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The Washington Post – February 08, 2018

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Mostly sunny 39/26 • Tomorrow: Mostly cloudy 47/39 B8
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
. $2
Congress set for
vote on budget to
avert a shutdown
DEAL BOOSTS MILITARY, DOMESTIC SPENDING
Critics cite effect on deficit, lack of help for ‘dreamers’
BY M IKE D E B ONIS
AND E RICA W ERNER
As threats to California’s giant redwoods grow, the key to survival might be in their genome
Decoding the Redwoods
S TORY BY S COTT W ILSON
P HOTOS BY C AROLYN V AN H OUTEN
T
he road from Highway 1
rises along the western
slopes of the Santa Cruz
Mountains, through vineyards
and horse farms, to the steepening Empire Grade. A dirt-road
turnoff dips into a dank twilight,
sun filtering through stands of
trees that John Steinbeck called
“ambassadors from another
time.”
The coast redwoods, ancient
and threatened, mix with towering Douglas firs and opportunistic tanoaks throughout this restoration project on a mountaintop
just miles from the sea. The
redwoods here are youthful, none
probably more than a century
and a half old. The massive
stumps of their old-growth ancestors are encircled by the young,
IN SAN VICENTE REDWOODS, CALIF.
clusters known as “fairy rings.”
As California’s climate changes
to one of extremes and humans
continue to harvest, the only
coast redwoods on the planet are
in peril. The challenge to preserving them is here, in forests like
this one — and so, scientists
believe, is the key to a solution.
For the first time, scientists are
mapping the coast redwood’s genome, a genetic code 12 times
larger than that of a human
being. By the end of the year,
scientists hope to have mapped
the complete genome of the coast
redwood and of the giant sequoia,
a close cousin that also is among
the tallest trees in the world,
some reaching hundreds of feet
high. The genetic code of a single
The Republican-led Congress is
set to vote Thursday on a two-year
budget deal that would include
massive increases in military and
domestic spending programs, reflecting an ideological shift for a
party whose leaders long
preached fiscal conservatism but
have now embraced big spending.
If the plan wins passage, it
would quell months of squabbling
between the parties with another
big addition to the federal deficit,
ending the need for repeated
short-term agreements that led to
frequent brinkmanship and a government shutdown.
The accord would deliver the
defense funding boost wanted by
President Trump and Republican
lawmakers alongside an increase
in domestic programs sought by
Democrats, as well as tens of billions of dollars for disaster victims.
Trump backed the deal
Wednesday, saying in a tweet that
it would give Defense Secretary
Speech in House
underscores Democrats’
lack of leverage
REDWOODS CONTINUED ON A7
BY E D O ’ K EEFE,
D AVID W EIGEL
AND P AUL K ANE
BY JOSH DAWSEY,
BETH REINHARD
AND ELISE VIEBECK
A senior White House official
said Wednesday that he would resign after his two ex-wives accused
him of physical and emotional
abuse, with one presenting pictures of her blackened eye.
The official, Rob Porter, served
as the staff secretary, a title that
belies the role’s importance in any
White House — but especially in
President Trump’s. Porter functioned as Chief of Staff John F.
Kelly’s top enforcer in their shared
mission to instill discipline and order in what had become an extraordinarily chaotic West Wing. He was
the gatekeeper to the Oval Office,
How Mattis succeeds in
turbulent White House
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Staff secretary Rob Porter,
right, walks on the South Lawn
in November with White House
Chief of Staff John F. Kelly.
Porter denied the allegations
by his ex-wives.
determining which articles and
policy proposals reached the president’s hands and screening the
briefing materials that his visitors
shared with him.
Aides had been aware generally
of accusations against Porter since
late last year, White House advisers
said, but learned of the specifics
late Tuesday when approached by a
reporter from the Daily Mail, a
British tabloid, which first detailed
many of the allegations. Porter’s
PORTER CONTINUED ON A6
Avoiding the limelight
and picking his battles
have paid off in influence
BY G REG J AFFE
AND M ISSY R YAN
Throughout his 40-year career
as a Marine, Defense Secretary
Jim Mattis built a reputation as an
aggressive warrior, leading a blitz
on Baghdad and pushing a reluctant Obama administration to hit
back against Iran.
Over the past year, he has
learned to play a different role:
acting as a check on an impulsive
president.
The big question is how long
Mattis can continue to act as a
force for continuity and caution
IN THE NEWS
THE NATION
WONG MAYE-E/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kim’s sister at Olympics Kim Yo Jong intends
to visit South Korea, a first for a member of
North Korea’s ruling family. A12
Raining on his parade District officials are
pushing back against President Trump’s
desire for a military parade in the city. B1
Failed federal drug
tests among transportation workers soared by
77 percent amid the opioid epidemic. A3
A Republican senator,
alleging bias against
President Trump, released additional texts
between FBI agents involved in the Hillary
Clinton and Russia
probes. A8
Senior Justice Department official David
Laufman, who helped
oversee the department’s Clinton and Russia probes, has stepped
down. A8
A Border Patrol agent
whose death last November fueled President
Trump’s calls for a
southern border wall
appears to have died in
an accident, according
to FBI findings. A11
THE WORLD
In visiting East Asia,
Vice President Pence
aimed to mount a oneman “maximum pressure” campaign against
North Korea. A10
In Germany, Chancellor Angela Merkel and
other party leaders
agreed on a new governing coalition, though obstacles remained. A10
Israeli Prime Minister
and still retain influence with a
president impatient to hit back at
America’s enemies and swiftly win
wars.
These days, Mattis’s influence
radiates across the government.
In places such as Afghanistan and
Somalia, he has been a force for
stability, resisting the president’s
instincts to withdraw. In Iran and
North Korea, he has curbed
Trump’s desire for a show of military strength.
One tense moment came last
May as officials grew increasingly
concerned about aggressive Iranian behavior.
For weeks, Mattis had been resisting requests from the White
House to provide military options
for Iran. Now Trump made clear
that he wanted the Pentagon to
deliver a range of plans that included striking Iranian ballistic
MATTIS CONTINUED ON A11
Benjamin Netanyahu
said he will be cleared in
a corruption case —
even as he conceded he
may be indicted. A12
THE ECONOMY
State-run ACA marketplaces outperformed the
rest of the country in attracting consumers to
sign up for 2018 health
plans. A15
Crowds are back at the
Kennedy Space Center,
but can NASA and a
budding commercial industry build on the momentum? A15
The resignation of a
Republican appointee
from the Federal Election Commission left
the panel with a bareminimum quorum. A17
BUDGET CONTINUED ON A4
Republican reversal: GOP is no
longer fretting over big deficits. A6
Pelosi makes marathon
plea to help ‘dreamers’
Emily Burns, above, is director of science for the nonprofit Save the Redwoods League, which is funding the effort to map the
massive genetic code of the coast redwood, some of which are seen at top in Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park in California.
Trump aide
to exit after
ex-wives
allege abuse
Jim Mattis “what he needs to keep
America Great” and calling on
lawmakers of both parties to “support our troops and support this
Bill!”
The Senate is expected to vote
first on the plan, clearing it Thursday afternoon or evening — giving
the House just hours to act before
a midnight deadline for a government shutdown.
But the deal offered another
reminder that GOP lawmakers,
many of whom were elected on a
promise to shrink government
and curb spending, have abandoned those pledges after gaining
power and facing the reality of
governing and delivering on competing political priorities. The taxcut law they passed in December is
also expected to add to the federal
deficit.
Several Republicans, citing
their continued belief in the virtue
of limiting government spending,
on Wednesday voiced their objec-
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi commandeered the House
floor Wednesday for a day-intonight marathon plea to Republicans for action on immigration,
casting the fate of young undocumented immigrants in moral
terms.
The 77-year-old Pelosi stood
for more than eight hours, reading multiple personal stories
from “dreamers” and citing Bible
passages. Her speech ranked as
the longest given by a member of
the House of Representatives in
at least a century, possibly ever,
focusing on an issue that has
vexed Democrats for months.
The speech underscored that
Democrats lack the leverage they
insisted they would have in
spending showdowns with Republicans. Pelosi and others repeatedly promised immigration
activists and the party base they
would force a vote sparing undocumented
immigrants
brought to the United States as
children from deportation after
President Trump rescinded the
program in September.
Instead, Democrats’ ineffectiveness has angered those same
activists and the voters critical in
a midterm election year with
control of the House at stake.
Pelosi, who began talking
shortly after 10 a.m., sought the
same assurances Democrats
DEMOCRATS CONTINUED ON A4
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D) talks with reporters.
Democrats’ ineffectiveness has angered activists and voters.
THE REGION
Gov. Larry Hogan’s
office backed away from
his transit chief’s remarks about luring
Amazon to Maryland. B1
The man behind D.C.’s
latest private school
venture calls it “the first
modern school,” with
“personalized education” and global ambition. B1
The Fairfax County
Fire Department is under investigation after a
top female firefighter
outlined complaints in
her resignation letter. B2
A woman who worked
in the Maryland legislature for eight years alleges that she was sexually harassed by six lawmakers. B4
Inside
LOCAL LIVING
Slimmer picking?
Ellie Krieger weighs the
merits of the SlimCado vs.
the popular Hass, at left.
ST YLE
Attire education
Robin Givhan’s guide to
understanding Fashion
Week’s shows. C1
BUSINESS NEWS........................A13
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES..........................A18
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS .............................. A9
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 65
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
6 6 7 5
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
Gates’s attorneys cite ‘irreconcilable di≠erences’ in asking to leave the case
BY
S PENCER S . H SU
Lawyers for Rick Gates, the
co-defendant of former Trump
campaign
manager
Paul
Manafort, cited unspecified “irreconcilable differences” with
their client in asking to leave the
case, but a federal judge did not
immediately rule on their request
after a sealed hearing Wednesday.
U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson of Washington took
the matter under advisement
after a nearly 90-minute hearing,
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
President Trump speaks at the 66th National Prayer
Breakfast at the Washington Hilton. For developments,
visit washingtonpost.com/politics.
All day
Vice President Pence visits Yokota Air Base in Tokyo
and delivers remarks to U.S. troops, then heads to Seoul
to participate in a bilateral meeting with South Korean
President Moon Jae-in. Visit washingtonpost.com/world
for details.
8:30 a.m.
The Labor Department issues jobless claims for the
week ended Feb. 3, which are expected to come in at
235,000, up from 230,000 the previous week. For
details, visit washingtonpost.com/business.
8 p.m.
The Washington Wizards host the Boston Celtics at
Capital One Arena. Follow the game at postsports.com.
KLMNO
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CO R R ECTI O N S
A Feb. 3 Real Estate article
about home energy audits
misstated the agency that Ely
Jacobsohn is with. He works
for the Energy Department, not
the Environmental Protection
Agency. The article also
misstated one of the agencies
where homeowners can find a
professional auditor online. It
should have listed the EPA’s
Energy Star website, not the
Energy Department’s Energy
Star website.
A Jan. 31 A-section article
about Ford’s plans for driverless
police cars incorrectly said that
a patent developed by the
company was granted in
January. The patent application
is still being reviewed by the U.S.
Patent and Trademark Office.
A Dec. 8, 2017, Weekend review
of the film “The Shape of Water”
incorrectly attributed a line of
dialogue. It is the character
Strickland, not Giles, who says
of God: “He looks like me —
maybe even you. But probably
more like me.”
The Washington Post is committed to
correcting errors that appear in the
newspaper. Those interested in
contacting the paper for that purpose
can:
Email: corrections@washpost.com.
Call: 202-334-6000, and ask to be
connected to the desk involved —
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Comments can be directed to The
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readers@washpost.com.
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former federal prosecutor and
consultant specializing in financial crime investigations.
CNN reported Jan. 23 that
Gates had added prominent
white-collar lawyer Thomas C.
Green of Sidley Austin in Washington to his defense team after
Green was spotted at Mueller’s
office, fueling speculation about
ongoing negotiations with prosecutors.
Wu declined to comment after
the hearing, citing a court gag
order in place in the case. Green
did not respond to requests for
comment and was not in the
courtroom Wednesday.
Gates, after more than two
months under house arrest,
reached bail terms in January on a
nearly $5 million secured bond to
gain conditional release. His attorneys also are sorting through
more than 640,000 pieces of evidence turned over by prosecutors.
The judge has set deadlines
starting April 6 for motions challenging the indictment before
Rick Gates is the
co-defendant of former
Trump campaign
manager Paul Manafort.
The two men are
charged with fraud,
conspiracy and moneylaundering in special
counsel Robert S.
Mueller III’s
investigation of Russian
interference in the 2016
elections.
scheduling a possible fall trial
date.
Manafort has yet to reach a
bond deal and has filed a lawsuit
challenging his indictment and
Mueller’s appointment as special
counsel.
A cloud over trial scheduling
emerged during a Jan. 16 hearing,
which included a lengthy discussion at the bench by prosecutors
and attorneys out of earshot of
those in the courtroom seats.
“We are the least prepared of
anyone here, and we want to do a
good job, and we need that time
to be able to do it,” Mack said in
open court at one point.
Court dockets show that Mack
also faces a trial date set for
April 9 in Manhattan federal
court in which he is defending a
former Gates business associate,
Steven Brown, in a fraud prosecution by the U.S. attorney’s office
there. Brown’s judge set the trial
date Jan. 11, shortly before Gates’s
last hearing.
spencer.hsu@washpost.com
Is a military parade really grand enough for Trump?
The Post’s scoop
about President
Trump’s plans for
a grand military
parade in
Washington
Dana
brings to mind
Milbank
Evelyn Waugh’s
WASHINGTON classic satire
about England’s
SKETCH
upper crust in the
early days of
World War II, “Put Out More
Flags,” named after a Chinese
proverb:
“A man getting drunk at a
farewell party should strike a
musical tone, in order to
strengthen his spirit . . . and a
drunk military man should order
gallons and put out more flags in
order to increase his military
splendor.”
I love a parade as much as the
next guy (though perhaps not as
much as the president), but there
are problems with this particular
idea, as The Post’s Greg Jaffe and
Philip Rucker note. Seventy-ton
tanks “would chew up
Pennsylvania Avenue blacktop,”
big displays of missile launchers
would make us look like North
Korea, and the expensive parade
would belie the Pentagon’s
poverty pleas while perhaps also
reminding people that the
commander in chief sat out
Vietnam with bone spurs.
There is a better way.
The obvious purpose of the
parade is not to celebrate the
troops, as the White House
professes, but to celebrate
Trump. Hence, his wish to have
the parade before the November
election (and the military’s wish
to have it after). Given the real
goal, the model that would best
suit Trump has much older roots
than a May Day or even a Bastille
Day parade. What Trump needs
is a Roman triumph.
The triumph was a public
ceremony, including a parade, to
celebrate as a near-deity the
emperor or a triumphant general
— complete with laurels, thrown
flowers, adoring troops, war
spoils and vanquished enemies
in chains. It is, in short, just the
sort of parade Trump would
enjoy if done in his honor.
The ritual was originally
meant for a returning general
who had conquered territory and
killed at least 5,000 of the enemy,
but it was later changed to honor
emperors and members of their
families. Trump qualifies as a
victorious commander, having
vanquished enemies foreign
(Islamic State) and domestic
(Cryin’ Chuck Schumer), and as
an emperor, having said that
those who don’t applaud him
commit treason against the state.
First in the Roman triumph
procession were the magistrates
and members of the Senate; first
in the Trump triumph would
come Devin Nunes, Paul Ryan,
Mitch McConnell, Tom Cotton
and the other magistrates
supportive of Trump. Next in the
Roman triumph came the spoils
of war: gold and silver, treasures,
and paintings and carvings
showing moments from the
conflict. In Trump’s triumph, the
spoils would include models of
Trump hotel and golf properties,
the nuclear football, a float with
a very large button, and chunks
of the border wall, carried by
Mexicans.
Next in the Roman triumph,
to the crowd’s jeers, came the
captured prisoners in chains:
leaders, soldiers and sometimes
family members, to be put on
display after the parade or
executed. Trump’s triumph
would feature all his foes, in
irons: the “dreamers,” NFL
players who kneel for the
national anthem, women who
alleged sexual misconduct by
Trump, the fake-news media,
Robert Mueller, James Comey,
FBI agents, Puerto Ricans,
Trump’s primary opponents,
Hillary Clinton, Steve Bannon.
Next, in a cloud of incense,
would come the Roman general,
or emperor, in a chariot driven
by four horses, holding a laurel
branch and scepter and wearing
a purple and gold tunic and a
painted toga. A slave would hold
a golden crown over his head.
The emperor’s children and
courtiers rode alongside his
carriage on horseback, followed
by the soldiers in togas and
laurel crowns, shouting “Io
triumphe” — Hail, triumphant —
at their leader.
Trump’s triumph would use
identical trappings, though he
might eschew the toga for a more
tasteful flight suit. Donald Jr.,
Eric Trump, Jared Kushner,
Stephen Miller and John Kelly
would escort him on horseback.
Instead of troops shouting “Hail
triumphant” at Trump, handling
that duty would be Sean Hannity,
Tucker Carlson and other Fox
News personalities.
Toward the end of the Roman
triumph procession, two white
oxen were sacrificed at the
Temple of Jupiter and the
prisoners killed. Trump’s
triumph, by contrast, would
pause outside the Trump
International Hotel. Though
executing his opponents could
be problematic, Trump might
stand in the middle of
Pennsylvania Avenue and shoot
somebody, just for symbolism.
Mission accomplished!
There’s only one problem with
this plan, as I see it. In the
Roman triumph, a slave would
ride with the general in his
chariot and repeatedly whisper
into his ear, “Memento mori”:
Remember, you are mortal.
For our parading president,
this could be a dealbreaker.
Twitter: @Milbank
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held behind closed doors to
preserve the secrecy of attorneyclient communications.
Gates’s attorneys Shanlon Wu
of Washington and Walter Mack
and Annemarie McAvoy of New
York moved Feb. 1 to withdraw as
counsel in a shake-up in the
pending prosecution by special
counsel Robert S. Mueller III.
In filings unsealed Wednesday,
the lawyers said they wanted to
discuss the reason for their request in secret because it involves
private, “highly sensitive matters” concerning Gates that
“would potentially be prejudicial
to the Defendant as well as embarrassing.”
In a separate document, they
added that “irreconcilable differences have developed with the
client which make our effective
representation of the client impossible” but invoked the protections given to lawyers’ discussions with their clients in asking
to disclose the matter in closed
court.
Gates and his attorneys have
not shown public signs of discord, despite drawn-out bail talks
and the appearance that he has
fewer financial assets than initially asserted by prosecutors.
A shift could leave Gates, 45,
with his third set of attorneys
since he and his former employer,
Manafort, 68, were indicted
Oct. 30 on fraud, conspiracy and
money-laundering counts in the
first disclosed charges of Mueller’s probe of Russian interference in U.S. political affairs.
The timing of the change in
lawyers comes as the prosecution
enters a new phase preparing for
trial.
Both men have pleaded not
guilty to the charges, which arose
out of Manafort’s alleged secret
lobbying for a Russia-friendly political party in Ukraine.
After the indictment, Gates
replaced his initial attorney, Michael Dry, with Mack, of Doar
Rieck Kaley & Mack in New York;
Wu, of Wu, Grohovsky & Whipple
in Washington; and McAvoy, a
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ALSO SELL RETRO SODAS, MOVIE SNACKS, LOCAL CANDY & WE RENT MOVIES/GAMES •• •
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
Positive drug tests rise 77% for U.S. transit workers
Figures show disturbing
trend amid national
opioid epidemic
BY
A SHLEY H ALSEY III
As the opioid crisis has mushroomed into a national epidemic,
the number of truck and bus drivers, commercial pilots, railroad
operators, and pipeline workers
who failed federal drug tests has
jumped by 77 percent since 2006,
federal data shows.
Transportation companies with
workers who hold “safety sensitive” jobs are required to test at
least 25 percent of their workforce
each year, although in some industries there is more regular and
stringent testing. Nearly a million
more workers are now being drug
tested as the transportation industry has rebounded from the
recession to employ more workers.
The drug testing data was obtained from the Transportation
Department by Democratic staff
members on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, who followed up on reports in 2016 about drug abuse by
railroad workers.
In a letter to Transportation
Secretary Elaine Chao and two
other administration officials,
Rep. Peter A. DeFazio (Ore.), the
ranking Democrat on the Transportation Committee, wrote
Thursday that “DOT is effectively
carrying out drug and alcohol testing requirements . . . but there are
STEVE SISNEY/OKLAHOMA CITY OKLAHOMAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The tractor-trailer driver involved in a fatal Oklahoma crash in 2014 was found by officials to have been high on synthetic cannabinoid.
significant gaps . . . that should be
addressed.”
The National Survey on Drug
Use and Health concluded that
10.9 million people misused opioids in 2016, and the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
put the number of deaths at a
record 42,000. The number of
deaths that year from synthetic
opiates such as fentanyl doubled
from the previous year to 19,413.
Investigators have found drug
use to a be a factor in several
transportation mishaps.
• When a container ship collided with a bridge and spilled 53,500
gallons of fuel into San Francisco
Bay in 2007, the National Transportation Safety Board found the
harbor pilot had taken high doses
of three opioids and several other
prescription medicines.
• The driver of a tractor-trailer
that collided with a bus in Oklahoma, killing four softball team
members in 2014, was found by
the NTSB to have been high on
synthetic cannabinoid.
• Another tractor-trailer driver,
this one in Tennessee in 2015,
struck eight vehicles, killing six
people. He tested positive for amphetamines.
• When an Amtrak train outside
of Philadelphia killed two mem-
bers of a crew working on the rail
bed, the engineer tested positive
for marijuana, and the two dead
workers were found to have a variety of drugs in their systems.
Aviation workers failed the
tests in 0.6 percent of cases; bus
and truck drivers by 0.8 percent;
railroad workers by 0.4 percent;
transit workers by almost 10 percent; U.S. Coast Guard licensed
operators by 0.9 percent; and
pipeline workers by 1.1 percent.
The number of failed drug tests
by railroad workers involved in
fatal wrecks in 2016 alone was
three times higher than a decade
ago, and the highest number since
the Federal Railroad Administration began keeping records in
1987.
The report by House Democratic staff members makes 15 recommendations. One is that the broad
range of testing done by the FRA,
including blood tests in addition
to urine sampling, be applied by
the Transportation Department to
all crash investigations.
The Federal Aviation Administration, the report says, should
finalize arrangements for testing
at offshore maintenance facilities
that host the planes of U.S. carriers. The report also recommends
creation of a single template for
drug testing among all DOT and
Health and Human Services agencies and that it be expanded to
include drugs not already covered
by the testing protocols.
It also says that a “scientifically
valid and legally defensible”
means to test for marijuana impairment be developed for the federal testing program.
ashley.halsey@washpost.com
DIGEST
OKLAHOMA
Judge refuses to release
habitual stowaway from jail: A
Man guilty of murder
in neighbor’s slaying
An Oklahoma man was
convicted Wednesday of fatally
shooting his Lebanese neighbor
after bombarding him with
racial and anti-Muslim insults in
a long-running feud with his
family.
A 12-member jury convicted
Stanley Vernon Majors, 63, of
first-degree murder and hatecrime charges in the August 2016
shooting death of Khalid Jabara,
37, outside his Tulsa home.
Majors also was found guilty of
threatening an act of violence.
Prosecutors said Majors spent
years in conflict with the Jabara
family, often hurling racial and
religious epithets at his nextdoor neighbors, who are
Christian.
The conflict between the
neighbors escalated to the point
that the victim’s mother, Haifa
Jabara, obtained a protective
order in 2013 that required
Majors to stay 300 yards away
and prohibited him from
possessing any firearms until
2018.
But prosecutors said Majors,
who also had a 2009 felony
conviction from California for
threatening a crime with intent
to terrorize, was undeterred.
Despite the court order,
Majors was accused of plowing
his car into Haifa Jabara in 2015.
She suffered a broken shoulder,
among other injuries.
Authorities said Majors kept
driving after he struck her.
Officers who stopped him later
reported that he was intoxicated.
While Majors awaited trial on
assault and battery charges, a
judge freed him from jail on
$60,000 bond, overruling strong
objections by Tulsa County
prosecutors, who called him “a
substantial risk to the public”
and pleaded with the court to set
a higher bond of $300,000.
Authorities said Majors shot
Khalid Jabara on the man’s front
porch while out on bond.
judge denied an attorney’s
request to have his client, a
woman with a history of
sneaking onto planes, released
from jail and sent to a nonprofit
facility. Cook County Judge
Donald Panarese Jr. on
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong has agreed to buy the Los Angeles
Times, whose offices are shown above, from parent company Tronc.
On Wednesday, Tronc announced the sale of the Times, the San Diego
Union-Tribune and the Spanish-language newspaper Hoy to SoonShiong’s Nant Capital investment firm for $500 million. The deal also
involves assuming $90 million in pension liabilities.
and a bloody bicycle lay across
the street.
Moye was shot in the thigh
about 1:30 a.m. and died in a
hospital, New Orleans police
spokesman Beau Tidwell said
Wednesday. It was not
immediately clear what led to
the shooting.
Last February, a news camera
recorded Moye jumping through
police tape in Charleston, S.C., as
he tried to take a protester’s
large Confederate battle flag
before being tackled by police
and arrested.
At the time, demonstrations
were going on outside a theater
at the College of Charleston for a
speech by Bree Newsome, an
activist who in 2015 climbed a
flagpole and temporarily
removed a Confederate flag from
the South Carolina Statehouse.
Moye was better known as
Muhiyidin d’Baha. His family
told South Carolina news outlets
that Muhiyidin Elamin Moye
was his legal name.
— Associated Press
Surprise her
with a
stunning
star.
— Associated Press
LOUISIANA
Activist fatally shot
in New Orleans
A Black Lives Matter activist
known for his leap through
police tape at a South Carolina
demonstration last year as he
attempted to seize a Confederate
battle flag from a protester was
fatally shot in New Orleans on
Tuesday, police said.
A police officer answering a
call about gunfire early Tuesday
found Muhiyidin Elamin Moye,
32, on the ground, asking for
help near the Treme
neighborhood, about eight
blocks from the French Quarter,
according to a police report.
The report says a bloody trail
to the body circled two blocks,
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Wednesday denied the request
from Marilyn Hartman’s
attorney to send her to A Safe
Haven, which provides housing
and counseling for former jail
inmates. Hartman, 66, of
Grayslake, Ill., faces charges
including theft and trespassing
after authorities say she sneaked
onto a flight to London last
month at Chicago’s O’Hare
International Airport. Panarese
warned her to stay away from
airports, but she was arrested
again at O’Hare about a week
later.
— Associated Press
A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
Deal raises spending for To some Republicans, plan is a ‘debt junkie’s dream’
disaster relief, military
BUDGET FROM A1
Domestic funding also
increased; ‘dreamers’
are not addressed
BY
S EAN S ULLIVAN
Congressional leaders finalized
a major budget deal Wednesday
that would increase federal spending by more than $500 billion over
the next two years. After funding
the government with short-term
measures, the leaders hope to pass
the agreement and end the recurring standoffs that have created
the persistent threat of a federal
shutdown.
Congressional aides and lawmakers familiar with the plan provided details of the framework
Wednesday. Here are the most notable elements:
Substantial increases in military and domestic spending: Un-
der the agreement, previously established defense spending limits
would be lifted by $165 billion
over two years — by $80 billion in
the current fiscal year and $85 billion in the next one. Nondefense
spending limits would be raised
by $131 billion over two years —
$63 billion this year and $68 billion in 2019. The agreement includes another $160 billion in unlimited spending on overseas Pentagon and State Department operations.
Democrats
and
Republicans have been wrangling
over the numbers for months,
with many GOP lawmakers underscoring the importance of upping
military spending and many Democrats pressing for those increases
to be matched with more federal
dollars on the domestic side.
Extend the nation’s borrowing
authority: According to Rep.
Chris Collins (R-N.Y.) and Sen. Roy
Blunt (R-Mo.), the plan will include a provision suspending
what is known as the “debt ceiling” into next year. The debt ceiling has been a politically charged
topic, and suspending it beyond
the November midterms would
keep the issue mostly out of the
campaign fray, easing the path,
particularly for GOP incumbents
who do not want to have to face
more votes on this in the coming
months.
Funding the Children’s Health
Insurance Program for a decade:
Congress reauthorized CHIP for
six years as part of a short-term
government funding bill it passed
last month. The measure unveiled
Wednesday extends that funding
to a window of 10 years. CHIP
helps about 9 million children and
hundreds of thousands of pregnant women who cannot otherwise afford medical care.
$6 billion to address opioid
addiction and mental health issues: The money, allocated over
two years, will go toward issues
lawmakers in both parties have
been increasingly speaking up
about in recent months. The figure is significantly less than what
many have called for to address
the crises, but it underscores the
growing urgency about them on
Capitol Hill.
More funding for disaster relief: The plan includes $90 billion
more to be spent on disaster aid
for recent hurricanes and wildfires, which have spurred calls
from some lawmakers for a more
robust federal response.
Does not address ‘dreamers’:
While many Democrats had
pushed for protections for young
undocumented
immigrants
brought to the United States as
children, the deal does not address
those “dreamers.” Nor does it tackle border security or legal immigration laws, areas where some
Republicans are pushing for
changes. Congress will have to
deal with these matters separately.
It remains unclear whether lawmakers will be able to reach a deal
amid stark differences between
the two parties on issues over
which they have struggled to
reach an accord for years. Senate
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(R-Ky.) agreed to try as part of an
arrangement with Democrats to
end last month’s government
shutdown. But senators have been
left wondering what, if anything,
that pact will yield.
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
Mike DeBonis and Erica Werner
contributed to this report.
tions to the plan.
“This spending bill is a debt
junkie’s dream,” said Rep. Mo
Brooks (R-Ala.), warning that it
would set up trillion-dollar-a-year
deficits. “I’m not only a no, I’m a
hell no.”
Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) noted the deal would deliver more
military funding than Trump requested in his 2018 budget proposal. “I’m all for supporting our
military, and I want to make sure
they’re funded properly,” he said.
“It’s very difficult to have that big
of an increase in one year and then
be able to use it wisely.”
The budget agreement would
increase what’s called discretionary spending — areas such as scientific research, education, roads
and health care that are funded
year to year through congressional appropriations — by 21 percent over existing budget caps.
Those caps were put in place
after 2011 budget talks broke
down between President Barack
Obama and GOP congressional
leaders.
Bipartisan deals raised the caps
in 2013 and 2015, and the new
agreement is the first to be struck
under unified Republican control
of the White House and both
chambers of Congress.
The budget agreement was unveiled on the Senate floor Wednesday in a moment of harmony between top party leaders.
“I hope we can build on this
bipartisan momentum and make
2018 a year of significant achievement for Congress, for our constituents and for the country we
all love,” Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said,
while Minority Leader Charles E.
Schumer (D-N.Y.) called it “the
first real sprout of bipartisanship”
in the Trump era.
Such amity was not on display
in the House. Democrats remained disgruntled that the
agreement did not include protections for young undocumented
immigrants who were brought to
the United States as children and
are now at risk for deportation
after Trump moved to cancel the
Obama-era Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals program.
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.) said Wednesday
that she and “a large number” of
fellow Democrats would oppose
the deal unless she is guaranteed a
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.), left, and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (RKy.) praised the plan.
vote on immigration legislation.
She delivered the ultimatum at
the top of an eight-hour stretch of
remarks that broke a modern record for the longest House floor
speech.
Meanwhile, House Speaker
Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) presented
the deal behind closed doors to the
Republican rank-and-file, who
were largely eager to secure the
defense funding boost but wary of
reneging on their long-standing
promises to rein in spending.
Rep. Tom McClintock (R-Calif.),
a conservative member of the
House Budget Committee, said he
had not decided how he would
vote on the budget plan. “But
there’s no blinking at the fact that,
having reduced taxes, we now
have to restrain spending,” he
said. “I’m hoping when I take a
closer look at it, I’ll see it, but I
don’t at the moment.”
Inside the meeting, Ryan told
members that the domestic
spending would be focused on areas that have broad bipartisan
support, such as medical research,
infrastructure and veterans’
health care — a pitch that appeared to win over some members.
“If we’re going to have some
domestic spending, let’s spend it
on things that actually matter instead of things that are wasteful,”
said Rep. Steve Russell (R-Okla.).
“None of it is pleasant because of
the dollar amounts we’re talking
about. But at least it’s money spent
finally on some of the right areas.”
But it appeared unlikely the bill
would be able to pass the House
solely with Republican votes.
The chairman of the hard-right
House Freedom Caucus, Rep.
Mark Meadows (R-N.C.), said all
but “a couple” of the group’s three
dozen members would oppose it
on fiscal grounds.
Influential conservative organizations such as the Heritage
Foundation and the Club for
Growth railed against the spending boost. Leaders of advocacy
groups funded by brothers
Charles and David Koch said in a
statement that the deal was “a
betrayal of American taxpayers
and a display of the absolute unwillingness of members of Congress to adhere to any sort of
responsible budgeting behavior.”
According to outlines of the
budget plan circulated by congressional aides, existing spending
caps would be raised by a combined $296 billion through 2019.
The agreement includes an additional $160 billion in uncapped
funding for overseas military and
State Department operations, and
about $90 billion more would be
spent on disaster aid for victims of
recent hurricanes and wildfires.
The bill also includes a provision suspending the federal debt
limit until March 1 of next year —
after November’s midterm elections — typically a politically difficult vote for Republicans.
Some of the funding is reserved
for programs favored by lawmakers of both parties: research conducted by the National Institutes
of Health, for instance, as well as
transportation and water infrastructure. Also included are extensions of tax breaks that could add
billions of dollars more to the cost
of the bill.
The Children’s Health Insurance Program would be extended
through 2028, and the federal
fund for community health centers would see a two-year extension. The bill also abolishes the
Independent Payment Advisory
Board, a body established in the
2010 Affordable Care Act with the
power to reduce the payments
Medicare makes to health providers.
The legislation setting out the
deal is expected to contain yet
another deadline, March 23, giving congressional appropriators
time to negotiate the fine details of
funding agencies for the remainder of 2018.
erica.werner@washpost.com
mike.debonis@washpost.com
Pelosi speech comes as Democrats start to strategize for this year’s elections
DEMOCRATS FROM A1
have gotten in the Senate — the
promise of debate on an immigration bill, the one glimmer of
hope on an issue that seems to
defy resolution.
“Why should we in the House
be treated in such a humiliating
way when the Republican Senate
leader has given that opportunity in a bipartisan way to his
membership? What’s wrong?
There’s something wrong with
this picture,” Pelosi said.
Aides to House Speaker Paul
D. Ryan (R-Wis.) said that he
intends to allow debate on immigration legislation that is supported by Trump. But when the
debate might happen — and
what kind of bill Trump can
support — is still unclear.
Taking advantage of a rule that
allows only top party leaders the
right to speak as long as they
want, Pelosi had called aides at
7:45 a.m. on her drive to work
Wednesday and instructed them
to send out an all-member request for stories from dreamers
and select Bible verses. By the
afternoon, Democrats had submitted hundreds of stories that
staffers printed out and rushed
to the floor.
Pelosi stood from the lectern
in four-inch heels and spoke and
spoke and spoke.
“I have no intention of yielding back,” she said at 3:41 p.m.
when she inquired about the
House schedule.
At one point, she lamented
that she didn’t have a rosary, so
Rep. Rosa L. DeLauro (D-Conn.)
gave her one. Pelosi read passages from the Gospel of Matthew
found for her by Rep. Juan
Vargas (D-Calif.), a former Jesuit
missionary.
Pelosi used the speech to say
she would lead opposition to a
broad two-year budget agreement, negotiated with Republicans by her and Senate Minority
Leader Charles E. Schumer
(D-N.Y.), that includes several
Democratic priorities but does
not address the legal status of
people protected by the Deferred
Action for Childhood Arrivals
program, which is set to expire
next month. The fate of people
protected by the program has
prolonged the spending debate
for several months.
Shortly after 6 p.m., Pelosi
finished her remarks, which had
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) leaves the House floor at the Capitol on Wednesday after delivering a marathon plea to Republicans
for debate on an immigration bill. For more than eight hours, she shared the personal stories of “dreamers” and recited Bible passages.
been delivered entirely standing,
as she was forbidden from sitting
down or taking a restroom break.
Her Democratic colleagues applauded.
Her speech came as her caucus
began three days of closed-door
meetings to craft a 2018 agenda
that can win wider appeal in
November’s elections.
Former vice president Joe
Biden warned in a speech to
House Democrats that the party
is engaged in a “false debate”
over the fight between defending
cultural diversity and fighting
for working-class job and wage
growth. Elsewhere on Capitol
Hill, dozens of dreamers waged
sit-ins and protests in congressional office buildings, courting
arrest. And moderate Democratic senators seeking reelection in
states Trump won in 2016 urged
Pelosi to support an impending
“Why should we in the House
be treated in such a humiliating way?”
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.)
budget agreement despite concerns with immigration policy.
The contrasts highlighted the
Democrats’ 2018 dilemma: how
to keep promises to a base that
feels under attack from Trump
and Republicans while pivoting
to an economic message that can
help them win back Congress.
Trump’s party, confident that
January’s brief shutdown revealed the Democrats’ divisions,
is eager to run on a growing
economy while accusing opponents of putting “illegal immigrants above law-abiding citi-
zens,” as the Republican National Committee said this week.
Some moderate Democratic
senators found fault with Pelosi’s
strategy. Sen. Jon Tester (DMont.) said he would back the
budget compromise if the disaster relief funds include provisions to help his state recover
from last year’s wildfires.
“There’s some important programs that need to be funded,
too,” Tester said. “Would I want it
to be all comprehensive? Absolutely. But it’s not going to be all
comprehensive. So, take what
you can get.”
Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr. (D-Pa.)
said approving the compromise
deal now will open the path for a
wide-open debate next week in
the Senate on the DACA program
and other immigration proposals — what Democrats should
consider a political victory.
“We have a chance to spend a
lot of floor time on it, and that’s
an opportunity we haven’t had in
five years,” Casey said, referencing the last immigration debate,
in 2013.
Biden, whose political persona
has been built around the “Middle Class Joe” moniker, devoted
most of his remarks to warning
Democrats about the effect of
Trump’s attacks on cultural and
political institutions.
“Our job, to me, seems pretty
clear: We have to stand up for
and protect the core values of
this nation. They’ve never been
under such direct assault,” he
said.
“Go out and holler,” he added.
“You’re going to win back the
House.”
Democrats need to gain at
least 24 seats to take control of
the House, and nonpartisan forecasters and recent fundraising
reports show that they are set to
exceed that figure.
But recent polls show growing
optimism among voters about a
tax-cut bill that recently passed.
A new Quinnipiac University
poll, released Wednesday, found
support for the tax cuts rising
from 32 percent in January to 39
percent today, while Trump’s approval had climbed from 36 to
40 percent.
But some Democrats now argue that the party should define
and sell its own tax plan in a way
that can win voters who are
already optimistic about the
economy.
“We’ve got to get onto an
economic message that’s going to
resonate across the board,” said
Rep. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio), who
challenged Pelosi for her leadership position in late 2016.
Ryan said that Democrats
should acknowledge that “some
people are going to get a little
bump” from the Trump tax cut
but that under a Democratic
plan, “they’d be getting hundreds and hundreds more than
under the Republican plan, and
we would have been able to pay
for it, by asking the wealthy and
corporations to pay more.”
For the record, the House
Office of the Historian confirmed
that Pelosi had delivered the
longest continuous speech in the
chamber’s history, dating to at
least 1909, when Rep. Champ
Clark (D-Mo.) delivered five
hours and 15 minutes of remarks
against a proposed tariff overhaul.
But Clark’s speech was repeatedly interrupted by his colleagues; Pelosi held the floor the
entire time with no interruption
— a feat not accomplished by
senators in recent years who
delivered filibuster-style remarks, each of whom was able to
yield to colleagues.
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
david.weigel@washpost.com
paul.kane@washpost.com
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
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M2
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
Tension rises ahead of GOP’s former ‘budget hawks’ take new flight path
Trump’s memo decision
BY D AMIAN P ALETTA
AND E RICA W ERNER
BY
K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
Tension is growing between
Congress and the White House as
lawmakers
await
President
Trump’s approval to release a
Democrat-authored memo rebutting GOP allegations that the FBI
relied on shoddy, politically
biased information to conduct
surveillance on a former Trump
campaign adviser.
Trump is expected to deliver
his decision to Capitol Hill as
early as Friday. White House
Chief of Staff John F. Kelly has
given the president’s legal team
until the close of business Thursday to complete its assessment of
the Democrats’ memo, which Kelly will then use to brief and advise
the president.
Trump has until late Saturday
— five days after the House Intelligence Committee voted to release the document — to block it
or request redactions.
Democrats say they welcome
redactions, so long as they are to
protect federal law enforcement’s
intelligence-gathering sources
and methods. But the House Intelligence Committee’s top Democrat, Rep. Adam B. Schiff (Calif.),
has warned the president against
removing additional information
for political purposes — irking
Republicans, who assert that
Schiff intentionally wrote the
Democrats’ memo in a way that
would ensure he could later accuse Trump of suppressing parts
of it.
Last week, Trump approved
the release of an unredacted
four-page Republican memo suggesting the FBI and Justice Department secured a surveillance
warrant against former Trump
campaign adviser Carter Page
based on bad information from a
former British spy.
Democrats have suggested the
GOP memo is an attempt to protect Trump from scrutiny in the
ongoing investigations into allegations that his associates coordinated with Russian agents during
the 2016 presidential campaign.
Members of both parties also
are at odds with the Trump administration over witnesses who
have resisted answering the intelligence panel’s questions in its
Trump aide
to exit after
allegations
of abuse
PORTER FROM A1
ex-wives said they informed the
FBI in January 2017 of their allegations against him while they were
being interviewed by agents as part
of Porter’s security clearance review. It was unclear when or
whether the FBI informed the
White House. The FBI did not respond to a request for comment.
Porter said on Tuesday that he
would resign, after the allegations
were first published, people close
to him say, even as he told White
House officials he had never physically abused women. But he was
talked out of it by Kelly and others,
according to these people, with
Kelly saying he believed Porter’s
denials and saw him as a valuable
ally in the White House. Kelly continued to press him to stay in his job
Wednesday, saying he could weather the storm, but Porter decided the
controversy had become too much
after the photos of his ex-wife’s
blackened eye appeared Wednesday morning.
In interviews with The Washington Post and other media outlets,
Porter’s ex-wives described him as
having a dark side and, at times, a
violent streak that White House
aides say they did not see.
Porter’s first wife, Colbie Holderness, said in an interview with The
Post that he was continually abusive during their marriage. She alleged he punched her in the face
during a trip to Florence in 2005
and provided photos showing her
with a black eye.
“He threw me down and
punched me in the face,” she said.
Holderness said she had insisted
that he take pictures of her bruised
eye after the assault and he agreed.
“He was trying to make it up to me,
and I said I wanted evidence if this
should happen again.”
Porter denied the accusations
but said he was stepping down
from his job, although it was unclear when he will officially leave
the White House.
“These outrageous allegations
are simply false. I took the photos
given to the media nearly 15 years
ago and the reality behind them is
nowhere close to what is being
described,” he said in a statement.
ongoing Russia investigation.
Former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski informed the committee this week
that he would not return to complete an interview that was halted
after Lewandowski said he was
not prepared to answer lawmakers’ questions.
Lewandowski is the second top
Trump aide whose interview was
cut short last month. The intelligence committee issued a subpoena for testimony from
Trump’s former campaign adviser
and chief White House strategist
Stephen K. Bannon after he attempted to reserve the president’s right to claim executive
privilege.
Republicans initially excused
Lewandowski’s resistance, accepting his argument that he
simply needed more time to pre-
Panel Republicans
share the Democrats’
frustration when it
comes to Bannon.
pare answers. But now, Lewandowski’s refusal to testify has
infuriated Democrats, who have
long called to subpoena him, and
put Republicans in an awkward
position as they wrestle with
whether to issue an official summons — and if they do, whether
Lewandowski will respond to it.
The committee has extended
Bannon’s subpoena three times
while the White House counsel
works out terms of the intelligence committee’s interview. But
those talks appear to be going
nowhere as, according to Schiff,
the White House “continues to
prohibit Mr. Bannon from testifying to the Committee beyond a set
of 14 yes-or-no questions the
White House had pre-approved.”
Panel Republicans share the
Democrats’ frustration when it
comes to Bannon, who they say
must be compelled to testify in
their probe if the committee’s
subpoenas are to have any weight
at all.
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
“I have been transparent and truthful about these vile claims, but I will
not further engage publicly with a
coordinated smear campaign.”
On Wednesday night, Kelly issued a statement condemning Porter’s alleged abuses while still expressing support for his aide.
“I was shocked by the new allegations released today against Rob
Porter. There is no place for domestic violence in our society,” Kelly
said. “I stand by my previous comments of the Rob Porter that I have
come to know since becoming
Chief of Staff, and believe every
individual deserves the right to defend their reputation. I accepted
his resignation earlier today, and
will ensure a swift and orderly transition.”
Porter’s second wife, Jennie Willoughby, received a temporary
emergency protective order in
Arlington in June 2010 after saying
he refused to leave her residence, in
violation of their separation agreement. She said he broke her window, causing his knuckles to bleed.
The document, a copy of which was
obtained by The Post, concludes
that “reasonable grounds exist to
believe that [Porter] has committed family abuse and there is probable danger of a further such offense.”
Kathryn Hughes, a 36-year-old
public relations consultant who
lives in Kamas, Utah, said that in
2012, Willoughby confided in her
about another violent incident, in
December 2010, in which Willoughby alleged that Porter
grabbed her by the shoulders and
pulled her from the shower during
a fight. Hughes said that she and
Willoughby met in 2010 at the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints in Alexandria and that
they struck up a close friendship.
“She told me that he had been
screaming at her while she was in
the shower and yanked her out and
bruised her,” Hughes said in an
interview with The Post, corroborating Willoughby’s account.
Willoughby and Holderness
said they talked to the FBI about
Porter twice last year, once in late
January and then again months
later. Willoughby provided the contact information for the FBI agent
she spoke with, who declined to
comment when reached Wednesday.
“I thought by sharing my story
with the FBI he wouldn’t be put in
that post,” Holderness said. “I’m
telling the FBI this is what he’s
done, and Jennie Willoughby is
telling them what he’s done, and
the White House says, sure, this is
okay? I was let down by that.”
Willoughby said Porter angrily
called her when she wrote a blog
Republican lawmakers in 2011
brought the U.S. government to the
brink of default, refused to raise the
debt ceiling, demanded huge
spending cuts, and insisted on a
constitutional amendment to balance the budget.
On Wednesday, they formally
broke free from those fiscal principles and announced a plan that
would add $500 billion in new
spending over two years and suspend the debt ceiling until 2019.
This came several months after Republicans passed a tax law that
would add more than $1 trillion to
the debt over a decade.
With all these changes, the annual gap between spending and
revenue in 2019 is projected to
eclipse $1.1 trillion, up from
$439 billion in 2015. And they are
expanding the deficit at an unusual
time, when the economy is growing
and unemployment is low, a dynamic that often leads to shrinking
budget gaps.
“I don’t think there’s any question but that there’s a bury-yourhead-in-the-sand view of the deficit
and the debt issues relative to this
Congress and this administration,”
said former senator Judd Gregg
(R-N.H.), who once led the Senate
Budget Committee.
The debt binge caps off a major
reversal for the Republican Party,
which has been swept up by President Trump’s demands for more
spending and tax cuts at a time
when the public seems to care less
about debt than it has in years.
In 2011, Rep. Paul D. Ryan (RWis.), then chairman of the House
Budget Committee, proposed a
budget-slashing plan that would
lead to a $415 billion deficit in 2019.
Ryan is now speaker of the House,
and the tax and spending plan he is
helping advance through Congress
would put the deficit at almost
three times the amount he envisioned in 2011.
A number of House conservatives on Wednesday said they were
mortified about the new spending
agreement, but there appears to be
little they can do to stop it. The deal
was cut between House and Senate
leaders from both parties, with the
White House’s support.
“It’s the wrong thing to do because it’s not consistent with what
we told the American people we
were going to do, and what they
elected us to do,” said Rep. Jim
Jordan (R-Ohio). “We’re going to
run a trillion-dollar deficit.”
AshLee Strong, a spokeswoman
for Ryan, said that it is spending on
other programs, such as Medicare
and Medicaid, that drive “our longterm debt problem.”
She said spending on programs
like these will “continue to be the
problem that [Ryan] hopes Washington will finally address.”
But changes to those programs
aren’t expected this year. All this
new borrowing costs money, and
rising interest rates make the widening deficit even more expensive.
The Congressional Budget Office
projected last year that annual interest payments on the debt would
grow from $307 billion in 2018 to
$818 billion in 2027. Interest rates
are projected to rise at least one full
percentage point over the next 18
months, and Gregg said that could
push up borrowing costs by $1.6
trillion over 10 years.
The U.S. government already has
more than $20 trillion in debt, and
as of last year it was on the path to
add more than $10 trillion in debt
over the next decade before factoring in the new tax law and spending
agreement.
There are myriad reasons Congress has turned away from focusing on the deficit. Trump has shown
little interest in deficit reduction,
having referred to himself as the
“king of debt” during the 2016 campaign.
Trump promised to try to tackle
the deficit once in office, but he has
rejected efforts by advisers to pursue changes to Medicare and Social
Security that would cut spending.
Medicare and Social Security account for $1.6 trillion of the $4.1
trillion in spending this year. And
Trump signaled several weeks ago
that he would likely not push for
cuts in welfare spending if Democrats wouldn’t go along.
White House officials have dismissed concerns about the deficit,
saying some near-term moves are
necessary to speed up economic
growth. But their growth projections often don’t match the expectations of budget experts and economists, which means that much of
the revenue they have promised
might not materialize.
The biggest budget hawks used
to be in the House, but many have
softened their demands since
Trump took office and supported
the tax bill late last year even
though it will add to the debt.
White House budget director
Mick Mulvaney was a South Carolina GOP lawmaker during many of
President Barack Obama’s budget
showdowns with Congress, but
since joining the Trump administration he has taken a different approach. He said last year that he had
to work with Congress to seek a
consensus on spending bills and
that lawmakers weren’t interested
in pursuing legislation that would
cut spending.
A number of Democrats have
accused Republicans of shirking all
their budget demands once Obama
left office.
Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.)
said Republicans were displaying
hypocrisy on the deficit “undoubtedly. It started with the orgy in the
tax cuts and it continues with the
budget caps.”
He said Republicans at the end of
the day weren’t “budget hawks,” but
rather “chicken hawks.”
The White House plans to put
out its 2019 budget proposal on
Monday, and it will likely call for
steep reductions in spending levels
on domestic programs. But
Wednesday’s spending agreement
is a signal from Congress that it will
cast most of the White House’s
ideas to the side.
The Senate isn’t even planning to
approve a budget resolution this
year, making it even harder for it to
curb spending.
And Trump has said he wants
Congress to enact a $1.5 trillion
infrastructure plan. White House
officials envision that $200 billion
of this money would come from
federal spending and the rest
would come from cities, states and
other resources. Still, they haven’t
specified where the $200 billion
would come from or whether it
would lead to even more debt.
There are growing signs that
Washington and Wall Street are
only now coming to grips with the
GOP embrace of higher debt levels.
The Treasury Department said last
week that it planned to issue $955
billion in new debt this year, an 84
percent increase from 2017, to account for its “fiscal outlook.”
The CBO has warned that the
tax-cut law would lead to a $10 billion or $15 billion monthly drop in
revenue from individuals and families starting in February compared
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
COURTESY OF COLBIE HOLDERNESS
TOP: White House staff secretary Rob Porter stands in the Oval Office on Friday. ABOVE LEFT:
Porter’s ex-wife Jennie Willoughby on Wednesday in Alexandria. ABOVE RIGHT: Porter’s ex-wife
Colbie Holderness in a photo from 2005, when she says Porter gave her a black eye on an Italy trip.
post about him in April — without
naming him — and asked her to
remove it, concerned about his image. She said Porter demanded
again in the fall that she take down
the blog post, citing delays in his
security clearance. In January, he
asked her again to take it down, she
said, telling her that reporters were
looking into his past.
“He has never faced repercussions that forced him to confront
his issues,” Willoughby said in an
interview Wednesday at an Alexandria restaurant. “I care about him
and want what’s best for him, but
that doesn’t necessarily mean him
keeping his job, because he needs
to face these underlying issues.”
White House officials said early
Wednesday that Porter could continue working for several weeks,
but as the backlash grew Wednes-
day night, a senior White House
official said he was expected to
leave within 48 hours. Porter is an
ally of Kelly, and in addition to
serving as staff secretary, he oversaw and sought to streamline the
White House’s policymaking process, working with Cabinet members and other agency officials and
leading meetings about issues including immigration and trade.
Kelly saw in Porter a partner in
professionalizing the operation.
Porter is one of the few senior
White House staffers with past government experience, having served
as chief of staff to Sen. Orrin G.
Hatch (R-Utah).
In a White House known for its
ever-evolving personnel dramas,
Porter kept a low profile, only rarely agreeing to be interviewed on the
record and never appearing as a
surrogate on television.
But he was a highly visible figure
in Trump’s orbit. He was seemingly
omnipresent in the Oval Office for
key meetings and events, and regularly traveled with the president —
often being one of only a handful of
aides to accompany him on the
Marine One helicopter before joining the larger staff entourage
aboard Air Force One.
When the allegations were published Tuesday, the White House
mobilized to defend Porter.
White House communications
director Hope Hicks is dating Porter, according to people familiar
with the relationship, and was involved in the White House’s defense of Porter on Tuesday evening.
“Rob Porter is a man of true integrity and honor and I can’t say enough
good things about him,” Kelly said
with what it was projecting last
year.
The stock market has careened
down and then back up in the past
two weeks in part because of concerns that inflation would drive up
interest rates, slowing the economy
and pushing borrowing costs even
higher.
Another reason the White House
and Congress have ignored past
pledges on the deficit is that the
mood of the country seems to have
changed, according to Pew Research polling. In 2018, 48 percent
of Americans said the budget deficit should be a top priority for the
president and Congress, down
from 63 percent in 2014. A year
before that, 72 percent said the
budget deficit was a priority, as high
as it had been in the past two decades.
A number of Republicans have
said they are only agreeing to the
new spending bill because they had
to allow Democrats to raise spending on domestic programs in order
to extract more money for the military.
“Most of us are not in favor of the
part that’s nondefense discretionary, but it’s what you call a compromise,” said Rep. Mike Simpson (RIdaho). “We all know the need in the
defense side. If that’s the only way
we can get it, it’s the only way we can
get it.”
He added: “Most of us on our side
would cut a hell of a lot out of
spending.”
The deficit, as a share of gross
domestic product, hit a recent peak
of 9.8 percent in 2009 and then
steadily contracted, shrinking to
2.4 percent in 2015. The deficit was
$666 billion last year, or roughly 3
percent of GDP.
Budget experts say restraining
spending will only get harder for
lawmakers as an aging population
will put more pressure on programs
such as Medicare and Social Security and rising debt levels and interest rates will push costs even higher.
The CBO last year projected the
deficit would hit $1 trillion in 2022,
but that was before the tax law and
spending bills promised to add
more debt. Now budget experts believe the government will widen the
deficit beyond $1 trillion in 2019.
damian.paletta@washpost.com
erica.werner@washpost.com
Mike DeBonis contributed to this
report.
in a statement Tuesday night. “He
is a friend, a confidante and a trusted professional. I am proud to serve
alongside him.”
The White House also distributed a statement from Hatch defending Porter. “It’s incredibly discouraging to see such a vile attack on
such a decent man,” Hatch said in a
statement. After the release of the
photos of Holderness’s bruised eye,
Hatch released a new statement.
“I am heartbroken by today’s
allegations. In every interaction
I’ve had with Rob, he has been
courteous, professional, and respectful,” he said. “My staff loved
him and he was a trusted advisor. I
do not know the details of Rob’s
personal life. Domestic violence in
any form is abhorrent. I am praying
for Rob and those involved.”
The decision by Kelly and other
top White House aides to defend
Porter from domestic-violence
allegations is in keeping with
Trump’s
modus
operandi.
Throughout his life, Trump has refused to apologize for alleged misdeeds, believing any such concession to be an admission of guilt and
a sign of weakness.
Asked Wednesday whether
Trump had any concerns about the
allegations against Porter or with
the photos of Holderness, White
House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said, “I don’t know.”
Porter had a reputation in the
building for his fastidious work
and was liked by the president,
who sometimes rages at other
aides. His ex-wives said that Porter
directed his abusive behavior
toward them in private.
“In my experience, his anger and
his lashing out is very much limited
to intimate, personal romantic relationships,” Willoughby said. “He
has the ability to compartmentalize and maintain his integrity and
professionalism at work. . . . He is
charming and intelligent and fun
and chivalrous and — in capital
letters — angry and deeply flawed.”
Willoughby, a writer and former
high school teacher, said she was
unaware of the abuse alleged by
Porter’s first wife while she was
with him. But Holderness reached
out to her through Facebook in late
January 2017 after she was contacted by the FBI and anticipating the
background-check interview.
The two met for lunch in Arlington in March and shared their stories — months before they were
contacted by reporters and shared
those stories publicly this week.
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
beth.reinhard@washpost.com
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
Philip Rucker and Tom Jackman
contributed to this report.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
M2
PHOTOS BY CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Below, Emily Burns holds a redwood cone, while Richard Campbell shows a map of redwoods in the area. They work to protect and restore California’s redwood forests, seen above and below.
REDWOODS FROM A1
1,300-year-old redwood from a stand just
north of here and of a same-age sequoia
will serve as baselines and the first step
in better understanding how to make
these forests more genetically diverse as
a defense against rising man-made
threats.
When the three-year project is complete, scientists will have the genetic
fingerprints of hundreds of redwoods, a
sample large enough to determine which
trees have the characteristics to best
withstand increased moisture or
drought, heat increases or temperature
drops. The results will be available as an
open online resource, a shared tool for
those managing the forests.
“We’re trying to apply basic science to
the basic decisions we’re making on the
ground,” said Emily Burns, director of
science for the century-old nonprofit
group Save the Redwoods League, which
is paying for the $2.6 million project
through private donations. “What we
see around us is the result of environment and genetics. Until now, we’ve
been making decisions based only on
environment.”
Since the mid-19th-century gold rush
showcased the extent of California’s natural wealth, redwood timber has been
prized by home builders and furniture
makers for its quality and color. The
trees’ harvesting accelerated around the
turn of the last century, when new rail
lines quickened the pace of the international lumber trade.
Old-growth redwood forests once extended from the now-arid northern edge
of Southern California to the Columbia
River Gorge in Oregon. Just 5 percent of
the redwoods that stood before 1849 are
still alive, and the tree’s footprint has
shrunk by one-third.
About 1.6 million acres of redwoods
remain — an area roughly the size of
Delaware and Rhode Island combined —
and about a quarter of that is protected.
Erratic weather patterns have raised the
risk to the trees, including changes in the
frequency of fog, from which redwoods
absorb the moisture at their crowns.
Coastal erosion from rising sea levels
brings a future threat.
“We don’t know how the climate is
going to change nor much about what
effect those changes will have on these
trees,” Burns said.
The best defense against the unknown
is to make stands such as this one in the
lush Santa Cruz Mountains more resilient. The best way to accomplish that is
to ensure that these forests are genetically diverse.
Knowing a tree’s genetic makeup, and
how those traits fit into a larger stand of
trees, will allow Burns and Richard
Campbell, the league’s forestry program
manager, to trust the choices they make
in protecting and restoring redwood
forests.
“It’s going to be like speaking a
new language,” said Burns, 37, who grew
up in a redwood house north of
San Francisco and, for her doctorate at
the University of California at Berkeley,
studied the effects of climate on the
coastal redwood forests.
Restoration work in “second growth”
redwood forests — those that have been
harvested at least once before — is
sometimes counterintuitive. As the forests reemerge, they do so in ways that
Genome may unlock
redwoods’ future
often stifle growth, as young trees compete for root and branch space.
The “fairy rings” around the oldgrowth stumps, while signs of vitality,
also routinely need to be cut back to
allow the most promising trees to thrive.
Which trees should be felled and
which kept is largely guesswork based, in
this case, on Campbell’s experience, including his time as the director of Yale
University’s research and demonstration
forests in New England.
“Thinning works,” Campbell said. “It’s
about choosing the trees we want to see
carry into the future. Knowing the genetics will make sure that I don’t screw that
choice up.”
The redwood genome project began in
April 2017, when a sample was taken
from an old-growth redwood in Butano
State Park, about an hour’s drive north in
San Mateo County. The tree’s exact location is kept secret to prevent overzealous
tourism.
Two labs — one at the University of
California at Davis, the other at Johns
Hopkins University in Baltimore — began work on identifying the tree’s genetic
makeup. The science is complex and
time-consuming. A human has 3 billion
“base pairs” of DNA on its chromosomes;
a redwood has 38 billion.
The lead scientist is David Neale, a
professor of population biology and
plant sciences at UC-Davis who has spent
40 years in the field developing and
refining the technology being used in
this project.
While examining the initial redwood
sample, Neale and his team have gathered genetic material from 10 other
old-growth redwoods across a variety of
climates and altitudes. This is the second
stage of the project: expanding the
genetic library available to forest managers.
“It begins to give you an estimate of
the kind of genetic variation that can be
found in specific stands of these trees,” he
said, describing how the information will
be used in terms similar to how genetic
material is applied in human health care.
“Once the patient is determined to be at
some genetic risk, you apply treatment
and prescribe medicine.”
The redwood’s genetic code can only
be “read” in Neale’s lab 150 letters at a
time (each piece of genetic information is
assigned a letter). At Steven Salzberg’s
lab at Johns Hopkins, a more expensive
process can read strings of up to 10,000
letters.
Salzberg is a professor of biomedical
engineering, computer science and biostatistics. Like Neale, he has mapped a
tree’s genome before but never one the
size of the redwood’s.
The identification of the genome’s
composition is one challenge. The sequencing and assembly — putting the
various strands of letters back together
in the right order — is another equally
daunting one.
“Imagine we took 100 copies of today’s
edition of The Washington Post and
shredded it so that strings of words
remained intact,” Salzberg said. “The job
then is to take those scraps and make a
single edition of The Post.”
The work is done by matching up
overlapping strings of gene sequences.
“The longer the strands, the easier to do,”
he said.
Salzberg has a number of questions
about what he is finding, including, in
his words, “Why is there no penalty for
having a genome as large as the redwood’s?”
The bigger the genetic code, the more
can go wrong, and much of what the
genome contains, Salzberg said, is unnecessary. The same is true of humans.
“On a pretty routine basis, we learn
about our own biology by studying the
genetics of others,” he said. “I’m not
saying we will in this case, but redwoods
do live a fantastically long life, and it
would be fascinating to discover why.”
The restoration project here is gated
off and patrolled, protection against
off-road enthusiasts, hikers and, as
Campbell put it, “the odd dope grow.”
The path slopes down toward Deadman Gulch, where a trickling creek runs
past old-growth stumps and new, looming redwoods, their ropy reddish bark
distinguishing them from Douglas firs.
The ground is spongy, thick with needles
and the leathery brown tanoak leaves
that Campbell fears might be keeping
new trees from emerging. A heavy
ground coat can suppress new growth,
and it is often burned off in the natural
course of a forest’s life.
“The problem here has been not
enough fire,” he said, aware that deadly
wildfires to the north and south made
last year the worst fire season in state
history.
Blue rings have been painted around
some of the redwoods, meaning Campbell has approved them for removal.
“If Richard knew that tree was genetically different in some significant way
from others in this stand, he wouldn’t
take it down,” Burns said, looking at one
blue-ringed redwood. “Right now, we
don’t know.”
The air is cool, especially low in the
gulch. No other tree comes close to
absorbing more carbon than the redwood, making these forests invaluable in
reducing greenhouse gases. “Saving
them seems like a better investment than
ever,” Burns said.
The quiet beneath the canopy belies
the life in this forest. On the 8,500-acre
San Vicente Redwoods preserve, at least
eight female mountain lions live with
cubs. The animals have been known to
make their homes in the hollowed-out
stumps of the old-growth giants.
The wandering salamander, a species
now at risk because of a dwindling
habitat, thrives on bugs living in the
moss and leaves that settle into the
redwoods’ high branches.
Also at risk is the marbled murrelet, a
sea bird that dwells high on heavy
branches above the canopy, flying each
day to the Pacific to hunt fish. The bird is
on the protected list, and that protection
extends to the redwood stands where it is
found.
“New redwoods are gaining a foothold
here,” Burns said. “Within 100 years, we
can grow really large redwoods. One
aspect of this restoration is that it is
possible in our lifetime.”
scott.wilson@washpost.com
A8
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
Alleging anti-Trump bias, senator releases more FBI texts
Page and Strzok did seem to
contemplate the interplay of their
work with politics and its broader
impact.
On May 19, 2017, two days after
Mueller’s appointment, Strzok
gleefully talked with Page of being involved in “A case which will
be in the history books” and “An
investigation leading to impeachment?”
“For me, and this case, I personally have a sense of unfinished
business,” Strzok wrote. “I unleashed it with MYE. Now I need
President calls them
‘BOMBSHELLS,’ but
notes’ effect is unclear
BY M ATT Z APOTOSKY
AND K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
Senate Homeland Security
Chairman Ron Johnson (R-Wis.)
initiated a fresh round of attacks
Wednesday on two of the FBI
officials involved in investigating
Hillary Clinton and Donald
Trump, releasing hundreds of
pages of texts between the pair
and a report that raises questions
about how the bureau has handled its most high-profile probes
of political figures.
Though many of the messages
already had been made public,
President Trump quickly seized
on their release, writing on Twitter, “NEW FBI TEXTS ARE
BOMBSHELLS!”
Collectively, the texts show the
two officials disliked Trump and
feared what he might do as president, and they freely intermingled talk of politics with talk of
work. But the pair also seemed to
harbor animosity for many other
politicians, including Democrats,
and even co-workers.
In recent weeks, Republicans
have launched increasingly aggressive attacks on the FBI and
Justice Department, especially
their collective handling of the
investigation into whether the
Trump campaign coordinated
with the Kremlin to influence the
2016 election.
Last week, House Intelligence
Committee Chairman Devin
Nunes (R-Calif.) successfully
pushed for the release of a memo
alleging the department misled a
court to be able to surveil a
former Trump campaign adviser,
and this week, the Senate Judiciary Committee added more detail
to those claims.
The two officials now at issue
— senior FBI lawyer Lisa Page
and senior FBI agent Peter Strzok
— have been targets of conservative ire for months. Many exchanges demonstrating the pair’s
dislike for Trump became public
in December, though they were
also a part of the tranche released
“Yes, bc potus wants
to know everything
we are doing.”
Peter Strzok, in text to other FBI
agent, referring to Barack Obama
T.J. KIRKPATRICK/BLOOMBERG
Wednesday by the Homeland Security Committee.
“This man can not be president,” Page wrote in March 2016.
“And F Trump,” Strzok wrote in
August of that year.
The report by Johnson’s committee alleged that the pair “repeatedly demonstrated hostility
to then-candidate Trump and Republicans in general.” It also
raised concerns about the FBI’s
investigation into Clinton’s use of
a private email server while secretary of state — a matter that the
Justice Department inspector
general also is exploring.
Page and Strzok both worked
on that case, which was concluded in 2016 with no charges. They
also had both been members of
special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III’s team, though Strzok was
reassigned in July after the inspector general uncovered the
texts, and Page left before that for
what officials have said were
unrelated reasons.
Johnson’s committee took particular aim at one Sept. 2, 2016,
exchange in which Page — on the
day the FBI released documents
about the then-closed Clinton
email investigation — told Strzok
that President Barack Obama
“wants to know everything we are
doing.”
If Obama had been meddling
in an ongoing investigation of a
political ally, that would have
been inappropriate. But it was
impossible to discern from the
texts alone what specifically the
president was inquiring about.
The Clinton email investigation had been closed for two
months, though it would be reopened in October, after the bureau came across potential new
evidence in an unrelated case.
After referencing the Clinton
case earlier in the day, Page noted
Senior Justice Dept. o∞cial resigns
David Laufman helped
oversee Clinton and
Russia probes
BY
E LLEN N AKASHIMA
A Justice Department official
who helped oversee the controversial probes of Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server
and Russian interference in the
2016 election stepped down this
week.
David Laufman, an experienced federal prosecutor who in
2014 became chief of the National Security Division’s Counterintelligence and Export Control
Section, said farewell to colleagues Wednesday. He cited personal reasons.
His departure from the highpressure job comes as President
Trump and his Republican allies
have stepped up attacks on the
Justice Department, the FBI and
special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III for their handling of the
Russia probe.
“It’s tough to leave a mission
this compelling and an institution as exceptional as the Department of Justice,” said Laufman,
59. “But I know that prosecutors
and agents will continue to bring
to their work precisely what the
American people should expect:
a fierce and relentless commitment to protect the national
security of the United States.”
Laufman declined to discuss
the Clinton or Russia probes. The
latter was handed off to Mueller
in May after Trump fired FBI
Director James B. Comey.
“David’s departure is a great
loss for the department,’’ said
Mary McCord, a former acting
head of the National Security
Division who resigned in May.
“He has the integrity and attention to detail that is critical to
investigating and prosecuting
the types of sensitive matters
handled by the department’s
Counterintelligence and Export
Control Section.”
The Clinton and Russia probes
have fueled political rancor. But
“David never expressed any hint
of partisanship in the management of his investigations,’’ said
McCord, who is now a senior
litigator at the Georgetown University Law Center’s Institute for
Constitutional Advocacy and
Protection.
Laufman became a target of
the far-right blogosphere, with
conspiracy theorist Mike Cernovich accusing him last year of
being the source of “national
security leaks.” Cernovich’s
claim, which Laufman’s colleagues have called baseless, surfaced after media reports detailed then-national security adviser Michael Flynn’s discussion
of U.S. sanctions with Russian
Ambassador Sergey Kislyak.
The online attacks persisted
for months. After Comey’s firing
in May, Cernovich posted a piece
titled “Will DOJ leaker David
Laufman be next to leave after
#Comey?”
Critics noted that Laufman
had donated to Barack Obama’s
presidential campaigns, referring to him as a “holdover.” But
he is a career attorney who has
served as a political appointee in
Republican administrations as
well, notably as chief of staff to
Deputy Attorney General Larry
Thompson under President
George W. Bush from 2001 to
2003.
“David is a dedicated public
servant and an excellent lawyer,”
Thompson said in an interview,
noting how Laufman had helped
him coordinate the department’s
response to the Sept. 11, 2001,
terrorist attacks.
Thompson laughed when he
heard about the criticism of
Laufman. In 2006, when Laufman was a federal prosecutor
handling terrorism cases in the
Eastern District of Virginia, he
was up for a job as the Pentagon
inspector general. The post required Senate confirmation, and
Laufman asked Thompson to
organize a letter of support.
“I asked a lawyer friend of
mine, a Democrat, to sign the
letter,” Thompson recalled. The
lawyer, a former Justice Department official, consulted Democratic colleagues, who told
Thompson they considered Laufman “a conservative — someone
they couldn’t support, and so she
declined. He’s been scorned by
the left, and now he’s been
scorned by the right.”
Laufman eventually withdrew
his nomination for the Pentagon
job.
Laufman contributed a total of
about $880 to Obama’s two
presidential campaigns, according to Federal Election Commission records. He has not donated
to Clinton’s campaigns, records
show.
During Laufman’s tenure, the
Justice Department stepped up
enforcement of the Foreign
Agents Registration Act, a 1938
law created to counter Nazi
propaganda efforts in the United
States. The FARA unit last year
pressed the company backing RT
America, a Russian-funded
broadcast network, to register.
And it pushed Paul Manafort,
Trump’s former campaign manager, to register his consulting
work on behalf of a pro-Kremlin
political party in Ukraine.
Building on the FARA unit’s
work, Mueller in October indicted Manafort and his business
partner Rick Gates, accusing
them of, among other things,
acting as an “unregistered agent
of a foreign principal” and issuing “false and misleading FARA
statements.”
In November, Mueller obtained a plea agreement from
Flynn, who conceded he had lied
to the FBI about his discussions
with the Russian ambassador. In
a court filing, Mueller noted that
Flynn had “made materially false
statements and omissions” in his
FARA registration, which had
been prompted by the FARA
unit’s increased enforcement efforts.
Laufman’s section also obtained a guilty plea by ZTE, a
major Chinese state-owned telecommunications company, for
selling equipment containing
items of U.S. origin to Iran and
North Korea in violation of sanctions. ZTE’s total settlement,
with the Commerce, Treasury
and Justice departments, neared
$1 billion and included the largest criminal fine for a sanctionsviolation case.
Laufman, who obtained a law
degree from Georgetown University, began his career in 1980 as a
CIA analyst. He has served as
deputy minority counsel for Republicans on the House Foreign
Affairs Committee and as investigative counsel on the House
Ethics Committee, which investigated members of both political
parties.
When he returned to Justice in
2014, Laufman was excited to be
heading what he called the department’s “crown jewel section,” with its focus on cybersecurity, counterespionage and export controls. Other than terrorism, he said then, its work is “at
the vortex of national security
threats to the United States.”
ellen.nakashima@washpost.com
The FBI has come under
fire from myriad
congressional angles,
including a House
Intelligence Committee
memo alleging agents
weren’t forthcoming in
obtaining a surveillance
warrant on a Trump
campaign adviser. Now,
Senate Homeland
Security Committee
Chairman Ron Johnson
(R-Wis.) has released a
new batch of texts
between FBI agents
involved in probes of
Hillary Clinton’s email
server and Russian
election meddling.
an upcoming meeting, and Strzok
responded, “TPs for D?” using
abbreviations that likely refer to
talking points for the FBI Director.
“Yes, bc potus wants to know
everything we are doing,” Page
wrote back.
A person familiar with the
president’s request said Page and
Strzok were discussing Obama’s
interest in Russian meddling in
the 2016 election — not the Clinton email case. He’d been briefed
the previous month on Russian
President Vladimir Putin’s involvement in a campaign to disrupt and discredit the U.S. presidential race and help Trump get
elected.
An Obama spokesman did not
return messages seeking comment. An attorney for Strzok
declined to comment, and an
attorney for Page could not be
reached.
to fix it and finish it.”
MYE is a reference to Midyear
Exam, the FBI’s code name for the
Clinton case.
But Strzok also said he was
reluctant to get involved, “in part
because of my gut sense and
concern there’s no big there
there.” And his views, while decidedly anti-Trump, are also complicated. In August 2016, for example, Strzok texted, “I’m worried about what happens if HRC
is elected.” HRC is a reference to
Clinton.
Johnson’s report says the information in the texts “warrants
further inquiry.”
“While some may discount the
investigation for political reasons, we all have a great interest
in ensuring the public has confidence in the integrity and independence of the FBI, the preeminent law enforcement agency in
the world,” the report says.
Some Republicans have in the
past called for the appointment
of a second special counsel to
investigate their concerns, and
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
has indicated he would at least
consider that idea. In November,
he directed senior federal prosecutors to explore a host of matters — many of them Clinton-related — and report back to him.
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
Boente now faces conservatives’ ire
Erstwhile GOP darling
signed controversial
surveillance application
BY
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
This time a year ago, Dana
Boente was something of a conservative darling. The veteran
federal prosecutor had just
stepped in to defend President
Trump’s entry ban after the
acting attorney general was
fired over her refusal to do so.
He would go on to serve, temporarily, in the country’s two top
law enforcement jobs and
seemed to earn Trump’s gratitude.
“Dana, I just want to thank
you on behalf of the government, on behalf of our country,
for leading a strong, strong
effort in the courts,” Trump told
Boente last February. “We really
appreciate it; believe me.”
That appreciation might be
dissipating, though, after Republicans revealed in a controversial memo released last week
that Boente had signed a secret
court application to surveil a
former Trump campaign adviser. At the time, Boente was
acting as the deputy attorney
general in Trump’s administration, according to the memo.
Conservatives have said that
surveillance application was
flawed because it did not reveal
that some information contained in it was funded by
Hillary Clinton’s presidential
campaign and the Democratic
National Committee. Trump has
said, “A lot of people should be
ashamed of themselves, and
much worse than that.”
Boente’s signature on the application could complicate Republicans’ effort to portray the
surveillance as politically motivated, given his past service to
the Trump administration.
“I think it sort of undercuts
any suggestion that this was a
politically motivated document
designed by people who are
against President Trump,” said
Barbara McQuade, who was a
U.S. attorney in the Obama
administration at the same time
as Boente and is now a University of Michigan law professor.
Of Boente, she said: “I think
he’s largely seen as a nonpartisan, independent prosecutor . . .
he dutifully follows orders. He
does what he thinks he’s supposed to do.”
Boente, 64, who now works as
general counsel at the FBI, is not
the only high-level official to
authorize surveillance of former
Trump campaign operative
Carter Page, nor is his signature
the only mark against GOP
claims about its propriety.
Deputy Attorney General Rod
J. Rosenstein, who was appointed to his post by Trump, also
signed an application — which
contained additional information beyond that paid for by the
Clinton campaign and also revealed some of its material had a
political funder.
The Republican memo, produced by House Intelligence
Committee Chairman Devin
Nunes (R-Calif.), details what it
claims are findings that “raise
concerns with the legitimacy
and legality of certain DOJ and
FBI interactions with the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance
Court” and “represent a troubling breakdown of legal processes.” Even before it was publicly released, though, the FBI
had disputed it, saying in a
statement the bureau had
“grave concerns about material
omissions of fact that fundamentally impact the memo’s
accuracy.”
The FBI declined to comment
for this report.
Boente’s inclusion in the
memo is particularly notable
because he is the only high-level
Justice Department official
identified who, before the document was released, had not
drawn Trump’s public scorn. His
move in recent weeks to the FBI
was supported by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who — like
Trump — has called for leadership changes at the bureau and
who said in a recent interview
with the Washington Times that
he “believed it was important to
have a fresh start at the FBI.”
Boente’s job now is a career —
rather than a political — position, meaning he cannot be
removed at will by Trump. But at
least one conservative website
suggested in recent days that he
“may have to step down” over
the revelation about his signing
the surveillance application.
Former Milwaukee County
sheriff David A. Clarke Jr., a
prominent Trump supporter
who has advised a pro-Trump
super PAC and was considered
for an administration post,
linked to that report on Twitter
on Tuesday and commented,
“Evidence that moving a few
deck chairs around won’t fix
what ails the FBI. We must
FIRST find out the depth of the
corruption. How far did the
cancer spread? THEN start the
purge. If we miss this important
step, the illegal behavior will
continue.”
Before Trump was elected,
Boente had been working as the
U.S. attorney in the Eastern
District of Virginia — one of the
premier federal jurisdictions in
the country, known for its handling of high-profile terrorism
and public corruption cases.
Prosecutors under Boente were
intimately involved in the investigation into Clinton’s use of a
private email server while she
was secretary of state, and they
recommended Clinton not face
charges in the case, people familiar with the matter said.
A more than 30-year veteran
of the Justice Department,
Boente was appointed to the
U.S. attorney’s job by Obama,
and he expected he would depart eventually after Trump
made his own picks for those
jobs.
Instead, Boente found himself serving as the acting attorney general after Trump fired
acting attorney general Sally
Yates for her refusal to defend
his entry ban. He held that spot
until Sessions was confirmed by
the Senate, then took over as the
acting deputy attorney general
before Rosenstein was put in
place. He signed the warrant
application on Page in April.
When Trump fired 46 other
Obama-era holdovers from their
U.S. attorney jobs in March,
Boente was the one to call them
and break the news. Boente,
though, kept his U.S. attorney
job and recently had also been
working as the acting head of
the National Security Division
and as the U.S. attorney in the
Eastern District of Virginia.
Though he was eventually
asked to leave the latter post, the
White House considered him for
other jobs, and he was allowed
to stay on until a successor was
in place. In recent weeks, FBI
Director Christopher A. Wray
picked him to be the bureau’s
general counsel, and he resigned from his post in the
Eastern District of Virginia.
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
The World
Anger and fear along Turkey’s border
As Erdogan government battles Kurdish fighters in northern Syria, frontier towns are caught between the warring rivals
BY
L OUISA L OVELUCK
reyhanli, turkey — It is
around midday when the day’s
third explosion echoes through
this small Turkish border town,
scattering birds across the sky
and bringing the streets to a nervous standstill.
As pedestrians bunch together
under storefronts, there is quiet
for a moment, and then the ambulances begin to wail.
For Fatma, a Turkish mother of
two waiting quietly beside the
greengrocer’s, the explosions
were starting to feel as familiar as
they did ominous. “This is happening every day now,” she said.
“I’m just waiting for it all to be
over.”
As Turkey presses its long-anticipated offensive against Kurdish fighters across the border in
northern Syria, frontier towns
like Reyhanli have found themselves along the fault line between
the region’s warring rivals. Mortar strikes apparently launched
by Kurdish forces are landing daily, setting communities already
transformed by Syria’s war on
edge and hardening support for
Turkey’s military operation.
Syria’s seven-year conflict has
provided an opportunity for that
country’s Kurdish separatists,
known as the People’s Protection
Units, or YPG, to establish themselves as a major territorial actor.
With U.S. backing, they have captured land the size of Indiana.
Turkey has watched those
gains with rising anger, viewing
Kurdish consolidation on the
Syrian side of the border as a
national security issue. Ankara
has been locked in a decades-old
war with the fighters’ Turkish allies, the Kurdistan Workers’ Party,
or PKK, and Turkey is framing its
nearly three-week-old offensive
in the Kurdish enclave of Afrin as
a fight against terrorism.
In Reyhanli and Kilis, another
Turkish border town, the streets
were unusually quiet this week as
residents spoke of anxieties and
anger at the cross-border attacks
from Syria. Where the midday
mortar round landed, a small
crowd was not far behind, some
cursing the attackers, others wondering whether another round
would soon land in the same
place.
“That building was a smithy.
They’ve taken the blacksmith and
the butcher’s son to hospital,” said
one man, who declined to give his
name as plainclothes policemen
watched on.
“I hope they finish off those
terrorists soon. It’s the only way to
bring peace around here,” the
man said.
Popular support for Turkey’s
military operation — code-named
Operation Olive Branch — appears widespread, and front pages here are a riot of nationalism.
With the organs of the state
swinging behind a common message, Turkish President Recep
Tayyip Erdogan’s government has
shown little tolerance for criticism, arresting hundreds who
dared to defy him.
As Turkish troops and thousands of allied Syrian rebels edge
through the mountains surrounding Afrin, cross-border shelling
has killed seven people and
Vatican
expert to
meet abuse
victim
BY N ICOLE W INFIELD
AND E VA V ERGARA
PHOTOS BY OZAN KOSE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
ABOVE: People gather in front
of a house in the Turkish town
of Reyhanli after it was hit by a
rocket on Jan. 31. A 17-year-old
girl was killed in the blast.
LEFT: A soldier walks past a
Turkish tank stationed at
Reyhanli. The casualty count in
the Turkish border area is
rising among both Turks and
Syrian refugees.
wounded 113 more across Kilis
and Hatay provinces since the
operation began, according to
local media.
memorial. In the street, mourners
gathered, clutching cups of tea,
and in the corner alone, an old
man sat with his head in his hands
“This is happening every day now.
I’m just waiting for it all to be over.”
Fatma, a Turkish mother of two, after a mortar strike in Reyhanli
A 17-year-old girl, Fatma Avlar,
was killed last month as she slept
in her sky-blue house on Reyhanli’s southern edge. On the wall of
the house, a sign announced her
and his shoulders shaking.
There are also Syrians among
the dead, displaced first from a
war zone and now caught in the
teeth of a new battle.
In Kilis, the name of 27-year-old
Tarek Tabbak, a Syrian refugee, is
listed on a placard displayed
outside a 17th-century mosque,
which was pierced by a rocket late
last month. The name of Muzaffer
Aydemir, a 72-year-old Turkish
shop owner, appears in the same
list. Both are named as “martyrs.”
Turkey hosts more Syrian refugees than any other country, and
many have settled in towns and
camps along the border. The newcomers have transformed the
area, setting up businesses and
lining the pockets of enterprising
landlords who have turned the
influx into opportunity. But their
presence has also brought tensions. Turkish residents often
view their new neighbors — many
of them unable to return home —
as a nuisance or a strain on resources.
One Syrian man, for instance,
speaking on the condition of anonymity because he feared retribution for public criticism, said his
Turkish friends had become angry that their own country’s soldiers had been dragged into the
war.
The casualty count among both
nationalities is rising. And in
Afrin, monitoring groups say that
dozens of civilians have been
killed.
Standing in the doorway of his
sweet shop, Fadel al-Masri, a
Syrian from Aleppo, scanned the
street as he described how the
attacks had made his son too
fearful to sleep. Then nodding
curtly to a reporter, he ducked
back inside. “Goodbye,” he said. “I
don’t want any trouble.”
But next door, Adil Ibanoglo
was holding court in his cake shop
as the television blared songs and
triumphant footage of Turkish
tanks rolling through Syria.
“Those bastards will get a shock if
they think they can break us.
Turkey is a NATO military — those
PKK terrorists are going to be
smashed,” he said.
louisa.loveluck@washpost.com
Zakaria Zakaria in Reyhanli and Kilis
contributed to this report.
vatican city — The Vatican’s
sex crimes expert is changing
plans and will fly to New York to
take in-person testimony from a
Chilean sex abuse victim after
his pleas to be heard by Pope
Francis were previously ignored, the victim said Wednesday.
The switch from a planned
video interview came after the
Associated Press reported that
Francis had received a letter in
2015 from Juan Carlos Cruz, a
survivor of Chile’s most notorious pedophile priest. Cruz wrote
the pope that one of the priest’s
proteges, Bishop Juan Barros,
was present during the abuse
and did nothing. Cruz questioned Francis’s decision to
make him a diocesan bishop.
Barros has denied seeing or
knowing of any abuse committed by the Rev. Fernando Karadima, a charismatic priest penalized by the Vatican in 2011 for
sexually abusing minors.
Francis sparked an outcry
during his recent visit to Chile
by strongly defending Barros,
describing the accusations
against him as slander and saying he had never heard from any
victims about Barros’s behavior.
The AP report, published Monday, belied the pope’s claim that
the victims had never come
forward.
Even before the report, the
Vatican last week tapped Archbishop Charles Scicluna to go to
Santiago to take testimony from
victims and others with information about the Barros affair.
Originally, Scicluna was to
interview Cruz via Skype since
he lives in Philadelphia. But
Scicluna called Cruz on Tuesday,
“on behalf of the pope,” and
asked if they could meet in
person, Cruz said. Their meeting
is scheduled for Feb. 17 in New
York, where Cruz has to be for
work, Cruz said.
Cruz said he appreciated Scicluna’s gesture as a sign that the
Vatican was taking his testimony seriously.
“I see a good disposition, that
they’re not only taking my testimony seriously but also that of
all those who are desperate
living with the anguish of sexual
abuse and a church that does
nothing for them,” he told
the AP.
Scicluna declined to comment.
Francis sparked the Barros
uproar in 2015 when he appointed him bishop of Osorno,
Chile, over the opposition of
many Chilean bishops. They
were worried about the fallout
from the Karadima scandal,
which cost the Catholic Church
much of its credibility in Chile.
Karadima was responsible for
cultivating dozens of priestly
vocations and five bishops —
including Barros — but he also
kissed and fondled young boys
in his community.
— Associated Press
DIGEST
MALDIVES
2 justices took bribes,
police chief says
Two Supreme Court justices
arrested in the Maldives took
millions of dollars in bribes in
return for issuing a ruling
ordering the release of
imprisoned politicians, the
country’s police chief said
Wednesday.
Police have “proof of these
transactions” by Chief Justice
Abdulla Saeed and Justice Ali
Hameed, said Abdulla Nawaz,
the acting police chief.
The justices were arrested
Tuesday along with ex-president
Maumoon Abdul Gayoom, whom
Nawaz accused of bribing
lawmakers “to oust the
government and also creating
dissent within armed forces,
encouraging armed forces to
rebel against the government.”
Political turmoil has swept the
nation since the court last week
ordered the release of the jailed
opposition leaders.
President Yameen Abdul
Gayoom ordered a state of
emergency, giving officials
sweeping powers to make
arrests, seize property and
restrict freedom of assembly.
On Tuesday, the three
Supreme Court justices who
were not arrested annulled the
order to free the politicians.
LEBANON
Israeli wall called
an ‘aggression’
— Associated Press
VENEZUELA
Negotiations with
opposition collapse
Negotiations between
Venezuela’s government and
opposition have broken down
after they failed to reach an
agreement on a formula for the
upcoming presidential election.
Talks aimed at resolving
Venezuela’s grinding political
and economic crisis have been
taking place for weeks in the
Dominican Republic.
Dominican President Danilo
Medina, one of the mediators,
said Wednesday that the talks
were in an “indefinite recess”
after government negotiators left
the island Tuesday night having
signed a draft that was
unacceptable to the opposition.
The head of the opposition
delegation, Julio Borges, urged
the government to reconsider
and accept the opposition’s
counterproposal.
YOAN VALAT/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
A man snowboards near the Sacre Coeur basilica in Paris’s
Montmartre district after six inches of snow fell in the city. Snow
disrupted travel across northern France on Wednesday after the
weather caught officials off guard. Hundreds of people were trapped
in vehicles or shelters outside Paris when roads were not cleared.
The Constituent Assembly,
which is controlled by the
government but considered
illegitimate by the United States
and many foreign governments,
has called for the election to take
place by the end of April.
If the government goes ahead
with the vote, the opposition
may boycott, ensuring that many
countries won’t recognize the
results. It could also prompt the
United States to carry out a
threat to cut off oil shipments
from the OPEC nation.
— Associated Press
Lebanon’s top security body
on Wednesday told the military
to confront Israel if it goes ahead
with plans to build a cement
wall along the country’s border,
calling it an “aggression” against
its sovereignty.
The statement by the Higher
Defense Council comes amid
escalating tensions between the
neighbors, who are technically at
war. At the heart of the current
tensions is a new oil and gas
exploration deal on their
maritime borders. Israel contests
Lebanon’s rights to one area.
Meanwhile, Lebanon is
protesting the planned wall.
“This wall, if it is built, will be
considered an aggression against
Lebanon,” the council statement
said. Israel’s military said all
work is “being carried out in
sovereign Israeli territory.”
Israel and Lebanon’s
Hezbollah fought a devastating
month-long war in 2006.
— Associated Press
Rescuers search for quake
victims in Taiwan: Rescuers
worked to free people trapped
after an earthquake near
Taiwan’s east coast caused
several buildings to cave in and
tilt dangerously. Six people were
killed in Tuesday’s magnitude6.4 quake, while 256 others were
injured and 76 unaccounted for,
officials said. At least four
midsize buildings in Hualien
county leaned at sharp angles,
their lowest floors crushed. Late
Wednesday, another temblor
struck in the same area, this one
registering at magnitude 5.7, the
government said.
Mexican officials find tiger cub
in mail: Mexico’s office for
environmental protection made
an odd discovery Wednesday:
Someone had tried to expressmail a tiger cub. The cub was
sedated and packed into a plastic
container, inspectors said. It was
detected by a sniffer dog looking
for contraband. The cub was
mailed in the western state of
Jalisco to an address in the
central state of Queretaro. It was
dehydrated but otherwise well
and was taken to an animal
management center, officials
said. The case is being
investigated.
— From news services
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
Germany’s Merkel passes big hurdle as party leaders agree on new coalition
Social Democrats’
rank and file could
still torpedo the deal
BY L UISA B ECK
AND R ICK N OACK
berlin — After a grueling all-
night negotiating session, Germany’s two leading parties
reached agreement Wednesday to
once again form a governing coalition, after inconclusive elections in September left the country mired in political gridlock.
The four months of wrangling
and repeated failures to come up
with a coalition have weakened
Germany, and particularly Chancellor Angela Merkel, at a time
when Europe is seeking a strong
leader.
The talks between Merkel’s
bloc — an alliance of the Christian
Democratic Union and the Christian Social Union — and the Social
Democrats (SPD) extended past a
self-imposed Sunday deadline
and a two-day grace period into
Wednesday morning, when party
leaders finally overcame differ-
ences on key issues such as health
care and labor policy.
One last hurdle remains, however: The Social Democrats have
insisted on a partywide vote on
the final deal, and the party’s
youth wing has been actively recruiting members to vote against
it.
An approval vote by party
members is not unprecedented in
Germany, but it is not standard
practice, either, said political scientist Thorsten Faas of the Free
University in Berlin. In 2013, the
SPD membership was also allowed to vote on the coalition
with Merkel’s conservatives.
“It shows that the leadership
was, and still is, in a rather weak
position,” Faas said.
On Wednesday morning, German media reported that the new
coalition would grant the Social
Democrats the Finance, Foreign
and Labor ministries, with their
leader, Martin Schulz, as foreign
minister and Hamburg Mayor
Olaf Scholz as finance minister
and vice chancellor.
Schulz, the SPD head, plans to
hand over his party leadership
post to parliamentary group chief
Andrea Nahles, according to the
center-left daily Süddeutsche Zei-
TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Horst Seehofer, left, of the Christian Social Union, Chancellor
Angela Merkel and the Social Democrats’ Martin Schulz in Berlin.
tung. Nahles would be the first
female leader in the party’s history, and she would be tasked
with reuniting a party that is
deeply divided over the proposed
coalition treaty with Merkel’s
conservatives.
Just days after the inconclusive
September elections, Schulz told
German media: “I won’t enter
into a government with Angela
Merkel.” His back-and-forth state-
ments appear to have hurt the
party’s credibility: Voter support
is at 18 percent, according to surveys by the polling institute Forsa.
The SPD’s youth wing has also
grown impatient with the party’s
direction. Left-leaning activists
recruited new party members to
vote against the coalition, drawing heavy criticism from the Social Democrats’ coalition advocates.
SPD members will be asked to
vote on the treaty in about three
weeks. Tarik Abou-Chadi, an assistant professor at the University
of Zurich and the Center for Democracy Studies in Aarau, Switzerland, cautioned that the growing number of SPD members may
not necessarily reflect an attempt
to derail a coalition government,
as some critics have suggested.
“It’s also a sign of a general
push among Germans to become
more politically active,” he said.
Other analysts cautioned
against underestimating the party base. “So far, the party membership has been relatively hostile to
the idea of another four years
under Ms. Merkel,” wrote Pepijn
Bergsen, an analyst with the
Economist Intelligence Unit.
“However, voting down the agreement would probably result in
another election, in which the
SPD risks slipping to third place
behind the far-right populist Alternative for Germany (AfD),
from second currently, according
to recent polls.”
If the SPD members back the
final treaty, a new government
will go into effect in late March or
early April. If they don’t, Merkel
will probably be forced to form a
minority government, and that
could mean the end of Schulz’s
career and even Merkel’s, according to Faas.
Over the past four months,
many Social Democrats have spoken out against entering coalition
talks at all, arguing that Merkel’s
bloc would dilute their attempt to
carve out a new, independent political identity after the party’s
support dropped below 20 percent in the September elections —
a record low in its postwar history.
Years of coalitions with the
conservatives had damaged their
standing with voters, they said.
Merkel is entering her fourth
term, and she and the SPD have
failed to generate much excitement about their parties’ renewed
partnership in governing. A Süddeutsche
Zeitung
editorial
deemed the renewed partnership
a “Coalition of Losers,” adding
that the party leaders “aren’t protagonists of the future, but of the
past.”
“Effectively they’re representatives of a ‘carry on’ politics, even if
they promise change all day long,”
the paper said.
luisa.beck@washpost.com
rick.noack@washpost.com
Watchdog probes chemical weapons allegations in Syria
A SSOCIATED P RESS
beirut — The global chemical
weapons watchdog said Wednesday that it is “investigating all
credible allegations” of chemical
weapons use in Syria and will
report its findings to the organization’s member states.
The fact-finding mission from
the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, however, does not have a mandate to
apportion blame for chemical attacks in Syria.
Earlier Wednesday, French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian
told BFM TV that “all indications
show us today that the Syrian
regime is using chlorine gas at the
moment” in attacks on rebel-held
areas.
On Tuesday, a U.N.-mandated
investigator said his team was
probing reports that bombs allegedly containing weaponized chlorine have been used on two recent
occasions in Syria.
The Syrian government of President Bashar al-Assad and its ally
Russia have been pounding a besieged rebel-held area east of Damascus for the last two days with
airstrikes, killing dozens of people.
New
airstrikes
launched
Wednesday on the region killed at
least 10 people, opposition activists said.
Around 60 civilians were killed
Tuesday in airstrikes and shelling
that overwhelmed rescue workers
and prompted calls for an immediate cease-fire that would allow the delivery of critical medical care.
The opposition’s civil defense
workers, known as the White Helmets, said 10 civilians were killed
on Wednesday and many were
wounded after warplanes target-
HASAN MOHAMED/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A Syrian man gets oxygen at a makeshift hospital after a reported gas attack in the Eastern Ghouta region outside Damascus on Jan. 22.
ed the town of Hamouriyeh, causing a building to collapse over its
residents’ heads. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported an overall death toll of 23
civilians for Wednesday, which it
said raised the number of people
killed in the area since Jan. 29 to
384, including 94 children.
The Eastern Ghouta region,
just east of the capital of Damascus, is home to nearly 400,000
people trapped by the violence
and a tightening siege. The area
has been under intense attack
since the end of December as the
Assad government struggles to
bring it under control.
The punishing campaign has
also battered the northwestern
province of Idlib, the largest area
under opposition control in Syria.
The Idlib offensive has hit hospitals and residential buildings, and
has intensified after al-Qaedalinked militants in Idlib shot
down a Russian Su-25 fighter jet
near the town of Saraqeb over the
weekend.
The children’s organization
Save the Children said in a statement Wednesday that the escala-
tion in the opposition-held enclave of Idlib is placing thousands
of children in extreme danger.
It said more than 30 schools
supported by Save the Children
and its partners in the area have
had to close temporarily because
of security fears. Hundreds of
families, many of whom have already been displaced and left living in tents that provide no shelter from bombs or shells, have
come under increasing fire and
have been left with almost nowhere left to turn, it added.
“Children and their families
are fleeing in the hope of finding
safety and help, but now the
bombs are following them even
into the camps and hospitals.
They are fast running out of places to go,” said Sonia Khush, the
organization’s Syria response director.
Meanwhile Sweden and Kuwait have called for a U.N. Security Council meeting on the escalating violence in several areas of
Syria and the “dire consequences”
for the already critical humanitarian situation in the war-torn
country.
The council is expected to hear
a briefing on Thursday and then
hold closed-door consultations on
the growing humanitarian crisis.
Sweden’s U.N. Ambassador
Olof Skoog said the council needs
to hear from U.N. humanitarian
chief Mark Lowcock about what
the council can do to support the
U.N. call for a 30-day humanitarian cease-fire to deliver lifesaving
aid and evacuate critically ill people from besieged areas in Syria.
The Security Council is currently deadlocked on Syria, with
Russia blocking a statement proposed by Sweden and Kuwait supporting five points urged by Lowcock.
Pence has blunt message for N. Korea as he steps into higher-profile role
BY
A SHLEY P ARKER
tokyo — On his way to Asia, Vice
President Pence stood in front of
an F-22 fighter jet in Alaska on
Monday and pressured North Korea to halt its nuclear ambitions,
declaring, “All options are on the
table.”
In Tokyo, Pence received a
briefing on a PAC-3 Patriot defense battery and stood before the
launch vehicle as it pointed its
pod of missiles skyward.
And later Wednesday, Pence
stood beside Japanese Prime
Minister Shinzo Abe and signaled
the administration’s harshest
sanctions yet on North Korea.
“I’m announcing today that the
United States of America will
soon unveil the toughest and
most aggressive round of economic sanctions on North Korea
ever — and we will continue to
isolate North Korea until it abandons its nuclear and ballistic missile program once and for all,”
Pence said.
Pence did not provide any specifics, leaving those to the Treasury Department in the coming
days. But the message was clear:
On his five-day trip to Japan and
South Korea this week, the vice
president intends to be the administration’s one-man “maximum pressure” campaign against
North Korea.
During his first year in President Trump’s administration,
Pence primarily took on a behindthe-scenes, supporting role. But
now, the vice president is taking a
more prominent posture, at home
and abroad, and is using this Asia
trip to help drive the administration’s hard-line policy on North
Korea.
“You’re beginning to see more
of the higher political profile in
2018, and it’s one Pence will have
more distinctly,” said Marc Short,
White House director of legislative affairs, who worked for Pence
when he was a congressman from
Indiana. “People know his close
relationship with the president,
and I think they know that he
clearly speaks for the administration.”
On this trip, Pence plans to
further solidify the U.S. alliance
with Japan against Kim Jong Un’s
North Korean regime, as well as
urge South Korea — which has
been eager to open a diplomatic
dialogue with North Korea — to
take a tougher stance.
Pence will attend the Opening
Ceremonies of the 2018 Winter
Olympics as a ballast to counter
Kim’s propaganda, and he did not
rule out a meeting with officials
from Pyongyang while on the
Korean Peninsula.
“With regard to any interaction
with the North Korean delegation, I have not requested a meeting,” Pence said during a refueling
stop Tuesday in Alaska. “But we’ll
see what happens.”
Speaking alongside Abe on
Wednesday, Pence decried “the
rogue regime in North Korea,”
and said “the era of strategic
patience is over.”
“All options are on the table,
and the United States has deployed some of our most advanced military assets to Japan
and the wider region to protect
our homeland and our allies,” he
said.
In 2017, Pence traveled abroad
five times, with many of his trips
serving as reassurance missions
of sorts, to lay the groundwork for
future visits by Trump or to explain to skittish allies the nuances
of the president’s latest tweets or
controversial statements.
During a February 2017 trip to
Munich and Brussels, for in-
stage. He made a surprise trip to
Afghanistan
shortly
before
Christmas to visit U.S. troops. The
next month, the vice president —
who was a strong advocate of
Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel —
made a three-nation, four-day
trip to the Middle East.
Pence’s team is also considering at least three more in-depth
trips abroad for the remainder of
this year, one White House official
said.
Domestically, Pence plans to
focus a significant portion of his
“All options are on the table.”
Vice President Pence,
speaking in Japan on his way to the Winter Olympics
in PyeongChang, South Korea
stance, Pence tried to assuage
concerns about the U.S. commitment to Europe’s security and the
transatlantic defense alliance,
even as Trump called the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization “obsolete.”
On those early trips, Pence
seemed to stumble into news as
much as proactively drive it himself, as when North Korea attempted a missile launch as he
was en route to Asia for his first
visit to the region in April — a
failed test he nonetheless dubbed
a “provocation” upon landing.
But in the past two
months, Pence has stepped
more confidently onto the world
time campaigning and raising
money for 2018 Republican candidates through his leadership
PAC. So far, the vice president has
written checks to more than four
dozen congressional and gubernatorial candidates — a firstround list focused on Trump loyalists, and a second round to
vulnerable Republicans who have
supported the president’s agenda.
On the Friday before he left for
Asia, he made a quick visit to
southwestern Pennsylvania, to
campaign for Rick Saccone, the
Republican nominee in a closely
watched March 13 special election in the state’s 18th Congressional District.
“In many cases, he can travel to
a lot of the congressional districts
with a calendar that allows it,
whereas the president will probably be doing larger rallies,” Short
said. “I think, obviously, he has a
familiarity with a lot of the members, too.”
This week in Asia, Pence’s focus
is helping the administration implement its pressure campaign,
which Trump reiterated in his
State of the Union address before
Congress last week.
Pence invited Fred Warmbier
— the father of Otto Warmbier,
who as a U.S. student abroad was
sentenced to 15 years of hard
labor in North Korea and died
shortly after returning home in a
coma — to attend the Opening
Ceremonies of the Olympics as
his guest Friday night. Earlier
that day, Pence is expected to
meet with North Korean defectors in another attempt to highlight the Kim regime’s atrocities
as the North Korean delegation
prepares to march under a shared
Korean flag into the Winter
Games.
The vice president’s meeting
with defectors — with whom
Trump also met last week in the
Oval Office — is another signal
that the United States is taking an
especially hawkish stance against
North Korea, said Evan Medeiros,
managing director at the Eurasia
Group and a former Asia adviser
to President Barack Obama.
“That’s a signal of the administration’s strategy on North Korea
hardening, because when you
start meeting with defectors,
you’re starting to call into question the legitimacy of the North
Korean regime,” Medeiros said.
“That’s understandable, but that
raises the purpose of the fundamental U.S. strategy. Is it regime
change or just denuclearization?”
Pence, he added, in Asia and
globally, also plays the critical
role of “reassurer in chief.”
“He’s the careful, stable center
who is meant to reaffirm longstanding pillars of U.S. foreign
policy, and there’s no better example of that than alliances, so sending him to the Olympics in South
Korea is a natural expression of
that broader role that he plays,”
Medeiros said. “The challenge he
faces is the one that most senior
U.S. officials face: People know
that no matter what he says,
Trump still does what he wants,
so there are structural limits to
how much reassurance he can
provide.”
Pence hammered North Korea
at nearly every opportunity
Wednesday and touted the strong
relationship between the United
States and Japan. The only moment of levity — and distance
between the two nations — came
when Pence gently teased Abe
about their competing loyalties at
the Olympics.
“Later this week, I expect my
wife and I will be cheering for a
different team at the Olympics,”
Pence said to laughter, “but I
expect we’ll be agreeing on just
about everything else.”
ashley.parker@washpost.com
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
SU
How Trump’s favorite general lasts
MATTIS FROM A1
Picking his battles
Mattis had been in his office for
just a week when Trump made his
first visit to the Pentagon.
There, Trump presided over the
ceremonial swearing-in of his new
defense secretary and signed two
executive orders: one relating to
military readiness and a second
imposing severe restrictions on
citizens of certain countries entering the United States. The scope of
the immigration order, which
came to be known as the “Muslim
ban,” and Trump’s decision to sign
it at the Pentagon’s “Hall of Heroes” took Mattis’s top staffers by
surprise. Mattis had hoped to keep
the Pentagon above politics and
saw his job as largely apolitical.
The unexpected signing put
Mattis and the department at the
center of one of the nation’s most
divisive political debates. Some
members of his staff were angry at
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis at Wednesday’s news briefing at the White House. “I’m trying to think of
a guy who could do the job better than Mattis,” retired Marine Gen. James Cartwright has said.
being blindsided. If Mattis was
upset or uncomfortable, he did
not show it. He applauded politely
as Trump signed the ban.
During the Obama administration, Mattis had alienated the
president and his top staff by
pushing for aggressive measures
to counter Iranian efforts to sow
discord and undermine U.S. allies.
The then-four-star general was
left off the invitation list to meetings of the National Security
Council and in early 2013 was told
he was being replaced five months
early.
Tough talk that irritated Obama
— Mattis boasted of the U.S. military’s ability to put Iran’s navy “at
the bottom of the ocean” — has
won him credibility with Trump.
Even before he was confirmed
as defense secretary, Mattis’s
Democratic admirers in Congress
warned him to stay close to Trump
to prevent the president or his
aides from doing something foolish.
“I called him and said, ‘Trump
has no idea what he’s doing but
isn’t afraid to do it. You’re across
the river, and they’re across the
hall,’ ” said Rep. Adam Smith
(Wash.), the top Democrat on the
House Armed Services Committee, referring to Trump’s top advisers. Smith recalled counseling
Mattis: “Your job is to make sure
these morons don’t get up in the
morning and advance some lamebrained idea.”
Mattis’s top aides said they were
struck by how much time he spent
at the White House with the president during his first months in the
job. When he was not traveling,
officials said, the defense secretary was at the White House at
least three or four times a week.
Even as Mattis has expressed
views contrary to those of the president, on the efficacy of torture or
the need for diplomacy with North
Korea, he has managed to escape
Trump’s wrath.
Before taking over the Pentagon, he often preached: “Loyalty
really counts when there’s a hun-
Border agent’s death
may have been accident
BY R OBERT M OORE
AND N ICK M IROFF
el paso — A Border Patrol agent
whose death last November fueled
President Trump’s calls for a border wall appears to have died in an
accident, according to FBI findings released Wednesday.
Border Patrol Agent Rogelio
Martinez, 36, was found dying at
the bottom of a roadside culvert
along a span of Interstate 10 in
West Texas on Nov. 18. Within
hours, union officials said they
believed Martinez had been ambushed by smugglers in a rock
attack.
The agent’s death became a political flash point less than a day
later when Trump tweeted that
Martinez had been “killed” and
that his assailants would be
brought to justice.
But the FBI said it has found no
evidence of a homicide, despite
mobilizing significant resources
involving 37 field offices to investigate Martinez’s death.
“To date, this investigation has
not conclusively determined how
Agent Martinez and his partner
ended up at the bottom of the
culvert and no suspects have been
linked to this incident,” the report
said.
“None of the more than 650
interviews completed, locations
searched, or evidence collected
and analyzed have produced evidence that would support the existence of a scuffle, altercation, or
attack on November 18, 2017,” the
report added.
An autopsy report released
Tuesday by the El Paso County
Medical Examiner’s Office confirmed that Martinez died of blunt
injuries to the head, but it listed
the manner of death as “undetermined.”
Another agent, Stephen Garland, was also found injured nearby with serious head injuries and
other trauma. Investigators have
said he cannot recall details about
what happened.
But the FBI findings include
previously undisclosed details
about the moments immediately
after the agents were injured and
Garland radioed for help.
In his distress call, Garland told
the dispatcher: “We ran into a
culvert,” “I ran into a culvert” or “I
think I ran into a culvert,” the
report said.
Judy Melinek, a San Francisco
forensic pathologist who reviewed
Martinez’s autopsy report at the
request of The Washington Post,
said the injuries described in the
report were more consistent with
an accident or fall than an assault.
“He doesn’t have injuries on his
back and front. He doesn’t have
injuries on both sides of his body.
They are all on the right side and
in line with each other. There are
also no defensive injuries on the
arms or hands,” she said.
dred reasons not to be loyal.” Mattis has held to that ideal in the
battles with the White House that
he has lost.
In meetings with the president,
Mattis often worked to acknowledge “the emotional essence” of
Trump’s arguments and to restate
them in ways that were more palatable or in some cases consistent
with international laws on armed
conflict, officials said.
In December, when Trump decided to move the U.S. Embassy in
Israel to Jerusalem, against the
advice of Mattis and Tillerson, the
defense secretary called a senior
U.S. official to explain the decision.
The official asked why the administration would make such an
inflammatory move, which could
put U.S. personnel at risk. Mattis
paused for what seemed like 15
seconds, the official said, and then
delivered the administration’s
line.
By picking his battles and staying out of the media spotlight,
Mattis has built influence
throughout the government. He
has won admirers at Foggy Bottom, the home of the State Department, by reserving a seat for State
Department officials at his meetings with foreign defense ministers. The same officials said they
have struggled to get into similar
meetings with Tillerson and his
foreign counterparts.
Under Mattis, the military has
gained greater autonomy on the
battlefield than it has had in a
decade. Trump’s National Security
Council largely ignored U.S. policy
in Somalia until Mattis pushed
last year to lift rules requiring
commanders to get White House
sign-off on airstrikes in the country.
“We had no meetings on Africa
until Mattis wanted an expansion
of authorities,” said a senior U.S.
official familiar with the process.
“When Mattis wanted to do something, he’d send a memo to [McMaster]. Then there would be a
rush to schedule meetings. That
was the only time anyone cared
about Somalia.”
Just before Christmas, Mattis
persuaded Trump to scale back a
hotly debated order that had given
U.S. ambassadors in places such as
Somalia, Libya and Yemen the
ability to call a pause in airstrikes.
Military officials had objected to
the earlier measure, which they
thought interfered with the chain
of command.
In contentious meetings last
summer on Afghanistan, Mattis
and his top aides often dominated
the process. He spoke regularly to
mid-level aides representing the
Defense Department at White
House meetings so that they could
forcefully advocate the Pentagon’s
position. By contrast, senior representatives from the State Department often seemed to have
little clue where their secretary
stood, officials said.
In one chaotic Situation Room
meeting on Afghanistan policy,
McMaster shouted at Stephen K.
Bannon, Trump’s chief strategist
at the time, accusing him of deliberately misrepresenting McMaster’s position.
“You’re a liar!” McMaster yelled,
according to two officials at the
meeting.
Mattis ended the confrontation
by grabbing McMaster’s knee and
advising him to be quiet, the officials said.
The scene prompted a shocked
Reince Priebus, the White House
chief of staff at the time, to turn to
a colleague and mouth “W.T.F.”
In the end, Trump decided to
nearly double the size of the force
in Afghanistan to 15,000 troops. In
announcing his decision, Trump
said he was acting against his
“original instinct.”
His final decision gave Mattis
and his commanders almost everything they wanted to expand
the longest war in U.S. history.
‘You just hold the line’
One of the biggest questions
surrounding Mattis after his first
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CONDUCTED BY
nick.miroff@washpost.com
5100 Wisconsin Ave NW, Suite 400, Washington, D.C. 20016
Miroff reported from Washington.
threaten U.S. forces as soon as
2025, according to U.S. intelligence estimates.
“The American way of war is to
establish air, space and maritime
superiority and have your way,”
said Michèle Flournoy, a senior
official in the Pentagon during the
Obama administration. “How do
you fight without that advantage
up front? It’s a big challenge for
Mattis.”
Even at a time of rising defense
budgets, reorienting the military
to deal with these new threats will
require pressing the services to
scale back long-favored weapons
systems and winning over lawmakers whose districts could lose
jobs if programs are scrapped.
For Mattis, it will potentially
mean mastering the details of the
Pentagon’s arcane procurement
system and bureaucracy, skills he
never developed while focusing
on the wars in Afghanistan and
Iraq.
Former defense secretary Leon
Panetta said Mattis, as beloved as
he might be in the military, may
struggle to leave lasting change at
the Defense Department. “His biggest challenge is trying to make
sure that this president doesn’t
make a careless decision that
could really jeopardize our national security, and to that extent, he’s
constrained in terms of what he’s
able to do,” Panetta said.
Although Trump has given the
military broad latitude on the battlefield, he also has raised pointed
questions about the wisdom of the
wars being fought by the United
States. Last year, after a delegation
of Iraqi leaders visited him in the
Oval Office, Trump jokingly referred to them as “the most accomplished group of thieves he’d
ever met,” according to one former
U.S. official.
He has repeatedly pressed Mattis and McMaster in stark terms to
explain why U.S. troops are in
Somalia. “Can’t we just pull out?”
he has asked, according to U.S.
officials.
Last summer, Trump was
weighing plans to send more soldiers to Afghanistan and was contemplating the military’s request
for more-aggressive measures to
target Islamic State affiliates in
North Africa. In a meeting with his
top national security aides, the
president grew frustrated.
“You guys want me to send
troops everywhere,” Trump said,
according to officials in the Situation Room meeting. “What’s the
justification?”
“Sir, we’re doing it to prevent a
bomb from going off in Times
Square,” Mattis replied.
The response angered Trump,
who insisted that Mattis could
make the same argument about
almost any country on the planet.
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
echoed Trump’s concerns, asking
whether winning was even possible in a place such as Afghanistan
or Somalia.
It was Mattis who made the
argument that would, for the moment at least, sway Trump to embrace the status quo — which has
held for the past two presidents.
“Unfortunately, sir, you have no
choice,” Mattis told Trump, according to officials. “You will be a
wartime president.”
greg.jaffe@washpost.com
missy.ryan@washpost.com
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missile factories or hitting Iranian
speedboats that routinely harassed U.S. Navy vessels.
“Why can’t we sink them?”
Trump would sometimes ask
about the boats.
National security adviser H.R.
McMaster and his staff laid out the
president’s request for Mattis in a
conference call, but the defense
secretary refused, according to
several U.S. officials, who spoke on
the condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive internal deliberations. At that point, McMaster
took Mattis off speakerphone,
cleared his staff from the room
and continued the conversation.
“It was clear that the call was
not going well,” one official said. In
the weeks that followed, the options never arrived.
In his first year in the Pentagon,
Mattis has been one of the least
visible and most consequential
members of Trump’s foreign policy team. In Situation Room meetings, he has established himself as
a commanding voice, reining in
discussions before they devolve
into chaos. State Department ambassadors say they have spent
more face-to-face time with him
than they have their own boss,
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.
A foreign policy establishment
that views Trump as erratic and
unreliable uniformly praises Mattis.
“I’m trying to think of a guy who
could do the job better than Mattis,” said retired Marine Gen.
James Cartwright, who served as
vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs
of Staff during the Obama administration. “There might be . . . but I
can’t think of one.”
The former general’s most valuable asset may be his relationship
with Trump, who has been known
to publicly dress down and freeze
out subordinates who disappoint
him.
Mattis is “doing a great job,”
Trump said of his defense secretary during his State of the Union
address last week, drawing a rare
standing ovation from Republicans and Democrats alike. A visibly uncomfortable Mattis — the
only Cabinet secretary Trump
mentioned in the speech — nodded slightly and smiled.
year in office is how he plans to use
his power and a surging Pentagon
budget to change the world’s most
powerful military.
Part of his influence and widespread support throughout Washington can be traced to his inscrutability and relative absence from
an increasingly partisan political
scrum.
Mattis has largely avoided the
Pentagon media briefing room
and has resisted White House requests to represent the administration on Sunday-morning talk
shows. His aides said that Mattis’s
low profile is a product of his
determination to focus as much
time as possible on understanding
the inner workings of the Pentagon, reading the latest intelligence
and talking with his commanders.
On occasion, he will confess to
pulling all-nighters, telling aides
the next morning that he had
stayed up reading and was feeling
“a little rummy.”
His absence from the spotlight
and the Washington scene has
meant that he has not had to defend some of the president’s more
controversial statements and divisive tweets.
To the extent that he has
weighed in on events, Mattis has
displayed a broad disdain for the
country’s politics, and, at times,
seemed to set the military above
the fray.
“You’re a great example for our
country right now, and it’s got
problems,” Mattis told troops in
Jordan last summer during an impromptu speech delivered a few
days after the racially charged riots in Charlottesville. “You know it
and I know it. It’s got problems
that we don’t have in the military.
And you just hold the line, my fine
young soldiers, sailors, airmen,
and Marines — you just hold the
line until our country gets back to
understanding and respecting
each other and showing it.”
Shortly after those remarks and
Trump’s initial reluctance to denounce white supremacists in
Charlottesville, Mattis’s closest
staffers would question what he
really thought of the president’s
handling of the Charlottesville
clashes and other issues. Their
conversations between meetings
and over beers became something
of a parlor game.
“We never heard him say a negative word,” one official said.
Mattis’s plans for the military
are somewhat clearer. Trump’s
2019 budget, to be unveiled in
mid-February, is expected to include $716 billion for national defense, a 7 percent increase over
Trump’s proposed 2018 budget
and a 13 percent boost over 2017
funding levels.
Mattis has said that he plans to
use the additional money to prepare the military for a potential
conflict with a major power such
as Russia or China.
“Today we are emerging from a
period of strategic atrophy, aware
that our competitive military advantage has been eroding,” he
wrote in the introduction to his
National Defense Strategy last
month. Inside the Pentagon, there
is a growing worry about advanced Chinese hypersonic missiles that can sink U.S. aircraft
carriers and increasingly sophisticated Russian air defense systems.
Some of those weapons could
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RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
Kim Jong Un’s sister to attend Olympics in South Korea
Visit could be sign
that North wants to
improve ties with Seoul
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
pyeongchang, south korea
— South Korea’s dream of making the Winter Olympics the
“peace Games” began taking
shape Wednesday, with busloads
of North Koreans arriving and an
announcement that Kim Jong
Un’s sister would follow soon.
Almost 300 North Koreans —
including 229 young women in
fur-trimmed red coats, members
of a “cheering squad” — crossed
the demilitarized zone between
the two Koreas. They were driven
through Seoul, along clogged
highways past a forest of apartment towers, to the east coast.
There, the cheering squad,
North Korean reporters and taekwondo demonstrators were
housed not far from the 140
North Korean orchestra members who arrived earlier by ferry.
They will perform Thursday.
“Coming from a formerly divided country and having competed for a divided country into
two different teams, this is very
special and also an emotional
moment,” Thomas Bach, the German who leads the International
Olympic
Committee,
said
Wednesday.
The Games are shaping up to
be a special moment for the South
Korean government, too.
North Korea on Wednesday
informed South Korean authorities that Kim Yo Jong, the leader’s
younger sister and close adviser,
plans to attend the Olympics as
part of a high-level delegation.
Kim Yo Jong’s name was included in a list of officials submitted to the South’s Unification
Ministry.
If the visit takes place, she
would become the first member
of North Korea’s ruling family to
visit South Korea, and it would be
seen here as a sign that the Kim
regime is serious about improving ties with the government in
Seoul.
Kim Yo Jong is expected to
arrive Friday for a three-day visit
and to attend the Opening Ceremonies — the same event where
the United States will be represented by Vice President Pence.
Bach, the IOC president, avoided answering a question about
seating arrangements at Friday’s
Opening Ceremonies.
Pence has refused to comment
on whether he would meet any
North Korean officials, and other
Trump administration officials
gave coy answers this week.
“Vice President Pence is quite
capable of making the call on that
there, while he’s in Korea,” Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told
reporters Wednesday.
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson told reporters traveling with
him in Latin America that any
meeting will be evaluated depending on “how it might be
presented to us” but that U.S.
officials don’t anticipate a meeting.
“We will see whether an opportunity even presents itself,” Tillerson said. “The North Koreans are
going to be there, we know they
are going to be there. So we will
just see.”
Both Pence and Kim Yo Jong
are deputies with the ability to
speak directly to their bosses.
However, Kim Yo Jong has been
sanctioned by the United States
for human rights abuses.
South Korean President Moon
Jae-in’s government has been eager to improve ties with the North
and to show the Trump administration, amid increasing talk
about military action, that diplomacy can work with Pyongyang.
South Korea’s presidential
Blue House welcomed the news
that Kim Yo Jong would be in the
delegation, calling her inclusion
“significant.”
KOREAN CENTRAL NEWS AGENCY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, right, and his sister Kim Yo Jong at a military site in North Korea
in 2015. Kim Yo Jong would be the first member of North Korea’s ruling family to visit South Korea.
“We believe that the North’s
announcement of the delegation
shows its willingness to ease tensions on the Korean Peninsula
along with a message of celebration for the PyeongChang Olympic Winter Games,” presidential
spokesman Kim Eui-kyeom said.
The South Korean government
will make sure the Northern delegation experiences “no inconvenience” during its stay in the
South, he said.
But experts said there were
several ways to interpret Kim Yo
Jong’s inclusion in the delegation.
“If you want a credible interlocutor for the North Korean
government, it should be a mem-
ber of the Kim family,” said Christopher Green, senior adviser for
the Korean Peninsula at the International Crisis Group. “But seeing her at Pyongyang station waving everyone off was a reminder
that she’s in the propaganda business.”
Indeed, if North Korea’s goal
was to drive a wedge between
South Korea and its U.S. ally, it
made sense to send such a senior
official “with a nice letter from
Kim Jong Un” to ask Seoul to
cancel the joint military exercises
that have been delayed until after
the Games, Green said.
North Korean authorities had
already said that they would send
Kim Yong Nam, who is technical-
Korean Air ‘nut rage’ heiress resurfaces
She is an Olympics VIP
while her former target
scrubs plane toilets
BY
ly North Korea’s head of state, as
part of a 22-member high-level
delegation that will attend the
Opening Ceremonies.
Also on the delegation list sent
to the South on Wednesday were
Choe Hwi, chairman of the National Sports Guidance Committee, and Ri Son Kwon, head of the
agency in charge of inter-Korean
affairs.
Both Kim Yo Jong and Choe
have been directly sanctioned by
the U.S. government, accused of
human rights violations because
they are involved in censorship
activities. Choe has also been
sanctioned by the United Nations.
Already, South Korea has con-
A NNA F IFIELD
rean Air heiress who achieved
global notoriety in the 2014 “nut
rage” incident, returned to the
public eye last month, accompanying her father as he ran with the
Olympic torch when the relay
passed through Seoul.
Korean Air is an official partner
of the Winter Games, which open
in PyeongChang on Friday, and
Cho’s father is the chairman of the
company — called “owner” in Korean because, although it is publicly listed, the company is in
many ways still operated like a
family business.
Running with her father and sister, Cho wore an official gray PyeongChang tracksuit and a smile.
Park Chang-jin is also trying to
put on a smile these days. He was
the chief flight attendant on Korean Air Flight 86 from New York to
Seoul the day of the fracas over nut
service in the first-class cabin, and
his life has not been the same since.
“I loved my job, but then suddenly this incident with Ms. Cho
happened,” Park said in an interview in Seoul. “I lost everything at
that moment because someone
who had power over me had this
emotional outburst.”
The unbridled power of big
business conglomerates and the
perceived gulf between the “owner” families and ordinary people
have become a major issue in
South Korea. Many complain that
there is one set of rules for the rich
and one for everyone else.
The most recent example: Lee
Jae-yong, the heir to the Samsung
empire, was released from prison
Monday, just six months into a
five-year term, even though the
court upheld most of his briberyrelated convictions.
He will participate in the Opening Ceremonies on Friday at the
Winter Games, where Samsung is a
major partner and official sponsor.
The progressive government
elected last May had vowed to
work to reduce economic and social disparities and limit some of
the powers of conglomerates such
as Korean Air and Samsung.
Both of the recent controversial
cases involving “owner” families
show just how hard achieving
change is, said Jun Sung-in, a professor of economics at Hongik
University in Seoul.
“A change doesn’t come simply
by changing political power,” he
BY
JUNG YEON-JE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Former Korean Air executive Cho Hyun-ah encounters journalists after her release from jail in 2015.
said. “It comes when continuous
efforts are made across all parts of
society for a long time.”
For Park, the Korean Air flight
attendant, a long time seems already to have passed.
It was Dec. 5, 2014, and Park,
who had worked at Korean Air for
many years, was asked to lead the
staff on the flight. He was tapped
because of his experience dealing
with VIPs, he said. The VIP that
day was Cho, then Korean Air’s
vice president for cabin service.
When the flight attendant in
first class served macadamia nuts
to Cho in an unopened bag, rather
than on a plate, the executive
daughter became apoplectic. She
apparently did not know that the
guidelines had recently been
changed to stipulate that open
nuts should not be carried
through the cabin in case passengers had severe allergies.
She unleashed a torrent of
abuse at the attendant, Kim Dohee, and according to court documents insisted that Park kick her
off the plane, which was still on
the ground in New York. Park said
he explained that they were starting to taxi, but Cho was not having
it.
She made Kim and Park apologize on their knees, then ordered
the plane back to the gate and had
them ejected.
The incident ignited a firestorm
in South Korea. Cho’s father, Korean Air chairman Cho Yang-ho,
called his daughter “foolish” and
fired her. She was charged with
obstructing aviation safety and
sentenced to a year in prison, although she was released after
three months.
The Washington Post requested
an interview with Cho through the
company, but Korean Air spokesman Cho Hyun-mook said it
would be “difficult” to arrange.
To Park, it feels as if the company is hellbent on revenge.
In the interview, the former
chief flight attendant described a
hostile work environment that he
believes is designed to force him to
resign.
Rumors spread about him, he
said. Korean Air denies waging a
character assassination campaign
against him.
Park said his working conditions also deteriorated, with his
superiors belittling him and asking him why he had returned to
work or why he was not married.
It took a toll on Park, who is 47
and has worked for Korean Air for
21 years.
“I have suffered physically and
psychologically,” he said. He had to
take a total of 18 months’ sick leave
while he sought treatment, he
said. He now takes antidepressants and often experiences anxiety and difficulty breathing.
But he wanted to return to
work. Park grew up on a small
island, where his father was a sailor who often sent postcards home
from exotic places. That instilled
in Park a desire to explore.
He applied to work at Korean
Air while he was a university student. “I knew I would be so good at
this job because I’m a very friendly
person and I like to help other
people,” he said.
He loved his job. His mother
was proud of him. “But now, my
situation has brought shame on
her and our whole family,” he said.
When Park returned to work, he
had to renew all his qualifications
after more than a year off. He was
repeatedly given failing grades on
language tests — in Korean and in
English — and began to suspect it
was deliberate. He was assigned to
economy class and often given the
most menial tasks, including
cleaning the toilets.
The company says it has treated
Park no differently from any other
employee.
“There [is] no different work
scope for juniors or seniors. As a
result, seniors can be assigned [to]
economy-class duties,” the Korean
Air spokesman said.
Park’s co-workers have advised
him to give up.
Instead, he is suing Cho and
Korean Air, alleging that they demoted him illegally and caused
him to be ostracized at work. The
case has been referred to mediation, he said. Korean Air declined
to comment on an ongoing legal
case.
Park said he does not expect to
win but wants to make a point. “I
want to fight for my rights, even
though I am just a little guy up
against a huge company,” he said
in English. “I want our people to
think about what’s wrong and
what’s right.”
And with that, he was off to
work the economy-class shift on a
Korean Air flight to the Philippines.
anna.fifield@washpost.com
Anne Gearan in Washington
contributed to this report.
Netanyahu concedes
risk in corruption probe
Israeli prime minister
asserts he will be cleared
even if he is indicted
seoul — Cho Hyun-ah, the Ko-
travened its own sanctions by
allowing the prohibited ferry carrying the orchestra members to
dock.
Kim Yo Jong, who is 28, according to the Treasury Department,
is one of the North Korean leader’s closest aides and is often seen
at her brother’s side.
They have an older brother,
Kim Jong Chul, who is not
thought to play a significant role
in the regime but is sometimes
spotted at Eric Clapton concerts
abroad.
The three were born to North
Korea’s second leader, Kim Jong
Il, and his third wife, Ko Yong
Hui, an ethnic Korean dancer
who was born in Japan. All three
spent several years attending
schools in Bern, Switzerland.
The Kim family asserts its legitimacy to lead North Korea
through a kind of divine right
purportedly bestowed from
Mount Paektu, a volcano on the
border with China that has mythical status in Korean culture.
Kim Jong Un, who is 34, has
played up this “Paektu bloodline”
as he has sought to cement his
claim to be his father’s rightful
successor.
Kim Yo Jong shares this same
blood, but, as a woman, she could
never be leader of this strict
Confucian society. She has, however, been elevated through the
regime to play an important role
supporting her brother.
She was promoted to deputy
director of the Workers’ Party
Propaganda and Agitation Department in 2014, which prompted the Treasury Department to
sanction her by name in January
last year for her role in censoring
information in North Korea.
Then, in October, Kim promoted her to the powerful political
bureau of the ruling Workers’
Party, making her the only woman there.
L OVEDAY M ORRIS
jerusalem — Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu suggested Wednesday night that he
could be implicated in a police
corruption investigation but
sought to reassure his supporters
that the allegations against him
would amount to nothing.
His Facebook video message
came as Israeli news media reported that police would recommend that Netanyahu be indicted
on charges including bribery and
breach of trust.
Mickey Rosenfeld, a police
spokesman, said two investigations in which Netanyahu has
been named a suspect are “reaching a final conclusion.” Rosenfeld
declined to comment further.
In the video, Netanyahu said:
“Many of you are asking, what will
happen? So I want to reassure
you: There will be nothing, because I know the truth.” He pointed out that only the attorney general can decide whether to indict
him.
The investigations in question
— dubbed case 1000 and case
2000 — center on whether Netanyahu accepted lavish gifts in exchange for political favors, or cut
a deal with a newspaper publisher
to receive favorable coverage. He
has defended his innocence, saying the investigations are part of a
political campaign to unseat him.
But pressure has mounted, and
police have recommended that
his wife, Sara, be indicted on a
charge of misuse of funds. A
leaked audio recording of the couple’s oldest son, Yair, during a
night of excess in Tel Aviv’s strip
clubs further dented the reputation of Israel’s first family.
Also looming is case 3000,
which involves allegations of
corruption and bribery in a
multibillion-dollar
submarine
deal with Germany. While Netanyahu has not been named as a
suspect in that case, members of
his close circle have been arrested.
“There will be nothing,
because I know
the truth.”
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
The state prosecutor recently
told the Knesset, Israel’s parliament, that about half of the police’s recommendations end with
nothing, Netanyahu said in his
video on Wednesday. “So don’t
worry: There will be recommendations, there will be signs saying,
‘Bibi is guilty until proven innocent,’” he said. “But I am sure that
at the end of the day the competent legal bodies will come to the
same conclusion, to the simple
truth: There is nothing.”
According to a December poll
by Hadashot TV news, 63 percent
of Israelis say the prime minister
should resign if police were to
recommend an indictment for
charges of fraud or breach of
trust. Some 27 percent say he
should not.
loveday.morris@washpost.com
Ruth Eglash contributed to this report.
anna.fifield@washpost.com
MAXIM SHEMETOV/REUTERS
Yoonjung Seo contributed to this
report.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, shown last month,
said he is confident that he will be cleared in a corruption case.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
SU
Economy & Business
DOW 24,893.35
DOWN 19.42, 0.1%
NASDAQ 7051.98
DOWN 63.90, 0.9%
S&P 500 2681.66
DOWN 13.48, 0.5%
GOLD $1,314.50
DOWN $14.90, 1.1%
CRUDE OIL $61.79
DOWN $1.60, 2.5%
10-YEAR TREASURY
CURRENCIES
DOWN $2.70 PER $1,000, 2.83% YIELD $1=109.45 YEN; EURO=$1.127
Dow bounces back, but prolonged volatility appears likely
Better bond yields and ‘new leadership’ in markets are driving turmoil, experts say, and traders searching for the new normal might not be done selling
BY T HOMAS H EATH
AND E MILY R AUHALA
It’s been a wild week in global
markets. And it’s only Thursday.
U.S. stocks saw another day of
swings, reflecting the new reality
that volatility has returned to
markets after an unusually placid
2017.
The Dow moved nearly 500
points during trading Wednesday
before closing down 19 points, or
0.08 percent, at 24,893. The
broader Standard & Poor’s 500stock index didn’t move far off its
baseline, closing down 13 points,
or 0.5 percent. The tech-heavy
Nasdaq struggled to stay in positive territory all day and lost 63
points, or 0.9 percent, by end of
trading.
The yield on the 10-year Treasury bond rose Wednesday to close
at 2.84 percent. The 10-year is a
key indicator for the market because a 3 percent yield is looked
upon by investors as a motive for
people to flee the risk of stocks for
the relative safety of bonds. When
bond prices go lower, their yield
increases.
“In 2018, volatility may be the
new normal,” said Michael Farr,
president of Farr, Miller & Washington, a D.C.-based money-management firm. “Nobody minds
upside volatility. It’s the downside
volatility that causes heartburn.”
Corporate earnings continued
to impress as Disney and social
media company Snap both beat
expectations. With more than
half the S&P 500 through earnings season, 78.5 percent are besting their targets, a sign of
strength in the economy.
“The revenue results are encouraging and should gain
strength in the coming quarters
from currency translation,” said
Joe Abbott, Yardeni Research’s
chief quantitative strategist.
Industrials and financials were
the only positive sectors in the
S&P 500. The big loser was energy, which dropped when oil
prices plunged more than 2 percent. Low crude oil prices hurt
profits for oil companies.
NORIKO HAYASHI/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Japan’s Topix stock index and blue-chip Nikkei 225, reflected above this week in Tokyo, were poised to enter a correction as the nation’s
shares headed for the biggest decline since June 2016, following U.S. peers lower.
Among the Dow’s top performers were Boeing, United Technologies and Walmart. Apple, Microsoft and Exxon Mobil were big
drags on the blue-chip basket.
“We’re having a transition to a
new normal, but it’s not the new
normal everyone expected,” said
Paul Ehrlichman of ClearBridge
Investments. “We were expecting
deflation and low growth forever.
Now we are getting strong synchronized growth and signs of
reflation. Markets are adjusting
to one of the broadest recoveries
we have seen in a decade.”
“We are transitioning to new
leadership in the markets,” he
said. “That’s all this correction is.”
Ehrlichman said investors
were moving out of bonds and
technology stocks — and into
financial stocks and foreign markets.
President Trump, who was
mum during the past three days
of wild gyrations in the global
markets, took to Twitter on
Wednesday morning to weigh in:
“In the ‘old days,’ when good news
was reported, the Stock Market
would go up. Today, when good
news is reported, the Stock Market goes down. Big mistake, and
we have so much good (great)
news about the economy!”
In trading overnight, Asia markets rebounded on the heels of
Wall Street’s end-of-day recovery.
But those gains were brief and
vanished quickly, deepening
questions about what comes next.
By afternoon in Europe, indexes were also creeping upward,
apparently buoyed by Wall
Street’s turnaround Tuesday.
The modest rebound — if you
can call it that — helped calm
nerves after a terrifying Tuesday
that saw across-the-board drops
in the Asia-Pacific region and
Europe.
Experts expect more ups and
downs to come. “I’m afraid panic
was only eased temporarily,” said
Zhu Zhenxin, chief analyst at Beijing’s Rushi Advanced Institute of
Finance.
Zhang Ming, a senior economist at Beijing’s Chinese Academy of Social Sciences who
warned about the potential volatility of the U.S. stock market in
the Communist Party’s flagship
People’s Daily a month ago,
agreed.
‘The market performance in
recent days has proved my point
and this phase of the correction
has not finished,” he said, “Investors should realize the risks of a
more volatile market.”
This week’s volatility actually
started with good news. Last Friday, official U.S. data showed rising wages, renewing concern
about inflation and rate hikes by
the Federal Reserve.
On Monday, the Dow saw a
record-setting drop, which, in
turn, led to a Tuesday sell-off that
one analyst called “genuine carnage.”
People had been predicting
that carnage for a while. The Dow
was up over 26 percent from
January 2017 to January 2018 —
too good, many analysts warned.
The big unanswered question
hanging over Wall Street on
Wednesday was: “Is the selling
over?” Early trading seemed to
point to more volatility, which
means some sellers are out there.
“We think the market sell-off is
likely over and the market will
head up from here,” said Luke
Tilley, chief economist at Wilmington Trust, the wealth and investment advisory arm of M&T
Bank. “There is always a chance
for more downward moves, but as
long-term investors, we don’t try
to time these market corrections.
We are focused on spotting a
downturn in the economy ahead
of time, which we don’t expect in
2018.”
Many experts also worried that
investors — encouraged, perhaps,
by President Trump’s tweets
about the stock market — seemed
to believe the rally was closely
related to the real economy.
Andrew Zimbalist, an economist at Smith College in Massachusetts, said the volatility in the
United States — and the impact
on Asia — was “not surprising in
the least” given what’s been happening.
“The U.S. has been ridiculously
bloated by the euphoria of
Trump’s tax cut and deregulation,” he said.
“He overstimulated the economy. The inevitable consequence is
higher rates, higher inflation and
higher deficits.”
emily.rauhala@washpost.com
thomas.heath@washpost.com
Rauhala reported from Beijing.
Shirley Feng, Luna Lin, Yang Liu and
Paul Schemm also contributed to this
report.
Essentials in Macy’s new ‘modest’ fashion line are aimed at Muslim women
Retailer is the latest U.S.
brand to tap into growing
Islamic clothing market
BY TRACY JAN
Macy’s is launching a “modest”
fashion line this month geared
toward Muslim women that will
feature maxi dresses, anklelength cardigans and hand-dyed
hijabs.
The collection will be available
on Macy’s website beginning
Feb. 15 and comes at a time when
mall traffic has plummeted and
the beleaguered retail chain has
been aggressively closing stores.
Macy’s is the latest U.S. brand
to tap into the growing Islamic
clothing market, after Nike last
year debuted a hijab designed for
female Muslim athletes, American Eagle began selling denim
hijabs, and DKNY launched its
Ramadan collection of long,
flowing dresses in 2014.
International retailers —
including casual chains such
as Uniqlo and H&M and luxury brands such as Dolce & Gabbana and Oscar de la Renta — have
begun courting fashion-conscious Muslim women in recent
years as they have become
viewed as a lucrative consumer
market with a youthful and fastgrowing demographic. Boutique
businesses featuring modest
fashion such as Louella, founded
by U.S. Olympic fencer Ibtihaj
Muhammad, have also recently
emerged in this country.
Macy’s, though, is the first major U.S. retailer to offer a wide
“It’s about time that this happened in the U.S.
I hope that Macy’s sees an influx in its bottom line,
and that it encourages other retailers to start
paying attention to this demographic.”
Sabiha Ansari, co-founder of the American Muslim Consumer Consortium
variety of modest clothing at a
more affordable price point, said
Sabiha Ansari, co-founder of the
American Muslim Consumer
Consortium.
“It’s about time that this
happened in the U.S.,” Ansari
said, noting that the outreach
toward Muslim women is occurring after Macy’s stock prices
have plummeted for years.
“I hope that Macy’s sees an influx
in its bottom line, and that it
encourages other retailers to
start paying attention to this
demographic.”
Ansari predicted the collection would also appeal to nonMuslim women looking for less
revealing fashionable options,
citing the difficulty her Jewish
and Catholic friends also have
finding appropriate clothing.
She applauded Macy’s message
of inclusivity at a time when
Muslims are being vilified in
political discourse and travelers
from some majority-Muslim
countries are still being barred
from entering the United States.
Macy’s executives were not immediately available to discuss
how Muslim women fit in the
company’s retail strategy, but
Muslim consumers are projected
to spend more than $368 billion
on fashion by 2021, according to
the latest State of the Global Islamic Economy Report by Thomson Reuters. The Muslim market
for clothing ranks third behind
the United States and China.
The new line, branded the
Verona Collection, was founded
by Lisa Vogl, a fashion photographer and convert to Islam who
graduated from Macy’s development program for minority- and
female-owned businesses. The
program was started in 2011 to
diversify the company’s mer-
chandise suppliers.
Vogl said she started her company online after finding it hard
to shop for modest and fashionable clothing that was also
affordable. She opened Verona Collection’s first brick-andmortar store in Orlando in 2016,
one of the first Islamic-wear
stores in a mainstream U.S. mall.
But Vogl told The Washington
Post that the Macy’s partnership presents an opportunity to
showcase her collection to an
even wider audience on a much
larger scale.
Vogl’s pieces for Macy’s range
in price from $13 to $85 and
include ruffled high-neck tunics,
flowy jumpsuits and bell-sleeve
ankle-length cardigans. Macy’s
spokesman Billy Dume said the
collection will be sold only online
for the time being.
tracy.jan@washpost.com
DIGEST
RETAIL
Hasbro revenue drops
on lagging sales
Toymaker Hasbro saw a
surprise sales drop for the
critical fourth quarter as it
struggled with lagging sales of
“Star Wars” toys and the woes of
Toys R Us.
That comes after results from
Mattel, which posted an
unexpected loss for the quarter
that includes the holiday season.
Hasbro’s results, announced
Wednesday, underscore the
challenges toy makers face.
Parents are spending more of
their money for toys online at
sites such as Amazon, and kids
are more interested in mobile
devices than traditional toys.
The Pawtucket, R.I.-based
company posted quarterly
revenue of $1.6 billion, down
from $1.63 billion and short of
Wall Street forecasts for
$1.73 billion.
Hasbro said higher sales of
brands such as Beyblade, Marvel
and Sesame Street were more
than offset by a drop in Star
Wars toy sales and to a lesser
extent declines in Yo-Kai Watch
and Disney “Frozen” products.
For the quarter, Hasbro
reported a loss of $5.3 million,
or 4 cents per share, compared
with a profit of $192.7 million,
or $1.52 per share, in the yearearlier period.
Adjusted to exclude pretax
expenses and the impact of tax
reform, earnings came to
$2.30 per share, surpassing Wall
Street expectations. The average
estimate of seven analysts
surveyed by Zacks Investment
Research was for earnings of
$1.82 per share. That helped
send Hasbro shares up nearly
9 percent to $102.22.
For the year, Hasbro earned
$396.6 million, or $3.12 per
share, on revenue of
$5.21 billion.
— Reuters
reported Wednesday a more
than 11-fold surge in profit for
the fiscal third quarter thanks
to strong sales and to improved
results from U.S. carrier Sprint.
SoftBank, which also owns
stakes in Chinese e-commerce
giant Alibaba and British
computer chip and software
giant Arm, said its OctoberDecember profit was
912.3 billion yen ($8.4 billion),
up from 80.3 billion yen a year
earlier. Quarterly sales rose
3.9 percent to 2.4 trillion yen
($22 billion).
The Tokyo-based company,
which sells the Pepper robot,
did not give annual forecasts,
citing uncertainties, as is its
usual policy.
SoftBank was the first carrier
to offer the Apple iPhone in
Japan and is buying a major
stake in Uber.
— Associated Press
TECHNOLOGY
Sprint buoys profits
for Japan’s SoftBank
SoftBank Group, a Japanese
Internet and energy company,
MEDIA
Fox profit, revenue up
on cable, satellite
Rupert Murdoch-controlled
Fox Broadcasting, fell
5.8 percent to $1.81 billion.
Total revenue rose 4.6 percent
to $8.04 billion, beating
analysts’ estimate of
$7.94 billion.
— Reuters
AMIT DAVE/REUTERS
A farmer arranges harvested tomatoes in a tractor trolley on the
outskirts of Ahmedabad, India, on Wednesday.
Twenty-First Century Fox’s
quarterly profit and revenue
trounced analysts’ estimates on
Wednesday, driven by higher
sales through its cable and
satellite companies.
Revenue from Fox’s cable
division, which houses the Fox
News and FX channels among
others, rose 11 percent to
$4.41 billion, accounting for
more than half of total revenue
in the quarter. That beat
analysts’ average estimate of
$4.33 billion, according to
Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S.
Revenue at Fox’s filmed
entertainment division fell
1 percent to $2.25 billion, but
beat analysts’ estimate of
$2.23 billion. Revenue at its
television unit, which houses
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline
said sales increased about
1 percent in the fourth quarter
from a year earlier to
$10.55 billion. The company
nonetheless posted a fourthquarter loss of $758 million
from a profit of $356 million a
year earlier. The company said
the impact of U.S. tax changes
reduced earnings by
$2.26 billion.
— Associated Press
COMING TODAY
10 a.m.: Freddie Mac, the
mortgage company, releases
weekly mortgage rates.
Earnings: CVS Health, Twitter,
Yum Brands
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
China targets sorghum farmers in the growing trade dispute with the U.S.
BY
C AITLIN D EWEY
Farmers in the American
heartland have planted sorghum
on more than 6 million acres,
driven in part by strong demand
from Chinese hog farms and liquor distillers.
But thanks to an escalating
trade conflict between China and
the Trump administration, that
$1 billion business may be in
peril. On Sunday, Chinese officials launched an anti-dumping
probe into U.S. sorghum exports
— two weeks after President
Trump slapped tariffs on washing machines and solar panels.
Beijing hasn’t specifically
named the Trump tariffs as the
reason for the sudden sorghum
probe. But experts say the country has a long record of retaliatory trade actions, which pose a
special risk to the United States’
farmers. Agricultural goods,
chiefly soybeans, made up nearly
13 percent of the $169.8 billion in
exports that the United States
sent to China in 2016. Soybeans
alone topped $12.4 billion.
Observers fear that, should
tensions continue to escalate,
China may target soybeans. The
country is by far the largest
export market for soybeans,
dwarfing runner-up Mexico by a
factor of seven.
“I fully expect China to take
action on soybeans,” said Arlan
Suderman, chief commodities
economist at INTL FCStone.
KEVIN FRAYER/GETTY IMAGES
Chinese workers prepare steamed sorghum for fermentation to be used in a locally made wine in
Maotai. Chinese officials have launched an anti-dumping probe into U.S. sorghum exports.
“That will have a major psychological impact on the market . . .
and will decrease prices for farmers.”
Suderman expects a Chinese
soybean probe within four to six
weeks, a time that would be
convenient for Chinese officials
because it coincides with the
period when South America
takes over world soybean production for the summer.
For sorghum farmers, the pain
could hit even sooner. China’s
commerce ministry said it would
spend the next year investigating
claims that the United States
subsidized sorghum farmers, allowing them to sell into China at
a loss.
China’s corn futures were up
sharply Monday, a sign that analysts predict Chinese farmers will
switch to domestic corn to feed
their animals. Chinese traders
have also begun making inquiries
about Australian sorghum, according to Platts, a commodity
news service.
In a statement, National Sor-
ghum Producers chief executive
Tim Lust disputed the antidumping allegations and said his
organization would cooperate in
China’s probe.
“The U.S.-China agricultural
relationship is beneficial to U.S.
farmers, Chinese consumers and
our respective partners,” Lust
said. “U.S. sorghum farmers sell
their product to our valued partners in China. We appreciate our
deep and long-standing relationship with these buyers and the
feed and livestock industries in
warned that agricultural and aircraft imports would be most at
risk of retaliation from Chinese
officials, should Trump adopt tariffs.
Agriculture is in a special position, said Chad Bown, a senior
fellow at the Peterson Institute
for International Economics, because the United States is such a
large supplier to China. And the
country has a long history of
biting back against trade partners who seek to impose tariffs
on it.
When
President
Barack
Obama slapped tariffs on Chinese tires in 2009, Beijing responded by placing its own tariff
on chicken feet.
The administration eventually
took the matter to the World
Trade Organization, which ruled
in favor of the United States —
but not before American poultry
exports to China collapsed
90 percent.
The concern now, Bown said, is
what China will do next — not
only in this investigation but also
in response to Trump’s other
trade actions.
Soybean groups are closely
watching China’s sorghum investigation to gauge what might be
next.
“Beijing seems to be sending a
signal, in this case that Washington should be careful,” Bown said.
“Because there are other actions
they could take in the future.”
China.”
Sorghum is grown in Kansas,
Texas, Colorado and Oklahoma
and is farmed chiefly for export
to China — a market that opened
in 2013 after China limited imports of genetically modified U.S.
corn. The grain is used largely to
feed hogs.
Between 2013 and 2015, sorghum exports to China exploded,
from less than half a million
metric tons to 9.1 million. The
growth in the Chinese market,
coupled with low prices for wheat
and corn, have prompted farmers
on the western edge of the corn
belt in the United States to plant
tens of thousands of new acres.
Between 2014 and 2016, Kansas averaged $180 million in annual sorghum exports to China.
There is fear there that the antidumping probe could let competitors sneak in, potentially ceding
access to the Chinese market
even without new tariffs.
“There are other producers out
there who export grain products,”
said Ryan Flickner, senior director of advocacy at the Kansas
Farm Bureau. “If the U.S. isn’t
supplying China, for whatever
reason, they will go out and find
sorghum somewhere else.”
Farmers and ranchers have
long feared they might become
the first victims of a trade war
between China and the United
States.
Last week, the American
Chamber of Commerce in China
caitlin.dewey@washpost.com
‘Greed is good’?: Waymo turns to Gordon Gekko to aid its case against Uber
san francisco
— How do
Innovations
Most of Kalanick’s nearly twohour testimony settled on his
relationship with Anthony
Levandowski, a onetime star
engineer who left Google and
was later hired by Uber,
unleashing a cloud of suspicion
among Google executives who
allege that the two men plotted
to steal trade secrets.
Google’s self-driving-car
project, which was started in
2009, became Waymo in 2016.
Amid their text messages was
a link to Michael Douglas’s
movie moment in “Wall Street,”
which made for a bizarre piece of
courtroom theater when it was
played for jurors.
“The point is, ladies and
gentlemen, that greed, for lack of
a better word, is good,” Douglas’s
Gordon Gekko said in a YouTube
video shown in court. “Greed is
right. Greed works. Greed
clarifies, cuts through and
captures the essence of the
evolutionary spirit. Greed, in all
of its forms — greed for life, for
PETER
HOLLEY
some wealthy
Silicon Valley
executives
pump
themselves up to conquer the
business world?
Evidently by watching — and
then sharing — a YouTube link of
the “greed is good” speech from
the 1987 film “Wall Street.”
That detail surfaced when
Travis Kalanick — Uber’s former
chief executive — testified
during the third, and most
climactic, day of the UberWaymo trial in a San Francisco
courtroom Wednesday, offering
rare insight into the behavior of
two Silicon Valley power brokers.
Listening intently in the
audience were dozens of lawyers,
reporters, PR people and curious
law students who had lined up
outside the courtroom before
sunrise in hopes of witnessing
the Silicon Valley equivalent of a
tech Super Bowl.
winding, sometimes humorous
testimony — spawned by
exchanges with Waymo’s nononsense attorney, Charles
Verhoeven — covered everything
from the billionaire’s texting
slang and hiring decisions to his
frayed relationship with
Alphabet chief executive Larry
Page amid rumors that they were
simultaneously trying to build
flying cars (a Silicon Valley nono, apparently).
Waymo’s legal team is trying
to convince jurors that Kalanick,
who has a reputation for flouting
rules, conspired with
Levandowski to create a fake
company that would be
purchased by Uber and used to
steal eight trade secrets from
Google’s self-driving-car team.
The goal was not only to
“leapfrog” Google in the race to
build self-driving cars, Waymo
lawyers allege, but to keep Uber
alive.
Kalanick — who used to refer
to Levandowski as his “brother
money, for love, knowledge —
has marked the upward surge of
mankind.”
Kalanick — who seemed
amused by Waymo’s focus on a
cinematic speech — said he
didn’t know whether he clicked
on the link when Levandowski
texted it to him in 2016.
“here’s a speech you need to
give ;-),” Levandowski texted.
Kalanick noted Wednesday
that it was just a movie and that
it’s fake.
“Wall Street” helped spawn
the villainous capitalist
archetype cited by left-leaning
politicians ahead of every
election cycle. More than three
decades later, Waymo used it to
cast Kalanick in the same light —
a Gordon Gekko for the digital
age.
Frequently swigging bottled
water, Kalanick had a generally
relaxed demeanor Wednesday,
ranging from mildly amused to
slightly confused during his
appearance on the stand. The
from another mother” — flatly
denied those allegations
Wednesday when lawyers grilled
him about text messages
between the men, including:
“Burn a village” and “I just see
this as a race and we need to
win. Second place is first looser.”
Aggressive rhetoric aside,
Kalanick said Uber hired
Levandowski for his skills, not
his secrets.
“We hired Anthony because
we felt that he was incredibly
visionary, a very good
technologist, and he was also
very charming,” Kalanick said,
noting that the goal was to
“make driverless cars a reality.”
“How do you feel about him
now?” Verhoeven asked.
“This has been a difficult
process,” Kalanick sheepishly
replied. “This makes it not as
great as what we thought it was
at the beginning.”
The testimony also revealed
that the Waymo-Uber
relationship could have had a
very different ending. Kalanick
said being picked up in one of
Google’s self-driving cars ahead
of a meeting with Page in 2013
inspired him to begin thinking
seriously about autonomous
vehicles.
Kalanick said he was hoping
the two companies — which he
described as having a “little
brother, big brother”
relationship at the time — could
find a way to partner. Around
the same time, Kalanick said, he
began to hear whispers that
Google was planning to start its
own ride-hailing business.
“We were optimistic in finding
a way to partner,” he said,
pointing out that Uber’s ridehailing expertise and Google’s
autonomous-tech knowledge
seemed like a promising
collaboration at the time.
peter.holley@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/news/
innovations
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
27,000
Close
YTD
% Chg
24,893.35
–0.1
+0.7
25,250
23,500
21,750
20,000
Nasdaq Composite Index
7600
7051.98
–0.9
+2.2
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Leisure Equipment & Prod
Construction Materials
Diversified Consumer Svcs
Aerospace & Defense
Auto Components
Oil, Gas, Consumable Fuel
Computers & Peripherals
Energy Equipment & Svcs
Metals & Mining
Internet Software & Svcs
0
–8.0%
+8.0%
6.02
2.40
2.27
1.92
1.10
–1.58
–1.93
–2.19
–2.62
–2.68
6600
6100
5600
S&P 500 Index
2681.66
–0.5
+0.3
2900
2775
2650
2525
2400
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
82,766.73
15,330.58
48,885.60
–1.3
–0.2
–0.9
380.13
5255.90
12,590.43
7279.42
2.0
1.8
1.6
1.9
5876.81
4050.50
30,323.20
21,645.37
0.7
–2.4
–0.9
0.2
YTD % Chg
–9%
0%
+9%
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
233.19
93.61
159.54
348.12
154.34
115.29
40.34
44.56
70.60
76.94
15.25
257.10
191.29
153.85
45.20
–0.2
–0.6
–2.1
2.1
–1.3
–1.6
0.4
–0.2
–1.8
–1.8
–0.1
–0.6
0.1
–1.0
0.6
–0.9
–5.7
–5.7
18.0
–2.1
–7.9
5.3
–2.9
–0.9
–8.0
–12.6
0.9
0.9
0.3
–2.1
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
WalMart
Walt Disney
131.42
112.87
165.71
55.88
89.61
65.63
81.84
34.98
142.14
131.97
225.82
51.01
119.65
102.85
104.76
–0.3
0.7
0.3
0.8
–1.9
0.6
–0.7
–0.9
0.9
1.7
0.3
0.4
–0.3
1.9
–1.3
–5.9
5.5
–3.7
–0.7
4.8
4.9
–10.9
–3.4
4.8
3.4
2.4
–3.6
4.9
4.2
–2.6
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.2269
0.0091
1.3882
0.3058
0.7959
0.0532
0.0074
1.1315
0.2489
0.6488
0.0434
151.9320
33.4581
87.1120
5.8274
0.2203
0.5734
0.0384
2.6030
0.1748
0.8151
Japan ¥ per 109.4500
134.2800
Britain £ per
0.7204
0.8838
0.0066
Brazil R$ per
3.2720
4.0168
0.0298
4.5415
Canada $ per
1.2565
1.5414
0.0114
1.7441
0.3842
Mexico $ per
18.7820
23.0426
0.1720
26.0706
5.7410
Mexico $
0.0669
14.9489
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 27,690.99
Russell 2000
1507.97
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 550.69
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
27.73
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
–0.4
0.1
0.9
–7.5
YTD % Chg
0.1
–1.8
1.3
151.2
Daily
% Chg
$3.0875
$3.6525
$61.79
$1,314.60
$2.70
–3.2
+0.5
–2.5
–1.1
–2.1
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded (Ticker)
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
% Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.4545
$16.24
$9.8300
$0.1400
$4.6050
–0.6
–2.1
–0.3
+1.2
+3.2
day
$900
month
$1100
$1000
1.4
–2.7
0.2
–0.6
–2.5
–1.7
–0.8
–1.4
–1.4
Gainers
Perry Ellis Intl
Cavco Industries
XL Group Ltd
Nanometrics Inc
SPS Commerce Inc
Greenhill & Co Inc
Hasbro Inc
ESCO Technologies
Wynn Resorts Ltd
Blackbaud Inc
Genworth Financial
Fossil Group Inc
Ultimate Software
Adtalem Global Edu
Ball Corp
3D Systems Corp
Express Inc
Hibbett Sports Inc
Guess? Inc
ScanSource Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$27.06
$169.60
$42.00
$25.97
$55.35
$18.40
$102.22
$64.50
$177.32
$99.34
$2.96
$8.83
$232.17
$46.85
$39.33
$10.32
$6.96
$24.00
$16.62
$34.50
16.7
14.3
12.5
10.2
9.8
9.5
8.8
8.7
8.6
8.3
7.6
7.6
7.2
6.6
6.5
6.4
6.1
6.0
5.9
5.8
Losers
Manhattan Assc
Extreme Networks
NETGEAR Inc
Electro Scientific
Chipotle Mex Grill
Microchip Tech
CEVA Inc
Southwestern Energy
Denbury Resources
Bill Barrett Corp
Brink's Co
Chesapeake Energy
Consol Energy
Olin Corp
Flotek Industries
Heska Corp
Ensco PLC
QEP Resources Inc
Vitamin Shoppe Inc
Rowan Cos Plc
Daily
Close % Chg
$41.88
$11.64
$57.05
$16.87
$272.21
$82.91
$36.05
$3.60
$1.91
$5.00
$75.00
$2.89
$11.83
$33.25
$5.06
$64.37
$5.17
$7.87
$3.55
$13.28
–17.0
–15.5
–15.4
–12.2
–10.6
–9.8
–9.3
–8.6
–8.2
–7.7
–7.7
–7.7
–7.6
–7.5
–7.3
–7.0
–6.8
–6.6
–6.6
–6.5
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Close
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7100
2275
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.33
0.52
0.80
1.56
3.34
5.57
4.50%
4.23%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.50%
Federal Funds
3.56%
1.79%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.58%
10-year note
Yield: 2.83
2-year note
Yield: 2.13
5-year note
Yield: 2.56
6-month bill
Yield: 1.73
15-Year fixed mortgage
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
SU
Is this space industry’s giant leap?
State-run exchanges show resilience
Stakes are high for firms
banking on a return to
the moon and beyond
Report says such ACA
marketplaces fare better
than federal versions
BY
C HRISTIAN D AVENPORT
The crowds were back. Lining
the beaches and the causeways,
they fixed their binoculars on the
same launchpad that first sent
men to the moon.
But this time the draw wasn’t
the NASA heroes of the 1960s
Space Age — Alan Shepard, John
Glenn, Neil Armstrong — who
paved a path to the lunar surface.
Instead it was a puckish and eccentric billionaire with a big new
rocket and a penchant for showmanship.
The launch of Elon Musk’s Falcon Heavy from the Kennedy
Space Center on Tuesday was the
latest in a series of milestones that
have revived interest in space, as
well as the sacrosanct stretch of
sand along the Florida coast that
has witnessed so many epic flights
through the atmosphere. The hotels were full, the press room overflowing, and the traffic near the
Kennedy Space Center was bumper to bumper.
Musk’s triumph Tuesday in a
SpaceX test flight that sent a
sports car deep into space may
have been something of a crosspromotional stunt involving Tesla, one of his other companies. But
it also marked a turning point for a
budding commercial space industry that has raised the stakes for
itself by promising big things.
Now the question is whether it can
maintain its momentum and live
up to the promise of returning
humans to space while landing
spacecraft on the surface of the
moon — inherently difficult and
dangerous endeavors, even for
NASA.
SpaceX’s launch comes as the
Trump administration is looking
to restructure the role of NASA,
ensuring that private enterprise
and international partners work
closely with the space agency.
Later this month, Vice President Pence and the rest of the
National Space Council will hold
their second meeting, this time at
the Kennedy Space Center, to discuss the role that companies such
as SpaceX could play in the country’s ambitions to return to the
moon and explore the cosmos.
As the council, which was reconstituted under Trump, convenes, one major question it will
have to grapple with is: “How can
we best spend our resources as a
nation to ensure the most robust
space portfolio we can?” said Phil
Larson, an assistant dean at the
University of Colorado at Boulder
and a former SpaceX spokesman.
Lori Garver, a former deputy
NASA administrator who pushed
for a greater reliance on the commercial sector during the Obama
administration, said the launch of
Falcon Heavy should spark a
BY
JOE BURBANK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A crowd cheers just north of the Kennedy Space Center in Florida
during the successful launch of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket Tuesday.
change in the way NASA operates.
“This much delayed, much maligned rocket is just what the space
agency needs to escape from the
governmental bureaucracy that
has bound her to Low Earth Orbit
for the past forty-five years,” she
wrote in an email. “Unfortunately,
the traditionalists at NASA don’t
share this view and have feared
this moment since the day the
program was announced seven
years ago.”
The Falcon Heavy launch was a
milestone not only because it became the most powerful rocket in
operation, but also because it
boosted its payload, the Tesla
Roadster, out of Earth’s orbit on a
trajectory around the sun that
Musk said would take it out farther than Mars to the asteroid belt.
SpaceX had outfitted the vehicle with three cameras that
beamed back stunning images of
the ruby-red car soaring through
the blackness of space, with the
Earth a blue orb in the distance.
As impressive as the launch
was, SpaceX still faces a far greater
test: flying astronauts. For all the
hype and hoopla surrounding the
launch of a $200,000 sports car
with a space-suited mannequin
named “Starman” at the wheel,
SpaceX has never flown a rocket
with a human being on board.
While the industry has had a
number of triumphs, “that doesn’t
mean it’s going to be easy,” said
Michael López-Alegría, a former
NASA astronaut who also served
as the president of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation. “Taking humans to space should never
be taken for granted.”
Along with Boeing, SpaceX is
under contract from NASA to deliver astronauts to the space station. Though there have been setbacks and delays, both companies
say the first flights with humans
could take place this year.
Virgin Galactic, the space company founded by Richard Branson, and Jeffrey P. Bezos’s Blue
Origin also could fly humans for
the first time this year, on suborbital jaunts that could reach the
edge of space. (Bezos, founder of
Amazon.com, also owns The
Washington Post.)
As the space council mulls how
best to involve commercial companies in its plans, its exploits so
far have begun to attract attention
on Florida’s Space Coast, reviving
an area that was hit hard when the
space shuttle was retired in 2011.
For about a decade, SpaceX has
been a presence here, including
making use of Pad 39A, scene of
some of the crucial Apollo and
space shuttle missions. More recently, Blue Origin is rehabilitating a historic launchpad here and
has recently built a massive manufacturing facility where it plans to
build its next-generation rocket,
New Glenn.
OneWeb, which plans to put up
constellations of thousands of satellites to beam the Internet to
remote corners of the world, is
building a manufacturing site of
its own nearby.
Boeing has taken over an old
shuttle facility at the Kennedy
Space Center and is making improvements to a Cape Canaveral
Air Force Station launch site in
preparation for the first flights of
NASA astronauts from U.S. soil
since the shuttle.
The shuttle landing strip could
be used by Virgin Orbit to launch
small satellites.
And then there’s Moon Express,
the first commercial entity to receive permission from the Federal
Aviation Administration to fly out
of Earth’s orbit to deep space. It
plans to fly a robotic lander to the
surface of the moon.
In some ways, Moon Express is
already moving ahead under a
new model in which it partners
with government agencies to
achieve a first for a private company: landing a rover on the moon.
“The challenges of space are
immense, and the risks are huge,”
Bob Richards, the founder and
chief executive of Moon Express,
said in a statement. “But the innovations, convictions and entrepreneurial drive of the commercial
space sector, in partnership with
government, will achieve new economics and permanence for the
expansion of Earth’s social and
economic sphere to the Moon and
beyond.”
christian.davenport@washpost.com
Nepotism doesn’t cost VA worker job
She steered big contract
to her brother but wasn’t
fired, despite new law
BY
E MILY W AX- T HIBODEAUX
When the Bedford, Mass., VA
Medical Center spent hundreds
of thousands of dollars hiring
landscapers and ordering rock
salt, mulch and crushed stone,
one whistleblower in the department found it suspicious that the
supplies never showed up.
Turns out they were never delivered, and an employee, Heather Garneau-Harvey, had steered
the contract to her brother’s landscaping business, according to a
recent investigation by the Office
of Special Counsel, an independent federal agency that investigates whistleblower claims.
The employee was allowed to
keep her federal job, and she was
demoted one pay grade, despite
President Trump’s VA Accountability Act allowing for the quick
removal of agency employees
who violate standards or break
the law.
Trump has said that since its
passage, his administration has
removed “more than 1,500 VA
employees who failed to give our
veterans the care they deserve —
and we are hiring talented people
who love our vets as much as we
do.”
In a letter to Trump, Special
Counsel Henry J. Kerner said, “By
allowing an employee who engaged in this conduct to remain
with the agency, VA demonstrates
a shocking degree of indifference
to government ethical standards,
procurement regulations, and
public integrity.”
VA found that Dennis J. Garneau and his daughter, Heather
Garneau-Harvey, as Bedford VA
employees, steered $200,000 in
snow removal and groundskeeping contracts to a business owned
by a family member, their son and
brother. VA also found that the
father directed purchases of more
than $750,000 in “landscaping
materials without appropriate
verification of delivery, among
other purchasing irregularities.”
“A shocking degree of
indifference to . . .
ethical standards.”
Henry J. Kerner, special counsel
Garneau-Harvey
denied
knowledge of her family’s ownership of the company to criminal
investigators, but emails later
proved otherwise, the OSC said.
Her father has resigned.
Attempts to contact the family
were unsuccessful.
Helping the financial interest
of a family member is a violation
of VA and government ethics
regulations, the OSC said.
Curt Cashour, a VA spokesman,
agreed the disciplinary action
highlighted in this report “is
wholly inappropriate and isn’t
anywhere close in proportion to
the offense” necessitating it.
As a result, he said, “we will be
reinforcing with each and every
VA facility leader the importance
of ensuring disciplinary actions
correspond appropriately with
the misbehavior that warranted
them. We are looking into the
actions of the leaders who made
the decision not to remove the
employee in question and will
take whatever action is appropriate after that review, which will
be complete by close of business
Feb. 9.”
Congress passed legislation in
June making it easier to fire VA
employees and shortening the
time they can hold hearings or
fight the charges. The law’s impact on improving accountability
at the department remains unclear: VA employees were fired at
about the same rate as during
Obama’s last budget year, for
instance, according to VA and
media efforts to fact-check the
issue.
Since Trump signed the bill
into law, VA has fired 1,737 employees, Cashour said in an email.
VA fired 2,001 people in 2016.
In 2017, 2,537 workers were terminated.
One example of the difficulty
the agency faces came in March,
when VA Secretary David Shulkin
said he was horrified to learn he
could not fire an employee in
Houston caught watching pornography while with a patient.
VA immediately removed the
employee from patient care and
placed the person on administrative duties. Because of the law in
place at that time, officials could
not make a final determination
for 30 days.
The new law shortens that
time to seven days in most cases.
Federal unions argue that the 30
days are important because employees deserve the time to respond to allegations.
emily.wax@washpost.com
A MY G OLDSTEIN
States that run their own Affordable Care Act insurance
marketplaces significantly outperformed the rest of the country
in attracting consumers to sign
up for health plans for 2018,
according to enrollment tallies
released Wednesday.
Overall enrollment stayed essentially level from the year before in the 11 states plus the
District with state-based marketplaces, while sign-ups in states
that rely on the ACA’s federal
exchange fell, on average, by
more than 5 percent. Five states
with hybrid systems did best of
all, according to a report compiled by the National Academy
for State Health Policy.
The data show that, nationwide, almost 11.8 million Americans chose ACA health plans for
this year. The total is nearly a
half-million fewer than for 2017
and about 900,000 fewer than in
2016, the high point in the five
years since the marketplaces created under the law began selling
coverage to consumers who lack
access to affordable health benefits through a job. But the modest decline is well short of the
enrollment meltdown that many
supporters and foes of the ACA
had anticipated.
The report is the first full
portrait of the results of an
enrollment season hampered by
steps the Trump administration
has taken to undercut the insurance marketplaces and unsuccessful efforts last year by congressional Republicans to dismantle large parts of the sprawling health-care law.
Against such head winds, leaders of state insurance exchanges
and other health policy experts
characterized the ultimate enrollment as surprisingly resilient.
“The message is, people want
coverage, and they came and got
it,” said Trish Riley, the health
policy group’s executive director.
In contrast with repeated assertions by President Trump that
the ACA marketplaces are essentially dead, “it’s not collapse, it’s
incredible stability,” said Peter
Lee, executive director of Covered California, the nation’s second-largest exchange after Florida.
Enrollment in Florida, which
relies on the federal marketplace,
fell 2.5 percent from 2017. Despite
an intense, well-funded campaign urging people to sign up,
California’s marketplace enrollment dipped by roughly the same
amount. Lee attributed that
largely to the fact that his exchange encouraged people with
incomes too high for federal
premium subsidies to seek coverage outside the ACA marketplace. For the most popular level
of coverage, those off-marketplace plans ended up being less
expansive than identical ones in
the exchange after the White
House ended important funding
to participating insurers in the
fall.
Even so, the number of Californians buying marketplace coverage for the first time rose 3
percent from the year before — a
sign of strength, Lee said.
Among the 12 state-based marketplaces, enrollment rose in
eight. It also rose in three of the
five states that run their own
marketplaces but rely on the
federal HealthCare.gov computer
system.
In contrast, 2018 sign-ups increased in just five of the 34
states that are part of the federal
marketplace.
In a conference call for reporters Wednesday, leaders of several
state marketplaces said theirs
tended to fare better for a combination of reasons. In states using
the federal exchange, the enrollment season was shortened to six
weeks, while many states with
their own marketplaces continued their sign-up period for two
or three months. And though
federal money was sharply curtailed for advertising and other
outreach activities, some state
exchanges had robust programs
and well-staffed call centers to
encourage sign-ups.
“The local flexibility makes all
the difference,” said Pam MacEwan, chief executive of Washington state’s Health Benefit Exchange, which had an 8 percent
surge in customers selecting
health plans for this year.
But the exchange directors
said that daunting obstacles
loom for the 2019 enrollment
season scheduled to begin in
November. “There have been several shots that have been fired at
the individual market” by the
administration and Congress,
MacEwan said.
One of the most significant is a
part of the new federal tax law
that next year will eliminate
penalties for individuals who
flout the ACA’s requirement that
most people carry insurance. Another is the cost-sharing reduction subsidies to insurers that
Trump ended in October.
Next year “looks very troubling,” Lee said, citing estimates
that ending enforcement of the
insurance mandate could drive
up ACA health plans’ premiums
by 15 percent to 30 percent. He
and the others urged Congress to
give states money for “reinsurance” programs that can help
buffer the burden of especially
high-cost customers — “so we
don’t have a train wreck in 2019,”
Lee said.
Zachary Sherman, director of
Rhode Island’s HealthSource,
said his state has analyzed the
effect there of ending enforcement of the insurance mandate
and predicts that premiums for
marketplace health plans will
soar by an average of 50 percent
in the next three years. “That is
something that scares us quite a
bit,” he said.
The data in Wednesday’s report are based on the most recent
“enrollment snapshot” that the
Department of Health and Human Services released in December for the federal-exchange
states, plus final tallies from
state-run marketplaces. States
are reporting those tallies to HHS
for a government enrollment report due out next month.
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
A ‘copycat’ e≠ect after a star’s suicide
After Robin Williams's
2014 death, study finds,
self-hangings increased
BY
A MY E LLIS N UTT
“Hanged.” The front page of
the New York Daily News said it
all in one word on Aug. 13, 2014.
Above the capital letters, which
filled nearly a third of the page,
was a photo of comedian Robin
Williams with a somber expression, dead at age 63.
The headline, unfortunately,
contravened the most basic recommendations of the World
Health Organization and suicide
prevention experts for how the
media should cover suicide, including “toning down” accounts,
to avoid inspiring similar deaths.
News of Williams’s death appears to be associated with a
nearly 10 percent rise in the
number of suicides in the United
States in the five months that
followed, according to a study
published Wednesday in the science journal PLOS ONE. That
increase was especially large
among men ages 30 to 44, whose
suicide rate rose almost 13 percent. Even more significant was a
32.3 percent spike in the number
of suicides by suffocation, which
is how Williams died.
“The effect you see . . . is so
dramatic, you don’t even need
statistics to see it,” said lead
author David S. Fink, referring to
a graph comparing suicides in
the five months after Williams’s
death with the same five months
the previous year. “That’s very
rare to see an effect so big you just
need the statistics to confirm it.
You can see it with the naked eye.”
Analyzing monthly mortality
statistics from the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention,
researchers at Columbia University estimated that the number of
suicides from August to December 2014 should have been 16,849.
Instead, it was 18,690, representing an additional 1,841 cases.
Fink and his colleagues based
their figures on long-term trends,
which they said were a more
accurate method of measurement.
Few studies of the effects of
celebrity suicides on the U.S.
population have been undertaken over the years, Fink said. The
most recent case was musician
Kurt Cobain, who died in 1994;
before that, there was Marilyn
RICK WILKING/REUTERS
A memorial to Robin Williams in Boulder, Colo., in 2014. A study
shows there was a 32 percent spike in the number of suicides by
suffocation after his death, which is how Williams died.
“The effect you see . . . is so dramatic,
you don’t even need
statistics to see it.”
Study author David S. Fink, referring to a graph comparing suicides in the five
months after Williams’s death with the same five months the previous year.
Monroe in 1962. Although Cobain’s death was not followed by
an increase in suicide, at least in
the Seattle area where the rock
star made his home, Monroe’s
death was followed by a 10 percent to 12 percent rise in suicides
among the general public. The
difference, Fink said, was probably a result of the media being
more circumspect in holding
back the details of Cobain’s death.
Lars Mehlum, the director of
Norway’s Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention, said by
email that the study’s authors
“used reasonably good methods”
and there was “every reason to
believe that the reported increase
is a real one.”
“Sadly, there were all too many
examples of unfortunate presentations of the case of Robin Williams’s suicide,” Mehlum said.
“Many journalists failed to mention the huge health problems
Williams struggled with (both
mentally and physically), but
rather portrayed a glorified version of the event. This is not
according to international guidelines for media reporting of suicide.”
He
continued:
“Another
breach of these guidelines was
the explicit reporting of the sui-
cide method. The problem of
these ways of reporting a suicide
in the case of a celebrity is, of
course, the real danger of copycat
suicides, and this seems to be
confirmed through this study.”
The phenomenon of copycat
suicides, or “suicide contagion,” is
not new. Scientists often refer to
it as the “Werther effect,” referring to the 1774 novel “The Sorrows of Young Werther” by German author Johann Wolfgang
von Goethe. After publication of
the book, whose lovelorn protagonist takes his own life, there
occurred an extraordinary outbreak of similar suicides all over
Europe. This was especially true
of young men about the same age
as Werther, and whose bodies
were often found dressed in the
same clothes the fictional
Werther was wearing at the time
of his death.
Fink knows there is no easy
solution to the problem, especially in the wake of a celebrity
suicide. “In curbing this phenomenon, the most difficult part is the
confluence of factors,” he said.
“There are so many little pieces.”
amy.nutt@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
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‘This isn’t the country we fought for’
They ‘kicked butt’ in one male-dominated world. Now, more women who served in the military are making their presences felt in another — politics.
BY
M ARY J ORDAN
In Amy McGrath’s pitch to
voters in Kentucky, she wears a
bomber jacket and stands next
to an F/A-18, the fighter jet she
flew as a Marine to drop bombs
on Afghanistan.
In Mikie Sherrill’s political ad
in New Jersey, the camera lingers over a whirring Sea King
helicopter, like the one she piloted on Navy missions.
And in Martha McSally’s video announcing her run for Senate in Arizona, she is crouched in
the cockpit of an Air Force fighter jet to underscore that she was
the first woman to fly in combat.
Women who served in the
military are running for elective
office in greater numbers than at
any time in history. Many broke
gender barriers in uniform and
say it’s time to make their mark
in politics. For generations, military veterans who become elected officials have overwhelmingly been male and Republican,
but these female veterans, many
of whom served in pioneering
combat roles in the wars in Iraq
and Afghanistan, are overwhelmingly Democrats and critical of President Trump.
“Many of us felt like we really
had to focus on some of the areas
that needed further groundbreaking, such as the House of
Representatives and the Senate,”
said Sherrill, 46, a Democrat
running in New Jersey’s 11th
Congressional District. Sherrill
said she and other female veterans are motivated to run for
office by what she calls a “lack of
respect” for women by the
Trump administration and by
the dearth of women on Capitol
Hill. She said she was astounded
to see an all-male Senate panel
debating last year whether to
repeal the Affordable Care Act.
Sherrill is considered a strong
contender who could flip the
Republican seat being vacated
by Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen,
the chairman of the House Appropriations Committee who
surprised many by dropping out
of the race in January after 24
years in Congress. His district
voted for Trump by less than one
percentage point.
Only four of the 535 members
of Congress are female veterans,
two Republicans and two Democrats. But at least 32 more women who served in the military are
now campaigning for the House
and Senate — 25 Democrats and
seven Republicans, said Debbie
Walsh, director of the Center for
American Women and Politics at
Rutgers University.
Scores more are campaigning
for statewide office and state
legislative seats, many with the
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
“Many of us felt like we really had to focus on
some of the areas that needed further
groundbreaking, such as the House of
Representatives and the Senate.”
Mikie Sherrill, Navy veteran running for a House seat in New Jersey
COURTESY OF AMY MCGRATH
ABOVE: Amy McGrath stands in front of an F/A-18 fighter jet she flew as a Marine pilot. Now a
candidate for the Democratic nomination for a House seat in Kentucky, McGrath is one of a growing
number of female military veterans seeking elected office. ABOVE RIGHT: Angel Chitnatham leads a
session on fundraising during a Veterans Campaign workshop last month in Washington. The
nonpartisan group assists people who hope to run for office after their military careers.
aim of running for Congress
later.
The increase in veterans running — the number of men is
rising, too — is beginning to
reverse the long decline of veterans in Congress. In the 1970s,
more than 70 percent of House
and Senate members had served
in the military. Today, about
20 percent have.
Although the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan created a larger
pool of potential candidates, it is
no coincidence that at a time of
sinking regard for politicians,
bomber jackets, Bronze Stars
and aviator wings are showing
up in so many 2018 campaign
ads. A recent Gallup poll showed
that 72 percent of people had “a
great deal” or “quite a lot” of
confidence in the military, but
only 12 percent did for Congress.
Combat veterans in Congress
have a long history of commanding attention when discussing
war. Sen. Tammy Duckworth (DIll.), who lost her legs when a
rocket-propelled grenade hit her
Black Hawk helicopter in Iraq,
was widely quoted recently
when she called Trump a “fivedeferment draft dodger” and
accused him of goading North
Korea.
In response to Trump calling
Democrats “treasonous” for not
clapping during his State of the
Union address, Duckworth
countered that she swore an
oath to the Constitution and did
not have to “mindlessly cater to
the whims of Cadet Bone Spurs,”
a reference to Trump receiving a
Vietnam War-era deferment because of bone spurs.
Democrats want to highlight
the fact that many military veterans are appalled by Trump,
who has filled his inner circle
with retired generals and is
planning a huge military parade
later this year.
Studies have shown that veterans in office are more reluctant to vote to go to war, but that
once war is declared, they back
an all-out effort, said Rebecca
Burgess, who studies veterans in
public office for the American
Enterprise Institute.
Republican steps down from FEC
Lee Goodman’s exit
leaves panel with
bare-minimum quorum
BY
M ICHELLE Y E H EE L EE
Lee Goodman, a Republican
appointee to the Federal Election
Commission, announced his resignation Wednesday, leaving the
deeply divided panel with a bare
quorum to conduct business.
Goodman, who has pushed
for less regulation of money
in politics during his four years
on the panel, will rejoin the
Washington-based law firm Wiley Rein, which specializes in
election law and government
ethics. His last day at the FEC
will be Feb. 16.
With Goodman’s departure,
the FEC has a bare-minimum
quorum of four members — two
Republicans, one Democrat and
one independent — whose unanimous votes are now required to
take official action.
The panel could soon lose
another commissioner: Steven T.
Walther, an independent appointed in 2006 who often votes
with the Democrats, also is considering stepping down, the Center for Public Integrity reported
in December. Walther did not
respond to requests for comment
Wednesday.
If Walther departs and a new
appointee is not immediately
confirmed, the commission
would be unable to take official
action, such as enforcing regulations, issuing advisory opinions
or approving audit reports.
Among the initiatives that
could be derailed: an effort to
place tighter regulations on Internet ads published on major
online platforms to thwart foreign meddling in U.S. elections.
“Until the next selected commissioner is in place, the commission will depend upon unanimity in order to act,” said
campaign finance lawyer Daniel
Petalas, formerly the FEC’s acting general counsel and head of
enforcement. “And given the often fractured relationship of the
members of the commission,
unanimity doesn’t come often.”
The last time the FEC lost
quorum and was effectively paralyzed was 2008, when only two of
the six commission seats were
filled, leaving it hobbled at the
start of a presidential election
year.
Goodman said he had planned
to resign at the end of 2017 and
return to private practice. But he
said he delayed his move when
fellow GOP Commissioner Matthew Petersen was nominated by
President Trump last year to
serve as a U.S. District Court
judge.
In December, Petersen withdrew from consideration after
struggling to answer basic questions about legal procedures during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Petersen still serves on
the FEC.
In anticipation of the departures of Goodman and Petersen,
the White House in September nominated Trey Trainor, a
conservative
Texas
lawyer
who worked for Trump’s campaign, to serve on the FEC.
But the Senate has not held a
confirmation hearing for Trainor. Trainor did not return a
request for comment.
The seat formerly held by
Democratic appointee Ann Ravel, who resigned from the FEC a
year ago, remains vacant. The
rest of the commissioners are
serving expired terms.
The White House did not respond to inquiries Wednesday
about how it plans to fill FEC
vacancies.
“You don’t have a margin for
error when you have four commissioners. You need unanimity
to get things approved,” said
Michael Toner, former FEC commissioner and partner at Wiley
Rein. “I do think this will create
greater focus on the FEC, and I
want to see whether it leads to
the nomination process proceeding here.”
Goodman said he believes that
Trainor would replace him on
the commission and that his
departure will spur the White
House and Senate Rules and
Administration Committee to
work quickly to fill the vacancies.
“I don’t think it’s in anyone’s
interest for the commission to
lack a quorum,” Goodman said.
Goodman, who was appointed
to the FEC in 2013 by President
Barack Obama, said he believes
he accomplished the work he had
set out to do on the commission.
“I leave one principle area sort
of incomplete: That’s greater deregulation of state and local
political parties, and there’s still
work underway here,” Goodman
said. “Otherwise, I thought I had
fought the good fight to keep
political speech on the Internet
free, to protect free-press rights
and generally protect the First
Amendment rights of American
citizens.”
michelle.lee@washpost.com
In half a dozen interviews
with female candidates who are
veterans, health care was a key
reason they wanted to run. Many
also talked about the need to
improve education, to gain
greater gender parity and to
institute paid maternity leave.
Wanting strong national security, they said, was a given and
rarely mentioned first.
“Women look around and see
what is happening, and they
want to see change,” said Maura
Sullivan, 38, a Marine veteran
who served in Iraq and is a
Democrat running for an open
House seat in New Hampshire.
She said many issues need to be
addressed, including child care,
mental health and maternity
leave.
Sullivan, who worked at the
Pentagon in the Obama administration, also said she has seen
firsthand the devastating consequences of war, and thinks that
Trump “puts the national security of this country at risk” with
his “erratic and bizarre” behavior.
McGrath agreed that many
veterans are upset with the commander in chief: “A lot of us are
saying this isn’t the country we
fought for.”
The former combat pilot singled out the need for better
affordable health care for her
candidacy. She first must win
the Democratic primary — a
field that includes Lexington
Mayor Jim Gray — for the
chance to unseat Rep. Garland
“Andy” Barr (R). A viral campaign video has boosted her bid.
In it she says that at age 13, she
wrote to her members of Con-
gress saying she wanted an opportunity to fly fighter jets. Her
House member wrote back saying that women were not allowed in combat, and her senator, Mitch McConnell (R), never
replied.
McGrath ended up flying 89
combat missions against alQaeda and the Taliban.
Several Republican Party officials acknowledged that the
Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and liberal
groups, including VoteVets.org,
are increasing their efforts to
recruit veterans who are critical
of Trump.
“Democrats have made a concerted effort because of the stigma attached to them since the
2016 election, which showed
them to be out of touch with
voters, a party of coastal elites,”
said Jesse Hunt, a spokesman
for the National Republican
Congressional Committee.
But Hunt said that although
military service is admirable,
“biography is not everything,
and a Democrat is a Democrat.”
Voters are swayed by where a
candidate stands on issues such
as single-payer health care and
tax cuts, Hunt said.
But many Democrats see the
effectiveness of having combat
veterans speak out on deeply
partisan issues, including those
involving guns.
Burgess, of the American Enterprise Institute, said veterans
have an identity apart from political party. Many grew up in
middle-class and rural areas,
and that helps them “get away
from the hated image of the elite
politician,” she said.
Jeremy Teigen, author of a
new book, “Why Veterans Run,”
said Republicans have had more
success in getting their veterans
elected. Democrats have a history of backing veterans in longshot races. But he said there are
signs this year that Democrats
are being more strategic.
Of 36 veterans who attended a
two-day workshop run by the
nonpartisan Veterans Campaign
in Washington last month, 14
were Democrats, nine were Republicans and the rest were
undecided or independents.
Erica Courtney, a former
Army helicopter pilot and a
Democrat living in Virginia, was
one of those who attended sessions such as “Bulletproofing
Your Service Record & Avoiding
Common Pitfalls.” She said the
military taught her to lead by
example and to be inclusive,
adding, “Now I am embarrassed
to watch the nightly news with
my children.”
In Arizona, McSally is embracing Trump as she seeks the
seat being vacated by Sen. Jeff
Flake (R).
Elected to the House in 2015,
McSally faces former sheriff Joe
Arpaio, another Trump ally, in
the Republican primary. The retired Air Force colonel is flying
herself to campaign stops, telling voters she will work with
Trump on border security, a top
issue in her Arizona district.
She also uses “salty language,”
as she calls it — just like the guys
she served with in the military.
She got people’s attention last
year when as a House member,
she stood up in a GOP conference room during discussions
about replacing the Affordable
Care Act and said “let’s get this
f---ing thing done.”
“Sorry if I offended you, but
that is who I am,” McSally said in
an interview. She said most voters appreciate her candid,
straightforward, “even a little
edgy” approach.
“Like our president, I am tired
of PC politicians and their BS
excuses,” McSally said in a video
announcing her Senate bid. “I
am a fighter pilot, and I talk like
one. That’s why I told Washington Republicans to grow a pair
of ovaries and get the job done.”
McGrath, the Kentucky Democrat, said the male-dominated
world of politics makes sense for
female veterans like her. “Success in combat as a fighter pilot
is not gender-dependent,” she
said. “A lot of women out there
kicked butt.”
mary.jordan@washpost.com
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would be taken hostage for political ends.
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The Children’s Health Insurance Program, which
until the most recent stopgap budget deal was starved
for funding, would get another four years of cash,
bringing its total extension to a full 10 years. Another
$90 billion would be pumped into disaster relief. The
Senate plan would also devote $6 billion to the opioid
crisis and $20 billion to infrastructure.
All of these things are good. Congress should have
agreed on them months ago. But they are what used to
be considered the easy part. Instead of raising revenue or reforming big entitlement programs — or,
ideally, both — to pay fully for government operations, senators would add billions more to the debt.
Though they would offset some of the proposal’s cost,
they would not come close to covering all of it. While
they would reap some savings from Medicare, a major
cost driver, they would at the same time abolish the
Independent Payment Advisory Board, one of the few
potential checks on rising health-care spending that
Congress has instituted in the past decade.
The deal reconfirms that there is a lot of agreement
about what the government should be doing and,
therefore, roughly how large it will remain. Lawmakers differ only in their degrees of denial about how
much it costs to provide the services Americans
expect. One month, Republicans pass a massive tax
cut that will add more than $1 trillion to the debt;
next, Democrats join them on a budget plan that hikes
spending. The result is a big, unsustainable gap
between revenue and outlays — just as the nation
should be husbanding its resources for the next
economic crisis and preparing to pay for the baby
boomers’ retirement.
The reality denial is particularly pervasive among
Republicans, who forfeited any moral authority they
claimed on debt when they rammed through that
huge tax bill. Their arguments that tax cuts will pay
for themselves and that lawmakers should simply
fill any gap with deep spending cuts are about
equally preposterous. Now in near-total control of
Washington, they are proving once again that they
care about the debt only when it is a good campaign
issue.
Is it too much to ask that Congress provide a
reasonable level of government service, without
near-constant drama, and pay for it? Apparently so.
TOM TOLES
Ms. Merkel’s
foremost task
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
ENATE LEADERS on Wednesday struck a
far-reaching, two-year budget deal that would
dispense with a bundle of issues that have
bedeviled Washington for years, and they immediately took a victory lap. Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) called it “a significant bipartisan
step forward,” and Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) hailed it as “very good for the American
people.”
The deal would, indeed, do some good. And Senate
leaders deserve credit for talking to one another and
dealing in good faith, a model the House and the
White House have resisted. Too bad it all had to come
at the cost of more debt, confirming yet again that the
only time Washington’s leaders appear able to shake
hands on big deals is when both sides agree to run up
the national tab.
The agreement would, first and foremost, prevent
another government shutdown and end the cycle of
short-term funding crises that lawmakers have been
inflicting on government agencies. Spending caps
that have threatened military preparedness and
domestic programs would be lifted. The debt ceiling
would also be suspended, heading off another episode in which the faith and credit of the United States
. THURSDAY,
Another day, another tiresome editorial whining
about the Washington Redskins name [“Your move,
Mr. Goodell,” Feb. 3]. Never mind that The Post’s own
poll in 2016 found that more than 90 percent of Native
Americans surveyed were just fine with the Redskins
name, thank you. Of course, the editorial conveniently (and disingenuously) didn’t mention that poll.
Let’s face it. The name will not change, because
the team’s ownership and fans do not want it to
change and the poll demonstrated that there is no
real reason to change it. People can kick and scream
all they want, but the phrase “beating a dead horse”
comes to mind. The irony is that The Post’s poll was
one reason the horse died.
Joseph Daly, Arlington
Limiting football’s damage
The reminiscences of former Redskins players in
Leonard Shapiro’s Feb. 4 Outlook essay, “Postgame
report,” were touching and disturbing. The physical
damage these men have sustained from playing
football has become even more distressing as players
have gotten bigger, stronger and faster. What to do to
stop the ever escalating increase in size of football
players? Impose and enforce an overall weight limit
on teams.
Just as the salary cap is imposed to foster
competitiveness, why not a weight cap? Coaches
would have to manage players and positions to
maximize effectiveness, but the benefits to players
and the game would be significant. Players would
not have to artificially gain weight. The premium
would be on skill, not size. The never-ending
technicalities of rules to help avoid injuries (no head
hits, no hits on quarterbacks while throwing, etc.)
have detracted from the flow of the game. A weight
limit would improve player safety and make the
game more enjoyable.
Carol Goodloe, Arlington
Reassess the nuclear triad
The West is counting on her
to shore up her centrist legacy.
The Feb. 4 editorial “An unnecessary nuclear
detour” argued against acquiring a new air-launched
cruise missile armed with a low-yield nuclear warhead. But the broader question that the Nuclear
Posture Review should have broached was whether
the nuclear triad, a creation of the 20th century,
should be extended into the 21st century more or less
equally divided among advanced sea-, air- and landbased systems, or whether the triad should be modified for current and future circumstances.
For example, instead of the B-21 Raider, why could
a conventional bomber armed with cruise missiles
not suffice? Why are replacements for 400 Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missiles warranted? And, to reduce costs, must the most secure leg of
the triad, ballistic-missile submarines, be nuclearpowered?
More to the point, why is the administration not
pursuing serious discussions with Russia and China
over nuclear arms limitations and reductions, confidence-building measures, and means to prevent
accidental or inadvertent use and proliferation at a
time when each of these states is modernizing its
respective nuclear system?
With a new defense strategy that posits Russia,
China, North Korea and Iran as the major potential
adversaries for planning purposes, even an annual
defense budget of $700 billion is not enough. No doubt
our strategic nuclear deterrent must be kept safe,
secure and current. But, in the Wild West, rarely did
cowboys carry three guns. Two were usually enough.
Harlan Ullman, Washington
The writer is a senior adviser
at the Atlantic Council.
G
ERMANY’S TWO big parties have finally
agreed on a new government under Chancellor Angela Merkel, which is both good
news and grounds for worry.
The announcement comes as a relief for many
Germans weary of months of political uncertainty. It
is welcome, too, for a European Union hoping for
more robust support from Berlin. But it offers more
reason for concern about the future of Western
liberal democracy: That the German center-left and
center-right were forced to renew a coalition that
has weakened both of them underlines the growing
strength of the political extremes and raises the
specter that in Germany, as in other Western
nations, the center ultimately may not hold.
Ms. Merkel, chancellor since 2005, has been a
stable and effective leader for Germany and Europe
and, in the past year, a welcome defender of liberal
values, including human rights, in the age of President Trump. Germany’s economy has grown so strong
that the new coalition will have a $55 billion budget
surplus to redistribute on benefits for families, tax
cuts and investments in infrastructure. That will be
cheered by critics who for years have urged Berlin to
spend more as a way of stimulating southern European economies and better balancing trade flows.
To win over the left-leaning Social Democrats
(SPD), Ms. Merkel ended up handing the finance
ministry as well as the foreign ministry to SPD
appointees. With SPD leader Martin Schulz, a
former president of the European Parliament, reported to be headed for the foreign ministry,
Germany could become more amenable to proposals
for strengthening E.U. institutions and the euro — to
the delight of French President Emmanuel Macron.
The first shadow on this seemingly positive
outcome is the possibility it will be rejected by the
SPD’s members, who will vote on it in the next few
weeks. Notably, the party’s youth wing is strenuously
opposed to a new coalition; like leftist young people
in Britain and the United States, young German
progressives are dissatisfied with the compromises
of the center.
The principal opposition to the coalition, meanwhile, will come from the right-wing Alternative for
Germany (AfD) party, whose very name is a rebuff to
Ms. Merkel’s insistent centrism. The coalition’s
answer to the AfD’s strident opposition to immigration is a cap on refugee admissions of 180,000 to
220,000 a year — far below the approximately some
1 million who arrived in 2015. Having once championed the need for Europe to help people fleeing the
carnage of Syria and Afghanistan, Ms. Merkel has
bowed to the populist backlash against them,
though her government will remain more welcom-
ing to refugees than the Trump administration is.
The larger worry is that, with Ms. Merkel’s career
widely perceived to be in its twilight, the strength of
the centrist parties will be further eroded during
another joint government. As it is, both received
their lowest shares of the vote since the 1940s in last
September’s election. If the new coalition falters, the
AfD could be the leading beneficiary. In neighboring
Austria, years of right-left coalitions finally led last
year to the election of a new government including
the far right. Ms. Merkel’s most important task will
be to avoid leaving such a legacy.
Transparency needed
The ethics board should share its reasoning for not reappointing D.C.’s open-government watchdog.
T
HE D.C. official whose job is to ensure
transparency in government has been denied reappointment to a second term. She
blames undue political pressure. Officials
in Mayor Muriel E. Bowser’s (D) administration say
they had nothing to do with the decision. Members
of the ethics board, who decided not to reappoint
Traci L. Hughes as director of the Office of Open
Government, refused comment about their secret
vote.
Here is what needs to happen. The Board of
Ethics and Government Accountability should live
up to its title and provide the public with reasons
for its decision. Ms. Bowser should show her
commitment to open government by calling on the
independent ethics board to do so. And Ms. Hughes
should waive any confidentiality protections that
might bar public discussion of her situation.
Without naming names, Ms. Hughes has said she
faced pushback for some of her actions to get city
agencies to adhere to laws on public disclosure and
open meetings. There is no question that
Ms. Hughes, in office since 2013, has crossed swords
with the administration: She sued the Mayor’s
Advisory Commission on Caribbean Community
Affairs, disagreed with its initial policy governing
release of footage from police body cameras and
questioned the legality of appointments of administrative law judges. Her recent decision faulting the
board of D.C.’s only public hospital for holding a
secret vote was seen as embarrassing to Ms. Bowser,
who appoints members of the independent board,
at a time she is seeking reelection.
Was any of that a factor in the board’s recent
vote not to continue Ms. Hughes’s tenure after her
term expires in April? John Falcicchio, the mayor’s
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Let’s put people ahead of parking
The Feb. 5 Metro article “Good to say ‘I’m home’ ”
was good news. Linwood Blount, a chronically
homeless man on the street for 30 years, found
housing with the help of the right program. Meeting
clients where they are, building trust and having the
right program available that provides needed assistance (rent, supportive case management and health
services) can help build new lives for many people on
whom society has largely given up.
The future of federal funding for such programs
as Permanent Supportive Housing, which helped
Mr. Blount, is uncertain. The District’s commitment
to this program for the chronically homeless with
disabilities and to rental assistance programs for
families who need help with the rent is also
uncertain.
The District is a right-to-shelter city, but it is not a
chief of staff, says no, telling us he is not aware of
any pressure, either overt or subtle, by the
administration to influence the board’s decision.
It is no secret that Ms. Hughes had been at odds
with the board over budget and governance issues,
and there were complaints about her management
style. Certainly she was not automatically entitled
to reappointment. But given the questions that
surround her departure and the importance of
open government, D.C residents are entitled to
more information.
It’s good that the D.C. Council’s judiciary committee has scheduled an oversight hearing on the
ethics board for Thursday. Equally important is
that in selecting a successor to Ms. Hughes, the
board find someone with the strong credentials and
unquestioned independence to insist on sunshine
in city government.
right-to-housing city. Consequently, the District can
take an incremental approach to rental assistance, a
typical political response. A little more money is put
into the rental voucher programs each year, but it’s
never enough to make a real change.
Eight hundred additional rental assistance
vouchers are needed for families living in extreme
poverty who are in shelter now. The cost would be
about $16 million annually. Some would consider
this a dangerous move toward codifying the right to
housing. Others, based on D.C.’s proclaimed progressive values, would consider it a good investment in
our residents and somehow more important than a
parking structure at Union Market.
Ann Friedman, Washington
The writer is a member of the board of the
Good Faith Communities Coalition.
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The goal should be the truth
Regarding E.J. Dionne Jr.’s Feb. 5 op-ed, “Nunes
paves Trump’s road to autocracy”:
Autocracy is roughly defined as a system of government by one person with absolute power. Somehow
Mr. Dionne was trying to sell the notion that we have
an autocratic administration.
The Nunes memo shares information about an
investigation into the current president regarding
potential election collusion with Russia. It shares facts
from the ongoing investigation that were vetted by the
FBI and the Justice Department.
Mr. Dionne quoted a philosopher from a 1951 book
on the totalitarian method, “Mass propaganda discovered that its audience was ready at all times to believe
the worst,” and referred to “the memo” as “a blatant
McCarthyite hit piece.”
Democrats are big on misdirection. Mr. Dionne
mentioned that Fusion GPS was originally contracted
by conservative enemies of now-President Trump.
True enough, and everyone knows this. But the Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee helped pay for the dossier intended to dig up dirt
on Mr. Trump — much of which was not vetted.
Conservative involvement with Fusion GPS ceased
when Mr. Trump won the GOP nomination.
The objective of the memo should be to get at the
truth. A cloud has been hanging over the president for
a year. If the warrants and special counsel appointment were the result of duplicitous justification, the
people have a right to know.
If Democrats want to release their memo, I say fine,
as long as it’s devoid of opinion and vetted by the FBI
and Justice Department.
Kevin McNamara, Vienna
House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin
Nunes (R-Calif.) is getting the same rough ride in Foggy
Bottom given the courageous men of the House Committee on Un-American Activities in the 1940s and
1950s.
Just as every true prophet in the Old Testament was
persecuted, polite Washington society came down
with both feet on anyone exposing Soviet subversion.
Subversives had a lot of friends in high society.
Mr. Nunes’s sin? He’s the point man. The FBI is just
the beginning.
Peter B. Hrycenko, Allentown, Pa.
Michael Gerson’s Feb. 6 op-ed, “This stain will
not wash out,” hit the nail on the head. He wrote: “The
nearly uniform cowardice among elected Republicans
is staggering. One is left wishing that Obamacare
covered spine transplants.” Sadly, that pretty much
defines the Republican Party, which is acting as President Trump’s reelection campaign committee rather
than as elected members of Congress who are supposed to uphold the Constitution, not prop up this
reprehensible excuse for a president.
Nancy Shablom, Haymarket
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
GEORGE F. WILL
CHARLES LANE
Emotional-support
snakes on a plane
A nightmare
for a
democracy
W
hen next you shoehorn yourself into one of America’s
ever-shrinking airline seats,
you might encounter a new
wrinkle in the romance of air travel. You
might be amused, or not, to discover a
midsize — say, seven feet long — boa
constrictor named Oscar coiled contentedly, or so you hope, in the seat next to
you. Oscar is an “emotional-support animal.” He belongs to the person in the seat
on the other side of him, and he is a
manifestation of a new item, or the metastasizing of an old item, on America’s
menu of rights. Fortunately, the federal
government is on the case, so you can
relax and enjoy the flight.
The rapid recent increase of
emotional-support animals in airplane
cabins is an unanticipated consequence
of a federal law passed with the best of
intentions, none of which pertained to
Dexter the peacock, more about whom
anon. In 2013, the Department of Housing and Urban Development told providers of public housing that the Americans
With Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) mandates “reasonable accommodations” for
people who require “assistance animals.”
The Air Carrier Access Act of 1986
allows access to animals trained to provide emotional support. Federal guidelines say airlines must allow even
emotional-support animals that have a
potential to “offend or annoy” passengers, but that airlines are allowed to — let
us not sugarcoat this — discriminate
against some “unusual” animals.
Yet a New York photographer and
performance artist named, according to
the Associated Press, Ventiko recently
was denied the right to board a flight
from Newark to Los Angeles with her
“emotional-support peacock,” for whom
Ventiko had bought a ticket. And there is
a 29-year-old traveler who insists that
she cannot “think about life without”
Stormy, her emotional-support parakeet. So, if Oscar’s owner says Oscar
provides support, and the owner lawyers
up . . .
In contemporary America, where
whims swiftly become necessities en
route to becoming governmentguaranteed entitlements, it is difficult to
draw lines. Besides, lines are discouraged
lest someone (or some species?) be “stigmatized” by being “marginalized.” The
line that JetBlue has drawn dehumanizes
snakes. Yes, they are not technically human, but don’t quibble. Anyway, soon
enough there will be a lobby (“Rights for
Reptiles”?), and lobbies are precursors to
entitlements.
JetBlue is attempting to fly between
the Scylla of passengers discomforted by
a duck waddling down the aisle (even
though it is wearing a diaper; this has
happened more than once) and the Charybdis of animal advocates who are hypersensitive to speciesism, a.k.a. anti-pet
fascism. JetBlue says “unusual animals”
such as “snakes, other reptiles, ferrets,
rodents and spiders” are verboten, even
as emotional-support animals. Southwest rather sternly says that passengers
accompanied by emotional-support animals had better have papers from credentialed experts certifying “a mental or
emotional disability recognized in the
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of
Mental Disorders — Fourth Edition.” But
the DSM already accords the status of
disability to almost every imaginable
human trait or quirk and is eager to
imagine new ones.
Delta experienced a nearly one-year
doubling of what it delicately calls “incidents” (urinating, defecating, biting,
etc.). “Farm poultry,” hedgehogs and
creatures with tusks, among others, are
unwelcome on Delta, which is going to be
alert regarding the booming market for
forged documents attesting to emotional
neediness. The Association of Flight Attendants is pleased, perhaps because one
of its members was asked to give a dog
oxygen because the dog’s owner said it
was having a panic attack.
Now, let us, as the lawyers say, stipulate a few things. Quadrupeds, and nopeds such as Oscar, have done a lot less
damage to the world than bipeds and
often are better mannered than many of
today’s human air travelers. Animals can
be comforting to anyone and can be
therapeutic to the lonely, the elderly with
symptoms of senescence, and soldiers
and others suffering from post-traumatic
stress disorder. Studies have purported
to show that people living with pets
derive myriad benefits, including lower
cholesterol. A Post report said that “horses are used to treat sex addiction.” Thank
you, Post, for not elaborating.
But the proliferation of emotionalsupport animals suggests that a cult of
personal fragility is becoming an aspect
of the quest for the coveted status of
victim. The cult is especially rampant at
colleges and universities, which increasingly embrace the therapeutic mission of
assuaging the anxieties of the emotionally brittle. There, puppies are deployed to
help students cope with otherwise unbearable stresses, such as those caused by
final exams or rumors of conservatism.
georgewill@washpost.com
RUTH MARCUS
Explain the bruises, Mr. Porter
L
ook at the picture. Really. Look at
the picture. The woman’s eye
socket is the sickly green-yellow
of a healing bruise. Around the
eyelid, and in a sickening swoosh underneath, there is the deep plum of blood
pooling around broken capillaries.
The picture, if you haven’t seen it,
shows Colbie Holderness, one of two
ex-wives who have accused senior White
House aide Rob Porter of physically
abusing them. Porter, in the statement
announcing his resignation Wednesday,
declared that “these outrageous allegations are simply false. I took the photos
given to the media nearly 15 years ago
and the reality behind them is nowhere
close to what is being described.”
Okay, then, explain the photo, which
Holderness says was taken after Porter
punched her in the face on a trip to
Florence. Bruises like this are not selfinflicted. Why does it matter who took
the photo? The question is: Who committed the assault?
Explain Holderness’s description, to
the Daily Mail, which broke the story, of
how, on their honeymoon, Porter “was
angry because we weren’t having sex
when he wanted to have sex and he
kicked me. . . . That was the first time he
hurt me and then the doors opened. I
didn’t do anything and it continued.” It
always does, by the way. Once is never
enough for abusers.
Explain the request for an emergency
protective order from Jennifer Willoughby, Porter’s second wife, after, she
said, Porter “punched in the glass on the
door” of their apartment when he refused to leave, in violation of their
separation agreement. Explain the finding that “reasonable grounds exist to
believe that [Porter] has committed family abuse and there is probable danger of
a further such offense.” Explain Willoughby’s description, in a blog post, of
how her husband “pulled me, naked and
dripping, from the shower to yell at me.”
Explain how this man could have
been allowed to work at the White House
after his ex-wives described this abusive
behavior to the FBI.
Explain how White House Chief of
Staff John F. Kelly, who reportedly knew
of the FBI reports, could assert, in a
statement circulated before and after
the abuse photos emerged, “Rob Porter
is a man of true integrity and honor and I
can’t say enough good things about him.
He is a friend, a confidante and a trusted
professional.”
Yes, true integrity. Take a look at that
photo, Gen. Kelly, and tell me how a man
of integrity behaves.
Explain, finally, how the White House,
with this information public, can allow a
man such as this to continue, even for a
single additional day, to work there.
Let me proffer two categories of explanation. The first involves the reflexive
tribalism of any entity, especially one
that feels itself under siege. The Trump
administration suffers from a singularly
morally bankrupt strain of this tribalism, in which loyalty to President Trump
is prized above all else and failings are
ignored, especially failings that echo
those of the president himself.
Recall how, after then-Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski was
shown on video assaulting Breitbart
reporter Michelle Fields, Trump described him as “a very decent man.”
Recall how Trump’s first wife, Ivana,
used the word “rape” in a divorce deposition to describe how her husband sexually assaulted her in a fit of rage; Ivana
later said she did not “want my words to
be interpreted in a literal or criminal
sense” but that “as a woman, I felt
violated.”
But there is another phenomenon at
work here that goes beyond the seeno-evil enablers of the Trump administration. It involves our continued societal resistance to the notion that domestic abuse knows no class barriers — that
the best and the brightest are among the
perpetrators. The wifebeater shirt can
equally be a pinstripe suit.
Consider Porter, the seeming golden
boy. Harvard University. Rhodes scholar. Republican bona fides (his father,
Roger Porter, worked for President
George H.W. Bush; Rob Porter served as
chief of staff to Utah Sen. Orrin G.
Hatch) to match what the Deseret News
called his “strong Latter-day Saint pedigree.” A man like that wouldn’t abuse his
wife, would he?
I learned differently, early in my career, writing about the case of John
Fedders, who resigned as enforcement
chief at the Securities and Exchange
Commission in 1985, after his wife accused him of years of beatings. “It
happens to all classes of people,” a
domestic abuse counselor told me then.
“It’s just that when you have that much
land around your house the screams are
not heard by the neighbors.”
The related delusion is that this private behavior has no public relevance,
that the two can be conveniently separated. Indeed, Willoughby herself expressed this view. “I have the utmost
respect for him professionally,” she told
the Intercept. “If there was to be a staff
secretary in the Trump administration I
hope to God it is Rob.”
Not me. Not anyone who understands
the true meaning of integrity.
ruthmarcus@washpost.com
S
“We don’t parade. We train and we fight,
all right?” he told host Jon Scott.
Jennifer Griffin, Fox News’s national
security correspondent, appeared on-air
at least twice Wednesday afternoon to
note that Pentagon officials had responded with a “collective eye-roll” and
had initially regarded the whole idea as a
joke. Military brass, said Griffin, have
“much more pressing issues” in front of
them than “planning a parade.”
Host Shepard Smith turned the anchor voice to the max-snark setting at the
top of the 3 p.m. hour: “And nations like
Russia, France and North Korea hold
regular military parades. Washington
hasn’t seen one since, like, 1991. But
President Trump says it’s time to roll out
the tanks. ‘I want a parade!’ ”
Here’s hoping, for once, that the president was tuning in to Fox News, the
better to effect a flip-flop from this
embarrassing idea.
Trouble is, he might just have hit the
wrong segment. In the 8 a.m. hour
Wednesday, the notion of tanks roaring
down Pennsylvania Avenue received a
vote of confidence from Fox News White
House correspondent Kevin Corke in a
report for “Fox & Friends.” “I gotta tell
you: That looks like it would be an
absolute blast. Ideally it would happen
on the Fourth of July weekend. I’d love to
see it. I’m sure we would have the show
right down here,” said Corke from the
White House lawn. “Can I just put out a
call for that? ‘Fox & Friends’ live on the
Mall if it happens.”
ome of the most effective intelligence
agencies in history have served the
most odious dictatorships. The Soviet KGB, the East German Stasi,
Cuban state security — many American
intelligence pros ruefully concede that
these services ran rings around Western
counterparts, even if some of the regimes
they served eventually collapsed anyway.
This is no accident. One-party states, as
that descriptor implies, combine a certain
unity of purpose with total insulation from
democratic accountability. This gives their
secret agents latitude to get the job done,
through extortion, infiltration, assassination — whatever it takes.
In a multiparty democracy, by contrast,
such methods go against the political grain.
The government may resort to them, but its
mandate is a bit tentative. The government
depends, crucially, on an underlying, voluntary political consensus strong enough to
support the inevitable moral trade-offs.
Israel is a fractious democracy, but with
wide agreement about securing an embattled Jewish state; Mossad performs accordingly.
And that brings us to the United States,
where the current attacks on the Federal
Bureau of Investigation by President Trump
and the Republican Party raise the question
of whether it’s possible to maintain an
effective, and legitimate, intelligence establishment, while the elected leaders who are
supposed to control it engage in openended, winner-take-all, partisan conflict.
Bipartisan consensus has played a crucial but underappreciated role in the history of U.S. intelligence.
The United States developed no real national intelligence agency in the 19th century, while European states such as France,
Russia and Prussia did.
Partly this was due to small-government
constitutional norms on this side of the
Atlantic; but mistrust between American
political factions was another inhibiting
factor.
Only when sectional and partisan battles
gave way to new international responsibilities, and (relative) domestic harmony, in the
20th century could Republicans and Democrats define shared national interests and
accept the need for permanent secret agencies to protect them.
This consensus almost broke down amid
the revelations of major abuses by the FBI
and CIA during the 1960s and 1970s. Bipartisan reforms — enhanced congressional
oversight, coupled with limited judicial review of spying by the Foreign Intelligence
Surveillance Court (FISC) — salvaged it.
Now Trump is consciously attacking the
very concept of bipartisan consensus, recasting it not as a manifestation of healthy
national unity but as an inherently corrupt
bargain that spawns a “deep state.” He and
House Intelligence Committee Chairman
Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) might be doing so
opportunistically, enacting a parody of congressional oversight in service of selfish
short-term political interests. Still, they are
tapping a deep vein of American thought —
a suspicion of secret government whose
roots go all the way back to the founding.
It’s the same vein that Edward Snowden
and his supporters on the left tapped in
their revelations about the National Security Agency, and Democrats on the Senate
Intelligence Committee tapped when they
brought out a damning report on the CIA
torture that took place during President
George W. Bush’s administration.
What’s more, even paranoids have real
enemies. Suppose a Democratic president’s
Justice Department really did use
Democratic-funded opposition research,
unverified and insufficiently disclosed, to
get a secret warrant from the FISC to spy on
a former Republican campaign adviser.
Would that be perfectly okay?
In short, the American national consensus about intelligence, and many other
things, was already in deep trouble long
before Trump came on the scene. If there
were still a robust political center, Trump
never would have been elected in the first
place.
Acting on instinct as much as anything
else, the president is now exploiting the
instability and confusion to neutralize
threats to his power, the most salient of
which, in the short term, is the investigation
by Robert S. Mueller III. Full co-optation of
the intelligence community could be his
grand prize later on.
It is futile to count on the FBI itself — a
“pillar of society,” as a New York Times
headline strangely called it — to check
Trump, even though many people who
should know better seem to be doing just
that.
When Phil Mudd, a former top official of
both the CIA and FBI, warns on television
that the FBI is “ticked” at Trump and preparing to “win” against the elected president, it only feeds Trump’s “deep state”
narrative.
“Those who would counter the illiberalism of Trump with the illiberalism of unfettered bureaucrats would do well to contemplate the precedent their victory would set,”
Tufts University constitutional scholar Michael J. Glennon warns in a 2017 Harper’s
article.
We are witnessing a democratic nightmare: partisan competition over secret and
semi-secret
intelligence
and
lawenforcement agencies. And as Glennon
notes, it would be unwise to bet against
Trump; he has favors to dispense and punishments to dish out.
Alone among all the others blundering
about in the ruins of America’s shattered
political consensus, he knows exactly what
he wants.
— Erik Wemple
lanec@washpost.com
THIERRY CHESNOT/GETTY IMAGES
President Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron during the
Bastille Day military parade in Paris on July 14, 2017.
E.J. DIONNE JR.
The problem with
Trump’s parade
M
ilitary parades, “treasonous” opponents — do you
sense a pattern here?
President Trump is such a
master of the politics of distraction
that everything he says and does is
assumed to be a diversion from something more important, the Russia collusion issue above all.
It’s certainly true that in Trump’s
exotic circus of scandal and outrage,
many stories that would have engulfed
earlier administrations roll right off
the back of the news cycle. Consider,
for starters, his profiting while president from his resorts and golf courses,
his alleged payoff of a porn star, and
the resignation of the director of the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over conflicts of interest.
On the substance of policy, he can
govern largely by stealth. Discussion
of the decisions his administration has
made on a range of regulatory, environmental, labor, health-care and tax
matters gets pushed to the bottom of
the public agenda.
It will thus be tempting to dismiss
Trump’s desire to have a big military
parade as yet another ploy to change
the subject. Trump knows perfectly
well that many liberals are uneasy
with massive demonstrations of military strength, so some who might raise
their voices in dissent could draw back
out of fear that he is baiting them and
that they’ll play into his hands. Trump
clearly longs to be the lead figure on
the reviewing stand gazing out on the
tanks and missiles as a tribute to his
own power, while casting his critics as
unpatriotic foes of our men and women in uniform.
But this is precisely why his parade
proposal should be treated as dangerous and not simply another bout of
Trumpian ego enhancement. It comes
within days of Trump’s charge that
Democrats who did not stand and
cheer him during his State of the
Union address could be guilty of “treason.”
When a leader who often praises
strongmen abroad defines routine political opposition as disloyalty to country and then suggests hauling out the
military to march in our streets as he
looks down from on high, friends of
freedom should take notice. Those
who challenge the portrayals of Trump
as an authoritarian or an autocrat
because our freedoms are still intact
miss the point. In enduring democracies such as ours, liberty is eroded
slowly by politicians who undermine
the norms and practices that protect
it. There is good reason that we have
not made military parades a standard
part of our patriotic repertoire.
Trump said he got this idea from
France, our democratic ally whose
Bastille Day military procession goes
back 138 years. This gives him cover
because spectacles of the sort Trump
has in mind are associated less with
free nations than with dictatorships in
Russia, North Korea, China, and the
totalitarian regimes of the 1930s.
The United States, born in republican opposition to royalist rule, has
been properly reticent about flaunting
our formidable arsenal, typically limiting such displays to celebrations of
war victories. This is in keeping with a
tradition that regularly honors those
who sacrifice to defend our country,
but resolutely limits the political role
of the armed forces.
There is also an element of pragmatism in our shunning of martial ostentatiousness. Our military is, as Defense Secretary Jim Mattis has said,
“the world’s most feared and trusted
force.” There is no need to prove this
with a pageant of might that is at least
as likely to inspire resentment as respect — especially since it is now
inevitable that even our friends
abroad would see Trumpian excess in
this break with our past, as Rick Noack
noted in The Post.
Mattis has done better than most
Trump appointees in avoiding complicity with the president’s worst abuses. Perhaps Mattis has decided to
preserve his influence by humoring
Trump’s parade envy. Here’s hoping
that instead, a Marine who knows
what genuine battlefield heroism entails will find a way to sideline this
very bad idea.
He might persuade Trump to contain his self-indulgence and spend the
money a parade would cost on scholarships for the children of wounded
warriors and those who have died in
battle, or to help homeless vets. This is
what real patriotism looks like.
Dwight D. Eisenhower, the last
great general to serve as president,
urged “an alert and knowledgeable
citizenry” to mesh the “huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and
goals, so that security and liberty may
prosper together.” Trump’s parade is
the antithesis of Ike’s prudence and his
commitment to safeguarding our democracy.
ejdionne@washpost.com
ERIK WEMPLE
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/erik-wemple
Could Fox News
kill the parade?
Showy displays of patriotism, the U.S.
military and a Republican president:
Fox News adores all three of these things,
as 20-plus years of broadcasting amply
attest. Now they’re all coming together
in President Trump’s wish that the Pentagon stage a military parade to one-up
the version he witnessed on Bastille Day
last year in Paris, as The Post reported on
Tuesday.
So Fox News broke out the pompoms,
right?
Not really. “I don’t know. It seems like
a waste of money,” said “Fox & Friends”
co-host Brian Kilmeade on Wednesday
morning.
Later in the morning, retired Lt. Col.
Ralph Peters, a Fox News strategic analyst, blasted the idea in a chat with host
Bill Hemmer. After Hemmer took a shot
at the media for comparing a U.S. military parade to similar spectacles in
Russia and North Korea — and pointing
out that the model is non-authoritarian
France — Peters said: “Bill, I served in
the military for almost 22 years, enlisted
man and officer. Let me tell you: I value
our tradition of civilian control of the
military. . . . I don’t like the image of
heavy weapons parading through our
streets and the streets of American cities. . . . We would throw the training
schedules out the window.”
Moving right ahead, retired Gen. Jack
Keane summed up his feelings this way:
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
Education Re-Imagined
We are pleased to announce the creation of a global network of schools, with innovations focused
on how students learn as well as what they learn. Guided one-on-one by exceptional faculty, Whittle students will
achieve a breadth of knowledge while having the time and resources for in-depth exploration of a particular passion.
Studying abroad at our other campuses will help students build language skills and cultural competencies
as they learn to be compassionate stewards of the world. From ages three to 18, interdisciplinary, project-based work
will prepare students to face the future’s most complex and exciting challenges.
The culmination of four years of development by hundreds of educators, experts, architects, and planners,
our first campuses in Shenzhen, China and Washington, D.C., will open in September 2019, with more campuses
to be announced this year. Each campus will serve over 2,000 day and boarding students in beautifully crafted
educational, athletic, performance, and dormitory facilities designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop.
Rendering of the Whittle campus in Shenzhen
Rendering of the Whittle campus at 4,000 Connecticut Avenue, Washington, D.C.
We invite prospective students, parents, and faculty members to visit us at whittleschool.org
and sign up to attend one of our Information Events in Shenzhen and Washington, D.C.
WHITTLESCHOOL.ORG
ILLUSTRATION: VIOLETA LÓPIZ; RENDERINGS: RENZO PIANO BUILDING WORKSHOP
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
KLMNO
METRO
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
High today at
approx. 3 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
28 34 37 32°
°
°
°
39°
Precip: 0%
Wind: NW
8-16 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
SU
THE DISTRICT
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
OBITUARIES
D.C. Council hopefuls field
questions from residents
on a raft of hot-button
progressive issues. B4
Skyping. Texting. Flossing?
Our roads are plagued by
DWDSE: Driving while
doing something else. B3
Fiscal conservative Joe
Knollenberg of Michigan
served eight terms in the
U.S. House with the GOP. B6
Education entrepreneur’s latest venture includes a China campus, with plans for many more
Hogan’s
o∞ce says
transit chief
‘misspoke’
‘BLANK CHECK’ OFFER
TO LURE AMAZON
Secretary’s remarks clash
with governor’s platform
BY R OBERT M C C ARTNEY
AND K ATHERINE S HAVER
PHOTOS BY SARAH L. VOISIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
D.C. private school has global ambition
BY
A
2,500 students within five years
of opening at a tuition comparable to what elite private schools
charge in the Washington area.
(Sidwell Friends, with about
1,150 students, costs $40,840 a
year.) About 500 are expected to
live in dormitories, and the rest
will be day students. Some scholarships will be available, but the
target audience is hardly the
typical D.C. family.
“He’s going to shake up the
independent school market in
Washington,” said Thomas Toch,
director of the FutureEd think
tank at Georgetown University,
who previously led the Association of Independent Schools of
Greater Washington.
Some affluent parents might
be curious about what Toch
called “a new and flashy schooling option,” and others might be
skeptical. “With the families he’s
pursuing, he’ll have to deliver on
several levels,” Toch said, “or
they’ll just go elsewhere.”
In video, defendant tells
of online chats, first sight
of girl in Blacksburg
BY
gressive resistance.
“I don’t think anyone believes
this would be about trying to
honor men and women who
serve our country,” said council
member Charles Allen (D-Ward
6). “This would only be about
feeding one man’s ego.”
Council member David Grosso
(I-At Large) said that if Trump
holds a military parade, he
would organize “an equally large
parade and march for peace and
for nonviolence” to take place
simultaneously.
“Maybe this can be a rallying
cry for people to come to the
nation’s capital and have a demonstration for peace,” he said.
Trump had long mused about
Eisenhauer, then 18, crossed his
arms and leaned over a table as
FBI Special Agent Travis Witt
questioned him about the January 2016 disappearance of Nicole Lovell.
The interview, captured on video and played in court this week,
came as a huge search was underway for the 13-year-old girl. Evidence gathered so far had led
police to Eisenhauer.
The then-Virginia Tech student
explained he had been messaging
a girl in an anonymous online
chat room in mid-December 2015
and then through Kik, another
social media platform. He didn’t
know her name, and she said she
was 16 or 17, he said.
By the end of January, they
agreed to meet up, but when he
arrived at her house, he told
Witt he saw “someone who is
maybe 11 years old climb out of a
window” and thought “Uh, uh —
not for me.” He eventually took
off without her, and there was
nothing sexual to their relationship, he said.
“I deleted Kik, Snapchat —
everything I had she possibly
could have access to because I
wanted nothing to do with that,”
he said.
Later in the interview, Witt
said, “Tell us where she is.”
“I told you — I do not know
where she is,” Eisenhauer re-
PARADE CONTINUED ON B2
EISENHAUER CONTINUED ON B5
The space-age building at 4000 Connecticut Ave. NW will house the
Whittle School & Studios, set to open in fall 2019. Chris Whittle, top, is
calling it “the first modern school,” with a heavy focus on “personalized
education.” His long-term goal is to have 36 campuses in 15 countries, with
90,000 students and 10,000 teachers.
PRIVATE CONTINUED ON B2
BY F ENIT N IRAPPIL
AND P ETER J AMISON
BY
P ERRY S TEIN
Enrollment in the District’s
traditional public schools declined slightly this academic
year, breaking six years of consecutive growth, according to
figures released this week by the
Office of the State Superintendent of Education.
But enrollment in public charter schools grew by 4.5 percent,
with those institutions accounting for nearly half of all public
school students in the District.
D.C. Public Schools — the
traditional system run by a chancellor appointed by the mayor —
lost 400 students this year, bringing its total enrollment to
48,144 students. This puts the
school system short of a 2014
goal of enrolling 50,000 students
by 2017, and it makes the objective of enrolling 54,000 students
within four years a greater challenge.
ENROLL CONTINUED ON B3
E LLIE S ILVERMAN
christiansburg, va. — David
D.C. public schools see D.C. rains on Trump’s military parade
slight dip in enrollment
Officials pan idea,
But tally shows charter
academies grew by 4.5%
this academic year
AMAZON CONTINUED ON B5
Ex-student
on trial in
death of
13-year-old
N ICK A NDERSON
n education company
backed by U.S. and
Chinese investors is
launching a global private school for students ages 3 to 18, with the first
two campuses scheduled to open
next year in Washington and the
Chinese coastal city of Shenzhen.
Whittle School & Studios will
offer foreign-language immersion — Chinese in the United
States, English in China — with a
curriculum centered on mastery
of core academic subjects,
student-driven projects and offcampus learning opportunities
in major world cities.
On Thursday, veteran education entrepreneur Chris Whittle
plans to announce the debut of
the D.C. campus in fall 2019 at a
prominent site near a cluster of
embassies — the striking aluminum and glass edifice at 4000
Connecticut Ave. NW once
known as the Intelsat building.
The campus aims to enroll
The office of Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) on Wednesday
backed away from comments
made by his transportation chief
that the state has promised Amazon.com a “blank check” for transportation improvements to lure
the company’s second headquarters to Montgomery County.
“Obviously Secretary [Pete K.]
Rahn misspoke,” said Doug Mayer,
Hogan’s communications director.
“The transportation portion of the
Amazon incentive package will include targeted investments in both
transit and roads that will be financed over at least 10 years. It will
be funded fully and appropriately.”
Hogan, who is seeking reelection, took the unusual step of contradicting a member of his senior
leadership team apparently out of
concern that offering a “blank
check” did not fit with his oftstated positions favoring fiscal responsibility and opposing tax increases.
Rahn, who declined to discuss
his comments further Wednesday,
raised eyebrows Tuesday when he
told state senators during his
agency’s budget hearing that
Maryland will “provide whatever
is necessary to Amazon when they
need it. . . . For all practical
The D.C. Council had a simple
message on Twitter for President
Trump’s proposed grand military
parade down Pennsylvania Avenue: “Tanks but No Tanks!”
Local officials are panning the
prospect of an unprecedented
show of military force that would
leave the city on the hook for
security, cleanup and road repair
— even if the federal government
reimburses its costs later.
The early jeers suggest the
tensions ahead if Trump proceeds with an elaborate procession in a city that overwhelmingly voted against him and has
emerged as an epicenter of pro-
citing high costs and
calling it ego-driven
“Sadly, the Giant
Tank Parade is
cancelled.
Permanently.”
A D.C. Council tweet
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
Whittle is a pioneer in charter-school movement
PRIVATE FROM B1
In the rarefied world of elite
private education, tradition
matters, and “new” is often a
hard sell. To bolster the credibility of the venture, Whittle has
assembled a leadership team
with prominent names in education, including Nicholas Dirks,
former chancellor of the University of California at Berkeley,
and James Hawkins, headmaster of the venerable Harrow
School in London.
Whittle, a pioneer in the U.S.
charter-school movement, is betting on demand for an internationalist brand of education that
also seeks to turn a profit. In a
company manifesto, he dismissed “the old world of schooling,” which he says was “focused
almost entirely on educating
groups of children.” Instead, he
wrote, the world needs more
“personalized education.”
The goal, Whittle said in an
interview, “is let’s build a better
school. More specifically, let’s
build the first modern school.”
Plans call for a rollout of 36
campuses in 15 countries within
a decade.
Those are audacious targets in
a field crowded with visionary
ideas that often fall short in
practice.
The new venture marks the
second time in recent years that
Whittle has sought to push a
for-profit school into the upper
echelon of private elementary
and secondary education. In
2012, he led the launch of Avenues: The World School in New
York. That start-up, next to the
High Line park in the Chelsea
neighborhood, now has more
than 1,500 students. It lured
Evan Glazer, principal of Northern Virginia’s acclaimed public
Thomas Jefferson High School
for Science and Technology, last
year to lead the school.
Most top private schools in the
United States are nonprofit or
religious institutions.
Whittle said the structure of
the new school — based in New
York, incorporated in the Cayman
Islands — is simply a means to an
end: “We are using the mechanism of the capital markets to do
what we want to do. What we
want to do is build a great school
. . . This is a for-profit institution,
but it’s deeply committed to what
it’s doing.”
Among his recruits, Dirks will
be chancellor, and Hawkins will
be global head of all schools. The
president is Ian Thomas, a former senior executive with the
Boeing Co. in Europe, Australia
and Asia.
Leading a global advisory
board are Benno Schmidt, former president of Yale University,
and Jean Liu, president of the
Chinese ride-sharing company
Didi Chuxing.
Hawkins said he was drawn
by the project’s emphasis on
student creativity, social responsibility and global exchange.
Students will be encouraged to
study at one or more campuses
abroad. Ten to 15 percent will be
offered need-based financial
aid.
“If you look at the scale and
holding an American military
parade similar to the Bastille Day
celebration he witnessed in
France that featured uniformed
troops, armored vehicles and
fighter jets flying overhead. It
apparently turned into a presidential directive when Trump
met with top Pentagon generals
in January, officials told The
Washington Post.
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D)
— whose administration is responsible for much of the city
services associated with a parade — was skeptical about the
idea.
“We would always be concerned about the impact on the
city, the impact on safety, the
impact on pulling personnel,
the impact on our roadways,
and quite frankly, the attention
it would attract,” Bowser said
Wednesday. “Usually when you
see big military parades, it’s
celebrating an end of a war, and
I don’t think that’s been announced.”
Her spokeswoman, Anu Ran-
ambition of what’s being done
here, you could ask the question
how else could it be done without
huge investment,” Hawkins said.
“The for-profit model does make
sense, I think, when considering
that.”
For Whittle, 70, the school
represents perhaps his final act
in decades of educational ventures. He began his career in
media, establishing a business
that for a time owned Esquire
magazine. In 1989, he launched
Channel One, a program delivering news and advertising in
schools. Critics said it exposed
students to too many commercials.
In the early 1990s, the Tennessee native teamed with
Schmidt to found Edison
Schools, which sought to improve public schools through
alternative management. The
for-profit company generated
controversy and mixed results,
falling far short of its lofty
reform goals. It weathered a
rocky financial period in the
early years of the last decade
and later reorganized under
new leadership. But under
Whittle, Edison also helped fuel
what was then a nascent charter-school movement, including
the Friendship Public Charter
Schools in the District.
Whittle serves on the boards
of Friendship and of the Center
for Education Reform, which
supports charter schools, private school vouchers and educational choice.
His new school plans to sponsor trips for D.C. Friendship
students to China. Donald L.
Hense, chairman of the Friendship board, said Whittle has had
“tremendous impact” on a charter network with more than
4,200 students in the city.
Global education has long
been a passion for Whittle. Avenues, in Manhattan, was conceived as a global project. It
expects to open a sister campus
in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in August.
But Whittle, who resigned
from Avenues in 2015, wants to
scale up fast. He has shuttled
between New York and China in
recent years, lining up equity,
leadership and design teams for
his new school. He said the
school has raised $168 million
for operations and coordinated
$450 million to finance the
upgrade and construction of its
campuses.
His board roster includes executives in investment firms
such as Hony Capital in China.
The cost of renovating the 4000
Connecticut building is expected to be $185 million.
None of the financing comes
from the Chinese government,
Whittle said. “It is all private.
We receive no special subsidies,
and we are a taxpayer.”
One morning this week, Whittle showed off demonstration
classrooms and dorm rooms at
what will become his school’s
D.C. home.
Built in the 1980s for a tele-
gappa, added that the city would
have more to say once it hears
from the Pentagon or the White
House. “In the meantime, we do
know that just like the wall, he
will have to pay for it,” she said.
Christopher Rodriguez, who
leads the District’s homeland
security and emergency management agency, said the city is
positioned to handle a military
parade but is concerned about
rising costs and declining congressional funding for providing
security for federal government
events. He said the city recovered only two-thirds of an estimated $30 million local spending on the inauguration.
An obvious cost of a military
parade would be repaving asphalt wrecked by tanks and
other heavy vehicles riding
down Pennsylvania Avenue, last
repaved after Trump’s inauguration. One of the U.S. Army’s most
common armored vehicles, the
Bradley Fighting Vehicle, for
example, weighs 27.6 tons —
about 14 times heavier than a
2016 Chrysler 300 sedan.
Council member Mary M.
THE DAILY QUIZ
Cheh (D-Ward 3), who chairs the
transportation committee, said
any worries about impacts to
city roads pale in comparison to
the message sent by such a
parade. “I don’t want to be
Russia or North Korea, I don’t
want to be a totalitarian state,
and this is straight from their
playbook,” she said.
Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton
(D-D.C.), the city’s nonvoting
representative in the U.S.
House, said Wednesday that the
parade would be a waste of
money and that she would seek
federal funds to offset any costs
it imposed on the District.
“While the District of Columbia, as the nation’s capital, is
proud to host grand federal
celebrations, such as the inauguration, we will fight a shutdown of our city that simply
assuages Trump’s desire to brag
and boast in a series of tweets,”
Norton said.
As winter weather coated
parts of the region with ice on
Wednesday, the D.C. Council’s
official Twitter account, in jest,
reminded followers that the
MEMBER EXCLUSIVES
government and schools were
open but “sadly, the Giant Tank
Parade is cancelled. Permanently.”
While the city could take
symbolic measures to oppose
the parade, it has little power to
dictate what the Pentagon and
the federal government do.
“The reality, though, is that
we can’t stop the president from
marching,” Grosso said.
There are other ways to register discontent with federal
events: The council mulled
downgrading stands during the
inauguration, and only three of
the 13 members attended the
festivities as Trump was sworn
into office.
Mark Plotkin, a D.C. political
activist and commentator, said
the parade presents an unusual
opportunity for the District’s
mayor and council to grab the
president’s attention.
“If they had the chutzpah and
guts to say, ‘We’re not participating, you can’t use public
works, the police are not going
to be available’ — maybe that
would provoke some indigna-
J USTIN J OUVENAL
tion,” he said.
After The Post published a
story Tuesday revealing the
plans for the parade, White
House press secretary Sarah
Huckabee Sanders issued a
statement saying the display is
about honoring the troops.
“President Trump is incredibly supportive of America’s
great service members who risk
their lives every day to keep our
country safe,” Sanders said. “He
has asked the Department of
Defense to explore a celebration
at which all Americans can show
their appreciation.”
Lacy MacAuley, a D.C. activist
and self-described anti-fascist
who was involved in protests on
the day of Trump’s inauguration,
was skeptical a parade will take
place but said demonstrators
would show up to decry what
she called a “preposterous” display of military might.
“If it became something that
had a time and date, I believe
that absolutely you could expect
to see counterprotesting there,”
MacAuley said.
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
justin.jouvenal@washpost.com
PHOTOS BY SARAH L. VOISIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
According to a story in this week’s
Local Living section on eco-friendly
living, what is the best time to water
your lawn?
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
Fairfax fire
department
probe
launched
Fairfax County officials announced Wednesday that they
will investigate claims that the
county’s fire department is doing
little to curb sexual harassment
and mistreatment of women in
the ranks.
Battalion Chief Kathleen Stanley outlined the allegations in a
scathing letter she submitted last
month, announcing her resignation as interim director of the fire
department’s women’s program.
Department leaders dispute the
claims.
“This position is for show with
no legitimate authority, respect
or value,” Stanley wrote in the
letter. “Advice, advocacy and suggestions are humored, at best,
and routinely dismissed.”
Stanley detailed a long list of
complaints, including claims that
a “seasoned Captain” was retaliated against after seeking an apology for sexual harassment, that a
small group of men receive exclusive privileges and that department claims of “zero tolerance”
for sexual harassment are hollow.
“Fairfax County takes very seriously any behavior that threatens
a safe, respectful and professional
work environment,” said Sharon
S. Bulova (D), chairman of the
county board of supervisors.
Fairfax County Fire Chief Richard R. Bowers Jr. defended the
department at a news conference
last week, saying a recent survey
of female firefighters found
95 percent reported being satisfied with the department’s culture. He said the department has
been working diligently to become a better place for women to
work.
“To our community, please
know that the men and women of
this department work hard to
ensure a welcoming and safe environment for all residents and
employees,” Bowers said. “We
stand behind and support all of
our personnel.”
The department employs
roughly 165 women in a workforce of about 1,400.
The department is highly regarded nationally but has been
dogged for years by complaints
and lawsuits claiming female firefighters have been sexually harassed and top brass has done
little to investigate or stem the
problems.
In 2016, a handful of women
came forward with such claims
after the suicide of a female firefighter, which became national
news. It’s not known why Nicole
Mittendorff took her life, but
lewd and harassing comments
were made about her in a local
online forum that appeared to
come from people within the department.
Despite an investigation, the
department said it was never able
to determine who posted the
comments.
The anger surrounding Mittendorff’s case prompted county
officials to commission a report
on the culture of the department,
which was released in February 2017 and found significant
problems. A survey found that
nearly 40 percent of firefighters
reported experiencing or witnessing harassment, bullying and discrimination. It also showed some
were dissatisfied with the department’s leadership.
“Poor leadership behaviors are
driving a negative culture,” the
report found. “These behaviors
include a lack of accountability,
lack of integrity, lack of consistency and most importantly, a lack of
trust.”
In the wake of Stanley’s letter
becoming public, Steve Mittendorff, Nicole’s Mittendorff’s widower, called for Bowers’s resignation last week.
“Shortly after the suicide of my
wife Nicole, a promise was made
to me by the Department that
every effort to educate and reshape the culture of this male
dominated profession would be
met; ultimately, to provide every
female or male a safe place to
work free of harassment by others and one that is open to progressive change,” Mittendorff
wrote in a statement.
communications satellite organization, on a site owned by
the State Department, the
space-age office complex designed by Australian architect
John Andrews is laid out as a
series of octagonal pods with
soaring atriums. The exterior
will remain the same, but Italian
architect Renzo Piano (among
his credits are the Pompidou
Center in Paris) is redesigning
the interior.
Whittle is fixated on details:
the double-thick glass walls to
let light into classrooms but
muffle noise, the choices yet to
be made between rolling glass
boards and whiteboards for instruction, the arrangement of
desks in seminar-style circles,
the tilting and swiveling action
of chairs students will use.
“We’re not for a ‘fancy’
school,” he said. “We’re for a
well- designed school.”
Neighboring the new school
are the University of the District
of Columbia and the embassies
of China, Jordan, Israel and
several other nations. Whittle’s
team has much to do before
opening day in September 2019:
prepare the campus, hire the
faculty, recruit the students. The
same process is unfolding simultaneously in Shenzhen, a
major Chinese city next to Hong
Kong. The next two campuses
are planned for China in 2020 in
Hangzhou and Nanjing, with
more to follow in Los Angeles,
London, Mumbai and elsewhere. In all, Whittle said, he
wants 90,000 students worldwide and 10,000 teachers.
The chances that the school
won’t open? “Zero,” Whittle said.
“Zero. The fleet has long since
left the port.”
nick.anderson@washpost.com
‘Tanks but No Tanks’: D.C. o∞cials slam Trump military parade
PARADE FROM B1
VIRGINIA
BY
TOP: Built in the 1980s for a
telecommunications satellite
organization, the Connecticut
Avenue building’s interior is
being redesigned by Italian
architect Renzo Piano.
LEFT: Chris Whittle, center,
meets Monday with school
President Ian Thomas and Li
Jing, global head of enrollment,
marketing and
communications.
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
DID YOU KNOW?
No “Lion”: Free Tickets to the Opening Night of The Wiz
on March 14 at Ford’s Theatre
A “Howl” of a Deal: Specially Priced Tickets to The Lathe
of Heaven on February 18 at Spooky Action Theater
Ease on down the road with Dorothy, Scarecrow, Tinman and Lion on their
quest to meet The Wiz. In this adaptation of L. Frank Baum’s novel, Dorothy is
whisked away by a tornado to the fanciful land of Oz. There, she and her sidekicks
encounter Munchkins, flying monkeys and a power-hungry witch. Winner of
seven Tony Awards, The Wiz is a musical feast of soul, gospel, R&B and pop. See
details at washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Events & Contests.
Blessed – or cursed – with dreams that alter reality, George Orr comes under the
hand of a doctor eager to exploit this amazing phenomenon. As the doctor uses his
patient to tinker with reality, unintended consequences ensue. Finally, the world
itself begins to dissolve. In one last leap, the dreamer risks all and a maelstrom of
change resolves in a final reality where lost love may be regained and balanced
restored. See details at washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Coupons & Discounts.
Not a PostPoints member yet?
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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
It’s one thing to abuse your horn. It’s another to play a French horn while driving.
We’ve all heard of
DWI: driving
while intoxicated.
The reader
response to my
recent column on
John
the lady I saw
Kelly’s
Skyping while
Washington driving makes me
think we need a
new acronym:
DWDSE. Driving while doing
something else.
Jay Collert of Friendship,
Md., once saw a guy on the
Beltway driving a big delivery
truck — the kind with an extralarge steering wheel — flipping
through what appeared to be a
library-size unabridged
dictionary.
“Not sure what word he had to
look up at that moment, but I am
sure it had nothing to do with
safety,” Jay wrote.
Sherrie Sidman of Round
Hill, Va., had a friend who was
killed when her car was T-boned
by a motorist who was staring in
her mirror, applying makeup.
“Of less tragic occurrences (at
least as far as I know), there was
the car swerving from lane to
lane at high speed on the New
Jersey Turnpike,” Sherrie wrote.
“As we finally got a straight shot
to pass him, I saw the driver was
typing away on a laptop which
was sitting on his passenger
seat.”
Roger Hartman of
Annandale, Va., said it took him
a while to realize what was going
on with the driver in the car
behind him a while back.
Wrote Roger: “He looked, for
all the world, like he was trying
to take a big bite out of the top of
his steering wheel — mouth wide
open, teeth bared. I couldn’t
figure it out. However, when we
came to a stop and I was able to
look at him a bit more closely, I
saw what he was doing: He was
flossing his teeth!
“His hands were at the correct
10 and 2 positions on the
steering wheel, but stretched
between them was a long piece
of dental floss. I’m just glad he
didn’t run into me. I don’t know
how he would have explained
that one to the police.”
The police probably wouldn’t
have been surprised. Lt. Michael
G. Hartnett, deputy commander
with the Montgomery County
Police, has seen plenty of
Man fatally struck
by bus at the Mall
A man was fatally struck by a
Virginia commuter bus in
downtown Washington on
Wednesday at the Mall, officials
said. His name was not
immediately released.
D.C. police responded about
5 p.m. to 14th Street and
Madison Drive NW for the
report of a man struck by a
vehicle. A spokesman for the
D.C. fire department said a
person was trapped under a bus.
The incident occurred on
14th Street between the National
Museum of African American
History and Culture and the
National Museum of American
History. A spokeswoman for the
Potomac and Rappahannock
Transportation Commission said
one of their OmniRide buses was
involved in the accident, and no
passengers reported injuries.
— Justin Wm. Moyer
MARYLAND
Montgomery County
files opioid lawsuit
Montgomery County has filed
suit against more than a dozen
manufacturers and distributors
of opioids, joining a host of
municipalities across the state
and the country that have
brought similar complaints.
The lawsuit, filed Tuesday in
U.S. District Court in Greenbelt,
alleges the companies
deceptively marketed opioids as
nonaddictive and refused to
report suspicious sales of the
drugs, leading to
“unprecedented opioid
addiction” in the state’s most
populous district.
The lawsuit names 14
companies and alleges violations
of the county and state
consumer protection acts, the
federal RICO racketeering act
and the state’s false claims act,
in addition to public nuisance,
negligence and unjust
enrichment.
In statements, several of the
companies either denied the
allegations or said they were
working to stop suspicious drug
orders and ensure that the drugs
they manufacture and distribute
are used appropriately.
— Jennifer Barrios
Homeless man is
charged with murder
a 61-year-old that occurred last
month in Temple Hills.
Dynel Jackson, 46, has been
charged with first-degree
murder in the killing of Lorenzo
Dancy, 61, of Northeast
Washington, police said. He was
found at a home in the 6700
block of Geneva Lane in Camp
Springs after midnight on Jan.
24. Jackson was arrested in
North Carolina and will be
extradited to Prince George’s.
— Lynh Bui
False gunman alert
at community college
Students, faculty and others
with ties to Montgomery College
received a text alert Wednesday
about a gunman on campus that
turned out to be sent in error.
The false alarm was the result
of someone with access to the
college’s alert system who sent
an active-shooter “template” by
mistake, officials said.
Thousands of cellphones
received the stark warning:
“EMERGENCY! Armed Person at
[insert name] Campus. Go to
nearest room and lock door
NOW! If off campus, STAY
AWAY.”
But the push to find safety
ended five or six minutes later,
with an all-caps text message
giving an all-clear. “THERE IS
NO ARMED PERSON. THE
MESSAGE WAS SENT IN
ERROR. THERE IS NO
THREAT,” it said.
9-9-6
6-3-5-3
1-1-1-2-3
3-8-0
1-6-4
0-7-9-8
1-7-1-4
6-8-2-9-5
6-0-2-6-2
Amtrak: Acela cars
had ‘hardware failure’
Amtrak officials said
Wednesday that a “hardware
failure” caused two Acela cars to
come apart as the Boston-bound
train was traveling through
Maryland after leaving
Washington’s Union Station.
The incident happened near
Havre de Grace, Md., around
5:55 a.m. Tuesday. There were no
injuries to the 52 passengers
aboard and the train did not
derail, a spokeswoman said. But
the incident, coming after two
high-profile crashes in less than
a week, added to concerns about
the safety of passenger rail
service in the United States.
Amtrak spokeswoman
Christina Leeds said this is the
first time Acela cars have
encountered this type of
mechanical issue. The train was
traveling 124 mph.
— Lori Aratani
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2H-10D-KD-10C-9D
BY
L YNH B UI
The stabbing of a 16-year-old
student outside a Maryland high
school Tuesday was related to MS13 and several other students are
in custody in connection with the
case, according to prosecutors.
Prince George’s County State’s
Attorney Angela Alsobrooks
would not detail what evidence
pointed to MS-13 involvement in
the incident at Parkdale High
School in Riverdale but said the
information investigators have
gathered points to the violent
street gang.
“To take weapons and to do
violence at a school, that will not
be tolerated,” Alsobrooks said.
“The first action for us is to aggressively prosecute the individuals disrupting the peace at these
schools.”
The juveniles in custody are
Parkdale students, prosecutors
said.
Prince George’s County officers
were called to Parkdale High
School shortly after 1 p.m. Tuesday about a group gathering outside the school along a wood line,
Police Chief Hank Stawinski has
said. While police were responding, a dispute broke out among
members of the group and the
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/john-kelly.
16-year-old student was injured.
Officers who arrived saw the student staggering out of the woods
and rendered aid before he was
taken to a hospital, police said.
Alsobrooks addressed the stabbing at Parkdale on Wednesday as
more details emerged in the unrelated shooting of a 17-year-old
Prince George’s County
police have had to
respond to violence
near or at a county
high school twice
in two days this week.
outside Oxon Hill High School
earlier this week. Prince George’s
County police have had to respond to violence near or at a
county high school twice in two
days this week, sparking concern
in the community.
On Monday, an 11th-grade student was lured to the parking lot
of Oxon Hill High School by his
ex-girlfriend when two other students in the back seat of a vehicle
grabbed him in an attempted robbery, according to police charging
documents made public Wednesday.
“Give that s--- up,” one of the
teens in the back seat demanded
before the victim was shot during
a struggle, charging documents
state.
The wounded student ran into
the school cafeteria, where he was
able to contact police.
Police have charged two teens
as adults with attempted murder
in the Oxon Hill case: Zanaya
Bryant, 17, identified in charging
documents as the victim’s ex-girlfriend, and Anthony Hollingsworth, 18.
Hollingsworth, who is romantically involved with Bryant, denied that he was involved in the
incident, charging documents
state.
Police are still searching for a
third Oxon Hill student suspected
in the shooting, Alsobrooks said.
The teen shot outside Oxon Hill
was released from the hospital
shortly after the shooting.
The teen stabbed near Parkdale
remains hospitalized in stable
condition, police said.
lynh.bui@washpost.com
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY POLICE
Anthony Hollingsworth, 18, has
been charged in an unrelated
shooting near Oxon Hill High.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY POLICE
Zanaya Bryant, 17, was charged
as an adult in the shooting of an
Oxon Hill student.
Enrollment numbers fall for D.C. public schools
ENROLL FROM B1
VIRGINIA
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Tue.):
Lucky Numbers (Wed.):
DC-4 (Tue.):
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DC-5 (Tue.):
DC-5 (Wed.):
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
Teen’s stabbing linked to MS-13, prosecutors say
THE REGION
LOTTER I ES
DISTRICT
the hair stylist, the clotheschanger, etc.
“Then there were the readers,
the last-minute-cramming-foran-exam, the too-good-to-putdown-book kind of person:
clearly people who were not
familiar with books on tape.”
Hartnett said he encountered
— Donna St. George
A homeless man has been
arrested in the fatal stabbing of
Results from Feb. 7
DWDSE during his 35-year
career.
“Back in the day, there were
the ‘get ready, running late for
work’ people who shaved with an
electric razor or with a straight
edge and shaving cream,” he
wrote. There was “the eyebrow
plucker, the mustache-trimmer,
because they’ve been in an
accident.
“One young man I’ll never
forget blamed his accident on
faulty brakes,” Hartnett wrote.
“His food-splattered passenger
was quick to reply that maybe it
had to do with the ice cream
cone in one hand, the burger in
the other and his attempt to
steer with his knees.”
Hartnett said he understands
that people want to multitask.
And some drivers seem not to
know how to manage their time.
That’s why they engage in
DWDSE.
But, he wrote, “nothing is
more important than getting
from point A to point B safely.”
Driving while distracted could
mean getting in an accident,
getting a ticket, losing your
license.
“Some of you may be taking
public transportation in the
future because of it,” Hartnett
wrote. “You’ll have plenty of time
to read then.”
MARYLAND
LOCA L D I G ES T
THE DISTRICT
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Interstate 66 doesn’t seem like an ideal place to practice for a violin
recital, but perhaps not all Washington-area drivers would agree.
people who had fashioned
clamps on their steering wheels
to hold the books in place and
rubber bands for the pages.
“One guy wore a headlamp so
he could read in the dark while
driving home from work,” he
wrote. “I always wondered what
their face would look like after
the air bag deployed — serious
paper cuts or an impaled
chapter?”
Hartnett said the most
entertaining drivers were the
musicians. He saw people
representing pretty much the
whole orchestra: guitar, banjo
and violin, as well as sax, flute
and French horn.
“In the percussion
department, a very entertaining
young man fashioned a
miniature drum set on the
passenger side of his van,”
Hartnett wrote. “And very early
in my career, bongo drums were
the rage. The least dangerous,
however, were all the air
instruments that were being
played. There’s nothing like a
good jam session rocking down
the highway.”
Hartnett said he’s met many of
these motorists the hard way:
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The city counts students for its
final enrollment tally in October.
Jennifer C. Niles, the District’s
deputy mayor for education, said
even though this week’s report
showed a decrease, she expects
enough students may transfer
into traditional public schools by
the end of the year that enrollment will inch up.
Niles said she saw promising
trends in middle schools and
special program schools, such
as the science- and technologyfocused McKinley Middle.
“I don’t see this as doom and
gloom,” Niles said. “I would describe [D.C. Public Schools] as
remaining steady and our charter schools as making a small
increase.”
Enrollment in charter schools
— publicly funded but privately
operated institutions — grew
from 41,506 last year to 43,393
this school year.
Taking into account traditional schools, nearly 92,000 students are attending class in public schools in the District, a
1.6 percent increase.
The enrollment numbers for
traditional schools are another
blow to that system, which has
been embroiled in a graduation
controversy. A city-commissioned
investigation found that about
1 in 3 graduates in 2017 received
their diplomas despite missing
too many classes or improperly
taking makeup classes.
Will Perkins — a research and
policy associate at the 21st Century School Fund, an education
advocacy organization — called
the numbers troubling for the
traditional system, noting that
enrollment numbers dropped
across most grade levels.
The superintendent’s report
showed that charter schools had
more students (6,929) at the
preschool level than traditional
schools (5,798). The traditional
school system has more kindergartners enrolled than does the
charter school system.
In the preschool years, students have to apply through a
“I don’t see this as
doom and gloom.”
Jennifer C. Niles, the District’s
deputy mayor for education
lottery to secure a slot, even if it
is at their neighborhood school.
Perkins said if the traditional
system guaranteed families pre-
school slots in their neighborhood schools, it could help the
system capture more families.
“I think it is an issue when
families start in charter schools,
and may never be in their
neighborhood schools,” Perkins
said.
A D.C. Public Schools spokeswoman said the system plans to
add slots for 3- and 4-year-olds.
Despite growth in recent
years, enrollment in the city’s
traditional public and charter
schools remains far below its
peak.
The student population had
been in a steady decline since the
1960s, when about 150,000 students attended the District’s
public schools.
By 1995, enrollment had plummeted to about 80,000 students
when the D.C. School Reform Act
was passed by Congress, paving
the way for charter schools to
open in the District.
“The steady increases in enrollment we have seen each year
for the past nine years are
encouraging signs of the progress we are making in public
education,” State Superintendent Hanseul Kang said in a
statement.
perry.stein@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
THE DISTRICT
Mendelson, Lazere spar
for first time at forum
BY
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
The biggest race in the District
this year may be a war of the
wonks.
At a Tuesday evening forum,
Council Chairman Phil Mendelson (D), a longtime, low-key lawmaker steeped in the nuances of
governance, sparred for the first
time with challenger Ed Lazere,
executive director of the D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute, an influential
liberal think tank.
Facing a challenge from the left,
Mendelson urged fiscal caution
and defended his record on progressive issues, including increasing the minimum wage and legalizing same-sex marriage. Lazere
said the city needs bolder leadership to address an affordablehousing crisis and racial inequality.
The forum was hosted by the
D.C. Working Families Party and a
constellation of progressive
groups — friendly territory for a
liberal advocate such as Lazere.
And it may have kicked off the
marquee race of the year in the
nation’s capital, since Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) does not appear
to be facing any prominent challengers in her bid for reelection to
a second term.
Lazere, who has taken a leave of
absence from his job to run for
office, bolstered his credibility as a
candidate when he outraised
Mendelson in the opening two
weeks of his campaign.
Although the general election is
in November, in deep blue Washington, the June 19 Democratic
primary essentially determines
the winner. The race for council
chairman offers a platform for
progressives who say Democratic
leadership hasn’t done enough to
make sure the entire city benefits
from its economic boom.
Lazere repeatedly rattled off
statistics illustrating persistent
racial disparities in the District.
“We just aren’t doing enough as
a city to address the impacts of
gentrification and the loss of affordable housing,” Lazere said to
applause. “Black and brown residents who have shaped the city’s
history and culture are being
pushed out and left behind.”
Mendelson, who was first elected to the council in 1998, highlighted his command of legislative
procedure and touted his ability
to forge coalitions.
“If there was an easy answer —
and candidates love to stand before audiences and make it sound
like it’s easy — then we wouldn’t
be struggling with this problem”
of income inequality, said Mendelson, adding later: “This isn’t
just about electing a council member who shares your values. It’s
about electing the chairman of the
council who can figure out how to
manage the council, manage 12
colleagues, get to majority votes
and do the checks and balances
with the mayor.”
Mendelson, 65, pleased progressives at the forum by announcing he’d side with them on
several hot-button issues, including blocking business-backed proposals to overhaul a paid family
leave law that’s currently being
implemented and rejecting new
tax incentives for Amazon to build
its second headquarters in the
District.
PHOTOS BY EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Council Chairman Phil Mendelson, above left, steeped in the nuances of governance, talks with members of the audience after a candidates’
forum at the Woman’s National Democratic Club in the District on Tuesday. At right, challenger Ed Lazere talks with Lauren Windsor,
executive director of American Family Voices. The forum was hosted by the D.C. Working Families Party and other progressive groups.
D.C. residents at a Tuesday forum at the Woman’s National
Democratic Club in the District ask the candidates questions.
Perennial candidate Calvin
Gurley also fielded questions at
the forum.
To distinguish himself from the
incumbent, Lazere, 53, said he
wants to double spending on affordable housing and impose a
carbon tax on polluters — with
that revenue distributed to resi-
dents. He argued that the city’s
overflowing coffers ought to be
poured into social welfare programs.
“We should use the city’s tremendous surplus that we have
been building up for almost a
decade — $2.4 billion — to help
residents who don’t have resourc-
es,” he said.
Lazere decried how lawmakers
recently tightened eligibility rules
for those seeking to enter homeless shelters and authorized
$80 million in bonds to be repaid
with tax revenue to support the
Union Market development.
“Those are the kind of things
that are going wrong in the city
that I want to do something
about,” he said.
Mendelson was the most animated when an audience member
accused him of slowing the implementation of the generous paid
sick leave measure that he shepherded into law. He grew red
when someone injected “It
passed!” after he mused that a
majority of the council probably
opposed paid family leave when it
was first considered.
“Of course it passed, and the
reason why it passed is because as
chairman of the council, I figured
out how to get the votes,” Mendelson said.
Throughout the forum, he told
progressive advocates in the audience to not just press city officials
to spend on their favored causes,
but also make sure money is spent
wisely. “It pisses me off when I
hear people talk about how we
need to spend more money, let’s
put more money into something,”
he said.
The forum also featured primary challengers to council member Anita Bonds (D-At Large),
who was absent because of a
scheduling conflict.
A veteran of D.C. politics and
head of the local Democratic Party, Bonds is so far opposed by three
millennial men: Environmental
activist Jeremiah Lowery, communications specialist Aaron
Holmes and real estate professional Marcus Goodwin.
All three were critical of
Bonds’s tenure as chair of the
council’s housing committee, especially regarding what they saw
as slow movement of rent-control
legislation.
Lowery was the most blunt in
his criticism, accusing Bonds of
not showing up on issues from
homelessness to holding developers accountable for meeting affordable-housing requirements.
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
Maryland o≠ers $100 million in decade-long case involving black schools
BY
D ANIELLE D OUGLASG ABRIEL
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan
(R) on Wednesday offered the
state’s historically black colleges
and universities up to $100 million to resolve a 12-year-old lawsuit over inequality in public
higher education.
The proposed settlement is
more than double the amount the
state pledged early in the case. It
arrives a day after a federal judge
granted the state a temporary
reprieve as it appeals an order
issued in November to establish a
set of unique and high-demand
programs at its four historically
black institutions — Morgan
State University, Coppin State
University, Bowie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore.
But the proposal may not be
enough to satisfy the coalition of
alumni from Maryland’s historically black institutions who filed
the lawsuit in 2006 to dismantle
what they say are vestiges of racial segregation. The group has
accused Maryland of insufficiently funding historically black colleges and allowing other state
schools to duplicate their programs, placing pressure on enrollment.
U.S. District Judge Catherine C.
Blake had directed Maryland to
appoint an independent monitor
for the creation of programs that
build on each school’s strengths.
The monitor was given the authority to provide annual funding
for marketing, student recruitment, financial aid and any related initiative over the next five to
10 years.
The state appealed a month
after Blake’s ruling and has since
suggested mediation in an attempt to resolve the case. The
settlement
offer
revealed
Wednesday would supplement
state appropriations to the four
public historically black institutions over a 10-year period, according to a letter Hogan’s chief
legal counsel Robert F. Scholz
sent Wednesday to Cheryl D.
Glenn (D-Baltimore City), who
chairs the Black Caucus.
“A settlement on this basis
would remove the litigation risk
for both the plaintiffs and defendants and enable all to move
forward knowing that the litigation will have advanced higher
education in Maryland,” Scholz
wrote. “It represents a serious,
multi-year commitment which
we believe goes well beyond what
the law requires.”
It remains to be seen how the
money would be divided among
the four schools or spent in a way
consistent with the judge’s order.
Scholz said those issues would
have to be negotiated between the
parties, resolved with the courts
and included in a final settlement
agreement.
“Governor Hogan wants to
bring this litigation to an end in a
manner satisfactory to all parties,
and in the best interests of all
Marylanders, especially current
and future [historically black institution] students,” Scholz wrote.
Traditionally white public universities in Maryland count 122
academic programs not duplicat-
The settlement offer
“represents a serious,
multi-year commitment
which we believe goes
well beyond what the
law requires.”
Robert F. Scholz, chief legal council to
Md. Gov. Larry Hogan (R)
ed elsewhere within the state system, while historically black
schools have only 11 such offerings. That disparity is why advocates have fought for more highdemand academic programs they
say would enhance the competitiveness and sustainability of the
four schools.
“The state’s letter just talks
about dollars — it does not talk
about putting any kind of dent in
that 10-to-1 disparity,” said Michael D. Jones, lead attorney for
the alumni coalition. “The goal is
to address the disparity by placing a certain number of unique
programs at the [historically
black institutions], and it was up
to the special master to figure out
which ones and at what cost.”
“You have to have programs
and a commitment by the state
that if the schools get a good
program, they are not going to
unnecessarily duplicate it,” he
said.
Over the years, the coalition
has called for increased funding
and merging the University of
Baltimore with Morgan State, the
state’s largest public historically
black school. A more recent proposal to transfer programs from
traditionally white state schools
raised the ire of the Maryland
Higher Education Commission
and some university presidents
who said the plan would ultimately harm students.
Judge Blake dismissed those
proposals, but delivered a ruling
that Jones and other advocates of
desegregation have considered
significant. Jones said he is willing to hash out the terms of the
proposed settlement depending
on the state’s stance on creating
programs. The money alone, he
said, will not dismantle the structural inequality that exists between traditionally white and historically black state colleges.
“If you say . . . we’re going to
give the [historically black institutions] these new programs that
are going to meet the state’s workforce needs and anybody black,
white or Latino who wants the
program can attend, that starts to
upend the structural inequality,”
Jones said. “And that needs to be a
part of the remedy.”
danielle.douglas@washpost.com
MARYLAND
This Year Fix
Former Annapolis sta≠er details harassment
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Nina Smith paused at times to
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Smith hesitated, and began to cry.
The answer, she said a minute
later, was six.
“In the eight years I worked in
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permission,” Smith told the Women Legislators of Maryland caucus on Wednesday. “There was a
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O VETTA W IGGINS
MHIC 50637
front of a lobbyist. Another would
reach out to me at the most
inappropriate hours asking me to
come to their room. One legislator rubbed his private parts on
me. I started buttoning my blouses a little higher after I noticed
that a chief of staff to a congressman wasn’t being friendly, he was
looking down my shirt.”
Smith’s testimony to the caucus did not name any alleged
harassers. But it was by far the
most public airing to date of what
women have privately described
as a pervasive culture of misconduct in Maryland’s General Assembly.
“You’re really a hero,” Del. Ariana B. Kelly (D-Montgomery),
president of the caucus, told
Smith after hearing her story.
The caucus is finalizing its
recommendations to prevent and
address instances of misconduct,
after months of allegations across
the country against politicians
and other powerful men.
Kelly said she plans to introduce legislation to address some
of the recommendations and will
discuss them with Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr.
(D-Calvert) and House Speaker
Michael E. Busch (D-Anne Arundel), who have appointed a commission to examine policies dealing with workplace sexual harassment in all three branches of
state government.
Del. Carol L. Krimm (D-Frederick), co-chair of the caucus’s Sexual Harassment Policy Workgroup, expressed solidarity with
Smith, noting that she, too, once
worked as a staffer.
“I understand your position,
how difficult it is for you to be
here today . . . how it has touched
you and how it has had an impact
on you even today,” Krimm said.
“We are committed to you and
staff here to make changes.”
Smith, 36, worked as an intern
in the office of then-Sen. Gwendolyn T. Britt (D-Prince George’s) in
2004. She spent most of the rest
of her time in Annapolis working
in the governor’s office.She said
she felt ashamed and unsure
what to do after each incident,
and sought the counsel of older,
more experienced women.
Their advice: “Wear longer
dresses . . . avoid form-fitting or
attention-drawing clothing — advice they used to navigate land
mines in their own political careers,” she said.
Eventually, she found herself
sharing the same advice with
young interns and staffers who
came to her seeking help.
“All of the interns that came
through my office when I was
working in the governor’s office, I
would advise them to be careful,”
Smith said, wiping her eyes and
cheeks. “My job and future trajectory was in the hands of these
same men. . . . This is political
life, and it certainly didn’t help
for someone like me to rock the
boat. So after awhile it became
normal, always expected.”
Smith circulated a letter late
last year among women in Annapolis calling for changes in the
state’s anti-harassment policy.
She hoped for dozens of signatures but dropped the idea after
many women said they were concerned about retaliation.
She described the current
process for reporting harassment
as “murky,” suggesting that the
list of officials and staffers in the
legislature who can receive initial
reports of harassment should be
expanded. That idea is included
in the caucus’s recommendations, along with scheduled training for lawmakers and lobbyists;
anonymous reporting that could
include hotlines; confidentiality
in reporting; and requiring an
independent investigator to work
with the Joint Committee on
Legislative Ethics to investigate
allegations of misconduct.
Last year, the Legislative Policy
Committee, chaired by Miller and
Busch, ordered officials to start
collecting data on sexual misconduct complaints against state
lawmakers or their staff members.
The commission created by
Miller and Busch is scheduled to
hold its first meeting Feb. 16.
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
MARYLAND
Ex-Uber driver faces life
for trying to kill o∞cer
BY
D AN M ORSE
The police officers who converged on Jonathan Hemming
hoped for a calm arrest. And for a
few seconds — as Hemming sat
behind the wheel of a Honda Civic
in a Maryland parking lot — things
went that way.
The officers approached. A car
door opened.
Then, suddenly, a struggle.
Hemming raised what appeared
to be a black pipe, maybe 8 inches
long, with tape wrapped around it.
He began slapping one end of it.
The other end?
“Aimed right at my face,” said
Montgomery County Police Detective Donnie Oaks.
Oaks’s recollections, heard by
jurors in a Montgomery courtroom, helped lead to Hemming’s
conviction Wednesday on a charge
of trying to kill Oaks with an operable, loaded, miniature 12-gauge
shotgun.
Hemming, 54, was also convicted of first-degree assault of another
officer, as well as three firearms
charges, one ammunition charge
and resisting arrest. The former
Uber driver from Gaithersburg faces a possible life sentence in jail.
By all accounts, at the time of
the parking lot chaos — on the
afternoon of May 18, 2016 — Hemming was not on duty for Uber.
He instead had driven his wife to
a doctor’s appointment, which the
couple had just left, when the officers converged. At the time, Hemming was wanted on drug charges
and detectives also wanted to question him about an unrelated case.
During the two-day trial, the
handmade weapon was introduced
as evidence. Jurors also heard from
an examiner from the U.S. Bureau
of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and
Explosives (ATF), who had evaluated the gun in a lab and successfully
test-fired it.
“As far as an improvised pipe gun
MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURT RECORDS
LEFT: Jonathan Hemming, 54, was convicted of attempted murder
on Wednesday for aiming a loaded, homemade 12-gauge shotgun at
a Maryland police officer in 2016. ABOVE: The improvised pipe
guns Hemming used in the incident.
MONTGOMERY COUNTY POLICE
would go, it’s actually fairly
evolved,” Ronald Davis told the jury.
He measured the device at 87/8
inches long. It had a strong back
end, with a tiny opening for a
narrow screwdriver, which could
be jabbed into the back end, piercing the ammunition and sending
buckshot blasting out.
“There was a fair amount of
thought that went into the design
and construction of this item,” the
ATF examiner testified.
A second, smaller homemade
shotgun also was presented that
was found in Hemming’s pocket
when he was arrested. Neither
gun was fired at police.
Hemming testified, moving
slowly to the witness stand using a
walker. He had seen examples of
homemade shotguns on the Internet and built them quickly, he
testified. “Both of them together,
maybe 10 minutes,” he told his
attorney, Ron Gottlieb, under
questioning.
Hemming spoke emotionally
about taking his wife, Mary, to a
neurologist on the day of the arrest. She was suffering from a
brain cyst and had problems with
her spleen and liver.
“Her systems were failing,”
Hemming said.
Hemming said they drove to the
appointment with the two weapons
because they had a suicide pact if the
doctor’s news was bad. “One for me,”
he said. “And one for Mary.”
His wife died, he told jurors,
while he was jailed awaiting trial.
“She died by herself,” he said.
Hemming challenged the testimony from officers. As police approached his car, he said, he had
moved one of his guns to look for
insurance papers, but said he did
not point either gun at the officers.
A spokeswoman for Uber said
Wednesday that Hemming had
driven for the company for about
eight months. He was removed
from access to Uber the day after
his arrest when the company
heard from law enforcement, according to the spokeswoman.
Montgomery Detective Dimitry
Ruvin, who was not one of the victims in the attempted shooting, testified that he had been interested in
interviewing Hemming for a different case in May 2016 and that when
he spoke with Hemming on his
cellphone, Hemming told him he
was in Florida. Ruvin learned later
that he was much closer.
“At the time, he was working as
an Uber driver,” Ruvin told jurors.
“So I subpoenaed his Uber records
and I learned he was in the D.C.
area making pickups using his
Uber vehicle.”
In closing arguments, assistant
state’s attorney Douglas Wink
questioned the claim of a suicide
pact, saying there were three extra
shotgun shells in the car Hemming was driving and that Hemming had said the couple, if they
killed themselves, intended to do
it elsewhere, after first going
home to get a different car.
“It just doesn’t add up,” Wink said.
dan.morse@washpost.com
Hogan’s o∞ce steps away
GWU plans diversity training after ‘racist’ posting from transit chief’s remark
THE DISTRICT
BY
A LLYSON C HIU
Following an outcry from
George Washington University
students over a racially charged
Snapchat posting, administrators
announced Wednesday that all incoming students will undergo
mandatory diversity training
starting in the fall.
The decision comes after the
university’s Student Association
Senate unanimously passed a resolution Monday with nearly 20
demands, many of which urged
administrators to institute diversity and inclusion initiatives.
In a statement, university President Thomas J. LeBlanc called the
image “offensive and racially inflammatory,” and said the school is
taking steps to ensure “all students truly feel welcome on this
campus.”
Plans include establishing a
bias incident reporting system,
updating the student code of conduct to address harassment and
discrimination, and requiring di-
versity training for staff members
who work closely with students.
“We have to use this moment
not to focus on hostility toward
individuals or groups, but as a
catalyst to truly improve our community by embracing our diversity,” LeBlanc said.
Peak Sen Chua, president of the
Student Association, said the university will need to ensure that
conversations about diversity continue beyond training, but said the
changes would “improve the campus climate.”
“They are great steps toward
creating a more inclusive and welcoming community,” Chua said.
The Student Association had
called for the removal of the sorority, Alpha Phi, that acknowledged
one of its members posted the
racially charged image on Snapchat. LeBlanc said administrators
are still communicating with the
sorority’s national headquarters
and considering appropriate actions.
The image showed two young
women, a banana and a caption
referencing race. The sorority
identified the two women in the
photo as members.
Administrators said in the
statement they had completed
their initial investigation and had
interviewed the women in the
photo and the person who posted
it.
The statement said “the individuals pictured were unaware of
the social media posting and its
content until after it was posted.”
The person who posted the picture also said “they did not intend
to offend others and acknowledged that the women in the picture did not know or approve of
the associated caption,” the statement said.
Linda Kahangi, executive director of Alpha Phi International,
said in an email the organization
has a “long history of embracing
membership inclusiveness and diversity.”
“We condemn racism in any
form, and our constitution and
bylaws always have,” Kahangi
said.
In an interview with the student newspaper, the GW Hatchet,
this week, LeBlanc called the matter an “eye opener” for some university officials.
“This is a racist posting,” LeBlanc said of the Snapchat post.
“We’re stunned that it came from
within our community.”
While the Snapchat post
sparked action at George Washington, students have emphasized
that their responses reflected
deeper concerns about race relations and inclusion, LeBlanc said
in a statement Wednesday.
“This incident has clearly signaled that racial tension at the
university needs to be confronted,” he said. “We need to speak
with one voice in saying racist acts
against black students on this
campus will not be tolerated.”
allyson.chiu@washpost.com
Sarah Larimer contributed to this
report.
2016 disappearance of girl started with ‘secret date’
EISENHAUER FROM B1
sponded. He eventually grew
frustrated and, as he burst out of
the room, said: “I’m done. I’m
calling a lawyer.”
The almost hour-long interview was played for the jury in
Montgomery County Circuit
Court on Tuesday in the trial for
Eisenhauer, who is accused of
fatally stabbing Nicole and
dumping her body across the border in North Carolina. The January 2016 crime shocked the
Blacksburg and Virginia Tech
communities, and a crowd had
gathered on the border of Virginia Tech’s campus two years ago
for a vigil in Nicole’s honor.
Eisenhauer has pleaded not
guilty to first-degree murder, abduction and concealing a dead
body.
While the prosecution argued
that the evidence shows Eisenhauer killed Nicole because he
was worried about his relationship with an underage girl, the
defense tried to shift the blame to
Eisenhauer’s friend and classmate Natalie Keepers, who is
charged with accessory to murder
before the fact and concealing a
dead body and is scheduled to go
on trial in September.
“Quite frankly,” Eisenhauer
told Witt during the interview, “I
haven’t done anything. I have
nothing to hide, and I strongly
believe the truth will set you free.”
Defense attorney John Lichtenstein told jurors that Keepers
“planned this event” and “was at
the scene of this murder,” bringing into question: “Who actually
committed this murder?”
John Robertson, an attorney
representing Keepers, declined to
comment on the defense’s statements.
Several law enforcement officials testified Wednesday about
evidence gathered in the investigation, including disinfecting
wipes, a shovel and blood found
in Eisenhauer’s car. The trial is
expected to continue into next
week.
Montgomery County, Va., Commonwealth’s Attorney Mary Pettitt told the jurors in her opening
statements that Eisenhauer’s
DNA was found under Nicole’s
fingernails and that the girl’s
blood was found in the trunk of
his car.
She said Nicole, a seventh-
POOL PHOTOS BY MATT GENTRY/ROANOKE TIMES/ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOP: David Eisenhauer has pleaded not guilty to first-degree
murder, abduction and concealing a dead body. BOTTOM: Tammy
Weeks, center, Nicole Madison Lovell’s mother, looks on after
testifying in Montgomery County Circuit Court in Christiansburg,
Va. The January 2016 crime shocked nearby communities.
grader, was self-conscious about
medical complications that left
her with a scar on her neck and
stomach, but that January night,
she had “a secret date.” Nicole
pushed her nightstand in front of
her door and planned to sneak
out the window to meet the college guy she had been messaging
online for months. Pettitt also
said the two had seen each other
at least once before.
That same night, Pettitt said,
Eisenhauer has “a problem, and
his problem is Nicole Lovell.”
He had spent 30 minutes the
day before, the prosecutor said,
doing Internet searches of things
like “knock-out drugs”; “How
long does it take to burn a body”;
and “How does the tv serial killer
Dexter get rid of bodies.”
Eisenhauer’s parents sat in the
courtroom as Pettitt said he and
Keepers had talked about switching out Nicole’s medication to
cyanide pills, drove around looking for the area to carry out the
murder and went to Walmart to
buy a garden shovel.
Shortly after 1 a.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 27, Pettitt said, Eisenhauer arrived at Nicole’s apartment to pick her up before he
took her into the woods and
“coldly and ruthlessly stabs Nicole — not once, not twice, but 14
times, he stabs her in the chest
and then her throat.”
Lichtenstein told the jurors
that the commonwealth’s evidence tries to pin the murder on
Eisenhauer in a “circumstantial
way.” Instead, he said, Keepers
was “exhilarated” and “excited”
about this murder. She admitted
to police, he said, everything
about her involvement in the case
with the “sole exception” of being
at the scene.
Keepers had a fascination with
a demonic fiction author, he said,
and was “deeply motivated to
commit this.” While Eisenhauer
was only interested in wiping
clean the data on his phone showing communications with Nicole,
Keepers wanted a “more permanent solution,” Lichtenstein said.
In Keepers’s dorm room, he said,
police found Nicole’s Minions
blanket, now bloody, along with
other belongings from Nicole.
This behavior, along with a
shovel with Keepers’s bloody fingerprints, is enough reasonable
doubt for a not-guilty verdict, he
told the jurors.
“Could this have happened another way?” he asked.
In the 2016 video interview,
Eisenhauer told Witt he was “concerned” he would be named as a
suspect in the missing-person
case.
“Given that she’s a 13-year-old
girl who is missing, I mean, if my
name’s associated with an ongoing investigation, I’m not going
to be able to do anything for the
rest of my life.”
The prosecution’s first witness
Tuesday was Nicole’s mother, who
wore blue, her daughter’s favorite
color. Other family members and
friends also dressed in blue, sat in
court.
Nicole was supposed to go to
school the morning of Jan. 27, so
Tammy Weeks went to her daughter’s room to give Nicole her medicine, she testified Tuesday. When
she pushed open the door, she felt
a rush of cold air. Nicole wasn’t
there and the window was open.
Weeks said she rushed to her
truck and started calling Nicole’s
phone, which went to voice mail.
She checked with friends and a
neighbor, and when she couldn’t
find Nicole, she called police.
“When was the next time you
saw Nicole?” Pettitt asked.
As her eyes teared up, she
replied: “In her coffin.”
ellie.silverman@washpost.com
AMAZON FROM B1
purposes, it’s a blank check.”
Rahn told lawmakers that he
didn’t know how the state would
pay for the $2 billion it had already
pledged to Amazon for transportation upgrades.
Del. Tawanna P. Gaines (DPrince George’s), who chairs the
transportation panel for the House
Appropriations Committee, called
the comments “irresponsible.”
“We don’t have the money,”
Gaines said. “I know we usually
come up with the money, but that’s a
conversation to have with everyone.”
Independent experts also questioned the wisdom of offering unlimited support, even to attract a
once-in-a-lifetime
investment
that Amazon says will create up to
50,000 jobs paying an average of
$100,000 a year.
Nathan M. Jensen, a government professor at the University of
Texas at Austin who studies public
economic development strategies,
said the offer probably would “fail
a basic cost-benefit analysis” and
set a bad precedent by encouraging other companies to expect lavish subsidies in the future.
“A blank check is basically a
guarantee to overpay,” Jensen
said. “It is madness.”
Hogan has already promised
Amazon an unprecedented $5 billion package. Of the offers whose
details have become public, either
through government or local media accounts, only New Jersey’s is
larger, at $7 billion.
Montgomery is one of 20 regions on the shortlist for the huge
investment by the Seattle-based
online retail behemoth. The District and Northern Virginia are
also on the list. (Amazon founder
Jeffrey P. Bezos owns The Washington Post.)
The District and Virginia declined to say whether they would
match Hogan’s offer.
“We’re going to be competitive,
obviously, but we’re going to be
mindful ultimately of the impact
that it will have on D.C. residents,”
said Brian Kenner, the D.C. deputy
mayor for planning and economic
development.
“For competitive reasons and to
protect confidential company information, we cannot provide details
at this time,” said Suzanne W. Clark,
spokeswoman for the Virginia Economic Development Partnership.
The Montgomery site would be
in the White Flint area of North
Bethesda, according to officials familiar with the proposal who
spoke on the condition of anonymity because the information has
not officially been made public.
The area has a Metro station but is
also heavily congested with traffic
from the Capital Beltway, Interstate 270 and Rockville Pike, a
heavily developed north-south
corridor in the D.C. suburbs.
Hogan’s offer to Amazon, announced last month, includes
$2 billion in unspecified transportation upgrades to deal with the
clogged roadways around the proposed site. It also includes $3 billion in tax credits, grants and other financial incentives. Hogan’s office sought to cast the softening of
Rahn’s comments as a simple clarification of a routine error.
“Pete Rahn is one of the finest
transportation experts in the nation,
but he also happens to be human,”
Mayer said. “He was simply reiterating the well-reported fact that Maryland is going to aggressively compete for this incredible economic development opportunity.”
But Rahn had a chance to correct the record Tuesday, when
asked to respond to a statement by
state Sen. Bill Ferguson (D-Balti-
more City) that the “blank check”
comment was “jarring.”
Rahn spokeswoman Erin Henson said then that Rahn was “simply reiterating” that the state
would “do what it takes” to close
the Amazon deal. She added, “The
real news here is that Senator Ferguson is so easily jarred.”
Hogan’s willingness to offer billions in incentives to Amazon
could become an issue in the governor’s race.
State Sen. Richard Madaleno Jr.
(D-Montgomery), who is running
in the Democratic primary for the
opportunity to challenge Hogan in
a general election, called talk of a
blank
check
“outrageous.”
Madaleno, who attended the
budget hearing where Rahn spoke
of the bid, said landing an Amazon
corporate headquarters would be
“transformative” for the Washington region by attracting entrepreneurs and diversifying the region’s
government-centric job base.
But he said he’s concerned the
state will offer so much that it will
end up shortchanging the public
schools and other amenities that
attract potential employers in the
first place.
“No one gets a blank check.
You’ve got kids in Baltimore who
don’t have heat in their classrooms because of broken pipes
and leaky roofs, and the governor
offered them $2.5 million,”
Madaleno said. “But when it
comes to a business, there’s no
price too big. You should be willing
to tell the children of our state that
they’ve got a blank check.”
Another Democratic candidate,
Baltimore County Executive Kevin
Kamenetz, said, “Hogan admits his
economic development strategy is
literally to write a blank check to
the world’s richest man. He can’t
tell us where the money comes
from, or where it goes. Hardly a
way to run a government.”
Gaines, the Prince George’s legislator, said she’s most concerned
about the transportation projects
that would have to be delayed or
cut statewide to find $2 billion,
particularly better bus service for
residents to reach jobs in more
rural parts of the state.
“How are you going to do this?”
Gaines said. “Do other jurisdictions lose? Prince George’s? Western Maryland?”
She noted that Hogan cited the
need to save money when he canceled a proposal to build a lightrail Red Line in Baltimore and
scaled back the Washington region’s light-rail Purple Line.
House Minority Whip Kathy
Szeliga (R-Baltimore-Harford) defended Hogan, saying she sees the
governor’s commitment to fixing
Montgomery’s traffic problems to
attract thousands of new jobs — as
a potentially “huge boon” to residents statewide.
“If I were looking at the project
from Amazon’s standpoint, a concern I’d have would be transportation because traffic in Montgomery
County is very challenging,” Szeliga
said. “Having the full backing from
the governor of the state of Maryland saying ‘We know our transportation infrastructure could be a
deterrent, but we’re here to solve
the problem’ is a great asset to get
Amazon to come to Maryland.”
Montgomery County Council
President Hans Riemer (D-At
Large) said it’s no secret Montgomery’s traffic congestion would
need to be alleviated before it
could absorb so many jobs. Riemer said he assumes that would
include improved transit, cycling
and walking options, as well as
moving more cars.
robert.mccartney@washpost.com
katherine.shaver@washpost.com
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
IN MEMORIAM
obituaries
ASHTON
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
BROWN
GANT
PAULINE BROWN
Alpha Pi Chi National Sorority, Inc.
The Ritual for the Deceased will be
held on Saturday, February 10, 2018
promptly at 10:45 a.m.
Please arrive by 10:30 a.m. wearing
all black. Viewing from 10 a.m.to 11
a.m. and service at 11 a.m. at the
Master Touch Praise Ministries, 4706 Raleigh
Road, Temple Hills, Maryland 20748.
CALDWELL
WALTER LEROY GANT, JR. (Age 78)
"Jitterbug"
CARLTON R. ASHTON, JR. "Rick"
We are celebrating a Great Day.
Happy Birthday Rick!
Your Loving Family
LARKINS
HARRIET PILGRIM CALDWELL
RAY LUSTIG/THE WASHINGTON POST
BETTY S. LARKINS
October 31,1930 - February 8, 1993
JOE KNOLLENBERG, 84
Republican from Michigan
served for 16 years in House
F ROM STAFF REPORTS
AND NEWS SERVICES
Joe Knollenberg, a Republican
fiscal conservative who served
suburban Detroit’s Oakland
County in the U.S. House of Representatives for 16 years, died
Feb. 6 at a memory-care center in
Troy, Mich. He was 84.
Michigan state Sen. Marty
Knollenberg announced the
death and said the cause complications from Alzheimer’s disease.
Mr. Knollenberg worked in
sales and sales management for
the insurance industry and ran
his own agency in Troy before
winning election to the U.S.
House in 1992. He had been chairman of the Oakland County Republican Party, a district chairman and president of a local GOP
club.
On Capitol Hill, he served on
the House Banking Committee
(now known as the Financial Ser-
vices Committee), vowing to reduce regulations. He also chaired
the House Appropriations subcommittee on the District and
other subpanels affecting military construction and transportation funding. He also was cochairman of the Congressional
Armenian Caucus.
His 2008 reelection race was
affected by a national sentiment
for change amid the economic
crisis. Democrat Gary Peters, now
a U.S. senator, defeated Mr. Knollenberg.
Joseph Knollenberg was born
in Mattoon, Ill., on Nov. 28, 1933,
and grew up on a farm. He graduated from Eastern Illinois University in 1955 and served two years
in the Army before entering the
insurance business and settling
in Michigan.
Survivors include his wife of
55 years, Sandie Knollenberg;
and two sons.
Rep. Joe Knollenberg,
seen at a hearing on
Capitol Hill in 2001,
was a fiscally
conservative Republican
who represented
suburban Detroit’s
Oakland County.
Mr. Knollenberg
lost his 2008
reelection bid
amid the national
sentiment
for change.
In Loving Memory Your Presence We Miss,
Your Memory We Treasure, Loving You Always,
Forgetting You Never.
Your family
DEATH NOTICE
ALLEN
David Brown,
HUD budget officer
David Brown, 81, a retired
budget officer with the Department of Housing and Urban
Development, died Nov. 4 at a
care center in Washington. He
had Alzheimer’s disease, said his
attorney and executor, John
Quinn.
Mr. Brown was born in Ithaca,
Mich. He came to Washington in
1962 and began his federal career
with what then was the Housing
and Home Finance Agency. He
received HUD’s Distinguished
Service Award and retired in
1991. He was a member of the
New York Avenue Presbyterian
Church and for 40 years was
co-director of its Community
Club mentoring program.
Jahangir Amuzegar,
economist, diplomat
Jahangir Amuzegar, 98, an
economist and onetime Iranian
government official who served
as Iran’s ambassador at large to
the United States, died Jan. 15 at
a hospice facility in Washington.
The cause was sepsis, said his
brother, Kuros Amouzegar.
Dr. Amuzegar was born into a
cultured, politically prominent
family in Tehran. After studying
and teaching in the United
States, he served as Iran’s minister of commerce and minister of
finance in the early 1960s and as
chairman of the National Iranian
Oil Co.
He was Iran’s ambassador at
large in Washington from 1963 to
1979 and also was a member of
the board of the International
Monetary Fund. He was a special
adviser to the IMF director from
1979 to 1984.
Dr. Amuzegar wrote widely on
Iranian political and economic
matters and was the author of
several books, including “The
Islamic Republic of Iran: Reflections on an Emerging Economy”
(2014), “Managing Oil Wealth”
(1999), “Iran’s Economy Under
the Islamic Republic” (1993) and
“The Dynamics of the Iranian
Revolution” (1991).
In 2011, he and his wife established endowments at the Smithsonian Institution’s Freer Gallery
of Art and Arthur M. Sackler
Gallery to support an annual
celebration of the Persian new
year and to fund the purchase of
contemporary Iranian art.
William White,
Marine Corps lieutenant
general
William White, 92, a retired
Marine Corps lieutenant general
and aviator who was awarded the
Silver Star for valor during the
Korean War, died Nov. 22 at a
hospital in Bethesda, Md. The
cause was cancer, said a daughter, Elizabeth Mahmassani.
Gen. White, a resident of Alexandria, Va., was born in New York
City. He served 39 years in the
Marine Corps and retired in 1982
as deputy chief of staff for aviation.
He was awarded the Silver Star
in 1952 while serving as tactical
air observer on a patrol mission
in enemy territory. “Braving intense enemy machine gun fire, he
carried out repeated passes at
extremely low altitude to mark
the enemy positions with smoke
grenades . . . thereby aiding in
the complete destruction of the
hostile positions,” read the medal’s citation.
In Vietnam, in 1968, he lost his
right eye during an enemy mortar attack and was reclassified as
a restricted naval aviator. In retirement, Gen. White was a consultant from 1984 to 2007 with
Burdeshaw Associates, a defense
contractor.
Nancy Graham,
Peace Corps official
Nancy Graham, 91, who served
as a special assistant to four
Peace Corps directors from 1976
to 1982 and also served on many
nonprofit boards, died Jan. 12 at
her home in Royal Oak, Md. The
cause was lung cancer, said a
daughter, Busy Graham.
Mrs. Graham was born Nancy
Aring in Milwaukee. In the 1950s,
she led the Planned Parenthood
chapter in Milwaukee, until resigning after having her fifth
child. She settled in the Washington area in the mid-1960s after
her husband, Richard, a former
deputy to Peace Corps Director
R. Sargent Shriver, became director of the National Teacher
Corps, vice president of the National Organization for Women
and an original member of the
Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission.
In the early 1970s, Mrs.
Graham was deputy director of
education programs at the Urban
Coalition. At the Peace Corps, she
focused on searching for talented
minorities and women to serve
overseas and as senior staff members. In the years that followed,
she was national coordinator of
Peace Links, a nuclear disarmament campaign, and co-founder
and executive director of the
Institute for Soviet American Relations, a group that encouraged
student and cultural exchanges.
She also served on many Washington school boards before moving to Royal Oak from the District in the 1990s.
William Missouri,
Maryland judge
William Missouri, 77, who retired in 2010 as administrative
judge and chief judge for Maryland’s 7th Judicial Circuit, which
includes Prince George’s, Calvert,
Charles and St. Mary’s counties,
died Nov. 21 at his home in
Mitchellville, Md. The cause was
congestive heart failure, said his
wife, Delores Missouri.
Judge Missouri was born in
Washington. At retirement, he
had been a Maryland judge for 25
years, beginning at the District
Court level in 1985. Earlier he
was an assistant state’s attorney
in Prince George’s County. From
1985 to 2004, he was chairman of
Bowie State University’s Board of
Visitors.
IMLE
Jeanne Marie “Pat” Ensor, 91, of Westminster, MD, formerly of Howard and Montgomery Counties, passed away on Saturday, February 3, 2018 at Sinai Hospital.
Born in Washington, D.C., on January 21,
1927, she was the daughter of the late
Harry Arthur Patterson and Mary Jane
Cochrane. She was the beloved wife of
the late Joshua Daniels Ensor.
She earned her pilot’s license before her
driver’s license at the age of 18 while
attending Western Maryland College. It was
at WMC where she met her future husband,
Josh, whom she married in 1948 on the
day she graduated with her bachelor’s
degree. Jeanne "Pat" was the Director of
the YMCA for Maryland; marketing director
for Ferris, Baker, Watts and Eyre Bus Service
of Glenelg; sat on the Board of Directors
for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce; and
was an Associate Pastor for local Methodist
churches. In addition, Jeanne volunteered
for several organization in every community
she lived.
Even with her many professional accomplishments, she was most proud of her
family. Surviving Jeanne are her children
and spouses Carole and Ron Asbury of
Bethany Beach, Delaware, John and Jackie
Ensor of Mt. Airy, Douglas Ensor and
Corinne Baldwin of Brookeville; and Pastor
Donald and Carolyn Ensor of Spokane,
Washington; 10 grandchildren and 14 greatgrandchildren.
The family will receive friends Friday, March
2 from 6 to 8 p.m. and Saturday March
3 from 10 to 11 a.m. at Pritts Funeral
Home, 412 Washington Rd, Westminster. A
memorial service will be held on March 3 at
noon in Little Baker Chapel on the campus
of McDaniel College.
Memorial contributions may be made in her
memory to Carroll Lutheran Village Endowment Fund, 300 St. Luke Circle, Westminster, MD 21157.
Online condolences may be offered at
www.prittsfuneralhome.com
EVANS
LILLIE MAE ALLEN
Obituaries of residents from the
District, Maryland and Northern
Virginia.
ENSOR
JEANNE MARIE ENSOR "Pat"
newsobits@washpost.com
O F N O TE
Died peacefully in Washington, DC on February
1, 2018 at the age of 70.
Harriet was born on February 8, 1947 in Washington DC. She graduated from Cardozo High
School. Harriet spent several years working for
the Postal Service before moving to a position
with Fairfax County from which she retired in
2016.
Harriet is survived by her son and daughterin-law, John and Laurie Caldwell; her sister,
Lydia Pilgrim; her brother, Irskin Pilgrim; and
her brother and sister-in-law, Ivory and Crystal
Pilgrim; as well as several nieces; nephews;
grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She
was predeceased by her parents, Jacob and
Mary Lee Pilgrim, her sister Delilah Pilgrim
Robinson and her brother Theodore Pilgrim.
A Memorial Service is scheduled for February
10, 2018 at 11 a.m. at Advent Funeral Services,
9013 Annapolis Rd. Lanham, MD. 20706.
Entered into eternal rest on Thursday, January
25, 2018. She is survived by her cousin, Frances
Woods Thompson; the Woods family, her
church family, other cousins, relatives and
friends. Ms. Allen will lie in state at New
Bethany Baptist Church, 1300 10th St., NW,
Saturday, February 10 from 10 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. Interment at Fort Lincoln
Cemetery.
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
IRENE MAE EVANS
Passed away on February 2, 2018. She is
survived by her children, Richard (Chris), Russell (Marla), Dale (Susan), Glenn (Robin) and
Franklin (Heather) Evans; five grandchildren;
sister, Carolyn (Tom) Curns; and a host of
nieces; nephews; other relatives and friends.
Gathering will be held on Monday, February
12 for 10 a.m. until time of memorial service
10:30 a.m. at Fort Lincoln Funeral Home, 3401
Bladensburg Road, Brentwood MD. Inurment
Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
www.fort-lincoln.com
On Wednesday, February 7,
2018 of Potomac, MD. Beloved
wife of Morton Faller. Devoted mother of Bryan Faller and
Scott Faller. Cherished grandmother of Zosia Faller. Funeral
services will be held Friday,
February 9, 2018, 1:30 p.m. at B'nai Israel
Congregation in Rockville, MD. Interment
to follow at Judean Memorial Gardens in
Olney, MD. Family will be observing shiva
Saturday and Sunday evening at the residence of Morton Faller with a 7 p.m. Minyan
service. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Montgomery
Hospice, or a charity of your choice.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
DEATH NOTICE
FORREY
BERRY
CHRISTOPHER PATRICK FORREY
Entered this world on March 4, 1986 and was
suddenly and sadly taken on January 31, 2018.
Beloved son of Patrick and Maggie Forrey (nee
Koran) of Washington, DC. Loving grandson of
Hurbert and Mary Jean Forrey (nee Lancaster)
of Westlake, OH and Robert and Margaret (Peg)
Koran (nee Sutton), both deceased. Nephew to
several aunts and uncles and cousins. Proud
member of Plumbers Local #5. Funeral services
will be on Friday, February 9, at 1:30 p.m. at
St. Patrick in the City Catholic Church, 619
10th St., NW, Washington, DC 20001. In lieu of
flowers, the family suggests donations to Lost
Dogs and Cats Rescue Foundation lostdogrescue.org PO Box 50037, Arlington, VA 22205
or Catholic Charities of DC Catholiccharitiesdc.org 924 G street NW, Washington, DC 20001
FORREY
LAURA ELLEN BERRY
On Tuesday, January 23, 2018, LAURA E. BERRY
of Washington, DC. Loving mother of Marie
B. Wilson and Jean Y. Ivory. She leaves to
cherish her memory nine grandchildren; 14
great-grandchildren; and seven great-greatgrandchildren. Also survived by a host of other
relatives and friends. Family will receive friends
on Friday, February 9, 2018 at Friendship
Baptist Church, 900 Delaware Ave., SW, Washington, DC from 10 a.m. until time of funeral
service at 11 a.m. Interment Quantico National
Cemetery, Trinangle, VA. Arrangements by
STRICKLAND FUNERAL SERVICES.
www.stricklandfuneralservices.com
CHRISTOPHER P. FORREY (Apprentice)
The officers and members of
Plumbers Local No. 5 are regretfully notified of the death of Brother Christopher P. Forrey, who
passed away earlier this year in
Washington, DC. Funeral services
will be held on Friday, February 9, 2018 at
St. Patrick In the City Catholic Church, 619
10th Street, NW, Washington DC at 1:30 p.m.
Interment will be private.
James E. Killeen, III
Business Manager
#1236
JENKS
RICHARD L. JENKS
Members of the Association of
Retired Police Officers of D.C. are
notified of the February 7, 2018
death of Richard L. Jenks. He
was an OFF with MPD-SOD when
retired on October 1, 1979.
KEIL
MARY B. KEIL (Age 85)
On January 28, 2018 in Chambersburg, PA.
Beloved wife of the late William C. Keil; sister
of the late James H. Butts, the late Nancy B.
Armistead and Sally B. Davis; mother of Kathryn
(Jay) Brown, Elizabeth Harley, Sharon (Scott)
Webb, and Susan (Jeff) White; and grandmother
of Jeffrey (Vianne) and Julia Brown, Will and
James Harley, Madeline and Harrison Webb,
Gabrielle, Lydia and Rosemary White. A celebration of her life was held by the family shortly
after her passing.
www.sellersfuneralhome.com
LAMEY
CHARLES HENRY LAMEY "Chuck"
Charles Henry Lamey, 82, of Gainesville, VA,
passed to his eternal home surrounded by
his family Monday, February 5, 2018. The
only son of Charles and Catherine Lamey,
Chuck was born May 9, 1935 in Cambridge,
Massachusetts.
Chuck graduated from Boston College with
a Mathematics BA, afterwards earning a
MS in Aeronautical Safety Systems Management from the University of Southern
California. In 1995, he retired from DISA
after 30 years of distinguished service with
the federal government.
Chuck’s greatest joy in life was his family.
He was a devoted husband to his loving
wife of 54 years Dovie (Betty), and a caring
father to his daughter Catherine and son
Jack (Cathy). Chuck adored his three grandchildren, Henry, James and Camille. He is
also survived by his sisters Marie Chisari
(Largo, FL) and Dorothy Silkman (Hooksett,
NH), a brother-in-law John Brannan (Theresa) (Gulf Breeze, FL), and nieces, nephews
and cousins.
He will be greatly missed by all who knew
him.
Friends may call at Money and King, Vienna,
on Thursday, February 8, from 6 to 8 p.m. A
funeral Mass will be held on Friday, February 9, at 10:30 a.m., at Holy Trinity Catholic
Church, Gainesville, VA.
LINDNER
THELMA LINDNER
Because your loved one served proudly...
C0979 2x3
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
SF
On Friday, February 2, 2018. Portia
Mary Mollard Imle was born on
April 5, 1924, the only child of
Olympic oarsman Sidney G. Mollard, Sr., and Amelia Stevenson
Mollard, in Philadelphia, PA. She
died peacefully at Riderwood Village in Silver
Spring, MD. At the age of five, she lost
her mother to tuberculosis. Her father later
remarried Olga, who became a loving stepmother. After graduating from Upper Darby
High School and Ursinus College, Portia
returned home to teach at her alma mater,
alongside her dear friend and mentor Agnes
Grunberg. A love of travel and adventure soon
took the two teachers to Costa Rica where
Portia met her future husband, Ernest Imle.
They were married in 1947 and lived in Costa
Rica until 1954. She remained a Maryland
resident from then on, but followed Ernest
on assignments with the USDA to El Salvador
and Rome. Her fluency in Spanish served
her well in her travels. Portia raised four
children while Ernest traveled extensively with
his work. As a student of anthroposophy, she
later returned to teaching at the Washington
Waldorf School where her students became
like another family, many of whom were still
in contact with her late in life. Her love of
literature, the arts, education, and liberal politics kept her mind sharp until her death at
93. Friends and family will always remember
that sharp mind, as well as her incredible inner
strength and indomitable spirit. A memorial
service will be held on Friday, February 9, at
noon at Riderwood Chapel, 3140 Gracefield
Rd Silver Spring, MD, 20904. Memorials may
be directed to the Riderwood Benevolent Care
Fund or a charity of the donor's choice.
www.borgwardtfuneralhome.com
FALLER
— From staff reports
1-800-753-POST
PORTIA M. IMLE
RUTH MACHTINGER FALLER
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
Home delivery is convenient.
Of Manassas VA, passed away Tuesday, January 30, 2018 in Novant Health Prince William
Medical Center in Manassas, VA surrounded by
his family.
Walter was born May 3, 1939 in Washington,
DC to the late Walter L. Gant, Sr. and Alma
Williams Gant who has preceded him in death.
Walter attended the Huffman-Boston School in
Arlington, VA. His lifelong working career was
serving as a Part Manager for Ted Britt Ford,
Kip Killmon Ford and Koons Ford.
He married Edna Strother Gant in 1962 who
has preceded him in death. He is survived by
wife, June Wells Gant who he married in 2014.
Along with his wife, he is also survived by
his son, Tony Gant (Norma) of Lanham, MD;
daughters, Michelle Thomas (Mark) and Lisa
Jackson (Scott), both of Winchester VA. His
step-daughter, April Bethune (Eric) of Bristow
VA; grandchildren, Donte’ Harris and Jordan
Jackson of Winchester VA, Michelle Viscarra of
Bowie MD, Cindy Viscarra of Upper Marlboro
MD, Jorge Viscarra and Kimberly Viscarra, of
Lanham MD and Ryan Bethune of Bristow, VA.
He was preceded in death by his daughter,
Stephanie Gant. Also survived by a host of
relatives and friends.
A celebration of his life will be held Saturday,
February 10, 2018 at Murphy Funeral Home,
4510 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22203.
Family and friends will be received at 10 a.m.,
service at 11 a.m. with Rev. Richard Greene
officiating.
Online condolences may be left at:
www.murphyfuneralhomes.com
On Tuesday, February 6, 2018 of
Potomac, MD. Beloved wife of
the late Jack Lindner; devoted
mother of Gregg Lindner and
Bonnie (Jeff) Endick; loving sister of Harvey (Judy) Sackheim,
and the late Carol (late Steve)
Marcus; dear grandmother of Jennifer
Endick, Drew Endick, Justin Lindner, Elana
Lindner and Ethan Lindner. Also survived
by nieces and nephews, Ari (Kim), Belinda
(Tony), Alisha (Kent) and many grandnieces
and grandnephews. Graveside services
will be held on Sunday, February 11, 2018
at 11 a.m. at Mount Ararat Cemetery in
Lindenhurst, NY. Family will be observing
shiva Monday and Tuesday at the residence
of Bonnie and Jeff Endick. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to the
Jewish Council for the Aging, Attention: The
Kensington Club or JSSA Hospice. Services
entrusted to Sagel Bloomfield Danzansky
Goldberg Funeral Care.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
BAYLISS
JOSEPH E. (Krankman) BAYLISS
(Age 74)
Of Stafford County, VA, went to that heavenly
jam session in the sky on February 2, 2018.
Born in Alexandria, VA, on January 27, 1944;
and grew up in Woodbridge, VA. Joe was a
musician all of his life. He started out standing
on a Coca-Cola crate singing “Hound Dog” at
about ten or eleven years old. He worked the
VA, MD, and DC. club circuit.
His bands played many of the military bases
stateside and overseas. He was also mentioned in the book Capitol Rock.
Joe worked with well-known musicians such
as Roy Buchanan, where he accompanied
Roy for his launch concert at Gaston Hall,
Georgetown University singing “Shotgun”
and “Hey Joe”. Joe also accompanied others
including Jerry Lee Lewis, Charlie Daniels, and
Ernest Tubb.
Joe was best known for his electrifying
vocals. He sang a mixed genre of rock, soul,
heavy blues, and country. He was a rebelrousing frontman and constant entertainer,
also well-known for his James Brown routine
throughout the 1960’s. His main instruments
were a Hammond B-3 and guitar.
In addition to his music, Joe was a collector
of antique motorcycles. He had a hobby
business called “East Coast Hummer,” and
was featured on History Channel’s American
Pickers. Joe was a free-spirited, fun-loving,
always smiling, beloved friend to all.
He is survived by his wife, Valerie Bayliss; his
son, Joseph E. Bayliss, III ( financeStephanie
Portch); his grandchildren, Sarah E. Bayliss
and Joseph E. Bayliss, IV; and a daughter,
Leslie Bayliss.
There will be a life celebration from 1 to 3 p.m.
Saturday, February 10, 2018 in the chapel at
Mt. Ararat Baptist Church in Stafford.
In lieu of flowers Joe’s family requests that
expressions of sympathy take the form of
contributions to Children’s Hospital.
Condolences to his family may be shared
online at:
www.vacremationservice.com
EZ
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
MATOVICH
WINFORD
HALL
OLIVER
MARGUERITE MARIE
MAJORS MATOVICH
MARY L. WINFORD (Age 93)
Marguerite Marie Majors Matovich, age 91, of
Buckeystown, MD and originally of Congress
Heights, passed away Thursday, February 1,
2018, at the family farm, Carrollton Manor
Overlook, in Buckeystown. She was the
beloved wife of Mark Matthew Matovich, who
predeceased her in 2007. She is survived by
her children, Melinda Geisbert, Maureen Olson
and Mark Matovich, Jr. She was preceded in
death by Mark's wife, Anita Matovich. She is
also survived by seven grandchildren, Philip
and Courtney Gosnell, Lauren and JT Olson
Smith, Jason and Caroline Berno, Lindsay and
Ben Herbst, Kristin and Scott Mosher, Jack
Berno, and Mark Matovich III. She is also
survived by six great-grandchildren as well
as many loving family members in Virginia,
Montana and Pennsylvania. Interment will be
a private service at Resthaven in Frederick.
The family is planning to have a spring time
renewal of life memorial for a life which goes
on eternally in those left behind. Those wishing
to make a memorial contribution may do so
to Hospice of Frederick County, P.O. Box 1799,
Frederick, MD 21702.
LEOPOLD
Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on August 16, 1939, Andrea spent her
early years raised in the Navajo Nation in Fort
Defiance, Arizona, and Gallup, New Mexico,
by her mother, Eve (Steinberg), and her
father, Jacob Siegel, a physician. The family
returned home to Philadelphia for Andrea to
attend school and to live among her many
aunts, uncles, and cousins about whom she
spoke with great fondness.
A stellar student who proudly traveled from
her home on Snyder Avenue by two trolley
cars and a train to The Philadelphia High
School for Girls, Andrea served as the yearbook editor and made lifelong friendships
from the Class of 1957.
Andrea attended the University of Pennsylvania, and through her clever phone skills
working in her father’s doctor’s office, she
first made a connection with Paul Leopold,
a fellow classmate from New York City.
Andrea and Paul began their nearly 40year marriage on December 22, 1957, and
moved to Boston, where Andrea completed
her degree studies in Sociology at Boston
University in 1960 with Phi Beta Kappa distinction.
Over the next two decades, Andrea devoted
her life to raising her three children in homes
in Tarrytown, New York; San Jose, California;
Potomac, Maryland; Stuttgart, Germany; and
Gaithersburg, Maryland. Through her unconditional love for her children, she strived to
instill her values of independence, education,
and adventure. The accomplishments of
each of her children are largely a result of
Andrea’s guidance and encouragement, and
her steadfast hope for their happiness.
Andrea returned to school to earn an M.S.
degree in Procurement, Acquisitions, and
Grants Management from American University in Washington, D.C. in 1981, which
launched her career in public service for
the federal government for the next 34
years. She began her career in the General
Accounting Office, and then transitioned to
what was for Andrea her most exciting work
as an inspector with the Department of
State. Her attention to detail and love for
travel made Andrea well suited for this role,
and she visited U.S. embassies in over 100
countries during her tenure.
Andrea loved to travel and explore andshe
filled her home with tasteful jewelry and
art treasures from around the world. African
culture and art held a special place in
Andrea’s heart. She dreamed of sharing her
adventurous spirit with each of her seven
grandchildren with a destination vacation
of their choice for their 13th birthday. She
began to fulfill this goal with trips to the
Andrea is survived by Theodore (Ted) Alves,
her constant, adoring partner of nearly 20
years.
With unwavering devotion, Ted
brought richness and adventure to their life
together with small surprises and thoughtful
gestures. He selflessly cared for his lady
when she needed it most. Andrea is also
survived by her first son, Jeffrey Ross
Leopold, his wife, Michelle, and their children, Mark, Morgan, and Mason of Richmond, Virginia; her second son, Philip Todd
Leopold, his wife, Anita, and their children,
Nathan and Nicholas of Atlanta, Georgia;
and her daughter, Julie Kay Leopold, her
husband, Bill Haddican, and their children,
Evan and Joseph of Brooklyn, New York. She
is predeceased by her mother and father, as
well as by her very dear stepfather Seymour
Feldman, formerly of Maple Shade, New
Jersey. Andrea will be forever-remembered
by her loving family as “Budgie”, “Mom”,
“Granma”, “Knobby”, “Grahs”, and “My
Lady”.
Andrea returns home to Philadelphia where
she will be memorialized on Sunday, February 11th at Joseph Levine & Son at 2811 West
Chester Pike, Broomall, Pennsylvania, from
10:30 until noon. Immediately following the
service, she will be interred next to her father
in Mount Jacob’s Cemetery in Glenolden,
Pennsylvania.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations in memory of Andrea Leopold be made
to one of the following very worthwhile
organizations:
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center,
Attn: Emily Carter, 885 Second Avenue, 7th
Floor, New York, NY 10017. By indicating
on your gift that it is in memory of Andrea
Leopold, the donation will be designated to
the Patient Financial Assistance Program for
the uninsured and under-insured.
MJHS Foundation, 39 Broadway, 3rd Floor,
New York, NY 10006. By indicating on your
gift that it is in memory of Andrea Leopold,
the donation will be applied to the continuation of high-quality healthcare programs.
www.levinefuneral.com
IN MEMORIAM
SEEVERS
BARBARA J. HALL
On January 28, 2018, of Upper
Marlboro, Maryland. Loving
wife of Jerome Hall.
She
leaves to cherish one son
Jeremy Hall; brother Maxfield
Hodge; step-father James
Makle, and a host of other relatives and friends.
Visitation will be held on Friday February 9,
2018 at Nottingham Myers United Methodist
Church, 15601 Brooks Church Rd, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772 from 9:30 a.m. until Celebration of Life at 11 a.m. Interment February 16,
2018, 11 a.m., Maryland Veterans Cemetery,
Cheltenham, Maryland. Services Entrusted to
Adams Funeral Home, P.A., Aquasco, Maryland.
www.Adamsfuneralhomemd.com
As it reads on our wedding bands
"10/18/58 E & G Forever"
Gene
LOUVENIA MADDOX McGILL
Of Washington, DC, departed this life on Friday,
January 26, 2018. The beloved mother of Consuella McGill and Regina McGill. She will be laid
to rest on Friday, February 9, 2018, visitation
from 12:30 p.m. until time of service 1:30 p.m.
at Fort Lincoln Funeral Home, 3401 Bladensburg Rd., Brentwood, MD. Interment at Fort
LIncoln Cemetery.
www.fort-lincoln.com
HARRISON
DEATH NOTICE
BERRY
MICHAEL BRODERICK THOMPSON
OLIVER
Deacon EDWARD B. HARRISON, JR.
"Eddie" (Age 76)
JOHN C. OLIVER
Members of Acacia Lodge #25
F&AM, PHA are hereby notified
of the passing of Bro. John C.
Oliver. Homegoing services Friday
February 9, at Asbury United
Methodist Church, 926 11th Street
NW, Washington, DC. Wake 10 a.m. service 11
a.m. Members please assemble at 10 a.m.
Masonic services will be performed.
Tart E. Dickerson., W.M.
P.M. Edward E. Brown, Secy.
PARKER
GREGORY LAMONT PARKER
(Age 44)
On January 28, 2018 of Forest Heights, MD.
Visitation, Friday, February 9, 2018 10 a.m. until
service at 11 a.m. at Higher Calling Ministries,
401 Prince Georges Boulevard, Upper Marlboro
MD. Interment Resurrection Cemetery.
POWELL
KEVIN CHARLES BERRY
Thespian Kevin Charles Berry, known to all who
loved him as "KC" passed away peacefully on
February 2, 2018 at Shady Grove Adventist
Hospital in the presence of his loving family.
KC was born on March 20, 1993 to Monica
and Kevin Berry; he graduated from Gonzaga
High School in 2011 and went on to attend the
Catholic University of America and the Stellar
Adler Drama School in New York in pursuit
of his passion, the theatre. "KC" lit up any
room with his smile and made all feel welcome
with his authenticity. From his family "KC" was
the kindest person you could ever meet. He
is survived by his mother and father; sisters,
Kayla and Parker; grandmothers, Lucy A. Wynn
and Brenda M. Berry; a host of aunts, uncles,
cousins and friends. Memorial Service will be
held on Saturday, February 10, 2018, 10 a.m.
at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, 7500
Pearl St., Bethesda, MD. Interment Fort Lincoln
Cemetery. Arrangements by McGuire.
www.mcguire-services.com
Deacon Edward B. Harrison, Jr.
entered into eternal rest on Sunday, January 28, 2018. He leaves
to cherish his memory family and
friends. On Thursday, February 8
from 9 a.m. until 11 a.m., Deacon Harrison will lie in repose at
Way of the Cross Church of Christ (Mother
Church), 1800 Hazelwood Dr., Capitol Heights,
MD, where services will be held at 11 a.m.,
Bishop Alphonzo D. Brooks, Senior Pastor.
Interment Harmony Memorial Park. Services
by Hunt Funeral Home.
www.huntfuneralhome.net
KANCHUGER
CIPRIANO
Funeral Home
Self-Service Deadline:
1 p.m.
NO EXCEPTIONS
SIMPSON
ARLENE BADEL SIMPSON (Age 94)
DORIS DAVIS TRONE
(Age 89)
children, Sarah (Mark) Girard, of Annandale,
VA, Anna Czaplicki (Joseph) Ryan, of Richmond, VA, Tiffany Klinedinst, Zachary Trone,
and Anthony Trone, all of York, PA, and four
great-grandchildren, Eamon, Ainslee, Ewan,
and Colvin Girard. She was preceded in death
by two brothers, Dr. Harold Davis of New
York City, and Wayne Davis of York, PA, and
her sister, Colonel (Ret. USA) Alice Davis of
Charlottesville, VA.
After moving back to York, PA, in 2014, Doris
resided at Autumn House West, and the
family would like to thank them for the love
and care they provided to her over these past
three years.
There will be a visitation from 9 to 10 a.m.
on Saturday, February 10, and a celebration
of life to follow at 10 a.m. The service will
be held at the John W. Keffer Funeral Home
and crematory, Inc. 2114 W. Market Street,
York, PA, 17404, with the Pastor Keith Fair
officiating. Following the funeral service, a
private graveside service will be held in
Prospect Hill Cemetery, York, PA.
Memorial contributions may be made to the
Women's Studies Program at The George
Washington University.
SMITH
MICHAEL KIRK SMITH, SR.
WILSON
He earned degrees from Taylor, Howard
and Johns Hopkins Universities. His career
included jobs with the Rhode Island Urban
League; President Johnson’s War on Poverty;
National Urban League; U.S. Department of
State (USAID)/Africa Bureau, Washington,
DC, which included travel to 33 countries.
DWIGHT THOMPSON WILSON
(Age 85)
Of Silver Spring, Maryland, died Friday, February 2, 2018 at his home surrounded by
his family. He courageously endured the
effects of Parkinson’s disease and Myasthenia Gravis for 13 years.
Dwight was born in Marion, Indiana on
October 31, 1932 the seventh of nine children, to the late Faustin and Helen Thompson Wilson. His marriage to Norma Smith
Wilson for almost 52 years produced two
daughters, Michele Renee Wilson (d. 1983)
and Jennifer Lynn Wilson. Family life brought
Dwight immense joy and pride. Being a
loving husband and doting father were his
most esteemed accomplishments.
Peacefully on Saturday, February 3, 2018. Family will receive friends on Saturday, February
10 at Shiloh Baptist Church, 505 Market St.,
Port Royal, VA 22535, wake, 10 a.m.; service,
11 a.m. Interment, February 14, 11 a.m. at
Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery.
DOROTHY LINDWALL SAITTA CIPRIANO
On February 1, 2018, Dorothy Lindwall Saitta
Cipriano, wife of retired USAF Lt Col John
Cipriano, passed away peacefully. She was
preceded in death by her first husband, Major
Michael Saitta USAF, her parents, Rudy and
Margaret Lindwall, and her brother, Richard
Lindwall.
She is survived by her children, Dr. Michael
Saitta (Wynn), David Saitta (Cynthia) and Laura
Saitta. She is also survived by her stepchildren,
Jeannette Cipriano Maize (Jay), Jennifer Cipriano (Ben), and Tony Cipriano (Sarah); grandchildren, Wayne Pearson (Ali), Colt Pearson,
Jonathan Saitta, Jaclyn Saitta, Angela Saitta,
Ariana Saitta, Nathan Maize, Avery Maize, Viola
Cipriano, Vincent McManus, Nicolas Cipriano
and Natalie Cipriano; great-grandchildren,
Bobby, Tatum and Logan Pearson; along with
her sister,Peggy Sorrentino, sister-in-law, Joann
Lindwall and nephews, Rick Gallo (Dawn), Rich
Lindwall (Lauren) and Joey Lindwall (Jaime).
Dorothy completed her bachelor and master
degrees at Wright State University after which
she began her civilian career for the USAF at
the Air Force Institute of Technology; followed
by many years for the Air Staff at the Pentagon.
During her husband John’s tour in Germany,
she worked for USAFE in Ramstein AB. After
retirement, Dorothy was an Air Force “Arling ton Lady” volunteer at Arlington National
Cemetery for 12 years. She was a member of
the Sumi-e Society of America and a Resident
Associate at the Smithsonian.
Relatives and friends may call at Jefferson
Funeral Chapel 5755 Castlewellan Dr. Alexandria, VA 22315 on Sunday, February 11, 2018
from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Funeral
service will be held at Saint Lawrence the
Martyr Roman Catholic Church, 6222 Franconia Rd., Alexandria, VA 22310 Monday, February 12, 2018 at 10:30 a.m. Interment Arlington
National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be made to Wounded Warriors
or a charity of your choice. Please view and
sign the family guestbook at:
www.jeffersonfuneralchapel.com
Memorial Service will be on Friday, February
9, 2018, 10 a.m. at the People’s Congregational United Church of Christ, 4704 – 13th
St., NW, Washington, DC 20011. A repast will
follow the service.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
the Michele Renee Wilson Memorial Scholarship Fund. Services by STEWART.
Of Potomac, MD passed away peacefully on
Saturday, February 3, 2018. Beloved husband
of Margaret Cotter; loving father of Stuart
(Arleen), Molly (Chuck) and Sarah (Eric); stepfather of David (Jennifer) and Ken (Ava); and dear
Poppa to 14 grandchildren.
Bob was the only child born to Morris and
Eva Kanchuger, who had emigrated as young
children from Eastern Europe. He was raised in
Brooklyn and the Bronx and attended college
at Amherst. He graduated from Harvard Law
School, then served in the U.S. Navy. He had
a career at the U.S. Agency for International
Development and the World Bank.
In retirement, Bob was a board member of
Language Etc. (now the Washington English
Center), an organization that provides English
classes and other services to immigrants, and
volunteered there as an English teacher. He
served as a mediator through the DC courts,
and mentored young people with challenges
through a Montgomery County program. With
friends, he established a bike riding group and
a New Yorker review group, both of which
continue.
Shiva will be observed at the family home on
Tuesday, February 6 and Wednesday, February
7 from 4 to 7 p.m. Small celebratory gatherings
are ongoing.
In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation
in Bob’s memory to a compassionate cause of
your choosing.
MASKE
WANDA M. MASKE
STEWART
MARLON DAVID GRAHAM
KAY D. STEWART
Passed away on Thursday, February 1, 2018. She is survived
by her devoted sons, Keith
Stewart and Duane Stewart;
and a host of other relatives.
Family and friends will unite
on Saturday, February 10, 2018
from 10 a.m. until time of service 11 a.m. at BRISCOE-TONIC FUNERAL
HOME, 38576 BRETT WAY, MECHANICSVILLE,
MD. Interment immediately following at Heritage Memorial Cemetery, Waldorf, MD.
www.briscoe-tonicfuneralhome.com
On January 30, 2018 of Landover,
MD. He leaves to cherish his memory, seven siblings, Michael E.,
Janette , Minister John R., Rhonda
B., Robert T., Alan T. and Anthony
T. Graham; two grandchildren,
Najae Sierra Jones and Damariae Jones; one
uncle, aunts, cousins, nieces, nephews, and
a host of relatives and friends. Visitation 10
a.m., followed by Homegoing and Celebration
of Service, 11 a.m., on Friday, February 9, 2018
at Trinidad Baptist Church, 6611 Walker Mill
Rd., Capitol Heights, MD, Pastor John T. Rhodes
officiating. Interment at Harmony Memorial
Park. Services to R.N. Horton Co. Morticians,
Inc.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 Ext 4-4122
deathnotices@washpost.com
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
CURRENT 2018 RATES:
( PER DAY)
GRAHAM
Dwight’s interests included politics, music
(especially jazz), religion, history, traveling,
sports and current events. His calm and
serene personality became energized when
engaged in conversation about politics and
international relations. He was a loving, giving, hard-working man who emphasized the
importance of God, family, education and
community in all his life’s works. Dwight
touched, inspired and encouraged many
lives. In spite of having to manage the
diseases that engulfed him, he was blessed
with a rich and full life and will be sorely
missed.
Left to cherish his memory are his wife,
Norma; daughter, Jennifer; two sisters,
Priscilla Warrick of Rockville, MD and Faustine King (Ralph) of Indianapolis, IN; one
brother, Robert Wilson of Detroit, MI and
a host of nieces, nephews, other family
members and friends.
Presidents' Day
Monday,
February 19, 2018
Photo Deadline:
1 p.m.
TRONE
Passed away at home on Monday, February
5, 2018. Arlene lived in, and worked or
volunteered for the City of Falls Church
for more than six decades. She served
in multiple capacities at the Mary Riley
Styles Public Library, joining the staff as
a volunteer, and eventually attaining the
position of Assistant Director. She retired
in 1998, but continued as a dedicated
volunteer until last week. Arlene was a
lover of physical fitness, the literary world,
baseball, eating fine food, and spending
time with her family, especially on Martha’s
Vineyard. She was preceded in death
by her husband, John Arol Simpson in
2011, and two sisters, Helen Forker and
Thelma Arthurs. She is survived by her
son, George Simpson (Kathy) of Annandale,
VA, and three grandchildren, Mark (Lida),
Julianne, and Laura. She is also survived by
one great-grandchild, Rockland Simpson,
a sister, Gloria Hilbert of Bethlehem, PA,
and three nieces. A memorial service will
be held at 3 p.m. on Saturday, February
10, at Murphy Funeral Home, 1102 West
Broadway Street, Falls Church, VA 22046.
The family will receive visitors from 2 to
3 p.m. on Saturday, February 10, 2018 at
Murphy Funeral Home, 1102 West Broad
Street, Falls Church, VA 22046, followed
by a Memorial Service at 3 p.m. In lieu
of flowers the family asks you to consider
donating to the Mary Riley Styles Public
Library, 120 N. Virginia Ave., Falls Church,
VA 22046.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
11 a.m. - 3 p.m.
WILBERT R. POWELL
On Saturday, February 3, 2018, Wilbert R.
Powell of Laurel, MD, formerly of Dayton, OH.
Beloved husband of Belva Powell, cherished
father of Anthony (Donna) and Anne Powell,
loving grandfather of Alise and Wesley Powell,
adored brother of Dorothy Mercer, and a host
of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Visitation will be held on Saturday, February 10,
2018 from 10 to11 a.m., followed by funeral
service at New Samaritan Baptist Church, 1100
Florida Avenue, NE, Washington D.C. Interment
will take place in Quantico National Cemetery
at a later date.
Michael Broderick Thompson entered into eternal peace on Tuesday, January 30, 2018. Loving
father of Donell Thompson, Crystal Thompson
and Michael B. Thompson, II. He is also survived
by his mother, Joanne S. Thompson; one sister,
Michelle Key; eight grandchildren; two greatgrandchildren; nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Memorial services will be
held at STEWART FUNERAL HOME, 4001 Benning Rd., NE on Saturday, February 10 at 11
a.m. Interment private.
HOLIDAY HOURS
ROBERT KANCHUGER (Age 87)
Of York, PA, died on February 4, 2018, at
York Hospital, after a brief illness. She was
born in Chester, PA, the daughter of the late
Colonel (Ret USAF) Burl A. Davis, and the
late Pauline Johnson (retired school teacher).
Doris lived for many years in York, PA, where
she worked in the Law Offices of Smith
and Feldmann. She was a graduate of York
Junior College, and Millersville State College,
earning a BA in English. She moved to the
Washington, DC area in 1972, and worked
in the Faculty Senate Office of the George
Washington University, as Coordinator, Faculty Senate Activities, until she retired in 2002.
She received an MA in Women's Studies in
1978 from the George Washington University,
and was member of the Board of Trustees
of the Alumina Association of GWU, 1984-86
She was an amateur photographer and loved
traveling and sharing wonderful stories and
pictures of her travels.
She is survived by her daughter, Leslie Trone
Czaplicki, and husband, Robert of Annandale,
VA; two sons, Mathew A. Trone, and wife,
Johnna, of York, PA, and P. Charles "Skip"
Trone, III, of Rockville, MD; five grand
JOHN CHESTER OLIVER (Age 80)
John C. Oliver passed away peacefully on
January 19, 2018. He was born October 3, 1937
in Washington, DC. He enjoyed spending time
with his friends and family, and listening to
his collection of R&B, jazz and blues. John is
survived by his sweetheart, Mary Murphy and
his two daughters, Tanya and Valerie Oliver. The
family will receive friends on Friday, February
9, 2018 from 10 a.m. until time of Homegoing
Service, 11 a.m., at Asbury United Methodist
Church, 926 11th St., NW, Washington, DC.
Interment at Fort Lincoln Cemetery. Arrangements by McGUIRE.
www.mcguire-services.com
THOMPSON
ELINOR BRAWNER SEEVERS
HAPPY 101st BIRTHDAY
February 8, 1917
December 11, 2008
Caribbean, London and Paris, and the Greek
Islands with three of her grandchildren.
Andrea made dear friends during her 78
years of life, and she will be remembered
as an avid reader with a special affection
for Shakespeare and the French language
and as an enthusiastic hostess who loved
to try recipes from Gourmet magazine. She
was knowledgeable on many subjects, which
made her the perfect companion with whom
to share a cup of tea, always her drink
of choice. She set a flawless dinner table
and wrapped carefully chosen gifts perfectly.
And while she was outspoken and had many
of her own stories to tell, she always made
time to ask and remember specific details
about those for whom she cared.
Passed away on Saturday, January 27, 2018.
Beloved wife of the late Roy Winford; mother
of DiAnn Winford and Don E. Winford (Gloria);
grandmother of twins Donielle and Donneaka
Winford. From a family of 15 siblings, Mary is
also survived by two sisters and five brothers
and a host of other relatives and friends.
Visitation will be held on Saturday, February 10,
2018 from 9:30 a.m. until time of service 10:30
a.m. at FORT LINCOLN FUNERAL HOME, 3401
Bladensburg Road, Brentwood, MD 20722.
Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
www.fort-lincoln.com
McGILL
ANDREA MARSH SIEGEL LEOPOLD
Andrea Marsh (Siegel) Leopold,
78, passed away peacefully on
February 5, 2018, at her home in
New York City.
B7
RE
Born October 5, 1926. Wanda passed
peacefully from this world to the next after
a massive stroke at age 91 on Saturday,
February 3, 2018. She passed at the Hospice of St. Mary's. She was raised in Falling
Waters, WV the youngest of seven and
the only member of the family born in a
hospital. Working in Washington, DC for the
U. S. Government, she met the love of her
life, Russell D. Maske, Sr. and married on
July 18, 1947. She had two sons, Russell D.
Jr. (deceased) and Lawrence "Larry". Wanda
was as comfortable sitting around a table
making crafts for the Church Bazaar as she
was sitting on a boat fishing or eating crabs
on her porch. She loved the beach, she
loved boating and most of all she loved her
family. She sacrificed anything so that her
family was protected and well. Wanda is
survived by her husband of 70 years, Russell
D.; son, Larry and daughter-in-law, Patrice;
many loving nieces, nephews, grand and
great grand nieces and nephews and many
loving friends. She was preceded in death
by son, Russell D. Jr., sisters, Alberta Faye,
Bernice, Fern, Gladys and Juanita and brother, Kenneth. Family may visit at 9:30 a.m.
and friends may visit at 10:30 a.m. on
Thursday, February 8, 2018 at Gasch's
Funeral Home, 4739 Baltimore Ave.,
Hyattsville, MD 20781. Service to be held
at 12:30 p.m. with interment to follow at
Fort Lincoln Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital or the Hospice of
St. Mary's.
www.gaschs.com
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
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2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
Color
3" - $566
4" - $609
5" - $744
-----SUNDAY
Color
3" - $599
4" - $685
5" - $834
6"+ for ALL color notices
$224 each additional inch wkday
$250 each additional inch Sunday
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
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LEGACY.COM
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PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
B8
EZ
. THURSDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Cold and windy under sunny skies
It’s another chilly and breezy day.
We’ve had plenty this winter, so we
are all rather used to them. Under
partly to mostly sunny skies, high
temperatures head for the mid-30s
to upper 30s. Winds are out of the northwest
around 10 to 15 mph, with higher gusts. Tonight,
skies turn partly cloudy as high pressure starts to
shift to our east. Conditions are seasonably cold,
with lows in the 20s to near 30, with light winds.
Today
Mostly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Mostly cloudy
Saturday
Rain
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Rain
Monday
Mostly cloudy
OFFICIAL RECORD
Tuesday
Rain
Temperatures
39° 26
47° 39
52° 47
57° 42
49° 36
50° 42
FEELS*: 33°
FEELS: 41°
FEELS: 48°
FEELS: 51°
FEELS: 47°
FEELS: 47°
CHNCE PRECIP: 0%
P: 25%
P: 80%
P: 75%
P: 30%
P: 65%
WIND: NW 8–16 mph
W: S 7–14 mph
W: ESE 6–12 mph
W: N 7–14 mph
W: N 6–12 mph
W: ENE 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
NATION
Hagerstown
33/20
Davis
26/18
Charlottesville
43/28
M
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
35/21
Dover
35/23
Cape May
Annapolis
34/24
36/24
OCEAN: 42°
Washington
39/26
Su
Weather map features for noon today.
Philadelphia
34/23
Harrisburg
32/16
Norfolk
40/29
Tu
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Dulles
BWI
37° 5:00 p.m.
33° 5:00 a.m.
45°/30°
73° 2017
3° 1907
34° 5:00 p.m.
26° 12:01 a.m.
45°/25°
72° 2017
–1° 1995
36° 5:00 p.m.
26° 12:42 a.m.
43°/25°
72° 2017
6° 1895
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –2.4° yr. to date: –0.7°
Virginia Beach
40/28
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 37°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
OCEAN: 40°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.35"
1.53"
0.66"
2.47"
3.47"
0.0"
3.1"
0.49"
1.83"
0.69"
3.62"
3.37"
0.0"
5.1"
0.40"
1.63"
0.72"
2.63"
3.77"
0.0"
6.5"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
3 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, partly sunny, breezy, cold. High 26–30.
Wind northwest 8–16 mph. Tonight, mostly clear, cold. Low
19–23. Wind west 6–12 mph. Friday, partly sunny, not as
cold, breezy. High 37–41. Wind southwest 8–16 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny, colder, breezy. High
35–40. Wind northwest 8–16 mph. Tonight, mostly clear,
cold. Low 22–29. Wind southwest 4–8 mph. Friday, partly
sunny, breezy, not as cold. High 41–53. Wind southeast
7–14 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly sunny, breezy,
colder. Wind northwest 8–16 knots. Waves a foot or less. Visibility
good. • Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly sunny,
windy, colder. Wind northwest 10–20 knots. Waves 2 feet or less
on the lower Potomac, 1–3 feet on the Chesapeake.• River Stages:
Today, the stage at Little Falls will be 4.3 feet, rising to 5.2 feet
Friday. Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
2:09 a.m.
8:45 a.m.
2:30 p.m.
9:40 p.m.
5:16 a.m.
12:04 p.m.
6:07 p.m.
11:43 p.m.
Ocean City
1:28 a.m.
7:55 a.m.
1:45 p.m.
8:01 p.m.
Norfolk
3:38 a.m.
9:55 a.m.
3:54 p.m.
10:00 p.m.
1:11 a.m.
7:57 a.m.
2:44 p.m.
7:43 p.m.
Point Lookout
W
Reagan
Precipitation
Kitty Hawk
39/30
Annapolis
FORECAST
OCEAN: 36°
Richmond
44/26
Washington
ACTUAL
Ocean City
37/22
Lexington
40/24
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
Sa
REGION
AVERAGE
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Fullerton, CA 87°
Low: Poplar, MT –24°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
26/8/pc
61/33/s
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Tomorrow
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50/35/c
38/27/sn
70/51/s
38/16/pc
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
25/18/c
21/9/c
68/40/s
–3/–18/s
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63/50/s
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35/34/pc
53/43/pc
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
58/33/s
29/15/c
78/62/c
34/23/s
83/52/s
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42/15/s
World
High: Kyancutta, Australia 110°
Low: Yekyuchchyu, Russia –60°
Today
Addis Ababa
80/44/s
Amsterdam
40/30/pc
Athens
62/49/s
Auckland
72/64/pc
Baghdad
74/49/s
Bangkok
90/73/s
Beijing
39/18/pc
Berlin
33/22/pc
Bogota
70/45/r
Brussels
38/29/s
Buenos Aires
95/69/c
Cairo
88/61/pc
Caracas
72/63/pc
Copenhagen
35/30/pc
Dakar
68/61/pc
Dublin
47/30/r
Edinburgh
45/31/r
Frankfurt
36/26/s
Geneva
39/30/pc
Ham., Bermuda 71/66/sh
Helsinki
29/17/sf
Ho Chi Minh City 88/70/s
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80/46/pc
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61/50/pc
73/70/r
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25/17/c
89/71/pc
Hong Kong
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London
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63/59/pc
71/41/pc
58/47/sh
69/53/c
73/58/t
47/22/s
85/75/pc
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Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
87/74/s
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33/28/c
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85/75/pc
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84/71/pc
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50/35/pc
49/38/s
23/17/sn
35/25/pc
34/26/c
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THE RELIABLE SOURCE
BOOK WORLD
CAROLYN HAX
THEATER REVIEW
Conway’s cousin and
Pence’s nephew, both
White House staffers,
are dating. C2
“Women Who Fly:
Goddesses, Witches,
Mystics, and Other
Airborne Females.” C2
Dude, my eyes are up
here: If a man wants to
wear a bra, it’s really none
of his friend’s business. C5
To see or not to see?
Alas, poor Washington,
“Something Rotten!”
lives up to its name. C8
C
Newseum
ponders
sale of
building
BY P EGGY M C G LONE
AND M ANUEL R OIG- F RANZIA
STEFAN KNAUER/MCV PHOTO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Whoa! Why is there a unicorn?
A normal person’s guide to understanding a Fashion Week runway show
BY
R OBIN G IVHAN
In one of the most dynamic runway shows last fall, Thom
Browne ended his Paris presentation with a model dressed
in white guiding an enormous unicorn puppet. Two dancers, padded like marshmallows, had opened the show,
flitting and twirling across the wooden floor of the majestic
City Hall. In between, models crept precariCRITIC’S
ously atop daunting heels in exquisite
NOTEBOOK attire one could never wear to the neighborhood market.
What is a casual consumer of fashion supposed to make
of such a sight?
Browne does not like to explain his shows. Interpretation,
he has said, is up to the beholder.
Not that long ago, the only people who would get to see
such a fantastical presentation were fashion industry
insiders and the journalists who cover that world. Now,
NOTEBOOK CONTINUED ON C3
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Thom Browne’s show;
Comme Des Garcons; Rihanna at the New York opening
of “Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garcons: Art of the
In-Between”; and two scenes from Browne’s show.
NEWSEUM CONTINUED ON C3
Galaxy far,
far away
will soon be
everywhere
ABOVE AND CENTER
LEFT: JONAS
GUSTAVSSON/MCV
PHOTO FOR THE
WASHINGTON POST,
CENTER RIGHT: JUSTIN
LANE/EPA
FAR RIGHT: BERTRAND
GUAY/AGENCE
FRANCE-PRESSE/
GETTY IMAGES
BY
DANCE REVIEW
Something so right, but
something’s wrong, too
BY
S ARAH L . K AUFMAN
More so than any other major
dance company, the Alvin Ailey
American Dance Theater carries
an aura of social, moral and even
spiritual righteousness. It’s not just
the dancers’ exquisite athleticism
and peerless commitment that
convey this and transfer such a
rush to the audience. It’s also the
artistic content, especially when it
directly engages with human virtues.
The obvious example is “Revelations,” the company’s closer that
guarantees a standing ovation, as
its gospel score and images of
strength and fellowship build to a
roar that engulfs you and lifts you,
Two months shy of its 10th
anniversary in a glass-and-steel
showpiece on Washington’s most
prestigious thoroughfare, executives at the struggling Newseum
will meet Thursday with a top
real estate firm to explore options
that include selling their building
or moving to another location.
The previously undisclosed
talks with officials from the international firm Eastdil Secured —
which were confirmed by museum management after it was
contacted by The Washington
Post — are the latest sign of
uncertainty at an institution that
has been swamped in debt and
roiled by leadership shake-ups.
The museum’s financial woes,
including lackluster fundraising
and the weight of its primary
benefactor’s $300 million debt
burden, have long prompted
speculation that it would be
forced to leave its grand location
on Pennsylvania Avenue, just
blocks from the Capitol, or close
altogether. But Chief Operating
Officer Scott Williams insisted in
an interview Wednesday that its
biggest supporter, the Freedom
Forum, intends to keep the museum alive.
“The plan is to continue to have
the Newseum in some capacity,
here or perhaps elsewhere,” Williams said.
The survival of the Newseum —
which charges one of the city’s
highest museum entrance fees at
up to almost $25 per person — has
long been in doubt as it has
sought to compete for visitors
and donors in a capital awash in
free cultural institutions. In 2016,
the museum operated at a substantial loss, spending $8.2 million more than the $55.7 million
in revenue it generated, according to previously unreported tax
documents. That was more than
triple the shortfall from the previous year. The museum has posted
an annual deficit every year since
it opened in its current location,
tax records show.
“It’s a slow-motion disaster,”
said a person familiar with the
no matter how many times you’ve
seen it.
Each piece on the Ailey company’s opening program at the Kennedy Center Opera House had this
effect. “Revelations,” of course,
worked its spell at the evening’s
end. Before then, there was Twyla
Tharp’s ecstatic “The Golden Section” to bowl us over, as well as the
local premiere of “Members Don’t
Get Weary,” by Ailey dancer turned
choreographer Jamar Roberts,
who took on the current unsettled
social climate.
But with all of the inspiration
onstage, hints of tension within the
company emerged at the annual
gala benefit after-party. Breaking
DANCE CONTINUED ON C2
GERT KRAUTBAUER
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in its signature showstopper, “Revelations.”
M ICHAEL C AVNA
Every dozen parsecs or so, the
Star Wars universe seems to expand.
Just one day after the world
glimpsed “Game of Thrones” star
Emilia Clarke in the first full
trailer for this summer’s “Solo: A
Star Wars Story,” Disney announced Tuesday that “Game of
Thrones” creators David Benioff
and D.B. Weiss will write and
produce a new series of Star Wars
films.
Disney chief executive Bob
Iger also announced Tuesday that
the company is developing “a
few” Star Wars TV series, according to the Hollywood Reporter.
So if you’re tracking Disney’s
cinematic march forward (cue
John Williams and the peal of
trumpets), you can see that our
screens will be practically overlapping with fresh Lucasfilm
fare.
To help you keep track of just
how many projects Disney has
deployed, here’s a user guide to
the Star Wars plans:
1. “Solo: A Star Wars Story”
Next up is the latest standalone story, “Solo,” starring Alden
Ehrenreich as young Han, as
directed by Ron Howard and
STAR WARS CONTINUED ON C4
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Alvin Ailey dancers boycott
annual gala at the Kennedy Center
A
sk anyone what the best thing about the
annual Alvin Ailey gala at the John F. Kennedy
Center for the Performing Arts is, and they will
answer simply: the dancers. Duh.
Not only do they perform to mythic-level
perfection on stage, but just over an hour later the
dancers shimmy out of their costumes and chassé
into the annual benefit upstairs, pumping the runof-the-ballroom soiree with all their bright kinetic
energy. The parade of performers, who burst into the
room just before the $1,000-a-plate dinner is served,
is the unanimous highlight of the night.
This year it did not happen.
There was no big introduction, no parade and no
standing ovation at the gala Tuesday at the Kennedy
Center. The dancers, who are renegotiating a threeyear contract with Alvin Ailey American Dance
Theater management, left the building in a
choreographed huff, boycotting the benefit where
their presence — schmoozing at individual tables
during dinner and two-stepping on the dance floor
afterward — is a huge draw for donors. The evening’s
organizers learned of the boycott in the middle of
Tuesday’s opening-night performance.
“It’s their decision,” said BET Chief Executive
Debra L. Lee, the gala’s longtime co-chair. She
added that the dancers’ absence had not affected the
party’s mood. Earlier in the night, Lee and Bennett
Rink, executive director of the Alvin Ailey Dance
Foundation, were spotted conferring quietly on what
to do about the evening’s twist. In the end, no
announcement was made, but the absence was felt.
One attendee even walked up to the Lee and Bennett
CLOCKWISE
FROM ABOVE:
Alvin Ailey Artistic
Director Robert
Battle, Linda
Denise FisherHarrell, Troy
Powell and Sarita
Allen at the gala;
Sen. Kamala Harris
(D-Calif.) and BET
boss Debra Lee. The
professional
dancers weren’t
there, but guests
made do.
to point out (complain?) that the empty seats at her
table should have been filed with Ailey dancers.
Robert Battle, Ailey’s artistic director, had no
official comment on the dancers’ decision but
instead waxed poetic about families and fighting.
“So many things are emotional, and I think we’re in
a very emotional and tense time in the country, and so
this is a natural part of a process,” Battle said Tuesday.
“We will get through it, because there’s a reason that
the Alvin Ailey dance company has withstood the test
of time. We’re a big family, and sometimes we just
need to talk, you know what I’m saying?”
Maybe this town might learn something from
that?
“I think that’s the important thing. We all just
need to talk,” Battle continued. “That’s where I am
right now. Because what [the dancers] give on that
stage is incredible. And what they give to people is
incredible, and we have to respect that. We family.
We can fight behind the scenes and figure things out,
but what those dancers give on the stage is what I
hired them to do.”
Even without the dancers there, the crowd at the
Kennedy Center somehow managed to do what it
was supposed to: party. As celebrity DJ D-Nice (last
seen in town at one of the Obamas’ final hurrahs in
the White House) spun old-school hits from the
booth, the black-tie mob boogied and wobbled, just
without the professionals there to sprinkle their
fairy dust on the evening.
Folks whispered about it, shaking their heads in
between tapping their toes. None said they would
not be back next year.
PHOTOS BY ERIN SCHAFF FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
HEY, ISN’T THAT . . . ?
Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan,
grabbing dinner at Supra in Shaw on
Tuesday night?
“Lady Kaga” (trust us, that’s what the
legal-eagle set calls her) was holding court
(yeah, we did that) at a corner table of the
new eatery, which is being billed as
Washington’s first Georgian restaurant. She
was accompanied by a female pal, we’re told,
for a leisurely meal. Kagan reportedly lives
in Logan Circle and apparently enjoys trying
out culinary hot spots — though, like the
rest of us mortals, she’s not quite on the level
of the Obamas when it comes to trendy
dining.
LOVE, ETC.
A White House
romance with
a relative twist
Dating: Giovanna Coia and
John Pence, both staffers for
President Trump. Love among
the folks serving at the pleasure
of the president is nothing new
— but these two have a
particularly interesting political
deputy executive director for
Trump’s campaign committee.
Coia graduated from Catholic
University, and before joining
Trump’s staff, she worked for
Conway’s polling firm and
interned for Rep. Steve King
(R-Iowa). Pence has an
undergraduate degree from the
College of William & Mary and
a law degree from Indiana
University. He joined the
Trump campaign in August
2016 and was named to his
current post in January of last
year.
lineage. Coia is a cousin of top
White House adviser Kellyanne
Conway, and Pence is the
nephew of Vice President Pence.
The couple recently made it
official by posting the same pic
of the two of them — smiling,
with arms around each other —
as their respective Facebook
profile pics (trust us, this is a
yuuuge step in modern dating).
Coia, 23, is a White House
press assistant whose father is
Conway’s first cousin, making
the two women first cousins
once removed. Pence, 28, is the
COURTESY OF GIOVANNA COIA
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
BOOK WORLD
If God wanted man to fly, She
would’ve made him a woman
BY
M ICHAEL D IRDA
Norse Valkyrie Brunhilde, and the
witchy Morgan le Fay of the Arthurian romances, just to name a few.
In “Women Who Fly: GoddessYoung also examines swan-maides, Witches, Mystics, and Other
ens, fairy-brides and succubi, as
Airborne Females” Serinity Young
well as Christian and Daoist mysargues that tales of flying women,
tics, female shamans and even the
widespread throughout the
comic book superheroine Wonder
world’s mythologies, should be inWoman. Being a specialist in Midterpreted as visions of female
dle Eastern and Asian mytholoemancipation from the congies, she relates numerous acstraints imposed by patriarchal
counts of aerial women from Iscultures: As she says, “the ability
lamic, Hindu and Buddhist tradito break free of the earth and to
tion.
soar is a profound expression of
Take, for instance, one of the
freedom.” The many stories Young
stories about the Sufi mystic
retells prove her point and are
Rabi’ah al-’Adawiyya. One day a
fascinating in themselves.
Sufi master named Hasan sees
“The human desire to break
Rabi’ah near a lake and, to show
through earthly restraints took
off his supposed spiritual
many forms,” she writes.
superiority, throws his
“It could be achieved
prayer rug onto the surthrough dreams or ecface of the water, then
static experiences; by asinvites her to join him in
cending a mountain, tree,
prayer. Instead, Rabi’ah
ladder or ritual pole;
tosses her prayer rug into
through self-cultivation,
the air and flies up to it.
asceticism, or spiritual
“Come up here, Hasan,”
discipline; or through ritshe cries, then adds that
uals. Multiple terms exist
they should be above
for the varieties of aerial
such competitive foolishexperience,
including WOMEN WHO
ness and apply themmagical flight, transvec- FLY
selves to the real business
tion, bilocation, ascen- Goddesses,
of loving God.
sion, assumption, and Witches,
Besides female ascetapotheosis.” Transvec- Mystics, and
tion, in case you won- Other Airborne ics and saints, Young regularly points out examdered, “refers to being Females
ples of what she calls the
carried through the air by By Serinity
“monstrous-feminine,”
another entity, for exam- Young
figures such as Medusa,
ple a witch.” Bilocation is Oxford. 358 pp.
the Sphinx, the Harpies,
the ability to be in two $29.95
Medea and the Furies. In
places at once. The most
these creatures we see
glorious of all assump“the demonization of aerial fetions is, of course, that of the Virmales” and “the male need to
gin Mary’s bodily ascent into heavmake these independent beings
en. Symbolically speaking, flying
into monsters and destroy them.
creatures are messengers, passing
. . . It seems there is nothing more
freely back and forth between the
perverse and ugly than an indeheavenly realm of the gods, the
pendent woman.”
Land of the Dead, the Other World
Much early myth and literature
of the fairies and the familiar
— Aeschylus’s “Eumenides” is a
earth most of us are bound to.
good example — dramatizes the
Young opens her book with redisplacement of matriarchal reliflections on the Louvre’s famous
gions by new belief systems privisculpture of the winged but headleging male deities. This pattern of
less Nike — commonly known as
appropriation — or should we say
the “Victory of Samothrace”— and
misappropriation? — recurs in
ends with a chapter on aviators
cultures around the world. By the
such as Amelia Earhart and Hantime of the European witch craze
na Reitsch. In between one finds
of the 15th to 17th centuries, womdiscussions of many of the most
en who “were not under the rule of
famous females of myth: the Middle Eastern goddess Isis, Adam’s a man . . . must be under the rule of
the devil. It was inconceivable that
first wife, Lilith, Homer’s Circe,
they could be autonomous.” Still,
the vengeful sorcerer Medea, the
it has always been easy for men to
believe in witches. As Young observes, from the perspective of a
male, especially a married male,
the members of the other sex are
“shape-shifters par excellence,
changing from desirable, young,
acquiescent women into ruthless
shrews.”
While Young’s occasionally academic tone may limit her audience, this provocative but convincing book certainly belongs on,
or at least near, the shelf containing some of the most intellectually
exhilarating books I know. I’m
thinking of such masterworks as
Vladimir Propp’s “Morphology of
the Folktale”; Claude LeviStrauss’s studies in structural anthropology (especially “The Story
of Asdiwal”); Robert Graves’s
crazed but wonderful historical
grammar of poetic myth, “The
White Goddess”; Carl Jung’s papers on the Anima, Shadow and
other archetypes; Joseph Campbell’s classic “The Hero With a
Thousand Faces”; and, not least,
that encyclopedia of pagan ritual,
J.G. Frazer’s “The Golden Bough.”
I’d also add to the list two works of
modern literary scholarship:
Northrop Frye’s myth-based, and
now rather neglected, “Anatomy
of Criticism” and Marina Warner’s
tour-de-force analysis of the fairy
tale, “From the Beast to the
Blonde.”
One last point: “Women Who
Fly” shows how relevant even
seemingly arcane scholarship can
be to contemporary life. Young
does this by simply unpacking the
meanings of “a single motif or
trope in the human imagination —
that of women not defined by the
restrictive gravity of men’s wishes
or desires, but women whose ability to fly empowered them to impose conditions on men, or to
escape roles they found constricting,” For centuries patriarchal cultures reflexively aimed to keep
down or marginalize defiant and
powerful females. Not for much
longer. During the last half century, and particularly during the
last year, more and more women
can finally say that from now on,
baby, the sky’s the limit.
mdirda@gmail.com
Michael Dirda reviews books every
Thursday for The Washington Post.
PAUL KOLNIK
Alvin Ailey American Dance Company performs in Jamar Roberts’s “Members Don’t Get Weary.”
Ailey shows cohesion, onstage at least
DANCE FROM C1
with tradition, the Ailey dancers
didn’t show up for it. There were
whispers of a boycott. (Shouts, really, above the music). On Instagram,
the dancers are directing followers
to a new account called Artists of
Ailey, which references their
union. They have been in contract
negotiations since December.
In an email on Wednesday, an
Ailey spokesman wrote that talks
are going forward “with a positive,
respectful approach.” AGMA, the
dancers’ union, said in a statement,
also on Wednesday, that the artists
boycotted the gala “based on management’s failure to adequately address the group’s substandard
wages and benefits.”
Spurning the gala is quite a
statement, but the evening’s performance didn’t give any indication of the unrest to come. Only in
looking back on it can you ponder
the ironies. “The Golden Section,”
with its irresistible dance score by
David Byrne, is the finale of a longer work by Tharp titled “The
Catherine Wheel,” after the medieval torture device of the same
name. The full piece focuses on a
dysfunctional family and its torments. But the finale — the part
that Ailey performed — is pure
catharsis. The earthly traumas are
past; this is the hard-won entry
into the divine.
The dancers, in their shorts and
miniskirts, look and move like celestial athletes, and “The Golden
Section” can come across as a parade of heroes. But these heroes are
all tenderly interconnected. One
dancer’s movement sets off another’s. As the beat gallops, a woman runs at her partner, knocking
into his shoulder; this sends him
spinning like a column of gold
light. Another woman is held aloft
by three men; they swing her by
her limbs like she’s a human jump
rope, then — whoosh — they fly her
high again, and bear her like a
goddess on their shoulders.
At the end, one dancer sprints
toward another, who has tucked
himself into a ball; she uses him as
a springboard to leap into the
wings, and just before we’re
plunged into darkness, we see her
trailing leg streaking through
space like a vanishing gold-tipped
bird.
Transcendence was also a theme
of “Members Don’t Get Weary.”
Roberts’s music choice was a triumph: John Coltrane’s otherworldly journeys by saxophone,
“Dear Lord” and “Ole.” Coltrane
may not rise instantly to mind as
great dance music, but Roberts has
a fine ear, and his dancers captured
the ineffable questioning in the
jazz, its winding paths and ultimate sense of spiritual freedom. In
her solo, Jacqueline Green made
frustration and release palpable as
she shook and tossed her long
limbs like whips.
At the top of the evening, Ailey
funders spoke to the audience
about the company’s recent engagement in Memphis, and its upcoming tour to Birmingham and
Selma, Ala., scheduled in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s assassination. To be sure, there is no better
arts entity than Ailey to give poetic
shape to the spiritual themes of
King’s work; yet is it as well-functioning internally as it looks?
Dance companies are such purveyors of delight and human community that it’s tempting to think
of them as big, happy families. The
past couple of months have revealed just what dysfunctional
families they can be. New York City
Ballet chief Peter Martins resigned
in January amid allegations of
physical abuse and sexual harassment. Last week, American Ballet
Theatre dancers came close to
striking over contract talks, before
reaching a tentative agreement.
The Ailey organization recently
spent $25 million on expanding its
Manhattan headquarters. Even so,
the dancers’ actions indicate that
things are not going so well within
its walls.
sarah.kaufman@washpost.com
Alvin Ailey American Dance
Theater is performing three rotating
programs at the Kennedy Center
through Sunday. kennedy-center.org.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
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RE
‘A novice should simply sit and enjoy a fashion show’
NOTEBOOK FROM C1
however, some of the most theatrical and esoteric runway shows can
be viewed by virtually anyone.
Sponsors and charities enable
those with a healthy bank account
to buy their way into a show.
Fashion houses live-stream their
presentations, and journalists upload show videos almost before
the designer has taken a bow — or
you can see pretty much the entirety of a collection on Instagram.
When runway shows veer
toward the more experimental,
they can be as confounding as
expressionist art or atonal music.
What does it mean? What is the
point? Doesn’t anyone offer the
equivalent of “music appreciation” classes to help a newcomer
make sense of fashion?
A few fundamentals can make
the experience more rewarding —
or, at least, less exasperating.
As the fall 2018 runway shows
begin in New York this week, some
will be a straightforward parade of
models in expensive but familiarlooking clothes, presenting a simple idea: This is what I will offer
for sale next season.
Most designers need to project
and to exaggerate so that their
message reaches the cheap seats
— or at least the most oversaturated viewers. Tom Ford sells glamour and sex appeal to a confident,
sophisticated customer. But on
the runway, he turns up the volume. Nipples are visible, blazers
are worn over bras, models wear
tops but no bottoms. He forces the
observer to ask: Is that acceptable?
Is that decent?
Others have more complicated
aspirations. Prabal Gurung says
he wants to connect his runway
show to the broader cultural conversation. Alexander Wang treats
his presentations as parties — emphasizing the street-cool, nightlife-loving attitude of his clothes.
Tommy Hilfiger has used the runway as an enormous Instagram
backdrop, organizing a two-day
carnival for his fall 2016 collection. Marc Jacobs crafts a mysterious fairy tale — sometimes with
provocative music, or more recently with a soundtrack of silence.
But whether the shows are
straightforward or avant-garde,
they leave many civilians with
questions:
Why don’t the models smile?
(Because they are in character,
and have been given directions by
the designer to appear strong,
confident, tough, aloof, nonchalant, whatever.)
Why are they walking so fast?
(Because speed exudes energy and
urgency. And when there are 10
shows in a single day, dawdling is
annoying.)
What’s with all the weird stuff?
(Wouldn’t you get bored looking
at little black dresses?)
Who would wear that? (Plenty
of folks, maybe just not you.)
“A novice should simply sit and
enjoy a fashion show — not overintellectualize it or under-intellectualize it,” says Browne. “Everyone
should have their own opinion to
what they see in fashion shows. A
good fashion show provokes some
type of emotion, some type of
feeling. A good fashion show you
should either love or hate.”
The mushy middle is forgettable. Dispassion is failure.
Designers have been staging
runway shows in New York since
the 1940s when a rudimentary
version of fashion week was established by the publicist Eleanor
Lambert. A new book from the
Council of Fashion Designers of
America, “American Runway: 75
Years of Fashion and the Front
Row,” celebrates this tradition,
noting the cultural shifts that have
transformed the runway, and the
simple mechanics of how a show
works, from set construction to
the models’ facial expressions.
It’s written by Booth Moore,
who has covered the fashion in-
MICHEL EULER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Dries van Noten fall 2018 men’s show in Paris was Instagram bait. If you’re a civilian in the audience, resist, says filmmaker Reiner Holzemer.
JP YIM/GETTY IMAGES
A model walks the water-soaked, fish-perfumed runway during the Raf Simons “Blade
Runner”-inspired spring 2018 men’s show.
KATE WARREN
Tommy Hilfiger’s fall 2016 show, which ran for two days, took on a carnival theme,
complete with rides, fried food, games and tattooing.
dustry for the Los Angeles Times
and the Hollywood Reporter, reviewing countless runway shows
over a decade. Still, her research
left her surprised by both the
amount of planning and the inevitable chaos that epitomize these
productions.
“As slick as it looks online,
there’s this high school musical
element to it,” Moore says.
Even the most mainstream
shows — Tory Burch or Michael
Kors, for example — will exaggerate the hair and makeup on the
models to create a heightened
reality. “And every photo is photoshopped,” Moore notes, if only to
correct for color or lighting.
For designers determined to
tell a whimsical story or challenge
the prevailing wisdom, an audience must suspend disbelief, as
with a novel that indulges in magical realism.
“Why a unicorn on the runway
in Paris — at this moment in
history?” she asks rhetorically.
“You’re not meant to take everything at face value.”
Browne, she notes, “takes a certain delight in making you feel
uncomfortable.” And Marc Jacobs
tries “to take you out of your
comfort zone, make you scratch
your head and say, ‘Whaaaat?’ ”
That’s why those designers don’t
offer show notes to explain their
source of inspiration.
Newseum could sell property, then lease back space
NEWSEUM FROM C1
museum’s inner workings and finances who commented on the
condition of anonymity to speak
frankly about nonpublic matters.
The museum is at the center of
a
particularly
complicated
real estate puzzle. Not only does
the 470,000-square-foot building
house the Newseum, but it also is
home to dozens of apartments
and the Wolfgang Puck restaurant The Source. The complexity
of the building, which was appraised at $667 million in 2014,
might require an unconventional
solution for its future. One option, according to Williams, is
finding a buyer who “wants to use
part of the building and loves the
idea of a museum here [and]
might let us lease back part of it.
There are so many different options.”
The selection of Eastdil to
guide that process may be a signal
that the museum is open to a
creative approach. The firm,
which describes itself as “a lowprofile powerhouse,” touts its expertise in property sales, as well
as its investment banking services, loan sales and financing.
The company is one of the nation’s most active brokers for
large commercial real estate
deals. In 2011, it brokered the sale
of the Watergate offices, a building made famous by the break-in
at Democratic Party headquarters that led to President Richard
M. Nixon’s resignation.
Eastdil officials did not respond to an interview request.
The Newseum opened in 1997
in more-modest environs in Rosslyn, Va. It made a splashy move in
April 2008 to its current location,
a dramatic structure with a soar-
ing glass facade. It amassed a
collection that includes a large
chunk of the Berlin Wall and an
antenna salvaged from the wreckage of the World Trade Center
after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist
attacks. But it flailed in its efforts
to find a sustainable financial
model, and it suffered through
the rocky tenures of several chief
executives who were unable to
balance its ledgers.
In August, amid heightening
worries about its future, the
Newseum undertook what it
called a “strategic review” of its
operation. Little information
about the review or how it has
been conducted has been disclosed publicly. Williams said
that a public statement will be
made Thursday after the meeting
with Eastdil.
The museum’s finances have
been a perpetual source of con-
cern, even as it has paid hefty
salaries to its top executives. It
has an outsize reliance on a single
donor. The Freedom Forum —
established by USA Today founder Al Neuharth — is its largest
source of contributions, turning
over $22.5 million in 2016.
The Newseum is billed as a
monument to the First Amendment and an exploration of media
in the United States. From a financial perspective, however, it
looks as much like an events
space as a museum.
The Newseum earned $18 million in rental and catering revenue and only $7.8 million in
admissions in 2016. Other revenue came from a parking garage
and food court. The museum attracts about 800,000 visitors annually. Williams, the chief operating officer, disclosed Wednesday
that it recorded an uptick in
For many avant-garde designers, such as Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garcons, the runway isn’t
even about showing off clothes.
It’s devoted to an intellectual exercise, “an exaggerated metaphor
for what the collection is about,”
says Valerie Steele, director of the
Museum at Fashion Institute of
Technology. A model dressed as a
witch, for example, may be intended to explore “the transgressive
aspects of women,” she says.
“The point of a more extreme
show is to give you an idea, a
feeling,” Steele says. “Clothes are
not really a language, but more
like music.”
Photographer Maria Valentino,
whose company has shot runway
shows for this newspaper and other publications, warns baffled observers: “Don’t necessarily take it
personally! A show is like an essay,
a designer’s opinion written in
fabric on the body, in a given time
period.”
“It’s natural to see a fashion
show and try to place it in the
context of one’s own wardrobe or
tastes,” she says. “But it’s amazing
how delightful a show can be
when you keep an open mind.”
Kors once noted that during his
design process, he’d always ask his
team: Where is a woman going in
that? The answer, he said, does not
have to be the office, a restaurant
or a soccer match. That woman
could be Rihanna, and she could
be heading to center stage. Fashion needs to be wearable, but it
doesn’t have to be practical.
For anyone lucky enough to sit
in the audience of a fashion show,
the spectacle can be intoxicating.
“There is really something special
about being part of the live experience,” Moore says. “It’s the arriving, the buildup, the lights down.
. . . There’s a community aspect to
it. It’s like if you’re at a Broadway
play: It’s different from being at
home watching on TV.”
Filmmaker Reiner Holzemer,
who recently released an intimate
documentary about Belgian designer Dries Van Noten, was something of a fashion show novice
when he began work on the project. “In order to get a real impression of a runway show and the
work of a designer,” Holzemer
says, “look through your eyes and
not through your mobile phone,
trying to get a good shot for your
Instagram.” Otherwise, you’ll miss
the visceral pleasure of it.
Most people, however, will consume runway visuals as video or
still photography. Liz Cabral, a
New York-based stylist, recommends viewing a collection in a
video, if possible. “Find the most
immersive, 360-degree outlet or
experience available,” Cabral says.
“A lot of brilliant clothes fall flat
when looking at them strictly
from a front-only, two-dimensional view.”
She adds that “hearing the
soundtrack, watching the clothes
move and being entirely in that
moment is the only way to be truly
captivated by these awesome 15
minutes of showmanship. Otherwise, they’re just clothes versus
moments in time.”
Runway images are part of a
continuum, representing shifts in
the culture, changes in the way we
think about gender and beauty. A
single runway image situates a
viewer in a particular era; a series
of them serve as a timeline.
Consider that in the 1980s models were like Amazons — tall and
toned, with hourglass figures. The
1990s ushered in the era of waifs,
brutally thin but refreshingly
quirky, jolie laide. And by the turn
of the century, the old obsession
with symmetrical bone structure
had given way to a desire to showcase racial diversity and gender
ambiguity.
Hyperbole and shock on the
runway evolve into subtle changes
and shifts in your closet. Frayed
edges and unfinished hems were
once head-spinningly strange. No
more. Big shoulder pads come and
go, and each time they return they
jar the eye — until, suddenly, they
don’t.
Steele, of Fashion Institute, says
it helps to view runway images
with a sense of context and history. “Do the research to know
who [the designers] are and what
they do. Otherwise, in a way, it’s
kind of meaningless.”
Not that you need a degree in
fashion history to make sense of,
say, Raf Simons. But it helps to
know that he’s Belgian and has a
long-standing fascination with
visual arts and street culture —
hence the “Blade Runner”-inspired menswear show last summer that sent models in big raincoats down a damp, dim-lit lane.
“Without the research, you’re
not in a position to know what the
show is about,” Steele says. “Is it
telling a story? Is it the same old
story?”
For many consumers, the story
won’t matter. And that’s fine.
That’s fine with designers, too. Put
simply, designers want to move
viewers, stir an emotion. They
want to get consumers to look
their way. And ultimately, buy
their clothes.
admissions in 2017 when 855,000
people visited — its best attendance figures since its debut year.
To its supporters, pondering
the museum’s future is nothing
short of an existential exercise
with ramifications far beyond a
mere building.
“Arguably in 2018 the notion of
free press and the First Amendment and other elements of the
Bill of Rights are perhaps more
important to remember and understand than they have ever
been,” said Tom Rosenstiel, executive director of the American
Press Institute. “I think in many
ways it’s an extraordinarily good
time to rethink what this means
to us.”
Jan Neuharth, the Freedom Forum’s chief executive, was not
available Wednesday. In August,
she said the foundation could no
longer prop up the museum without help. (Tax records show the
Freedom Forum has poured
$272 million into the museum
from 2008 to 2016.)
“It has become obvious that the
current model — where the Freedom Forum is the primary funder
of the Newseum — cannot continue indefinitely at this level,” she
said in a statement. “Left unchecked, this deficit spending
rate would eventually drain the
Freedom Forum’s entire endowment.”
Williams, the chief operating
officer, said Wednesday he is confident the museum’s main benefactor is committed to its survival.
“The Newseum is one of the
tools the Freedom Forum uses to
champion the First Amendment
and the freedom of the press,”
Williams said. “They have no intention of it going away. . . . The
Newseum will continue.”
Now the big question is this:
How?
robin.givhan@washpost.com
peggy.mcglone@washpost.com
manuel.roig-franzia
@washpost.com
Jonathan O’Connell contributed to
this report.
C4
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
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Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Untold Secrets
Travel
Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Jokers
Jokes
Talk Show
Imp. Jokers
TruTV
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Mom
Mom
King
King
TV Land
Cosby Show Cosby Show Living Single Living Single Living Single Living Single Living Single Living Single Living Single Living Single
TV One
(5:00) Marvel’s the Avengers Movie: Remember the Titans ★★★ (2000)
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
USA Network
RuPaul’s Drag Race: All
RuPaul’s Drag Race: All Stars
RuPaul’s Drag Race: All Stars
Love & Hip Hop Miami
VH1
GE
Washington
Govt.
Matters
On
Your
Side
SportsTalk
ABC
News
News
at
10pm
Govt.
Matters
On
Your Side
WNC8
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
WGN
CRACKLE
In the Cloud (Crackle streaming) After their mentor dies, two estranged
techies (Tomiwa Edun, left, and Justin Chatwin) reunite to create a way to
extract a terrorist’s memories to thwart a bomb plot.
Grey’s Anatomy (ABC at 8) April is
put in charge of the new surgical
innovation contest, and Meredith
has a returning patient.
RETURNING
RuPaul’s Drag Race All Stars
(VH1 at 8) Constance Zimmer and
Jeffrey Bowyer-Chapman guestjudge.
PREMIERE
Scandal (ABC at 9) Olivia tries to
prevent Mellie from naming Jake as
her new chief of staff.
Mysteries at the Museum
(Travel at 9) Season 15.
LATE NIGHT
Conan (TBS at 11) Jamie Dornan,
Jenna Fischer, Jena Friedman.
Daily Show (Comedy Central at 11)
Steve Aoki.
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Andrew
Garfield, Rachel Brosnahan, Alice
Merton.
Nashville (CMT at 9) The new
addition to the boys’ band
becomes instantly popular.
Arrow (CW at 9) Oliver debates
turning to his old teammates for
help.
How to Get Away With Murder
(ABC at 10) The friends keep doing
what they can to build a case for
Annalise’s class-action lawsuit.
Lip Sync Battle (Paramount at 10)
Former figure skaters Tara Lipinski
and Johnny Weir compete.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Joel
McHale, Yara Shahidi, Joywave.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Ellen
Pompeo, Elise Trouw.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Taylor
Kitsch, Dan Stevens, Ron Funches.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) Holly
Hunter, Jason Jones, the Broadway
cast of “Once on This Island,” Alan
Cage.
— Sarah Polus
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
The Force will be with you, always:
Disney’s ambitious Star Wars plans
STAR WARS FROM C1
written by veteran Star Wars
scribe Lawrence Kasdan and son
Jon. Lucasfilm is hoping to land
it safely after original directors
Phil Lord and Chris Miller got the
galactic heave-ho. (Due out: May
25.)
2. “Star Wars: Episode IX”
Stepping in for the booted
Colin Trevorrow, “The Force
Awakens” filmmaker J.J. Abrams
returns to the director’s chair for
the final film in the current Star
Wars sequel trilogy. But will Luke
(Mark Hamill) return, now with
Force-powers from the afterlife?
(Due out: Dec. 20, 2019)
3. The new Rian Johnson
trilogy
As fans continue to debate
every last burn-it-all turn in
Johnson’s “The Last Jedi,” the
director is guiding the next Star
Wars trilogy. Johnson will write
and direct the first outing in the
new triptych, which Lucasfilm
has said will exist outside “the
episodic Skywalker saga.” When
might we see it? It could be years,
Padawan.
4. The Benioff-Weiss trilogy
The “Game of Thrones” creators will see their epic HBO
series launch its final season next
year, according to Variety. The
pair had planned on a follow-up
HBO series, “Confederate” —
which imagined an America in
which the South had won the
Civil War — but as The Washington Post reported in the fall,
Benioff and Weiss were no longer
working on that technically stillin-development series after it
sparked controversy.
Besides the team’s massive
“Game of Thrones” success —
they’ve won four Emmys for the
series — Benioff received screen-
play credits for the critically
drubbed 2009 film “X-Men Origins: Wolverine,” the sword-andsandals epic “Troy” and the wellreceived “Brothers.”
5. Potential spinoffs of other characters
Talk continues to swirl around
Obi-Wan Kenobi, Yoda and Boba
Fett getting their own films, according to such outlets as the
Hollywood Reporter. At this
point of galloping Disney expansion, who’s to say that each won’t
one day get his own TV trilogy?
6. The streaming TV series
Iger’s new announcement
comes just several months after
he first said a live-action Star
Wars series would happen. Expect that TV menu to grow at a
significant rate, as Disney gets
set to launch its own entertainment streaming services by next
year.
michael.cavna@washpost.com
VINCE BUCCI/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
David Benioff, left, and D.B. Weiss, the creators of HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” will write and produce a
new series of Star Wars films, one of Disney’s many projects to perpetuate the franchise.
THEATRE
La Foto
A Selfie Affair
Thru Feb 25
Thurs-Sat at 8 pm
Sun at 2 pm
A selfie can change your life forever. A revealing comedy
about privacy and relationships in the age of social media.
#LaFoto
Thornton Wilder’s
Extended to 2/18!
Th, Fri, Sat at 8 pm
Sat, Sun at 2 pm
Sun at 7:30 pm
The End of the World at Its Most Entertaining!
“Festive, imaginative, and completely involving…
You’ll be dazzled and delighted” – Wall Street Journal
The Skin of Our Teeth
GALA Theatre
3333 14th Street, NW
202-234-7174
Galatheatre.org
Source
1835 14th St. NW
202-204-7741
ConstellationTheatre.org
$30-$45
$25-55
In Spanish with
English surtitles
“Famously twisted”
-Washington Post
MUSIC - CHAMBER
Dumbarton Concerts
Berlin
Philharmonic
Piano Trio
February 9, 2018
8 p.m.
Konzertmeister Andreas Buschatz, violist Matthew Hunter,
cellist Knut Weber, and pianist Markus Groh perform the
World Premiere of Danny Elfman’s Piano Quartet along with
works by Schubert, Suk, and Brahms.
Dumbarton Concerts
Dumbarton United
Methodist Church
3133 Dumbarton St. NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-965-2000
$42 Adults
$39 Senior
Dumbarton
concerts.org
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
ForeWords, with
Ted Libbey
Beginning at
6:45 p.m. before
the Sat., Feb. 10
performance
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
National Symphony
Orchestra:
Shostakovich's
Ninth Symphony /
Gerhardt plays
Bloch
Tonight at 7
Saturday at 8
Fabien Gabel conducts a program inspired by nonmusical
sources, from a heartbreaking love poem to World War II
politics to the book of Ecclesiastes. He leads Dukas's
Overture to Polyeucte, Bloch's Schelomo featuring cellist
Alban Gerhardt, Rachmaninoff's The Rock, and
Shostakovich's Symphony No. 9.
AfterWords immediately following tonight's performance.
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
16-2898
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
He wears a bra, bro. Get over it.
Adapted from a recent online discussion.
I think it’s none of this friend’s
business and I’m under no
obligation to answer, but my nonanswering has convinced the
friend that I am hiding something
unseemly.
How to deal with this? It’s no big
deal, but it’s irritating. Friend is not
otherwise nosy or judgmental.
— What Lies Beneath
Dear Carolyn: My
boyfriend is a very
athletic, CrossFit,
off-road-biking,
jock kind of guy. He
also sometimes
likes to wear ladies’ lingerie, which
is completely fine with me.
The other day, he was wearing a
satiny bra under a T-shirt and a
friend of ours happened to see the
strap. The friend is kind of freaked
out and has been pestering me
about “what this means” and if it is
some weird fetish I have. (It is not.
It’s the boyfriend’s thing. And he
does not otherwise wear women’s
garments.)
Carolyn
Hax
What Lies Beneath: An
unambiguous “Drop it, because
this isn’t even remotely your
business” is all you need, as long as
you have the proper enforcement
of a zero-further-discussion policy.
Nice to know someone’s
sustaining the satiny-skivvies
industry. Most women I know are
so thoroughly done with it.
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Dear Carolyn: Do you know of any
good books on fighting fair in a
marriage? After a drag-out fight
the other day, my husband said
explicitly that he cares more about
“getting to the truth” than my
feelings. This has shown up in our
fights as a lot of contempt when I
say something incorrect — as small
as mixing up dates or names — and
it is clearly not going to work for us
long-term.
On the positive side, data and
studies about how mutual respect
and kindness are essential for
healthy fights (even more so than
being right?) might win him over.
Thanks in advance.
— Fighting Fair
Fighting Fair: Do some research
on “nonviolent communication.”
It’s a revelation. Also, John
Gottman has done standardsetting work for years on marital
communication, identifying
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
2:15-5:00-7:45-10:25
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: 6:45-10:20
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC:
7:00-9:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 4:15-7:25
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 1:40
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
3:50-9:15
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
1:00-4:45-6:50
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
1:20-4:30-7:30-9:40
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 6:45-10:00
12 Strong (R) CC: 4:20-10:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 2:00-7:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 4:00-9:50
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 1:304:10-10:00
I, Tonya (R) 1:50-4:45-7:40-10:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:15-7:15
Hostiles (R) 12:30-3:35
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3D (PG-13) CC: 1:25-10:30
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:503:50-7:10-10:10
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
CC: 12:30-3:45
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) CC: 7:00-9:45
Fifty Shades Marathon 1:00
The Post (PG-13) 12:50-3:406:30-9:20
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
The Post (PG-13) CC: 4:30-7:30
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
12:00-2:30-5:00
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: 12:50-4:00-7:10
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!) 7:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 1:40-4:30-7:20
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 12:40-3:20
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
2:00-4:50-7:40
12 Strong (R) CC: 7:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 5:10
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:204:10-7:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:30-2:50-7:50
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air and Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
Angelika Pop-Up
at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:30
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-12:301:50-2:45-4:20-5:15-7:00-8:00
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 11:15-2:00-4:45
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
I, Tonya (R) 11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-2:155:00-7:45
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:45-2:15-4:30-7:00-9:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 12:15-3:30-6:45-9:50
Molly's Game (R) CC: 1:00-4:00
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:35-12:002:00-2:40-4:40-5:10-7:20-7:459:45-10:15
Hostiles (R) CC: 11:30-2:10-4:507:30-10:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC:
7:00-10:00
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:204:20-7:20-9:45
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:30
The Final Year CC: 12:55-9:55
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 12:50-3:506:50-9:30
I, Tonya (R) CC: 1:10-4:10-7:109:40
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
1:05-9:45
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:10-3:20-5:307:40-9:50
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 1:004:00-7:00-9:40
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
The Disaster Artist (R) CC:
4:30-7:30
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 1:30-4:15
The Florida Project (R) CC:
1:15-7:15
In the Fade (Aus dem Nichts) (R)
1:45-4:45-7:45
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14
701 Seventh St Northwest
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:05-3:25-6:45
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:30-3:45-7:00-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:00-3:00-10:35
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:30-4:15
Proud Mary (R) 10:05
12 Strong (R) 7:15-10:15
Winchester (PG-13) 12:35-3:105:40-8:15-10:45; 12:00-2:30-5:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:30-10:15
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
IMAX Theater
601 Independence Avenue SW
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
(NR) 2:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13)
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Seas 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
12:25
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-2:05-5:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
MARYLAND
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 11:002:30-3:45-7:15-10:15
12 Strong (R) CC: 11:30-2:45-5:45
Hostiles (R) (!) 10:40-2:00-5:15
The Shape of Water (R) 2:15-7:05 Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:15Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 2:00-4:45-6:45-9:30
Missouri (R) 4:45-9:30
AMC Magic Johnson
The Post (PG-13) 1:50-4:10Capital Ctr 12
6:45-9:10
800 Shoppers Way
Lady Bird (R) 9:35
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Phantom Thread (R) 1:30-4:15(PG-13) CC: (!) 11:05-2:05-5:057:00
8:05
AMC Academy 8
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC:
7:00-9:30
6198 Greenbelt Road
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC:
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
11:10-4:15
(PG-13) CC: 12:55-4:00-7:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
CC: 4:45-7:15
7:00-8:15
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 5:25 Coco (PG) CC: 11:35-2:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:40-2:25
The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
(PG-13) CC: 2:30-5:15-8:00
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 4:30 1:45-6:45
Get Out (R) CC: 5:10-7:40
Coco (PG) CC: 2:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
11:30-5:05
2:30-7:45
Proud Mary (R) CC: 1:25-3:45-6:00 Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:15-1:253:45-6:10-8:20
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 1:40Den of Thieves (R) CC: 11:004:45-7:55
2:00-5:00-8:15
Molly's Game (R) CC: (!) 1:15
Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:00- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 2:15-7:45
3:30-6:00-8:30
Molly's Game (R) CC: 12:30-3:40
Hostiles (R) CC: 4:35-7:30
Hostiles (R) 11:15-2:15-5:15-8:15
AMC Center Park 8
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
CC: 1:00-4:15
(PG-13) CC: 12:00-3:15-6:30-9:45 Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:05Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
1:30-4:00-6:30
7:00-9:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 9:55 (PG-13) 11:35-2:35-5:30-8:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
(PG-13) CC: 12:15-3:00-6:00-8:45 Experience (R) CC: 7:30-10:00
The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
ArcLight Bethesda
2:30-7:15
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Coco (PG) CC: 1:30-4:15
The
Greatest
Showman (PG)
Proud Mary (R) CC: 12:20-5:0011:50-2:20-4:45-7:10-9:35
9:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:4511:15-1:00-4:00-9:00
3:45-6:45-10:00
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:30- Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 1:20-4:15-7:15-10:15
7:20-10:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:30-10:00
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 1:45Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
4:15-6:45-9:15
Hostiles (R) CC: 12:45-4:00-7:00 (PG-13) 11:25-2:10-4:50-7:3510:10
AMC Columbia 14
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:30-1:5510300 Little Patuxent Parkway
4:20-6:45-9:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Dunkirk (PG-13) 4:55
11:10-2:40-6:10-9:40
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:20-2:15Maze Runner: The Death Cure
5:05-7:50-9:05
(PG-13) CC: 11:35-12:20-2:45Get Out (R) 3:40-10:45
3:30-6:00-6:40-9:20-9:45
Den of Thieves (R) 12:40-6:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Shape of Water (R) 3:50-8:20
(PG-13) CC: 11:50-3:00-6:20-9:20 Call Me by Your Name (R) 3:20
Coco (PG) CC: 11:50-2:55
Molly's Game (R) 2:00
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:00-1:50- All the Money in the World (R)
4:25-7:00
4:40
The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
The Post (PG-13) 11:55-2:35-5:1011:20-4:20
7:45-10:25
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
12 Strong (R) 12:35-6:00
12:00-6:55
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
Missouri (R) 1:15-6:40
3:00-9:40
Lady Bird (R) CC: 2:25
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 11:50Maze Runner: The Death Cure
3:20-6:35-9:45
(PG-13) 11:35AM
12 Strong (R) CC: 12:10-3:30Hostiles (R) CC: 11:45-2:406:40-9:40
5:30-9:45
Winchester (PG-13) (!) 11:20Winchester (PG-13) 11:45-2:451:50-4:20
5:00-7:25-10:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:50-2:50- I, Tonya (R) CC: 11:10-1:45-4:256:10-9:00
7:05-9:20
Lady Bird (R) CC: 2:00-9:55
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 11:40Hostiles (R) CC: 11:40-2:452:30-5:15-8:00-9:50
6:05-9:20
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-8:30Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D 9:15-11:00
Experience (R) (!) 7:00-9:40
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
The Greatest Showman: The
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
IMAX 2D Experience (PG) 11:00Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 4:00-9:50
1:30-4:05
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Fifty Shades Freed (R) (!)
11:30-2:50-6:20-9:40
7:00-9:50
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Winchester (PG-13) 6:05-9:00
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18 (PG-13) 12:10-1:10-3:20-4:206:30-9:40
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-9:40
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 1:05-5:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: (PG-13) 11:00-1:45-4:30-7:1511:10-1:30-4:20-7:10-9:45
10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Paddington 2 (PG) 12:30-3:00-5:30
CC: 11:45-3:10-6:35-10:05
The Commuter (PG-13) 1:30-7:20
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 12:15 Den of Thieves (R) 1:20-4:25Maze Runner: The Death Cure
7:35-10:45
(PG-13) CC: 11:20-12:30-3:4512 Strong (R) 12:05-3:05-6:05-9:05
7:00-10:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Coco (PG) CC: 11:30-2:05-4:45
Missouri (R) 8:00-10:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Winchester (PG-13) 11:10-1:40(PG-13) CC: 11:10-2:00-4:504:15-7:00-9:30
7:30-10:35
Hostiles (R) 1:15-4:10-7:05-10:10
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Fifty Shades Freed (R) 8:00-10:40
CC: 7:20
12 Strong (R) 11:05AM
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 1:15Winchester (PG-13) 3:10
4:00-6:40
Bow Tie Harbour 9
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
2474 Solomons Island Road
1:30-10:25
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG- The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:00-2:00-4:40-7:40-10:30
13) (!) 1:45-4:30-7:10-9:55
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 5:20 The Shape of Water (R) 10:40-7:20
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 3:45 The Post (PG-13) 10:30-11:40Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) 1:10-4:20-7:10-8:00-10:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:20-1:20(NR) 6:50-9:55
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 6:30-9:50 4:00-6:50-9:40
Lady Bird (R) 2:30-5:30-10:40
12 Strong (R) CC: 12:00-3:00I, Tonya (R) 1:30-4:30-10:20
6:00-9:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Phantom Thread (R) 9:50-12:503:50-7:00-10:00
Missouri (R) CC: 2:15-7:40
Forever My Girl (PG) CC: 2:45Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
10:25
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:15- Winchester (PG-13) 12:00-2:452:30-5:00-7:50-10:30
10:55-1:35-4:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:20-1:50- 5:20-8:00;
The Greatest Showman (PG)
4:40-7:30-10:15
12:35-3:45-6:45-9:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:00-4:25
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Hostiles (R) CC: 12:50-4:1011:20-2:50-6:20-10:00
7:15-10:20
Runner: The Death Cure
I, Tonya (R) CC: 1:00-3:50-6:40- Maze
(PG-13) 10:55-12:40-2:20-3:559:30
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:30- 5:40-7:10-9:00-10:25
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 8:30-11:15
3:30-6:45-9:40
Welcome to the Jungle
Padmaavat: An IMAX 3D Experi- Jumanji:
(PG-13) 11:15-2:10-5:10-8:15ence (NR) (!) 11:00-2:40
11:00
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D Coco (PG) 12:20-3:00
Experience (R) (!) 7:00-9:30
The Last Key (PG-13)
Ang Dalawang Mrs. Reyes 9:20 Insidious:
10:55-1:30-4:05
Fifty Shades Freed (R) (!) 8:15Paddington 2 (PG) 11:25-2:1510:45
5:00-7:35
AMC Loews
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:15St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
1:50-4:25
11115 Mall Circle
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 11:00-2:45-6:30-10:05
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: (!) 11:45-3:15-6:30- Forever My Girl (PG) 1:30-4:106:35
9:45
The Post (PG-13) 11:55-2:55Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
5:50-8:40
7:00-7:30-8:00-8:30-9:00-9:45The Shape of Water (R) 12:10-6:05
10:15-10:30
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 4:45 Molly's Game (R) 10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Proud Mary (R) 11:00-10:05
Den of Thieves (R) 12:15-3:30(PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:15-4:005:40-6:55-10:30
7:00-9:45
12 Strong (R) 1:10-4:10-7:10-10:35
Coco (PG) CC: 11:30-2:15
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:15-1:45 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 4:15 Missouri (R) 3:10
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:00-1:30- Winchester (PG-13) 12:00-2:455:20-7:00-8:00-9:50
5:45
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr
8633 Colesville Road
C5
RE
productive vs. non-.
I don’t know that you can fix,
however, a person’s fundamental
comfort with causing you pain just
to get a pedantic win.
Dear Carolyn: I have several lovely
adult daughters, ranging from the
late teens to early 20s. I am
concerned about the weight gain
(30-plus pounds each) over the
past year or two, but I am not sure
how to approach them. I do not
want them to feel body-shamed by
anyone, never mind their dad.
But I worry about future health
concerns. We have healthy meals
whenever they visit, and I make an
effort to have them join me in
outside activities . . . but, in the
end, these are their choices.
Should I express my concerns —
once and only once? What are the
right words? I would rather they be
a bit upset with me than to have to
deal with bigger issues in their
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Oru Nalla Naal Paathu Solren (NR)
11:30AM
Lady Bird (R) 2:25-7:50
Hostiles (R) 11:30-2:40-5:45
I, Tonya (R) 11:10-4:50-10:20
Touch Chesi Chudu (NR) 11:002:35
Phantom Thread (R) 11:45-3:006:15-9:15
Chalo (NR) 11:45-6:40
Bhaagamathie (Telugu) (NR)
3:25-10:10
Fifty Shades Marathon 1:25
La boda de Valentina (R) 7:1510:40
Ang Dalawang Mrs. Reyes
3:05-10:05
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 10:55-2:20-5:40-9:00
Inttelligent (NR) 9:10
Fifty Shades Freed (R) XD:
7:00-9:45
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14
1591 West Nursery Road
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
1:35-4:05-6:35-9:05
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 12:30-3:40-6:50-10:00
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: 12:20-1:20-3:20-4:206:20-7:20-9:20-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 1:10-4:10-6:55-9:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 7:008:00-9:30-10:30
Coco (PG) CC: 2:00-4:45
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 1:25-4:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:003:50-6:40-9:30
Proud Mary (R) CC: 12:45-3:005:15-7:30-9:45
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:554:00-7:05-10:15
12 Strong (R) CC: 1:40-4:357:30-10:25
The Post (PG-13) CC: 12:40-3:306:30-9:10
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 12:302:55-5:20-7:45-10:10
Hostiles (R) CC: 12:35-4:007:00-10:00
Winchester (PG-13) 12:30-3:155:45-8:30-11:00
The Post (PG-13) 1:15-4:157:15-10:15
Hostiles (R) 12:30-3:45-7:15-10:30
Padmaavat 3D (Padmavati 3D)
(Hindi) (NR) 10:30
The Shape of Water (R) 12:00-3:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 8:15-11:00
Phantom Thread (R) 12:45-3:45
Inttelligent (NR) 8:00
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Stadium 14
6505 America Blvd.
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:30-3:15-6:00-8:45
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:30-3:45-7:15-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-9:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:45-3:45-7:15-10:20
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
6:30-9:15
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:20-3:55
The Commuter (PG-13) 1:15-3:506:25-9:00
The Shape of Water (R) 1:30-4:257:20-10:15
Proud Mary (R) 1:15-3:30-5:458:00-10:15
Den of Thieves (R) 12:45-4:007:15-10:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 3:30-9:00
Winchester (PG-13) 12:30-3:005:30-8:00-10:30
The Post (PG-13) 1:05-4:007:00-10:00
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-6:15
Hostiles (R) 1:00-4:05
I, Tonya (R) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Phantom Thread (R) 12:50-4:007:15-10:15
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
14716 Baltimore Avenue
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:25
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 11:30-3:00-6:30-10:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-8:009:45-10:30
Landmark
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Bethesda Row Cinema
(PG-13) 12:30-3:45-7:00-9:50
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:50- Paddington 2 (PG) 7:15
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:204:40-7:25-10:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:50-3:20-5:40- 1:55-4:30
Proud Mary (R) 3:45-9:10
7:50-9:55
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:30- Den of Thieves (R) 12:00-3:307:30-10:45
4:20-7:20-10:00
12 Strong (R) 12:00-3:15-10:00
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
The Post (PG-13) 11:45-2:451:20-4:10-9:50
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:00-3:50- 6:00-9:00
Winchester (PG-13) 11:45-2:306:50-9:40
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:50- 5:15-8:00-10:35
Hostiles (R) 12:45-4:00
3:40-7:00-9:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, The Shape of Water (R) 12:15Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:30-7:30- 3:30-10:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
10:05
Missouri (R) 1:00-6:15
The Insult (L'Insulte) (R) 1:10Phantom Thread (R) 12:154:00-7:10-9:40
3:15-6:45
Old Greenbelt Theatre
129 Centerway
The Shape of Water (R) 8:00
Call Me by Your Name (R) 5:15
Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13
199 East Montgomery Avenue
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:154:15-7:15-10:00
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
3899 Branch Avenue
3:00-9:30
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:40-4:00-7:40
(PG-13) 12:00-3:30-7:00-10:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-9:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:45-2:45-5:25-8:15
(PG-13) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:30-3:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:15-3:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:30
Proud Mary (R) 1:00-3:30-6:00The Shape of Water (R) 12:45-4:00
8:30
Den of Thieves (R) 1:05-4:05-7:10 Den of Thieves (R) 3:15-6:4510:00
Winchester (PG-13) 1:15-3:4512 Strong (R) 3:15-6:15-9:15
6:15-8:35
Winchester (PG-13) 12:15-2:45Regal Bowie Stadium 14
5:15-7:45-10:30
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
The Post (PG-13) 1:00-3:45Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-9:45 6:30-9:30
Regal Cinemas Majestic
I, Tonya (R) 12:00-6:30
Stadium 20 & IMAX
Hostiles (R) 12:00-3:30-6:45-9:45
900 Ellsworth Drive
Till The End Of The World (NR)
1:00-4:00-7:30-10:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Lady Bird (R) 12:45
12:00-2:45-5:30-8:20-11:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Phantom Thread (R) 12:30-3:457:00-10:00
12:10-3:45-7:20-10:40
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Regal Waugh Chapel
(PG-13) 12:40-4:10-7:30-10:50
Stadium 12 & IMAX
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:30-8:151419 South Main Chapel Way
10:30-11:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:25
(PG-13) 12:55-3:55-6:55-9:55
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Coco (PG) 12:50-3:30
12:05-3:20-6:35-9:50
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Maze Runner: The Death Cure
12:20-3:00-5:45-8:25-11:00
(PG-13) 12:00-3:10-6:20-9:30
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:15-4:00-6:50 Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:45-10:30
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
13) 12:10-1:00-2:50-3:40-5:35
(PG-13) 1:20-4:20-7:30-10:20
The Commuter (PG-13) 1:20-4:05 Paddington 2 (PG) 1:35-4:05
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) Proud Mary (R) 1:30
(NR) 1:20-5:20
Den of Thieves (R) 12:45-3:55Den of Thieves (R) 12:00-3:157:00-10:05
6:45-7:00-10:50
12 Strong (R) 4:25-7:20-10:15
12 Strong (R) 12:55-4:10-7:15The Post (PG-13) 12:30-3:1010:30
6:00-9:00
Winchester (PG-13) 1:25-4:20Winchester (PG-13) 12:20-2:508:00-10:35
5:20-7:50-10:30
Hostiles (R) 12:15-3:40-10:00
Hostiles (R) 12:35-3:40-6:50-10:00
I, Tonya (R) 1:25-4:25-6:20-9:30 Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 12:30-3:40
12:05-3:25
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
Padmaavat 3D (Padmavati 3D)
Experience (R) 7:00-9:45
(Hindi) (NR) 9:25
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D Missouri (R) 6:40-9:20
Experience (R) 7:00-10:00
Phantom Thread (R) 12:50-3:45
La boda de Valentina (R)
Regal Westview
7:00-9:50
Stadium 16 & IMAX
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 6:10-9:05
5243 Buckeystown Pike
The Shape of Water (R) 12:25The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:303:25-6:25-9:35
4:15-7:00-9:45
Call Me by Your Name (R) 9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Missouri (R) 1:15-4:25-7:15-10:15 11:30-3:00
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
The Post (PG-13) 12:15-3:15(PG-13) 12:30-3:45-7:15-10:30
6:15-9:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 8:00-10:45
Regal Germantown Stadium 14 Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 6:15-9:15
20000 Century Boulevard
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:45- (PG-13) 12:45-4:00-7:00-10:00
4:45-8:00-10:45
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 11:15
7:00-10:30
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:30-3:15
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG(PG-13) 12:00-3:15-6:30-10:00
13) 12:00-2:45-5:30-8:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:30-10:30 The Commuter (PG-13) 4:30-11:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Shape of Water (R) 12:45(PG-13) 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
3:45-6:45-9:45
Coco (PG) 12:45-4:00
Den of Thieves (R) 1:15-7:45
Paddington 2 (PG) 2:45-5:30
12 Strong (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
The Commuter (PG-13) 4:00-10:30 The Post (PG-13) 12:15-3:15Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:45-4:45- 6:15-9:15
7:45-10:45
Winchester (PG-13) 12:15-2:45Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) 5:15-8:00-10:45
(NR) 12:00-3:30-7:00
Phantom Thread (R) 12:00-3:30Den of Thieves (R) 12:15-7:15
6:45-10:15
12 Strong (R) 12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45 Hostiles (R) 1:00-4:15-7:30-10:45
I, Tonya (R) 11:45-3:00-6:00-9:00
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) 7:00-9:45
The Greatest Showman: The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG)
11:30-2:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 3:30-9:00
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-6:30
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:501:45-4:50-7:50-10:45
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) CC: 7:00-9:30
The Greatest Showman: The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG)
1:45-4:15
Ang Dalawang Mrs. Reyes 12:353:05-5:40
La boda de Valentina (R)
UA Snowden Square
7:00-9:45
Stadium 14
Winchester (PG-13) 11:25-2:159161 Commerce Center Drive
4:45
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 10:15
12:40-3:15-6:00-8:45
(R) CC: 12:40-3:50-7:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Hostiles
Fifty Shades Marathon 1:00
12:30-3:50-7:10-10:30
AMC Potomac Mills 18
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
(PG-13) 12:45-3:50-7:00-10:10
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-7:30- Ferdinand (PG) CC: 11:45-2:30
9:30-10:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 11:15-2:05-4:45-7:20-10:10
(PG-13) 1:40-4:30-7:20-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:30-4:20
CC: 11:20-2:50-6:10-9:40
The Commuter (PG-13) 3:20
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Den of Thieves (R) 12:50-4:00(PG-13) CC: 11:20-2:45-6:00-9:20
7:10-10:25
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 4:20
12 Strong (R) 4:40-7:30-10:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Winchester (PG-13) 12:30-3:00- (PG-13) CC: 11:00-2:00-5:005:30-8:00-10:30
8:00-10:45
The Post (PG-13) 1:10-4:00Coco (PG) CC: 11:45-2:15-5:05
6:50-9:40
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
I, Tonya (R) 12:35
CC: 7:45-10:25
Hostiles (R) 1:50-4:50-7:40-10:30 Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:00-1:40
Phantom Thread (R) 1:00-4:10Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG7:15-10:15
13) 11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:40
The Shape of Water (R) 12:45The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 5:303:40-6:30-9:20
8:10-10:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
Missouri (R) 1:20-4:15-7:00-9:45 11:40-5:35
Lady Bird (R) 1:45
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14 1:50-7:35
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:25-4:207710 Matapeake Business Dr
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: 9:10
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:0010:40-1:10-3:40-6:30-9:00
3:30-6:40-10:00
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: (!) 9:50-12:20-1:00- 12 Strong (R) CC: 11:50-3:006:15-9:25
3:30-4:10-6:40-7:20-9:50-10:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
Missouri (R) CC: 11:00-4:50-10:35
7:00-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:35-2:205:10-8:00-10:45
(PG-13) CC: 11:20-2:20; 10:00Winchester (PG-13) 11:15-2:0012:40-3:50-6:50-9:40
4:30
Coco (PG) CC: 12:10
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:50-6:45
Hostiles (R) 12:45-4:00-7:00-10:15
CC: (!) 3:00-5:30-8:10
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 11:10- I, Tonya (R) CC: 2:40-8:30
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
2:00-4:40-7:10-9:35
Paddington 2 (PG) Open Caption; The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
12:15-3:45
CC: (!) 11:00-1:50-4:20
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 11:40-2:50- Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:103:20-6:30-9:30
7:50-10:35
Den of Thieves (R) CC: (!) 10:10- La boda de Valentina (R)
7:00-9:40
1:20-4:30-7:40-10:50
12 Strong (R) CC: (!) 10:50-2:10- Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-10:00
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
6:10-9:10
Forever My Girl (PG) CC: (!) 10:20- Experience (R) CC: 7:00-9:45
AMC Shirlington 7
12:50-3:20
2772 South Randolph St.
Hostiles (R) CC: (!) 11:30-2:406:20-9:20
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:50- 7:00-9:30
2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
AMC Tysons Corner 16
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
7850e Tysons Corner Center
7:40-8:20-10:10-10:50
The
Greatest
Showman (PG) CC:
Den of Thieves (R) CC: (!) 10:10
11:10-1:45-4:40-7:15-9:50
iPic Pike & Rose
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11830 Grand Park Avenue
CC: 11:30-3:05-6:35-9:55
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) (!) 12:00-3:20
(PG-13) CC: (!) 11:15-7:45-10:55
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
(PG-13) 12:15-3:45-6:15-9:30
7:00-9:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) (!) 7:00Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC:
7:30-7:45-8:00-10:15-10:45-11:00 12:40-5:20
The Shape of Water (R) 12:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Proud Mary (R) 2:15-4:45
(PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:40-4:45Den of Thieves (R) 12:30-4:157:40-10:30
6:45-10:30
Coco (PG) CC: 10:35-1:10-4:10Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 7:05
Missouri (R) 3:00
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Winchester (PG-13) (!) 12:45-3:30- CC: 9:45
6:15-9:15
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:45-1:15The Post (PG-13) 12:15-3:104:00-6:40
6:30-9:45
The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
Phantom Thread (R) (!) 12:45-4:00 10:25-9:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
5:10-10:45
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
1:30-7:20
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: (!) 9:10
2:45-5:15
Den of Thieves (R) CC: (!) 10:20Maze Runner: The Death Cure
1:25-4:30-7:35-10:40
(PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:00
12 Strong (R) CC: 10:55-1:55Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 7:00- 4:50-10:35
8:00-10:00-10:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Missouri (R) CC: 10:40-4:35
(PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:45-7:45-10:30 Winchester (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:2512 Strong (R) CC: 1:30-4:3012:55-3:25-5:55-8:25-10:55
7:30-10:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:35-1:20Winchester (PG-13) CC: 2:004:05-7:50-10:20
5:15-8:00-10:45
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:20-3:00
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:00- Hostiles (R) CC: (!) 10:30-1:357:30-10:15
4:55-7:55-11:00
I, Tonya (R) 2:30-5:00-7:45-10:30 I, Tonya (R) CC: 2:25-8:00
Hostiles (R) 1:00-4:15-7:15; 10:30 Maze Runner: The Death Cure
AMC Hoffman Center 22
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
CC: (!) 12:10-3:30
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) CC: (!) 7:00-10:15
4:45-7:25-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Fifty Shades Marathon (!) 1:00
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
CC: 11:00-2:30-6:00-9:25
(PG-13) (!) 10:30-1:50-5:00
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Fifty Shades Freed (R) (!) 8:10(PG-13) CC: 10:30-12:00-1:4010:50
3:15-6:30-9:45
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 8:15
AMC Worldgate 9
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 2:00
13025 Worldgate Drive
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
(PG-13) CC: 12:15-3:15-6:10-9:15 2:30-5:00-7:30
Coco (PG) CC: 11:35-2:10-4:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 10:25AM
CC: 5:00-8:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Maze Runner: The Death Cure
CC: 10:30
(PG-13) CC: 2:30-5:30-8:30
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:10Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
1:55-4:25
7:00-7:45
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
13) 11:10-1:45-4:20-7:00-9:35
(PG-13) CC: 2:00-4:45-7:30
The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
Coco (PG) CC: 2:30
11:20-4:20
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 2:00-4:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 12:00- Darkest Hour (PG-13) 4:45
3:00-6:15-9:15
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 2:05
Get Out (R) CC: 1:40-7:30
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 7:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
12 Strong (R) CC: 2:00-5:00
2:15-7:40
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 8:00; (!)
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
2:10-4:30
2:00-7:50
The Post (PG-13) CC: 2:00Molly's Game (R) CC: 10:304:40-7:15
4:15-10:10
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Proud Mary (R) CC: 7:25-9:50
One Loudoun
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:4520575 East Hampton Plaza
4:00-7:15-10:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12 Strong (R) CC: 10:45-1:5010:25-1:35-4:10-6:20-9:50
4:45-7:45-10:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Missouri (R) CC: 11:15-5:00-10:45 11:10-3:00
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Forever My Girl (PG) CC: 9:15
Winchester (PG-13) CC: 6:50-9:20 (PG-13) 1:25-4:50
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:45- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:45-3:00-6:40-10:35
4:35-7:30-10:20
12 Strong (R) 10:20AM
Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:35-5:15
I, Tonya (R) CC: 10:30-1:35-4:30- Maze Runner: The Death Cure
7:20-10:15
(PG-13) 11:05-6:00-9:30
VIRGINIA
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-8:2010:05-11:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:15
The Shape of Water (R) 3:40-9:10
12 Strong (R) 2:30-5:35-8:40-11:40
I, Tonya (R) 3:15
The Post (PG-13) 10:35-1:10-4:207:20-10:20
Winchester (PG-13) 11:50-2:355:20-8:05-10:50
Phantom Thread (R) 12:00
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
2911 District Ave
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:008:00-9:30
The Shape of Water (R) 11:001:45-4:50-7:30-10:05
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:0512:50-4:00
Call Me by Your Name (R)
10:00-3:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 10:45-1:35-4:207:00-9:50
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-6:30-8:50
I, Tonya (R) 11:30-2:20-5:00-10:50
Phantom Thread (R) 10:15-1:204:15-10:15
The Greatest Showman (PG)
10:25-12:55-3:30-6:00-8:30-10:55
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) (!) 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:4510:50
Bow Tie
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
11940 Market Street
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:20-3:20-6:20-9:20
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 1:30-4:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:009:40-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:50-3:50-6:50-9:50
The Shape of Water (R) 12:30
Call Me by Your Name (R)
1:10-7:10
12 Strong (R) 12:40-3:40-6:40-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:00-7:00
The Post (PG-13) 12:00-3:006:00-9:00
Hostiles (R) 12:10-3:10-6:10-9:10
The Greatest Showman (PG)
1:20-7:20
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 4:00-10:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 3:30
Lady Bird (R) 4:20-10:20
I, Tonya (R) 4:10-10:10
Phantom Thread (R) 1:30-5:008:20
Cinema Arts Theatre
9650 Main St
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 9:4012:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:55
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
10:00-1:00-4:00-7:00-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 9:45-12:15-2:405:10-7:50-10:05
The Post (PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:052:35-5:05-7:40-10:00
I, Tonya (R) CC: 9:45-12:10-2:354:55-7:20-9:45
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:101:15-4:15-7:10-9:50
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
1600 Village Market Boulevard
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:10-2:40-5:10-7:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:30-2:15-5:00-7:50
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:45-2:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:303:30-7:05
12 Strong (R) 1:30-4:30-7:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:25-2:05-4:45-7:35
Hostiles (R) 11:50-2:50-7:10
I, Tonya (R) CC: 11:35-2:205:05-7:55
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 12:00-1:00-3:20-4:20-7:45
The Post (PG-13) 11:20-2:004:40-7:20
Lady Bird (R) 4:50-7:15
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 1:00-4:20-7:45
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00
Manassas 4 Cinemas
8890 Mathis Ave.
The Shape of Water (R) 1:504:10-6:30
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 2:15-5:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:50-4:10-6:30
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG13) 1:45-4:00-6:10
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
6201 Multiplex Drive
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:35-2:05-4:35-7:15-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
4:40
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 10:00-1:10-4:20-7:3010:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:007:50-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 10:35-1:20-4:10-7:0510:00
Coco (PG) 10:50-1:50
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:05-1:35-4:05
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 11:50-6:50
Den of Thieves (R) 12:35-3:40
12 Strong (R) 11:00-1:55-4:507:45-11:00
Winchester (PG-13) 11:45-2:104:55-7:20-10:05
The Post (PG-13) 10:15-1:05-4:257:35-10:25
Bhaagamathie (Telugu) (NR)
12:00-3:00
Padmaavat 3D (Padmavati 3D)
(Hindi) (NR) 3:20-10:20
Chalo (NR) 10:10AM
Fifty Shades Marathon 1:25
Rave Cinemas
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
11900 Palace Way
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:30-2:05-4:45-7:30-10:25
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 11:55-3:30-6:50-10:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 8:00-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 10:40-1:30-4:20-7:1010:00
Coco (PG) 10:55-1:25-4:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:05-2:004:55-7:50-10:40
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) XD: 11:10-2:45
The Shape of Water (R) 7:20-10:20
12 Strong (R) 10:45-1:50-4:50
mid-40s.
— Concerned Dad
Concerned Dad: No one on our
part of Earth needs help noticing
weight gain.
And it’s not either-or, that you
either upset them or they deal with
bigger issues. You will upset them
or not, and they will deal with
bigger issues or not, each process
independent of the other. If a
concerned talk could turn weight
gain around, America would be
thin.
Love them and lay off the
health-coaching idea, no matter
how tempting it gets.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her column
delivered to your inbox each morning at
wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
Thursday, February 8, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Winchester (PG-13) 11:50-2:205:00-7:40-10:30
The Post (PG-13) 10:50-1:40-4:257:15-10:10
Oru Nalla Naal Paathu Solren
(NR) 2:25
Lady Bird (R) 11:00-9:50
I, Tonya (R) 11:40-2:30-5:208:05-11:00
Bhaagamathie (Telugu) (NR)
11:25AM
Touch Chesi Chudu (NR) 2:50
Chalo (NR) 11:35AM
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) XD: 12:45-4:15-7:35-10:50
Fifty Shades Marathon 1:25
Fifty Shades Freed (R) XD:
7:00-9:45
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
1:00-4:15
Chalo (NR) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
The Shape of Water (R) 1:45-4:307:15-10:00
Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) 7:30-10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:00-2:45-5:30-8:15
Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR)
8:45
Gayatri (Telugu) 8:00
Regal Kingstowne
Stadium 16 & RPX
5910 Kingstowne Towne Center
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-9:35
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 12:05
The Greatest Showman (PG) 2:00- Fifty Shades Freed (R) 8:00-10:35
4:35-7:30-10:10
Regal Manassas
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Stadium 14 & IMAX
(PG-13) 1:50-5:10-8:30
11380 Bulloch Drive
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-9:45 Fifty Shades Freed (R) 8:00-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Fifty Shades Freed: The IMAX 2D
(PG-13) 1:05-3:50-6:45-9:45
Experience (R) 7:00-9:30
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:15-3:40
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PGRegal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
13) 1:55-4:50
3575 Potomac Avenue
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:10-4:05- The Greatest Showman (PG) 2:057:05-10:05
4:45-7:35-10:15
The Shape of Water (R) 1:20-4:10Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
7:25-10:20
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) 2:10-6:15-9:45
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(NR) 2:30-6:30
(PG-13) 1:00-4:05-7:15-10:30
Molly's Game (R) 6:15-9:30
Den of Thieves (R) 1:40-4:55-8:15 Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-9:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Post (PG-13) 1:25-4:107:00-9:50
(PG-13) 1:30-4:20-7:05-10:05
Hostiles (R) 1:35-4:45-8:00
Coco (PG) 1:40-4:25-6:55-9:35
Phantom Thread (R) 1:00-4:00Paddington 2 (PG) 2:15-5:00
7:15-10:15
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PGPadmaavat 3D (Padmavati 3D)
13) 1:10-3:50
(Hindi) (NR) 10:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 10:10
Regal Countryside Stadium 20 Call Me by Your Name (R) 1:25
45980 Regal Plaza
Proud Mary (R) 8:05-10:25
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Den of Thieves (R) 1:00-4:10(PG-13) 12:10-3:25-6:55-10:05
7:20-10:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-9:45 12 Strong (R) 1:10-4:10-7:10-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Winchester (PG-13) 1:20-3:55(PG-13) 12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
6:50-9:20
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-2:55-6:15
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG- The Post (PG-13) 1:55-4:407:40-10:25
13) 12:05-3:30-7:05-10:35
Hostiles (R) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:50The Shape of Water (R) 1:00-3:452:30-5:05-7:45-10:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:45-2:45- 6:45-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
5:45-8:45
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) Missouri (R) 1:50-4:30-7:25
(NR) 11:35-2:25-3:10-5:55-6:35- Darkest Hour (PG-13) 4:35-7:309:30-10:10
10:20
The Shape of Water (R) 1:25-4:25- Phantom Thread (R) 1:15-4:157:25-10:25
7:15-10:15
Molly's Game (R) 12:30-3:55Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
7:10-10:30
6500 Springfield Town Center
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:00-3:50-6:40-9:35 The Greatest Showman (PG)
12 Strong (R) 9:25
11:10-2:00-5:10-7:50-10:35
The Post (PG-13) 11:55-2:35Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
5:25-8:15
11:00-2:20-6:00-9:20
Forever My Girl (PG) 2:10-7:30
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Lady Bird (R) 11:30-4:50-10:00
Oru Nalla Naal Paathu Solren (NR) (PG-13) 11:40-3:30-7:25-10:20
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-10:00
12:15-3:20
I, Tonya (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Touch Chesi Chudu (NR) 12:25- (PG-13) 11:20-2:40-5:50-9:10
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:00
3:35-6:50-9:50
Phantom Thread (R) 11:40-2:50- The Shape of Water (R) 11:556:00-9:10
3:10-6:30-9:30
Chalo (NR) 11:50-3:00-6:10-9:20 Proud Mary (R) 9:50
Bhaagamathie (Telugu) (NR)
Den of Thieves (R) 12:10-3:2011:25-2:40-5:30-8:30
6:50-10:10
Padmaavat 3D (Padmavati 3D)
12 Strong (R) 12:20-3:40-7:10
(Hindi) (NR) 1:40-5:10-8:40
The Post (PG-13) 12:00-3:25Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10
6:40-10:00
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Winchester (PG-13) 11:30-2:10The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:15- 4:50-7:40-10:30
4:30-6:15-9:00
Hostiles (R) 1:10-4:20-10:30
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
(PG-13) 1:00-4:15-7:30-10:40
Missouri (R) 4:00-7:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-9:45 Phantom Thread (R) 11:35-3:00Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
6:20-9:25
(PG-13) 12:20-2:30-5:15-8:0010:20
Regal Virginia Gateway
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-3:15
Stadium 14 & RPX
Den of Thieves (R) 4:00-10:10
8001 Gateway Promenade Pl
12 Strong (R) 1:30-7:15
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:15The Post (PG-13) 12:30-3:303:45-6:15-9:15
6:30-9:30
Winchester (PG-13) 12:00-2:20- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
6:55-10:20
5:00-7:45-10:45
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
I, Tonya (R) 12:00-2:45-5:30(PG-13) 1:00-4:15
8:15-11:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 8:00-10:45
The Shape of Water (R) 12:453:45-6:45-9:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Phantom Thread (R) 12:10-3:00- (PG-13) 1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
6:00-9:15
Coco (PG) 1:35-4:25
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:55-3:25
Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:20-4:204110 West Ox Road
7:20-10:15
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Den of Thieves (R) 1:30-4:3512:00-2:35-5:10-7:45-10:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 7:35-10:35
12:05-3:30-7:00-10:25
12 Strong (R) 1:05-4:05-7:00-10:05
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
The Post (PG-13) 1:25-4:00
(PG-13) 12:40-3:55-7:20-10:40
Winchester (PG-13) 12:50-5:30Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00-9:40 8:00-10:25
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:05-2:40
Hostiles (R) 1:10-4:10-7:10-10:10
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG- Maze Runner: The Death Cure
13) 12:25-3:15
(PG-13) 2:15-3:15-6:30-9:45
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:45
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 7:00Den of Thieves (R) 12:45-4:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 8:45-9:45
The Shape of Water (R) 1:50-4:45Missouri (R) 5:15-8:00-10:45
7:45-10:50
The Post (PG-13) 12:50-3:456:50-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Hostiles (R) 1:10-4:20-7:30-10:35 Missouri (R) 6:00
Phantom Thread (R) 12:15-3:20 Phantom Thread (R) 1:40-4:40Along With the Gods: The Two
7:40-10:40
Worlds 12:30-6:40-7:30
Smithsonian - Airbus
1987: When the Day Comes (NR)
IMAX Theater
3:40-9:50
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
La boda de Valentina (R)
7:00-9:50
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX 11:10-4:00
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Seas 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
12:30-3:00-6:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Dream Big: Engineering Our
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
2:20
(PG-13) 12:00-3:15-6:30-9:45
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 8:00-10:30 12:00-4:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Padmaavat: An IMAX 3D Experi(PG-13) 1:00-3:45-6:30-9:15
ence (NR)
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:30-3:00
University Mall Theatre
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero (PG10659 Braddock Road
13) 12:30-3:00-5:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 6:15-9:15 Ferdinand (PG) CC: 12:00-2:2012 Strong (R) 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30 4:40
Forever My Girl (PG) 5:30-8:00Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
10:30
7:00-9:35
The Post (PG-13) 1:15-4:00Justice League (PG-13) CC:
6:45-9:30
Winchester (PG-13) 12:15-2:45- 7:15-9:50
Coco (PG) CC: 12:15-2:30-4:45
5:15
Phantom Thread (R) 12:15-3:15 Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC:
Hostiles (R) 12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45 7:40-9:45
I, Tonya (R) 12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00 Wonder (PG) CC: 12:05-2:40-4:55
Regal Ballston Common
Stadium 12
671 N. Glebe Road
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
NEITHER SIDE VULNERABLE
NORTH
A75
43
AQ98
QJ82
EAST
K 10 8 3
Q 10 9 2
7
K543
WEST
2
J8765
K652
A76
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
QJ964
AK
J 10 4 3
10 9
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1
Pass
4
Opening lead — 6
EAST
All Pass
I
n the final of the Senior
Knockout Teams at the Fall
NABC, Eric Rodwell earned
a swing for his team with a
good deceptive play.
At both tables, South
played at four spades. When
Rodwell was East, South’s
opening bid of one spade
was limited in strength, so
North simply jumped to
game. West led a heart, and
South took the king and led
the jack of spades: deuce,
five ... and Rodwell followed
with the eight.
South could have led a
low spade next, planning to
insert dummy’s seven as a
safety play for one trump
loser if West played the
three. But South didn’t know
he could afford to play safe;
East might have held the
king of diamonds.
It looked as if East had
the bare eight or doubleton
10-8 anyway, so South led
the queen next. Rodwell was
sure of two trump tricks.
Down one.
At the other table, the
pro sitting East missed the
textbook falsecard: He won
the first spade with his king.
Later, South picked up the
trumps and made his game
when the diamond finesse
won.
CLASSIC PEANUTS
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
A7543
AQ98QJ82
Your partner opens one
club, you respond one diamond and he bids one heart.
What do you say?
ANSWER: If a jump-preference to three clubs would be
forcing in your partnership,
that bid would be fine. But
many pairs treat such a jump
as invitational. (What would
you bid with A 7 5, 4 3, A Q 9
8, J 10 8 2?) Then you must
invent a forcing call. Bid one
spade, a “fourth-suit” bid
that merely asks partner
to continue describing his
hand.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | FEBRUARY 8
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you need to
focus on your goals
and long-term desires;
you will see several of
them come to fruition by your
next birthday. If you are single,
try to keep your personal and
professional lives separate.
Try to stay open to different
types of people. If you are
attached, you will find it easier
and easier to relate to your
sweetie. The two of you are
likely to fall in love all over
again. Sagittarius takes more
risks than you do.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You have pondered an
opportunity so much that you
might feel as if it would be
best to go for it and see where
it gets you. One can weigh the
pros and cons of a situation
for only so long. Open up to
new possibilities.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
One-on-one relating is
highlighted. A long-overdue
discussion with a friend will
help you to clear the air.
You have different styles
of communicating, and
understanding each other
takes time.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Drop the word “impossible”
from your vocabulary, and
reach out for more of what
you want. You might not
always be comfortable with
this approach, but right now it
WEINGARTENS & CLARK has the highest likelihood of
success.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Though you might want to fly
off the rails emotionally, you
won’t. Look carefully at an
issue that keeps arising. Stay
centered, no matter what you
do or when. Worry less about
what is going on with those
around you.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Your fiery side comes out when
dealing with a loved one. Know
that getting angry won’t help.
You need to get to the bottom
of an issue in order to move
forward. You could be dealing
with a problematic situation.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You often push so hard to
accomplish what you must
that you barely have time to
take a deep breath and relax.
Make an attempt to slow down
and do something just for you.
This break will renew your
energy and make it easier to
deal with certain issues.
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Assess the present situation.
Do not minimize what is
happening between you and
the other party involved. You
finally will be able to clear the
air and get past an obstacle or
misunderstanding that exists
between you.
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You suddenly might feel as if
you can get past an ongoing
hassle. Your ability to read
between the lines makes a big
difference in how you handle
a personal matter. Others
note your sensitivity when you
approach a controversial topic.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Issues could arise a little
too easily right now. You
might prefer to keep your
energy at bay in order to
allow yourself the time to
weigh the pros and cons of a
situation. Be ready to make a
commitment.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You could reach a point of
agreement much easier than
you originally had anticipated.
Do not hesitate to go after
what you desire. You might not
get the immediate results you
want, but at least you will have
taken the first step.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Reach out to a dear friend
whom you don’t often get to
see. Ask more questions as
you decide what would be the
best way to catch up on each
other’s news. Make a point of
planning a visit in person.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
You might opt to change
direction, to others’ surprise.
People often think that they
have you figured out, only to
discover otherwise. You like
to grow and adapt to different
situations. Stay on top of a
personal matter involving an
older person.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
While the Opening Ceremonies of the
Olympics are tomorrow, some competitions
are already underway. Alpine skiing and
curling are among the events that start today.
Sunshine should return, but it will
be breezy and chilly, so bundle up
before going outside.
Find more of Fred Bowen’s
columns about your favorite
sports in our online Score
archive.
ILLUSTRATION BY CATHY AMAYA, 12, WASHINGTON
Winter Games
started small
but grew large
The Winter Olympic
Games, which open
Friday in South Korea,
FRED BOWEN
are a big deal. About
6,500 athletes from
almost 100 countries
will compete for medals
in more than 100 events.
But when the modern
Olympic Games started
in 1896 in Athens, Greece, there was no
such thing as the Winter Olympics.
Athletes competed only in the Summer
Games.
There were, however, the Nordic
Games. That was a competition in winter
sports that took place every few years
starting in 1901. But not everyone could
compete: The Nordic Games were open
only to athletes from the Scandinavian
countries — Denmark, Finland, Norway
and Sweden.
Then, the 1908 Summer Olympics
featured a figure skating competition,
and the 1920 Games in Antwerp,
Belgium, had more figure skating
competitions, as well as an ice hockey
tournament.
The winter sports were popular, so in
1924 an International Winter Sports
Week was held in Chamonix, France.
Those competitions are considered the
first Winter Olympics, but they were not
as big as today’s Games.
Only about 250 athletes representing
16 countries competed in nine sports at
Chamonix: cross-country skiing, figure
skating, speed skating, four-man
bobsleigh, ice hockey, ski jumping,
Nordic combined, curling and military
patrol (somewhat like today’s biathlon).
Something else was different about
these Games compared with today’s
Olympics: There were only 11 female
athletes at the 1924 Games, and they
competed only in figure skating.
Not all the contests at Chamonix were
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
President wants big
parade to show off
U.S. military might
The Score
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Color changers
5 Allowing for the
uncertainty of
the future
10 Fairy tale bear
14 Set
15 Greenland coin
16 Holiday lead-ins
17 Aerialists’
insurance
19 Days in Durango
20 Side by side?
21 Medical priority
system
23 Visually
transfixed
26 Porsche
Boxster, e.g.
29 Mauritania
neighbor
30 Make a big
stink
31 Immobile
32 Lining fabric
34 Zebra hunter
36 Breakfast order
... and a hint
to the last
words of
17-, 26-, 51and 58-Across
41 Loaves that
may be seeded
42 Printing goofs
44 Narrow groove
48 Take to heart
50 “Yikes!”
51 Like some
pizza ovens
53 Decorative
draperies
54 Brand name
for the sleep
aid zolpidem
55 Culture starter?
57 Tropical tuber
58 Conflict in
Tennyson’s
“The Charge
of the Light
Brigade”
64 Tiny bit
65 Broadcaster
66 Sticking point
67 Many Christmas
presents
68 Involuntary
muscle
contraction
69 Jet black
DOWN
1 Wedding
reception VIPs
CORR/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
LEFT: Sonja Henie, 11, strikes a pose
with world champion skater Gilles
Grafstrom at the International Winter
Sports Week event in 1924. Henie won
gold medals in the 1928, 1932 and
1936 Olympics. ABOVE: German skier
Christl Cranz rides on the shoulders of
fans at the 1936 Games after winning
the women’s alpine combined event.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
close. For example, the Canadian hockey
team won the gold medal in ice hockey by
outscoring their opponents in five games,
110 goals to 3.
The equipment in the early Games
would look strange today. Skis were made
of wood and held on to the skier’s boots
with leather straps. And the bobsleighs
looked like Flexible Flyer sleds with a
steering wheel stuck on the front.
Still, the Winter Olympics were
underway, adding more sports to the
Games, and especially more sports for
women. Over the years, women were
allowed to compete in skiing (starting in
1936), luge (1964), ice hockey (1998) and
bobsleigh (2002).
Now the Games feature such fun
events as freestyle skiing, snowboarding
and skeleton. Some of these events have
changed since they were introduced. The
first Olympic halfpipe was only 11 1/2 feet
tall. Now daredevil snowboarders shoot
up icy walls that are 22 feet high.
Four new events will debut at the 2018
Winter Games. Men and women skiers
will compete together in the Alpine team
event. Men and women will also form
By Susan Gelfand
teams in curling mixed doubles.
Two new events that should be really
wild are big-air snowboarding, which is
like ski jumping for snowboarders, and
mass-start speedskating. That’s when as
many as 24 skaters race around a 400meter oval. Look out for crashes.
The Winter Olympics — always
changing, always fun. Since 1924.
President Donald Trump has asked
the Pentagon to plan a grand parade of
the U.S. armed forces in Washington
this year to celebrate military strength,
officials said Tuesday.
Trump wants an elaborate parade,
with soldiers marching and tanks
rolling, but no date has been selected.
Military parades are common in
some countries, but the United
States traditionally has not staged
showy displays of military power.
U.S. military units often
participate in parades on the Fourth
of July and other holidays to mark
appreciation and remembrance of
veterans, but these typically do not
include displays of military
hardware.
— Associated Press
C OR R E C TI ON
In Wednesday’s recipe for ice-cube
tray chocolates, the ingredients
listed 3/4 cup of milk chocolate chips
and dark chocolate chips. Steps 4 and
5 should have mentioned using that
amount of the chips. The corrected
recipe is at wapo.st/easychocolates.
kidspost@washpost.com
Bowen writes the sports opinion column for
KidsPost. He is the author of 22 sports books
for kids.
KRIS CORONADO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
THEATER REVIEW
What if ‘Hamlet’ had showgirls?
‘Something Rotten!’ hits and misses.
BY
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
2 Vote for
3 Cookie baker
in the Hollow
Tree
4 More
disreputable
5 Terrier breed
from Scotland
6 Richly
decorated
7 Rival
8 Colony
crawler
9 Stops working
for a while
10 Highway
divider
11 Pilot
12 Scanty
13 State
strongly
18 Little Italian
number
22 “Stand By Me”
director
23 Bowling alley
initials
24 Some square
dancers
25 Baldwin
brother
27 “Maybe”
28 1930s migrant
to California
2/8/18
30 Beverage
company __
Cointreau
33 Coffee server
35 Binged (on)
37 Paint brand sold
at Home Depot
38 Got big
enough for
39 “Born This Way”
Lady
40 Antlered animal
43 Program
interruptions
44 Try to hit,
as a fly
45 Minestrone
ingredient
46 Drink named for
a Scottish hero
47 Make a scene
and act up
49 One of a ’50s
singing quartet
52 Ancient empire
builders
53 Madrid Mrs.
56 Start of an idea
59 Fabric flaw
60 Yo La Tengo
guitarist
Kaplan
61 Break the tape
62 Whichever
63 King of ancient
Rome
WEDNESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
N ELSON P RESSLEY
Face it, Washington: After a
long day of running the government or trying to shut it down,
you don’t want to spend the
evening with an earnest show.
You want something that turns
your brain to crab dip, and lo,
there’s a vat of cream cheese at
the National Theatre called
“Something Rotten!”
This is a musical spoofing
musicals, and the title gets it
right: “Something Rotten!” isn’t
fresh. This touring version of the
2015 Broadway hit has the leftover aroma of “The Producers,”
“The Book of Mormon” and a half
dozen campy escapades from the
Reduced Shakespeare Company.
“How do you solve a problem
like Ophelia?” someone asks as
everything you know about theater gets pureed at high speed.
A bitter rival of Shakespeare’s
— Nick Bottom, the ham from “A
Midsummer Night’s Dream” —
goes to a soothsayer named
Thomas Nostradamus to see
what audiences will want in the
future, so he can write a hit now.
The answer is musicals — “Musicals!” the poufy-pants characters
gush with wonder, looking up
and spreading their arms. This
leads to anachronistic inside
jokes about singing cats and
fiddlers on roofs.
This is easy pickins, a wideopen door to a “Forbidden
Broadway”-esque mash-up with
endless Shakespearean puns — a
consummation devoutly to be
squished. Once you get the setup,
it’s surprising how unsurprising
it is, from the theme-park energy
of the opening number, “Welcome to the Renaissance,” to the
inevitable second-act anthem of
realization, the gospel-funk “We
See the Light.” Wink, wink,
nudge — this is the formula, get
it? As “Spamalot” sang, it’s the
song that goes like this.
Here’s the rub: Directorchoreographer Casey Nicholaw
has a knack for shepherding
these high-concept low comedies
written by showbiz veterans trying out their first musicals. His
résumé goes from “The Book of
Mormon” by the “South Park”
guys to Tina Fey’s “Mean Girls”
and this, by screenwriter Karey
JEREMY DANIEL
“Something Rotten!” is a Shakespearean spoof of Broadway
musicals that doesn’t stink but at the same time isn’t very fresh.
Kirkpatrick and his songwriting
brother, Wayne, with British
writer John O’Farrell. Nicholaw
runs a tight ship and can disarm
you with joy, especially during
the musical numbers. His shrugging, swiveling jazz-hands dancers always look incredibly happy,
as if they just lucked into the
greatest party.
The cast at the National sells
this awfully well, too. Who better
to be a rock-star Shakespeare
than original “Rent” star Adam
Pascal? He’s got the strut and ego
and, for a second, he even sounds
like David Bowie as he croons
over the bass-heavy rocker “Will
Power”: “I am the Will with the
skill to thrill you with my quill.”
The book is loaded with smutty puns that particularly grip the
tongue of the Puritan minister
who sees the stage as a pit of
sinners, and playing this scold,
actor Scott Cote fumes like
Yosemite Sam at the Bottom
brothers. Yes, Nick (Rob McClure, in a role that’s all frustrated energy and no real appeal)
tries to collaborate with his poetic brother, Nigel (Josh Grisetti,
sweet and naive), whose genius
lines get swiped by that magpie
Shakespeare.
The material seldom catches
you off guard until Nick’s
“Springtime for Hitler”-y musical
of “Hamlet,” which gets things
wrong a la the wacky “Book of
Mormon” second-act number
but with enough delirium that
you can’t really resist. If you
want to compare and contrast,
there’s a big “Hamlet” playing a
couple of blocks away at the
Shakespeare Theatre Company,
and “Something Rotten!” is right
in that sometimes you just need a
hot furnace blast of glitz and a
kick line. Nicholaw molds it into
a crowd-pleaser, especially for
audiences hip to blips of everything from “Pippin” to “Les Miz.”
But it’s mostly a one-joke rip-off
that spins in place.
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
Something Rotten!, book by Karey
Kirkpatrick and John O’Farrell, music
and lyrics by Wayne Kirkpatrick and
Karey Kirkpatrick. Directed by Casey
Nicholaw. Scenic design, Scott Pask;
costumes Gregg Barnes; lights, Jeff
Croiter; sound design, Peter
Hylenski. About 21/2 hours. Through
Feb. 18 at the National Theatre,
1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Tickets:
$48-$203. Call 800-514-3849 or
visit thenationaldc.com.
KLMNO
SPORTS
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
M2
D
PYEONGCHANG
Suspected
Russian
athletes
still on hold
Frustrations mount as
CAS delays verdict on 32
under cloud of doping
BY
A DAM K ILGORE
pyeongchang, south korea
— The athletes have arrived, and
the global media have descended
at the PyeongChang Olympics.
And yet the dark cloud that
formed at the previous Winter
Games remains at the start of
these. International Olympic
Committee officials were still navigating final decisions on how to
handle Russians found to have
participated in a state-sponsored
doping program, and athletes
were still reckoning with the
damage done and lingering uncertainty.
Russia’s widespread doping at
the 2014 Sochi Olympics — and an
IOC response that has been criticized as inconsistent and meandering — already has affected
these Games. On Wednesday evening, 32 Russian athletes still
hoping to compete had verdicts
delayed when the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) adjourned
a hearing without resolution. The
delay means the number of Russians permitted to compete may
not be determined until Friday
morning, the day of the Opening
Ceremonies.
“I hope we will have as soon as
possible the results from CAS,”
IOC President Thomas Bach said.
“I do not know more.”
The final questions prompted
by last week’s controversial decision by CAS to overturn Olympic
bans for 28 Russian athletes remain unanswered, fitting for a
drawn-out saga. The World AntiDoping Agency released an initial
report on the Russian program in
2015, and the McLaren Report
deepened the evidence and case
against Russia in July 2016. Despite ample warning, IOC officials
allowed a scandal at one Olympics
to seep into another.
“The timing of all this is ridiculous,” U.S. biathlete Lowell Bailey
said. “I mean, thank God that
they’re at least looking into it and
DOPING CONTINUED ON D6
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Maryland loses for the
sixth time in eight games,
falling at Penn State. D4
BASEBALL
Nationals minor leaguer
Raudy Read is suspended
for 80 games for PEDs. D8
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Mikaela Shiffrin, 22, admits to feeling ‘external pressure’ as a gold medal favorite
world’s best is a worrier
BY
B ARRY S VRLUGA
T
he numbers are plain,
and they lay out the case
that’s as easy to argue as
the sky is blue or rock
beats scissors. Mikaela Shiffrin is
the best female Alpine ski racer
in the world. Not yet 23, she is on
a pace that could leave her as the
most decorated World Cup racer
ever. She already owns one Olympic gold medal and is favored to
win two more — with potential
beyond that — as the PyeongChang Games begin. What are
her limits?
Shiffrin’s ability and her accomplishments validate her confidence. Still, when she climbs
JURE MAKOVEC/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Mikaela Shiffrin, the defending slalom gold medalist,
could be a medal threat in five events at these Olympics.
paju, south
korea — He was
there on the other
side of the river,
but through the
binoculars, there
Barry
was no way to tell
Svrluga
whether he was
happy or
miserable, content with his life or
obsessed with finding a way out.
He was just a figure working
Wednesday morning in a field in
the southwestern corner of North
Korea, and for the purposes of
those of us clustered on the
southern side of the river,
gawking from less than a mileand-a-half away, he was
CARL COURT/GETTY IMAGES
A South Korean soldier stands guard near the border
between North and South, where relations are fraught.
A life around firearms
For U.S. biathlete, reconciling her sport
with gun violence is a tricky endeavor. D5
C ANDACE B UCKNER
Mike Scott got his first emoji
tattoos at a friend’s house in
Atlanta in 2013, the summer
after his rookie season in the
NBA — a purple devil smirking
on his right shoulder, an orange
angry face on the left. Each cost
just $30. Fast and cheap, as Scott,
now a 29-year-old Washington
Wizards forward, proudly brags.
But back when he revealed the
new ink to friends, their reaction
mimicked the character on his
left shoulder.
“Everybody was criticizing
him about it,” longtime friend
Marque Robinson says.
That only motivated Scott to
get more emoji tattoos. Whenever a software update added new
digital images, Scott returned to
SHIFFRIN CONTINUED ON D5
Ahead of ‘Peace Olympics,’ a di≠erent reality at the DMZ
Jerry Brewer
U.S. slopestyle snowboarder Jamie
Anderson finds the proper balance. D6
A deadeye shooter, Scott marches to his own beat
BY
into the start gate, she can be
surprisingly vulnerable. She believes in herself, for sure, but she
is the rare elite athlete who will
tell you, quite flatly, that pressure
can be palpable.
“I get so nervous; I was throwing up last year,” Shiffrin said.
“It’s like, the races I’m supposed
to win, I worry about what
happens if I don’t. Who am I
letting down? My family? The
media? What’s the media going
to say if I don’t win? I was
listening, and I had never really
listened to those things before.”
With her second Olympics
about to open, this is Mikaela
Shiffrin: capable of confidently
a tattoo parlor. A carrot, an
ambulance, a middle finger, a
hamburger, a playful ghost with
a pink tongue, a stick of butter
with wings and a pair of dancing
ladies in leotards — Scott describes them as “two mistresses”
— now make up the tapestry of
body art. Scott covered nearly
every inch of his arms and chest
— he has lost count of how many
tattoos — for no reason other
than a desire to be his own
person.
“Very different,” Wizards forward Chris McCullough says of
his teammate. “Definitely original.”
And definitely quirky. Scott is
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D3
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
“Very different,” teammate Chris McCullough says of Mike Scott,
who has resurrected his NBA career. “Definitely original.”
Celtics at Wizards
Today, 8 p.m., TNT
presented as an exhibit.
The PyeongChang Winter
Olympics officially will start
Friday in this country — on this
side of the river — and when you
listen to organizers, you will hear
how these are intended to be the
“Peace Olympics” so many times
that you either will start to
believe it or become numb to it.
Standing in someplace called the
Odusan Unification Observatory
on Wednesday morning, looking
across the intersection of the Han
and Imjin rivers into North
Korea, the history of the Korean
Peninsula was plain to see. The
land on either side of the rivers
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D7
Roller derby on ice
The 500-meter short-track speedskating
race is frenzied, unpredictable mayhem. D7
Cavaliers pass road test,
poised to ascend to No. 1
VIRGINIA 59,
FLORIDA STATE 55
BY
G ENE W ANG
tallahassee — Even by its lofty
standard for defensive excellence, Virginia’s performance
against Florida State on Wednesday night was remarkable.
The second-ranked Cavaliers
did not allow a field goal over the
final 9:01 in erasing a double-digit halftime deficit to secure a
59-55 win at Tucker Center.
And while Coach Tony Bennett
and several players gladly broke
down the specifics behind the
defensive stand, sophomore
guard Ty Jerome, not often at a
loss for words, was speechless.
Well, almost.
“I don’t even know,” Jerome
said with an incredulous stare
when asked how the Cavaliers
(23-1, 12-0) managed the remarkable feat despite facing the second-highest scoring team in the
ACC this season.
Backcourt mate Kyle Guy put it
VIRGINIA CONTINUED ON D4
St. John’s upsets Villanova
Red Storm follows win over Duke
with a shocker on the road. D4
Virginia Tech at Virginia
Saturday, 6:15 p.m., ESPN
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
FANCY STATS
PRO FOOTBALL
EARLY LEAD
Knicks lose
Porzingis,
any chance
at playo≠s
BY
Colts GM
says rivalry
vs. Patriots
‘is back on’
N EIL G REENBERG
New York Knicks cornerstone
Kristaps Porzingis tore the anterior cruciate ligament in his left
knee during Tuesday night’s 10389 home loss to the Milwaukee
Bucks and probably will be sidelined for at least 10 months after
surgery, a huge blow to a franchise
that just can’t seem to get back on
track.
Porzingis cannot be replaced.
Dubbed a “unicorn” by Golden
State Warriors star Kevin Durant
for his unusual skill and athleticism, Porzingis is part of the
league’s group of gifted big men
with the size, speed and savvy to
space the floor on offense without
sacrificing defense. Before his injury, the 7-foot-3 Latvia native led
the Knicks in scoring at 22.7 points
per game, while adding 6.6 rebounds and a league-leading
2.4 blocks.
“It’s deflating because he’s a big
part of what we’re trying to build
around,” New York Coach Jeff Hornacek said after Tuesday’s game.
Porzingis touched the ball
61 times per game, second on the
team to point guard Jarrett Jack,
and scored 0.37 points per touch
— seventh highest in the NBA this
season among players with at
least 50 touches per game. He is
typically used in the post, where
he can create his own shot, scoring
almost a point per possession with
his back to the basket. But he also
opens up space for his teammates
because of his ability to make
three-pointers (4.8 attempts per
game, 39 percent shooting).
Before Porzingis was injured,
the Knicks, who are five games
behind the Philadelphia 76ers for
the Eastern Conference’s last playoff spot, at least had a chance at a
postseason appearance. With Porzingis hurt, those hopes essentially are no more.
Overall, the Knicks scored
105.5 points per 100 possessions
while allowing 105.4 points with
Porzingis on the court. However,
the team was outscored by almost
five net points per 100 possessions
with him on the bench.
neil.greenberg@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/news/
fancy-stats
QUOTABLE
“He gets the most assists
from me and gets
the most spoon-fed
baskets ever.”
JOHN WALL,
Wizards guard, making reference to
center Marcin Gortat during an ESPN
interview Tuesday. Wall apparently
took exception to how the team’s ball
movement has been portrayed in his
absence. (Via Post Sports)
BY
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
The Redskins’ acquisition of Alex Smith from the Chiefs gives them a veteran QB and signals they are in a win-now mode.
Assessing the NFC East field
BY
K IMBERLEY A . M ARTIN
The Washington Redskins have
another reason to dislike the
Philadelphia Eagles. The first-time Super
Bowl champions are comfortably nestled
atop the NFC East after their 41-33 upset
of the New England Patriots on Sunday
night in Super Bowl LII. It was a frenetic
and dramatic performance, led by
backup-turned-starter Nick Foles, who
outdueled Tom Brady, while Doug
Pederson outcoached Bill Belichick.
The NFC East now is the only NFL
division in which all four teams have
won at least one Super Bowl. The Dallas
Cowboys have won five, while the New
York Giants have won four and the
Redskins three. So what does the Eagles’
Super Bowl victory mean for the rest of
the division and, more importantly, the
Redskins?
Philadelphia was by far the best team
in the division during the regular
season, and it will enter 2018 training
camp as the NFC East favorite. But all
four teams have critical needs to address
and big questions to answer:
Redskins
There’s plenty of time for roster
tinkering via free agency and the NFL
draft, but Washington altered the
market with its stunning trade for
Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Alex
Smith during Super Bowl week. The
acquisition, which technically isn’t
official until the start of the new league
year in March, signaled the Redskins are
in a win-now mode with a veteran
quarterback
with
postseason
experience. (The trade effectively ended
the Kirk Cousins era in Ashburn, too.)
The addition of Smith could pay
dividends if the Redskins tinker their
system to suit his strengths, if Smith
plays well and if he stays healthy. Those
are a lot of “ifs.”
Before the Redskins can think about
dethroning the Eagles in the division,
they first need to focus on ways to put
together a competitive and successful
team. Washington needs to be active in
Eagles will be favorites again
in 2018, but all four teams
have needs and questions
free agency and have a strong draft in
April. The team has several holes on
defense,
doesn’t
have
enough
playmakers and still needs to improve
its running game (despite all of the
backs who saw playing time this year).
The Redskins have to address their
needs at inside linebacker, left guard,
cornerback and strong safety. Plus, they
need a speed threat to stretch the field.
Cowboys
Just two seasons ago, the Cowboys
went 13-3 and reached the divisional
round of the playoffs with two rookies
leading the way. But without star
running back Ezekiel Elliott, who served
a six-game suspension in 2017 on
account of domestic violence allegations
made by his former girlfriend,
quarterback Dak Prescott and the
offense struggled to find consistency.
Although Dallas finished 9-7 in 2017, it
missed the playoffs for the sixth time in
the past eight seasons. Even worse for
ultra-competitive owner Jerry Jones:
The Cowboys haven’t reached the Super
Bowl since the 1995 season.
Save for some tweaks to their position
coaches, Jones didn’t do much tinkering
to his staff because he wanted to
maintain continuity. And with Elliott
back in 2018, expectations remain high
in Jerry’s world.
Giants
The firings of coach Ben McAdoo and
general manager Jerry Reese signaled a
new day in East Rutherford, N.J. Reese’s
replacement, Dave Gettleman, tabbed
former Minnesota Vikings offensive
coordinator Pat Shurmur as his head
coach. Now Shurmur has at his disposal
a former Super Bowl MVP in
quarterback Eli Manning and one of the
NFL’s best playmakers in Odell
Beckham Jr. Oh, and the Giants have the
No. 2 overall pick in the draft after going
3-13.
With that said, the Giants are still an
unknown. One one hand, it’s hard for
them to be any worse, right? But
Manning just turned 37; Beckham, who’s
known as much for his on-and-off-thefield antics as he is for his game-day play,
is coming off ankle surgery and is
seeking a lucrative contract extension —
a sticky situation for the new front office.
Not to mention the Giants have several
roster holes to fill, namely at offensive
line.
Eagles
It’s always sunny in Philadelphia. And
right now the future looks bright for
Pederson.
The Eagles’ victory over the Patriots
was one for the ages. After being the
underdogs of the postseason despite
their 13-3 regular season record, the
Eagles showed the football world that,
with the right system and backup
quarterback in place, anything’s
possible. But eventually, Philadelphia’s
front office will have to turn the page
and focus on some lingering questions
heading into the 2018 season.
Quarterback Carson Wentz, who
suffered a season-ending knee injury
with three regular season games to go, is
still the face of the franchise. But it’s
unclear how long it will take him to look
and feel like himself again after he had
major surgery.
Meanwhile, it remains to be seen
whether Foles, the Super Bowl MVP, will
still be on the roster during Week 1. The
Eagles, who don’t have a second- or
third-round pick this year, need to
stockpile draft picks. Plus, the team will
have to decide whether to re-sign its free
agents, including running back
LeGarrette Blount, cornerback Patrick
Robinson and tight end Trey Burton.
kimberley.martin@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
insider
United Coach Olsen
suspended for opener
MLS suspended D.C. United
Coach Ben Olsen for the season
opener for berating the referee
after RFK Stadium’s farewell
match last fall. He also was fined
an undisclosed amount.
The league took the action in
the days after the Oct. 22 match
against the New York Red Bulls
but never announced the
penalties publicly. During an
interview with The Washington
Post this week, Olsen mentioned
in passing that he would not be
on the sideline for the March 3
match at Orlando City.
He admitted directing
unsavory language at referee
Dave Gantar on the field after the
final whistle and in the tunnel
leading to the locker rooms
following the 2-1 defeat in the
final MLS game at RFK.
— Steven Goff
Sevilla scored early and late
through Joaquin Correa and
Franco Vazquez to defeat visiting
Leganes, 2-0, advancing to its
second Copa del Rey final in three
seasons with a 3-1 aggregate
score.
Sevilla, a five-time Copa
With the Patriots mum as always, it was left to Colts General
Manager Chris Ballard to explain
just how Indianapolis was left
holding the bag after Josh McDaniels decided this week to remain
with New England — roughly
24 hours before he was to be introduced as the Colts’ next head
coach.
Ballard’s closing words at his
Wednesday news conference indicated some of what lies below the
surface. As he left the affair, the
GM told reporters, “The rivalry is
back on.”
The two franchises have something of a contentious history, including most notably the Deflategate drama the Colts prompted
after a 2015 loss to New England in
the AFC championship game. Ballard’s closing line, though, was the
closest he came to saying anything
critical about the Patriots on
Wednesday.
“We were disappointed. Unquestionably, we were disappointed and surprised,” Ballard told reporters after McDaniels opted to
keep his job as New England’s
offensive coordinator. “We had an
agreement in place, had two interviews. Both went very well. [We
were] very confident even Tuesday
morning. Then I got a call Tuesday
evening saying he had changed his
mind and was going in a different
direction.
“We’ll keep moving forward,”
Ballard said. “Just know this: Obstacles happen. That’s what makes
this league great. That’s what
makes football great.”
The decisive phone call came at
about 7:15 p.m. on Tuesday and
lasted “around five minutes,” Ballard said.
“I’ve got bad news for you,” McDaniels told him. “I just said, ‘Are
you in or out?’ ” the GM recalled.
When the reply was “out,” Ballard said he wished McDaniels
luck without asking for more information.
The news came amid a difficult
few days for the Colts, after the
death of linebacker Edwin Jackson and Uber driver Jeffrey Monroe in a roadside accident early
Sunday morning.
Urging everyone to “keep in
perspective what’s important,” the
general manager went on to discuss the team’s coaching situation.
He was asked whether the uncertain physical status of quarterback Andrew Luck was a factor for
McDaniels.
“I’ll say this, and I’ve said this
since Day One: It’s never about
one guy,” Ballard said. “It’s never
about one guy. It’s about the team.”
As he reopens his coaching
search, Ballard said he won’t panic
and that, like all NFL general managers, he has a list.
“We will get the right leader for
the Indianapolis Colts,” he said. “I
am very confident in this.”
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
DIG ES T
SOCCER
C INDY B OREN
winner, will face either Barcelona
or Valencia, who play
Thursday. . . .
Forwards Maxwell Cornet and
Nabil Fekir scored first-half goals
as Lyon won, 2-1, at Montpellier to
reach the French Cup
quarterfinals.
Caen, second-division Lens
and third-division Chambly also
advanced to join Cup holder Paris
Saint-Germain, Marseille and
third-division side Les Herbiers
in the final eight.
TENNIS
Top-seeded David Goffin of
Belgium reached the quarterfinals
of the Open Sud de France in
Montpellier by beating French
veteran Gilles Simon, 6-4, 6-2.
Sixth-seeded Russian Andrey
Rublev joined Goffin in the
quarterfinals with a 6-2, 6-1 win
against Frenchman Jeremy
Chardy. . . .
Ilie Nastase had two bans
reduced by eight months and his
fine doubled to $20,000 following
his appeal of International Tennis
Federation sanctions for foulmouthed comments and
misconduct as the Romanian Fed
Cup captain.
The ITF suspended the 71-yearold Nastase from Fed Cup and
Davis Cup events and from
working in an official capacity in
the sport after his outbursts in
April.
An independent tribunal
agreed that Nastase, the 1973
French Open champion, hurled
abuse at British player Johanna
Konta and the umpire during a
Fed Cup match and made
“unwelcome advances of a sexual
nature” toward British captain
Anne Keothavong.
The tribunal ruled Nastase can
attend ITF competitions, such as
Fed Cup and Davis Cup, starting
April 24. The ban doesn’t apply to
Grand Slam, ATP or WTA
tournaments.
He can return in an official
capacity to ITF events April 24,
2020.
GYMNASTICS
Six Republicans and 12
Democratic lawmakers signed on
to legislation to establish a special
committee to investigate the
handling of sexual abuse
allegations against former sports
doctor Larry Nassar by the U.S.
Olympic Committee and USA
Gymnastics.
Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.)
said she is hopeful Senate leaders
will back the effort once the
chamber has dealt with an array
of critical issues, namely keeping
the federal government running.
But she has not yet received a
commitment.
PRO FOOTBALL
The Detroit Lions introduced
Matt Patricia as their head coach.
Patricia, with his previously
bushy beard trimmed
considerably, had his first news
conference on the team’s indoor
practice field.
The 43-year-old Patricia helped
New England win three Super
Bowls over 14 years. He was the
Patriots’ defensive coordinator
the past six seasons.
GOLF
Former Dallas Cowboys
quarterback Tony Romo is
making his PGA Tour debut next
month in the Dominican
Republic.
Romo, now the lead NFL
analyst for CBS Sports, received a
sponsor’s exemption to play in the
Puntacana Resort & Club
Championship on March 22-25.
The first-year event is held
opposite the Match Play, a World
Golf Championships event that
features the top 64 players in the
world.
BASEBALL
According to a Yahoo report,
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Boston at Washington » TNT, WFED (1500 AM)
Oklahoma City at Los Angeles Lakers » TNT
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
8 p.m.
8 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
10 p.m.
10 p.m.
11 p.m.
11 p.m.
Bryant at Wagner » CBS Sports Network
Austin Peay at Murray State » CBS Sports Network
Georgia Tech at Louisville » ESPN2
Vermont at Albany » ESPNU
Tulane at Tulsa » ESPNews
Pittsburgh at Clemson » NBC Sports Washington Plus
Duke at North Carolina » ESPN, WTEM (980 AM)
Stanford at Utah » Fox Sports 1
Charlotte at Louisiana Tech » beIN Sports
Wisconsin at Illinois » Big Ten Network
Southern Illinois at Illinois State » CBS Sports Network
SMU at Houston » ESPN2
Tennessee Tech at Jacksonville State » ESPNU
UCLA at Arizona » ESPN, WTEM (980 AM)
Washington at Oregon » Fox Sports 1
Southern California at Arizona State » ESPN2
Santa Clara at BYU » ESPNU
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
9 p.m.
Maryland at Michigan State » Big Ten Network
South Carolina at Alabama » SEC Network
Kentucky at Missouri » SEC Network
GOLF
3 p.m.
11 p.m.
PGA Tour: Pebble Beach Pro-Am, first round » Golf Channel
European Tour: World Super 6 Perth, second round » Golf Channel
SOCCER
3 p.m.
Copa del Rey, semifinal: Barcelona at Valencia » beIN Sports
BOYS’ HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
5:30 p.m.
Greensboro Day (N.C.) at Spartanburg Day (S.C.) » ESPN2
the Major League Baseball
Players Association is trying to
arrange a spring training outpost
in either Florida or Arizona for
the approximately 100 free agents
who remain unsigned in what has
been a slow offseason for player
movement.
— From news services
and staff reports
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Sign of the times: NHL players develop autographs
Young Caps among those
who are still perfecting
their signatures for fans
BY
J ESSE D OUGHERTY
After a January practice, with
most of his teammates already
gone for the day, rookie defenseman Madison Bowey walked out
of the locker room and stared
down five wooden tables covered
in red Washington Capitals sweatshirts.
“All of them?” the 22-year-old
Bowey asked while smiling.
“Yep,” a Capitals staffer answered. “Every single one.”
Off Bowey went, black Sharpie
in hand, tagging each sweatshirt
with his signature: a wavy “M” to
start, a few straight lines down the
middle to give the autograph some
weight, a smaller, squiggly “B”
next to the “M,” and then his number, 22, to finish it off. He repeated
it dozens of times, no one autograph exactly the same but no one
autograph noticeably different, either.
Autographs are a fixture of the
sports world. There is always some
crowd — sometimes a few people,
sometimes a whole lot more —
hanging in the Capitals’ practice
facility, all holding jerseys or hats
or posters, waiting for the players
to come off the ice. The fans usually migrate to the parking lot by the
players’ exit if their memorabilia
isn’t autographed inside the rink.
The players, along with stopping
for these crowds when they have
the time, consistently sign gear for
charities and promotions and, occasionally, each other.
For veterans, it is a normal part
of the professional hockey routine. For rookies and other young
players, developing signatures
can be a comical source of stress as
they learn all the aspects of being
in the NHL.
“I have the worst signature,”
Capitals rookie defenseman
Christian Djoos said while blush-
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Capitals forward T.J. Oshie is a veteran, but some younger players
are still working on developing their signatures for inquiring fans.
C A P I TA L S ’ N EX T TH R EE
vs. Columbus Blue Jackets
Tomorrow
7 NBCSW
vs. Detroit Red Wings
Sunday
3 NBCSW
at Winnipeg Jets
Tuesday
8 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
ing and scratching his head. “It’s
so, so bad. Sometimes I feel bad
that it is going to hang on someone’s wall or something. I need to
improve it.”
How?
“Practice,” he deadpanned.
“More work in the summer, I
guess.”
Djoos is right. His signature
isn’t good, and there is really no
method to it. He starts with a big
“C,” then wiggles his pen to make a
few waves that look like a heart
monitor readout, then ends it with
something that looks like an “S”
but could be any letter. He also
adds his number, 29, but it could
really be anything depending on
how you tilt your head.
“What is that?” Bowey yelled
across the Capitals’ dressing room
when shown Djoos’s signature.
“Honestly,” Djoos said through
heavy laughter. “I have no clue.”
For three days in late January,
Tampa became the NHL autograph capital of the world. That is
where the league held its annual
all-star weekend, and players did a
lot more autograph-signing than
they did skating or scoring goals.
There were scheduled signings,
jerseys to autograph at the end of
each event, exchanges between
players and then more signing after that.
Columbus Blue Jackets defenseman Zach Werenski, named an
all-star in his second season, left
Tampa with autographs from Capitals winger Alex Ovechkin, Pittsburgh Penguins center Sidney
Crosby, Ottawa Senators defenseman Erik Karlsson and New York
Islanders center John Tavares.
Third-year Carolina Hurricanes
defenseman Noah Hanifin estimated that he signed a few hundred autographs across the weekend — at least. This all led secondyear Tampa Bay Lightning forward
Brayden Point, one of his team’s
four all-stars, to a realization.
“I have a pretty bad signature,”
Point said. “Here’s the thing you
need to balance: You need to have
something fast so you can get to a
lot of people, but it also has to be
good because that is a keepsake for
people. That can be really hard. I
look at the veterans with all these
swoops and loops. I want that, but
I’m not there yet.”
The need to sign a lot of autographs in a short period of time is
maybe why Djoos’s signature is
reduced to a clump of illegible
waves. Or why Capitals forward
Jakub Vrana renders his last name
with a big “V” and then a loop that
does not resemble any of the letters that make up the rest of it. The
21-year-old from the Czech Republic, like many NHL players, signed
his first autograph when he was a
teenager playing in juniors. His
signature has since evolved, dropping any hints of “Jakub” and adding his number, 13.
But Vrana is quick to point out
that he doesn’t always use his
number.
“I mean, come on, man,” he said,
smirking. “I’m not going to write
‘13’ on there if it’s a form or contract or something. Only autographs.”
When discussing the finer
points of his signature, like the
fancy “M” or the hard-drawn lines
in the middle, Bowey drops his
voice a bit. He has a confession to
make. He has been practicing his
autograph since he was 12 years
old, when he was a budding hockey and baseball player in Winnipeg with big dreams and a lot of
time to kill.
He signed his first autograph
when he was 15 years old, and it
was just his name fully spelled out
in cursive, like some kind of elementary-school handwriting exercise. It didn’t look right. It didn’t
look cool. So Bowey continued to
refine it, then refined it some
more, and ended up with a signature he can repeat over and over
without any stress.
“Maybe I thought there would
come a day when people would
want my autograph,” Bowey said.
“But I don’t know if 12-year-old me
could have possibly seen that far
ahead.”
jesse.dougherty@washpost.com
With a new start, Scott gives Wizards a career year
WIZARDS FROM D1
a conspiracy theorist who believes the existence of UFOs is
being suppressed by the government. Imagine how interesting
the morning commute to downtown Washington, past all those
federal buildings with all those
bureaucrats and politicians, can
be for a guy who distrusts the
system.
“I drive past the Capitol every
day,” Scott says with a sigh. “I just
always think the government is
doing something.”
Antonn Scott believes his older brother’s movie tastes might
have something to do with his
paranoia. As kids, big brother
Mike’s idea of babysitting Antonn was by popping in horror
and mystery movies such as “Final Destination” or “Signs.” Antonn was 5.
“That has me cautious about
everything,” Antonn says, laughing, “because of him.”
Scott may be the most eccentric player in the Wizards’ locker
room and one of the most generous. The team’s assistant athletic
trainer, Jeff Bangs, hails from
Philadelphia and is a die-hard
Eagles fan. So when Bangs’s team
made the Super Bowl, Scott
brought him a ticket because he
didn’t want Bangs to miss out on
the experience.
“He literally had a bucket-list
moment when he got to go to the
Super Bowl. They won the Super
Bowl, and he got to see it his own
self,” Wizards big man Jason
Smith said of Bangs. “It’s truly
special that Mike did that for
him.”
Scott owns more than
700 pairs of sneakers but gives
away many to churches — or
really anyone he can find who fits
into a size 16. Though he and
Robinson, a longtime friend who
shares Scott’s Arlington condominium, obsessively play the video game “NBA 2K,” the real
competition goes down at Dave
& Buster’s. Naturally, the Wizards’ best shooter, who is hitting
a career-high 56 percent of his
attempts from the field this season, sets the high score on Super
Shot. Those tickets that gush out
of the machine? Scott gives them
to nearby kids.
His coach is thankful his
shooting skills extend beyond the
arcade.
“I’m pleasantly surprised that
he shoots the ball so well,” Wizards Coach Scott Brooks says. “I
didn’t know that he was deadly
from 17 to 18 feet, all the way to
the three-point line. So that’s
been a great surprise.”
In July, Scott woke up his
younger brother with a text message: “We goin’ home.” Scott, who
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Boston Celtics
Today
8 TNT
at Chicago Bulls
Saturday
8 NBCSW
at New York Knicks
Wednesday 7:30 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
hails from Chesapeake, Va., and
played college ball at Virginia,
agreed to terms with the Wizards
early in free agency for a oneyear deal worth the veteran’s
minimum of $1.7 million. On the
surface, that contract reflected
little risk for the Wizards. However, amid boiling racial tensions
between black men and white
law enforcement, it appeared
that Washington was signing a
floor-spacing wing with baggage.
Last season, Scott’s fifth with
the Atlanta Hawks, he was experiencing the worst year of his
career. Because of injuries, Scott
logged only 18 appearances in
the team’s first 56 games. After a
short stint with the Long Island
Nets in the NBA Development
League, where he first played
alongside McCullough, Scott was
shipped to the Phoenix Suns last
February. But he never took that
flight to Phoenix. One day after
the trade, Scott had to appear
inside a Georgia courtroom to
face felony drug charges stemming from an incident a year and
a half earlier.
In a recent interview, Scott
spoke extensively for the first
time about the July 2015 incident, a day that nearly derailed
his career.
Scott rented a 2015 Chevrolet
Tahoe for a road trip back to
Chesapeake with Antonn. The
Scott brothers had barely made it
out of Atlanta on Interstate 85
when they saw the flashing lights
of a Banks County sheriff ’s office
patrol car.
“I got pulled over by a cop who
was on his ‘Training Day’ [expletive],” Scott says, referencing the
Denzel Washington film about a
corrupt police officer.
Antonn, who was 20 at the
time, was driving. The deputy,
Brent Register, said he stopped
the SUV because it was following
other cars too closely, though
Scott denies they were driving
recklessly. During the traffic stop
and search, Register uncovered a
microwaveable
dish
with
35.2 grams of marijuana and a
plastic baggie containing a white
powder, MDMA. Mike Scott told
Register the drugs belonged to
him.
“I couldn’t have my little
brother take that,” Scott says
now. “My little brother ain’t had
nothing to do with it. It was on
me. I just took it because I didn’t
want him getting in trouble for
something I did . . . I couldn’t live
with myself.”
Scott initially didn’t grasp the
gravity of the situation — not
after making his phone call to his
father or while spending a night
in a holding cell. Only when his
girlfriend posted bail and he
heard news reports of his arrest
did the weight hit the NBA
player.
“Like, damn, ‘I [screwed] this
up. Did I [screw] it up?’ ” Scott
says he asked himself on the ride
back to Atlanta. “And once I saw
the consequences I was like, ‘This
[stuff ] is for real for real. It’s
serious.’ I didn’t realize how
serious it was until I got out of
jail.”
Scott played a season and a
half for the Hawks with the case
hanging over his head.
“It was heavy on him,” Robinson says. “Of course he knew he
made a mistake. That was probably the start of a very tough
year.”
By 2016-17, injuries to his left
knee, ankle and toe hampered
him. After Atlanta finalized the
Phoenix trade a year ago, the
Suns waived Scott. For several
weeks he searched for a new
team, preferably one bound for
the playoffs, but found no takers.
In May, a judge tossed out the
drug charges after ruling that
Register had racially profiled the
Scott brothers. “We weren’t doing nothing wrong. Just saw two
black dudes driving a nice SUV.
That’s what tripped him off,”
Scott says.
The dismissal came too late for
Scott’s hopes of latching on with
a playoff team. He believes the
stigma from his arrest played a
role in his unemployment.
“They probably thought I was
a drug dealer, a drug user,” Scott
says. “I got all that type stuff. I got
all that hate mail. On social
media, people were killing me.
Just got to take it. When the
spotlight’s on you, it’s your turn.
So I’m pretty sure that’s what
[NBA teams] were thinking: ‘He’s
a troublemaker.’ I’m always going
to have that, even though we got
acquitted of everything. We don’t
have no record or nothing, but
it’s still going to be with me.
Forever.”
When he didn’t hear back from
a team, the 6-foot-8 Scott packed
on the pounds, ballooning to 277.
But by the summer, free from a
criminal court case, Scott committed to dieting and training.
He gave up fast food and received
weekly prep meals favoring lean
D3
M2
protein such as salmon and
ground turkey. After six-day-aweek workouts with fitness and
basketball
trainers,
Scott
slimmed to 235 pounds. By the
start of free agency in July, he
was ready to shed his outcast
label.
“Only playing 18 games puts a
drive in you when you know
you’re capable of playing every
game,” Robinson says.
Now midway through his first
season in Washington, Scott has
a room full of teammates who
love his quirks — and his generosity.
“Ask him about some of the
sayings on his tattoos,” Smith
says. “ ‘I do not care at all.’ It’s an
eyeball, then a doughnut, then a
carrot.”
“He’s probably the first person
ever to have emojis tatted on
him,” McCullough says. “So that’s
big. But overall, he’s a good guy.
He’s a good guy I look up to.”
Scott also has a stat line flush
with jumpers (he’s averaging
9.2 points and shooting another
career high at 43.3 percent behind the arc), a refreshed reputation in the league and a life story
full of pages waiting to be written.
“It’s like a new start,” he says.
Somewhere on his body, an
emoji is smiling.
candace.buckner@washpost.com
NHL ROUNDUP
Boston keeps on rolling,
routs New York on road
time since 2010.
BRUINS 6,
RANGERS 1
MAPLE LEAFS 3, PREDATORS 2 (SO): James van Riems-
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Riley Nash and Zdeno Chara
scored first-period goals and Patrice Bergeron added two in the
second to help the surging Boston Bruins swamp the host New
York Rangers, 6-1, on Wednesday
night.
The Bruins won for the
18th time in their past 23 games,
getting 21 saves from backup
netminder Anton Khudobin. The
Bruins (33-11-8) are just a point
behind Atlantic Division-leading
Tampa Bay.
Tim Schaller’s goal that made
it 4-1 at 7:25 of the second period
chased Rangers goaltender Henrik Lundqvist and brought boos
from the crowd at Madison
Square Garden. Lundqvist was
replaced by Ondrej Pavelec.
The Rangers had won seven
straight over the Bruins, including both meetings this season.
But New York was no match for
the Boston attack Wednesday.
After Rick Nash gave the
Rangers an early lead with his
16th goal five minutes into the
first period, the Bruins began
their relentless barrage.
Sean Kuraly completed the
scoring for the visitors.
Boston is 18-1-4 in its past
23 games and 27-4-4 in its past
35. The Bruins are 10-0-2 in their
past 12 road games. They last lost
an away game in regulation on
Dec. 4 at Nashville.
The spiraling Rangers have
lost four consecutive games and
seven of their past eight. They
are 3-10-0 since winning at Arizona on Jan. 6.
The Rangers, who sit in last
place in a tightly packed Metropolitan Division, are in danger of
missing the playoffs for the first
dyk scored in regulation and
again in the seventh round of a
shootout in Toronto’s victory
over visiting Nashville.
Kasperi Kapanen also scored
in regulation to help the Maple
Leafs win for the sixth time in
seven games. Frederik Andersen
made 44 saves to improve to 7-1-0
against Nashville.
Colton Sissons and Viktor
Arvidsson scored for the Predators, and Pekka Rinne stopped
30 shots.
Toronto built a two-goal lead
on van Riemsdyk’s long-range
shot in the first period and
Kapanen’s wrister in the second.
Sissons picked up a loose puck
and scored with 1:50 left in the
second period, and Arvidsson
tied the game on a rebound
25 seconds into the third.
Burrows suspended 10 games
Ottawa Senators forward Alexandre Burrows was suspended
for 10 games without pay by the
NHL for serving as the aggressor
in an altercation and kneeing
New Jersey Devils forward Taylor Hall.
Burrows was assessed two minor penalties on the play, one for
cross-checking and one for
roughing, midway through the
second period in the Senators’
5-3 home victory Tuesday night.
The suspension will cost Burrows $134,409.
WILD: Minnesota defenseman Jonas Brodin will miss the
next three to four weeks recovering from a broken left hand.
The Wild announced Brodin
had surgery Wednesday. He is
one of the team’s top four blueliners and by far Minnesota’s
leader with a plus-19 rating.
Brodin was hurt in the second
period at St. Louis on Tuesday
night.
NBA ROUNDUP
James comes to rescue
for reeling Cleveland
CAVALIERS 140,
T’WOLVES 138 (OT)
A SSOCIATED P RESS
LeBron James hit a jumper over
Jimmy Butler at the buzzer in
overtime, giving the Cleveland
Cavaliers a 140-138 win over the
visiting Minnesota Timberwolves
on Wednesday night.
Moments after James blocked
Butler’s potential game-winning
shot with 1.3 seconds left, he
caught a long pass from Jeff
Green, created some space from
Butler near the foul line and sank
his fadeaway shot.
The crowd erupted, and James
was mobbed by his teammates as
the Cavaliers got a much-needed
win to ease tensions during a prolonged slump. Cleveland has won
just seven of its past 20.
James finished with 37 points,
15 assists and 10 rebounds in
48 minutes.
Butler scored 35 and Karl-Anthony Towns 30 for the Timberwolves.
ROCKETS 109, HEAT 101:
James Harden scored 41 points,
and visiting Houston defeated Miami for its sixth straight victory
and 10th in 11 games. Miami has
lost a season-high six straight.
PISTONS 115, NETS 106:
Andre Drummond had 17 points
and 27 rebounds, and Detroit beat
visiting Brooklyn to extend its
winning streak to five games.
Blake Griffin added 25 points for
the Pistons, who have not lost
since they acquired him last week.
JAZZ 92, GRIZZLIES 88:
Ricky Rubio had 29 points and
eight rebounds as visiting Utah
won its seventh in a row.
Pelicans-Pacers, ppd.
The game between the Indiana
Pacers and Pelicans in New Orleans was postponed after a nearly
two-hour delay because of a roof
leak that allowed rain water to
puddle near one of the foul lines.
KNICKS: New York traded
center Willy Hernangomez to the
Charlotte Hornets in a deal that
brings back second-round picks in
the 2020 and 2021 drafts, plus
forward Johnny O’Bryant.
CLIPPERS: Los Angeles
signed Lou Williams, the NBA’s
best scorer off the bench, to a
multiyear contract extension.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
college basketball
AREA ROUNDUP
Robinson Another night, another close loss for Terps
PENN STATE 74,
powers
MARYLAND 70
the Hokies
to victory
BY
ROMAN STUBBS
state college, pa. — Maryland
VIRGINIA TECH 85,
N.C. STATE 75
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
Justin
Robinson
scored
32 points to carry Virginia Tech to
an 85-75 win over North Carolina
State on Wednesday in Blacksburg, Va.
Kerry Blackshear Jr. added
18 points for the Hokies (17-7, 6-5
ACC), who shot 63.5 percent (33 for
52). Omer Yurtseven led the Wolfpack (16-8, 6-5) with 20 points.
GEORGE WASHINGTON
80, LA SALLE 69: Senior Yuta
Watanabe scored a career-high
29 points to lead the host Colonials (10-14, 3-8 Atlantic 10) over
the Explorers (10-14, 4-7).
RICHMOND
77, VCU 76:
Khwan Fore’s free throw with
3.8 seconds left capped the host
Spiders’ rally from a 12-point, second-half deficit. Jacob Gilyard and
Nick Sherod each scored 18 points
for Richmond (9-14, 7-4 Atlantic
10). Justin Tillman scored
21 points for the Rams (14-10, 6-5).
NAVY 69, HOLY CROSS 34:
Cam Davis scored 18 points to pace
the Midshipmen (16-10, 7-6 Patriot
League) in Worcester, Mass. Holy
Cross fell to 8-16, 5-8.
FORDHAM 67, GEORGE
MASON 66: Prokop Slanina
scored 17 points, and the Rams
(8-15, 3-8 Atlantic 10) overcame a
17-point deficit to win in New York.
Otis Livingston II scored 16 points
for the Patriots (10-14, 4-7).
LOYOLA (MD.) 72, AMERICAN 69: Isaiah Hart and Brent
Holcombe had 17 points each to
lead the Greyhounds (8-16, 6-7 Patriot) over the Eagles in Baltimore.
Sa’eed Nelson scored 31 points for
American (5-19, 2-11).
Hokies women rout UNC
Taylor Emery scored 25 points,
and Regan Magarity added
24 points and 13 rebounds to pace
the Virginia Tech women (16-8,
5-6 ACC) to a 90-74 win over North
Carolina in Chapel Hill, N.C.
WASHINGTON
67, GEORGE MASON 66: Kelsi
Coach Mark Turgeon spoke for less
than four minutes after his team’s
74-70 loss to Penn State on
Wednesday night, but it seemed
much shorter than that. His weariness was plain to see as he took
questions about his team’s sixth
consecutive road loss — and its
sixth loss in eight games.
Things came to a head when he
was asked how thin his team’s margin of error is for what remained of
the Terrapins’ threadbare NCAA
tournament hopes. At this, his
tone changed.
“My guys battled. Are you serious, guys? Let’s be real. My kids
battled. We had like four guys out
there. My guys battled,” he said in
the wake of Maryland’s seventh
loss by six points or fewer.
There were other parts of this
game that Turgeon had more difficulty explaining. He didn’t know
why his team didn’t compete hard
enough on the defensive end in the
first half, which partly nullified
their 54.3 percent shooting from
the field on the night. The defensive performance on Nittany Lions
forward Lamar Stevens spoke for
itself after he scored 25 points on
10-for-12 shooting, as did Maryland’s lack of defensive rebounding in critical spots.
The Terrapins (16-10, 5-8 Big
Ten) surrendered nine offensive
boards, including two on one possession with about four minutes
left that led to a pair of made free
throws by Stevens to extend Penn
State’s lead to six.
And yet, just as it did a week ago
in an eight-point loss at Purdue
and the week before that in a threepoint loss to Indiana and the week
before that in a crushing one-point
loss at Michigan — Maryland had a
chance in the final minutes. The
Terrapins trailed by 10 with 8:11
left and pulled within 73-70 with
1:13 remaining after a three-pointer by senior Jared Nickens.
Maryland forced a stop and had
ABBY DREY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Maryland started four guards and struggled on the defensive glass in its sixth consecutive road loss.
a possession to draw even, but
sophomore guard Anthony Cowan
Jr.’s contested layup was too
strong.
“It’s just a play that I have to
finish,” said Cowan, who finished
with 15 points on seven shots with
five assists. After Penn State added
a free throw to extend the lead to
four, neither Cowan nor Kevin
Huerter (13 points) could break
free to get a shot off on the final
offensive possession of the night.
Instead, Nickens had to force up a
contested turnaround threepointer that was off the mark.
“Losing is hard. It’s not like
we’re losing by a lot. Every game
has been close,” said Nickens, who
finished with 13 points off the
bench. He was part of one of Maryland’s more balanced offensive
performances of the season; the
Terrapins also received 13 points
from freshman Bruno Fernando,
10 from freshman guard Darryl
Morsell and even a pair of threepointers from Dion Wiley, who
started in Turgeon’s four-guard
lineup to begin the game.
It was that small-ball lineup
that quickly looked overmatched
against Penn State’s starters. Stevens posed major matchup problems from the outset — with senior
big man Michal Cekovsky missing
his third straight game with a heel
injury, the 6-foot-4 Morsell started
at power forward — but the Nitta-
ny Lions (17-9, 7-6) also burned the
Terrapins with pick-and-rolls with
center Mike Watkins. That included an alley-oop to Watkins with
4:23 left in the first half after Fernando subbed out of the game for a
quick breather. Watkins also had a
steal and a dunk in the final minute of the first half that gave Penn
State a 41-35 lead at the break.
But while the lack of frontcourt
depth again was exposed — center
Sean Obi and forward Joshua Tomaic combined for just 12 minutes
played — Maryland’s effort was
spotty throughout the first 20 minutes. The urgency wasn’t there,
especially for a team that essentially needs to win out in February to
have a realistic chance of being
considered for an at-large bid to
the NCAA tournament.
Maryland was slow to close out
on shooters. Loose balls went unchased. And Penn State’s offensive
boards piled up and gave the Nittany Lions 13 second-chance points.
In a game that came down to two
possessions, that number was crucial.
“We just can’t take plays off,
especially with what we’re going
through now,” Cowan said.
But Maryland also squandered
its own chances; it missed alleyoops to Fernando off multiple
plays out of timeouts. Huerter
didn’t heat up until the second half
and finished 5 for 12 from the field.
Fernando had six of the team’s
14 turnovers. Cowan, despite hitting three crucial three-pointers,
again couldn’t connect in the final
seconds to get his team over the
hump.
And Turgeon again had to take
the podium and provide answers,
some of which were terse. He
vowed to figure out his team’s rebounding issues despite its shortcomings, even though there are
only five games left before the Big
Ten tournament.
He was asked at one point why
he didn’t take a timeout with his
team down four and only five seconds remaining. “We were down
four. It had nothing to do with the
game,” Turgeon said.
He stayed on the dais for a little
while longer before launching into
a defense of his players. “My guys
battled,” Turgeon finally said, his
final words before rising to his feet
and somberly walking out of the
room.
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
NATIONAL ROUNDUP
Red Storm delivers stunning encore with upset of No. 1 Wildcats
GEORGE
Mahoney scored 17 points as the
Colonials (12-11, 7-4 Atlantic 10)
won at EagleBank Arena. Natalie
Butler led the Patriots (18-7, 7-4)
with 15 points and 15 rebounds.
AMERICAN 69, LOYOLA
(MD.) 56: Emily Kinneston had
17 points to pace the Eagles (19-4,
12-0 Patriot) at Bender Arena.
NAVY
62, HOLY CROSS 54:
Bianca Roach scored 15 points to
lead the Midshipmen (19-4, 9-3
Patriot) in Annapolis.
ST. JOHN’S 79,
VILLANOVA 75
ASSOCIATED PRESS
St. John’s watched a desperation heave clang off the rim, and
players broke into wide smiles and
raised their arms in triumph. The
players ran toward their reserves
for joyous, leaping chest bumps
that the program waited more
Owned and Operated by
Professional Engineers since 1993
than three decades to bust out for
such an occasion.
Winless in the Big East and woeful no more, the Red Storm is
toppling Final Four contenders.
St. John’s took down another of
the nation’s elite and stunned No. 1
Villanova, 79-75, on Wednesday
night in Philadelphia for its second
win over a top-five team this week
— and first over the top-ranked
team in 33 years.
Shamorie
Ponds
scored
26 points to spark the Red Storm
(12-13, 1-11 Big East) to its first
conference win of the season and
easily its best week since Chris
Mullin was in uniform, not the
coach.
Mullin played for St. John’s
when it beat No. 1 Georgetown,
66-65, on Jan. 26, 1985.
The Wildcats (22-2, 9-2) ended a
nine-game winning streak and
surely will tumble from the top of
the national rankings, where they
have spent the last five weeks at
No. 1.
OHIO
STATE 64, PURDUE
Keita Bates-Diop scored
18 points, including the decisive
putback with 2.8 seconds left, as
the 14th-ranked Buckeyes ended
the nation’s longest winning
streak at 19 games with an upset of
the third-ranked Boilermakers in
West Lafayette, Ind.
The Buckeyes (21-2, 12-1 Big Ten)
grabbed a share of the conference
lead with their 11th victory in the
past 12 games.
Carsen Edwards finished with a
career-high 28 points to lead the
Boilermakers (23-3, 12-1), who lost
for the first time since Nov. 23.
Isaac Haas missed an eight-foot
jumper at the buzzer to win it.
63:
TEXAS
TECH 76, IOWA
58: Freshman guard
Zhaire Smith scored a career-high
21 points, including a steal that led
to his alley-oop slam, and the seventh-ranked Red Raiders (20-4,
8-3 Big 12) routed the Cyclones
(12-11, 3-8) in Lubbock, Tex., for
their fifth straight win.
STATE
TEXAS A&M 81, AUBURN
80: Duane Wilson made one of two
free throws with four seconds left
to lift the visiting Aggies to an
upset of the eighth-ranked Tigers.
Texas A&M (16-8, 5-6 Southeastern Conference) held on for its
third straight win after squandering a 17-point lead in the second
half. Freshman guard T.J. Starks
scored a career-high 23 points.
Malik Dunbar forced a jump
ball off an inbounds pass with
50 seconds left, but Auburn (21-3,
9-2) gave it right back.
MIAMI 87, WAKE FOREST
81: Lonnie Walker IV scored
19 points to lead the 25th-ranked
Hurricanes past the Demon Deacons in Coral Gables, Fla.
Miami (18-5, 7-4 ACC) withstood a late Demon Deacons comeback attempt fueled by consecutive three-pointers from Bryant
Crawford in the final minute.
Crawford’s second long-range shot
with 31 seconds left pulled Wake
Forest (9-15, 2-10) to 82-79.
Crawford scored 23 points and
Brown finished with 20 for Wake
Forest (9-15, 2-10).
No. 1 U-Conn. women cruise
Katie Lou Samuelson scored
19 points and Azura Stevens added
12 to help No. 1 Connecticut beat
Central Florida, 55-37, in Orlando.
It was the lowest scoring effort
of the season for the Huskies (23-0,
11-0 American Athletic), who came
into the game averaging an NCAA
best 93.1 points.
Napheesa Collier had 11 points
and 12 rebounds for the Huskies,
who led by 17 at the end of the first
quarter and were never seriously
challenged the rest of the game.
Zakiya Saunders led UCF (16-8,
8-3) with 13 points.
LOUISVILLE 65, CLEMSON 46: In their final tuneup be-
fore a big nonconference game
against Connecticut, the fourthranked Cardinals (25-1, 11-1 ACC)
looked shaky before putting away
the Tigers (11-14, 1-11) in Louisville.
On verge of No. 1 ranking, Cavaliers top Seminoles
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thusly: “For lack of better words,
they felt they wouldn’t wear
down, but we wear teams down.
When you see that defense for
40 minutes, eventually we’re going to get our share.”
In limiting the Seminoles (17-7,
6-6) to their fewest points of the
season, Virginia extended its
winning streak to 15 and remained the lone school in the
ACC without a conference loss.
The triumph also continued Virginia’s best start in the conference since 1980-81.
Should the Cavaliers beat Virginia Tech on Saturday in Charlottesville, they probably will become No. 1 in the Associated
Press rankings after St. John’s
upset Villanova on Wednesday
night. The Cavaliers have not
been ranked first since December
1982.
“We know how good a team
they are,” redshirt senior guard
Devon Hall said of the Seminoles,
who entered 10-1 at home and
had beaten Virginia twice in a
row. “So we knew coming into the
game they were going to come at
us, and we just had to respond.”
In addition to suffocating defense when it mattered most,
Virginia settled the outcome for
good when De’Andre Hunter
made both ends of a one-and-one
with 9.2 seconds to play for the
final margin, sending much of
the announced crowd of 10,657 to
the exits.
Hunter had put the Cavaliers
in front to stay at 48-47 with 5:59
remaining in the second half on a
jumper with an assist from Jerome. The field goal was part of a
9-2 flurry that concluded with
Jerome’s three-pointer for a 5348 advantage with 4:23 left.
In foul trouble for much of the
game, Hunter finished with four
points but got plenty of help. Hall
led the charge with a game-high
17 points, making 3 of 4 threepointers, and Jerome added 15,
with nine coming in the second
half.
The Cavaliers were able to
survive without starting forward
Isaiah Wilkins, one of the team’s
most complete players, for the
final 1:52 after the senior collected his fifth personal foul. They
also played their final contest
without guard Nigel Johnson, a
top reserve who had been given a
three-game suspension for a violation of team rules.
“You hope you can outlast
them,” Bennett said. “The way it
was looking in the first half, it
was coming in waves, and we had
some breakdowns, and that cost
us. Once we got established in the
second half, I could tell, ‘Okay, it’s
getting a little easier.’ We’re making some more plays. There’s so
much energy. It was a gut-check
time.”
During long stretches in the
first half, Florida State was able
to push the pace, succeeding
where the vast majority of opponents have failed. The quick tenor of the game allowed the Seminoles to get clean looks before
Virginia was able to set its defense, and Florida State capitalized, especially from beyond the
arc.
The first four field goals of the
game for Florida State came from
three-point range, loosening up
the interior. Seminoles guard
Trent Forrest took advantage
midway through the half by getting to the rim for a layup while
drawing a second foul on Hunter,
who promptly took a seat on the
bench.
Forrest’s bonus foul shot
opened a 20-13 lead that swelled
to 29-18 following a 9-2 burst in
which Wilkins scored Virginia’s
only points. Soon after Wilkins’s
basket, Seminoles 7-foot-4 center
Christ Koumadje collected a lob
pass from C.J. Walker for a twohanded dunk that brought Florida State supporters out of their
seats and prompted a timeout by
Bennett.
The shaky first half for Virginia included five turnovers,
more than half its per-game average, and rushed shots that yielded a 32-22 deficit at intermission.
It marked the first time the
Cavaliers trailed at halftime since
Jan. 21 at Wake Forest and the
second time this season.
“I knew they were coming
after us,” Bennett said. “This is
tough, and I knew how they were
playing. I knew their pressure,
and just where we’re at being
undefeated in the league, you
know you’re going to get the
target. You know you’re going to
get people’s focused effort. I understood that.
“We were just fortunate to
hang in there.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
SU
Pyeongchang
Reconciling carrying a rifle to work with gun violence
BY C HELSEA J ANES
IN PYEONGCHANG, SOUTH KOREA
American women’s top biathlon medal hope has struggled with news of mass shootings
O
ver the past decade of
Susan Dunklee’s life,
most days have involved a
gun. A gun helped lift a
national-level cross-country skier
into a world-class biathlete who
has competed in two Olympic
Games. A gun traveled over Dunklee’s shoulder for what must
amount to thousands of chilly
miles by now. But after a gunman
killed 58 people at a concert in Las
Vegas last year, Dunklee felt the
urge to put hers down forever.
“I was so distraught and felt so
sick to my stomach thinking
about that stuff,” said Dunklee,
who will be the best medal hope
among American female biathletes in PyeongChang.
“. . . Every time I hear of some
mass shooting like that, it’s really
painful. That’s so different than
my experience with rifles and firearms. It’s tough. I struggle with
that.”
Dunklee specializes in transforming the seemingly contradictory into productive balance. She
is an Olympian who refuses to
base her life around the title,
though she must devote so much
of her life to training for it. She
once lived at the Olympic Training Center in Lake Placid, N.Y.,
where she was surrounded by
elite athletes. She ditched it for
life at the Craftsbury Outdoor
Center near where she grew up in
Vermont, where none of her
neighbors have anything to do
with biathlon.
She is a Dartmouth graduate
whose initial post-grad plans included heading west, working at a
MATTHIAS SCHRADER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Susan Dunklee (23), the first U.S. woman to win a world championship individual biathlon medal, also has a beekeeping business.
coffee shop, and maybe racing
cross-country now and then. She
is an elite athlete who doesn’t
obsess about nutrition, though
her sport requires as much cardiovascular fitness as any at these
Games, and she more than keeps
up. She began a beekeeping business at Craftsbury and tends the
hives when she’s not racing,
drawn to the peace she finds in
the stress of the process.
“It feels a lot like shooting in a
highly pressurized situation with
the bees,” Dunklee said. “. . . The
consequences of losing focus on
the process of the task at hand are
pretty high. The consequences of
messing up are very drastic. You
just have to be very Zen-like and
very calm and collected.”
In biathlon, a competition that
includes five events built around
skiing fast and shooting accurate-
ly, a missed target incurs a distance or time penalty. Medals,
therefore, can be determined by
millimeters. Events are wide
open. Each shot carries consequences, particularly at the Olympic level.
Biathlon became an Olympic
event in 1960, and the United
States has never won a medal. No
American woman had won an
individual medal in a world
championship event until Dunklee won silver last year.
But in a sport with such thin
margins, expectations and predictions are little more than
guesswork. Over the first few days
of news conferences here, Americans have talked about the desire
to end their country’s medal
droughts, medal-related goals
they have chased for years, a singular focus.
Shi≠rin is world’s best female skier — and worried it’s not enough
SHIFFRIN FROM D1
executing her plan and winning
by margins with which ski racing
is unfamiliar while simultaneously battling the hamsters in
her head. She is a transcendent
talent who brandishes her gifts
with extraordinary diligence and
flat-out work. But she admits,
sometimes with alarming candor, of occasionally having to
visit “a dark place” to access her
best performances.
“It’s definitely more pressure
for me to repeat than to do
something new for the first time,”
she said.
Whatever the path through
her mind, her best performances
are stunning. This season on the
World Cup circuit, Alpine skiing’s highest level of competition, she has won five of the
seven slalom races that have
been contested. In none of those
victories has her nearest competitor come within three-quarters
of a second of her time — a blink
for most of us, enough time to
run errands and do laundry in ski
racing. Throw in her two victories in giant slalom, a surprising
victory in a downhill and two
more wins in “city event” headto-head slalom competitions and
she has 10 victories and 15 podium finishes in the 23 World Cup
races she has entered this season.
And she worries about whom
she’s letting down?
“I’ve been encouraging everybody to slow down and really
appreciate what she’s doing right
now,” said Mike Day, Shiffrin’s
coach for the past two seasons.
“On the same hand, we did not
spend really much time at all
soaking it in because we get
straight back to work. She’s such
a process-oriented athlete that
literally, these wins are just part
of the process, and these performances are just part of the
process. As soon as they’re over,
they’re over.”
Such an approach would be
beneficial as PyeongChang approaches. After Shiffrin won
eight of nine events from Dec. 19
through Jan. 9, she skidded. She
enters her second Olympics with
two seventh-place finishes (one
downhill, one giant slalom) and
three failures to finish (one each
in super-G, giant slalom and
slalom) in her past five events.
Four years ago, as she headed
to Sochi, she was something of a
curiosity — a precocious slalom
specialist who had never appeared on such a stage. Now, just
as people gaped at her triumphs
— “She is very difficult to beat,”
Slovakia’s Petra Vlhova said following Shiffrin’s first win of the
season, in Killington, Vt. — her
stumbles stand out.
“One of the differences now,”
Shiffrin said in a lengthy interview before the season started,
“is that I wasn’t dealing with any
of that external pressure four
years ago. Now I’ve started to
notice it. I’m in a different phase
of my life.”
Unwrapping the gift
Jeff and Eileen Shiffrin grew
up skiing and put both their
children — son Taylor and
daughter Mikaela — on skis at
early ages. Mikaela’s development, almost from the time she
first got on the snow, was preternatural.
“She knew how to make the
skis carve at a really young age,
an age that others really couldn’t
figure out how to get that done,”
said Barbara Cochran, the 1972
Olympic gold medalist in slalom
whose family still owns a Vermont ski hill where young Mikaela occasionally competed. “She
just had a tremendous foundation of technique from the getgo.”
So once the Shiffrins recognized that, they did what they
could to develop it. When they
moved from Colorado to Lyme,
N.H., then back to Colorado, the
kids decided they felt comfortable attending Burke Mountain
Academy, an elite high school for
elite ski racers. By that point,
Mikaela had become a student of
her sport.
Day, who two years ago joined
the U.S. Ski Team’s staff for a
third stint specifically to work
with Shiffrin, first encountered
Shiffrin a decade ago in a slalom
race for 12- to 14-year-olds at
Sunday River in Maine. Shiffrin
won the race by “something absurd, like 10 or 12 seconds,”
remembered Day, who turned to
a coaching friend and said, “She
should be racing World Cup next
year.”
“He thought I was joking,” Day
said, “but I wasn’t.”
Ski coaches can see the elements of a finger-snap quick
sport and slow them down in
their minds. What Day saw in
that early exposure was Shiffrin’s
textbook stance and disciplined
upper body that she combined
with an ability — both innate and
meticulously honed — to begin
the shape of her turn above the
gate, the poles around which
slalom skiers must navigate. The
instinct for most kids is to get to
the gate and then turn around it,
with most of the curve coming
below the mark. Shiffrin’s technique was faster, anticipating the
turn so that once she got below
the gate, she was pointed to the
next one.
“She was really the only kid
I’ve ever seen that executed that
way,” Day said. “It ends up being
faster and safer. It’s a place where
gravity works with you.”
By the winter of 2011-12, when
she was 16, Shiffrin was skiing
World Cup events regularly. Eileen, who served as her age group
coach growing up, stayed on as a
coach, travel companion — and
mom. She remains to this day.
That first season, Mikaela posted
her first World Cup podium fin-
ish, third place in a slalom in
Lienz, Austria. The next season,
she took her first four World Cup
victories and won the seasonlong slalom title. The following
year brought five more World
Cup victories and the Olympic
gold in the mountains outside
Sochi.
She was just 18. But this was a
road-tested 18. In the final
World Cup slalom race before
the Sochi Games, held in Kranjska Gora, Slovenia, Shiffrin made
an error during the second run,
lost all her speed and finished
seventh.
“It was devastating for that
day,” she said. But she carried the
experience — and lesson — to
Russia. In the Olympic slalom —
which combines the times from
two separate runs to determine a
winner — Shiffrin skied fastest in
the afternoon’s first run, best by
nearly half a second. But during
the second run, she encountered
the same kind of misstep, one
that almost sent her tumbling off
course.
“But by then, I had that experience,” Shiffrin said. “I was able to
make the exact same error and
say, ‘This is not going to be a
repeat.’ That’s how you change.
That’s how you get better.”
‘Often the favorites don’t win’
Shiffrin’s only real rival for
all-around skiing stardom at the
moment is Austria’s Marcel
Hirscher, winner of the past six
World Cup overall titles on the
men’s side. But Hirscher is 28.
Shiffrin is more than six years
younger.
No woman has won more
World Cup ski races than Lindsey
Vonn, the American who will
appear in her fourth Olympics in
PyeongChang. (Vonn missed
Sochi because of an injury.) Of
Vonn’s 81 World Cup victories,
seven came before she turned 23.
Shiffrin, who will turn 23 in
March, has 41. Only Austria’s
Annemarie Moser-Pröll won that
many before she turned 23; Moser-Pröll finished with 62. The
career record for either gender,
which the 33-year-old Vonn continues to pursue, is Ingemar
Stenmark’s 86 victories.
“The record won’t last long if
she keeps at it,” said Tiger Shaw,
the former Olympian who now
serves as CEO of the U.S. Ski and
Snowboard Association. “Whether Ingemar holds it or Lindsey
passes him and holds it, she’s
coming. It’s amazing.”
Last year, she won the World
Cup overall title, which combines
points from all five disciplines,
and she leads the standings by
such a wide margin this season
that she has all but clinched the
title. (Her 671-point lead over
next-best Wendy Holdener of
Switzerland covers the gap between Holdener and American
Jackie Wiles, who sits 40th.)
In December at Lake Louise,
Canada, Shiffrin won her first
downhill in just her fourth try,
and she also has two third-place
finishes in the sport’s fastest
discipline. So, the thinking goes,
she could be a medal threat in
five Olympic events, should she
attempt them: certainly slalom
and giant slalom, definitely combined — which is one run each of
downhill and slalom — perhaps
super-G and downhill. There is a
new, mix-gender team event that
makes its debut at these Olympics, but Shiffrin’s team considers her doubtful for that. Her
program, other than slalom and
giant slalom, will be determined
on a day-to-day basis depending
on a variety of factors: energy
level, health, conditions, etc.
But when she climbs into the
starting gate Wednesday for the
slalom — defending the one medal she now owns — she will be
favored — and heavily, having
won 19 of the 24 World Cup
slaloms dating from February
2015.
“But that’s the thing about ski
racing,” said Ted Ligety, the twotime Olympic gold medalist in
giant slalom. “Often the favorites
don’t win.”
Which is what Shiffrin wrestles with now. Her final two races
before Korea were late last
month in Lenzerheide, Switzerland. She took seventh in the
giant slalom and was crushed.
“I was pretty heartbroken,” she
told reporters the next day. “I
don’t think I’ve ever taken a race
that hard. . . . I felt like the hill
yesterday and the course really
had a clear definition of what my
limit is in GS. And that’s a hard
thing to stare at straight in the
face and say, ‘Welp, there’s the
limit.’ ”
The next day, she led the
slalom comfortably in the second
run. And then she skied off
course.
“I don’t expect to be able to ski
everything perfectly every race at
22,” Shiffrin said. “But there’s
definitely part of me that didn’t
want to feel that.”
Back to work
On the Saturday after Thanksgiving, Shiffrin was still just
starting her season when she
finished second in a giant slalom
in Killington. The result was
satisfying, and she felt better
about her process and her preparation that led to the result than
she had at the season-opening
races in Soelden, Austria. That
morning, she had forsaken her
old playlist — heavier on, say,
Coldplay — for some raw
Eminem, over and over and over.
“There’s a lot of swear words in
there,” she said. “Made me feel a
little uncomfortable.”
Finishing on the podium
comes with obligations to chat
with the media, and as Shiffrin
sat in a cushioned chair and
reviewed her performance and
her mind-set, the late autumn
light began to fade. Her team, led
by Day and her mother, was
ready for a few runs of slalom
training just so Shiffrin could get
the feel, the tempo, of the disci-
Dunklee, who turns 32 on Tuesday, spent much of her time with
reporters talking about bees and a
balanced lifestyle.
“I think the Olympics are a very
cool thing to chase after, very
motivating and inspiring, but you
have to have more in your life
than just that,” Dunklee said. “I
don’t know who said it once, but
it’s always stuck with me when I
heard this quote: ‘If you’re not
happy without a gold medal,
you’ll never be happy with it. If
you’re not happy without the
Olympics behind your name,
you’ll never be happy with it.’ ”
Dunklee’s father was an Olympic cross-country skier. She
wasn’t brought up hunting. She
considered biathlon only after
U.S. Biathlon sent her a recruiting
email during the spring of her
senior year at Dartmouth, offering full room and board to a
student graduating with plenty of
loans around the time of the stock
market crash of the late 2000s. A
decade later, her life is somehow
tied to a weapon she has watched
wreak sickening violence. But
over that decade with a rifle on
her shoulder, she also has found
her peace.
“I’ve realized it requires considerable emotional control to be
able to shoot precision shots well.
You have to be able to keep your
focus very closely,” Dunklee said.
“You have to stay focused, and you
have to be very disciplined —
extremely emotionally disciplined. When I’m shooting, it feels
like this Zen-like state. It’s almost
like a meditation in a way. That’s
so opposite and different from
what I ever would have expected.”
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
pline she would race the next
day.
Here is another challenge for
Shiffrin as she prepares for PyeongChang. There is the mental
gymnastics of making sure her
confidence is in the right place —
not so nervous that she’s throwing up but not feeling as if she
will win with something less
than her best. And there’s the
physical preparation. Shiffrin’s
instinct: more, more, more.
“She’s incredibly driven, so
there are times when I definitely
encourage her to slow down a
little bit,” Day said. “And at this
point, I would say I don’t often
win on that.”
On her way out of the small
lodge, Shiffrin signed a few autographs for volunteers and walked
quickly down some steps onto a
well-trodden surface where snow
mixed with mud.
“I listen to more people, and I
care what people are saying,”
Shiffrin said. “The opinions of
the other athletes, my competitors, that kind of stuff makes
more of a difference to me now. I
also feel this sort of moral obligation to show people who I am. I
want to show them I’m a good
person.”
Outside, a Vermont state
trooper fell in lockstep behind
her. The crowd was headed
home. The light was fading. And
Mikaela Shiffrin — sometimes
filled with doubt, sometimes desperate to prove to people who she
is, unquestionably the best female Alpine skier in the world —
headed to the one place that
could clear her head. She went
back to work.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
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D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
Pyeongchang
Her moment of Zen: Down-to-earth Anderson finds peace while she is soaring
pyeongchang,
south korea —
Jamie Anderson
felt inferior, and
this was after she
won a gold medal.
Jerry
She wanted to
Brewer
quit. The next
snowboarding
season, early in her reign as the
first women’s slopestyle Olympic
champion in the 2014 Sochi
Games, the 5-foot-3 bundle of
clashing emotions observed the
rapid evolution of the sport —
her sport, one that she helped
revolutionize — and she sank
into self-doubt.
She saw younger competitors
“doing tricks that I wouldn’t
even attempt,” executing flawless
900s and 1080s, elevating a
game that she had owned. A
pioneer by age 23, Anderson
feared she soon would become a
has-been.
“It was really discouraging,”
said Anderson, now 27. “I almost
felt like I just wanted to go hide
under a rock. I was kind of
freaking out. I’m like, ‘Oh, snap.
I’m going to have to retire sooner
than I thought.’ ”
Venture inside Anderson’s
fascinating mind, and you will
receive a most candid look at
success. She wins. She worries.
She’s known for her Zen-like
temperament, but she breaks
character often to freak out. All
of this somehow makes her not
erratic and weak but mentally
tough and refreshingly selfaware. On a U.S. team full of
teenage and early-20s
snowboarders with aweinspiring stunts, Anderson stays
relevant by adapting and
embracing all her quirks, even if
BY RICK MAESE
IN PYEONGCHANG, SOUTH KOREA
C
arlo Valdes and his teammates had worked for
four years to get to this
point. They had landed in
South Korea hopeful about what
these Olympics might hold, an
excitement that was temporarily
doused earlier this week when
three officials with USA Bobsled
walked into their Olympic Village suite with somber looks.
“We didn’t know what was
going on,” Valdes said Wednesday. “Like, did someone fail a
drug test or something?”
The news was, in some ways,
even more dire. Justin Olsen, the
man charged with piloting their
sled in the PyeongChang Games
and an essential piece of their
Olympic dream, was headed into
surgery. Olsen, 30, had mentioned he was feeling abdominal
pain earlier in the day, but no one
thought much of it. After all, he
was a finely tuned athlete, and no
one had reason to suspect something was seriously wrong.
But his teammates were told
that Olsen was headed to a South
Korean hospital with acute appendicitis.
“All of us were kind of
shocked,” Valdes said. “We didn’t
expect anything like that.”
Olsen, a three-time Olympian
who was a pusher for the United
States’ four-man team that won
gold at the Vancouver Games in
2010, was chosen as a pilot for the
PyeongChang Games, hoping to
steer sleds in both the two-man
DAVID RAMOS/GETTY IMAGES
American Jamie Anderson became the first women’s slopestyle Olympic champion in 2014.
sometimes she needs a while to
find herself.
“So much ego is involved in
our sport, and that’s one of the
hardest things to balance, and it
has been for a long time,”
Anderson said.
For all her doubt, Anderson
has found the proper balance
again. She’s back at the
Olympics, with a good chance to
win another slopestyle gold. She
also will have an opportunity to
earn a medal in big air, which is
making its Olympic debut. She’s
not the aging athlete she feared.
Her many methods to stay
healthy and grounded — yoga,
meditation, Chinese and
Ayurvedic medicine, plant-based
dieting, Pranayama breathing
and nature appreciation — keep
her young. But what matters
most is that she didn’t succumb
to anxiety. She continues to
evolve with her sport.
“What helped me push
forward was getting out of my
ego and realizing, no matter
what I do, there’s always going to
be younger girls coming up, and
that’s just the nature of life,”
Anderson said. “Embrace it. And
even if I’m not always going to
be the best, at least I’m doing my
personal best and am inspired by
those girls. Changing my mind
and not being so stuck in ‘I suck.
They’re great.’ Just realizing
everyone is doing their best and
that’s all we can do is what
helped me get to the right place.”
If Anderson captures gold in
these Games, she would become
the first female snowboarder to
win multiple gold medals. But if
she’s a legacy chaser, it’s
impossible to tell. She’s more
interested in chasing happiness,
which can be a fickle aspiration
at this level of competition.
“I think inside I have my own
goals and plans, and I’m a big
dreamer,” Anderson said. “The
From surgery to sled in 10 days? That’s the plan.
Olsen, a three-time Olympian, aims to compete in Games following emergency appendectomy
and four-man races.
For his teammates, the news
was hard to process. Assured
Olsen was going to be okay, they
started thinking about the upcoming Olympic competition,
just days away.
“Our hearts kind of sank,”
teammate Chris Fogt said. “All of
us have trained hard for these
last four years to get here. For a
brief moment, you kind of think
about the worst-case scenario.
You see your dreams and your
hard work go out the window.”
On Monday, Olsen underwent
a laparoscopic appendectomy in
Gangneung, and his teammates
waited with bated breath.
“There was definitely a brief
moment of panic,” said Nathan
Weber, a teammate in Olsen’s
four-man sled, “not knowing
what was going on or what was
going to happen.”
Initially, the pain was so bad
that Olsen was texting his teammates expressing doubts that he
would be able to compete. Doctors caught it early enough that it
required only a minimally invasive procedure. They didn’t have
to cut through the muscle tissue
in his obliques to remove his
appendix, and the morning after
the surgery, Olsen was back on
his feet and texting teammates
with encouraging news.
“That’s just the kind of guy he
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
U.S. bobsledder Justin Olsen, 30, had surgery Monday, but he was
quickly back on his feet and texting encouraging news to teammates.
Olympians are frustrated by slow response to doping
DOPING FROM D1
not pushing it forward another
year. But yeah, we had the opportunity two years ago to review the
evidence. I just think, unfortunately, the political rhetoric is
somehow a clash between the
West and Russia. It’s not about
that. It’s about clean sport.”
Bailey hopes IOC punishments
will provide a deterrent, “but I
really think the jury’s out on that. I
think we have to wait and see what
happens. And the fact that we have
to wait and see, four years out from
the events in question, the timing
of that is pretty bad.”
Even with the IOC banning the
Russian Olympic Committee, at
least 168 Russians could compete
in Sochi under the banner of Olympic Athletes from Russia. There
will be no official Russian delegation, the Russian flag is not permitted to be flown, and the Russian
anthem will not be heard. But
there will be plenty of Russians
competing and winning medals,
and they have a clear presence.
Olympic Athletes from Russia
maintains an office in the Main
Press Center, just steps from the
U.S. and British offices. A man in
the OAR office said its role is to
assist Russian athletes with the
media and to provide logistical
manifestation of the law of
attraction is really powerful. But
having so much competition this
year, it’s been harder to be like,
‘I’m going to go win gold.’ I’ve
just been trying to have the
thought in my head to just
perform my best and bless the
rest.
“All I can do is focus on me. I
have no control over everyone
around me, and genuinely, I
hope everyone does their best
because it’s such a great stage to
be on. It’s been fun. Today, I’m
feeling good. Tomorrow, I might
feel scared. Who knows?”
On Team USA, Anderson is
the veteran of a snowboarding
squad that includes Jessika
Jenson, 26, who competed four
years ago; and rookies Julia
Marino, 20, and Hailey
Langland, 17. The first-timers are
listening to Anderson’s advice
every night. Despite the age
differences, there’s an easy
camaraderie within the group,
and Anderson assists the good
chemistry by being a down-toearth gold medalist.
“To be at the Olympics with
these girls, especially Jamie
who’s been here already, is
special,” Marino said Tuesday
afternoon. “Even last night, we
had a chat. We were feeling
stressed, and we talked to her
about it. It’s just good to have
your friends there to talk to and
keep you grounded.”
In private, Anderson deals
with her own nerves. Her
confidence wavers. Earlier this
week, she visited the Olympic
snowboarding venue, Phoenix
Snow Park, and admitted she
was “pretty scared.” She rode
powder on the side for five laps
support with matters such as ticketing — part of the role of any
national committee. “It’s like any
other Games,” the Russian official
said.
Bach would not speculate on
the outcome of the pending CAS
rulings and did not explain what
the IOC’s options might be if CAS
rules in Russia’s favor.
Bailey, an athlete representative
for biathlon, said a representative
of the IOC panel told him there
would be no retroactive invitations to Russian athletes. “If that
changes,” he said, “then that’s
them going back on their word to
me.”
The ordeal and mixed messages
have tested the faith of athletes
that these Games will be competed
on a fair playing field and prompted many to implore IOC leadership to do more to promote and
protect clean athletes. Their voices
formed a chorus of dismay.
“Every athlete from any nation
feels the same way,” said Canadian
Kaillie Humphries, a two-time
bobsled gold medalist. “Creating
that fair and open place to compete, it shouldn’t be something we
have to think about. You shouldn’t
wonder if you’re facing somebody
who’s had unfair advantages.”
American skeleton racer Katie
Uhlaender, who missed out on a
bronze medal by four hundredths
of a second to a Russian later
ensnared in the doping scandal,
cast the fight — and plight — of
clean athletes as a battle for the
future of the Olympic movement.
Uhlaender said she received taunting messages from Russians on
social media after the CAS ruling
but also heard from athletes who
told her the decision eroded their
faith in the system.
“Right now, it’s not just me,”
Uhlaender said. “A lot of athletes
feel like we’re believing in a movement that is dying.”
The system “did fail clean athletes,” Bailey said. “It did not protect the right to fair play. We’re at a
watershed moment right now. It’s
really up to the IOC, WADA and the
international federations to take a
definitive, decisive stance. Where
are you going to come down?”
Canadian luger Sam Edney had
a similar experience to Uhlaender’s. He thought his team
would receive a medal after Albert
Demchenko and Tatyana Ivanova
were found to have doped before
Sochi, only to receive a shock when
CAS ruled.
“Last week, not only us but all
clean athletes experienced a step
back in this continued fight when
this gift was potentially removed
as a result of this CAS decision,”
Edney said. “I feel this has to stop.
This whole situation is disturbing
to our team and, we believe, a
nightmare for clean athletes. We
are encouraging the IOC to push
for another appeal.”
At an IOC session Tuesday, Canadian IOC member and former
WADA head Dick Pound leveled a
verbal broadside at Bach, saying
the IOC originally “dismissed” the
result of multiple investigations
into Russian doping in Sochi as
“mere allegations.” He said both
athletes and the public no longer
have confidence in the IOC.
“It’s important to identify that
the IOC’s conduct — our conduct
— in the matter of the Russian
doping activities have caused outside the fairly comfortable cocoon
outside the IOC session,” Pound
said. “I believe that in the collective mind of a significant portion
of the world and among the athletes of the world that the IOC has
not only failed to protect clean
athletes but has made it possible
for cheating athletes to prevail
against the clean athletes.”
Pound suggested that the IOC
wanted CAS to open the door for
more Russians to participate and
called for an examination of the
composition of the CAS panels.
“Tonally, I would say more attention has been paid to getting
is,” Valdes said, “pretty optimistic
about the whole process.”
His sledmates knew that as
long as Olsen could stand, there
was a good chance they would
compete. Olsen is a sergeant in
the National Guard, and his fellow bobsledders have seen him
overcome a lot to get to this point.
“It’s just the way he thinks, his
mentality,” Valdes said. “It’s always been that way.”
Said Weber: “He’s a great driver and phenomenal athlete, so if
anyone can bounce back from
this, it’s him.”
While Olsen is missing important practice runs this week, his
teammates take comfort in his
familiarity with the track. Olsen
visited PyeongChang in October
and squeezed in 15 to 20 runs that
they hope will compensate for
missed practice time this week.
Two-man training begins Feb. 15.
Training for the four-man race is
scheduled to begin Feb. 21.
“It’s probably going to bother
him, but at the same time it’s
going to clear his mind and allow
him to focus on what he needs to
do and get back as fast as he can,”
Valdes said.
The PyeongChang Games
mark Olsen’s third Olympics but
his first as a pilot. He was a
member of Steven Holcomb’s
four-man team that won gold at
the 2010 Vancouver Games and
Russian athletes into the PyeongChang Games than dealing with
the Russian conduct,” Pound said.
“Every effort has been made to give
a distinctly Russian profile to the
athletes invited to participate. I’m
sorry, but that is not an appropriate response by the IOC to a flagrant attack on the Olympic
Games and on clean athletes by
Russia.”
Still, in an email to The Washington Post, Pound said it would be
a “fair bet” these Games will be
cleaner because the Russian punishment will serve as a deterrent.
He called for the IOC to implement
more advanced testing and to
store samples for 10 years.
American luger Chris Mazdzer
captured the sentiment of several
athletes. He wanted to focus on his
event because he had no control
over his competitors or IOC decisions. But he still could not stifle
his frustration.
“Even if we are going up against
people who could have potentially
doped, we still have the ability to
be 100 percent confident with ourselves,” Mazdzer said. “I mean, it
was state-sponsored, systematic,
but I think there’s ways we can still
go 100 percent and still be the best
in the world.”
In the next breath, he said: “And
I am also really disappointed with
CAS’s decision.”
“I’m confident in the decisionmakers,” American luger Tucker
West said. “If they determine
to get comfortable.
Anderson doesn’t come to
these Games with a gold
medalist’s sense of entitlement.
Friends and family told her to
show more swagger, but she
shook her head and said, “You
don’t know how I feel.”
“Sometimes, I feel really good
and confident,” Anderson added.
“At other times, I’m like, ‘I don’t
know what to do with myself.’
That’s just everyone. Everyone is
dealing with the yin and yang of
life.”
Anderson handles it with flair.
Before she competes, Anderson
must find a tree to hug and
admire. It’s a tradition that she
says is overblown, but she’s still
looking for a tree in
PyeongChang. She also would
like to explain that she’s not a
good meditator because she
doesn’t like to sit in place for a
long period. So when she’s home
in South Lake Tahoe, Calif., she
will walk by a meadow and go
through the meditation routine.
“I’ve come to find out I’m a
meadow-tator,” Anderson said,
laughing hard at her joke.
At 27, the young/old
snowboarder will try to make
history. Before competition, she
will probably freak out, just as
she did in Sochi. But she knows
how to stave off fear and get
focused.
“I’m trying to keep it light,”
Anderson said. “But one day in
four years is pretty dramatic.”
Now, if you will excuse the
nervous champion, she has a
tree to hug.
jerry.brewer@washpost.com
For more by Jerry Brewer, visit
washingtonpost.com/brewer.
part of Nick Cunningham’s crew
four years ago at the Sochi Olympics.
Texas-raised and Army-bred,
Olsen has shown a special brand
of toughness and resilience since
his first day in a sled nearly a
dozen years ago.
“He probably crashed more
times in his first month of sliding
than I’ve crashed in the last 10
years,” Fogt joked. “And I’ve still
never seen Justin miss a training
day.”
Olsen was released from the
hospital in Gangneung on Tuesday and could return to the
Olympic Village with his teammates by the end of the week. As
he recovers, Olsen might not be
running with his teammates initially but could still sit in the
front of the sled and steer them
down the icy track.
“I feel just as confident as I did
before this happened,” Weber
said. “There isn’t anyone I’d rather be pushing for in the Olympics,
and I know he’ll be ready when
we rip it off the top of the hill on
race day.”
In the meantime, they’re missing some vital training runs but
trying to take comfort in the fact
that Olsen is healthy and that he
has more experience than most
on the PyeongChang track. They
don’t need any extra motivation,
but they also realize a bit more
effort might be required to have
any chance at the podium.
“If it was up to him,” Valdes
said, “he would hop in the sled
right now.”
rick.maese@washpost.com
they’re clean, then they’re clean.
It’s not really my business to go
digging in there. My business is to
just go out there and beat them.”
Bailey said he believes the IOC’s
choice to ban Russian athletes
from competing will eliminate
dopers — “we have maybe our best
chance of having a clean field that
we have ever had,” he said. But he
also wants the IOC to use its influence to help clean up his sport.
Russia’s noncompliance with international doping policies — including the loss of two biathlon
medals in Sochi — didn’t deter
biathlon officials from holding the
World Cup final this year in Tyumen, Russia.
“I feel like the last few years,
especially the last year, I have been
very uncertain about whether the
people around me in a race are
clean or whether they’re cheating,”
U.S. biathlete Susan Dunklee said.
“That’s a very frustrating position
to be in as an athlete. I worry about
the future of our sport.”
Her concerns echoed across
sports. One after another, athletes
here expressed qualms about the
fairness of their sport and called
for further protections to be taken.
Most athletes in Korea will be
competing against each other but
also will be banded together.
“We’re all fighting the same
fight,” Canada skeleton racer Jane
Channell said. “We’re all fighting
for clean athletes.”
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
Pyeongchang
In 500-meter race, strategy is simple: Go fast
Short-track speedskating’s signature event passes in a flash, features close finishes and sometimes includes spectacular crashes
BY RICK MAESE
IN PYEONGCHANG, SOUTH KOREA
I
t’s part NASCAR, part bumper
cars. It’s as much an on-ice
roller derby as it is a game of
speed chess. The 500-meter
short-track speedskating race is
one of the most frenzied, unpredictable events at any Olympics,
40 or so blurry seconds of speed
that include crashes, disqualifications and tight finishes barely discernible to the naked eye.
The other two short-track distances — 1,000 and 1,500 meters —
are no stroll through the park, but
the 500 is different. With the longer races, skaters might try to conserve their energy, spending several laps jockeying for position
before pouncing late. In the 500,
the skaters look as if they have
been blasted out of a cannon.
It’s an all-out, pistons-pumping
sprint from start to finish, 41/2 laps
of grunting and bumping. Anthony Barthell, coach of the U.S. shorttrack team, likens it to track’s 100yard dash — but without designated racing lanes and plenty of contact around the turns, sometimes
incidental, other times covert and
deliberate.
“It’s more outright sprint and
power,” he said. “But there’s a little
bit of strategy that goes along with
it.”
“The strategy,” explained J.R.
Celski, a three-time Olympic medalist who holds the world record in
the 500, “is to go as fast as you can.”
For most, the race plan is simple: Get the lead within the first
few strides and then fend off attackers. That’s because the short
distance rewards sheer athleticism more than strategy.
The rink is 200 feet long, a
quarter the size of the long track
oval. The short race favors skaters
who accelerate quickly, which is a
ROBERT CIANFLONE/GETTY IMAGES
Short-track speedskaters trained this week at Gangneung Ice Arena, where 500-meter races will be held starting Saturday.
big reason 18-year-old Maame Biney, a native of Ghana who moved to
the Washington area when she was
5, is a candidate to reach the Olympic finals.
Biney nearly swept the 500-meter races at the U.S. trials in December, where she posted a personalbest time of 43.161 seconds. That
mark is faster than any women’s
Olympic gold medal winner has
posted since short track made its
debut at the 1992 Winter Games.
The strategy and tactics in the
longer races aren’t yet her strong
suit, she concedes. She would rather race than plot.
“You just have to get off the start
as fast as you can and just skate,”
said Biney, who will graduate from
South Lakes High in Reston this
spring and plans to study at the
BARRY SVRLUGA
University of Utah. “If there’s
someone behind you, you have to
figure out a way to block them. Or
if there’s anyone in front of you,
you have to figure out a way to pass
them.”
Preparing for her first Olympics, Biney was all smiles at a news
conference Wednesday in PyeongChang, prompting a reporter to
ask whether she’s that jovial on the
ice.
“My game face on the ice is
totally different from right now.
It’s not this. It’s like, ‘Don’t be in my
way because I’m probably going to
kill you,’ ” she said, breaking into a
fit of laughter.
The women’s 500-meter qualifying heats begin Saturday with
the finals set for Tuesday. The
men’s races are scheduled for
Feb. 20 and 22.
Even though Celski, competing
here in his third Olympics, has
skated a faster 500 race than any
other man or woman, clocking a
time of 39.937 seconds in 2012, he
actually prefers the strategy of the
longer distances. He’s only competing in the 1,000- and 1,500-meter races in PyeongChang.
“They’re all physically demanding,” he said. “Your heart rate
might get higher in the 500 just
because you are in a full-out sprint
the whole time.”
The 500 is a race that often helps
crown the sport’s titans, such as
Apolo Ohno, the 2006 Olympic
champion, or Viktor Ahn, the
South Korea-born skater who
competes for Russia and took gold
four years ago in Sochi.
Ahn, 32, is the biggest question
mark surrounding this year’s
PyeongChang races. He’s the owner of six career Olympic golds,
twice as many as any other skater.
His eight total Olympic medals
match Ohno’s career mark.
Though he never had been previously implicated with any wrongdoing, he was among the 2014
Sochi medalists barred from competing at the PyeongChang Games
by the International Olympic
Committee because of doping concerns. The Court of Arbitration for
Sport is hearing his appeal this
week but isn’t expected to render a
decision until Thursday or Friday,
barely a day before the short-track
competition begins.
“It was shocking news for the
team and, I’m sure, for the rest of
the world,” Celski said of the IOC’s
initial decision. “He’s one of the
greatest of all time in our sport.
You want the greats to be here to
compete against. You want to beat
the best, and he’s historically one
of the best.”
rick.maese@washpost.com
OLYMPICS NOTES
Stability in Korea is di∞cult to imagine Luger Hamlin named U.S. flag-bearer
SVRLUGA FROM D1
had for centuries been home to a
single, unified nation. That man
over there, the guy in the field on
the other side of the
Demilitarized Zone — isn’t it a
shame he can’t rejoin his
southern brethren?
Every Olympics has its
backdrop, and some are more
complicated than others. The
Summer Games in Rio left us
wondering how countries in
which millions of residents
endure impoverished lives could
host such an expensive,
extravagant festival — and to
what end? The Sochi Winter
Olympics four years ago
introduced us to the ego and
power of Vladimir Putin on his
own turf. The 2008 Beijing
Games put China’s human rights
record in focus.
Now, this: a Winter Olympics
hosted by an established
economic force with a crotchety,
antagonistic relative less than
50 miles away. The Peace
Olympics will be an idea buoyed
because athletes from North and
South Korea will march together
in Friday night’s Opening
Ceremonies, because the two
countries will form one women’s
hockey team, because Koreans —
whether from Seoul or
Pyongyang — will root for other
Koreans of any stripe.
Wednesday even brought news
that North Korean leader Kim
Jong Un would be sending his
younger sister, a powerful
member of his inner circle, as
part of a delegation to South
Korea, an unexpected
development that could be an
indication that Kim might be
willing to have a more productive
relationship with the
government in Seoul.
“We will use sports as a tool for
peace,” said Lee Hee-beom, CEO
of the PyeongChang Games.
It’s a nice thought, and it goes
back to an Olympic ideal that has
long been obscured by all the
Coca-Cola and McDonald’s and
Visa money.
But it’s also oversimplified,
even painfully so. These
Olympics could well be an
athletic, commercial and even
cultural success. But by
themselves, they are not going to
bring peace between countries —
and that’s what they are, separate
countries — that have been
divided, initially against their
will, since the end of World War
II.
We need no further evidence
than to consider Kim’s other
plans this week: a massive
military parade to show North
Korea’s might, staged on the eve
of the Olympics. Maybe all those
tanks and missiles simply had
Thursday free on their calendars.
Because it’s clear, then, that
these Olympics will be colored by
the relationship — the history
and future — between the two
Koreas, on Wednesday morning I
departed Seoul on a bus loaded
with curious Westerners —
mostly Americans — for a tour of
the Demilitarized Zone, the DMZ.
That such tours existed was news
to me just weeks ago, as was the
fact that you could look into
North Korea, walk a few hundred
yards and have lunch at a
Popeyes. The disagreements
between the two Koreas involve
military might and human rights,
and they’re all rolled into a
smoking-hot geopolitical
conflict.
“Is anybody scared? Nervous?”
our guide, Gina Lee, asked as we
pulled out of Seoul.
It’s nearly impossible, with the
neon and high-def screens that
mark Seoul’s skyscrapers, to
believe that 60 years ago, South
Korea was a third-world country
with a recent history of Japanese
control and a future that seemed
iffy at best. At the end of the
1950s, the per capita gross
domestic product was around
$100. The wounds of the postwar
division from the north — in
which Japan was ousted but the
Soviets controlled territory above
the 38th parallel, the United
States south of it — were fresh.
The Korean War had just ended.
That story is an essential part
of the South Korean experience,
and the exhibits at the Odusan
observatory focus on the pain the
split caused. Brother was
separated from brother, mother
from daughter, father from son.
It is an anguished tale, and the
case for reunification is made
throughout the five-story
building on a mountaintop,
windows pointing north.
“Our hope is reunification,”
concludes a film, narrated in
English, shown to Western
visitors. “It is the greatest wish of
the Korean people. We hope for
one Korea.”
And yet present-day polls don’t
reflect that sentiment. South
Korean citizens with relatives left
behind in the north are aging,
almost all in their 70s and 80s.
Young South Koreans know
nothing of “one Korea” and have
a keen understanding that
reunification would come at a
heavy financial cost to their
country. Kim — and his father
and grandfather before him —
have stripped the North Korean
people of their rights and their
wealth, while South Koreans
have worked for nearly three
generations to build a society
that values education and fosters
competition so it can surge
forward.
On our bus was Kim Hana, a
50-something woman who has
invented a new name as she
invents a new life. Kim is
essentially a professional North
Korean defector. Her job: telling
the assembled how, in 2011, she
walked for some 16 hours from
her home to the North Korean
border with China, how she
waded through waist-high water
into the guardianship of a
smuggler, how she was then sold
to another smuggler and forced
to live with him for two years and
how she eventually escaped to
Cambodia and then Thailand
before making her way to Seoul
— all with her daughter left
behind in North Korea. Had she
been caught, she said through
Lee’s translation, she would have
been killed.
More than 30,000 defectors
live in South Korea, and Kim did
not hesitate when asked whether
she favors reunification:
Absolutely. She is now sending
money back to her daughter
through Chinese smugglers, but
her daughter can’t allow her
fellow townspeople to know she
is receiving it. Looking into
North Korea, which she now does
as the means to make that money,
makes her feel one emotion more
than any other.
“Very sad,” she said.
So, then: Luge, anyone?
On Wednesday morning, as we
looked across the river into North
Korea, music wafted from the
other side. Propaganda, we were
told. The South Koreans do it,
too. Further north and east, we
stopped at Imjingak, where the
so-called “Bridge of Freedom”
extends across the Imjin — and
the DMZ — into North Korea. If
there were ever to be peace, the
railroad tracks there could be
reopened, and you could take a
train from Seoul to, say, Paris.
Now it is a tourist site, a piece
of South Korean history that,
even Wednesday, was visited by
schoolchildren. When these
Olympics start, there will be no
escaping the theme they studied
there: the two countries that used
to be one throwing their athletes
together to compete as one, even
as they remain wholly separate.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
world championships and enters
these Olympics ranked seventh in
the world.
The U.S. Olympic team selected
luger Erin Hamlin as its flag-bearer for Friday’s Opening Ceremonies in PyeongChang, South Korea. Four years ago, she wasn’t
even certain she still would be on
the sled at these Olympics, much
less tasked with leading the entire
United States’ contingent into the
Opening Ceremonies.
“It’s definitely a surprise, definitely a shock,” she said. “I was not
expecting it at all.”
Hamlin, 31, will be the fourth
luger to serve as flag-bearer for the
United States and the first since
Mark Grimmette at the 2010
Olympics.
“The nerves will be flying, for
sure,” said Hamlin, who will be
competing in her fourth Winter
Games. “I slide — that’s what I do.
Put me at the top of a track, [and]
that’s my happy place. Walking
out in front of a lot of people with
even more watching from home,
not tripping over my own feet or
dropping the flag is going to be
way more nerve-racking.”
Hamlin won the world title in
2009 and felt her career was peaking at the Vancouver Games. After
a disappointing 16th-place finish
Siblinghood triumphed over matrimony as the
newest Olympic event debuted in
Gangneung with American pair
Becca and Matt Hamilton beating
Anastasia Bryzgalova and Alexander Krushelnitskiy in mixed doubles curling.
The Americans started strongly
and never looked back in a 9-3 win
over married Russian couple Bryzgalova and Krushelnitskiy in the
first of seven rounds of preliminary play.
“Blood’s thicker than water,”
Matt Hamilton said after the
match.
Mixed doubles curling is one of
four new events in the 2018 Winter
Olympics and was the first to kick
off official competition even
though the Games do not formally
open until Friday.
The Americans built a 3-0 lead
in the first end when Becca Hamilton knocked two of the Russians’
stones out of scoring position.
The Americans never trailed after that first end, and the game was
called after seven ends when they
amassed an insurmountable lead.
— Rick Maese
CURLING:
RICK BOWMER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Erin Hamlin, a bronze medalist
in Sochi, will become the fourth
luger to carry the U.S. flag.
there and a few rough seasons, she
thought the 2014 Games in Sochi
might be her last. Instead, she
surprised many — including herself — by winning a bronze medal,
becoming the first American luger
to reach the Olympic podium.
That made sticking around an easier decision.
“To do that and really have that
flip everything upside down, I decided to continue on the next four
years,” Hamlin said of the Sochi
medal. “I took a different approach to competing, and the last
four years have been some of my
most successful. It’s been an interesting path that I didn’t expect to
happen.”
Hamlin took silver at last year’s
— Reuters
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EZ
Nationals catcher Read
gets 80-game PED ban
BY
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
Nats’ next slugging hope is just getting started
BY JORGE CASTILLO
boca chica, dominican republic — Modesto Ulloa usually
J ORGE C ASTILLO
Washington Nationals catcher
Raudy Read was suspended for
80 games after testing positive for
Boldenone, a performance-enhancing substance, Major League
Baseball announced Wednesday
afternoon. Read’s suspension will
be effective at the beginning of the
upcoming regular season. The
suspension is without pay.
In a statement released through
the Major League Baseball Players
Association, the 24-year-old Read,
a first-time offender, said he does
not know how he tested positive
for the substance and filed an appeal, which prompts tests to prove
the validity of the initial findings,
to no avail.
“Over the course of my sevenyear career with the Washington
Nationals, I have been routinely
tested dozens of times for performance enhancing substances
(including seven times throughout the 2017 season),” Read’s statement read. “I never tested positive,
because I have never in my life
knowingly used a banned substance. I have been extremely
careful and conscience about
what I put into my body. . . . So
when I heard I tested positive
during a routine drug test this
winter, I was shocked. . . .
“ I know I have let many people
down, including my teammates,
coaches, family and fans. And I am
so sorry to you all for hearing the
news of my suspension. This does
not reflect who I am as an athlete
or as a person. I will do whatever I
can to clear my name. My work
ethic and dedication to the game
has never been higher. I will utilize
this time away to train at the most
elite level, while working to regain
the trust of MLB, the Washington
Nationals’ front office, coaches,
teammates and fans.”
Read is the first player to test
positive for a banned substance
while on the Nationals’ 40-man
roster since MLB installed its joint
drug prevention and treatment
program in 2005 but not the organization’s first brush with violations. The previous case was righthander Jefry Rodriguez, who re-
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Raudy Read tested positive for
Boldenone and will be banned
for 80 games without pay.
ceived an 80-game suspension
while with Class A Potomac last
May. Rodriguez was added to
Washington’s 40-man roster in
November.
Boldenone is an anabolic steroid developed for veterinary use,
specifically for the treatment of
horses.
“This is a very serious matter —
one that I do not take lightly,”
Nationals General Manager Mike
Rizzo said in a statement. “We
educate players across our system
on the program and set the expectation that they fully abide by it. I
am deeply disappointed in Raudy.
I have spoken with him directly,
and he understands that he is ultimately responsible for what he
puts into his body.”
Read is one of several Nationals
prospects from the Dominican Republic to make his major league
debut in recent years. An offensefirst catcher, Read signed for
$130,000 at age 17 in 2011. He
made his major league debut in
September after hitting 17 home
runs with a .767 on-base-plus-slugging percentage in 108 games for
Class AA Harrisburg. He appeared
in eight games for Washington,
going 3 for 11 at the plate.
Read sits behind Matt Wieters,
Miguel Montero and Pedro Severino on the Nationals’ catching
depth chart. He is projected to
begin the 2018 season with Class
AAA Syracuse.
jorge.castillo@washpost.com
doesn’t work on Sundays, but he
reports to a ballpark if someone
he trusts calls, insisting there is a
player he must see. He doesn’t
like to say no. Maybe he will find a
star. There’s always a chance. So a
few years ago, the Washington
Nationals’ most experienced
scout in the Dominican Republic
arrived on a Sunday to watch a
left-handed pitcher top out at 82
mph over three innings. The performance piqued Ulloa’s interest.
He decided to stay for a second
game even though he knew the
lefty wouldn’t pitch again.
At some point during that second game, a hitter smashed a line
drive to right-center field, where
the center fielder smoothly ran
over for the catch — so smoothly
Ulloa had to ask those around
him for the youngster’s name. It
was Juan Soto, the left-handed
pitcher from the first game, they
told him. He’s a good hitter, too,
they said.
“So I stayed and saw three
at-bats,” Ulloa said recently in
Spanish. “He got three hits. From
then on, I never left him alone.”
Soto isn’t a pitcher anymore.
He is a 19-year-old hit machine
the Nationals signed for a thenclub record $1.5 million bonus in
July 2015 in hopes that he would
eventually assume a corner outfield spot in Washington. Two full
seasons into his professional career — despite appearing in just
83 games and none above Class A
Hagerstown — Soto appears to be
on a path to the big leagues
because his hitting ability, scouts
and officials insist, is extraordinary.
“He’s probably our best hitter
in the minor leagues that we have
right now,” Nationals Vice President of International Operations
Johnny DiPuglia said.
Soto’s primary obstacle since
signing has been staying healthy.
A fractured ankle and surgery on
his right hand limited him to
32 games between Hagerstown
and the Gulf Coast League last
season. He produced when he
played — he batted .351 with a
.919 on-base-plus-slugging per-
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Outfielder Juan Soto, top right, is the Nationals’ consensus No. 2 prospect behind Victor Robles, left.
centage across the two levels —
but played in just nine games
after May 2.
“Last year was a year filled
with experiences,” Soto said recently in Spanish. “A lot of laughter, tears, a little bit of everything.
I felt, at first, bad because I wanted to help my team and continue
moving forward after my great
start. But that was the way God
wanted it to happen, and that’s
what I had to deal with.”
Soto’s blend of skill and misfortune has produced a wide
range of spots on baseball’s annual prospect rankings lists.
Three major lists have been revealed over the past month, and
each has a different take on Soto’s
place among baseball’s top minor
leaguers; Baseball America
ranked him No. 56, MLB.com
slotted him No. 29, and Baseball
Prospectus had him at No. 22.
“If he plays a full year, I think
there’s going to be surprising
things coming out of that guy,”
DiPuglia said. “He’s very mature.
One of the most mature young
Latin players I’ve ever been
around as far as spending his
money, what he does for a plan,
how he approaches the game. . . .
He loves the game. He has an
advanced [strike] zone knowledge, and he’s the kind of kid
you’d want to marry your daughter. He’s just a great kid. And he
can hit. He’s an outstanding hitter. So I think if he plays a full
year, I think this guy really goes
up the charts.”
The Nationals, of course, have
their own evaluation system, and
they hold Soto, their consensus
No. 2 prospect behind Victor
Robles, in high regard — so much
that they have refused to make
him available to the Miami Marlins as part of a trade package for
catcher J.T. Realmuto. The Nationals envision Soto as a middleof-the-order run producer from
the left side, which the club may
need after Bryce Harper and
Daniel Murphy become free
agents next winter. Soto played
mostly right field in 2017, but
DiPuglia said he believes he will
settle in left field in the majors.
“Right now the area I want to
improve most on is my defense,”
Soto said. “I’d like to improve my
speed so I can be a better outfielder. I’d like to develop more as a
fielder so I’m not just limited to
right field and can play left field
easily.”
As for a player comparison,
DiPuglia pointed to a left-handed
corner outfielder who starred for
the New York Yankees during
their dynasty in the 1990s.
“People think I’m crazy when I
say this, but he reminds me a lot
of Paul O’Neill,” DiPuglia said.
“When I say Paul O’Neill, people,
the hair on their arms doesn’t
stand up, but Paul O’Neill had a
hell of a career. . . . Something
about him reminds me of Paul
O’Neill. Maybe he’ll be better
than him. But if he turns out to be
Paul O’Neill, I’ll be happy.”
The Nationals are years away
from finding out. Maybe it
doesn’t happen; most prospects
never pan out as envisioned. But
club officials steadfastly believe
Soto will become an impactful
big leaguer if he can stay on the
field and develop. They believe
Ulloa found a star that Sunday
afternoon.
jorge.castillo@washpost.com
Chen, Rippon took di≠erent paths to their first Games
But the American figure skaters share a veteran coach in Arutyunyan and shared the ice for their opening practice in South Korea
BY L IZ C LARKE
IN GANGNEUNG, SOUTH KOREA
Nathan Chen was an 11-year-old
figure skating phenom when he
came to work with Coach Rafael
Arutyunyan. Adam Rippon, by
contrast, enlisted Arutyunyan’s
help at 22, wondering whether his
best results were behind him as he
struggled to reach the podium
after winning back-to-back junior
world championships as a teenager.
So it was difficult for Arutyunyan to convey the emotions he
felt Wednesday as his two pupils
— a decade apart in age, markedly
different in their skating style yet
so compatible as practice mates —
stepped onto Olympic ice for the
first time.
None of the four others in their
practice group, American Vincent
Zhou included, took advantage of
the session, mindful that a second
opportunity would follow in the
afternoon. That afforded Chen
and Rippon ample room to loosen
their limbs, execute their jumps
and run through select passages
in their programs as Arutyunyan
looked on from the boards.
It was simply a 40-minute practice session on the rink designated
for that purpose, with a low ceiling and fluorescent lights, tucked
just below Gangneung Ice Arena,
where Chen and Rippon will
make their Olympic debuts later
this week in the team event.
“I brought up this young kid
starting when he was 11,” said
Arutyunyan, a native of the nation
of Georgia who was schooled as a
skater in the former Soviet system
before moving to California in
1991. “I took Adam five years ago,
when he was [22], couldn’t jump
at all. Now they [are] both at
Olympics. . . . I’m proud of them,
proud of myself and proud of my
team.”
Arutyunyan revealed that Chen
will skate his short program in the
team event, which gets underway
Friday (8 p.m. Thursday Eastern
time), while Rippon will skate the
long program. A formal announcement is expected from U.S.
Figure Skating on Thursday. The
remaining U.S. team assignments
Olympic TV schedule
NBC
8-11:30 p.m. Team figure skating,
men’s and pairs short programs
(live); men’s and women’s freestyle
skiing moguls, qualifying
NBCSN
2-6 a.m. Mixed doubles curling,
Canada-Norway, China-Switzerland
6-10 a.m. Mixed doubles curling,
U.S.- Canada (live), China-South
Korea; men’s ski jumping
8-11:35 p.m. Mixed doubles
curling, U.S.-Switzerland; men’s
downhill training (live), men’s luge
training
11:35 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Mixed
doubles curling, U.S.-South Korea
(live)
Live updates online
For analysis and results throughout
the Games, visit
washingtonpost.com/sports
JOHN SIBLEY/REUTERS
Nathan Chen, 18, and Adam Rippon, 28, took to the ice Wednesday for a practice session. “I’m at the Olympics!” Rippon gushed afterward.
will be announced later.
Chen, 18, is the United States’
best hope for gold in men’s singles,
with fluency in five types of quadruple jumps. He closed the 201718 season by winning the Grand
Prix championship in Nagoya, Japan, and followed last month by
clinching a second consecutive
U.S. championship by a staggering margin, performing seven
quadruple jumps in the rout.
Defending Olympic champion
Yuzuru Hanyu of Japan is regarded as Chen’s most formidable
challenger at the 2018 Winter
Games but is recovering from an
ankle injury. Japanese officials recently announced that Hanyu
won’t take part in the team event,
fanning speculation about his
readiness.
Chen demurred when asked
Wednesday what he expected
from Hanyu, saying simply, “I
don’t know his situation.” He also
dismissed a suggestion that he
was being eyed as the gold medal
favorite.
“Honestly, I try not to think
about it. I don’t think about it,”
Chen insisted. “I just want to come
out of this competition proud of
what I’ve done. That’s my goal.”
Rippon, 28, oozed all the excitement that Chen contained. The
moment his blades touched the
practice rink’s ice Wednesday,
Rippon made a point of skating
directly to the Olympic rings at
What! Still not getting home delivery?
the center and gliding over them,
soaking up the significance of all it
represented.
“I’m at the Olympics!” he
gushed to reporters afterward, detailing the thrill of living in the
Olympic Village and seeing the
Olympic rings from his dormroom window.
“It’s bomb-dot-com!” Rippon
said. “It’s very cool! It’s everything
I kind of thought it would be, but
it’s so weird to be actually living in
it.”
But on the practice ice, he was
all business. Wearing a Team USA
T-shirt and tights, he went
through his short program, which
ripples with sass and attitude. His
spins were elegant, and his triple
1-800-753-POST
jumps exuded confidence.
Chen, who ran through his free
skate, drew applause from several
of the young Olympic volunteers
in attendance who were dazzled
by the amplitude of his jumps. He
had a rough patch toward the end
of the session, putting a hand
down to steady himself after one
shaky triple jump and falling on a
do-over. But he was upbeat afterward.
“I still have a few practices to
get the ice under me,” Chen said.
“Ultimately everything feels good
right now.”
Arutyunyan was no less
pleased, pointing out that
Wednesday was the first day of his
skaters’ Olympic experience and
plenty of time remained to round
into form and decide which elements, if any, should be added or
dropped to their programs.
In Chen’s case, that’s code for
quadruple jumps. He typically
fine-tunes his programs at the last
minute, based on how his training
is going, but said Wednesday that
he plans to do two quads in his
short program and four or five in
his long program.
“It’s all about percentages and
how I feel,” he explained.
Arutyunyan, 60, whose life has
been devoted to figure skating,
has a special saying about the
Olympics — a competition that he
believes exacts a physical and
emotional toll unlike any other.
“After Olympics, you get four
years older — right away. Next
day,” Arutyunyan said. “That’s a
problem. So you should play your
game very secure. The advice I
would give every Olympic athlete:
Be very careful what he’s doing
during Olympics and make sure
he will execute everything he is
planning.”
liz.clarke@washpost.com
washingtonpost.com/subscribe
SF
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D9
M2
scoreboard
B A S K ETB A L L
HOCKEY
F O O TBALL
H I GH S C HOOLS
NBA
NCAA men
Virginia Tech 85, N.C. State 75
NHL
NCAA men
THE TOP 10
EASTERN CONFERENCE
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
N.C. State (16-8)
Abu 3-6 1-1 7, Yurtseven 7-12 5-7 20, Johnson 4-7 4-5 15,
Dorn 2-5 0-0 4, Beverly 3-8 0-0 9, L.Freeman 3-4 0-1 6,
Batts 0-1 0-0 0, Hunt 2-6 0-0 6, A.Freeman 3-13 1-2 8.
27-62 Totals 11-16 75.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
NATIONAL SIGNING DAY
LOCAL CLASSES
MARYLAND
Wrestling
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................39
Toronto ......................................37
Philadelphia ...............................26
New York ...................................23
Brooklyn.....................................19
L
16
16
25
32
37
Pct
.709
.698
.510
.418
.339
GB
—
1
11
16
201/2
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................31
Miami.........................................29
Charlotte....................................23
Orlando ......................................17
Atlanta.......................................17
L
23
26
30
36
37
Pct
.574
.527
.434
.321
.315
GB
—
21/2
71/2
131/2
14
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................31
Milwaukee .................................30
Indiana .......................................30
Detroit .......................................27
Chicago ......................................18
L
22
23
25
26
35
Pct
.585
.566
.545
.509
.340
GB
—
1
2
4
13
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................40
x-San Antonio............................34
New Orleans ..............................28
Memphis ....................................18
Dallas .........................................17
L
13
21
25
36
37
Pct
.755
.618
.528
.333
.315
GB
—
7
12
221/2
231/2
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota..................................34
Oklahoma City ...........................31
Denver........................................29
Portland .....................................29
Utah ...........................................26
L
23
24
25
25
28
Pct
.596
.564
.537
.537
.481
GB
—
2
31/2
31/2
61/2
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................41
L.A. Clippers...............................27
L.A. Lakers .................................22
x-Phoenix...................................18
Sacramento ...............................17
L
13
25
31
37
36
Pct
.759
.519
.415
.327
.321
GB
—
13
181/2
231/2
231/2
x-late game
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Orlando 116, Cleveland 98
Atlanta 108, Memphis 82
Houston 123, Brooklyn 113
Milwaukee 103, New York 89
Toronto 111, Boston 91
Philadelphia 115, Washington 102
L.A. Lakers 112, Phoenix 93
Oklahoma City 125, Golden State 105
EAST
Colgate 74, Boston U. 60
Fordham 67, George Mason 66
George Washington 80, La Salle 69
Lafayette 81, Army 54
Loyola (Md.) 72, American U. 69
Marquette 88, Seton Hall 85
Navy 69, Holy Cross 34
Penn St. 74, Maryland 70
St. Bonaventure 79, Saint Louis 56
St. John’s 79, Villanova 75
Temple 90, East Carolina 73
UConn 68, South Florida 65
Virginia Tech (17-7)
Blackshear 7-10 3-4 18, Bibbs 4-8 3-4 11, Robinson 11-17
8-14 32, Wilson 3-4 0-2 6, Alexander-Walker 1-2 1-2 3,
Horne 1-1 0-1 2, Hill 2-5 0-0 4, Jackson 0-0 0-0 0, Bede 0-0
0-0 0, Clarke 4-5 1-2 9. Totals 33-52 16-29 85.
Halftime: Virginia Tech 47-34. Three-point goals: N.C.
State 10-31 (Johnson 3-6, Beverly 3-8, Hunt 2-6, Yurtseven 1-2, A.Freeman 1-8, Dorn 0-1), Virginia Tech 3-10
(Robinson 2-3, Blackshear 1-1, Alexander-Walker 0-1,
Bibbs 0-2, Hill 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: N.C.
State 31 (Abu 7), Virginia Tech 26 (Clarke, Blackshear 4).
Assists: N.C. State 17 (Johnson 10), Virginia Tech 12
(Robinson 4). Total fouls: N.C. State 24, Virginia Tech 16.
Technical fouls: N.C. State Coach Kevin Keatts.
SOUTH
Campbell 78, Gardner-Webb 70
Charleston Southern 87, Liberty 75
Covenant 68, Berea 66
Florida 73, LSU 64
High Point 61, Radford 60
Lamar 79, Northwestern St. 75
Maryville (Tenn.) 80, Brevard 69
Miami 87, Wake Forest 81
Tenn. Wesleyan 87, Reinhardt 78
Texas A&M 81, Auburn 80
Tusculum 97, Mars Hill 71
UNC Asheville 78, Longwood 73
UNC Greensboro 80, Furman 67
Union (Ky.) 70, Bluefield 68
Vanderbilt 81, Georgia 66
Virginia 59, Florida St. 55
Virginia Tech 85, NC State 75
Winthrop 63, Presbyterian 49
Wofford 92, Samford 79
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Penn State 74, Maryland 70
Atlanta at Orlando, 7
New York at Toronto, 7:30
Boston at Washington, 8
Charlotte at Portland, 10
Dallas at Golden State, 10:30
Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
Maryland ......................................... 35
Penn St. .......................................... 41
MARYLAND
Fernando
Cowan
Huerter
Morsell
Wiley
Nickens
Obi
Tomaic
Mona
TOTALS
FRIDAY’S GAMES
L.A. Clippers at Detroit, 7
New Orleans at Philadelphia, 7
Cleveland at Atlanta, 7:30
Indiana at Boston, 7:30
Denver at Houston, 8
Milwaukee at Miami, 8
Charlotte at Utah, 9
Minnesota at Chicago, 9:30
Portland at Sacramento, 10:30
Pistons 115, Nets 106
BROOKLYN ......................... 21
DETROIT ............................. 26
29
27
23
26
33 — 106
36 — 115
BROOKLYN: Harris 7-13 0-1 18, Carroll 4-14 3-3 14, Allen
5-11 3-3 13, Dinwiddie 3-9 3-3 12, Crabbe 13-22 2-2 34,
Webb III 1-2 0-0 3, Okafor 1-2 0-0 2, Mozgov 2-3 0-0 4,
Whitehead 1-3 0-0 2, Russell 2-5 0-0 4, Stauskas 0-6 0-0
0. Totals 39-90 11-12 106.
DETROIT: S.Johnson 9-15 0-0 19, Griffin 9-19 6-7 25,
Drummond 5-17 7-10 17, Smith 6-14 2-4 15, Bullock 4-7
0-0 9, Tolliver 2-5 3-4 9, Galloway 5-9 0-0 13, Kennard 4-6
0-0 8. Totals 44-92 18-25 115.
Three-point Goals: Brooklyn 17-51 (Crabbe 6-14, Harris
4-8, Dinwiddie 3-8, Carroll 3-10, Webb III 1-2, Allen 0-1,
Whitehead 0-1, Russell 0-2, Stauskas 0-5), Detroit 9-24
(Galloway 3-6, Tolliver 2-4, Bullock 1-2, Smith 1-2,
S.Johnson 1-3, Griffin 1-5, Kennard 0-2). Fouled Out:
Carroll. Rebounds: Brooklyn 50 (Allen 14), Detroit 46
(Drummond 27). Assists: Brooklyn 32 (Dinwiddie 11),
Detroit 20 (Griffin 7). Total Fouls: Brooklyn 20, Detroit
12. Technicals: Carroll, Griffin. A: 15,114 (21,000).
Rockets 109, Heat 101
HOUSTON ........................... 35
MIAMI ................................ 24
26
33
22
23
26 — 109
21 — 101
HOUSTON: Mbah a Moute 2-6 4-4 9, Tucker 1-2 0-0 3,
Capela 6-8 1-2 13, Paul 10-19 1-2 24, Harden 13-25 10-12
41, Nene 3-6 1-1 7, Brown 0-0 0-0 0, Green 3-8 4-5 12.
Totals 38-74 21-26 109.
MIAMI: Winslow 2-7 0-0 5, Jones Jr. 1-7 0-0 3, Whiteside
7-16 2-3 16, Dragic 11-17 6-7 30, Richardson 11-20 1-1
30, J.Johnson 4-12 0-0 9, Adebayo 2-2 1-1 5, T.Johnson
1-7 0-0 3. Totals 39-88 10-12 101.
Three-point Goals: Houston 12-31 (Harden 5-12, Paul
3-8, Green 2-6, Tucker 1-1, Mbah a Moute 1-4), Miami
13-32 (Richardson 7-9, Dragic 2-4, Winslow 1-3, J.Johnson 1-5, Jones Jr. 1-5, T.Johnson 1-6). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Houston 35 (Capela 8), Miami 41 (Whiteside
17). Assists: Houston 16 (Paul 7), Miami 23 (Dragic 6).
Total Fouls: Houston 16, Miami 17. A: 19,600 (19,600).
Jazz 92, Grizzlies 88
UTAH .................................. 21
MEMPHIS ........................... 16
23
23
24
24
24 — 92
25 — 88
UTAH: Ingles 3-7 0-0 7, Favors 1-4 0-0 2, Gobert 1-5 6-8 8,
Rubio 8-16 11-14 29, Mitchell 4-12 0-0 9, O’Neale 1-2 2-2
4, Jerebko 0-0 0-0 0, Neto 3-3 1-1 8, Hood 5-12 8-8 18,
Johnson 3-8 0-0 7. Totals 29-69 28-33 92.
MEMPHIS: Martin 3-7 0-0 6, Green 4-7 2-2 11, Gasol 7-20
4-7 20, Harrison 9-15 3-3 23, Brooks 4-13 2-2 11, Ennis III
2-6 1-2 6, Rabb 2-3 0-0 4, Chalmers 3-8 0-0 7, Selden 0-2
0-0 0. Totals 34-81 12-16 88.
Three-point Goals: Utah 6-22 (Rubio 2-4, Neto 1-1,
Johnson 1-3, Mitchell 1-3, Ingles 1-4, O’Neale 0-1,
Favors 0-1, Hood 0-5), Memphis 8-23 (Harrison 2-5,
Gasol 2-6, Ennis III 1-2, Green 1-2, Chalmers 1-3, Brooks
1-3, Selden 0-1, Martin 0-1). Fouled Out: Harrison.
Rebounds: Utah 43 (Gobert 12), Memphis 36 (Green 7).
Assists: Utah 14 (Ingles 4), Memphis 18 (Gasol 5). Total
Fouls: Utah 16, Memphis 26. Technicals: Utah coach Jazz
(Defensive three second), Gasol, Memphis coach JB
Bickerstaff 2, Brooks. Ejected: Brooks. A: 13,187
(18,119).
Cavaliers 140,
Timberwolves 138 (OT)
MINNESOTA .................. 29
CLEVELAND ................... 31
37
33
33
37
30
28
9 — 138
11 — 140
MINNESOTA: Wiggins 7-13 1-2 19, Gibson 4-8 1-1 9,
Towns 10-12 4-4 30, Teague 6-12 0-0 14, Butler 14-21 3-3
35, Bjelica 2-5 0-0 5, Dieng 4-7 2-2 10, Jones 0-2 0-0 0,
Crawford 7-13 0-0 16. Totals 54-93 11-12 138.
CLEVELAND: James 16-22 0-2 37, Crowder 3-5 3-4 10,
Thompson 7-9 3-5 17, Thomas 4-8 2-2 13, Smith 7-14 0-0
20, Osman 3-5 1-2 9, Green 4-6 5-6 13, Frye 2-9 0-0 4,
Rose 1-3 1-2 3, Korver 5-7 0-0 14. Totals 52-88 15-23 140.
Three-point Goals: Minnesota 19-33 (Towns 6-6, Butler
4-5, Wiggins 4-8, Teague 2-4, Crawford 2-5, Bjelica 1-4,
Jones 0-1), Cleveland 21-41 (Smith 6-11, James 5-7,
Korver 4-6, Thomas 3-5, Osman 2-4, Crowder 1-2, Frye
0-6). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 35 (Towns
10), Cleveland 41 (James 10). Assists: Minnesota 33
(Teague 15), Cleveland 34 (James 15). Total Fouls:
Minnesota 19, Cleveland 21. A: 20,562 (20,562).
Thunder 125, Warriors 105
Late Tuesday
OKLAHOMA CITY ............... 42
GOLDEN STATE .................. 30
28
27
29
20
35 —
33 —
GOLDEN STATE: Durant 8-14 14-15 33, Green 2-4 1-3 5,
Pachulia 1-2 0-2 2, Curry 6-14 7-7 21, Thompson 5-13 0-0
12, Casspi 1-2 0-0 2, Looney 3-5 0-3 6, West 4-5 1-1 9,
McGee 2-4 0-0 4, Livingston 3-6 0-0 6, Iguodala 1-2 0-0 2,
McCaw 0-1 0-0 0, Young 1-5 0-0 3. Totals 37-77 23-31
105.
Three-point Goals: Oklahoma City 12-31 (George 6-11,
Abrines 3-7, Westbrook 2-5, Grant 1-2, Anthony 0-1,
Felton 0-2, Patterson 0-3), Golden State 8-28 (Durant
3-8, Thompson 2-6, Curry 2-9, Young 1-4, McGee 0-1).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 40 (Adams
10), Golden State 46 (Green 8). Assists: Oklahoma City
17 (Westbrook 9), Golden State 27 (Green 7). Total
Fouls: Oklahoma City 28, Golden State 24. Technicals:
Golden State coach Steve Kerr, West, Green 2, Iguodala.
Ejected: Green. A: 19,596 (19,596).
L
14
11
19
22
23
25
25
29
OL PTS. GF GA
3
75 189 140
8
74 173 124
5
69 182 156
6
52 146 164
8
50 136 154
6
50 139 164
9
45 137 179
10
38 120 175
W
32
32
32
31
29
29
24
L
13
12
20
19
19
19
21
OL PTS. GF GA
9
73 176 143
8
72 163 134
3
67 155 140
4
66 167 140
5
63 159 152
4
62 167 150
8
56 155 148
PACIFIC
Vegas ............................
San Jose ........................
Calgary ..........................
Anaheim .......................
x-Los Angeles ...............
x-Edmonton ..................
Vancouver .....................
Arizona .........................
W
35
28
27
26
28
23
21
12
L
14
17
18
19
19
24
26
32
OL PTS. GF GA
4
74 181 145
8
64 153 145
8
62 150 151
10
62 155 159
5
61 148 126
4
50 144 163
6
48 138 171
9
33 122 186
George Mason (10-14)
Calixte 3-6 1-1 7, Mar 2-12 1-2 6, Kier 3-5 0-0 8, Grayer
1-4 0-0 2, Livingston 6-16 1-1 16, Wilson 0-2 1-2 1, Boyd
6-10 2-2 15, Greene 4-8 0-0 11. 25-63 Totals 6-8 66.
Fordham (8-15)
Raut 6-13 0-0 16, Slanina 7-17 0-1 17, Havsa 4-4 0-0 9,
Tavares 3-14 3-6 11, Chartouny 3-6 3-4 11, Downing 0-0
0-0 0, Hicks 1-7 0-2 3, Petty 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 24-61 6-13
67.
Halftime: George Mason 33-23. Three-point goals:
George Mason 10-25 (Greene 3-5, Livingston 3-6, Kier
2-2, Boyd 1-2, Mar 1-8, Grayer 0-2), Fordham 13-37
(Raut 4-10, Slanina 3-8, Chartouny 2-5, Tavares 2-6,
Havsa 1-1, Hicks 1-7). Fouled out: Slanina. Rebounds:
George Mason 45 (Calixte, Kier 8), Fordham 32 (Tavares
11). Assists: George Mason 16 (Livingston 7), Fordham
16 (Havsa 8). Total fouls: George Mason 12, Fordham 10.
A: 1,152 (3,200).
70
74
George Washington 80,
La Salle 69
La Salle (10-14)
Washington 1-3 2-4 4, Stukes 0-2 0-0 0, Phiri 5-10 1-2 16,
Powell 7-16 0-0 16, Johnson 5-12 2-2 14, Brookins 4-6
3-3 11, Shuler 0-3 0-0 0, Deas 0-7 1-2 1, Kuhar 0-0 0-0 0,
Moultrie 2-3 3-3 7. 24-62 Totals 12-16 69.
Percentages: FG .532, FT .786. 3-Point Goals: 9-17, .529
(Cowan 3-3, Nickens 3-7, Wiley 2-3, Huerter 1-4). Team
Rebounds: 0. Team Turnovers: 13 (10 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 2 (Fernando, Morsell). Turnovers: 13 (Fernando 5,
Huerter 4, Cowan 2, Nickens, Obi). Steals: 6 (Cowan 3,
Fernando, Huerter, Morsell). Technical Fouls: None.
Halftime: George Washington 39-33. Three-point goals:
La Salle 9-26 (Phiri 5-10, Johnson 2-4, Powell 2-5, Stukes
0-1, Moultrie 0-1, Shuler 0-2, Deas 0-3), George Washington 6-15 (Watanabe 5-7, Nolan 1-4, Toro 0-1, Jack
0-1, Langarica 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: La Salle
36 (Johnson 8), George Washington 42 (Nolan 11).
Assists: La Salle 17 (Powell 5), George Washington 13
(Nolan, Mazzulla 4). Total fouls: La Salle 16, George
Washington 15. A: 2,017 (5,000).
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
40 10-12 3-4 3-4 2 1 25
31
5-7 1-4 2-6 1 2 11
37 5-12 2-2 0-1 6 2 16
28
2-8 0-0 0-0 1 2
6
36 5-10 3-4 3-9 1 3 14
11
0-0 0-0 0-1 3 1
0
7
0-1 2-2 0-1 0 1
2
6
0-1 0-2 1-2 0 0
0
4
0-1 0-0 0-1 0 0
0
200 27-52 11-18 9-25 14 12 74
Percentages: FG .519, FT .611. 3-Point Goals: 9-21, .429
(Carr 4-6, Stevens 2-3, Garner 2-8, Reaves 1-3, Bostick
0-1). Team Rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 8 (20 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 3 (Stevens 2, Watkins). Turnovers: 8
(Reaves 4, Carr, Garner, Moore, Watkins). Steals: 5
(Watkins 3, Reaves, Stevens). Technical Fouls: None.
St. John's 79, No. 1 Villanova 75
St. John's (12-13)
Clark 5-8 3-3 15, Owens 3-5 3-6 9, Ponds 8-20 8-9 26,
Simon 6-14 3-4 16, Ahmed 4-7 2-2 10, Trimble 1-1 0-0 3.
27-55 Totals 19-24 79.
Villanova (22-2)
Cosby-Roundtree 1-2 0-0 2, Spellman 5-12 0-0 11,
Brunson 8-21 10-11 28, DiVincenzo 5-14 1-1 11, Bridges
5-12 0-0 11, Samuels 0-0 0-0 0, Gillespie 4-6 0-0 12.
Totals 28-67 11-12 75.
Halftime: St. John’s 39-34. Three-point goals: St. John’s
6-15 (Clark 2-4, Ponds 2-5, Trimble 1-1, Simon 1-3,
Ahmed 0-2), Villanova 8-33 (Gillespie 4-6, Brunson 2-11,
Bridges 1-5, Spellman 1-6, DiVincenzo 0-5). Fouled out:
DiVincenzo. Rebounds: St. John’s 31 (Simon 10), Villanova 29 (Spellman 12). Assists: St. John’s 13 (Simon
7), Villanova 11 (Brunson, Gillespie 3). Total fouls: St.
John’s 17, Villanova 19.
No. 2 Virginia 59, Florida St. 55
Virginia (23-1)
Wilkins 3-4 0-0 6, Salt 0-1 0-2 0, Hall 5-11 4-4 17, Jerome
7-14 0-0 15, Guy 5-19 0-0 13, Diakite 1-2 2-2 4, Anthony
0-1 0-0 0, Hunter 1-3 2-2 4. 22-55 Totals 8-10 59.
Florida St. (17-7)
Cofer 3-7 1-2 9, Koumadje 3-5 0-0 6, C.Walker 2-3 2-2 7,
Mann 1-4 1-2 3, Angola 1-11 4-4 7, Kabengele 3-4 0-0 6,
Allen 0-0 0-0 0, Obiagu 1-1 2-4 4, M.Walker 3-7 2-4 10,
Forrest 1-3 1-1 3. Totals 18-45 13-19 55.
Halftime: Florida St. 32-22. Three-point goals: Virginia
7-17 (Hall 3-4, Guy 3-10, Jerome 1-3), Florida St. 6-20
(Cofer 2-3, M.Walker 2-5, Angola 1-8). Rebounds:
Virginia 24 (Diakite 6), Florida St. 28 (Kabengele 6).
Assists: Virginia 8 (Hall 3), Florida St. 11 (C.Walker,
Angola 4). Total fouls: Virginia 18, Florida St. 15.
No. 14 Ohio State 64,
No. 3 Purdue 63
Ohio St. (21-5)
Tate 4-10 2-4 10, A.Wesson 4-7 2-2 13, Bates-Diop 9-18
0-0 18, K.Wesson 0-4 0-0 0, Jackson 2-8 1-2 5, Young 0-0
1-2 1, Potter 1-3 3-4 5, Dakich 1-3 0-0 2, Jallow 3-4 1-2
10. 24-57 Totals 10-16 64.
Purdue (23-3)
V.Edwards 3-12 3-3 11, Haas 7-11 4-7 18, Mathias 2-5
0-0 6, C.Edwards 8-14 8-9 28, Thompson 0-5 0-0 0,
Haarms 0-0 0-0 0, Eifert 0-0 0-0 0, Cline 0-0 0-0 0,
Eastern 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 20-48 15-19 63.
Halftime: Purdue 31-29. Three-point goals: Ohio St. 6-19
(Jallow 3-4, A.Wesson 3-6, Potter 0-1, Dakich 0-1, Tate
0-1, Bates-Diop 0-1, Jackson 0-4), Purdue 8-20 (C.Edwards 4-7, V.Edwards 2-3, Mathias 2-5, Thompson 0-5).
Rebounds: Ohio St. 26 (Bates-Diop 10), Purdue 28
(V.Edwards 9). Assists: Ohio St. 14 (Tate 5), Purdue 14
(Mathias 4). Total fouls: Ohio St. 20, Purdue 14.
Texas A&M 81, No. 8 Auburn 80
Texas A&M (16-8)
R.Williams 8-9 0-0 16, Hogg 1-8 0-0 3, Davis 7-12 1-1 15,
Gilder 4-9 1-2 11, Starks 8-12 3-4 23, Trocha-Morelos 2-2
0-0 4, Caldwell 0-0 0-0 0, Chandler 0-0 0-0 0, Wilson 3-8
1-2 9, Flagg 0-1 0-0 0. 33-61 Totals 6-9 81.
Auburn (21-3)
Murray 5-9 0-0 11, McLemore 4-5 0-0 10, Heron 8-15
10-11 28, Brown 3-5 0-0 7, Harper 3-8 6-6 13, Okeke 1-2
1-2 3, Spencer 0-0 3-4 3, Mitchell 0-0 0-0 0, Dunbar 2-6
1-1 5. Totals 26-50 21-24 80.
Halftime: Texas A&M 46-36. Three-point goals: Texas
A&M 9-18 (Starks 4-5, Gilder 2-3, Wilson 2-5, Hogg 1-4,
Flagg 0-1), Auburn 7-21 (McLemore 2-2, Heron 2-8,
Murray 1-2, Brown 1-2, Harper 1-4, Dunbar 0-3).
Rebounds: Texas A&M 29 (Davis 8), Auburn 20 (Heron,
Murray, Spencer, Harper 4). Assists: Texas A&M 19
(Hogg 7), Auburn 14 (Harper 8). Total fouls: Texas A&M
20, Auburn 13. Technical fouls: R.Williams, Dunbar.
26 — 125
28 — 105
OKLAHOMA CITY: George 11-23 10-12 38, Anthony 0-4
0-0 0, Adams 7-9 0-3 14, Westbrook 13-26 6-6 34,
Huestis 3-5 0-0 6, Grant 5-8 5-8 16, Singler 0-1 2-2 2,
Patterson 1-6 2-2 4, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, Felton 1-4 0-0 2,
Ferguson 0-0 0-0 0, Abrines 3-7 0-0 9. Totals 44-93 25-33
125.
W
36
33
32
23
21
22
18
14
CENTRAL
Winnipeg ......................
Nashville .......................
St. Louis ........................
Dallas ............................
Minnesota .....................
Colorado ........................
Chicago .........................
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
30
4-7 5-5 2-9 3 3 13
40
4-6 4-7 0-2 5 2 15
37 5-12 2-2 0-5 3 2 13
33
5-9 0-0 1-3 3 1 10
23
2-3 0-0 0-0 0 1
6
25 5-10 0-0 1-2 0 4 13
10
0-0 0-0 0-2 0 3
0
2
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1
0
-0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
200 25-47 11-14 4-23 14 17 70
PENN ST.
Stevens
Watkins
Carr
Garner
Reaves
Wheeler
Bostick
Moore
Pierce
TOTALS
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay ....................
Boston ...........................
Toronto .........................
Florida ...........................
Detroit ..........................
Montreal .......................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
x-late game
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Cent. Arkansas 100, Houston Baptist 80
Kansas St. 67, Texas 64
Nicholls 69, Abilene Christian 65
Sam Houston St. 66, Texas A&M-CC 64
Texas Tech 76, Iowa St. 58
Detroit 115, Brooklyn 106
Houston 109, Miami 101
Cleveland 140, Minnesota 138, OT
Indiana at New Orleans, ppd.
Utah 92, Memphis 88
San Antonio at Phoenix, Late
OL PTS. GF GA
5
67 165 154
3
63 169 166
8
62 157 156
9
59 152 155
4
58 139 150
6
58 181 197
9
57 144 164
5
55 157 168
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Fordham 67, George Mason 66
SOUTHWEST
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
L
17
22
17
19
22
22
21
24
Vcu (14-10)
Tillman 8-12 5-8 21, Vann 6-10 1-2 14, Mobley 1-2 0-0 2,
Crowfield 4-8 0-0 11, Jenkins 5-15 2-2 14, Lane 3-6 1-2 7,
Santos-Silva 1-1 0-0 2, Jackson 0-0 0-0 0, Maye 1-1 0-2 2,
Simms 1-3 1-2 3. 30-58 Totals 10-18 76.
Halftime: 41-41. Three-point goals: VCU 6-21 (Crowfield
3-7, Jenkins 2-7, Vann 1-2, Tillman 0-1, Simms 0-1,
Mobley 0-1, Lane 0-2), Richmond 3-14 (Gilyard 2-4,
Golden 1-1, Kirby 0-1, Cayo 0-1, Johnson 0-2, Sherod 0-2,
Buckingham 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: VCU 33
(Vann 9), Richmond 30 (Golden 9). Assists: VCU 17
(Jenkins 4), Richmond 9 (Gilyard 6). Total fouls: VCU 19,
Richmond 17. Technical fouls: Vann, Johnson .
Albion 70, Kalamazoo 67
Augsburg 79, St. Thomas (Minn.) 66
Bethany Lutheran 104, Crown (Minn.) 99
Bethel (Minn.) 62, Hamline 54
Cardinal Stritch 80, Olivet Nazarene 77
Carroll (Wis.) 73, Carthage 69
Concordia (Moor.) 86, St. Mary’s (Minn.) 77
Cornerstone 75, Aquinas 59
Creighton 76, DePaul 75
Dayton 88, Duquesne 73
Doane 80, Hastings 71
Evansville 63, Valparaiso 59
Gustavus 103, Macalester 59
Hope 95, Adrian 77
Loyola of Chicago 72, Drake 57
Minn.-Morris 100, Martin Luther 64
N. Iowa 74, Bradley 65
Northland 89, North Central (Minn.) 56
Ohio St. 64, Purdue 63
Olivet 81, Alma 75
W
31
30
27
25
27
26
24
25
Richmond 77, VCU 76
Richmond (9-14)
Golden 6-12 3-4 16, Sherod 9-13 0-0 18, Buckingham 1-5
5-6 7, Fore 5-11 5-6 15, Gilyard 6-11 4-5 18, Friendshuh
0-0 1-2 1, Johnson 0-3 0-0 0, Kirby 1-2 0-0 2, Cayo 0-2 0-0
0. Totals 28-59 18-23 77.
MIDWEST
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
Pittsburgh .....................
New Jersey ...................
Philadelphia ..................
Columbus ......................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
Carolina .........................
N.Y. Rangers .................
No. 25 Miami 87,
Wake Forest 81
Wake Forest (9-15)
Thompson 2-3 0-0 5, Moore 5-6 0-0 10, C.Brown 8-14 2-3
20, Crawford 7-17 4-8 23, Childress 3-8 2-2 9, Mitchell
0-0 0-0 0, Okeke 0-0 0-0 0, Sarr 2-7 0-0 4, Woods 4-11 2-2
10, Eggleston 0-0 0-0 0. 31-66 Totals 10-15 81.
Miami (18-5)
Huell 4-7 2-4 10, Vasiljevic 3-7 1-1 9, Lykes 3-8 6-7 13,
Walker 5-11 6-7 19, Lawrence 1-4 2-4 4, Waardenburg
3-5 3-4 12, Miller 0-0 1-2 1, Izundu 1-1 1-2 3, Newton
6-12 4-6 16. Totals 26-55 26-37 87.
Halftime: Miami 35-31. Three-point goals: Wake Forest
9-23 (Crawford 5-8, C.Brown 2-4, Thompson 1-1, Childress 1-4, Sarr 0-2, Woods 0-4), Miami 9-22 (Waardenburg 3-4, Walker 3-7, Vasiljevic 2-5, Lykes 1-3, Newton
0-1, Lawrence 0-2). Fouled out: Moore. Rebounds: Wake
Forest 32 (Moore 10), Miami 32 (Huell 10). Assists:
Wake Forest 18 (Crawford 7), Miami 14 (Lykes 5). Total
fouls: Wake Forest 26, Miami 15.
George Washington (10-14)
Toro 5-9 5-5 15, Steeves 6-13 3-3 15, Nolan 3-9 2-3 9,
Mazzulla 1-6 0-0 2, Watanabe 11-20 2-3 29, Langarica
0-3 0-0 0, Sasser 0-0 0-0 0, Zeigler 1-2 0-0 2, Granger 0-0
0-0 0, Jack 2-5 2-2 6, J.Williams 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 30-68
14-16 80.
NCAA women
Pittsburgh 5, Vegas 4
Anaheim 4, Buffalo 3 (OT)
Washington 3, Columbus 2
Philadelphia 2, Carolina 1 (OT)
Ottawa 5, New Jersey 3
Boston 3, Detroit 2
Florida 3, Vancouver 1
Minnesota 6, St. Louis 2
Winnipeg 4, Arizona 3
Calgary 3, Chicago 2
Colorado 3, San Jose 1
VIRGINIA
Brennan Armstrong, qb, 6-1{, 210, Shelby, Shelby, Ohio
Jaylon Baker, cb, 6-2, 170, Baylor School, Chattanooga,
Tenn.
Joseph Bissinger, ot, 6-4, 297, Memorial, Houston,
Texas
Derek Devine, ot, 6-6, 275, North Allegheny, Wexford,
Pa.
Aaron Faumui, dt, 6-3, 285, Kapolei, Kapolei, Hawaii
Javar Garrett, olb, 6-2, 205, The Peddie School, Hightstown, N.J.
TC Harrison, olb, 6-3, 199, Collins Hill, Suwanee, Ga.
Bobby Haskins, te, 6-7, 250, Hun School, Princeton, N.J.
Tavares Kelly, wr, 5-8, 160, St. Thomas Aquinas, Fort
Lauderdale, Fla.
Billy Kemp, wr, 5-9, 170, Highland Springs, Highland
Springs, Va.
Grant Misch, olb, 6-4, 232, Potomac Falls, Sterling, Va.
Ugo Obasi, wr, 6-1, 170, Milford Mill Academy, Gwynn
Oak, Md.
Hunter Pearson, k, 6-4, 192, Seneca, Seneca, S.C.
Bryce Perkins, dual, 6-2, 215, Arizona Western College,
Yuma, Ariz.
Jordan Redmond, dt, 6-0, 292, Osceola, Kissimmee, Fla.
Samson Reed, wde, 6-3, 252, Kahuku, Kahuku, Hawaii
Noah Taylor, olb, 6-4{, 200, The Avalon School, Bethesda, Md.
Wooby Theork, wr, 5-10, 163, Naples, Naples, Fla.
Martin Weisz, ot, 6-6, 305, The Benjamin School, North
Palm Beach, Fla.
Joseph White, s, 6-2, 175, Landstown, Virginia Beach,
Va.
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Toronto 3, Nashville 2 (SO)
Boston 6, N.Y. Rangers 1
Edmonton at Los Angeles, Late
THURSDAY’S GAMES
N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo, 7
Calgary at New Jersey, 7
Montreal at Philadelphia, 7
Nashville at Ottawa, 7:30
Vancouver at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Arizona at Minnesota, 8
Colorado at St. Louis, 8
Dallas at Chicago, 8:30
Vegas at San Jose, 10:30
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Columbus at Washington, 7
Detroit at N.Y. Islanders, 7
Calgary at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Los Angeles at Florida, 7:30
Vancouver at Carolina, 7:30
St. Louis at Winnipeg, 8
Pittsburgh at Dallas, 8:30
Edmonton at Anaheim, 10
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Buffalo at Boston, 7
New Jersey at Columbus, 7
Nashville at Montreal, 7
Los Angeles at Tampa Bay, 7
Ottawa at Toronto, 7
Colorado at Carolina, 8
Philadelphia at Arizona, 8
Chicago at Minnesota, 8
Edmonton at San Jose, 10
American U. 69, Loyola (Md.) 56
Army 48, Lafayette 39
Dayton 78, UMass 49
Navy 62, Holy Cross 54
Saint Joseph’s 64, Rhode Island 46
Bruins 6, Rangers 1
SOUTH
Scoring: 1, N.Y. Rangers, Ric.Nash 16, 5:00. 2, Boston,
Ril.Nash 8 (Backes, Heinen), 7:54. 3, Boston, Chara 5
(DeBrusk), 16:09.
BOSTON ................................... 2
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 1
3
0
1 —
0 —
6
1
FIRST PERIOD
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Boston, Bergeron 23 (Krug, Pastrnak), 3:47. 5,
Boston, Schaller 8 (Grzelcyk, Khudobin), 7:25. 6, Boston,
Bergeron 24 (Chara, Marchand), 10:00 (sh).
MIDWEST
THIRD PERIOD
Ball St. 91, E. Michigan 85
Miami (Ohio) 67, Toledo 58
N. Illinois 84, Akron 61
South Dakota 79, Fort Wayne 60
Scoring: 7, Boston, Kuraly 5 (Czarnik, Grzelcyk), 6:34.
SHOTS ON GOAL
BOSTON ................................. 11
11
12 — 34
N.Y. RANGERS ....................... 11
7
4 — 22
Power-play opportunities: Boston 0 of 2; N.Y. Rangers 0
of 2. Goalies: Boston, Khudobin 11-3-4 (22 shots-21
saves). N.Y. Rangers, Pavelec 4-7-1 (18-16), Lundqvist
21-17-4 (16-12). A: 18,006 (18,006). T: 2:20.
SOUTHWEST
Cent. Arkansas 64, Houston Baptist 56
Oklahoma St. 71, TCU 54
Stephen F. Austin 73, McNeese St. 58
Texas A&M-CC 62, Sam Houston St. 48
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Team
Damascus
Battlefield
Huntingtown
Robinson
Glenelg
Leonardtown
Westfield
Spalding
St. John's
Churchill
Record
21-0
9-1
29-2
11-0
20-0
13-1
19-3
11-6
19-10
13-1
THE TOP 10
Ice hockey
Gonzaga beat up on Bullis on Monday as nine players
scored in a 13-0 win. . . . Landon sophomore forward
Ryan Giles leads the Bears with 26 assists this
season. . . . Churchill locked up the top seed in the
Maryland Student Hockey League playoffs with a 4-2
win over Wootton on Friday. . . . Glenelg trailed after
two periods but came back to beat Marriotts Ridge, 4-2,
in the Howard County championship Friday. . . . Briar
Woods junior forward Aidan Robbins scored four goals in
a 7-2 win over Patriot on Friday. . . . St. John's clinched a
Mid-Atlantic Prep Hockey League playoff spot with a 7-3
win over Mount St. Joseph's on Tuesday.
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Team
Gonzaga
Landon
Broad Run
Churchill
DeMatha
Glenelg
Briar Woods
St. John's
Wootton
West Potomac
Record
18-4-1
16-2-1
8-0
18-2
20-7-3
10-1
8-0-1
11-5-1
10-3-1
7-1-2
Results
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
MARYLAND
Leonardtown 66, Northern 47
Oakland Mills 55, Glenelg 28
Severna Park 51, Northeast 24
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
MARYLAND
North Point 64, La Plata 50
Thomas Stone 66, McDonough 42
PRIVATE
Model 49, Edmund Burke 42
National Christian 72, Capitol Christian 65
ICE HOCKEY
PRIVATE
Stone Ridge 5, Georgetown Visitation 1
VIRGINIA TECH
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
Duke 59, Wake Forest 51
George Washington 65, George Mason 61
Louisville 65, Clemson 46
South Florida 88, East Carolina 47
Tulane 69, Temple 65
UConn 55, UCF 37
Virginia Tech 90, North Carolina 74
Jalen Alexander, dt, 6-4, 288, Western Branch, Chesapeake, Va.
Nihym Anderson, olb, 6-2, 227, Vineland South,
Vineland, N.J.
Spencer Anderson, ot, 6-5, 270, Bishop McNamara,
District Heights, Md.
Tyler Baylor, wde, 6-4, 220, Good Council, Olney, Md.
Raymond Boone, ath, 5-11, 199, Eleanor Roosevelt,
Greenbelt, Md.
TJ Bradley, ot, 6-8, 290, Lackawanna C.C., Scranton, Pa.
Chance Campbell, olb, 6-2, 222, Calvert Hall College,
Towson, Md.
Brian Cobbs, wr, 6-2, 200, Hayfield, Quantico, Va.
Byron Cowart, wde, 6-3, 277, Hillsborough C.C., Tampa,
Fla.
Dontay Demus Jr., wr, 6-4, 205, Friendship Academy,
Washington, District of Columbia
Tyler DeSue, dual, 6-1, 185, Bishop Sullivan Catholic,
Virginia Beach, Va.
Jaelyn Duncan, ot, 6-6, 300, St. Frances Academy,
Baltimore, Md.
Vincent Flythe, cb, 5-11, 175, Woodson H.D., Washington, District of Columbia
Austin Fontaine, dt, 6-3, 309, DeMatha Catholic, Hyattsville, Md.
Fa’Najae Gotay, olb, 6-0, 205, North Fort Myers, North
Fort Myers, Fla.
Evan Gregory, og, 6-4, 285, DeMatha Catholic, Hyattsville, Md.
Darryl Jones, wr, 6-2, 180, Princess Anne, Virginia
Beach, Va.
Jeshaun Jones, wr, 6-1{, 176, South Fort Myers, Fort
Myers, Fla.
Ken Montgomery Jr., cb, 6-1{, 165, Hillsborough, Tampa,
Fla.
Jordan Mosley, olb, 6-1, 214, Haverford, Havertown, Pa.
Durell Nchami, olb, 6-3, 217, Paint Branch, Burtonsville,
Md.
Chigoziem Okonkwo, te, 6-3, 224, Hillgrove, Powder
Springs, Ga.
Joseph Petrino, k, 5-11, 165, Richmond Hill, Richmond
Hill, Ga.
Damascus beat Northwest, 65-12, last Thursday night to
wrap up its undefeated regular season. . . . Nine Battlefield wrestlers won individual titles at the Cedar Run
District tournament. . . . Fresh off a Southern Maryland
Athletic Conference title, Huntingtown will wrestle
Chopticon in the Maryland 3A South region semifinals on
Wednesday. . . . Robinson picked up a Patriot District
championship this past weekend. . . . With a 56-9
thumping of River Hill to close the regular season,
Glenelg entered the Maryland 2A South region playoffs
full of confidence. . . . In one of its more competitive dual
matches of the season, Leonardtown toppled Old Mill,
38-35, last Thursday.
Eli Adams, de, 5-11, 236, South Pointe, Rock Hill, S.C.
Keshon Artis, lb, 5-11, 227, Oscar Smith, Chesapeake,
Va.
Coleton Beck, ath, 6-0, 185, Blacksburg, Blacksburg, Va.
Jaevon Becton, de, 6-3, 255, Ocean Lakes, Virginia
Beach, Va.
Armani Chatman, ath, 6-0, 180, Bishop Sullivan Catholic,
Virginia Beach, Va.
Chamarri Conner, db, 6-0, 195, Trinity Christian Academy, Jacksonville, Fla.
D.J. Crossen, db, 6-1, 186, Dudley, Greensboro, N.C.
Walker Culver, ol, 6-5, 275, Baylor School, Chattanooga,
Tenn.
Christian Darrisaw, ot, 6-5, 290, Fork Union Military
Academy, Fork Union, Va.
DeJuan Ellis, qb, 5-11, 180, McDonogh School, Owings
Mills, Md.
John Harris, ol, 6-4, 278, Mill Creek, Hoschton, Ga.
John Harris, rb, 6-1{, 208, Mill Creek, Hoschton, Ga.
Dax Hollifield, ilb, 6-2, 240, Shelby, Shelby, N.C.
Joe Kane, dt, 6-2, 280, Heritage, Wake Forest, N.C.
James Mitchell, te, 6-4, 227, Union, Big Stone Gap, Va.
Quincy Patterson, qb, 6-4, 229, Solorio Academy, Chicago, Ill.
Nasir Peoples, dl, 6-0, 178, Archbishop Wood, Warminster, Pa.
Oscar Shadley, ls, 6-0, 230, Golden Gate, Naples, Fla.
Darryle Simmons, wr, 6-3, 200, St. Joseph’s, Philadelphia, Pa.
Kaleb Smith, wr, 6-2, 180, Louisa County, Bumpass, Va.
Caleb Steward, rb, 5-11, 203, Ed White, Jacksonville, Fla.
Luke Tenuta, ol, 6-7, 275, Western Albemarle, Crozet,
Va.
Nadir Thompson, db, 5-10, 170, Southern Nash, Bailey,
N.C.
Alan Tisdale, ath, 6-3, 208, Page, Greensboro, N.C.
Tre Turner, wr, 6-2, 177, Northwest Guilford, Greensboro, N.C.
Jermaine Waller, db, 6-1, 178, The Avalon School,
Bethesda, Md.
Jeremy Webb, db, 6-3, 190, ASA College Brooklyn, East
Mims, Fla.
TE N NI S
B OY S ’ B A S K E TB A L L
SMAC - POTOMAC DIVISION
THOMAS STONE 66, MCDONOUGH 42
M (0-4)Totals 0 0-0 42.
TS (14-5) Grant 20, MitchellL 13, Jackson 12, Wilson 9,
Jones 4, Queen 3, Locke 2, Queen 2, Barclay 1 Totals 26
11-19 66.
Halftime: Thomas Stone, (34-12).
Three-point goals: TS 1 (Mitchell1).
CAPITAL BELTWAY
NATIONAL CHRISTIAN 72,
CAPITOL CHRISTIAN 65
CC (16-13) Jordan 22, Coleman 16, Ellerbe 9, Onaopemipo 9, Boulder 5, Ndaw 4 Totals 13 12-17 65.
NC (13-9) Robinson 22, Kpadeh 11, Khan 11, Washington
10, Ngonadi 10, Koureissi 8 Totals 19 19-28 72.
Halftime: National Christian, (35-35).
Three-point goals: NC 5 (Kpadeh 2, Khan 1, Robinson 1,
Washington 1); CC 9 (Jordan 1, Boulder 1, Ellerbe 3,
Coleman 4)
NONLEAGUE
NORTH POINT 64, LA PLATA 50
LP (5-13) Anderson 13, Brown 13, Brown 8, White 8,
Devine II 6, Graham 2 Totals 16 6-8 50.
NP (12-9) McKenzie 17, Williams 11, Lawrence 9,
Campbell 9, Ekwi 6, Grant 4, Chesley 3, Hewlett 3, Brooks
2 Totals 15 7-9 64.
Halftime: North Point, (22-22).
Three-point goals: NP 9 (Williams 3, McKenzie 3,
Hewlett 1, Ekwi 2); LP 4 (Anderson 1, Brown 3)
GI R LS ’ BA S K E TBALL
WEST
Fresno St. 66, San Diego St. 60
No. 1 Connecticut 55, UCF 37
U-Conn. (23-0)
Collier 3-7 5-5 11, Stevens 5-12 2-2 12, Williams 1-4 1-2
3, Nurse 0-4 3-4 3, Samuelson 6-12 3-4 19, Camara 1-1
0-0 2, Irwin 0-1 0-0 0, Bent 0-0 0-0 0, Coombs 0-0 0-0 0,
Walker 2-4 1-3 5, 18-45 Totals 15-20 55.
Ucf (16-8)
Kaba 1-4 0-0 2, Shuler 1-7 0-0 2, Saunders 5-18 3-3 13,
Wilson 0-4 0-0 0, Wright 5-15 2-4 12, Uwusiaba 0-0 0-0 0,
Paul 3-4 0-0 6, Thigpen 1-2 0-0 2, 16-54 Totals 5-7 37.
UCONN ............................... 21 16 11
7
—55
UCF ....................................... 4
8
8 17
—37
Three-point goals: U-Conn. 4-12 (Nurse 0-3, Samuelson
4-9), UCF 0-11 (Shuler 0-5, Saunders 0-2, Wilson 0-1,
Wright 0-2, Thigpen 0-1). Assists: U-Conn. 16 (Williams
8), UCF 10 (Saunders 5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds:
U-Conn. 38 (Collier 12), UCF 29 (Shuler 7). Total fouls:
U-Conn. 9, UCF 16. Technical Fouls_U-Conn. Williams
1,UCF TEAM 1.A: 6,155.
No. 4 Louisville 65, Clemson 46
Clemson (11-14)
Atkism 0-2 0-0 0, Thornton 6-13 1-2 13, Carter 0-3 5-8 5,
Edwards 2-6 3-4 8, Tagliapietra 2-5 0-0 5, Bennett 0-1
1-4 1, Diarra 0-0 0-0 0, Strover 1-2 0-0 2, Collier 4-10 1-2
9, Cotton 0-0 0-0 0, Fields 0-0 0-0 0, Purvis 0-1 0-0 0,
Thomas 1-2 0-0 3, 16-45 Totals 11-20 46.
Louisville (25-1)
Fuehring 5-8 4-7 14, Hines-Allen 3-7 0-0 6, Carter 3-6 2-2
8, Durr 3-9 6-6 15, Jones 3-4 4-5 10, Dunham 1-3 0-2 2,
Shook 4-8 0-0 10, Evans 0-2 0-0 0, Laemmle 0-0 0-0 0,
Zambrotta 0-3 0-0 0, 22-50 Totals 16-22 65.
CLEMSON ........................... 13
8 13 12
—46
LOUISVILLE ........................ 15 17 15 18
—65
Three-point goals: Clemson 3-9 (Carter 0-1, Edwards
1-2, Tagliapietra 1-3, Collier 0-1, Thomas 1-2), Louisville
5-17 (Fuehring 0-2, Carter 0-2, Durr 3-7, Shook 2-3,
Zambrotta 0-3). Assists: Clemson 6 (Edwards 3),
Louisville 14 (Durr 3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds:
Clemson 30 (Collier 10), Louisville 36 (Shook 10). Total
fouls: Clemson 22, Louisville 16. Technical Fouls_Louisville Fuehring 1, TEAM 1.A: 7,014.
OLYMPICS
Mixed doubles curling
Country .............................................. W
Norway ................................................ 1
South Korea......................................... 1
Switzerland ......................................... 1
United States ...................................... 1
Canada ................................................. 0
China.................................................... 0
Finland ................................................. 0
OA Russia ............................................ 0
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
United States 9, OA Russia 3
Norway 9, Norway 6
South Korea 9, Finland 4
Switzerland 7, China 5
THURSDAY’S MATCHES
United States vs. South Korea, 11:30
Finland vs. Switzerland, 6 a.m.
South Korea vs. China, 6 a.m.
OA Russia vs. Norway, 6 a.m.
United States vs. Canada, 6 a.m.
South Korea vs. Norway, 6:30
United States vs. Switzerland, 6:30
China vs. Canada, 6:30
OA Russia vs. Finland, 6:30
Canada vs. Finland, 11:30
China vs. OA Russia, 11:30
Switzerland vs. Norway, 11:30
FRIDAY’S MATCHES
China vs. United States, 7
Norway vs. Finland, 7
Canada vs. Switzerland, 7
South Korea vs. OA Russia, 7
L
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
Maple Leafs 3, Predators 2 (OT)
ATP
SMAC - CHESAPEAKE DIVISION
NASHVILLE ........................ 0
TORONTO .......................... 1
OPEN SUD DE FRANCE
LEONARDTOWN 66, NORTHERN 47
At Sud de France Arena-Montpellier
In Montpellier, France
Purse: $624,335 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
L (15-2)Totals 0 0-0 66.
N (5-13) Pruitt 13, DeToto 8, Stanbery 7, Culbert 7, Jones
6, O'Brien 5, Litton 1 Totals 13 6-9 47.
Halftime: Leonardtown, (34-23).
Three-point goals: N 5 (DeToto 1, Stanbery 1, Pruitt 3).
1
1
1
0
0 — 2
0 — 3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Toronto, van Riemsdyk 21 (Brown, Dermott),
16:06.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Toronto, Kapanen 4 (Hainsey, Moore), 9:38
(sh). 3, Nashville, Sissons 6 (Aberg, Ellis), 18:10.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Nashville, Arvidsson 18, 0:25.
SHOOTOUT
Nashville 1 (Turris NG, Fiala NG, Ellis G, Smith NG, Josi
NG, Johansen NG, Arvidsson NG), Toronto 2 (Matthews
NG, Nylander NG, Bozak G, Marner NG, Marleau NG,
Brown NG, van Riemsdyk G).
SHOTS ON GOAL
NASHVILLE ........................ 8
19
16
3 — 46
TORONTO ........................ 11
11
6
4 — 32
Power-play opportunities: Nashville 0 of 2; Toronto 0 of
2. Goalies: Nashville, Rinne 27-8-3 (32 shots-30 saves).
Toronto, Andersen 25-15-4 (46-44). T: 2:48.
TRANSACTIONS
SINGLES
FIRST ROUND
Ruben Bemelmans, Belgium, def. Calvin Hemery, France,
6-1, 6-2; Pierre-Hugues Herbert, France, def. Kenny de
Schepper, France, 7-6 (7-4), 6-7 (7-5), 6-4; Richard
Gasquet (5), France, def. Daniil Medvedev, Russia, 6-0,
6-3; Nicolas Mahut, France, def. Dustin Brown, Germany,
6-7 (7-2), 2-5, retired; John Millman, Australia, def.
Yuichi Sugita (8), Japan, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4.
SECOND ROUND
David Goffin (1), Belgium, def. Gilles Simon, France, 6-4,
6-2; Andrey Rublev (6), Russia, def. Jeremy Chardy,
France, 6-2, 6-1.
Ben Mclachlan, Japan, and Hugo Nys (4), France, def.
Karen Khachanov, Russia, and Mischa Zverev, Germany,
6-4, 6-4; Ken and Neal Skupski, Britain, def. Marcus
Daniel, New Zealand, and Dominic Inglot (2), Britain, 7-6
(7-1), 7-6 (9-7); Wesley Koolhof, Netherlands, and
Artem Sitak, New Zealand, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, and
Rajeev Ram (1), United States, 2-6, 7-5, 10-0.
N (2-4)Totals 0 0-0 24.
SP (8-6)Totals 0 0-0 51.
Halftime: Severna Park, (22-18).
Three-point goals:
Mlb: Suspended Washington C Raudy Read 80 games
without pay after testing positive for Boldenone, a
performance-enhancing substance, in violation of Major
League Baseball’s Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment
Program.
Minnesota Twins: Agreed to terms with RHPs Myles
Jaye, Michael Kohn and Jake Reed; Cs Willians Astudillo,
Brian Navarreto and Bobby Wilson; INFs Taylor Featherston, Nick Gordon, Gregorio Petit and Brock Stassi; and
OFs Nick Buss, Ryan LaMarre and LaMonte Wade on
minor league contracts.
Texas Rangers: Traded INF Russell Wilson to the New
York Yankees for future considerations. Named Josiah
Igono major league director of peak performance; Brett
Hayes major league advance scout; Randy Smith and Al
Hargesheimer pro scouts; Casey Fox assistant, player
development; Eric Gagne pitching coach for Arizona
League Rangers, Don Kalkstein senior advisor and
Andrew Koo analyst, baseball operations.
New York Mets: Agreed to terms with 3B Todd Frazier on
a two-year contract. Designated INF Matt Reynolds for
assignment.
Tristan Lamasine and Lucas Pouille, France, def. Andre
Begemann, Germany, and Jonathan Eysseric, France,
3-6, 6-3, 10-4.
NBA
SECOND ROUND
Los Angeles Clippers: Agreed in terms with G Lou
Williams on a contract extension.
New York Knicks: Traded C Willy Hernangomez to
Charlotte for 2020 and 2021 second-round draft picks
and F Johnny O’Bryant.
Jozef Kovalik, Slovakia, def. Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, 4-6,
6-2, 7-5; Mirza Basic, Bosnia-Herzegovina, def. Philipp
Kohlschreiber (4), Germany, 7-5, 7-6 (7-5).
SOFIA OPEN
SEVERNA PARK 51, NORTHEAST 24
I C E H OC K E Y
NONLEAGUE
STONE RIDGE 5, GEORGETOWN VISITATION 1
SR (7-1)Totals - 5.
GV (0-2)Totals - 1.
Halftime: , .
Three-point goals: GV (); SR ()
At Arena Armeec Sofia (Bulgaria)
Purse: $624,335 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SINGLES
FIRST ROUND
Maximilian Marterer, Germany, def. Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, 7-6 (7-3), 6-4; Marius Copil, Romania, def. Robin
Haase (5), Netherlands, 7-6 (7-5), 6-4; Blaz Kavcic,
Slovenia, def. Laslo Djere, Serbia, 6-4, 6-4; Andreas
Seppi, Italy, def. Mikhail Youzhny, Russia, 6-3, 6-4;
Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, def. Salvatore Caruso, Italy,
7-6 (7-4), 6-3.
DOUBLES
FIRST ROUND
Romain Arneodo, Monaco, and Tristan-Samuel Weissborn, Austria, def. Marcin Matkowski, Poland, and
Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi (1), Pakistan, 7-6 (7-4), 1-6, 10-8;
Robin Haase and Matwe Middelkoop (4), Netherlands,
def. Viktor Troicki and Nenad Zimonjic, Serbia, 6-4, 6-4;
Jamie Cerretani, United States, and Sander Gille, Belgium, def. Alexander Donski and Alexandar Lazov,
Bulgaria, 6-3, 6-4; Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Daniel
Nestor, Canada, def. Jonathan Erlich, Israel, and Philipp
Petzschner, Germany, 3-6, 7-6 (7-5), 10-5.
COLLEGES
Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference: Named Phil Paquette director of new media/communications.
Mountain West: Suspended New Mexico senior F Joe
Furstinger one game and issued a public reprimand to
Boise State sophomore G Justinian Jessup for their
actions in a men’s basketball game Tuesday.
Clemson: Announced RB C.J. Fuller is transferring.
Fordham: Named Paul Rice defensive coordinator, Vincent Natali offensive line coach/recruiting coordinator,
and Scott Vallone defensive line coach.
Georgia: Rehired assistant football coach Scott Fountain. Named Cortez Hankton assistant football coach
Georgia Tech: Announced the resignation of men’s
assistant basketball coach Darryl LaBarrie.
Rutgers: Named Nunzio Campanile running backs coach.
Wisconsin: Named Bobby April III outside linebacker
coach.
G (0-3)Totals 0 0-0 28.
OM (13-7) Grenway 18, Riggs 15, Washington 14,
McDuffie 5, Eldridge 3 Totals 15 7-9 55.
Halftime: Oakland Mills, (21-12).
Three-point goals: OM 6 (Eldridge 1, Grenway 4,
McDuffie 1).
NONLEAGUE
QUARTERFINALS
Cleveland Browns: Named Sam Shade assistant special
teams coach.
Detroit Lions: Named David Corrao director of football
research, Paul Pasqualoni defensive coordinator, Jeff
Davidson offensive line coach, George Godsey quarterbacks coach, Al Golden linebackers coach, Brian Stewart
defensive backs coach and Chris White tight ends coach.
San Francisco 49Ers: Re-signed DL Cassius Marsh to a
two-year contract.
OAKLAND MILLS 55, GLENELG 28
DOUBLES
FIRST ROUND
MLB
NFL
HOWARD
ATP World Tour ranking
Through Sunday
SINGLES
1. Rafael Nadal, Spain, 9760
2. Roger Federer, Switzerland, 9605
3. Marin Cilic, Croatia, 4960
4. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, 4630
5. Alexander Zverev, Germany, 4610
6. Dominic Thiem, Austria, 4060
7. David Goffin, Belgium, 3460
8. Jack Sock, United States, 2880
9. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, 2815
10. Pablo Carreno Busta, Spain, 2705
BOXI NG
Fight schedule
SATURDAY
At Copper Box Arena, London, Zolani Tete vs. Omar
Narvaez, 12, for Tete’s WBO bantamweight title.
At Hartman Arena, Park City, Kansas (CBSSN), Tramaine Williams vs. Alexei Collado, 12, for the vacant
WBO International super bantamweight title.
At Cancun, Mexico, Miguel Berchelt vs. Cristian Mijares,
12, for Berchelt’s WBC junior lightweight title.
FEB. 16
At Reno-Sparks Convention Center, Reno, Nev., Raymundo Beltran vs. Paulus Moses, 12, for the vacant WBO
World lightweight title; Egidijus Kavaliauskas vs. David
Avanesyan, 10, welterweights.
FEB. 17
At Manchester, England, George Groves vs. Chris Eubank Jr., 12, for Groves’ WBA Super World and Eubanks’
IBO super middleweight titles (World Boxing Super
Series semifinals); Ryan Walsh vs. Isaac Lowe, 12, for
Walsh’s British featherweight title; Arfan Iqbal vs.
Simon Vallily, 10, for Iqbal’s English cruiserweight title.
At El Paso, Texas (FOX), Devon Alexander vs. Victor
Ortiz, 12, welterweights; Caleb Plant vs. Rogelio Medina, 12, IBF super middleweight eliminator.
At Mandalay Bay Events Center, Las Vegas (SHO),
Danny Garcia vs. Brandon Rios, 12, welterweights; David
Benavidez vs. Ronald Gavril, 12, for Benavidez’s WBC
World super middleweight title.
FEB. 22
At Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, Indio, Calif. (ESPN),
Joseph Diaz, Jr. vs. Victor Terrazas, 12, for Diaz’s NABO
featherweight title.
FEB. 24
At the Forum, Inglewood, Calif. (HBO), Wisaksil Wangek
vs. Juan Francisco Estrada, 12, for Wangek’s WBC World
super flyweight title; Carlos Cuadras vs. McWilliams
Arroyo, 10, junior bantamweights; Brian Viloria vs.
Artem Dalakian, 12, for the vacant WBA World flyweight title.
D10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8 , 2018
United’s Moreno is among Venezuelans who left instability at home for MLS
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
clearwater beach, fla. —
Each day, as he chased his soccer
dreams, playing a sport that also
blessed his father and two brothers, Junior Moreno struggled to
detach himself from the terrible
reality infecting his homeland.
Moreno is Venezuelan, and
like almost everyone in the South
American country of some
31 million, he has felt and seen
the effects of a historic economic
crisis.
Endless lines at gas stations.
Empty grocery stores. A rise in
violent crime. Families begging
on the streets. Malnourished
children. Hospitals in need of
medicine. Young girls selling
their bodies.
“It’s very difficult being a professional athlete and have to be
at training every day and being
very focused on that aspect of
your life but also have to worry
about where you’re going to get
your food and your basic needs,”
Moreno said through an interpreter this week. “To have that
stress on top of everything is
challenging to keep yourself disciplined on your job.”
As a new member of D.C.
United, Moreno has physically
left behind Venezuela’s ills, exchanging the anxiety of everyday
life for the white-sand beaches
here outside the MLS team’s
hotel at training camp. But as a
proud Venezuelan, one who debuted for the national team last
summer and scored days later,
the 24-year-old midfielder cannot completely separate his professional joy and personal anguish.
His family was better off than
many, he said, but the suffering
was all around him. He said he
would wait in long lines for
chicken or beef and often go
weeks without it.
“It’s a situation where we are
FEDERICO PARRA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Midfielder Junior Moreno, left, said at home “we are all just trying to make it to the next month.”
all just trying to make it to the
next month,” he said. “We are all
surviving.”
Many Venezuelans have fled,
seeking stability elsewhere in the
region and in the United States.
It would be incomplete to say
Venezuela’s hardship was the
sole reason Moreno and six other
compatriots moved to MLS
teams this winter — an unusually
high influx from a nontraditional
soccer country.
It’s a confluence of circumstances:
Rising wages have made MLS
more competitive in attracting
players from abroad.
Even before the crisis, Venezuelan players were more affordable than, say, those from
Colombia or Argentina.
Venezuelans are making
their mark in MLS, with Atlanta’s
Josef Martinez scoring 19 goals in
20 matches last year, Real Salt
Lake’s Jefferson Savarino posting
six goals and five assists and the
Portland Timbers hiring Giovanni Savarese as head coach this
winter.
And despite being the only
country from the South American confederation known as
CONMEBOL never to play in the
World Cup, Venezuela has made
strides. Last year, a nation known
more for nurturing baseball players than soccer talent advanced
to the Under-20 World Cup final
in South Korea before losing to
England, 1-0.
The national crisis, though, is
also nudging players to leagues
such as MLS.
“There is no escaping the fact
that the realities of the situation
currently in Venezuela — socially,
politically, economically — affects every aspect of life, including professional sports,” ESPN
analyst Alejandro Moreno, a former MLS and Venezuelan national
team
forward,
told
MLSsoccer.com. (He and Junior
Moreno are not related.)
Junior Moreno said his move
was made for multiple reasons.
“It’s a great opportunity on the
football side, and I’m grateful for
it. Coming to the United States,
I’ve visited many times and am
comfortable with how things
work here. It was a big attraction
to come here, to have a more
stable life, more stable salary.”
Moreno’s sisters live in Tampa
and Miami, respectively, and his
father-in-law is in Orlando.
Junior was in Utah in June for
his national team debut in a
friendly against the United
States, and early in the 1-1 draw,
his header set up Jose Manuel
Velazquez’s goal. Four days later,
he scored against Ecuador in
Boca Raton, Fla. In the fall, he
started in World Cup qualifiers
against Argentina and Uruguay
and entered as a sub against
Paraguay.
MLS teams took notice. And
last month, United purchased
him from Zulia, a club based in
Maracaibo, for an undisclosed
transfer fee.
Moreno is a central midfielder
vying for a starting job in a
deep-lying position or a more
advanced role. United’s preseason opener is Thursday
against Swedish champion Malmo in Bradenton, Fla.
Moreno is among three Latin
American midfielders to sign
with United this winter, joining
Ulises Segura (Costa Rica) and
Yamil Asad (Argentina). The club
also added, via trades, forward
Darren Mattocks (Jamaica), defenders
Frederic
Brillant
(France) and Oniel Fisher (Jamaica), and goalkeeper David
Ousted (Denmark).
Moreno’s family ties to the
sport run deep. His Argentineborn father, Carlos Horacio
Moreno, parlayed a modest playing career into a long coaching
career in Venezuela. He guided
the national team at the 1989
Copa America in Brazil and has
enjoyed stints with domestic
clubs Tachira and Zulia and is
currently guiding Portuguesa.
While at Zulia, the elder Moreno coached Junior and another
son Carlos, now 27. The youngest
son, Marcelo, 23, plays for Portuguesa. All are midfielders.
“From a very young age, I
always had a ball at my feet,”
Junior said. “We always watched.
We lived football. We lived that
lifestyle.”
The family lived in San Cristobal, a city of almost 300,000 in
the mountainous western region
near the border with Colombia.
The sons were regular visitors to
the training grounds and stadiums, particularly during school
vacations.
“I always wanted to be a
professional because I was
around it so much,” Junior said.
“I’ve been very lucky to have a
father in that position at every
stage of my career, giving me
advice and encouragement to
keep going and follow the right
path. He is a great example for
me.”
The father is proud of his
middle son.
“Junior is a boy who prepared
for this, who lives for this,” Carlos
Horacio Moreno told Venezuelan
website Panorama. “I have met
many professionals who have put
absolutely everything into it, and
I have to put Junior on this list.”
United Coach Ben Olsen has
noticed a coach’s influence on his
Venezuelan import.
“I can see he has been around
the game for a long time. He’s
watched the game. He understands the game. He has a spatial
awareness and a composure, his
positioning and ability to adapt
and read off others. He just does
the little things right.”
And as he integrates himself
into a new team and new league
in a new country, Moreno has
kept Venezuela in his heart and
mind.
“It’s my home, my country,” he
said. “The situation is very difficult, and everyone hopes it ends
very soon.”
steven.goff@washpost.com
H.D. Woodson’s Salahuddin signs with Pittsburgh, Boykin with Notre Dame
BY SAMANTHA PELL
AND CALLIE CAPLAN
Mychale Salahuddin wore a
boyish grin as he sat on stage at
H.D. Woodson’s auditorium,
donning a University of Southern California sweatshirt with
hats for both Pittsburgh and
Syracuse laid out in front of him.
It was finally the moment he
would make his college decision
public — a choice he didn’t make
until Wednesday morning, when
he sent in his national letter-ofintent.
Salahuddin, the No. 5 all-purpose back in the nation and No. 1
prospect from the District, according to the recruiting website
247Sports’ composite rankings,
first reached for the orange Syracuse hat, examining it before
putting it back down. Then he
took off the USC sweatshirt,
unveiling a bright blue Pittsburgh shirt.
With that, the four-star running back finally had announced
his decision: He would be heading to Pittsburgh in the fall.
“Pitt is definitely a powerhouse down there,” Salahuddin
said after the ceremony. “It is a
school that has a lot of great
running backs from there and a
running backs tradition.”
While the majority of college
football prospects across the
country submitted national letters-of-intent during the new
early signing period in December, Salahuddin waited until
Wednesday’s signing day to
make his school choice.
With Salahuddin’s iPhone
propped up on stage, Pittsburgh
Coach Pat Narduzzi’s face stared
back at him on FaceTime during
the entire ceremony. Narduzzi
wasn’t about to miss this moment, and neither were the
Woodson students who packed
the auditorium to watch the
signing ceremony.
Salahuddin — or “Houdini” as
college recruiters have come to
know him — averaged more than
10 yards per carry his senior
National Signing Day
Hokies in June.
The following local football players
from the Class of 2018 signed with
an FBS program:
Walker picks Penn State
Rasheed Walker waited to finish his official college recruiting
visits until his senior season as
the anchor of North Point’s offensive line ended. Then he waited
until Monday to inform Penn
State Coach James Franklin that
he wanted to be a Nittany Lion.
So it wasn’t much of a surprise
that after the drawn-out process
and the attention surrounding
one of Maryland’s best prospects
in the 2018 class seemed ready to
end — Walker had to wait longer.
A two-hour delay for icy
weather forced North Point’s National Signing Day ceremony to
be pushed back an hour, and the
four-star prospect’s announcement came last among the Eagles’ 10 football signees.
But as Walker finally picked
up his white Penn State hat,
which had been positioned next
to ones for Ohio State and Virginia Tech, and the bleachers full
of family and students hollered,
he smiled, positioned it on his
head and took a breath.
“I was ignoring everyone calling me, texts, Twitter, everything.
I wasn’t responding,” Walker
said. “I was just like, ‘Man, I’m
just ready for it to be over.’ ”
Walker said that on each of his
eight or nine visits with the
Nittany Lions, including an official one in early December, Walker had “a gut feeling that Penn
State was home.” It also helped,
he said, that Franklin, a former
Maryland assistant, has had recruiting success in the D.C.,
Maryland and Virginia area.
Walker already knows most of
his recruiting class, including
early signees Ricky Slade, a running back from Hylton, and Oxon
Hill wide receiver Daniel George.
“When you’re in a process of
elimination decision like that,”
Walker said, “you have to dissect
everything and just take your
time.”
OL Spencer Anderson, McNamara — Maryland
TE Donta Anthony Jr., Potomac (Md.) — Old Dominion
LB Tyler Baylor, Good Counsel — Maryland
QB Doc Bonner, Quince Orchard — Air Force
DB Raymond Boone, Eleanor Roosevelt — Maryland
DB Noah Boykin, H.D. Woodson — Notre Dame
CB D.J. Brown, St. John’s — Notre Dame
DB Ryan Carroll, Potomac (Md.) — Connecticut
WR Brian Cobbs, Hayfield — Maryland
RB Elijah Davis, Heritage — Old Dominion
WR Dontay Demus, Friendship Collegiate — Maryland
QB Kevin Doyle, St. Johns — Arizona
CB Vincent Flythe III, H.D. Woodson — Maryland
DL Austin Fontaine, DeMatha — Maryland
CB Kenny Gardner, Blake — Old Dominion
WR Daniel George, Oxon Hill — Penn State
OL Jesus Gibbs, Potomac (Va.) — South Carolina
DL Cam Goode, St. John’s — Virginia Tech
OL Devonte Gordon, Maret — Wake Forest
OL Evan Gregory, DeMatha — Maryland
OL Christian Haynes, Bowie — Connecticut
WR Edward Hendrix, H.D. Woodson — Syracuse
RB Rashard Jackson, Riverdale Baptist — Massachusetts
OL Josh Jefferson, St. John’s — Massachusetts
LB Dashaun Jerkins, Woodbridge — Vanderbilt
OL Michael Jurgens, Damascus — Wake Forest
DL Jeffrey Keene, Potomac (Md.) — Hawaii
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Noah Boykin, left, and H.D. Woodson teammate Mychale Salahuddin announced their college choices.
season while scoring 12 rushing
touchdowns and returning one
kickoff for another.
“That’s once in a lifetime,”
longtime assistant coach Wayne
Johnson said of coaching Salahuddin. “I would say every 10
years you get a kid like that.”
Also participating in the signing ceremony was defensive back
Noah Boykin, who announced he
will attend Notre Dame in the
fall, picking the Irish over Florida and Virginia. Boykin, a fourstar defensive back, is the No. 2
player in D.C., according to
247Sports. He chose Notre Dame
after decommitting from Maryland at the end of January.
“I had to restart the process all
the way over with my decommitment from Maryland, so that
pretty much was how I started,”
Boykin said. “All the Notre Dame
coaches worked hard in recruiting me, and they haven’t been
there since Day One, so they had
a lot of catching up to do. . . .
They showed they loved and
wanted me.”
St. John’s stars commit
With inclement weather in the
D.C. area canceling school for
St. John’s, some of the region’s
top recruits had to roll out their
announcements on Twitter rather than attend an official signing
ceremony. This included quarterback Kevin Doyle, who announced he was signing with
Arizona late Wednesday afternoon.
The All-Met Offensive Player
of the Year, Doyle had decommitted from Michigan on Sunday
but was then offered by Arizona,
as well as Colorado State, on
Monday. He is the No. 23 prostyle quarterback in the country,
according to 247Sports, and the
No. 6 player in the Distict.
Doyle spearheaded a group
that led St. John’s to a Washington Catholic Athletic Conference
championship last season, beating Gonzaga, 30-7, in the WCAC
title game in November. It was
the school’s first WCAC title in
football since 1989. Wednesday
was the cap to the Cadets’ historic run.
“The senior class is the senior
class,” St. John’s Coach Joe Casamento said. “I will say the leadership from those kids are great,
but I think one of the keys is all of
our kids understand their role.”
While Doyle’s announcement
came in the afternoon, the first of
the large senior group to announce his college choice
Wednesday was three-star cornerback D.J. Brown, who signed
with Notre Dame. Shortly after
Brown’s announcement, threestar offensive lineman Josh Jefferson announced he was signing
DL Jamree Kromah, C.H. Flowers — Rutgers
DB A.J. Lytton, Wise — Florida State
LB Grant Misch, Potomac Falls — Virginia
WR Aaron Moore, Potomac (Va.) — Old Dominion
DB Chauncey Moore, Friendship Collegiate — Temple
DL John Morgan, DeMatha — Pittsburgh
LB Durell Nchami, Paint Branch — Maryland
DL Caleb Okechukwu, St. John’s — Syracuse
CB Johnnie Pitman, Potomac (Md.) — Charlotte
OL Aidan Rafferty, Gonzaga — Indiana
LB Ish Robinson, H.D. Woodson — Kent State
RB, Mychale Salahuddin, H.D. Woodson — Pittsburgh
RB Ricky Slade, Hylton — Penn State
WR Dillon Spalding, South County — West Virginia
CB Judson Tallendier, DeMatha — Pittsburgh
LB Noah Taylor, Avalon — Virginia
OT Rasheed Walker, North Point — Penn State
DB Jermaine Waller, Avalon — Virginia Tech
LB Daesean Winston, Spalding — Temple
with Massachusetts, and Caleb
Okechukwu, a three-star defensive end, signed with Syracuse.
Cam Goode, a defensive tackle
included in ESPN’s Top 300
prospect rankings, announced
he had signed with Virginia
Tech. A first-team All-Met selection, the 6-foot, 315-pound nose
tackle orally committed to the
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Mercedes Benz 2009 CLK550
Convertible - white ext/int, black
top, performance group 2, all
options, showroom cond, 20,500 mi,
$22,000 OBO 703-447-0965
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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2018
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sales, auctions, tickets
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Happy Days
SEEKING FOREVER ROOMMATE.
Must be willing to attend occasional protests, fluent in VietThai
and *cook* avocado black bean
salsa dip. Qualified candidates
please apply in person.
205
Antiques
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—100 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
208
Appliances
EdenPure Space Heater with Remote
Control—$80.00 Bethesda, MD,
301-943-3419
Kirby Sentria Vacuum Cleaner—$249
Like New-Extra Bags & Belts-Cost
$1800 New. 571-606-0319
Portable Space Heater 40 1/2" x 5"
x 9"—$35.00 Bethesda, MD, 301943-3419
225
Collectibles
610
Dogs for Sale
MINI AUSSIE/BLUE HEELER PUPSBeautiful, bouncy, personable puppies, handled w/care, vt checkd, tails
docked, 1st shots & worming, $495
8 weeks old. 540-422-1625
Mini pinscher—$800, M/F, 8 weeks,
very small, purebred pet only homes.
Parents on site 10-15lbs full grown
text for best response 240-626-9749
SHELTIE PUPPIES - AKC, tri and
sable females. Ready to go now.
Raised in home. Chambersburg, PA.
Call 717-816-5161
SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPPIESBlack&white, red&white, males &
females, AKC reg. 9 weeks old.
540-877-1567 timreissig@yahoo.com
Standard Poodle—AKC Purebred
Cream Puppies, M&F Avail Feb 7.
$950. Visit www.sugarspups.com or
text 202-427-2490 for more info.
815
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—100 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
IN THE MATTER OF
JASON REED HICKEY
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
JASON REED
FAMILY LAW: 150750FL
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
Firewood
NEW YEAR SPECIAL! 1 cord $175.
2 cords $325. 3 cords $475.
4 cords $600. Call 703-357-2180
245
Electronics
Therapy Lamp—32.00 NatureBright
Light and Ion Therapy Lamp $32,
Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
255
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
Tires (set of 4)—$200.00 LIKE NEW.
Hankook Optimo H426 (195/50R16)
- Vienna, VA, 571-723-2253
260
Furniture
Toddler Bed Handcrafted by Little
Colorado 54" x 2—$125.00 Bethesda, MD, 301-943-3419
265
Home & Garden
Car Seats—33 Generic infant or
Graco child car seat $44 (70 both)
Alexandria, VA 571431-1501
Ladder
1
3/4"
Wide
When
Closed—$55.00 Bethesda, MD 301943-3419
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
Sterling Silver Flatware—249.00
"Prelude" 4 place settings, 17
pieces, Oak Hill, VA, 571-446-7190
275
Merchandise Wanted
Buy Chinese furniture,Jewelry, painting,porcelain,—249 c:7039669935,
sharonantique@gmail.com
Freon R12 WANTED—Certified buyer
will pick up, pay CASH for cylinders
and cases of cans. 312-291-9169
RefrigerantFinders.com
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—100 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
Old Bottles Of Bourbon And Rye—50
Seeking full bottles of vintage
bourbon/rye. Alex 443-223-7669
Radio tubes—249 WANTED ham
radios huge speakers tube hif amps
202 527 9501, vcvdc@msn.com
VINTAGE HI-FI TUBE AMPS—1 TUBES
BIG SPKRS MCINTOSH AMPS MOST
CASH 410-740-5222 50's 60's 70's
280
Musical Instruments
Piano—249.00
Winter NY Co.
Musette Upright @249.00 Alexandria, Va 7039417130
291
Sporting Goods
& Services
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Jason Reed Hickey to Jason Reed. The petitioner is
seeking a name change because:
Hickey is my father's last name. He
was abusive growing up and I want
to distance myself from him.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 23rd
day of February, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 8th day of
February, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
TERESA LYNNE CYGNAROWIXC
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
TERESA LYNNE CYGNAROWICZ
FAMILY LAW: 150588FL
Barbara Beth Cynarowicz
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Teresa
Lynne Cygnarowixc to Teresa Lynne
Cygnarowicz. The petitioner is
seeking a name change because: It
was misspelled on birth certificate
11 years ago.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 23rd
day of February, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 8th day of
February, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
Nordic Track Exercise Skier—$195
Exc.Cond-Folds up easy to fit in
car. Cost $800 new. 571-606-0319
IN THE MATTER OF
I-CHUN LIN
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
JENNY LIN NAYLOR
FAMILY LAW: 150719FL
Weight Set—$35.00 Bethesda, MD,
301-943-3419
PUBLICATION NOTICE
Woman's
Downhill
Skis
and
Poles—$145 Bethesda, MD, 301943-3419
295
Toys
Sno sled "SnoSprint" Emsco Product—$12.00 Bethesda, MD, 301943-3419
358
Moving Sale
Alexandria—409 Rucker Pl.,
EVERYTHING for your home.
02/10-2/11, 9-3, 703-548-0187
610
Dogs for Sale
APBT—$300, Female/Male,
8 weeks old, 240-412-1772
BERNEDOODLES - Males, females, tricolored, black & white, 1 brindle.
Shots, wormed, crate trained, family
raised. $500-$2000. 301-639-8636
Bernese Mountain Dogs—$1600,
2 males & 5 females,
7 weeks old, 330-852-4807
COTON DE TULEAR Puppies
2 Males 2wks old www.amourdecotons.comgrandmamadg@aol.com. 540-347-5318
DOBERMAN PUPPIES - AKC, big
boned, family raised, great temperament, parents on premises. 8 weeks
old. some have Ears done. All colors
available. $500/$900. 240-674-2844
or 240-674-3994
ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES
AKC, ready for Valentine's Day.
Vet checked, first shots.
Call 814-793-2008
ENGLISH SHEPHERDS Naturally
reared, Rare heritage collie breed,
versatile, farm, service, therapy,
SAR, intelligent, sweet, love ppl,
7mos/in training, 814-444-1631
Englishshepherdspa.com
German Shepherd—AKC Reg.
Czech/West German working lline.
$1,200, 6 males, 7 wks,
Kingkennels.net 540-850-1269
Goldendoodle—$1400,
Males and Females,
717-271-3086
Goldendoodle—f1b m's & f's ready
now! Hypoallerg & nonshed vet
chkd, health guar $1200 540-7296365 www.doodledogpups.com
Golden Retriever & more—Cute Puppies. 304-904-6289, Cash, CC, Easy
Finance, www.wvpuppy.com, 59
East Rd, Martinsburg WV, exit 16E
GOLDEN
RETRIEVER
PUPPESAKC, vet checked, dewormed,
first
shots. Ready
2/8/18.
540-908-7767 twinoaksgoldens.
wixsite.com/goldens
LAB/GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIESAdorable, good blood lines,
ready 2/17. $600. No Sunday calls.
540-879-2603
Labrador yellow—AKC Champ Lines
8 wks 301-730-5450 Health Guar.
www.SouthMountainLabs.com
LAB SHEPHERD MIX PUPPIES
for sale to good home, call for pricing, first shots, dewormed, 8 weeks
old, call 540-820-0652.
LABS - AKC reg, 3 black puppies,
1 F 2 M $600 each. 7.5 weeks old.
Call 540-908-6937,
no Sunday calls please.
To place an ad, go to washingtonpostads.com
Labrador Retriever—$700,
Pups, Yellow/Black,
434-607-1761.
AURORA SLOT CARS Wanted—$100
& up, cars/sets. +Atlas, AFX, Tyco,
Cox, Monogram. 703-960-3594
237
EZ
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For Jobs advertisements, go to
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(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
102
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2018
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from I-Chun Lin to
Jenny Lin Naylor. The petitioner is
seeking a name change because: I
am recently married and would like
to adopt my husband's last name
and my nickname "Jenny" as my
first name.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 23rd
day of February, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 8th day of
February, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
KATLIN DAVITT
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
KATLIN MCCLENAGHAN DAVITT
FAMILY LAW: 150671FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Katlin Davitt to
Katlin McClenaghan Davitt. The
petitioner is seeking a name change
because: recently married.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 23rd
day of February, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 8th day of
February, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
SEKOY MUHAMMAD
ABDUSSHAHID AHMAD
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
MUHAMMAD
ABDUSSHAHID AHMAD
FAMILY LAW: 150740FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Sekoy Muhammad Abdusshahid Ahmad to
Muhammad Abdusshahid Ahmad.
The petitioner is seeking a name
change because: Birth certificate is
spelled wrong. In addition, to avoid
confusion with siblings with similar
first names.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 23rd
day of February, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
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815
Legal Notices
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 8th day of
February, 2018.
815
ANTONIA MELTON DAVIDSON
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
CHENG FEI AUSTIN HSU
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
AUSTIN CHENG FEI HSU
FAMILY LAW: 150922FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Cheng Fei Austin
Hsu to Austin Cheng Fei Hsu. The
petitioner is seeking a name change
because: easier to use.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 23rd
day of February, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 8th day of
February, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE UNITED STATES
DISTRICT COURT FOR THE
DISTRICT OF MARYLAND
Case No. 8:18-cv-00059-PX
KCS LENDING LLC
Plaintiff,
v.
WENDELL GARRISON, et al.,
Defendants
NOTICE TO COMMUNITY FIRST BANK
AND ALL PERSONS UNKNOWN
CLAIMING ANY LEGAL OR EQUITABLE
RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR
INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY
KNOWN AS 6413 KILMER STREET,
CHEVERLY, MARYLAND 20785, THAT
IS ADVERSE TO KCS LENDING LLC'S
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY OF
COMPLAINT FILED AND SERVICE BY
PUBLICATION
The above-captioned action is one
to quiet title in connection with
certain residential real property
located at 6413 Kilmer Street, Cheverly, Maryland 20785 (the "Property"). The legal description of the
Property is as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SEVEN (7) IN BLOCK
LETTERED "E" IN A SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "CHEVERLY MANORS"
AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY IN PLAT
BOOK BB9, AT PLAT 75.
The Plaintiff in this action has sued
the Defendants to quiet title, seeking relief that the Property should
be titled in the name of Solar Plus
Energy, Inc., and that any tax or
judgment liens of Wendell Garrison
have not attached to the Property.
The latest date on which the Defendants may file a response to the
Plaintiff's Complaint filed in the
above-captioned action is March
11, 2018.
The failure by the Defendants to
file a response to the Plaintiff's
Complaint filed in the above-captioned action by the aforesaid date
may result in the entry of a judgment by default against the Defendants or the granting of the relief
sought by the Plaintiff in this action.
LEGAL NOTICE
In the Court of Common Pleas, Division of Domestic Relations, Lake
County, Ohio located at 25 North
Park Place, Painesville, Ohio 44077,
and pursuant to Civil Rule 4.4 Legal
Notice is hereby issued in the matter of Cecilia Calderon-Mayen v.
Otto Rene Mayen Cordova upon:
Otto Rene Mayen Cordova, whose
last known address was 11721
Emack Road, Beltsville, Maryland
20705, otherwise whose place of
residence is unknown and cannot
by reasonable diligence be ascertained, will take notice on the 26th
day of December, 2017, the plaintiff, Cecilia Calderon-Mayen filed a
Complaint for Divorce against him
in the Court of Common Pleas of
Lake County, Ohio, the same being
Case No. 17 DR 000742 in said
Court, praying therein for an
Absolute Divorce from the Defendant; orders regarding a division of
property, debts, distributive award
and spousal support consistent
with the evidence; for an order of
fees and costs consistent with the
evidence; and for such other and
further relief as the Court deems
equitable and necessary.
Said party is required to answer
with 28 days after last publication,
which shall be conspicuously published once a week for six (6) successive weeks pursuant to Civil Rule
and Local Rule. Service is complete
on the date of last publication.
NOTICE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS
BY PUBLICATION
STATE OF MARYLAND,
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY
In the Circuit Court for
Montgomery County, Maryland
Live Oak Banking Company .v.
AVRM, LLC, et al, Case No.438936V
To Dr. Tolulope K. Akinyemi:
Please take notice that a Complaint
seeking relief against you has been
filed in the above-entitled action.
The nature of the relief sought is as
follows:
Breach of Contract and seeks Monetary Damages
You are required to make defense
to such pleading no later than
March 26, 2018 and your failure
to do so may result in a judgment by
default or the granting of the relief
sought.
This , the 8th day of February, 2018
Shawn C. Whittaker,
Attorney for Plaintiff
Whittaker & Associates, PC
1010 Rockville Pike, Suite 607
Rockville, MD 20852
NOTICE TO OLIVIER JAVAUDIN
IN THE UNITED STATES
BANKRUPTCY COURT
FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF
VIRGINIA
ALEXANDRIA DIVISION
IN RE:
CASSANDRA L. JOHNSON
Debtor
Case No. 17-11893-BFK
JANET M. MEIBURGER, Trustee,
Plaintiff,
v.
Adv. Pro. No. 17-01117-BFK
OLIVIER JAVAUDIN
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ADVERSARY
PROCEEDING
Please take notice that a lawsuit
has been filed against you in the
bankruptcy case of Cassandra L.
Johnson, Case No. 17-11893. The
Complaint requests approval to sell
3908 Woodley Drive, Alexandria, VA
22309. A copy of the Complaint has
been mailed to you at 3908 Woodley
Drive, Alexandria, VA 22309. You
are required to submit a motion or
answer to the Complaint. If you fail
to respond to the Complaint, your
failure will be deemed to be your
consent to entry of a judgment by
the Bankruptcy Court and judgment
by default may be taken against
you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint. You may obtain a copy
of the Complaint and related documents from the Bankruptcy Court,
200 South Washington Street,
Alexandria, VA 22314 or by contacting the Trustee, Janet M. Meiburger,
The Meiburger Law Firm, P.C. (703)
556-9404, 1493 Chain Bridge Road,
Suite 201, McLean, Virginia 22101.
Legal Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 26
Jeanette Day Loser, whose address
is 61 Sylva Rd., Tappahannock, VA
22560 was appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Antonia
Melton Davidson who died on
November 5, 2017 without a Will
and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed With the
Register of Wills, D.C., Building A,
515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before August 8, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before August 8, 2018, or be forever
barred. Persons believed to be heirs
or legatees of the decedent who do
not receive a copy of this notice
by mail within 25 days of its first
publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Jeanette Day Loser
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000031
DOLORES C. HALL
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Akua Hall, whose address is 14014
Vista Drive #21C, Laurel MD 20707
was appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Dolores C.
Hall who died on December 9, 2017
without a Will and will service without Court supervision. All unknown
heirs and heirs whose whereabouts
are unknown shall enter their
appearance in this proceeding.
Objections to such appointment
shall be filed With the Register of
Wills, D.C., Building A, 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor, Washington,
D.C. 20001, on or before August 8,
2018. Claims against the decedent
shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register
of Wills or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before August 8, 2018,
or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Akua Hall
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
VIRGINIA:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
FAIRFAX COUNTY
In the Matter of the
Change of Name of
FIRST NAME UNKNOWN/NO NAME
GIVEN MEENA (last name)
to
Civil No. 2017 17496
MEENA BISHT
ORDER
This cause came on upon the Petition of FIRST NAME UNKNOWN
MEENA, seeking to change her
name.
UPON CONSIDERATION WHEREOF, it
appearing to the Court that such a
name change is appropriate; that
Petitioner's current address is 4448
Oakdale Crescent Court, #222, Fairfax, VA 22030, in Fairfax County,
that the Petitioner's name previously changed from her birth name
of MEENA BISHT to FIRST NAME
UNKNOWN/NO
NAME
GIVEN
MEENA; and that Petitioner's
present request for a name change
is not for any fraudulent purposes;
it is hereby
ADJUDGED,
ORDERED,
AND
DECREED that the name of Petitioner is hereby changed from FIRST
NAME UNKNOWN/NO NAME GIVEN
MEENA TO MEENA BISHT; and it is
further ADJUDGED, ORDERED, AND
DECREED that the Clerk of this
Court, pursuant to the provisions of
the 1950 Code of Virginia §8.01-217,
as amended, shall spread this Order
upon the current deed book, index
it in both the old and new names,
and transmit a certified copy to both
the State Registrar of Vital Statistics
and the Criminal Records Exchange.
ENTERED this 19th day of December, 2017.
Jan L. Brodie
Judge
820
Official Notices
Donald Wheeler Young II.Pls contact
Charmain Sweat at 3013052089.
MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COUNCIL
PUBLIC HEARINGS
March 20, 2018; 1:30 P.M.
Deadline to sign up to
speak is March 19 at
5pm
(1) The Council will receive
testimony on the Rock
Spring
Sector
Plan
Sectional
Map
Amendment (SMA) H-126,
which
would
rezone
approximately 245 acres in
the SMA. The remaining 290
acres are proposed to be
reconfirmed in the existing
zoning
classifications.
Written comments should
be submitted by March 20,
2018.
(2) The Council will receive
testimony
on
the
Grosvenor-Strathmore
Metro Area Minor Master
Plan SMA H-127, which
would rezone approximately
57 acres in the SMA. The
remaining 60 acres are
proposed to be reconfirmed
in the existing zoning
classifications.
Written
comments
should
be
submitted by March 20,
2018.
(3) The Council will receive
testimony on the White
Flint 2 Sector Plan SMA
H-128, which would rezone
approximately 253 acres in
the SMA. The remaining 207
acres are proposed to be
reconfirmed in the existing
zoning
classifications.
Written comments should
be submitted by March 20,
2018.
7 pt. bf.The hearings will be
held in the Council Office
Building,
100
Maryland
Avenue, Rockville. To testify
sign
up
online
at
http://www.montgomery
countymd.gov/council/ph
signup.html or call 240-7777803. Documents available
at
www.montgomerycounty
md.gov/council. To arrange
for services needed to
participate in this activity,
call the Council Office at
240-777-7900 seven days in
820
820
Official Notices
Notice of Availability: Draft
Gaithersburg Campus Master Plan
820
Official Notices
Environmental
Assessment,
Agency:National Institute of Standards and Technology
Public Comment Period: February 8 – March 31, 2018
Summary: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of
1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 USC 4321 et seq.) and the Council on
Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing the Procedural
Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR parts 1500-1508), the National Institute
of Standards and Technology (NIST) has prepared and issued a Draft
Environmental Assessment (EA) for the implementation of a 20-year
Master Plan (MP) for its headquarters campus in Gaithersburg, MD.
The Master Plan will provide a framework for the future physical
development of the campus that best supports the NIST mission of
advancing measurement science, standards and technology. Under
the Master Plan, NIST would perform various improvements to
facilities, circulation, parking, security, landscaping, stormwater
management, utility infrastructure and sustainability within the
campus in phases over the course of 20 years. Implementation of the
Master Plan would result in temporary construction-related impacts
and continuing impacts due to an increase in campus personnel, new
circulation patterns and operation of the new facilities. The Draft EA
also evaluates a No-Action Alternative, which would not result in
these impacts or improvements but would ultimately render much of
the campus obsolete.
Based on the Draft EA, the Master Plan is not expected to result in
any significant adverse effects or impacts on the natural or human
environment. It is anticipated that this EA will result in a Finding of No
Significant Impact for the Master Plan.
Where Draft EA May Be Reviewed: https://www.nist.gov/ofpm/nistgaithersburg-master-plan.
Send Comments: By email to nistMPcomments@nist.gov or, by mail
to: NIST Master Plan Comments, National Institute of Standards and
Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, MS-1900, Gaithersburg MD 208991900.
For Further Information, Contact: Susan Cantilli, AIA, Master
Plan Project Manager; telephone: (301) 975-8833; email:
susan.cantilli@nist.gov.
Notice of Hearing
Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Council of Rockville,
Maryland, will conduct a public hearing on Monday, February 26,
2018 at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as it may be heard, in the
Council Chamber, Rockville City Hall, 111 Maryland Avenue, Rockville,
Maryland on the Rockville Housing Enterprises’ (RHE) plan to refinance
the Fireside Park Apartments and support the planned modernization
of the property. Fireside Park Apartments are located at 735 Monroe
St. RHE is the City’s public housing agency and purchased the Fireside
Park Apartments under Montgomery County’s First Right of Refusal
law to preserve affordability of the 236 rental units.
Any person or organization interested in speaking at the public
hearing should contact the City Clerk's Office at (240) 314-8280 by
4:00 p.m. on February 26, 2018. For further information, contact the
Department of Community Planning and Development Services at
(240) 314-8203. Additional information will be available in the Mayor
and Council agenda item, which will be online by February 23, 2018
at: www.rockvillemd.gov/AgendaCenter
MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF ROCKVILLE
By: Kathleen Conway, City Clerk/Director of Council Operations
Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Council of Rockville,
Maryland, will conduct a public hearing on Monday, February 26,
at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as it may be heard, in the
Council Chamber, Rockville City Hall, 111 Maryland Avenue, Rockville,
Maryland, in connection with Text Amendment Application TXT201800248, Mayor and Council of Rockville, Applicant.
The purpose and intent of this application is to amend Chapter 25
of the Rockville City Code entitled “Zoning” by amending Section
25.13.05 so as to allow a single retail tenant to occupy up to100,000
square feet of floor area if the tenant is located within a development
project identified by the Mayor and Council as a Champion Project.
More detailed information on the above application can be found
on file in the City Clerk/Director of Council Operations Office at
Rockville City Hall and on the City’s web site at:
http://www.rockvillemd.gov/DocumentCenter/View/20134.
Persons wishing to testify at the hearing are asked to call (240)
314-8280, before 4:00 p.m. on the day of the hearing to place their
names on the speakers' list.
Mayor and Council of Rockville
By: Kathleen Conway, City Clerk/Director of Council Operations
y
advance (MD Relay – dial 711
or 800-201-7165).
Notice is hereby given that the
following named company at the
address listed herewith has made
application to engage in the business of loaning money for the
license year ending December 31,
2018 as provided by the Act of
Congress, approved February 14,
1913. Anyone desiring to protest
against the issuance of this license
should do so in writing to the Commissioner of the Department of
Insurance, Securities and Banking,
810 First Street, NE, Suite 701,
Washington DC 20002, in the manner prescribed by said Act: See DC
Code Title 26, Chapter 9 and 16
DCMR 2.
CarFinance.com LLC
7525 Irvine Center Drive,
Suite 250, Irvine, CA 92618
825
Bids & Proposals
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY
REQUEST
FOR
PROPOSALS
#RFP7012083. BANKING SERVICES
2018. RFP is available at
pwcgov.org/bid
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
DANIEL J. ZEALBERG
ESTATE OF MARIE ANN ZEALBERG
ELIZABETH PAYNE,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-18682
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 1st day
of February 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 1410 Airport
Lane, Accokeek, MD 20607, will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 1st day
of March, 2018, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
1st day of March, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$98,253.55.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Feb 8, 15, 22, 2018
12163765
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
CONSTANCE L TROUTMAN
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-15628
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 1st
day of February, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R.
Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner, Philip
S. Shriver, Trustees, of the Real
Property designated as 15734 Piller
Lane, Bowie, MD 20716, and reported in the above entitled cause, will
be finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 1st
day of March, 2018 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 1st
day of March, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $174,800.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Feb 8, 15, 22, 2018
12163759
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
XAVIER JOHNSON
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF14-15466
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 1st
day of February, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto,
Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 4806 71ST AVENUE,
Hyattsville, MD 20784, and reported in the above entitled cause, will
be finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 1st
day of March, 2018 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 1st
day of March, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $211,982.37.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Feb 8, 15, 22, 2018
12163761
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
MARY M MERTZENICH
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-25298
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 1st
day of February, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R.
Kip Stone, Trustees, of the Real
Property designated as 6408 Solar
Avenue, Bowie, MD 20720, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 1st day of March, 2018
next; provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in THE WASHINGTON
POST, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week for
three successive weeks before the
1st day of March, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $263,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Feb 8, 15, 22, 2018
12163762
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
820
Official Notices
NOTICE OF JOINT PUBLIC HEARING
The Mayor and City Council and Planning Commission of the City of
Gaithersburg, Maryland, will conduct a joint public hearing on Master
Plan Amendment Application MP-1-17 on
TUESDAY
FEBRUARY 20, 2018
AT 7:30 P.M.
or as soon thereafter as this matter can be heard in the Council
Chambers at 31 South Summit Avenue, Gaithersburg, Maryland.
This amendment includes the Historic Preservation Element of the
2018 Master Plan Update. Gaithersburg, as an incorporated city, is
subject to the Land Use Article of the Annotated Code of Maryland.
Land Use Division 1, §3-301(a) Plan Revisions requires the City’s
comprehensive master plan to be reviewed and if necessary revised
and amended at least once every 10 years. Land Use Division I, §3102(b)(1) Elements-Municipal Corporations permits the City to include
additional plan elements beyond what is required, such as Historic
Preservation.
Historic Preservation is the first element of the 2018 Master Plan
Update to be reviewed.
Further information may be obtained from the Planning and Code
Administration Department at City Hall, 31 South Summit Avenue,
between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday,
or on the City’s website at http://www.gaithersburgmd.gov/services/planning-services/city-master-plan.
Rob Robinson, Long Range Planning Manager
Planning and Code Administration # 1194
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
ON PROPOSED REVENUE BOND FINANCING
BY FAIRFAX COUNTY ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
Notice is hereby given that the Fairfax County Economic
Development Authority (the “Authority”) will hold a public
hearing on the application of Congressional School, Inc.
(the “Applicant”), an organization that is not organized
exclusively for religious purposes and is described in Section
501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended,
whose address is 3229 Sleepy Hollow Road, Falls Church,
Virginia 22042 (County of Fairfax). The Applicant has
requested the Authority to issue up to $11,000,000 of its
revenue bonds, at one time or from time to time in one
or more series, to assist the Applicant in (a) financing
certain capital improvements at the Applicant’s educational
facilities located at 3229 Sleepy Hollow Road, Falls Church,
Virginia (the “Campus”), including improvements to existing
structures, expansion of buildings, roofs and heating and air
conditioning system improvements (which improvements
may include a possible expansion of the Applicant‘s Early
Childhood Learning Center), (b) refinancing certain debt of
the Applicant originally incurred to acquire the Campus and
to finance certain capital improvements to the Campus,
including construction of a gymnasium, and (c) paying
certain costs of issuance of the proposed bonds.
The issuance of revenue bonds as requested by the Applicant will not constitute a debt or pledge of the faith and
credit of the Commonwealth of Virginia or the County of
Fairfax, Virginia, and neither the faith and credit nor the
taxing power of the Commonwealth of Virginia or any
political subdivision thereof, including the County of Fairfax,
Virginia, will be pledged to the payment of such bonds.
The public hearing, which may be continued or adjourned,
will be held at 9:00 a.m. on February 22, 2018, before the
Authority at the PenFed (Pentagon Federal Credit Union)
office located at 7940 Jones Branch Drive, 11th Floor,
Tysons Corner, Virginia 22102. Any person interested in
the issuance of the bonds or the location or nature of the
proposed project may appear at the hearing and present his
or her views. A copy of the Applicant’s application is on file
and is open for inspection at the office of the Authority’s
counsel, Thomas O. Lawson, Esquire at 10805 Main Street,
Suite 200, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 during normal business
hours.
FAIRFAX COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
Advertised: February 8 and 15, 2018
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
SF
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Sharon Taylor
Defendant(s)
v.
Manu M. Kamara
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-27808
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
Civil No. CAEF17-14750
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 1st day of February 2018, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
4703 Medora Drive, Suitland, Maryland 20746, made and reported
by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
Hugh J. Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel, and
Brian Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 1st day
of March, 2018, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 1st day of March, 2018.
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 1st day of February 2018, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
6968 Mayfair Terrace, Laurel, Maryland 20707, made and reported
by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
Hugh J. Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel, and
Brian Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 1st day
of March, 2018, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 1st day of March, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $182,400.00.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $229,731.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Feb. 8, 15, 22, 2018
12163766
Feb. 8, 15, 22, 2018
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage
Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart
B, and the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner,
I will conduct a COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1510 Queen Street NE,
Washington, DC in execution of a certain deed of trust by Blondell B.
Brockington dated February 21, 2007, in the original principal amount of
$412,500.00 recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, as
Instrument No. 2007023520, and the Assignment recorded in the Land
Records of the District of Columbia in favor of the Secretary of Housing
and Urban Development recorded on April 5, 2016 as Instrument Number
2016033187, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby
secured and at the request of the holder, the undersigned Foreclosure
Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction in the front of the
building housing the Superior Court for the District of Columbia located
at 500 Indiana Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20001 on March 1, 2018 at
9:00 A.M. (note this is an adjournment from the sale date of February 1,
2018), the property described in said deed of trust, located at the above
address, with improvements thereon and more particularly described as
follows: 1510 Queen Street NE, Washington, DC 20002, for which further
legal description is attached to the Deed of trust. This property is also
presently known for assessment and taxation purposes as Lot numbered
Two Forty-three in Square numbered Forty Seventy-six.
TERMS OF SALE: Neither the FORECLOSURE COMMISSIONER nor the
holder of the note secured by the deed of trust will deliver possession of
the property to the successful bidder. The purchaser at the sale will be
required to pay all closing costs. Real estate taxes, water/sewer fees and
other public charges will be prorated as of the date of sale. The risk of
loss or damage to the property passes to the purchaser immediately upon
the conclusion of the sale. Terms: A bidder's deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price in the form of certified funds payable to the Secretary
of Housing and Urban Development and must be present at the time of
sale. The balance of the purchase price will be due within 30 days at the
office of the Foreclosure Commissioner. Time is of the essence as to the
closing date and the payment of the purchase price. If payment of the
balance does not occur within thirty days of the sale date, the deposit will
be forfeited. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based
upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a
foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure
Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of
the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as
provided herein. Foreclosure Commissioner shall have no duty to obtain
possession for purchaser. The property and the improvements thereon
will be sold "AS IS" and without representation or warranties of any kind.
The sale is subject to all liens, encumbrances, conditions, easements and
restrictions, if any, superior to the mentioned deed of trust and lawfully
affecting the property. Sale is subject to post-sale confirmation that the
borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior
to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination
of whether the borrower(s) reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.
In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser's
sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the Purchaser's
deposit without interest. Additional terms to be announced at the sale.
HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant. Anderson Law,
Foreclosure Commissioner, 2492 N. Landing Rd, Ste 104, Virginia Beach,
VA 23456, 757-301-3636 Tel, 757-301-3640 Fax. Add to run February 8,
2018, February 15, 2018, February 22, 2018.
February 8, 15, 22, 2018
12163783
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
3129 38TH STREET NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20016
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on January 16, 2007, as
Instrument Number 2007006267, and in accordance Judgment
filed on March 10, 2017 in case 2015 CA 003595 R(RP) and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within
the office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335
WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC
20015-2034 on,
FEBRUARY 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
3129 38TH STREET NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20016, LOT
NUMBERED FIFTY (50) IN THE SUBDIVISION MADE BY
THOMAS J. LANE, JR. OF LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-ONE (21)
IN BLOCK NUMBERED ONE (1)
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (3.375%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 25640
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12163770
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JANUARY 18, 25, FEBRUARY 1, 8, 2018
12153818
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840
Official Notices
Montgomery County
Application for State Discharge Permit 16DP2754,
NPDES Permit MD006477:
The International Monetary Fund, Bretton Woods Recreation
Center, 15700 River Rd., Germantown, MD 20874 applied
for renewal of the permit to discharge an average of
15,000 gallons per day of treated domestic wastewater from
the Bretton Woods Wastewater Treatment Plant located at
15700 River Road, Germantown, MD 20874 to the Potomac
River.
If a written request is received by February 15, 2018, an
informational meeting can be held to discuss the application
and permitting process. Requests should be forwarded to
the Maryland Department of the Environment, Water
and Science Administration, 1800 Washington Blvd.,
Baltimore, Maryland 21230-1708, Attn: Mr. Yen-Der
Cheng, Chief, Municipal Permits Division. Hearingimpaired persons may request an interpreter at the informational meeting by contacting Mr. Cheng at (410) 537-3363
or 1-800-633-6101, or at the above address, at least ten
working days prior to the scheduled meeting.
Any person wishing to review the application should contact
Mr. Cheng at the above telephone number to schedule an
appointment. Copies may be obtained at a cost of $0.36 per
page.
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MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF THE
ENVIRONMENT
WATER AND SCIENCE ADMINISTRATION
NOTICE OF APPLICATION RECEIVED
851
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
Historic Preservation will present recommendations for the City’s
continued stewardship of its historic resources while being consistent
with the State and City visions. Public comment is invited prior to
and at the joint public hearing on the Historic Preservation Element.
NOTICE OF HEARING
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
ENROLL TODAY
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S0833-1 6x2
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CLASSIFIED
D11
D12
850
Montgomery County
OPQRS
850
Montgomery County
850
850
Montgomery County
Montgomery County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13656 HARVEST GLEN WAY
GERMANTOWN, MD 20874
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
12812 TAMARACK RD.
SILVER SPRING, MD 20904
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Wilson
Sauceda and Sandra J. Cole a/k/a Sandra J. Sauceda dated January 10,
2005 and recorded in Liber 29404, folio 401 among the Land Records
of Montgomery County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court
for Montgomery County, at the Court House Door, 50 Maryland Ave.,
Rockville, MD 20850, on
FEBRUARY 14, 2018 AT 11:22 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Mathunni
Mathai, Arun S. Mathai and Kunjamma Mathai dated November 28,
2005 and recorded in Liber 31426, folio 117 among the Land Records
of Montgomery County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court
for Montgomery County, at the Court House Door, 50 Maryland Ave.,
Rockville, MD 20850, on
FEBRUARY 28, 2018 AT 11:20 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and
described as Unit D-7 in the subdivision known as "Autumn Glen
Condominium Phase 2" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of
Trust. Tax ID #02-03410028.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-00338563.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $7,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67822.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 25, Feb 1 & Feb 8, 2018
12154644
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
68 SILVER MOON DR.
SILVER SPRING, MD 20904
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Rochelle
M. Fashaw dated January 28, 2009 and recorded in Liber 36537, folio
1 among the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court House
Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
FEBRUARY 21, 2018 AT 11:20 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-02733610.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $39,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69811.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 1, Feb 8 & Feb 15
12157802
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $46,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69317.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 8, Feb 15 & Feb 22
12159388
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13012 Tamarack Road
Silver Spring, MD 20904
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
BLANCA E. JOYA HERNANDEZ AKA BLANCA JOYA AND ROSA
D. JOYA AND RAMON C. OLIVARES, dated July 12, 2016
and recorded in Liber 52526, folio 464 AND RE-RECORDED
IN LIBER 52603, FOLIO 472 among the Land Records
of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.438250V;
Tax ID No.05-00329810 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850,
on
FEBRUARY 26, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $36,200.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 579708)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9235 Hummingbird Terrace
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
MICHAEL J. TRILLING AND EDITH B. LAZENBY, dated July
8, 2009 and recorded in Liber 37660, folio 479 among
the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as
Case No.405255V; Tax ID No.09-01473753 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
FEBRUARY 26, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $24,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
www.hwestauctions.com
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this FEBRUARY 8, 15, 22, 2018
12164025
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of 851
Prince Georges County 851 Prince Georges County
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
Wake up to
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
home delivery.
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid James E. Clarke
Dyson
1-800-753-POST
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note Renee
Hugh J. Green
SF
Menapace
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Shannon
851
Christine M. Drexel
Prince Georges County
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in Brian Thomas
Trustees
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or Substitute
Plaintiffs
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed v.
Wake up
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes Monique N. Fox
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the Defendant(s)
to home delivery.
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
Civil No. CAEF17-27843
NOTICE PURSUANT
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
by the Circuit Court for
1-800-753-POST
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect, ORDERED,
Prince George's County, Maryland,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit this 1st day of February 2018, that
SF
the foreclosure sale of the properwithout interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps, ty described in the deed of trust
docketed
herein
and
located
at
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
Dove Circle, Laurel, Marywater rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association 12177
land 20708, made and reported
James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual by
Hugh J. Green, Shannon Menabasis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if pace, Christine M. Drexel, and
Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed Brian
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible unless cause to the contrary be
shown
on or before the 1st day
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser of March,
2018, provided a copy
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of this Order be inserted in The
Washington
Post once in each of
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey three (3) successive
weeks before
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in the 1st day of March, 2018.
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned The Report of Sale states the
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified amount of the sale at $171,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 558464)
Feb. 8, 15, 22, 2018
12163769
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. COHEN,
Home delivery
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
is convenient.
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Home
delivery
is
convenient.
850
Montgomery County
850
EZ
Montgomery County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
25105 Vista Ridge Road
Gaithersburg, MD 20882
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DEBORAH CHALKLEY, Trustee(s), dated June 7,
2004, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27650, folio 299, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
FEBRUARY 16, 2018 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-SEVEN (37) IN THE SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "SENECA SPRINGS", AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 192, PLAT NO. 21028, AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $68,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 1.625%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (14-08930)
Keith M. Yacko, Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Jason L. Hamlin, Gene Jung, Glen H. Tschirgi,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY1,8, 15, 2018
852
Anne Arundel County
12159347
852
Anne Arundel County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7811 Elizabeth Road
Pasadena, MD 21122
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to RECONTRUST COMPANY, NA. , Trustee(s),
dated December 21, 2006, and recorded among the Land
Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
18650, folio 0463, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8
CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
FEBRUARY 12, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOTS NOS. 235, 236, 237 AND 238, AS SHOWN ON A PLAT
OF ROCK VIEW BEACH, AND RECORDED AMONG THE PLAT
RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK 3,
FOLIO 40.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.125% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (44813)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
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www.hwestauctions.com
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
852
Anne Arundel County
ARE YOUR
TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
CLASSIFIED
SF
12164026
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2018
Anne Arundel County
GREENSPOONMARDER, P.A.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
1125 WEST STREET, SUITE 265
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE,
MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
7560 E HOWARD ROAD
GLEN BURNIE, MD 21060
8121A Armiger Drive
Pasadena, MD 21122
FEBRUARY 12, 2018 AT 10:00 AM
By virtue of a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed
of
Trust
to
PRLAP,
INC. , Trustee(s), dated February
CAROLYN ANN BRISCOE, dated JULY 18, 2012, and recorded
in the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, Maryland, at 23, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE
ARUNDEL
COUNTY,
MARYLAND
in Liber 18882, folio 124, the
Liber 24987, Folio 327, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, the Substitute Trustee will sell at public auction, holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustees, by instrument
at the front of the Anne Arundel County courthouse located at 7
CHURCH CIRCLE, ANNAPOLIS, MD. All that FEE SIMPLE lot of duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred
under
the
terms
thereof,
and
at
the request of the party
ground and the improvements thereon, situated in Anne Arundel
County and being more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Trust.
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT B AS SHOWN 21401 ON,
ON THE PLAT OF PROPERTY ENTITLED, “LUCY T. AND
FEBRUARY 13, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALBERT P. BRISCOE,” AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK 2407, ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
FOLIO 135. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING KNOWN thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
AS NO. 7560 E. HOWARD ROAD. ASSESSED AS: MAP 10 described as follows:
GRID 22 PARCEL 22 TAX #03-00-02685200; BEING THE ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
SAME LOT OF GROUND AS DESCRIBED IN A DEED DATED RECORDED MARCH 15, 2007 IN LIBER 18882, FOLIO 124.
12/22/83, RECORDED IN LIBER 3677 AT FOLIO 895. SAVING
AND EXCEPTING THAT PORTION OF GROUND DESCRIBED The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
IN DEED DATE 7/7/1958 RECORDED IN LIBER 1434 AT without either express or implied warranty or representation,
FOLIO 117. SAVING AND EXCEPTING THAT PORTION OF including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
GROUND DESCRIBED IN DEED DATED 1/25/82, RECORDED particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiIN LIBER 3469 AT FOLIO 438. SAVING AND EXCEPTING THAT tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, matePORTION OF GROUND DESCRIBED IN DEED DATED 1/09/85, rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
RECORDED IN LIBER 3848 AT FOLIO 80.
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the loan and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered into by which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale is void subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without interest. record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
Purchaser must obtain possession and assumes risk of loss or assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
damage to the property from the date of the auction forward.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
The property will be sold in an “as is” condition, without express certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
or implied warranty as to the nature and description of the NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
improvements as contained herein, and subject to conditions of the purchase price with interest at 8.44% per annum from
restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, but the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
omitting any covenant or restriction based on race, color, TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, if any, on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
and with no warranty of any kind.
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $18,000.00 by cash, certified by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
check or cashier’s check will be required of the purchaser, if association dues and assessments that may become due after
other than the note holder, at time and place of sale, balance the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
in immediately available funds upon final ratification of sale by Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, Maryland, interest taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid at the rate of 5% on unpaid purchase money from are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
date of sale to date of settlement. The secured party herein, if the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
a bidder, shall not be required to post a deposit. Third party property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser (excluding the secured party) will be required to purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
complete full settlement of the purchase of the property within mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
TWENTY (20) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification of the sale said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser’s deposit shall be Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
of the defaulting purchaser. All other public charges and private the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
rent, taxes, if any, to be adjusted to date of sale. Cost of purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
all documentary stamps and transfer taxes and all other costs Trustee's File No. (40425)
incident to the settlement shall be borne by the purchaser. If
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
applicable, condominium and/or homeowner association dues
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
and assessments due pursuant to Md. Real Property Article
11-110 and those that may become due after the time of
sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Purchaser must
obtain possession and assumes the risk of loss or damage to
the property from the date of sale forward. If the sale is
rescinded or not ratified for any reason, including post sale
lender audit, or the Substitute Trustee is unable to convey good
www.hwestauctions.com
and marketable title, or a resale is to take place for any reason, A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to a JANUARY 25, FEBRUARY 1, 8, 2018
12152963
refund of the aforementioned deposit. The purchaser waives all
rights and claims against the Substitute Trustee whether known
or unknown. These provisions shall survive settlement. Upon
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
refund of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect,
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
and the purchaser shall have no further claim against Substitute
SUITE 100
Trustee. The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
the loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
is void and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without
KNOWN AS
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, may be
announced at the time and date of sale. (File #44377.0007 /
3 Beach Road
C02-CV-000834)
Glen Burnie, MD 21060
Erin M. Shaffer,
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Substitute Trustee
Deed of Trust to RECON TRUST COMPANY, Trustee(s), dated
October 27, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 18490, folio
751, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 25, FEBRUARY 1, 8, 2018
12152967 request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
FEBRUARY 12, 2018 at 10:00 AM
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon
situated
in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
described as follows:
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
KNOWN AS
RECORDED NOVEMBER 17, 2006 IN LIBER 18490, FOLIO
2539 Selkirk Court
751.
Crofton, MD 21114
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
certain Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE INSURANCE CORP. , without either express or implied warranty or representation,
Trustee(s), dated December 12, 2005, and recorded among the including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
17309, folio 455, the holder of the indebtedness secured by construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merTrustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
FEBRUARY 12, 2018 at 10:00 AM
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
described as follows:
the purchase price with interest at 5.875% per annum from
LOT NUMBERED FIFTY NINE (59) IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
AS "THE KNOLLS AT CROFTON VILLAGE, SECTION 8", AS PER TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 157 AT PLAT 38 on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
AND 39
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
without either express or implied warranty or representation, association dues and assessments that may become due after
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condi- Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mate- taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 3.875% per annum from Trustee's File No. (21702)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
www.hwestauctions.com
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for ANUARY 25, FEBRUARY 1, 8, 2018
12151355
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (54933)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
1-800-753-POST
FEBRUARY 8, 15, 22, 2018
852
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
JANUARY 25, FEBRUARY 1, 8, 2018
12152969 JANUARY 25, FEBRUARY 1, 8, 2018
12152968
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
C054F 2x3
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2018
852
Anne Arundel County
852
OPQRS
EZ
Anne Arundel County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8334 Woodland Road
Pasadena, MD 21122
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE SERVICES INC. , Trustee(s),
dated October 6, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records
of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 18404, folio
412, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH
CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
FEBRUARY 12, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED OCTOBER 24, 2006 IN LIBER 18404, FOLIO
412.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (55742)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
JANUARY 25, FEBRUARY 1, 8, 2018
12150467
856
856
Frederick County
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 6, 13, 20, 2018
12164018
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
Home delivery
is convenient.
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Samuel
P. Summers and Bonnie A. Robertson, dated August 1, 2007 and recorded
in Liber 6727, folio 302 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the
parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer
for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the
Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 21, 2018 AT 1:13 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $27,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #15-617521).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 1, Feb 8 & Feb 15
12157965
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
Frederick County
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Eleanor
V. Hamilton and Clarence E. Hamilton, Jr., dated February 21, 2008 and
recorded in Liber 6903, folio 268 among the Land Records of Frederick
County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at
the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for
Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick,
MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 14, 2018 AT 1:17 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and described as Unit
No. 2-1C, in Building #2, in the Monocacy Overlook Condominium and
more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is
improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $15,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 6% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #17-602098).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 25, Feb 1 & Feb 8
12155661
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2257 WETHERBURNE WAY
FREDERICK, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Jacqueline
R. Bryant, dated May 7, 2004 and recorded in Liber 4636, folio 21 among
the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having occurred under
the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the
undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick
St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 28, 2018 AT 1:09 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $17,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #15-618138).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
12163352
8390 DISCOVERY PL.
WALKERSVILLE, MD 21793
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from John L.
Spinks, dated September 27, 2005 and recorded in Liber 5636, folio 209
among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby,
the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at
the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W.
Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 21, 2018 AT 1:12 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $17,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5.5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #17-600716).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 1, Feb 8 & Feb 15
12157963
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
8617 CHESTNUT GROVE RD.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
5806 WHITEROSE WAY
NEW MARKET, MD 21774
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Kristyn
Alahouzos and John E. Alahouzos dated April 7, 2006 and recorded in
Liber 5974, folio 270 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 28, 2018 AT 1:22 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-318038.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65058.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 8, Feb 15 & Feb 22
12159386
Stern & Eisenberg Mid-Atlantic, P.C.
9920 Franklin Square Dr., Suite 100
Baltimore, MD 21236
410-635-5127
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1475 EDEN DR.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Marion
Lewis Abrecht, Jr. and Kathy Kelly Abrecht, dated March 9, 2007 and
recorded in Liber 6509, folio 187 among the Land Records of Frederick
County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick
County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701,
on
FEBRUARY 28, 2018 AT 1:15 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions,
restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with
no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County. TIME IS OF THE
ESSENCE. If the purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10)
days of ratification, the purchaser relinquishes their deposit and the Sub.
Trustees may file an appropriate motion with the court to resell the
property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued
by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper
or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided
by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the
purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon
the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office.
It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified
mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub. Trustees and
all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission
on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid
from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from
any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to
the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate of 6.875% per annum from the date of sale to the date
the funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. Taxes, ground
rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues,
all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including
sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted
for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the
purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer
taxes, (including agricultural transfer taxes, if applicable), documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be
responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes
the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post
sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to
the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by
the Sub. Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal
effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub. Trustees are
unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale
is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by
the Sub. Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be
limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest.
Steven K. Eisenberg, Paul J. Moran, Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 8, Feb 15 & Feb 22
856
1602 BERRY ROSE CT., UNIT #1
FREDERICK, MD 21701
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
100 Featherstone Place
Frederick, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
GREGORY R. BLOSE AND KRISTINA J. BLOSE, dated August
25, 2009 and recorded in Liber 7371, folio 0180 AND
MODIFIED BY A LOAN MODIFICATION AGREEMENT RECORDED IN LIBER 10175, FOLIO 0114 among the Land Records of
FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-10-CV-17-000183;
Tax ID No.02-458152 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at
100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 26, 2018 at 11:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $25,800.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576983)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Frederick County
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
8049 CHESTNUT GROVE RD.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
Feb 8, Feb 15 & Feb 22
856
12159389
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from
Christopher Gallagher, dated October 26, 2016 and recorded in Liber
11480, folio 412 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 21, 2018 AT 1:10 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $25,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #17-601817).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 1, Feb 8 & Feb 15
12157955
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2170 E. GREENLEAF DR.
FREDERICK, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Jesse A.
Meman and Melissa A. Meman, dated July 30, 2004 and recorded in Liber
4788, folio 230 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale
at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 21, 2018 AT 1:11 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $38,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #16-602459).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 1, Feb 8 & Feb 15
12157960
COULD YOU USE
SOME EXTRA CASH?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054B 2x2
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5060 Old Bartholows Road
Mount Airy, MD 21771
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to SOVEREIGN TITLE PARTNERS, LLC. ,
Trustee(s), dated February 23, 2008, and recorded among the
Land Records of FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
7187, folio 193, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE
FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W.
PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701 ON,
FEBRUARY 20, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED FEBRUARY 19, 2009 IN LIBER 7187, FOLIO
193.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 6.5% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (17029)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12157253
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1244 ROSEMONT DRIVE
ROSEMONT, MD 21758
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to MICHAEL LYON, Trustee(s), dated October 23,
2010, and recorded among the Land Records of FREDERICK
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 8104, folio 0484, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE FREDERICK COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK,
MD 21701 ON,
FEBRUARY 20, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-FIVE (35), IN THE SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "BRUNSWICK HEIGHTS", AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF FREDERICK
COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK S.T.H. AT PLAT 116
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 4.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (56259)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12157257
LEGAL
NOTICES
To place your
legal notice in the
Classified section:
Call:
856
Frederick County
856
D13
Frederick County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
8505 FORTUNE PL.
WALKERSVILLE, MD 21793
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Pamela E.
Morgan dated September 12, 2008 and recorded in Liber 7086, folio 731
among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick
St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 14, 2018 AT 1:12 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #26-491827.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $12,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68327.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 25, Feb 1 & Feb 8, 2018
12155258
Stern & Eisenberg Mid-Atlantic, P.C.
9920 Franklin Square Dr., Suite 100
Baltimore, MD 21236
410-635-5127
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11 EAST B ST.
BRUNSWICK, MD 21716
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from The
Forest Group, LLC and Tim Fonseca, dated July 7, 2016 and recorded in
Liber 11245, folio 450 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 14, 2018 AT 1:05 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions,
restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with
no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $15,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County. TIME IS OF THE
ESSENCE. If the purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10)
days of ratification, the purchaser relinquishes their deposit and the Sub.
Trustees may file an appropriate motion with the court to resell the
property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued
by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper
or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided
by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the
purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon
the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office.
It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified
mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub. Trustees and
all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission
on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid
from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from
any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the
real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at
the rate of 12.00000% per annum from the date of sale to the date
the funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. Taxes, ground
rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues,
all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including
sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted
for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the
purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer
taxes, (including agricultural transfer taxes, if applicable), documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be
responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes
the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post
sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to
the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by
the Sub. Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal
effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub. Trustees are
unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale
is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by
the Sub. Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be
limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest.
Steven K. Eisenberg, Paul J. Moran, Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 25, Feb 1 & Feb 8, 2018
12155260
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
5817 Bartonsville Road
Frederick, MD 21704
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
CATHERINE M. CRUMMITT, dated November 13, 2006 and
recorded in Liber 6395, folio 0540 among the Land Records of
FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-10-CV-17-000021;
Tax ID No.09-228551 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at
100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 12, 2018 at 10:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $15,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 559415)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
202-334-7007
e-mail:
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 25, FEBRUARY 1, 8, 2018
legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x3
12156010
OPQRS
856
877
Frederick County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2140 Wainwright Court, Condo Unit: 1A
Frederick, MD 21702
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE SERVICES INC. , Trustee(s),
dated August 11, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records
of FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 6644, folio
0200, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE FREDERICK
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST,
FREDERICK, MD 21701 ON,
FEBRUARY 20, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED JUNE 28, 2007 IN LIBER 6644, FOLIO 0200.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 8.5% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (53656)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 1, 8, 15, 2018
12152448
Prince William County
875
Fauquier County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
9712 GRANT AVENUE,
MANASSAS, VA 20110
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
6125 OLIVERA AVENUE,
BEALETON, VA 22712.
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $162,011.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.125000% dated
December 31, 2013, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number 201401030000654,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on March 13, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 101-06-A-1
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated July 25, 2006, in
the original principal amount of
$368,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Fauquier County, Virginia, in Book
1227 at Page 1475 as Instrument
No. 2006-00012052 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Fauquier County, 40 Culpeper
Street, Warrenton, Virginia on
March 8, 2018, at 12:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: LOT 87,
PHASE 3, BEALETON STATION, AS
THE SAME APPEARS DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED RECORDS IN
DEED BOOK 1038 AT PAGE 2343
AND PLATTED IN DEED BOOK 1038
AT PAGE 2319, AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF FAUQUIER COUNTY,
VIRGINIA.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-269803.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 8, 15, 2018
12153240
Home
delivery
is
convenient.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3253951.
Feb. 8, 15, 2018
879
Stafford County
TRUSTEE SALE
9 Azalea Street,
Fredericksburg, VA 22406
Stafford County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $148,000.00, dated October 7,
2016 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in
Document No. 160017822, default
having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, on February 20, 2018
at 12:00 PM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 101, Section 4, The Timbers,
with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $400,000.00, dated November
30, 2005 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of
Stafford County, Virginia, in Document No. 050050245, default having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse
Road, Stafford, on February 20,
2018 at 11:00 AM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 232, Section 17, England Run
North, with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (59152)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Feb 1, 8, 2018
12158536
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (49655)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Feb 1, 8, 2018
12159333
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$50,000.00, dated March 24, 2008
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of Stafford County, Virginia, in Document No.
080006605,
default
having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse
Road, Stafford, on February 27,
2018 at 11:00 AM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Unit 27, Phase 3, Sunningdale
Meadows Condominium, together
with an undivided interest in the
common elements.
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$293,000.00, dated June 26, 2006
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of Stafford County, Virginia, in Document No.
060022256,
default
having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse
Road, Stafford, on February 27,
2018 at 11:00 AM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as: Lot 5, Keatwood,
with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (44560)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Feb 1, 8, 2018
12159328
Home
delivery
is
convenient.
Home
delivery
is
convenient.
SF
For routes in
Suitland, Oxon Hill
and Temple Hills, MD
Call Mr. Howard at
301-627-2408
Excellent part-time
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Reliable transportation
required.
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
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The Washington
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VIRGINIA
Houses
Roommates
SILVER SPRING - 4 BR, 3 BA, close to
Metro, shopping, parks. Exc cond.
CAC. $2,200. Andre 202-359-1738
Springfield— $575, furnished basement. Share full bath, FIOS TV,
free WiFi, utilities incl. 703-912-5616.
MARYLAND
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
Roommates
ADELPHI - Basement room for rent.
Furnished. Quiet neighborhood.
1 person. Call 301-887-1788
BOWIE - Male preferred, no smoking. Basement room, share kitchen,
cable, internet incl. Quiet neighborhood. $700/mo. 301-523-8222
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (58075)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Feb 1, 8, 2018
12159399
JOBS
The Washington
Post
PostPoints takes you to
the best shows in town.
CAP HGTS/SUITLAND- Beautifully
decorated. Very quiet. Cooking priv.
Metro. Call 252-209-7887
CAPITAL HEIGHTS / SEAT PLEASANTM pref to share house. $160 and up/
week. Good transp. 301-499-6323
CAPITAL HEIGHTS - Furn room for
rent, share bath & kitchen.
$650 +utilities. 301-502-6581
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
Ft. Washington - Single Family home
to shr, fully furn., Non-smoking $600.
all utilities included 301-806-6070
LANHAM - 2 Rooms avail, $560 &
$580/mo, Incl Utils, A/C, quiet.
240-645-2380
or
301-537-2635
MONTGOMERY VILLAGE
1BR, furnished, everything incl.
$650. Call 240-535-5219
Don Money at
301-674-0010
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Silver Spring- room ($600), bsmt
apt($950) incl utils, sec dep req. No
pets. single occ. 301-439-0468
1-800-753-POST
Silver Spring-Female pref. utils incl.
$550 Close to bus. Deposit req.
Call
703-914-5555
Silver Spring Large furn room, pvt
kitch. pvt entr, bath. M or F pref. Nr
transp & shopping. Safe area. Incl
cable, utils, phone, internet $375
bi weekly. Call Sam 240-286-5451
SF
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Home delivery
makes good
sense.
Dale City— $590, 1 bedrm, 1 ba, 1857
cedar cove, 703-597-3525
1-800-753-POST
TEMPLE HILLS/WESTPHELIA OFF
PENN- Rooms. $550-$675. Utilities
incl. N/S. 1 person pref. 301-848-0418
Roommates
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
Membership is rewarding.
For routes in
Olney, Silver Spring
& Rockville, MD
NE DC- Double furnished room.
Good bus location. $250/week
and utilities incl. 202-526-8268
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$256,170.00, dated June 5, 2014
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of the Orange
County, Virginia, in Document No.
140003510,
default
having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Circuit Court of Orange County,
110 North Madison Road, Orange,
on February 21, 2018 at 3:30 PM
the property described in said
deed, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
Lot 925R, Section 7, Wilderness
Shores, with improvements thereon.
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
NE DC - Near MD line. 1 furnished
room for rent with shared BA.
Bus stop in front. Call 202-669-7992
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
SF
MANASSAS, VA-Bsmt, sep entr, FBA,
W/D. Quiet area 2 mi. to I66. $600/mo
Call
Raj
571-247-6908
S2930 2x5
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
1. Coffee
2. Paper
3. Bills
Enroll your Washington Post subscription
in Easy Pay and we’ll automatically
charge your card when a payment
is due–no fuss, no hassle,
no interruptions.
ENROLL TODAY
for the following
areas:
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
For routes in
DuPont Circle and
GW area in D.C.
Call Howard
Kennedy at
202-543-6880
Upper NW area
in D.C.
Call Dan Santos at
240-912-7978
1-800-753-POST
Wake up to
home delivery.
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
SF
SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
for the following
areas:
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2018
EZ
MD H MONTGOMERY
For routes in
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
The Washington
Post
Orange County
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
881
C
1-800-753-POST
SF
TERMS: CASH. A deposit of
$28,000.00 or 10% of the sale
price, whichever is lower, will be
required of the successful bidder
at time of sale. Prior to the sale,
interested bidders will be required
to register with and must present
a bid deposit which may be held
during the sale by the trustee.
The bid deposit must be certified
funds and/or cash, but no more
than $9,900.00 of cash will be
accepted. The successful bidder’s
deposit will be retained at the sale
and applied to the sale price. If
held by the trustee, all other bid
deposits will be returned to the
unsuccessful bidders. Settlement
is to be made within 15 days. The
successful bidder will be responsible for obtaining possession of the
property, and for all costs and fees
related to recording the Trustee’s
Deed, including the grantors tax.
The successful bidder will be
required to execute a Memorandum of Trustee's Sale, available for
review on the Foreclosure Sales
page of www.glasserlaw.com, outlining additional terms of sale and
settlement. A Trustee’s Deed will
be prepared by Trustee’s attorney
at high bidder’s expense. This is
a communication from a debt collector.
Glasser and Glasser, P.L.C. on behalf
of Atlantic Trustee Services, L.L.C.,
and/or REO Solutions, LLC, Substitute Trustees, Crown Center Building, Suite 600, 580 East Main
Street, Norfolk, VA 23510, File No.
207630-09, Tel: (757) 321-6465,
between 10:00 a.m. & 12:00 noon
only.
Feb. 1, 8, 2018
12159134
2068 Mallard Lane,
Locust Grove, VA 22508
Orange County
12163960
1-800-753-POST
Virginia. Sale is subject to all prior
liens, easements, restrictions,
covenants, and conditions, if any,
of record, or other matters which
would be disclosed by an accurate
survey or inspection of the premises.
TRUSTEE SALE
TRUSTEE SALE
54 Buckys Way,
Fredericksburg, VA 22406
Stafford County
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
Default having been made in the
terms of a certain Deed of Trust
dated October 22, 2004, in the
original principal amount of
$280,393.00 and recorded in the
Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court
of the County of Culpeper, Virginia
in Instrument No. 040011663, the
undersigned Substitute Trustees
will sell at public auction on February 16, 2018, at 2:30 p.m., in
front of the building housing the
Culpeper County Circuit Court,
Main Entrance , 135 West Cameron
Street, Culpeper, VA 22701, the
property designated as Lot 164,
Lakeview of Culpeper, Phase 3A, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted and recorded in
Instrument No. 020006557 and
plat recorded in Plat Cabinet 7
at Pages 480-487, among the land
records of Culpeper County,
Stafford County
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (55649)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Feb 1, 8, 15, 2018
12159338
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
717 Monument Lane,
Culpeper, Virginia 22701
(Tax Map No.: 40U-3-164)
TRUSTEE SALE
202 Dover Place, Apt 202,
Stafford, VA 22556
Stafford County
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
JOBS
Trustee's Sale
TRUSTEE SALE
306 Burman Lane,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
Spotsylvania County
878
C
Culpeper County
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
is convenient.
Wake up to
home delivery.
SF
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Membership is rewarding.
1-800-753-POST
SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Democracy Dies in Darkness
From dramas and musicals to stand-up and
ballet, discover great ways to save money,
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washingtonpost.com/postpoints
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THE DISTRICT EDITION
THE WASHINGTON POST
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2018
Local Living
The skinny on avocados
The bright green ‘SlimCado’ isn’t necessarily more slimming
than the Hass, but both offer a host of health benefits.
PAGE 13
Home Environmentally friendly products used
to be more expensive and less effective. Newer,
improved versions make it easier to be green. 6
Home Six ways to stop
drafts and save money
on your energy bill. 8
Gardening The art —
and science — of color
in landscape design. 12
On Parenting How to
help a young child end
play dates peacefully. 14
2
INSID E
the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
DC
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Splurge or Save
Home Front
Home Sales
Gardening
Wellness
On Parenting
Crime report
Code violations
ON THE COVER
Photo of Hass, left,
and “SlimCado”
avocados by Deb
Lindsey for The
Washington Post
LOCAL LIVING
STAFF
Editor: Kendra
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Editors: Amy
Joyce, Mari-Jane
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Director: Victoria
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Home
HOW TO
Minimize dust when refinishing floors
BY
J EANNE H UBER
Q: We are planning to have our
old hardwood floors refinished.
We have a small grand piano in
fine shape and do not want it
damaged from wood dust. We
could store it in our kitchen,
which does not have hardwood
floors. Or should we move it to a
different floor in the house or
wrap it somehow to protect it?
Olney, Md.
A: To protect your piano, you
clearly need to keep it away from
dust. But why stop there? There
is a lot you can do to protect not
only your piano but also
everything else in your house, as
well as the workers who will be
refinishing your floors.
Sanding a floor used to mean
showering everything inside the
house with fine wood dust.
Homeowners would complain
that piles of it were still showing
up in closets and drawers weeks
after they thought they had
cleaned everything. But since the
International Agency for
Research on Cancer classified
sawdust as carcinogenic in 1995,
manufacturers have redesigned
sanders and linked them to
better vacuum systems. With a
little work, you can find a floorsanding company that delivers
what marketers call “dustless”
service. You still might get dust
in your house, but you will find a
lot less of it.
Many dustless companies
connect their sanders to tubing
that carries the dust to bags
outside, thanks to vacuums
mounted on trailers. Others use
indoor vacuums equipped with
filters that trap even the
extremely fine particles that
cause the most lung damage. To
locate these contractors, start
with the “find a professional”
service on the National Wood
Flooring Association’s website,
woodfloors.org. Then call a few
companies and ask what
equipment they use, as well as
the questions you’d use to screen
any contractor, such as how
much experience they have and
whom they list as references.
“Hire someone who is
certified,” said Tom Peotter, a
technical representative for the
association. “Certified means
they have gone through the
schools and we’ve shown them
the best way to do it. But it
doesn’t always mean they have
the best equipment. You have to
ask.” He said he would be
surprised if your calls don’t
quickly turn up contractors who
have good sanders and vacuums,
such as those made by Bona.
Hiring a company with good
equipment will go a long way
toward minimizing dust. But the
National Wood Flooring
Association still urges crews to
wear respirators while they are
sanding, Peotter said, because it
is inevitable that some dust will
get into the air. Thus,
homeowners are smart to
protect valuable items. There is
no way to sand around a piano
without moving it, so moving it
into a room with a floor that
won’t be sanded is the least you
should do. But will you need to
use your kitchen during the work
and the time it takes for the new
floor finish to cure? If your
kitchen is a typical size, it might
be pretty hard to cook and clean
up with a piano in the middle of
it. And because even dustless
sanding is likely to leave some
dust in your house, you would
probably still need to protect the
piano in some way.
Covering it with plastic might
work, but the plastic could trap
moisture, cautioned Rick Butler,
a piano technician in the
Washington area (240-396-7480;
rickbutler.org). “The piano
couldn’t breathe properly,” he
said. “The plastic could trap
heat, or moisture in the summer.
It’s better than nothing but not
ideal.”
The best option is to move the
piano to a dust-free place, he
said. Perhaps surprisingly, hiring
piano movers to put your piano
into temporary storage would
cost only a little more than
hiring the same crew to move the
piano from one room to another
in your house. Empire Piano
Movers in Rockville (888-4318570; empirepianomovers.com)
ISTOCK
DC Design House closes its doors
Having your wood floors
refinished used to mean
dealing with dust in closets
and drawers for weeks. But
with sawdust’s classification
as carcinogenic in 1995,
sanders have been redesigned
with better vacuum systems.
charges $145 to move a piano
from one room to another, and
another $145 to move it back,
said Stephen Swancer, the
owner. To put a piano into
storage, the company charges
$225 each way, plus $2 a day for
storage.
If you need to move furniture
and other items less sensitive
than a piano out of the way,
storing them in a room that
won’t be sanded makes sense. To
minimize dust getting on them,
close doors and cover gaps under
doorways with towels rolled into
snake shapes. Cover doorways
that you will need to use with
zippered plastic, such as ZipWall
ZipDoor Commercial Door Kit
for Dust Containment, $36 on
Amazon.com.
You can also cover individual
items with plastic. To minimize
the risk of condensation forming
on wooden items covered with
plastic, follow Swancer’s advice
for situations in which the only
way to protect a piano from dust
is to cover it with plastic: First
drape a blanket or other cloth
over the wood, then top that with
the plastic.
LEN SPODEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The DC Design House, a charity event that raised more than
$2 million for the Children’s National Health System, is ending its
10-year run, citing difficulty finding volunteers and properties.
Have a problem in your home?
Send questions to localliving@
washpost.com. Put “How To” in the
subject line, tell us where you live
and try to include a photo.
3
DC
3/1/18
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171 Reviews as of 2/6/2018
2/18/18
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the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
4.1
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the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
DC
Home
SPLURGE OR SAVE
$1,900
Apollo mirror
by Ben & Aja Blanc
(thefutureperfect.com)
$790.88
My Moon My Mirror by Diesel with Moroso
(nest.co.uk)
$248
$420
Prisma mirror in blue green (anthropologie.com)
Masai round mirror by
Serena Confalonieri
(artemest.com)
A reflection of good taste
BY MEGAN MCDONOUGH
Well-placed mirrors can be a design game-changer. They can make
a room feel brighter, create the illusion of additional square footage
and serve as the perfect finishing touch in the smallest of spaces.
They also make great decorative accents, according to Dana Tomic
Hughes, interior designer and founder/editor of the Australian
online design publication Yellowtrace.
“These shiny, reflective and contemporary statement mirrors are
not only alluring as physical items — they play a dual purpose as
magnificent sculptural objects that can occupy a space with
confidence,” Hughes says.
Here are some of Hughes’s top picks.
megan.mcdonough@washpost.com
Dana Tomic Hughes
More Splurge
or Save online
Go to
washingtonpost.com/home.
$129
$1,180.45
Ikornnes floor mirror (ikea.com)
Asplund Tati mirror
in white (skandium.com)
$449
$1,050.59
Tri-cut Noon mirror by Ross Gardam (rossgardam.com.au)
Geo Shapes wall mirror (westelm.com)
PHOTOS COURTESY OF RETAILERS
DC
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2/23/18
the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
2/23/18
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the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
DC
Home
Enjoy your environment without harming the Earth’s
With advances in technology, you don’t need to sacrifice comfort to be eco-conscious
BY
E LISABETH L EAMY
It’s not easy being green. Kermit the Frog said it — even sang it
— but it might as well have been
the motto of the first wave of
eco-conscious
consumers.
Scratchy sheets, anemic showers
and weird-looking lightbulbs
were the norm as people tried to
do their part. To add insult to
injury, these clunky green products used to cost more green cash.
No longer! When consumers
started demanding environmentally friendly products, manufacturers started delivering better,
cheaper ones. Today, it’s entirely
possible to be eco-conscious without giving up comfort or breaking
the bank.
The key is to consider how you
can positively affect the environment, in addition to how you
negatively impact it. “Every person has a carbon footprint. As
hard as we try to reduce it, we
cannot exist without one,” said
Leigh Stringer, author of “The
Green Workplace” and “The
Healthy Workplace.” Stringer has
been collaborating with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public
Health, which is trying to change
the conversation from reducing
our footprint to increasing our
“handprint” — our positive influence on the environment.
“I like this principle and use it
to guide my clients,” Stringer
said. “I find it a more inspiring
way to tackle my personal life,
too.” You can use the EPA’s carbon
footprint calculator (epa.gov/
carbon-footprint-calculator) and
the Water Footprint Calculator
(watercalculator.org) to assess
your impact. Yes, you are looking
for your biggest obstacles, but
also your biggest opportunities.
With that in mind, here are several comforts you may not want
to live without, along with environmentally friendly solutions so
you don’t have to.
Energy
Comfort: Powerful heating
and cooling.
In 1977, President Jimmy Carter told Americans to turn down
their thermostats and “put on a
sweater,” but today it’s possible to
stay warm — and be environmentally conscious — without bundling up.
Solutions: Here are several
ideas, from least to most involved.
• Programmable thermostats:
“This technology has really
helped us to go green while actually increasing our comfort,” said
Ted Trabue, managing director of
that need less water.
• “Grasscycling”: This is 21stcentury speak for leaving your
grass clippings on the lawn,
which helps return valuable nutrients to the soil.
• Water early: To save money
and water, sprinkle your lawn
before 10 a.m., when it’s cooler
out and the water won’t evaporate so fast.
Vehicles
Comfort: A powerful car.
Gas-saving vehicles used to be
wimpy and strange, but manufacturers have responded to consumer demand with many more
choices.
Solution: A record number of
auto manufacturers make hybrid
versions that look just like their
most popular vehicles. And, as an
example, Consumer Reports says
the Tesla Model S all-electric car
has more horsepower than many
gasoline vehicles.
Shopping
ISTOCK
the D.C. Sustainable Energy Utility, which works to bring energy
efficiency to the District.
• Green power: If you live in
one of the states that have deregulated their power companies,
you can choose one that promises
green power.
• Solar: The federal government will give you a 30 percent
tax credit for installing solar panels. Once you’ve paid them off,
you’ll get electricity free.
Comfort: Attractive lighting.
Compact fluorescents, the first
alternatives to traditional, incandescent lightbulbs, were funnylooking and slow to warm up, and
they put out a harsh light. The
first LEDs were huge and crazy
expensive. It’s all changed.
Solution: Edison-style LEDs.
I’ve already written about how
switching an average house to
LEDs will save you as much as
$600 a year. But did you know
that some manufacturers make
LEDs that have the cool retro look
of Edison bulbs? Plus, you have to
change them only about every
30,000 to 50,000 hours.
Water
Comfort: Strong water pres-
sure.
I like my showers strong and
long. They are my coffee and
masseuse rolled into one. But I
lived through the California
drought of the 1970s, so I don’t
like the idea of wasting water.
What to do?
Solutions: Once again, here
are several solutions, from least
to most expensive.
• Collect shower water: Most
of us waste water while our shower is heating up. In California in
the ’70s, we all collected that
water in five-gallon buckets and
used it to water our houseplants.
Find an attractive water-collection basin if it makes you feel
better.
• Low flow, high pressure:
Look for shower heads that bear
the EPA’s “WaterSense” label and
are low flow but high-pressure.
The EPA worked hard on these
and even brags that you can
“shower with power.”
• Save water elsewhere: Just
as corporations buy clean-energy
credits in exchange for being
naughty, if a strong shower is
your priority, you could work to
save water elsewhere. National
Geographic estimates that fixing
leaks can save you 10 gallons of
water a day. Believe it or not,
toilets use the most water in our
homes, so switch to low-flow or
dual-flush toilets. When your appliances conk out, you can save
water with Energy Star-rated
washers or dishwashers, which
use about half as much water.
Home
Comfort: A nice house.
Judging from the explosion of
magazines and blogs about home
improvement and decorating, we
are in love with our houses.
Solution: A tiny house. Millennials are buying tiny houses instead of McMansions, so much so
that this is considered a “movement.” Even if yours is small, not
tiny, it’s easier to transform a
little place into a jewel. Plus, if
you save money on power and
water (see above), you can put
that money back into home upgrades.
Comfort: Acquiring stuff.
Let’s face it: Shopping is sometimes an activity, not just a means
of getting things.
Solutions: There are several
ways to shop more responsibly.
• Buy lasting products: Power
shoppers, allow me to enable you:
Your No. 1 excuse for shopping is
to buy longer-lasting products to
replace the disposable ones you
used to buy (once you’ve used
them up). Think cloth napkins
instead of paper ones.
• Buy in bulk — to a point:
Environmentalists want you to
avoid single-use products to cut
down on packaging. But it’s also
important to buy only what you
will use to cut down on waste.
• Buy “eco-chic”: “Design and
sustainability often go hand in
hand nowadays,” Trabue said.
“For example, products made of
recycled materials are very
trendy.”
• Buy discriminatingly: Then
again, sometimes the best way to
be green is to not buy anything at
all. Don’t forget the “reduce” and
“reuse” parts of the reduce-reuserecycle mantra. Reduce how
much you buy. Reuse what you
own. And then you’ll have more
money for the stylish stuff.
localliving@washpost.com
Comfort: A lush lawn.
Solutions: I like these ideas
because two out of three are free
and the other saves you money.
• Cut the grass: Cut, as in have
less of it, not as in mow it. If you
must have a lawn, shrink it and
surround it with native plants
Elisabeth Leamy hosts the podcast
“Easy Money.” She is a 13-time
Emmy winner and a 25-year
consumer advocate for programs
such as “Good Morning America.”
Connect with her at leamy.com and
@ElisabethLeamy.
DC
7
the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
8
the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
DC
Home
ISTOCK
A winter draft can drive you daft. Locate the leak.
BY
D ANIEL B ORTZ
On frigid winter days, sometimes you just want to hunker
down at home and stay warm.
Sounds cozy, right? Well, good
luck doing that in a house full of
drafts.
Drafts, or air leaks, can be a
homeowner’s worst nightmare. In
addition to making your space uncomfortable, drafts can drive up
your energy bills — as your heating system goes into overdrive to
keep your home warm — and even
create health risks.
“If you have a drafty home,
you’re exposing yourself to a lot of
outside elements,” says Eddie Zielinski, a Lowe’s store manager in
Harper Woods, Mich. Drafts can
reduce air quality inside your
home, let water in (creating a potential mold problem) and lead to
pest infestation. “There can be a
domino effect depending on the
size and location of the openings,”
Zielinski says.
The good news? There are easy
steps you can take to plug air leaks
inside your home — and reducing
drafts can cut your energy costs by
up to 20 percent per year, according to the U.S. Energy Department.
Here are six ways to keep the
cold out, the heat in and your
utility bills down.
Find the culprits
In addition to openings around
windows and doors, common
sources of drafts include attic
hatches, wiring holes for cable TV
and electrical outlets, plumbing
vents, recessed lights and chimneys. But pinpointing air leaks
may require you to do some detective work.
One old-school search method
is to slowly wave an incense stick
around these problem areas on a
windy day. “If the smoke stream
travels horizontally, you’ve got a
leak that’s costing you comfort
and money,” says Dan DiClerico,
home expert at HomeAdvisor. Another DIY approach is to use a
thermal leak detector, which employs infrared sensors to measure
surface temperatures. (You can
pick one up at a home improvement store or buy one online for
$25 to $40.)
Do an energy audit
Want to get a better idea of how
well your home’s energy system
works? Ask an HVAC company to
perform an energy audit, a comprehensive assessment of energy
performance.
An energy auditor will inspect
your home’s heating and cooling
systems and offer tips on making
your house more energy-efficient.
Most home energy audits cost between $215 and $600, according
to HomeAdvisor, but some utility
companies offer rebates or don’t
charge for them, DiClerico says.
Air-seal your home
Caulking and weatherstripping
are two simple, affordable and effective techniques for plugging
leaks around windows, doors,
electrical outlets and other openings, says Bob Hanbury, a board
member at the National Association of Home Builders. And you
need only a few tools and materials. Weatherstripping windows,
for instance, requires only measuring tape, a utility knife and
self-adhesive tape.
Insulate your home
Your home’s duct system circulates the air supplied by your heating and cooling unit, but over time
connections in ductwork can
come loose and create air leaks,
especially in homes with forcedair heating and cooling, DiClerico
says. In some homes, as much as
20 percent of conditioned air is
lost through leaks in the ductwork. That’s why DiClerico recommends hiring a professional to
insulate and seal ductwork
throughout your home — an improvement that he says can lower
your house’s energy bills by about
$400 a year.
Insulating the attic can also
slash energy costs. Although estimates vary depending on the type
of insulation you choose and
where you live, you can expect to
pay about $1,300 to $2,000 for a
contractor to install attic insulation. Opt for fiberglass insulation,
which has an average return on
investment of 108 percent, according to Remodeling magazine.
You do this by installing foam
socket sealers ($2.88 for a 24pack at Walmart), which fit behind the outlet or the switch’s
faceplate to act as a buffer between your home’s interior and
the outdoor air. Nervous about
handling electrical wiring? Don’t
be with this one. “I know electricity scares folks, but as long as you
turn off the electricity while
you’re doing it, there’s no risk,”
Zielinski says.
Fix small leaks
“Many homes have small leaks
in the foundation, walls, ceilings
and roof that let out as much
heated air in the winter — and cool
air in the summer — as an open
window,” DiClerico says.
One low-cost solution is to use
spray foam insulation to seal air
leaks in crawl spaces and basements, as well as exterior spots
such as wall joints in a garage
ceiling, around exterior faucets
and vents, and where siding and
the foundation meet. This is a
simple DIY project. You can cover
200 square feet with a foam insulation kit that costs between $300
and $600.
Sealing electrical outlets and
switch plates is another easy task
that can improve your home’s
energy efficiency, Zielinski says.
Consider storm windows
Storm window installation expenses can add up quickly. Each
window costs $90 to $140 and
takes about two hours to install at
$30 to $65 per hour, HomeAdvisor
found — but it’s one of the most
cost-effective solutions for upgrading energy-inefficient windows. On average, low-emissivity
(“low-e”) storm windows can save
you about 12 to 33 percent in annual heating and cooling expenses, according to the Energy Department’s website, and they cost
a fraction of installing new windows.
On a tight budget? Buy thermal
window curtains for sun-facing
rooms, Zielinski advises. “They
keep heat in, they’re affordable,
and they look good.”
localliving@washpost.com
9
DC
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the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
PLUS
10
the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
DC
Home
HOME FRONT
A little help around the house from a veteran consumer advocate
Elisabeth
Leamy
Washington
Post consumer
columnist
Elisabeth
Leamy joined
staff writer
Jura Koncius
last week on
our Home
Front online
chat. Here is
an edited excerpt.
Q: I live in the District, and I
keep running into friends who
are appealing their property
taxes. It makes me think I am
missing out, but I don’t have time
to research it. Any tips?
A: My tip is to go for it!
Something like 98 percent of
people never try appealing their
property tax assessment. It is not
much harder than appealing a
traffic ticket, and it saves much
more money. My tips:
• Meet the deadline. In the
Washington area, assessments
are usually mailed out between
January and March.
• Get your property “worksheet”
from your local government and
look for errors, such as the sheet
listing three bedrooms when you
really have two.
• See whether they have
compared your house to others
that are not comparable, and if
so, find alternative comparables
online.
• Try appealing by mail first. If
you must go to a hearing, attend
someone else’s to get the hang of it.
Q: What are your thoughts on
solar power for your house, and
what are things to consider?
A: We are researching solar
panels for our own house as we
speak, and I am going to cover
this in detail in an upcoming
Local Living column. Stay tuned
for those answers. Meanwhile,
some questions to ask:
• How fast will the panels pay
for themselves?
• Can you really generate
enough electricity to sell some
back to the power company?
• What kinds of rebates and
tax credits are available?
• Should you store any extra
power in batteries or just sell it
back?
• Should you pay for your
panels upfront or allow a
company to install them for free
and profit from your tax breaks
and the power you generate?
Q: How do you find good
contractors to do projects around
the house, and avoid unnecessary
work and inflated pricing?
A: I use Consumers’ Checkbook
to find new contractors and
repair people when I need them.
It’s sort of like Consumer
Reports, but for services, and
we’re lucky to have this resource
in the Washington area. As for
not getting taken, I suggest
getting lots of estimates for any
substantial project. Case in
point: I just had a fence built and
the first contractor quoted me
$27,000! All the rest of the bids
clustered between $5,000 and
$8,000. I wouldn’t have known
that without getting lots of
estimates. Plus, I learned
something new from each
estimator. I suggest making a
form for yourself, with questions
to ask each estimator, so you can
later compare them.
your home by combining oils. I
like peppermint and lavender.
Experiment!
Q: My parents are relatively
ISTOCK
young (late 60s and early 70s),
but I’d like to get a sense of their
long-term financial plans and
care plan. However, they are not
receptive to these discussions at
all, and I’m not sure why. Are
there any books or resources
you’d recommend on how to
manage these tricky discussions?
A: Perhaps get them a gift
certificate to see a certified
financial planner and then back
off and let them learn what they
learn? That way you’ve provided
them a smart tool to handle their
own planning.
Q: I love the Container Store, but
it is too pricey. Where can I find
items like plastic tubs for less?
A: Have you checked Ikea? They
have many sturdy — and
attractive — organizational
containers. And if you use the
entire system, the parts work
beautifully together. Ikea is also a
great source for drawer
organizers for the kitchen or
bathroom.
they contain mercury. Take them
to your county’s or city’s
hazardous-waste disposal site.
LEDs, by contrast, give nicer
light and contain no hazardous
materials, so you can toss them
out with the regular trash. You
can also check with your
jurisdiction to see whether the
glass in them is recyclable.
Q: Would you recommend using
Q: When shopping for
homeowner’s insurance, what
questions should I ask? Is the
cheapest policy the best, or do I
need to consider the company
providing it and pay a bit more
for a better name?
A: Yes, the reputation of the
insurance company matters a
lot. You want a company that
will pay out when you actually
have a problem. That said,
shopping around for car,
homeowner’s and other
insurance is one of the fastest
and easiest ways to save more
than a thousand bucks at once.
There are often equally reputable
companies willing to insure you
for far less. A tip for shopping
around with a single call:
Contact an independent
insurance agent who represents
multiple brands of insurance
and let them shop and compare
for you. Find one at
trustedchoice.com/find-an-agent.
Q: I read your recent story about
switching to LED lightbulbs. As
we do that in our home, what is
the best way to get rid of the
hideous compact fluorescent
lamps we still have? Is it safe to
dispose of LEDs in the trash, or
do they also require special
treatment?
A: Isn’t it amazing that an
average household with 40
sockets can save $600 a year by
switching to LEDs? You are right
to dispose of CFLs carefully, as
a project manager during a
renovation to help track progress
and oversee what the general
contractor and other contractors
are doing?
A: A project manager can be a
great idea if you hire a good one
and have plenty of money to do so.
An alternative: You could hire a
home inspector who specializes in
new construction to come out at
key points during the project to
make sure the work is being done
right.
Q: I have always used hand-me-
down vacuums, and it’s time to
purchase a new one. We are
considering robot vacuum options,
as well as upright manuals. What
are some things to consider? We
want this one to last a long time
and work well. We have a cat and
hard floors and carpets.
A: I just bought a robot vacuum
for my husband to give me for
Christmas! Ha-ha. I went with
the one Consumer Reports
recommended, and I’m happy to
say it cost a lot less than the first
couple of generations of robot
vacuums. Mine is a Black &
Decker, and, looking just now,
Consumer Reports also rates a
Samsung and an Ecovacs model
very highly. My robot vacuum
handles both hard floors and
carpets, but you will still need a
regular vacuum as well.
Q: What’s the best way to sell
your old cellphone and delete all
the data before the sale?
Q: What products are best for
A: Some companies you know
cleaning hardwood floors? I’d
like to find something that
doesn’t contain too many harsh
chemicals.
A: Honestly, just water! I have
experimented with various
commercial products but always
come back to just using water on
my hardwoods. The other
products either gummed up or
stripped the finish. If you clean
hardwoods with water, it’s best to
use just a few drops on a Swiffertype mop. Do not saturate the
floor. Oh, and vacuum first.
well, such as Amazon.com, Target
and Best Buy, purchase used
electronics, including cellphones.
Other companies you may not
have heard of that also
participate are BuyBackWorld
and Gazelle, which focuses on
Apple. In terms of eliminating
data, for iPhones there is a simple
procedure in the settings menu
that wipes your phone nearly
instantly. I am not an Android
user or expert, but I find doing a
quick Web search almost always
yields a tutorial or video for little
tech projects such as this.
Q: What’s the best and safest way
to sell old furniture or larger
items?
A: Craigslist is great, but if you
have valuable items and want to
get more money for them,
consider using websites that
attract a clientele willing to pay
more for good pieces. Some
options include Apartment
Therapy Marketplace
(marketplace.apartmenttherapy.
com), Chairish (chairish.com),
Everything but the House
(ebth.com), Facebook
Marketplace (facebook.com/
marketplace), The RealReal
(therealreal.com) and Viyet
(viyet.com).
Q: Many cleaning people are
suggesting using essential oils for
cleaning. Is there a DIY cleaning
list you’d suggest?
A: If I’m not mistaken, the
essential oils are not for the
actual cleaning but rather to add
a scent to DIY cleaning products.
You can create a very effective
general cleaning solution by
using half water and half white
vinegar (two cups of each). Then
add 20 to 30 drops of your
favorite essential oils. You can
even create a custom scent for
Q: Can you use LED bulbs with
CFLs and incandescent bulbs if
you decide to slowly transition to
LEDs?
A: You sure can. Just be cautious
if you have any lights on dimmers.
CFLs don’t work on dimmers, and
some LEDs don’t, either.
Q: We are replacing our outdated
and worn kitchen cabinets. I do
not need a gourmet kitchen with
commercial appliances. What
type of countertop materials are
durable and easy to maintain?
We are also considering nonfinished oak hardwood flooring.
A: I am not a professional
designer, but I am an avid home
decorator. From what I have read,
quartz countertops are the most
durable and are good for resale.
As for floors, I have oak
hardwood floors in my own
kitchen and do like how they flow
seamlessly from that room to
others. However, you need to stay
on top of spills so that the water,
solutions and foods in your
kitchen don’t strip the floors.
localliving@washpost.com
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read the rest of this transcript and
submit questions to the next chat,
Thursday at 11 a.m., at
live.washingtonpost.com.
Home Sales
D I S T RIC T OF C OL UMB I A
These sales data recorded by the
D.C. Office of Tax and Revenue
were provided by Black Knight Inc.
For information about other
residential real estate
transactions, visit
washingtonpost.com/homesales.
NORTHWEST
Arizona Terr., 2833-Laurent
Granier and Tazeen Hasan-Granier
to Mark C. Medish and Sue O.
Edwards, $1.39 million.
Belmont St., 1451, No. 103-Robert
A. Williams Jr. and Robert J.
Lancelotta Jr. to Allison M. Kant,
$524,550.
Calvert St., 1949, No. D-Timothy
S. Rieser to Svetoslava Milusheva,
$444,000.
Cathedral Ave., 4201, No. 1107EJames J. and Joan V. Rowan to
Nawal Abouelala, $305,000.
Church St., 1445, No. 12-Elisa
Catalano to Katherine Amanda
Ellis, $549,000.
Colorado Ave., 5754, No. 101Mary F. Slattery to Patricia Daniela
Donati, $210,000.
Columbia Rd., 1851, No. 305Christopher Eric and Aryan
Rodriguez Bocquet to Michael
Dausen, $395,000.
Connecticut Ave., 3100, No. 232Donna C. Lardiere to Gretchen Ehle
and Quinn A. Warner, $430,000.
Connecticut Ave., 4600, No. 616Colleen Smale to Francis and Julia
B. Creighton, $220,000.
Connecticut Ave., 5402, No. 402Erica S. Hand to Stephen Mayeaux
and Julia Strusienski, $319,000.
Corcoran St., 1808-Reid William
and Catherine Maria Madden to
Margot N. Friedman, $950,000.
D St., 631, No. 537-Adam L. Hudes
to Roghieh Zareifar, $442,000.
Dent Pl., 3042-Robert K. and
Elena G. Tompkins to Carrie Lowell
Hoffman, $1.55 million.
E St., 616, No. 1146-Patrick and
Pamela Venzke to David Lawrence
and Deedra Vosvick, $1.05 million.
Euclid St., 1454, No. 7-Shelley
Fleet and Andrew Ackerman to
Blythe Nicole Kladney, $552,000.
Florida Ave., 929, No. 14-Carlos J.
Ocasio to Catherine Johnson,
$317,745.
Gallatin St., 818-John W.
Lessandrini and Tatiana C.
DC
Tompkins to Micah Lemons and
Samina Vieth, $699,900.
Georgia Ave., 7129-Deborah L.
Hawkins to Daniel R. Gaddy,
$450,000.
Grant Rd., 4537-Diane Cornell to
Harun Dogo, $422,000.
Hamilton St., 1369-Robert Osuji
and Lurden A. Barrett Perez to
James Edward Gregory, $508,725.
Hillyer Pl., 2014-Michele C. White
to Mark Miller, $1.62 million.
Hutchins Pl., 4841-Timothy M.
Johnson and Dawn E. MurphyJohnson to Osman Medar and Jill
Tuncay, $805,000.
Irving St., 1361, No. 9-Matthew E.
Brown to Yunjun Guo, $516,666.
Kalorama Rd., 1849, No. 3-Peter
Roushdy to Julia R. Merkin,
$730,000.
Kansas Ave., 3717-Adrian Deveny
to Alexander Roth and Kelsey King,
$810,000.
Kennedy St., 1216-Sebastein Audy
to Xuan Hoang Thi Nguyen and
Francis X. Whelan Jr., $660,000.
Kilbourne Pl., 1751-Tyler Reeves
to Edward Rounsaville and
Catherine Ward, $1.58 million.
L St., 2425, No. 224-Jarrett B.
Gansky to David Robert Lilling,
$658,000.
Linnean Ave., 4850-RSC 4850
Linnean Corp. to Justin Daniel and
Rebecca Rothbaum Galen,
$2.9 million.
Lowell Lane, 5116-Cartus
Financial Corp. to Jennifer S.
Zuclker, $2.7 million.
M St., 910, No. 629-Jessica D.
Bradley to Daniel Raoul and Rachel
Claire Shively, $655,000.
Macomb St., 2710, No. 202-Sooya
Uhm to Renis Kapshtica,
$215,000.
Massachusetts Ave., 3843James McDermott and Kathleen
Boucher to Patrick Brian and
Patrick Brian Venzke,
$2.08 million.
N St., 1300, No. 617-Deborah L.
Paratore to Robert Scott Ginzel,
$427,000.
N St., 2130, No. 101-David A.
Kaplan to Regan M. Trappler,
$261,000.
N St., 3334-William B. and Cynthia
M. Broydrick to John Carmichael
and Gregory Jackson, $100,000.
New Jersey Ave., 1631-Alison
Ruth Welcher to Casey Pfitzner and
James Warycha Both, $730,000.
O St., 1209, No. 3-Marilyn H. and
George W. Cushman to Yenny and
Philip Yoo, $905,000.
Ontario Rd., 2431-Richard S.
Silver and Kerri L. McGovern to
Brett Schneider, $618,750.
P St., 1737, No. 401-David Novillo
Ortiz and Romina Cialdella to David
Novillo Ortiz, $206,690.
Paper Mill Ct., 1053-Hampton R.
Pearson Jr. to Roxana Samimi,
$675,000.
Park Rd., 1105-Mona AbdelHamlin and Ayan Kishore to Jean
Arlet and Angelica Castanon,
$640,000.
Princeton Pl., 615-Rebecca
Cramer to Ryan A. Abraham and
Katherine F. Johnson-Reid,
$875,000.
Q St., 1401, No. T1-Joseph Todd
Breasseale and Mark S. Nelson to
Dylan Kramer, $385,000.
Queen Annes Lane, 2527Sheshagiri R. Kalavar and Kusum
A.R. Kalavar to Jun Song and Yue
Niu, $1.05 million.
R St., 429-Daniel J. Vukelich and
Travis L. Hollenbeck to Lauren
Ross, $789,000.
Rhode Island Ave., 51, No. 2Diane S. Rosenberg and Mark D.
Meyer to Jalatee Worjloh,
$338,000.
Rhode Island Ave., 1437, No. 710Dragana Ostojic to Keith Neely,
$638,000.
River Rd., 4226-Ugo Fasano to
Jason L. and Rachel F. Russell,
$1.25 million.
S St., 1011-Robert M. Holum to
Samuil Shah, $1.25 million.
S St., 1900, No. 303-Alison J.
Kirchgasser and Kirchgasser
Investment Trust to Nicole Denise
St. Jean, $565,000.
Sheridan St., 1316-William
Griffiths and Jessica Schubel to
Elani and Marc Lawrence,
$625,000.
Sherman Ave., 2608, No. 202Daniel Hagerty to Catherine N. Yin,
$399,999.
Spruce Dr., 1900-Marcus D.
Jadotte and Jennifer Park-Jadotte
to Sarah E. Longwell and Karin R.
Bencala, $1.09 million.
T St., 1518-Dwayne B. Frasier and
Robert J. Divito to Christopher K.
Jensen and Halley H. Dodge,
$1.45 million.
Tuckerman St., 710-Seifu Haile to
Michelle Reid Hamel, $447,500.
U St., 132-Vishal Patel to Travis
Gregory Millsaps and Eun Young
Jang, $1.1 million.
Upton St., 5117-Joann B.
Turrentine and J. Drake Turrentine
to Adnan and Lynda B. Shindala,
$1.34 million.
Van Ness St., 2939, No. 338Adrienne Dale Levinson to
Jacqueline J. Monahan, $262,500.
W St., 925-Lexcore Properties
Corp. to Jonathan M. and Adela L.
Bateman, $680,000.
Webster St., 1512-Joseph D.
Falletta and Annamarie Didonato
to Charlie D. Michael and Susan
Hsu, $759,000.
Wisconsin Ave., 3100, No. 308Laura M. Bernardini to Alex R.
Kramer and Ramon Moreno,
$320,000.
First St., 2315-Marie-Laure
Lajaunie and John Kamman to
Jude Volck and Davida Connon,
$1.48 million.
Third St., 4216-Bradford Charles
Andrew Flewellen to Benjamin P.
Leubsdorf and Kathleen M. List,
$610,000.
Fifth St., 5028-5028 Fifth Street
Corp. to Paul James Rinefierd and
Paige Allison Einstein, $672,500.
Seventh St., 777, No. 1113Howarth Earle Bouis to John
Wayne Lui and Morgan Milner
Pleasant, $645,000.
Ninth St., 4530-Deatrice SimpsonSteer and Nicholas Steer to
Michael Englert and Ambica
Prakash, $650,000.
10th St., 1215, No. 22-John T. and
Susan Stinson to David L. Brodsky,
$518,000.
11th St., 2214, No. 3-Matthew
Alexander and Nicole Lynne Bowen
to Patricia Arty, $669,000.
12th St., 1125, No. 4-Federal
Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to
Allen-Wesley Powell, $204,900.
12th St., 1939, No. 404-Jason D.
Linder to Mariclaire E. Petty,
$443,000.
13th St., 2717, No. A-Casey A.
Callister to Gail and Daniel Morse,
$710,000.
14th St., 1529, No. 309-Yvonne
Marie Carter to Elizabeth Anne
Dooghan, $560,000.
14th St., 3525-Congressional
3525 14th Street Corp. to Michael
Nunes and Ashley Siefert,
$499,900.
15th St., 1601-Hig 1601 15th
Street Corp. to Steven Bradley and
Kenneth Ray Thornton,
$2.02 million.
16th St., 3060, No. 311-Jamie
Estock to Anna Ibrahim and
Andrew Perkins Lomax, $365,000.
18th St., 1713, No. B-Margot
Neumegan Friedman to Spencer
Whalen and Bryann Dasilva,
$435,000.
20th St., 2227, No. 206-Andrew
J.S. Miller to Brian Thomas Wagner
and Kathleen Chang Mee Malone,
$570,000.
24th St., 1121, No. 305-Mark H.
Lee to Rissa Camins and Maria
Antonia Martinez Camins,
$495,000.
26th St., 909-Kenneth T. and
Jacqueline A. Durham to Mark C.
and Theresa J. Matthews,
$1.34 million.
31st St., 6144-Leonard H. Becker
and Stephen Zwim to Ana T. Flynn
and Kelly J. Gannon, $775,000.
34th St., 5147-Todd A. and Claire
A. Delelle to Michael Hochman and
Amanda Bean, $1.23 million.
41st St., 2400, No. 202-Hillary
Thomas-Lake and Rene Lake to
Ashley Joyce May, $320,000.
46th St., 2221-Gordon Lavigne to
Menno Goedman and Charlotte
Read Taylor, $1.4 million.
49th St., 4610-Marco Sorge and
Diana Lillian Fonovich to Matthew
E. Braffman and Leah M. Craft,
$1.16 million.
SOUTHEAST
Adrian St., 727-Pauline C. Bryant
and Morlene C. Gaines to Latoya K.
Young, $255,000.
Bay St., 1821-Donna M. Brown to
Joshua Kersey and Chelsea
HOMES CONTINUED ON 15
the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
NORTHEAST
Blair Rd., 5709-Park Road Corp. to
Dennis A. Horner, $672,250.
C St., 1358-Philip A. and Lauren B.
Medley to Meredith Stafford and
Sixuan Hou, $638,000.
Capitol St. E., 912-Scott Stuart
Plumridge and Mary Margaret
Hiller Plumridge to Jeffrey S. Simon
Jr., $1.44 million.
Channing St., 1529-Regina G.
Davis to Nissa Hiatt and Jacob
Joyce, $475,000.
D St., 509-Omar S. McDoom to
Diane Rusignola, $679,000.
Downing St., 1334-Sheryl M. and
Darryl E. Watson to Benjamin E.
and Laura E. Kallen, $365,000.
Eads St., 3432-Emily J. and Carroll
M. Johnson to Hadiya Green,
$285,600.
Florida Ave., 1138, No. 2-Sarah
Johnson to Edward J. Valentine,
$340,000.
Gallaudet St., 1831-Trevor C. Lack
to Alexander Chen, $378,888.
Hayes St., 4209-Charles Walker
Thomas Jr. to Anne Marie Murdock,
$195,000.
I St., 215, No. 309-Abdo H. Street
Corp. to Zachary and Stacy
Dawson, $700,000.
L St., 1749-Stefan Schwarzkopf to
Colin J. Geraghty, $475,000.
Longfellow St., 40-Adam Nicholas
Fosson and Michelle Ann Johncock
to Susan E.N. Ooi and Robert S.L.
Ooi, $685,000.
Maryland Ave., 1350, No. 414Gregory M. and Linda Mathis to
Christopher S. Lee, $399,000.
Mills Ave., 2919-Nicole Simmons
to Kim Cherry and Gerry Duane
Burnett, $270,000.
Nicholson St., 232-Van Hoose
Properties Corp. to Haleigh Duke
and Jenny Mey, $519,000.
Oneida St., 406-Dominic Cheng
and Swee K. Yip to David H. Slack,
$555,000.
Sheriff Rd., 4917-Christopher L.
Hudson-Boyd to Dakar J. Lanzino,
$255,000.
Taylor St., 1207-Della J. Hoffman
and Matthew J. Rosen to Jonathon
R. McDaniels and Leah M. Nicholls,
$599,900.
U St., 150-Eric Richard Eide and
Elizabeth Ben-Ishai to Katherine
Ross and Brett K. White,
$631,000.
Wright Terr., 3622-Bryan A. and
Julie S. Crawford to Meheret
Tarekegn, $570,000.
Fourth St., 1914, No. 2-Edgardo
Ortiz and William A. Wynne to
Jonathan James Edward Perry,
$420,000.
Sixth St., 916-Steven B.
Grodnitzky to Jesus Lemus and
Helene Audrey Camille OrgnonBreyton, $885,000.
Ninth St., 18, No. 403-Anne
Furlong to Stephanie Duchesneau,
$520,000.
11th St., 410, No. 15-Kim C.
Jordan to Julie Ann Hrdicka,
$605,000.
12th St., 5000-Dennis R. Rich to
Aselefech Chernt, $410,000.
14th St., 73-Ralph Dicapua and
Marie Pace to Rachel Clement and
Jacob Sacks, $384,900.
18th St., 1240, No. 2-Federal
National Mortgage Association to
Andrew J. Chassaing, $167,500.
24th St., 522-Anita Alexander to
Malaka Gharib and Darren
Vandergriff, $552,000.
42nd St., 1225-Ahjah D. Hall to
Pamela Hayes, $235,000.
59th St., 517-517 59th Street NE
Corp. to Rachael Adereni,
$275,000.
11
12
the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
DC
Home
Color-driven landscapes are harder than they look
The most eyecatching part of a
garden plant is its
flower, and the
most captivating
element of a
Adrian
bloom is its color.
Higgins
You might think
then that
GARDENING
designing a
garden should be
an exercise in painting with
flowers. This idea once held a lot
of sway, but color-driven garden
design is, by and large, a dead
duck.
Gardeners today are more
relaxed about their plantings and
are driven less by color schemes
than the desire for naturalistic
effects. We are still drawn to
flowers and have our own color
preferences, but the need for
elaborate, color-coded borders
has generally vanished.
There are ways to pinpoint
plant color — the most famous is
the Royal Horticultural Society
Color Chart, essentially paint
charts with holes in them for
matching chips directly with a
flower — but I have never seen a
gardener here use one.
This retreat from overt color
design doesn’t mean that we
should abandon our interest in
color theory. Every gardener
needs to know how color works.
To that end, we mark this week
the Smithsonian’s publication of
“Werner’s Nomenclature of
Colours,” a reproduction or
facsimile of an 1821 manual that
is slender physically but a giant
in its significance. It was devised
by a Scottish art teacher named
Patrick Syme and based on a
system of color classification by a
German mineralogist, Abraham
Werner. The book standardized
the color descriptions of
scientific specimens in a pivotal
era of discovery. One of its users
was Charles Darwin.
But color systems are needed
by artists as well, and by the end
of the 19th century, color science
had made the leap from botany
to horticulture, most famously
with the work of the Arts and
Crafts garden writer and
designer Gertrude Jekyll. She
started out as a painter but
turned to gardening after her
eyesight deteriorated.
While Claude Monet was
capturing his garden on canvas,
Jekyll was turning her unrealized
paintings into gardens.
She put together planting
plans for borders of hot colors
and cool colors. Her favored
approach was to compose a plant
border that started with cool
colors, moved to hot ones and
then receded to the cooler ones.
This coherent artistry had
Tip of the Week
The best tool for cutting back
ornamental grasses is a pair of
sharp hedging shears. Cut the
grasses two to four inches above
ground level. Tall grasses such as
miscanthus or panicum can be tied
before cutting for ease of disposal.
— Adrian Higgins
ADRIAN HIGGINS/THE WASHINGTON POST
In the author’s garden, a lot of the improbably pretty pink-and-orange tulip named Dordogne and one
unplanned white renegade. Sometimes the color schemes in the garden are best left to the plants.
great appeal and was adopted on
both sides of the Atlantic. One of
Jekyll’s admirers was Vita
Sackville-West, whose renowned
garden at Sissinghurst Castle,
south of London, includes a
white garden aped in private
gardens around the world. I
prefer Sissinghurst’s Purple
Border, which, as I recall, is a
medley of reds, pinks and blues
as well as purple, all set against a
high brick wall.
The desire to group plants by
color is thrilling when done well,
but it leads you into a maze —
you must master color theory
before moving on to high-level
gardening.
First, the theory. If you’ve
taken an art class, you know that
the appearance of a color is
controlled by three components:
hue, brightness (or value) and
saturation.
A pastel color — seen in a pink
Oriental poppy, perhaps — has
high value and high saturation,
making it light and bright. The
pale color of a blushed peony has
high value but low saturation.
The rich color of a crimson
gallica rose has low value and
high saturation. This is explained
in a book by the late Sandra
Austin, who was an instructor of
landscape design at George
Washington University. “Color in
Garden Design” was published in
1998 but still can be found
online.
Austin hoped that if gardeners
understood the technical
attributes of color, they could use
it more effectively in the
landscape.
But mastering color theory is
one thing; having the proficiency
to create a season-long colorcoordinated garden is something
else.
Even if you include foliage as
part of the color plan, as Austin
suggests, you’d still need an
encyclopedic knowledge of
plants and how they grow in
your garden. Sorry, but you can’t
Google that; such knowledge
takes years to accumulate
through trial and error.
Another factor working
against color gardens is our MidAtlantic climate, which is colder
in winter than England and
certainly a lot hotter in summer.
This alters the plant repertoire.
You can’t just crib a planting
scheme from an English book.
I can think of a few instances
where color-driven gardening
still commends itself. The first is
in garden areas of light shade,
where you could put together
plants in considered shades of
green and white with a little blue
thrown in. Foliage color would
be a major element. I might
suggest various hostas and ferns,
grasses and sedges, Satsuki
azaleas, smooth hydrangeas,
fothergillas, sasanqua camellias,
the native fringe tree,
foamflowers, wood asters,
foxgloves, Japanese anemones,
rue anemones, white varieties of
wood anemone and Grecian
windflowers, and lots of little
white daffodils followed by
Virginia bluebells.
The easiest, cheapest color
playground is the container,
where you can pick longflowering annuals and tropicals
that conform to a given three-orfour-color scheme (or a single
color).
Another simple way to play
with colors is to mass-plant three
or four tulip varieties in a
considered color scheme. The
show lasts for only a couple of
weeks, but it’s a delightfully
luxurious way to celebrate the
arrival of spring.
How should you piece
together a planting plan? It is far
more satisfying to compose
gardens in terms of textures,
forms, heights and blocks of
plants rather than color. Such
compositions still pack a flower
punch, but they aren’t reliant on
a constant floral parade for
effect. Besides, there are times
when the color wheel and rules
about complementary and
harmonious hues seem
irrelevant. Color combinations
often take care of themselves,
and there will be happy
accidents. I am thinking of a
tulip named Dordogne, which by
rights should be a gaudy disaster,
marrying a peachy orange
ground with a flame of bubblegum pink. It looks fabulous.
adrian.higgins@washpost.com
@adrian_higgins on Twitter
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read past columns by Higgins at
washingtonpost.com/home.
Wellness
13
DC
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The Hass avocado, left, is the variety you’re used to seeing in grocery stores. The slightly larger “SlimCado,” right, isn’t necessarily more slimming, but it’s still worth trying.
For avocado aficionados, a worthwhile pit stop
Although the ‘SlimCado’ doesn’t live up to its name, you might like its lighter texture
BY
E LLIE K RIEGER
fats replace refined carbohydrates and/or saturated fats in the diet. (Ironically, in one Mediterranean country, Spain, a variety dubbed “Aguacate (Avocado) Light” was launched last year
under the brand Isla Bonita.) Actually, the fat
content of the Hass avocado is one of its considerable health assets, as the nutritious fruit can
replace less beneficial, more calorie-concentrated fats such as butter, mayonnaise and cream.
But misguided marketing aside, the oftenneglected Florida avocado deserves some love.
After reading several negative comments by
bloggers on its taste, I was apprehensive about
trying one, but I was surprised at how much I
enjoyed it. I found the Florida avocado to be
lovely and light and more refreshing than the
Hass (which I have long adored). It would be
perfect, I thought, for salads and smoothies
and for recipes from the more tropical regions
where it grows, such as in a cooling salsa to
accompany a spicy jerk chicken.
Where those bloggers went wrong was in
using it for avocado toast or guacamole; it’s too
watery and not creamy enough for those dishes. The bottom line? California and Florida
avocados have different assets and applications; neither is better than the other at helping
with weight loss, but both are bountifully nutritious. I see no reason not to put both kinds in
your shopping cart.
localliving@washpost.com
Krieger is a registered dietitian, nutritionist and
author who hosts public television’s “Ellie’s Real
Good Food.” She blogs and offers a weekly
newsletter at elliekrieger.com. She also writes
weekly Nourish recipes in The Washington Post’s
Food section.
the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
While sifting through the pyramid of familiar nubby-skinned avocados at the store, you
may have noticed them stacked nearby. Large,
bright green and smooth-skinned, they resemble the avocados you know and love, but they’re
different. Take a closer look, and you may spot a
branded sticker on them saying “SlimCado,”
prompting you to wonder whether this is a
less-fattening avocado or some kind of new
Franken-fruit (yes, an avocado is a fruit).
It’s neither. Although this variety is indeed
lower in fat and calories, it is not necessarily
healthier or more slimming than a “regular”
avocado. And it’s far from new; the variety has
been cultivated for centuries.
Ninety-five percent of the avocados we buy
are Hass avocados from California and Mexico,
which in the U.S. Agriculture Department’s
National Nutrient Database are called “California” avocados. SlimCado is a brand name for the
other variety in the database, “Florida” avocados. You can think of California and Florida
avocados the same way you would red and green
apples. They are different varieties of the same
fruit, with different flavors, textures and culinary applications. They are two broad categories that cover a much more diverse group than
meets the eye; there are actually more than
1,000 varieties of avocado.
Avocado mania is going strong: Sales of the
fruit increased nearly sevenfold between 1989
and 2014, and they continue to grow exponentially. A search of #avocado yields more than 7 million posts on Instagram, and avocado toast has
become a staple food seemingly overnight. You
can buy avocado yogurt, avocado ice cream, and
avocado salad dressing and baby food.
Hass avocados have dominated this boom
for several reasons: There is a plentiful, yearround supply thanks to imports from Mexico;
the variety is relatively easy to ship and sell
because it ripens slowly and its thick skin
prevents bruising; and the most popular avocado dishes, such as avocado toast and guacamole, have their roots in Californian and Mexican
cuisine, so they are best suited to the variety
from those regions. But the Florida fruit that
has been all but ignored in this boom also has a
lot to offer.
Florida avocados, which are from a West
Indian variety that grows best in more humid
climates, are larger than the Hass variety and
have a smoother, brighter green skin. Their
flesh is lighter in flavor and texture, more
water-rich and less buttery. Nutritionally, as
per the USDA data, Florida avocados have
about 25 percent fewer calories and 30 percent
less fat per cup than their California cousins.
For both, the fat is primarily healthy monounsaturated fat. Although similarly packed with
essential nutrients such as potassium and folate, Florida avocados have more vitamin C and
E than California avocados, but they have less
fiber and are slightly less nutrient-dense overall.
The fact that Florida avocados have less fat
and calories may sound compelling to those
watching their weight — something the SlimCado branding clearly hopes to harness — but that
rationale doesn’t hold up scientifically. Many
studies involving eating patterns such as those
of the Mediterranean diet show that enjoying
plenty of good fats benefits health and can help
with weight management, especially if those
14
the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
DC
Family
ON PARENTING
When my daughter’s play dates end, the tantrums begin
BY
M EGHAN L EAHY
Q: My 41/2-year-old daughter loves to have
kids over or go to other kids’ houses, but
at the end of the play date, she is
horrible. This happens when both
parents were there the whole time, when
I drop her off and when the other parent
drops their kid off with us. My daughter
stomps and pouts and yells at me and
her friend and just generally loses it over
having to break up the time together.
Walking away and giving her space is the
most effective thing to do, but sometimes
I have to get her out of someone else’s
house. We’ve tried to talk about it before
play dates. We’ve talked about how they
end, how we will see people again, and
how to be a good host or guest. We’ve
talked about saying, “I’m sad,” instead of
falling apart. She says she gets it but then
is incredibly rude every time. Most
parents of 4-year-olds are pretty
forgiving, but I hate this. Is there a way
to stop her from being rude to her
friends and their parents?
WASHINGTON POST ILLUSTRATION/ISTOCK
A: Children not leaving a play
date — oh boy, have I been where
you are. I once had to drag one of
my children from underneath
the host’s master bed, bringing
every dust bunny known to man
with her. Just thinking of it
makes me sweat again. Complete
and total humiliation. If you
were to poll parents (and if they
would answer honestly), you
would find this to be a
ubiquitous challenge. What’s a
well-meaning parent to do?
To begin, we have to understand
the mind of your 41/2-year-old
daughter. Four-year-olds are
notoriously tough to parent
because they have so much
emergent growth. You are
witnessing a young child come
into her own. Four-year-olds love
to share their opinions, their
bodies are largely at their
command, and their creativity and
imagination are at all-time highs.
But for all this growth, your
41/2-year-old is still immature.
This means that she still wants
what she wants when she wants
it. She can be prone to fits and
tantrums when life does not go
her way. And this is really
important: She cannot always
hold on to her good intentions.
When you talk to her and she is
nodding vigorously and
promising, “Yes, Mommy, I will
definitely leave the playmate
today and not scream or stomp
my feet,” she means every word
she says. I repeat: Your daughter
means it when she promises to
be good.
But when it’s time to leave,
your daughter’s immature mind
is focused only on playing with
her friend. Every promise she
made is out the window. Your
frustration grows because, in
your mind, you have discussed
this topic already, and it probably
feels like your daughter is
yanking you around. But your
daughter is not trying to
humiliate you.
We have a situation where
your daughter is running away or
throwing a fit, your frustration is
building (because as soon as we
are in front of other parents, our
insecurities grow exponentially),
and you feel pressured to lay
down the law or, worse, punish
her at home.
What are you supposed to do?
1. Stop thinking she is
behaving like this on purpose.
Even if her behavior seems
premeditated, it isn’t. She is
hyped up from the play date,
doesn’t want it to end and has
forgotten her promises. Her
tantrums and sass are not
personal. Read that again and
repeat as necessary.
2. If you accept that her
behavior is not personal and that
she can’t control her big
emotions, your marching orders
become clear. Who is the person
who needs to change this
situation? You. I can hear you
sigh from here, but this is the
easier of the two paths. Stipulate
that all play dates must be at
your house. It is much easier to
control the end of the play date
when you are on your own turf.
Tell the other parents: “My
daughter loves playing with
Tonya, but we are struggling with
ending play dates. We are
practicing how to end them with
a bit more . . . peace.” I don’t
know a single parent who
wouldn’t understand this.
3. Mandating that play dates
occur at your home may lessen
the number of them, but that’s
okay. Four-year-olds (especially if
they are in school) do not need
play dates, and her spinning out
could be a sign that her nervous
system is hitting a wall.
Americans are borderline obsessed with socializing our children for fear that we will miss a
magic developmental window
and our children will become recluses. But that’s not how it
works.
Preschool-age children take
their cues from the adults in
their lives and are not meant to
spend gobs of time with other
children. Many 4-year-olds are
easily overstimulated by the
company of children (hence
more out-of-control behaviors).
Your child cannot handle these
play dates, and you need to act as
her prefrontal cortex. Either stop
them or slow them considerably.
The alternative is that you keep
waiting for a preschooler to “get
it” and control herself. That’s
unfair to you and your daughter.
4. Does this mean that you will
never have a play date again? Of
course not. Start practicing
maturity at home. Let’s say a
friend is coming over. Say to your
daughter: “Tonya is coming over
tomorrow. Let’s start practicing
the end of the play date.” Then
you script how the conclusion
will look. Have your daughter
walk you to the door, shake
hands or hug, smile and say,
“Thank you so much for coming.”
Practice this multiple times and
then again at the play date.
Before the parent arrives, have
the friend and your daughter put
on their shoes and coats, then
take them outside to wait.
This way, you are moving the
children out of your home and
easing the path to the car,
bypassing the shenanigans.
Expect that your child will forget and begin to stomp her feet.
Pick her up, smile wide, thank
Tonya and her parent, and get
back into the house.
As long as you are in front of the
other parent, you will feel out of
control and more embarrassed, so
get out of that situation. The end
of the play date isn’t the time for
chitchat and in-depth discussion.
If you keep your boundaries
where the play dates take place,
keep practicing with your daughter and strongly reconsider
whether she needs the play dates
right now, you will find some ease
in this drama.
Your daughter will outgrow
this. Good luck.
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read the transcript of a recent live
Q&A with Leahy at washingtonpost.
com/advice, where you can also find
past columns. Her next chat is
scheduled for Feb. 14.
Send questions about parenting
to meghan@mlparentcoach.com.
15
Home
DC
Horner Pl., 3646-Catrina Y.
Sumter to Debora and Victor
Stewart, $274,000.
Kentucky Ave., 436-Peter M.
Cunningham to Scott K. Duncan
and Jennifer Nelson, $850,000.
Massachusetts Ave., 3405Leanna F. Scriver to James L. and
Terry D. Gray, $385,000.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1391, No.
238-Andrea L. Messina to Michael
L. Shenkman and Rebecca Fleming
Terrell, $399,900.
Texas Ave., 4544-Latonya R.
Muse to Patrice Howard,
$288,000.
13th St., 308, No. 4-Kevin Chi Han
Chan and Mary Patrice Tipton to
Kathleen Plankey, $359,000.
HOMES FROM 11
Forinash, $620,000.
Camden St., 3670-Erica
Westendorf to Jonathan Hebron
and Alisha Mary Bennett,
$543,000.
D St., 1113-Jordan and Melissa B.
Zappala to Richard David and
Debra Deorsey Liebling,
$1.14 million.
Duddington Pl., 129-Carol U.
Meteyer to Michael P. Mobilia and
Brooke K. Weidenbenner,
$815,000.
Frederick Douglass Ct., 1911Kimberly McClure to Richard
Kayeen and Monee Sconyers
Thomas, $330,000.
WE
GET IT
DONE:
17th St., 31-Shu-Chiang Chiu and
Philip Wang to Keith Michael
Gerver and Jessica Palumbo,
$615,000.
32nd Pl., 2116-Jason D. Jones to
Robin Marcus, $525,000.
SOUTHWEST
Danbury St., 109-Kristin L.
Mitchell to Ivan Gholston,
$318,000.
G St., 350, No. N112-Irene
Nemitsas to Brandon Roccio and
Ildiko Juhasz, $391,000.
M St., 240, No. E605-Benjamin
Bahk to Heather S. King,
$284,000.
Fourth St., 1250, No. W611-Myron
Mageto to Ali Velasco Cabrera,
$290,000.
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16
the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
DC
Crime Report
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
These were among incidents
reported by D.C. police. For
information, call 202-727-9099.
NORTHEAST
ASSAULTS
Adams St., 1300 block, 1:08 a.m.
Jan. 27. With knife.
Benning Rd., 1500 block, 11:33
a.m. Jan. 28. With gun.
Isherwood St., 1500 block, 4:07
p.m. Jan. 28.
Jay St., 3500-3899 blocks, 9:07
p.m. Jan. 27. With gun.
Kenilworth Ave., 1600 block, 7:19
p.m. Jan. 25. With gun.
Levis St., 1300 block, 2:39 p.m.
Jan. 26.
Minnesota Ave., 4000-4121
blocks, 11:47 p.m. Jan. 27. With
gun.
Mount Olivet Rd., 900-1020
blocks, 2:05 p.m. Jan. 25. With gun.
Queen St., 1100 block, 5:39 p.m.
Jan. 27.
56th Pl., 700 block, 3:48 p.m. Jan.
28.
62nd St., 300 block, 8:18 a.m. Jan.
25. With knife.
ROBBERIES
Division Ave., 600 block, 1:34 p.m.
Jan. 24.
Jackson St., 1700 block, 8:50 p.m.
Jan. 26. With gun.
Maryland Ave., 1300 block, 10:04
a.m. Jan. 30.
Massachusetts Ave., unit block,
3:32 p.m. Jan. 28.
Montello Ave., 1700 block, 7:53
a.m. Jan. 30.
New York Ave., 1600-1779 blocks,
5:12 p.m. Jan. 29.
Quarles St., 4500 block, 3:51 p.m.
Jan. 26. With gun.
12th St., 400 block, 6:28 p.m. Jan.
26.
40th St., 300-499 blocks, 10:14
p.m. Jan. 27. With gun.
47th St., 200 block, 2:37 p.m. Jan.
26. With gun.
BREAK-INS
Channing St., 2200-2399 blocks,
5:54 p.m. Jan. 28.
Fairview Ave., 1900 block, 9:40
a.m. Jan. 25.
H St., 500 block, 11:38 a.m. Jan.
30.
H St., 800 block, 2:50 p.m. Jan. 30.
H St., 900 block, 12:28 a.m. Jan.
30.
H St., 1200 block, 6:17 a.m. Jan.
30.
I St., 1800 block, 9:59 a.m. Jan. 25.
Ninth St., 200 block, 3:08 p.m.
Jan. 25.
16th St., 200 block, 4:43 p.m. Jan.
29.
45th St., 500 block, 3:54 a.m. Jan.
28.
50th St., 300-409 blocks, 11:08
a.m. Jan. 26.
THEFTS
A St., 600 block, 11:41 a.m. Jan.
26. From vehicle.
Abbey Pl., 1100 block, 6:54 p.m.
Jan. 30.
Benning Rd., 1500-1699 blocks,
10:46 a.m. Jan. 25.
Benning Rd., 1900-2099 blocks,
4:46 p.m. Jan. 28.
Benning Rd., 1900-2099 blocks,
6:30 p.m. Jan. 28.
Benning Rd., 1900-2099 blocks,
2:28 p.m. Jan. 29.
Benning Rd., 3900 block, 3:27
a.m. Jan. 27.
Benning Rd., 3900 block, 5:48
p.m. Jan. 30.
Benning Rd., 4000 block, 6:58
a.m. Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Benning Rd., 4400 block, 12:13
p.m. Jan. 24.
Bladensburg Rd., 900 block, 4:38
p.m. Jan. 27.
Bladensburg Rd., 900 block, 4:49
p.m. Jan. 27.
Bladensburg Rd., 2100-2299
blocks, 2:11 a.m. Jan. 24.
Bladensburg Rd., 2800-3200
blocks, 7 a.m. Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Blaine St., 3300 block, 11:18 a.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Blair Rd., 5400 block, 6:26 a.m.
Jan. 30. From vehicle.
Brentwood Rd., 900 block, 7:34
a.m. Jan. 25. From vehicle.
Brentwood Rd., 900 block, 5:11
a.m. Jan. 28.
Brentwood Rd., 1000-1249
blocks, 9:49 a.m. Jan. 29.
Brooks St., 4400 block, 8:31 a.m.
Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Channing St., 2200-2399 blocks,
10 p.m. Jan. 26.
Clay Pl., 4000 block, 7:03 p.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
Clay St., 5200 block, 9:33 a.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
Commodore Joshua Barney Dr.,
3400-3599 blocks, 3:15 p.m. Jan.
20. From vehicle.
D St., 1100 block, 5:38 a.m. Jan.
25. From vehicle.
East Capitol St., 3800 block, 6:20
a.m. Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Eastern Ave., 900-1099 blocks,
10:46 a.m. Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Eastern Ave., 4500 block, 5:39
a.m. Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Eastern Ave., 4800 block, 1:42
p.m. Jan. 25.
Eastern Ave., 5700 block, 11:08
p.m. Jan. 29.
Eastern Ave., 6200 block, 5:45
a.m. Jan. 28.
F St., 1600 block, 1:17 p.m. Jan. 28.
From vehicle.
Florida Ave., 300 block, 5:08 a.m.
Jan. 29.
Florida Ave., 700 block, 8:44 a.m.
Jan. 30.
Gallatin St., 1500 block, 8:08 p.m.
Jan. 24. From vehicle.
H St., 800 block, 3 p.m. Jan. 29.
H St., 1800 block, 3:20 p.m. Jan.
29.
Hawaii Ave., 300 block, 1:21 p.m.
Jan. 30.
Hayes St., 3600-3764 blocks, 8:29
p.m. Jan. 27.
I St., 2100 block, 7:02 a.m. Jan. 24.
Kearny St., 1500 block, 4:22 a.m.
Jan. 27.
Kendall St., 1900 block, 9:04 a.m.
Jan. 26.
Kenilworth Ave., 200 block, 4:23
a.m. Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Kenilworth Ave., 1300-1499
blocks, 4:19 a.m. Jan. 26. From
vehicle.
Kenilworth Ave., 1500 block, 8:23
a.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Kenilworth Terr., 600 block, 7:17
p.m. Jan. 24.
Lee St., 4000 block, 10:55 a.m.
Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Lincoln Rd., 2100-2399 blocks,
3:44 a.m. Jan. 30. From vehicle.
Market St., 2400 block, 11:45
a.m. Jan. 25.
Maryland Ave., 1300 block, 3:31
a.m. Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Michigan Ave., 1900 block, 11:26
a.m. Jan. 27.
Monroe St., 600 block, 5:48 a.m.
Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Monroe St., 1200 block, 10:45
a.m. Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Mount Olivet Rd., 900-1020
blocks, 9:39 a.m. Jan. 25. From
vehicle.
New York Ave., 1200-1399 blocks,
5:49 a.m. Jan. 25.
New York Ave., 1600-1779 blocks,
5:57 p.m. Jan. 29.
New York Ave., 1800-2299 blocks,
10:19 a.m. Jan. 30.
Perry St., 1800 block, 5:14 p.m.
Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Queens Chapel Rd., 2100-2399
blocks, 9:50 a.m. Jan. 29. From
vehicle.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
11:13 a.m. Jan. 24.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
4:05 a.m. Jan. 28.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
4:27 a.m. Jan. 28.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
5:35 a.m. Jan. 28.
Rhode Island Ave., 3000-3133
blocks, 4:28 p.m. Jan. 28.
Riggs Rd., 300 block, 2:15 a.m.
Jan. 25.
Riggs Rd., 300 block, 6:42 a.m.
Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Riggs Rd., 300 block, 1:02 p.m.
Jan. 28.
Rittenhouse St., 300 block, 5:53
a.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Rock Creek Church Rd., 52005399 blocks, 6:47 a.m. Jan. 29.
From vehicle.
Summit St., 1100 block, 7:46 a.m.
Jan. 29.
T St., 300 block, 1:23 a.m. Jan. 25.
From vehicle.
Trinidad Ave., 1200 block, 6:01
a.m. Jan. 30. From vehicle.
Washington Pl., 2300-2499
blocks, 3:43 a.m. Jan. 27. From
vehicle.
Washington Pl., 2300-2499
blocks, 3:06 p.m. Jan. 30.
Webster St., 100 block, 4:48 a.m.
Jan. 11. From vehicle.
West Virginia Ave., 1900 block,
5:49 p.m. Jan. 26.
First St., 1200 block, 1:48 p.m.
Jan. 25.
First St., 1200 block, 9:13 a.m.
Jan. 28.
Second St., 700-899 blocks, 7 a.m.
Jan. 24.
Second St., 1300 block, 7:01 p.m.
Jan. 24.
Second St., 1300 block, 10:14
a.m. Jan. 26.
Fourth St., 1200 block, 3:53 p.m.
Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 1300 block, 6:41 a.m.
Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 1300 block, 1:13 p.m.
Jan. 25.
Sixth St., 900 block, 5:15 a.m. Jan.
25.
Seventh St., 200 block, 1:59 a.m.
Jan. 30.
Seventh St., 600 block, 11:59 a.m.
Jan. 30. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 3400 block, 8:50 a.m.
Jan. 23.
10th St., 300 block, 5:35 a.m. Jan.
28. From vehicle.
10th St., 3100 block, 3:58 p.m.
Jan. 25.
10th St., 4300 block, 3:22 p.m.
Jan. 25.
12th St., 3700 block, 1:31 p.m. Jan.
26.
13th St., 300 block, 12:59 p.m.
Jan. 30. From vehicle.
14th Pl., 200 block, 3:13 a.m. Jan.
27. From vehicle.
14th Pl., 600 block, 6:42 a.m. Jan.
30.
18th Pl., 1200 block, 9:39 a.m.
Jan. 24.
18th Pl., 2300 block, 11:35 a.m.
Jan. 24.
18th St., 800 block, 8:46 a.m. Jan.
25.
21st St., 800 block, 1:07 p.m. Jan.
26.
40th St., 300-499 blocks, 7:45
a.m. Jan. 30.
46th St., 1-199 blocks, 4:14 a.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
46th St., 1000 block, 5:53 a.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
47th St., 200 block, 8:18 p.m. Jan.
26.
48th St., 1100 block, 4:19 a.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
49th Pl., 500 block, 7:13 a.m. Jan.
27. From vehicle.
49th St., 1300 block, 10:36 a.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Ames St., 3900 block, 3:41 p.m.
Jan. 29.
Bladensburg Rd., 1200-1699
blocks, 7:29 p.m. Jan. 26.
Bladensburg Rd., 2800-3200
blocks, 5:46 a.m. Jan. 29.
Blaine St., 5400-5599 blocks,
11:33 a.m. Jan. 24.
Blaine St., 5600 block, 4:43 a.m.
Jan. 25.
Hayes St., 4400 block, 9:43 a.m.
Jan. 30.
Hunt St., 5000 block, 6:41 a.m.
Jan. 25.
Market St., 2400 block, 5:37 p.m.
Jan. 25.
Maryland Ave., 1600 block, 11:07
p.m. Jan. 27.
Maryland Ave., 1800 block, 4:54
a.m. Jan. 24.
Minnesota Ave., 3800 block,
12:50 p.m. Jan. 27.
Nannie Helen Burroughs Ave.,
4800 block, 2:06 p.m. Jan. 29.
Okie St., 1400-1599 blocks, 5:51
p.m. Jan. 24.
Fourth St., 2600 block, 5:17 a.m.
Jan. 30.
Eighth St., 200 block, 7:21 a.m.
Jan. 24.
44th St., 1000 block, 1:14 p.m.
Jan. 24.
48th Pl., 500 block, 4:41 a.m. Jan.
29.
48th St., 1100 block, 6:58 p.m.
Jan. 28.
60th St., 500 block, 7:07 p.m. Jan.
25.
NORTHWEST
ASSAULTS
Connecticut Ave., 1200 block,
4:49 p.m. Jan. 25. With gun.
Connecticut Ave., 1300-1699
blocks, 10:24 p.m. Jan. 27.
Connecticut Ave., 3300-3499
blocks, 12:36 p.m. Jan. 24. With
knife.
Fairmont St., 1300 block, 4:47
p.m. Jan. 26.
Irving St., 500-699 blocks, 9:56
p.m. Jan. 23. With gun.
U St., 1600 block, 7:30 p.m. Jan.
27.
Eighth St., 1700 block, 10:13 p.m.
Jan. 27. With knife.
14th St., 4600 block, 3:27 p.m.
Jan. 28.
ROBBERIES
Allison St., 1300 block, 2:38 p.m.
Jan. 25.
Georgia Ave., 3800 block, 10:23
p.m. Jan. 27.
Georgia Ave., 5300 block, 7:11
p.m. Jan. 25.
Georgia Ave., 5700-5899 blocks,
2:56 p.m. Jan. 29.
Longfellow St., 900 block, 7:17
a.m. Jan. 27.
Mount Pleasant St., 3300 block,
12:31 a.m. Jan. 28.
New Hampshire Ave., 5000 block,
2:58 p.m. Jan. 25. With gun.
Rhode Island Ave., 1400 block,
11:46 p.m. Jan. 27.
T St., 1000 block, 9:57 a.m. Jan.
29.
U St., 1700 block, 12:21 a.m. Jan.
28.
W St., 900 block, 4:52 p.m. Jan.
27.
Seventh St., 1100 block, 2:41 p.m.
Jan. 24. With gun.
Ninth St., 3700 block, 12:18 p.m.
Jan. 30. With gun.
14th St., 5800-5912 blocks, 3:21
p.m. Jan. 27. With gun.
15th St., 2600-2798 blocks, 10:01
p.m. Jan. 28. With gun.
18th St., 1200 block, 8:09 p.m.
Jan. 27.
22nd St., 1700 block, 6:11 p.m.
Jan. 25.
BREAK-INS
Columbia Rd., 1300 block, 9:41
a.m. Jan. 21.
Euclid St., 700-898 blocks, 6:32
CRIME CONTINUED ON 17
17
Crime Report
CRIME FROM 16
a.m. Jan. 24.
Kenyon St., 500-699 blocks, 3:45
p.m. Jan. 29.
Kenyon St., 1600 block, 12:45
p.m. Jan. 30.
Linnean Ave., 4500 block, 3:42
a.m. Jan. 23.
P St., 1100 block, 11:55 a.m. Jan.
28.
S St., 1400 block, 5:49 p.m. Jan.
27.
U St., 1600 block, 1:15 p.m. Jan.
24.
Wisconsin Ave., 5200 block, 7:51
a.m. Jan. 29.
Seventh St., 5300 block, 6:11 p.m.
Jan. 24.
11th St., 2000 block, 8:16 a.m.
Jan. 29.
14th St., 3600 block, 12:28 a.m.
Jan. 11.
14th St., 6400 block, 12:49 p.m.
Jan. 25.
17th St., 1500 block, 1:14 p.m. Jan.
30.
23rd St., 600 block, 4:54 p.m. Jan.
25.
THEFTS
Connecticut Ave., 1300-1699
blocks, 11:50 p.m. Jan. 28.
Connecticut Ave., 1700 block,
3:46 p.m. Jan. 24.
Connecticut Ave., 1700 block,
6:07 p.m. Jan. 25.
Connecticut Ave., 4200-4399
blocks, 10:25 a.m. Jan. 24.
Connecticut Ave., 4200-4399
blocks, 5:57 p.m. Jan. 25.
Connecticut Ave., 4200-4399
blocks, 7:22 a.m. Jan. 26.
Connecticut Ave., 4400 block,
1:36 a.m. Jan. 24.
Corcoran St., 1700 block, 3:12
p.m. Jan. 25.
E St., unit block, 6:42 p.m. Jan. 26.
F St., 900 block, 4:15 p.m. Jan. 30.
From vehicle.
F St., 1000 block, 8:03 a.m. Jan.
25.
F St., 1000 block, 8:16 a.m. Jan.
25.
F St., 1000 block, 9:20 a.m. Jan.
25.
F St., 1000 block, 7:31 a.m. Jan.
29.
F St., 2000 block, 9:42 a.m. Jan.
25.
F St., 2000 block, 11:20 a.m. Jan.
25.
Fessenden St., 4500 block, 4:35
a.m. Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Florida Ave., 400 block, 6:02 p.m.
Jan. 25.
Fort Dr., 4500 block, 3:05 p.m.
Jan. 24.
Fuller St., 1600 block, 6:03 p.m.
Jan. 27.
G St., 1200 block, 5:16 p.m. Jan.
26.
G St., 1300 block, 9:52 a.m. Jan.
24. From vehicle.
G St., 1300 block, 2:55 p.m. Jan.
26. From vehicle.
Gallatin St., 500-699 blocks, 4:25
a.m. Jan. 30. From vehicle.
Garrison St., 4000 block, 12:43
p.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 2000 block, 8:13
a.m. Jan. 25.
Georgia Ave., 2800 block, 3:29
p.m. Jan. 25. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 2800 block, 8:51
a.m. Jan. 28. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 3000 block, 10:57
a.m. Jan. 28. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block, 5:31
p.m. Jan. 25. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block, 4:22
p.m. Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block, 8:42
a.m. Jan. 28. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block, 1:24
p.m. Jan. 28.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block, 5:43
a.m. Jan. 30. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 4300 block, 12:37
p.m. Jan. 15.
Georgia Ave., 5100 block, 10:17
a.m. Jan. 25. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 5200 block, 1:56
p.m. Jan. 25.
Georgia Ave., 6300 block, 1:56
p.m. Jan. 25. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 6300 block, 12:04
a.m. Jan. 29.
Georgia Ave., 7700 block, 7:33
p.m. Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Gresham Pl., 500-699 blocks, 5:11
a.m. Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Gresham Pl., 500-699 blocks,
6:51 p.m. Jan. 27. From vehicle.
H St., 700 block, 7:55 p.m. Jan. 25.
H St., 2300 block, 4:37 a.m. Jan.
27. From vehicle.
H St., unit block, 6:36 p.m. Jan. 26.
H St., unit block, 4:12 p.m. Jan. 27.
H St., unit block, 9:23 a.m. Jan. 30.
Hamilton St., unit block, 6:24 p.m.
Jan. 26. From vehicle.
I St., 600 block, 4:54 p.m. Jan. 25.
From vehicle.
I St., 600 block, 4:15 p.m. Jan. 26.
From vehicle.
I St., 1300 block, 5:27 p.m. Jan. 26.
I St., 2200 block, 5:36 p.m. Jan.
26.
Ingomar St., 3900 block, 6:39
a.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Irving St., 1300 block, 8:42 a.m.
Jan. 26.
Irving St., 1300 block, 4:21 a.m.
Jan. 29.
Jenifer St., 3700 block, 3:37 a.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Jenifer St., 4200 block, 3:38 a.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
K St., 600 block, 8:41 p.m. Jan. 25.
K St., 1400 block, 1:31 p.m. Jan.
27.
Kennedy St., 100 block, 8:28 a.m.
Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Kennedy St., 100 block, 6:52 a.m.
Jan. 25.
Kennedy St., 100 block, 4:41 p.m.
Jan. 28.
Kenyon St., 700-999 blocks, 4:49
a.m. Jan. 25.
Kenyon St., 700-999 blocks, 2:36
p.m. Jan. 28. From vehicle.
L St., 400 block, 9:48 p.m. Jan. 24.
Lamont St., 1100-1299 blocks,
3:47 p.m. Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Lanier Pl., 1600 block, 9:59 a.m.
Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Laurel St., 6800 block, 7:09 p.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
M St., 400 block, 7:18 p.m. Jan. 28.
M St., 2300 block, 9:55 a.m. Jan.
25.
M St., 2400 block, 6:31 a.m. Jan.
29.
M St., 3100 block, 8:02 a.m. Jan.
28.
M St., 3200 block, 2:50 p.m. Jan.
24.
M St., 3200 block, 3:11 p.m. Jan.
24.
M St., 3200 block, 1:38 p.m. Jan.
25.
M St., 3200 block, 6:02 a.m. Jan.
26.
M St., 3200 block, 11:51 a.m. Jan.
28.
M St., 3200 block, 2:51 p.m. Jan.
29.
Macarthur Blvd., 5700 block,
9:45 a.m. Jan. 28.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
1:11 p.m. Jan. 28.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
4:35 p.m. Jan. 29.
Mill Rd., 2500 block, 11:15 p.m.
Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Monroe St., 1400-1599 blocks,
6:24 a.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Morton St., 600 block, 3:58 p.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
N St., 800 block, 2:35 p.m. Jan. 24.
From vehicle.
N St., 800 block, 7:26 a.m. Jan. 25.
N St., 2000 block, 8:54 a.m. Jan.
28. From vehicle.
Nebraska Ave., 3700-4102
blocks, 4:10 a.m. Jan. 29.
Nebraska Ave., 5600 block, 5:57
p.m. Jan. 30. From vehicle.
New Hampshire Ave., 3500 block,
2:51 p.m. Jan. 29.
New Hampshire Ave., 3700 block,
3:13 p.m. Jan. 30. From vehicle.
Newton Pl., 400 block, 7:19 a.m.
Jan. 21.
Nicholson St., 1300 block, 2:35
a.m. Jan. 25. From vehicle.
North Capitol St., 2500-2699
blocks, 11:19 a.m. Jan. 28.
North Capitol St., 4700-4931
blocks, 6:01 a.m. Jan. 24. From
vehicle.
North Capitol St., 5300-5416
blocks, 5:03 a.m. Jan. 28. From
vehicle.
O St., 900 block, 6:45 p.m. Jan. 26.
O St., 900 block, 9:19 a.m. Jan. 30.
From vehicle.
Ontario Rd., 2800 block, 8:04
a.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Otis Pl., 800 block, 8:17 a.m. Jan.
25.
Otis Pl., 1000 block, 3:27 p.m. Jan.
30. From vehicle.
P St., 1400 block, 8:17 a.m. Jan.
26.
Park Rd., 700-899 blocks, 11:35
p.m. Jan. 26.
Pennsylvania Ave., 2000 block,
4:11 a.m. Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Piney Branch Rd., 6700 block,
8:49 a.m. Jan. 25. From vehicle.
Q St., 1800 block, 8:52 p.m. Jan.
24. From vehicle.
Quebec St., 4900 block, 7:13 a.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
R St., 1400 block, 10:43 a.m. Jan.
24.
R St., unit block, 10:42 a.m. Jan.
29.
Randolph Pl., unit block, 5:06 p.m.
Jan. 25.
Randolph Pl., unit block, 12:55
p.m. Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Rhode Island Ave., 1400 block,
10:57 p.m. Jan. 29.
Rock Creek Church Rd., 700
block, 8:19 p.m. Jan. 24. From
vehicle.
Rock Creek Ford Rd., 1400 block,
7:21 a.m. Jan. 25. From vehicle.
Rodman St., 3000 block, 4:31
a.m. Jan. 25. From vehicle.
S St., 600 block, 10:04 p.m. Jan.
27. From vehicle.
S St., 1400 block, 11:25 a.m. Jan.
26. From vehicle.
S St., 1600 block, 3:19 p.m. Jan.
28. From vehicle.
S St., 1800 block, 12:51 p.m. Jan.
24.
S St., 1800 block, 1:46 p.m. Jan.
26.
Shepherd St., 500 block, 12:24
p.m. Jan. 28.
Spring Rd., 1400-1599 blocks,
11:48 a.m. Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Sunderland Pl., 1900 block, 11:44
a.m. Jan. 25. From vehicle.
T St., 600 block, 4:31 p.m. Jan. 24.
T St., 3800 block, 5:59 a.m. Jan.
29. From vehicle.
Taylor St., 1300 block, 2:16 a.m.
Jan. 24. From vehicle.
U St., 900 block, 3:34 p.m. Jan. 30.
U St., 1200 block, 6:49 a.m. Jan.
27.
U St., 1200 block, 12:31 a.m. Jan.
28.
U St., 1200 block, 9:02 a.m. Jan.
29. From vehicle.
U St., 1300 block, 8:41 a.m. Jan.
29.
U St., 1300 block, 4:17 a.m. Jan.
30.
U St., 1300 block, 7:27 a.m. Jan.
30.
U St., 1300 block, 10:04 a.m. Jan.
30.
U St., 1400 block, 10:27 a.m. Jan.
30. From vehicle.
University Pl., 2500 block, 7:05
p.m. Jan. 29.
Upshur St., 800 block, 3:50 p.m.
Jan. 26.
V St., 700 block, 2:54 a.m. Jan. 24.
From vehicle.
V St., 1300 block, 11:38 a.m. Jan.
27. From vehicle.
V St., 1600 block, 8:21 a.m. Jan.
26. From vehicle.
V St., 4900 block, 3:54 p.m. Jan.
30. From vehicle.
Vermont Ave., 1100 block, 5:52
p.m. Jan. 27.
Vermont Ave., 1700 block, 9:30
a.m. Jan. 28. From vehicle.
Vine St., 200-399 blocks, 4:49
p.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Vine St., 200-399 blocks, 5:37
p.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Warder St., 3200 block, 5:30 p.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Warder St., 3600 block, 6:43 a.m.
Jan. 25.
Warren Pl., 5100 block, 6:41 a.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Whittier Pl., 1400-1599 blocks,
4:37 a.m. Jan. 28. From vehicle.
Willow St., 6900 block, 1:41 a.m.
Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Willow St., 6900 block, 7:07 p.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Wisconsin Ave., 1000 block, 6:41
a.m. Jan. 30.
Wisconsin Ave., 1200 block, 1:58
p.m. Jan. 25.
Wisconsin Ave., 1400 block, 1:07
a.m. Jan. 24.
Wisconsin Ave., 1400 block, 5
a.m. Jan. 28.
Wisconsin Ave., 1800-2008
blocks, 11:24 a.m. Jan. 28.
Wisconsin Ave., 2200-2318
blocks, 10:10 a.m. Jan. 28.
Wisconsin Ave., 5200 block,
12:04 p.m. Jan. 26.
Wisconsin Ave., 5300 block, 1:45
p.m. Jan. 25.
Wisconsin Ave., 5300 block, 5:37
p.m. Jan. 29.
Woodley Rd., 2600 block, 7:19
CRIME CONTINUED ON 18
the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
Adams Mill Rd., 2800 block, 11:41
a.m. Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Arkansas Ave., 4400 block, 6:08
a.m. Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Aspen St., 1400-1599 blocks,
11:37 a.m. Jan. 29.
Bates St., unit block, 1:18 p.m. Jan.
15.
California St., 1800 block, 4:51
p.m. Jan. 23.
Calvert St., 1800-1999 blocks,
4:19 p.m. Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Cathedral Ave., 2200 block, 10:19
a.m. Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Cathedral Ave., 2200 block, 1:12
p.m. Jan. 28. From vehicle.
Cathedral Ave., 5400 block, 9:13
a.m. Jan. 30. From vehicle.
Cedar St., 200 block, 10:22 p.m.
Jan. 23.
Cedar St., 200 block, 9:13 p.m.
Jan. 28.
Chesapeake St., 4000 block, 7:14
a.m. Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Cliffbourne Pl., 2500 block, 3:05
p.m. Jan. 29.
Clifton St., 1200 block, 4:19 p.m.
Jan. 28. From vehicle.
Clifton St., 1300 block, 9:16 a.m.
Jan. 27.
Columbia Rd., 1700 block, 12:16
a.m. Jan. 28.
Columbia Rd., 2000 block, 9:15
a.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block, 1
p.m. Jan. 27.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
2:40 p.m. Jan. 29.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
3:52 p.m. Jan. 30.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
4:52 p.m. Jan. 30.
Connecticut Ave., 1200 block,
12:04 p.m. Jan. 27.
Connecticut Ave., 1200 block,
1:27 p.m. Jan. 27.
Connecticut Ave., 1300-1699
blocks, 11:13 p.m. Jan. 26.
DC
the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
DC
Crime Report
CRIME FROM 17
a.m. Jan. 22.
Second St., 500-721 blocks, 10:09
a.m. Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Second St., 1800 block, 4:17 a.m.
Jan. 27.
Second St., 5100 block, 1:41 p.m.
Jan. 25.
Third St., 4200 block, 1:50 p.m.
Jan. 30.
Fourth St., 1200 block, 4:02 p.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 1800 block, 2:01 p.m.
Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 700 block, 2:05 p.m. Jan.
25. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 1800 block, 2:48 p.m.
Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 1800 block, 9:26 p.m.
Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 700 block, 8:02 a.m.
Jan. 27.
Seventh St., 700 block, 9:34 a.m.
Jan. 28.
Seventh St., 700 block, 4:01 p.m.
Jan. 29.
Seventh St., 800 block, 6:31 p.m.
Jan. 29.
Seventh St., 1100 block, 3:05 p.m.
Jan. 30. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 1300 block, 8:48 a.m.
Jan. 28. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 1300 block, 5:57 p.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 1500 block, 9:45 a.m.
Jan. 24.
Seventh St., 1600 block, 4:32 p.m.
Jan. 25.
Seventh St., 1600 block, 9:33 p.m.
Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 1800 block, 4:46 a.m.
Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 1900 block, 6:54 a.m.
Jan. 29.
Seventh St., 1900 block, 4 p.m.
Jan. 29.
Eighth St., 400 block, 4:42 p.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 1700 block, 2:59 a.m.
Jan. 29.
Eighth St., 1800 block, 2:48 p.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 1900 block, 6:40 a.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 500 block, 7:53 p.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 1300 block, 2:12 p.m.
Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 1400 block, 9:41 a.m.
Jan. 27. From vehicle.
10th St., 3500 block, 9:13 a.m.
Jan. 27.
11th St., 700 block, 4:57 p.m. Jan.
29. From vehicle.
11th St., 2100 block, 4:12 a.m.
Jan. 26. From vehicle.
11th St., 2800 block, 4:48 a.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
11th St., 3000 block, 4:44 p.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
11th St., 3400 block, 5:44 p.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
12th St., 600 block, 10:03 a.m.
Jan. 28.
12th St., 1000 block, 1:54 p.m.
Jan. 26. From vehicle.
12th St., 1100 block, 11:25 a.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
12th St., 2000 block, 10:07 a.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
13th St., 600 block, 1:37 p.m. Jan.
29.
13th St., 1900 block, 12:55 a.m.
Jan. 28. From vehicle.
13th St., 2000 block, 5:04 p.m.
Jan. 28. From vehicle.
13th St., 2100 block, 11:44 p.m.
Jan. 26. From vehicle.
13th St., 3000 block, 6:45 a.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
13th St., 3200-3399 blocks, 11:25
a.m. Jan. 27. From vehicle.
13th St., 3500 block, 2:16 p.m.
Jan. 29.
13th St., 4100 block, 7:46 a.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
14th St., 1600 block, 2:45 p.m.
Jan. 26.
14th St., 1800 block, 5:31 p.m.
Jan. 29.
14th St., 1900 block, 6:04 p.m.
Jan. 24.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 9:50
a.m. Jan. 24.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 11:26
a.m. Jan. 27.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 4:37
Nature. In all its beauty.
a.m. Jan. 29.
15th St., 700 block, 6:31 a.m. Jan.
29.
15th St., 800 block, 2:51 p.m. Jan.
27.
15th St., 1200 block, 2:42 p.m.
Jan. 28.
15th St., 1700 block, 5:18 p.m. Jan.
25. From vehicle.
17th St., 4000 block, 2:01 p.m.
Jan. 26. From vehicle.
20th St., 1700 block, 7:04 a.m.
Jan. 20. From vehicle.
24th St., 900-1010 blocks, 5:14
a.m. Jan. 27.
31st Pl., 6300-6599 blocks, 2:35
p.m. Jan. 25. From vehicle.
31st St., 1500 block, 9:14 a.m.
Jan. 25.
31st St., 1500 block, 9:23 a.m.
Jan. 25.
33rd St., 5800 block, 11:36 a.m.
Jan. 27. From vehicle.
37th St., 3700-3999 blocks, 7:53
a.m. Jan. 24.
41st St., 4700 block, 9:34 a.m.
Jan. 28. From vehicle.
41st St., 5100 block, 5:07 p.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
44th St., 4800 block, 2:39 p.m.
Jan. 24. From vehicle.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Gresham Pl., 700-999 blocks,
11:39 a.m. Jan. 30.
Overlook Lane, 3500 block, 11:52
p.m. Jan. 25.
V St., 1300 block, 1:31 p.m. Jan.
27.
Vermont Ave., 1800 block, 5:26
p.m. Jan. 28.
Vermont Ave., 2000 block, 3:18
p.m. Jan. 24.
Ninth St., 700 block, 6:03 p.m.
Jan. 30.
14th St., 1900 block, 8:16 a.m.
Jan. 28.
14th St., 2000 block, 7:13 p.m.
Jan. 30.
17th St., 3300 block, 6 a.m. Jan.
26.
21st St., 1600 block, 5:18 a.m. Jan.
24.
SOUTHEAST
HOMICIDES
Chesapeake St., 800 block, 7 p.m.
Jan. 27. With gun.
Elvans Rd., 2400-2599 blocks, 7
p.m. Jan. 25. With gun.
ASSAULTS
A St., 3500 block, 6:50 p.m. Jan.
24. With knife.
Alabama Ave., 900 block, 9:10
a.m. Jan. 27. With knife.
Alabama Ave., 1800 block, 2:31
p.m. Jan. 29. With gun.
Alabama Ave., 2400 block, 9:44
p.m. Jan. 26. With knife.
Bellevue St., 1100 block, 7:13 p.m.
Jan. 23. With gun.
Croffut Pl., 3300 block, 3:58 p.m.
Jan. 24. With knife.
Elvans Rd., 2400-2599 blocks,
9:32 a.m. Jan. 27.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 2900
block, 11:59 a.m. Jan. 27. With gun.
10th Pl., 3300 block, 2:21 p.m.
Jan. 25. With gun.
37th Pl., 300 block, 3:32 p.m. Jan.
29. With knife.
37th Pl., 400 block, 4:59 p.m. Jan.
28. With knife.
ROBBERIES
East Capitol St., 4500 block, 4:17
p.m. Jan. 28.
Mississippi Ave., 1300-1500
blocks, 5:16 p.m. Jan. 25. With gun.
Shipley Terr., 2800 block, 3:46
p.m. Jan. 28. With gun.
Stanton Rd., 3400 block, 3:54
p.m. Jan. 29. With gun.
Wayne Pl., 200 block, 4:16 p.m.
Jan. 30.
Eighth St., 400 block, 8:29 a.m.
Jan. 25.
14th St., 1900 block, 4:33 a.m.
Jan. 30.
29th St., 2700 block, 4:11 p.m.
Jan. 29. With gun.
35th St., 100 block, 2:06 p.m. Jan.
26.
BREAK-INS
B St., 5000 block, 8:19 p.m. Jan.
23.
Congress Pl., 1400 block, 9:12
p.m. Jan. 25.
Elvans Rd., 2400-2599 blocks,
5:40 p.m. Jan. 24.
Knox Pl., 2900 block, 9:18 a.m.
Jan. 25.
Langston Pl., 2700-2899 blocks,
9:57 a.m. Jan. 30.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.,
3600-3799 blocks, 4:30 a.m. Jan.
25.
Nash Pl., 2900 block, 12:24 p.m.
Jan. 26.
Pomeroy Rd., 2400-2699 blocks,
4:22 p.m. Jan. 30.
Savannah St., 200-399 blocks,
9:35 a.m. Jan. 26.
Savannah St., 1800 block, 3:59
p.m. Jan. 30.
16th St., 400 block, 7:38 a.m. Jan.
24.
19th St., 3400 block, 5:12 p.m.
Jan. 26.
22nd St., 3400-3683 blocks, 11:03
a.m. Jan. 29.
THEFTS
Alabama Ave., 600 block, 10:04
a.m. Jan. 26. From vehicle.
Alabama Ave., 600 block, 10:01
a.m. Jan. 29.
Alabama Ave., 700 block, 11:39
p.m. Jan. 28.
Alabama Ave., 1500-1699 blocks,
10:12 a.m. Jan. 25.
Alabama Ave., 1500-1699 blocks,
12:35 p.m. Jan. 30.
Alabama Ave., 2000-2248 blocks,
12:33 p.m. Jan. 24.
Alabama Ave., 2000-2248 blocks,
1:34 p.m. Jan. 27.
Altamont Pl., 2300 block, 4:19
p.m. Jan. 30.
Anacostia Rd., 200-499 blocks,
5:59 p.m. Jan. 29.
Atlantic St., 800 block, 5:13 a.m.
Jan. 25.
Austin St., 3600 block, 5:03 a.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Ayers Pl., 4900 block, 10:26 a.m.
Jan. 28. From vehicle.
Ayers Pl., 5100 block, 11:16 a.m.
Jan. 28. From vehicle.
Barker Lane, 4200 block, 6:55
p.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Benning Rd., 4700-4809 blocks,
6:51 p.m. Jan. 24. From vehicle.
CRIME CONTINUED ON 19
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18
19
Crime Report
CRIME FROM 18
block, 3:37 p.m. Jan. 25.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 3000
block, 4:42 a.m. Jan. 30.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 3000
block, 9:33 a.m. Jan. 30.
Massachusetts Ave., 1800 block,
5:10 a.m. Jan. 24.
Minnesota Ave., 1800 block, 6:43
p.m. Jan. 29.
Minnesota Ave., 2600-2715
blocks, 6:25 a.m. Jan. 27. From
vehicle.
N St., 3300 block, 4:25 a.m. Jan.
29. From vehicle.
Naylor Rd., 1900-2199 blocks,
8:47 a.m. Jan. 30. From vehicle.
Naylor Rd., 2800-2913 blocks,
6:46 a.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
New Jersey Ave., 1100 block,
11:22 a.m. Jan. 27.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
12:30 p.m. Jan. 24.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
5:27 a.m. Jan. 27.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
5:41 a.m. Jan. 27.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
8:57 a.m. Jan. 28.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
3:44 a.m. Jan. 30.
Pennsylvania Ave., 2300 block, 3
p.m. Jan. 24.
Pennsylvania Ave., 3200 block,
6:48 a.m. Jan. 29.
Potomac Ave., 1300 block, 6:16
a.m. Jan. 27.
Prout St., 2300 block, 5:32 a.m.
Jan. 28. From vehicle.
Ridge Rd., 400 block, 10:15 a.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
Savannah Pl., 1800-2099 blocks,
8:31 a.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Southern Ave., 800 block, 11:30
p.m. Jan. 23.
Southern Ave., 2500-2999 blocks,
7:02 p.m. Jan. 24.
Southern Ave., 4000-4123 blocks,
2:54 a.m. Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Stanton Rd., 2600 block, 7:15
a.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Stanton Rd., 3100 block, 9:31
a.m. Jan. 30. From vehicle.
Tanner Pl., 1000 block, 1:01 p.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Texas Ave., 4800 block, 3:29 p.m.
Jan. 26. From vehicle.
W St., 1200 block, 9:30 a.m. Jan.
24.
Wilmington Pl., 100 block, 8:42
a.m. Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Second St., 3800 block, 4:36 p.m.
Jan. 30.
Third St., 400 block, 4:40 p.m.
Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 300 block, 1:49 a.m. Jan.
30.
Sixth St., 600-749 blocks, 7:45
p.m. Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 3300-3699 blocks,
10:43 a.m. Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 4200 block, 12:47 a.m.
Jan. 27.
Seventh St., 500 block, 4:13 a.m.
Jan. 30. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 400 block, 10:07 p.m.
Jan. 28.
Eighth St., 700 block, 11:55 a.m.
Jan. 26.
Ninth St., 3700-3851 blocks, 5:39
p.m. Jan. 24. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 3700-3851 blocks, 2:21
a.m. Jan. 27. From vehicle.
12th St., 500 block, 6:33 a.m. Jan.
24.
12th St., 500 block, 9:03 a.m. Jan.
29.
14th St., 1900 block, 4 a.m. Jan.
28.
21st St., 3500 block, 5:24 p.m.
Jan. 27.
25th St., 1500-1601 blocks, 1:54
a.m. Jan. 30. From vehicle.
38th St., 1600-1799 blocks, 6:40
a.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
45th Pl., 1100 block, 7:27 a.m. Jan.
27. From vehicle.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Barnaby Rd., 700-4375 blocks,
4:34 a.m. Jan. 30.
D St., 5400-5599 blocks, 6:31 p.m.
Jan. 30.
Kimi Gray Ct., 5000 block, 12:31
a.m. Jan. 26.
R St., 2500-2699 blocks, 2:18 p.m.
Jan. 26.
S St., 1800 block, 7:13 a.m. Jan.
28.
Southern Ave., 800 block, 2:04
p.m. Jan. 29.
Tobias Dr., 1800 block, 7:08 p.m.
Jan. 26.
Wheeler Hill Dr., 700-899 blocks,
5:14 p.m. Jan. 29.
Sixth St., 4600 block, 11:38 a.m.
Jan. 30.
18th St., 2100 block, 3:17 a.m.
Jan. 25.
22nd St., 3300 block, 7:10 a.m.
Jan. 28.
28th St., 1300 block, 9:24 a.m.
Jan. 30.
SOUTHWEST
ASSAULT
Third St., 1000 block, 7:40 p.m.
Jan. 26. With gun.
ROBBERY
South Capitol St., 4600-4799
blocks, 8:20 p.m. Jan. 29.
BREAK-IN
Joliet St., 100 block, 6:50 a.m.
Jan. 30.
THEFTS
C St., 400-599 blocks, 7:56 p.m.
Jan. 23.
G St., 300 block, 4:28 p.m. Jan. 29.
Half St., 1900 block, 4:25 a.m.
Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Joliet St., 100 block, 5:51 a.m. Jan.
26. From vehicle.
O St., unit block, 12:24 p.m. Jan.
26.
Q St., unit block, 6:18 a.m. Jan. 25.
From vehicle.
South Capitol St., 1000-1299
blocks, 3:33 p.m. Jan. 24.
South Capitol St., 4600 block,
5:46 a.m. Jan. 30.
Third St., 700-899 blocks, 1:12
p.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 900-1199 blocks, 11:29
a.m. Jan. 28. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 900-1199 blocks, 4:08
p.m. Jan. 28.
Fourth St., 900-1199 blocks, 2:18
p.m. Jan. 29. From vehicle.
10th St., 400-999 blocks, 12:34
p.m. Jan. 26. From vehicle.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT
Fourth St., 500-699 blocks, 10:47
a.m. Jan. 26.
HEALTH CODE VIOLATIONS
These food establishments were
closed because of health code
violations. The list, compiled from
health department reports, reflects
actions taken by the departments.
THE DISTRICT
Loaf Coffee
101 15th St. NE
Closed Jan. 30 for operating
without a license.
Subway
632 Rhode Island Ave. NE
Closed last Thursday for operating
without a manager on duty and
because of insects, rodents and
other pests.
MARYLAND
Hank Dietle’s Tavern
11010 Rockville Pike, Rockville
Closed Friday for operating without
a license.
Glassmanor Elementary School
1011 Marcy Ave., Oxon Hill
Food service closed Jan. 30 for
operating without hot water.
Reopened last Thursday.
VIRGINIA
Punjabi By Nature
13955 Metrotech Dr., Chantilly
Closed Jan. 24 because of sewage.
Reopened last Thursday.
Sam Won Gak
13955 Metrotech Dr., Chantilly
Closed Jan. 24 because of sewage.
Reopened last Thursday.
Shiro Sushi and Teriyaki
24650 Southpoint Dr., Chantilly
Closed Friday because of a fire.
— Compiled by Terence McArdle
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the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
Brandywine St., 400-599 blocks,
2:29 a.m. Jan. 25.
Burbank St., 300 block, 9:32 a.m.
Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Burbank St., 400 block, 6:25 a.m.
Jan. 27. From vehicle.
Burns Ct., 3900 block, 8:44 a.m.
Jan. 28. From vehicle.
Burns St., 800 block, 3:16 a.m.
Jan. 30. From vehicle.
Call Pl., 4900 block, 6:25 p.m. Jan.
29. From vehicle.
Croffut Pl., 3300 block, 4:05 a.m.
Jan. 25. From vehicle.
D St., 200 block, 2:03 p.m. Jan. 27.
From vehicle.
D St., 200 block, 4 p.m. Jan. 28.
From vehicle.
D St., 600 block, 9:48 a.m. Jan. 24.
From vehicle.
East Capitol St., 4800-4904
blocks, 11:24 p.m. Jan. 27. From
vehicle.
East Capitol St., 5500-5689
blocks, 11:42 a.m. Jan. 25.
East Capitol St., 5800-6099
blocks, 7:45 p.m. Jan. 29. From
vehicle.
Ely Pl., 3300 block, 10:13 a.m. Jan.
28. From vehicle.
Fort Davis St., 2000-2199 blocks,
7:45 p.m. Jan. 24.
Good Hope Ct., 2300 block, 7:04
a.m. Jan. 25.
Good Hope Rd., 1500-1600
blocks, 5:03 p.m. Jan. 29.
Good Hope Rd., 1600-1799
blocks, 7:40 a.m. Jan. 27.
Good Hope Rd., 2300 block, 5:14
p.m. Jan. 29.
Horner Pl., 3700 block, 5:39 p.m.
Jan. 26.
I St., 200 block, 9:43 p.m. Jan. 29.
Independence Ave., 1500 block,
5:28 p.m. Jan. 25.
Independence Ave., 1500 block,
4:17 p.m. Jan. 26.
Kentucky Ave., 300 block, 3:51
p.m. Jan. 24.
M St., 2900 block, 11:31 a.m. Jan.
25.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 2900
DC
20
washingtonpost.com/jobs
the washington post . thursday, february 8 , 2018
DC
FEATURED EMPLOYERS SPOTLIGHT
Washington
Post
Featured Employers are DC’s largest and most prominent organizations. They include employers
across a range of industries, like
IT, accounting, healthcare, and
government, and are hiring candidates today!
DARCARS Automotive Group
AboutWeb
SmithBucklin Corporation
The Motley Fool
Automotive–Founded in 1977 with a single dealership, DARCARS Automotive Group has grown to
include over 20 locations throughout the DC metro
area, representing both domestic and import lines
... and we are still growing! Our loyal customer base
and outstanding reputation for customer satisfaction have led us to become one of the top privately
held automotive groups in the country, and to earn
the prestigious honor of being a "Forbes 500" Company. DARCARS Automotive Group currently is represented at over 20 locations in the DC metro…
Ass't Service
Ford-Certified AutomoManager–College Park tive Technician–Lanham
Our Assistant Service Automotive Technicians /
Manager (ASM) launches Automotive Mechanics /
services and repairs Master Technicians With
based on performance the ongoing growth the
concerns and/or re- auto industry is experiquested services. In this encing today, this is the
role, you'll primarily: right time to continue
Initiate and maintain su- your automotive techniperior relations between cian career with DARcustomers and service CARS Automotive - a
department: listen…
leader in the industry!
Consulting–Our people make a meaningful difference in a wide range of diverse industries and professions, helping our client organizations achieve
their missions and generate more opportunities for
their stakeholders. For the trade and professional
associations they serve, our people advocate for
businesses and industries, help create and protect
jobs, and increase product and workplace safety.
Through the healthcare and scientific associations
and societies they support, our people help enhance patient outcomes and advance professions…
National Sales ManMembership and
ager–Washington, D.C.
Operations Associate–
The National Sales Man- Washington, D.C.
ager will be responsible We are seeking an entryfor selling all advertising level candidate for our
vehicles for each asso- Business + Trade Indusciation s/he represents try Practice. Associates
to include, but not limited in our business units play
to, print and digital adver- an integral role in providtising, as well as exhibit/ ing excellent customer
tradeshow booths and service to the nonprofit
sponsorships. This role volunteers and members
supports clients across… from our client…
The Endocrine Society
Nonprofit–Endocrine Society is the world's largest
and most active professional organization of endocrinologists in the world. Founded in 1916, the Society is internationally known as the leading source of
state-of-the-art research and clinical advancements
in endocrinology and metabolism. We are dedicated
to promoting excellence in research, education and
clinical practice in the field of endocrinology. Society membership continues to grow with more than
17,000 members from over 100 countries. These
professionals are dedicated to the research…
Manager, Marketing– Specialist, Marketing–
Washington D.C.
Washington D.C.
Under the direction of Reporting to the Manager
the Director of Market- of Marketing, the Marketing, the Manager of Mar- ing Specialist provides
keting provides a blend marketing solutions to
of technical, strategic, improve member enand interpersonal skills gagement, increase revto drive marketing solu- enue, and grow Society
tions to improve member brand awareness. This
engagement,
increase position works across all
revenue, and grow Soci- channels, both traditional
ety brand awareness.
and digital marketing…
This spotlight showcases a small
sample of our Featured Employers, allowing you to learn about
each company and some of the
thousands of jobs they are currently hiring for. Check out the FE
Spotlight each Sunday to discover
new DC area companies.
Technology and Software–AboutWeb is a Certified
HUBZone Small Business Government Contractor as
well as a leading provider of cybersecurity solutions,
information technology consulting and product development. Our areas of expertise include IT Solutions, Staff Augmentation and IT Training. Our teams
have experience providing solutions for government
agencies, commercial entities, and associations.
Our HUBZone certification combined with two decades of IT solutions expertise and over ten years of
Prime Government Contracting experience…
.Net Developer–Reston Senior Programmer/
AboutWeb is hiring for a Analyst–Alexandria
.Net Developer to join a Senior Programmer/Ananew client project sup- lyst Duties: Performs proporting a federal agency. gramming in accordance
This role is based in our with established proceReston, VA offices and dures using appropriate
because of a Federal programming languages;
Clearance Requirement, Designs
and
writes
US Citizenship is required scripts to process data
for this role. This is a file and to connect and
modernization
project /or streamline programworking with Microsoft… ming processes. Uses…
Media / Journalism / Advertising–"Educate, amuse,
enrich." That's our global mission, carried out
through our award-winning website, best selling
books, NPR radio show, syndicated newspaper
column, and a growing series of market-beating
subscription newsletters. We communicate common-sense money management skills and superior
investment ideas in plain English. We spend our days
puncturing pretensions. So it follows that our Alexandria,Virginia HQ is an unpretentious place to work.
No suits. No neckties. No pantyhose. No problem…
Business Lead / General Customer Service RepManager, Motley Fool
resentative–Alexandria
Hong Kong–Alexandria
Customer Service RepreBusiness Lead / General sentative Do friends and
Manager, Motley Fool family commend you for
Hong Kong Motley Fool your cheerfulness, adaptHong Kong, soon to be ability, and fantastic
the newest addition to listening skillz? Do you
The Motley Fool's global get a rush of adrenaline
business, is searching for when helping people
a dynamic Business Lead and solving problems?
/ General Manager to Can you patiently stand
catapult our brand to…
behind someone in the…
Alexandria City Public Schools
Education–Alexandria City Public Schools is one of
the most diverse school systems in the country and
we celebrate that diversity. Our students come from
more than 80 different countries, speak more than
60 languages, and represent a rainbow of ethnic
and cultural groups. They are economically diverse,
but all are rich in that the residents of Alexandria are
dedicated to ensuring that each and every one of
them achieves success. The children of Alexandria
have benefited significantly from the strong support
of City Council and the Alexandria community…
ELL/Spanish Literacy Speech Language
Teacher–Alexandria
Pathologist–Alexandria
The job of ELL Teacher The Speech Language
develops bilingual stu- Pathologist provides serdents' ability to effec- vices to students with
tively perform courses of communication
disorstudy in the English lan- ders in the areas of writguage by implementing ten and oral language,
district approved curricu- articulation, fluency, and/
lum; documents teaching or voice within the eduand student progress/ cational setting. Qualifiactivities/outcomes; pro- cations: Education: Masvides methods to…
ter's degree in Speech…
To view a complete list of our Featured Employers’ job listings, visit www.washingtonpost.com/jobs. To register
online, create a job seeker profile
and upload your resume visit
washingtonpost.com/resume.
Searching for talent?
Join some of DC’s top companies
on the area’s #1 job board. Washington Post Jobs has over 1.5 million registered online jobseekers
across a variety of industries, occupations and career levels.
Washington Post Jobs’ Featured
Employer packages offer a valuable and unique way to source
qualified candidates. Become an
FE today and leverage the power
of Washington Post media. Contact your Jobs account rep and call
202-334-4101.
US Pharmacopeia (USP)
Axiom Resource Management, Inc.
Financial Services and Banking–It’s an exciting time
to join Freddie Mac! Join us and do important work
to shape the future of the housing finance system.
You’ll have opportunities that challenge you, coworkers that motivate you, and a company that
stands by you. And, you’ll make a difference by helping America’s families own or rent a home. Freddie Mac was chartered by Congress in 1970 with
a public mission to stabilize the nation's residential
mortgage markets and expand opportunities for
homeownership and affordable rental…
Risk & Controls Sr–
Ops Change Mgmt
McLean
Prf–Dulles
The Enterprise Opera- The Single Family Operational Risk department is tions division is seeking
seeking an Operational an Operations Change
Risk Senior to support the Management Professionexecution of operational al to join the Customer
risk reporting and analy- Operations and Technolsis. Responsibilities in- ogy team. The candidate
clude: * Support the prep- will be responsible for
aration and execution of acting as the primary inthe Issues Management terface between technolUpdate reporting…
ogy infrastructure…
Healthcare–The U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention
(USP) is a scientific nonprofit organization that sets
standards for the identity, strength, quality, and purity of medicines, food ingredients, and dietary supplements manufactured, distributed and consumed
worldwide. USP's drug standards are enforceable in
the United States by the Food and Drug Administration, and these standards are used in more than 140
countries. Being a part of USP means belonging to a
diverse culture made up of more than 1000 talented
professionals working together at five international…
Senior IT Business Ana- Scientist IV-V Reference
lyst (1038-679)–Rockville Standards Laboratory
The Senior Business Ana- (1039-679)–Rockville
lyst serves as key team This is a key hands-on,
member on Information leadership position in
Technology (IT) Project USP’s Reference Stanteams for delivering proj- dards Laboratory. In this
ect requirements; in sup- role, the Scientist IV/V
porting project teams; shares technical reand in improving the sponsibility for scientists
products/services deliv- conducting routine, nonered by IT. They conduct routine, and investigative
project intake…
analyses of candidate…
Government Contractor–Established in 1996 by experts in military healthcare acquisition, Axiom Resource Management (AXIOM) provides superior program management and analytical support to clients
in both the government and private sector. AXIOM’s
cadre of experienced healthcare analysts, epidemiologists, and public health analysts are recognized
throughout the Military Health System (MHS) and
are strategically located across the United States
supporting clients in San Antonio, Texas; San Diego,
California; Aurora, Colorado…
Junior Financial
Education Program
Analyst–Arlington
Coordinator - ANCC–
We are seeking a Junior Silver Spring
Finance Analyst to sup- Implements,
evaluates
port the Defense Health and manages the adManagement
System ministrative
processes
Modernization program and outcomes related
in Rosslyn, VA. Successful to educational programs
candidate will: Act as the and associated products
program Organizational and services. Creates and
Defense Travel Adminis- manages databases and
trator (ODTA) for the De- develops reports related
fense Travel…
to seminars and…
EMMES Corporation
American Speech-Language-Hearing
Association
Metropolitan Washington Airports
Authority
Freddie Mac
Science–The EMMES Corporation, organized in 1977,
is a privately owned Contract Research Organization
(CRO) located in Rockville, Maryland, just outside of
Washington, D.C., a short distance from NIH, FDA,
and the Route I-270 biotechnology corridor. EMMES
is dedicated to providing statistical and epidemiological expertise, computer systems development,
data management, study monitoring, regulatory
guidance, and overall operational support to clients
engaged in clinical and biomedical research.
In-House Clinical
Research Associate–
Rockville
The EMMES Corporation,
organized in 1977, is a
privately owned Contract
Research Organization
(CRO) located in Rockville, Maryland. EMMES
is dedicated to providing
statistical and epidemiological expertise, computer systems…
Fairfax Water
CDISC Specialist–
Frederick
The EMMES Corporation,
organized in 1977, is a
privately owned Contract
Research Organization
(CRO) located in Rockville
and Frederick, Maryland.
Emmes is dedicated to
providing statistical and
epidemiological expertise, computer systems
development, data…
Science–Fairfax County Water Authority (Fairfax Water) is Virginia's largest water utility, serving one out
of every five Virginians who obtain their water from
public utilities. Nearly 1.5 million people in the Northern Virginia communities of Fairfax, Loudoun, Prince
William and Alexandria depend on Fairfax Water for
superior drinking water. That's 1.5 million friends,
neighbors and family members. We don't need any
other reason to demand the highest in water quality
standards! Chartered in 1957 by the Virginia State
Corporation Commission as a public, non-profit…
Water Utility Worker
Network Analyst II/
I/II–Chantilly
III–Fairfax
Under close supervision Provides operations and
of a Water Utility Crew project support to all
Chief or Water Utility Fairfax Water network
Worker IV, performs a va- environments. Assists in
riety of routine unskilled the planning and evaluaand semi-skilled manual tion of existing and new
duties required in the op- network systems and
eration, maintenance and makes
recommendainstallation of the water tions to maintain and
distribution and transmis- expand the network. Prosion system and…
vides resolution for…
Associations–The American Speech-LanguageHearing Association was founded in 1925. It is a
not-for-profit scientific and professional association
for speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and
speech and hearing scientists. ASHA is committed
to the consumers of our services, the more than 42
million Americans with communication disorders.
ASHA's mission is to ensure that all people with
speech-language, and hearing disorders receive …
Defense / Aerospace–The Airports Authority operates
a two-airport system that provides domestic and international air service for the mid-Atlantic region.The
organization consists of more than 1,000 employees
in a structure that includes central administration,
airports management and operations, and police
and fire departments. In addition to operating Ronald
Reagan National and Dulles International Airports,
the Airports Authority is responsible for…
Data Analytics
Manager–Rockville
Description: The purpose
of this position is to lead
the design, development, and deployment
of ASHA’s data strategy.
This includes ensuring
ASHA’s data analytics
program supports the
Strategic Pathway and
other key initiatives;
managing business…
Deskside Specialist
(IT)–Arlington
Deskside Specialist (IT)
- (MWAA-18-12136) Job
Requisition ID: MWAA-1812136 Job Title: Deskside
Specialist (IT) Job Type:
F/T Temporary Location:
Crystal City, VA Post Date:
01/26/2018 Job Description: The Metropolitan
Washington Airports Authority Your Journey…
User Experience
Designer (This is not a
Freelance or Remote
Work Position)–Rockville
Description: The User
Experience Designer will
help support ASHA’s mission and vision by ensuring that its digital products are developed from
a user-centric design perspective. The individual in
this position will…
Community Connections
Social Services and Mental Health–Since its founding
in 1984, Community Connections has been committed to innovative and compassionate mental health,
addictions and residential services for the District
of Columbia's most vulnerable citizens. Community
Connections combines a commitment to quality
mental health care with a passion for research and
education that has led to our status as a recognized
national leader in the delivery of creative and constantly evolving, evidence-based services for our
consumers and our community.
Community PsychiaRapid Rehousing Spetrist–Washington D.C.
cialist–Washington D.C.
Community Connections' CC's Clinical Housing DeAssertive
Community partment has an opening
Treatment (ACT) program, in our Launch Initiative
is hiring progressive for Transition Age Youth
community psychiatrists (LIFT) Program for a Rapid
who enjoy working with Rehousing Specialist to
exceptionally vulnerable provide housing navigaadults, especially Transi- tion services to young
tion Aged Youth (18-30) adults who are exiting
and forensically involved homelessness and tranadults within a program… sitioning to permanent…
Budget Technician–
Dulles
Budget
Technician
(MWAA-18-12376)
Job
Requisition ID: MWAA18-12376 Job Title: Budget Technician Job Type:
F/T Permanent Location:
Dulles Toll Road, McLean,
VA Post Date: 01/25/2018
Job Description: The Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority Your…
Loudoun County Public Schools
Education–Located 25 miles northwest of Washington, D.C., Loudoun County combines the best of rural
and suburban living for a steadily increasing population which will total approximately 255,518. Now one
of the fastest growing jurisdictions in the nation. The
county is home to increasing numbers of regional
and global corporations whose active participation in
school-business partnerships enriches and extends
learning opportunities in Loudoun County Public
Schools. Strong community commitment to quality
public education provides Loudoun youngsters…
Assistant Principal–
Eligibility CoordinaAldie
tor–Ashburn
See Detailed Description. See Detailed Description.
The Assistant Principal This position is responsiprovides assistance to ble to assist in providing
the school Principal as leadership for Assistive
requested in the total Technology services and
school program. Assists will work directly with
the Principal in the imple- the Specialized Instrucmentation, supervision, tional Facilitators for
and evaluation of the to- Assistive
Technology
tal school program; in the (SIF-ATs) to implement
evaluation of …
models for integration…
Visit washingtonpost.com/jobs to view complete details and to apply to these and thousands of other listings.
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