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The Washington Post – February 06, 2018

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Partly sunny 46/31 • Tomorrow: Rain 48/27 B8
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
. $2
Dow ends wild
day down 1,175
BIGGEST DAILY POINT
DROP IN HISTORY
Global markets rocked
by inflation fears
BY T HOMAS H EATH
AND H EATHER L ONG
PHOTOS BY DIEGO IBARRA SÁNCHEZ/MEMO/FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Frozen on a snowy mountain
The fate of 15 Syrians who died trying to reach Lebanon marks another sad milestone in the war
BY
L IZ S LY
AND S UZAN H AIDAMOUS
IN CHTAURA, LEBANON
T
he mountain range that forms a
natural boundary between Syria
and Lebanon has long served also
as a wartime conduit for people
who cannot travel legally — the gunrunners, the rebels, the dissidents and the
ordinary citizens who just want to escape.
On one night last month, it became a
death trap. A storm whipped up at the
moment a group of about 70 Syrian refugees was climbing over the mountain to try
to reach Lebanon.
In the darkness, wind and snow, they
began to falter. The elderly fell behind.
Children tripped. Men slipped. Unable to
see their guide, the refugees became lost
and scattered.
One small group became so tired that
they decided to lie down on the cold, hard
ground and go to sleep.
By daybreak, 15 people had frozen to
death, a sad new milestone in the tragedy of
Syria’s seven-year-old war. Refugees have
drowned trying to reach Europe and are
regularly shot on the Turkish border. But
this was the first known instance of a group
dying of cold, according to the United
Nations refugee agency and Lebanese authorities.
It was also a reminder of the continued
desperate efforts of Syrians to escape the
fighting, even as the world closes its doors.
REFUGEES CONTINUED ON A8
Clockwise from top left: Shihab al-Abed is one of the survivors of a group that crossed the mountains between Syria and Lebanon.
He set out with more than a dozen family members, but six died after a snowstorm hit. Abed’s daughter Amal holds her daughter,
Goufran. Her 1-year-old son, Yasser, died. Mohammed, 11, survived, as did Abir, holding Beshayer, who suffered frostbite.
Her penance,
after trying
to disrupt
the Olympics
BY
C HICO H ARLAN
daegu, south korea — Until
recently, she could often go full
days without reminders of what
happened. She preferred it that
way. The event was so long ago. It
was so terrible. She’d been pardoned for her crimes, and she’d
tried to build a new version of her
life. She got married. She raised
two children. She attended
church. She went on hikes —
relaxing ones, short ones, nothing
like the mandatory 60-mile treks
she’d taken when training as a
spy.
But now, the reminders of
what Kim Hyon-hui once did
again seem to be everywhere.
South Korea is hosting the Winter Olympics this month, and
even seeing the Olympic rings
gives her flashbacks to 30 years
ago, the other time this country
was preparing to host the
BOMBER CONTINUED ON A9
27,000
The Dow peaked at
26,616 on Jan. 26.
26,000
25,000
The Dow Jones industrial average plunged 1,175 points Monday
in an exceptionally volatile day for
financial markets around the
world, stirring concerns about the
durability of long-running stock
gains.
In the biggest global sell-off
since 2016, financial markets from
Asia to Europe to the United States
were rocked primarily by concerns about inflation.
The Dow was off a heart-stopping 1,600 points during afternoon trading, the largest intraday
point decline in the blue-chip index’s history. But the 4.6 percent
loss for the day was not even close
to the biggest.
The downdraft raised fresh
anxieties among Americans
whose retirement savings and
household worth have marched
steadily higher without any of the
gyrations that are part of a normal
market cycle.
It also threatened to deprive
President Trump and the GOP of a
favorite talking point at the nascent stages of the 2018 midterm
campaign.
Although the declines were eyecatching, market observers have
been anticipating a correction after a year of big gains in the Dow,
the broader Standard & Poor’s
500-stock index and the techheavy Nasdaq.
“This was crowd psychology at
its best,” said Daniel Wiener, chief
executive of Adviser Investments.
“Investors had the weekend to
worry about what happened Fri-
President Trump and congressional Republicans have spent
much of the past year trying to
connect a giddy stock market
rally with their economic agenda,
but stocks’ precipitous plunge in
the past five days has delivered a
sobering reality: What goes up
can come back down — quickly
and with little warning.
With Monday’s steep fall,
Trump has presided over the
biggest stock market drop in U.S.
history, when measured by points
in the Dow Jones industrial average. The free fall began in earnest
Jan. 30 and snowballed Friday
and Monday, for a combined loss
of almost 2,100 points, or 8 percent of the Dow’s value.
It is also unclear if the past
week will amount to a small
correction or the beginning of a
painful slide that many investors
said was overdue.
Trump’s economic team is
MARKETS CONTINUED ON A12
TRUMP CONTINUED ON A12
24,345
24,000
Jan. 2
Mon.
Source: Bloomberg News
Trump and GOP
see the downside
of touting market
BY D AMIAN P ALETTA
AND E RICA W ERNER
In Philadelphia, there’s catharsis amid some chaos Panel votes
Celebration of Eagles’ first Super Bowl victory features tears of joy, chants and downed light poles
BY
D AVE S HEININ
philadelphia — Philadelphia
Eagles fans awoke Monday to sunshine and cold, nursing foggy
brains that might still be trying to
piece together the new reality confronting them. Along Broad
Street, city sanitation workers had
done such a stellar job of cleanup
overnight, it might make one wonder: Was Sunday night real? Did
the Eagles really win the Super
Bowl? Did the raucous celebration, the tangle of overjoyed humanity — and the inevitable pockets of debauchery — really happen?
You could tune in to 94WIP
Sports Radio, or glance at the cover of the Philadelphia Inquirer
(“AT LAST!”), and hear or see that
it was all true. Or you could walk
out to Broad, run your finger along
a light pole, note the coating of
hydraulic fluid still present — and
feel it: For Eagles fans, the world
BY K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
AND D EVLIN B ARRETT
EAGLES CONTINUED ON A5
JULIO CORTEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
What now for Foles? Super Bowl
MVP faces an uncertain future. D1
Eagles tight end Zach Ertz hoists the Vince Lombardi Trophy on Monday as fans gathered to
welcome the team home to Philadelphia after Sunday night’s 41-33 triumph over the Patriots.
IN THE NEWS
JOURNALIST ROKHAYA DIALLO. JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Seeing color A black feminist is under fire for
writing about structural racism in France,
which officially eschews the concept. A6
Boost for Pa. Democrats The Supreme Court
rejected a GOP push to delay the redrawing of
congressional districts until after 2018. A4
to release
rebuttal of
GOP memo
THE NATION
THE WORLD
President Trump
blasted a Senate proposal on border security
and the status of young
immigrants as a “waste
of time” because it
doesn’t address spending for a U.S.-Mexico
border wall. A2
The engineer in the
South Carolina Amtrak
crash sounded the horn
and hit the emergency
brake before impact,
investigators said. A3
Defense Secretary Jim
Mattis had doubts about
revamping the U.S. nuclear arsenal at the start
of his tenure, but now
fully supports it. A13
The Maldives government declared a 15-day
state of emergency as a
political crisis deepened
in the Indian Ocean
nation. A6
Russian and Syrian
warplanes hit hospitals
and an apartment building in rebel-held areas
of Syria’s Idlib province,
and may also have used
chlorine gas, residents
and activists said. A8
A suspect in the Paris
attacks that killed 130
people in 2015 went on
trial in Brussels. A9
THE ECONOMY
The Hollywood man-
ager who helped propel
Halle Berry to stardom
has closed his agency
amid accusations of
sexual harassment. A10
Samsung’s de facto
chief was released from
prison a few months
into a five-year sentence
for bribery, embezzlement and perjury. A11
THE REGION
Virginia Gov. Ralph
Northam and Attorney
General Mark Herring
differ on a bill to regulate
electric utility rates. B1
The Metro Safety
Commission is moving
toward federal certification after a lengthy legislative and appointment process. B1
A court challenge says
Maryland is improperly
denying the possibility of
parole to offenders sentenced to life terms for
crimes committed while
they were minors. B1
D.C. officials voiced
concern about the unexplained ouster of a government-transparency
watchdog who said she
faced friction on enforcing some D.C. laws. B1
Virginia lawmakers
advanced a bill that
would allow prosecutors
to charge “sexting”
among minors as a misdemeanor. B5
ST YLE
The musical “In the
Heights” led the Helen
Hayes Awards nominations with 10 nods. C3
The House Intelligence Committee voted unanimously Monday to release a Democratic rebuttal to GOP accusations that the
FBI misled a secret surveillance
court. President Trump now has
five days to decide whether the
information will become public.
The vote means the political
rancor roiling Congress is likely to
continue. Each party has accused
the other of misrepresenting sensitive intelligence surrounding
the ongoing probe into whether
any Trump associates coordinated
with Russia to interfere in the
2016 presidential election.
The panel’s senior Democrat,
Rep. Adam B. Schiff (Calif.), announced the vote results, saying
Republican attacks on the Justice
Department and the FBI show
desperation on the part of the
MEMO CONTINUED ON A4
Inside
HEALTH & SCIENCE
Staying buoyant
It’s one thing to stay
resilient at work. What
about home life? E1
ST YLE
Art of a revolution
A traveling U.K. exhibit is a
brilliant look at the Black
Power movement. C1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A10
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES ......................... A14
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS .............................. A6
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 63
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
5 3 2 9
A2
EZ
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson travels to Bogota,
Colombia, where he will meet with President Juan Manuel
Santos and Foreign Minister Maria Angela Holguin to
discuss surging drug production, economic issues and
the growing refugee population. For developments, visit
washingtonpost.com/politics.
8:30 a.m.
The Commerce Department issues the international
trade deficit for December, which is expected to widen to
$51.9 billion from $50.5 billion in November. Visit
washingtonpost.com/business for details.
8 p.m.
Former vice president Joe Biden, author of “Promise
Me, Dad: A Year of Hope, Hardship, and Purpose,” speaks
at the Anthem in Washington as part of his “American
Promise Tour.” Former defense secretary William Cohen
is the discussion moderator. For developments, visit
washingtonpost.com/national.
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CO R R ECTI O N S
A listing in the Feb. 4 Arts &
Style section’s Spring Arts
Preview misstated the end date
for Rep Stage’s “All She Must
Possess.” The show closes Feb. 25,
not Feb. 28. The section also
included an incorrect final day
for the Washington Ballet’s
“Romeo and Juliet,” which closes
Feb. 18, not Feb. 17, and an
incorrect location for the
company’s “Mixed Masters.” It
will be performed at the Kennedy
Center, not the Harman Center
for the Arts.
A listing of home sales in the
Fairfax edition of the Feb. 1 Local
Living section misstated the price
of the house at 11308 Antrim Ct.
in Great Falls. The home sold for
$1.318 million, not $131,800.
Courtland Milloy’s Dec. 27, 2017,
Metro column, about former
defense contractor Gwyn
Whittaker’s efforts to teach
healthful eating through her
organic restaurant in Herndon,
incorrectly identified Neal
Barnard as a cardiologist at
George Washington University. He
is an adjunct associate professor
of medicine at the university’s
School of Medicine and Health
Sciences and a fellow of the
American College of Cardiology.
The Washington Post is committed to
correcting errors that appear in the
newspaper. Those interested in
contacting the paper for that purpose
can:
Email: corrections@washpost.com.
Call: 202-334-6000, and ask to be
connected to the desk involved —
National, Foreign, Metro, Style, Sports,
Business or any of the weekly sections.
Comments can be directed to The
Post’s reader advocate, who can be
reached at 202-334-7582 or
readers@washpost.com.
EVAN VUCCI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Trump speaks Monday about tax cuts in Ohio. He also
discussed Democrats’ reactions to last week’s State of the Union.
‘Treasonous’: Trump calls out
lawmakers who held applause
BY A NNE G EARAN
AND J OHN W AGNER
BLUE ASH, Ohio — President
Trump on Monday lambasted
Democrats who did not applaud as
he relayed positive numbers about
black and Hispanic unemployment during his State of the Union
address, accusing them of being
“un-American” and “treasonous.”
“Even on positive news like that,
really positive news like that, they
were like death and un-American,”
Trump said here as he went off
script during a speech on tax cuts.
“Somebody said ‘treasonous.’ I
mean, yeah, I guess, why not? Shall
we call that treason? Why not? I
mean, they certainly didn’t seem
to love our country very much.”
The president’s incendiary assessment came in the middle of a
speech designed to tout the benefits of the Republican tax-cut
package, which Trump said set off
“a tidal wave of good news that
continues to grow each day.”
As he spoke, Trump made no
mention of the remarkably volatile
day on Wall Street that ended with
the Dow Jones industrial average
plunging more than 1,150 points.
Trump frequently cites the Dow’s
anne.gearan@washpost.com
john.wagner@washpost.com
Wagner reported and Erica Werner
contributed to this report from
Washington.
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
Trump meets reality, and not the TV-show kind
President Trump,
in his State of the
Union address last
week, boasted to
the nation about
stock market
Dana
gains: “The stock
Milbank
market has
WASHINGTON smashed one
record after
SKETCH
another, gaining
$8 trillion and
more in value in just this short
period of time.”
He has boasted about the
booming market in tweets no
fewer than 54 times since taking
office. Including boasts he has
made in speeches, he has
celebrated stock market gains
roughly 100 times. In January
alone had extolled the “record
stock market,” the “most
explosive stock market rally,” the
“incredible” gains, and more.
And how is that boast working
out for him now?
The Dow Jones industrial
average plunged 1,175 points
Monday, its biggest one-day point
drop in history, following Friday’s
beastly 666-point slide. The S&P
500 has lost more than $1 trillion
in market value in just three
trading days, and the Dow’s
8 percent drop in six trading days
wiped out the year’s gains.
Stocks rise and fall, but the
recent sell-off shows the ultimate
folly of the president’s fact-free
existence. For a year, he took
credit for stock market gains that
were the continuation of a nineyear bull market (a market he had
called a “bubble” before
assuming the presidency). Now,
the market is, arguably,
beginning to react to Trump’s
actual policies — a tax cut that
added fuel to an already strong
economy, raising fears it will
overheat, causing inflation,
higher interest rates and
recession.
In ways large and small, reality
is catching up with Trump.
In the same State of the Union
address, Trump boasted that
“African American
unemployment stands at the
lowest rate ever recorded.” (Never
mind that this continued an
eight-year trend.) Barely 60 hours
later, Trump’s Labor Department
reported that this boast was no
longer true: Black unemployment
swelled to 7.7 percent in January
from 6.8 percent in December.
Reality caught up with the
Trump tax cut over the weekend
in a most unusual way.
Republicans had mocked Nancy
Pelosi for saying the cut
amounted to “crumbs” for
ordinary workers. But on
Saturday, House Speaker Paul
Ryan tweeted out a message
pulled from an Associated Press
story: “A secretary at a public
high school in Lancaster, PA, said
she was pleasantly surprised her
pay went up $1.50 a week . . . she
said [that] will more than cover
her Costco membership for the
year.” Amid the social media
ridicule that followed — Rep. Joe
Kennedy noted that the
wealthiest Americans get an
extra $3,000 per week — Ryan
took down the truth-telling tweet.
In Illinois, reality is catching
up with Trump, and Republicans,
in a less amusing way. Trump has
given rhetorical support to white
supremacists — in
Charlottesville, for example, and
with talk about “shithole” African
countries. Such comments have
won praise from the likes of
Richard Spencer, David Duke and
the Daily Stormer.
But look where this is Göring.
The Chicago Sun-Times just
reported that a whitesupremacist Holocaust denier is
now poised to be the Republican
nominee in a Chicago-area
congressional district. At the
same time, a Republican state
representative challenging the
state’s Republican governor
released a vulgar ad portraying a
deep-voiced transgender person
thanking the governor for the
right to use a girls bathroom, a
woman in a pink protest hat
thanking him for her abortions
and a black teacher thanking him
for bailing out public schools.
State party officials can’t get
either candidate to back off —
and no wonder. The president of
the United States and leader of
the party has, with his actions,
licensed this anything-goes
environment.
Trump
rejects new
bipartisan
DACA plan
BY
E D O ’ K EEFE
Talks to resolve the legal status
of young undocumented immigrants and enact new border security measures remain stalled in the
closely divided Senate on Monday,
as a new bipartisan proposal to
resolve the impasse was dismissed
by the White House as insufficient.
The proposal by Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Christopher A.
Coons (D-Del.) would grant permanent legal status to undocumented
immigrants known as “dreamers”
and bolster security along the
U.S.-Mexico border. It copies a plan
introduced in the House that has
54 co-sponsors from both parties.
But President Trump tweeted that
the idea is a “total waste of time”
because it doesn’t immediately authorize spending the billions to
build new barriers along the border.
Trump announced in September that he would end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program (DACA) on March 5,
giving Congress six months to enact a permanent solution. Attempts to do so have sputtered so
far and contributed to a three-day
partial government shutdown last
month.
In his tweet Monday, Trump added that “March 5th is rapidly approaching and the Dems seem not
to care about DACA. Make a deal!”
McCain and Coons introduced
their measure believing that the
only potential deal in the Senate is
a narrow one focused on legalizing
dreamers and authorizing the Department of Homeland Security to
JOSHUA ROBERTS/REUTERS
A proposal by Sen. Christopher A. Coons (D-Del.), above, and Sen.
John McCain (R-Ariz.) addresses “dreamers” and border security.
draw up a comprehensive southern border plan.
Coons said his proposal with
McCain could be a “fresh start”
and a “strong starting place” for
the Senate’s upcoming debate. In
Senate speak, he described it as “a
good base bill” — legislation that
could be used to launch the immigration debate, be amended with
other proposals and earn an upor-down vote.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) has vowed to
permit votes on immigration legislation this month as part of the
agreement to reopen the government — but he has not said which
bill he will use to begin the debate,
how long the debate will run and
what kinds of amendments will be
permitted.
McCain, who is battling Stage 4
brain cancer, remains in Arizona
and isn’t expected in Washington
this week. In a statement, he said
the bill “would address the most
urgent priorities” of legalizing the
status of dreamers and make
changes to border security — and
allow Congress to move on.
“It’s time we end the gridlock so
we can quickly move on to completing a long-term budget agreement that provides our men and
women in uniform the support
they deserve,” he added.
The McCain-Coons plan is the
Senate version of the USA Act, introduced last month by Reps. Will
Hurd (R-Tex.) and Pete Aguilar (DCalif.) with a total of 54 co-sponsors
— 27 from each party. The bill has
been fodder for conversations between Trump administration officials and senior congressional leaders trying to set the contours of a
potential immigration debate.
Like the House version, the new
Senate bill would grant legal status to dreamers who have been in
the country since 2013 — a larger
pool of undocumented immigrants than the 1.8 million Trump
supports legalizing. The measure
would not immediately authorize
spending the $25 billion Trump is
seeking to fortify the border with
new wall and fence construction.
Some Republicans are seeking at
least $30 billion.
Rather, the legislation would
immediately authorize using
more technology and drones to
monitor some border areas, but
would also require the secretary of
homeland security to submit a
southern border security strategy
within a year. The plan would
need to include a projected cost
Reality also threatens to upend
Trump’s claim that the infamous
Devin Nunes memo vindicated
him in the Russia probe. Now
Trump faces an unpalatable
choice — declassify a Democratic
rebuttal showing the memo was
out of context or refuse to release
it and appear to be concealing
something.
But perhaps nowhere does
reality threaten such a rude
intrusion into Trump’s world as it
does on Wall Street. Trump
claimed credit for the rising stock
market, even though it has been
setting records for about six
years. But what goes up
inevitably must come down.
New York Federal Reserve
Bank President William Dudley,
in a prescient speech as the
market surged last month, said
that while he was optimistic
about the near term, he was
concerned that the tax cut
worsened a fiscal position
already “far worse” than before
the last downturn and that the
“extra boost” caused by the tax
cuts to an already tight labor
market means the Fed “may
have to press harder on the
brakes at some point over the
next few years. If that happens,
the risk of a hard landing will
increase.”
Now just such a concern is
riling markets. For the
braggadocious Trump, it could be
a particularly hard landing.
Twitter: @Milbank
per mile for any changes.
The bill says nothing about
curbing family-based legal migration or making changes to the
diversity visa lottery program —
two other priorities for Trump and
conservative Republicans.
Asked about the idea, White
House legislative affairs director
Marc Short told reporters Monday
at the Capitol, “I don’t think it’s
ever going anywhere.”
“It’s not sufficient,” Short said as
he called on lawmakers to use
Trump’s demands as the starting
point.
Sponsoring this immigration
measure is a stark departure from
McCain’s previously aggressive
stance on border security. During
his 2010 reelection campaign, he
vowed to “complete the danged
fence” across Arizona’s span with
Mexico. In 2013, he was a lead GOP
negotiator on a bipartisan immigration bill with a pathway to citizenship for the 11 million immigrants here illegally. The bill
passed overwhelmingly in the
Senate but stalled in the House.
Coons has been an eager participant in recent bipartisan talks to
end a partial government shutdown and broker a compromise on
immigration policy. He told reporters that “a broader solution” introduced by Sens. Richard J. Durbin
(D-Ill.) and Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.) is one possible compromise for senators to support, but
said that Trump’s “unconstructive
engagement” with Durbin and
Graham on the issue means that
their bill “may not be feasible.”
Trump, Durbin and Graham
clashed in an Oval Office meeting
last month when the president
dismissed some of their potential
proposals and used a vulgarity to
describe Haiti and some African
nations — comments that roiled
Washington for several days and
contributed to a partial government shutdown.
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
John Wagner and Erica Werner
contributed to this report.
Trump staffers are warned about encrypted apps
C AROL D . L EONNIG,
J OSH D AWSEY
AND A SHLEY P ARKER
BY
record rise over the last year as
evidence that his tax cut and deregulation programs are working.
Democrats have said Trump is
taking undue credit for a trend
that began under President Barack Obama. Since the recession’s end, unemployment rates
for all demographic segments
have fallen, including blacks and
Hispanics.
The black unemployment rate
was at its lowest point in history in
December after it was more than
cut in half during the last threequarters of Obama’s presidency.
Democrats reacted angrily to
the president’s characterization of
“treason,” a crime punishable by
death.
“Whether I chose to applaud or
not applaud is a First Amendment
right that our forefathers wrote
down and that generations before
me have sacrificed many a life for,”
said Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.).
“And I would just say the president’s
out of line with that statement.”
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
White House lawyers have
been
reminding
President
Trump’s staff not to use encrypted
messaging apps for official government business as the administration seeks to dismiss a lawsuit
accusing it of violating federal
records laws.
The warnings were issued during mandatory ethics training
sessions held for White House
personnel in the past several
weeks. During the hour-long
briefings, deputy counsel Stefan
C. Passantino told staffers to use
only White House email accounts
for work communications and
not unofficial platforms such as
smartphone apps, text messages
and private emails, according to
several people in attendance.
Using such messaging services
for official government business
could violate the Presidential
Records Act, which requires that
nearly all official White House
correspondence be preserved.
Some participants at the ethics
sessions in the Old Executive Office Building said Passantino suggested that there had been inap-
propriate use of smartphone apps
such as WhatsApp.
“He did focus on WhatsApp —
said that people were using it, and
it wasn’t appropriate,” said one
staffer who attended a recent
briefing and spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe the
discussion. “He said, ‘All those
apps are a big problem.’ ”
Passantino declined to comment, but White House officials
disputed that description of his
remarks. Although he noted that
executive branch employees
should not use such platforms for
official business, they said, he did
not assert that officials had been
relying on them in the past.
“Regular ethics briefings are a
critically important part of a
much larger initiative designed to
ensure that all White House personnel hold themselves to the
highest possible ethical standards,” White House spokeswoman Lindsay Walters said. “It’s disheartening to see the false accusations of anonymous sources
outweigh the truth of what was
actually said in the briefing.”
Passantino said that staffers
who receive work-related communications on unofficial platforms should forward them to
their White House email address
so official administration business can be preserved, according
to people in attendance. A White
House official said Passantino
used the example of a staffer who
receives a work-related question
on a private Gmail account, saying that employee should reply
and copy his or her government
email account to ensure that communications are steered to official accounts.
In addition, he reminded aides
to preserve White House records
and told them not to conduct
political activities that could violate the Hatch Act, these people
said.
The reminder came as the
White House contends with a
lawsuit filed in June by the watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington
(CREW), which alleges that the
administration is failing to comply with records laws because of
past reports that aides have used
messaging apps to communicate.
The Trump administration has
argued that the case should be
dismissed because courts do not
have the authority to review the
executive branch’s compliance
with the law.
CREW lawyer Anne Weismann
said the White House ethics sessions reinforce her group’s case.
“They know that these apps are
being used; they know the requirements of the Presidential
Records Act are not being met,”
she said. “I guess I will claim
some victory. . . . If they are in fact
now training people and monitoring compliance, that’s a good
thing.”
The recent focus on appropriate communication channels
came as part of mandatory ethics
training sessions the White
House Counsel’s Office has been
leading for all executive staffers
since early January.
Trump’s son-in-law and senior
adviser, Jared Kushner, attended
a session last month, according to
people familiar with his participation. Last year, an attorney for
Kushner confirmed that he used a
private email account to discuss
official White House business
during his first nine months in
government service. Those messages were forwarded to his official email account for preservation, the attorney said.
carol.leonnig@washpost.com
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
ashley.parker@washpost.com
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
Train horn and brake used
before S.C. crash, NTSB says
Probe centers on switch
that sent Amtrak onto
rails occupied by CSX
BY L ORI A RATANI
AND A SHLEY H ALSEY
III
The engineer of an Amtrak
train sounded his horn for three
seconds and eventually hit the
emergency brake, slowing the
train to 50 mph before it
slammed head-on into a freight
train near Columbia, S.C., federal
investigators said Monday.
The impact of the crash early
Sunday was so intense that it
moved the empty CSX freight
train 15 feet from where it was
parked on tracks adjacent to the
main rail line, according to Robert Sumwalt, chairman of the
National Transportation Safety
Board, which is investigating the
crash. The Amtrak train’s conductor and engineer were killed,
and 116 others were hospitalized.
Sunday’s crash in Cayce, S.C.,
about four miles south of Columbia, was the third high-profile
incident involving an Amtrak
train in less than two months.
Last Wednesday, an Amtrak train
carrying GOP lawmakers to their
annual retreat in West Virginia
hit a garbage truck outside
Crozet, Va. No lawmakers were
seriously injured, but a passenger in the truck was killed.
The crashes have renewed
concern about whether enough is
being done to equip railroads
with an automatic braking system known as positive train control, which Sumwalt and others
say could have prevented Sunday’s fatal crash and one that
occurred in December, just outside Seattle.
PTC originally was supposed
to be in place by the end of 2015,
but after a push by the rail
industry, Congress postponed
the deadline until the end of this
year, with the possibility that it
could be extended to the end of
2020.
Last month, however, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao
sent letters warning railroad industry leaders that they must
meet the end-of-year deadline.
On Monday, members of the
Association of American Railroads, which lobbies for the
freight industry, said its members will meet the deadline.
“The railroads are very far
along,” said Michael J. Rush,
senior vice president of the Association of American Railroads.
“All of the (seven major railroads)
are going to make it by (December) 2018.”
What “making it” means will
vary. The law passed by Congress
puts a December deadline on
hardware installation, acquisition of the mandated radio spectrum and training of employees
in its use.
The law also requires that
50 percent of the system be
switched on by December. If the
railroads comply with that deadline they will then be required to
complete the balance of the system by the end of 2020.
In the briefing with reporters
on Monday, Sumwalt said the
information about the Amtrak
train’s speed and the engineer’s
actions comes from the data
recorder, which was retrieved
from the wreckage. Investigators
were hopeful that the front-facing video camera retrieved from
the train’s locomotive Sunday
would offer them more insight
into what happened before the
crash. However, it was discovered that the recording ended a
few seconds before the crash. A
forensics team in Washington is
working on the footage, he said.
The train hit a top speed of
57 mph before the engineer began to slow it; the speed limit in
the corridor is 59.
About seven seconds before
the end of the recording, the
train’s horn was activated for
three seconds.
“A lot has been done, and a lot
needs to be done,” Sumwalt said.
“But I’m confident that our investigator will be able to piece this
together.”
He said investigators are expected to remain in Cayce though
the weekend.
Amtrak 91, traveling on tracks
owned and maintained by freight
railway giant CSX, was supposed
to pass over the switch to continue onto the main-line tracks.
Instead, it was directed onto a
portion of track known as “siding,” which was occupied by the
parked CSX train, Sumwalt said.
Sumwalt said officials have
confirmed that a signal outage
along the rail corridor meant
that trains had to be manually
directed through the area. He
said the outage occurred because
of upgrades tied to the installation of PTC. Investigators also
are focusing on why a railroad
switch was locked in the wrong
position, sending the Amtrak
train off the main line and onto
the side track.
Sumwalt said NTSB investigators have also been able to interview four CSX crew members,
including the engineer, conductor and the dispatcher who
would have been responsible for
directing the Amtrak train because of a signal outage along the
rail line.
Sumwalt could not say whether the Amtrak engineer’s actions
before the collision indicated
that he knew the train had detoured off the main line and onto
the side track.
Amtrak trains have PTC equipment, but the freight railroads on
which Amtrak trains travel, including the one involved in Sunday’s crash, must install and
activate transponders along their
rail beds for the system to work.
According to Sumwalt, the
Amtrak train was headed south
on the main track, as directed by
dispatchers with CSX. The empty
freight train, which had unloaded its cargo of automobiles, was
parked on a side track adjacent to
the main line. When the Amtrak
train moved past the area, it hit a
switch that moved it to the side
track where it crashed into the
freight train.
lori.aratani@washpost.com
ashley.halsey@washpost.com
Panel shuts down probe of Kozinski
BY
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
The judicial council tasked with
investigating allegations of sexual
misconduct against former appeals court judge Alex Kozinski
announced Monday that it was
closing its probe because his retirement effectively took away its
legal authority to explore the matter.
The four-page order from the Judicial Council of the Second Circuit
was not surprising, as the panel
seemed to have the ability to investigate only sitting judges. Still, the
move probably will disappoint
some of those who had leveled allegations against the powerful jurist
and who worried his stepping
down from the bench would shortcircuit a full and formal reckoning.
“We recognize that the complaint references grave allegations
of inappropriate misconduct,
which the federal judiciary cannot
tolerate,” the council wrote in its
order, before adding, “Because
Alex Kozinski has resigned the office of circuit judge, and can no
longer perform any judicial duties,
he does not fall within the scope of
persons who can be investigated
under” federal law. A lawyer for
Kozinski declined to comment.
Kozinski, 67, was one of the most
well-known appeals court judges
in the country. His colorful opinions on the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the 9th Circuit drew national
attention, and those who worked
for him often went on to win prestigious Supreme Court clerkships.
But after The Washington Post
reported in December on sexual
misconduct allegations against
the judge, his downfall was swift.
He announced Dec. 18 that he was
stepping down from the bench —
10 days after The Post published
its first story on the accusations
and less than a week after the
judiciary initiated its review.
Fifteen women detailed what
they said was the judge’s sexual
misconduct — including three for-
mer clerks who alleged Kozinski
showed them explicit images in
his chambers, a lawyer who said
Kozinski kissed her without warning at a legal community event
and a former U.S. Court of Federal
Claims judge who said Kozinski
grabbed and squeezed each of her
breasts as the two drove back from
an event in Baltimore. The incidents ranged in time from the mid1980s to 2016.
The reporting spurred the judiciary to explore some changes. In late
December, Chief Justice John G.
Roberts Jr. announced an initiative
to ensure there are proper procedures in place to protect court
employees from sexual harassment, tasking James C. Duff, the
director of the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts, with creating
a group to work on the matter. That
group has been formed. The judiciary also updated the handbook for
law clerks to encourage reporting of
sexual harassment.
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
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JOE SKIPPER/REUTERS
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket is readied for the demonstration flight of its megarocket at Cape
Canaveral, Fla., on Monday. The rocket, which is set to launch on Tuesday, will be carrying a red Tesla with
a dummy at the wheel. Elon Musk, who heads SpaceX and Tesla, aims to send the electric car on an orbit
around the sun that will take the vehicle as far out as Mars.
WEATHER
5 dead, many injured
in Midwest crashes
Five people died and dozens
were injured in more than 650
crashes on snow-covered
Missouri roads, and authorities
said up to 50 vehicles collided on
a freeway in Iowa.
The Missouri State Highway
Patrol said the crashes started
Sunday afternoon as snow began
falling. Less than 2 inches
accumulated, but the snow was
treacherous because
temperatures dropped rapidly
from the high 30s to the single
digits throughout the day, said
meteorologist Gene Hatch with
the National Weather Service in
Springfield.
The largest crash happened
on Interstate 44 near
Marshfield, about 150 miles
southeast of Kansas City. In
addition to the 60 to 80
damaged vehicles, two dozen
vehicles became blocked and
were unable to move, police said.
The pileup killed a 55-year-old
man from Glendora, Calif.
Nearly 350 crashes and 50 to
55 injuries were reported in an
18-county area in the southwest
part of the state.
In Iowa, authorities closed
part of I-35 near Ames on
Monday after up to 50 vehicles
collided on the snow-covered
pavement.
— Associated Press
CALIFORNIA
San Francisco police
to adopt changes
The San Francisco Police
Department will be the first in
the nation to get voluntary state
oversight after the federal
government ended an Obamaera program aimed at easing
tensions amid fatal police
shootings of black men across
the country, officials announced
Monday.
California Attorney General
Xavier Becerra said his office
will oversee the implementation
of nearly 300 changes
recommended by federal
officials to help the San
Francisco department rebuild
community trust.
At least 15 law enforcement
agencies nationwide had been
receiving federal advice and
technical assistance to change
practices involving use of force,
racial bias, recruitment and
other issues, but in September
the Justice Department decided
to stop providing resources or
guidance for the Community
Oriented Policing Services
program.
Then-Mayor Ed Lee (D) called
for a federal review of the San
Francisco department in 2016
after officers exchanged racist
and homophobic text messages
and the police shooting of Mario
Woods, a 26-year-old black man,
sparked protests that led to the
resignation of Police Chief Greg
Suhr.
— Associated Press
A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
House GOP Supreme Court won’t halt redrawing of Pa.’s congressional map
plan means
more funds
for military
BY
But bill breaking defense
budget caps is unlikely to
make it through Senate
BY E RICA W ERNER
AND M IKE D E B ONIS
House Republican leaders are
proposing a long-term boost to
military funding in a bill that
would give other federal agencies
only a short-term extension of
current spending levels, a move
that stands to heighten tension
with Democrats and complicate
plans to keep the government
open past Thursday.
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan
(R-Wis.) pitched the plan to his
GOP colleagues in a closed-door
meeting Monday. The bill, set for a
vote on Tuesday, would increase
Pentagon funding by about
$30 billion, to $584 billion, breaking existing spending caps as well
as making funding available
through September. The rest of
the government would continue
to be funded at 2017 levels
through March 23.
The spending bill would also
provide two years of funding for
the federal community health
center program, which lapsed last
year and is at risk of running out
of spending authority, and would
also extend several other programs.
While House GOP leaders are
confident the bill will pass their
chamber with Republican votes,
it is likely to be dead on arrival in
the Senate.
Democrats have refused to sign
on to any defense spending increase absent an agreement to
bolster nondefense spending
alongside it. The budget agreement has also been stalled by
unrelated policy disputes, primarily over immigration.
“We want to fund defense, absolutely, but we also want to fund
programs that help the middle
class, like education, like infrastructure, like scientific research,”
Senate Minority Leader Charles
E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Monday.
“We’re standing up and saying we
must do both. That’s how this
body works.”
The House’s move is calibrated
to both appease conservative lawmakers who have become increasingly frustrated at the string of
temporary spending measures
and to also nudge senators to
boost defense funding.
“It’s time for the Senate to take
action,” House Majority Whip
Steve Scalise (R-La.) said.
Government funding is set to
run out Thursday at midnight,
and though there were few fears
of another shutdown as lawmakers scrambled Monday, the House
maneuver stands to inject new
uncertainty into the process.
House Republicans plan to
pass the spending bill and send it
to the Senate on Tuesday, then
recess for the week so Democrats
can head to Maryland’s Eastern
Shore for their yearly policy retreat. But with the Senate unlikely
to swallow the House bill, lawmakers could be forced to return
to Washington to vote again before the deadline.
Rep. Bradley Byrne (R-Ala.), an
Armed Services Committee member, said it would have been “difficult” for Republican leaders to
cobble together enough GOP
votes for another temporary bill,
known as a “continuing resolution.”
“One CR after another, at some
point you have to say this is not
working,” he said.
Still unresolved is the issue of
protections for undocumented
immigrants brought to the United
States as minors, known as
“dreamers.”
The immigration issue has
complicated the negotiations,
with some Democrats resisting a
deal on spending until they have
achieved protections for dreamers.
Rep. Dennis A. Ross (R-Fla.)
said House Republicans have run
out of patience with the Senate
and want to “impress upon them
the significance of funding our
defense.”
“I think we have an obligation
for the defense of this country to
keep doing this, and if it’s a battle
of wills, I hope that we will prevail,” he said.
Nonetheless, aides in both parties say a budget deal is in reach
and could be finalized as soon as
this week. Once that’s in place, the
spending committees could get to
work writing the actual legislation funding the government
through Sept. 30.
erica.werner@washpost.com
mike.debonis@washpost.com
R OBERT B ARNES
The Supreme Court on Monday
denied a request from Pennsylvania Republicans to delay redrawing congressional lines, meaning
the 2018 elections in the state will
most likely be held in districts far
more favorable to Democrats.
The Pennsylvania Supreme
Court last month ruled that the
state’s Republican legislative leaders had violated the state Constitution by unfairly favoring the
GOP. Although there are more registered Democrats than Republicans in the state, Republicans
hold 13 of 18 congressional seats.
The GOP leaders asked the U.S.
Supreme Court to intervene, but
Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. turned
down their request for a stay without even referring the case to his
colleagues. He gave no reason for
the decision, but generally the Supreme Court stays out of the way
when a state’s highest court is
interpreting its own state constitution.
The practical impact is that it
might aid Democrats in their attempt to flip the House from Republican control. Democrats need
to take about two dozen seats to
win the majority, and Pennsylvania could provide some of that
total. Six incumbents, five of them
Republicans, have said they will
not be on the fall ballot.
The victory for opponents of
partisan gerrymandering might
also indicate a new way to combat
the issue, by challenging redistricting in state courts under state
constitutions.
Federal courts in Texas, North
Carolina and Wisconsin found
that politics or intentional discrimination played an unaccept-
able role in drawing electoral lines
and ordered new districts drawn
for the 2018 elections. But the
Supreme Court stopped those decisions, and Monday’s denial to
Pennsylvania Republicans’ request does not affect them.
The justices are traditionally
reluctant to order changes in an
election year. And they have never
thrown out a state’s redistricting
plan because they found it so infected with partisan bias that it
violates voters’ constitutional
rights.
Unless and until it does — the
subject is under review at the high
court in cases from Wisconsin and
Maryland — the justices have routinely told states found to be offenders that they do not have to
immediately redraw the maps.
But the previous decisions have
been by federal courts weighing
how gerrymandering might violate the U.S. Constitution. The
Pennsylvania case was brought
under the commonwealth’s Constitution, and the U.S. Supreme
Court generally does not interfere
in such decisions.
“State courts long before this
decade of redistricting have been
somewhat more willing to strike
down partisan gerrymanders
than federal courts, though that
isn’t saying much, because federal
courts have not been willing to do
so at all,” said Richard Pildes, an
election law specialist at New York
University Law School.
The Pennsylvania Supreme
Court last month ruled that the
congressional map drawn by the
Republican legislature in 2011
“clearly, plainly and palpably violates” the commonwealth’s Constitution. It demanded a quick
redrawing of the lines so that 2018
elections could be held in fairer
districts.
Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court
justices are elected and, with
Democrats in the majority, voted
along party lines in demanding a
change to the districts.
Republican legislative leaders
in Pennsylvania had asked the U.S.
Supreme Court to put the decision
on hold. And other Republicanled states told the justices that
they should refrain from ordering
new districts anywhere, even if
they find later this term that there
is a way to gauge extreme partisan
gerrymandering.
The decision’s practical
impact is that it
might aid Democrats in
their attempt to flip
the U.S. House from
GOP control.
“Put simply, there is no need to
hurry,” said an amicus brief filed
by Republican officials in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Kansas,
Missouri and South Carolina.
They noted that the 2020 Census
will require new lines to be drawn
nationwide anyway.
Even with the U.S. Supreme
Court’s decision not to intervene,
the process of redrawing the maps
will be strained as a result of the
tight elections timeline and the
highly polarized politics surrounding the matter.
The Pennsylvania high court
wants the legislature to submit a
new plan to the governor by the
end of this week and said the
governor should have it ready for
the state court’s review by Feb. 15.
Pennsylvania’s governor, Democrat Tom Wolf, indicated that
was possible.
“Gerrymandering is wrong and
we must correct errors of the past
with the existing map,” he said in a
statement. “My team is ready, willing and able to work with the
General Assembly to ensure a new
map is fair and within the clear
orders given by the Pennsylvania
Supreme Court.”
But Republican leaders have
taken no action to draw new maps
and have filed another request for
delay at the state Supreme Court.
They have questioned whether
two of the Democratic justices
should be disqualified from the
case because of comments they
made about gerrymandering during the elections.
And a Republican justice, after
questioning, filed a disclosure
noting that she had accepted
$25,000 in campaign contributions from a fund controlled by
Senate President Pro Tempore Joseph B. Scarnati (R), one of the
legislative leaders who brought
the case.
Pennsylvania is scheduled to
hold congressional primaries May
15. Because the district lines are in
question, filing for the races has
been pushed back to March 20.
In their appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, Pennsylvania’s Republican legislative leaders said
that, just as when the court decided to reverse the Florida Supreme
Court’s decision in Bush v. Gore,
there is a federal issue at stake.
The U.S. Constitution’s elec-
tions clause provides that the
“Times, Places and Manner” of
congressional elections shall be
decided by the “legislature” of
each state, or by Congress. That
leaves no room for the Pennsylvania Supreme Court to usurp the
legislature’s power under vague
interpretations of the state’s guarantees of free speech and equal
protection, the state Republicans
say.
The Pennsylvania court’s 5-to-2
ruling was not accompanied by a
detailed opinion; it said one
would come later.
“For the first time in United
States history, a state court, in
attempting to play the role of ‘lawmaker,’ has invalidated a congressional districting plan without
identifying a violation of the U.S.
Constitution or a state constitutional or statutory provision providing specific redistricting criteria,” the GOP leaders told the
court.
But the League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania, one of the
challengers to the plan, told the
U.S. Supreme Court in its response brief that the justices on
numerous occasions have said the
meaning of “legislature” in the
Constitution is not so literal.
To rule for the commonwealth’s
legislative leaders, “this Court
would need to overrule no fewer
than six of its precedents, all upholding the power of state courts
to review and remedy unconstitutional congressional districting
plans,” the group’s brief said.
It added, “Their stay applications are just a ploy to preserve a
congressional map that violates
Pennsylvania’s Constitution for
one more election cycle.”
robert.barnes@washpost.com
Trump accuses key Democrat of lies and leaks
MEMO FROM A1
president’s defenders.
“We think this will help inform
the public of the many distortions
and inaccuracies” in the GOP
memo released last week, Schiff
told reporters after Monday’s vote,
adding that he was concerned the
Trump administration could still
try to stymie the Democrats’ response.
“We want to make sure that the
White House does not redact our
memo for political purposes,”
Schiff said. “There is a rising sense
of panic, clearly, within the White
House and as well on the Hill.”
Schiff said that he gave copies of
the Democrats’ memo to the FBI
and the Justice Department days
ago and that he expected it to go to
the White House on Monday night
for review.
In announcing the vote, Schiff
blasted the Intelligence Committee’s Republican chairman, Rep.
Devin Nunes (Calif.), for his handling of Russia-related intelligence issues. He said Nunes had
blocked efforts to obtain testimony from key witnesses and refused
to answer repeated questions
about whether he had coordinated with the White House in preparing the GOP memo.
Nunes did not address the media after Monday’s vote.
One Republican on the panel,
Rep. K. Michael Conaway (Tex.),
said he was not aware of any coordination between Nunes and the
White House. “I just can’t imagine
Devin would be involved in that,”
Conaway said.
In an interview Friday with Fox
News, Nunes blasted Democratic
critics, saying they were trying to
conceal abuses of surveillance
powers by the FBI and the Justice
Department. “These guys tell so
many lies, you can’t keep track of
them,’’ Nunes said.
Even with the committee voting
to make the Democrats’ memo
public, Trump could decide to
keep it secret. Under congressional rules, the president has five
days to consider whether to block
the memo’s release. If he blocks it,
Nunes could then ask the full
House to override the president’s
decision.
A White House spokesman said
the Democratic memo would undergo the same review as the GOP
memo before it.
Before Monday’s vote, Trump
charged in a tweet that Schiff
“leaves closed committee hearings to illegally leak confidential
information” and “must be
stopped” — suggesting that the
president may decide not to allow
the Democrats’ assertions to be
made public.
And during a speech about tax
cuts Monday in Ohio, Trump went
off script to talk about the Nunes
memo.
“Oh, but did we catch them in
the act or what?” he asked his
audience. “You know what I’m
talking about. Oh, did we catch
them in the act. They are very
embarrassed. They never thought
they were going to get caught. We
caught them. Hey, we caught
PHOTOS BY BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Rep. Adam B. Schiff (Calif.), top, the leading Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, criticized
Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), the panel’s chairman, for his handling of Russia-related intelligence
issues and said the GOP memo released last week contained “distortions and inaccuracies.”
them. It’s so much fun — we’re like
the great sleuth.”
In the same speech, Trump
ratcheted up his rhetoric against
congressional Democrats, suggesting they were “treasonous” for
not applauding during his State of
the Union address last week.
Nunes has indicated to other
committee members that the president might make significant redactions before allowing the
Democrats’ memo to be released,
according to one person familiar
with the discussion, though accounts differed.
Rep. Thomas J. Rooney (R-Fla.)
said that he did not think the
president would block the memo’s
release but that Trump should redact information about sources
and methods of intelligence collection. Such details do not represent the bulk of the Democrats’
memo, he added, calling it an inaccurate representation of what’s
contained in underlying intelligence documents.
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan
(R-Wis.) said last week that he
supports the rebuttal’s public release once it goes through the
same process the Republican
memo was put through. The GOP
memo was available to House
members to read in a secure facili-
ty for 11 days before the panel
voted to make it public. On Jan. 29,
the House Intelligence Committee
voted to make the Democrats’
memo available to all members to
peruse in a secure facility as well.
The four-page GOP document
released Friday accuses the FBI
and the Justice Department of
misusing information from a British ex-spy during the 2016 election
to help justify their warrant application to surveil a former Trump
campaign adviser, Carter Page.
The Democrats’ 10-page rebuttal, written by Schiff and staffers,
suggests that the Republicans’
memo is misleading and relies on
cherry-picked information intended to discredit the ongoing
probe into possible links between
Russian agents and the Trump
campaign.
In his Monday tweet, the president accused “Little Adam Schiff”
of being “one of the biggest liars
and leakers in Washington,” along
with former FBI director James B.
Comey; Sen. Mark R. Warner
(D-Va.), vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee; former CIA director John Brennan;
and former director of national
intelligence James R. Clapper Jr.
All had spoken out against releasing the GOP memo.
The committee is scheduled to
interview former White House adviser Stephen K. Bannon on Tuesday — the third time it has scheduled him for a return trip to Capitol Hill after he refused to answer
the panel’s questions related to the
Trump transition team.
But lawmakers were unsure
Monday evening if Bannon was
going to show and indicated that
they were starting to lose patience.
Rooney warned that if Bannon did
not comply with the committee’s
subpoena, it could prompt talk
about “contempt of Congress,”
which could trigger a showdown
between the legislative and executive branches.
A person familiar with Bannon’s plans said he would not appear Tuesday because the White
House and the House counsel
have not come to an agreement
about whether Bannon is covered
by executive privilege, as the
White House insists. This person
said, however, that Bannon will
meet with special counsel Robert
S. Mueller III before the middle of
the month and will answer his
questions with no restrictions.
In the Senate on Monday, Sens.
Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) and
Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) released a heavily redacted version
of their memo urging the Justice
Department to investigate whether the British ex-spy, Christopher
Steele, lied to the FBI. Steele authored a now-famous dossier alleging ties between Trump associates and the Kremlin, a document
at the center of Republicans’ complaints about the bureau.
The two senators also made
clear that they are probing whether officials at the State Department may have helped Steele.
Nunes has indicated that he is
investigating this as well.
The document made public by
Grassley on Monday indicates that
the Senate Judiciary Committee
launched its inquiry in response to
reports published by The Washington Post about Steele and the
firm that hired him, Fusion GPS. It
accuses Steele of misleading the
FBI about his contact with reporters during the campaign.
Steele declined to comment. A
lawyer for Fusion GPS did not
immediately comment on the document.
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
John Wagner contributed to this
report.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
SU
For Eagles fans,
a whole new world
EAGLES FROM A1
had changed overnight.
With their 41-33 victory over
the New England Patriots on Sunday night, the Eagles earned the
first Super Bowl title in franchise
history and set off a wild, teeming
street party that lasted deep into
the wee hours of Monday, one full
of tears, chants, songs and the
occasional overturned car and
downed light pole — the hydraulic
fluid applied in advance by city
police proving woefully ineffective at keeping fans off the poles.
“It changes your whole outlook
about yourself, your whole identity,” said Tom Russo, a business
owner from South Philly and Eagles season ticket holder, as he
headed up Broad Street from
South Philly toward City Hall.
“When you’re an Eagles fan, it’s like
you’ve been a loser your whole life,
and suddenly you’re not a loser
anymore. I’m not a loser anymore.”
Eagles fans might not have
much experience in celebrating
the biggest of victories — the franchise’s last championship was in
1960, before the Super Bowl era,
and Philadelphia had lost the big
one in 1981 and 2005 — but nobody needed to be told what to do,
where to go and how to act at 10:18
p.m. Sunday. It was as if the joyous
hordes streaming out of the bars
and houses and into the chilly
night were guided by some deeprooted, instinctual force in their
bloodlines. If the Eagles won, the
people were going in the streets.
It’s what they do.
And if Eagles fans went in the
streets, they would know what to
do once they got there:
“We’re going to break some
[stuff ],” said Marco Borda, 26, of
South Philadelphia, heading
down Packer Avenue toward
Broad Street following the Eagles’
cathartic victory.
For any unsuspecting strangers
who knew nothing of Super Bowls
or the pent-up generational angst
of Eagles fans, and who might
have found themselves plopped
down — tragically sober — in the
middle of Broad Street in the wee
hours of Monday morning, at the
height of the postgame mob, the
scene that revealed itself would
have looked like some apocalyptic
hellscape.
All along Broad Street, the city’s
main north-south artery, there
were fireworks going off in all
directions, their smoke mixing
with that of cigars and marijuana
and hanging over the street like a
jungle fog. There were broken
beer bottles everywhere, their
shards of glass reflecting the blue
and red lights of police cruisers
and making brittle crunching
sounds beneath hundreds of thousands of boots.
An unholy cacophony enveloped the city — horns honking,
fireworks popping, pots and pans
clanging, cowbells ringing, sirens
wailing, fans chanting “E-A-G-LE-S, Eagles!” A different, threeword chant went up every few
minutes, one that began with an
expletive and ended with “Tom
Brady.”
There was the constant threat
of some unwanted liquid entering
your personal space, either beer or
champagne being sprayed upward or public urinators pointed
downward.
Every square block of Broad
Street, from the deepest reaches of
South Philly, all the way up to City
Hall, and north to Spring Garden,
seemed to be jammed shoulderto-shoulder with people — many
JOE LAMBERTI/COURIER-POST (CHERRY HILL, N.J.)/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Julia Kauterman, right, and Michael Banes kiss on Broad Street in Philadelphia late Sunday night as
Eagles fans celebrated the team’s 41-33 win over the New England Patriots for its first Super Bowl title.
of them wearing Eagles jerseys
and holding beers, signs or small
children, and many of them seeking nothing more than to celebrate the best night of their fanlives with their like-minded brethren. Strangers shared tearful hugs
with each other, the moment they
had waited for all their lives finally
at hand.
In the middle of Broad Street in
South Philly, a young man looked
skyward and screamed, “This is
for you, Aunt Pauline” — a reminder that the Eagles’ futility had
spanned generations, and for everyone who was partying in the
streets Sunday night, there were
loved ones who hadn’t lived long
enough to witness the sweetness
of the ultimate victory.
But still other fans were hellbent on destruction — driven by
what seemed like a sense of duty to
Why sports fans riot (it’s not just beer)
BY
AND
W ILLIAM W AN
A MY E LLIS N UTT
After the Super Bowl, football
fans in Philadelphia rioted. They
set fires in the streets, smashed
windows and flipped cars — the
kind of chaos many cities have
suffered after big games.
Psychologists and sociologists
who study sports-fan violence
have come up with some answers
to basic questions about the
phenomenon.
When do fans tend to riot?
U.S. fan riots typically occur
after championships or highstakes playoff games, said Jerry
Lewis, a Kent State University
sociologist who has spent decades studying fan violence. And
when American sports fans riot,
it is almost always in celebration
of a victory rather than because
of a defeat.
Unlike European soccer hooliganism, in which fans of opposing teams often hurt one another, fan rioting in the United
States is usually limited to vandalism, he said.
Why do fans feel so strongly
about their teams?
“We’re social creatures. We
have a need to belong,” said
Daniel Wann, a psychology professor at Murray State University.
Sports fandom is like a religion: It’s self-selecting but also
strongly influenced by family
and where you grow up. It be-
stows a sense of belonging that
can be beneficial. In studies of
college students, Wann has
found that fans who identify
strongly with a team often are
less likely to feel lonely or alienated and have higher self-esteem.
Indiana University social psychologist Edward Hirt said: “Just
think about how we interact with
each other at games — for guys
especially. We hug and touch
each other in ways that we often
never do otherwise. We all want
to be part of something that
transcends ourselves.”
What happens after a win or
loss?
For ardent fans, the team
becomes an extension of the self.
Hirt conducted a study of college
basketball fans in the 1990s.
Fans who saw their team win
believed they could do much
better on seemingly unrelated
tasks, such as solving anagrams
or shooting darts. Those who saw
their team lose thought they
would do worse.
When shown a picture of a
member of the opposite sex and
asked to rate their chances of
getting a date, fans whose team
lost were much more pessimistic.
Fans’ testosterone levels may
increase after their team wins
and decrease when they lose,
according to some studies. And a
2013 study found that fans of
losing teams experience an urge
to eat more saturated fats and
sugars the day after, while winning teams’ fans choose healthier foods.
Where does the urge for
violence come from?
Most agree the mob mentality
has a lot to do with it. In study
after study, psychologists have
shown people behave differently
in big crowds.
“There’s the contagion theory.
We know people do things in
crowds they would not do alone.
They think they’re anonymous,”
said Jason Lanter, a psychology
professor at Kutztown University.
“But there’s also the alcohol,
which adds fuel to the action,”
Wann said.
When people act in groups,
neuroscientists have also found,
their medial prefrontal cortex,
responsible in part for self-reflection, is more dormant. That
lack of self-reflection seems to
allow people in groups to act in
ways they ordinarily would not,
said Mina Cikara, a neuroscientist at Harvard University. Cikara
hastened to add that being in
groups also can bring out the
best in us, encouraging us to
donate or do collective acts of
kindness.
Lewis said some fans riot as a
way to identify with their teams.
The rioters, he noted, are almost
always young white males.
“They can’t throw a football 60
yards like the quarterback can,
but they can throw a rock
through the window or pull
uphold the city’s reputation as the
hardest of hard-core sports towns
— and those people made good on
their vow to “break some [stuff ],”
the destruction getting worse as
the night wore on and the alcohol
made its inevitable turn from happy buzz to sinister drunk:
An occasional smashed store
window. A looted convenience
store. A small tree somehow uprooted just outside City Hall and
being paraded around like a trophy. A handful of cars flipped over.
A couple of small fires set.
Many of the street-bound congregants seemed to be governed
by an internal drive for verticality,
every object that could be climbed
upon housing one or more people.
They climbed atop cars, atop police tactical trucks, garbage
trucks, concrete barricades, busstation shelters, ledges of build-
ings and the awning of the RitzCarlton hotel — until it collapsed
under the weight of a half-dozen
or more people, who, upon picking
themselves up from the sidewalk,
ripped the awning to shreds and
waved the pieces around like pennants.
And then there were the light
poles. In what had become a fascinating cat-and-mouse game between police and fans, the city had
tried greasing the poles with Crisco before the NFC championship
game two weeks ago, in a failed
effort to keep fans from climbing
them and pulling them down. This
time, they slathered them with
Bio-Bottle Jack hydraulic fluid. It
was a waste of time and money: By
the end of the night, dozens of
light poles were toppled to the
ground, their wires severed and
exposed.
down a light pole,” Lewis said.
“To them, it becomes their feat of
strength and skill.”
Others say the very nature of
sports contributes to the tendency for violence. “Viewing a
sporting event serves to both
build up and relieve the ‘destructive energy,’ ” say the au-
thors of a 2012 academic book
on the subject titled “Violence
and Aggression in Sporting Contests.”
“For a certain subset of sports
fans . . . ‘aggressive acts’ serve to
relieve the tension built up before, during, and after an exciting sports event,” conclude the
“We have had several acts of
vandalism where windows have
been smashed, and some injuries
have been reported around light
poles that have been pulled down,”
the Philadelphia Police Department said in a statement. “We have
one report of looting at a gas station. There have been no fatalities.”
From deepest South Philly, near
the Eagles’ home stadium, Lincoln
Financial Field, it is about a threemile drive up Broad Street to City
Hall. Late Sunday night, with the
roads blocked off and jammed
with people, thousands of fans
made that pilgrimage on foot,
passing through pockets of revelry
and destruction that unfolded
block by block, the lighted clock
tower of City Hall glowing in the
distance like the North Star.
At Broad and Wolf streets, an
elderly woman stood alone shouting, “We did it, honey! We did it!”
and offering high-fives to everyone who passed by.
At Broad and Carpenter, someone was blasting Hall & Oates
from an open window three stories up, and everyone below was
singing and dancing.
At Broad and Kater, a brass
band played in the middle of the
intersection, everyone joining in
to sing the fight song, “Fly, Eagles,
Fly!”
At Broad and Chestnut, just a
block south of City Hall, fans had
two light poles yanked out of the
ground, one on either side of the
street, and appeared to be attempting to sword-fight with
them.
It would all be mostly invisible
by the time the sun peaked in the
sky Monday, when foggy minds
met spotless streets and questioned, if only for a moment,
whether it had all been a dream.
For Eagles fans, Monday was
the first day of their new world.
They weren’t losers anymore. And
the next time that many people
line Broad Street, later this week,
it will be for a victory parade that
was decades in the making and
arrives not a moment too soon.
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
authors before adding this caveat: “Or, maybe some sports fans
just enjoy hurting people and
breaking stuff.”
william.wan@washpost.com
amy.nutt@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
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change could release it, study finds
BY
C HRIS M OONEY
Arctic permafrost contains
massive quantities of mercury, a
toxic heavy metal that could be
released into the atmosphere if
global warming thaws the frozen
soil, U.S. government scientists
said Monday.
Permafrost acts as a massive
ice trap that keeps carbon stuck in
the ground and out of the atmosphere — where, if released as
carbon dioxide, the greenhouse
gas would drive global warming.
But as humans warm the climate,
they risk thawing that permafrost
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There are 32 million gallons of
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swimming
pools,
trapped in the permafrost, the
scientists wrote in a study published in the journal Geophysical
plies,” said Kevin Schaefer, a scientist with the National Snow and
Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado, and a co-author of the study.
How much mercury would be
released depends on how much
the permafrost thaws — which, in
turn, depends on the volume of
greenhouse gas emissions and
There are 32 million gallons of mercury,
or the equivalent of 50 Olympic swimming
pools, trapped in the permafrost.
Research Letters. For context,
that’s “twice as much mercury as
the rest of all soils, the atmosphere, and ocean combined,”
wrote the study’s 16 co-authors.
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the course of the century. The
study says that with current emissions levels through 2100, permafrost could shrink by between 30
and 99 percent.
chris.mooney@washpost.com
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A6
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
The World
In colorblind France, she sees race everywhere
Rokhaya Diallo, a black feminist, earns her living writing on structural racism in a nation that officially eschews the concept
BY
J AMES M C A ULEY
paris — Rokhaya Diallo is almost exactly the same age as
French President Emmanuel
Macron and, like him, a fresh
face in a political realm defined
by tradition. But the likeness
stops there.
Macron — white, male and
bourgeois — is an embodiment
of the French establishment: The
son of two doctors from Amiens,
he breezed through three of the
country’s elite universities and a
top investment bank on his path
to the Elysee Palace. Diallo, the
black feminist daughter of Muslim Senegalese and Gambian immigrants, grew up in a Paris
suburb and earns her living writing about race in a country
where the government officially
eschews the concept.
In May 2017, Macron, a political outsider, won the presidency
in a landslide at age 39. By
contrast, just 36 hours after she
joined a government panel in
December, Diallo was forced out
— mostly, she says, for daring to
talk about structural racism in
public. An explosive debate has
since ensued over freedom of
speech and the meaning of “state
racism” in the storied republic of
liberty, equality and fraternity.
Many saw Macron’s victory as
the harbinger of a new, more
inclusive society. But for Diallo,
the France he leads is still governed by a white majority that,
despite its aspirational rhetoric,
has little interest in bridging the
gaps between people of color and
everyone else.
“Many people from the elite
are comfortable being surrounded only by white people and
acting as if racism doesn’t have
any effect,” Diallo said, adding
that the new president is no
exception.
Diallo’s critics, including a
senior official from France’s
mainstream right-wing party,
the Republicans, portrayed the
writer and broadcaster as an
extremist whose views had no
place on a government body.
They objected to her criticisms of
the satirical newspaper Charlie
Hebdo, which has been the target of several violent attacks, and
her casting of women’s right to
wear the veil as a feminist cause.
Above all, however, Diallo has
been denounced for circulating,
in venues as public as the United
Nations, the idea of state racism.
In a country where the government refuses even to collect
official statistics on race or ethnicity, on the grounds that all
citizens are equal in the state’s
eyes, the notion that the state
might treat different groups differently was always going to be
inflammatory.
“Most of the people in France
who are decision-makers try to
avoid the topic of race, and when
you push them to face it, they call
you a radical,” Diallo, 39, said in
an interview last week. She was
sipping hot chocolate in the cafe
at Station F, the start-up campus
in southeastern Paris that is
widely seen as a symbol of Macron’s new vision for France.
Diallo does not look particularly “radical”; in fact, she looks
Maldives
declares
state of
emergency
BY
PHOTOS BY JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: Rokhaya Diallo, the feminist daughter of Muslim
Senegalese and Gambian immigrants, hosts a television program
last March on BET France. LEFT: A diverse crowd passes through
the streets of Paris. Though France is home to millions of people of
color, the country refuses to collect statistics on race or ethnicity.
like any other young professional in Paris, juggling appointments on multiple devices and
trying not to be late. But few
public figures in France elicit as
much vitriol — and it does not all
flow from the right. Other
French feminists, most of them
white, say they are mystified by
the attention Diallo has garnered in British and American
media.
To them, Diallo’s Anglo-American supporters ignore what they
see as the threat of “Islamism” in
a society that has weathered a
string of terrorist attacks in recent years, many at the hands of
militants dispatched or inspired
by the Islamic State. It’s a threat,
they worry, that is only fueled by
Diallo’s views on race.
“I’ve never heard her defend
anything but the veil and basically attack feminists for defending
the bodies of other women. She
attacks only Islamophobia,” Caroline Fourest, a feminist writer
and radio presenter, said in an
interview. “But we live in a society where some radical Muslims
are intolerant, anti-Semitic, sexist and homophobic.”
Diallo, notably in a long profile in Le Monde, has been accused of not condemning forcefully enough a controversial recent book titled “Whites, Jews
and Us” by a former associate,
the French Algerian activist
Houria Bouteldja.
“I have not read it yet,” Diallo
said, noting that many of her
campaigns have included condemnations of anti-Semitism,
homophobia and other prejudices. “I’m being associated with
comments that I never made.”
Her 2013 book, “How to Talk
About Racism With Children,”
includes a section on combating
anti-Semitism.
“If you are a feminist, normally you are a universalist,” said
Céline Pina, a writer and former
politician in the Paris region.
“Rokhaya Diallo calls for ‘ethnic
feminism,’ whose principal fight
is about the wearing of the veil.
That is not a piece of clothing; it’s
a symbol. It sends a clear message — that a woman is impure
and that she has to cover her
hair.”
Diallo rejects those critiques.
“Actually, I don’t support the
hijab as the hijab. I support —
how can I say? — free choice,” she
said. “The right for any woman
to wear whatever she wants.”
France “doesn’t handle the
reality that there are people at
the intersection of both fights,”
she said, referring to the struggles against racism and sexism.
“White feminists attack Muslim
women because they wear the
hijab, instead of standing for
them and pushing for them to be
free.”
To that end, some gender
scholars see a strange convergence in France’s contemporary
feminist discourse between the
leftists and the hard right.
Because of their “all-or-nothing declarations against the veil
in particular, and their angst
around political Islam destroying the foundations of a secular
Republic,” prominent leftist feminists such as Fourest and Pina
“have failed to articulate a vision
that is noticeably different than
the current discourse of Marine
Le Pen on the topic,” Cécile
Alduy, the author of a wellknown book on Le Pen’s rhetoric
and a professor of French politics
at Stanford University, said in an
email.
Throughout the 2017 presidential election, Le Pen sought to
use feminism as a means of
denigrating Muslims.
Leftist feminists agree with
Le Pen and her allies on next to
nothing, but for Alduy and others, the differences between the
two disappear when it comes to
Islam.
“The problem with espousing
absolute ‘secularist’ politics is
that it starts to sound like what
the far right is saying,” said
Alduy.
When she talks about “state
racism,” Diallo comes with statistics in hand. The most prominent example she cites is a January 2017 study by France’s public
defender of civil liberties, on
police brutality. According to the
study, 40 percent of young people between ages 18 and 24
reported having been stopped by
police, while 80 percent of men
in that age range “perceived as
black, Arab/from the Maghreb”
said they were stopped.
“To me that’s racism sponsored by the state,” Diallo said.
To others, the dismissal of
Diallo from the government’s
digital advisory council — and
that of Hicham Kochman, a rapper and defender of minority
rights better known as “Axiom”
— only underscored what they
see as the limited public space
afforded to minorities in France.
The government “helped her
show how freedom of speech is
different based on your color,”
said Louis-Georges Tin, who
chairs the Representative Council of France’s Black Associations. “In a way, she has made her
point.”
james.mcauley@washpost.com
M OHAMED S HARUHAAN
The Maldives government declared a 15-day state of emergency
Monday as the political crisis
deepened in the Indian Ocean
nation amid an increasingly bitter
standoff between the president
and the Supreme Court.
Hours after the emergency was
declared, soldiers forced their way
into the Supreme Court building,
where the judges were thought to
be taking shelter, said Ahmed
Maloof, an opposition member of
parliament.
Soon after that, security forces
arrested opposition leader Maumoon Abdul Gayoom on charges
that include bribery and attempting to overthrow the government,
his lawyer, Maumoon Hameed,
said on Twitter. Gayoom was the
nation’s president from 1978 to
2008 and is the half brother of
the current Maldives president,
Yameen Abdul Gayoom.
[Chief Justice Abdulla Saeed
and another Supreme Court
judge, Ali Hameed, were arrested
“for an ongoing investigation,”
police said on Twitter, according
to the Reuters news agency.]
A surprise Supreme Court ruling last week ordering the release
of imprisoned opposition leaders
has led to growing turmoil, with
the president lashing out at the
court, opposition protests spilling
into the streets of Male, the capital, and soldiers in riot gear sent to
the parliament building to stop
lawmakers from meeting.
The emergency decree gives the
government broad powers to
make arrests and search and seize
property, and it restricts freedom
of assembly, officials said.
The government did not immediately comment on soldiers
going inside the court building or
Maumoon Abdul Gayoom’s arrest,
but the president’s main rival, who
lives in exile, urged people not to
obey what he called an “unlawful
order.”
“This declaration is unconstitutional and illegal,” former president Mohamed Nasheed, the nation’s first democratically elected
leader, said in a statement. He was
among the opposition leaders
whom the court ordered freed.
In a statement issued after the
state of emergency was announced on state television,
Yameen Abdul Gayoom said that
“during this time, though certain
rights will be restricted, general
movements, services and businesses will not be affected.”
In a letter to the court released
by his office earlier Monday, he
said its ruling had encroached on
powers of the state and was an
“infringement of national security
and public interest.”
Officials say the court has not
properly responded to letters citing problems with implementing
the order. A Supreme Court statement Sunday said that “there are
no obstacles in implementing the
ruling.”
The court had ruled that the
politicians’ guilty verdicts were
politically influenced.
— Associated Press
DIGEST
KENYA
CONGO
U.S. conservationist
found dead in Nairobi
At least 24 dead in
fighting in northeast
Esmond Bradley Martin,
a Kenya-based American
conservationist whose dogged
investigations of the elephant
ivory and rhino horn trades over
decades were seen as critical in
efforts to protect the threatened
species, was found stabbed to
death in his Nairobi home,
Kenyan authorities said Monday.
International conservationists
were shaken by news of the
violent death of Martin, who
sometimes worked undercover,
and at considerable personal
risk. “He was an inspiration” and
a pioneer of research on the
illegal wildlife trade, said Julian
Rademeyer, author of “Killing for
Profit,” a book about rhino horn
trafficking.
A family member found
Martin’s body with a stab wound
to the neck on a bed in his house
on Sunday, said Nicolas
Kamwende, head of criminal
investigations in Nairobi.
The motive for the killing of
Martin, who was in his mid-70s,
was unclear.
Congolese authorities say at
least two dozen people are dead
in several villages after an
outbreak of intercommunal
violence in the country’s
northeast.
Lt. Jules Ngongo, the military
spokesman for Ituri province,
said Monday that the fighting
started in the territory known as
Djugu over the weekend.
The exact reason for the latest
violence involving the Lendu and
Hema communities was not
immediately known. Some local
officials said tensions were
renewed in December.
Local authorities say teams
are searching a nearby forest and
fear the toll might rise.
— Associated Press
Alvarez of the opposition
National Liberation Party, who
was in third with 18.6 percent,
conceded defeat. President Luis
Guillermo Solís of the Citizens’
Action Party is not in the race.
Costa Rican election rules say
that if no one in the 13-candidate
field finishes above 40 percent,
the top two advance to a runoff
that would take place April 1.
A recent poll found about twothirds of Costa Ricans oppose
same-sex marriage. The nation is
majority Roman Catholic with a
growing evangelical population.
— Associated Press
Israeli stabbed in West Bank:
PAVEL GOLOVKIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Snow covered Moscow’s Red Square after a weekend storm that
dropped more than a month’s worth of snow in 36 hours. Measured at
22 inches, it was the biggest snowfall in the city since meteorological
records began. One person died when a tree downed power lines.
— Associated Press
COSTA RICA
Alvarado and Alvarado
lead presidential race
Two candidates with the same
last name and opposing stances
on same-sex marriage, an issue
that dominated Costa Rica’s
presidential campaign,
led election returns and appear
headed to a runoff to decide who
will be the Central American
nation’s next leader.
With 94 percent of the ballots
counted Monday, Fabricio
Alvarado, an evangelical whose
political stock soared after he
came out strongly against samesex marriage, had 24.9 percent of
the vote. Carlos Alvarado, the
only major candidate to support
same-sex marriage, had
21.7 percent. They are not
related, and neither is from one
of the two main parties.
Agri-businessman Antonio
A Palestinian stabbed an Israeli
man to death at a bus stop near
a West Bank settlement, Israeli
officials said. The military said
an army officer chased the
assailant after the stabbing near
the entrance to Ariel, hitting him
with his vehicle, but the attacker
fled. Israeli media identified the
victim as Itamar Ben Gal, 29, a
father of four. Channel 2 News
aired footage showing the
attacker crossing a busy road
and then lunging at the man.
Azerbaijan leader calls snap
presidential vote: Azerbaijan’s
president has called a snap
presidential election. Ilham
Aliyev, 56, who has ruled the
oil-rich Caspian Sea nation since
2003, was to seek reelection
in October, but his office said he
had ordered the election to be
held April 11. Azerbaijan’s
constitution was amended in
2016 to extend the presidential
term from five to seven years;
Aliyev’s critics saw the move as
effectively cementing a dynastic
rule. An Aliyev adviser said the
vote was moved up because the
country would be busy with
high-profile events in the fall.
2 priests found shot to death in
Mexico: Mexican authorities say
two priests were shot dead and
four people were wounded when
their vehicle was attacked in the
night in the southern state of
Guerrero. Security spokesman
Roberto Alvarez said in a
statement that authorities
received a report early Monday
of a white pickup with bullet
holes on a highway. He said the
truck was traveling from the
town of Juliantla when it was
suddenly blocked by another
vehicle and unknown attackers
opened fire before fleeing.
— From news services
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
RE
Pence leaves for Asia, focused on countering N. Korea
Vice president aims to
increase pressure on
nation amid Olympics
BY
A SHLEY P ARKER
Vice President Pence departed
Monday for a five-day trip to Japan and South Korea, a visit to
Asia intended to focus almost entirely on rallying allies to ratchet
up their pressure on North Korea,
as well as directly pressing Kim
Jong Un’s repressive regime to
stop its nuclear ambitions.
Even his final stop — leading
the U.S. delegation at the 2018
Winter Olympics Opening Ceremonies in PyeongChang, South
Korea, on Friday night, and attending an Olympic event Saturday morning — has a clear geopolitical undertone: to combat
North Korean propaganda amid
the Olympic festivities, White
House officials said.
Fred Warmbier — the father of
Otto Warmbier, an American student who was jailed and sentenced to hard labor in North
Korea and died upon returning to
the United States — will attend the
opening ceremony with Pence.
The trip, White House officials
said, has two main goals.
“The first one is that we are
seeing unprecedented cooperation from the international community from the maximum pressure strategy targeting North Ko-
rea,” said Jarrod Agen, Pence’s
communications director. “The
vice president will deliver a message that the maximum pressure
strategy is only going to intensify.”
The second goal is to ensure
that the Olympics don’t turn into
an opportunity for North Korea to
burnish its image on the world
stage. In January, North and
South Korea agreed to try to resolve their tensions through dialogue, marking the first negotiations between the two countries
since 2015 and frustrating some in
the Trump administration as it
attempts to take an even more
hard-line stance against the regime.
“We’re not going to let the
North Korea propaganda machine hijack the messaging of the
Olympics,” Agen said. “The vice
president will remind the world
that anything the North Koreans
do during the Olympics is a charade to disguise the reality of the
oppression inside North Korea.”
On Monday, when he stops to
refuel at Joint Base ElmendorfRichardson in Alaska, Pence will
receive a briefing on the nation’s
missile defense system, setting
the tone for the trip. Once in
Japan, Pence plans to meet with
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo
Abe, including attending a banquet dinner with him Wednesday
night, as well as speak to troops at
Yokota Air Base on Thursday.
He will depart for Seoul on
Thursday, where he will meet and
dine with South Korean President
Moon Jae-in. Before the Olympics
Opening Ceremonies on Friday,
Pence will visit the Cheonan Memorial, which honors the 46 seamen who died when a North Korean torpedo sank a South Korean
naval vessel in 2010.
Pence’s trip, which White
House officials said is expected to
echo and amplify President
Trump’s message during his visit
to the region last year, comes as
the administration is taking an
especially hawkish stance against
Pyongyang.
Last week, the nomination of
Victor D. Cha, the White House’s
original choice for U.S. ambassador to South Korea, was derailed
after disagreements arose over
how aggressive to be in targeting
North Korea if it does not cease its
nuclear program. Cha, who served
in President George W. Bush’s administration, expressed concern
to National Security Council officials about the idea of a limited
strike on North Korea — a controversial
option
known
as
the “bloody nose” strategy — as
well as about the administration’s
threats to exit a bilateral trade
deal with South Korea.
And in his State of the Union
address last week, Trump rejected the “complacency and concessions” of past administrations against Pyongyang’s “cruel
dictatorship.”
“We’re not going to let the North Korea
propaganda machine hijack the
messaging of the Olympics.”
Jarrod Agen, Vice President Pence’s communications director
“North Korea’s reckless pursuit of nuclear missiles could
very soon threaten our homeland,” Trump said. “We are waging a campaign of maximum
pressure to prevent that from
happening.”
At his address before Congress,
Trump also singled out Ji Seong-
Ire in U.K. over Trump’s
tweet about health care
Swift rebukes after he
wrongly says Britons are
marching against system
BY
K ARLA A DAM
london — President Trump
took a swing at Britain’s beloved
National Health Service on Monday, tweeting that Britons were
marching in the streets because
their universal health-care system is financially strapped and
dysfunctional, and got a swift
rebuke from the British prime
minister.
“The Democrats are pushing
for Universal HealthCare while
thousands of people are marching in the UK because their U
system is going broke and not
working. Dems want to greatly
raise taxes for really bad and
non-personal medical care. No
thanks!” he wrote.
But the thousands of Britons
who took to the streets over the
weekend were marching in support of the NHS and calling for
greater government funding.
Trump’s tweet about Britain’s
universal health-care system —
once said to be the closest thing
that the British have to a national
religion — provoked ire from
across the political spectrum, including from British Prime Minister Theresa May.
A spokesman for May said that
“the prime minister is proud of
our NHS, that is free at the point
of delivery.” The spokesman said
that funding “is at a record high
and was prioritized in the budget
with an extra 2.8 billion pounds
[about $3.9 billion]. In the recent
Commonwealth Fund international survey, the NHS was rated
the best in the world for a second
time.”
Jeremy Hunt, Britain’s health
secretary, tweeted that he is
proud to hail from a country
where people have coverage “no
matter the size of their bank balance.”
Opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn of the Labour Party said on
Twitter that Trump was “wrong,”
adding: “People were marching
because we love our NHS and
hate what the Tories are doing to
it. Healthcare is a human right.”
The march, dubbed NHS in
Crisis: Fix It Now, was organized
by the People’s Assembly and
Health Campaigns Together.
Demonstrators carried placards
that read: “NHS: More staff, more
beds, more funds” and “Saving
lives costs money, Saving money
costs lives.”
Responding to Trump’s comments, the march’s organizers
said they were campaigning
against a U.S.-style health-care
system, which they said would be
“expensive, inefficient and unjust.”
It’s hard to overstate how
proud Britons are of their “free at
the point of use” health-care system, established after World War
II. Some have pointed out that
Britain spends a lower percentage
of its gross domestic product on
health care than the United States
does and that life expectancy is
longer in the United Kingdom.
In the Opening Ceremonies for
the 2012 London Olympics, the
NHS was celebrated with a dance
sequence with nurses and patients. In the lead-up to the Brexit
vote in June 2016, the pro-Brexit
side said that leaving the bloc
could mean that an extra 350 million pounds ($490 million) a
week could be spent on health
care.
“We send the EU £350m a week
— let’s fund our NHS instead,”
was the slogan plastered on the
side of a red campaign bus.
Few things unite the British
like an outsider complaining
about their universal health care.
But within the United Kingdom,
there is widespread concern
about the NHS’s financial health.
Britain’s aging population, the
rising cost of new technology and
years of austerity have contributed to notable pressures on the
system.
Britain has also had, once
again, a terrible flu season, and
hospitals nationwide are struggling to cope with the spike in
demand.
“There is widespread concern
that austerity we’ve seen in the
last seven years has basically put
the NHS on its knees. In an attempt to drive efficiency in the
system, to deliver the same for
less money, we are now seeing
poorer quality of care,” said Harry
Quilter-Pinner, a research fellow
at the Institute for Public Policy
Research, a London-based think
tank.
“Waiting times for elective
treatments, for cancer, for example, have gone up. Waiting times
for GPs [general practitioners]
have gone up. Hospitals are missing targets for how long you wait
at A&E [accident and emergency],” he said.
Still, there is no public appetite
for privatized health care. “The
[British] system is still one of
most efficient ways of funding
and running a health service; it
just needs more money,” QuilterPinner said.
The NHS contretemps are just
the latest between May and
Trump. In November, the British
leader said that Trump was
“wrong” to retweet anti-Muslim
videos from a far-right British
group. He shot back saying that
she should focus on “destructive
radical Islamic terrorism” in Britain.
There is speculation that
Trump’s tweet might have been
inspired by a segment on the NHS
by Fox News Channel, which the
president frequently watches. In
fact, he followed up his tweet on
the NHS by thanking Fox News
for “exposing the truth.”
Nigel Farage, a former leader of
the UK Independence Party, was
on the Fox News segment, saying
that Britain’s health service is
“pretty much at a breaking point”
because of a “population crisis.”
“We just haven’t got enough
hospitals, we haven’t got enough
doctors, we haven’t got enough
facilities,” he said.
karla.adam@washpost.com
ho, a North Korean defector who
still keeps the crutches he used
after a train ran over his legs
when, as a starving boy, he passed
out trying to steal coal from a rail
car to trade for food. Ji pumped
his crutches in the air in one of the
most moving moments of the
night.
.
CaseDesign.com | 844.831.5966
On Friday, Trump met with a
group of North Korean dissidents
and defectors in the Oval Office,
including Ji.
Asked on a conference call with
reporters Monday, in advance of
Pence’s trip, whether Trump’s recent meetings and highlighting of
North Korean atrocities could be
considered its own form of preemptive propaganda, a White
House official dismissed the suggestion.
“I don’t know how you could
call it propaganda for the president of the United States to allow
North Korean defectors in their
own voice to tell stories about
what life was like in North Korea,”
the official said, speaking on background based on the White
House’s ground rules for joining
the conference call.
Pence, a former governor of Indiana, traveled abroad five times
in 2017, including a 10-day trip to
Asia and a surprise trip to Kabul,
in December. When he was en
route to Asia, North Korea attempted a missile launch, an effort
Pence derided upon landing as
a “provocation.” He also visited the
demilitarized zone between North
and South Korea on that trip.
This year, Pence made a fourday trip to the Middle East, with
stops in Egypt, Israel and Jordan.
ashley.parker@washpost.com
A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
How 7 years of war ended for 15 Syrian refugees
REFUGEES FROM A1
The United States and Europe
are not alone in restricting the
entry of Syrians — Syria’s neighbors also long ago shut their
borders to refugees. For those
still fleeing to Lebanon, which is
hosting about a million Syrian
refugees, the only way in is
across one of the mountain
smuggling routes.
The fate of these recent refugees first came to light after
rescue workers posted photographs on Facebook, offering
clues to the horrors of the night.
Three adults and a child lay
rigidly alongside one another. A
boy was crouched beside a wall.
A woman had huddled in a
thorn bush, the child she was
carrying tipped upside down
from her arms, feet clad in pink
sneakers pointing skyward.
And one little girl was found
alive, lying in the snow. Someone
picked her up and took her to the
hospital in the nearby town of
Chtaura. Half of her face was
burned away from frostbite, and
she was comatose from the cold.
In the intensive care unit, she
became another small question
mark in the tragedy of a larger
war. The doctors wondered:
Who was she? Why didn’t any
relatives come to claim her? And
would she survive?
Among those on the mountain that night were Shihab alAbed, 43, and more than a dozen
other members of his extended
family, who had come from the
small village of Barghouz in Deir
al-Zour province. The village
had been under Islamic State
control for years but was too
small and unimportant to be
caught up in the battles that
have killed more than 300,000
people elsewhere, and their lives
had remained mostly peaceful,
Shihab said, recounting the tale
from his brother’s home in the
northern Lebanese city of Tripoli.
Late last year, everything
changed.
The Islamic State was rapidly
being driven out of all of its
major strongholds. More and
more of its fighters began showing up in the village as they fled
from other areas.
In November, the Syrian army
overran the nearby town of Bukamal, and Barghouz suddenly
found itself on the last front line
of the Islamic State’s dwindling
defenses.
After a night of intense fighting in late December, during
which their house was hit by a
shell, the family decided they
would have to flee to survive,
Shihab said. They piled into
vehicles and made their way to
Damascus, the Syrian capital —
Shihab and his mother, wife,
sister, three daughters and a son,
three grandchildren, a sister-inlaw, and two nieces.
Once in Damascus, they made
contact with a smuggler who
said he could take them to safety
in Lebanon. The journey would
cost $140 per person, and the
route would be easy and short,
the smuggler promised — just a
half-hour walk, alongside the
main road, and they would be in
Lebanon.
“But he was lying,” Shihab
said.
When they arrived at the border on the evening of Jan. 18,
instead of remaining alongside
the road, the smuggler pointed
the family up the nearby moun-
PHOTOS BY DIEGO IBARRA SÁNCHEZ/MEMO/FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Mishan al-Abed, above, lived in Lebanon while his family stayed in Syria. He discovered the fate
of his wife and daughter, who froze to death while trying to cross into Lebanon, only when he saw
the photos on Facebook. His daughter Sarah, top, lay comatose in intensive care for two days.
tain, indicating a series of blinking lights high in the darkness
that he said they were to follow.
There they were met by another
smuggler, who gave his name as
Abu Hashish, their guide for the
rest of the journey.
It is a common ploy of smugglers to deceive their customers
into believing they will take an
easy route, according to Lebanese security officials and local
civil defense workers who have
rescued people from the mountain before. Many people might
refuse to make the trek at all if
they knew in advance how challenging it would be.
The Abed family still had no
idea what lay ahead. They struck
out into the darkness and driving rain, following Abu Hashish
and the big, white lettering emblazoned on the back of his
jacket: “Police.”
The path grew steeper, the
weather worsened. The wind became a howling gale. The rain
turned to snow. Like most of the
refugees in the group, they were
lightly dressed. Hanan, Shihab’s
13-year-old daughter, was wear-
Med.
Sea
North
L E B A N O N
LEBANON
Beirut
Detail
SYRIA
Souairi
Damascus
50 MILES
S Y R I A
Jdaidit Yabws
Yanta
Refugees begin their journey
near Jdaidit Yabws, taking
about 7 hours to cross over 4
miles of mountainous terrain.
Note: Scale varies in this perspective
Sources: Landsat 8, Google Earth
LAUREN TIERNEY/THE WASHINGTON POST
ing plastic sandals and kicked
them off so that she could walk
faster.
It quickly became clear that
not all of them were able to keep
up.
Shihab’s 70-year-old mother,
Hasba, was the first to fall back.
Shihab’s wife, Anout, sister Dalal
and daughters Amal and Abir
stayed with her to try to help her
along. Soon they had lost sight of
Abu Hashish and the rest of the
party. Then, in the buffeting
winds, they lost Hasba. Amal
was carrying her 1-year-old son,
Yasser. Abir, seven months pregnant, was struggling, too. She
handed her year-old daughter,
Beshayer, to another refugee.
The women grew colder and
colder and sleepier and sleepier.
“So we decided just to take a
rest,” recalled Abir, who survived
that night.
“We lay down and said we
would find the way in the morning.”
Up ahead, Shihab was carrying on, his 3-year-old niece Sarah in his arms. The rest of the
night is a blur, he said. They
ascended one mountain peak,
descended, and then another lay
ahead. They passed a dead man
on the way, a teenage girl crying
over his body.
At one point, Shihab slipped
and fell and cracked his ribs. The
girl in his arms had grown lifeless and cold. He could hardly
walk. So he lay his niece down in
the snow and continued on his
way. “She was cold and motionless,” he said. “I thought she had
died.”
When dawn broke, Abir
awoke. Her grandmother, mother, sister and nephew lay immobile beside her. “They were stiff
and frozen. I hoped they were
just asleep,” she said. “I could see
a house, so I went to get help. It
turned out to be an army post.
They went to fetch them.”
Seven hours after they had set
off, Shihab and the other survivors reached the bottom of the
mountain. He learned that his
wife, mother, sister and grandson Yasser were dead. His niece
Sarah, her sister and her mother
were unaccounted for.
At the hospital in the nearby
town of Chtaura, civil defense
rescuers were ferrying in others
they had found on the mountain,
some dead, some alive. Over the
next two days they would find a
total of 15 bodies, all but three of
them fleeing battles in Deir alZour, and six of them from the
Abed family, according to police.
Most of the survivors were in
good shape and were treated and
released the same day, said
George Kortas, a doctor and the
head of the hospital. But one
small girl, estimated to be about
3 years old, was in critical condition, barely responsive and with
third-degree ice burns to her
face.
For two days she lay comatose
in the ICU. Half of her face was a
mass of blackened scars from
where her cheek had lain in the
snow. The doctors fretted that
she would die.
On the third day, she began to
show signs of life. And on the
fourth day, she spoke for the first
time. “I want to go to Mama,” she
said in a weak little voice.
“It’s a miracle she is still alive.
She is a strong little girl, and her
organs have recovered well,” Kortas said. “But she is going to
need many, many plastic surgeries to lead a normal life.”
He and the other doctors puzzled over who she was. All of the
refugees who had perished had
relatives in Lebanon who slowly
trickled into the morgues of the
Bekaa Valley to claim the bodies.
But no one came to claim the
girl — until the fifth day, when
her father showed up. Living in
Tripoli, he had discovered the
fate of his missing family members only when he saw the photos on Facebook.
The woman found huddled in
the thorn bush was his wife. The
girl in her arms was his 4-yearold daughter, Heba. He scoured
the morgues until he found them
and took them for burial in
Tripoli. Only later did he learn
there was an unclaimed girl in
the hospital, his other child.
It was an awkward reunion.
He had seen Sarah only once,
when she was an infant, because
he was living in Lebanon while
his family remained in Syria.
“She doesn’t know me, and I
don’t know her,” he said, cradling her inexpertly as he fed her
spoonfuls of egg, soup and salad
from a hospital tray.
She ate weakly but hungrily,
pointing to the dishes she wanted to taste. Then she repeated
the only words she had spoken
so far. “I want to go to Mama.”
liz.sly@washpost.com
suzy.haidamous@washpost.com
Ecuador vote is a setback for South America’s left-wing populists
lima, peru —
WorldViews When Rafael
Correa, Ecuador’s
combative
socialist
president,
decided not to run in his
country's 2017 presidential
election, the move was widely
interpreted as a tactical retreat.
The strategy, commentators
agreed, was to let his protege,
Lenín Moreno, keep his seat
warm for a single term — and
take the blame for the country’s
stalling economy — while
Correa’s approval ratings
recovered ahead of a
triumphant return in the 2021
election.
But if that was the plan, it
has backfired spectacularly.
Ecuadorans voted
overwhelmingly on Sunday to
approve constitutional changes
that bar Correa from ever
becoming president again —
and bury significant chunks of
his legacy.
According to preliminary
results, with 89 percent of
ballots counted, 64.8 percent of
voters backed a proposal to
limit public officials to a single
reelection, leaving Correa
unable to run again.
SIMEON
TEGEL
The result marks the end of
an era in Ecuador, where the
54-year-old Correa has been a
towering — and polarizing —
figure. It is also the latest in a
wave of electoral setbacks for
South America’s left-wing
populist leaders, including
reverses over the past three
years in Argentina, Bolivia and
Venezuela.
Correa held power from 2007
to 2017, bringing a dose of
much-needed political stability
to the small Andean nation and
ushering in momentous
revisions to public education
and the police service. He also
memorably survived an
apparent coup attempt during
which he ripped open his shirt
on live TV and invited
mutinying police officers to
shoot him.
But critics accuse Correa of
authoritarianism, including
repressive policies toward the
news media that Human Rights
Watch once described as
“Orwellian.” Correa also allowed
WikiLeaks founder Julian
Assange to take refuge in the
Ecuadoran Embassy in London.
Despite serving as Correa’s
vice president for six years,
Moreno could hardly be more
different. He is the author of
nearly a dozen books
advocating humor to promote
well-being, and is known for his
listening skills. He has a
reputation as a conciliator who
praises the role of a free press,
in particular to root out corrupt
bureaucrats.
The referendum also
included proposals to reverse
two flagship Correa policies that
had long infuriated Ecuador’s
powerful indigenous movement.
One proposal, to roll back
mining in urban and protected
areas, was approved with
69 percent of the vote. Another,
“This kind of messianic politician has stopped
succeeding in the region. Voters want more
responsive public servants.”
Dawisson Belém Lopes, professor at Brazil’s Federal University of Minas Gerais
Moreno also launched
Sunday’s referendum. Correa,
who has labeled Moreno a
“traitor” and “impostor,”
campaigned hard against the
measure on reelection but
appeared to have lost his magic
touch. His once sky-high
approval rating now hovers
around 30 percent, and
protesters pelted his car with
trash last week.
In a televised speech as the
referendum result became clear,
Moreno talked up the need for
national unity, noting: “The
confrontation is behind us.”
to curb oil drilling in the
stunningly biodiverse Yasuni
National Park, home to some of
the last indigenous people
living in isolation anywhere in
the Amazon, received
67.8 percent.
Paulina Recalde, the head of
Quito-based polling firm
Perfiles de Opinion, says
Correa’s fiery brand of
populism, rooted in class
confrontation, grew obsolete.
“It is not just Correa’s tone. It
is also the substance,” Recalde
said. “You can rail against the
traditional political class to get
elected or when you have just
arrived in power. But when you
have been governing for a
decade, that rhetoric stops
ringing true.”
While Correa is just the latest
left-wing populist on the
continent to lose at the polls,
Dawisson Belém Lopes, a
professor of international
politics at Brazil’s Federal
University of Minas Gerais, said
South Americans are not
turning rightward. Instead, he
argued, they are rebelling
against leaders perceived to be
autocratic, venal and
incompetent.
“This kind of messianic
politician has stopped
succeeding in the region,” he
added. “Voters want more
responsive public servants and
better management.”
Nevertheless, Belém Lopes
warned, there remains the
lurking danger of “contagion”
from the United States. “It is
not just historic Latin American
strongmen or [Philippine
President Rodrigo] Duterte
now,” he said. “Trump is also a
role model.”
More at washingtonpost.com/
blogs/worldviews
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
Warplanes
bombard
rebel areas
in Syria
Attacks appear to be in
retaliation for downed
Russian fighter jet
BY E RIN C UNNINGHAM
AND L OUISA L OVELUCK
istanbul — Russian and Syrian warplanes pounded rebelheld areas of Syria’s Idlib province Monday in raids that
struck hospitals, collapsed an
apartment building and included a possible chlorine gas attack, residents and activists
said.
The onslaught — which began late Sunday and targeted
multiple towns and cities —
appeared to be in retaliation for
the rebel downing of a Russian
Sukhoi Su-25 fighter jet on
Saturday.
The
stepped-up
attacks
against rebels were part of an
increasingly complex web of military action and politics in northern Syria.
Rebel factions are seeking to
hold on to some of their last
strongholds in Syria. Meanwhile,
neighboring Turkey has opened
an offensive against Syrian Kurdish militias that are backed by
the United States as a proxy force
against the Islamic State.
On
Saturday,
militants
downed the Russian plane using
a man-portable air-defense system, according to Russia’s Defense Ministry. It was a rare
instance of rebel fighters bringing down either Russian or Syrian aircraft.
“We are extremely worried
that terrorists have manportable antiaircraft missile systems in their possession,” Dmitry
Peskov, a Kremlin spokesman,
said in a briefing Monday with
journalists in Moscow. Russia
often refers to groups opposing
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad
as terrorists.
“This is a huge danger to all
states,” Peskov added.
The latest bombardment by
Russian and Syrian forces was
one of the worst suffered by the
opposition stronghold in weeks.
Rescue workers said they were
still digging through the rubble
of destroyed buildings by nightfall Monday.
At least 33 people have been
killed by airstrikes in and around
Idlib province since Saturday,
reported the civil defense forces,
also known as the White Helmets. At least one hospital, in
Maaret al-Numan, was forced to
close following multiple strikes,
the Syrian American Medical
Society said. A five-story building in Idilb city also collapsed,
activists said.
In the city of Saraqeb, near the
location where the fighter jet was
downed, doctors and local residents said 11 patients were hospitalized late Sunday with symptoms that indicated exposure to
chlorine. The reports could not
be independently verified.
U.S. officials expressed alarm
last week at a rise in reports that
the Syrian military is using chlorine as a chemical weapon
against opposition-held areas.
Medical groups have recorded
six alleged chlorine attacks since
the start of the year.
“The bombs were falling on
our residential areas, which were
packed because it was the evening,” said Maysara al-Askar, an
activist in the town of Kafr Nabl
in Idlib province. “I was in the
marketplace last night just before they bombed it. I heard the
explosions as I was walking out
my front door.”
Another strike, however, on
Kafr Nabl’s surgical hospital, was
reported by doctors and activists
Monday morning.
Fighters loyal to Hayat Tahrir
al-Sham, a former al-Qaeda affiliate, control much of Idlib province, but many of Kafr Nabl’s
residents have resisted their rule.
The group claimed responsibility
for the downing of the Russian
jet Saturday.
Russia’s Defense Ministry on
Monday said that the pilot, Maj.
Roman Filipov, “ejected and
landed near Tell Debes held by
the terrorists.”
“He kept firing his serviceissue weapon at militants until
he died,” the statement said,
adding that when the militants
continued to advance, he “blew
himself up with a grenade.”
erin.cunningham@washpost.com
louisa.loveluck@washpost.com
Loveluck reported from Sanliurfa,
Turkey. Zakaria Zakaria in Sanliurfa
and Anton Troianovski in Moscow
contributed to this report.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
SU
After a spy’s deadly mission, ‘Can my sins be pardoned?’
BOMBER FROM A1
Games. Then, Kim was an elite
North Korean agent. She was
acting on national orders. She
boarded a South Korean passenger plane, carrying a time bomb.
She left the bomb in an overhead
bin. She exited the plane during
a layover. The plane blew up.
There was a manhunt for the
perpetrators. Kim was captured.
And then, Kim was taken for the
first time to South Korea, arrested for an act of terrorism that
killed 115 people and was designed to derail the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul.
Thirty years later, Kim’s life
speaks to the disorienting contrasts on the Korean Peninsula,
where the Olympics can be peaceful or deadly, unifying or dividing,
and where a terrorist can become
a housewife who says she’s excited to watch the 2018 Games on
TV. “In North Korea, I lived as
Kim Il Sung’s robot,” Kim said in
an interview. “In South Korea, I
got to live a new life.”
Though Kim has tried to establish a mostly quiet existence, the
issues that prompted her initial
mission still resonate, with the
Olympics, which begin Friday,
again testing how the North will
respond to a global celebration on
the soil of its rival. In 1988, North
Korea pushed to co-host the Summer Games, failed to strike a deal
and instead launched a campaign
of violence aimed at making the
event untenable. This time, the
North and South agreed to march
together in the Opening Ceremonies, sharing a flag and fielding a
joint women’s hockey team, a
show of unity that belies years of
tensions.
Kim says that her deadly role in
the bombing of Korean Air Lines
Flight 858 is something that
leaves her sorry and ashamed.
“Can my sins be pardoned?” she
said. “They probably won’t be.”
Kim, who has given a handful
of interviews about the bombing
in recent months as the Winter
Olympics approached, spoke expansively about her new life in
South Korea. She no longer resembles the spy who was given
eight years of physical and ideological training. She is 56 years
old. She lives on the outskirts of
South Korea’s third-largest city.
She wears glasses and keeps her
hair short. She no longer practices taekwondo. She no longer has
an interest in knife combat or
code-cracking.
But recently, she was watching
television and saw another reminder of her past: footage of her
arrival in South Korea, in December 1987, when she descended the
steps of a plane, under arrest,
surrounded by men in suits. At
that moment, she wasn’t yet cooperating with investigators. At
that moment, she hadn’t yet admitted she was a North Korean.
At that moment, she had already
once tried to kill herself rather
than talk, and she was wearing a
device on her mouth to prevent
her from biting off her tongue.
The first part of her life was
ending, and Kim remembers never considering there would be a
second part.
“I feared interrogation,” she
said. “I thought it was the end. I
thought I was in the last months
of my life. In my head, I was
singing a North Korean revolutionary song.”
KIM CHON-KIL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Groomed to be a warrior
Kim’s life as a spy — and what
ultimately became her mission to
disrupt the Olympics — began
during her second year of studying at the Pyongyang Foreign
Language College, when she was
called to the dean’s office, and met
there by a man from the Central
Party. What followed was several
rounds of interviews, and finally,
a handshake from a special agent.
“You have been chosen by the
Party,” he said, according to an
account from a book Kim wrote,
published in 1991. The agent told
Kim to pack her belongings, say
goodbye to her family, and be
ready to leave the next day.
She was, from that point on,
groomed to be a warrior in North
Korea’s army of international
spies. She studied Japanese. She
was given a false passport and a
fake name — Mayumi Hachiya.
She was introduced to an older
male spy who’d pose as her Japanese father. And then, one day,
she was chauffeured to a foreign
intelligence building and told
about her mission — to destroy a
South Korean airliner. “By destroying this plane,” Kim in her
book quoted an intelligence director saying, “we intend to increase this sense of chaos and
ultimately prevent the Olympic
Games from taking place in
Seoul.” The orders for her mission, she said, were handwritten
by Kim Jong Il, Kim Il Sung’s son
and heir apparent.
When Kim heard of the plan,
she did not think of the lives
involved. The plot, she said, was a
“technical operation.” Kim and
the older agent were given cyanide-tipped cigarettes, to be used
in the event they were captured.
They were told to kill themselves
rather than reveal information.
In the weeks leading up to the
bombing, according to Kim’s account and South Korea’s investigation, Kim and the other agent
traveled across Europe, posing as
Japanese tourists. Then, in Belgrade, they connected with two
other agents, who handed off the
weapon of choice: a time bomb
disguised as a portable Panasonic
radio, amplified by liquid explosives in a liquor bottle. Kim and
her fellow agent flew to Baghdad
with the weapon. In Baghdad, Kim
activated the timer and boarded a
Korean Air flight to Abu Dhabi.
She placed the bomb in a shopping
bag and stowed it above her seat.
She and the other agent exited the
plane in Abu Dhabi. Several hours
later, the plane blew up over the
Andaman Sea. Many of the passengers were South Koreans with energy jobs in the Middle East, going
home to see their families.
Kim, initially, didn’t know if
the plot had worked. She didn’t
know about the news alert that
went off in South Korea, or about
the 300 people who rushed to the
airport in Seoul, weeping and
frantic. But what Kim did know is
that she had to quickly return to
Pyongyang, taking a convoluted
series of flights, and it was in
Bahrain
where
authorities
stopped them, having noticed
their suspicious travel patterns.
“Can I see your passports?” one of
the authorities said, and soon
Kim and the other agent realized
they’d been cornered. The two
spies bit down on their cigarettes.
The older agent died. But Kim did
not. When she awoke, her left
hand was cuffed to a hospital bed,
an oxygen tube in her nose. Men
Terrorism suspect on trial in Brussels
French national linked
to 2015 attacks in Paris
that left 130 people dead
BY
AND
Q UENTIN A RIÈS
J AMES M C A ULEY
brussels — Salah Abdeslam,
believed to be the last surviving
member of the terrorist cell that
mounted the deadly Paris attacks
of November 2015, went on trial
Monday, lashing out at prosecutors but ultimately refusing to
answer questions.
“My silence does not make me a
criminal; it’s my defense,” he said.
Authorities are hoping the case
will clarify unanswered questions
about the wave of recent violence
that has rocked Europe. Technically, Abdeslam, 28, is standing
trial in Brussels for an incident
that happened four months after
a coordinated series of Islamic
State-orchestrated
assaults
across Paris killed 130 people.
Belgian prosecutors are trying
him for his alleged role in a
Brussels shooting in March 2016,
when Abdeslam was still a fugitive from the Paris attacks, Europe’s most wanted man.
Four police officers were injured in the Brussels shooting,
which occurred during a joint
JUN MICHAEL PARK FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Kim Hyon-hui, shown at right, is a former North Korean agent responsible for the 1987 bombing of Korean Air Flight 858, which killed
115 people. It is believed that the bombing was North Korea’s attempt to derail the 1988 Summer Games in Seoul. At left, with a device on
her mouth to prevent her from biting off her tongue, Kim is escorted from a plane after arriving in Seoul following her arrest.
Franco-Belgian investigation into
the Paris attacks. Abdeslam’s codefendant in the trial is Sofien
Ayari, 24, a Tunisian national who
authorities say was with Abdeslam during the Brussels shooting. Both are charged with attempted murders against several
police officers in a terrorist context.
Abdeslam was arrested two
days after that shooting, in Molenbeek, a heavily immigrant district of the Belgian capital. Abdeslam, a French national who grew
up in Brussels, had eluded French
and Belgian authorities for
months. The lengthy manhunt
came under intense public scrutiny — especially after the attacks
on the Brussels metro and airport
that killed 32 people on March 22,
2016, two days after Abdeslam’s
arrest.
Questions still remain about
the extent of the relationship between the Paris and Brussels attacks and about whether Abdeslam’s arrest precipitated the assault on the Belgian capital. The
trial on Monday gave the public
the first opportunity to learn the
narrative of a complicated chain
of events that prosecutors have
been piecing together for more
than a year.
On a general level, the trial also
presents an early opportunity to
prosecute an individual suspected in a spate of attacks either
organized or inspired by the Islamic State in recent years. Nice,
Berlin and Barcelona have all
suffered similar violent incidents
in the years since, although none
as deadly as the Paris attacks.
On Monday, Ayari told the
court he had fought for the Islamic State in Syria.
Abdeslam momentarily broke
the silence he has kept since his
arrest. Although he declined to
answer any questions, he told
Judge Marie-France Keutgen that
Muslims are “treated in the worst
ways, mercilessly.” He then implored the prosecution to make a
case based on “forensic and tangible evidence” and not to “swagger
about to satisfy public opinion.”
Luc Hennart, president of the
Brussels tribunal, told reporters
Monday morning: “If [Abdeslam]
is not talking, we will continue
with his silence. If he expresses
himself, the tribunal will give him
an occasion to explain himself.”
Kathleen Grosjean, a Belgian
prosecutor, pleaded for a sentence of 20 years.
Abdeslam, who was temporarily moved from a maximum-security prison outside Paris to another prison nearer the
Belgian border, will also eventually face trial in France, although
not until 2019 at the earliest.
james.mcauley@washpost.com
McAuley reported from Paris.
in combat fatigues stood around
her, machine guns cocked.
According to accounts from
South Korean investigators, Kim
endured weeks of interrogation
before confessing. It was only
after being extradited to South
Korea that her defenses began to
weaken. The day before she
opened up about the plot, a team
of South Korean special agents
gave her a suit to wear and told
her to get into a car. What they did
was take her sightseeing around
Seoul. Kim saw a city that looked
nothing like the miserable enemy
outpost North Korea had described. She saw families smiling.
She saw cars everywhere. She saw
crowded shopping malls. She saw
street vendors selling food. She
saw the Olympic Village.
And she started to think that
her mission, her whole purpose,
had been a sham.
“Founded upon lies,” she said.
She began cooperating with
investigators, and several months
later, still in detention, Kim
watched the Opening Ceremonies on television. “I still remember the theme song they played,”
she said. “Everybody seemed joyous. I was thinking to myself,
‘Why did North Korea do this?’ ”
Raising two teenagers
It seemed, initially, that there
would be no second part of her
life. In 1989, a South Korean judge
sentenced her to death. But the
next year, South Korean President Roh Tae-woo pardoned her,
saying that she had been a mere
tool manipulated by the real perpetrators, North Korea’s ruling
Kim family. She mostly escaped
the wrath of the South Korean
public, according to news accounts from the time, helped by a
tearful news conference she gave
in apologizing for the bombing.
After the pardoning, she wrote a
book, “Tears of My Soul,” donating the proceeds to family members of KAL Flight 858 victims.
Then, Kim largely disappeared
from the public spotlight.
“It’s as if I’ve been hiding away,”
she said.
Partly, she said, she has no
choice. North Korea has a history
of targeting high-level defectors
and captured agents. Kim lives
under police protection, and she
keeps most details of her life
private. What she does say is that
she is an “ordinary citizen” raising two teenagers, ages 16 and 18.
In the mornings, she cooks for
them. In the evenings, she reads.
To relax, she heads to the mountains. Her husband, whom she
married in 1997, was one of the
first people she met in South
Korea — one of the agents handling her case.
She says she remains traumatized by her role in the bombing,
but sometimes feels obliged to
talk about it. She is a witness, she
said, to the “truth of North Korea.” That’s why Kim has mixed
feelings about how the two Koreas are cooperating ahead of this
year’s Olympics — news she has
been following closely. With its
own athletes participating, North
Korea could be less inclined to
cause chaos or violence. But Kim
also thinks the cooperation plays
into North Korea’s hands, giving
the country a celebratory spotlight despite how it treats its own
people. North and South Korea
are marching together, holding a
white and blue unity flag, but Kim
said the countries aren’t on equal
ground.
“That flag,” she said, “doesn’t
symbolize peace.”
chico.harlan@washpost.com
Dasl Yoon and Ian Shapira
contributed to this report.
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A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
Economy & Business
DOW 24,345.75
DOWN 1,175.21, 4.6%
NASDAQ 6967.53
DOWN 273.42, 3.8%
S&P 500 2648.94
DOWN 113.19, 4.1%
GOLD $1,336.50
DOWN $0.80, 0.1%
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10-YEAR TREASURY
CURRENCIES
UP $11.40 PER $1,000, 2.70% YIELD $1=109.23 YEN; EURO=$1.239
U.S. set to borrow a lot more, but there may be a limit to what the market wants
There was a lot of
news last week, so
it’s
HEATHER
understandable if
LONG
you missed a small
but important
announcement from the Treasury
Department: The federal
government is on track to borrow
nearly $1 trillion this fiscal year —
Trump’s first full year in charge of
the budget.
That’s almost double what the
government borrowed in fiscal
year 2017.
Here are the exact figures:
Treasury expects to borrow
$955 billion this fiscal year,
according to documents released
Wednesday. It’s the highest
amount of borrowing in six years,
and a big jump from the
$519 billion the federal
government borrowed last year.
Treasury mainly attributed the
increase to the “fiscal outlook.”
The Congressional Budget Office
was more blunt. In a report last
Wonkblog
week, the CBO said tax receipts
are going to be lower because of
the new tax law.
The uptick in borrowing is yet
another complication in the
heated debates in Congress over
whether to spend more money on
infrastructure, the military,
disaster relief and other domestic
programs. The deficit is up
significantly, even before
Congress allots more money to
any of these areas.
“We’re addicted to debt,” says
Marc Goldwein, senior policy
director at Committee for a
Responsible Federal Budget. He
blames both parties for the
situation.
What’s particularly jarring is
this is the first time borrowing
has jumped this much (as a share
of gross domestic product) in a
non-recession time since Ronald
Reagan was president, says Ernie
Tedeschi, a former senior adviser
to the Treasury Department who
is now head of fiscal analysis at
Evercore ISI. Under Reagan,
borrowing spiked because of a
buildup in the military,
something Trump is advocating
again.
Trump didn’t mention the debt
— or the ongoing budget deficits —
in his State of the Union address.
The absence of any mention of the
national debt was frustrating for
Goldwein and others who warn
that America has a major
economic problem looming.
“It is terrible. Those deficits
and the debt that keeps rising is a
serious problem, not only in the
long run, but right now,” Harvard
economist Martin Feldstein, a
former Reagan adviser, told
Bloomberg News.
The White House got a taste of
just how problematic this debt
situation could get in the past few
days. Investors are concerned
about all the additional
borrowing and the likelihood of
higher inflation, which is why the
interest rates on U.S. government
bonds hit the highest level since
2014 on Friday. That, in turn,
partly drove the worst weekly
sell-off in the stock market in two
years. The selling accelerated on
Monday.
The belief in Washington and on
Wall Street has long been that the
U.S. government could just keep
issuing debt because people around
the world are eager to buy up this
safe-haven asset. But there may be
a limit to how much the market
wants, especially if inflation starts
rising and investors prefer to ditch
bonds for higher-returning stocks.
“Some of my Wall Street clients
are starting to talk recession in
2019 because of these issues. Fiscal
policy is just out of control,” says
Peter Davis, a former tax economist
in Congress who now runs Davis
Capital Investment Ideas.
The Federal Reserve was also
buying a lot of U.S. Treasury debt
since the crisis, helping to beef up
demand. But the Fed recently
decided to stop doing that now
that the economy has improved.
It’s another wrinkle as Treasury
has to look for new buyers.
Tedeschi, the former Treasury
adviser to the Obama
administration, calls it
“concerning, but not a crisis.”
Still, he says it’s a “big risk” to
plan on borrowing so much in the
coming years.
Trump’s Treasury forecasts
borrowing over $1 trillion in 2019
and over $1.1 trillion in 2020.
Before taking office, Trump
described himself as the “king of
debt,” although he campaigned
on reducing the national debt.
The Committee for a
Responsible Federal Budget
predicts the U.S. deficit will hit
$1 trillion by 2019 and stay there
for a while. The latest borrowing
figure — $955 billion — released
last week was determined from a
survey of bond market participants,
who tend to be even faster to react
to the changing policy landscape
and change their forecasts.
Both parties claim they want to
be “fiscally responsible,” but
Goldwein says they both pass
legislation that adds to the debt.
Politicians argue this is the last
time they’ll pass a bill that makes
the deficit worse, but so far, they
just keep going.
The latest example of largesse
is the GOP tax bill. It’s expected to
add $1 trillion or more to the
debt, according to nonpartisan
analysis from the Joint
Committee on Taxation (and yes,
that’s after accounting for some
increased economic growth).
But even before that, Goldwein
points to the 2015 extension of
many tax cuts and the 2014 delays
in Medicare reimbursement cuts.
“Every time you feed your
addiction, you grow your
addiction,” Goldwein says.
There doesn’t seem to be any
appetite for budgetary restraint
in Washington, but the market
may force Congress’ hand.
heather.long@washpost.com
Hollywood manager closes his agency
Twelve more women accuse Vincent Cirrincione of sexual misconduct dating to 1989
BY
T RACY J AN
Vincent Cirrincione, who
helped propel Halle Berry and
Taraji P. Henson to Hollywood
stardom, shut his management
agency on Monday following allegations that he sexually harassed
aspiring black actresses over a period of two decades.
Cirrincione, 70, read a statement
to The Washington Post saying that
he made the decision to close after
40 years in business to protect the
careers of the two dozen actors and
actresses he represented.
“It is with incredibly great sadness at this time that I believe it’s in
the best interest of all my actors
and actresses that I represent to
close my management company,”
Cirrincione said. “This business is
hard enough, and I don’t want to
distract in any way from their careers or opportunities in the entertainment field. I wish all my clients
the very best in all their endeavors.”
Cirrincione’s decision to shutter Vincent Cirrincione Associates
comes amid 12 new allegations of
sexual misconduct against the
Hollywood manager.
The Post reported last week
that nine women of color accused
Cirrincione of dangling Berry’s
and Henson’s names and achievements before them as he pressed
them for sex.
The nine women said Cirrincione, who is white, used his role as
a gatekeeper for black actresses in
a fiercely competitive industry to
prey upon young women of color
seeking an entry in Hollywood.
They alleged that Cirrincione
pushed for sex as a condition for
representing them, and that he
did not take them on when they
refused. Those he did work with
say he made regular requests for
sex, at times masturbating in front
of one woman during their meetings in his office.
The Post has since heard from 12
additional women, three of whom
FREDERICK M. BROWN/GETTY IMAGES
Actress Taraji P. Henson said she was “saddened, disappointed and ashamed” to hear of the allegations against Vincent Cirrincione.
are white, who allege that Cirrincione made sexually inappropriate
advances toward them, as well. The
new accusations, dating back to
New York in 1989, come from women who auditioned for him and
those he represented, as well as
from one of his former employees.
Notified of the new allegations,
Cirrincione said, “I apologize for
my bad behavior. It was never my
intention to disrespect anyone.”
He said last week that he accepts responsibility for pursuing
sexual relationships but denies allegations that he sought sexual
favors in exchange for represent-
ing actresses. He apologized to the
women but characterized all of his
interactions with them as “consensual.”
Barbara Stark, a former agentturned-manager who said she
worked with Cirrincione for more
than three decades, called his behavior toward women “absolutely
unconscionable” and questioned
how consensual any of the interactions could be.
“It’s not a two-way street,” she
said. “When these men say it’s
consensual, it’s really not an even
road because the pseudo power
lies with the one behind the desk.”
Stark said she met Cirrincione
in New York in the 1980s when she
was an agent and worked in his
Los Angeles office as a manager
for about five years in the 1990s
representing lower-profile clients.
She said that Cirrincione always treated her professionally —
“nothing but a gentleman” — and
that she witnessed him working
hard for Berry and Henson at a
time when “it was hard to get a
black actress on anything.” But she
said she left his company because
of the “climate in that office.”
“If there’s nine, there’s 90,”
Stark said, “because it’s been go-
ing on many, many years. But it’s
the climate of Hollywood. Actresses were going in and out of his
office all day long, every hour. I
and other employees would just
get totally disgusted. We all knew
what was going on.”
Cirrincione did not dispute
Stark’s account.
Tamika Lamison, who had accused Cirrincione of kissing her
forcefully during an audition in
his hotel room in 1996 when she
was a stage actress in New York
City, said she had “mixed feelings”
about his decision to shut his management company.
“While it is true this company has
built and supported the careers of
many women of color, it hasn’t been
without collateral damage,” Lamison said in a statement.
She said it pains her that her
friends who were his clients may
be affected negatively by his decision to close. But “it also pains me
to think of the unknown number
of women who may have suffered
in the future had this story not
come to light.”
She said she hopes the closing
will bring “some solace to the
women” who were harassed.
Cirrincione’s decision to close
comes one day after Henson, his
most high-profile client, delivered
her first public response to news
that Cirrincione had used her celebrity to bait actresses of color
seeking to break into Hollywood.
“I feel saddened, disappointed
and ashamed. We deserve better,”
she wrote in an Instagram post.
“THIS HAS TO STOP!!!”
Actor Jussie Smollett, Henson’s
“Empire” co-star, was the first of
Cirrincione’s clients to announce
that he has left the management
company after learning of the allegations.
Cirrincione was also Berry’s
manager for more than 25 years.
Berry, too, said that Cirrincione
had never made any inappropriate gestures toward her.
Hours after the story was published Friday, Berry posted a public note on Twitter and Instagram
saying that she was “sick after
reading the horrifying detailed accounts of [Cirrincione’s] abuse
toward 9 women.”
“I’m livid that he used me, and
the role model he helped me become, to lure and manipulate innocent, vulnerable women of color for
his predatory actions,” Berry wrote
in her post. “I’m deeply hurt and I
want these women and countless
others to know I see you. I hear you.
You matter. I will fight for you.”
tracy.jan@washpost.com
DIGEST
TECHNOLOGY
Broadcom increases
offer for Qualcomm
Broadcom made a $121 billion
“best and final offer” Monday to
acquire Qualcomm, ratcheting up
pressure on its U.S.
semiconductor peer to engage in
talks on what would be the
biggest-ever technology
acquisition.
The takeover battle is at the
heart of a race to consolidate the
wireless-technology equipment
sector, as smartphone-makers
such as Apple and Samsung use
their market dominance to
negotiate down chip prices.
Qualcomm responded that its
board of directors would review
the latest offer and declined to
comment further until then.
Broadcom’s new $82-per-share
offer included $60 in cash and
$22 in Broadcom stock. Its first
offer, of $70 per share, in
November comprised $60 in cash
and $10 in stock. The increased
stock component would subject
the deal to a Broadcom
shareholder vote.
Reuters first reported on
Broadcom’s new offer Sunday.
Singapore-based Broadcom is
mainly a manufacturer whose
connectivity chips are used in
products from mobile phones to
servers. Qualcomm primarily
licenses its technology for the
delivery of broadband and data, a
business that would significantly
benefit from the rollout of 5G
wireless technology.
Qualcomm is locked in a patent
dispute with Apple over its
licensing agreements.
In a presentation on its
website, Broadcom criticized
Qualcomm’s management team,
led by chief executive Steve
Mollenkopf, for its total
shareholder returns of negative
7 percent since 2005, while the
wider semiconductor index has
returned 106 percent.
— Reuters
RETAIL
Bon-Ton Stores files
for bankruptcy
The future of Bon-Ton Stores
looks tenuous after the department
store chain, saddled with debt and
faltering sales, filed for bankruptcy
protection Sunday.
Even as it plans to reduce its
sales had tumbled 6.6 percent in
the prior quarter.
Bon-Ton runs 260 stores in 24
states, largely in the Northeast
and the Midwest.
Bon-Ton, which has dual
headquarters in York, Pa., and in
Milwaukee, is now in talks with
debt holders about restructuring
$1 billion in debt. It’s closing
about 47 stores early this year in
Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Illinois,
Indiana and elsewhere.
— Associated Press
JASON REDMOND/REUTERS
Boeing’s first 737 MAX 7 makes its debut at the company’s factory
in Renton, Wash. The aircraft is designed to fly farther, with more
passengers and lower fuel costs per seat, than the first two planes in
Boeing’s MAX family. After testing, the new MAX 7 is slated to take to
the skies in 2019; Southwest Airlines is the first customer.
store footprint, jazz up its label
assortments and reduce its debt
load, it still struggles with
standing out in a fiercely
competitive marketplace.
The filing makes Bon-Ton the
largest retailer to file for
bankruptcy so far this year.
There have been signs for some
time that Bon-Ton was in trouble,
and those did not ease heading into
the recent holiday season. Sales at
established Bon-Ton stores, a
critical gauge of a retailer’s health,
slid 2.9 percent in the nine-week
period before the new year. Those
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Arby’s completed its deal to buy
Buffalo Wild Wings on Monday
and created a new company,
Inspire Brands, that will run the
chains. It will oversee Arby’s,
Buffalo Wild Wings and a small
chain with about 30 locations
called R Taco. Arby’s had
announced in November that it
would pay $2.4 billion for Buffalo
Wild Wings. When debt is
included, the companies value the
deal at $2.9 billion.
Nissan Motor Co. intends to
spend 1 trillion yen ($9 billion)
over five years in China as it vies
to become the largest global
electric-vehicle maker in the
country. The Japanese carmaker
aims to increase annual deliveries
by 1 million units by 2022, with
much of the growth coming from
electric models, Jun Seki, head of
Nissan’s China operations, told
reporters in Beijing on Monday.
British convenience store
operator EG Group is buying
Kroger’s convenience-store unit for
$2.15 billion as it expands into the
United States. The Cincinnatibased company has been
considering a sale of its
convenience-store operations since
October. EG Group expects to close
the purchase early this year. The
acquisition includes 66 locations in
18 states employing 11,000 workers.
— From news services
COMING TODAY
8:30 a.m.: Commerce
Department releases
international trade data for
December.
10 a.m.: Labor Department
releases job openings and labor
turnover survey for December.
Earnings: General Motors,
Chipotle Mexican Grill, Walt
Disney Co.
.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
SU
Proposal that could allow employers to keep tips faces an audit
BY
D ANIELLE P AQUETTE
they moved to undo the Barack
Obama-era regulation that declared tips the property of the
workers who collected them.
The decision came less than a
week after Bloomberg Law reported that the Labor Department hid
an “unfavorable” economic analysis
of its proposed measure on tips,
according to four sources who
leaked the information to reporters.
Under the proposed measure
unveiled in December, restaurants and other establishments
could require waiters, bartenders
and delivery drivers — any employee who receives tips — to
share the cash with their co-workers or bosses.
The rule would apply only to
companies that pay tipped employees at least the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour and
The Department of Labor’s Office of Inspector General said Monday it was launching a review of how
Trump administration officials
crafted a proposed rule that could
allow employers to keep tips.
The move followed reports that
the department had ignored an
economic analysis that found such
a measure would drain “billions”
from workers’ pockets.
“The Office of Inspector General
is initiating an audit of the rulemaking process used by the Wage and
Hour Division related to its proposal to rescind portions of its tip regulations issued pursuant to the Fair
Labor Standards Act,” the office said
in a statement Monday.
The audit will examine whether
officials followed protocol when
allow income splitting through a
“tip pool” with back-of-the-house
workers.
Critics of the proposal said it
could open the way for employers
to pocket all of the tips. Supporters
said it would boost earnings for
dishwashers and other workers
who don’t interact with patrons.
“The proposal would help decrease wage disparities between
tipped and non-tipped workers,”
the Labor Department said in a
statement at the time. “These
‘back of the house’ employees contribute to the overall customer
experience, but may receive less
compensation than their traditionally tipped co-workers.”
On Monday, a Labor Department
spokesperson said the agency intends to publish a cost-benefit
analysis as part of any final rule. The
proposal has already undergone
public comment, receiving 371,000
comments.
Paul DeCamp, a Washington lawyer who represents the National
Restaurant Association and previously worked for the George W.
Bush administration’s Labor Department, said federal agencies
must study the potential impact of
major economic decisions under
law, and the Labor Department appears to have met that standard.
“Agencies aren’t required to anticipate to the penny what effect a
regulation would have on the
economy or on groups or individuals,” he said.
The Labor Department had said
it was unable to say how the proposal could affect workers’ earnings,
maintaining that it could not predict how customers would react to
pact of this thing, but we’re going to
do it anyway,’ ” Holzer said. “You
don’t just dive in blindly.”
Heidi Shierholz, who was chief
economist at the agency under
Obama, was so troubled by the
lack of estimates on how the proposed rule would affect workers’
wages that she did the calculations herself.
Shierholz and her team at the
Economic Policy Institute, a
Washington think tank, looked at
IRS filings, accounted for state
laws and concluded the proposal
could cost workers up to $5.8 billion each year.
“Restaurants have wanted to
get their hands on this revenue
forever,” she said. “It would literally mean billions out of the pockets
of workers.”
proposals of tip sharing.
“The Department is unable to
quantify how customers will respond to proposed regulatory
changes, which in turn would affect total tipped income and employer behavior,” according to the
proposal’s text. “The Department
currently lacks data to quantify
possible reallocations of tips
through newly expanded tip pools
to employees who do not customarily and regularly receive tips.”
But Harry Holzer, a public policy
professor at Georgetown University
who served as chief economist at
the Labor Department under President Bill Clinton, said the agency
needed to do more research before
releasing its proposal.
“It’s a bizarre thing for the Labor
Department to say, ‘we don’t really
know enough to estimate the im-
danielle.paquette@washpost.com
Samsung heir released from prison after appealing bribery conviction
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
seoul — The normally inscrutable Lee Jae-yong allowed himself a
smile Monday, when he was suddenly released from prison after
serving less than a year of his
five-year sentence for bribery, embezzlement and perjury.
A South Korean appeals court
concluded that former president
Park Geun-hye had “browbeat”
Lee, the de facto head of the Samsung conglomerate, into promising $38 million in bribes to her
and her confidante.
Even Lee himself appeared surprised when the appeals court delivered its ruling. The court upheld four of the five charges
against him in a sensational bribery case that has shaken the South
Korean establishment to its core,
but it halved his prison sentence
and then suspended it for four
years.
The 49-year-old Samsung scion
was free to go, barely six months
after being convicted. The other
main figures, Park and her secretive confidante, remain in detention while their trials continue.
“The past year has been a valuable time for self-reflection,” Lee,
bowing in apology, told reporters
waiting outside the prison. “I will
look at things more carefully from
now on.”
Riot police held back protesters
who yelled that Lee should still be
locked up.
Then Lee got into a waiting black
car to be whisked off to see his
father, who is technically still the
chairman of the Samsung behemoth despite being hospitalized
and in a coma since suffering a heart
attack almost four years ago.
Conveniently, Lee may have a
JEAN CHUNG/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Lee Jae-yong, de facto head of Samsung, leaves the Seoul Detention Center. “The past year has been a
valuable time for self-reflection,” Lee said. “I will look at things more carefully from now on.”
chance to “contribute to society,”
as he put it Monday, by the end of
this week. He may appear at the
Opening Ceremonies of the
PyeongChang Winter Olympics
on Friday. Samsung is a major
sponsor.
For many South Koreans, this
was a sign that, despite the extraordinary events of the past two
years, including the impeachment
of their president, nothing had
fundamentally changed: They still
lived in the “Republic of Samsung.”
The term — a derogatory one underlining the conglomerate’s power
in the country — and “Lee Jae-yong
probation” began trending on social
media after the decision.
“The court has been far more
brazen than I expected in letting
him off,” said Ahn Jin-gul, secretary general of People’s Solidarity
for Participatory Democracy, a civil group fighting for better corporate governance. “It is questionable how the law can be so generous toward conglomerate owners
while so strict toward workers and
ordinary people,” he told local reporters after the verdict.
South Korea transformed its
economy from postwar agrarian
backwater to high-tech powerhouse through “chaebol” con-
glomerates. They were supported
with government subsidies during the 1960s and 1970s, when
Park’s father was president, and
the links between the bureaucracy
and the corporate sector remain
strong.
That often-incestuous relationship was laid bare with the explosive
revelations of 2016: The president’s
confidante, Choi Soon-sil, was accused of extracting bribes from the
conglomerates while promising
them favorable treatment.
Choi is now on trial for bribery,
as is former president Park, who
was impeached last March.
Lee was convicted in July for his
role in the scheme. The Seoul Central District Court found him
guilty of paying bribes totaling
$6.4 million, embezzling corporate money to fund the bribes,
then lying about it.
Lee and other Samsung executives were accused of promising to
pay $30 million more in bribes to
Choi.
The Lee family, which maintains control of the Samsung behemoth through a complicated set of
cross-shareholdings, was seeking
approval at the time for a crucial
merger that would enable the family to pass control from Lee’s father to Lee.
Special prosecutors said the
Samsung heir arranged the deal
during three face-to-face meetings with Park between 2014 and
2016.
But Lee’s team of 28 attorneys
said he had no knowledge of what
his underlings were doing. They
appealed the prison sentence. So
did the special prosecutors who
had charged him and wanted him
sentenced to 12 years behind bars.
The appellate court Monday
overturned part of the bribery
charges and one charge of illegally
transferring assets overseas. The
court said it was impossible to
prove that Lee and Park had
hatched the deal in which Lee
allegedly paid a $1.6 million bribe
to Choi.
“We find no evidence of collusion between power and business
here,” said presiding appeals court
judge Cheong Hyung-sik. He added that Samsung executives had
no choice but to “passively comply” with demands made by those
with political power.
Lee’s defense team signaled
that it would continue trying to
have all the convictions overturned.
“We respect the court’s decision
in finding the defendants not
guilty on the key indictments,”
said Lee In-jae of Bae, Kim & Lee, a
law firm. (Two other Samsung executives were also released Monday.) “We will do our best during
the Supreme Court proceedings to
clear the charges of which the
court did not fully accept our arguments,” he said in a statement
forwarded by Samsung.
The case had become a test of
President Moon Jae-in’s pledge to
clean up the corporate sector and
create a level playing field. Moon,
a progressive, was elected president after Park was impeached.
His ruling Democratic Party
said the decision was at odds with
public sentiment in South Korea.
“All citizens hoped that the ruling would help sever collusive ties
between politics and business and
herald the start of a new Republic
of Korea,” Park Wan-joo, the party’s spokesman, told reporters
Monday.
Instead, the court’s decision
will only fuel suspicions that there
is “no guilt for the haves, only guilt
for the have-nots,” he said.
Hank Morris, an American
business consultant and longtime
Seoul resident, said Samsung has
been using all its clout to try to
overturn the case, including by
hiring fewer people at a time when
the Moon administration is focused on job creation.
Even so, he said, things are
moving in the right direction.
“There’s no magic here,” Morris
said. “It’s still the same old South
Korea. It’s not going to change in
an instant.”
anna.fifield@washpost.com
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
27,000
Close
YTD
% Chg
24,345.75
–4.6
–1.5
25,250
23,500
21,750
20,000
Nasdaq Composite Index
7600
6967.53
–3.8
+0.9
Industry Group
Water Utilities
Personal Products
Multi-Utilities
Electric Utilities
Metals & Mining
Communications Equipment
Biotechnology
Real Estate Mgmt & Dev
Commercial Banks
Divers Financial Svcs
Daily
% Chg
0
–6.0%
+6.0%
–0.76
–0.99
–1.58
–1.61
–2.44
–5.03
–5.13
–5.28
–5.59
–5.89
6600
6100
5600
S&P 500 Index
2648.94
–4.1
–0.9
2900
2775
2650
2525
2400
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
81,861.09
15,334.81
50,395.84
–2.6
–1.7
–0.4
382.00
5285.83
12,687.49
7334.98
–1.6
–1.5
–0.8
–1.5
6026.23
4274.15
32,245.22
22,682.08
–1.6
0.1
–1.1
–2.5
YTD % Chg
–8%
0%
+8%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
231.44
92.01
156.49
328.88
151.08
112.62
38.78
44.89
67.84
79.72
14.91
249.11
183.11
152.53
44.52
–5.6
–4.8
–2.5
–5.7
–4.1
–5.0
–5.3
–3.9
–4.3
–5.7
–4.7
–4.2
–5.6
–4.1
–3.5
–1.7
–7.4
–7.5
11.5
–4.1
–10.0
1.3
–2.2
–4.7
–4.7
–14.6
–2.2
–3.4
–0.6
–3.6
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
WalMart
Walt Disney
130.39
108.80
163.85
56.40
88.00
64.39
81.06
34.67
141.52
127.24
220.02
50.50
116.27
100.09
104.70
–5.3
–4.8
–3.3
–3.7
–4.1
–4.2
–3.8
–5.3
–4.3
–5.5
–5.1
–4.7
–3.8
–4.2
–3.7
–6.7
1.7
–4.8
0.2
2.9
2.9
–11.8
–4.3
4.3
–0.3
–0.2
–4.6
2.0
1.4
–2.6
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.2393
0.0091
1.3975
0.3065
0.7988
0.0532
0.0074
1.1276
0.2478
0.6446
0.0429
152.6510
33.4795
87.2580
5.8125
0.2193
0.5716
0.0381
0.8069
Japan ¥ per 109.2300
135.3700
Britain £ per
0.7157
0.8868
0.0066
Brazil R$ per
3.2534
4.0344
0.0298
4.5600
Canada $ per
1.2518
1.5514
0.0114
1.7494
0.3837
Mexico $ per
18.7922
23.2889
0.1720
26.2631
5.7590
Mexico $
2.6065
0.1739
0.0666
15.0112
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 27,365.89
Russell 2000
1491.09
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 540.92
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
37.32
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
–4.0
–3.6
–4.2
115.6
YTD % Chg
–1.1
–2.9
–0.5
238.0
Daily
% Chg
$3.2210
$3.5875
$64.15
$1,336.50
$2.75
+1.1
–0.8
–2.0
–0.1
–3.5
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded (Ticker)
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
% Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.4375
$16.67
$9.6975
$0.1390
$4.4025
–2.2
–0.2
–0.9
+2.0
–1.5
day
$900
month
$1100
$1000
0.2
1.8
–0.8
–0.5
0.7
1.5
0.6
–3.3
0.8
Gainers
Haynes Intl
TripAdvisor Inc
Guess? Inc
Kirby Corp
Enanta Pharma
Church & Dwight
CARBO Ceramics
PetMed Express Inc
Deckers Outdoor
OSI Systems Inc
ESCO Technologies
Enova International
Heska Corp
HealthEquity Inc
SolarEdge Tech
Mobile Mini Inc
Tetra Technologies
MarketAxess
Invacare Corp
Sucampo Pharma
Daily
Close % Chg
$38.50
$35.62
$15.08
$77.75
$89.38
$47.42
$7.59
$43.92
$94.90
$55.20
$60.55
$20.40
$72.09
$50.20
$34.80
$42.65
$3.83
$197.13
$18.00
$18.00
4.6
3.7
3.2
2.7
2.4
2.4
2.2
1.5
1.4
1.1
0.8
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.6
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.3
Losers
Corcept Therpt
Mercury General
Veeco Instruments
II-VI Inc
KEMET Corp
Synchronoss
Wells Fargo
Denbury Resources
Veritiv Corp
Arconic Inc
Orion Group
NVIDIA Corp
Cypress Semicon
Moog Inc
Granite Constr
Esterline Tech
Kopin Corp
Sotheby's
Meritage Homes Corp
Owens & Minor
Daily
Close % Chg
$17.26
$42.91
$14.85
$37.73
$17.37
$6.85
$58.16
$2.07
$25.50
$26.52
$6.48
$213.70
$15.70
$81.98
$59.35
$69.70
$3.15
$48.24
$45.20
$16.33
–26.4
–12.4
–10.0
–9.8
–9.6
–9.3
–9.2
–9.2
–9.1
–8.9
–8.7
–8.5
–8.5
–8.4
–8.3
–8.2
–7.9
–7.9
–7.7
–7.6
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Close
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7100
2275
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.33
0.51
0.80
1.55
3.34
5.56
4.50%
4.30%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.50%
Federal Funds
3.63%
1.79%
LIBOR 3-Month
10-year note
Yield: 2.70
2-year note
Yield: 2.03
5-year note
Yield: 2.44
6-month bill
Yield: 1.61
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.56%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
Netflix took a gamble in releasing Super Bowl-promoted movie after game
BY
S TEVEN Z EITCHIK
los angeles — On Super Bowl
Sunday, Netflix threw a deep ball
that few other entertainment
companies have ever attempted.
During and after the game,
Netflix ran two commercials for
“The Cloverfield Paradox,” the sequel to the 2008 low-budget hit
“Cloverfield.” Produced by Star
Wars and Star Trek director J.J.
Abrams, the sequel was made by
rival Paramount, which had
planned to release it in the spring.
Instead, Netflix snatched it up
and made it available right after
the football game and its marketing blitz.
“History in the making,” tweeted “Wrinkle in Time” director Ava
DuVernay. “Gamechanger.”
What was game-changing, or at
least new, was the immediacy
with which Netflix brought out
“The Cloverfield Paradox.”
Studio releases are typically a
months-long dance in which
teasers precede trailers, which
precede more trailers, which lead
to Comic-Con appearances,
which lead to junkets. Just look
at Disney’s rollout of “Solo: A Star
Wars Story” on Sunday night: a
teaser to a planned trailer drop
on “Good Morning America” on
Monday. The film arrives in theaters in May.
Netflix was taking a different
gamble. It wanted the bang for its
Super Bowl buck — estimated to
have approached $10 million —
right away. A commercial, then
another ad after the game, then
bam, movie available. It was hoping that the novelty of the release
would offset the absence of a
marketing campaign. It was going
for immediacy over anticipation.
In doing so, Netflix bet that
consumers want entertainment
they hear about right away. In an
on-demand world, audiences
can become distracted in the
long lag time between the start
of a marketing campaign and a
product’s release.
“Netflix’s goal is disruption,
and you can’t disrupt the marketing window any more than they
did tonight,” said one executive at
a rival company who spoke on the
condition of anonymity because
of industry relationships.
Netflix declined to comment.
The sudden availability of “The
Cloverfield Paradox” echoed another streaming surprise: Beyoncé’s immediate release of “Lemon-
ade” on Tidal, the streaming service she co-owns, in April 2016.
It’s unclear whether Netflix’s
marketing gamble was enough to
spark interest in a movie that
Paramount had decided not to
release. Paramount had been developing the movie, directed by
Julius Onah, under the title “God
Particle.”
Netflix for some time has been
picking up packages in development that traditional studios
wouldn’t or couldn’t finance:
The recent Stanley McChrystalinspired black comedy “War Machine,” starring Brad Pitt, for instance, had gone from New Regency/21st Century Fox to Netflix
after the streamer was willing to
nearly double the budget to
$60 million.
Reviewers weren’t enamored
after seeing “The Cloverfield Paradox.”
“While initial murmurs suggested the studio might have
avoided a cinema run because
the film might be a bit too complex for a mass audience, the
truth is ultimately something far
more obvious: ‘The Cloverfield
Paradox’ is an unholy mess,” the
Guardian wrote in its review,
echoing the thoughts of many
major publications.
Of course, Netflix’s goal isn’t
(entirely) about critics or even a
consensus of quality. Instead, it is
the level of subscriber growth and
retention in its upcoming quarterly earnings calls that will reveal if the gambit worked. (Netflix
doesn’t release viewership numbers by movie.) Netflix’s business
model is based on subscribers,
Inflation
fears rock
global
markets
MARKETS FROM A1
day, and they sold on Monday. This
is normal, everyday stock market
volatility. And it’s healthy.”
Asian stocks tumbled Tuesday
morning, tracking a volatile day in
Monday’s U.S. trading.
Japan’s Nikkei stock average
dropped more than 6 percent in
early-afternoon trading, after falling 2.5 percent a day earlier. Hong
Kong’s Hang Seng Index sank
nearly 4 percent, as markets in
Australia, South Korea and China
also fell.
Many analysts pointed to a
seemingly unusual cause for the
turbulence: rising wages.
The Labor Department reported Friday that wages had gone up
by 2.9 percent in January compared with a year earlier. That was
the fastest growth in almost a decade, evidence that the extraordinarily low unemployment rate
was forcing employers to pay
higher wages.
“The employment report on
Friday showed wages are growing
at the fastest rate since the recession,” said Torsten Slok, chief international
economist
at
Deutsche Bank. “Investors are
waking up to the fact that we won’t
have low interest rates forever.”
For years, Americans have been
hungry for more pay. Politicians,
including Trump, campaigned on
giving U.S. workers raises. Yet the
first sign that wages might finally
be going up, even slightly, set off
Wall Street. On a basic level, investors worry that higher pay means
lower profits for shareholders, but
there’s an even deeper concern.
The heart of the stock market
sell-off is about inflation. More
specifically, it’s a fear that wages
and prices are going to rise faster
For Trump,
a downside
to touting
stock highs
TRUMP FROM A1
largely untested in periods of
economic uncertainty. Many investors and lawmakers are
watching the actions of Trump’s
newly sworn-in pick for Federal
Reserve chairman, Jerome H.
Powell, to see how quickly he is
willing to raise interest rates in
the face of rising inflation.
Treasury Secretary Steven
Mnuchin briefed Trump on the
market’s fall Monday during a
trip to Ohio, where the president
made no mention of the financial
troubles in public remarks.
Mnuchin is a close Trump adviser, but his views on how the
government should respond to
market volatility are not wellknown since he had little experience in Washington before joining the administration.
Stock market spikes and blips
are not uncommon, though
the swing in the past week was
highly unusual because of its
sustained fall.
And Republicans’ repeated
swooning about the stock market’s performance in the past year
opened them to criticism that
they should take some responsibility for the past week’s poor
performance. Some of the investor anxiety is directly related to
heightened fears about the growing budget deficit, which is widening under the new GOP-backed
MICHAEL NAGLE/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange as U.S. stocks plunge, sending the Dow Jones industrial average down almost
1,600 points in afternoon trading. Though the declines were dramatic, observers have been expecting a correction after a year of big gains.
than expected, and that the Federal Reserve is going to fumble its
attempts to keep inflation in
check.
“The Fed has been predicting
inflation and interest rates would
go up since 2013,” Slok said. “It
felt like a boy-who-cried-wolf situation, but now it’s finally happening.”
Moderate inflation is a healthy
component of an economy. But
markets may fear that inflation
could quickly grow overheated.
Should that happen or even appear to be a real risk, the Federal
Reserve would probably raise interest rates, a move that could
dramatically slow the economy or
even cause a recession.
“There is not a high chance of a
recession,” Slok said. “There is a
high chance of the economy overheating. The market is reacting to
good news, not bad news.”
There was also a focus on the
10-year Treasury bond, a closely
watched harbinger of investor
sentiment. The yield’s rise toward
3 percent is widely believed to be a
marker for investors to eschew
equities for the stability of bonds.
Bond yields are rising as the
Federal Reserve trims its U.S.
bond holdings. The U.S. Treasury
is also having to borrow more
money, partly because of the tax
cuts, and issuing more debt tends
to raise yields.
The S&P 500 in January rose for
the 10th consecutive month, the
longest streak in 59 years. The stock
market has lost $1 trillion in value in
the first five days of February.
The market may end up in an
official correction, a 10 percent
drop from the last peak. There
have been only four corrections in
this long bull market, and this
would be the fifth. But Ed Yardeni,
head of Yardeni Research, notes
that this bull market has had 60
“panic attacks,” where there’s a dip
that gets everyone buzzing, even
though it doesn’t turn out to be a
full correction.
“You can’t make too much out of
a couple of days of craziness,”
Yardeni said.
“It’s not all that complicated,”
said Jared Bernstein, an economist at the Center on Budget and
Policy Priorities. “The market got
spooked by a jobs report suggesting wage growth had accelerated.”
While the economy has
hummed along, wage growth has
lagged behind. Even 2.9 percent is
well below historic norms.
“Folks are overreacting,” Bernstein said. “Working people are
due for some wage growth. And
that’s a good thing, not a bad
thing.”
These new concerns about rising inflation come after years of
worry by U.S. officials about too
little inflation. Since the Great Recession, inflation has yet to hit the
Fed’s goal of 2 percent per year. The
tax law.
“Any time you claim credit for
an increasing stock market, you
risk having to take the blame for
one that decreases,” said Sen. Ron
Johnson (R-Wis.). “Markets move
in strange ways.”
The fall began on the same day
as Trump’s State of the Union
speech, in which he boasted that
“the stock market has smashed
one record after another, gaining
$8 trillion in value.”
The stock market closed Monday at its lowest levels since early
December, though it is still up
substantially since Trump’s inauguration.
Many analysts had warned
that the stock market was overheated and due for a correction.
But White House officials continued to boast about its performance, particularly as Trump’s approval ratings lagged for much of
2017. The stock market was one
measuring stick that they sought
to connect closely with his time in
office, believing that Americans
would eventually come around if
they felt the economy was getting
better.
“The reason our stock market
is so successful is because of me,”
Trump told reporters on Air Force
One in November.
There have been signs in recent weeks that Trump’s approval
rating has improved, particularly
as he and other Republicans have
worked to portray decisions by a
number of companies to offer
bonuses and raise wages as a
direct result of the tax cuts. Sustained stock market losses, however, could undermine the president’s effort to take credit for a
growing economy ahead of the
midterm elections in November.
A Washington Post-ABC News
poll in January found 58 percent
of respondents rating the economy positively, up seven points in
the past year and the highest level
in 17 years. But fewer than 4 in 10
said Trump’s administration deserves significant credit for the
economy’s condition, compared
with half who said the Obama
administration does.
“The perception of a growing
and healthy economy is key to
Trump’s success as president,”
said Neil Newhouse, a Republican pollster. “The unnoticed
number that people haven’t
paid attention to is the improving mood of the country, the
right-direction number. When
that goes up, presidential approval goes up, and the condition of
the economy is tied very strongly
to that right-direction number.”
There have been numerous
signs that the economy was continuing to improve, but again and
again, Trump kept coming back
to the stock market as his primary barometer for success. That
focus could complicate the White
House’s efforts to distance the
president from the reversal.
“The tricky part of claiming
credit for the stock market is the
stock market can go up and the
stock market can go down,” said
Andy Laperriere, a partner at
Cornerstone Macro, a Wall Street
advisory firm.
He said there was a sense
among many investors that the
stock market had become overvalued and that much of the
recent increase was what he referred to as “air.”
“And once the air comes out,
people are headed for the exits,”
he said.
It’s unclear how much more air
will come out, which is one of the
reasons investors are so wary. The
stock market surged last year
because of sustained global
growth combined with enthusiasm for Trump’s tax plan and his
effort to pare regulations. But
there are new worries about inflation, higher debt levels and rising
interest rates that have fueled
volatility in recent days.
House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady
(R-Tex.) told reporters Monday
that the stock market fall reflected good news about the economy,
as it showed that higher wages
were adding to inflationary pressures that the Fed would need to
address.
“Corrections like this are normal,” Brady said.
Trump delivered a speech on
his economic agenda Monday
that didn’t mention the stock
market once, a rare occurrence
for him. After tweeting incessantly about the stock market in 2017,
Trump has stopped since Jan. 20.
“The President’s focus is on our
long-term economic fundamentals, which remain exceptionally
strong, with strengthening U.S.
economic growth, historically
low unemployment, and increasing wages for American workers,”
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a
statement. “The President’s tax
cuts and regulatory reforms will
further enhance the U.S. economy and continue to increase prosperity for the American people.”
In 2017, the economy grew at a
slightly better clip than the year
before, but job creation appeared
to plateau and wage gains remained modest. The Dow, which
grew 25 percent last year, was a
bright spot for White House officials, reflecting what they believed was robust enthusiasm for
Trump’s agenda.
In a Dec. 19 Twitter post,
Trump wrote: “DOW RISES 5000
POINTS ON THE YEAR FOR
THE FIRST TIME EVER —
MAKE
AMERICA
GREAT
AGAIN!” It was the 58th time
since taking office that he had
mentioned the stock market on
Twitter.
The last time he mentioned the
stock market on Twitter was on
Jan. 20, a day after the Dow
closed at 26,072. The 30-stock
index has fallen more than 1,700
points since.
Trump used to ridicule the
stock market before taking office,
saying in September 2016 that
recent gains in the market were a
result of a “big, fat, ugly bubble”
that would pop once interest
rates increased.
The stock market’s steep fall in
the past week has prompted a
number of Democrats to pounce,
saying Trump should shoulder
some of the blame.
President Barack Obama took
office when the economy was
cratering, and he saw the stock
market bottom out several
months into his first term. The
stock market would more than
double before he left office, but
his economic team was often
cautious about wading into speculation on how the stock market
would perform.
Jay Carney, Obama’s former
press secretary, wrote on Twitter
on Monday: “Good time to recall
that in the previous administration, we NEVER boasted about
the stock market — even though
the Dow more than doubled on
Obama’s watch — because we
knew two things: 1) the stock
market is not the economy; and
2) if you claim the rise, you own
the fall.”
Brian Riedl, a former adviser to
Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) and
two GOP presidential candidates,
said presidents frequently try to
highlight good economic news,
opening themselves to criticism
when bad news emerges.
“All presidents take credit for
good economic news, whether it’s
economic growth or the stock
and fresh content is what wins
them over.
The move, incidentally, was
also disruptive in another regard:
It implicitly challenged the long
tradition of the post-Super Bowl
network broadcast slot, in which
a new or rising show is positioned
to benefit from the massive viewer lead-in. This year, NBC was
using the slot for a much-promoted episode of its family drama
“This Is Us.”
“This Is Us” proved impervious
to the disruption, however — the
episode garnered 27 million viewers, according to Nielsen, an alltime high for the nearly two-yearold show.
steven.zeitchik@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
business
latest read on inflation, 1.7 percent,
is still fairly anemic, according to
data out last week. But Wall Street
is forward-looking.
Investors have already priced in
a bounce from the tax cuts and
Trump’s regulatory rollback. Now
Wall Street is trying to price in the
risk of a troubling scenario unfolding later this year or next. It is also
reacting to the fact that U.S. stocks
have shot up 26 percent in the past
year, more than three times the
typical annual return of 8 percent.
“The data is good, the psychology is poor,” said Michael Block,
chief strategist at Rhino Trading.
This sell-off is occurring when
company after company has been
reporting record profits: About 80
percent of companies have beaten
expectations on earnings so far,
according to JPMorgan Chase.
Another factor that might have
investors finally pricing in more
risk is the rising federal deficit.
On Wednesday, the Treasury released data showing that the government is on track to borrow
nearly $1 trillion this year, an
84 percent increase from last year.
That kind of spike in borrowing
helped push government bond
yields to levels last seen four years
ago. Those headlines started to
cause angst among investors who
had largely ignored any bad news
about the debt.
The change of leadership at the
Fed brings another sort of uncertainty. While new Fed Chair Jerome H. Powell is widely expected
to follow Janet L. Yellen’s lead and
move interest rates up slowly, he’s
still a relatively unknown quantity
for the markets. The Fed is also
operating with just three of its
seven governor seats filled. Trump
has yet to nominate a vice chair of
the Fed. Some worry that Trump
could fill the remaining board
seats with conservative-leaning
economists and that Powell will
aggressively go after inflation by
quickly raising interest rates.
The market’s tumult may hold
another sort of message.
As Yardeni put it: “I think the
market is sending a signal to the
Fed and Powell not to change
course in any radical fashion.”
thomas.heath@washpost.com
heather.long@washpost.com
market,” he said. “And as a result
they are going to get the blame
when the party ends.”
Some key members of Trump’s
economic team are in transition.
White House National Economic
Council Director Gary Cohn, a
former president at Goldman
Sachs, could leave soon, and it is
unclear if Trump would bring in
another markets expert to replace him. Decisions by Powell,
the new Fed chair, about how and
when to raise interest rates could
also have a direct effect on the
stock market’s performance.
Trump has told advisers that
the economy would be the GOP’s
calling card heading into elections in 2018 and 2020. He has
said the stock market’s increase
has led to a ballooning of 401(k)
and other retirement accounts, a
connection that has made some
aides wary because many of his
supporters don’t hold such investments.
He often asks about the market
several times a day, aides said,
and he will occasionally flip his
television to CNBC to check for
himself.
Stephen Moore, who served as
an economic adviser to Trump
during the campaign and has
cheered the new tax law, said
Monday that the stock market is
still up sharply from the day
Trump was elected in 2016. But he
conceded that it is unclear whether the recent plunge is the beginning of a downturn.
“The Dow gyrates much more
than these other economic statistics,” Moore said. “Who knows?
The Dow could be up 500 points
tomorrow. Or it could fall 500
points.”
damian.paletta@washpost.com
erica.werner@washpost.com
Josh Dawsey, Philip Rucker and Scott
Clement contributed to this report.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Medicaid insurers aren’t ‘hyperventilating’ about effects of work requirements
Guess who’s not
The
fretting over
Health 202 making low-
ROGELIO V. SOLIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mario Henderson leads others in chants of “save Medicaid” at a 2017 protest opposing the Senate health-care bill, which failed to pass.
Last month, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said states may issue work requirements for certain Medicaid recipients.
executive director of the liberal
consumer health lobby Families
USA, called Indiana’s waiver “a
profound and deeply saddening
departure from our nation’s
commitment to the health of our
families.”
Yet given the small number
of enrollees likely to be affected
by the work requirements, the
uproar may be premature.
Myers says he’s watching states
closely to see exactly how
they implement work
requirements. But he feels that
if done the right way, such
requirements could give
some recipients — but only a
small number of them — a needed
boost toward employment.
“Most people probably won’t
be covered by this work
requirement,” Myers said.
Members of MHPA contract
with states to cover the 74 million
Americans who rely on Medicaid,
the federal government’s primary
health insurance program for
low-income individuals. It’s their
plans that stand to lose customers
if work requirements prompt a
reduction in Medicaid
enrollment, as many critics
predict. Myers acknowledges
that’s an anticipated effect —
after all, enrollment dropped
when work requirements were
introduced to welfare in the
1990s — but he’s expecting only a
minimal effect.
“We’re not hyperventilating
that millions of people will get
thrown off the rolls,” Myers said.
“We just want to make sure as
states do this, they understand
there is a cost involved.”
Why might the effect be
limited? For one thing, the
majority of Medicaid recipients
work or cite some valid reason
they don’t, such as having a
disability or illness, acting as
caregivers or attending school.
Forty-two percent of Medicaid
recipients work full time and
18 percent work part time,
according to population survey
data analyzed by the Kaiser
Mattis a∞rms nuclear policy after review
BY
P AUL S ONNE
When retired Marine Corps
Gen. Jim Mattis became defense
secretary last year, he arrived at
the Pentagon with reservations
about the U.S. nuclear arsenal.
He had doubts about an
air-launched nuclear cruise missile under development at the
Pentagon and questioned whether the United States should have
intercontinental ballistic missile
(ICBM) silos at all.
But in the year since then,
Mattis has changed his tune.
The nuclear weapons policy his
team rolled out at the Pentagon
last week offered full-throated
support for the military’s current
and planned nuclear capabilities,
including the new cruise missile
and the ICBM fleet he once questioned.
The strategy marks a resounding win for backers of the U.S.
nuclear enterprise and a setback
for disarmament advocates. Mattis is scheduled to testify on the
matter Tuesday on Capitol Hill.
The policy reaffirms a full modernization of the U.S. nuclear
force approved by President Barack Obama, which replaces the
military’s nuclear bombers, submarines and ICBMs at an estimated cost of $1.2 trillion over
30 years. It calls for two types of
nuclear weapons not currently in
the arsenal.
Mattis’s evolution in thinking
offers insight into the decisionmaking process of a defense secretary known for his intellectual
rigor. His evaluation of the military’s nuclear weapons capabilities also serves as a counterpoint
in an administration whose policymaking process has often appeared hurried and impulsive.
Thomas Karako, a specialist on
nuclear issues at the Center for
Strategic and International Studies in Washington, said many
people — including Obama —
enter government sympathetic to
disarmament but moderate their
ambitions when confronted with
threat intelligence.
“I would point out a pattern of
being mugged by reality,” said
Karako, who wasn’t involved in
the evaluation.
In the preface to the policy,
Mattis appeared to confirm that
sentiment. “We must look reality
in the eye and see the world as it
is, not as we wish it to be,”
he wrote.
Over more than four decades
in the Marines, Mattis had little
direct involvement with the nuclear arsenal, which is typically
the domain of the Air Force
and Navy.
He delved into the issue at
Stanford University’s Hoover Institution after his retirement.
There, he exchanged views with
disarmament advocates including former secretary of state
George Shultz and his onetime
boss at the Pentagon, former defense secretary William J. Perry.
Perry has argued that the United States should retire its landbased ICBM force. The U.S. bombers and submarines that carry
nuclear warheads offer sufficient
deterrence, he has said, and the
ICBMs, which sit in fields ready to
launch at any moment, could accidentally trigger a nuclear war.
Perry has also said adversaries
could confuse the cruise missile
the Pentagon is developing for a
conventional missile.
Mattis at times has nearly
echoed such views. In 2015 testimony to the Senate Armed Services Committee, he said it was
time for the Pentagon to consider
retiring the land-based ICBM
force. During his 2017 confirmation, Mattis said he needed to
“look at” the cruise missile.
President Trump commissioned a review of nuclear weapons policy a week after taking
office. For Mattis, it became an
opportunity to reeducate himself
about the U.S. nuclear force, this
time with full access to the latest
intelligence reports and the U.S.
military.
He visited the ICBM force and
B-52 bomber fleet in North Dakota. He stopped by a nuclear submarine base in Washington state.
He spoke to the generals at Strategic Command in Nebraska.
“I can’t think of a secretary who
so quickly visited all the nuclear
forces,” said Rob Soofer, deputy
assistant secretary of defense for
nuclear and missile defense policy.
All the while, Mattis read wide-
ly about nuclear weapons, according to people with knowledge of the process who spoke on
the condition of anonymity because of the review’s sensitivity.
One person said Mattis referenced works including Yale Professor Paul Bracken’s “The Second
Nuclear Age,” which argues for a
post-Cold War approach to arms
control.
Mattis has said he pressed retired officers, scientists and professors for their views. In addition, he convened a council of
retired admirals, generals and
specialists known as “the graybeards” to engage in what Soofer
said Mattis calls a “skilled dialectic,” or an exchange of divergent
views.
“I’ve got the smartest people I
can find,” Mattis told nuclear submarine officers in Washington.
“And it’s Republican and Democrat. It’s men and women. It’s old
people. It’s young physicists. It’s
people who studied history. There
are people who know what
they’re doing.”
By the time he visited Naval
Base Kitsap last August, Mattis
appeared to have all but decided.
Ultimately, Mattis took those
and other recommendations to
the White House. To have done
otherwise would have forced him
to confront tremendous pressure
from Congress, the military and
the White House, all of which
backed the new policy.
Some disarmament advocates
view the results of the review with
dashed hope.
“I found it disappointing that
this document includes misguided framing and ideas that have
long been on the wish list of
conservative nuclear policy analysts and government officials,”
said Kingston Reif, director of
disarmament and threat reduction policy at the Arms Control
Association.
Still, Reif held out hope. He
said Mattis’s signed preface to the
new policy appeared to take a
more restrained tone than the
rest of the document. Reif added, “It does remain to be seen how
vociferously and strongly Mattis
will go to bat for some of the
proposals.”
paul.sonne@washpost.com
Family Foundation.
That’s a top argument among
critics for why they don’t think
work requirements are needed.
But it’s also a reason the
requirements probably won’t
have a massive wave effect on the
program — most recipients either
work or have some other life
circumstance that prevents them,
exempting them from the new
requirements.
In addition, CMS is giving
wider latitude than many were
expecting to ensure states provide
plenty of exemptions from a work
requirement, moving to broadly
define what constitutes “work.”
For example, the agency in its
guidance said those caring for
children or undergoing substance
abuse treatment could be
exempted from working. So
could the 10 million people on
Medicaid who have a disability.
And work doesn’t have to mean
a paying job, according to the
administration. States could also
count job training, job searching,
volunteer work or education as
satisfying the requirement.
It’s still true that imposing
more rules on government
benefits increases the likelihood
that even eligible people won’t be
able to sign up because of higher
barriers. Kentucky officials have
predicted that 90,000 to 95,000
fewer people will be on Medicaid
by the end of the state’s five-year
waiver period — although that’s
only a fraction of the more than
2 million Kentucky residents
enrolled in the program.
Tom Miller, a health-care
fellow at the conservative
paige.cunningham@washpost.com
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S0193 3x10.5
income Americans
work or volunteer
in return for
government health
benefits? The
Medicaid insurers covering them.
“I think some of the heavy
breathing about how terrible
work requirements are going to
be is over the top,” said Jeff Myers,
president of Medicaid Health
Plans of America (MHPA), the
country’s largest association of
Medicaid plans.
There has lately been a frenzy of
pushback from Democrats and
progressives against the Trump
administration’s unprecedented
move to allow states to enact work
requirements as a condition of
receiving benefits. Some red states
are imposing such requirements
for the first time in the program’s
five decades, following the failure
of the GOP Congress to repeal and
replace the Affordable Care Act —
which expanded Medicaid in
many states.
Last month, the Centers for
Medicare and Medicaid Services
(CMS) issued guidance saying
states may require non-disabled
Medicaid recipients to work,
volunteer or undergo job
training to participate in the
program. Out of a dozen
states that have applied for work
requirements, CMS granted
Kentucky’s request last month
and on Friday gave the go-ahead
to Indiana, my colleague Amy
Goldstein reports.
Because this is a pioneering
move for CMS — the Obama
administration rejected work
requirements, saying they were
inconsistent with Medicaid’s
objectives — it has incited
spirited applause from the
political right but loud groans
from the left. House Minority
Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.)
called work requirements a
“shameful violation of the letter
and spirit of Medicaid” when the
guidance was initially issued.
“This mean-spirited decision will
have a particularly damaging
impact on women, including
women currently taking care of
seriously ill family members and
those who have chronic health
conditions of their own,” Pelosi said.
Last week, Frederick Isasi,
PAIGE
WINFIELD
CUNNINGHAM
American Enterprise Institute,
estimates work requirements
might affect 20 to 30 percent of
the Medicaid population at most.
“The reality is these are
marginal things,” Miller said.
“You can do this for a smaller
fraction of the entire Medicaid
population — you’re not going to
nudge a large number of folks
into full-scale work.”
Critics view diminished
Medicaid rolls as a negative, but
conservative proponents view it
as a victory. The idea, they’ve
emphasized, is to make Medicaid
a temporary safety-net program
with incentives to propel people
up the economic ladder.
“True compassion is lifting
Americans most in need out of
difficult circumstances,” CMS
Administrator Seema Verma
wrote in an op-ed published in
The Post on Sunday.
Myers wants to make
sure states don’t impose new
burdens of oversight on plans
as it’s the states that have
traditionally handled enrollment
qualification. And he wants
safeguards to minimize churn so
care isn’t disrupted.
To Myers, the devil is in the
details. Back in the 1990s, when
work requirements were first
added to the Temporary
Assistance for Needy Families
program, TANF enrollment
declined while job participation
increased, especially among lowincome single mothers.
But success varied widely
among states and stalled with the
2001 recession. With the new
Medicaid rules, states must
decide how to implement the
requirements. The Trump
administration is expected to
respond to waiver requests from
perhaps as many as 10 more
states to implement work
requirements.
“This is what I think the people
talking about work requirements
are missing,” Myers said. “There
are all kinds of granular decisions
to be made at the state level
before this can even be
implemented.”
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Much ado about a ‘nothing burger’
EDITORIALS
A vicious cycle for Virginia’s poor
Suspending driver’s licenses for failure to pay fines punishes poverty — and perpetuates it.
M
(638,003) were suspended solely for that reason. That
translates into about 1 in 6 drivers in the commonwealth. Payment plans were found to be ineffective,
because the underlying issue is not drivers’ willingness to pay fines but the fact that they simply don’t
have the money.
Virginia unfortunately is not alone in suspending
or revoking licenses to punish people for failure to pay
court debt. A state-by-state analysis by the Legal Aid
Justice Center last fall found that 43 states and the
District of Columbia suspend driver’s licenses because
of unpaid debt. Only four states require a determination of the person’s ability to pay. Some, such as
Virginia, make the suspensions mandatory, while
others, including the District and Maryland, allow for
discretion, albeit automated systems make its use
rare. Virtually all states that suspend licenses for
Make
a deal
unpaid debt do so indefinitely, with rules that prevent
reinstatement until full payment is made.
What results is a vicious cycle. You can’t afford to
pay an initial court fine for a parking ticket or a
shoplifting charge, so you lose your license. That
means you can’t drive to work or hold a job that
requires a license — which makes you even less able to
pay your court debt. If you drive without a license, you
may get into more serious trouble. Meanwhile, you
can’t drive your children to school or to their medical
appointments.
California last year ended its license-for-payment
system. Legislation to end the practice is pending in
the D.C. Council and Virginia General Assembly and
ought to be approved. Yanking driver’s licenses should
be reserved for getting dangerous drivers off the roads,
not punishing people for being poor.
The immigration bills in Congress
aren’t perfect. That’s okay.
In his Feb. 2 Washington Forum commentary, “No
fate but what we make,” Joe Scarborough made a
great case that we make our own fate and that fate lies
in how well our actions align with where our loyalties
are.
I agree with Mr. Scarborough that all members of
Congress should remind themselves that their loyalties should lie with serving our country and not with
any party or person.
Similarly, I think ordinary Americans also need to
get engaged with our democracy and remember that
our loyalties need to lie with strengthening our
democracy and serving our nation, not with winning
an argument or election.
Strengthening our democracy has to include building communities and having civil discussions on
difficult topics with each other and with members of
Congress. So let’s get out of our echo chambers and
work on building stronger communities with people
not in our “tribe.” If America is to succeed as the great
experiment in democracy of a diverse people, we need
the many diverse groups that make up our nation to
work together, locally, regionally and nationally.
Sabrina Fu, Ellicott City, Md.
An unfair attack
ence should be negotiable.
On border security, the senators don’t go as far as
Mr. Trump would like — he wants $25 billion right off
the bat to build his “beautiful” wall — but they would
direct Homeland Security officials to formulate a
plan that would achieve “operational control” of the
border by 2020. That’s a term of art, though not a
precise one, meaning much tighter security than
currently exists along most of the border. It does not
preclude building hundreds of miles of walls and
barriers on the frontier with Mexico, if that is in line
with recommendations from the Department of
Homeland Security.
The House version of the bill has 52 co-sponsors in
addition to Mr. Hurd and Mr. Aguilar, 26 from each
side of the aisle. In the Senate, both Mr. McCain, who
has long pressed for an immigration deal, and
Mr. Coons are known for a willingness to reach across
the aisle even as they remain true to core convictions.
This bill offers a large majority the opportunity to do
the same. A broader deal is not within Congress’s
ability for the foreseeable future. This one is.
Ecuador takes a step forward
In restoring presidential term limits, the nation pushes back against the destructive spread of authoritarianism.
R
oil deliveries in exchange. Ecuador now owes
Beijing the equivalent of three years of its production.
The caudillo clearly expected that his successor,
Lenín Moreno, would follow his lead. Instead, to his
credit, Mr. Moreno has moved to clean up the mess
he inherited. He reached out to the media and
businesses and let citizens know for the first time
how much had been borrowed from China. When
Mr. Correa’s vice president was implicated in a
corruption scandal, Mr. Moreno made no attempt to
shield him.
The new president is also looking for a way to end
the government’s protection for Julian Assange,
who has been holed up in the Ecuadoran Embassy
in London since 2012. Mr. Moreno called the
WikiLeaks founder “more than a nuisance” and
warned him to stop meddling in the politics of other
nations.
Predictably, Mr. Correa has called Mr. Moreno a
traitor. In fact, Mr. Moreno is a moderate leftist who
happens to believe in democracy. That has made
him popular: His approval rating has soared, while
Mr. Correa has been pelted with eggs during his
recent public appearances.
Voters elsewhere in Latin America appear eager
to push long-serving leaders out of power; the
problem is that the caudillos aren’t listening.
Bolivian President Evo Morales lost a referendum to
remove his term limit, but then induced the
supreme court he appointed to void it. Daniel
Ortega of Nicaragua and Honduras’s Juan Orlando
Hernández similarly manipulated their courts.
After extracting permission to run for reelection,
Mr. Hernández most likely stole Honduras’s election last November. But he began a new term of
office last month with the support of the Trump
administration.
The struggle over democracy in Latin America
has been a seesaw battle in recent months. Venezuela has sunk deeper into dictatorship, and
corruption scandals have destabilized Brazil and
Peru. Ecuador, however, now appears to be joining
Argentina in shaking off the destructive authoritarianism that spread across the region at the turn of
the century. It’s a small but important step forward.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Join the debate at washingtonpost.com/local-opinions
The solution for Washington football: Change the name, keep the logo
In the Jan. 31 Sports article “Goodell unmoved by
Indians’ logo change,” National Football League Commissioner Roger Goodell was quoted saying “nine out
of 10 Native Americans do not take that in a negative
fashion, the Redskins’ logo or the Redskins’ name.”
This statement obscured an important distinction
that is often missed in the roiling debate about
professional sports teams’ use and abuse of Native
American culture: A team name may be offensive, but
not the logo, and vice versa. Most would consider
Cleveland’s Major League Baseball team name, the
Indians, as inoffensive and neutral. Not so the team’s
logo, Chief Wahoo, a grinning, racist caricature.
Hence the decision to drop the logo. The case is
exactly opposite with Washington’s NFL team: The
team logo of an Indian chief in profile is proud, noble;
And so, I eagerly read the memo that was hyped
to blow things apart on what was “worse than
Watergate.” I discovered nothing that I did not
already know, had not already heard or could not
figure out on my own. What a dud, or to use an
expression from President Trump’s team, a “nothing
burger.” I will wait for special counsel Robert
S. Mueller III to serve the steak sizzling on a platter.
Catherine Reinhard, Burke
Country over party
B
AFAEL CORREA, like Vladimir Putin, Hugo
Chávez and other authoritarian rulers,
found himself stymied by term limits. So in
2015, the Ecuadoran president persuaded
his legislature to lift a ceiling of two presidential
terms by promising not to run in 2017. His idea was
to install a follower for four years and then return to
power, as Mr. Putin once did. Then, on Sunday, came
a much-deserved comeuppance: Ecuadoran voters,
prompted by Mr. Correa’s own successor, voted
overwhelmingly to restore a two-term presidential
limit, thus blocking the planned second act. It was a
victory for democracy not just in Ecuador but also
in a region where numerous rulers have sought to
entrench themselves in power.
Mr. Correa, who was first elected in 2007,
embraced a somewhat milder version of
Mr. Chávez’s left-wing populism. With the help of
high prices for Ecuador’s oil exports, he reduced
poverty while launching assaults on media freedom, private business and the courts. When oil
prices fell, Mr. Correa followed Mr. Chávez in
borrowing huge sums from China, promising future
Regarding the Feb. 3 front-page article “Memo
released, and recriminations fly”:
The validity of the House Intelligence Committee
memo about improprieties related to surveillance of
Carter Page can be demonstrated only if the Justice
Department impanels a grand jury to make a
determination as to whom, if anyone, should be
charged and tried for obtaining Foreign Intelligence
Surveillance Act warrants under allegedly dubious
circumstances.
Certainly, any suggestion that FISA warrants were
obtained under dubious circumstances should concern all Americans and be either validated or refuted
through the judicial, not the political, process.
Absent such an action by the Justice Department, I
think we can safely assume that the memo is, as
described by the FBI statement, inaccurate because
of significant omissions of fact.
Ron Tollefson, Alexandria
Let me get this straight: Following the logic of
the Nunes memo, if Iraq offered the FBI evidence of
an impending terrorist attack by the Islamic State,
the FBI should not follow up on it because Iraq is
known to be prejudiced against the Islamic State.
Did I get that right?
Michael Ball, Silver Spring
TOM TOLES
Y TRYING to solve every problem related to
America’s immigration system, Congress has
repeatedly failed to solve any of them. It’s
time to end that legislative dysfunction,
which has played on a loop on Capitol Hill for years.
Why not sidestep the most incendiary disagreements
and target the two main areas on which there is broad
bipartisan acceptance: protecting “dreamers”
brought to the United States as children and beefing
up border security?
The contours of such a deal, if not the details, are
within lawmakers’ reach. Similar bipartisan bills to
that end now have been introduced in both houses of
Congress — this month, by John McCain (R-Ariz.) and
Christopher A. Coons (D-Del.) in the Senate and, last
month, by Will Hurd (R-Tex.) and Pete Aguilar (D-Calif.) in the House. Each deserves a hearing and a vote.
Congress is duty-bound to act not only because
immigration has all but paralyzed Washington politics, entangled as it is with spending to keep the
government running, but also because President
Trump’s own approach is a nonstarter.
Mr. Trump campaigned on building a border wall
to enhance national security — fine, let him have his
mandate. But the deal he has proposed and is
insisting on goes much further than that. Yes, he has
offered a path to citizenship for 1.8 million dreamers,
but Democrats are highly unlikely to support his quid
pro quos, which would not only crack down on illegal
immigrants but also slash legal immigration to levels
unseen in decades — a policy goal that was never part
of Mr. Trump’s rhetoric as a candidate.
The McCain-Coons legislation, like its counterpart in the House, tackles a problem that the
president himself has said he wants to resolve:
providing long-term security for dreamers, whose
status and work permits under Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals were ordered revoked last fall by
Mr. Trump and remain in limbo in the courts. The
Senate bill would shield from deportation young
immigrants who have lived in the United States
since the end of 2013 — a somewhat bigger cohort
than the one Mr. Trump would protect. That differ-
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
ILLIONS OF people across the country have
had their driver’s licenses suspended — but
not because they drove drunk or recklessly
or posed any kind of public-safety risk.
Rather, they lost their ability to drive legally because
they failed to pay court fines incurred from parking
tickets, minor traffic infractions or low-level misdemeanors. The practice is unfair, possibly unconstitutional and certainly counterproductive: The system
perpetuates poverty by penalizing poverty.
The problem with laws that link the suspension of
driver’s licenses to the failure to pay court debt was
spotlighted in a recent report examining the practice
in Virginia. The Legal Aid Justice Center found that, as
of December 2017, nearly 1 million Virginians
(974,349) had their licenses suspended at least in part
due to court debt, and nearly two-thirds of those
. TUESDAY,
the team name, Redskins, is demeaning.
There’s a compromise solution for the Washington NFL team dilemma: Keep the logo, change the
name. I propose the “Washington Braves” as the new
name. Not only does “Braves” fit the logo, but it also
recognizes team heritage: The Redskins were originally the Boston Braves; they moved to the District
in 1937.
Such a compromise will not satisfy everyone. To
some, any reference to Native Americans by a sports
team is appropriation of Indian culture. To those on
the other end, changing the team name is caving to
the forces of political correctness. But compromise
will be required if we are ever to have a Washington
NFL team in which all can take pride.
Mark Weadon, Crofton
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It was a reckless and disappointing choice for the
Jan. 29 editorial “Cruelty from the top down” to
wrongly impugn the integrity of thousands of
dedicated federal law enforcement officers who
work for Immigration and Customs Enforcement
and execute federal immigration laws enacted by
Congress.
Attacking front-line law enforcement personnel is
a cheap swing at a group of officers sworn to carry
out lawful, congressionally mandated actions. Inflammatory, emotional rhetoric has come to taint
much of today’s public discourse surrounding immigration policy, and, unfortunately, this editorial was
no different.
The glib description of “garden-variety technical
violations of immigration rules” (otherwise known
as violations of federal law) displayed a fundamental
lack of understanding and respect for ICE’s mission
and our law enforcement personnel. Contrary to The
Post’s claims of indiscriminate enforcement, 92 percent of all aliens arrested by ICE in fiscal 2017 had
criminal convictions or pending criminal charges, or
were an immigration fugitive or an illegal reentrant.
Those kinds of outcomes only come about through
targeted enforcement.
Instead of bringing light to the complicated issues
in the larger immigration debate, the editorial
instead further clouded the truth in a debate that
deserves reasoned, factual arguments.
Tom Homan, Washington
The writer is deputy director of
Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
Christian support for Israel
The Jan. 29 front-page article “Evangelical passion for Israel may be peaking” mentioned Christians United for Israel’s (CUFI) position toward a
two-state solution and young evangelical Christians’ attitudes toward Israel, but it grievously
lacked nuance. CUFI stands with the democratically
elected government of Israel, a principle we share
with the American Israel Public Affairs Committee,
but against whom we are erroneously juxtaposed.
While CUFI does not lobby in support of a two-state
solution, we also do not lobby against it. We respect
Israel’s sovereign right to make its own decisions.
The LifeWay Research poll found somewhat
lower, though still majority, support for Israel
among younger evangelicals, but The Post’s analysis fundamentally underestimated young Christians’ capacity to grow and learn and misunderstood their approach to faith. Morally, young
Christians wish to live as Jesus did. They place a
premium on social justice and helping those in
need. While some millennial Christians have been
manipulated into believing that Israel does not
share their ethics and ideals, as young evangelicals
broaden their horizons and learn that Israel exemplifies their values, they become increasingly supportive of the Jewish state.
Sandy Parker, San Antonio
The writer is chairwoman of Christians United
for Israel Action Fund.
Jessica Marzucco, Nashville
The writer is director of Christians United
for Israel on Campus.
Letters and Local Opinions: letters@washpost.com
Op-eds: oped@washpost.com
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
Good news:
Stocks are
down
MICHAEL GERSON
This stain will not wash out
A
ccording to House Speaker
Paul D. Ryan, the declassified
Devin Nunes memo — alleging
FBI misconduct in the Russia
investigation — is “not an indictment of
the FBI, of the Department of Justice.”
According to President Trump, the
memo shows how leaders at the FBI
“politicized the sacred investigative
process in favor of Democrats” and
“totally vindicates ‘Trump’ in probe.”
Both men are deluded or deceptive.
Releasing the memo — while suppressing a dissenting assessment from
other members of the House Intelligence Committee — was clearly intended to demonstrate that the FBI is a
wholly owned subsidiary of the Democratic Party. The effort ended in a pathetic fizzle. Nunes’s brief, amateurish
document failed to demonstrate that
FBI surveillance was triggered solely or
mainly by a Democratic-funded dossier. But for cherry-picking above and
beyond the call of duty, Nunes (R-Calif.)
deserves his own exhibit in the hackery
hall of fame. This was a true innovation:
an intelligence product created and
released for the consumption of Fox
News.
Trump’s eager publication of the
memo was expected. Yet his action
crossed a line: from criticism of the FBI
to executive action designed to undermine an ongoing investigation. Trump
seems to be testing the waters for direct
action against the FBI by testing the
limits of what his Republican followers
will stomach. So far, there are no limits.
With the blessing of Republican
leaders, the lickspittle wing of the GOP
is now firmly in charge. The existence of
reckless partisans such as Nunes is
hardly surprising. The nearly uniform
cowardice among elected Republicans
is staggering. One is left wishing that
Obamacare covered spine transplants.
The Republican-led Congress is now an
adjunct of the White House. The White
House is now an adjunct of Trump’s
chaotic will.
And what to make of Ryan (R-Wis.)? I
have been a consistent defender of his
good intentions. But after the 17th time
saying “He knows better,” it dawns that
he may not. By his recent actions, the
speaker has provided political cover for
a weakening of the constitutional order.
He has been used as a tool while loudly
insisting he is not a tool. The way Ryan
is headed, history offers two possible
verdicts: Either he enabled an autocrat,
or he was intimidated by a fool. I believe
Ryan to be a good person. But the
greatest source of cynicism is not the
existence of corrupt people in politics;
it is good people who lose their way.
The United States Congress is an
institution of great power. According to
the Constitution, it can deny jurisdiction to the Supreme Court. It can remove the commander in chief. But now
it watches as Trump makes the executive branch his personal fiefdom. It
stands by — or cheers — as the president persecutes law enforcement professionals for the performance of their
public duties.
Why can’t Republican legislators see
the personal damage this might cause?
Trump has made a practice of forcing
people around him to lower their standards and abandon their ideals before
turning against them when their usefulness ends. His servants are sucked
dry of integrity and dignity, then
thrown away like the rind of a squeezed
orange. Who does Trump’s bidding and
has his or her reputation enhanced? A
generation of Republicans will end up
writing memoirs of apology and regret.
The political damage to the GOP as
the party of corruption and coverup
should be obvious as well. This is a rare
case when the rats, rather than deserting a sinking ship, seemed determined
to ride it all the way down.
But it is damage to the conscience
that is hardest to repair. For Republicans, what seemed like a temporary
political compromise is becoming an
indelible moral stain. The Russia investigation is revealing a Trump universe
in which ethical considerations did not
(and do not) figure at all. Who can
imagine a senior Trump campaign official — say, Paul Manafort or Donald
Trump Jr. — saying the words “That
would be wrong”? Their degraded spirit
has now invaded the whole GOP. By
defending Trump’s transgressions, by
justifying his abuses, Republicans are
creating an atmosphere in which corruption and cowardice thrive.
How can this course be corrected?
“You only have one political death,” said
Rep. John Jacob Rhodes, the late Republican congressman from Arizona,
“but you can choose when to use it.”
Larger showdowns — concerning the
possible firings of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III and Deputy Attorney
General Rod J. Rosenstein — now seem
likely. If there is nothing for which Ryan
and other Republican leaders will risk
their careers, there is nothing in which
they truly believe.
michaelgerson@washpost.com
EUGENE ROBINSON
Memo to Nunes and Trump:
Your ruse isn’t working
F
or the sake of argument, let’s
take President Trump and his
Fox News cheerleaders at their
word that they really believe
that the memo Rep. Devin Nunes (RCalif.) released Friday reveals a serious
assault on our freedoms by the FBI and
the Justice Department.
Nah. Just kidding.
It’s simply not possible, on any level,
to take seriously the histrionics from
Trump and his true-believer allies over
the Nunes memo — except as evidence
of how far the GOP has plunged into
cynicism and madness.
A bunch of law-and-order, war-onterrorism, lock-’em-up Republicans
suddenly sound like spokesmen for the
American Civil Liberties Union, so
grave is their concern that our government might in any way trespass upon
sacred due process. Imagine how such
guardians of the Constitution would
protest if, say, that selfsame government were to hold suspects in detention for a decade or more without
charges or trials. Wait, my bad: I seem
to recall Republicans applauding with
gusto when Trump, in his State of the
Union address, announced that the
prison at Guantanamo Bay will remain
open.
Nunes, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, packed so much
half-truth and distortion into four
short pages that it’s hard to know
where to begin. His hope must have
been that everyone would get lost in
thick weeds of arcane detail, losing
sight of the big picture. Which is not a
picture at all.
The point of the memo is to suggest
that in October 2016, the FBI and
Justice Department — under President
Barack Obama — improperly obtained
a secret warrant to conduct surveillance on former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page. We are supposed to
believe the warrant was based on information in the “discredited” Christopher Steele dossier about Trump’s connections with Russia. We are also given
to understand that pertinent information was improperly withheld from the
judge: the fact that Steele’s firm was
initially hired by Democrats seeking
dirt on Trump. Nunes strongly implies,
but doesn’t quite say, that without the
dossier, which was misrepresented by
prosecutors, there would be no Russia
investigation.
Ta-da! “This memo totally vindicates
‘Trump’ in probe,” the president desperately claimed in a tweet.
Stop laughing, readers.
The problem with Trump’s selfexoneration, of course, is that every-
thing the memo tries to make us believe
is false. The dossier was not the only
information the court relied on to
approve the warrant. Steele is a respected former British intelligence
agent, and some of the dossier’s findings, though by no means all, appear to
be accurate. The judge wasn’t told that
the dossier was funded by the Democrats, merely a partisan “political entity,” but the materials provided by the
FBI made it obvious it was an entity
opposed to Trump. The memo itself
acknowledges — quietly — that the
whole probe began with George Papadopoulos, another campaign adviser,
months before Page even came into the
picture.
Break this gently to Sean Hannity,
who might blow his last remaining
gasket: Even if the dossier had never
been written, Trump and his campaign
would still be under investigation.
If you don’t believe me, take it from
Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.), whose partisan credentials are unimpeachable —
he led the Benghazi inquisition — and
who was dispatched by Nunes to review all the classified intelligence used
to obtain the Page warrant.
“There is a Russia investigation
without a dossier,” he said Sunday. “The
dossier has nothing to do with the
meeting at Trump Tower. The dossier
has nothing to do with an email sent by
Cambridge Analytica. The dossier really has nothing to do with George
Papadopoulos’s meeting in Great Britain. It also doesn’t have anything to do
with obstruction of justice.”
Gowdy announced recently that he
will not run for reelection this fall. I
wonder which comes first for Republicans these days: The decision to retire?
Or the pangs of honesty, duty and —
one hopes — remorse?
Three other Republican members of
the Intelligence Committee — Chris
Stewart of Utah, Will Hurd of Texas and
Brad Wenstrup of Ohio — joined
Gowdy on the rounds of the Sunday
shows to deliver what sounded like a
coordinated message: Of course the
memo is a Terribly Serious Thing, but it
doesn’t undercut special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation.
It sounded like a warning to Trump,
who might be tempted to use the memo
as a pretense to rid himself of the
troublesome Mueller. This isn’t the way
Trump’s fawning courtiers on “Fox &
Friends” told him this memo gambit
was going to work out. The whole
Russia thing was supposed to be over.
Maybe he should change the channel
every once in a while.
eugenerobinson@washpost.com
BY
S EBASTIAN M ALLABY
W
MICHAEL NAGLE/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday.
CATHERINE RAMPELL
Why traders
are so nervous
P
resident Trump has been bragging about the stock market
since he took office, attributing
any upward movement to his
stewardship of the economy. Curiously,
with the market tumbling in recent
days, he’s been a teensy bit shyer about
taking credit for market performance.
So: What’s going on? And is Trump to
blame?
Markets move in mysterious ways —
animal spirits and all that — and you
should be skeptical of anyone who
claims they can definitively explain any
particular twinge of the ticker. Still, we
can point to at least a few factors that
could be making traders nervous right
now.
The first is that stocks have looked
pricey for a while. Consider the longterm price-to-earnings ratio. That’s a
measure of how much a stock costs
relative to how much that company has
been making in profits. That ratio is
about twice as high as the average from
the past century, a sign that stocks have
likely been overvalued.
In fact, the ratio for January was at its
highest level since mid-2001, when the
dot-com bubble was mid-pop.
Of course, we’ve known for a while
that this measure has seemed out of
whack. That doesn’t explain why we
had such a sharp correction mere days
after Trump’s State of the Union, when
he went out of his way to boast about
record highs on Wall Street.
So a second explanation, at least as it
relates to timing, has to do with recent
economic data.
Inflation has been unusually low for
a while. But some recent reports suggest that could change. For instance,
Friday’s jobs report showed U.S. wages
rising at their fastest annual pace since
June 2009. This is generally welcome
news, especially since we’ve seen such
sluggish wage growth for so long. But
higher wages could also be the start of
higher prices — that is, faster inflation.
If prices rise more quickly than had
been expected, and the economy suddenly looks as though it is overheating,
that might lead the Federal Reserve to
raise interest rates more quickly than it
previously suggested it would. If rates
rise more quickly, that’s generally bad
for stocks.
In the several months leading up to
Friday’s sell-off, rates on 10-year government bonds had been creeping
up. Rising yields can reflect anticipation of higher inflation and could also
convince the Fed that it soon needs to
nip inflationary concerns in the bud.
A third, and related, factor: We just
got a new Fed chair. As in, on Monday
morning. And that chair’s approach to
monetary policy — including how
quickly to raise rates in any particular
environment — is a bit of a mystery.
Investors knew that his predecessor,
Janet L. Yellen, was an inflation dove,
meaning she was more willing to keep
interest rates low for longer. But the
new chair, Jerome H. Powell, may be
inclined to speed up rate hikes in response to the recent wage and bond
yield data. So investors may feel it’s best
to err on the side of assuming he’s more
hawkish. Which means that, faced with
a report suggesting faster inflation
could be on its way, they may choose to
sell off stocks, just to be safe.
Finally, there’s fiscal policy to consider.
We’ve seen Congress and the White
House decide to blow up deficits of late.
That includes the $1.5 trillion, deficitfinanced tax cut passed in December, as
well as costly proposals for an infrastructure package, Mexican border
wall, and upgrading our nuclear arsenal and more broadly ramping up
spending on our military.
All of these measures amount to economic stimulus. But with unemployment at 4.1 percent, now is a strange
time to be engaging in expansionary fiscal policy. Usually you do that
when the economy needs a boost. This
has led to speculation that the Fed may
feel more pressure to offset, or correct
for, these stimulative fiscal policies; if
Congress is going to step on the gas, Fed
officials may conclude that they need
step on the brakes.
And again, with a new chair, it’s even
more difficult to deduce exactly how
hard the Fed might step — even slam —
on the brakes.
All that said, while presidents can
influence markets, they don’t control
them. The best thing Trump and lawmakers can do to reassure investors
would be to show they take their economic policymaking responsibilities
seriously and are not just trying to score
short-term stock-market spikes. And
that, moreover, they recognize that the
market is not the same thing as the
economy.
Given the ugly numbers Monday, at
least, they may have finally taken this
last lesson to heart.
crampell@washpost.com
POSTPARTISAN
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan
Trump’s vile new
attack on Democrats
How dare he? The plummeting stock market
served to divert attention from President
Trump’s astonishing attack on Democrats for
failing to applaud during his State of the
Union address last week.
Speaking at a manufacturing plant outside Cincinnati on Monday, Trump accused
Democrats of the vilest crime: treason. Even
when he touted record-low black unemployment, Trump complained, Democrats sat on
their hands. “They were like death. And
un-American. Un-American. Somebody said
‘treasonous.’ I mean, yeah, I guess, why not?
Can we call that treason? Why not? I mean
they certainly didn’t seem to love our country very much.”
It’s fair to say that Democrats looked
churlish in their sour response to Trump’s
speech. But not un-American. Not treasonous.
It is not treasonous, but it is un-American,
actually, to accuse your political opponents
of a crime against the nation for constitutionally protected dissent. It should not be
necessary to spell this out, but here we are.
The president does not understand the first
thing about the country he was elected to
lead, or about the Constitution that he swore
to uphold.
For instance, that treason is the only crime
defined in the Constitution, which provides
that “treason against the United States, shall
consist only in levying war against them, or
in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid
and comfort.”
The reason for this specificity, as University of California at Davis law professor
Carlton F.W. Larson has explained, is that the
framers were concerned that accusations of
treason not be transformed into criminal
cudgels against political enemies.
“Treason,” wrote James Wilson, understood to be the author of the treason clause,
“is unquestionably a crime most dangerous
to the society, and most repugnant to the first
principles of the social compact. It must,
however, be observed, that as the crime itself
is dangerous and hostile to the state, so the
imputation of it has been and may be dangerous and oppressive to the citizens.”
Dangerous and oppressive indeed. Trump
surely does not imagine putting Democrats
on trial for treason. Indeed, if you watch the
video, you can see him treat the outrageous
accusation in an offhand, why-not-go-there
manner: Treason? Whatever. But even if
Trump is not ready to round up his political
opponents, it is appalling — it is unthinkable
— that a president would use this kind of
language to describe dissent.
Nor is this the first time that Trump has
gone there. In an interview with the Wall
Street Journal last month, he accused FBI
agent Peter Strzok of “a treasonous act” for
sending texts critical of Trump and, in
Trump’s paranoid interpretation, scheming
to oust him.
That was vile enough. This is worse. We all
need to stop checking our depleted retirement accounts long enough to take note of
this disgraceful moment.
— Ruth Marcus
all Street is always quick
with colorful disaster metaphors, and the latest market
convulsion has already been
dubbed the “bondcano.” But a little lava
spillage can be a hopeful sign. For the
first time since the financial crisis of
2008, a strange cloud that has hung
over the economy may finally be lifting.
By most measures, the economy has
performed well since 2008. The recovery has so far lasted for 103 months and
will soon rank as the second-longest
post-war expansion. GDP is up by
2.5 percent over the past year, not bad
for a graying society; unemployment is
at a rock-bottom 4.1 percent. But an
uneasy feeling has haunted the celebration. No matter how many jobs the
economy created, many feared it would
never return to the pre-crisis condition
in which buoyant hiring could coexist
with decent returns for savers.
This pessimism has been most evident among Federal Reserve leaders.
Members of the Fed’s monetary committee regularly publish their views of
the appropriate long-run interest rate,
known as “R*” in the jargon. This is the
interest rate that the economy needs to
achieve stable inflation and maximum
employment. A high R* is generally
good news: It means that businesses
want to borrow and expand aggressively, so you can get to full employment
even when interest rates are relatively
high. Workers can do well even as
savers do well. Think back two decades,
when unemployment was low, wages
were rising and savers enjoyed a riskfree 5.5 percent return on their money.
The bad news is that, in the judgment of Fed leaders, R* has come down
sharply. Since 2012, the median estimate of the long-run interest rate
published by monetary committee
members has fallen from a bit over
4 percent to under 3 percent — this
means that, stripping out inflation, the
estimate for the real interest rate has
collapsed by about two-thirds. Businesses seem unexcited about borrowing and investing, the Fed chiefs are
saying. Interest rates will have to stay
low to generate full employment.
For anyone with a retirement fund,
this is a grim prospect. The lower the
return on savings, the more you have to
set aside to afford retirement. For the
past several years, admittedly, this
truth has been obscured: Stocks have
had a glorious run as low interest rates
have chased savings into the markets.
But that portfolio shift is probably over,
and may well have overshot; witness
Monday’s fall of more than 4 percent in
the S&P 500 index. From here on out,
workers seeking to build up their retirement funds may have to save more
and work longer.
How did the economy get stuck in
this rut? The gloomy estimates of R*
reflect a conviction that, even before
the 2008 shock, powerful forces were
pushing down on interest rates. The
aging of the baby boomers boosted the
saving rate. So did the rise in inequality
— more of the national income was
flowing to people who could afford to
save it. The growing supply of capital
was met with falling demand for capital, pushing down the natural interest
rate further. Slowing productivity gains
suggested that there were not that
many great machines that businesses
wanted to buy — hence sluggish business investment. Even the exciting
breakthroughs in Silicon Valley were
not capital-hungry. You can launch a
ride-sharing company or a digital coin
without buying much machinery.
So far, so pessimistic. But the United
States has a history of defying gloomy
predictions. Economists predicted
“secular stagnation” in the 1940s, right
before the 1950s boom, and today there
are signs that Fed estimates of R* are
too cautious. Jason Cummins, the research chief at a major hedge fund and
a candidate to lead the New York Fed,
points out that capital expenditure is
recovering; expectations of capital expenditure are soaring; and the personal saving rate has fallen back to its
pre-crisis low. In Washington, the
Trump tax cut means that the government saving rate is falling dramatically
as well: We are back on the path to a
trillion-dollar deficit. Meanwhile in Silicon Valley, some venture capitalists
are shifting to capital-hungry projects
— medical robotics, next-gen nuclear
fusion, satellites and so on. Globally,
healthy economies have dulled investors’ urge to park money in the United
States because of its safe-haven status.
All of which suggests that savings in
the United States will be less abundant,
demand for them will be more abundant, and the natural interest rate will
move higher. Unless markets suddenly
reverse themselves, the recent bondcano probably reflects an awakening:
When investors revise up their view of
interest rates, bond prices tumble. For
many professional money managers,
these may well be scalding times. But
for the economy as a whole, a higher R*
would be a sign that the post-2008
malaise is finally healing.
Sebastian Mallaby, author of “The Man Who
Knew: The Life & Times of Alan Greenspan,”
is the Paul A. Volcker senior fellow for
international economics at the Council on
Foreign Relations and a contributing
columnist for The Post.
A16
EZ
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RE
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
High today at
approx. 3 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
31 41 44 37°
°
°
°
46°
Precip: 10%
Wind: W
6-12 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
SU
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
MARYLAND
OBITUARIES
Gravelly Point Park’s
name speaks to the
District’s foundation, and
it shouldn’t be changed. B3
Democratic Del. Dan K.
Morhaim (Baltimore
County) said he’s retiring
after 24 years in office. B3
Dennis Edwards was a
Grammy-winning member
of the Motown group
the Temptations. B6
A Md. teen brutally beat a man in 1995. He has a shot at parole, but a court case argues the system will unjustly keep him
behind bars for life
Dispute
clouds
bill on
utilities
MEASURE WOULD
REGULATE RATES
Northam, Herring differ
on cost to consumers
BY
MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
W
alter Irving Maddox was on the
phone making New Year’s Eve
plans when he heard a knock
on the door of his secluded
cottage steps from the creek
where he’d spent decades hauling crabs. He
laid the phone on a bed.
From the other end of the line, his girlfriend
heard voices. Then, sharp banging and doors
slamming, followed by groans and gurgling.
The metallic sound, she would learn, was a
neighborhood teenager, James E. Bowie, pummeling the 68-year-old Maddox with an aluminum baseball bat.
Bowie was a high school dropout, fueled by
drugs and anger. He never intended to hurt
Maddox so severely, just to subdue him while a
friend grabbed the waterman’s cash, he said
recently.
Maddox, now 90, was never the same.
“It just destroyed his memory,” said Maddox’s son, who shares his father’s name. “They
took his life away from him, but they didn’t
finish the job.”
Bowie was 17. He was sentenced in 1997 to
BY
A NN E . M ARIMOW
life in prison with the possibility of parole — a
possibility his lawyers say exists on paper but
carries no real chance for release.
Maryland is one of three states, with
California and Oklahoma, that requires the
governor’s signature to parole inmates sentenced to life. In the past two decades, no
Maryland governor has signed off on a parole
board recommendation to release a lifer like
Bowie who committed his crime before he
turned 18.
Bowie spent his 20s and 30s in prison —
more time locked up than he lived on the
outside.
“My life experience stopped at 17,” Bowie,
now 40, said in interviews from the state
prison in Hagerstown, Md. “I needed to be
punished for what I did and needed to have
time to be corrected, but the rest of my life is
overkill. I’m not the same person I was.”
His case is one of four being considered this
week by the state’s highest court in Annapolis
in a challenge to the legality of the Maryland
parole system. Prison reform advocates say
FAMILY PHOTO
LIFER CONTINUED ON B2
TOP: Walter Irving Maddox, 90, sits on his bed at the assisted-living facility in La Plata, Md., where he lives. The attack on him more than 20 years
ago “destroyed his memory,” his son says. ABOVE: James E. Bowie poses with his mother, Judy Fields, a few days before he attacked and robbed
Maddox. Bowie was then 17. He received a life term with the possibility of parole — but a court challenge says that possibility is, in reality, nonexistent.
D.C. watchdog says she
lost job after pushback
BY P ETER J AMISON
AND F ENIT N IRAPPIL
D.C. lawmakers voiced concern
Monday about the unexplained
removal of the District’s government-transparency
watchdog,
who said that she faced pushback
from other public officials — including in the office of Mayor
Muriel E. Bowser (D) — as she
sought to enforce the city’s laws
on open meetings and records.
D.C. Office of Open Government Director Traci L. Hughes
learned last week that the panel
that oversees her office had voted
unanimously not to reappoint
her. The board voted in closed
session, as is common in internal
decisions affecting employees,
and has not disclosed its reasons
for seeking a replacement.
Hughes said Monday that she
had faced pressure to pull punches in her role of policing District
agencies’ compliance with the
Open Meetings Act and Freedom
of Information Act. “I resisted the
pressure, and I do think that
that’s probably part of the reason
that I’m in the position that I’m in
today,” she said on the “Kojo
Nnamdi Show” on WAMU-FM
(88.5).
Hughes later said in an interview with The Washington Post
that Betsy Cavendish, the mayor’s
general counsel, had opposed
Hughes’s 2016 decision to sue the
Mayor’s Advisory Commission on
Caribbean Community Affairs
over its refusal to comply with
open-meeting laws. That lawsuit
emerged as an important test
case of the office’s enforcement
power, with a judge ruling that
the commission must follow
Hughes’s directions.
Hughes, 48, was appointed the
first director of the open government office in 2013.
Bowser’s office declined to reETHICS CONTINUED ON B4
It’s time for Melania to find her voice
Nope, ladies. No
more mulligans
for Melania.
Thanks to a
recent report of
her husband’s
Petula
alleged affair with
Dvorak
an adult film star
years ago, a
bipartisan sisterhood is coming
to the first lady’s side. She has
been defended and protected.
Even a “Saturday Night Live” skit
over the weekend gave her the
closest thing to sympathy that
merciless crew can muster.
The truth is, Melania Trump is
not a delicate flower or a victim.
She is a grown woman, an
immigrant who made it in a
cutthroat industry.
She is capable of tackling
tough issues, of respecting the
responsibility and opportunity
she’s been given.
And yet — she hasn’t.
America deserves better.
Women say we shouldn’t focus
on her clothing (like when she
wore stilettos on the way to visit
JIM WATSON/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Melania Trump is not a delicate flower, Petula Dvorak says, and she
owes it to the country to use her power as first lady to speak out.
Texas after a hurricane); they say
it’s not right to criticize her for
not smiling (the fallen face
behind Trump’s back at the
inauguration); and there’s the old
“women-have-been-criticizedenough-for-their choices” chorus
after she waited so long to move
to Washington.
There are the hopeful women
trying to find encrypted feminist
messages embedded in her
movements, her clothing, her
DVORAK CONTINUED ON B3
G REGORY S . S CHNEIDER
richmond — Gov. Ralph
Northam (D) has brokered an
agreement on a bill to restore state
regulation of electric utility rates,
but the consumer protection office of Attorney General Mark R.
Herring (D) contends that the
measure remains a bad deal for
ratepayers.
Northam says the proposed legislation balances the need to keep
rates low with the obligation to
upgrade the state’s electricity grid
and invest in renewable energy
such as wind and solar.
But Herring’s office said the
package doesn’t adequately protect consumers and could actually
let the utilities charge ratepayers
twice for the same expenses.
The legislation is among the
most ambitious the General Assembly is tackling this year, a
sweeping recasting of the state’s
relationship with its biggest regulated monopoly that will affect
customers’ power bills for a decade.
It would undo a rate freeze the
legislature approved in 2015 when
Dominion Energy, the state’s biggest utility, successfully argued it
needed a cushion against unpreVIRGINIA CONTINUED ON B4
Safety
panel
nears
for Metro
But tasks remain before
board can get federal
certification
BY
F AIZ S IDDIQUI
When the long-awaited Metro
Safety Commission gathers for its
orientation Wednesday, the group
will include two former chairs of
the National Transportation Safety Board, the former head of the
nation’s largest transit system,
and a onetime executive of perhaps the country’s best-known
transportation advocacy group.
Joining them will be a mix of
homeland security experts and
former public administrators with
less clear-cut transit credentials
but who officials say bring sufficient expertise to oversee the safety of the troubled Metro.
“We’ve got a very strong group
of commissioners with a very wide
variety of experience,” said Jennifer Mitchell, director of the Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation. “I think they’re
going to work very well together.”
More than two years after the
Federal Transit Administration
took over safety oversight of the
rail system, the new panel is moving toward federal certification after a lengthy legislative and appointment process. Founding legislation has been enacted at the
federal, state and D.C. levels, and
eight of nine commissioners have
been appointed. But significant
tasks remain: the hiring of an executive director, legislative confirmations of the commissioners and
METRO CONTINUED ON B8
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
“There really isn’t any excuse for why Maryland is . . . denying people who were sent to prison as kids any hope of relief.”
Sonia Kumar, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union
‘A life
sentence
means
life’
LIFER FROM B1
the system is unconstitutional
because while the punishment in
the cases involving juvenile offenders technically includes the
chance of parole, the state hasn’t
paroled any inmate in that position in more than 20 years.
The office of Attorney General
Brian E. Frosh says Bowie’s sentence, for attempted murder and
robbery, is legal and his challenge
is premature. Bowie hasn’t been
recommended for parole or formally denied release by any governor.
“If they are unhappy with the
way parole is implemented, their
issue is with the executive
branch,” said Raquel Coombs,
Frosh’s spokeswoman.
The question for the Maryland
Court of Appeals is whether a
young person can be sentenced to
life without what advocates say is
a realistic chance of parole. The
outcome of the cases could affect
an estimated 300 lifers imprisoned for crimes they committed
as juveniles.
In several rulings, the U.S. Supreme Court prohibited a sentence of life without parole for
juveniles in all but the rarest
cases, saying most juvenile offenders should have a “meaningful opportunity” to show they
have matured and to be released.
Juveniles are not as culpable as
adults, the court has said, in part
because they are more susceptible to peer pressure and to making bad decisions.
“The Supreme Court has been
so clear and so forceful about how
the landscape has changed,” said
Sonia Kumar, a lawyer with the
American Civil Liberties Union.
She is challenging Maryland’s parole system in a separate, federal
case.
“There really isn’t any excuse
for why Maryland is still operating the way it is and denying
people who were sent to prison as
kids any hope of relief no matter
how thoroughly they’ve turned
their lives around,” Kumar said.
The Maryland attorney general’s office says the fact that parole
on life sentences is infrequent
and has declined “is not proof of a
constitutional violation” but
rather “proof, perhaps, of changes in the way that governors and
parole commissioners exercise
their discretion, but nothing
more.”
Inmates with life sentences
with the possibility of parole
must serve at least 15 years before
being considered for release. Parole commissioners, appointed
by the governor, review records,
notify victims and interview the
prisoner before making a recommendation to the governor, who
must act within 180 days.
In Bowie’s case, the parole
board recommended him for a
rehearing after his first review in
2007.
Changes to the system, the
attorney general’s office says,
must come from the legislature or
the governor. But legislation to
take the governor — and politics
— out of the parole process, proposed again this session, has been
stymied for years in part because
of opposition from elected state
prosecutors.
Between 1969 and 1994, three
Maryland governors paroled 181
lifers.
As governor, Parris N. Glendening said in 1995 that he would
sign no paroles in life-term cases,
standing in front of a state prison
to announce: “A life sentence
means life.”
In the following two decades,
court records show, none was
paroled. Governors rejected recommendations on 24 lifers —
juveniles and adults — without
explanation.
The current governor, Gov.
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Larry Hogan (R), has approved
parole for two adults sentenced to
life. Like each governor since
Glendening, he also has used
separate clemency powers to reduce prison sentences and bring
early release for a small number
of lifers. But advocates say acts
based on prerogative do not fix an
unconstitutional life sentence or
the parole system.
“Not only is the governor not
bound by any standards or forced
to consider any particular factors,
but the governor is not required
in any way to explain his decision,” said James Johnston, director of the Youth Resentencing
Project within the Maryland Office of the Public Defender, which
has brought dozens of court challenges throughout the state, including in Bowie’s case.
The three other cases before
the appeals court this week involve crimes committed by teenagers who are serving life sentences or, in one case, a term of
100 years. They involve a 1989
home invasion in Prince George’s
County that resulted in three
deaths; a 1999 murder in Baltimore; and a 2004 shooting outside Randallstown High School in
Baltimore County that paralyzed
a student.
‘They tried to kill me’
The violent assault on Maddox
at his home in Southern Maryland came three months after
Glendening’s pronouncement.
Maddox was “top dog” on the
water, known for building his
own crab pots, for making spicy
chowder and for his strong opinions, said his eldest son, Walter
Irving Maddox Jr.
A family photo from a few days
before the Dec. 28 attack shows
Bowie with feathered blond hair,
in a polo shirt, with his arm
draped around his mother, who
wears a red Christmas sweater.
Bowie’s smile belies his troubled
childhood.
After his parents split up, Bowie lived with his grandmother in
modest, former military housing
overlooking the Potomac River.
He said he had been a diligent
kid, interested in music and art,
but started drinking at 10, smoking marijuana at 12 and fighting
in middle school to get attention.
As a teen, he sold PCP to pay for
limo rides and name-brand
sneakers
his
grandmother
couldn’t afford, he said.
Court records, transcripts and
interviews detail the night that
put Bowie in prison: Three days
after Christmas, Bowie was
drinking and buzzing on cocaine.
THE DAILY QUIZ
Guzzling around four or five cups of coffee a day
is when maximum benefits of drinking it occurs.
That translates to what in Starbucks lingo?
A) Three “tall” drinks. B) Seven “venti” drinks.
C) Two “grande” drinks. D) One “trenta” drink.
E) All of the above.
(Hint: The answer is in today’s Health and Science section.)
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
FAMILY PHOTO
FAMILY PHOTO
MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
FROM TOP: Maryland state Sen. Delores G. Kelley holds
photos of people serving life terms during a news conference
to push for changes in the parole system. A photo of Walter
Irving Maddox displayed in his son’s house. James E. Bowie
with his grandmother, Marie Bowie, during a prison visit in
an undated photo. Maddox gets help from his son, Walter
Jr., at the memory-care facility in La Plata where he lives.
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Events & Contests.
A friend who had worked for
Maddox’s fishing operation suggested robbing the waterman,
who kept his cash at home and
lived alone about three-quarters
of a mile off a main road in
Charles County.
The plan was to spray Maddox
with mace at the door and quickly
find his cash, which they would
use to buy drugs.
Instead, Bowie hit Maddox in
the head with the bat, dropping
him to the floor. When Maddox
tried to get up on all fours, Bowie
swung and connected again, according to court records.
In all, the teens took five onehundred-dollar bills from Maddox’s wallet, the records show.
When Maddox’s son, Walter Jr.,
arrived after getting a call from
his father’s landlord, there was so
much blood in the entryway, he
recalled recently, “it looked like
someone had killed a hog in
there.” His father had a concussion and a fractured skull. He
didn’t know where he was.
“His eyes were as black as a
frying pan,” said his son, who
vividly remembers the helicopter
landing in a hayfield to take his
father to the hospital.
After weeks in a trauma center
and rehabilitation, Maddox was
diminished physically and intellectually, said his son, a fisherman who is also a machinist at
The Washington Post.
Maddox’s short-term memory
was shot; he talked more about
his service in the military during
World War II and Korea. It took
him years to relearn his work on
the water. Even tasks such as
setting crab pots were vexing.
“We learned to work around it,”
said his then-girlfriend, Betty
Duty, who had called 911 that
night and lived with him for years
after the attack.
Now 90, and in a memory-care
facility in La Plata, Maddox has
trouble speaking clearly and gets
easily confused, including about
Bowie’s appeal. But when his son
asked whether he remembered
what happened to him that night,
he was direct: “They tried to kill
me. They beat the hell out of me.”
At sentencing, Bowie apologized and said, “This should have
never happened.”
As a juvenile offender, he
thought he would be out of prison
in six years.
The judge acknowledged Bowie’s tough childhood, easy access
to drugs and the failings of the
community around him not to
step in and help. “There’s a lot of
fault, a lot of blame,” the judge
said.
But, he concluded, “Whether
we made him this way or whether
somebody else made him this
way, the fact is, he is somebody
who is capable of this kind of
engineering and participating actively in this kind of horror.”
Sentenced to life, Bowie was
angry all over again. For the first
six years in prison, he was known
as “Jimbo Jones,” for the bad-boy
“Simpsons” character, fighting
and using drugs, he said.
A change in attitude
A turning point came in 2003,
after Bowie tested positive for
heroin and was sent to solitary
with no phone calls or visits for
five months.
As soon as he was back on his
regular wing, Bowie called his
father, who had rarely visited. His
father promised they’d talk — but
by the next day, Bowie said, his
father was dead from a mix of
alcohol and painkillers he was
taking after a knee surgery.
“That woke me up,” Bowie said
in a prison interview in late January. “Even ending up in prison
didn’t hit me as hard as losing my
father.”
He said he has found structure
in the routine of his work in the
prison commissary and is paid $2
a day to teach English, mostly to
Latino prisoners.
At 40, Bowie describes himself
as the “old head” among inmates,
who tease him for never having
used the Internet or social media.
He takes part in a regular mentoring program for young inmates
who are as emotional and irrational as he once was, steering them
to avoid the mistakes he made.
“I never want to belittle what
happened, because it was a horrific thing,” said Bowie, whose
attorney told him early on not to
contact Maddox or his family to
apologize directly. “But those
decisions were made as a drugaddled teenager who wasn’t even
sure who I was as a person.”
In La Plata, Maddox’s son isn’t
sure that years of prison could
have helped someone like Bowie
turn his life around after such a
rocky start.
“It ain’t the kid’s fault he was
brought up in a drug world,”
Walter Jr. said, but that doesn’t
mean he should be paroled. “I
hate to say it, no, I don’t think he
should get out.”
For what was done to his father, “I can’t forget it,” he said,
tearing up. “I can’t forgive it.”
ann.marimow@washpost.com
Magda Jean-Louis contributed to this
report.
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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
Gravelly Point Park’s moniker is one that shouldn’t just be shoveled aside
A Republican
representative
from Georgia,
Jody Hice, wants
to rename
Gravelly Point
Park and call it
John
Kelly's
Nancy Reagan
Washington Memorial Park. I
wonder if there’s
anything else he
wants to rename while he’s at it.
The Rocky Mountains? The
Great Salt Lake? The Grand
Canyon?
That fact is, Gravelly Point
has a perfectly good name
already, a name that — like
those other landmarks — has
the rather commendable quality
of being refreshingly honest.
Gravelly Point, on the Potomac
just above Reagan National
Airport (don’t get me started), is
named after gravel.
Gravel, you say? Ugh, you say?
Boring, you say?
To which I say: Pshaw.
Gravel was created by the
great geologic processes that
have raked this planet since its
birth 4 billion years ago. This
town is built on gravel and its
little brother, sand. And a heck
of a lot of it came from the area
around Gravelly Point, scooped
from the bottom of the Potomac
like so much Klondike gold.
“Gravel is truly one of the
most fundamental building
blocks in America,” said Bailey
Wood, vice president of
communications for the
National Stone, Sand and Gravel
2015 PHOTO BY MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
People gather at Gravelly Point Park in Arlington, a popular spot to watch airplanes land at nearby
Reagan National Airport. Rep. Jody Hice (R-Ga.) wants to rename it Nancy Reagan Memorial Park.
Association, located about five
miles from Gravelly Point, in
Alexandria. “We commonly say
around here that there is
nothing of significance built in
this country that doesn’t start
with a rock. And gravel is a
fundamental component of
that.”
As lovely as Nancy Reagan
may have been, she didn’t
literally provide the foundation
for our city.
Take the Pentagon. In “The
Pentagon: A History,” author
Steve Vogel recounts the
construction of the famed fivesided office building, which
required massive amounts of
gravel-hungry concrete.
“The location chosen to
construct such a building was a
wise one, from the standpoint of
the basic ingredients needed,”
Vogel writes. “Just south of the
site, beneath the waters of the
Potomac and below a layer of
soft mud, lay a boundless supply
PETULA DVORAK
Melania has a
powerful role.
She needs to
start using it.
DVORAK FROM B1
rare public statements.
Oh! She wore a pussy-bow
blouse right after the “grab them
by the p---y” tape was discovered
— she’s telling him it’s wrong!
Whoa — she said Internet
bullying will be her platform —
she’s signaling that she knows her
husband’s tweets are awful!
She went to the Holocaust
museum — she’s against the
Nazis!
And finally, there’s that SNL bit
about first ladies comforting
Trump, played by Cecily Strong,
who confirms that she wore white
to the State of the Union address
just like the suffragists, just like
sister Hillary!
Puh-leeze.
If all of this were true, if our
first lady believes that women
should not be grabbed by the
genitals by powerful men, if she
believes that cyberbullying is a
danger, if she believes that all of
humanity should never forget the
lessons of the Holocaust, and if
she believes that the suffragists
were righteous in their fight for
equal rights — then she needs to
say it. Out loud.
Coy signals — if that’s what
they are — are about her, not us.
Yeah, yeah, she wasn’t elected,
she didn’t ask for this, and there
is no real job description that
comes with being a president’s
JONATHAN ERNST/REUTERS
President Trump and first lady Melania Trump leave a National
Guard base in Puerto Rico after a tour of Hurricane Maria damage.
spouse.
And yes, she should totally
wear killer heels if she wants to.
That’s not what this is about.
She has one of the most
powerful platforms in the
country, the world.
And she can do so much good
with that. People will listen to her.
This isn’t the 1820s, and Trump
has no need to be like the only
other foreign-born first lady,
Louisa Adams.
They’re similar, those two.
Adams didn’t go willingly into
public life and made no secret of
her resentment over her
husband’s presidential victory.
She spent her summers apart
from John Quincy Adams.
Eventually, quietly, after
reading some of the early
writings about women’s rights
and equality, Louisa Adams wrote
plays and poems that skewered
her husband in the kind of thinly
veiled references so many
feminists want from Trump.
Those days should be behind
American women.
It’s an honor, a privilege and a
platform, this position of first
lady.
Even before Eleanor Roosevelt
set a new standard for the
influence and input as a first lady
by holding regular radio chats,
advocating for civil rights and
working to help the unemployed,
earlier first ladies used their
power for good.
Grace Coolidge advocated for
people with disabilities and
raised $2 million for a school for
the deaf. Nellie Taft hired African
American men to work at the
White House. The beloved Dolley
Madison was fiercely involved in
local charities and saved many
national treasures before the
White House was trashed in the
War of 1812.
Pat Nixon set a precedent as
first lady as the first to visit a
combat zone. Betty Ford
advocated for treatment of
substance abuse, breast cancer
awareness and the Equal Rights
Amendment. Libraries, mental
health, the environment,
of sand and gravel.”
It was these deposits that
gave the area its name.
“Gravelly Point is a landform
geologists call a point bar,
because of its location on the
inside of a big bend in the river,”
said geologist Tony Fleming,
author of “Geologic Atlas of the
City of Alexandria, Virginia and
Vicinity.” “That’s where you get
sand and gravel deposited in a
river.”
Each pebble was born
education, literacy, obesity, health
care — first ladies worked to
make a meaningful impact on all
of these issues.
Trump has given us possible
smoke signals and one reading of
a Dr. Seuss book. In exchange, the
taxpayers have subsidized her
complicated life and travels. But
more importantly, the American
people have given her a coveted
place in American history, in
Americans’ hearts.
Trump isn’t bound by the days
when women weren’t allowed to
vote, weren’t welcome into
Congress, weren’t expected to
learn, to think and to speak.
She has an open door, an onramp and a public ready to hear
from her.
She owes it to America and
especially to American women to
use that power. The former model
also owes it to American girls
(and boys) to be shown that
women are more than their looks,
their bodies, their shoes and their
hair.
Let’s go back to Adams, that
other foreign-born first lady, to
offer Trump some inspiration.
After her subversive poems, plays
and quiet protests, Adams
blossomed. She became one of
the first women to attend
congressional hearings. She went
on to become a fierce and vocal
abolitionist.
By the time of her death on
May 15, 1852, she was so respected
for her work and for her voice,
both houses of Congress
adjourned in mourning, making
her the first woman whose death
was recognized in such a way by
the federal government.
It’s time for Melania Trump to
be more than a blank slate on
which women project their fears.
She owes that to her country.
petula.dvorak@washpost.com
Twitter: @petulad
hundreds of miles away and
millions of years ago. Gravel
began as massive chunks of
bedrock, like you see
surrounding the gorge at
Harpers Ferry, W.Va. Big rocks
fell into the Potomac, which
during the last ice age was a
much more violent river.
The rocks tumbled down the
river, driven by the churning,
fast-moving water.
“As they’re transported
downstream, they get abraded,”
Tony said. “Eventually they get
abraded into a smaller size and
get more rounded.”
Broken but unbowed, each
stone came to settle in the
slower-moving inside bend of
the river, creating vast islands of
gravel: Gravelly Point.
Said Tony: “That could well be
some Colonial name given by
some luminary, like George
Washington.”
That’s right: House
Republicans on the Natural
Resources Committee, who
advanced a bill sponsored by
Hice on a party-line vote, want
to take away a name that may
have been bestowed by the
father of our country.
In the 19th century, the gravel
in our stretch of the Potomac
started to create great fortunes.
The largest company was Smoot
Sand & Gravel. It was Smoot
sand that gritted the District’s
icy roads in winter. It was Smoot
gravel that strengthened the
concrete of its buildings.
Smoot bought up riverfront
MARYLAND
Slain man found in
Prince George’s road
A homeless man was fatally
stabbed Sunday night in Prince
George’s County.
The incident happened about
11:20 p.m. in the 1300 block of
Glacier Avenue in Capitol
Heights.
Police were called to the area
to check on a man in the road.
Officers found Joseph Whack,
32, with a stab wound, and he
died at a hospital, police said.
The incident does not appear
to be a random crime,
police said.
— Dana Hedgpeth
and Lynh Bui
Carbon monoxide
kills church leader
A 61-year-old man who was a
leader in the Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints died
after he was overcome by carbon
monoxide at his Montgomery
County house, authorities said.
The victim was identified on
Facebook as James Baird,
president of the Washington
stake of the church, often
referred to as the Mormon
Church. The Annapolis stake of
the church reported his death
on Thursday.
Three people, one in critical
condition, were taken to
hospitals Wednesday after they
BY
R ACHEL S IEGEL
Maryland Del. Dan K. Morhaim
(D-Baltimore County) will not
seek another term in the General
Assembly, ending a 24-year run in
which he championed legislation
for health and environmental
causes, including helping to
launch the state’s medical marijuana program, and recently made
headlines for his ties to that industry, which resulted in a political
conflict of interest.
Morhaim, who would be 70 at
the start of next year’s legislative
session, said Monday that he and
his wife decided four years ago
that he would not seek another
term. He said his major accomplishments included crafting
Maryland’s medical marijuana
program, expanding addiction
treatment and creating a statewide organ donation system and
electronics recycling program.
An emergency room physician,
Morhaim said he will continue
practicing medicine after leaving
office.
“I’m committed to social and
policy change,” Morhaim said. “It’s
been 24 years of doing that in the
House of Delegates. There are lots
of ways to do that in addition to
being a state legislator.”
In a Facebook statement,
Morhaim wrote that in his first
term, the family of a young girl
born with a cleft lip and palate
asked him to introduce legislation
that eventually passed and required health insurance companies to pay for surgical repairs of
that condition. He also oversaw
bills supporting colon cancer
screenings and improving end-oflife care by promoting advance
directives.
“So much of what I was seeing
in the emergency room was from
social issues,” Morhaim said. “For
most of the patients I was seeing,
there was often a social antecedent to them being in the emergency room.”
Morhaim also rallied around
environmental causes, introducing legislation to protect Maryland’s coastal bays from overdevelopment and creating a statewide electronics recycling system.
He also pushed for green construction practices in the state to
reduce utility expenses and pollution.
Morhaim led the charge for
Maryland’s medical cannabis pro-
BRIAN WITTE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
gram, which debuted in December
after nearly five years of delays.
He first introduced medical
marijuana legislation in 2003,
long before he forged business ties
with the industry as a paid consultant to a prospective dispensary —
a relationship he did not publicly
disclose until a Washington Post
story in 2016.
Morhaim was then removed
from the health committee overseeing medical marijuana legislation and investigated by the Joint
Committee on Legislative Ethics,
which concluded he had violated
the principles of state ethics laws
by using his influence to engage
with the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission and push pol-
icies that could have benefited the
dispensary, Doctor’s Orders.
Morhaim was reprimanded by
the House of Delegates and said he
would end his relationships with
the dispensary and cannabis regulators and stop working on medical marijuana legislation.
When asked about the launch of
the medical marijuana program,
Morhaim said it had “been a long
time coming” and that he was
always motivated by thousands of
patients who suffered without
safe access to the drug.
He declined to comment further, saying he had his “own perspective, and someday I’ll be happy to share, but not now.”
rachel.siegel@washpost.com
were found in a house in the
10000 block of Parkwood Drive
in the Bethesda area where
elevated levels of carbon
monoxide were detected, said
Pete Piringer, a county fire
spokesman.
He said renovations were
underway at the house, and that
the critically injured man was
found near a furnace.
— Martin Weil
VIRGINIA
School bus driver is
fatally struck in lot
A school bus driver was
struck and killed Monday in a
lot where buses are parked in
Prince William County, police
said.
The incident happened about
7:30 a.m. at a bus operations
center in the 7900 block of Piney
Branch Lane in Bristow.
Richard Lee Proffitt, 62, of
Manassas was struck as he was
standing behind a bus that was
backing out of a service area. He
was pronounced dead at the
scene. It was not immediately
clear why he was standing
behind the bus.
The other driver, a 60-yearold man, has not been
identified. Police said he was not
injured, and no charges have
been filed.
No children were on the bus.
The accident is under
investigation.
— Dana Hedgpeth
VIRGINIA
Results from Feb. 5
9-8-7
2-6-9-8
9-7-5-6-3
7-6-1
3-4-8
6-1-5-8
3-9-8-7
3-3-2-2-4
6-7-2-5-9
MARYLAND
Del. Dan K. Morhaim (D-Baltimore County) speaks in March. He
has focused on health and environmental causes during his tenure.
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/johnkelly.
LOTTE R I E S
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Sun.):
Lucky Numbers (Mon.):
DC-4 (Sun.):
DC-4 (Mon.):
DC-5 (Sun.):
DC-5 (Mon.):
Del. Dan Morhaim to retire
from the General Assembly
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
LOC AL D I GE S T
DISTRICT
MARYLAND
land on both sides of the river,
owning parcels between the
14th Street Bridge and Fort
Belvoir. It dug into the riverbed,
pocketing the prize gravel and
creating channels useful for
shipping.
In a 1958 article, The
Washington Post wrote: “No
present competitor has been
able to share in this veritable
gold mine. That is, in part,
because the Smoot company was
first on the scene and it is the
only company in the area which
owns the expensive waterborne
equipment necessary to dredge
it.” (In 1961, Smoot was
purchased by Pittsburgh-based
Dravo Corp.)
Look at a geologic map of
Washington and its environs,
and you will see a lot of gravel.
“The Capitol is built on a hill
of gravel,” Tony said.
We should be celebrating this
seemingly modest product of
nature. It began as mountains,
survived baptism in the watery
crucible of the Potomac, and
now is the ultimate
representation of our very
nation: E pluribus unum. Out of
many small pieces of rock, our
capital is made strong.
I refuse to grovel, but I will
say this: Long live gravel! And
long live Gravelly Point.
Mid-Day Pick 3:
1-0-3
Mid-Day Pick 4:
0-4-8-7
Night/Pick 3 (Sun.):
1-7-5
Pick 3 (Mon.):
2-3-1
Pick 4 (Sun.):
2-6-7-6
Pick 4 (Mon.):
7-3-3-7
Multi-Match:
29-30-35-36-41-43
Match 5 (Sun.):
4-14-21-32-37 *35
Match 5 (Mon.):
5-7-13-32-35 *29
5 Card Cash:
AS-2S-2H-2C-7H
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5:
Night/Pick-3 (Sun.):
Pick-3 (Mon.):
Pick-4 (Sun.):
Pick-4 (Mon.):
Cash-5 (Sun.):
Cash-5 (Mon.):
3-2-3
9-1-7-7
4-9-11-14-28
6-7-0
8-6-0
7-7-3-3
0-9-7-0
7-10-20-28-34
5-10-18-30-32
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
Lucky for Life:
*Bonus Ball
30-36-39-55-60 ¶1
1-2-5-32-48 ‡17
‡Lucky Ball
¶Cash Ball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
VIRGINIA
Trustee Sales & Legal Notices
825
Bids & Proposals
825
Bids & Proposals
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
Solicitation GAGA-2018-R-0018
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OFFICE OF CONTRACTS AND ACQUISITIONS
825
Bids & Proposals
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
The District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) Office of
Contracts and Acquisitions (OCA) on behalf of the DCPS
Office of Food and Nutrition Services (FNS) is soliciting
proposals from offerors to provide Maintenance, Services,
and Repair to Hot Food Equipment at DCPS 113 schools.
1-800-753-POST
The solicitation will be posted on DCPS website and will be
available for pick-up on Wednesday, February 07, 2018 at
1200 First Street, N.E. Suite 900, Washington, D.C. 20002,
from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00pm, EST Wednesday through Friday ,
February 09, 2018 and may also be downloaded from DCPS
website below:
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
851
Prince Georges County
851
SF
Prince Georges County
LAW OFFICES
Shulman, Rogers, Gandal, Pordy & Ecker, P.A.
12505 Park Potomac Avenue, 6th Floor
Potomac, MD 20854
(301) 230-5241
File No. 116914.00002
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
of
Valuable Fee Simple Property
located in Prince George's County, Maryland,
known as
5601 54th Avenue,
5617 54th Avenue,
and
54th Avenue (TAX ID NO. 19-2154987)
Riverdale, MD 20737 (the “Properties”)
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, Assignment of Leases and Rents, Security Agreement
and Fixture Filing (the “Deed of Trust”) from The Redeemed
Christian Church Of God, River of Life, Maryland, to William
A. Hunt, Jr., Trustee, bearing the date of August 8, 2007,
recorded in Book 28404, at Page 366 among the Land Records
of Prince George's County, Maryland, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, default having occurred in the terms
and conditions thereof, the Substitute Trustees having been
substituted for the Trustee named in said Deed of Trust, will
sell at public auction at the Prince George’s County courthouse
located at the 14735 Main Street, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772,
Duval Wing entrance, on February 23, 2018 at 11:00 a.m.,
some or all of the Properties described in said Deed of Trust.
All those Fee-Simple lots of ground and the improvements
thereon identified as Tax ID Nos. 19-2154979, 19-3722758
and 19-2154987 and more fully described in the aforesaid
Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE
The bid which yields the highest price for the Properties will
be accepted by the Substitute Trustees. Notwithstanding the
foregoing, the Substitute Trustees absolutely reserve the right
to postpone the sale and/or cancel the sale at any time until
the auctioneer announces that the Properties are "sold" and the
deposit in the required amount and form is received by the
Substitute Trustees. A deposit in the amount of $350,000.00
will be required at the time of sale. Such deposit must be
by cashier's check or certified check or such other form as
the Substitute Trustees’ may determine in their sole discretion.
The Noteholder secured by the Deed of Trust (or any related
party) shall be exempted by the Substitute Trustees from
submitting any bidding deposit. The Substitute Trustees will,
as a condition of the sale, require all potential bidders, except
the Noteholder, to show their deposit before any bidding begins.
The retained deposit of the successful purchaser shall be
applied, without interest, to the successful purchaser's credit at
settlement, provided, however, that in the event the successful
purchaser fails to consummate the purchase in accordance
with the terms of sale as herein provided, such deposit will
be forfeited. The terms of sale must be complied with and
settlement consummated thereon within 30 days from date of
final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Prince
George's County, Maryland unless extended at the sole discretion
of the Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is
delayed for any reason. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. The balance
of the purchase price over and above the retained deposit, with
interest thereon at a rate of 9% from the date of sale through
the date of receipt of the balance of the purchase price, will be
due at settlement in cash or certified funds; and if not so paid,
the Substitute Trustees reserve the right to retain the deposit
and resell the Property at the risk and cost of the defaulting
purchaser, after such advertisement and on such terms as the
Substitute Trustees may deem proper, and to avail themselves
and the Noteholder of any legal or equitable rights against the
defaulting purchaser.
The Properties are sold subject to the lawful rights, if any, of
parties in possession, if such rights have priority over the Deed
of Trust, and to any and all covenants, conditions, restrictions,
easements, rights of way, encumbrances, liens, agreements and
limitations of record having priority over the Deed of Trust. The
Properties will be sold “WHERE IS” and in “AS IS” condition
without any warranty as to condition, express or implied, and
without any representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the
information furnished to prospective bidders by the Substitute
Trustees or any other party and without any other representations
or warranty of any nature. The sale is also subject to postsale
audit of the status of the loan. Without limiting the generality of
the foregoing, the Properties will be sold without representation
or warranty as to (i) title to the Properties, (ii) the nature,
condition, structural integrity, or fitness for a particular use of
any improvements, fixtures or personal property included within
the Properties, (iii) the environmental condition of the Properties
or the compliance of the Properties with federal, state and local
laws and regulations concerning the presence or disposal of
hazardous substances, (iv) compliance of the Properties with
the Americans with Disabilities Act or any similar law, or (v)
compliance of the Properties with any zoning laws or ordinances
and any and all applicable safety codes, and acceptance of
the Deed to the Properties by the successful purchaser shall
constitute a waiver of any claims against the Substitute Trustees
or the Noteholder concerning any of the foregoing matters.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the Properties.
Conveyance shall be by Trustee’s Deed, without covenant or
warranty, express or implied, specifically including marketability
or insurability (hazard or title), unless otherwise required by
statute, court rule or the Deed of Trust. The risk of loss or damage
by fire or other casualty to the Properties from and after the
date of sale will be upon the successful purchaser. Adjustment
of all taxes, ground rents, public charges, assessments, sewer,
water, drainage and other public improvements will be made as
of the date of sale and are to be assumed and paid thereafter
by the successful purchaser, whether assessments have been
levied or not. Any condominium fees, homeowners association
dues, assessments or capital contributions, if any, payable with
respect to the Properties shall be assumed after the date of sale
by the successful purchaser. All costs incident to the settlement
and conveyancing including, without limitation, examination
of title, conveyancing, all recordation taxes and charges, all
transfer taxes and charges, title insurance premiums, notary
fees, settlement fees and all other costs incident to settlement
shall be at the cost of the successful purchaser. In the event
the Substitute Trustees are unable for any reason to convey
title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be to
request and receive a return of the deposit. Upon return of the
deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
This advertisement, as amended or supplemented by any oral
announcements during the conduct of the sale, constitutes the
entire terms upon which the Properties shall be offered for sale.
Benjamin P. Smith and Sara A. Michaloski,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
Man threatened elderly
subscribers with fines,
arrest for phony charges
BY
1-800-753-POST
https://dcps.dc.gov/node/974022
The Pre-Proposal conference will be held on Tuesday,
February 14, 2018 from 11:0am to 1:00pm EST at 1200 First
Street NE, Suite 900, Washington, DC. 20002. Proposals are
due at DCPS/OCA on Tuesday March 06, 2018 no later
than 3:00PM (EST) at the address indicated above.
Magazine scam payo≠: $548,000 and a court date
Home
delivery
is
convenient.
1-800-753-POST
R ACHEL W EINER
An Arizona man made more
than a half-million dollars scamming elderly magazine subscribers across the country, threatening to have them arrested if they
did not pay huge fees and fines.
Raheem Oliver, 38, pleaded
guilty in Alexandria federal court
Monday to conspiracy to commit
mail and wire fraud.
One person who fell prey to the
scam was a 94-year-old Alexandria, Va., resident identified in
court documents as R.B. He was
called by Oliver more than 100
times between May 2014 and October 2015 and sent at least three
checks to addresses in Arizona.
According to court documents,
from about 2013 until a fall 2016
raid on his swanky Phoenix rental
pleaded guilty Monday in what is
home, Oliver stole from about 250
an ongoing investigation, officials
people and made at least
$548,000.
said.
Oliver or an associate would
“This guy is bad. He is a bad
call victims and offer to renew
man,” said Mark Pyper, the owner
their magazine subscripof the home and a Phoetions by phone, according
nix-area attorney. He
said in an interview Monto the court papers. He
would then bill their acday that he began renting
his large house to Oliver’s
counts two or three times
without renewing the
family in April 2016.
“He moved in and was
subscriptions.
kind of a deadbeat from
People who seemed
vulnerable, particularly
the get-go,” Pyper said of
Oliver
Oliver. He said his tenthe elderly, were targeted
for a secondary scam, Oliant, a tall and athletic
man who drove a black Mercedesver admitted in court filings. Oliver would call individuals and tell
Benz, was often behind on his
them that they needed to pay rent. When Pyper pressed him in
thousands of dollars in renewal
August 2016, he said Oliver promised a payment the next day.
fees, fines, attorney’s fees and
court costs for purportedly over“Sure enough, in my mailbox I
received a FedEx from a gentledue subscription balances.
He warned victims — falsely —
man in Kentucky who had sent me
a personal check for over $8,000,”
that if they failed to send the money they could face legal action,
Pyper said Monday.
The check cleared, but Pyper
including arrest.
U.S. Postal Service inspectors
found the situation odd and made
and FBI agents raided the Phoenix
a copy. Pyper reached the man in
Kentucky and learned he was an
home where Oliver was living over
a year ago, in November 2016. He
88-year-old farmer who thought
he was paying half of what he
owed for overdue magazine subscription fees to avoid being taken
to court.
Pyper did some digging and
told the farmer in Kentucky there
was no court hearing. The attorney then went to the FBI, which
referred him to the postal inspector. He was told that officials had a
case open on Oliver and were planning a raid of the rental house.
“They said, ‘If you give us the
key code we won’t have to rip out
your 18-foot wrought iron front
door,’ ” Pyper recalled.
Pyper was happy to comply.
Pyper ultimately had him evicted and is suing his former tenant
over unpaid rent.
Oliver faces up to 20 years in
prison when he is sentenced
June 22. Court files show Oliver
spent six years in Arizona state
prison for robbery, after what the
East Valley Tribune described as a
jewelry store heist.
As part of his plea, he has
agreed to forfeit the money he
made from the scam.
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
D.C. councilman to question board about watchdog
ETHICS FROM B1
SF
Wake up
to home
delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home
delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
Northam,
Herring
disagree on
utilities bill
VIRGINIA FROM B1
1-800-753-POST
12164011
spond to specific questions about
Hughes’s removal or comments
about Cavendish. The mayor
“looks forward to the work that
the Office of Open Government
will continue to do to promote
civic engagement and transparency with all stakeholders,” a
spokeswoman said.
Hughes said that she also was
subjected to “personal attacks in
an effort to keep me from issuing
an opinion” while she was investigating the D.C. Commission on
Selection and Tenure of Administrative Law Judges. Hughes
found in October 2017 that the
commission had repeatedly violated the Open Meetings Act over
the course of three years.
She declined to identify the
source of those attacks but said it
was “an individual within government” who does not work in the
mayor’s office.
More recently, Hughes issued
an opinion last month finding
that the board of the District’s
public hospital, United Medical
Center, violated the law when it
held a secret vote to close the
facility’s obstetrics ward — a decision that left Southeast Washington without a hospital for women
to give birth or seek prenatal care.
The decision to remove
Hughes has provoked a backlash
among good-government advocates, who say they fear she is
being punished for her strict enforcement of the city’s “sunshine
laws” and could be replaced with
a less independent figure. Some
council members echoed those
worries.
“She did a good job, and that
may be why the board did not
want to reappoint her,” Council
Chairman Phil Mendelson (D)
said Monday. “Since there was no
statement of reasons for not continuing her appointment, we are
SF
Find out what’s happening this
.
Fridays in
N0779 2x1.5
dictable costs it could face under
the now-defunct federal Clean
Power Plan. As a result of that
freeze, the utilities raked in hundreds of millions in excess profit.
Under the proposed measure,
the State Corporation Commission would once again review the
rates of Dominion and the state’s
other provider, the far smaller Appalachian Power. But the SCC
would conduct the review every
three years instead of every two, as
it did before. And if it found that
the utilities had overcharged customers, instead of refunding that
money, the utilities could use it to
invest in alternative energy such
as wind and solar or for upgrading
the power grid.
In return, ratepayers would get
money back for the excess profit
that the power companies earned
under the rate freeze. That
amount has crept up over the past
two weeks as the legislation has
been renegotiated; the latest version returns $200 million to Dominion customers, plus another
$125 million the company is expected to get from federal tax
restructuring.
In addition, Dominion would
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
D.C. Office of Open Government Director Traci L. Hughes said she faced pushback from the office of
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser, above, who declined to answer questions on Hughes’s removal.
left to speculate.”
Council Judiciary Committee
Chairman Charles Allen (D-Ward
6) said he planned to ask questions about Hughes on Thursday
at an oversight hearing for the
Board of Ethics and Government
Accountability, which oversees
the open-government office. It
was that board, whose members
are all mayoral appointees, that
decided not to renew Hughes’s
job for a second, five-year term.
“The allegations that she’s
making of being told to keep
quiet or being told not to issue
reports are certainly troubling
allegations,” Allen said. “That’s
why I want to learn more about
it.”
Hughes, whose salary is
$163,000, said she had struggled
to get the staff and resources to
carry out her office’s mandate,
and has only two employees.
When it sued the Mayor’s Advisory Commission on Caribbean
Community Affairs, the office had
to rely on pro bono legal representation.
She said the office also faced
structural problems because it is
overseen by a board of mayoral
appointees while simultaneously
ensuring that other mayoral appointees comply with the law.
“This office will not be sustainable under this current structure,” she said.
Ethics board Chairwoman
Tameka Collier did not respond to
requests for comment.
Last year, Hughes proposed
legislation that would establish a
separate, three-person board,
jointly appointed by the mayor
and council, to oversee the opengovernment office.
Allen chose not to advance that
bill in his committee. He said he
does not see a conflict in the
ethics board’s oversight of
Hughes’s office.
“I haven’t seen [the Board of
Ethics and Government Accountability] pull any punches or be
afraid of any consequences,” Allen said.
greatly expand its Energy Share
program to help customers with
financial hardships pay their bills,
and commit to $870 million in
energy efficiency programs over
the next decade. The plan would
also set big goals for developing
solar energy, aiming for some
5,000 megawatts, or about 10
times the amount currently under
development.
Mark Webb, a Dominion senior
vice president, said the package is
better for consumers than simply
returning the utility to SCC oversight because it would keep rates
stable. “It gives a pathway to transform the grid and build renewables in a way that lessens impact
on customer rates,” he said.
Under the old system, he said,
every element of the plan would
require separate review by the
SCC and could lead to changes in
consumer rates.
The legislation that a Senate
committee considered Monday
incorporated the recommendations of a stakeholders group convened by Northam that included
the utilities as well as industry,
conservation and consumer
groups.
On Monday, a handful of advocacy groups, including the League
of Conservation Voters and the
Natural Resources Defense Council, said they now support the
legislation because of its commitment to renewable energy. Others
remained unconvinced.
The legislation is moving quickly. It hit a Senate subcommittee
Monday morning and the full
committee in the afternoon. A few
senators complained that they
were being asked to quickly decide something that the SCC staff
would normally review in depth.
Senators — and the attorney
general’s office — also disagreed
on how to interpret a central aspect of the legislation: whether it
would allow Dominion to “double
dip,” or charge customers twice for
the same costs.
A lobbyist for Dominion, Jack
Rust, assured the committee that
it would not.
Sen. Richard L. Saslaw (D-Fairfax), one of the sponsors of the bill
along with committee chairman
Sen. Frank W. Wagner (R-Virginia
Beach), later assured his colleagues that they should listen to
Rust, a former delegate who
helped craft the legislation.
“If he tells you that this thing
cannot be double counted, you
can pretty much take that to the
bank,” Saslaw said.
But Herring’s office and the
SCC interpret the legislation differently. They say that if Dominion was found to have overcharged customers by $100 million, the proposed law would let
the utility invest all that money in
new ventures such as solar energy
instead of returning it to ratepayers. But it would also be able to
build the $100 million investment
into base electricity rates — in
effect, double-dipping.
“We’re concerned that the bill
as written opens the door to effectively charging consumers twice
for the same investment,” said Michael Kelly, a spokesman for Herring.
Brian Coy, a spokesman for
Northam, said the attorney general evaluates the legislation from a
different perspective. “Their concern is really focused very narrowly on that ratepayer piece,” Coy
said.
Northam “is looking at a broader range of issues,” he said, including how to get the utilities to make
massive investments in renewable energy and upgrading the
electricity grid. He said the governor believes the legislation does
not permit Dominion to doubledip on its investments.
Sen. Richard H. Stuart (RStafford) was not convinced.
“I can’t get past that we’re not
giving money back to rate payers
and not giving the SCC the oversight they should have,” he said,
adding that he regretted voting for
the rate freeze in 2015. “We made a
mistake before and I think we
should thoroughly correct that
mistake.”
He and three other Republicans
voted against the bill, SB966, but
it cleared the committee 10-4 and
will advance to the Senate floor. A
similar bill in the House of Delegates will come before a committee Tuesday.
There is almost certain to be
more opposition as the measures
advance. Dominion became a target in last year’s elections for its
outsize influence in Richmond.
The company gave more than
$50,000 in 2017 for Northam’s
campaign and another $50,000 in
December for his inauguration,
according to the Virginia Public
Access Project.
In the past two years it gave
$35,000 to the campaign coffers of
Wagner, who sponsored the bill,
and $55,000 to Saslaw, a co-sponsor, according to the project. It
gave $24,000 to Del. Terry G. Kilgore (R-Scott), who is carrying the
House version of the bill.
peter.jamison@washpost.com
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
VIRGINIA
EZ
B5
SU
MARYLAND
Bill adds misdemeanor Cardin to face independent challenger for Senate
option in ‘sexting’ cases Potomac businessman
could be charged with a Class 1
misdemeanor, punishable by up
to a year in jail and a maximum
fine of $2,500, as long as there is
no intent to harass or intimidate,
or to extort money. That scenario
might apply to teens who show
explicit photos of their girlfriends
or boyfriends to friends, supporters of the bill said.
A less-serious Class 2 misdemeanor charge would apply if the
minor possesses no more than 10
images, and if he or she obtained
them with the permission of the
subject. That charge carries a
maximum six-month sentence
and a fine of $1,000. A first offender would be eligible for six
months’ probation and 50 hours
of community service.
A handful of senators expressed
concern that, as written, the measure could criminalize the possession of any pornography — depicting a minor or not — by a minor.
Some also said the bill could
make it more likely that minors
face criminal charges for something best left in the realm of
parental response.
“You don’t need a statute to take
the phone away,” said Sen. J. Chapman “Chap” Petersen (D-Fairfax
City). “It’s well intentioned, but
what we need is more involved
parenting.”
The measure goes to the House
of Delegates for consideration.
Lawmakers try to create
middle ground in
prosecution of minors
BY
L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond — The Virginia Senate on Monday passed a bill intended to keep teenagers who
willingly share sexually explicit
images with one another from being branded felony sex offenders.
The measure, which passed on
a bipartisan 35-to-5 vote, would
give prosecutors the option to
charge “sexting” among minors as
a misdemeanor.
Under current law, the sender
and recipient can be charged with
dissemination and possession of
child pornography, a felony. That
means prosecutors must choose
between bringing felony charges
or doing nothing, said Sen. William M. Stanley Jr. (R-Franklin),
who sponsored the bill with Sen.
Scott A. Surovell (D-Fairfax).
Stanley said the bill would let
prosecutors “do something in the
middle, not to end someone’s life
before it even begins with a felony
conviction that doesn’t fit the
crime.”
Under the proposed legislation,
a minor who transmits sexually
explicit images to another minor
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
says he’s disillusioned
by major party politics
BY
J ENNA P ORTNOY
Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin, the
well-regarded top Democrat on
the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, is facing another
potential challenger in this
year’s election: Neil Simon, a
financial services executive
from Potomac, will announce
Tuesday that he will run for the
seat as an independent.
Simon, 49, said he was inspired by a group called Unite
America, previously known as
the Centrist Project, which believes a few independent senators acting as a bloc could force
both parties to the middle instead of their partisan extremes.
The
Denver-based
group is backing Terry Hayes for
Maine governor, Bob Krist for
Nebraska governor and Greg
Orman for Kansas governor. It
plans to announce more endorsements later.
In Maryland’s June 26 Democratic primary, Cardin faces a
challenge from the left by Chelsea Manning, the Army private
who passed government secrets
to WikiLeaks and wants to harness anti-establishment sentiment. Three lesser-known Dem-
ocrats are also running, along
with a Republican and a Libertarian.
Cardin, who filed his reelection papers Monday, has a long
history in Maryland politics and
is favored to win in November.
He was first elected to the
Senate in 2006 and served before that in the House of Representatives and in the State
House in Annapolis. A 2017
Goucher College poll said 45
percent of Marylanders approve
of his performance and 21 percent disapprove, with 34 percent holding no opinion.
Democrats outnumber Republicans nearly 2 to 1 in Maryland, but Simon said he believes
voters are willing to stray from
their party affiliation, citing the
election of Republican Gov. Larry Hogan in 2014 and Robert L.
Ehrlich Jr. (R) in 2002.
“There are no political parties in our Constitution. That
guy over there,” Simon said,
pointing to a picture of George
Washington on the wall of his
office, “in his farewell address,
his number one concern was
that Americans would develop
more loyalty to political parties
than to their country.”
Simon said he also is encouraged by the number of young
voters who consider themselves
independent. Almost 700,000
Maryland voters have declined
to register with a political party,
a 58 percent increase from a
decade ago, state data show.
BROOKS KRAFT
Neil Simon, a financial services executive, said he was inspired by a
group seeking candidates to create an independent bloc.
Without blaming Cardin specifically, Simon said he believes
Democrats should have worked
with Republicans on the tax bill
that passed in December with
only GOP support, pushing for
changes that would permanently lower taxes for the working
class, simplify the tax code and
reduce the impact on the deficit.
Simon said he voted for Hillary Clinton for president in
2016, but wasn’t enthusiastic
about any of his choices. A
native of New York, he earned a
bachelor’s degree from Brown
University, got his MBA from
the University of Chicago and
moved to Maryland in 2002.
He is taking a leave of absence from his job as chief
executive of Bronfman Rothschild to run for office, and said
he plans to fund his campaign
through a combination of his
own money and outside donations. He is chairman of the
board of the Greater Washington Community Foundation
and previously served on the
boards of Interfaith Works and
the Capital Area Food Bank.
jenna.portnoy@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Convicted detective says he stole money with colleague who was slain
supervisors as well.
The police department said on
Monday that the “allegations
and actions [are] disturbing, unacceptable, and criminal,” and
said Acting Commissioner Darryl De Sousa has formed a corruption investigation unit that
will be led by a lieutenant colonel and specifically focus on the
actions of the Gun Trace Task
Force. The department has said
previously that it had internal
affairs investigations underway
related to the case.
“We are working diligently to
investigate and hold those who
tarnished the badge and violated
public trust accountable for their
actions,” police said in a statement. “The citizens deserve better and the hard-working honorable men and women of this
agency deserve better.”
Internal affairs investigations
are kept under wraps in Maryland, which critics say helped at
least some of the officers in the
gun unit to avoid being held
accountable for years as complaints stacked up.
Meanwhile, Deputy Commissioner Dean Palmere, who for
years worked in and supervised
plainclothes work, denied accusations that arose in court that he
had coached officers on what to
say after a fatal shooting in 2009.
Palmere also disclosed that he is
retiring, which he said he informed De Sousa about two
weeks ago.
Monday’s allegations revived
the questions about the dormant
investigation into Suiter’s death.
The detective was investigating a
triple homicide in November
when he was shot in the head
with his own gun in a vacant lot
in West Baltimore, police have
said. His death was ruled a homicide by the medical examiner’s
Allegation revives
questions about murder
probe in Baltimore
BY
J USTIN F ENTON
baltimore — A convicted Baltimore police detective testified
Monday in the Gun Trace Task
Force trial that he used to steal
money with Sean Suiter, the city
homicide detective whose fatal
shooting in November — one day
before he was to have testified
before a federal grand jury in the
case — remains
unsolved.
The claim
came on crossexamination of
Detective Momodu Gondo,
who admitted
Sean Suiter
stealing from
people dating
to 2008. Defense attorney Christopher Nieto asked Gondo if he
had told the FBI that he stole
money when he worked with
Suiter and a squad of several
other people.
“You’d take money, split it
among yourselves?” Nieto asked.
Gondo agreed.
Gondo is one of six gun task
force officers to plead guilty in
the case, and the last of four to
testify for the government in the
federal racketeering trial of Detectives Daniel Hersl and Marcus Taylor. His testimony, based
on “proffer sessions” with the
FBI last year in which he outlined allegations across the department in hopes of getting a
lower sentence, implicated a
number of other officers and
PATRICK SEMANSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
office, and remains unsolved despite a $215,000 reward. Colleagues have said Suiter was an
honest and beloved cop.
Suiter was shot one day before
he was to have testified before a
federal grand jury that was continuing to investigate claims involving the Gun Trace Task Force.
Police have said that they do not
believe there is a connection between Suiter’s killing and his
scheduled testimony, and the FBI
declined a request by the former
police commissioner to take over
the investigation.
The Baltimore Sun has reported that there was internal tension, with some investigators believing that Suiter’s death could
be a suicide or an accident.
A member of the
Baltimore Police
Department walks
behind a police line near
the scene of the shooting
death of Detective Sean
Suiter in November.
Suiter was shot while
investigating a triple
homicide in a
particularly troubled
area of West Baltimore.
Sgt. Wayne Jenkins, the supervisor of the gun unit, was later hit
with additional charges that he
and Suiter had been involved in a
2010 incident in which drugs
were planted on a man who fled
and got into a serious crash. The
indictment said Suiter did not
know that the drugs had been
planted, but had been the one
who found them.
Umar Burley, who served years
in federal prison after pleading
guilty in the case, said after his
conviction was overturned in December that the officers were
masked and pointed guns at him,
and that he thought he was being
robbed. His attorneys say he
made the accusation at the time
he was charged.
Sherman “Pops” Basil, Suiter’s
82-year-old uncle who helped
raise him in Washington, dismissed the allegations against his
nephew.
“Sean has never done anything
wrong in his life,” said Basil,
noting that Suiter joined the
Army right out of high school,
served two tours and then joined
the police force. “People will say
anything, so I don’t pay no attention to what they say.”
Gondo was the final cooperating officer charged in the case to
take the stand in the trial. It was
Gondo’s relationship with a
Northeast Baltimore drug crew
that first led investigators to the
corrupt police unit. Gondo was
picked up on a wiretap during a
Drug Enforcement Administration investigation, which in 2015
was referred to the FBI to begin
investigating the role of the officer. That expanded into an investigation into the Gun Trace Task
Force, with a recording device
being placed in one of its vehicles.
Palmere has been a deputy
police commissioner since April
2015 and has been closely aligned
with the agency’s signature
crime-fighting initiatives. Palmere told the Sun that he did not
coach officers on what to say after
a fatal shooting in 2009.
“It’s not true. I would not coach
somebody,” Palmere said. “I’ve
always taken pride in my ethics
and integrity.”
Gondo maintained that when
he arrested someone for having a
gun or drugs, it was always a good
arrest. He said he never planted
evidence or lied in search warrant affidavits.
— Baltimore Sun
Baltimore Sun reporters Kevin
Rector and Alison Knezevich
contributed to this report.
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B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
IN MEMORIAM
obituaries
HEILIGH
DEATH NOTICE
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
DEATH NOTICE
CRAWFORD
EVANS
JOYCE LORRAINE CRAWFORD
MICHAEL JUAN EVANS (Age 65)
On Tuesday, January 23, 2018. The beloved
wife of the late Frank J. Crawford, Jr.;
mother of Janis L. White, Ted J. Crawford
and Donna L. Donahue. Also survived by
six grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Memorial service and inurnment will
be held at Maryland Veterans Cemetery,
11301 Crain Hwy., Cheltenham, MD on
Monday, February 12 at 11 a.m. In lieu of
flowers, contributions may be made to the
American Cancer Society, 7500 Greenway
Center Dr., Ste. 300, Greenbelt, MD 20770.
Condolences may be made online at:
KalasFuneralHomes.com
DAVIS
JOANNE HEILIGH
August 21, 1949 - February 6, 2002
16 Years
Although your smile is gone forever
and your hands we can not touch,
we still have many memories
of the one we love so much.
Love, The Heiligh Family
Passed away on Thursday, January 25, 2018.
Visitation 10 a.m., service 11 a.m., on Thursday,
February 8 at Henry S. Washington & Sons
Funeral Home, 4925-27 Nannie Helen Burroughs Ave., NE, Washington, DC 20019. Interment Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery.
FERGUSON-DAVIS
ANGELIA GALE FERGUSON-DAVIS
"Angie"
Peacefully entered into eternal rest on
Wednesday, January 31, 2018. Dearly beloved
daughter of Wilbert and Patricia Ferguson is
survived by her loving husband of over 29
years, Mark E. Davis. She is also survived by
three sons, Erik, Bryan and Mark Davis, II; one
daughter, Krysta Powell (Brandon Powell); five
grandchildren, Madicyn, Brandon II, Ayrelle,
Erik, II and Alexander; sisters, brothers and a
host of other relatives and many friends. Family
and friends are invited to celebrate the life of
Angie on Wednesday, February 7, 2018. Wake,
10 a.m. until time of Homegoing Celebration,
11 a.m. at Holy Comforter-Saint Cyprian Roman
Catholic Church, 1357 East Capitol St., SE,
Washington, DC 20003. Arrangements by Beall
Funeral Home.
www.beallfuneral.com
GIBLIN
JOHN M. GIBLIN
McDOUGAL
NANCY CHASE DAVIS
Loved by all, died suddenly on January 25,
2018. 45 years a dedicated elementary school
teacher, Nancy touched the lives of children,
parents and fellow educators at University
Liggett School in Grosse Pointe, Michigan,
Stanwich School in Greenwich, Connecticut,
Riverdale County School in Bronx, New York,
locally at Norwood School, Primary Day School,
Landon School and most recently at Concord
Hill School in Chevy Chase. Her contributions
to the Landon community, large and small,
were particularly exceptional.
LENNOX MCLENDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Temptations, with Dennis Edwards, second from right. Mr. Edwards sang on the group’s hit 1972
record “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone,” as well as 1969’s “Cloud Nine.”
Nancy is survived by her husband, Lowell;
daughter Laura Stifel, Laura’s husband Adam,
their daughters Sybil and Jane, Nancy’s sister
Suzanne, her husband Ernest Werle and their
children Michael and Heather.
DENNIS EDWARDS, 74
His ‘voice for the ages’
defined the Temptations
FROM N EWS S ERVICES
AND S TAFF R EPORTS
Douglas Grodin,
Navy psychiatrist
Douglas Grodin, 75, a Navy psychiatrist who retired in 1999 after
serving as head of the Tri-Service
Alcohol Rehabilitation Department at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md.,
where he was also an associate
professor of clinical psychiatry,
died Nov. 26 at a hospital in
Bethesda. The cause was Crohn’s
disease, a disorder of the digestive
tract, said his wife, Maryann Grodin.
Dr. Grodin, a captain in the
Navy Medical Corps and a resident of Potomac, Md., was born in
Brooklyn. He was commissioned
as a Navy officer in 1972 and
served as a medical officer in Japan, director of inpatient services
at Philadelphia Naval Hospital
and chief of psychiatry at a naval
hospital in Newport, R.I. He was a
physician member of the Defense
Department’s Physical Evaluation
Board.
Donna Hartman,
teacher, ambassador’s spouse
Donna Hartman, 89, a former
French and English teacher at the
Washington School of Ballet and
the widow of Arthur A. Hartman,
former U.S. ambassador to France
and the Soviet Union, died Nov. 16
at her home in Washington. The
cause was complications from Alzheimer’s disease, said a daughter, Lise Hartman.
Mrs. Hartman was born Donna
Ford in Camden, N.J., and moved
to Washington in 1958. In the
1960s, she taught at the Washington School of Ballet. She also managed a landscape architecture
consultancy.
She accompanied her husband,
a career Foreign Service officer, to
posts including Paris, where he
was ambassador from 1977 to
1981, and Moscow, where he was
ambassador from 1981 to 1987. He
died in 2015.
DEATH NOTICE
Nancy’s life will be celebrated by a private
church service. Additionally, all are welcomed
to attend a memorial service in the Coates
Auditorium at Landon School on February 10
at 11 a.m. Donations in Nancy’s memory can
be made to any of the aforementioned schools.
BIBB
Walter F. Bibb, Sr. 87, of Fredericksburg, VA
died January 29, 2018. He was born February
8, 1930 in Schuyler, Virginia to the late George
Lynwood Bibb, Sr. and Maggie Florence ButlerBibb-Carroll. He was also preceded in death by
his wives, Phyllis Clayton-Bibb, Evelyn G. PetittBibb and Mary Louise Dove-Bibb; children,
Gary C. Bibb, Linda Jewell-Loving-Tanks, Steven
Weakley and Debbie Jewell Barushak; and eight
siblings.
JOHN SALANGSANG/INVISION/AP
Dennis Edwards attends an event in Beverly Hills, Calif., in 2015.
He was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1989.
into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame
with the rest of the Temptations
in 1989.
In the 1990s, a federal judge
barred him from performing under his former band’s name. Otis
Williams, the band’s lone original
member, sued Mr. Edwards for
trademark infringement after he
had used variations of the group’s
name, including “The New Temptations.” He was allowed to use
“The Temptations Review featuring Dennis Edwards” and performed under that name for
nearly two decades.
Mr. Edwards was born Feb. 3,
1943, in Birmingham, Ala., and
lived near St. Louis with his wife.
newsobits@washpost.com
Robert Bonitati,
media consultant
Robert Bonitati, 79, a media
consulting officer with several organizations, died Oct. 31 at a hospital in Tampa. The cause was
complications from treatment for
leukemia, said a friend, Thom
Rubel.
Mr. Bonitati was born in
Bridgeport, Conn., and settled in
the Washington area in 1967. A
former chief of staff to Sen. Howard Baker (R-Tenn.), he became
vice president for government affairs at the Air Line Pilots Association, a liaison officer with organized labor in the Reagan White
House, and an officer with media
consulting organizations including, at his death, Smith & Harroff.
He lived in Rehoboth Beach, Del.,
and Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Janet Wheeler,
artist
Janet Wheeler, 81, an independent artist who exhibited
paintings, collages and other artistic works at galleries in the
Washington area and in neighboring states, died Oct. 23 at her
home in Silver Spring, Md. The
cause was cancer, said a son, Theodore Wheeler.
Mrs. Wheeler was born Janet
Bowman in Poughkeepsie, N.Y.,
and had lived in the Washington
area for 53 years.
John Bladen Sr.,
CPA, World Bank auditor
John Bladen Sr., 97, a certified
public accountant who retired in
1985 after 25 years as an auditor
for the World Bank, died Nov. 26 at
a hospital in Bethesda. He had
complications from cardiac arrest, said a son, John Bladen Jr.
Mr. Bladen, a Bethesda resident, was a native Washingtonian.
During World War II, he served in
the Army in Europe and was captured on Christmas Eve 1944 during the Battle of the Bulge. He was
liberated from a German POW
camp on April 1, 1945. Before joining the World Bank, he served on
the staff of the board of governors
of the Federal Reserve as an inspector of Fed banks.
William Bozman,
administrator, financial
officer
William Bozman, 93, an administrator and financial officer for
several government and nonprofit organizations and who retired
in 1982 as vice president of the
U.S. Railway Association, died
Nov. 30 at an assisted-living center in Falls Church, Va. The cause
was complications from heart disease, said a son, Mac Bozman.
Mr. Bozman, a resident of Arlington, Va., was born in Massillon, Ohio. He was a budget examiner with the federal Bureau of the
Budget from 1948 to 1961. He later
worked for the Commerce Department and the federal antipoverty program, among other organizations, before joining in 1974
the Railway Association, a government-owned corporation established to oversee the creation
of Conrail. The association closed
in 1987.
Mr. Bozman was a volunteer in
a reading program for disadvantaged children and with various
projects of Rock Spring Congregational United Church of Christ in
Arlington.
Theodore Stecher,
NASA scientist
Theodore Stecher, 86, a NASA
scientist who specialized in the
use of ultraviolet imaging to study
celestial bodies, including the
moon, stars and galaxies, died
Oct. 29 at his home in Silver
Spring. The cause was pancreatic
cancer, said a daughter, Sarah
Stecher.
Mr. Stecher was born in Kansas
City, Mo., and came to Washington to join NASA as a staff astronomer in 1959. According to his family, he was principal investigator
for the ultraviolet imaging telescopes flown aboard two space
shuttle missions. He retired from
NASA in 2002 and was twice the
recipient of NASA’s medal for exceptional scientific achievement.
— From staff reports
The family will receive friends 12 p.m., Friday,
February 9, 2018 at Cunningham Turch Funeral
Home, 811 Cameron St., Alexandria, VA 22314,
followed by a Life Celebration service at 1
p.m. Interment will follow at Mount Comfort
Cemetery, Alexandria, VA .
www.cunninghamfuneralhome.net
BROWN
LEAH S. BROWN
On Sunday, February 4, 2018,
LEAH S. BROWN of Rockville,
MD. Beloved wife of the late
Sidney J. Brown; loving daughter of the late Edward and
Esther Schneider Torchin;
devoted mother of Rachel, Adam and the
late Louis Blitz; cherished sister of Norman
and Stanley (Cindy) Torchin; dear grandmother of Alex and Jessica. Leah is also
survived by many loving relatives and
friends. Funeral services will be held on
Wednesday, February 7, 2018, 10 a.m. at
Ohev Sholom - The National Synagogue,
1600 Jonquil St., NW, Washington, DC
20012. Interment following at Ohev Sholom
Cemetery, Washington, DC. Shiva will be
observed at the late residence. Memorial
contributions may be made to Ohev Sholom
- The National Synagogue. Arrangements
entrusted to TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL HOME, 202-541-1001.
CAMPBELL
on January 30, 2018 Barbara
went home to be with the Lord.
Loving mother of Warren, Jr.
(Deborah), William
(Maria)
Janet, Terrence and Karen
Campbell, Barbara Jackson,
Elizabeth
(Cecil)
Jenkins,
Jacqueline and Sharon Johnson; sister of Eloise Williams. She is also
survived by a host of grandchildren; greatgrandchildren; great-greatgrandchildren; a
host of other relatives and friends. Visitation on
Thursday, February 8, 10 a.m. until service 11
a.m. at Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church, 215 Rhode
Island Ave. NW., Washington, DC. Interment
Lincoln Memorial Cemetery.
www.briscoe-tonicfuneralhome.com
Suddenly departed on Saturday, January 27,
2018. He leaves to cherish his memory, his
loving wife Blanche Gibson; three children,
Reginald Gibson, Cheryl Gibson-Baylor and
Wayne Gibson; seven grandchildren; eight
great-grandchildren; two sisters, three brothers, and a host of relatives and friends. Visitation Wednesday, February 7, 2018 from
10:30 a.m. until services at 11:30 a.m. at St.
John the Evangelist Catholic Church, 8908 Old
Branch Ave., Clinton, MD. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Arrangements by J.B. JENKINS
INC.
Peacefully passed away among family and
friends on February 2, 2018. She was the
beloved mother of Robert Gossett (Colleen),
Richard Gossett (Joan) and Jane Edwards (Rex);
grandmother to Erin, Kelley, Danny, Kirsten,
Nick and Callie and great-grandmother to
Quinnlan, Avalon and Mae. She was predeceased by her husband, Robert Gossett, her
sister, Mary Spinks and her brother, James
Brickett. Born in College Point, NY, she raised
her family in Great River, NY, before moving
to Maryland to be close to her family. Along
the way, she made lasting friendships through
her devotion to her church, neighborhood and
volunteer organizations. A memorial service
will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, February
9, 2018 at Our Lady of the Visitation Catholic
Church in Germantown, MD, with a reception
to follow. In lieu of flowers, please make
a donation to Montgomery County Humane
Society.
HILDEBRAND
DEATH NOTICE
BERNARD HILDEBRAND
DONNELLAN
THOMAS J. DONNELLAN, JR.
(Age 82)
Passed away on Wednesday, January 31, 2018.
He was a former resident of Washington, DC.
He is survived by his wife, Virginia Donnellan;
sons, Brian Donnellan, Michael Donnellan and
James Hunter; daughters, Laura Montalvo,
Mary Ellen Curto and Tricia Cabrera; brother,
James Donnellan; sisters, Dorothy Costinett
and Eileen Denny; as well as 16 grandchildren
and five great-grandchildren.
There will be a memorial service in the funeral
home chapel on Tuesday, February 6, 2018.
The family will receive friends and loved ones
directly before, from 1 to 2 p.m.
Condolences and memories can be shared at:
www.williamsonandsons.com
Arrangements are by Williamson and Sons
Funeral Home, 8852 Dayton Pike, Soddy-Daisy,
TN 37379.
ENGERT
RODERICK MORRISON ENGERT
(1925 - 2018)
On January 2, 2018, following a brief illness,
Roderick Engert, 92, passed away at Sibley
Hospital with family beside him.
The son of a career Foreign Service Officer,
Cornelius Van Hemert Engert and Sara Cunningham Engert, Roderick was born in El Salvador in 1925 and spent his early years in
Chile, Venezuela, China, Egypt, Ethiopia and
Iran. He was educated at Harrow School,
England and received a B.A. in International
Relations from Yale University in 1950. He
served in the U.S. Army, OSS, 1944-46, in the
China Burma India Theater, and was later a
military historian with the U.S. Department of
the Army. After a career spanning more than
30 years, he retired in 1985, receiving the
Army’s Meritorious Civilian Service Award –
one of the U.S. Army’s highest civilian honors.
Roderick married Jane Soule in 1953 and they
raised three children in Washington, DC. They
were married 42 years when, sadly, Jane died
of cancer in 1996. Four years later, Roderick
married Elizabeth Hurst Southcott, whom he
had met at River Road Presbyterian Church,
where both were active members and served
on the Session. They later joined the Chevy
Chase Presbyterian Church, were regular theater-goers, and enjoyed outings to concerts
and museums. Unfortunately, less than three
years after they had married, his second wife,
Elizabeth, also died of cancer.
BARBARA LEE CAMPBELL
GIBSON
JAMES A. GIBSON (Age 79)
JOAN FRANCIS GOSSETT
Walter was a longtime resident of Alexandria,
Va and retired from the Fairfax County Public
School System. He proudly served his country
during the Korean War in the United States
Army.
He is survived by his children, Walter F. Bibb, Jr.,
Kathy Jewell-Kidd and Julie Weakley-Bell (John);
granddaughter, Kelly N. Luttrell, Fred, Chris,
Carissa, Gina and Frank Barushak, Chrisitina
Loving-Tates, Lance and Brian Loving, David Jr.,
and Garry Kidd, Melody Kidd-Hogan, Heather
Weakley-Williams, Steven Weakley Jr., John
Bell, and Jamie Bell-McFarland; and numerous
great-grandchildren.
Relatives and friends may call at Collins Funeral
Home, 500 University Blvd. West, Silver Spring,
MD on Wednesday, February 7 from 7 to 9 p.m.
The Funeral Mass will take place on Thursday,
February 8 at 10 a.m. at Saint Michael the
Archangel Catholic Church, 805 Wayne Ave.,
Silver Spring, (park in church lot across the
street), with interment to follow at Gate of
Heaven Cemetery, Silver Spring.
GOSSETT
WALTER F. BIBB, SR.
O F N O TE
Obituaries of residents from the
District, Maryland and Northern
Virginia.
Nancy was the daughter of the late Aralie and
William Chase of Grosse Pointe, Michigan. She
graduated from Grosse Pointe High School in
1966 and the University of Michigan in 1970.
Nancy enjoyed playing tennis, gardening and
visiting with legions of friends. She also loved
watercolor painting, a hobby that inspired her
many travels. A gracious hostess, Nancy’s door
was always open. Her kindness, patience and
generosity of spirit will be missed.
Bernard ('Bernie') Hildebrand,
PhD, of Chevy Chase, Maryland, born on January 23,
1924, retired from the Atomic Energy Commission after a
career devoted to high energy
physics. Bernie passed away
on February 2, 2018. He was
devoted to his first wife Ruth Levy until her
death in 2001 and later to his wife Esther
Haar until her death in 2016. Together
they enjoyed music, theater, travel, family,
and friends. He is survived by his children,
Joanne (John) Byrnes and Deborah (Roger)
Lebbin; step-children, Cheryl Haar (Thomas
Arledge), Robert (Robin) Haar and Michael
(Therese) Haar; grandchildren Jack Byrnes,
Andrea Rubinfeld (Michael), and Daniel Lebbin (Erin); step-grandchildren, Benjamin
Haar, Lucy Arledge, Brian Haar, Patrick Haar,
and Daniel Haar; great-grandchildren, Ellie,
Trey and Claire Rubinfeld, Tessa and Samuel
Lebbin. All who knew Bernie will remember
his kindness, creative poetry, avid reading,
and perpetual learning. He was laid to rest
yesterday at the Garden of Remembrance
Memorial Park in an intimate family service.
Contributions may be made in his memory
to the American Physical Society and the
Jewish Social Service Agency of Greater
Washington. Services were entrusted to
Sagel Bloomfield Danzansky Goldberg
Funeral Care.
WWW.SAGELBLOOMFIELD.COM
HOLMES
MILTON O. HOLMES
Members of the Association of
Retired Police Officers of D.C. are
notified of the February 3, 2018
death of Milton O. Holmes. He was
an OFF with MPD-5D when retired
on August 30, 1980.
JONES
JOHN B. JONES, JR.
Members of the Association of
Retired Police Officers of D.C. are
notified of the January 31, 2018
death of John B. Jones, Jr. He was a
OFF with MPD-TSB when retired on
November 1, 1971.
KING
In addition to two beloved wives, Roderick
was preceded in death by his sister, Sheila
Gillen, of Rochester, New York. He is survived
by his family who misses him: his children,
William Engert of Washington, DC, Jane Engert,
of Eugene, Oregon, Jamie Engert of Montreal,
Canada and a daughter-in-law, and granddaughter, Lise Coderre, and Catherine Engert
also of Montreal, as well as four nieces and a
nephew, and nine great nieces and nephews.
A memorial service will be held at Chevy Chase
Presbyterian Church Washington, DC on March
10th at 3 p.m. and a graveside ceremony will
take place in Middlebury, Connecticut in June.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be made to Partners in Health, or the charity of
your choosing.
Because your loved one served proudly...
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
C0979 2x3
Dennis Edwards, a Grammywinning former member of the
Motown group the Temptations,
died Feb. 1 in Chicago. He was 74.
The cause was complications
from meningitis, his wife, Brenda
Edwards, told the St. Louis PostDispatch.
Mr. Edwards replaced founding member David Ruffin in
1968, and his soulful, passionate
voice defined the group for years.
A member on and off for about
two decades, he was part of the
Temptations lineup that released
hits “Ball of Confusion (That’s
What the World Is Today)” and
the Grammy-winning “Cloud
Nine” (1969) and “Papa Was a
Rollin’ Stone” (1972).
He possessed a “voice for the
ages,” with great range, energy
and artistry, Paul Riser, a Motown arranger and musician who
worked with Mr. Edwards during
the label’s Detroit heyday, told
the Associated Press. “That voice
was just flat-out outstanding —
very well defined.”
Mr. Edwards was inducted
STEVEN A. McDOUGAL
"Pee-Wee"
On this day, February 6, 2017,
When you died, it was the biggest shock of my
life. Nothing prepared me for it, I live each day
wondering how I will get through it and then
remember that you would want me to. You
are truly missed and continue to rest in peace.
Your Wife, Marie; Son and Family
Of Silver Spring, MD died Sunday, February
4, 2018, at the age of 93. A mathematician
by training, John worked largely in probability
analysis. Early in his career, he came to Washington, DC to work at the U.S. Army Map
Service, went on to work under federal government contract in several states, and returned
to the area in 1964 to work at the Johns
Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory,
where he was employed for 30 years. A widower and father of four, John was an active
member of his church. His later life was much
enriched by friends and social service.
LEONARD T. KING, SR.
Of Deale, Maryland, and formerly of Damascus,
Maryland, died Thursday, February 1, 2018 at
the Anne Arundel Medical Center, Annapolis,
Maryland, with friends and family by his side.
Born April 21, 1942, in Clarksburg, Maryland,
he was the son of the late Kenneth and Olivia
King. He is survived by three children, Lisa
Lewis of Charlestown, West Virginia, Kelly King
of Deale, Maryland and Leonard T. King, Jr. of
Frederick, Maryland; four grandchildren and
two great-grandchildren.
Upon graduation from Damascus High School,
he attended the University of Maryland in their
fire engineering curriculum before taking a job
as a Fire Prevention Officer with Montgomery
County, Maryland. He received his Associate of
Arts Degree in Fire Science from Montgomery
College. He was the President of the Maryland
State Firemen’s Association (1985-1986), President of the Maryland Fire Chiefs Association
(1990-1991) and served on the Board of Directors for the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation (2003-2015). He was involved with Damascus, Rocky Ridge, Deale, Marlboro, and many
other Volunteer Fire Departments. He was also
the recipient of many awards and honors.
Friends may call 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m.
Friday, February 9, at Molesworth-Williams
P.A., Funeral Home, 26401 Ridge Road, Damascus, Maryland 20872. A funeral service will
be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, February 10,
at Damascus United Methodist Church, 9700
New Church Street, Damascus, Maryland
20872. Interment will be private.
The family suggests that in lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions be made to the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation, P.O. Drawer
498, Emmitsburg, Maryland 21727.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
LOFTUS
EZ
B7
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DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
MAY
ROLLER
WALKER
HUNTER
OLIVER
WILLIAM E. MAY, SR
(Age 82)
REX R. ROLLER
Of Hyattsville MD departed this life on Thursday, January 25, 2018. He leaves to cherish
his memory, wife Corine May, two daughters,
Lillian (Anthony) and Kimberly (Kenneth), one
son, Brandon Strother, one stepson, Rodney
Watford, and a host of relatives and friends.
Viewing will be held on Wednesday, February 7,
2018 from 9:30 to 11 a.m. until hour of service
11 a.m. at First Baptist Church of Glenarden.
3600 Brightseat Road, Glenarden MD 20706.
Interment to be held at National Harmony
Memorial Park Cemetery in Landover, MD.
On January 25, 2018, beloved husband and
father, after short illness. Survived by Julie
Gray-Roller, Cynthia and Jeremy Cook; four
siblings, and host of friends. Funeral service
previously held. In lieu of flowers, donations to
Shenandoah National Park Trust.
SAPPERSTEIN
SYLVIA MORRIS SAPPERSTEIN
McGILL
MARY FERER LOFTUS
After a long battle with Alzheimer’s, Mary
passed away peacefully at home surrounded
by family at Potomac Green in Ashburn, VA on
February 2, 2018. She was 81.
Mary was born in Swickley, PA in 1937 and
raised in Meadville, PA. In 1959 she graduated
with honors from the Francis Payne Bolton
School of Nursing at Western Reserve University in Cleveland, OH. While there she met and
married Martin Loftus, an Army Officer. They
then began their 54 year journey, 23 years of
which were to various Army posts across the
United States and Europe.
In 2000 Mary retired after a more than 20 year
nursing career with the INOVA Health Systems
(Fairfax and Fair Oaks Hospitals). She was then
able to enjoy her time summering at Rushford
Lake, NY, joining her nurse friends in their book
club and being with her family and watching
her 9 grandchildren grow into adulthood.
Mary is predeceased by her parents, Dr. Walter
and Margaret Ferer of Meadville, PA and her
brother Walter “Tom” Ferer of NJ. She is
survived by her loving husband Col. Martin R.
Loftus, USA (Ret.) of Ashburn, VA; her four
children, Kathleen Stapleton of Downingtown,
PA, Bridget Holzwarth (Jake) of Exeter, RI, Mary
Elizabeth Loftus of Centreville, VA and Kerry
Diaz (Amador) of Centreville, VA and her 9
much loved grandchildren.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at
St. Theresa Catholic Church, 21371 St. Theresa
Lane, Ashburn, VA 20147 on Friday, February
9 at 10:30 a.m. followed by a gathering of
family and friends at the Hilton Garden Inn,
Dulles North, 22400 Flagstaff Plaza, Ashburn,
VA 20148.
Those wishing to honor her legacy may do
so by donating to The Alzheimer’s Association
National Office, 225 N. Michigan Ave., FL 17,
Chicago IL 60601.
LOUVENIA MADDOX McGILL
Of Washington, DC. Departed this life on Friday,
January 26, 2018. The beloved mother of Consuella McGill and Regina McGill. She will be laid
to rest on Friday, February 9, 2018, visitation
from 12:30 p.m. until time of service 1:30 p.m.
at Fort Lincoln Funeral Home, 3401 Bladensburg Rd., Brentwood, MD. Interment at Fort
Lincoln Cemetery.
www.fort-lincoln.com
On Wednesday, January 31,
2018 of Rockville, MD. Beloved
wife of the late Nathan (Sandy)
Sapperstein and Philip Morris;
devoted mother of Martin
(Judy), Jay (Debbie) and Michael
(Carrie) Morris; loving sister of Ruby Kaster.
Also survived by her grandchildren, Stacey,
Adam, Jonathan, Remy, Stephanie, Emily,
Caroline, Laurie, Brian and Paul Morris;
and eight great-grandchildren. Graveside
services will be held Thursday, February 8,
2018 at 11 a.m. at King David Memorial
Gardens in Falls Church, VA. Family will
be observing shiva on Thursday evening
with a Minyan service at 7:30 p.m. at the
residence of Michael and Carrie Morris.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
MARTHA E. WALKER
On Monday, January 29, 2018 of Washington,
DC. Beloved wife of James E. Walker; devoted
mother of the late Raymond Walker and Cherry
Nance; grandmother of Janice, Raymond,
Richardo, Jeffrey and Johniece; sister of
Pearline Hale. Also survived by a host of greatgrandchildren, nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Visitation from 9:30 a.m. until
time of service 10:30 a.m. at FORT LINCOLN
FUNERAL HOME, 3401 Bladensburg Rd., Brentwood, MD on Wednesday, February 7, 2018.
Interment Parklawn Cemetery, Rockville, MD.
SINGLETON
SMILEY
Died peacefully in her sleep on January 24,
2018 at age 90. She was a highly beloved
member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Inc., the
Questers, Inc., and Metropolitan Baptist
Church; through all of which she performed
decades of devoted service.
DEATH NOTICE
WEAVER
Margie’s statistical analysis skills guided her
work at the ECA/AID and, later, at the U.S.
Department of Agriculture, from which she
retired after 40 years of government service.
OWEN
LONG
DONALD HARRY OWEN (Age 87)
On Monday, February 5, 2018, of
Wheaton, MD. Beloved husband
of the late Lois Jean Owen; father
of Mary Frances (Roger) King and
Neil Patrick Owen; grandfather of
Roger Owen King. Relatives and
friends may call at Collins Funeral
Home, 500 University Boulevard West, Silver
Spring, MD, (Valet Parking), Thursday, February
8, 2018 from 2 to 4 and 7 to p.m., where
a Memorial Service will take place on Friday,
February 9, 2018 at 11 a.m. Interment private.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
Margie leaves behind a prolific legacy of community service. Through her marriage to the
late Eugene L. Singleton, she is survived by her
four children, Eugene Singleton, Jr., Michael
Singleton, Tamara Sisk, and Valerie St. John
Starbird and four grandchildren, Danielle,
Elliott, Siena, and Weston.
Her memorial service is scheduled for February
8, 2018 from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Ft.
Lincoln Funeral Home in Brentwood.
SMIGOCKI
ELAINE ANN SMIGOCKI (Age 78)
PURCELL
JAMES C. PURCELL
"Tippy"
MICHAEL PATRICK LONG
"Bob"
Peacefully died on Saturday, February 3, 2018
with his family by his side. Beloved husband
to his wife Mary Anne Long for 52 years; loving
father to six children, Kelly Hershey (Jim), Ken
Long (Christine), Kathleen Lineberger (Ryan),
Debbie George (Chris), Terri Moroney (Brian),
and Carrie Pelkey (Lance); and grandfather to
17 grandchildren. He is also survived by his
sisters, Kathleen Tear of Dudley, NC and Susan
Fitzgerald (PJ) of Silver Spring, MD and was
predeceased by his parents, Susan S. Kelly
and Owen P. Long and siblings, John, Jack,
Owen and Julia (Alderton). Family will received
friend’s Wednesday, February 7, 2018 from 2 to
4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. at Beall Funeral Home,
6512 NW Crain Hwy. (Rt. 3 South), Bowie, MD.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St.
Pius X Catholic Church, 14710 Annapolis Road,
Bowie, MD on Thursday, February 8, 2018 at
10:30 a.m.; followed by Interment at Our Lady
of the Fields Roman Catholic Church, 1070
Cecil Ave, Millersville, MD. Please view and sign
the family’s guestbook at:
www.beallfuneral.com
Tippy as he was more fondly known departed
this life on Wednesday, January 31, 2018.
James, son of the late William Cleo and Beatrice
Purcell Smith, was born on September 21,
1947 in Draper (now Eden), NC. He attended
Booker T. Washington High School, graduation
class of 1965. After graduating he severed
in the US Army. James was employed as
General Manager of Revenue Control at Dulles
International Airport in Dulles, Virginia for
twenty five years. He was an avid golfer and
computer enthusiast. Other than his loving
parents, preceded in death are two sisters,
Lavern Cole and Alice Purcell. James leaves to
cherish his memory, Roz, his wife of thirty-two
years; son, Oscar Gregory Purcell; daughter,
Radiah Cerice Purcell Spleen; grandchildren,
Ciara and Christopher; two sisters, Diane
Broadnax and Victoria Purcell Coan (Jeffrey);
and seven brothers, William “Book”, Edward
“Buddy” (Norma), Michael Smith, Warren
“Mack” (Liz), Curtis (Lottie), Thurman Smith
(Beth) and Jerome Purcell. Also he leaves
his mother-in-law, Lois Woltz, brothers-in-law,
Michael Woltz (Kim), Courtland Woltz (Rose),
Fentriss Woltz (Angela), Adrian Woltz (Loretta)
and Mark Woltz (Vicki) and a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins, relatives and friends.
On Sunday, February 4, 2018, of
Beltsville, MD. Beloved wife of
the late Henry L. Smigocki; mother
of Michael A. (Heidi J.) and Paul
H. Smigocki; sister of Joan and
Janice; grandmother of Kory M.
and Kimberly J. Smigocki. Relatives and friends
may call at Collins Funeral Home, 500 University Boulevard West, Silver Spring, MD, (Valet
Parking), on Wednesday, February 7, from 2 to
4 and 7 to 9 pm. Mass of Christian Burial will
be celebrated at St. Joseph's Catholic Church,
11011 Montgomery Road, Beltsville, MD, on
Thursday, February 8 at 11 am. Interment
Gate of Heaven Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to Holy
Cross Hospice, 10720 Columbia Pike, Silver
Spring, MD 20901.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
MILDRED JONES WEAVER
On January 30, 2018 at the home of her
daughter, LaVerne surrounded by her children
God quietly and peacefully called our mother
home to rest. She leaves to cherish her memory her sons, Brent and Charles Weaver (Kathleen); daughters, Darlene Weaver Scott
(Michael) and LaVerne Weaver; six grandchildren, Stephanie, Kenny, Brittany, Cynthia,
Chase and Shannon; step-son, Jesse Weaver;
sisters, Evelyn Knight, and Dorothy Moultrie.
Services will be held at Deliverance Free Will
Baptist Church, 3915 Holly Tree Road, Temple
Hills, Maryland, viewing - 10 a.m.; service, 11
a.m. Interment Cedar Hill Cemetery. Marshall
March Funeral Home of Maryland
www.marchfh.com
DWIGHT THOMPSON WILSON
(Age 85)
Of Silver Spring, Maryland, died Friday, February 2, 2018 at his home surrounded by
his family. He courageously endured the
effects of Parkinson’s disease and Myasthenia Gravis for 13 years.
Dwight was born in Marion, Indiana on
October 31, 1932 the seventh of nine children, to the late Faustin and Helen Thompson Wilson. His marriage to Norma Smith
Wilson for almost 52 years produced two
daughters, Michele Renee Wilson (d. 1983)
and Jennifer Lynn Wilson. Family life brought
Dwight immense joy and pride. Being a
loving husband and doting father were his
most esteemed accomplishments.
Left to cherish his memory are his wife,
Norma; daughter, Jennifer; two sisters,
Priscilla Warrick of Rockville, MD and Faustine King (Ralph) of Indianapolis, IN; one
brother, Robert Wilson of Detroit, MI and
a host of nieces, nephews, other family
members and friends.
Memorial Service will be on Friday, February
9, 2018, 10 a.m. at the People’s Congregational United Church of Christ, 4704 – 13th
St., NW, Washington, DC 20011. A repast will
follow the service.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
the Michele Renee Wilson Memorial Scholarship Fund. Services by STEWART.
WRIGLEY
for many years at The Maret School. Through
a series of fortunate events, she connected
with the Virginia Migrant Education Program
and began working in migrant camps and
local school communities to improve the
education of migrant children throughout the
state. For the past two decades, Pam worked
with ESCORT educational services at SUNY
Oneonta, providing training and professional
development to school and state education
administrators and hundreds of teachers on
best practices for migrant education and
supporting English learners. In her work
around the country, Pam became recognized
as a valued expert, providing guidance
through her publications and direct service
on methods that continue to be used widely
in the field.
PAMELA GRACE WRIGLEY (Age 69)
Of Washington, DC, passed away peacefully
on January 19, 2018. Pam was born in Detroit,
M.I. on May 24, 1948, daughter of R. Alexander and Barbara (Kittelberger) Wrigley of
Grosse Pointe Woods, MI.
From an early age, Pam loved to travel.
She spent time, always with her camera
close at hand, often with family and friends,
exploring the cultural treasures of Japan,
Latin America, much of Western Europe,
including her beloved Spain, and the United
States.
Pam graduated from Wheaton College in
Boston and earned her master’s degree from
Middlebury College in Vermont after which
she dedicated her professional career to
teaching. She started in the Mission District
in San Francisco where she worked in a
program helping at-risk students earn their
high school diploma.
She then moved to Washington, DC. where
she taught Spanish and coached volleyball
Pam celebrated life to its fullest and urged
those around her to do the same. She never
let a holiday or birthday pass without copious
attention to the celebrants through multiple
cards and extravagantly wrapped gifts. Pam
loved cherry blossom season, Motown
music, Chincoteague summers, and a good
meal with family and friends. She was a firm
believer that laughter is the best medicine.
Pam is survived by her brother, George
Wrigley and sister-in-law, Dorothy (Jones)
Wrigley of Grosse Pointe, MI, her nieces,
Kendall Wrigley (Paul Boisi) of New York, and
Katherine Wrigley Gorski (Brian) of Chicago,
and her grandniece, Grace Boisi.
Funeral services will be held privately. She
will be interred at White Chapel Cemetery in
Troy, MI where her parents are resting.
In lieu of flowers, a memorial gift may be
made to The Foundation for Language Education and Development (LEAD) and sent to
PO Box 141203 Gainesville FL 32614. Please
indicate that the donation is for the Pamela
Wrigley Scholarship Fund.
Virginia, known affectionately as Pretty Girl
or Aunt Ginny, is survived by her children,
Lowell Nicholas Jones and Geraldine Diaz;
her grandchildren, Andrew, Johnetta, David,
Lowell Nicholas, Angela, and Louis Paul; as
well as her great-grandchildren, great-greatgrandchildren, and their families. A memorial
gathering will be held in the spring. In lieu of
flowers, donations in her honor may be made
to the MSU Black Alumni Education Fund.
www.capitolmortuaryinc.com
KANCHUGER
KASSANDRA A. SMILEY
Peacefully entered into eternal
rest on Friday, February 2, 2018.
She is survived by her loving parents, Willie, Sr. and Arzelia Smiley;
her brother, Willie Smiley, Jr.;
niece, Lindsey Smiley and a host
of other relatives and friends. Viewing will be
at 9 a.m. followed by services at 11 a.m.
at First Baptist Church of Capitol Heights, 6
Capitol Heights Blvd., Capitol Heights, MD on
Wednesday, February 7, 2018. Interment will
be in Selma, AL. Services entrusted to R.N.
HORTONS COMPANY MORTICIANS, INC.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
HOLIDAY HOURS
Presidents' Day
Monday,
February 19, 2018
11 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Funeral Home
Self-Service Deadline:
1 p.m.
STETTINIUS
NO EXCEPTIONS
ROBERT KANCHUGER (Age 87)
WILSON
Dwight’s interests included politics, music
(especially jazz), religion, history, traveling,
sports and current events. His calm and
serene personality became energized when
engaged in conversation about politics and
international relations. He was a loving, giving, hard-working man who emphasized the
importance of God, family, education and
community in all his life’s works. Dwight
touched, inspired and encouraged many
lives. In spite of having to manage the
diseases that engulfed him, he was blessed
with a rich and full life and will be sorely
missed.
VIRGINIA HOPE NICHOLAS JONES
Known for her tough and lively personality,
Virginia Hope Nicholas Jones, 94, was reunited
with the love of her life, John Charles Jones,
in the heavenly kingdom on January 31, 2018.
Born on October 22, 1923 in Indianapolis, Indiana, Virginia grew to value dignity and excellence in education. She was a proud graduate
of Michigan State University (BA Education,
MS Mathematics), a distinguished math and
science teacher, and founder of the Alpha
Chapter of Sigma Gamma Rho, Inc. in Freeport,
Grand Bahama. She was also an active member
of the Bahá’í Faith, which emphasizes the unity
of mankind and the harmony of science and
religion. She and her husband served as Bah’i
pioneers in his native Bahamas for many years.
Photo Deadline:
1 p.m.
Funeral services will be held in North Carolina
on Saturday, February 10.
He earned degrees from Taylor, Howard
and Johns Hopkins Universities. His career
included jobs with the Rhode Island Urban
League; President Johnson’s War on Poverty;
National Urban League; U.S. Department of
State (USAID)/Africa Bureau, Washington,
DC, which included travel to 33 countries.
JOHN CHESTER OLIVER (Age 80)
John C. Oliver passed away peacefully on
January 19, 2018. He was born October 3, 1937
in Washington, DC. He enjoyed spending time
with his friends and family, and listening to
his collection of R&B, jazz and blues. John is
survived by his sweetheart, Mary Murphy and
his two daughters, Tanya and Valerie Oliver. The
family will receive friends on Friday, February
9, 2018 from 10 a.m. until time of Homegoing
Service, 11 a.m., at Asbury United Methodist
Church, 926 11th St., NW, Washington, DC.
Interment at Fort Lincoln Cemetery. Arrangements by McGUIRE.
www.mcguire-services.com
JONES
MARGIE BELLE ALLEN SINGLETON
Born to Sam Wilson Allen and Naomi PhillipsAllen in Wichita, Kansas, Margie and her mother moved to Dallas, TX after her father died.
She graduated high school there and earned
a diploma in Shorthand, Typing and Business
English at the Afro-American Business College
in Dallas. She subsequently moved to Washington, D.C. and landed work as a clerk-stenographer for the Economic Cooperation Administration (ECA) now the Agency for International Development (AID); and simultaneously enrolled part-time at Howard University,
graduating in 1957 with a degree in economics.
DEATH NOTICE
ARTHUR G. HUNTER
"Pete (Age 82)
Passed on Tuesday, January 30, 2018. Survived
by wife of 57 years, Doris P. Hunter; son,
Rodney Paul Hunter and a host of other relatives and friends. Family will receive friends
on Thursday, February 8 at Church of The
Incarnation, 880 Eastern Ave. NE, Washington,
DC 20015. Visitation from 10 a.m. until time of
service at 11 a.m. Interment Maryland National
Cemetery, Laurel, MD. Arrangements by J,B.
JENKINS FUNERAL HOME.
DEATH NOTICE
JOSEPH STETTINIUS, JR. (Age 55)
HARRISON
Died on February 1, 2018 at his home, Oakfield,
in Upperville, VA.
Following a thirty-year career as a leader in
the commercial real estate industry, he most
recently served as Cushman & Wakefield’s
Chief Executive Officer for the Americas. He
was also a Trustee of the Virginia Historical
Society and a Board Director of the Boys & Girls
Club of Greater Washington.
Born in Richmond VA to the late Joseph Stettinius and Mary Ballou Williams of Richmond
VA.
Survivors include his wife of 22 years, Regina
Travers Stettinius; and their two children,
Isabel Stuart Stettinius and Alexander Travers
Stettinius, of Washington, DC; his twin brother,
Edward Reilly Stettinius of Washington, DC;
his sisters, Mary Stettinius Benevento of New
Canaan, CT, Virginia Stettinius McMullan of
Washington, DC and Carolyn Stettinius Rankin
of Atlanta, GA; his brother, Richard Roland
Reynolds of Alexandria, VA, their families; as
well as a large extended family.
A funeral service will be held on Wednesday,
February 7 at 11 a.m. at Trinity Episcopal
Church, 9108 John S Mosby Hwy., Upperville,
VA.
In lieu of flowers, please consider a gift to the
Piedmont Fox Hounds, P.O. Box 13, Upperville,
VA 20185 or the Boys & Girls Club of Greater
Washington, www.bgcgw.org.
DEATH NOTICE
Of Potomac, MD passed away peacefully on
Saturday, February 3, 2018. Beloved husband
of Margaret Cotter; loving father of Stuart
(Arleen), Molly (Chuck) and Sarah (Eric); stepfather of David (Jennifer) and Ken (Ava); and dear
Poppa to 14 grandchildren.
Bob was the only child born to Morris and
Eva Kanchuger, who had emigrated as young
children from Eastern Europe. He was raised in
Brooklyn and the Bronx and attended college
at Amherst. He graduated from Harvard Law
School, then served in the U.S. Navy. He had
a career at the U.S. Agency for International
Development and the World Bank.
In retirement, Bob was a board member of
Language Etc. (now the Washington English
Center), an organization that provides English
classes and other services to immigrants, and
volunteered there as an English teacher. He
served as a mediator through the DC courts,
and mentored young people with challenges
through a Montgomery County program. With
friends, he established a bike riding group and
a New Yorker review group, both of which
continue.
Shiva will be observed at the family home on
Tuesday, February 6 and Wednesday, February
7 from 4 to 7 p.m. Small celebratory gatherings
are ongoing.
In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation
in Bob’s memory to a compassionate cause of
your choosing.
EDWARD B. HARRISON, JR. (Age 76)
Deacon Edward B. Harrison, Jr.
entered into eternal rest on Sunday, January 28, 2018. He leaves
to cherish his memory family and
friends. On Thursday, February 8
from 9 a.m. until 11 a.m., Deacon
Harrison will lie in repose at Way
of the Cross Church of Christ (Mother Church),
1800 Hazelwood Dr., Capitol Heights, MD,
where services will be held at 11 a.m., Bishop
Alphonzo D. Brooks, Senior Pastor. Interment
Harmony Memorial Park. Services by Hunt
Funeral Home.
www.huntfuneralhome.net
Area Community College, she was recruited
to work for the U.S. government at the
Pentagon and eventually worked as an
administrative assistant in the Office of the
Secretary of the Air Force. Between 1979
and 2015 she supported the intelligence
community as a government employee and
as a contractor for Trident Data Systems/Veridian/General Dynamics as an Oracle database trainer and administrator, Scitor
Corporation as a data manager, Harris Corporation as a data administrator, ManTech
International Corporation as a data analyst/forensic tech, and KLC Network Services,
Inc. as a digital forensics software engineer.
During this time, she went back to school and
graduated with a BIS degree from George
Mason University in 2001.
MARY LYNN CREASON MANSFIELD
After graduating from Bishop McDevitt High
School and receiving her AS at Harrisburg
deathnotices@washpost.com
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SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
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MASKE
MANSFIELD
Mary Lynn Creason Mansfield passed away
on Saturday, January 27, 2018 at her home in
Aldie, VA from acute myeloid leukemia. Mrs.
Mansfield was born on October 26, 1950 in
Harrisburg, PA., daughter of Joanne E. Yost
Creason of Harrisburg, PA and the late Lynn
Alvis Creason. She is survived by her mother,
her husband of 34 years Robert D. Mansfield,
brothers David W. Creason of La Plata, MD,
John S. Creason of Carlisle, PA, and L. Richard
Creason, Robert L. Creason, James M. Creason, William L. Creason, and sister Elizabeth
A. Creason DiCosimo, all of Harrisburg. She
is also survived by 20 nieces and nephews
and 21 great nieces and nephews in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Nebraska, Georgia and
California.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 Ext 4-4122
Mrs. Mansfield retired in 2015. Besides enjoying traveling, attending sporting events and
beach vacations, her passions were reading,
knitting, playing Bunco and Mahjong. She
was a member of the Northern Virginia
Neighbors, the South Riding Knitters group,
and the Prince William Purlers. She was well
known for sending Three Kings Christmas
cards every year.
The family will receive friends on Saturday,
February 10, 2018 from 1 to 4 p.m. and 6
to 8 p.m. at Fairfax Memorial Funeral Home,
9902 Braddock Road, Fairfax, VA. Burial
will be at Arlington National Cemetery in
approximately 4 to 5 months.
In lieu of flowers the family asks that you
consider donating to one or both of the
following: The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, Capitol Caring Hospice (www.capitalcaring.org)
WANDA M. MASKE
Born October 5, 1926. Wanda passed
peacefully from this world to the next after
a massive stroke at age 91 on Saturday,
February 3, 2018. She passed at the Hospice of St. Mary's. She was raised in Falling
Waters, WV the youngest of seven and
the only member of the family born in a
hospital. Working in Washington, DC for the
U. S. Government, she met the love of her
life, Russell D. Maske, Sr. and married on
July 18, 1947. She had two sons, Russell D.
Jr. (deceased) and Lawrence "Larry". Wanda
was as comfortable sitting around a table
making crafts for the Church Bazaar as she
was sitting on a boat fishing or eating crabs
on her porch. She loved the beach, she
loved boating and most of all she loved her
family. She sacrificed anything so that her
family was protected and well. Wanda is
survived by her husband of 70 years, Russell
D.; son, Larry and daughter-in-law, Patrice;
many loving nieces, nephews, grand and
great grand nieces and nephews and many
loving friends. She was preceded in death
by son, Russell D. Jr., sisters, Alberta Faye,
Bernice, Fern, Gladys and Juanita and brother, Kenneth. Family may visit at 9:30 a.m.
and friends may visit at 10:30 a.m. on
Thursday, February 8, 2018 at Gasch's
Funeral Home, 4739 Baltimore Ave.,
Hyattsville, MD 20781. Service to be held
at 12:30 p.m. with interment to follow at
Fort Lincoln Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital or the Hospice of
St. Mary's.
www.gaschs.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Slightly warmer, then sleet
The day starts with temperatures
well below freezing, but light winds
from the south help the air warm a
bit in most spots in the afternoon.
There will be at least periodic
cloudiness, especially early and late. Highs head
for the low to mid-40s. Overnight, we could see
light mixed precipitation. Our colder areas north
and west of the Beltway have the best chance to
see a mix of snow, sleet and freezing rain toward
dawn. Lows range from 30 to 35.
Today
Partly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Wednesday
Rain
Thursday
Partly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Partly sunny
Saturday
Shower
OFFICIAL RECORD
Sunday
Rain
Temperatures
46° 31
48° 27
37° 27
48° 33
50° 42
62° 40
FEELS*: 45°
FEELS: 37°
FEELS: 31°
FEELS: 42°
FEELS: 44°
FEELS: 57°
CHNCE PRECIP: 10%
P: 75%
P: 5%
P: 15%
P: 45%
P: 55%
WIND: W 6–12 mph
W: SSE 7–14 mph
W: NW 8–16 mph
W: SSE 7–14 mph
W: S 6–12 mph
W: SSW 8–16 mph
°
°
°
°
°
NATION
Harrisburg
39/22
Hagerstown
39/25
Davis
33/22
F
Sa
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Normal
Philadelphia
42/27
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
43/26
Dover
44/29
Washington
46/31
FORECAST
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
39° 5:47 a.m.
31° 10:02 a.m.
45°/29°
70° 1991
–10° 1996
36° 5:23 a.m.
28° 8:00 a.m.
44°/25°
73° 1991
–10° 1996
36° 6:12 a.m.
28° 9:52 a.m.
43°/25°
73° 1991
–1° 1996
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –2.1° yr. to date: –0.6°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 42°
Ocean City
45/34
OCEAN: 35°
Lexington
47/33
Richmond
54/32
Norfolk
56/40
Virginia Beach
54/40
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 37°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
52/42
OCEAN: 40°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.34"
1.18"
0.48"
2.12"
3.29"
0.0"
3.1"
0.38"
1.34"
0.49"
3.13"
3.17"
0.0"
5.1"
0.41"
1.23"
0.52"
2.23"
3.57"
0.0"
6.5"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
3 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, partly sunny. High 33–37. Wind west
8–16 mph. Tonight, cloudy, snow, sleet, freezing rain. Low
26–30. Wind south–southwest 6–12 mph. Wednesday,
cloudy, rain, ice early. High 40–44. Wind south–southwest
8–16 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny. High 43–56. Wind
southwest 6–12 mph. Tonight, increasingly cloudy. Low
30–40. Wind northeast 6–12 mph. Wednesday, cloudy,
breezy, rain. High 47–64. Wind south–southeast 10–20
mph. Thursday, partly sunny. High 36–42.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, partly sunny. Wind west
4–8 knots. Waves 1 foot. Visibility unrestricted. • Lower Potomac and
Chesapeake Bay: Today, partly sunny. Wind west–southwest 6–12
knots. Waves 1 foot on the Potomac and Chesapeake Bay. Visibility
unrestricted.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls will be 3.7
feet, holding steady at 3.7 feet Wednesday. Flood stage at Little Falls
is 10 feet.
Today’s tides
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
12:17 a.m.
7:10 a.m.
12:40 p.m.
7:49 p.m.
3:36 a.m.
9:59 a.m.
4:08 p.m.
10:05 p.m.
5:58 a.m.
11:56 a.m.
Ocean City
ACTUAL
Cape May
41/31
Annapolis
43/30
Charlottesville
51/34
Annapolis
RECORD
°
Th
REGION
AVERAGE
6:20 p.m.
none
Norfolk
1:46 a.m.
7:58 a.m.
2:04 p.m.
8:14 p.m.
Point Lookout
5:54 a.m.
12:26 p.m.
6:02 p.m.
none
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Thermal, CA 88°
Low: Black River Falls, WI –23°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
32/14/sf
61/28/pc
28/17/sn
64/54/pc
63/44/r
43/26/pc
25/11/pc
61/57/pc
16/–9/c
52/34/pc
36/24/pc
24/12/sn
30/9/c
70/50/s
41/29/c
59/48/pc
38/20/pc
19/12/pc
36/26/c
26/18/c
52/34/r
45/22/c
Tomorrow
27/18/sn
54/29/s
26/12/s
64/36/r
47/33/sh
44/25/i
40/31/c
63/31/r
14/0/c
55/37/pc
36/26/sn
26/13/sn
25/11/sn
74/54/c
44/22/r
60/37/r
44/32/s
22/5/pc
34/15/sn
27/17/sn
51/32/pc
51/32/s
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
17/8/pc
25/15/c
75/44/s
–2/–23/pc
9/–3/pc
36/19/pc
78/67/t
71/60/t
30/20/c
64/58/r
70/55/pc
21/11/sn
74/47/s
42/32/r
75/55/pc
40/31/c
46/35/r
80/72/pc
17/10/pc
9/4/pc
49/43/r
71/65/t
39/28/pc
56/40/pc
20/12/s
26/5/sn
65/35/s
–8/–22/pc
10/–5/pc
33/22/sn
79/67/sh
62/41/r
30/9/pc
62/31/r
79/59/c
29/14/s
71/47/s
45/23/c
81/56/s
38/20/c
41/27/sh
82/70/pc
22/5/pc
16/1/pc
46/23/r
71/46/r
40/27/sn
64/36/r
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
35/21/i
16/6/sn
79/61/pc
42/27/pc
80/52/s
32/19/c
33/18/pc
53/40/c
39/21/pc
58/43/pc
58/30/s
54/32/pc
72/43/s
29/20/c
84/74/pc
49/35/pc
68/52/pc
70/52/s
85/72/pc
50/45/c
44/36/c
28/11/sn
79/66/pc
30/15/sn
43/24/s
22/14/s
82/64/pc
43/26/sn
80/51/s
33/14/sn
29/22/sn
56/41/pc
41/28/sn
65/35/r
59/31/s
58/33/r
72/44/s
32/16/pc
83/74/pc
54/37/pc
75/53/s
69/52/s
83/74/pc
53/46/c
48/42/c
26/14/sn
80/67/pc
39/24/s
World
High: Twee Rivieren, South Africa 109°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –60°
Feb 7
Last
Quarter
Feb 15
New
Feb 23
First
Quarter
Mar 1
Full
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:10 a.m.
none
7:36 a.m.
2:30 a.m.
1:15 a.m.
4:40 a.m.
Set
5:35 p.m.
10:56 a.m.
6:05 p.m.
12:13 p.m.
11:26 a.m.
2:11 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
76/42/s
Amsterdam
35/23/pc
Athens
59/47/pc
Auckland
73/61/s
Baghdad
73/47/pc
Bangkok
85/69/pc
Beijing
36/20/s
Berlin
32/21/pc
Bogota
69/46/sh
Brussels
34/24/pc
Buenos Aires
92/71/c
Cairo
80/60/c
Caracas
72/63/pc
Copenhagen
30/26/sf
Dakar
69/62/c
Dublin
38/27/pc
Edinburgh
38/23/pc
Frankfurt
36/27/pc
Geneva
43/33/c
Ham., Bermuda 68/63/s
Helsinki
19/13/sn
Ho Chi Minh City 87/65/s
Tomorrow
78/43/s
37/26/pc
62/52/sh
74/61/sh
75/48/s
88/69/s
36/10/s
34/22/s
70/48/sh
35/25/pc
95/72/pc
84/62/pc
72/63/pc
34/30/pc
70/62/pc
41/38/c
40/37/c
39/25/s
39/31/c
68/66/pc
23/17/sn
86/68/s
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
58/51/pc
73/41/pc
50/42/s
68/50/c
82/62/pc
46/22/s
86/76/pc
87/65/pc
90/80/pc
77/70/pc
51/39/pc
38/29/c
42/27/c
84/71/pc
75/49/pc
25/5/sn
13/5/pc
90/78/c
82/58/pc
73/48/pc
20/11/c
23/2/sn
34/29/sn
32/26/pc
61/54/s
72/41/s
56/49/pc
69/50/s
81/60/t
47/21/s
84/75/pc
86/64/pc
91/80/pc
78/69/pc
53/38/pc
40/29/pc
44/27/pc
84/72/c
73/48/pc
19/8/sn
19/7/c
89/72/pc
82/56/pc
74/46/pc
19/11/pc
17/5/sn
32/21/sn
35/26/c
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
81/74/c
78/55/s
58/43/r
89/65/pc
85/58/s
46/32/pc
21/6/s
39/26/s
84/76/pc
25/13/c
79/66/pc
56/50/c
57/38/s
45/33/s
24/10/c
36/29/c
31/18/pc
83/73/sh
82/56/pc
55/41/t
89/67/pc
86/57/s
51/35/sn
27/13/c
44/28/c
84/75/c
25/22/c
80/67/pc
60/54/r
56/37/s
46/34/s
23/11/sn
35/31/sn
33/26/c
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
FTA will release $15.8 million when safety board launches
METRO FROM B1
the selection of a chair from
among their ranks.
The FTA has withheld
$15.8 million from the District,
Maryland and Virginia for their
failure to establish the group by a
February 2017 deadline — money
that will be restored upon the
commission’s launch.
The D.C. Council held public
hearings Monday on the District’s
three appointees, including former city administrator Robert
Bobb, former Homeland Security
and Emergency Management
Agency director Christopher
Geldart, and — perhaps the highest-profile of the commission’s appointees — former National
Transportation Safety Board
chairman Christopher A. Hart.
Bobb and Geldart were appointed by Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) and would serve as principal and alternate members, respectively. The council appointed
Hart. All three are subject to council confirmation, with a vote expected Tuesday.
As vice chairman and later
chairman of the NTSB, Hart oversaw investigations into both of
Metro’s most high-profile safety
incidents, including its most deadly — the 2009 Red Line crash near
the Fort Totten station that killed
nine, including the train operator.
He also oversaw the investigation
into the 2015 Yellow Line smoke
calamity that killed 61-year-old
Carol I. Glover and sickened
scores of others.
“What I bring to the table is
expertise in transit safety,” Hart,
who said he rode Metro to the
hearing, told the D.C. Council on
Monday. “I’ve been extensively involved with every serious mishap
that Metro has had since 2009
with Fort Totten, so I think I am
intensely qualified to look at the
present state of the system and
how to make it better.”
Meanwhile, Geldart faced the
most serious questioning in light
of a recent Washington City Paper
report highlighting the D.C. Office
of the Inspector General’s findings
that he committed ethics violations during his time at HSEMA,
findings that were later dismissed
by D.C.’s Board of Ethics and Government Accountability (BEGA).
Among the inspector general’s
findings were that Geldart used
his authority as a government offi-
SALWAN GEORGES/THE WASHINGTON POST
The D.C. Council held public hearings Monday on the District’s three appointees to the Metro Safety Commission. Virginia’s and
Maryland’s appointees are awaiting confirmation by state legislative bodies, a process that is expected to be completed by spring.
cial for the private gain of a “close
personal acquaintance” and that
he used a government vehicle for
personal purposes. But the ethics
board later dismissed the investigation, saying “insufficient evidence exists to support a reasonable belief that a violation has
occurred.”
D.C. Council Chairman Phil
Mendelson (D) said before the
hearing that BEGA’s conclusion
was unlikely to put Geldart’s nomination in jeopardy.
“My sense is that’s not going to
imperil the nomination,” Mendelson said. “There’s always concerns, but the question is how
great the concerns are. The fact
that BEGA concluded that there
was not an ethics violation is satisfactory.”
Geldart, who serves as chief operating officer of a software firm,
defended himself against accusations of misconduct.
“I don’t believe there was a
breach of ethics in the things that I
did in my five years with District
government service,” he said.
Bobb, the former D.C. administrator and emergency financial
manager for Detroit public
schools, is a turnaround specialist
who owns a consulting business
but lacks experience specific to
transit. Pressed by Mendelson on
his relevant experience, he pointed to his extensive work with cities
and local entities, some with troubled histories.
“I have been city manager of a
number of jurisdictions across the
country,” Bobb said, having earlier
touted his “history of service with
the District of Columbia government.”
He pledged to oversee Metro’s
safety in similar fashion, “including performing inspections, investigating certain practices and incidents” with the commission. “This
is a weighty task and one I take
seriously,” Bobb said. “The lives of
millions of people annually depend on the work we will do here.”
A spokeswoman for Bowser defended both of her picks in a series
of written statements on Monday.
Geldart has “20 years of homeland security experience and a
strong track record of leading
large governmental agencies,” the
Bowser spokeswoman said. Bowser’s office did not address the ethics concerns raised against
Geldart in the hearing.
In addressing Bobb’s experience, the spokeswoman said his
public finance credentials fit the
terms of the commission’s founding legislation, which specifies appointees should have experience
in fields from transit safety and
transportation to “relevant engineering disciplines, or public finance.”
Bobb “has more than 40 years
of executive management experience in both the private and public
sectors, including public financing,” the spokeswoman said.
Virginia’s and Maryland’s appointees are awaiting confirmation by state legislative bodies, the
Virginia General Assembly and
the Maryland Senate, a process
that is expected to be complete by
spring. The Maryland Senate is
expected to hold confirmation
hearings Feb. 12, according to Del.
Marc A. Korman (D-Montgomery).
Virginia’s appointees are Greg
Hull, former vice president of the
American Public Transportation
Association, and Mark V. Rosenker, former chairman of the NTSB.
Maryland’s appointees are
Howard H. Roberts Jr., former
president of New York City Transit, and Debra A. Farrar-Dyke, who
formerly served as a Metro liaison
for disadvantaged business enterprises and currently serves on the
Maryland Transportation Commission. Virginia has yet to appoint an alternate, while Maryland selected John Contestabile,
program manager for homeland
security for the applied physics lab
of Johns Hopkins University.
Mitchell said commissioners
are considered as seated amid the
confirmation
process,
and
Wednesday’s orientation at the
Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments and an upcoming action meeting are necessary
steps ahead of FTA certification.
At Monday’s hearing, Council
member Jack Evans (D-Ward 2),
who serves as Metro board chairman, raised broad questions
about the mission of the safety
body. Would appointees’ decisions
be made with the safety of the
system in mind, for example, or
would their interests be with the
jurisdiction that appointed them?
The Metro board has been criticized for its complex structure —
involving eight voting and eight
alternate members, with dual loyalties to Metro and their appointing jurisdictions.
Evans used the example of Metro’s late-night hours, which were
curtailed by General Manager
Paul J. Wiedefeld in an action set
to expire after the 2019 fiscal year.
“Critical to the District’s economy is late-night hours, which we
stopped last year — because we
need more track time,” Evans said,
referring to vital maintenance
windows. “You guys represent the
District. Where do you come down
on that?”
“I would have to come down on
the part of safety,” Bobb said.
Questioning by council member Elissa Silverman (I-At Large)
took a similar tack. She noted Wiedefeld’s unprecedented decision
to close the system for a day amid
critical safety concerns in March
2016.
“How will you make that type of
decision?” she asked, as officials
noted the commission would have
the power to compel a shutdown
of all or parts of the rail system.
Hart said he had great respect
for Wiedefeld’s decision, which involved putting his job on the line.
“That’s obviously a last resort if
things aren’t going well,” he said.
“That’s a last resort — if all else
fails.”
Bobb said such decisions
should be made with precise, methodical consideration.
“It should be based on really
great analysis, rationale-wise — so
it doesn’t give the impression that
[it] is just making a rash decision
that could affect thousands of individuals who use the system every day,” Bobb said.
faiz.siddiqui@washpost.com
Fenit Nirappil contributed to this
report.
KLMNO
Style
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
SU
C
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
BOOK WORLD
HELEN HAYES AWARDS
THEATER REVIEW
Three Philadelphia Eagles say they’d sit
out a visit to the White House. C2
Paul Howarth is to Cormac McCarthy
what the dingo is to the coyote. C3
Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “In the Heights”
leads the way in the nominations. C3
What’s more awkward than high school
romance? “La Foto (A Selfie Affair).” C3
20 years
ago, Vegas
paper held
Wynn story
Review-Journal’s owner
is a rival of casino mogul
accused of misconduct
BY
PRIVATE COLLECTION/MICHAEL ROSENFELD GALLERY LLC
ART REVIEW
The revolution
will be painted
Exhibition is a brilliant overview
of the Black Power movement
BY
P HILIP K ENNICOTT
bentonville, ark. — In July, a month before
white racists gathered in Charlottesville for a
torchlight parade followed by a violent Unite
the Right rally, the Tate Modern in London
opened an exhibition called “Soul of a Nation:
Art in the Age of Black Power.” It was a resounding success, not just because the subject was
newly topical but because it galvanized audiences with its emotional and visual power.
Now the exhibition has come to the United
States, first to Crystal Bridges Museum of
American Art here in Arkansas and later this
year to the Brooklyn Museum. Even if the
names of the artists and many of their key
works are better known here than they were in
London, the sense of discovery, or rediscovery,
is no less thrilling. The exhibition includes
more than 160 works by some 60 artists,
covering two decades, beginning with the
March on Washington in 1963. These were
some of the most tumultuous and tragic years
in the history of the nation, with the assassinaART REVIEW CONTINUED ON C2
ROBERT WEDEMEYER/BETYE SAAR AND ROBERTS & TILTON
EDWARD C. ROBISON III/CRYSTAL BRIDGES
MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART
COLLECTION OF HALLEY K. HARRISBURG AND MICHAEL ROSENFELD
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP:
“Did the Bear Sit Under a
Tree?,” 1969, by Benny
Andrews; “Rainbow Mojo,”
1972, by Betye Saar; “Black
Unity” 1968, by Elizabeth
Catlett; and “Pittsburgh
Memory,” 1964, by Romare
Bearden.
P AUL F ARHI
Las Vegas’s leading newspaper
has a confession to make: It buried
a huge story about one of its city’s
leading citizens some 20 years
ago. But why it’s fessing up now
may be a story in itself.
In a lengthy
article
published Monday,
the Las Vegas
Review-Journal acknowledged that it
knew
about
sexual harassment allega- Steve Wynn
tions
surrounding casino mogul Steve
Wynn and his Mirage Hotel in
1998 but spiked the story for unknown reasons.
The newspaper had court records and other documentation
about harassment allegations involving Wynn, who later became
the finance chairman of the Republican National Committee. It
even took the unusual step of paying for lie-detector tests for two
women who said harassment was
common at the Wynn-owned Mirage during that time.
Yet the paper never published
the story. The Wall Street Journal
broke the news last month, leading to Wynn’s resignation from the
RNC and an internal investigation
at his company. Wynn has denied
the allegations.
Although the Review-Journal
doesn’t mention it in its article
about itself, its self-revelation follows a significant change in the
paper’s ownership over the past
two years.
After decades of control by a
private media company, the Review-Journal was sold twice in
2015, eventually ending up in the
hands of Sheldon Adelson, who,
like Wynn, is a billionaire casino
magnate and a major Republican
donor. Adelson and Wynn are also
longtime business rivals in Las
Vegas — giving the Review-Journal’s new story a possible payback
subplot.
But the paper’s editor, J. Keith
Moyer, denied in an interview that
Adelson had any involvement or
influence over publication of the
new story.
“I’ve said this many times before,” he said. “Sheldon Adelson
read this story this morning for
the first time like everyone else.
WYNN CONTINUED ON C2
During the Super Bowl:
Images of appropriation? Funny, Prince still feels giant, but J.T., not so much
CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK
BY
S ONIA R AO
In 2018, we heard Martin Luther King Jr. speak and saw
Prince perform during the Super
Bowl.
NBC aired a commercial from
Ram Trucks during the second
quarter of Sunday night’s game
that featured the voice of King
delivering “The Drum Major Instinct,” one of his final addresses.
Shortly afterward, Justin Timberlake paid tribute to Prince during
the halftime show, singing a few
bars of “I Would Die 4 U” while a
video of the late singer was projected onto a sheet behind the
stage, in the Purple One’s home
town of Minneapolis.
Both instances sparked immediate backlash online. Many
called out Ram Trucks for manipulating King’s words about the
value of service to sell a product.
Music fans, already peeved by
rumors that Timberlake had previously planned to feature a hologram of Prince during the show,
pointed out that the two singers
had feuded in the past.
This kind of appropriation has
happened before. A 2013 commercial for Galaxy got mixed
reactions after it used a CGI-rendering of Audrey Hepburn to sell
chocolate. That same year, Johnnie Walker was criticized for digitally resurrecting Bruce Lee.
The uproar boils down to one
question: Is this what the late
figures would have wanted?
In Prince’s case, it’s unlikely. In
an interview conducted with Guitar World in 1998, Prince was
asked whether, with digital editing, he would ever consider creating a situation “where you could
jam with any artist from the past.”
“Certainly not,” he said. “That’s
the most demonic thing imaginable. . . . If I was meant to jam
with Duke Ellington, we would
have lived in the same age.”
Plus, it’s rumored that at a
post-Emmy Awards party in
2006, Prince dissed Timberlake’s
hit “SexyBack” by saying, “For
whoever is claiming that they are
bringing sexy back, sexy never
left.” Timberlake, while featured
on Timbaland’s 2007 track “Give
It to Me,” hit back: “We missed
SUPER BOWL CONTINUED ON C3
Reliving the disaster
that was Timberlake’s
halftime performance
BY
ANGELA WEISS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
In sync with a moment that’s passed, Justin Timberlake performs with a projection of Prince.
C HRIS R ICHARDS
Do you like me?
That’s the latent question
throbbing at the center of every
Justin Timberlake song, and suddenly the answer is no. His best
pop songs always seemed to radiate desire, but it turns out that his
music is merely needy — and
Sunday night, headlining a hyper-hyped Super Bowl halftime
show, Justin Timberlake sounds
needier than ever before.
It’s been a trying few days for
J.T. On Friday, he released “Man of
the Woods,” the weakest and most
savagely reviewed album of his
career. On Saturday, rumors
zipped across the American
bandwidth that he’d be performing inside Minneapolis’s U.S.
Bank Stadium alongside a hologram of the late Prince — a form
of ghoulish duet that Prince himself once called “demonic.”
So on a dark Sunday night in
NOTEBOOK CONTINUED ON C3
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Yay, another
comedy show on
politics. But, wait,
there’s singing?
HANNAH FOSLIEN/GETTY IMAGES
Malcolm Jenkins
ROB CARR/GETTY IMAGES
Chris Long
Ever watch C-SPAN and think,
“Ya know, what this really needs
are more punchlines . . . and
maybe a few up-tempo musical
numbers”? Enter “The
Politician,” a comedy series that
Netflix has bought from the team
behind the musical series “Glee.”
The hour-long show by “Glee”
creators Brad Falchuk, Ian
Brennan and Ryan Murphy will
star “Dear Evan Hansen” star
Ben Platt, with Barbra
Streisand and Gwyneth Paltrow
in negotiations to co-star,
Deadline Hollywood reports.
Details about the plot are scant,
but the industry pub says that it
will feature Platt as “a wealthy
Santa Barbarian” and that every
season (it’s reportedly a twoseason deal) “will revolve around
a different political race his
character is involved in.”
Distinguishing the show about
funny politics from that other
political comedy, HBO’s “Veep,”
will be the Tony-winning Platt,
who will have musical numbers
in “several episodes of the show,”
per Deadline.
ERIC GAY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Torrey Smith
3 Eagles to the White House: I’d rather be in Philadelphia
F
orget Disney World. Are you going to the
White House?
That was the more pressing question after
the Philadelphia Eagles beat the New England
Patriots in Super Bowl LII on Sunday. As it turns
out, multiple Eagles players won’t be landing in
the West Wing for the traditional postgame
presidential photo op. So far three Super Bowl
champs — safety Malcolm Jenkins, defensive end
Chris Long and wide receiver Torrey Smith —
will be unavailable on that as-yet-unscheduled
day.
When CNN asked Jenkins on Monday if he
planned to show up to the celebration in
Washington, the player responded definitively.
“No,” Jenkins said. “I personally do not
anticipate attending that.”
Jenkins joins his teammates Long and Smith,
who already made up their minds about a
potential visit before the game even happened.
“No, I’m not going to the White House,” Long
said in an interview with the “Pardon My Take”
Hillary Clinton intends to ‘remain
on the front lines of democracy’
MICHAEL REYNOLDS/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Hillary Clinton on Monday at
the Georgetown Institute for
Women, Peace and Security.
Hillary Clinton isn’t about to
retire to her mystery novels and
chardonnay anytime soon. The
former Democratic presidential
candidate on Monday indicated
that she’s not ready to exit left
from the world stage, despite
her 2016 loss to Donald Trump.
Clinton told a group of
students at Georgetown
University that she thinks
“advancing the rights,
opportunities and full
participation of women and
girls is the great unfinished
business of the 21st century.”
And Clinton, for one, is not
looking to outsource the job.
“I intend to keep fighting to
pursue this agenda and remain
on the front lines of democracy,”
she said during an appearance
at the Georgetown Institute for
Women, Peace and Security,
during which she presented
human rights awards named in
podcast on Jan. 29, almost a week before the
Super Bowl took place. “Are you kidding me?”
According to Post sportswriters Cindy Boren
and Des Bieler, Smith, who called President
Trump “the most divisive person in this entire
country” in a since-deleted tweet last fall, also
told reporters last week that he would skip the
White House visit.
Expect a tweet from Trump, who in a statement
Sunday urged players to “proudly stand for the
anthem,” in five, four, three, two . . .
her honor to three female
activists.
Clinton tried to rally the
troops, warning them against
complacency in what sure
sounded like an oratorical
subtweeting of the Trump
presidency. “It is hard to
continue to speak out and stand
up against what you think of as
obvious wrongs,” she told the
students. “But do not grow
weary. Don’t get discouraged.”
Clinton has been in the news
recently, although not for
reasons she would like. After the
New York Times reported that
she had refused to fire a top
campaign aide who was accused
of sexual harassment, the
former secretary of state came
under fire for her mild, notquite apology on Twitter and
finally followed up with a
Facebook post saying she
wished she’d handled it
differently.
And during the Georgetown
speech, Clinton offered another
seemingly veiled swipe at the
state of politics. “It’s easy to be
overwhelmed with everything
going on in the world today,” she
said. “I get overwhelmed at least
a dozen times a day.”
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
Art pieces
relay the
power of
movement
ART REVIEW FROM C1
tions of Martin Luther King Jr.
and Malcolm X, the disastrous
escalation of the Vietnam War,
race riots that scarred cities across
the country, the entrenchment of
poverty and inequality along racial lines, the corruption and resignation of Richard Nixon and
ultimately a lingering and corrosive sense of despair about American institutions, American character and America’s future.
All of this is registered in myriad ways in the work on view,
which is urgent, sometimes confrontational and bitterly ironic.
But it is also subtle, passionate,
poetic and inflected with humor.
The range of materials used, the
breadth of ideas adumbrated, the
multiplicity of strategies and techniques, the geographical diversity
of the artists involved, all of this
makes it difficult to contain the art
with any single description, except perhaps this: Revolution.
The word was used in its literal
sense by artists connected to the
Black Panther movement, and by
artists who sympathized with the
Panthers’ desire to create a new
and nurturing black nation apart
from the old, systematically racist
white one. Liberation is a common theme, from Betye Saar’s
now classic assemblage piece
“The Liberation of Aunt Jemima”
in which a black “mammy” figu-
rine holds a small rifle to Norman
Lewis’s abstraction “Processional” which suggests the gathering
force and widening purpose of
people on the march.
But it takes a far more capacious sense of revolution to understand the importance of this show.
Immediately after a gallery that
explores the iconography of the
Panthers, one confronts Elizabeth
Catlett’s 1968 “Black Unity,” a
large, shining cedar sculpture
with sides: On one is carved the
clenched fist of the classic Black
Power salute (famous throughout
the world that year after two African American athletes made the
gesture during a medal ceremony
at the Mexico City Summer Olympics) and on the other a pair of
masklike faces gently conjoined in
a moment of affection. In a single
work we confront revolution not
just as resistance and refusal of
the old order, but revolution as a
process of rethinking identity and
relationships. Catlett said of the
work: “We ought to stop thinking
we have to do the art of other
people.”
The placement of Catlett’s
sculpture greets the visitor with
the clenched fist side first. Not
until you walk around to the back
(or is it the front?) can the faces be
seen. And so it gives a double
shock, first to see the power fist so
boldly displayed and then to realize that it is integrated into another message, about the friendship, fellowship or intimacy implied by the conjoined faces. Physically, the viewer hasn’t made a
full revolution yet. For that, he or
she must complete the circle and
confront the fist once again, tempered by an understanding of
what lies behind it.
The exhibition is organized
around clusters of artists, or art
movements or moments of stylistic affinity, arguing in its layout
Former reporter had saved
copy of original Wynn story
WYNN FROM C1
. . .We’re just reporting what’s going on. We thought this was a story
our readers should know about.”
Moyer said Adelson maintains
a hands-off policy about the paper’s news coverage. He said any
assertion to the contrary would be
similar to suggesting that The
Washington Post favors the interests of its owner, Amazon.com
founder Jeffrey P. Bezos, in its
reporting.
The Review-Journal said in its
story Monday that it was unable to
determine who ordered the 1998
article killed or why. But it suggested that publishing what it
knew back in 1998 might have led
to Wynn’s removal from his company or changed what it said was
“a culture of harassment” in
Wynn’s company.
The reporter of the 1998 story,
Carri Geer Thevenot (who is now
the paper’s metropolitan editor)
told her newspaper that she kept
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
and its diversity for a simultaneity
of many ideas and currents rather
than a linear or chronological narrative. These moments are sometimes rooted in particular places,
like New York City (where galleries such as Just Above Midtown
and spaces such as the Studio
Museum in Harlem offered exposure to artists excluded from
mainstream institutions) or Chicago (where artists of the AfriCOBRA movement sought wide engagement and empowerment
with a bold, busy, colorful and
populist aesthetic). But sometimes they arose in different places all at once. Saar gets a room of
her own, and a gallery of photography focuses on the work of Roy
DeCarava. Abstraction, often suspect to more politically motivated
artists, is seen in several large
galleries, including work by Sam
Gilliam and a stunning, wall-sized
1971 painting, “Texas Louise,” by
Frank Bowling.
There is a tendency to think of
art as epiphenomenal to the “real”
world, as a second-order register
in which we may occasionally find
signs of more important things,
like politics and struggle and revolution. But throughout this exhibition, the art refuses to be a footnote to or mere instrument of
politics. A self- portrait by Barkley
L. Hendricks can’t be reduced to
the shock of seeing the artist represent himself fully nude, or the
double entendre of its title, “Brilliantly Endowed,” which repurposed words from a condescending review of the artist’s work.
Both the painting, and the man
depicted, are beautiful, and the
work leaves you with the same
hard-to-explain but uncanny
sense that all great portraits convey: He isn’t going away.
A work by Jae Jarrell, her 1969
“Revolutionary Suit,” offers a moment of clarifying power about
revolution and the ways its multiple meanings were taken up by
artists of this period. It is a handsome gray wool garment, with
what looks to be an ammunition
belt crossing over the front. The
ammunition belt was an iconic
accoutrement of these years, seen
in a poster by Faith Ringgold and
ubiquitous presence in the imagery of the Panthers. But Jarrell’s
ammunition belt is full of crayons
or pastels, the tools of art and
representation.
In works like this, the artist
claims the right to lead rather
than follow the political actors, to
assert revolution on new terms.
There could be no revolution
without images, and much of
what scared people about black
power was the force of its imagery.
Saar was once asked, “Are you for
violence?” She said, “No, I don’t
really like guns. But if you want to
get somebody’s attention, all you
have to do is have a gun.” The gun,
which appeared in her classic
Aunt Jemima piece, was a symbol
“of empowerment,” just as guns
remain symbols of empowerment
among white men who are losing
their cultural claim to centrality
and leadership.
Black Power terrified white
America, just as the Black Lives
Matter movement still terrifies
many people. It was a truly revolutionary movement that, over time,
was torn asunder by police infil-
her file of notes, documents and
interviews from 1998, including a
printout of the story itself. “I always wanted to tell these women’s
stories,” she said in the ReviewJournal’s article on Monday.
“That’s why I saved this file for 20
years.”
According to a 1997 court filing,
a Mirage waitress said she was
pressured into having sex with
Wynn after she mentioned the
birth of her first grandchild; she
said Wynn wanted to experience
sex with a grandmother.
Another Mirage server alleged
that supervisors didn’t protect
women from gamblers who
groped and harassed them, and
that some were sent to sexually
“accommodate” high rollers at the
resort’s luxury villas throughout
the 1990s.
The statements were part of a
lawsuit in which 11 women who
worked at the Mirage alleged coerced sexual conduct at the hotel
and misconduct by Wynn. One of
the plaintiffs told the newspaper
the following year that she received between $1,000 and $5,000
from each customer in exchange
for sex. The Mirage settled all of
the claims in 2003.
Two of the women took lie-detector tests at the newspaper’s request — a practice sometimes employed by celebrity-gossip publications but almost unheard of by a
mainstream newspaper. One
woman passed; another showed
indications of untruthfulness. The
Review-Journal published an image of the bill for the polygraph
test.
The paper said its former publisher didn’t remember the 1998
story. Its outside counsel at the
time — who raised libel concerns
about the original article — said he
wouldn’t comment, citing attorney-client privilege. The ReviewJournal’s editor in 1998, Thomas
Mitchell, offered only a vague account of the spiking, saying he
wasn’t pressured by others to kill
the story.
In a statement to the Wall Street
Journal denying the allegations
against him last month, Wynn
CAROLYN LAWRENCE/CAROLYN LAWRENCE
“Black Children Keep Your Spirits Free,” 1972, by Carolyn
Lawrence is part of the “Soul of a Nation” exhibition.
DIMITRIOS KAMBOURIS/GETTY IMAGES FOR NARAS
“Dear Evan Hansen” star Ben
Platt is slated to appear in “The
Politicians” on Netflix.
tration, divide-and-conquer power tactics and its own internal
divisions. Black Lives Matter is
more inclusive and open to alliances across the racial divide,
which will impact the art that
emerges from it. Protesters have a
ready-made communications network infinitely more powerful
than that which connected people
during the age of Black Power,
making the words of Gil ScottHeron’s “The Revolution Will Not
Be Televised” sound both dated
and paradoxically prophetic:
“There will be no pictures of pigs
shooting down/ Brothers in the
instant replay.” And so the art that
comes from Black Lives Matter
will look and circulate in fundamentally different ways because
of that network.
But the emergence of Black
Lives Matter proved that the work
of Black Power a half-century earlier was unfinished, that fantasies
of a post-racial America were both
premature and sadly short-lived.
This exhibition demonstrates
again and again the persistence of
the problem, the persistence of
the pain and destruction it causes,
and the persistence of the persisters, which is the most powerful
message in the end. Perhaps
someday America will have its revolution proper; leveling inequalities; opening up access and opportunity to all; replacing authoritarian and racist cops with true civil
servants; and eradicating the materialism and greed that animates
every aspect of our politics. Even
after that day, if it ever comes, this
work will remain, and we will look
to it to understand who we are.
wrote, “We find ourselves in a
world where people can make allegations, regardless of the truth,
and a person is left with the choice
of weathering insulting publicity
or engaging in multiyear lawsuits.
It is deplorable for anyone to find
themselves in this situation.”
One of the women quoted in the
quashed 1998 story, Cynthia Simmons, said she was upset that the
paper never published her account.
“It was hard enough to come
forward in the first place and reveal this stuff to my family, and
then to have the newspaper curb
the whole story, I feel I got silenced,” she said.
philip.kennicott@washpost.com
Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of
Black Power is on view at Crystal
Bridges Museum of Art in Bentonville,
Ark., through April 23. For more
information visit crystalbridges.org.
paul.farhi@washpost.com
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
BOOK WORLD
The 1880s outback is no
country for young men
BY
M ARK A THITAKIS
The hero of Paul Howarth’s
blood-soaked debut novel, “Only
Killers and Thieves,” is a 14-yearold boy who can’t do anything
right, and that includes burying
his dad. It’s 1885 in the scrubland
of Queensland, Australia, and
Tommy has come home with his
older brother, Billy, to find his
parents murdered and his sister
grievously wounded. At the spare
funeral ceremony — no coffin,
just corpses bundled in sheets —
his grasp slips. “The body tumbled and rolled and the bedsheet
unraveled, and Father lay exposed in the earth, bloated and
white, riddled with a veiny fungus, ravaged by the flies.”
Howarth is a Briton who lived
for six years in Australia, but
prose like that arrives direct from
Cormac McCarthy’s dusty Southwest: the rolling, Biblical run-on
sentences, the evocations of violence, the suggestion that we
clumsy humans are stupidly
doomed to decline and death.
Even so, Tommy is the stand-up
guy in this Down Under Western.
Because he can’t do anything
quite right, he’s admirably out of
the step with the ruthless and
racist world he has been thrust
into. It’s a world Howarth depicts
artfully, although he also takes a
discomfiting giddiness in the violence he has conjured up.
The Queensland setting is
parched and expansive and feels
overrun with Black Hats. Chief
among them is John Sullivan, a
rapacious squatter who forced
Tommy’s family into privation by
EZ
secretly cutting off their water
supply, starving their livestock.
Supporting him is Inspector Edmund Noone, head of the region’s
Native Police, which for much of
the 19th century deputized aborigines to effectively help exterminate themselves. Both men
and their cronies never go wanting for a race-based justification
for their actions.
“The only thing they understand is the gun,” Sullivan opines.
“You kill enough, they’ll get the
message.”
“Remember Darwin: a species
adapts or it dies,” Noone says. “We
must not allow them to adapt. If
we take their land, their women,
kill their men, sooner or later they
will simply expire. It is science.”
It’s tempting to roll your eyes at
the transparent bigotry in lines
like these, as if Sullivan and
Noone were twirling their mustaches, begging us to hiss at them.
That simplicity weakens some
central plot points. We’re meant
to believe that Tommy, naive but
also alert and inquisitive, never
really doubts that a native farmhand he respects murdered his
C3
RE
ONLY KILLERS
AND THIEVES
By Paul Howarth
Harper. 336 pp.
$26.99
parents. He’s similarly credulous
that his dying sister, a witness to
the incident, will be treated by a
doctor due to arrive, oh, any day
now.
But Howarth is more nuanced
when it comes to broader themes
of power and masculinity. Although Billy is just two years
older than Tommy, he embraces
his role as the new family elder
with gusto, staying close to Sullivan, attempting to keep up with
his new cohort’s drinking and
shutting down his kid brother at
every turn. “All I’m doing is seeing
us through this,” Billy insists.
“We’re minors. . . . They’d make us
wards if they found us, put us in
some lockup or Mission house, no
better than the [expletive]
blacks.”
The heart of the novel is an
expedition deep into the outback
that’s ostensibly a search for the
murderer but is in fact a grotesque hunt for aborigines. The
boys are forced to witness members of a native family captured,
chained, raped and murdered.
Howarth’s language turns symphonically lurid at such moments: “The lightning crackled
above them and the echoes of
grunting and whip cracks came
whispering through the ravine.”
Tommy is press-ganged into having a hand in the violence himself,
of course, setting the stage for a
redemptive third act.
Howarth is skilled at taking the
old forms of the Western — the
thrill of the chase, the Manichaean nonsense of “civilized” and
“savage” — and reshaping them to
address contemporary concerns.
That’s only fitting. Ever since
John Wayne died, we’ve been well
trained on how to question those
old John Wayne tropes, which
demonized Native Americans
and lionized white privilege. The
very title is designed to flatter this
wisdom. It refers to the casual
characterization of aborigines,
but we’re not far into the story
before we know who it really
refers to.
Like every Western, Howarth’s
spotlights how arbitrary frontier
justice can be. But he also asks:
How much less arbitrary is a
purportedly civilized society?
“Every law, every custom, every
rule by which we live is made up
by someone, conjured from thin
air, then written down and by
some sort of magic enacted into
law,” Noone says. “It is so malleable, Tommy.” For the farm boy,
it’s as valuable a lesson as how to
dam a river or how to fire a gun.
As long as people are inclined to
scapegoat, there’ll be people
who’ll use the law to legitimize it.
Tommy’s heroism resides in his
ability to pursue a more noble
purpose. But the bloody, bullying
milieu of Howarth’s imagination
reveals how difficult it can be to
make that leap.
bookworld@washpost.com
Mark Athitakis is the author of “The
New Midwest,” a critical study of the
region’s fiction.
THEATER REVIEW
Reunited, and it feels so modern
BY
CHRISTOPHER POLK/GETTY IMAGES
Justin Timberlake underwhelming us in the Super Bowl LII halftime show Sunday night.
Turns out
Timberlake
could stop
the feeling
NOTEBOOK FROM C1
Minnesota, Timberlake tries to
make the world forget about his
dud album and about that alleged
purple hologram and — oh, right
— about the last time he performed at the Super Bowl, way
back in 2004 when he sang, “Bet
I’ll have you naked by the end of
this song,” then proceeded to rip
away a significant portion of Janet Jackson’s stage costume, exposing her right breast to 90 million unsuspecting television
viewers.
In the months of pearlclutching that followed, Timberlake’s career went boffo while the
rest of the industry encouraged
Ms. Jackson to convalesce in the
void — a stark and enduring
example of how our culture allows some artists (white/men) to
get away with any old thing, while
others (black/women) are swiftly
silenced for stepping out of
bounds.
So it’s hard to imagine how
Timberlake could locate the gall
Timberlake,
Ram Trucks
got blessings
from estates
SUPER BOWL FROM C1
you on the charts last week/
Damn, that’s right you wasn’t
there.”
Sheila E., Prince’s close friend
and former collaborator, calmed
fears when she tweeted on Saturday night that she had spoken to
Timberlake, who confirmed that
he would not use a hologram.
During the show, Timberlake,
seated at a piano, opted instead to
sing alongside the projected video.
In a statement shared with The
Washington Post on Monday, the
Prince estate praised the performance: “Justin Timberlake,
the NFL, and the City of Minneapolis used the stadium and the
city to give a beautiful hometown
tribute to Prince. The two pieces
of footage that appeared on the
screens were licensed from the
Purple Rain movie and a vintage
performance in Syracuse, NY.”
But not everyone reacted positively. For some, the projection
still seemed to go against the
music icon’s wishes. “Bet $50 they
play a Black Panther trailer after
this Timberlake performance to
to perform that tune again 14
years later, but — presto! — here
comes the neo-disco thumpythump of “Rock Your Body,” only,
when Timberlake finally arrives
at the clothes-ripping cue, he
pretends to be a bandleader and
shouts, “Hold up, stop!” The music halts, the band pivots into
“SexyBack,” and Timberlake
smiles into the camera, but
thankfully doesn’t wink.
Now he’s surrounded by dancers and backing musicians and
audience members who might
actually be dancers paid to look
like audience members, and everyone’s clothes look hideously
mismatched, and it’s hard to
make out the precision of Timberlake’s android dancing, and it’s
even harder to hear his voice,
which he seems to deploy only in
interstitial bursts as this momentum-sucking medley moves from
decade-old hit to decade-old hit.
By the time he lurches into
“Cry Me a River,” it’s clear Timberlake is not going to truly inhabit
his music, at least not tonight, or
maybe ever again. Surely, great
pop music expresses things that
can’t be expressed any other way,
but for the past decade, Timberlake seems to have preferred expressing himself through voiceacting in Hollywood cartoons and
doing half-funny skits with Jimmy Fallon. Suddenly, out on the
gridiron, Timberlake’s falsetto
sounds like little more than a tool
— one that his brightest collaborators, producers Timbaland and
calm down the Prince hate,”
tweeted Roy Wood Jr. of “The
Daily Show.”
After the Super Bowl, Timberlake appeared on “The Tonight
Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” and
said he proceeded with the tribute after getting the thumbs-up
from the Roots’ Questlove, whom
he called “the encyclopedia on
music.”“I just felt like I wanted to
do something for this city and
something for him that would
just be the ultimate homage to
what I consider the GOAT of
musicians,” Timberlake said of
Prince.
Ram Trucks actually did get
the permission of King’s estate in
creating its Super Bowl spot. The
commercial played a portion of
King’s sermon, during which he
extols the virtues of service over
clips of people helping one another through trying situations.
The ad ends by flashing the Ram
slogan, “Built to serve.”
Eric D. Tidwell, who manages
King’s estate, shared the following statement with The Post
on Monday: “When Ram approached the King Estate with
the idea of featuring Dr. King’s
voice in a new ‘Built To Serve’
commercial, we were pleasantly
surprised at the existence of the
Ram Nation [disaster relief ] volunteers and their efforts. . . . Once
the final creative was presented
for approval, it was reviewed to
ensure it met our standard integrity clearances. We found that the
overall message of the ad embodied Dr. King’s philosophy that
the Neptunes, once used to send
their beautiful sci-fi pop songs
across the planet.
The grody metaphysics finally
surface nine minutes into the
show, when Prince’s voice is piped
into the stadium and his image is
projected onto a towering, billowing scrim. Timberlake has decided to drape an isolated vocal track
of “I Would Die 4 U” over the
oozing chords of his 2006 ballad
“Until the End of Time,” and it
feels more like taking than giving.
Prince didn’t die for Justin Timberlake, and he certainly didn’t
die for this.
We begin to unclench our teeth
by the time he reaches “Can’t Stop
the Feeling” — not because it’s the
most confused feel-good anthem
of this feel-scared era, but because the show is almost over.
And then it is. And a feeling of
togetherness washes over us, a
feeling of certainty that we all just
witnessed something unambiguously underwhelming.
And if we must join the consensus, joining a widespread backlash beats bandwagon-jumping
every time. It restores our faith in
the notion that, as a society, we
can abandon bad ideas. We can
stop decorating our homes with
lead paint. We can stop smoking
cigarettes on airplanes. We can, in
fact, stop “the feeling” and say
goodbye to a pop superstar, which
really isn’t much, but in these
senseless times, somehow feels
like some kind of start.
chris.richards@washpost.com
true greatness is achieved by
serving others.”
But the King Center, established in 1968 by King’s wife,
Coretta Scott King, was quick to
distance itself from the commercial. That night, the nonprofit
tweeted that neither it nor its
CEO, King’s daughter Bernice
King, “is the entity” that
approved “tonight’s @Dodge
#SuperBowl commercial.”
The King siblings, who have
had their fair share of legal
squabbles, control separate aspects of their family inheritance.
Dexter King runs the copyright
enterprise Intellectual Properties
Management, where Tidwell
serves as managing director. Bernice King oversees the King Center, the “traditional memorial
and programmatic nonprofit.”
The Ram Trucks commercial
set Twitter off, with many decrying the appropriation of King’s
sermon. New York Times columnist Charles Blow, for instance,
said that it proved America is
“willing to exploit blackness but
perfectly incapable of honoring
it.”
Ironically, King, in the sermon
in question, called advertisers
“gentlemen of massive verbal
persuasion.”
“They have a way of saying
things to you that kind of gets you
into buying,” King said. “In order
to be a man of distinction, you
must drink this whiskey. In order
to make your neighbors envious,
you must drive this type of car.”
sonia.rao@washpost.com
C ELIA W REN
A Proustian moment is measured in pixels in “La Foto (A
Selfie Affair),” Gustavo Ott’s
flawed new comedy. Making its
world premiere in a GALA Hispanic Theatre production directed by Abel López, the play centers
on Laura and Denis, former high
school sweethearts who reconnect online decades later. Intoxicated by memories of youthful
passion and possibility, with the
immediacy of a 21st-century digital hookup providing a further
thrill, one of the erstwhile lovers
sends off a risque selfie.
Bad move! With a speed no
madeleine could hope to emulate,
the nostalgia-freighted snapshot
proceeds to upend lives, create
public scandal and threaten
Denis’s midlife-crisis car, a red
flame-etched Camaro. The fallout
generates situational incongruity,
plus some wry quips: Laura (Luz
Nicolás) finds herself being lectured by her teenage daughter,
Kelly (Samantha Ríos), who is
aghast at her mother’s spending
on lingerie. Denis (Carlos Castillo) observes that, when an old
flame asks whether you are happy, “your answer is automatic,
imaginary, arousing, dangerous,
passionate, young and hopeful,
meaning the answer is no.” (The
play is performed in Spanish with
English surtitles.)
The serviceable humor in “La
Foto” sometimes cedes to affecting seriousness as Laura and
Denis reveal their worries about
aging. Unfortunately Ott, a Washington-based Venezuelan playwright, undermines the play’s effectiveness by devoting too much
fleeting attention to too many
characters, most of whom (a major exception being Denis) are
DANIEL MARTINEZ
Carlos Castillo and Luz Nicolás play reconnecting high school
sweethearts in “La Foto (A Selfie Affair)” at GALA Theatre.
more circumstance than personality. Figures such as Kelly, or
Denis’s wife, Thais (María Peyramaure), and teenage son, Fran
(José González), surge to the fore
and then recede without sufficient dramaturgical payoff. The
split focus is surely aimed at emphasizing how one individual’s
thoughtless action can affect
many other people. But it would
have been better to make this
point in a way that did not obscure whose story “La Foto” is
principally telling.
The production’s pronounced
comic style adds some zest. Castillo’s Denis sometimes moves with
rubbery clownishness, his neck at
one point seeming to recede into
his collar. Along similar lines,
when González’s Fran hears a parental decree that he use his
mother’s Toyota, not his father’s
sexy Camaro, for a driver’s-license
test, the boy flings himself to his
knees in despair.
Setting off such warm, broad
humor is Jessica Cancino’s spare
scenic design, dominated by panels that look like giant cellphones.
Christopher Annas-Lee’s lighting
sometimes adds to the aesthetic,
pinning characters in a momentary spotlight that evokes a camera flash. It’s an austere look, and
fittingly so, underscoring the predicament of foolish, yearning, regretful humans trapped in an unforgiving gone-viral reality.
style@washpost.com
La Foto (A Selfie Affair) by Gustavo
Ott. Directed by Abel López;
projections design, Christopher
Annas-Lee; costumes, Moyenda
Kulemeka; sound, David Crandall;
properties, Tony Koehler. With Karen
Morales. In Spanish with English
surtitles. English translation by
Heather McKay. About 100 minutes.
Tickets: $30-45. Through Feb. 25 at
GALA Theatre, 3333 14th St. NW. Call
202-234-7174 or visit galatheatre.org.
THEATER
‘Heights’ leads Hayes nominations
BY
N ELSON P RESSLEY
All it took for “In the Heights”
to become a hit in Washington
was for “Hamilton” to become a
hit in New York.
Lin-Manuel Miranda’s 2008
Tony-winning musical was finally
produced here not once but twice
last year, and both stagings
cleaned up as the Helen Hayes
Award nominations were announced Monday evening. The
Olney Theatre Center-Round
House Theatre co-production
(presented at the Olney) picked
up 10 nominations, tops in the
“Hayes” category for shows with
mostly Equity actors in the cast.
Signature Theatre’s “A Little
Night Music” followed close behind, with nine nominations for
the revival of Stephen Sondheim’s bittersweet musical.
GALA Hispanic Theatre’s
Spanish-language
“In
the
Heights” commanded the “Helen” categories, for shows with
mainly non-Equity casts. (The
awards split several seasons ago
to increase the odds of comparing
apples to apples; it loosely follows the long-standing Equity
and non-Equity separation in
Chicago’s Jeff Awards.) GALA’s
“Heights” hauled in 18 nominations; Constellation Theatre’s
“The Wild Party” was next among
Helen contenders, with 11 nods.
The Hayes Awards cover 210
eligible productions that opened
during 2017; all those shows are
closed now, though audiences
wanting one more crack at “In the
Heights” can see the Kennedy
Center’s concert staging next
month. Forty judges are divided
among five panels focusing on
STAN BAROUH
Olney Theatre Center and Round House Theatre’s co-production of
“In the Heights” is up for 10 Helen Hayes Awards.
musicals or plays, Helen or Hayes
categories, and new works.
Among Hayes plays, the Shakespeare
Theatre
Company’s
“Twelfth Night” — which took
advantage of the spacious Harman Hall to create a bustling
airport departure lounge —
racked up nine nominations.
“Or,” the Liz Duffy Adams comedy about Restoration playwright
Aphra Behn, earned seven nominations, including one for each
cast member in that Round
House show: Holly Twyford,
Gregory Linington and Erin
Weaver.
Linington was also nominated
as lead actor in Ford’s Theatre’s
“Who’s Afraid of Virginia
Woolf ?,” though Twyford was not
named for her leading turn as
Edward Albee’s acidic Martha.
The versatile Twyford did pick up
a nomination for lead actress in a
musical for “A Little Night Music,” and Kevin McAllister earned
two nominations as leading actor
in a musical, for “Ragtime” at
Ford’s and “Annie” at the Olney.
The National Theatre’s preBroadway tryout of Tina Fey’s
“Mean Girls” musical last fall was
eligible only in the limited “visiting” category, where supporting
performers Grey Henson (playing Damian) and Kate Rockwell
(as the vapid Karen Smith)
picked up acting nominations.
Theatre Alliance, the stylistically adventurous troupe based
in the Anacostia Playhouse, typically fares well in the Helen
categories, and its “Still Life With
Rocket” earned eight nominations, with “Mnemonic” garnering six.
The awards, administered by
the local service organization
Theatre Washington and now in
their 34th year, will be presented
May 14. The location for the event
has not yet been announced.
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
2/6/18
7:00
7:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
8:00
◆ News
◆ Access
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
Mod Fam
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
◆ J’pardy!
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆ ET
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
14.1 WFDC (UNI) ◆ La Rosa de Guadalupe
◆ FamFeud
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ FamFeud
Healing
22.1 WMPT (PBS) Farm
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
◆ Old House
32.1 WHUT (PBS) DW News
Goldbergs
50.1 WDCW (CW) Goldbergs
66.1 WPXW (ION) Criminal Minds
Ellen’s Game of Games ◆ This Is Us
◆ Lethal Weapon
◆ LA-Vegas
◆ The Mick
◆ Middle
◆ Fresh-Boat ◆ blackish
◆ Mod Fam
◆ NCIS
◆ Bull
El rico y Lázaro
Papá a toda madre
College Basketball: Boston College at Notre Dame
◆ We’ll Meet Again
◆ American Experience
We’ll Meet Again
American Experience
France 24 Programming
Blood of the Vine
◆ Victoria on Masterpiece
Streets to the Stage
◆ The Flash
◆ Black Lightning
Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds
◆
10:00
10:30
11:00
(10:01) ◆ Chicago Med
Fox 5 News at Ten
◆ Kevin (Probably)
◆ NCIS: New Orleans
Caer en tentación
Big Bang
Big Bang
Democracy Now!
◆ Seinfeld
News
Criminal Minds
11:30
◆ J. Fallon
News
News
The Final 5
◆ Kimmel
News
◆ Colbert
9 News
◆ Noticiero
Noticias
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◆ Amanpour
◆ Beyond 100
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World News ◆ Beyond 100
◆ Mom
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Criminal Minds
CABLE CHANNELS
Intervention
Intervention
Intervention
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(11:03) Intervention
A&E
(4:00) The Green Mile (1999) Movie: Enemy of the State ★★★ (1998)
Movie: U.S. Marshals ★★
AMC
Killer Whales: The Mega Hunt
River Monsters
River Monsters: Legendary
Animal Planet
All About
Movie: Big Momma’s House 2 ★ (2006)
The Quad
The Quad
BET
Real Housewives/Beverly
Real Housewives
Real Housewives
Bethenny
Bethenny
Watch
Housewives
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We Bare
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Burgers
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Period
Daily
Opposition
Comedy Central The Office
Moonshiners
Moonshiners: Outlaw Cuts Moonshiners
(10:04) Moonshiners
(11:05) Moonshiners
Discovery
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Bunk’d
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Stuck/Middle Bizaardvark Raven
Gravity Falls Gravity Falls Andi Mack
Stuck/Middle
Disney
E! News
Movie: Bring It On ★★ (2000)
The Kardashians
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E!
College Basketball: Tennessee at Kentucky (Live)
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SportsCenter (Live)
ESPN
College Basketball: South Carolina at Arkansas (Live)
College Basketball: TCU at Kansas (Live)
Basketball National
ESPN2
Chopped
Chopped
Chopped
Chopped
Chopped
Food Network
The Story With Martha
Tucker Carlson Tonight
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The Ingraham Angle
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(5:30) The Bounty Hunter ★ The Fosters
(9:01) Movie: The Wedding Planner ★★ (2001)
The 700 Club
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X-Men: Days Movie: Terminator Genisys ★★ (2015)
Baskets
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This End
FX
Full House
Full House
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The Middle
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The Middle
Golden Girls Golden Girls
Hallmark
Psych
Movie: Hailey Dean Mystery: Deadly Estate (2017)
Murder, She Wrote
Hallmark M&M Psych
Everything
VICE
Movie: Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle ★★ (2003)
(9:50) Divorce High Main.
(10:50) 2 Dope Queens
HBO
Fixer Upper
Fixer Upper
Fixer Upper
Restored
Hunters
Hunters
Hunters Int’l
HGTV
The Curse of Oak Island
Digging Deeper
The Curse of
(10:03) Hunting Hitler
The Curse of Oak Island
History
Married at First Sight
Married-Sight Married
Married at First Sight
This Time Next Year
(11:04) Married at First Sight
Lifetime
Orioles Classics
Ballgame
Walker
MASports
MASN
Hardball Matthews
All In With Chris Hayes
Rachel Maddow Show
The Last Word
The 11th Hour
MSNBC
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
Ridiculous.
The Challenge
(10:01) The Challenge
(11:02) The Challenge
MTV
Tut’s Treasures
Maya Snake Kings
Stonehenge Decoded
Tut’s Treasures
Nat’l Geographic Wild Hawaii
Caps
Caps Overtime (Live)
Caps in 30 Redskins
NBC SportsNet WA NHL Hockey: Washington Capitals at Columbus Blue Jackets (Live)
Hunter
SpongeBob Movie: Rango ★★★ (2011)
Full House
Friends
Friends
Nickelodeon
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Ink Master
Fast and Furious-Drift
PARMT
The Chronicles of Riddick
Futurama
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Futurama
Futurama
Futurama
Futurama
Syfy
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Detour
Conan
TBS
(6:00) Movie: Bullitt ★★★
Movie: Air Force ★★★ (1943)
(10:15) Movie: The Adventures of Robin Hood ★★★★
TCM
Fat Fabulous
Fat Fabulous
(9:03) I Am Jazz
(10:06) Seeking Sister Wife My Big Fat Fabulous Life
TLC
(5:30) Need for Speed ★★ NBA Basketball: Washington Wizards at Philadelphia 76ers (Live)
NBA Basketball: Thunder at Warriors
TNT
America
Delicious
Delicious
Delicious
Bizarre Foods/Zimmern
Bizarre Foods/Zimmern
Bizarre Foods/Zimmern
Travel
Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Hack
Inside
Carbonaro
Carbonaro
TruTV
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Mom
Mom
King
King
TV Land
Cosby Show Cosby Show Cosby Show Cosby Show Movie: A Weekend With the Family (2016)
Movie: Will to Love (2015)
TV One
NCIS
WWE SmackDown! (Live)
Chrisley
Chrisley
Chrisley
Chrisley
USA Network
America’s Next Top Model
America’s Next Model
Love & Hip Hop Miami
Love & Hip Hop
America’s Next Top Model
VH1
GE
Washington
Govt.
Matters
On
Your
Side
Sports
ABC
News
News
at
10pm
Govt.
Matters
On Your Side
WNC8
M*A*S*H
Movie: Edge of Tomorrow ★★★ (2014)
Bellevue
Cops
Cops
WGN
GREG ENDRIES/BRAVO
Bethenny & Frederik (Bravo at 10) Fredrik Eklund and Bethenny Frankel
try to turn their friendship into a business partnership, renovating
multimillion-dollar properties. The series premieres tonight.
Ellen’s Game of Games
(NBC at 8) Contestants play Danger
Word, Don’t Leave Me Hanging,
One Eyed Monster and Scary Go
Round.
The Flash (CW at 8) Barry has to
decide whether he should expose
his powers to save his cellmates.
LA to Vegas (Fox at 9) After Capt.
Dave offends the cleaning crew, he
and Bernard have to pay the price.
Married at First Sight
(Lifetime at 9) The couples must
figure out where to live.
The Real Housewives of Beverly
Hills (Bravo at 9) Kyle and Lisa
Vanderpump work through their
issues publicly.
This Is Us (NBC at 9) The Pearson
family history as told through the
life of the family car.
SPECIALS
Fred Armisen: Standup for
Drummers (Netflix streaming)
Stand-up from the comedian.
Maya civilization.
DOCUMENTARY
American Experience: The
Gilded Age (WETA at 9) This
special examines the period of U.S.
economic growth in the late 19th
century and the effect it had on
social division.
LATE NIGHT
Conan (TBS at 11) Laurence
Fishburne, Nicole Byer, Liza Anne.
Daily Show (Comedy Central at 11)
Yance Ford.
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Sarah
Jessica Parker, Jesse Tyler
Ferguson, Diplo.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Wanda
Sykes, Thomas Haden Church,
June Diane Raphael.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Sam
Rockwell, Awolnation.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Willem
Dafoe, Michelle Monaghan, Max.
Lost Treasures of the Maya
Snake Kings (Nat Geo at 9)
Archaeologists use new
information to piece together an
understanding of the complex
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) James
Spader, Whitney Cummings, Matty
Matheson, Alan Cage.
— Sarah Polus
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
MUSIC REVIEW
Violinist Roumain stages Super Bowl Sunday protest of sorts at National Gallery
BY
C HARLES T . D OWNEY
Crossover violinist Daniel Bernard Roumain paired up with
jazz pianist Yayoi Ikawa for a
concert of many surprises Sunday afternoon at the National
Gallery of Art. Roumain narrated
the performance with a microphone, speaking in the often
rambling manner of a nightclub
act. He announced that he was
going to change the program,
informing us of the pieces before
he played them.
The selection was primarily
compositions and arrangements
by Roumain, and a spirit of
political protest, leading up to
Bob Marley’s “Redemption Song,”
ran through the concert. “I woke
up angry this morning,” Roumain confided. The violin, Roumain later explained, is “my
COURTESY OF DANIEL BERNARD ROUMAIN
Daniel Bernard Roumain.
weapon of choice,” and his arrangement of “La Dessalinienne,”
the Haitian national anthem, he
related to his identity as the “son
of two immigrant parents from
Haiti.” As amplification of both
instruments increased throughout the program, the volume
level edged toward oppressive.
In Roumain’s piece “Filter,”
early in the concert, the violinist
walked through the audience,
eventually weaving in the tune of
“The Star-Spangled Banner.” At
the point where the melody became unmistakable, Roumain
knelt and kept playing on his
knees by the fountain in the
center of the West Garden Court.
The allusion to the protests of
professional sports players, on
the day of the Super Bowl, was a
powerful gesture in this place
just a few blocks from the White
House.
Roumain was at his most effective when he let go of the polemics, especially in a piece offering a
tribute to his father, who died in
2014. Capped by his singing of a
wordless minor-mode melody,
sometimes in duet with himself
on the violin, the piece’s simplicity and poignancy were devastating.
style@washpost.com
B FEATURED LISTING B
Lara Fabian's
"Camouflage
World Tour"
Wednesday,
February 7 at 8 pm
Lara Fabian is undoubtedly one of the best voices in the
world. A one-of-a-kind lyricist, composer and singer.
The Camouflage World Tour is Lara’s first tour based on
her English repertoire, which started with the release of her
eponymous album in the USA in 1999.
The Warner Theater
513 13th St NW,
Washington, DC 20004
Phone: (202) 783-4000
$76 - $326
The “Camouflage
World Tour” will have
a stunning and
innovative visual
production, and will
consist of a setlist
based on the new
album.
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
Great Group Rates
for 15 or More
THEATRE
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
This record-breaking interactive solve-the-crime comedy
keeps the audiences laughing as they try to outwit the
suspects and catch the killer. New clues and up to the
minute improvisation deliver “shrieks of laughter night after
night.” (Washington Post)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
MUSIC - CONCERTS
First Wednesday
Concerts presents
the men’s vocal
ensemble Bamburía
Wednesday, February 7th
from 12:10-12:45 p.m.
A concert of jovial a cappella music from the Renaissance
by one of DC’s newest ensembles
St. John’s Church, Lafayette Square
at the corner of 16th & H Streets NW
Washington, D.C. 20005
( 202) 270-6265
Free
The church is
fully wheelchair
accessible
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
ForeWords, with
Ted Libbey
Beginning at
6:45 p.m. before
the Sat., Feb. 10
performance
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
"An impressive
spectrum of works
push the company
forward "
—The New York
Times
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
National Symphony
Orchestra:
Shostakovich's
Ninth Symphony /
Gerhardt plays
Bloch
Thursday at 7
Saturday at 8
Fabien Gabel conducts a program inspired by nonmusical
sources, from a heartbreaking love poem to World War II
politics to the book of Ecclesiastes. He leads Dukas's
Overture to Polyeucte, Bloch's Schelomo featuring cellist
Alban Gerhardt, Rachmaninoff's The Rock, and
Shostakovich's Symphony No. 9.
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
AfterWords immediately following the Thu., Feb. 8 concert.
DANCE
Alvin Ailey
American
Dance Theater
Tonight at 7
Wed-Sat at 7:30
Sat & Sun at 1:30
Now more than ever, the world needs the power of dance
to bring people together and connect us all by our common
humanity. For its annual Kennedy Center engagement, the
beloved company will continue to push the art form into
fascinating new territory. Tonight's program: The Golden
Section by Twyla Tharp, Members Don’t Get Weary by
Jamar Roberts, Revelations by Alvin Ailey. Complete
schedule available online at www.kennedy-center.org
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
16-2898
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A Valentine’s Day rose tutorial:
Know which color is the best
Hints
From
Heloise
Dear Readers:
Valentine’s Day
will soon be here.
Roses are a popular gift, but do you
know how to purchase roses and what to look for?
Here are some hints:
Neighborhood flower shops,
online florists, grocery stores and
large discount retailers are good
sources for fresh flowers.
Closed buds are best. They
will open over the next several
hours.
That little flower-food packet
that comes with the roses is seriously good — use it!
If you’re not happy with your
purchase, don’t hesitate to ask for
a replacement.
Oh, and which color of rose is
best? Here are what the colors
mean:
Orange: passion and enthusiasm; white: purity or sympathy;
pink: fondness or gratitude; lavender: love at first sight and
grace; yellow: cheerfulness and
friendship; and, of course, red: romance and love. Happy Valentine’s Day!
Dear Heloise: Please remind
your readers: When eating out for
breakfast, providing that the
service is friendly, prompt and
attentive, tipping a little bit extra
is a good idea.
The server most likely will be
checking on you quite a bit,
refilling coffee cups and clearing
lots of dishes (if the meal is buffetstyle).
Breakfast typically is the
cheapest meal on the menu, but
the servers still work really hard.
Reward them!
Ronald M., Tulsa
Dear Heloise: When I’m at the
gym three times a week, I don’t
bring valuable jewelry, etc., but I
store any small items I don’t want
to lose in a designated stray sock.
I’ve stitched this sock into my
gym bag so it won’t get tossed into
the laundry by mistake, and it
works as a little storage pouch for
my keys and wallet.
Helen D., Erie, Pa.
Dear Heloise: I save some “junk
mail” I receive, and I let my
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: 12:55-4:00-7:15
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 5:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
1:25-4:00-6:30-9:15
Maze Runner: The Death Cure (PG-13) CC: 2:30-5:15-8:00
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 4:30
(PG-13) CC: 4:20-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Coco (PG) CC: 2:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
(PG-13) CC: 4:15-10:00
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 1:45-4:15 2:30-7:45
Proud Mary (R) CC: 1:25-3:45Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
6:00-8:15
3:45-9:15
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 1:40The Shape of Water (R) CC:
4:45-7:55
1:20-7:00
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: Molly's Game (R) CC: 1:15-7:00
Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:001:00-4:00-7:05-10:05
3:30-6:00-8:30
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:45Hostiles (R) CC: 4:35-7:30
4:05-7:15-10:25
12 Strong (R) CC: 7:00-10:15
AMC Center Park 8
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:25-7:45
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Missouri (R) 4:15-9:50
(PG-13)
CC: 12:00-3:15-6:30-9:45
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 12:30- Pitch Perfect
3 (PG-13) CC:
3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
6:45-9:00
I, Tonya (R) 1:30-4:20-7:10-10:05 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:15-6:55
CC: 12:15-3:00-6:00-8:45
Hostiles (R) 12:30-3:35-6:45-9:55 (PG-13)
Commuter (PG-13) CC:
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The
2:30-7:15
3D (PG-13) CC: 1:25-7:10
Coco (PG) CC: 1:30-4:15
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 1:00- Proud Mary (R) CC: 12:204:10-7:15-10:20
5:00-9:50
Maze Runner: The Death Cure Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:00The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 3:10-6:15-9:30
CC: 2:00-5:20-8:45
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:30The Post (PG-13) 12:50-3:407:20-10:00
6:30-9:20
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 1:45AMC Loews Uptown 1
4:15-6:45-9:15
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Hostiles (R) CC: 12:45-4:00The Post (PG-13) CC: 4:30-7:30 7:00-10:00
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: 12:50-4:00-7:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 1:40-4:30-7:20
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 12:403:20-5:50
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 2:004:50-7:40
12 Strong (R) CC: 8:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 5:10
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:204:10-7:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:30-2:507:50
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air and Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
Angelika Pop-Up
at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-12:301:50-2:45-4:20-5:15-7:00-8:00
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 11:15-2:00-4:45-7:30
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
I, Tonya (R) 11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-2:155:00-7:45
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:45-2:15-4:30-7:00-9:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 12:15-3:30-6:45-9:50
Molly's Game (R) CC: 1:00-4:007:00-10:00
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:3512:00-2:00-2:40-4:40-5:10-7:207:45-9:45-10:15
Hostiles (R) CC: 11:30-2:10-4:507:30-10:15
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:204:20-5:10-7:20-9:45
The Final Year CC: 12:55-3:007:50-9:55
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 12:50-3:506:50-9:30
I, Tonya (R) CC: 1:10-4:107:10-9:40
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:054:05-7:05-9:45
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:10-3:20-5:307:40-9:50
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 1:004:00-7:00-9:40
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:30
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
The Disaster Artist (R) CC:
4:30-7:30
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 1:30-4:15
The Florida Project (R) CC:
1:15-7:15
In the Fade (Aus dem Nichts) (R)
1:45-4:45-7:45
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14
701 Seventh Street Northwest
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:05-3:25-6:45
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:30-3:45-7:00-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:30-4:30-7:45-10:40
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:30-4:15
Proud Mary (R) 10:05
12 Strong (R) 7:15-10:15
Winchester (PG-13) 12:35-3:105:40-8:15-10:45; 12:00-2:30-5:007:30-10:10
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
IMAX Theater
601 Independence Avenue SW
AMC Columbia 14
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:10-2:40-6:10-9:40
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: 11:35-12:35-2:453:45-6:00-6:55-9:20-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 11:55-3:00-6:20-9:20
Coco (PG) CC: 11:50-2:55
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 6:05-9:00
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:001:50-4:25-7:00
The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
11:20-4:40-9:55
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
12:00-6:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
3:00-9:00
Proud Mary (R) CC: 9:45
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 11:503:20-6:35-9:55
12 Strong (R) CC: 12:10-3:306:40-9:40
Winchester (PG-13) (!) 11:201:50-4:20-6:50-9:20
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:50-2:506:10-9:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 2:00-7:30
Hostiles (R) CC: 11:40-2:456:05-9:20
The Greatest Showman: The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG) 11:101:50-4:25-7:10-9:40
MARYLAND
grandkids open the mail when
they come to visit.
They feel important, having
mail to open, and they can
practice reading. Some of the
mail comes with stickers or
pretend credit cards, bookmarks
and even coins from time to time!
The kids get a kick out of
opening the mail; it’s a fun thing
for them to do.
Celeste G., Helena, Mont.
Dear Heloise: When I receive an
invoice in my email, I take a
picture of it (a screenshot). The
email can get lost or forgotten,
but the picture on my phone is
handy.
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:15-1:253:45-6:10-8:20
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 11:002:00-5:00-8:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 2:15-7:45
Molly's Game (R) CC: 1:204:30-7:30
Hostiles (R) 11:15-2:15-5:15-8:15
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
CC: 1:00-4:05-7:20
Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:051:30-4:00-6:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:35-2:35-5:30-8:30
ArcLight Bethesda
7101 Democracy Boulevard
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:50-2:20-4:45-7:10-9:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:15-1:00-4:00-7:05-9:50
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 1:20-4:15-7:15-10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:25-2:10-4:50-7:3010:05
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:30-1:554:20-6:45-9:10
Dunkirk (PG-13) 4:55
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:202:15-5:05-7:50-9:05
Get Out (R) 3:40-9:55
Den of Thieves (R) 12:40-6:15
The Shape of Water (R) 2:50-8:15
Call Me by Your Name (R) 3:20
Molly's Game (R) 2:00-8:45
All the Money in the World
(R) 4:40
The Post (PG-13) 11:55-2:355:10-7:45-10:20
12 Strong (R) 12:35-6:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:15-5:40-7:20
Lady Bird (R) CC: 2:25-7:40
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 11:35AM
Hostiles (R) CC: 11:45-2:40-5:308:20-9:45
Winchester (PG-13) 11:45-2:455:00-7:25-10:30
I, Tonya (R) CC: 11:10-1:45-4:257:00-9:40
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 11:402:30-5:15-8:00-10:10
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 4:00-9:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:30-2:50-6:20-9:40
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:10-1:10-3:20-4:206:30-9:40-10:35
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:00-1:45-4:30-7:1510:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:30-3:005:30
The Commuter (PG-13) 1:30-7:20
Den of Thieves (R) 1:20-4:257:35-10:45
12 Strong (R) 12:05-3:05-6:059:05
Winchester (PG-13) 11:10-1:404:15-7:00-9:30
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18 Hostiles (R) 1:15-4:10-7:05-10:10
Three
Billboards Outside Ebbing,
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Missouri (R) 8:00-10:40
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 1:05-5:00
12 Strong (R) 11:05-7:10
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Winchester (PG-13) 3:10-10:20
11:10-1:30-4:20-7:10-9:45
Bow Tie Harbour 9
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
2474 Solomons Island Road
CC: 11:45-3:10-6:35-10:05
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC:
11:00-2:00-4:40-7:40-10:30
12:15-6:50
Maze Runner: The Death Cure The Shape of Water (R) 10:40(PG-13) CC: 11:20-12:30-3:45- 7:20
The Post (PG-13) 10:30-11:407:00-10:10
Coco (PG) CC: 11:30-2:05-4:45 1:10-4:20-7:10-8:00-10:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle I, Tonya (R) 1:30-4:30-10:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:20(PG-13) CC: 11:10-2:00-4:501:20-4:00-6:50-9:40
7:30-10:20
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Lady Bird (R) 2:30-5:30-10:40
Phantom Thread (R) 9:50-12:50CC: 7:20-10:00
3:50-7:00-10:00
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 1:154:00-6:40
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
1:30-9:15
Winchester (PG-13) XD: 10:55Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG- 1:35-4:15-7:00-9:45; 12:00-2:4513) (!) 1:45-4:30-7:10-9:55
5:20-8:00
The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
The Greatest Showman (PG)
5:20-10:30
12:35-3:45-6:45-9:30
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
3:45-10:25
11:20-2:50-6:20-10:00
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 6:30-9:50 Maze Runner: The Death Cure
12 Strong (R) CC: 12:00-3:00(PG-13) 10:55-12:35-2:20-3:556:00-9:00
5:40-7:10-9:00-10:25
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Missouri (R) CC: 2:15-7:40
(PG-13) 11:15-2:10-5:10-8:15
Forever My Girl (PG) CC:
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:402:45-7:55
2:20-5:05-7:45-10:20
Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:15- Coco (PG) 12:20-3:00
2:30-5:00-7:50-10:30
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:20-1:50- 12:30-3:20-6:10-8:45
4:40-7:30-10:15
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:25-2:15Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:00-4:25
5:00-7:35
Hostiles (R) CC: 12:50-4:10Forever My Girl (PG) 1:00-3:507:15-10:20
6:35-9:25
I, Tonya (R) CC: 1:00-3:50Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
6:40-9:30
(NR) 11:00-2:45-6:30-10:05
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:30- The Post (PG-13) 11:55-2:553:30-6:45-9:40
5:50-8:40
Padmaavat: An IMAX 3D
The Shape of Water (R) 12:10Experience (NR) (!) 11:00-2:40- 6:15
6:20-9:55
Molly's Game (R) 2:00-10:15
Ang Dalawang Mrs. Reyes 9:20 Proud Mary (R) 11:35-5:25AMC Loews
7:45-10:05
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
Den of Thieves (R) 12:15-3:3011115 Mall Circle
5:40-6:55-9:05-10:15
Maze Runner: The Death Cure 12 Strong (R) 1:05-4:05-7:1010:15
(PG-13) CC: (!) 11:45-3:15Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
6:30-9:45
Missouri (R) 3:10-9:35
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC:
Winchester (PG-13) 12:00-2:455:00-7:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 5:20-8:00
Oru Nalla Naal Paathu Solren
(PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:15-4:00(NR) 11:30-6:25
7:00-9:45
Lady Bird (R) 2:25-7:50
Coco (PG) CC: 11:45-2:30
Hostiles (R) 11:30-2:40-6:00-9:20
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:30I, Tonya (R) 11:10-4:50-10:20
2:15
Touch Chesi Chudu (NR) 11:00The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
2:35-6:05-9:40
4:45-7:30-10:15
Proud Mary (R) CC: 10:45-1:00- Phantom Thread (R) 11:45-3:006:00-9:15
5:00-6:45-10:15
Chalo (NR) 11:45-6:40
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 11:30Bhaagamathie (Telugu) (NR)
3:00-6:15-9:30-10:00
3:25-10:10
12 Strong (R) CC: 10:45-1:45Ang Dalawang Mrs. Reyes
3:30-7:15-9:00
Hostiles (R) (!) 11:30-2:45-6:00- 3:05-10:05
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
9:15
Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:15- (PG-13) 10:55-2:20-5:40-9:00
2:00-4:30-7:15-10:00
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
(NR) 2:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13)
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Seas 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
AMC Magic Johnson
12:25
Capital Ctr 12
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:25800 Shoppers Way
11:50-2:05-5:15
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
(PG-13) CC: (!) 11:05-2:05IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
5:05-8:05
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC:
11:10-4:15
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
8633 Colesville Road
CC: 4:45-7:15
The Shape of Water (R) 2:15-7:05 Coco (PG) CC: 11:35-2:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:40Missouri (R) 4:45-9:30
2:25
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-1:50The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
4:10-6:45-9:10
1:45-6:45
Lady Bird (R) 11:30-9:35
Get Out (R) CC: 5:10-7:40
Phantom Thread (R) 1:30The Shape of Water (R) CC:
11:30-5:05
4:15-7:00
C5
RE
1591 West Nursery Road
Proud Mary (R) CC: 12:45-3:005:15-7:30-9:45
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:554:00-7:05-10:15
12 Strong (R) CC: 1:40-4:357:30-10:25
The Post (PG-13) CC: 12:40-3:306:30-9:10
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 12:302:55-5:20-7:45-10:10
Hostiles (R) CC: 12:35-4:007:00-10:00
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:30-3:45-7:15-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
6:30-9:15
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:20-3:55
The Commuter (PG-13) 1:153:50-6:25-9:00
The Shape of Water (R) 1:304:25-7:20-10:15
Proud Mary (R) 1:15-3:30-5:458:00-10:15
Landmark
Den of Thieves (R) 12:45-4:00Bethesda Row Cinema
7:15-10:30
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:50- Missouri (R) 3:30-9:00
4:40-7:25-10:00
Winchester (PG-13) 12:30-3:00Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:50-3:205:30-8:00-10:30
5:40-7:50-9:55
The Post (PG-13) 1:05-4:00The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:30- 7:00-10:00
4:20-7:20-10:00
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-6:15
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: Hostiles (R) 1:00-4:05-7:15-10:20
1:20-4:10-6:55-9:50
I, Tonya (R) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:00-3:50- Phantom Thread (R) 12:50-4:006:50-9:40
7:15-10:15
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:50Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
3:40-7:00-9:50
14716 Baltimore Avenue
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:3011:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:25
7:30-10:05
The Insult (L'Insulte) (R) 1:10- Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 11:30-3:00-6:30-10:00
4:00-7:10-9:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Old Greenbelt Theatre
(PG-13) 12:30-3:45-7:00-10:10
129 Centerway
Paddington 2 (PG) 6:30
The Shape of Water (R) 8:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:20Call Me by Your Name (R) 5:15 1:55-4:30-7:15-10:00
Proud Mary (R) 3:45-9:10
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
Den of Thieves (R) 12:00-3:303899 Branch Avenue
Maze Runner: The Death Cure 7:30-10:45
12 Strong (R) 12:00-3:15-9:15
(PG-13) 12:40-4:00-7:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Post (PG-13) 11:45-2:456:00-9:00
(PG-13) 11:45-2:45-5:25-8:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Winchester (PG-13) 11:45-2:305:15-8:00-10:35
7:30
Hostiles (R) 12:45-4:00-7:15Paddington 2 (PG) 12:30-3:00
10:30
Proud Mary (R) 1:00-3:30The Shape of Water (R) 12:156:00-8:30
3:30-7:00-10:10
Den of Thieves (R) 1:05-4:05Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
7:10
Missouri
(R) 1:00-6:15
Winchester (PG-13) 1:15-3:45Phantom Thread (R) 12:15-3:156:15-8:35
6:45-9:50
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
Ferdinand (PG) 3:20-6:10-9:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
3:25-6:30-9:05
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 2:00-5:45-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the
Jungle (PG-13) 1:30-4:30-7:3010:20
Paddington 2 (PG) 2:40-5:15
The Commuter (PG-13) 1:003:35-6:20-9:15
The Shape of Water (R) 1:004:15-7:40-10:30
Proud Mary (R) 2:30-4:457:15-9:40
Den of Thieves (R) 3:40-7:0010:20
12 Strong (R) 8:05
Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri (R) 1:40-4:257:25-10:10
Winchester (PG-13) 2:50-5:208:15
The Post (PG-13) 1:00-3:506:40-9:30
Hostiles (R) 1:15-4:20-7:3010:30
Phantom Thread (R) 3:30-6:5010:15
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Stadium 20 & IMAX
900 Ellsworth Drive
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:00-2:45-5:30-8:20-11:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:20-3:55-7:30-10:50
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:40-4:10-7:30-10:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:55-3:55-6:55-9:55
Coco (PG) 12:50-3:30
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
12:20-3:00-5:45-8:25-11:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:15-4:00-6:50
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero
(PG-13) 12:10-1:00-2:50-3:405:35-8:25-11:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:102:50-5:30-8:10-10:55
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 1:20-5:20
Proud Mary (R) 7:30-9:55
Den of Thieves (R) 12:50-4:207:40-10:50
12 Strong (R) 12:55-4:10-7:1510:30
Winchester (PG-13) 12:05-2:455:25-8:00-10:35
Hostiles (R) 12:15-3:40-6:4510:00
I, Tonya (R) 1:25-4:25-6:20-9:30
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
12:05-3:25-6:45-10:05
Padmaavat 3D (Padmavati 3D)
(Hindi) (NR) 9:25
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 6:10-9:05
The Shape of Water (R) 12:253:25-6:25-9:35
Call Me by Your Name (R) 9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:15-4:25-7:1510:15
The Post (PG-13) 12:15-3:156:15-9:15
Regal Germantown Stadium 14
20000 Century Boulevard
The Greatest Showman (PG)
1:45-4:45-8:00-10:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
7:00-10:30
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:00-3:15-6:30-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
Coco (PG) 12:45-4:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 2:45-5:30
The Commuter (PG-13) 4:0010:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:45-4:457:45-10:45
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 12:00-3:30-7:00
Den of Thieves (R) 12:15-7:15
12 Strong (R) 12:45-3:45-6:459:45
Winchester (PG-13) 12:30-3:155:45-8:30-11:00
The Post (PG-13) 1:15-4:157:15-10:15
Hostiles (R) 12:30-3:45-7:1510:30
Padmaavat 3D (Padmavati 3D)
(Hindi) (NR) 10:30
The Shape of Water (R) 12:003:00-6:00-9:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 8:15-11:00
Phantom Thread (R) 12:45-3:457:00-10:15
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
1:35-4:05-6:35-9:05
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 12:30-3:40-6:50-10:00
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: 12:20-1:20-3:204:20-6:20-7:20-9:20-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 1:10-4:10-6:55-9:40
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 7:35-10:05
Coco (PG) CC: 2:00-4:45
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 1:25-4:30
Stadium 14
The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
6505 America Blvd.
7:15-9:50
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:00- The Greatest Showman (PG)
3:50-6:40-9:30
12:30-3:15-6:00-8:45
Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13
199 East Montgomery Avenue
The Greatest Showman (PG)
1:15-4:15-7:15-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
3:00-9:30
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:00-3:30-7:00-10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:15-3:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:30
The Shape of Water (R) 12:454:00-7:15-10:15
Den of Thieves (R) 3:15-6:4510:00
12 Strong (R) 3:15-6:15-9:15
Winchester (PG-13) 12:15-2:455:15-7:45-10:30
The Post (PG-13) 1:00-3:456:30-9:30
I, Tonya (R) 12:00-6:30
Hostiles (R) 12:00-3:30-6:45-9:45
Till The End Of The World (NR)
1:00-4:00-7:30-10:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 6:00-9:00
Lady Bird (R) 12:45
Phantom Thread (R) 12:30-3:457:00-10:00
Regal Waugh Chapel
Stadium 12 & IMAX
1419 South Main Chapel Way
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:25
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:05-3:20-6:35-9:50
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:00-3:10-6:20-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:20-4:20-7:30-10:20
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:35-4:05
Proud Mary (R) 1:30
Den of Thieves (R) 12:45-3:557:00-10:05
12 Strong (R) 4:25-7:20-10:15
The Post (PG-13) 12:30-3:106:00-9:00
Winchester (PG-13) 12:20-2:505:20-7:50-10:30
Hostiles (R) 12:35-3:40-6:5010:00
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
12:40-3:50-7:00-10:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 6:40-9:20
Phantom Thread (R) 12:50-3:456:45-9:40
Regal Westview
Stadium 16 & IMAX
5243 Buckeystown Pike
The Greatest Showman (PG)
1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:30-3:00-6:30-10:00
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:30-3:45-7:15-10:30
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 6:15-9:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:45-4:00-7:00-10:00
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:15
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:30-3:15
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG13) 12:00-2:45-5:30-8:30
The Commuter (PG-13) 4:3011:00
The Shape of Water (R) 12:453:45-6:45-9:45
Den of Thieves (R) 1:15-7:45
12 Strong (R) 1:15-4:15-7:1510:15
The Post (PG-13) 12:15-3:156:15-9:15
Winchester (PG-13) 12:15-2:455:15-8:00-10:45
Phantom Thread (R) 12:00-3:306:45-10:15
Hostiles (R) 1:00-4:15-7:30-10:45
I, Tonya (R) 11:45-3:00-6:00-9:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 3:30-9:00
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-6:30
The Greatest Showman: The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG) 11:302:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
UA Snowden Square
Stadium 14
9161 Commerce Center Drive
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:40-3:15-6:00-8:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:30-3:50-7:10-10:30
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:45-3:50-7:00-10:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:40-4:30-7:20-10:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:30-4:20
The Commuter (PG-13) 3:20-9:00
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 6:50-10:20
Den of Thieves (R) 12:50-4:007:10-10:25
12 Strong (R) 4:40-7:30-10:25
Winchester (PG-13) 12:30-3:005:30-8:00-10:30
The Post (PG-13) 1:10-4:006:45-9:30
I, Tonya (R) 12:35-6:15
Hostiles (R) 1:50-4:50-7:40-10:30
Phantom Thread (R) 1:00-4:107:15-10:15
The Shape of Water (R) 12:453:40-6:30-9:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:20-4:15-7:00-9:45
Lady Bird (R) 1:45
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:254:20-9:10
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:003:30-6:40-10:00
12 Strong (R) CC: 11:50-3:006:15-9:25
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 11:00-4:5010:35
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:35-2:205:10-8:00-10:45
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14 Winchester (PG-13) 11:30-2:155:00-7:45-10:30
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:50-6:45
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Hostiles (R) 12:45-4:00-7:0010:40-1:10-3:40-6:30-9:00
10:15
Maze Runner: The Death Cure I, Tonya (R) CC: 2:40-8:30
(PG-13) CC: (!) 9:50-12:20-1:00- Maze Runner: The Death Cure
3:30-4:10-6:40-7:20-9:50-10:30 The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 12:15-3:45-7:15-10:35
(PG-13) CC: 11:20-2:20-5:10;
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:1010:00-12:40-3:50-6:50-9:40
3:20-6:30-9:30
Coco (PG) CC: 12:10
AMC Shirlington 7
Paddington 2 (PG) Open Caption;
2772 South Randolph St.
CC: 11:00-1:50-4:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:45The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
4:40-7:25
11:10-2:00-4:40-7:10-9:35
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:40-2:50- The Shape of Water (R) CC:
1:20-6:30
5:20-7:50-10:20
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 10:101:40-7:30
1:20-4:30-7:40-10:50
Molly's Game (R) CC: 4:30
12 Strong (R) CC: 10:50-2:10Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
6:10-9:10
Forever My Girl (PG) CC: 10:20- Missouri (R) CC: 1:30-4:15-7:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:1512:50-3:20-6:00
4:00-6:45
Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!)
Lady Bird (R) CC: 4:10
8:10-10:40
Hostiles (R) CC: (!) 11:30-2:40- I, Tonya (R) CC: (!) 1:30-4:25-7:10
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 1:006:20-9:20
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) 4:20-7:00
CC: 3:00-5:30-8:00-10:45
AMC Tysons Corner 16
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 7:007850e Tysons Corner Center
8:30-10:10
The
Greatest
Showman (PG) CC:
Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:50- 11:10-2:05-4:35-7:10-9:40
2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
iPic Pike & Rose
CC: 11:30-3:00-6:35-10:00
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Maze Runner: The Death Cure (PGMaze Runner: The Death Cure 13) CC: (!) 11:05AM
(PG-13) (!) 12:15-3:45-7:10-10:40 Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 12:55Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 5:45-10:35
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:00-3:00-6:15-9:15
The Shape of Water (R) 12:00- (PG-13) CC: 11:25-2:20-5:108:00-10:45
6:30
Proud Mary (R) 12:15-3:00-5:30- Coco (PG) CC: 10:25-1:20-4:15-7:00
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
8:00-10:30
Den of Thieves (R) 12:30-4:00- CC: 9:35
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:55-1:357:20-10:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 4:00-6:40-9:15
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 10:40Missouri (R) 3:15-9:40
Winchester (PG-13) (!) 1:00-4:00- 4:30-10:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
7:00-9:50
5:05-10:50
The Post (PG-13) 12:30-3:30The Shape of Water (R) CC: (!)
6:45-10:00
1:30-7:15
Phantom Thread (R) (!) 12:45Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: (!)
4:15-7:30-11:00
1:15-7:25
Den of Thieves (R) CC: (!) 10:201:25-4:40-7:50-11:00
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
12 Strong (R) CC: (!) 10:45-1:502150 Clarendon Blvd.
4:50-7:55-10:55
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
Missouri (R) CC: (!) 10:50-4:25Maze Runner: The Death Cure 10:10
(PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:00-7:45-10:15 Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:20Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 12:50-3:25-5:55-8:25-11:00
(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30 The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:0012 Strong (R) CC: 1:30-4:304:45-7:35-10:25
7:30-9:45
Lady Bird (R) CC: (!) 10:25-3:15Winchester (PG-13) CC: 2:008:10
5:15-8:00-10:45
Hostiles (R) CC: (!) 10:20-1:20-4:20The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:15-5:00- 7:30-10:40
7:15-10:45
I, Tonya (R) CC: 2:15-8:05
I, Tonya (R) 2:30-4:15-7:00-10:30 Maze Runner: The Death Cure The
Hostiles (R) 1:00-4:15-7:15-10:00 IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC:
(!) 10:30-1:45-5:00-8:15
AMC Hoffman Center 22
Maze Runner: The Death Cure (PG206 Swamp Fox Rd.
13) (!) 11:45-2:55-6:10-9:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
AMC Worldgate 9
CC: 4:45
13025 Worldgate Drive
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 11:00-2:30-6:00-9:25
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
Maze Runner: The Death Cure 1:55-4:25-6:55-9:30
(PG-13) CC: 10:30-12:00-1:40- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
3:15-6:30-7:25-9:45-10:45
CC: 2:30-6:00-9:15
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC:
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
2:00-7:00
(PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:35-6:40-9:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 12:15-3:15-6:10-9:15 (PG-13) CC: 1:35-4:15-7:05-9:45
Coco (PG) CC: 11:35-2:10-4:45 Coco (PG) CC: 12:00
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 11:05Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 1:00-3:30
4:15-6:55
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:15-8:45
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) The Shape of Water (R) CC:
CC: 7:30-10:15
3:00-6:05
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:40Den of Thieves (R) CC: 6:10-9:10
2:25-5:00
12 Strong (R) CC: 12:30-3:30Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG- 6:15-9:20
13) 11:10-1:45-4:20-7:00-9:35
Winchester (PG-13) (!) 12:15The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
2:40-5:00-7:20-9:45
11:20-4:20-9:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:00-3:45Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 12:00- 6:25-9:00
3:00-6:15-9:15
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Get Out (R) CC: 1:40-7:30
One Loudoun
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
20575 East Hampton Plaza
2:15-7:40
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: The Greatest Showman (PG)
10:25-1:25
2:00-7:50
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Molly's Game (R) CC: 10:30(PG-13) 10:55-12:15
4:05-10:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Proud Mary (R) CC: 7:25-9:50
(PG-13) 10:45AM
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:45The Shape of Water (R) 12:00
4:00-7:15-10:30
12 Strong (R) 11:20-1:50
12 Strong (R) CC: 10:45-2:30Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
6:00-9:25
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (R) 1:10
Winchester (PG-13) 10:00-12:45
Missouri (R) CC: 11:15-5:00The Post (PG-13) 11:40AM
10:45
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Forever My Girl (PG) CC:
4:15-7:00-9:50
1:40-9:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 10:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:45- 6:20-10:10
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
4:35-7:30-10:20
(PG-13) 3:55-7:40-11:10
Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:30-5:15Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
10:35
(PG-13) 2:45-6:00-9:05
I, Tonya (R) CC: 10:30-1:35Coco (PG) 10:30-2:20
4:30-7:20
Hour (PG-13) 3:20-9:45
Hostiles (R) CC: 12:40-3:50-7:10 Darkest
Shape of Water (R) 6:40
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:50- The
12
Strong
(R) 5:00-8:20-11:30
1:45-4:50-7:50-10:45
I, Tonya (R) 4:05-10:30
The Greatest Showman: The
Post (PG-13) 2:30-5:40IMAX 2D Experience (PG) 1:45- The
8:40-11:40
4:15-7:00-9:45
Winchester (PG-13) 3:30-5:15Ang Dalawang Mrs. Reyes
8:00-10:45
11:05-1:40-4:15-6:50-9:30
Winchester (PG-13) 11:45-2:15- Bound (1996) (R) 7:20
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
4:45-7:20-10:00
VIRGINIA
AMC Potomac Mills 18
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 11:45-2:30
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:15-2:05-4:45-7:20-10:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 11:20-2:50-6:10-9:40
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: 11:20-2:45-6:00-9:20
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC:
6:50-9:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 11:00-2:00-5:008:00-10:45
Coco (PG) CC: 11:45-2:15-5:05
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 7:45-10:25
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:001:40-4:10
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG13) 11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:40
The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
5:30-8:10-10:40
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
11:40-5:35
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
1:50-7:35
2911 District Ave
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:0512:50-4:00-6:45-9:35
The Shape of Water (R) 11:001:45-4:50-7:30-10:05
Call Me by Your Name (R)
10:00-3:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 10:45-1:35-4:207:00-9:50
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-6:30-8:50
I, Tonya (R) 11:30-2:20-5:008:00-10:50
Phantom Thread (R) 10:15-1:204:15-7:15-10:15
The Greatest Showman (PG)
10:25-12:55-3:30-6:00-8:30-10:55
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) (!) 10:30-1:30-4:307:45-10:50
Bow Tie
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
11940 Market Street
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:20-3:20-6:20-9:20
Maze Runner: The Death Cure (PG13) 2:00-5:30-9:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:50-3:50-6:50-9:50
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:303:30-10:00
Call Me by Your Name (R)
1:10-7:10
12 Strong (R) 12:40-3:40-6:40-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:00-7:00
The Post (PG-13) 12:00-3:006:00-9:00
Lady Bird (R) 4:20-10:20
Hostiles (R) 12:10-3:10-6:10-9:10
I, Tonya (R) 4:10-10:10
Phantom Thread (R) 1:30-5:00-8:20
The Greatest Showman (PG)
1:20-7:20
Maze Runner: The Death Cure (PG13) 4:00-10:00
Also, our bank will not take
coins unless they are rolled. I roll
any spare quarters I may have,
and take the other coins to a
commercial counter.
Carol in Fort Wayne, Ind.
Carol in Fort Wayne, Ind.: By
the way, you can get gift cards at
those commercial counters, and
there is no fee charged for one of
these.
Heloise’s column appears six days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Send a hint to Heloise, P.O. Box
795000, San Antonio, TX 78279-5000,
or email it to Heloise@Heloise.com.
©2018, King Features Syndicate
Tuesday, February 6, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
45980 Regal Plaza
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:10-3:25-6:55-10:05
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-2:556:15
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG13) 12:05-3:30-7:05-10:35
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:502:30-5:05-7:45-10:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:452:45-5:45-8:45
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 11:35-1:40-2:25-3:10-5:105:55-6:35-8:40-9:30-10:10
The Shape of Water (R) 1:254:25-7:25-10:25
Molly's Game (R) 12:30-3:55Cinema Arts Theatre
7:10-10:30
9650 Main St
Three
Billboards Outside
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 9:40Ebbing, Missouri (R) 1:00-3:5012:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:55
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: 6:40-9:35
12 Strong (R) 9:25
10:00-1:00-4:00-7:00-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, The Post (PG-13) 11:55-2:355:25-8:15
Missouri (R) CC: 9:45-12:15Forever My Girl (PG) 2:10-7:30
2:40-5:10-7:50-10:05
The Post (PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:05- Lady Bird (R) 11:30-4:50-10:00
Oru Nalla Naal Paathu Solren
2:35-5:05-7:40-10:00
I, Tonya (R) CC: 9:45-12:10-2:35- (NR) 12:15-3:20-6:30-9:40
I, Tonya (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
4:55-7:20-9:45
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:10- Touch Chesi Chudu (NR) 12:253:35-6:50-9:50
1:15-4:15-7:10-9:50
Phantom Thread (R) 11:40-2:50Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
6:00-9:10
1600 Village Market Boulevard
Chalo (NR) 11:50-3:00-6:10-9:20
Bhaagamathie (Telugu) (NR)
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:25-2:40-5:30-8:30
12:10-2:40-5:10-7:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Regal Dulles Town Center 10
(PG-13) 11:30-2:15-5:00-7:50
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:45-2:10
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:301:15-4:30-7:00-10:00
3:30-7:05
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
12 Strong (R) 1:30-4:30-7:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, (PG-13) 1:00-4:15-7:30-10:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Missouri (R) 11:25-2:05-4:45(PG-13) 12:20-2:30-5:15-8:007:35
Winchester (PG-13) 12:20-3:00- 10:20
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-3:15
5:30-8:00
Den of Thieves (R) 4:00-10:10
Hostiles (R) 11:50-2:50-7:10
12 Strong (R) 1:30-7:15
I, Tonya (R) CC: 11:35-2:20The Post (PG-13) 12:30-3:305:05-7:55
Maze Runner: The Death Cure 6:30-9:30
Winchester (PG-13) 12:00-2:20(PG-13) 12:00-1:00-3:20-4:205:00-7:45-10:45
7:00-7:45
I, Tonya (R) 12:00-2:45-5:30The Post (PG-13) 11:20-2:008:15-11:00
4:40-7:20
The Shape of Water (R) 12:45Lady Bird (R) 4:50-7:15
Maze Runner: The Death Cure 3:45-6:45-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
(PG-13) 12:00-3:20-7:00
Missouri (R) 6:15-9:00
Manassas 4 Cinemas
Phantom Thread (R) 12:10-3:008890 Mathis Ave.
6:00-9:15
The Shape of Water (R) 1:50Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
4:10-6:30-8:50
4110 West Ox Road
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
The
Greatest Showman (PG)
(PG-13) 2:15-5:00-7:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 12:00-2:35-5:10-7:45-10:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG(PG-13) 1:50-4:10-6:30-8:50
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG- 13) 12:05-3:30-7:00-10:25
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
13) 1:45-4:00-6:10-8:20
(PG-13) 12:40-3:55-7:20-10:40
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 Paddington 2 (PG) 12:05-2:40
6201 Multiplex Drive
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero
(PG-13) 12:00-2:45
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 5:25-8:20
11:35-2:05-4:35-7:15-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Den of Thieves (R) 12:45-4:007:10-10:30
3:55-7:35-10:50
Maze Runner: The Death Cure Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri (R) 5:15(PG-13) 10:00-1:10-4:20-7:308:00-10:45
10:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Post (PG-13) 12:50-3:456:50-9:40
(PG-13) 10:40-1:25-4:10-7:00Hostiles (R) 1:10-4:20-7:3010:00
10:35
Coco (PG) 10:05-1:15
Paddington 2 (PG) 10:50-1:30- Phantom Thread (R) 12:153:20-6:30-9:30
4:05-6:55-9:35
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) Along With the Gods: The Two
Worlds 12:30-6:40
(NR) 11:50-6:50
Den of Thieves (R) 10:30-1:40- 1987: When the Day Comes
(NR) 3:40-9:50
4:45-7:50-10:55
12 Strong (R) 11:00-1:55-4:50Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
8:00-11:00
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Winchester (PG-13) 11:45-2:10The
Greatest Showman (PG)
4:55-7:20-10:05
12:30-3:00-6:00-8:30
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ing, Missouri (R) 12:00-2:45Oru Nalla Naal Paathu Solren
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(PG-13) 1:05-3:50-6:45-9:45
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6:55-10:05
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG- 12 Strong (R) 1:00-4:25-7:2013) 1:55-4:50
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Smithsonian - Airbus
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D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
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A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of
the Seas 3D (NR) 10:20-1:303:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our
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2:20
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
12:00-4:50
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Ferdinand (PG) CC: 12:002:20-4:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
7:00-9:35
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
7:15-9:50
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C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
A8
32
75432
A 10 8 7
EAST
K6
76
K J 10 9 8
Q965
WEST
972
9854
6
KJ432
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
Q J 10 5 4 3
A K Q J 10
AQ
None
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
2
Pass
2
2
Pass
3
5
Pass
5
6
All Pass
Opening lead — 6
EAST
Dbl
Pass
Pass
CLASSIC PEANUTS
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
F
or years, my friend Eddie
Kantar has contributed an
excellent “Thinking Bridge”
feature to Daily Bulletins at
the ACBL North American
Championships. Today’s
Kantar deal appeared during
the Fall NABC in San Diego.
South’s opening bid of two
clubs is strong and artificial.
North’s two diamonds is neg- RHYMES WITH ORANGE
ative or waiting, and East’s
double is lead-directing.
North would prefer threecard spade support to raise
at his second turn, but he
has no better call.
South’s jump to five clubs
at his third turn is a gadget
called “Exclusion Keycard
Blackwood”: It asks North to
show aces outside the club
suit. His five hearts shows
LIO
one, so South goes to six
spades.
West leads a diamond — a
sure singleton — so declarer
is at risk of a ruff. If he lets
the queen of trumps ride
next, or even if he leads the
ace and a second trump, he
goes down.
Instead, South goes to the
ace of spades and discards
his last diamond on the ace
of clubs. He can then lead a
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
second trump safely.
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
A832
7 5 4 3 2 A 10 8 7
Your partner opens one
spade, you respond 1NT,
he bids two hearts and you
return to two spades. Partner
bids three hearts. What do
you say?
ANSWER: Despite your
weak preference, partner still
aspires to game. He wouldn’t
have bid three hearts just
to show you length in both
majors. Since you have a
side ace and a possible ruffing value, bid four spades.
He may hold K Q J 9 4, A Q
10 5 4, A 6, 5.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
BIRTHDAY | FEBRUARY 6
This year you will
open up to many new
changes. However, in
some areas you could
become quite rigid and stuck.
Consider other possibilities
more than you have in the
recent past. If you are single,
many people admire you,
but few feel as though they
can handle your intensity.
Fall 2018 will be unusually
exciting, as a new romance
is likely to enter your life. If
you are attached, work on the
friendship that exists between
you and your sweetie. Scorpio
is more insightful than usual.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Your fiery side emerges, which
might cause you to be more
outgoing than usual. Somehow
you could trigger much more
confusion than you or anyone
else had thought possible. Tap
into your creativity.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You might want to offer your
support to others. Listen
to your sixth sense as you
attempt to clear out a problem,
especially if it involves your
finances. Confusion surrounds
you and a loved one.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
One-on-one relating opens
new doors. Understand what
is happening around you,
and refuse to be cornered by
someone who thinks that he
or she is in charge. Your smile
WEINGARTENS & CLARK goes a long way in loosening
up the moment.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
You could be more in touch
with your feelings than you
have been in the recent past.
Don’t push so hard to finish a
creative project. Go with the
flow, and you will feel much
better. Examine your long-term
goals.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You could be put off by
someone you really care
about. Don’t worry so much
about what needs to happen
next. This person often triggers
more activity than you are
comfortable with.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You could feel overloaded as
others reach out to you. It
appears as if everyone has
a different idea about what
works best in his or her life.
Allow your loved ones to
discuss what is on their minds.
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Be aware of how direct you
need to be with a friend.
Pressure could build to
an unprecedented level.
Understand what is happening
within this friendship. Discuss
your limits openly, especially
when it comes to your
finances.
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You could be exhausted by
everything that is going on
around you. Stay centered,
and remain in command of
your ship. The drain you feel
from others will seem a lot less
intense if you pull back some.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You will want to defer to a
loved one about a situation
that keeps popping up.
Understand that you might
have been in the wrong
place at the wrong time. Your
emotions emerge no matter
what you are up to. Take time
for a chat with a friend.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
Avoid getting too focused on a
personal matter. Other issues
need your attention, especially
those involving your friends.
Your input is valued, and is
likely to create a lot of thought
and awareness. Listen to
what is going on with a family
member.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Someone might view you
as being overly friendly
and a bit too casual. Those
characteristics easily could
make this person feel uneasy.
Try not to give in to a need to
impress others. Express your
compassion more subtly.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
You could be overwhelmed by
everything that is happening
around you. You might be able
to swim for miles, but how
well can you tread water for
lengthy periods of time? Ask
more questions, and you’ll be
delighted by what you hear.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
KIDSPOST.COM
TODAY
Tundra swans have a
wingspan of 51/2 feet
and can fly at 50 miles
per hour!
Read about how SpaceX, with
its new Heavy Falcon rocket,
aims to launch a car into space
for the first time.
A pleasant winter day: Frigid in
the morning, but the sun might
peek out in the afternoon.
ILLUSTRATION BY DALTON CHILDRESS, 10, BURKE
ANN CAMERON SIEGAL
Alaska to Annapolis,
these birds flock together
A NN C AMERON S IEGAL
E
ach September, 12-yearold “Julia” flies 4,200
miles from her home in
northern Alaska to
spend winters in Annapolis, Maryland.
Traveling in a “V” formation,
she and her migrating companions take several months to make
the cross-country journey — stopping at waterways along the route
to rest and eat.
By December, they join hundreds of other tundra swans, who
feed on aquatic plants in the Chesapeake Bay until March, when
their return trip begins.
Named by Annapolis residents,
Julia is monitored by researchers
by a collar with her scientific
name, “T186.”
Craig Ely, a research wildlife
biologist with the U.S. Geological
Survey’s Alaska Science Center,
said T186 was banded July 27,
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
1
5
10
14
15
16
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19
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21
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30
31
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37
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45
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54
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59
60
61
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65
ACROSS
Jazz singer
Simone
Colorado ski
resort
Apple computer
with a Magic
Keyboard
Ambulancecalling situation:
abbr.
Take off
Fizzy drink
Cold dish
topped with
hard-boiled egg
Grasp
Sent to the
canvas
Japanese
beef city
Wisdom
tooth, e.g.
Having many
curves
Longtime Susan
Lucci soap role
Bully’s warning
words
A cat may
climb one
Beginning
Skater’s surface
Tiny amount
Place for pillow
talk
It clicks on the
dance floor
Crown installer’s
org.
Picked out of a
lineup, briefly
Fizzy drink
“Here’s the
deal ...”
Metal in steel
Hire, as a
lawyer
Appear
intermittently
Nocturnal calls
Wonderland
visitor
Simplify
Tiny insect egg
Bread for a gyro
It may be a
boundary
between
neighboring
countries ... or
what each set of
circles depicts?
Nights before
Confess
2006, in the Colville River Delta —
one of Alaska’s five tundra swan
breeding areas.
Scientists keep track of Julia
with the help of observers notifying USGS when they see her. Tundra swans are flightless briefly
during the summer as they shed
their flight feathers (or molt) and
grow new ones, so Alaska researchers were able to recapture
Julia in 2009 while testing wild
birds for avian flu. (She was fine.)
Birds on the move
Many birds migrate, but some
tundra swans spend most of the
year traveling to and from breeding grounds. Those from Julia’s
home travel the farthest, wintering in Maryland, Virginia and
North Carolina. Those from Alaska’s western shore winter in Washington state, Oregon and Northern California. Tundras from Alaska’s lower peninsula don’t migrate
at all.
Park in Lorton, Virginia, said tundra swans have soothing three-syllable, high-pitched calls.
Also, look at the lores — the area
below the eyes and above the bill.
U.S. tundra swans have small yellow spots on their lores, while
those of trumpeters are usually all
black. The young of both — called
cygnets (pronounced SIG-nets) —
have grayish bodies and some
pink on their bills.
ANN CAMERON SIEGAL
A tundra swan nicknamed Julia, above, paddles with travel mates,
top left, in Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay. Each year, tundra swans
follow migration routes, top right, from Alaska to warmer states.
“It’s something in their DNA,”
Ely said, explaining the different
routes. He and other researchers
wondered whether distance traveled affected swan survival and
breeding rates, but in 2016, they
concluded it wasn’t a major factor.
Tundra vs. trumpeter swans
North America’s two native
swan species have white bodies,
with black bills and feet. Adult
tundras weigh 15 to 17 pounds and
have six- to seven-foot wingspans.
The larger trumpeter swans,
found mostly in the Midwest,
occasionally show up in the MidAtlantic.
You can easily tell these species
apart by their vocalizations. Trumpeters, as their name suggests,
sound as if they’re tooting horns
loudly. Lee Hendrik, 24, a park
naturalist at Mason Neck State
Family life
Swans mate for life and can
breed at 3 to 4 years old. Cygnets
stay with their parents for the first
year to learn the migration route.
Julia doesn’t appear to have a
mate yet, but wild swans can live
for more than 20 years.
“Tundra swans are so tied into
water resources that changes in
climate and wetlands can really
affect them,” Ely said. “It’s one
demonstration of how wetland
conservation is important.” Still,
they have proved to be very adaptable to changing climate conditions, he said.
As to Julia’s continued appearances in Maryland, “she has good
habits,” Ely said. “Whatever she’s
doing, she’s doing it well.”
Where to see
tundra swans
Tundra swans usually winter in the
Mid-Atlantic — on the bay, lakes
and marshes — until early March.
Mason Neck Wildlife Refuge,
Lorton: About 200 tundras were
seen recently in the cove at the
Woodmarsh or Great Marsh Trail
overlooks. The refuge is open
daily, and entry is free, but there is
a charge for the adjacent state
park. wapo.st/MasonNeck.
Eastern Neck National Wildlife
Refuge, Rock Hall, Maryland: The
population ranged from 265 to
872 in January. Check out the
tundra swan boardwalk by the
bridge at the park’s entrance.
Open daily, and entry is free.
wapo.st/EasternNeck.
Compare sounds
of tundra and
trumpeter swans
Tundra: wapo.st/tundraswan
Trumpeter: wapo.st/trumpeterswan
kidspost@washpost.com
The in-laws across the political divide
By C.C. Burnikel
Adapted from
a recent online
discussion.
Hi, Carolyn: My
husband and I
have planned a
vacation in a few
months that
includes spending
several days with his parents. I
love his parents. In the 10 years
we’ve been together, they’ve been
nothing but pleasant.
That is, until about two years
ago, when they both retired,
giving them way too much time
to spend watching the news and
on social media. My mother-inlaw spends all day on Facebook.
Both have become very vocal in
their political beliefs, which are
on the opposite end from where
my husband and I sit.
We are going to be spending at
least three, possibly more, days in
their home on this trip. I would
shorten it, but my husband gets
to see them only once a year. A
hotel room is not an option, as
the small town they live in
doesn’t have one and the closest
are too far away to be practical.
I combated the political talk
on our last visit with a “no
politics” rule, which mostly
worked. But they’ve gotten only
worse since then. My husband
can’t have a 20-minute phone
conversation with his mom
without it turning to politics. It’s
all she has to talk about.
I know this trip is months out,
but I’m already starting to stress
about it. Any suggestions will be
helpful.
— Political Prisoner
Carolyn
Hax
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
66 Radar screen spot
67 Take a break
68 Medicinal
amounts
69 Flies on a fast
plane
DOWN
1 Mandolin parts
2 Bit of gratitude
from an award
recipient
3 Driver’s
invitation
4 [I want a treat!]
5 As well
6 Naval builder
7 Not as tanned
8 Juan Perón’s wife
9 Homer Simpson’s
friend Flanders
10 “The pressure
was too much
for me”
11 Greenbacks
12 Hunter
Quatermain of
“The League of
Extraordinary
Gentlemen”
13 Close-knit group
18 Like greenhouses
22 West of old films
24 Brewery
container
26 Rash symptom
27 New Orleans
cuisine
29 Attach with
a click
31 Back-tied sash
32 Co. for web
users
34 Underlying
reason
2/6/18
35 Police artist’s
composite
pic maker
36 Blackball
39 Duck’s
habitat
40 “Your choice”
43 Like many
metal toys
46 __ Tomé
48 Singer Carly __
Jepsen
49 Rock band’s
helper
50 Zany adventure
51 Martini fruit
52 Tiny parasites
53 Causes of illness
55 Fitbit units
58 Film backdrops
61 No longer edible
62 Prefix with meter
63 Prez whose
library is in Austin
MONDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Political Prisoner: I’m sorry. I
think we all can relate at this
point.
But: By dwelling on this now,
you’ve extended an
uncomfortable several days into
months of stress.
No matter how bad it is, it’s
just a few days, and will end.
Even if your means of coping is
to stand in the middle of the
room and yell “STOP IT STOP IT
STOP IT” until the gathering
descends into total mayhem, it’s
just a few days, and will end.
It will be fine.
You will be fine. Maybe
miserable for a while, but fine.
So you have two options for
handling the trip in a rational
manner: Either put off thinking
about it until you actually
embark on the visit, figuring
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
BY
USGS ALASKA SCIENCE CENTER
you’ll just tough it out — or
spend a day or so discussing a
few strategies with your husband
now so you don’t have to think
about it anymore. “I’m stressing
about this. I want to make a plan
early so I can be free not to think
about again.”
May I suggest:
Leave the room. Every time.
Go for a walk, do the dishes, grab
a book and retreat to the guest
room.
“Please, let’s not talk about
politics.” Repeat verbatim as
needed.
Talking about politics. It
might unravel quickly, but
maybe that’s preferable to
mounting tension and weather
talk.
Whatever you decide, just
decide. Torturing yourself for
months now over a few days then
just defies logic and wears you
down.
And as with anything
stressful, try finding a positive
side, too, even in a small way —
like with your in-laws. Where do
you agree? Or tune up your
coping skills. What calms you:
good books, movies, music,
dance, exercise, friends, comedy,
yoga, meditation, good deeds?
Why just get by when you can get
better?
Re: Prisoner: Would it be better
if his parents were pestering you
about having children?
— Anonymous
Anonymous: Ooh, I think I know
this one:
Yes.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
Eagles’
Foles is
staying in
moment
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
Wizards
notch
fifth win
in a row
With a personality perfect for the times and her Korean heritage,
snowboarder Chloe Kim, 17, is about to rule the Winter Games
Future is uncertain
for Super Bowl MVP
with Wentz returning
BY
WIZARDS 111,
PACERS 102
Minus Wall, team is tied
for third place in East
K IMBERLEY A . M ARTIN
bloomington, minn. — Along
BY
this indescribable, unforgettable
journey full of self-doubt and
self-discovery, Nick Foles learned
a valuable lesson about himself,
the business of football and the
redeeming power of failure.
There were so many times he
had fallen short of his goals, so
many times he had failed to meet
expectations, so many times
when he wasn’t sure where his
path would lead.
But as he stood on the podium
during the morning-after Super
Bowl news conference Monday,
in between the Vince Lombardi
and Pete Rozelle trophies, Foles
spoke of how embracing the
struggle and finding beauty in
the setbacks can transform a life
and even a football career.
“The big thing is: Don’t be
afraid to fail,” said Foles, who was
named the Super Bowl’s most
valuable player after throwing
for three touchdowns and catching a touchdown pass on a perfectly executed trick play in the
Eagles’ thrilling 41-33 victory
over the New England Patriots on
Sunday night in Super Bowl LII.
“Failure is a part of life; that’s a
part of building character and
growing. Without failure, who
would you be?” asked Foles, who
was traded from Philadelphia in
March 2015, re-signed with the
Eagles two years later to serve as
Carson Wentz’s backup and was
then propelled into the starting
role after Wentz suffered a season-
SEAN M. HAFFEY/GETTY IMAGES
PYEONGCHANG 2018
The sky’s the limit
BY
R ICK M AESE
Chloe Kim’s appeal is easy to understand. With a snowboard strapped to her feet, she can
twirl and flip and generally send eyeballs rattling in sockets better than any teenage girl
who has set foot on snow. A four-time X Games champion, she already might be an
Olympic medalist if rules didn’t bar her from competing at the Sochi Games four years ago
as a 13-year-old. ¶ But talent is only part of the equation. Kim comes equipped with a
bubbly personality — candid, eager and relatable — and a Korean heritage that makes her
marketable at home and abroad. NBC long ago tabbed her as one of the faces of the
PyeongChang Games, featuring her in a promotion that aired during the Super Bowl. Nike
plans to feature her in a campaign on the ground in South Korea this month, and among
her myriad sponsors is a South Korean-based cosmetics company. Oh, and she speaks
English, French and Korean. ¶ “You’d be hard-pressed to create a more promising brand
spokeswoman in a lab,” Sports Business Journal declared this month. ¶ How unique and
marketable is she? Consider this: Kim obtained her California driving permit in
November 2015. Barely five months passed before she signed a major sponsorship deal
KIM CONTINUED ON D5
with Toyota, just days after her 16th birthday.
Rulings
on catches
get a good
reception
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D6
Capitals
sticking
to the plan
with Orlov
Defenseman on track
to be one of NHL’s elite
Chatty SoCal teen Chloe Kim hits PyeongChang with an active social media presence
and unlimited athletic potential. Now the world will get to know her.
minneapolis — It was another
seconds of this Monday night
matchup, every player on the
Washington Wizards’ bench
stood. They were witnessing
something special — at least for
this season.
The Wizards’ 111-102 victory
over the Indiana Pacers secured
Washington’s first five-game winning streak of the 2017-18 campaign.
Many expected Washington to
crash without injured all-star
point guard John Wall, but the
Wizards have responded to his
absence by committing to their
team depth. Eight Wizards scored
in double figures inside Bankers
Life Fieldhouse on Monday as
Washington beat a playoff contender for the third time during
its streak.
“It’s fun. It’s the game of basketball. Everybody can share the
wealth,” reserve forward Kelly Oubre Jr. said before smiling and
dropping the team’s new catchphrase. “Everybody eats, you
know.”
Indeed, the Wizards are eating.
When Bradley Beal first used
the line, it became a source of
controversy because some people
outside of the Wizards’ locker
room took it as a shot at Wall. But
Wizards at 76ers
Today, 8 p.m., TNT, NBCSW Plus
M ARK M ASKE
season with “What’s a catch?”
intrigue in the NFL, so much so
that Commissioner Roger Goodell said last week he wants the
league’s rulemakers to start from
scratch this offseason in rewriting the now-infamous, often-confounding catch rule.
So it was only natural that four
days after Goodell made that
proclamation at his annual stateof-the-league address, the season’s biggest game included two
significant instant replay reviews
of catches that played major roles
in determining the outcome.
Fortunately for the Philadelphia Eagles, both rulings went in
their favor, upholding two touchdowns as they beat the New
England Patriots, 41-33, in a highly entertaining Super Bowl LII on
Sunday night.
Just as fortunately for the NFL,
both rulings were correct, regardless of what analyst Cris Collinsworth said during the NBC
broadcast or what Patriots fans
may have thought.
Tight end Zach Ertz’s go-ahead
touchdown for the Eagles with a
little more than two minutes to
play was followed by the replay
review that comes after any scoring play. There was some reason
for the Eagles to be wary, given
that Ertz lunged for the end zone
at the end of the play and held out
the football, which hit the turf
and came free from Ertz’s grasp.
Was this another case in which
C ANDACE B UCKNER
indianapolis — For the final
MVP CONTINUED ON D3
BY
D
M2
BY
Where have all the American skaters gone?
U.S. women have not captured gold in Olympic figure skating since 2002
BY L IZ C LARKE
IN GANGNEUNG, SOUTH KOREA
Kimmie Meissner spent her
childhood trying to keep up with
three older brothers in soccer
and lacrosse, so they’d let her
join their teams. After figure
skating became her passion, she
tried keeping up with the best in
the world.
“I definitely wanted to push
the sport a little bit technically,”
says Meissner, 28, explaining the
impact of seeing Japan’s Miki
Ando practice a quadruple jump
at her first junior world championships, in 2004. “I thought, ‘I
need to push myself. I need to
start going for it.’ ”
The result catapulted Meissner to gold at figure skating’s
2006 world championships. She
also became only the second
American woman (after Tonya
Harding in 1991) to land the risky
MATTHEW STOCKMAN/GETTY IMAGES
Bradie Tennell, 20, won gold at last month’s U.S.
championships and leads this year’s Olympic squad.
triple axel in competition.
But since then, no female U.S.
figure skater has won a world
championship. The gold medal
drought for American women
has lasted longer on the Olympic
stage — dating from the 2002 Salt
Lake City Games, where Sarah
Hughes, an 11th-grade honors
student from Long Island, edged
Russia’s Irina Slutskaya as Olympic champion. Since then, Olympic gold in women’s figure skating has belonged to Russia and
Japan.
If a figure skating generation
is six years, as veteran coach
Audrey Weisiger believes, it has
been nearly three generations
since American women dominated the Olympic discipline that 50
years ago was synonymous with
California’s Peggy Fleming.
After Fleming’s gold at the 1968
Grenoble Games, a subsequent
SKATE CONTINUED ON D5
J ESSE D OUGHERTY
If there are any glimpses into
the future, of what may result
from the years-long process to
push Dmitry Orlov to the peak of
his potential, they were evident in
an otherwise discouraging threegoal loss to the Pittsburgh Penguins on Friday night.
There was the Washington Capitals defenseman matching up
with star center Sidney Crosby
and the Penguins’ top line for most
of the game. There was Orlov asserting himself into the offense by
trailing the rush as a quasi-fourth
forward, knocking the puck
around the zone and seeking opportunities to fire shots at the net.
There was his slap shot that found
the net, launched by his swinging
stick and past Pittsburgh’s Matt
Murray before the goaltender
even began to react.
That is the Orlov the Capitals
are molding, and they don’t think
he is far from achieving a place
among the NHL’s top defensemen.
The 5-foot-11, 212-pound blue-liner is following a meticulous plan
that Capitals assistant coach Todd
Reirden believes will ultimately
establish Orlov in that upper echelon of defenders, as a player who
shuts down top lines, consistently
produces on offense and contribCAPITALS CONTINUED ON D6
Capitals at Blue Jackets
Today, 7 p.m., NBCSW
SUPER BOWL CONTINUED ON D3
OLYMPICS
SUPER BOWL
OLYMPICS
HIGH SCHOOLS
Kim Hyon-hui killed 115 people before
the last Korean Games. She wonders if
her sins can ever be forgiven. A1
The Eagles’ victory brings both chaos
and catharsis to a passionate fan base
in Philadelphia. A1
Coming out gave figure skater Adam
Rippon a feeling of freedom both on and
off the ice. D4
Our weekly area roundup includes
stories from around the region and new
boys’ and girls’ hoops rankings. D7
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
D.C. SPORTS BOG
FANCY STATS
EARLY LEAD
With win
by Eagles,
Vegas took
a beating
New role
for Cousins,
thanks to
fake Trump
BY
S COTT A LLEN
Redskins quarterback Kirk
Cousins and President Trump
impersonator John Di Domenico
starred in one of the more bizarre ads during Sunday’s Super
Bowl, a 30-second spot that aired
in the D.C. metro area and required some creative post-production tinkering. The commercial for gas fireplaces was shot
more than two weeks ago, before
the Redskins’ trade for Kansas
City Chiefs quarterback Alex
Smith effectively signaled the
end of Cousins’s tenure in Washington.
“We had so many different
versions of our commercial
based on what was happening
with the news,” Virginia-based
Cyprus Air co-owner Peter Demetriou said Monday. “We made
our final decision on what we
wanted to use on Thursday and
then made the final edits.”
The final version of the ad may
be the final time that Cousins,
who is expected to become a free
agent, appears in a Redskins
uniform. In it, the quarterback
encourages fake Trump, who has
apparently been kicked out of the
White House by the first lady for
installing a coal-burning fireplace, to consider buying a gas
fireplace. Trump returns the favor by offering Cousins a new
position in his administration.
“Sneaky Alex stole your job, so
I’m appointing you secretary of
offense,” fake Trump says, coining a new nickname for Smith.
The extended version of Sunday’s ad was among the top 30
trending videos on YouTube on
Monday morning. “It’s a huge
response,” Demetriou said.
Demetriou had expressed
hope that Cousins, who played
the past two seasons on the
franchise tag, would remain with
the Redskins for the 2018 season.
But he doesn’t hate the acquisition of “Sneaky Alex.”
“Kirk Cousins is one of my
favorite players, but I will say I’m
a big fan of Alex Smith, as well,
and I think he’ll do fantastic
here,” Demetriou said.
scott.allen@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog
QUOTABLE
“Daddy won five times.
They never won before.
. . . You have to let
someone else
win sometimes.”
GISELE BÜNDCHEN,
supermodel and wife to the Patriots’
Tom Brady, as she was consoling
their 5-year-old daughter, Vivian, after
Sunday’s Super Bowl loss, according
to USA Today. (via Early Lead)
BY
ROB CARR/GETTY IMAGES
Entering Sunday night’s loss to the Eagles, the Patriots had been 69-1 when Tom Brady’s passer rating was 115 or better.
Life after Brady nears for Patriots
BY
N EIL G REENBERG
The New England Patriots have been
an NFL powerhouse for almost two
decades. But Sunday’s Super Bowl LII
loss to the Philadelphia Eagles raised
some red flags about their future, and
Coach Bill Belichick and the front office
have significant concerns to address in
the offseason — none bigger than their
quarterback succession plan.
Yes, Tom Brady said before the game
that he would return for the 2018 season,
but as well as he played as a 40-year-old,
he can’t play forever. And that stellar
play is precisely the reason the Patriots
should be so concerned: Brady has been
covering up a lot of warts.
Think about this for a second: Brady
threw for 505 yards, three touchdowns
and no interceptions for a 115.4 passer
rating, yet found himself on the losing
end. Before that performance, the
Patriots were 5-1 when Brady threw for at
least 400 yards, two touchdowns and no
interceptions. They had been 69-1 when
Brady’s passer rating was 115 or better,
with the lone loss coming at the hands of
Peyton Manning and the Indianapolis
Colts in Week 9 of 2005.
The question becomes what the
Patriots will look like with a quarterback
not named Brady under center —
particularly after they parted with
backup Jimmy Garoppolo in a trade
during the season. A dip from Brady to
an average quarterback could carry
considerable consequences.
Brady turns 41 in August, and it’s fair
to expect his performance to start to dip.
Since the merger in 1970, there have been
three quarterbacks to throw at least 200
passes in a season at 41 or older. Warren
Moon did it in 1997 and 1998, and Vinny
Testaverde (2004) and Brett Favre (2010)
did it once each. If we lower the bar to 100
attempts at 41 or older, we add two more
seasons from Testaverde (2005 and
2007), plus a year of Doug Flutie (2003).
If Brady were to regress quickly,
before the Patriots can install a suitable
backup, the franchise could falter. Brian
Whenever Father Time
catches up to the 40-year-old,
it may be ugly in New England
Hoyer, who finished the season as
Brady’s backup, has a career 83.3 passer
rating, which would be considered
below-average performance since 2012.
Odds are that Hoyer will not be Brady’s
successor. Still, the Patriots have to find a
quarterback who is better than average if
they want to maintain their status as the
perennial favorites to win the AFC East
and challenge for a spot in the Super
Bowl. That could be tricky, at least in the
short term.
Since 2002, there have been just five
rookie quarterbacks who have thrown at
least 300 passes in their first year while
also maintaining an above-average
passer rating: Dak Prescott, Marcus
Mariota, Robert Griffin III, Russell
Wilson and Matt Ryan. Just 26 passers
out of 69 (37.7 percent) who have
changed teams since 2002 — via trade or
free agency — both qualified for the
passer rating title and produced an
above-average passer rating for their
new team in their first season.
Even a tumble to average quarterback
production (or worse) could be
extremely problematic. The collective
record of below-average quarterbacks
(by passer rating) is 1,289-1,787 since
2002 for a winning percentage of .393,
equaling a 6-10 record over a 16-game
season.
Dubbed the “Mother of All Stats”
during the 2012 Pro Football
Researchers Association meeting, net
passer rating during the regular season
has been a litmus test for Super Bowlcaliber teams. Since 2002, 23 of the past
32 Super Bowl participants, including 11
of the past 16 winners, had a net passer
rating differential among the top five in
the league. The Eagles just made the cut
at fifth (plus-18.1), while the Patriots
finished at 10th (plus-13.1) after an MVPcaliber performance from Brady (102.8
passer rating, third-highest in 2017). Sub
in average passer performance — or
worse — and New England’s
championship potential looks even
gloomier; the Patriots would have
ranked 18th.
As constructed, so much of New
England’s offense flows through its
passing game. Through the lens of
expected points added — the difference
between how many points per game an
offense scores compared with what we
would expect after taking into account
down, distance and field position —
Brady and his receivers added a leaguehigh 7.3 more points per game than
expected in 2017. The rest of the league
managed just 0.6 added points per game.
Since 2001, Brady’s first year as a starter,
no passing offense has been more
prolific (6.6 expected points added via
passing plays). Offenses led by league
average quarterbacks (2.0 expected
points added) were significantly less
successful.
Not only would the Patriots’ offense
take a huge step back if Brady fails to
maintain his MVP-caliber performance,
the surrounding cast could change
significantly, too. Running backs Dion
Lewis (the third-best rusher per Pro
Football Focus in 2017) and Rex
Burkhead, wide receiver Danny
Amendola (the second-best receiver in
the playoffs, per PFF) and left tackle Nate
Solder are free agents. Plus, Pro Bowl
tight end Rob Gronkowski has said his
future with the team is uncertain.
Maybe Gronkowski returns and the
team finds other players to make plays.
But the more likely scenario is this: We
just witnessed the beginning of the end
of the Belichick/Brady era. Eventually,
Father Time is going to catch up with
Brady. When he does, it could bring some
rare down years in New England.
neil.greenberg@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
news/fancy-stats
Free agent third baseman Todd
Frazier is switching sides close to
home, set to join the New York
Mets and take over a spot that’s
been in flux since David Wright
was first injured.
A person familiar with the deal
told the Associated Press on
Monday night that Frazier and
the Mets had agreed on a twoyear contract for $17 million. The
person spoke on condition of
anonymity because the deal was
still pending a physical.
Frazier, who was a 1998 Little
League World Series champion in
nearby Toms River, N.J., and later
starred at Rutgers, finished last
season with the New York
Yankees.
The Yankees got him last July
in a trade with the Chicago White
Sox, and Frazier hit a combined
.213 with 27 home runs, 76 RBI
and a .344 on-base percentage.
Popular wherever he’s been, the
spirited Frazier has always drawn
cheers from local fans when
playing in the New York area.
“I love playing at home,”
Frazier said last year after he was
traded to the Yankees, his favorite
matt.bonesteel@washpost.com
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
8 p.m.
Frazier leaves Yankees
to join crosstown Mets
Entering Sunday’s Super Bowl,
Las Vegas’s sportsbooks had come
out ahead in 25 of the previous 27
NFL title games. And while we
have yet to see official numbers
from the casinos after this year’s
game, anecdotal evidence seems
to suggest the books had a rough
Sunday night.
According to ESPN’s David
Payne Purdum, the oddsmakers
were hoping for two things to happen: The Patriots to cover the
spread, and the game to go under
the over/under point total.
Neither happened. The underdog Eagles won outright, 41-33,
and the score raced past the over/
under total of 49 late in the third
quarter.
And if the spread and the total
didn’t hurt the books, the prop
bets made before an offensively
explosive game certainly did.
“I’d be doing a lot better if I
didn’t have to grade over, over,
over on both teams on the proposition bets,” Treasure Island sportsbook director Tony Nevill told
Covers.com. “This was a horrible
outcome, and one of the few times
where the props were so disastrous that it ruined the whole day.”
Purdum checked in with various sportsbooks and posted their
estimates on Twitter:
William Hill: A “multimillion
dollar” loss.
Westgate SuperBook: A small
win overall, but props were “really
bad.”
CG Technology: A six-figure
loss.
Caesars: A seven-figure win
thanks to some late-arriving money on the Patriots.
MGM Grand: A “very modest
win,” according to Covers.com’s
Patrick Everson.
Wynn: A loss on the game.
If there was a saving grace, it’s
that some bettors anticipated a
Patriots second-half comeback,
just as New England roared back
from a 28-3 deficit to win the
Super Bowl over Atlanta a season
earlier. So the in-game bets came
in on New England at halftime,
mitigating the books’ losses.
The unnamed gambler nicknamed “Bettor X,” who reportedly
took the books for $10 million
after a crazy run of success gambling on the World Series, had a
big hand in the books’ losses. He
made a string of large wagers on
the Eagles moneyline at a number
of books, according to ESPN, cashing all of them. One of the bets was
a $3 million wager at the MGM
Grand, the largest bet ever taken
at that casino on a sporting event.
Jay Rood, MGM Resorts vice president of race and sports, told Covers the bet was made in the +150 to
+180 range (meaning a bet of $100
would win $150 or $180), implying
a win on a $3 million wager would
yield between $4.5 million and
$5.4 million.
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
DIG ES T
BASEBALL
M ATT B ONESTEEL
team as a kid.
Frazier hit 35 homers for
Cincinnati in 2015 and won the
Home Run Derby. He set career
highs with 40 homers and 98 RBI
for the White Sox in 2016.
A steady defender his whole
career, the two-time all-star turns
32 next week. . . .
Agent Scott Boras said the
number of major league teams
rebuilding with younger, lowercost rosters has become a cancer
to the sport, attributing behavior
to the strengthened luxury tax
combining with restraints on
draft-pick salaries.
Boras attributes baseball’s
attendance drop to an increase in
noncompetitive teams, predicts
fans from perennial losers will
increasingly stay away from
ballparks until ticket prices are
cut and says regional sports
networks will negotiate lower
rights fees with teams going into
rebuild cycles.
J.D. Martinez, Mike
Moustakas, Eric Hosmer and
Jake Arrieta, all Boras clients,
remain unsigned 10 days before
spring training in a historically
slow market. He said the luxury
tax, envisioned by Commissioner
Bud Selig to increase competitive
balance, is having the opposite
effect. He claims incentives are
needed to winning, such as
increasing draft-pick money
based on victories.
“They decided we’re going to
have the 12 teams-a-tanking, if
you will, and therefore you’ve got
a noncompetitive cancer and this
is completely opposite of what
Commissioner Selig in good-faith
sought in bargaining,” Boras said
in an interview. . . .
World Series MVP George
Springer and the Houston Astros
avoided salary arbitration by
agreeing to a two-year, $24
million contract.
SOCCER
Antonio Conte’s future as
Chelsea’s manager was cast into
further doubt as his 10 men were
thrashed by host Watford, 4-1, in
the English Premier League.
Conte called on Chelsea’s
hierarchy to “prepare a statement
. . . to say they trust me in my
work” ahead of the game but it
was another dismal evening for
the defending champion, which is
19 points behind Manchester City.
Chelsea, which lost at home to
Bournemouth, 3-0, last week, was
poor again, especially after
Tiemoue Bakayoko was sent off
inside half an hour for a second
yellow card for a second woeful
tackle.
Watford hadn’t won since Dec.
26. . . .
Italy under-21 Coach Luigi Di
Biagio was promoted to take over
the senior national team on a
caretaker basis for friendlies
against Argentina and England
next month.
The Azzurri have been without
a coach since November, when
Gian Piero Ventura was fired
following a playoff loss to Sweden
that ruled Italy out of the World
Cup for the first time in six
decades. . . .
Even with help from the video
assistant referee, Lazio lost for
the second straight week in Serie
A.
Diego Laxalt leaped above
Lazio defender Patric to score
with a bouncing header in injury
time as visiting Genoa won, 2-1.
Ten minutes earlier, Laxalt
thought he had already scored
the go-ahead goal but the score
was waved off after video replays
showed the Genoa midfielder
used his hand to control the ball
before scoring. . . .
Substitute Alen Halilovic
scored late for Las Palmas to beat
relegation rival Malaga, 1-0, in the
Spanish league.
MISC.
Rafael Nadal said he is on
10:30 p.m.
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track to returning to the ATP Tour
in Acapulco this month.
The top-ranked Nadal said he
is recovering well from the left leg
muscle injury that forced him to
retire in the Australian Open
quarterfinals last month. He was
in the fifth set against eventual
finalist Marin Cilic.
Nadal said he is undergoing
intensive treatment to make sure
he is fit to play in the Mexico
event, which starts Feb. 26. . . .
Australian center Liz Cambage
signed a multiyear contract with
the Dallas Wings, returning to the
WNBA franchise that drafted her
second overall seven years ago. A
two-time Olympian for Australia,
she became the first woman to
dunk in an Olympic game in 2012.
— From news services
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
NFL NOTES
Lions make
it o∞cial,
hire Pats’
Patricia
A SSOCIATED P RESS
The Detroit Lions hired Matt
Patricia on Monday, doubling
down on the franchise’s hope it
can copy the New England Patriots’ formula for success.
The expected hiring of the defensive coordinator came a day
after the Patriots lost to Philadelphia in the Super Bowl.
“This position comes with
great responsibility, and I will
commit every ounce of my energy
to this football team, starting today,” Patricia said in a statement
released by the team.
Lions General Manager Bob
Quinn made the move, reuniting
with someone he worked with in
New England for more than a
decade.
“He has been preparing for this
opportunity his entire career, and
he’s ready for the responsibility
and its challenges,” Quinn said.
The Lions plan to formally introduce him at a news conference
Wednesday.
Quinn fired coach Jim Caldwell
last month with a record eight
games above .500 over four years
and postseason appearances in
2016 and 2014. The Lions went 9-7
this season and missed the playoffs.
Patricia was the Patriots’ defensive coordinator for six seasons,
ending with his unit giving up 41
points and 538 yards to the Eagles.
“Obviously, I didn’t do a good
enough job here with the defense,”
he told reporters Sunday night.
The 43-year-old Patricia was on
Bill Belichick’s staff for 14 seasons,
overlapping with Quinn for many
years. Quinn was a part of the
Patriots’ personnel department
for 16 years before Detroit gave
him his first shot to be an NFL
general manager.
Patricia’s top task in Detroit
may be helping it establish a good
running game.
The Lions ranked among the
NFL’s worst in rushing offense in
each of the previous four years
under Caldwell, who was fired last
month with a 36-28 record, plus
two postseason losses with the
franchise.
“Now I turn all of my attention
to the Lions,” Patricia said. “I look
forward to the next chapter of my
career in Detroit.”
PATRIOTS: Bill Belichick
was no more forthcoming Monday about his surprise benching of
one-time Super Bowl star Malcolm Butler.
Speaking on a conference call
the day after the New England
blew its chance at a sixth NFL title
with a 41-33 loss to the Eagles,
Belichick said, “There are a lot of
things that go into that.” He declined to be specific.
Butler’s interception in the end
zone in the final minute of the
Super Bowl against Seattle
clinched New England’s 2014 title.
He had been one of the Patriots’
steadiest players this season, appearing in 98 percent of the defensive snaps and starting 17 of 18
games this season.
But the defensive back made it
on the field for only one play
Sunday — on special teams. He
appeared to be crying during the
national anthem. And after the
game, he told ESPN that he “could
have changed that game.”
Belichick said: “I respect Malcolm’s competitiveness, and I’m
sure that he felt like he could have
helped. I’m sure other players felt
the same way.”
Butler was not available to the
media after the team’s buses returned to their home stadium
Monday afternoon. Only a few
dozen fans were waiting to greet
them.
Only one player commented,
defensive lineman Eric Lee.
“That doesn’t concern me at
all,” he said when asked about
Butler’s benching. “I’m the wrong
person to talk to about that.”
Butler is an unrestricted free
agent this offseason. He’s one of
many holes the team would need
to fill from a defense that gave up
538 yards in the Super Bowl.
RAIDERS: Oakland released
former starting cornerback David
Amerson in the first significant
move since Jon Gruden took over
as coach last month.
The Raiders announced the
move to cut ties with Amerson
before his $5.5 million salary for
2018 would have been fully guaranteed later this week.
Amerson was a revelation after
being claimed off waivers from
Washington early in the 2015 season. He started 14 games for Oakland that year and set a franchise
record with 26 passes defensed
and added a career-high four interceptions.
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
Eagles, Foles will enjoy present, mull future later
MVP FROM D1
ending knee injury in December.
“I wouldn’t be up here if I hadn’t
fallen thousands of times and
made mistakes. . . . When you look
at a struggle in your life, just know
that’s just an opportunity for your
character to grow.”
Foles completed an impressive
77 of 106 passes (72.6 percent)
during the Eagles’ playoff run.
Only two other quarterbacks in
history had a higher completion
percentage in a single postseason
(minimum of 75 attempts): Joe
Montana and Troy Aikman. Both
are in the Hall of Fame.
Foles, however, isn’t even
guaranteed to be on the Eagles’
roster in 2018.
Less than 12 hours after Philadelphia pulled off the improbable by defeating the defending
champions, Coach Doug Pederson was pressed on his somewhat
complicated quarterback situation. The team that belonged to
Wentz won a Super Bowl on the
arm strength and accuracy of
Foles, a backup-turned-starter
who outdueled future Hall of
Famer Tom Brady. With Wentz
coming off major knee surgery,
it’s unclear when he’ll return to
action. But the Eagles, who don’t
have a second- or third-round
pick in this year’s draft, likely will
field trade offers for their No. 2
quarterback.
“I knew I couldn’t get off the
stage without that question,”
Pederson joked. “You know
what? We’re just going to enjoy
this moment. I’m going to tell
you right now: We’re going to
enjoy it. We’re going to get on this
plane and go back to Philadelphia, and we’re going to celebrate
with our fans back in Philly.
We’ve got a long offseason —
really a short offseason now.
We’re just going to enjoy this
moment.
“I’m happy for Nick,” added
the coach, whose team will celebrate on the streets of Philadelphia during Thursday morning’s
ELSA/GETTY IMAGES
“I’m not really worried about my future right now,” Super Bowl MVP Nick Foles said. “ I’m just living in the moment. I’m not thinking ahead.”
championship parade. “I’m happy for the team. It’s not about one
guy. It’s about the team. We’re
going to enjoy these next few
days.”
Foles said as much, too, reiterating that he is not concerned
about what next season will
bring. “I’m not really worried
about my future right now,” he
said. “There will be a time and
place to handle all that. But I take
a lot of pride in wearing the
Philadelphia Eagles jersey. . . .
I’m excited for Carson Wentz
coming back healthy. I get to
work with him every day. Dude’s
a stud. I’m just living in the
moment. I’m not thinking
ahead.”
In fairness, this team was never his. Foles was merely the fill-in
tasked with keeping the offense
on track and the team together
after the devastating loss of its
star quarterback. And the Eagles,
a team that appears to be on the
verge of building something special in South Philly, have already
begun envisioning championship seasons with Wentz under
center.
“I had a chance to talk to
Carson actually on the field, on
the podium, last night after the
game and just told him to take
this in, just enjoy this moment,”
Pederson said. “He’s a great quarterback and he’s a big reason. I
told him, ‘You’re a big, big part of
why this team won this championship and won this game.’ I told
him that hopefully we’ll be back
in this game with him leading the
way.”
While 31 other NFL teams
have eagerly turned the page on
the 2017 season, the Eagles are
content to revel in their success
just a little while longer. Foles,
especially.
As he said all last week, this
journey was about the importance of faith, family and football
in his life. And on Sunday all
three converged in an indescribable, unforgettable moment for a
man who proved under the spotlight’s hot glare that he always
was more than just a backup.
What is a catch? NFL seems to have right answer.
SUPER BOWL FROM D1
the Calvin Johnson rule — the
dreaded requirement that a player who goes to the ground while
in the process of making a catch
maintains control of the football
while on the turf to be awarded a
legal catch — would come into
play? Was this a reenactment of
Dez Bryant’s notorious non-catch
during the NFC playoffs a few
years ago? Or the non-catch by
the Pittsburgh Steelers’ Jesse
James that pretty much decided
the outcome of their loss to the
Patriots in December that, in
turn, all but decided the top seed
in the AFC playoffs?
Nope. And here’s why: Ertz
didn’t go to the ground while
making the catch. He made the
catch, took a few steps and became, under the rules, a runner.
So once he got the football across
the goal line, it was a touchdown.
Whatever happened thereafter
didn’t matter. (Of course, Bryant
basically became a runner himself. But there’s no righting that
wrong.)
“You can’t really worry about it
because at the end of the day, it’s a
weird rule,” Eagles wide receiver
Nelson Agholor said. “But, like,
the guy catches a slant . . . takes it
two steps and then on his own
will dives in to score. It’s a touchdown. It’s obvious.”
Since when did that mean
anything?
This time, apparently.
“Control, two feet, on his feet
turned upfield, he is then a runner,” former NFL officiating czar
Mike Pereira wrote on Twitter.
“That is a clear touchdown. Surprised it took so long” to uphold.
Dean Blandino, who had that
job after Pereira and before current occupant Al Riveron, agreed,
writing on Twitter: “He had the
ball long enough to be a runner
and then went to the ground. Call
should stand.”
Pereira and Blandino have not
been anything close to a rubberstamping rooting section this
season for Riveron, who became
the NFL’s senior vice president of
officiating after Blandino left the
league to join Pereira as a rules
analyst for Fox. That change
came at a difficult time for the
NFL’s officiating department, given that owners decided last
March to give Blandino more
power by centralizing replay and
having rulings be made by those
in the league office in consultation with the on-field referee, not
vice versa.
That power passed to Riveron
when Blandino left, and it was a
difficult first season. He overturned some on-field calls that
probably shouldn’t have been
overturned, drawing the ire of
several teams and prompting
public criticism by Buffalo Bills
owner Terry Pegula of the current
replay system. But on Sunday,
Riveron and the league got it
right.
“They called it a catch, three
feet down and a football move,”
Patriots wide receiver Danny
Amendola said of Ertz’s touchdown. “I call it a catch.”
Riveron and Russell Yurk, the
league’s senior vice president of
instant replay and administration, had a tougher call on a
third-quarter touchdown catch
by Eagles running back Corey
Clement.
Clement appeared to have
made a clean catch and gotten
both feet inbounds before going
out of the end zone. But on replay,
there seemed to be a slight bobble
of the football, calling into question whether his toe might have
been on the line on his third step
after initially grabbing the football. Collinsworth, on the telecast, predicted that the on-field
ruling of a touchdown would be
reversed.
This was more of a replay issue
than a catch-rule issue, really.
Was there enough there for a
reversal? One of Riveron’s biggest
problems earlier in the season, it
seemed, was overturning on-field
rulings without clear-cut replay
evidence to do so. That’s not how
it’s supposed to work. Replay is
supposed to be about correcting
obvious officiating mistakes, not
re-officiating the game. In this
case, Riveron did the right thing,
and referee Gene Steratore announced that the touchdown ruling made on the field would
stand.
“I agree,” Pereira wrote on
Twitter after the ruling. “It was
close but the initial ruling dictated. Good for Riveron/Yurk to stay
with the standard that it [was]
not obvious that the call was
wrong. Slight movement of the
ball and slight bobble but slight is
not enough to overturn.”
Blandino wrote: “Issue is control. Looks like he has it initially
and gets both feet down in
bounds. There is some movement
of the ball, but don’t think
enough to say loss of control. Call
should stand.”
It remains to be seen whether
the NFL’s competition committee
“My daughter won’t know anything that’s going on. She’s 71/2
months old. But just to look in
her eyes the whole world slowed
down,” Foles said of standing on
the field immediately after the
win. “Seeing her look at the
confetti, to look in my wife’s eyes
and embrace her and just know
that I get to spend the rest of my
life with her and she’s been there.
But then, all around us, my
teammates, my coaches, their
loved ones, that’s what it’s about.
It’s about that moment where
you can just enjoy the love, the
joy, everything you do with one
another, the support. . . . That’s
what it’s about.”
kimberley.martin@washpost.com
will be able to overhaul the catch
rule during the upcoming offseason and come up with a commonsense approach as Goodell has
ordered. Goodell said Wednesday
that he wants the process to
work, in effect, in reverse. The
league knows what it wants a
catch to be, Goodell said, and
now it wants a rule that reflects
that.
“From our standpoint, I think I
would like to start back, instead
of adding to the rule or subtracting [from] the rule, start over
again and look at the rule fundamentally from the start because I
think when you add or subtract,
then it still leads to confusion,”
Goodell said.
He also said Wednesday: “I’m
not here to tell you there won’t be
controversy. But I believe we can
get to a much better place.”
Sunday night’s developments
were, for a change, a step in the
right direction.
mark.maske@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
Pyeongchang 2018
TONY AVELAR/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Adam Rippon, 28, is the oldest American figure skater to make his first Olympic team in more than 80 years. He claimed a spot after he was fourth at the U.S. championships in January.
‘I felt myself
owning who I was’
Coming out gave Adam Rippon freedom, both off the ice and on
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
Adam Rippon skates unapologetically, as if
every movement is a declaration of some part
of himself, every twist and turn and spin
oozing confidence. He is an expert in artistry,
as much performer as athlete, unfettered by
convention and propelled by conviction.
That on-ice authenticity helped Rippon, 28,
become the oldest American skater to make his
first Olympic team in more than 80 years. In a
sport that so often looks to youth, his trademark self-expression — and, therefore, his
skating — improved with age.
Rippon speaks unapologetically, too, with
unfiltered bravado. He once foretold “his coronation” and more than once lauded the hardearned shape of his buttocks — a conversation
others started for him, though he was not
afraid to finish it. He has spoken out against
Vice President Pence, who will head the U.S.
Olympic delegation attending the Opening
Ceremonies on Friday in PyeongChang, South
Korea. He has said he will not visit the White
House if invited, largely because he disagrees
with this administration’s policies toward
LGBT Americans.
Rippon became the first openly gay American to qualify for these Winter Olympics when
he was named to the U.S. team in early January.
He and snowboarder Gus Kenworthy, who
qualified not long after Rippon, will be the first
openly gay American men to compete in the
Winter Olympics.
Straight athletes don’t have to talk about the
deepest corners of their personal lives, to
analyze their feelings, to weigh the pros and
cons of sharing them. For Rippon, like many
others, it has to be part of the conversation. He
is an Olympian because he is unapologetic on
the ice. He is one of the more fascinating U.S.
athletes heading to PyeongChang because he
is unapologetic off the ice as well. He would be
neither if not for a years-long process by which
he became comfortable with himself and realized he had nothing to apologize for in the first
place.
An awkward fit
Rippon remembers the first time he heard
someone talk about being gay. He was young,
growing up outside Scranton, Pa., as the oldest
of what would eventually be a family of six
children, when someone brought it up.
“Oh my God, they’re disgusting,” was the
wrenching reaction.
“I really brought that with me: that people
think gay people are disgusting,” Rippon said.
“. . . I remember thinking, ‘Okay, I might be gay.
But I won’t tell anybody. Nobody will ever
know.’ ”
His mother, Kelly, raised her kids with
tolerance. They went to Catholic school, but
she exposed them to various religions and
wouldn’t let them use words such as “stupid”
or “hate.” But kids at school and things he
watched and read made him feel like something was wrong with him. His voice was
always a little higher. He tried to speak lower so
no one would notice. His mannerisms were
different from the other boys’. He tried to
change those, too.
“I think about it now, and it’s so sad,” Rippon
said. “. . . I hope young kids don’t ever have to
feel like that.”
Rippon wanted to be good at sports such as
baseball, like the other kids. He just wasn’t.
But each winter, they would flood the baseball field at nearby Montage Mountain, and he
would beg his mother to take him to skate. He’d
skate successfully for five minutes, fall, then
declare himself done for the day. Then, around
age 10, Rippon was invited to a skating birthday party. His mother, a dancer who had
dabbled in on-ice choreography, showed him
some basics. She would turn her back for a
moment and, instead of clutching the wall as
most preteens might, Rippon was twisting and
turning with near-textbook grace. She asked
him where he learned that.
“He said, ‘I just figured out if I want to go
that way, I go like that,’ ” Kelly Rippon remembered.
Six weeks of group lessons followed, and
then she signed him up for individual lessons.
By the time he was 18, he was the U.S. junior
national champion.
Trusting himself
Even after that title, Rippon was never the
most highly touted man in American skating.
After he missed out on the Olympic team in
2014, he wasn’t sure he wanted to continue.
But entering the Sochi Games, Rippon saw
his best friend, American women’s figure skater Ashley Wagner, profess her opposition to
Russia’s laws regarding anti-gay propaganda,
even as the U.S. Olympic Committee advised
athletes about the potential repercussions of
taking public political stances.
“She said, ‘I didn’t do anything; I just spoke
up about people getting treated badly,’ ” Rippon said. “When she said that, it changed the
course of my life.”
By that time, Rippon had been out to his
friends and family. In the fall of 2015, Rippon
came out publicly in an article in Skating
Magazine.
“I realize now that it’s important that I share
my story,” Rippon said. “. . . Also, it’ll be easy for
me to do an interview, to interact with people.
When you’re not hiding anything, it’s just very
easy to be yourself — shockingly.”
The freedom that came with being himself
changed things as much on the ice as it did off
it.
He started writing his own practice plans
and submitting them to his coach for review.
He recommitted to fitness with a new trainer,
revamped his style and suddenly looked like an
entirely different skater — and, frankly, an
entirely different person from the awkward,
curly-haired kid who had been skating on the
outside of the American elite for years. A few
months after coming out, in January 2016, he
won his first U.S. championship.
“It was just like, in all aspects of my life, I felt
myself owning who I was,” Rippon said. “. . .
For such a long time in my life, I didn’t trust my
own voice at all. I always tried to do what other
people wanted. For the first time in my life, I
had my own opinion.”
Over the next two years, he medaled in four
events a season. Even a broken foot, suffered in
January 2017, didn’t stop him from entering
this year’s national championships as a favorite to make the Olympic team. Heartened by
his consistency over two-plus years, U.S. figure
skating forgave a fourth-place finish and an
uncharacteristically shaky free skate at nationals and made him a groundbreaking member
of the 2018 U.S. Olympic team.
“First and foremost, I’m an athlete. And I’m
an Olympian. I’m not a gay Olympian. I’m just
an Olympian that’s also gay,” Rippon said. “I
don’t mind reading that — like, ‘gay Olympian
Adam Rippon.’ It’s fine. I hope that, in a way, it
makes it easier for other young kids who are
gay. If they go to the Olympics, they can just be
called Olympians.”
Finding a voice
Rippon was surprised that the title of “first
gay male Olympian” was still available. In his
sport alone, many have come out after their
skating careers, such as 1988 Olympic gold
medalist Brian Boitano, 1996 national champion Rudy Galindo and Olympian Johnny
Weir.
Weir, now a popular commentator for NBC,
said he thinks skating probably has the same
percentage of gay athletes as other sports.
“I think it would be belittling to [Rippon’s]
years of hard work, blood, sweat and tears to
focus solely on his sexuality,” Weir said. “But it
is an incredible step for American athletics and
the Olympic movement to have out athletes.
. . . It’s wonderful that young LGBT people
around the world will have someone like them
to look up to.”
Because Rippon never had anyone to look
up to, he doesn’t mind that most of the coverage is about his off-ice story. In a mid-January
interview with USA Today, Rippon criticized
Pence for his long-standing opposition to gay
rights. Asked about the comments later, Rippon called it “a no-brainer” to speak his mind.
“I think his track record on LGBT rights is
very clear and straightforward about his opinion of gay people,” said Rippon, who studied
Pence’s policies around the 2016 presidential
election to learn more about him. “So when I
was asked the question of what I think, I said
exactly what I thought.”
A decade or so ago, this part of Rippon’s
story would have been unthinkable. Now, it’s
hard to believe he ever considered hiding at all.
“Look at me now,” Rippon said. “The only
things I’ve been talking about the last few days
are Mike Pence, being gay and my eyebrows. I
guess the joke was on me.”
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
Nassar’s sentencing concludes with a 40- to 125-year term
BY
W ILL H OBSON
A Michigan judge delivered a
40- to 125-year sentence to disgraced former Michigan State
University and Olympic gymnastics physician Larry Nassar on
Monday, bringing the criminal
proceedings against the convicted child molester to a conclusion.
The sentence, for three sexual
assault counts Nassar admitted to
committing at a gymnastics center in Dimondale, Mich., didn’t
lengthen what already amounted
to a life sentence for the 54-yearold: He will serve it concurrently
with the 40- to 175-year sentence
he received last month for seven
counts of sexual assault in nearby
Lansing. Nassar also must serve a
60-year federal term for child
pornography crimes.
More than 260 girls and women have asserted abuse by Nassar
who, often under the guise of
medical treatment, digitally penetrated and fondled them. Eaton
County Judge Janice Cunningham termed the scope of Nassar’s
crimes “beyond comprehension”
as she issued her sentence.
Wearing an orange jumpsuit,
Nassar spoke briefly before receiving his sentence.
“The words expressed by everyone that has spoken, including
the parents, have impacted me to
my innermost core. . . . It’s impossible to convey the depth and
breadth of how sorry I am to each
and every one involved,” he said.
As the judge explained her
sentence, however, she noted that
Nassar, in a letter he wrote last
month that another judge read
aloud at his previous sentencing
hearing, still professed innocence
and claimed he had been performing legitimate procedures
that his patients misconstrued as
assault.
“I am not convinced that you
truly understand that what you
did was wrong and the devastating impact that you have had on
the victims, their families and
friends. Clearly you are in denial,”
Cunningham said.
Monday’s sentence brought an
end to a three-day hearing featuring 65 emotional impact statements from girls and women who
asserted abuse by Nassar, as well
as some parents — including a
father who tried to attack Nassar
in court Friday before he was
restrained by law enforcement
officers.
While the criminal proceedings against Nassar have concluded, the fallout is just beginning at
the institutions through which he
accessed his victims.
Michigan State’s president and
athletic director have resigned,
and the school faces lawsuits filed
by more than 140 victims and
parents, a number that could rise
after dozens more girls and women asserting abuse by Nassar
emerged in the past month. USA
Gymnastics’ chief executive resigned last year, and last month
the organization’s entire board of
directors resigned. It is also facing scores of lawsuits filed by
victims and parents.
The U.S. Olympic Committee
has resisted calls from two U.S.
senators for its chief executive to
resign and has commissioned an
independent investigation by an
international law firm to assess
any blame Olympic organizations
deserve for Nassar’s abuse. Victims have said the abuse occurred
at the Karolyi ranch outside
Houston — where Team USA
women gymnasts trained — and
at national and international
competitions, including the
Olympics.
Several members of Congress
have called for inquiries into how
Nassar avoided prosecution for so
long. Several victims said they
raised complaints about Nassar
to coaches and trainers at Michigan State as far back as 1997. A
2004 investigation by a local police force in Michigan cleared
Nassar, as did a 2014 investigation by Michigan State police and
the university’s Title IX office. An
FBI investigation, started in 2015
with a complaint from USA Gymnastics, languished for more than
a year.
Nassar continued to treat, and
assault, patients at a Michigan
State clinic until August 2016,
when another victim filed a complaint with Michigan State police
and told her story to the Indianapolis Star.
“It is unfathomable to think
about the number of victims who
could have been spared,” had authorities acted on prior complaints, Cunningham said Monday, moments before announcing
Nassar’s sentence. “But that is a
discussion for a different time
and a different place.”
will.hobson@washpost.com
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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D5
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Pyeongchang 2018
For Hong, the fastest route is through the details
Born in South Korea and raised in Maryland, short-track speedskater stays on top of tiny mechanics
BY RICK MAESE
IN KEARNS, UTAH
L
ap after lap and year after
year, the thrill is in going
fast, and the goal is always to go faster. Thomas
Hong loves the sensation
as much as anyone else on the ice,
but it’s the process that can keep
him up at night, that has him
studying the past greats and obsessing over his technique.
Short-track speedskaters can
reach speeds topping 30 mph, just a
thin blade separating athlete from
ice, but it never feels fast enough.
“Just to understand the intricacies of how to get to the speeds that
we’re going, it’s so challenging,”
Hong said. “If anyone observes,
we’re really not doing too much on
the ice. We’re doing, like, five movements. We’re doing them over and
over again, and little by little we
improve. I think the challenge of
getting better at speedskating is
what makes it fun for me.”
Hong’s fascination with the mechanics of the sport are hardly
surprising. After all, he was born
into speedskating, almost literally.
According to family lore, his
mother began going into labor at a
rink in the family’s native South
Korea while watching his older
sister practice speedskating. She
made it to the hospital in time, and
20 years later, Hong is preparing
for his first Olympics, a member of
the U.S. short-track team.
Hong’s Olympic journey has
brought him full circle. Maybe it’s
serendipity, but these PyeongChang
Games are taking him back to the
country of his birth, back to the
place he spent summers learning
the ins and outs of the sport from
Korean coaches, back to his second
home where his father and extended family still live.
Hong was just 4 years old when
he moved to Maryland with his
mother, sister and grandmother.
He spoke no English when they
settled in Laurel.
“I can remember as a kid, I was
really confused,” he said, “really
didn’t have a good time because I
couldn’t communicate with people.”
VLADIMIR PESNYA/SPUTNIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thomas Hong, right, was 4 when he moved to Maryland.
He spoke no English when the family settled in Laurel.
He adjusted quickly to American life, and when his sister found a
speedskating coach in nearby Columbia, Hong started taking lessons, too. A weekend activity became an after-school activity and
then a year-round activity. He visited Seoul each summer to stay with
his father, Doopyeo, who worked in
broadcasting, and found himself
increasingly immersed in the
sport, trying to master the little
movements that can shave tenths
of seconds off his time.
Speedskating is much more
popular in South Korea, with
coaching and training that’s more
demanding than young speedskaters typically encounter in the
United States.
“Even kids that are 5 or 6 years old
train all day in order to become the
next Olympic prospect,” Hong said.
His time skating in Seoul instilled a strong work ethic, an appreciation for the details and also
heightened aspirations. When he
was 16 years old, he was the youngest male short-track speedskater
at the U.S. Olympic trials, and
though he finished 11th overall
and didn’t qualify for Sochi, his
2018 goal came into focus.
“I kind of realized, maybe next
time I can make this team,” he
said.
That required both work and
sacrifice. Following Hong’s freshman year at the University of
Maryland, he decided to put his
studies temporarily on hold, to
focus full-time on his sport. That
meant relocating to Utah, training
with the U.S. national team and
beginning an earnest quest to
shave time.
“Thomas studies video more
than probably anyone I can think
of,” said Anthony Barthell, the U.S.
short-track coach. “If he can sit
down and look at videos 24-7, he
would be in front of a TV or laptop
just watching videos.”
Barthell said he actually has
had to steer Hong away from video
at times, concerned the young
skater is overthinking the process.
But that’s really all Hong
knows. At a recent practice, Hong
and his fellow PyeongChangbound teammates raced laps
around the rink at the Utah Olympic Oval, the team’s training facility. Immediately after, Hong skated
over to a flat-screen television stationed on the perimeter of the
rink, where he and teammates
could review video of the laps.
After each practice, coaches upload that video into a Dropbox
folder, which allows Hong to access it from home at night. “The
deep analysis definitely comes
when I get home,” he said.
The extra study has paid dividends. At 5 feet 8, Hong is not the
biggest skater on the ice but is
often one of the most explosive. He
has honed his technique and can
accelerate quickly.
In PyeongChang, he will compete in the 500 meters, but his best
Kim, 17, is poised to rule the Games
KIM FROM D1
Kim, now 17, could emerge from
these Olympics as a transcendent
athlete — in the vein of a young
Shaun White or Michael Phelps
even — but she enters them already
comfortable with who she is. Her
Korean-born parents immigrated
here more than 20 years ago, and
she will have no shortage of extended family members gathering
around the PyeongChang halfpipe.
Despite her close ties to the host
nation, Kim feels little internal
struggle over cultural identity.
“I’m so used to America, used to
the traffic in L.A., and I don’t really
feel it click with the Korean culture,” she explained recently. “But
obviously I have a Korean face, and
I feel like that’s just — you know, I
can’t walk around people like I’m,
like, straight-up American. It’s like,
I’m Korean American. My parents
are from Korea.
“I don’t know. It’s weird. I just
grew up in the States, so I feel like I
identify more with the American
culture.”
Identity is always a curious
thing at the Olympics, especially as
nations increasingly recruit athletes from around the globe, sometimes with only tenuous ties to
their country. That Jamaican bobsled team competing in PyeongChang? One member is from New
Jersey. The Nigerian sled will feature women from Texas, Illinois
and Minnesota. The South Koreans will field nearly 20 athletes
from other countries, and about
three dozen U.S.-born athletes will
be representing other nations at
these Olympics.
There’s little confusion for Kim,
the chatty SoCal teen with blond
highlights, active social media
presence and unlimited athletic
potential whom the world is about
to meet.
“I always get the question, like,
‘Where are you from?’ L.A. ‘No,
where are you really from?’ I was
born in Long Beach. ‘No, no, like,
where are you really, really
from?’ ” she said. “. . . I always get
that question. It’s never, like, my
first answer would be, ‘I’m from
Korea,’ or, like, ‘I’m Korean.’ It’s
always, like, ‘I’m American.’ ”
Family commitment
Kim’s parents met in Switzerland when both were working for
travel agencies. Jong Jin Kim and
his wife, Boran, found their way to
Southern California, where he
studied engineering and the cou-
ple raised their three daughters.
Chloe is the youngest and was
all of 4 years old when she snowboarded for the first time. Jong
took her to Mountain High resort
in the San Gabriel Mountains outside of Los Angeles.
“He wanted my mom to go with
him,” she explained. “So he took me
as bait.”
Kim showed promise on a
snowboard early, entering her
first competition at 6 and winning
junior nationals a year later. Even
when she moved to Switzerland
for two years at age 8, she made
regular treks to the Alps. She
would wake up at 4 a.m., take two
trains to reach a halfpipe in France
and continue her training.
“It was kind of crazy now that I
think about it,” she said with a laugh.
When she returned to the States,
she joined a developmental program at Mammoth Mountain, and
her potential started to come into
focus. By then, the Olympics were a
distant goal for the family, and
Kim’s father quit his engineering
job to help make it a reality.
“Obviously, when I was 8, I had
no idea what he was doing,” Kim
said. “It was, like, ‘Why is Dad home
more?’ You know? But now that I
think about it, you know, I feel like
it was a really bold move, and I can’t
believe my mom was okay with it.”
The Kims started home-schooling and doing online courses with
their daughter in middle school, and
every weekend Jong would drive 51/2
hours from their home in La Palma
to Mammoth so Kim could learn
from the best. Their lives suddenly
seemed to revolve around a dream,
which Kim said startled some of
their relatives back in Korea.
“I think at first it was a little hard
for them to support it,” she said,
“because, you know, I feel like a
Korean’s ideal thing is their kid
being, like, a lawyer, a doctor.”
Anyone who saw her on the
snow, though, understood. Kim
was soon entering bigger competitions, steadily posting higher
scores and drawing more attention
along the way, from other competitors and potential sponsors.
“Chloe is one of the most talented young snowboarders I’d ever
seen,” said Kelly Clark, who is heading to her fifth Winter Olympics. “I
remember talking to Burton [a
snowboard manufacturer] about
her when I first saw her in Mammoth. I said, ‘Hey, I’ve never suggested that you pick up any athlete
— except for this girl. This girl is
someone you should sponsor and
you should get behind. She has the
potential to go very far.’ ”
The Sochi Games were not an
option because the Olympics bar
anyone younger than 15 from competing, but 2014 still marked the
year Kim announced herself as one
of the world’s best in the halfpipe,
winning silver at the X Games at
just 13. It meant she had four years
to prepare for her first Winter
Games, and the Olympic world had
four years to prepare for her.
Star power
Since she was small, Kim has
visited her family in Korea almost
every year. She enjoys going out
with cousins there, sampling local
cuisine and taking a break from her
sport. “It’s cool. I feel like I have
another life,” she said.
Even back in California, she never feels too far removed from Korean culture.
“Since I travel with my parents,
my mom is always cooking Korean
food,” she says. “So it’s, like, I always
want American food. It’s like, I
need In-N-Out. We need to go to
Chipotle. KFC, where are you at?”
Her most recent visit to Korea
came in February 2017, when the
U.S. State Department tapped her
as a special envoy for a goodwill
tour. It was her first taste of how
she might be received at these
PyeongChang Games.
“It was actually really crazy; I
had, like, a paparazzi moment
there,” she said, “which was, like,
kind of cool. I felt like Kim Kardashian. . . . I look up, and there’s
like 25 cameras around.”
Snowboarding is still a growing
sport in South Korea. Since 1992,
the country has won 53 medals
across eight Winter Olympics. All
but two have come in speedskating
or short-track speedskating. The
host nation might only compete for
a handful of medals at these Olympics, but Kim gives Koreans someone else to root for.
“I think people know that she’s
from the USA, but her background
is Korean. We can distinguish that
she’s American,” said Im Bomi, a
sports reporter for Dong-A Ilbo,
one of the country’s largest daily
newspapers. “But we respect that
she’s a talented snowboarder who
speaks Korean and who shares
common things with us.”
In South Korea, headlines regularly refer to her as the “genius
snowboarder” and highlight her
Korean roots, noting her fondness
for eating spicy rice cakes — a
common after-school snack — and
shot at a medal will come in the
men’s 5,000-meter relay, where the
Americans will be one of eight
teams vying for gold. At a November
World Cup event in Shanghai, Hong
and the U.S. squad, which also included J.R. Celski, John-Henry
Krueger and Keith Carroll Jr., set a
world record in the relay with a time
of 6:29.052, more than a full second
faster than the previous mark.
“Words can’t express how I felt
at that point in time,” Barthell
said, “because these guys have put
their heart and soul in this. That
was a great moment.”
Hong is so explosive that Barthell now has him lead off the
relay, hoping the young skater can
put the American team out front
early.
“To be as little as he is, he has a
lot of fast-twitch [muscles], very
explosive and technically, he’s really dialed in,” the coach said.
The Olympic relay heats are
scheduled to take place Feb. 13,
with the finals scheduled for
Feb. 22. The prospects of racing in
the country of his birth on the
sport’s biggest stage has been a motivator for Hong, but he said he feels
no internal conflict. He still speaks
Korean to both of his parents, but in
most ways, he is a typical American
college student. He feels like he is a
part of both countries, and that
both countries are a part of him.
“Culturally, I definitely think I
try to marry the two cultures,
American and Korean,” he said.
Following the Olympics, Hong
plans to return to the Salt Lake
City area to train for next month’s
world championships in Montreal. He’ll then come back to
Maryland and resume classes in
College Park and training with the
Potomac Speedskating Club, as he
contemplates another four-year
Olympic cycle.
He is not thinking about the
2022 Winter Games quite yet.
Right now, the goal is the same as
it has ever been: to go as fast as
possible.
“I’m a little bit of a perfectionist
when it comes to my own technique,” he said. “I just try to adapt
and make myself better.”
rick.maese@washpost.com
her predilection for K-pop groups
such as Girls’ Generation, Shinee
and Super Junior.
“She’s just like a South Korean
teenager,” the Hankook Ilbo newspaper reported.
She has also become a role model
for kids in the country. The U.S.
Embassy in Seoul produced a video
called “Just Like Chloe Kim,” featuring young Korean girls who want to
snowboard like the Korean American teenager. Her goodwill trip last
year included visiting the mountains, touring the U.S. Embassy,
meeting local reporters and chatting with Korean college students.
“I’m, like, finishing up high
school. I don’t know how you can
learn anything from me because
I’m still, like, a teenager,” she recalled. “I don’t know what I’m doing with my life.”
She was plenty familiar with the
people, the culture and the sprawling city of Seoul but was still taken
aback by the attention, each stop
reinforcing to her what she is and
what she isn’t.
“I was in Korea for media,” she
said, “and they do my face so pale. I
had so much makeup on my neck
to make it look like I’m pale. But,
like, my hands are this color, and
I’m not pale. . . . It’s definitely really different, and it’s kind of shocking to get used to, I guess.”
Back in the United States, she’s
more well known, her face already
ever-present on NBC promos in
the weeks leading into the Olympics and her fan base bigger than
any single demographic. “I got
mail from a prison once,” she said
with a laugh.
Kim is still among the youngest
competitors at most competition
stops, and she will wrap up her
final year of high school this spring.
She is applying to colleges and
knows the next phase of her life —
with or without an Olympic medal
— will be different.
For now, she travels with both
parents and has a publicist and a
high-profile agent. She is backed by
many big-name Olympic brands —
Visa, Samsung and Oakley among
them — but seems unaffected by
the expectations that might be accompanying her to PyeongChang.
When she is entering the pipe,
she is not thinking about any of
that, of course. She rides up the
22-foot-high wall, climbing and
climbing, before launching into
the air. Kim spins and she flips
and, for what can feel like several
seconds, she looks like even gravity
can’t pull her back down to Earth.
rick.maese@washpost.com
Min Jung Kim in Seoul contributed to
this report.
Judging system in U.S.
may have hurt its skaters
SKATE FROM D1
generation of American girls got
haircuts to match the bouncy bob
of Dorothy Hamill, so captivated
by her gold medal performance at
the 1976 Olympics. American
women reasserted their dominance in the 1990s, via Kristi
Yamaguchi and Tara Lipinski,
Olympic gold medalists in 1992
and 1998, while Michelle Kwan
elevated artistry and technical
precision to new heights en route
to five world championships and
Olympic silver and bronze.
Then came a huge gap, with the
U.S. women taking a back seat to
their counterparts in Russia and
Japan, who have dominated the
Olympic podium for the past 16
years.
Several factors explain why
American women have receded
from the world stage:
Russia, which historically set
the standard in ice dance, has
made women’s singles a priority
in recent years, producing champion after champion.
“They have probably 50 girls in
the country, all teenagers, and all
can do triple-triples and all are
vying for [an Olympic] spot,” noted Weisiger, a two-time Olympic
team coach who is based in Fairfax, Va.
Japan, a country in which
figure skating champions Mao
Asada and Yuzuru Hanyu have
movie-star status, has sustained
its long-standing excellence in
the sport.
Young American female skaters fell behind in technical ability
under a scoring system in the U.S.
developmental ranks that, for a
few years, valued perfect execution of less rigorous programs
over less-than-perfect ambitious
ones. The unintended effect discouraged many young skaters
from pushing their limits, proving a disincentive to master triple
jumps when pristine doubles
were a safer way to accumulate
points.
“For two or three years, we had
a generation of girls not learning
to do triples because the reward
did not outweigh the risk in scoring,” Weisiger explained. “We had
girls that could have been much
better technically but were not
being pushed.”
Added Meissner, who bucked
the trend, determined to test her
limits despite the risk: “It’s almost
like it wasn’t rewarded when you
tried a harder element. When you
missed it, you had a devastating
blow [in your scores]. You would
have no chance to stay within the
medal range.”
There have been more subtle,
cultural factors at play in the view
of veteran coach Frank Carroll, a
World Figure Skating Hall of
Fame inductee who worked with
Kwan, among many U.S. champions, and helped American Evan
Lysacek to the men’s Olympic
gold in 2010.
In his experience, Carroll said,
the Asian skaters he has coached
bring uncommon discipline to
the rink.
“They are taught discipline
from Day One,” Carroll said,
“which is different from American kids, who are now taught, ‘Oh,
dear, you have a right to stand up
for whatever you think!’ ”
Moreover, Carroll noted, it
hasn’t helped that figure skating’s
popularly has waned in the United States since what he refers to as
“the whack heard round the
world” — a reference to the attack
on Nancy Kerrigan in the run-up
to the 1994 Winter Games in Lillehammer. The battle between the
recovering Kerrigan and her complicit rival Tonya Harding resulted in a TV ratings bonanza.
But Carroll bristles at the suggestion that U.S. women’s figure
skating is in a “drought,” pointing
to Mirai Nagasu’s fourth-place
finish at the 2010 Vancouver
Olympics, Gracie Gold’s fourth at
the 2014 Sochi Games and Ashley
Wagner’s second-place finish at
the 2016 world championships.
“I hardly think we’re in a
drought because they’re not
standing on the podium,” Carroll
said, adding a mocking, “ ‘Oy, my
God! How horrible! Our American skaters are worthless! They’re
just terrible!’ ”
Weisiger, for one, sees better
times ahead for U.S. women because of a new approach by U.S.
Figure Skating. There has been a
shift toward awarding bonuses
for attempting rigorous double
axels and triples. The sport also
has introduced international selection-pool camps in Colorado
Springs each summer and invited
“mentor coaches,” such as Weisiger, to take part.
But the turnaround isn’t expected at this month’s PyeongChang Games, where the women’s
competition gets underway with
the short programs Feb. 21. It
could produce a podium sweep for
Russian skaters, who won’t be
competing for country (as a result
of International Olympic Committee sanctions against evidence
of state-sponsored doping at the
2014 Sochi Games) but under the
banner Olympic Athletes from
Russia.
The U.S. women competing for
medals in singles (as opposed to
ice dance or pairs) consist of
Bradie Tennell, 20; Nagasu, 24;
and Karen Chen, 18, who won
gold, silver and bronze, respectively, at last month’s U.S. championships.
Tennell crushed her American
challengers to win her first national championship, landing
seven triple jumps with a technically brilliant program. But while
she boasts the highest international score of any American
woman entering her Olympic debut, she is still developing the
artistry and maturity that international judges tend to favor.
Since being left off the 2014
team, Nagasu, who finished
fourth at the 2010 Olympics, has
devoted herself to perfecting the
difficult triple axel (which requires three-and-a-half rotations
in the air). But it would likely take
sterling execution of both attempts — one in her short program, another in her long — for
Nagasu to finish on the medal
podium. Chen, the 2017 U.S.
champion, is a first-time Olympian like Tennell.
Meissner, who now coaches
young skaters part-time, is encouraged by the rising technical
ambition she sees in the current
generation of U.S. junior competitors. And this month, she will be
cheering for the U.S. women in
PyeongChang, especially hopeful
that Nagasu will land her triple
axel on the Olympic stage.
“I’m all for it,” Meissner said.
“Sometimes I think, it has been 11,
12, 13 years since the last time I
did it. And I’d love to see it become
a normal thing for U.S. women.”
liz.clarke@washpost.com
RICK DIAMOND/GETTY IMAGES FOR SCOTT HAMILTON
“It wasn’t rewarded when you tried a harder element,” said 2006
world champion Kimmie Meissner of the U.S. judging system.
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FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
OLYMPIC NOTES
Six-time gold medalist Ahn is among 32 Russians filing appeals to compete
F ROM N EWS S ERVICES
Six-time Olympic gold medalist
Viktor Ahn and three former NHL
players are among 32 Russian athletes who filed appeals Tuesday
seeking spots at the PyeongChang
Olympics.
The 32 athletes all failed to pass
the mandatory International
Olympic Committee vetting — imposed as a result of Russian doping at the 2014 Sochi Olympics —
and weren’t invited to the games.
The Court of Arbitration for
Sport said it would likely hear the
case Wednesday in PyeongChang.
If the Russian athletes force the
IOC to invite them, it would mean
the medal contenders in some
sports change dramatically only
days before the Games open on
Friday.
CAS added that as well as shorttrack speedskating great Ahn, the
32 include world cross-country
skiing champion Sergei Ustyugov
and world biathlon champion Anton Shipulin.
Also on the list are former NHL
players Sergei Plotnikov, Anton
Belov and Valeri Nichushkin, who
had been considered possible candidates for the Russian team in
PyeongChang.
If figure skater Ksenia Stolbova
is invited, she could compete as
soon as Friday morning in the
pairs short program component of
the team event.
The IOC hasn’t said why any of
the individual Russians weren’t
invited, but did say it used a newly
available database detailing past
doping when it decided who
should be eligible.
It is a separate case from the 28
Russian athletes who last week
overturned doping bans from the
2014 Olympics at CAS. The IOC is
also refusing to invite 13 of those
that are still active.
Any Russians who win late invitations would compete under
“Olympic Athletes from Russia”
because the Russian team is formally banned for doping at the
Sochi Olympics. If they win gold
medals, the Olympic anthem will
be played.
FIGURE SKATING: North
and South Korean figure skaters
shared the same ice Monday for
the first time at the PyeongChang
Olympics.
The North’s pair of Ryom Tae
Ok and Kim Ju Sik didn’t socialize
much with the South Korean and
Japanese athletes in their practice
session in Gangneung, but South
Korean skater Alex Kam said
they’d shared a few words.
“We didn’t have much time to
talk because our warmup schedule was different, but we just said
‘Hi’, ” Kam said. “We were just
talking about our schedule for this
weekend.”
Fresh off a third-place finish at
the Four Continents champion-
ship in Taiwan last month, Ryom
and Kim are the only North Koreans who met the Olympic qualifying standards in their sport before being invited. They’re also
rare among North Korean athletes
in having competed at several
competitions abroad, where
they’d mixed with foreign skaters
including Kam and his partner
Kim Kyu-eun.
They’re likely to be respectable
mid-level competitors in PyeongChang, though aren’t considered medal contenders.
“They’re really friendly and really bright,” Kam said.
BOBSLED: U.S. bobsled pilot
Justin Olsen was admitted to the
hospital Monday night with acute
appendicitis and underwent a
successful laparoscopic appendectomy in Gangneung, South Korea. The U.S. team is hopeful Olsen
will recover and be cleared to compete. The two-man competition
will take place Feb. 18-19, and fourman races are Feb. 24-25.
“We are hoping Justin will recover quickly enough to compete
in the two-man race,” USA Bobsled
and Skeleton CEO Darrin Steele
said.
This is the third Olympic selection for Olsen, and his first in the
front seat of the sled. Olsen was a
member of Steven Holcomb’s
four-man gold medal winning
team at the 2010 Vancouver
Games.
NHL ROUNDUP
NBA ROUNDUP
Josi scores
winner for
Nashville
in overtime
Detroit
cruises to
fourth win
in a row
PREDATORS 5,
ISLANDERS 4
PISTONS 111,
TRAIL BLAZERS 91
A SSOCIATED P RESS
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Ryan Johansen scored the tying
goal in the final minute of regulation, and Roman Josi scored the
winner 3:42 into overtime to rally
the Nashville Predators past the
host New York Islanders, 5-4, on
Monday night.
Kevin Fiala had two goals, and
Calle Jarnkrok and Johansen also
scored for Nashville, which improved to 9-1-2 in its last 12 games.
Pekka Rinne stopped 24 shots.
On the winner, Nick Bonino
sent a saucer pass across the front
to Josi, who tapped it into the open
net with Islanders goalie Jaroslav
Halak out of position.
John Tavares, Ryan Pulock,
Casey Cizikas and Nick Leddy
scored for New York, which lost for
the third time in four games after
the all-star break. Halak made 42
saves and Andrew Ladd and Brock
Nelson added two assists each.
MAPLE LEAFS 7, DUCKS 4:
William Nylander scored twice,
including the tiebreaking goal early in the third period, and Toronto
defeated Anaheim at Air Canada
Centre.
Auston Matthews also had two
goals for the Maple Leafs. Mitch
Marner, Leo Komarov and Zach
Hyman scored one apiece, but the
win might have come at a cost.
Toronto starting goaltender
Frederik Andersen left at 6:15 of
the second period after he was
struck in the head by Corey Perry’s
left skate.
Andersen stopped 25 of 28
shots before being replaced by
backup Curtis McElhinney, who
improved to 6-4 this season with
16 saves on 17 shots.
STARS 2, RANGERS 1: Martin Hanzal returned from injured
reserve and scored the game-winning goal in the Stars’ victory over
slumping New York in Dallas.
On the power play, Hanzal skated across the goalmouth and
tipped in Julius Honka’s shot from
the right point to break a 1-1 tie
4:05 into the third period.
The Stars’ third straight win
moved them within one point of
St. Louis for third place in the
Central Division.
OILERS 6, LIGHTNING 2:
Connor McDavid scored four
goals to propel Edmonton’s home
rout of Tampa Bay.
Andre Drummond had 17
points and 17 rebounds as the Detroit Pistons beat the visiting Portland Trail Blazers, 111-91, on Monday night for their fourth straight
victory.
Detroit has won three in a row
with Blake Griffin in the lineup
after acquiring him in a trade last
week. The victory pulled the Pistons back to .500 and even with
Philadelphia for the final playoff
spot in the Eastern Conference.
Griffin had 21 points, nine rebounds and six assists. Damian
Lillard had 20 points for the Blazers. Drummond’s 266 double-doubles since 2012-13 tie him with
DeMarcus Cousins for the most in
that span.
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Under assistant coach Todd Reirden’s supervision, Washington defenseman Dmitry Orlov remains on track to become an elite-level player.
Capitals sticking to the plan with Orlov
CAPITALS FROM D1
utes to the Capitals’ power play.
After missing all of the 2014-15
season with a broken wrist, Orlov
has gradually worked through
Reirden’s blueprint and continued his upward trajectory. He has
seven goals, one short of a career
high, and 12 assists in 52 games
this season. He leads the team in
even-strength ice time at 19:46 per
game. He and Matt Niskanen
spend a lot of that time matched
against the opposition’s top skaters, and Orlov is also a fixture on
the Capitals’ second power-play
unit.
Now the 26-year-old defenseman is looking to layer more offense back into his game, a proven
ability that has been dampened
since he took on a tougher defensive workload.
“It’s just mind-set really,” Orlov
said. “Everyone wants to be in the
offensive zone, joining the rush, all
that. But when you take on top
lines, you have to also put defense
ahead of that always, and it can be
tough to get your offense going.
But I will get there, just sticking to
the plan.”
The plan comes up a lot.
Reirden, who works with the
Capitals’ defensemen, has one for
each of his players tailored to their
age, ability and fit in the team’s
system. Orlov’s plan started in
what, from the outside, may be
seen as a lost 2014-15 season. Orlov
and Reirden spent hours alone on
the ice together that season, working through Orlov’s frustration
and a rehab process that lasted
longer than expected. There was
doubt, at times, that Orlov would
fully recover, moments when it
seemed like his wrist could keep
him from ever shooting or stickhandling as he did in the past or
becoming the player he wanted to
become.
“I think it helps you reconnect
with how important the game of
hockey is and how much you miss
being around your teammates and
being the player you once were,”
Reirden said of what that season
meant for Orlov. “It’s a situation
we’ve used as growth, and we’ve
referenced it in the last couple
years. When things got bad or if
games didn’t go well, when things
weren’t moving in the right direction, occasionally you’d be like,
‘Remember two years ago; we
weren’t sure you’d be able to play
at this level again.’ ”
That isn’t referenced anymore.
Orlov doesn’t need to hear it to
find another gear. He is driven by
his own ambition to succeed and
Reirden’s vision for him, which
has added another element to his
game in each season since the
C A P I TA L S ’ N E X T T H R E E
at Columbus Blue Jackets
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Friday
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vs. Detroit Red Wings
Sunday
3 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
injury.
Step 1: Build Orlov’s confidence
by giving him favorable matchups
and a lot of offensive-zone starts.
Check.
Step 2: Build his role and move
him into a place among the team’s
top-four defensemen, which
heightens his competition, but
measure the ice time at first.
Check.
Step 3: Add ice time and challenge him to bump up his offense
within that role. He finished with
a career-high 33 points (six goals,
27 assists) last season. Check.
Step 4: Raise his level of competition to matchups with top lines
and lessen his offensive responsibilities. Check.
Step 5: Keep skating him
against top lines and add that
high-level offense back in. Pend-
ing.
“That’s at the top,” Reirden said,
his right hand raised well above
his shoulder. “That’s where he becomes a top guy. He’s had growth
every year. He’s on track for that
goal, absolutely.”
Adding that offense back in is
not a matter of conditioning. Orlov’s preparation and work ethic is
what stands out most to his fellow
defensemen — from 22-year-old
rookie Madison Bowey to the veterans of the bunch — and he sometimes skates so hard in practice
that his laces split open. His average ice time, 23:07, is the highest of
his career by almost four minutes,
and it hasn’t slowed him down.
Finding the right balance between jumping into the offense
and carrying out the team’s most
important defensive assignments
is what Orlov has to figure out. He
feels like he is close to doing so.
Reirden feels it, too. And when
this plan is complete, another will
be put in place to see just how
much Orlov’s game can grow.
“He is a great guy to follow, a
great guy to look up to and model
my game after, I feel like,” said
Bowey, who is just 44 games into
his own plan. “Dmitry just does
everything and does it so well. I
want to be like that.”
jesse.dougherty@washpost.com
JAZZ
133, PELICANS 109:
In New Orleans, Rodney Hood
scored 30 points in his second
game back from a lower leg bruise
as Utah extended its winning
streak to six.
Ricky Rubio had 20 points and
11 assists, and Rudy Gobert added
19 points and 10 rebounds for the
Jazz, which made 14 of 21 threepoint attempts and shot 58.4 percent (52 of 89).
MAGIC 111, HEAT 109: Mario Hezonja scored 20 points,
Jonathan Simmons made the tiebreaking dunk with 1:31 remaining, and Orlando won in Miami.
The Heat appeared to tie it after
Tyler Johnson was credited with a
basket when Orlando’s Bismack
Biyombo was called for goaltending with 2.8 seconds left but a
review overturned the call.
NUGGETS 121, HORNETS
104: Gary Harris scored 27 points
and was one of seven Denver players to reach double figures as the
Nuggets rolled at home.
Bucks get T. Zeller from Nets
The Brooklyn Nets traded center Tyler Zeller to the Milwaukee
Bucks for guard Rashad Vaughn
and a second-round pick. The Nets
will get the pick this June if it falls
between Nos. 31-47. If not, it will go
to Brooklyn in 2020.
Zeller is averaging 7.1 points
and 4.6 rebounds this season.
KNICKS: New York reserve
guard Ron Baker will have right
shoulder surgery and miss the rest
of the season.
Wizards use balanced scoring to beat Pacers for season-best fifth straight win
WIZARDS FROM D1
“everybody eats” — Beal was quoting a line from the movie “Paid In
Full” — only represents the team’s
reformed attitude while compensating for its missing star. And
with everyone chipping in, it’s
easy to explain why the Wizards
are playing their best basketball
of the season.
“It means a lot,” Beal said about
the five-game streak. “But we still
got a lot of work to do. . . . It’s great
that we’ve got five in a row. Our
confidence is high, but at the same
time we’re staying level-headed
and keep riding the wave.”
As preseason expectations
gave way to underachievement,
the Wizards became defined by
their inconsistency. Before the
current streak, Washington
hadn’t won more than two consecutive games since mid-November but also never dropped
more than a pair in a row. This
was good enough to keep the
Wizards in the playoff hunt, but
they could not get within striking
distance of the elite teams in the
Eastern Conference.
After these five consecutive victories the Wizards are the hottest
team in the East and have pulled
into a virtual tie or third in the
conference with the Cleveland
Cavaliers, and they are playing
like one of the best offensive
squads in the league.
On Monday, Washington
shared the ball for 29 assists — the
sixth straight game in which the
team has collected 25 or more, the
longest active streak in the NBA.
The Wizards have also shot better
than 51 percent in four of their
past five games, and since Jan. 1
they rank third in the league in
field goal percentage.
“We didn’t start the season off
shooting the ball well and we had
the same situation last year,”
Coach Scott Brooks said. “I knew
eventually it would turn around.
Hopefully it continues. We’ve got
some pretty good shot makers. I’d
like to get everybody good looks.”
The improved ball movement
and shot-making carried into
chilly Indianapolis. Washington
made its decisive push midway
through the second quarter by
scoring 13 straight points. Beal
knocked down a three-pointer
and followed with a layup. Then
Markieff Morris hit a deep shot
while under pressure at the top of
the key, making a three then falling after taking contact. Oubre
sank a corner three and Beal
capped the run with a 12-foot
jumper. Each made shot came
after an extra pass as Washington
built a 55-39 lead, its largest of the
first half.
In the fourth quarter, as the
Pacers (30-25) trimmed Washington’s advantage to 10 points, players still relied on sharing the ball.
With the reserves protecting the
lead, Mike Scott swung a pass to
Jodie Meeks, who hit a spot-up
three. Meeks scored five of his 10
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
at Philadelphia 76ers
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vs. Boston Celtics
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8 TNT
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Saturday
8 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
points (4 of 6 from the field) in the
fourth quarter.
From there, Washington had no
problem closing out against a depleted Pacers roster.
Indiana has played surprisingly well this season in its post-Paul
George era, relying on newly
minted all-star Victor Oladipo,
the former DeMatha High standout. But Oladipo sat out Monday
night because of an illness, and
the Pacers announced before the
game that starting point guard
Darren Collison would undergo
arthroscopic surgery and miss the
next two to three weeks.
Even without his starting backcourt, Pacers Coach Nate McMillan played on with only nine in
his rotation. Former Wizards forward Bojan Bogdanovic led Indiana with 29 points, but he didn’t
get enough help.
For the Wizards, depth made all
the difference.
Beal scored a team-high 21
points, while three other starters
and four reserves also reached
double figures. Oubre’s energy
played a role in Washington’s best
run of the game when he took
offensive fouls on consecutive
plays in the second quarter. Besides his defense, Oubre added 15
points and grabbed seven rebounds.
“I thought everybody chipped
in and played well,” Brooks said.
candace.buckner@washpost.com
Wizards 111, Pacers 102
Washington ........................ 28
Indiana ................................ 23
WASHINGTON
Morris
Porter Jr.
Gortat
Beal
Satoransky
Oubre Jr.
Mahinmi
Scott
Frazier
Meeks
TOTALS
30
26
28
25
25 — 111
28 — 102
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
29:04 5-13 0-0 2-10 2 3 11
25:07 6-11 0-0 1-2 3 4 13
20:57
5-8 1-1 3-9 1 3 11
36:13 9-16 2-2 0-1 3 1 21
21:59
2-3 1-1 0-2 6 2
5
32:25
4-9 6-8 0-7 2 1 15
24:22
4-4 4-5 1-7 1 6 12
19:19 5-10 0-0 0-4 2 1 11
18:47
1-2 0-0 0-1 6 2
2
11:47
4-6 0-0 0-0 3 0 10
240 45-82 14-17 7-43 29 23 111
Percentages: FG .549, FT .824. 3-Point Goals: 7-25, .280
(Meeks 2-4, Scott 1-3, Beal 1-4, Oubre Jr. 1-4, Morris 1-5,
Porter Jr. 1-5). Team Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 13
(11 PTS). Blocked Shots: 1 (Oubre Jr.). Turnovers: 13
(Beal 6, Mahinmi 2, Morris 2, Frazier, Gortat, Meeks).
Steals: 7 (Frazier 2, Mahinmi 2, Satoransky 2, Oubre Jr.).
Technical Fouls: coach Wizards (Defensive three second), 2:58 second
INDIANA
Bogdanovic
T.Young
Turner
Joseph
Stephenson
J.Young
Sabonis
Jefferson
Moore
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
36:35 9-15 6-7 1-4 2 0 29
30:20 3-10 0-1 4-7 2 0
7
22:38
2-5 2-2 2-5 0 5
6
35:39
2-7 3-4 0-2 4 3
7
37:42 4-14 4-6 0-9 6 4 13
27:41 6-10 0-1 0-2 0 0 17
26:38 7-12 1-3 1-4 2 2 15
16:24
4-7 0-1 0-1 3 2
8
6:23
0-0 0-0 0-1 0 2
0
240 37-80 16-25 8-35 19 18 102
Percentages: FG .463, FT .640. 3-Point Goals: 12-29, .414
(Bogdanovic 5-7, J.Young 5-8, T.Young 1-2, Stephenson
1-7, Sabonis 0-2, Joseph 0-3). Team Rebounds: 8. Team
Turnovers: 15 (30 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Bogdanovic,
Turner). Turnovers: 15 (Stephenson 6, Sabonis 3, Turner
3, T.Young 2, Bogdanovic). Steals: 5 (Stephenson 2,
Bogdanovic, J.Young, T.Young). Technical Fouls: None.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
SU
high schools
B OY S ’ BA S KETBA L L TO P 20
1. Paul VI (22-2) Last week: 1
The Panthers, who haven’t lost
since Dec. 21, continued their
undefeated run through the
WCAC with wins over Bishop
Ireton, Good Counsel and
St. John’s.
2. Gonzaga (21-1) LW: 2
The Eagles beat The Heights and
Good Counsel last week by an
average of 50.5 points.
3. DeMatha (19-4) LW: 3
Without star guard Justin Moore,
the Stags fell behind in the WCAC
race with a 65-62 loss to O’Connell on Tuesday.
4. Loudoun Valley (19-1) LW: 4
The Vikings extended their winning streak to 13 games with
victories over Park View and
Woodgrove.
5. Rock Creek Christian (15-3)
LW: 5
The Capital Beltway League-leading Eagles cruised past Arundel
twice this past week, even without star forward Jermaine Harris.
6. O’Connell (17-6) LW: 10
Xavier Johnson (21 points) and
Matt Becht (17) powered a 65-62
upset win against DeMatha.
7. Georgetown Prep (16-5) LW:
6
The Little Hoyas responded to a
45-40 upset loss to St. Albans on
Tuesday by dominating Episcopal on Friday.
point loss to St. Frances by
trumping Glenelg Country and
New Jersey’s Bishop Eustace by
an average of 22 points.
12. Eleanor Roosevelt (11-5)
LW: 8
The Raiders made up for a loss to
Wise on Tuesday by beating
C.H. Flowers, 52-45, on Friday.
13. Wise (14-4) LW: 15
Guards Keyshawn Johnson and
Sherwyn Devonish powered the
Pumas past Eleanor Roosevelt
and Suitland.
14. Marshall (18-2) LW: 14
Daniel Deaver and Joseph Lampman each had 17 points to push
the Statesmen past Lee for one of
their two wins this past week.
15. Theodore Roosevelt (24-3)
LW: 16
Led by guard Darius Miles (20
points), four players scored in
double digits to down McKinley,
82-75, on Friday.
16. Potomac (Md.) (14-2) LW: 17
The Wolverines averaged 83.5
points in victories over Surrattsville and Largo.
17. Springbrook (16-2) LW: 18
Senior guard Delaino Jessup led
the Blue Devils to a win over Blair
with 17 points.
18. South County (18-3) LW: 20
The Stallions received 23 points
from center Quentin MilloraBrown in a 57-54 win over Robinson on Tuesday.
I95BALLERZ.COM
Carroll junior guard Jamal Muhammed has helped the Lions to an impressive season, even after their unusual loss against St. John’s.
8. St. John’s (15-8) LW: 7
After playing four straight games
decided by four points or fewer,
the Cadets couldn’t outlast Paul
VI in a 65-55 defeat Friday.
19. Wilson (22-9) LW: NR
9. Friendship Tech (18-3) LW: 11
20. Fairmont Heights (14-4)
LW: NR
The Titans picked up victories
over Eastern, Washington Latin
and National Christian.
10. Bullis (17-6) LW: 12
The Bulldogs earned wins over
St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes, St. Albans and Avalon this week and
forged a tie with Georgetown
Prep atop the IAC standings.
The Tigers return to the rankings
as winners of 10 of their past 11
games.
The defending Maryland 1A
champions have lost just once —
to Rock Creek Christian — since
Jan. 9.
Dropped out: No. 13 Riverdale
Baptist (16-12), No. 19 Paint
Branch (14-4)
On the bubble: Freedom-South
11. Pallotti (20-8) LW: 9
The Panthers answered a four-
Riding
(16-3),
River
(16-2), Paint Branch (14-4)
Hill
G IR LS ’ BA S KETBA L L TO P 20
1. Paul VI (21-2) Last week: 2
After their big win over St. John’s
on Friday, the Panthers move into
the top spot.
2. St. John’s (20-2) LW: 1
Azzi Fudd’s 27-point performance
wasn’t enough to take down a
Paul VI team that seemed to
consistently be a step ahead of the
Cadets.
3. Riverdale Baptist (16-4)
LW: 3
Without Honesty Scott-Grayson,
the Crusaders got past National
Christian in overtime thanks to
20 points and nine rebounds
from Shakira Austin.
couldn’t stop the Crusaders’ momentum in overtime.
11. Howard (17-1) LW: 13
Senior guard Courtney Furr led
the Lions with 16 points in a 65-23
rout of Reservoir.
12. Long Reach (12-1) LW: 14
The Lightning went on a 30-6 run
in its 83-33 win over Oakland
Mills.
13. T.C. Williams (16-4) LW: 9
Edison became the first local
team to beat the Titans, storming
back in the fourth quarter for a
55-52 victory.
BOYS’ BASKETBALL NOTES
Strange defeat cannot slow Carroll’s turnaround
F ROM STAFF REPORTS
Carroll Coach Mike Powell
gathered his team in the locker
room Jan. 26 but didn’t know what
to say.
The Lions had made a layup to
pull ahead of then-No. 7 St. John’s
by a point with one second left. But
Powell said “baffling” calls by the
referees that included a technical
foul against Carroll and makeup
free throws for St. John’s helped
the Cadets score a 53-51 victory.
So, in the locker room, Powell
talked about life seeming unfair
while pleading for the Lions to
move past their disappointment
and continue their turnaround
season.
“This was about to be a signature win,” he said. “I just reminded
them to stay focused and still understand what your goal is.”
Powell wondered whether his
players would let the late defeat
linger. Referees had called a technical foul after Lions players
charged the court when junior
Jamal Muhammad sunk his layup.
They then allowed St. John’s a redo
on two foul shots for what Powell
said they explained as distractions
from fans waving behind the basket and then filming with a light
from the side.
Powell said Carroll sent a complaint about the officiating to the
Washington Catholic Athletic
Conference.
WCAC Commissioner Steve
Colantuoni didn’t respond to a
request for comment, and
St. John’s Coach Pat Behan declined to comment.
“What I was concerned about,”
Powell said, “is this didn’t become
a win, so maybe they didn’t feel
like winners yet.”
But Powell didn’t fret for long.
The Lions faced Friendship Tech,
another top 10 squad, a day later
and won by 14. It served as an
example of Carroll’s growth. Last
year, the Lions went 0-22. In the
previous two seasons combined,
they won nine games. But this
season, Carroll is 12-7, with that
St. John’s game representing its
lone defeat in five games since Jan.
19.
“They left no doubt,” Powell
said. “What happened [against
St. John’s] was no fluke.”
— Callie Caplan
Small-ball Stone Bridge
There are stretches in which
Stone Bridge and its shooters
seem unstoppable. On Thursday,
the Bulldogs avenged a loss to
Freedom-South Riding by scoring
31 points in the second quarter of
an 84-67 win.
“When we’re knocking down
shots, we can beat anyone,” said
senior Ben Kling, who is third in
the area with 72 three-pointers.
“And we’ll also be the most fun
team to watch in the area.”
Through 20 games, Kling, senior James DiLuigi, junior Evan
Buckley and sophomore Isaiah
Rhodes have combined to make
192 three-pointers. Without a
player taller than 6 feet 3, Stone
Bridge (13-7) scores on fast breaks
and by spreading the floor.
Against Freedom, the Bulldogs hit
15 three-pointers and forced more
than 20 turnovers.
“We’re really small and scrappy,
but I think we fight harder than
any team out there, and that’s
what makes us win games,” said
Buckley, a point guard who counts
George Mason and American
among his list of 10 Division I
scholarship offers. “There’s really
no answer when we’re shooting
like we did against Freedom. Like,
everyone shot over 50 percent,
and then we don’t turn the ball
over as a team, so it gets hard to
keep up with us.”
Despite the loss, Freedom (16-3)
has locked up the Potomac District regular season crown.
Elsewhere in Loudoun County
over the weekend, senior Jordan
Miller became Loudoun Valley’s
all-time leading scorer with 1,588
points and counting.
‘No quit’ in Fairmont Heights
That No. 20 Fairmont Heights
was missing some players because
of injuries didn’t lessen the sting
of a blowout loss to St. John’s in
late December.
“We had a sit-down with all the
guys and said, ‘Hey, this is going to
dictate how your season is going to
go,’ ” Coach Chuck Henry said. “Either we’re going to tank because of
this, or we’re going to rally together.”
The Hornets still had a rough
patch ahead of them, losing to
Chapelgate Christian and Oxon
Hill as their players recovered, but
it was clear to Henry that the team
had gotten the message.
“There’s just really no quit in my
guys,” he said.
Point guard Darren LucasWhite and the reigning Maryland
1A state champions have backed
up that statement by winning 10 of
their past 11 games, including an
86-84 victory over No. 16 Potomac
to take the lead in the Prince
George’s County championship
seeding.
“No one on our staff and none of
our kids had ever beaten Potomac
before in a varsity game,” said
Henry, who is in his third year as
the head coach. “That was one of
the giants that we’ve had to slay
this year.”
— Dillon Mullan
— Dan Roth
14. Tuscarora (19-1) LW: 15
4. Poolesville (19-0) LW: 4
The Falcons are still in search of a
close game. Their most recent
margin of victory that was 20
points or fewer was an 18-point
win over Damascus on Jan. 5.
5. Rock Creek Christian (21-6)
LW: 5
Only one player managed to
reach double figures in the Eagles’ 61-28 loss to North Carolina
powerhouse Westridge Academy.
Senior guard Kennedy Middleton
made 12 two-pointers as part of a
26-point performance against
Broad Run.
15. Parkdale (13-1) LW: 16
The Panthers’ winning streak
reached double figures with a
30-point win over Bladensburg.
16. Bishop Ireton (17-5) LW: 12
The Cardinals had a rough week,
falling to Worcester Prep and
Elizabeth Seton.
6. McNamara (16-5) LW: 6
The Mustangs had a one-point
lead at halftime against St. John’s,
but a 25-point third quarter by
the Cadets quashed any hope of
an upset.
7. Richard Montgomery (18-0)
LW: 7
Senior center Nusaibah Rashad
had a huge week for the Rockets,
averaging 24.6 points in three
wins.
17. Edison (17-3) LW: NR
Junior guard Carole Miller is
averaging 14.9 points for the Eagles.
18. Freedom-South Riding (17-3)
LW: 19
Junior guards Kamryn Meador
and Jaelyn Batts combined for 31
of the Eagles’ 56 points in a win
over Stone Bridge.
8. Oxon Hill (18-0) LW: 8
19. Sidwell Friends (14-3)
LW: 20
Sophomore guard Aniya Wilson
had 23 points as the Clippers
stayed undefeated with a fivepoint win over Largo.
The Quakers beat Bullis for the
second time in six days thanks to
17 points and 13 rebounds from
junior Nalani Lyde.
9. Georgetown Visitation (18-4)
LW: 10
20. Eleanor Roosevelt (15-4)
LW: NR
Ellie Mitchell had 28 points and
15 rebounds, and Taylor Webster
contributed 19 points and seven
rebounds in an 81-45 victory over
Anacostia.
Senior guard Ashia McCalla had
24 points and 12 rebounds in the
Raiders’ 51-42 victory over C.H.
Flowers.
10. National Christian (18-6)
LW: 11
The Eagles watched an early lead
slip away in the fourth quarter
against Riverdale Baptist and
Dropped out: No. 17 Anacostia
(18-4), No. 18 Clarksburg (15-3)
On the bubble:
Woodbridge
(16-4), Leonardtown (14-2), Anacostia (18-4), Flint Hill (17-5)
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL NOTES
Langley learns to finish, just in time for the playo≠s
F ROM
STAFF REPORTS
Through the first two months
of the season, all of Langley’s
closest games were losses. After
single-digit defeats to Marshall
and O’Connell in December, the
trend peaked in mid-January
when the Saxons lost back-toback games to Liberty District
rivals Herndon and South Lakes
by a combined seven points.
Just in time for the playoffs,
though, Langley has started to
close. The Saxons began their
week by shutting out McLean in
overtime for a 50-43 win before
overcoming a slow start to beat
Herndon, 49-46, on Friday.
“We learned from all those
losses to value possessions at the
end of the game. It’s those tiny
details that can separate you and
put you in the upper echelon of
teams,” Coach Amanda Baker
said. “It takes on-court experience to get a handle of the small
things — shot selection, like taking a great shot instead of a good
shot, and even as small as a shot
fake or a pass fake that minimizes
turnovers.”
The Saxons have played plenty
of basketball over the past two
seasons: They reached the state
final in 2016 and a state semifinal
last March. Senior point guard
Jordyn Callaghan, a four-year
starter, leads Langley (13-5) at
12.9 points per game and has
reached double figures 14 times.
Under her leadership, the Saxons
hope to continue finishing games
over the final month.
“Wins like last week really remind the team that we’re in the
hunt and we can do this. Even if
we had a couple bumps, we’re in a
good place,” Baker said. “[Callaghan] has a lot of physical
talent on the court, but with what
she says and her thoughts and the
ideas that she brings, I look at her
like a fourth coach sometimes.”
— Dillon Mullan
Key loss for Rock Creek
Three weeks into life without
senior star Makayla Pippin,
things were going fine for Rock
Creek Christian. A loss to No. 10
National Christian aside, the Eagles were rolling, beating up on
locals and non-locals alike.
Taleah “Noo” Washington was
stuffing the stat sheet, and Sonia
Smith and Carrie Gross were
helping fill the vacancy left by
Pippin, the team’s leading scorer,
who was dismissed from the team
Jan. 14.
Then came the Westridge game
Friday. The Eagles were outscored
in the first quarter 16-7, and the
comeback burst never came
against the national power from
North Carolina. No. 5 Rock Creek
Christian fell, 61-28, but Eagles
assistant coach Kelvin Smith said
he doesn’t think the defeat was a
sign of things to come.
“We learned that, with the
schedule we have, we can’t have
mental breakdowns and mental
lapses,” he said.
Rock Creek Christian Coach
James “Boogie” Washington declined to reveal the reason behind
Pippin’s dismissal but said
Jan. 19: “It was a hard decision,
but at the end of the day, I got to
be able to look myself in the
mirror every day, and I got to be
able to keep the respect level of
our kids.”
Pippin, a four-star recruit according to ESPN, has signed with
La Salle. “God has a plan for
everyone. God’s in control; that’s
all I got to say,” said Pippin’s
mother, Johnetta.
Smith said the Eagles’ style
hasn’t changed without Pippin,
although they have gone smaller:
5-foot-6 guard Ayiana Keith has
slid into the starting lineup in
place of the 6-1 Pippin.
— Joshua Needelman
Crossland’s Canlas returns
Katelyn Canlas, fresh off a junior season at Crossland in which
she averaged more than 18 points,
was playing in the Deep South
Classic in Raleigh, N.C., as part of
the Havoc City AAU team in April
when an injury struck.
With college scouts crowding
the gym to assess a rich talent
pool, it could not have been a
more inopportune time to tear
her right anterior cruciate ligament.
“I was heartbroken,” Canlas
said. “I’d never seen so many
coaches on the sidelines. It was
just packed.”
Canlas had surgery to reconstruct the ligament and embarked on a grueling recovery
schedule to make it back as soon
as she could. She and her mother,
Elisa, have settled into the same
routine over the past four
months, driving to rehab in the
District every morning before
school.
“She wakes me up every morning at 4:30,” Elisa Canlas said.
“We leave the house at 5, and we’ll
be at therapy at 5:30.”
Much to the appreciation of
Crossland Coach Selina Smith,
Canlas finally took the court, albeit on a minutes restriction, just
over a week ago.
“She’s back, and she’s making a
total difference on our team,”
Smith said. “I was struggling
without her, as far as having a
floor leader.”
Smith, who said Canlas would
“stick around and work out with
the boys’ team” after practice last
season, wasn’t surprised to see
the senior back on the court
ahead of schedule.
“The girl’s phenomenal,” she
said.
— Dan Roth
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
COLLEGE ROUNDUP
W. Virginia
overcomes
Young and
Oklahoma
WEST VIRGINIA 75,
OKLAHOMA 73
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
Lamont West scored 17 points,
and No. 19 West Virginia survived
a 32-point night from Oklahoma’s
Trae Young to escape with a 75-73
win over the 17th-ranked Sooners
on Monday night in Norman,
Okla.
Esa Ahmad and Sagaba Konate
each scored 14, and Jevon Carter
added 10 points, eight assists and
six steals for the Mountaineers
(18-6, 7-4 Big 12), who swept the
regular season series and moved
within a half-game of conference
co-leaders Kansas and Texas
Tech.
Young, the freshman who leads
the nation in scoring and assists,
had just one assist.
Brady Manek scored 12 points
and Khadeem Lattin had 13 rebounds and four blocks for the
Sooners (16-7, 6-5).
Rashard Odomes made a layup
to cut West Virginia’s lead to 74-73
with 24.3 seconds to play. Oklahoma struggled to get the ball
upcourt after Ahmad made 1 of 2
free throws with 13 seconds remaining, and Odomes missed
from in close in the final seconds.
Carter sliced through Oklahoma’s defense for a layup at the
first-half buzzer to give West Virginia a 50-40 lead. The Mountaineers shot 57 percent from the field
and made 8 of 13 three-pointers
before the break. Young scored 17
points in the first half and had
just one turnover, but the Sooners
couldn’t stop the Mountaineers.
The Mountaineers had lost five
of seven and got the big win they
needed to move back into the
conference title hunt.
Meanwhile, it was Oklahoma’s
first home loss of the season. The
Sooners have just one road win in
league play.
MORGAN STATE 97, HOWARD 61: Tiwian Kendley scored
27 points, and Phillip Carr had his
12th double-double of the season
to help the Bears rout the Bison in
Baltimore and snap a two-game
skid.
It was Morgan State’s highest
scoring output since beating Norfolk State, 100-94, in overtime on
Jan. 31, 2010.
Carr finished with 20 points, 13
rebounds and five assists for the
Bears (9-14, 5-5 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference).
The Bison (7-18, 4-5), who had a
four-game
winning
streak
snapped, got 30 points from RJ
Cole, who hit five-three pointers.
Miss. St. women move to 24-0
In front of the first women's
basketball sellout crowd in
Starkville, Miss., Victoria Vivians
scored 20 of her 24 points in the
first half to help No. 2 Mississippi
State beat seventh-ranked South
Carolina, 67-53.
The Bulldogs (24-0, 10-0
Southeastern Conference) had
lost 11 straight to the Gamecocks,
including a defeat in the national
championship game last season.
The rematch of that April contest brought 10,794 fans to Humphrey Coliseum with the game
sold out two weeks in advance.
Student tickets were exhausted
within eight minutes of them
being offered earlier in the week.
The Gamecocks (18-5, 7-3) got
off to a strong start and led 20-10
before the Bulldogs rallied behind Vivians.
“I think we are tough because I
know how hard we practice,” Mississippi State Coach Vic Schaefer
said
BAYLOR
74, OKLAHOMA
65: Lauren Cox scored a career-
high 24 points, and the No. 3 Lady
Bears (22-1, 12-0 Big 12) outlasted
the Sooners (12-12, 7-6) in Waco,
Tex.
TEXAS 73, WEST VIRGINIA 55: Jatarie White had 18
points and 10 rebounds to lead
the No. 6 Longhorns (19-4, 10-2
Big 12) past the Mountaineers
(17-7, 5-7) in Morgantown, W.Va.
UCLA 84, USC 70: Monique
Billings and Jordin Canada each
scored 18 points to help the No. 8
Bruins (19-4, 10-2 Pac-12) move
into a first-place tie in the conference with Oregon and Stanford
by defeating the Trojans (15-8,
5-7) in Los Angeles.
HOWARD
68, MORGAN
STATE 61: Jayla Thornton scored
15 points to lead three players in
double figures as the Bison defeated the Bears in Baltimore.
Jayla Mills scored 11 points for
Howard (9-13, 5-4 MEAC), and
Sarah Edmond added 10. Morgan
State fell to 12-11, 5-5.
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
SCOREBOARD
BASKETBALL
HOCKEY
NBA
NCAA MEN
No. 6 Texas 73, West Virginia 55
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
AP MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL POLL
Texas (19-4)
Caron-Goudreau 4-8 0-0 9, White 7-10 4-5 18, Atkins
7-10 0-0 17, Higgs 3-8 0-0 6, McCarty 4-12 0-0 9, Hosey
0-1 0-0 0, Holmes 2-7 3-4 7, Sutton 3-6 0-2 7, Underwood
0-0 0-0 0, 30-62 Totals 7-11 73.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................39
Toronto ......................................36
Philadelphia ...............................25
New York ...................................23
Brooklyn.....................................19
L
15
16
25
31
35
Pct
.722
.692
.500
.426
.352
GB
—
2
12
16
20
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................31
Miami.........................................29
Charlotte....................................23
Orlando ......................................16
Atlanta.......................................16
L
22
25
30
36
37
Pct
.585
.537
.434
.308
.302
GB
—
21/2
8
141/2
15
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................30
Milwaukee .................................29
Indiana .......................................30
Detroit .......................................26
x-Chicago ...................................18
L
21
23
25
26
34
Pct
.588
.558
.545
.500
.346
GB
—
11/2
2
41/2
121/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................38
San Antonio ...............................34
New Orleans ..............................28
Memphis ....................................18
x-Dallas......................................17
L
13
21
25
34
36
Pct
.745
.618
.528
.346
.321
GB
—
6
11
201/2
22
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota..................................34
Oklahoma City ...........................30
Denver........................................29
Portland .....................................29
Utah ...........................................25
L
22
24
25
25
28
Pct
.607
.556
.537
.537
.472
GB
—
3
4
4
71/2
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................41
x-L.A. Clippers ...........................26
L.A. Lakers .................................21
Phoenix ......................................18
x-Sacramento ............................16
L
12
25
31
36
36
Pct
.774
.510
.404
.333
.308
GB
—
14
191/2
231/2
241/2
x-Late game
The top 25 teams in the Associated Press’s college
basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through Feb. 4, total points based on 25 points
for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place
vote and previous ranking:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
Villanova (48)
Virginia (16)
Purdue (1)
Michigan St.
Xavier
Cincinnati
Texas Tech
Auburn
Duke
Kansas
Saint Mary's (Calif.)
Gonzaga
Arizona
Ohio St.
Tennessee
Clemson
Oklahoma
Rhode Island
West Virginia
Michigan
North Carolina
Wichita St.
Nevada
Kentucky
Miami
Washington 111, at Indiana 102
at Detroit 111, Portland 91
Orlando 111, at Miami 109
Utah 133, at New Orleans 109
at Denver 121, Charlotte 104
Chicago at Sacramento, Late
Dallas at L.A. Clippers, Late
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Washington at Philadelphia, 8
Cleveland at Orlando, 7
Boston at Toronto, 7:30
Houston at Brooklyn, 7:30
Memphis at Atlanta, 7:30
Milwaukee at New York, 7:30
Oklahoma City at Golden State, 10:30
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
PVS
1
2
3
5
6
8
10
11
4
7
13
14
9
17
18
20
12
22
15
24
19
16
—
21
—
USA TODAY MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL POLL
The top 25 teams in the USA Today men’s college
basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through Feb. 4, points based on 25 points for a
first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote
and previous ranking:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
MONDAY’S RESULTS
PTS
1608
1572
1500
1407
1350
1305
1182
1138
1075
1015
895
851
816
747
739
720
636
486
457
331
304
295
205
133
76
Others receiving votes: Butler 65, Washington 54,
Florida St. 27, New Mexico St. 23, Seton Hall 20,
Creighton 18, Arizona St. 17, Texas 15, NC State 12,
Alabama 8, Middle Tennessee 6, Nebraska 4, Florida 3,
Houston 3, TCU 3, Oklahoma St. 2, ETSU 1, Vermont 1.
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Atlanta 99, at New York 96
at Boston 97, Portland 96
Milwaukee 109, at Brooklyn 94
at Toronto 101, Memphis 86
L.A. Lakers 108, at Oklahoma City 104
Charlotte 115, at Phoenix 110
RECORD
22-1
22-1
23-2
22-3
21-3
21-2
19-4
21-2
19-4
18-5
23-2
21-4
19-5
20-5
17-5
19-4
16-6
19-3
17-6
19-6
17-7
17-5
20-4
17-6
17-5
Villanova (22)
Virginia (8)
Purdue (1)
Michigan State
Xavier
Cincinnati
Texas Tech
Duke
Auburn
Kansas
Gonzaga
Saint Mary's
Arizona
Tennessee
Clemson
Ohio State
West Virginia
Oklahoma
Rhode Island
Michigan
Wichita State
North Carolina
Nevada
Kentucky
Miami
RECORD
22-1
22-1
23-2
22-3
21-3
21-2
19-4
19-4
21-2
18-5
21-4
23-2
19-5
17-5
19-4
20-5
17-6
16-6
19-3
19-6
17-5
17-7
20-4
17-6
17-5
PTS
765
751
716
662
649
622
549
494
461
451
441
436
351
348
334
322
283
255
252
168
163
150
103
73
59
PVS
1
2
3
4
6
8
10
5
13
7
12
14
9
19
20
18
11
15
21
25
16
17
—
22
—
Others receiving votes: Creighton 45, Arizona State 42,
Seton Hall 25, Middle Tennessee 15, N.C. State 13,
Florida State 11, New Mexico State 10, Washington 10,
Boise State 9, Florida 8, Butler 6, Houston 5, Louisiana-Lafayette 5, Alabama 3, Southern Cal 3, Kansas
State 2, Louisville 2, Texas 2, Loyola of Chicago 1.
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Brooklyn at Detroit, 7
Houston at Miami, 7:30
Indiana at New Orleans, 8
Minnesota at Cleveland, 8
Utah at Memphis, 8
San Antonio at Phoenix, 10:30
No. 2 Mississippi St. 67,
No. 7 South Carolina 53
South Carolina (18-5)
Jennings 0-3 1-2 1, Wilson 10-20 5-7 25, Cliney 3-7 3-4
10, Harris 3-6 0-0 6, Jackson 2-5 0-0 5, Grissett 0-1 0-0 0,
Herbert Harrigan 0-3 0-0 0, Patrick 0-0 0-2 0, Spann 2-8
1-2 6, 20-53 Totals 10-17 53.
Mississippi St. (24-0)
McCowan 3-9 3-4 9, Johnson 1-4 0-0 2, Schaefer 5-7 2-4
14, Vivians 8-24 5-6 24, William 2-6 1-2 5, Bibby 2-6 2-2
7, Campbell 0-0 0-0 0, Danberry 0-2 0-0 0, Holmes 1-2 4-5
6, 22-60 Totals 17-23 67.
SOUTH CAROLINA ............. 20
8 16
9
—53
MISSISSIPPI ST. ................ 10 19 10 28
—67
Three-point goals: South Carolina 3-9 (Cliney 1-3,
Jackson 1-1, Spann 1-5), Mississippi St. 6-14 (Johnson
0-1, Schaefer 2-4, Vivians 3-5, William 0-1, Bibby 1-3).
Assists: South Carolina 5 (Harris 4), Mississippi St. 10
(Holmes 8). Fouled out: South Carolina Harris, Jackson,
Mississippi St. Bibby. Rebounds: South Carolina 36
(Wilson 14), Mississippi St. 40 (McCowan 20). Total
fouls: South Carolina 23, Mississippi St. 17. Technical
Fouls_None.A: 10,794.
TENNIS
ATP
Corentin Moutet, France, def. Adrian Menendez-Maceiras, Spain, 6-4, 6-7 (7-5), 6-2; Andrej Martin, Slovakia,
def. Rogerio Dutra Silva, Brazil, 7-5, 6-4; Stefano
Travaglia, Italy, def. Pablo Andujar, Spain, 6-4, 5-7, 7-5.
SOUTH
Coppin St. 84, SC State 60
Grambling St. 81, Alcorn St. 72
Hampton 86, NC Central 70
Morgan St. 97, Howard 61
Syracuse 78, Louisville 73
23
27
24
30
Morgan St. 97, Howard 61
Howard (7-18)
Cousins 1-3 4-8 6, Lewis 3-3 0-0 6, Mingo 0-2 0-0 0, Cole
8-15 9-11 30, C.Williams 4-13 0-0 9, J.Jones 0-1 0-0 0,
Obindu 0-0 1-2 1, Odunze 0-0 0-0 0, Garvey 1-5 0-0 3,
P.Jones 0-0 0-0 0, Foster 0-3 0-0 0, Cotten 0-3 0-0 0, Hall
3-4 0-1 6. 20-52 Totals 14-22 61.
DETROIT: S.Johnson 3-10 1-2 8, Griffin 9-20 0-0 21,
Drummond 7-12 3-4 17, Smith 3-8 1-1 7, Bullock 4-8 2-3
13, Ellenson 0-1 0-0 0, Tolliver 6-9 0-0 15, Reed 1-1 0-0 2,
Galloway 5-8 0-0 13, Felder 0-2 0-0 0, Kennard 5-7 1-2 12,
Hearn 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 44-87 8-12 111.
Morgan St. (9-14)
Syfax 3-5 0-0 6, Carr 6-10 8-8 20, Gillespie 0-1 0-0 0,
Kendley 7-13 12-13 27, Rawls 4-8 0-0 12, Sykes 0-0 0-0 0,
Streeter 3-6 0-0 8, McCray-Pace 0-0 0-0 0, Davis 2-6 2-2
7, Gracey 2-5 2-2 7, Cameron 2-5 4-6 8, Staley 1-2 0-0 2.
Totals 30-61 28-31 97.
Three-point Goals: Portland 10-33 (Connaughton 3-3,
Napier 2-6, McCollum 2-6, Layman 1-1, Aminu 1-5,
Lillard 1-5, Swanigan 0-1, Vonleh 0-1, Harkless 0-2,
Collins 0-3), Detroit 15-30 (Bullock 3-5, Galloway 3-5,
Tolliver 3-6, Griffin 3-7, Hearn 1-1, Kennard 1-2, S.Johnson 1-3, Felder 0-1). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Portland 44 (Aminu 13), Detroit 51 (Drummond 17).
Assists: Portland 18 (Lillard 5), Detroit 36 (Smith 7).
Total Fouls: Portland 14, Detroit 14. Technicals: McCollum. A: 13,810 (21,000).
Halftime: Morgan St. 53-27. Three-point goals: Howard
7-23 (Cole 5-9, C.Williams 1-2, Garvey 1-5, Mingo 0-2,
Cotten 0-2, Foster 0-3), Morgan St. 9-20 (Rawls 4-7,
Streeter 2-4, Davis 1-1, Gracey 1-2, Kendley 1-5,
Gillespie 0-1). Fouled out: Foster, Cousins, J.Jones.
Rebounds: Howard 24 (Cousins 7), Morgan St. 37 (Carr
13). Assists: Howard 10 (Cole 4), Morgan St. 21 (Kendley
6). Total fouls: Howard 25, Morgan St. 19. A: 3,156
(4,250).
Magic 111, Heat 109
33
25
34
27
18 — 111
22 — 109
ORLANDO: Simmons 6-9 2-3 16, Hezonja 7-14 2-2 20,
Biyombo 3-5 3-4 9, Payton 3-8 4-4 10, Fournier 6-13 0-0
13, Iwundu 2-3 0-0 5, Speights 4-9 2-2 12, Birch 1-4 0-0 2,
Augustin 6-11 1-2 16, Mack 2-4 2-2 6, Afflalo 1-4 0-0 2.
Totals 41-84 16-19 111.
MIAMI: Winslow 6-10 4-4 16, Olynyk 0-0 0-0 0, Whiteside 8-16 3-5 19, Dragic 5-13 2-4 13, Richardson 8-13 4-5
20, J.Johnson 2-5 2-3 6, Mickey 0-0 0-0 0, Adebayo 6-13
6-8 18, Ellington 0-9 5-5 5, T.Johnson 5-14 0-1 12. Totals
40-93 26-35 109.
Three-point Goals: Orlando 13-30 (Hezonja 4-9, Augustin 3-6, Simmons 2-2, Speights 2-6, Iwundu 1-1, Fournier
1-4, Payton 0-1, Afflalo 0-1), Miami 3-23 (T.Johnson 2-7,
Dragic 1-4, J.Johnson 0-1, Richardson 0-1, Adebayo 0-2,
Ellington 0-8). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 39
(Afflalo 6), Miami 53 (Whiteside 14). Assists: Orlando
25 (Payton 7), Miami 21 (Dragic 7). Total Fouls: Orlando
26, Miami 19. Technicals: Fournier, Orlando coach Frank
Vogel. A: 19,600 (19,600).
Jazz 133, Pelicans 109
36
41
29
22
34 — 133
23 — 109
UTAH: Ingles 7-12 0-0 18, Favors 7-11 3-4 19, Gobert 7-8
5-5 19, Rubio 8-19 3-4 20, Mitchell 1-6 0-0 2, McCree 0-1
0-0 0, O’Neale 6-7 0-0 13, Jerebko 0-2 0-0 0, Udoh 1-2 0-0
2, Neto 2-3 2-2 8, Hood 12-14 2-2 30, Johnson 1-4 0-0 2.
Totals 52-89 15-17 133.
NEW ORLEANS: Moore 5-9 2-2 14, Mirotic 2-8 1-2 5,
Davis 6-16 3-4 15, Rondo 7-13 0-2 18, Holiday 13-21 0-1
28, Miller 1-3 0-0 2, Diallo 3-6 0-0 6, Okafor 1-2 1-2 3,
James 0-2 0-0 0, Clark 7-11 0-0 14, Liggins 2-2 0-0 4.
Totals 47-93 7-13 109.
Three-point Goals: Utah 14-21 (Hood 4-4, Ingles 4-5,
Neto 2-2, Favors 2-2, O’Neale 1-1, Rubio 1-3, Jerebko
0-1, Johnson 0-1, Mitchell 0-2), New Orleans 8-22
(Rondo 4-6, Moore 2-3, Holiday 2-5, Clark 0-2, Davis 0-2,
Mirotic 0-4). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Utah 45
(Gobert 10), New Orleans 30 (Davis 11). Assists: Utah 29
(Rubio 11), New Orleans 24 (Rondo 8). Total Fouls: Utah
18, New Orleans 15. Technicals: Gobert. A: 14,293
(16,867).
Nuggets 121, Hornets 104
37
27
22
34
20 — 104
24 — 121
CHARLOTTE: Kidd-Gilchrist 1-3 0-0 2, Kaminsky 4-8 0-2
9, Howard 9-11 1-5 19, Walker 6-13 5-6 20, Batum 5-11
2-4 15, Bacon 0-0 0-0 0, O’Bryant III 0-2 0-0 0, Zeller 2-3
4-4 8, Carter-Williams 3-6 0-0 6, Monk 0-2 0-0 0, Stone
0-0 0-0 0, Graham 4-7 0-0 11, Lamb 5-11 3-3 14. Totals
39-77 15-24 104.
DENVER: Barton 7-10 2-2 18, Chandler 1-4 0-0 2, Jokic
5-11 3-3 15, Murray 7-15 0-0 18, Harris 9-13 4-5 27,
Hernangomez 0-0 0-0 0, Lyles 4-8 1-2 11, Arthur 4-5 0-0
10, Mudiay 5-7 1-1 12, Beasley 1-2 0-0 2, Craig 3-6 0-0 6.
Totals 46-81 11-13 121.
Three-point Goals: Charlotte 11-26 (Graham 3-4, Walker
3-6, Batum 3-7, Kaminsky 1-3, Lamb 1-4, Carter-Williams 0-1, Monk 0-1), Denver 18-34 (Harris 5-7, Murray
4-8, Barton 2-3, Arthur 2-3, Jokic 2-4, Lyles 2-4, Mudiay
1-1, Beasley 0-1, Chandler 0-1, Craig 0-2). Fouled Out:
None. Rebounds: Charlotte 36 (Zeller 10), Denver 41
(Jokic 16). Assists: Charlotte 21 (Batum 5), Denver 30
(Barton 8). Total Fouls: Charlotte 16, Denver 15. A:
14,410 (19,155).
NBA INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
No. 19 West Virginia 75, No. 17
Oklahoma 73
West Virginia (18-6)
Ahmad 5-10 4-6 14, Harris 2-4 0-0 5, Konate 7-15 0-0 14,
Bolden 3-9 0-0 9, Carter 5-17 0-0 10, Allen 0-1 0-0 0,
West 5-10 2-3 17, Routt 1-2 0-0 2, Miles 2-3 0-0 4. 30-71
Totals 6-9 75.
Oklahoma (16-7)
Manek 4-11 3-3 12, Lattin 1-4 4-4 6, Odomes 4-9 0-0 8,
James 2-6 0-1 5, Young 10-20 8-9 32, Doolittle 1-3 0-0 2,
Freeman 0-0 0-0 0, McNeace 2-2 2-2 6, Shepherd 1-1 0-0
2, McGusty 0-0 0-0 0, Lazenby 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 25-56
17-19 73.
Halftime: West Virginia 50-40. Three-point goals: West
Virginia 9-25 (West 5-9, Bolden 3-5, Harris 1-2, Ahmad
0-4, Carter 0-5), Oklahoma 6-16 (Young 4-10, James 1-2,
Manek 1-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: West Virginia
34 (Konate 11), Oklahoma 31 (Lattin 13). Assists: West
Virginia 14 (Carter 8), Oklahoma 8 (Odomes, James 2).
Total fouls: West Virginia 17, Oklahoma 11.
Albany (N.Y.) 93, Mass.-Lowell 60
Binghamton 69, Stony Brook 64
Bryant 60, Sacred Heart 56
CCSU 76, Fairleigh Dickinson 56
Canisius 52, St. Peter’s 49
Maine 59, Hartford 56
Md.-Eastern Shore 87, Florida A&M 70
Siena 44, Monmouth (N.J.) 41
St. Francis Brooklyn 75, Mount St. Mary’s 56
Texas 73, West Virginia 55
Vermont 58, New Hampshire 53
Wagner 52, LIU Brooklyn 44
G
44
48
38
46
51
45
REBOUNDS
Drummond, DET ...............
Jordan, L.A.C. ....................
Cousins, NOR ....................
Howard, CHA ....................
Towns, MIN .......................
Embiid, PHL ......................
G OFF. DEF. TOT. AVG.
49 243 509 752 15.3
46 198 488 686 14.9
48 105 513 618 12.9
52 180 481 661 12.7
56 165 518 683 12.2
40
89 349 438 11.0
FG
411
489
329
455
512
417
FT
372
341
224
301
231
217
PTS.
1371
1344
1045
1243
1341
1165
AVG.
31.2
28.0
27.5
27.0
26.3
25.9
Alabama A&M 57, MVSU 49
Bethune-Cookman 60, Norfolk St. 45
Grambling St. 68, Alcorn St. 51
Hampton 62, N.C. Central 53
Howard 68, Morgan St. 61
Mississippi St. 67, South Carolina 53
N.C. A&T 75, Delaware St. 55
S.C. State 67, Coppin St. 65
Savannah St. 79, Allen 41
Southern U. 68, Jackson St. 58
MIDWEST
Missouri 66, Florida 64
SOUTHWEST
Ark.-Pine Bluff 55, Alabama St. 53
L
14
11
19
22
22
25
25
29
OL PTS. GF GA
3
75 189 140
8
70 164 121
5
67 179 154
6
50 143 163
8
50 134 151
6
50 139 164
9
43 132 176
9
37 117 171
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Carroll 63, Ballou 26
New Hope 2, Wilson 0
VIRGINIA
Freedom-South Riding 51, Westfield 36
Heritage 61, Park View 34
McLean 50, Battlefield 42
PRIVATE
Grace Brethren 43, Field 34
Hebrew Academy 51, Oakcrest 38
McLean School 33, Washington Waldorf 26
WESTERN CONFERENCE
B OY S ' B A S K E TB A L L
CENTRAL
Nashville .......................
Winnipeg ......................
St. Louis ........................
Dallas ............................
Minnesota .....................
Colorado ........................
Chicago .........................
W
32
31
32
31
28
28
24
L
12
13
19
19
19
19
20
OL PTS. GF GA
7
71 161 131
9
71 172 140
3
67 153 134
4
66 167 140
5
61 153 150
4
60 164 149
8
56 153 145
PACIFIC
Vegas ............................
San Jose ........................
Los Angeles ..................
Calgary ..........................
Anaheim .......................
Edmonton .....................
Vancouver .....................
Arizona .........................
W
35
28
28
26
25
23
21
12
L
13
16
19
18
19
24
25
31
OL PTS. GF GA
4
74 177 140
8
64 152 142
5
61 148 126
8
60 147 149
10
60 151 156
4
50 144 163
6
48 137 168
9
33 119 182
TOP 20
NO. 4 LOUDOUN VALLEY 67, DOMINION 53
D (6-12)Totals 0 0-0 53.
LV (20-1) Miller 18, Melbourne 16, Williams 10, Peterson
10, Adams 4, Jones 3, Obaid 2, Dawson 2, Johns 2 Totals
15 13-16 67.
Halftime: Dominion, (26-25).
Three-point goals: LV 8 (Williams 2, Melbourne 2,
Peterson 2, Miller 1, Jones 1).
PVAC
JEWISH DAY 51, WASHINGTON CHRISTIAN 10
WC (1-9)Totals 0 0-0 10.
JD (9-8) Offer 14, Katz 10, Stravitz 6, Gordon 5, Galitzer
4, Gershman 4, Swagel 3, Schwartz 3, Bitton 2 Totals 20
5-8 51.
Halftime: Jewish Day, (28-4).
Three-point goals: JD 2 (Offer 1, Gordon 1).
x-Late game
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Vegas 4, at Washington 3
San Jose 3, at Carolina 1
at Montreal 4, Ottawa 1
MONDAY’S RESULTS
NONLEAGUE
at Toronto 7, Anaheim 4
Nashville 5, at N.Y. Islanders 4 (OT)
at Dallas 2, N.Y. Rangers 1
at Edmonton 6, Tampa Bay 2
MCLEAN SCHOOL 99,
TRINITY AT MEADOW VIEW 51
MS (14-5) Frye 26, Leta 20, Braithwaite 17, Atta 11,
Collins 9, Kalinowski 9, Rah 3, McCarthy 2, Kerr 2 Totals
28 16-20 99.
TMV (1-4)Totals 0 0-0 51.
Halftime: McLean School, (55-28).
Three-point goals: MS 9 (Leta 4, Rah 1, Kalinowski 1,
Braithwaite 1, Frye 2)
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Washington at Columbus, 7
Vegas at Pittsburgh, 7
Anaheim at Buffalo, 7
Philadelphia at Carolina, 7
New Jersey at Ottawa, 7:30
Boston at Detroit, 7:30
Vancouver at Florida, 7:30
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8
Arizona at Winnipeg, 8
Calgary at Chicago, 8:30
San Jose at Colorado, 9
FLINT HILL 88, JOHN PAUL THE GREAT 69
FH (16-5) Moore 20, Wahab 17, Turner 14, Taylor 9,
Herlihy 7, Jioklow 4, Solomon 4, Worman 4, Stern 3,
Ellison 2, Ferguson 2, Adams 2 Totals 34 5-11 88.
JPG (6-13)Totals 0 0-0 69.
Halftime: Flint Hill, (42-30).
Three-point goals: FH 5 (Taylor 2, Moore 2, Stern 1)
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Nashville at Toronto, 7:30
Boston at N.Y. Rangers, 8
Edmonton at Los Angeles, 10:30
GI R LS ' BA S K E TBALL
THURSDAY’S GAMES
TOP 20
N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo, 7
Calgary at New Jersey, 7
Montreal at Philadelphia, 7
Nashville at Ottawa, 7:30
Vancouver at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Arizona at Minnesota, 8
Colorado at St. Louis, 8
Dallas at Chicago, 8:30
Vegas at San Jose, 10:30
NO. 19 FREEDOM-SOUTH RIDING 51,
WESTFIELD 36
W (14-8) McNamara 11, Johnson 9, Wardak 8, Reed 2,
Yoham 2, Williams 2, Mackmin 2 Totals 13 1-1 36.
F-SR (18-3) Haley 21, Batts 13, Meador 8, Scales 7,
Wolin 2 Totals 18 9-20 51.
Halftime: Freedom-South Riding, (26-18).
Three-point goals: F-SR 2 (Scales 2); W 3 (McNamara 1,
Wardak 2).
1
1
1
0
1 — 5
0 — 4
Scoring: 1, N.Y. Islanders, Tavares 27 (Bailey, Lee), 4:55
(pp). 2, Nashville, Fiala 16 (Turris, Smith), 11:59. 3,
Nashville, Fiala 17 (Ellis, Bonino), 13:27. 4, N.Y. Islanders, Pulock 5 (Ladd, Nelson), 14:05. 5, N.Y. Islanders,
Cizikas 6 (Chimera), 17:03.
SECOND PERIOD
ATP
Scoring: 6, N.Y. Islanders, Leddy 8 (Nelson, Ladd), 3:39.
7, Nashville, Jarnkrok 12 (Hartnell, Ekholm), 16:25.
WORLD RANKING
THIRD PERIOD
Through Sunday
Scoring: 8, Nashville, Johansen 6 (Arvidsson, Subban),
19:17.
SINGLES
1. Rafael Nadal, Spain, 9760
2. Roger Federer, Switzerland, 9605
3. Marin Cilic, Croatia, 4960
4. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, 4630
5. Alexander Zverev, Germany, 4610
6. Dominic Thiem, Austria, 4060
7. David Goffin, Belgium, 3460
8. Jack Sock, United States, 2880
9. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, 2815
10. Pablo Carreno Busta, Spain, 2705
11. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, 2620
12. Sam Querrey, United States, 2490
13. Novak Djokovic, Serbia, 2470
14. Nick Kyrgios, Australia, 2395
15. Stan Wawrinka, Switzerland, 2385
16. Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic, 2320
17. Lucas Pouille, France, 2235
18. John Isner, United States, 2230
19. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, France, 2050
20. Andy Murray, Britain, 1960
21. Albert Ramos-Vinolas, Spain, 1925
22. Fabio Fognini, Italy, 1850
23. Roberto Bautista Agut, Spain, 1845
24. Diego Schwartzman, Argentina, 1810
25. Adrian Mannarino, France, 1670
DOUBLES
1. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, 9560
1. Marcelo Melo, Brazil, 9560
3. Henri Kontinen, Finland, 6790
4. John Peers, Australia, 6790
5. Mate Pavic, Croatia, 6070
6. Oliver Marach, Austria, 5900
7. Nicolas Mahut, France, 5220
8. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 5190
OVERTIME
Scoring: 9, Nashville, Josi 9 (Bonino), 3:42.
SHOTS ON GOAL
NASHVILLE ...................... 18
19
6
4 — 47
N.Y. ISLANDERS .............. 11
9
7
1 — 28
Power-play opportunities: Nashville 0 of 3; N.Y. Islanders 1 of 4. Goalies: Nashville, Rinne 27-8-3 (28 shots-24
saves). N.Y. Islanders, Halak 16-15-4 (47-42). A: 10,217
(15,795). T: 2:35.
Maple Leafs 7, Ducks 4
ANAHEIM ................................ 0
TORONTO ................................ 1
3
3
1 —
3 —
4
7
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Toronto, Matthews 24 (Hyman, Nylander),
6:32.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Anaheim, Getzlaf 7 (Rakell, Perry), 0:43. 3,
Toronto, Nylander 11 (Gardiner), 5:52. 4, Anaheim,
Rakell 20 (Perry, Getzlaf), 8:23. 5, Anaheim, Kase 13
(Perry, Silfverberg), 11:06 (pp). 6, Toronto, Marner 10
(van Riemsdyk, Kadri), 15:28 (pp). 7, Toronto, Komarov 5
(Gardiner, Kadri), 17:40.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 8, Anaheim, Rakell 21 (Manson, Perry), 2:07. 9,
Toronto, Nylander 12 (Gardiner), 3:28. 10, Toronto,
Matthews 25 (Kapanen), 16:49. 11, Toronto, Hyman 11
(C.Brown, Matthews), 19:06.
SHOTS ON GOAL
1. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark, 7965
2. Simona Halep, Romania, 7616
3. Elina Svitolina, Ukraine, 5835
4. Garbine Muguruza, Spain, 5690
5. Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, 5445
6. Jelena Ostapenko, Latvia, 5000
7. Caroline Garcia, France, 4495
8. Venus Williams, United States, 4277
9. Angelique Kerber, Germany, 3031
10. Julia Goerges, Germany, 2900
11. Johanna Konta, Britain, 2825
12. Sloane Stephens, United States, 2813
13. Kristina Mladenovic, France, 2770
14. Madison Keys, United States, 2644
15. Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, 2540
16. Ashleigh Barty, Australia, 2486
17. CoCo Vandeweghe, United States, 2434
18. Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 2363
19. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, 2362
20. Elise Mertens, Belgium, 2215
21. Petra Kvitova, 2187
22. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, 2125
23. Elena Vesnina, Russia, 2115
24. Daria Kasatkina, Russia, 2095
25. Barbora Strycova, Czech Republic, 1940
SOUTH
Entering Monday’s games
POINTS
Harden, HOU .....................
Antetokounmpo, MIL .......
Curry, GOL .........................
Davis, NOR ........................
James, CLE ........................
Durant, GOL ......................
Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, def. Evgeny Donskoy (8), Russia,
6-4, 6-4; Joao Sousa (8), Portugal, def. Dimitar Kuzmanov, Bulgaria, 7-6 (8-6), 6-1.
SINGLES
MONDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
W
36
31
31
22
21
22
17
14
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
HERITAGE 61, PARK VIEW 34
The top 25 teams in the Associated Press’s women’s
college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 4, total points based on 25
points for a first-place vote through one point for a
25th-place vote and last week’s ranking:
Others receiving votes: West Virginia 46, Belmont 28,
South Florida 28, LSU 21, Nebraska 12, Mercer 8, Dayton
7, California 2, Cent. Michigan 2, Gonzaga 2, Iowa 2,
DePaul 1, Purdue 1, Rutgers 1.
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay ....................
Boston ...........................
Toronto .........................
Florida ...........................
Detroit ..........................
Montreal .......................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
VIRGINIA
Loudoun Valley 67, Dominion 53
PRIVATE
Flint Hill 88, John Paul the Great 69
Jewish Day 51, Washington Christian 10
McLean School 99, Trinity at Meadow View 51
Saint Anselm's 53, Hebrew Academy 52
FIRST PERIOD
AP WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL POLL
PVS
1
2
3
4
5
8
7
9
6
11
12
10
18
14
15
16
24
17
19
20
13
23
—
22
—
OL PTS. GF GA
5
65 162 152
8
62 154 151
3
61 164 162
4
58 137 147
6
58 181 197
9
57 150 154
8
56 143 162
5
55 156 162
At Arena Armeec Sofia; in Sofia, Bulgaria
Purse: $624,335 (WT250); Surface: Hard-Indoor
Through Sunday
PTS
800
764
732
701
683
610
579
558
555
535
483
445
360
348
332
298
283
267
219
218
175
92
78
72
52
L
17
16
22
21
22
19
21
23
CONFERENCE 21-B
WTA
RECORD
22-0
23-0
21-1
24-1
22-2
18-4
18-4
18-4
21-4
20-3
19-4
19-4
19-5
18-6
17-5
17-6
16-8
20-3
18-6
21-2
19-6
16-6
19-5
16-6
17-7
W
30
27
29
27
26
24
24
25
NASHVILLE ........................ 2
N.Y. ISLANDERS ................ 3
WORLD RANKING
U-Conn. (32)
Mississippi St.
Baylor
Louisville
Notre Dame
Texas
South Carolina
UCLA
Oregon
Maryland
Tennessee
Florida St.
Ohio St.
Texas A&M
Missouri
Oregon St.
Stanford
Georgia
Duke
Green Bay
Michigan
Oklahoma St.
NC State
TCU
Arizona St.
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
New Jersey ...................
Pittsburgh .....................
Columbus ......................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
Philadelphia ..................
Carolina .........................
N.Y. Rangers .................
Predators 5, Islanders 4 (OT)
NCAA WOMEN
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
BOYS' BASKETBALL
DIEMA XTRA SOFIA OPEN
SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
24 — 91
32 — 111
PORTLAND: Harkless 3-5 0-0 6, Aminu 3-11 2-2 9, Nurkic
5-10 0-0 10, Lillard 8-17 3-3 20, McCollum 6-15 0-0 14,
Layman 2-4 0-1 5, Swanigan 1-2 0-0 2, Vonleh 0-1 0-0 0,
Davis 2-5 0-0 4, Collins 1-8 0-0 2, Leonard 0-0 0-0 0,
Napier 3-12 0-0 8, Connaughton 3-4 2-2 11. Totals 37-94
7-8 91.
CHARLOTTE ....................... 25
DENVER .............................. 36
Missouri (18-5)
Frericks 8-13 2-2 18, Porter 11-16 2-3 27, Aldridge 2-4
0-0 6, Cunningham 5-9 0-0 10, Smith 1-3 0-0 2, Michael
1-3 0-0 2, Schuchts 0-2 0-0 0, Chavis 0-0 0-0 0, Roundtree
0-2 1-2 1, 28-52 Totals 5-7 66.
FLORIDA ............................... 9 23 13 19
—64
MISSOURI .......................... 15 17 15 19
—66
Three-point goals: Florida 9-33 (Lorenzen 0-2, Anderson
3-10, Hersler 2-6, Nakkasoglu 1-6, Washington 3-8,
Johnson 0-1), Missouri 5-19 (Frericks 0-1, Porter 3-4,
Aldridge 2-4, Cunningham 0-3, Smith 0-1, Michael 0-2,
Schuchts 0-2, Roundtree 0-2). Assists: Florida 10
(Lorenzen 3), Missouri 18 (Cunningham 4). Fouled out:
None. Rebounds: Florida 32 (Lorenzen 10), Missouri 33
(Cunningham 9). Total fouls: Florida 10, Missouri 8.
Technical Fouls_None.A: 3,164.
SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Fairfield 78, Siena 65
Indiana 65, Rutgers 43
Lehigh 92, Bucknell 89, OT
Md.-Eastern Shore 62, Florida A&M 61
Pistons 111, Trail Blazers 91
UTAH .................................. 34
NEW ORLEANS .................. 23
Florida (10-13)
Lorenzen 4-9 0-0 8, Anderson 4-13 1-1 12, Hersler 6-14
0-0 14, Nakkasoglu 2-11 2-2 7, Washington 7-15 6-6 23,
Hayes 0-0 0-0 0, Thomas 0-0 0-0 0, Johnson 0-2 0-0 0,
23-64 Totals 9-9 64.
At Club Jacaranda; in Quito, Ecuador
Purse: $501,345 (WT250); Surface: Clay-Outdoor
MONDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
Boston at Washington, 8
Atlanta at Orlando, 7
New York at Toronto, 7:30
Charlotte at Portland, 10
Dallas at Golden State, 10:30
Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
ORLANDO ........................... 26
MIAMI ................................ 35
No. 15 Missouri 66, Florida 64
ECUADOR OPEN
THURSDAY’S GAMES
PORTLAND ......................... 20
DETROIT ............................. 22
West Virginia (17-7)
King 3-9 2-2 8, Muldrow 4-12 1-2 12, Davenport 4-14 3-4
14, Pardee 3-8 1-2 8, Ray 3-11 0-0 8, Harden 0-4 0-0 0,
Ekhelar 1-1 0-0 2, Jones 1-2 0-0 3, 19-61 Totals 7-10 55.
TEXAS ................................ 18 19 19 17
—73
WEST VIRGINIA ................. 19
7 20
9
—55
Three-point goals: Texas 6-15 (Caron-Goudreau 1-2,
Atkins 3-4, Higgs 0-1, McCarty 1-5, Sutton 1-3), West
Virginia 10-20 (Muldrow 3-5, Davenport 3-5, Pardee 1-4,
Ray 2-5, Jones 1-1). Assists: Texas 16 (McCarty 6), West
Virginia 15 (Ray 4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Texas
44 (Caron-Goudreau 10), West Virginia 34 (King 7). Total
fouls: Texas 10, West Virginia 14. Technical
Fouls_None.A: 2,149.
H I GH S C HOOLS
DOUBLES
1. Latisha Chan, Taiwan, 10130
1. Martina Hingis, Switzerland, 10130
3. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 8100
3. Elena Vesnina, Russia, 8100
5. Timea Babos, Hungary, 7130
6. Andrea Sestini Hlavackova, Czech Republic, 6040
7. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, 5315
8. Katerina Siniakova, Czech Republic, 4500
BOXING
Fight Schedule
SATURDAY
At Copper Box Arena, London, Zolani Tete vs. Omar
Narvaez, 12, for Tete’s WBO bantamweight title.
At Hartman Arena, Park City, Kansas (CBSSN), Tramaine Williams vs. Alexei Collado, 12, for the vacant
WBO International super bantamweight title.
At Cancun, Mexico, Miguel Berchelt vs. Cristian Mijares,
12, for Berchelt’s WBC junior lightweight title.
FEB. 16
At Reno-Sparks Convention Center, Reno, Nev., Raymundo Beltran vs. Paulus Moses, 12, for the vacant WBO
World lightweight title; Egidijus Kavaliauskas vs. David
Avanesyan, 10, welterweights.
ANAHEIM .............................. 16
14
14 — 44
TORONTO .............................. 15
9
16 — 40
Power-play opportunities: Anaheim 1 of 3; Toronto 1 of
3. Goalies: Anaheim, Miller 6-4-5 (39 shots-33 saves).
Toronto, McElhinney 6-4-0 (16-15), Andersen 25-15-4
(28-25). A: 19,055 (18,819). T: 2:39.
Stars 2, Rangers 1
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 1
DALLAS .................................... 0
0
1
0 —
1 —
PVAC
HEBREW ACADEMY 51, OAKCREST 38
H (7-10) Raskin 20, Mellman 10, Panitch 8, Lowenstein
5, Dekelbaum 3, Kanovsky 2, Fuller 2, Fleisher 1 Totals 17
5-16 51.
O (4-7) Spalding 15, Rudy 11, Kilmer 6, Friddle 2, Kilmer
2, Miller 2 Totals 12 5-9 38.
Halftime: Hebrew Academy, (23-12).
Three-point goals: O 3 (Spalding 3); H 4 (Raskin 4)
GRACE BRETHREN 43, FIELD 34
F (3-12) Rauch 13, Blackman 12, Pardo 4, Shaw 3,
Bennett 2 Totals 10 5-11 34.
GB (6-14) Mills 16, Justice 13, Benjamin 6, Clark 4, Banks
2, Blake 2 Totals 14 12-16 43.
Halftime: Grace Brethren, (18-17).
Three-point goals: GB 1 (Justice 1); F 3 (Rauch 3)
NONLEAGUE
NEW HOPE 2, WILSON 0
W (11-11)Totals 0 0-0 0.
NH (4-9) Ballinger 2 Totals 1 0-0 2.
Halftime: New Hope, (0-0).
Three-point goals:
MCLEAN SCHOOL 33,
WASHINGTON WALDORF 26
WW (4-2)Totals 0 0-0 26.
MS (14-0) Lewis 15, Zimmerman 7, Hawley 7, Gilinson 2,
Harrison 2 Totals 12 9-13 33.
Halftime: McLean School, (18-12).
Three-point goals:
CARROLL 63, BALLOU 26
B (9-8) Ingraham 15, Cain 5, Hooker 4, Lemons 2 Totals 9
2-5 26.
AC (6-16) James 19, Gakdeng 18, Harris 8, Mooney 6,
Jones 6, Middleton 6 Totals 27 6-11 63.
Halftime: Carroll, (31-14).
Three-point goals: AC 1 (James 1); B 2 (Ingraham 2)
MCLEAN 50, BATTLEFIELD 42
M (7-11) Moskowitz 12, Hedrick 12, Dufrane 11, Auza 6,
Barlow 3, Cox 2, Buday 2, Jones 2 Totals 18 11-14 50.
B (4-4)Totals 0 0-0 42.
Halftime: Battlefield, (21-19).
Three-point goals: M 1 (Barlow 1)
1
2
TR ANS AC TI ONS
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, N.Y. Rangers, Desharnais 6 (Lettieri, Miller),
17:55.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Dallas, Seguin 26 (Radulov, Spezza), 14:44.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Dallas, Hanzal 5 (Honka, Lindell), 4:05 (pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 9
12
11 — 32
DALLAS .................................. 21
13
7 — 41
Power-play opportunities: N.Y. Rangers 0 of 3; Dallas 1
of 5. Goalies: N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 21-16-4 (41
shots-39 saves). Dallas, Bishop 22-14-3 (32-31). A:
17,543 (18,532). T: 2:32.
TAMPA BAY ............................ 1
EDMONTON ............................. 2
MLB
Houston Astros: Agreed to terms with OF George
Springer on a two-year contract.
New York Yankees: Named Josh Bard bench coach, P.J.
Pilittere assistant hitting coach, Phil Nevin third base
coach, Reggie Willits first base coach/outfield instructor, Carlos Mendoza quality control coach/infield instructor, Jason Brown catching coach, Radley Haddad
coaching assistant/bullpen catcher and Brett Weber
coaching assistant/instant replay coordinator.
Texas Rangers: Agreed to terms with INF Darwin Barney
on a minor league contract.
NBA
Brooklyn Nets: Traded C Tyler Zeller to Milwaukee for G
Rashad Vaughn and either a 2018 second-round draft
pick or a 2020 second-round draft pick.
WNBA
Oilers 6, Lightning 2
0
2
1 —
2 —
2
6
Dallas Wings: Signed C Liz Cambage.
Washington Mystics: Signed F Devereaux Peters. Resigned F Asia Taylor.
FIRST PERIOD
NBA G LEAGUE
Scoring: 1, Edmonton, McDavid 18 (Klefbom, Strome),
1:48 (pp). 2, Tampa Bay, Killorn 8 (Gourde), 9:42. 3,
Edmonton, Draisaitl 13 (McDavid, Strome), 17:24 (pp).
NBA G League: Granted the Santa Cruz protest and
ordered the final 17.5 seconds of their loss to Iowa to be
replayed.
SECOND PERIOD
NFL
Scoring: 4, Edmonton, McDavid 19 (Benning, Draisaitl),
2:33. 5, Edmonton, Pakarinen 1 (Slepyshev, Letestu),
12:59.
Detroit Lions: Named Matt Patricia coach.
Oakland Raiders: Released CB David Amerson.
Tennessee Titans: Signed CB Demontre Hurst.
THIRD PERIOD
NHL
Scoring: 6, Tampa Bay, Gourde 19 (Johnson), 1:54 (pp).
7, Edmonton, McDavid 20, 6:55. 8, Edmonton, McDavid
21 (Cammalleri, Draisaitl), 13:49.
Calgary Flames: Recalled F Marek Hrivik from Stockton
(AHL).
Carolina Hurricanes: Recalled G Callum Booth from
Florida (ECHL) to Charlotte (AHL).
SHOTS ON GOAL
TAMPA BAY .......................... 11
4
18 — 33
EDMONTON ........................... 13
13
9 — 35
Power-play opportunities: Tampa Bay 1 of 3; Edmonton 2
of 4. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 31-9-2 (26
shots-22 saves), Domingue 2-7-0 (9-7). Edmonton,
Talbot 18-17-2 (34-32). T: 2:26.
FEB. 17
At Manchester, England, George Groves vs. Chris Eubank Jr., 12, for Groves’ WBA Super World and Eubanks’
IBO super middleweight titles (World Boxing Super
Series semifinals); Ryan Walsh vs. Isaac Lowe, 12, for
Walsh’s British featherweight title; Arfan Iqbal vs.
Simon Vallily, 10, for Iqbal’s English cruiserweight title.
At El Paso, Texas (FOX), Devon Alexander vs. Victor
Ortiz, 12, welterweights; Caleb Plant vs. Rogelio Medina, 12, IBF super middleweight eliminator.
At Mandalay Bay Events Center, Las Vegas (SHO),
Danny Garcia vs. Brandon Rios, 12, welterweights; David
Benavidez vs. Ronald Gavril, 12, for Benavidez’s WBC
World super middleweight title.
PV (1-8)Totals 0 0-0 34.
H (11-10) Phelps 15, Gaither 9, Sibley 9, Campion 6, Terry
6, Kaiser 5, Keefe 5, Berry 5, Fenton 1 Totals 21 7-24 61.
Halftime: Heritage, (38-22).
Three-point goals: H 4 (Sibley 1, Phelps 1, Kaiser 1, Berry
1).
MLS
Los Angeles FC: Signed M Mark-Anthony Kaye.
UNITED SOCCER LEAGUE
Sacramento Republic: Agreed to terms with M Villyan
Bijev on a one-year contract.
COLLEGES
NHL INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Entering Monday’s games
POINTS
GP G A PTS
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ................ 52 27 39 66
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh ......................... 54 23 40 63
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado ............... 49 24 37 61
GOALS
GP
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................. 52
Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh ............................... 50
G
32
29
Evangel: Reinstated women’s golf starting the fall of
2018. Announced men’s golf coach Jon Jenkins will coach
the women’s team.
San Jose State: Promoted Fred Guidici to special teams
coordinator, Joe Bernardi to offensive line coach and run
game coordinator, Alonzo Carter to running backs coach
and recruiting coordinator, Ryan Gunderson to quarterbacks coach and passing game coordinator and Derrick
Odum to associate head coach and defensive coordinator. Named Kevin McGiven offensive coordinator, Aric
Williams defensive backs coach and Terry Malley football analyst.
EFGHI
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washingtonpost.com/pets
To place an ad, go to washingtonpostads.com
850
Cars
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
820
Montgomery County
RIDBERG ARONSON LLC
TRUSTEES’ SALE OF
VALUABLE IMPROVED PROPERTY
DODGE 2002 INTREPID SE - Silver,
4 door, automatic, 64k miles, MD
inspected, AC, stereo, heat, clean
and runs well. $1800. 240-645-6767
KNOWN AS
3602 Taylor St, Chevy Chase,
Montgomery County, Maryland
MERCEDES-BENZ
By virtue of the power of sale
contained in a certain Deed of
Trust dated Taylor Road, LLC to
Joel Aronson and Jeffrey Levin,
Trustees, recorded among the
Land Records of Montgomery
County, Maryland on August 5,
2016 in Liber 52584 folio 476 was
given to secure a loan evidenced
by a Promissory Note(s) in the
amount of One Million Two Hundred
Thousand
Dollars
($1,200,000), dated July 21, 2016
payable to Capitol Funding Group
LLC, the current holder of the Note
secured thereby, and default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the undersigned Trustees
will offer for sale at public auction,
at the Courthouse for Montgomery
County, 50 Maryland Ave.,
Rockville, Maryland, at the Maryland Avenue entrance on
February 13, 2018
at
11:00 AM
Mercedes Benz 2009 CLK550
Convertible - white ext/int, black
top, performance group 2, all
options, showroom cond, 20,500 mi,
$22,000 OBO 703-447-0965
1447
Autos Wanted
DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S.
LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your
donation helps local families with
food, clothing, shelter, counseling.
Tax deductible. MVA License
#W1044. 410-636-0123 or
www.LutheranMissionSociety.org
JOBS
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Olney, Silver Spring
& Rockville, MD
Don Money at
301-674-0010
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
DuPont Circle and
GW area in D.C.
Call Howard
Kennedy at
202-543-6880
For routes in
Upper NW area
in D.C.
Call Dan Santos at
240-912-7978
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Suitland, Oxon Hill
and Temple Hills, MD
Call Mr. Howard at
301-627-2408
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Official Notices
Donald Wheeler Young II.Pls contact
Charmain Sweat at 3013052089.
Bids & Proposals
MBE/SLBE
Subcontractors and Suppliers
Ulliman Schutte Construction,
LLC is interested in receiving
quotes
from
qualified
MBE/SLBE subcontractors and
suppliers for the Contract No.
CD5170D11: Piscataway Secondary Clarifiers and Polymer
Feed System Upgrade and
Expansion bidding on February
27, 2018. Opportunities are
available for Specifications
Divisions 1 thru 16. Please Fax
quotes to 703-434-3714. Contact telephone 703-972-6053
to obtain username and password where documents can be
downloaded.
Ulliman Schutte
Construction, LLC
14420 Albemarle Point Place,
Suite 110
Chantilly, VA 20151
Phone: 703-972-6052
Fax: 703-434-3714
www.ullimanschutte.com
Equal Opportunity Employer
All that lot of ground, the improvements, and personal property
thereon situated in Montgomery
County, Maryland and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of
Trust. The property is believed to
be improved.
The property will be sold in “AS IS”
condition, subject to any existing
building violations, etc., and also
subject to conditions, restrictions,
easements and agreements of
record and tenancies affecting
same. Neither the Trustees nor
their agents, successors or assigns
make any representation or warranties, either expressed or
implied, with respect to the property including, without limitation,
description, use, recorded or
unrecorded leases or other occupancy agreements, operating and
management agreements, physical conditions or environmental
conditions of the property or transferability of the liquor license.
TERMS OF SALE: Cash or certified
check in the amount of $50,000.00
will be required of the purchaser
(other than the above-named
Holder or its designee) at the time
and place of sale, balance in cash
the earlier of ten days after ratification or July 30, 2019, time
being of the essence, and to bear
interest at the rate of 8% per
annum from date of sale to date
of settlement. In the event the
Holder or its designee purchases
the property as the high bidder,
no deposit shall be required, and
the requirement of interest on the
balance is waived. If the purchaser defaults, the Substitute Trustees
may declare the entire deposit
forfeited and resell the property
at the risk and expense of the
defaulting party. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason,
there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water, rent, all
public
charges/assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan
district charges, if applicable, to be
adjusted as of sale date. Cost of
all documentary stamps, transfer
taxes and settlement expenses
shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for
obtaining physical possession of
the property. Purchaser assumes
the risk of loss or damage to the
property from the date of sale
forward. If the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey insurable
title, the purchaser's sole remedy
in law and equity shall be limited
to a refund of the deposit.
Joel S. Aronson, Jeffrey Levin
Trustees
All Inquiries should be directed to
Joel S. Aronson
301-907-6555
Jan 23, 30, Feb 6, 2018 12155571
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
STEPHEN B. JACKSON and
STEVEN P. HENNE
Substituted Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
THOMAS R. JOHNSON and DIANA
THOMPSON-JOHNSON
Defendants
Civil Action No. CAEF17-26164
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 25th
day of January, 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property identified as 4910 Emo
Street, Capitol Heights, Maryland
20743, made by Stephen B. Jackson and Steven P. Henne, Substituted Trustees, to: The Community Development Administration of
the Department of Housing and
Community Development for the
State of Maryland and reported in
the above-entitled cause be ratified and confirmed unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 26th day of February,
2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be inserted in some newspaper published in said Prince
George's County once a week for
three consecutive weeks on or
before the said 26th day of February, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $153,900.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Attorney Louis S.Pettey, Esq
Heise Jorgensen & Stefanelli P.A.
18310 Montgomery Village
Avenue, Suite 400
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
(301) 977-8400
Feb 6, 13, 20, 2018
12159418
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
SF
820
Official Notices
Community Development Administration
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Wednesday, February 21, 2018
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
7800 Harkins Road
Lanham, Maryland 20706
Federal Low Income Housing Tax Credits
The Community Development Administration, a unit of the Division
of Development Finance of the Maryland Department of Housing and
Community Development (the “Department”), will conduct a public
hearing on February 21, 2018, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., at the
offices of the Department at 7800 Harkins Road, Lanham, Maryland.
The purpose of the hearing is to receive comments from the public on
the proposed amendments to the Maryland Low Income Housing
Tax Credit Program Qualified Allocation Plan (the “QAP”), which
incorporates by reference the Multifamily Rental Financing Program
Guide. The QAP specifies the procedures, standards, and policies that
the Department follows in administering the federal
Low-Income
Housing Tax Credit (“LIHTC”) Program and in making awards of LIHTCs
and Rental Housing Funds.
A copy of the proposed QAP, as well as a summary of the amendments, is available at http://dhcd.maryland.gov/HousingDevelopment/Pages/lihtc/qap2017.aspx
or by contacting the Department at the phone number listed below.
Comments or notice of intent to present oral comments at the public
hearing should be e-mailed no later than 5:00 p.m., February 20,
2018 to dhcd.qap@maryland.gov. Oral comments will be limited to
10 minutes per person. If further assistance or information is required,
please contact Qirstan Byrd at 301-429-7501.
825
Bids & Proposals
825
Bids & Proposals
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AVAILABILITY AND COMMENT PERIODS
The Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental
Services announce Availability and Public Comment Periods on
Virginia’s Annual State Application Under Part C of the Individuals with
Disabilities Education Act as Amended in 2004 for Federal Fiscal Year
(FFY) 2018 prior to submission to the United States Department of
Education.
The Commonwealth of Virginia is making this document available for
a 60-day public exposure period beginning February 08, 2018 and
concluding on April 08, 2018. There will also be a 30-day public
comment period that will begin on March 10, 2018 and conclude on
April 08. 2018. The application is available on the Infant & Toddler
Connection of Virginia web site at (www.infantva.org) under the
section “What’s New”.
For a printed copy of the application or to submit public comment
contact:
Karen Durst, Part C Technical Consultant
DBHDS
Infant & Toddler Connection of Virginia
P.O. Box 1797
Richmond, VA 23218-1797
Phone: (804) 786-9844 Fax: (804) 371-7959
Email: karen.durst@dbhds.virginia.gov
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
840
Trustees Sale - DC
12159421
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
JANUARY 16, 23, 30, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
1-800-753-POST
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 Rockville Pike, Suite 100
Rockville, MD 20852
PUBLIC AUCTION SALE
SHARES OF CAPITAL STOCK
"MEMBERSHIP SHARES" OF
HAMPSHIRE GARDENS APARTMENTS
a cooperative housing corporation, entitling the owner
thereof to possession of a dwelling unit
KNOWN AS
250 FARRAGUT STREET NW #103, WASHINGTON, DC 20011
SALE ON FEBRUARY 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM.
Pursuant to Order of the D.C. Superior Court in case 2016
CA 001079 R(RP) and by virtue of the power and authority
contained in a certain Security Agreement from Justin Fitzgerald
Maddox, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the
secured creditor, by its undersigned attorney will sell at Public
Auction AT THE OFFICE OF HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS,
INC., LOCATED AT 5335 WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, Suite 440,
WASHINGTON, DC 20015.
All the membership shares described in said Security Agreement being HAMPSHIRE GARDENS APARTMENTS shares of
Capital Stock of the HAMPSHIRE GARDENS APARTMENTS,
allocated to 250 Farragut Street NW #103, Washington, DC
20011, together with all rights, duties and obligations under
the terms of a certain Occupancy Agreement dated October 28,
2005 between Justin Fitzgerald Maddox and the HAMPSHIRE
GARDENS APARTMENTS. Subject to the terms, provisions and
conditions contained in DC Superior Court Order in case 2016
CA 001079 R(RP) and the Articles of Incorporation, By-Laws,
Occupancy Agreement, Recognition Agreement and House Rules
of the HAMPSHIRE GARDENS APARTMENTS
The membership shares will be sold subject to their proportionate share of certain underlying purchase money mortgages, the
exact amount due thereon will be announced at time of sale and
subject to all conditions, liens restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same, and subject to any assessments including
assessments pursuant to D.C. Code Sections 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $24,600.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 5.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of settlement. Within sixty (60)
days of settlement, the Trustees shall file evidence of settlement
including a copy of the Economic Interest Deed, a proposed
accounting and distribution of funds, and a proposed order
ratifying the distribution. A copy of those documents shall be
sent to the borrower and all junior lien holders and must inform
them that claims or disputes must be filed within fourteen
(14) days or the distribution may be ratified without further
hearing. It is understood and agreed that Hampshire Gardens
has a superior lien for part of the sums due it from Maddox
pursuant to the Recognition Agreement. . "[t]here will be no
abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
settlement is delayed for any reason" and that "[t]axes . . .
[and] homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed
by the purchaser from the date of sale." Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. After the purchaser’s funds
submitted to the Trustees have cleared, the Trustees shall
execute and deliver an Economic Interest Deed to the purchaser
memorializing the transfer of the Co-op Interest. The costs of
recording the Deed shall be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Unless otherwise ordered at the time of ratification, settlement
shall occur by payment of all sums due under the bid in
certified funds to the trustees within sixty (60) days from
the entry of an Order ratifying the Sale and approval of the
purchaser by Hampshire Gardens pursuant to its Certificate of
Incorporation, Bylaws, and Recognition Agreement. Pursuant to
the Recognition Agreement, the required approval by Hampshire
Gardens may be withheld only on the basis of failure of purchaser
to meet reasonable standards or creditworthiness or other written
cooperative occupancy standards duly adopted by Hampshire
Gardens, or on the basis of potential non-compliance with law,
regulation or administrative rulings. The failure on the part of
Hampshire Gardens of an application from the purchaser, shall
be conclusively deemed to constitute approval thereof. If the
purchaser, fails or refuses to settle within the allotted timeframe,
the deposit will be forfeited and the Trustees may apply the
deposit toward costs, fees or their compensation associated with
the initial auction and the resale process. Any remaining amount
shall be credited to the underlying debt.
DANIEL J. PESACHOWITZ, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Trustees
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
5348 E. CAPITOL STREET, NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on October 17, 2003, as
Instrument Number 2003138359, and in accordance Judgment
filed on November 28, 2017in case 2017 CA 001385 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
FEBRUARY 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
5348 E. CAPITOL STREET, NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019, LOT
NUMBERED EIGHT (8), IN SQUARE NUMBERED FIFTY TWO
HUNDRED AND FORTY-THREE (5243
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (5.375% JANUARY 16, 23, 30, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
12151129
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN 851 Prince Georges County 851 Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
STEPHEN B. JACKSON and
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date STEPHEN B. JACKSON and
STEVEN P. HENNE
P. HENNE
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other STEVEN
Substituted Trustees
Substituted Trustees
Plaintiffs
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such Plaintiffs
v.
v.
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, VIRNA M. DANIELS
SHARON DUKES
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are Defendant
Defendant
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
Civil Action No. CAEF16-38398
Civil Action No. CAEF16-35899
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
NOTICE
NOTICE
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 29th NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 25th
day of January, 2018, by the Circuit
of January, 2018, by the Circuit
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. day
Court for Prince George's CounCourt for Prince George's County,
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the Maryland, that the sale of the prop- ty, Maryland, that the sale of the
property identified as 755 Saint
identified as 13100 Glasgow
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from erty
Michaels Drive, Bowie, Maryland
Way, Fort Washington, Maryland
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the 20744, made by Stephen B. Jack- 20721, made by Stephen B. Jackson and Steven P. Henne, Substiand Steven P. Henne, SubstiPurchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser son
tuted Trustees, to: The Communituted Trustees, to: The Communiagrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit ty Development Administration of ty Development Administration of
Department of Housing and
the Department of Housing and
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all Community Development for the the
Community Development for the
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall State of Maryland and reported in State of Maryland and reported in
the above-entitled cause be ratithe above-entitled cause be ratihave no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service fied and confirmed unless cause fied and confirmed unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
the contrary thereof be shown
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address to
or before the 26th day of February,
on or before the 1st day of March,
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of 2018, provided a copy of this 2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be inserted in some newsbe inserted in some newsSale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause NOTICE
paper published in said Prince
paper published in said Prince
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be George's County once a week for George's County once a week for
three consecutive weeks on or
consecutive weeks on or
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even three
before the said 26th day of Februbefore the said 1st day of March,
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by 2018.
ary, 2018.
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit The report states the amount of The report states the amount of
the sale to be $214,913.96.
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but the sale to be $267,560.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Sydney J. Harrison #544
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan Prince George's County, Maryland Prince George's County, Maryland
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the Attorney Louis S.Pettey, Esq
Attorney Louis S.Pettey, Esq
Heise Jorgensen & Stefanelli P.A.
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest. Heise Jorgensen & Stefanelli P.A.
18310 Montgomery Village
18310 Montgomery Village
Avenue, Suite 400
Avenue, Suite 400
Trustee’s File No. 24802
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
(301) 977-8400
(301) 977-8400
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET.AL., SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
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12159417
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APARTMENT BLDG
“De
eanwood”
(Known As)
4900 QUARLES STREET NE
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in that certain Deed
of Trust from 4900-4902 Quarles Street, LLC to Claude O. Barrington and
John Gamble, Trustees, dated December 30, 2010 recorded among Land
Records of the District of Columbia (“Land Records”) as Instrument No.
2000046937 (the “DOT”), the holder of the indebtedness secured by said
Deed of Trust having appointed Paul J. Cohen, Substitute Trustee for
the purpose of foreclosure, default having occurred, demand having
been made for payment of the obligations secured thereby, and notice
having been filed in accordance with applicable law, at the request of
the holder of the indebtedness secured by the DOT (the “Noteholder”),
the Trustee, or either of them, will offer for sale at public auction, on the
premises, on
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2018 AT 12:00
P.M. (NOON)
ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND WITH THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON being known as 4900
Quarles street, NE, Washington, DC 20019 and more fully described in the DOT as follows:
Lots numbered 39 and 40 in a subdivision made by Allen W. Mallery and Lawrence O. Mallery, Trustee’s subdivision
of lots in block numbered Eight (8) as per plat recorded in liber county 10 at folio 17 in the office of the surveyor for
the District of Columbia.
DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The property is believed to be improved by a 3 story 6 unit apartment building.
TERMS OF SALE—A deposit of Twenty-Five Thousand Dollars ($25,000.00) will be required of the purchaser at
time and place of sale, such deposit to be in cash, cashier’s check, or certified check, drawn on a banking institution
acceptable to the Trustee, or such other form as the Trustee may determine in his sole discretion. The deposit must
be increased to equal ten percent (10%) of the purchase price by noon on, Tuesday, February 13, 2018 at the
Auctioneer’s office. The Noteholder, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a deposit or pay interest. The Trustee
will, as a condition to the sale, require all potential bidders, except the Noteholder, to show their deposit before any
bidding begins. If the Noteholder bids, it shall be entitled to debt bid and, the Auctioneer shall be entitled to bid on
the Noteholder’s behalf. The balance of the purchase price, together with interest thereon at the rate of (6.00%) per
annum from the date of the sale to the date that the funds are received by the Trustee, shall be due in cash or
certified funds within thirty (30) days of the date of sale unless extended at the sole discretion of the Trustee. TIME
IS OF THE ESSENCE. If payment of the balance does not take place within thirty (30) days of sale (or such extended date as may be approved in writing by the Trustee as provided above), in addition to any other legal or equitable
remedies available, the Trustee may declare the deposit forfeited, retain the deposit, resell the Property at the risk
and cost of the defaulting purchaser, and avail themselves and the Noteholder of any legal and equitable rights
against the defaulting purchaser. In the event of such default, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorneys’ fees (including full
commission on the gross sale price) and all other charges incurred by the Trustee or the Noteholder including, but
not limited to, all incidental damages. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason and the Property is purchased by someone other than the Noteholder, there shall be no abatement of interest caused by the delay. All
taxes, ground rent, water rent, homeowner association charges, condominium fees, and all other public and private
charges and assessments, including, without limitation, paving, sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges that are
owed against the Property shall be borne by the purchaser and paid for by the purchaser at settlement. In addition,
the cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, document preparation, title insurance, title examination costs,
survey costs, and all other settlement expenses incidental to conveyance of the Property, shall be borne by the
purchaser and paid for by the purchaser at settlement. To the extent not extinguished by operation of law by the
sale, the Property is being sold subject to the following: the rights of any parties in possession, if such rights have
priority over the DOT; encumbrances, easements, equitable servitudes, conditions, rights of way, restrictions, rights
of redemption, covenants, declarations, restrictions and limitations of record affecting the Property, as well as, all
recorded and unrecorded agreements referred to therein that pertain to the ownership, operation or use of the
Property; all nuisances, housing code violations, building code violations, zoning code violations, critical area and
wetland violations, and environmental problems, conditions and hazards, whether latent or observable, which may
exist on or with respect to the Property; and, such state of facts that an accurate survey or physical inspection of the
Property might disclose. The Property will be sold “WHERE IS” in an “AS IS” condition and without any recourse,
representations or warranties, either express or implied, as to its nature, condition, value, use or description. The
Trustee, the Noteholder or Auctioneer do not make any warranty or representation of any kind or nature, including,
without limitation, the physical condition of, description of, or title to the Property, or as to the accuracy of the information furnished to the prospective bidders by the Trustee or any other party. The successful purchaser recognizes
that any investigation, examination or inspection of the Property is not within the control of the Trustee or the Noteholder. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the Property following conveyance of
the Property by the Trustee to the purchaser. The purchaser shall assume the risk of loss for the Property immediately after the sale. The Noteholder and Trustees assume no liability for fuel, gas, electricity, utilities, rents, or any
other cost or expense whatsoever, under recorded or unrecorded documents and agreements and other operating
charges accrued before or after the sale and all such charges shall be the sole responsibility of the purchaser from
the date of the sale (whether payable before or after the date of sale). If the Trustees are unable to convey title to
the Property, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to the refund of its deposit, without
interest thereon. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no
further claims against the Trustee, Noteholder or Auctioneer. The conveyance of the Property by the Trustees to the
purchaser at settlement shall be by Trustees’ Deed without covenant, warranty or representations whatsoever
expressed or implied. NOTE: The information contained herein was obtained from sources deemed to be reliable,
but is offered for information purposes only. The Trustee, Noteholder or Auctioneer do not make any representations or warranties whatsoever with respect to the accuracy of the information contained herein. All square footage,
acreage, and other measurements, if any, are approximate. Prospective purchasers are urged to make their own
inspection. Until an offer is finally accepted by the Trustees, it is subject to higher and better offers. The Trustee
reserve the right in their sole discretion to reject any and all bids or withdraw the Property from sale at any time
before the Auctioneer announces that the Property is “sold” and the deposit in the required amount and form is
accepted by the Trustee. The Trustee may adjourn and/or continue the sale at any time and close the sale. The
parties’ respective rights and obligations regarding the terms of the sale and conduct of the sale shall be governed
and interpreted under the laws of the District of Columbia. Further particulars may be announced at the time of sale.
For info call MARIE (410) 366-5555 or go to www.mdauctioneers.org and click on auctions.
Paul J. Cohen, Substitute Trustee
872
872
Fairfax County
872
Fairfax County
873
Fairfax County
Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
8914 GRIST MILL WOODS COURT,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22309
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
5789 LADEUS END CT,
FAIRFAX, VA 22030
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
4228 CORCORAN STREET,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22309
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2816 PULPIT HILL CT,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22191
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $900,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 7.000000% dated
July 25, 2005, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book/Instrument Number 17578 AT PAGE 1250, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on March 7, 2018
at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 1092 08 0006
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $1,070,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.750000% dated
August 26, 2005, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the County of Fairfax
as Deed Book 17693, Page 0393,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the County of Fairfax,
on the courthouse steps at the
front of the Circuit Court building
for the County of Fairfax located
at 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on March 7, 2018
at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 067-4-15-0004
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $135,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.750000% dated
April 13, 2004, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 15948, Page 0067,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on March 7, 2018
at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 101-1-03-0357
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 14-243665.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 6, 13, 2018
12163746
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 18-271946.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 6, 13, 2018
12159723
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $432,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.500000% dated
September 11, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number 200609140133807,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on March 6, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 8289-67-5992-106386
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THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 11-220522V.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 6, 13, 2018
12163747
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PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 6, 13, 2018
12163744
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SF
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to home delivery.
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THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-247123.
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840
Trustees Sale - DC
6 UNIT MULTI FAMILY
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840
Trustees Sale - DC
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S AUCTION OF
SF
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mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
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D10
840
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OPQRS
840
850
Trustees Sale - DC
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
851
Prince Georges County
851
EZ
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8010 BLACK GUM COURT
Clinton, MD 20735
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to FRIEDMAN & MAC FAYDEN PA, Trustee(s),
dated September 22, 2006, and recorded among the Land
Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
26440, folio 522, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED
AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED 6, IN BLOCK LETTERED "B" IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT SEVENTEEN, LOTS 1-14, BLOCK
'A', LOTS 1-11, BLOCK 'B', LOTS 1-14, BLOCK 'J', PARCEL
'A', BLOCK 'A' AND PARCEL 'A', BLOCK 'J', SUMMIT CREEK",
AS PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN
PLAT BOOK VJ 167 AT PLAT NO. 96. THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON BEING KNOWN AS: 8010 BLACK GUM COURT,
CLINTON, MD 20735.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $52,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 8.9% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (13-24390)
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12163472
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
JANUARY 16, 23, 30, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
12151130 851
851
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Prince Georges County
Prince Georges County
850
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Montgomery County 850 Montgomery County
Substitute Trustees
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
14 HALLEY PLACE SE, UNIT 102
WASHINGTON, DC 20032
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on August 12, 2010, as
Instrument Number 2010069484, and in accordance Judgment
filed on December 20, 2017 in case 2015 CA 009205 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the
office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
FEBRUARY 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
14 HALLEY PLACE SE, UNIT 102, WASHINGTON, DC 20032,
PART OF LOT 33, IN SQUARE 6095.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (5% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 20277
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET.AL., SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
24305 Preakness Drive
Damascus, MD 20872
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from KAREN
M. FASH, dated May 31, 2005 and recorded in Liber 30030,
folio 436 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case
docketed as Case No.433850V; Tax ID No.12-02650148 ) the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $40,600.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 565752)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
14044 Weeping Cherry Drive
Rockville, MD 20850
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
SYLVIA ZAMBRANO AND WILLIAM E. ZAMBRANO, dated
August 21, 2007 and recorded in Liber 34842, folio 342
among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD,
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed
as Case No.434196V; Tax ID No.04-03011088 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 572807)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
KHALID D. WALKER,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
13602 Royal Court
Laurel, MD 20708
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to WILLIAM A. MARKWAT, Trustee(s), dated
September 29, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 23852,
folio 329, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 18, PLAT TWO
AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT ENTITLED SNOW HILL ESTATES,
WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK VJ 172 FOLIO 94.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $62,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 5.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-25076)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri,
David M. Williamson, Keith M. Yacko,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12163609
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Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7802 ASHDALE ROAD
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DEBORAH CURRAN OR LAURA OSULLIVAN,
Trustee(s), dated October 20, 2006, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 26304, folio 395, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 3:00 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED FOURTEEN (14) IN BLOCK 'F', IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS
"SECTION ONE, MILLWOOD" AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK
W.W.W. 46 AT PLAT NO. 70, BEING IN THE 18TH ELECTION
DISTRICT. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN AS
NO. 7802 ASHDALE ROAD.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $21,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.89% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-18452)
Keith M. Yacko, Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Jason L.
Hamlin, Gene Jung, Glen H. Tschirgi,
Substitute Trustees
851
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5702 45TH AVENUE
Hyattsville, MD 20781
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JACQUELINE A. KANE, Trustee(s), dated
September 24, 2012, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34038,
folio 557, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 33, AS SHOWN ON PLAT FOUR, EYA / ARTS DISTRICT
HYATTSVILLE, EAST VILLAGE, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
PM233, PLAT 4. AND BEING A PORTION OF THE SAME
PROPERTY AS CONVEYED TO PULTE HOME CORPORATION,
A MICHIGAN CORPORATION BY VIRTUE OF DEED FROM
LH EAST ASSOCIATES LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, A MARYLAND
LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, DATED MARCH 29, 2011, RECORDED APRIL 4, 2011, IN LIBER 32561, FOLIO 488, RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $23,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.75% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-14484)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine
Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12159143
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
12159372
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6403 BLUE SAGE LANE
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in
a certain Deed of Trust to COMMONWEALTH LAND TITLE
INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee(s), dated January 10, 2006,
and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 24621, folio 270, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 25, IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "CROOM STATION",
AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN
PLAT BOOK VJ 186 AT PLAT 30.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $45,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-03069)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
12159376
Oliveri, Christine JOhnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
GREENSPOONMARDER, P.A.
1125 West Street, Suite 265
Annapolis, MD 21401
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8612 UNDERMIRE COURT
BOWIE, MD 20720
FEBRUARY 15, 2018 AT 10:00 AM
By virtue of a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust
from WALTER A. GUZMAN AND YESSIKA A. GUZMAN, dated
APRIL 25, 2005, and recorded in the Land Records of Prince
George's County, Maryland, at Liber 22179, Folio 756, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustee
will sell at public auction, at the front of the Prince George's
County courthouse located at 14735 MAIN STREET, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772. All that FEE SIMPLE lot of ground and
the improvements thereon, situated in Prince George's County
and being more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 160 IN BLOCK
“E” IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS “PLAT 3 OF SECTION 5,
SPRINGFIELD MANOR”, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 126 AT PLAT 32 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the loan
and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered into by
the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale is void
and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without interest.
Purchaser must obtain possession and assumes risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of the auction forward.
The property will be sold in an “as is” condition, without express
or implied warranty as to the nature and description of the
improvements as contained herein, and subject to conditions
restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, but
omitting any covenant or restriction based on race, color,
religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, if any,
and with no warranty of any kind.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $22,000.00 by cash, certified
check or cashier’s check will be required of the purchaser, if
other than the note holder, at time and place of sale, balance
in immediately available funds upon final ratification of sale by
the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, interest
to be paid at the rate of 5% on unpaid purchase money from
date of sale to date of settlement. The secured party herein, if
a bidder, shall not be required to post a deposit. Third party
purchaser (excluding the secured party) will be required to
complete full settlement of the purchase of the property within
TWENTY (20) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification of the sale
by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser’s deposit shall be
forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense
of the defaulting purchaser. All other public charges and private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground
rent, taxes, if any, to be adjusted to date of sale. Cost of
all documentary stamps and transfer taxes and all other costs
incident to the settlement shall be borne by the purchaser. If
applicable, condominium and/or homeowner association dues
and assessments due pursuant to Md. Real Property Article
11-110 and those that may become due after the time of
sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Purchaser must
obtain possession and assumes the risk of loss or damage to
the property from the date of sale forward. If the sale is
rescinded or not ratified for any reason, including post sale
lender audit, or the Substitute Trustee is unable to convey good
and marketable title, or a resale is to take place for any reason,
the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to a
refund of the aforementioned deposit. The purchaser waives all
rights and claims against the Substitute Trustee whether known
or unknown. These provisions shall survive settlement. Upon
refund of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect,
and the purchaser shall have no further claim against Substitute
Trustee. The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of
the loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, may be
announced at the time and date of sale. (File #41583.0057 /
CAEF17-13220)
Erin M. Shaffer,
Substitute Trustee
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 30, FEBRUARY 6, 13, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12159200
12157645
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4411 Henderson Road
Temple Hills, MD 20748
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to SAMUEL I. WHITE, PC. , Trustee(s), dated June
22, 2012, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 33751, folio 562, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWO (2), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS
"BYRD'S ADDITION TO BONA LAND", AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NLP 146, AT PLAT NO. 95
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.115% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (51589)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
S0833-1 6x2
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
851
12158811
12157641
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
851
OPQRS
EZ
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
11807 Shady Stone Terrace
Mitchellville, MD 20721
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to GEORGE H. OMILAN, Trustee(s), dated August
15, 1997, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 11686, folio 325, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-EIGHT (28), IN BLOCK LETTERED
"C", IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS PLAT 1, WOODMORE
SOUTH, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
VJ157 AT PLAT NO. 4, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
Said property is subject to a 120 day IRS Right of Redemption.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $19,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-03856)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri, Erin M. August,
Substitute Trustees
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2007 Ode Road
District Heights, MD 20747
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to DAVID G. SWEIDERK AND ROBERT
BYSTROWSKI, Trustee(s), dated March 28, 2005, and recorded
among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND in Liber 22241, folio 223, the holder of the
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 17, BLOCK "A", AS
SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED "BLOCKS A THRU C, "LUNAR
MANOR", "AS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
THE COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, MARYLAND, IN PLAT
BOOK 72, PAGE 57. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING
KNOWN AS 2007 ODE ROAD BEING THE SAME LOT OF
GROUND AS SHOWN ON A DEED DATED SEPTEMBER 17,
2004 AND RECORDED NOVEMBER 10, 2004 AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE COUNTY, MARYLAND IN
LIBER 20684, FOLIO 226
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $18,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-00672)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
10607 Terraco Terrace
Cheltenham, MD 20623
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to MICHAEL S. SCULLY, Trustee(s), dated May
25, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28034, folio 203, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED 9, IN BLOCK F, IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN
AS TERRACO ACRES, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK NLP 129, AT PLAT 67
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (23917)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12157254
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
www.hwestauctions.com
4107 Kilbourne Drive
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12157335
Fort Washington, MD 20744
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12157269 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LESLIE J. KEIDEL, Trustee(s), dated March
28, 2014, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 35864, folio 579, the
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
SUITE 100
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEES'
SALE
OF
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
SUITE 100
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
KNOWN AS
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
5028 Leland Drive
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
Oxon Hill, MD 20745
KNOWN AS
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon
situated
in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
certain Deed of Trust to KEVIN KEEGAN, Trustee(s), dated April
9225 Fowler Lane
28, 2000, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE described as follows:
Lanham, MD 20706
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 13819, folio 465, the LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-NINE (29) IN BLOCK LETTERED "B",
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "KILBOURNE ESTATES", AS
Deed of Trust to KEVIN KEEGAN, Trustee(s), dated March appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
26, 1999, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having OF SAID COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK W.W.W. 77, AT FOLIO
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 13013, folio 522, the occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the 76, AND BEING LOCATED IN THE 9TH ELECTION DISTRICT.
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will SUBJECT TO A RIGHT-OF-WAY TO WASHINGTON SUBURBAN
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S SANITARY COMMISSION RECORDED IN LIBER 4388, AT
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER FOLIO 582.
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
described as follows:
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements LOT NUMBERED TWELVE (12) IN BLOCK LETTERED "C" IN chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "BARNABY MANOR OAKS, laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
" AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
described as follows:
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN
LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-FOUR (34), IN A SUBDIVISION PLAT BOOK WWW 41 AT PLAT 29. SAVING AND EXCEPTING which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
KNOWN AS "LANHAM HEIGHTS," AS PER PLAT THEREOF THAT PORTION CONVEYED BY DEED RECORDED IN LIBER subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE 2664 AT FOLIO 373.
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK RNR, #2, AT
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
FOLIO 32.
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition including but not limited to the description, fitness for a certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
without either express or implied warranty or representation, particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, the purchase price with interest at 3.625% per annum from
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of association dues and assessments that may become due after
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL of the purchase price with interest at 8% per annum from the purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
of the purchase price with interest at 7% per annum from the DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed association dues and assessments that may become due after convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
association dues and assessments that may become due after Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement Trustee's File No. (46817)
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20,www.hwestauctions.com
2018
12157255
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
Trustee's File No. (36786)
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Trustee's File No. (35007)
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
CLASSIFIED
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12157318
12157256
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3811 WINDBROOK PLACE
Clinton, MD 20735
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE REALTY SRVC INC, Trustee(s),
dated April 24, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 31204,
folio 348, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED SIXTYEIGHT IN BLOCK LETTERED "B" IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN
AS "WINDBROOK" AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED, IN
PLAT BOOK 65 AT PLAT 28 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN AS NO. 3811 WINDBROOK
PLACE. TAX ID #05-0378430
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.625%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-06601)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
851
Prince Georges County
851
D11
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5007 69th Avenue
Riverdale, MD 20737
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JAMES H. HUDSON, III, Trustee(s), dated July
30, 2012, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 34293, folio 387, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NO. 55, AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT ENTITLED, "LOTS 51
THRU 58, (BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF LOTS 37, 38 AND
39, KIDMORE PARK RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 14 NO. 77),
KIDMORE PARK", WHICH IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK
R.E.P. NO. 206 FOLIO 14.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 3.375% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (56919)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12154635
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
www.hwestauctions.com
KNOWN AS
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12157252
14304 Kathleen Lane
Brandywine, MD 20613
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to SUELLEN WOHLFARTH, Trustee(s), dated
September 22, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26451,
folio 514, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
SUITE 100
default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
KNOWN AS
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
6109 Armor Drive
Clinton, MD 20735
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
Deed of Trust to MONUMENT TITLE, Trustee(s), dated March described as follows:
10, 2008, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-FOUR (24), AS SHOWN ON THE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29584, folio 338, the PLAT ENTITLED "PLAT THREE (3), BRANDYWINE VILLAGE",
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having AS PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK VJ
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument 163, AT PLAT 30
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will without either express or implied warranty or representation,
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateMARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SIX (6), IN BLOCK LETTERED "F", IN THE subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "KASTLE ESTATES, BLOCKS D & G", record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW64 assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
AT PLAT NO. 100
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
without either express or implied warranty or representation, NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a the purchase price with interest at 3.625% per annum from
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condi- the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mate- TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record association dues and assessments that may become due after
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
the purchase price with interest at 2.232% per annum from said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Trustee's File No. (22332)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
www.hwestauctions.com
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12154636
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (56801)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12154637
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054E 2x2
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x2
D12
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8722 MAPLE AVENUE
Bowie, MD 20720
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to VINH PHAM, Trustee(s), dated November
10, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 23774, folio 414, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
THE LAND REFERRED TO IN THIS POLICY IS DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS: LOT NUMBERED SIXTY-SIX (66), AND THE
ADJOINING SOUTH HALF OF LOT NUMBERED SIXTY-FIVE (65)
WITH IMPROVEMENTS, BLOCK NUMBERED SIX (6) IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "BOWIE" , AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A AT PLAT NO. 133, AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED IN LIBER 15025
AT FOLIO 236, AMONG THE AFORESAID LAND RECORDS
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $17,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.87% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-11013)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine
Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12154630
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
9805 Lake Pointe Court, Unit 204
Largo, MD 20774
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to MICHAEL DUFOUR, ESQ. , Trustee(s), dated
August 24, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26201, folio
455, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED OCTOBER 16, 2006 IN LIBER 26201, FOLIO
455.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 6.96% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (54709)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
12154633
851
EZ
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8105 RIVER GATE LANE
Bowie , MD 20715
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to GATEWAY TITLE, Trustee(s), dated April
9, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27747, folio 497, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 8, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEGINNING FOR THE SAME AND BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED FIVE (5), BLOCK LETTERED
"A", IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT ONE, SADDLEBROOK WEST", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK VJ 179, PAGE 17, AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN AS: 8105
RIVER GATE LANE.
Said property is subject to a prior mortgage.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 5.75% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-05270)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
851
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
16117 BROOKMEAD COURT
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DAVE VACH, Trustee(s), dated March 19, 2008,
and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29542, folio 070, MODIFIED
OCTOBER 26, 2013 IN LIBER 36431, FOLIO 579 the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 3:00 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SIXTY (60) IN BLOCK NUMBERED "3" IN A
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT 4, MARLBORO MEADOWS,
SECTION ONE", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK VJ 158 AT PLAT 2 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, AND HAVING A
PROPERTY ADDRESS OF 16117 BROOKMEAD COURT, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20774. TAX ID: 03-0214221
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $26,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.25% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-17444)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine
Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12152466
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 23, 30, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
12152901
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Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUITE 100
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
KNOWN AS
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
7712 Allendale Drive
KNOWN AS
Hyattsville, MD 20785
15940 Alameda Drive
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Bowie, MD 20716
Deed of Trust to DENNIS L. TRENT, Trustee(s), dated January
26, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 25597, folio 340, the Deed of Trust to MELVIN L. SCHNEIDER, ESQ. , Trustee(s),
dated November 30, 2007, and recorded among the Land
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having 29133, folio 566, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
FEBRUARY 8, 2018 at 10:00 AM
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
described as follows:
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
LOT NUMBERED NINE (9) IN BLOCK NUMBERED SEVEN (7) described as follows:
IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS PLAT NO. THREE, SECTION
TWO, PALMAR PARK, WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG LOT NO. 65, BLOCK NO. 3, AS SHOWN ON PLAT 4, "OAKTREE",
THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE COUNTY IN PLAT WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
BOOK WWW 31,FOLIO 80. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK NLP
BEING KNOWN AS 7712 ALLENDALE DRIVE, HYATTSVILLE, 102, AS PLAT NO. 22.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
MD 20785. TAX I.D.:-13-1562644
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition without either express or implied warranty or representation,
without either express or implied warranty or representation, including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condi- construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mate- liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merrials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $13,000.00 payable in certified certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final of the purchase price with interest at 4.5% per annum from
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.25% on TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the association dues and assessments that may become due after
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
All other public charges and private charges or assessments, the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned Trustee's File No. (4467)
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
www.hwestauctions.com
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
12152960
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe JANUARY 23, 30, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (14-12067)
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Robert
SUITE 100
M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
Substitute Trustees
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6414 Fairborn Terrace
Hyattsville, MD 20784
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12154627 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated October
27, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27307, folio 708, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
SUITE 100
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
FEBRUARY 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
KNOWN AS
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
1605 Pebble Beach Court
Bowie, MD 20721
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-NINE (29), IN BLOCK NUMBERED
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a AND LETTERED TWENTY-SIX-A (26-A), SECTION 9, IN A
certain Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE INSURANCE CORP., SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "CARROLLTON", AS PER PLAT
Trustee(s), dated August 15, 2006, and recorded among the THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 32, AT FOLIO 69
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
in Liber 26120, folio 005, the holder of the indebtedness without either express or implied warranty or representation,
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merthe undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
ON,
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
described as follows:
LOT NO. 23, BLOCK J AS SHOWN ON PLAT ENTITLED "PLAT certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
7, PART OF BLOCKS J AND I, NEWBRIDGE", WHICH PLAT NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE of the purchase price with interest at 2.74% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
GEORGE'S COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK 107, FOLIO 12.
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
without either express or implied warranty or representation, will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, association dues and assessments that may become due after
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
the purchase price with interest at 4.625% per annum from convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments Trustee's File No. (57722)
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
www.hwestauctions.com
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting JANUARY 30, FEBRUARY 6, 13, 2018
12153620
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (53666)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
851
12153900
KLMNO
202.334.6200
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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
851
OPQRS
EZ
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5312 Thomas Sim Lee Terrace
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to THOMAS DORE, Trustee(s), dated August
5, 2011, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 32947, folio 415, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-THREE (183) IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT SIX, MELWOOD PARK", AS
PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK VJ 171 AT
PLAT 98, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND. SUBJECT TO COVENANTS, CONDITIONS
AND RESTRICTIONS OF RECORD.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $26,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.875%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-13893)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine
Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3310 Belleview Avenue
Hyattsville, MD 20785
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE SERVICES INC, Trustee(s),
dated June 23, 2003, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 17856,
folio 170, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED AND LETTERED TWO HUNDRED THIRTYTWO-A (232A), IN BLOCK NUMBERED SEVENTY-SIX (76), IN
THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION 10, CHEVERLY", (A
RE-SUBDIVISION OF BLOCK 40), AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK SDH NO.
3 AT PLAT 79.
Said property is subject to a 120 day IRS Right of
Redemption.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $14,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 5.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-12845)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine
Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
12152019
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6904 MOUNTAIN LAKE PLACE
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to MARK H. FRIEDMAN AND KENNETH
J. MACFADYEN, Trustee(s), dated February 22, 2006, and
recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 24675, folio 413, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 8, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY SITUATE IN PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND DESCRIBED AS: LOT NUMBERED TEN (10) IN
BLOCK LETTERED "N", IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS PLAT
2, ADDISON WOODS, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOK
NLP 144 AT PLAT NO. 63, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND. BEING THE SAME
PROPERTY CONVEYED TO GENEVA MURPHY BY DEED FROM
WILLISTINE S. JONES RECORDED 03/27/2001 IN DEED BOOK
14476 PAGE 723, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $21,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.32% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-13926)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4216 East West Highway
Hyattsville, MD 20782
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JAMES R. MANION III, Trustee(s), dated
October 30, 2003, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 18470, folio
362, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 8, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 5, BLOCK 7 IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION
2, UNIVERSITY PARK", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK S.D.H.3 AT PLAT 5 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND; AND BEING IN
THE RIVERDALE ELECTION DISTRICT.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $18,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 7.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (14-05111)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri, Erin M. August,
Substitute Trustees
INSIDE THSIEC.
MU
Home
delivery
makes good
sense.
IS YOUR
OLD CAR
HOLDING UP?
NO
YES
PostPoints takes you
to special exhibits.
NO
From dinosaur bones and
space shuttles to panda
bears and modern art,
discover great ways to
save money, win tickets
and have fun at museums.
YES
CLASSIFIED
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
S2931 2x5
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054E 2x6
Prince Georges County
851
D13
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
614 Hedgeleaf Avenue
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to PATRICK J. FLANAGAN, Trustee(s), dated
November 21, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 24143,
folio 736, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 8, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOTS NUMBERED TWENTY (20) AND TWENTY-ONE (21) IN
BLOCK LETTERED G, IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS SECTION
NO. 1, CARMODY HILLS, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK SDH 3 FOLIO 10, ONE OF THE LAND RECORDS
OF SAID STATE AND COUNTY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $21,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-04119)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner,
Robert M. Oliveri, David M. Williamson, Keith M. Yacko,
Substitute Trustees
JANUARY 23, 30, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
kes you
PostPoints ta
Wake up
to home
delivery.
851
www.hwestauctions.com
12151194
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
www.hwestauctions.com
4805 RODGERS DRIVE
JANUARY 23, 30, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
12151604
Clinton,
MD 20735
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12152018
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to RONALD S. DUETCH, Trustee(s), dated
February 17, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
Membership is rewarding.
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 25523, folio
591, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 8, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SIX (6) IN BLOCK LETTERED "D" IN A
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION ONE TEMPLE HILLS
ESTATES", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK CEC 91 AT PLAT 32 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, AND HAVING A
PROPERTY ADDRESS OF 4805 RODGERS DRIVE, CLINTON,
MD 20735. BEING THE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY WHICH, BY
DEED DATED SEPTEMBER 12, 1994, AND RECORDED IN THE
LAND RECORDS OF THE COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S,
From classical and swing to alt rock
MARYLAND, IN LIBER 9793, FOLIO 728, WAS GRANTED AND
and synth pop, discover great ways to save
CONVEYED BY WILLIAM C. BLACK AND EMMA T. BLACK UNTO
money, win tickets and have fun at concerts.
LEROY D. MOSS AND DENISE Y. MOSS.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer1-800-753-POST
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
1-800-753-POST
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,000.00 payable in certified
SF
SF
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
Membership is rewarding.
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
WANT TO SELL IT?
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
HE MEANS
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-22945)
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri,
David M. Williamson, Keith M. Yacko,
Substitute Trustees
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
Prince Georges County
S2929 2x4
www.hwestauctions.com
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3104 Manson Place
Hyattsville, MD 20785
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to BETCO INC, Trustee(s), dated May 26, 2015,
and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 37225, folio 536, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FOURTEEN (14) IN BLOCK LETTERED "D"
IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS PLAT NO. TWO, KENMOOR,
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW 40 PLAT 43,
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND, BEING ELECTION DISTRICT 13. BEING THE
SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO TEKESTE MAKONNEN AND
JOYCE N. MAKONNEN, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS TENANTS BY
THE ENTIRETIES, BY DEED DATED SEPTEMBER 21, 2004,
FROM JOYCE N. MAKONNEN, OF RECORD IN BOOK 20718,
PAGE 417, OFFICE OF THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
COURT CLERK. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 3104 MANSON
PLACE, HYATTSVILLE, MD 20785 PARCEL NUMBER: 131412857
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-09172)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Robert
12152021 M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
851
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 23, 30, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 23, 30, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
12151618
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
9104 8th Street
Lanham, MD 20706
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to ATG TITLE, Trustee(s), dated September
18, 2014, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 36379, folio 298, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 8, 2018 at 3:00 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FORTY-TWO (42) IN BLOCK NUMBERED
EIGHTEEN (18) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "HYNESBORO PARK" AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
IN PLAT BOOK WWW43 AT PLAT 99.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $26,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.125%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-07501)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Jason L. Hamlin, Glen H.
Tschirgi, Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
12151398 JANUARY 23, 30, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
12150463
D14
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6113 North Hil Mar Circle
District Heights, MD 20747
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to ROSENBERG AND ASSOCIATES LLC,
Trustee(s), dated November 9, 2016, and recorded among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 39301, folio 529, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
ON,
FEBRUARY 8, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, STATE OF MARYLAND, BEING
KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS FOLLOWS: LOT NUMBERED
THIRTY-EIGHT (38), IN BLOCK LETTERED "A", IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT ONE, SECTION ONE, COLONY
SQUARE", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
WWW 87 AT PLAT 77, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND. BEING THE SAME
PROPERTY AS CONVEYED FROM GALEN D. CLEMONS AND
SONIA L. CLEMONS, ERRONEOUSLY RECORDED AS SONYA
L. CLEMONS, HUSBAND AND WIFE, TO GALEN D. CLEMONS
AND SONIA L. CLEMONS, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS TENANTS
BY THE ENTIRETIES, AS DESCRIBED IN DEED, LIBER 24335
FOLIO 139, DATED DATE 09/13/2005, RECORDED DATE
02/14/2006, IN PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY RECORDS.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $27,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.75% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-13752)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 23, 30, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
873
Prince William County
875
Fauquier County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
7183 EVAN COURT,
WARRENTON, VA 20187
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $234,332.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.750000% dated
August 5, 2011, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM as Deed Instrument
Number 201108050064850, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on March 13, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 8191-45-7371
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated July 10, 2006, in
the original principal amount of
$911,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Fauquier County, Virginia, in Book
1225 at Page 2340 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Fauquier County, 40 Culpeper
Street, Warrenton, Virginia on
March 8, 2018 , at 12:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
SITUATE IN THE "BROOKSIDE,
FAUQUIER COUNTY", COUNTY OF
FAUQUIER, COMMONWEALTH OF
VIRGINIA, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 9, PHASE 7A, BROOKSIDE, AS THE SAME IS SHOWN ON
A PLAT PREPARED BY THE ENGINEERING GROUPE, INC., DATED
SEPTEMBER 5, 2002, AS REVISED
THROUGH JANUARY 12, 2004,
ENTITLED "PLAT SHOWING SUBDIVISION PHASE 7A BROOKSIDE AND
CONVEYANCE OF UTILITY EASEMENTS TO THE F.C.W.S.A. ON THE
PROPERTY OF BROOKSIDE COMMUNITIES, L.L.C., DEED BOOK 0958,
PAGE 431, SCOTT MAGISTERIAL
DISTRICT, FAUQUIER COUNTY, VIRGINIA", ATTACHED TO DEED OF
DEDICATION RECORDED APRIL 8,
2004 IN DEED BOOK 1091, PAGE
2431, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF FAUQUIER COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-1516881.
Feb. 6, 13, 2018
12163474
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 6, 13, 2018
12158874
Home
delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
How about some
home delivery?
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Home delivery
is convenient.
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN, on the courthouse
steps in front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of
Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on
March 7, 2018 at 9:30 AM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 032-29-5355-000
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-263212.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 6, 13, 2018
12159721
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
111 RICHARD DRIVE SE,
LEESBURG, VA 20175
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $525,309.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.625000% dated
June 9, 2016, recorded among the
land records of the Circuit Court
for the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN as
Deed
Instrument
Number
20160613-0035491, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN, on
the courthouse steps in front of
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Loudoun located at 18
East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on March 7, 2018 at 9:30 AM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 233476313000
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-271800.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 6, 13, 2018
12163748
Loudoun County
ment No. 070013379, at Page 0523,
default having occurred in the
payment of the Note thereby
secured and at the request of
the holder of said Note, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction at the entrance
to the Circuit Court of Frederick
County, 5 North Kent Street, Winchester, on February 16, 2018 at
11:00 AM the property described
in said deed, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
Lot 76, Section 8A, Lake Holiday
Estates, with improvements thereon.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (59858)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Jan 30, Feb 6, 2018
12157874
Anne Arundel County
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
is convenient.
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
JANUARY 30, FEBRUARY 6, 13, 2018
12157294
Prince Georges County
NO
YES
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
9705 TULIP TREE DRIVE
Bowie, MD 20721
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to RICHARD T. CREGGER, Trustee(s), dated May
23, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 25177, folio 703, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 8, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THREE (3) AS SHOWN ON PLAT ENTITLED
"PLAT FOUR, SECTION SIX WOODVIEW VILLAGE WEST",
RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK VJ 184 AT
PLAT 92. BEING ALL AND THE SAME LAND CONVEYED
UNTO PAMELA A. KHUMBAH BY VIRTUE OF DEED DATED
SEPTEMBER 8, 2000 FROM RG WOODVIEW 6, LLC AS
RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE
GEORGE%U2019S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK
14045, FOLIO 369.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $36,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.25% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (13-21142)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
SF
853
Calvert County
853
Calvert County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2149 Duckhorn Court
Waldorf, MD 20601
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to VINH PHAM, Trustee(s), dated November 4,
2006, and recorded among the Land Records of CHARLES
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 06107, folio 0282, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE CHARLES COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 200 CHARLES STREET ( IN THE
BREEZEWAY BETWEEN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS ), LA
PLATA, MD 20646 ON,
FEBRUARY 8, 2018 at 1:30PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CHARLES COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT NUMBERED SEVENTY-FOUR (74) IN A SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "PLAT TWO, LOTS 72-89, 118-120 & OPEN
SPACE NO. 7, ROLLING MEADOWS" AS PER PLAT THEREOF
DULY RECORDED AMONG THE PLAT RECORDS OF CHARLES
COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 53, FOLIO 212.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $34,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CHARLES COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-10644)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine
Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray and Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 23, 30, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 23, 30, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
873
12151190
Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
12921 AUGUSTUS COURT,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22192
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $186,558.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.375000% dated
June 5, 2009, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the County of Prince
William as Deed Instrument Number 200906110057054, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the County of Prince William,
on the Court House steps in front
of Main Entrance for the Circuit
Court building for the County of
Prince William located at 9311
Lee Avenue, Manassas, Virginia
on March 6, 2018 at 4:00 PM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 8193-70-3521
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-265643.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 6, 13, 2018
12159743
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
ARE YOUR
TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
EZ
851
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
ARE YOUR
TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
NO
I WISH THEY
WOULD STAY
FOREVER
I WISH THEY
WOULD STAY
FOREVER
KEEP US
IN MIND
KEEP US
IN MIND
YES
NEED TO
RENT THE
PLACE OUT?
NEED TO
RENT THE
PLACE OUT?
CLASSIFIED
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x6
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x6
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
SF
SF
852
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
SF
1-800-753-POST
Anne Arundel County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1484 Snug Harbor Road
Shady Side, MD 20764
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to HERBERT M. WAYNE AND WILLIAM
J. ZIEGLER, Trustee(s), dated March 12, 2014, and recorded
among the Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27122, folio 384, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
FEBRUARY 14, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
PARCEL 1: BEGINNING FOR THE SAME AT AN IRON PIPE
SET ON THE SOUTHEAST SIDE OF A ROAD LEADING TO
PARRISH CREEK, SAID PIPE BEING LOCATED AT THE END
OF NORTH 29 DEGREES 45' EAST 90 FOOT LINE OF THE
CONVEYANCE FROM THE ANNAPOLIS BANKING AND TRUST
COMPANY TO C. EDWARD LEATHERBURY AND WIFE BY
DEED DATED APRIL 24, 1950, AND RECORDED AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY IN LIBER JHH
567, FOLIO 227; AND RUNNING FROM THENCE WITH THE
SOUTHEAST SIDE OF THE ROAD TO PARRISH CREEK NORTH
32 DEGREES 45' EAST 118.7 FEET TO A PIPE SET ON THE
SOUTH SIDE OF AN 8 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY LEADING FROM
THE ROAD TO PARRISH CREEK TO THE LAND OF MOODY
PHIPPS; THENCE WITH THE SOUTH SIDE OF SAID RIGHT
OF WAY, SOUTH 59 DEGREES 34' EAST 66 FEET TO A PIPE;
THENCE LEAVING THE RIGHT OF WAY AND RUNNING ACROSS
THE PHIPPS PROPERTY OF WHICH THE HEREIN DESCRIBED
IS A PART, SOUTH 32 DEGREES 45' WEST 115 FEET TO A
GRANITE STONE BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE
AFOREMENTIONED CONVEYANCE TO LEATHERBURY, THENCE
WITH THE NORTH LINE OF SAID CONVEYANCE NORTH 62
DEGREES 45' WEST 66 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING,
CONTAINING 0.18 OF AN ACRE, MORE OR LESS. PARCEL
2: BEING ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND SITUATE ABOUT 150
YARDS EASTERLY FROM SHADYSIDE POST OFFICE IN GREAT
SWAMP AND BORDERING ON THE ROADS, ONE LEADING
FROM THE ABOVE POST OFFICE TO THE BAY SHORE, AND
THE OTHER LEADING TO A LANDING ON PARRISH'S CREEK,
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING FOR THE SAME AT A
CEDAR FENCE POST STANDING ON THE NORTHEAST SIDE OF
THE INTERSECTION OF THE ABOVE ROADS AND RUNNING
WITH THE ROAD LEADING TO PARRISH'S CREEK, NORTH 29
DEGREES 45' EAST 90 FEET TO A STONE; THENCE LEAVING
SAID ROAD RUNNING SOUTH 65 DEGREES WEST 90 FEET
TO A STONE ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE ROAD LEADING
TO THE BAY SHORE; THENCE WITH THE SAME AND NORTH
SIDE THEREOF, NORTH 65 DEGREES 45' WEST 66 FEET TO
THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 5,913.2 SQUARE
FEET OF LAND, MORE OR LESS. SAID PROPERTY ADDRESS
BEING KNOWN AS 1484 SNUG HARBOR ROAD, SHADY SIDE,
MD 20764.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $24,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of ANNE ARUNDEL
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.95% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
www.hwestauctions.com
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
JANUARY 23, 30, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
12151340 shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
876
882
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
Loudoun County
Frederick County
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
707 SOUTH DOGWOOD STREET,
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
STERLING, VA 20164
TRUSTEE SALE
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
407 Dogwood Drive,
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
In execution of a Deed of Trust
Cross Junction, VA 22625-2554
in the original principal amount
Frederick County
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-21933)
of $315,250.00, with an annual
In execution of a Deed of Trust
interest rate of 3.625000% dated
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Thomas
in the original principal amount
November 8, 2005, recorded
of $220,000.00, dated August 17,
W. Hodge, Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri, David M.
among the land records of the
2007 recorded in the Clerk's
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
Williamson, Keith M. Yacko
Office of the Circuit Court of FredLOUDOUN as Deed Instrument
erick County, Virginia, in DocuSubstitute Trustees
Number 20051116-0130080, the
876
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
852
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7904 Rosaryville Road
Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE SERVICES INC, Trustee(s),
dated January 12, 2009, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 30334,
folio 624, MODIFIED OCTOBER 30, 2014 IN LIBER 36911,
FOLIO 183 the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
FEBRUARY 8, 2018 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN
Prince George's County, STATE OF MARYLAND, AND IS
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: PARCEL "A" - BEGINNING for the
same at an iron pipe lying in the Northeasterly right of
way line of Rosaryville Road said iron pipe being 20.0
feet from the centerline of the said road as now laid out
and existing marking the common front corner between
the land of Jack F. and Joan H. Cox and Gordon R. Cox
(Liber 2796, Folio 118) and running thence along the
said road N. 47° 13' 13" W. 151.70 feet to an iron
pipe thence crossing the Cox land, N. 43° 28' 8" E.
304.56 feet to an iron pipe and running thence along
the division line between Cox and Charles L. Harman
(Liber 2323, Folio 214), S. 46° 14' 17" E. 90.45 feet to
an iron pipe and running thence along the division line
between Jack Cox, et ux and Gordon Cox, S. 32° 01'
00" W. 308.42 feet to the point of beginning; containing
36,753 square feet or 0.8437 acres of land, more or less.
As per survey made by W. L. Meekins, Registered Land
Surveyor dated November 16, 1973. PROPERTY ADDRESS:
7904 ROSARYVILLE ROAD, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
TAX MAP# 15-1734995
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $35,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.625%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-06617)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
12151342
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
14774 DARBYDALE AVENUE,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22193
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: VA. Reference Number 14242757.
851
12153425
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
165 WINSLOW PLACE
Prince Frederick, MD 20678
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to CLAUDE O. BARRINGTON & ROY B. MOSS
JR, Trustee(s), dated December 1, 2004, and recorded among
the Land Records of CALVERT COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
02363, folio 152, MODIFIED FEBRUARY 1, 2011 IN LIBER
3859, FOLIO 0017 the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE
CALVERT COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 175 MAIN ST,
PRINCE FREDERICK, MD 20678 ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CALVERT COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT NUMBERED EIGHTY-SIX (86), IN THE SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "PLAT FIVE CHAPLINE PLACE", AS PER PLAT
THEREOFRECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
CLAVERT COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK KPS,1, AT
PLAT 46; BEING IN THE 2ND ELECTION DISTRICT OF SAID
COUNTY. A.P.N. #: 02-124912
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CALVERT COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 5.25% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-13895)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer,
Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12158115
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
853
Calvert County
853
OPQRS
EZ
Calvert County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8320 RIDGE VIEW ROAD
Lusby, MD 20657
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to SUELLEN WOHLFARTH, Trustee(s), dated June
2, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of CALVERT
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 02814, folio 038, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction at THE CALVERT COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT 175 MAIN ST, PRINCE FREDERICK, MD 20678
ON,
FEBRUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CALVERT COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
BEGINNING FOR THE SAME AND BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED SEVENTEEN (17), BLOCK
NUMBERED THIRTY-TWO (32), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN
AS "WHITE SANDS", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF CALVERT COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK JLB 1, PAGE 41. THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON BEING KNOWN AS 8320 RIDGE VIEW ROAD TAX
IDENTIFICATION NUMBER: 01-057308
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $23,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CALVERT COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.625% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-12341)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine
Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis Gingher
Substitute Trustees
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
17334 SABILLASVILLE RD.
SABILLASVILLE, MD 21780
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated May 6,
2009 and recorded in Liber 7479, Folio 340 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $337,500.00,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 23, 2018 AT 11:10 AM
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Roommates
NE DC - Near MD line. 1 furnished
room for rent with shared BA.
Bus stop in front. Call 202-669-7992
MARYLAND
Roommates
Rockville— $950, 3 bed, 3.5 ba,
k'ette, deck, patio, Fpl, Hw Flrs,
new carpet. WD. (301) 806-3560.
ADELPHI - Basement room for rent.
Furnished. Quiet neighborhood.
1 person. Call 301-887-1788
BOWIE - Male preferred, no smoking. Basement room, share kitchen,
cable, internet incl. Quiet neighborhood. $700/mo. 301-523-8222
Rockville- large furn BR w/ walk in
closet. Shared SFH, nr transportation/shops, N/S, N/P, clean, quiet
area. Avail Feb 1. $750 incl utils.
Leave voice msg. 240-351-5150
Silver Spring Large furn room, pvt
kitch. pvt entr, bath. M or F pref. Nr
transp & shopping. Safe area. Incl
cable, utils, phone, internet $375
bi weekly. Call Sam 240-286-5451
CAP HGTS/SUITLAND- Beautifully
decorated. Very quiet. Cooking priv.
Metro. Call 252-209-7887
CAPITAL HEIGHTS - Furn room for
rent, share bath & kitchen.
$650 +utilities. 301-502-6581
COLLEGE PARK -Den pvt entrance &
prvt BA $875/mo. sec dep req. No
smoking. Pref male. 240-423-7923
VIRGINIA
Roommates
FT. WASHINGTON - Large furnished
room, carpet, cable TV/wifi, N/S.
$150/wk + $100 dep. 301-919-5150
Dale City— $590, 1 bedrm, 1 ba, 1857
cedar cove, 703-597-3525
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 6, Feb 13 & Feb 20
MONTGOMERY VILLAGE
1BR, furnished, everything incl.
$650. Call 240-535-5219
MANASSAS, VA-Bsmt, sep entr, FBA,
W/D. Quiet area 2 mi. to I66. $600/mo
Call
Raj
571-247-6908
Springfield— $575, furnished basement. Share full bath, FIOS TV,
free WiFi, utilities incl. 703-912-5616.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 317144-1)
12159117
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 23, Jan 30 & Feb 6
12154614
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
616 BRUNSWICK ST.
BRUNSWICK, MD 21716
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
November 8, 2006 and recorded in Liber 6313, Folio 92 among the Land
Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of
$180,000.00 and a current interest rate of 4.25%, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick
St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 16, 2018 AT 10:46 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $16,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 321930-2)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 30, Feb 6 & Feb 13
12157407
857
Howard County
857
Howard County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
8669 Ridge Road, Ellicott City, MD 21043
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 8669 Ridge Road, Ellicott City, MD
21043. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated March 26, 2009, and recorded in Liber 11659 at
Page 040 among the land records of the COUNTY OF HOWARD,
in the original principal amount of $300,668.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building, located at
9250 Bendix Rd., Columbia MD 21045, on February 15,
2018 at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 02-298120
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12152016 of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-268483.
610
VIRGINIA
Dogs for Sale
Roommates
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
BERNEDOODLES - Males, females, tricolored, black & white, 1 brindle.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Shots, wormed, crate trained, family
raised. $500-$2000. 301-639-8636
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
Gainesville— $500, 2 bedrm, 1 ba,
8749 Lords View Loop, 703-3430733, DW, EIK, Hw Flrs, WW Carpet,
WD, HSI, pkg, Pool, garbage, water
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
110
Lost
LOST IRAQ PASSPORT Saif Alnajafi Passport ID:
A5811044 If found, please call.
571-699-5078
Collectibles
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
Log Splitter (25 Ton)—$500, Huntingtown, MD, 407-432-9154
265
Bernese Mountain Dogs—$1600,
2 males & 5 females,
7 weeks old, 330-852-4807
BOXER PUPPIES - AKC, champion
blood line, 5 males, 2 females.
Ready for new home 2/28. Shots
and vet checked. Call 304-229-5300
Freon R12 WANTED—Certified buyer
will pick up, pay CASH for cylinders
and cases of cans. 312-291-9169
RefrigerantFinders.com
RECORDS - I pay cash for
50s, 60s, & 70s .
Categories: Jazz, Soul, R&R, R&B.
Call 703-865-6050
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 30, FEBRUARY 6, 13, 2018
610
Dogs for Sale
Goldendoodle—$1400,
Males and Females,
717-271-3086
COTON DE TULEAR Puppies
2 Males 2wks old www.amourdecotons.comgrandmamadg@aol.com. 540-347-5318
DOBERMAN PUPPIES - AKC, big
boned, family raised, great temperament, parents on premises. 8 weeks
old. some have Ears done. All colors
available. $500/$900. 240-674-2844
or 240-674-3994
ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES
AKC, ready for Valentine's Day.
Vet checked, first shots.
Call 814-793-2008
Home & Garden
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
275
Merchandise Wanted
LANHAM - 2 Rooms avail, $560 &
$580/mo, Incl Utils, A/C, quiet.
240-645-2380
or
301-537-2635
6677 COLDSTREAM DR.
NEW MARKET, MD 21774
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated
December 3, 2013 and recorded in Liber 9885, Folio 343 among the Land
Records of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of
$191,073.00 and a current interest rate of 4.75%, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick
St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 9, 2018 AT 10:50 AM
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
255
Silver Spring-Female pref. utils incl.
$550 Close to bus. Deposit req.
Call
703-914-5555
D15
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
225
Silver Spring- room ($600), bsmt
apt($950) incl utils, sec dep req. No
pets. single occ. 301-439-0468
856
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
MARYLAND
Roommates
Frederick County
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $13,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 320536-1)
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2739 PRICES DISTILLERY ROAD
Clarksburg, MD 20871
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to VICKI L. PARRY, Trustee(s), dated May 18,
2007, and recorded among the Land Records of FREDERICK
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 6603, folio 0420, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE FREDERICK COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK,
MD 21701 ON,
FEBRUARY 21, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT 4 AS SHOWN ON A SUBDIVISION PLAT ENTITLED,
"PRELIMINARY/FINAL PLAT LOTS 1-4, SECTION I, DISTILLERY MANOR, PREVIOUSLY RECORDED AT PLAT BOOK 50,
PAGE 180" AS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK 73, PAGE
107.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
www.hwestauctions.com
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12154626 and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
856
856
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
Frederick County
Frederick County
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
Rockville, MD 20852
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $29,500.00 payable in certified
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
3104 ROLLING MEADOWS CT.
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
MONROVIA, MD 21770
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of FREDERICK COUNTY,
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated June
21, 2006 and recorded in Liber 6534, Folio 68 among the Land Records of
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.625% on unpaid
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $722,000.00
and a current interest rate of 2%, default having occurred under the terms
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick,
MD 21701, on
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
FEBRUARY 16, 2018 AT 10:45 AM
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $35,000 in the form of certified check,
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postcontacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
sale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
No. (14-06859)
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Thomas W.
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri, Erin M. August,
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
Substitute Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 322139-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 30, Feb 6 & Feb 13
12157406
856
ENGLISH SHEPHERDS Naturally
reared, Rare heritage collie breed,
versatile, farm, service, therapy,
SAR, intelligent, sweet, love ppl,
7mos/in training, 814-444-1631
Englishshepherdspa.com
Goldendoodle—f1b m's & f's ready
now! Hypoallerg & nonshed vet
chkd, health guar $1200 540-7296365 www.doodledogpups.com
GOLDEN
RETRIEVER
PUPPESAKC, vet checked, dewormed,
first
shots. Ready
2/8/18.
540-908-7767 twinoaksgoldens.
wixsite.com/goldens
Huskys Poodles & more—Puppies for
Sale. 304-904-6289, Cash, CC, Easy
Finance, www.wvpuppy.com, 59
East Rd, Martinsburg WV, exit 16E
LAB/GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIESAdorable, good blood lines,
ready 2/17. $700. No Sunday calls.
540-879-2603
610
12153831
Dogs for Sale
Labrador Retriever—$700,
Pups, Yellow/Black,
434-607-1761.
LABS - AKC reg, 3 black puppies,
1 F 2 M $600 each. 7.5 weeks old.
Call 540-908-6937,
no Sunday calls please.
MINI AUSSIE/BLUE HEELER PUPSBeautiful, bouncy, personable puppies, handled w/care, vt checkd, tails
docked, 1st shots & worming, $450
8 weeks old. 540-422-1625
SHELTIE PUPPIES - AKC, tri and
sable females. Ready to go now.
Raised in home. Chambersburg, PA.
Call 717-816-5161
SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPPIESBlack&white, red&white, males &
females, AKC reg. 9 weeks old.
540-877-1567 timreissig@yahoo.com
Standard Poodle—AKC Purebred
Cream Puppies, M&F Avail Feb 7.
$950. Visit www.sugarspups.com or
text 202-427-2490 for more info.
German Shepherd—AKC Reg.
Czech/West German working lline.
$1,200, 6 males, 7 wks,
Kingkennels.net 540-850-1269
Labrador yellow—AKC Champ Lines
8 wks 301-730-5450 Health Guar.
www.SouthMountainLabs.com
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
857
Howard County
857
Howard County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5512 UPSHUR SQUARE
Frederick, MD 21703
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to JOHN M. MERCER, Trustee(s), dated June 6,
2006, and recorded among the Land Records of FREDERICK
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 6165, folio 0248, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE FREDERICK COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK,
MD 21701 ON,
FEBRUARY 21, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT NUMBERED ONE THOUSAND ONE HUNDRED TWENTYTWO (1122) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "FINAL PLAT,
BALLINGER CROSSING, SECTION V, PLAT 2, LOTS 11131128", AS PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND
IN PLAT BOOK 1113 AT PLAT NO. 1128. BEING THE SAME
PROPERTY CONVEYED TO TRACY A. TURNER AND BRENDA
J. TURNER FROM JENNIFER M. CUORRO, KARIN C. CUORRO,
AND BARRY M. CUORRO, BY DEED DATED OCTOBER 30,
2000, AND RECORDED ON NOVEMBER 6, 2000, IN LIBER
2776, FOLIO 965.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $23,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of FREDERICK COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.625% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-11031)
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris, Robert
M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher,
Substitute Trustees
LAW OFFICES
Shulman, Rogers, Gandal, Pordy & Ecker, P.A.
12505 Park Potomac Avenue, 6th Floor
Potomac, MD 20854
(301) 230-5241
File No. 127710.00022
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
of
Valuable Fee Simple Property
located in Howard County, Maryland,
known as
5565 Sterrett Place
Columbia, MD 21044 (the “Property”)
By virtue of the power and authority contained in an Indemnity
Deed of Trust, Assignment of Leases and Rents, Security
Agreement and Fixture Filing (the “Deed of Trust”) from 5565
Sterrett Place, LLC, to Marthew J. Murko and Mitchell Fenton,
Trustees, bearing the date of March 29, 2007, recorded in Book
10600, at Page 219 among the Land Records of Howard County,
Maryland, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
default having occurred in the terms and conditions thereof,
the Substitute Trustees having been substituted for the Trustees
named in said Deed of Trust, will sell at public auction located at
the Thomas Dorsey Building, 9250 Bendix Road, Columbia, MD
21045 on February 15, 2018 at 11:00 a.m., some or all of the
Property described in said Deed of Trust.
All that Fee-Simple lot of ground and the improvements thereon
identified as Tax ID No. 15-001720 and more fully described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE
The bid which yields the highest price for the Property will
be accepted by the Substitute Trustees. Notwithstanding the
foregoing, the Substitute Trustees absolutely reserve the right
to postpone the sale and/or cancel the sale at any time until
the auctioneer announces that the Property is "sold" and the
deposit in the required amount and form is received by the
Substitute Trustees. A deposit in the amount of $1,500,000.00
will be required at the time of sale. Such deposit must be
by cashier's check or certified check or such other form as
the Substitute Trustees’ may determine in their sole discretion.
The Noteholder secured by the Deed of Trust (or any related
party) shall be exempted by the Substitute Trustees from
submitting any bidding deposit. The Substitute Trustees will,
as a condition of the sale, require all potential bidders, except
the Noteholder, to show their deposit before any bidding begins.
The retained deposit of the successful purchaser shall be
applied, without interest, to the successful purchaser's credit at
settlement, provided, however, that in the event the successful
purchaser fails to consummate the purchase in accordance
with the terms of sale as herein provided, such deposit will
be forfeited. The terms of sale must be complied with and
settlement consummated thereon within 30 days from date of
final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Howard
County, Maryland unless extended at the sole discretion of the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest
due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for
any reason. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. The balance of the
purchase price over and above the retained deposit, with interest
thereon at a rate of 5.56% from the date of sale through the
date of receipt of the balance of the purchase price, will be
due at settlement in cash or certified funds; and if not so paid,
the Substitute Trustees reserve the right to retain the deposit
and resell the Property at the risk and cost of the defaulting
purchaser, after such advertisement and on such terms as the
Substitute Trustees may deem proper, and to avail themselves
and the Noteholder of any legal or equitable rights against the
defaulting purchaser.
The Property is sold subject to the lawful rights, if any, of
parties in possession, if such rights have priority over the Deed
of Trust, and to any and all covenants, conditions, restrictions,
easements, rights of way, encumbrances, liens, agreements and
limitations of record having priority over the Deed of Trust. The
Property will be sold “WHERE IS” and in “AS IS” condition
without any warranty as to condition, express or implied, and
without any representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the
information furnished to prospective bidders by the Substitute
Trustees or any other party and without any other representations
or warranty of any nature. The sale is also subject to postsale
audit of the status of the loan. Without limiting the generality
of the foregoing, the Property will be sold without representation
or warranty as to (i) title to the Property, (ii) the nature,
condition, structural integrity, or fitness for a particular use of
any improvements, fixtures or personal property included within
the Property, (iii) the environmental condition of the Property
or the compliance of the Property with federal, state and local
laws and regulations concerning the presence or disposal of
hazardous substances, (iv) compliance of the Property with
the Americans with Disabilities Act or any similar law, or (v)
compliance of the Property with any zoning laws or ordinances
and any and all applicable safety codes, and acceptance of the
Deed to the Property by the successful purchaser shall constitute
a waiver of any claims against the Substitute Trustees or the
Noteholder concerning any of the foregoing matters. Purchaser
www.hwestauctions.com
shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12154631 Property.
857
857
Howard County
Howard County
Conveyance shall be by Trustee’s Deed, without covenant or
warranty, express or implied, specifically including marketability
or insurability (hazard or title), unless otherwise required by
TRUSTEE'S SALE
statute, court rule or the Deed of Trust. The risk of loss or damage
by fire or other casualty to the Property from and after the
5796 Waterloo Road, Columbia, MD 21045.
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by date of sale will be upon the successful purchaser. Adjustment
premises known as 5796 Waterloo Road, Columbia, MD of all taxes, ground rents, public charges, assessments, sewer,
21045. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed water, drainage and other public improvements will be made as
of Trust, dated August 3, 2007, and recorded in Liber 10868 of the date of sale and are to be assumed and paid thereafter
at Page 678 among the land records of the County of Howard, by the successful purchaser, whether assessments have been
in the original principal amount of $382,000.00. Upon default levied or not. Any condominium fees, homeowners association
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for sale dues, assessments or capital contributions, if any, payable with
at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey Building, located at respect to the Property shall be assumed after the date of sale
9250 Bendix Rd., Columbia MD 21045, on February 15, by the successful purchaser. All costs incident to the settlement
2018 at 10:00 AM, all that property described in said Deed of and conveyancing including, without limitation, examination
of title, conveyancing, all recordation taxes and charges, all
Trust including but not limited to:
transfer taxes and charges, title insurance premiums, notary
Tax ID# 06-390269
fees, settlement fees and all other costs incident to settlement
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and shall be at the cost of the successful purchaser. In the event
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, the Substitute Trustees are unable for any reason to convey
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be to
request and receive a return of the deposit. Upon return of the
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect and the purchaser
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum This advertisement, as amended or supplemented by any oral
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within announcements during the conduct of the sale, constitutes the
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments entire terms upon which the Property shall be offered for sale.
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments Benjamin P. Smith and Sara A. Michaloski, Substitute Trustees
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
www.hwestauctions.com
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for JANUARY 30, FEBRUARY 6, 13, 2018
12156264
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
TRUSTEE'S SALE
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
7118 Fox Harbor Way Unit 130, Elkridge, MD 21075
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
Trustee's File No. 17-268994.
premises known as 7118 Fox Harbor Way Unit 130, Elkridge,
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
MD 21075. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, a Deed of Trust, dated August 28, 2006, and recorded in Liber
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
10274 at Page 140 among the land records of the COUNTY
OF HOWARD, in the original principal amount of $315,400.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey
Building, located at 9250 Bendix Rd., Columbia MD 21045, on
February 15, 2018 at 10:00 AM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 30, FEBRUARY 6, 13, 2018
12152939 Tax ID# 01-308424
873
873
Prince William County
Prince William County Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
13420 Quate Lane,
affect same, if any.
Woodbridge, VA 22193
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust
dated September 17, 2014, and recorded at Instrument Number
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
201409180067547 in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.75% per annum
William County, VA, securing a loan which was originally $451,048.00. The
appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
for sale at public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
William County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
February 28, 2018 at 1:00 PM
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 4,
Thomas Mill Subdivision, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted and
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
recorded as Instrument Number 201201200005437, with corresponding
association dues and assessments that may become due after
plat recorded as Instrument Number 201201200005438, among the land
records of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more fully described in
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
Trustee's File No. 17-265830.
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
January 30, February 6, 2018
12151579
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 30, FEBRUARY 6, 13, 2018
12153896
D16
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
ADVERTISEMENT
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
ADVERTISEMENT
UNITED IN SPORT
When we are united, together, we are at our best. But today our world,
our country, even our communities are as divided as they have ever been.
No one seems to have time or tolerance for anyone with an opinion
differing from their own. Turn on the news or flip through your phone
and it seems as though someone or something is trying to drive us apart.
Those forces will not succeed because you can’t break the human spirit,
which at its core is indivisible.
As a proud sponsor of Team USA and a company rooted in sport, we are
fortunate enough to see humanity at its best every single day … on fields,
rinks, courts, tracks, diamonds, gridirons, bleachers and in locker rooms.
Sport shows us that the similarities that bind us are infinitely stronger
than the differences that divide us. It is the diversity of race, religion and
gender that truly moves us forward, together.
For 17 days, as Team USA and the world compete in the 2018 Olympic
Winter Games, we will put our differences aside and simply play games.
We will play with excitement and pride. We will play by the rules.
And we will play with sportsmanship and respect for our opponents.
For 17 days, the world will be united by the joy and spirit of sport.
Sport has the power to bring us together as one community, one country
and one world. Sport has always been one of the great uniters.
The Olympic Winter Games will show those divisive forces that they are
fighting a losing battle. We will see how the human spirit can be lifted to
new heights. We will see that when we are united, we are at our best.
So let us remember the power sport has to unite us as one race ... the
human race, living together with respect, tolerance and love.
Not just for 17 days every two years, but always.
Sincerely,
Edward W. Stack
Chairman & CEO
DICK’S Sporting Goods
KLMNO
HEalth Science
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2018
.
SECTION E
EZ
EE
GÉRARD DUBOIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Out of coma,
ultra runner is
back on road
BY
A MANDA L OUDIN
Head trauma can be life-threatening,
particularly to older people. In 2015,
Tom Green, then 65, faced such a
threat as he clung to life in a Baltimore hospital after a freak accident.
As he regained consciousness and
began relearning simple movements,
caregivers marveled at his grit and
determination, according to his wife,
Kay. She knew what they didn’t: Tom
Green was no ordinary patient.
In 1986, Green cemented his spot
in running history. He ran all four of
the nation’s 100-mile races in one
season, becoming the first to complete ultra running’s “grand slam.”
Only about 300 people have replicated that accomplishment.
So while health-care workers
might have been surprised by the
sexagenarian’s tenacity, friends and
fellow runners knew Green would
RUNNER CONTINUED ON E4
When faced with life’s stresses,
I have a hard time bouncing back
BY
A NDREW R EINER
R
ecently I was sitting with my son and my
wife while she read aloud the children’s
book “Stuart Little.” She reached the part
where Stuart, the mousy main character, on
the romantic date of his dreams with an equally diminutive female named Harriet, plans to take her on a
moonlit canoe ride. But Stuart refuses to continue with
the date once he discovers a hole in his toy birch-bark
canoe. Despite Harriet’s suggestions that they pivot to
dinner and dancing at her father’s country club, Stuart
can’t sever ties with the idyll he had hatched. Ultimately, as shown in one of the book’s illustrations by Garth
ANIMALS
Fish skin heals the badly
burned paws of bears. E2
HEALTH ANXIETY
What qualifies someone as
a hypochondriac? E3
RESEARCH
NIH fact sheets assess
dietary supplements. E3
MENTAL ILLNESS
A star of “Black-ish” talks
about being bipolar. E5
Williams, he’s left sitting alone, dejected. ¶ “Hey,” said
my 6-year-old son, Macallah. “That looks like Dad.”
My wife, Liz, shot me a look of validated victory. ¶ At
work I meet my deadlines and keep my cool as well as
anyone. Once I cross the threshold into the rest of life,
though, all bets are off, as Liz often reminds me. Yet it
RESILIENCE CONTINUED ON E5
As in 1918, flu
could again
kill millions
The flu arrived as a
great war raged in
Europe, a conflict that
BY ASHLEY
would leave about
HALSEY III
20 million people
dead over four years.
In 1918, the flu would kill more
than twice that number — and
perhaps five times as many — in just
15 months. Though mostly forgotten,
it has been called “the greatest
medical holocaust in history.”
Experts believe that between
50 million and 100 million people
were killed. More than two-thirds of
them died in a single 10-week period
in the autumn of 1918.
Never have so many died so swiftly
from a single disease. In the United
States alone, it killed about 675,000 in
about a year — the same number who
have died of AIDS in nearly 40 years.
As the country muddles through a
particularly nasty flu season — one
Retropolis
FLU 1918 CONTINUED ON E4
ANDRE CHUNG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
E2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
S C I E NC E S C AN
PHYSICS
Blog reveals the big benefits of thinking small.
Really, really small.
Look around you.
Look again.
If you don’t see a world teeming with condensed matter, you’re
probably not a physicist. Or maybe you just don’t read Nanoscale
Views.
It’s a blog about the sometimes
bizarre world of condensed matter physics — science that’s concerned with how large numbers
of particles or atoms act when
they’re highly concentrated or
adhere to one another.
Condensed matter physics concerns itself with liquid and solid
matter. It examines and explains
why materials conduct heat, stick
to one another, stretch and crystallize — and why they behave in
odd and unexpected ways.
Nanotechnology, semiconductors and quantum computing all
have roots in the field. It also
concerns itself with some of the
more perplexing phases of matter, such as Bose-Einstein condensates, in which atoms cooled
to near absolute zero begin acting
like a single entity instead of a
group.
Nanoscale Views is written by
Douglas Natelson, a physicist at
Rice University whose research
group tries to tease out the properties of nanoparticles and other
super-small structures.
On a mission to explain condensed matter physics, Natelson
BULLIT MARQUEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A rare lunar event gets eclipsed
A cloud of volcanic ash obscures a “super blue blood moon” last week as lava flows down the Philippines’ Mount Mayon. It had been
decades since a blue moon — a second full moon in a month — coincided with a supermoon and a total lunar eclipse, or blood moon.
Nanoscale Views
nanoscale.blogspot.com
ISTOCK
points out developments in the
field, ruminates on the day-to-day
concerns of research — including
how it gets paid for — and shares
insights from conferences and
scientific events. He gets deep
into the hows and whys of his
super-specific, often deeply weird
field, and the result is fun to read.
If you’re a physics nerd — or
someone who wants an unusual
look at the world around you —
it’s worth checking out.
— Erin Blakemore
For bears whose paws were burned in wildfire, fish skin works wonders
BY
K ARIN B RULLIARD
When Jamie Peyton first examined the bears’ paws, she figured
they might take six months to
heal.
Peyton, a veterinarian at the
University of California at Davis,
had treated cats and dogs with
burns before, and she knew these
wounds were severe. The two
female black bears in her care
had survived the Thomas wildfire, which swept through a portion of Southern California in
December, but both suffered
third-degree burns that had
caused their paw pads to slough
off. They could hardly stand because of the pain.
Instead of six months, the
bears’ injuries healed in a matter
of weeks — a quick recovery
Peyton attributed to a treatment
never before tried on human or
animal burn victims in the United States: tilapia skin applied as
bandages.
Using fish skin wasn’t Peyton’s
first instinct when state wildlife
authorities enlisted her help.
They had found one bear huddling on Dec. 9 in a backyard
aviary near the town of Ojai and
the other two weeks later in a
nearby wooded area. A third
patient, a 5-month-old male
mountain lion with burned paws,
was discovered in the woods
shortly before Christmas. Kirsten
Macintyre, a spokeswoman for
the California Department of
Fish and Wildlife, said officials
determined the three were candidates for rehabilitation, which
meant transferring them to a
state wildlife investigations lab
near Sacramento. A vet there
suggested calling on Peyton, chief
of the Integrative Medicine Service at the UC Davis veterinary
teaching hospital.
Peyton said she first tried the
usual care: cleaning the burns,
removing dead tissue and applying ointments. But she knew that
two very important steps — covering the burns and providing
pain control — would be tricky
with these unusual patients,
which had to be kept a safe
distance from people when not
sedated.
There was no guarantee they’d
gulp down pain pills hidden in
their food, Peyton said. “And we
couldn’t put on any type of bandage material they would eat,”
because that might cause intestinal obstruction. Also, she said, “if
a bandage comes off, you can’t
really go into the cage to get it.”
A fast recovery was imperative,
especially for the second bear.
Peyton’s team had discovered the
bear was pregnant during an
ultrasound exam, and they feared
the stress of giving birth in captivity would cause her to reject
the cub.
Then, the veterinarian said,
she remembered a news story she
had read about scientists in Brazil successfully using sterilized
tilapia skin on human burns.
Like the pig and human tissues
that have long been applied to
burns, the fish skin is moist and
transfers collagen, a protein that
helps healing. But it’s cheaper
and widely available, because it’s
a byproduct of tilapia sold as
food. The Brazilian researchers
told Reuters last year that it
hastened recovery in their patients and reduced the need for
pain medication.
Tilapia skin had some additional selling points in Peyton’s
mind: It could remain intact for
several days, and no harm would
come to the bears and mountain
lion if they ate it.
“I thought this would be perfect,” she said. “The skins are
really, really strong, and it’ll help
with pain control.”
Peyton procured the skin from
a local fish market, sterilized it
and then sutured it onto the
sedated animals’ paws. To keep
the scaly bandages protected, her
team wrapped the paws in two
other edible substances: rice paper and corn husks.
“We wrap their feet like tamales,” she said. “They were known
either as ‘tamale feet’ or ‘Califor-
nia bear roll feet.’ ”
The bears stood soon after
waking from sedation, a sign of
improvement. They also didn’t
remove the skin until their next
application 10 days later, which
Peyton took to mean the bears
understood the treatment helped
them feel better. Not so for the
mountain lion kitten, which
would eat its fish skin after a
couple of days.
“Cats don’t like stuff on their
feet,” Peyton said. Fortunately,
the mountain lion’s burns were
less severe and required tilapia
only on one paw, she said. “Once
he started feeling better, he was
playing.”
So fast did the bears’ paws heal
that wildlife officials decided
they were ready for release in
RIGHT: Veterinarian Jamie
Peyton examines the paw of a
mountain lion injured in a
wildfire. ABOVE: Peyton also
treated the third-degree burns
that hobbled two bears caught
in the blaze.
mid-January. A state biologist
spent a few days hiking around
Los Padres National Forest — in
an area not damaged by fire and
not too far from where the bears
had been found — in search of
good denning spots, Macintyre
said. After she identified two
about five miles apart, a team
from the wildlife agency built
dens from logs, brush and
branches. They constructed an
extra-spacious one for the pregnant bear, she said.
“We wanted to give her particularly Cadillac accommodations,” Macintyre said.
On Jan. 17, the bears were
sedated and outfitted with their
final strips of tilapia skin, as well
as radio collars and ear tags.
Wildlife officials drove them to
their new homes, then placed
them in their dens and set up
trail cameras nearby. Macintyre
said they’re hoping to see footage
of a bear cub in the coming
weeks.
The mountain lion, which in
the wild would have stayed with
its mother until reaching about
18 months old, is too young to be
released. He’ll go to a wildlife
rescue center, Macintyre said.
Peyton, meanwhile, said she
plans to experiment more with
using tilapia skin to help the kind
of animals she more typically
sees — pets.
“You get inspired by your patients, and my goal was really to
just help that first bear, and then,
of course, the other ones came
in,” she said. “I’ve just been really
impressed by how much pain
release they got, and the really
marked improvement in healing
time.”
karin.brulliard@washpost.com
PHOTOS BY KARIN HIGGINS/UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT DAVIS
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/animalia
Earthquake geologists find fault under L.A.’s swankiest shopping district
BY R ONG- G ONG L IN I I
AND R AOUL R AÑOA
los angeles — New data from
state geologists show that an
earthquake fault runs below Rodeo Drive and Beverly Hills’s
shopping district, heightening
the known seismic risk in an area
famous for Cartier, Gucci, Prada
and other luxury brands.
The California Geological Survey’s final map has the Santa
Monica fault zone cutting
through what is called the Golden
Triangle, running between Santa
Monica and Wilshire boulevards.
The new map is a change from
a draft version released last year
that showed the fault zone ending
on the western edge of Beverly
Hills. Based on more information, the state now says the fault
zone extends through Beverly
Hills’s central district.
The Santa Monica is one of
several faults running through
highly populated areas of Southern California to generate interest and concern from seismic
experts and government officials.
It’s capable of producing a major, 7-magnitude earthquake. Experts believe the most recent
earthquake on the Santa Monica
fault occurred 1,000 to 3,000
years ago.
Over the past few years, the
state has stepped up drawing
official fault zones across California, a required first step before
seismic safety laws can be applied
to areas.
Areas with fault zones face
limits on development. Owners of
properties in these zones are obligated to hire geologists to ensure
that new buildings and major
renovation projects aren’t located
directly on an active fault line.
Containing some of the priciest
retail real estate in the nation, the
Beverly Hills shopping district is
already built out with shops and
midrise office buildings. It’s unclear whether any major developments that haven’t been approved by local governments are
on the drawing board in the fault
zone.
“We’re all afraid of earthquakes,” said Norbert Wabnig,
who runs the Cheese Store of
Beverly Hills. “To know that
there’s [a fault line] close to us,
that’s even scarier.”
During both the 1971 Sylmar
and 2014 Napa earthquakes,
houses built atop a fault suffered
major damage as their foundations were torn apart, while
buildings just a few hundred feet
ALEXANDER KLEIN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
A new map shows that an
earthquake fault zone extends
through the central district of
Beverly Hills.
“We’re all afraid of
earthquakes. To know
that there’s [a fault line]
close to us, that’s even
scarier.”
Norbert Wabnig, who runs
the Cheese Store of Beverly Hills
away were far less affected, said
Tim Dawson, senior engineering
geologist with the California Geological Survey.
Larger buildings straddling a
fault could be more vulnerable
and completely collapse, Dawson
said.
“We don’t want to put essential
facilities on top of active faults,
such as fire stations, hospitals,
schools,” he said.
Earthquake faults can change
land in ways that made them
appealing generations ago for developers who were unaware of the
seismic risk.
It was past earthquakes that
made Santa Monica Boulevard a
perfect spot for a major roadway
and the Red Car trolley line: a flat
area just below a hillside, Dawson
said.
Prehistoric earthquakes threw
up the north side of Santa Monica
Boulevard, Dawson said, forming
the dramatic hillside perch that
the Mormon temple now calls
home and moving it west toward
the ocean. The area to the south of
the boulevard is getting relatively
lower and has also been shifting
to the east.
California law does not require
existing buildings in the zones to
be altered. But it prohibits new
development on top of fault lines.
State scientists have various
degrees of certainty about the
fault’s location. Some drawn
paths are considered accurate
based on detailed investigations
on specific plots of land. Other
sections of the fault are considered approximately located.
Yet other parts of the fault’s
path are inferred, as when geologists connect the dots between
two points along the fault and “we
see a fault at Point A, and there’s
good evidence there’s a fault at
Point B,” Dawson said. “Faults are
typically continuous features —
they don’t typically stop.”
State officials said the part of
the Santa Monica fault they now
believe runs through the Beverly
Hills shopping district is considered inferred, based on a geology
investigation done in preparation
for subway construction and on
data collected from east of the
civic center.
Beverly Hills spokeswoman
Therese Kosterman said the city
is aware of the new Santa Monica
fault map issued by the state.
“The current map has significant
revisions from the earlier draft
map that the city had commented
on and so we are currently in the
process of evaluating the chang-
es,” Kosterman said in an email.
More study in coming years
and decades will help improve
the fault maps. One research
technique that state geologists
hope to pursue is to send waves of
energy underground. If a fault is
there, the energy will move in a
specific way.
The threat of destruction on
top of faults is such a risk that
some agencies have taken steps to
vacate or demolish buildings directly on top of them. San Bernardino Valley College demolished
seven buildings along the San
Jacinto fault in the 2000s; in 1991,
Los Angeles Southwest College
tore down two that sat on top of
the Newport-Inglewood fault.
In the San Francisco Bay area,
officials in Hayward ordered its
historic city hall vacated after the
Hayward fault was found to be
slowly tearing it apart. Fremont
demolished its city hall after geologists said it was on top of the
same fault.
In areas where construction
has occurred after fault map studies were published, developers
have avoided building on top of
faults, placing structures away
from fault lines while still building in the fault zone.
— Los Angeles Times
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
38
It’s true that fewer Americans smoke
cigarettes today than in decades past, but
about 38 million still smoke daily or some of
the time, according to a new report from the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Overall, the percentage of adults who smoke
fell from 20.9 in 2005 to 15.5 percent in 2016.
And those who still smoke reportedly puff
away on fewer cigarettes each day than before.
However, smoking is blamed for 1 of every 5 deaths in the United
States each year, and it puts at risk not just those who smoke but also
those who are exposed to secondhand smoke. The possible health
effects of smoking are numerous, including lung disease and lung
cancer, heart disease and stroke. Smoking also can cause problems
with your immune system, bone density and vision, studies have
found, and it has been linked to cancers throughout the body.
According to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, health-care costs
attributed to smoking total $170 billion a year. Although quitting is
not easy, studies have found that doing so can put you on the path to
better health right away: improved circulation and blood pressure,
easier breathing, better senses of taste and smell. Also, cancer risk
goes down as long as you stay smoke-free. Best of all: You’ll live longer.
million
— Linda Searing
H EA LTH S CA N
PUBLIC HEALTH
For Hawaiians quarantined with leprosy, exile
to a settlement wasn’t the end of the story
A Source of Light,
Constant and Never-Fading
James and Abigail Campbell Library,
University of Hawaii — West Oahu
hawaii.edu/news/2018/01/08/
kalaupapa-exhibit
derstood: It doesn’t spread easily,
and it can be treated with antibiotics.
The exhibition includes historical photographs, testimonies and
fragments of songs and letters,
along with information about current and recent residents of Kalaupapa. The peninsula, now a national historical park, is still home
to some who were once quarantined. (The mandatory quarantine was abolished in 1969.)
“A Source of Light” is the work
of Ka ‘Ohana o Kalaupapa, a nonprofit dedicated to memorializing
and upholding the dignity of those
who were exiled. It’s open through
March 10.
You can read testimonies of
people who were once isolated on
Molokai at nps.gov/kala/learn/
historyculture/words.htm.
— Erin Blakemore
ERIC RISBERG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tourists walk through a cemetery on the Kalaupapa peninsula,
where Hawaiians with leprosy were exiled under a quarantine law
passed in 1865. At the settlement’s peak, 1,100 people with leprosy,
or Hansen’s disease, lived there.
Do dietary supplements really work? Fact sheets
from NIH provide research-based answers.
BY
R ACHAEL R ETTNER
Plenty of dietary supplements
claim to help you get in shape or
lose weight, but do they really
work? Several new resources from
the National Institutes of Health
summarize what is known about
the safety and effectiveness of
popular supplement ingredients.
For example, NIH has put
together a fact sheet on ingredients in exercise supplements,
which manufacturers often claim
can improve users’ strength or
endurance, or help them achieve
their performance goals faster.
“Dietary supplements marketed for exercise and athletic performance can’t take the place of a
healthy diet, but some might
have value for certain types of
activity,” Paul Coates, director of
the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at NIH, said in a
statement. “Others don’t seem to
work, and some might even be
harmful.”
The fact sheet covers more
than two dozen ingredients in
exercise supplements.
Thinking of trying creatine?
The fact sheet says that this
supplement might help with
short bursts of high-intensity activity such as sprinting or weightlifting, but not with endurance
exercises such as distance running or swimming. On the other
hand, antioxidants such as vitamins C and E don’t seem to help
E3
EE
FROM CONSUMER REPORTS
TH E BI G NUM B ER
Molokai’s Kalaupapa peninsula
seems like a peaceful haven. But it
is home to a painful legacy — that
of thousands of people with Hansen’s disease, or leprosy, who were
once banished there to live and die
in exile.
“A Source of Light, Constant
and Never-Fading,” an exhibition
at the University of Hawaii — West
Oahu, tells their stories.
They were sent to Kalaupapa in
an era when the bacterial disease
was not well understood. For centuries, leprosy had been thought
to be a punishment from God, and
people hated and feared those
whose bodies were marked by the
disease.
Beginning in the 1830s, the illness spread rapidly through the
native Hawaiian population. In
response, Hawaii’s legislature
passed a quarantine law in 1865
and exiled all people with leprosy
to Kalaupapa.
The exiles were subjected to
stigma and, sometimes, neglect.
At the settlement’s peak, 1,100
people with Hansen’s disease lived
there.
Today, the disease is better un-
EZ
improve performance, although
they are needed in small
amounts for overall health, NIH
said.
A second fact sheet covers
weight-loss supplements. Despite the popularity of these
products, there’s little evidence
that they actually work, and
some can even be harmful, the
agency said. “People may not
know that many manufacturers
of weight-loss supplements don’t
conduct studies in humans to
find out whether their product
works and is safe,” said Anne
Thurn, director of the ODS communications program.
The ingredient chromium, for
example, may help people lose a
very small amount of weight and
body fat, and it is safe; but another ingredient, raspberry ketones, haven’t been studied
enough to know whether they’re
safe or effective, the fact sheet says.
Consumers should keep in
mind that many supplements
contain more than one ingredient, and these combinations often have not been studied for
their safety or effectiveness, the
agency said.
“We encourage people to talk
with their health-care providers
to get advice about dietary supplements and to visit the ODS
website to learn valuable information about these products,”
Coates said.
— Live Science
You’ve got pre-diabetes? Take a detour.
A
bout 30 million Americans, including more
than a quarter of adults
older than 65, have
Type 2 diabetes, a
chronic condition in which the
body is unable to make and properly use the hormone insulin.
This creates high levels of glucose in the blood, which, over
time, can lead to heart disease,
vision loss, kidney and nerve
damage, and more.
And more than 84 million
adults in the United States have
pre-diabetes, or blood sugar levels that are elevated but not high
enough for a diabetes diagnosis.
This puts them at high risk for
developing Type 2 diabetes, according to new data from the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention.
Up to 70 percent of people with
pre-diabetes that’s not remedied
eventually progress to full-blown
diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA).
But “pre-diabetes is absolutely
reversible,” says Marvin M. Lipman, an endocrinologist and
Consumer Reports’ chief medical
adviser.
Lifestyle steps appear to be key.
For instance, most doctors agree
that healthy strategies that enable weight loss can cut your risk
of Type 2 diabetes — without the
need for medication.
Considerable research bears
this out. A large 15-year study
published in the Lancet in 2015
compared the effectiveness of
lifestyle changes with that of the
diabetes drug metformin (Glu-
ISTOCK
cophage and generic) in almost
3,000 people with pre-diabetes.
The study found that following
a low-fat, low-calorie diet and
exercising for 150 minutes a week
were slightly more beneficial
than the medication. Diet and
exercise were particularly effective for older adults, cutting their
risk of progressing to Type 2
diabetes by 72 percent.
Here’s what to know — and do
— to put the brakes on pre-diabetes:
Lose a little weight if possible
If you’re overweight and have
pre-diabetes, shedding a few
pounds may be the best way to cut
your diabetes risk, Lipman says.
Carrying less body fat can im-
prove insulin sensitivity — your
body’s ability to use the hormone.
This, in turn, can reduce high
blood sugar levels.
And you may not have to lose a
whole lot. Losing just 7 percent of
your body weight may prevent or
delay the onset of Type 2 diabetes,
according to the Diabetes Prevention Program, a major, long-term
clinical research study. Bonus: A
healthy weight can also cut your
risk for heart disease, high blood
pressure and some cancers.
There are a number of effective
strategies for losing weight. It’s
important to talk with your doctor about what’s most appropriate for you. But in general, eating
smaller portions and limiting
high-fat foods such as red meat
and full-fat dairy can help cut
surplus calories. Focus instead on
produce, whole grains and lean
protein such as chicken and fish.
Avoiding drinks with added
sugar, such as soda, is also wise. A
study published in 2016 in the
Journal of Nutrition found that
over 14 years, middle-aged adults
who drank the most sugar-sweetened beverages were more likely
to have pre-diabetes than those
who drank the least.
You don’t have to go it alone,
either. Ask your health-care provider for information on free or
low-cost diabetes education or
nutrition classes, or for a referral
to a diabetes nurse-educator for a
one-on-one session.
Get regular physical activity,
too
Exercise can assist your
weight-loss efforts and allow your
body to use insulin more efficiently, helping to normalize your
blood sugar levels.
The ADA recommends 30 minutes or more of aerobic activity,
such as brisk walking, at least five
times a week.
If you’ve been sedentary, start
by adding five to 10 minutes of
daily activity and build up to the
30 minutes over a few weeks, says
Ada Stewart, a family physician
in South Carolina and a member
of the board of directors of the
American Academy of Family
Physicians.
Be aware that if you’re still
inching toward diabetes despite
positive diet and exercise habits,
your doctor might consider drug
treatment for pre-diabetes.
Don’t be discouraged if this
occurs, Stewart says: “With accompanying lifestyle changes,
some patients may be able to
work their way off medications in
the long term.”
© Copyright 2017-2018, Consumer Reports
Inc.
Consumer Reports is an
independent, nonprofit organization
that works side by side with
consumers to create a fairer, safer,
and healthier world. CR does not
endorse products or services, and
does not accept advertising. CR has
no financial relationship with
advertisers in this publication. Read
more at ConsumerReports.org.
The Internet can be a hypochondriac’s worst friend
My 9-year-old
came home from a
day of skiing and
EMILY SOHN
said his eyes hurt.
They looked a
little red. He had been wearing
goggles all day, but I felt a pang of
worry: Could it be snow
blindness? (He was fine.)
I’ve had similar experiences
with my own health. I might have
jaw pain, dizziness or a stomach
flu that makes me vomit. Before
long, I’m wondering about heart
attacks, tumors, even Ebola.
Usually, I manage to rationalize
away my fears, especially when
symptoms go away — until a new
problem arises. Then, even when
I try not to look, I end up online,
searching for signs of my own
imminent demise.
I’m not the only one with a
tendency to jump from physical
ailment to worst-case scenario.
An informal poll of friends turned
up a list of inaccurate selfdiagnoses that included malaria,
multiple sclerosis, West Nile virus,
a femoral hernia, cancer and a
post-hysterectomy pregnancy.
Health anxiety is extremely
common if not universal, says
Thomas Fergus, a clinical
psychologist at Baylor University
in Waco, Texas. With so much
health information available
online, most people search their
symptoms at some point. That’s
not necessarily a bad thing. The
anxiety that often ensues may be
short-lived or even helpful.
But sometimes the worry
becomes its own kind of problem,
leading to a preoccupation with
illness that persists even after
doctors offer reassurance.
“Everyone is going to be anxious
about their health from time to
time,” Fergus says. “What makes it
a problem is the frequency, the
intensity and the severity.”
People who worry excessively
about their health used to be
called hypochondriacs. But that
term developed negative
connotations, and psychologists
dropped it in 2013. The latest
edition of the Diagnostic and
Statistical Manual of Mental
Disorders replaced
hypochondriasis with two
alternatives: somatic symptom
disorder and illness anxiety
disorder.
Both diagnoses remain
controversial. Some doctors
argue that they are overly general,
putting too many people at risk of
being unnecessarily diagnosed
with a mental illness. Partly
because the terms are so new,
there is no clear statistic on how
many people have clinical levels
of health anxiety.
But the Internet has become a
potential breeding ground for
health anxiety, according to
researchers who use the term
“cyberchondria” to describe the
interplay between online health
searches and health anxiety.
WebMD, the Mayo Clinic and
other websites allow users to
enter symptoms in exchange for a
list of possible diagnoses, and
most people end up searching at
some point. A 2013 survey of more
than 3,000 American adults by
the Pew Research Center reported
AnyBODY
that 59 percent had searched
online for health information in
the previous year. And 35 percent
said they had used the Internet
looking specifically to diagnose a
medical condition. Fergus says
other studies have shown that 60
to 80 percent of people look
online for health information.
In some cases, that kind of
research can be helpful and a little
dose of anxiety can motivate
people to finally seek out the health
care they need. Once in the midst
of testing and evaluation, Fergus
adds, it’s normal to experience a
heightened state of anxiety.
People with health
anxiety tend to jump to
catastrophic outcomes
when symptoms arise,
says researcher
Karmpaul Singh.
But searching for health
information can magnify the pool
of potential problems to worry
about, and studies suggest that
people who are prone to health
anxiety are most vulnerable to
getting sucked in. Anxiety levels
also tend to be higher, Fergus
says, when people think there is a
higher chance that they have a
problem and when the burden of
having that problem would be
particularly large — if, say, a
family member was diagnosed
with a disease or if the
consequences of the disease
would be devastating.
Health worriers share other
features, too, says Karmpaul
Singh, a research psychologist at
the University of Calgary, who has
published three studies on health
anxiety in the past few years with
Richard J. Brown at the
University of Manchester in the
United Kingdom. Echoing
previous work, their findings
have shown that those with
higher levels of health anxiety
tended to be most uncomfortable
with uncertainty. Instead of
waiting something out or
rationalizing it away, they went
looking for answers.
“It’s really that discomfort with
the unknown,” Singh says, “that
draws them in to Googling a
symptom at midnight instead of
waiting to see if it disappears.”
People with health anxiety also
tend to jump to catastrophic
outcomes when symptoms arise,
Singh says. They may seek out
information that confirms their
worst suspicions. They resist
reassurance. Or they consider
unlikely diagnoses, even if there
is only a tiny chance of their being
responsible.
Singh once had a student who
thought a mole on her arm was a
sign of cancer even after her
doctor said it was benign. She
went on to visit several doctors,
who all said the same thing. Still,
she went home every night and
circled the mole with a Sharpie to
see if it was growing.
When health worries persist
after test results are negative or
doctors say that nothing is wrong,
it might be a sign that the anxiety
needs extra attention, Fergus
says, especially if the anxiety
sticks around for months or more.
Missing school, work or time with
friends to spend hours on patient
forums or Google searches is
another warning sign.
“Once something becomes so
preoccupying that it takes away
from your quality of life, no
matter what it is, that’s the point
when you should see a
psychologist or psychiatrist,”
Singh says.
Anxiety is worth taking
seriously because it can carry
health consequences of its own.
Studies have linked anxiety with
higher rates of heart attacks in
people with heart disease. And
treating anxiety has been shown
to improve symptoms in people
with chronic respiratory and
gastrointestinal diseases.
Relaxation exercises, such as
yoga and meditation, can
sometimes help people conquer
health anxiety, Fergus says. But
when people can’t manage
anxiety on their own, he suggests
seeking professional help.
For people who choose to look
online, sussing out high-quality
sources of information is one way
to avoid falling into rabbit holes.
Most people look only at the first
page of Google results, studies
show. And they tend to trust sites
as long as the grammar looks
sound and they see the word
“doctor.” Singh recommends
looking away from the rare
diseases and sticking with the
most reliable sources, such as the
Harvard School of Public Health
and the Mayo Clinic.
He also advises trusting the
medical process, which is far
more likely than self-diagnosis to
deliver accurate answers. In a
2016 study, online symptomcheckers got the right answer on
the first try just 34 percent of the
time, while doctors nailed it at a
rate of 72 percent.
A little bit of self-reflection can
go a long way, he adds. He
developed health anxiety as a
teenager, convinced that aches,
pains or coughs were leading him
to organ failure. Since then, his
research has made him aware of
what was happening and helped
him stop jumping to conclusions,
in part by avoiding health-related
websites. “I still Google
symptoms once in a while,” he
says. “It doesn’t bother me
anymore because I’ve learned a
lot about it.”
health-science@washpost.com
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FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
RETROPOLIS
‘100 years after the lethal 1918 flu, we are still vulnerable,’ CDC expert warns
Many flu victims died in their
homes of starvation, not the
disease, because they were too
weak to seek food and no one
dared bring it to them.
FLU 1918 FROM E1
that the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention says has
killed at least 53 children — the
1918 nightmare serves a reminder.
If a virulent enough strain were to
emerge again, a century of
modern medicine might not save
millions from dying.
“You think about how bad it
was in 1918, and you think surely
our modern medical technology
will save us, but influenza is the
Hollywood movie writer’s worst
nightmare,” said Anne Schuchat,
CDC’s acting director, at a recent
seminar on the 1918 pandemic.
“We have many more tools than
we had before, but they are
imperfect tools.”
Carts filled with the dead
One hundred years ago, a third
of the world’s population came
down with what was dubbed the
Spanish flu. (It got its name when
the king of Spain, Alfonso XIII,
his prime minister and several
cabinet ministers came down
with the disease.)
The flu brought life to a
standstill, emptying city streets,
closing churches, pool halls,
saloons and theaters.
Coffinmakers couldn’t keep up
with demand, so mass graves
were dug to bury the dead. People
cowered behind closed doors for
fear they would be struck down.
In Philadelphia, news stories
described priests driving carts
through the streets, encouraging
people to bring out the dead so
that they might be buried.
In New York there were
accounts of people feeling perfectly
healthy when they boarded the
subway at Coney Island and being
taken off dead when they reached
Columbus Circle.
Entire families succumbed.
In Tyler County, W.Va., John
Linza, his wife and two of their
sons died on the same day. Two
other sons died just days before
them. The last Linza, an infant,
died the day after his parents.
In the southwestern tip of
Virginia, J.W. Trent, his wife and
two sons fell ill. They were
preceded in death by all four of
the family’s young daughters —
Hattie, Mary, Ellen and Ruby.
In 10 weeks, the flu killed
20,000 in New York City and
produced 31,000 orphans.
There is debate among
historians about where the flu
first surfaced — did it come from
China or a British encampment
in northern France or rural
Kansas? But it spread worldwide
practically overnight.
By the end of November,
50,000 had died in South Africa,
where at its peak flu killed 600
people each day. In Egypt, the
death count reached 41,000 in
Cairo and Alexandria by January.
In Tahiti, trucks roamed the
streets of Papeete to collect the
dead, and great funeral pyres
burned day and night to
incinerate the bodies.
Normally the people most
vulnerable to influenza are infants,
whose immune systems are not yet
up to the test, and the elderly,
whose ability to fight disease
diminishes with age. In 1918, more
than half the people it killed were
in the prime of their lives.
Many died within hours,
turning blue from lack of oxygen
as they coughed foamy blood up
from their lungs and bled from
the nose, ears and eyes.
EDWARD A. "DOC" ROGERS/ASSOCIATED PRESS/NATIONAL MUSEUM OF HEALTH AND MEDICINE
CYNTHIA GOLDSMITH/CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, PRINTS & PHOTOGRAPHS DIVISION
The Spanish flu infected the
upper respiratory tract and then
dived deep into the lungs with
viral or bacterial pneumonia.
How did it kill so many young
healthy adults? Their immune
systems attacked the influenza
invader with such force that it
killed them.
One Army doctor, quoted by
historian John M. Barry, author
of the bestseller “The Great
Influenza,” described the scene at
a base hospital in Massachusetts:
“When brought to the
[hospital] they very rapidly
develop the most vicious type of
pneumonia that has ever been
seen. Two hours after admission
they have the Mahogany spots
over the cheek bones, and a few
hours later you can begin to see
[the blueness] extending from
their ears and spreading all over
the face. . . . It is only a matter of a
few hours then until death comes.
. . . It is horrible.”
Yet President Woodrow Wilson
was unwilling to take any action
that would compromise the war
effort.
In early October, even as the
disease was sweeping through
military bases, killing soldiers
and sailors by the thousands, U.S.
Surgeon General Rupert Blue
warned against rushing to see
doctors with “mild cases of
influenza.”
“The present generation,” Blue
said, “has been spoiled by having
had expert medical and nursing
care readily available.”
Cowering in their homes
Then as now, the catchphrase
was “a touch of the flu.” The flu
rolled in every winter, enveloping
people in a fog and fever that
lasted a few days and lingered for
a week or two. It was something
to be endured, but not many
people died from it.
And so it began in 1918.
To comprehend what came
next — and why it is possible that
a deadly strain of influenza could
rear up 100 years later to kill tens
of millions — requires an
understanding of the disease.
The world’s most successful
vaccinations against measles,
polio, tetanus and smallpox
generally work in the same way.
They introduce a minuscule
amount of the disease so that if it
ever arrives in full-blown form,
the body will recognize and
neutralize it with an immunesystem counterattack.
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Victims of the 1918 flu fill an
emergency hospital at the Fort Riley Army base in Kansas. An
electron microscope image shows the re-created virus. A Red
Cross emergency ambulance station in Washington conducts a
demonstration during the pandemic.
Influenza, however, never
gives the immune system a stable
target. Instead, it can transform
itself into something that appears
innocent to the white blood cells
and enzymes intended to wage
war against it.
That explains why a vaccine
against the flu is a hit-or-miss
proposition, based on the best
guess of scientists about what flu
strains are most likely to emerge
six months later. The CDC
estimates flu vaccines will be
about 30 percent effective against
this year’s predominant strain,
H3N2, but about 60 percent
effective against the other
influenza A strain, H1N1, and
about 50 percent effective against
influenza B viruses.
In 1918 there were no flu
vaccinations, and it would not
have mattered anyway. After the
“touch of the flu” that proved
deadly only here and there during
the spring, the influenza
apparently mutated into a killer.
By early autumn, the public
face of America and other parts of
the Western world had a gauze
mask on it. People wore them to
church, the military marched in
them, police posed for photos in
them and doctors wore them to
visit patients. In Seattle, anyone
who tried to board a streetcar
without a gauze mask was
arrested.
The masks served little
purpose. The fine spray of a
sneeze creates a cloud of more
than half a million virus particles,
and the virus can live for hours on
any hard surface where the
particles settle.
Four women who gathered to
play bridge in Albuquerque in
November prudently wore six-ply
cloth masks. Three of them were
dead the next day.
The frightening spread of the
disease led to official and selfimposed quarantines.
Schools, theaters, bars and
other gathering places were
ordered closed. Mothers were
told their children should be
confined to their own yards. In
New York, officials so feared
transmission on overcrowded
subways that they ordered people
to work staggered shifts.
People cowered from contact
with anyone who might carry the
disease. A doctor in Philadelphia
spoke of driving from the hospital
to his suburban home without
seeing another person or vehicle
on the streets.
We are still vulnerable
A century later, science has
revolutionized the medical
profession, producing miracle
drugs and surgical procedures
that no one could have imagined
in 1918.
But when Thomas Frieden
stepped down as head of the CDC
last year, he was asked in an
interview what keeps him awake
at night.
“We always worry about
pandemic influenza because this
has the potential to kill so many
people,” he said. “We stockpile
antivirals for an emergency. But
much more is needed to both
track influenza better around the
world and develop a better flu
vaccine.”
A “touch of the flu” kills up to
646,000 people worldwide each
year, sometimes as many as
56,000 of them in the United
States. Since 1918, there have
been three flu pandemics. (An
epidemic occurs when an
infectious disease spreads rapidly
to many people. A pandemic is a
global disease outbreak.)
“Obviously, we still have no
control over the virus,” said Barry,
the historian who gave the
keynote speech in 2004 when the
National Academies of Science
gathered to discuss pandemic
influenza. “In a lot of ways, we’re
arguably as vulnerable, or more
vulnerable, to another pandemic
as we were in 1918 because there’s
more economic
interdependence.”
A universal vaccine — one that
will protect against every
possible flu strain — isn’t
expected to emerge anytime soon.
“One hundred years after the
lethal 1918 flu, we are still
vulnerable,” warned Anthony S.
Fauci, director of the National
Institute of Allergy and Infectious
Diseases (NIAID), at a
Smithsonian seminar on the 1918
pandemic. “Without a universal
vaccine, a single virus would
result in a world catastrophe.”
Could a 1918 scenario repeat
itself?
“It’s clear that we have a much
greater capacity to respond, and
we would expect to respond more
effectively to a 1918-like virus, but
we could have [a strain] more
transmissible and more severe,”
Daniel Sosin, the CDC’s deputy
director for preparedness, said at
a recent Council on Foreign
Relations forum.
One of the scant protections
against another pandemic is the
global reporting system that
tracks emerging strains. If a 1918like flu were to present itself, the
system would, at least, alert the
rest of the world to its deadly
potential.
Jeffery K. Taubenberger and
Ann Reid were the first
researchers to sequence the
genome of the influenza virus
that caused the 1918 pandemic.
“The most important thing to
do is not just to understand 1918
as a historical phenomenon,” said
Taubenberger, an NIAID
virologist, “but as an example of
what could happen in the future.”
health-science@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/news/
retropolis
Despite a head injury that put him in a coma, ultra runner has many miles to go
RUNNER FROM E1
win the fight for his life.
Green, from Columbia, Md.,
got his start in running much as
many young men of his generation did, as a football player wannabe in high school in northern
Illinois. “I was too small for football, but my brother told me
about cross-country, and I decided to give it a try,” he said. “I hated
it at first, but eventually I began
improving my times and learned
to like it.”
Green had aspirations of running at Concord College in West
Virginia. But he was told by the
coach that his hair was too long
and his mustache too radical, so
he took a break from formal
training. After college, he heard
about a 10-kilometer event organized by the Howard County
Striders running club and ran it.
“Around 1983, I read about a
100-miler in a magazine,” Green
said. “All the pictures showed
smiling, happy runners, so I
thought, ‘How hard can it be?’ ”
Green registered for Virginia’s
Old Dominion 100-miler and
quickly learned the answer: very
hard. “It was my first time on
trails, and I made it to Mile 60
before the race organizers made
me drop out due to dehydration,”
he said. “I left there with no
intention of ever trying that
again, but I kept replaying the
race in my mind and decided I
had to go back.”
He did — and finished — the
following year. Around that time,
another article caught his attention — one about a fellow ultra
runner attempting to run the four
grand slam events, but over the
course of several years. “It sounded like a nice adventure, so I
decided to try all four in one
season,” Green said.
The four races — Old Dominion, Western States 100 in California, Leadville 100 in Colorado and
Wasatch Front 100 in Utah — all
took place between June and September. “Old Dominion and Western States were only two weeks
apart,” Green said, “and then I
had a couple of months off before
trying Leadville and Wasatch
Front, which were also two weeks
apart.”
At age 35, Green completed all
four. In the ensuing years, Green
would run nearly 300 ultramarathons (distances of more than
26.2 miles), 50 of which were
100-milers. At his peak in the
1980s and 1990s, he even bagged
a few wins.
In 2014, at age 64, Green decided to give the grand slam one
more try. By this time, the Old
Dominion race had been replaced
JASON GREEN/YETI TRAIL RUNNERS
After suffering a head injury, ultra runner Tom Green uses a baby
jogger to help him with balance. Here, he is congratulated for
completing the Yeti 100-mile race by its director, Jason Green.
with the Vermont 100.
Slower but no less determined,
Green completed three of the four
races under the cutoff time of 30
hours, some of them within minutes. But on the fourth, the
Wasatch Front, Green dropped
out at Mile 35 with crippling back
pain. “It turned out I had a stress
fracture in my sacrum,” he said.
“It was hard for me to stop, but I
physically couldn’t continue.”
The following April, Green suffered an accident. A contractor by
trade, Green was in his back yard
trimming tree limbs with a
friend. “The first branch we cut
was uneventful,” he said. “But the
second branch bounced up and
hit me in the back of the head.”
Green’s injuries were extensive: a fractured skull, a cut to the
carotid artery, internal bleeding
and subsequent strokes. For two
weeks, his future remained uncertain, and physicians brought
him into and out of a coma. The
lasting impact included a damaged vestibular system, hearing
loss and impaired vision.
After about a month, Green
began working to regain whatever abilities he could. “Once I got
home, I started taking walks outside with a walker,” he said.
“Within two months of the accident, I could walk a mile, but it
was slow.”
Returning to running remained a big question mark. “I
wanted to go faster than I could
with a walker,” Green said. “I
thought of using a baby jogger to
help with the balance issues, and
gave it a try.”
Green’s determination led to a
long, gradual return to running.
“It was very awkward, and it took
more energy than it did before,”
he admitted. “But the accident
took so much, and I didn’t want to
give up running — it defined me
for so many years.”
As he clawed his way back, the
running community cheered him
along — dedicating races to him,
running club events beside him
and keeping tabs on his progress.
Exactly a year after his accident, Green lined up with his
baby jogger at North Carolina’s
Umstead 100 race with the intent
of running 50 miles. “I made it in
15 hours, which gave me the idea
to try another 100 with the standard cutoff of 30 hours,” he explained.
Green selected the Yeti 100 in
Abingdon, Va., because it is held
largely on crushed limestone and
dirt, which makes it easier than
some others, and because it features a net drop of 2,000 feet. He
didn’t make the cutoff that year,
mostly because he didn’t have
enough lights on his baby jogger
to run safely after dark. With his
balance still off, Green is especially dependent on his vision, and
darkness limits that ability.
He returned last year with extra lights strapped onto the jogger. His longtime friend and running partner Charlie Romanello
flew in from Los Angeles to accompany him. With just 15 minutes to spare, Green and Romanello crossed the finish line,
pulling off the ultimate comeback.
Reflecting on his return to 100milers, Green admits the experience is bittersweet. “In the old
days, I might have won that race,
and now I come in last place,” he
said. “It’s not the way I wanted to
return. But I was not going to let
my injury defeat me.”
health-science@washpost.com
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E5
EE
Actress embraces
her bipolar self
BY
L ITSA D REMOUSIS
C
haracter actress Jenifer
Lewis has played the
hilarious, take-noprisoners grandmother
Ruby Johnson to great
acclaim for 31/2 seasons on ABC’s
hit sitcom “Black-ish.”
I’m on the phone with her to
discuss her new memoir, “The
Mother of Black Hollywood,”
which gets its name from the
myriad roles in which she has
played mom — to Angela Bassett
(as Tina Turner), Taraji P. Henson,
Whitney Houston, Tupac Shakur
and several other superstars.
The book’s subject matter,
however, lies much more with
bipolar disorder, with which she
was diagnosed in 1990.
Lewis resisted the diagnosis at
first and refused to take
medication until a self-described
nervous breakdown left her
convulsing in sobs, a hostage to
her untreated neurochemistry. A
quarter-century later, she is
thriving and happy because, as
she says, she “does the work.” She
takes her medication daily, was
in therapy for nearly two
decades, and still occasionally
checks in for fine-tuning. She
routinely hikes, does Pilates, and
eats and drinks healthfully. (But
she does allow for splurges. One
of the book’s funnier anecdotes
involves eating creme brulee for
breakfast on vacation.)
At 61, she is radiant and agile
with — as she put it one night
while live-tweeting “Black-ish” —
“a black belt in high kicks.”
Lewis has worked steadily in
theater, film and television since
earning her first Broadway role
in 1979, two weeks after she
moved to New York from
Kinloch, Mo., with a brand-new
degree in theater arts from
Webster University.
She has made educating
others about bipolar disorder a
huge part of her life’s work.
Following is a transcript of our
conversation, edited for clarity
and length.
Q: In your memoir, you’re
wonderfully candid about your
bipolar disorder. And instead of
devoting one chapter to it or
compartmentalizing it, you
weave your bipolarity
throughout the entire book. Why
did you decide to tell your story
this way?
A: It’s like I always say, “There
ain’t no shame in my game.”
When I was first diagnosed
bipolar in 1990, I was, like,
“What? Bipolar? I’m bicoastal,
but what’s this ‘bipolar’?”
[Laughs.] If you say, “Jenifer,
you’re crazy!” hell, I always knew
that. I’d heard, “Jenny, you’re
crazy!” my whole life. [Laughs.]
And it was hard. It took me
four years after my diagnosis to
start taking medication. I
thought, “I’m fine.” And in my
work, in my one-woman shows in
particular, I used the mania to
my advantage. Oh! That
electricity onstage!
But afterward, offstage, I just
got tired. I got so tired. The
crying, and I didn’t know why. It
was a very dark place. But really,
my therapist gave a name to how
I’ve been all my life. . . . I wrote
one of my one-woman shows
about it, “Bipolar, Bath, and
Beyond.” [Laughs.] You’ve got to
work hard each day. There are no
shortcuts to getting better. Or to
anything in life. You absolutely
have to work at it. Go to therapy.
Take your meds. Take care of
yourself. Don’t eat or drink alone
in the dark. Live your life.
My therapist says, “You did it!
You did it kickin’ and screamin’,
but you did it.” But no one gets it
right the first time. Or the second
or third time. You’ve got to stay at
it. You better get up and stay up.
You’ve got to do the work.
ANDRE CHUNG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
“It took me four years after
my diagnosis to start taking
medication,” says Jenifer
Lewis. “And in my work, in
my one-woman shows in
particular, I used the mania
to my advantage. Oh! That
electricity onstage! But
afterward, offstage, I just
got tired. I got so tired. The
crying, and I didn’t know
why. It was a very dark
place.”
Q: Do you think you’d have the
career you have right now if you
hadn’t gotten help?
A: Oh, girl. No, no, no. Come on.
[Laughs.] I’d be lying in a gutter
somewhere. I’d be dead. It’s
dangerous not to get help. I
wouldn’t be where I am today if I
hadn’t gotten help. You reach a
point where you don’t want to
wake up and feel depressed like
that again. You don’t want to feel
tired like that. Unfortunately, as
people, we usually reach that
point before we seek help.
I wanted to keep working. I’ve
always loved my work. From the
first time I had a solo in church
when I was 5, I knew I was an
entertainer. Oh, that applause! To
keep working, I had to get help.
And I’m grateful every day for the
encouragement I’ve gotten and
for the help I receive. That’s why
the acknowledgments section in
the book is so long. I don’t want
to leave out anyone.
I’m so grateful. Life can still be
hard sometimes, but I wake up
with a smile. And I know what it’s
like to wake up crying. Now, I
find such pleasure in colors, in
flowers, in children’s eyes. And I
think, “Here am I.”
Q: You’re a longtime AIDS
activist, you march for Black
Lives Matter, for women. You’ve
often said we can’t just fight on
behalf of ourselves, but on behalf
of one another.
A: That’s part of why I wanted to
tell my story now for the
millennials. It’s very important
for me to give them my story.
They’ve honored all those in the
civil rights movement at the
front of the line, those who took
the fire hoses, who took the dogs.
They stood up and they’ve stayed
up. So I tell it all, so that they
might learn from it. I ain’t telling
no lies. This is my story. I don’t
keep secrets. We’re only as sick as
our secrets. I don’t tell lies. I tell
the truth. I lay it all on the slab.
[Laughs.]
health-science@washpost.com
I know how hard it can be to bounce back when everyday things fall apart
RESILIENCE FROM E1
took my little boy, pointing at that
illustration of a sulking Stuart
Little, to force me to admit what
I’ve dodged for too long: I lack
whole-life resilience, that ability
to bounce back when upsetting or
stressful things happen.
Sure, I have some modicum of
resilience. I’ve always been pretty
pugnacious, and that, psychologists say, helps.
Still, I’m what I call a Quick
Sinker. I’m someone who struggles to stay buoyant when life’s
daily waters grow rough.
I’m not alone. Social media
memes and news stories illustrate
that many of us aren’t getting by
all that well — not at a time when
we’re overstressed, overcaffeinated, overly partisan and underrested, factors that cumulatively
gnaw at our emotional stamina. If
resilience weren’t a problem for
many of us, why is the Internet
crummy with articles about unhealthy addiction to those two
all-purpose escape valves, red
wine and smartphones?
The topic of resilience has
received a lot of media attention
regarding children (think: grit
factor and tiger moms). And the
Internet is rife with stories about
how to not let things get you
down in the workplace. But when
it comes to developing resilience
in our private lives — with our
family, at home and in public —
few resources exist. Sure, you can
find self-help books that help you
navigate the grief and struggles
of profound loss or trauma. But
help for coping with garden-variety, everyday stressors? The predominating cowboy ethos is that
we should pull ourselves up by
our own bootstraps.
For my entire adult life I have
assumed that my identity as a
Quick Sinker was a fait accompli. My son’s comparison of me
with a swamped Stuart Little,
though, was a wake-up call, and
I decided it was time to break
with fatalism.
Quick Sinker
Most psychologists and researchers have defined resilience
as the ability, as the cliches put it,
“to weather the storms of life”
without much griping and to
“turn lemons into lemonade.”
Among the problems with
these motivational mantras is
this one: Most of us who lack
these skills cannot utter such
affirmations or simply decide to
become more upbeat and positive after years of digging negative sluices in our neural pathways.
Instead, I find myself heading
down the familiar old rut where I
pathways in my locus coeruleus
are a maze of microscopic knots
resembling the millstones that
once hung from criminals’ necks.
believe that the stressor I’m facing at that moment — and it can
be as simple as a traffic jam or a
conflict with my wife — will never
dissipate. At that moment, all
objective perspective gets pushed
out with waves of dread.
I know intellectually that this
reaction will be short-lived. But
the fear that the problem may go
on indefinitely is what Martin
Seligman, who founded the positive psychology movement, describes as “permanence” in his
1991 book “Learned Optimism:
How to Change Your Mind and
Your Life.”
Although such fears dissipate
by day’s end, the cumulative anxiety of being a Quick Sinker
doesn’t. I’ve come to understand
why so many people numb themselves with a drink or two after
work or after dinner. When I’m
faced with additional, unexpected responsibilities, such as having to fix a clogged toilet or
respond to an unexpected and
complex email, my mind feels
like a game of Jenga, and one
more chore heaped on me will
send whatever resilience I have
left crashing down.
Finding meaning
In “Leading a Life That Matters,” a college course that I created, I tell students about an anecdote from Pema Chodron’s book
“When Things Fall Apart.” In it,
the American Buddhist teacher
and nun recalls having the rug
yanked out on her first marriage
suddenly, unexpectedly. After
spending days on the floor grieving and indulging in self-pity
(understandably), Chodron turns
her focus on, of all things, her
suffering. She finds answers to
and meaning in the very thing
she desperately wants to deny:
her deep emotional wound. For
years, I have wanted to try
Chodron’s approach — which is
similar to the way behavioral
psychologists build resilience in
their phobic patients — by pushing myself to experience the
things I deeply fear.
I’ve often wondered: What
would happen if I turned toward
the very thing from which many
of us notoriously run: the things
that knock me off balance, depress me, push me toward
gloom? Could I possibly find
meaning in them and, in turn,
develop whole-life resilience?
This is what Viktor Frankl
talks about in his memoir “Man’s
Search for Meaning,” an account
of surviving Auschwitz. What
saved Frankl was finding meaning and purpose in his darkest
plight. At one point, Frankl, who
was a psychiatrist, turns back
after a seemingly successful es-
FAMILY PHOTO
“I’m what I call a Quick Sinker,” writes Andrew Reiner, “someone
who struggles to stay buoyant when life’s daily waters grow rough.”
cape attempt because he cannot
abandon dying typhoid patients.
“In some ways,” he writes, “suffering ceases to be suffering at the
moment it finds a meaning, such
as the meaning of a sacrifice.”
My students love Frankl’s book
and, especially, this precept. But
they often struggle to understand
Who gets to judge
another person’s
suffering? Aren’t there
degrees of it that are
relative to an
individual’s own
experience?
how it can possibly apply to their
largely mundane, sheltered lives.
In response, I often ask them
to imagine working part time at a
fast-food restaurant (a reality for
many of my students who come
from
working-class
backgrounds). The job includes many
thankless tasks, including cleaning toilets.
I tell the class that whenever I
go into any public bathroom and
find that it’s clean, especially
when I’m having a lousy day, I’m
grateful. Really grateful.
“So,” I declare, “if you consider
that the dread and frustration
you’re experiencing at that moment might translate into making someone else’s day better,
even in some small way, maybe
that sacrifice can minimize some
of your own suffering.”
I try to remind myself about
this toilet analogy when I leave
the classroom, but it’s tough to
circumvent the two ingrained
loops that take over once I encounter quotidian stressors. A
2016 study published in Frontiers
in Neural Circuits suggests why:
It found that the overall brain
activity in mice behaving helplessly in stressful situations was
considerably lower “compared to
mice showing ‘resilient’ behavior.” In particular, the researchers
found this lower activity in areas
of the brain associated with executive functioning — i.e., with
processing and regulating emotions.
One region that was more active in helpless mice was the
locus coeruleus. Researchers said
they believe this plays a role in
“stress-induced depression.” Although I’ve never seen an MRI of
my brain, I imagine that the
‘I just needed perspective’
I hesitate to describe myself as
“suffering” because this verb is
generally reserved for the extremes — such as combat veterans, cancer victims and survivors
of mass shootings who endure
post-traumatic stress syndrome.
Remembering those examples
can be helpful when confronted
with less profound problems.
This was the coping technique
used by a friend whom I met long
ago in Maine. Whenever she felt
really stressed, she disappeared
to a nearby hospital emergency
waiting room. “I just needed perspective to remember how small
my problems are compared with
other people,” she told me more
than once. Experts agree that
perspective is an important tool
in becoming more resilient.
That said, who gets to judge
another person’s suffering?
Aren’t there degrees of it that are
relative to an individual’s own
experience? Does someone really
suffer less just because his life has
been less fraught, say, with poverty or extreme trauma? After surviving the Holocaust, Frankl — a
psychiatrist for seven decades
and a seminal figure in the existential and humanistic therapy
movements — observed that suffering is, in fact, relative.
He compared it to an amount
of a gas released into a tank,
observing that, regardless of how
little or how much gas is involved,
the tank is filled “completely and
evenly.” If Frankl was correct,
then even small-scale suffering
shouldn’t be dismissed outright:
It may look like nothing to an
outsider, but to someone who is
hurting, it can fill all their emotional space. And it may even
hold answers to the quest for
greater whole-life resilience.
At least, that’s what I’m slowly
discovering.
The pivot
A few weeks ago, I stopped at a
suburban town center after work
to clear my head amid the cold air
and soothing strains of retail
therapy. It had been a particularly challenging week, and I was
overwhelmed from the stresses of
living paycheck to paycheck on
stagnant Bush-era wages (the
first President Bush), making
marriage work in the 21st century, negotiating the challenges
of stepparenthood and facing the
realization I would never become
the type of husband or father I
admired on such family-centric
television shows as “Parenthood.”
For the first time, I tried to get
some distance from myself and
considered what I could do to
pull myself out of this tailspin. Do
what Liz always suggests when I
feel self-pity — “learn to be more
grateful” — I told myself. I turned
my face skyward (seriously) and
gave thanks for my family, my
health, the roof over our heads,
and more. In other words, I
summoned all of the things I
knew I should be grateful for.
But the buoyancy of gratitude
couldn’t compete with the leaden
frustrations of a Quick Sinker.
Walking with my head down,
searching for answers in the
scrubbed brick sidewalk, I nearly
knocked into a panhandler. I gave
him a dollar. “God bless you,
brother,” he mumbled as I walked
away. His benediction must have
delivered a shot of dopamine to
my brain, because suddenly I
surged with the “helper’s high”
that this neurotransmitter releases. I turned around and gave him
another dollar, and as his tight
face loosened, some small knot in
my brain did the same thing.
A few moments later, I opened
the door to a bookstore and
turned to see an older woman
hobbling toward it from 20 or 25
yards away. I waited and held it
open for her to pass through. “It’s
nice to see that chivalry isn’t
dead,” she said, smiling. My brain
hummed.
On the car ride home, I spoke
with Liz, whose frustration with
me came through my smartphone for forgetting to transfer
money to her for bills. My dopamine rush ceded to resentment
and my shoulders sank into a
familiar hunch. Then I thought
about both people I had encountered a half-hour earlier. “Thank
you for taking care of our bills,” I
said, a bit taken aback by my
words. “It must be frustrating to
have to keep asking me about
money.” Silence.
Eventually, Liz spoke. “It is.
Thank you for acknowledging
that.” She added, “Who is this,
and what have you done with my
husband?”
It would be disingenuous to
say that, at that moment, decades
of accumulated neural millstones
had simply crumbled away. I
hadn’t gone full-tilt Pema
Chodron and found enlightenment. But an unfamiliar lightness overcame me, and my shoulders floated back up against my
seat, helping me see above the
tide of traffic with clearer vision
than before.
health-science@washpost.com
Reiner, a lecturer at Towson
University in Maryland, is writing a
book about masculinity.
E6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6 , 2018
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on suet in Towson and a snowy owl near Street, Md.
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PHOTOS BY JERRY JACKSON/THE BALTIMORE SUN
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“It’s impossible that we still
struggle to decide if coffee is
healthy or unhealthy,” says
Giuseppe Grosso, a nutritional
epidemiologist at the University of
Catania in Italy: Good for hypertension one week. Bad for hypertension the next.
To address this vexing situation, Grosso and his colleagues
collected all studies on the health
effects of coffee, systematically reviewed the evidence, then offered
up their bottom line in the Annual
Review of Nutrition.
Specifically, they looked at 127
meta-analyses, which lump together and statistically analyze
studies on similar topics. A few of
the studies were randomized controlled trials on coffee or caffeine
administration, but most were observational studies of real-world
coffee and caffeine consumption
habits. (None of the review’s authors were paid by any food or
beverage company.)
For each meta-analysis, the
team calculated the strength of
the study’s designs and conclu-
sions and then ranked its evidence
for relationships between coffee
and health on a scale from “convincing” all the way down to “limited.”
No studies showed a “convincing” level of evidence — not surprisingly, since observational
studies lack the rigor of
gold-standard trials that use placebo controls. But several found
“probable” evidence that coffeedrinking is associated with a decreased risk of many common cancers — including breast, colorectal, colon, endometrial and prostate — with a 2 to 20 percent
reduction in risk, depending on
the cancer type.
The review also found risk reductions of 5 percent for cardiovascular disease and around
30 percent for both Type 2 diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. A
coffee habit was also associated
with a lowered rate of death from
any cause during the course of a
study. Great news for coffee drinkers!
But there is one group who
should exercise caution with coffee: pregnant women. Some stud-
ies showed a link (with a “probable” score on the scientists’ scale)
between caffeine or coffee intake
and increased risk of miscarriage.
Grosso notes that fetuses lack
the enzyme needed to metabolize
Maximum benefits
occurred at around four
to five cups per day —
the equivalent of two
Starbucks “grande”
drinks.
caffeine, and they accumulate caffeine when the mother drinks coffee. He points out that these findings are still uncertain, but out of
an abundance of caution he recommends that women give up or
severely limit their coffee intake
while pregnant.
The team also solved some earlier discrepancies involving coffee
and the risk for high blood pressure and death from all cancers
(when lumped together). The confusion, they found, stemmed from
failure to adequately control for
smoking — a habit that’s strongly
linked to coffee consumption.
When nonsmokers alone were
considered, the data indicated
that moderate coffee drinkers
gained some protection from
these diseases.
Most studies didn’t measure exact coffee volumes or caffeine levels. But in those that did, maximum benefits occurred at around
four to five cups per day — the
equivalent of two Starbucks
“grande” drinks. That’s roughly
380 to 475 milligrams of caffeine
per day for typically brewed coffee
drinks. (You’ll find at least 95 mg
in an eight-ounce cup.)
So how do the positive effects
work? Coffee lovers probably benefit from two main mechanisms.
First, coffee beans contain phytochemicals (some of which are
also found in fruits, vegetables,
chocolate and tea) that have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory
properties. All of the diseases
linked to protective effects from
coffee start with low-level inflammation, and anti-inflammatory dietary chemicals circulating in the
body could calm it down.
Second, caffeine and other
phytochemicals have specific effects on enzymes that regulate liver
function, insulin and glucose metabolism, and DNA repair. All could
act favorably to fend off Parkinson’s, Type 2 diabetes and cancer.
Sadly, Grosso notes that none of
the analyzed data pertains to his
home country’s coffee habits: “For
99.9 percent of Italians, coffee is
espresso and anything else is ‘dirty
water,’ ” he says. Italians’ typical
espresso intake is only about one
ounce a day — a paltry 50 to 75 mg
of caffeine. In other parts of the
world, he has seen people guzzling
much larger volumes of coffee and
tea, he says. “It was absolutely
important to know if this was having an effect on health.”
The review’s conclusion: Our
“findings indicate that coffee can
be part of a healthful diet.”
This article appeared first in Knowable
Magazine.
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