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The Washington Post – December 18, 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Partly sunny 56/43 • Tomorrow: Partly sunny 61/43 B6
Besieged
IRS loses
‘will’ for
oversight
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
CRITICIZES SPECIAL
COUNSEL ON EMAILS
Effort to discredit
Russia probe intensifies
R OBERT O ’ H ARROW J R.
Years of conservative attacks
on the Internal Revenue Service
have greatly diminished the ability of agency regulators to oversee
political activity by charities and
other nonprofits, documents and
interviews show.
The fall in oversight, a byproduct
of repeated cuts to the IRS budget,
comes at a time when the number
of charities is reaching a historic
high and they are becoming more
partisan and financially complex.
It represents a success for conservatives who have long sought
to scale back the IRS and shrink
the federal government. They
capitalized on revelations in 2013
that IRS officials focused inappropriately on tea party and other
conservative groups based on
their names and policy positions,
rather than on their political activity, in assessing their applications for tax-exempt status.
Among conservatives, the episode has come to be known as the
“IRS targeting scandal.”
Under the federal tax code,
charities may not directly or indirectly support a political candidate, but they are allowed to
IRS CONTINUED ON A12
P HILIP R UCKER,
J OSH D AWSEY
AND S ARI H ORWITZ
BY
CONGRESS CONTINUED ON A10
MAYOR CONTINUED ON A9
TRUMP CONTINUED ON A10
People take to skating at the Wharf Ice Rink on the District’s Southwest Waterfront on Sunday. The Washington region
won’t be so chilly Monday, as partly sunny skies show up and temperatures rise to 56 degrees. Weather, B6
Defiant German mayor takes in refugees
Despite attack on his life
by asylum foe, official
says he has no regrets
G RIFF W ITTE
altena, germany — Moments
before the would-be assassin
tried to kill the mayor of this
small and picturesque riverside
town in the Sauerland hills of
western Germany, he told him
why.
He was thirsty, he said, as he
pressed a foot-long butcher’s
knife to the mayor’s throat. But
rather than help his fellow German, the mayor had taken in
hundreds of refugees.
Two weeks later, the gash in
Mayor Andreas Hollstein’s neck
has largely healed. But the sense
of profound shock in this tightknit community remains. And the
debate over his decision to make
this economically precarious
town a German model for the
acceptance and integration of
asylum seekers has only escalated.
Since the attack, Hollstein —
who credits the quick response of
the immigrant family that runs
the kebab shop where he was
ambushed with saving his life —
has been defiant.
Some people may not like his
humanitarian-based approach,
he said while sitting in his office
overlooking the town’s imposing
12th-century castle, and a few on
the extreme right may be angry
enough to try to kill him.
But Hollstein said he had no
regrets about taking in 450 asylum seekers, 100 more than was
required under German rules for
distributing the influx of more
Calif. pot offenders get
chance to clear records
BY J EFF S TEIN,
M IKE D E B ONIS
AND P ATRICK R EIS
Republicans return to Congress on Monday facing a packed
agenda with little time to enact it,
as party leaders aim to quickly
pass their massive tax plan and
then cut a budget deal with Democrats before the end of Friday to
avert a government shutdown.
Republicans’ tight timing on
taxes is self-imposed. GOP lawmakers have for months been racing to meet President Trump’s
demand that they send him tax
legislation before Christmas — a
timeline that gained new urgency
when Alabama Democrat Doug
Jones won the Senate seat currently occupied by Sen. Luther
Strange (R).
GOP leaders hope to hold tax
votes early in the week before
moving to the budget bill. They
need Democrats’ help to pass the
budget measure through the Senate, and thus far they have made
little progress bringing them
aboard amid disagreements over
spending levels, protection from
deportation for certain undocumented immigrants and a federal
than 1 million people in 2015 and
2016.
“It was the right thing to do,”
said the blond, bespectacled and
youthful-looking 54-year-old, a
scar forming beneath his left ear
where the blade pressed in. “I’d
do the same thing tomorrow.”
That puts Hollstein, a member
of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s
center-right Christian Democratic Union, sharply at odds with the
political moment in Europe.
Across the continent, politicians wary of a voter backlash
against those seeking a haven
President Trump on Sunday
sought to douse speculation that
he may fire special counsel Robert S. Mueller III amid an intensifying campaign by Trump allies
to attack the wide-ranging Russia
investigation as improper and
politically motivated.
Returning to the White House
from Camp David, Trump was
asked Sunday whether he intended to fire Mueller. “No, I’m not,”
he told journalists, insisting that
there was “no collusion whatsoever” between his campaign and
Russia.
The president’s comments
came a day after a lawyer representing Trump’s transition team
accused Mueller of wrongfully
obtaining thousands of emails
sent and received by Trump officials before the start of his administration — a legal and public
relations maneuver seen as possibly laying the groundwork to oust
the special counsel.
Trump criticized Mueller for
gaining access to those emails,
telling reporters the situation
was “not looking good.”
“It’s quite sad to see that,”
Trump said. “My people were very
upset about it.”
Mueller’s spokesman denied
wrongdoing, and some legal experts questioned the claim that
the emails were improperly obtained.
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
BY
GOP faces
scramble
on tax bill,
budget deal
. $2
Trump:
No plan
to fire
Mueller
Lacing up for the holidays
Study found no targeting
of tea party, but dispute
and budget cuts take toll
BY
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
Thousands could see
convictions expunged
BY
AND
R OB K UZNIA
K ATIE Z EZIMA
los angeles — Yirtuamlak Hailu
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Redskins show signs of life
Running back Kapri Bibbs scores a touchdown on a 36-yard pass from quarterback Kirk Cousins
during Washington’s 20-15 victory over the Arizona Cardinals at FedEx Field. Sports, D1
IN THE NEWS
THE NATION
PAVEL GOLOVKIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Terrorism alert Russian President Vladimir
Putin thanked President Trump for a CIA tip
that thwarted an attack in St. Petersburg. A2
Get in line At the end of the 2017 Supreme
Court session, one question remains: Should
attendance require nights on the sidewalk? A2
Homeland Security’s
inspector general criticized several U.S. immigration detention centers for having spoiled
food and inadequate
medical care, and for inappropriate treatment
of detainees. A2
A power outage at the
Atlanta airport brought
the busy facility to a
standstill, grounding or
diverting flights and
stranding thousands of
travelers. A14
THE WORLD
At least nine Christian
worshipers were killed
and 50 hurt when sui-
cide bombers attacked a
church in Pakistan. A9
THE REGION
Northern Virginians
would pay higher taxes
to provide Metro with
long-sought dedicated
funding under a plan to
be announced by Gov.
Terry McAuliffe (D). B1
The District government’s efforts to protect
residents from abusive
practices in the student
loan market could be
undermined by the
House Republican
higher-education bill. B1
SPORTS
Carolina Panthers
owner Jerry Richard-
son, the subject of a
league investigation into
alleged workplace misconduct, said he will sell
the NFL team at the end
of the season. D1
THE WEEK AHEAD
MONDAY
President Trump delivers a speech on national
security.
Education Secretary
Betsy DeVos delivers a
fall commencement address at the University of
Baltimore.
TUESDAY
November housing
starts are estimated at a
1,240,000 annual rate.
Derege came to California a decade ago with dreams of making it
big in the entertainment business.
But shortly after arriving, he was
arrested and convicted of selling
marijuana, a felony that has made
it difficult for him to find any job at
all.
But now, with California on the
verge of legal recreational marijuana sales starting Jan. 1, Derege
and hundreds of thousands of others could have their drug convictions wiped away, thanks to a lesser-known provision in the new
state marijuana law.
California is offering a second
chance to people convicted of al-
WEDNESDAY
Vice President Pence
meets with Egyptian
President Abdel Fatah alSissi in Cairo.
most any marijuana crimes, from
serious felonies to small infractions, with the opportunity to have
their criminal records cleared or
the charges sharply reduced. State
officials hope to reverse decades of
marijuana convictions that can
make it difficult for people to gain
meaningful employment and disproportionately affect low-income minorities.
“We worked to help create a
legalized and regulated process
for legal marijuana, but we also
wanted to make sure we could
help — some way, somehow —
repair the damages of marijuana
prohibition,” said Eunisses Hernandez, a policy coordinator at
the Drug Policy Alliance. The alliance said there have been 500,000
arrests for marijuana offenses in
California in the past 10 years, and
it estimates that up to a million
people have reviewable convictions on their records.
At least 4,500 people had filed
MARIJUANA CONTINUED ON A14
Inside
ST YLE
Wind wonders
Musicians tried to save
2017 with these special
instruments: flutes. C1
Existing-home sales for
November are estimated
at 5,520,000 on an annual basis.
Point of sales
A New York retailer may
have discovered the
antidote to the aversion
to shopping in stores. C1
THURSDAY
Third-quarter GDP is
expected to match the
prior month’s 3.3 percent
increase.
FRIDAY
Durable-goods orders
for November are expected to rise 2 percent.
Pence meets with Israeli
President Reuven Rivlin
in Jerusalem.
BUSINESS NEWS........................A13
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES ......................... A16
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B5
TELEVISION..................................C5
WORLD NEWS .............................. A8
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 13
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
2 9 0 4
A2
EZ
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
1 p.m.
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos addresses the
University of Baltimore’s fall commencement ceremony at
the Modell Performing Arts Center at the Lyric in Baltimore.
Visit washingtonpost.com/education for details.
2 p.m.
President Trump delivers a speech on his national
security strategy at the Ronald Reagan Bulding in
Washington. Visit washingtonpost.com/politics for
developments.
5 p.m.
The House Rules Committee meets on Capitol Hill to
formulate the conference report for the final Republican
tax bill. For developments, visit washingtonpost.com/
business.
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RE
. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
Sleeping on sidewalks to see Supreme Court at work
Before we get too
far away from the
event, let’s reflect
on the fact that —
ROBERT
BARNES
once again — folks
had to sleep on the
sidewalk for days to see or hear the
Supreme Court at work.
Some of those in line for
Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado
Civil Rights Commission, the case
of the Colorado baker who refused
to make a wedding cake for a samesex couple, waited for four days. In
the end, about 50 or so got a golden
ticket, according to those in line.
Some who waited were turned
away.
This is becoming the norm
when the court takes up big
issues — gay rights, gun control,
abortion, affirmative action.
Cases with lesser profiles can
also be cause for all-nighters. The
first people seeking admission to
recent oral arguments in New
Jersey’s bid for legalized sports
betting got in line at midnight for a
10 a.m. argument.
Some of those who care about
the court are disturbed at the
scenes of paid line-sitters and the
collection of camping chairs,
bedrolls and tarps that make life
a bit more comfortable for those
who wait in often dismal weather.
Kannon Shanmugam, a former
clerk to Justice Antonin Scalia
and a lawyer who frequently
argues before the court, says
there must be a better way.
In a tweet, he said: “Paid linesitting at #SCOTUS is unseemly.
But more generally, people
shouldn’t have to line up in the
cold for days to get into a public
court hearing. Whether it’s some
form of broadcast or something
else, the Court should come up
with a better solution.”
Everyone knows, of course, that
cameras are not allowed in the
Supreme Court, and years of calls
from Congress, the media and the
public to open up the proceedings
have left the justices unmoved.
Not one of the nine favors
televising the court’s arguments.
No live audio, either, or even
the same-day release of a tape.
The court turned down a specific
request in Masterpiece and has
been less and less likely to agree
in similar big cases.
@SCOTUS
Reporter
MARI MATSURI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Paid line-sitters queue in front of the Supreme Court on Dec. 4, the
day before a hearing in the case of a Colorado baker.
So while a transcript of the
arguments was available on the
court’s website hours later, the
audio of the justices’ Dec. 5
consideration of Masterpiece was
not released until Dec. 8.
For reasons the court has never
fully explained, audio of the court’s
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
arguments is made available on
Friday. It’s not a technology
problem: The court once released
same-day audio by mistake.
Justices have worried that
cameras or even live audio would
change the solemn process by
which they do their work.
Educating the public about the
process would be good, Chief
Justice John G. Roberts Jr. has
said, but the court’s most
important job is deciding cases.
The court is reluctant to
change a procedure it believes is
working. This, even as federal
courts around the country are
allowing in cameras and making
audio more available.
Shanmugam, who argues
before federal appeals courts
across the country, said more and
more offer either live audio or
same-day release of recordings,
with no discernible effect.
There are two lines for those
seeking admission to the
arguments — one for the public
and the other for members of the
Supreme Court bar. He was glad
the court in October 2015 banned
paid placeholders from the
“lawyers line.” Members of the
bar must hold their own spots if
they want to get in.
Gabe Roth, executive director
of Fix the Court, a group that
seeks greater Supreme Court
transparency, notes that even
with audio there would be some
who want to be physically
present. He suggests some sort of
lottery.
“Even if a lottery created a
secondary market, that would
still be an improvement over the
current situation, where linestanders are often paid
thousands of dollars,” his group
said in a statement.
It was line-standers who
started the rush in Masterpiece. At
noon the Friday before the
Tuesday argument, 18 people
began the queue, holding spots
for members of Alliance
Defending Freedom, the
conservative legal organization
representing Jack Phillips, the
baker at the center of the case.
Others quickly got in line behind
them.
Martin Naunov, who wrote his
college dissertation on the
Masterpiece case, was on the bus
from New York when he learned
the line had already started. He
had meant to stay with a friend
for a day or so.
But he went straight from
Union Station to the court and
got in line with nothing but his
bag. Generally, he’s quite chipper
about the experience.
When he arrived, he said he
thought, “Okay, this is what
democracy looks like.” When he
found out the folks in front of him
were professional line-sitters, he
said he thought, “I don’t think this is
exactly what democracy looks like.”
But the professionals became
mentors. They held his spot — he
was No. 25 — and sent him to the
Walmart on H Street NW to buy an
umbrella, tarp, sleeping bag and
blanket. He and others in the line
formed something of a community,
and they held one another’s spaces
so they could go get something to
eat or, in Naunov’s case, go to a
friend’s house for a shower.
He found the oral arguments
“excellent” and loved the
experience. But he is 23 years old
and, as he noted, able to take off
time from his work as a paralegal
to be able to do it.
The early lineup of the
professionals may have cut down
on the number of people in line.
Brittany Shalla, a 25-year-old
law student at Catholic University,
was initially turned off when she
saw the line began that Friday. But
that Sunday, she checked Twitter —
searching for the hashtag
#SCOTUSline — and saw the line
hadn’t grown much. She and two
friends arrived that evening.
“Going into it, I was a little
upset that the only way of being
informed was sitting outside for
days and praying you get it,”
Shalla said. One of her friends
gave up Monday morning, and
Shalla called two friends at
Georgetown Law to join her.
She, too, loved the experience
and was amazed to see the court
in action, something she’d only
read about before. She also
recognizes that not everyone has
the kind of student schedule that
allows for days in line.
Those in line respectfully
debated the case for hours on
end, Shalla said, building
something of a symposium on the
First Amendment and unlawful
discrimination.
It was sometimes too much of a
good thing. “Oh, my gosh,” she
thought as she finally entered the
court Tuesday morning. “This is the
last I want to hear about this case.”
robert.barnes@washpost.com
Report criticizes ICE immigrant detention centers Putin phones Trump in
thanks for tip from CIA
Watchdog agency finds
moldy food, detainee
mistreatment at facilities
BY
M ARIA S ACCHETTI
The inspector general for the
Department of Homeland Security has criticized several immigration detention facilities for
having spoiled and moldy food
and inadequate medical care,
and for inappropriate treatment
of detainees, such as locking
down a detainee for sharing
coffee and interfering with Muslims’ prayer times.
Acting Inspector General John
V. Kelly, who took over Dec. 1,
said the watchdog agency identified problems at four detention
centers during recent, unannounced visits to five facilities.
The Dec. 11 report, released
Thursday, said the flaws “under-
mine the protection of detainees’
rights, their humane treatment,
and the provision of a safe and
healthy environment.”
“Staff did not always treat
detainees respectfully and professionally, and some facilities
may have misused segregation,”
the report found, adding that
observers found “potentially unsafe and unhealthy detention
conditions.”
Immigration and Customs
Enforcement jails tens of thousands of immigrants for civil
immigration violations, holding
them until they are deported or
released in the United States.
The jails are not supposed to be
punitive, according to the report.
ICE concurred with the inspector general’s findings and
said it is taking action to fix the
problems, some of which have
already been addressed.
“Based on multi-layered, rigorous inspections and oversight programs, ICE is confi-
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dent in conditions and high
standards of care at its detention facilities,” the agency said
in a statement. “To ensure the
safety and well-being of those
in our custody, we work regularly with contracted consultants and a variety of external
stakeholders to review and improve detention conditions at
ICE facilities.”
The Office of Inspector General said it launched the surprise
inspections after receiving complaints from immigrant advocacy groups and on its hotline
about treatment of detainees.
The inspectors also interviewed
staff members and detainees and
examined records.
Advocates for immigrants said
the report reaffirmed their longstanding calls for the detention
facilities to be closed. Advocates
have complained about reports
of physical and sexual assaults,
deaths in detention and other
concerns for years under past
presidents — and say their worries are increasing under President Trump.
Trump has pledged to dramatically increase deportations and
is seeking congressional approval for more than 51,000 detention beds this fiscal year, up from
about 30,000 under President
Barack Obama.
Trump’s pick for the permanent director of ICE, Thomas D.
Homan, previously ran the ICE
detention system.
“The realities documented by
the OIG inspectors, and many
more, are endemic to the entire
detention system,” Mary Small,
policy director at Detention
Watch Network, a nonprofit
group that monitors immigration detention, said in a statement. “ICE has proven time and
time again to be incapable of
meeting basic standards for humane treatment.”
In a statement, Azadeh Shahshahani, legal and advocacy
director of Project South, in
Atlanta, cited the death in May
of Jean Jimenez-Joseph. The
27-year-old Panamanian national was held in solitary confinement for 19 days at the
Stewart Detention Center in
rural Georgia, according to
Project South.
Shahshahani said his death
“should have served as a final
wake-up call and resulted in the
immediate closure of the facility.”
The Inspector General’s office
did not provide the dates of the
inspections and did not respond
to multiple requests for comment.
Officials praised one facility, in
Laredo, Tex., for its treatment of
immigrants and said the severity
of problems at the other detention centers varied.
At all four facilities, the
Homeland Security watchdog
said, kitchens had “moldy produce” and thawing meat in
packages that failed to indicate
an expiration date. Multiple detainees said they faced long
waits for medical care, including those with painful conditions such as infected teeth and
a knee injury. Two detainees,
one at the Hudson County Jail in
New Jersey and another at the
Santa Ana City Jail in Santa Ana,
Calif., waited months for eyeglasses.
In some facilities, immigrants
with criminal records were
housed with noncriminals, the
report said. Jailers sometimes
did not use interpreters to communicate with detainees, and
some staff members failed to
take detainees’ grievances.
In the Stewart center, staff
members sometimes interrupted
or delayed Muslim prayers. In
Santa Ana, officers stripsearched all detainees, a violation of existing policy, and one
guard launched a “hostile and
prolonged rant” at immigrants
and threatened to lock them in
their cells.
ICE stopped housing detainees at the Santa Ana facility in
May, a spokeswoman said.
Detainees are supposed to be
able to make phone calls, including to the Office of the Inspector
General to lodge complaints. But
at Stewart, a call to the agency’s
hotline resulted in a message
that said that number was restricted. And at the Otero County
Processing Center in New Mexico, inspectors found several broken telephones.
Detainees also complained
about mold and peeling paint at
the Otero and Stewart centers. At
Stewart, some bathrooms lacked
either hot or cold water.
Several detainees at the Hudson jail and Stewart also complained that basic supplies, such
as toilet paper, soap and toothpaste, were not provided
promptly or at all.
The Inspector General issued
a separate report in March,
after visiting the Theo Lacy
detention center in California
in November 2016, which detailed similar findings about
food handling and other issues
it said required immediate attention.
maria.sacchetti@washpost.com
Information allowed
Russia to head off
terrorist bombing plot
BY
D AVID F ILIPOV
moscow — Russian President
Vladimir Putin on Sunday
phoned President Trump to
thank him for a tip from the CIA
that thwarted a terrorist attack
being planned in St. Petersburg.
The unusual call — countries
share intelligence all the time,
but presidents rarely publicly
thank one another for it — was
confirmed by White House
spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee
Sanders.
Putin told Trump that the information provided by the CIA
allowed Russian law enforcement
agencies to track down and detain a group of people who were
planning to bomb the centrally
located Kazan Cathedral and other crowded parts of Russia’s second-largest city.
“Based on the information the
United States provided, Russian
authorities were able to capture
the terrorists just prior to an
attack that could have killed large
numbers of people,” the White
House said in its readout of the
call. “Both leaders agreed that
this serves as an example of the
positive things that can occur
when our countries work together.”
It was the two presidents’ second conversation since Thursday,
when they spoke after Putin’s
annual four-hour televised news
conference, during which the
Russian leader mentioned the
booming U.S. stock market as an
example of Trump’s successes. The White House said Trump
thanked Putin for remarks he
made “acknowledging America’s
strong economic performance.”
Putin said he doubted Trump
would be able to improve relations between their two countries
because the U.S. president was
being held back by his political
opposition, and allegations
of Russian interference in the
2016 U.S. election were being
invented to raise doubts about
Trump’s legitimacy.
The CIA tip apparently provided the breakthrough that allowed
Russian authorities last week to
detain seven members of what
officials identified as Islamic
State cells. The suspects, investigators said, had been planning a
suicide bombing this weekend in
Kazan Cathedral, a St. Petersburg
landmark located on Nevsky
Prospect, its main thoroughfare.
The cathedral was built between
1801 and 1811, and, controversially at the time, was designed along
the lines of a Roman Catholic
basilica.
Russian state television reported the capture of the alleged cell
members as it often does in takedowns of terrorist suspects, with
a video that shows agents in
action and an on-camera confession. In this case, a man identified
as Yevgeny Yefimov confessed
that he planned to carry out an
attack in the city. Later, Yefimov
told a St. Petersburg court that he
was planning to target the Kazan
Cathedral. Three more people
were arrested Sunday in connection with the alleged plot, RIA
Novosti reported.
The agency published a list
of 17 major terrorist plots that
Russian law enforcement has
been able to head off this year.
The suspects in the latest arrests had been using the messaging app Telegram to communicate with Islamic State leaders
abroad, according to law enforcement
agencies.
Telegram
was fined last month for refusing
to provide Russian security forces
access to the online conversations
of two suspects linked to a suicide
bombing in April that killed 16
people and injured about 100.
In their phone conversation
Sunday, Putin asked Trump to
pass along his gratitude to CIA
Director Mike Pompeo and the
American intelligence agents
who received the information,
the Kremlin said. It said Putin
also told Trump that “if Russian
special services obtain any information on terrorist threats
against the United States and its
citizens, they will definitely and
immediately pass it to American
counterparts through partner
channels.”
The CIA declined to comment
on that.
But the White House said that
Trump “then called Director
Pompeo to congratulate him, his
very talented people, and the
entire intelligence community on
a job well done!”
david.filipov@washpost.com
Greg Miller and Phillip Rucker in
Washington contributed to this
report.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
RE
A3
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Politics & the Nation
After losing 2 staples, Hawaii sees new path for farming
BY
B RITTANY L YTE
kahului, maui — Tens of thousands of abandoned acres of
farmland lie fallow on this island,
cemeteries of Hawaii’s defunct
plantation era, which met its end
last year when the state’s last
remaining sugar grower shut
down an operation that had run
for 146 years.
Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar
Co.’s sprawling sugar cane fields
used to provide visitors to Maui a
rolling green blanket as they
arrived at the airport, but they
are newly stagnant, joining other
growers in a long decline. Facing
competition from cheap foreign
labor, a shortage of farmworkers
and some of the nation’s highest
land costs, the sugar and pineapple plantations that used to be
the state’s lifeblood are not redeploying into active agriculture,
raising questions about the industry’s future here.
“Pineapple is lost, sugar is lost,
and we now have one sole industry, which is a very dangerous
position to be in,” said Maui
County Councilman Alika Atay.
“We have put all our eggs into
one basket, and that is tourism.
But not everybody who lives on
this island wants to work in the
hotel industry, and it’s almost
impossible to feed a family here
working as a farmer. We are now
seeing drastic displacement of
young people leaving Maui because of a lack of economic
opportunity.”
The closure of Maui’s last sugar producer marked a pivotal
moment in Hawaii’s agricultural
production. Since 1980, Hawaii’s
total land use for agricultural
production has shrunk by about
68 percent, according to data
from the University of Hawaii.
Sugar had, at one point, been
Hawaii’s top crop. Now the corn
seed industry is the state’s dominant agricultural land user, followed by commercial forestry
and macadamia nuts. But none
of those products, not even when
combined, come anywhere close
to filling the economic void created by the loss of sugar and
pineapple.
The state’s Agriculture Department is working on the issue
with a depleted staff — 122 of its
360 positions are vacant, including the entire branch responsible
for market analysis and tracking
the state’s trends in food imports
and production. The agency is
narrowing its focus to court outside capital for investments in
Hawaii food production and is
studying the possibility of allowing farmers to inhabit small
family homes alongside their
crop beds. Tenant farming is now
restricted on state agriculture
land.
“There are tens of thousands
of acres of good ag land, at least,
currently sitting fallow in Hawaii, where we have some of the
most expensive land in the
world,” said Department of Agri-
PHOTOS BY BONNIE JO MOUNT/THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Kini Kalakua Kaaihue Oliveira, 25, and Kawana’ao Frias, 17,
clean a taro field in Wailua. For years, the farm lacked sufficient
water because of the sugar industry’s irrigation. ABOVE: A sugar
mill abandoned by Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar in Puunene.
culture Director Scott Enright.
“At the same time, we’ve got a
group of farmers who are aging
out of the business. The next
generation is coming in and
finding if you’re going to try and
start up a farm when you’re a
20-something with no track record, the banks aren’t going to
lend to you. That’s a problem for
us.”
The sugar industry, which
helped usher Hawaii into statehood, steered the state’s politics
and economy for more than a
century. It helped build company
towns inhabited by multiethnic
field laborers from Asia and
Europe.
With statehood came U.S. labor laws, inspiring Hawaii’s biggest sugar and pineapple producers to embrace cheaper foreign labor. As monocrop agriculture declined, the state put its
economic faith in tourism, which
accelerated as jet plane travel
became faster and more affordable. Plantation companies either vanished or transitioned
into land-development firms.
Some swaths of farmland have
been sold off and developed into
commercial or residential real
estate, inspiring fears that Hawaii’s agrarian past could one
day be lost to a more citified
future.
“We have and we will continue
to lose ag land to urban development,” Enright said.
HC&S is a division of Alexander & Baldwin, one of Hawaii’s
largest commercial real estate
holders.
The passage of the plantation
heyday has been slow but impactful. In 1980, Hawaii hosted
14 sugar and four pineapple plantations that farmed more than
300,000 acres. In 2017, these two
crops account for less than 5,000
D I G ES T
MILITARY
PUERTO RICO
Details emerge about
soldier killed in Niger
Report: U.S. response
to hurricane a ‘failure’
Army Sgt. La David T. Johnson
died in a hail of gunfire, hit as
many as 18 times as he took
cover in thick brush, fighting to
the end after fleeing militants
who had just killed three
comrades in an October ambush
in Niger, the Associated Press has
learned.
A military investigation
concluded that Johnson was not
captured alive or killed at close
range, dispelling rumors about
how he died.
The reports determined that
Johnson, 25, of Miami Gardens,
Fla., was killed by enemy rifle
and machine gun fire from
members of an Islamic State
offshoot, said U.S. officials
familiar with the findings. The
Oct. 4 ambush took place about
120 miles north of Niamey, the
capital. Johnson’s body was
recovered two days later.
U.S. officials familiar with the
findings spoke to the AP on the
condition of anonymity to
describe details of an
investigation that has not been
finalized or publicly released.
A 12-member Army Special
Forces unit was accompanying
30 Nigerien troops when they
were attacked by as many as
50 militants traveling by vehicle
and carrying small arms and
rocket-propelled grenade
launchers. Four U.S. soldiers and
four Nigerien troops were killed.
Two U.S. and eight Nigerien
troops were wounded.
Housing is urgently needed for
tens of thousands of Puerto
Ricans who lack power and a
regular source of safe water
nearly three months after
Hurricane Maria damaged their
homes, Refugees International
says in a report.
The nonprofit group visited
the U.S. territory in recent weeks
to survey needs and review the
response by local and federal
officials in the aftermath of the
Category 4 storm, marking the
first time it has organized a
mission to a U.S. jurisdiction. In
a report, the group said its team
was shocked by poor
coordination and logistics that
have caused delays in aid. It
noted that the island is still in
emergency mode.
“There was a failure of
leadership and a failure to
appreciate the magnitude of the
situation and the need for
extraordinary action by U.S.
officials,” Eric Schwartz, the
group’s president and a former
U.S. assistant secretary of state
for population, refugees and
migration, said in a phone
interview. “These people are our
fellow Americans. The response
of the federal authorities should
have been and should be much
stronger than it was and much
stronger than it is.”
Officials with the Federal
Emergency Management Agency
did not return a request for
comment Sunday.
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
Community mourns students
killed in New Mexico shooting:
Hundreds of people gathered
Sunday in northwestern New
Mexico for a memorial service
and bonfire to remember a 17year-old student killed in a
school shooting rampage in the
small city of Aztec. Casey Jordan
Marquez was a cheerleader who
planned to travel to Florida to
perform as part of a cheer squad
during the upcoming Orange
Bowl festivities. She and
Francisco “Paco” Fernandez, 17,
were killed Dec. 7 when a
gunman disguised as a student
opened fire inside Aztec High
School. Authorities have said
William Atchison, 21, planned
the attack, but the victims
weren’t targeted. People were
asked to write messages to put
on the wood for the bonfire at
Marquez’s service. Many of the
mourners were cheerleaders
from all over New Mexico’s San
Juan County. They presented a
cheer bow and a shadow box to
Marquez’s mother. Friends said
Marquez had a big heart and
always helped people, including
showing new students around
Aztec High. Students are to
return to the school Monday.
acres. Once the largest pineapple
plantation in the world, the island of Lanai’s former crop beds
are now parched and deserted.
Hawaii spends as much as
$3 billion a year to import
90 percent of its food, and residents routinely pay some of the
highest prices in the nation for
staples such as eggs and milk.
Even the grain that feeds the
cows on the islands’ two dairy
farms is shipped in. Should a
natural disaster affect the ability
for cargo ships to arrive, the
state’s 1.4 million residents and
nearly 9 million annual visitors
could be vulnerable to crippling
food shortages.
The shaky state of food security in the world’s most isolated
group of islands has prompted
Hawaii Gov. David Ige (D) to set a
deadline of 2030 to double local
agriculture production, a goal
that some experts decry as unrealistic because Hawaii does not
consistently track agricultural
data about crop yields.
On an island chain that once
was completely self-sufficient —
before the arrival of Westerners
in the late 1700s, indigenous
Hawaiians thrived 2,500 miles
from the nearest continent using
sustainable farming and fishing
methods — many believe a resurgence of agriculture is possible.
“There’s no reason why we
should go to a grocery store and
see a banana from Ecuador or
Mexico. We can grow banana
here,” Atay said. “Why do we go to
the store and see mango from
Chile, not mango from Maui,
when Maui grows some of the
sweetest-tasting mango in the
world? Because in the last 200
years we never had the land and
the water available — until now.”
HC&S has so far deployed
4,500 of its 36,000 farmland
acres. A new grass-fed cattle
operation aims to expand local
beef production through a 300calf management partnership
with Maui Cattle Co. More than
95 percent of the beef consumed
in Hawaii has been shipped in
from the U.S. mainland. On
Maui, HC&S hopes to cut that
number to as low as 80 percent.
In addition to raising cattle,
HC&S has dedicated 1,500 acres
to grow sweet potato and crops
that help produce energy. Hawaii’s eight main islands have the
highest electricity prices in the
nation, but a 250-acre orchard of
pongamia trees, which produce
biofuels, could help wean the
state off its fossil fuel dependence, experts say.
Another 800 acres are being
considered for an agricultural
park for small-scale, local farmers.
“We’ve been talking about diversified agriculture and energy
for 10 years, but nobody has
found the magic bullet,” said Rick
Volner, the former HC&S plantation manager who now oversees
the company’s fledgling diversified agriculture program. “The
hope was that we could launch
right into it. Instead we’re trying
to grow different crops to try and
see what works.”
Elsewhere on the island, the
shift away from agriculture is
providing some immediate relief.
Water diversions from hundreds
of streams long fed the island’s
sugar cane at the expense of the
wetland taro crop cultivated by
indigenous Hawaiians in rural
east Maui. A storm of lawsuits
over water rights coupled with
the sugar industry’s gradual
scale-back has led to some restoration of the natural water flow.
With water returned to the
remote Wailua Nui Valley, a new
program at a nearby public
school is reintroducing local families to the culturally important
practice of taro farming. Last
year, more than 150 people in
Maui’s Hana community pounded poi, the starchy Hawaiian
staple food, for the first time in
their lives.
“My grandchildren used to tell
me, ‘Papa, what happened to the
water?’” said sixth-generation
taro farmer Edward Wendt.
“King Sugar — that’s where our
water went. Now that it’s flowing
again, I must show and teach the
younger generation as much as I
can for as long as I can.”
Elsewhere on Maui, the Colorado-based land development
firm Bio-Logical Capital manages an oceanfront cattle ranch and
diversified organic fruit and vegetable farm on 3,600 acres formerly cultivated for sugar. The
company’s goal is to invent a
sustainable agricultural system
that enriches the land, provides
healthy, fresh food for the local
population and lends itself to be
duplicated as a model foodproduction system in communities around the world.
“The land in Maui that was in
sugar is some of the best ag land
in the world,” said Bio-Logical
CEO Grant McCargo. “But politically, how do you put that land
back to good use?”
McCargo noted that the challenge for publicly traded companies is to manage risk with
shareholder value.
“This really is a public policy
question,” he said. “After all, we
wouldn’t still be farming corn in
this country if it weren’t for
subsidies from the government.”
national@washpost.com
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SpaceX capsule used on
resupply mission: A recycled
SpaceX capsule is back at the
International Space Station.
NASA astronauts used the space
station’s robot arm to grab the
Dragon capsule out of orbit
Sunday. It is the second visit for
this supply ship, which also
made a delivery for NASA in
2015.
— From news services
AND OVER 500
CHANDELIERS.
A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
Trump accusers see power in presenting a united front
Film producer notes
strength in numbers,
invites women to meet
BY
F RANCES S TEAD S ELLERS
AND M ARK B ERMAN
Rachel Crooks and Samantha
Holvey had never met. But
through a twist of fate, they
became players at the center of a
national political storm over sexual misconduct that has now
reached President Trump.
Both women have accused
Trump of inappropriate advances earlier in his career, and a
liberal film producer brought
them together for the first time
Dec. 10 at a private dinner in
Manhattan.
Crooks traveled from Ohio
and Holvey from South Carolina to take part in a media
blitz arranged by the filmmaker to bring attention to women’s
accusations
against
Trump. The White House says
all the women are lying, and
the president tweeted that
their allegations — first made
public during the presidential
campaign last year — were
“false accusations and fabricated stories.”
But Crooks and Holvey said
their memories of Trump remain
vivid and unsettling. Crooks, 34,
recalled him kissing her repeatedly in a Trump Tower encounter
in 2005 when she was 22.
Holvey, 31, remembered her
experience as a 2006 Miss USA
contestant,
horrified
when
Trump, the pageant owner,
barged into the dressing room to
inspect the partially clothed
women. She was one of several
pageant participants who had
publicly complained that Trump
treated contestants like his personal property. He talked about
his unannounced dressing room
inspections on Howard Stern’s
radio show.
No one had thought to try to
forge a sisterhood of Trump accusers until former Hollywood
producer Robert Greenwald and
his colleague Shira Levine
reached out to Crooks, Holvey
and other women willing to
come forward once again with
their stories.
The filmmakers from Brave
New Films had created a short
video in November from clips of
16 women making a range of
allegations against Trump.
When they posted it on YouTube, Facebook and other social
media platforms, it went viral.
They decided to contact the
women and bring some of them
together for an appearance
Monday on NBC’s “Megyn Kelly
Today” and a news conference
that attracted international coverage.
The White House condemned
ANDREW KELLY/REUTERS
Rachel Crooks, left,
Jessica Leeds and
Samantha Holvey attend a
news conference for the
film “16 Women and
Donald Trump.” The
women accuse Trump of
misconduct before he
became president.
“I felt very strongly
I wanted to support
the other women.
I’m going to fight
with you, and I’m
going to fight
for you.”
Samantha Holvey
the effort as a liberal political
ploy, but it gained traction
during a week in which allegations of sexual misconduct became a major theme in the
Senate race in Alabama.
Trump’s tweet about Sen.
Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.),
which some considered suggestive, further inflamed his critics. Gillibrand said Wednesday
that she believed the women’s
accusations and called on
Trump to resign.
Not all of the Trump accusers
wanted to participate in the new
alliance or in the push for Congress to investigate the president’s behavior. A third accuser
showed up to dine with Crooks
and Holvey, Greenwald said, but
did not want to be identified
because of repercussions she
said she suffered after she came
forward a year ago.
Levine said she now has a core
group of six to eight women who
want to participate, and she
intends to link them all by email.
The atmosphere has changed,
Levine said, since the women
first came forward, many in outraged response to Trump’s lewd
comments on an “Access Hollywood” tape and his denial that he
had ever engaged in the behavior
described on the recording.
“It’s a new planet this year,”
Holvey said in an interview, “and
change needs to happen.”
The goal of the dinner, Greenwald said, was to give Crooks,
Holvey and the unidentified accuser “a private moment” before
Monday’s media whirlwind.
Holvey said the women felt an
immediate bond.
“I felt very strongly I wanted
to support the other women,”
said Holvey, a former Miss
North Carolina. “I’m going to
fight with you,” she recalled
thinking, “and I’m going to fight
for you.”
Jessica Leeds, 75, whose complaint about Trump’s behavior
on an airplane dates back decades, did not attend the dinner
but appeared with Crooks and
Holvey on Kelly’s show and at
the news conference, where another accuser, Lisa Boyne, called
in.
“Now I think it’s kind of important that we do sort of form a
unit,” Leeds said.
Four of the women also issued
a statement Tuesday, calling
Trump’s denials “straight out of
the Harvey Weinstein and Bill
Cosby playbook.”
Melinda McGillivray, who said
last year that Trump groped her
in 2003 at his Mar-a-Lago resort,
could not attend the dinner and
did a separate interview with
Kelly on Tuesday, in which she
asked why Congress has not
launched an investigation.
“It’s important that we hold
this man to the highest standards,” McGillivray said on Kelly’s show. “If 16 women have
come forward, then why hasn’t
anything been done?”
In an interview this year with
The Washington Post, McGillivray said she initially was
afraid to make her claims publicly during the presidential
campaign. McGillivray also said
she received online death
threats after speaking out in
2016.
The White House dismissed
McGillivray’s allegations against
Trump as “a false and absurd
claim.”
Absent thus far from the group
public appearances were a few
accusers who aligned with Los
Angeles attorney Gloria Allred,
including Summer Zervos, a former contestant on “The Apprentice.” Allred, who is representing
Zervos in a defamation suit
against Trump in Superior Court
in New York, declined to comment. A ruling on Trump’s motion to dismiss the case is pending.
The White House also criticized Brave New Films.
“This is nothing more than a
publicity stunt by a film studio
backed by liberal interest groups
intent on lobbing politically mo-
tivated attacks against American
voters,” the White House said in a
statement.
Brave New Films has an openly liberal mission “to champion
social justice issues by using a
model of media, education, and
grassroots volunteer involvement,” according to its website.
The group did a full-length documentary on the conservative industrialists Charles and David
Koch, which the Kochs called
inaccurate.
Brave New Films has a special
nonprofit designation through
the Internal Revenue Service
that allows it to engage in politics. Executive director Jim Miller said 492 donors give a total of
$5,536 a month to create content. The group also gets foundation grants for specific projects,
Miller said, and donations from
individuals.
The film, “16 Women and Donald Trump,” was a low-budget
project, Miller said. After the
film’s mid-November launch, the
nonprofit solicited new funds to
use “our platform to share the
voices of women that have refused to be intimidated into
silence.”
Crooks
dismissed
White
House criticism that the women’s
accusations were a coordinated
political ploy.
“The things that happened to
us spanned decades, states, all
over,” Crooks told Kelly. “What
could we possibly have, colluded
to come up with these tales that
all sound so eerily similar?”
Holvey said she has seen suggestions that they were working
with Democratic leadership. “It
was not organized like that in
any way, shape or form,” she
said. “We’re independent of
that.”
Now, the women say they are
braced for more backlash.
Holvey shared with The Post a
threatening,
obscenity-laced
message she received after
speaking on Monday. It included
the phrase “I would hate for
something to happen to you.”
But she said the bond among
the women makes threats seem
more manageable.
Greenwald said he sensed a
new resolve among the women.
“I’m sure as the days go on the
sisterhood will get stronger and
more bonded,” he said.
Even the shared memories at
the dinner indicated that more
women may have stories to tell,
Levine said.
There were 51 women at each
of the pageants that Trump
owned for more than two decades, Levine said, and others
who might have found his dressing room inspections offensive.
“Can you imagine?” she said.
“That is a force.”
frances.sellers@washpost.com
mark.berman@washpost.com
Karen Tumulty and Julie Tate
contributed to this report.
What the GOP’s tax-bill proposal means for schools, students and parents
Final plan backs away
from some controversial
education provisions
BY M ORIAH B ALINGIT AND
D ANIELLE D OUGLAS- G ABRIEL
Republicans backed away
from some of the most controversial education proposals in their
tax bill finalized Friday, leaving
in place a school-supply deduction for teachers and breaks for
student borrowers, while also
declining to tax tuition benefits,
a prospect that infuriated graduate students.
“On balance, the final bill is far
better news — especially for
students and families — than it
could have been,” said Terry W.
Hartle, senior vice president of
the American Council on Education, which represents colleges
and universities.
But public school advocates
assailed the plan, which left
intact provisions that could hurt
public school funding while providing tax breaks for parents
who send their children to private schools.
Five groups that represent
public school superintendents,
school business officials and rural schools authored a letter
opposing the tax overhaul, saying it “includes provisions that
undermine the strength of our
nation’s public school systems
and compromises the ability of
these systems to adequately and
effectively provide educational
opportunities and services to the
students they serve.”
Here’s a roundup of some of
the ways the tax bill could affect
parents, educators and students.
It’s
good for parents of pri-
vate schoolchildren and a win
for school choice.
Under current law, tax-free
529 college savings accounts can
be used only to pay for college.
But the Republican proposal
allows parents to use that money
— up to $10,000 a year per child
— to pay for private K-12 school
tuition and home schooling.
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has applauded the provision, calling it “a good step
forward, reflecting that education should be an investment in
individual students, not systems.”
Other advocates of school
choice have pointed out that it
largely benefits wealthier families who can afford to save for
private schools. And public
school advocates say it gives
parents incentives to leave public schools, and that harms districts that rely on education
funding based on how many
pupils enroll.
It’s
good for teachers who
reach into their pockets to pay
for school supplies.
Teachers spend about $500 of
their own money on school and
classroom supplies, according to
one survey. In 2002, Congress
gave educators who shelled out
for pencils, art supplies, paper
and other school supplies a $250
tax break. The House bill sought
to eliminate that, leading to an
outcry
from
cash-strapped
teachers. The Senate bill aimed
to double the deduction to $500.
The final plan leaves the deduction at $250.
It may be bad for public
school funding at all levels.
The proposal curtails the ability of taxpayers to deduct state
and local taxes from their federal
tax bill, limiting the deduction to
$10,000. By increasing the federal tax burden on individuals,
advocates worry that states,
counties and school boards will
have a tougher time raising money for schools, which get most of
their resources from state and
local tax revenue.
Public colleges and universities could see a ripple effect.
Although people will be able to
deduct up to $10,000 in state and
local taxes, that might not be
enough to relieve pressure on
states to cut their own taxes to
compensate. And that could reduce revenue for public colleges
and universities, which down the
road might raise tuition to offset
the loss of funding.
Additionally, the legislation
bans school districts from using
one kind of tax-free method to
refinance their school bond debt,
a move that has helped districts
save millions of dollars, said
John Musso, executive director
of the Association of School Business Officials International.
It could be good for taxcredit scholarships that fund
private school education.
Several states have tax-credit
scholarship programs that offer
generous breaks — sometimes
dollar-for-dollar tax credits — for
donating to special state-administered scholarship programs
that help families pay for private
schools. With the curtailing of
the state and local tax deduction,
some are predicting wealthier
people will pour more money
into tax-credit scholarship funds
to reduce their state tax burden.
It’s good for graduate students and university employees.
Republicans backed away
from House proposals to tax the
value of college tuition benefits
that universities provide graduate students and campus employees.
Thousands of graduate stu-
dents staged walkouts across the
country and called members of
Congress to ensure that the
tuition waivers they receive for
working as teachers and research assistants were not
counted as income. Their efforts
were bolstered by the Senate’s
decision to exclude the proposed
repeal in its tax plan. A group of
31 House Republicans also asked
party leaders to abandon the
provision, arguing it would
place an unfair burden on students.
Graduate students were also
spared the loss of the Lifetime
Learning Credit, a tax credit for
up to $2,000 spent on tuition,
books and supplies. Students
pursuing advanced degrees rely
on the credit because there is no
limit on the number of years it
can be claimed, unlike the American Opportunity Tax Credit,
which is good for only the first
four years of college. House
Republicans had proposed consolidating the tax credits into
one that would be available only
for five years, effectively limiting
its usefulness to graduate students.
Campus employees scored a
win in the final bill, which excluded a House provision to tax
the tuition benefits they receive.
Janitors, secretaries and other employees at most colleges
are afforded discounted or free
tuition for themselves, their
children and spouses. More
than one-third of employees
who take advantage of this benefit earn less than $50,000 a
year, according to a survey from
the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources.
It’s good for anyone paying
for college.
People whose employers cover
a portion of their college costs no
longer have to worry about the
money becoming taxable income, because the final bill excludes a House proposal that
would have taxed that benefit.
It’s
a mixed bag for colleges.
Let’s start with the good news.
The final legislation axes a House
provision that would have gotten
rid of interest-free bonds that
many private colleges use to fund
construction on campus. It also
holds the line on increasing the
taxes colleges pay on unrelated
business income, such as the
money a school earns selling
coffee mugs at the campus bookstore.
The not-so good news: Colleges can no longer use a loss in one
business venture to offset a gain
in another as a strategy to lower
their taxes. Republicans adopted
a Senate proposal requiring taxexempt organizations such as
universities to calculate losses
and gains for each activity — a
move that schools have said will
raise their tax burden. The bill
delivered Friday also gets rid of
another form of bond financing
that universities rely on to refinance debt at lower interest
rates, known as advanced refunding bonds.
What’s more, it includes a
controversial 1.4 percent excise
tax on the net investment income
on endowments at a handful of
private colleges and universities.
The tax will be applicable to
schools with endowments worth
at least $500,000 per full-time
student, the threshold set in the
Senate tax plan. About 30 colleges will be affected by the endowment tax, according to the American Council on Education. Opponents of the tax have argued it
sets a dangerous precedent for
all of higher education.
All colleges and universities
could see a drop in charitable
giving because of the GOP plan.
Raising the standard deduction
will result in fewer people itemizing their taxes, which is the
only way you can deduct charitable contributions. That deduction has been a powerful fundraising tool for colleges and universities of all sizes.
It’s good for student loan
borrowers.
Taking a page from the Senate
tax plan, the final bill will leave
in place the student loan interest deduction. The benefit lets
people repaying student loans
reduce their tax burden by as
much as $2,500. Because borrowers can claim the deduction
even if they choose not to itemize, the tax benefit is available to
anyone paying interest on education debt. But only single
people earning less than
$80,000 and married couples
earning less than $160,000 can
take advantage of the deduction.
Still, more than 12 million
benefited from the deduction in
2015, according to the Internal
Revenue Service. That’s just
about 3 in 10 of the 44 million
Americans with student loans.
The higher the interest payments, the greater the deduction,
which is why the benefit is
especially valuable to people
with large loan amounts.
The final bill would also end
the government counting as taxable income the student debt
that is forgiven because of death
or disability. Anyone with a severe disability is eligible to have
the government discharge their
federal student loans. Every dollar forgiven by the government,
however, is considered taxable
income. Not anymore if this bill
passes.
moriah.balingit@washpost.com
danielle.douglas@washpost.com
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
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. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
Faith endures as small Calif. college survives wildfire
BY
S USAN S VRLUGA
Students leaving dinner and
heading for evening seminars
saw flames rising near their
Southern California campus. Everyone could hear the Santa Ana
winds swirling in gusts, hot and
dry and fast.
Almost immediately the chapel
bell rang, summoning students to
an emergency meeting at Thomas
Aquinas College, a small and lovely private school nestled in the
ridges near Los Padres National
Forest.
The facilities manager whispered in the college president’s
ear. The president told students
to take a blanket, a pillow and any
other essentials they could grab
within a minute from their dorm
rooms. Half an hour later, the
campus had emptied. Within an
hour, the road was shut down.
The wildfire still searing
Southern California, the thirdlargest in the state’s history, started Dec. 4 about a half-mile south
of this Catholic liberal arts college
— so close that the school gave the
fire its name: Thomas.
Thomas Aquinas is an unusual
place, tiny and philosophical, with
no majors and much reverence for
the classical texts that frame and
define its curriculum. When a
force of nature sparked here, it left
physical scars, made more than a
few talk of miracles and taught
lessons that will endure.
While employees helped find
temporary housing for the 365
students who evacuated to a
church, facilities manager Clark
Tulberg and others locked down
buildings. With firefighters stationed at each one, the few college
officials who remained were
hopeful the flames would bypass
the school. Michael F. McLean
had evacuated the president’s
house with his wife, relocating to
an office on campus, determined
to stay at the school. At 1 a.m., it
seemed safe to take a nap.
But after 2 a.m., the wind
shifted direction. Suddenly, the
fire had encircled the campus,
along ridgelines in every direction. And then “it descended on
the campus from all sides all at
once.”
“It was a view of hell,” Tulberg
said. “Just walls of flame in every
direction.”
It was time to move to the
last-stand area, the campus’s athletic fields.
So about 3 a.m., McLean and
his wife and a few others parked
their cars on the field. They were
surrounded by fire. They were
getting rained on — Tulberg and
others had turned on the sprinklers.
It was raining fire, too. Burning embers, blown by the wind,
were falling everywhere.
McLean, who has been at the
college for nearly 40 years as a
professor and administrator,
watched the flames approaching
the campus’s perimeter road, and
saw blazes shoot up suddenly. He
assumed those were college
buildings burning.
He was glad the college chaplain had stayed on campus, and
was praying.
KYLE GRILLOT/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
The Thomas Fire in Southern California, which started about a half-mile south of Thomas Aquinas College, got its name from the school.
“It was a view of
hell. Just walls
of flame in every
direction.”
Clark Tulberg,
facilities manager
at Thomas Aquinas College
Tulberg and a couple of other
workers were outside on the field,
stomping out fires ignited by
falling embers. When the blazes
were too big to stomp out, they
would rush over with sprinklers.
The college’s well stopped working when the power grid burned
up, he said, but backup generators kept the water running.
He had seen burning ash before.
But never like this: “There were
THOMAS AQUINAS COLLEGE
Students and most staff members left the campus. Although the
college was spared, the smell of smoke remains.
sticks a foot and a half long, all in
flames, landing all around you.
“We were in the fire,” he said.
Tulberg, a graduate of Thomas
Aquinas who left his self-made
business of 40 years in January to
join the college staff, told his
workers that risking their lives
was not in their job description.
They were recent graduates
and they kept going, stomping on
flames, moving sprinklers.
“You see a mountain on fire — a
whole mountain — and it is full of
fire,” he said. “And the winds are
so strong that these plumes of fire
are reaching out 100 feet horizontally. It is terrifyingly beautiful.”
Because of tar that naturally
occurs near the surface in the
area, thick acrid smoke filled the
air, reminiscent of burning tires.
They could hear trees crashing
down, and the pop of bamboo
shoots exploding in the heat
sounded like small-arms fire.
During the worst of it, Tulberg
said, his large gray beard was
sizzling.
His job, he said, was to project
calm.
He was thinking, though,
about when he was 6 years old.
He had been playing with a candle when his shirt caught fire.
The recovery took years and
years, he said, with all the skin
grafts.
“I knew what was at stake,” he
said. “It is no fun to be on fire.”
As dawn approached that
morning, the people on the field
marveled. The flames had been
stopped at the perimeter road. No
buildings — other than a large
storage container — had been
lost. The people fighting the fire
had been heroic, McLean said.
“Thanks to their efforts, the
flames, amazingly — maybe even
miraculously — never reached
any of our major structures.”
By 6 or 7 a.m., McLean said,
they felt the worst was over. “But
many others had not seen the
worst.”
The fire rages on; it was
45 percent contained Sunday,
with 270,000 acres burned and
more than 1,000 buildings destroyed.
Tulberg went to check on his
aunt’s house near campus and
found it destroyed, still burning;
a friend’s house was gone, too.
McLean had friends who lost
homes. Many faculty members
had to evacuate not just once but
twice or three times. The school’s
longtime nurse lost her home.
But in this close-knit community they are grateful, too, that
the campus was spared. The president’s house remains standing,
with singed grass. That part of
campus had been parklike, with
25 acres of woodland ferns fed by
springs. “Now, it looks like the
moon,” Tulberg said.
A dorm door was scorched.
Hundreds of trees were destroyed. The hills all around are
blackened. Tulberg saw a squirrel
darting back and forth in apparent shock. (“I’m not allowed to
panic,” Tulberg said, “but I sure
felt for him. Inside, I was feeling
the same way.”)
They began scrubbing the
smoke out of buildings, throwing
out spoiled food, cobbling ways to
communicate with students and
families, cleaning soot out of
fountains. There was no power,
no phone service, no Internet.
Within a mile of campus, 14
power lines were toppled.
Milton Daily, a member of the
board of governors, had gone to
the church where students evacuated, concerned that many had
nowhere to go. He and his wife,
who live in Ventura County, took
10 home with them.
They could see from the windows of their house a 180-degree view of the fire in the
distance. In the days that followed, they helped the students
lug home library books to study
for final exams, shared meals
and clean-up, and decorated a
Christmas tree listening to a
recording of Bing Crosby crooning carols.
When school officials announced they would postpone
exams until spring semester, the
students went home — to Maine,
Ohio, Washington state and
Northern California. But before
that, the Dailys came home one
evening to find the students had
planned a surprise concert for
them. They sang, in Latin, classical Christmas songs.
“With tears in my eyes, I still
think about it,” Heather Daily
said. “They all harmonized. It was
just simply beautiful. We are family.”
Even late last week, parts of
Thomas Aquinas still smoldered.
Trees remained on fire; the
flames work their way in from the
roots up the core of the trunk
until, perhaps, shooting out the
side like a blowtorch 20 feet
overhead, Tulberg said. He has
started to worry about what will
happen to the bare hillsides if
spring rains come. When a few
staff members returned to campus and complained about “a
smoke smell,” he wasn’t ready to
hear it. “Are your fingertips
burned?” he thought.
But power was restored to
campus last week, and wildlife —
other than the single petrified
squirrel — began to reappear in
recent days. “To hear birds in the
air, chirping — it’s such a reassuring, pleasant sound,” Tulberg
said.
McLean has been working
from his new office — he dragged
a chair out to the faculty parking
lot, and, if he’s next to a certain
bush, he gets two bars of signal on
his cellphone, enough to send
texts and make patchy calls. He is
feeling grateful for the firefighters’ and his employees’ courage,
for the closeness that made the
evacuation and relocation so
easy, for the grace that spared
Thomas Aquinas.
It was about 75 degrees and
sunny as he worked in the empty
parking lot one day last week,
preparing for students and faculty to return in January on a
modified schedule. The day was
picture postcard, he said. It’s
Southern California: When it’s
not a disaster, it’s perfect.
susan.svrluga@washpost.com
Congregation mourns preacher who faced assault allegations
BY
J AMES H IGDON
louisville — Dan Johnson’s
closed silver casket was at the
front of the sanctuary next to his
favorite Harley on Saturday, and
scores of mourners lined up to
wish him a final farewell, many of
them sporting tattoos, black leather vests and silver skull rings.
Here, on this same spot within
the Heart of Fire Church in the
rural outskirts of this Kentucky
city, Johnson had built his reputation as the congregation’s “Pope.”
Here, he delivered sermons to a
flock of self-described bikers, outlaws and lost sheep, giving them
hope and direction. Here, he presided over a fun-loving, boozy
crowd that liked to party. Here, he
launched an unlikely bid to become a state representative.
And here, a week ago, he denied
published allegations that he had
gotten drunk and sexually assaulted a teenage friend of his daughter’s after a party at the church
fellowship hall. His return, in a
casket, came days after he killed
himself amid the ensuing tumult.
The atmosphere at the church
was a mixture of sadness and anger over the weekend, sadness at
the loss of the gregarious pastor,
anger at the local investigative
news organization that reported
the allegation that Johnson had
forced himself on a 17-year-old
girl. Many in this congregation —
including Johnson’s wife, Rebecca, and their four children —
staunchly deny the allegations
could be true.
“There’s just a lot of hurt. He
saved a lot of these guys from an
early grave,” Johnson’s 25-year-old
son Judah told The Washington
Post. “You’ve got a bunch of guys
who were like sons to my dad, and
we all feel really hurt. We just want
it to stop, and we wish we could get
someone to make it stop, you
know?”
Johnson’s suicide Wednesday
at age 57 came amid a stream of
sexual assault and harassment allegations against powerful men in
U.S. society, including the entertainment business, the media, local politicians, judges, mayors and
members of Congress. His death
followed his denials of sexual assault accusations published in a
lengthy story by the Kentucky
Center for Investigative Reporting
on Dec. 11.
It was an end that his wife and
friends say they never saw coming. In retrospect, they said, it
appears that while Johnson had
found a way to balance his seemingly contradictory natures of a
“born-to-be-wild” biker and his
calling to ministry, it was his entry
into politics — and public scrutiny
— last year that was perhaps too
much for him.
“His lifestyle was so unorthodox that the mainstream Christian leaders just felt there were
sinners in his church. And then in
politics, the leaders of the Republican Party felt the same way, that
he was out of the mainstream,”
said Jeff Klusmeier, chairman of
the Kentucky Young Professionals
for Trump, noting that members
of Louisville’s two largest motorcycle clubs, the Grim Reapers and
Outlaws, consider Johnson’s
church to be neutral territory.
TIMOTHY D. EASLEY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kentucky state Rep. Dan Johnson (R) on Tuesday denied assault
allegations. Supporters stand behind him at his Louisville church.
“But that’s where the rubber
meets the road. Christ came to
save the lost.”
The foyer of the Heart of Fire
Church celebrates Johnson’s pastoral career with a wall dedicated
to the 9/11 terrorist attacks —
Johnson has long said he was in
New York at the time and administered last rites to victims at the
World Trade Center. The wall displays photos of Johnson at anniversary services in New York in
2003 and 2004 with him standing
next to former New York mayor
Rudy Giuliani (R), former president George H. W. Bush, thenPresident George W. Bush and
then-New York Gov. George Pataki
(R). On another wall, a photo from
2000 shows Johnson at the Million Family March in Washington,
standing next to former D.C. mayor Marion Barry (D) and Martin
Luther King III.
Johnson’s career as a minister
reached its peak in early March
2016, when he prayed the invocation at the first rally in Louisville
for
then-candidate
Donald
Trump, an event remembered for
protesters getting roughed up as
they were ejected.
A few months after that Trump
rally, Johnson found his way onto
the November ballot as a Republican candidate for state representative for a district that covers part
of Bullitt County, a mostly rural
area adjacent to Louisville. It was
an ambitious career move that
would bring closer scrutiny of his
past.
During the campaign, it was
reported that Johnson had shared
racist memes on his Facebook
page that compared the Obama
family to monkeys. The Republican Party of Kentucky asked that
he withdraw from the race, but he
refused. He defeated the incumbent Democrat by fewer than 160
votes.
In his only legislative session,
Johnson served on four committees at a time when the future
seemed bright for newly elected
Republicans, the Kentucky General Assembly having flipped to Republican control for the first time
in nearly 100 years.
But the past few months had
been rocky in the state capital:
The Republican speaker of the
Kentucky House, Jeff Hoover, was
accused of sexual harassment and
stepped down from his leadership
post, sending the House into potential chaos as the 2018 legislative session is set to begin in January. At the same time, the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting was conducting a monthslong investigation into Johnson’s
background, which included the
allegations that in the early morning of New Year’s Day 2013, he got
drunk and molested a teenager
who was sleeping in the apartment attached to the church’s fellowship hall.
On Tuesday, the day after the
story was published, Johnson
spoke at a news conference in the
Heart of Fire sanctuary and refused calls for his resignation,
even from his party. On Wednesday, Johnson drove to a remote
part of Bullitt County to a graffiticovered bridge over the Salt River
and killed himself with a handgun, according to the Bullitt County coroner. In his final posting on
Facebook, Johnson wrote that the
allegations are false and that
“GOD and only GOD knows the
truth, nothing is the way they
make it out to be. AMERICA will
not survive this type of judge and
jury fake news.”
The day after his death, his
widow sat for a 20-minute interview with local ABC affiliate
WHAS-11, calling the last few days
“pretty horrific.” She said she was
“indignant” and “mad because
this man who has served his community and given everything he
has, literally, has been treated so
bad.”
Rebecca Johnson said in the
television interview that Johnson
struggled with health issues and
post-traumatic stress disorder after, she says, he worked as a minister at Ground Zero after 9/11.
Johnson’s experience in New York
became a central part of the personal narrative he would share as
a public speaker; the local investigative story called that story into
question. In the note Johnson
posted to Facebook shortly before
his death, he referred to his emotional trauma from 9/11 as a factor.
To his son Judah, Dan Johnson
wasn’t just his dad, but also a
father to many in the extended
nontraditional family that congregated at the Heart of Fire
Church.
national@washpost.com
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
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. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
The World
Chile picks
conservative
for president
R EUTERS
santiago, chile — Billionaire
PHOTOS BY CHRISTOPHE ENA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A fashion show with plus-size models helped launch the campaign Friday. “Fat phobia is a reality lived by so many citizens,” said Mayor Anne Hidalgo,
who convened a conference after the success of “You Are Not Born Fat,” by a writer who struggled to find steady employment because of her weight.
Paris, capital of thin, targets fat shaming
The world’s most fashionable city launches a campaign to end the stigmatizing ‘grossophobia’ aimed at women
BY
J AMES M C A ULEY
paris — Chic, svelte, feline.
This is the caricature of “la Parisienne,” the well-heeled woman who
embodies the essence of the world’s
most fashionable city. Think Coco
Chanel, Catherine Deneuve and Inès
de la Fressange: paragons of style,
arbiters of taste. To make the cut,
you have to be many things. Until
recently, one of those things was
thin.
Not anymore.
On Friday, the city of Paris formally launched a campaign against
“grossophobia,” or fat shaming. Mayor Anne Hidalgo convened a conference after the stunning success of a
book, “On Ne Naît Pas Grosse” (“You
Are Not Born Fat”), published this
year. The book was written by Gabrielle Deydier, a teacher and journalist
who has long struggled to find
steady employment because of her
weight.
“Fat phobia is a reality lived by so
many citizens,” Hidalgo said in a
statement Friday. “The city of Paris is
unveiling this phenomenon and engaging.”
That may very well be the case,
but this is still a city where the
reigning power breakfast is an
espresso and a cigarette. If you’re
feeling indulgent, you can maybe
allow yourself a drop of milk in your
coffee. Come nighttime, the cocktail
hour of “apéro”— where you might
have some nice red wine, and possibly some nuts or a little nibble of
cheese — can absolutely count as a
meal. And, of course, many Parisians
walk everywhere they go, and climb
steep flights of stairs back to tiny
HRISTO RUSEV/NURPHOTO/GETTY IMAGES
Water at the Place du Trocadéro reflects the Eiffel Tower in Paris, a city
where the reigning power breakfast is still an espresso and a cigarette.
apartments that cost the arms and
the legs they otherwise exhaust.
Obesity is far less visible here in
the French capital than it is in much
of the United States or Britain.
According to a 2017 report from the
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, drawing on
data up to 2015, only 15.3 percent of
the French population is obese, compared with 26.9 percent and
38.2 percent of the British and American populations, respectively. The
predominant view in Paris is that
you are born thin, and if you do your
job right, nothing will ever change.
But it is because of this view,
Deydier argues in her book, that fat
people — and especially fat women
— are stigmatized in French society.
She cites multiple personal experiences with discrimination in the
workplace and says she has even had
trouble finding long-term accommodations as a result of irregular work.
“I think we have a problem with
minorities in general in France,” she
said in one interview this year after
her book was published. “We say we
are politically correct, but in fact we
are not at all. The biggest problem is
that people generally do not consider fat phobia to be on the same level
as other discriminations because
they think that if someone is fat, it’s
their fault and that they should
change.”
This is especially the case for
French women, Deydier says, who
live in a society with an aggressive
ideal of femininity. “There is this
feeling that women have to be perfect in every way,” she said in another
interview. The ideal of the perfect
female body is even on display in the
French language, in which the word
for pregnancy literally translates as
“fatness.”
But this standard of French femininity is known far outside France.
In the United States, for example,
books such as “French Women Don’t
Get Fat” are periodic bestsellers. In
fact, myths such as that of the lithe,
stylish French woman and her perfect body are part of the rhetoric that
is most often used to shame American women, said Jes Baker, an American blogger and body activist who
also spoke in Paris on Friday.
“Fat is not wrong,” she said. “What
is wrong is the way we address fat.
It’s time for change, and this conversation is happening all over the
world.”
It is finally happening in Paris.
On Friday, the city hosted a rare
plus-size fashion show in the lavish
expanse of the Hôtel de Ville, Paris’s
city hall. While such fashion shows
are fairly common in the United
States, they are not in France, where
the annual couture events remain
something of a religious rite — and
mostly the province of rail-thin fashion editors and the even-thinner
models they applaud.
The choice of venue was significant, as the Hôtel de Ville is often
used for those couture shows. On
Friday, however, plus-size fashion
models strode the aisle to the music
of Rihanna turned up loud.
They received a standing ovation.
james.mcauley@washpost.com
conservative Sebastian Piñera
won Chile’s presidency on Sunday,
with center-left opponent Alejandro Guillier conceding the election as Chile followed other South
American nations in a political
turn to the right.
With 98.44 percent of the ballots counted, Piñera, 68, had won
54.57 percent in the runoff vote, to
45.43 percent for Guillier, a widerthan-expected margin in a race
that pollsters had predicted would
be tight.
Months of campaigning exposed deepening rifts among the
country’s once-bedrock centerleft, an opening that Piñera, a former president, leveraged to rally
more centrist voters around his
proposals to cut corporate taxes,
double economic growth and
eliminate poverty in the world’s
top copper producer.
In his concession speech at a
hotel in downtown Santiago, Guillier called his loss a “harsh defeat”
and urged his supporters to defend the progressive reforms of
outgoing President Michelle
Bachelet’s second term.
Many Chileans had viewed the
election as a referendum on her
policies, which focused on reducing inequality by making education more affordable and overhauling the tax code.
Piñera’s supporters cheered the
news at his campaign headquarters as the results were swiftly
tabulated on a hot, sunny Santiago
evening.
Though neither candidate
would have marked a dramatic
shift from Chile’s long-standing
free-market economic model, a
Piñera victory underscores an increasing tilt to the right in South
America after the rise of conservative leaders in Peru, Argentina and
Brazil.
Piñera painted Guillier, a senator and former TV anchor, as extreme in a country known for its
moderation and likened him to
Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro, a socialist.
But Piñera’s conservative agenda may also struggle at a time
when efforts by his ideological allies in Brazil and Argentina to
reduce fiscal deficits by cutting
spending have faced political opposition and sparked protests.
After a leftist party made
unexpected gains in the first
round of voting in November,
Piñera sought to woo less-affluent
voters with proposals such as
the creation of a public pension
fund to compete with Chile’s
much-criticized private pension
funds. He also called for the expansion of free education.
The race marks a turning point
for Chile’s historical coalition of
center-left parties. The pact fissured under Bachelet, riven by
disagreements over policies such
as loosening Chile’s strict abortion
laws and strengthening unions.
Piñera seized on the backlash,
campaigning on a platform of scaling back and “perfecting” Bachelet’s tax and labor laws, seen by
many in the business community
as crimping investment at a time
when slumping copper prices
were weighing on the economy.
DIGEST
UKRAINE
Saakashvili allies rally,
try to seize building
About 5,000 supporters of
opposition leader Mikheil
Saakashvili rallied Sunday in
Ukraine’s capital, pushing for the
ouster of the nation’s president
and briefly attempting to seize a
public building.
Saakashvili’s followers
marched across Kiev and then
rallied with him on Independence
Square to call for President Petro
Poroshenko’s impeachment.
Saakashvili, a former Georgian
president and former Ukrainian
governor, also suggested setting
up a headquarters for the protest
in the October Palace, a
performing arts and conference
center overlooking the square.
People in the crowd shattered
windows of the building and tried
to break the doors open, but
police prevented them from
getting inside.
City officials said hundreds of
children were attending an event
in the October Palace at the time.
The Interior Ministry said
more than 30 police officers were
injured in scuffles with some of
Saakashvili’s supporters, who
allegedly fired tear gas and threw
flares and bottles.
Saakashvili was briefly
detained this month on
allegations that he colluded with
Ukrainian business executives
tied to Russia to topple
Poroshenko.
LIBYA
Thousands rally in
support of strongman
— Associated Press
PHILIPPINES
Slow-moving storm
kills more than 30
A slow-moving storm has left
more than 30 people dead and
several missing, mostly in
landslides and floods, in the
central Philippines, officials said
Sunday.
A disaster-response officer said
26 villagers died and 23 were
missing mostly because of
landslides in the island province
of Biliran, where the weather has
improved after Tropical Storm
Kai-tak blew over Saturday.
At least seven people were
killed in landslides and floods in
four central areas because of Kaitak, which weakened into a
tropical depression but moved
southwestward and picked up
speed Sunday with sustained
winds of 34 mph, according to
JASON LEE/REUTERS
A man in Beijing walks by Christmas decorations outside one of the
city’s tallest skyscrapers, China World Trade Center Tower III.
officials and police.
More than 89,000 people were
forced to flee to emergency
shelters because of the storm.
Thousands of Christmas holiday
travelers were stranded because
inter-island ferries and flights
were canceled.
Kai-tak has remained almost
stationary over the eastern
section of the central Philippines
in recent days, drenching island
provinces, setting off landslides
and floods, and knocking out
power in some areas.
— Associated Press
Thousands who support
military strongman Khalifa
Hifter rallied Sunday in cities in
Libya, calling on him to take
charge of the country after the
end of a two-year mandate of the
U.N.-backed administration
based in the capital, Tripoli.
The rallies in Benghazi, Tobruk
and Tripoli called on the
Moammar Gaddafi-era general to
become the ruler to fill the
political void.
The United Nations maintains
that its mandate for the Tripoli
government, one of two rival
administrations in Libya,
remains in effect until a new one
is introduced.
In a televised address Sunday,
Hifter strongly hinted that he
might step in to fill the void but
stopped short of saying clearly
that he would run in presidential
elections, if a vote is held next
year, or take the reins before that.
He is at odds with the easternbased administration that he was
once linked to and is a rival of the
U.N.-backed administration.
— Associated Press
11 killed in attacks on Afghan
checkpoints: Taliban insurgents
attacked checkpoints in the
southern province of Helmand,
killing 11 police officers, a
spokesman for the provincial
governor said. He said Afghan
forces eventually repelled the
attack. In the southern province
of Kandahar, a suicide car
bomber attacked a convoy of
foreign forces, killing an Afghan
woman and wounding five other
civilian bystanders, Kandahar’s
police chief said. A spokesman for
the NATO-led mission in
Afghanistan said there were no
casualties among the
international forces.
British Embassy worker found
dead in Lebanon: A British
woman who worked at her
nation’s embassy in Beirut was
found strangled by the side of a
road east of the Lebanese capital,
officials said, and authorities are
investigating whether she was
also sexually assaulted. Britain’s
Foreign Office in London
confirmed the death, but officials
did not provide further details.
The woman was named by British
media and friends as Rebecca
Dykes.
— From news services
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
Attack part of growing violent trend
MAYOR FROM A1
from war or persecution have
sharply toughened both their
rhetoric and their policies. Just
this week, European Council
President Donald Tusk proposed
giving up on forcing countries to
take in refugees after two years of
largely failed efforts.
Yet if Hollstein is out of step
with the political mood, the attack on him is in keeping with the
times.
Two years ago, the leading candidate for mayor of the western
German city of Cologne, Henriette Reker, was stabbed in the
neck as she campaigned in an
election she would win days later
while recovering in the hospital.
Police said her assailant was motivated by opposition to her prorefugee politics.
Last year in Britain, Jo Cox, a
41-year-old member of Parliament and passionate advocate for
Syrian refugees, was shot and
stabbed to death in her northern
English district. A right-wing extremist who shouted “Britain
first!” during the attack was convicted of her murder.
And on Tuesday, German federal prosecutors charged a soldier
with plotting to assassinate top
politicians, including the justice
minister, and to frame refugees
for the crimes.
The growing trend toward violence comes amid a public discourse that has become far more
poisonous and accepting of extreme measures against refugees
and their supporters, said Dierk
Borstel, an expert on the far right
at Dortmund University of Applied Sciences and Arts.
“It’s a big problem for security
services. The police used to know
about the people who could be
violent. There was tight observation,” said Borstel, whose university is a short drive from Altena.
“But now the circle has expanded,
and people who haven’t been previously suspected are committing
these acts. So it’s very hard to
control.”
Police have said little about the
man charged with the attempted
murder of Hollstein beyond his
first name, Werner. But locals in
Altena described him as a middleaged town resident who largely
kept to himself and had fallen on
hard times.
On the night of the attack,
Hollstein had stopped for dinner
at City Doener, a favorite neighborhood gathering spot where
native-born Germans, Turkish
immigrants, Arab refugees and
many others feast on sizzling kebab sandwiches piled high with
veggies and hot sauce.
He had just placed his order
when a man approached and
asked if he was the mayor.
“Yes, I am,” Hollstein said he
responded. “Why?”
With that, the man pulled out
his knife and lunged, while berating the mayor for having taken in
“foreigners.”
In a flash, Ahmet Demir, 27,
was out from behind the counter
where he had been making ke-
ULRICH HUFNAGEL/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Andreas Hollstein serves as
mayor of Altena, Germany.
babs, and was trying to wrest the
knife away.
“I was just shocked,” said
Demir, who has lived in the area
since his family immigrated to
Germany from Turkey when he
was 2 and who has long worked
with his parents at the family
restaurant. “There’s never been
anything like this in Altena. No
crime. No fighting. It’s quiet here.
It’s safe.”
“We can’t solve
everyone’s problems
here in Europe. But we
can do what we can do.
And it was very clear
to me that we could
do more.”
Andreas Hollstein
Demir’s father, Abdullah,
joined him within seconds. His
mother, Hayriye, dashed to the
police station down the road. An
officer’s gun fixed on the perpetrator, it took several minutes of
commands to drop the knife before he complied and let the
mayor go.
“In my mind, I knew it was a
life-or-death situation,” Hollstein
said. “I was lucky that [the
Demirs] were there to help me.
Without them, there was no
chance.”
The next morning, his threeinch neck wound wrapped in
bandages, Hollstein was back at
town hall insisting he would not
be intimidated. He would continue to do his job without police
protection, he said, and to pursue
a high-octane strategy for integrating refugees that has won the
town a national award.
Hundreds of residents gathered for a candlelight march that
evening. Merkel condemned the
attack and called Hollstein to
express her hopes for a fast recovery. Cards and emails poured in
from thousands of well-wishers
around the world, including the
mayors of Barcelona, Milan and
New York.
But mixed in with the mail
were more than 100 letters of the
sort Hollstein has grown accustomed to in the past several
years.
“I’m sorry this man wasn’t suc-
cessful in killing you,” said one.
“Now we will kill you.”
Klaus Laatsch, a local spokesman for the far right Alternative
for Germany party (AfD), said the
attack on Hollstein was “a really
bad thing.” But he can understand the anger.
“If you drive around Altena, it’s
a very sad place,” said Laatsch,
whose party this fall became
the first from the far right to enter
the German Parliament in more
than half a century. “And the
mayor’s the one who’s responsible
for a lot of the problems.”
Like many small and oncemighty industrial towns in Germany, Altena has suffered as factories have moved away. A population of 32,000 decades ago has
dwindled to just over 17,000 today.
When asylum seekers from the
Middle East, Africa and Asia began making their way to Europe
in large numbers several years
ago, Hollstein saw an opportunity: The town had surplus housing that would otherwise be
knocked down. It had schools on
the verge of being shuttered because of under-enrollment. It had
employers looking for young
workers to train.
Hollstein, whose grandmother
fled to Altena from her home in
Kaliningrad as Soviet troops advanced during World War II, said
he also thought the town had a
humanitarian imperative to act.
“We can’t solve everyone’s
problems here in Europe,” he
said. “But we can do what we can
do. And it was very clear to me
that we could do more.”
Beyond taking a higher share of
refugees than required, Altena
has stood out for its aggressive
efforts to integrate the newcomers. At the town hall, a team of four
helps to connect asylum seekers
with jobs, guides them through
the German bureaucracy and coordinates the work of an unusually large cadre of volunteers.
But these days, the refugees
need a lot less help than they used
to.
“They’re independent. They’re
self-sufficient,” said Esther Szafranski, a 50-year-old Altena resident and volunteer. “The kids all
speak German very well, and the
adults are catching up.”
Among them is Nazeer Mohseni, a 29-year-old Afghan who fled
a conflict zone more than two
years ago and traveled six months
to reach Germany. He now speaks
the language, has a German girlfriend and walks the steep streets
of Altena delivering mail as a
postal trainee.
“When I leave at 9 a.m. for my
rounds with my letters and packages, everyone greets me with a
smile and says, ‘Guten morgen,’ ”
said Mohseni, who bears the scars
of a bomb blast he survived five
years ago. “I feel very good here.
There’s security.
“But when I saw what happened to the mayor, I said to
myself: ‘How can this happen in
Germany?’ ”
griff.witte@washpost.com
Luisa Beck contributed to this report.
Bombing at Pakistan church kills 9
BY
M AX B EARAK
At least nine Christian worshipers were killed and 50
wounded when two suicide
bombers attacked a church in the
southwestern city of Quetta on
Sunday, a local hospital spokesman said. The Islamic State,
which has a presence along the
Pakistan-Afghanistan
border,
quickly claimed responsibility.
One attacker detonated an explosives-laden vest at an entrance
to the church’s main hall. A second attacker’s vest failed to detonate and he was killed by security
forces, according to police and
government officials. Nearly 400
worshipers were gathered inside
Bethel Memorial Methodist
Church for early morning
prayers. Photos from the scene
showed debris and pools of blood
near the pulpit, which was decorated with a Christmas tree.
Moazzam Jah Ansari, a provincial police chief, told reporters
that the area around the church
had been secured. The Associated
Press reported that “a search was
underway for two suspected accomplices who escaped,” citing
Quetta’s police chief, Abdur Razzaq Cheema.
Speaking by telephone from
Quetta, eyewitness Salim Masih
said he was in the church’s main
hall when the attack began.
“I was in the middle [of the
church] when suddenly we heard
shots being fired and people crying outside the hall,” Masih said.
“Then everyone was trying to
escape. Suddenly, a huge explosion occurred outside the hall
that broke windowpanes.
“I didn’t see the attackers because I was trying to save my kids.
I kept them in my arms,” he said.
RAHAT DAR/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK/
Pakistani Christians sing in Lahore at a memorial for victims of a
deadly suicide attack at a Methodist church in Quetta on Sunday.
Christians make up about
2 percent of Pakistan’s population. Sunday’s attack raises questions about their safety, and that
of other religious minority
groups, going into a season of
festive gatherings. Over the past
several years, there have been
several attacks by extremist
groups on churches, including a
twin suicide bombing in the
northwestern city of Peshawar in
September 2013 that killed 85.
The Islamic State’s regional affiliate, known as the Islamic State
in Khorasan, has claimed other
attacks in Pakistan’s Baluchistan
province, mostly targeting Shiite
Muslims, but this is the first time
it has taken responsibility for
attacking a church. In August
2016, it claimed an attack that
killed 60 lawyers in Quetta, devastating the city’s legal community.
Pakistani officials have been
pointing to success in reducing
violence in Baluchistan, a sparsely populated and rugged province
bordering Afghanistan and Iran.
But Sunday’s bombing was one of
a string of brazen attacks in the
province’s biggest city.
Baluchistan Interior Minister
Sarfaraz Bugti said that quick
police action averted a much
worse attack on Sunday.
“God forbid, if the terrorists
could have succeeded in their
plans, more than 400 precious
lives would have been at stake,”
Bugti said on Twitter.
Bugti was joined by Pakistan’s
prime minister, Shahid Khaqan
Abbasi, and Army chief Qamar
Bajwa in condemning the attack
and calling for religious tolerance.
max.bearak@washpost.com
Haq Nawaz Khan in Peshawar,
Pakistan, contributed to this report.
WIKUS DE WET/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Supporters of Cyril Ramaphosa rally as the African National Congress meets Sunday in Johannesburg.
Ramaphosa, a business magnate and the deputy president, is one of two major candidates remaining.
ANC postpones vote for next leader
BY
P ETER G RANITZ
johannesburg — The race to
succeed President Jacob Zuma as
leader of the African National
Congress went unresolved Sunday, as ANC officials delayed a
vote more than 24 hours to settle
internal disputes over who was
allowed to participate.
The winner of the party presidency will be the ANC nominee
for president of South Africa in
2019 and will face the tremendous task of winning back the
support of voters disenchanted
with the rampant corruption
that has marked the years with
Zuma at the helm.
Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa and former government
minister Nkosazana Dlamini
Zuma emerged as the two remaining candidates at the party
conference late Sunday. Five other candidates bowed out, and no
candidate was nominated from
the floor. The two are now competing for a majority of delegates
from ANC branches throughout
South Africa’s nine provinces
and from the party’s Women’s
and Youth League.
Ramaphosa founded the politically influential National Union
of Mineworkers and led the
union through strikes that
shocked the apartheid-era economy. He left politics in the 1990s
and entered the private sector,
where he became one of the
country’s richest people.
The winner will be
the party’s nominee
for president of
South Africa in 2019.
Dlamini Zuma served as
health minister in the cabinet of
Nelson Mandela and at one point
served as his doctor, said Carien
du Plessis, the author of “Woman
in the Wings: Nkosazana
Dlamini Zuma and the Race for
the Presidency.” Dlamini Zuma
later served as minister of home
and foreign affairs before leaving
domestic politics to lead the
African Union Commission.
She and Zuma divorced in
1998. They have four children
together.
Zuma’s term as president of
the republic continues until
2019, but a winner could face
intense pressure to remove him
early. The ANC’s National Executive Committee recalled former
president Thabo Mbeki in 2008
after he lost the ANC presidency
to Zuma.
“The sooner Zuma leaves from
national, state presidency the
better for the ANC for election
2019,” said Susan Booysen, a
professor of governance at the
University of the Witwatersrand
in Johannesburg.
The ANC, a banned political
organization during the apartheid years of the 20th century,
led the resistance to white minority rule. After his release from
prison, Mandela guided the party to victory in the first all-race
elections in 1994.
The party has remained firmly
in the presidency since then, but
its share of the electorate has
decreased in each of the past
three elections.
foreign@washpost.com
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
5-day push
for the GOP
CONGRESS FROM A1
PHOTOS BY ANDREW HARNIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Trump, returning from Camp David, talks to reporters a day after a lawyer representing his transition team accused special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III of wrongfully obtaining thousands of emails — a situation that Trump said was “not looking good.”
Trump says he doesn’t plan to fire special counsel
TRUMP FROM A1
The outcry over Mueller’s investigation into Russia’s 2016
election interference grew louder
over the weekend among Trump
loyalists and conservative media
figures. Although Trump has publicly and privately criticized the
Department of Justice and the
FBI and voiced displeasure with
his appointees there, the president’s advisers insisted he is not
aiming his ire at Mueller.
“As the White House has repeatedly and emphatically said
for months, there is no consideration about firing or replacing
the special counsel with whom
the White House has fully cooperated in order to permit a fully
vetted yet prompt conclusion,” Ty
Cobb, a White House lawyer overseeing the Russia matter, said
Sunday in a statement.
Trump’s lawyers, who have
been assuring the president that
Mueller’s investigation is poised
to wrap up by January or so, are
scheduled to meet with Mueller’s
team this week for a routine
status conference. They are expected to ask the special counsel
if there are any other outstanding
questions or materials that investigators need before concluding
the probe.
As the special counsel has
inched closer to Trump with a
series of indictments and guilty
pleas, including securing the cooperation of former national security adviser Michael Flynn, the
president’s defenders have spotlighted examples of political bias
among two senior FBI officials as
proof of a compromised investigation.
FBI lawyer Lisa Page and counterintelligence agent Peter Strzok
worked on the Russia investigation. Strzok was removed from
Mueller’s team in July after text
messages were discovered in
which they discussed their dislike
of Trump and support of Democrat Hillary Clinton; Page had left
the team two weeks earlier for
what officials said were unrelated
reasons. Their text messages
were released by the Justice Department last week and are still
under review.
Some Trump surrogates have
said the texts show that Mueller’s
investigation is partisan.
“It looks more and more and
more like an attack on the presidency,” former Trump campaign
adviser Michael Caputo said Sunday. “I still don’t believe Mueller
is in for a silent coup, but I think
people around him have shown
that this thing is off the rails. . . .
These texts and emails were a
declaration of their membership
in the resistance.”
The attacks have fed speculation about Mueller’s fate. Rep.
Jackie Speier (D-Calif.) told a
California television station on
Friday that “the rumor” on Capitol Hill was that Trump would fire
Mueller at the end of this week, as
Congress disperses for a holiday
break.
Liberal activist groups have
readied mass protests in the
event that Mueller is fired. The
sprawling “Trump Is Not Above
the Law” coalition says it has
more than 400 demonstrations
ready to launch nationwide. Were
Mueller to be fired in the morning, events would be held at
5 p.m. local time; if he were fired
in the afternoon or evening, protests would kick off at noon the
following day.
Trump’s aides said the rumors
Mueller is seen leaving the Capitol this year. The outcry over the
special counsel’s probe into Russia’s interference in the 2016
election grew louder over the weekend among Trump loyalists.
are nonsense. Asked whether the
Trump transition team lawyer’s
complaint was setting the stage
for firing Mueller, Marc Short, the
White House legislative affairs
director, replied, “No!”
“There is no conversation
about that whatsoever in the
White House,” Short said Sunday
on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”
Treasury Secretary Steven
Mnuchin said Sunday on CNN’s
“State of the Union” that Trump
did not mention firing the special
counsel when they had dinner
Saturday night. “I don’t have any
reason to think that the president
is going to do that, but that’s
only thing that remains is whether we have the fortitude to not
just fire these people immediately, but to take them out in
cuffs,” Pirro said.
Christopher Ruddy, a Trump
friend and chief executive of
Newsmax, distinguished between
Trump’s belief that the probe is
politically motivated and his assessment of Mueller’s performance.
“I don’t think he personally
blames Mueller,” said Ruddy, who
said he discussed the issue recently with the president. “I just
think he sees the whole probe as
political from the get-go and un-
“I don’t have any reason to think that the president
is going to do that, but that’s obviously up to him.”
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, on CNN’s “State of the Union,” on whether
President Trump intends to fire special counsel Robert S. Mueller III
obviously up to him,” he said.
Advisers who have spoken recently with Trump about the Russia investigation said the president was sharply critical of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, as well
as Deputy Attorney General Rod
J. Rosenstein, who oversees the
Mueller operation — but did not
broach the idea of firing Mueller.
“I think he realizes that would
be a step too far,” said one adviser,
who spoke on the condition of
anonymity to share a private
conversation.
Rather, Trump appeared to be
contemplating changes in the
Justice Department’s leadership.
In recent discussions, two advisers said, Trump has called the
attorney general “weak,” and
complained that Rosenstein has
shown insufficient accountability
on the special counsel’s work. A
senior official said Trump
mocked Rosenstein’s recent testimony on Capitol Hill, saying he
looked weak and unable to answer questions. Trump has ranted about Rosenstein as “a Democrat,” one of these advisers said,
and characterized him as a threat
to his presidency.
In fact, Rosenstein is a Republican. In 2005, President George
W. Bush nominated him to be U.S.
attorney in Maryland.
Trump has watched Fox News
Channel segments attacking
Mueller’s investigation, advisers
said, including those by Jeanine
Pirro, a former judge and prosecutor whose show is a Trump
favorite and who has visited with
the president in the White House.
On her Saturday night broadcast, Pirro railed against Strzok
and Page, as well as Deputy FBI
Director Andrew McCabe. “The
warranted. In my mind, I think
Mueller is 0 for 4 so far: Two
indictments and two plea agreements, and there’s no evidence of
Russian collusion in any of them.”
Senior law enforcement officials have been worried for
months that they would face intensifying criticism once Strzok
and Page’s communications became public. Since the revelations, some conservatives have
called for the appointment of a
second special counsel to investigate the FBI — a move that could
cause significant headaches for
Mueller because FBI agents have
performed so much of the investigation.
“This bias is like an infection,”
Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) said
Friday on Fox Business Channel.
“It’s like an incurable cancer
that’s inoperable, and we’ve got to
end this Mueller probe.”
On Saturday, a lawyer representing Trump’s transition team
claimed in a letter to congressional investigators that Mueller’s team improperly obtained a
trove of transition emails from
the federal General Services Administration. The letter from
Kory Langhofer, counsel to
Trump for America, alleged that
career GSA employees improperly provided privileged communications to investigators working
for Mueller, contending that transition documents are private
property and not public records.
The special counsel’s office rejected the allegations.
“When we have obtained
emails in the course of our ongoing criminal investigation, we
have secured either the account
owner’s consent or appropriate
criminal process,” said Peter Carr,
a spokesman for Mueller’s team.
Some legal experts challenged
Langhofer’s charge. Randall Eliason, a former federal prosecutor
who teaches a course on whitecollar crime at George Washington University Law School, said it
was not surprising that Mueller’s
team sought Trump transition
emails.
“It’s not your personal email,”
Eliason said. “If it ends in .gov,
you don’t have any expectation of
privacy.”
If Trump’s team had a valid
legal claim, Eliason said, it would
follow standard protocol of filing
a sealed motion to the judge
supervising the grand jury and
ask the judge to provide a remedy,
such as requiring Mueller’s team
to return the emails or excluding
their use in the investigation.
The transition team has not yet
been in contact with the grand
jury judge, according to an official with knowledge of the legal
activities who was not authorized
to discuss them for attribution.
There are ways that Trump
could fire Mueller, according to
legal scholars and former Justice
Department officials. Under the
special counsel regulations,
Mueller could be disciplined or
removed from office only for
“good cause” and “by the personal action of the attorney general.”
In this case, Rosenstein is acting
as the attorney general because
Sessions recused himself from
the Russia investigation.
Rosenstein faced heated questioning from House Judiciary
Committee Republicans last
week.
“We recognize we have employees with political opinions,”
Rosenstein testified. “It’s our responsibility to make sure those
opinions do not influence their
actions. I believe that Director
Mueller understands that, and he
is running his office appropriately.”
Neal Katyal, the former acting
solicitor general who wrote the
special counsel regulations that
govern Mueller’s appointment,
has said that Trump would have
to fire Rosenstein to get rid of
Mueller.
“If Rosenstein refused, Trump
could fire him and keep firing
everyone who replaced him until
he found someone who would fire
Mueller,” said Harvard Law
School professor Jack Goldsmith,
former head of the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel and co-founder of the Lawfare
blog.
If Trump fires Rosenstein, the
next in line to oversee the special
counsel is Associate Attorney
General Rachel Brand, the thirdranking official in the Justice
Department.
On Capitol Hill, Mueller has
widespread support, even among
Trump’s allies. Senate Majority
Whip John Cornyn (R-Tex.) said
Sunday that Mueller should “be
concerned about the appearance
of conflicts of interest that would
undermine the integrity of the
investigation” but said he still has
confidence in Mueller.
Asked what might happen if
Trump fired the special counsel,
Cornyn said, “I think that would
be a mistake.”
health insurance program for
low-income children.
The outcome of the tax votes,
however, appears certain after Republican Sens. Marco Rubio (Fla.)
and Bob Corker (Tenn.) on Friday
pledged their support. The two
gave the GOP the Senate votes to
pass the bill, even as Sen. John
McCain (R-Ariz.), who is battling
an aggressive form of brain cancer, returned to Arizona on Sunday. He is not expected to vote on
the final bill.
The measure’s passage would
mark the first major legislative
accomplishment for Trump and
GOP leaders in a year of stumbles,
the products of months of negotiations and late adjustments
aimed at winning over the last
holdouts.
Republicans fanned out across
the national news shows Sunday
as part of their continued efforts
to sell the public on the bill, promising benefits to the middle class
both from tax cuts and ensuing
economic growth.
“We think as a result of lowering business taxes, wages will go
up. So, this is a huge opportunity
for creating jobs, for creating tax
cuts for working families,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin
said Sunday on CNN’s “State of
the Union.”
Congress’ nonpartisan tax analysts, joining several other nonpartisan assessments, concluded
that the bulk of the bill’s benefits
would go to the wealthy and corporations. Those analyses have
also projected that the cuts will
produce far less economic growth
than Trump and administration
officials are promising.
The plan, unveiled in its final
form Friday, would make the biggest changes to the tax code in
three decades. Most significant, it
would drop the corporate tax rate
to 21 percent from 35 percent. The
bill also would cut taxes for nearly
all individuals, giving the biggest
trims to the wealthy but in most
cases providing some relief for the
middle class.
Polls suggest that the public is
skeptical of the promised major
gains for the middle class. In a
recent CBS poll, 76 percent of
respondents said the bill’s biggest
benefits would go to the largest
corporations. Democrats, who
were shut out of the bill’s construction and find themselves all
but powerless to prevent its passage, attempted to hammer home
that point Sunday.
“What we are seeing here is a
real massive attack on the middle
class,” Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.),
who caucuses with Democrats in
the Senate, said Sunday on CBS’s
“Face the Nation.”
For Republicans, the bigger
drama may come later in the
week, after the planned tax votes
in the House and Senate, when
leaders from both parties weigh a
spending deal to avoid a partial
government shutdown before
funding runs out at the end of the
day Friday.
As the tax debate has consumed
Congress, there has been scant
progress toward a spending deal.
House Republican leaders filed
a spending bill last week that
would temporarily extend funding for most government agencies
at current levels until Jan. 19,
while providing longer-term military funding at higher levels —
$650 billion through Sept. 30.
That bill is considered dead on
arrival in the Senate, where Democrats can block it because of the
chamber’s 60-vote filibuster
threshold.
To cut a long-term spending
deal, Democrats are pushing for
an equivalent increase in defense
and nondefense funding above
the spending caps set under a 2011
agreement — one similar to deals
reached in 2013 and 2015 to raise
the caps for the following two
years. But bipartisan negotiations
that have been open for weeks
have yet to produce an accord.
Democrats railed against the
House GOP gambit last week. Senate Minority Leader Charles E.
. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
Schumer (D-N.Y.), in floor remarks Thursday, called the proposal “a spectacle, a charade, a sop
to some militant, hard-right people who don’t want the government to spend money on almost
anything.”
He added, “And it is a perilous
waste of time as the clock ticks
closer and closer and closer to the
end of the year.”
The spending talks are suffused
with other issues. For instance,
Democrats and some Republicans
want legislation providing legal
status to “dreamers” — immigrants brought to the United
States as children without documentation — to be attached to the
year-end deal.
Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine)
struck a deal with Trump and
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) to provide subsidies for the Affordable Care Act
health insurance marketplaces in
return for her vote on the tax bill,
but it remains to be seen whether
those provisions will be included
in any final accord.
The Children’s Health Insurance Program expired Sept. 30,
and states have been warning for
weeks that coverage could be
threatened if Congress does not
reauthorize it soon.
And a key surveillance authority used by U.S. intelligence agencies to monitor noncitizens
abroad expires Dec. 31, prompting
fears of a lapse in national security.
Even if a bipartisan agreement
is reached on some or all of these
issues, the timeline is tight: The
House is not expected to vote on
its spending bill until Wednesday
at the earliest. That would leave
little time for the Senate to take
that bill, amend it, and send it
back to the House, and any hiccup
could mean a breach of the Friday
shutdown deadline.
Congress averted a partial
shutdown earlier in the month
with a two-week deal that left
spending constant and punted on
all other policy questions, but it’s
unclear if either side has interest
in another short-term deal.
For Democrats, the vote represents a moment of leverage in a
Congress in which Republicans
have used their control of government to shut the minority party
out of the legislative process almost entirely. With enough Senate votes to filibuster any deal, the
Democrats’ leaders, Schumer and
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (Calif.), are under intense
pressure from their base to protect spending on domestic programs and secure concessions on
immigration.
The young people, many of
whom have lived in the United
States for nearly their entire lives,
were afforded temporary protection from deportation via an executive order from President Barack
Obama. The Trump administration is changing that policy, and
Democrats — as well as some
Republicans, such as Sen. Jeff
Flake (Ariz.) — are eager to replace it with new protections.
Republicans face their own
intraparty tensions.
Hard-line conservatives in the
House want GOP leaders to stand
firm against Democrats’ insistence on raising nondefense
spending, arguing that Republicans ought not bow down to those
demands when the GOP holds the
White House and both chambers
of Congress.
If House leaders bow to those
demands, the showdown could
push an extension past the Friday
deadline. Come Saturday morning, many agencies dealing with
the public would close their doors,
including national parks and federal buildings, though many personnel deemed “essential” to national security and public safety
would continue to work.
Republicans of all stripes have
campaigned on cutting spending,
but since the 2011 accord, federal
outlays have continued to rise.
The tax bill, meanwhile, is projected to increase the deficit by at
least $1 trillion over the next decade, a figure that would expand
greatly if Republicans are correct
that future Congresses will extend
the plan’s many income tax cuts
set to expire in eight years.
jeffrey.stein@washpost.com
mike.debonis@washpost.com
patrick.reis@washpost.com
philip.rucker@washpost.com
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
sari.horwitz@washpost.com
Devlin Barrett, Rosalind S.
Helderman, Carol D. Leonnig and
David Weigel contributed to this
report.
ANDREW HARRER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin appeared on CNN’s “State of
the Union” as part of GOP efforts to sell the public on the tax bill.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
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. MONDAY,
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McCain leaves Washington for Arizona before crucial vote on GOP tax plan
Trump says senator, who
is battling brain cancer,
will return if needed
BY
D AN L AMOTHE
Sen. John McCain left the nation’s capital Sunday to spend
Christmas in Arizona with his
family as he battles brain cancer,
giving his Republican Party one
less vote as it is expected this
week to attempt to push through
a contentious tax plan along party lines.
President Trump told report-
ers Sunday that McCain and his
wife, Cindy McCain, have “headed back [to Arizona], but I understand he’ll come if we ever needed
his help, which hopefully we
won’t.” He added: “But the word
is John will come back if we need
his vote. It’s too bad. He’s going
through a very tough time, there’s
no question about it. But he will
come back if we need his vote.”
Trump said he spoke to Cindy
McCain by phone Sunday. “I
wished her well. I wish John well,”
he said.
McCain was hospitalized
Wednesday while receiving chemotherapy treatment at Walter
Reed National Military Medical
Center in Bethesda and at the
nearby National Institutes of
Health. He received a diagnosis
this year of glioblastoma, an aggressive, malignant brain tumor
that can cause headaches, seizures, blurred vision and other
symptoms.
In a brief statement, the senator’s office provided an assessment from Mark Gilbert, chief of
neuro-oncology at the National
Institutes of Health’s National
Cancer Institute.
“Senator McCain has responded well to treatment he received
at Walter Reed Medical Center for
a viral infection and continues to
improve,” Gilbert said, according
to the Associated Press. “An evaluation of his underlying cancer
shows he is responding positively
to ongoing treatment.”
News of McCain’s travel first
emerged Sunday afternoon after
his daughter Meghan McCain
tweeted about the family’s holiday plans.
“Thank you to everyone for
their kind words,” she wrote. “My
father is doing well and we are all
looking forward to spending
Christmas together in Arizona. If
you’re feeling charitable this
Christmas @HeadfortheCure or
@NBTStweets to help find a cure
for brain cancer is what I recommend.”
McCain, 81, missed several
Senate votes last week while at
Walter Reed. He voted for the
initial version of the tax plan,
which includes sweeping tax cuts
and initially passed the Senate
with 51 votes. Without McCain,
Republican leaders have a razorthin margin to pass the final
version, which has been in
House-Senate negotiations and
cannot afford any more defections.
But for Republicans, the bar to
pass the legislation isn’t quite as
high as initially feared. Sens. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Bob Corker
(R-Tenn.) said last week that they
will vote for the measure after
indicating earlier that they would
not.
McCain has been in “good spirits” while receiving treatment,
Ben Domenech, Meghan McCain’s husband, said in an appearance Sunday on CBS’s “Face
the Nation.”
“I’m happy to say that he’s
doing well,” said Domenech, a
conservative writer. “The truth is
that as anyone knows whose family has battled cancer or any
significant disease, that oftentimes there are side effects of
treatment that you have. The
senator has been through a round
of chemo and he was hospitalized
this week at Walter Reed.”
McCain, Domenech added, “remains one of the toughest men on
the face of the earth, as you
know.”
dan.lamothe@washpost.com
IRS division lacks budget, experience to monitor charities
that more than a third of the
groups surveyed were not qualified to use the EZ form and should
not have been approved. The advocate service said there was “a
disturbing lack of information”
about the new groups that threatened to undermine “the public’s
and the IRS’s ability to effectively
monitor this segment of the exempt organization population.”
Meanwhile, some IRS critics
were intensifying their rhetoric.
“I believe that we are in the
most serious constitutional crisis
in our nation’s history, worse than
the Civil War . . . and worse than
Nixon,” Mitchell said in November 2014, while receiving an
award from Horowitz’s Freedom
Center.
In December 2014, Rep. Darrell
Issa (R-Calif.), chairman of the
House Committee on Oversight
and Government Reform, released a report that asserted collusion between the White House
and the IRS. “The Administration
is using the targeting as pretext to
support its proposed regulation
to limit political speech of conservative nonprofits,” the report
said.
IRS FROM A1
participate in educational debates about the issues. Other nonprofits known as social welfare
groups may be involved in politics, but only as long as it is not
their primary purpose.
The main part of government
tasked with policing those lines,
the IRS’s Exempt Organizations
division, has seen its budget decline from a peak of $102 million
in 2011 to $82 million last year. At
the same time, division employees have fallen from 889 to 642.
The division now lacks expertise, resources and the will needed to effectively oversee more
than 1.2 million charities and tens
of thousands of social welfare
groups, according to interviews
with two dozen nonprofit specialists and current and former IRS
officials.
“This completely neutered
them,” said Philip Hackney, a tax
law professor at Louisiana State
University and former Exempt
Organizations lawyer at the IRS.
“The will is totally gone.”
In an interview before he
stepped down in November, thenIRS Commissioner John Koskinen told The Washington Post that
the division is still enforcing the
tax code and pursuing audits and
examinations. But he acknowledged the effect of the budget
cuts.
“The Exempt Organizations division, along with the entire IRS,
is hampered significantly in its
operations,” he said.
Conservatives have likened the
IRS’s extra scrutiny of the tea
party groups to Watergate and
called it a political witch hunt.
Among the leading critics was
Cleta Mitchell, a veteran Republican activist and nonprofit lawyer.
In 2014, she told a House oversight panel that Congress ought
to abolish the IRS, saying the
agency “is so corrupt and so rotten to the core that it cannot be
salvaged.”
But while investigations by
Congress and federal agencies
found that IRS officials selected
tea party groups for added attention, the investigators concluded
there was no proof of political
intent, a liberal conspiracy or
White House involvement.
In recent years, division leaders compounded their challenges
by ordering expedited approval of
tens of thousands of groups seeking tax-exempt status, documents
and interviews show. Last year,
the division rejected just 37 of the
79,582 applications on which it
made a final determination, according to agency data and interviews.
The Post this year has reported
on a sprawling network of conservative charities, funded by
wealthy contributors such as the
Koch brothers, the Mercer family
and the Lynde and Harry Bradley
Foundation, that worked closely
with Stephen K. Bannon, Breitbart News and other conservative
media outlets to amplify President Trump’s messages.
Among them was the David
Horowitz Freedom Center, which
describes itself as a “school for
political warfare” and openly supported Trump. The charity’s president, David Horowitz, told The
Post that both the right and left
routinely use charities in a political war by proxy.
“The entire [charity] universe
is political,” Horowitz said.
Another member of that universe of charities is the Government Accountability Institute,
which was started by Bannon,
among others, and funded by the
Mercer family. It helped produce
“Clinton Cash,” a book that presented a stinging critique of Hillary Clinton and the Clinton
Foundation.
On the left are groups like
Media Matters for America,
which has described its core mission as “disarming right-wing
misinformation.” Media Matters
has received funding from leftleaning members of an organization called Democracy Alliance,
whose members were required to
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
Lois Lerner, who led the IRS division that improperly applied extra scrutiny to conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status, leaves a
House committee meeting in 2014 after exercising her Fifth Amendment right not to incriminate herself by testifying about her actions.
donate at least $200,000 a year to
organizations endorsed by the
group, according to documents
that became public in 2014. Democracy Alliance members — including George Soros — have donated more than $500 million to
liberal organizations over more
than a decade.
Media Matters spokeswoman
Laura Keiter said the group observes IRS rules against direct or
indirect involvement in political
campaigns.
“We are partisan but not political,” she said.
Such activity is effectively subsidized by American taxpayers,
because contributors to charities
— known as 501(c)(3) groups under the tax code — can deduct
donations from their personal
taxes.
More charities have now begun
to recognize they face little
chance of an examination or sanction, which can involve terminating a group’s tax-exempt status
and the ability of its donors to
deduct their contributions, specialists said.
“More and more groups are
going to discover that they get
away with doing politics,” said
Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer, a law professor at Notre Dame and a former
nonprofit lawyer.
Tim Delaney, president and
chief executive of the National
Council of Nonprofits, said his
25,000 members rely on federal
regulators to look out for abusive
practices and maintain the public’s trust in nonprofits. Many of
them worry about the weakening
of the division, he said.
“If bad actors are allowed into
the sector or if even just a few
charitable nonprofits are turned
into partisan pawns, that erases
the trust that charitable nonprofits need to advance nonpartisan
public policy solutions,” Delaney
said.
Effect of 2010 ruling
In 1970, the Exempt Organizations division at the IRS created
an examinations branch to bolster oversight of charities, private
foundations and other nonprofits.
The division was something of
an anomaly at an agency whose
central mission is to collect taxes.
For decades, it had steady leadership and an experienced force of
lawyers, auditors and others who
understood the nuances and political sensitivities of the nonprofit world, according to former IRS
officials.
The number of charities soared
from 366,000 in 1985 to more
than 1.2 million last year, and
regulators struggled to keep up.
PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Koskinen, who resigned as IRS commissioner last month,
said the agency “is hampered significantly in its operations.”
Among the challenges was assessing whether new groups seeking tax-exempt status complied
with restrictions on political activity. The Johnson Amendment
of 1954 prohibited 501(c)(3) charities from getting involved in campaigns. Other nonprofits designated as social welfare organizations under 501(c)(4) in the tax
code are allowed to engage in a
limited amount of political activity, as long as that is not their
primary purpose. But the law is
vaguely written and hard to enforce, according to tax lawyers
and current and former IRS officials.
The division’s burden became
heavier in 2010, after the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision, which removed limits on
spending by corporations and labor unions on political communication. That opened the way for a
flood of donations to nonprofits.
Hundreds of tea party social
welfare groups and other conservative organizations that opposed Obama administration policies submitted applications to be
recognized as tax-exempt. Democrats complained that new
501(c)(3) and 501(c)(4) groups
were more involved in political
campaigns than the law allowed.
With the backlog of applications growing, the Exempt Organizations division’s regulators
— most of them in IRS offices in
Cincinnati — scrambled behind
the scenes to assess the groups’
qualifications. The IRS officials
there took shortcuts, such as flagging groups because of their
names rather than focusing on
their activities, according to investigations by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration and the Senate Finance
Committee. Division leaders in
Washington failed to manage the
process properly and offered conflicting directions on how to fairly
address the surge in applications,
according to the investigative reports.
By early 2012, tea party groups
across the country were growing
frustrated by the delays, some
stretching to two years or more.
Some activists bristled that IRS
officials had sent them intrusive,
wide-ranging requests for more
information about political affiliations, social media posts and
other details.
Toby Marie Walker, organizer
of a tea party group in Waco, Tex.,
arranged a conference call for tea
party activists across the country
to discuss how to respond. Walker
told The Post that more than 100
activists participated. Among
them was Mitchell. A second conference call included Jay Sekulow,
chief counsel for the American
Center for Law and Justice, now a
private attorney for Trump,
Mitchell said.
“We wanted to follow all the
rules,” Walker said. “We didn’t
want to get hammered.”
On March 5, 2012, Sekulow
sent the Exempt Organizations
division a letter saying he represented an applicant for taxexempt status. The next day, the
New York Times reported that
Sekulow was representing 16 tea
party nonprofits in a burgeoning
fight with the IRS.
“This is obviously a coordinated effort by the IRS to stifle these
Tea Party and Tea Party-affiliated
groups, and to stifle free speech
activities,” Sekulow told The
Times. Sekulow declined to comment for this article.
Congress pressed the IRS
about the allegations, and the
Treasury Inspector General for
Tax Administration launched an
investigation.
The IG’s report was released in
May 2013, triggering an uproar.
It concluded that IRS officials
“used inappropriate criteria that
identified for review Tea Party
and other organizations,” based
on names or policy positions rather than an assessment of the
groups’ political activity.
Conservatives set the tone of
media coverage, claiming that the
report showed the White House
tried to use the agency to silence
critics and calling the episode the
“IRS targeting scandal.” But nowhere in the IG report did investigators assert that IRS officials
“targeted” conservatives.
“As an initial concern, ‘targeted’ has a connotation of improper
motivation that does not seem to
be supported by the information
presented in the audit report,”
according to an internal email by
the inspector general’s chief
counsel, Michael McCarthy, that
was later included in an investigative report by the Senate Finance Committee. “I think ‘selected’ or even ‘singled out’ would be
accurate.”
Conservatives continued pushing the issue. On April 9, 2014,
Republicans on the House Ways
and Means Committee asked the
Justice Department to pursue
criminal charges against former
Exempt Organization division
leader Lois Lerner, who had left
the agency under fire after the tea
party scandal erupted.
Rep. Hal Rogers (R-Ky.), chairman of the powerful House Appropriations Committee, blasted
the IRS for “impropriety and
abuse” in a news release announcing $346 million in planned cuts
to the agency’s budget.
Eager to avoid more congressional criticism, Exempt Organizations division leaders took extraordinary steps to streamline
the review of nonprofits and clear
out the backlog. Pending applications began sailing through the
approval process at a pace that
would cut the backlog from 32,713
in April 2014 to 205 by December
2016, an average of about 50 each
working day.
At the same time, the division
adopted an expedited 1023 EZ
application form for small charities claiming to have less than
$50,000 in donations. It required
no supporting documentation. In
less than six months in 2014 —
even as the Exempt Organizations division was shedding oversight employees — the IRS received more than 100,000 applications, more than double the
number for the entire previous
year.
A study by the Taxpayer Advocate Service at the IRS later found
The repercussions
Repercussions from the tea
party scandal continue to echo
through Washington.
This spring, Rep. Kevin Brady
(R-Tex.), chairman of the House
Ways and Means Committee,
asked Justice to reexamine the
request for a criminal prosecution of Lerner. The department
declined in a Sept. 8 letter, saying
that although an FBI investigation found “substantial evidence
of mismanagement” that disproportionately affected conservative groups, it “had not uncovered
evidence of criminal intent by any
IRS official.”
That same month, the Treasury
Inspector General for Tax Administration issued another audit.
The IG reported that the agency
had also used shortcuts over nine
years to select for examination
liberal-oriented groups that focused on such topics as “medical
marijuana” and “green energy.”
Though fewer progressive
groups received additional attention than tea party groups, Democrats said the IG report provided
evidence that the scrutiny was
not motivated by ideology.
“After years of baseless claims
and false accusations it is my
hope Republicans will finally put
an end to this witch hunt and
admit that their attacks on the
IRS were nothing but political
grandstanding on behalf of special interests at the expense of
American taxpayers,” Sen. Ron
Wyden (D-Ore.) said in a statement in October.
In interviews and an email exchange with The Post, Mitchell
said the investigations failed to
highlight the essence of IRS
wrongdoing. She maintains the
scandal was grounded in abusive,
politically motivated targeting, as
chronicled by the Issa report in
2014.
“I have no intention of ‘schooling’ anyone on why the IRS /
Obama / Democrats’ narrative is
wrong,” she wrote. “I’m not going
to get into an argument to try to
convince you of why that narrative is wrong. It just is. You either
believe it or you don’t and if you
don’t think there was a Political
targeting scandal, then you don’t
need to talk to me.”
Miriam Galston, a law professor at George Washington University, said there’s growing evidence
that many charities are “flagrantly violating” the expectation that
they contribute to “the public
good.” She said IRS regulators are
not in a position to do anything
about it.
“They’ve been burned. They’ve
been hammered. They’ve been
bludgeoned,” said Galston, a specialist in state and federal nonprofit law. “They’re trying to survive.”
robert.oharrow@washpost.com
Steven Rich contributed to this
report.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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capital business
Lockheed project
aims for revival
of supersonic jet
Plane would cut 3 hours
from transatlantic trip for
wealthy passengers
BY
C HRISTIAN D AVENPORT
For 27 years, until its retirement
in 2003, the Concorde was a flying
symbol of glamour and speed, a
sleek embodiment of technological prowess and supersonic power
that ferried the wealthy from New
York to London in 31/2 hours while
they dined on veal medallions and
crème caramel.
Its excess, though, led to its
demise. The plane was too expensive and carried too few passengers to be sustainable. After a fatal
crash, the fleet ceased operation
with one last flight from Charles
de Gaulle to Dulles International
Airport, as the pilot raised a glass
of champagne and toasted his passengers: “To your first Mach 2 —
and the last.”
On Friday, however, leaders of
Lockheed Martin and the Aerion
Corp. announced a deal to build a
speedy business jet that they
vowed would “engineer a renaissance in supersonic travel.” Speaking at the National Press Club in
Washington, the companies said
they would build a civil jet, capable of flying as fast as Mach 1.4, or
about 60 percent faster than a
typical commercial airliner.
With operations projected to
start in 2025, the AS2, as the jet
would be called, would be able to
fly as many as 12 passengers, and
shave as much as three hours off
the seven- to eight-hour trips between New York and London, so
business executives could make a
daily commute back and forth
across the Atlantic.
The memorandum of under-
standing between the two companies represents a departure for
Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin. The company is the largest
defense firm in the world, known
primarily as a maker of weapons
and military aircraft, including
the F-16, F-22 and F-35.
That legacy in building supersonic fighter jets, as well as the
SR-71 surveillance jet — capable of
traveling three times the speed of
sound — is what made Lockheed
such a good partner, the companies said.
Although Lockheed is focused
on defense, it did build the first
operational business jet, the Lockheed JetStar, which flew in the
1960s and ’70s.
“We do believe new material
and new technologies are making
civil supersonic flight a realistic
near-term possibility,” said Orlando Carvalho, the executive vice
president of Lockheed Martin
Aeronautics.
Despite the struggles of the
Concorde — a commercial airliner
capable of flying about 100 people
— Brian Barents, the executive
chairman of Aerion, said he believes the demand would be there
for
a
comfortable,
fastflying jet designed for corporations and the ultrawealthy.
“We strongly believe that speed
is the next frontier in civil aviation, and we will begin that journey with a supersonic business
jet,” he said.
Reno, Nev.-based Aerion forecasts building 300 jets in the first
10 years of production, and the
comfort of the jets would rival
other business jets on the market.
One of the problems with supersonic travel is the sonic booms
they create. The United States
bans commercial airliners from
flying at supersonic speeds over
land. Such speeds are permitted
over water, however. NASA and
LOCKHEED MARTIN AERONAUTICS
The AS2, to be produced by Lockheed Martin and Aerion Corp., has two engines under the wings and a third in the tail. It’s speed would
top out at Mach 1.4, which is 40 percent faster than the speed of sound and 60 percent faster than a typical commercial jet.
several companies are working on
ways to lessen the impact of sonic
booms, reducing the bone-rattling
cacophony to mere rumbles.
But the even bigger hurdle may
be persuading people to pay a
premium for the extra speed and
convenience.
“Some very wealthy people are
going to have to say, ‘I want the
speed. I want my own Concorde,’ ”
said Richard Aboulafia, an aerospace analyst at the Teal Group, a
consulting firm. The fact that it
doesn’t fly as fast as the Concorde,
which could hit Mach 2, “might
also put a crimp in the ego factor.”
He predicted governments
could also be a customer, making
Lockheed Martin’s involvement
essential. “There are absolutely no
options for rapid delivery of essential personnel — soldiers or diplomats or doctors,” he said. “There’s
nothing faster than the fastest civil jet.”
Since Lockheed Martin has traditionally shied away from civil
markets, Aboulafia said the question is, will it “actually come
through with the large pile of cash
needed to bring [the jet] to market?”
Aerion and Lockheed, however,
were optimistic.
“This really is the dawn of a new
era,” said Aerion Chairman Robert
Bass. “As our motto says, ‘It’s about
time.’ ”
christian.davenport@washpost.com
INNOVATIONS
With its ‘Stupid Patent’ awards, group targets the trolls
BY
L ARRY D OWNES
The year 2017 was a critical one
for patents — limited legal monopolies granted to inventors to control the market for their innovations.
Notably, the Supreme Court decided two cases that continued a
trend of reining in “patent trolls,”
companies that buy up patents
and then sue anyone and everyone
for infringement, looking for easy
settlements.
In TC Heartland v. Kraft Foods,
the court restricted the ability of
patent holders to sue for infringement claims in plaintiff-friendly
courts. Instead, the court held,
patent cases can be filed only
where a defendant is incorporated
or has a regular place of business.
That common-sense test has
greatly curtailed the popularity of
the notoriously patent-friendly
Eastern District of Texas, where
patent holders win nearly 80 percent of the time. With the Supreme
Court’s decision in the TC Heartland case, filings in the Eastern
District have shrunk from 40 percent of all patent infringement
cases to 10 percent.
Although Apple can still be
sued in the Eastern District, because of a retail store that happens
to be on the wrong side of the
street in the city of Plano, the real
victims of the Texas court have
long been smaller companies and
start-ups that have had little
choice but to settle with patent
trolls to avoid expensive, drawnout litigation.
Last month, the Supreme Court
heard arguments in another important case, which challenged
the legality of a streamlined Patent and Trademark Office review
process that has likewise reduced
abusive litigation. A decision is
expected sometime next year.
Still, there were plenty of eyerolling moments in the world of
patents this year. That’s according
to Daniel Nazer, who holds the
Mark Cuban Chair to Eliminate
Stupid Patents — a position endowed by the well-known tech investor — at the Electronic Frontier
Foundation, an advocacy group
based in San Francisco.
As his title suggests, Nazer’s
work is focused on exposing and
defusing patents he believes
shouldn’t have been granted in the
first place. To that end, EFF publishes a monthly column highlighting the excesses of a patent
system that EFF sees as in desperate need of revision, including
those they crown with the dubious
honor of “Stupid Patent of the
Month.”
That may sound like a joke, but
bad patents are serious business.
According to the Consumer Technology Association, patent trolling drains $1.5 billion from the
U.S. economy every week.
This year’s stupidest picks include several glaringly obvious
and unoriginal ideas, including
the “invention” of automated outof-office emails, a way to organize
files on a computer, software that
helps users count calories, and a
disturbing trend of patents being
granted on the use of routine and
well-known artificial-intelligence
techniques.
Yet the patent office gave each
of these protection that now lasts
20 years. Some of the patents were
approved this year; in other cases,
2017 marked the first time an alleged troll tried to enforce them,
often against a wide range of users
and third-party developers who
were almost certainly unaware of
the claimed inventions.
Nazer believes none of these
patents should have been granted,
because they failed to overcome
the legal requirements of being
original and non-obvious. A big
part of the problem, he says, has to
do with how the patent office
works. “Patent examiners spend
an average of only 18 hours reviewing each application,” he told me,
“which is grossly inadequate.”
Worse, in reviewing applications for software patents, examiners compare only other software
patents. They rarely if ever have
the time to look at software already in the market, leaving it to
the litigation process to sort the
innovations from the frauds.
Software patents, recognized as
a valid category only in the past 20
years, represent the fastest-growing category of applications and
have outsize representation
among EFF’s horror stories. That’s
despite the fact that in 2014, the
Supreme Court took important
steps to slow the expansion of this
dubious category. In Alice Corp. v.
CLS Bank, the justices held that
simply doing a manual process on
a general-purpose computer is insufficiently novel to qualify for
patent protection.
But many of this year’s worst
patents did just that, Nazer says.
That’s the case with EFF’s January winner, a patent granted to
CBS Interactive for software that
allows users to “interact” with
song lyrics by reviewing and entering annotations. Ditto for a patent, recently asserted against
Uber and Lyft, that purports to
cover all software that “determines if a taxi is free” and, if so,
“sends the current location of the
taxi to the taxi dispatch server.”
Then there’s a patent granted to
HP for software that sends calendar reminder messages, which the
patent office reviewed for years
“without ever considering any
real-world products” that already
existed.
The Alice case, Nazer says,
needs to be more aggressively applied by the courts and the patent
office. The Supreme Court could
go further, ruling that Congress
never intended for software to be
patentable in the first place. Software, after all, is already protected
under copyright and, in many cases, trade-secret law, providing
plenty of incentives for developers
to keep writing code.
At the time Alice was decided,
Nazer notes, advocates proclaimed the end of the software
industry. Yet spending on research
and development remains at record-high levels, and software
continues, in the words of Internet
entrepreneur Marc Andreessen,
“eating the world.”
“If that’s what happens when
you weaken patents,” Nazer says,
“let’s weaken them some more.”
With that attitude, it’s little surprise that EFF’s project has often
drawn ire from pro-patent groups.
The “Stupid Patent of the Month,”
in fact, was itself the subject of
litigation. Last year, EFF named a
patent for a “virtual cabinet” to
graphically represent data stored
on a computer as its stupid patent
for June. Gemsa, the company that
holds the patent, sued Nazer and
EFF, alleging defamation, in an
Australian court where free-
speech protections are weaker.
Late last month, a federal court
in California sided with EFF, holding that Australian law could not
be squared with the First Amendment. Citing an American law that
protects U.S. defendants from “libel tourism,” the court concluded
easily that none of Gemsa’s claims
“could give rise to defamation under U.S. and California law.”
Nazer hopes the court’s strongly worded opinion will deter future efforts to mute his project,
which still has a long way to go.
Congress, after all, has done little
in the past several years to rebalance patent law in favor of true
innovators. While the federal
courts have been doing some of
their job for them, it’s not enough.
So, expect a full slate of stupid
patents to be exposed next year.
Downes is co-author with Paul Nunes
of “Big Bang Disruption: Strategy in
the Age of Devastating Innovation”
(Portfolio 2014). He is a project
director at the Georgetown Center for
Business and Public Policy.
BUSINESS RESOURCES
Commercial Real Estate
or
fax 202-334-7635, or
email Reclass@washpost.com
APPOINTMENTS
COMPANIES
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appointed LaVerne Council
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enterprise digital strategy and
innovation.
Guess & Co. of the District
appointed Stephanie Mykonos
senior executive vice president,
chief administrative officer,
secretary and deputy treasurer.
Hitt Contracting of Falls
Church appointed Kim Roy chief
executive, Brett Hitt and Jim
Millar co-chairmen of the board.
Peraton of Herndon
appointed Matt McQueen chief
communications officer.
ASSOCIATIONS
AND NONPROFITS
ICI Global of the District
appointed Jennifer Choi chief
counsel.
National Defense Industrial
Association of Arlington
appointed Jim Boozer chief of
staff.
FINANCE
Washington Financial Group
of McLean appointed Michelle
Taylor client service
administrator.
LAW AND LOBBYING
Covington & Burling of the
District appointed Tom
Cosgrove partner.
Latham & Watkins of the
Dir. Deadline: Thurs. 4pm
District appointed Todd
Beauchamp partner.
McGuireWoods of the
District appointed Emily Gordy
partner.
Quarles & Brady of the
District appointed David Blank
partner.
Sidley Austin of the District
appointed Jennifer Clark and
Michael Lewis partners and
Michael Schmidtberger chair of
VA: Commercial Property
the executive committee.
— Compiled by Aaron Gregg
Send information about promotions,
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TRANSACTIONS
Trading as reported by companies’ directors, presidents, chief financial officers, general counsel, chief executive
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Company
2U
Avalonbay Communities
Booz Allen Hamilton Holdings
Glycomimetics
Marriott International
Saul Centers
Tegna
United Therapeutics
Walker & Dunlop
Insider
Paul A. Maeder
Sean Joseph Breslin
Leo S. Horey
Susan L. Penfield
Helen M. Thackray
Bruce W. Duncan
Bruce W. Duncan
David J. Grissen
Deborah M. Harrison
James Page Lansdale
Clifton A. McClelland III
Christopher Causey
Paul A. Mahon
Martine A. Rothblatt
Richard M. Lucas
Title
Director
Chief operating officer
Officer
Officer
Officer
Director
Director
Officer
Director/owner
President
Officer
Director
General counsel
Chief executive
General counsel
Date
Action
Shares
Dec. 7
Dec. 11
Dec. 12
Dec. 6
Dec. 8
Dec. 13
Dec. 5 to Dec. 8
Dec. 7
Dec. 8
Dec. 12
Dec. 6
Dec. 7
Dec. 7
Dec. 8
Dec. 5, Dec. 6
Bought
Sold
Sold
Sold
Sold
Sold
Sold
Sold
Sold
Sold
Sold
Sold
Sold
Sold
Sold
67,830
60.07 to 61.66
89,544
1,500
182.65
33,319
1,000
183
35,690
30,022
38.31
28,067
2,000
15.01
148,615
8,644
129.34
88,456
4,388 129.03 to 129.70
97,100
2,139
127.73
47,044
35,401
128.85 25,597,660
2,372
62.50
600
7,740
13.69
26,284
580
134.72
1,555
6,000
137.07
35,426
1
136.16
140
20,000
47.97 to 48.33
153,068
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A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
Outage at Atlanta airport grounds flights, strands thousands of passengers
Customers may have
trouble rebooking trips
during busy travel week
BY
J ONATHAN L ANDRUM J R.
atlanta — A sudden power
failure brought the world’s busiest airport to a standstill Sunday,
grounding more than 1,000
flights in Atlanta just days before
the start of the Christmas travel
rush. Hours after the blackout
began, authorities announced
that electricity would be restored
at Hartfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport by midnight.
Passengers at the airport were
left in the dark when the lights
went out about 1 p.m. The outage
halted all outgoing flights, and
arriving planes were held on the
ground at their points of departure. International flights were
being diverted, officials said.
According to a Georgia Power
statement, a fire in an underground electrical facility may
have been responsible for the
outage. The cause of the fire was
not known.
“No personnel or passengers
were in danger at any time,” the
statement said.
No areas outside of the airport
were affected by the power loss.
The utility said that there are
“many redundant systems in
place” to ensure the power supply
to the airport and that such outages at the airport “are very rare.”
Delta Air Lines passenger
Emilia Duca, 32, was on her way
to Wisconsin from Bogota, Colombia, when she got stuck in
Atlanta. She said police made
passengers who were in the baggage-claim area move to a higher
floor. She said restaurants and
shops were closed. Vending machines weren’t working.
“A lot of people are arriving,
and no one is going out. No one is
saying anything official. We are
stuck here,” she said. “It’s a nightmare.”
Delta, with its biggest hub
operation in Atlanta, will be hardest hit. By evening, the airline had
already canceled almost 800 Sunday flights and 250 more on
Monday, nearly all of them in
Atlanta, according to tracking
service FlightAware.com.
Robert Mann, an aviation consultant and former American Airlines executive, said it probably
will be Tuesday before Delta’s
operations in Atlanta return to
normal, and for passengers “it
could be most of the week” because there aren’t many open
seats on other flights during the
week before Christmas.
“Tomorrow is going to be a
long and difficult day for everybody,” Mann said.
There was one bit of good
news, he added: Delta has more
spare planes and available crews
in Atlanta than anywhere else,
which will help it to recover.
Although Delta was hit hardest
by the outage, other airlines also
canceled flights for the rest of
Sunday. American Airlines canceled 24 departures and an equal
number of arrivals, spokesman
Ross Feinstein said. The airline
also diverted three planes that
were headed to Atlanta when the
failure occurred, sending them
instead to Dallas, Nashville and
back to Philadelphia.
The FAA said it would staff the
airport control tower throughout
the night so that it can handle
flights once they resume. The
FAA said the tower could operate
normally but flights were affect-
ed because airport equipment in
the terminals was not working.
By evening, power had been
restored to at least one concourse. On its Twitter page Sunday night the airport tweeted,
“Power on Concourse F is back
ON! We are working with great
urgency w/ @GeorgiaPower to
restore power throughout rest of
airport.” Later, it tweeted: “Power
is back ON in Atrium and Concourses T, A and B!”
Officer Lisa Bender of the Atlanta Police Department said officers were at the airport to help
control crowds and manage traffic around the airport.
At Southwest Airlines, about
70 Atlanta departures out of 120
scheduled for Sunday were canceled, an airline spokesman said
in an email. United Airlines and
JetBlue Airways also reported
delays or cancellations.
Mozell Smith, 58, of Atlanta
arrived at the airport hours after
the electricity went out. He was
headed to Las Vegas with a sister
and a friend.
“This is terrible. I wish someone would’ve given us a heads-up
before we got to the airport,” he
said. “I wish there would have
been better communication.”
American Airlines reported
only a handful of diversions and
cancellations because the carrier
does not use Atlanta as a hub,
airline spokeswoman Alexis Aran
Coello said.
Hartsfield-Jackson,
which
serves 104 million passengers a
year, is the world’s busiest airport, a distinction it has held
since 1998.
The airport serves an average
of 275,000 passengers daily, according to its website. Nearly
2,500 planes arrive and depart
each day.
— Associated Press
Provision in California law allows some pot offenders to clear their records
MARIJUANA FROM A1
petitions to have their sentences
reduced, redesignated or thrown
out as of September, according to
the California Judicial Council.
The highest amount came from
Riverside County, where 613 applications were filed. In addition, at
least 365 people have applied to
have their juvenile marijuana convictions thrown out. Not every
county reported data.
The change here is part of a
nationwide movement to reduce
marijuana charges and atone for
harsh penalties during the war on
drugs. At least nine states have
passed laws expunging or reducing marijuana convictions, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Maryland, Oregon and Vermont also
now allow convictions for marijuana offenses that are not crimes
under current law to be wiped off a
criminal record.
The re-designation of marijuana crimes in California went into
effect immediately after voters approved the measure legalizing pot.
Many viewed it as an offshoot of a
2014 ballot initiative that reduced
penalties for certain drug and
theft crimes.
Those who want their marijuana
convictions lessened must present
their cases in court. Prosecutors
can decide not to support a reduction should someone have a major
felony, such as murder, on their
record. Old convictions will be reclassified under the law as it reads
now. For example, if someone had
been convicted of possessing an
ounce or less of marijuana, that
conviction would be tossed out because that is now legal in California.
Some district attorney’s offices
notified the recently convicted
and incarcerated that they were
eligible to have their records
changed and that they potentially
could leave prison. Last year, prosecutors in San Diego searched for
people convicted of marijuana offenses in the prior three years who
would be eligible for reductions.
When the measure passed, prosecutors got their petitions before a
judge as soon as possible.
“We absolutely didn’t want people to be in custody who shouldn’t
be in custody,” said Rachel Solov,
chief of the collaborative courts
division in the San Diego district
attorney’s office. She said that as of
mid-December, the office has han-
ROB KUZNIA FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Restaurateur Tim Gee said his
conviction in California has
prevented him from buying guns
and from traveling to Canada.
dled nearly 600 reductions.
But advocates said many people
who completed their sentences
still do not know they could be
able to change their criminal records. Hernandez and defense lawyers said that the state has put
little effort into outreach and that
most people are hearing about the
opportunities through word of
mouth or social media.
“One of the projects we’re working on this year is to notify people
that this is an option,” said Bruce
Margolin, a Los Angeles defense
lawyer who specializes in marijua-
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na cases. “It’s a viable thing to do,
obviously, because people are suffering with these felony convictions
in so many aspects of their life.”
Omar Figueroa, a defense lawyer in Sebastopol, Calif., who specializes in marijuana law, said the
requirement to go to court makes
it more difficult for the poor to
take advantage.
“That’s one of the criticisms,
that a lot of people don’t have the
time or energy or the access to
public transportation to get to the
courthouse,” Figueroa said. “What
I see is the people who have more
means are the ones who are taking
advantage of this, and the people
who have more basic struggles in
their everyday life, the last thing
they’re thinking about is cleaning
up their criminal history for their
old marijuana convictions.”
Hernandez and others are hoping people without the means to
hire an attorney will come to expungement clinics where paralegals and public defenders review
cases.
Derege saw an ad about a Saturday expungement clinic on Facebook just hours before it started.
He threw on a hoodie and a backpack stuffed with legal documents
and headed out on a 21/2-hour trek
by bus, train and foot. He finally
arrived at a rehabilitation center
in downtown Los Angeles for the
clinic, which was organized by
Californians for Responsible Marijuana Reform, a committee that
campaigned for the initiative.
“I’m hoping they can see what’s
on my record and I can get
cleared,” Derege said, “and go back
to how things was when I first
came to California.”
Derege moved to Los Angeles
from Missouri in his early 20s. He
appeared as an extra in a “Key &
Peele” skit called “Bling Benzy &
Da Struggle” and has an IMDb
credit for the television series
“Women Behind Bars.”
In 2008, when he was 23,
Derege used his medical marijuana card to purchase pot and resell
it on the street in Hollywood. He
was arrested and charged with a
felony for transporting marijuana
with intentions to distribute — a
rap he thinks was heavy-handed.
“Mind you, I was standing in
front of McDonald’s selling weed. I
wasn’t in no car,” he said. “I didn’t
even have a car at the time.”
The conviction has barred him
from many types of employment,
including driving for Uber or Lyft.
He works at a warehouse for
$10.50 an hour.
“At the end of the day, I made a
mistake,” he said. “I know I was
wrong. . . . But man, come on. It’s
been 10 years. I’m about to be 33.”
His case was referred out, and
he discovered something surprising: He is still on probation but
didn’t know it.
Restaurateur Tim Gee, 50, came
to the clinic from Las Vegas, clad in
a suit and red tie. He has long
worried that his possession-withintent-to-sell conviction in California from the 1990s would hamper
his ability to obtain a liquor license.
Gee said the conviction has prevented him from purchasing firearms and from traveling to Canada for a vacation with his girlfriend. He often works with local
elected officials, and he no longer
wants to be saddled with a decades-old conviction.
“I just really want to get it
cleaned up — to be as straight as
possible,” Gee said. “It’s been
hanging over my head. Hopefully,
it will be gone.”
katie.zezima@washpost.com
Zezima reported from Washington.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Trump adviser’s plan would reduce compensation for government workers
The Trump
administration’s
consideration of a
wage freeze for
JOE
federal employees
DAVIDSON
is one piece of a
renewed
multifront Republican push to
shrink those workers’ pay,
benefits and workforce.
That effort has been around
for years, but it now has an
intellectual champion in the
White House, and I don’t mean
President Trump.
Confidential administration
information released last week
by Sen. Claire McCaskill (Mo.),
the leading Democrat on the
Senate Homeland Security and
Governmental Affairs
Committee, revealed an
administration proposal to
freeze federal salaries in fiscal
2019. That is the third piece in
a pattern that includes
Trump’s 2018 budget proposal
to cut the employer
contribution to retirement
benefits and the House
Republican plan to have
retirees pay more out of pocket
for their health insurance.
Congress did not approve the
last two recommendations, and
the pay freeze, which Trump can
impose, is not beyond the
leaked-document stage. Yet the
proposals lurk, likely to
reemerge in future budget plans
after having long percolated in
conservative circles.
Now, with James Sherk — a
chief proponent of the notion
that federal workers are
Federal
Insider
MANDEL NGAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
The Christopher Columbus statue at Columbus Circle in front of
Union Station in Washington. Columbus Day is one of the paid
federal holidays a labor adviser to President Trump wants to cut.
overpaid — serving as Trump’s
labor adviser, the proposals
stand their best chance yet of
becoming policies that dig deep
into federal employees’ pockets.
Sherk, a labor economist,
joined Trump’s team early this
year after working for the
conservative Heritage
Foundation. His co-authored
report “Why It Is Time to
Reform Compensation for
Federal Employees” was
published by Heritage just days
after the 2016 Republican
National Convention nominated
Trump.
The bottom line: Feds would
get less pay and benefits for
more work.
“Our paper was intended to
serve as a framework for any
candidate or elected official who
wants to improve the way the
federal government operates
and offer more competitive
options to federal employees,”
Rachel Greszler, a Heritage
economist who wrote the report
with Sherk, said by email Friday.
“Reform” really does not
convey the serious bite of their
proposals. The central thesis is
that federal workers are
overcompensated compared
with those in the private sector.
They outlined a plan to cut
those costs — a blueprint that
Sherk can follow from a position
of influence in the White House
— “to the extent that the
administration is willing to take
on the labor policies that Sherk
has spent much of his career
championing,” Greszler said.
Those policies face fierce
opposition from Democrats and
federal employee organizations.
Policies like Sherk’s
“undermine the value this
country places on public service
by targeting the income security
of those who carry it out,” said
Richard G. Thissen, president of
the National Active and Retired
Federal Employees Association.
“Whether caring for our
veterans, responding to
disasters or just ensuring the
day-to-day operation of
democratic government, the
work these individuals do is
vital to our country, and it
should be rewarded, not
devalued.”
The paper did not call for a
pay freeze, but Greszler’s email
said that “without congressional
action, it is the administration’s
only tool. While a freeze alone
doesn’t help achieve a more
competitive pay structure
(because the current system
massively overcompensates
lower-skilled workers and
provides little to no
compensation premium for the
highest-skilled workers), it
could serve as a bargaining tool
for more comprehensive
Congressional action.”
Rather than making the
government a model employer,
the proposals would unite Uncle
Sam with employee-regressive
business practices designed to
maximize profits. But Sam is in
the business of service, not
propelling profits.
The authors begin by citing
three studies indicating that
federal compensation is higher
than private-sector
compensation by at least
16 percent. They ignored Federal
Salary Council data, saying
federal workers earn 34 percent
less on average than comparable
private-sector employees.
Sherk and the White House
declined my requests to speak
with him, but his published
work speaks for itself.
Sherk has argued for years
that federal compensation is too
high. Consider the title of his
2010 Star Tribune piece: “Who
in This Country Has More than
They Deserve? Most Federal
Employees.”
Really? Seeking to counter
that negative notion, he and
Greszler want to:
Restrict within-grade
increases, also known as step
increases. These pay increases
are based largely on tenure,
rather than performance.
“Limiting the size of step
increases would, over time,
lower pay for all federal
employees.”
Undermine the federal
retirement program by moving
away from defined-benefit
pensions, which cost employers
more, to a refined-contribution
system, which provides less
certainty and higher costs for
federal workers.
Shrink pensions
significantly in the future,
basing them on the average of
employees’ annual career
salaries instead of the current
high three years — not even on
the high five that other
Republicans have suggested
Kill federal retiree healthcare benefit subsidies for new
hires
Extend the probationary
period to three years, giving
managers more time to fire
workers at will.
Speed the firing process by
limiting the opportunity to
appeal terminations and
lowering the proof needed to
give workers the boot from “a
preponderance of evidence” to
“substantial evidence.”
Cut paid time off, including
vacation and sick time. The
authors noted that few private
employers provide paid time off
for every federal holiday,
implying that federal employers
also should not provide it. (The
rationale for Columbus Day as a
federal holiday is weak, but
that’s another story.)
“These policies would boost
federal employees’ productivity
by increasing the number of
days they work,” Greszler and
Sherk wrote, “and thus could
reduce the number of federal
employees needed to carry out
government functions.”
joe.davidson@washpost.com
Trump environmental o∞cials keep tight rein over torrent of FOIA requests
BY D INO G RANDONI
AND J ULIET E ILPERIN
The Trump administration’s
top environmental policymakers
are engaged in a new war with
their adversaries — over how
much information to release to
the media and outside groups,
who are often perceived as enemies, as part of a heavy stream of
Freedom of Information Act requests.
The Environmental Protection
Agency and Interior Department
are at ground zero in this growing feud. At those departments
and elsewhere in the administration, news outlets and nonprofit
organizations have uncovered
meeting schedules and travel
manifests through FOIA requests
that illustrate the ties top officials
have forged with players in industries they are tasked with
regulating. FOIA requests have
also shed light on EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt’s and Interior
Secretary Ryan Zinke’s taxpayerfunded travel habits.
The result is that some highlevel officials at EPA and Interior
are keeping closer tabs on these
FOIA requests, while at least at
the EPA — according to those who
have filed such requests — bureaus drag their feet when responding.
At Interior, Zinke’s office has
taken control of the various FOIA
requests that have piled up at the
various agencies responsible for
his review of national monuments created during the past
three presidential administrations.
In April, President Trump instructed Zinke to review all national monuments established
since 1996 that span 100,000
acres or more. Preparing for a
public relations and potential legal battle, environmentalists and
other groups outside government
began filing federal records requests to learn exactly how Zinke
was conducting the review and
what recommendations he would
issue.
Since the 1906 Antiquities Act
empowers presidents to establish
national monuments on federal
lands and waters deemed worthy
of protection, the review of 27
national monuments spanned
Interior’s Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service
and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as well as the Agriculture
Department’s Forest Service and
the Commerce Department’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration.
In early November, as Zinke
was finalizing his monuments
recommendations to the White
House, Clarice Julka, a FOIA
officer in Zinke’s office, emailed
other FOIA officers in 11 Interior
offices, including the Park Service and BLM, to inform them she
and FOIA officers in the secretary’s office would handle requests pertaining to the monument review going forward.
Julka told the staffers to collect
records that responded to FOIA
requests about the monuments,
and forward them to the secretary’s office rather than send
them directly to the news outlets,
corporations, nonprofits and other groups making the requests.
“This would also include any
FOIA requesting records pertaining to your bureaus’ participation
in the review of any monument,”
Julka wrote in the Nov. 6 email
obtained by The Washington
Post.
The next month, Zinke gave
Trump his recommendations: He
told the president to shrink at
least four monuments and modify the way an additional half-dozen are managed.
Trump’s move last week to cut
Utah’s Bears Ears and Grand
Staircase-Escalante
national
monuments by 85 percent and
46 percent, respectively, has
sparked a legal and political
backlash. Environmental groups
and tribal officials have challenged the new presidential proclamations in court, and the outdoor retailer Patagonia had
changed its website’s homepage
to read, “The President Stole Your
Land.”
Zinke has pushed back against
the criticism, telling reporters in
a conference call last week that
the suggestion that he was selling
public lands is “nefarious, false
and a lie.”
Interior spokeswoman Heather Swift declined to comment on
how Interior is handling national
monument requests. “We don’t
have anything to add on the
internal process,” she said in an
email.
“The desire to consolidate duplicative FOIAs isn’t in itself a
sign of something untoward,”
said David Pozen, a professor at
Columbia Law School and expert
on information law. “But the
consolidation of the FOIA requests in a political office strikes
me as more notable and concerning.”
Noting that the email says the
FOIA office within Zinke’s office
would be coordinating the response, Pozen added that “there
may still be concerning aspects to
the situation, but it at least suggests the FOIA bureaucracy isn’t
being cut out.”
Part of the issue may be the
endless stream of FOIA requests
hitting environmental and other
departments.
Interior has seen an uptick in
FOIA requests since Trump took
office and began rolling back
decisions made under President
Barack Obama. Between October
2016 and September 2017 Interior received a total of 8,014 FOIA
requests, Swift said, compared
with 6,438 the previous fiscal
year. Public records requests
made to the secretary’s office
more than doubled during that
time, she added, from 509 to
1,226.
But Interior’s public records
request workload pales in comparison with that of the EPA.
That agency received 1,377 FOIA
requests between Oct. 1 and
Nov. 7, 2017. The EPA received
11,493 in the last fiscal year,
between Oct. 1, 2016 and Sept. 30,
2017 — 995 more than the previous year.
Several environmental groups
and media outlets have criticized
the EPA for failing to more quickly provide documents responding to these requests. Pruitt announced last month his staff has
prioritized clearing out the backlog of records requests filed during the previous administration.
There were 652 such open requests as of October, and officials
estimate they will complete
70 percent of them by the end of
the year.
Trump officials have kept close
tabs on these FOIA requests. In a
recent hearing before the U.S.
District Court for the Southern
District of New York, lawyers
representing four environmental
groups argued that the intense
level of scrutiny applied by the
administrator’s office had delayed the release of critical documents.
Thomas J. Cmar, an attorney
for Earthjustice, told U.S. District
Judge Valerie E. Caproni that
hard copies of redacted documents they were waiting to receive about the delay of a rule
curbing the amount of polluted
water steam electric power
plants can emit “had been submitted for something that was
described as a senior management review before they could be
finally released,” something he
said was “not a normal part of
FOIA procedures as we understand them.”
Asked about the procedure,
Assistant U.S. Attorney Anthony
J. Sun said “the new administration put in a procedure for this
case — not all cases, but this
particular case” where the office
that manages Pruitt’s correspondence and records reviews any
releases under FOIA.
In an email, EPA acting general
counsel Kevin Minoli said that
while he could not discuss that
specific case, the role that office
performs regarding FOIA requests “is consistent with what it
was in the last administration.”
Caproni ordered the EPA to
provide a complete response to
the FOIA that Earthjustice filed
in April by Dec. 31. Earthjustice
spokesman Daveon Coleman said
that late last month the EPA
provided the three documents
that had been subject to senior
management review.
State officials are also taking
the agency to court over access to
public records. California Attorney General Xavier Becerra filed
suit in August in an effort to
compel the EPA to hand over
documents related to how Pruitt
is handling any potential conflicts of interest.
Interior is being sued over
FOIA requests from two whistleblowers, Joel Clement and Matthew Allen, who were reassigned
since Trump took office.
Allen, who was working as
BLM’s communications director
for nearly a year, was transferred
to the Bureau of Safety and
Environmental
Enforcement
(BSEE) in September. He filed
suit last week in U.S. District
Court for the District of Colum-
bia over the department’s failure
to release public records related
to his case.
Allen’s attorney, Katherine Atkinson — who previously sued
Interior over Clement’s case —
said in a statement that they went
to court because “federal agencies
are required to release documents
and records in a timely manner as
part of their responsibility to
transparency to the American people.”
dino.grandoni@washpost.com
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/powerpost
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EDITORIALS
Too quick to judge
Recent embarrassments should serve as a reminder to senators to vet judicial nominees thoroughly and carefully.
P
RESIDENT TRUMP has confirmed 12 nominees to judgeships on the federal courts of
appeals — more than any other modern
president achieved during his first year. Yet
while Republicans may pride themselves on this
record, a string of recent embarrassments shows
that the Senate is rushing too quickly through
Mr. Trump’s choices.
The White House announced last week that it
would not be moving forward with two nominees for
district court posts, Brett Talley of Alabama and Jeff
Mateer of Texas. Mr. Talley and Mr. Mateer faced
resistance from Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) and Sen. John
Neely Kennedy (R-La.) — though both senators voted
in support of Mr. Talley’s nomination before the
committee.
The case of Mr. Mateer, who referred to transgender children as “Satan’s plan,” is the less concerning
of the two. Before Mr. Mateer went far in the
confirmation process, questions arose over whether
he had failed to disclose his hateful comments. By the
time Mr. Trump withdrew his support, Mr. Mateer
had yet to even file the paperwork required for his
committee hearing.
Mr. Talley, on the other hand, is a case study of how
the confirmation process has broken down. Unanimously rated “not qualified” to be a judge by the
American Bar Association, he has never tried a case
or filed a motion in federal court. His hobbies have
included ghost-hunting and right-wing political
blogging. Yet he won the support of every Republican
on the Judiciary Committee. Mr. Grassley, Mr. Kennedy and even Mr. Talley’s home-state Sen. Richard
C. Shelby (R-Ala.) balked only when it surfaced that
the nominee had failed to disclose both his wife’s
work with White House Counsel Don McGahn and a
number of his contentious Internet comments —
including one defending “the first KKK.”
We are glad that these senators raised concerns
about Mr. Talley’s nomination and that the White
House heeded their warnings. But it should not have
taken these revelations about Mr. Talley’s lack of
candor to make clear his lack of qualification for a
lifetime appointment to the bench. Going forward,
the committee must take Mr. Talley’s nomination as a
Here’s looking
at you
reminder of its responsibility to vet nominees thoroughly and carefully instead of rubber-stamping the
president’s selections.
Republicans may already have learned their lesson, as we saw when Mr. Kennedy aggressively
quizzed Matthew Spencer Petersen on his courtroom
knowledge during Mr. Petersen’s confirmation hearing for a position on the U.S. District Court for the
District of Columbia. The nominee proved unable to
answer even basic legal questions. Mr. Petersen,
currently chair of the Federal Election Commission,
may well be an excellent election lawyer. But he is
clearly unqualified to be a federal judge.
We hope that Mr. Kennedy continues to hold
nominees to the high professional standard appropriate for a lifetime appointment — and that his
Republican colleagues, including Mr. Grassley, share
that commitment. The committee can start by calling back Thomas Farr, the nominee for the U.S.
District Court for the Eastern District of North
Carolina, to explain discrepancies regarding his
knowledge of a voter-suppression effort by then-Sen.
Jesse Helms’s 1990 campaign.
TOM TOLES
China rolls out intrusive and
ambitious surveillance of its people.
out a system known as the social credit score, which
collects information on the behavior of individuals
from data such as financial transactions, shopping
habits, social media and interactions with friends,
as well as other indicators such as traffic tickets and
unpaid bills, and computes a single loyalty or “trust”
score for each individual. The authorities plan to
make the system mandatory for the whole country
by 2020. It is not hard to imagine the social credit
system quickly turning into a Big Brother of the
digital age, used to punish those who express
dissent and to reward obedience to the Communist
Party. The magazine Wired described this as a shift
from the old regimen of trying to enforce obedience
with truncheons and top-down fear; instead, “the
government is attempting to make obedience feel
like gaming. It is a method of social control dressed
up in some points-reward system.”
China promotes itself as a rising power, but a
state that lords over its people with hidden cameras,
secret databases and intrusive algorithms sounds
more like prison.
The death of a high school senior in Montgomery County should be a wake-up call about underage drinking.
F
ravine by his father who had been searching for him
after he had failed to come home. An autopsy report
released Friday said he died from a combination of
alcohol poisoning, drowning and hypothermia. The
death was ruled accidental.
The boy was among a group who apparently
crashed a party. After homeowners present at the
party discovered uninvited guests, they ended the
party and told teens to leave and call their parents
for rides home. Police, responding to an anonymous
call about underage drinking at the location, saw
kids running away but talked to a group in the street
that — investigation later revealed — included
Navid.
According to police, the boy appeared to have
been drinking but was upright, responding to officers and in the company of other boys who agreed to
get him home. It appears Navid later broke away
from the group, declining a ride booking in favor of
walking home.
Police said there was no applicable civil or criminal charge that would have allowed them to take the
boy into custody. Should they have done more? Why
not call the boy’s parents or make sure the group was
safely headed home? Did police delay in starting a
search, and would that have made a difference?
Police said they will conduct a thorough review of
events, and it is important that conclusions about
whether policies were followed — or whether they
need changing — be shared with the public. It’s also
important that parents and schools reinforce the
dangers of underage drinking and that teens have a
real understanding of the consequences.
As Montgomery County Police Chief J. Thomas
Manger told us, “I think we as a community,
including police, parents, lawmakers all need to look
at these kind of tragedies and ask the question ‘what
can we do better.’ ”
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
D.C. should opt out of FirstNet’s approach to public safety broadband
By next week, the D.C. mayor must decide whether
to “opt in” to FirstNet’s federal approach to interoperable public safety broadband or “opt out” in search of
a better deal.
Opting out is the correct choice. For decades,
firefighters and law enforcement have bemoaned the
lack of inter-operable communications. Responders
from different agencies or jurisdictions can’t communicate during a large event. The 9/11 Commission
recommended building a nationwide public safety
communications system.
Congress set aside a piece of spectrum — Band 14 —
for public safety and established FirstNet to oversee
the project. FirstNet selected AT&T as its vendor. The
law allows states, tribes, territories and the District to
explore other options. They should. Band 14 is extremely valuable. Except during a major disaster, the
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
letters@washpost.com
GOP concerns about Mr. Mueller
In casting aspersions on special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III’s objectivity, Andrew C. McCarthy condemned his own [“The course correction Mueller
must make,” op-ed, Dec. 14].
Mr. McCarthy wrote: “None of these cases [brought
by Mueller against Trump operatives] bears on the
2016 election or suggests any wrongdoing on Trump’s
part. Thus, while there is cause for concern, the
results Mueller has produced so far appear free of
political taint.”
So, are we to assume that, in Mr. McCarthy’s view,
as soon as Mr. Mueller gets close to President Trump
himself, Mr. Mueller must be on a political witch
hunt?
Kathie Sowell, Vienna
The subtitle of the Dec. 14 editorial “Unwarranted
attacks” said, “GOP concerns over the integrity of
Mr. Mueller’s team are overblown.” That missed the
point. The GOP’s concerns are not with the integrity
of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s team but
with the fact that it is closing in on President Trump.
This is an organized and coordinated propaganda
campaign by Republican members of the House and
the right-wing media to discredit the investigation
and lay the groundwork for Mr. Trump to fire
Mr. Mueller.
David Boesel, Severna Park
The Dec. 14 editorial “Unwarranted attacks”
may have unwittingly explained why special counsel
Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation into Russian
interference has not met the criteria for a special
investigation when it said that Hillary Clinton and
the Justice Department are not being investigated
because there is no “factual basis for such an investigation, which would require a showing of a possible
crime.”
Including the recently disclosed anti-Trump text
messages by FBI personnel, this reeks of political bias.
Without a crime, there is no case. The FBI is supposed
to be an independent and neutral law enforcement
agency. The whole thing stinks.
Margie Tompros, Woodbridge
Listen to our modern prophets
A young man’s tragic death
RANK SEPEHRI last saw his son the Saturday night of Dec. 9, headed out to a friend’s
house at 7 o’clock. That Navid Sepehri didn’t
want to drive the new car recently purchased
for him was — in hindsight — an indication the
17-year-old planned to drink alcohol (and probably a
lot of it). Other things — in hindsight — are clear
about the tragic events of that night in Bethesda:
that kids can’t always be trusted to do what they
promise; that adults need to be vigilant; that police
should have done more. Above all, the lesson is that
bad things can happen when friends don’t look out
for each other.
The death of this young Montgomery County man
should serve as a wake-up call to the community — to
parents, to teens and to authorities — about the need
to do more in combating underage drinking.
Navid, a Walt Whitman High School senior, was
found dead Dec. 10 in a patch of water in a wooded
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
Reading about the GOP-led House Judiciary
Committee’s outrageous denunciations of special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III and his team in the
Dec. 14 news article “Rosenstein defends Mueller
after FBI officials’ anti-Trump texts surface” filled me
with disgust. It’s pretty clear that this crew, led by Rep.
Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.), is trying desperately to distract
Americans from the serious criminality Mr. Mueller’s
team is investigating. These Republicans would like
us to believe that FBI investigators and the evidence
they present can’t be trusted simply because a few of
the investigators at some point held (perfectly reasonable) political opinions. Nonsense. Democrats
don’t dismiss Mr. Mueller’s work because he is a
lifelong Republican.
Mr. Goodlatte and his Republican accomplices are
hoping to create a smokescreen for probable criminality by undercutting law enforcement, but instead
they are creating the impression among voters of
complicity.
Beth Kreydatus, Henrico, Va.
S
TEP BY STEP, China has been rolling out
surveillance technology that is remarkably
intrusive, comprehensive and ubiquitous.
Eager to exploit gains in technology, Beijing
seems little concerned about human rights or
privacy violations.
On Dec. 10, the BBC reported that China seeks to
build the world’s largest camera surveillance network, with 170 million closed-circuit cameras installed and an estimated 400 million new ones
coming in the next three years. In the city of Guiyang
in southwest China, correspondent John Sudworth
agreed to add a photograph of his face to the
database of the local public security bureau and
have it flagged as a “suspect” in an experiment to see
how long he could walk freely on the streets before
the police could find him. He got out of his car close
to the city center and walked toward a bus station.
The exercise took just seven minutes.
Meanwhile, Human Rights Watch reported on
Dec. 13 that Chinese authorities have been collecting DNA samples, blood types, fingerprints and iris
scans, in some cases possibly without informing
people, from a large swath of the population in the
restive Xinjiang province in far northwestern China. Ethnic Uighurs in Xinjiang have long complained about repression and discrimination at the
hands of the Chinese government; resentment has
sometimes turned violent. According to Human
Rights Watch, in a procedure rolled out this year, the
authorities there are collecting the DNA and
blood-type information under the cover of a “free
annual physical exams program called Physicals for
All.”
It wasn’t clear that people were giving their
consent or even knew that the DNA data was being
taken, the group said. Although the government had
sold the idea of amassing biodata in terms of poverty
alleviation, better delivery of health services and
“social stability,” Human Rights Watch noted that
such widespread collection of intimate data as DNA
can be a serious human rights and privacy violation.
For several years now, China has been building
. MONDAY,
excess bandwidth will be available for commercial use.
Elected leaders should secure the best deal for their
first responders and for local governments, which
will pay for the services. There is no downside to
opting out. Opting in now is a permanent choice. If a
state opts out, it can leverage competitors for the best
deal. States would then have until mid-2018 to opt in.
Firefighters, emergency medical services and law
enforcement providers, and state and local governments deserve to have the highest-quality, best-value
option for their emergency communications. Opting
in may be the easiest choice, but it’s the wrong choice.
Kevin O’Connor, Baltimore
The writer, a retired Baltimore County firefighter,
has lobbied extensively on public safety
communications issues. He is a columnist and
associate editor of Firehouse Magazine.
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Thursday was the five-year mark of the murders at
Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.,
and we have not moved toward any sensible national
gun laws.
The church I serve, St. Mark’s Episcopal on Capitol
Hill, has been hosting the survivors of gun violence
for the past four years. Meeting and talking with this
group of people from all over the United States, from
every religion and belief structure, and featuring
diversity of every kind has persuaded us to stand up
and say, enough. We are all touched by this violence,
and we are all the lesser for it. We can and must stand
up and stop the expansions of guns in our society.
In our tradition, we have prophets we lean on
when the powerful are disrespectful and act shamefully. So in the tradition of the Christian faith, we
have listened to the people who have lost loved ones
to gun violence. They are our modern prophets. We
need to listen to them and seek universal background checks. It is the least we can do.
Michele Morgan, Washington
The writer is the rector of
St. Mark’s Episcopal Church.
The EPA has to start somewhere
Regarding the Dec. 11 news article “EPA lists
21 Superfund sites in need of ‘immediate and intense’ cleanup”:
I was executive vice president at NUS Corp. in the
1980s. We managed the Environmental Protection
Agency team that investigated all potential Superfund sites east of the Mississippi River. There were
tens of thousands of potential candidate U.S. sites. A
hazard ranking system and legal action against
responsible parties were used to shorten the list, but
it was still too long and growing. Eventually, a
national priorities list was created, which more than
1,700 sites have been on. Was that the most effective
way to reduce public-health and safety risk? Not
necessarily. This list was based mostly on public data
and not comprehensive geologic site investigations
and analyses. Such technical tasks are expensive and
time-consuming and divert funds that could be
spent on actual cleanups. However, the information
is necessary to estimate cleanup costs and schedules,
which are needed to compare the costs and benefits
between sites.
EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is responsible for
prioritizing the best use of limited available funding.
Unfortunately, it’s a zero-sum game, which won’t
simultaneously allow for both a more perfect selection process and an aggressive site cleanup. Mr. Pruitt has apparently shifted the balance
from more studies to more action. The sites he has
identified certainly merit attention and will reduce
public risk when remediated. There are without
doubt many other important sites, but Mr. Pruitt’s
action plan seems like a good start until we develop
better selection tools.
Barry Naft, Potomac
Letters can be sent to letters@washpost.com.
Submissions must be exclusive to The Post and should
include the writer’s address and day and evening
telephone numbers. Because of the volume of material we
receive, we are unable to acknowledge submissions;
writers whose letters are under consideration for
publication will be contacted.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
SU
JOSH ROGIN
E.J. DIONNE JR.
Steaks, favors
and China’s
subtle wins
Corruption
and
the tax bill
I
T
n its effort to cultivate foreign influence, the Chinese Communist Party
boldly mixes economic incentives
with requests for political favors. Its
dealings with Sen. Steve Daines (R-Mont.)
this year offer a success story for Beijing.
Last month Daines announced a breakthrough in his long-standing effort to win
access for Montana’s beef exports to China
— a $200 million deal with a leading
Chinese retailer.
Then, on Dec. 5, the regime of Xi Jinping got something at least as valuable
from Daines. The senator hosted a delegation of Chinese Communist Party officials
who oversee Tibet, at the request of the
Chinese Embassy — thereby undercutting
a simultaneous visit to Washington by the
president of the Tibetan government in
exile.
Lobsang Sangay, the Tibetan leader
regarded as an enemy by Beijing, was in
Washington to meet with lawmakers and
members of the Tibetan community. The
House Foreign Affairs Asia subcommittee
held a hearing Dec. 6 on Chinese repression in Tibet.
The rival meeting hosted by Daines the
day before included Sen. John Barrasso
(R-Wyo.). After the meetings, the stateowned China Daily claimed the congressmen had praised Chinese officials in Tibet
for doing “a good job in environmental
protection and traditional cultural preservation.”
The episode illustrated China’s growing practice of enlisting Western politicians to blunt criticism of the regime —
and also its determination to haunt its
opponents wherever they travel. “Everywhere I go, I’m followed by a high-level
Chinese delegation” denying human
rights abuses in Tibet, Sangay told me,
adding that Chinese officials pressure
governments across the world not to meet
with him.
Sangay was in town to push legislation
calling for foreigners to have the same
access to Tibet that Chinese officials who
oversee Tibet have here. The Chinese
Communist Party did allow one congressional delegation to visit Tibet in April —
led by Daines — which met top Chinese
officials.
Daines’s office couldn’t produce any
record that he, either in China or Washington, publicly raised the fact that the
Chinese government is perpetrating brutal, systematic repression in Tibet, including attempted cultural genocide, environmental destruction, mass surveillance,
mass incarceration and severe denial of
freedoms for Tibetans.
The senator had another agenda —
selling Montana beef. He presented four
frozen steaks to Chinese Premier Li Keqiang in Beijing and hosted Chinese Ambassador Cui Tiankai at a Montana ranch.
The $200 million contract was the first
reward for his efforts.
Daines has done other favors for the
Chinese government. Early this summer,
he discussed with other senators his opposition to a bill that would rename the street
in front of the Chinese Embassy in Washington after Liu Xiaobo, the Nobel Peace
Prize laureate who later died in Chinese
government custody, his office confirmed.
Spokeswoman Marcie Kinzel told me
Daines has long fought for human rights
in China and pushed to visit multiple
Chinese regions where human rights are a
concern. Daines believed the Liu Xiaobo
bill was the wrong strategy at the time
because it would complicate efforts to
negotiate his release, she said. The senator
doesn’t criticize China much in public
because his “focus is on making change
with tact and wisdom, not flashy headlines,” she added.
Daines’s approach to Chinese human
rights is “not connected” to his push for
beef exports, Kinzel said. Yet for the Chinese government, economics and politics
are always linked. By helping the Communist Party squash political criticism in
Washington, Daines’s actions constituted
a victory for Chinese foreign influence
operations, said Derek Mitchell, former
U.S. ambassador to Burma.
“It confirms everything the Chinese
believe about us and folks around the
world, that anyone can be bought,” he
said. “We’re only as strong as our weakest
link, and that Daines would do this only
encourages them to continue.”
There’s no evidence of a direct quid pro
quo or any illegal behavior, just multiple
favors between Daines and the Chinese
government. But by using his power to
protect China from accountability on human rights, Daines compromised American values and helped perpetuate the
suffering of innocent people abroad.
In Australia last week, a senator resigned after it was revealed he took money
from a Chinese donor and then parroted
Chinese government lines on the South
China Sea issue. It’s the same pattern:
China dangles economic incentives and,
soon enough, its friends begin helping
China’s political aims.
Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is
leading a national drive to excise Chinese
foreign influence from Australian politics. “Foreign powers are making unprecedented and increasingly sophisticated
attempts to influence the political process, both here and abroad,” Turnbull said.
In Washington, political and policy
leaders are just waking up to the scope
and scale of China’s efforts to interfere.
But if the Chinese government can claim
U.S. lawmakers as defenders of its repression in Tibet, it’s clear the problem is
much worse than we realize.
josh.rogin@washpost.com
JOSHUA ROBERTS/REUTERS
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) in his Capitol Hill office in 2009.
FRED HIATT
Democracy’s dogged champion
M
any otherwise hard-boiled
political reporters still fondly recall their moments with
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.)
on the Straight Talk Express, the lowspin, laughs-filled campaign bus of his
losing 2000 presidential try.
My travel memories with the senator are no less evocative, if perhaps not
quite as rollicking: slogging through a
muddy refugee camp in Serbia, say, or
listening to the anguished testimony of
exiled Belarusian dissidents in a government building in Vilnius.
Year after year, to no particular
political advantage, McCain has traveled to distant, lightly touristed corners of the world, dragging along
whatever senators or members of Congress he could, no matter their party or
ideological persuasion. Meanwhile,
the McCain Institute for International
Leadership gives temporary shelter in
Washington and Arizona to democratic activists from those same distant
corners.
At a time when U.S. global leadership is in doubt as never before in the
modern era, we have something to
learn from that commitment.
McCain being McCain, when I asked
him during a recent conversation in
his Senate office why he devotes so
much energy to such trips, he shied
away from grand pronouncements and
began telling stories instead.
About the time he helped head off a
Russian-inspired coup in the tiny Balkan nation of Montenegro.
About walking through Tripoli, Libya, with U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens in 2012 as dozens and
then hundreds and thousands of Libyans gathered, honking their horns
and shouting, “Thank you, USA,” for
America’s part in overthrowing Moammar Gaddafi.
About meeting with former political
prisoners in Burma who began to cry
when they heard his voice — having
heard him, on the Voice of America,
speak up for human rights.
“So the reward is mine, not theirs,”
McCain told me.
Like many people, I’ve been alternately cheered and disappointed by
McCain’s stances on domestic matters
over the years — admiring when he
helped save Obamacare a few months
ago, disappointed when he went along
with the Republican tax-cut bill this
month.
But McCain has never wavered in
his support for democracy and human
rights, and in his conviction that the
United States needs to provide moral
support to those who fight for freedom
around the world. With President
Trump often expressing more admiration for dictators than for democratic
leaders, McCain’s advocacy has become lonelier — and more essential.
His advocacy isn’t always successful,
as his anecdotes make clear. Libya slid
into civil war, and Stevens was killed
two months after that election-day
stroll through Tripoli. Burma, though
former human rights icon Aung San
Suu Kyi is nominally in charge, is
presiding over the ethnic cleansing of
the Rohingya people.
“The easy part is the revolution,”
McCain said. “The hard part is democracy. . . . The trend is obviously in the
wrong direction.”
One reason, he said, is “the lack of
American leadership,” which he believes accelerated under President Barack Obama. For the most part McCain
tries to restrain his criticism of the
incumbent, though the occasional
acerbic remark slips out. “Maybe we
ought to have a rule that [national
security adviser H.R.] McMaster has to
be up and about by 5 a.m.,” he suggested to me, for example.
But he does not disguise how worried he is by the deeper currents that
recall to him the darker movements of
the 1930s: the nativism, the assaults on
freedom of the press and the rule of
law, the blaming of foreign competition for all ills, the rise of extremism.
“I worry about the polarization
that’s going on here, I really do,” McCain said. “The terms of the debate is
what is really disappointing.
“The other day I was flipping the
channels, and I saw [Stephen K.] Bannon just beating the crap out of [Mitt]
Romney,” he continued, alluding to
Bannon’s attacks on Romney for his
service as a Mormon missionary in
France during the Vietnam War. McCain, who more than did his part in
Vietnam, made clear he didn’t share
Bannon’s view. “I didn’t think there
was anything wrong with serving your
church. I had no idea that was a crime.”
Then McCain, who is fighting a
brain tumor and who briefly returned
to the hospital not long after our
conversation, paused for a moment to
gather his thoughts.
“Could I also say — I still believe that
we’re the best nation on Earth,” he said.
“I still would not bet against the United
States of America. I still would rather
be the United States than any of these
other countries.
“But we’re going through some very
choppy waters,” he said. “We’ve got to
appeal to the better angels of our
nature.”
fredhiatt@washpost.com
ROBERT J. SAMUELSON
Yellen leaves a solid legacy at the Fed
O
ne of Washington’s permanent
parlor games is how much credit
or blame a president deserves for
the state of the economy. Inevitably, then, the question being asked now is
whether Donald Trump or Barack Obama
created today’s strong economy. The correct answer: neither. To the extent that
personal responsibility can be assigned,
the worthy recipient is Janet Yellen.
In practice, presidents’ influence over
the economy is limited. If it were otherwise, we’d live in an economic paradise.
Unemployment would always be low,
wages would always rise, and recessions
would never occur. No one has that kind
of power. Presidents and their agencies
can’t govern the business cycle.
The obvious qualification to this reality is the Federal Reserve. By regulating
the flow of money and credit, the Fed
stimulates or retards the economy,
though not always in predictable ways.
There are regular collisions between
what the Fed can actually achieve and
what the public thinks it should achieve.
Yellen has led it since 2014 but will leave
early next year and be replaced by Fed
governor Jerome Powell.
Under Yellen, the economy has made
huge progress. Here’s the record since she
became Fed head in February 2014: Payroll employment has expanded by nearly
10 million jobs; the unemployment rate
has dropped from 6.7 percent to 4.1 percent; average hourly earnings, uncorrected for inflation, rose from $24.32 to
$26.55. (Corrected for inflation, the wage
gain is about 4 percent — not great but
not stagnation either. The pace, if maintained, would be roughly 10 percent over
a decade.)
None of this was preordained. It’s true
that Yellen followed the policies of her
predecessor, Ben Bernanke, but these
policies were not, as Yellen has repeatedly stated, on “automatic pilot.” They
ALEX WONG/GETTY IMAGES
Fed Chair Janet Yellen on Dec. 13.
required much judgment. The problem
faced by Yellen was to maintain a policy
of easy money long enough to promote
the economy’s recovery but not so long as
to feed either inflation or financial speculation.
It will be some years before a final
verdict can be rendered on Yellen’s stewardship. Is the stock market overvalued?
Did the Fed contribute to that? What
happens if stocks crash? Questions linger.
Still, for the moment, most of Yellen’s
judgments seem on the mark. Bernanke’s
Fed had adopted a policy of ultra-easy
money. It had reduced short-term interest rates to near zero and, in an effort to
bring down long-term rates, had purchased more than $3 trillion of Treasury
and home-mortgage securities. (When
the Fed buys securities, their price typically goes up and their interest rate goes
down.)
Yellen has slowly been reversing this
policy. Since December 2015, the Fed has
raised short-term interest rates five
times, including an increase last week.
The so-called Fed funds rate has risen to a
maximum of 1.5 percent. More increases
are expected in 2018. Likewise, the Fed is
reducing its holdings of Treasury and
mortgage securities, putting upward
pressure on long-term interest rates.
All this has gone smoothly — and that’s
just the point. It wasn’t inevitable. The
mechanics of raising interest rates from
their ultra-low position involved new and
untested procedures. There were dire
predictions that things would go awry.
They didn’t.
“The Fed was acutely aware that it had
to be perceived as successful . . . to have
public support,” says economist Ken Matheny of Macroeconomic Advisers.
Given her reputation as a conciliator,
Yellen may also have improved the Fed’s
public standing. Remember: The chair
can’t single-handedly impose policy. The
Fed’s key decision-making body, the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC),
has 12 members. Despite a tradition of
deference to the chair, “you have to
achieve a consensus,” says Matheny. “It’s
not a dictatorship.”
Yellen leaves a solid legacy, built on
professional competence, integrity and
dignity.
Just what prompted President Trump
to pass her over in favor of Powell is
unclear. It’s not monetary policy, where
both adhere to the present Fed consensus.
Trump’s decision flouts an informal
custom, since the 1980s, to reappoint the
Fed chair to at least a second four-year
term. It may be that the president feels
more comfortable with Powell. Or he may
think (inaccurately?) that, if the economy
weakens, he can more easily bend Powell
to his will than Yellen.
Whatever the case, the irony is hard to
miss. Powell’s performance, at least initially, will be compared with Yellen’s. It is
a high hurdle to clear.
he tax bill the GOP is trying to
foist on the country is not only
an unfair and deficit-bloating
hodgepodge written on the fly. It
is also deeply corrupt. Every Republican
who votes for this bill will be joining a
festival of venality.
Corruption is not a word to be used
lightly, so let’s be disciplined by the
Merriam-Webster dictionary’s definitions: “dishonest or illegal behavior especially by powerful people” and “inducement to wrong by improper or
unlawful means.”
We can stipulate that the tax bill is not
illegal. But it is a dishonest power and
money grab by — and on behalf of — the
already powerful. As for “inducements,”
well, there are those long-term investments of tens of millions of dollars in
campaign contributions (enabled by the
collapse of all the guardrails around
political money) from wealthy individuals and regiments of interest groups.
They will have a merry holiday season if
the bill passes as expected.
This legislation proves that Washington is, indeed, the “swamp” that President Trump described during the campaign. But instead of draining it, he and
his partisan allies have jumped right in.
Actually, they have polluted it further.
A prime example of this subtle corruption is how the “compromise” bill deals
with the radical scaling back of the
deduction for state and local taxes.
Gutting what is known as the SALT tax
break sets back the common good because doing so penalizes states that (a)
have progressive income taxes and (b)
have somewhat larger governments and
thus tend to invest more in education,
infrastructure and programs for the
needy. While California, New York and
New Jersey would be hit hard, many
other states would hurt, too.
The bill is a mess of opaque
provisions that almost
no one understands.
But instead of restoring all or most of
the lost deduction, Republicans offered a
fig-leaf compromise. Originally, the Senate bill reduced the amount that could be
deducted to $10,000 and restricted it to
property taxes. The new version keeps
the cap while allowing the deduction to
be used for sales and income taxes as
well.
For most taxpayers who use the existing deduction, this won’t solve their
problem. One estimate from the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy
found that 1.89 million Californians
would still see their taxes rise under the
new provision, only a modest drop from
the 2.36 million who would have had a
tax increase under the version confined
to property taxes. Any California representative who votes for this is voting
against the interests of the state.
Ah, but the Republicans did want to
respond to rich New Yorkers and Californians who were howling to their usual
GOP benefactors, including Trump,
about their lost SALT deductions.
So rather than offer general relief, the
Republicans sliced the top income tax
rate — for couples earning $600,000 or
more — from the current 39.6 percent to
37 percent. Rep. Kevin Brady (R-Tex.),
the House Ways and Means Committee
chairman, could not really explain why
only the best-off got real help, arguing
lamely that middle-income people got
other benefits from the bill.
The shamelessness of Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin’s description of the
bill on CNN Sunday as “a very large tax
cut for working families” is quite staggering. Consider that this confection of
loopholes gives lawyers at big firms
many paths to lower taxes but not much
to the people who clean their offices.
Soon, all Americans will demand the
right to transform themselves into “passthrough” legal entities.
The bill’s champions claim that the
big corporate tax cut will lead to massive
new investment. But, as former New
York City mayor Michael Bloomberg (no
enemy of business) pointed out, corporations are already “sitting on a record
amount of cash reserves: nearly $2.3 trillion.” Bloomberg added: “It’s pure fantasy to think that the tax bill will lead to
significantly higher wages and growth.”
And imagine: The “Make America
Great Again” crowd appears to have
designed a corporate tax system that
creates new incentives to “shift profits
and operations overseas,” as former
Obama administration economic adviser Gene B. Sperling argued in a careful
analysis. Trump probably doesn’t even
know this.
The key to corruption is operating in
the dark. This bill is a mess of opaque
provisions that almost no one outside
the ranks of tax lobbyists understands —
because many of these giveaways were
written or inspired by lobbyists themselves.
Needlessly rushing a massive specialinterest tax bill through Congress is the
antithesis of good government. This
doesn’t seem to matter anymore, even to
Republicans who built reputations as
champions of moderation, openness and
rectitude.
ejdionne@washpost.com
A18
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
We manufacture prescription opioids.
How could we not help fight the
prescription and illicit opioid abuse crisis?
Two doctors founded a company in 1892 now known as Purdue Pharma.
Continuing the strong heritage of a research-driven, science-based
company, another doctor is currently at the helm as CEO. We’re the
pharmaceutical company that manufactures OxyContin®. Patients’ needs
and safety have guided our steps. It’s what led us to research and develop
medications to help patients. Today, it’s what has spurred us to redouble
our efforts in the fight against the prescription and illicit opioid abuse
crisis. It’s why we’re taking action.
We support recommendations in The President’s Commission on
Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis and the FDA’s Opioid
Action Plan. There are too many prescription opioid pills in people’s
medicine cabinets. We support initiatives to limit the length of first opioid
prescriptions. Reducing the number of excess tablets won’t end the
epidemic, but we believe it will help rein in the problem. We believe doctors
should check their state Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP)
databases before writing an opioid prescription, to guard against doctorshopping by those trying to game the system. Information sharing between
state databases must improve.
Our industry and our company have and will continue to take meaningful
action to reduce opioid abuse. We focused our talented research scientists
and applied our innovative thinking to making opioids with abuse-deterrent
properties, making them harder to crush and, therefore, harder to be
abused by snorting or injection. With this investment, we pioneered
the pharmaceutical industry’s movement toward developing opioids
with abuse-deterrent properties when we were the first to receive FDA
approval.1 Developing new formulations is risky and there are never any
guarantees, but we did it anyway. Our company also took the initiative
to distribute the CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids to thousands of
prescribers and pharmacists shortly after it was released.
As we continue to fight the prescription opioid and illicit substance abuse
crisis, we are applying our resources and our best scientific minds to
discover and develop new, non-opioid pain medicines for patients.
No one solution will end the crisis, but multiple, overlapping efforts will.
We want everyone engaged to know you have a partner in Purdue Pharma.
This is our fight, too.
1
Opioids with abuse-deterrent properties are not abuse-proof and don’t prevent addiction,
but they are part of a multifaceted approach to addressing the prescription opioid abuse crisis.
KLMNO
METRO
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
High today at
approx. 2 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
40 51 54 49°
°
°
°
56°
Precip: 0%
Wind: SW
4-8 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
RE
EDUCATION
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
THE DISTRICT
Using mastery-based
assessments instead of
grades is worth looking at,
Jay Mathews writes. B2
Fashion development:
From “new wave” suits
to ratty thrift-shop duds
to Alex P. Keaton style. B3
The owner of Stephen K.
Bannon’s home is locked
in a municipal battle over
a security fence. B6
A new
tax hike
plan for
Metro
MCAULIFFE TO SEEK
FUNDING VIA N.VA.
Dedicated transit money
would be a breakthrough
BY
PHOTOS BY SARAH L. VOISIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
A study in stress
S ARAH L ARIMER
K
endell Long was parked in a dimly
lit room in Lauinger Library. A
blanket was draped around his
shoulders. A coffee drink with a
tremendously
potent-sounding
name sat on the table where he worked. One
of those fireplace videos played in the background.
Long, a junior at Georgetown University,
had been at the campus library for hours. He
was a frequent visitor.
So, Kendell, have you ever slept here?
“Um, by sleep do you mean like, taking
naps, or being here throughout the night?”
said Long, a 20-year-old Texan.
“Okay,” Long said. “I’ve done both.”
It is mid-December, final exam season on
college campuses across the country. For
students, that means study guides, stacks of
notebooks, piles of books. Long nights, full of
terrors. Stress eating. Panicked phone calls
home. Coffee. More coffee. Coffee again.
And it means trips to the campus library,
places such as Lauinger, a colossus that serves
thousands of people during Georgetown’s
final exam and study days.
BY DANIELLE DOUGLAS-GABRIEL
TOP: Clockwise from bottom left are Georgetown University students Eva Niedermeyer, Genevieve Pennanen, Hannah Fratt, Caitlín Beattie and
Kristina Mish while studying for final exams at Lauinger Library. ABOVE: Freshman Christopher Cassidy takes a break to work on a puzzle. Other
stress relievers that the campus library provides are coloring books, Play-Doh and snacks.
Lawmaker cries foul on Worried about the ‘new’ D.C.’s future
Va.’s swearing stance
BY
L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond — Dang it! Shoot!
Jeepers creepers!
Virginia law demands that
residents keep it clean, even in
moments crying out for the foulest four-letter words. It’s illegal
in this state to curse in public.
“Profane swearing” is a Class 4
misdemeanor punishable by a
$250 fine, right up there with
public intoxication. It’s a law that
predates the Civil War. Yet modern-day potty-mouths still get
charged under it — in small
numbers, but in ways that can
raise troubling questions about
law enforcement.
But a state lawmaker from a
county that sounds a lot like a
curse word is trying hard to get
rid of the law.
Del. Michael J. Webert (R-Fauquier) is a cattle farmer who
knows that stuff happens. And
that when it does, only a few
choice words will do.
“When you’re working [with]
cows and a 1,400-pound animal
doesn’t do what you want it to, or
SWEARING CONTINUED ON B4
Bill may
hurt D.C.
student
loan laws
House GOP measure
could limit city rules over
college lending firms
LIBRARY CONTINUED ON B2
Effort to overturn ban on
cursing in public might
have better odds in 2018
Northern Virginians would
pay higher taxes on real estate
sales, hotel stays and wholesale
gasoline to provide Metro with
long-sought dedicated funding
under a proposal to be announced Monday by Gov. Terry
McAuliffe (D).
The new tax revenue of
$65 million a year would be in
addition to $85 million that
Northern Virginia would earmark for Metro from funds the
region already devotes to transportation, according to the
McAuliffe plan.
The total — $150 million annually — would represent Virginia’s
share of $500 million a year in
additional, dedicated funds that
Metro says it needs to ensure the
transit system’s safety and reliability.
If approved by the General
Assembly, the measure would be
a breakthrough for Metro — the
only large transit system in the
country that does not obtain a
METRO CONTINUED ON B4
During finals season, students pack into college libraries to study, snack and, sometimes, sleep
BY
R OBERT M C C ARTNEY
After serving as
the District’s
chief financial
officer in 1996,
and two-term
mayor from 1999
Courtland to 2007, Anthony
Milloy
Williams was
widely credited
with unleashing the market
forces that gave rise to a new,
revitalized Washington. Now, 20
years after it all began, he basks
in the glow of a vision realized.
“I like the walkability of the
city, being able to walk wherever
I want,” said Williams, who lives
in a condominium on H Street
NE, in a newly renovated part of
town called NoMa. Buildings
that had been deteriorating
since the riots in 1968 are now
bustling shops and restaurants.
“With the building height
limitations, you get lots of
sunlight,” Williams said. “That’s
what I like best.”
Despite his successes as a
public official, however,
Williams continues to wrestle
with a vexing problem after
more than a decade in private
life.
“We have to keep the city
growing, but we have challenges
in terms of making the city
more inclusive, increasing
affordable housing and
improving social services,” he
said. “I think that left
unattended, if we have no
intervention with good public
policy, this city will end up like a
European city, and everybody in
the city will be doing fine while
MILLOY CONTINUED ON B3
MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
As mayor, Anthony Williams
led the revitalization of D.C.
The D.C. government’s efforts to
protect residents from abusive
practices in the student loan market could be undermined by the
House Republican higher education bill.
The District requires student
loan servicing companies, the middlemen who collect education debt
payments, to obtain a license to
operate within its borders. But the
Promoting Real Opportunity, Success and Prosperity Through Education Reform Act would exempt
servicers working on behalf of the
U.S. Education Department —
which holds the vast majority of
student loans — from having to
comply with the local law.
The legislation, which reauthorizes the Higher Education Act of
1965, would allow the federal government to preempt state laws governing student loan servicing and
debt collection. Lawmakers originally sought to rein in local authorities from dictating what information servicers needed to disclose
and their interactions with federal
student loan borrowers. But the
version that cleared a key House
committee Tuesday not only includes that provision but also takes
aim at licensing, delivering a blow
to a nascent movement of states
seeking greater oversight of servicers.
“This is a blatant attack on the
rights of states to protect student
loan borrowers,” said Maggie
Thompson, executive director of
Generation Progress, an arm of the
liberal think tank Center for AmerDEBT CONTINUED ON B2
B2
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
education
Mastery-based assessments are worth consideration to replace A-to-F grading
American private
high schools are
buzzing about
something called
the mastery
transcript — a way
Jay
to replace
Mathews
traditional letter
grades with
digital, evidence-based records of
each student’s academic
achievements and character
strengths. And it would be used in
the college admissions process.
When schools such as Andover,
Miss Porter’s, Chapin and HoltonArms — where annual tuition is
more than $40,000 — start
talking about changing college
admission procedures,
commentators understandably
wonder if they want to muscle out
those of us who could only afford
the neighborhood high school.
My Post colleague Catherine
Rampell has concluded the
mastery transcript “would have at
least one pernicious effect: It
would probably help mediocre
(generally rich) prep school kids
and hurt high-achieving
(generally less well-off ) public
school students.”
She is wrong about that. The
most selective colleges reveal
annually what percentage of their
incoming students are from
private high schools. Already
under fire for not admitting
enough low-income students,
they would never let their
percentage of rich kids increase.
The Mastery Transcript
Consortium includes 160 private
schools and plans to admit public
schools soon. It is smart and brave
of those educators to challenge
the standard American A-to-F
slapdash assessments and
commit to subject mastery for
each student. Some of the best
teachers I know want to make
sure every student learns the
essentials no matter how long it
takes. Just putting a grade on a
report card at the end of the
school year feels to them like
giving up.
That mastery approach is
absent from nearly all of our high
schools, including those that cater
to senators’ and billionaires’
children. Why can’t we adopt the
same attitude toward learning
high school math, science, history
and English that we do toward
young students learning to read?
Most elementary schools have
specialists to get every child over
that hurdle, while we shove
students who struggle in high
school courses off to the next
grade with just a concerned look
and a low mark.
Advocates of mastery learning
want to encourage projects —
such as designing a school
building or reenacting the
Constitutional Convention — that
don’t lend themselves to report
card grades. They hope their new
transcript will spotlight character
traits ignored by the traditional
grading system. A panel at each
school would have final say on
each student’s transcript.
Individual students and families
could choose to use the new
mastery transcript or stick with
the old one.
The consortium says it has
“organized around the
development and dissemination
of an alternative model of
assessment, crediting and
transcript generation” that will
“demonstrate a mastery of skills,
knowledge and habits of mind by
presenting evidence that is then
assessed against an institutionally
specific standard of mastery.”
Attempts to do that in the past
have failed because they devoured
so much time. But D. Scott
Looney, head of Cleveland’s
Hawken School and founder and
board chair of the consortium,
said the old system provides
almost no feedback “for the
student to figure out how to
improve,” so some extra time
would have great value in
augmenting “the quality and
depth of dialogue between the
student and teacher.”
Looney said college admissions
officers could read the resulting
online transcript in two minutes.
If they wished, with a few more
clicks they could see some of the
student’s actual work.
He said each school would
decide how it wants to measure
mastery. Independent measures
of achievement, such as Advanced
Stressed
students
flock to
libraries
LIBRARY FROM B1
For many students, campus
libraries can be a home away
from home, those who work in
the spaces say. During this time,
things get especially busy.
“Every seat is taken, especially
in the afternoon and the evening,” said Beth Campolieto Marhanka, head of the Georgetown
library’s Gelardin New Media
Center. “It’s just completely
packed. I really think of it as sort
of like a colony of bees, swarming
back to the hive.”
Long, who is pursuing a double
major in government and African
American studies, said he can
spot the library regulars, the
people who come in time and
again. “I’ve developed friendships from the library,” he said.
But during finals, Long said,
things can get pretty depressing
in the building.
“It can be a very toxic-ish
place,” Long said. “That’s why I’ve
got my blanket here and my
fireplace, to kind of counterbalance that.”
Megan Browndorf was at a
reference desk, not far from the
building’s lobby. Browndorf, an
Eastern European studies liaison
and reference librarian, likes it
here at the desk, where she gets to
see students “doing their thing,”
she said. The same people come
in, over and over.
“It’s really good people watching,” she said. “But it’s people
watching in a not-creepy way.
SARAH L. VOISIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
A video of a roaring fireplace brought a little levity as juniors Taylor Riddick, left, and Kendell Long study at Georgetown’s Lauinger
Library. Said one university librarian of finals week: “I really think of it as sort of like a colony of bees, swarming back to the hive.”
You’re there to be helpful if they
need you.”
Here now, a brief look around
the space: First, please note the
printers. Students ask a lot of
questions about the printers. See
those reference books? Browndorf always thinks they don’t get
used. Then, she’ll find one somewhere — obviously someone
grabbed it and left it out. So
maybe she’s wrong about that.
All around the room, Georgetown students are hunkered
down, working alone. But not
really. Because even if they came
to this place by themselves, they
are all still here together.
“One of the things that you’ll
see here is that it’s a whole bunch
of students who are all doing the
same thing,” Browndorf said.
“The way I see it is that they are
feeding off of each other. There’s
this kind of shared stress, but also
concentration.”
Every part of the library has a
different “sound expectation,”
Browndorf said. This particular
area is quiet, but not too quiet. On
a livelier floor, you’ll find stress
relievers — coloring sheets, PlayDoh, a 1,000-piece jigsaw puzzle.
Also, snacks. The snacks are on
that floor.
A chill and not-at-all-awkward
thing to do, though, when visiting
the library around this time is to
pop into a room in which everyone is working in silence. There,
you will hear a muffled cough, the
buzz of building noise, a door
opening, but not much else.
Browndorf called the library
the “heart” of her life, and said
she feels it is the heart of the
university’s life, too.
“The entire point of having a
university is to study and research and grow as people,
right?” she said. “The whole point
is that we become better humans
and do more work. Learn more.
And that’s the whole point of the
library.”
Less than two miles from the
heart of Georgetown, in the District’s Foggy Bottom neighborhood, sits the Gelman Library, on
the campus of George Washington University. Gelman’s entrance floor is meant to be a hub
of activity. Except now.
“When you hit finals, pretty
much anywhere you walk, you’ll
get dirty looks from students if
you’re making too much noise,”
said Geneva Henry, dean of libraries and academic innovation
at the school.
George Washington sophomore Libby Schiller is a frequent
Placement and SAT exams, would
remain. We could learn a great
deal from the schools that try this.
But that won’t make the college
admissions system more rational
or less stressful, because the most
sought-after colleges will still be
selective, and many applicants
will still be disappointed. Looney
acknowledged colleges won’t
accept the new transcript unless it
helps them decide who the best
applicants are from each high
school.
Looney said some schools have
so many straight-A students that
the transcript could help separate
the true geniuses from dogged
grade-grubbers like me. Maybe,
but when a student finds a
classmate beat her out of a place
at Yale University because of
better “habits of mind,” it’s going
to hurt just as badly.
jay.mathews@washpost.com
Gelman patron. Schiller, 19, is not
a huge fan of studying in her
room, she said, and she’s tried
other places around campus but
has found some good spots in
Gelman where she can work comfortably.
“There’s these really comfy
blue chairs,” she said, describing
a second-floor location. “They are
these huge chairs. And they have
cushions on them and they’re in
sets of four and I can spread my
stuff around those chairs. And
there’s also on that floor, there’s a
bunch of tables that have outlets
on them, which is really helpful.”
Gelman is a quiet place, said
Schiller, a political communications major from Maryland. It is a
place where people come with a
singular purpose: to get stuff
done.
“One of my professors actually
said Gelman smells like fear during finals season,” she said. “But I
don’t know, it gives off kind of a
calm vibe.”
Henry said her favorite spot is
the National Churchill Library
and Center, a new space on the
first floor. She likes the feel of the
room. The layout is solid, with
tables that can be moved around.
Good lighting. Aesthetically
pleasing.
“You can get sort of burrowed,”
Henry said. “You are off of the
main area. It’s like a secret place. I
mean it’s a really nice place, but
it’s a secret, hidden-away place.”
A few months after Henry
came to the university in 2013,
she met with parents and told
them that the library was a safe
harbor. College students could
come to Gelman and ask any
question they wanted. The library is a calming force, she told
the parents. It is there for students, every single day.
“The students have claimed it
as theirs,” she later said. “It’s a
place of belonging. It’s the place.
They came here to be students,
and if there’s any one place on
campus where they’re going to
affirm that they are students, it’s
here.”
sarah.larimer@washpost.com
House GOP bill could curb D.C.’s oversight of student loan firms, critics warn
DEBT FROM B1
ican Progress. “When it comes to
regulating financial institutions,
state laws are designed to stack up
on top of federal law.”
States have been stepping in to
fill what many see as a void in the
federal oversight of student loan
servicers. For years, liberal lawmakers have criticized the Education Department for lax monitoring of the companies it pays to
manage the $1.2 trillion student
loan portfolio. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has received thousands of complaints
about servicers providing inconsistent information, misplacing paperwork or charging unexpected
fees. The bureau has accused some
of these companies of driving borrowers into default with sloppy collection and application of payments.
Against this backdrop, California, Connecticut and the District
have used licensing to bring federal
student loan servicers under their
regulatory purview. Their local
agencies have the authority to
monitor loan servicers’ compliance with federal laws, investigate
their behavior and refer cases to
the attorney general. Each has established a borrower’s bill of rights
with minimum standards for timely payment processing, correction
of errors and communication. The
measures require companies to
produce periodic information on
their business activities that could
be used to identify breakdowns in
servicing.
Other states, including New
York, New Jersey and Illinois, are at
various stages of following suit,
much to the chagrin of industry
groups.
In July, the National Council of
Higher Education Resources, a
trade group representing private
lenders, loan servicers, debt collectors and loan guarantee agencies,
sent a letter urging the Education
Department to preempt state laws
that regulate federal contractors.
James Bergeron, president of the
council, said state laws aimed at
servicing companies will add “unnecessary complexity to the federal
student loan system” and create “a
regulatory and supervisory maze
in the process” that will lead to
confusion.
Bergeron wrote that some new
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state servicing standards conflict
with federal rules. Illinois, he noted, is proposing lengthy requirements for the transfer of student
loans from one servicer to another,
although federal rules exist. The
House Republican bill addresses
his concerns by nullifying any state
“requirement relating to the servicing or collection of a loan.” The
industry trade group did not immediately respond to requests for
comment on the congressional bill.
Winfield P. Crigler, executive director of the trade group Student
Loan Servicing Alliance, said the
House GOP bill would simply clarify existing Higher Education Act
preemptions that establish a uniform regulatory structure for the
federal student loan program.
“It doesn’t help borrowers if
states create a 50-state patchwork
of competing requirements dictating how payments are applied on
Department of Education loans or
which notices are sent when,” she
said. “Nothing in the bill as we read
it would prevent states from efforts
to assist residents, such as establishing an ombudsman office to
help them navigate the complexities of state and federal loan pro-
MEMBER EXCLUSIVES
grams.”
Last year, the D.C. Council created a student loan ombudsman position to regulate education loan
servicers doing business in the city.
The District appointed Charles
Burt to the role, to field borrower
complaints, educate residents
about repayment options and
monitor servicers. The House bill
would not affect the city’s ability to
track complaints or prosecute
fraud, but by limiting the District’s
licensing authority, Republicans
would make it difficult for the city
to thoroughly investigate federal
student loan servicers.
D.C. insurance commissioner
Stephen Taylor said his office is
studying the bill.
“We are concerned and do not
want to create a problem like the
subprime mortgage crisis which, in
part, was facilitated by federal preemption of state anti-predatory
lending laws — laws that would
have prevented volumes of the bad
subprime loans that harmed the
nation’s economy,” he said in a
statement to The Washington Post.
“Given the problems identified in
the student loan market, we need
to be very careful to ensure borrow-
ers are protected as they work to
repay their loans.”
Servicing groups have called
state campaigns for greater oversight of their industry misguided.
Rather than focus on licensing servicers, they say states should support simplifying repayment plans
and counseling students before
they borrow. Some have complained that states are imposing
onerous fees that fail to account for
the narrow profit margins of servicing federal student loans.
The District, for instance, wants
companies to pay an annual $800
fee plus $6.60 per loan serviced
during the licensing period, a requirement the House GOP bill
would outlaw for federal servicers.
Industry groups have argued that
because people often have multiple
loans, the annual fee per borrower
could soar. They note that the most
a federal student loan servicer can
earn per month for keeping someone current is $2.85 per borrower.
Advocacy groups have balked at
such complaints, arguing that if
servicing companies were doing
their jobs effectively, states would
not have to intervene. And as the
Trump administration has rolled
back consumer protections for student loan borrowers, more states
see the need to move ahead with
plans to regulate education loan
companies.
In the spring, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos withdrew policy
memos issued by the Obama administration imposing contract requirements to improve the quality
of servicing. One called on the Office of Federal Student Aid to hold
companies accountable for borrowers receiving accurate, consistent and timely information about
their debt. Another 56-page memo
called for the creation of financial
incentives for outreach to people at
substantial risk of defaulting on
their loans. DeVos said the policies
were too complex and costly to
implement.
“There is no doubt that the federal government is best suited to
regulate the activities of its student
loan contractors. Unfortunately,
the Trump administration has signaled that this is no longer a priority,” said Ben Barrett, a higher education policy analyst at New America, a think tank.
danielle.douglasgabriel@washpost.com
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MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
Clothes encounters: Trying to find a suitable way to cross over to adulthood
Steven Spielberg
had to leave a lot
out when he
turned Peter
Benchley’s novel
“Jaws” into a
John
movie. One
Kelly's
deletion was
Washington Police Chief
Martin Brody’s
teenage memory
of ripping up an Izod polo shirt
in disgust and using it to clean
his greasy lawn mower.
Brody was an Amity townie
who felt he couldn’t hang with
the cool kids unless he had that
pricey crocodile on his chest.
The crocodile didn’t make any
difference.
Clothes can be like that: as illfitting on the psyche as on the
body.
I thought of that after my
column last week on Marshalls.
Several readers weighed in, some
of them curious about the
admittedly bizarre items I was so
excited about discovering at the
Tysons Corner Marshalls: striped
jeans and a sharkskin suit.
They say there’s no accounting
for taste, but I’ll try to account
for mine.
My first job out of college was
at an association of people who
run associations. Let’s call it the
Greater Washington Society of
Association Executives, because
that was its name. I was hired in
1984 as an editorial assistant.
I’d interned a year earlier at
GWSAE, when I was a junior at
the University of Maryland. That
internship was my first taste of
working in an office, as opposed
to the restaurant kitchens I
worked in as a teenager and the
photo lab I worked at in college.
In those jobs, it didn’t much
matter what you wore. But my
internship was in an office, in an
office building. I thought I
should dress the part: jacket and
tie.
This was no great hardship. I
was a “new wave” music fan, and
the idea then was to look like the
guys on the front of Blondie’s
“Parallel Lines” album: dark
suits, skinny ties.
Those are the things I looked
for at thrift shops. I pawed
through wide-lapeled polyester
horrors from the 1970s in search
of something that had survived
from the 1960s. I spun the racks
of dangling neckties, looking for
slivers of slender fabric hidden
among the voluminous
“Mannix”-era circus tents.
And that’s what I wore to my
was an adult now.
There was a uniform that
striving, young, white-collar men
donned in Washington in 1984:
khaki pants, blue blazer with
gold buttons, white button-down
shirt, tie. (By the late 1980s the
tie would be yellow, with a small
paisley pattern, but this had yet
to be codified.) To get this, I went
I’d gone from Elvis Costello to Alex P. Keaton, and
no one noticed. That’s when I decided that from
then on I was going to wear what I liked.
internship: dead men’s clothes.
They were anachronistic, and
also a bit ratty, pulled as they
were from Goodwill and Value
Village.
When I was offered an actual
paying job at GWSAE after
graduation, I thought perhaps I
should dress a little differently.
Looking like an extra from
“Quadrophenia” was all right
when I was a college kid, but I
to a place where my mother
shopped: Raleigh’s.
I couldn’t afford anything
more than a single outfit. I didn’t
particularly like the ensemble
but told myself it was what
grown-ups wore. Still, I was
excited on my first day to reveal
the new John. How could my coworkers not appreciate the
sartorial transformation?
Easily, it turned out. I’d gone
from Elvis Costello to Alex P.
Keaton, and no one noticed.
That’s when I decided that from
then on I was going to wear what
I liked.
Shop till you drop
Marshalls figures in a holiday
tradition that dates to the 1980s
for Barbara Fleming of Burke,
Va. That’s when she and her
dearest friend, Margarita
Miller, first took a day off work
to be at Tysons Corner Center
when it opened.
“We’d shop there all day, have
dinner at the Nordstrom’s
cafeteria, and then head out
onto Route 7, where the best
shopping was yet to be done,”
Barbara wrote. “We would hit TJ
Maxx, Marshalls and, in later
years, HomeGoods. We would
end our shopping day at Tower
Records because they were open
until midnight. It would be us —
two suburban women — and the
young men with the tattoos and
chains, listening to music. It was
a hoot.”
Barbara said her fondest
memory was trying on mink
coats at Marshalls. “No, we did
not purchase them, but we could
not have had a better way to end
the evening,” she wrote. “We are
now both retired, but still do our
‘annual’ shopping spree
together. It’s a day together that
we cherish as each year goes by.”
Helping Hand
So far, readers have donated a
total of $89,314 to the three
charities in The Washington Post
Helping Hand: Bright
Beginnings, N Street Village
and So Others Might Eat.
Thank you! That still leaves us
needing to raise a little more
than $110,000 to meet our
$200,000 goal before our Jan. 5
deadline.
To read stories about these
groups — and make a taxdeductible donation — visit
posthelpinghand.com.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/john-kelly.
COURTLAND MILLOY
Anthony Williams, architect of D.C.’s
boom, wants everyone to share in it
MILLOY FROM B1
people in the inner ring are
hurting.”
But that raised a question: Do
D.C. residents really care if the
city ends up with the poorest
people pushed out to make way
for more microbreweries and
fresh-baked bread shops? And if
they did care, why had the
problem remained “unattended”
to after decades of
gentrification?
I was interviewing Williams
at the offices of the Federal City
Council, where he has served as
chief executive and executive
director since 2012. The
organization, composed mostly
of influential members of the
business community, has
worked as a behind-the-scenes
player in local government.
With the business community
profiting immensely from the
city’s economic boom, the
council had ramped up plans to
give something back. According
to Williams, among the latest
efforts was the creation of a
“social impact and housing
affordability” fund that would
raise “a couple of hundred
million” dollars to help the
District meet the challenges.
That means providing job
training and affordable housing
before the city’s economic gap
grows even wider.
“This group, they get it,” he
added. “One of our largest
meetings has been about this.”
During his years as mayor,
Williams thought his economic
development plan would lift up
the poor, not drive them out of
the city.
“I thought the A-number one
thing to do was to create a
climate where people were
willing to reinvest in D.C.,” he
said. “Once you create a flow of
investment, you start solving
financial problems. But first you
have to improve the operation
of the place, and then you can
start creating a cycle of
prosperity.”
He noted that the city has had
20 balanced budgets in a row
and won the respect of Wall
Street.
Among city officials in the
late 1990s, Williams stood out
for his understanding of
accounting practices and
management. He had degrees
from Yale and Harvard and had
served as the first chief financial
officer of the 100,000-employee
U.S. Agriculture Department.
In 2003, at the end of his first
term as D.C. mayor, Williams
announced his
accomplishments:
“Five years ago, the District
was an economic desert,” he
said. “Today, everywhere you
look you see cranes cutting
through our skyline. Since I
became mayor, we have brought
$27 billion in real estate
investment and development
across our city. We are currently
building — or planning to build
— 154 retail projects, 171 office
projects, nearly 7,000 hotel
rooms and more than 32,000
residential units, for current
renters and new residents alike.”
And that was just
42 percent between 2002 and
2013. That’s a decline of more
than 24,000 units.
This year Georgetown
University issued a report, “The
State of African Americans in
DC: Trends in Employment &
Workforce Development,” that
concluded many black people
have been locked out of
economic opportunity in the
new Washington.
“It’s a failure of the school
system, but it’s also a failure of
the city and others to create
opportunities where people can
be trained for any number of
jobs in the service industries,
hospitality, and so forth,” said
Maurice Jackson, a history
professor at Georgetown and
author of the study.
Making matters worse, a
study by the Urban Institute,
PHOTOS BY KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Bauble wonder
ABOVE: Yaara
Hananya, 3, examines
her reflection in an
ornament hung on the
Christmas tree at
Town Center in
Rockville, Md., on
Sunday. LEFT: Her
twin sister, Adi, joins
her.
“We have challenges in terms of making the city
more inclusive, increasing affordable housing
and improving social services.”
Former D.C. mayor Anthony Williams
the beginning.
There would be more
announcements about money
allocated for crime fighting, job
training, education and
affordable housing. But the
primary mission seemingly was
to keep those investment dollars
flowing. And attract 100,000
new residents to the city.
After just two years in office,
Williams had made the District
the top city in the world for
foreign real estate investments
— followed by London, Paris,
New York and Milan.
“The real estate wave, when I
came, there wasn’t a real estate
wave — and we got the wave
going,” he said.
But there was a flip side: That
wave was not lifting all boats,
but battering the heck out of
the poor.
A 2015 analysis of census data
by the D.C. Fiscal Policy
Institute found that the number
of apartments with rents less
than $800 per month — a
number that represents
40 percent of monthly income
for a family of four living at the
poverty line — decreased by
“The Color of Wealth in the
Nation’s Capital,” found that
white households in the
Washington region have a net
worth that is 81 times greater
than black households. In the
city itself, the wealth and
income gap between blacks and
whites is among the highest of
any city in the nation.
Williams, the city’s last twoterm mayor, remains
optimistic. “A city with diverse
populations, with diverse
incomes and occupations works
better than one that is mostly
rich or mostly poor,” he said.
“Social research shows that
children who grow up in
mixed-income communities do
better in school. At the council,
we’re trying to promote policies
that increase the public good in
an economically sustainable
way.”
But was this effort a day late
and a dollar short?
“I’d say it’s urgent, but not too
late,” he said.
courtland.milloy@washpost.com
To read previous columns, go to
washingtonpost.com/milloy
L O C AL D I GE S T
THE DISTRICT
Man is arrested
in January slaying
An arrest was made Friday in
the death of a man whose body
was found after a fire earlier this
year in a house in the Trinidad
neighborhood of Northeast,
police said.
They said Garrett Taylor, 40, of
Northeast, was arrested in the
death of Awlachew Ayele, 66.
Ayele’s body was found Jan. 26, in
an apartment in the 1100 block of
Queen Street NE after a fire
there, police said.
An autopsy on June 7
determined the cause of Ayele’s
death was smoke and soot
inhalation with blunt force
injuries also being significant,
the police said. The death was
determined to be a homicide,
police said. Taylor was charged
with murder, they said.
Andrade, 24, was driving a
2008 BMW 335xi and attempting
to make a left turn from Rockville
Pike onto Congressional Lane
when he collided with Redler.
Redler, who was traveling in
the opposite direction on
Rockville Pike on a 2014 Tao Tao
scooter, was about a mile away
from his home, police said.
Police said Andrade got out of
the car and ran away. Police
found him afterward; he was not
injured.
— Julie Zauzmer
Three dead in crash of
Maryland-bound plane
A single engine airplane flying
from Kansas City, Mo. to
VIRGINIA
Results from Dec. 17
DISTRICT
Scooter rider killed
in vehicle collision
A man riding a motor scooter
was killed in a collision with an
impaired driver in Rockville on
Saturday night, Montgomery
County police said Sunday.
Ross Stanley Redler, 56, of
Rockville, was killed in the crash
about 11:14 p.m. Police said the
driver ran from the scene.
The driver, Mark Steven
Andrade of Bethesda, was later
arrested for driving under the
influence, police said, and may
face further charges after they
conclude their investigation.
ASTRID RIECKEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
D.C. Mayor Anthony Williams ushered in an economic boom, which helped drive poor people away. As
a private citizen, he heads the Federal City Council, a behind-the-scenes player in local government.
— Ashley Halsey and Martin Weil
LOTTE R I E S
— Martin Weil
MARYLAND
Frederick, Md., crashed Saturday
night near Oldenburg, Ind.,
killing all three people on board,
the Indiana State Police said.
Names of the victims were
withheld pending autopsies and
notification of relatives. The
cause of the crash was not
known.
The police said they are
conducting a joint investigation
with the Federal Aviation
Administration and the National
Transportation Safety Board.
The plane was registered in
Maryland. The police said one
dog was also killed but another
survived.
After the crash, the police said,
the surviving dog “showed up at
a nearby residence.”
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Sat.):
Lucky Numbers (Sun.):
DC-4 (Sat.):
DC-4 (Sun.):
DC-5 (Sat.):
DC-5 (Sun.):
1-2-5
1-7-5-3
5-4-0-5-7
4-6-4
1-6-1
8-3-4-5
6-7-8-9
4-4-1-1-7
1-1-0-3-4
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5:
Night/Pick-3 (Sat.):
Pick-3 (Sun.):
Pick-4 (Sat.):
Pick-4 (Sun.):
Cash-5 (Sat.):
Cash-5 (Sun.):
Bank a Million:
4-9-7
2-9-1-9
3-12-24-32-33
3-5-7
8-8-7
9-5-2-7
6-6-3-3
1-4-10-18-25
8-21-23-25-28
3-4-6-15-25-30 *8
MULTI-STATE GAMES
MARYLAND
Mid-Day Pick 3:
3-5-3
Mid-Day Pick 4:
8-1-7-4
Night/Pick 3 (Sat.):
0-4-1
Pick 3 (Sun.):
7-4-4
Pick 4 (Sat.):
4-3-3-5
Pick 4 (Sun.):
0-7-1-9
Match 5 (Sat.):
1-12-25-29-30 *23
Match 5 (Sun.):
10-15-19-24-39 *13
5 Card Cash:
JD-4S-8H-QS-4H
Powerball:
Power Play:
*Bonus Ball
9-35-37-50-63 **11
2x
**Powerball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
Did you know? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
NF407 3x.5
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
Va.’s Metro plan involves real estate, hotel and gas taxes
METRO FROM B1
significant amount of its funding
from a tax or other dedicated
source.
The proposal, a description of
which, including documents, was
obtained by The Washington
Post, is part of the budget that
McAuliffe will present for the
legislative session that begins in
January.
The governor promised in September that he would propose
dedicated funding for Metro before leaving office next month in
hope of breaking the deadlock in
the region over how to fund the
agency.
The effort is expected to continue under his successor,
Gov.-elect Ralph Northam (D), a
McAuliffe ally.
As McAuliffe has said previously in previewing his proposal, it
sets two conditions. One is that
Virginia will provide the money
only if the District and Maryland
commit to their share of dedicated funding as well.
The other is that the 16-member Metro board must be replaced
by a temporary, five-member “reform board” to improve the agency’s governance, as recommended in a recent study by former U.S.
transportation secretary Ray LaHood.
The McAuliffe plan is expected
to face resistance in the General
Assembly, where Republicans
have shown no appetite for increasing taxes since raising them
in a landmark $3.5 billion transportation plan in 2013, backed by
then-Gov. Robert F. McDonnell
(R).
House Majority Leader M.
Kirkland
Cox
(R-Colonial
Heights) also said last week that
his party would help Metro only if
there are significant changes to
restrain labor costs and ensure
safety. He spoke in favor of enforceable measures that go beyond creating a reform board.
“This is the beginning of the
sausage-making,” Virginia Transportation Secretary Aubrey
Layne said. “We’ve given a platform here for a deal to be done.”
The McAuliffe administration
hopes Republican legislators will
show flexibility, because the extra
money for Metro would come
exclusively from taxes paid in
Northern Virginia — which is
heavily Democratic. The only tax
change that would affect anyone
outside the region is the institution of a floor for the wholesale
gasoline tax, which would apply
in both Northern Virginia and
Hampton Roads.
In addition, the plan includes
“This is the beginning of the sausage-making.
We’ve given a platform here for a deal to be done.”
Virginia Transportation Secretary Aubrey Layne
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
The purpose of having dedicated or earmarked funding is to provide a guaranteed stream of revenue that can be used by Metro to support
the issuance of bonds. The agency says it needs additional money from the jurisdictions it serves to ensure system safety and reliability.
an important sweetener for the
rest of the state. It allows the
issuing of bonds totaling
$110 million a year to cover a
looming shortfall in state transit
funding. The impending deficit —
dubbed a “fiscal cliff ” — threatens
county and municipal bus systems and other local transit agencies, including those in many Republican-dominated districts, as
well as some funding for Metro.
“We have to get buy-in from the
rest of the state,” Layne said.
Without solving the transit shortfall, he said, “there would be zero
chance of this passing.”
The McAuliffe plan proposes
three increases in Northern Virginia taxes, which also were
raised in the 2013 package:
The real estate transfer levy,
known as the grantor’s tax, would
increase a dime to 25 cents per
$100 of assessed value. That
would supply $33 million for
Metro in 2019.
The hotel levy, or transient
occupancy tax, would rise from
2 percent to 3 percent, raising
$15 million annually.
An existing floor in the state
wholesale gas tax would be applied to the regional levies, which
are now separate. The state Department of Transportation estimated that if the new tax is passed
to retail customers, it would add
2 cents a gallon to the pump price.
The change would raise an additional $17 million in Northern
Virginia for Metro, while the
Hampton Roads increase would
go toward projects there.
To make the real estate and
hotel tax changes more palatable
to the legislature, McAuliffe set
them at levels the General Assembly endorsed at one point in the
process of approving the 2013 law.
Lawmakers voted for a 25-cent
real estate tax and 3 percent hotel
tax, but McDonnell reduced them
before the final package was approved.
“We’re not asking them to vote
for anything they haven’t already
voted for,” Layne said.
McAuliffe suggested earlier
this month that his plan would
not involve a tax increase.
“I have never been a fan of tax
increases,” McAuliffe said Dec. 5,
when asked at a news conference
whether his plan would include
higher levies.
But it appears that the governor concluded there was no other
way to both cover Metro’s needs
and eliminate the statewide fiscal
transit deficit without cutting
deeply into spending on roads,
education, public safety or other
priorities.
Most of the dedicated funding
for Metro would come by committing revenue that Northern Virginia already is receiving through
regional taxes raised in 2013.
The Northern Virginia Transportation Authority (NVTA) receives about $330 million a year,
which goes to both road projects
and transit. The McAuliffe plan
calls for dedicating $85 million a
year of that to Metro.
The purpose of having dedicated or earmarked funding is to
provide a guaranteed stream of
revenue that can be used by Metro to support the issuance of
bonds. That significantly increas-
es the amount of money that the
transit agency can raise, compared with what it gets through
its reliance on annual appropriations that must be approved by
the jurisdictions that support it.
A potential objection to the
McAuliffe plan is that by dedicating the $85 million to Metro, it
reduces the amount available for
road projects in Northern Virginia.
Layne said the region should
be willing to go along, partly
because fixing Metro is its top
transportation priority.
In addition, he said, the McAuliffe administration has used public-private partnerships to pump
more than $7 billion into projects
in the region including widening
Interstates 66, 395 and 95. That
has reduced the demands on
NVTA funding for roads.
Fairfax County Board of Supervisors Chairman Sharon Bulova
(D), who was briefed separately
about the McAuliffe plan, welcomed it as a compromise.
“My concern has been shaving
some of the funding from NVTA,
but on the other hand, funding
for Metro is really our major
priority right now,” Bulova said.
“There is no perfect package. I’m
sure there will be some folks who
will be disappointed and may
have some objections. The bottom line is, I think it’s a pretty
good package.”
The Northern Virginia taxes
would apply in the jurisdictions
that belong to the NVTA. It includes Fairfax, Arlington, Loudoun and Prince William counties, and the cities of Alexandria,
Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas
and Manassas Park.
If Virginia lawmakers approve
McAuliffe’s
dedicated-funding
plan, it will increase political
pressure on the District and
Maryland to go along.
The District has strongly supported dedicated funding, but it
wants a uniform regionwide sales
tax that Virginia and Maryland
have rejected.
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan
(R) has proposed a four-year,
$2 billion funding plan, without
committing to a long-term approach. His transportation secretary, Pete K. Rahn, has questioned
both the value of a reform board
and whether Metro needs as
much money over the long term
as the agency and others have
said.
Maryland Democrats, who
control the legislature, support
the principle of dedicated funding, but they have not spelled out
how it might be achieved.
robert.mccartney@washpost.com
In a law that predates the Civil War, public swearing in Va. can net a $250 fine
SWEARING FROM B1
steps on your feet, every once in a
while something colorful comes
out of your mouth,” said Webert,
38.
A conservative on most issues,
Webert says his goal is to protect
free speech and shrink a bloated
state code by removing a law
already deemed unconstitutional decades ago under Virginia
Court of Appeals and U.S. Supreme Court rulings.
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“When I cursed, my mother
told me not to and handed me a
bar of soap,” he said. “You
shouldn’t get hit with a Class 4
misdemeanor.”
Repeal is by no means assured,
even in a Capitol designed by
free-speech champion Thomas
Jefferson. Webert has carried the
same bill for the past two sessions. Both times, it died in
committee. It might have better
chances when the General Assembly convenes next month,
with lots of new, more-liberal
delegates who were elected in
November.
While it might make sense to
scrap an unconstitutional law,
legislators who vote for repeal
could stand accused of promoting profanity. And that has made
many wary of discussing Webert’s bill. The rare exception
was Del. David B. Albo (R-Fairfax), who steps down in January
and served on the House committee that torpedoed Webert’s
previous attempts.
“We’ve had conversations
about this type of thing over the
years. There are a few statutes on
the books that have been ruled
unconstitutional,” Albo said, noting that state law still prohibits
flag burning decades after the
Supreme Court struck down
such bans.
“Your opponent is not going to
say, ‘Dave Albo voted to let
people burn American flags, but
to be fair, it’s unconstitutional.’
They’re not going to explain the
whole thing,” Albo said. “For
most people, it’s not worth it.”
There are reasons beyond political self-preservation for hang-
ing on to the law.
Daniel Post Senning is the
great-great grandson of the late
Emily Post, whose musings
about etiquette set the tone for
polite society in a more formal
era.
Senning, who carries on the
family business through the Emily Post Institute, thinks there’s
something to be said for keeping
a lid on blue language.
“You want some sort of public
gious era, blasphemy was considered the biggest taboo. In secular
times, it was “anything having to
do with bodily functions.” And
today, racist or sexist slurs.
“There’s always some taboo in
language, some perception that
those words have a strange and
magical power, often a power to
harm,” he said. “And it moves
around.”
It is not clear how many
people get charged under Vir-
“When I cursed, my mother told me not to and
handed me a bar of soap. You shouldn’t get hit
with a Class 4 misdemeanor.”
Del. Michael J. Webert (R-Fauquier)
standards for decorum,” said
Senning, who has conducted etiquette seminars on the subject of
profanity in the workplace. “We
are definitely advocates for
awareness and consideration.”
But academics who do scholarly research on swearing —
really, they exist — say such bans
are futile. It aims to “enforce
politeness, and that’s not something that the law is equipped to
do,” said Jesse Sheidlower, a
lexicographer, Columbia University professor and author of “The
F-Word,” a scholarly history of
the word.
Jonathan Hunt, a University of
San Francisco language professor who has researched cussing,
said what’s considered profane is
always changing. In a more reli-
What! Still not getting home delivery?
ginia’s law each year. Statewide
figures are hard to come by since
the statute covers swearing and
public intoxication, and a breakdown for swearing alone was not
immediately available.
The numbers appear to be
small based on arrests in Arlington County, which has a local
ordinance modeled on the state
law.
In a county of 230,000 residents, police charged a mere
three people with cursing over
the past two years.
That is not to say the law is all
but forgotten. The Arlington
County Board voted in 2015 to
increase the $100 local fine to
match the state penalty. Virginia
Beach, which also has a local
ordinance, has signs on its
1-800-753-POST
boardwalk saying swearing is
banned, an effort to enhance the
family-friendly atmosphere.
Fairfax County drew attention
to its own swearing ban in late
October, when police took a
reporter from a liberal media
outlet to the ground following an
expletive-laced argument captured on video.
“If you curse again, you will go
to jail,” an officer says at one
point.
The reporter’s reply — “F--this!” — triggers an aggressive
arrest, though in the end he was
charged with disorderly conduct
and avoiding arrest.
Claire Guthrie Gastañaga, executive director of the American
Civil Liberties Union’s Virginia
affiliate, said it is “well settled
law that generalized prohibitions on profanity in public are a
violation of the First Amendment.”
“This is an interesting issue, in
part because (even though they
are supposed to issue a summons
for misdemeanors) police often
use this statute or a related local
ordinance as an excuse to arrest
someone, or at least stop them,
and then do a search incident to
arrest so they can arrest the
person on another charge,”
Gastañaga said in an email.
Virginia’s aversion to profanity goes back to the nation’s
infancy, as native son George
Washington famously ordered
his troops to quit swearing in
August 1776.
State law has prohibited public swearing at least since 1860.
The fine then: $1 per offense.
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
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.
THE WASHINGTON POST
IN MEMORIAM
DESSIN
MARYLAND
BY
MARCEL P.L. DESSIN
Some of us still love and miss you dearly.
Your daughter, Liz and son, René
Rest in peace with Mom and Marcel.
DANIELLE OHL
Three inmates killed themselves in an Anne Arundel County
jail this year, the highest number
of suicides since 2008.
Macey Marie Machen, Sobhy
Fariz Narouz Abdelmalak and
Sean Paul Cassady took their own
lives while being held this year at
the Jennifer Road Detention Center, the county’s maximum security intake and pretrial facility.
In 2008, when the jail last experienced three suicides in one year,
detention center officials brought
in a consultant to review jail policies, superintendent Terry Kokolis said. But this time is different,
he said.
The three suicides happened
under varying circumstances.
Cassady, 29, hanged himself in
February a day after arriving at
the Jennifer Road facility near
Annapolis. The door of his cell was
open, and his cellmate found him
after returning from a visitation.
Abdelmalak, 59, took his own
life after a month in a single cell,
where he stayed for his own protection. His charges related to the
sexual abuse of a minor made him
a potential target for violence.
Machen, who committed suicide in November, was under
heightened surveillance in the
medical facility at Jennifer Road.
She’d talked to multiple people,
including a social worker, during
the day and exhibited no signs of
mental distress, Kokolis said.
Police found no foul play in the
three cases, said Lt. Ryan Frashure,
a county police spokesman.
“Why somebody loses hope
that their only solution is that, I’m
not sure a consultant can come in
and solve it,” Kokolis said.
Machen arrived at the Jennifer
Road facility after having seizures
at the Ordnance Road Correctional Center in Glen Burnie, her family said. The Jennifer Road jail is
equipped to house inmates with
specific medical or behavioral
needs.
She was undergoing a detox
from methadone, said Denise
Jones, Machen’s mother, which
she’d been on for at least five
years. Jails are required to detox
inmates with methadone addictions, Kokolis said, excluding
pregnant women, as detox could
harm the fetus.
“Each and every person that
walks in the door” goes through an
intake process and medical
screening partially aimed at identifying potential risk factors and
detecting mental health concerns,
said Patricia Sollock, director of
mental health services at the jail.
A nurse asks specific questions
to ascertain the person’s mental
state and takes notes on the person’s expression, appearance, behavior and circumstance. At any
point during an inmate’s incarceration, any staff member can refer
them to mental health services for
potentially harmful or unusual
behavior.
After a referral and mental
health assessment, there are different options for housing, including a mental health unit, an observation area in the medical unit or a
step-down unit for those rehabilitating and working toward more
independence. Inmates who show
signs of self-harm or suicidal tendencies are placed on “suicide precautions” in a high-visibility cell
where officers check in at 15-minute intervals.
A suicidal person might be given
a weighted, tear-resistant garment
called an anti-suicide vest or a similarly impervious anti-suicide blanket.
Even then, with the best science
and assessment available, it’s
hard to predict who will take their
own life, Kokolis said.
“It’s almost like using a template, and the template could turn
out to be inaccurate,” he said. “You
take the best information available and . . . assume everyone will
commit suicide.”
At the Jennifer Road facility,
there have been 350 calls for suicide evaluations between January
and November. There were 230
people on suicide precaution between January and November.
This year there were two attempted suicides, but it’s the first year
there has been a suicide since
2014. In 2014, there were 50 suicides for every 100,000 inmates in
local jails, according to U.S. Department of Justice statistics.
— Baltimore Sun
B5
RE
DEATH NOTICE
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
STANHAGEN
FAUNTLEROY
DARBY
McKEE
VIRGINIA LEE PALMER STANHAGEN
“Ginny” (Age 87)
Suicides up
in Anne
Arundel
County jail
Jennifer Road Detention
Center has seen three in
2017, highest since 2008
EZ
Of Winchester, VA, died Tuesday, December
12, 2017 at Shenandoah Valley Westminster
Canterbury.
Ginny was born January 4, 1930, in Camden,
AR, the daughter of the late Wellington Palmer
and Maxiene Greve. She worked at Fairfax
County Public Schools until her retirement in
1995. She was a member of Kappa Delta at
the University of Southern California and Grace
Evangelical Church of Winchester.
Ginny is survived by her sons, Eric Stanhagen
and his wife Elizabeth of Williamsburg, VA and
Kenneth Stanhagen and his wife Jane of Basye,
VA and her brother, Denny Wellington Palmer
and his wife Sally of El Dorado, AR. She is also
survived by two granddaughters.
She was preceded in death by her son, John
Franklin Stanhagen.
A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on
December 20, 2017 at Shepherd of the Hills
Lutheran Church, 4090 Sudley Road, Haymarket, VA with a reception following. Burial will
be private.
In lieu of flowers memorial contributions in
honor of Virginia Stanhagen may be made
to Children’s National Medical Center, 111
Michigan Ave, NW, Washington, DC or to the
Fellowship Fund of Shenandoah Valley Westminster Canterbury, 300 Westminster Canterbury Dr., Winchester, VA 22603.
Online condolences may be left at
www.jonesfuneralhomes.com
STARK
THERESA J. STARK “Terri” (Age 84)
DEATH NOTICE
CORNELL
L. PAUL CORNELL, P.M.
The W.M. of Samuel Gompers-Benjamin Franklin #45 hereby calls
an Emergent Communication for
our departed brother: 9:30 a.m.,
December 18 at Oseh Shalom.
Raymond Horn, W.M.
DeSHIELDS
VALERIA S. DeSHIELDS
On Thursday, November 30, 2017. Survived by
a host of relatives and friends. Mrs. DeShields
will lie in state at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1500
9th St. NW. on Thursday, December 21 from
10 a.m. until service 11 a.m. Interment Lincoln
Memorial cemetery. Services by Stewart.
O'ROUUKE
THERESA M. O'ROURKE
On December 12, 2017 passed away peacefully
after a long illness at Manor Care, Arlington.
She is survived by her sister, Monica O'Rourke
Richmond (Washington, DC) and brothers,
Michael O'Rourke (New York City) and Reverend Kevin O'Rourke (Co. Lietrim, Ireland).
A memorial mass will be held on Thursday,
December 21 at 100 a.m. at St. Anthony
of Padua Catholic Church, Falls Church, VA.
Interment will be in Ireland.
On December 16, 2017. She was born in
Brooklyn, NY. Terri is the loving wife of Kenneth
W.; devoted mother of Kenneth C., Christopher
(Vickie), and Aileen (Jeff); grandmother to Jessica, David, Kevin, Kristen, Sara, and Corey;
great-grandmother to Raylynn; and sister to
Nancy and Andrew. Friends may call at HinesRinaldi Funeral Home, 11800 New Hampshire
Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20904 on Tuesday,
December 19, 2017 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be
held on Wednesday, December 20 at St Mark
the Evangelist Catholic Church, 7501 Adelphi
Rd., Hyattsville, MD 20783 at 10 a.m. Interment
at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Silver Spring, MD.
In lieu of flowers, please send mass cards.
Please sign and view the family guestbook at
www.hinesrinaldifuneralhome.com
Thirteenth Annual Dedication
to the Memory of
LINDA BUNDY FAUNTLEROY
Mom, Nana, Sweetheart, no words can express
the loss we felt when you went to be with the
Lord 13 years ago today. But knowing that you
were saved and going to receive your eternal
reward, put our hearts at rest. We will always
remember your gorgeous smile and stunning
physical beauty which was only surpassed by
your inner beauty and peaceful spirit. We love
and miss you more as each year passes taking
solace in knowing, we will see you in heaven
one day.
Your Loving Family, Heather,
Trae, PJ/Bootsey and Marvin
HAWKINS
Dr. ALVIN J. DARBY, SR.
JAMES R. McKEE
Departed this life on Monday, December 11,
2017. Devoted and loving husband of Donella
Jo Darby. Also survived by one son, Alvin Darby
Jr (Amber); two sisters, Claudia I Daniels and
Mary Lee Bell; one brother, Akil Azizi; two
grandchildren; and a host of other relatives
and friends. Dr. Darby will lie in state on
Tuesday, December 19, 9 a.m. until funeral
service 11 a.m. at Zion Baptist Church, 4850
Blagden Ave. NW, Rev. Dr. Keith W. Byrd,
officiating. Interment Parklawn Cemetery.
Funeral arrangements by John T. Rhines Funeral Home
Passed away on December 15, 2017 at Rebecca House in Potomac at the age of 77 after a
long battle with frontal lobe dementia. Born
in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, on June 8, 1940,
Jim was the first son of Col. Richard and
Dorothy McKee.
HALOTA
TAMKIN
Passed away very peacefully in her sleep after
illness on December 17, 2017. She is survived
by two sons, Wayne Berlin Jr. and Glenn Scott,
and her daughter-in-law, Gretchen Cope Weinbach.
In addition to being the best mom ever, Audrey
had a strong love for her extended family,
including each of her seven very special brothers and sisters. Between taking care of others,
she traveled the roads between Maryland
and the Shenandoah Valley on the antiques
and auction circuit. She also belonged to the
Women of the Moose #1865 American Legion
Auxiliary and enjoyed country music ballads.
Funeral services will be held Wednesday,
December 20, 11 a.m. at Dellinger Funeral
Home, 159 N. Main Street, Woodstock, VA.
22664. Reverend Stephanie Heishman-Litten
will officiate. Interment will follow at Massanutten Cemetery, and all are invited for lunch
after the services. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to the charity of your choice.
Online condolences can be left at
www.dellingerfuneralhome.com
Jim graduated from Mercersburg Academy and
received his BA in Economics from Lycoming
College. He earned his Ph.D. in Economics from
the Maxwell School, Syracuse University. In
his first year of graduate study he met the
love of his life, Mary Jane Schmitz. They were
married the following year and enjoyed 52+
years together.
In the Syracuse area, Jim held teaching positions at several institutions, including SUNY
Oswego, LeMoyne College and Syracuse University. In 1975 he accepted a position at the
International Monetary Fund in Washington,
DC, and served in several departments including Administration, Research, and Statistics.
He retired in 2003 and in addition to consulting,
served on the Property Tax Assessment Appeal
Board of Montgomery County. He was a
member of Congressional Country Club and
the Isaac Walton League.
In addition to his wife, Jim is survived by two
daughters: Nancy Osborne (Chris) of Vienna,
VA, and Amy McKee (Greg Olson) of Washington, DC, a brother, David McKee (Judy) of
Vienna, VA, and four beloved grandchildren,
Britt, Ben, Emma and Alexandra. He also leaves
several nieces and nephews. The family is most
grateful to Montgomery Hospice and the staff
of Rebecca House for their loving care during
his illness. In addition, he enjoyed over a year
of activity and friendship at Friends Club in
Bethesda.
AUDREY BEVERLY TAMKIN (HUBSCHER)
BARBARA A. HAWKINS
9-8-1930 - 12-6-2016
Thank you for all the wonderful years you gave
us. Words cannot describe how much we love
and miss you.
Daughters Gloria, Brenda and Joan;
Grandsons Gregory, Andre and Brandin.
DEATH NOTICE
BLADOS
WALTERS
STEVEN BROOKS HALOTA
Of Potomac, MD passed away on Thursday,
November 23, 2017 surrounded by family and
friends. Beloved husband of Stacey J. Halota;
son of Enid Julihn and the late John Robert
Halota; father of Austin Eric Halota; brother of
Cheryl Halota Horton, Christine Halota and
Craig Halota; cousin of Marilyn Maria Murphy;
grandfather of Soren Gaston Halota and Felix
Martel Halota. Brooks was also survived by a
large extended family. Brooks was the former
owner of Top of the Town Restaurant in Arlington; after selling it, his career was in the
building and mortgage industries. An avid
white water canoeist, Brooks spent many
hours on the Potomac and other rivers and
tributaries, passing the love of white water
on to his son, Austin. He also loved nature
and bird watching. A memorial service will
be held at All Saints Church, 3 Chevy Chase
Circle, Chevy Chase, MD on January 5, 2018 at
11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, the family requests
that memorial contributions be made to The
American Cancer Society
A memorial service and celebration of Jim’s
life will be held on December 22 at 2 p.m. at
Westmoreland Congregational United Church
of Christ, 1 Westmoreland Circle, Bethesda, MD
with a reception to follow. Memorial donations
may be made to Lycoming College, Williamsport, PA, 17701, or Montgomery Hospice.
STEINBERG
MILDRED MAE WALTERS "Millie"
PEREZ
RAFAEL J. PEREZ
On December 14, 2017, Rafael J. Perez” Ralph”
passed away. He was the loving husband of
the late Isabel Perez who died on October 13,
2015. Both were the devoted parents to Daniel
R. Perez (Pamela), Diane P. Giuliani (Nicholas),
Melissa M. Perez (Heath Love ), Richard J. Perez
(Kim) and loving grandparents of Matthew,
Stacey, Geoffrey, Gabriela, Andrew, Rachael,
David, Carly, Marissa and Erica. Ralph was
a chemical engineer by trade and besides a
B.S in Chemical Engineering he obtained a
Master’s degree in Chemical Engineering, a
Master’s in Polymer Materials and an MBA.
He is also credited with three patents. Before
obtaining his college education Ralph spent
two years in the Army. Ralph especially took
solace in his Catholic faith and cherished his
59-year marriage to Isabel. He enjoyed the
many gatherings with their friends and family
while living in New York, Connecticut, New
Jersey, North Carolina and Florida.
A private family service will be held to honor
his life. Donations may be made in his memory
to The Parkinson’s Foundation www.parkinson.org.
PERRY
FRENCHIE J. PERRY
On December 1, 2017, Frenchie Perry passed
away. Memorial service will be held at From
the Heart Ministries, 5055 Allentown Rd., Camp
Springs, MD on Tuesday, December 19. Family
Gathering at 10 a.m. Service at 11 a.m.
SCOTT
On Thursday, December 14, 2017, of Gaithersburg, MD. Beloved daughter of Thomas J.
Walters and the late Elizabeth J. Walters; loving
sister of Edward T. Walters, Dr. Deborah W.
Barnett, Ken B. Walters and Rebecca J. Latta.
She is also survived by her many nieces and
nephews. The family will receive friends at
PUMPHREY’S COLONIAL FUNERAL HOME, 300
W. Montgomery Ave. (Route 28 just off I-270,
exit 6-A) Rockville, MD on Wednesday from 7
to 9 p.m. A service will be held at Cedarbrook
Community Church, 23700 Stringtown Road,
Clarksburg, MD 20871 on Thursday, December
21, 2017 at 11 a.m. Interment will follow at
Parklawn Memorial Park. Memorial contributions may be made to Cedarbrook Community
Church for the ESOL Mission, a program for
which Millie volunteered as Director. Please
view and sign the family’s online guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
WINTER
KENNETH M. WINTER (Age 97)
Of Floral Park, NY on Saturday, December 16, 2017.
Beloved husband of the late
Rita Winter. Devoted father
of Gary (Barbara) Winter and
David (Patty) Winter. Cherished grandfather of Sam,
Emily, Danielle and Sage. Loving brother of Irwin (Helen) Winter and
the late Betty Samuels. Services will be
11:30 a.m., Tuesday, December 19, 2017
at Temple Beth Ami, 14330 Travilah Rd.,
Rockville, MD with interment to follow at
King David Cemetery, Falls Church, VA.
The family will be sitting shiva at the
home of Gary and Barbara Winter Tuesday
at 7 p.m. with a minyan at 7:30 p.m.
Donations in his memory can be made to
the Casey House of Montgomery Hospice,
www.montgomeryhospice.org/donate
www.sagelbloomfield.com
HAMILTON
SHUEY
Col. HENRY BETTS HAMILTON, SR.
USA (Ret.) (Age 90)
BURKHART
Peacefully passed away on November 22,
2017. He is survived by his devoted wife of
70 years, Annie Hamilton, five children and
three grandchildren. A memorial service will
be held on Wednesday, December 20, 2017, at
11 a.m., in the Knollwood Military Retirement
Community Chapel, 6200 Oregon Ave NW,
Washington, DC 20015; 202-541-0400.
On Saturday, December 9, 2017. Jean Labe
Steinberg, beloved wife of Ronald Steinberg,
devoted mother of Lauren Levy (Howard) and
Jody Brown (Matthew), loving grandmother of
Allan and Robyn Levy and D. L. Lucid Brown,
beloved sister of L. Jay Labe (Bev), loving stepsister to Barbara Bloom (Robert Rossman) and
Steven Gross (Lea).
A certified medical assistant, Jean was a much
appreciated administrative assistant at the
National Eye Institute, where she served for 24
years. Outside of work, she enthusiastically
pursued varied interests, notably bird watching, the study and admiration of a wide variety
of natural wonders, general photography, and
she was an accomplished amateur artist in
a diverse array of media. She traveled the
country and the world to observe nature,
which included flora, insects, birds, fish, and
also large and small animals in their natural
environment. She will be remembered affectionately for the 3-D pillows and wall hangings
that she made depicting family’s and friends’
pets, in the medium of fake fur. Her zest for
life and learning was infectious, admired and
appreciated by all those around her.
In keeping with her commitment to make this
world a better place for having been in it, Jean
has donated her body to science. A memorial
service will be held at the Bender JCC, 6125
Montrose Road, Rockville, on Tuesday, December 19 at 3 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations to the Jewish
Social Services Agency of Greater Washington
or to the Audubon Naturalist Society will be
appreciated.
LAMADE
WOOD
BETTY WOOD (Age 88)
Beloved wife of Roger Wood for 66 years
died on December 14, 2017. She is survived
by her children, Randy and Debbie (Rick)
Balak; her grandchildren, Tyler (Jenn) Balak
and Meredith (Rob) Nicholson and two
great-granddaughters.
Relatives
and
friends are invited to Betty's Visitation at
MONEY AND KING FUNERAL HOME, 171
West Maple Ave., Vienna, VA on Thursday,
December 21 from 6 to 8 p.m. Funeral
services will be held at Church of the
Holy Comforter, 543 Beulah Rd, Vienna,
VA on Friday, December 22, 2017 at 11
a.m. with reception following. Interment
National Memorial Park.
IN MEMORIAM
CULTICE
CLIFFORD MARTIN SHUEY
Of Centreville VA, passed away peacefully on
November 18, 2017. He was preceded in death
by Julia, his wife of 54 years and his parents,
Omer and Marie Shuey. He is survived by his
daughter, Debbie. A native Washingtonian, Cliff
ran a successful Matco tool distributorship,
retiring to take care of his wife as she battled
MS. A celebration of life is planned for noon on
Sunday, January 7 at the Barcroft Community
House, 800 S Buchanan St Arlington VA.
JEAN STEINBERG
CLARA HATFIELD BLADOS ( Age 86 )
Passed away at home in Silver Spring, MD.
on November 24, 2017 She is survived by her
loving husband of 65 years, Stanley Blados,
granddaughter, Stephanie Blados, grandson,
Jason Blados and great-granddaughter, Jocelyn
Blados. She was predeceased by her children,
Michael Blados, Steven Blados and Suzanne
Curry. Born on a farm in Jabez, KY and moved
early to Monticello, Ky. She came to Washington, DC to work at the Forest Service of USDA
from 1951 to 1959 and stayed at home to raise
her family. In 1976 she returned to work at NIH
as a grants technical assistant and retired in
1992. A memorial service was held at home
with family and friends December 3, 2017.
Donations in her memory may be made to
Children’s Inn at Bethesda, MD or Children’s
Hospital, Washington, DC.
FREDERCIK ROLAND SCOTT, JR.
Transitioned on Friday, October 27, 2017. Fred
leaves to mourn his beloved companion
Michele Proctor; granddaughter London (Lulu)
Proctor, Shon Proctor and Shontell Proctor.
Brothers Ricardo (Beryl) Scott and Ron (Sylvia)
Scott and sister, Jacqueline Scott English, and
many nieces, nephews, aunt Margaret,
cousins, and other relatives and friends. On
December 20 friends may visit with the family
from 10 a.m. until time of memorial service at
11 a.m. at All Saints Church, 3 Chevy Chase
Cir., Chevy Chase, MD 20815. Interment Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery.
KRISTINE J. CULTICE
Beloved wife, adored mother and healing
therapist. Kris is deeply missed by her
family and friends, all of whom she so
deeply cherished. We love you so and will
keep you close in our hearts forever.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
NANCY RUTH BURKHART (Age 80)
Beloved wife of Roger Burkhart passed
away December 6, 2017 of complications
arising from aspiration of food. Born March
30, 1937, in Ames, Iowa, to Ruth (Ramey)
and Ernest Wallace. Graduated from Ames
High School in 1955 and from Iowa State
Teachers College (now UNI) in Cedar Falls
in January 1960 with a major in speech
(drama). She was particularly involved in
journalism and drama in high school and
college. She married Roger L. Burkhart
of Woodward, Iowa, on June 12, 1960, in
Ames. The couple was blessed with two
children, Bryce and Sharon.
Nancy held a wide range of work positions
including teacher, newspaper reporter, and
support staff positions at a variety of business and agencies. Her final career was
as a freelance editor and proof reader for
companies all over greater Washington.
Nancy was a life-long creative writer. She
wrote poetry, short stories and non-fiction
articles. She corresponded with many people around the U.S. and the world. She
was active for over 50 years with her
Ames High class of 1955, a class that has
held both reunions and five year birthday
parties through age 80. She initiated the
production of five personal information
booklets for her class. She and her husband
joined Gaithersburg Presbyterian Church in
1973 and wrote church histories published
in 1989, 2004, and 2014. Nancy also sang
in the Praise Team and was an elder. She
liked to travel and read; she collected many
books dealing with the U.S. Presidents.
She and her husband visited all 50 states,
Canada, Mexico, and a dozen European
countries.
She is survived by her husband Roger
Burkhart; son Bryce of Cary, NC; daughter
Sharon (Mike) Sterbis of Missoula, MT;
grandchildren, Piers Burkhart (Lindy Jackson) and Emily, Sabrina, and Max Sterbis,
and numerous nieces and nephews. Her
parents, brother Keith, and niece Linda
Clifton preceded her in death.
A memorial service will be held at 1:30
p.m. on January 6, 2018 at Gaithersburg
(MD) Presbyterian Church and burial will be
in Iowa in the spring. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to Gaithersburg
Presbyterian Church or the Asbury
Methodist Village Benevolent Care Fund.
BARBARA WHITE LAMADE (Age 97)
Died on December 4, 2017 of natural causes. She was the only child of Walker and
Catherine White.
Barbara, better known as Bobby, was born
in Orange, New Jersey in 1920 and raised
in Douglaston, New York. She married Lieutenant John Erickson in 1939, a graduate of
the Naval Academy and an aviator who was
killed in the Pacific during World War II. In
1945 she married John D. Lamade; also, an
aviator and Academy graduate who died in
1985.
Bobby had one son from her marriage
to John Erickson (Walker Gibson Erickson);
two stepsons from John D. Lamade's prior
marriage (John Steele Lamade and the late
Stephen Hull Lamade), and her youngest
son Lawrence Lewis Lamade, from her
marriage to John D. Lamade. She also had
five grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.
Bobby was active, outgoing and vivacious.
She valued her friends highly and surrounded herself with many of them. Besides
socializing with her friends, she enjoyed
gardening and golf. In addition, she found a
love in investing and following the progress
of the companies in which she owned
stock.
Bobby will be buried in Arlington Cemetery
alongside her second husband at a private
ceremony for family only. Contributions
may be made to the Alzheimer's Association through the following website
http://act/alz.org/goto/larrylamade.
Email and faxes MUST include
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B6
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
A warm December Monday
Today
Partly sunny
Temperatures will rise nicely as we
sit on the positive side of a warm
front. Light winds (around
5 mph) from the southwest will push
temperatures into the low 50s by the
afternoon, and we’ll see partly sunny skies.
Clouds move in by the evening, with a slight
chance of a shower or two at night. Lows are
expected to be in the upper 30s to low 40s.
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Tuesday
Partly sunny
Wednesday
Partly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Thursday
Sunny
Friday
Partly sunny
OFFICIAL RECORD
Saturday
Rain
Temperatures
56° 43
61° 43
52° 34
47° 35
55° 48
57° 48
FEELS*: 57°
FEELS: 59°
FEELS: 50°
FEELS: 50°
FEELS: 52°
FEELS: 56°
CHNCE PRECIP: 0%
P: 0%
P: 0%
P: 5%
P: 20%
P: 30%
WIND: SW 4–8 mph
W: SW 7–14 mph
W: NW 7–14 mph
W: NE 4–8 mph
W: S 6–12 mph
W: WSW 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
NATION
Harrisburg
49/38
Hagerstown
51/43
Davis
43/38
F
High
Low
Normal
Philadelphia
47/40
Charlottesville
59/41
Th
Weather map features for noon today.
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
52/39
Dover
50/38
Cape May
Annapolis
48/41
52/40
OCEAN: 52°
Washington
56/43
Norfolk
59/44
Sa
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Dulles
BWI
50° 3:00 p.m.
30° 4:06 a.m.
46°/32°
64° 1984
10° 1876
51° 2:00 p.m.
23° 5:30 a.m.
45°/27°
70° 1984
3° 1989
49° 1:45 p.m.
25° 5:04 a.m.
45°/28°
68° 1984
5° 1951
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –0.5° yr. to date: +2.7°
Virginia Beach
58/42
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 44°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
OCEAN: 44°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
0.29"
1.78"
35.39"
38.47"
0.0"
2.2"
0.00"
0.36"
1.77"
40.25"
40.35"
0.0"
4.2"
0.00"
0.52"
1.95"
37.85"
40.46"
0.0"
3.8"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
2 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, patchy morning fog, rather cloudy. High
43–47. Wind west 8–16 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy, spotty
drizzle, areas of fog late. Low 34–38. Wind west 7–14 mph.
Tuesday, morning fog, clouds and sunshine. High 49–53.
Wind west 10–20 mph.
T-storms
<–10
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
(High tides in Bold)
2:50 a.m.
8:06 a.m.
2:43 p.m.
8:15 p.m.
Annapolis
4:39 a.m.
10:53 a.m.
5:43 p.m.
11:59 p.m.
12:55 a.m.
7:17 a.m.
1:43 p.m.
7:31 p.m.
2:58 a.m.
9:25 a.m.
3:42 p.m.
9:38 p.m.
12:47 a.m.
6:34 a.m.
1:38 p.m.
8:34 p.m.
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Immokalee, FL 84°
Low: Saranac Lake, NY –19°
for the 48 contiguous states
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, intervals of clouds and
sunshine. Wind southwest 3–6 knots. Waves around 1 foot. • Lower
Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, a mix of clouds and sunshine.
Wind west 3–6 knots. Waves around 1 foot on the lower Potomac
and Chesapeake Bay.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls
will be around 2.9 feet and holding nearly steady Tuesday. Flood
stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
Washington
Rain
NATIONAL
Atlantic beaches: Today, clouds and sunshine. High
48–59. Wind west 4–8 mph. Tonight, partly cloudy. Low
40–44. Wind west–southwest 4–8 mph. Tuesday, times of
clouds and sunshine. High 54–62. Wind west–southwest
6–12 mph. Wednesday, mostly cloudy. High 48–54.
Point Lookout
Su
Reagan
Precipitation
Kitty Hawk
55/46
Norfolk
FORECAST
OCEAN: 40°
Richmond
61/42
Ocean City
ACTUAL
Ocean City
52/40
Lexington
55/40
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
W
REGION
AVERAGE
Today
37/31/sn
50/26/s
22/16/pc
63/49/c
62/57/c
52/39/pc
48/28/c
61/50/c
52/24/c
37/30/c
34/33/sf
40/37/sh
31/29/sf
67/54/c
52/44/c
63/41/c
49/32/pc
47/38/pc
50/40/c
45/39/c
63/55/pc
56/31/c
Tomorrow
45/35/c
50/28/s
34/28/sn
67/59/r
69/46/r
59/41/pc
42/32/c
67/59/r
41/23/pc
42/35/c
45/34/c
44/29/r
43/31/sn
74/58/c
60/42/c
68/54/c
50/33/s
51/28/pc
55/33/pc
51/32/c
64/47/r
55/34/s
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
53/34/pc
42/36/c
56/36/c
15/10/sn
38/25/sn
37/30/c
82/68/pc
67/62/r
49/40/c
67/58/r
80/62/c
56/39/s
59/40/pc
62/46/c
71/50/s
54/43/c
61/48/c
83/68/pc
44/35/c
38/28/c
58/43/c
74/62/r
46/39/c
59/44/pc
51/27/s
46/27/pc
59/35/s
21/18/sn
33/15/pc
46/30/c
79/67/c
76/54/r
55/32/s
75/61/r
80/60/c
57/33/s
62/40/s
62/51/r
70/49/s
60/41/c
64/53/r
83/69/s
46/26/pc
36/19/s
61/49/r
77/63/c
52/38/pc
62/47/pc
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
61/42/pc
53/30/s
82/60/pc
47/40/c
68/45/s
45/41/c
26/22/sf
50/45/r
39/32/sn
63/41/pc
49/29/s
61/42/pc
62/35/s
56/44/pc
85/76/pc
40/29/pc
70/49/s
61/44/s
84/76/sh
48/41/r
40/36/c
38/35/i
82/65/pc
60/36/s
61/40/sh
51/26/s
84/61/pc
55/41/pc
68/45/s
52/31/c
40/30/c
50/38/r
47/33/c
66/48/pc
55/39/pc
63/46/pc
62/44/pc
60/38/s
85/75/pc
48/36/pc
67/48/s
58/48/s
85/76/pc
48/36/r
41/29/r
45/31/r
83/65/pc
59/35/s
Dec 18
New
World
High: Birdsville, Australia 113°
Low: Oymyakon, Russia –61°
Jan 1
Full
Dec 26
First
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Jan 8
Last
Quarter
Rise
7:21 a.m.
7:24 a.m.
7:00 a.m.
3:12 a.m.
3:56 a.m.
7:33 a.m.
Set
4:48 p.m.
5:27 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
1:56 p.m.
2:20 p.m.
5:03 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
74/43/pc
Amsterdam
47/37/pc
Athens
60/44/c
Auckland
73/63/sh
Baghdad
68/45/pc
Bangkok
81/60/s
Beijing
43/18/s
Berlin
35/27/c
Bogota
71/39/s
Brussels
46/36/pc
Buenos Aires
71/59/s
Cairo
77/62/c
Caracas
74/65/s
Copenhagen
37/33/pc
Dakar
78/68/pc
Dublin
46/41/pc
Edinburgh
44/41/pc
Frankfurt
37/33/sh
Geneva
36/28/c
Ham., Bermuda 71/68/c
Helsinki
36/29/sf
Ho Chi Minh City 87/67/s
Tomorrow
71/41/s
45/40/pc
55/44/pc
75/64/pc
73/49/pc
79/60/pc
40/26/s
35/30/pc
72/43/pc
42/38/pc
71/61/c
77/62/pc
73/65/s
38/35/pc
77/70/pc
54/48/pc
53/47/pc
40/36/pc
39/28/pc
73/67/r
34/30/pc
86/69/c
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
63/51/s
72/46/pc
51/46/r
67/54/pc
86/63/pc
48/27/c
87/78/s
76/57/pc
86/78/t
74/65/c
55/44/s
45/32/pc
52/38/s
83/76/sh
73/45/pc
17/15/sn
31/29/sn
91/73/pc
78/58/c
75/49/pc
33/21/pc
17/15/sn
45/35/pc
32/23/c
64/54/s
73/49/pc
51/42/pc
69/54/c
81/60/pc
51/29/s
86/77/s
78/59/pc
85/76/t
74/66/c
62/42/s
46/44/pc
55/30/pc
85/76/r
74/47/pc
38/25/sn
35/31/sn
90/73/pc
75/57/sh
73/52/pc
28/26/c
39/22/sn
42/37/pc
31/26/sf
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
92/72/pc
68/44/s
51/30/s
89/65/pc
85/55/pc
31/24/pc
40/18/pc
45/33/s
86/77/c
34/22/sf
82/73/pc
62/57/c
55/36/s
49/37/pc
39/32/i
34/22/pc
33/23/pc
88/74/pc
71/45/s
49/31/pc
88/67/pc
89/57/s
30/10/pc
28/14/s
48/32/s
85/76/pc
28/26/pc
94/79/pc
61/57/r
57/39/s
56/38/s
43/28/r
33/24/pc
30/26/pc
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
THE DISTRICT
Owner of Breitbart house is fighting for a fence
Three-foot enclosure was
rejected by two groups
and now awaits final vote
BY PERRY STEIN
While the Breitbart News operation pushes an anti-establishment message across the country,
it is also locked in a municipal
battle in the nation’s capital. The
conservative news outlet might
have the ear of the president, but it
can’t seem to get a fence built in its
own front yard.
The owner of the Capitol Hill
rowhouse that has been dubbed
“Breitbart Embassy” is trying to
build the fence for security. Because it is in a designated historic
neighborhood, it needs approval
from D.C. government officials,
but that is proving to be an uphill
battle.
The city tentatively rejected the
application, saying there is no
place for such a fence in the neighborhood.
The application submitted to
the D.C. Historic Preservation Office states the property is the home
of Stephen K. Bannon, the executive chairman of Breitbart News
and a former White House chief
strategist.
“Planning on installing a metal
3’ high fence around the front of
house with a 3’ gate that opens
electronically to the inside,” reads
the application submitted by a
Virginia-based contractor. “This
fence is intended for security reasons. This is the primary residence
of Mr. Steve Banon [sic].”
The house is owned by Moustafa el-Gindy, a former member of
the Egyptian parliament who is
now part of the nation’s opposition party. Breitbart had long operated out of the rowhouse, although USA Today reported earlier this year that it was planning to
relocate from the rowhouse to
downtown Washington. It’s unclear if that happened.
Neither Breitbart’s top editor
nor a spokesman for Bannon responded to requests for comment.
While seemingly innocuous,
the fence would be an aberration
among the tony front yards in the
200 block of A Street NE — a
mostly residential block near the
Supreme Court building. The
property is elevated and plans
called for the fence to be built atop
a reinforced wall, with the top of
the fence several feet above the
sidewalk.
The city’s Historic Preservation
Office did not sign off on the
application. Once the office denies
a request, the applicant has the
option to submit it to the Historic
Preservation Review Board for a
vote. Ed Giefer, a spokesman for
the D.C. Office of Planning, said
the construction contractor for
the property has requested a hearing and vote but has not yet sub-
n
As See h
a
r
p
O
On
e
and Th
Today
Show!
THE EASY, SIMPLE AND
ACCURATE 10-MINUTE
BODY SCAN
mitted the necessary drawings
and plans.
The proposed fence didn’t fare
any better among elected officials
at the Capitol Hill Advisory Neighborhood Commission. The ANC,
which votes on matters like, say,
whether a fence can be built
around a home, unanimously voted against the fence on Thursday.
That decision will be considered if
the Historic Preservation Review
Board, which has final say, votes
on the fence.
“We have United States senators who live on Capitol Hill, and
they don’t turn their homes into
security compounds,” said Mark
Eckenwiler, an ANC commissioner. “If they don’t need it, then it’s a
little hard to determine how you
could justify it in this case.”
D.C. police say they have no
record of police reports filed at
that property since 2010. Neighbors said they aren’t aware of security issues, and the area is flooded
with federal security agencies.
EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The office of Stephen K. Bannon and Breitbart News. A plan to
build a 3-foot fence in front of the house has been halted by the city.
Neighbor Patricia Burke said
the house is a nuisance in the
residential neighborhood because
of its usage of street parking, as
well as frequent large events with
caterers going in and out.
“This is absolutely not acceptable,” Burke said of the fence. “We
have Supreme Court security. We
have Capitol Hill security. We have
Secret Service.”
The rowhouse often hosts glitzy
events each year for the Conservative Political Action Conference
and the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner, in addition to the occasional book party
and other events. It also has a
basement and carriage house with
office space.
D.C. property records indicate
el-Gindy purchased the house in
2009 for $2.35 million.
perry.stein@washpost.com
D.C.
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BOOK WORLD
MUSIC REVIEW
MUSIC REVIEW
The subject of SNL cast
member Pete Davidson’s
new work of body art?
Hillary Clinton. C2
A.J. Finn’s “The Woman in
the Window” is a richly
enjoyable tale of love, loss
and madness. C3
Lil Uzi Vert mixes hearton-sleeve honesty with an
audiovisual onslaught at
the Anthem. C5
The trio Harriet Tubman
explores varied sonic
terrain in its debut at the
KC Jazz Club. C5
‘The Post’
has lessons
for female
leaders
CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK
Someone recently asked Bjork about the
ideas that animate her new album, and the
visionary singer gave a visionary answer. She
said she wanted to conjure a “post-Trump”
world where listeners could “escape to an
island, and there’s a lot of women there with
children, and everybody’s playing flutes, and
everybody’s naked, and there’s all these plants
you’ve never seen before and all these birds
you’ve never heard before, and orchids, and it
has that feeling of pioneering into a new
world.”
Click on the title track of Bjork’s “Utopia,”
and you’ll hear what she sees. Or at least all the
flutes. And while the sweep of these wind
instruments sounds majestic, it might not feel
as otherworldly as the singer had hoped. This
year’s brightest jazz recordings featured some
astonishing flute work, while various flute
samples wafted through the year’s hottest rap
hits, most notably Future’s “Mask Off,” the
highest-charting hit of his career. So the sound
is all around us — up on the bandstands, out
on the airwaves, high on the pop charts, deep
in our dreamtime.
Maybe this shouldn’t surprise us. As a
species, we go way back with the flute.
Transforming
breaths into
mighty music
2017’s strongest sounds came from
an unlikely instrument: The flute
BY
C HRIS R ICHARDS
WASHINGTON POST ILLUSTRATION/ISTOCK IMAGES
I met Katharine
Graham exactly
once. It was at a
white-tie dinner
in Washington, a
year or so before
Margaret
she died in 2001.
Sullivan
Four decades
separated us in
age. She had long since stepped
down as publisher of
The Washington Post, and I had
recently been named editor of
the Buffalo News — the first
woman to hold that top
newsroom job at my hometown
paper.
She was, by then, an icon —
and certainly an idol of mine. So
I searched to find something to
chat with her about, and
managed to let her know that I
admired her. Though I doubt
that I used the words “courage”
or “inspiration,” I wish I had.
Now, through Meryl Streep’s
portrayal of Graham in the new
movie “The Post,” a new
generation of women — and
girls — will get the chance to
meet her, too. Maybe they’ll
even be intrigued enough to
seek out her Pulitzer Prizewinning autobiography,
“Personal History,” which tells
the story of an insecure widow
who inherited control of a
newspaper and rose to meet
challenges she never
anticipated, changing the world
along the way.
Whether they encounter her
on the screen or on the page,
they’ll find that Graham has
plenty to say to them, especially
at this fraught moment in the
history of women in America.
“The movie is about a woman
finding her voice,” producer
Amy Pascal recently told Post
film critic Ann Hornaday.
Referring to the reckoning on
sexual misconduct that
dominates today’s headlines,
Pascal added, “And what’s
happening right now is women
realizing they haven’t had a
voice in a very long time.”
At the film’s premiere last
week in Washington, many of
the luminaries in attendance
had a connection to the story or
the newspaper that told it: Post
owner Jeffrey P. Bezos and
publisher Fred Ryan; former
chairman Donald Graham;
Judith Martin, also known as
Miss Manners; Watergate
reporter Carl Bernstein; and
SULLIVAN CONTINUED ON C3
NOTEBOOK CONTINUED ON C3
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Actress Meryl Streep portrays
Katharine Graham in “The Post.”
‘Last Jedi’ sees $450 million global debut The art of selling a ‘story’ — and wares
BY
M ICHAEL C AVNA
Star Wars is celebrating its
40th birthday this year by proving
one truth: It refuses to weaken as a
commercial force.
Five years ago, Disney acquired
Lucasfilm for $4 billion. Now,
judging by the massive opening of
“The Last Jedi,” Disney will soon
pass that total just from the three
Star Wars films that have been
released since that 2012 deal
was struck.
The eighth episode in the Star
Wars saga powered its way to a
$220 million domestic debut, according to studio estimates Sunday.
The only movie to open bigger, before adjusting for inflation, is the
series’ previous film. “Star Wars: The
STAR WARS CONTINUED ON C4
BY
K AREN H ELLER
new york — It’s a gray, cold,
GARETH CATTERMOLE/GETTY IMAGES FOR DISNEY
John Boyega, who plays Finn in “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” takes a
photo with a fan at the London premiere of the film last week.
semi-miserable Saturday morning, yet three dozen people are
waiting in the shadow of Manhattan’s High Line for Story to open.
Story is a store. A cozy one of
less than 2,000 square feet on the
ground floor of a residential brick
building. It sells neither the latest
sneakers nor the newest Apple
gizmos, yet there’s often a line.
Especially when the theme is
“Home for the Holidays,” the gas
fireplace is ablaze, and the store is
packed with potential Christmas
gifts — 2,300 items ranging in
price from $2 (candy cane) to
$1,400 (a store-exclusive Edie
Parker clutch handbag).
Story changes its theme, or
Amid a ‘retail apocalypse,’
stores try to woo buyers
through experiences
“story,” every few weeks. The website says it has the “point of view of
a magazine, changes like a gallery,
sells things like a store.” Staff
members are called “storytellers”
and greet everyone at the door.
The brainchild of fourth-generation retailer Rachel Shechtman,
Story has been profitable since its
first year of business in 2011. On a
holiday-season Saturday, says
Shechtman, as many as 5,500 people parade through its glass
doors.
Meanwhile, retailers elsewhere
go begging for customers, even at
the height of the holiday shopping season. Why? Because so
many of us would rather have oral
surgery than set foot in an actual
store anymore.
Shechtman, 40, may have discovered the antidote to this aversion. “People are yearning and
desiring of experience,” she says,
nailing a salient truth about the
millennial generation. (Well, every generation, to be honest.)
“The idea is that you tell stories
through merchandise curation
and event promotion.”
Story holds yoga and cooking
classes, and dozens of DIY workshops. In early December, style
icon Iris Apfel held her sixth
SHOPPING CONTINUED ON C2
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
HEY, ISN’T THAT. . .
THE SCENE
Barack and Michelle Obama
grabbing dinner with a slice of
the star power behind the new
film “The Post” on Friday night?
Diners at Fiola Mare got an
eyeful when the Obamas — as
well as director Steven Spielberg
and his wife, Kate Capshaw, and
actress Meryl Streep and her
husband, Don Gummer (what, no
Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson?) —
arrived for an intimate feast in the
restaurant’s private Mermaid
Room.
Our source said the A-list group
seemed “super happy.” Spielberg,
who we hear was especially “cool,”
mentioned that he would be back.
The whole party took photos with
the restaurant’s staff before
exiting stage left.
It has been a busy D.C. trip for
“The Post,” the Spielbergdirected film about
The Washington Post’s
publication of the Pentagon
Papers in 1971. There was a panel
discussion about the movie
Thursday at The Post’s HQ, and a
glitzy red-carpet premiere at the
Newseum later that day. Then
Friday, while Streep and
Spielberg dined with 44, there
was yet another screening in
town, this time at the National
Geographic Society.
Christmas shopping for a
cause at anchor’s annual event
Some familiar faces from a local news station gathered Friday night
at the Kendra Scott boutique in Bethesda to shop. But this wasn’t your
average anchors’ night out. The crowd was there supporting WUSA 9
anchor Lesli Foster’s Girlfriends Give Back annual event, which
introduces women to “everyday philanthropy.” Proceeds from the
evening went to the Anchor Fund, which provides emergency
resources to survivors of domestic abuse and sexual violence. All that
Christmas shopping ka-ching raised nearly $6,000.
DANA EDELSON/NBC
Pete Davidson, left, and Colin Jost during an SNL segment in 2015.
Hillary Clinton feels ‘honored’
by SNL member’s tattoo tribute
BY
A MY B W ANG
“Saturday Night Live” cast member
Pete Davidson recently unveiled a
PHOTOS BY SANDY ADAMS/OUTDOORVIZIONS
TOP: WUSA anchor Lesli Foster at her annual event Girlfriends
Give Back on Friday in Bethesda. ABOVE: From left, Laura Evans
of Laura Evans Media, WUSA reporter Andrea McCarren, Foster
and WUSA reporter Marcella Robertson attend the fundraiser.
new tattoo to his Instagram followers
— and boy, was it a talker.
The 24-year-old comedian posted a
picture Friday of the latest addition to
his leg: a tattoo of 2016 Democratic
presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.
“Wanted to get @hillaryclinton a
Christmas gift so I got a tattoo of my
hero,” Davidson wrote in the caption.
“Thanks for being such a badass and
one of the strongest people in the
universe.”
He added a heart emoji and tagged
New York tattoo artist Jon Mesa.
The tattoo shows Clinton with
long hair and a structured, buttondown suit jacket: channeling her
days as first lady, it seems (and
Mesa’s Instagram backs up).
Among the fans of the new tattoo
was apparently Clinton herself.
“Thanks, @petedavidson. This
makes it significantly less awkward
that I’ve had a Pete Davidson tattoo
for years,” the former secretary of
state wrote in a comment on
Davidson’s Instagram post. “But
seriously, I’m honored. Merry
Christmas my friend.”
Davidson simply replied: “OMG
WHAAAAAAAAT!!!!”
A spokesman for Clinton confirmed
the exchange was real — and that she
was, in fact, joking about also having a
tattoo of Davidson.
“[Clinton] saw Pete’s Instagram post
on a flight back from L.A. to New York
and replied from her account,” Clinton
spokesman Nick Merrill told The
Washington Post in an email. “And
that is correct, while she is fond [of ]
Pete Davidson, she has no tattoos of
him . . . yet.”
CHARLES REX ARBOGAST/ASSOCIATED PRESS
BRENT N. CLARKE/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOP: Barack and Michelle
Obama in November. ABOVE:
Director Steven Spielberg at the
Newseum premiere of
“The Post” on Thursday.
— Amy B Wang
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
Can wine, yoga and storytelling make stores fun again?
nounce additional stores, a plan
to take Local national. Says Jensen, “We’ll let the customer guide
our journey.”
SHOPPING FROM C1
trunk show at the store. It’s a
destination, a hit on social media,
a hub that extends well beyond
the neighborhood.
Shopping there feels exclusive
and special, and not like something that you can replicate at
home. Because you can’t. Shechtman manages a robust website
and a mailing list of 50,000, but
she sells nothing online. It’s all
about the store.
Melissa Heitmann, a beauty-industry consultant, visits Story
three times a week with her dog —
Story is very dog-friendly — and
her infant daughter.
“I’m known among my friends
as the queen of online shopping. I
hate to go into brick-and-mortar
stores,” Heitmann says. “But Rachel brings playfulness back to
shopping. She’s found a way to
make shopping fun again. She has
a way of finding items that you
have to have before you even
knew you wanted them.”
Imagine that. Shopping as
something exciting. Shopping as
fun.
R
W
emember when people used
to go to stores for fun? Maybe you don’t, but honest,
they did. Shoppers made special
trips downtown to the grand temples of commerce, especially at
the holidays. Shopping was a journey of discovery.
Not so long ago, department
and specialty stores offered exclusive merchandise, creating identity and a distinct, enticing world.
Zippy, flashy Bloomingdale’s
boasted completely different inventory from ladylike Lord & Taylor. Those stores had flair. They
inspired loyalty.
Today, there’s little loyalty, despite rewards cards that state otherwise, and less joy.
As a result, to add to 2017’s
myriad joys, this was the year of
the “retail apocalypse.”
Almost 7,000 stores, large and
small, boutique and chain, closed
their doors. Plenty more are withering on life support. More than a
thousand malls — a thousand! —
are nearing zombie status. Enter,
and you can sense death, a way of
ELLEN WEINSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
business that’s doomed.
People no longer go out to shop
as much. They stay in — especially
the younger set — on the computer, alone.
Online shopping offers an intoxicating trifecta of freedom: the
ability to shop anywhere, anytime, wearing anything. Younger
consumers believe shopping is
about ordering eight nubby gray
sweaters online to send back all
but one.
Who can blame them? In-store
shopping has become a miserable
experience. You’re ignored when
you require service, or bombarded when you don’t (especially in
the perfume aisle). Stores are
comically large, requiring you to
walk a football field in length
from gadgetry to produce. Many
are too dingy. Correctional insti-
tutions offer better lighting.
There are too many stores and
a confounding preponderance of
malls, which all smell alarmingly
similar — drenched in Cinnabon
and Aunt Annie’s pretzels with a
base note of failure. “We built too
many stores, and America has too
many malls,” concurs Barbara
Kahn, a marketing professor at
the University of Pennsylvania’s
Wharton School. “People got
greedy.”
The stores purport to offer
choice yet stock the same pickedover stuff that looks worn, wrinkled and dated before it has left
the premises.
Is this enjoyable? No, it is not.
“Retailers took everything for
granted,” says Columbia Business
School retail professor Mark A.
Cohen. “The department stores
now haven’t got a prayer of retaining customers’ affection. They fail
to deliver what once made them
famous.”
Some, though, are trying to
woo customers back.
Shoppers — especially millennials, and they are the shoppers of
the future — actually like being
with other people, and crave community. They want to feel special
again, say retail experts, and to
believe that leaving the comfort of
their homes and the ability to
shop in their pajamas is worth the
trip.
Fulfilling those desires is the
driver behind a radical innovation that Nordstrom unveiled this
fall. Nordstrom Local in Los Angeles offers a panoply of services:
personal stylists, alterations, nail
technicians, a juice bar, wine.
What’s missing from the
streamlined “showroom” is,
well, stuff.
A stylist helps you select items
from the company’s website that
you pick up at a later date — or
have shipped to your home. Promoted as a “neighborhood hub,”
Nordstrom Local is intended as a
place to gather and gab that melds
the old (physical stores) and the
new (online shopping) with a return of the personal touch.
“Finding new ways to engage
with customers on their terms is
more important to us now than
ever,” says Nordstrom’s Shea Jensen. Jensen’s title is senior vice
president of customer experience.
Apparently, the company wants
people to have more of them.
Can this effort succeed?
Nordstrom has yet to an-
e are on some journey. If
we must shop — and who
can avoid it this time of
year? (or any other time, really) —
we should enjoy the ride. Customer service that pays attention to
the customer would be nice for
starters. And maybe some melted
cheese.
During the holidays, Story
treats shoppers to lunch from a
rotating series of food trucks
parked outside on Tenth Avenue,
including one selling maple
grilled cheese. “We know shopping is a pain,” Shechtman says.
“Have lunch on us.”
She tries to stock items that
can’t be found in other stores.
Humor also works. “We sell a ton
of socks, 100 unique styles, candles,” Shechtman says. “Lots of
books, an absurd amount of
books. Anyone who says people
aren’t buying books isn’t trying
hard enough.”
One of her great successes is
“Pitch Night,” held four times a
year, when she invites small vendors to pitch their goods to her
store, the media and other retailers, including some of the giants.
Retail is “driven by spreadsheets, and executives are handcuffed to Wall Street and quarterly earnings,” Shechtman says. “To
me, the in-store experience
should begin as a conversation
with the customer.”
Shechtman’s formula seems to
be working. She’s in discussions
with potential partners about expanding Pitch Night nationally.
And she’s considering possibly
opening another location of Story
in Los Angeles.
“Time is the ultimate luxury,”
Shechtman says as she walks
around tidying items, handing
out baskets and sharing her story.
“Are you giving people an experience they can’t have on their
own?”
In other words, retailers, it’s
time to make shopping fun again.
Otherwise, we may as well
stay home.
karen.heller@washpost.com
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
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BOOK WORLD
‘Woman in the Window’ is a richly enjoyable tale of love, loss and madness
BY
P ATRICK A NDERSON
Most of the hundreds of first
novels published each year sink
like stones into a vast, cold ocean
of indifference. A lucky handful
receive a more favorable welcome. A.J. Finn’s “The Woman in
the Window” is among these
fortunate few.
Even before its publication,
movie rights were sold as well as
foreign rights in multiple countries. Novels such as this, for
which publishers have high
hopes, are often dreadful potboilers. But if “The Woman in the
Window” achieves success, it will
be entirely deserved. It’s a beautifully written, brilliantly plotted,
richly enjoyable tale of love, loss
and madness.
The title character, Anna Fox,
is 38 and lives alone in a costly
house in uptown Manhattan. We
soon learn why she is so often
peering out her window. She is
agoraphobic and has not left
home in nearly a year, but she
delights in spying on her neighbors. Otherwise, Anna drinks a
great deal of wine, mostly merlot,
and watches countless blackand-white movie classics — “Gaslight,” “Rebecca,” “Strangers on a
Train” and “Spellbound” are
among her favorites.
Anna’s husband has left her
and taken their 8-year-old
daughter with him. She talks to
them by phone and vainly begs
him to return. She’s a child
psychologist and still advises a
few patients by email, but mostly
she is alone with her wine, her
movies and her cat. She also has a
tenant, a handsome carpenter
who lives in her basement. His
presence injects a bit of “will they
or won’t they?” excitement into
the story, but mostly she is content to spy on her neighbors.
Then, Ethan Russell, a boy of
16 who lives across the street,
arrives bearing a gift from his
mother. He is a good-looking,
friendly lad: “He looks like a boy I
once knew, once kissed — sum-
THE WOMAN IN
THE WINDOW
By A. J. Finn
Morrow. 448 pp.
$26.99
COURTESY OF A.J. FINN
The title character,
Anna Fox, delights in
spying on her neighbors.
A.J. Finn’s characters are rarely
who they first appear to be.
mer camp in Maine, a quarter
century ago. I like him.” Anna
meets Ethan’s parents, Paul and
Jane, and Finn’s plot kicks in.
The Russells are a troubled
family. Ethan hints that his father is violent toward his wife
and son. Anna uses her binoculars to learn more, and one day
sees what she believes is an act of
violence. She calls the police,
who investigate and find no
problem. They think Anna’s wine
consumption — two or three
bottles a day — along with the
many prescription drugs she
consumes, have impaired her
judgment. (Anna cherishes
George Bernard Shaw’s quip that
alcohol is the “anesthesia by
which we endure the operation
of life.”) She continues to spy on
the Russells, and dark deeds
soon unfold.
As the plot seizes us, the prose
caresses us. Anna recalls “Central Park, swans with their
question-mark necks, high noon
beyond the lacy elms.” A woman
“walks west, toward the avenue,
the crown of her head a halo in
the sunset.” Thinking of a man
she fears, “I shudder, wade deeper into my wineglass.” She
mourns that “yesterday had faded like a flower.” And tells us,
“Now the night has my heart in
its claws. It’s squeezing. I’ll burst.
I’m going to burst.” Anna is a
mess, but in her way she’s wonderful.
Although Finn’s plot must not
be revealed, it’s fair to say that his
characters are rarely who or
what they first appear to be. And
that his story ends with a series
of mind-boggling surprises. “The
Woman in the Window” is firstrate entertainment that is finally
a moving portrait of a woman
fighting to preserve her sanity.
After finishing the novel, I
wanted to know more about the
author, A.J. Finn. It turns out
Finn is pseudonym of Daniel
Mallory, an executive editor with
none other than the novel’s publisher, William Morrow. In an
autobiographical
statement,
Mallory writes that he has for
years struggled with depression.
It is an experience, he writes, that
“informs, in part, my debut novel
and its traumatized heroine.”
With “The Woman in the Window” he has not only captured,
sympathetically, the interior life
of a depressed person, but also
written a riveting thriller that
will keep you guessing to the very
last sentence.
bookworld@washpost.com
Patrick Anderson writes regularly
about thrillers and mysteries for
The Washington Post.
Injecting some levity into the year’s sonic conversation
NOTEBOOK FROM C1
Paleolithic bone flutes — some as
many as 43,000 years old — are
the oldest musical instruments
ever discovered, and flute music
has floated across cultures and
continents in the centuries that
followed.
In his 2013 book “World Flutelore,” ethnomusicologist Dale Olsen explores that breadth, examining the effects of a simple musical instrument that — according
to myths, folk tales and religious
stories from across the planet —
causes “people to fall in love,
plants to grow, animals to arrive,
animals to go away, spirits to
come, spirits to go away, armies to
come, children and rats to march,
people to be transfixed and unable to move, animals and people
to dance,” and more.
Olsen describes the flute itself
as “a tool that transforms inaudible breath into audible sound
which becomes the sonic manifestation of breath itself ” —
which helps to explain why we’ve
become re-enchanted by the flute
in 2017. This is a sound that
vibrates deep in our genetic memory. It reminds us of our humanity in inhumane times.
Bjork seems to hear it that way
— and so might Nicole Mitchell, a
flutist, jazz composer and the
leader of Black Earth Ensemble, a
group whose commanding new
album “Mandorla Awakening II:
Emerging Worlds” aims to reconcile dreams of a Bjork-adjacent
paradise with the global miasma
we’re living in.
“I’m curious about discovering
what happens if we unify duality
by smashing together two worlds:
a dystopic world and utopic
world,” Mitchell writes in the album’s liner notes. “Can human
consciousness be transformed by
embracing fears and establishing
balance?”
Musically, Mitchell asks that
question most directly during a
piece called “Listening Embrace,”
in which the bandleader breathes
heavy into a fragile melody, as if
trying to speed up the song’s
stubborn drumbeat. Utopiabuilding is hard work. The friction feels heroic.
Elena Pinderhughes has a
more delicate touch, at least during “Encryption,” a recent song
with jazz trumpeter Christian
Scott aTunde Adjuah during
which the young flutist casually
JASMINE KWONG
ABOVE: Flutist Nicole Mitchell
performs with poet Haki R.
Madhubuti. LEFT: Flutist
Elena Pinderhughes, also
known as Elena Ayodele, has a
delicate touch on “Encryption”
with jazz trumpeter Christian
Scott aTunde Adjuah, but is
more mournful on “Mask Off ”
with rapper Future.
ZACH LICHTSTRAHL
ascends into her solo as if momentarily stepping out of her
body. And still, she plays with the
stylish levity heard in many of
this year’s flute-friendly rap songs
— which isn’t a coincidence. Back
in April, Pinderhughes, who also
performs as Elena Ayodele, was
recruited by Future to perform
the mournful flute riff of “Mask
Off ” at Coachella.
Other rappers have pointed
their flutes — some of them syn-
thetic — in different directions.
On Kodak Black’s “Tunnel Vision,” the flute sits high in the
mix, twisting like steam. On “Get
Right Witcha” by Migos, it moves
differently, like a steady breeze.
On Tay-K’s “The Race,” a thrill ride
of a hit about the life of a teenage
fugitive, the flute sounds bright
and urgent — like an alarm that
can’t be shut off.
If there’s a commonality here,
it’s this: Instead of evoking fantasy worlds, these flute lines seem
to be engaging rappers in sonic
conversation.
Baroque composer Johann
Joachim Quantz would probably
approve. In his 1752 treatise “On
Playing the Flute,” Quantz warns
that a flutist’s lack of lung power
will stifle the music’s ability to
communicate. “Melodies that
should be coherent are often
broken up,” he wrote of deficient
flute playing. “To separate several notes that belong together is
just as bad as to take a breath in
reading [words] before the sense
is clear, or in the middle of a
word of two or three syllables.”
So in that sense, rappers and
wind players have always wrestled with the same fundamental
question: How many ideas can be
arranged on the length of a single
breath?
It’s an especially interesting
question for Future, a charismatic antihero who always
sounds as if he’s rapping with a
busted heart, a stoned brain and
a collapsed lung. He rarely has
much air to work with, so he
communicates with the timbre
of his voice, and to hear him
gasp alongside the levitating
flute loop of “Mask Off ” — which
producer Metro Boomin cribbed
from the 1978 musical “Selma”
— is to hear a phantom flutist
nodding along in sympathy.
There’s an idea in country music that the keening sounds of the
steel guitar help to convey the
sorrow that unflappable singers
won’t allow themselves to express. In this year’s rap music —
and perhaps in Bjork’s and Mitchell’s new music, too — these potent flute sounds appear be doing
something similar.
Spending our lives in the dehumanizing airlessness of digital
space has made it easier than ever
to absorb the heaviness of an ugly
world, but there’s still a lightness
to be felt on our every breath.
chris.richards@washpost.com
MARGARET SULLIVAN
‘The Post’ pays tribute to Katharine Graham’s leadership, and women in media
SULLIVAN FROM C1
even Daniel Ellsberg, who
leaked the secret papers
revealing the U.S. government’s
shameful lies about the Vietnam
War — first to the New York
Times’s Neil Sheehan.
(Why, then, isn’t this story
primarily about the Times,
which broke the Pentagon
Papers story and won the
Pulitzer Prize for it? Tom Hanks,
in an onstage chat with The
Post’s executive editor, Martin
Baron, made it simple: “Well,
they didn’t have Katharine
Graham, in all honesty. If they’d
had a Katharine Graham, it
would be — we’d be calling it
‘The Times.’ ”)
But also in the audience were
many prominent media women
who know all too well what it
feels like to be the only woman
in a boardroom, or who have
struggled to assert their hardwon authority in jobs never held
by a woman before.
For them, the narrative is
personal.
“That photo of Katharine
Graham and Ben Bradlee
leaving the Supreme Court was
emblazoned on my mind,” said
Susan Goldberg, editor in chief
of National Geographic
magazine. Goldberg wasn’t
even in high school in 1971,
when that famous picture was
taken after the court
overturned the Nixon
administration’s effort to
restrain the Times and The Post
from further publication.
The image became a
touchstone over the years as
Goldberg faced many days —
many years — when she was the
only woman in the room or the
only woman around the table of
decision-makers. She was the
first female editor of the San
Jose Mercury News, the first
female editor of the Cleveland
Plain Dealer, the first woman in
NIKO TAVERNISE/TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Meryl Streep portrays publisher Katharine Graham in “The Post,”
a reminder to many what it’s like to be the only woman in the room.
charge of Bloomberg’s
Washington bureau, and the
first woman in her current job.
“We’ll be in a much better
place as a society when there
are fewer female ‘firsts,’ and
having a woman in charge —
whether in journalism or law or
finance or politics — is less
notable because it is just the
normal course of doing
business,” Goldberg told me.
Sexual harassment is, of
course, as much about power as
about sex. Hollywood mogul
Harvey Weinstein was able to
prey on aspiring actresses
because he had so much control.
The antidote, then, is not only
finding one’s voice. It’s also
creating a world — no, insisting
on a world — where women
hold power, too.
“The answer to creepy men is
being the boss” was how Tina
Brown, former editor of Vanity
Fair and the New Yorker
magazines, put it last week as
she promoted her new book at
the Jefferson Hotel in
Washington.
These days, there still aren’t
enough woman in authority —
not in news organizations, not
in Hollywood, not in business,
not in politics.
Decades later, it’s still hard
for women to speak their truths
and to be fully heard. But more
and more, that’s changing.
At the end of “The Post,”
Katharine Graham leaves the
Supreme Court and moves
through a crowd of young
women, their faces aglow with
admiration for the woman who
screwed up her courage, took on
a big fight and won.
The literal truth of this
triumphant scene is debatable,
but as metaphor it is dead on.
And it couldn’t be more timely.
margaret.sullivan@washpost.com
For more by Margaret Sullivan, visit
wapo.st/sullivan
C4
EZ
Enduring box-o∞ce success for Star Wars
STAR WARS FROM C1
Force Awakens,” which jump-started the main franchise in 2015 after a
decade of dormancy, had a North
American opening of $247.9 million.
Part of the emotional appeal of
“The Last Jedi” is seeing Mark Hamill’s full return to the Luke Skywalker role after a 34-year hiatus,
as well as the last central appearance of Leia as portrayed by Carrie
Fisher, who died last December
after completing her performance.
Luke and Leia are both spotlighted
in especially dramatic scenes in
“Last Jedi,” in which the young
warrior Rey (Daisy Ridley) seeks
Jedi training as Poe (Oscar Isaac),
Finn (John Boyega) and Rose (newcomer Kelly Marie Tran) help the
Resistance try to hold off the First
Order as led by Snoke (Andy Serkis) and Kylo Ren (Adam Driver).
After a single weekend, “The
Last Jedi” has grossed $450 million
worldwide. Its trilogy predecessor,
“The Force Awakens,” grossed
more than $2 billion worldwide —
the only film not directed by James
Cameron to do so. Last year’s
“Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” a
spinoff from the main saga,
grossed $1.05 billion globally.
Domestically, the only other films
to open above the $200 million
mark (before adjusting for inflation) are Universal’s “Jurassic
World” ($208.8 million two years
ago), and Disney’s “The Avengers”
($207.4 million) in 2012. Thanks to
“Last Jedi,” Disney owns seven of the
eight biggest domestic debuts.
“Last Jedi” also recorded the
second-biggest opening day in history, with $104.7 million Friday —
trailing only the $119.1 million tally for “Force Awakens.”
An interesting wrinkle in the reception of “Last Jedi” is the disparity, by some metrics, between reviewers and audiences. As of Sunday, the movie has an average critics’ score of 86 on Metacritic and a
certified “fresh” 93 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, yet the film gets audience scores of just 4.9 out of 10
and 56 percent (the lowest on any
of the live-action theatrical releases) on those two sites, respectively.
According to comScore’s PostTrak metrics, however, 2 in 3 viewers judged “Last Jedi” to be “excellent” and 79 percent said they
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
would “definitely recommend” the
movie, Variety reported.
“Last Jedi’s” writer and director
is Rian Johnson, whose previous
biggest film was 2012’s “Looper,”
which grossed $176.5 million on a
$30 million production budget.
Lucasfilm, led by president
Kathleen Kennedy, and Disney announced last month in an advance
vote of confidence that Johnson
would be handed the creative
reins to a new Star Wars trilogy
after J.J. Abrams finishes “Episode
IX,” set to hit theaters in 2019.
“There are very few people who
can write and direct and play in
that scope like Rian,” “Last Jedi”
producer Ram Bergman told The
Washington Post on Friday. “If
you’re [Kennedy], you say, ‘Let
him do his thing.’ ”
The only Star Wars film that Disney does not own full distribution
to is the 1977 original, “Star Wars: A
New Hope,” which was distributed
by Fox. But last week, Disney announced a pending $52.4 billion
deal that includes acquisition of
Fox film and TV properties — which
include “A New Hope.”
DISTRICT
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 11:00-6:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) CC: 2:30-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 12:00-3:307:00-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:30-4:00-7:45-11:15
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: (!) 3:30-7:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) CC: (!) 12:00-10:30
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Ferdinand (PG) CC: (!) 12:30-3:055:40-10:50
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: (!) 8:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 1:004:00-8:30-10:10
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: (!)
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) CC: (!) 12:50
Coco (PG) CC: 2:00-4:30-7:1010:50
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:50-4:40-7:2010:05
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
(!) 1:40-4:10-5:10-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) (!) 7:30
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air and Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
What's New in Space Science
(NR) 10:30AM
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
One World, One Sky: Big Bird's
Adventure (NR)
Angelika Pop-Up at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11:30-2:00-4:30-7:00
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R)
1:45-4:15-6:45
The Florida Project (R) OC: 8:15
Wait for Your Laugh 11:15AM
The Florida Project (R) 11:15-1:303:45-6:00
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-3:10-5:20-7:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 2:00-4:45-7:30
Landmark Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
11:30-2:10-4:45-7:25-10:05
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) CC: 11:40-2:15-4:40-7:10-9:35
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
12:00-3:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 11:45-12:30-1:00-3:15-3:455:00-6:30-7:00-7:15-8:00-9:3010:00-10:15
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
The Other Side of Hope (Toivon
tuolla puolen)12:40-2:50-7:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:104:10-7:10-9:55
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 12:50-3:50
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) CC:
5:00-9:45
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:10-3:20-5:307:40-9:15-9:50
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
1:00-1:45-4:00-4:45-7:00-7:45-9:45
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 12:301:30-3:30-4:30-6:30-7:30-10:00
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 1:00-3:155:30-7:45
Tom of Finland (NR) 1:30-4:30-7:30
The Florida Project (R) CC: 1:154:15-7:15
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:0012:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14
701 Seventh Street Northwest
Ferdinand (PG) 11:20-2:10-5:007:45-10:35
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:45-3:105:35-8:00-10:25
Justice League (PG-13) 10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:001:55-4:50-7:45-10:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) 12:30-3:50-7:10
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 11:55-2:30-5:10-7:45-10:35
The Disaster Artist (R) 7:15-9:45
Justice League (PG-13) 12:303:15-6:05-8:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:00-1:30-3:20-4:50-6:40-8:1010:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) 2:40-10:00
Coco (PG) 11:30-12:10-2:05-2:554:40-5:35-8:10-10:45
Wonder (PG) 11:35-2:10-4:457:05-10:40
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
12:00-2:25-4:45-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:00-6:30
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
IMAX Theater
601 Independence Avenue SW
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 10:304:30-10:30
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 11:152:00-4:30-7:15-10:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
9:45-12:45-3:45-6:30-9:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: (!) 11:00-2:30-6:00-9:30
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Center Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG8633 Colesville Road
13) CC: (!) 11:45-3:15-6:45-10:15
The Muppet Christmas Carol
Coco (PG) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:15(G) 3:30
6:45-9:15
Naples '44 (NR) 5:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
The Shape of Water (R) 11:3011:30-2:15-7:45-10:15
2:00-4:30-7:05-9:40
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Daphne 9:30
10:15-1:00-3:45-5:00-6:30-9:15
Lady Bird (R) 11:20-1:20-3:20AMC Magic Johnson
5:20-9:20
Capital Center 12
Custody (Jusqu'à la garde) 7:20
800 Shoppers Way
Racer and the Jailbird (Le fidele)
Ferdinand
(PG) CC: 11:00-4:00(NR) 7:00
It's a Wonderful Life (1946) (PG) 6:30
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: 1:30-9:00
12:45
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 11:15AMC Academy 8
2:05-4:50-7:45
6198 Greenbelt Road
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Ferdinand (PG) CC: (!) 10:2012:00-3:00-6:10-9:10
3:25-6:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: (!)
CC: 11:30-1:30-4:45-8:00
12:50-8:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PGJustice League (PG-13) CC: 10:00- 13) CC: 2:45-6:00-9:15
12:45-3:35-6:25-9:15
The Star (PG) CC: 11:45-2:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Jigsaw (R) CC: 2:35-7:40
CC: (!) 10:15-11:05-1:30-4:45Coco (PG) CC: 11:10-12:30-1:458:00-9:00
3:10-4:15-5:45-6:50-8:15-9:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- Murder on the Orient Express
13) CC: (!) 12:30-3:45-7:00-10:15 (PG-13) CC: 4:20-7:10-9:45
The Star (PG) CC: 12:10-2:20Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
4:35-6:45
12:05-2:30-5:05-7:35-10:00
Coco (PG) CC: 11:30-2:00-4:50Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
7:30-10:00
12:25-3:15-6:15-9:05
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:30- Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
7:15-10:05
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 12:10Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 2:25- 5:15-10:00
5:00-7:25-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
AMC Center Park 8
12:30-3:45-7:00-10:15
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
ArcLight Bethesda
Ferdinand (PG) CC: (!) 12:45-6:15
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:154:15-7:15-10:10
Ferdinand (PG) 10:40-6:10
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: (!) 3:30-9:00 The Disaster Artist (R) 11:05-1:35Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
5:50-8:25-11:00
2:00-5:00-8:00
Justice League (PG-13) 1:15Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 4:25-8:35
CC: (!) 12:00-3:15-6:30-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- 10:45-2:00-8:30
13) CC: (!) 12:30-3:45-7:00-10:15 Coco (PG) 11:00-2:15-4:05-7:10Coco (PG) CC: (!) 4:00
10:55
Wonder (PG) CC: 12:00-2:45Wonder (PG) 11:20-1:55-4:105:30-8:30
7:25-10:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 2:15- Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:35-11:404:45-7:30-10:00
1:20-2:25-4:35-5:05-7:45-10:35
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 1:30-6:45-9:30 Call Me by Your Name (R) 10:1011:25-1:05-2:20-4:00-5:20-7:20AMC Columbia 14
8:20-10:20
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 11:35-2:10Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:10-12:50- 4:40-7:05-9:35
6:20
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: 3:45-9:00 Ferdinand 3D (PG) 3:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
The Disaster Artist (R) 9:204:45-11:15
3:30-10:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:10-3:50-6:20Justice League (PG-13) CC: 12:00- 8:10-10:25
3:00-6:00-9:15
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: 1:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:35Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
2:25-6:05-9:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 10:00-11:15-12:00-12:30-1:00CC: (!) 10:00-11:00-11:30-2:00-2:30- 2:30-3:15-3:45-5:45-6:30-7:007:15-7:30-9:00-9:30-9:45-10:153:35-5:30-7:00-9:00-9:45
10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
13) CC: (!) 6:15
(PG-13) 5:15; 10:15-1:30-8:00;
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX 4:15-10:45
3D Experience (PG-13) (!) 9:30Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
1:00-4:30-8:00
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Coco (PG) 9:25-10:40-1:20-4:106:50-9:30
Ferdinand (PG) 10:40-12:15-1:30Murder on the Orient Express (PG- 2:50-4:20-7:00-9:50
13) CC: 11:10-1:50-4:50-7:40-10:30 The Disaster Artist (R) 11:15-1:50Wonder (PG) CC: 10:35-1:25-4:15- 4:15-10:10
7:05-10:05
Justice League (PG-13) 10:05Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC: 12:55-3:40-9:40
1:15-10:25
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 6:4011:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
CC: 5:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PGLady Bird (R) CC: 9:40-12:00-5:20- 13) 12:10-3:40-7:10-10:40
7:40-10:05
The Star (PG) 9:55AM
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 8:05
Coco (PG) 10:30-1:05-3:30-6:45Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 9:10
12:00
Wonder (PG) 10:00-1:00-4:00Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:20- 7:15-10:20
2:00-4:40-7:20-10:05
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:20AM
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) 2:45 Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 10:10-11:30-12:50-1:40-3:004:10-5:10-5:30-6:30-7:40-8:40(!) 9:00-12:30-4:00-7:30-10:45
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18 9:00-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
13) 10:50-2:20-5:50-9:20
Ferdinand (PG) CC: (!) 11:25Bow Tie Harbour 9
2:00-7:20
2474 Solomons Island Road
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: (!) 4:35-9:55
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 11:50- Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 10:20-1:00-3:40-6:40-9:10
2:40-4:10-7:00-9:50
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 11:15- Just Getting Started (PG-13)
1:40-4:30-9:50
1:40-5:30-8:00-10:30
The Shape of Water (R) 10:30Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:30-3:20-6:10-7:10-10:00
11:35-1:05-4:05-7:25-10:25
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
CC: (!) 11:00-12:00-1:30-3:20-4:50- Missouri (R) 10:50-1:50-4:207:00-9:40
8:10-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- Lady Bird (R) 12:20-2:40-5:007:20-10:10
13) CC: (!) 2:20-5:40-6:40-9:00
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) 12:00-2:30Coco (PG) CC: 11:40-1:00-2:155:10-7:40-10:10
3:35-4:55-6:10-7:30-8:45-10:05
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
13) CC: 1:25-4:30-7:15-10:10
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:45-1:35-4:25- Ferdinand (PG) 10:45-4:35-7:207:10-10:20
10:05
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Ferdinand 3D (PG) 1:35
11:05-1:40-4:20-7:05-9:40
The Disaster Artist (R) 10:40-1:20Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
4:10-7:00-9:45
11:05-1:50-4:15-7:05-9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:45Wonder Wheel (PG-13) 2:45-5:35- 6:10
8:05-10:35
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
Lady Bird (R) 11:10-2:50-5:153D (PG-13) 3:35-10:00
7:45-10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
The Thousand Faces of Dunjia
(NR) (!) 11:00-1:45-4:40-7:35-10:20 10:30-2:00-5:30-9:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PGStar Wars: The Last Jedi The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC: 13) XD: 12:15-10:50
Coco (PG) 11:10-1:55-4:45-7:45(!) 12:40-4:00-7:20-10:40
Unexpectedly Yours 11:15-2:10- 10:30
Murder on the Orient Express (PG5:00-7:50-10:35
13) 10:45-1:50-4:40-7:40-10:45
AMC Loews St. Charles Town Ctr. 9 Wonder (PG) 10:30-1:30-4:2511115 Mall Circle
7:25-10:25
Ferdinand (PG) CC: (!) 1:30-7:30 Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:30Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: (!) 10:45- 2:00-4:30-7:20-10:40
4:30-10:15
Unexpectedly Yours 10:50-1:4510:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Justice League (PG-13) 3:15-9:20
11:30-2:45-6:00-9:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
1:30-7:30
“Star Wars: The Last Jedi” had a strong debut weekend. The number of weeks in release is in parentheses.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
MARYLAND
TOTAL
in millions of dollars
220.0
13.3
10.0
5.4
4.2
3.8
3.0
2.6
2.5
2.1
220.0
13.3
150.8
109.3
219.5
96.6
306.4
12.9
97.3
26.0
Source: boxofficemojo.com
THE WASHINGTON POST
The planet Crait is
seen in “Star Wars:
The Last Jedi,”
which took in
$220 million at the
box office in its
opening weekend.
INDUSTRIAL LIGHT & MAGIC/LUCASFILM
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 11:55-2:40-5:35-8:25-11:25
Wonder (PG) 11:35-4:20-7:1010:10
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
12:55-3:40-10:40
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:45-12:103:10-4:05-6:15-7:10-9:20-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:152:55-5:35-8:20-10:55
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:10-3:05-6:10-9:30
1591 West Nursery Road
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:10-1:1512:00-3:05-6:10-9:10
4:00-6:40-9:10
Wars: The Last Jedi The
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 10:45- Star
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 12:00
1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45
Star
Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
11:40-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:05-4:1010:15-1:10-4:05-7:15-10:10
5:00-5:55-6:40-7:40-8:30-9:30Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 10:50-11:00
CC: 10:00-11:00-11:50-12:45-1:35Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
2:35-3:25-4:15-6:05-7:00-7:503D Experience (PG-13) 3:308:45-9:35-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- 7:00-10:30
Regal Hyattsville Royale Stadium 14
13) CC: 5:05
6505 America Blvd.
The Star (PG) CC: 10:00-2:40
Coco (PG) CC: 10:30-1:00-3:35Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:15-4:156:20-8:55
7:15-10:15
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- Ferdinand (PG) 12:00-1:00-4:0013) CC: 10:50-1:45-4:40-7:20-10:00 6:45-9:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:20-1:00The Disaster Artist (R) 11:45-2:303:40-6:30
5:00-7:45-10:15
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC: Justice League (PG-13) 1:15-4:1511:20-1:35-3:50-6:05-8:20
7:15-10:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: The Star (PG) 1:00-3:30-6:0011:15-1:55-4:25-10:35
8:15-10:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:45-2:15-4:40-7:05-9:30
12:00-1:20-3:30-4:40-7:00-8:00The Man Who Invented Christmas 10:30
(PG) CC: 12:10-4:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
(PG-13) 11:45-2:35-3:10-6:00-6:30CC: 9:10
9:30-10:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 7:35-9:55
Coco (PG) 11:50-12:30-2:30-3:30Landmark Bethesda Row Cinema 5:15-6:15-7:50-9:00-10:30
Wonder (PG) 1:15-4:00-6:45-9:45
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Getting Started (PG-13)
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:30- Just
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
4:20-6:50-7:20-9:35-10:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:30Wonder Wheel (PG-13) CC:
3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
1:50-4:30
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:1014716 Baltimore Avenue
2:00-3:55-5:00-7:10-8:00-9:50
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
Ferdinand (PG) 12:00-3:20-6:5012:50-1:20-3:40-4:10-6:30-7:009:40
9:30-9:50
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:50-2:30Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 5:00-7:50-10:20
Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:40-7:30- Justice League (PG-13) 12:5010:00
3:55-7:05-10:05
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:00-3:20-5:40- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:407:45-9:55
2:50-6:20-9:55
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Old Greenbelt Theatre
11:30-3:00-3:45-6:40-7:15-9:20129 Centerway
10:05
The Wind Rises (Kazetachinu)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
(PG-13) 8:00
(PG-13) 12:15-1:00-2:00-4:30-5:40Murder on the Orient Express
8:00-10:45
(PG-13) 3:00
Coco (PG) 1:30-4:15-7:00-9:50
Bill Nye: Science Guy 5:30
The Royal Ballet: The Nutcracker Wonder (PG) 12:40-3:30-6:30-9:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:35(NR) 12:00
2:05-4:45-7:30-10:10
Paragon Kentlands Stadium 10 Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
629 Center Point Way
1:40-4:40-7:40-10:30
Ferdinand (PG) 12:30-2:50-5:10Regal Rockville Center Stadium 13
7:30-9:50
199 East Montgomery Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) 11:50The
Disaster Artist (R) 11:45-2:302:25-5:00-7:35-10:10
5:15-8:00-10:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:45-4:30Justice League (PG-13) 10:457:15-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 1:30-4:45-7:45-10:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:3011:00-1:00-2:05-4:00-5:10-7:001:45-5:00-8:15
8:15-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
The Star (PG) 1:10-3:15-5:20
Coco (PG) 12:05-2:30-4:55-7:20- 12:00-12:30-3:30-4:00-7:00-7:308:30-10:30-11:00
9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PGMurder on the Orient Express
13) 10:30-11:30-1:30-2:00-3:00(PG-13) 2:15-4:50-7:25
5:00-5:30-6:30-9:00-10:00
Wonder (PG) 12:10-2:40-5:10Coco (PG) 10:30-1:15-4:15-7:007:40-10:10
9:45
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Wonder (PG) 11:15-2:45-6:15-9:45
12:10-10:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 7:25-9:40 Lady Bird (R) 10:45-1:15-4:156:45-9:15
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-3:10-5:20Youth (Fang Hua) (NR) 11:30-2:457:30-9:40
6:00-9:30
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
Ferdinand (PG) 11:00-1:45-4:303899 Branch Avenue
7:15-10:15
Ferdinand (PG) 3:20-5:55-8:40
Regal Waugh Chapel
Ferdinand 3D (PG) 12:45
Stadium 12 & IMAX
Justice League (PG-13) 1:451419 South Main Chapel Way
4:30-7:15
Ferdinand (PG) 11:40-2:20-5:00Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 7:40-10:20
12:30-1:00-3:15-3:45-4:15-7:00The Disaster Artist (R) 12:00-2:407:30-8:30
5:10-7:50-10:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
Justice League (PG-13) 1:10-4:10(PG-13) 12:00
7:20-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:15- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:103:05-5:30-8:00
3:10-6:20-9:30
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
(PG-13) 11:30-1:00-3:00-4:30Ferdinand (PG) 12:30-5:30-7:00- 8:00-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
10:30
3D Experience (PG-13) 3:30Justice League (PG-13) 1:107:00-10:30
4:05-7:10
The Star (PG) 11:50-2:10-4:30Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:456:50-9:10
4:45-7:45
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:35-3:05- Coco (PG) 1:40-4:40-7:15-9:55
Wonder (PG) 1:30-4:20-7:10-9:50
5:35-8:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:203:50-6:40-9:20
1:00-4:00-6:30-7:30
The Star (PG) 1:00-3:45-6:30-9:15 Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 12:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
(PG-13) 2:00-2:30-3:00-3:30-6:00- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:30-4:00-6:30-7:30-11:00
7:00-9:00-9:30-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Regal Westview Stadium 16 & IMAX
(PG-13) 1:05-3:55-6:50-9:40
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Coco (PG) 12:50-3:35-6:20-9:20
Ferdinand (PG) 10:00-12:45-3:45Just Getting Started (PG-13) 2:15- 6:45-9:45
5:00-7:45-10:30
The Disaster Artist (R) 10:30-1:45Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 4:25-9:45 4:45-7:15-9:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13) 10:151:20-4:20-7:20-10:20
1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Regal Cinemas
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:00Majestic Stadium 20 & IMAX 1:15-4:30-7:45-11:15
900 Ellsworth Drive
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PGFerdinand (PG) 11:50-2:40-5:30- 13) 11:30-3:00-3:30-6:30-10:00
8:20-11:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:45-2:20- 3D Experience (PG-13) 12:30-4:007:30-11:00
5:15-7:50-10:25
The Star (PG) 9:45-12:15-2:45Justice League (PG-13) 11:455:15-7:45-10:15
2:40-5:35-8:35-11:30
Coco (PG) 10:30-1:45-4:45-7:45Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:5510:30
4:20-7:40-11:05
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 11:30-12:40-3:00-6:30-10:00 13) 9:15-12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Coco (PG) 11:30-1:05-2:20-3:55- Wonder (PG) 9:30-12:30-3:306:30-9:30
5:10-6:45-8:00-9:35-10:50
WEEKEND
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (1)
Ferdinand (1)
Coco (4)
Wonder (5)
Justice League (5)
Daddy’s Home 2 (6)
Thor: Ragnarok (7)
The Disaster Artist (3)
Murder on the Orient Express (6)
Lady Bird (7)
michael.cavna@washpost.com
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:30-11:40-12:50-2:00-3:10-4:205:30-6:40-7:50-9:00-10:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
(PG-13) 11:05-1:25-2:35-4:55-6:058:25-9:35
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:30-6:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
XD: 3:45-7:15
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
Top 10 films
MOVIE DIRECTORY
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
. MONDAY,
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:152:15-5:30-8:15-11:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
10:15-1:30-4:00-6:45-9:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 9:1512:15-3:15-6:00-8:45-11:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
9:00AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
9:30-11:00-12:00-1:00-2:30-4:306:00-7:00-8:00-9:30-10:30-11:30
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) 10:25-1:053:40-6:20-9:05
Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:40-2:05-4:256:45-9:20
Unexpectedly Yours 10:20-1:104:00-6:50-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
Beyond Skyline (R) 1:25-7:35
AMC Potomac Mills 18
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 9:45-3:15-
Lady Bird (R) (!) 10:30-1:15-3:306:00-8:30-10:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) (!) 9:45-4:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
(!) 12:05-1:00-3:15-6:30-7:309:45-10:45
Bow Tie
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX
11940 Market Street
Ferdinand (PG) 10:20-1:20-4:207:20-9:55
UA Snowden Square Stadium 14 8:45-10:00
The Disaster Artist (R) 10:50-1:509161 Commerce Center Drive
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: 12:30-6:00 4:50-7:50-10:50
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 11:452:15-4:40-7:15-9:40
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 8:00;
10:00-1:00-2:00-4:00-7:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 9:3012:40-3:40-6:40-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 10:00-1:30-5:00-8:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) CC: 11:00-2:30-6:15-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) CC: 9:0012:30-4:00-7:45-11:15
The Star (PG) CC: 10:00-12:202:45-5:00-7:15-9:30
Coco (PG) CC: 11:00-12:15-1:304:00-5:40-6:30-9:00-10:45
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) CC: 10:10-1:10-4:10-7:10-10:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:00-12:503:30-6:10-9:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
10:30-1:00-3:30-5:50-8:15-10:35
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:30-2:15-5:00-7:30-10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14 Missouri (R) CC: 9:25-12:10-3:107710 Matapeake Business Drive
6:10-9:10
Ferdinand (PG) CC: (!) 9:50-10:30- Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:15-12:4511:10-11:50-12:30-1:10-1:50-3:10- 3:20-5:50-8:15-10:40
3:50-4:30-6:00-7:10-9:10
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 9:40-3:00-8:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:40-3:40-7:00-10:20
8:30-12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
CC: (!) 9:30-12:50-4:10-7:30-10:50 11:00-5:00-11:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PGAMC Shirlington 7
13) CC: (!) 12:10-3:30-6:50-10:10
2772 South Randolph St.
The Star (PG) Open Caption; CC: (!)
Star
Wars:
The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:20-2:20
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC: CC: (!) 10:00-2:30-4:00-9:00
Star
Wars:
The Last Jedi 3D (PG11:00-1:40-4:20-6:40-9:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: 13) CC: (!) 1:00-7:00
Coco
(PG)
CC:
(!) 11:00-4:00-9:15
6:30-10:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: (!)
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
10:30-12:00-1:30-3:00-4:30-7:3011:15-2:40-5:10-7:40-10:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: 9:00-10:20
The Shape of Water (R) (!) 10:159:40-5:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 12:20- 11:45-1:15-4:15-6:00-7:15-10:15
Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:15-1:45-4:153:20-6:20-8:30-9:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 6:45-9:30
CC: (!) 10:10-10:50-11:30-1:30-2:10- Coco 3D (PG) CC: 1:30-6:30
AMC Tysons Corner 16
2:50-4:50-5:30-6:10-7:50-8:107850e Tysons Corner Center
8:50-9:30
Coco (PG) CC: 11:20-2:00-4:40Ferdinand (PG) CC: (!) 10:307:20-9:20
1:15-7:00
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: (!) 4:00-9:40
iPic Pike & Rose
The Disaster Artist (R) (!) 9:2511830 Grand Park Avenue
12:05-2:35-5:15-7:50-10:25
Ferdinand (PG) (!) 12:15-3:45Justice League (PG-13) CC: 10:157:15-10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 1:25-4:20-7:25-10:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
(!) 11:00-11:30-12:30-2:00-3:0010:40-4:55-7:55-10:55
3:30-4:30-6:00-6:30-7:00-7:30Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
8:30-10:00-10:30-10:45-11:15
(!) 9:00-10:00-12:20-1:30-3:45Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- CC:
13) (!) 12:00-4:00-8:00-11:45-12:00 5:00-7:15-8:30-10:45
Star
Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PGCoco (PG) 11:15-2:45-6:15-9:30
13) CC: (!) 11:45-3:15-6:45-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
(PG-13) 2:30
3D Experience (PG-13) CC: (!)
9:15-12:40-4:05-7:30-11:00
The Star (PG) CC: 10:10-12:305:55-8:05-10:40
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
Coco (PG) CC: 11:00-1:45-2:552150 Clarendon Blvd.
4:25-7:10-9:55
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 4:00-9:00
on the Orient Express (PGFerdinand 3D (PG) CC: 1:30-6:30 Murder
13) CC: 10:35-1:20-4:10-6:50-9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:05-1:05-4:153:45-6:15
7:05-10:00
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 1:00- Darkest Hour (PG-13) (!) 10:203:45-6:45-9:15
1:35-1:40-4:30-7:40-10:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 9:40CC: 1:00-4:30-8:00-9:15-10:30
12:10-2:50-5:35-10:30
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- Lady Bird (R) 12:25-2:45-5:0513) CC: 2:00-4:20-7:15-10:00
7:35-10:05
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:30-4:45-7:30- Coco 3D (PG) CC: 9:30-8:10
10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- (!) 10:45-2:15-5:55-9:20
13) CC: 12:00-3:30-7:00
AMC Worldgate 9
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
13025 Worldgate Drive
Missouri (R) CC: 12:30-12:45-3:10Ferdinand (PG) CC: 11:30-4:506:00-8:45
7:30
AMC Hoffman Center 22
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: 2:10-10:10
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 12:30Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:15-3:453:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
9:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Ferdinand 3D (PG) CC: 1:00-6:30 12:15-3:40-6:45-9:40
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 11:30- Justice League (PG-13) CC: 10:2012:15-2:00-3:00-4:30-5:30-7:001:20-4:20-7:25-10:15
8:00-9:30-10:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 11:30- CC: (!) 10:00-11:00-2:30-4:05-5:002:30-5:15-8:15-11:05
6:00-7:40-8:30-9:15-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Coco (PG) CC: 11:10-1:45-4:3010:15-1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
7:00-9:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Murder on the Orient Express
CC: 11:15-1:30-2:45-5:00-6:15(PG-13) CC: 10:10-12:50
8:30-9:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 12:00-3:20Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- 6:20-9:00
13) CC: 10:30-2:15-5:45-9:15
Alamo Drafthouse
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
Cinema - One Loudoun
3D Experience (PG-13) CC: 12:4520575 East Hampton Plaza
4:15-7:45-11:15
The Star (PG) CC: 10:50-1:20-3:35 Coco (PG) 10:10-12:00-2:50-5:358:25-11:30
Coco (PG) CC: 11:50-2:30-5:15Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
8:00-10:45
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- 11:15-3:10-7:00-10:50; 10:2013) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:45-7:25-10:05 10:55-12:20-1:00-2:10-2:30-4:104:50-6:00-6:20-8:00-8:45-9:50Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
10:20-11:10-11:50
4:00-10:10
Star
Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PGWonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:40-4:2013) 11:40-3:30-7:20
7:10-9:50
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
Just Getting Started (PG-13) CC:
2911 District Ave
11:25-1:45-4:10-6:35-9:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Call Me by Your Name (R) (!)
6:00-9:00
10:00-11:05-12:55-2:00-3:50-5:00Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
6:45-8:00-9:55-10:55
11:45-2:35-5:05-7:50-10:25
The Shape of Water (R) (!) 10:45Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 1:30-4:20-7:00-8:15-10:00-10:55
Missouri (R) CC: 11:10-1:50-4:35- Darkest Hour (PG-13) (!) 11:007:20-10:05
11:45-1:45-4:30-5:15-7:15-10:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: Wonder Wheel (PG-13) (!)
9:45-2:40
10:45-1:35-4:40-7:30-10:20
Ferdinand (PG) 10:20-1:20-4:106:50-9:30
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:10-2:505:30-8:10-10:50
Justice League (PG-13) 1:50-4:457:45-10:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:151:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:30-12:00-3:30-7:00-10:20-10:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) 10:00-11:30-12:30-1:30-3:004:00-5:00-6:30-7:30-8:30-9:50
Coco (PG) 10:00-12:40-3:206:15-9:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:20-3:10-6:00-8:45
Wonder (PG) 10:10-12:50-3:506:40-9:20
Just Getting Started (PG-13) 3:205:40-8:00-10:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:15-3:15-6:00-8:40
Lady Bird (R) 10:40-1:10-3:406:15-8:50
VIRGINIA
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 4:3011:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) 3:30-10:30
Coco (PG) 10:30-1:00-3:50-6:509:20
Wonder (PG) 10:40-1:40-4:407:30-10:40
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
11:10AM
Lady Bird (R) 11:20-2:20-5:208:20-11:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:00-12:40-2:30-3:00-6:00-6:307:40-9:30-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) 10:00-1:30-5:00-8:30
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) 10:10-1:104:10-7:10-10:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:00-7:00
Cinema Arts Theatre
9650 Main St
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 10:00-1:00-4:00-7:10-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 7:50-10:05
Wonder (PG) CC: 9:50-12:10-2:254:50-7:20-9:40
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 9:4012:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:55
The Divine Order (Die gottliche
Ordnung) (NR) CC: 9:40-2:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 9:45-12:05-2:355:05-7:40-9:55
Lady Bird (R) CC: 9:55-12:15-2:254:45-7:00-9:20
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 12:10-5:10
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
1600 Village Market Boulevard
Ferdinand (PG) 2:20-4:55-7:30
Ferdinand 3D (PG) 11:00-9:45
The Star (PG) 11:40-1:50-4:006:30-8:40
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:10-5:20-10:30
Wonder (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:457:25-10:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
12:00-2:30-4:50-7:10-9:50
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:35
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:50-8:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:501:45-4:40-7:40
Justice League (PG-13) 11:252:15-5:00-7:55-10:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) 11:45-9:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:45-12:30-1:15-2:00-3:00-3:454:30-5:15-6:15-7:00-7:45-8:3010:15
Coco (PG) 11:15-1:30-4:15-7:1510:05
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
3:00-6:15
Manassas 4 Cinemas
8890 Mathis Ave.
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
2:30-5:30
Ferdinand (PG) 1:15-3:30-5:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
2:00-5:00
Coco (PG) 1:05-3:10-5:15-7:25
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
6201 Multiplex Drive
Ferdinand (PG) 11:15-4:25-7:009:35
Ferdinand 3D (PG) 1:50
Justice League (PG-13) 11:102:05-4:55-7:45-10:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 9:4512:50-4:00-7:05-10:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
8:55-9:40-12:20-1:05-3:45-7:107:55-10:35-11:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) 10:35-2:00-4:30-5:25-8:50
The Star (PG) 10:15-12:30-2:455:00
Coco (PG) 9:00-10:00-11:55-1:002:50-3:55-5:45-6:50-8:40-9:50
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 9:55-12:45-3:30-6:15-10:20
Wonder (PG) 10:55-1:45-4:407:25-10:05
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 7:2010:25
Aruvi 9:25-12:35-3:40-6:45-9:55
Monday, December 18, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Justice League (PG-13) XD: 10:301:15-4:10-7:05-10:05
Aruvi 3:05-9:00
Coco (PG) XD: 10:35-1:20-4:057:00-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:30-4:20-7:20-10:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:003:50-6:50-9:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:00Regal Ballston Common Stadium 12 2:30-5:00-8:00
The Man Who Invented Christmas
671 N. Glebe Road
(PG) 11:15-3:15-6:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) The Disaster Artist (R) 12:45-3:201:30-5:00-8:30
5:50-8:30-11:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
13) 11:45-3:15-6:45-10:15
11:00-12:15-2:20-3:00-3:45-4:45Regal Countryside Stadium 20 5:45-7:15-8:15-9:15-10:45
45980 Regal Plaza
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
(PG-13) 11:30-1:20-1:50-5:15Justice League (PG-13) 10:258:45-10:15
1:20-4:15-7:15
Ferdinand (PG) 9:45-11:00-1:45Regal Manassas Stadium 14 & IMAX
4:35-7:20
11380 Bulloch Drive
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 2:00Ferdinand (PG) 1:10-4:30-7:155:05-8:05
10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) The Disaster Artist (R) 12:10-2:4011:30-12:30-4:00-6:30-7:30-10:00 5:40-8:15-10:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- Justice League (PG-13) 1:30-4:2013) 10:30-12:00-3:00-3:30-7:00
7:10-10:10
The Star (PG) 10:20-12:45-3:10- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:40-4:505:30-8:15
7:45-10:45
Coco (PG) 11:20-1:50-4:25-7:05- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
9:50
12:50-4:10-7:30-9:20-10:50
Oxygen (Telugu) (NR) 10:00-12:50- Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG3:50-6:40-9:40
13) 1:20-2:30-4:40-6:00-8:00
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
11:30-2:15-4:40-7:10-9:40
3D Experience (PG-13) 3:40Tumhari Sulu (NR) 11:15-2:307:00-10:20
6:00-9:15
The Star (PG) 1:45-4:15-6:30-9:00
Jawaan (NR) 10:15-12:55-3:35Coco (PG) 12:40-3:50-6:45-9:30
6:15-9:30
Murder on the Orient Express
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG-13) 1:00-4:00-6:50-9:40
(PG) 11:05-1:35-4:10-6:45-9:45
Wonder (PG) 12:30-3:30-6:15-9:10
Fukrey Returns (NR) 10:35-1:40- Just Getting Started (PG-13)
4:45-7:50
12:45-3:20-5:50-8:30-10:50
Firangi (NR) 9:50-1:10-4:20-7:35 Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:00Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
2:50-5:20-7:50-10:30
9:55-1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
Lady Bird (R) 10:55-1:15-3:45IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 12:20
6:05-9:00
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) 10:50-1:55- Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
4:50-7:45
Mental Madhilo (NR) 10:45-1:55- Ferdinand (PG) 12:00-2:30-5:107:50-10:25
4:50-7:45
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:15-2:50Gruham (NR) 10:05-1:05-3:555:25-8:00-10:25
6:50-10:05
Regal Dulles Town Center 10 Justice League (PG-13) 1:20-4:157:15-10:20
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:25Ferdinand (PG) 10:15-1:15-4:00- 3:40-6:50-10:05
7:00-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
The Disaster Artist (R) 9:30-12:30- 1:00-1:30-2:40-3:50-4:20-6:103:15-6:00-8:30
6:40-7:10-7:40-9:30
Justice League (PG-13) 10:45Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG1:30-4:30-7:15-10:30
13) 12:00-12:30-2:10-3:20-5:40Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 9:009:00-10:00-10:30
12:00-9:30
The Star (PG) 12:00-2:15-4:35Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 7:00-9:25
9:45-10:30-1:00-1:45-3:00-4:15Coco (PG) 1:25-4:10-6:45-9:35
5:00-6:15-7:30-8:15-10:45
Murder on the Orient Express
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- (PG-13) 12:05-3:05-6:00-8:55
13) 9:00-11:00-12:15-2:15-3:30Wonder (PG) 1:15-3:55-6:35-9:20
5:30-6:45-8:45-10:00-11:15
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Coco (PG) 9:15-11:45-2:45-5:15- 12:10-4:55-7:20-9:50
7:45-10:15
The Man Who Invented Christmas
Wonder (PG) 10:00-12:45-3:45(PG) 12:00-2:35-5:05-7:55-10:30
6:30-9:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Regal Fairfax Towne Center 10 12:20-3:25-6:30-9:40
4110 West Ox Road
Ferdinand (PG) 10:30-1:20-4:207:00-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:00-12:30-4:10-7:15-7:45-10:4511:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) 10:50-11:30-2:30-3:10-3:406:15-6:45-9:45-10:15
Wonder (PG) 11:15-2:00-4:457:35-10:30
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
12:10-2:50-5:30-8:15-10:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:20-2:20-5:158:00-10:50
The Man Who Invented Christmas
(PG) 10:35-1:10-3:50-6:35-9:10
The Swindlers (NR) 11:10-1:554:40-7:25-10:10
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Ferdinand (PG) 10:30-1:15-4:006:45-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:451:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:00-1:454:15-6:45-9:15
Justice League (PG-13) 12:453:30-6:15-9:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:30-12:30-1:00-3:00-4:00-4:306:30-7:00-7:30-8:00-10:00-11:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
(PG-13) 10:00-12:00-1:30-3:305:00-8:30-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An
IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13)
2:30-6:00-9:30
The Star (PG) 10:30-12:45-3:155:45-8:15-10:30
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 11:15-2:00-4:45-7:30-10:15
Rave Cinemas
Coco (PG) 10:45-12:15-1:15-2:45Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
3:45-5:15-6:15-7:45-8:45-10:15
11900 Palace Way
Wonder (PG) 10:15-1:00-3:45Ferdinand (PG) 11:15-1:55-4:35- 6:30-9:15
7:20
Just Getting Started (PG-13)
Ferdinand 3D (PG) 10:10
10:15AM
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:25-2:05- Lady Bird (R) 11:45-2:15-4:304:45-7:55-10:40
7:15-9:45
Justice League (PG-13) 11:10Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
2:00-4:50-7:40-10:50
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:4011:00AM
1:45-5:00-8:00-10:55
Regal Kingstowne
Coco (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:55-7:45Stadium 16 & RPX
10:45
5910 Kingstowne Towne Center
Murder on the Orient Express
Ferdinand (PG) 12:50-3:35-7:00(PG-13) 1:50-7:30
9:40
Wonder (PG) 10:50-1:30-4:20Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:307:50-10:35
3:30-6:30-9:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Justice League (PG-13) 1:05-4:4012:10-6:25
7:35-10:30
The Shape of Water (R) 10:45Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:35-1:35-2:25-4:30-5:15-7:2512:50
8:05-10:15-11:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:20- Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) 4:10-7:35-11:00
4:40-10:25
The Star (PG) 11:00-12:20-6:45-9:45
Lady Bird (R) 11:00-1:25-4:15Coco (PG) 11:15-2:00-4:30-7:307:15-9:55
Wonder Wheel (PG-13) 11:05-1:40- 10:20
4:25-7:35-10:20
Wonder (PG) 12:05-3:05-6:00-8:50
Regal Springfield Town Center 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
Ferdinand (PG) 11:10-1:50-4:407:20-10:10
The Disaster Artist (R) 1:40-4:207:10-9:50
Justice League (PG-13) 12:503:50-6:50-10:05
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:10-4:107:40-10:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:00-11:00-12:30-2:30-3:00-4:006:00-7:30-9:30-10:00-10:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) 10:30-11:30-12:00-2:00-3:305:30-6:30-7:00-9:00-10:30
Coco (PG) 12:20-3:20-6:20-9:10
Wonder (PG) 12:40-3:40-6:40-9:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:202:10-4:50-7:50-10:20
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:15-1:505:00-7:35-10:35
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:351:35-4:35-7:35-10:35
Justice League (PG-13) 11:453:00-6:30-9:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:00AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) 2:30-6:00-9:30
The Star (PG) 10:50-2:45-5:107:40-10:45
Coco (PG) 10:45-1:15-3:45-6:159:15
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 11:05-1:45-4:20-7:10-9:50
Wonder (PG) 10:40-1:30-4:106:45-9:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:205:20-8:15-10:50
Ferdinand (PG) 11:10-2:15-4:457:15-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:30-12:00-12:30-1:00-3:30-4:004:30-7:00-7:30-8:00-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) 10:30-2:00-5:30-9:00-10:30
Smithsonian - Airbus IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 10:304:30-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
1:30-7:30
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 7:15-9:35
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
12:00-2:15-4:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
CC: 12:20-2:35-4:40
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 7:00-9:25
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
7:30-9:45
Elf (PG) 12:10-2:20-4:45
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
12/18/17
7:00
7:30
8:00
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
◆ News
◆ Access
◆ Ellen’s Game of Games
◆ J. Fallon
The Voice (Live)
News
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
◆ Lucifer
◆ The Gifted
Mod Fam
Fox 5 News at Ten
News
The Final 5
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
◆ J’pardy!
◆ The Great Christmas Light Fight
◆ Year in Memoriam
◆ J. Kimmel
News
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆ ET
◆ Kevin Can
◆ Man-Plan
◆ Superior
◆ 9JKL
◆ Scorpion
◆ Late-Colbert
News
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
◆ Noticiero
Rey David
Mi marido tiene familia
Caer en tentación
Noticias
14.1 WFDC (UNI) Enamorándome
◆ Law & Order: SVU
◆ Law & Order: SVU
Big Bang
Big Bang
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ Family Feud ◆ Family Feud Fox 5 News ◆ Page Six
◆ Independent Lens
Connect.
Antiques Roadshow
Great British
Connection
22.1 WMPT (PBS) ◆ Business
Antiques Roadshow
Call the Midwife Holiday Special
Last Tango in Halifax
Amanpour
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
France 24 Programming
Thicker Than Water
Thicker Than Water
Thicker Than Water
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
The Vietnam War
Veterans in
Democracy Now!
32.1 WHUT (PBS) Alan Jackson Precious Memories
◆ Popstar’s Best of 2017
◆ Walk of Fame
◆ Seinfeld
◆ Mom
News
Two Men
50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Goldbergs
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
66.1 WPXW (ION) Criminal Minds
CABLE CHANNELS
ROBERT VIGLASKY/HBO
Gunpowder (HBO at 10 p.m.) Kit Harington (“Game of Thrones”) stars in
this three-part BBC miniseries, which premieres Monday and is based on
the Gunpowder Plot in London in 1605.
Kevin Can Wait (CBS at 8 p.m.)
Vanessa and Kevin think back on
their first patrol together.
Williams hosts this celebration of
people who have received a star
this year.
Man With a Plan (CBS at 8:30)
Adam and Andi try to woo back
their neighbors after none of them
show up for their potluck dinner.
The Daily Show’s The Yearly
Show 2017 (Comedy at 11) Trevor
Noah and the news team look back
on the best happenings from the
past year.
PREMIERE
The Accident (L’Accident) (Acorn
TV streaming) In this French
mystery, Gabriel Cauvy (Bruno
Solo) tries to clear his wife’s name
after police blame a suspicious car
accident on drunken driving.
SPECIALS
Decorating Disney: Holiday
Magic (Freeform at 8) This special
gives an inside look at how Disney
theme parks prepare for the
holiday season.
Agnelli (HBO at 8) This
documentary offers insight on the
life of former Fiat head Gianni
Agnelli.
The Hollywood Walk of Fame
Honors 2017 (CW at 9) Montel
FINALES
The Voice (NBC at 8) The final four
contestants compete on part 1 of
the live finale.
Ill Behaviour (Showtime at 10:30)
Tess tries to get Joel to focus on
curing Charlie in the season finale.
LATE NIGHT
Daily Show (Comedy Central at
11) Listed above.
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Anna
Kendrick, Rhett and Link, Randy
Newman.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37 a.m.) Kenny
Chesney, Aaron Sorkin.
— Sarah Polus
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
The First 48
The First 48
The First 48: Be Killed
The First 48
(11:03) The First 48
A&E
(5:30) Movie: Ghostbusters II Movie: This Christmas ★★ (2007)
Movie: A Christmas Carol ★★ (1984)
AMC
Alaskan Bush People
Alaskan Bush People
Alaskan Bush People
Alaskan Bush People
Alaskan Bush People
Animal Planet
(7:05) Movie: Toni Braxton: Unbreak My Heart (2016)
(9:56) Movie: Are We There Yet? ★★ (2005)
BET
Vanderpump Rules
Vanderpump Rules
Vanderpump Rules
(10:01) RelationShep
Watch
Vander
Bravo
King of Hill
Amer. Dad
Cleveland
Amer. Dad
Burgers
Burgers
Family Guy
Family Guy
Cartoon Network (6:00) Kung Fu Panda 2
Erin Burnett OutFront
Anderson Cooper 360
Anderson Cooper 360
CNN Tonight
CNN Tonight
CNN
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
The Daily Show
Comedy Central South Park
Street Outlaws
Street Outlaws: Full Throt Street Outlaws
Street Outlaws
(11:01) Street Outlaws
Discovery
Bunk’d
Raven
Stuck/Middle Stuck/Middle Bizaardvark Raven
K.C. Under.
Liv-Mad.
Bizaardvark Raven
Disney
E! News
Movie: Hitch ★★★ (2005)
E! News
E!
Monday Night
(8:15) NFL Football: Atlanta Falcons at Tampa Bay Buccaneers (Live)
SportsC.
ESPN
College Basketball: Nebraska-Omaha at Kansas (Live)
College Basketball: Tennessee State at Texas (Live)
SportsCenter SportCtr
ESPN2
Holiday Baking
Holiday Baking
Holiday Baking
Christmas Cookie
Gingerbread Giants
Food Network
The Story With Martha
Tucker Carlson Tonight
Hannity
The Ingraham Angle
Fox News at Night
Fox News
(5:30) Movie: Frozen ★★★ Decorating Disney
Movie: Elf ★★★ (2003)
The 700 Club
Freeform
(5:30) Movie: The Internship Movie: Pitch Perfect 2 ★★ (2015)
(10:50) Pitch Perfect 2 ★★
FX
(6:00) The Mistletoe Promise Movie: A Very Merry Mix-Up (2013)
Movie: The Most Wonderful Time of the Year ★★★
Hallmark
Movie: Christmas in Angel Falls (2017)
Magical Christmas
Hallmark M&M Movie: Romance at Reindeer Lodge (2017)
Peregrine
VICE
Agnelli
Shape
Gunpowder
(11:05) Movie: Logan ★★★
HBO
Fixer Upper
Hunters
Hunters
Hunters
Hunters
Tiny
Hunt Intl
Hunters
Hunters Int’l
HGTV
Forged in Fire
Forged in Fire: Cutting Deeper
(11:03) Forged in Fire
History
On Strike for Christmas
Movie: Snowed Inn Christmas -- Director’s Cut (2017)
(10:14) Movie: 12 Men of Christmas (2009)
Lifetime
Nationals Classics
Basketball N.C. State
MASports
MASN
Hardball Matthews
All In With Chris Hayes
Rachel Maddow Show
The Last Word
The 11th Hour
MSNBC
Teen Mom OG
Teen Mom OG
Teen Mom OG
(10:01) Floribama Shore
(11:03) Teen Mom OG
MTV
Drugs, Inc.
Drugs, Inc.
Drugs, Inc.
StarTalk
Nat’l Geographic Border Wars
On Ice
Caps in 30
Best of The Sports Junkies
Redskins 100
Redskins
Basketball
NBC SportsNet WA Redskins 100
(6:30) Movie: Tiny Christmas Full House
Full House
Full House
Full House
Fresh Prince Fresh Prince Friends
Friends
Nickelodeon
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Spike
(6:00) Jeepers Creepers 3
Movie: Faster ★★ (2010)
Movie: The Last Airbender ★ (2010)
Syfy
Family Guy
Family Guy
Family Guy
Family Guy
Family Guy
Family Guy
Tarantula
Tarantula
Conan
TBS
(6:00) The Last Sunset
Movie: Doctor Dolittle ★★ (1967)
(10:45) Movie: My Fair Lady ★★★★
TCM
90 Day Fiancé
90 Day Fiancé
(11:10) 90 Day Fiancé
TLC
(6:15) Movie: Maleficent
Movie: A Christmas Carol ★★ (1999)
(10:16) Movie: New Year’s Eve ★ (2011)
TNT
Delicious
Delicious
Delicious
Man v. Food Food
Food
Booze Traveler
Ginormous Man v. Food
Travel
Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers
TruTV
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Mom
Mom
King
King
TV Land
Fatal Attraction
Fatal Attraction
For My Man
Fatal Attraction
Fatal Attraction
TV One
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
WWE Monday Night RAW (Live)
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
USA Network
Love & Hip Hop
Love & Hip Hop
Love & Hip Hop
Remy & Papoose
VH1
GE Washington
Govt. Matters On Your Side Sports
ABC News
News at 10pm
Govt. Matters On Your Side
WNC8
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
WGN
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
MUSIC REVIEWS
Lil Uzi Vert rocks with 6,000 teens
BY
C HRIS K ELLY
At a rap concert, the DJ sets the
tone and hypes the crowd. Maybe
he’ll scream, “You got a hundreddollar bill, get your hands up!”
like Fatman Scoop. But when the
DJ says, “If you have straight A’s,
make some noise!” you know
you’re in for an entirely different
experience. That was the case
Friday night at the Anthem,
which hosted its first hip-hop
concert, headlined by Philadelphia rapper Lil Uzi Vert.
Don’t judge one of rap’s most
exciting new personalities by his
cover: The 23-year-old’s facial
piercings and mop of magenta
dreadlocks belie the soft edges of
his music, which bakes heart-onsleeve honesty and playful singrapping into songs built on top of
trap beats and video-game sound
effects. And while he names Marilyn Manson as his chief influence,
he owes more to third-wave emo,
with his petulant pop-punk melodies and lyrics about young love
damaged by jealousy and infidelity.
Those lyrics certainly resonated with his audience, a group that
was mostly underage (judging by
the short lines at the bar) and
underdressed (considering the
freezing temperatures outside).
Imagine 6,000 teens turning a
warehouse into a parentless playground, throwing coats overhead
like deflated beach balls to pass
the time until Uzi took the stage.
Once he did, it was a nonstop
audiovisual onslaught. At this
type of concert, disorientation is
de rigueur, with more bass than
the human body knows what to
do with, a light show as blinding
as the music is deafening, and
quick-cutting videos and 3-D
graphics: a goth apocalypse of
skeletons, hellfire and anime that
can keep even the most attentiondeficient audience rapt.
Against that backdrop and in
front of three inverted crucifixes
(perhaps a nod to his Manson
fandom), Uzi bounced across the
stage, less a musical performer
and more an avatar. He lived up to
his self-described “rock star” persona with coquettish shoulder
rolls and Jaggeresque prancing,
and the fact that he can’t hit many
of his notes or lyrics does
not matter. He wasn’t there to
re-create the record. He was there
to re-create emotions.
Uzi was at his best spilling his
neon guts on songs that revisit
the heartache and anger of his
breakup with his longtime girl-
Lil Uzi Vert bounces around the
stage Friday at the Anthem in
Washington. The Philadelphia
rapper’s show drew thousands of
mostly underage fans, who braved
freezing temperatures outside.
friend. His lyrics and melodies
sounded more like Brand New
than Brand Nubian, as he sang
along with an electropop sample
on “The Way Life Goes” or wailed
the chorus on his hit “XO Tour
Llif3,” a song with a couplet —
“Push me to the edge / all my
friends are dead” — that just
might be the apex of emo.
But like his fellow rock-star
rappers, Uzi hasn’t mastered the
dynamics of a concert. He had the
DJ play “XO Tour Llif3” a second
time, asking, “Who knows the
whole song?” before arcing the
microphone into the crowd.
Sadly, no one was brave enough to
pick it up and have their own
emo-ment. After that, he performed a few more songs, but
after the catharsis of “XO,” it was
impossible to recapture the magic. Oh, well: Like his audience,
Lil Uzi Vert has some growing up
to do.
KYLE GUSTAFSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
style@washpost.com
A blend of strong melody and noise from Harriet Tubman (the jazz trio)
BY
M ICHAEL J . W EST
The phrase “jazz trio at the Kennedy Center” does not often come
with the caveat “bring earplugs.”
But, then, that jazz trio has never
before been Harriet Tubman (emcee
Kevin Struthers took pains to introduce them as “Harriet Tubman, the
band”), who made their debut Saturday night at the KC Jazz Club with
a blare of noisy and often free-form
electric jazz. Through the first set’s
assault, however, they maintained a
(frequently surprising) grip on a
strong current of melody.
In fact, that current was apparent even before the blare was. Guitarist Brandon Ross and bassist
Melvin Gibbs opened the set with a
duet on Bob Marley’s “Redemption
Song.” The performance could be
best described as careful: Gibbs studiously stuck to playing inverted
arpeggios on his six-string electric
bass, and Ross, though he used a
distortion pedal throughout the
song, applied it for detail rather
than swagger. It was when drummer J.T. Lewis came crashing in, on
Wadada Leo Smith’s “President
The group covers a range
of sonic terrain in its
debut at the KC Jazz Club
Obama’s Speech at the Selma
Bridge” (from “Araminta” — Tubman’s recording with trumpeter
Smith that was one of this year’s
best), that their sound became a
battering ram. Jazz drummers are
often regarded as the personality of
a performance, and Lewis was no
exception: It was he who brought
the free-form spirit to the tune,
spattering thuds and crashes liberally over it with particular attention
to his two rack toms. Gibbs hopped
unpredictably across chords, and
Ross emitted lines that darted, spiderlike, through the maelstrom.
There were plenty of excursions
into other sonic terrain, too.
“Blacktal Fractal” was complex
funk, with Lewis first establishing
a groove, then Gibbs a countergroove for Ross to signify over.
“Afro Chic” was a full-blown rock-
SCOTT FRIEDLANDER
Jazz trio Harriet Tubman performs at BRIC JazzFest in March 2014 in New York. Guitarist Brandon Ross,
left, drummer J.T. Lewis and bassist Melvin Gibbs brought their sound to the Kennedy Center on Saturday.
er, taut (thanks to Gibbs and Lewis) but loud (thanks to Ross). But
melody was the throughline of the
set. Ross’s work on “Blacktal Fractal” involved precise phrases, separated with a kind of staccato
framework that brought each discrete phrase into relief. “U Street,”
a particularly noisy piece colored
by clouds of feedback from Gibbs,
also featured single-note lines on
guitar and judicious vamps from
Gibbs on one string of his bass. The
hammering but textured “Wadmalaw Island” began and ended
with a fragile, folklike statement.
The evening’s most melodic
moment was also its most moving.
Ross fingered a very delicate line
that he then looped to accompany
himself as he unexpectedly began
singing with a pleasing tenor voice
the hymn “I’ll Overcome Someday.” All three musicians began
quietly and gained intensity,
though without letting go of the
calm resolve at the song’s center,
circling back to Ross repeating the
title lyric: “If in my heart I do not
yield, I’ll overcome someday.”
style@washpost.com
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
Q982
10 6 3
Q J 10
K83
WEST
6
AKJ
87542
J 10 9 4
EAST
53
954
A963
Q765
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
A K J 10 7 4
Q872
K
A2
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1
Pass
2
4
All Pass
Opening lead — K
EAST
Pass
I
n a holiday-season cartoon,
Frosty the Snowman has
his hands in the air. He is
being robbed by a masked
snowman armed with — a
hair dryer.
Today’s deal saw some
highway robbery: South
made an impossible game.
Against four spades, West led
the king of hearts. When East
followed with the four, South
falsecarded with his eight,
trying to make East’s four
look like an encouraging spot
card. But West interpreted
his partner’s play correctly
and shifted to the jack of
clubs.
Dummy played low, East
contributed the five, and
South ... played the deuce!
Maybe West should have
been suspicious, but he led
another club. South produced the ace, drew trumps
with the A-Q, threw his king
of diamonds on the king
of clubs and led the queen
of diamonds for a ruffing
finesse.
When East’s ace covered,
South ruffed and got back to
dummy with a trump to pitch
two hearts on the J-10 of diamonds. Making four. I guess
West was lucky that he didn’t
get “iced” by his partner.
CLASSIC PEANUTS
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
53954
A963Q765
Your partner opens one
club, you respond one diamond and he bids 1NT. The
opponents pass. What do
you say?
ANSWER: Bid two clubs
to play at your eight-card
or longer trump fit. Partner
did not bid a major or raise
diamonds at his second turn,
so he must have at least four
clubs. True, your sequence
may invite the opponents
to “balance” their way into
the auction, but you can’t
assume that will happen.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | DECEMBER 18
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
This year you exhibit
newfound strength
and determination.
Soon you will let
go of whatever is weighing
you down. You will be more
content, but you’ll need to
watch your spending. If you
are single, your inner circle
widens. Look for a major
relationship to enter your life
sometime after the summer.
If you are attached, the two
of you connect on a much
deeper level. As a couple, you
enjoy your friends more than
ever and make plenty of social
time. Capricorn proves to be
a source of well-oiled financial
ideas.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You wake up mentally alert
and full of spunk. Your ability
to move through one errand
after the next emerges. You
could start feeling dragged
down, which will encourage
you to assume a take-charge
attitude.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You have enjoyed a certain
closeness with a loved one,
and you finally opt to focus on
the upcoming holiday. Many of
you will travel, but others will
have friends head your way.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You will make a decision that
is likely to affect your finances.
You will visualize a life that’s
more to your liking with a new
WEINGARTENS & CLARK approach to security. You also
will be unusually driven and
committed, which will help you
to establish this change.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Your popularity soars, though
you could be discouraged by
your interaction with a key
person in your life. You might
feel as if this person’s feelings
toward you are changing. Ask
questions, if need be.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You know how much ground
you have to cover. To those
around you, you could seem a
bit overly serious. As a result,
you might opt to cocoon at
home or be more of a loner. Try
to keep your tolerance for this
type of isolation limited.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Look for a more creative
solution to an ongoing
dilemma. Others will
brainstorm with you to help
you achieve the results you
desire; they even might
overwhelm you with ideas.
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You will move through a
hassle with ease. You might
not appreciate others’
suggestions, as you can’t
really absorb them at the
moment. You could do some
unnecessary spending if you
don’t stop to clear your mind
and take a break.
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You will express strong feelings
and think that you have been
heard, only to discover that the
other party might have mixed
up your words and confused
your message. Consider taking
a different approach in order
to make your point more
clearly.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You will be reviewing your
spending and wondering
where you can cut some costs.
Consider giving a loved one an
“experience” type of gift. This
person might delight in your
thoughtfulness.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You might feel insecure about
pursuing a certain desire and
doing whatever is necessary
to make it a reality. Give up
negativity, and drop the words
“impossible” and “no” from
your vocabulary.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
What you had planned on
doing later in the day could
be thrown off track quickly in
the morning. You might need
to regroup and let go of a
feeling of dissatisfaction and
insecurity.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Taking responsibility will
result in some important and
long-desired outcomes. You
could be delighted by the
ensuing possibilities and the
support you gain from others.
Communication flourishes
between you and someone at
a distance.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
Did you know that polar bears don’t hibernate? Only
pregnant female polar bears take to a den in winter.
But aside from hunting, a polar bear typically spends
20 hours a day resting.
With highs in the 50s, it shouldn’t
be as bitingly cold as this weekend
— you may not even need mittens.
Find more sciencerelated stories in the
Ever Wondered archive
on our website.
B I R TH D A Y S OF TH E W EEK
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18
Gainesville’s Evan Bath (2007).
Falls Church’s Will Headley (2006).
Arlington’s Sebastian Mataka (2004).
Actor Brad Pitt (1963).
Composer Julia Wolfe (1958).
Director Steven Spielberg (1946).
Bath
Headley
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19
Silver Spring’s Scarlett Menjivar (2010).
Actor Jake Gyllenhaal (1980).
Singer Édith Piaf (1915).
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 20
Mataka
Menjivar
Upper Marlboro’s Dalen Hatcher
(2006).
Potomac’s Elias Bernstein (2005).
Singer JoJo (1990).
Writer Sandra Cisneros (1954).
Baseball executive Branch Rickey (1881).
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21
Actor Samuel L. Jackson (1948).
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22
Singer Jordin Sparks (1989).
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23
Hatcher
Bernstein
Fairfax County’s Dashiell Taylor
(2011).
Gaithersburg’s Aaron Waldman
(2005).
Actor Finn Wolfhard (2002).
Capitals’ T.J. Oshie (1986).
Supreme Court justice John Jay (1745).
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 24
Taylor
Allen
Waldman
Callinicos
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Trains with a
view of the
street below
4 Second-string
squad
9 Cherokee and
Wrangler
14 VCR go-back
button
15 1945 “Big Three”
conference city
16 “Snowy” bird
17 Shunning public
utilities and such
20 “Blame It __”:
Caine film
21 Continental coin
22 Even-steven
26 Twelfths of yrs.
29 “Say what?”
responses
30 Horror film
reaction
33 __ fatso: bit of
Archie Bunker
languagemangling
37 World games
org.
38 Oktoberfest
dance
39 Respond to cries
of “Encore!”
43 Delivery doc
44 Prefix with natal
45 Breathe like a
hot dog
46 “You can’t leave
this way” sign
48 Soprano
superstar
50 Notepad file
extension
51 Is totally in the
dark
56 Classic 900
automaker
58 No-brainer
60 Where to find
the last words of
17-, 22-, 39- and
51-Across
66 Cry of dismay
from Charlie
Brown
67 Grape holders
68 McKellen of
“X-Men”
69 Minor, as a
complaint
70 Online social
appointment
71 Z’s 10, in
Scrabble: abbr.
McLean’s Brooks Allen (2007).
Arlington’s Alexandra Leal Callinicos
(2006).
Singer Louis Tomlinson (1991).
Fashion designer Kate Spade (1962).
Sculptor Paul Manship (1885).
Birthday announcements are for ages 6 to 13 and
are printed on a first-come, first-served basis.
They do not appear online. A parent or legal guardian
must give permission. We need photos at least two
months ahead of publication. We need names (if
photos are not desired) at least two weeks before
publication. Include name, address and birth date
(with year of birth). Fill out the online form at
kidspost.com or send the information to KidsPost,
The Washington Post, 1301 K St. NW, Washington,
D.C. 20071.
ILLUSTRATION BY ORION RODRIGUEZ-BLACK, 9, WASHINGTON
Why are
these polar
bears’ hairs
so fair? Air.
BY
R ACHEL F ELTMAN
P
olar bears are white,
right? Not quite.
Though closely related to the brown bears
you might find in the
most northern regions of the United States, polar bears have a special set of adaptations that allow
them to live in the cold Arctic. The
most famous of these adaptations
is their bright white coloring,
which lets them blend in as they
roam across ice and snow in search
of seals to eat. Can you imagine a
dark brown bear trying to hide
against bright, white snow?
Although while polar bears usually look white, their fur isn’t white
at all. And their skin is black! Polar
bear fur is actually see-through,
but it takes on a white color because of its structure.
Your hair gets its color from
something called pigment. Different types of pigment form in
different amounts to create various colors when light hits them,
sort of like when you mix shades
of paint. But polar bear hair has a
structural color, which comes
from the way light bounces
around the structure of the hair
itself — no pigments required.
Unlike human hair, polar bear
fur is hollow like a straw. These
tubes are too small to see without
a microscope, but there’s enough
room for light to scatter inside.
When the bears stand in the sun
and all that light bounces off
them, they look white.
Some scientists used to think
BRIAN BATTAILE/U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
ILNAR SALAKHIEV/ASSOCIATED PRESS
ABOVE: In a Siberian zoo east of Moscow, Russia, a polar bear cub
plays with its mother. TOP: In coastal Alaska, an adult dries off
after taking a dip in the Chukchi Sea, south of the Arctic Ocean.
these hollow hairs might do more
than just help bears blend in.
They thought the structure of the
hair, along with the black skin
beneath, allowed polar bears to
absorb way more heat from sunlight than other animals can. It’s a
nice idea, because one wonders
how animals manage to keep so
toasty warm in Arctic conditions.
But experiments showed that
very little sunlight actually makes
it all the way down the hairy tubes
to touch bare bear skin. That
makes sense, because the time of
year when bears actually have to
worry about keeping warm — the
Arctic winter — is almost totally
dark. It would be silly if their
hairs were designed to collect as
much warmth as possible during
the sunny, warm summer.
If you occasionally see a polar
bear who looks a little green,
hollow hairs are to blame. Tiny
plants called algae sometimes
grow inside their hollow hairs.
The space where light would usually scatter to create white coloring is filled with green stuff instead, so the bears look like they
just took a tumble in some freshcut grass. This happens only
when it’s quite balmy. Climate
change is raising the temperature
in the Arctic. But green bears
have been spotted more often in
zoos, where the weather can be
even warmer than an unusually
hot Arctic summer. Zookeepers
have found a solution, according
to Julie Hartell-DeNardo of the
St. Louis Zoo: Chilled, salty water
with a good filtration system can
keep algae growth at bay, so even
captive bears can generally maintain their bright white sheen all
year round.
kidspost@washpost.com
By Brock Wilson
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
DOWN
1 Therefore
2 British pop
singer Lewis
3 Ice cream
pattern
4 “Golly!”
5 Lao Tzu
principle
6 Helper in Santa’s
workshop
7 Justice Dept.
arm
8 Mom in
Middlesex
9 Sound of
bleachers
discontent
10 Toaster waffle
choice
11 Goof
12 Architect I.M. __
13 Par for the
course: abbr.
18 Zero, in soccer
19 Color variations
23 Storm out of
work for good
24 “Oops!”
25 Climbs
26 Word before
toast or after
peach
27 Like the
old bucket
of song
28 Intelligent
31 PC brain
32 Easy victory
33 “__ get it”
34 Mail dely.
compartment
35 Bob of
“Fuller House”
36 Black gem
12/18/17
40 Covert maritime
org.
41 Equestrian strap
42 De __: again
47 Melt
49 Point a finger at
52 Below’s opposite
53 Actress Taylor,
familiarly
54 Open, as a ski
suit
55 Brilliant display
56 NCO rank
57 Like used
fireplaces
59 Coop layers
60 Baseball hat
61 Charlotte of
“The Facts of
Life”
62 On a date, say
63 Unburdened (of)
64 “CSI” evidence
65 Family dog, e.g.
SATURDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Left reeling by an unexpected breakup
Adapted from a
recent online
discussion.
Dear Carolyn:
Arriving from a
work trip, I texted
my fiance that I
had landed safely
and would be
home soon. He responded with:
“I love you. I’ll bring home pizza
for dinner.” Thirty minutes later:
“Actually, I can’t be in a
relationship anymore. I need to
experience living on my own for
a while. We aren’t getting back
together.” He then blocked my
number and signed our shared
home over to me in full.
I sold quickly as I can’t afford
the mortgage on my own, and I
have not found another place to
live yet. I have a 7-year-old son
and my ex has two sons. We were
a family and lived together for
four years. I miss my “stepsons.”
I never got to say goodbye. My
son is brokenhearted at losing
the only dad he ever knew. In
two weeks, I lost my fiance, two
stepsons, my home and the
family I thought I had. It’s like a
death to both of us.
I have my son in therapy. I
will go once we move and I can
afford it again.
I’m a level-headed person and
Carolyn
Hax
can safely say I could not see this
coming. In our few brief
conversations, he agrees with
that assessment. We had
intimacy, laughter, were a great
team around our house, always
made time for each other with a
date night once a week.
When he said he loved me and
looked forward to our future, he
said it was because he always
hoped for, how he worded it,
“better days.”
I’m shocked. Stunned. In
disbelief. What’s next in carrying
on? How will I learn to trust
again?
— Ghosted
Ghosted: So awful — I’m sorry.
I think you’re as close as you
can get to an answer in treating
this as a death. Something so
sudden and transformative and
final (with the added slap of his
having chosen it) has a set of
rules of its own — along with
license not to hold yourself to
any rules too tightly.
The first step is relieve
yourself of any responsibility to
figure out long-term issues like
how to trust again. Your job now
is to think of the immediate,
because that’s plenty. Housing.
Kid’s emotional needs. Getting
through today, then tomorrow,
then the day after.
Our bodies are built to help us
through truly horrible things by,
for lack of a cheerier word,
normalizing even acute pain.
What is agony now will dull with
time. And, as it dulls, your
abilities to function will return,
including those that help you
make sense of what happened
and help you rebuild your
optimism. Which is, of course,
emotionally synonymous with
trust.
Obviously people can get
stuck in this process and may
need help getting there.
So the moment you get your
housing resolved, yes, therapy
for you, whether you’re stuck or
not. A support group might also
help you on the cheap — check
NAMI (nami.org) for listings.
You probably know this, but
I’ll say it anyway: Anyone who
can leave so abruptly has
problems serious enough that
you can’t assume all or even half
of the blame for the outcome
yourself.
He also isn’t representative of
most people; he’s a sick outlier.
But that’s for later. Now, just
console yourself and your boy.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
KLMNO
SPORTS
.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
Ravens
Browns
27
10
Dolphins
Bills
16
24
Bengals
Vikings
7
34
Jets
Saints
19
31
Eagles
Giants
34
29
Packers
Panthers
24
31
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
Texans
Jaguars
7
45
Rams
Seahawks
42
7
D
M2
Patriots
Steelers
27
24
Titans
49ers
23
25
Cowboys
Raiders
20
17
Falcons
8:30 p.m.
Buccaneers
Life after death
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
REDSKINS 20, CARDINALS 15: Linebacker Preston Smith, second from left, is surrounded by teammates after his fumble recovery during the first quarter of Washington’s win against Arizona.
The Redskins already have been eliminated from postseason contention this season, but they did just enough to beat their shorthanded visitors. More coverage online at washingtonpost.com/sports
Get to 8-8, and suddenly
it won’t look so bad
This team showed a pulse,
and that is progress
Redskins rebound after
back-to-back defeats
BY
L IZ C LARKE
Think about the names. Then cast
your mind back to August, just
four months ago, and imagine
what a chillingly brutal season
you might have imagined for
Washington if you thought they
Thomas
would have to be your stalwarts
Boswell
in December.
Then, perhaps, consider
reevaluating what you think of
this 6-8 Washington season, which still has two
winnable games left. When you consider the
team’s blighted roster and its brutal schedule,
the toughest by far in the NFL this year, maybe
Coach Jay Gruden and his team are just a couple
of respectable wins away from having one of the
best “disappointing” seasons this town has seen
in years.
The three leading tacklers for Washington in
its homely but huggable 20-15 victory Sunday
over the Arizona Cardinals at FedEx Field were
Zach Vigil, Kendall Fuller and Martrell Spaight.
The overall star of a victory that was built on a
After back-to-back blowout losses, collective relief
rather than unbridled celebration settled over the
Washington Redskins following Sunday’s 20-15 victory
over the Arizona Cardinals.
The Redskins didn’t topple a world-beater in their
return to FedEx Field. But with little to play for but
pride, having eliminated themselves from playoff
contention by two woeful defeats on the road, the
Redskins did enough to handle an opponent with as
many injuries and far greater limitations.
Coach Jay Gruden credited his defense for holding
the Cardinals without a touchdown.
“That was the game. Story of the day,” Gruden said
afterward. “[The Cardinals’] red-zone offense against
our red-zone defense.”
Still, there was something less than convincing
about a narrow victory over an opponent whose only
scores came from place kicker Phil Dawson, who hit
from 40, 35, 19, 34 and 32 yards in the face of the
game-long foibles of quarterback Blaine Gabbert, who
had opened the season as the team’s third-string
BOSWELL CONTINUED ON D10
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D8
That was better, I guess. Better
than another unsettling loss.
Better than a crowd of allegedly
71,026 booing the day away at
FedEx Field. Better than more
blame, speculation and anger
Jerry
management.
Brewer
The Washington Redskins won
a game — yes, a football game —
Sunday, 20-15, over the Arizona Cardinals. It was
ugly. If the Cardinals had a quarterback just a
skosh more effective than the wretched Blaine
Gabbert, the Redskins might have lost. So they
weren’t impressive in victory. But they weren’t a
disaster, either. For them, that’s progress. Or at
least it’s reason to wake up this morning and try
to finish the season’s remaining two weeks with
some vigor.
After watching Washington lose its previous
two games by a combined score of 68-27, it’s hard
to be dissatisfied with evidence of a pulse.
December wouldn’t feel so dreadful if the players
had competed in this manner in road games
BREWER CONTINUED ON D9
Broncos at Redskins Sunday, 1 p.m., CBS | Inside: Patriots hold off Steelers in wild finish in Pittsburgh D5 | Coverage from around the NFL on an eventful Sunday of action. D5-12
Amid investigation, Richardson
plans to sell Panthers after season
BY
M ARK M ASKE
Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson, under investigation by the NFL
for allegations of workplace misconduct,
announced Sunday night that he will sell
the franchise he founded.
Richardson said in a statement that he
will seek a buyer for the team following
the 2017 season.
“I believe that it is time to turn the
franchise over to new ownership,” Richardson said in the statement. “Therefore,
I will put the team up for sale at the
conclusion of this NFL season. We will
not begin the sale process, nor will we
entertain any inquiries, until the very
last game is played. I hope everyone in
this organization, both on and off the
field, will be firmly focused on just one
mission: to play and win the Super
Bowl.”
Richardson called football “an integral part of my life” but did not address
the accusations against him.
The NFL said earlier Sunday that it
had taken over the investigation, which
the Panthers originally announced Friday. The NFL said through a spokesman
that it expects to retain outside counsel,
but it declined further comment.
RICHARDSON CONTINUED ON D12
James dominates in different way
as Cleveland again prevails in D.C.
CAVALIERS 106, WIZARDS 99
BASEBALL
Stephen Strasburg blames
All-Star Game he didn’t pitch
in for trip to disabled list. D3
HOCKEY
Jakub Vrana and Evgeny
Kuznetsov have formed the
Caps’ latest dynamic duo. D3
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
LeBron James spared the Washington
Wizards another thrashing. The last time
James visited Capital One Arena, he left
the floor with the highest-scoring night of
any Wizards opponent on their home
court.
James did not enter destruction mode
Sunday, but he still dominated the Wizards with timely buckets, laserlike passes
and a workmanlike mentality under the
boards. Although James did not come
close to the 57 points he dropped on the
Wizards during their Nov. 3 matchup, his
triple-double Sunday night was just as
devastating in leading the Cleveland Cavaliers to a 106-99 win.
James finished with 20 points, 15 assists and 12 rebounds for his third straight
triple-double, tying the longest streak in
his career. The sum of this masterpiece
battered the Wizards (16-14), and after the
loss John Wall sat in front of his locker
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D4
Pelicans at Wizards
Tomorrow, 7 p.m., NBC Sports Washington
D2
EZ
. MONDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
The NFL commissioner is worth half a billion, but how much is he really worth?
Roger Goodell is
the $500 million
man. With NFL
owners okaying
NORMAN
his four-year,
CHAD
$200 million
contract extension last week as
Protector of the Shield, Goodell
will cross the half-billion mark in
earnings since becoming
commissioner.
By comparison, the late
Michael Jackson earned an
estimated $750 million in his
music career, with 13 No. 1 singles
and 350 million records sold.
Goodell, meanwhile, wears a nice
suit and shakes 32 hands a year.
Like many of you who have
been watching the NFL a long,
long time, I have a simple
question: What exactly does
Roger Goodell do?
Can anyone name his top five
achievements as NFL
commissioner?
Go ahead, I’ll wait; I’m here all
day.
Couch
Slouch
Seriously, is he a business
genius? A brilliant thinker? A
dealmaker? Tech savvy?
Tech savvy? He still has a
Blackberry.
When your bio starts with the
line “son of a U.S. senator,” I’m
guessing you haven’t done much
other than ride in the back of a
Lincoln town car and eat lobster
with truffles at your summer
home in Maine.
Here are three jobs I know
Goodell could do well:
Maitre d’, Peter Luger Steak
House, Brooklyn.
Concierge, Ritz-Carlton,
Kapalua, Hawaii.
Toll taker, New Jersey
Turnpike, Exit 8.
He is uniquely qualified for
these positions — the first two,
you just stand all day and look
good; the other one, you just
stand all day and take people’s
money.
Granted, since Goodell took
over in 2006, the average value of
an NFL franchise has more than
doubled, with league revenues
swelling to $14 billion annually.
But I believe an ambidextrous
porcupine living behind a trash
bin in a 7-Eleven parking lot
could’ve been commissioner in
that time, and the NFL would see
similar results.
(Column Intermission: I was
laughed out of town when I made
the Los Angeles Chargers my
NFL Team of Destiny this season.
Then I was laughed out of
another town when the Chargers
started 0-4. And, now, after the
Chargers climbed back to 8-6
before losing their AFC West
showdown to the Kansas City
Chiefs on Saturday, 30-13, I have
voluntarily moved abroad before
being laughed out of my latest
town.)
Goodell’s M.O. is “look good,
say nothing.” When he talks for
an hour, you get maybe a
minute’s worth of insight. His
state-of-the-NFL address every
February would be more
informative if he just read names
out of the Manhattan white
pages.
He also takes every
complication and worsens it. It’s
the opposite of crisis
management — it’s crisis
manglement.
Under Goodell, we don’t even
know when a catch is a catch
anymore.
Goodell’s rap sheet includes:
Bungled the referee labor
dispute.
Bungled the Ray Rice
suspension.
Bungled the Ezekiel Elliott
suspension.
Bungled virtually every other
player-discipline matter.
Bungled player safety
considerations.
Bungled Rams, Chargers and
Raiders relocation issues.
Bungled the anthem-protest
controversy.
Bungled Spygate.
Rose wins by eight
at Indonesian Masters
Justin Rose played 30 holes
Sunday in the weather-delayed
Indonesian Masters in Jakarta,
closing for a final-round 10under-par 62 and an eight-stroke
victory at Royale Jakarta Golf
Club.
The Englishman was 10 under
after 13 holes in the final round
and looked like he could achieve a
59, but he bogeyed the par-4 16th.
After weather delays Friday
and Saturday, Rose was forced to
play the final 12 holes of his third
round Sunday. He completed that
in 66 to give him a three-stroke
lead heading into the final round,
which started almost
immediately and with the same
threesomes as the third round.
Rose, who led after all the first
and later delayed rounds, had a
72-hole total of 29-under 259.
Phachara Khongwatmai of
Thailand (65) was second. . . .
Angel Cabrera and Angel
Cabrera Jr. closed with a 12under 60 for a three-shot victory
in their debut at the Father-Son
Challenge in Orlando.
The Cabreras opened with a 59
at the Ritz-Carlton Golf Club and
were challenged briefly by the
defending champions, David
Duval and Nick Karavites, in the
scramble format Sunday. The
Argentines went out in 30, and
they had a two-shot lead when
Cabrera’s son came within an
inch of chipping in for eagle on
the final hole.
They finished at 25-under 199
for a three-shot win over Duval
and Karavites, and Bernhard
Langer and Jason Langer. The
Langer team won in 2014.
The Cabreras weren’t even in
the field until two-time U.S. Open
champion Curtis Strange and his
son, Tom Strange, had to
withdraw.
Duval and his stepson went out
in 28, but the Cabreras regained
control by starting the back nine
with back-to-back birdies, and
then making birdies on the 13th,
14th and 16th. The final birdie
allowed them to tie the
tournament scoring record.
“This is certain my best week of
the year,” said Cabrera, the 2009
Masters champion and 2007 U.S.
Open champion at Oakmont. “To
play alongside all the legends . . .
as well as playing alongside my
son, has been the greatest week of
the year.”
The popular event is for players
who have won a major
championship or the Players
Championship. It is a scramble
format both days. . . .
A late surge by Kiradech
Aphibarnrat has made him
among nine players projected to
get invitations to the Masters by
finishing the year in the top 50 in
the world ranking.
Kiradech ended his year with
four straight top 10s, including a
fifth-place finish in the
Indonesian Masters. The Thai is
projected to finish the year at
No. 49, one spot ahead of Yusaku
Miyazato of Japan, who also will
Noren, Matt Fitzpatrick,
Branden Grace, Ross Fisher,
Yuta Ikeda and Bernd
Wiesberger. That puts the field
of players expected to compete at
80 going into next year.
The Masters also invites
players who are in the top 50 on
March 25, and anyone winning a
PGA Tour event that offers full
FedEx Cup points.
TRACK AND FIELD
Mo Farah was voted BBC
Sports Personality of the Year for
the first time after winning a
third successive world 10,000meter title.
In a public vote that produced
surprising results, World
Superbikes champion Jonathan
Rea from Northern Ireland
finished second and para-athlete
Jonnie Peacock was third.
Farah appeared to have better
chances to win the prestigious
award in previous years, having
won the 5,000-10,000 double at
the Olympics in 2012 and ’16 and
at the world championship in
2013 and ‘15.
This year, he failed to follow up
his win in the 10,000 at the worlds
in London, finishing second in
the 5,000 in his last track race in a
global championship.
COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
Mikaela Foecke had 20 kills
and hit .250, Kelly Hunter had 37
assists and No. 5 Nebraska
defeated No. 2 Florida in four
sets, 25-22, 25-17, 18-25, 25-16, on
Saturday night in Kansas City,
Mo., to capture the program’s fifth
NCAA women's championship.
The Cornhuskers flipped the
script on the defensive-minded
Gators, as it was their suffocating
defense that fueled them to
victory. They allowed the Gators
to hit just .141, their lowest hitting
percentage of the season, and
four Cornhuskers finished with
double-digit digs.
MISC.
UCF’s Scott Frost, Georgia’s
Kirby Smart and Clemson’s Dabo
Swinney are the finalists for the
Associated Press college football
coach of the year award.
The winner will be announced
Monday. . . .
The San Diego Padres signed
right-hander Jordan Lyles to a
one-year contract with a club
option for 2019, and designated
left-hander Travis Wood for
assignment.
The 27-year-old Lyles joined
San Diego in early August, soon
after being released by Colorado.
He was a combined 1-5 with a 7.75
ERA in 38 games.
Lyles is 28-48 with a 5.43 ERA
in seven seasons with Houston,
the Rockies and Padres.
Wood was 4-7 with a 6.80 ERA
in 39 games for Kansas City and
San Diego last season.
— From news services
Atlanta at Tampa Bay » ESPN, WJFK (106.7 FM)
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7 p.m.
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Boston at Indiana » NBA TV
Golden State at Los Angeles Lakers » NBA TV
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
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Houston Baptist at Michigan State » Big Ten Network
Omaha at Kansas » ESPN2
Charleston Southern at Florida State » ESPNU
Northern Illinois at Marquette » Fox Sports 1
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Boise State at SMU » ESPNU
Texas-Arlington at Creighton » Fox Sports 1
Tennessee State at Texas » ESPN2
SOCCER
3 p.m.
You, too can enter the $1.25 Ask The
Slouch Cash Giveaway. Just email
asktheslouch@aol.com, and if your
question is used, you win $1.25 in
cash!
get to Augusta National.
The last tournament offering
ranking points this year is on the
Asian Development Tour and is
not expected to affect the top 50.
The other seven who get into
the Masters through the world
ranking are Tyrrell Hatton, Alex
TELEVISION AND RADIO
FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
Ask The Slouch
Q. I have a 4-year-old daughter
who does not understand Dick
Vitale. Can you explain him to
her? (Scott Peters; Bethesda)
A. You’re permitting a pre-K
progeny to listen to Vitale? Please
forward an address ASAP so I can
send social services to your home.
Q. Why haven’t I ever seen you
on “Around the Horn”? Aren’t you
pretty enough for television?
(William Mahl; Indianapolis)
A. I’m not even pretty enough
for a podcast.
Q. Tom Brady was 0 for 11 on
third-down conversions against
the Dolphins last week, with
many of his passes skipping off
the ground 10 feet short of the
receivers. Is there any way for
him to improve his grip on the
ball? (Steve Owings; Spokane,
Wash.)
A. Pay the man, Shirley.
Q. Do you know if the NFL is
still considering an 18-game
schedule? Here in Cleveland we
would like to break the loss
record rather than just tie it.
(Eddie Vidmar; Cleveland)
A. Pay this wretched soul, too.
soccer insider
D I G ES T
GOLF
Bungled Bountygate.
Bungled Deflategate.
Bungled Marcus Mariota’s
name at the 2015 NFL draft.
In addition, he has incorrectly
foisted “Thursday Night
Football” on us, been wrong on
the Washington R*dsk*ns
nickname dispute and has
dragged his feet on CTE/brain
trauma/concussion concerns.
On the other hand, Goodell
once received the Outstanding
Civilian Service Award from the
U.S. Army, even though he made
the military pay for the NFL’s onfield tributes to the military.
English Premier League: Swansea at Everton » NBC Sports Network
MARK LENNIHAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“We’ve got to campaign,” said Sunil Gulati, center, the chair of the United Bid Committee for North America.
2026 World Cup host up in air
North America’s bid to stage the event is jeopardized by falling U.S. popularity
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
The North American bid to stage
the 2026 World Cup seems like a sure
thing. From stadiums and infrastructure to commercial opportunities and
organizational experience, the joint
effort by the United States, Mexico and
Canada appears to meet all the necessary requirements (and then some) to
host soccer’s premier competition.
The proposal would mesh more
than a half-billion people from three
countries that have put on 12 FIFA
tournaments (men and women, senior
and youth). With European and Asian
countries ineligible to bid and South
America waiting for 2030, the only
challenger is Morocco, a country of
similar size and population to California.
No contest, right? Not so fast.
As the sides finalize their bids ahead
of the March 16 deadline, there is
growing concern in some U.S. circles
that a North American victory celebration after the FIFA vote June 13 in
Moscow is not as certain as once
thought.
Behind the scenes, those familiar
with the tri-nation effort are worried
many FIFA member countries — and,
by extension, continental voting blocs
— are leaning toward Morocco.
The reasons have nothing to do with
the sterling credentials of the North
American bid or the certainty that the
tournament would fill stadiums and
coffers. Rather, they stem from a precipitous decline in U.S. popularity
around the world and, to a smaller
extent, the fact that the American judicial system took the lead in prosecuting FIFA scandals. While the exposure of misconduct has helped cleanse
the sport’s tarnished international
governing body, some in world soccer
apparently aren’t happy with the U.S.
government’s aggressive role.
The inclusion of Mexico and Canada should broaden the bid’s appeal. Of
the 80 matches, 60 would take place in
U.S. venues and 10 apiece in the other
two countries. The 2026 World Cup
will be the first with 48 teams, an
increase of 16.
The North American campaign is
bracing for a hard fight.
“We expect Morocco to put together
a very good bid,” said Sunil Gulati, the
outgoing U.S. Soccer Federation president who chairs the United Bid Committee on behalf of the North American effort. “This isn’t going to be a
computer-generated program that
spits out an answer about what the
best bid is. So we’ve got to campaign.”
FIFA’s membership will vote. The
four involved countries are ineligible
to cast ballots, leaving the bids seeking
to secure 104 of the 207 votes. Before
FIFA’s reforms, the 24-member executive committee decided the winner by
secret ballot. New guidelines mandate
an open vote.
Morocco presumably would receive
backing from most, if not all, of the
other 53 African countries. The North
American bid would likely claim 32
from CONCACAF and, it hopes, 10
from South America. That leaves Europe (55), Asia (46) and Oceania (11) up
for grabs.
One possible, but unlikely, twist: If
the 37-member FIFA Council (which
replaced the executive committee)
doesn’t believe either bid is adequate,
the process would reopen to countries
in all continents.
With lobbying efforts accelerating,
Gulati was in the United Arab Emirates this past week for the FIFA Club
World Cup. Gulati is a member of the
FIFA Council, which, in the wake of the
corruption scandal, replaced the organization’s executive committee.
The North American bid will feature 32 cities interested in hosting
matches or training centers (25 in the
United States, four in Canada and
three in Mexico). If the bid is successful, the local organizing committee
would work with FIFA in selecting
between probably 15 and 18 game venues. (Mexico would get three, Canada
two or three.)
Morocco is bidding for the fifth time
after failed attempts to host the 1994,
1998, 2006 and 2010 tournaments. In
August, the country suggested nine
stadiums. Doubts about Morocco’s infrastructure to handle an expanded
tournament will loom large ahead of
the vote.
The United States lost out on the
2022 rights to Qatar (albeit amid corruption allegations) and could be part
of an effort that falls short against a
smaller foe again.
At the very least, the North American organizers expect a fair fight.
“FIFA has put a lot more compliance
and ethics requirements into this bid
than certainly in the last one,” United
Bid Committee Executive Director
John Kristick said. “FIFA knows the
spotlight is shining very, very brightly.
This is something the FIFA president
is going to be judged every step of the
way, and based on the fact you have an
independent compliance agency every
step of the way, I feel much better
about where we are at for this process
going forward than the last one.”
steven.goff@washpost.com
ROUNDUP
Lukaku finding
scoring touch
After his barren run in
the English Premier
League, Manchester
United striker Romelu
Lukaku has scored
two goals in two
games.
What he’s yet to
rediscover is the joy
of scoring.
Lukaku scored the
opening goal in
Manchester United’s
2-1 win at West
Bromwich Albion on
Sunday but refused to
celebrate, instead
looking stone-faced
as he was mobbed by
his teammates.
Just like after he
scored the midweek
winner against
Bournemouth.
“Maybe he looks to
the bench and sees
his manager doesn’t
celebrate,” United
Manager Jose
Mourinho said.
Milan tumbling
AC Milan’s crisis
deepened as it was
humiliated, 3-0, at
struggling Hellas
Verona in the Italian
Serie A.
“We have to apologize
and understand why
these things happen.
We were
embarrassing,” Milan
Coach Gennaro
Gattuso said. “. . . We
don’t manage to react
or, if we do, we seem
confused and messy.
I don’t like this. The
embarrassment
remains; now we
have to look forward.”
It has been a difficult
month for Milan,
which has won just
two of its five
matches since
Gattuso replaced
Vincenzo Montella as
coach.
A 4-4 draw
Jamaica striker Leon
Bailey scored twice
after coming on as a
substitute, but Bayer
Leverkusen failed to
hang on as host
Hannover grabbed a
4-4 draw in the
German Bundesliga.
Bailey, who came on
at the break, needed
only two minutes to
equalize after
Hannover had gone
ahead 3-2, and he
scored again 20
minutes later to put
Leverkusen in front
4-3.
But the 20-year-old
missed another
chance to complete a
hat trick, and Julian
Korb scored late for
Hannover to draw.
Villarreal wins
Pablo Fornals scored
his first goal for
Villarreal, which
broke a three-game
losing streak with a 10 victory at Celta Vigo
in the Spanish
league.
Fornals headed in
Carlos Bacca’s cross
in the 34th minute at
Balaidos Stadium. . . .
Girona continued its
excellent first
campaign in Spain’s
top flight by beating
Getafe, 1-0, at home
after Christian
Stuani’s header in the
fifth minute.
Girona rose into
seventh place on the
strength of its fifth
victory in the past
eight rounds.
— Associated Press
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
Strasburg blames All-Star Game for landing him on DL
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
Stephen Strasburg had floated
the theory many times before. He
always thought the nerve impingement that sent him to the
disabled list in late July resulted
from a breach in his routine perpetrated by his trip to the All-Star
Game in Miami.
“Might have to rethink about if
I’m going to actually pitch or not
pitch in an All-Star Game, whether I’ll actually go altogether,”
Strasburg said at Nationals WinterFest on Sunday. “That was the
issue I felt like was the reason why
I got hurt. I was on such a good
program with the training staff
and massage therapists — I was in
this routine. Then all of a sudden
you’re asked to throw, potentially
pitch — maybe not — but not have
any access or ability to really stick
to your routine. Once that’s over,
it’s like right back into it. Bullpen,
day off, game. I just know that
little lapse, for whatever reason, it
pushed me back a bit. It started
making my arm hurt.”
Strasburg held opposing hitters
to a .211 batting average in the first
half of the season, earning an
all-star nod for the second straight
year. He was selected to the 2016
All-Star Game in his home town of
San Diego but chose not to pitch,
though he made the trip. Last
year, Strasburg made himself
available for the game in Miami
despite some reservations and the
fact that surrendering a spot
might have allowed Gio Gonzalez
to take the trip to his home town.
Strasburg did not pitch, in the
end. He felt discomfort in his first
start after the break, in which he
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
“My arm felt good before that, then it was like after [the All-Star Game], it just didn’t feel right,” the Nationals’ Stephen Strasburg said.
allowed one run in seven innings
to the Cincinnati Reds. He left his
next start after two innings and
landed on the disabled list shortly
thereafter for what the team insisted were precautionary reasons
— and ultimately seemed to be so.
“My arm felt good before that,
then it was like after [the All-Star
Game], it just didn’t feel right. I’m
glad at that point I kind of tried to
put my pride aside and say, hey, I
want to be there in the end,” Strasburg said. “So we just had to get it
right. No point in pushing
through it. I’m glad it worked out
that way.”
Strasburg returned to throw 35
consecutive scoreless innings and
dominate in two playoff starts,
most notably his seven scoreless
innings in Game 4 of the National
League Division Series. After
spending the 2015 and 2016 seasons shuffling on and off the disabled list with a variety of injuries,
Strasburg entered last offseason
prioritizing longevity — as well as
October. He inserted more long
distance running into his offseason program, working on stamina
rather than just raw strength, and
intends to keep running on the
beaches of San Diego all winter, as
he did last year. He pitched from
the stretch all season, something
he says he intends to do again, in
part because of its effects on his
mechanics, in part because he believes hitters had a tougher time
picking up pitches and timing
when he did.
“I think physically, there was
that little spot around the All-Star
Game, but I’m glad with how I
bounced back. I think I progressed a little bit in that department with how my body works
and what I need to do,” Strasburg
said. “I think it’s not satisfied by
any means, but I think there’s
more in the tank. So I’m excited. I
was excited to get back to work as
soon as the season was over, to
keep trying to get better, keep
getting stronger, and get out there
next season.”
The strange all-star experience
could become a prominent narrative next summer, when the AllStar Game is at Nationals Park.
Bryce Harper has said he will
finally participate in the Home
Run Derby there, in front of his
home crowd. Strasburg and Max
Scherzer, two of the three Cy
Young finalists, will be the sentimental favorites to start the game.
While Strasburg indicated the
need to reconsider future all-star
games, perhaps the proximity of
the Nationals’ training staff and a
better sense of the potential pitfalls will help next season. Either
way, Strasburg felt the tweaks he
made to his mechanics and routine succeeded in keeping him
healthy — and that the only reason he didn’t make it through the
season unscathed was an optional
trip to Miami he will not have to
take next year.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
TREVOR HAGAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Jets put four goals past the Blues’ Jake Allen, but he kept out
forward Joel Armia when he crashed the net in the second period.
NHL ROUNDUP
Winnipeg turns tables,
gets shutout of St. Louis
JETS 4,
BLUES 0
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Jakub Vrana, second from right, and Evgeny Kuznetsov have been on the ice together for nine Capitals goals in the past 12 games.
The Caps’ next perfect combination?
They’re not Ovechkin-Backstrom yet, but Kuznetsov and Vrana are building a bond and putting up points
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
Jakub Vrana rubbed his hands
over his face and sighed, struggling to come up with a definitive
answer to the question. You see,
Vrana’s surprising offensive tear
means everyone wants to know
the correct way to pronounce his
first name, and Vrana insists he
doesn’t have a preference between the Czech “Ya-kub” and the
Americanized “Jacob.” He has
also added “Ya-koob” and “Jake”
as acceptable variations.
“Whatever,” Vrana finally said
with a smile and a shrug.
As a rookie with the Washington Capitals, Vrana is still reserved, even around his teammates, who affectionately call
him “V.” Enter center Evgeny
Kuznetsov, who has made it his
mission to help Vrana relax and
get comfortable. Their connection is also the reason Vrana’s
name has been coming up so
often lately.
Washington has long had the
dynamic duo of center Nicklas
Backstrom and superstar winger
Alex Ovechkin, but perhaps a
new, younger version has started
to bond. Kuznetsov and Vrana
have been on the ice together for
nine Capitals goals since Coach
Barry Trotz paired them on a line
12 games ago. With his goal at
Boston on Thursday, Vrana
reached the 10-goal plateau, and
he’s the first Washington rookie to
do that since — you guessed it —
Kuznetsov in the 2014-15 season.
“I just think, if you have some
relationships and you have a little
bit of a friendship and you’re on
the same line, you want to do
well,” Trotz said. “So you try to
help each other and you grow a
little bit of a bond.”
Kuznetsov is considered the
Capitals’ most creative player
with his unique vision and awareness on the ice, so when Trotz has
noticed Kuznetsov often chatting
with Vrana on the bench, Trotz
figured Kuznetsov was just
“coaching him along.” In reality,
hockey is the last thing Kuznetsov wants to talk about with
Vrana. Though Kuznetsov is in
his fourth full NHL season, he is
less than four years older than
Vrana, and he’s not quite comfortable with the “mentor” title in
their relationship.
“My part is probably just trying
to be me,” Kuznetsov said, and
that means maintaining his reputation as the team’s resident joker. Vrana said he tries to stay
focused on the game when Kuznetsov begins his comedy routine
on the bench, “but he’s funny. I
like that.”
“They’ll have a couple chuckles, too; there’s no question,”
Trotz said.
“I never talk about hockey with
him,” Kuznetsov said. “He don’t
need it. We have coaches, we have
everyone else. Sometimes, when
the game’s not going well, he’s
going so deep and he’s thinking
about that; that’s when my part of
the job comes in. Just have to give
him joke or whatever. . . . He’s
worrying that he made a mistake
or whatever. I always tell him,
‘Hey, that’s okay.’ ”
C A PITA L S ’ N E X T T H R E E
at Dallas Stars
Tomorrow
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Friday
9 NBCSW Plus
at Vegas Golden Knights
Saturday
8 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
When Vrana went through a
scoring slump early in the season,
Trotz made him a healthy scratch
and criticized the 21-year-old for
being in “participation mode.”
Vrana played in 21 games with the
Capitals last season, but when he
started to struggle, the team sent
him back to the American Hockey
League, where he was then
scratched from two playoff
games. Since Vrana is still exempt
from
waivers,
Washington
wouldn’t risk another team swiping him if it chooses to reassign
him to the minors, so he doesn’t
have the same security as some
other rookies.
But rather than let the November scratch and the stress of his
status on the team derail his
season like it might have a year
ago, Vrana responded well. He
has six goals and two assists in
the 14 games since, and the 24goal pace he is on has been a
welcome surprise after Washington parted ways with top-six forwards Marcus Johansson and
Justin Williams in the offseason.
“I’m not putting my head in the
trash there,” Vrana said. “I tried to
keep going and build my confidence up.”
Vrana and Kuznetsov are two
of the Capitals’ fastest players, so
their speed naturally complements each other. But there’s
more to their successful partnership. Once considered a defensive
liability, Kuznetsov has improved
his two-way play to the point that
he has encouraged Vrana to take
chances because, if there’s a turnover, Kuznetsov can cover for
him. “Just dangle guys; I’ve got
backcheck,” Kuznetsov told him.
“Obviously, V has a ton of
speed and skill, and he’s using it
offensively, which is a good
thing,” goaltender Braden Holtby
said. “I think Kuzy can control the
puck, and with V still young and
inexperienced, Kuzy’s helping
him with just coming back, slowing things down, getting it out of
the [defensive] zone, making sure
he’s a pass option at times. Kuzy’s
speed can get back if we do end
up making a mistake or whatever.
I think he’s taking it as a big
challenge for him, and he’s doing
a fantastic job with more of a
leadership role with V and letting
him use his skill when he can.”
Said Kuznetsov: “If you’re not
going to try to do something on
the ice, it’s tough to learn. That’s
how he got confidence, you
know? It’s easy to put pressure on
him, but it’s tough to help him. I
mean, mentally you’ve got to find
a way how to talk with him, and
you see the results.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Connor Hellebuyck stopped 24
shots for his eighth career shutout, Patrik Laine got his teamhigh 16th goal, and the host Winnipeg Jets beat the St. Louis
Blues, 4-0, on Sunday night.
Adam Lowry, Mark Scheifele
and Josh Morrissey also scored
for Winnipeg, which lost, 2-0, at
St. Louis on Saturday night. Morrissey also had an assist, and
Andrew Copp and Jacob Trouba
added two apiece. Hellebuyck’s
shutout was his second of the
season.
Jake Allen was in goal for the
Blues and finished with 42 saves.
Carter Hutton had 48 saves in the
St. Louis win Saturday.
Lowry got the Jets on the scoreboard at 4:32 of the second. Brandon Tanev brought the puck behind the St. Louis net and was hit
by two Blues players, with the
puck popping loose. Copp picked
it up and sent a pass into the
crease to Lowry, who put it in the
net for his fifth of the season.
Laine used a wrist shot on
Allen’s blocker side to get his
league-leading 10th power-play
goal with 4:47 left in the second,
while Alex Pietrangelo was in the
penalty box for cross-checking.
Scheifele scored his 15th when
he redirected Morrissey’s shot
from near the top of the circle
with 8:06 left in the third to make
it 3-0. Morrissey capped the scoring less than two minutes later
with his shot from the high slot.
BLACKHAWKS
4, WILD 1:
Patrick Kane scored two slick
goals, Corey Crawford made 27
saves, and host Chicago beat Minnesota for its season-high fifth
straight win.
Ryan Hartman also scored for
Chicago, snapping a 17-game
drought. Tommy Wingels added a
shorthanded empty-netter.
Matt Dumba scored at 5:56 of
the third, spoiling Crawford’s
shutout bid on a screened shot
from the right point. The Wild
dropped its second straight after
a four-game winning streak.
Kane, who has seven points in
his past four games, connected on
a one-timer and a breakaway to
give him 14 goals this season and
four in the past three games. The
Chicago forward’s 298th and
299th career goals moved him
into fifth place in team history,
ahead of Dennis Hull (298).
Alex Stalock made 42 saves in
his third straight start in place of
Minnesota No. 1 goalie Devan
Dubnyk, who is sidelined with a
lower-body injury.
GOLDEN KNIGHTS 5,
PANTHERS 2: Erik Haula scored
the go-ahead goal in the third
period, and the Golden Knights
cruised past Florida in Las Vegas.
Nate Schmidt, Colin Miller,
Jonathan Marchessault and
James Neal also scored for Vegas,
while Malcolm Subban stopped
16 shots as the team moved into
first place in the Pacific Division.
Radim
Vrbata
and
Mike
Matheson scored for Florida.
FLAMES
6, CANUCKS 1:
Defenseman Mark Giordano
scored twice as visiting Calgary
surged to a 5-0 lead through two
periods, and backup goalie David
Rittich made 16 saves for a win in
Vancouver.
Mark Jankowski, Matthew
Tkachuk, Sam Bennett and Micheal Ferland had Calgary’s other
goals; Bennett added three assists, and Jankowski had two.
Markus Granlund scored for the
Canucks; Jacob Markstrom allowed five goals on 19 shots before being pulled from the game
following 40 minutes.
Johnson suspended 2 games
Colorado defenseman Erik
Johnson was suspended for two
games for boarding Tampa Bay
forward Vladislav Namestnikov
on Saturday.
Johnson was assessed a minor
penalty for slashing and a major
penalty and a game misconduct
for boarding in the second period
of the Avalanche’s 6-5 home loss.
D4
EZ
NBA ROUNDUP
Detroit makes 17 threes
to tie franchise record
PISTONS 114,
MAGIC 110
A SSOCIATED P RESS
The Detroit Pistons tied a franchise record for three-pointers —
and they needed almost all of
them to avoid a bad home loss.
Reggie Bullock scored a career-high 20 points, and the Pistons made 17 shots from beyond
the arc in a 114-110 victory over
the Orlando Magic on Sunday.
Detroit nearly gave away a 24point lead in the fourth quarter,
and Coach Stan Van Gundy
wasn’t happy at all with his
team’s effort.
“We played a very good first
half, Reggie Bullock and Anthony
Tolliver played very well, and we
didn’t try at all in the second
half,” Van Gundy said. “We didn’t
bring anything to the second
half.”
The Pistons have won three in
a row after starting December
with a seven-game losing streak.
Nikola Vucevic had 24 points,
14 rebounds and seven assists for
the Magic. It has dropped five
straight and 16 of 19.
Detroit started fast, making six
of its first seven shots to take a
15-5 lead. At the end of the first
quarter, Ish Smith made a shot,
and then Langston Galloway
added a steal and a floater when
the Magic botched the inbound
play. It was 36-23 after one.
The Pistons led 60-43 at halftime after going 10 for 18 from
beyond the arc in the first half.
Then Detroit added six more
three-pointers and 36 points in
the third quarter.
Tolliver’s three-pointer tied the
franchise record and gave the
Pistons a 105-81 lead with 7:00
remaining. Then Orlando scored
the game’s next 19 points.
“I don’t really feel like our
defensive intensity was very good
the whole game,” Tolliver said.
“Even though we were shooting
really well, I think we definitely
relaxed way too much.”
RAPTORS
108, KINGS 93:
After a high-scoring first half,
Sacramento suddenly found itself struggling to put points on
the board against host Toronto.
DeMar
DeRozan
scored
21 points, Jonas Valanciunas had
13 points and a season-high
16 rebounds, and Toronto held
Sacramento to 30 second-half
points.
Kyle Lowry added 16 points
and Norman Powell had 14 for
the Raptors, who won their ninth
straight home game. Toronto is
an NBA-best 11-1 at home.
DeRozan gave the Raptors a
61-60 lead with a pull-up jump
shot with less than two seconds
remaining in the second quarter,
but George Hill banked in a
46-foot three-pointer from midcourt at the buzzer, giving Sacramento a 63-61 edge at the intermission. The Kings shot 61.9 percent in the first half, making 26 of
42 field goal attempts.
Sacramento scored 14 points in
the third quarter, making five of
18 shots, then followed up with
16 points in the fourth.
“I thought we played a little bit
slower in the second half,” Kings
Coach Dave Joerger said. “I think
both teams were in there saying
‘Man, we can’t give up 60 points
by halftime.’ Maybe we got a little
slow. I credit their defense.”
PACERS 109, NETS 97: Victor Oladipo scored 26 points,
Domantas Sabonis had 17 coming
off the bench, and visiting Indiana beat Brooklyn.
Myles Turner added 16, Cory
Joseph chipped in 15 and Darren
Collison added 14 for the Pacers.
Allen Crabbe shook off his recent struggles, scoring 17 points in
the first half on 5-for-7 shooting,
including four threes. He didn’t
score in the second half.
Quincy Acy, Caris LeVert and
Joe Harris each had 14 in Brooklyn’s third straight loss.
The second meeting of the
season between these teams definitely lacked the offensive spark
of their first matchup, an opener
in mid-October that Indiana
won, 140-131, at home.
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
James leads Cavaliers with third straight triple-double
WIZARDS FROM D1
stall wearing only a blue towel,
saying nothing while waiting for
reporters to find him in the corner.
Wall usually needs postgame
treatment and then dresses outside the view of the assembled
media, so he was asked whether
any physical ailment had brought
along this change from the routine. Wall, who played in just his
third game since he returned from
an inflamed left knee, denied the
suggestion and then offered some
truth.
“Nah. Just tired of getting my
[tail] beat,” Wall quipped.
Wall scored 15 points and
pulled down 10 rebounds, while
Bradley Beal played the iron-man
role with game highs of 43 minutes and 27 points on 10-for-27
shooting.
Before the first meeting with
the Cavaliers in November, Wall
and Beal claimed on ESPN that
Cleveland had dodged the Wizards in last year’s playoffs. They
are the ones who publicly promote the idea of Washington
matching up so well against Cleveland, and on Sunday, as Beal lofted
rainmaking jumpers around the
court and Wall sprinkled in drives
and dishes (six assists), their play
backed up their words.
In the second quarter, when
Washington worked out of a seven-point hole, Beal and Wall
scored nine points apiece. However, their hustle on the other end
displayed more leadership than
any bucket they scored. The Wizards played with just one true big
man while Markieff Morris sat on
the bench saddled with fouls, so
Wall had to face up James on one
play and then made the extra effort to defend the rim and force a
stop for the first time in nine
possessions.
Wall and Beal led Washington
for much of the game, but the pair
slowed down in the fourth quarter, combining to make 1 of 9 shots
for two points. The teams were
tied at 83 heading into the final
quarter, but Washington shot
31.8 percent in the final period,
and any notion of these two teams
being even quickly dissipated.
“Shots just didn’t go in,” Beal
said. “We had a lot of good looks, a
Cavaliers 106, Wizards 99
Cleveland ............................ 27
Washington ........................ 23
CLEVELAND
Crowder
James
Love
Calderon
JR Smith
Green
Korver
Osman
Thompson
Frye
TOTALS
33
37
23
23
23 — 106
16 — 99
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
23:17
3-5 0-0 0-1 1 3
7
40:19 8-23 2-3 2-12 15 4 20
33:58 9-20 2-2 0-9 0 2 25
19:30
3-4 0-0 0-4 2 0
7
28:54
3-9 0-0 0-9 1 3
7
28:33 5-12 4-5 2-5 2 0 15
23:58
4-6 2-2 0-1 2 1 11
17:29
2-3 0-0 0-1 0 3
5
16:16
2-2 0-0 0-0 0 0
4
7:44
2-3 0-0 0-0 1 0
5
240 41-87 10-12 4-42 24 16 106
Percentages: FG .471, FT .833. 3-Point Goals: 14-34, .412
(Love 5-8, James 2-7, Calderon 1-1, Osman 1-1, Crowder
1-2, Frye 1-2, Korver 1-2, Green 1-4, JR Smith 1-7). Team
Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 9 (6 PTS). Blocked Shots:
4 (Green 2, JR Smith, James). Turnovers: 9 (James 6,
Calderon, JR Smith, Love). Steals: 6 (JR Smith 2,
Calderon, Korver, Love, Osman). Technical Fouls: JR
Smith, 7:41 first.
WASHINGTON
Morris
Oubre Jr.
Gortat
Beal
Wall
Scott
Satoransky
Mahinmi
Meeks
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
27:18 4-10 1-2 2-7 0 3 10
31:14
4-8 2-2 1-8 3 4 11
23:01
3-5 1-4 4-9 1 1
7
43:28 10-27 3-4 0-5 5 2 27
31:25 6-16 1-2 2-10 6 0 15
32:56 8-14 0-0 2-4 4 4 19
25:20
1-4 0-0 1-3 0 1
2
12:45
2-3 1-2 1-2 0 3
5
12:32
1-4 0-0 0-3 1 0
3
240 39-91 9-16 13-51 20 18 99
Percentages: FG .429, FT .563. 3-Point Goals: 12-33, .364
(Beal 4-13, Scott 3-7, Wall 2-5, Morris 1-1, Meeks 1-2,
Oubre Jr. 1-4, Satoransky 0-1). Team Rebounds: 7. Team
Turnovers: 10 (11 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Wall 2, Beal,
Mahinmi, Scott). Turnovers: 10 (Wall 3, Oubre Jr. 2,
Beal, Gortat, Mahinmi, Morris, Scott). Steals: 4 (Scott 2,
Morris, Wall). Technical Fouls: Morris, 2:05 first
NICK WASS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
LeBron James had 20 points, 15 assists and 12 rebounds and made
big plays down the stretch to help Cleveland win in Washington.
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. New Orleans Pelicans
Tomorrow
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Friday
7:30 NBCSW
vs. Orlando Magic
Saturday
7 NBCSW Plus
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
lot of open threes, a lot of easy
ones at the rim. A few turnovers
hurt us, but all in all, we had good
shots. They just didn’t go.”
Since last year, the Wizards
have had designs on meeting the
Cavaliers in the spring. They
speak confidently in their ability
to match up with Cleveland, but
on Sunday the Wizards lacked the
frontcourt depth to test that
claim.
Starting small forward Otto
Porter Jr. missed his second game
of the season while dealing with a
right hip bruise. Kelly Oubre Jr.
moved into the starting unit, but
before the end of the first quarter,
he and Morris were on the bench
with two fouls apiece.
Morris, with three fouls and a
technical, remained in the locker
room after halftime to get an
X-ray after getting hit in the neck,
and Mike Scott joined the starters
for the beginning of the third
quarter.
Though Scott had 19 points and
wasn’t just a live body to throw at
James and Oubre played smart in
not digging deeper into foul trouble, Washington could not overcome its deficit in depth. Conversely, 10 players produced effective minutes for Cleveland (23-8)
even though Dwyane Wade rested, Isaiah Thomas remained out
and Derrick Rose and Iman
Shumpert were inactive.
“They have a lot of guys. They
sat out a couple of players, and
they still have a lot of guys,” Wizards Coach Scott Brooks said.
“That’s what makes them one of
the best teams in basketball. . . .
“Brad probably played a few
extra minutes too many,” Brooks
continued. “We needed some extra minutes out of guys. Hopefully
Otto will be back soon.”
Early in the fourth quarter, Beal
took over the defensive assignment on James and forced him
into a miss on a long two. Beal
needed a break at the 8:24 mark,
and James turned into a lethal
facilitator in setting up teammates during an 8-0 Cavaliers
run. Though Beal quickly returned to the floor, the Wizards
did not return to form, and the
Cavaliers opened their biggest
lead of the game.
“The effort was there,” Scott
said. “We just have to outlast
them, win, get rebounds, make
plays — simple plays. Especially
against a great team like that, you
have to be sharp.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
Nittany Lions go inside
Tar Heels tough it out with rally late vs. Volunteers to overpower the Patriots
MEN’S ROUNDUP
NORTH CAROLINA 78,
TENNESSEE 73
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Brandon Williams sank a
three-pointer to put North Carolina ahead for good with 35 seconds left as the seventh-ranked
Tar Heels rallied past No. 20
Tennessee, 78-73, on Sunday in
Knoxville, Tenn.
The Tar Heels (10-1) capitalized
on a 9-0 run in the final minute to
win for the fifth straight time and
ended Thompson-Boling Arena’s
hex on defending national champions.
Tennessee (7-2) had won each
of the past five times it had hosted
a defending national champion, a
string that included victories over
Connecticut (in January 2012),
Florida (February 2007 and February 2008) and Kentucky (February 1999 and February 2013).
Joel Berry II scored 21 points
for North Carolina. Williams and
Luke Maye added 15 points each.
The Volunteers led by nine
points in the second half and
were ahead 70-67 before North
Carolina took control down the
stretch.
ARIZONA
STATE 76, VAN-
DERBILT 64: Tra Holder scored
25 points, Shannon Evans II added 15, and the No. 5 Sun Devils
overcame a dismal start to beat
the Commodores in Tempe, Ariz.
Arizona State (10-0) looked
nothing like the team that won at
Kansas last week in the opening
minutes against Vanderbilt (3-7),
falling into a 13-0 hole.
But once they got rolling, there
was no stopping the Sun Devils.
Arizona State used a 26-3 run
spanning halftime to take control.
Mickey Mitchell provided the
Sun Devils with a spark off the
bench, playing solid defense
while grabbing 13 rebounds. Arizona State hit 14 of 28 shots in the
second half to remain one of the
nation’s four undefeated teams.
Saben Lee had 24 points to lead
Vanderbilt, which shot 4 for 30
from three-point range.
Following a 10-point win over
then-No. 2 Kansas on Dec. 10, the
Sun Devils moved up to No. 5,
their highest ranking since being
No. 3 in 1980-81.
The spotlight appeared to be
too bright for the Sun Devils early
against Vanderbilt.
Disjointed and struggling with
double-teams in the post, Arizona
State had five turnovers in the
game’s opening five minutes. The
Sun Devils didn’t score until
Romello White’s layup at 14:49.
But after taking a 30-29 halftime lead, the Sun Devils kept the
engine revving in the second half,
scoring 12 straight points to push
the lead to 49-31.
BAYLOR 118, SAVANNAH
STATE 86: Jo-Lual Acuil piled up
31 points and 20 rebounds for the
No. 21 Bears, who had a 21-0
first-half run to rout the Tigers in
Waco, Tex.
Baylor (9-2) led by 31 points
during a first half in which it shot
62 percent (21 for 34), including
53 percent from three-point
range (9 for 17).
Manu
Lecomte
added
25 points for Baylor. Dexter McClananahan led Savannah State
(3-10) with 22 points.
WOMEN’S ROUNDUP
Shepard scores 39 to lead Irish past Blue Demons
NOTRE DAME 91,
DEPAUL 82
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
Jessica Shepard scored a career-high 39 points, and No. 2
Notre Dame withstood a threepoint barrage by DePaul for a 9182 victory Sunday in South Bend,
Ind.
Shepard, who twice scored
35 points for Nebraska before
transferring, hit 17 of 22 shots and
had 11 rebounds.
“Jessica has just a phenomenal
game to dominate the inside the
way she did,” Notre Dame Coach
Muffet McGraw said. “That’s what
we hoped she could do, what we
knew she could do, and I think the
team did a very good job looking
for her.”
Arike Ogunbowale added 21 for
the Irish (10-1). She had just two
points at halftime while making
1 of 9 shots.
DePaul (7-4) shot 13 for 36 on
three-pointers. Ashton Millender
led the Blue Demons with
18 points.
Shepard scored 26 points as
Notre Dame led 41-40 at halftime.
The Irish were up 60-58 Irish after
three quarters.
Notre Dame’s Jackie Young
missed her first five shots while
adjusting to a mask to protect a
broken nose suffered Friday in
practice. She finished with just
four points.
Marina Mabrey had 13 points
and Kathryn Westbeld added
10 for Notre Dame.
Amarah Coleman had 17 and
Chante Stonewall 16 points for
DePaul.
TEXAS
87,
FLORIDA
STATE 72: Brooke McCarty re-
turned from a hip injury to score a
season-high 24 points, leading the
No. 8 Longhorns past the No. 12
Seminoles in Austin.
McCarty, a senior guard, missed
one game. She appeared just fine
against Florida State, making 10 of
13 shots and adding six assists.
Ariel Atkins had 17 points, eight
rebounds and four steals for Texas
(9-1). Lashann Higgs had 15 points
and four steals, and Jatarie White
added 10 points and 12 rebounds.
AJ Alix led Florida State (10-1)
with 21 points, including five
three-pointers, and had eight assists. Shakayla Thomas scored 19.
Florida State set a blistering
tone from the start, converting its
first seven shots. When the Seminoles finally missed, they retrieved the rebound and Alix
made a three-point basket, her
second of the game and FSU’s
fourth. The Seminoles led by 11
after tacking on a free throw.
Texas then finished the quarter
with a 16-2 push, with Higgs and
McCarty scoring six apiece.
18 points and 11 rebounds in her
seventh double-double of the season, and the No. 5 Bulldogs (11-0)
rolled over the Black Bears (6-5) in
Starkville, Miss.
LOUISVILLE 87, KENTUCKY 63: Asia Durr scored
OREGON 90, MISSISSIPPI
46: Sabrina Ionescu tied an NCAA
32 points, Myisha Hines-Allen
added 18, and the No. 3 Cardinals
outscored the Wildcats 24-9 in the
second quarter and cruised in Lexington, Ky.
The Cardinals (13-0) were
ahead throughout but broke it
open in the second quarter to lead
47-25 at halftime. Durr followed
three straight baskets by HinesAllen early in the third with eight
consecutive points, including consecutive three-pointers, for a 6337 cushion. Louisville didn’t let up
to earn its first series win in Lexington in 10 years and second in a
row overall.
Maci Morris had 16 points and
Tatyana Wyatt 10 for Kentucky
(8-4). The Wildcats dropped their
third straight and fourth in six
games.
record with her seventh career
triple-double, and the No. 9 Ducks
(9-2) routed the Rebels (9-2) in
Eugene, Ore. Ionescu, a sophomore guard, had 21 points, 14 assists and 11 rebounds for her third
triple-double this season.
SOUTH CAROLINA 99, SAVANNAH STATE 38: In Colum-
bia, S.C., A’ja Wilson scored
26 points as the shorthanded
Gamecocks, ranked fourth, improved to 10-1 with the blowout of
Savannah State (2-7).
MISSISSIPPI STATE 83,
MAINE 43: Teaira McCowan had
TENNESSEE 90, LONG
BEACH STATE 61: In Long
Beach, Calif., Anastasia Hayes and
Meme Jackson each scored
15 points and the No. 7 Lady Vols
defeated the 49ers (2-8) to extend
their season-opening winning
streak to 11 games.
Colonials upend Eagles
Junior Kelsi Mahoney made a
career-high five three-pointers en
route to 15 points and freshman
Neila Luma chipped in 12 points
and seven rebounds as George
Washington (4-7) snapped a fourgame skid with a 61-44 win over
American (6-4) at Smith Center.
VIRGINIA 77, OHIO 59: The
Cavaliers (5-6) got 17 points from
senior guard Aliyah Huland and
defeated the Bobcats (5-4) in the
West Palm Invitational Tournament in West Palm Beach, Fla.
PENN STATE 72,
GEORGE MASON 54
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
Penn State played without its
leading scorer Sunday, but against
a George Mason team in a terrible
shooting rut, the absence hardly
mattered for the rising Big Ten
program.
The Nittany Lions toyed with
the Patriots in the lane and easily
compensated for suspended
guard Tony Carr, roaring to a 20point halftime lead and cruising to
a 72-54 victory before 5,439 at
Eagle Bank Arena in Fairfax.
Forwards Lamar Stevens and
Mike Watkins combined for
37 points on 14-for-25 shooting,
24 rebounds and four blocked
shots as the Nittany Lions (9-3)
completed a week-long sweep of
Atlantic 10 foes from the Washington area. On Dec. 9, they smashed
visiting George Washington by
20 points.
This outcome was put to rest
early.
The Patriots (5-7) shot 26 percent in the first half and 37 percent
overall and missed all 14 threepoint attempts. Coupled with a
23-point home loss to Georgia
Southern on Tuesday, the perimeter-oriented team has made four
of its past 37 three-pointers and
shot 33 percent overall.
“We’re a better team than what
we have shown” the past two
games, Mason Coach Dave Paulsen said. “We know that. This is the
same group that has put together
some pretty good performances
against some good teams. But
we’re in a little bit of a funk right
now offensively. We’ve got to battle
through it.”
The Patriots were competitive
at Louisville and Auburn, fueling
optimism for the last stretch of
nonconference games. But they
have dropped three of four during
a five-game homestand that will
end Friday against Morgan State.
The latest setback was ugly in
the first half and trivial in the
second as the margin never
dipped below 17.
Sophomore Justin Kier led the
Patriots with 17 points, and junior
Jaire Grayer added 13 points and
nine rebounds. Penn State junior
Josh Reaves, from Fairfax and Paul
VI, added 13 points and four assists, while freshman Jamari
Wheeler came off the bench to
record six steals as the Nittany
Lions avenged a 19-point home
defeat last winter.
Carr, the Big Ten’s second-leading scorer at 20 points per game,
did not play after violating team
rules, Coach Patrick Chambers
said. The sophomore will return
Tuesday against Binghamton.
“The beauty of what happened
was Tony was amazing these last
few days: led his team, was engaged,” Chambers said. “I was really pleased with how he took this
game being out and then what he
did after it. That’s growth. That’s
maturity.”
Carr’s absence did not spoil the
Nittany Lions’ plans. With a notable size advantage, they placed
greater emphasis on the inside
game and scored at will in the first
half.
For a 41/2-minute stretch, the
6-foot-8 Stevens (23 points, 12 rebounds) and the 6-9, 254-pound
Watkins (14, 12) encountered little
resistance in combining for four
layups and three dunks on eight
possessions.
After Paulsen called a timeout,
the Nittany Lions stepped out for
consecutive three-pointers by
Shep Garner and Stevens to cap a
21-4 run and stretch the lead to
30-12. The margin ballooned to 20
when Wheeler swiped the ball
from Otis Livingston II at midcourt and breezed for a layup.
“Their whole offense was mostly attacking with their size,” Grayer said. “For some reason, we just
couldn’t keep it out of the paint.
That’s where they mostly killed
us.”
Aside from a height deficit, the
Patriots lacked bulk on the front
line. Consequently, they labored to
push the stronger Nittany Lions
away from the basket.
At the other end, Mason relied
almost solely on guards.
“We don’t have a guy who can
just impose his will physically on
the other team on the offensive
end to make the game a little
easier for the guys,” Paulsen said.
In the first half, the Patriots
were 7 for 27 and missed all nine
three-point attempts. The situation worsened after intermission
before it improved, leaving Mason
behind by more points (26) than it
had scored (18).
“If we get the guys to continue
to take the steps forward,” Paulsen
said, “hopefully we can put all the
pieces together here — sooner
rather than later.”
steven.goff@washpost.com
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
nfl Week 15
L.A. makes
statement,
dominates
in Seattle
RAMS 42,
SEAHAWKS 7
BY
there,” Bridgewater said. “I have a
ton of people to thank for getting
me to this point.”
Terence Newman also picked
off former teammate Dalton, who
went 11 for 22 for 113 yards before
the Bengals (5-9) turned to backup AJ McCarron after the interception by Williams.
Keenum completed 20 of 23
passes, including seven tosses to
McKinnon for 114 yards in the
first 100-yard receiving game for a
Vikings running back since Onterrio Smith in 2004. With the
Bengals already missing both
starting cornerbacks and all three
regular linebackers, they lost free
safety George Iloka in the first
quarter to a shoulder injury. That
left Williams as the only starter in
the back seven.
About the only bright spot for
the Bengals was five-time Pro
Bowl defensive tackle Geno Atkins, who sacked Keenum twice
in the first quarter. The Bengals
didn’t cross midfield until less
than three minutes remained in
the third quarter.
seattle — Todd Gurley caught
the pass from Jared Goff, turned
upfield and once again found no
resistance in his sprint to the end
zone.
After 21/2 quarters and four
touchdowns scored, Gurley was
no longer needed. The Los Angeles Rams had made their statement.
“This was just one of those
wins where everything was clicking for us. Everybody was doing
their job. Everybody was out
there competing and we didn’t
want to let up,” Gurley said.
“These guys been kicking our
[butt] for the last 10, 15 years so
you’ve got to enjoy it and you’ve
got to take advantage of a situation like this.”
Led by Gurley’s 152 yards rushing and four total touchdowns,
the Rams moved to the cusp of
their first division title since 2003
with a 42-7 thumping of the
Seattle Seahawks on Sunday.
What was supposed to be a
matchup to determine first place
in the NFC West turned into the
Rams embarrassing Seattle into
the worst loss of Coach Pete
Carroll’s eight seasons.
It was one-sided. It was dominant. And whether the Rams
(10-4) wanted to admit it or not, it
was a statement victory.
“Did we expect a game like
this? Probably not,” Rams defensive end Robert Quinn said. “But
we did expect to play a great
game. We played pretty great.”
The Rams don’t have the division wrapped up, but have a
two-game lead with two weeks to
play. A win against either Tennessee or San Francisco is enough for
their first division title in 14
years.
Perhaps bigger than the division title was the statement made
by the Rams. They didn’t just win
in Seattle — a place losing its aura
as the toughest to play in the
league. They completely dominated the Seahawks, making a
Carroll-coached team look rarely
overmatched in a big game.
Seattle (8-6) is barely alive for
the postseason, and it will likely
need some help.
“No, there is nothing to be
happy about. That was a really
dismal performance by us,” Carroll said.
While the Seahawks don’t look
playoff ready, the Rams look
playoff scary, dominating the line
of scrimmage and taking advantage of their first-half opportunities.
The Rams scored on six of
seven first-half drives thanks
largely to great field position. Six
of the Rams seven possessions in
the first half started at midfield
or inside Seattle territory and
they scored on all six.
The surge included a 21-point
scoring blitz in the second quarter capped by a 57-yard TD run by
Gurley on third and 20 with less
than a minute remaining in the
first half to take a 34-0 lead at the
break.
Gurley had 144 yards rushing
in the first half, twice scoring
from the 1. He added a 14-yard
touchdown reception midway
through the third quarter for a
40-0 Rams lead and spent the
rest of his day watching. The 152
yards rushing were the secondbest of his career.
Goff didn’t need to do much,
completing 14 of 21 for 120 yards
and two touchdowns. He threw a
one-yard touchdown pass to Robert Woods in the second quarter
along with his touchdown to
Gurley.
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
KEITH SRAKOCIC/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Safety Duron Harmon, center, saved the day for New England with his interception of a tipped pass from Ben Roethlisberger in the final seconds Sunday at Heinz Field.
Patriots steal an emotional win in Pittsburgh
PATRIOTS 27,
STEELERS 24
BY
M ARK M ASKE
pittsburgh — The rain fell
steadily and the emotions swung
wildly Sunday for the Pittsburgh
Steelers, the New England Patriots and most everyone else gathered at Heinz Field.
The spirits of the Steelers and
their fans were buoyed by the
appearance of injured linebacker
Ryan Shazier at the game. Their
hopes sagged when wide receiver
Antonio Brown was helped from
the field and subsequently taken
to a hospital with what was described as a calf injury.
Then the Steelers somehow
found ways to win, then lose, then
win, then lose the most significant game of the NFL season so
far. They fell to the Patriots, 27-24,
by succumbing to the late-game
magic of Tom Brady and the
return to prominence of the
sport’s notorious catch rule via a
key instant replay reversal.
“It’s a game of emotion,” Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger said.
That certainly was the case
Sunday. Brady, losing his quarter-
back duel with Roethlisberger for
most of the afternoon, took the
Patriots down the field when it
mattered most. He led a 77-yard
touchdown drive that culminated
with an eight-yard touchdown
run by Dion Lewis with 56 seconds remaining. Brady then
threw a two-point conversion
pass to tight end Rob Gronkowski, and the New England defense
held on from there — barely — as
the Patriots regained the upper
hand in the race for the top seed
in the AFC playoffs.
“It was just one of those days,”
Brady said. “It goes back and
forth, and you play right to the
end. The ball bounces some weird
ways. I’m glad it bounced our way
today.”
The Patriots, coming off a stunning loss Monday night at Miami,
improved to 11-3. They are tied
with the Steelers but hold the
head-to-head tiebreaker.
“Obviously the Patriots are the
team to beat,” Steelers offensive
tackle Alejandro Villanueva said.
“They’ve proven year in and year
out that they dominate the AFC.
For us, if we’re going to accomplish our goals, we’re going to
have to beat them at some point.
We had a pretty good chance
today. Definitely heartbroken to
some degree. But we’ll have to
[regroup] and get better. We have
to be a better team to beat the New
England Patriots the next time.”
The Patriots now control the
race for home-field advantage in
what many regard as an inevitable rematch between these
teams in the AFC title game.
“We’ll see them again in a
couple weeks,” Steelers wide receiver Martavis Bryant said.
The Steelers appeared to answer the Patriots’ late-game
touchdown with one of their own.
Roethlisberger followed a 69yard catch and run by rookie wide
receiver JuJu Smith-Schuster
with an apparent 10-yard touchdown pass to tight end Jesse
James with 28 seconds left. But a
replay review concluded that
James did not have control of the
football as he went to the turf,
resulting in an incompletion.
“I reached the ball out,” James
said. “I felt good about it. But it’s
the National Football League. I
can’t control that.”
The wild final sequence ended
with Roethlisberger throwing a
tipped-pass interception to New
England’s Duron Harmon with
five seconds to go after faking a
clock-stopping, third-down spike.
“I think all the great quarterbacks do that,” Patriots safety
Devin McCourty said. “If they can
catch you sleeping and get an easy
play, they’re going to try to do it.
So you could see us yelling and
screaming the coverage, trying to
line guys up.”
Roethlisberger said the spikethat-wasn’t wasn’t his idea.
“It wasn’t a fake spike,” he said.
“I was yelling, ‘Clock it!’ because I
felt like that was the thing to do
was clock it, get yourself one play.
And it came from the sideline:
‘Don’t clock it! Don’t clock it!’
Well, at that time, everyone
thinks it’s a clock. So you don’t
have time to try and get everyone
lined up. So I tried to — Eli
[Rogers] saw that. He kind of ran
a quick slant in there. At that
time, you’ve just got to try to
make a play. I didn’t make a good
enough throw.”
Fans gave a loud ovation when
Shazier, who suffered a spinal
cord injury while making a tackle
during a game against the Cincinnati Bengals earlier this month,
was shown on the stadium video
board. He appeared to be sitting
in a suite in the stadium. Shazier
underwent spinal stabilization
surgery and has begun rehabilitation, and the Steelers placed him
on the season-ending injured reserve list.
“It was awesome,” Roethlisberger said. “I would have loved
to have been able to win this one
for him. Just to see him here was
really cool.”
Roethlisberger threw for two
touchdowns on the day. Tailback
Le’Veon Bell added a touchdown
run as the Steelers had to compensate for the loss of Brown
from their offense.
He was hurt amid of tangle of
bodies — and legs — on a secondquarter incompletion in the end
zone. Brown remained on the turf
and had to be helped by members
of the Steelers’ medical staff to
the sideline. He appeared to be
putting no weight on his left leg.
He was taken to the medical tent
on the Steelers’ sideline and then,
soon after, to the locker room.
The team initially announced
that Brown had suffered a calf
injury and his return to the game
was questionable. But he was
taken to a hospital soon thereafter, and the Steelers declared him
out for the game.
Steelers Coach Mike Tomlin
said he did not have “a lot of
information” on Brown’s injury. It
was one of many issues with
which the Steelers were left to
deal.
“Just not quite enough to finish
it,” Tomlin said. “Such is life sometimes in the NFL.”
mark.maske@washpost.com
Minnesota routs depleted Cincinnati to claim NFC North title
VIKINGS 34,
BENGALS 7
BY
D AVE C AMPBELL
minneapolis — The Minnesota
Vikings and their loud crowd
overwhelmed the Cincinnati Bengals from start to finish, and the
players put on NFC North champions hats to celebrate the first
major milestone of a season that
they hope will feature many more.
From coaches to players to
fans, everyone in purple enjoyed a
postseason tuneup.
Eric Kendricks had an interception return for a touchdown,
Case Keenum passed for 236
yards and two scores, and the
Vikings clinched the division title
with a 34-7 victory over the depleted and disinterested Bengals
on Sunday.
“To guarantee a home playoff
game there? I can’t imagine. I
have a feeling it’s going to be even
more amped up,” Keenum said.
Running backs Latavius Mur-
ray and Jerick McKinnon combined for 242 yards from scrimmage for the Vikings (11-3), who
were given quite a reprieve after
their eight-game winning streak
ended last week at Carolina.
“It feels good,” wide receiver
Adam Thielen said, “but it was a
little bit restrained because
there’s still work to do.”
The Vikings were never challenged by a Bengals team missing
more than half of its starting
defense to injuries and that was
met with a morning report by
ESPN that Coach Marvin Lewis
will not return next season. Lewis
said after the game that that’s not
true, but the Bengals have all
kinds of issues to address after
losing their past two games by a
combined 67-14.
“It’s the most disappointed I’ve
been in the last couple of years,”
said wide receiver A.J. Green, who
accounted for two of Cincinnati’s
three first downs while starting
quarterback Andy Dalton was in
the game until midway through
the fourth quarter. “It’s been a
tough season.”
BRUCE KLUCKHOHN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vikings cornerback Terence Newman, center, had an interception
as Minnesota held the Bengals to 161 yards of total offense.
The game went so smoothly for
the Vikings that Teddy Bridgewater even made a grand entrance,
his first action in 16 months since
a massive knee injury. Bridgewater’s first pass was intercepted — a
high throw that bounced off McK-
innon’s hands and into the arms
of safety Shawn Williams deep in
Vikings territory. That set up a
short touchdown run by Giovani
Bernard to keep the Bengals from
being shut out.
“It was great just being out
T IM B OOTH
L EA DER S
PASSING
RUSHING
CMP-ATT
YARDS
TD
37-57
31-43
434
381
3
1
C.J. Anderson, Broncos
Kareem Hunt, Chiefs
Blake Bortles, Jaguars
21-29
326
3
Mitchell Trubisky, Bears
31-46
314
1
Tom Brady, Patriots
22-35
298
Aaron Rodgers, Packers
Joe Flacco, Ravens
26-45
26-42
290
288
Drew Brees, Saints
Eli Manning, Giants
Jimmy Garoppolo, 49ers
RECEIVING
ATT
YARDS
TD
REC
YARDS
TD
30
24
158
155
0
1
Keelan Cole, Jaguars
Rob Gronkowski, Patriots
7
9
186
168
1
0
Todd Gurley, Rams
21
152
3
Sterling Shepard, Giants
11
139
1
Le’Veon Bell, Steelers
24
117
1
Greg Olsen, Titans
9
116
1
1
Kenyan Drake, Dolphins
16
78
1
Marquise Goodwin, 49ers
3
1
Melvin Gordon, Chargers
Marshawn Lynch, Raiders
19
16
78
76
1
0
Jerick McKinnon, Vikings
JuJu Smith-Schuster, Steelers
10
114
0
7
6
114
114
0
0
26-36
285
2
Latavius Murray, Vikings
20
76
1
Jarvis Landry, Dolphins
10
99
0
Ben Roethlisberger, Steelers 22-30
281
2
Mark Ingram, Saints
12
74
2
Rishard Matthews, Titans
6
95
1
Jay Cutler, Dolphins
274
0
Isaiah Crowell, Browns
5
72
0
Michael Thomas, Saints
9
93
1
28-49
STEPHEN B. MORTON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
NFL WEEK 15
Foles’s four TD throws help Philadelphia earn bye
S TA ND I NG S
NFC
EAST
W
L T
PCT
NFC
AFC
DIV
z-Philadelphia
Dallas
12
8
2 0
6 0
.857 438 279
.571 336 311
6-0-0
3-4-0
6-2-0 10-1-0
5-2-0 6-4-0
2-1-0
2-2-0
5-0-0
4-1-0
6 8 0
2 12 0
.429 305 359
.143 228 355
4-3-0
1-6-0
2-5-0 5-6-0
1-6-0 0-10-0
1-2-0
2-2-0
1-4-0
0-5-0
Washington
N.Y. Giants
PF
PF
PA HOME
SOUTH
W
L T
PCT
AWAY
NFC
AFC
DIV
New Orleans
10
4 0
.714 401 282
6-1-0
4-3-0
7-3-0
3-1-0
3-1-0
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Bay
10
8
4
4 0
5 0
9 0
.714 331 286
.615 294 261
.308 264 312
5-2-0
4-3-0
3-3-0
5-2-0
4-2-0
1-6-0
6-4-0
7-2-0
2-7-0
4-0-0
1-3-0
2-2-0
2-2-0
2-1-0
0-3-0
PA HOME
NORTH
W
L T
PCT
AWAY
NFC
AFC
DIV
z-Minnesota
11
3 0
.786 343 242
6-1-0
5-2-0
8-2-0
3-1-0
3-1-0
8
7
6 0
7 0
.571 358 339
.500 309 333
3-4-0
4-3-0
5-2-0
3-4-0
7-4-0
5-5-0
1-2-0
2-2-0
4-1-0
2-2-0
Chicago
4 10 0
.286 234 294
2-5-0
2-5-0 1-10-0
3-0-0
0-5-0
WEST
W
L T
L.A. Rams
Seattle
Arizona
10
8
6
4 0
6 0
8 0
.714 438 272
.571 321 294
.429 246 337
4 10 0
.286 253 337
Detroit
Green Bay
San Francisco
PCT
PF
PA HOME
AWAY
PF
PA HOME
AWAY
NFC
AFC
DIV
4-3-0
4-3-0
4-3-0
6-1-0
4-3-0
2-5-0
7-4-0
6-4-0
3-7-0
3-0-0
2-2-0
3-1-0
4-1-0
4-1-0
2-3-0
2-5-0
2-5-0
2-9-0
2-1-0
0-5-0
PA HOME
AFC
EAST
W
L T
PCT
AWAY
AFC
NFC
DIV
z-New England
Buffalo
11
8
3 0
6 0
.786 395 274
.571 264 306
4-2-0
6-2-0
7-1-0
2-4-0
8-2-0
6-4-0
3-1-0
2-2-0
3-1-0
2-2-0
6
5
8 0
9 0
.429 252 342
.357 285 342
4-3-0
4-3-0
2-5-0
1-6-0
5-5-0
5-5-0
1-3-0
0-4-0
2-3-0
2-3-0
PA HOME
Miami
N.Y. Jets
SOUTH
W
L T
PCT
y-Jacksonville
10
4 0
.714
Tennessee
Houston
Indianapolis
8 6 0
4 10 0
3 11 0
PF
AWAY
AFC
NFC
DIV
374 209
PF
6-2-0
4-2-0
9-2-0
1-2-0
4-1-0
.571 296 319
.286 319 380
.214 225 368
5-1-0
3-4-0
2-5-0
3-5-0
1-6-0
1-6-0
7-4-0
3-7-0
2-8-0
1-2-0
1-3-0
1-3-0
4-1-0
1-4-0
1-4-0
PA HOME
NORTH
W
L T
PCT
AWAY
AFC
NFC
DIV
z-Pittsburgh
11
3 0
.786 344
278
5-2-0
6-1-0
8-2-0
3-1-0
5-0-0
8
5
6 0
9 0
.571 345 256
.357 233 305
4-2-0
3-4-0
4-4-0
2-5-0
6-4-0
5-6-0
2-2-0
0-3-0
3-2-0
2-3-0
Cleveland
0 14 0
.000 207 362
0-8-0
0-6-0 0-11-0
0-3-0
0-5-0
WEST
W
L T
Kansas City
L.A. Chargers
Oakland
8
7
6
6 0
7 0
8 0
.571 359 302
.500 311 255
.429 281 324
Denver
5
9 0
.357 254 328
Baltimore
Cincinnati
PCT
PF
PF
PA HOME
AWAY
AFC
NFC
DIV
5-2-0
4-3-0
4-4-0
3-4-0
3-4-0
2-4-0
6-4-0
4-6-0
5-6-0
2-2-0
3-1-0
1-2-0
4-1-0
2-3-0
2-3-0
4-3-0
1-6-0
4-7-0
1-2-0
2-3-0
x-late game; y-clinched playoff spot; z-clinched division
Thursday’s result
Saturday’s games
Denver 25, at Indianapolis 13
Indianapolis at Baltimore, 4:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Green Bay, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday’s results
at Detroit 20, Chicago 10
at Kansas City 30, L.A. Chargers 13
Sunday’s results
at Washington 20, Arizona 15
at Minnesota 34, Cincinnati 7
at Baltimore 27, Cleveland 10
at Buffalo 24, Miami 16
at Carolina 31, Green Bay 24
at Jacksonville 45, Houston 7
at New Orleans 31, N.Y. Jets 19
Philadelphia 34, at N.Y. Giants 29
L.A. Rams 42, at Seattle 7
New England 27, at Pittsburgh 24
at San Francisco 25, Tennessee 23
Dallas 20, at Oakland 17
Sunday’s games
Denver at Washington, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Miami at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
L.A. Rams at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
L.A. Chargers at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at New England, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Arizona, 4:25 p.m.
Seattle at Dallas, 4:25 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 25
Pittsburgh at Houston, 4:30 p.m.
Oakland at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.
Monday’s game
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 8:30 p.m.
EAGLES 34,
GIANTS 29
BY
T OM C ANAVAN
east rutherford, n.j. — Nick
Foles replaced the injured Carson Wentz, and nothing really
changed for the Philadelphia Eagles.
They got four touchdown passes from their quarterback, like
they did a week ago, and won
again to secure a first-round
playoff bye.
Another ho-hum day for the
best team in the NFC and NFC
East champions.
Foles hit four different receivers on touchdown passes ranging
from three to 13 yards in his first
start, and the Eagles rallied from
an early 13-point deficit to defeat
the New York Giants, 34-29, on
Sunday.
“I thought he played well,”
Philadelphia Coach Doug Pederson said of Foles. “There are
some things he would like to do
over. Every game is going be that
way. I thought he handled himself extremely well, a lot of poise.
He did a nice job.”
There was speculation that the
Eagles (12-2) would rely on their
running game this week against
the Giants (2-12) to give Foles
time to adjust to the offense.
Pederson ruled that out.
“With him coming out and
saying he’s not changing anything, it says a lot about his
confidence in me and his confidence in the players in the offense,” said Foles, who completed
24 of 38 passes for 237 yards with
no interceptions.
Foles clearly is no Wentz. He is
more a pocket passer, and there
were times in the game in which
Wentz clearly would have been
scrambling for a first down. Foles
carried twice for zero yards.
The Eagles made a late stand
on fourth and goal in the final
minute in edging the Giants for
the second time this season,
spoiling a three-touchdown, season-high 434-yard passing game
by Eli Manning.
“We know what he’s capable of,
and that showed today,” Giants
interim coach Steve Spagnuolo
said after Manning’s ninth 400yard game of his career.
Manning, who threw for
BRAD PENNER/USA TODAY SPORTS
Nick Foles excelled in replacing Carson Wentz, who was lost for the season last week with a torn ACL.
366 yards earlier this season
against the Eagles, said the Giants had a good game plan.
“We got the ball out quickly,
playing fast with some tempo
stuff,” said the 36-year-old, who
finished 37 for 57. “I think that
confused them a little bit.”
Foles hit Alshon Jeffery, Zach
Ertz, Trey Burton and Nelson
Agholor on scoring passes in
filling in for Wentz, who tore an
anterior cruciate ligament last
week and was lost for the season
after a brilliant year.
The Eagles also got two field
goals from Jake Elliott and three
blocked kicks from their special
teams, foiling an extra point, a
punt and field goal. The blocked
punt set up a touchdown.
Philadelphia will play its final
two regular season games at
home and then wait for the
conference semifinal.
“It’s obviously something
great,” Foles said of the bye. “I
was fortunate to be a part of it
last year in Kansas City. We still
have a lot of work to do this
season. The big thing is you let
your body recover.”
Manning hit Tavarres King for
CHRIS GRAYTHEN/GETTY IMAGES
Mark Ingram rushed for two TDs, including a late 50-yard score
that sealed the victory as New Orleans stayed atop the NFC South.
Saints 31, Jets 19
Mark Ingram gave New Orleans much more than the firstdown run it needed to wind
down the clock on New York.
His determined burst across
the line of scrimmage thrust him
into the Jets’ defensive backfield
with too much speed and vigor
for anyone to catch him — a fitting finish to one of his better
days in a memorable season.
Ingram ran for two touchdowns and gained 151 yards from
scrimmage, capped by his late
50-yard TD run, and the Saints
overcame three turnovers to defeat the reeling Jets.
“Getting the ball into his
hands is obviously what we want
to do,” New Orleans center Max
Unger said of Ingram, who
eclipsed 1,000 yards rushing for
a second straight season. “He’s
explosive.”
Ingram’s 54-yard gain on a
screen, which set up a field goal,
was the longer of his two 50-yard
plays.
“He’s making people miss.
He’s creating,” said fellow Saints
RB Alvin Kamara, who added a
10-yard touchdown catch.
The Saints (10-4) needed to
beat the Jets (5-9) to maintain a
tenuous hold on first place in the
NFC South. New Orleans leads
Carolina (10-4) on head-to-head
results. Atlanta (8-5) can pull
one game behind by beating
Tampa Bay on Monday night.
The Jets, eliminated from
playoff contention, kept it close
until Saints WR Michael Thom-
as’s four-yard fourth-quarter
touchdown made it 24-13.
Bryce Petty made his first start
at quarterback for New York this
season, completing 19 of 39 passes for 179 yards and a touchdown. He was intercepted twice.
JETS ......................................... 0
SAINTS .................................. 10
10
7
3
0
6 — 19
14 — 31
FIRST QUARTER
New Orleans: FG Lutz 23, 11:36.
New Orleans: Ingram 1 run (Lutz kick), 3:07.
SECOND QUARTER
N.Y. Jets: Powell 2 run (Catanzaro kick), 10:58.
New Orleans: Kamara 10 pass from Brees (Lutz kick),
6:12.
N.Y. Jets: FG Catanzaro 29, :09.
THIRD QUARTER
N.Y. Jets: FG Catanzaro 26, 8:07.
FOURTH QUARTER
New Orleans: M.Thomas 4 pass from Brees (Lutz kick),
7:39.
N.Y. Jets: McGuire 2 pass from Petty (pass failed),
1:51.
New Orleans: Ingram 50 run (Lutz kick), 1:33.
Attendance: 73,018.
JETS
First Downs ......................................... 19
Total Net Yards ................................. 294
Rushes-Yards ............................... 28-124
Passing .............................................. 170
Punt Returns ...................................... 1-0
Kickoff Returns .............................. 5-106
Interceptions Ret. ............................... 1-6
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 19-39-2
Sacked-Yards Lost .............................. 1-9
Punts .............................................. 7-45.1
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 0-0
Penalties-Yards ................................ 8-50
Time Of Possession ........................ 30:50
SAINTS
23
416
28-131
285
5-36
2-35
2-20
26-36-1
0-0
4-46.8
2-2
8-92
29:10
RUSHING
New York: Powell 13-44, McGuire 4-24, Forte 7-24, Petty 2-16, Natson 1-15, L.Thomas 1-1.
New Orleans: Ingram 12-74, Kamara 12-44, Line 2-8,
Lewis 1-6, Brees 1-(minus 1).
PASSING
New York: Petty 19-39-2-179.
New Orleans: Brees 26-36-1-285.
RECEIVING
New York: Anderson 5-40, McGuire 3-48, Kearse 3-28,
Hansen 3-21, Seferian-Jenkins 2-13, Forte 2-10, Natson 1-19.
New Orleans: M.Thomas 9-93, Kamara 6-45, Ingram
5-77, Coleman 3-20, Snead 1-23, J.Hill 1-22, Line 1-5.
MISSED FIELD GOALS
None.
two touchdowns and Sterling
Shepard for another. Orleans
Darkwa scored on a short run,
and Aldrick Rosas kicked a 28yard field goal.
Manning drove the Giants
from their 25-yard line with 3:56
to play to the Philadelphia 9 with
about a minute to go. A two-yard
loss on a pass to Shepard, an
incompletion in the end zone
and a five-yard run by Shane
Vereen got New York to the
Philadelphia 6 with 48 seconds
to play. Right tackle Bobby Hart
had a procedure penalty on
fourth down, putting the ball at
the 11.
Manning then threw a pass to
Evan Engram at the back of the
end zone that was high and
incomplete. The Giants complained bitterly after the play
that Eagles safety Corey Graham
held the rookie tight end’s left
arm and should have been called
for pass interference.
“I definitely thought it was
defensive pass interference,” Engram said. “Fourth down. It was
really obvious but no call.”
The Giants led 23-21 at the
half, but the Eagles took the lead
for good in the third quarter on a
28-yard field goal by Elliott and a
10-yard touchdown catch by Agholor.
New York had led 20-6, but
mistakes by Manning and the
Giants’ special teams got the
Eagles back in the game in a less
than three-minute span in the
second quarter.
A 37-yard interception return
by Ronald Darby to the New York
18 set up Foles’s second touchdown pass, a 10-yarder to Ertz,
cutting the Giants’ lead to 20-14.
Kamu Grugier-Hill blocked Brad
Wing’s punt on the Giants’ next
series. Foles found a wide-open
Burton on a 13-yard pass to give
the Eagles a 21-20 lead.
Rosas had a go-ahead 28-yard
field goal with 20 seconds left in
the half for a 23-21 lead.
The last time a team had a hat
trick of blocked kicks was
Nov. 24, 1991, when the Buffalo
Bills accomplished the feat
against New England.
Up next, the Eagles host the
Oakland Raiders on Christmas
night. The Giants visit the Arizona Cardinals on Sunday.
— Associated Press
LOGAN BOWLES/GETTY IMAGES
Backup wideout Jaydon Mickens, center, had two touchdown grabs
as Jacksonville clinched its first postseason berth since 2007.
Jaguars 45, Texans 7
Jacksonville owner Shad Khan
waited until the final few minutes
to start celebrating.
Had he uncorked the champagne when the game was essentially over, Khan would have been
drinking by halftime.
Blake Bortles threw three
touchdown passes, including two
to seldom-used backup WR Jaydon Mickens, and the Jaguars
clinched a playoff spot with a
drubbing of AFC South rival
Houston. Jacksonville’s seventh
victory in its past eight games
locked up the franchise’s first
postseason berth since 2007.
“It’s a story of perseverance,”
Khan said.
Once the NFL’s poster child for
futility and a punchline for potential relocation, the Jaguars (10-4)
are now one of the NFL’s top turnarounds.
The injury-riddled Texans
(4-10) have dropped four in a row
and seven of eight.
“They can smell the playoffs,”
Houston WR DeAndre Hopkins
said. “You can tell that by the way
they played. That’s what you play
for: playoff football.”
Bortles finished with a seasonhigh 326 yards and the best QB
rating (143.8) of his career. He did
it without WRs Allen Robinson,
Allen Hurns and Marqise Lee.
With Robinson (knee) on injured reserve, Hurns (ankle) inactive and Lee (ankle) in the locker
room, Mickens and rookie WR
Keelan Cole stepped up. Mickens
caught four passes for 61 yards
and two scores. Cole had seven receptions for a career-high 186
yards and a TD.
“It’s kind of cool that we solidified our spot,” Jaguars DT Malik
Jackson said. “Now we can get
over the giddiness of it. . . . We’re
not done yet.”
TEXANS .................................... 0
JAGUARS .................................. 7
0
24
7
7
0— 7
7 — 45
FIRST QUARTER
Jacksonville: Bohanon 1 run (Lambo kick), 3:52.
SECOND QUARTER
Jacksonville: Mickens 5 pass from Bortles (Lambo kick),
14:45.
Jacksonville: Mickens 14 pass from Bortles (Lambo kick),
10:12.
Jacksonville: FG Lambo 38, :53.
Jacksonville: K.Cole 9 pass from Bortles (Lambo kick),
:26.
THIRD QUARTER
Houston: Hopkins 25 pass from Yates (Fairbairn kick),
8:12.
Jacksonville: Bohanon 1 run (Lambo kick), 7:13.
FOURTH QUARTER
Jacksonville: Grant 8 run (Lambo kick), 10:26.
Attendance: 64,701.
TEXANS
First Downs .............................................. 9
Total Net Yards .................................... 186
Rushes-Yards ................................... 21-87
Passing ................................................... 99
Punt Returns ....................................... 1-16
Kickoff Returns ................................... 2-25
Interceptions Ret. ................................. 0-0
Comp-Att-Int ................................ 12-31-1
Sacked-Yards Lost .............................. 4-29
Punts .............................................. 11-47.1
Fumbles-Lost ........................................ 2-0
Penalties-Yards .............................. 14-127
Time Of Possession .......................... 26:42
JAGUARS
25
464
38-138
326
6-57
2-44
1-0
21-29-0
1-0
6-47.2
0-0
8-54
33:18
RUSHING
Houston: Blue 12-55, L.Miller 9-32.
Jacksonville: Grant 10-69, Ivory 17-42, Yeldon 7-27, Bohanon 2-2, Henne 2-(minus 2).
PASSING
Houston: Yates 12-31-1-128.
Jacksonville: Bortles 21-29-0-326.
RECEIVING
Houston: W.Fuller 5-44, Hopkins 4-80, L.Miller 2-1, Prosch 1-3.
Jacksonville: K.Cole 7-186, Mickens 4-61, Yeldon 4-25,
Westbrook 2-21, M.Lewis 2-18, O’Shaughnessy 1-15,
Koyack 1-0.
MISSED FIELD GOALS
None.
BRETT CARLSEN/GETTY IMAGES
LeSean McCoy scored two TDs and reached 10,000 rushing yards
for his career while helping Buffalo remain in the playoff hunt.
Bills 24, Dolphins 16
With his personal chase for
10,000 career yards rushing out
of the way, Buffalo RB LeSean
McCoy can turn his focus to
reaching an even better destination: the playoffs.
McCoy scored twice and became the 30th NFL player to hit
10,000, and the Bills remained
firmly in the AFC playoff picture
with a win over Miami.
“I’m happy it’s done,” McCoy
said of his accomplishment.
“Now I look forward to trying to
get in these playoffs. We took
care of business today.”
Buffalo QB Tyrod Taylor
showed no signs of a bruised left
knee that sidelined him for one
game. He went 17 for 29 for
224 yards and a touchdown. He
added 42 yards rushing and
scored on a nine-yard scamper in
a game the Bills never trailed.
On defense, the Bills intercepted Jay Cutler to end the Dolphins’ first two possessions of
the second half. Then rookie CB
Tre’Davious White sealed the win
with an interception with 28 seconds left — and a play after Miami P Matt Haack recovered an
onside kick.
The loss all but mathematically eliminated the Dolphins (6-8)
from playoff contention; they
ended a seven-year drought last
season.
Buffalo improved to 8-6 to
match the team’s best record
through 14 games during the
team’s 17-year playoff drought —
the longest active streak in North
America’s four major professional sports. The Bills were 8-6 in
both 2004 and 2014 but missed
the playoffs with 9-7 finishes.
Buffalo’s 6-2 home record was
its best finish in Orchard Park,
N.Y., since 1999.
The Bills now hit the road to
continue their playoff pursuit in
closing the season at New England and at Miami.
DOLPHINS ................................ 3
BILLS ........................................ 7
3
14
0
3
10 — 16
0 — 24
FIRST QUARTER
Buffalo: McCoy 4 run (Hauschka kick), 10:12.
Miami: FG Parkey 28, 3:16.
SECOND QUARTER
Miami: FG Parkey 41, 9:15.
Buffalo: McCoy 16 pass from T.Taylor (Hauschka kick),
6:05.
Buffalo: T.Taylor 9 run (Hauschka kick), :33.
THIRD QUARTER
Buffalo: FG Hauschka 34, 5:40.
FOURTH QUARTER
Miami: Drake 1 run (Parkey kick), 7:57.
Miami: FG Parkey 26, :39.
Attendance: 62,202.
DOLPHINS
First Downs .......................................... 21
Total Net Yards ................................... 349
Rushes-Yards ............................... 21-100
Passing ................................................ 249
Punt Returns ..................................... 2-33
Kickoff Returns ................................. 2-43
Interceptions Ret. ............................... 0-0
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 28-49-3
Sacked-Yards Lost ............................ 3-25
Punts .............................................. 4-46.8
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 4-0
Penalties-Yards ................................ 7-60
Time Of Possession ......................... 32:25
BILLS
21
328
30-116
212
1-2
3-38
3-63
17-29-0
2-12
5-41.0
1-0
3-28
27:35
RUSHING
Miami: Drake 16-78, Cutler 2-8, Grant 1-7, Gray 2-7.
Buffalo: McCoy 20-50, T.Taylor 6-42, Cadet 4-24.
PASSING
Miami: Cutler 28-49-3-274.
Buffalo: T.Taylor 17-29-0-224.
RECEIVING
Miami: Landry 10-99, Parker 6-89, Drake 6-35, J.Thomas 2-15, Fasano 2-15, Grant 1-13, Stills 1-8.
Buffalo: Clay 5-68, McCoy 4-46, O’Leary 2-33, Benjamin
2-20, Tate 1-21, Thompson 1-16, Cadet 1-14, DiMarco
1-6.
MISSED FIELD GOALS
None.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
NFL week 15
Baltimore breezes past 0-14 Browns
RAVENS 27,
BROWNS 10
BY
J EFF Z REBIEC
cleveland — The out-of-town
scoreboards behind the end zones
at FirstEnergy Stadium put more
pressure on the Baltimore Ravens
than the host Cleveland Browns
did for much of the afternoon.
The scoreboards showed that
the Buffalo Bills were beating the
Miami Dolphins handily, meaning that the Ravens had to defeat
the Browns on Sunday to keep
pace in the AFC wild-card race.
Despite being behind at one
point in the second quarter, Baltimore scored 24 of the game’s final
27 points to pull away from Cleveland and post a relatively easy
27-10 victory.
The Ravens won their fourth
road game of the season and improved to 8-6 overall, while the
Browns (0-14) took another step
toward becoming the first winless
NFL team since the 2008 Detroit
Lions.
Joe Flacco threw for a seasonhigh 288 yards and didn’t turn the
ball over. He scored on a two-yard
touchdown run that gave the Ravens the lead for good late in the
second quarter, then added a 33yard touchdown pass to tight end
Benjamin Watson later in the second.
The Ravens’ defense forced
four turnovers and finished with
nine takeaways in two games
against the Browns this year.
After holding on to a tenuous
seven-point lead at halftime, the
Ravens took control of the game
with their special teams and defense. Punter Sam Koch pinned
the Browns inside the 5-yard line
for the third time in the game.
On the next play, Za’Darius
Smith got loose on the edge and
stripped Browns rookie quarterback DeShone Kizer in the end
zone. The ball rolled over the goal
RON SCHWANE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joe Flacco passed for a season-high 288 yards and a touchdown as
Baltimore improved to 8-6 to stay afloat in the AFC wild-card race.
line, but Ravens defensive tackle
Brandon Williams dived on it and
then got it back over the line for a
touchdown. It was the Ravens’
fifth defensive touchdown this
season.
A 43-yard field goal by Justin
Tucker in the final seconds of the
third quarter made the score 2710. Cornerback Brandon Carr
ended any thoughts of a Browns
comeback when he intercepted
Kizer in the end zone early in the
fourth quarter.
The Ravens controlled play in
the first quarter, but a failure to
finish drives prevented them
from building a commanding
league and from eliminating the
angst in a game they had to win.
They took the opening possession
and quickly drove into the red
zone, but they were forced to settle for a 31-yard field goal by
Tucker.
Through the first quarter, the
Browns had no net yards of total
offense and negative 12 passing
yards. Kizer was also intercepted
on Cleveland’s third drive by Eric
Weddle, who snared an overthrow
for his sixth pick of the season.
Eagles 34, Giants 29
EAGLES .................................... 7
GIANTS .................................. 13
14
10
10
6
3 — 34
0 — 29
Jimmy Garoppolo led one final
scoring drive in the closing seconds to cap a fantastic first home
start, Robbie Gould kicked a
game-winning 45-yard field goal
as time expired, and San Francisco topped Tennessee.
Garoppolo threw for a careerhigh 381 yards and a touchdown
during a dominant day to give the
49ers (4-10) a three-game winning
streak in a lost season. And Tom
Brady’s former backup showed he
could do it at home as well as on
the road — and against a playoff
contender, no less — outdueling
Marcus Mariota down the stretch
as the teams traded field goals.
Gould kicked three of his six
field goals in the final nine minutes — from 50, 48 and 45 yards —
and has gone 20 consecutive
without a miss.
Gould put the Niners out front
on a 48-yarder with 3:08 left.
Mariota then drove the Titans
(8-6) to a lead as Ryan Succop
kicked a 50-yard field goal with
1:07 to play before Garoppolo and
the San Francisco offense got one
last shot.
It took three tries this season,
and first-year Coach Kyle Shanahan finally found his reliable, playmaking quarterback after acquiring Garoppolo from New England
at the October trade deadline. Garoppolo showed that in 67 seconds
when forced into late action in a
loss to Seattle three weeks before
at Levi’s Stadium, then in back-toback road games before shining
again Sunday.
TITANS ...................................... 0
49ERS ........................................ 6
10
10
3
0
10 — 23
9 — 25
FIRST QUARTER
Tennessee: FG Succop 40, 14:06.
San Francisco: Celek 5 pass from Garoppolo (Gould kick),
5:30.
San Francisco: FG Gould 28, 1:37.
Tennessee: Walker 4 pass from Mariota (Succop kick),
:29.
THIRD QUARTER
RECEIVING
Tennessee: Matthews 6-95, Decker 5-63, Walker 5-37,
Davis 3-28, Henry 2-9, J.Smith 1-5, Murray 1-4.
San Francisco: Goodwin 10-114, Bourne 4-85, Kittle 4-52,
Tr.Taylor 4-40, Celek 3-63, Juszczyk 2-16, Hyde 2-14,
Robinson 1-3, Garoppolo 1-(minus 6).
MISSED FIELD GOALS
None.
7
0
THIRD QUARTER
SECOND QUARTER
Carolina: FG Gano 33, 9:02.
GB: Cobb 33 pass from A.Rodgers (Crosby kick), :26.
THIRD QUARTER
Carolina: Olsen 30 pass from Newton (Gano kick),
11:34.
Carolina: D.Byrd 9 pass from Newton (Gano kick), 7:20.
GB: FG Crosby 28, 1:23.
THIRD QUARTER
New England: Cooks 4 pass from Brady (kick failed),
8:50.
Pittsburgh: Bell 3 run (Boswell kick), 1:33.
THIRD QUARTER
FOURTH QUARTER
FOURTH QUARTER
Philadelphia: FG Elliott 28, 9:18.
Philadelphia: Agholor 10 pass from Foles (Elliott kick),
5:47.
N.Y. Giants: King 57 pass from Manning (pass failed),
1:57.
Carolina: D.Byrd 13 pass from Newton (Gano kick),
12:24.
GB: R.Rodgers 24 pass from A.Rodgers (Crosby kick),
2:43.
Attendance: 74,447.
New England: FG Gostkowski 46, 3:56.
New England: Lewis 8 run (Gronkowski pass from Brady), :56.
Attendance: 68,574.
FOURTH QUARTER
PACKERS PANTHERS
First Downs .......................................... 24
29
Total Net Yards ................................... 384
387
Rushes-Yards ............................... 19-120
38-151
Passing ................................................ 264
236
Punt Returns ..................................... 2-15
1-5
Kickoff Returns ................................... 0-0
2-45
Interceptions Ret. ............................... 0-0
3-10
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 26-45-3
20-31-0
Sacked-Yards Lost ............................ 3-26
1-6
Punts .............................................. 2-41.0
4-43.5
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 1-1
0-0
Penalties-Yards ................................ 6-28
5-40
Time Of Possession ......................... 26:03
33:57
GIANTS
27
504
23-75
429
1-7
5-100
0-0
37-57-1
1-5
3-24.7
0-0
5-67
29:07
RUSHING
Philadelphia: Ajayi 12-49, Barner 2-21, Blount 7-21,
Clement 4-17, Foles 2-0.
New York: Gallman 8-39, Vereen 5-15, Engram 1-14,
Darkwa 9-7.
RUSHING
Green Bay: A.Jones 3-47, A.Rodgers 6-43, J.Williams
10-30.
Carolina: McCaffrey 12-63, Newton 14-58, Stewart 1127, Whittaker 1-3.
PASSING
Green Bay: A.Rodgers 26-45-3-290.
Carolina: Newton 20-31-0-242.
PATRIOTS
First Downs .......................................... 21
Total Net Yards ................................... 360
Rushes-Yards ................................. 19-77
Passing ................................................ 283
Punt Returns ..................................... 1-11
Kickoff Returns ................................. 4-74
Interceptions Ret. ............................... 1-0
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 22-35-1
Sacked-Yards Lost ............................ 2-15
Punts .............................................. 2-48.0
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 0-0
Penalties-Yards .................................. 2-4
Time Of Possession ......................... 24:53
STEELERS
21
413
31-143
270
1-2
5-85
1-13
22-30-1
2-11
4-42.8
1-0
6-63
35:07
RUSHING
New England: Lewis 13-67, Burkhead 4-12, Brady
2-(minus 2).
Pittsburgh: Bell 24-117, Conner 3-13, Roethlisberger
3-10, Toussaint 1-3.
SECOND QUARTER
Oakland: Crabtree 2 pass from Carr (Tavecchio kick),
8:03.
Oakland: FG Tavecchio 39, 6:14.
Dallas: Prescott 5 run (Bailey kick), :45.
FOURTH QUARTER
Oakland: Crabtree 2 pass from Carr (Tavecchio kick),
10:35.
Dallas: FG Bailey 19, 1:44.
Attendance: 55,372.
COWBOYS
First Downs .......................................... 21
Total Net Yards ................................... 330
Rushes-Yards ............................... 31-126
Passing ................................................ 204
Punt Returns ..................................... 2-15
Kickoff Returns ................................. 1-22
Interceptions Ret. ............................... 0-0
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 18-27-2
Sacked-Yards Lost .............................. 2-8
Punts .............................................. 2-43.0
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 0-0
Penalties-Yards .............................. 7-100
Time Of Possession ......................... 32:20
RAIDERS
19
293
23-122
171
0-0
4-103
2-8
21-38-0
0-0
4-45.5
4-1
14-105
27:40
RUSHING
Dallas: Morris 16-61, Prescott 6-32, C.Jones 1-24,
R.Smith 7-13, Bryant 1-(minus 4).
Oakland: Lynch 16-76, Carr 4-47, Washington 2-3, Patterson 1-(minus 4).
PASSING
Dallas: Prescott 18-27-2-212.
Oakland: Carr 21-38-0-171.
RECEIVING
Dallas: Witten 4-47, R.Smith 3-21, Te.Williams 3-19,
Bryant 2-59, Morris 2-0, Hanna 1-31, Beasley 1-15,
K.Smith 1-12, N.Brown 1-8.
Oakland: Crabtree 7-39, Roberts 3-52, Lynch 3-16, Richard 2-21, J.Cook 2-17, Washington 2-16, Patterson 1-7,
L.Smith 1-3.
RECEIVING
RECEIVING
Green Bay: Cobb 7-84, D.Adams 5-57, Allison 5-33,
R.Rodgers 4-77, Nelson 3-28, A.Jones 1-6, Kendricks
1-5.
Carolina: Olsen 9-116, McCaffrey 6-73, D.Byrd 3-25,
Funchess 1-19, Stewart 1-9.
New England: Gronkowski 9-168, Cooks 4-60, Amendola
2-23, White 2-8, Lewis 1-13, D.Allen 1-10, Britt 1-7,
Burkhead 1-5, Dorsett 1-4.
Pittsburgh: Smith-Schuster 6-114, Bell 5-48, Bryant
4-59, A.Brown 2-24, James 2-7, Rogers 1-18, Grimble
1-8, Heyward-Bey 1-3.
MISSED FIELD GOALS
MISSED FIELD GOALS
None.
None.
Philadelphia: Agholor 7-59, Ertz 6-56, Jeffery 4-49,
Ajayi 2-40, T.Smith 2-17, Burton 2-15, Clement 1-1.
New York: Shepard 11-139, Engram 8-87, Gallman 6-40,
Vereen 5-15, Lewis 4-74, King 2-70, Darkwa 1-9.
3 — 20
7 — 17
New England: Brady 22-35-1-298.
Pittsburgh: Roethlisberger 22-30-1-281.
Philadelphia: Foles 24-38-0-237.
New York: Manning 37-57-1-434.
RECEIVING
7
10
PASSING
PASSING
MISSED FIELD GOALS
Oakland: Tavecchio 39.
MISSED FIELD GOALS
None.
0
7
0
3
7— 7
7 — 34
FIRST QUARTER
Minnesota: Murray 1 run (Forbath kick), 10:31.
Minnesota: Kendricks 31 interception return (Forbath
kick), 5:54.
Minnesota: FG Forbath 53, 1:30.
SECOND QUARTER
Minnesota: FG Forbath 35, 6:34.
Tennessee: Mariota 23-33-0-241.
San Francisco: Garoppolo 31-43-0-381.
11 — 27
0 — 24
Dallas: R.Smith 1 run (Bailey kick), 14:04.
THIRD QUARTER
PASSING
6
7
Pittsburgh: FG Boswell 51, 12:15.
New England: FG Gostkowski 32, 9:04.
Pittsburgh: Bryant 4 pass from Roethlisberger (Boswell
kick), :25.
Tennessee: Matthews 8 pass from Mariota (Succop
kick), 13:31.
San Francisco: FG Gould 50, 8:27.
San Francisco: FG Gould 48, 3:08.
Tennessee: FG Succop 50, 1:07.
San Francisco: FG Gould 45, :00.
Attendance: 70,133.
Tennessee: Murray 18-59, Henry 7-19, Ta.Taylor 1-8,
Mariota 2-4.
San Francisco: Hyde 16-25, Breida 5-16, Goodwin 1-10.
3
10
SECOND QUARTER
FOURTH QUARTER
RUSHING
7 — 24
7 — 31
Dallas: FG Bailey 45, 4:56.
Minnesota: Diggs 20 pass from Keenum (Forbath kick),
6:41.
49ERS
23
414
22-51
363
1-12
4-65
0-0
31-43-0
3-18
1-43.0
0-0
7-70
32:35
COWBOYS ................................ 3
RAIDERS .................................. 0
3
14
FIRST QUARTER
Tennessee: FG Succop 31, 8:29.
TITANS
First Downs ............................................ 23
Total Net Yards .................................... 328
Rushes-Yards ................................... 28-90
Passing ................................................. 238
Punt Returns ......................................... 1-0
Kickoff Returns ................................... 1-21
Interceptions Ret. ................................. 0-0
Comp-Att-Int ................................ 23-33-0
Sacked-Yards Lost ................................ 1-3
Punts ................................................ 2-55.5
Fumbles-Lost ........................................ 1-1
Penalties-Yards .................................. 3-22
Time Of Possession .......................... 27:25
Cowboys 20, Raiders 17
PATRIOTS ................................ 7
STEELERS ................................ 7
7
3
New England: Burkhead 1 run (Gostkowski kick), 9:00.
Pittsburgh: Rogers 18 pass from Roethlisberger (Boswell kick), 5:32.
BENGALS ................................. 0
VIKINGS ................................. 17
SECOND QUARTER
Patriots 27, Steelers 24
PACKERS ................................. 7
PANTHERS ............................... 7
FIRST QUARTER
Vikings 34, Bengals 7
San Francisco: FG Gould 38, 8:51.
San Francisco: FG Gould 48, 4:35.
Panthers 31, Packers 24
Carolina: McCaffrey 7 pass from Newton (Gano kick),
5:57.
GB: D.Adams 13 pass from A.Rodgers (Crosby kick),
:00.
EAGLES
First Downs .......................................... 22
Total Net Yards ................................... 341
Rushes-Yards ............................... 27-108
Passing ................................................ 233
Punt Returns ....................................... 0-0
Kickoff Returns ................................. 4-70
Interceptions Ret. ............................. 1-37
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 24-38-0
Sacked-Yards Lost .............................. 1-4
Punts .............................................. 4-46.8
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 1-0
Penalties-Yards ................................ 7-44
Time Of Possession ......................... 30:53
Marquise Goodwin had 10
catches for 114 yards and Garoppolo completed 31 of 43 passes to
go over 300 yards passing for the
second straight game after last
week’s win at Houston.
— Baltimore Sun
Cincinnati Bengals Coach Marvin Lewis is not ready to concede
the end of his second-longest tenure in the NFL.
ESPN reported Sunday before
the game at Minnesota, citing unnamed league sources, that Lewis,
59, does not want to return to
Cincinnati after his contract expires following a 15th season with
the Bengals. Lewis steadfastly denied that in his postgame news
conference after a 34-7 loss to the
Vikings, dismissing the story as
recycled from the summer and
irrelevant to the team’s second
straight lackluster performance.
“It’s just speculation people
keep throwing out there,” he said.
Only New England’s Bill
Belichick, by three years, has been
with the same team longer than
Lewis has been with the Bengals.
“I have not made any decisions
about anything,” Lewis said.
With an 0-7 record for Lewis in
the playoffs, speculation swirled
at the start of the season that this
could be his final year in Cincinnati. The Bengals (5-9) will miss the
postseason for a second straight
time, having lost their last two
games by a combined 67-14.
PACKERS: In past seasons,
Green Bay has been in position to
rest quarterback Aaron Rodgers
late in the season to prepare for
the playoffs. The Packers haven’t
been in position to hold him out
because they didn’t make the playoffs since his first season as a
starter in 2008.
By the end of Monday night, that
could be a reality. If Atlanta wins at
Tampa Bay, Green Bay will be eliminated from postseason contention
with two games to go.
That could mean that Rodgers’s
return Sunday from his broken
collarbone could be short-lived.
After his team’s 31-24 loss at
Carolina, Packers Coach Mike McCarthy was noncommittal about
playing Rodgers against Minnesota on Saturday night or in
Week 17 at Detroit if the playoffs
are out of reach.
Rodgers threw three touchdown passes and three interceptions in his first game since his
Oct. 15 injury at Minnesota. Green
Bay dropped to 7-7.
PATRIOTS: Running back
Rex Burkhead left with a knee
injury in the third quarter. He did
not return as New England rallied
to beat Pittsburgh, 27-24.
49ERS: Wide receiver Aldrick
Robinson suffered a concussion in
the first quarter of San Francisco’s
25-23 victory over Tennessee. He
went to the locker room with head
and wrist injuries after a hit by
cornerback Adoree’ Jackson.
JETS: Defensive lineman
Leonard Williams, whose interception set up a field goal late in the
first half, left in the third quarter of
New York’s 31-19 loss at New Orleans with concussion symptoms.
Saints tight end Michael
Hoomanawanui and right guard
Larry Warford also left with concussion symptoms.
GIANTS: New York safety
Landon Collins and linebacker
B.J. Goodson left after aggravating
ankle injuries in their team’s 34-29
loss to Philadelphia. Tavarres King
suffered a concussion on his 57yard touchdown catch that ended
with a dive into the end zone.
Eagles cornerback Patrick Robinson left in the second half to be
evaluated for a concussion. Philadelphia tight end Trey Burton,
who caught a touchdown pass,
was limited in the second half by
cramps.
BILLS: Buffalo cornerback
E.J. Gaines was carted off in the
fourth quarter of his team’s 24-16
victory over Miami with a knee
injury.
FIRST QUARTER
Philadelphia: FG Elliott 20, 3:56.
Attendance: 76,896.
49ers 25, Titans 23
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
N.Y. Giants: Darkwa 1 run (kick blocked), 9:04.
Philadelphia: Jeffery 3 pass from Foles (Elliott kick),
5:28.
N.Y. Giants: King 13 pass from Manning (Rosas kick),
1:26.
N.Y. Giants: Shepard 67 pass from Manning (Rosas
kick), 13:44.
Philadelphia: Ertz 10 pass from Foles (Elliott kick),
4:49.
Philadelphia: Burton 13 pass from Foles (Elliott kick),
2:20.
N.Y. Giants: FG Rosas 28, :27.
Jimmy Garoppolo (career-high 381 passing yards) led San Francisco
on a game-winning drive capped by Robbie Gould’s 45-yard field goal.
Lewis dismisses report
Bengals tenure will end
FIRST QUARTER
SECOND QUARTER
D. ROSS CAMERON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Ravens, who took over at
the Browns 40-yard line, moved
inside the 10 on a 14-yard reception by Alex Collins and then a
four-yard run by Collins. However, after having a first-and-goal
from the 4, Baltimore couldn’t
punch the ball into the end zone.
Flacco ran the ball for three yards
on first down. Tight end Nick
Boyle couldn’t make a difficult
catch on the right side of the end
zone on second down. Collins was
stuffed for no yards on third-andgoal from the 1. Ravens Coach
John Harbaugh left his offense on
the field and Collins was stopped
for a loss of three yards on fourth
and goal.
On the next play, Browns running back Isaiah Crowell burst
through the line for a 59-yard
gain. Two runs by Kizer then set
up Duke Johnson’s 12-yard touchdown run to give the Browns a 7-3
lead. The Ravens hadn’t given up
more than 80 rushing yards in six
straight games, but the Browns
had 91 on the drive.
The Ravens answered quickly.
Flacco hit Mike Wallace for a 30yard gain to start the next drive.
Another catch by Wallace, a 14yard completion to Watson and
two completions to Danny Woodhead pushed the ball inside the
10-yard line. The Ravens finally
were able to find the end zone as
Flacco kept the ball on third and
goal from the 2 and went untouched as he crossed the end
zone. It was Flacco’s first rushing
touchdown this season.
Leading 10-7, the Ravens forced
another turnover as Johnson
coughed the ball up when sandwiched by C.J. Mosley and Tony
Jefferson after a nine-yard completion. Anthony Levine Sr. recovered the ball, and three plays later
Flacco found Watson all alone for
a 33-yard touchdown pass.
Browns kicker Zane Gonzalez
made a 45-yard field goal as time
expired in the second quarter to
cut Baltimore’s lead to 17-10.
NFL NOTES
FOURTH QUARTER
Minnesota: Rudolph 1 pass from Keenum (Forbath
kick), 12:53.
Cincinnati: Bernard 2 run (Bullock kick), 6:22.
Attendance: 66,833.
BENGALS
First Downs ............................................ 8
Total Net Yards ................................... 161
Rushes-Yards ................................. 20-46
Passing ................................................ 115
Punt Returns ..................................... 2-12
Kickoff Returns ................................. 2-44
Interceptions Ret. ............................... 1-7
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 14-28-2
Sacked-Yards Lost ............................ 3-17
Punts .............................................. 8-45.6
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 1-0
Penalties-Yards ................................ 5-44
Time Of Possession ......................... 24:08
VIKINGS
18
346
34-124
222
5-41
0-0
2-34
20-25-1
2-14
5-43.4
0-0
11-93
35:52
Rams 42, Seahawks 7
Ravens 27, Browns 10
RAMS ..................................... 13
SEAHAWKS ............................. 0
RAVENS ................................... 3
BROWNS .................................. 0
21
0
6
7
2 — 42
0— 7
14
10
10
0
0 — 27
0 — 10
FIRST QUARTER
FIRST QUARTER
Los Angeles: FG Zuerlein 36, 12:06.
Los Angeles: FG Zuerlein 31, 8:21.
Los Angeles: Gurley 1 run (Zuerlein kick), 5:57.
Baltimore: FG Tucker 31, 8:46.
SECOND QUARTER
Cleveland: D.Johnson 12 run (Gonzalez kick), 8:12.
Baltimore: Flacco 2 run (Tucker kick), 3:01.
Baltimore: Watson 33 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick),
:59.
Cleveland: FG Gonzalez 45, :00.
Los Angeles: Gurley 1 run (Zuerlein kick), 8:13.
Los Angeles: Woods 1 pass from Goff (Zuerlein kick),
3:26.
Los Angeles: Gurley 57 run (Zuerlein kick), :28.
THIRD QUARTER
Los Angeles: Gurley 14 pass from Goff (kick failed),
7:04.
Seattle: Willson 26 pass from Wilson (Walsh kick),
1:23.
FOURTH QUARTER
Los Angeles: safety, 10:14.
Attendance: 69,077.
RAMS SEAHAWKS
First Downs .......................................... 19
11
Total Net Yards ................................... 352
149
Rushes-Yards ............................... 43-244
17-78
Passing ................................................ 108
71
Punt Returns ................................... 7-128
2-18
Kickoff Returns ................................. 2-52
6-118
Interceptions Ret. ............................... 0-0
1-0
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 15-23-1
14-30-0
Sacked-Yards Lost ............................ 2-16
7-71
Punts .............................................. 5-42.6
9-47.4
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 2-0
3-2
Penalties-Yards ................................ 3-25
9-60
Time Of Possession ......................... 36:46
23:14
is printed using
recycled fiber.
THIRD QUARTER
Baltimore: B.Williams 1 fumble return (Tucker kick),
7:06.
Baltimore: FG Tucker 43, :04.
Attendance: 56,434.
RAVENS
First Downs .......................................... 23
Total Net Yards ................................... 376
Rushes-Yards ................................. 31-97
Passing ................................................ 279
Punt Returns ....................................... 1-0
Kickoff Returns ................................... 0-0
Interceptions Ret. ............................. 2-13
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 26-42-0
Sacked-Yards Lost .............................. 1-9
Punts .............................................. 5-43.0
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 0-0
Penalties-Yards ................................ 7-57
Time Of Possession ......................... 36:48
BROWNS
15
266
19-130
136
1-11
3-77
0-0
20-37-2
2-10
5-43.2
2-2
6-35
23:12
RUSHING
Baltimore: Allen 13-70, Collins 12-19, M.Williams 1-4,
Flacco 4-3, Woodhead 1-1.
Cleveland: Crowell 5-72, Kizer 7-35, D.Johnson 7-23.
RUSHING
RUSHING
PASSING
Cincinnati: Bernard 14-30, B.Hill 5-12, Malone 1-4.
Minnesota: Murray 20-76, McKinnon 9-24, Keenum
1-20, Diggs 1-7, Bridgewater 3-(minus 3).
Los Angeles: Gurley 21-152, M.Brown 10-45, Austin 1044, Mannion 2-3.
Seattle: Wilson 5-39, McKissic 6-20, M.Davis 6-19.
Baltimore: Flacco 26-42-0-288.
Cleveland: Kizer 20-37-2-146.
PASSING
PASSING
Cincinnati: Dalton 11-22-2-113, McCarron 3-6-0-19.
Minnesota: Keenum 20-23-0-236, Bridgewater 0-2-1-0.
Los Angeles: Goff 14-21-1-120, Mannion 1-2-0-4.
Seattle: Wilson 14-30-0-142.
RECEIVING
RECEIVING
Cincinnati: Uzomah 4-24, Bernard 3-13, LaFell 2-53,
Green 2-30, Kroft 2-1, Erickson 1-11.
Minnesota: McKinnon 7-114, Diggs 5-30, Thielen 3-30,
Rudolph 2-17, Murray 1-28, Wright 1-11, Ham 1-6.
MISSED FIELD GOALS
Los Angeles: Woods 6-45, Gurley 3-28, Kupp 2-21, Watkins 2-14, Higbee 1-12, Carrier 1-4.
Seattle: McKissic 3-38, M.Davis 2-20, P.Richardson
2-18, Lockett 2-8, Willson 1-26, McEvoy 1-19, Darboh
1-8, Baldwin 1-6, Graham 1-(minus 1).
None.
MISSED FIELD GOALS
None.
The Washington Post
SECOND QUARTER
RECEIVING
Baltimore: Wallace 6-89, Woodhead 6-31, Collins 5-33,
Watson 4-74, Maclin 1-22, Campanaro 1-17, Perriman
1-9, Boyle 1-9, Allen 1-4.
Cleveland: Gordon 5-47, D.Johnson 5-40, Crowell 4-(minus 7), DeValve 2-32, Higgins 2-10, C.Coleman 1-16,
Coates 1-8.
MISSED FIELD GOALS
None.
NF407 1x6
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
NFL W
Redskins hold o≠
Cardinals, 20-15
REDSKINS FROM D1
option.
Gabbert was 16 of 41 for 189
yards and an interception. And
the Cardinals have now gone 10
quarters without a touchdown,
eking out a victory over Tennessee last week on a quartet of
Dawson field goals.
Cousins fared better: 18 of 26
for 196 yards, two touchdowns
and no interceptions.
With it, the Redskins improved to 6-8, keeping alive the
possibility of finishing 8-8 while
scuttling the Cardinals’ faint
playoff prospects and shoring up
their own morale.
“The last two weeks we came
out there and quite frankly, we
laid an egg,” said third-year cornerback Kendall Fuller, whose
spirited performance (eight tackles, two passes broken up) helped
compensate for the absence of
middle linebacker and leading
tackler Zach Brown, who missed
his first game of the season with
an Achilles’ injury. “We didn’t
want to put another performance [like that] out there.”
And they didn’t, despite being
without Brown and left tackle
Trent Williams, who sat out with
a long-standing knee injury and
was spelled by swing tackle Ty
Nsekhe.
Washington’s defense set a
fierce tone at the outset, with a
sack and forced fumble by Anthony Lanier II on the third play
of the game. Linebacker Preston
Smith scooped it up and rumbled
to the Arizona 6-yard line.
Two plays later, Cousins hit
wide receiver Jamison Crowder
with a five-yard strike that
staked the Redskins to a 7-0 lead
just 90 seconds into the proceedings.
The defense kept the pressure
on Gabbert and his patchwork
offensive line, sacking him on
back-to-back plays on Arizona’s
next series. Dawson hit from 40
yards to make it 7-3.
Having lost two third-down
backs to season-ending injuries,
the Redskins activated practicesquad member Kapri Bibbs, an
unemployed free agent who had
only signed three weeks earlier,
for Sunday’s game. After committing a penalty on his first
snap, Bibbs was sure-handed on
a play-fake from Cousins and
streaked up the sideline for a
36-yard score that extended the
lead to 14-3 early in the second
quarter.
Apart from Bibbs’s impressive
debut, the game laid bare the
limitations of the injury-depleted Redskins as it ground on.
Third-down conversions — a
strength of Gruden’s offense last
season — have become near insurmountable absent trusted
playmakers Chris Thompson and
Jordan Reed (both on injured
reserve). The Redskins converted just 1 of 9 third downs Sunday,
which explained why they ran
only 15 plays in the first half and
47 all game.
The running game contributed little. Even with a 14-3 lead,
there was little sense in sticking
with the run when so many
carries went nowhere. The Redskins finished with 31 total rushing yards, averaging 1.6 yards per
carry.
Yet each time the Redskins ran
into trouble Sunday, Gabbert
found a way of extending a
lifeline. In the bumbling waning
minutes of the first half, the
Cardinals managed a 46-yard
pass play against Washington
cornerback Bashaud Breeland.
But from the Washington 9, Gabbert threw directly into the
hands of Smith.
Instead of capitalizing, the
Redskins gave the ball back on a
fumble by tight end Vernon Davis that set up what looked like a
surefire Cardinals score. Arizona
drove to the 1-yard line, and had
10 seconds and four downs to
work with. After an incompletion, Gabbert threw one ball
squarely into the back of his
receiver’s helmet. His next pass
was tipped by Lanier. Once
again, Dawson mopped up, with
his 19-yard field goal paring the
Redskins’ lead to 14-9 at the
break.
Having won the toss and deferred, the Redskins set themselves up to build on their momentum to start the second half.
Instead, ineptitude on special
teams allowed the Cardinals,
rather than the Redskins, to
score in the period’s first 90
seconds.
Washington’s kickoff-return
team apparently lost sight of the
ball as it plopped on the field,
and Budda Baker recovered for
the Cardinals on the Washington
22. Gabbert’s struggles continued, so Dawson returned to
knock through a 34-yarder that
made it 14-12.
After the teams traded field
goals, it was a 17-15 game midway
through the fourth quarter.
A 33-yard kickoff return by
Maurice Harris set up a favorable
drive start, and Cousins drove
the Redskins to the Arizona 14.
But wide receiver Josh Doctson
couldn’t corral a high throw for a
first down, bringing up Dustin
Hopkins for his second field goal
attempt. The 32-yarder padded
the Redskins’ lead, 20-15, with
4:30 remaining, and Cousins
went to the sideline for treatment after being hit from his
blind side, in the middle of his
back, as he released the throw to
Doctson.
The game-clinching play
turned into a nail-biter, as penalty flags flew in the waning seconds after Redskins defensive
captain D.J. Swearinger yanked
off his helmet to celebrate an
incomplete pass by the Cardinals
on fourth down.
After an anxious pause, officials ruled that the ball still
belonged to Washington —
Swearinger’s celebration came
after the play — leaving it to
Cousins to take a knee and bring
an end to a desperately needed
victory down the stretch of a
disappointing season.
liz.clarke@washpost.com
Redskins cornerback Josh Norman breaks up this pass intended for Cardinals wide receiver Jaron Brown in the second quarter. Arizona c
BEST
Best hit
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Redskins quarterback Kirk Cousins completed 18 of 26 passes for
196 yards and two touchdowns with no interceptions Sunday.
Redskins safety D.J.
Swearinger denied
his former team a
comeback win and
officially eliminated
the Cardinals from
the playoffs by
breaking up a fourthdown pass intended
for Larry Fitzgerald
deep in Washington
territory in the final
seconds. Swearinger
celebrated the play
by removing his
helmet, which is a
penalty, but all it did
was back up the
Redskins’ victory
formation 10 yards.
Worst scare
The Cardinals had
several close calls
on their final
possession,
including a pass that
squirted out of tight
end Troy Niklas’s
grasp near the goal
line. Two plays later
Kendall Fuller, who
committed a crucial
pass interference
penalty earlier in the
drive, broke up
another pass
intended for
Fitzgerald with his
helmet.
Best or worst
on-air goof
Fox analyst Ronde
Barber apologized
for mistakenly
referring to Fuller as
reality television star
Kendall Jenner
multiple times during
the Cardinals’ final
drive.
Best sack
The Redskins were in
Cardinals
quarterback Blaine
Gabbert’s grill all
afternoon, including
on a key play late in
the fourth quarter.
With Arizona trailing
20-15 and three
minutes remaining,
the Cardinals faced
third and five from
the Washington 35yard line. As the
pocket collapsed,
Gabbert scrambled
and fumbled the
ball. He eventually
fell on it before Ryan
Kerrigan touched
him down for a sack,
but the 18-yard loss
took Arizona out of
field goal position.
Best play by
someone you
might not
have known
played for the
Redskins
Running back Kapri
Bibbs, who was
signed to the
T
.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2017
EZ
D9
SU
WEEK 15
JERRY BREWER
Following two disasters,
this counts as progress
BREWER FROM D1
against Dallas and the Los
Angeles Chargers. It’s not entirely
about the outcome, because
injuries have left this squad so
limited. But if an NFL team, in
any condition, gives a good,
professional and focused effort,
few games should be blowouts.
Washington is competing now
to keep its core of players and
coaches intact. Sunday’s
performance won’t be cherished
forever, but it was a victory that
eliminated Arizona from playoff
contention. And it kept alive the
consolation that Washington
(6-8) could finish the season with
a .500 record.
“I know we can’t go forward,”
cornerback Josh Norman said.
“Everybody knows that. But what
you can do is, when you step on
that field, give all 110 percent of
you and come out with a win.
That’s all you can do.”
Give the players credit for a
resilient defensive performance.
Gabbert, the replacement for the
injured Carson Palmer, shouldn’t
be starting games on this level.
The Cardinals were without
several offensive weapons,
including top running back
David Johnson and midseason
acquisition Adrian Peterson. Still,
even with those advantages, the
Washington defense fought
through difficult situations
during the game and kept
Arizona out of the end zone,
limiting the Cardinals to five Phil
Dawson field goals.
Arizona held the ball for more
than 60 percent of the game, ran
80 plays to Washington’s 47,
visited the red zone six times —
and came away with only
15 points and 286 yards. The
Cardinals averaged just 3.6 yards
per play.
The Washington defense — led
by developing lineman Anthony
Lanier II — was ready to play
from the beginning. Less than a
minute into the game, Lanier
sacked Gabbert and forced a
fumble that Preston Smith
recovered and returned to the 6yard line. It set up Kirk Cousins’s
five-yard touchdown pass to
Jamison Crowder. The early gift
of a 7-0 lead was exactly what a
floundering team needed. Two
frustrating games could be set
aside. Confidence would not be
an issue.
From there, the defense
carried the team. The
Washington offense gained just
218 yards, failing to reach 300 for
a third straight game, the first
time that has happened in Coach
Jay Gruden’s four seasons. The
running game produced just four
yards in the first half. It finished
with 31 and averaged 1.6 yards
per carry. Vernon Davis lost a
fumble. Cousins was efficient
(18 for 26 for 196 yards and two
touchdowns), but he needed to
introduce us — if not himself — to
Kapri Bibbs to function.
The offense’s struggles and a
special-teams gaffe on the
opening kickoff of the second half
put the defense in several bad or
sudden-change situations. But
Gabbert wasn’t going to get into
that end zone.
“We didn’t want to be denied
this win,” Norman said. “We did
not want to be denied this win.
And we gave everything it took.
Guys, when we had lulls in the
game, they picked it up. They rose
to the challenge. That’s football.”
Before this game, Washington
had spent two weeks playing the
victim. If something went
wrong, the players folded. The
team that had been so
competitive all season morphed
into a pitiful, indifferent
embarrassment. Back at home,
with speculation about an
uncertain future swirling, the
players needed to respond.
Gabbert’s inaccuracy and poor
feel for the game helped, but the
Washington defense did its job. It
even came through in the closing
minutes, stopping two Arizona
opportunities in the final 4:30.
The last drive — a classic twominute situation that has
resulted in too much Redskins
failure — ended 21 yards from the
end zone when D.J. Swearinger
disrupted a fourth-down Gabbert
pass to Larry Fitzgerald.
Swearinger ripped off his
helmet foolishly in celebration,
and flags littered the field. At
first, there was fear that his
unsportsmanlike conduct
penalty would give Arizona
another opportunity with
16 seconds remaining. It didn’t.
The penalty occurred after the
Cardinals’ final play.
After four losses in five games,
after allowing at least 30 points
in all of those defeats, the skid
ended. Washington won. The
defense won. Despite being on
the field for nearly 24 of the
game’s first 30 minutes, the
defense showed its resolve. It
sacked Gabbert five times and
harassed him into an awful stat
line: 16 for 41, 189 yards, one
interception, 43.6 passer rating.
“We were out there a long
time,” linebacker Ryan Kerrigan
said. “We were just playing ball,
man. I don’t think any of us really
thought, ‘We’ve been out here
forever. We’ve been put in a bad
situation.’ We were just like,
‘Okay, we’re up now. We’ve got to
go out and play.’ I think that
mentality really can take you a
long way.”
Said defensive lineman Ziggy
Hood: “We’ve been training all
season long to come through in a
game like this. I wish we had been
doing this every game, especially
in our losses. Our two-minute
drills have never really been up to
par, where we need it to be. But
somehow we came through with
it, hung in there, and we won.”
A single victory doesn’t change
much, not at this point in a lost
season. It’s something, however.
The team has a heartbeat. It’s
faint, but it still registers.
jerry.brewer@washpost.com
For more by Jerry Brewer, visit
washingtonpost.com/brewer.
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
could muster only five field goals. “The last two weeks we came out there and quite frankly, we laid an egg,” cornerback Kendall Fuller said.
& W OR S T
Redskins’ practice
squad in November
and promoted to the
active roster
Tuesday, scored his
second career
touchdown on a 36yard catch-and-run
on a screen pass in
the second quarter.
It was sweet
redemption for
Bibbs, who spent the
first three seasons of
his NFL career with
the Denver Broncos
and committed a
false start earlier in
the drive.
Best apparent
INT ruled a
completion
Linebacker Zach Vigil
appeared to seal
Washington’s sixth
win with an
interception on the
first play of the
Cardinals’ final drive,
but officials ruled
that Niklas came
down with the ball.
The officials ruled
incorrectly.
Worst crowd?
Not exactly. The
smallest announced
crowd in FedEx Field
history was 56,247
on Dec. 8, 2013,
when the 3-9
Redskins lost to the
9-3 Chiefs, 45-10, in
a blizzard. It was 49
degrees Sunday, so
the weather couldn’t
explain all the empty
seats at kickoff, but
the announced
attendance was still
a respectable
71,026.
Worst
giveaway
With apparently no
interest in adding to
their comically low
time of possession,
the Redskins didn’t
even bother fielding
the second half
kickoff. Cardinals
safety Budda Baker
pounced on the ball,
giving Arizona
excellent field
position, but the
Washington defense
held strong yet
again. A fourth Phil
Dawson field goal
(he finished with five)
pulled Arizona within
14-12.
Best
milestone
Vernon Davis had
two catches for 18
yards to become the
ninth tight end in
NFL history to go
over 7,000 yards
receiving.
— Scott Allen
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Redskins defensive linemen Ziggy Hood, left, and Stacy McGee
made sure the Cardinals never made their way into the end zone.
D10
EZ
SU
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
NFL WEEK 15
TOTAL
NET YARDS
Cardinals
Redskins
1
2
3
3
7
6
7
3
3
4
FINAL
S C OR I NG
3 15
3 20
FIRST QUARTER
Washington: Crowder 5 pass from
Cousins (Hopkins kick), 13:30.
Arizona: FG Dawson 40, 3:47.
SECOND QUARTER
Washington: Bibbs 36 pass from
Cousins (Hopkins kick), 13:27.
Arizona: FG Dawson 35, 7:35.
Arizona: FG Dawson 19, 0:00.
THIRD QUARTER
ARZ
WAS
286
80 plays
218
47 plays
3.6 avg.
4.6 avg.
Arizona: FG Dawson 34, 13:37.
Washington: FG Hopkins 24, 4:23.
FOURTH QUARTER
Arizona: FG Dawson 32, 11:13.
Washington: FG Hopkins 32, 4:30.
Attendance: 71,026.
NET
PASSING YARDS
ARZ
WAS
145
41 att.
187
26 att.
3.2 avg.
6.9 avg.
Cardinals Redskins
First Downs
19
Total Net Yards
286
Rushes-Yards
34-141
Passing
145
Punt Returns
5-43
Kickoff Returns
2-28
Interceptions Ret.
0-0
Comp-Att-Int
16-41-1
Sacked-Yards Lost
5-44
Punts
5-50.2
Fumbles-Lost
3-1
Penalties-Yards
8-71
Time Of Possession 36:16
14
218
20-31
187
2-18
4-95
1-18
18-26-0
1-9
6-53.2
1-1
7-82
23:44
RUSHING
NET
RUSHING YARDS
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Wide receiver Jamison Crowder gave Washington an early lead with a five-yard touchdown catch after an Arizona fumble.
Arizona: K.Williams 17-61, Penny
10-45, Gabbert 6-28, Nelson 1-7.
Washington: Perine 14-37, Bibbs
2-6, Daniels 1-2, Cousins 2-0,
Doctson 1-(minus 14).
PASSING
Arizona: Gabbert 16-41-1-189.
Washington: Cousins 18-26-0-196.
ARZ
WAS
141
34 plays
31
20 plays
4.1 avg.
1.6 avg.
Cardinals’ drives
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
TIME
OF POSSESSION
ARZ
WAS
36:16
23:44
Redskins’ drives
Time
received
How ball
obtained
Drive
began
Number
of plays
Net
yards
Last
snap
Drive
result
15:00
13:30
1:57
13:27
5:26
1:39
15:00
12:01
4:23
14:50
9:21
4:30
1:59
Kickoff
Kickoff
Punt
Kickoff
Punt
Fumble
Own kickoff
Punt
Kickoff
Punt
Punt
Kickoff
Punt
ARI 25
ARI 17
ARI 12
ARI 26
ARI 20
WAS 33
WAS 22
ARI 31
ARI 25
ARI 39
ARI 16
ARI 25
ARI 48
3
16
3
11
7
10
4
3
3
9
3
5
8
-7
60
3
57
71
32
6
9
1
47
-9
22
31
ARI 28
WAS 23
ARI 15
WAS 17
WAS 9
WAS 1
WAS 16
ARI 40
ARI 26
WAS 14
ARI 7
ARI 47
WAS 21
Fumble
Field goal
Punt
Field goal
Interception
Field goal
Field goal
Punt
Punt
Field goal
Punt
Punt
Downs
OCT. 8
OCT. 15
OCT. 23
OCT. 29
BYE
SF
26-24
@PHI
34-24
DAL
33-19
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
RECEIVING
Time
received
How ball
obtained
Drive
began
Number
of plays
Net
yards
Last
snap
Drive
result
14:13
3:47
0:08
7:35
1:50
13:37
10:27
3:24
11:13
7:51
2:26
0:16
Fumble
Kickoff
Punt
Kickoff
Interception
Kickoff
Punt
Punt
Kickoff
Punt
Punt
Downs
ARI 6
WAS 18
WAS 37
WAS 35
WAS 41
WAS 16
WAS 6
WAS 21
WAS 35
ARI 44
WAS 12
WAS 11
2
4
5
3
1
3
11
5
3
8
3
1
6
17
63
10
7
8
88
-2
6
30
2
-1
ARI 5
WAS 35
ARI 36
WAS 45
WAS 41
WAS 24
ARI 6
WAS 19
WAS 41
ARI 14
WAS 14
WAS 11
Touchdown
Punt
Touchdown
Punt
Fumble
Punt
Field goal
Punt
Punt
Field goal
Punt
End of game
Arizona: Fitzgerald 5-60, Foster 422, Niklas 3-41, Seals-Jones 2-11,
Nelson 1-46, Ja.Brown 1-9.
Washington: Crowder 5-55, Bibbs
4-47, Perine 2-29, Grant 2-20,
V.Davis 2-18, Doctson 2-16, Paul 111.
MISSED FIELD GOALS
None.
Redskins’ schedule
SEPT. 10
SEPT. 17
SEPT. 24
OCT. 2
PHI
30-17
@LAR
27-20
OAK
27-10
@KC
29-20
L
W W
L
— W
L
L
NOV. 5
NOV. 12
NOV. 19
NOV. 23
NOV. 30
DEC. 10
DEC. 17
DEC.
DEC.
@SEA
17-14
MIN
38-30
@NO
34-31 (OT)
NYG
20-10
@DAL
38-14
@LAC
30-13
ARI
20-15
DEN
1, CBS
@NYG
1, Fox
W
L
L
W
L
L
W 24 31
THOMAS BOSWELL
Given the context, 8-8 would be one of the best disappointing seasons in years
BOSWELL FROM D1
Washington defense that didn’t
allow a touchdown probably was
defensive end Anthony Lanier,
who had two sacks, a forced
fumble, three passes batted
down and two quarterback hits.
In training camp, Vigil wasn’t on
the radar, Fuller was a nickel
back, Spaight a backup
linebacker and Lanier an
undersized project.
The biggest offensive play of
the day was a 36-yard dash for a
touchdown on a screen pass by
Kapri Bibbs, playing his first
game for Washington after only
22 days with the team. The
bubbling, smallish Bibbs was out
of the NFL and “on the street for
10 weeks” just hoping he one day
would get another chance.
Quarterback Kirk Cousins,
almost devoid of offensive
weapons against a strong
Arizona defense and playing
behind a smashed-up offensive
line that included backups Ty
Nsekhe, Arie Kouandjio and
rookie Chase Roullier, still
managed a stellar
116.8 quarterback rating and two
touchdown passes.
Without injured Trent
Williams to cover his blind side
against NFL sack leader
Chandler Jones, Cousins played
game manager all day, nursing a
Washington lead with
conservative calls yet still
completing 18 of 26 passes for
196 yards. He also survived a
vicious, legal, center-of-the-back,
full-speed sack by Jones late in
the game that left Cousins
wincing. But he returned, saying,
“I dodged a bullet.”
This team, which has played
26 different combinations on its
offensive line, according to tackle
Morgan Moses, and is without
11 players projected as starters
before the season, at least the
way safety D.J. Swearinger
counts it, still has a shot at an 8-8
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Beating Arizona after back-to-back big defeats was more than enough reason for Jay Gruden to smile.
record. The Redskins haven’t
done it yet, but they are facing a
decent 5-9 Denver team at FedEx
next Sunday, then the woeful 2-12
Giants in the Meadowlands on
New Year’s Eve. If they win both
games, they will wind up with an
average final record in a season
that, all things considered, may
be one of their better-coached
and most professionally played
seasons in years.
These Redskins will never
admit to much pride in any a
record that doesn’t have “playoff
spot” attached to it. But you can
hear the dignity when
Swearinger, who broke up the
last fourth-down pass to future
Hall of Famer Larry Fitzgerald
with 23 seconds to play inside
the Washington 10-yard line,
says quietly, “That’s the NFL
game — make the most of what
you have. We’re still looking for
wins.”
This team even will take
homely ones such as this, in
which it was outgained on the
ground 141 to 31 and lost time of
possession 36:16 to 23:44.
When your third-stringers are
suddenly starters, developmentproject players must turn into
contributors immediately and
you just hope that those Guys Off
the Street can remember the
plays they just learned, you can’t
be choosy.
Instead, you have to be tough;
and put an end to Arizona drives
at your 23-, 17-, 9-, 1-, 16-, 14- and,
finally, 21-yard lines; and turn
those possessions into five field
goals, an interception for
linebacker Preston Smith and
that final fourth-down stop.
“That was the game, story of the
day,” Gruden said. “Their redzone offense against our red-
zone defense.
“I would call [this win] more
desire than desperation,” Gruden
said. “We celebrated. . . .
Everybody’s relieved. They
played hard, and I feel happy for
them.”
Perhaps Gruden’s most
overlooked quality is his sincere
belief in the talent of his players,
an infectious confidence. Some,
such as me, see limitations in
basic ability throughout his
roster — players who are injuryprone or who came here from the
scrap heap or are inconsistent or
who have ability but show no
signs of turning it into
significant production — in other
words, the stuff that makes a 9-7
or 10-6 team in the best of
seasons.
But Gruden honestly sees
much more. At bleak points in
bad games, he may seem
deflated. But he’s essentially
optimistic and jovial by nature,
and after the pain subsides, he
sets an example of resilience.
Players know and care what
the head coach really thinks.
Gruden really thinks they are
good, that they can constantly
get better and, even after their
past two stinkers and plenty of
ugly spots in this win, that they
should stay proud of themselves.
Over the last three years, are
they 23-22-1 because of these
qualities in an often relaxed nonNFL-type coach or despite it?
At the least, Gruden brings out
the best out of players whom
others have doubted or rejected.
This year, he has had to count on
them by the boatload. His bond
with Cousins may even have its
roots in their common
experience — Gruden in trying
and failing to get to the NFL as a
quarterback and Cousins in
trying to be anointed as a trusted
franchise quarterback — of
constantly being doubted.
“I’ve been that [doubted] guy.
I’ve been cut twice. I’ve been on
the couch watching football.
You’re just hoping to make your
presence felt in the league again
somehow,” Swearinger said,
praising all the unlikely
contributors this year.
Professionals, the best ones
anyway, never make excuses,
even when they are chest-deep in
them. Unlike so many
Washington teams in the past
quarter century that shirked
responsibility for their failings or
flat-out quit late in seasons, this
team owns its record and its
beatings.
One player after another
mentioned how badly they had
played the past two weeks in
losses to the Cowboys and
Chargers. And some recounted
the two games that got away that
might have changed the season.
If Josh Doctson, held to two
catches for 16 yards by the
Cardinals, had held a potential
touchdown pass in the end zone
in Kansas City with 51 seconds
left or if the team, with a
99.6 percent chance of a win late
in the fourth quarter against
New Orleans, hadn’t collapsed,
this season might have been
different.
But it wasn’t. So it will have to
be swallowed whole — just in the
proper context. And that context
includes a schedule so tough
that, according to the website
Pro Football Reference,
Washington has, in effect, started
its 13 previous games at a deficit
of about 48 points before the
opening kickoff.
For one day, let the newest
mini-hero on this team, the 5foot-11, 203-pound Bibbs, stand
for all the fill-ins who have
played like standouts.
“When I scored . . . it made my
heart glow,” Bibbs said.
“Three weeks before
[Washington] called me for a
workout, I had a dream that I
was trying to make a team in
burgundy-and-mustard
uniforms — this team,” Bibbs
said. “When they really did call, I
thought, ‘It can’t just be a fluke.’ ”
But Bibbs didn’t make the
team after that tryout. “I
thought, ‘Maybe I wanted it too
bad,’ ” he said. “Then two weeks
later, they did call me back.
“And now it’s worked out just
like my dream.”
This Washington season has
been closer to a nightmare. But,
in a couple of weeks, maybe the
players will end their season
with their heads up and the
sense that sometimes, even
though you’re not allowed to say
it out loud in the NFL, a bad
season, all things fairly
considered, can still be pretty
good.
thomas.boswell@washpost.com
For more by Thomas Boswell, visit
washingtonpost.com/boswell.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D11
SU
NFL week 15
STREETER LECKA/GETTY IMAGES
Aaron Rodgers threw for three touchdowns but also three interceptions in his first game since Oct. 15.
Carolina prevails in Rodgers’s return
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Anthony Lanier II sacks Arizona’s Blaine Gabbert early on, with Preston Smith scooping up the fumble.
Lanier stands tall on defensive line
BY
K IMBERLEY A . M ARTIN
Anthony Lanier II stood alone
at one end of Washington’s vast
locker room, awkwardly shifting
his weight from one foot to the
other.
He looked uncomfortable.
Nervous. Fidgety.
You see, attention is the last
thing the Redskins’ second-year
defensive lineman craves.
“It comes with the territory,
but I don’t hold down this job by
myself,” the 24-year-old said of
being bombarded by postgame
interview requests.
Lanier would rather go about
his business quietly, expending
his energy on perfecting his craft
and making plays. And on Sunday afternoon, he proved that all
of the hard work he’s been putting in is paying off.
In a game the Redskins desperately needed to win to save face —
and, perhaps, coaching jobs —
Lanier delivered a breakout performance. He recorded two of the
team’s five sacks of Arizona quarterback Blaine Gabbert and batted down three passes to help the
Redskins stave off the woeful
Cardinals, 20-15, at FedEx Field.
“I just knew that I was blessed
and I was supposed to be here,”
said the 6-6, 280-pound lineman,
who signed as an undrafted free
agent in 2016. “I worked real hard
for it. And [my teammates] let me
know, ‘You should be here. Now
what are you going to do about
it?’ ”
Lanier answered that question
on the field, sacking Gabbert for a
loss of 10 yards on the third
offensive play of the game while
forcing a fumble that was
scooped up by teammate Preston
Smith. Two plays later, the Red-
PANTHERS 31,
PACKERS 24
BY
skins (6-8) scored on a five-yard
touchdown pass from Kirk Cousins to Jamison Crowder.
Lanier is open in saying that
he’s still a work in progress. But
this is the man the Redskins have
been waiting to see. Humble, yet
hungry. Fiery on the field, focused off it.
“He’s starting to understand
that he can do it and starting to
believe more in himself,” said
veteran nose tackle Ziggy Hood,
one of the players Lanier credited
for his steady improvement. “The
more he has success, the more
success that builds and he’s able
to produce and be a force to be
reckoned with.”
Redskins Coach Jay Gruden
saw promise in Lanier last year,
when the Alabama A&M alum
was only 265 pounds and a complete uncertainty — too raw and
too small to be consistently productive. Coincidentally, Gruden
also wasn’t where he wanted to
be physically at the end of the
Redskins’ 2016 season. So, during
the team’s exit interviews, player
and coach made a pact to meet
their individual weight goals together. For every pound Lanier
put on in the weight room,
Gruden promised to shed weight
just as quickly.
“It was pound for pound,” Lanier said, smiling. “So I ended up
coming back at 293.”
The defensive lineman said his
ultimate goal is to reach 300
pounds. Although it sounds like a
lofty endeavor, Lanier already
has proven himself to be a
changed man from the one who
first arrived in Ashburn.
“He was a puppy,” Gruden said
affectionately.
Told later of his coach’s comment, Lanier joked: “I hope he’s
saying that I’m cute.”
The young lineman knew everyone in the building saw him as
“a diamond in the rough.” But the
Redskins also wanted him to
grow up a little bit and to mature
into the position. So far, they’ve
all been impressed.
“It was great to hear Anthony
Lanier’s name over the intercom
a few times and see how far he
has come along from a young
rookie free agent,” said Gruden,
who credited the tutelage of defensive line coach Jim Tomsula
for Lanier’s development. “He is
getting better and better. The sky
is the limit for him.”
But Gruden still isn’t ready to
call off their bet.
“No, I’ll wait until he gets his
next contract,” he joked, “And
then he can pay me.”
Lanier’s transformation is far
from complete, but his showing
Sunday was further proof — “a
small piece,” he cautioned — that
all of the time spent studying,
working on his technique and
heeding the advice of teammates
likes Hood, Zach Brown, Josh
Norman and D.J. Swearinger is
paying off.
At the conclusion of this disappointing season, Washington will
turn its focus toward building
upon a foundation of young,
talented players. And Lanier has
positioned himself well within
that group of potential rising
stars.
“He’s got a long ways to go,”
Hood said. “He’s still got to get
stronger in the weight room, still
got to learn how to play blocks
better, but the upside is he’s
doing it. And he has yet to even
scratch the surface of his potential.”
kimberley.martin@washpost.com
S TEVE R EED
charlotte — Cam Newton
proved the Carolina Panthers can
win in multiple ways.
After dominating opposing
teams on the ground with three
straight 200-yard rushing games
at home, the Panthers turned to
their 28th-ranked passing game
Sunday and took a big step toward
reaching the postseason.
Newton threw for 242 yards
and four touchdowns, and the
Panthers spoiled Aaron Rodgers’s
return from a broken collarbone
with a 31-24 win over the Green
Bay Packers.
Wide receiver Damiere Byrd
had two touchdown catches and
running back Christian McCaffrey racked up 136 yards from
scrimmage, including a sevenyard touchdown reception, as the
Panthers won their fourth
straight at home.
Tight end Greg Olsen had his
most productive game since returning from a broken foot, catching nine passes for 116 yards and a
touchdown as the Panthers (10-4)
kept pace with the first-place New
Orleans Saints in the NFC South.
“It’s something we pride ourselves on — being a complete
offense, being able to run the ball
when we can and pass when we
can,” McCaffrey said. “Guys
showed up and made plays today.”
That included Carolina’s defense, which forced four turnovers, including a strip by cornerback James Bradberry on Packers
wide receiver Geronimo Allison
with 1:28 remaining to seal the
victory and prevent the Packers
from possibly playing in their
third straight overtime game.
“I need to do a better job of
squeezing and securing it and
there wouldn’t be an argument,”
Allison said.
Rodgers, making his first appearance since Oct. 15, threw for
290 yards and three touchdowns
but was intercepted three times as
the Packers’ playoff hopes took a
potentially critical blow.
At 7-7, the Packers are on the
cusp of not making the playoffs
for the first time since 2008.
“I’m disappointed in my performance today,” Rodgers said.
“Obviously, I didn’t play well.”
Bradberry also had an interception of Rodgers and said he plans
to put the football in a trophy case.
“Going against him and getting
able to get as many turnovers as
we did puts a stamp on this defense,” Bradberry said of the Panthers, who have forced seven turnovers and recorded nine sacks in
the past two weeks.
The Panthers trailed 14-10 at
halftime, but Newton threw
touchdown passes to Olsen and
Byrd in the third quarter to give
them a 24-14 lead.
Byrd’s first touchdown, a nineyard grab in the back of the end
zone, came with some controversy.
The play was initially ruled an
incompletion, but Coach Ron Rivera challenged the play and officials overturned the call ruling
that Byrd’s buttocks landed inbounds.
“Initially, I wasn’t sure if they
were going to count just one cheek
or both cheeks,” Byrd said with a
laugh. “I think I got lucky on that
one.”
“I guess it pays to have little
cheeks,” Newton said of the 5foot-8, 180-pound Byrd.
Packers Coach Mike McCarthy
said he didn’t have a problem with
the decision, calling it a good
catch.
Olsen was seen screaming at
the Carolina sideline before the
review, urging Rivera not to challenge the play because he was
certain Byrd was out of bounds.
“I was like, ‘Greg, you are being
obnoxious right now,’ ” Newton
said with a laugh. “He’s saying,
‘No, he did not catch it! Coach,
don’t waste a timeout!’ I was like,
‘Greg, whose team are you on?’ ”
Olsen said sheepishly: “I was
150,000 percent wrong.”
For the Packers, it didn’t help
that Rodgers lost his most productive wide receiver in the third
quarter with a concussion.
Davante Adams took a helmetto-helmet hit from Panthers linebacker Thomas Davis on an interception return by safety Colin
Jones. As Adams was running to
make the tackle on Jones, Davis
appeared to launch himself at
Adams with a peel-back block,
immediately sending Adams to
the ground and out of the game.
Davis was flagged for a 15-yard
penalty.
Rodgers called it an “unnecessary hit” and said Davis is a “repeat offender.”
Davis could face a fine or suspension from the league.
“I’m sure the league will deal
with him accordingly to that,”
Rodgers said.
Davis immediately realized
what he had done, cupping his
head in hands as he sat on the
Panthers’ bench. Adams had five
catches for 57 yards and a touchdown against Carolina. Davis was
not available for comment after
the game.
After going 12 games without
an interception, Panthers starting
cornerbacks Bradberry and Daryl
Worley both have interceptions in
back-to-back games. Worley got
Rodgers in the first half on a deep
route along the left sideline, while
Bradberry got one on an underthrown deep ball.
On the injury front, Packers
linebacker Nick Perry left the
game with an ankle injury in the
third quarter and did not return.
Up next, Green Bay hosts Minnesota on Saturday night and
Carolina plays host to Tampa Bay
on Sunday.
— Associated Press
R EDS K IN S N O T ES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
‘Redhawks’ hold rally
Cousins is unharmed
after fourth-quarter hit
Redskins quarterback Kirk
Cousins said he felt a “flash of
pain” after he took a blow to the
back in the fourth quarter of
Washington’s 20-15 victory over
Arizona on Sunday and that he
was lucky to avoid an injury.
With Washington up 17-15 with
4:38 left, Cousins and the
Redskins’ offense faced third and
five on the Cardinals 14-yard line.
The quarterback stayed in the
pocket and released a pass
intended for wide receiver Josh
Doctson. The ball fell short as
Cousins was slammed in the back
by Arizona outside linebacker
Chandler Jones. Cousins fell
forward and into offensive
lineman Brandon Scherff to
double the hit’s impact.
“Fortunately, I’m feeling just
fine,” Cousins said after the game.
“There was a flash of pain there,
but by the time I got to the sideline
and settled down, the pain
subsided and I was feeling fine. I
feel like I dodged a bullet there
and was pretty fortunate.”
Cousins was slow to get up
after the play as he reached for his
back, but he still made it to the
sideline and didn’t miss a snap.
After the incomplete pass, Dustin
Hopkins made a 32-yard field
goal to give Washington a 20-15
lead. Cousins finished the game
18-of-26 passing for 196 yards and
two touchdowns with no
interceptions.
Cousins hasn’t missed a game
since he was elevated to
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Redskins fan Louis Hilliard, middle, talks with Native American
activists Jay Winter Nightwolf, left, and Peter Landeros on Sunday.
Washington’s starting
quarterback in 2015.
Williams shut down?
With Redskins left tackle Trent
Williams inactive for Sunday’s
victory, the question begged to be
asked: Is this the end of his
season?
It was the fourth missed game
for the 29-year-old, who has been
playing through a knee injury
that will require offseason
surgery.
But Coach Jay Gruden isn’t
ready to shut down Williams — at
least not yet.
“Today he wasn’t ready, and we
will talk about that for next week,”
he said. “With me, if there is a one
percent chance that Trent can
play, I will leave him up, just in
case you get that one percent.
“But we will readdress the
situation on Monday. Talk to the
doctor and talk to Trent.”
Gruden added of Williams, one
of seven players who missed
Washington’s victory because of
injuries: “If he’s going to have
surgery or something like that,
then we’ll put him down. But if
there’s a chance, then I will keep
him up.”
With only two games
remaining — against the Denver
Broncos and at the New York
Giants — and offseason surgery a
matter of when, not whether, it
wouldn’t be surprising if
Washington decided to place him
on injured reserve. Williams has
stressed repeatedly that he would
prefer to play through the pain,
but he also is a realist.
“It’s always my decision, but
whatever they want me to do is
what I would do,” he recently told
reporters.
Peter Landeros and Louis Hilliard
stood toe to toe Sunday morning
in the middle of a grassy field a
couple of blocks from FedEx Field
and talked.
Hilliard, on his way to Sunday’s
game, sported a burgundy jacket
with the Redskins’ logo
showcased prominently on the
front and a gold hat with an
uppercase “R.”
Landeros — a leader with the
D.C. area’s American Indian
Movement, which is determined
to get the Redskins to change a
nickname perceived as racist —
met Hilliard as the fan walked into
a group of about 40 people. Most
of the group was made up of
supporters of the “#GoRedhawks”
online campaign that spread false
news stories across social media
this past week.
“You can have a choice whether
or not to support racism,”
Landeros said to Hilliard as the
two spoke for about five minutes,
shaking hands at the end of the
exchange.
Hilliard said he wanted to
engage in an act of learning. After
the conversation, he said he
would support a name change if
Redskins owner Daniel Snyder
decided it was the right thing to
do. Snyder has previously vowed
not to change the team name.
Before he left, Hilliard took
three of the free T-shirts with the
Redhawks logo.
Hilliard was just one of the few
fans who chose to engage with the
activists as hundreds more
passed by the demonstration on
the way into the stadium.
— Samantha Pell
and Kimberley A. Martin
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. MONDAY,
DECEMBER 18 , 2017
BOB LEVERONE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jerry Richardson, 81, brought the NFL to Charlotte in 1995
and has owned the Carolina Panthers ever since.
LACHLAN CUNNINGHAM/GETTY IMAGES
Carolina’s Richardson
says he will sell the team
Dak Prescott’s five-yard third-quarter TD run put Dallas ahead, and the Cowboys went on to win by the slimmest of margins and move to 8-6.
RICHARDSON FROM D1
Dallas remains in playoff race — barely
Dallas’s three straight losses at
the start of the suspension created a hole from which the team is
still trying to escape.
The Cowboys took a risk in the
third quarter on a fourth and 11
from their own 24. Punter Chris
Jones kept the ball and ran
24 yards for a first down. Dallas
then drove down the field and
took a 17-10 lead when Prescott
ran in from five yards out and
then was given a shower of drinks
thrown by fans in the Black Hole.
Carr set up Oakland’s first
touchdown with a 32-yard scramble that was his longest run since
his rookie year. That led to a
two-yard touchdown to Michael
Crabtree that gave Carr 100 career touchdown passes. He joined
Dan Marino, Peyton Manning,
Russell Wilson and Andrew Luck
as the only players with at least
100 touchdown passes in their
first four years in the NFL. Carr
added a second touchdown pass
to Crabtree in the fourth quarter
that tied the game at 17.
Cornerback Sean Smith intercepted two passes for the Raiders,
doubling the team’s total from the
first 13 games. Smith got his first
on the opening drive of the game
and added another just moments
after Oakland got on the board for
the first time. Linebacker Bruce
Irvin hit Prescott on the throw,
and Smith came up with the
floater. He was initially given a
touchdown return on the play but
was ruled down by contact on
replay, and Oakland settled for a
game-tying field goal from Giorgio Tavecchio.
The Raiders appeared to get on
the scoreboard when tight end
Jared Cook caught an 11-yard
touchdown pass from Carr in the
closing seconds of the first half.
But a pass interference call on
Cook wiped out the score, and
Oakland came up empty when
Tavecchio missed a 39-yard field
goal wide left on the final play.
On the injury front, the Raiders
lost left tackle Donald Penn (foot)
and defensive tackle Treyvon
Hester (ankle) to injuries in the
first half. Cowboys left tackle Tyron Smith left in the second half
with a knee injury.
Up next, Dallas hosts Seattle on
Sunday, and Oakland visits Philadelphia on Christmas night.
Two locals on U.S. speedskating team
WINTER SPORTS ROUNDUP
COWBOYS 20,
RAIDERS 17
BY
J OSH D UBOW
oakland, calif. — Dallas kept
its playoff hopes alive by the
slimmest of margins.
Dak Prescott converted a
fourth-down sneak by the width
of an index card to set up Dan
Bailey’s go-ahead 19-yard field
goal and Derek Carr fumbled the
ball inches from the goal line with
31 seconds left to give the Cowboys a 20-17 victory over the Oakland Raiders on Sunday night.
The first key play came when
Cowboys Coach Jason Garrett decided to go for it on fourth and
one from his own 39-yard line
with about five minutes left in a
tie game. Prescott ran into a pile
that took officials time to untangle.
Referee Gene Steratore then
called for the chains to come out,
but even that wasn’t enough. He
then tried to slide what appeared
to be an index card between the
tip of the ball and the end of the
BY
chain. When the card didn’t slide
through, Steratore gave Dallas
(8-6) a first down.
Bryant then hit Dez Bryant
with a 40-yard pass that set up
Bailey’s short kick with 1:44 to
play that gave the Cowboys the
lead.
But the game was far from over.
The Raiders (6-8) got a gift when
Jourdan Lewis committed a 43yard pass interference penalty on
a fourth and 10 from their own 30.
Carr then scrambled on third and
three from the 8 and reached out
for the end zone. But the ball
came loose before crossing the
goal line and went out of the end
zone for a touchback that all but
ended Oakland’s playoff hopes.
The Raiders are tied for ninth in
the AFC.
Dallas is in a three-way tie for
seventh place in the NFC, a halfgame behind Atlanta for the final
playoff spot. The Falcons, who
visit Tampa Bay on Monday night,
beat the Cowboys head to head.
The Cowboys picked up their
third straight win without suspended star running back Ezekiel
Elliott, who returns from a sixgame suspension next week. But
R ICK M AESE
Maame Biney was born in
Ghana and Thomas Hong in
South Korea. But their families
settled in the Washington area
when they were young, and they
fell in love with speed at area
skating clubs. Now, as two of the
fastest Americans on skates, both
are slated to represent the United States at the PyeongChang
Olympics.
The two were among eight
American skaters who locked up
spots on the short-track speedskating team over the weekend at
the U.S. Olympic trials in Kearns,
Utah.
Biney, 17, who grew up in
Reston, became the first black
woman to qualify for an American Olympic speedskating team.
Hong, 20, will have a chance to
compete on the sport’s biggest
stage in the country of his birth.
Biney was grinning and giggling all weekend, unable to
contain her enthusiasm at times.
“Whenever I get really nervous, I start laughing uncontrollably. That helped me,” she said
during an infectious fit of laughter during the NBC broadcast
Sunday. “I’m sorry; I’m just so
nervous right now.”
“I can’t believe it,” she told
reporters a day earlier, shortly
after making the team. “It’s a
really good feeling. It has to set in
first. It takes me a while before
I’m like, ‘Holy cow!’ ”
Biney, who won bronze at the
junior world championships this
year, nearly swept the 500-meter
races Saturday. She won five of
her six races that day, including
the final, which included a personal-best time of 43.161 seconds.
“When I crossed the finish
line, I don’t know what I was
thinking. I was just like, ‘I got
first; that’s so cool,’ ” she said.
“Then I realized I made the
Olympic team. I started cheering
like crazy.”
Biney grew up around the
Dominion Speedskating Club in
Reston. Hong, of Laurel, fell in
love with the sport while skating
— Associated Press
Sports Illustrated reported
Sunday morning that at least four
former team employees received
significant financial settlements,
accompanied by nondisclosure
agreements, following inappropriate behavior in the workplace
by Richardson, including sexually suggestive remarks and actions. According to the report,
there also was an incident in
which Richardson directed a racial slur at a Panthers scout who
is African American.
The Panthers said Friday that
their investigation was being led
by law firm Quinn Emanuel
Urquhart and Sullivan, LLP, and
that it was being overseen by
Erskine Bowles, a limited partner
in the franchise and a former
White House chief of staff.
The announcement raised
questions about the independence of an investigation conducted by one of the team’s owners.
“The Carolina Panthers and
Mr. Richardson take these allegations very seriously and are fully
committed to a full investigation
and taking appropriate steps to
address and remediate any misconduct,” Panthers spokesman
Steven Drummond said Friday.
“The entire organization is fully
committed to ensuring a safe,
comfortable and diverse work
environment where all individu-
als, regardless of sex, race, color,
religion, gender or sexual identity or orientation, are treated
fairly and equally. We have work
to do to achieve this goal, but we
are going to meet it.”
Richardson, 81, attended the
Panthers’ 31-24 win over the
Green Bay Packers on Sunday in
Charlotte. He has owned the
Panthers since their inception
and is the only current NFL
owner to have played in the
league.
He once was regarded as a
leading power broker among
owners but has had a lower
profile in recent years, perhaps in
part because of health issues. (He
received a heart transplant in
2009.) Richardson did not attend
last week’s NFL owners’ meeting
in Dallas.
Richardson’s sons, Mark and
Jon, left the franchise in 2009.
Team President Danny Morrison
resigned earlier this year and has
not been replaced, and Richardson fired Dave Gettleman as the
Panthers’ general manager just
before training camp, replacing
him with former GM Marty Hurney.
In September, Panthers players met with Richardson, reportedly because they were wary that
they could be punished by the
team if they spoke out on social
issues.
mark.maske@washpost.com
Vonn drops out to rest her sore knee
A SSOCIATED P RESS
RICK BOWMER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Maame Biney, who grew up in Reston, is the first black woman
to qualify for a U.S. Olympic speedskating team.
with the Potomac Speedskating
Club. He earned his spot on the
U.S. Olympic team with his
fourth-place finish in Sunday’s
top 1,000-meter final.
“I’m tremendously excited,”
Hong told reporters in Utah
about competing in South Korea.
“I’m extremely familiar with Korean culture. I’ve lived there for
parts of my life, and I’m excited
to go back.”
Hong was part of a U.S. team
that broke the world record in the
5,000-meter relay last month in
Shanghai. Because the men’s
team qualified a relay team for
PyeongChang — unlike the American women — Hong should have
a chance to help the United States
see whether its relay success on
the World Cup circuit can carry
over to the Olympics.
Biney is the youngest of the
three women on the U.S. team,
and Hong is the youngest male.
Jessica Kooreman wrapped up
the third and final spot on the
women’s squad Sunday, punching her ticket to her second
Winter Olympics. She finished
behind Lana Gehring, who qualified for the team Friday, and
Biney in their 1,000-meter final
race, giving her enough total
points to make the team.
John-Henry Krueger led the
men’s team all weekend, winning
finals in all three distances: the
500-, 1,000- and 1,500-meter races. Krueger, J.R. Celski and Aaron
Tran had locked up their spots
Friday and Saturday. Ryan Pivirotto wasn’t in the top 1,000-meter final Sunday but earned
enough points to claim a spot on
the team.
“We have a great team,” U.S.
Coach Anthony Barthell said.
“This is probably the most stressful competition I have ever been
a part of — even when I was a
competitor — but the team we
are going with is an extremely
strong team.”
rick.maese@washpost.com
Lindsey Vonn pulled out of a
World Cup super-G race Sunday
in Val d’Isere, France, because of
a sore knee.
The 33-year-old American did
not say which knee hurts, but she
has injured both before.
She took part in Sunday’s early-morning inspection at the
French Alpine resort but then
decided against racing as a precautionary measure and flew
home.
Vonn secured her first win of
the season and record-extending
78th in Saturday’s super-G on the
same Oreiller-Killy course.
“Knee is a bit sore from yesterday so to be on the safe side I’m
going to give my body some rest,”
Vonn tweeted. “My focus is on the
Olympics so no need to risk
anything now.”
Vonn did not say when she
plans to return. There are only
slalom and giant slalom races to
follow — not her specialty — until
the next speed events in January.
They begin with a downhill and
super-G at the Austrian resort of
Bad Kleinkirchheim starting
Jan. 13.
Last weekend, Vonn jarred her
back in another super-G race at
St. Moritz in Switzerland.
Her mind is on the PyeongChang Olympics in February. She
won gold in downhill and bronze
in super-G at the 2010 Games.
Olympic champion Anna Veith
claimed Sunday’s race, more than
two years after her last win. The
28-year-old Austrian profited
from an early bib number to
clock 1 minute, 5.77 seconds. It
was her first podium since finishing third in a super-G at the
Italian resort of Cortina d’Ampezzo in January, and her previous win came in a giant slalom at
the French resort of Meribel in
March 2015.
MEN’S SKIING: Marcel
Hirscher dominated both runs to
take a record fifth straight win in
the Alta Badia giant slalom in La
Villa, Italy.
ALAIN GROSCLAUDE/AGENCE ZOOM/GETTY IMAGES
Lindsey Vonn won the super-G race Saturday in France but sat out
Sunday’s competition and did not say when she would return.
The Austrian finished a massive 1.70 seconds ahead of Norwegian rival Henrik Kristoffersen,
with Zan Kranjec of Slovenia
1.82 seconds behind in third for
his first podium result.
While Hirscher dropped some
time in the lower portion of his
opening run, he was flawless in
his second trip down, increasing
his advantage at every interval.
“Once I felt good with my
setup in the second run, I could
really attack and turn on the
turbo,” Hirscher said.
At the finish, Hirscher let out a
scream, then took off his right
glove and held up all five fingers
to celebrate the record.
Hirscher broke a tie with Italian great Alberto Tomba; the pair
had four GS wins each on the
challenging Gran Risa course.
Hirscher, the six-time defending
overall World Cup champion,
also won a slalom in Badia in
2011.
Kristoffersen also finished second to Hirscher in the GS in
Beaver Creek, Colo., this month.
“It’s just that Marcel is so
much better, and I’m not good
enough to beat him,” Kristoffersen said, adding that he got
caught in ruts during his second
run.
Olympic and three-time world
champion Ted Ligety of the United States moved up from seventh
after the opening run to finish
fifth for his best result in more
than a year.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D13
M2
scoreboard
B A S K ETB A L L
NBA
Pacers 109, Nets 97
EASTERN CONFERENCE
INDIANA ............................. 28
BROOKLYN ......................... 29
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................25
Toronto ......................................20
New York ...................................16
Philadelphia ...............................14
Brooklyn.....................................11
L
7
8
13
14
18
Pct
.781
.714
.552
.500
.379
GB
—
3
71/2
9
121/2
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................16
Miami.........................................15
Orlando ......................................11
Charlotte....................................10
Atlanta.........................................6
L
14
14
20
19
23
Pct
.533
.517
.355
.345
.207
GB
—
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................23
Indiana .......................................17
Detroit .......................................17
Milwaukee .................................15
Chicago ........................................8
L
8
13
13
13
20
Pct
.742
.567
.567
.536
.286
GB
—
51/2
51/2
61/2
131/2
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................24
San Antonio ...............................20
New Orleans ..............................15
Memphis ......................................9
Dallas ...........................................8
L
4
10
15
21
22
Pct
.857
.667
.500
.300
.267
GB
—
5
10
16
17
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota..................................17
Portland .....................................16
Denver........................................16
Oklahoma City ...........................14
Utah ...........................................14
L
13
13
13
15
16
Pct
.567
.552
.552
.483
.467
GB
—
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................23
L.A. Clippers...............................11
L.A. Lakers .................................10
Phoenix ......................................10
Sacramento .................................9
L
6
17
17
21
20
Pct
.793
.393
.370
.323
.310
GB
—
111/2
12
14
14
1/
2
51/2
51/2
91/2
31
19
21
24
HOCKEY
29 — 109
25 — 97
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 4-8 0-0 9, T.Young 2-6 1-2 5,
Turner 7-11 2-2 16, Collison 6-10 1-2 14, Oladipo 9-14 4-5
26, Poythress 0-1 0-0 0, Sabonis 7-13 3-4 17, Joseph 5-7
4-4 15, Stephenson 3-6 0-0 7. Totals 43-76 15-19 109.
BROOKLYN: Carroll 1-6 0-0 2, Hollis-Jefferson 2-10 4-4
9, Zeller 5-9 2-3 13, Dinwiddie 1-6 3-3 5, Crabbe 5-8 3-3
17, Acy 5-10 0-0 14, Allen 3-5 3-3 9, LeVert 6-11 2-5 14,
Harris 6-11 0-0 14, Stauskas 0-5 0-0 0. Totals 34-81
17-21 97.
Three-point Goals: Indiana 8-18 (Oladipo 4-6, Collison
1-1, Stephenson 1-2, Joseph 1-2, Bogdanovic 1-4, Turner
0-1, T.Young 0-2), Brooklyn 12-33 (Crabbe 4-6, Acy 4-7,
Harris 2-5, Zeller 1-1, Hollis-Jefferson 1-2, LeVert 0-2,
Stauskas 0-2, Carroll 0-3, Dinwiddie 0-5). Fouled Out:
None. Rebounds: Indiana 43 (Sabonis 8), Brooklyn 29
(Hollis-Jefferson 6). Assists: Indiana 21 (Collison 7),
Brooklyn 26 (Dinwiddie 9). Total Fouls: Indiana 20,
Brooklyn 17. Technicals: Brooklyn team. A: 13,934
(17,732).
WESTERN CONFERENCE
1/
2
1/
2
2
1/
2
3
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Portland 93, Charlotte 91
Cleveland 109, Utah 100
New York 111, Oklahoma City 96
Houston 115, Milwaukee 111
Miami 90, L.A. Clippers 85
Phoenix 108, Minnesota 106
San Antonio 98, Dallas 96
Boston 102, Memphis 93
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
NCAA men
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
NCAA women
NHL
Flames 6, Canucks 1
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
CALGARY ................................. 1
VANCOUVER ........................... 0
Albany (NY) 69, St. Bonaventure 52
Boston College 64, New Hampshire 55
Drexel 65, Saint Joseph’s 58
Fordham 71, Bucknell 62
Gardner-Webb 75, Mount St. Mary’s 67
George Washington 61, American U. 44
Holy Cross 69, Rhode Island 63
La Salle 71, Delaware St. 48
Northeastern 71, Vermont 66
Penn St. 59, Pittsburgh 48
Princeton 58, Wagner 37
UCLA 77, Seton Hall 68
SOUTH
Alabama 59, SMU 44
Clemson 53, Jacksonville St. 45
Georgia 60, Georgia Tech 53
LSU 60, Louisiana-Lafayette 45
Louisville 87, Kentucky 63
Mississippi St. 83, Maine 43
North Carolina 90, Washington 78
South Carolina 99, Savannah St. 38
Syracuse 69, Coastal Carolina 57
Tulane 62, Middle Tennessee 44
UTEP 93, East Carolina 79
Virginia 77, Ohio 59
W. Kentucky 70, Toledo 56
William & Mary 75, Old Dominion 58
Binghamton 51, Sacred Heart 48
Boston College 84, CCSU 65
Delaware 68, Delaware St. 59, OT
Duquesne 74, NC A&T 58
Elon 77, Boston U. 69
La Salle 95, Mercer 85
Old Dominion 82, Fairfield 77, OT
Providence 62, Stony Brook 60
Saint Joseph’s 72, Maine 59
Siena 87, Bryant 68
St. John’s 69, Iona 59
St. Peter’s 71, LIU Brooklyn 56
UMBC 76, N. Kentucky 75
MIDWEST
SOUTH
SOUTHWEST
Furman 90, UNC-Wilmington 84
Gardner-Webb 80, Hampton 79
Georgia Tech 79, Florida A&M 54
Lipscomb 67, Abilene Christian 65
Morehead St. 98, Cent. Arkansas 94, OT
North Carolina 78, Tennessee 73
Penn St. 72, George Mason 54
Tennessee Tech 82, Chattanooga 76
W. Carolina 76, UNC-Asheville 72
William & Mary 126, Milligan 69
Wofford 70, High Point 57
MIDWEST
Cleveland St. 56, Illinois St. 47
Dayton 82, James Madison 54
Iowa 71, N. Iowa 47
Iowa St. 89, UC Riverside 66
Marquette 83, Milwaukee 68
Missouri 75, Indiana 55
Notre Dame 91, DePaul 82
Ohio St. 87, Cincinnati 76
Purdue 65, E. Washington 40
S. Dakota St. 85, Drake 78
Xavier 75, Furman 62
Arizona St. (10-0)
Shibel 1-3 1-2 3, White 6-8 0-2 12, Holder 6-15 11-11 25,
Justice 2-7 2-2 7, S.Evans 4-12 5-6 15, Lake 0-0 0-0 0,
Mitchell 3-4 2-5 8, Salzman 0-0 0-0 0, Martin 3-8 0-0 6,
Fogerty 0-0 0-0 0, Witherill 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 25-57 21-28
76.
Raptors 108, Kings 93
SACRAMENTO ................... 30
TORONTO ........................... 35
33
26
14
22
16 — 93
25 — 108
SACRAMENTO: Carter 2-5 0-0 4, Koufos 3-9 0-0 6,
Cauley-Stein 5-9 2-2 12, Hill 6-11 0-2 16, Temple 6-13 4-4
18, Jackson 1-4 0-0 2, Labissiere 0-2 0-0 0, Papagiannis
2-4 0-0 4, Mason 3-6 0-0 6, Hield 3-8 0-0 7, Bogdanovic
7-10 0-0 18. Totals 38-81 6-8 93.
TORONTO: Anunoby 4-8 0-0 11, Miles 3-9 2-2 10,
Valanciunas 3-10 7-8 13, Lowry 5-11 2-2 16, DeRozan
6-17 9-12 21, Siakam 1-9 0-0 2, Poeltl 4-6 1-2 9, VanVleet
3-4 0-0 7, Wright 2-6 0-0 5, Powell 5-5 2-2 14. Totals
36-85 23-28 108.
Three-point Goals: Sacramento 11-26 (Hill 4-7, Bogdanovic 4-7, Temple 2-7, Hield 1-2, Jackson 0-3), Toronto
13-30 (Lowry 4-8, Anunoby 3-6, Powell 2-2, Miles 2-7,
VanVleet 1-1, Wright 1-2, DeRozan 0-1, Valanciunas 0-1,
Siakam 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento
32 (Cauley-Stein, Koufos 6), Toronto 46 (Valanciunas
16). Assists: Sacramento 25 (Hill, Bogdanovic 5), Toronto 20 (Lowry 7). Total Fouls: Sacramento 19, Toronto 13.
A: 19,800 (19,800).
Pistons 114, Magic 110
ORLANDO ........................... 23
DETROIT ............................. 36
20
24
36
36
31 — 110
18 — 114
ORLANDO: Simmons 10-19 3-6 23, Hezonja 10-18 0-0 28,
Vucevic 10-20 0-0 24, Payton 6-7 1-2 15, Mack 1-1 0-0 2,
Isaac 0-4 1-2 1, Iwundu 2-5 0-0 5, Biyombo 0-2 0-0 0,
Augustin 2-9 6-7 12, Artis 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-85 11-17
110.
DETROIT: Bullock 8-10 0-0 20, Harris 7-17 0-0 17,
Drummond 5-10 2-2 12, Jackson 7-15 0-0 17, Kennard 1-5
0-0 3, Johnson 1-5 4-6 7, Tolliver 5-7 2-2 17, Moreland
3-4 0-0 6, Marjanovic 0-0 0-0 0, Galloway 3-9 5-6 11,
Smith 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 42-88 13-16 114.
Three-point Goals: Orlando 17-33 (Hezonja 8-12, Vucevic
4-6, Payton 2-3, Augustin 2-7, Iwundu 1-2, Simmons
0-3), Detroit 17-34 (Tolliver 5-7, Bullock 4-6, Harris 3-5,
Jackson 3-7, Kennard 1-1, Johnson 1-3, Galloway 0-5).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 40 (Vucevic 14),
Detroit 39 (Moreland 8). Assists: Orlando 27 (Vucevic,
Payton, Simmons 7), Detroit 27 (Smith, Jackson 6).
Total Fouls: Orlando 16, Detroit 17. A: 16,312 (21,000).
NBA INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Entering Sunday’s games
POINTS
Harden, HOU .....................
Antetokounmpo, MIL .......
James, CLE ........................
Curry, GOL .........................
Cousins, NOR ....................
G
28
27
30
23
30
FG
267
296
323
192
271
FT PTS. AVG.
228 881 31.5
200 805 29.8
138 843 28.1
139 606 26.3
175 787 26.2
Halftime: Arizona St. 30-29. Three-point goals: Vanderbilt 4-31 (Toye 2-11, LaChance 1-4, Lee 1-4, Roberson
0-2, M.Evans 0-2, Fisher-Davis 0-8), Arizona St. 5-23
(Holder 2-6, S.Evans 2-9, Justice 1-5, Martin 0-1, Shibel
0-2). Fouled out: White. Rebounds: Vanderbilt 29 (Fisher-Davis 8), Arizona St. 42 (Mitchell 13). Assists:
Vanderbilt 10 (Lee 6), Arizona St. 7 (Holder, S.Evans,
Mitchell 2). Total fouls: Vanderbilt 23, Arizona St. 20.
Technical fouls: Vanderbilt coach Bryce Drew, Martin. A:
10,797 (10,754).
No. 7 North Carolina 78,
No. 20 Tennessee 73
North Carolina (10-1)
Brooks 3-5 3-3 9, Maye 7-14 0-1 15, Pinson 1-5 5-5 7,
K.Williams 6-11 1-2 15, Berry 7-19 4-4 21, Manley 5-9 0-2
10, Huffman 0-0 0-0 0, Platek 0-2 0-0 0, Felton 0-2 0-0 0,
Robinson 0-0 1-2 1. 29-67 Totals 14-19 78.
Tennessee (7-2)
G.Williams 7-15 1-2 15, Alexander 2-3 1-2 5, Schofield
3-13 2-2 10, Bone 4-9 2-2 10, Bowden 3-7 4-4 12,
Fulkerson 0-2 2-2 2, Walker 0-0 0-0 0, Turner 1-8 0-1 2,
Daniel 4-6 2-2 14, Darrington 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 25-67
14-17 73.
Halftime: Tennessee 38-32. Three-point goals: North
Carolina 6-17 (Berry 3-9, K.Williams 2-4, Maye 1-2,
Pinson 0-1, Platek 0-1), Tennessee 9-25 (Daniel 4-6,
Bowden 2-3, Schofield 2-6, Darrington 1-2, Bone 0-3,
Turner 0-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: North Carolina
42 (Pinson 9), Tennessee 34 (Turner 9). Assists: North
Carolina 17 (Pinson 8), Tennessee 11 (Bone 4). Total
fouls: North Carolina 16, Tennessee 23.
No. 21 Baylor 118,
Savannah State 86
Savannah St. (3-10)
Glenn 0-0 0-0 0, Dasent 6-13 0-0 18, McClanahan 7-18
2-3 22, Sellers 2-6 2-3 7, Jenkins 4-14 0-0 10, Orizu 2-4
0-0 4, Grant Jr. 1-2 0-0 3, Dubose 0-0 0-0 0, Evans 4-9 1-1
11, Felder 1-1 0-0 3, Fenner 2-8 1-2 6, Cabeza 1-4 0-0 2.
30-79 Totals 6-9 86.
Baylor (9-2)
Lual-Acuil 10-15 11-16 31, Omot 6-11 3-4 18, Clark 2-3
0-0 4, Lecomte 8-14 2-3 25, McClure 6-11 4-4 19, Vital 5-8
2-4 12, Lindsey 4-5 0-0 9, Okeke 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 41-69
22-31 118.
Halftime: Baylor 61-37. Three-point goals: Savannah St.
20-51 (Dasent 6-12, McClanahan 6-12, Evans 2-4,
Jenkins 2-10, Felder 1-1, Grant Jr. 1-2, Sellers 1-4,
Fenner 1-5, Cabeza 0-1), Baylor 14-33 (Lecomte 7-13,
McClure 3-8, Omot 3-8, Lindsey 1-2, Okeke 0-2). Fouled
out: Glenn. Rebounds: Savannah St. 23 (McClanahan 6),
Baylor 54 (Lual-Acuil 20). Assists: Savannah St. 24
(McClanahan 5), Baylor 32 (Omot 8). Total fouls:
Savannah St. 23, Baylor 14. A: 6,996 (10,284).
L
7
11
10
11
14
13
15
OL PTS. GF GA
4
46 108 85
2
46 107 88
5
43 112 94
5
39 102 86
2
38 99 99
3
37 94 95
2
32 101 107
PACIFIC
W
Vegas ............................ 21
Los Angeles .................. 20
San Jose ........................ 17
Calgary .......................... 17
Anaheim ....................... 14
Vancouver ..................... 15
Edmonton ..................... 14
Arizona ........................... 7
L
9
10
10
14
11
15
17
23
OL PTS. GF GA
2
44 112 97
4
44 103 81
4
38 85 75
3
37 97 102
8
36 88 95
4
34 88 106
2
30 96 107
5
19 78 122
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Episcopal 53, Wilson 37
PRIVATE
Bullis 59, Pallotti 45
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Calgary, Giordano 5 (Gaudreau, Hamilton),
3:56. 3, Calgary, Tkachuk 7 (Jankowski, Bennett), 15:47.
4, Calgary, Giordano 6 (Stajan, Brouwer), 18:47. 5,
Calgary, Bennett 5 (Hamonic, Jankowski), 19:47.
B OY S ’ B A S K E TB A L L
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Vancouver, Granlund 7 (H.Sedin, Edler), 6:48
(pp). 7, Calgary, Ferland 13 (Bennett, Hamilton), 11:09
(pp).
IAC
EPISCOPAL 69, GOOD COUNSEL 36
SHOTS ON GOAL
CALGARY ................................. 9
10
19 — 38
VANCOUVER ........................... 7
6
4 — 17
Power-play opportunities: Calgary 1 of 5; Vancouver 1 of
5. Goalies: Calgary, Rittich 3-1-0 (17 shots-16 saves).
Vancouver, Markstrom 9-11-3 (19-14), Nilsson 6-4-1
(19-18). A: 18,236 (18,910). T: 2:30.
GC (3-5) Melton 8, Carter 7, Flood 6, Nwosu 6, Graham 3,
Vazzana 2, Carter 2, Walker 2 Totals 10 10-14 36.
E (8-1) Steele 15, Johnson 13, Johnson 13, Pfaffenberger
13, Shannon 8, Chenery 5, Bounds 2 Totals 19 19-24 69.
Halftime: Episcopal, (45-18).
Three-point goals: E 4 (Johnson 2, Johnson 1, Steele 1);
GC 2 (Carter 1, Flood 1)
GI R LS ’ BA S K E TBALL
Golden Knights 5, Panthers 2
FLORIDA .................................. 2
VEGAS ..................................... 2
0
0
0 —
3 —
2
5
TOP 20
FIRST PERIOD
NO. 16 BULLIS 59, PALLOTTI 45
Scoring: 1, Florida, Vrbata 4 (Malgin, Bjugstad), 2:58
(pp). 2, Florida, Matheson 2 (Trocheck, Dadonov), 5:13.
3, Vegas, Schmidt 2 (Karlsson, Smith), 6:39. 4, Vegas,
Miller 5 (Neal, Marchessault), 17:20.
B (5-2) Carrillo 18, Walker 17, Page 11, Howard 5,
Saddler 4, Eniafe 2, Pendleton 2 Totals 14 13-19 59.
P (0-2)Totals 0 0-0 45.
Halftime: Bullis, (34-7).
Three-point goals: B 6 (Walker 4, Carrillo 2).
THIRD PERIOD
EPISCOPAL 53, WILSON 37
Arkansas 91, Texas-Arlington 57
TCU 89, Northwestern St. 51
Texas 87, Florida St. 72
Texas State 73, Sam Houston St. 41
Texas Tech 80, Rio Grande 64
New Jersey 5, Dallas 2
Carolina 5, Buffalo 4 (OT)
N.Y. Rangers 4, Los Angeles 2
Detroit 3, Toronto 1
Vancouver 4, San Jose 3 (OT)
FLORIDA .................................. 9
7
2 — 18
VEGAS ................................... 11
9
20 — 40
Power-play opportunities: Florida 1 of 3; Vegas 0 of 4.
Goalies: Florida, Reimer 6-9-4 (38 shots-35 saves).
Vegas, Subban 8-2-0 (18-16). A: 17,593 (17,367). T: 2:35.
WEST
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
W (4-3) Cousins 13, Camille 11, Brown-Egue 10, Fischer
3 Totals 11 9-9 37.
E (7-1) Shepherd 17, Weger 15, Shepherd 7, Goree 5,
Huffines 4, Giblin 3, Phillips 2 Totals 13 6-6 53.
Halftime: Episcopal, (28-17).
Three-point goals: E 7 (Giblin 1, Goree 1, Shepherd 1,
Shepherd 1, Weger 3); W 2 (Cousins 1, Fischer 1)
Gonzaga 97, St. Francis (Pa.) 74
Hawaii 65, Arizona 60
Nebraska 81, San Jose St. 55
New Mexico St. 86, Pepperdine 64
Oregon 90, Mississippi 46
San Francisco 70, Fresno St. 62
Tennessee 90, Long Beach St. 61
Weber St. 91, Portland 70
Washington 3, Anaheim 2 (OT)
Edmonton 3, Minnesota 2
N.Y. Rangers 3, Boston 2 (OT)
N.Y. Islanders 4, Los Angeles 3 (OT)
St. Louis 2, Winnipeg 0
Ottawa 3, Montreal 0
Carolina 2, Columbus 1
Philadelphia 2, Dallas 1 (OT)
Pittsburgh 4, Arizona 2
Tampa Bay 6, Colorado 5
Nashville 2, Calgary 0
DePaul (7-4)
Grays 4-9 0-0 9, Campbell 3-12 0-0 6, Coleman 6-21 4-4
17, Millender 7-11 0-0 18, Prochaska 0-1 0-0 0, Stonewall
6-11 0-0 16, Allen 1-4 1-1 3, Bekelja 2-7 0-0 5, Cage 3-7
0-0 8, McLimore 0-1 0-0 0, 32-84 Totals 5-5 82.
Vanderbilt (3-7)
Roberson 1-7 5-5 7, LaChance 1-8 0-0 3, Lee 9-14 5-9 24,
Fisher-Davis 1-10 0-0 2, Toye 6-18 0-0 14, Brown 2-4 1-2
5, Willis 1-2 1-1 3, Austin 2-3 2-2 6, M.Evans 0-2 0-0 0.
23-68 Totals 14-19 64.
W
21
22
19
17
18
17
15
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
Scoring: 1, Calgary, Jankowski 6 (Bennett, Hathaway),
5:45.
NONLEAGUE
Baylor 118, Savannah St. 86
Houston 92, Prairie View 72
Toronto at Charlotte, 7
Indiana at Atlanta, 7:30
Miami at Boston, 7:30
Sacramento at Brooklyn, 7:30
L.A. Lakers at Houston, 8
Orlando at Chicago, 8
Utah at Oklahoma City, 8
Detroit at Dallas, 8:30
Minnesota at Denver, 9
San Antonio at Portland, 10
Memphis at Golden State, 10:30
Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, 10:30
OL PTS. GF GA
2
50 123 80
1
41 109 97
5
35 86 85
4
32 87 103
7
31 86 103
7
29 85 103
5
29 95 115
7
23 72 111
PRIVATE
Episcopal 69, Good Counsel 36
FIRST PERIOD
SHOTS ON GOAL
Boston at Indiana, 7
New York at Charlotte, 7
Miami at Atlanta, 7:30
Denver at Oklahoma City, 8
Philadelphia at Chicago, 8
Portland at Minnesota, 8
Utah at Houston, 8
L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 8:30
Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30
Golden State at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
No. 5 Arizona State 76,
Vanderbilt 64
L
6
13
10
15
13
13
16
18
6
1
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
No. 2 Notre Dame 91, DePaul 82
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay .................... 24
Toronto ......................... 20
Boston ........................... 15
Montreal ....................... 14
Detroit .......................... 12
Ottawa .......................... 11
Florida ........................... 12
Buffalo ............................ 8
1 —
1 —
Scoring: 5, Vegas, Haula 12 (Miller, Marchessault),
11:40. 6, Vegas, Marchessault 11 (Smith), 17:50. 7,
Vegas, Neal 16 (Theodore), 19:32.
SOUTHWEST
New Orleans at Washington, 7
Sacramento at Philadelphia, 7
Cleveland at Milwaukee, 8
OL PTS. GF GA
1
43 108 98
5
41 100 96
1
41 95 86
3
39 108 96
3
39 118 114
3
37 99 108
7
35 90 98
7
35 91 90
BOYS' BASKETBALL
4
0
x-Late game
MONDAY’S GAMES
TUESDAY’S GAMES
L
12
9
12
12
12
14
11
11
CENTRAL
Nashville .......................
St. Louis ........................
Winnipeg ......................
Chicago .........................
Dallas ............................
Minnesota .....................
Colorado ........................
Evansville 79, Midway 52
Miami (Ohio) 109, Rio Grande 70
Nebraska-Omaha 99, Cornell College 58
S. Illinois 71, Lamar 61
Arizona St. 76, Vanderbilt 64
Army 79, Air Force 54
Colorado St. 66, Texas State 58
E. Washington 86, CS Northridge 58
Montana 77, UC Riverside 61
Nevada 77, Radford 62
South Dakota 76, San Jose St. 62
Southern Cal 98, UC Santa Barbara 87
Stanford 71, San Francisco 59
Washington 80, Loyola Marymount 77
W
21
18
20
18
18
17
14
14
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Cleveland 106, Washington 99
Toronto 108, Sacramento 93
Detroit 114, Orlando 110
Indiana 109, Brooklyn 97
WEST
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
New Jersey ...................
Columbus ......................
N.Y. Rangers .................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
Pittsburgh .....................
Carolina .........................
Philadelphia ..................
H I GH S C HOOLS
Notre Dame (10-1)
Shepard 17-22 5-6 39, Westbeld 4-5 2-2 10, Mabrey 2-10
8-8 13, Ogunbowale 8-17 2-4 21, Young 1-6 2-4 4, Butler
0-0 0-0 0, Nelson 0-0 0-0 0, Patterson 0-1 0-0 0, Cole 0-0
0-0 0, Thompson 2-5 0-0 4, 34-66 Totals 19-24 91.
DEPAUL .............................. 19 21 18 24
—82
NOTRE DAME ..................... 19 22 19 31
—91
Three-point goals: DePaul 13-36 (Grays 1-3, Campbell
0-5, Coleman 1-7, Millender 4-8, Stonewall 4-4, Allen
0-3, Bekelja 1-3, Cage 2-3), Notre Dame 4-10 (Mabrey
1-3, Ogunbowale 3-4, Young 0-2, Thompson 0-1). Assists: DePaul 15 (Campbell 4), Notre Dame 22 (Mabrey
6). Fouled out: DePaul Grays, Campbell, Rebounds:
DePaul 39 (Campbell 8), Notre Dame 46 (Shepard 11).
Total fouls: DePaul 22, Notre Dame 7. A: 8,503.
No. 3 Louisville 87, Kentucky 63
Louisville (13-0)
Fuehring 4-8 2-2 10, Hines-Allen 9-15 0-4 18, Carter 4-8
0-0 11, Durr 12-22 2-2 32, Jones 0-3 0-0 0, Dunham 1-1
0-0 2, Shook 1-4 0-0 3, Evans 2-6 7-8 11, Laemmle 0-0 0-0
0, Zambrotta 0-1 0-0 0, 33-68 Totals 11-16 87.
Kentucky (8-4)
Rice 3-8 2-4 8, Cann 2-4 0-0 6, Morris 6-13 3-4 16, Murray
3-8 2-4 8, Roper 3-5 2-2 9, McKinney 1-2 0-0 3, Wyatt 3-6
3-4 10, Harrison 1-2 0-0 2, Paschal 0-1 1-2 1, 22-49 Totals
13-20 63.
LOUISVILLE ........................ 23 24 22 18
—87
KENTUCKY ......................... 16
9 20 18
—63
Three-point goals: Louisville 10-23 (Fuehring 0-1, Carter
3-6, Durr 6-11, Shook 1-2, Evans 0-2, Zambrotta 0-1),
Kentucky 6-12 (Cann 2-3, Morris 1-3, Murray 0-1, Roper
1-2, McKinney 1-1, Wyatt 1-2). Assists: Louisville 22
(Evans 10), Kentucky 12 (Murray 7). Fouled out: None.
Rebounds: Louisville 36 (Fuehring 10), Kentucky 25
(Murray 7). Total fouls: Louisville 24, Kentucky 17. A:
5,871.
No. 8 Texas 87,
No. 12 Florida State 72
Florida St. (10-1)
Degbeon 1-3 0-0 2, Thomas 8-17 3-4 19, White 1-3 0-0 3,
Alix 8-13 0-0 21, Wright 4-12 0-2 10, Ekhomu 3-8 0-0 7,
Woolfolk 4-8 0-0 10, 29-64 Totals 3-6 72.
Texas (9-1)
Caron-Goudreau 2-6 0-0 4, White 4-10 2-2 10, Atkins
5-15 6-7 17, Higgs 6-13 3-4 15, McCarty 10-13 1-1 24,
Aborowa 0-1 0-2 0, Boothe 4-9 0-0 8, Hosey 0-4 0-0 0,
Sutton 4-5 0-0 9, 35-76 Totals 12-16 87.
FLORIDA ST. ....................... 23 17 16 16
—72
TEXAS ................................ 26 15 22 24
—87
Three-point goals: Florida St. 11-25 (White 1-2, Alix 5-8,
Wright 2-7, Ekhomu 1-3, Woolfolk 2-5), Texas 5-15
(Caron-Goudreau 0-1, Atkins 1-5, McCarty 3-4, Boothe
0-3, Hosey 0-1, Sutton 1-1). Assists: Florida St. 14 (Alix
8), Texas 16 (McCarty 6). Fouled out: Florida St. Ekhomu,
Rebounds: Florida St. 32 (Degbeon 6), Texas 46 (White
12). Total fouls: Florida St. 20, Texas 10. A: 4,202.
Virginia 77, Ohio 59
Virginia (5-6)
Aiyeotan 4-11 2-4 10, Huland El 8-15 0-0 17, Tinsley 1-6
0-0 3, Toussaint 5-9 0-0 13, Willoughby 2-3 0-0 4, Allen
1-1 0-0 2, Jablonowski 3-5 0-0 6, Moses 2-2 3-4 7, Payne
0-1 1-2 1, Brown 4-6 2-2 14, Caldwell 0-3 0-0 0, 30-62
Totals 8-12 77.
Ohio (5-5)
Jessing 1-4 0-0 2, Agler 1-5 2-2 5, Barker 2-6 0-0 6, Burke
5-10 1-2 14, Doseck 4-12 0-0 11, Bower 2-6 0-0 6, Burris
2-6 4-4 9, Stover 0-1 0-0 0, Bambule 0-1 0-0 0, Hooks 2-4
2-6 6, 19-55 Totals 9-14 59.
VIRGINIA ............................ 19 16 25 17
—77
OHIO ................................... 28
6
8 17
—59
Three-point goals: Virginia 9-18 (Huland El 1-2, Tinsley
1-4, Toussaint 3-6, Jablonowski 0-1, Brown 4-5), Ohio
12-39 (Jessing 0-3, Agler 1-4, Barker 2-6, Burke 3-6,
Doseck 3-11, Bower 2-3, Burris 1-4, Stover 0-1, Bambule
0-1). Assists: Virginia 20 (Brown 6), Ohio 13 (Agler 3).
Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Virginia 51 (Aiyeotan 14),
Ohio 22 (Agler 4). Total fouls: Virginia 15, Ohio 14. A:
200.
NHL leaders
Through Sunday’s games
POINTS
GP
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ................ 32
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ............... 32
John Tavares, N.Y. Islandrs .................. 33
Johnny Gaudreau, CGY ......................... 34
Connor McDavid, Edmonton ................. 33
Josh Bailey, N.Y. Islandrs ..................... 33
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia ................ 32
Anze Kopitar, Los Angeles ................... 34
Blake Wheeler, WPG ............................ 34
Brayden Schenn, St. Louis .................... 35
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh ......................... 34
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado ............... 32
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ................. 34
Mark Scheifele, WPG ........................... 34
Evgeny Kuznetsov, Washington .......... 34
4 tied with 35 points
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Winnipeg 4, St. Louis 0
Chicago 4, Minnesota 1
Calgary 6, Vancouver 1
Vegas 5, Florida 2
MONDAY’S GAMES
Anaheim at New Jersey, 7
Columbus at Boston, 7
Los Angeles at Philadelphia, 7
San Jose at Edmonton, 9
Pittsburgh at Colorado, 9
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Washington at Dallas, 8:30
Carolina at Toronto, 2
Minnesota at Ottawa, 7
Detroit at N.Y. Islanders, 7
Anaheim at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Boston at Buffalo, 7:30
Winnipeg at Nashville, 8
Florida at Arizona, 9
Tampa Bay at Vegas, 10
Montreal at Vancouver, 10
Jets 4, Blues 0
ST. LOUIS ................................. 0
WINNIPEG ............................... 0
0
2
0 —
2 —
0
4
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Winnipeg, Lowry 5 (Copp, Tanev), 4:32. 2,
Winnipeg, Laine 16 (Perreault, Trouba), 15:13 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Winnipeg, Scheifele 15 (Morrissey, Copp),
11:54. 4, Winnipeg, Morrissey 5 (Wheeler, Trouba),
13:45.
SHOTS ON GOAL
ST. LOUIS ................................. 9
6
9 — 24
WINNIPEG ............................. 12
16
18 — 46
Power-play opportunities: St. Louis 0 of 4; Winnipeg 1 of
4. Goalies: St. Louis, Allen 17-9-2 (46 shots-42 saves).
Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 17-4-4 (24-24). A: 15,321
(15,294). T: 2:26.
Blackhawks 4, Wild 1
MINNESOTA ............................ 0
CHICAGO .................................. 1
0
1
1 —
2 —
1
4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Chicago, Kane 13 (Schmaltz, Anisimov),
10:56.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Chicago, Kane 14 (Keith, Oesterle), 15:36.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Chicago, Hartman 5, 1:41. 4, Minnesota,
Dumba 6 (Suter, Coyle), 5:56. 5, Chicago, Wingels 6,
16:00 (sh).
SHOTS ON GOAL
MINNESOTA .......................... 13
6
9 — 28
CHICAGO .................................. 9
22
15 — 46
Power-play opportunities: Minnesota 0 of 2; Chicago 0 of
6. Goalies: Minnesota, Stalock 5-5-1 (45 shots-42
saves). Chicago, Crawford 16-7-2 (28-27). A: 21,813
(19,717). T: 2:26.
Predators 2, Flames 0
Late Saturday
NASHVILLE .............................. 0
CALGARY ................................. 0
2
0
0 —
0 —
2
0
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Nashville, Johansen 4 (Arvidsson), 11:17. 2,
Nashville, Fiala 8 (Subban, Turris), 19:22.
SHOTS ON GOAL
NASHVILLE .............................. 6
16
6 — 28
CALGARY ............................... 12
9
11 — 32
Power-play opportunities: Nashville 0 of 3; Calgary 0 of
5. Goalies: Nashville, Rinne 18-4-3 (32 shots-32 saves).
Calgary, M.Smith 13-11-3 (28-26). A: 18,618 (19,289). T:
2:28.
G
23
23
20
19
17
17
17
16
16
16
16
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
ASSISTS
GP
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia ............................ 32
Josh Bailey N.Y. Islanders
... 33
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ........................... 32
Blake Wheeler, Winnipeg ................................ 34
Connor McDavid, Edmonton ............................. 33
Johnny Gaudreau, Calgary ............................... 34
Evgeny Kuznetsov, Washington ...................... 34
Tyson Barrie, Colorado ..................................... 31
Jonathan Huberdeau, Florida ........................... 33
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh .................................... 34
John Klingberg, Dallas ..................................... 34
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 32
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado .......................... 32
John Carlson, Washington ............................... 34
Claude Giroux, Philadelphia ............................. 32
Anze Kopitar, Los Angeles ............................... 34
Kris Letang, Pittsburgh .................................... 34
Brayden Schenn St. Louis
... 35
Artemi Panarin, Columbus ............................... 33
Mark Scheifele, Winnipeg ................................ 34
A
33
31
31
31
28
27
25
23
23
23
23
23
23
22
22
22
22
22
21
21
SHOTS
GP
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................. 34
Vladimir Tarasenko St. Louis
... 35
Tyler Seguin, Dallas ......................................... 34
Evander Kane, Buffalo ..................................... 33
Max Pacioretty, Montreal ................................ 33
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh .................................... 34
Brent Burns, San Jose ...................................... 31
Jeff Skinner, Carolina ....................................... 32
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia ............................ 32
Patrick Kane, Chicago ....................................... 33
Tyler Toffoli, Los Angeles ................................ 34
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 32
Vincent Trocheck, Florida ................................. 33
Mike Hoffman, Ottawa .................................... 31
Jack Eichel, Buffalo .......................................... 33
Viktor Arvidsson, Nashville ............................. 32
Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh ............................... 34
Patric Hornqvist, Pittsburgh ............................ 31
S
156
153
144
138
132
131
128
120
114
113
113
111
110
109
108
107
107
107
PLUS/MINUS
GP
Anton Stralman, Tampa Bay ............................ 32
Jaden Schwartz St., Louis
... 30
Brayden Schenn St., Louis
... 35
Brayden Point, Tampa Bay ............................... 32
Drew Doughty, Los Angeles ............................. 34
Robert Hagg, Philadelphia ............................... 32
Matt Niskanen, Washington ............................ 21
Vladimir Tarasenko St., Louis
... 35
Radek Faksa, Dallas ......................................... 33
Brian Gibbons, New Jersey .............................. 32
Ondrej Palat, Tampa Bay ................................. 32
Dustin Brown, Los Angeles .............................. 34
Sean Couturier, Philadelphia ........................... 32
Yanni Gourde, Tampa Bay ................................ 32
Michael Grabner N.Y. R, angers
... 33
Auston Matthews, Toronto ............................. 26
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ........................... 32
Andrew Ladd N.Y. Isl, anders
... 33
Alex Pietrangelo St., Louis
... 31
Mikhail Sergachev, Tampa Bay ........................ 32
+/24
23
22
16
15
15
15
15
14
14
14
13
13
13
13
13
13
12
12
12
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Per Month
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703-468-4040 VA | 301-920-7795 MD | 202-559-0336 DC
MHIC #125450 | DC #67004413 | VA #2705 108835A | WVA #036832
A PTS
23 46
31 43
21 40
27 40
28 40
31 40
33 40
22 39
31 39
22 38
23 38
23 38
14 37
21 36
25 36
GOALS
GP
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 32
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................. 34
Anders Lee N.Y. Isl, anders
... 33
John Tavares N.Y. Isl, anders
... 33
Brock Boeser, Vancouver ................................. 31
Anze Kopitar, Los Angeles ............................... 34
Sean Monahan, Calgary ................................... 34
Michael Grabner N.Y. Rangers
... 33
Patrik Laine, Winnipeg ..................................... 34
James Neal, Vegas
... 32
Brayden Schenn St. Louis
... 35
Logan Couture, San Jose .................................. 31
Sean Couturier, Philadelphia ........................... 32
Nikolaj Ehlers, Winnipeg .................................. 34
Filip Forsberg, Nashville .................................. 32
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh .................................... 34
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado .......................... 32
Mark Scheifele, Winnipeg ................................ 34
Vladimir Tarasenko St. Louis
... 35
James van Riemsdyk, Toronto ......................... 33
Financing
As Low As
99
G
23
12
19
13
12
9
7
17
8
16
15
15
23
15
11
GOLF
Asian Tour
INDONESIAN MASTERS
At Royale Jakarta (Indonesia) Golf Club
Purse: $750,000
Yardage: 7,324
FINAL
Justin Rose, England....................... 62-69-66-62
Phachara Khongwatmai, Thailand.. 65-69-68-65
Scott Vincent, Zimbabwe ............... 67-65-68-69
Yusaku Miyazato, Japan ................. 67-67-67-69
Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Thailand...... 68-64-70-69
Younghan Song, South Korea ......... 67-69-70-66
Sihwan Kim, United States ............ 68-67-67-70
Ajeetesh Sandhu, India................... 72-68-67-67
Steve Lewton, England ................... 67-70-71-66
Jake Higginbottom, Australia ........ 71-68-66-70
Chan Shih-Chang, Taiwan ............... 68-71-68-69
Shubhankar Sharma, India.............. 71-67-67-71
Danthai Boonma, Thailand ............. 71-70-63-73
Hyunwoo Ryu, South Korea ............ 68-71-68-70
Daniel Chopra, Sweden ................... 68-71-66-72
Gaganjeet Bhullar, India ................. 67-71-72-67
Bowen Xiao, China .......................... 68-73-70-67
Suradit Yongcharoenchai, Thailand 72-66-68-72
Jazz Janewattananond, Thailand ... 69-68-74-67
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
259
267
269
270
271
272
272
274
274
275
276
276
277
277
277
277
278
278
278
Micah Lauren Shin, United States ..69-69-71-70 —
Sam Chien, United States ...............69-72-75-67 —
Johannes Veerman, United States .71-71-72-69 —
Jarin Todd, United States ...............72-70-71-72 —
Jason Knutzon, United States ........72-71-73-72 —
Casey O'Toole, United States .........70-72-74-73 —
279
283
283
285
288
289
ALSO
TR ANS AC TI ONS
MLB
Los Angeles Angels: Agreed to terms with SSs Kevin
Maitan and Livan Soto on minor league contracts.
San Diego Padres: Agreed to terms with RHP Jordan
Lyles on a one-year contract. Designated LHP Travis
Wood for assignment.
NBA
Chicago Bulls: Recalled G Kay Felder and F/C Cristiano
Felicio from Windy City (NBAGL).
NHL
Minnesota Wild: Recalled G Adam Vay from Rapid City
(ECHL) to Iowa (AHL).
New York Islanders: Recalled G Eamon McAdam from
Worcester (ECHL) to Bridgeport (AHL).
Toronto Maple Leafs: Placed D Nikita Zaitsev on injured
reserve. Recalled D Martin Marincin from Toronto
(AHL).
BOXI NG
Fight schedule
DEC. 30
At Yokohama, Japan, Naoya Inoue vs. Yoan Boyeaux, 12,
for Inoue’s WBO junior bantamweight title; Ken Shiro
vs. Gilberto Pedroza, 12, for Shiro’s WBC junior flyweight title; Satoshi Shimizu vs. Filipino Edward Mancito, 12, featherweights; Takuma Inoue vs. Kentaro
Masuda, 10, bantamweights.
DEC. 31
At Tokyo, Milan Melindo vs. Ryoichi Taguchi, 12,
Melindo’s IBF and Taguchi’s WBA World junior flyweight titles; Hiroto Kyoguchi vs. Carlos Buitrago, 12,
for Kyoguchi’s IBF strawweight title; Sho Kimura vs.
Toshiyuki Igarashi, 12, for Kimura’s WBO flyweight title.
2018
JAN. 6
At Accra, Ghana, Cesar Juarez vs. Isaac Dogboe, 12, for
the vacant interim WBO junior featherweight title.
JAN. 16
At Macao, China, Donnie Nietes vs. Juan Carlos Reveco,
12, for Nietes’ IBF flyweight title.
JAN. 20
At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (SHO), Errol Spence
Jr. vs. Lamont Peterson, 12, for Spence’s IBF welterweight title.
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Electronic documents must be submitted on or before
closing date. Proposals can be obtained by registering to
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Proposals received after date and time stated will not be
considered.
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JOBS
Landscape Laborer - Temporary,
full-time
3/1/1811/30/18. 23 jobs w/ Chapel
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Woodbine (MD) & Sterling (VA)
& job sites in Carroll(MD),
Frederick(MD), Howard(MD),
Montgomery(MD) & Loudoun
(VA) cntys. Use hand/power
tools/equip including lay sod,
trim, plant, water, fertilize,
dig, rake, assist w/ sprinkler
installs & w/ installs of mortarless segmental concrete
masonry wall units. Lift/carry
60 lbs, when nec. Drug test
req'd prior to starting work,
upon suspicion & post accident. No exp req’d/will train.
Entry lvl; req supervision. 40
hr/wk 6:30 AM-3 PM M-F.
Sat/Sun work req'd, when
nec. Wage is no less than
$14.70/hr (OT varies @
$22.05/hr). Transport (incl.
meals &, as nec, lodging) to
place of employ provided or
paid to wkrs residing outside
normal commute distance by
completion of 50% of job period. Return transport provided
or paid to same wkrs if wkr
completes job period or is
dismissed early. Wkrs are
guaranteed offer of 3/4 of
work hrs each 12-wk period.
Tools, supplies, equip, uniform & daily trans. to/from
wksite from central loc provided at no cost. Potential
deduct for reasonable cost of
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and/or vol. health insurance
may apply. Emplr may assist
to secure wkr-paid lodging if
needed. Emplr provides incidental transport btw job sites.
Interview req'd. Fax resume
to (301) 854-6390 or apply at:
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JO#1211522.
Official Notices
Notice is hereby given that the
following named company Scratch
Financial, Inc. at the address listed
herewith as 815 Colorado Blvd,
Suite 450 Los Angeles, CA 90041
has made application to engage in
the business of loaning money for
the license year ending December
31, 2018 as provided by the Act
of Congress, approved February 14,
1913. Anyone desiring to protest
against the issuance of this license
should do so in writing to the Commissioner of the Department of
Insurance, Securities and Banking,
810 First Street, NE, Suite 701,
Washington, DC 20002, in the manner prescribed by said Act: See DC
Code Title 26, Chapter 9 and 16
DCMR 2.
How about some
home delivery?
Special Notices
AVAVA Nursing Services, Inc. is
applying for a Certificate of
Need to establish a Home
Healthcare Services in the District of Columbia. A letter of
Intent will be filed with the
State Health Planning and Dev.
Agency (SHPDA). The office is
at 6120 Kansas Ave. Washington DC 20011. For additional
information contact SHPDA at
202-442-5875.
Public Notice
New Opportunities For People
Inc is applying for a Certificate of
Need to establish an outpatient
mental health facility. A Letter
of Intent will be filed with the
District of Columbia State Health
Planning
and
Development
Agency (SHPDA). The facility will
be located at located at 1523
White PL. SE, Washington DC
20020 in Ward 8 For additional
information contact the SHPDA
at 202-442-5875
Amha Selassie
Director
State Health Planning and
Development Agency
899 North Capitol Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002
835
Public Sale Notices
Notice is hereby given that the
following watercraft has been abandoned for more than 60 days on the
property of Paula Calderon, 7628
Anzio Lane, Lorton, VA 22079,
703–655–3136. Description
of
watercraft:
Bayliner 17’4” 2005 white/black
BBB91KCUB505 Application for
watercraft registration/title will be
made in accordance with section
29.1–733.25 of the code of Virginia,
if this watercraft is not claimed
and removed within 30 days of first
publication of this notice. Please
contact the Virginia Department of
game and inland fisheries for questions.
850
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Erin M. August
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
V.
Jermell D. Howard
Defendant(s)
Civil No. 422445V
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court
for Montgomery County, Maryland, this 4th day of December,
2017, that the foreclosure sale
of the property described in the
deed of trust docketed herein and
located at 14168 Aldora Circle,
Burtonsville, Maryland 20866,
made and reported by James E.
Clarke, Renee Dyson, Brian
Thomas, Erin M. August, Hugh J.
Green, and Patrick M. A. Decker,
Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 3rd day of January,
2018; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three
(3) successive weeks before the
3rd day of January, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $240,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Md.
MATL570705
Orlans PC
PO Box 2548
Leesburg, Virginia 20177
Dec 11, 18, 25, 2017
SF
840
Trustees Sale - DC
1010 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE NW UNIT 312,
WASHINGTON, DC 20001
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia’s
Decree of Sale in Case # 2016 CA 009334 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 1010 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE NW UNIT 312,
WASHINGTON, DC 20001 at public auction within the offices
of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue NW Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567
On JANUARY 9, 2018 AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises
situated in the District of Columbia, and designated as and being
Lot 2025 in Square 0342, and more particularly described in
the Deed of Trust recorded in the Land Records of the District
of Columbia, on AUGUST 1, 2007 as Instrument Number
2007100918.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $12,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 552629
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Trustees Sale - DC
1212 JEFFERSON STREET NORTHWEST,
WASHINGTON, DC 20011
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2014 CA 002557 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 1212 JEFFERSON STREET NORTHWEST, WASHINGTON, DC 20011 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY
WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite
440, Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9,
2018 AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the
District of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0074 in
Square 2931, and more particularly described in the Deed of
Trust recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on SEPTEMBER 4, 2008 as Instrument Number 2008093889.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $12,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 563888
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
840
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
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840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
1230 QUEEN STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20002
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 007431 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 1230 QUEEN STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC
20002 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0817 in Square
4057, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
MARCH 9, 2006 as Instrument Number 2006030046.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $13,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 500854
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Trustees Sale - DC
1421 T STREET NW, UNIT 3, WASHINGTON, DC 20009
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2014 CA 002013 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 1421 T STREET NW, UNIT 3, WASHINGTON, DC
20009 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 2003 in Square
0205, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on AUGUST 14, 2006 as Instrument Number 2006111097.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $11,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 562447
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12147961
DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
850
850
Montgomery County
V.
Donna Mansoury
aka Donna Sue Harmon and
Nourali Mansoury
Defendant(s)
Civil No. 436548V
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court
for Montgomery County, Maryland, this 4th day of December,
2017, that the foreclosure sale
of the property described in the
deed of trust docketed herein and
located at 8308 Mariner Court,
Gaithersburg, Maryland 20882,
made and reported by James E.
Clarke, Renee Dyson, Hugh J.
Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel, and Brian Thomas,
Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 3rd day of January,
2018; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three
(3) successive weeks before the
3rd day of January, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $298,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Md.
MATL577266
Orlans PC
PO Box 2548
Leesburg, Virginia 20177
V.
Jose A. Hernandez and
Silvia A. Hernandez
Defendant(s)
Civil No. 435193V
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court
for Montgomery County, Maryland, this 4th day of December,
2017, that the foreclosure sale
of the property described in the
deed of trust docketed herein and
located at 18928 McFarlin Drive,
Germantown, Maryland 20874,
made and reported by James E.
Clarke, Renee Dyson, Hugh J.
Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and Brian Thomas,
Substitute Trustees, Be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 3rd day of January,
2018; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post, once in each of three
(3) successive weeks before the
3rd day of January, 2018.
BY THE COURT:
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Md.
MATL578632
Orlans PC
PO Box 2548
Leesburg, Virginia 20177
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James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $288,836.86.
12147960
SF
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is convenient.
12147962
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is convenient.
Montgomery County
vs.
KIMMI K BONNER
MARC A SAINT JOY
A/K/A MARC A SAINT
A/K/A MARC A JOY
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO. 435482V
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THIS
29th day of November, 2017 by the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
MONTGOMERY, Maryland, and by
the authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto,
R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Phillip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 10263
Cove Ledge Ct, Montgomery Village, MD 20886, and reported in
the above entitled cause, will be
finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary
thereof be shown on or before
the 29th day of December, 2017,
next; provided a copy of this order
be inserted in THE WASHINGTON
POST, 1150 15th Street, Washington DC, MD published in said
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY once
a week for three successive
weeks before the 29th day of
December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $332,245.62
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Dec 11, 18, 25, 2017
12147963
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850
852
Montgomery County
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No. C-02-CV-17-001889
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Tuesday, November 28, 2017 that the
sale of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by Mark D. Meyer, Substitute
Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 28th
day of December 2017 next; provided, a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 28th day of December 2017
next. The report states that the
amount of sale of the property at
1714 FOXDALE COURT, UNIT 187,
CROFTON, MD 21114 to be
$236,000.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Dec 11, 18, 25, 2017
12147953
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Thomas W. Hodge, et al.
Substitute Trustees
SF
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CIRCUIT COURT FOR
FREDERICK COUNTY
100 West Patrick Street
Frederick, MD 21701
Clerk of the Court 301-600-1976
Assignment Office 301-600-2015
CLARKE VS JOHNSON
Date: 11/29/2017
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby issued by the
Circuit Court for Frederick County
this day, that the sale made and
recorded by James E. Clarke et
al., for the sale of the property
described in these proceedings
33 Challenger Court,
Walkersville, MD 21793
be ratified and confirmed thiry (30)
days from the date of this Notice,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown, provided a copy of this
Notice be inserted in some Newspaper published in this County,
once in each of three (3) successive weeks.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $127,000.00.
Sandra K. Dalton
Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Frederick County
Dec 11, 18, 25, 2017
12147957
CIRCUIT COURT FOR
FREDERICK COUNTY
100 West Patrick Street
Frederick, MD 21701
Clerk of the Court 301-600-1976
Assignment Office 301-600-2015
Case Number:10-C-17-001905
No. C-02-CV-17-001522
1-800-753-POST
871
Frederick County
12147625 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
872
City of Alexandria
872
Fairfax County
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Tuesday, November 28, 2017 that the
sale of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by Thomas W. Hodge, Substitute
Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 28th
day of December 2017 next; provided, a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 28th day of December 2017
next. The report states that the
amount of sale of the property at
4957 ELM STREET, SHADY SIDE, MD
20764 to be $209,100.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Dec 11, 18, 25, 2017
12147954
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Date: 11/29/2017
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby issued by the
Circuit Court for Frederick County
this day, that the sale made and
recorded by James E. Clarke et
al., for the sale of the property
described in these proceedings
5420 Upper Mill Terrace South,
Frederick, MD 21703
be ratified and confirmed thiry (30)
days from the date of this Notice,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown, provided a copy of this
Notice be inserted in some Newspaper published in this County,
once in each of three (3) successive weeks.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $204,667.59.
Sandra K. Dalton
Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Frederick County
Dec 11, 18, 25, 2017
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
1914 CRESCENT PRK DR#2122,
RESTON, VA 20190
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
14453 SAGUARO PL,
CENTREVILLE, VA 20121
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $175,925.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.500000% dated
September 20, 2012, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the CITY OF
ALEXANDRIA as Deed Instrument
Number 120020806, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, on
the courthouse steps at the front
of the Circuit Court building for
the City of Alexandria located at
520 King Street, Alexandria, Virginia on January 10, 2018 at 11:30
AM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 50004700
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $337,500.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.625000% dated
October 26, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 17907,
Page 0313, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on January 17, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0173 13022122
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$71,750.00, with an annual interest rate of 8.000000% dated May
2, 1997, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX as Deed
Book 09990, Page 0270, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on January 17,
2018 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 054-3-06-0042-C
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-266131.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-265076.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 11, 18, 2017
Dec 4, 11, 2017
12143411
12145131
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THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-270717.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 11, 18, 2017
12145354
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
12147958
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is convenient.
12147526
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
203 YOAKUM PKWY, UNIT 1103,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22304
CLARKE VS SAYEGH, ET AL
Kenneth Lee Gale, Jr., et al.
Defendants
You, too, could have
home delivery.
SF
Robin Y. Graham
Defendant
Versus
Home delivery
is convenient.
856
Case Number:10-C-17-000052
Versus
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
Anne Arundel County
Diane S. Rosenberg, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
12147864
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
vs.
ROBERTO CARLOS MOREJON
XIOMARA ARACELY LOPEZ
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO. 432768V
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THIS
29th day of November, 2017 by the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
MONTGOMERY, Maryland, and by
the authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto,
R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Phillip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 12622
EPPING ROAD, Silver Spring, MD
20906, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, unless cause
to the contrary thereof be shown
on or before the 29th day of
December, 2017, next; provided
a copy of this order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington DC, MD
published in said COUNTY OF
MONTGOMERY once a week for
three successive weeks before
the 29th day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $244,000.00
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Dec 11, 18, 25, 2017
12147965
SF
SF
Wake up
to home delivery.
DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR THE COUNTY OF
MONTGOMERY, MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
12147865
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR THE COUNTY OF
MONTGOMERY, MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
840
Trustees Sale - DC
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Dec 11, 18, 25, 2017
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
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Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
ESC-Region 19 Allied States Cooperative is accepting
proposals for the following Request for Proposals:
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EZ
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
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L
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2017
the local expert
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For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
C
CLASSIFIED
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1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2017
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
5161 SHERIFF ROAD NORTHEAST, WASHINGTON, DC 20019
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 002771 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 5161 SHERIFF ROAD NORTHEAST, WASHINGTON,
DC 20019 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY
WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite
440, Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9,
2018 AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the
District of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0269 in
Square 5176, and more particularly described in the Deed of
Trust recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on OCTOBER 23, 2009 as Instrument Number 2009115457.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $7,500.00 or 10%
of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 557595
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
OPQRS
EZ
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
244 57TH PLACE NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 009292 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 244 57TH PLACE NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019
at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0101 in Square
5247, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on AUGUST 15, 2001 as Instrument Number 2001075915.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $8,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 539782
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12148183 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
1816 KALORAMA ROAD NW, UNIT 306,
WASHINGTON, DC 20009
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2016 CA 006819 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 1816 KALORAMA ROAD NW, UNIT 306, WASHINGTON, DC 20009 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY
WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite
440, Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9,
2018 AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the
District of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 2061 in
Square 2553, and more particularly described in the Deed of
Trust recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on AUGUST 9, 2007 as Instrument Number 2007105018.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $11,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 545696
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
606 RITTENHOUSE STREET, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 000689 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 606 RITTENHOUSE STREET, NW, WASHINGTON, DC
20011 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0193 in Square
3200, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
JULY 13, 2007 as Instrument Number 2007092047.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $12,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 561668
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12148184 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
3356 BLAINE STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2014 CA 003608 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 3356 BLAINE STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC
20019 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0042 in Square
5001S, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on FEBRUARY 2, 2005 as Instrument Number 2005015510.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 562968
JAMES E. CLARKE, RENEE DYSON, SHANNON MENAPACE
AND HUGH GREEN,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12147968
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
D15
Trustees Sale - DC
3327 5TH STREET SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20032
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 005558 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 3327 5TH STREET SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20032
at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0802 in Square
5971, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on JANUARY 28, 2009 as Instrument Number 2009008282.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $11,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 553244
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
608 GALVESTON PLACE SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20032
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 002197 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 608 GALVESTON PLACE SE, WASHINGTON, DC
20032 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0011 in Square
6212, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
DECEMBER 18, 2006 as Instrument Number 2006170548.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $11,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 514212
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
840
12147874 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
3015 25TH STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20018
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 002057 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 3015 25TH STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20018
at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0820 in Square
4288, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
FEBRUARY 15, 2008 as Instrument Number 2008018050.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $13,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 516104
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12148182 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
5443 B STREET SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 007994 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 5443 B STREET SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019
at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0076 in Square
5291, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on MARCH 14, 2006 as Instrument Number 2006033278.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 504858
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12147594 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
12147868
12147873
4008 22ND STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20018-0000
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia’s
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 009990 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 4008 22ND STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 200180000 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0019 in Square
4229, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
APRIL 29, 2008 as Instrument Number 2008045501.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $11,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 561986
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12147871 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
12147866
D16
840
Trustees Sale - DC
OPQRS
840
Trustees Sale - DC
5004 7TH PLACE NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 003088 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 5004 7TH PLACE NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011
at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0088 in Square
3148, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
APRIL 1, 2004 as Instrument Number 2004044668.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $11,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 555614
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
1726 R STREET SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20020
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia’s
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 003296 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 1726 R STREET SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20020
at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0046 in Square
5596, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
APRIL 17, 2007 as Instrument Number 2007051616.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 547819
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12147863 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
5318 GAY STREET, NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2016 CA 000864 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 5318 GAY STREET, NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019
at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0056 in Square
5209, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
NOVEMBER 8, 2005 as Instrument Number 2005161351.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $9,500.00 or 10%
of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 578470
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
EZ
Trustees Sale - DC
1477 MORRIS ROAD SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20020
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2017 CA 002968 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 1477 MORRIS ROAD SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20020
at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0073 in Square
5809, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
MAY 29, 2007 as Instrument Number 2007071712.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $12,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 565080
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12147626 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
643 HAMILTON STREET NORTHWEST,
WASHINGTON, DC 20011
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 005318 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 643 HAMILTON STREET NORTHWEST, WASHINGTON, DC 20011 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY
WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite
440, Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9,
2018 AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the
District of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0126 in
Square 3210, and more particularly described in the Deed of
Trust recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on MAY 15, 2012 as Instrument Number 2012052621.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $12,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 561016
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12147527 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
308 11TH STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20002
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 006508 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 308 11TH STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20002
at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0068 in Square
0963, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
SEPTEMBER 1, 2005 as Instrument Number 2005123233.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $15,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 518342
JAMES E. CLARKE AND/OR RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12147619 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
477 VALLEY AVENUE SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20032
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia’s
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 007377 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 477 VALLEY AVENUE SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20032
at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0055 in Square
6126, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on JANUARY 3, 1995 as Instrument Number 9500000324.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 562042
JAMES E. CLARKE AND RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12147621 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
840
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2017
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
4343 GORMAN TERRACE SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019-4256
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 009480 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 4343 GORMAN TERRACE SE, WASHINGTON, DC
20019-4256 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY
WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite
440, Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9,
2018 AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the
District of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0061 in
Square 5392, and more particularly described in the Deed of
Trust recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on MARCH 18, 2005 as Instrument Number 2005038174.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 507478
JAMES E. CLARKE, AND/OR RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12147479 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
4729 1ST STREET SW, APT 301, WASHINGTON, DC 20032
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia’s
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 008388 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 4729 1ST STREET SW, APT. 301, WASHINGTON,
DC 20032 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY
WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite
440, Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9,
2018 AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the
District of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 2007 in
Square 6254, and more particularly described in the Deed of
Trust recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia,
on AUGUST 14, 2009 as Instrument Number 2009090355.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or
10% of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No.553853
JAMES E. CLARKE AND/OR RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12147620 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
840
12146770
4402 1st PLACE NE UNIT 21, WASHINGTON, DC 20011
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 008468 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 4402 1ST PLACE NE UNIT 21, WASHINGTON, DC
20011 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 2005 in Square
3667, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
JUNE 30, 2010 as Instrument Number 2010059046.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $10,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 544110
JAMES E. CLARKE, AND/OR RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
12147477 DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
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Trustees Sale - DC
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Trustees Sale - DC
Trustees Sale - DC
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Trustees Sale - DC
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S AUCTION OF
6 UNIT MULTI FAMILY
APART
TMENT BLDG
“De
eanwood”
(Kn
nown
n As
s)
4900 QUARLES STREET NE
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in that certain Deed
of Trust from 4900-4902 Quarles Street, LLC to Claude O. Barrington and
John Gamble, Trustees, dated December 30, 2010 recorded among Land
Records of the District of Columbia (“Land Records”) as Instrument No.
2000046937 (the “DOT”), the holder of the indebtedness secured by said
Deed of Trust having appointed Paul J. Cohen, Substitute Trustee for
the purpose of foreclosure, default having occurred, demand having
been made for payment of the obligations secured thereby, and notice
having been filed in accordance with applicable law, at the request of
the holder of the indebtedness secured by the DOT (the “Noteholder”),
the Trustee, or either of them, will offer for sale at public auction, on the
premises, on
THUR
RSDAY DECEMBER 21, 2017 AT 12
2:00 P.M.
(NOON)
ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND WITH THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON being known as 490
00
Quarlles street, NE, Washing
gton,, DC
C 200
019
9 and more fully described in the DOT as follows:
Lots numbered 39 and 40 in a subdivision made by Allen W. Mallery and Lawrence O. Mallery, Trustee’s subdivision
of lots in block numbered Eight (8) as per plat recorded in liber county 10 at folio 17 in the office of the surveyor for
the District of Columbia.
DESCRIPTION OF PR
ROPER
RTY: The property is believed to be improved by a 3 story 6 unit apartment building.
TERMS OF SALE—A deposit of Twenty-Five Thousand Dollars ($25,000.00) will be required of the purchaser at
time and place of sale, such deposit to be in cash, cashier’s check, or certified check, drawn on a banking institution
acceptable to the Trustee, or such other form as the Trustee may determine in his sole discretion. The deposit must
be increased to equal ten percent (10%) of the purchase price by noon on, Wednesday, December 27, 2017 at the
Auctioneer’s office. The Noteholder, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a deposit or pay interest. The Trustee
will, as a condition to the sale, require all potential bidders, except the Noteholder, to show their deposit before any
bidding begins. If the Noteholder bids, it shall be entitled to debt bid and, the Auctioneer shall be entitled to bid on
the Noteholder’s behalf. The balance of the purchase price, together with interest thereon at the rate of (6.00%) per
annum from the date of the sale to the date that the funds are received by the Trustee, shall be due in cash or
certified funds within thirty (30) days of the date of sale unless extended at the sole discretion of the Trustee. TIME
IS OF THE ESSENCE. If payment of the balance does not take place within thirty (30) days of sale (or such extended date as may be approved in writing by the Trustee as provided above), in addition to any other legal or equitable
remedies available, the Trustee may declare the deposit forfeited, retain the deposit, resell the Property at the risk
and cost of the defaulting purchaser, and avail themselves and the Noteholder of any legal and equitable rights
against the defaulting purchaser. In the event of such default, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorneys’ fees (including full
commission on the gross sale price) and all other charges incurred by the Trustee or the Noteholder including, but
not limited to, all incidental damages. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason and the Property is purchased by someone other than the Noteholder, there shall be no abatement of interest caused by the delay. All
taxes, ground rent, water rent, homeowner association charges, condominium fees, and all other public and private
charges and assessments, including, without limitation, paving, sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges that are
owed against the Property shall be borne by the purchaser and paid for by the purchaser at settlement. In addition,
the cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, document preparation, title insurance, title examination costs,
survey costs, and all other settlement expenses incidental to conveyance of the Property, shall be borne by the
purchaser and paid for by the purchaser at settlement. To the extent not extinguished by operation of law by the
sale, the Property is being sold subject to the following: the rights of any parties in possession, if such rights have
priority over the DOT; encumbrances, easements, equitable servitudes, conditions, rights of way, restrictions, rights
of redemption, covenants, declarations, restrictions and limitations of record affecting the Property, as well as, all
recorded and unrecorded agreements referred to therein that pertain to the ownership, operation or use of the
Property; all nuisances, housing code violations, building code violations, zoning code violations, critical area and
wetland violations, and environmental problems, conditions and hazards, whether latent or observable, which may
exist on or with respect to the Property; and, such state of facts that an accurate survey or physical inspection of the
Property might disclose. The Property will be sold “WHERE IS” in an “AS IS” condition and without any recourse,
representations or warranties, either express or implied, as to its nature, condition, value, use or description. The
Trustee, the Noteholder or Auctioneer do not make any warranty or representation of any kind or nature, including,
without limitation, the physical condition of, description of, or title to the Property, or as to the accuracy of the information furnished to the prospective bidders by the Trustee or any other party. The successful purchaser recognizes
that any investigation, examination or inspection of the Property is not within the control of the Trustee or the Noteholder. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the Property following conveyance of
the Property by the Trustee to the purchaser. The purchaser shall assume the risk of loss for the Property immediately after the sale. The Noteholder and Trustees assume no liability for fuel, gas, electricity, utilities, rents, or any
other cost or expense whatsoever, under recorded or unrecorded documents and agreements and other operating
charges accrued before or after the sale and all such charges shall be the sole responsibility of the purchaser from
the date of the sale (whether payable before or after the date of sale). If the Trustees are unable to convey title to
the Property, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to the refund of its deposit, without
interest thereon. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no
further claims against the Trustee, Noteholder or Auctioneer. The conveyance of the Property by the Trustees to the
purchaser at settlement shall be by Trustees’ Deed without covenant, warranty or representations whatsoever
expressed or implied. NOTE: The information contained herein was obtained from sources deemed to be reliable,
but is offered for information purposes only. The Trustee, Noteholder or Auctioneer do not make any representations or warranties whatsoever with respect to the accuracy of the information contained herein. All square footage,
acreage, and other measurements, if any, are approximate. Prospective purchasers are urged to make their own
inspection. Until an offer is finally accepted by the Trustees, it is subject to higher and better offers. The Trustee
reserve the right in their sole discretion to reject any and all bids or withdraw the Property from sale at any time
before the Auctioneer announces that the Property is “sold” and the deposit in the required amount and form is
accepted by the Trustee. The Trustee may adjourn and/or continue the sale at any time and close the sale. The
parties’ respective rights and obligations regarding the terms of the sale and conduct of the sale shall be governed
and interpreted under the laws of the District of Columbia. Further particulars may be announced at the time of sale.
For info call MARIE (410) 366-5555 or go to www.mdauctioneers.org and click on auctions.
Paul J. Cohen, Substitute Trustee
309 SHEPHERD STREET NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20011
In execution of the Superior Court for the District of Columbia's
Decree of Sale in Case # 2015 CA 008927 R (RP), the
undersigned Substitute Trustee(s) will offer for sale the property
known as 309 SHEPHERD STREET NW, WASHINGTON, DC
20011 at public auction within the offices of, HARVEY WEST
AUCTIONEERS, INC. 5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW Suite 440,
Washington, DC 20015 202-463-4567 On JANUARY 9, 2018
AT 11:00 A.M., the land and premises situated in the District
of Columbia, and designated as and being Lot 0045 in Square
3313, and more particularly described in the Deed of Trust
recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, on
APRIL 18, 2006 as Instrument Number 2006050603.
The property will be sold by Trustee's Deed "as is" without
any covenant, expressed or implied, in Fee Simple, subject
to conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other recorded
instruments superior to the Deed of Trust referenced above, and
subject to ratification by the Court
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of the lesser of $13,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price will be required at time of sale in certified
funds CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. The deposit required
to bid at the auction is waived for the Noteholder and any of
its successors or assigns. The Noteholder may bid up to the
credit and may submit a written bid to the Trustee which shall be
announced at sale. The balance of the purchase price is to be
paid in cash within 30 days of final ratification of the sale by the
Court.
TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
If purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid thirty (30) days
of the ratification, the purchaser agrees to pay the Substitute
Trustees' reasonable attorney fees as ordered by the Court,
plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed
the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order
issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any
such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to
the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the
documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale.
Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days
after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail
is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees
and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall
be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the
event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled
to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of
the property regardless of any improvements made to the real
property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date
of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the
Substitute Trustees. In the event that the settlement is delayed
for ANY REASON WHATSOEVER, there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner
association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on
an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date
of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall
be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser
shall be responsible for physical possession of the property.
Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward.
The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Mortgage holder
to determine whether the borrower filed bankruptcy, entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid
off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees
that upon notification by the Substitute Trustees of such event
the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit
returned without interest.
Substitute Trustees' File No. 505709
JAMES E. CLARKE, AND/OR RENEE DYSON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE(S)
C/O ORLANS PC
1602 Village Market Blvd SE, Suite 310
Leesburg, VA 20175
(703) 777-7101
850
Montgomery County
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
850
D17
Montgomery County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7400 New Hampshire Ave, Takoma Park, MD 20912
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 7400 New Hampshire Ave, Takoma Park,
MD 20912. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated October 5, 2007, and recorded in Liber
34985 at Page 530 among the land records of the County of
Montgomery, in the original principal amount of $310,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland Avenue, Rockville,
Maryland, on December 20, 2017 at 1:00 PM, all that property
described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 13-03175065
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-255043..
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
14522 Wexhall Drive, Burtonsville, MD 20866
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 14522 Wexhall Drive, Burtonsville, MD
20866. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
Deed of Trust, dated December 8, 2005, and recorded in Liber
31562 at Page 217 among the land records of the County of
Montgomery, in the original principal amount of $220,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland Avenue, Rockville,
Maryland, on January 3, 2018 at 1:00 PM, all that property
described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 05-02341015
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-256042.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 4, 11, 18, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
850
12144758 DECEMBER 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
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12147517
TRUSTEE'S SALE
18613 WILLOW OAK DR, Rockville, MD 20855
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 18613 WILLOW OAK DR, Rockville, MD
20855. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated December 12, 2005, and recorded
in Liber 31618 at Page 389 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, in the original principal amount
of $688,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland
Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, on January 3, 2018 at 1:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 08-02617042
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-243749.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
417 Hillsboro Dr, Silver Spring, MD 20902
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 417 Hillsboro Dr, Silver Spring, MD
20902. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
Deed of Trust, dated December 19, 1991, and recorded in
Liber 0010100 at Page 200 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, in the original principal amount
of $96,500.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland
Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, on January 3, 2018 at 1:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 13-01323886
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or
certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 8.625% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-267436.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
15111 Jones Ln, North Potomac, MD 20878
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 15111 Jones Ln, North Potomac, MD
20878. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated August 1, 2005, and recorded in
Liber 30859 at Page 607 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, in the original principal amount
of $603,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland
Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, on December 20, 2017 at 1:00
PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including
but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-02581142
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-263857.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 4, 11, 18, 2017
12144032
TRUSTEE'S SALE
12843 Grand Elm Street, Clarksburg, MD 20871
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 12843 Grand Elm Street, Clarksburg,
MD 20871. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated November 23, 2005, and recorded
in Liber 31383 at Page 563 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, in the original principal amount
of $424,612.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland
Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, on January 3, 2018 at 1:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 02-03443085
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-265693.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
12144245
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LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
WP 2x1
Montgomery County
DECEMBER 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
12146769
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
850
Pardo & Drazin, LLC
Russell S. Drazin, Attorney
4400 Jenifer Street, NW, Suite 2
Washington, DC 20015
202-223-7900
TRUSTEE’S SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY
1732-1736 Trinidad Avenue, NE,
Washington, DC 20002 (Lot 0176 in Square 4052)
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of $850,000.00 dated August
23, 2016 and recorded on August 31, 2016 as Instrument
No. 2016089157 among the Land Records of the District
of Columbia ("Land Records") from Vision Investment LLC, a
www.hwestauctions.com
District of Columbia limited liability company, as Grantor, to
DECEMBER 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
12145932
www.hwestauctions.com
Daniel Huertas, as Trustee, for the benefit of DP Capital LLC,
12145937
a Virginia limited liability company, as Beneficiary ("Deed of DECEMBER 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
Trust'), default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
following the mailing and recordation in the Land Records of
an Affidavit of Non-Residential Mortgage Foreclosure, Deed of
TRUSTEE'S SALE
Appointment of Substitute Trustee appointing Russell S. Drazin
TRUSTEE'S SALE
20633 Shadyside Way, Germantown, MD 20874
('Trustee') substitute trustee under the Deed of Trust, and a
2053 Mayflower Drive, Silver Spring, MD 20905
Notice of Foreclosure Sale of Real Property or Condominium Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
Unit, at the request of the current noteholder, the Trustee will premises known as 20633 Shadyside Way, Germantown, Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
sell at public auction at the office of Harvey West Auctioneers, MD 20874. By virtue of the power and authority contained premises known as 2053 Mayflower Drive, Silver Spring, MD
Inc., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC in a Deed of Trust, dated April 27, 2006, and recorded in 20905. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
20015, on
Liber 32266 at Page 313 among the land records of the Deed of Trust, dated December 8, 2006, and recorded in Liber
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, in the original principal amount 34205 at Page 055 among the land records of the County of
DECEMBER 27, 2017 AT 11:00 AM
Montgomery, in the original principal amount of $770,000.00.
ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS of $203,600.00. Upon default and request for sale, the Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
THEREON situated in the City of Washington, District of undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
Courthouse
for
the
COUNTY
OF
MONTGOMERY,
at
50
Maryland
Columbia, known as 1732-1736 Trinidad Avenue, NE, WashingCOUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland Avenue, Rockville,
ton, DC 20002 (Lot 0176 in Square 4052), and more fully Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, on January 3, 2018 at 1:00 PM, Maryland, on January 3, 2018 at 1:00 PM, all that property
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
described in the Deed of Trust.
described in said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
not limited to:
The property will be sold in an 'AS IS' condition, with no warranty
Tax ID# 05-02578268
of any kind, and subject to conditions, restrictions, agreements, Tax ID# 02-02350910
liens, and encumbrances of record affecting the same except Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
is
sold
in
"as
is
condition"
and
subject
to
all
superior
covenants,
those encumbrances of record that are extinguished by operation
of District of Columbia law by virtue of the foreclosure of the conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
affect same, if any.
Deed of Trust.
Purchaser will take title to the property subject to all taxes, water TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
and sewer charges, and other utility charges, if any. Purchaser or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
date of sale forward. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
physical possession of the property.
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $100,000.00 by cash or on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
cashier's check will be required of the purchaser at the time and will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
by
purchaser.
If
applicable,
condominium
and/or
homeowners
place of sale. Purchaser shall settle within thirty (30) days of
association dues and assessments that may become due after
sale. TIME SHALL BE OF THE ESSENCE WITH RESPECT TO association dues and assessments that may become due after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
SETTLEMENT BY PURCHASER. Balance of the purchase price the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
Title
examination,
conveyancing,
state
revenue
stamps,
transfer
to be paid in cash or certified funds at settlement. Interest to
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
be paid on the unpaid purchase money from the date of sale taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
to the date of settlement at the interest rate set forth in the are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
debt instrument secured by the Deed of Trust. Purchaser shall the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
be responsible for payment of all settlement costs.
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
The noteholder and its affiliates, if a bidder, shall not be required are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
to post a deposit or to pay interest.
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-263720.
In the event that purchaser does not settle as required for any Trustee's File No. 17-268989.
reason, purchaser shall be in default. Upon such default, the
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
deposit shall be forfeited to the Trustee and all of the expenses
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
of this sale (including attorney's fees and full commission on SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
the gross sale price) shall be charged against and paid out of
the forfeited deposit. The Trustee may resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting
purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits
resulting from any resale of the property.
If the Trustee cannot settle as set forth herein, the purchaser's
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
sole remedy at law and in equity shall be limited to a refund of
12145933
12146908 DECEMBER 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
the deposit and the sale shall be considered null and void and of DECEMBER 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
no effect whatsoever.
The Trustee reserves the right, in Trustee's sole discretion, to
reject any and all bids, to withdraw the property from sale at any
time before or at the auction, to extend the time to receive bids,
to waive or modify the deposit requirement, to waive or modify
the requirement that interest be paid on the unpaid purchase
money, and/or to extend the period of time for settlement.
Additional terms may be announced at the sale. The successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Trustee
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of
bidding.
Russell S. Drazin, Trustee
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x1
DECEMBER 11, 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
Montgomery County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
13209 Meander Cove Drive #78, Germantown, MD 20874
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 13209 Meander Cove Drive #78, Germantown, MD 20874. By virtue of the power and authority
contained in a Deed of Trust, dated October 26, 2009, and
recorded in Liber 38371 at Page 086 among the land records
of the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, in the original principal
amount of $205,214.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland
Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, on January 3, 2018 at 1:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 02-02713268
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-267655.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
S0833-2 6x3
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2017
Democracy Dies in Darkness
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy or call 202-334-6100.
D18
850
Montgomery County
OPQRS
850
Montgomery County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
3589 Medd Ave, Mount Airy, MD 21771
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 3589 Medd Ave, Mount Airy, MD 21771.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated April 5, 2007, and recorded in Liber 34230 at Page 601
among the land records of the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, in
the original principal amount of $400,000.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF
MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, on
December 20, 2017 at 1:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 12-02179477
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or
certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 6.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-249841.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
856
TRUSTEE'S SALE
1813 Middlevale Terrace, Silver Spring, MD 20906
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 1813 Middlevale Terrace, Silver Spring,
MD 20906. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated November 7, 2005, and recorded
in Liber 31337 at Page 215 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, in the original principal amount
of $306,600.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY, at 50 Maryland
Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, on December 20, 2017 at 1:00
PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including
but not limited to:
Tax ID# 13-01463572
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.75% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-249727.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
876
Loudoun County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
22803 ANGELIQUE DR,
ASHBURN, VA 20148
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
43523 KIPLINGTON SQUARE,
SOUTH RIDING, VA 20152
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $636,446.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.500000% dated
August 4, 2016, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN as Deed Instrument
Number 20160805-0050217, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN, on the courthouse
steps in front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of
Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on
February 14, 2018 at 9:30 AM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 159471550000
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $100,427.00, with an annual
interest rate of 8.625000% dated
June 15, 2000, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN as Deed Book 1794,
Page 1083, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF LOUDOUN, on the
courthouse steps in front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Loudoun located at 18
East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on January 17, 2018 at 9:30
AM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 130302190000
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-267579.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec. 18, 2017, Jan. 15, 22, 2018
12149677
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is convenient.
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SF
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Home delivery
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THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-270696.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 11, 18, 2017
12145355
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
15117 CORONET PLACE,
WATERFORD, VA 20197
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $613,857.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.875000% dated
July 27, 2016, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN as Deed Instrument
Number 20160728-0048077, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN, on the courthouse
steps in front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of
Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on
January 17, 2018 at 9:30 AM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 41219793900
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
12143212
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SF
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your
legal notice in the
Classified section:
Call:
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your day off right.
202-334-7007
Home delivery
is convenient.
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SF
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-270562.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Dec 11, 18, 2017
e-mail:
legalnotices@washpost.com
1-800-753-POST
WP 2x2
SF
877
Spotsylvania County
Spotsylvania County
880
City of Fredericksburg
880
City of Fredericksburg
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
702 Hanson Avenue,
Fredericksburg, VA 22401
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated May
21, 2012, and recorded at Instrument Number 201205240048653 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County, VA, securing
a loan which was originally $269,003.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction
at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
January 10, 2018 at 1:00 PM
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
October 7, 2013, and recorded at Instrument Number 201300023787 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Spotsylvania County, VA, securing
a loan which was originally $281,084.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction
at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Spotsylvania County, 9107 Judicial
Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia 22553 on:
January 8, 2018 at 11:30 AM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All that
certain Lot or Parcel of land situate in the County of Prince William,
Commonwealth of Virginia, and being more particularly described as
follows: Lot Twenty-Four (24), Section Six (6), BRIDLEWOOD, as the same
is duly dedicated, platted and recorded in Deed Book 1892, at page 1374,
among the land records of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Land
situated in the County of Spotsylvania in the State of VA
All that tract or parcel of land together with all buildings and improvements
thereto appurtenant situate, lying and being in the Chancellor Magisterial
District, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, contain 5.199 acres, more or less,
and better described as Lot 5 (erroneously referred to as Lot 6) on Plat
of Trapper’s Den, by E.W. Knisely Surveys dated November 13, 1978, a
copy of said plat is recorded in the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court of
Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in Plat Book 14, at pages 25, and 26, and as
more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
October 20, 1993, and recorded in Deed Book 265, Page 83 and a
Loan Modification recorded on February 28, 2017 at Instrument Number
170000489, in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Fredericksburg,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $78,850.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale
at public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for the City of
Fredericksburg, Virginia, 701 Princess Anne Street, Fredericksburg, VA
22404-0359 on:
January 8, 2018 at 12:30 PM
877
877
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE SALE
Spotsylvania County
November 13, December 11, 18, 2017
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
11605 Saddleback Drive,
Fredericksburg, Virginia 22407
5708 Up A Way Drive,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $227,950.00, dated August 26,
2016 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in
Document No. 160015500, default
having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at
the entrance to the Spotsylvania
County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, on
January 16, 2018 at 12:00 PM the
property described in said deed,
located at the above address and
briefly described as:
Lot 244, Section 5, Sheraton Hills
East, with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (58580)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Dec 11, 18, 2017
12147584
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is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
12142625
SF
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to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
878
In execution of that certain deed
of trust in the original principal
amount of $121,062.74 dated
May 29, 2002 and recorded
among the land records of Spotsylvania County, Virginia in Deed
Book 2186, Page 342 as Instrument Number 016528 and subsequent modifications or re-recordings, if any, as amended by an
instrument appointing the undersigned as Substituted Trustee,
default having been made in the
payment of the indebtedness
thereby secured and having been
requested to do so by the holder
of the note evidencing the said
indebtedness, the undersigned
Substituted Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction in front
of Spotsylvania County Circuit
Court, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia, on:
January 11, 2018 @ 01:00 PM
The property described in said
deed of trust located at the above
street address, and more particularly described as:
All that parcel of land in Spotsylvania County, Commonwealth of
Virginia, as more fully described in
Deed Book 832 page 751, Id#22G 846 Being known and designated as
Lot 46, Section 2, Chancellor Hills,
filed in Plat Book File 1, Page 211
recorded 07/24/1987.
TERMS OF SALE: Cash or certified
funds. A non-refundable deposit
of ten percent (10%) of the successful bid price, payable in cash
or by certified or cashier's check
to the undersigned will be
required of the successful bidder
at time of sale. Terms of sale
to be complied with within 14
days from date of sale or deposit
will be forfeit and property will
be resold at costs of defaulting
purchaser. All real estate taxes to
be adjusted as of date of sale.
Seller shall not be responsible for
any costs incurred by the purchaser in connection with their
purchase or settlement, including, without limitation, state and
local recording fees, title insurance or research, or any other
costs of purchaser's acquisition.
The property and the improvements thereon will be sold as is,
without representations or warranties of any kind. The sale is
subject to all other liens, encumbrances, conditions, easements
and restrictions, if any, superior
to the aforesaid deed of trust
and lawfully affecting the property. Trustee shall have no duty to
obtain possession for purchaser.
All risks of casualty pass to successful bidder at conclusion of
bidding. Sale is subject to postsale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection
under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code
prior to the sale, as well as to
post-sale confirmation and audit
of the status of the loan with
the loan servicer including, but
not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower(s) entered
into any repayment agreement,
reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to the sale. In any such
event, the sale shall be null and
void, and the Purchaser's sole
remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the Purchaser's
deposit without interest. Additional terms to be announced at
the sale.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Terra Abstract Virginia, Inc.
22375 Broderick Drive
Suite 235
Dulles, VA 20166
410-635-5127 M-F
Between 8:00AM - 5 P.M.
(VA201700000801)
December 11, 18, 2017 12147553
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
How about some
home delivery?
SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
SF
1-800-753-POST
FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE
FRIES?"
Stafford County
SF
12140148
MARYLAND
December 11, 18, 2017
610
12147138
610
Dogs for Sale
French Bulldog—AKC/shots/chip
(240)292-8995 $3500 obo
smallbatchfrenchies@gmail.com;
youtube.com/user/Divinsky83
Roommates
TRUSTEE SALE
11 Brentsmill Drive,
Stafford, VA 22554
Stafford County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $421,200.00, dated October 10,
2008 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Stafford County, Virginia, in Document No. 080017955, default having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse
Road, Stafford, on January 16,
2018 at 11:00 AM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 110, Brentsmill, Section 1A,
with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (33327)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Dec 11, 18, 2017
12147585
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Roommates
CAPITAL HGHTS Newly reno full furn
house to share. near metro,& shops
all util incl, cable wifi W/D must see,
starting $170/wk call 240-463-2554
MARYLAND
Roommates
CAPITAL HGHTS Newly reno house to
share. Hi-end close to shops, metro,
must see $180/wk 301-674-9278
FORT WASHINGTON - furnished
rooms for rent with pvt BA &
Kitchenette. Vets welcome. Nr
MGM. Inc cable/internet. Starts
@ $850. Call 301-292-6147
LAUREL- Large Sep BA & Kit, Nr
Shopping Center Everything included. $650 Call 301-254-5536
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 97 on
the map of Section 3 of Normandy Village,, and as more fully described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
VIRGINIA
Dale City— $580.00, 1 bedrm, 1 ba,
1857cedar cove way, 703-597-3525,
Fpl, AC, Heat
MANASSAS, VA-Bsmt, sep entr, FBA,
W/D. Quiet area 2 mi. to I66. $675/mo
all incl. int. also. Call Raj 571-247-6908
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
225
Collectibles
ETI, Collectible—Videos, digital,
panoramic photos; 41 vols. $1500,
Oklahoma City, OK, 405-429-4295
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
237
Firewood
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL! 1 cord $175.
2 cords $325. 3 cords $475. 4 cords
$600. Call 703-357-2180
260
Furniture
French Bulldogs - 9 weeks,2 F,
1 M. fawn, tan&white, brindle &
white. $2,500 each.
301-252-9213 or visit:
www.windsoroakfarm.com
Yorkie—$1300, Male, 12 wks old.
Registered. Health guar. Parents on
Premises. Ready to go. Great personality, very lovable. 540-229-1618
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS - Pure
bred, AKC reg, shots, vet checked.
9 weeks old. Males & females.
$650-$800.
Call 240-398-6312
GERMAN SHEPARD PUPS - 9 weeks.
AKC, vet checked, shots/de wormed,
mostly black w/ little tan. priced right
for christmas at $400 717-789-3199
German Short hair Pointer Puppies—
Call for pricing, Male and Females,
10 weeks old, 540-216-1855
Goldendoodles Ready Dec 23rd
2017, health guaranteed, shots,
dewormed, $700. Also, Labradoodles, ready Jan. 6th 2018. $500.
Health guaranteed, shots,
dewormed. Check us out on
facebook : Barb Hade 717-328-9549
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
GOLDENDOODLES- M &F, 9 weeks, S
&W, declaws removed, fam raised,
blonde to med. in color,
301-639-8636
Golden Retriever Pups—AKC.
Vet checked, Have both parents,
$900, 434-709-5435
Golden Retriever—Male and Female
pups AKC and all certs.
Call 540-896-7327 for
more info, Gap View Ranch
GREAT PYRENEES PUPPIES
6 Males & 2 Females, 14 weeks old,
vet checked, shots. $300 each
Call 540-636-4897 or 540-622-1060
1-800-753-POST
Lab Pups—AKC. Chocolate/Yellow
Guaranteed, wormed/shot. Socialized w/kids. 703-203-0702, 540825-4688. belgianwayfarm.com
MOVING
Moving Sale - couches, computer
furniture, huge stamp collection, all LABRADOR RETRIEVER PUPPIES CKC
uncancelled,misc furniture and yellow chocolate & black, family
lamps. Call for appt 703-360-4304
raised and good with children, Ready
now. 540-383-4203
265
Home & Garden
SF
MALTESE PUPS - AKC, adorable,
shots, vetted, health guarantee,
champ lines, home raised. Ready
now. Call 434-384-7032
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
Mini/Toy Dachshund—AKC
280
$1650, Male/ Female, 8 wks old Feb.
Musical Instruments
Balwin Acoustical Piano—Great Condition w/humidifier. New pedal
covers and recently tuned. $1,000
Glenn Dale, MD. 301-467-1786
610
Dogs for Sale
AUSSIE LABRADOODLE PUPS - blue
merle & 1 black, very sweet & soft,
9 weeks old, first shots/ dewormed.
$560 CASH 301-797-5622
4th, vet exam, chip, and supplies
240-575-1718, 240-454-4702
Pomeranian—Poms Chocolate
Merle. Teddy Bear Face. 2 Females,
One Male. 8 Wks. old. S/W. Health
Guarantee. Ready for Christmas.
$2,500, 301-467-1786
Pomeranian—AKC. Intact Orange
Sable Male Pom. 1 Yr Old. S/W
Healthy. $750, 301-467-1786
Poodle, Shihpoo & more—Christmas
Bernedoodles—M/F, 8wks,
Vacs/ Puppies on Sale 304-904-6289, Cash,
wormed. Brindle, Bi color, Black/ CC, Easy Finance, wvpuppy.com,
White, Tri color, sure to be show 59 East Rd, Martinsburg WV, exit16E
stoppers, $1200+, 301-639-3808
ROTTWEILER PUPS AKC, German,
Bichon Frise — AKC reg.,$695-$895,
1st shots,, tails docked, hlth guar.,
Males & females, ready 12/22,
P.O.P. ready now. Loc in Ruther Glen,
540-348-4212
VA. Call /text 210-584-8896
BOUVIER PUPS - 2 females from
outstanding European working
lines. 8 weeks old, ready to go
home. Carla 757-426-1223. See
info at www.DutchEastDogs.com
Brittany SPaniel Pups, AKC reg Males
and Females Available Jan 26, 2018.
Reserve now.
Culpeper, VA. 540-905-0405
CANE CORSO PUPS 3 females, 2
black, 1 fawn, UTD on shots ICCF
reg, working bloodlines. $1000
11 weeks. 202-270-0259
Cavapoo puppies—$500-750, m/f,
non-shed, ruby. Vet check, shots.,
8 wks on 12/23; Home raised w/ kids
& pets. 240-838-1361
Wake up
to home delivery.
DOBERMAN PUPPIES - AKC, big
boned, family raised, great temperament, parents on premises. 8 weeks
old. some have Ears done. All colors
available. $500/$900. 240-674-2844
or 240-674-3994
1-800-753-POST
European Rottweilers—8 wks, TOP
European Champion BLOODLINES
health clearance on parents, vet
records on pups, text: 240-595-1388
SF
WHEATEN PUPS - 8 wks, purebred,
"meet the parents!" soft, no shed,
crt/ppr trnd, home bred, fab, 1.5yr
F&M Fursonality.com 540-286-0633
Oxon Hills/Temple Hills-Lg BRs, some
w/pvt BA. $675-$875 utils incl. 1 per
occ. 240-432-0751 or 301-537-2247
Roommates
ShiChon/ZuChon—Teddybear
puppies in time for Christmas!
Perfect little family puppy.
703-577-1069, $850+ 9wks
www.DCDogFinders.com
Shih Tzu/Bichon—ShiChon teddybear
ZuChon Puppy 703-577-1069 9wks
$750+ DCDogFinders.com
OXON HILL - 2 BR unfurn bsmt apt
self contained. nr metro, shops,
hwy and schools. N/S. $1500/ mo
+ utilities 804-647-3841
TEMPLE HILLS- 23rd Pl. Near trans/
shops. Quiet, clean, furn.No smkg.
$200 dep. BR w/ BA,1 person, $700.
spacious bsmt equal to 2 rm w/ BA.
pref M, $800. Call 301-390-5608
Dogs for Sale
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
Schnoodle mini—Male, 12 wks. Parents our pets! Free prepaid breed
identification kit! $800, Text at 240723-6573. Silver Spring, Maryland.
SHAR PEI PUPPIES Available now,
1 female, 3 males, Lots of wrinkles
to love. Call 814-232-7956
after 3:30pm.
SHELTIE PUPPIES - AKC registered,
very small parents,3 sable white
males. brown and blue eye color.
9 wks. Call 540-560-5132
Shiba Ina—puppies, $1200, Females,
8 weeks old, 240-707-7404
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
You know us for shopping, and
now Cars.com is the site for the
entire life of your car. So for
every turn, turn to Cars.com.
C3748 10x5.25
FROM "NO
SF
877
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
12901 Orange Plank Road,
Locust Grove, VA 22508
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
MONDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2017
EZ
Prince William County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
13671 Shire Place,
Gainesville, VA 20155
12144640
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
873
November 30, December 11, 18, 2017
12147608
Loudoun County
Prince William County
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
www.hwestauctions.com
12143206 DECEMBER 18, 25, 2017, JANUARY 1, 2018
876
DECEMBER 4, 11, 18, 2017
873
Frederick County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
4998 Tall Oaks Dr, Monrovia, MD 21770
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 4998 Tall Oaks Dr, Monrovia, MD 21770.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated June 18, 2013, and recorded in Liber 09635 at Page
0310 among the land records of the COUNTY OF FREDERICK,
in the original principal amount of $324,326.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF
FREDERICK, at 100 W. Patrick Street, Frederick, Maryland, on
January 3, 2018 at 9:30 AM, all that property described in said
Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 09-254951
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-258717.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
DECEMBER 4, 11, 18, 2017
856
Frederick County
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