2-4, Collins 0-1, McCollum 0-2), Orlando
10-29 (Augustin 4-7, Vucevic 2-5, Gordon 2-5, Simmons
1-3, Speights 1-6, Iwundu 0-1, Mack 0-2). Fouled Out:
None. Rebounds: Portland 45 (Nurkic 11), Orlando 45
(Vucevic 14). Assists: Portland 18 (McCollum, Lillard 4),
Orlando 15 (Augustin 4). Total Fouls: Portland 20,
Orlando 18. Technicals: Speights. A: 16,963 (18,846).
BALTIMORE RAVENS AT CLEVELAND BROWNS
Ravens: QUESTIONABLE: CB Maurice Canady (knee), G
Jermaine Eluemunor (shoulder), C Ryan Jensen (ankle),
QB Ryan Mallett (hips), WR Chris Moore (hip), LB
Za’Darius Smith (shoulder), WR Mike Wallace (ankle).
Browns: DOUBTFUL: CB Briean Boddy-Calhoun (knee).
QUESTIONABLE: WR Matt Hazel (hamstring), CB Darius
Hillary (knee), CB Jamar Taylor (foot).
NCAA
BOWL SCHEDULE
SATURDAY’S GAMES
CELEBRATION BOWL — IN ATLANTA
NC A&T (11-0) vs. Grambling State (11-1), Noon (ABC)
NEW ORLEANS BOWL
North Texas (9-4) vs. Troy (10-2), 1 (ESPN)
CURE BOWL — IN ORLANDO
Georgia State (6-5) vs. Western Kentucky (6-6), 2:30 (CBSSN)
LAS VEGAS BOWL
Boise State (10-3) vs. Oregon (7-5), 3:30 (ABC)
NEW MEXICO BOWL — IN ALBUQUERQUE
Colorado State (7-5) vs. Marshall (7-5), 4:30 (ESPN)
CAMELLIA BOWL — IN MONTGOMERY, ALA.
Arkansas State (7-3) vs. Middle Tennessee (6-6), 8 (ESPN)
TUESDAY’S GAME
BOCA RATON (FLA.) BOWL
Akron (7-6) vs. FAU (10-3), 7 (ESPN)
WEDNESDAY’S GAME
FRISCO (TEX.) BOWL
Louisiana Tech (6-6) vs. SMU (7-5), 8 (ESPN)
THURSDAY‘S GAME
GASPARILLA BOWL — IN ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
Temple (6-6) vs. FIU (8-4), 8 (ESPN)
FRIDAY‘S GAMES
BAHAMAS BOWL — IN NASSAU
Ohio (8-4) vs. UAB (8-4), 12:30 (ESPN)
FAMOUS IDAHO POTATO BOWL — IN BOISE
Central Michigan (7-5) vs. Wyoming (7-5), 4 (ESPN)
SATURDAY, DEC. 23
BIRMINGHAM (ALA.) BOWL
South Florida (9-2) vs. Texas Tech (6-6), Noon (ESPN)
ARMED FORCES BOWL — IN FORT WORTH
San Diego State (10-2) vs. Army (9-3), 3:30 (ESPN)
DOLLAR GENERAL BOWL — MOBILE, ALA.
Appalachian State (8-4) vs. Toledo (11-2), 7 (ESPN)
SUNDAY, DEC. 24
HAWAII BOWL — IN HONOLULU
Fresno State (9-4) vs. Houston (7-4), 8:30 (ESPN)
TUESDAY, DEC. 26
HEART OF DALLAS BOWL
West Virginia (7-5) vs. Utah (6-6), 1:30 (ESPN)
QUICK LANE BOWL — IN DETROIT
Northern Illinois (8-4) vs. Duke (6-6), 5:15 (ESPN)
CACTUS BOWL — IN PHOENIX
Kansas State (7-5) vs. UCLA (6-6), 9 (ESPN)
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 27
INDEPENDENCE BOWL — IN SHREVEPORT, LA.
Southern Mississippi (8-4) vs. Florida State (6-6), 1:30 (ESPN)
PINSTRIPE BOWL — IN BRONX, N.Y.
Boston College (7-5) vs. Iowa (7-5), 5:15 (ESPN)
FOSTER FARMS BOWL — IN SANTA CLARA, CALIF.
Arizona (7-5) vs. Purdue (6-6), 8:30 (FOX)
TEXAS BOWL — IN HOUSTON
Texas (6-6) vs. Missouri (7-5), 9 (ESPN)
THURSDAY, DEC. 28
MILITARY BOWL — IN ANNAPOLIS, MD.
Virginia (6-6) vs. Navy (6-6), 1:30 (ESPN)
CAMPING WORLD BOWL — IN ORLANDO, FLA.
Oklahoma State (9-3) vs. Virginia Tech (9-3), 5:15 (ESPN)
ALAMO BOWL — IN SAN ANTONIO
Stanford (9-4) vs. TCU (10-3), 9 (ESPN)
HOLIDAY BOWL — IN SAN DIEGO
Washington State (9-3) vs. Michigan State (9-3), 9 (FOX)
FRIDAY, DEC. 29
BELK BOWL — IN CHARLOTTE, N.C.
Wake Forest (7-5) vs. Texas A&M (7-5), 1 (ESPN)
SUN BOWL — IN EL PASO, TEXAS
NC State (8-4) vs. Arizona State (7-5), 3 (CBS)
MUSIC CITY BOWL — IN NASHVILLE, TENN.
Kentucky (7-5) vs. Northwestern (9-3), 4:30 (ESPN)
ARIZONA BOWL — IN TUCSON, ARIZ.
New Mexico State (5-6) vs. Utah State (6-6), 5:30 (CBSSN)
COTTON BOWL CLASSIC — IN ARLINGTON, TEXAS
Southern Cal (11-2) vs. Ohio State (11-2), 8:30 (ESPN)
Thunder 119, 76ers 117 (3OT)
OKLAHOMA CITY . 28 27 26 13
PHILADELPHIA ..... 23 24 30 17
8
8
9
9
8 — 119
6 — 117
OKLAHOMA CITY: George 8-23 3-4 24, Anthony 11-17
1-1 24, Adams 2-8 1-1 5, Westbrook 10-33 5-12 27,
Roberson 2-5 0-0 4, Huestis 3-3 0-1 7, Grant 3-4 0-0 7,
Patterson 1-3 0-0 2, Felton 5-10 0-0 14, Abrines 1-6 0-0
3, Ferguson 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 47-113 10-19 119.
PHILADELPHIA: Covington 4-21 0-0 11, Saric 7-16 0-0
16, Embiid 11-20 12-13 34, Simmons 6-10 0-2 12, Redick
7-18 1-1 19, Holmes 2-2 0-0 4, Booker 3-4 0-0 6,
A.Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, McConnell 0-2 1-1 1, Bayless 4-7 2-3
14. Totals 44-100 16-20 117.
Three-point Goals: Oklahoma City 15-35 (George 5-11, Felton
4-5, Westbrook 2-5, Huestis 1-1, Grant 1-2, Anthony 1-4,
Abrines 1-5, Patterson 0-1, Roberson 0-1), Philadelphia 13-46
(Bayless 4-6, Redick 4-13, Covington 3-15, Saric 2-9, Embiid
0-3). Fouled Out: Adams. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 60
(Westbrook 18), Philadelphia 50 (Covington 10). Assists:
Oklahoma City 28 (Westbrook 15), Philadelphia 35 (Simmons
11). Total Fouls: Oklahoma City 21, Philadelphia 20. Technicals: George, Westbrook, Covington. A: 20,612 (21,600).
Pistons 104, Pacers 98
DETROIT ............................. 27
INDIANA ............................. 19
25
35
34
20
18 — 104
24 — 98
DETROIT: Bullock 5-8 2-2 15, Harris 2-14 0-1 6, Drummond 9-14 5-8 23, Jackson 3-11 2-2 8, Kennard 4-6 0-0 9,
Johnson 4-10 4-4 13, Tolliver 3-6 0-0 9, Moreland 2-3 0-0
4, Smith 3-12 0-0 6, Galloway 4-9 0-0 11. Totals 39-93
13-17 104.
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 2-11 0-0 4, T.Young 5-9 2-4 12,
Turner 8-14 7-8 24, Collison 4-8 0-0 10, Oladipo 8-22 5-5
26, Leaf 1-2 0-0 2, Sabonis 4-6 3-6 11, Joseph 0-5 0-0 0,
Stephenson 3-10 2-2 9. Totals 35-87 19-25 98.
Three-point Goals: Detroit 13-32 (Bullock 3-4, Tolliver
3-6, Galloway 3-7, Harris 2-7, Kennard 1-1, Johnson 1-4,
Jackson 0-3), Indiana 9-30 (Oladipo 5-12, Collison 2-4,
Turner 1-4, Stephenson 1-4, T.Young 0-1, Sabonis 0-1,
Joseph 0-1, Bogdanovic 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 44 (Drummond 13), Indiana 51 (Turner,
T.Young, Oladipo, Stephenson 8). Assists: Detroit 22
(Harris, Smith, Johnson, Kennard 4), Indiana 21 (Stephenson 5). Total Fouls: Detroit 22, Indiana 15. Technicals: Johnson. A: 14,687 (18,500).
25
13
33
28
28 — 107
28 — 95
UTAH: Ingles 4-7 0-0 12, Favors 3-6 0-0 6, Gobert 0-1 0-0
0, Rubio 10-15 1-1 22, Mitchell 6-18 3-3 17, Johnson 1-3
1-2 3, Jerebko 6-8 3-3 17, Udoh 2-4 1-1 5, Burks 2-7 4-4 8,
Hood 6-14 1-4 17. Totals 40-83 14-18 107.
BOSTON: Tatum 1-6 4-4 7, Horford 9-14 0-0 21, Baynes
1-4 0-0 2, Irving 11-25 9-9 33, Brown 3-8 0-1 6, Nader 0-0
0-0 0, Ojeleye 3-5 0-1 7, Yabusele 1-1 0-0 3, Theis 0-0 0-0
0, Smart 3-13 0-0 6, Rozier 0-4 1-2 1, Larkin 3-6 2-2 9.
Totals 35-86 16-19 95.
Three-point Goals: Utah 13-25 (Ingles 4-6, Hood 4-7, Jerebko
2-3, Mitchell 2-5, Rubio 1-2, Burks 0-2), Boston 9-31 (Horford
3-5, Irving 2-8, Yabusele 1-1, Larkin 1-3, Tatum 1-3, Ojeleye
1-3, Rozier 0-2, Brown 0-3, Smart 0-3). Fouled Out: Rubio.
Rebounds: Utah 55 (Udoh 9), Boston 31 (Brown, Horford 6).
Assists: Utah 19 (Mitchell 9), Boston 20 (Horford 7). Total
Fouls: Utah 20, Boston 18. A: 18,624 (18,624).
Heat 104, Hornets 98
MIAMI ................................ 24
CHARLOTTE ....................... 19
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
Buffalo 76, St. Bonaventure 59
SOUTH
FAU 82, Georgia St. 50
Miami 79, Alabama St. 31
South Florida 108, Southern U. 48
Southern Miss. 58, Sam Houston St. 38
MIDWEST
Creighton 72, S. Dakota St. 65
Ohio St. 103, Dartmouth 70
Valparaiso 99, Indiana-Northwest 59
W. Michigan 85, Kentucky St. 50
Wichita St. 66, Chicago St. 63
FAR WEST
Colorado 68, Air Force 43
HI GH S C HOOLS
METROPOLITAN
Columbus ......................
New Jersey ...................
Washington ..................
N.Y. Rangers .................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
Pittsburgh .....................
Philadelphia ..................
Carolina .........................
W
20
18
20
17
17
16
13
13
L
11
9
12
12
12
14
11
11
OL PTS. GF GA
1
41 94 84
5
41 100 96
1
41 105 96
3
37 105 94
3
37 114 111
3
35 95 106
7
33 89 89
7
33 88 97
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay .................... 23
Toronto ......................... 20
Boston ........................... 15
Montreal ....................... 14
Detroit .......................... 12
Florida ........................... 12
Ottawa .......................... 10
Buffalo ............................ 8
L
6
13
10
14
13
15
13
18
OL PTS. GF GA
2
48 117 75
1
41 109 97
4
34 84 82
4
32 87 100
7
31 86 103
5
29 93 110
7
27 82 103
7
23 72 111
W
20
21
18
17
16
18
15
L
7
10
9
11
11
14
14
OL PTS. GF GA
4
44 106 85
2
44 105 84
5
41 108 92
3
37 91 88
5
37 98 85
1
37 98 97
2
32 96 101
PACIFIC
W
Los Angeles .................. 20
Vegas ............................ 20
x-San Jose .................... 17
Calgary .......................... 16
Anaheim ....................... 14
x-Vancouver .................. 14
Edmonton ..................... 13
Arizona ........................... 7
L
10
9
10
13
11
14
17
22
OL PTS. GF GA
3
43 100 77
2
42 107 95
3
37 82 71
3
35 91 99
7
35 86 92
4
32 83 97
2
28 93 105
5
19 76 118
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
Nashville .......................
St. Louis ........................
Winnipeg ......................
Minnesota .....................
Chicago .........................
Dallas ............................
Colorado ........................
BOYS' BASKETBALL
x-Late game
DISTRICT
Capitol Christian 64, Cesar Chavez 54
Coolidge 70, H.D. Woodson 65
MARYLAND
Crossland 89, Croom Vocational 62
Gaithersburg 76, Bethesda-Chevy Chase 57
Northwest 69, Seneca Valley 63
Rockville 51, Quince Orchard 48
Sherwood 71, Magruder 59
Springbrook 67, Whitman 59
Walter Johnson 49, Poolesville 42
Wise 68, Bladensburg 52
Wootton 64, Churchill 46
VIRGINIA
Battlefield 56, Gar-Field 47
Edison 87, Lee 44
Fairfax 62, Westfield 55
Heritage 53, Broad Run 50
Lake Braddock 98, Annandale 70
Marshall 77, Falls Church 43
McLean 56, Woodbridge 48
Patriot 77, Osbourn Park 67
Potomac Falls 62, Dominion 46
Riverside 57, Rock Ridge 45
Robinson 55, Hayfield 49
South County 69, West Potomac 33
W.T. Woodson 74, Washington-Lee 73
PRIVATE
Capitol Christian 84, IDEA 58
DeMatha 69, St. John's 51
McNamara 56, Bishop Ireton 52
O'Connell 69, Largo 44
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 73, Christ Chapel Academy 65
Bullis 80, John Paul the Great 58
Episcopal 82, Westtown (Pa.) 62
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
DISTRICT
Anacostia 64, Theodore Roosevelt 13
Ballou 54, Phelps 30
Bell 66, Cardozo 41
MARYLAND
Bethesda-Chevy Chase 69, Gaithersburg 52
Clarksburg 58, Watkins Mill 24
Damascus 51, Thomas Johnson 50
Einstein 42, Northwood 35
Gwynn Park 75, McDonough 32
Poolesville 68, Walter Johnson 30
Seneca Valley 53, Northwest 47
Sherwood 69, Magruder 47
Suitland 86, High Point 2
Wise 72, Bladensburg 28
VIRGINIA
Centreville 45, Jefferson 22
Edison 87, Lee 22
Fairfax 44, Westfield 39
George Mason 51, John Paul the Great 31
Heritage 53, Broad Run 39
Herndon 66, Chantilly 58
Langley 50, Oakton 41
Robinson 56, Hayfield 51
South Lakes 37, Madison 33
Stone Bridge 36, Forest Park 21
Tuscarora 75, Woodgrove 54
Washington-Lee 54, W.T. Woodson 45
West Potomac 52, South County 42
PRIVATE
McNamara 66, Bishop Ireton 47
O'Connell 62, Holy Cross 32
Richard Montgomery 62, Holton-Arms 45
School Without Walls 34, Field 23
St. John's 85, Elizabeth Seton 55
Bullis 59, Wilson 45
B OY S ’ B A S K E TB A L L
TOP 20
NO. 2 DEMATHA 69, NO. 6 ST. JOHN'S 51
SJ (4-3) Njoku 9, Morsell 9, Leggett 7, Hunt 7, Maddox 6,
Wood 5, Abbott 5, Dunn 3 Totals 14 11-13 51.
D (5-0) Dickinson 16, Young 15, Moore 12, Kolgenik 7,
Timberlake 7, Gielen 3, Richmond 3, Carson 3, Brawner 3
Totals 21 15-17 69.
Halftime: DeMatha, (32-17).
Three-point goals: D 4 (Gielen 1, Kolgenik 1, Young 2); SJ
4 (Wood 1, Abbott 1, Dunn 1, Leggett 1).
NO. 8 WISE 68, NO. 14 BLADENSBURG 52
W (2-1) Devonish 29, Crowell 13, Longshore 10, Webb 7,
Johnson 4, Arnold 3, Gibbons 2 Totals 19 12-13 68.
B (0-3) Oladapo 15, Walker 15, Marbury 8, McAdoo 8,
Washington 4, Taylor 2 Totals 12 7-9 52.
Halftime: Wise, (34-29).
Three-point goals: B 7 (Oladapo 2, Marbury 2, Walker 3);
W 6 (Devonish 4, Crowell 1, Arnold 1).
NO. 13 BULLIS 80, JOHN PAUL THE GREAT 58
B (5-0) Morse 27, Tarke 18, Hanin 7, Reynolds 7, Salvi 4,
Smith 4, Alexander 4, Lewis 3, Matthews 2, Yeutter 2,
Amsellem 2 Totals 23 7-13 80.
JPG (1-2) Slaughter 14, Perry 12, Hibbert 11, Wheatley
10, Mustafaa 8, Adofo 2, Kosar 1 Totals 15 16-26 58.
Halftime: Bullis, (43-19).
Three-point goals: JPG 4 (Perry 1, Mustafaa 1, Wheatley
2); B 9 (Morse 5, Lewis 1, Alexander 1, Reynolds 1, Hanin
1).
NO. 19 W.T. WOODSON 74,
WASHINGTON-LEE 73
WL (5-1) Ozgo 20, Reyes 15, DEILY 11, Geisman 10,
Simmons 8, MacCullough 5, Hwang 2 Totals 19 6-9 73.
WTW (4-3) Urbach 22, Spurlock 21, Mains 19, Nickel 6,
Lee 4, Hamrock 2 Totals 23 16-20 74.
Halftime: W.T. Woodson, (42-23).
Three-point goals: WTW 4 (Urbach 3, Spurlock 1); WL 9
(Ozgo 3, Reyes 3, Simmons 1, Geisman 2).
GI R L S ’ B A S K E TBALL
Washington 5, at Boston 3
at Philadelphia 2, Buffalo 1
at Columbus 6, N.Y. Islanders 4
at Montreal 2, New Jersey 1 (OT)
Chicago 5, at Winnipeg 1
Anaheim 3, at St. Louis 1
at Minnesota 2, Toronto 0
at Colorado 2, Florida 1
Tampa Bay 4, at Arizona 1
Nashville 4, at Edmonton 0
San Jose 3, at Calgary 2
at Vegas 2, Pittsburgh 1
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
at New Jersey 5, Dallas 2
Carolina 5, at Buffalo 4 (OT)
at N.Y. Rangers 4, Los Angeles 2
at Detroit 3, Toronto 1
San Jose at Vancouver, Late
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Edmonton at Minnesota, 2
N.Y. Rangers at Boston, 5
Los Angeles at N.Y. Islanders, 7
Winnipeg at St. Louis, 7
Montreal at Ottawa, 7
Columbus at Carolina, 7
Dallas at Philadelphia, 7
Anaheim at Washington, 8
Pittsburgh at Arizona, 8
Tampa Bay at Colorado, 9
Nashville at Calgary, 10
SUNDAY’S GAMES
St. Louis at Winnipeg, 6
Minnesota at Chicago, 7
Calgary at Vancouver, 8
Florida at Vegas, 8
MONDAY’S GAMES
Anaheim at New Jersey, 7
Columbus at Boston, 7
Los Angeles at Philadelphia, 7
San Jose at Edmonton, 9
Pittsburgh at Colorado, 9
Hurricanes 5, Sabres 4 (OT)
CAROLINA ......................... 0
BUFFALO ........................... 0
1
1
3
3
1 — 5
0 — 4
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Carolina, Williams 7 (Staal, McGinn), 10:16.
2, Buffalo, Eichel 9 (Kane, McCabe), 10:46.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Buffalo, McCabe 2 (Kane, Eichel), 1:20. 4,
Carolina, Staal 8 (Slavin, Williams), 3:00. 5, Carolina,
Ryan 6 (Pesce), 4:03. 6, Carolina, Lindholm 9 (Aho,
Ryan), 6:57. 7, Buffalo, Eichel 10 (McCabe, Okposo),
9:24. 8, Buffalo, Eichel 11 (Kane), 9:34.
OVERTIME
Scoring: 9, Carolina, Slavin 3 (Aho, Lindholm), 2:15.
SHOTS ON GOAL
CAROLINA ......................... 7
15
9
3 — 34
BUFFALO ......................... 12
14
13
2 — 41
Power-play opportunities: Carolina 0 of 2; Buffalo 0 of 2.
Goalies: Carolina, Ward 6-2-1 (41 shots-37 saves).
Buffalo, Johnson 1-5-3 (34-29). A: 17,610 (19,070). T:
2:38.
Rangers 4, Kings 2
LOS ANGELES .......................... 0
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 1
1
1
1 —
2 —
2
4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, N.Y. Rangers, Kreider 11 (Desharnais, Shattenkirk), 10:23 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Los Angeles, Gaborik 5 (Jokinen), 3:46. 3, N.Y.
Rangers, Hayes 7 (Grabner, McDonagh), 14:43.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Los Angeles, Mitchell 2 (Gaborik, Jokinen),
7:59. 5, N.Y. Rangers, Nash 9, 16:33. 6, N.Y. Rangers,
Miller 5 (Vesey, Zuccarello), 19:06.
SHOTS ON GOAL
LOS ANGELES ........................ 10
12
13 — 35
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 8
12
8 — 28
Power-play opportunities: Los Angeles 0 of 1; N.Y.
Rangers 1 of 3. Goalies: Los Angeles, Quick 15-10-1 (27
shots-24 saves). N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 15-8-2 (3533). A: 17,756 (18,006). T: 2:24.
Devils 5, Stars 2
DALLAS .................................... 1
NEW JERSEY ........................... 2
1
1
0 —
2 —
2
5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, New Jersey, Santini 2 (Gibbons), 4:28. 2,
Dallas, Hanzal 2 (Seguin, Lindell), 6:42 (pp). 3, New
Jersey, Coleman 4 (Greene, Gibbons), 19:06.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Dallas, Radulov 11 (Lindell, Janmark), 8:09. 5,
New Jersey, Boyle 7 (Butcher, Zacha), 16:39 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
TOP 20
NO. 13 POOLESVILLE 68, WALTER JOHNSON 30
Scoring: 6, New Jersey, Lappin 1 (Boyle, Hayes), 12:57. 7,
New Jersey, Boyle 8, 18:00.
WJ (2-2) Lucas 10, Assaker 6, Wagar 5, Kemp 2,
Sarnowski 2, Tavik 2, Dever 2, Martin 1 Totals 7 7-13 30.
P (4-0) Thompson 12, Lee 11, Haddaway 11, Hobbs 10,
Green 9, Lemarr 7, Mullikin 5, Hobbs 3 Totals 21 2-7 68.
Halftime: Poolesville, (37-12).
Three-point goals: P 8 (Green 1, Lee 1, Thompson 4,
Mullikin 1, Haddaway 1); WJ 3 (Lucas 3).
SHOTS ON GOAL
DALLAS .................................. 12
5
13 — 30
NEW JERSEY ........................... 9
9
8 — 26
Power-play opportunities: Dallas 1 of 3; New Jersey 1 of
5. Goalies: Dallas, Lehtonen 5-5-1 (25 shots-21 saves).
New Jersey, Schneider 13-6-4 (30-28). A: 13,171
(16,514). T: 2:45.
NO. 16 BULLIS 59, WILSON 45
Jazz 107, Celtics 95
UTAH .................................. 21
BOSTON ............................. 26
NCAA women
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
MONDAY’S GAMES
Boston at Indiana, 7
New York at Charlotte, 7
Miami at Atlanta, 7:30
Denver at Oklahoma City, 8
Philadelphia at Chicago, 8
Portland at Minnesota, 8
Utah at Houston, 8
L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 8:30
Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30
Golden State at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
PORTLAND ......................... 24
ORLANDO ........................... 20
EAST
Mount St. Mary’s 89, Washington (Md.) 67
SOUTH
E. Kentucky 70, Charleston Southern 65
NC A&T 64, Tennessee St. 54
Samford 98, Thomas (Ga.) 51
MIDWEST
Creighton 87, Md.-Eastern Shore 36
UIC 76, Dartmouth 60
SOUTHWEST
Houston Baptist 100, Barclay 65
Sam Houston St. 57, UALR 55
FAR WEST
Colorado 112, S. Dakota St. 103 (2OT)
29
28
26
24
25 — 104
27 — 98
MIAMI: Richardson 4-7 2-2 11, J.Johnson 5-10 1-1 11,
Olynyk 4-9 2-4 11, Dragic 2-10 4-4 8, Waiters 5-14 2-2 12,
Mickey 4-6 0-0 8, Adebayo 5-6 1-1 11, T.Johnson 5-6 2-2
16, Ellington 5-10 1-1 16. Totals 39-78 15-17 104.
CHARLOTTE: Kidd-Gilchrist 6-8 1-2 13, Williams 2-6 0-0
5, Howard 4-8 7-12 15, Walker 8-22 5-6 25, Batum 2-7
1-1 5, O’Bryant III 2-6 0-0 4, Kaminsky 3-11 2-2 10,
Carter-Williams 1-1 2-2 4, Monk 1-3 0-0 3, Lamb 4-10 2-2
12, Graham 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 34-83 20-27 98.
Three-point Goals: Miami 11-31 (Ellington 5-10, T.Johnson 4-4, Richardson 1-2, Olynyk 1-4, Mickey 0-1,
J.Johnson 0-2, Dragic 0-3, Waiters 0-5), Charlotte 10-27
(Walker 4-10, Lamb 2-4, Kaminsky 2-6, Monk 1-2,
Williams 1-4, O’Bryant III 0-1). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Miami 40 (Mickey 7), Charlotte 42 (Howard
16). Assists: Miami 25 (Dragic 7), Charlotte 21 (Batum
10). Total Fouls: Miami 23, Charlotte 14. Technicals:
Williams. A: 15,565 (19,077).
B (3-2) Saddler 14, Carrillo 13, Walker 10, Page 9,
Urofsky 5, Pendleton 5, Eniafe 3 Totals 16 9-17 59.
W (4-2) Camille 13, Cousins 11, Brown-Egue 10, Fischer
9, Hopkins 2 Totals 13 16-23 45.
Halftime: Wilson, (27-27).
Three-point goals: W 1 (Fischer 1); B 6 (Saddler 3,
Walker 1, Urofsky 1, Carrillo 1).
Red Wings 3, Maple Leafs 1
NO. 17 EDISON 87, LEE 22
SECOND PERIOD
E (3-2) Miller 15, Bagsby 15, Lee 11, Jewell 10, Gray 9,
Lee 9, Henderson 8, Castma 4, Harris 4, Johns 2 Totals 33
9-14 87.
L (1-3)Totals 0 0-0 22.
Halftime: Edison, (54-10).
Three-point goals: E 4 (Gray 1, Lee 1, Bagsby 1, Lee 1).
Scoring: 2, Detroit, DeKeyser 1 (Zetterberg, Frk), 5:22. 3,
Detroit, Daley 1 (Ericsson, Glendening), 11:22 (sh).
NO. 18 ANACOSTIA 64,
THEODORE ROOSEVELT 13
SHOTS ON GOAL
A (4-2) Moye 30, Simmons 7, Cathcart 6, Coates 5,
Anthony 4, Hawkins 3, Banks 2, Walker 2 Totals 21 8-16
64.
TR (4-0) Mccauley 5, Whitehead 2, Anderson 2, Deneke 2
Totals 2 4-6 13.
Halftime: Anacostia, (41-9).
Three-point goals: TR 1 (Mccauley 1); A 3 (Moye 2,
Hawkins 1).
TORONTO ................................ 1
DETROIT .................................. 0
0
2
0 —
1 —
1
3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Toronto, Borgman 3 (Martin, Moore), 1:58.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Detroit, Tatar 10 (Kronwall, Zetterberg), 9:39
(pp).
TORONTO .............................. 12
5
9 — 26
DETROIT .................................. 7
13
9 — 29
Power-play opportunities: Toronto 0 of 3; Detroit 1 of 4.
Goalies: Toronto, McElhinney 3-3-0 (29 shots-26 saves).
Detroit, Howard 10-9-6 (26-25). A: 19,515 (20,000). T: 2:26.
TR ANS AC TI ONS
NO. 19 HERNDON 66, CHANTILLY 58
H (6-0) Newman 27, Brunson 18, Pearson 11, Kimble 4,
Koch 3, Johnson 2, Anane 1 Totals 9 15-22 66.
C (3-4) O'Brien 19, Baxter 11, Chae 9, Brunais 7, Francis
5, Copeland 4, Mazari 3 Totals 14 12-15 58.
Halftime: Herndon, (33-29).
Three-point goals: C 6 (Chae 1, Brunais 1, Baxter 2,
Francis 1, Mazari 1); H 11 (Brunson 3, Koch 1, Kimble 1,
Newman 4, Pearson 2).
NO. 20 MCNAMARA 66, BISHOP IRETON 47
BM (5-0) Matharu 28, Brown-Turner 20, King 8, Scott 4,
Bell 2, Evans 2, Gibson 2 Totals 16 13-17 66.
BI (4-1) Peters 18, Konkwo 11, Shacklford 8, Jewett 5,
Kennard 5 Totals 9 5-12 47.
Halftime: McNamara, (31-25).
Three-point goals: BI 8 (Shacklford 1, Jewett 1, Peters
6); BM 7 (Matharu 4, Brown-Turner 3).
NFL
Arizona Cardinals: Placed RB Adrian Peterson on injured
reserve. Activated LS Aaron Brewer from injured reserve. Claimed CB C.J. Goodwin off waivers from
Atlanta.
Buffalo Bills: Placed OT Cordy Glenn on injured reserve.
Cleveland Browns: Released OL Andrew Wylie from the
practice squad. Signed DL T.Y. McGill to the practice
squad.
Kansas City Chiefs: Placed C Mitch Morse on injured
reserve. Signed CB Keith Reaser from the practice
squad.
Minnesota Vikings: Placed TE Blake Bell on injured
reserve. Signed TE Kyle Carter.Signed S Jack Tocho to
the practice squad.
Oakland Raiders: Placed S Obi Melifonwu on injured
reserve. Activated CB Antonio Hamilton from injured
reserve.
EFGHI
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Appliances
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Excel'nt Cond, HEPA filtration, Cost
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225
Collectibles
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280
Furniture
MOVING
Musical Instruments
Balwin Acoustical Piano—Great Condition w/humidifier. New pedal
covers and recently tuned. $1,000
Glenn Dale, MD. 301-467-1786
Moving Sale - couches, computer
furniture, huge stamp collection, all
uncancelled,misc furniture and 284
lamps. Call for appt 703-360-4304
Student Desk & Chair—$45 24x42
top with drawers, v/good cond.
roller chair, 301-345-1693
Office & Business
Equipment
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MD, 240-988-6885. Trillium 306 3
lines 4 handsets
Home & Garden
602
610
Found
MONTGOMERY CO. ANIMAL SHELTER
If you have lost an animal in the
Washington Metro area: Please call
the Montgomery Co. Animal Shelter
at 240-773-5960 or online for found
animals at www.mchumane.org
610
Dogs for Sale
AUSSIE LABRADOODLE PUPS - blue
merle & 1 black, very sweet & soft,
9 weeks old, first shots/ dewormed.
$560 CASH 301-797-5622
Dogs for Sale
European Rottweilers—8 wks, TOP
European Champion BLOODLINES
health clearance on parents, vet
records on pups, text: 240-595-1388
French Bulldog—AKC/shots/chip
(240)292-8995 $3500 obo
smallbatchfrenchies@gmail.com;
youtube.com/user/Divinsky83
Sporting Goods
& Services
Medical Equipment
Clothing, Shoes
& Accessories
French Bulldogs - 9 weeks,2 F,
1 M. fawn, tan&white, brindle &
white. $2,500 each.
301-252-9213 or visit:
www.windsoroakfarm.com
205
Antiques
Antiques
KENSINGTON
ANTIQUE ROW
Antiques & Specialty Shops
Antique & Vintage Furniture.
Lighting, Jewelry, Art, Linens,
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Multi-Dealer Mall B Stay 4 Lunch
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German Short hair Pointer Puppies—
Call for pricing, Male and Females,
10 weeks old, 540-216-1855
GOLDENDOODLES- M &F, 9 weeks, S
&W, declaws removed, fam raised,
blonde to med. in color,
301-639-8636
610
KensingtonAntiqueRow.com
HOWARD CO. ANIMAL CONTROL
If you have lost an animal in the
Howard County/
Washington Metro area:
CALL 410-313-2780
E. Howard Ave., Kensington,
MD N. on Conn., R. on Howard,
2 mi. N of Beltway (I-495)
Free Parking!
Ask me about home delivery!
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mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
FREE UNDER $250
Dogs for Sale
GREAT PYRENEES PUPPIES
6 Males & 2 Females, 14 weeks old,
vet checked, shots. $300 each
Call 540-636-4897 or 540-622-1060
Huskys & more — Christmas puppy
Sale. 304-904-6289, Cash, CC, Easy
Finance,www.wvpuppy.com, 59
East Rd, Martinsburg WV, exit16E
Lab Pups—AKC. Chocolate/Yellow
Guaranteed, wormed/shot. Socialized w/kids. 703-203-0702, 540825-4688. belgianwayfarm.com
Labradoodle— Multigeneration Labradoodles.
10 weeks old, $1400,
202-670-1564
LABRADOR RETRIEVER PUPPIES CKC
GOLDEN RET AKC & GOLDEN /
yellow chocolate & black, family
LAB RET CROSS PUPS & ADULTS
raised and good with children, Ready
8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents now. 540-383-4203
on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543
W www.VictoriasPups.com W
Labrador Retriever—Pups
$1,200, 2 Black m, 1 Yellow f, 3 wks., AKC Excel
Pedigree, Health clear/
guar./ genetic screens.
Training/ Socialized/ vaccines/ microchip. #540364-2989/#757-373-6967
FRENCH BULLDOGS- AKC, M/F,
all colors, $3500+, 10 weeks +
timeoutkennels.com 240-447-7615
Mini American Shepherds—AKC
Toy&Mini(10&20pound)hlth guar.
care pkg. 540-937-4887, CircleA
FarmAussiesandMore.weebly.com
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS - Pure
bred, AKC reg, shots, vet checked.
9 weeks old. Males & females.
$650-$800.
Call 240-398-6312
Golden Retriever Pups—AKC.
Vet checked, Have both parents,
$900, 434-709-5435
Pomeranian—AKC. Intact Orange
Sable Male Pom. 1 Yr Old. S/W
Healthy. $750, 301-467-1786
Found
FAIRFAX CO. ANIMAL SERVICES
LAB RETR MIX M WH
FFX CO
RETRIEVER, F.C. MIX M BLK FFX CO
JACK RUS TER MIX F W/BLK FFX CO
ALASK HUSK MIX M BLK/W FFX CO
HAVANESE MIX M BR/BG
FFX CO
COO/BLUETICK M BLK/BLU FFX CO
CHOW MIX F CRM
FFX CO
CHOW MIX M CRM
FFX CO
DSH MIX F GRAY/W
FFX CO
DSH MIX F BR/CRM
FFX CO
FOR MORE INFO CALL (703) 830-1100
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
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Golden Retriever, AKC— READY FOR
CHRISTMAS PUPPIES. Hand-Raised
Family Centered Breeder OFA/CH
Bloodlines American/English Creme
Health Wrnty Microchips
www.manorhousegoldens.com
Manor House Golden Retrievers on
Facebook. $1500. 434-960-5023
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
Dogs for Sale
Golden Retriever—Male and Female
pups AKC and all certs.
Call 540-896-7327 for
more info, Gap View Ranch
Merchandise Wanted
602
610
Goldendoodles Ready Dec 23rd
2017, health guaranteed, shots,
dewormed, $700. Also, Labradoodles, ready Jan. 6th 2018. $500.
Health guaranteed, shots,
dewormed. Check us out on
facebook : Barb Hade 717-328-9549
Estate Sales
Antiques & Auctions
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
COMIC BOOK & SPORTSCARD
SHOW—Saturday Dec. 30, 10am- 265
291
3pm Annandale Va. Fire House Expo
Bernedoodles—M/F, 8wks,
Vacs/
Hall 7128 Columbia Pike 22003
Area Rug—$225, Burke, VA, 703-250wormed. Brindle, Bi color, Black/
shoffpromotions.com
1159 multi colored-6.7x9.6
White, Tri color, sure to be show
FOLDING BIKE—$75 20" silver Unis
stoppers, $1200+, 301-639-3808
folding bike in good shape, lv mesI BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I drive
sage, 301-345-1693
to you, pay CASH, and haul them Boxwood—$10 American 1 gal.12"
Bichon Frise — AKC reg.,$695-$895,
for $10 301-807-1063
away. Call 571-830-5871
Males & females, ready 12/22,
Nordic Track Exercise Skier—$150
540-348-4212
Folds up for easy transport in your
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian car. Cost $800 new. 571-606-0319
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
BOUVIER
PUPS
- 2 females from
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
outstanding European working
SCUBAGEAR Large—$249
WetWill Come to you!
lines. 8 weeks old, ready to go
suit,Fins,Gloves,Boots,Mask/Snrkl,
268
home.
Carla
757-426-1223.
See
Wght belt/wghts, 301-345-1693
229
info at www.DutchEastDogs.com
POWER WHEEL CHAIR- Sold as is. 360
Cash only. Serious buyers. Asking
$1200. Call 202-829-3889, lv msg
13701 CHESTNUT OAK LN, BRANDYBrittany SPaniel Pups, AKC reg Males
Men's bicycling shoes—$40 Forte
WINE, MD – FINAL DAY ESTATE SALE! and Females Available Jan 26, 2018.
MTB bike shoes Euro size 45 / US 275
DIR: Floral Park Rd, Yellow Poplar Ln,
Reserve now.
10, includes cleats, 703-622-6494
Woodreed Dr, Chestnut Oak Ln.
Culpeper, VA. 540-905-0405
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—I drive
www.FOURSALES.com
255
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
Cavapoo puppies—$500-750, m/f,
Sat 9-3; Sun 9-1.
away. Call 571-830-5871
non-shed, ruby. Vet check, shots.,
9649 PARK ST, MANASSAS, VA
8 wks on 12/23; Home raised w/ kids
HUGE COLLECTOR'S ESTATE SALE!
& pets. 240-838-1361
DIR: Sudley Rd, Stonewall Rd,
Peabody St, Park St.
BRICK—$249 550 New 10 Hole Bldg Radio tubes—WANTED ham radios
Size, less or more if need (apprx
huge speakers tube hif amps 202 Need a Quality Sale? 703-256-8300
DOBERMAN PUPPIES - AKC, big
2000) .45 each, 301-345-1693
527 9501, vcvdc@msn.com
boned, family raised, great temperament, parents on premises. 8 weeks
21135 White Clay Pl.
old. some have Ears done. All colors
Leesburg, Va. 20176
available. $500/$900. 240-674-2844
Fri, Sat & Sun 10 - 3
or 240-674-3994
www.emeraldestatesales.com
571 314 4391
205
EZ
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208
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2017
610
Dogs for Sale
Pomeranian—Poms Chocolate
Merle. Teddy Bear Face. 2 Females,
One Male. 8 Wks. old. S/W. Health
Guarantee. Ready for Christmas.
$2,500, 301-467-1786
PURE BRED SHIH TZUS- 4 weeks,
raised with family in loving home.
ready for chritsmas 4 F, 1M white &
tan, $750+ negotiable 202-210-3572
610
825
Dogs for Sale
Purchasing Cooperative of
America will receive proposals
until 11:00am CT on Tuesday,
January 23, 2018 in the Bonfire
application on the PCA Website
Yorkie—$1300, Male, 12 wks old. for Region III ESC, 1905 Leary
Registered. Health guar. Parents on
Premises. Ready to go. Great per- Ln, Victoria, TX 77901, for the
sonality, very lovable. 540-229-1618 following # of RFP/RFQs
national contracts: (1) RFQ 3622
184-18 Financing for Public
Entities
and
Facilities
Operations and Maintenance;
(2) RFP 3-185-18 HVAC,
Plumbing,
Electrical,
Mechanical, Operations &
4Paws—Adopt fr 40+ cat/
Maintenance Trades, Supplies
kitten $v Sat 1-5 Fairfax
and Service. NOTICE: PCA is
Petco www.fourpaws.org
holding a pre-proposal Meeting
CFC#34517 Bring your pet
on Wednesday, December 20,
for photo w/ Santa 1-4 pm
2017 at 11811 North Freeway
(I-45N), 5th Floor, Houston, TX
@ 10 a.m. – Noon. RSVP
Required. Call 844-722-6374
x700 or 713-254-1858. Go to
www.pcamerica.org/solicitatio
ns for more information.
4Paws—Adopt fr 20+ cats/
kittens $v Sun 1-4 Sterling
C JOBS
Petco www.fourpaws.org
571-434-6562 CFC#34517
Adopt Cats
ROTTWEILER PUPS AKC, German,
1st shots,, tails docked, hlth guar.,
P.O.P. ready now. Loc in Ruther Glen,
VA. Call /text 210-584-8896
SHAR PEI PUPPIES Available now,
1 female, 3 males, Lots of wrinkles
to love. Call 814-232-7956
after 3:30pm.
SHELTIE PUPPIES - AKC registered,
very small parents,3 sable white
males. brown and blue eye color.
9 wks. Call 540-560-5132
Shiba Ina—puppies, $1200, Females,
8 weeks old, 240-707-7404
640
SHIBA INU PUPS- ACA Reg, Ready
12/18. First shots,
M&F $850, accepting deps. 540879-2180, no Sunday calls
Shih Tzu/Bichon—ShiChon teddybear
ZuChon Puppy 703-577-1069 9wks
$750+ DCDogFinders.com
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Birds & Other Animals
CANARIES - Christmas Special!
2 for the price of 1. Buy a male
for $60, get Female free (if wanted)!
Mr.Domingo - 703-992-8468
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WHEATEN PUPS - 8 wks, purebred,
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KIA
2013
FORTE
EX
FWD
MGR
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all power, CD, VA inspected, runs
excellent, $8200 only.
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CHEVROLET
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CHRYSLER 2015 200 LIMITED FWD
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THE WASHINGTON POST . SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2017
Real Estate
A beginner’s
step-by-step
guide to being
a landlord
Entering the world of real estate
investment requires a close look at
your options and a sound strategy. 6
TERRY WONG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
WHERE WE LIVE: DUNN LORING
SHAPING THE CITY
BUYING NEW
This Vienna, Va., community is tranquil and
bucolic, yet minutes from Tysons Corner. 2
Exhibit highlights housing
of the future. 5
Affordable condos at
National Harbor. 3
ACTIVE ADULT LIVING, UNMATCHED.
NOW SELLING! ELEVATOR 2-CAR GARAGE TOWNHOMES FROM THE UPPER $600s.
THE ONLY NEW URBAN 55+ ACTIVE ADULT COMMUNITY IN ALEXANDRIA, VA
GPS Address: 7900 Telegraph Road Alexandria, VA 22315
Contact: Lori Windsor (703) 507-6882 | Open: Daily 11am – 5pm | Brokers Warmly Welcome.*
CraftmarkHomes.com/CrestofAlexandria
*Must register on site and comply with policy terms. Prices and details subject to change without notice. See Sales Manager for details. The Community is intended to provide housing
primarily for persons 55 years of age or older, and additional restrictions apply. The Community shall be operated as an age-restricted community in compliance with all applicable
state and federal laws. At all times, at least eighty percent (80%) of the homes within the Community shall be occupied by at least one (1) individual 55 years of age or older.
3.93%
30-year rate falls. 5
2
EZ
Where We Live
Dunn Loring
A quiet
place
to hit
the trail
Virginia neighborhood makes
exercise easy with access
to biking, running paths
BY
L ESTER D AVIS
Ali Alavi moved nine years ago to a house
in Vienna’s Dunn Loring with an eye toward
improving his quality of life.
The neighborhood’s tranquil, tree-lined
streets were nice. And Dunn Loring’s large
plots of land, sporting an array of architectural styles, certainly were a draw.
But the thing that ultimately sold him on
the neighborhood was the W&OD Trail,
with its maze of paths for hiking, biking,
running and walking.
For the sexagenarian, who has diabetes,
having access to 45 miles of paved trails that
run along the former roadbed of the Washington & Old Dominion Railroad has been a
“lifesaver,” Alavi said.
“The trails are vital to my lifestyle because, living with diabetes, I have to be
active,” said Alavi, who said he exercises
outdoors daily. “I can exercise anytime I
want, and that’s helped improve my health,
Alavi said. He lives steps away from the
park’s trails in a 3,000-square-foot, sevenbedroom, three-bathroom Cape Cod on
Idylwood Road.
PHOTOS BY JUSTIN T. GELLERSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Vienna’s Dunn Loring neighborhood is a “hidden gem,” a real estate agent says. Located close to interstates and shopping, it also
offers easy access to the W&OD Trail, below, which runs along the former roadbed of the Washington & Old Dominion Railroad.
Md.
Detail
Va.
495
DUNN
LORING
CE
DA
RL
N.
DECEMBER 16, 2017
. SATURDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
PI
KE
ELEC
TRIC
AV
E.
‘Hidden gem’: Consisting mostly of sin-
gle-family houses, with a smattering of
townhouses, Dunn Loring is a “great place
to live that’s under the radar for most buyers,” said Traci Oliver, an agent with TTR
Sotheby’s International Realty.
The community is only about two square
miles, and that compactness, Oliver said,
results in a true sense of camaraderie that
makes people want to stay put.
“Dunn Loring is sort of a hidden gem. It’s
really rare to find a neighborhood that’s so
close to major highways, and offers plenty of
shopping options, still have a sense of community,” she said.
Sue Weis, who moved to Dunn Loring 35
years ago, said she remembers when a large
part of the surrounding county consisted of
woodlands. Over the years, she’s enjoyed
watching the growth of shopping options
around her.
“The access we enjoy to seemingly everything is just such an asset,” said Weis, who
lives in a four-bedroom, four-bathroom
split-level on Sandburg Street.
Steve Payne and Holly Bastian had just
finished jogging along the W&OD Trail and
were making the two-minute walk from the
park to the front door of their 4,200-squarefoot, four-bedroom, five-bathroom Colonial
on Iliff Drive when they stopped to talk
LE
ES
BU
RG
D.C.
Dunn LoringMerrifield
66
about their affinity for the neighborhood.
The couple used to live three miles south
of Dunn Loring until they grew tired of
having to “put our bikes on our car and drive
over here,” Bastian said. “We thought it
would be great to live in Dunn Loring and
get to use the trails whenever we wanted.”
“There’s no excuse not to exercise,” Payne
chimed in. “The pressure is seeing someone
out jogging or biking, and then we’re like,
‘Okay, let me get out there, too,’ ” he said.
About five minutes from Tysons Corner
and close to the Mosaic District’s blend of
retail and dining options, Dunn Loring is
centrally located to the activity outside its
borders, Bastian said.
“We’re within walking distance of so
many takeout and sit-down restaurants that
it’s often too difficult to choose,” she said.
“And we’re far enough from Tysons Corner
that the traffic isn’t a problem.”
Living there: Dunn Loring is roughly
bordered by Leesburg Pike to the north;
Interstate 495 to the east; Interstate 66 to
the south; and Gallows Road, Electric Avenue and Cedar Lane to the west.
In the past 12 months, 19 properties have
sold in Dunn Loring, ranging from a threebedroom, two-bathroom rambler for
$545,000 to a five-bedroom, five-bathroom
Colonial for $1,150,000, said Oliver, the real
estate agent with TTR Sotheby’s International Realty.
There are three homes under contract in
Dunn Loring, Oliver said. They range from a
2,294-square-foot, five-bedroom, threebathroom split-level for $675,000 to a 3,514square-foot, five-bedroom, four-bathroom
Victorian for $1,049,900.
Schools: Stenwood and Westbriar elementaries, Joyce Kilmer Middle and George
2,000 FEET
Source: Maps4News/Here
THE WASHINGTON POST
C. Marshall High.
Transit: The Dunn Loring-Merrifield station on Metro’s Orange Line serves the
neighborhood. The community is also
served by Metrobus’s 2A route.
Crime: In the past six months, there have
been four assaults and one robbery reported
in the area that includes Dunn Loring,
according to Fairfax County police.
realestate@washpost.com
To see more photos of Dunn Loring, go to
washingtonpost.com/realestate.
Buying New
3
EZ
The Haven
These homes have their own highway exit
BY
A UDREY H OFFER
An outdoor pool, a lounge with
a gas fireplace and a dog-washing
station are among the amenities
offered to prospective buyers at
the Haven, a 248-unit condominium building going up at National
Harbor.
But one perk for residents who
drive to work is the community’s
own exit off the highway. National
Harbor in Oxon Hill, Md., home to
the recently opened MGM National Harbor, is off Exit 2A on Interstate 495 and Exit 1B on Maryland
Route 295, less than 10 miles from
downtown Washington. “No other
development, up or down the East
Coast, has its own exit,” said Jon
Peterson, principal of Peterson
Cos. and developer of National
Harbor and the Haven.
National Harbor is a 550-acre
development that has been in the
making for 10 years. “At the beginning,” Peterson said, “our mindset was, we hope, we think this will
work. We’re putting all the right
pieces in place, but how will the
world receive us?”
That original vision was a success. “People are coming by the
thousands for fun, entertainment,
[the] beauty of the site, and to
live,” he said.
Paley designed two monumental
steel structures, one abstract and
the other a pair of eagles. Prince
George’s artists also contributed:
Steven Weitzman designed a large
terrazzo tile mural; Norman
Greene made a cast stone sculpture of five individuals; and Cheryl Foster designed two pairs of
panels, one of stained-glass mosaic and another of copper, brass,
aluminum and stained glass.
“Art isn’t cheap, but it’s everlasting and brings joy to all,” Peterson
said. “You know it’s been received
well when you see Lincoln’s hand
is discolored because so many
people have touched it.”
Delivery of the units is expected to start in midsummer. Amenities
will include an outdoor pool and a lounge with a gas fireplace.
dos with one space and some of
the larger ones with two spaces.
What’s nearby: National Har-
walkable on wide sidewalks, and
there’s room for bikes and cars to
ride side by side. A bike-sharing
To see more photos of the Haven, go to washingtonpost.com/realestate.
DECEMBER 16, 2017
Artwork: The Capital Wheel —
a huge white Ferris wheel — is the
standout landmark on the water’s
edge. A carousel, steps away, is
also popular.
Public art is a whimsical backdrop to street life. Milt Peterson,
Peterson’s father, promoted an
ambitious public art program by
curating art from several artists.
J. Seward Johnson and Ivan
Schwartz made painted bronze
sculptures of famous people, including Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and Marilyn Monroe. Albert
realestate@washpost.com
Transit: The Haven locale is
. SATURDAY,
bor is a full-fledged neighborhood
with more than 2,000 residents
and 13,000 employees. “We are
our own community, a micro-city
and the crown jewel of Prince
George’s County. We’ve built a
place with everything one needs
— dry cleaner, bank, drugstore
and coffee shops. It sounds like a
cliche, but you can really live,
work and play there,” Peterson
said.
There are more than 160 stores
and 40 dining establishments. Potomac Gourmet Market on American Way in downtown National
Harbor and Aldi’s in Oxon Hill sell
groceries. Tanger Outlets houses
retail fashion.
Holiday events are scheduled
hourly from noon to 4 p.m. Saturdays through Dec. 23.
Schools: Fort Foote Elementary, Oxon Hill Middle, Oxon Hill
High.
service will begin in the spring.
The Beltway/Interstate 495 entrance is barely a minute’s drive. It
takes 12 minutes to get downtown,
15 minutes to Ronald Reagan National Airport, and roughly 20
minutes to practically any other
location in the region, Peterson
said.
Water taxi service operates between National Harbor, Gaylord
National Convention Center and
Old Town Alexandria and the
Mall. Starting in the spring, a service will operate between National
Harbor and the Wharf. The cost is
$8 to $20.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Recreation to residential: Initially, National Harbor was intended as a commercial enterprise. “Then we added residential,
and people realized, ‘Oh, people
live there, too!’ ” Peterson said.
“The residential buildings totally
transformed perceptions from a
recreation destination to a real
live community.”
The Haven was initially designed as an apartment project,
but then Peterson studied demographic and sales data. He determined people were interested in
living there permanently — that
apartments were over-built and
condominiums under-built. So he
stepped in.
There are 20 junior one-bedroom condos, 117 one-bedrooms,
85 two-bedrooms, three two-bedrooms plus den, and 23 three-bedrooms. Several street-facing condominiums have their own entry
door and look like townhouses. A
few will have a terrace big enough
for outdoor furniture, and a few
will have a small balcony. A onebedroom furnished model is available for viewing at the nearby
sales office. Delivery is scheduled
to start in midsummer.
Interiors will be bright, with
natural light coming through big
windows, and contemporary in
design. Multiple floor plans will be
offered. A two-floor above-ground
parking podium will provide con-
PHOTOS BY BENJAMIN C TANKERSLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The living room in the model unit at the Haven, a 248-unit condominium going up at National Harbor
in Oxon Hill, Md. Several street-facing condos have their own entry door and look like townhouses.
THE HAVEN
165 Waterfront St.,
National Harbor, Md.
There will be 248 condominiums
ranging from $245,000 to
$650,000.
Builder: Peterson Cos.
Features: Hardwood-inspired
resilient flooring runs through each
unit. Frigidaire appliances are
installed in the kitchen, along with
two-tone cabinets featuring gray
oak on the lower cabinets and
high-gloss white on the upper ones.
Quartz counters with polished
chrome hardware are in the
kitchen and bathrooms. Amenities
include private cabanas in the pool
area, a billiards table in the lounge,
a cyber lounge for quiet work, an
outdoor kitchen with a seating area
and fire pits, a yoga studio and a
fitness center.
Bedrooms/bathrooms: 1 to 3 / 1
to 3
Square footage: 555 to 1,550
Condominium association fees:
$279 to $699 per month.
View model: From noon to 5 p.m.
daily.
Contact: Chris Masters at 703299-4226 or havennationalharbor.
com.
4
EZ
absolutely beguiling
SUMMER CREEK
featuring a bespoke themescape, back to mature trees and offer increasingly rare luxury; privacy and quiet in a convenient
suburban setting. Each home is ingeniously designed for the modern family and crafted with the care you’ve come to expect
from Gulick Group. Starting from the $1.8Ms. Learn more at www.gulickgroup.com or contact us for a private appointment.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16, 2017
Introducing Summer Creek in Great Falls – a new signature community from Gulick Group. These nine ~1-acre homesites,
Inquiries: 703.674.0350 | summer_creek@gulickgroup.com | www.gulickgroup.com | Brokers Warmly Welcomed
5
Urban Planning
EZ
Nuclear families are no longer the norm, and housing must catch up
From left,
Justin Griffis,
Garrett
Lance, James
Arnold and
Andrew
Krentz live in
an apartment
in the Oslo
building that,
like others
there, is
designed to be
shared by
several
people.
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
The vast majority of existing,
conventional detached and
semidetached homes, as well as
most townhouses, have been built
almost exclusively for nuclear
families: parents, two or three
children, and a pet or two. The
need for these homes will always
exist. But for many other
households, the size, interior
layout and functional details of
such homes are a poor fit.
Today’s real estate market is
more diverse and changing
rapidly as more people look for
homes satisfying their particular
needs, lifestyles and budgets.
Differing market segments
include singles living together,
whether young or old; aging
couples not ready to downsize;
single-parent families; multigenerational households; and
households with someone who is
disabled. This pertains not only to
detached and attached housing in
suburbs but also to dwellings in
multiunit buildings.
For example, in the past, a
typical two-bedroom
condominium or rental
apartment would have a master
bedroom-bathroom “suite” and a
much smaller, second bedroom
for a child or guest. Today,
demand is rising for units
without bedroom hierarchy.
The National Building
Museum beautifully
demonstrates how this can be
Kenneth R. Harney is
away. His column will
resume when he returns.
realestate@washpost.com
Roger K. Lewis is a practicing
architect, a professor emeritus of
architecture at the University of
Maryland and a regular guest
commentator on “The Kojo Nnamdi
Show” on WAMU (88.5 FM).
Weekly averages for popular
mortgage types
5%
30-YEAR FIXED 3.93
4
15-YEAR FIXED 3.36
3
5-YEAR ARM
3.36
2
1
0
’16
Source: Freddie Mac
THE WASHINGTON POST
’17
DECEMBER 16, 2017
The
Nation’s
Housing
achieved. At the center of the
exhibition, it has constructed a
complete, 1,000-square-foot
dwelling unit that could be either
a house or an apartment. Very
much hands-on and experiential
for museum visitors, the unit
embodies cutting-edge interior
design and technology.
Movable partitions and
recessed-in-the-wall, pull-down
furniture enable transformation
of the unit without need for
reconstruction. It can be
configured to work for a shared,
two-person household, for an
extended family or for two
independent empty nesters.
The kitchen is equipped and
detailed with state-of-the-art
materials, lighting, appliances,
hardware and cabinetry.
Countertop height can be
adjusted manually or
mechanically to comfortably
serve people of all ages, sizes and
physical abilities, in accord with
universal design principles.
Arrayed in the final exhibition
segment are photos, drawings
and explanatory texts showing
numerous built projects, some in
Washington, suggesting where
future residential architecture
. SATURDAY,
Yet permitting accessory
dwellings — or homes with
shared occupancy — is a very
cost-effective strategy for
increasing availability and
accessibility of affordable
housing for both young and aging
adults. In fact, neighborhood
density is unlikely to increase
because many homes, originally
occupied by families with five or
six members, are occupied by
empty-nester couples or a senior
citizen without a spouse.
To explain this nationwide
phenomenon, the National
Building Museum recently
opened a visually stimulating,
informative exhibition: “Making
Room: Housing for a Changing
America.” It begins by telling the
statistical story of demographic
and lifestyle changes in the
United States. With colorful,
easily understood diagrams and
charts, the exhibition asserts that
today “our vision of the American
household is inaccurate and
outdated.”
A snapshot of diverse
household percentages supports
the assertion: single-parent
families, 7 percent; nuclear
families, 20 percent; adults
sharing with other adults, 20
percent; couples, 25 percent; and
single people living alone, 28
percent. Over past decades, the
percentage of traditional, nuclear
family households has steadily
declined while single-person
households have steadily
climbed.
Other revealing statistics are
on display: Forty-eight percent of
U.S. adults are single, 32 percent
of young adults live at home, 27
percent of children live with a
single parent, and 22 percent of
Americans will be over 65 in 2050.
and urbanism are headed.
Included are shared and group
homes; housing for the elderly;
repurposed and retrofitted
buildings; and new,
demographically responsive
housing in suburban and urban
settings.
Among the featured examples
is the four-story Oslo, built by
Ditto Residential on a small lot on
Sixth Street NW in the District.
The modern, architecturally
sophisticated structure contains
nine three- and four-bedroom
flats. But what makes the Oslo
unique is that, in each apartment,
all bedrooms are essentially the
same size, and each has its own
bathroom.
Clearly, the Oslo apartment
units have been designed to be
occupied by and shared among
several individuals who may or
may not be related.
For a thought-provoking
glimpse into the future of U.S.
housing, visit the National
Building Museum exhibition. At
the very least, you’ll love the
kitchen.
THE WASHINGTON POST
The future shape
of housing in U.S.
cities and suburbs,
including
ROGER K.
metropolitan
LEWIS
Washington, is
destined to change significantly.
Whether detached, attached, part
of a residential cluster or in a
multiunit building, more and
more dwellings in coming
decades will look less and less like
the home you now inhabit or the
home where your parents grew
up.
Future housing types will be
influenced primarily by
substantial changes in household
demographics and lifestyles.
Additionally, evolving
technological innovations,
coupled with economic
conditions making homes
increasingly less affordable, will
affect the future form of housing.
Such changes also will have an
impact on land-use planning and
regulation, in turn affecting
patterns of urban growth, new
development and redevelopment
in cities and suburbs.
Indeed, long-standing, out-ofdate zoning ordinances continue
to determine the nature and
scope of physical growth and
housing, often impeding realestate-development innovation
and market-responsive changes.
In many jurisdictions, zoning
laws and regulations reflect
demographic and cultural norms
going back generations.
Most notably, around central
cities, zoning overwhelmingly
favors low-density, single-family
detached home development
serving traditional nuclear
families. A relatively small
proportion of land may be zoned
for higher residential densities,
whether for detached or attached
homes, multiunit buildings, or
homes shared and inhabited by
more than one family.
Many zoning ordinances still
outlaw creation of accessory
dwellings within single-family
zones. An accessory dwelling can
be a separately accessible unit in a
basement, an addition to the back
of a house, a small apartment
atop a detached garage or a
modest, free-standing unit built
in a single-family home’s back
yard.
Often when municipal or
county governments try to
change residential zoning
regulations to allow accessory
dwellings, neighborhood
homeowners voice opposition.
They usually contend that
allowing accessory units will
change neighborhood character,
increase neighborhood
population density and make onstreet parking more difficult.
Shaping
the City
6
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Cover Story
TERRY WONG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16, 2017
BY
M ICHELE L ERNER
When Arlington resident Jesse
Shapiro wanted to diversify his
investment portfolio with real estate, he recognized quickly that
he didn’t want to buy a place in
the Washington area.
“Housing costs in this region
are prohibitive, and I didn’t want
to risk buying something that’s 10
times the median price of a home
in other parts of the country,”
Shapiro says. “At the same time, it
can be difficult to invest long-distance if you don’t know enough
about other real estate markets.”
With the help of Roofstock, an
online real estate investment
platform, Shapiro and his wife
purchased a single-family house
in a suburb of Raleigh, N.C., in
January.
The decision to buy locally or
long distance is one of many to
make if you want to join the world
of real estate investors. The first
essential decision is to determine
whether you want to buy and flip
a property or invest for long-term
appreciation and cash flow from
rents.
According to the National Association of Realtors’ 2017 Investment and Vacation Home Buyers
Survey, investment home purchases rose 4.5 percent in 2016 to
1.14 million, up from 1.09 million
in 2015. The survey found that
INVESTING
IN REAL
ESTATE — AS
A LANDLORD
If you live in an area such as D.C., where housing
costs are high, consider long-distance ownership
FEVERPITCHED/GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCK
most individual investors bought
property to generate income in
recognition of the demand for
single-family house rentals.
“If you want to invest in real
estate, you need to know your
strategy,” says Rick Sharga, chief
marketing officer of Ten-X, an
online real estate marketplace
based in Irvine, Calif., that owns
Auction.com. “Most people focus
on buying property cheaply, but if
you plan to become a landlord,
then price is less of an issue. In
that case, cash flow is most important, and you want to buy
something that will be ready to
rent quickly and for more than
your costs.”
There are 19 million single-family house rentals in the
United States, according to
“Landlord Land,” a white paper
produced in February by Irvine,
Calif.-based ATTOM Data Solutions and Reno, Nev.-based Clear
Capital. The vast majority of the
rentals — 79 percent — are owned
by small-time landlords with only
one or two properties.
Invest locally or long-distance
Everyone is naturally more
comfortable investing in a local
market, but sometimes you can’t
get a reasonable return on your
investment, says Greg Rand, chief
executive of OwnAmerica, a Charlotte-based brokerage for inves-
7
EZ
“If you want to invest in real
estate, you need to know your
strategy. Most people focus on
buying property cheaply, but if
you plan to become a landlord,
then price is less of an issue.”
Rick Sharga, chief marketing officer of Ten-X,
an online real estate marketplace
your property goes up in value, then your
return on your investment is even higher.
Hawkins says that your financial evaluation should also include the property condition and estimate of when you may need
to replace appliances, heating or plumbing
systems or the roof.
Avoiding pitfalls
Although real estate investing can be
profitable, there are four main pitfalls
investors should avoid:
Being over-leveraged: If your mortgage is too high and the rent barely covers
your expenses, you could lose money if
your tenant doesn’t pay one month. Rand
recommends keeping 10 percent of the
gross annual rent in a separate account for
maintenance and reserves. “Don’t spend
your last dollar on a real estate investment,” he says.
Beasley recommends keeping 1 percent
of the property value in a reserve account
and adding to that account periodically.
Frequent vacancies: Turnover is the
fastest way to fail, Rand says. Landlords
need to screen their tenants to make sure
they have the means to pay the rent and
good credit. “One of the biggest risks is in
the length of time your rental stays vacant,”
Sharga says.
Chasing too-high returns: Rand says
you should expect returns in the mid-single
digits. “This is a get rich slowly proposition,” he says. “If you’re trying to get
quicker returns, you’re likely to buy a lower
priced property and have more turnover.
It’s better to buy a quality home in an area
with good schools where people will stay
longer.”
Thinking short-term: Beasley says investors need to look at rental property as a
long-term investment that can build
wealth over time. “You’re buying through
different real estate cycles, but if you don’t
have too much debt, you don’t need to
worry about selling even if the property
value declines,” says Beasley. “Keep in mind
that even if home values drop, rents usually
don’t. This can be a good hedge in the event
of another real estate downturn.”
Insuring your property
Rental properties require a landlord
insurance policy, also known as a dwelling
policy, which is typically a little costlier
than a traditional homeowner’s insurance
policy, says Laura Adams, a senior insurance analyst for InsuranceQuotes.com in
Austin.
“Insurance data shows that rental properties have more claims and higher dollar
claims than primary residences,” Adams
says.
A typical landlord policy covers physical
damage to the property for a covered
disaster, such as a fire or a hailstorm, along
with personal property belonging to the
owner, such as a lawn mower or furniture.
You also need to find out whether you
need flood insurance and whether insurance rates are particularly high in the area
where you intend to invest, such as along
the coast of Florida, because high insurance premiums will cut into your profit.
“Liability coverage is included in a land-
lord policy because of the potential of being
sued if a tenant or a guest is injured on the
property,” Adams says. “Landlords may
want to look at all of their assets that could
be at financial risk and purchase an umbrella policy for added coverage.”
Landlords can require tenants to buy
renter’s insurance to cover the tenant’s
personal property and to provide their own
liability protection.
Adams suggests that another option
could be to place the property in a limited
liability business structure to increase your
personal protection.
“If you place your investment property
in a business structure, then the only assets
at risk are those within the business, not
your other assets,” she says.
Legal and tax issues
Whether you are investing in property
long-distance or locally, it’s important to
make sure you are complying with local
laws and with the rules of a homeowners
association. In the Washington area, Virginia is considered to have more landlordfriendly laws, whereas the District and
Maryland have more tenant-friendly laws.
For example, Hawkins points out, all tenants in the District have the first right of
refusal if you want to sell your property,
which could delay the sale.
“If you have a local lawyer and are
investing long-distance, you can ask your
lawyer for a referral to someone familiar
with local laws,” says Jeff Bell, chief executive of LegalShield in Ada, Okla., a company that provides legal services in every
state for a monthly fee.
A real estate agent will know whether a
market is landlord- or tenant-friendly, says
Sharga, who adds that it might be best to
invest someplace else if your area is unfriendly to landlords.
“Your safest bet is to talk to a local real
estate attorney,” Sharga says. “But you also
need to make sure that the homeowners
association allows rentals. If you’re buying
a condo, make sure that you know what
percentage of the units can be rented, and
how many are currently rented. The last
thing you want is to buy an investment
property that you can’t rent.”
Bell says that legal issues that can plague
landlords include a difficult tenant who
pays late or not at all.
“A lawyer can help you determine the
best way to formally communicate issues
about nonpayment to prevent the necessity
of an eviction and to be compliant with
local laws,” Bell says. “For example, in some
jurisdictions, you can take late fees out of
your tenant’s security deposit, but in others
that would be illegal.”
Other legal issues include whether sublets are allowed and whether you can
collect any rent if a tenant breaks a lease,
Bell says.
“It’s important to make sure your rental
agreement is written appropriately with
everything spelled out, especially about the
condition of the property and the return of
a security deposit,” Bell says.
Consult a tax adviser to assist you with
the nuances of tax deductions for an
investment property.
“When you’re researching where to invest, you should also ask whether there are
different property tax rates for homeowners versus investors,” Rand says.
realestate@washpost.com
DECEMBER 16, 2017
Property management
If you’re a local landlord, you can manage your property yourself if you have the
time and the skills to maintain it. Alternatively, if you have a roster of good contractors, you can avoid the fee for a property
management company. However, you also
then need to screen your own tenants and
handle their rent payments.
“You need to have the right attitude to be
a landlord,” Hawkins says. “It can be a
hassle and inconvenient, so if you want to
avoid that, you should hire a property
management company.”
Most long-distance investors need a
property-management company to handle
tenant issues and maintenance. Typically,
property management companies charge
about 8 percent of the rent, Rand says.
He says technology has made it easier for
people to invest long-distance, because
there are national property management
companies with branches in multiple markets that can connect automatically with
tenants and owners.
Roofstock provides investors with a list
of two or three property managers in the
market where they are purchasing a home,
including their fees. The chosen property
manager then coordinates directly with
the investor.
. SATURDAY,
Crunching the numbers
Although some investors pay cash for
their property, many finance the purchase.
Beasley says the Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae) and the
Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. (Freddie Mac) guidelines require a 20 percent
down payment for an investment loan.
Typically, the interest rate is slightly higher
on investment loans, such as 4.5 percent
when owner-occupied loans are at 4.0
percent.
“Roofstock provided the underwriting
information I needed to invest long-distance, including market analysis, appraisals and home-inspection reports,” says
Shapiro, who picked his investment property by looking at a variety of factors, such
as the estimated value if he would need to
sell within five years, the forecast for the
rent and information on the property’s
tenant.
“When I reviewed the return on investment I included the cost of financing the
purchase,” says Shapiro, who made a 25
percent down payment on the approximately $100,000 property.
Shapiro shopped for a loan and ultimately chose his own lender, although
Roofstock also provides investors with a
list of potential lenders.
Rand says investors must do a costbenefit analysis, starting with an estimate
of the annual rent, minus 5 percent for
anticipated vacancies. They should then
subtract all expenses, such as taxes, insurance, homeowners association dues, property management fees and maintenance
costs, estimated at 10 percent of the gross
rent to generate your net operating income.
The return on your investment is calculated by dividing your net operating income by your mortgage payment. For
example, if you purchase a $100,000 property and your profit is $6,000, then your
return on your investment is 6 percent. If
THE WASHINGTON POST
tors of single-family rental homes.
“The yield is what matters with real
estate investing, and if the property prices
are too high or the rent isn’t high enough,
you can’t get a good return,” Rand says.
“For many people, that means investing in
a place that they are semi-comfortable
with, such as a place where they have
vacationed or have some kind of connection.”
It’s essential to understand the characteristics of any market before you invest,
such as the trends for job growth and
population growth, Rand says.
“Historically, 70 percent of people buy
an investment property within an hour of
their home because it’s convenient and
they know the area,” says Gary Beasley,
chief executive of Roofstock in Oakland,
Calif. “That’s fine if you live in a market
with good rental demand, and there’s no
danger of a recession. But it makes more
sense to diversify with an investment in
another market, just in case job growth
declines and rental demand drops at some
point.”
Roofstock recently developed a “Neighborhood Ratings” index that compiles information on a variety of factors such as
income, crime, schools, property values
and the nature of the housing stock to help
investors compare neighborhoods when
buying remotely.
“We sell single-family homes that are
tenant-occupied and provide investors
with 3-D tours, a home inspection and
demographic projections that help break
down the geographic barrier to investing,”
Beasley says. “We have advisers in different
markets, as well as data to make it easier
for investors.”
A real estate agent can help you evaluate
the market and will also know about
whether rents are going up or down,
Sharga says.
Beasley says investors are particularly
interested in buying in less costly markets,
such as Florida, Atlanta, Texas, North
Carolina and Las Vegas, especially when
they live in high-cost housing markets.
“When you invest in rental property, it’s
best to start modestly with a property on
the fringes of development that’s not super-expensive but is in the path of progress,” says Dave Hawkins, managing broker
of McEnearney Associates in Alexandria.
Hawkins purchased two townhouses as an
investment when he was in his 30s with the
goal of using the properties to pay for
college tuition for his children.
“We bought places where we could drive,
so I could handle the property management,” Hawkins says. “It’s important to talk
to a Realtor who can give you advice about
the neighborhood and what could impact
it, such as businesses moving in or out and
plans for public transportation.”
Town Square
Real Estate News & Notes
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16, 2017
A three-level
townhouse
in Pr. George’s
for $289,500
Buyers looking for affordable
homes within a short commute
of the District are turning to
Prince George’s County, where
the median sales price in
October was $285,000,
compared with the $550,000
median sales price in the
District, according to Rockvillebased Bright MLS. One popular
area with buyers who want
proximity to the city is
Hyattsville, which offers Metro
access and plenty of shops and
restaurants, plus an arts district.
One recent listing in
Hyattsville, a townhouse at 907
Meadow Trail Lane, is priced at
$289,500. Buyers must also pay
homeowners association dues of
$71 per month and annual
property taxes of $3,682.
The three-level brick
townhouse in the Landover
Mews development, built in
2003, has three bedrooms, four
bathrooms and 1,760 finished
square feet. The exterior includes
a deck, a patio and a one-car
garage. The area is served by
Metrobus.
The townhouse has an eat-in
kitchen with a center island,
granite counters and new
stainless-steel appliances, a
dining room and a large living
room on the main level, along
with a powder room. The master
bedroom has a walk-in closet
and a private full bathroom with
double vanities, a soaking tub
and a separate shower. Two more
bedrooms and a second full bath
are on the upper level. The house
has new carpet and paint. The
walkout basement is fully
finished and has another powder
room.
Assigned schools include
Cooper Lane Elementary,
Charles Carroll Middle and
Bladensburg High, all rated
below average or average by
GreatSchools.org.
For more photos, visit
slideshow.mris.com/slideshow/
slideshow.htm?ListingKey=3002
22791435.
For information, contact
Mynor Herrera with Keller
Williams Capital Properties at
301-437-1622.
New rental townhouses and
apartments in Falls Church
Rental housing shortages have
plagued the Washington area for
years, but now renters are
finding new options in the D.C.
suburbs. The Loren, a mixedused community co-developed
Del Webb has already sold
more than 65 houses in its
active-adult neighborhoods at
Terramor, known as Cortina and
Ardena. CalAtlantic Homes
anticipates opening Sterling,
another active adult
neighborhood, this winter.
The Veranda, which is open to
all Terramor residents, includes
outdoor swimming pools. The
Terrace Club, designated for 55and-older residents, will include
a 20,000-square-foot clubhouse
and indoor and outdoor pools.
All residents can use five miles of
walking trails that have rest
areas, dog parks, a community
garden, ballfields, tot lots and a
basketball court. For
information, visit terramor.com.
INA HERNANDEZ
The Hyattsville townhouse in the Landover Mews development has
Metro access and is near shops, restaurants and an arts district.
and managed by Bozzuto,
recently opened at 6410
Arlington Blvd. in Falls Church,
Va.
The 185-unit development
includes apartments ranging
from studios to two-bedroom
units with a den. In addition, the
Loren includes rental
townhouses with three levels,
two bedrooms, a private terrace
and more than 1,600 square feet
of living space.
Restaurants and shops will be
part of the development, which
is near the East Falls Church
Metro station, as well as several
commuter routes. Free shuttle
bus service is provided to the
Metro station.
The Loren’s amenities,
designed to provide an
atmosphere similar to that of a
hotel, include a swimming pool,
an entertaining kitchen with an
18-foot-long farm table, a fitness
center, a lounge with a fireplace,
a meeting room and a coffee bar.
The community also has a garage
for residents.
The residences include open
floor plans, granite counters,
stainless-steel appliances and
tile bathrooms. Rents range from
$1,795 to $3,525 for the
apartments and $3,325 to $3,525
for the townhouses. For
information, visit liveloren.com.
Multigenerational planned
communities are a new trend
Active-adult communities,
typically restricted to residents
55 and older, are traditionally
built as separate developments
for retirees and pre-retirees who
prefer to live among people
about their own age.
But a new trend appears to be
underway: planned communities
with both an active-adult
neighborhood and
multigenerational
neighborhoods.
In Temescal Valley, in
Riverside County, Calif.,
Foremost Cos. recently opened
two all-age neighborhoods at
Terramor, a planned community
that is already home to two
active-adult neighborhoods built
by Del Webb. Eventually,
Terramor will have 1,443 singlefamily houses in 16
neighborhoods.
In the Washington area, the
Two Rivers planned community
in Anne Arundel County, Md.,
started as an active-adult
community and then added an
all-ages neighborhood to the
development. At the Dominion
Valley development by Toll
Brothers in Prince William
County, Va., an active-adult
community is nestled within a
multigenerational development.
At Terramor, KB Home
recently opened six model homes
within its Sorrel and Caraway
neighborhoods. Priced from the
low $500,000s, the 170 singlefamily houses range from 2,229
to 2,787 square feet, with up to
six bedrooms, four bathrooms
and a two-car garage.
RE AL ESTAT E
Real Estate Editor:
V. Dion Haynes,
dion.haynes@washpost.com
Art Director:
Dwuan June
Advertising Manager:
Howard J.S. Bomstein,
howard.bomstein@washpost.com
To contact us:
realestate@washpost.com
Mail:
The Washington Post, Real Estate
Section
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C.
20071
Being cool and connected are
priorities for most renters
Although tenants want, most
of all, a rent they can afford,
there other considerations that
are deal-breakers for many.
Across the country, 92 percent
of renters would not lease a
home without air conditioning,
according to the 2017 National
Multifamily Housing Council
(NMHC)/Kingsley Renter
Preferences Report. That
number rises to 98 percent in the
hot and humid Washington area.
The report, based on
responses from more than
270,000 renters, found that
many tenants also say they won’t
lease a place without high-speed
Internet access (63 percent),
soundproof walls (53 percent), a
washer and dryer in the unit
(77 percent), or a dishwasher
(86 percent).
In the Washington area, more
renters (71 percent) won’t lease a
home without high-speed
Internet access or an in-unit
washer and dryer (88 percent).
Renters in the Washington
area are closely aligned with
their counterparts across the
country when it comes to
community amenities they
consider must-haves. These
include: reliable cell reception
(78 percent won’t rent without
it); secure resident parking (71
percent); secure amenity access
(49 percent); a swimming pool
(60 percent); and a fitness center
(55 percent).
For information about the
survey, visit nmhc.org/residents.
— Michele Lerner
To pass on a tip or item, contact us at
realestate@washpost.com and put
“Town Square” in the subject line.
Dec .
23
30
Dec .
The Real Estate section is
taking a holiday break
There will be no print
Real Estate section on
Saturday, December 23
and December 30.
Coming Saturday, January 6
Economist Mark Zandi forecasts
the local housing market outlook for 2018
N1494 2x6
8
EZ
9
EZ
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DECEMBER 16, 2017
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THE WASHINGTON POST
Know your neighbors. Experience a true sense of community. Be part of
10
EZ
House of the Week
Colonial history comes alive at Summerset in Fauquier County
BY
K ATHY O RTON
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16, 2017
Summerset, later known as
Rose Hill, in Delaplane, is one of
the earliest and most intact Colonial-period houses in Fauquier
County.
Delaplane, originally named
Piedmont Station, is in the southern end of the Crooked Run Valley
Rural Historic District. The village was established in 1852 as
one of the stops along the newly
chartered Manassas Gap Railroad. It was renamed Delaplane
in 1874 for Washington E. Delaplane, who was postmaster and
owner of the mercantile store.
John Rout, who was driven east
from the Shenandoah Valley by
the French and Indian War, built
Summerset sometime before 1759
on land that was part of James
Ball’s 18th-century land grant.
Hezekiah Turner, a native of
Charles County, Md., and a captain in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, came
to the Crooked Run Valley in 1767
and later settled at Summerset.
Turner had John Balthorpe
build Summerset Mill and a miller’s house on the south boundary
DWAYNE MOYERS
Summerset, in Delaplane, Va., is one of the earliest and most intact
Colonial homes in Fauquier County. It’s listed at $1.1 million.
of the estate in 1779. Balthorpe’s
initials and the year 1779 can be
found carved into stone on the
property. Turner sold Summerset
to Hezekiah Shacklett in 1787 but
retained ownership of the mill.
The mill went through several
owners before it burned down in
1894. Stones from the miller’s
house were used for the founda-
tion of Delaplane Manor, according to an architectural survey
form by the Virginia Department
of Historic Resources.
Several buildings on the property are thought to have been
built about 1790, including the
kitchen, now attached to the
home by a 20th-century hyphen
or hallway, the slave quarters, a
plantation office, a springhouse
and a stable.
Various skirmishes occurred
within the valley during the Civil
War, and the area was frequently
crossed by Union and Confederate troops. Many homes, including Summerset, provided shelter
for Confederate Col. John S. Mosby’s Rangers. Summerset survived the Civil War mostly intact.
Only the stable was destroyed,
and it was later rebuilt.
During the 19th and 20th centuries, the property went through
a handful of owners and became
known as Rose Hill.
The current owner bought
Summerset in the 1950s. Following Williamsburg National Park
Service guidelines, he extensively
renovated the house and several
outbuildings on the 25-acre estate
in the 1960s. Because of his painstaking renovation efforts, they retain their 18th-century structures
and many features, including
original doors with leather hinges, windows and interior details.
The two-story stone slave quarters are one of the best preserved
in the Crooked Run Valley, according to the Virginia Depart-
1796 WINCHESTER RD.,
DELAPLANE, VA.
$1.1 million
Features: Built about 1759,
Summerset is one of the earliest
and most intact Colonial-period
houses in Fauquier County. The
house and several outbuildings
retain their 18th-century structures
and many features, including
original doors with leather hinges,
windows and interior details.
Bedrooms/bathrooms: 2/2
Approximate square footage:
1,624
Lot size: 25.05 acres
Agent: Donna Carleton, Long &
Foster
For more photos of this home
and other houses for sale in the
area, go to washingtonpost.com/
wherewelive.
ment of Historic Resources.
The historic estate, which is
eligible for state and federal tax
credits for historic preservation,
is listed at $1.1 million.
kathy.orton@washpost.com
11
Real Estate Guide
Dupont Circle - NW
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(O)301-388-2600
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
Solomons Island
211 C St.
Prince George's Co
MD
With only a few homes remaining in Phase I, now is
How about some
home delivery?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
Chris McNelis, Broker
410-394-0990 Office
410-610-4045 Mobile
www.mcnelisgroup.com
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
C054E 2x3
SF
THE WASHINGTON POST
ARE YOUR TENANTS MOVING OUT?
NEED TO RENT THE PLACE OUT?
NO
WELL, KEEP Us IN MIND
IT’s ANOTHER yEAR
Of CLARINET PRACTICE
YES
CLASSIFIED
. SATURDAY,
YES
KLMNO
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
C054F 5x3.75
DECEMBER 16, 2017
2.1 million reader, renter included • 202.334.6200 • wahingtonpot.com/claified • Open 24/7
Or place our ad in Expre, our dail commuter read, and reach 536,000 reader.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
DECEMBER 16, 2017
12
EZ
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