close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Washington Post – February 22, 2018

код для вставкиСкачать
ABCDE
Prices may vary in areas outside metropolitan Washington.
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Rain 54/42 • Tomorrow: Cloudy, shower 55/50 B8
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
Father of four was trying
to protect a neighbor
from her armed husband
BIPARTISAN TALKS
ON NEW LEGISLATION
BY L YNH B UI,
P ETER H ERMANN
AND A NN E . M ARIMOW
SHOOTING CONTINUED ON A16
Trump in-laws
likely aided
by ‘chain
migration’
. $2
Protests
stir Fla.
debate
on guns
O≠-duty
Md. o∞cer
shot dead
near home
Police officer Mujahid Ramzziddin was off duty Wednesday
morning, at home on a quiet suburban street in Southern Maryland, when he stepped out to aid a
neighbor who had asked for his
help.
She was in the process of leaving her husband and the night
before
had
asked the officer to park his
marked cruiser
in front of her
house.
On Wednesday, when he
saw her outside
removing her
Mujahid
belongings, he
Ramzziddin
went over to
stand by her and took his police
radio and gun with him.
Suddenly, from between a row
of homes, the neighbor’s estranged husband emerged carrying a shotgun, police said, and
fired five times at Ramzziddin
before fleeing with the dead officer’s service weapon.
Police had been called in repeatedly for reports of problems
at the house. On Wednesday, it
was Ramzziddin who intervened.
He was shot dead at about
10:15 a.m., steps from his own
house by the man, police said,
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
But tighter rules on
firearms far from certain
BY
M ICHAEL S CHERER
tallahassee — Filled with fury
MARK WALLHEISER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Protesters at the Florida Capitol in Tallahassee call for action against gun violence Wednesday. A week earlier, 17 students and staff
members were killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., when a gunman opened fire inside the school.
‘Fix it’: Students, parents plead with
Trump for action to stop shootings
BY J ENNA J OHNSON
AND J OHN W AGNER
President Trump leaned forward and listened intently for
nearly an hour Wednesday afternoon as students, parents and
teachers begged him to do something, anything, to prevent a
mass shooting from happening
at another school.
The group offered a wide variety of suggestions — bolster
school security, drill students on
what to do during a shooting
and raise the age at which someone can buy an assault rifle —
but in the end, the president
remained focused on the solution he often proposes after a
Taking charge: Youths make guncontrol movement their own. A7
mass shooting: increasing the
number of people with guns so
they can quickly stop shooters
with lethal force.
“If the coach had a firearm in
his locker, when he ran at this
guy — that coach was very brave,
saved a lot of lives, I suspect —
but if he had a firearm, he
wouldn’t have had to run,”
Trump said, referring to Aaron
Feis, an assistant football coach
and security guard who was one
of 17 people killed by a gunman
last week at Marjory Stoneman
Douglas High School in South
Florida. “He would have shot,
and that would have been the
end of it.”
On no-holds-barred Internet,
conspiracies are tough to contain
BY C RAIG T IMBERG,
E LIZABETH D WOSKIN,
A BBY O HLHEISER
AND A NDREW B A T RAN
TRUMP CONTINUED ON A6
David Hogg, 17, went from
Florida high school student to
mass shooting survivor to telegenic advocate for gun-control
laws in a few days. And just as
quickly, online conspiracy theorists began spinning viral lies
attacking the teenager’s credibility.
By Wednesday — a week after
a gunman wielding a semiautomatic rifle killed 17 people at
Hogg’s Parkland, Fla., school —
online media sites including
YouTube swelled with false
Walk to White House: Hundreds
of Maryland students protest. B1
Rise in hate groups: Their reach
has grown over the past year. A3
That David
Hogg’s dad
is a retired
FBI agent
only added
fuel to the
online
theories.
allegations that Hogg was
secretly a “crisis actor” playing
the part of a grieving student in
local and national television
news reports.
Hogg was not the only one
targeted by an online campaign
that flared up on anonymous
forums such as 4chan and Reddit before it reached conservaVIRAL CONTINUED ON A8
Margaret Sullivan: D’Souza and
his ilk show how low they’ll go. C1
and impatient for change, thousands of Florida high school students and protesters rallied
Wednesday at the state Capitol to
demand that lawmakers take action in the final weeks of the legislative session to curb the sale of
assault-style rifles.
“Thoughts and prayers won’t
stop my brothers and my sisters
from dying — action will,” declared Sheryl Acquaroli, 16, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 students
and faculty members were fatally
shot on Feb. 14. “They are our
students, our teachers and our
coaches. And they died because
you failed.”
As lawmakers were condemned on the steps of the Capitol, a bipartisan group in the
House and Senate continued
working to hash out a set of bipartisan proposals that could be voted on as early as next week in
response to the shooting. Amid
the din of young protesters, the
rigid partisan lines that have long
deadlocked the national debate
over gun violence have shown
signs of cracking.
The proposals under consideration stop short of student demands for a ban on the sale of
semiautomatic assault weapons
like the AR-15-style gun that was
used in the most recent shooting.
Instead, lawmakers have focused
on new waiting period and age
restrictions for buyers of semiautomatic rifles, new powers for poGUNS CONTINUED ON A6
BILLY GRAHAM 1918-2018
C AROL D . L EONNIG,
D AVID N AKAMURA
AND N ICK M IROFF
BY
The parents of first lady Melania Trump have become legal
permanent residents of the United States and are close to obtaining their citizenship, according
to people familiar with their
status, but their attorney declined to say how or when the
couple gained their green cards.
Immigration experts said Viktor and Amalija Knavs very likely
relied on a family reunification
process that President Trump
has derided as “chain migration”
and proposed ending in such
cases.
The Knavses, formerly of Slovenia, are living in the country on
green cards, according to Michael Wildes, a New York-based
immigration lawyer who represents the first lady and her family.
“I can confirm that Mrs.
Trump’s parents are both lawfully admitted to the United States
PARENTS CONTINUED ON A12
Evangelist spread Gospel to world’s poor and powerful
BY
B ART B ARNES
B
LUCIAN PERKINS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Billy Graham, praying at a 1981 service in Baltimore, became one of the world’s most influential
religious figures of his time. His evangelical “crusades” touched almost every part of the globe.
In THE NEWS
THE NATION
CHRISTOF STACHE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
U.S. gold Kikkan Randall and Jessie Diggins
take first in team cross-country skiing, and
David Wise defends in freestyle ski halfpipe. D1
Whistleblower ruling Those alleging
corporate misdeeds must alert the SEC to get
legal protections, the Supreme Court rules. A3
Two senior USGS officials stepped down, saying a request for confidential data by Interior
Secretary Ryan Zinke
violated the agency’s
policy on scientific
integrity. A2
After allegations led
to a judge’s resignation,
a top administrator said
the federal judiciary is
exploring changes in
the way it handles
sexual misconduct
complaints. A3
White House Chief of
Staff John F. Kelly will
meet with the heads of
six veterans advocacy
groups over alleged at-
tempts to undermine
Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin. A16
A company run by
President Trump’s
former director of Oval
Office operations has received $75,000 from the
Republican National
Committee. A17
THE WORLD
A confidant of Benjamin Netanyahu’s has
become a state witness
as corruption allegations pile up against
the Israeli prime
minister. A11
With national elections on the horizon in
Italy, the unorthodox
Five Star Movement
party has consistently
topped polls. A11
Doctors in rebel-held
suburbs of Damascus
said they were overwhelmed by casualties
in a bombardment by
Syrian and Russian
forces. A12
THE REGION
Maryland lawmakers
are considering legislation that would require
public schools to have
consent education to address sexual violence. B1
The District has
reached a $3.5 million
settlement with the
family of a motorcyclist
fatally shot by a police
officer in 2016. B1
A local MS-13 leader
illy Graham, the evangelist whose eloquent oratory and passion for Jesus
attracted a worldwide following
and made him one of the most
influential and best-known religious figures of his time, was
found dead Feb. 21 at his home
in Montreat, N.C. He was 99.
His death was confirmed by a
spokesman, Mark DeMoss. Mr.
Graham had Parkinson’s disease.
Mr.
Graham’s
ministry
spanned more than six decades,
and his evangelical “crusades,”
as he called them for most of his
career, touched every corner of
the world. He proclaimed his
message of salvation through
repentance and commitment to
Jesus in the poorest of Third
World villages and in the world’s
highest centers of power and
testified against gang
members about the
2016 killing of a teen in
a rival group. B1
Virginia, Maryland
and the District are closer to agreeing on a dedicated funding deal for
Metro, but hurdles remain. B1
Amanda Alexander, the
new interim leader of
D.C. schools, faces a system engulfed in controversies left by her predecessor. B1
ST YLE
D.C. chef José Andrés
is named Humanitarian
of the Year by the James
Beard Foundation for
feeding numerous victims of natural disasters. C1
authority.
In addition to his mass rallies
and serving as spiritual adviser
to U.S. presidents, he reached
millions more through a syndicated newspaper column and
best-selling books.
Mr. Graham — he preferred
this salutation over “the Rev.” —
was a frequent guest at the
White House, and he delivered
the invocations at presidential
inaugurations and national political conventions. In the royal
chapel at Britain’s Windsor Castle, he preached before Queen
Elizabeth II and Prince Philip.
He traveled to combat zones in
South Korea and Vietnam to
pray with U.S. service members.
An accomplished showman
with a down-to-earth theology,
GRAHAM CONTINUED ON A4
Partisan prayer: What is Billy
Graham’s evangelical legacy? A5
Inside
LOCAL LIVING
Use the good stuff
A Hillwood exhibit shows
how your heirloom china
can gain new life.
ST YLE
At 62, a rising star
Actress Laurie Metcalf is
in the hunt for an Oscar
for “Lady Bird.” C1
BUSINESS NEWS........................A13
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES..........................A18
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS.............................A11
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 79
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
9 7 7 0
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
The calls for stricter gun laws are resoundingly pro-life
Let us hear no
more lectures
from Clarence
Thomas on the
sanctity of human
life.
Dana
The Supreme
Milbank
Court justice,
WASHINGTON with timing that
could be
SKETCH
charitably
described as
clumsy, issued his latest paean to
gun rights Tuesday, as the child
victims of last week’s school
shooting were still being buried.
Reacting to his colleagues’
refusal to hear a case challenging
California’s waiting period for
gun purchases, he complained
that justices would hear similar
challenges to abortion, speech or
privacy. “The Court would take
these cases because abortion,
speech, and the Fourth
Amendment are three of its
favored rights,” Thomas wrote.
“The right to keep and bear arms
is apparently this Court’s
constitutional orphan.”
Not for the first time, Thomas
has it backward. Abortions are
restricted far more than guns
(and abortions are declining,
while gun deaths are rising).
Even speech is limited if it
endangers life. Why shouldn’t
there be reasonable restrictions
on guns, too?
But Thomas has a bigger
problem: claiming to be “pro-
life” while his advocacy of
unlimited gun rights expands a
culture of death. The gun-control
movement has been reluctant to
use such words, lest it be seen as
aping the antiabortion
movement. But the theme is apt,
and it points to the hypocrisy of
those who profess to be pro-life
but are also pro-gun without
exception, those who denounce
the termination of a pregnancy
but not the termination of
innocent life outside the womb.
If anything, the “sanctity of
life” argument is more
compelling for gun control:
There is no moral consensus on
abortion, but there is a moral
consensus on wanton killing.
Even though 92 percent of
abortions take place in the first
trimester, the pro-life movement
takes particular aim at late-term
abortion. So let’s think of the
Parkland victims in those terms:
Nicholas Dworet, who aspired
to swim in the 2020 Olympics,
was killed in the 72nd trimester
of his life, a month shy of his
18th birthday.
Carmen Schentrup, a 2018
National Merit Scholarship
finalist, was killed at the end of
her 68th trimester of her life and
buried the day before her 17th
birthday.
Peter Wang, who had not yet
reached his 64th trimester, was
buried in his Junior ROTC
uniform and was accepted
“If we truly are pro-life,
we should be willing to
. . . talk about what
needs to be done to stop
a uniquely horrifying
form of bloodshed that’s
wracked this nation
again and again in
recent months and
years.”
G. Shane Morris, religion writer
PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Supreme Court Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, left, with
Judge Gregory Maggs, speaks Feb. 15 at the Library of Congress.
posthumously at West Point.
They had a right to life. So did
the 12 other kids and two faculty
members who died.
Pro-life groups are largely
silent about this, while others on
the right have slandered the
Parkland survivors, who in their
grief have cried out for gun
control, by claiming they are
itinerant actors. Some explicitly
tie the shooting to abortion. On
the conservative website
Newsmax, Dan Perkins wrote:
“How is it that we have a society
that on the one hand can become
enraged at a school shooting, but
have no compassion for the 27
babies killed by abortion each
day [in Florida]?”
The theme has been
prominent this week in
conservative social media,
prompting a writer for the
religion website Patheos, G.
Shane Morris, to argue,
thoughtfully: “It is not
legitimate, in the aftermath of
the carnage at Stoneman
Douglas High School, to yell,
‘Yeah, but what about
abortion?!’ ” Morris argued: “If
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
we truly are pro-life, we should
be willing to . . . talk about what
needs to be done to stop a
uniquely horrifying form of
bloodshed that’s wracked this
nation again and again in recent
months and years.”
Pro-lifers are often called
hypocritical, sometimes unfairly,
for opposing health-care
spending, or supporting the
death penalty. Those are
complicated. For many,
opposition to abortion is deeply
held morality. But it is no stretch
to say that those who accept the
routine mass murder of
innocents are not truly pro-life.
Many on the right bristle at
the idea that gun control will
limit gun deaths, so let’s set that
aside. What else would stop
horrors of the sort that occurred
at Parkland? More school
security? Better mental-health
intervention? As Politico
reported, President Trump’s
budget, released two days before
the shooting, proposed a
$25 million cut in funds for
school safety activities, and
elimination of a $400 million
grant program for bullying
prevention, mental-health
assistance and the like. The
budget also proposed deep cuts
to the Substance Abuse and
Mental Health Services
Administration and the National
Institute of Mental Health.
Trump has made some noises
about gun control in recent days,
though it remains to be seen
whether that is the usual progun rope-a-dope after such
tragedies. He has also responded
to Parkland with the language of
the pro-life movement, urging a
culture “that embraces the
dignity of life.”
“Dignity of Life.” “Culture of
life.” “Sanctity of life.”
“Protecting life.” Those fighting
against gun violence should own
such language, seizing it from
those who call themselves prolife but refuse to act against
America’s culture of death by
firearms.
Twitter: @Milbank
DIGEST
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
ILLINOIS
Vice President Pence addresses the annual
Conservative Political Action Conference at the Gaylord
National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor.
Visit washingtonpost.com/politics for developments.
CALIFORNIA
12:15 a.m.
Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Randal
Quarles addresses the 26th International Financial
Symposium, organized by the Institute for International
Monetary Affairs, in Tokyo. Visit washingtonpost.com/
business for details.
8:30 p.m.
New jobless claims are expected to have remained level
at 230,000 for the week ended Feb. 17, compared with
230,000 the previous week. For details, visit
washingtonpost.com/business.
6:45 p.m.
U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki
Haley discusses issues facing the intergovernmental
organization at a forum hosted by the University of Chicago
Institute of Politics in Chicago. For developments, visit
washingtonpost.com/politics.
The federal government began
work Wednesday on replacing
border wall in California, the first
wall contract awarded in the
Trump administration outside of
eight prototypes that were built
last year in San Diego.
U.S. Customs and Border
Protection is replacing a little
more than two miles in
downtown Calexico, a sliver of
the president’s plan for a “big,
beautiful wall” along the U.S.Mexico border. A barrier built in
the 1990s from recycled metal
scraps and landing mat will be
torn down in favor of bollardstyle barriers that are 30 feet
high, significantly taller than
existing walls.
The administration is seeking
$18 billion to extend the wall.
Efforts to pay for it as part of a
broader immigration package
that would include granting legal
status to people who came to the
country as children failed in the
Senate last week.
In November, SWF
Constructors of Omaha won a
contract for $18 million to replace
wall in Calexico, about 120 miles
east of San Diego. It encompasses
an area bisected by the New
River, where smugglers are
known to guide people through
polluted waters. The project,
which includes a bridge over the
river, is expected to take 300 days.
The administration cleared the
KLMNO
CO R R ECTI O N S
NEWSPAPER DELIVERY
For home delivery comments
or concerns contact us at
washingtonpost.com/subscriberservices or
send us an email at
homedelivery@washpost.com or call
202-334-6100 or 800-477-4679
The Washington Post is committed to
correcting errors that appear in the
newspaper. Those interested in
contacting the paper for that purpose
can:
Email: corrections@washpost.com.
Call: 202-334-6000, and ask to be
connected to the desk involved —
National, Foreign, Metro, Style, Sports,
Business or any of the weekly sections.
Comments can be directed to The
Post’s reader advocate, who can be
reached at 202-334-7582 or
readers@washpost.com.
TO SUBSCRIBE
800-753-POST (7678)
TO ADVERTISE
washingtonpost.com/mediakit
Classified: 202-334-6200
Display: 202-334-7642
MAIN PHONE NUMBER
202-334-6000
Washington Post
iPad app
TO REACH THE NEWSROOM
Metro: 202-334-7300;
metro@washpost.com
National: 202-334-7410;
national@washpost.com
Business: 202-334-7320;
business@washpost.com
Sports: 202-334-7350;
sports@washpost.com
Reader Advocate: 202-334-7582;
readers@washpost.com
We bring you a richly designed
reading experience — a replica of
the printed
newspaper,
along with
a 14-day
archive,
more than
40 comic
strips, all
Post blogs
and realtime social
media. The app gives you video,
photo galleries, new search
functionality and offline reading.
Find it in the App Store.
TO REACH THE OPINION PAGES
Letters to the editor:
letters@washpost.com or call
202-334-6215
Opinion:
oped@washpost.com
Published daily (ISSN 0190-8286).
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
The Washington Post, 1301 K St. NW, Washington,
D.C. 20071.
Periodicals postage paid in Washington, D.C., and
additional mailing office.
CUSTOM
SHADES BY
50% OFF!
CUSTOM LABOR
Call for details
• Upholstery • Shutters • Slipcovers • Curtains
• Cornices • Swags • Roman Shades • Custom Bedding
FREE SHOP AT HOME 1.800.666.3727
Fairfax 703.425.4887 • N. Bethesda 301.881.6585
Annapolis 410.224.2360 • DC 202.537.8966
Celebrating 85 Years!
www.millendshops.net
A lawyer for Joseph
Boeckmann, 72, asked for a term
of home detention. Prosecutors
said 37 months in prison was
necessary because Boeckmann
was a judge with a 20-year history
of abusing young men who
appeared before him.
But U.S. District Judge Kristine
Baker imposed a tougher penalty
than the one lawyers negotiated
during a plea bargain. She said
that Boeckmann’s crimes deserve
a more severe punishment and
that as investigators closed in, he
obstructed justice and abused his
power as a judge. “That sets his
crime apart,” she said.
A suburban Chicago man who
spent 22 years behind bars on
charges of arson and murder in
his mother-in-law’s death was
found not guilty by a judge in the
retrial of his case.
William Amor, 62, had been
convicted in 1997 and was
sentenced to 45 years in prison
for the 1995 Naperville fire that
killed Marianne Miceli. Amor was
released on bond in May after a
judge vacated his convictions and
ordered a new trial, ruling that
advances in fire science proved
the description Amor gave in his
confession was impossible.
Amor said in a statement after
the DuPage County judge’s
Wednesday ruling that he was
grateful to have his day in court.
Amor’s attorneys, who
included representatives from
the Illinois Innocence Project at
the University of Illinois at
Springfield and the Exoneration
Project, said his conviction was
based on a coerced false
confession to police that came
after 15 hours of questioning and
Amor being served divorce
papers at the station. Amor
confessed to police that he
started the fire by leaving a
smoldering cigarette on a
newspaper soaked in vodka.
Three fire science experts
testified in the spring that labtested samples found no ignitable
liquids at the scene.
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
SPENCER PLATT/GETTY IMAGES
Police attend a memorial Mass at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in
Manhattan for New York Police Department Officer Edward Byrne
almost 30 years after he was executed by a drug gang on Feb. 26, 1988.
The 22-year-old officer was slain as he guarded the Queens home of a
witness. The killing, ordered by notorious drug dealer Howard
“Pappy” Mason, shocked the city for its brutality.
way for construction in
September by waiving dozens of
environmental reviews and other
evaluations in Calexico.
— Associated Press
ARKANSAS
Ex-judge gets 5 years
in sexual favors case
A federal judge sentenced a
former Arkansas judge to five
years in prison after he admitted
giving young male defendants
lighter sentences in return for
sexual favors — a harsher
punishment than prosecutors
recommended for the judge.
Two senior Geological Survey o∞cials step down
Interior chief Ryan Zinke
made improper request
for data, scientists say
BY
J ULIET E ILPERIN
Two senior U.S. Geological
Survey officials have stepped
down after Interior Secretary
Ryan Zinke asked that they provide his office with confidential
data on the National Petroleum
Reserve-Alaska before the information was released to the public.
Murray W. Hitzman and Larry
Meinert — who had served as the
agency’s associate director for
energy and minerals and as acting deputy associate director for
energy and minerals mission
area, respectively — charge that
Zinke’s request violated the
USGS’s scientific integrity policy
because such commercially valuable data should not be shared in
advance.
The policy states, “Particularly
sensitive results, however, such
as energy and mineral resource
assessments and mineral commodity reports that typically
have significant economic implications are not disclosed or
shared in advance of public release because pre-release in these
BOOKS (USED, NEW VINTAGE, RARE, COLLECTIBLE), NEW! EXPANDED LP SECTIONS,
WONDER BOOK
WE BUY ALL BOOKS
At Our Retail Stores 10-6 Every Day
DVDs, CDs & More Every Day • Cash Paid
House calls possible for large collections of 1000+ desirable items • Prompt Removal
Contact chuck@wonderbk.com or 301-694-0350
Pickup in store & save 50¢ per item!
Store pickup & standard domestic shipments only
GAITHERSBURG MD • 15976 Shady Grove Rd. • Open 10-7 Every Day
301-977-9166 • Also in FREDERICK & HAGERSTOWN MD
www.WonderBook.com • WE “RECYCLE” ALL BOOKS
• • • WE
ART PRINTS, SHEET MUSIC, AUDIOBOOKS, COLLECTIBLE MAGAZINES, VHS, CASSETTES
20% OFF!
Man who served 22
years cleared in retrial
Work begins to replace
border wall in Calexico
WE BUY/SELL DVDS, BLU-RAY, VIDEO GAMES, CDS, COMICS, MAPS,
10:35 a.m.
ALSO SELL RETRO SODAS, MOVIE SNACKS, LOCAL CANDY & WE RENT MOVIES/GAMES •• •
cases could result in unfair advantage or the perception of unfair advantage.”
But Interior spokeswoman
Heather Swift said Wednesday
that the solicitor’s office had
determined Zinke had the right
to “review data, draft reports or
other information as it deems
necessary” under the department’s 1950 reorganization plan.
The dispute, first reported by
Mother Jones magazine, represents the latest clash between
career federal scientists and the
Trump administration. Scientists
at Interior, as well as at the
Environmental Protection Agency and elsewhere, have raised
objections over issues ranging
from the scrubbing of data from
government websites to limits
imposed on what federal scientists can say publicly about their
work.
Hitzman sent his resignation
letter on Dec. 17, writing that he
objected to the idea of providing
results of an assessment of the
energy reserve’s potential “several days in advance of the information’s public release, in contradiction of my interpretation of
U.S.G.S. fundamental science
policy.”
Meinert, who retired Jan. 31,
said in an interview that he was
already planning to retire but
that the incident “certainly increased my desire to step out the
door.” There was no indication,
he emphasized, that either Zinke
or any of his deputies intended to
use the information for personal
gain. But he cited a long-standing
practice of withholding the information until it is made widely
available because its release “directly affects markets and who’s
interested in investing in a geographical area.”
“This is the first time we’ve had
anyone insist we want that number,” said Meinert, who joined
USGS in 2012. “This is simply a
matter of them wanting to control information.”
USGS Deputy Director William Werkheiser, who serves as
Interior’s scientific integrity officer, said in a statement that the
agency’s principles are violated
“when there is a significant departure from the accepted standards, professional values, and
practices of the relevant scientific community.”
“I do not believe that current
or proposed practices for the
notification of DOI leadership
constitute a loss of scientific integrity,” he said. “In fact, at no
time was USGS asked to change
or alter any of the findings for the
assessment.”
Zinke, who signed orders in
March aimed at jump-starting
energy exploration on federal
and tribal lands, hailed the USGS
assessment when it was released
Dec. 22 as proof that more leasing
could take place there.
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
Hate groups in the U.S. remain on the rise, study finds
Much of growth was in
white supremacist
movement, center says
BY
J OE H EIM
Hate groups continued to expand their reach in the United
States last year during a tumultuous 12 months marked by racist
violence, social media attacks and
the deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, according to
a nonprofit legal advocacy organization that monitors extremist activity.
The Southern Poverty Law
Center identified 954 organizations as hate groups, which it
defines as “an organization that
— based on its official statements
or principles, the statements of its
leaders, or its activities — has
beliefs or practices that attack or
malign an entire class of people,
typically for their immutable
characteristics.” That number
was up from 917 in 2016 and 892
in 2015, according to a study the
center released Wednesday.
Much of the rise took place
inside the white supremacist
movement. The number of neoNazi groups grew from 99 to 121,
anti-Muslim groups grew from
101 to 114 and anti-immigrant
groups grew from 14 to 22. The
law center said the growth among
white supremacists was fueled in
large part by racially divisive language and actions by President
Trump.
“This has been a year that has
seen increasing divisiveness and
bigotry, particularly in the mainstream of American life,” Heidi
Beirich, director of the Southern
Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence
Project, said in a conference call
with
reporters
Wednesday.
“There has been a substantial
emboldenment of the radical
right and that is largely due to the
actions of President Trump, who
has tweeted out hate materials
and made light of the threat to
our society posed by hate groups.”
Trump came under sharp criticism following the violence in
Charlottesville when he said
there was “blame on both sides”
and seemed to equate the white
supremacists with those who opposed them.
The White House rejected the
law center’s assertion that Trump
was responsible for the growth of
white supremacist groups.
JONATHAN ERNST/REUTERS
Ku Klux Klan members are protected by riot police at a white
supremacist rally in Charlottesville which later turned deadly.
“The president condemns hatred, bigotry and violence in all
forms,” deputy press secretary
Raj Shah wrote in an email. “He
will continue to fight for all Americans, regardless of race, religion,
gender or background, and any
suggestion otherwise is wrong
and insulting.”
But according to Beirich, the
participants in the Unite the
Right rally are people who view
Trump positively, and the president “has brought them into the
political system in a way that
hasn’t happened in decades.”
The report designates as hate
groups anti-LGBT organizations,
anti-government militias and
black nationalist groups, includ-
ing the Nation of Islam, which
profess anti-Semitic, anti-white
and anti-LGBT rhetoric. It points
out that those groups should not
be confused with “mainstream
black activist groups such as
Black Lives Matter that work to
eliminate systemic racism in
American society and its
institutions.”
For the first time, the Southern
Poverty Law Center added to its
hate list two men’s rights groups
— Return of Kings and A Voice for
Men.
“They demonize women as an
entire population,” Beirich said.
“It’s the same kind of language
directed at demonizing all women and trying to make women
look like a lesser form of
humanity.”
Many of the groups the center
identified as hate groups reject
that label.
“The listing is a complete
farce,” said Paul Elam, chief executive of A Voice for Men.
Roosh Valizadeh, who operates
the Return of Kings website,
called the report “a mountain of
lies” and said it was “merely an
attempt to shut down speech that
goes against their far left agenda.”
Return of Kings “is a website
operated solely by myself without
any employees,” Valizadeh wrote
in an email. “How can one man’s
blog be a ‘hate group?’ ”
The Nation of Islam did not
immediately respond to a request
for comment.
Perhaps surprisingly, the number of Ku Klux Klan groups
dropped dramatically from 130 to
72, an indication, the law center
says, that the 150-year-old organization has little appeal for a new
generation of white supremacists.
Though the overall number of
hate groups continues to rise,
Beirich said the violence in Charlottesville and the negative publicity that followed had an immediate impact that may reduce
their effectiveness. Social media
companies such as Twitter and
Facebook removed hate groups
and their leaders from their platforms and stopped allowing those
groups to use their services.
But
Matthew
Heimbach,
founder of the Traditionalist
Worker Party, a far-right white
nationalist organization that the
law center identifies as a hate
group, declared the Charlottesville rally a “stunning success” for
the
white
supremacist
movement.
joe.heim@washpost.com
Federal judiciary to track and release data on sexual harassment complaints
Move comes after
judge’s resignation over
misconduct accusations
BY
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
The federal judiciary will begin
tracking and publicly releasing
data on sexual harassment complaints against judges and is exploring other possible changes
after a powerful appeals court
judge’s resignation over misconduct allegations, according to a
letter from the director of the
administrative office of the
U.S. courts.
In an 18-page letter, Director
James C. Duff wrote that the
federal judiciary already had implemented several changes and
was examining others to encourage reporting. His letter came in
response to an inquiry from the
top Republican and Democrat on
the Senate Judiciary Committee,
which had inquired about how
the court was responding to news
reports about misconduct among
federal judges.
The judiciary — like many industries — has been grappling
with changes in the wake of the
#MeToo movement, particularly
after The Washington Post reported on sexual misconduct allegations against Alex Kozinski, a
once powerful and well-known
judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the 9th Circuit.
Those allegations sparked a
judicial investigation into Kozinski, though he stepped down
from the bench soon after the
probe got underway. The judicial
council handling the case announced this month it was closing the matter because it no longer had jurisdiction over the former judge.
In their letter, Senate Judiciary
Chairman Charles E. Grassley (RIowa) and Sen. Dianne Feinstein
Whistleblowers must go to SEC for
protections to apply, high court rules
BY
R OBERT B ARNES
The Supreme Court ruled
unanimously Wednesday that
whistleblower
protections
passed by Congress in the wake
of the financial crisis of 2008
apply only when those alleging
corporate misdeeds bring their
information to the government.
The court said that the DoddFrank Act of 2010 did not cover
those who brought allegations
only to their employers and not
to the Securities and Exchange
Commission.
Although some justices wondered during oral arguments
whether Congress intended to
draw such a distinction, Justice
Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote for
her colleagues that the statute
provides an “unequivocal answer” of who qualifies as a
whistleblower.
“ ‘When a statute includes an
explicit definition, we must follow that definition,’ even if it
varies from a term’s ordinary
meaning,” Ginsburg wrote, quoting an earlier court precedent.
“This principle resolves the question before us.”
The decision was one of four
issued by the court Wednesday,
as the justices begin to slowly
announce the outcomes of cases
they have heard this term. None
of the cases was among the most
controversial the court has encountered, and only one — a
technical case involving attorney
fees for prisoners — split the
court along its ideological divide.
Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.
was in the majority in all four.
The other cases involved a
man who brought a weapon onto
the U.S. Capitol grounds and a
setback for families who tried to
seize Persian antiquities to compensate for an act of terrorism
aided by Iran.
The Dodd-Frank Act has been
widely criticized by President
Trump, but the Justice Department had urged the Supreme
Court to take a broader view of
who was covered by the act’s
whistleblower protections.
The Justice Department had
supported Paul Somers, who was
a vice president of Digital Realty
Trust, a real estate investment
trust that owns and develops
data centers.
Somers alleged that he was
fired after he told senior management that his boss hid millions of dollars in cost overruns,
among other alleged violations
of security laws.
Lower courts, including the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the
9th Circuit, had ruled for Somers
and said it did not matter that he
had not also taken his claims to
the SEC.
Other appeals courts read the
law differently, which landed the
issue at the Supreme Court.
The Justice Department argued that it would gut much of
the protection provided by
Dodd-Frank to apply the statute’s
strict whistleblower definition to
the part of the law that keeps
companies from retaliating
against those who allege wrongdoing.
Lawyers who have represented whistleblowers before the
SEC said Wednesday’s ruling
clearly narrowed protection.
But they also said companies
might not like the result, as it
could mean those alleging
wrongdoing will go directly to
the SEC rather than using internal procedures at their companies.
The case is Digital Realty
Trust v. Somers.
The controversy involving
Iran centered on a remarkable
collection of antiquities housed
at the University of Chicago. It
consists of about 30,000 clay
tablets and fragments containing ancient writings recovered
during an excavation of the old
city of Persepolis. In 1937, Iran
lent the collection to the university for research.
Decades later, in 1997, Hamas
carried out three suicide bombings in Jerusalem, resulting in
five deaths and 200 injuries. U.S.
citizens who were wounded in
the attack or related to those
injured sued in federal court in
Washington, alleging that Iran
was responsible because it provided material support and
training to Hamas.
The plaintiffs were successful
and won a judgment of more
than $70 million. When Iran
refused to pay, they moved to
seize the collection.
But Justice Sonia Sotomayor
agreed with lower courts that a
federal law that generally protects foreign assets in this coun-
try did not allow the seizure. The
law does provide some exceptions when the country involved
provides support to extremist
groups, she wrote, but doesn’t
allow what the plaintiffs were
seeking.
The decision in Rubin v. Islamic Republic of Iran was unanimous. Justice Elena Kagan did
not participate.
A majority of the court also
sided with Rodney Class, a veteran from North Carolina who in
2013 parked his Jeep in a lot near
the U.S. Capitol.
Inside were three lawfully
owned firearms and some
knives.
Class was charged with violating a prohibition on having
weapons on Capitol grounds.
Class entered a guilty plea but
on appeal wanted to challenge
the law as a violation of his
Second Amendment rights and
due process, since there were no
signs warning him of the weapons ban.
The question for the court was
whether it was too late.
By a 6-to-3 vote, the court said
it was not. “A defendant’s guilty
plea does not make irrelevant the
kind of constitutional claim
Class seeks to make,” Justice
Stephen G. Breyer wrote for the
majority.
Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr.
dissented, joined by Justices Anthony M. Kennedy and Clarence
Thomas.
He said the court had created
a “muddle” about when a plea is
considered final that will “bedevil” the lower courts trying to
apply it.
The case is Class v. United
States.
The decision in the remaining
case means that prisoners who
win civil rights lawsuits will
probably have to pay more of
their awards to their attorneys.
At issue was whether the law
required the prisoner to pay
25 percent of the award to satisfy
a lawyer’s fees or whether a judge
could set a lower percentage up
to 25 percent.
The law requires the former,
Justice Neil M. Gorsuch wrote in
a decision, joined by the court’s
other most consistent conservatives.
The case is Murphy v. Smith.
robert.barnes@washpost.com
(Calif.), the ranking Democrat on
the committee, wrote that they
were “deeply troubled” by the
allegations against Kozinski and
other news reports that indicated
the problem might be more widespread.
CNN — which first reported
that the judiciary would track
sexual harassment allegations —
published a story in late January
asserting that very few of the
5,000 judicial misconduct orders
over the past 11 years were deeply
investigated and that judges were
very rarely disciplined. On
Wednesday, the judiciary said in a
news bulletin that 1,303 misconduct complaints were filed in
fiscal 2016 — more than 1,200 by
dissatisfied litigants and prison
inmates. The judiciary said none
related to sexual harassment, nor
were any complaints filed by law
clerks or judiciary employees.
Duff wrote in his letter that was
the case in most years. There was,
however, one law clerk who alleged sexual harassment in 2016
by a judge through a different
process known as the Employee
Dispute Resolution program.
“The sad fact is that, just as in
other public and private workplaces, sexual harassment issues
are often not reported,” Duff
wrote. He said the judiciary was
“addressing this issue by remov-
ing barriers to filing complaints
and educating employees about
the options they have available.”
Chief Justice John G. Roberts
Jr. in late December announced
the court would undertake an
initiative to ensure there were
proper procedures in place to
protect law clerks and other court
employees from sexual harassment, and he directed Duff to put
together a group to explore the
issue. That group, which met in
person for the first time on Feb. 7
and is scheduled to do so again in
early March, is supposed to produce a report and recommendations by May 1.
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
From sermons in a swamp emerged a magnetic preacher
GRAHAM FROM A1
Mr. Graham preached with a
burning sincerity, although he
generally avoided the exaggerated theatrics of the stereotypical
Bible-thumping revivalists of an
earlier era.
He was charming, tall and
handsome, always immaculately
dressed, and he had an engaging
smile. As he aged, his hair turned
snow-white. His delivery was varied and dramatic, liberally laced
with a stream of self-deprecating
anecdotes, and he was an extraordinarily effective proselytizer.
“Are you frustrated, bewildered, dejected, breaking under
the strains of life?” Mr. Graham
would ask his audiences. “Then
listen for a moment to me. Say yes
to the savior tonight, and in a
moment you will know such comfort as you have never known.”
Millions accepted his invitations to come forward and “make
a decision for Christ” over the
years of Mr. Graham’s ministry,
although his critics liked to cite
published statistics that 80 to 90
percent of these people were
church members who were reaffirming their faith.
William Martin, a professor of
sociology at Rice University,
called him “the most powerful
evangelist since Jesus” in a 2002
article in Texas Monthly magazine.
Martin, author of a 1991
Graham biography, “A Prophet
With Honor,” wrote that Mr.
Graham was singularly influential in trying to restore American
evangelism’s good name.
The profession had become
badly tarnished by the middle of
the 20th century for a variety of
reasons. Among these were the
rigid fundamentalist religious
dogma held up to ridicule in the
Scopes “monkey” trial of the
1920s and the unscrupulous excesses of itinerant evangelists
traveling the “tent-and-sawdust
circuit” as portrayed in the Sinclair Lewis novel “Elmer Gantry,”
which later became a hit movie.
In the 1980s, Mr. Graham
emerged unscathed amid the
scandals of financial duplicity
and sexual misconduct that
brought down other TV evangelists. He avoided involvement in
many of the causes dear to the
hearts of such conservative Christian groups as the Moral Majority,
arguing that many of these issues,
such as opposition to the Panama
Canal Treaty, were political questions, not spiritual or moral ones.
“I don’t think politics is part of
my work,” he often said, but he
nevertheless managed to spend
many well-publicized hours in the
company of leading politicians.
In 1981, he prayed at the bedside of Ronald Reagan when the
president was seriously wounded
in an assassination attempt. In
January 1991, when the United
States began the Persian Gulf War
with air attacks against Iraq, Mr.
Graham spent the night at the
White House. The next day, he
preached a sermon to the nation’s
leaders telling them that “there
comes a time when we have to
fight for peace.”
In 1989, he delivered the invocation and benediction at George
H.W. Bush’s inauguration. Former
president George W. Bush said
Mr. Graham, while on a visit to the
family vacation home in Kennebunkport, Maine, “planted the
seeds” of his Christian conversion.
Mr. Graham was especially
close to Richard M. Nixon. Years
after the fact, it was discovered
that in 1960 Mr. Graham hosted a
meeting of Protestant leaders to
discuss ways of preventing the
election of John F. Kennedy, Nixon’s Democratic opponent that
year for the presidency and a
Catholic. But Mr. Graham later
spoke positively of Kennedy and
said his election improved interreligious understanding in the
United States.
Mr. Graham sat in on the political strategy session in which
Maryland Gov. Spiro T. Agnew
was chosen as Nixon’s running
mate in the 1968 presidential election, which Nixon won.
The minister was a staunch and
vocal anti-communist, and he
generally supported the war in
Vietnam and opposed antiwar
protesters. In 1969, he delivered
the invocation at Nixon’s presidential inauguration, thanking
God that “thou hast permitted
Richard Nixon to lead us at this
momentous hour of our history.”
The invocation went on to decry
“materialistic and permissive”
ways, which Mr. Graham said had
created “a whirlwind of crime,
division and rebellion.”
Some found the prayer offensive. Christian Century magazine
characterized it as a “raucous harangue.” In his 1997 autobiography, “Just As I Am,” Mr. Graham
said his relationship with Nixon
was “not political or intellectual,
SPENCER PLATT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Billy Graham reads Bible passages to a crowd in London in 1954. For photos and video, go to http://wapo.st/ob-main-graham0222.
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
Mr. Graham holds hands with Nigerian children in their village.
He also took his message to Central and South America, India,
the Philippines, Hong Kong, Taiwan and South Korea.
rather it was personal and spiritual.”
But after Nixon resigned in the
wake of the Watergate scandal,
Mr. Graham had second thoughts.
“I wonder whether I might have
exaggerated his spirituality in my
own mind,” he wrote. Nevertheless, Mr. Graham officiated at Nixon’s funeral in 1994.
Eight years after Nixon’s death,
with the release of 30-year-old
tape recordings of an Oval Office
conversation, Mr. Graham would
again be linked in controversy
with Nixon. The tapes recorded
Mr. Graham agreeing with Nixon’s comments that left-wing
Jews dominate the U.S. media.
“They’re the ones putting out
the pornographic stuff,” Mr.
Graham says in his Southern
drawl. “This stranglehold has got
to be broken, or the country’s
going down the drain.”
The remarks were especially
hurtful because many Jewish
leaders had long considered Mr.
Graham a friend. He apologized,
saying: “I don’t ever recall having
those feelings about any group,
especially the Jews, and I do not
have them now. My remarks did
not reflect my love for the Jewish
people.”
Widely admired among rankand-file Christians, Mr. Graham
had been included in the Gallup
Organization’s annual list of the
10 most admired people in the
world at least 49 times since 1948,
more than any other person.
But many academicians and
theologians
criticized
Mr.
Graham’s message as too literal
and overly simplistic, offering a
form of “instant redemption”
based on emotional appeal.
His interpretation of the Bible
was essentially a fundamentalist
one, but as his ministry developed, many non-fundamentalist
Christian clergy came to regard it
as enlightened. Mr. Graham al-
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESS/GETTY IMAGES
Billy Graham is greeted by his family aboard the Queen
Mary in 1954 after a religious tour of Europe. With him are
his daughters Virginia, left, Ruth and Anne and wife, Ruth.
All of his children later went into some form of ministry.
ROBERT PADGETT/REUTERS
In 2007, Mr. Graham and three former presidents — George
H.W. Bush, Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton — bow their heads
during the dedication of the Billy Graham Library in Charlotte.
ways took care to operate within
the framework of mainstream
Christianity, and he generally left
his converts with the exhortation,
“Above all, go to church.”
In 1964, Cardinal Richard J.
Cushing, then the Catholic archbishop of Boston, declared that no
Catholic who heard Mr. Graham
preach “can do anything but become a better Catholic.”
Mr. Graham had at his command the resources of a multimillion-dollar organization, the Billy
Graham Evangelistic Association,
and affiliates responsible for media outreach through radio, TV,
film and publications. His weekly
radio program, “Hour of Decision,” was carried by as many as
840 stations around the world. He
wrote a syndicated newspaper
column, “My Answer,” and dozens
of books, many of which became
bestsellers.
The Graham organization took
in tens of millions of dollars in
contributions every year and received more than 11,000 pieces of
mail each day. For most of Mr.
Graham’s ministry it was based in
Minneapolis, but in 2003 it
moved to Charlotte.
The prominent theologian Reinhold Niebuhr once wrote in Life
magazine that Mr. Graham
“promises a new life, not through
painful religious experience but
merely by signing a decision
card.”
Mr. Graham invariably dismissed such criticism, contending that he was only a servant of
God, spreading the Gospel as best
he knew how. “I’m not here to
teach psychology or philosophy or
theology,” he said. “I’m here to tell
you what the Bible says. We’ve
listened to the voice of man long
enough. Let’s hear what God has
to say.”
William Franklin Graham was
born Nov. 7, 1918, on a farm near
Charlotte. As a boy, he helped out
on the farm and took odd jobs to
make spending money. He played
first base on his high school baseball team and dreamed of becoming a major league baseball player.
Raised as a Presbyterian, he
was an unenthusiastic Christian
until he was 17, when he experienced a religious conversion at a
revival in Charlotte.
“No bells went off inside me,”
he wrote in his autobiography.
“No signs flashed across the tabernacle ceiling. No physical palpita-
tions made me tremble. . . . I
simply felt at peace.”
After graduation from high
school, he sold Fuller brushes
door to door, testing the persuasive skills that would serve him so
well later in life, then attended
Florida Bible Institute in St. Petersburg.
While there, he honed his pulpit techniques by rehearsing his
sermons in a swamp before a
congregation of bullfrogs. He was
ordained as a Southern Baptist
clergyman in 1938, then attended
Wheaton College in Illinois, an
evangelical institution, where he
received a degree in anthropology.
At Wheaton, Mr. Graham met
Ruth Bell, a fellow student and the
daughter of Presbyterian missionaries in China. They were married
from 1943 until her death in 2007.
Survivors include his son
Franklin Graham, who took over
his father’s ministry in 2000; four
other children, Gigi Tchividjian,
Anne Graham Lotz, Ruth Graham
and Ned Graham, all of whom
went into some form of ministry;
a sister; 19 grandchildren; and
numerous great-grandchildren.
After
graduating
from
Wheaton, Mr. Graham began his
career in the professional ministry as pastor of the First Baptist
Church of Western Springs, Ill. He
renamed it the Village Church to
give it an interdenominational
appeal. Simultaneously, he began
a radio ministry, preaching every
Sunday evening in an hour-long
program over a Chicago station
that included his sermon and
songs.
Beginning in 1944, Mr. Graham
was chief preacher at “Youth for
Christ” rallies, and three years
later he published his first book,
“Calling Youth to Christ.” That
year, he also accepted the presidency of Northwestern Schools, a
complex of religious educational
institutions that included a college, a Bible institute and a seminary, under the aegis of the First
Baptist Church of Minneapolis.
During this period, Mr.
Graham was on the road most of
the time, pursuing his calling as
an evangelist, but the results were
unimpressive until November
1949, when he preached in Los
Angeles.
In a series of tent rallies that he
called a “Canvas Cathedral” campaign, Mr. Graham drew national
media attention, in part because
he caught the eye of newspaper
baron William Randolph Hearst,
who had decided that America
needed a spiritual awakening.
“Puff Graham,” Hearst is said to
have wired all his newspaper editors, encouraging positive stories.
In 1950, Mr. Graham made his
first White House visit, calling on
President Harry S. Truman, who
was cool to the young evangelist.
When Mr. Graham suggested that
they “have a word of prayer” together, the president answered, “I
don’t suppose it could do any
harm.”
Leaving the White House afterward, Mr. Graham knelt in prayer
on the lawn, in a demonstration
for news photographers of how he
and the president had prayed together. He was not invited back
during the Truman administration.
During the 1950s, Mr. Graham
redoubled his evangelical efforts,
and his meetings grew more ambitious. He drew crowds that grew
to be in the hundreds of thousands.
By the middle of the decade,
Mr. Graham was probably the
world’s best-known Christian
evangelist. He drew 2.1 million
during a 16-week crusade in 1957
in New York that included a crowd
of 100,000 at Yankee Stadium. He
took his message to Central and
South America, Europe and North
Africa, India, the Philippines,
Hong Kong, Taiwan and Korea.
In 1959, during a three-month
revival campaign in Australia, Mr.
Graham drew 3.2 million people.
“His magnetic personality has
broken down his most cynical
critics,” wrote the Melbourne Herald. His message was invariably
direct and uncomplicated.
“I have found that if I say, ‘The
Bible says,’ and ‘God says,’ I get
results,” his biographer, Martin,
quoted him as telling a friend.
Mr. Graham made one of his
first breaks with the traditional
conservatism of his Southern fundamentalist origins over the issue
of race. Even in the Jim Crow era,
he reached across racial lines and
sought integrated audiences for
his crusades.
Nonetheless, Mr. Graham was
not a vocal supporter of the civilrights movement of the 1960s. He
opposed racial segregation, he
said, but he declined to attend the
1963 March on Washington for
Jobs and Freedom. At other times,
he accused “some extreme Negro
leaders [of ] going too far and too
fast.”
His tribute to the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr. after the civil
rights leader’s assassination in
1968 was restrained. “Many people who have not agreed with Dr.
King can admire him for his nonviolent policies, and in the eyes of
the world he has become one of
the greatest Americans,” Mr.
Graham said.
With the relaxation of EastWest tensions and the Cold War
detente in the 1980s, he twice
visited the Soviet Union and took
his crusades to Eastern Europe
and to China. In 1990, he stood
before the remains of the battered
Berlin Wall and proclaimed himself “the ambassador of the Kingdom of God,” come to lead East
and West Germans to Christianity.
In 1993, Mr. Graham announced that he had Parkinson’s
disease, and there were times
when he needed assistance walking across a stage, but his strength
seemed to return the moment he
grasped the pulpit with his hands.
At the National Day of Prayer
service that followed the 9/11 terrorist attacks, a frail and gaunt
Mr. Graham had to be helped to
the pulpit at Washington National
Cathedral. “This nation will not
be defeated,” he proclaimed in a
firm, strong voice.
At a 2002 Texas Stadium mission rally — Mr. Graham had
dropped the “crusade” terminology in deference to Muslim sensitivities — former president
George H.W. Bush called Mr.
Graham a “genuine American
hero” and “personal pastor to
America’s first family since as
long as I can remember.”
Mr. Graham received two of the
highest awards an American civilian can receive, the Presidential
Medal of Freedom in 1983 and the
Congressional Gold Medal in
1996.
In 2000, his son Franklin was
named chief executive of the Billy
Graham Evangelistic Association,
and the elder Mr. Graham said he
was prepared to end his ministry
whenever the time came.
“Most of my life has already
been lived,” he said. “I’ll be glad
when the moment comes when
the Lord calls me to heaven. I get
tired down here sometimes.”
newsobits@washpost.com
Sarah Pulliam Bailey contributed to
this report.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
RE
What would Billy Graham think of evangelicals today?
He grew wary of partisan
politics, but his followers
took a different path
BY M ICHELLE B OORSTEIN,
S ARAH P ULLIAM B AILEY
AND J ULIE Z AUZMER
“An evangelical,” historian
George Marsden once said, is
“anyone who likes Billy Graham.”
Ironically, the death of
Graham, a towering figure in
20th-century American religion,
revealed evangelicals’ deep and
bitter divisions — in this case over
his legacy.
His passing on Wednesday
seemed to highlight a question:
How did a group so uniformly
inspired by Graham appear to so
deeply reject his nonpartisan
viewpoint? How did American
evangelicals come to be the most
partisan of faith groups, and what
role did Graham play?
Decades after Graham in 1981
expressed disgust at the possibility of a merger between the religious and political right, the term
“evangelical” has for many become synonymous with rightwing politics.
Some experts said Graham,
who was virtually absent from
public life in the past 10 years
because of Parkinson’s disease,
was the antithesis of today’s climate. Others said he made it possible.
“I think he would be mortified
by what’s happened today,” said
Grant Wacker, who wrote a biography of Graham. “I think he
would be in shock with how politicized the faith has become. He
would look around and say, ‘This
is not what the Gospel is about.’ ”
Graham, who preached at massive revivals around the world
from the 1940s until 2005, was
always present near American
politics, but he tried not to be
partisan. He visited the White
House under every president
from Harry S. Truman through
George W. Bush. He was close
with Democrats Lyndon B. Johnson and Bill Clinton, and Republicans Richard M. Nixon and
George H.W. Bush.
And yet in 2011, when asked
about his regrets, he said, “I also
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Then-Vice President Richard M. Nixon pours coffee for his luncheon guest, evangelist Billy Graham, in
1960 in Nixon’s D.C. office. Graham was close to Nixon but was criticized for the association later.
would have steered clear of politics.”
“I’m grateful for the opportunities God gave me to minister to
people in high places; people in
power have spiritual and personal
needs like everyone else, and often they have no one to talk to,”
Graham said at the time. “But
looking back I know I sometimes
crossed the line, and I wouldn’t do
that now.”
The evangelical community
that Graham leaves behind has
gone in just the opposite direction, casting their lot decisively
with the Republican Party. In the
2016 presidential election, 80 percent of white evangelicals voted
for Trump.
And just as white evangelicals
aligned themselves strongly with
Trump, the president has tied
himself to them. Instead of the
multifaith groups that have advised prior presidents, Trump has
only a panel of informally organized evangelical advisers — pastors who regularly defend his policies and his personal character
on TV news.
At his inauguration, Trump had
a prayer by Franklin Graham, Billy Graham’s son, who now leads
his ministry.
Graham’s five children have all
gone into ministry in some way, as
have many of his grandchildren.
The family’s theological and political stances range fairly widely; at
least two grandchildren have entirely rejected the label “evangelical” that their grandfather
shaped, precisely because they
feel the word is now too associated with Republican politics.
But it is Franklin who leads his
father’s ministry and most often
claims his imprimatur.
Franklin Graham had a dire
view of Barack Obama and embraced the idea of Trump running
for president as early as 2011, in an
interview with Christiane Amanpour in which the second-generation evangelist shared Trump’s
“birther” views, saying Obama
should produce his birth certificate.
Bill Martin, a professor emeri-
tus at Rice University who wrote a
biography of Graham, saw a sharp
divergence from the elder
Graham. “It was always hard for
Billy not to like people. Franklin
was always willing to draw lines,”
Martin said.
Others saw Billy Graham as one
of the authors of the current story,
if an unwitting one.
Anthea Butler, associate professor of religious studies and Africana Studies at the University of
Pennsylvania, argued that although Graham was openly nonpartisan, he “laid the groundwork
for Trump and evangelicals today.” Graham wound himself into
political life, and advanced the
idea that America has a unique
Christian purpose. To see Franklin Graham use his stature to bless
Donald Trump, Butler said, shows
the natural end point of Billy
Graham’s politicking.
She pointed out that Billy
Graham held racially integrated
rallies during his hugely popular
evangelistic crusades — which
were barrier-breaking at the time
— but also worked with racist
Southern leaders.
“It’s this accommodationist
perspective that I’m talking
about. Everyone will say he’s a
great man, and I don’t discount
that, but he is embedded in a
particular project about America,
from his anti-communist work to
the last president he was photographed with,” she said, noting a
2013 image of Graham’s 95th
birthday party with Trump, former Alaska governor Sarah Palin
and Rupert Murdoch. “His project
is about preaching the message of
Jesus Christ with a uniquely
American spin that promotes
America and makes us look like a
Christian nation — period.”
Butler, among others, noted
that Graham’s recent activities
may have been steered by his son
Franklin. The ailing elder Graham
wasn’t available for interviews in
recent years, so it was impossible
to know.
Many conservatives say Franklin Graham’s political prominence
is appropriate and rightly reflects
Billy Graham’s legacy.
“I think Franklin is certainly
carrying the mantle of his dad in a
very positive way. I think Franklin
had a better idea of what his dad
would do than anybody,” said Robert Jeffress, a Texas megachurch
pastor who is among Trump’s informal evangelical advisers.
Jeffress
quoted
Franklin
Graham to argue that the elder
Graham would likely not have
condemned Trump for his crass
statements or his personal moral
failings, like extramarital affairs.
“I think Franklin has said it
well. Many of us have said it. We
support candidates based on their
policies, not on their personal piety,” he said. That’s what Billy
Graham would have done, Jeffress
said. “Just as the Bible says Jesus
was a friend of sinners, Billy
Graham was a friend of sinners.
He was a friend of all presidents.
We’re talking about John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, or anyone
else in between.”
Others dispute whether Franklin speaks for his father, even
within the Graham family. Jerushah Armfield, one of Graham’s
grandchildren who has been an
outspoken critic of Trump and of
evangelicals who support him,
said that her Uncle Franklin does
not share the views of her late
grandfather.
“People know my grandfather’s
message,” Armfield said. “They
don’t think that all of a sudden his
message has taken a sharp right
turn.”
Richard Mouw, the former
president of the evangelical Fuller
Theological Seminary, said he believed Billy Graham’s caution
about partisanship arose from his
experience with Nixon. Graham
was close to the president, then
harshly criticized for it once the
Watergate scandal unfolded, and
again later when tapes from Nixon’s White House revealed
Graham participating in an antiSemitic conversation with the
president.
“I think Billy Graham would
warn evangelicals against getting
too cozy with any political candidate out of his own experience of
having been taken in by Nixon.
Billy Graham would be concerned
by how evangelicals have cast
their lot with Donald Trump,”
Mouw said. “He had a clear sense
of where the dangers were in political ties. . . . I think he’d be very
disturbed right now by what’s
happening in evangelicalism.”
Evangelicalism was a poorly
understood movement when
Graham entered the ministry in
the 1940s. He helped define the
core tenets of evangelical Christianity, and he preached them again
and again — personal salvation
through Jesus Christ, the inerrancy of the Bible, the importance of
sharing the good news far and
wide. In his simple, straightforward, captivating sermons, he
brought evangelicalism to the
masses.
“He was a unifying symbol. He
was able to transcend so many
different theological tribes and
personal squabbles. People who
could not get along with one another at all . . . loved Billy
Graham,” said Russell Moore, the
president of the Southern Baptist
Convention’s Ethics and Religious
Liberty Commission.
“Billy Graham brought unity to
evangelicalism through his own
influence and integrity,” Moore
said. In many ways, he said, the
elusive unity that seems to have
been lost today, was lost with Billy
Graham.
michelle.boorstein@washpost.com
sarah.bailey@washpost.com
julie.zauzmer@washpost.com
Guidance starts with hearing you out.
TD Ameritrade’s Financial Consultants take the time to understand what matters to you, and why, before
discussing investment strategies. To help you find the plan that works for you, we want to get to know you first.
Schedule a complimentary goal planning session today and get up to $600 when you open and fund an account.
Call (800)870-9668 or
visit tdameritrade.com/goalplanning to learn more.
See tdameritrade.com/600offer for offer details and restrictions/conditions. All investments involve risk, including risk of loss. This is not an offer or solicitation in any jurisdiction
where we are not authorized to do business. TD Ameritrade, Inc., member FINRA/SIPC. © 2017 TD Ameritrade.
A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
Shooting in FloriDA
Trump endorses arming teachers, checks on gun buyers
TRUMP FROM A1
The 70-minute listening session
with students, parents and teachers
at the White House was a remarkable event with participants’ raw
emotions often on display — at one
point, a student openly sobbed after
he spoke, his head down as he wiped
away tears and those around him
rubbed his back.
By hosting the event, Trump signaled he wants to take ownership
of addressing the vexing problem
of gun violence at American
schools. As one parent after another, one student after another,
publicly pleaded with Trump to
find a solution, the pressure
mounted on the president to show
that he can move Washington to
act on an issue it has failed to
confront despite the frequency of
mass shootings in recent years.
“We’re going to do something
about this horrible situation that’s
going on,” Trump said. “And we’re
going to all figure it out together.”
But it will be a difficult promise
to fulfill with Trump’s Republican
Party long opposed to making it
more difficult to buy a gun and
Democrats and gun-control advocates calling anything short of limiting access to firearms a failure. It
will require him to use the bipartisan dealmaking skills he promised
to bring to his presidency but has
yet to show.
The event at the White House,
held a week after 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz allegedly opened fire at
his former high school, was part of
the administration’s effort to show
it is determined to listen and then
act.
Vice President Pence urged participants to be open, candid and
vulnerable — an unusual request
on behalf of a president who has
tried to minimize his exposure to
people who don’t agree with him.
Trump sat quietly for most of the
event, often nodding his head as if
in agreement. He held notes that
told him to ask the participants
about their experiences and what
the White House could do, along
with a reminder to say, “I hear you.”
Trump heard from students
who attend Marjory Stoneman
Douglas High School and parentsturned-activists whose children
were killed in shootings in Colorado in 1999 and Connecticut in
2012. He also heard from teachers
and students at public charter
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
Samuel Zeif, left, a student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, weeps during a meeting with other students and President Trump
Wednesday at the White House. Zeif said he doesn’t understand why teenagers “can go in a store and buy a weapon of war, an AR.”
schools in Southeast Washington
that have instituted airport-like
security checkpoints at their
buildings.
Missing from the listening session were the teenage survivors of
last week’s mass shooting who have
become outspoken leaders of a
movement focused on banning assault rifles such as the one allegedly
used by the gunman. Those students were in Florida on Wednesday to lobby state lawmakers in
Tallahassee and participate in a
town hall event hosted by CNN in
South Florida.
David Hogg, a survivor of the
shooting who has passionately argued for stricter gun-control measures, declined an invitation extended by the White House, according to
his mother, Rebecca Boldrick. She
said that Hogg told the White House
that if Trump wants to talk to the
students, he has to come to Parkland, Fla.
At the White House, Trump sat
in a circle with many of the participants and asked them to share
their stories and suggestions for
making schools safer from gun
violence.
Carson Abt, a Parkland student,
said all public schools need to regularly do drills to prepare for a
potential mass shooting. Cary
Gruber, who texted with his son
during the Parkland shooting, said
he doesn’t understand why teenagers who are too young to buy a
beer can purchase an assault rifle.
“In Israel, you have to be 27 years
old to have a gun,” said Gruber,
whose son survived the shooting.
“You’re only allowed one. They tax
the guns. You have to go through
significant training. We got to do
something about this. We cannot
have our children die. This is just
heartbreaking. Please.”
Samuel Zeif, the student who
sobbed after speaking, said he
doesn’t understand why teenagers
like him can “go in a store and buy
a weapon of war, an AR.”
On Wednesday, an NRA spokeswoman said the group would oppose putting age restrictions on
firearms, saying that it would punish “law-abiding citizens for the
evil acts of criminals.”
Parkland Mayor Christine Hunschofsky read aloud messages for
the president from the parents of
two high school students killed
last week. One of the fathers, an
airline pilot, said he supports the
Second Amendment but not ownership of assault rifles. Another
parent urged the president to
“publicly acknowledge the role of
guns” in these shootings.
Andrew Pollack, whose daughter was killed last week, said that it
made him angry to visit the Education Department on Wednesday
and see armed security guards everywhere, even in the elevator. He
said this is not a gun issue and is
instead a matter of better securing
and guarding schools.
“Fix it,” said Pollack, who was
wearing a red “Trump 2020” T-shirt
as he searched for his daughter last
week. “It should have been one
school shooting, and we should have
fixed it. And I’m pissed, because my
daughter, I’m not going to see again.
She’s not here. She’s at — in North
Lauderdale, at whatever it is — King
David Cemetery. That’s where I go to
see my kid now.”
After all of these ideas had been
shared, Trump again asked the
group whether they could suggest
some solutions, prompting one father to call for arming teachers, custodians and librarians. A mother
suggested that government agencies need to better communicate
about students who are struggling
with mental-health problems.
Then, it was the president’s turn
to speak.
He reflected on how many mental hospitals and institutions have
been shut down over the years,
adding that the alleged shooter in
Parkland was “a sick guy, and he
should have been nabbed a number of times.” He mentioned how
first responders often cannot get to
schools quickly enough when a
shooting begins, and he endorsed
the idea of arming teachers and
other school employees. He said
that gun-free zones like those at
schools attract maniacs who want
to harm others — a reversal from
the campaign when he said that he
didn’t “want guns brought into the
school classroom.”
Trump promised that “we’ll be
doing the background checks” for
those looking to purchase guns.
He said “a lot” of airline pilots now
carry guns — a questionable assertion — making the skies safer. He
then polled the group to see how
many supported the idea of arming teachers.
A parent who lost a child at
Sandy Hook Elementary School,
Mark Barden, said his wife is a
teacher and does not want her job
to include using “lethal force to
take a life.”
“Nobody wants to see a shootout in a school,” he said, as some in
the room applauded.
Barden said that he and other
activists have come up with ways to
train teachers and students to intervene before a shooting happens.
“We have a solution right here,”
Barden said. “We’re asking for you
to please help.”
Trump broadly promised that
he would.
“It’s very difficult, it’s very complex, but we’re going to find the
solution,” he said. “There are many
different ideas. Some, I guess, are
good. Some aren’t good.”
jenna.johnson@washpost.com
john.wagner@washpost.com
Mark Berman and Faiz Siddiqui
contributed to this report.
Fla. lawmakers inch closer to changes on guns amid waves of student anger
GUNS FROM A1
lice to confiscate guns from people deemed dangerous by the
courts, and new measures to protect schools from mass shooters.
The proposals represent a
sharp break from the state’s traditional response to mass-casualty
gun violence. Though a contested
state in presidential elections,
Florida has a long history as a
laboratory of gun-rights legislation pushed by the powerful National Rifle Association.
The state spearheaded efforts
to establish concealed-carry permits and a “stand-your-ground”
law, which protects citizens who
use deadly force if they feel they
are in imminent danger. Many
state leaders, including Republican Gov. Rick Scott, boast high
NRA approval ratings.
The voices of survivors of
school shootings also filled the
White House on Wednesday as
President Trump held a listening
session and heard pleas from parents and students for government
action to keep children safe.
“My daughter has no voice. She
was murdered last week. She was
taken from us,” Andrew Pollack,
whose daughter Meadow was
killed at Parkland, told Trump.
His voice rising, Pollack said
change was long overdue, “One
school shooting and we should
have fixed it.”
National gun control groups,
including the Brady Campaign to
Prevent Gun Violence and a group
founded by former congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.),
helped to organize the rally in
Tallahassee and then led hundreds of students to clog the hallways of the state capitol building
in protest afterward.
Deafening chants of “face us
now” and “serve your public, not
your pocket” greeted state House
members as they adjourned for
the day, forcing many lawmakers
to leave the main chamber
through side doors. In several other high schools across the state
Wednesday, students staged walkouts in solidarity with the survivors of the Parkland shooting.
Before the rally, where a procession of students spoke wearing
“We Call B.S.” T-shirts, Republican
leaders of the Florida Senate met
at the capitol with a group of
CHARLOTTE KESL FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Florida state Sens. Bill Galvano, left, and Joe Negron greet students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas
High School at the Florida Capitol in Tallahassee on Wednesday.
about 50 Parkland students. One
student denounced the NRA as
“murderers,” several said they had
come to “beg” for changes to gun
laws, and many cried as they described their friends’ deaths.
“He was a boy who got shot in
the head because of your laws
saying an 18-year-old boy can carry a military-grade weapon to
kill,” said Tyra Hemans, 19, a senior who held a photo of her friend
Joaquin Oliver, which she kept in
her cellphone case.
She demanded several times
that the lawmakers look her in the
eye as they spoke, and they complied.
In his introductory remarks,
Florida Senate President Joe Negron, a Republican who has received a perfect score from the
NRA for his gun votes, choked up
while talking about the funeral he
attended Tuesday for 15-year-old
Peter Wang, one of the slain students. “We are here to listen to
your concerns,” he told the students.
The lawmakers said they intended to reconsider a Florida law
that allows 18-year-olds to buy
assault rifles in the state although
the age for purchasing a handgun
is 21. Negron also said the state
would replace the school building
where the shooting was carried
out with a memorial.
Florida took no legislative action on guns after a man armed
with a rifle killed 49 people in an
attack on an Orlando nightclub in
2016 or after another rampage in
the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood
International Airport that left five
people dead in 2017. In the current
legislative session, Republicans
have proposed allowing guns in
courthouses and airports, as well
as the carrying of handguns without a permit.
The outlines of a possible new
agreement emerged last week, in
the days immediately following
the Parkland shooting, during bipartisan tours of the crime scene
at the school. Local Democratic
legislators invited the state’s Republican leadership to walk the
bloodstained halls and hear directly from first responders about
the impacts of the attack.
For some involved in the process, the fact that Democrats now
have a seat at the table to discuss
gun violence is a breakthrough
that could have implications outside the state as the rest of the
country grapples with growing
concerns over gun violence. This
The NRA announced its
opposition Wednesday
to raising the age for
purchasing an assault
weapon to 21.
week, Trump, a staunch ally of the
NRA, also began talking about
potential gun-control measures.
“The change that we are on the
cusp of making in the state of
Florida has implications for the
rest of the country,” said state Rep.
Kristin Jacobs, a Broward County
Democrat who represents the
families of those slain in Parkland
and helped to arrange the tours of
the school. “It’s not, ‘My way or the
highway.’ ”
In an acknowledgment of the
efforts, state House Speaker Richard Corcoran (R) ended the House
session Tuesday with a public call
for more work across party lines.
“Continue to have a dialogue,” he
told the Democrats and Republicans in his chamber. “The goal
would be that we would come up
with a very substantive bipartisan
bill.”
Hours earlier, the Republicandominated Florida House handily
defeated a Democratic effort to
open debate on an assault-weapons ban, as several students
watched tearfully from the gallery.
In addition to possibly raising
the age for buying an assault rifle
to 21, the lawmakers have discussed adding a three-day waiting
period for taking possession of the
type of semiautomatic rifle used
in the school shooting. At the urging of local sheriffs, they are also
exploring ways to strengthen the
ability of law enforcement departments to take weapons away from
those deemed a danger by courts.
And they plan to establish a training program for teachers and faculty members to qualify to carry
guns at schools, an idea that has
been opposed in the past by the
Florida Education Association.
Several participants warned
that the efforts still could collapse.
Scott, a likely U.S. Senate candidate who held listening sessions
on guns Tuesday, has been informed of the negotiations but
has not publicly taken a position.
The NRA announced its opposition Wednesday to raising the
age for purchasing an assault
weapon to 21. The group has not
yet commented on the other measures being discussed in Florida.
“Legislative proposals that prevent law-abiding adults aged 1820 years old from acquiring rifles
and shotguns effectively prohibits
them for purchasing any firearm,
thus depriving them of their constitutional right to self-protection,” said Jennifer Baker, an NRA
spokeswoman.
“We are in a very vulnerable
place right now,” said Sen. Lauren
Book, a Democratic lawmaker
who represents Broward County
and has been organizing the bipartisan outreach. “There is very
little margin for error. There is not
a lot of time. And I think there are
some who are incendiary and
want to throw stones and create
havoc because they have their
own agendas.”
Other groups that have pushed
for more gun control but had been
on the defensive for much of the
legislative session, expressed optimism Tuesday that a breakthrough could be achieved, given
the visibility the students have
brought to the issue.
“The students are what is different this time,” said Kate Kile,
leader of the Tallahassee chapter
of Moms Demand Action for Gun
Sense in America, which has been
providing water and snacks for
students visiting the state capital.
“As the grown-ups, it’s on us.”
Potential bipartisanship began
to take root during lawmakers’
emotional tours of the school site
in recent days.
“They needed to see it to understand,” said Book, who took photos of the attack’s bloody aftermath that she keeps on her phone
to illustrate the horror of the
event.
Among the Republicans who
made the pilgrimage in those first
days were Speaker Corcoran, Senate President Negron, future Senate president Bill Galvano and
House Appropriations Committee Chairman Carlos Trujillo.
They looked through the small
glass windows in the classroom
doors where shots had been fired
at students taking cover. They
learned about the resilience of
hurricane windows to a bullet
from an AR-15-style rifle. They
heard concerns from law enforcement about the difficulty of taking
guns out of the hands of people
they assess as dangerous.
They ultimately agreed to try to
accomplish something together,
even if it meant steering clear of
the most explosive debates over
the sale of high-capacity magazines and semiautomatic rifles.
“Being righteous isn’t enough,”
said Jacobs, the lawmaker from
Broward County. “I’ve been referring to this as a sort of a trust fall,
to do something now but also
opening the door to future conversations.”
michael.scherer@washpost.com
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
SU
shooting in florida
U.S. students make the gun-safety movement their own
Established groups give
young activists support
from behind the scenes
BY D AVID W EIGEL
AND W ESLEY L OWERY
A half-dozen students from
Iowa City High School began planning their first-ever protest for
gun safety Sunday evening, logging into a group chat and saying
they wanted to do something in
solidarity with the students in
Parkland, Fla., who had survived
the mass shooting there that left 17
people dead.
“We need concrete actions, not
just walking out cuz we’re angry
and then go back to school the
next day like nothing happened,”
Esti Brady, 16, wrote in the chat.
More than 250 students braved
cold rain the next morning and
marched 1½ miles, giving speeches using a megaphone borrowed
from Women’s March organizers.
Students also walked out of
high schools in Illinois, and they
participated in a “die-in” at the
White House. In Tallahassee on
Wednesday, survivors of the Parkland massacre rallied at the state
Capitol for stronger gun control
and implored the nation’s adults
to do something.
Such displays have given gunsafety advocates fresh hope that
the Parkland shooting — and the
widespread response to it among
youths — could create new momentum across the country to enact firearms restrictions. And the
grass-roots campaigns that have
sprung up in high school hallways
among angry and tearful teenagers are now attracting attention
from national groups demoralized
after a string of shootings prompted no political response.
The students have attracted political attacks from advocates for
gun rights, who have accused
them of being shills for anti-gun,
left-wing lobbyists. And while the
students have claimed little to no
involvement from national advocates, the gun-control groups are
entering the fray behind the
JOE SKIPPER/REUTERS
Cameron Kasky, a 17-year-old junior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, speaks to students in
Coral Springs, Fla., on Wednesday before they boarded buses to Tallahassee to meet with legislators.
scenes, aware of how quickly such
a moment can fade but also wanting to avoid tainting what they
describe as an organic, youth-driven movement.
Anti-gun groups are going out
of their way to claim distance from
the student activists while praising their efforts. Everytown for
Gun Safety, the group founded by
Michael Bloomberg in the wake of
the Newtown, Conn., school
shooting in 2012, connected some
of the Parkland students with its
“survivor network.” The Brady
Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence is starting to talk to students
about rallies planned for March
and expects to set aside money to
help students who can’t afford to
travel to the events. Giffords, formerly known as Americans for
Responsible Solutions, shared
“some context on gun violence
protection” with students who requested it, according to Peter Ambler, the group’s executive director.
“It’s important to recognize
that in every single way possible
this is an authentically grassroots, student-led movement,”
Ambler said. “Of course we’re
reaching out and trying to lift
them up, and give them the resources we can muster to make
them successful. But we have been
sort of at arm’s length, in the background doing whatever we can to
support them.”
Major donors already have
stepped up to bolster the marches,
from George and Amal Clooney,
who have pledged $500,000.
Oprah Winfrey and Steven Spielberg vowed matches.
In Florida, student organizers
have been coordinating with the
leadership of the Women’s March
— which is helping them plan a
march on Washington that, like
their own back in 2017, will be
accompanied by other rallies
across the nation. They also have
met several times with parents of
the children killed in Newtown as
well as several students who survived that shooting.
“The amazing thing about this
specific movement is that it’s run
by the students, and the students
are at the forefront of it all,” said
Dylan Baierlein, 18, who graduated from Marjory Stoneman Douglas last spring and has been working with Never Again MSD. “And
the people and groups who have
reached out to help understand
that, they’ve given us advice and
support without taking over. And I
think that’s invaluable.”
The students in Iowa City said
they put together their rally with
no outside help, no funding and
promotion only from a student
newspaper. The organized student efforts in Parkland began the
day after the shooting, when sev-
eral groups of friends from the
school’s drama and journalism
programs met up at a vigil and
vowed that something had to
be done.
Students have been organizing
at the same rapid clip across the
country. Lane Murdock, a 15-yearold at Ridgefield High School in
Connecticut, started the National
School Walkout campaign last
week with a Change.org petition.
When the questions started to
come in, she teamed up with Paul
Kim, the 17-year-old student-body
president, and created a joint
email account to help organize
what, by Tuesday, was more than
78,000 students pledging a walkout on April 20.
“I hadn’t told my parents when I
started it,” Murdock said. “My
mom came home that night and
was like, ‘Hey, what’s going on?’
My dad was at a restaurant where
he overheard people talking about
the walkout, and he said, ‘Hey,
that’s my daughter!’ ”
The worry that students could
come under political attack was
well-founded. On some fringe conservative news sites, the highestprofile students from Parkland
were probed for evidence that they
were being coached. David Hogg,
a Douglas senior and student journalist who did several bracing interviews, was attacked by the farright site Gateway Pundit as “the
child of an FBI agent” willing to be
“used as a pawn for anti-Trump
rhetoric and anti-gun legislation.”
“This kid is a shill,” tweeted
Republican strategist and commentator Bradley Blakeman.
Jack Kingston, a former Republican congressman and current
CNN commentator, said the students’ rapid organizing raised
questions about whether they had
been “hijacked by left-wing
groups that have an agenda.”
“Do we really think 17-year-olds
on their own are going to plan a
nationwide rally?” Kingston
asked. “Organized groups that are
out there like George Soros are
always ready to take up the charge,
and it’s kind of like instant rally,
instant protest, and those groups
are ready to take it to the streets.”
Soros, who has donated to the
Brady Campaign in the past, fully
supports the Florida students’
cause but has not provided them
any funding, Laura Silber, the
communications director for Soros’s Open Society Foundation,
said in a statement Wednesday.
And this week, the aide of a
state lawmaker from Florida accused two Parkland students who
were interviewed on television of
being actors who travel the
country.
Such attacks do not — yet —
appear to be gaining steam. Sen.
Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) quickly retorted this on Twitter: “Claiming
some of the students on tv after
#Parkland are actors is the work of
a disgusting group of idiots with
no sense of decency.”
Even the aide’s boss, Republican state Rep. Shawn Harrison,
felt compelled to issue a statement
rebuking his staffer — and he later
fired him.
Several of the activist students
said the group has yet to discuss
fully how they’ll handle it if their
members come under sustained
political attack. But they insist
they’ll be able to lean on one another as a support system.
“We know that we don’t have to
take anything from anybody. We
are survivors,” said Diego Pfeiffer,
18, a senior at Douglas who helped
organize Never Again MSD. “We
understand that there are trolls
and there are people who are go-
You aren’t the only one
confused by this weather!
SCALLOPED
EDGE
Confused by all of this wacky weather? So is your roof! Spring-like
temps one day and snow the next is wreaking havoc with your roof!
from
Only
$
99
per month!
g
g
g
g
50 Year Full Replacement
Value Warranty
Select ShingleMaster Earned by
Only 1% of the Nation’s Roofers
Traditional Asphalt Shingles,
Architectural, Designer & Luxury
Styles, and Flat Roofing
Many Colors & Options
“Very professional company! Well worth the money for top quality
materials and a 50 year warranty! Best service ever!” – Joyce N.
A TRUSTED NAME SINCE 1945
ASPHALT
SHAKES
DESIGNER
SLATE
DESIGNER
PREMIUM
SHINGLES
FREE ESTIMATES
844-427-LONG
LongRoofing.com
We build Trust and Peace of Mind
into every Long Roof
david.weigel@washpost.com
wesley.lowery@washpost.com
ARCHITECTURAL
SHINGLES
It was
7
degree 0
yester s
day
limited time
t offer
ing to work against our goals.”
Several students have gone viral after giving interviews in
which they called for new guncontrol measures or sent tweets
ridiculing the responses of progun politicians. They attacked the
president by name and accused
Rubio of callousness. On television, they were given a platform
nearly equal to that of the political
class, and they used it.
“We needed to capture the faces
of the movement,” said Alex Wind,
17, a junior who was one of the first
three members of Never Again
MSD, which has quickly ballooned
to several dozen members.
Among those faces were Cameron Kasky, a 17-year-old junior and
Wind’s best friend, and Hogg,
whose interviews on CNN on
Thursday and Friday were shared
widely. On Saturday, the world
met Emma González, an 18-yearold junior whose infuriated address at a gun-control rally quickly
became Twitter’s top trending topic and perhaps the most widely
shared moment from the shooting’s aftermath.
“I was trending number one on
Twitter and I didn’t have a Twitter
account,” said González, who has
since started an account that has
amassed 272,000 followers — and
counting. “Now I’ve got this platform that just whipped itself up
out of nowhere.”
And student organizers say
members of their group have decamped to New York and Los Angeles to hold meetings with other
activists and organizations who
have offered support, although
they have declined to say with
whom they are meeting.
“These kids know they are plugging into a political movement
that is growing in power, and they
are laying bare the gun industry
mythology that you can’t talk
about changing the laws after a
mass shooting,” said Sen. Chris
Murphy (D-Conn.). “It used to be
that Republicans would respond
to mass death and destruction by
stubbornly insisting that there
was no possible legislative route
that could save lives. But things
have started to change.”
Licensed, Bonded, Insured MHIC 51346, VA 2705048183A, DC 67006785, PA 115431 Expires 4/25/18.
Valid initial visit only. Min. purchase required. Cannot be combined with other offers. OAC thru Greensky.
LUXURY
SHINGLES
A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
shooting in florida
Douglas student decries the NRA
18-year-old turns
sadness into action
against gun violence
BY
W ESLEY L OWERY
About an hour before a gunman
entered Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and fatally shot 17
people with an AR-15 rifle, Emma
González was in an AP U.S. government class, learning about the
role of special interest groups in
American politics.
Those interest groups, the class
discussed, used money to influence politicians to support their
causes. As the classroom discussion continued, González thought
about interest groups she supported, like the Sierra Club. And then
she recalled the one she most despises: the National Rifle Association.
“I hate guns,” González said in a
recent interview as she recalled
the classroom debate. “All of these
people are getting paid to do nothing about guns, and we as a people
are doing nothing in response, so
that’s our fault. It’s the people’s
fault for not doing something.”
Just three days later, González
would be behind a microphone to
give an impassioned speech seen
around the nation. She decried the
NRA and vowed to get politicians
who accept their money voted out
of office.
González has been among the
most prominent of the crop of
student activists thrust onto the
national stage in the wake of one
of the nation’s worst school shootings. The activists have done a
wave of interviews, petitioned
lawmakers in Tallahassee and
served as a major part of a CNN
JOHN MCCALL/SUN-SENTINAL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Emma González says she hated
guns even before the mass
shooting at her school.
gun violence town hall.
“This has changed me fundamentally to the core,” González
said in an interview. “I was never
able to take naps before and now
I’ve been needing naps.”
González, 18, is the youngest of
three children. Her mother works
as a math tutor, and her father is
an attorney for a cybersecurity
company. She’s lived in Parkland,
Fla., her entire life.
Before her activism of the past
week, González was best known
for her distinct style — she sews
much of her own clothing — and
was recently featured on the
school’s “Humans of MSD” Instagram page, where she discussed
the decision to shave her head.
She loves creative writing and
astronomy. She does not love
math.
González, who identifies as bisexual, is the president of the
school’s Gay-Straight Alliance, of
which she has been a member for
three years. On the day of the
shooting, allegedly by a former
student, González spent her lunch
period selling “professions of love”
— Valentine’s Day cards designed
like marriage certificates.
González was with dozens of
other students in the auditorium
when they heard the fire alarm go
off that day. They made their way
to the hallway, where they were
quickly told to turn around and
take cover, prompting them back
into the auditorium. She would
spend the next two hours searching Google News for updates on
the active shooter until the police
entered the auditorium to let
them out.
The night of the shooting, after
scouring local news, González saw
a list of the victims and realized
she knew several of them.
“There’s a pot of sadness in my
stomach,” González said, adding
that she’s still having trouble fully
comprehending what happened
inside her high school last week.
Thursday afternoon was spent
attending a small vigil in honor of
the victims.
“I just wanted to see everybody,”
González said. “It was a day full of
tears, but really good tears in a
way.”
By that night, González had decided to speak out publicly. She
soon got her chance: Her friend,
David Hogg — one of the most
outspoken students at the school
— texted to tell her that CNN was
looking for someone to join them
on-air that night with Anderson
Cooper.
“I was excited, I was like . . . ‘I
know that guy from TV,’ ”
González said. “And then I started
getting text messages from people
who saw the interview and
thought ‘Wow, people are listening to me.’ ”
wesley.lowery@washpost.com
A survivor’s quest for new gun laws
Douglas senior has
become one of the faces
of student-led movement
BY
M ORIAH B ALINGIT
Delaney Tarr’s first brush with
television cameras came during
her freshman year, when she took
a production class as an elective.
She has taken the class every year
since, and as a junior last year,
she anchored the school’s news
broadcast.
Calm and self-assured — even
in moments of chaos — she was a
good fit for the role.
Now a 17-year-old senior at
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School in Parkland, Fla., Delaney
aspires to be a journalist, said her
mother, Jennifer, and she spends
part of each school day wandering the halls doing interviews. In
the weeks before the shooting
massacre on Valentine’s Day, Delaney and her mother discussed
what to do if there were an attack
there while she was in the halls —
teachers had warned her that
they would lock classroom doors
and she would be unable to get
inside. At the time, it felt like a
far-fetched scenario, and they
tossed around some unusual solutions: Could she hide in a
garbage can? Or in the bathroom?
“There’s no lock on the door.
You’ll be a sitting duck,” Jennifer
recalled telling her. Speaking
from a hotel lobby in Tallahassee,
where Delaney had gone with
other students to rally and meet
with state legislators about gun
control on Wednesday, Jennifer
paused for a moment, catching a
glimpse of a CNN broadcast on a
COLIN ABBEY/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
High school student Delaney
Tarr, 17, speaks at a news
conference at the Florida
nearby television. “Oh, she’s on
TV.”
They ultimately decided that
Delaney should carry her car keys
everywhere, and if shots were
fired while she was in a hallway,
she would go to her car and
crouch down in the hatchback.
When the shooting began on Feb.
14, Delaney was in her journalism
class — a room outfitted with a
large closet to store equipment —
and she and her classmates piled
inside. She texted her mother
that she was keeping other students calm. Her mother tried to
keep things light.
“What happens if somebody
farts in the closet?” Jennifer said
she texted her daughter.
Delaney came home “a wreck,”
slept little the night after the
shooting and then attended vigils
the following day. She then banded with students from the
school’s politics club, birthing a
campaign for stronger gun restrictions, creating the hashtag
#NeverAgain and spawning walkouts in high schools across the
country.
As the requests for interviews
rolled in, her mother pressed her
to make sure she was okay. Did
she need grief counseling or a
break?
She told her mother: “I’m at
anger mode. I’m past the sadness.”
“I don’t know how she does it,”
Jennifer said. She said Delaney
views herself as a spokeswoman
of sorts for students who are too
traumatized to speak.
Before Wednesday, Delaney
said she was stressed about all
the things that would normally
preoccupy a high-octane student:
putting together restaurant reviews for the school newspaper,
assembling a portfolio for the
school literary magazine, trying
to choose the perfect prom dress.
Now she’s written an editorial for
Teen Vogue, and appeared on
CNN, ABC and “The Opposition
With Jordan Klepper.” This week,
she flew from New York City,
where she sat for interviews with
national media, to Tallahassee —
for a rally at the state Capitol —
and back to Broward County to
participate in a town hall hosted
by CNN.
Tuesday, she will return to
school, but she said she will
continue her advocacy for “common-sense gun reform,” including raising the minimum age to
purchase a firearm and implementing more robust background checks.
“This is not a sprint. This is a
marathon,” Delaney said. “This is
something we have to keep working on for months, for years
even.”
moriah.balingit@washpost.com
Stopping the spread of false conspiracies is tough for online platforms
VIRAL FROM A1
tive websites, Twitter, Facebook
and Google’s video platform. Collectively the posts questioned the
honesty and credibility of the
grieving students as they spoke
out against gun violence and in
some cases publicly challenged
President Trump, the National Rifle Association and lawmakers opposed to gun control.
“It’s annoying. I hate it. But it’s
part of American democracy,”
Hogg said in a phone interview.
“Am I an actor? No. Am I a witness? Yes.”
The falsehoods about Parkland
students come even after the technology giants have tried to tamp
down on disinformation campaigns by hiring thousands of
moderators, changing the algorithms that surface information
and enacting stricter policies. The
Parkland flare-up underscores
how efforts to quell the spread of
such online conspiracies remain
incomplete on platforms that derive profits by attracting eyeballs
en masse.
The incident has also highlighted how nobody — even a group of
teens just days removed from seeing their fellow students gunned
down — is off limits in the noholds-barred world of online commentary, with its often-toxic mix
of rumor, innuendo and unrefuted
accusation.
The president’s son, Donald
Trump Jr., was among the many
people who “liked” a tweet criticiz-
EXTENDED
JONATHAN DRAKE/REUTERS
David Hogg speaks at a rally Saturday in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Responding to allegations that he is a
“crisis actor,” the high school student said: “Am I an actor? No. Am I a witness? Yes.”
ing Hogg. On YouTube, a video
featuring one conspiracy theory
reached the top of the service’s
“Trending” clips list and was
viewed more than 200,000 times
before the company admitted that
PRESIDENT’S
DAY SALE!
its filtering of news had not functioned as intended and it blocked
the video. A search for Hogg’s
name on YouTube on Wednesday
turned up eight conspiracy videos
and only two legitimate news re-
70% OFF*
up
to
BUY DIRECT, NOT RETAIL
Visit our New Showroom Featuring 84 Live Displays!
Contemporary Burners
Before
Transform any Wall or Existing
Fireplace into a Work of Art
Next Day Installation*
NO GAS? NO PROBLEM!
ASK OUR EXPERTS ABOUT
PROPANE LOG FIREPLACE INSTALLATIONS
UP TO
70% OFF
*On Select Gas Logs and Fireplaces
with new gasline installed
while supplies last (in stock items only)
Offer Expires 3/1/18.
Free
Gas Log!**
Offer Expires 3/1/18.
Visit Our Design Centre or Call Today to
Schedule a FREE In-Home Estimate
571.482.7605
www.getgaslogs.com
*For replacements gas logs.
In stock items only
**With purchase of stone veneer wall. Min 64 sq. ft.
14088-B Sullyfield Circle, Chantilly,VA
Hours: 7 days/week 10am-7pm
ports in a top-10 listing before
YouTube intervened.
The conspiracy theories about
Hogg grew from a combination of
facts and falsehoods, mixed together with authentic photos and
videos collected online, making it
more difficult for the algorithms
on social media platforms to detect false information.
Mike Cernovich, a far-right social media commentator who
sometimes appears on the Infowars conspiracy site, said it’s
possible to concoct a video in as
little as 20 minutes that splices
together images and text to create
an alternative narrative capable of
spreading rapidly on social media.
Postings skeptical of the news
reports about the Parkland shooting began appearing on 4chan just
hours after, police said, a former
student rampaged through Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School
on Feb. 14.
Online talk of a “false flag” attack — essentially a fake in which
the real culprit is trying to frame
somebody else — started soon after the Parkland survivors started
speaking on television and social
media about the horror of the
shooting and demanding government action to prevent yet another one.
Hogg became the target of some
of the conspiracy stories after he
mentioned in one interview that
his father was a retired FBI agent,
allowing the online narrative to
merge with ongoing attacks
against the bureau. The FBI has
been under fire from conservatives over its investigation into
allegations that the Trump campaign colluded with the Russians
during the 2016 presidential campaign, and President Trump has
blamed the Parkland shooting on
the FBI’s failure to follow up on a
tip about the suspect.
The conservative website Gateway Pundit on Monday posted a
picture of Hogg under the headline: “EXPOSED: School Shooting
Survivor Turned Activist David
Hogg’s Father in FBI, Appears To
Have Been Coached On AntiTrump Lines.”
Posts alleging that the Parkland
students were “crisis actors” began at about the same time.
Such allegations are a mainstay
of conspiracy reports about mass
shootings, with some gun rights
activists claiming that those favoring stricter gun laws hire actors to
pretend to be victims of phony
attacks.
“You have the same three or
four tropes that get floated again
and again,” said Whitney Phillips,
a Mercer University professor who
studies the relationship between
online trolling and mainstream
culture. “Its hard to know what is
causing it. But as a person who has
been studying this a lot, I brace
myself for the narrative that I
know is about to unfold” each time
a shooting occurs. In October, YouTube said it would change its algorithm to elevate authoritative
news sources after hoaxes quickly
dominated the site after the Las
Vegas shooting.
Google, which owns YouTube,
said in a statement Wednesday
that it had removed several videos
related to Hogg for violating company policy on harassment. “We
recognize the challenging issues
presented by hoax videos and the
pain they can cause the families
who have suffered these incredibly tragic losses.”
The recommendation engine
on YouTube, with has 1.5 billion
monthly users, features a list of
links that plays automatically
when a person clicks on them.
Such recommendations are the
way the most YouTube users find
and discover content.
Guillaume Chaslot, a former
YouTube engineer who worked on
the recommendation algorithm,
says YouTube recommends conspiracy theories with abnormal
frequency, in part because its algorithm favors links that encourage
people to watch longer.
“People who distrust other media tend to spend more time on
YouTube,” he said. “Since the algorithm is optimizing for watchtime, it figures that recommending conspiracy theories is efficient.”
A post on Facebook featuring a
photo of Hogg and claiming that
the Parkland students were actors
also was shared more than
100,000 times before Facebook
later deleted it for violating its
policies. “Images that attack the
victims of last week’s tragedy in
Florida are abhorrent,” said Mary
deBree, head of content policy for
Facebook.
Conspiracy theories around
“crisis actors” — feigning grief and
working to build support for
tougher gun laws — start with a
premise that the event never occurred, according to Kate Starbird, a University of Washington
professor who runs a lab that
tracks the spread of online rumors
after disasters.
Starbird said her lab has documented both domestic sites and
some tied to foreign governments
in Russia and Iran amplifying the
narratives, including after the
“Since the algorithm
is optimizing for
watch-time, it figures
that recommending
conspiracy theories
is efficient.”
Guillaume Chaslot,
a former YouTube engineer
Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando in 2016.
“The goal seems to be to want
to undermine the collective response to tragedy,” she said. They
hark back to “a high-level narrative, which is the media is lying . . .
and you can’t trust anything
you see.”
Hogg’s mother, Rebecca Boldrick, an elementary school teacher, scoffed at the conspiracy theories growing online about her son
and other Parkland students. She
said her husband, a Republican,
worked for the FBI as an agent at
airports in Los Angeles and Florida before retiring from the bureau
in October 2016.
Kevin Hogg, 51, left the FBI
because he had been diagnosed
with early-onset Parkinson’s
disease several years earlier, Boldrick said. The family has not previously revealed this fact publicly
because her husband is embarrassed, she said.
The wild allegations online
have also taken on a more dangerous tone, she said. Boldrick said
her family has received death
threats online.
“I’m under so much stress,” she
said describing her state a week
after the shooting. “I’m angry and
exhausted. Angry, exhausted and
extremely proud.”
craig.timberg@washpost.com
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com
abigail.ohlheiser@washpost.com
andrew.tran@washpost.com
Mark Berman, Wesley Lowery,
Michael Scherer and Aaron C. Davis
contributed to this report.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
A STRAIGHTFORWARD
INCOME?
INVEST IN
HIGHWAYS.
Tax-free municipal bonds are issued by state and local governments to raise money
for major infrastructure projects, such as local roads, hospitals and stadiums.
Like any borrower, state and local governments pay interest to investors who hold
the bonds. But what sets them apart are two important investing benefits.
1. Potential Safety of Principal
When investing in municipal bonds, investors
are paid back the full face value of their
investment at maturity or earlier if called,
unless the bond defaults. This is important
because many investors, particularly those
nearing retirement or in retirement, are
concerned about protecting their principal. In
May of 2016, Moody’s published research
that showed that rated investment grade
municipal bonds had an average cumulative
10-year default rate of just 0.09% between
1970 and 2015.* That means while there is
some risk of principal loss, investing in rated
investment-grade municipal bonds can be
an important part of your portfolio.
2. Potential Tax-Free Income
Income from municipal bonds is not subject
to federal income tax and, depending on
where you live, may also be exempt from
state and local taxes. Tax-free income can
be a big attraction for many investors.
About Hennion & Walsh
Since 1990 Hennion & Walsh has
specialized in investment-grade taxfree municipal bonds. The company
supervises over $3 billion in assets
in over 16,000 accounts, providing
individual investors with institutional
quality service and personal attention.
Our FREE Gift To You
In case you want to know more about
the benefits of tax-free Municipal Bonds,
our specialists have created a helpful
Bond Guide for investors. It’s free and
comes with no obligation whatsoever.
Call (800) 316-2783
and request our Bond Guide,
written by the experts at Hennion
& Walsh. It will give you a clear
and easy overview of the risks and
benefits of tax-free municipal bonds.
© 2018 Hennion & Walsh Inc. Securities offered through Hennion & Walsh Inc. Member of FINRA, SIPC. Investing in bonds involves risk
including possible loss of principal. Income may be subject to state, local or federal alternative minimum tax. When interest rates rise, bond
prices fall, and when interest rates fall, bond prices rise. *Source: Moody’s Investor Service, May 31, 2016 “US Municipal Bond Defaults and
Recoveries”, 1970–2015. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
At town hall talk, congressman gets an earful about guns
Community shadowed
by tragedy is eager
for action after shootings
BY
M IKE D E B ONIS
greenwood village, colo. —
Patti Seno registered for Rep.
Mike Coffman’s town hall meeting
expecting to ask him about health
care. The deadly mass shooting at
a Florida high school changed all
that.
In a high school auditorium
here, amid a suburban landscape
scarred by the acts of mass gun
violence in the nearby towns of
Littleton and Aurora, Seno delivered a stern message to the fiveterm Republican, whose response,
at times, was met with jeers.
“It took children to shake me
from my comfort zone to come
forward to say: Enough is
enough,” said the 53-year-old benefits administrator, referring to
the students who have spoken out
after a troubled ex-student, the
alleged shooter, killed 17 people
inside a Florida high school last
week.
“There is no way a 19-year-old,
and a 19-year-old with the problems this young man had, who
can’t even buy alcohol, should be
able to buy a weapon of mass
destruction,” she told Coffman,
pressing him to support age limits
on gun purchases and adding, “An
avalanche is coming to Washington, sir, and it is going to be led by
our children.”
Whatever fresh public momentum exists for new gun legislation
in Congress, Coffman felt it Tuesday night, with roughly half of the
questioners he faced during the
hour-long event pushing him to
do something — anything — to
stem the bloodshed in American
schools with a rowdy, frustrated
crowd egging them on.
Coffman, for the most part, did
not give them the answers they
were seeking. He said he would
“look at” raising age limits for gun
purchases. He opened the door,
with many caveats, for expanding
the circumstances where potentially dangerous individuals
might have their gun-owning
rights curtailed. But he was on
more comfortable ground calling
for improvements to school security and mental health care — and
not impeding what he called “responsible gun ownership.”
“We live in an imperfect world,”
he told one questioner as the
crowd erupted in jeers. “There is
no way that you can say, no matter
what laws you pass, that bad
things are not going to happen.”
Sparking another uproar, he
mused, “Why do we give more
protection for any federal building than we do for a school? . . .
Force has to be met with force.”
Since 2012 — when shooter
James Holmes killed 12 and
wounded 70 inside an Aurora
movie theater — Coffman has
been a walking and talking lesson
in the limits of anti-gun politics.
That year, thanks to new district lines that made Colorado’s
6th Congressional District more
suburban and much more competitive, Democrats put unseating
Coffman near the top of their national priority list. That year, and
every election year since, a Democratic candidate has run against
Coffman with strong national party support and a campaign platform calling for stronger gun laws,
only to lose every time.
Some of the reasons Coffman
has survived in a moderate and
diverse suburban district were on
display as he fielded the other half
of the questions he heard Tuesday
— many of them concerning immigration, particularly protections for young immigrants
brought to the United States as
children who now face deportation due to President Trump’s cancellation of the Deferred Action
for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)
DAVID ZALUBOWSKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Residents peppered Rep. Mike Coffman (R) with questions at a town hall meeting in Greenwood
Village, Colo., on Tuesday, pushing him to do something — anything — to stem bloodshed in schools.
program.
Completing a pivot from his
earlier hard-line immigration
views, Coffman has been a prominent Republican voice calling for
“dreamers” to be protected. He
won applause from a skeptical
crowd Tuesday when he said that,
if Congress does not act by next
month, he would dust off his effort
to force action on a bill extending
DACA for three years — over the
objections of House Republican
leaders.
GOP strategists argue that Coffman has forged a unique and durable bond with voters in his
swing district and see no reason
2018 will be different from the
past three elections.
“Mike Coffman is as formidable
as they come, and you would be
hard-pressed to find anyone who’s
done more for [the 6th District]
than he has,” said Jesse Hunt, a
spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee.
Democrats believe Coffman has
new reasons to sweat this year:
One, of course, is Trump, whose
unpopularity threatens to drag
down GOP incumbents across the
country — especially one running
in a district where Democrat Hillary Clinton beat Trump by nine
points. They also believe Coffman
will have to answer for a voting
record that, they say, belies his
image as a independent willing to
buck the GOP line.
Over the past year, he has voted
for the Republican health care and
tax bills and has supported two
gun-rights measures — one forcing states to recognize concealedcarry permits from other states,
and one overturning an Obama
administration regulation that
could prevent some mentally disabled people from purchasing
guns.
National Democratic officials
also think they have a better challenger this year. After three
straight state legislators failed to
unseat Coffman, they have thrown
their support behind Jason Crow,
a lawyer and former Army Ranger
officer making his first run for
office.
“What the Donald Trump presidency has done is it’s forced him to
take the votes on his politics,” said
Crow, who leads in fundraising
among several Democratic candidates but must win a June 23
primary. “After a year of that, he’s
got a 95 percent voting record
with this administration and with
[Speaker] Paul Ryan. That’s not
somebody standing up to any-
body.”
Crow is backing several changes to gun laws, ranging from eliminating the congressional prohibition on federal gun violence research to mandating universal
background checks to banning
“military-style” weapons like the
AR-15 rifle used in Florida. He is
calling on Coffman to cut his longstanding ties to the National Rifle
Association.
A mile from Coffman’s district
is Columbine High School, where
two teenagers killed 13 people and
then themselves in 1999.
Questioners on Tuesday repeatedly brought up the NRA’s donations to Coffman’s campaigns,
which total more than $30,000
since he first ran in 2008.
One woman spoke of her 5year-old granddaughter: “The
idea of her going to a public school
and having to go through drill
after drill after drill to protect her
from an assault weapon coming
into her school sickens me beyond
belief. . . . I ask you, stop taking
money from the NRA.”
Another woman pressed him
on the recent concealed-carry
vote: “Can you explain to your
constituents why you sided with
the NRA instead of our children’s
lives?”
Said Coffman, “They support
me based on what I do, and I don’t
support them based on what they
do. And I’m for responsible gun
ownership.”
Whether the gun debate will
remain at the center of the campaign for Coffman’s seat is a matter of considerable doubt.
The issue is far from a centerpiece for the incumbent. Asked
during a session with reporters
what he would say to voters who
liked his own views on combating
gun violence or revamping immigration but were frustrated with
the GOP’s ability to take any action, Coffman talked about the tax
bill instead before conceding
some frustration.
mike.debonis@washpost.com
For some Democrats running for Congress, a strategic navigation of gun issues
Democrats have
found their latest
dose of political
PAUL KANE
adrenaline in the
fight over tougher
gun restrictions, appearing to
have Republicans on the
defensive following their slowmoving response to the
massacre of 17 at a Florida high
school on Feb. 14.
But there are also a fair
number of Democrats running
for Congress with mixed views
on the issue, sounding quite
different from those in the party
who are angling for the 2020
presidential nomination.
The most noticeable example
is Conor Lamb, a 33-year-old
from outside Pittsburgh with a
sterling résumé running in a
special House election next
month. Lamb served as a
captain in the Marine Corps
until 2013, when he went on to
serve as a federal prosecutor
focusing on opioid crimes.
Lamb also likes guns and
does not believe in banning any
weapons, even the type of
“military-style’” weapon used in
Florida last week. He does not
support new limits on the size of
ammunition clips.
“I think the problem of crime
prevention is much more
complex than banning
individual guns,” he said at
Monday’s debate with the
Republican nominee, state Rep.
Rick Saccone (R).
Lamb supports an enhanced
background check system along
the lines of what Sens. Patrick J.
@PKCapitol
KEITH SRAKOCIC/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Conor Lamb (D), left, is running for Congress in southwestern
Pennsylvania and doesn’t support a ban on any weapons.
Toomey (R-Pa.) and Joe
Manchin III (D-W. Va.) have
proposed, but not much else. He
strikes a measured tone that is
at odds with most Democrats
who are pounding their chests
at years of inaction on gun laws.
“I recognize that there is
great passion on both sides of
the gun-control debate,” he said.
It’s not surprising he has
struck this pose. Pennsylvania’s
18th Congressional District gave
President Trump a sweeping
margin in 2016, when the
longtime GOP incumbent, Tim
Murphy, won by acclamation as
the Democrats did not bother to
field a candidate.
After Murphy resigned last
year amid a personal scandal,
Lamb jumped into the race and
made it surprisingly
competitive, softening the
liberal edges on issues such as
guns in a region where National
Rifle Association memberships
and hunting licenses are
ingrained in the culture.
He is not alone in being
something of an apostate on
guns. Democrats are fielding a
number of House candidates
who have mixed records on
guns, if not outright praise from
the NRA.
The Democratic
Congressional Campaign
Committee has touted its
recruitment of Paul Davis to run
in a conservative-leaning
district in Kansas as one of its
finest recruits. He narrowly lost
the 2014 governor’s race and is
viewed as a moderate who can
appeal to the voters there.
Though he did not get the NRA’s
endorsement in 2014, Davis had
a B rating from the group.
In southern New Jersey,
Democrats have mobilized
around state Sen. Jeff Van Drew
to run for a seat in Congress
that a veteran Republican is
leaving behind, presenting one
of the party’s best pickup
opportunities. Van Drew won
reelection to his state seat last
fall with an A rating from the
NRA.
Needing 24 seats to reclaim
the House majority, Democrats
feel they need to win in some of
these rural districts for total
victory, so gun positions are not
a litmus test.
To be sure, the focus of their
effort is in winning over
suburban districts, particularly
the several dozen that either
favored Democrat Hillary
Clinton in 2016 or only narrowly
gave Trump a victory.
In those places, Democrats
are seeing some candidates
embrace a more aggressive
approach to the gun issue, with
Jason Crow in the Denver
suburbs leading that charge. A
former Army captain, Crow is
running in the district that was
home to the 2012 Aurora movie
theater shooting that left 12
dead.
He supports a ban on the type
of weapons used in last week’s
shooting and he has called for
his opponent, five-term Rep.
Mike Coffman (R), to give away
the more than $30,000 in NRA
donations he has received in his
campaigns.
Crow is hitting the pulse of
most Democrats at this
moment.
“A tectonic shift is underway
on guns. Democrats have tried
making nice with the NRA and
been burned again and again,”
said Adam Jentleson, a
strategist at Democracy
Forward, a liberal research
group. “More and more
Democrats are coming around
to seeing that there’s no upside
to courting the NRA — they’re
going to spend millions casting
you as a gun-grabber regardless
of your actual position, so
what’s the point?”
Jentleson had a front-row
seat for one of those “making
nice” efforts as a senior adviser
to Harry M. Reid (D-Nev.) while
he served as Senate majority
leader. In 2009 and 2010, ahead
of a tough reelection, Reid
courted the NRA and even
hosted Wayne LaPierre, the
public face of the group, at a
gun range outside Las Vegas.
The group stayed neutral
despite Reid’s nearly perfect
voting record on guns. After the
December 2012 Sandy Hook
massacre, Reid abandoned his
previous positions and
supported a sweeping number
of gun-control bills, including
an assault-weapons ban and a
limitation on clip size.
That same transformation
happened with Sen. Kirsten
Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), who arrived
in Congress in 2007 with dozens
of other conservative Democrats
who supported gun rights. Now
one of the more liberal senators,
Gillibrand is frequently
mentioned as a possible 2020
presidential candidate and she
has crafted the answer to a
question she knows she will
face: How did she once get an A
from the NRA?
Nine years ago, Gillibrand sat
down with a mom and a dad,
she told CBS’s “Late Show” host,
Stephen Colbert, on Tuesday
night when he pressed her. The
parents had just lost a daughter
to a stray bullet. “The anger and
fear and resentment in their
community because Congress
does nothing made me want to
change.”
Other 2020 contenders are
voicing similar views, but back
in southwestern Pennsylvania,
Lamb is walking a finer line by
citing his time as a prosecutor,
believing that only an
improvement in existing
background check laws are
needed.
“Most of the cases that I saw
were committed with handguns
and by people who were already
not allowed to have those
firearms,” he said.
paul.kane@washpost.com
Conservatives are gathering to praise Trump. His critics will be elsewhere.
President and Pence will
address CPAC crowd,
but some will opt out
BY
D AVID W EIGEL
Thousands of conservative activists will converge on a Washington-area resort this week for
their movement’s largest annual
gathering — and more than ever,
they’ll focus on what the Trump
administration is doing right.
Both President Trump and
Vice President Pence will deliver
speeches at the four-day Conservative Political Action Conference, on Friday morning and
Thursday morning respectively. A
half-dozen members of the administration will give remarks or
sit for interviews, including
White House counsel Donald Mc-
Gahn and “the FCC’s courageous
chairman,” Ajit Pai, as he’s identified in the agenda.
Conservative critics of the administration, and most members
of Congress, will be elsewhere.
Even more than in 2017, when
Senate confirmation of Supreme
Court Justice Neil M. Gorsuch
raised Republican spirits, this
year’s conference, at the Gaylord
National Resort & Convention
Center in Maryland, is structured
as a celebration of GOP power
and Trump-style nationalism.
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (RWis.) and Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) won’t be
there; neither will Sen. Jeff Flake
(R-Ariz.), a sometime CPAC
speaker before he became a critic
of Trump.
“There’s no question that there
are still people opposed to
Trump,” said Matt Schlapp, the
president of the American Conservative Union, which organizes
CPAC. “But it’s not 50/50 — on TV
they usually oversample the
Trump critics. In all candor, most
of those people, even if they don’t
like Trump personally, have come
to respect the fact that he’s governing on a conservative agenda.”
Like nearly every CPAC, the
run-up has been marked by controversy. Dinesh D’Souza, an author and filmmaker who has promoted his work at previous conferences, won’t be speaking after
the ACU called his tweets mocking students who have lobbied for
gun control “indefensible.”
Wayne LaPierre, the fiery executive vice president of the National Rifle Association, will give his
now-traditional speech; versions
of the agenda put online this
week left his name off, as a
precaution against protests. On
Wednesday, the conservative
American Principles Project
scrambled to change a panel on
“suppression of conservative
voices on social media” after the
ACU barred Jim Hoft, the founder of the conspiracy-prone news
site Gateway Pundit, from attending.
More controversial, among
conservatives, is a prominent
Thursday morning speaking slot
— less than an hour after Pence —
for Marion Maréchal-Le Pen, the
youngest member of France’s farright political dynasty. The announcement of Le Pen’s appearance made international news, in
part because she had dramatically “quit” politics last year, and in
part because her National Front
party favors policies — universal
health care, a lower retirement
age — that are anathema to the
U.S. conservative movement.
“I don’t see what makes Marion Le Pen a good representative
of conservatism,” said Ben Shapiro, a conservative columnist,
author, and sometime Trump
critic who is speaking at CPAC.
“I’m optimistic that young people
are interested in conservatism,
not just the faux philosophy of
‘nationalist populism.’ ”
Schlapp brushed off the controversy, saying that Le Pen, like
Britain’s Nigel Farage, will give
CPAC attendees a broader sense
of what’s happening in conservative politics. Several panels and
speakers will focus on the left’s
perceived threats to free speech,
on campus and elsewhere.
“I’m not personally close to her,
but for three years in this job I’ve
had people tell me that she represents a new voice in that country,”
Schlapp said. “So we’re testing the
waters, and we’re going to let her
speak. I’m interested to hear her,
but from who I’ve talked to and
what I’ve read, she’s more aligned
with conservatives than with her
party.”
Beyond Trump’s speech, there
will be several CPAC panels defending the president from accu-
sations of wrongdoing. The conservative Capital Research Center
will lead two discussions for
those who want to “learn more
about the entire Russian investigation and how it remains unsubstantiated,” and one of the conference’s main-stage panels will
bring conservative reporters together to discuss “unmasking the
deep state.”
Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.),
the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee who has argued
that it should investigate the
Obama administration instead of
Trump’s campaign, will give the
conference’s closing address.
“Most of us believe we’ve wasted a year of our lives chasing
down a story that has no basis in
fact,” Schlapp said. “No, we’re not
going to run down whether someone on the Trump campaign sent
an email to someone with a Russian accent.”
david.weigel@washpost.com
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
M2
The World
Netanyahu
confidant
turns state
witness
A SSOCIATED P RESS
PIERO CRUCIATTI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Luigi Di Maio, 31, center, replaced comedian Beppe Grillo as the leader of Italy’s Five Star Movement, a party with an unorthodox melange of ideas from right and left.
BY
G RIFF W ITTE
chieri, italy — Born on a co-
median’s blog as an irreverent and
profane call to arms against a corrupt and complacent political establishment, Italy’s Five Star
Movement has long cherished its
image as the ultimate renegade.
But the outsiders could soon be
marching in. With national elections only weeks away, Five Star
consistently tops the polls. Its
leaders, meanwhile, say they
would consider teaming with rival
parties to form a government —
breaking their own long-held taboo.
After nearly a decade of raging
against the powerful, this Netizen
band of rebels says it is ready to
rule.
“At the beginning, we were representing just one part of the
country,” said Manlio Di Stefano,
Five Star’s 36-year-old point person on foreign affairs. “Now we
want to represent the whole country.”
The idea of a Five Star-led government is enough to send shivers
down the spines of Italy’s political
and financial establishment —
and Europe’s, too.
Given the party’s unorthodox
melange of ideas from right and
left — including skepticism
toward the euro, embrace of Russia and enthusiasm for Internetenabled direct democracy — the
euro zone’s third-largest economy
could be in for a jolt if Five Star
gets the chance to govern.
Most analysts say that is possible but unlikely. Even if Five Star
tops the March 4 vote, other parties are expected to team up to try
to box the movement out of the
government.
That won’t be easy, however,
given that the party’s share of the
vote in pre-election polls hovers at
nearly 30 percent — well ahead of
Italy’s Five Star Movement
may be no joke
any other in Italy’s fractured political landscape. Without Five Star
involved, efforts to form a government could founder, with the
deadlock ultimately ending in a
rerun of the vote.
The potential to disrupt Italian
politics, either from within the
government or from outside, is
exactly what Five Star activists
were seeking when the party got
off the ground in 2009.
An outgrowth of a blog penned
by the bombastic comedian Beppe
Grillo, Five Star tapped a rich vein
of discontent in a country where
politicians and corruption often
have seemed inseparable, and
where the economy had been ravaged by a global recession.
In the early days, followers of
the blog came together in vast
public demonstrations — dubbed
“V” days, a reference to a popular
Italian vulgarity — and listened as
the wild-haired Grillo colorfully
told Italy’s political and economic
elite to get lost.
The movement soon fielded
candidates, selected via online
polls of its members, and in 2013
stunned the political establishment by placing second in national elections.
This year, it is gunning for
more. But the mood in Italy has
shifted, and so has the party.
Although household income
and employment numbers have
yet to bounce back to where they
were before the crisis, the economy is ever so slowly returning to
life, taking a bit of the edge off the
public’s outrage.
Five Star, meanwhile, is seeking
to prove it can be a responsible
party of government, not just one
of protest.
“We’ve become more institutional,” Di Stefano acknowledged.
The change can be seen at the
party’s top. The 69-year-old Grillo
has given up any active role in Five
Star and has been replaced by the
clean-cut, buttoned-up Luigi Di
Maio, 31.
The new leader lately has been
on a charm offensive targeting European investors, meeting
them in closed-door London sessions and granting interviews to
business news broadcasters in
which he insists that the party has
no plans to hold a referendum on
Italy’s euro membership — despite
years of Five Star promises to do
just that.
It is hardly the first time the
party has shifted positions.
“Five Star is a chameleon undergoing continuous metamorphosis,” said Massimiliano Panarari, who teaches politics at
Rome’s LUISS university. “It’s really a post-ideological party. The
platform changes according to the
circumstances.”
Although successful populist
parties abound in Europe, Five
Star is unlike any of the others,
with stances that straddle the political divide. It believes in massively ramped-up investments in
renewable energy, for instance,
but also has taken a hard line on
immigration, with Di Maio calling
rescue efforts in the Mediterranean a “sea-taxi service” that must
end.
The party also emphasizes good
governance: Its politicians commit to give back half of their salaries to the treasury and to serve
no more than two terms at any
level.
If there is a core to Five Star’s
beliefs, Panarari said, it is “faith in
the ability of technology to solve
every problem.”
Grillo’s co-founder and the party’s financial patron, the late Webmarketing entrepreneur Gianroberto Casaleggio, prophesied an
Internet-created utopia that, following the near-destruction of
Earth in a cataclysmic third world
war later this century, would end
all conflict. Citizens of a global
government would peacefully resolve their disputes online.
Five Star nods in that direction.
The party crowdsources its legislative proposals and would leave
decisions on some of Italy’s thorniest problems to online popular
referendums.
To Five Star’s opponents, there
is no mystery why the party has
won a big following.
“It’s a perfect machine to obtain
votes,” said Claudio Borghi Aquilini, economics lead for the rightwing Northern League. “Everything that is popular, they say
they’re for it.”
But for Italy and Europe, that
willingness to flip-flop, when coupled with Five Star’s inexperience
in governing, could be dangerous,
said Emanuele Fiano, a member of
Parliament with the ruling Democratic Party.
He pointed to Rome and Turin,
two places where Five Star won
control of city hall but has drawn
widespread criticism for its performance in office.
“The political establishment
has to admit its mistakes,” said
Fiano, whose party lags in second
place and is unlikely to win another shot at governing. “But to
change everything is not the way.”
At a parking-lot rally in the
small northern town of Chieri one
recent evening, a few hundred
Five Star die-hards begged to differ. Huddled under umbrellas as a
freezing rain fell, they cheered the
party’s candidates — and railed
against the status quo.
“The old politics took away all
our hope,” said Sergio Tommasi, a
42-year-old artisan woodworker
who has struggled to find work.
“Five Star has fresh ideas.”
His partner, 42-year-old Loredana Sciacca, said she lost her job
four years ago and hasn’t found a
new one, despite constantly
searching.
She once supported parties on
the left, and he used to back the
right. But now they’re both
squarely behind Five Star.
“Honesty! Honesty!” the crowd
chanted as one of the party’s most
prominent figures, 39-year-old
Alessandro Di Battista, unleashed
a litany of grievances against the
political old guard.
In Di Battista’s telling, former
center-left prime minister Matteo
Renzi was “a hypocrite,” while Silvio Berlusconi, a four-time centerright premier, was “a looter.”
“If the other parties had done
their job,” he shouted from a
makeshift stage as a cold rain
dripped down his face, “Five Star
wouldn’t have been born.”
griff.witte@washpost.com
Stefano Pitrelli contributed to this
report.
jerusalem — One of Benjamin
Netanyahu’s confidants has
turned state witness, according to
Israeli media reports Wednesday,
marking what may be a turning
point for the beleaguered prime
minister amid a slew of corruption
allegations that could topple him
from office.
Police would not confirm
whether Shlomo Filber would testify against Netanyahu, but all the
major Israeli media outlets said a
deal to do so had been reached.
Filber, the former director of
the Communications Ministry under Netanyahu, is under arrest on
suspicion of promoting regulations worth hundreds of millions
of dollars to Israel’s Bezeq telecommunications company. In return, Bezeq’s popular news site
allegedly provided favorable coverage of Netanyahu.
The reports came shortly after
an allegation that a different
Netanyahu confidant had tried to
bribe a judge to drop a corruption
case against Netanyahu’s wife. Nir
Hefetz, a longtime media adviser
to Netanyahu, remains in custody
in relation to that matter.
The prime minister has not
been named a suspect, although
he may soon be questioned.
Netanyahu has denied all the allegations, calling them part of a
media-orchestrated witch hunt.
Still, the string of accusations
appears to be taking a toll.
Senior cabinet ministers from
Netanyahu’s governing Likud party, who until just recently have
marched out dutifully to defend
him, have largely gone silent.
Meanwhile, former prime minister Ehud Barak, a bitter rival,
told Channel 10 TV that “there is
no way back” for the premier.
Some leading Israeli columnists on Wednesday suggested
that if Filber told all he knew,
Netanyahu probably would be
more worried about avoiding prison than staying in office.
Filber is one of Netanyahu’s
closest associates, a loyal aide dating to when Netanyahu first took
office in 1996. Former Netanyahu
chief of staff Ari Harow also has
signed a state witness settlement
in which he has agreed to testify
against his former mentor. The
collapse of Netanyahu’s inner circle has spawned speculation that
he may step down in return for a
deal that offers him amnesty.
The latest probes come days
after police said there was sufficient evidence to indict Netanyahu on bribery, fraud and breachof-trust charges in two other cases.
Netanyahu is accused of accepting nearly $300,000 in gifts from
Hollywood mogul Arnon Milchan
and Australian billionaire James
Packer. In return, police say, Netanyahu operated on Milchan’s behalf on U.S. visa matters, legislated
a tax break and connected Milchan with an Indian businessman.
In the second case, Netanyahu
is accused of offering a publisher
legislation to weaken his newspaper’s main rival in return for morefavorable coverage.
DIGEST
MONTENEGRO
NIGERIA
Man throws explosive
toward U.S. embassy
50 girls missing after
attack, governor says
An unidentified person threw
an explosive device, believed to be
a hand grenade, at the U.S.
Embassy building in Podgorica,
the capital of Montenegro, before
blowing himself up, the
government said Thursday.
“An unknown person
committed suicide with an
explosive device” half an hour
after midnight, the government’s
official Twitter account said in
English, adding: “Immediately
before, that person threw an
explosive device from the
intersection near the Sport Center
into the U.S. embassy compound.”
It said, “Most probably, the
device was a hand grenade.”
A Reuters photographer in
Podgorica said a police vehicle
blocked the street where the
embassy is located, adding that no
damage was visible. The embassy
warned U.S. citizens to stay away
until further notice.
Montenegro, the smallest of all
former Yugoslav republics, was
the 29th country to join NATO last
May.
More than 50 girls in Nigeria
are missing after Boko Haram
militants attacked a school in the
northeast this week, according to
the governor of Yobe state.
“Out of the 926 students in
the school, over 50 are still
unaccounted for,” Abdullahi Bego,
a spokesman for Gov. Ibrahim
Gaidam, said in an emailed
statement Wednesday. There is
“no credible information yet as to
whether any of the schoolgirls was
taken hostage by the terrorists,”
Bego added.
Officials are working with
the military and other security
officials to find the students,
the statement said. The girls
disappeared after militants made
an “incursion” into a science and
technical college in the town of
Dapchi, it said.
Yobe borders Borno state, the
epicenter of Boko Haram’s yearslong insurgency. In April 2014,
Boko Haram kidnapped more
than 200 girls from the Borno
town of Chibok, causing an
international outcry.
— Reuters
— Bloomberg News
in Bahrain, an island kingdom off
the coast of Saudi Arabia that is
home to the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet.
Rajab is already serving a two-year
sentence handed down in July
over TV interviews he gave that
included criticism of Bahrain.
Bahrain’s constitution
guarantees its citizens freedom
of speech. However, Rajab was
prosecuted under laws making it
illegal to offend a foreign country,
spread rumors at wartime or
“insult” a government agency.
The court’s decision was
denounced by rights groups.
— Associated Press
YE AUNG THU/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Detained journalist Wa Lone is escorted to a court in Rangoon,
Burma. The court had earlier denied bail to Wa Lone and fellow
Reuters journalist Kyaw Soe Oo, charged in a case that has sparked a
global outcry. They were arrested Dec. 12, accused of acquiring “secret
papers” from two police officers in Rakhine state, where a military
crackdown has caused about 700,000 Rohingya Muslims to flee.
BAHRAIN
Top rights activist
receives 5-year term
A prominent human rights
activist in Bahrain was sentenced
Wednesday to five years in prison
over tweets alleging prison torture
in his country and misconduct in
Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen,
despite wide international
criticism of his trial.
Nabeel Rajab’s sentencing
marks the latest chapter in a
years-long crackdown on dissent
POLAND
U.S. group stirs anger
with Holocaust video
A prominent Jewish American
foundation sparked outrage in
Poland and beyond on Wednesday
with a video calling on the United
States to sever ties with Poland
over a controversial new
Holocaust law and by repeatedly
using the historically inaccurate
term “Polish Holocaust.”
The Ruderman Family
Foundation put out the video in
response to the new law, which
criminalizes suggestions that
the Polish nation bore any
responsibility for the Holocaust.
The measure has angered Israel,
where it is seen as a bid to
whitewash actions of Poles who
killed Jews during World War II.
The use of the term “Polish
Holocaust” in the video was seen
as hugely offensive to many in
Poland. Many of Nazi Germany’s
death camps were in Germanoccupied Poland, but Poles had no
role in operating them.
— Associated Press
Pakistan’s top court rules
against Sharif: Pakistan’s
Supreme Court has ruled against
former prime minister Nawaz
Sharif, declaring that anyone
disqualified from holding office
cannot serve as head of a political
party. The decision is likely to
force Sharif to step down as
president of the ruling Muslim
League-N party and possibly end
his career in politics. The ruling
was in response to petitions that
challenged an amendment
pushed through by Sharif’s party
last year, after he resigned as
premier. The top court
disqualified him from office in
July for concealing financial
assets.
— From news services
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
Scorned process likely used
PARENTS FROM A1
as permanent residents,” he said.
“The family, as they are not part
of the administration, has asked
that their privacy be respected,
so I will not comment further on
this matter.”
The Knavses are awaiting
scheduling for their naturalization oath ceremony, according to
a person with knowledge of their
immigration filings. Permanent
residents typically have to hold
green cards for five years before
they can apply for U.S. citizenship.
It is unclear when the Knavses
first moved to the United States,
but by late 2007, Viktor Knavs
was listed in public records as
residing at Mar-a-Lago, Trump’s
private club in Palm Beach, Fla.
Questions over the Knavses’
immigration status have escalated since Trump campaigned for
the White House on a hard-line
anti-immigration agenda. Those
questions grew sharper last
month, when the president proposed ending the decades-long
ability of U.S. citizens to sponsor
their parents and siblings for
legal residency in the United
States.
Trump has repeatedly blasted
the long-standing policy as
“chain migration.” In last
month’s State of the Union address, the president called that
process a threat to Americans’
security and quality of life. Under
his plan, he said, only spouses
and minor children could be
sponsored for legal residency.
But immigration experts said
that such a path was the most
likely method his in-laws would
have used to obtain permits to
live in the United States.
Matthew Kolken, a partner at a
New York immigration law firm,
said there are only two substantive ways Trump’s in-laws could
gain green cards: through sponsorship by their daughter or an
employer. The latter is unlikely,
he said, as it would require
evidence that there were no
Americans who could do the job
for which they were hired.
The Knavses are reportedly
retired. In Slovenia, Viktor
Knavs, now 73, worked as a
chauffeur and car salesman.
Amalija Knavs, now 71, was a
pattern maker at a textile factory.
David Leopold, an immigration lawyer and a past president
of the American Immigration
Lawyers Association, said the
first lady’s sponsorship of her
parents appears to be the only
reasonable way they would have
obtained green cards because the
process currently gives preferential treatment to parents of U.S.
citizens.
“That would be the logical way
to do it, the preferred way to do it
and possibly the only way to do it
under the facts that I know,”
Leopold said.
Foreigners can also petition
for refugee status or other humanitarian programs, according
to the Department of Homeland
Security.
A White House spokesman
and a spokeswoman for the first
lady declined to comment.
The revelation that the Knavses have permanent legal residency threw a spotlight once again
on questions about Melania
Trump’s immigration history.
Wildes, her attorney, has said
that she first came to the United
States from Slovenia in 1996 for
modeling work, first on a visitor’s
visa and then a work permit. In
2000, he said, Trump sponsored
herself for a green card based on
her “extraordinary ability” as a
model.
However, the Associated Press
reported in 2016 that Trump was
paid for 10 modeling jobs in 1996
before she received legal authorization to work in the United
States.
She has not provided details
about how she proved to the U.S.
government that she qualified to
receive a green card for her
“extraordinary ability,” a category generally reserved for highly
accomplished people such as
Nobel Prize winners.
In 2001, several years after
meeting Donald Trump, she received a green card that granted
her permanent residency, Wildes
has said. She became a U.S.
citizen in 2006, the year after she
and Trump were married.
“I came here for my career,”
Melania Trump told Harper’s
Bazaar in January 2016. “I did so
well. I moved here. It never
crossed my mind to stay here
without papers. That is just the
person you are. You follow the
rules. You follow the law.”
After their daughter moved to
the United States, the Knavses
joined her, living on and off with
the Trumps. As of December
2007, Viktor Knavs was using
Mar-a-Lago as his address and
had a Florida-based MercedesBenz registered in his name,
according to public records.
They are not the only family
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Amalija and Viktor Knavs, parents of first lady Melania Trump, are legal permanent residents of the
United States after coming from Slovenia. Their attorney wouldn’t say when they received green cards.
members to join Melania Trump
from Slovenia: Her older sister,
Ines, lives in an apartment in a
Trump-owned building on Park
Avenue in New York, public records show.
Since the first lady and her
son, Barron, moved into the
White House last summer, her
parents have been seen frequently in Washington.
Several years ago, their attorneys contacted the office of Sen.
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.), now
the Democratic minority leader,
for help checking on the status of
their petition for a green card
with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, according to a
person familiar with the outreach.
Such efforts are not unusual,
and some congressional staffs,
including Schumer’s, have a dedicated immigration case worker
to handle such requests. Schumer’s office declined to comment.
In his State of the Union address on Jan. 30, President
Trump offered a four-point immigration plan that he said “protects the nuclear family by ending chain migration.”
“Under the current broken system, a single immigrant can
bring in virtually unlimited numbers of distant relatives,” he said
in his speech. “Under our plan,
we focus on the immediate family by limiting sponsorships to
spouses and minor children. This
vital reform is necessary, not just
for our economy, but for our
security and our future.”
Trump underscored his position in a Feb. 6 tweet.
“We need a 21st Century
MERIT-BASED immigration system,” he tweeted. “Chain migration and the visa lottery are
outdated programs that hurt our
economic and national security.”
Democrats and some Republicans have opposed that measure.
Last week, the Senate defeated
legislation offered by Sen.
Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) and
backed by the White House that
included Trump’s proposal.
carol.leonnig@washpost.com
david.nakamura@washpost.com
nick.miroff@washpost.com
Alice Crites contributed to this
report.
Casualties fill hospitals in Syria siege Macron risks image as humanitarian
Offensive by Assad’s
Russian-backed forces
grinds on near Damascus
French president
criticized for bill that
cracks down on migrants
BY P HILIP I SSA
AND Z EINA K ARAM
beirut — Doctors in Syria’s
rebel-controlled suburbs of Damascus said Wednesday that
they were unable to keep up with
the staggering number of casualties, amid a ferocious bombing
campaign by government forces
that has struck hospitals, apartment blocks and other civilian
sites, killing and wounding hundreds in recent days.
The bombardment has forced
many among the nearly 400,000
residents in the area to sleep in
basements and makeshift shelters.
Waleed Awata described a desperate, chaotic scene at the small
hospital where he works as an
anesthesiologist in the town of
Zamalka, one of a cluster of
settlements that make up the
Damascus suburbs known as
Eastern Ghouta. The facility, with
just 17 beds, received 82 patients
Tuesday night alone, he said.
“We had to give them IVs and
treat them on the floor,” the
44-year-old physician said. He
said the bodies of two women
and two children killed in
Wednesday’s bombardment also
were brought to the hospital.
The hospital was struck Tuesday by barrel bombs — crude,
explosives-filled
oil
drums
dropped from helicopters at high
altitudes — as well as sporadic
artillery fire, Awata said. As in
many hospitals in the area, patients at his hospital had been
moved into the basement to shelter from airstrikes. No one was
hurt, but the hospital’s generator,
water tanks and several ambulances were damaged.
Another doctor said he was at
the hospital where he works in
BY
berlin — One of
German
Chancellor Angela
RICK NOACK
Merkel’s most
distinctive
character traits has been caution.
For years, it served her well and
helped her sideline rivals and
other rising stars.
Her governing style eventually
led to criticism at home, with
some accusing her of putting
Germany into a “deep sleep” by
refraining from clashing with her
opponents. But she was still
hailed as the “leader of the free
world” abroad as the Obama era
neared its end in 2016. At the
time, Britain was beset by
upheaval over plans to leave the
Most people in Washington —
which has long prided itself on
being the world’s most influential
place — may consider that a
strange worldview to hold, but it’s
far from a minority perception
here in history-burdened Berlin.
Few Germans believe their
country should assume a more
influential role in world affairs,
and 52 percent said in a recent
survey by the Körber Foundation
that more restraint was
beneficial. That is one reason the
German military remains so
chronically underfunded that it is
virtually “not deployable for
collective defense,” according to
an independent commissioner.
“It’s good for Germany’s
reputation abroad that it won’t
have to assume the role of
Europe’s primary leader,” said
Thorsten Benner, director of the
Berlin-based Global Public Policy
Institute. “It’s great to see that
France has taken on more
responsibilities and that
President [Emmanuel] Macron
has had a chance to shine, too.”
Macron has quickly
established himself as a force on
the world stage, taking part in
geopolitical discussions and
negotiations. With Germany
mired in internal divisions and
Britain overwhelmed by Brexit,
the French president has emerged
as one of Europe’s strongest
public faces. Some say the exinvestment banker could even
become the de facto leader of the
free world.
Merkel’s earlier rise to global
political superstar and her
“leader of the Western world”
nickname had disgruntled many
other governments in Europe
that felt suffocated by Germany’s
influence. And although a Gallup
survey recently concluded
Germany has replaced the United
States “as the top-rated global
power in the world,” it remains
AMMAR SULEIMAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Germans favor more
restraint in world a≠airs
WorldViews
— Associated Press
paris — French President Emmanuel Macron approved an immigration bill Wednesday that
would sharply limit the number
of asylum seekers allowed to stay
in the country and at the same
time increase deportations, infuriating migrant advocates and
even political allies.
The bill, to be debated in Parliament in June, challenges the
humane public image that Macron has sought to project: He
once pointed to German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s embrace of
1 million migrants as an inspiring
example of “our collective dignity.” Now his administration is
making it easier for France to rid
itself of unwanted migrants.
“He’s proclaiming he’s the hero
of refugees, but in reality, this law
does the opposite,” said Patrick
Weil, a constitutional scholar and
expert on immigration in France.
“It makes it much more difficult
for asylum seekers to actually
receive refugee status. When you
are a foreigner afraid for your life,
you are not in the best position to
deal with the kind of requests the
government is demanding.”
Macron’s proposed legislation
is mostly concerned with distinguishing between asylum seekers
and economic migrants.
To that end, it seeks to shorten
the asylum application process
from roughly a year to six
months.
It would also reduce the time a
migrant has to appeal a government decision from a month to
15 days.
Most controversial, perhaps, is
its proposed extension of detention periods.
At present, authorities are
obliged to release detained mi-
Injured children wait to receive treatment Wednesday at a
makeshift hospital in the town of Kafr Batna after Syrian
government bombardments of the rebel-held Eastern Ghouta
region on the outskirts of the Syrian capital, Damascus. Western
powers and aid agencies voiced alarm over the mounting death toll.
the town of Saqba when it came
under attack Tuesday, killing
some of the patients and forcing
the relocation of others to nearby
homes.
The international medical organization Doctors Without Borders said 13 hospitals and clinics
that it supports have been damaged or destroyed in the past
three days.
Syrian government forces supported by Russian aircraft have
shown no signs of letting up their
aerial and artillery assault on
Eastern Ghouta since they
stepped up strikes late Sunday as
part of a new push to recapture
the territory, controlled by rebels
since 2012.
The U.N. human rights office
said Wednesday that at least 346
people had been killed in Eastern
Ghouta since the government
and its allies escalated their offensive on the region on Feb. 4. At
least 92 of those deaths occurred
in one 13-hour period on Monday, it said. An additional 878
people have been wounded,
mostly in airstrikes hitting resi-
European Union, and France
faced its own break-the-mold
populist surge.
Yet one year later, Germany
itself has become trapped in a
political stalemate.
As coalition talks and
negotiations here have dragged
on for five months, forcing Merkel
to confront one of the worst crises
of her 12-year tenure, hopes have
faded that Germany would fill the
power vacuum left by a retreating
United States under President
Trump. Yet Germany may have
never wanted that role in the first
place, and some even believe a
withdrawal from the spotlight
might benefit Germany overall —
by making it less powerful.
J AMES M C A ULEY
dential areas.
The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said
at least 300 people have been
killed since Sunday night alone.
Rebels in Eastern Ghouta retaliated by sending mortar shells
crashing Wednesday into Damascus, seat of President Bashar
al-Assad’s power.
The Russian military is again
supporting Assad’s forces as it
did in the all-out assault on the
rebel-held half of Syria’s largest
city, Aleppo, in late 2016, which
drove the rebels from their enclave there. Tens of thousands of
civilians fled their homes, and
many have not been able to
return. Hundreds more were
killed in indiscriminate shelling
and airstrikes.
Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said this week that the
assault on Aleppo could serve as
a model for the campaign in
Eastern Ghouta, which he said
was necessary to uproot alQaeda-linked militants in the
area.
grants after 45 days. If the new
law passes, migrants who have
been refused asylum could be
held for 90 days before deportation.
That is the provision that has
outraged some members of Macron’s party, the centrist La République En Marche (“Republic
on the Move”).
“We are in danger of normalizing locking people up,” Florence
Granjus told Agence FrancePresse.
Other party members have said
much the same, and immigration
now appears a major wedge dividing Macron’s unwieldy centrist coalition.
Those internal critiques echo
statements last month from close
advisers of Macron, including
economist Jean Pisani-Ferry, a
principal author of the president’s economic platform.
In an open letter to the
Le Monde newspaper, PisaniFerry and others decried what
they saw as a betrayal.
“Mr. Macron, your politics contradict the humanism that you
preach,” the letter said.
The office of Interior Minister
Gérard Collomb said in a statement Wednesday that the bill is
meant to “strengthen the protec-
tions of people in a vulnerable
state,” to “converge our procedures with European law and
practice,” and to “adapt our law to
operational realities.”
The government has also said
that the legislation merely upholds campaign promises Macron has repeated from the beginning.
“The bill is completely balanced,” Collomb said in January.
“It works on two guiding principles: France must welcome refugees, but it cannot welcome all
economic migrants.”
For now, a majority of French
voters appear to agree with Macron.
Approximately 63 percent
think there are too many migrants in the country, according
to a BVA opinion poll conducted
this month.
In 2017, France saw a record
100,000 people file asylum requests, although the figure is far
smaller than in some neighboring
countries — especially Merkel’s
Germany, which Macron often
praises.
In 2017, Germany received
186,000 requests from asylum
seekers. In 2015, it received
890,000.
james.mcauley@washpost.com
LUDOVIC MARIN/POOL/REUTERS
French President Emmanuel Macron’s legislation would extend
detention periods for migrants from 45 days to 90.
deeply unpopular across parts of
Europe.
“Countries whose perception
of Germany affects us directly —
such as Poland and Greece — are
much more wary of Berlin than
international surveys that
include many countries much
further away may indicate,”
Benner said.
As Germany’s influence in
Europe was rising, the Law and
Justice party in neighboring
Poland stirred anti-German
sentiments, which were mainly
rooted in history and the
country’s suffering under the
Nazis. In Greece, the austerity
largely implemented by Merkel’s
government was seen as a more
contemporary version of a
German takeover.
Germany’s controversial role in
Europe also has shown Berlin its
limits. “Germany’s greatest
constraint is that more than most
other powers, it depends on the
multilateral order,” the
Economist observed last summer
before the September election.
In a broader context, the E.U.’s
cohesion has long suffered under
what smaller nations perceive to
be an unfair distribution of
power. Even though Germany
and other larger countries
shoulder the bloc’s biggest
financial burden, Eastern and
Central European governments
in particular frequently complain
that Berlin has forced them to
accept its stance on issues such as
immigration and the euro-zone
crisis. Merkel’s decisions, they
argue, have triggered a surge in
populist movements in those
places.
Some hope a less-dominant
Germany may help a divided E.U.
overcome some of its divisions.
rick.noack@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/worldviews
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
RE
A13
K
Economy & Business
DOW 24,797.78
DOWN 166.97, 0.7%
NASDAQ 7218.23
DOWN 16.08, 0.2%
S&P 500 2701.33
DOWN 14.93, 0.5%
GOLD $1,332.10
UP $0.90, 0.1%
CRUDE OIL $61.68
DOWN $0.11, 0.2%
10-YEAR TREASURY
CURRENCIES
DOWN $5.00 PER $1,000, 2.95% YIELD $1=107.70 YEN; EURO=$1.129
U.S. panel would shift
space business oversight
Cycle of congestion
As industry expands,
Pence assails existing
regulations as stifling
BY
GREG BAKER/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
People ride past shared bicycles piled beside a road in Beijing on Wednesday. China issued national
guidelines governing bike-sharing operations in 2017 to help nurture an industry credited with spurring a
transport revolution while addressing complaints over an accumulation of millions of bikes on the streets.
Sharing your video log-in isn’t always a no-no
When the
Olympics come
around, the cable
guy has an awful
GEOFFREY A.
way of making us
FOWLER
feel like criminals.
It happens like this: You’re
telling your buddy about Lindsey
Vonn’s big downhill run, but he
doesn’t have a way to watch. It’s
possible to stream all this stuff
through apps in 2018 — but he
needs a password from a pay TV
provider.
And then comes the digital
dilemma. Can you give your login to your friend? What about
your kid in college? The same
issue returns around big Netflix
and HBO releases. Is that sharing
. . . or stealing?
Good luck getting a straight
answer from the fine print in
your contract. So I had some
extremely awkward
conversations with cable and
streaming companies, lawyers,
and industry insiders about what
is permitted — and what is
ethical. My conclusion: It’s often
okay to share a log-in, so long as
it’s limited to someone in your
family or a close friend.
To be clear, I’m not advocating
for passing around log-ins willynilly. Sharing a password is, first
of all, a security risk for hacking.
Using someone else’s password,
even with their permission, can
be a legal gray area, though
nobody has been charged with a
crime. There is also less of an
excuse to be a freeloader since it
has become possible to buy TV
through streaming apps such as
Sling TV and HBO Now.
But don’t fall for a guilt trip,
either. Many distributors and
channel owners I spoke with
insisted on being vague about
their policies, tacitly
acknowledging that they see
some sharing as either as a cost of
business or a form of marketing.
And the smartest TV companies
The
Switch
sell packages in ways that make
sharing a shame-free part of the
service.
What’s permitted?
Last year, research firm Parks
Associates found that 16 percent
of U.S. households with
broadband admitted either
borrowing video log-ins or
sharing their own credentials.
A few companies say they
consider this behavior stealing.
“Charter believes that
password sharing is a copyright
infringement,” said Nathalie
Burgos, a spokeswoman for
America’s second-largest cable
company.
Most, however, would not
go that far — and what they
don’t say is just as instructive as
what they do.
Almost all TV companies
provide simultaneous streams to
facilitate sharing. The sticking
point is who is allowed to
participate. Some traditional
cable companies say it’s for a
single household only. What
defines a household? Most don’t
really say.
Adding to the confusion, app
policies are often specific to the
network, not the pay-TV provider
that gives you a log-in.
Could sharing be illegal?
Courts have applied a 1986
computer fraud and abuse law to
forbid sharing passwords to
Why should TV
providers decide whom
you consider close?
databases and social media sites.
But there is confusion over the
rationale behind those rulings.
At least for now, companies
seem focused on extreme abuses,
such as hundreds of
simultaneous streams from a
single account.
Netflix chief executive Reed
Hastings, speaking in 2016, called
password sharing “something
you have to learn to live with”
because there’s so much
legitimate use by families.
The most Internet-savvy of TV
companies do away with some of
this ambiguity by letting us
figure out how we want to
distribute the streams we pay for.
Netflix and AT&T’s DirecTV
sell packages with multiple
streams and appear to give us
leeway in using them. A
spokeswoman for Dish Network
and its sister streaming service
Sling TV said its focus is on too
many simultaneous log-ins
rather than “who is using an
account.”
It’s a great point: In the
Internet age, why should TV
providers be in the business of
deciding whom you consider
close?
Is it stealing — or marketing?
Good TV is expensive: NBC paid
$963 million to broadcast the
2018 Olympics. Of course,
companies need to protect the
value of their services by making
them scarce.
But the Internet also has the
potential to get a generation that
might never buy cable to pay for
TV online.
As broadband Internet became
common, some channels began
streaming as a benefit to cable
subscribers. With a log-in from
your pay TV provider, you could
use a TV Everywhere app on your
phone or a web browser. This
fueled sharing because for years
using a TV Everywhere log-in was
the only easy way to watch
online.
But since the 2014 Winter
Olympics, TV has come a long
way in catching up with the
Internet. Some of the most
popular networks, such as HBO
and CBS, joined Netflix in selling
streaming directly. There is still
no way to buy online access to
only the Olympics from NBC, but
there are now ways to get the
equivalent of a cable TV package
through an app. Cable-cutting
services offer a patchwork of
streaming channels.
Now that the business of TV
on the Internet is growing, it
puts password sharing in a
different light.
Brett Sappington, a director of
research at Park Associates,
estimates that sharing cost the
TV industry $3.5 billion in 2017.
But he’s not just wagging a finger
at us. “Ultimately, the solution is
to turn it into a market
opportunity, rather than a reason
to enforce strict rules,”
Sappington told me. “Do you
really want to be in a position
where you are suing your own
customers?”
Most people want to do the
right thing, or at least the easy
thing. But now TV is scattered
among so many offers — cable
providers and streaming services,
all with different content — that
it can be hard to tell when it’s
worth paying for a service.
Sampling off a friend’s account
can be the gateway to fully
subscribing, or deciding you’re
interested only in the Olympics.
HBO, for one, has focused on
building a fan base. It gives free
streaming access to students who
live on campus at dozens of
universities.
When households take on free
trials of streaming services,
about half the time they end up
subscribing to at least one,
Sappington said. TV providers
just have to figure out how to
treat folks dipping into their
services like potential customers
rather than criminals.
geoffrey.fowler@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
C HRISTIAN D AVENPORT
The National Space Council,
headed by Vice President Pence,
formally recommended Wednesday that space commerce responsibilities be consolidated under
the Commerce Department,
while creating a sort of space czar
— an undersecretary of space
commerce to oversee “all commercial space regulatory functions.”
In a speech at the Kennedy
Space Center, Pence also announced a plan to streamline
licensing requirements for rockets that launch and then return,
which the industry has been
pushing for.
The Commerce Department
would also work to cut back on
regulations for remote sensing
and the way spacecraft approach
and interact with each other in
space. The recommendations,
which would need to be approved
by the president, come as companies such as Planet are putting up
constellations of satellites to
beam back images of the Earth.
And others, such as Space Systems Loral and Orbital ATK, are
working to perform maintenance
in space, which could extend the
life of satellites in orbit.
The moves are designed to
reduce regulations and help
boost the commercial space industry as it begins to show momentum.
Commerce Secretary Wilbur
Ross said during the meeting that
American industry was competing “against 70 foreign governments, so they need all the support we can give them.” To do that,
he said there would be a “new,
one-stop shop for space commerce.”
“Asteroid mining, space tourism and space habitats are quickly becoming much more than
science fiction,” he said. “And we
need a future-oriented space
commerce agenda.”
In a speech, Pence likened the
emerging space industry to “the
railroads that opened up the
American West.” And he said that
as “captains of industry turn their
gaze to the infinite frontier,” they
would “usher in a new era of
American space leadership.” But
he said companies are too often
“stifled” by “outdated regulatory
processes.”
Brian Weeden, a technical adviser for the Secure World Foundation, a space advocacy group,
said it was a “big positive” to find
a way for “the government to say
‘yes’ to all the new and innovative
commercial activities, such as
satellite servicing and asteroid
mining, which currently don’t
have a licensing process.” But he
said that not all space activity can
be put under the umbrella of the
Commerce Department because
the Federal Aviation Administration is required by law to license
rocket launches, and the Federal
Communications Commission licenses radio frequency spectrum
use.
Moving much of the regulation
from the Transportation Department to Commerce reflects an
ideological difference, he said.
“Both Commerce and Transportation are tasked to promote
and regulate industry, but Republicans perceive Commerce as putting promotion ahead of regulation,” he said.
Whoever is in charge, the challenge will be whether the office
has enough staff and resources to
oversee the growing industry —
“and they are already struggling
to meet the workload of their
existing responsibilities,” Weeden
said.
The council's recommendations follow other wins for the
industry, which for years has lobbied Congress to take a more
hands-off approach. More than a
decade ago, it pushed for human
space flights to be regulated by
the same “informed consent”
standards that govern extreme
sports such as skydiving.
More
recently,
Congress
passed legislation giving U.S.
companies the right to the resources they mine in space — on
asteroids or on the moon, for
example.
The space council's meeting
came a couple weeks after SpaceX
launched its massive Falcon
Heavy rocket and returned two of
the boosters safely to a landing
site on Cape Canaveral. Nick Ayers, Pence's chief of staff, tweeted
before the launch that the rocket
could have “major (positive) ramifications for US space industry if
“Asteroid mining,
space tourism and
space habitats are
quickly becoming much
more than science
fiction. And we need a
future-oriented
space commerce
agenda.”
Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross
this goes according to plan.”
Pence attended a reception at
which one of the boosters was on
display Tuesday evening, ahead of
the second meeting of the Space
Council, which includes the secretaries of state, commerce, defense and transportation, among
others. He also toured the facilities of the United Launch Alliance, the joint venture of Lockheed Martin and Boeing, as well
as Blue Origin, the rocket company founded by Amazon.com chief
executive Jeffrey P. Bezos. (Bezos
also owns The Washington Post.)
In an interview earlier this
month while attending the Falcon
Heavy launch, Ross, the commerce secretary, said he applauded the growing space industry's
success in winning back a large
portion of the world’s market
share for commercial launches.
He said one of the council’s top
priorities is “to accelerate the
progress of the commercialization of space. We’re moving quite
aggressively to try to accomplish
that.”
christian.davenport@washpost.com
DIGEST
AUTO INDUSTRY
Ford executive ousted
after investigation
Ford Motor’s head of North
American operations is leaving
the automaker after an
investigation into reports of
“inappropriate behavior.”
An internal investigation
found that Raj Nair, an executive
vice president, engaged in
behavior that was “inconsistent
with the company’s code of
conduct,” chief executive Jim
Hackett said in a statement
Wednesday.
Ford makes most of its money
in North America, the region that
Nair, 53, has overseen since June.
He was previously head of Ford’s
global product development and
served as chief technical officer.
“I sincerely regret that there
have been instances where I have
not exhibited leadership
behaviors consistent with the
principles that the company and I
have always espoused,” Nair said
in the statement.
— Bloomberg News
HOUSING
Home sales dropped
3.2 percent in January
U.S. sales of existing homes fell
in January from a year earlier by
the most in more than three
years. Would-be buyers were
stymied by rising prices and a
shortage of homes.
The National Association of
Realtors said Wednesday that
sales dropped 3.2 percent from
December to January, the second
straight monthly decline, to a
seasonally adjusted annual rate of
5.38 million.
Compared with 12 months
earlier, sales dropped 4.8 percent
— the steepest year-over-year
decline since August 2014. A lack
of available homes is holding
back sales, even as the NAR
reports that demand is strong.
The number of homes for sale
dipped to 1.52 million in January.
union of the Screen Actors Guild
and the American Federation of
Television and Radio Artists, over
whether the Amazon.com-owned
website can publish the ages of
actors. U.S. District Judge Vince
Chhabria of the Northern District
of California ruled Tuesday that
California cannot enforce a state
law that compels the Internet
Movie Database to remove an
actor’s age upon request. The
2016 law was supported by those
who said that revealing actors’s
ages could lead to discrimination.
Chhabria said such an argument
“would enable states to forbid
publication of virtually any fact.”
He also noted that the law
violates the First Amendment.
(Amazon chief executive Jeffrey P.
Bezos owns The Washington
Post.)
— Associated Press
ALSO IN BUSINESS
The U.S. Securities and
Exchange Commission on
Wednesday updated guidance to
public companies on how and
when they should disclose
cybersecurity risks and breaches.
The guidance said company
executives must not trade in a
firm’s securities while possessing
nonpublic information on
cybersecurity attacks. The SEC
encouraged companies to
consider adopting specific
policies restricting executive
trading in shares while a hack is
being investigated and before it is
disclosed. It discouraged
companies from withholding
disclosure simply because of an
ongoing investigation.
IMDb won a victory in its feud
with the state of California and
SAG-AFTRA, the joint labor
JEAN-FRANCOIS MONIER/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
French farmers topple shopping carts outside a supermarket in
Angers, in western France, to show their opposition to additional
agricultural imports from South America. Tensions over agriculture
have been a roadblock as the European Union and the Mercosur bloc
of South American countries negotiate a trade agreement.
— From news reports
COMING TODAY
10 a.m.: Freddie Mac releases
weekly mortgage rates.
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
Zuckerberg’s push for change at Facebook clashes with employee realities
Workers haven’t figured
out how to implement
his wishes, some say
BY
E LIZABETH D WOSKIN
san francisco — Mark Zuckerberg has mandated wholesale
change at Facebook after a year
during which the company was
rocked by Russian meddling, fake
news and controversies over its
role in a democracy.
But there is an apparent gap
between what the big boss wants
and the realities of the people
who implement his wishes — a
fact exacerbated by a culture of
outspoken executives that is endemic to Silicon Valley.
That struggle has been evident
at the social network in recent
weeks. This past weekend, its
leaders scrambled to manage
Facebook’s message in the wake
of an indictment by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III that laid
out how Russian operators used
Facebook and other social media
platforms to manipulate American voters.
And just days before the indictment, another Facebook executive disclosed that the company
wasn’t yet sure how to put in
place Zuckerberg’s latest major
directive: shifting the company’s
metrics so that “meaningful interactions” are valued over likes
and clicks, a response to the misinformation and to reports about
the harms of social media that
drew attention last year.
“Even if [Zuckerberg] says, ‘Resolve this right away,’ the problems are baked into the fundamentals of the platform,” said
Jonathon Morgan, chief executive of New Knowledge, a company that tracks disinformation.
“The changes are a real threat to
the way that these people think
about success at their jobs.”
Almost immediately after the
indictment landed, Facebook’s
vice president of global public
policy, Joel Kaplan, took advantage of an opportunity to appear
cooperative with the regulators
and critics that the company has
clashed with in recent months.
He said in a statement that “today’s news confirms our announcement last year that foreign actors conducted a coordinated and sustained effort to attack our democracy,” and that the
company had readily handed
over information on Russian interference to authorities. He said
he was “grateful that the US government was now taking this
aggressive action against those
who abused our service.”
But hours later, another Facebook vice president, Rob Goldman, who runs the company’s
massively lucrative ad business,
seemed more defensive about
Facebook’s role. “I have seen all of
the Russian ads and I can say very
definitively that swaying the election was *NOT* the main goal,” he
tweeted, adding that the majority
of Russian ads ran after the election. “We shared that fact,” he
wrote, “but very few outlets have
covered it because it doesn’t align
with the main media narrative of
Tump and the election.”
Researchers
and
experts
pounced on Goldman, pointing
out that the bigger challenge for
Facebook was related not to ads
but to the free content posted by
Russians. (Facebook has not said
whether the majority of the free
posts appeared after the election.) Others said his conclusions
contradicted the special counsel’s
indictment, which found that
election meddling on Facebook
was indeed a priority for the
Russian operatives.
The comments from Goldman,
who had 1,600 followers at the
time, could have been a standard
Twitter debate between professionals — until President Trump
broadcast the comments to more
than 48 million users the following day. Goldman now has more
than 11,000 followers.
The controversy sent Facebook
executives scrambling. They tried
to recast the statements, emphasizing that Goldman was speaking for himself, without prior
approval. Kaplan issued an additional company statement saying
that “nothing we found contradicts the Special Counsel’s indictments. Any suggestion otherwise
is wrong.” They vented internally
that Goldman had damaged
hard-won credibility with the
public. By Monday, Goldman,
posting on Facebook this time,
had issued an apology to his
colleagues.
Goldman is part of a socialmedia-oriented culture that is
permissive of employees having a
voice and becoming “thought
leaders” in their field. Several
Facebook executives are regular
Twitter users, including Andrew
Bosworth, who initially shared
Goldman’s tweet.
But that culture is increasingly
pushing up against the need of
big tech companies such as Facebook to defend their credibility.
Marc Andreessen, a Facebook
board member, shut his popular
Twitter account after making offensive comments about Facebook’s goals in India. After
Google fired a conservative engineer for making derogatory statements about women, employees
took to social media to protest
both sides of the issue.
Recently, a Facebook executive
spoke publicly about the challenges of implementing Zucker-
berg’s latest directive to make the
product less harmful by measuring time well spent and meaningful interactions.
“We’re trying to figure out how
to best measure and understand
that,” Adam Mosseri, Facebook
vice president who manages the
company’s news feed, said at an
industry conference. “The metric
is definitely evolving.”
Later, Mosseri took to Twitter
to explain himself further. He
said the company was considering placing more emphasis on
comments and messages, particularly long ones, after surveys
found that users reported those
features to be meaningful to
them. He said the company was
trying to define how to give people news that is genuinely informative.
“But there is a real difference
between feeling informed and being informed,” he wrote. “We have
yet to work out a way to do the
latter.”
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
Workers accuse Disney of withholding tax-cut bonuses
Unions say company
is tying payments
to new labor deal
BY
D ANIELLE P AQUETTE
The Disney World puppeteer
had to miss his sister’s wedding in
West Virginia. He had to skip his
family reunion in the Dominican
Republic.
But after President Trump
signed a tax law last December
slashing corporate rates, his employer announced it would offer
$1,000 bonuses to 125,000 theme
park workers, and he thought: I
can finally take a vacation.
“That’s three weeks’ salary,”
said Michael Kirby, 36, who maneuvers Muppets and Little Mermaid characters in Orlando.
“That’s a week in the Dominican
Republic.”
However, it is now unclear
whether Kirby, along with 36,000
other unionized Disney workers,
will get the bonus. The extra cash
is stuck at the center of a dispute
between a coalition of labor
groups and the company responsible for Mickey Mouse.
“I’m counting on it never happening,” Kirby said.
The Service Trades Council
Union — a coalition of six locals,
including branches of the Teamsters, the United Food and Commercial Workers International
Union and the Transportation
Communications International
Union — filed a federal unfairlabor-practices complaint to the
National Labor Relations Board
on Monday accusing Walt Disney
World Resorts of refusing to pay
the bonuses until unionized employees agree to a new contract.
In December, members voted
GETTY IMAGES
Unionized workers at Walt Disney World Resorts say they do not know whether they will receive a $1,000 bonus promised to them after
President Trump signed tax cuts into law in December. The unions filed an unfair-labor-practices complaint Monday against Disney.
to reject Disney’s November offer
for a 50-cent wage increase, plus
another one the following year
and a $200 bonus.
Disney responded with a wage
proposal earlier this month
threatening to withdraw the offer
if the two sides do not reach a deal
by August. “If the Company’s offer
is not ratified by August 31, 2018,
the bonus offer will expire,” the
proposal said.
Disney did not immediately
respond to The Washington Post’s
request for comment.
The next round of negotiations
has yet to be scheduled. For nonSTCU employees, the first installment of the bonus ($275) is slated
to be paid in March.
The union said Disney’s tactics
were illegal.
“We believe an effort by Disney
to link cast members’ raises with
the $1,000 Trump tax cut bonus
would constitute an unlawful Unfair Labor Practice for discriminating against Cast Members engaged in Bargaining,” Jeremy
Haicken, the STCU’s secretarytreasurer, wrote to Disney in a
Feb. 16 letter.
Disney has already signed off
on bonuses for security guards
and painters who do not belong
to the STCU, said Eric Clinton,
president of Unite Here Local
362, which is part of the coalition.
“You’re holding us hostage,” he
said. “You’re saying we have to
accept the raise we already said
no to. That’s discrimination
against people in negotiations.”
Legal analysts say the union
could have a case.
“What they’re saying is: You’re
treating us differently,” said Michael Leroy, a labor and law pro-
fessor at the University of Illinois.
“That does appear to have merit.
Everyone is being offered the
$1,000 — except the union folks.
They’re being asked to take the
$1,000 with some conditions.”
It’s hard to say how the NLRB
will respond to the complaint.
“It really only becomes illegal if
the employer has some provable
anti-union motivation, and even
then, NLRB and court decisions
are somewhat inconsistent as to
what that entails,” said Joseph
Slater, a professor at the University of Toledo College of Law.
Disney reported a 78.4 percent
jump in quarterly profits this
month, attributing the $1.6 billion gain to the Republicans’ tax
law, which shrank the corporate
tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent.
The company was one of several firms, including AT&T and
Walmart, to announce employee
bonuses after Trump signed the
measure in December.
“We are directing approximately $125 million to our cast
members and employees across
the country and making higher
education more accessible with
the launch of this new program,”
chief executive Bob Iger said in a
statement at the time.
Clinton, the local president,
said the union was holding out
for “living wages” and declined to
name a number. Members make
$10.71 an hour, above Florida’s
minimum wage ($8.25).
But on Unite Here Central
Florida’s public Facebook page,
some who identified themselves
as Disney employees have bashed
the union for delaying their extra
money.
“You guys just threw me into
debt,” one wrote. “I needed that
money to pay for my prescriptions.”
“Are you freaking kidding me?”
said another, who described herself online as a Disney World
pastry chef. “So because I’m in the
union I won’t get the bonus?
Great. You know I was counting
on that money for my unborn
child but I guess not.”
Others put the blame on Disney.
“Just want to say bullshot and
Corp needs to stop treating us like
s---,” someone wrote. “We work
hard and keep the Disney magic
alive for the guest that comes to
our park.”
danielle.paquette@washpost.com
New pay transparency rule risks vexing workers CDC warns about kratom
BY
J ENA M C G REGOR
A potentially embarrassing
math calculation employers have
long hoped to escape — one that
pay experts thought was dead
following President Trump’s election — can no longer be avoided.
In recent weeks, a few public
companies have begun disclosing
a ratio, required for the first time
this year, that compares the pay of
their chief executive with the pay
of their median employee. At industrial giant Honeywell, the
largest company yet to disclose,
the ratio was 333 to 1. At Teva
Pharmaceuticals, the Israelbased generic pharmaceutical
company, it is 302 to 1. And at the
regional bank Umpqua Holdings,
it is about 55 to 1.
As of Wednesday morning,
companies had disclosed the figure for only about 20 CEOs, according to the research firm
Proxy Insights. But with corporate America’s annual meeting
season getting underway —
the majority of public companies
release their annual reports
and proxy voting documents in
the coming months — investors,
the public and employees are
about to get a much closer look at
how their pay compares not only
with that of their CEO, but that of
their peers.
It is that last comparison that
has employers most concerned,
say consultants who work with
them on executive pay issues.
“I don’t think companies are as
worried about newspaper articles, because they are what they
are, and I don’t think they’re
worried about shareholders,” said
David Wise, a senior client partner at Korn Ferry, as investors are
closely focused on executive pay
issues. “I think they’re worried
about how their own people will
react. How do you communicate
to an employee who now knows
they’re paid in the bottom half of
the company?”
The regulation mandates that
companies identify the compen-
Pay consultants say
employees may be
bothered not only by
how many multiples
higher the chief
executive is paid,
but also by where they
fit in with their peers.
sation of the median-paid employee at the firm, compare that
to the CEO as a ratio, and disclose
it each year.
Pay consultants say employees
may be bothered not only by how
many multiples higher the chief
executive is paid, but also by
where they fit in with their peers.
At most companies, compensation remains pretty opaque, and a
company-endorsed median figure would provide additional
transparency.
“At the end of the day, we’re all
human. We all want to be above
average. When you’re not, that
impacts job satisfaction, engagement and performance,” Wise
said. “That’s the part companies
are worried about the most — and
they should be.”
Compounding that concern is
timing. The ratios are being disclosed just after corporations
have received a massive windfall
in the form of a corporate tax cut,
which could add to questions
about inequality.
“There may very well be
heightened expectations from
employees who are paid in the
bottom half that incremental taxcut dollars are going to be used to
enhance companywide pay programs,” Wise said.
Last week, Honeywell reported
that its CEO, Darius Adamczyk,
made 333 times the median worker at Honeywell, who is paid
$50,296. In an emailed statement, a company spokesman said
that Adamczyk’s compensation
package is “tied to performancebased incentives that deliver value only when Honeywell performs well against pre-defined
targets,” aligning his interests
with shareholders and “reflects
his strong performance over the
past 12 months.”
The Securities and Exchange
Commission’s regulation permits
companies to exclude from the
calculation certain non-U. S. employees, representing up to 5 percent of its total employee base,
acknowledging the cost of collecting the data. In its filing, Honey-
well said it had excluded workers
from 27 countries, such as Brazil,
Indonesia and Slovakia, from its
figure, slightly less than 5 percent
of its workforce.
A recent survey of 356 public
companies by Equilar, an executive compensation and governance research firm, found that the
median CEO pay ratio was 140
to 1. But it also suggested that
Honeywell’s figure, which is
No. 73 on the Fortune 500, would
not be that out of line with other
similar-size companies. Companies above $15 billion in annual
sales had a ratio of 263 to 1 and
those with the greatest number of
employees (43,000 or more) also
had the largest ratio, at 318 to 1.
Honeywell had 2017 sales of
$40 billion and has more than
143,000 employees.
Whether lopsided CEO pay ratios will raise the ire of employees
or the public is not clear. Despite
rising populist sentiments and
increasing focus on income inequality, high CEO pay does not
seem to generate the same outrage it did during the financial
crisis, and only time will tell
whether juxtaposing the two
numbers will have the effect of
shaming outlier companies into
lower pay for CEOs — or higher
pay for workers.
But if unemployment rises or
the market faces a correction, it
could, Wise said: “The pay ratio
becomes an even bigger deal in
the court of public opinion if the
bottom falls out of the stock market — full stop.”
jena.mcgregor@washpost.com
after salmonella outbreak
BY
L AURIE M C G INLEY
The Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, the Food and Drug
Administration and several states
are investigating an outbreak of salmonella illness linked to kratom, an
unregulated herbal supplement
that is sometimes used for pain,
anxiety and opioid-withdrawal
symptoms, the CDC said Tuesday.
The agency, which urged consumers not to use kratom in any
form because of the possibility of
contamination, said the infections
started in October and have affected 20 states. Eleven people have
been hospitalized, and no one has
died. Most of the people sickened
have reported consuming kratom
in pills, powder or tea, according to
the CDC, which didn’t name any
specific brands or suppliers.
Symptoms of a salmonella infection include diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps. The CDC said
whole genome sequencing performed on salmonella samples from
ill people showed the germs were
closely related genetically, making it
likely that they came from a common source. Three people in California have been sickened; the other
affected states, including Utah, Oregon, Ohio and Pennsylvania, have
had one or two cases.
Kratom, which comes from a
tree in Southeast Asia, is at the
center of a fierce debate about
whether it should be banned. In
2016, the Drug Enforcement Administration tried to classify kratom in the same category as hero-
in but backed off after intense
public backlash. Recently, the
FDA has supported a kratom
crackdown, saying the botanical
is potentially dangerous and addictive. The DEA is reviewing the
FDA’s recommendation and conducting its own analysis.
Kratom is widely available on
the Internet and is sold in some
head shops, gas stations and corner grocery stores. It has been
banned for sale and possession in
at least five states and in several
cities. The FDA said recently that
a new computer model it developed shows that kratom contains
opioid compounds that can cause
potentially lethal side effects
such as seizures and depressed
breathing. The agency said there
is no evidence that kratom is safe
for medical use, including to treat
opioid-withdrawal symptoms.
Kratom advocates have attacked
the FDA’s views, saying the supplement is much safer than traditional
opioids such as oxycodone and can
help addicts wean themselves off
the powerful painkillers. The
American Kratom Association,
which promotes access to the herb,
is launching an online campaign
this week, using the slogan #IamKratom, to increase support. The
group earlier sent a letter to the
White House from several scientists calling the FDA’s warnings a
“disinformation campaign.”
laurie.mcginley@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
27,250
Close
YTD
% Chg
24,797.78
–0.7
+0.3
25,500
23,750
22,000
20,250
Nasdaq Composite Index
7700
7218.23
–0.2
+4.6
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Leisure Equipment & Prod
Airlines
Road & Rail
Internet Software & Svcs
Internet & Catalog Retail
Oil, Gas, Consumable Fuel
REITS
Food & Staples Retailing
Power Prodct & Enrgy Trdr
Diversified Consumer Svcs
0
–3.0%
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
+3.0%
2.01
1.07
0.91
0.86
0.74
–1.71
–1.83
–1.99
–2.19
–2.80
6700
6200
5700
2701.33
S&P 500 Index
–0.5
+1.0
2900
2700
2500
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
F
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
232.18
97.50
171.07
352.37
155.23
109.06
43.31
43.34
70.96
74.89
14.49
263.40
183.06
153.96
45.94
–1.2
0.3
–0.5
–0.3
–0.2
–1.7
–1.7
–1.5
–0.9
–1.1
–1.7
–0.6
–2.0
–0.8
–0.8
–1.4
–1.8
1.1
19.5
–1.5
–12.9
13.1
–5.5
–0.4
–10.5
–17.0
3.4
–3.4
0.4
–0.5
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
WalMart
Walt Disney
129.91
115.19
158.64
54.55
91.49
67.05
80.24
35.76
138.54
129.26
225.13
47.96
120.43
91.52
105.05
–0.7
0.4
0.9
–0.8
–1.3
–0.7
–1.4
–0.7
–0.4
2.2
–0.7
–2.0
–1.3
–2.8
–0.9
–7.0
7.7
–7.8
–3.1
7.0
7.2
–12.7
–1.3
2.1
1.3
2.1
–9.4
5.6
–7.3
–2.3
Close
Daily
% Chg
86,051.82
15,524.01
48,433.31
0.3
0.5
–0.5
381.10
5302.17
12,470.49
7281.57
0.2
0.2
–0.1
0.5
5943.72
3966.96
31,431.89
21,970.81
0.0
0.8
1.8
0.2
YTD % Chg
–15%
0%
+15%
US $
EU € per
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.2288
0.0092
1.3921
0.3058
0.7876
0.0530
0.0076
1.1330
0.2491
0.6410
0.0432
149.9310
32.9180
84.8310
5.7123
0.2195
0.5658
0.0381
0.8138
Japan ¥ per 107.7000
132.3400
Britain £ per
0.7184
0.8826
Gainers
Encore Wire Corp
RoadrunnerTrans Sys
La-Z-Boy Inc
LivePerson Inc
WEX Inc
Navigant Consulting
Advance Auto Parts
Universal Insurance
Ingevity Corp
HealthStream Inc
The Finish Line
Brinker Intl
Comtech Telecom
Ruth's Hospitality
LSC Communications
DineEquity Inc
RR Donnelley
QuinStreet Inc
MSA Safety Inc
Fred's Inc
0.0067
Brazil R$ per
3.2663
4.0140
0.0303
4.5554
Canada $ per
1.2696
1.5600
0.0117
1.7674
0.3880
Mexico $ per
18.8539
23.1678
0.1750
26.2471
5.7620
Mexico $
2.5749
0.1738
0.0673
14.8504
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 27,916.64
Russell 2000
1531.84
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 563.96
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
20.02
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
–0.5
0.1
–0.2
–2.8
YTD % Chg
0.9
–0.2
3.8
81.3
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Daily
(Ticker) % Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.4205
$16.68
$10.4550
$0.1327
$4.5950
–2.9
+1.0
+0.8
–0.2
–0.6
day
$800
month
$1200
$1000
–1.2
0.3
–0.5
0.1
–0.2
0.2
–0.3
0.6
0.6
Daily
Close % Chg
$52.65
$3.87
$31.75
$14.35
$154.30
$20.40
$114.00
$31.10
$77.66
$25.39
$10.22
$34.98
$23.38
$24.00
$13.85
$67.03
$6.97
$13.38
$80.25
$3.33
10.4
9.9
9.9
9.5
9.0
8.9
8.2
8.2
7.5
7.3
7.1
7.1
6.8
6.7
6.5
5.7
5.3
5.0
5.0
4.7
Losers
Tile Shop Holdings
US Silica Holdings
Kraton Corp
Matson Inc
Vonage Holdings
Devon Energy Corp
LaSalle Hotel Prop
Newfield Expl
United Therapeutics
McDermott
Campbell Soup
Boyd Gaming Corp
Xperi Corp
Cardtronics PLC
Chesapeake Energy
Rent-A-Center
Kirkland's Inc
Avon Products
Garmin Ltd
Penn Natl Gaming
Daily
Close % Chg
$6.18
$25.15
$43.10
$29.80
$10.03
$30.57
$25.37
$23.20
$122.17
$7.34
$42.90
$35.01
$21.00
$23.41
$2.63
$8.48
$8.89
$2.71
$61.87
$27.16
–26.9
–18.2
–15.1
–13.3
–12.6
–11.8
–10.2
–9.8
–9.5
–7.0
–6.9
–6.9
–5.2
–5.2
–5.1
–5.0
–5.0
–4.9
–4.6
–4.5
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
+0.7
+0.1
–0.2
+0.1
+1.6
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Cross Currency Rates
US $ per
Daily
% Chg
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
$3.2370
$3.7400
$61.68
$1,332.10
$2.66
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7200
2300
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.29
0.52
0.80
1.56
3.34
5.76
4.50%
Bank Prime
1.50%
Federal Funds
1.90%
LIBOR 3-Month
4.31%
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.74%
10-year note
Yield: 2.95
2-year note
Yield: 2.27
5-year note
Yield: 2.68
6-month bill
Yield: 1.85
15-Year fixed mortgage
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
3.63%
1-Year ARM
ADDICTION IN AMERICA
ON THE FRONT LINES
BOSTON
Speakers Include:
Thursday, February 22
Streamed Live from 9:00 - 11:00 a.m. ET
The Northeast has been one of the regions
hardest hit by the nation’s opioid crisis.
The Washington Post will gather key elected
officials, medical experts and advocates for
a live news event in Boston about how New
England and the nation are grappling with the
deadliest drug epidemic in U.S. history.
Massachusetts
Gov. Charlie Baker (R)
Member of The President’s
Commission on Combating Drug
Addiction and the Opioid Crisis
Michael Botticelli
Executive Director
Grayken Center for Addiction,
Boston Medical Center
This event is part of Washington Post Live’s
“Addiction in America” series, which examines
the devastating effects of addiction on
communities across the country.
To watch the live stream or
see the full list of speakers:
wapo.st/opioidsboston
Joyce Craig
Mayor of Manchester,
N.H. (D)
Marty Walsh
Mayor of Boston (D)
Content from Optum:
Presenting Sponsor:
Supporting Sponsor:
Martha Temple
David F. Torchiana, MD
CEO
Optum Behavioral Health
President and CEO
Partners HealthCare
The green pages.
Did you know? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
NF407 6x1
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
Trump team releases first economic report
White House predicts 3%
GDP growth; economists
warn of overheating
BY
H EATHER L ONG
President Trump’s policies are
driving an economic turnaround
that puts him in the company of
transformative presidents such
as John F. Kennedy and Ronald
Reagan, White House economists
said Wednesday as they unveiled
their first “Economic Report of
the President.”
The report presents a highly
optimistic view of the economy’s
current condition and future
course, with growth predictions
that exceed most nonpartisan
economists’ expectations. Economists also caution the White
House’s efforts to juice growth
could cause the economy to overheat and then careen into a
downturn.
But the White House argues
Trump’s economy has already
outperformed expectations, noting 2.3 percent growth in the U.S.
gross domestic product last year.
And it argues the administration’s efforts to cut taxes and strip
regulations can push growth
rates far beyond recent levels.
“The Trump Administration is
the first since that of President
Ronald Reagan to see positive
economic growth exceed its firstyear forecast,” the White House
said when it released the 568page report.
Going forward, Trump’s team
predicts 3 percent GDP growth
for years to come. That’s short of
the 4 percent growth Trump
promised while campaigning,
but it would still be a marked
improvement from former president Barack Obama’s time in
office.
“We’ve restored economic policies to where a sensible, rational
country would put them,” said
economist Kevin Hassett, head of
Trump’s Council of Economic
Advisers.
For now, however, the Trump
economy is performing much as
it did during Obama’s final years.
Hiring during Trump’s first year
in office was slower than the
annual pace in Obama’s last several years, and the economic
growth rate was similar in 2017 to
what it was in 2014 and 2015. The
one noticeable change has been a
jump in business and consumer
confidence since the election,
according to nonpartisan economists.
Trump’s report repeatedly
casts the Obama economy as a
period of “stagnation” where the
former president “worsened the
wound” of the crisis with his
policies. In contrast, the Trump
economy is described as “reinvigorating,” “pro-growth” and visionary.
Every president since Harry
Truman in 1947 has put out an
annual economic report laying
out a vision for how to boost
growth and lower unemployment and making projections of
what’s ahead for the next decade.
Forecasting where the economy is headed is notoriously difficult, and both Republican and
Democratic
administrations
have been way off. Predictions
from George W. Bush and Obama
proved too optimistic. In 2011,
the Obama team predicted
growth would soar to 4 percent a
GDP growth forecast: White House vs. Federal Reserve
The Trump administration predicts 3 percent or more growth for years to
come. The Federal Reserve and private sector predict much lower growth,
especially after 2019.
4%
3.1
3.2
3.1
2.1
2
3
2.5
2%
1.8
0
2018
2019
Sources: White House, Federal Reserve
year in 2012, 2013 and 2014.
Growth didn’t come close to that.
Most independent economists
think Trump’s forecast is also too
rosy. The current expansion is
already nine years old, making it
one of the longest periods of
growth in U.S. history. Trump is
projecting he can beat the 1990s
expansion to usher in the longest
expansion ever.
Economists warn that there’s
been a dramatic change since the
1990s: America’s population is a
lot older now. Many baby boomers are retiring, which is dragging down growth. On top of
that, Trump wants to restrict
immigration. With fewer workers in the economy going forward, the United States could
struggle to match past growth
rates.
Macroeconomic Advisers, a
top forecasting company, predicts 2.7 percent growth this year
and 2.6 percent in 2019, but after
that, growth is expected to fall
2020
2021
THE WASHINGTON POST
back to 1.8 percent.
“The pretty solid growth we’re
showing over the next couple of
years is in part the result of the
boost from the Tax Cut and Jobs
Act, but that’s only a temporary
boost in growth,” said Ben Herzon, senior economist at Macroeconomic Advisers. “The only
way to get to 3 percent growth on
a sustained basis is faster growth
of the labor force or faster growth
of productivity. I just don’t see
that happening.”
Productivity has been stubbornly low in the United States
since the dot-com era, and that
slowdown has occurred in Europe and Japan as well. The
Trump team forecasts a large
jump in productivity as businesses use their tax savings to invest
more in new equipment, factories and technology.
Trump says he’s just getting
going. The report touts the benefits of the tax cuts. Based on the
latest totals, White House econo-
mists note “over 300 companies”
have announced bonuses, wage
increases and extra contributions to retirement accounts.
More than 4.2 million workers
are enjoying the benefits right
now, economists said, and Americans are starting to see the tax
savings in their paychecks.
Trump’s team said the economy could get a further boost from
more favorable trade agreements
and an infrastructure deal. The
White House is pushing lawmakers to pass legislation that would
revamp the country’s roads, waterways and other infrastructure,
though it faces a difficult path
through a divided Congress
The White House continues to
argue that the tax cut will pay for
itself with faster growth, but
nonpartisan economists disagree. Congress’ Joint Committee
on Taxation estimates the tax bill
would add at least $1 trillion to
the debt over the next decade,
even after accounting for some
extra growth.
A growing number of economists say a more likely course for
the U.S. economy is a boom in the
next year or two and then a bust.
They foresee all the extra spending in Washington and the deficit-financed tax cuts are likely to
cause the U.S. economy to overheat.
“We are prepared to risk the
whole economy for the sake of
one point of extra GDP,” said
economist Desmond Lachman at
an event last week at the rightleaning American Enterprise Institute. He sees rising risks, especially if inflation starts to rise
rapidly, forcing the Federal Reserve to increase interest rates
sharply in the next two years.
heather.long@washpost.com
Steps from home, o∞cer is shot dead trying to protect neighbor
SHOOTING FROM A1
who had “a history of domestic
incidents” in several jurisdictions.
The officer saved the woman as
workers at her home Wednesday
were changing locks in the aftermath of a violent Valentine’s Day
argument with her husband over
her plans to break up with him,
according to court records and
the county police chief.
The veteran officer and father
of four “saved her life by giving his
own,” said Prince George’s County
Police Chief Hank Stawinski.
Ramzziddin’s eldest son said he
was not surprised his father died
protecting someone else.
“It’s always the good ones who
die, isn’t it?” said the son, Eric
William Tyler Jr., who spoke from
North Carolina as he waited for a
sheriff’s deputy to pick him up
and take him to Maryland.
The suspect, identified as
Glenn Tyndell, fled in a black SUV
and was killed by two officers in
the Fort Washington area, Stawinski said. When Ramzziddin’s
stolen weapon was recovered,
shots had been fired from it, the
chief said.
Stawinski said a preliminary
investigation showed that Tyndell, 37, “should not have had a
firearm.” He had three open arrest
warrants for assault, police said.
Tyndell, a Metro mechanic, and
his wife had argued about the
potential split at Valentine’s Day
dinner, she told a judge in court
filings before being granted a
temporary protective order that
was still in effect as of Wednesday.
The couple was due in court for a
hearing next week over claims
MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
Prince George’s County police officers confer Wednesday near Crain Highway and Chadds Ford Drive in the Brandywine area, where
authorities say Glenn Tyndell shot off-duty officer Mujahid Ramzziddin, who was trying to help Tyndell’s estranged wife.
that Tyndell had been physically
violent and had access to firearms
and knives.
Tyndell drove to the neighborhood as the locks were being
changed, two law enforcement
officials said. He was threatening
his wife when Ramzziddin
stepped in and was fatally shot
outside the house in the 15000
block of Chadsey Lane near
Chadds Ford Drive, police said.
Ramzziddin, the 30th officer in
Prince George’s to die in the line of
duty, joined the department in
2004, after three years as a D.C.
police officer. The 51-year-old
Medal of Valor winner and Marine veteran was most recently
assigned to the department’s special operations division.
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan
(R) said in a statement that
Ramzziddin “made the ultimate
sacrifice in defense of his neighbors and community.”
In remarks Wednesday, State’s
Attorney Angela D. Alsobrooks
called for a renewed commitment
to reducing domestic violence in
the county, where she has worked
to bring more resources to women
seeking shelter and housing aid
before they file protective orders.
D.C.
WASTING ENERGY
START SAVING TODAY!
SAVE 20%
$O
PLUS
SALE
MONEY DOWN
INTEREST
FOR 12
PAYMENTS MONTHS!
ENDS FEBRUARY 28TH
We Offer
Military Discounts
Call NOW! Free In-Home Consultation!
Maryland: (301) 683-7873 D.C.: (202) 897-3107
Virginia: (703) 270-6050
Our promise to you is that you’ll LOVE our
People, Products, Process & Pricing.
Better homes begin with beldon.
Loans provided by EnerBank USA (1245 Brickyard Rd. Suite 600, Salt Lake City, UT 84106) on approved credit, for a limited time. Repayment terms vary from 30 to
138 months. Interest waived if repaid in 18 months. 16.73% fixed APR, effective as of 12/1/17, subject to change. Other restrictions may apply. Not valid with any other
offer or previous job. Offer expires 2/28/18. MHIC 121787, DCRA 420218000021, VA 2705116122.
“A gutless coward took the life
of a very important part of the
community,” she said at a news
briefing.
Of Ramzziddin, she said, “he
came out to save a neighbor and
died in his own neighborhood.”
Tyndell’s history of domestic
violence also included allegations
from his ex-wife. She was in court
in late January asking for protection for their three young children. She and Tyndell shared custody, and she told the court she
was fearful because she was told
Tyndell had recently “slammed”
his current wife to the ground in
front of one of his children.
Her protective order was denied because she “couldn’t meet
required burden of proof,” a court
spokesman said Wednesday.
Tyndell’s ex-wife declined to
comment through her attorney,
requesting privacy and time to
grieve. His widow could not be
reached Wednesday.
Throughout the morning, police cars lined the streets of the
Chadds Ford neighborhood while
a helicopter flew overhead. Officers from all over the county
rushed to the scene. By afternoon,
many lined the sidewalks along
Chadds Ford Drive in an informal
send-off for the fallen officer.
Tyler, Ramzziddin’s son, described his father in an interview
Wednesday as a “very honest guy”
who pressed the importance of
integrity on his children and colleagues.
His father — who converted to
Islam in 1997 and changed his
name in 1999 — enjoyed coaching
young people, in his personal life
and on the police force, his son
said Wednesday. He never missed
his son’s track meets or basketball
games.
“He wanted to make young
boys into young men,” Tyler said.
“And he wanted to make young
men into strong men.”
In addition to his wife, Tammi
Ramzziddin, and Tyler, Ramzzid-
din is survived by three more
children and two grandchildren.
One neighbor, Earline Harris,
said Wednesday that police had
visited Tyndell’s home often for
domestic disturbances.
“He has gotten into an altercation with a neighbor over some
small stuff,” said Harris, a retired
D.C. police officer. Harris teared
up, thinking about her fallen
“brother in blue.”
“My heart goes out to his family,” Harris said. She said she was
at work when she heard about the
shooting in her neighborhood.
Another resident of the neighborhood, Gwen Roberts, said she
saw news reports of the incident
and saw a photo of her house. She
looked out her bedroom window
and saw police cars and heard a
helicopter flying overhead.
She said she was shocked and
described the neighborhood as
“fairly quiet.”
“It’s really a nice neighborhood,” she said. “When the weather’s nice, people are at the pond,
people are jogging, walking their
dogs.”
In the hours after the shooting,
13-year-old Martrell Johnson recalled the advice he’d gotten from
Ramzziddin just the day before.
Martrell was collecting money for
the American Heart Association.
Ramzziddin gave him $10 and a
tip — to remember to say his name
— to improve his pitch.
He heard about the shooting
from his mother.
“Yesterday, I’m talking to the
man, he’s fully alive, and then my
mom tells me . . .” Martrell said,
his voice trailing off. “That’s how
crazy — that’s how fast your life
can end.”
lynh.bui@washpost.com
peter.hermann@washpost.com
ann.marimow@washpost.com
Jennifer Jenkins, Dana Hedgpeth,
Ellie Silverman, Rachel Chason and
Ovetta Wiggins contributed to this
report.
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
Kelly to
meet with
veterans
groups
Some advocates worry
that VA secretary
will be ousted
BY
E MILY W AX- T HIBODEAUX
White House Chief of Staff John
F. Kelly intends to meet with the
nation’s leading veterans advocates next week amid ongoing
anxiety that there is a desire by
some of President Trump’s political appointees to oust Veterans
Affairs Secretary David Shulkin,
according to people familiar with
the matter.
The impending meeting follows a private gathering Tuesday
of the top officials from 12 veterans service organizations (VSOs),
including the American Legion,
the Veterans of Foreign Wars and
Disabled Veterans of America.
These groups represent millions
of former and retired service
members and their families, forming one of Trump’s core
constituencies.
“At one point . . . cellphones
started ringing and the directors
of AMVETS, Legion, VFW and
DAV politely excused themselves
almost simultaneously to take the
calls,” said one person familiar
with the gathering. “Each of these
calls came from White House
meeting schedulers to establish an
appointment for VSOs to meet
together” with Kelly.
Kelly, a retired Marine Corps
general, has told Shulkin to stop
the drama and infighting at VA.
The White House did not respond
to messages seeking details about
his objectives for next week’s
meeting.
Kelly’s offer to host the meeting
comes as the troubled agency has
weathered weeks of negative publicity.
Shulkin, the only Obama-era
holdover in Trump’s Cabinet, was
accused along with a senior staff
member of misleading the agency’s ethics office about a taxpayerfunded trip to Europe last year. He
maintains he did nothing improper by having his wife join him and
accepting complimentary tickets
to a professional tennis match in
London. The staffer, Shulkin’s former chief of staff, was replaced last
week after announcing her retirement.
White House officials have told
Shulkin that his job is safe despite
the allegations, which were outlined in a report released last week
by VA’s inspector general.
The veterans organizations met
Tuesday with hopes of forming a
united front and to brainstorm
strategies for pushing back
against the Trump appointees
who seem, in their view, overly
focused on outsourcing veterans
health care. Of principal concern
is what they have characterized as
the outsize influence of a conservative group, Concerned Veterans of America, that advocates expanding care options beyond VA.
CVA is backed by Charles and
David Koch, billionaires with a
Organizations also
want to form a united
front and develop
strategies to push back
against Trump
appointees they think
are overly focused on
outsourcing health care.
deep interest in rolling back government bureaucracy. The group
has been one of VA’s most vocal
critics since the agency’s 2014
wait-time scandal was exposed. Its
profile has grown during the
Trump administration, with one
of its former senior advisers, Darin
Selnick, serving as veteran affairs
adviser inside the White House.
Dan Caldwell, CVA’s director of
policy, said it has not proposed the
wholesale transfer of VA’s services
to the private sector. “What we
support is giving veterans the
choice to access care in the community if they feel the VA isn’t the
best option for them,” he added.
Some veterans service organizations say they support Shulkin
because they see him as a stopgap,
someone who can prevent sending more care outside VA’s hospital
system.
emily.wax@washpost.com
Lisa Rein contributed to this report.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Trump associate’s firm has received $75,000 from RNC
Keith Schiller, a former
White House staffer, is
studying convention sites
BY
M ICHAEL K RANISH
A company run by Keith Schiller, who was one of President
Trump’s closest associates when
he abruptly left his job as director
of Oval Office operations in September, has received $75,000
from the Republican National
Committee under a contract to
assess security at possible 2020
GOP convention sites, according
to records and a party official.
The payments, including
$30,000 disclosed in a new filing
this week, put Schiller back in the
spotlight at a time when he may
be of interest to investigators
regarding his knowledge of intimate actions involving Trump.
Schiller served for more than a
decade as Trump’s bodyguard and
security chief and then served the
president in the Oval Office job,
which gave him unusual access.
His company’s work was confirmed by an RNC official who
spoke on the condition of anonymity to disclose details that are
not included in federal filings.
Schiller worked for Trump during a period that may be of interest to special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III and congressional investigators. Schiller accompanied
Trump during a 2013 trip to Moscow, and he delivered a letter
from Trump telling then-FBI Di-
rector James B. Comey that he
was being fired. Schiller has testified in private before a House
committee about his knowledge
of some Trump actions, but there
is no public indication that Mueller has sought to interview him.
Schiller’s attorney, Danny
Onorato, declined to comment,
and Schiller did not respond to a
request for comment.
“The president trusts Keith
Schiller implicitly,” said Michael
Caputo, a former Trump aide who
has remained friends with Schiller. For example, in asking Schiller
to deliver the letter firing Comey,
the president “realized the gravity of what he was doing and
turned to his closest aide and
friend.”
Most recently, Schiller, a former New York City police detective, has been cited in news accounts for his purported role as a
liaison during Trump’s alleged
affairs.
Stephanie Clifford, a porn star
known as Stormy Daniels, said in
an interview with In Touch magazine released last month that she
communicated with a Trump
bodyguard named “Keith” in
2006 to arrange a consensual
affair with Trump while he was
married to Melania Trump. The
president’s attorney, Michael Cohen, told the New York Times last
week that he paid $130,000 from
his personal funds to Clifford.
Cohen did not return a call requesting comment.
Karen McDougal, a former
Playboy Playmate, has said
she communicated with Schiller
during an affair with Trump, ac-
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Keith Schiller, then the director of Oval Office operations, prepares
to board Marine One on the White House South Lawn on Aug. 22.
cording to the New Yorker. The
magazine also said that the
“Keith” referred to by Clifford was
Schiller.
In November 2013, Schiller was
in Moscow with Trump, who was
in the city to attend the Miss
Universe pageant, which was produced by a Trump company.
Schiller said a Russian man
whom he did not know asked if he
would like five women to come to
Trump’s hotel room, according to
his testimony in November 2016
before the House Intelligence
Committee. Schiller told the man
that “we’re not interested” and
later joked about the offer with
Trump, according to people fa-
miliar with Schiller’s testimony.
Trump’s Moscow trip has generated intense interest because it
was referenced in the “dossier”
paid for by Hillary Clinton’s campaign, in which a former British
spy wrote that his sources
said prostitutes had visited
Trump at his room at the Moscow
Ritz-Carlton in 2013.
Sam Nunberg, who worked as
Trump’s political and public affairs adviser before he was fired
in 2015, said that Schiller “was a
loyal soldier to Mr. Trump. He
would take a bullet for Mr.
Trump, but he wasn’t a yes man
who would blindly do anything.”
Schiller, who told the House
committee that he sometimes
traveled six days a week with
Trump, transitioned to providing
security for the campaign when it
launched in 2015. During the
campaign, Schiller gave a rare
interview to a former high school
classmate, Rich Siegel, who posted it on Facebook. In the hourlong interview, conducted at
Trump Tower, a relaxed Schiller
recounted how he had traveled on
Trump’s retrofitted Boeing 757
and seen the billionaire’s lavish
lifestyle at close-up range. He said
Trump had been a good and generous boss.
Schiller said in the interview
with Siegel during the campaign
that “life has been good” and that
he had three residences, including one in Trump Tower.
At one point, Schiller told associates traveling with him on the
campaign plane in the fall of 2016
that there was no need to worry
about allegations being made by a
number of women about the candidate, according to a person familiar with the conversations.
In joining the White House,
Schiller was required to divulge
his finances. He said on his financial disclosure report that in 2016
he earned $160,000 in salary and
bonus from the Trump Organization, $70,000 from the Trump
campaign and $64,0000 from his
security consulting firm, KS Global Group. He made $43,000 from
his New York City police pension.
He had four bank accounts holding a total of between $66,003
and $166,001. The form does not
require that residences be listed.
Working in the White House
was not nearly as profitable. As
Trump’s director of Oval Office
operations in 2017, his annual
salary was $165,000. In September, Schiller announced he was
quitting. Several associates said
Schiller told them that he was
leaving for financial reasons.
Schiller had easy access to
Trump under the administration’s first chief of staff, Reince
Priebus. A Trump associate said
Schiller became disenchanted as
his access to Trump was limited
by Chief of Staff John F. Kelly.
However, a Schiller friend said
Schiller and Kelly remained cordial.
Shortly after leaving the White
House, Schiller returned to KS
Global Group, based in Boca Raton, Fla. The company’s RNC consulting contract has paid at least
five installments of $15,000, according to Federal Election Commission records, including one in
October, two in November and
two in January.
The report says only that Schiller was being paid for security
services, but the RNC official said
Schiller’s company “has been retained to provide security consultation for the RNC 2020 convention site selection process, which
is currently underway.” The official said the funds came from a
pool of money for convention
expenses. That account can accept up to $101,700 per donor a
year.
michael.kranish@washpost.com
David A. Fahrenthold, Carol D.
Leonnig, Joshua Dawsey and Alice
Crites contributed to this report.
Trump administration pulling back from key Obama-era Medicare goals
The Trump
The
administration
Health 202 is putting the
brakes on a key
set of goals
created under
President Barack
Obama to
dramatically reduce the cost of
the clunky and overpriced U.S.
health-care system.
The Centers for Medicare
and Medicaid Services (CMS)
says it’s no longer operating on
the aggressive timeline laid
out by the Obama administration
that increasingly seeks to
tie more Medicare payments to
the quality of care received by the
program’s beneficiaries. Obama’s
goal was to revamp the way
Medicare, the nation’s largest
health program, pays doctors
and hospitals so that providers
were encouraged to reduce
unnecessary or duplicative
services and better coordinate
patient care. That would be a
major shift for a U.S. health-care
system in which providers make
more money the more
treatments they offer, even if
such services are unnecessary or
even harmful.
In 2015, Sylvia Mathews
Burwell, Obama’s health and
human services secretary,
announced an ambitious goal for
Medicare: By the end of 2018,
half of all its payments were to be
tied to alternative payment
methods with wonky-sounding
titles — mechanisms such as
“accountable care organizations,”
“bundled payments” and
PAIGE
WINFIELD
CUNNINGHAM
“primary medical homes.”
They all aim to help doctors
improve the care they provide by
basing payments on certain
quality standards.
That’s no longer the goal, a
CMS spokesman told me last
week. Instead, the focus is on
ramping up a review of the
Obama administration’s
performance in this area. “The
Trump administration’s focus
has not been on a specific
targeted number by the previous
administration, but rather on
evaluating the impact of new
payment models on patients and
providers,” said CMS spokesman
Raymond Thor.
Health-care stakeholders told
me they’re still not exactly sure
how CMS plans to tackle the
task of improving Medicare
payments. That’s partly because
the agency is going through a
time of transition: HHS
Secretary Alex Azar is new to the
job, and CMS’s innovation center
is soon expected to get a new
leader, widely rumored to be
Adam Boehler of Landmark
Health.
The Trump administration
isn’t entirely backing away from
Medicare payment reforms —
but it may not be chasing them as
forcefully. CMS head Seema
Verma publicly acknowledges
that there need to be changes to
the way Medicare pays doctors
and hospitals — now
primarily done through a “feefor-service” model in which
providers are compensated per
test, procedure and clinic visit.
But in recent months, Verma has
been critical of some of the
Obama administration’s tactics
while also pulling back on some
of her predecessor’s projects.
In a Wall Street Journal op-ed
last fall — around the time CMS
formally requested input into
which payment models were
and weren’t working —
Verma suggested that some of
the Obama officials’ efforts made
it harder for providers to
participate and may even have
encouraged consolidation within
the health-care industry.
“We are analyzing all
innovation center models to
determine what is working and
should continue, and what isn’t
and shouldn’t,” Verma wrote.
The following month,
Verma spoke to a group of
health-care payers and providers
called the Health Care Payment
and Learning Action Network
(HCP-LAN), which Burwell
formed in March 2015 to support
CMS’s efforts and share ideas for
spreading payment changes
throughout the industry.
Verma didn’t try to undermine
the value of innovative new
Medicare payment reforms. But
she did lob a criticism at the
system, suggesting her
predecessors forged ahead with
new experiments without
sufficiently evaluating how they
performed.
“I like to think of our initiative
in terms of painting a house,”
Verma told attendees. “Typically,
repainting needs to occur every
few years, and before you
repaint, you need to strip out the
layers of paint from underneath
. . . unfortunately, CMS has been
applying new layers of paint
without taking this essential
step.”
In November, CMS did
partially cancel two programs
changing reimbursements for
joint replacement and cardiac
rehabilitation procedures. Under
the new approach, providers get
a flat payment covering the
duration of a procedure and
recovery. If their costs come in
under the fee, they can keep the
difference — if their costs exceed
the fee, they lose money.
But the agency is moving
forward on voluntary payment
experiments for other types of
health procedures. Patrick
Conway, who headed CMS’s
innovation center before
departing last fall, pointed to a
new program the agency rolled
out in January that allows
doctors to participate in
“bundled payments” for 32 kinds
of procedures, including major
joint replacements and spinal
fusion.
Conway acknowledged that
the Trump administration has
discarded the Obama-era goal of
reforming 50 percent of
Medicare payments by the end of
this year. But he said officials
currently at the top of HHS have
still expressed interest in the
idea overall.
“It’s not like the White House
has come out with a new number
as a goal,” Conway said. “But
Seema and others — Alex Azar —
have stated their belief that the
push for value-based payment
needs to continue.”
During the last few years of
Obama’s tenure, Burwell made it
a top priority to change Medicare
payments and sought to draw
more public attention to the
issue. She and her staff rolled out
a specific timeline, including a
goal of tying 30 percent of
Medicare payments to qualitybased models by the end of 2016,
an aim it achieved a full year
early.
Private insurers are
increasingly adopting valuebased payments — including
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of
North Carolina, which
Conway heads — but it’s still
Medicare that largely sets the
tone for the rest of the industry.
The government’s ability
to adopt these new approaches to
payments successfully is a crucial
factor in determining the future
of the U.S. health-care system.
By 2026, federal, state and local
governments will sponsor
47 percent of national health
spending, up from 45 percent
last year, according to a
projection released last week by
CMS.
“Medicare is really the critical
player in this,” said Sue Sherry,
deputy director for the advocacy
group Community Catalyst and a
member of HCP-LAN.
Sherry and others think that
for progress to continue, CMS
needs to give clear direction to
doctors, hospitals and other
providers on the types of
payments they can expect.
“You try to run a system with
these conflicting incentives, and
you have your feet in two
different canoes,” Sherry said.
“Momentum is so important.”
Medicare spending has grown
more slowly in recent years,
increasing an average of just
1.3 percent per person annually
since 2010 compared with
7.4 percent in the decade prior.
Conway credits much of
that decrease to payment
innovations. There are now
more than 1,000 accountable
care organizations in the public
and private sectors caring for
millions of patients around the
country. These “ACOs” are groups
of doctors, hospitals and other
providers that unite to deliver
coordinated, high-quality care
for their patients.
It’s a shift in the way doctors
and hospitals think, Conway
explained. Under the old system,
for example, a hospital would be
paid for filling every one of its
beds. These new payment models
instead reward hospitals if they
prevent hospital readmissions,
meaning, advocates hope, that
patients got better care to begin
with.
“If you were a CEO in a
hospital in the older world, you
wanted as many heads in your
beds as possible,” Conway said.
“In the new world, you want to
prevent as many people from
being admitted as possible,
because the finances have
shifted.”
paige.cunningham@washpost.com
Enjoy the Outdoors All Year!
SunSuites Sunrooms
SunSuites Sunroom
End of the Year Special
$
Ultra-Low
3” Step-In
2,500 OFF
ents
Paymw as
as lo 99
$1
Multifunction
Handshower
Winter Screen Room
Special
BUY NOW AND
$
SAVE
1,250
Fast Drain
Technology
KOHLER® LuxStone™ Bath Walls
KOHLER® Belay™ Hydrotherapy Walk-In Bath
Some restrictions apply
CALL FOR A FREE QUOTE
(703) 565-2375 (202) 816-8844 (301) 841-0161
202-869-1044 DC
703-468-4418 VA
301-841-8308 MD
Lifetime Warranty
MHIC #125450 • VA #2705 108835
*Limited time offer. Valid through February 28th, 2018, at participating dealers only. Not available in AK; HI; Nassau County, NY;
Suffolk County, NY; Westchester County, NY; and Buffalo County, NY. Also may not be available in other areas. $1,000 off average
price of KOHLER Belay™ Walk-In Bath. Dealer sets all prices and is responsible for full amount of discount. Cannot be combined
with any other advertised offer. Walk-in bath installed in as little as one day..
Locally Owned & Operated
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Thanks to the NSA officers
EDITORIALS
Is Mr. Trump serious about gun control?
If so, he should pursue a ban on ‘bump stocks’ with legislation, not regulation.
P
semiautomatic weapons to simulate the rapid fire of
illegal machine guns. “We cannot merely take
actions that make us feel like we are making a
difference,” said Mr. Trump. “We must actually make
a difference.”
That approach, though, is guaranteed not to
produce immediate action. The agency that regulates firearms, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives, made clear — first in 2010
and again in 2013 — that it does not have the legal
authority to ban bump stocks. An attempt to ban the
devices through regulation would prompt a battle
that would likely tie the issue up in court for years
and allow continued sales of bump stocks. No doubt
that’s the aim of the National Rifle Association,
which coyly suggested it supported a ban even as it
opposed legislation to bring it about.
If Mr. Trump is genuinely committed to banning
bump stocks, he should back legislation sponsored by
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) that would bar them,
In Va., the GOP gets
Medicaid religion
along with other devices that have been created to
circumvent the intent of federal gun laws. And he
should recognize that eliminating bump stocks falls
far short of a solution to the epidemic of mass
shootings. Semiautomatic, assault-style weapons —
like the one used without a bump stock at Florida’s
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School — continue
to pose a risk to public safety and should be banned or,
at the very least, subject to stringent regulation. That
a 19-year-old with a history of troubled behavior was
able to easily and legally acquire an AR-15 rifle
underscores the need for better controls.
Mr. Trump also signaled interest in legislation
that would strengthen the system of national background checks as well as raise the minimum age for
purchase of certain weapons. Congress should take
his cue and pursue measures, including pending
legislation on background checks, that would enact
these small reforms. Though not an adequate response to the students, it would be a start.
TOM TOLES
After years of blocking expansion,
some Republicans have an epiphany.
I
N REFUSING to expand Medicaid under the
Affordable Care Act for the past several years,
Virginia Republicans seemed intent on sticking
it to President Barack Obama and thenGov. Terry McAuliffe (D). In fact, they stuck it to
themselves, losing 15 seats in this past fall’s elections
for the House of Delegates, in most cases to
Democrats who promised to expand Medicaid. And
the GOP really stuck it to hundreds of thousands of
poor and mostly employed working Virginians,
especially in rural areas, who lack Medicaid coverage.
That message has now been received by some
Republicans in Richmond, but not all. In the House,
where the GOP clings to a 51-to-49 majority, a wave
of new thinking has prompted Republicans to back a
draft budget that would expand Medicaid to cover
an estimated 300,000 Virginians, albeit with some
conditions. In the state Senate, though, Republicans,
who also hold a paper-thin majority in that chamber,
seem convinced that they can continue to spurn
billions in federal funding and let indigent Virginians suffer the consequences.
Those consequences are considerable. In 2014, the
Urban Institute estimated that if Virginia expanded
Medicaid, it would incur $1.3 billion in costs over
10 years — but also gain $14.7 billion in federal
Medicaid funding, plus $6.2 billion in hospital
reimbursements.
In human terms, the beneficial impact of expansion would be enormous, as some influential Republicans have lately acknowledged. One is Del. Terry G.
Kilgore of rural Scott County, on the Tennessee
border, where, among a rapidly aging population of
22,000, more than 1,000 people would gain health
insurance under Medicaid expansion. “For my district, for my part of the state, it’s the right thing to
do,” said Mr. Kilgore, who chairs the House Commerce and Labor Committee.
Apparently looking for a political fig leaf, House
Republicans yoked their expansion blueprint to a
gratuitous requirement that Medicaid recipients,
including the 1 million or so existing ones, seek work
training — most are already employed — and
contribute to their coverage through private insurers. Even with those conditions, there’s no sign of
movement yet among Senate Republicans.
All but 18 states, including some with GOP
legislatures and governors, have already expanded
Medicaid. The logic of expansion is compelling: At
least 90 percent of the cost is borne by the federal
government. In the past, Republicans who opposed
Medicaid expansion warned that states would be left
holding the bag if Congress cut off aid. But Congress
hasn’t done so, and the Virginia House bill includes a
“kill clause” that would rescind expanded coverage if
the federal funds dried up. In the state Senate,
Republicans have run out of excuses for refusing to
help their neediest constituents.
Through a half-century and more, Billy Graham maintained his public standing.
M
their needs in ways they could understand and who
could, quite simply, be trusted.
America has been heavily influenced, even
shaped, by its preachers, from Jonathan Edwards to
Henry Ward Beecher and the televangelists of today.
Some fostered great and needed social change
(Northern Protestant churchmen and women created the abolition movement); others sought to impose
their will on a dubious nation (as in Prohibition). A
few were frauds or hypocrites and were eventually
discredited. But through a half-century and more,
Mr. Graham maintained his standing.
From the 1950s, when he filled big-city arenas
across the country with his upbeat, joyful revival
meetings, through his emergence as a world figure
who preached to thousands upon thousands and
was consulted by heads of state all over the globe,
including a series of American presidents,
Mr. Graham kept his message relatively simple,
which may be one reason it endured. He was never a
great hero of the political left or right, though he
took a stand fairly early in this country’s civil rights
movement against segregation, and spoke often, if
somewhat vaguely, on the need for social justice. (It
was in one of his presidential sessions that
Mr. Graham had what may have been his worst
moment, when the White House tapes caught him
going along with some of Richard Nixon’s maundering about Jewish influence in the media. The episode
was mortifying for a minister with a long history of
support for Jewish-Christian understanding.)
In 2005, Mr. Graham held his last full-fledged
crusade in New York, which had become a city with a
large and vibrant variety of evangelical Christian
believers. He drew nearly a quarter of a million
people over three days.
When he was young, Mr. Graham had a close
friendship with Charles Templeton, a fellow evangelist. The two eventually parted ways, with Mr. Templeton going on to what he saw as a more intellectual
and skeptical view of religion. Many years later, Mr.
Templeton recalled of his old friend, “I disagree with
him profoundly on his view of Christianity and think
that much of what he says in the pulpit is puerile
nonsense. But there is no feigning in him: he believes
what he believes with an invincible innocence. He is
the only mass evangelist I would trust. And I miss
him.”
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
A harvest of bad faith at the Haupt Garden
Gardens are never static, as horticulturalist Enid
A. Haupt knew so well. She also knew that a deal was
a deal. That’s why her lawyers engaged in detailed
correspondence with Smithsonian Institution leaders to establish a “garden for the ages” with an
invested endowment of $3 million to sustain the
eponymous space. While Adrian Higgins is rightfully
concerned with maintenance costs, as he wrote in his
Feb. 18 Arts & Style article “Not exactly a Garden of
Eden,” Haupt’s endowment exists for that purpose, a
point made by Haupt’s great-niece and former
Smithsonian Institution secretary S. Dillon Ripley
II’s daughter in their Feb. 18 Local Opinions essay,
“Hands off the Haupt Garden and Ripley Center.”
They underscored the Smithsonian’s legal obligation
to adhere to Haupt’s intent, and the absurdity of the
more than $2 billion master plan (revised with
I read with amazement the Feb. 17 Metro article
“Wrong turn cited in run-in with NSA,” about an
incident in which National Security Agency police
officers shot at a car traveling on a restricted-access
road leading to the NSA installation at Fort Meade.
The article said a great deal about Javonte Alhajie
Brown’s anger about what happened at the NSA gate,
but I saw no evidence of gratitude from Mr. Brown.
Despite the fact that those in the car did everything stupid that they possibly could have, including
making a U-turn and trying to leave, everyone in the
car is alive and well today (a “shrapnel” injury
notwithstanding). For that, they owe thanks to the
incredible professionalism and training of the individuals on duty at the gate that morning.
I’ll say it for them: Thank you. We are all grateful
for your service.
Bill Fenton, Alexandria
The nation’s user’s manual
In her Feb. 16 op-ed, “We have been defeated,”
Elizabeth Bruenig superbly explained that the ongoing slaughter of our nation’s young is something
that our nation “doesn’t intend to do anything
about.” But when she wrote that our unrestricted
gun culture is based in “the Constitution itself, the
closest thing we have to civil holy scripture,” she
accepted defeat based on a misconception of that
document’s place in our nation’s history.
The founding document of our nation is the
Declaration of Independence. It was accepted virtually unchanged by unanimous vote at the Continental Congress. If there was a “civil holy scripture,” it
was that declaration.
The Constitution, on the other hand, was adopted
only after much backroom haggling and much ill will
among various states. Many Founding Fathers had
reservations. (Patrick Henry denounced it as a threat
to liberty and opposed it until the day he died.)
Perhaps it’s time to recognize the Constitution for
what it is: a user’s manual for organizing a government. It has served us well, but we have made many
needed changes over the years. Many were bitterly
opposed, and some may have been a mistake that
had to be righted, but they were made and the nation
survived. Now is the time to make a needed change
in the types of weaponry one may legally possess.
It might be difficult, but probably not on par with
ending slavery or allowing votes for women. Let’s
just do it.
Peter M. Storm, Vienna
Not really in a forgiving mood
An evangelist with an ‘invincible innocence’
ANY YEARS ago, Robert Benchley, a celebrated humorist, essayist, film actor and
regular at New York’s Algonquin Round
Table, took time in an article to reflect on
misconceptions about his city, widely viewed in those
days as a cesspool of sin, gin and cynical sophistication. In truth, he wrote, the typical New Yorker goes
through life sharing many of the hopes, fears and
attitudes of the typical citizen of Peoria, Minneapolis
or Fresno. He is, wrote Benchley, someone “at whom
one does not look a second time, because there are so
many of him and, furthermore, because he would not
justify a second look . . . a composite of the smalltown qualities of every State in the Union.”
The Rev. Billy Graham, who has died at age 99,
must have had much the same insight when he
launched his “crusades” into the teeming cities of
mid-20th-century America: a realization that the
country was a good deal less jaded and materialistic
than many believed it to be, and that people
everywhere were seeking continuity with their past,
reassurance about the beliefs of parents and family,
and guidance for the future. Above all, perhaps, they
wanted someone who understood this, who spoke to
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
RESIDENT TRUMP had very little to say
about gun control in his first year in office,
even after 58 people were killed on the Las
Vegas Strip in the deadliest mass shooting in
modern U.S. history last October. But this week — in
the aftermath of the school shooting in South Florida
that claimed 17 lives and amid a rising student
movement for gun control — Mr. Trump signaled he
is open to modest gun-control measures, including a
ban on “bump stocks” and improved background
checks. We would like to believe that Mr. Trump is
sincere when he says he has been deeply affected by
recent events and wants to bring about change. But
his approach to one needed reform — banning the
bump stocks that were used to such terrible effect by
the Las Vegas gunman — raises questions about just
how serious he is.
Mr. Trump said Tuesday he has ordered the
Justice Department to issue regulations that would
prevent the devices that can be attached to legal
. THURSDAY,
dizzying and costly regularity by its Danish firm) for
the Smithsonian Quadrangle Historic District.
Lest it lose faith of donors and taxpayers, it’s time
the Smithsonian stood down on the problematic
master plan. As Commission of Fine Arts chairman
Rusty Powell outlined in a recent hearing on the
proposal, the Smithsonian should focus its efforts
and dollars on real needs: restoring the Castle and
incorporating the Arts and Industries Building into a
master plan. By doing so, it can also give planners
time to ensure the Smithsonian adheres to Haupt’s
intent, honors the historic and cultural significance
of the Quadrangle and duly adapts the garden to
today’s climatic challenges.
News pages:
MARTIN BARON
Executive Editor
CAMERON BARR
Managing Editor
EMILIO GARCIA-RUIZ
Managing Editor
TRACY GRANT
Managing Editor
SCOTT VANCE
Deputy Managing Editor
BARBARA VOBEJDA
Deputy Managing Editor
Editorial and opinion pages:
FRED HIATT
Editorial Page Editor
JACKSON DIEHL
Deputy Editorial Page Editor
RUTH MARCUS
Deputy Editorial Page Editor
JO-ANN ARMAO
Associate Editorial Page Editor
Anne Neal Petri, Washington
Vice Presidents:
JAMES W. COLEY JR......................................................................................Production
L. WAYNE CONNELL..........................................................................Human Resources
KATE M. DAVEY..................................................................................Revenue Strategy
ELIZABETH H. DIAZ ................................................. Audience Development & Insights
GREGG J. FERNANDES........................................................Customer Care & Logistics
STEPHEN P. GIBSON...................................................................Finance & Operations
SCOT GILLESPIE .......................................................................................... Engineering
JED HARTMAN.......................................................................................Client Solutions
KRISTINE CORATTI KELLY...................................................Communications & Events
JOHN B. KENNEDY.................................................................General Counsel & Labor
MIKI TOLIVER KING........................................................................................Marketing
SHAILESH PRAKASH...............................Digital Product Development & Engineering
The writer is president of the
Garden Club of America.
The Washington Post
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071 (202) 334-6000
Regarding the Feb. 18 editorial “Arrogance and
dissembling at VA”:
How nice of Veterans Affairs Secretary David J.
Shulkin to offer to “pay back” some of the more than
$4,000 he and his aide, Vivieca Wright Simpson,
took from the VA. And Ms. Simpson’s promise to
retire is a really nice gesture. I’m sure most veterans,
including me, will feel forgiving toward a few more
overpaid VA bureaucrats/political appointees who
felt it was perfectly justified to take desperately
needed funds from the primary health-care provider
to this nation’s many, many wounded, sick and aged
veterans.
And we are especially pleased to know that
Mr. Shulkin and his aide live under a completely
different set of rules than those set up for us lesser
beings who are often punished severely for providing inaccurate information on our yearly means-test
documents that determine our co-pay level. Thank
God justice has prevailed.
Norman Michael Harman, Harpers Ferry, W.Va.
Colombia’s exploited flower workers
The Feb. 11 front-page article “In rose beds, money
blooms,” about the flower industry in Colombia, was
obviously timely. While the article detailed the
growth of the floriculture industry in Colombia as a
legitimate alternative to narcotics trafficking, it
didn’t relate the abysmal working conditions for
Colombians in the industry.
With its presence in Colombia, my organization,
Witness for Peace, monitors and highlights such
issues. During the high season, many flower workers
have to endure 12-to-22-hour shifts six days a week.
Two-thirds of workers have health problems because
of exposure to pesticides and toxins (many of which
are prohibited in the United States). Women —
60 percent of the workforce — are often forced to
take pregnancy tests and use birth control as
conditions of employment. And workers can’t mobilize to address these problems because they’re
denied the right to collectively organize, bargain and
strike. This is all despite promises made under the
United States-Colombia Free Trade Agreement that
workers’ rights would be protected.
Congress should designate Feb. 14 as International Flower Workers’ Day and make the U.S. government ensure fulfillment of the free-trade agreement’s labor rights provisions, bringing the production of flowers for Valentine’s Day closer in line with
the warmth and compassion the holiday evokes.
Walker Grooms, Washington
The writer is D.C. program manager at
Witness for Peace.
Mr. Trump’s DACA delay was a ruse
The Feb. 18 editorial “Mr. Trump to the ‘dreamers’:
Drop dead” accurately characterized President
Trump’s position on “dreamers.”
The need for legislation on Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals was caused by the president
himself, who delayed termination of the DACA
program until March, supposedly to give Congress
time to act. Yet, each time Congress has presented
him with a bipartisan agreement that includes
protecting the dreamers, he has scuttled it.
Mr. Trump never really intended to defer to Congress or to provide any protection for the dreamers.
The delay to March was just a ruse. He apparently
didn’t have the courage to take the heat for unilaterally terminating the DACA program last year. Now
he will try to place most of the blame on Congress for
failing to act. Thus, as usual, the president is acting
duplicitously and is deflecting attention from, and
failing to take responsibility for, his own meanspirited, uninformed and misguided views.
David L. Hutner, Chevy Chase
Letters to the editor: letters@washpost.com
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
E.J. DIONNE JR.
It’s about saving lives,
not waging culture wars
Y
ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Rev. Billy Graham at New York’s Madison Square Garden in 1957.
MICHAEL GERSON
Consumed by grace
B
illy Graham was easily the
most influential evangelical
Christian of the 20th century
— a man at home in the
historical company of George Whitefield and John Wesley.
But this would be hard to tell from
reading his sermons, which even close
associates described as ordinary. His
books are hardly more memorable. So
what was it that compelled hundreds
of millions of people to attend and
watch his evangelistic “crusades” and
to find personal transformation in his
words?
Graham’s global ministry was the
triumph of complete sincerity, expressed with a universally accessible
simplicity. “There is no magic, no
manipulation,” said publicist Gavin
Reid. “The man just obviously believes
what he says.” Graham could display
charisma in meetings with presidents
and queens. In the pulpit — the place
of his calling from an early age — he
was nearly transparent, allowing a
light behind him to shine through him.
He had the power of a man utterly
confident in some other, greater power.
American fundamentalism from the
Scopes monkey trial to the 1950s was
traumatized,
marginalized
and
inward-looking. Graham’s achievement was to turn the face of fundamentalism outward toward the world
— shaping, in the process, a distinct
religious movement. His evangelicalism was more open and appealing,
more intellectually and culturally engaged. Graham took his fellow evangelicals from the margins to the center
— from the sawdust trail to the White
House. He managed to be winsome
without being compromised. And
evangelical Christians felt grateful to
have a public representative who —
through his integrity and consistency
— brought credit to their faith.
There was initial resistance to
Graham’s work among mainline Protestants. As Graham announced more
and more crusades, theologian Reinhold Niebuhr was not amused.
Graham, Niebuhr warned, would “accentuate every prejudice which the
modern, ‘enlightened’ but morally sensitive man may have against religion.”
Graham responded: “I have read nearly everything Mr. Niebuhr has written
and I feel inadequate before his brilliant mind and learning. Occasionally I
get a glimmer of what he is talking
about . . . [but] if I tried to preach as he
writes, people would be so bewildered
they would walk out.”
More than 2 million people walked
into Graham’s 16-week New York crusade in 1957. And Graham was joined
one night at Madison Square Garden
by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
There was also resistance among
some fundamentalists.
I grew up in a theologically conservative Calvinist church in which the
Reformation was refought on a weekly
basis. The man who would become my
father-in-law — blessed with a fine
voice — decided to sing in the choir at a
Graham crusade that came into town.
Afterward, he was hauled in front of
the elders of the church to be questioned. They were upset at this participation because Graham — when people would come forward during the
altar call — would refer them back to
their home churches, including Catholic churches.
In fact, the tone of Graham’s public
voice changed over the years, becom-
ing more ecumenical, less harsh and
nationalistic. Some of this he credited
to broader exposure to the world. “I
think now when I say something, ‘How
is this going to sound in India? How is
it going to sound to my friends in
Hungary or Poland?’ ” But this also
involved a theological shift. “I used to
believe that pagans in far countries
were lost if they did not have the gospel
of Christ preached to them,” he reflected in 1978. “I no longer believe that.”
His faith in the essentials of the
Christian gospel, however, never
changed. And it made him into a busy
builder of institutions that still carry
the Christian message. Graham was
instrumental in the founding of Christianity Today, the Billy Graham Center
at Wheaton College and GordonConwell Theological Seminary. He was
a major supporter of the National
Association of Evangelicals and Fuller
Theological Seminary.
As in any long, public life, there were
low moments, particularly when
Graham came into contact with political figures such as Lyndon B. Johnson
and Richard Nixon. But he also had a
powerful, positive influence in the life
of the young George W. Bush and
countless others. And this much is
clear. For Graham, faith was not the
instrument to some other end; it was
the prize itself. He had no ulterior
motives. No trace of cynicism. He was
consumed by grace and spoke in
gratitude.
For a Christian, it is not a small
thing for a man to talk about Jesus
Christ, face to face, to more people
than anyone has ever done. Or to see
how remarkably God used his servant
Billy, just as he was.
michaelgerson@washpost.com
GEORGE F. WILL
Sunshine, faith and naivete
A
sked in 1972 if he believed in
miracles, Billy Graham answered: Yes, Jesus performed
some, and there are many “miracles around us today, including television and airplanes.” Graham was no
theologian.
Neither was he a prophet. Jesus said
“a prophet hath no honor in his own
country.” Prophets take adversarial
stances toward their times, as did the
20th century’s two greatest religious
leaders, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
and Pope John Paul II. Graham did not.
Partly for that reason, his country
showered him with honors.
So, the subtitle of Grant Wacker’s
2014 book, “America’s Pastor: Billy
Graham and the Shaping of a Nation,” is
inapposite. When America acquired
television and a celebrity culture, this
culture shaped Graham. Wacker, of
Duke University’s Divinity School, judges Graham sympathetically as a man of
impeccable personal and business probity.
Americans respect quantification,
and Graham was a marvel of quantities.
He spoke, Wacker says, to more people
directly — about 215 million — than any
person in history. In 1945, at age 26, he
addressed 65,000 at Chicago’s Soldier
Field. The 1949 crusade in Los Angeles,
promoted by the not notably devout
William Randolph Hearst, had a cumulative attendance of 350,000. In 1957, a
May-to-September rally in New York
had attendance of 2.4 million, including
100,000 on one night at Yankee Stadium. A five-day meeting in Seoul in
1973 drew 3 million.
Graham’s effects are impossible to
quantify. His audiences were exhorted
to make a “decision” for Christ, but a
moment of volition might be (in theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s phrase) an
exercise in “cheap grace.” Graham’s
preaching, to large rallies and broadcast
audiences, gave comfort to many people
and probably improved some.
Regarding race, this North Carolinian
was brave, telling a Mississippi audience
in 1952 that, in Wacker’s words, “there
was no room for segregation at the foot
of the cross.” In 1953, he personally
removed the segregating ropes at a
Chattanooga, Tenn., crusade. After the
Supreme Court’s 1954 school desegregation ruling, Graham abandoned the
practice of respecting local racial practices. Otherwise, he rarely stepped far in
advance of the majority. His 1970 Ladies’
Home Journal article “Jesus and the
Liberated Woman” was, Wacker says, “a
masterpiece of equivocation.”
The first minister with a star on
Hollywood’s Walk of Fame for his
preaching was an entrepreneurial evangelical Christian who consciously emulated masters of secular communication
such as newscasters Drew Pearson,
Walter Winchell and H.V. Kaltenborn.
Wielding the adverbs “nearly” and
“only,” Graham, says Wacker, would
warn that all is nearly lost and the only
hope is Christ’s forgiveness.
Graham frequently vowed to abstain
from partisan politics and almost as
frequently slipped this self-imposed
leash, almost always on behalf of Republicans. Before the 1960 election,
Graham, displaying some cognitive dissonance, said that if John F. Kennedy
were a true Catholic, he would be a
president more loyal to the pope than to
the Constitution but that he would fully
support him if elected.
Graham’s dealings with presidents
mixed vanity and naivete. In 1952, he
said he wanted to meet with all the
candidates “to give them the moral side
of the thing.” He was 33. He applied
flattery with a trowel, comparing
Dwight Eisenhower’s first foreign policy
speech to the Sermon on the Mount and
calling Richard Nixon “the most able
and the best trained man for the job
probably in American history.” He told
Nixon that God had given him, Nixon,
“supernatural wisdom.” Graham should
have heeded the psalmist’s warning
about putting one’s faith in princes.
On Feb. 1, 1972, unaware of Nixon’s
Oval Office taping system, when Nixon
ranted about how Jews “totally dominated” the media, Graham said, “This
stranglehold has got to be broken or this
country is going down the drain.” He
also told Nixon that Jews are the ones
“putting out the pornographic stuff.”
One can reasonably acquit Graham of
anti-Semitism only by convicting him of
toadying. When Graham read transcripts of Nixon conspiring to cover up
crimes, Graham said that what “shook
me most” was Nixon’s vulgar language.
Of the My Lai massacre of Vietnamese
civilians by U.S. troops, Graham said,
“we have all had our My Lais in one way
or another, perhaps not with guns, but
we have hurt others with a thoughtless
word, an arrogant act or a selfish deed.”
Speaking in the Washington National
Cathedral three days after 9/11, he said
“it’s so glorious and so wonderful” that
the victims were in heaven and would
not want to return.
Graham, Wacker concludes, had an
attractively sunny personality and was
“invincibly extrospective.” This precluded “irony” but also “contemplativeness.”
georgewill@washpost.com
ou have perhaps heard the joke
about the liberal who is so
open-minded that he can’t even
take his own side in an argu-
ment.
What’s less funny is that on gun
control, liberals (and their many allies
who are moderate, conservative and
nonideological) have been told for years
that if they do take their own side in the
argument, they will only hurt their
cause.
Supporters of even modest restrictions on firearms are regularly instructed that their ardent advocacy turns off
Americans in rural areas and small
towns. Those in favor of reforming our
firearms laws are scolded as horrific
elitists who disrespect a valued way of
life.
And as the mass killings continue, we
are urged to be patient and to spend our
time listening earnestly to the views of
those who see even a smidgen of action
to limit access to guns as the first step
toward confiscation. Our task is not to
fight for laws to protect innocents, but to
demonstrate that we really, honestly,
truly, cross-our-hearts, positively love
gun owners and wouldn’t for an instant
think anything ill of them.
What is odd is that those with extreme
pro-gun views — those pushing for new
laws to allow people to carry just about
anytime, anywhere — are never called
upon to model similar empathy toward
children killed, the mourning parents
left behind, people in urban neighborhoods suffering from violence, or the
majority of Americans who don’t own
guns.
Depending on the survey, somewhere
between 58 percent and 68 percent of us
live in households without guns. But no
one who belongs to the National Rifle
Association is ever told to prove their
respect for our way of life. Rarely is it
pointed out that the logic of the gun
lobby’s position is to create a world in
which everyone will need a gun, whether
we want one or not. (“Arm the teachers!”
“Arm the students!”) I reported on
Lebanon’s civil war in the 1980s, and I
can assure you that a heavily armed
country is not an ideal (or safe) place to
live.
The students at Marjory Stoneman
Douglas High School, an institution that
suffered the worst effects of our inaction
on guns, have not gotten the memo that
they are supposed to shut up, and may
they be blessed for this. You can tell their
angry outspokenness is having an impact, and not only because President
Trump has taken modest steps to suggest
he hears the message. More telling is
that some of the same right-wingers who
demand deep respect for gun culture
have shown no scruples about trashing
the kids.
Bill O’Reilly was so upset at the
attention their protests are drawing that
he accused the media of “promoting
opinions by teenagers who are in an
emotional state and facing extreme peer
pressure in some cases.” The condescension is revolting, and never mind that
without emotionalism and peer pressure
to conform, O’Reilly’s former employer,
Fox News, would go out of business.
Former representative Jack Kingston
(R-Ga.) doubted the capacity of these
students to think or act for themselves.
“Their sorrow can very easily be hijacked
by left-wing groups who have an agenda,” he said on CNN. Young people who
disagree with him can’t possibly have
minds of their own.
No wonder the foes of gun sanity are
worried. On Wednesday, the students
and supporters gathered at the state
Capitol in Florida shouting “vote them
out!” — a day after the state’s Republicanled legislature voted down a ban on many
semiautomatic guns and large-capacity
magazines.
How come only one side of the
supposed culture war on guns is required to exude respect for the other?
Because the culture-war argument is
largely a gimmick pushed by the gun
lobby as a way of demonizing its opponents. None of us who endorse stronger
gun laws wants to disrupt anybody else’s
way of life. And none of the measures we
are proposing would do that.
What truly alarms the gun lobby is that
many steps to curb the scourge of gun
violence enjoy broad support, from those
who own guns as well as those who don’t.
A Quinnipiac poll released on Tuesday,
for example, found that 97 percent of
Americans favor background checks for
all gun buyers. While the survey showed
the highest level of approval for background checks in some time, it is not an
outlier. Background checks have long
been embraced by 85 to 95 percent of us.
Quinnipiac, by the way, also showed that
66 percent of voters support stricter gun
laws, up from 47 percent in December
2015.
I am all for Americans reaching out
across our cultural divides. But if we
wait to act until our cross-cultural
understanding is complete, many more
who might have been saved will die.
ejdionne@washpost.com
CHARLES LANE
On guns, the court will decide
S
upreme Court Justice Clarence
Thomas waded into the postParkland debate on Tuesday —
with an opinion denouncing what
he sees as the high court’s insufficient
support for the right to keep and bear
arms.
The lower federal courts, Thomas
charged, have been guilty of a “general
failure to afford the Second Amendment
the respect due an enumerated constitutional right,” and the Supreme Court, by
failing to check this trend, is treating the
Second Amendment as “a disfavored
right.” The latest example, Thomas protested, was the court’s refusal to hear an
appeal by Californians who already own
guns but seek to overturn that state’s
10-day waiting period to buy more.
Jarring as his words sounded at this
moment, Thomas’s timing reflected the
quirks of the court’s schedule rather
than anything deliberate on his part.
Still, the juxtaposition is a stark
reminder of two realities: First, survivors of the massacre in Florida and
other gun-control advocates are up
against a powerful movement; second,
even if the Parkland shootings lead to
tougher laws — state or federal — the
final word could belong to the Supreme
Court.
A decade ago, the justices handed the
gun-rights movement a historic victory,
declaring by a 5-to-4 vote in District of
Columbia v. Heller that the Second
Amendment protects an individual’s
right to firearm possession.
Like other constitutional rights, this
one was not unlimited; the court said
there might be room for “prohibitions
on the possession of firearms by felons
and the mentally ill,” or laws forbidding
the carrying of firearms in schools or
government buildings.
This obviously left a lot unresolved. Is
there a constitutional right to bear arms
for self-defense outside the home? By
what standard, exactly, should federal
courts decide whether any particular
gun law is constitutional?
For the most part, however, the justices have allowed lower federal courts
to fill in those blanks. And those courts,
in turn, have generally interpreted Heller as permitting state and local gun
regulations. One exception came in
2016, when the Supreme Court summarily vacated a ruling by Massachusetts’s
highest court upholding that state’s ban
on nonlethal stun guns.
The Supreme Court’s reluctance to
weigh in again reflects the fact that,
generally, only blue states enact restrictive laws in the first place. There are
consequently few conflicts among the
regional circuit courts of appeal for the
justices to settle.
In practical terms, this means that the
states — red and blue — have been free
to pursue their separate approaches, as
long as no one tries to prohibit gun (or
stun-gun) ownership outright.
There’s a certain rough wisdom to
that. What Thomas wants, though, is for
the Supreme Court to rein in the lower
courts — to nationalize a broad individual right to own guns and to require that
any limitations face heightened judicial
scrutiny, just as, say, restrictions on
speech must do.
“If a lower court treated another right
so cavalierly,” he complained in the
opinion, “I have little doubt that this
Court would intervene.”
And he has half a point. Having
placed the right to gun possession on the
same plane as the other Bill of Rights
guarantees, it is a trifle inconsistent for
the justices to leave the precise definition of that right to others.
Obviously — painfully so, after Parkland, and Las Vegas, and Newtown —
guns present unique dangers, as the
court acknowledged in Heller.
Yet that argues for more guidance
from the institution that produced that
opinion as to what regulations the Constitution does and does not allow, not
less.
Four justices must vote to hear a case;
though only Thomas affixed his name to
Tuesday’s opinion, he is probably not
alone in his views. Justice Samuel A.
Alito Jr. wrote a vigorous denunciation
of the Massachusetts stun-gun ban in
2016, and Justice Neil M. Gorsuch joined
Thomas last year when the latter dissented from the court’s refusal to hear a
challenge to California’s ban on carrying
a loaded handgun in public.
Thomas seems unable to persuade the
court’s other two conservatives, Chief
Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice
Anthony M. Kennedy, to join his project.
Like Thomas, both voted with the majority in Heller; unlike him, perhaps, they
are not eager to engage in repeated
constitutional analyses of blue-state gun
laws, each case potentially more politically fraught than the last.
A change in the Supreme Court’s
hands-off approach may require a
change in Supreme Court personnel.
The current lineup can’t last forever.
Kennedy is 81 and just completed his
30th year on the court. Justice Ruth
Bader Ginsburg, a dissenter in Heller, is
84. If either leaves before 2021, President Trump — “The right to keep and
bear arms protects all our other rights,”
he said in 2016 — would nominate the
replacement.
lanec@washpost.com
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PRESIDENTS’
DAY
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
sa
l
e
final days
-plus-
-plusl
18 MONTHS
S A V E FR
REE* ZERO
%
55
DELIIVERY
INTEREST*
On Purchases of $1199 or more with your
Marlo Furniture credit card made between
1/29/18 and 2/28/18.
18 equal monthly payments
required.
BUY ANY
-
GET FREE
DELIVERY
-plus$300 IN FREE
FURNITURE
*
FURNITURE & SLEEP GALLERY MARLOFURNITURE.COM
ROCKVILLE, MD
725 Rockville Pike
(301) 738-9000
ALEXANDRIA, VA
5650 Gen. Washington Dr.
(703) 941-0800
LAUREL, MD
13450 Baltimore Ave.
(301) 419-3400
FORESTVILLE, MD
3300 Marlo Lane
(301) 735-2000
FREDERICKSBURG, VA
LIQUIDATION CENTER
4040 Plank Road
540-785-2635
*Free local delivery with minimum purchase of $1199 or more. Financing offer applies only to single-receipt qualifying purchases. No interest will be charged on promo purchase and equal monthly payments are required equal to initial promo purchase
amount divided equally by the number of months in promo period until promo is paid in full. The equal monthly payment will be rounded to the next highest whole dollar and may be higher than the minimum payment that would be required if the purchase
was a non-promotional purchase. Regular account terms apply to non-promotional purchases. New accounts subject to credit approval. $300 free furniture must be claimed at time of mattress set purchase. See store for details.
KLMNO
METRO
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
High today at
approx. 12 a.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
53 51 48 46°
°
°
°
54°
Precip: 70%
Wind: NE
7-14 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
In 1935, George Gershwin
found his perfect “Porgy”
in Howard University voice
teacher Todd Duncan. B3
House GOP leaders try to
sell Medicaid expansion
by tying it to the Trump
administration. B8
Journalist Helen Sloane
Dudman drew attention to
her husband’s 40-day
captivity in Cambodia. B6
Md. weighs
bill calling
for consent
education
“Inside are the powers that be. Outside are the powers that ought to be.”
Rep. Jamie B. Raskin (D-Md.), referencing the Capitol as he spoke to a crowd of student protesters
Joins other states looking
at having public schools
address sexual violence
BY
B
SU
District
settles
in police
shooting
VICTIM’S FAMILY
TO GET $3.5 MILLION
M ICHAEL A LISON
C HANDLER
Officer who killed
motorcyclist on paid leave
As sexual harassment allegations continue to dominate headlines, exposing scandals that have
touched Hollywood stars, pop
singers and gymnastics gold medalists, the issue has seeped into
conversations among students in
the nation’s schools.
“It’s in our world. We talk
about it a lot,” said Maeve
Sanford-Kelly, an eighth-grader
at North Bethesda Middle School.
So she thought it was weird that
they never talk about it in her
health classes.
Her mother, Maryland Del. Ariana B. Kelly (D-Montgomery),
agreed with her. Together they
came up with a way to change
that — through a bill that would
require public schools to provide
age-appropriate instruction on
the meaning of consent and respect for personal boundaries.
In a House committee hearing
last week in Annapolis, 13-yearold Maeve testified in support of
the bill, which was approved by
an education subcommittee Tuesday.
“Why don’t our schools teach
us that this is not how we treat
people?” she asked. “We cannot
spend one more day allowing
people to grow up and continue
this culture of predatory behavior.”
In the past few years, amid
reports of widespread sexual violence on college campuses and a
The District has reached a
$3.5 million settlement with the
family of Terrence Sterling, the
unarmed motorcyclist who was
fatally shot in 2016 by a D.C.
police officer during an attempted arrest for
reckless driving.
The settlement in the
wrongfuldeath lawsuit
comes
four
months after
an internal re- Sterling
view by the
D.C. police concluded that Officer
Brian Trainer should not have
pulled his gun and was not in
danger when he fired at Sterling.
The department ruled the shooting unjustified.
On Wednesday, Mayor Muriel
E. Bowser (D) said in a statement
that the city had sought to “illuminate what went wrong.”
“When something bad happens, we keep the public’s trust by
looking into what went wrong
and taking steps to make things
right,” Bowser said. “In the tragic
death of Terrence Sterling, a family lost a beloved son and brother,
and thus we have a duty to bring
some sense of closure to his
CONSENT CONTINUED ON B3
STERLING CONTINUED ON B5
BY
Metro
financing
deal gains
momentum
PHOTOS BY BONNIE JO MOUNT/THE WASHINGTON POST
Hundreds of students
protest gun violence
Hurdles include Hogan’s
objection to open-ended
funds, less federal money
BY
R OBERT M C C ARTNEY
Maryland Del. Maggie L.
McIntosh was stunned. The veteran lawmaker, who chairs the
powerful House Appropriations
Committee, had just heard nearly 90 minutes of testimony in
which people who typically disagree were all on the same side.
Corporate executives and
union leaders. Chamber of commerce presidents and environmentalists. Civic leaders from
both the Washington suburbs
and Baltimore. All favored giving
Metro more state money.
“I can’t believe there’s nobody
opposing this bill,” McIntosh (DBaltimore City) said at the end of
a hearing in Annapolis last week.
The unanimity was a sign of
the political momentum in
Maryland, Virginia and the District propelling what would be a
landmark deal to provide permanent, dedicated funding for the
regional transit system.
Metro revenue and governance bills enjoyed favorable receptions in three key committee
hearings in Annapolis. Maryland
Gov. Larry Hogan (R) is resisting
some key provisions, but his
team is in active negotiations
with Democratic lawmakers in
hope of achieving progress.
In Richmond, both the full
House and Senate passed separate
METRO CONTINUED ON B2
BY
A LLYSON C HIU
Daniel Gelillo had just returned home
from school when the news flashed on his
TV screen. It had happened again. A
gunman had walked into classrooms and
opened fire, this time in Florida.
“When the videos of the shooting from
inside the school came out, the first thing
I said was ‘Enough is enough,’ ” the senior
from Richard Montgomery High School
in Rockville said.
Gelillo took to Facebook and called on
other Montgomery County students to
leave school Wednesday morning and
venture to the U.S. Capitol to rally for
legislation that would aim to curb gun
violence. Maybe, he and fellow student
organizers thought, 150 of their peers
would show up.
Montgomery County
pupils walk from Md.
to White House, part of
wave of rallies across U.S.
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP:
High school students hold up
signs outside the White House.
Andrea Bisk, left, a junior at
Albert Einstein, participates in
the walkout. Montgomery Blair
High School students head
toward the Capitol.
But when Olivia McCarren, a BethesdaChevy Chase High School senior and one
of the organizers, emerged from Union
Station, hundreds of students had already gathered, and more were arriving.
“It’s really incredible to look behind
you when you’re leading the march and
see maybe thousands of kids walking
behind you. It was crazy,” the 17-year-old
said.
The demonstration was one of a flurry
of student-led protests across the country
after last week’s shooting at Marjory
Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., which left 17 people dead and
sparked a surge of student activists calling
for stronger gun control. This week alone,
students have walked out of schools in
Florida, Illinois and Pennsylvania.
P ERRY S TEIN
It was supposed to be a day like
any other for Amanda Alexander.
The District’s chief of elementary
schools ran 3½ miles on the
treadmill and arrived at work
with plans to visit two schools
and meet with some of her
deputies.
But then Mayor Muriel E.
Bowser (D) summoned Alexander
in the morning with a startling
question: Would she be willing to
run the entire D.C. Public Schools
system?
Chancellor Antwan Wilson
was being forced to resign, and
Bowser needed someone immediately to take charge for the rest of
the school year.
Alexander accepted and, by
late Tuesday afternoon, became
interim chancellor of a system
engulfed in two scandals, one
involving graduation policy and
the other the school lottery.
“I was surprised because it
Victim was targeted
because he belonged to
a rival gang, man says
BY
R ACHEL W EINER
she left the chancellor’s post in
2016, according to a Bowser administration official not authorized to discuss the matter publicly. But she was passed over for
Wilson, who led the District’s
schools for just one year and
resigned this week after revelations that he skirted the city’s
competitive lottery system so his
daughter could transfer to a highperforming school. Deputy Mayor for Education Jennifer Niles,
ALEXANDER CONTINUED ON B5
MS-13 CONTINUED ON B4
PROTEST CONTINUED ON B2
wasn’t something I was expecting, but I am excited to make sure
that we stay the course here,”
Alexander said in an interview
Wednesday. “I am very capable of
keeping things in the right direction.”
With Alexander, the District
gets a veteran of its schools system and a leader whose career has
focused on instructional and curriculum development.
Alexander had applied to
replace Kaya Henderson when
Leader in
Va. MS-13
testifies
on slaying
Carlos Otero Henriquez told a
friend he was a member of the
18th Street gang. On Facebook,
he posted photos of himself
flashing his gang’s signs. When
members of the rival MS-13 gang
noticed, the 18-year-old from
Leesburg, Va., was targeted for
murder.
“We’re always patrolling the
area to make sure it’s clean of
enemies,” Wilmar Javier Viera
Gonzalez, a top Virginia MS-13
leader recently testified in Alexandria federal court. He showed
jurors a notebook he kept full of
MS-13 codes, nicknames and
rules. Among the gang’s policies:
To move up, “you must kill a
rival.”
Before his arrest, Viera Gonzalez commanded a Northern Virginia chapter of MS-13 called
Virginia Locos Salvatrucha and
was in charge of the state for a
larger group called the “East
Coast Program.”
Now he has testified against
six former subordinates, joining
two other MS-13 members involved in the murder who hope
their cooperation will get them
out of prison before their own
deaths. The trial is expected to
conclude this week.
In court last week, Viera Gonzalez, who formerly held the title
Interim schools chief aims to finish year smoothly
BY
K EITH L . A LEXANDER
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
Md. students march to White House to protest gun violence
PROTEST FROM B1
To generate more visibility,
Montgomery County students
walked from their high schools to
the nearest Metro station. For
those at Montgomery Blair High
School in Silver Spring, the walk
was more than two miles down
Colesville Road, a frenetic sixlane thoroughfare. Montgomery
County police stopped traffic and
made sure students did not stray
from the lane they were told to
walk in.
Holding a double-sided sign
she made from a cardboard box,
Blair freshman Sarah McKinzie
said walking emphasized the students’ willingness to “go the longest way” to make sure their
schools stay safe. As motorists
honked in support, hundreds of
students cheered and waved colorful handmade signs.
“I am incredibly proud of all
the students protesting today,”
McKinzie said. “My heart is swelling that we can be part of something like this that can help to
bring about change and bring
about awareness of this cause.”
Once at the Capitol, students
chanted, “Enough is enough,” and
held signs that read, “How many
more?” and “We will not be next!”
On more than one occasion, Capitol Police had to remind students
to stay within a designated area.
Montgomery County school officials said that about 1,000 students walked out of county high
schools including Richard Montgomery, Bethesda-Chevy Chase,
Blair, Albert Einstein, Northwood
High School and Wootton High
School.
Students were addressed by
Rep. Jamie B. Raskin (D-Md.),
who spoke to the crowd twice,
moving from one side of the
BONNIE JO MOUNT/THE WASHINGTON POST
High school students
protest outside the
U.S. Capitol.
Hundreds of students
staged a walkout after
last week’s shooting at
a school in Florida.
throng to the other, because of its
size. Raskin compared the students’ efforts to the civil rights
movement and protests against
the Vietnam War.
“Inside are the powers that be,”
Raskin said, referencing the Capitol. “Outside are the powers that
ought to be, and you are the
powers that are soon to be in the
United States of America.”
Although the Capitol was the
protest’s intended final destination, students decided to walk for
more than half an hour under the
blazing sun to the White House.
While some took breaks — sitting on the ground or park benches — and others refueled at refreshment kiosks on the Mall, the
majority pushed on. Their voices
rang out, piercing the sounds of
traffic and attracting the attention of pedestrians.
Rebecca Helm, a biology professor, said she heard the students chanting from inside her
office at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History.
“I am so inspired by these
students,” said Helm, who is on
leave from the University of
North Carolina at Asheville. “This
generation has a lot of guts.”
The students were told they
would receive unexcused absences for participating in the walkout, said Derek Turner, a Montgomery County Public Schools
spokesman. In some other states,
including Texas, students faced
suspension for participating in
protests.
Albert Einstein sophomore
Sofia Hidalgo said that even
though her school’s administrators urged students to stay on
campus, she believed the protest
was a place where “real learning”
could happen.
“You take what you learn in
your history books, and you make
[history] yourself,” she said. “We
need to be pushing ourselves to
not just be learning inside the
classrooms but to take it to action.”
Before they left school, Hidalgo said, she gathered Sharpies for
people to write “Don’t shoot” on
the fronts and backs of their
hands. At the protest, they held
their hands aloft — the inked
words visible. Although a majority of the students aren’t old
enough to vote, Hidalgo said,
they have the power of their
voices.
“We can tell people we are the
ones that are dying, we are the
ones getting shot,” she said. “We
are the ones that are being affected by this every day, and it is our
government’s job to protect us
because that is what they are here
for.”
allyson.chiu@washpost.com
Sarah Larimer and Donna St. George
contributed to this report.
Enthusiasm for Metro leader has garnered support for historic funding deal
METRO FROM B1
bills that would give Metro earmarked funding. The District,
which is strongly supportive of
Metro, is expected to go along
with whatever the states decide.
Crucial details remain to be
decided. There is no consensus
on how much money Metro
would get, what management
and labor reforms would be required, whether Northern Virginians’ taxes would increase,
and whether an increased federal contribution must be part of
the package.
And the Trump administration cast a shadow over the
otherwise sunny outlook by saying it wants to reduce federal
funding for Metro.
Still, the events in Maryland
and Virginia made clear that
Metro is closer than ever to
gaining a significant, guaranteed
stream of revenue. Since its
founding in 1967, the agency has
been the only major transit system in the nation to lack such
financial support.
“The jurisdictions are aligning
for the first time in 50 years,” said
Maryland state Sen. Brian J.
Feldman (D-Montgomery), chief
sponsor of one of the funding
bills.
Several factors account for the
encouraging prospects. One is
the nearly universal respect accorded Metro General Manager
Paul J. Wiedefeld for the changes
he has instituted regarding management, safety and reliability
since taking over the system in
late 2015.
“We have a new leader who
has done a great job,” said Virginia Del. Timothy D. Hugo (Fairfax), chairman of the House Republican Caucus.
Another element is the growing acceptance among politicians outside the Washington
region that Metro is vital to the
area’s economy and thus to the
prosperity of Virginia and Maryland.
“Metro is extremely important
to the vibrancy of our commonwealth, just like the port is,” said
Virginia Del. S. Chris Jones
(R-Suffolk), referring to the harbors at Hampton Roads, which
have received substantial state
support.
That point has been driven
home by Amazon.com’s desire to
build its second North American
headquarters on a site with good
public transit. (Amazon founder
and chief executive Jeffrey P.
Bezos owns The Washington
Post.) Northern Virginia, Mont-
THE DAILY QUIZ
PostPoints members can enter for
the chance to win a pair of tickets to
Cornelius on March 7 at 9:30 Club.
What is the artist’s given name?
(Hint: Sign in to your account for the answer.)
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
SALWAN GEORGES/THE WASHINGTON POST
A healthy Metro
system is key to the
prosperity of Virginia
and Maryland,
politicians say.
“Metro is extremely
important to the
vibrancy of our
commonwealth,” says
a Virginia delegate.
“The
jurisdictions
are aligning
for the first time
in 50 years.”
Democratic
Maryland state
Sen. Brian J. Feldman
gomery County and the District
are on the Seattle-based retail
company’s shortlist of 20 locations for HQ2 and its 50,000
jobs.
“Surely we will not get the
Amazon headquarters if we allow Metro to wither on the vine,”
Del. Richard C. “Rip” Sullivan Jr.
(D-Fairfax) said.
Finally, the region’s business
leaders have forged an unusually
large and strong alliance to lobby
for increased Metro funding. In
the latest sign of business support, six major companies joined
the MetroNow coalition backing
the campaign: Capital One, Marriott, Hilton, MedStar Health,
Exelon and Washington Gas.
The companies and business
groups also have joined with
other civic organizations, including environmental groups such
as the Coalition for Smarter
Growth and the Southern Environmental Law Center.
“Our growing membership is
showing its strength at the right
time,” said MetroNow campaign
manager Clare Flannery.
Despite the optimism, significant hurdles remain. Perhaps the
biggest is Hogan’s insistence on
limiting the increased funding to
four years. Both bills in Virginia,
as well as the Democratic-backed
ones in Maryland, call for permanent dedicated funding.
Metro and its supporters say
the distinction is important, because only a guaranteed stream
of revenue will allow Metro to
MEMBER EXCLUSIVES
borrow on financial markets at
favorable interest rates.
Hogan, however, opposes an
open-ended pledge of funds.
“The governor’s plan is not a
blank check,” spokesman Doug
Mayer said. “He is not going to
turn over unlimited funds to an
agency that has been known
more for its failures than its
successes.”
In another potential obstacle,
the total contributions agreed
upon by the three jurisdictions
may fall short of the additional
$500 million a year in dedicated
funding that Wiedefeld says is
necessary to ensure reliability
and safety.
Metro and its backers want
each jurisdiction to contribute
its share based on an existing
Metro funding formula, which is
based on population, number of
stations and similar factors. Under it, Maryland would contribute $167 million, Virginia
$154 million and the District
$179 million.
However, the bills being considered in Maryland would provide $125 million. Business
groups and others are pushing
hard to raise that to $167 million,
but it’s not clear whether they
will be successful.
In Virginia, a key issue is tax
increases. The House approved a
bill offering $105 million a year
— with no tax increases. The
Senate’s version provides the full
share of $154 million but includes new taxes on hotel stays
and real estate transactions in
Northern Virginia.
Virginia House leadership has
ruled out tax increases, although
there may be support for setting
a floor for regional wholesale
gasoline taxes. That could yield
$17 million or more for Metro on
top of the $105 million, for a total
of $122 million.
The District is considering
dedicating three-quarters of a
penny per dollar of its sales tax to
help meet its obligation to Metro.
It has given up seeking a regionwide sales tax to support the
transit agency because of opposition from Virginia and Maryland. But D.C. Council Chairman
Phil Mendelson (D) has objected
that the proposed regional funding formula is unfair to the city.
Wiedefeld said it is crucial to
get the full $500 million from the
three jurisdictions, because the
White House has signaled it
wants to reduce the federal government’s contributions.
“The key message is we’ve got
to stick to the $500 million
across the board,” Wiedefeld
said. “We may need to backfill” to
make up for a lower federal
subsidy, he said.
The Trump administration
last week proposed reducing the
federal subsidy to Metro from
$150 million to $120 million in
the next fiscal year. The White
House budget office also said
federal support to the transit
agency needs to be “lessened”
over the “long term”; the federal
subsidy program for Metro is set
to expire after 2019.
Given the federal government’s position, another possible
stumbling block is Hogan’s insistence that Maryland would contribute more money for Metro
only if the federal government
increases its contribution. Democrats, business groups and other Metro supporters see that as
unrealistic.
Hogan’s spokesman defended
the governor’s position while
noting that negotiations are continuing.
“It is bare bones commonsense that we put pressure on the
federal government to pay their
fair share,” Mayer said. “What’s
really important is the governor
has been leading on the issue . . .
and he’s going to continue to do
that.”
A key player in procuring
federal funding is Rep. Barbara
Comstock (Va.), the only Republican to represent a congressional jurisdiction that includes
a Metro station. She said Friday
she is “confident” that Congress
will restore the full $150 million
for Metro for the next fiscal year.
Asked about extending and
increasing the federal subsidy in
later years, as she has proposed
in her own Metro bill, Comstock
said only that changes would be
necessary to have a chance of
succeeding.
“I think if we have the reforms,
it’s going to be a lot easier for me
to make that case,” Comstock
said.
Such changes should include
restructuring the board to make
it more “businesslike” and saving
money on pension and overtime
costs, she said.
A requirement for governance
and labor revisions as a condition for getting extra money is
also an issue in the state legislatures, especially Virginia.
The House bill in Richmond
would shrink the 16-member
Metro board to a “reform board”
of four or five members at first,
and later create an eight-member board. It also calls for limiting the agency’s annual growth
in operating costs to 2 percent
and adopting a “right-to-work”
provision for any Metro projects
solely within Virginia.
The less-restrictive Senate bill
calls for effectively shrinking the
Metro board to eight by restricting the participation of the eight
alternate members. It backs Wiedefeld’s commitment to 3 percent annual growth in the operating budget and does not include the labor provision.
In Maryland, proposed governance changes include requiring the state secretary of transportation or their representative
to serve as a Metro board member, and to strengthen the role of
the Metro inspector general.
It will be a daunting task to
work out these differences in
Annapolis and Richmond in the
relatively short time allotted.
Virginia lawmakers must resolve
the differences between their
two competing bills by the scheduled close of the General Assembly session March 10.
Maryland has more time — its
session lasts until April 9 — but
its legislation cannot conflict
with what Virginia approves if
the deal is to work. The D.C.
Council meets year round, so its
calendar is not an issue.
Nonetheless, the progress has
lifted the hopes of Metro and its
backers that dedicated funding is
on the way.
“Clearly there’s a sense that
something has got to happen,”
Wiedefeld said.
robert.mccartney@washpost.com
DID YOU KNOW?
A Real Tweet: Free Tickets to The Fabulous Thunderbirds Save Big on Tickets to Washington National
Opera: Don Carlo at The Kennedy Center
on March 21 at Pearl Street Warehouse
For over 30 years, The Fabulous Thunderbirds have been the quintessential American band.
The group’s distinctive and powerful sound, influenced by a diversity of musical styles,
manifested itself into a unique musical hybrid via such barnburners as “Tuff Enuff” and
“Wrap It Up.” Co-founder Kim Wilson, the sole original member, still spearheads the group.
“We now incorporate a mixture of a lot of different styles… We’re much higher energy than
we were before.” See details at washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Events & Contests.
Family ties fray and unravel in Verdi’s spectacle of forbidden passion,
political intrigue and shattering betrayal set at the height of the Spanish
Empire. More than 20 years have passed since WNO last staged this grand
masterpiece in four acts, and now a solid-gold cast heralds its return in this
stunning new production. See details at washingtonpost.com/postpoints,
Coupons & Discounts.
Not a PostPoints member yet?
It’s free. Sign up and get rewarded.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
Washington’s key contribution to ‘Porgy and Bess’
LOC AL D I GE S T
THE DISTRICT
In February 1936,
the famed
composer George
Gershwin came
to Washington.
He was here to
John
perform with the
Kelly's
National
Washington Symphony
Orchestra, but
when he met reporters at his
hotel, Gershwin said he had
some other business to take care
of: He wanted to thank
Washington for the “loan” of an
opera singer named Todd
Duncan.
Duncan was the Howard
University voice teacher who,
four months earlier, had
debuted the role of Porgy in
“Porgy and Bess” on Broadway.
It’s a role Kevin Deas will sing
Saturday at the Music Center at
Strathmore in a concert
presentation by the National
Philharmonic. Soprano
Marlissa Hudson is portraying
Bess. The performance will
include the Duke Ellington
School of the Arts concert choir.
Duncan gave the opera a
Washington connection.
Gershwin had spent more than
a year assembling the cast for
“Porgy and Bess,” which is set in
a black community in coastal
South Carolina. As a 1935 article
in The Washington Post put it:
“Through night clubs, cotton
clubs, yeah-mans and cabarets,
he searched for colored men and
women who could be depended
upon to sustain an opera about
Negroes, based on blues and
spirituals.”
The hardest role to fill was
the most important: Porgy. Then
he heard Duncan’s audition.
Years later, Duncan described
that audition to an interviewer:
“The paradox is that I sang an
old Italian song, ‘Lungi dal caro
bene,’ by Secchi. Now I say
paradox because here was a
Negro singing for a Jew and
singing an old Italian aria of the
eighteenth century, auditioning
for an opera whose site was to
be in South Carolina.”
Gershwin was bowled over
and offered the baritone the job
on the spot. Duncan wasn’t so
sure. He was an opera singer.
Gershwin had gained fame for
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Todd Duncan debuted the role of Porgy in “Porgy and
Bess” on Broadway. When the show came to Washington,
he protested the National Theatre’s segregation.
Tin Pan Alley pop songs,
lightweight stuff. Plus, Duncan
was well established at Howard
and with the private voice
students he taught in his home
studio at 1600 T St. NW.
It was only after hearing
more of the new opera’s music
that Duncan was convinced.
Of its pre-Broadway stint in
Boston, a Post critic wrote: “Its
hectic jumblings of
mythological, Afro-religious and
American folklore elements,
permeated with Gershwinion
harmonies, seasoned with
typical Gershwin musical
comedy interludes and with a
Negro cast, scored a success
down East by the sheer audacity
and merit of its exotic and
irrational entertainment.”
New York critics weren’t sure
what to make of what Gershwin
called a “folk opera.” Several
panned it. It closed after 124
performances.
A national tour followed,
ending in March 1936 with a
week of performances at
Washington’s National Theatre.
This was a whites-only house,
meaning African Americans
would not be allowed to see an
opera that featured an entirely
black cast.
Duncan and the soprano
playing Bess, Anne Brown,
protested, refusing to perform
unless the audience was
integrated.
Negotiations ensued with the
theater’s management. What if
blacks were allowed to
Wednesday and Saturday
matinees? No, said Duncan.
How about if African Americans
sat in the balcony?
“I have too many friends at
Howard University who take
baths every day and are clean,”
Duncan responded. “They don’t
smell, and they are very
intelligent, and they can sit
beside anybody.”
The theater finally relented.
Interracial audiences were
allowed to buy tickets, which
ranged from balcony seats at
85 cents a pop to seats in the
orchestra at $2.75.
And after the run? The
National went back to its
segregated ways. It wasn’t fully
integrated until 1952.
Duncan went on to an
esteemed career, performing
around the world and teaching
generations of singers here in
Washington, at his house on
T Street and, later, a house on
Upshur Street.
“He was generous with his
students, and he was generous
with me,” said Duncan’s
grandson, Charles Todd
Duncan, 69, a journalist who
lives in St. Louis. “I was always
allowed into his studio. I had a
specific set of rules: I had to
knock, and I had to be
absolutely quiet.”
The young Duncan would lie
under the grand piano and
listen.
In the summer, the Duncan
family would leave the city
behind for their house at
Arundel-on-the-Bay, a resort
south of Annapolis.
“Frequently when we were in
the car, he would without
provocation start singing in full
operatic tone,” Duncan
remembered. “And it was never
amazing, because he did it
frequently, but, still, you
listened. You can’t have an opera
singer in the front seat belting
out ‘Porgy and Bess’ without
paying attention to that.”
Todd Duncan died in 1998. He
was 95.
“On his last day, he had a
voice student in the waiting
area of his studio, waiting for
his morning lesson,” his
grandson said. “And my
grandfather was upstairs in his
bed, dead. He had died
overnight and not been
discovered. . . . He died with his
boots on.”
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/johnkelly.
Md. law would require students learn about consent
CONSENT FROM B1
still-growing #MeToo movement,
state lawmakers and educators
are grappling with how to shape a
future generation that will not
repeat the same mistakes. Many
say that waiting until freshman
orientation sessions in college,
when the topic of consent is
increasingly taught, is too late to
introduce such foundational concepts of respect and setting
boundaries.
This year, at least two dozen
states are considering legislation
that would incorporate sexual
violence prevention into middle
and high school curriculums, or
sooner. Bills introduced in New
Jersey, Missouri, Oklahoma and
Michigan are among those that
would require or allow teachers
to address the issue of requesting
and recognizing consent before
engaging in sexual activity. In
Maryland, a companion bill in the
Senate was approved unanimously in committee on Tuesday and is
expected to move to the Senate
for a vote on Thursday.
“Clearly this is an issue of our
time and this is a huge problem.
Here is an answer to the question,
‘But what do we do?’ ” said Chitra
Panjabi, the president and chief
executive of the Sexuality Information and Education Council of
the United States (SIECUS), a
Washington-based nonprofit that
advocates for comprehensive sex
education and has been tracking
this legislation.
Panjabi’s organization, with
help from Tarana Burke, the activist who first conceived of the
#MeToo movement, announced a
campaign last November called
#TeachThem to highlight the lack
of education around sexual assault and harassment in U.S.
schools. It published a tool kit to
help people advocate for change
in their local schools, which has
since
been
downloaded
1,000 times, Panjabi said.
Advocates say teaching about
consent from an early age — the
idea that they have a right to
consent or not, and an obligation
to obtain consent — can help
students learn to build healthy
relationships and prevent sexual
violence.
Many advocates say that students should be taught the principle of affirmative consent, or “yes
means yes,” for any kind of sexual
activity. The approach, which is
used as a legal standard on many
college campuses, teaches that
silence does not mean yes and
challenges gender roles that pre-
sume men are sexually aggressive
and women should be responsible for setting boundaries.
In Maryland, if the law is
passed, schools would be required to introduce the concept
of consent at least once in middle
school and once in high school.
Local school boards could decide
how new curriculum requirements would be implemented in
age-appropriate ways.
Amid reports of sexual
violence on college
campuses and the
#MeToo movement,
state lawmakers
are grappling with
how to shape a
future generation that
will not repeat the
same mistakes.
California in 2015 was the first
state to require that students
learn about consent, part of a
broader law aimed at teaching
about healthy relationships. Last
year, Virginia lawmakers passed a
law permitting but not requiring
schools to teach about consent in
high school while requiring ageappropriate instruction about
preventing dating violence and
sexual abuse.
Sex education remains a highly
polarizing issue in many communities. Opponents of consent education are often concerned that it
would condone or encourage sexual activity among young people.
Many politicians prefer that the
topic be addressed by local school
boards or left to parents.
Some men’s groups also have
opposed policies that mandate
consent education, saying that
such lessons often paint a negative portrait of men as perpetrators of sexual crimes, and do not
include examples of how men can
also be victims.
Kelly, the Maryland bill’s sponsor, president of the women’s
legislative caucus, has been at the
forefront of discussions about
sexual harassment in Annapolis
this session and has led efforts to
update the legislature’s antiharassment policy.
Kelly said she was at first uncertain about introducing her
consent bill statewide because
she anticipated controversy. Her
initial proposal, which she introduced last year, focused only on
changing the curriculum in
Montgomery County. But with
urging from student advocates,
she broadened it to include all
school districts in the state.
She got a strong reception. The
bill passed in the state’s House
last year but stalled in the Senate.
A year later, Kelly said a greater
understanding of what consent
education is exists and, because
of the #MeToo movement, why it
matters. Montgomery County already incorporated the concept
into its Family Life and Human
Sexuality curriculum starting
this school year.
In many states, as in Maryland,
young people are leading efforts
to advocate for changes to the
way their teachers and schools
are addressing sexual violence.
Last year, the Nevada Youth
Legislature, a body of 21 appointed students who have authority to
propose legislation, succeeded in
getting a bill passed that would
require public schools to teach
about consent.
“Young people are really the
changemakers,” said Esther
Warkov, co-founder of the advocacy group Stop Sexual Assault in
Schools. “Parents aren’t really
that aware of the magnitude of
the problem, but students know
firsthand what they are experiencing.”
Research shows that many
children and teens experience
sexual violence.
In a national survey, 42 percent
of female rape survivors said they
were under 18 when they were
first raped, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Twenty-eight percent of male
survivors said they were first
raped when they were 10 or
younger.
Sexual crimes or harassing behavior often occur on school
property. Twenty-one percent of
middle school students reported
that they experienced unwanted
physical touching on school
grounds, according to a 2014
study from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Warkov became painfully
aware of this issue when her
daughter was allegedly raped
while on an overnight field trip
with her Seattle high school.
Warkov said consent education
policies only scratch the surface
of what schools need to do to
create safe spaces for students.
Schools, like universities, are
covered under Title IX laws that
require schools to protect students from sexual harassment,
though they rarely report crimes
or acknowledge they have a problem, she said.
Her organization launched a
#MeTooK12 campaign in January
to encourage students who have
been harassed or assaulted while
at school to speak out.
In Annapolis last week, Maeve
was joined by several other students to advocate for the bill.
One, a female student from
Wheaton High School in Silver
Spring, testified that when she
was 13 she played with a boys’
soccer team and every time she
got knocked over, someone would
reach down to help her up, then
touch her body in a different
place.
Her attempts to say no were
not enough, she said. But she
thinks schools can help set those
boundaries.
“We need to be able to teach
young children what can be right
and what can’t be,” she said.
michael.chandler@washpost.com
Officer wounded in
accidental shooting
A U.S. Park Police officer was
shot and wounded Wednesday
morning while searching a house
in Northwest Washington,
according to authorities.
Police said in a statement that
an officer’s firearm “was
unintentionally discharged.” The
incident occurred about 7 a.m. in
the 4900 block of Kansas Avenue
NW in Petworth.
The statement was not clear as
to whether the injured officer
accidentally shot himself or was
struck from a bullet fired from
another officer’s weapon. A
department spokesman declined
to elaborate on the statement,
saying the investigation is
continuing.
The wounded officer was
taken to a hospital. Police said he
was struck in the lower
extremities. Other than
describing him as stable, police
did not provide a condition.
Sgt. James Dingeldein, the
spokesman for the Park Police,
said only that the search warrant
stemmed from a previous
investigation.
— Peter Hermann
Evacuation at building
near White House
The New Executive Office
Building, next to the White
House, was evacuated
Wednesday morning on a report
of a suspicious vehicle nearby,
according to the U.S. Secret
Service.
The incident started about
8 a.m. near the building, which is
on 17th Street NW, between
Pennsylvania Avenue and
H Street. Police closed part of
17th Street until the Secret
Service cleared the vehicle about
9 a.m. Some parts of
Pennsylvania Avenue and
Lafayette Square were also closed
to pedestrians.
At 9:22 a.m., the Secret Service
said in a Twitter post that
explosives experts had “cleared
the suspicious vehicle.”
— Dana Hedgpeth
Man pleads guilty
to fatal shootings
A District man pleaded guilty
Wednesday to two counts of
second-degree murder while
armed in the shootings of his two
housemates two years ago at
their rooming house in Northeast
Washington.
David Bright, 31, pleaded
guilty in D.C. Superior Court to
fatally shooting Clifton Francis,
51, and David Watkins Jr., 45,
who lived with Bright in the 500
block of 58th Street NE.
Prosecutors say Bright walked
into the home Feb. 18, 2016, and
later fired at Francis. Bright then
turned the gun on Watkins.
— Keith Alexander
MARYLAND
Governor announces
plans for 911 texting
Gov. Larry Hogan (R)
announced plans Wednesday for
a “text to 911” system that will
allow residents to send
emergency responders messages
of up to 160 characters — but no
photos or video.
The system is aimed at people
who are deaf or hard of hearing,
have a speech impediment or are
in an emergency situation where
it is easier to text than make a
phone call.
More than 70 percent of all 911
calls come from cellphones,
according to Federal
Communications Commission
data cited by the governor’s
office. In 2015, the state started a
pilot 911 texting program at the
Maryland School for the Deaf in
Frederick County.
The contract to install the
technology statewide begins
March 1, officials said.
— Justin Wm. Moyer
Two teens charged
with making threats
Two Maryland teenagers have
been charged with making
threats and are accused of talking
about bringing guns to school.
The St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s
Office said it received a call
Friday about two Leonardtown
High School students who were
discussing a recent school
shooting. Police said the teens
were overheard discussing
bringing guns to school and how
they were too smart to get
caught.
Deputies said they learned
that one teen had access to
numerous firearms and had
made posts on social media.
The two teens, ages 15 and 16,
were arrested and charged with
threats of mass violence.
Authorities said a person
connected to the teen had a
federal firearms license. A search
warrant found that numerous
weapons were in a place that
would be accessible to the
juvenile. As a result, a 39-year-old
man from Leonardtown was
charged with reckless
endangerment and allowing
access to a firearm by a minor.
— Associated Press
LOTTE R I E S
VIRGINIA
Results from Feb. 21
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Tue.):
Lucky Numbers (Wed.):
DC-4 (Tue.):
DC-4 (Wed.):
DC-5 (Tue.):
DC-5 (Wed.):
7-7-4
6-3-2-1
4-8-4-8-1
0-5-1
6-8-7
0-2-8-8
8-7-7-3
3-8-4-4-6
8-7-5-4-3
Day/Pick-3:
5-2-3
Pick-4:
1-7-0-4
Cash-5:
8-11-13-17-20
Night/Pick-3 (Tue.):
4-8-5
Pick-3 (Wed.):
6-4-9
Pick-4 (Tue.):
9-2-2-6
Pick-4 (Wed.):
8-1-8-4
Cash-5 (Tue.):
1-3-14-20-21
Cash-5 (Wed.):
6-17-28-29-34
Bank a Million:
4-5-12-21-24-38 *35
MULTI-STATE GAMES
MARYLAND
Mid-Day Pick 3:
Mid-Day Pick 4:
Night/Pick 3 (Tue.):
Pick 3 (Wed.):
Pick 4 (Tue.):
Pick 4 (Wed.):
Match 5 (Tue.):
Match 5 (Wed.):
5 Card Cash:
9-4-6
0-3-0-5
2-8-2
6-7-9
5-2-3-0
2-2-5-3
1-8-21-22-24 *29
4-13-14-29-37 *8
4S-QD-7S-KH-KC
Mega Millions:
Megaplier:
Powerball:
Power Play:
*Bonus Ball
17-19-23-24-43 **14
3x
7-15-31-34-36 †8
3x
**Mega Ball
†Powerball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
Don't Replace...
REFACE!
Transform your Kitchen with
the Look of New Cabinets
Available in a variety of panel
styles, colors and wood grains
$500 Off
Cabinet Refacing
Some restrictions may
apply. Limited time offer.
Complete Financing
Available Now
Get a FREE Customized
Quote Today
Sausvaends
Tho
202-741-4433 DC
301-850-4372 MD
703-258-1758 VA
MHIC #125450 | DC #67004413 | VA #2705 108835A | WVA #036832
B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
MARYLAND
Democratic governor’s
race wide open, says poll
Prince George’s official
Rushern L. Baker III gets
most support at 19%
BY
O VETTA W IGGINS
Maryland’s Democratic gubernatorial primary race is wide
open, according to a poll by
Goucher College released just
days before the campaign filing
deadline.
Nearly half of the Democrats
who are likely to vote in the
primary say they have no preference among the seven candidates in the race, and the majority say they don’t know enough
about the candidates to form an
opinion.
The poll, which was released
on Thursday, asked Democrats
whom they would select if the
election were held today. Fortyseven percent said they were
undecided or had no preference,
a
statistically
insignificant
change from September, when a
Goucher poll found 44 percent
had no preference.
“It suggests to me that there is
a lot of time for some serious
movement to happen” before the
June 26 primary, said Mileah
Kromer, director of Goucher’s
Sarah T. Hughes Field Politics
Center.
Prince George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker III fares
the best among the potential
Democratic challengers, with
19 percent saying they support
his campaign. Baltimore County
Executive Kevin Kamenetz received 12 percent, and former
NAACP president Ben Jealous
followed with 10 percent.
The poll found the rest of the
field in the single digits. Tech
entrepreneur Alec Ross had
3 percent support, while state
Sen. Richard S. Madaleno Jr.,
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Walking on sunshine
Sara Walters and her dog, Rolo, stroll along the C&O Canal on an unseasonably warm winter day Wednesday in Washington, where the
temperature reached a record 82 degrees, crushing the previous record of 75 from 1953. It will be significantly cooler Thursday as clouds
and showers roll in. Story, B5; forecast, B8
attorney James Shea and former
Michelle Obama aide Krishanti
Vignarajah each received 2 percent.
Kromer speculated that many
Democratic voters are focused
on the White House and national
politics and have not tuned into
the gubernatorial race.
“While the candidates have
had a lot of forums, nobody has
advertised yet,” she said. “The
campaigns haven’t really kicked
into gear.”
In another Goucher poll released earlier this week, Gov.
Larry Hogan’s approval rating
remained strong and unchanged
since September, at 61 percent.
But the poll also found that
the Republican incumbent’s
chance of reelection is not certain.
Forty-seven percent of Marylanders said they are “leaning
toward or will definitely vote”
to reelect Hogan to a second
term, while 43 percent say they
are leaning toward or will definitely vote for a different candidate. Another 10 percent said
they are unsure who they would
vote for if the election was held
today.
“It speaks to this being a blue
state.” Kromer said of the fact
that more than four in 10 voters
are inclined to back someone
other than Hogan, even though
his potential Democratic challengers are not yet well known.
“Regardless of how popular Hogan is, it’s still going to be
competitive.”
The poll was taken Sept. 14–17.
The questions on the Democratic
primary included 454 respondents who identified themselves
as registered Democrats, and
had a margin of error of 4.8 percentage points. The poll results
on Hogan released Tuesday included 658 registered voters,
with a 3.8 percentage-point margin of error.
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
MS-13 leader in Virginia testifies against 6 about slaying of rival gang member
MS-13 FROM B1
“first word” of the VLS, calmly
admitted he ordered members of
his gang to stab Henriquez to
death in May 2016 so they could
rise up the ranks.
“He had no idea that night
would be his last,” Assistant U.S.
Attorney Patricia Giles said of
Henriquez in her opening statement. “He had no idea of the
horrible death he would suffer.”
The criminal case is among
several playing out across the
Washington region involving violence attributed to MS-13, which
had a resurgence in the area and
other parts of the country in
recent years.
In the Alexandria federal court
case, the members of the VLS
chapter had learned through an
associate that Henriquez was in
the 18th Street gang, which has
battled MS-13 in the United
States and El Salvador for decades. “If he was [18th Street], we
must kill him,” Viera Gonzalez
said.
It was an MS-13 hanger-on
named Andres Velasquez Guevara who alerted the gang members to the rival, according to
court documents. He had become friends with Henriquez
early in 2016. Early on, Velasquez
Guevara later told police, he
asked his new friend if he was in
a gang.
Henriquez said yes: 18th
Street.
This Year Fix
your Foundation,
Damp Crawl Space or
Wet Basement and pay
0
$
“He had no idea that
night would be his last.
He had no idea of
the horrible death
he would suffer.”
Assistant U.S. Attorney Patricia Giles,
on Carlos Otero Henriquez’s death
Henriquez said he was in the
18th Street gang. He asked Viera
Gonzalez the same questions,
noting his tattoos and that he
was from San Miguel, a city in El
Salvador dominated by MS-13.
No one in this van is in a gang,
the MS-13 leader said he
responded.
Eventually they stopped at a
gate to a park and got out. Lazo
stayed by the van as a lookout.
The others walked down a gravel
path.
“Why are you guys waiting to
light it up?” Viera Gonzalez
asked.
That was the signal. They
surrounded Henriquez and told
them they were MS-13.
“ ‘I kind of figured something
crooked was going on,’ ” Viera
Gonzalez recalled Henriquez
saying.
The gang leader and Centeno
watched and filmed while four
others beat Henriquez, Viera
Gonzalez testified.
“They had to do jobs” to become full MS-13 members, Centeno testified through an interpreter. “To assassinate someone
— that is a job.”
When Henriquez tried to
stumble to his feet, Centeno
testified, he hit him with an
empty beer bottle.
Viera Gonzalez said he told the
four to each grab Henriquez by a
limb. He approached, while Centeno recorded with his phone
and shone a flashlight in the
teenager’s face.
“I said, ‘I promise, if you
provide us with information,
we’re not going to kill you,’ ”
Viera Gonzalez recalled. “He refused. He said he was going to die
for it.”
Henriquez grabbed his leg.
Viera Gonzalez kicked him in the
face.
Quality
You Can
Complete Kitchen Remodeling
NO Payments & NO Interest
For 18 Months!*
*Financing offer good at time of Free Inspection before March 15, 2018. Subject to qualifying credit approval. Interest accrues
during the promotional period but all interest is waived if the purchase amount is paid before the expiration of the promotional
period. Financing for GreenSky consumer credit programs is provided by federally insured, federal and state chartered financial
institutions without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex or familial status. Not to be combined with any other offer.
Owned & Operated
by Professional Engineers
Foundation Repair • Basement Waterproofing
Crawl Space Encapsulation • Concrete Leveling
VA 2705068655
the way there, Viera Gonzalez
passed around Heinekens and
asked Henriquez questions:
Where he was from, how long he
had been in the country and
whether he was in a gang.
*
New Year Special
VA:
703-413-3443
“Here, you don’t go around
saying things like that,” Velasquez Guevara told police he
responded. “Dangerous.”
When he became friends with
Henriquez on Facebook in April,
he saw the teenager had posted
photos of himself making 18th
Street gang signs. He passed
those photos on to Miguel
Gomez, an MS-13 member, according to court documents, who
alerted gang leaders in El Salvador.
The message came back to kill
Henriquez, Viera Gonzalez said.
Soon after, as the gang members were planning to go to a
club,
second-in-command
Dublas Lazo got a call from
Velasquez Guevara. He was with
Henriquez.
The victim was brought to a
van, where MS-13 members waited.
“He was told that we were
going to a party . . . where there
were girls,” testified Manuel Antonio Centeno, who has also
pleaded guilty.
As they drove, Viera Gonzalez
said he turned the music up and
discussed with the driver where
they might kill Henriquez undetected.
They decided on the isolated
mountains of West Virginia. On
DC:
202-813-9955
MD:
301-760-4385
www.jeswork.com
MHIC 50637
Afford
Superior Service | Years of Experience
Buy Now
and
Save
Financing
As Low As
$2000
limited time offers
other restrictions may apply
FREE Consultation | FREE Design | FREE Estimates
202-897-3103 DC | 703-382-6833 VA | 301-683-7909 MD
MHIC #125450 | DC #67004413 | VA #2705 108835A | WVA #036832
149
$
Per Month
“I told them to finish it,” he
testified. “They all took a chance,
one at a time, stabbing Carlos
with the pocketknife.” He was
stabbed in the stomach so many
times, Viera Gonzalez said, “you
could see his intestines.”
Viera Gonzalez told them to
make sure Henriquez was dead,
so he said one gang member
stabbed the victim in the throat.
Centeno took pictures to send to
leaders in El Salvador, he said.
Then they stripped Henriquez,
threw his body in a ditch and set
his bloody clothes on fire.
“When his body was recovered, it was mostly bones,” Giles
told jurors.
As they walked back to the
van, Viera Gonzalez said, they all
put their hands in the air and
made an MS-13 sign.
As
Henriquez’s
mother
searched for her son, Giles said,
she found clues that helped police track the conspirators down.
Unbeknown to the others, at
the time of the killing Lazo had
already been cooperating with
the FBI to expose suspected extortion, defense attorney Robert
Jenkins said in court. Lazo had
even filmed his fellow gang
members demanding “rent”
from a young man.
Lazo initially denied involvement in the killing but took
police to the body.
Now he faces a mandatory life
sentence if convicted, as does
Daniel Flores-Maravilla, Carlos
Jose Benitez Pereira and Lelis
Ezequiel Treminio-Tobar. Velasquez Guevara is charged only
with helping kidnap Henriquez,
and Juan Carlos Guadron Rodriguez with involvement in the
extortion plot.
Although killing rivals is how
MS-13 members advance, Viera
Gonzalez said he was not actually interested in killing Henriquez. It was Gomez who
pushed for the slaying, he said,
and was the first to stab Henriquez.
“If there was any way I could
have stopped it, I would have,”
Velasquez Guevara later told FBI
agents.
Yet Gomez, who also testified
at trial and has pleaded guilty in
the case, was the first to cooperate with prosecutors. He disappeared after the slaying, and the
clique nearly had him marked for
assassination. But he got back to
a fellow gang member that day,
Viera Gonzalez said, to say he
just needed some time alone.
“Not everybody’s of a strong
mind about what happened with
Carlos’ murder,” Viera Gonzalez
testified he thought at the time.
“Not everybody can live with it.”
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
MARYLAND
Kamenetz
picks his
running
mate
Gubernatorial hopeful
adds labor activist
Valerie Ervin to ticket
BY
O VETTA W IGGINS
Maryland gubernatorial candidate Kevin Kamenetz (D) plans
to announce Thursday that he
has selected Valerie Ervin, a
grass-roots activist and former
Montgomery County Council
member, as his choice for lieutenant governor.
Ervin became the first African
American woman elected to the
Montgomery County Council in
2006. She resigned in 2013 to
become the executive director of
the Center for Working Families,
the education and issue advocacy
arm of the Working Families
Party.
“She can govern from Day
One,” said Kamenetz, who called
Ervin “a fighter for progressive
change, and a tireless advocate
for education.”
Ervin, a former labor organizer, said she has belonged to a
union since she was 16. She is
widely known among progressive
leaders and in the heavily Democratic Washington suburbs, an
area where Kamenetz — currently Baltimore County executive —
needs to raise his profile. Ervin
said she is leaving her current
job, as a senior adviser to the
Working Families Party, to join
Kamenetz’s ticket.
Before taking a position with
the Center for Working Families,
a New York-based nonprofit
group that promotes economic
and social justice for low-income
families, Ervin considered a run
for Montgomery County executive.
When then-U.S. Rep. Chris Van
Hollen launched his Senate campaign in 2015, Ervin decided to
run for his congressional seat.
But she dropped out of the race
months later because she
couldn’t raise enough money to
compete in the costly race.
“She brings a wealth of experience that is different from my
own,” Kamenetz said. “As an African American, as a woman, as a
mother and grandmother and as
someone who hails from Montgomery County, [the selection] is
a great balance and complements
many of the skill sets I already
have.”
“She brings a wealth
of experience that is
different from my own.”
Kevin Kamenetz,
Democratic candidate for governor
Similar to her close friend,
former U.S. Rep. Donna F. Edwards, who ran for U.S. Senate
against Van Hollen, Ervin is an
outspoken progressive who has
clashed at times with members of
her party.
In her role with the Working
Families Party, Ervin has taken
Democratic leaders to task over
workers’ rights issues, including
paid sick leave and raising the
minimum wage.
Ervin said she and Kamenetz
share a commitment to improving public education and “are
very similar people. He’s a fighter
for Baltimore and Baltimore
County and I’m a fighter for
Montgomery County and Maryland.”
“We agree on many policies,
especially those that impact our
children,” she said.
Ervin was elected to the Montgomery County Board of Education in 2004. She was encouraged
to run after becoming an education advocate and founding the
Montgomery County Education
Forum and Blacks United for
Excellence in Education.
Gubernatorial
candidates
have until Feb. 27, the filing
deadline, to name their running
mates. Of the six Democrats who
have announced their selections
so far, five have chosen women.
There are currently no women in
Maryland’s congressional delegation or in top statewide elected
posts.
Krishanti Vignarajah, the only
woman running for governor, has
not revealed her running mate.
The winners of the June 26
Democratic primary will face
Gov. Larry Hogan (R) and Lt. Gov.
Boyd Rutherford (R) in November’s general election.
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
RE
District makes record settlement in police shooting of Md. man
STERLING FROM B1
family. This settlement is a step in
that direction.”
District officials said the settlement is the highest ever
reached in a fatal police shooting
by an on-duty city officer.
Sterling’s parents, Isaac and
Florence Sterling, appreciate
that they were able to reach an
agreement with the city and end
what could have been a protracted court case, the family said.
They had filed a $50 million
lawsuit against the District.
“This is something we worked
long and hard for. It doesn’t
bring Terrence back, but it does
bring some closure,” Isaac Sterling said in an interview. “We are
satisfied.”
The Sept. 11, 2016, shooting at
Third and M streets NW sparked
protests in parts of the city and
immediately prompted questions about the conduct of Trainer and his partner. The two
officers had pulled in front of
Sterling’s motorcycle to make
the traffic stop, and Trainer, who
was getting out, fired when the
bike struck his car door. The
officer later said he felt his life
was in danger, according to the
internal report. But witnesses
said the motorcyclist appeared
to be trying to steer around the
police car.
Bowser at the time ordered
Trainer’s name made public soon
after the incident, breaking with
long-standing policy. Authorities also revealed that the officer
had failed to turn on the camera
on his uniform before the shooting.
Last August, federal prosecutors who investigated the shooting determined there was not
enough evidence to file criminal
charges against Trainer, who is
28.
D.C. police officials, however,
recommended that the officer be
fired.
The events leading up to the
shooting began about 4:20 a.m.,
when officers got a call about a
motorcycle being driven erratically in Adams Morgan. The
motorcycle ran several red
lights, and one officer said he
spotted it driving in excess of
100 mph, according to the report
by the department’s Use of Force
Review Board.
An autopsy later determined
that Sterling’s blood alcohol level was twice the legal limit, and
he tested positive for marijuana.
Sterling’s family has said they
NIKKI KAHN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Florence and Isaac Sterling, the parents of Terrence Sterling, will receive a $3.5 million settlement in the death of their son, who was
fatally shot by a D.C. police officer in 2016. The Sterlings said they were pleased to avoid a lengthy court battle.
“This is
something we
worked long and
hard for. It
doesn’t bring
Terrence back,
but it does bring
some closure.”
Isaac Sterling
believe the HVAC technician
from Fort Washington had been
at a party and was headed home.
The internal police review
found that Trainer and his partner, Officer Jordan Palmer, began to track Sterling through the
city. Two ranking officers had
ordered police not to pursue
Sterling, according to the report.
Trainer and Palmer eventually
spotted the motorcycle stopped
at a red light at Third and M
streets in Northwest D.C., near
the Third Street Tunnel. They
pulled their marked cruiser into
an intersection ahead of the
biker.
Trainer was getting out of the
passenger side of the squad car
as Sterling rode forward and the
motorcycle struck the car door.
Trainer then fired his gun twice,
striking Sterling in the neck and
back.
Trainer told investigators that
he heard the bike revving before
it came “violently” toward him
and pinned his leg between the
door and the car’s body, according to the internal police report.
He said he fired because he
feared for his safety, as well as
Palmer’s safety.
But investigators concluded
that Trainer’s decision to shoot
“was not in defense of his life,
nor was it in defense of the lives
of others,” according to the internal report.
Trainer, who has been on the
force since 2012, is on paid
administrative leave. He has
challenged the recommendation
that he be fired. A public hearing
is scheduled for April 11.
Early Wednesday morning, Jason Downs, one of the Sterling
family attorneys, filed notice
with D.C. Superior Court to dismiss the lawsuit against the city
following the settlement.
“Hopefully this settlement
will highlight and continue the
very important conversation
about police violence on unarmed black men,” said Hassan
Murphy, another of the Sterling
family attorneys.
The firm of Murphy, Falcon &
Murphy, which represents the
Sterling family, also represented
the family of Freddie Gray, who
died in police custody in Baltimore in 2015. In that case, they
helped the Gray family secure a
$6.4 million settlement from
Baltimore.
keith.alexander@washpost.com
School system in turmoil looks to new interim leader for stability
dramatically under her watch.
ALEXANDER FROM B1
In 2013, Alexander was tapped
who helped Wilson circumvent
by Henderson to serve as deputy
the lottery rules, resigned last
chief of schools and rose to chief
week.
of elementary schools a few years
“She is stepping into a
later. In her most recent
situation that is unenvirole, she oversaw the
able, to say the least,”
city’s elementary schools
said Patricia McGuire,
and supervised six inpresident of Trinity
structional superintenWashington University
dents who managed and
and co-chair of a commentored the lower
munity committee in
school principals.
2016 that helped select
Alexander said she
Wilson. “The community Alexander
has not considered
is very upset right now,
whether she will apply to
and being supportive of an interbe chancellor permanently.
im chancellor is important so we
Educators who work with Alexdon’t waste any time. There are
ander said she scrupulously studtoo many problems to fix.”
ies school data and uses it to
Alexander, 42, started her caestablish plans aimed at improvreer in 1998 as a kindergarten
ing teacher and student achieveteacher in the District. She left for
ment.
New York for two years before
“She has been consistently
returning to the nation’s capital,
working toward having strong
where served as principal of Buninstructional practices in all the
ker Hill and Ross elementary
classes, and she has strong expecschools. At Ross, test scores rose
tations for all the boys and girls
and holds people accountable,”
said Mary Ann Stinson, principal
of Truesdell Education Campus in
Brightwood. “She has a strong
belief in equity and making sure
there is equity throughout
the city.”
Alexander said she has no
plans for dramatic shake-ups, and
is focused on leading the city to a
smooth finish of the school year.
But part of her mandate will
include addressing the findings
of a damning city-commissioned
investigation
released
last
month.
The investigation discovered
1 in 3 graduates in 2017 missed too
many classes or improperly took
makeup classes, undermining the
validity of hundreds of diplomas.
The report also uncovered a culture of pressure in which teachers
felt compelled to graduate unqualified students so that lofty
graduation goals could be met.
“My takeaway is that there
were some systems and pro-
cedures that were lacking . . . and
that’s the work that we are focused on now,” Alexander said. “I
think [D.C. Public Schools] has a
great culture, but that’s not to say
there are not areas that need
improvement.”
While Alexander’s experience
is mostly at the elementary level,
she said she believes her two
decades in education will allow
her to tackle serious challenges
facing the city’s high schools.
Test scores have improved in
elementary schools, which are
seen as a bright spot in the city’s
education system. Still, education
watchdogs said they believe there
is a lack of rigor and discipline in
elementary schools, which puts
students on a path toward failure
in high school.
Natalie Wexler, a D.C. education blogger, said lower-performing elementary schools are focusing on basic reading and math to
boost standardized test scores —
at the expense of a more
well-rounded education that
would help students think critically.
“What they are focusing on is
just reading and math skills all
day long — that apparent success
is really sowing the seeds of failure in high school,” Wexler said.
Richard Jackson — a former
D.C. high school principal who
heads the Council of School Officers, a union for mid-level leadership in the school system — said
he hopes Alexander looks to experienced high school leaders to
help fix problems at the secondary level.
And after a period of upheaval
in the school system’s leadership
suites, Jackson said he hopes people rally behind Alexander.
“People are really rooting for
her so that at least she can be a
stabilizing force so there can be a
level of normalcy,” Jackson said.
“We don’t have anyone else to fire,
so let’s do the work.”
perry.stein@washpost.com
Washington blazes through early-in-the-year temperature records
Capital
Weather
Gang
JASON
SAMENOW
The temperature
in Washington on
Wednesday shot
up to a record
82 degrees,
warmer than it
has ever been so
early in the
calendar year.
It was the second straight day
of record-setting temperatures in
the region. On Tuesday, all three
airports surged to record highs in
the upper 70s.
Both Tuesday’s and
Wednesday’s temperatures are
some 25 to 35 degrees above
normal. Capital Weather Gang’s
Ian Livingston notes the high
temperatures of 78 and 82 on
Tuesday and Wednesday mark
the warmest back-to-back
readings in winter ever observed
in Washington.
Temperatures Wednesday
afternoon sprinted into the
upper 70s and low 80s.
Reagan National Airport,
Washington’s official
measurement site, surged to
82 degrees, crushing the previous
record of 75 from 1953. Dulles
International Airport sailed past
its previous record of 70 from
1997, hitting 80 degrees.
Baltimore-Washington
International Marshall Airport
rose to 79, cruising past the prior
record of 74 from 1930.
The 82 degrees at National ties
the second-highest February
temperature ever observed since
records began in 1872, either at
the airport or at 24th and
M Street in the District, where
measurements were taken prior
to 1945.
At 80 degrees, Dulles Airport
logged its highest temperature on
record for the month of February,
passing the previous mark of 79
degrees, set Feb. 17, 1976.
BWI’s 79 degrees ties for the
second-warmest February
reading in Baltimore’s
temperature history.
Winds from the south kept
pumping in warm air Tuesday
night, so temperatures fell only
into the 50s throughout the
region Wednesday morning.
All three airports had their
highest low temperatures on
record for the date through
7 a.m.:
National’s low of 56 was
higher than the previous record
of 51 from 1954.
Dulles’s low of 59 was much
higher that the previous record of
45 from 1981.
BWI’s low of 52 was higher
than the previous record of 49
from 1981.
Dulles’s low of 59 was not only
the warmest for the date but also
for the entire month of February,
several degrees above the
previous record of 55, set Feb. 17,
1976.
February is starting to look
like a repeat of last February,
when we also witnessed
anomalous warmth late in the
month. National posted four days
above 70 between Feb. 19 and 26,
2017:
Feb. 19: 71
Feb. 23: 75
Feb. 24: 77
Feb. 25: 75
So much warmth so soon last
year brought the unwelcome
effect of an early uptick in pollen
levels and a premature start of
the growing season. Many early
bloomers, such as the cherry
blossoms, were then damaged
when a hard freeze came in midMarch.
This February’s warmth hasn’t
been quite so extreme, but over
the upcoming weekend, we could
again be near 70.
jason.samenow@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/news/
capital-weather-gang
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
obituaries
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
KHIANEY
BURRELL
HELEN SLOANE DUDMAN, 93
Washington Post editor, broadcast executive
BY
M ATT S CHUDEL
Helen Sloane Dudman, a former Washington Post editor who
held executive positions with The
Post’s broadcasting division and
PBS and who drew widespread
attention to her journalist husband’s 40-day captivity in Cambodia during the Vietnam War,
died Feb. 19 at an assisted-living
center in Blue Hill, Maine. She
was 93.
The cause was congestive
heart failure, said a daughter, Iris
Dudman.
Mrs. Dudman edited The
Post’s women’s section from 1965
to 1969, leaving when the Style
section was born. She became
director of public relations for
Post-Newsweek stations.
In 1970, her husband, St. Louis
Post-Dispatch journalist Richard
Dudman, was captured by Viet
Cong-aligned forces while covering the war in Vietnam. He and
two other reporters, Elizabeth
Pond of the Christian Science
Monitor and Michael Morrow of
Dispatch News Service International, were held for 40 days in
Cambodia.
During that time, Mrs. Dudman used her contacts among
the Washington press corps, on
Capitol Hill and in diplomatic
circles to bring attention to the
case. When her husband and the
other journalists were released,
Mrs. Dudman received a telephone call at 4 a.m., with an
overseas operator saying, “This is
Richard Dudman, calling from
Saigon.”
Mrs. Dudman told The Post
that she had no doubt that her
FAMILY PHOTO
Helen Sloane Dudman drew public attention to the 40-day captivity
of her husband, Richard Dudman, left, during the Vietnam War.
husband would survive the ordeal.
“I knew all along he’d be
home,” she said. “He wouldn’t do
anything to jeopardize his objectivity as a reporter or his life. In
1954, when he was covering a
Guatemala revolution his editor
told him, ‘A dead correspondent
is no use to us — and an injured
one is worse.’ He’s used that as his
guide.”
When Richard Dudman returned to the family’s home in
Washington’s Cleveland Park
neighborhood, Mrs. Dudman
helped organize a block party
that included many political dignitaries among the 1,000 guests.
“This occasion makes me feel
like Huckleberry Finn sneaking
in to attend his own funeral,”
Richard Dudman said at the
time. He later published a book
about his experiences, “Forty
Days With the Enemy,” and credited his wife with securing his
release.
Helen Rosalyn Sloane was
born Jan. 13, 1925, in Cincinnati
and grew up in Chicago. Her
father was a salesman, her mother a homemaker.
In 1946, she received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in
journalism from Northwestern
University in Evanston, Ill. She
married Richard Dudman in
1948, and they lived in St. Louis
before moving to Washington in
1954.
Mrs. Dudman was publicity
director of the National Symphony Orchestra from 1962 to 1965.
After working for The Post and
for the company’s broadcasting
division, she was a vice president
for PBS.
In 1979, she bought three radio
stations in Maine, where she and
her family had long spent summers. She and her husband settled permanently in Ellsworth,
Maine, in 1981. Mrs. Dudman and
a daughter, Martha Tod Dudman,
operated the radio stations until
selling the business in 1999.
As a civic activist, Mrs. Dudman helped implement reforms
to Maine’s workers’ compensation program, chaired the state’s
Judicial Responsibility and Disability Committee and was a
board member of the Maine Employers’ Mutual Insurance Co.
and the state’s electrical utility
provider.
In the 1990s, as a Knight
International Press Fellow, she
helped establish community radio stations in South Africa.
Her husband died last year
after 69 years of marriage. Survivors include two daughters,
Martha Tod Dudman of Northeast Harbor, Maine, and Iris Dudman, formerly known as Janet, of
Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y.; and
four grandchildren.
When Mrs. Dudman received
the phone call from her husband
in 1970, announcing that he had
been freed from captivity, he said
he and the other journalists held
in Cambodia had subsisted primarily on rice and warm water.
“I’m throwing out all our rice,”
Mrs. Dudman said at the time.
MATHURI BAI KHIANEY "Bhabhi"
February 22, 2008
In loving memory of Mathuribai Khianey, wife
of the late Idandas Khianey. Bhabhi is fondly
remembered by her children, Manmohan,
Meera, Kannahiya, Vimla, Narendar and
Anusha. Her 11 grandchildren, Shalini, Atul,
Ashish, Sheila, Reena, Pooja, Natasha, Ameet,
Nina, Kiran and Rahul. Her 10 great-grandchildren GW, Ross, Caroline, Sahil, Saira, Ashna,
Sonia, Sonali, Shaan and Aditi. She raised them
with a tender heart and a gentle voice. Her
caring, motherly and loving spirit will remain
with us forever.
MEMORIAL SERVICE
WADE
JAMES P. WADE, JR.
Funeral Mass
Wednesday, February 28 at 10:45 a.m.
Old Post Chapel
Fort Myer, Arlington, VA
Inurnment directly following at
Arlington National Cemetery Columbarium
DEATH NOTICE
BARNETT
matt.schudel@washpost.com
ROBERT A. BARNETT, M.D.
Surgeon and WWII veteran died February 12,
2018 at age 92. Services, Saturday, February 24
at Leisure World Inter-Faith Chapel at 11 a.m.
Donations to JSSA Hospice or the Inter-Faith
Chapel.
DAVID ZWICK, 75
‘Nader’s Raider’ who founded Clean Water Action
BELL
B ART B ARNES
David Zwick, an early disciple
in the corps of citizen activists
who were popularly known as
“Nader’s Raiders” and a founder
and president of the environmental advocacy organization Clean
Water Action, died Feb. 5 at his
home in Minneapolis. He was 75.
The cause was congestive
heart failure, said Patrick Davis,
press officer for the environmental group Friends of the Earth.
“If you drink water today, you
are feeling the effects of David
Zwick,” said consumer advocate
Ralph Nader, who 50 years ago
lured Mr. Zwick from Harvard
Law School to his burgeoning,
whistleblowing
band
of
watchdog-critics of government
and industry.
After Nader spoke to students
at the law school in 1968, Mr.
Zwick sought him out and asked
how he could join up. “You haven’t even graduated,” a skeptical
Nader recalled saying, but Mr.
Zwick persisted.
By the next summer, he was
leading a Nader task force on
contaminated drinking water
and recreational water, and he
became principal author of a 1971
Nader-sponsored book, “Water
Wasteland,” which focused on the
failings of the Federal Water
Quality Office to curb filthy waterways across the country.
Newsweek called the book “the
first systematic attempt to wrap
up all available information
about water pollution,” and a
Kirkus Review critic admiringly
praised the volume as “another
constructive, competent, brackish stinkbomb from the Nader
camp.”
“Water Wasteland” was credited with having helped spur passage of the federal Clean Water
Act of 1972 and the Safe Drinking
Water Act of 1974.
Clean Water Action, which Mr.
Zwick founded in 1972, was a
grass-roots amalgam made up
mostly of ordinary citizens joining forces to lobby for protection
and improvement of water quality at the local, state and federal
level. He was its first president
and remained a leader in its
hierarchy until 2008, taking periodic leaves of absence for other
tasks, such as organizing community action groups.
In 46 years, Clean Water Action has grown into a Washington-based national organization
with offices in a dozen states,
250 employees and an annual
budget of $20 million.
David Reynolds Zwick was
born May 1, 1942, in Rochester,
N.Y. As a young man, he led a
rock-and-roll band and played
college football at the U.S. Coast
Guard Academy in New London,
Conn., where he graduated in
1963.
For four years, he was an
officer in the Coast Guard, including stints in Vietnam where
he commanded an 82-foot riverboat in the Mekong Delta. “He
went to Vietnam a patriot, and he
came back an antiwar protester,”
said his former wife, Wendy
Weingarten Zwick.
Disillusioned, he spent one of
his “R&R” leaves writing a report
for his superior officers saying
the war was not winnable. It was
disregarded.
On the GI bill, he went to
Harvard, where he enrolled in
the law school as well as the John
F. Kennedy School of Government. Within a year, he was a
fledgling Nader’s Raider, assigned to “water because he was
in the Coast Guard,” Nader
quipped.
He missed classes at Harvard
but still managed to pass the
exams, and he made the Harvard
Law Review.
“Zwick is a phantom on campus,” the Harvard Law Record
wrote of him in 1972. “He is
constantly commuting between
HLS, his Kennedy School classes
and his office in Washington.” In
1973, he graduated from the law
school and received a master’s
degree in public policy from the
Kennedy School.
One of his early assignments at
the Nader organization was to
help write a paperback book,
“Who Runs Congress?: The President, Big Business or You?” which
became a bestseller but drew
tepid reviews.
He organized Clean Water Action the old-fashioned way:
knocking on doors and house-tohouse canvassing, which three
decades later remains a fundamental tactic of the organization,
said Clean Water’s president, Bob
Wendelgass. The staff includes
environmental lawyers, professional pollsters and political advisers. Canvassers still solicit letters to political officeholders.
Just to be sure, they come back
later to pick up the letters and put
them in the mail.
In 2005, Mr. Zwick moved to
Minneapolis after 35 years in
Washington. Survivors include
three children, Winnie Zwick of
Brooklyn, Ruth Zwick of Minneapolis and Jack Zwick of Minneapolis.
For recreation, the family went
on camping trips. One of their
favorite spots was the Pictured
Rocks National Lake Shore, on
the southern shore of Lake Superior. It is the largest body of fresh
water in North America.
newsobits@washpost.com
CORRECTION
The Feb. 20 obituary for
photographer Max Desfor
incorrectly reported the place
where the bomber Enola Gay
landed after its mission to drop
the atomic bomb on Hiroshima.
It was the island of Tinian, not
Saipan.
On Monday, February 19, 2018, the beloved
wife of the late Roland W. Carnal; mother
of Donna Granato, Barbara Carnal and Ralph
Carnal; sister of Rose Koontz and the late
Godfrey Gwynn and Mary F. Jenkins. Also
survived by five granddaughters; and five
great-grandchildren. Friends are invited to celebrate Grace's life on Friday, February 23 from
7 to 8 p.m. at the George P. Kalas Funeral
Home, 2973 Solomons Island Rd., Edgewater,
MD. A Memorial Mass will be held on Saturday,
February 24 at 10:30 a.m. at Holy Family
Catholic Church, 826 W. Central Ave., Davidsonville, MD. Interment private. Memorial
contributions may be made to Catholic Charities USA, P.O. Box 17066, Baltimore, MD 21297.
Online guestbook available at
www.KalasFuneralHomes.com
CULMER
MARY BROSNAN
FLOYD. D. CULMER , JR
Mary was married to Edward Brosnan in 1951
and moved with him to Philadelphia while he
completed his dental studies at the University
of Pennsylvania. They subsequently settled in
Syracuse, NY and later suburban Fayetteville,
NY, where they raised their family. Mary moved
to Arlington VA about 25 years ago. She is
survived by her six children, two sons-in-law
and two daughters-in-law: Anne Lincoln Curtis
(Mel) of Columbus, GA, Kate McCollom and Pat
Brosnan of Arlington, VA, Tim Brosnan (Bunny)
of Philadelphia, PA, Rosemary Walker (John)
of Ann Arbor, MI and Tom Brosnan (Paula) of
Atlanta, GA. She has 15 grandchildren and 6
greatgrandchildren.
CLEAN WATER ACTION
Funeral services will be held on Friday,
February 23, 2018 at 11:30 a.m. at Judean
Memorial Gardens Chapel, 16225 Batchellors Forest Rd., Olney, MD 20832. Interment
to follow. Family will be receiving friends at
the home of Andee and Jonathan Forster
immediately after the funeral and observing
Shiva on Saturday and Sunday at 7 p.m.
and on Monday through Wednesday at the
home of Danielle and Aaron Jeweler at 7
p.m. Contributions may be made to the
Charles E. Smith Life Communities/Cohen
Rosen Home, Rockville, MD or B’nai B’rith
Youth Organization, 800 8th St., NW, Wash
DC 20001 in Memory of Ruth Cantor.
Arrangements by Hines-Rinaldi Funeral
Home under the Jewish Funeral Practices
Committee of Greater Washington Contract.
BROSNAN
Mary died peacefully at home in Arlington on
February 20, 2018. She was born Mary Frances
Creedon in Oneida, NY on September 15, 1924,
the second child of Alice and Frank Creedon.
She graduated from St. Mary’s Nursing School
in Rochester NY. She was predeceased by her
husband, Edward Brosnan and her brother,
Daniel Creedon.
David Zwick along the Merrimack River in 2002, marking the 30th anniversary of the Clean Water
Act. A book he co-wrote, “Water Wasteland,” is credited with helping the legislation pass.
On Tuesday, February 20,
2018, Ruth M. Cantor, of
Rockville, MD passed away
at 94 years young. She was
the beloved wife of the late
Sidney Cantor; loving mother
of Barbara Kurshan, Richard
Cantor (Amy) and Andee Forster (Jonathan);
dear sister of Betty Kedan and the late
Harold Melman and Francis Schooler; cherished grandmother of Debra Kurshan (Ben
Bolitzer), Jonathan Kurshan (Philip Hall),
Noah Cantor (Stacey), Danielle Jeweler
(Aaron), Stephanie Cantor, Remi and Zoe
Forster; and great grandmother of five
adorable children.
CARNAL
RAYMOND BELL, SR.
BY
CANTOR
RUTH M. CANTOR
GRACE E. CARNAL "Gracie"
Peacefully entered into eternal rest on
Tuesday, February 13, 2018. Family will
welcome friends on Friday, February 23,
2018 at Woodstream Christian Church,
9800 Lottsford Rd., Mitchellville, MD.
Visitation will begin 10 a.m. until the time
of service 11 a.m. Interment Resurrection
Cemetery.
www.johnsonandjenkinsfh.com
Harvard Law graduate’s
grass-roots group grew
to national organization
ANNETTE CELESTINE BURRELL
(nee Smith)
Beloved wife of Ronny Burrell, departed this
life on February 16, 2018 at Charlestown,
Renaissance Gardens in Catonsville, MD. The
former resident of the District of Columbia, BelPre Strathmore in Silver Spring, MD and River
Creek Country Club of Leesburg, VA was 82
years old. Loving mother of three daughters,
Linda Burrell Warr (Richard), Kathy Slack (Benjie), and Janice Burrell. She is also survived
by two brothers, Helvon Smith, Jr., Randolph
Smith, Sr. (Peggy); a sister, Rosie Baker, stepmother, Helen Smith, sister-in-law Ann English,
nine grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren,
and a host of relatives and friends. She was
preceded in death by her sisters Diane Williams-Bey and Doris Chapman.
Family will receive guests on Saturday, February 24 at 10:30 a.m. at Our Lady of the Angels
Catholic Church, 711 Maiden Choice Lane,
Catonsville, MD 21228, where a memorial
service will be held at 11 a.m.
The family will greet guests on Friday February
23, 2018 at Murphy’s Funeral Home, 1102 W.
Broad St., Falls Church, VA 22046 from 4 to
7 p.m. and a Mass of Christian Burial will
be offered on Saturday February 24, 2018 at
1:30 p.m. at St. James Church, 905 Park Ave,
Falls Church, VA 22046. In lieu of flowers,
a memorial donation may be made to We
Care Solar, a highly rated charity that provides
solar powered energy packs to health workers
to reduce maternal mortality in developing
countries throughout the world.
Entered into eternal rest Tuesday, February
13, 2018 at 7:20 a.m. He is predeceased by
his father, Floyd D Culmer, Sr. He leaves to
mourn his devoted mother, Bettye Culmer;
sister, Valarie Culmer; uncle, Julius Neely; and
a host of relatives and friends, Homegoing
Saturday, February 24, 2018. Visitation and
services will be held 10 a.m. and 11 a.m.
respectively at Hemmingway AME Memorial
Church, 6330 Gateway Blvd., District Heights,
MD. Interment National Harmony Memorial
Park Arrangements by J.B.
EDDY
VIOLA C. EDDY
Viola C. Eddy departed this life on Friday
evening, February 16, 2018 to go be with
our Lord. She was the beloved mother of
Francis J. Eddy and Viola C. Smith; sister of
Joseph Anton and sister-in-law of Gladys
Marble.
Funeral services for Viola C. Eddy will be
held on Friday, February 23 , 2018 at 11
a.m. at Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic
Church, 3800 Ely Place, SE, Washington,
DC 20019. Visitation 10 a.m. until hour of
funeral service. Interment Lincoln Memorial Cemetery, 4001 Suitland Rd., Suitland,
MD.
MAYER
South Carolina) and IBM (Cape Canaveral,
Florida). Bernie joined Mobil Oil Corporation
in New York in 1968. His first assignment
in Operations Research was to design and
implement a simulator to forecast workloads
of a computer center with up to three IBM
360 computers. Bernie’s career at Mobil Oil
continued in the Computer Specialist field
until his retirement in 1995. In 1990 he
moved to Fairfax, Virginia when the company
relocated its headquarters.
BERNARD DREYFUS MAYER, JR.
Bernard Dreyfus Mayer, Jr. who passed away,
February 16, 2018, was born October 6,
1939 in Enid, Oklahoma to parents Bernard
and Bernice Mayer. Bernie grew up in Enid
where his parents owned Mayer’s Shoes
for many years. After graduating from Enid
High School, Bernie attended the University
of Texas at Houston and graduated with a
BS degree in chemistry. Bernie went on
to attend Massachusetts Institute of Technology pursuing graduate work in physical
chemistry. He obtained his MS degree in
Mathematics in 1965 from the Mellon College
of Science at the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Bernie worked at various interesting summer
jobs while continuing his education, including Phillips Petroleum (Bartlesville, Oklahoma), Savannah River Laboratory (Aiken,
Bernie married Estelle Rubin in 1981, and
although they divorced they remained lifelong friends. It was at Mobil Oil that Bernie
met his long-time partner, Judy Turner. While
they knew each other slightly from work,
they met socially outside work and became
friends, then partners, eventually living
together. Judy and Bernie were together for
over 27 years, including through his illness.
Bernie had many hobbies and enjoyed the
friends he made through them. He was an
excellent chess player, and an accomplished
pianist. He wrote music for two songs that
were entered into the Washington Music
Association annual contest. Bernie also loved
to travel and he and Judy took many wonderful trips. Bernie enjoyed playing poker and
he and Judy went on several Poker Cruises.
They also made annual trips to Las Vegas
where Bernie could play in poker games
and tournaments and indulge in his love of
food, especially at the buffets. Bernie always
enjoyed returning to Oklahoma to visit with
his friends in Enid and Oklahoma City and
especially to attend his Enid High School
reunions.
A memorial service will be held at a future
date in Virginia.
POST YOUR
CONDOLENCES
Now death notices on
washingtonpost.com/obituaries allow you
to express your sympathy with greater ease.
Visit today.
The green pages.
Did you know? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
NF407 4x1.25
GHI
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
Dr. GARY GROVER
Dr. Gary Grover passed away on Saturday,
January 27, 2018 surrounded by his closest
loved ones.
Gary was a phenomenal surgeon, entrepreneur, outdoorsman, and a loving husband and
father.
He was born in India, grew up in East Africa,
went to medical school in Poland and settled
here in America. Throughout his journey he
touched hundreds of people and saved countless lives. His life will be honored and all that
knew him will cherish their memories of him.
Gary is survived by his loving wife and two
sons.
Services private.
ICENHOWER
WAYNE ICENHOWER
COL., USAF, DCANG (Ret.)
On Wednesday, February 14, 2018, Col. Wayne
Icenhower was called by our Heavenly Father
to join his soulmate and valentine Anne who
has been patiently waiting. He will be forever
remembered and missed by his children, Steve
and RoAnna; grandchildren Julie, Lynnette,
Mandi, Darryl JR., Ryan, Garrett, Matthew,
Amanda, and Sarah; great-grandchildren, and
a multitude of “brothers” who he loved like
family.
“Ike” was one of the greatest pilots that ever
lived. He passionately loved his lifelong career
as both an Air Force/DC Air National Guard and
United Airlines pilot and his heart was broken
when he had to retire. His greatest loves in
life were his family, airplanes, animals, and
socializing with his friends. He always had a
joke to tell and advice to give.
Celebration of life service followed by the
burial will be held at 9 a.m., Saturday, February
24, 2018 at Cedar Hill Funeral Home, 4111
Pennsylvania Ave., Suitland, MD 20746. Gathering will follow at FOP Lodge 89. Friends may
call from 2 to 7 p.m. Friday, February 23, 2018
at funeral home.
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
MELENDEZ
SHELL
HARRIS
JEFFERSON
O'BRIEN
NORMA THERESE MELENDEZ
DAVID ALAN SHELL
On Wednesday, February 21,
2018 of Washington, D.C.
beloved wife of the late Robert
D. Melendez Jr.; loving mother
of Daniel, Gina Hasty, Paul, Lisa
Lintelman
(Glenn),
James
(Jeanette) and the late Michael.
Sister of Robert F. Simi and Barbara Neider.
Also survived by three grandchildren, two
great-grandchildren and other relatives. The
family will receive friends at PHILIP D. RINALDI
FUNERAL SERVICE, P.A., 9241 Columbia Blvd.,
Silver Spring, MD 20910 on Friday, February 23
from 7 to 9 p.m. Mass of Christian burial will
be offered at the Little Sisters of the Poor 4200
Harewood Rd. N.E., Washington, D.C. 20017
on Saturday, February 24, 2018 at 10:30 a.m.
Interment Ft. Lincoln Cemetery Brentwood,
MD. In lieu of flowers contributions may be
made in her memory to The Little Sisters
of the Poor or Family Links 3255 O St. S.E.
Washington, DC 20020.
MIDDLEBROOKS
BOBBIE JEAN MIDDLEBROOKS
On February 18, 2018. She is survived by
her sisters, Savolia, Nina, Gladys and Phyllis.
Visitation, 10 a.m.; service, 11 a.m., Friday,
February 23 at Abyssinia Baptist Church, 4705
Addison Rd., Capitol Heights, MD. Interment
George Washington Cemetery.
OREMLAND
KENNETH EINAR OREMLAND
Kenneth Einar Oremland, 69, passed away
February 15, 2018 after a brief illness. Native
Washingtonian, avid Senators and Redskins fan
and passionate golfer and softball player. He
graduated from Fairfax High School in 1966
and became a committed anti-war activist.
Preceded in death by his father, Robert, and
sister, Nancy. Survived by his mother, Eleanor;
sisters Susan (Robert) and Peggy; son Jesse
(Joanna) and granddaughter Eleanor; nieces
Francesca, Daniela and Anna and other relatives and friends too numerous to name. A
celebration of his life will be held at a later
date.
PIMENTAL
POLLOCK
KING
SANDRA LYNN KING
February 1, 1973 ~ February 16, 2018
Viewing will be held on Friday, February 23,
2018 at Johnson Memorial Baptist Church, 800
Ridge Rd, SE, Washington, DC from 10 a.m. to
11 a.m with funeral service to follow. Interment
will be held at Heritage Cemetery, Waldorf, MD.
KRIKORIAN
MARGARET ATANOSSIAN KRIKORIAN
August 24, 1934 - February 20, 2018
Margaret Atanossian Krikorian, 83, peacefully
passed away February 20, 2018 at her home
in Lansdowne, Virginia. She was born on
August 24, 1934 in Providence, Rhode Island
to Guregh and Mary (Hovanessian) Atanossian.
She is predeceased by her husband, George
Krekor Krikorian, and is survived by her five
children, Jacqueline, Karen, Christine, Sonya,
and Krikor; 12 grandchildren, Alena, Matthew,
Elyse, Andrew, John, Sarah, Jacob, Vlad, Katie,
Kirk, Stephanie, and Nicholas, and three greatgrandchildren, Landon, Ryan, and Isaac. Visitation and funeral services will be performed
at St. Mary Armenian Apostolic Church, 4125
Fessenden St. NW, Washington, DC 20016,
Friday, February 23, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m, followed by a luncheon. Additional information
may be found at:
www.colonialfuneralhome.com
Eleanor departed this life on February 14, 2018
at her Springfield, Virginia home after living
with Alzheimer's Disease for several years.
As a member of First Baptist Church of Washington, DC for over four decades, she was
an Ordained Deacon, sang in the choir, and
served on Education, Music, and Child Care
committees.
Visitation will be February 24, 1 to 4 p.m.,
Demaine Funeral Home, Springfield, VA. The
burial service will be on February 28, 1 p.m.,
Westhampton Memorial Park, Richmond. A
memorial service at First Baptist Church in DC
will be scheduled for spring. Eleanor is survived
by her sister, Lucia Pollock, of Washington, DC.
SALVAIL
THOMAS RICHARD SALVAIL
On Wednesday, April 14, 2018 of Annapolis,
MD. Beloved husband of Leslie Hellier Salvail;
loving father of Ryan, Michelle and Samantha
Salvail; son of the late Jack and Mary Salvail;
brother of Nora Burrows and Patrick Salvail
and the late Mary Ann Keough, John Salvail,
Rita Marie Cooper, Michael Salvail and William
Salvail. Memorial Services will be held at St.
Margret’s Episcopal Church, 1601 Peasant
Plains Rd., Annapolis, MD 21409 on Sunday,
March 4, 2018 at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers,
contributions may be made in his name to the
Cancer Research Institute, 55 Broadway, Suite
1802, New York, NY 10006.
JOHN WILLIAM SAVAGE
John William Savage of Alexandria, Virginia
passed away peacefully surrounded by his
family on February 19, 2018. He was born
on September 8, 1940 in Seaford, Virginia.
The son of the late Mary Virginia (Taylor)
Savage and Mason Paul Savage, John grew
up on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. A
beloved husband, father, and granddaddy,
John made his home in Alexandria, Virginia
for the last 54 years.
CLIFFORD SAMUEL LEE
(Age 77)
Peacefully on Tuesday, February 13, 2018.
Husband of the late Shirley Lee; loving father
of Dorotha, Carrie, Diane, Thomas, Willie and
Marlene; and a host of other relatives and
friends. Services will be held at Mt. Calvary
Missionary Baptist Church, 5000 St. Barnabas
Rd., Temple Hills, MD on Saturday, February
24, 2018, visitation, 10 a.m.; services, 11 a.m.
Interment Ft. Lincoln Cemetery, Brentwood,
MD. Services by Freeman.
Virginia was born in April 1935 in Beltsville,
Maryland and spent most of her life in Maryland. Louise and Tom, as they were known
to family and Maryland friends, were avid
bowlers and Louise bowled on a major team.
She was a crafter and cake decorator, as well
as an accomplished seamstress. She was
a beautiful woman who loved people well
and put others above herself. A devoted
wife, a loving mother and grandmother, she
MAYO
On February 18, 2018, Angie Steagall of Silver
Spring, MD. Loving and devoted wife of the
late Roy Steagall; mother of James, Sr. and
wife Amy; beloved grandmother of James, Jr.
and Amanda. She is also survived by two greatgrandchildren, Christian and Allison; and other
relatives and friends. Mrs. Steagall will be in
state at Hines Rinaldi Funeral Home, 11800
New Hampshire Ave, Silver Spring, MD on
Sunday, February, 25 from 2 to 6 p.m. Church
services at St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral in DC on Monday, February 26; viewing at
10 a.m.; funeral service at 11 a.m. Interment at
Gate of Heaven Cemetery.
He is survived by his wife of 52 years,
Carole Joyce (Wadlow) Savage, Alexandria,
VA; son, John Brian Savage (wife, Kitty),
Augusta, WV; daughters, Mary Catherine
Keefe (husband, Dan), Lorton, VA and Jennifer Lynn Conway (husband, Terry), Warrenton, VA; one sister, Mary Jo (Savage)
Martin (husband, Kenneth), Melfa, VA. He
is also survived by seven grandchildren,
Hannah Rose Conway, Chloe Virginia Keefe,
Quinn William Conway, Kellsey Taylor Savage, Owen Daniel Keefe, Jackson Thomas
Savage, and Marley Claire Savage.
A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m.
on Saturday, February 24, 2018, at Jefferson
Funeral Chapel, 5755 Castlewellan Dr.,
Alexandria, VA. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Capital Caring’s
Adler Hospice Center, 24419 Millstream Dr.,
Aldie, VA, 20105 or to INOVA’s Nursing Stars
at Fairfax Hospital’s IMC Unit.
He is survived by his wife, Patricia (née
Howard); four children: Kathleen (Kate),
Karen (Kerry), Elizabeth (Beth) and Timothy
(Tim); as well as five grandchildren: Silas,
Camille, Oscar, Greta and Zilfa.
Entered into eternal rest on Thursday, February
8, 2018. He is survived by his father, James
S. Hawkins; four sisters, Aquanetta Clyburn,
Quanisha Quick, Sade' Quick and Sonita Quick;
four brothers, Angelo Brown, Marquis Clyburn,
Ricardo Hawkins and Deon Clyburn; four aunts,
Brenda Hawkins, Phyllis Hawkins, Artise McAlister and Patrice Hawkins; five uncles,
Chauncey Hawkins, Keith Hawkins, Tony
Brown, Mitchell Hawkins and Albert Hawkins.
He leaves behind a host of cousins, nieces,
nephews, other relatives and friends. Mr.
Hawkins may be viewed at Stewart Funeral
Home, 4001 Benning Rd., NE on February 23
from 10 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. Interment
Harmony Memorial Park.
HOLMES
ISABELL A. MAYO (Age 103)
"Puddin", "Aunt PooPoo"
On Thursday, February 15, 2018, Isabell at
her residence in Silver Spring, MD accepted
God’s hand for eternal rest. Beloved wife of
the late Charlie W. Mayo, devoted mother of
Anita Walker (Philip), grandmother of Philip Jr.,
great-grandmother of Abayomi, Chinua and
Alaina. Also survived by sister-in-law, Florence
Snowden; godson, Charles Carter; devoted
niece, Marjorie Williams, great-niece, Deborah
Moir, many other nieces, nephews, cousins,
devoted friends. Viewing 9 a.m. followed by
homegoing service at 11 a.m. on Saturday,
February 24, 2018, at Mt. Calvary Baptist
Church, 608 North Horners Lane, Rockville,
MD. Interim Pastor, Rev. Dr. Lora Hargrove.
Interment Ash Memorial Cemetery, Sandy
Spring, MD. Arrangements by SNOWDEN.
A viewing will be held on Friday, February
23, at Demaine Funeral Home in Springfield
from 6 to 8 p.m. Funeral mass will be held at
St. Bernadette’s in Springfield on Saturday,
February 24 at 12:30 p.m. Burial will be held
at Arlington National Cemetery at a date to
be determined.
In lieu of flowers, please donate to your
favorite charity in Captain O'Brien's name.
SILVER
Peacefully on Thursday, February 15, 2018, a
resident of Capitol Heights, MD. Loving wife
of the late Henry S. Thomas; devoted mother
of Henry A. Thomas, Joseph L. Thomas and
the late Francis S. Thomas. Also survived
by four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Visitation will be held on Friday,
February 23, 2018 from 10 a.m. until Mass
of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. at Church of the
Incarnation, 880 Eastern Ave., NE, Washington,
DC. Interment Harmony Memorial Park. Services by J.B. JENKINS.
TILLMAN
Apostle JAMES SILVER
Pastor Emeritus of
Bible Way Church
of Washington, DC
MILTON O. HOLMES
Of Washington, DC passed away peacefully in
his home after bidding farewell to family and
caregivers on February 3, 2018. He leaves to
cherish his memory; one sister, three children,
two daughters-in-law, three grandchildren,
eight great-grandchildren, one great-greatgrandchild and a fiancée. He is also survived
by the descendants of Arthur Kelly, Pettie Littlejohn, George Holmes, Hattie Ury and Arthur
Dick. He will be missed by a host of friends,
fellow alumni and members of several clubs.
Viewing will be 10 to 11 a.m., service, 11 a.m.
to 12 Noon, Saturday, February 24 at STEWART
FUNERAL HOME, 4001 Benning Rd., NE. Interment 12:30 to 1 p.m. at Lincoln Memorial
Cemetery, 4001 Suitland Rd., Suitland, MD.
DEATH NOTICE
MORRIS
JAMES
FRED TILLMAN, JR.
On Wednesday, February 14, 2018, Fred Tillman, Jr. of Fort Washington, MD. Beloved
husband of Bonita Tillman; loving father of Fred
T. Tillman (Dina) and Traci Tillman Jackson; and
cherished grandfather of Cierra, Charles Jr.,
Bonita, and Paloma. He also leave to cherish
his memory a host of other relatives and
friends. Visitation will be held on Friday, February 23 from 11 a.m. to 12 Noon followed
by funeral services at John Wesley AME Zion
Church, 1615 - 14th Street, NW, Washington DC
20009. Interment will take place at Washington
National Cemetery, Suitland, MD.
JEANNETT BACON MORRIS, JR. (Age 73)
WOLKE
GUTA WOLKE
On Thursday, February 15,
2018 of Silver Spring, MD.
Beloved wife of the late
Joseph Wolke; devoted mother of Anita (Kenneth Brooks)
Wolke, Cyna (Paul) Cohen;
loving grandmother of Sara (Norm) Cohen
Rich, Mia (David) Renaud, Heather
(Theodore Karatz) Brooks, Erica (Alan)
Kaplan, Jessica Brooks, and Aaron Brooks
and great-grandmother of Amelia, Sean,
Julia, Lauren, Saul, Sylvie, Abe, Joelle, Jem
and Persephone. Graveside services will be
held at Eretz Hachaim in Jerusalem, Israel.
Family will be observing Shiva Wednesday
through Sunday morning at the late residence. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Yeshiva of Greater
Washington, United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum, Charles E. Smith Jewish
Day School, or Kemp Mill Synagogue. Services entrusted to Shomrei Neshama of
Greater Washington.
www.shomreineshama.com
LINDA JAMES
On Sunday, February 18, 2018 of Washington,
DC. Linda James is survived by two daughters,
Tara Barnes-Darby, (son-in-law Douglas Darby
III) and Pearl James; two grandchildren, Jermaine Carter and London Jones; two sisters,
Gloria Turner and Peggy Wilson and a host of
close friends, nieces and nephews. A Celebration of Life Service will be held at the GEORGE
P. KALAS FUNERAL HOME, 6160 Oxon Hill Rd.,
Oxon Hill, MD 20745 on Monday, February
26, 2018 at 12 p.m. Interment private. Online
guestbook available at
www.KalasFuneralHomes.com
Of Burtonsville, MD. On February 7,
2018 at Holy Cross Hospital, Silver
Spring, MD. He was affectionalley
called Jerry. He was born on April
28, 1944 in Louisa, VA to the late
Jeannett "Jack" Morris, Sr. and
Leatrice Thomasson Morris. He
leaves to mourn his death, his daughter, Stacey
Morris Leonard (Ray, Jr.); grandchildren, Jalen,
Devin and Ryan; a devoted former wife and
caregiver, Ruth "Pat" Morris, all of Temecula, CA; a brother, Joseph Morris (Jackie) of
Richmond, VA; one uncle, John E. Thomasson
(Chris) of Louisa, VA; a devoted friend, Will
Allen and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins,
other relatives and friends. Interment service
will be held on Friday, February 23, 2018 at 11
a.m. from Maryland Veterans Cemetery, 11301
Crain Hwy., Cheltenham, MD 20623. Arrangements by LYLES FUNERAL SERVICE, Serving
Northern Virginia, Eric S. Lyles, Director. Lic.
VA/DC/MD, 1-800-388-1913.
CIGTAY
WOODS
DEBORAH LAURINDA WOODS
Of Clinton MD, passed away, February 14, 2018.
Services will be held at Holy Comforter-Saint
Cyprian Catholic Church, 1357 East Capitol
Street, SE, Washington, DC 20019 Friday, February 23, 2018 10 a.m., viewing 11 a.m., Mass.
DEATH NOTICE
ATTILA S. CIGTAY, M.D.
Attila S. Cigtay M.D. died February 19, 2018
at Manor Care of Arlington due to complications of a stroke. Dr. Cigtay was a retired
radiologist and is survived by his devoted
wife of 59 years, Dr. Olcay S. Cigtay of
Mclean, Virginia.
Attila was born in Izmir, Turkey on December
21st,1932 to Selahattin and Aliye Cigtay. He
graduated from Istanbul University Medical
School in 1956. After graduation, Dr. Cigtay
served two years with the U.N. peace keeping force in Korea following the war. The
Cigtays came to America in 1958 following
their marriage in Turkey. Dr. Cigtay started
his residency at D.C. General Hospital and
finished his training at George Washington
University Hospital in Washington D.C. Upon
completion he joined the staff as a radiologist
at George Washington University Hospital for
one year prior to returning to Turkey.
She and her husband moved to Melbourne
Village, Florida in 2015, and attended First
United Methodist Church in Melbourne, Florida.
In lieu of flowers, donations in her honor may
be made to Aging Matters in Brevard, 3600
W. King Street, Cocoa, Florida, 32926.
His wife of 48 years, Patricia (née Howard),
was his high school sweetheart. He was
always quick to point out she was an allstate champion basketball player on an 840 team at Norfolk Catholic High School.
THOMAS
will be missed dearly by her family and
friends whose lives she touched.
Her family would like to thank the staff of
Vitas Hospice and her home health care
providers for their kind and compassionate
care during her last months.
He was an avid, lifelong basketball player
who often surprised much taller and
younger opponents with his solid presence
under the basket and consistently accurate
hook shot.
HELEN D. THOMAS
DEYO
Viewing and services will be held at Ammen
Family Funeral Care, 1001 S. Hickory Street,
Melbourne, Florida, on Saturday, February
24 from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. Burial at
Fountainhead Memorial Park, Palm Bay Florida at 12:30 p.m., with a luncheon reception
to follow at the AHF Hall from 1 to 4 p.m.,
535 Hammock Road, Melbourne Village, FL
32904.
Captain MICHAEL F. O'BRIEN
Captain Michael F. O’Brien, “Obie”, of
Springfield, Virginia, died peacefully on February 19, 2018, at the age of 72. He spent 28
years in the United States Navy where he
served as a naval aviator (A7s) in command
positions and in Washington as an advisor in
political-military policy. He spent 22 years at
NASA, where he began by leading the team
that negotiated international agreements
for the International Space Station and
concluded with 12 years as the Associate
Administrator for International and Interagency Relations, visiting over 60 countries.
He was a leader who highly valued teamwork, dedication, precision, pride and
courage and never took himself too seriously. He loved to laugh, and his good
nature and sense of humor (particularly
his love of puns) lessened any sadness for
those around him during difficult times. He
was deeply loved by many.
Entered into eternal rest on Saturday, February
17, 2018. Beloved wife of Richard R. Smith;
devoted mother of Eldalene Harper and Daron
Clay. She is also survived by one grandchild,
Andrew R. Clay; two sisters, one brother and a
host of other relatives and friends. Mrs. Smith
may be viewed at STEWART FUNERAL HOME,
4001 Benning Rd., NE, Saturday, February 24
from 1 p.m. until service at 2 p.m. Online
condolences may be made:
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
VIRGINIA LOUISE WESTBROOK
Virginia was preceded in death by her parents Almeda and Robert Brown, daughter
Jacqueline McAlexander, brother Robert
Brown, Jr., and a great grandson.
HAWKINS
SMITH
WESTBROOK
Virginia Louise Westbrook, a long-time resident of Darnestown, Maryland, passed away
peacefully February 16, 2018 at home in
Melbourne Village, Florida. She is survived by
her husband of 66 years, Lewis Westbrook,
brother Gene Brown, daughter Brenda Mathews, sons Robert and Keith Westbrook,
seven grandchildren and five great grandchildren.
PEARL GREENE JEFFERSON
Peacefully entered into eternal rest on Friday,
February 16, 2018. Survived by her devoted
daughter, Alva C. Hinton; loyal son, Barrington
O. Jefferson, Jr.; one sister, Eileen Crawford;
one sister-in-law, Margie Greene; faithful
nephew, Harold Lucas, Sr.; dedicated granddaughter, Deborah Mayronne; and a host of
other relatives, friends and loved ones. A Mass
of Christian Burial will be offered at The Nativity
Catholic Church, 6001 13th Street, NW, Washington, DC on Friday, February 23. Viewing:
10 a.m., Service: 11 a.m. Interment Lincoln
Memorial Cemetery, Suitland, MD. Services
entrusted to Marshall-March Funeral Home.
YVONNE R. SMITH
Eleanor received a BA in Voice from Mary
Washington College which was then the
Womens College of the University Of Virginia,
and a Masters degree from the University.
A teaching position at Lynnbrook Elementary School brought her to the DC area. She
was a longtime member of ALPHA DELTA
KAPPA teachers sorority, first the KAPPA chapter, and then TAU chapter, where she held
several offices. A classically trained singer,
she was also a member of MU PHI EPSILON
international music sorority. She loved travel,
toured throughout the US and Europe and
visited Turkey, Egypt and Peru
SAVAGE
LEE
Of Annandale, Virginia, died Thursday, February
15, 2018 after a lengthy illness. She is survived
by four brothers, Edward (Genevieve), Roderick
(Kathleen), Steven (Sandy) and Frederick and
several nephews and nieces. Graveside service
and Interment is private.
AGELCA STEAGALL "Angie" (Age 95)
ELEANOR POLLOCK (Age 84)
Passed away peacefully on Saturday, February 10, 2018. Survived
by two daughters, Nana I. DayoOtekunrin and Biba M. Inoussa;
two sisters, Frances Scott and
Regina Sanders; and two grandchildren. Viewing, Friday, February 23 at Hillandale Baptist Church, 2601 Powder Mill Rd.,
Adelphi, MD 20783, viewing, 9 a.m.; service, 10
a.m. Interment George Washington Cemetery.
SIMONS
CATHERINE ANN SIMONS (Age 58)
GRACE E. HARRIS (Age 94)
On Wednesday, February 14, 2018. Loving
and devoted mother of John A. Harris, Jr.,
Ronald L. (Joyce) Harris and Kenneth J. (Evelyn)
Harris; beloved grandmother of André M. Harris, Rachel T. Harris and Robyn T. Harris. She is
survived by three great-grandchildren, André
Z. Hudson, Kristefer L. Harris and Samia J.
Courtney; other relatives and friends. Mrs.
Harris will lie in state at Faith Presbyterian
Church, 4161 South Capitol St., SW, Friday,
February 23 from 10 a.m. until funeral services
at 11 a.m. Interment Lincoln Memorial Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributionsmay be made to the American Cancer Society.
Services by STEWART.
KENARD DANIEL HAWKINS
On Sunday, February 18, 2018. The beloved
husband of Carol; father of Bruce(Evelyn),
Christopher, Tracey (Jay) and Peter (Terri). Also
survived by five grandchildren. Friends are
invited to celebrate Len's life from 6 to 8
p.m. on Friday, February 23 at the George P.
Kalas Funeral Home, 2973 Solomons Island
Rd., Edgewater, MD. A memorial service will
be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, February 24
at the Annapolis Evangelical Lutheran Church,
38 W. Central Ave., Edgewater, MD. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be made to the
Len Pimental Memorial Fund, c/o Annapolis
Evangelical Lutheran Church. Online guestbook available at
www.KalasFuneralHomes.com
MARY MARTHA COMBS INOUSSA
On Tuesday, February 20, 2018
of Gaithersburg, MD. Adored
husband of Lori Shell; devoted
father of Samantha, Lindsay
and Ryan; beloved son of Ely
and Helen Shell; loving brother
of Robin Shell and Joyce (Richie) Lynch
and brother-in-law of Marni and Michael
(Sandra) Finkelstein; treasured son-in-law
of Robert and Beverly Finkelstein. Also
survived by his nieces, Hailey and Nicole
and nephews, Brendan, Matthew and
Daniel. David had a good sense of humor
and always made everyone laugh, most of
all he loved his CAPS! Funeral services will
be held on Friday, February 23, 10 a.m. in
the Sadugor Gazebo at Garden of Remembrance Memorial Park in Clarksburg, MD.
Family will be receiving guests immediately
following services at the home of Robert
and Beverly Finkelstein. Minyan will be at
7 p.m., Saturday-Monday at the Finkelstein
residence as well as receiving guests from 2
to 4 p.m. on Sunday and Monday. Memorial
contributions may be made to PANCAN
(www.pancan.org) or a charity of your
choice. Services entrusted to Sagel Bloomfield Danzansky Goldberg Funeral Care.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
STEAGALL
LEONARD THEODORE PIMENTAL
INOUSSA
B7
RE
DEATH NOTICE
GROVER
Respected vascular surgeon and clinical
thought leader, dies at 65.
EZ
BOYD D. DEYO
It is with a sad heart that we announce the
passing of Boyd D. Deyo on Thursday, February
15, 2018 at Henrico Doctors Hospital in Richmond, VA. The funeral service will be held at
11 a.m. on Saturday, February 24, 2018 at St.
John Baptist Church, 17080 South River Rd.,
Woodford, VA 22580 with a viewing one hour
prior to the service. Interment and repast will
follow immediately after the service.
Online condolences may be submitted to
cwewardsfuneralhome.com
From 1964 to 1967, he worked at Hacettepe
University in Ankara,Turkey. Upon his return
to America, he joined the faculty at George
Washington University Hospital and concurrently served as a clinical faculty member
teaching medical students at Georgetown
University Hospital. He went on to enjoy a
long career in private practice in Alexandria,
VA and Falls Church, VA prior to retiring for
the first time.
Dr. Cigtay was coerced out of retirement and
enjoyed a long second career with Kaiser
Permanente in Springfield, Virginia. His final
retirement brought him more time to pursue
his passions which included world traveling
and gourmet dining with his beloved wife
Olcay. His hobbies included reading, watching European soccer and solving some of
the most challenging crossword puzzles ever
written.
He leaves behind his nephew Matt A. Uzer
M.D. (Leyla), of Mclean, Virginia, and their
four daughters Sara, Ashley, Heather, and
Olivia; his nephew Michael F. Uzer, M.D.
(Leslie) of Chicago, Illinois, and their children
Emily and Max; his niece Ayse I. Crowley
(Ken) of Mclean, Virginia, and their children
Tyler and Holly. He also leaves behind a
multitude of close friends with whom he and
Olcay socialized with regularly.
Services will be held at National Funeral
Home, 7482 Lee Highway, Falls Church on
February 25 at 11 a.m. A reception hosted
by Olcay Cigtay M.D. will follow the service.
Memories of Attila and condolences can be
expressed at www.dignitymemorial.com.
In lieu of flowers, contributions in his memory
may be made to Washington Turkish
Women’s Association, www.wtwa1965.com.
Peacefully on Tuesday,
February 13, 2018. He is
survived by his loving wife
of 68 years, Vera Silver;
two devoted children, Barbara Johnson and Michael
Silver; a brother, Randolph
Silver;
sister,
Genola
Eiland; grandchildren, Bishop Ronald
(LaShawn) Demery, Jr., Eric (Nikita), Duane
(Angel), Michael A., Brian (Keisha) and Felecia Silver; a host of other relatives and
friends. Apostle will lie in honor, Friday,
February 23 from 12 noon until Reflection
of Life Celebration at 6 p.m. and Saturday,
February 24, visitation from 9 a.m. until
Celebration of Life Service at 10 a.m. at
Bible Way Temple, 1100 New Jersey Ave.,
NW, Washington, DC. Interment Washington National Cemetery.
www.briscoe-tonicfuneralhome.com
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
CURRENT 2018 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
Color
3" - $566
4" - $609
5" - $744
-----SUNDAY
Color
3" - $599
4" - $685
5" - $834
6"+ for ALL color notices
$224 each additional inch wkday
$250 each additional inch Sunday
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Scattered showers and cooler
The big high pressure off the East
Coast relents slightly and increases
our odds of clouds and rain. It’s not a
lot of rain, mainly some occasional
showers, perhaps focused on late
day. But we are behind a cold front and socked in
with clouds, so temperatures struggle
comparatively. Highs range from the upper 40s to
lower 50s most spots. Tonight, scattered light
showers could linger, along with some fog or
mist. Temperatures under cloudy skies will be
around 40 to the low 40s.
Today
Rain
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Cloudy,
shower
Saturday
P.M. rain
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Rain, warm
Monday
Partly sunny,
breezy
Tuesday
Partly sunny
54° 42
55° 50
63° 55
70° 49
57° 41
54° 39
FEELS*: 49°
FEELS: 51°
FEELS: 62°
FEELS: 65°
FEELS: 57°
FEELS: 50°
CHNCE PRECIP: 70%
P: 55%
P: 55%
P: 65%
P: 15%
P: 25%
WIND: NE 7–14 mph
W: SE 4–8 mph
W: ENE 4–8 mph
W: SW 8–16 mph
W: ENE 4–8 mph
W: WNW 8–16 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
45/36
Hagerstown
45/37
Davis
55/50
Philadelphia
49/37
Charlottesville
59/45
FORECAST
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
82° 3:43 p.m.
56° 6:51 a.m.
49°/32°
82° 2018
7° 1885
80° 4:00 p.m.
59° 5:00 a.m.
48°/27°
80° 2018
7° 1968
79° 4:00 p.m.
52° 2:20 a.m.
46°/28°
79° 2018
2° 2015
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +5.6° yr. to date: +2.1°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 42°
Richmond
68/47
Virginia Beach
69/48
Norfolk
73/48
Past 24 hours
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Totals for season
OCEAN: 47°
Kitty Hawk
69/53
OCEAN: 48°
Pollen: High
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
High
Low
Moderate
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
4.40"
1.97"
5.34"
4.78"
0.0"
3.3"
0.00"
3.85"
2.07"
5.64"
4.75"
0.0"
6.6"
0.00"
4.62"
2.16"
5.62"
5.21"
0.0"
8.7"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
1 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly cloudy, rain, mild. High 56–63.
Wind southwest 8–16 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy, showers.
Low 47–52. Wind southwest 7–14 mph. Friday, mostly
cloudy, showers. Wind southwest 6–12 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, mostly cloudy, morning fog,
shower, breezy. High 49–73. Wind northeast 7–14 mph.
Tonight, mostly cloudy, rain, cooler. Low 37–48. Wind
northeast 10–20 mph. Friday, mostly cloudy, shower. High
50–65. Wind northeast 6–12 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly cloudy, cooler, rain.
Wind northeast 5–10 knots. Waves a foot or less. • Lower Potomac
and Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly cloudy, cooler, rain. Wind
northeast 7–14 mph. Waves a foot on the Potomac, 2 feet or less on
the Chesapeake.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls will be
4.9 feet, rising to 5.1 feet Friday. Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
Today’s tides
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
12:08 a.m.
6:54 a.m.
12:24 p.m.
7:54 p.m.
3:35 a.m.
10:01 a.m.
4:25 p.m.
9:56 p.m.
6:10 a.m.
Ocean City
ACTUAL
Ocean City
49/42
Lexington
65/53
Annapolis
Su
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Weather map features for noon today.
Baltimore
50/38
Dover
52/38
Cape May
Annapolis
49/38
50/39
OCEAN: 44°
Washington
54/42
RECORD
°
Sa
REGION
AVERAGE
12:05 p.m.
6:24 p.m.
none
Norfolk
1:38 a.m.
8:02 a.m.
2:03 p.m.
8:12 p.m.
Point Lookout
5:53 a.m.
12:45 p.m.
6:08 p.m.
none
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Edinburg, TX 89°
Low: Chinook, MT –32°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
34/26/sn
46/24/s
36/19/sn
80/61/pc
44/44/r
50/38/r
16/–6/s
82/64/c
23/1/pc
34/15/sn
39/31/sn
36/31/pc
31/22/pc
81/58/pc
62/57/r
77/59/c
29/10/pc
39/34/c
50/47/r
39/37/i
49/39/r
29/14/pc
Tomorrow
39/35/r
52/23/s
26/17/s
78/61/c
67/59/c
51/46/r
20/11/s
80/64/c
22/6/pc
34/24/c
41/37/r
49/34/sh
41/34/i
80/61/pc
78/58/sh
78/59/pc
31/13/c
47/32/r
64/49/r
54/37/r
57/52/r
36/17/c
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
33/26/i
39/32/c
61/36/s
35/19/sn
25/13/pc
40/29/i
82/70/sh
62/61/r
47/44/c
83/63/pc
80/62/pc
38/32/i
57/38/pc
54/51/r
59/44/pc
56/54/r
61/59/r
84/72/pc
39/34/c
29/22/sn
68/62/t
84/70/pc
45/34/r
73/48/c
36/23/pc
48/34/r
67/38/s
22/3/sn
24/8/pc
39/35/r
81/72/sh
80/68/c
56/42/r
78/64/t
81/62/pc
43/30/c
51/32/pc
61/56/r
61/41/pc
69/55/r
69/63/r
84/72/pc
44/31/sh
31/16/c
76/62/r
80/70/sh
43/40/r
65/56/c
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
38/27/i
32/21/sn
84/65/pc
49/37/r
62/42/pc
45/42/r
38/23/pc
41/22/sf
42/32/sh
80/57/c
37/12/sf
68/47/c
54/30/c
49/42/c
82/72/pc
37/24/c
61/52/pc
54/39/pc
83/70/pc
40/27/c
29/11/c
36/27/c
87/70/s
37/25/i
49/40/r
34/20/pc
85/64/pc
48/45/r
57/36/pc
62/45/r
37/31/r
40/35/sh
42/37/r
75/60/c
36/16/pc
67/56/c
57/27/s
55/42/c
81/72/pc
34/20/sn
60/45/pc
56/41/pc
81/71/pc
39/35/sh
28/23/sn
44/33/sh
87/69/pc
45/35/c
World
High: Julia Creek, Australia 110°
Low: Oymyakon, Russia –52°
Feb 23
First
Quarter
Mar 1
Full
Mar 9
Last
Quarter
Mar 17
New
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
6:51 a.m.
10:49 a.m.
7:24 a.m.
2:14 a.m.
12:17 a.m.
3:43 a.m.
Set
5:53 p.m.
none
6:43 p.m.
11:45 a.m.
10:27 a.m.
1:14 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Tomorrow
Addis Ababa
69/54/sh
Amsterdam
40/27/c
Athens
61/50/t
Auckland
71/62/pc
Baghdad
72/51/c
Bangkok
92/77/t
Beijing
49/22/pc
Berlin
37/20/c
Bogota
65/48/r
Brussels
39/25/s
Buenos Aires
84/59/s
Cairo
75/59/s
Caracas
71/62/pc
Copenhagen
34/26/c
Dakar
71/62/pc
Dublin
44/34/c
Edinburgh
45/30/pc
Frankfurt
38/24/s
Geneva
35/29/c
Ham., Bermuda 70/64/s
Helsinki
17/8/c
Ho Chi Minh City 94/73/t
75/53/pc
38/25/s
61/50/sh
73/62/pc
68/50/pc
87/77/t
51/24/pc
34/22/s
66/45/sh
37/25/s
85/64/pc
73/60/s
72/62/pc
35/25/pc
70/60/pc
42/32/c
43/30/c
37/26/s
38/31/pc
70/65/pc
16/1/pc
93/73/pc
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
62/57/sh
76/51/pc
52/44/sh
59/48/pc
72/55/c
56/31/c
83/74/pc
90/67/pc
86/78/t
79/69/pc
59/41/s
42/31/s
51/25/s
91/75/s
76/51/pc
28/15/c
14/–2/pc
93/77/pc
85/59/pc
86/58/pc
29/18/c
29/13/c
40/26/s
32/20/c
67/64/c
76/54/c
50/43/c
60/47/s
74/58/pc
54/36/c
83/74/pc
93/67/pc
86/79/t
79/69/pc
60/41/s
42/30/s
49/27/s
90/75/s
75/53/pc
37/31/sn
14/–2/s
92/77/pc
85/60/c
87/63/pc
29/21/c
35/27/i
39/28/s
31/17/pc
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
90/77/t
83/61/pc
51/42/sh
91/67/pc
88/55/pc
39/32/sn
43/27/sn
49/38/c
90/78/c
26/18/sf
79/70/c
64/58/r
58/45/c
41/38/sn
33/25/c
33/26/sn
28/14/c
84/75/r
85/65/pc
54/43/r
90/67/pc
86/56/pc
43/33/sn
46/25/s
58/44/s
87/77/c
27/13/c
81/72/pc
68/63/c
57/44/pc
47/39/pc
41/32/sh
34/22/sn
27/18/pc
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
VIRGINIA
MARYLAND
Speaker drops some names in Medicaid pitch
Estate sale of KKK robe
benefits Nigerian student
Cox ties expansion to
Pence’s Indiana model,
working with Trump
BY
L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond — Leaders of Virginia’s House of Delegates are
trying to sell wary fellow Republicans on Medicaid expansion by
tying it to President Trump and
Vice President Pence.
House Speaker M. Kirkland
Cox (R-Colonial Heights) contends that expanding the federalstate health-care program during
the Trump administration offers
the “best chance for conservative
reforms.” He also compares the
House’s expansion plan to the
“Indiana-style model” adopted by
that state in 2015, when Pence
was its governor.
Cox’s effort to associate the
plan with Trump and Pence
comes as it faces a critical vote
Thursday, when the House of
Delegates takes up the matter as
part of its proposed two-year
budget.
There is little doubt that the
House, which the GOP controls
by a 51-to-49 majority, will keep
Medicaid expansion in the spending plan, given that Democrats
and at least a few Republicans are
on board.
But expansion advocates hope
it does not merely squeak out of
the chamber. Firm support for
expansion from House Republicans could strengthen that chamber’s hand in budget negotiations
with the Senate, which is expected to pass a rival budget plan
Thursday without expansion.
Republican voters strongly
supported the idea of Medicaid
expansion when it was tied to
Trump, according to an internal
poll conducted by the House Republican Caucus and obtained by
The Washington Post.
“The House health care plan
allows Virginia to work with the
Trump Administration to expand
Medicaid while guaranteeing
common sense reforms to control
costs and protect taxpayers. Do
you support or oppose this plan?”
voters were asked.
When expansion is presented
as a way to “work with Trump,”
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
House Speaker M. Kirkland Cox (R-Colonial Heights) supports a
state health plan with co-pays and work stipulations.
Republicans were nearly twice as
likely to support it than Democrats. The poll used a computerized voice to pose the questions to
1,000 likely voters, a method
generally considered less accurate than surveys conducted by
live callers. House leaders have
presented the findings to GOP
holdouts.
Cox, who endorsed Sen. Marco
Rubio (R-Fla.) over Trump in the
2016 presidential primary, opposed Medicaid expansion for
years but changed course after an
anti-Trump wave in state elections last year nearly erased the
GOP’s 66-to-34 majority in the
House.
Expansion is a top priority for
Gov. Ralph Northam (D), as it was
for his Democratic predecessor,
Terry McAuliffe. They contend it
would provide health care to as
many as 400,000 uninsured Virginians and create 30,000 jobs.
A poll released this month by
the Wason Center for Public Policy found 56 percent of voters
support expanding Medicaid
while 53 percent said they would
back a compromise of partial
Medicaid expansion if “acrossthe-board expansion” does not
pass the General Assembly.
Republicans have warned over
the years that Washington could
not afford to make good on its
promise to pick up most of the
$2 billion annual cost. Some fiscal hawks in the House say that
concern has hardly gone away
given the soaring federal deficits
projected to result from Trump’s
budget plan. Other Republicans
have expressed philosophical objections to providing an entitlement to able-bodied Virginians,
no matter how poor.
Cox still describes his support
grudgingly, noting that the
Republican-led Congress has
been unable to repeal the Affordable Care Act, the Obama-era
health-care law that laid the
groundwork for expansion. But
as he seeks to woo House and
Senate Republicans, Cox con-
tends having Trump in the White
House softens the blow.
“My long-standing concerns
about the cost of expansion aren’t
going away, but unfortunately the
ACA is here to stay and the Trump
administration is the best chance
to secure conservative reforms,”
Cox said. “The governor agreed to
an Indiana-style model with a
strong work requirement instead
of straightforward Medicaid expansion.”
Pence’s plan, dubbed Healthy
Indiana Plan 2.0, required copays from low-income recipients
and charged smokers higher
rates. Hospital fees and cigarette
taxes covered the state’s share of
the costs.
The plan Cox supports also
would impose work requirements for able-bodied adults and
co-pays. It would allow the state
to pull out of expansion if the
federal government reneged on
its promise to pick up 90 percent
of the $2 billion-a-year cost. And
hospitals would foot the state’s
10 percent share through a “provider assessment.”
John Fredericks, a conservative radio host who was chairman
of Trump’s Virginia campaign,
echoed Cox’s appeal to Trump
supporters in the Bull Elephant, a
conservative blog.
“In my mind, if it’s good
enough for a conservative like
Mike Pence and Indiana, then it’s
good enough for Virginia,” Fredericks wrote.
But some expansion foes are
not buying the Trump-Pence appeal.
On its Facebook page, the Virginia chapter of Americans for
Prosperity posted a photo of
Pence by a remark he made at a
National Governors Association
meeting in July 2017.
“Obamacare has put far too
many able-bodied adults on the
Medicaid rolls, leaving many disabled and vulnerable Americans
at the back of the line,” Pence
said.
U.S. Senate hopeful Corey R.
Stewart, who co-chaired Trump’s
Virginia campaign with Fredericks but was later ousted, blasted
House Republicans as “flimsier
than toilet paper” and announced plans to hold a news
conference on the steps of the
state Capitol on Thursday.
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
Eastern Shore auctioneer
donates online bid
money to his employee
BY
C HRISTINA T KACIK
David Allen, owner of A&M
Auctioneers and Appraisers, never quite knows what’s going to
turn up from the old homes and
shops of the Eastern Shore.
Once, he said, he came across a
box of wooden and metal washboards from an old general store,
100 years old and looking new.
This month, though, the
Wicomico County auction house
handled an item with a somewhat
darker history.
In an otherwise humdrum estate in Cambridge — heavy on
Persian rugs, china dolls and
decorative crystal vases — was a
white robe, with a deep red patch
embroidered over the heart. A
number, 127, adorned the left
sleeve. The triangle-topped hood
was stained brown at the edges.
A&M offered the robe as part of
an online auction. The listing:
“Cambridge Lodge #127 original
Ku Klux Klan complete robe and
cap with original patch and embroidered lodge number on
sleeve.”
The KKK was active on Maryland’s Eastern Shore throughout
the 20th century. In 1928, the
Baltimore Sun estimated the
group’s membership there at
3,000 to 8,000. In the 1960s, the
Klan opened a recruiting office in
Salisbury. In later decades, members passed out leaflets, spread
racist graffiti and burned crosses
on the lawns of African American
residents, according to media accounts.
More recently, Richard Wilson
Preston Jr. of Baltimore founded
the Confederate White Knights of
the Ku Klux Klan around 2013.
The group gained notice late that
year when it applied for and
received permission to hold an
“organizational meeting” in the
Cecil County Administration
Building in Elkton. Last August,
Preston was accused of shooting
at a black man during the deadly
white supremacist rally in Charlottesville. He was indicted in
December on a charge of firing a
weapon near a school.
Allen said this was the first
time he had come across a KKK
robe as part of an estate.
“It’s the only one we’ve ever
sold and probably the only one I’ll
ever sell again,” he said.
Liz Harward, an antiques dealer from Pasadena, came across
the item through an ad on Facebook. Harward said she was horrified.
“To offer that item in Black
History Month, are you kidding
me? I was shocked . . . and also
kind of sad,” she said. “You don’t
offer something up that’s a symbol of death.”
She contacted the auction
house, hoping to dissuade it from
selling the item.
Allen told her the auction
house was contractually bound to
sell all the items from the estate
— including the robe. But together with the seller, he arranged to
donate proceeds from its sale
toward college costs for one of his
employees, whom he described as
an immigrant from Nigeria
studying in the United States.
Contacted by the Sun, the student declined to comment and
wished to remain anonymous.
“We didn’t really want it publicized,” Allen said. But the solution
was “something that we feel was
fair,” he said, given the item’s
legacy.
Allen said that under the terms
of the auction house’s contract,
he couldn’t reveal the buyer or
the seller. But he said the robe,
which sold Feb. 7 during the
online auction, went for about
$1,300.
“Take it or leave it, it’s a piece of
history,” Allen said.
Harward said that even with
the proceeds being donated, she
still disagrees with the sale of a
KKK robe.
So did Malik Russell, a spokesman for the national headquarters of the NAACP in Baltimore,
who said he found no worth in
the preservation of a symbol of
the Klan.
People who find items such as
KKK robes in their closets should
burn them, he said.
KLMNO
Style
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
At long last,
have you
left no sense
of decency?
THEATER REVIEW
BY
ANDRÉS CONTINUED ON C3
JIM YOUNG/AGENCE
FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
JESSE DITTMAR FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A FEATHER IN
METCALF’S CAP
BY
K AREN H ELLER
new york — Actress Laurie Metcalf
Artifact from Trump’s
second marriage to be
sold at auction. C2
MUSIC REVIEW
George Burton takes
the crowd on a wild ride
at Blues Alley. C4
CAROLYN HAX
Mom’s outrage over a
pet name sounds fishy.
Is it a red herring? C8
T IM C ARMAN
Following a turbulent year in
which chefs from New York to
Oakland were accused of sexual
harassment, the James Beard
Foundation
announced
on
Wednesday that it would bestow
its annual Humanitarian of the
Year award on a chef who exhibited far more selfless qualities during 2017: José Andrés, the Washingtonian who led the charge to
feed millions of people in Houston, Puerto Rico and Southern
California after natural disasters
struck those areas.
“José’s work in Puerto Rico and
Haiti shows how chefs can use
their expertise and unique skills
to enact profound change on a
global scale,” Mitchell Davis, the
foundation’s executive vice president, said in a statement. Andrés
will receive the award at the foundation’s May 7 ceremony in Chicago. “He has demonstrated how, at
the most difficult times, hotcooked meals provide more than
nutrition, they provide dignity.
José’s work serves as an important
reminder of how precious and
nourishing food can be. And we
couldn’t imagine a more fitting
honoree this year as we celebrate
how chefs and our industry
‘Rise.’ ”
The foundation’s Rise campaign — which “celebrates the
community of chefs and industry
leaders who rise to the occasion”
— is part of its efforts at damage
Stalwart actress sees Oscar nod for ‘Lady Bird’ as ‘karma’
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
C
He’ll get humanitarian
award for his work in
providing disaster relief
SULLIVAN CONTINUED ON C5
“Peepshow” exposes
the Harvey Weinsteins
of the world. C2
SU
Beard
to honor
D.C. chef
Andrés
When people act
like cretins,
should they be
ignored? Does
talking about
their misdeeds
Margaret
merely give them
Sullivan
oxygen?
Maybe so. But
the sliming — there is no other
word for it — of the survivors of
last week’s Florida high school
massacre is beyond the pale.
Here is the often-appalling
pundit Dinesh D’Souza,
outright mocking the students
at Marjory Stoneman Douglas
High, after they showed their
disappointment in a state
legislature vote on assault
weapons on Tuesday: “Worst
news since their parents told
them to get summer jobs.”
Recall for a moment: These
are teenagers whose friends
were brutally murdered a week
ago.
D’Souza, who has a huge
social-media following
precisely because he sinks so
low so often, also tweeted out
his cynical scorekeeping:
“Adults: 1. Kids: 0.” And he took
a shot at what he called their
“politically orchestrated grief.”
(D’Souza’s tweets went viral,
and, under attack, he backed off
a few steps Wednesday
morning, with an apology that
said he was only trying to
blame the news media. It sure
did not sound that way at the
time.)
But there was far worse out
there. Emma González, the
Douglas High student who
made an impassioned speech
last week, became the object of
the worst kind of racism and
sexism.
One Twitter user called her a
“brown bald lesbian girl” —
disparagement that got some
approval from a state
legislator’s aide, the same aide
who was fired Tuesday for
telling the Tampa Bay Times
the students were paid and
coached actors.
“Both kids in the picture are
not students here but actors
that travel to various crisis
when they happen,” wrote the
aide, Benjamin Kelly, speaking
of González and David Hogg
(whom I interviewed last
week). That was, of course, a
lie.
But the conspiracy theory
had already spread far and
INSIDE
EZ
does not do fancy. Her boxy white
handbag hails from Target, “my favorite place to shop.” In a cozy Theater
District cafe, she appears in a blunt-cut
bob, jeans, sneakers, an oversize sweater, without a dab of makeup, a glint of
jewelry.
Metcalf prefers to work the same
way, not letting artifice — “a shell” she
calls it — distract from the work. But
she is in the midst of an Oscar campaign. The strategy involved would give
George Patton pause. So she consented
to doing a glamorous photo shoot a few
days before the interview. On her one
day off.
“A dream job is to walk right past
hair and makeup” and sail onto the
stage or set, says the critically acclaimed actress who, at the age of 62,
finally finds herself on the cusp of
mainstream stardom.
“I would win in the contest of who’s
had the best year,” she admits of her
movies-theater-television hat trick: an
Oscar nomination, the first in four
decades of acting, for her performance
as the exasperated mother, Marion, in
the film “Lady Bird.” A 2017 Tony Award
as returning Nora in “A Doll’s House,
Part 2.” A nine-episode revival next
month as beleaguered Jackie in “Roseanne,” the role she last played in 1997
and that snared her a trio of Emmys.
“I’d like to think that it’s karma,” says
Metcalf, one of the earliest members of
Chicago’s illustrious Steppenwolf Theatre, where she performed in dozens of
plays. “I’d like to think that, having
treated every single project as the most
important one in that moment, and
having worked your ass off, and given
150 percent to each one, that maybe
there’s a little payback.” She raises a
glass of pinot noir in a toast to her
marvelous year.
“It feels like ‘What the hell took
everyone so long? What have you been
looking at?’ ” says Jim Parsons of ‘The
Big Bang Theory,” where Metcalf has a
recurring role as the pious, shade-tossing mother of his character, Sheldon.
METCALF CONTINUED ON C3
“I’d like to think that, having treated every single project as the
most important one in that moment, and having worked your ass
off, and given 150 percent to each one, that maybe there’s a little
payback,” says supporting actress nominee Laurie Metcalf.
José Andrés and the nonprofit
group he founded helped feed
hurricane and wildfire victims.
BOOK WORLD
Even loners
shouldn’t
keep this to
themselves
BY
M ICHAEL D IRDA
For years I always considered
myself rather a loner, not antisocial or anything but simply, to
borrow the title of one of Kipling’s
“Just So Stories,” a cat that walked
by himself. But then one day it
struck me that I belonged to the
Baker Street Irregulars, the North
American Jules Verne Society, the
Wodehouse Society, the Lewis Carroll Society of North America and
half a dozen others. I was obviously more clubbable than I had imagined.
What I like about these groups,
along with the camaraderie, is
their publications. While academic journals tend to be unreadable, this isn’t the case for, say, the
Wodehouseans’s lively Plum
Lines, the Carrollian Knight Letter, the fanzine Old-Time Detection or the now sadly defunct All
Hallows: The Journal of the Ghost
Story Society. Over the years their
pages have taught me a lot and
done so in an entertaining fashion.
So here’s some advice: If you’re
passionate about a subject, don’t
restrict yourself to reading about
it in books and online. Look for the
field’s “trade” or fan publications.
Consider, for example, the most
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C2
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Clooney in 2020? That’s
the $500,000 question
the right gleefully asks.
For sale: A candlestick once
owned by President Trump
Speculating about an Oprah presidential
bid is sooo last month. The celebrity whose
2020 plans everyone is suddenly interested in:
George Clooney.
The actor prompted a fresh round of
speculation about his possible political
ambitions when he announced via Twitter
that he and his wife, human rights attorney
Amal Clooney, would be donating $500,000
to the gun-rights march being held March 24
and would participate in
the protest. Media mogul
Oprah Winfrey, who has
been the subject of intense
speculation following a
fiery, politically tinged
Golden Globes speech,
followed with a tweet
saying she’d match the
George Clooney Clooneys’ big gift.
Cue the sirens.
“CLOONEY 2020 VISION?
OPRAH TEAMS WITH
GEORGE” was the all-caps
headline blaring across the
Drudge Report, with a link
to the Hill newspaper’s story
about the twin donations.
(We should note that the
splashy Clooney gift is
Amal Clooney
hardly out of character — in
fact, it’s exactly what he’s long been known for:
cutting big checks for liberal causes and
showing his chiseled face in their support.) But
the echo chamber was already noisy.
Even Fox News host Sean Hannity hyped
the possibility, expressing his mock support
for a possible Clooney bid during his Tuesday
afternoon radio show. “My attitude is, ‘Run,
George, run,’ ” said Hannity, who is an
outspoken backer of President Trump,
Clooney’s ostensible rival. “If George Clooney
wants to run, I’m all for it.”
And hey, while we’re at it, why not widen the
field? Director Steven Spielberg and wife
Kate Capshaw said that they, too, would
match the Clooneys’ donation. Film producer
Jeffrey Katzenberg and his wife, Marilyn,
also said they would put up $500,000.
And although he hasn’t pledged to open his
wallet, Justin Bieber tweeted his support for
the march. So . . . Bieber 2020? Never mind,
he’s Canadian. And not old enough.
S
oon anyone looking to snag a piece of the
Trump legacy will get their chance —
without stealing towels from the White
House bathrooms.
Nate D. Sanders Auctions, which recently
sold a lock from the Watergate scandal, is
selling two candlesticks (melted wax
included!) that once lit up Donald Trump and
then-wife Marla Maples’s dinner table during
happier times. The pair of “hand-carved gilt
angels” — or two naked babies with wings
holding grapes — will hit the open market
Thursday with a starting bid of $6,000.
According to the auction house, the
authenticated candlesticks were last
auctioned off in 2013 by Maples, who has a
history of Marie Kondo-ing the last vestiges of
her marriage to Trump. Following their 1999
divorce, Maples sold the 7.45-carat emerald
cut platinum engagement ring Trump gave
her eight years prior. That rock fetched
$110,000, which she donated to charity. At the
time, Trump called the sale “pretty tacky” and
“really ridiculous.”
At the same auction in which she sold the
candlesticks, Maples offloaded a U-Haul’s
worth of other goods from her high-profile
marriage including art, clothes, luggage,
furniture from several of their homes, and a
bottle of 1945 Chateau Lafite Rothschild wine
that they had received as a wedding gift. A
portion of proceeds from that auction went to
charity and the rest to Maples, who unlike
“first Trump wife” Ivana, received a small (by
Trump standards) post-divorce settlement of
$2 million.
So why is the latest owner of the
candlesticks willing to part with them now?
According to a representative from Nate D.
Sanders, “the consignor thought now would
be a good opportunity to test the market” —
you know, seeing as how Trump is currently
the leader of the free world. That also means
more artifacts from his second marriage just
might end up on whatever eBay-type site rich
people use. And the proof could be in the
presidential seal. That engagement ring that
Maples auctioned off almost two decades ago?
It was resold in 2016 for $300,000 during the
height of election fever.
Donald Trump
and future wife
Marla Maples
in 1991.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alex Trebek
What is a di≠erent gig
for Trebek? Moderator
of Pennsylvania debate.
We’ll take “surprising side gigs” for $1,000!
“Jeopardy” host Alex Trebek will moderate a
debate among candidates vying for the
Pennsylvania gubernatorial race.
The longtime game show star will question
candidates at an Oct. 1 forum sponsored by
the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and
Industry, the organization announced. He’s
certainly an unusual choice — his onstage
queries are usually more focused on bits of
trivia than policy proposals (and they’re
accompanied by that jaunty “Jeopardy” tune,
which we imagine won’t be part of the
political debate). The Pennsylvania chamber’s
last two such debates have been moderated
by the kind of Wise Men of Broadcasting you
would expect: local ABC anchor Dennis
Owens (Tom Brokaw also spoke) and Ted
Koppel in 2010.
But Trebek, a native of Canada and a
naturalized U.S. citizen, is apparently living
out a dream. He told the Hill newspaper in
2013 that he would be a tough and persistent
questioner if he ever landed the gig of
moderating a presidential debate. “Unlike
some of the other moderators — I’m not going
to disparage them — but I have a different
approach,” he said. “I would not let the
politicians get away with standard responses.
I would try to pin them down, even though I
might look bad doing it.”
So how did he land this job? Sounds like a
combo of inspired thinking and good timing.
“We were trying to come up with ideas, and
someone on staff suggested Alex Trebek,” a
chamber spokeswoman told us. “And we
looked into it and found out he was available.”
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
Journals are perfect for avid readers
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
recent issues of four terrific critical journals devoted to fantastic
and supernatural fiction.
Weird Fiction Review is published by Centipede Press and edited by S.T. Joshi, the world’s leading authority on H.P. Lovecraft.
The current issue, No. 8 (Autumn
2017), contains nearly 400 pages of
articles, short fiction, artwork and
verse. The nonfiction is particularly outstanding. In “The Shasta
Publishing Story,” Stefan Dziemianowicz chronicles the small press
that brought out early hardcover
editions of Robert A. Heinlein,
Alfred Bester (“The Demolished
Man,” winner of the first Hugo
Award) and John W. Campbell Jr.,
including a collection named for
that writer-editor’s suspenseful
Antarctic horror story, “Who Goes
There?,” the basis of at least three
films, starting with Howard
Hawks’s 1951 classic, “The Thing
From Another World.”
Elsewhere in the issue, “Weird
Erotica in the Age of Essex,” by
Adam Groves, surveys science fictional porn during the 1960s and
70s. In these years, Essex House
and similar publishers issued such
notorious works as Samuel R.
Delany’s “The Tides of Lust” and
Charles Platt’s “The Gas.” In complementary articles Jason V. Brock
discusses the music in horror films
and Michael L. Shuman considers
how such films have influenced
pop music. Certainly fans of Dungeons & Dragons won’t want to
miss Chad Hensley’s “Visceral Visual Wizardry,” an illustrated account of the D&D artwork of Erol
Otus.
Still, my two favorite pieces are
Daniel Olson’s long interview with
Patrick McGrath, one of the masters of the New Gothic, and “The
Ghosts of James M. Barrie,” by
John C. Tibbetts. The latter focuses on the supernatural fiction and
theater of a writer too often remembered only for “Peter Pan.” As
I’ve written myself about Barrie’s
plays and his haunting short novel, “Farewell, Miss Julie Logan,” I
can say with some authority that
Tibbetts has produced the best
analysis this work has ever received.
Wormwood, edited by Mark
Valentine and published by Tartarus Press, is devoted to “Literature of the fantastic, supernatural
and decadent.” The most recent
issue, Number 29, (Autumn, 2017),
includes an article by Colin Insole
about Hope Mirrlees’s extraordinary 1928 fantasy, “Lud-in-theMist,” and three essays of rediscovery: Nick Wagstaff on the Marxist
writer Edward Upward, best
known for his surreal short story,
“The Railway Accident”; John
Howard on the science fiction author (and full-time bus driver)
Philip E. High; and the late, muchmissed Richard Dalby on Ulric
Daubeny, author of a single outstanding book of ghost stories,
“The Elemental.”
This issue of Wormwood also
features the second half of Nina
Antonia’s enthralling “Incurable:
Lionel Johnson, the Disconsolate
Decadent” (its first half appeared
last spring). Like his friend and
fellow poet Ernest Dowson (“I
have been faithful to thee, Cynara,
in my fashion”), Johnson died
young, a major fatality of what
Yeats called the Tragic Generation
G Street Fabrics
& Home Decorating Center
25
25%
50%
%
PRESIDENTS’
DAY SALE
HAPPENING
NOW!
G Street Fabrics
12220 Wilkins Avenue
Rockville, MD 20852
OFF
• MOST FABRICS
• Notions
• Buttons
• Trims
OFF
• MOST BROTHER
and BERNINA™
Sewing and
Embroidery Machines
CUSTOM LABOR on
• Draperies
• Upholstery
• Bedding
• Slipcovers
Extra Savings Coupons
www.gstreetfabrics.com
OFF
301-231-8998
of the 1890s. For a while the absinthe-drinking poet lived in a
haunted flat where unseen visitants left strange claw-like footprints.
If I were to list the greatest
supernatural short stories of all
time, I would start with Arthur
Machen’s “The White People,”
about a young girl’s unknowing
initiation into an ancient, otherworldly cult. A poet-in-prose, Machen also wrote the hallucinatory
novel “The Hill of Dreams,” and
the intricately nested eerie stories
gathered in “The Three Impostors.” Faunus: The Journal of the
Friends of Arthur Machen, appears twice a year and the latest
issue, Number 36 (Fall, 2017), offers reflections by Mark Goodall
on adapting Machen stories for
the film “Holy Terrors”; articles
about the Welsh fantasist from
two of his contemporaries, the
mystical modernist A.R. Orage
and decadent stylist extraordinaire M.P. Shiel; a chatty letter
from a noted collector of Machenalia and much else.
Last, but hardly least, is the
Green Book “Writings on Irish
Gothic, Supernatural and Fantastic Literature,” published by Swan
River Press. Issue 10 is dated Samhain 2017 — Samhain is a Gaelic
festival marking the first day of
winter — and entirely devoted to
Lord Dunsany and that prodigious
fantasy writer’s place in Irish literature. Editor Brian J. Showers has
gathered appreciations and critiques by Elizabeth Bowen, W.B.
Yeats, Sean O’Faolain and many
others, as well as a delightful reminiscence of visits to Dunsany Castle by Kathleen Tynan. This issue is
a must-have for any admirer of
“The King of Elfland’s Daughter.”
As a postscript, let me add one
sui generis item: Zagava Books’
facsimile edition of the first magazine entirely devoted to weird fiction and poetry. Published in 1919,
Der Orchideengarten, The Orchid Garden, features a garishly
macabre cover, in red and greenish yellow, depicting a gigantic
sickly blossom that has broken
through a hothouse window. On
one of its tendrils sits a voluptuous
nude, while two froglike creatures
peer from a seed sac. For those
whose German is rusty or nonexistent, Zagava’s facsimile interleaves English translations of the
original text.
mdirda@gmail.com
Michael Dirda reviews books each
Thursday for The Washington Post.
SANDI MOYNIHAN MULTIMEDIA
Natasha Gallop interacts with the audience in a scene from Dog & Pony DC’s “Peepshow.”
THEATER REVIEW
‘Peepshow’ lays bare objectification
and mistreatment in a satirical way
BY
P ETER M ARKS
At a crucial early juncture
of “Peepshow,” a video screen
flashes a list of names recently in
the news, starting with former
film studio chief Harvey Weinstein and moving on through
dozens of other prominent men,
identified of late in the wideranging reports of sexual misconduct and harassment.
This ignominious listing — a
national Dishonor Roll — goes on
and on, and of course, as you sit in
Woolly Mammoth Theatre’s rehearsal hall, where the heavily
didactic, mostly satirical show
runs through this weekend, you
are compelled to reflect anew on
the kinds of behavior these men
have gotten away with, how a
male-dominated culture has allowed them to do it — and how a
reckoning is finally taking place.
Consider the visually playful,
raucous,
collegiate-in-spirit
“Peepshow,” by the interactive
company Dog & Pony DC, an
element of that reckoning. As
conceived by Rachel Grossman,
Tosin Olufolabi and Ivania Stack,
and directed by Grossman, the
production unfolds as a series of
skits, designed to remind you of
the ways women have been objectified in popular culture and tacitly encouraged the bad acts now
being exposed everywhere.
The approach here might lean
heavily toward silliness — in one
long sequence, called Feminist
Fight Club, female wrestlers and
boxers costumed as “housewives”
and “suffragettes” pummel their
male chauvinist opponents — but
there is an undercurrent of revolutionary fervor suffusing the
evening. Are women supposed to
confine themselves to distinct
rules of comportment when expressing their disgust and pentup frustrations? No freakin’ way,
says “Peepshow.”
Some of the statements come
across as hackneyed in this 90minute revue, the only piece in
the Women’s Voices Theatre Festival, “Peepshow” declares, written, produced and performed entirely by women. There are moments of the production that echo
declarations you heard in feminist tracts back in the ’60s and
’70s. But at least the rawness and
loudness here are amplifying
things that authentically deserve
to be restated, widely and often.
peter.marks@washpost.com
Peepshow, conceived by Rachel
Grossman, Tosin Olufolabi and Ivania
Stack. Directed by Grossman. With
Elaine Yuko Qualter, Ouida Maedel,
Natasha Gallop, Kerry McGee,
Olufolabi, Amelia Hensley, Sandra
Mae Frank, Carol Spring. About
90 minutes. $20-$25. Through
Sunday at Woolly Mammoth Theatre,
641 D St. NW. Visit
dogandponydc.com.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
Oscar nominee has also earned acclaim for theater work
METCALF FROM C1
“She brings it every single time at
an intense, always fascinating,
realistic and grounded degree.”
The Oscar nomination arrived
the day Metcalf began rehearsals
for the upcoming Broadway revival of Edward Albee’s “Three
Tall Women.” (She accepted the
role before even reading the
Pulitzer Prize-winning play —
her now warped, water-stained,
scribble-infested copy perched
by her elbow on the cafe table —
for the opportunity to work with
co-star and British acting titan
Glenda Jackson.)
This will be her first time
attending the Academy Awards.
She says, “I watch the Oscars in
my pajamas like everybody else.”
I
t has been a strong movie
season for female characters
of a certain age who exhibit
grit, raw emotion, and little
makeup. “For me, it’s not new,”
Metcalf says. “That’s my literal
comfort zone.”
She was raised in Edwardsville, Ill., and attended Illinois
State University. After graduation, she joined an extraordinary
group of talented actors and
directors at Steppenwolf, including Gary Sinise, John Malkovich
and Jeff Perry, who became her
first husband. “In the beginning,
because we were all the same age
and there weren’t many plays
that we could all be in and be the
same age, I would be John Malkovich’s mother in ‘True West,’
then his 13-year-old niece in
‘Fifth of July,’ ” she recalls.
The plays and ensemble were
terrific. The income was not. “I
was always a secretary in the
early days, before we decided we
were brave enough to join Equity
and see if this thing has any legs,”
says Metcalf, who quit temping
at age 28. The next year, she
appeared in Steppenwolf ’s New
York production of Lanford Wilson’s “Balm in Gilead” to rapturous reviews. A “tour de force”
declared the New York Times.
She went on to become primarily a stage and television
performer. Her first movie was
“Desperately Seeking Susan”
(1985), a performance that still
displeases her. “I guess you could
call it a glamorous role,” she says
of her role as the sister-in-law of
the lead, played by Rosanna
Arquette. “I felt like I was playing
a caricature.”
She can’t recall her last movie
role before “Lady Bird.” It was
“Stop-Loss,” a decade ago, one
day’s labor. She has no personal
publicist.
After a glass of wine and
appetizers, she will consult with
a stylist — “a word I never
thought would come out of my
mouth,” she says, flicking it like a
piece of indeterminate foreign
food — for the Oscars luncheon
in Los Angeles that Sunday.
“They knew that they had to get
me one. They did not trust me at
all to put myself together.”
Designer Christian Siriano, a
fan who’s now a friend, offered to
create the gown for the Oscars
ceremony. “I don’t know what it’s
going to be like,” says Metcalf,
who didn’t even specify a color
MERIE WALLACE/A24
Saoirse Ronan, above left, and Laurie Metcalf in “Lady Bird,” the film for which Metcalf is nominated
for an Oscar. Metcalf earned three Emmys for her role in “Roseanne,” below left, with co-star
Roseanne Barr. She’ll also appear in a revival of “Roseanne,” bottom right, with Barr and Sara Gilbert.
ABC
for a dress that will be seen by a
massive global audience. “But I
trust him.”
She prefers to concentrate on
the work. When she’s in a play,
she runs through the entire
script before each performance.
“It’s boring and lonely,” she says,
“but I feel if I don’t do it, even on
a two-show day, something bad
will happen.”
Her preference is for new
plays. She is that rare actor who
admits to harboring zero interest
— none! — in tackling Shakespeare.
“It sounds blasphemous,” she
says, in a near whisper, “but I
don’t get it. I just don’t get it. I
like contemporary, bare-boned
writing. I don’t like having the
language that I barely understand get in the way of me
interpreting it over to an audience. It’s this barrier that I don’t
want to have to attack.”
She appears to have never
earned a bad review. Her “Lady
Bird” performance revealed “a
remarkable combination of grit,
vulnerability and panicked con-
cern,” raved The Washington
Post’s Ann Hornaday. “One of the
great stage actresses of our time,”
noted The Washington Post’s Peter Marks last spring.
“Three Tall Women” director
Joe Mantello once said of her
that “I will go anywhere anytime
to work with you again.” More
than three decades ago, she was
the second actor cast on “Roseanne,” after the title character
and creator, Roseanne Barr.
The producers, said Barr via
email, “told me that she was the
greatest actress they had ever
seen, and I came to agree with
them!”
“L
ady Bird,” directed and
written by Greta Gerwig
(nominated for both directing and original screenplay
Oscars), changed everything.
The role of Marion, Metcalf believes, came her way at the
suggestion of impresario Scott
Rudin, producer of “Doll’s
House” and now “Three Tall
Women,” the architect of the
Metcalf renaissance.
ADAM ROSE/ABC
“I could respond to the material immediately, the butting of
heads with a teenage child in the
house. I was so taken with the
amount of heart that Greta managed to infuse into this complex
mother-daughter relationship,”
says Metcalf. She plays opposite
Saoirse Ronan, who, at 23, received her third Oscar nomination. Marion, Metcalf says, “is not
the ogre, the monster in the
room. It’s a balance that I found
beautifully written.”
The movie premiered last year
at Telluride and caused Metcalf
to break “my five-year rule. Anything that I did on film or TV, I
would not be able to watch it for
at least five years after I was
done. It would give me a chance
to forget what I’d done, to stop
beating myself up for the many,
many hours afterward spent telling myself, ‘Oh, I should have
done this on that line.’ So I
squinted watching my part,” she
says, shrinking a bit on the
banquette, “but the rest of it I
was as moved and touched by the
film as everyone around me was.
As we were exiting, I heard so
many people say ‘I have to go and
call my mom.’ ”
When actress and director
first met, “Greta pulled out a
cardboard box filled with memo-
rabilia from her high school
years. It was at that moment
where I thought, ‘I’m the mom of
a real teenage girl,’ ” says Metcalf,
who is twice divorced — both
times from actors, Perry, who
plays Cyrus on “Scandal,” and
Matt Roth, who portrayed Jackie’s abusive boyfriend on “Roseanne” — and the mother of four,
ages 33 to 12.
Having children spaced so far
apart “wasn’t brave,” Metcalf
says. “It was — what would I call
it? — confused.”
Her eldest, Zoe Perry, will be
her Oscar date. Perry sounds
uncannily like Metcalf and was
cast as Mary Cooper, the mother
on the “Big Bang” spinoff, “Young
Sheldon.”
“This can’t ever have happened in the history of anything,
playing the same character decades apart, and we’re mother and
daughter,” Metcalf says. Perry’s
even the same age, 33, that her
mother was when she started on
“Roseanne.”
Metcalf appeared on three seasons of HBO’s woefully overlooked “Getting On” as the harried, clueless stool-sample expert
Dr. Jenna James. “I like to play
those characters that are just so
egotistical and driven, that it’s
like they have blinders on. I find
them really funny because they
don’t care what’s in their way,”
she says. “They’re just going to
get what they want, and you end
up weirdly rooting for them.
They become endearing in their
myopia.”
Awards season “has been this
ride for the last couple of
months,” she says. “I’ve gotten to
meet a lot of actors that I’ve
never gotten the chance to meet
before. Willem Dafoe, Sam Rockwell, Octavia Spencer, Sally Hawkins, Richard Jenkins. It’s like
we’re in the same class. We’re
having a shared experience.”
“I’m trying to enjoy the moment. It’s going to go away,” she
says. Despite the accolades and
nominations, she doesn’t have
another movie lined up after her
three-month Broadway run.
“I’m not worried about it.
Fortunately, in the theater, there
are many roles to age into,” she
says, before rushing off to meet
the stylist she never imagined
needing.
karen.heller@washpost.com
A “fiercely funny” '(
from Tony-nominated Danai Gurira
Andrés helped feed people stricken by disasters
ANDRÉS FROM C1
control in a restaurant industry
that has been rocked by scandals.
Among those charged with sexual
harassment last year are New Orleans chef and restaurateur John
Besh and New York chef and restaurateur Mario Batali, both
James Beard Award winners.
A Beard winner himself, Andrés rose to the occasion last year
with his humanitarian efforts,
which often put him at odds with
President Trump, who was accused of focusing his attention on
other matters as the crisis unfolded in Puerto Rico. (Andrés and
Trump have, of course, been legal
foes, too, after the chef backed out
of his lease at the Trump International Hotel in the summer of 2015
when the then-presidential candidate referred to Mexicans as drug
dealers and rapists on the campaign trail.)
During the latter part of 2017,
Andrés, the chef and owner behind ThinkFoodGroup, frequently took leave of his daily responsibilities to focus on feeding the
hungry with World Central Kitchen, the nonprofit group he founded after the massive earthquake in
Haiti. The chef and organization
first mobilized in Houston in late
August after Hurricane Harvey
turned much of the city into a
giant lake. A month later, they
were in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria, providing millions of
hot meals to residents who would
have had to survive on MREs and
snacks for months if not for Andrés and myriad volunteers.
Late in 2017, Andrés and World
Central Kitchen also collaborated
with L.A. Kitchen — founded by
Robert Egger, the same man who
started D.C. Central Kitchen, an
organization that Andrés has
championed for years — to help
feed displaced residents and firefighters who battled the wildfires
in Southern California.
When contacted by phone
about the Humanitarian of the
Year award, Andrés, 48, quickly
deflected attention away from
himself. “I’ve been praised
enough,” the chef said. This is
something of an understatement:
Since focusing his attention on
disaster relief, Andrés and his
work have been covered in depth
by many media outlets, including
the New York Times, “60 Minutes”
and the Wall Street Journal.
“We are all as good as the people
around us,” Andrés added. “In my
case . . . I was in the right moment,
in the right place and surrounded
by the right people.”
With women calling out sexual
harassers in many industries —
film, politics, media and restaurants, to name a few — Andrés
noted that many have called 2017
the year of the woman. He was fast
to acknowledge the influences in
his own development, including
chefs Susan McCreight Lindeborg
and Nora Pouillon, who were pioneers in helping to feed the poor
and hungry through an innovative Share Our Strength program
in the 1990s.
This isn’t the first time Andrés
has been honored for his activism.
In 2012, Time magazine listed An-
drés among the 100 Most Influential People in the World. The magazine specifically pointed to the
chef’s activism, including his
work for D.C. Central Kitchen, the
Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves and first lady Michelle
Obama’s Let’s Move campaign. At
that time, Andrés acknowledged
chef-activist Alice Waters as an
inspiration.
“I’ve been inspired by so many
people,” Andrés said Wednesday.
People continue to inspire him
daily, he added.
World Central Kitchen’s work
in Puerto Rico has, in fact, inspired Andrés to rethink how the
nonprofit organization goes about
its business in disaster zones. To
date, WCK has served 3.3 million
meals in Puerto Rico, most of
them prepared by volunteer chefs
who work in makeshift kitchens,
and the organization continues to
have a presence on the island.
Volunteers still make more than
6,000 meals a day for residents in
areas that have yet to fully recover
from the hurricane, Andrés said.
But during a recent trip to the
island, Andrés and crew started
developing new approaches to
feed people after natural disasters. One idea includes shipping
containers retrofitted into mobile
kitchens, which could be moved
from place to place within 24 to 48
hours. The nonprofit group also
wants to help Puerto Ricans grow
more of their own food; Andrés
estimated the nearly 90 percent of
the food on the island comes from
somewhere else.
There was other good news for
Andrés on Wednesday. Anthony
Bourdain Books/Ecco, an imprint
of HarperCollins Publishers, announced that it has acquired the
North American rights to the story of how Andrés, WCK and all
those volunteers fed millions on
Puerto Rico. The book, “We Fed an
Island: The True Story of Rebuilding Puerto Rico, One Meal at a
Time,” will be written by Andrés.
It’s set for release in September via
author and celebrity chef Bourdain’s imprint.
“With a fraction of the resources available to the government,
huge non-profits or NGOs, José
Andrés and World Central Kitchen fed hundreds of thousands of
desperate people in Puerto Rico,
in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria,” Bourdain noted in the announcement. “Their ingenuity,
creativity and fortitude deserve to
be recognized, and recorded and
replicated as a practical blueprint
for how humans can and should
best react in the face of disaster. To
say that I am proud to publish this
book, and to help tell this vital
story, is a vast understatement.”
Andrés is not prepared to say
that his life has taken a turn because of his humanitarian work in
Puerto Rico and other disaster
areas. He said he could never have
predicted what kind of success he
would achieve after immigrating
to the United States in 1991. He’s
not about to predict what the
future holds.
“I don’t know what my life is
going to be like in the next five to
10 years,” he said.
tim.carman@washpost.com
DANAI GURIRA
ADAM IMMERWAHR
FEBRUARY 5 – MARCH 4
! ! ! "#$ %
#$
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
2/22/18
7:00
7:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
8:00
◆ News
Olympic
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
Mod Fam
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆
◆ J’pardy!
Wheel
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆
ET
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
14.1 WFDC (UNI) Noche de Estrellas
◆
◆
FamFeud
FamFeud
20.1 WDCA (MNTV)
Nick Stellino
22.1 WMPT (PBS) Money
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
Rick Steves
32.1 WHUT (PBS) DW News
Goldbergs
50.1 WDCW (CW) Goldbergs
66.1 WPXW (ION) Blue Bloods
2018 Winter Olympics: Figure Skating, Short Track (Live)
◆ Gotham
◆ 9-1-1
◆ The Bachelor Winter Games
◆ Big Bang
◆ Sheldon
◆ Big Bang
(9:31) ◆ Mom
Premio Lo nuestro 2018
Fox 5 News ◆ Page Six
Big Bang
Big Bang
Doc Martin
Murder in Suburbia
Miss Marple
Miss Marple
France 24 Programming
Murders at Barlume
◆ Independent Lens
Pioneers
◆ Supernatural
◆ Arrow
Blue Bloods
Blue Bloods
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
◆
Fox 5 News at Ten
Bach-Games
S.W.A.T.
News
The Final 5
◆ Kimmel
News
◆ Colbert
9 News
◆ Noticiero
Noticias
◆ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ◆ Law & Order: Criminal Intent
◆ Amanpour
Death in Paradise
Farm-Harvest
Secret Service
The Undertaker
Democracy Now!
World News ◆ Beyond 100
◆ Seinfeld
◆ Mom
News
Two Men
Blue Bloods
Blue Bloods
◆
◆
CABLE CHANNELS
The First 48
The First 48
The First 48
60 Days In
(11:03) The First 48
A&E
(5:00) Movie: True Lies
Movie: Mr. & Mrs. Smith ★★ (2005)
Movie: U.S. Marshals ★★ (1998)
AMC
North Woods Law
North Woods Law
North Woods Law: Uncuffed
North Woods Law
Animal Planet
The Death Row Chronicles
The Death Row Chronicles
The Death Row Chronicles
Dea. Chronicles
Dea. Chronicles
BET
Real Housewives/Beverly
Top Chef
Top Chef
Bethenny & Bethenny & Watch
Housewives
Bravo
Gumball
King of Hill
Amer. Dad
Cleveland
Amer. Dad
Burgers
Burgers
Family Guy
Family Guy
Cartoon Network Gumball
Erin Burnett OutFront
Anderson Cooper 360
Anderson Cooper 360
CNN Tonight
CNN Tonight
CNN
The Office
The Office
The Office
The Office
To Be Announced
Daily
Opposition
Comedy Central The Office
Moonshiners
Killing Fields
(10:01) Moonshiners
(11:02) Moonshiners
Discovery
Bunk’d
Bunk’d
Andi Mack
Stuck/Middle Bizaardvark Raven
Gravity Falls Gravity Falls Andi Mack
Stuck/Middle
Disney
E! News
Movie: The School of Rock ★★★ (2003)
E! News
Sex-City
E!
College Basketball: Connecticut at Cincinnati (Live)
College Basketball: UCLA at Utah (Live)
SportsCenter (Live)
ESPN
College Basketball: Wisconsin at Northwestern (Live)
College Basketball: Gonzaga at San Diego (Live)
Basketball Boxing
ESPN2
Chopped
Chopped
Chopped
Beat Flay
Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby
Food Network
The Story With Martha
Tucker Carlson Tonight
Hannity
The Ingraham Angle
Fox News at Night
Fox News
(6:00) Movie: The Wedding Planner ★★
Movie: Just Go With It ★★ (2011)
The 700 Club
Freeform
(5:00) Movie: Man of Steel Movie: The Martian ★★★ (2015)
Movie: The Martian ★★★
FX
Full House
Full House
Full House
Full House
The Middle
The Middle
The Middle
The Middle
Golden Girls Golden Girls
Hallmark
Psych
Movie: Hailey Dean Mystery: Deadly Estate (2017)
Murder, She Wrote
Hallmark M&M Psych
E.T.
VICE
Movie: Wonder Woman ★★★ (2017)
(10:25) Here and Now
Queens
HBO
Flip or Flop
Flip or Flop
Flip or Flop
Flip or Flop
Flip or Flop Flip or Flop
Hunters
Hunt Intl
Hunters
Hunters Int’l
HGTV
Swamp People
Swamp People
Swamp People
(10:08) Swamp People
(11:08) Swamp People
History
Project Runway All Stars
Project Runway
Project Runway
(10:02) Movie: What Happens in Vegas ★ (2008)
Lifetime
College Basketball: Radford at Liberty (Live)
ESPNWS
ESPNWS
ESPNWS
ESPNWS
Bensinger
Basketball
MASN
Hardball Matthews
All In With Chris Hayes
Rachel Maddow Show
The Last Word
The 11th Hour
MSNBC
Wild ’n Out
Nick Cannon: Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild ’n Out
Wild/Out
Wild/Out
MTV
Life Below Zero
Life Below Zero
Running Wild-Bear Grylls
Life Below Zero
Nat’l Geographic Running Wild-Bear Grylls
NHL Hockey: Washington Capitals at Florida Panthers (Live)
Caps
Caps Overtime (Live)
Caps in 30
NBC SportsNet WA GameTime
Hunter
Knight Squad Movie: The Nut Job ★ (2014)
Full House
Full House
Friends
Friends
Nickelodeon
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Lip Sync
Lip Sync
(10:32) Movie: Happy Gilmore ★★ (1996)
PARMT
Movie: Jeepers Creepers 2 ★★ (2003)
Movie: The Mechanic ★★ (2011)
The Magicians
Syfy
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Conan
TBS
(6:15) Movie: Babes in Arms Movie: Goodbye, Mr. Chips ★★★★ (1939)
(10:15) Movie: Marty ★★★★ (1955)
TCM
My 600-Lb. Life
My 600-Lb. Life
Dr. Pimple Popper
(11:01) My 600-Lb. Life
TLC
NCIS: New Orleans
NBA Basketball: Washington Wizards at Cleveland Cavaliers (Live)
NBA Basketball: Clippers at Warriors
TNT
Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Tallest Buildings
Travel
Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Jokers
Jokes
Talk Show
Imp. Jokers
TruTV
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Mom
Mom
King
King
TV Land
Cosby Show Cosby Show Cosby Show Cosby Show Living Single Living Single Living Single Living Single Uncensored
TV One
Chicago P.D.
Chicago P.D.
Chicago P.D.
Chicago P.D.
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
USA Network
RuPaul’s Drag Race: All
RuPaul’s Drag Race: All
America’s Next Top Model
RuPaul’s Drag Race: All
Love & Hip Hop Miami
VH1
GE Washington
Govt. Matters GovLoop’s
SportsTalk
ABC News
News at 10pm
Govt. Matters On Your Side
WNC8
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
WGN
LORENZO BEVILAQUA/ABC
The Bachelor Winter Games (ABC at 8) Find out which of the contestants
find love and who goes home brokenhearted on tonight’s finale of the fourepisode Olympics-style “Bachelor” spinoff show.
for a natural disaster.
2018 Winter Olympics
(NBC at various) Short track,
snowboarding, Alpine, figure
skating.
SPECIAL
RuPaul’s Drag Race: All Stars
(VH1 at 8) Tituss Burgess and Shay
Mitchell guest-judge.
Nashville (CMT at 9) Daphne
auditions for a country music
singing competition and Scarlett
invites Sean to hang out.
Project Runway All Stars
(Lifetime at 9) RuPaul and Jesse
Tyler Ferguson guest-judge.
Top Chef (Bravo at 9) The chefs
get surprise visitors from home
and one contestant is sent home.
Lip Sync Battle (Paramount at 10)
Kathy Bates battles her
“Disjointed” co-star Tone Bell.
Portlandia (IFC at 10) Jamie’s coworkers help her recover from a
cold, and Fred and Carrie prepare
The Bachelor Winter Games:
World Tells All (ABC at 10) The
cast reunites after the finale to
discuss their time on the show and
the current status of the
relationships.
LATE NIGHT
Daily Show (Comedy Central at 11)
Lupita Nyong’o.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Christine
Baranski, Constance Zimmer, Bon
Jovi.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Oprah
Winfrey, Timothée Chalamet, Andra
Day and Common.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Gary
Oldman, Greta Gerwig, Bruno Major.
— Sarah Polus
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
MUSIC REVIEW
George Burton’s twists
and turns at Blues Alley
BY
M IKE W EST
He plays the same material
and works with some of the same
musicians, but pianist George
Burton is nonetheless a different
beast in concert than he is on
record. This critic has rarely, in 11
years and hundreds of concerts,
seen a musician who fed off the
energy of the room as voraciously
as Burton. On Tuesday night at
Blues Alley, he brought his band
members in on the feast.
His first action toward the
audience, however, was to disorient them. Burton began the set
with a glitchy solo intro, bucking
the time as soon as he established
it and taking long, sudden pauses
that felt more like a sound check
than the main event. Finally,
Pablo Menares’s bass and Wayne
Smith Jr.’s drums crept in, followed by saxophonist Tim Warfield and trumpeter Jason Palmer
with the short-phrase melody to
Burton’s “Stuck in the Crack.” The
horns both played propulsive,
free-ranging solos — then came
Burton to capitalize on their
momentum.
On his 2016 debut album, “The
Truth of What I Am > The
Narcissist,” Burton coaxed a luminous glow in his piano tones
even during his wildest, most
outside improvisations. Playing
“Stuck in the Crack” in person,
however, he was all fluorescents:
harsher lights and quick, colorful
explosions. The difference, it became clear, was us. The audience
was welcome and open-eared but
also intrigued and riled up, and
that’s what Burton gave back to
them.
The band managed only three
more long tunes in its 80-minute
set, and all of them had the same
kind of symbiotic exchange of
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
ZORAN JELENIC
Pianist George Burton took it to
another level Tuesday night.
vibes. Now, however, the other
musicians picked it up, too. On
“Second Opinion,” Warfield, now
on soprano sax, parlayed the
audience’s palpable intrigue into
a halting, inquisitive line, slightly
monotonous but mesmerizingly
so. After his careful buildup, all of
the band except Burton fell away,
and in their duet the pianist
goaded his sideman into spasmodic dissonances. They felt
earned, and the crowd ate them
up.
“Ecidnac” was Palmer’s turn at
the tension-and-release process.
Harmonically aggressive, his solo
was at first dotted with pauses.
Once he felt the audience’s suspense, however, he elongated the
pauses, letting Burton and Menares cross swords while we wondered what Palmer would say
next. When Palmer’s time came,
he alternated approaches: here,
delicate passagework like a Beethoven sonata, there, sturdy,
hearty barrages.
With the final tune, Warfield’s
“Shake It for Me,” something
changed, however. The tune had
the general feel of soul jazz, a la
Horace Silver (or Warfield’s mentor, organist Shirley Scott). But
the details were much more complex, with 6/4 time and dense
chords. Warfield played a jabbing
staccato, Palmer countering with
matter-of-fact singsong, and Burton capped them with an off-kilter refraction of Silver. The quintet made magic of the soul abstraction, but in this case they
needed no fuel from the audience.
style@washpost.com
MUSIC - CHAMBER
Dumbarton Concerts
Leon BatesMichelle Cann
February 24. 2018
8 p.m.
Piano Duo
Bates performed with the Philadelphia orchestra, Cleveland
Symphony, and the New York Philharmonic while Cann
graduated from Curtis Institute of Music. They join forces to
showcase Bernstein, Gershwin, and Copland.
Dumbarton Concerts
Dumbarton United
Methodist Church
3133 Dumbarton St. NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-965-2000
$42 Adults
$39 Senior
Dumbarton
concerts.org
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
Note: The Friday
performance is a
Coffee Concert. A la
carte breakfast items
will be available for
purchase in the KC
Café from 9:30 to
11:15 a.m.
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
Janowski
conducts
Brahms's First
Symphony /
Jackiw plays
Bruch
Tonight at 7
Tomorrow at 11:30
Saturday at 8
Known for his skill with the core classical repertoire, conductor
Marek Janowski leads Bruch's electrifying First Violin
Concerto featuring the NSO debut of Stefan Jackiw. The
program also includes Brahms's Beethoven-influenced
Symphony No. 1.
ForeWords, with with Classical WETA's Deb Lamberton
Beginning at 6:45 pm before the Sat., Feb 24 performance.
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
16-2898
Does this page look familiar?
The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
NF407 6x2.75
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
MARGARET SULLIVAN
D’Souza
gives slime
a bad name
SULLIVAN FROM C1
RHONA WISE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Internet lowlifes went after Marjory Stoneman Douglas High
School student Emma González, who made an impassioned speech
calling out adults for their inaction on gun violence.
wide: “This chick was coached,”
echoed one Twitter user.
“Democrats used an innocent
girl as a pawn.”
The trashing of these
students — whose
determination and passion are
nothing but admirable —
removes a rock to reveal several
varieties of maggots. One is the
“say anything to get attention”
crowd that sees nothing as
beneath them. You know their
names.
Another, though, are those
whose shameful reaction has an
undercurrent of fear. These
students seem to have the
potential to create actual
change.
It may turn out to be
meaningless that President
Trump is talking about banning
bump stocks, the devices that
can boost the firing rate of
semiautomatic weapons. But he
is reacting to the students’
powerful messages and their
passionate delivery, and that is
notable.
Imagine the terror it must
provoke in those who are so
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Magic Johnson
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D ExCapital Ctr 12
perience (PG-13) 4:20-7:05-9:50
800 Shoppers Way
America's Musical Journey:
An IMAX 3D Experience 11:00- Game Night (R) CC: 7:00-9:15
Annihilation (R) CC: 7:00-9:00
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:30- 12:25-2:40
2:15-4:45-8:00-8:45
ArcLight Bethesda
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
7101 Democracy Boulevard
1:00-4:40
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr Black Panther (PG-13) 11:00Black Panther in Disney Digital
1:00-2:00-5:00-8:00-10:00-11:00
8633 Colesville Road
3D (PG-13) CC: 2:45-5:30-9:15
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 1:15- The Shape of Water (R) 2:1511:35-1:40-4:40-6:45-9:35
7:05-9:30
4:00-7:25-10:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:40The Post (PG-13) 2:00-7:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:052:05-5:45-8:10-10:25
Lady Bird (R) 5:15-9:20
2:30-4:55-7:20-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Phantom Thread (R) 4:20-7:10
Early Man (PG) CC: 12:10(PG-13) 11:55-2:40-5:25-8:05Three
Billboards
Outside
Ebbing,
2:25-4:55
10:40
Missouri (R) 4:45-9:40
Game Night (R) CC: 7:00-9:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:05-2:50The Shape of Water (R) CC:
AMC Academy 8
4:45-6:55-9:50
12:40-3:45-6:45-9:40
6198 Greenbelt Road
Early Man (PG) 11:55-2:25Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!)
5:05-7:35
3:50-10:10
10:00-1:00-4:00-5:00-7:00-10:00- Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:50-2:10The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:40- 11:00
4:55-7:40
7:30-10:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital Paddington 2 (PG) 11:30-1:05
I, Tonya (R) CC: 7:20-10:15
3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:00-12:00- Game Night (R) 7:10-9:25-10:05
Annihilation (R) CC: 7:00-9:50
2:00-3:00-6:00-8:00-9:00
The Shape of Water (R) 1:20
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 1:20
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC: (PG-13) CC: 12:15
Missouri (R) 12:10-4:05
1:50-4:20
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 11:40- The Post (PG-13) 11:45-2:20Detective Chinatown 2 (R) 1:15- 2:00-4:35-7:15-9:45
4:50-7:25-9:55
4:10-7:10-10:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Annihilation (R) 7:00-9:40-10:35
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
(PG-13) CC: 11:05-1:45-4:45Every Day (PG-13) 7:20-9:05Experience (PG-13) CC: 12:00- 7:30-10:15
10:20
3:15-6:30-9:45
Early Man (PG) CC: (!) 12:30-2:45- The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 11:25Black Panther (PG-13) 12:452:55-5:10
5:10-7:35-9:55
4:00-7:15-10:30
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 7:00-9:30 Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00AMC Loews Uptown 1
1:15-2:45-3:00-3:30-4:15-6:30Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
7:15-7:30-9:30
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
3:30
I, Tonya (R) CC: 12:15-4:10
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
AMC Center Park 8
Black Panther in Disney Digital
12:20-7:00
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
3D (PG-13) 4:00-7:05; 2:30-5:30Black Panther in Disney Digital Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!)
8:30-9:15
3D (PG-13) CC: 3:40
12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
AMC Mazza Gallerie
Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 7:00-9:45
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) (!) 1:00-4:00-7:00Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
3D (PG-13) 1:00-7:20
10:00
12:00-1:20-3:00-4:20-6:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
AMC Columbia 14
(PG-13) 11:05-1:50-4:40-7:251:50-4:30-8:10
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
10:15
Early Man (PG) CC: (!) 12:40Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
Early Man (PG) 11:40-2:103:00
(!) 4:20
4:35-8:25
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 7:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital Game Night (R) 7:00-9:20-10:45
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:30-3:00Black Panther (PG-13) 11:00(!) 5:20
6:10-9:30
12:30-2:00-3:30-5:10-6:40-8:20The Post (PG-13) CC: 12:20
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: 10:00
Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 7:00
10:55-1:30-4:05
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:10National Theatre Live: Cat on a Maze Runner: The Death Cure
2:20-5:05-8:00-10:35
Hot Tin Roof (!) 7:00
CC: 11:40-3:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 11:10The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC: (PG-13)
Fifty
Shades
Freed
(R)
(!) 11:00- 1:30-4:15-7:30-9:55
2:00-2:55-4:30
1:50-4:40-7:35-10:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:25-1:55Black Panther in Disney Digital Jumanji:
Welcome to the Jungle 4:30-7:00-9:25
3D (PG-13) (!) 7:30
(PG-13)
CC: 12:50-4:20-7:20Black Panther in Disney Digital
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-2:2010:15
3D (PG-13) 12:00-3:00-6:10-9:30
4:40-7:10
Early Man (PG) CC: (!) 11:20-1:45- Black Panther (PG-13) 4:10-10:30
Albert Einstein Planetarium - 4:10-9:55
Bow Tie Harbour 9
National Air and Space Museum Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 3:30
2474 Solomons Island Road
6th Street and Independence Ave SW Game Night (R) CC: (!) 7:00-9:30
The
Greatest
Showman (PG)
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 3:45
To Space and Back 11:00AM
11:00-2:00-4:40-7:50-10:40
Samson (PG-13) CC: 11:05Dark Universe Space Show
Maze
Runner:
The Death Cure
1:40-4:20
(NR) 11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30(PG-13) 12:30-3:30-6:40-9:40
3:30-4:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:40
Journey to the Stars (NR)
National Theatre Live: Cat on a Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:40AM
12 Strong (R) 10:20-1:30-4:3012:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00 Hot Tin Roof (!) 7:00
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM Every Day (PG-13) (!) 7:00-9:45 7:30-10:30
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC: Winchester (PG-13) 10:50-1:20Angelika Pop-Up
3:40-6:30-9:00
10:50-1:35-4:15
at Union Market
Is Genesis History? Anniversary The Post (PG-13) 10:30-1:40550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
4:20-7:20-10:00
(!)
7:00
Event
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:15Lady Bird (R) 1:50
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
1:20-3:30-5:40-7:45
Annihilation (R) 7:00-10:00
(PG-13) (!) 12:00Double Lover (L'amant double) Experience
Hostiles (R) 10:10-1:10-4:103:30-6:50-10:00
1:15-3:35-5:45-8:00
7:10-10:10
Black Panther (PG-13) (!)
The Final Year 11:20AM
I, Tonya (R) 4:00
1:00-7:30-10:30;
(!)
11:00-2:10The Post (PG-13) 11:30-2:00Phantom Thread (R) 9:50-1:005:20-8:40
4:30-7:00
3:50-7:00-9:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:10-1:402018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Avalon Theatre
4:10-6:40-9:20
Animation
(NR) 12:50-3:00-5:20
5612 Connecticut Avenue
The Post (PG-13) 12:20
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Annihilation (R) (!) 7:00-9:50
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 12:00Live
Action
(NR) 10:00AM
5:15
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
Molly's Game (R) 2:15-7:30
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
I, Tonya (R) 2:00-7:45
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-5:00
Black Panther (PG-13) XD: 12:45(!) 11:40-2:05-2:50-5:15-6:004:00-7:25
Landmark
8:25-9:05
Panther in Disney Digital
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
Black Panther in Disney Digital Black
3D
(PG-13) 10:00-11:40-1:20807 V Street, NW
3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:35-3:453:00-4:40-6:20-8:00-9:40
Molly's Game (R) CC: 1:00
6:55-10:05
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:45-2:20- The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Black Panther (PG-13) 10:1510:35-11:10-12:15-1:35-1:554:55-7:25-10:00
1:00-6:40
2:30-3:25-5:00-5:15-5:50-6:45Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 11:30- Maze Runner: The Death Cure
8:15-8:30-9:05-10:05
2:25-5:00-7:40-10:10
(PG-13) CC: 12:25-6:35
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Annihilation (R) CC: 7:15-9:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 11:25- 3D (PG-13) XD: 10:45
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 11:10- 2:45-5:25-8:00-10:35
The Greatest Showman (PG)
1:50-4:25-7:10-9:55
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 9:55-1:00-3:50-6:45-9:25
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 11:00- (PG-13) CC: 11:15-1:10-4:10Maze Runner: The Death Cure
12:00-1:45-3:00-4:00-4:30-7:00- 7:20-10:15
(PG-13) 11:45-3:05
7:30-9:45-10:15
Coco (PG) CC: 11:15AM
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:00Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:30-1:55- 12:35-1:45-3:15-4:20-5:50-7:05Landmark E Street Cinema
4:20-7:00-9:35
555 11th Street NW
8:25-9:55
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts - Early Man (PG) CC: (!) 2:20-4:50- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
7:10-9:30
(PG-13) 11:15-2:05-5:25-8:50
Animation (NR) 1:45-7:15
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:45-2:30 Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:10-11:45Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri (R) CC: 12:50- Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) 1:10-2:45-4:30-6:05-7:50-9:35
(NR) 11:05-2:40-6:20-9:55
Early Man (PG) 9:55-12:35-4:053:50-9:30
7:05-10:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:10-3:20-9:50 Pad Man (Padman) (PG-13)
12:10-3:20-6:30-9:40
Game Night (R) 7:10-10:15
I, Tonya (R) CC: 1:10-4:10Samson (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:25-4:05 Pad Man (Padman) (PG-13)
7:10-9:40
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts - Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 11:00-2:20
Missouri (R) CC: 3:40-9:50
Samson (PG-13) 10:20-1:15-4:10Live Action (NR) 4:30-9:30
7:10-10:00
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:55- Aiyaary (NR) (!) 5:10-8:40
The Post (PG-13) CC: 3:35-9:15 Den of Thieves (R) 10:15-1:453:55-6:55-9:35
5:05-8:35
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer Black Panther: An IMAX 3D
12 Strong (R) 11:00-2:00
fantastica) (R) 1:05-4:05-7:05- Experience (PG-13) (!) 7:35
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC: Aiyaary (NR) 2:15
9:40
11:35-2:25-5:20-7:50-10:25
Winchester (PG-13) 10:55-1:40The Shape of Water (R) CC:
Monster Hunt 2 (Zhuo yao ji 2) (!) 5:10-8:25
1:20-4:20-7:20-9:45
Annihilation (R) 7:00-10:00
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: 12:55-4:10
The Monkey King 3 (NR) (!)
National Theatre Live: Cat on a
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:30
1:05-4:00
Hot Tin Roof 7:00
\Landmark West End Cinema Every Day (PG-13) (!) 7:00-9:30 Every Day (PG-13) 7:10-9:45
2301 M Street NW
Detective Chinatown 2 (R) (!)
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 11:50In the Fade (Aus dem Nichts) (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:10
3:10-6:30-10:10
1:30-4:30-7:30
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Detective Chinatown 2 (R) 11:302018 Oscar Nominated Shorts - Experience (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:20- 2:35-5:40-8:40
Documentary (NR) 12:00-3:15- 4:30-10:40
Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR)
4:00-7:15-8:00
Game Night (R) (!) 7:00-9:25
2:20
Awe! (NR) 10:45AM
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC Annihilation (R) (!) 7:00-9:45
Is Genesis History? Anniversary
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
AMC Loews
Event 7:00
St.
Charles
Town
Ctr.
9
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00La boda de Valentina (R)
11115 Mall Circle
11:00-12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
11:20AM
Black
Panther
(PG-13)
CC:
(!)
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14
9:30-12:45-1:45-4:00-4:45-7:15- Black Panther (PG-13) 10:35701 Seventh Street Northwest
1:55-5:15-8:30
7:45-10:15-10:45
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30Black Panther in Disney Digital Black Panther in Disney Digital
3:40-6:55-10:10
3D (PG-13) 10:00-1:20-4:40-8:00
3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:00-10:30Black Panther in Disney Digital 11:30-12:00-2:45-3:15-6:00-6:30- Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14
3D (PG-13) 10:10-1:25-4:401591 West Nursery Road
9:15-9:45
7:55-11:10
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC:
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 12:00National Theatre Live: Cat on a 11:15-2:00-5:00-8:00-10:45
1:00-1:30-2:00-3:10-4:10-4:40Hot Tin Roof 7:00
Welcome to the Jungle 6:20-7:20-7:50-8:20-9:30-10:30
Is Genesis History? Anniversary Jumanji:
(PG-13) CC: 11:30-2:15-4:00Black Panther in Disney Digital
Event 7:00
7:45-10:30
3D (PG-13) CC: 5:10
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 5:15The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
IMAX Theater
7:15-9:45
1:35-4:05
601 Independence Avenue SW
Early Man (PG) CC: (!) 11:45Maze Runner: The Death Cure
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR) 2:00-4:30
(PG-13) CC: 12:20-3:20
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the Game Night (R) CC: (!) 7:00-9:30 Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 12:00Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 7:00Seas 3D (NR) 1:15-3:30
2:30-5:00
10:00
Dream Big: Engineering Our
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
World: An IMAX 3D Experience The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC: (PG-13) CC: 1:10-4:00-6:55-9:40
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:25- 11:00-1:45-4:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 12:00-2:2011:50-2:05
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:00-1:30
4:45-7:05-9:25
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
MARYLAND
C5
SU
deeply invested in the corrupt
status quo.
D’Souza’s apology and the
legislative aide’s swift firing
suggest the wind is blowing in
a new direction.
That’s encouraging.
It would also be encouraging
to see news organizations who
employ those who spread lies
taking some remedial action,
too.
CNN, for example, pays
former congressman Jack
Kingston (R-Ga.) as a political
commentator. Here is his point
of view, as expressed in a tweet:
“O really? ‘Students’ are
planning a nationwide rally?
Not left wing gun control
activists using 17yr kids in the
wake of a horrible tragedy?
#Soros #Resistance #Antifa
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Early Man (PG) CC: 12:15-2:304:45-7:00-9:15
Game Night (R) CC: 7:30-10:00
Samson (PG-13) CC: 12:40-4:207:10-9:45
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 12:554:30-7:30-10:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:25
Annihilation (R) CC: 7:00-9:40
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
12:10-2:50-5:15-7:35-9:55
Every Day (PG-13) CC: 7:15-9:35
Landmark
Bethesda Row Cinema
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
1:10-6:55-9:40
Phantom Thread (R) CC:
12:50-3:40
Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:50-3:305:40-7:50
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:504:40-7:25-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:304:20-7:20-10:00
The Post (PG-13) CC: 3:50-9:55
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Animation (NR) 3:30-7:40
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Live Action (NR) 1:00-5:30-9:50
The Insult (L'Insulte) (R) 1:204:00-7:10-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 1:40-4:307:30-10:05
Old Greenbelt Theatre
129 Centerway
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 5:15
Killer of Sheep (1977) (NR) 8:00
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
3899 Branch Avenue
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:302:00-3:30-4:30-5:00-6:30-7:308:00-9:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 1:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:353:05-5:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:45-2:45-5:25-8:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:05-2:254:45-7:05
Game Night (R) 8:00
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
15200 Major Lansdale Blvd
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:051:10-1:50-3:25-5:00-6:35-7:408:10-9:10-9:50
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 2:15-2:50-4:25-5:356:00-8:45
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:00-4:307:10-9:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:40-4:40-7:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:10-4:507:30-10:00
Early Man (PG) 1:30-4:00
Game Night (R) 7:00-9:45
The Shape of Water (R) 12:503:50-10:20
Proud Mary (R) 10:30
Samson (PG-13) 1:00-3:40-9:30
Den of Thieves (R) 1:00-4:10-7:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 2:40
Annihilation (R) 7:00
National Theatre Live: Cat on a
Hot Tin Roof 7:00
Every Day (PG-13) 7:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13)
12:30-3:35
Is Genesis History? Anniversary
Event 7:00
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Stadium 20 & IMAX
900 Ellsworth Drive
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:303:45-4:45-5:15-7:00-8:00-8:3010:15
The Greatest Showman (PG)
4:30-10:05
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 12:00-12:25-1:301:55-3:15-3:35-6:30-6:50-9:4510:05
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 1:35
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:001:15-2:50-4:05-5:30-8:15-10:0010:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:55-4:50-7:55-11:00
Coco (PG) 1:20-4:20
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-1:302:25-4:05-5:05-7:20-11:00
Early Man (PG) 1:20-4:00-6:359:00
Game Night (R) 7:15-9:55
Samson (PG-13) 12:45-3:506:40-9:25
Den of Thieves (R) 12:10-3:206:35-10:00
Annihilation (R) 7:30-10:20
I, Tonya (R) 1:50-4:40-7:55-10:55
National Theatre Live: Cat on a
Hot Tin Roof 7:00
Every Day (PG-13) 7:55-10:35
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:553:45-6:25-9:10
La boda de Valentina (R) 1:40
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 1:00-4:157:30-10:45
Is Genesis History? Anniversary
Event 7:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 6:30
The Shape of Water (R) 12:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 3:20-9:10
The Post (PG-13) 4:45
Regal Germantown Stadium 14
20000 Century Boulevard
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:453:00-4:00-7:15-9:30-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 11:00-11:45-2:005:15-6:15-8:30
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) 1:15-7:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:151:30-2:30-4:15-7:30-10:15-11:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:00-1:45-4:45-7:4510:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:00-1:304:00-6:30-9:00
Early Man (PG) 11:15-1:45-4:156:45-9:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 4:30-10:45
Samson (PG-13) 11:30-2:15-5:007:45-10:30
Idi Naa Love Story (Tarun's Idhi
Naa Love Story) (NR) 8:15-11:00
National Theatre Live: Cat on a
Hot Tin Roof 7:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:003:30-6:00-8:30-11:00
Awe! (NR) 12:45-3:30-9:45
Manasuku Nachindi (NR) 1:004:00-7:00-10:00
Is Genesis History? Anniversary
Event 7:00
The Shape of Water (R) 11:002:00-5:00
The Post (PG-13) 10:30AM
Jumanji: Welcome to the
Jungle (PG-13) 1:10-4:006:45-9:40
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:50-3:206:00-8:30
Early Man (PG) 1:20-3:506:15-8:40
Samson (PG-13) 12:00-2:405:10-7:50-10:25
Annihilation (R) 7:10-9:50
National Theatre Live: Cat on a
Hot Tin Roof 7:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13)
12:10-2:30-5:00-7:15-9:50
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Animation (NR) 12:00-4:30
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Live Action (NR) 2:10-9:30
Is Genesis History? Anniversary
Event 7:00
The Shape of Water (R) 3:0010:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (R) 12:15
The Post (PG-13) 12:40-6:15
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:15-1:50-4:20-6:55-9:40
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
(PG-13) CC: 10:20-1:45-5:008:20
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC:
11:50-2:30-5:15-7:50-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:40-4:40Regal Hyattsville Royale
7:40-10:40
Stadium 14
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:256505 America Blvd.
11:00-11:30-1:30-2:00-3:45-4:30Black Panther (PG-13) 12:457:10-9:40
1:00-1:15-1:30-4:15-4:30-4:40Early Man (PG) CC: 11:30-2:107:30-7:45-7:55-10:20-10:35-10:50
4:45-7:15-9:50
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Game Night (R) CC: 7:00-9:40
3D (PG-13) 12:30-3:45-4:00-7:00Samson
(PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:157:15-10:05-11:00
4:00-6:40-9:20
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 3:55
(PG-13) 1:00
12 Strong (R) CC: 1:10
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 2:00-4:15Winchester (PG-13) CC: 10:404:45-7:20-10:00
6:40-9:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:20-4:10
(PG-13) 1:45-4:45-7:35-10:30
Annihilation (R) CC: 7:00-9:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:45-3:15Every Day (PG-13) 7:00-9:30
5:45-8:15-10:45
Early Man (PG) 12:30-2:50-5:10Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14 The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
11:20-1:50-4:30-7:20-9:50
8:00-10:30
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
La boda de Valentina (R) 1:10
Proud Mary (R) 12:45-3:10-5:40- Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!)
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
8:00-10:30
10:10-10:50-1:10-1:50-4:10-4:50- Experience (PG-13) CC: 10:15Game Night (R) 7:00-9:45
7:10-7:50-10:10-10:50
1:30-4:45-8:00-11:00
Samson (PG-13) 1:30-4:15Black Panther in Disney Digital Black Panther (PG-13) 12:307:15-10:00
3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:30-6:30
Den of Thieves (R) 1:15-4:30
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: 3:45-7:00-10:15
Bengali Beauty 10:40-1:20-4:10
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:30- 1:20-6:20
3:00-5:30
AMC Shirlington 7
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Annihilation (R) 7:30-10:15
2772 South Randolph St.
(PG-13) CC: 10:00-8:50
Every Day (PG-13) 7:45-10:15
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!)
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12 11:00-1:40-4:40-7:40-10:20
2:30-4:00-8:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Black Panther in Disney Digital
14716 Baltimore Avenue
(PG-13) CC: 9:55-12:50-3:403D (PG-13) CC: (!) 5:30
Black Panther (PG-13) 11:306:40-9:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: (!)
2:00-3:00-5:30-6:30-8:45-9:30
2:00-4:30-7:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: (!) 9:50Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:20
3D (PG-13) 12:15-1:00-3:40-4:20- 10:20-11:40-12:10-12:40-2:002:50-4:30-5:20-6:50-9:10
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
7:10-7:45-9:45-10:30
Early Man (PG) CC: (!) 11:50-2:40- 1:45-7:30
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
5:00-7:20-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
(PG-13) 1:45-5:45-9:00
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 3:50 Missouri (R) CC: 1:30-7:40
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:45Game Night (R) CC: (!) 7:00-9:25 The Post (PG-13) CC: 2:451:15-2:30-3:50-6:45-9:55
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Den of Thieves (R) CC: 9:40-1:00- 5:45-8:30
4:20-7:30-10:40
Lady Bird (R) CC: 4:15
(PG-13) 12:45-4:00-7:00-10:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-2:45-5:05 Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 7:20-10:05 Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 7:00
Early Man (PG) 12:30-3:15-6:00- The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC: (!) I, Tonya (R) CC: 4:45
11:20-2:20-4:35
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 4:40
8:15-10:35
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Den of Thieves (R) 11:25-2:45- Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!)
9:30-10:10-11:30-2:10-2:303D (PG-13) (!) 1:00-7:00
6:15-10:15
3:00-3:30-5:30-6:00-8:30-9:00Annihilation (R) 7:30-10:20
AMC Tysons Corner 16
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 11:30- 9:30-11:30
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Every Day (PG-13) CC: 7:40-10:00
2:15-4:55-7:30-10:00
Black
Panther (PG-13) CC: (!)
Is Genesis History? Anniversary
iPic Pike & Rose
9:55-10:55-12:55-2:00-4:00Event 7:00
11830 Grand Park Avenue
5:05-7:05-8:15-10:10-10:55
Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13 Black Panther (PG-13) (!)
Black Panther in Disney Digital
199 East Montgomery Avenue
11:00-11:30-12:00-12:15-12:30- 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:40-2:452:15-2:45-3:15-3:45-4:00-4:15Black Panther (PG-13) 12:008:55
12:30-3:15-3:45-6:30-7:00-9:45- 6:00-7:00-7:30-8:00-9:45-10:30- The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:00-11:30
10:15
CC: 10:35-1:30-4:10-9:50
Black Panther in Disney Digital Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:45Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG3D (PG-13) 1:00-4:15-7:30-10:45 3:00-6:30-9:30
13) CC: 3:15-10:00
National Theatre Live: Cat on a Game Night (R) (!) 7:15-10:15
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Annihilation (R) (!) 7:45-11:15
Hot Tin Roof 7:00
(PG-13) CC: 6:45
Monster Hunt 2 (Zhuo yao ji 2) The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 11:15- Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC:
2:30-6:15-9:15
12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
10:00-12:30-3:00-5:30-8:10Detective Chinatown 2 (R) 12:0010:40
3:00-6:00-9:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the
Is Genesis History? Anniversary
Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 10:45-1:35AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
Event 7:00
4:45-7:40-10:30
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Coco (PG) CC: 10:05-12:40
Regal Waugh Chapel
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: 1:00- Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 10:30Stadium 12 & IMAX
4:00-6:00-7:00-9:00-10:00
11:45-1:05-2:10-3:45-4:301419 South Main Chapel Way
Black Panther in Disney Digital 7:15-9:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:103D (PG-13) CC: 2:00-3:00-5:00- Early Man (PG) CC: (!) 10:251:10-4:20-7:30-10:30
8:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 2:15- 12:45-3:05-5:25-7:45
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:153D (PG-13) 2:50-3:20-6:00-6:30- 5:00-7:45-10:15
1:55-4:40
9:00-9:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Game Night (R) CC: (!) 7:00-9:25
The Greatest Showman (PG)
(PG-13) CC: 2:00-4:45-7:30-10:15 The Shape of Water (R) CC:
1:25-4:05
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 1:45-4:15- 10:20-1:10-4:05
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
6:30-9:00
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 10:05
(PG-13) 3:15
Game Night (R) CC: 7:00-9:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:40Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:05The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:00- 1:25-4:15-6:55
2:40-5:15-7:50-10:25
6:45-9:30
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Hostiles (R) CC: 4:00
Experience (PG-13) (!) 10:15(PG-13) 1:35-4:30-7:20-10:10
I, Tonya (R) 1:15
1:15-4:25-7:30-10:35
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:20-1:00Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 7:00AMC Hoffman Center 22
3:35-6:10-8:45
9:55
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Early Man (PG) 12:00-2:20-4:45National Theatre Live: Cat on a
7:10-9:45
Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
Den of Thieves (R) 12:15-3:30- 11:30-1:00-2:45-3:15-4:15-6:00- Hot Tin Roof (!) 7:00
Every Day (PG-13) (!) 7:00-9:30
10:05
7:30-9:15-9:45-10:45
Game Night (R) 7:00-9:40
Black Panther in Disney Digital The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
11:10-1:40-4:20-9:35
The Post (PG-13) 12:30
3D (PG-13) CC: 10:45-12:00Is Genesis History? AnniverAnnihilation (R) 7:00-9:50
2:00-5:15-6:30-8:30
sary Event (!) 7:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:20- The Greatest Showman (PG)
Black Panther (PG-13) (!) 12:204:00-6:40-9:15
CC: 10:55-1:30-4:05-9:50
Is Genesis History? Anniversary Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG- 3:30-6:40-9:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Event 7:00
13) CC: 3:40
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Maze Runner: The Death Cure 3D (PG-13) (!) 5:50
Experience (PG-13) 12:40-3:50- (PG-13) CC: 3:40
AMC Worldgate 9
7:00-10:10
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC:
13025 Worldgate Drive
12:15-3:00-5:45-8:15-11:00
Regal Westview
Black Panther (PG-13) CC: (!)
Jumanji: Welcome to the
Stadium 16 & IMAX
1:00-3:00-4:00-6:00-7:00-9:00
Jungle (PG-13) CC: 12:20-3:05 Black Panther in Disney Digital
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 11:15Black Panther (PG-13) 11:303D (PG-13) CC: (!) 2:00-5:00-8:00
12:30-1:30-3:45-4:45-6:00-7:00- 1:15-2:00-4:00-7:00-9:35
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Early Man (PG) CC: 11:45-2:00- CC: 1:30
8:00-10:15-11:15
4:30-6:45-9:00
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Fifty Shades Freed (R) CC: 2:203D (PG-13) 12:00-2:45-3:15-6:30- Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:40- 4:50-7:30
2:10-4:50
9:15-9:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Game Night (R) CC: 7:00-9:30 (PG-13) CC: 1:35-4:30-7:20
The Greatest Showman (PG)
The Shape of Water (R) CC:
12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
Early Man (PG) CC: (!) 1:20-3:4511:00-1:50-4:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
6:00-8:15
Samson (PG-13) CC: 11:304:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 4:05
2:15-5:00-7:35-10:15
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Game Night (R) CC: (!) 7:00
Den of Thieves (R) CC: 7:20(PG-13) 12:45-4:30-10:30
Annihilation (R) CC: (!) 7:00
10:25
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:00The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC:
12 Strong (R) CC: 10:20AM
1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
1:55-4:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:40-4:25- Peter Rabbit (PG) CC: 1:457:10-10:10
(PG-13) 12:15-3:15-10:00
4:05-6:25
Annihilation (R) CC: 7:00-10:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-1:00Alamo Drafthouse Cinema 2:30-3:30-5:00-6:00-8:30-11:00 National Theatre Live: Cat on a
One Loudoun
Early Man (PG) 12:15-2:30-5:00- Hot Tin Roof 7:00
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 12:40
7:15-9:45
Fifty
Shades
Freed (R) 11:30Every Day (PG-13) 7:00-9:45
Game Night (R) 8:00-10:45
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) CC: 2:40-5:30-8:20-11:10
Samson (PG-13) 1:15-4:00Jumanji:
Welcome
to the Jungle
11:15-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
6:45-9:30
Winchester (PG-13) 11:15-2:00- Monster Hunt 2 (Zhuo yao ji 2) (PG-13) 10:30-1:40-4:40-8:4010:05
11:20-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
4:45-7:30-10:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:00-11:10Detective Chinatown 2 (R)
The Post (PG-13) 1:15
2:00-4:40-6:20-9:00-11:35
12:35-3:25-6:15-9:05
Black Panther: An IMAX 3D
Is Genesis History? Anniversary A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
Experience (PG-13) 7:30
fantastica) (R) 12:10-3:05
Event 7:00
Annihilation (R) 7:30-10:30
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts Black Panther (PG-13) 11:50Every Day (PG-13) 7:45
2:20-3:25-6:00-9:40; 12:50-4:25The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 11:00- - Animation (NR) 11:30-4:158:00-11:25
10:05
1:30-4:00-6:45-9:15
Is Genesis History? Anniversary 2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts - Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 10:40AM
Live Action (NR) 1:45-7:40
Event 7:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 10:10Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Ex- Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
perience (PG-13) 1:00-4:15-10:45 Experience (PG-13) CC: 10:15- 1:00-3:40-5:50
Early Man (PG) 10:50-1:25-4:051:30-4:45-8:00-11:15
UA Snowden Square
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:30- 6:40-10:30
Stadium 14
Game Night (R) 7:20-10:15
3:45-7:00-10:15
9161 Commerce Center Drive
Annihilation (R) 7:00-9:25
Golden Exits (R) 1:20
Black Panther (PG-13) 9:00Tammy and the T-Rex (PG-13)
Honor Up (R) 4:25
12:00-12:30-3:45-6:30-7:007:40
AMC Potomac Mills 18
10:00
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
2700
Potomac
Mills
Circle
Black Panther in Disney Digital
2911 District Ave
3D (PG-13) 1:00-1:30-3:15-4:15- Black Panther (PG-13) CC:
Fifty
Shades Freed (R) 10:1511:00-12:00-2:15-3:15-4:15-5:304:45-7:30-8:10-9:30-10:30
12:50-3:30-6:00-8:30-11:00
6:30-8:45-9:45-10:45
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Black Panther in Disney Digital A Fantastic Woman (Una
3:30-9:00
mujer fantastica) (R) 2:153D (PG-13) 11:45-1:00-3:00Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:204:45-10:30
1:45-3:00-4:30-5:30-8:00-10:30 6:15-7:45-9:30
VIRGINIA
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (R) 11:30-2:205:05-9:45
Nostalgia (R) 7:55-10:45
The Party (R) 7:40
Lady Bird (R) 12:40-2:50-5:00
National Theatre Live: Cat on a
Hot Tin Roof 7:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:00AM
The Shape of Water (R) 10:451:45-4:40
Phantom Thread (R) 11:10-7:15
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13)
10:35-12:45-3:05-5:30
Black Panther (PG-13) (!)
11:00-1:00-2:00-5:00-7:008:00-10:00-11:00
Annihilation (R) 7:30-10:15
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) (!) 10:00-4:00
Bow Tie
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
11940 Market Street
Phantom Thread (R) 12:403:55-6:50-9:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the
Jungle (PG-13) 1:20-4:05
Early Man (PG) 12:20-2:40-5:007:20-9:40
Game Night (R) 7:00-9:35
The Post (PG-13) 12:30-3:306:30-9:15
Black Panther (PG-13) 3:009:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
1:10-3:50-6:45-9:50
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:501:50-3:40-4:30-6:20-9:20
Annihilation (R) 7:00-9:50
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13)
12:10-2:30-4:50-7:10-9:30
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:30-4:106:40-9:10
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 12:00-6:00
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:004:00-7:00-10:00
Cinema Arts Theatre
9650 Main St
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC:
9:45-2:40-5:10
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
1:15-7:10
A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer
fantastica) (R) CC: 9:40-12:002:30-5:00-7:30-9:45
Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri (R) CC:
12:15-7:50
The Post (PG-13) CC: 9:4012:05-2:35-5:05-7:40-10:00
I, Tonya (R) CC: 4:15-10:05
The Insult (L'Insulte) (R) CC:
9:45-12:10-2:35-4:55-7:20-9:35
Phantom Thread (R) CC:
10:10-9:45
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts
- Animation (NR) 12:00-4:008:00
2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts
- Live Action (NR) 10:00-2:006:00-9:50
#DNC.”
A video suggesting Hogg is a
paid actor was the top-trending
video on YouTube Wednesday
morning before it was,
thankfully, taken down. Scores
of other conspiracy-mongering
videos littered the platform and
gained traction on right-wing
sites that regularly spread
misinformation.
Legitimate disagreement
over policy issues is one thing.
Lies, conspiracy theories and
insults are quite another.
Go ahead and make the case,
if you can, that the Douglas
students are wrong.
But get out of the gutter first.
margaret.sullivan@washpost.com
For more by Margaret Sullivan visit
wapo.st/sullivan
Thursday, February 22, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:153:10-6:15
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 9:15
The Shape of Water (R) 12:453:40-6:45-9:50
Annihilation (R) 7:00-9:45
National Theatre Live: Cat on a
Hot Tin Roof 7:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13)
12:35-3:05-5:40-8:15
Is Genesis History? Anniversary
Event 7:00
Early Man (PG) 12:45-3:05-5:307:45-10:00
Game Night (R) 7:15-9:45
Samson (PG-13) 1:25-4:257:05-10:10
Aiyaary (NR) 1:45-5:15-8:50
Annihilation (R) 7:00-9:45
Hostiles (R) 4:30-10:25
Every Day (PG-13) 7:30-10:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13)
1:20-3:55
Black Panther (PG-13) 1:004:05-7:20
Regal Countryside Stadium 20 Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 10:25
45980 Regal Plaza
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:50Black Panther (PG-13) 1:003:45
3:30-4:05-7:15-9:45-10:25
Black Panther in Disney Digital Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi)
(NR) 1:40-5:00-8:20
3D (PG-13) 12:30-6:35
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:15- Black Panther (PG-13) 12:301:30-3:35-4:40-6:50-7:50
3:00-5:35-8:20-10:55
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Jumanji: Welcome to the
3D (PG-13) 2:30-5:40-8:45-9:55
Jungle (PG-13) 1:35-4:357:35-10:30
Regal Manassas
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:50-3:10Stadium 14 & IMAX
5:50-8:20-10:50
11380 Bulloch Drive
Early Man (PG) 1:15-3:35-5:55Black Panther (PG-13) 12:308:15-10:35
3:40-6:45-9:50
Bilal: A New Breed of Hero
(PG-13) 12:30-3:15-6:15-9:05 Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 2:40-5:45-8:50
Padmaavat (Padmavati)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
(Hindi) (NR) 1:30-4:55-8:30
The Shape of Water (R) 11:45- 12:45-4:00-7:20-9:30
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
2:45-5:45-8:45
(PG-13) 2:00-5:10-8:15
Pad Man (Padman) (PG-13)
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:3511:40-2:55-6:00-9:10
Samson (PG-13) 12:40-3:25- 3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
6:20-9:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebb- (PG-13) 2:10-5:00-7:50-10:45
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:40-4:15ing, Missouri (R) 4:30-10:10
7:00-9:15
Aiyaary (NR) 1:45-5:15-8:45
Winchester (PG-13) 1:40-4:10- Early Man (PG) 1:45-4:20-7:1510:40
6:50-9:35
Game Night (R) 7:00-9:45
Idi Naa Love Story (Tarun's
Samson (PG-13) 1:50-4:30
Idhi Naa Love Story) (NR)
Den of Thieves (R) 12:30-3:30
12:15-3:20-6:35-9:55
Annihilation (R) 7:00-10:00
Chalo (NR) 12:50-4:00-7:1010:20
Hostiles (R) 12:50-3:20-6:15-9:20
Bhaagamathie (Telugu) (NR) Every Day (PG-13) 7:00-9:40
12:45-3:50-6:45-9:50
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR) Experience (PG-13) 7:45
12:35-3:45-6:55-10:05
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13)
Awe! (NR) 12:25-3:30-6:30-9:30 1:20-3:45
Manasuku Nachindi (NR)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
11:30-2:55-6:10-9:30
Missouri (R) 12:40-3:50-6:30-9:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:40Black Panther: An IMAX 3D Ex7:20
perience (PG-13) 1:30-4:40-10:50
Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:101:15-2:00-4:15-5:00-6:00-7:158:00-9:00-10:15-10:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 12:30-2:45-3:305:45-8:45
The Greatest Showman (PG)
2:15-7:45
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:30-5:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:00-2:204:30-7:00-9:15
Early Man (PG) 12:00-3:15-4:457:30-10:00
Game Night (R) 7:00-9:30
Annihilation (R) 7:00-9:45
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13)
1:00-3:45
The Shape of Water (R) 12:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:20-4:006:30-9:15
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:1012:50-1:30-2:10-4:05-4:45-5:256:40-7:20-8:00-8:40-9:55-10:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 12:30-2:45-3:25-3:456:00-7:00-9:15-10:15
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:00-2:25
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:202:55-5:15-7:45-10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:00-3:50
Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:05-12:551:30-3:30-4:10-6:35-9:00
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
Early Man (PG) 12:05-2:30-4:551600 Village Market Boulevard
7:15-9:45
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Game Night (R) 7:45-10:30
3D (PG-13) 1:45
Samson (PG-13) 12:05-2:35-5:10The Greatest Showman (PG)
7:50-10:30
12:00-2:40-5:10-7:40
The Post (PG-13) 12:10
Peter Rabbit (PG) 11:50-2:10Annihilation (R) 7:00-9:55
4:30-7:15
National Theatre Live: Cat on a
Early Man (PG) 11:35-1:50-7:25
Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
Hot Tin Roof 7:00
Samson (PG-13) CC: 11:25-2:004110 West Ox Road
Every Day (PG-13) 7:30-10:15
4:40-7:20
The Greatest Showman (PG)
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:1012 Strong (R) 2:50
12:40-3:30
2:40-5:05-10:10
The Post (PG-13) 12:05-4:20
Fifty
Shades
Freed
(R)
12:00Is Genesis History? Anniversary
Annihilation (R) 7:15
1:35-2:35-4:15-5:15-7:50-10:30 Event 7:00
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:45Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:10-1:15- 2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts 2:20-5:00-7:30
2:40-3:50-5:05-7:30-9:55
Animation (NR) 3:05-7:55
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Early
Man (PG) 12:00-2:20-4:40- 2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts (PG-13) 12:30-3:30
7:00-9:25
Live Action (NR) 12:40-5:20-10:05
Game Night (R) 7:30
2 (PG) 12:05-2:45- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 12:20- Paddington
5:20-10:40
Missouri (R) 3:15
3:00-5:40-8:00
Game Night (R) 7:10-9:50
Black Panther (PG-13)
Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
Samson (PG-13) 1:10-4:0011:30-12:15-1:00-2:30-3:156500 Springfield Town Center
8:00-9:50
4:00-4:45-5:30-6:15-7:00-7:45;
Three Billboards Outside Ebb- Black Panther (PG-13) 12:4011:30-2:30-5:30
ing, Missouri (R) 10:45
3:50-4:20-7:00-10:00-10:40
Manassas 4 Cinemas
The Post (PG-13) 1:30
Black Panther in Disney Digital
8890 Mathis Ave.
Annihilation (R) 7:00-10:00
3D (PG-13) 10:00-10:30-12:10National Theatre Live: Cat on a 1:10-1:40-3:20-4:50-6:30-7:30Fifty Shades Freed (R) 1:45Hot Tin Roof 7:00
4:00
8:00-9:40-11:00
Every Day (PG-13) 7:00-9:40
Black Panther (PG-13) 2:10The Greatest Showman (PG)
Is Genesis History? Anniver2:55-4:50-5:35
12:00-3:00
sary Event 7:00
Peter Rabbit (PG) 2:00-4:00Maze Runner: The Death Cure
La boda de Valentina (R) 4:30 (PG-13) 1:00
6:00
Detective K: Secret of the
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:45Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
Living Dead (NR) 12:40-3:403:30-6:40-9:20
6201 Multiplex Drive
6:40-9:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Game Night (R) 7:10-9:40
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX (PG-13) 10:20-1:20-4:10-7:10Annihilation (R) 7:00-9:40
22875 Brambleton Plaza
10:05
Rave Cinemas
Peter Rabbit (PG) 10:10-12:50Black Panther (PG-13) 1:00Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
2:45-4:15-6:00-7:30-9:15-10:45 3:40-6:20-9:00
11900 Palace Way
Black Panther in Disney Digital Early Man (PG) 12:30-3:10Black Panther (PG-13) 10:403D (PG-13) 11:30-1:30-4:45-8:00 6:10-9:10
12:00-2:40-3:20-8:40-9:20-10:00 The Greatest Showman (PG)
Game Night (R) 7:15-9:50
Black Panther in Disney Digital 1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30
Den of Thieves (R) 4:20
3D (PG-13) XD: 12:40-7:10-10:40 Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG- Annihilation (R) 7:40-10:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
13) 12:00
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 10:5011:30-2:10-4:50-7:40-10:55
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:451:30-4:00-6:50-9:30
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:003:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
Is Genesis History? Anniversary
11:55-1:40-4:15-5:30-8:05-10:45 Jumanji: Welcome to the
Event 7:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Jungle (PG-13) 2:15-5:00-7:45- Fifty Shades Freed (R) 11:00(PG-13) 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:2010:30
1:45-4:30
10:15
Peter Rabbit (PG) 1:15-4:00Regal Virginia Gateway
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:056:30-9:00
Stadium 14 & RPX
12:55-3:55-6:50
Early Man (PG) 1:45-4:308001 Gateway Promenade Place
Padmaavat (Padmavati) (Hindi) 7:15-9:45
Is
Genesis
History? Anniversary
(NR) 9:40
Game Night (R) 7:30-10:00
Event 7:00
The Shape of Water (R) 2:30
Samson (PG-13) 1:45-4:30Black
Panther
(PG-13) 7:30
12 Strong (R) 10:50-1:55-4:557:15-10:00
7:55-11:00
Annihilation (R) 7:15-10:00
Smithsonian - Airbus
The Post (PG-13) 10:15-1:05Every Day (PG-13) 7:00-9:30
IMAX Theater
3:50-7:05-10:10
Tholiprema (Tholi Prema) (NR)
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
Lady Bird (R) 11:10-10:25
12:15-3:15-6:15-9:30
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
Annihilation (R) 7:00-10:05
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 1:15- A Beautiful Planet 3D (G)
I, Tonya (R) 1:35-4:25-7:25
4:15-6:45-9:15
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13) 11:45- Manasuku Nachindi (NR)
Seas 3D (NR) 11:10AM
2:15-5:05-7:35-9:55
11:45-2:45
Dream Big: Engineering Our
Black Panther (PG-13) XD: 10:00- Chalo (NR) 2:00-5:00-8:00
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
1:20-4:00-4:40-7:45-11:20
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D
Black Panther in Disney Digital Experience (PG-13) 12:30-3:45- 2:00
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:303D (PG-13) 11:20-2:00-5:207:00-10:15
12:00-1:25-3:40
6:05-6:40
The Shape of Water (R)
Black Panther: The IMAX 2D Ex11:30-2:15
Regal Ballston Common
perience
(PG-13) 4:15-7:05-9:55
Three Billboards Outside EbbStadium 12
America’s Musical Journey: An
ing, Missouri (R) 3:30
671 N. Glebe Road
IMAX 3D Experience 12:35-2:50
Regal Kingstowne
Black Panther (PG-13) 12:00University Mall Theatre
Stadium 16 & RPX
1:30-2:00-4:45-5:15-8:00-8:30
10659 Braddock Road
5910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
Black Panther in Disney Digital
Ferdinand
(PG) CC: 12:00-2:203D (PG-13) 12:30-3:15-3:45The Greatest Showman (PG)
4:40
6:30-7:00-9:45-10:15
1:15-7:35
Justice League (PG-13) Open
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:35Caption; CC: 7:30-9:55
1:30-4:10
2:10-3:10-4:45-7:15-9:50
Coco (PG) CC: 12:15-2:30-4:45
Fifty Shades Freed (R) 12:05Jumanji: Welcome to the
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
1:10-2:40-4:00-5:20-8:00
Jungle (PG-13) 1:05-3:507:15-9:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the
6:35-9:15
Maze Runner: The Death Cure
Jungle (PG-13) 1:25-4:15-10:10 Peter Rabbit (PG) 12:15-1:55Early Man (PG) 12:10-2:35-5:00- 3:00-4:15-5:25-6:55-7:55-9:30- (PG-13) CC: 7:00-9:50
7:30-10:00
10:30
Wonder (PG) CC: 12:05-2:40-4:55
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
NEITHER SIDE VULNERABLE
NORTH (D)
7654
Q 10 4
KQ
KQ32
EAST
J8
A
J98765
9765
WEST
A K 10 2
653
A43
J 10 8
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
Q93
KJ9872
10 2
A4
The bidding:
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
1
Pass
1
1 NT
Pass
3
Opening lead — K
WEST
Pass
All Pass
“N
obody was at fault,
but the accident
wouldn’t have happened if
the other driver had been
alert.” — from a motorist’s
report filed with the insurance
adjuster.
Look at the defense, or
the lack thereof, today and
decide whether anyone was
at fault. Against three hearts,
West led the king of spades,
and East signaled with the
jack. West mulled and shifted
... to the jack of clubs. South
swiftly took three high clubs
to pitch a spade and next
led a trump. He lost a trump,
another spade and a diamond, making three.
“At least I didn’t continue
with the ace and a third
spade, making you ruff
with your ace of trumps,”
West told East. “Maybe you
should signal low on the first
spade.”
East-West had an accident.
Whose fault?
West wasn’t alert. Clearly,
he must find East with an
ace. If East has the ace
of clubs, the contract will
always fail. But if East has
the ace of trumps, West
needs to lead a trump at
Trick Two, lest declarer get
a fast discard on dummy’s
clubs.
CLASSIC PEANUTS
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
7 6 5 4 Q 10 4
KQKQ32
As dealer with neither side
vulnerable, North in today’s
deal opened one club with
this hand. Do you agree with
that action?
ANSWER: Many players
would open with less, as
per the modern tendency.
The hand does contain two
defensive tricks, but it lacks
playing tricks, and the diamond honors aren’t carrying
their weight because there
are no long cards in the suit
for them to set up. I would
not open.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | FEBRUARY 22
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you break
past previous
restrictions. You
often think in terms
of your daily life, and let
long-term planning fall to the
wayside. If you are single, your
popularity soars. Be willing to
read between the lines with
a potential suitor. If you are
attached, the two of you enjoy
more excitement than usual.
As a couple, you are likely
to make a major change on
the homefront. Gemini often
presents new ideas that you
can count on.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Your possessive side emerges
when dealing with a financial
matter. Stay on top of your
to-do list, or else you’ll
need to adjust your plans.
Opportunities knock on your
door that you won’t want to
say “no” to.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Your upbeat attitude melts
others’ negativity and opens
up several opportunities.
Friends support you in taking
the next step toward pursuing
a long-desired goal. You feel
more positive than you have in
quite a long time.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You might want to do some
thinking about your next
choice or action. Planning
your day contributes to even
more possibilities. Deal with
WEINGARTENS & CLARK a partner directly, especially
when handling a money
matter.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Use the morning to focus
on what you want to do.
Associates and friends are
likely to be your cheerleaders
and supporters. Later in the
day, you might find that a
partner is easily irritated.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Demands push you into the
limelight, which you can
handle and actually even
might like. With this activity
comes a lot of responsibility.
You might want to rearrange
your schedule in order to be as
effective as possible.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Be willing to take a leap of
faith. Consider what it would
be like to walk in someone
else’s shoes before you decide
to head in a new direction.
If your insecurities keep
encouraging you to back off,
you might need more time to
think.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You often relate to a loved
one on a one-on-one level.
Together, you make a strong
and insightful combo.
Make it OK to tap into your
imagination. Reach out to
someone who always adds a
fresh perspective.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Defer to others for now, and
understand that they need
to see their ideas become a
reality. The results might not
be what they had anticipated.
You express yourself with
clarity and demonstrate
the ability to see situations
differently.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Breeze into the morning
with determination to
complete some errands.
Your perspective about a
financial matter could change
after a conversation with a
partner.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
Some people think of you
as a stick-in-the-mud.
Today you’ll give these
people a reason to reassess
their judgments. Your
creativity allows you to
approach an important
project differently.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Stay anchored. You know what
is good for you, and you know
which way you need to go. You
might opt to work from home
and handle a problem from
there. With you less available,
others will make more of an
effort to bypass a hassle.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
You have the ability to
speak your mind in a
way that triggers others’
thoughts. Choose the
most effective and powerful
method of achieving results
and drawing in supporters.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
At Sunday’s closing ceremonies in South Korea, you
will see the traditional passing of the Olympic flag to
the next host of the Winter Olympics, Beijing, which
will hold the Games in 2022.
Temperatures should be back down
near normal, with cloudy skies, a
cool breeze and maybe some rain.
Do you know who paved the
way for black players in the
National Football League?
Find out in our Score archive.
ILLUSTRATION BY EVAN MEYER, 7, ARLINGTON
Best hockey isn’t happening at the Olympics
The best male hockey
players are not
competing in the Winter
FRED BOWEN
Olympics in South
Korea. That’s because
the National Hockey League (NHL)
decided not to allow its players to
participate in the Winter Games this
year.
So let’s check in on some of the big
stories in the best hockey league on
Earth.
Washington Capitals: It seems funny
to say, but the Capitals have been lucky so
far this season.
The Caps have long specialized in
losing heartbreaking seven-game series
in the NHL playoffs. But this year, the
puck seems to be bouncing Washington’s
way.
The Caps have an excellent record of
34-19-7 (34 wins, 19 losses and seven
overtime losses) even though they have
outscored their opponents by only seven
goals.
Alex Ovechkin is leading the way with
36 goals. The superstar left wing is also
playing a terrific all-around game, having
dealt out 31 assists. Evgeny Kuznetsov,
Nicklas Backstrom and T.J. Oshie are all
helping on the front lines, while John
Carlson is having an outstanding season
on defense.
Could this be the year the Capitals
finally get lucky in the playoffs?
Vegas Golden Knights: The biggest
surprise of the season by far is that the
Las Vegas team — in its first season in the
NHL — has one of the best records in the
league (39-16-4).
When the Golden Knights became the
league’s 31st team, the NHL allowed the
other 30 teams to protect most of their
best players. Then Vegas picked from the
leftovers to form its team.
It turns out the leftovers are pretty
good. While the Golden Knights do not
have any big-name stars, they have three
very solid lines that can put the puck in
the net. Vegas is second in the NHL in
goals per game.
Add steady goaltending by Marc-
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
The Score
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Word with rose
or road
4 AMA part: abbr.
9 __ Bornes: card
game
14 Caen comrade
15 Thick-skinned
herbivore
16 Big Apple stage
honors
17 Longtime PBS
news anchor
19 Open, in a way
20 Delon of cinéma
21 Exactas, e.g.
23 Site for a
railroad signal
30 Part of __
31 Hawk or eagle
32 Tic-toe link
35 “That was
close!”
38 Buckwheat dish
39 Statistic
including
farmers and
their neighbors
43 “25” album
maker
44 Wedding
invitation encl.
45 Yellowknife is
its cap.
46 Mournful
artwork
48 Abhor
51 Kielbasa
55 Anorak part
56 Really cool
place to live?
59 Grouchy look
63 Primitive area,
and what’s
literally found
in this puzzle’s
circles
66 Ventricular
outlet
67 Thar Desert
country
68 JFK Library
architect
69 180-degree
river bend
70 __ Heights:
Mideast region
71 Serpentine
letter
DOWN
1 Mexicali’s
locale
2 Oscar winner
Jannings
BROCK FENTON/NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP/AFP
The common vampire bat feeds on
the blood of farm animals, such as
cattle and horses.
For vampire bats,
eating blood just
comes naturally
KATHY WILLENS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
ABOVE: The National Hockey League plays at least one game a year outdoors, in
such places as Yankee Stadium in 2014. LEFT: Marc-Andre Fleury is one reason
the Vegas Golden Knights — the NHL’s newest team — is a legitimate contender.
ETHAN MILLER/GETTY IMAGES
Andre Fleury and Malcolm Subban, and
the NHL’s newest team is a legitimate
contender.
Outdoor hockey: For the past 10
seasons, the NHL has played at least one
regular-season game in an outdoor
stadium. Fans have flocked to games in
such famous sports palaces as Yankee
Stadium, Wrigley Field and Fenway Park.
More than 100,000 fans filled the
University of Michigan’s football stadium
to watch a hockey game on New Year’s
Day in 2014.
On March 3, the Capitals will host the
Toronto Maple Leafs at the Navy-Marine
Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis,
Maryland. It should be a great game in a
very cool place.
If you can’t get to the game, don’t
worry: It will be televised on NBC.
Let’s hope the weather cooperates.
Temperatures in the Washington area
have reached the 70s a couple of times
this week. Not exactly hockey weather.
kidspost@washpost.com
Bowen writes the sports opinion column for
KidsPost. He is the author of 23 sports books
for kids. His latest, “Lucky Enough,” has just
been published.
If you want to know how vampire
bats can survive on a diet that
consists only of blood, the answer is
simple. It’s in their genes.
Scientists on Monday said they
have mapped for the first time the
genome, or complete set of inherited
traits, of the common vampire bat
and compared its genome with those
bat species that eat nectar, fruit,
insects and meat.
The scientific study identified
genes in the metabolism of vitamins
and fats that could help the bat deal
with the unique nutritional aspects of
its blood diet.
This bat and the world’s two other
vampire bat species are the only
mammals that eat just blood.
The common vampire bat lives in
parts of Mexico, Central America and
South America and is active at night.
It feeds on the blood of farm animals,
such as cattle and horses.
“My personal feelings about them
is that it’s too bad people demonize
them,” said the study’s lead author,
Lisandra Zepeda. “We should be
amazed by them, not scared.”
— Reuters
By Mark McClain
Call this nickname resentment what it is
Adapted from a
recent online discussion.
Hi, Carolyn: My
mother-in-law,
“Linda,” has been
calling my
daughter
“Tootsie” as a
nickname since the day she was
born. I have no idea where this
nickname came from but it
drives me crazy. I have asked her
to call her by her given name so
she is not confused as she grows
older and to avoid possible
ridicule from classmates down
the road. She tried to catch
herself at first but now
continues to call her Tootsie
even with gentle reminders.
We see her about once a week,
plenty of chances to correct
herself, but she continues with
this nickname and sometimes
even comes up with other crazy
ones that are really bizarre.
How do I get her to stop
without causing too much
tension?
— Not a Fan of Tootsie
Carolyn
Hax
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
3 Joltin’ Joe
4 Bull-riding
venues
5 Warning
to a chatty
theatergoer
6 Chivalrous title
7 Year not designated as such
until centuries
later
8 Kitchen gizmo
9 Greek menu
staple
10 Hebrew : Ben ::
Arabic : __
11 Lemon on
“30 Rock”
12 Floral neckwear
13 Clairvoyant’s
gift
18 Turkish dough
22 Only Canadian
MLB team
24 “Murder on the
Orient Express”
(2017) actor
25 Value system
26 Irritated words
27 “__ the bag”
28 “Not gonna
happen”
29 Researcher’s
request
2/22/18
32 “The Sound of
Music” name
33 Sound
34 Fish basket
36 #TestforRadon
org.
37 Chinese martial
arts
40 Meter opening?
41 Rule governing intentional
walks?
42 Open fields
47 “Ray Donovan”
network, briefly
49 Ang Lee’s
birthplace
50 Its main
product was
originally given
the portmanteau name
“Froffles”
52 Ferber novel
53 Hersey’s “A Bell
for __”
54 Skip church?
57 Pindaric verses
58 Malady suffix
59 __ Paulo
60 Regatta chief
61 Marble, e.g.
62 Geneva-based
commerce gp.
64 XLV x X
65 Sedona, for one
WEDNESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Not a Fan of Tootsie: OMG. Let
the woman call her grandchild
what she wants.
“[S]o she is not confused as
she grows older”? You can’t have
typed that with a straight face.
I’m not sure there’s a person
in the roiling 7 billion-plus who
didn’t get nicknamed as a kid,
and I’m reasonably confident
all of them know their given
names. And if there are some
pet-nameless, they probably
wished they’d had one because
nicknaming is one of the
universal currencies of
affection.
Unless of course it’s blatant
ridicule, which Tootsie is not.
Were it not for your avoidconfusion point, I’d have spent
the preceding paragraph on
your “avoid possible ridicule by
classmates” point, which was
only a couple of degrees less
acute on the see-my-own-brain
scale.
When your daughter is old
enough to feel the sting of
classmate ridicule — or just to
have classmates — she can tell
Grandma herself that she
dislikes the nickname. If for
some reason she feels she can’t
take on Grandma on this issue,
she can ask you to.
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
So please let’s just call this
what it is: You don’t like Linda.
Yes? Because this is the kind
of thing people forgive — or
even love — from people they
love, and complain about when
they’re already annoyed with
someone.
If I’m wrong, then consider
how your anti-Tootsie “crazy”
comes across to Linda. She
might think as I do.
Either way: The best
approach is not, not, not to
impose yourself on her
relationship to your daughter or
to micromanage a minor
nuisance as if it’s a matter of
grave consequence. It is to
accept that even a grandma who
gets under your skin can be a
gift to your child.
Let them have their own
bond. It’s a crucial step, if not
THE step, in accepting that your
daughter is a fully realized
person, as opposed to a miniextension of you.
If Linda ever actually,
objectively puts your daughter
at risk, then you can step in. But
the power of the Lindaresentment vibe I’m getting
suggests you need an objective
third party to help you
differentiate real risks to your
daughter from perceived threats
to you that you spin into
justifications to “protect” your
daughter. This is where friends
who aren’t yes-friends are so
valuable. They’re the ones
willing to tell you to chill.
—
Happily, readers were willing
to tell us their nicknames.
Thank you Booger, WooWoo,
Princess Canoodles Fricky,
Smidgen, Messy Bessy
Knucklehead, Schmopples, Toad
and Kevin. More here: bit.ly/
BoogerBear.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
PYEONGCHANG
A sprint for the books
DMITRI LOVETSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jessie Diggins, left, crosses the finish line a fraction of a second ahead of Stina Nilsson of Sweden in the team sprint event Wednesday. It marked the first women’s cross-country gold for the United States.
U.S. medal count jumps
as Wise, Ferreira grab
top spots in halfpipe
BY
Randall blazed a cross-country trail;
Diggins followed it to make history
BY
C HICO H ARLAN
A DAM K ILGORE
daegwallyeong, south korea — The
bongpyeong, south korea — The experiences here of America’s two freestyle ski medalists had almost nothing in common Thursday.
One skier, Alex Ferreira, was dominant all day,
pulling off the best run in the first heat, the best
run of the second — and a run in the third heat
that scored even higher than those two. The
other skier, David Wise, struggled all day,
changed skis three times, spent much of the
competition near last place, and only vaulted to
the top — above Ferreira, above everybody else
— on the last run, one that he called the best of
his life.
But those experiences dovetailed at the podium, where America’s loaded team of freestyle
skiers grabbed the top two places in Thursday’s
men’s ski halfpipe event, a performance that
continues the United States’ medal surge as
these Winter Olympics near a close.
Wise, 27, and Ferreira, 23, provided their
country its 18th and 19th medals of the Games
HALFPIPE CONTINUED ON D11
unattainable had become inevitable, the
magical had grown feasible, and Kikkan
Randall started screaming at the top of
her lungs. She was standing under the
lights, at the finish line of Alpensia CrossCountry Skiing Centre, imploring her
team sprint partner. She watched Jessie
Diggins blaze around the final turn in
intimate pursuit of the leader, a whoosh
of Lycra and a blur of limbs.
Diggins pumped her legs and thrashed
her arms, stride for stride with Sweden’s
Stina Nilsson. Her thighs burned. “Go, go,
J ORGE C ASTILLO
west palm beach, fla. — Trea
Turner was stunned when he
walked into the Washington Nationals’ clubhouse at Ballpark of
the Palm Beaches last week. Anthony Rendon, his favorite baseball player and locker neighbor,
had a close-cropped haircut. His
long hair was gone, a casualty of
the offseason.
“It’s different. I don’t know if
he looks younger or skinnier,”
Turner said. “I don’t know. . . . It’s
CROSS-COUNTRY CONTINUED ON D13
A won silver follows a lost gold
For American bobsledder Elana Meyers
Taylor, context makes all the difference. D9
‘The greatest skier’
Barry Svrluga on Lindsey Vonn, whose final
Olympic downhill ended with a bronze. D13
The young and the breathless
Russian figure skater Alina Zagitova’s
dazzling short program belies her age. D10
Live updates and more online
For coverage of U.S.-Canada gold medal
women’s hockey game: wapo.st./sports
With Rendon, the Nationals
are hoping for more of same
BY
go,” Diggins told herself. Randall could
not discern whether Diggins or Nilsson
held the lead. History would be made.
The frantic, furious final 100 yards would
determine which kind.
Diggins started the homestretch just
behind. They traded the lead, seemingly
every glide of their skis. Diggins moved
ahead, first by inches, then by maybe a
foot, never more. Diggins crossed the line
0.19 seconds before Nilsson, so close
Randall could not be sure who won until
she looked at a scoreboard above the
grandstand. It showed a “1” next to “United States.”
just a big change I guess. I actually didn’t care for the man bun and
all the curls. I just wasn’t prepared for it.”
The Nationals can hope it’s the
only significant change for Rendon in 2018. Still one of baseball’s
under-the-radar elite players,
Rendon finished sixth in the National League MVP voting last
season after not making the NL
all-star team. He finished with
career highs in batting average
(.301), home runs (25), doubles
NATIONALS CONTINUED ON D3
D.C. SPORTS BOG
The debut of U-Md.
pitcher Billy Phillips,
a cancer survivor, had
extra meaning. D2
HOCKEY
Capitals trade for
another defenseman,
landing Jakub Jerabek
from Montreal. D4
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Virginia handles
Georgia Tech, and
Georgetown falls short
at home to Xavier. D4
Early mistake in slalom
ends Hirscher’s quest
for third Alpine gold
BY
A DAM K ILGORE
daegwallyeong, south korea — First
came the gasps, then a collective groan and
then silence, the kind of unsettled quiet that
accompanies disbelief. Marcel Hirscher, the
great Austrian skier trying for history, was up
on the top third of the hill, not powering
around gates and carving gorgeous turns but
standing still in a puff of snow.
Poof: Hirscher’s bid to become the second
man to win three Alpine gold medals in one
Olympics came to a shocking end Thursday
morning at Yongpyong Alpine Center. Before
he could swish halfway down the track in the
first run of the men’s slalom, Hirscher missed a
gate and skied out, the first time he had failed to
finish a race in more than two years. In what
may have been his final Olympic appearance,
Hirscher reached the bottom to polite, confused applause.
Earlier at the PyeongChang Games,
Hirscher, 28, had won the downhill combined
SLALOM CONTINUED ON D11
Coming out of break, Wizards won’t catch one
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
The Cleveland Cavaliers and
Washington Wizards have met
only twice this season, but the
teams’ earliest encounter has defined much of the year.
During the Nov. 3 matchup —
only the eighth game on the
schedule — Washington discovered its all-NBA point guard
wasn’t indestructible and learned
just how devastating LeBron
James can be when properly motivated. John Wall experienced his
first injury (a left shoulder sprain)
in a season of aches and pains,
while James poured in 57 points
Difficult 25-game stretch
to close the season begins
against ‘reborn’ Cavaliers
following Wall’s assertion that the
Cavaliers had dodged the Wizards
in last year’s playoffs.
Washington (33-24, fourth in
the East) has since had to evolve
without Wall, who is recovering
from left knee surgery, while the
Cavaliers — with a flurry of moves
at the Feb. 8 trade deadline — have
morphed into something else al-
together, again inspiring James.
“They changed so many guys,
and I think they look very good.
They look like they have new energy now,” Wizards point guard
Tomas Satoransky said, adding
that the Cavaliers look “a little
reborn.”
Cleveland (34-22, 11/2 games
ahead of Washington in the standings) had languished before the
trade deadline. The team spent
much of January near the league’s
cellar in defensive efficiency, and
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D5
Wizards at Cavaliers
Today, 8 p.m., TNT
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
D.C. SPORTS BOG
SOCCER INSIDER
Cuban says
he will fix
Mavericks’
workplace
BY
USSF paid
Ellis less
than many
employees
D ES B IELER
BY
Responding this week to a
Sports Illustrated story alleging a
“corrosive” workplace culture
within his NBA team, Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban said he
was “embarrassed” and vowed to
fix the problem. The lengthy story
recounted numerous alleged instances of sexual harassment and
abuse, as well as apparent indifference to them, by staffers and highly placed executives with the team.
Based on claims made by former
and current Mavericks employees,
many of whom were women who
requested not to be identified, plus
events already on the record, SI’s
story painted, as the magazine put
it, “a picture of a corporate culture
rife with misogyny and predatory
sexual behavior.”
In a statement issued shortly
before SI published its article, Cuban’s organization emphasized
that the former team president
whose alleged behavior is at the
center of the story “left the employment of the Mavericks nearly three
years ago.” Terdema Ussery, who
was hired as president three years
before Cuban bought the team in
2000 and stayed in the job until
2015, was accused by one team employee of predicting she was soon
“going to get gang-banged” and by
another of repeatedly asking her to
have sex with him.
Professing ignorance of the corporate culture portrayed by SI, Cuban told the magazine, “It’s wrong.
It’s abhorrent. It’s not a situation
we condone. I can’t tell you how
many times, particularly since all
this [#MeToo] stuff has been coming out recently, I asked our HR
director, ‘Do we have a problem?’
And the answer was no.”
In other news, the NBA on
Wednesday fined Cuban $600,000
for comments about tanking during a podcast Sunday with Hall of
Famer Julius Erving.
Cuban said during the 30-minute interview that he met recently
with some of his players and told
them “losing is our best option.”
Cuban told the Associated Press
he “earned” the fine because he said
something he “shouldn’t have.”
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND ATHLETICS
“Best baseball moment I’ve experienced,” one teammate wrote of Billy Phillips’s scoreless sixth inning Sunday at Tennessee.
For Terps lefty, a special debut
BY
S COTT A LLEN
Before Billy Phillips took the mound
to start the bottom of the sixth inning in
the second game of Maryland’s
doubleheader at Tennessee on Sunday,
the left-hander studied the notecard on
which he had written a few things he was
thankful for that day. He texted his mom,
Michelle, who was back home in
Delaware, and his four best friends to let
them know he would, at last, be making
his college debut. And then, three years
after he was diagnosed with leukemia as
a senior in high school, adrenaline
kicked in.
“I couldn’t feel my legs, and my heart
was racing,” Phillips said Tuesday of his
short trip from the bullpen at Knoxville’s
Lindsey Nelson Stadium to the mound.
The notecard was Terrapins pitching
coach Corey Muscara’s idea. A firm
believer that the mental aspect of the
game is every bit as important as the
physical aspect, Muscara asks all of his
pitchers to jot down what they’re
thankful for and what they hope to
accomplish before every practice and
game. As he prepared to throw his
warmup pitches, Phillips was especially
thankful for the eight guys in red jerseys
on the field with him, including
shortstop AJ Lee.
“I looked around at my teammates,
and they all had big smiles on their faces,”
Phillips said. “AJ came in and gave me a
hug, and I thought, ‘Hey, I’m here now. I
might as well just have some fun with it.’ ”
“I just wanted him to know that we
were all behind him and he had nothing
to worry about out there, that he wasn’t
out on an island by himself,” said Lee, the
2015 All-Met Player of the Year at
St. John’s. “You could tell that he was a
little nervous. That’s what you would
expect for anyone’s first outing but
especially given what he’s been through.”
Phillips, who starred at St. Mark’s in
Wilmington, Del., had been through a lot
during his recovery from leukemia and
subsequent complications from a bonemarrow transplant, but his latest
challenge was figuring out a way to retire
Tennessee catcher Benito Santiago. The
son of the 1987 NL rookie of the year by the
same name, Santiago had homered and
desmond.bieler@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“I’ve got to get back,
bro. . . . I’m giving
everything I got.”
RYAN SHAZIER,
Steelers linebacker, speaking on
teammate Roosevelt Nix’s podcast in
his first public comments since he
suffered a spinal injury during a game
Dec. 4 in Cincinnati. Shazier says he
plans not only on playing again but
becoming one of the best NFL
linebackers ever. (Via Early Lead)
Goalie saves the day
in Man. United’s draw
A solid performance by
goalkeeper David De Gea helped
Manchester United hold Sevilla to
a 0-0 draw in their first-leg match
in the round of 16 of the
Champions League on Wednesday
in Seville, Spain.
The hosts played well and had
most of the significant scoring
chances but could not get past the
Spanish goalkeeper.
Among De Gea’s saves was a
spectacular one-handed reflex
stop after a close-range header by
Sevilla forward Luis Muriel just
before halftime.
Next month’s second leg will be
staged in Manchester, England,
where Sevilla will be trying to
make it to the quarterfinals for the
first time and United will look to
return to the final eight after three
seasons. . . .
Shakhtar Donetsk came from
behind to beat Roma, 2-1, in the
first leg of their Champions
League meeting in Kharkiv,
Ukraine, thanks to a spectacular
winner from Brazil midfielder
Fred.
The 24-year-old Fred showed
why some of Europe’s top clubs
doubled twice in his first three at-bats to
help the Vols build a 12-6 lead.
Despite the score, everyone in the
Maryland dugout was leaning on the
railing as Phillips prepared to pitch.
Santiago fouled off Phillips’s first pitch,
swung through a breaking ball on 0-1
and then took a called third strike on the
outside corner. Phillips pounded his
glove, which features his name in orange
stitching — the color for leukemia
awareness — as his teammates cheered.
After allowing a one-out single,
Phillips got Wyatt Stapp to hit into an
inning-ending double play. Phillips
pounded his glove again, pumped his fist
and smiled as he backpedaled toward the
dugout, pausing after he crossed the third
base line. First baseman Kevin Biondic
flipped Phillips the baseball, which he
now keeps in his dorm room, and Phillips
shared another hug with Lee.
“The first thing I thought of was to
kind of say thank you and give a hug to all
the guys who had supported me from
Day One,” said Phillips, who was
wrapped in a minute-long stream of
embraces after his only inning of work. “I
wanted to make sure I waited for them. It
was probably one of the greatest
moments I’ve had in my entire life.”
“Best
baseball
moment
I’ve
experienced,” Maryland pitcher Hunter
Parsons wrote on Twitter, a sentiment
shared by several Terrapins players and
coaches.
“You can’t ask to be a part of
something much more special than
that,” Lee said.
Lee and Phillips first met as juniors in
high school, when St. John’s and
St. Mark’s scrimmaged in D.C. before
their respective seasons. Lee and Phillips
had both committed to Maryland by
then and were looking forward to
becoming college teammates. Phillips
was named first-team all-state for the
second time that year, but on March 10,
2015, a couple of weeks before the start of
his senior season, he was diagnosed with
acute lymphocytic leukemia after
experiencing joint and muscle soreness.
Phillips, whose father died of cancer at
age 46 in 2011, spent 35 days in the
hospital to undergo chemotherapy,
during which time he lost 30 pounds off
his 175-pound frame. Things got worse
for Phillips before they got better. After
receiving a bone-marrow transplant, he
developed graft versus host disease
(GVHD) in his gastrointestinal tract and
dropped to 126 pounds after being fed
intravenously for two months.
Phillips’s condition began to improve
in the spring of 2016. He was cured of
GVHD and regained enough strength to
begin taking classes at Maryland. He
roomed with Lee and lifted weights with
the team, but a return to the field was an
uncertainty. Phillips continued to regain
his strength and added about 30 pounds
last summer. The NCAA reinstated his
eligibility in the fall, and he threw his
first bullpen session as a college athlete
in November.
On Sunday, Michelle Phillips couldn’t
figure out how to stream her son’s debut
from home, so Lee’s mom, who made the
trip to Knoxville for Maryland’s seasonopening series, texted her video updates
from the stands. After the game,
Maryland’s only loss in three games over
the weekend, Phillips called his mom,
who is planning to attend the Terps’ series
vs. Army in College Park this weekend.
“I couldn’t really talk to her because
she was sobbing the whole time and
couldn’t get a word out, but I told her it
was all right and I had a lot of fun and
that I loved her and all that good stuff,”
Phillips said. “It was a great moment.”
Phillips’s phone was inundated with
congratulatory messages. On Monday,
he attended five classes and received a
text from Zach Jancarski. The senior
center fielder wanted Phillips to know
how proud he was of him.
“The very next thing he said was,
‘You’re not done yet,’ ” Phillips said. “I
keep that mind-set.”
scott.allen@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
dcsportsbog
The U.S. Soccer Federation this
week posted its most recent tax
form, and although context is important in understanding the
numbers (see below), the optics
are not great.
In fiscal year 2017 (April 2016 to
March 2017), several federation
employees earned more money
than Jill Ellis, head coach of the
world champion women’s national team. Furthermore, she was
among only two women in the list
of top earners at the Chicagobased, nonprofit organization.
Ellis collected about $292,000
in that time frame. Andi Herzog,
Jurgen Klinsmann’s top assistant
on the men’s squad at the time,
claimed $447,000. Bruce Arena,
who replaced Klinsmann in December 2016, received $400,000 in
that final month of the year, most
of it coming from a signing bonus.
Klinsmann, by far the highestpaid coach in U.S. soccer history,
received $3.3 million until his termination in November 2016. Later, he collected $6.2 million in
severance because he had been
under contract through the 2018
World Cup.
Among the other officials who
were paid more by USSF than
Ellis:
Dan Flynn, the USSF’s chief
executive: $832,000.
Jay Berhalter, chief commercial officer: $780,000.
Paul Marstaller, director of
events: $340,000.
Greg Fike, staff attorney:
$322,000.
Behind Ellis were:
Eric Gleason, chief financial
officer: $265,000.
Lisa Levine, legal counsel:
$252,000.
Tab Ramos, under-20 men’s
coach: $248,000.
The USSF president does not
collect a salary, though expenses
are covered. The board of directors is also unpaid.
Levine has since shifted her duties to general counsel of the National Women’s Soccer League,
which is administered by the
USSF. Her USSF replacement is a
woman, Lydia Wahlke.
Now, some context:
Ellis could have earned more
in 2016 but fell short of bonuses
when her squad lost to Sweden in
the Olympic quarterfinals in Brazil. Her base salary is now over
$300,000, and she has several performance incentives, particularly
in a World Cup year, which, for the
women’s team, next comes in 2019.
Several USSF executives were
rewarded for the financially successful Copa America Centenario,
held at U.S. venues in summer
2016.
Marstaller and Fike carry
smaller base salaries than Ellis,
but both essentially worked two
jobs before and during the 16team Copa America Centenario.
steven.goff@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/soccerinsider
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
D I G ES T
SOCCER
A teammate’s hug helped put
cancer survivor Phillips at ease
before his first college outing
S TEVEN G OFF
are reportedly after him with a
perfect free kick in the
71st minute. . . .
The Washington Spirit will play
its next-to-last match of the 2018
season Aug. 25 at home against
the Portland Thorns, the National
Women’s Soccer League reigning
champions. The location,
however, remains undecided.
Spirit management said it’s
weighing whether to play at
Maryland SoccerPlex, its
suburban home for the past five
seasons, or at Audi Field, the new
D.C. United stadium opening this
summer near Nationals Park.
The schedule is clear: United is
on the road against the New York
Red Bulls that weekend, and the
Washington Nationals are in New
York to play the Mets, providing
logistical flexibility for an event at
the 20,000-capacity soccer venue
at Buzzard Point.
United, which owns the
stadium, said it’s hopeful of
striking a deal with the women’s
organization. The Spirit is
weighing the economics of
playing in a large, more expensive
facility and how it would impact
season ticket holders. No decision
is expected for a few weeks.
— Steven Goff
Real Madrid overcame the
absence of Cristiano Ronaldo
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
GOLF
2 p.m.
Washington at Cleveland » TNT, WFED (1500 AM)
Los Angeles Clippers at Golden State » TNT
12:30 p.m.
NHL
7:30 p.m.
Washington at Florida » NBC Sports Washington, WJFK (106.7 FM)
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
11 p.m.
11:30 p.m.
Radford at Liberty » MASN
Robert Morris at Mount St. Mary’s » CBS Sports Network
Connecticut at Cincinnati » ESPN
Wisconsin at Northwestern » ESPN2
Winthrop at North Carolina Asheville » ESPNU
Purdue at Illinois » Fox Sports 1
Houston at Memphis » CBS Sports Network
UCLA at Utah » ESPN
Gonzaga at San Diego » ESPN2
Belmont at Jacksonville State » ESPNU
Arizona at Oregon State » Fox Sports 1
BYU at Portland » ESPNU
Arizona State at Oregon » Fox Sports 1
ATP: Delray Beach Open and Rio Open, early rounds » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
10:50 a.m.
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
PGA Tour: Honda Classic, first round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
3 p.m.
UEFA Europa League, round of 32, second leg:
OGC Nice at FC Lokomotiv Moscow » Fox Sports 2
UEFA Europa League, round of 32, second leg:
Copenhagen at Atletico Madrid » Fox Sports 1
UEFA Europa League, round of 32, second leg:
Napoli at RB Leipzig » Fox Sports 2
UEFA Europa League, round of 32, second leg:
Ostersund at Arsenal » Fox Sports 1
UEFA Europa League, round of 32, second leg:
Borussia Dortmund at Atalanta » Fox Sports 2
INTERNATIONAL BASKETBALL
4:30 p.m.
FIBA World Cup, qualifying game: Canada at Virgin Islands » ESPNU
BOXING
11:30 p.m.
Joseph Diaz Jr. vs. Victor Terrazas (featherweights) » ESPN2
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
8 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
Maryland at Michigan » Big Ten Network
LSU at South Carolina » SEC Network
Penn State at Nebraska » Big Ten Network
Kentucky at Mississippi » SEC Network
and other regular starters, coming
from behind to defeat Leganes,
3-1. The result allowed the
defending champions to regain
third place in the Spanish league
from Valencia.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Former Louisville coach Rick
Pitino believes the school should
consider taking legal action
against the NCAA after the
governing body ordered the
vacation of the Cardinals’ 2013
men’s basketball championship as
part of sanctions for a sex scandal.
Louisville announced Tuesday
that the NCAA had denied its
appeal of sanctions that included
vacating 123 victories and the
return of about $600,000 in
conference revenue from the 201215 NCAA tournaments. The school
later removed banners of the 2013
championship and 2012 Final
Four appearance.
Pitino said Wednesday from his
attorney’s offices in New York that
the NCAA’s decision was unfair.
The former coach did take
responsibility for his assistant
coaching hires. Asked about legal
action, Pitino said he was
defenseless but that Louisville’s
Board of Trustees should consider
legal action “because the players
deserve it.”
MISC.
John Tillman became the
fastest coach in Maryland men’s
lacrosse history to win 100 games
as the No. 3 Terrapins defeated
No. 17 Penn, 13-6, in College Park.
The Terrapins improved to 4-0. . . .
Three players finished with hat
tricks to lead the No. 16 Virginia
women’s lacrosse team (2-0) to a
15-7 victory over Richmond in
Charlottesville. . . .
The Carolina Panthers rehired
Marty Hurney as their general
manager, marking his second fulltime stint in the position.
The team had reinstated
Hurney as interim general
manager last week after an NFL
investigation found no
wrongdoing into charges of
harassment by his ex-wife.
— From news services
and staff reports
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
SPRING TRAINING NOTES
NATIONAL ROUNDUP
Astros prospect Whitley suspended
Cowboys boost résumé with big upset
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
Major League Baseball announced Wednesday that it suspended Forrest Whitley, who is
widely seen as one of the top
pitching prospects in baseball, for
50 games over a violation of the
league’s drug policy. Whitley’s suspension will begin at the start of
the Texas League season. He is on
the roster of the Corpus Christi
Hooks, the Houston Astros’ Class
AA affiliate. The Hooks are scheduled to play their 51st game on
May 29.
MLB did not announce the specific nature of Whitley’s violation.
“MLB has released the information that they’re going to release.
I’m not in a position to release any
information beyond that,” Astros
General Manager Jeff Luhnow
told the Athletic’s Jake Kaplan.
The Astros chose Whitley, 20,
out of his Texas high school with
the 17th pick of the 2016 amateur
draft. Last year, he went 5-4 with a
2.83 ERA, 34 walks, 78 hits and
143 strikeouts in 23 games
(18 starts) across 921/3 innings at
Corpus Christi, Class A Advanced
Buies Creek and Class A Quad
Cities. The right-hander led the
minor leagues in strikeouts per
nine innings (13.94), and Baseball
America lists him as the secondbest pitching prospect in all of
baseball behind the Angels’ Shohei Ohtani, the Japanese import
who probably will not play in the
minor leagues.
Late last month, the Astros announced that Whitley would
spend spring training with the
club’s minor leaguers, a decision
that reportedly was not unexpected because of the World Series
champion’s already strong rota-
tion. Luhnow told MLB.com then
that Whitley still could be a latesummer call-up, though the prospects of that happening now seem
much cloudier.
— Matt Bonesteel
Outfielder Colby
Rasmus decided to return to baseball after walking away last summer and signed a minor league
contract with Baltimore.
Rasmus was in camp to finish
up his physical. He got an invitation to big league spring training.
The 31-year-old Rasmus was
with Tampa Bay in mid-July when
the Rays said he was going to “step
away from baseball.” Neither the
team nor Rasmus offered an explanation, though he had been
slowed by hip trouble.
Rasmus was hitting .281 with
nine home runs and 23 RBI in
37 games for the Rays when he
left. . . .
The Orioles signed pitcher
Chris Tillman to a one-year,
$3 million contract that includes
performance bonuses.
Tillman was 1-7 with a 7.84 ERA
in 19 starts and five relief appearances last year.
GIANTS: San Francisco said
Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda
remains hospitalized in critical
condition after a cardiac incident.
The Giants gave an update on
the condition of the 80-year-old
Cepeda. He was taken to a Bay
Area hospital late Monday.
Cepeda has been a regular at
San Francisco home games. He
played first base during his 17 seasons in the majors, beginning
with the Giants. He also played for
St. Louis, Atlanta, Oakland, Boston and Kansas City.
A seven-time all-star who
played in three World Series,
Cepeda was the 1958 NL rookie of
ORIOLES:
the year with San Francisco and
NL MVP in 1967 with St. Louis. In
1961, he led the NL with 46 homers and 142 RBI. Cepeda was a .297
career hitter with 379 home runs.
YANKEES: Newly acquired
Brandon Drury is the now the
favorite to be the starting third
baseman for New York.
The Yankees acquired Drury
from Arizona on Tuesday night in
a three-team deal that also involved Tampa Bay. Drury played
mostly second base for Arizona
but came up through the minors
at third.
Prospect Miguel Andujar was a
leading candidate at third before
the trade for Drury was completed.
MARLINS: Veteran outfielder Cameron Maybin had to correct
himself as he talked about rejoining the team that first made him
an everyday player.
He said he was happy to be back
with the Florida Marlins before
noting a name change since he
left.
“It has been a while — what,
about 10 years, I think,” Maybin
said.
He actually departed after the
2010 season. The franchise became the Miami Marlins two
years later, and now Maybin is
back. The well-traveled 11-year
veteran signed a one-year,
$3.25 million contract and gives
the young, rebuilding Marlins
much-needed experience.
PIRATES: Pittsburgh signed
free agent outfielder Michael
Saunders to a minor league contract and invited him to major
league spring training.
The 31-year-old Saunders hit a
combined .202 with six home runs
and 21 RBI in 73 games for Philadelphia and Toronto last season.
OKLAHOMA STATE 79,
TEXAS TECH 71
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Kendall Smith scored 21 points
to help Oklahoma State stun No. 6
Texas Tech, 79-71, on Wednesday
night in Stillwater, Okla.
Lindy Waters added a careerhigh 18 points to help the Cowboys
(16-12, 6-9 Big 12) get a huge boost
to their hopes of gaining an NCAA
tournament bid. The Cowboys already had four wins against teams
that were ranked in the top 20 at
the time they played — Florida
State, Oklahoma, West Virginia
and Kansas.
Zhaire Smith scored 18 points,
and Jarrett Culver added 15 for
Texas Tech (22-6, 10-5).
VILLANOVA 93, DEPAUL
62: Phil Booth scored 14 points in
his comeback from a broken right
hand that sidelined him for seven
games, and Mikal Bridges scored
27 points to lead the third-ranked
Wildcats in Philadelphia.
Eric Paschall added 16 points to
help Villanova (25-3, 12-3 Big East)
beat the Blue Demons for the
16th straight time.
Max Strus scored 21 points for
DePaul (10-17, 3-12).
DUKE
82, LOUISVILLE 56:
Grayson Allen scored 28 points,
and the fifth-ranked Blue Devils
held the Cardinals to a season-low
point total in a rout in Durham,
N.C.
Freshman big man Wendell
Carter Jr. finished with 18 points
to help Duke (23-5, 11-4 ACC) win
its fourth straight game — all coming with star freshman Marvin
Bagley III out with a sprained
knee.
Ray Spalding scored 17 points
for Louisville (18-10, 8-7).
NORTH CAROLINA 78,
SYRACUSE 74: Senior Theo Pin-
son scored a career-high 23 points,
Joel Berry II added 18, including
the tie-breaking layup with 1:36
left, and the 10th-ranked Tar Heels
held off the Orange in Syracuse,
N.Y.
North Carolina (22-7, 11-5 ACC)
SUE OGROCKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jeffrey Carroll and Oklahoma State now boast five victories over
teams in the top 20 after Wednesday’s win against Texas Tech.
has won six straight, but this was
the most difficult against a team
fighting for its postseason life. Syracuse (18-10, 7-8) was teetering on
the NCAA tournament bubble entering the game.
AUBURN 90, ALABAMA 71:
In Auburn, Ala., Jared Harper
scored 21 points as the 12thranked Tigers (24-4, 12-3 Southeastern Conference) won without
ailing star Mustapha Heron and
injured Anfernee McLemore.
Collin Sexton scored 25 points
to lead the Crimson Tide (17-11,
8-7).
WICHITA STATE 93, TULANE 86: Shaquille Morris had
25 points and nine rebounds to
help the 13th-ranked Shockers
(22-5, 12-3 American Athletic) outlast the Green Wave in Wichita.
Melvin Frazier scored 16 of his
22 points in the second half for
Tulane (13-14, 4-11).
MICHIGAN
72,
PENN
STATE 63: Duncan Robinson
scored 19 points and Moritz Wagner added 18 to help the 17thranked Wolverines (23-7, 12-5 Big
Ten) upend the Nittany Lions in
State College, Pa.
Tony Carr scored 21 points for
the Nittany Lions (19-11, 9-8).
TENNESSEE 62, FLORIDA
57: In Knoxville, Grant Williams
bounced back from one of his
worst performances of the season
by scoring 23 points as the 19thranked Volunteers (20-7, 10-5
Southeastern Conference) handed the Gators their third consecutive loss.
Florida (17-11, 8-7) trailed nearly
the whole way but threatened in
the final minute.
NEVADA 80, SAN JOSE
STATE 67: Kendall Stephens
scored a career-high 30 points,
and the 20th-ranked Wolf Pack
(24-5, 13-2 Mountain West) hit
14 three-pointers to cruise to an
easy win in Reno.
Ryan Wellage had 22 points and
nine rebounds for San Jose State
(3-23, 0-15).
No. 1 U-Conn. women roll
Azura Stevens scored 23 points,
Napheesa Collier scored 22, and
top-ranked Connecticut won its
50th straight road game with a
91-47 rout of Tulane in New Orleans.
Katie Lou Samuelson had
15 points, nine rebounds and seven assists for the Huskies (27-0,
14-0 American), who led by 32 in
the first half and built 48-point
lead in the final period.
Kolby Morgan scored 15 points
for Tulane (12-15, 4-10), which lost
its third straight and fell to 0-9 all
time against U-Conn.
AREA ROUNDUP
Boyd’s buzzer-beater boosts Patriots
GEORGE MASON 79,
SAINT JOSEPH’S 76
F ROM
NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
PHOTOS BY JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Nationals pitchers gather as they await their next assignment during spring training Wednesday.
Rendon looks to build on stellar 2017
NATIONALS FROM D1
(41), on-base percentage (.403)
and slugging percentage (.533).
He was one of three qualified
batters in baseball to compile
more walks (84) than strikeouts
(82). All while playing elite third
base.
“I tried to drive the ball more,”
the 27-year-old Rendon said
Wednesday morning. “I wouldn’t
necessarily say I tried to Daniel
Murphy it and launch angle and
tried to hit it at a certain degree,
but I did take one of his terms:
Get my A-swing, I guess you could
say.”
New Nationals hitting coach
Kevin Long, the man credited for
unleashing Murphy’s potential
with the New York Mets in 2015,
wasn’t one of the people overlooking Rendon.
Over the course of a 30-minute
media session Tuesday afternoon,
Long offered his initial impressions of some players he has
worked with. He got technical, a
couple times getting up for a
demonstration, as he explained
how he thinks each player could
improve in the batter’s box and
answered questions about other
hitting topics. He spoke about, or
at least hinted at, ways he believes he can help most of the
players mentioned improve.
There was one notable exception:
Rendon.
“I’m leaving Anthony Rendon,”
Long said. “He’s one guy I’m not
going to be able to help out too
much.”
Long said he marveled at Rendon when he watched him bat
from the other dugout with the
Mets the past three seasons. He
said he noticed Rendon was
standing closer to the plate last
year, an adjustment that made
him more compact while still
being able to hit the ball inside.
He called him a magician.
“He’s always on time,” Long
said. “It looks effortless. His me-
Ian Boyd picked up a loose ball
at the top of the key and drilled a
game-winning three-pointer as
time expired to give George Mason a 79-76 win over Saint Joseph’s in an Atlantic 10 battle
Wednesday night in Philadelphia.
The win pulled George Mason
into a tie with Saint Joseph’s,
Dayton and Richmond for sixth
place in the conference standings
with three games to play.
Taylor Funk hit three straight
free throws to get the Hawks
within 75-74 with 15 seconds left,
and Shavar Newkirk tied it at 76
on two free throws with six seconds left.
Justin Kier scored 19 points to
lead the Patriots (13-15, 7-8).
Newkirk scored 23 points to
lead the Hawks (12-15, 7-8).
GEORGE
WASHINGTON
103, RICHMOND 77: Yuta Wa-
tanabe scored 23 points, and the
Colonials shot 69 percent from
the field at Smith Center and
earned their third straight win.
George Washington (13-15, 6-9
A-10) has won four of its past five
games and snapped a four-game
skid against Richmond (9-18,
7-8), which has lost four in a row.
BUCKNELL
85, NAVY 61:
In Lewisburg, Pa., Zach Thomas
scored 23 points, tying a school
record with his 16th 20-point
game, and the Bison rolled past
the Midshipmen.
Bucknell (21-9, 15-2) had already locked up the Patriot
League title and home court for
the quarterfinals for the fourth
straight season. Navy (19-11, 10-7)
is tied for third.
HOLY
CROSS 70, AMERI-
CAN 64: Jacob Grandison scored
11 of his team-high 16 points in
the second half as the Crusaders
(11-17, 8-9 Patriot) defeated the
Eagles in Worcester, Mass.
Larry Motuzis led American
(6-22, 3-14) with 21 points, including six three-pointers.
VCU 82, MASSACHUSETTS 78:, Justin Tillman scored
26 points with 13 rebounds,
De’Riante Jenkins scored 17
points and the Rams topped the
Minutemen in Amherst, Mass.
The Rams improved to 16-12,
8-7 in the Atlantic 10. Luwane
Pipkins made eight three-pointers for U-Mass. (11-17, 4-11).
AU women clinch Patriot title
The American women’s basketball team clinched the program’s
sixth regular season title with a
72-57 win over Holy Cross at
Bender Arena as the Eagles swept
the Crusaders for the first time
since 2011-12.
The Eagles (23-4, 13-0 Patriot
League) extended their recordbreaking winning streak to
17 games.
DAYTON 71, GEORGEMASON 66: In Dayton, Ohio, Natalie
Butler had another double-double with 16 points and 24 rebounds for the Patriots (21-8, 10-5
Atlantic 10), but the Flyers (22-4,
15-0) won their 16th straight
game.
BUCKNELL
49, NAVY 40:
The Midshipmen (22-5, 12-4 Patriot League) had their home
winning streak snapped at
16 games with a loss to the Bison
(19-8, 13-3).
“His mechanics are flawless,” new Washington hitting coach Kevin
Long said of Anthony Rendon. “He just does a lot of things right.”
chanics are flawless. He’s in line.
He’s balanced. He just does a lot
of things right.”
Rendon, who will make
$12.3 million in 2018, is two seasons away from free agency. If
retained, he would serve as a
centerpiece in what could be a
world without Bryce Harper and
Murphy populating the middle of
Washington’s lineup beyond just
one season.
At NatsFest in December, Rendon said he’s open to listening to
the Nationals if they want to discuss a contract extension but added Wednesday that he believed his
words were taken out of context.
“I think you all kind of exploited that,” said Rendon, a Scott
Boras client. “You all made it
seem like, ‘Oh, I want a contract
right now.’ And I think what I was
talking about was, ‘Yeah, I’m open
to listen to it.’ It’s kind of like if
anybody wants a promotion,
you’re obviously going to want to
hear about it, you’re not going to
want to just ignore it.
“But, hey, I’m not going to be
like, ‘Hey, I want my extension
now.’ I’m open to hear about it.”
In the meantime, Rendon
spent his offseason getting married and watching his beloved
first-place Houston Rockets exceed his expectations. He wanted
to cut his hair for the November
wedding, but his wife didn’t want
him to, so he waited until later in
the offseason. After a year and a
half of growing his hair out, the
maintenance had gotten annoying. He was over having to put
product in it or wear hats.
“It was probably not a good
start to our marriage,” he
quipped.
The hair isn’t gone, though.
Rendon said it’s in a plastic bag
back home in Texas. He has plans
for it in the future, though he
wouldn’t disclose them. Maybe,
he joked, the haircut will help
him receive the accolades that
have eluded him.
“I’m thinking [with] my new
haircut, I’m a professional now,”
Rendon said with a smile. “I’m
trying to show everybody to take
me seriously.
“So maybe I’ll get more all-star
votes.”
jorge.castillo@washpost.com
BATH FITTER QUALITY
lasts a lifetime
One-Day Installation1
Seamless Wall
Certified Technicians
Lifetime Warranty2
Schedule your FREE design
consultation ($125 value)
and get up to a
$600 CREDIT*
CODE: 18751
Call Now
301-683-7135
Now serving Maryland, D.C., and Virginia.
1Tub-to-shower conversions and fiberglass replacements typically require a two-day installation. 2Lifetime warranty valid for as long as you own your
home. Subject to limitations. See location for details. *Subject to limitations. See location for details. Offer must be presented and used at time of
estimate only. May not be combined with other offers or applied to previous purchases. Valid only at select Bath Fitter locations. Fixtures and features
may be different than pictured. Accessories pictured are not included. Daniel Paul Hemshrodt MD MPL #17499, MD HIC #129995,
VA HIC #2705146537, DC HIC #420213000044. Each Franchise Independently Owned And Operated By Mid Atlantic Bath Solutions, LLC.
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
Robinson,
Blackshear
lead Hokies
past Tigers
BY
J IMMY R OBERTSON
blacksburg, va. — Virginia
Tech Coach Buzz Williams admitted that he and his team only
focus on increments of 24 hours.
“Just be consumed with today,”
he said.
That approach certainly has
been working.
Justin Robinson and Kerry
Blackshear Jr. scored 14 points
each to lift the Hokies to a 65-58
victory over No. 15 Clemson on
Wednesday night.
Robinson continued his stellar
play of late, scoring in double
figures for the 14th time in the
past 15 games for the Hokies
(20-8, 9-6 ACC), who have won six
of their past eight games and
moved into a tie for fourth place
in the conference standings.
Blackshear struggled from the
field but was 3 for 4 on free throws
in the final 33 seconds to preserve
the win.
“How we manage the next
24 hours emotionally, physically,
mentally, that’s going to impact
Saturday,” Williams said. “The
same can be said for Friday. I’ve
allowed our staff to kind of step in
front me because they’re better at
it than me at doing that more.
“I’ve kind of just tried to help
give energy to our guys. Same
thing in the game tonight. Very
little strategy. Not a lot of technique. I thought we won the game
because of energy, and I believe
that will be the case if we win”
Saturday against Louisville.
Virginia Tech, which won its
third straight over the Tigers
(20-7, 9-6), broke open a close
game midway through the second
half. The Hokies trailed 38-34 after Clemson’s Marcquise Reed hit
a three-pointer with 13:43 remaining, but they went on a 10-0
run punctuated by Ahmed Hill’s
layup to take the lead for good.
The Hokies led by 14 points
with 2:33 left before the Tigers
put on a furious rally. They used
an 11-2 run to cut the lead to 61-56
on a three-pointer by Gabe DeVoe
with 41 seconds remaining.
Virginia Tech scored the next
four points — all from the foul line
— with Blackshear making 3 of 4
and Chris Clarke 1 of 2, which was
just enough. The Tigers missed
three three-pointers in the final
30 seconds.
“It’s a big step,” Robinson said
of the win. “We got a win in front
of [our] fans. We kind of talked
about it before the game. We’ve
got more losses [at home] this
year than the last two. I think it’s
something in our pride that we
took care of tonight.”
Reed paced the cold-shooting
Tigers, who have lost three
straight games, with a career-high
28 points, while Elijah Thomas
had his eighth double-double
with 12 points and 10 rebounds.
Clemson shot just 38.6 percent
from the field (22 for 57).
— Associated Press
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
After making two deals,
Caps mull more moves
VIRGINIA TECH 65,
CLEMSON 58
BY
. THURSDAY,
AMBER SEARLS/USA TODAY SPORTS
Ty Jerome made 4 of 6 three pointers and led the Cavaliers with 18 points at home Wednesday night.
Cavs clinch top seed in ACC
VIRGINIA 65,
GEORGIA TECH 54
BY
G ENE W ANG
charlottesville — The coronation of the Virginia men’s basketball team as ACC regular season champion became little more
than a formality long ago, when it
had dispatched its closest pursuers to gain separation at the top.
Then came this past week, in
which the top-ranked Cavaliers,
weary from a recent stretch of
three road games in 10 days, enjoyed an extended hiatus from the
grind of conference competition.
The time to recharge was particularly beneficial for guard Ty
Jerome, whose right thumb had
been heavily wrapped the past two
games.
With the digit unencumbered
Wednesday night, the starting
point guard produced his secondbest scoring performance of the
season, allowing Virginia to overcome a sluggish first half and pull
away from visiting Georgia Tech,
65-54, to claim the top seed in the
conference tournament.
“I don’t know if we were rusty
from the break,” said Coach Tony
Bennett, whose team improved to
25-2, 14-1. “I don’t know what it
was, but I know it did heal up,
helped his thumb a lot, and so he
played without the tape. We had to
fight to get this one, but good that
he is healthy, and I thought he had
a very good game.”
Jerome scored 15 of his teamhigh 18 points in the second half
and 13 of the Cavaliers’ 16 points
over the final 11-plus minutes at
John Paul Jones Arena. He finished 4 for 6 from beyond the arc
in Virginia’s 17th triumph in 18
games and fourth in a row against
the shorthanded Yellow Jackets.
The sophomore had combined
to score 17 points with his thumb
and hand taped against Virginia
Tech and Miami. He made 1 of
12 three-point attempts in those
games.
No other Cavaliers player
reached double figures against
Georgia Tech (11-17, 4-11), which
got a game-high 22 points and
seven rebounds from center Ben
Lammers. The 6-foot-10 senior
had just four points in the first
meeting Jan. 18, when Virginia
won handily, 64-48, in Atlanta.
“It’s definitely a good step in the
right direction for what we want
to do this year,” Jerome said of a
third regular season ACC championship under Bennett in five
years. “We just can’t get complacent because we have so much
more to go. Hopefully at least 10,
11, 12 more games. We have so
much more to do.”
With Virginia holding a 46-43
lead with 11:31 left in regulation,
Jerome made a three-pointer to
trigger a 14-6 run over the next six
minutes. Senior guard Devon Hall
followed with two free throws,
and Jerome swished another
three-pointer and added a pair of
free throws to grow the lead to
56-47.
The margin swelled to 11 for the
first time after De’Andre Hunter
sank a pull-up jumper and Mamadi Diakite, who had seven straight
points early in the second half,
converted a difficult layup. That
duo contributed significantly to
Virginia’s 19-4 advantage in bench
points.
Diakite also impacted the outcome on defense, fronting Lammers and denying him entry passes. The 6-9 redshirt sophomore’s
turn guarding Lammers yielded
just two points and no field goals
for the Yellow Jackets’ preseason
all-ACC selection over nearly
10 minutes in the second half.
The Cavaliers’ frontcourt regulars of Diakite, Jack Salt and Isaiah
Wilkins combined to make 10 of
13 field goal attempts, part of the
Cavaliers’ 10-4 advantage in
points in the paint in front of an
announced crowd of 13,873.
“That helps us,” Bennett said.
“Georgia Tech, they were switching a lot of the off-ball screens, so
we got some slips, we call it, some
stuff right in front of the rim, and
then we had some mismatches.
We got it in to Mamadi. He made a
few nice moves and finished, [as
did] Jack and Isaiah. Those are
really important things for us.”
The victory began Virginia’s
closing kick to the regular season
in which it plays three teams
among the bottom four in the ACC.
Georgia Tech dropped into that
group with losses in nine of its
previous 10 games entering
Wednesday. Then circumstances
worsened for the Yellow Jackets
when point guard Jose Alvarado
fractured his left elbow Feb. 11
during an 80-69 loss to Duke.
The freshman is out for the
remainder of the season, Coach
Josh Pastner announced the next
day, leaving Georgia Tech without
one of two players who had started
every game this season. The other
is Lammers, himself nursing a
gimpy ankle.
Lammers still helped keep the
Yellow Jackets well within reach at
halftime in their pursuit of their
first win against a ranked opponent this season.
Virginia led by only 31-30 at
intermission, marking the second
time this season the Cavaliers
have surrendered 30 points in the
first half of a home game. The
other instance was Feb. 10, when
they gave up 33 points to Virginia
Tech in a 61-60 loss.
“Congratulations to Coach Bennett and his staff, players and program,” Pastner said. “It’s a great
accomplishment to win this
league.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
Hot start leads to a cold finish as Hoyas fall short
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
In response to the suggestion
by Capitals Coach Barry Trotz
that Brian MacLellan might have
“more under his sleeve,” Washington’s general manager chuckled. “That’s easy for him to say,”
MacLellan retorted with a smirk.
Then he pressed his sleeves firmly against his sides, not revealing
a thing.
“I mean, we are looking,” MacLellan said.
Less than 24 hours after that
statement, MacLellan acquired
his second mobile Czech defenseman of the week, and with the
trade deadline still five days away,
the Capitals might not be done
dealing. Washington added Chicago’s Michal Kempny on Monday, waived depth defenseman
Taylor Chorney on Tuesday and
cleared salary cap and roster
space, then traded a 2019 fifthround pick to Montreal for Jakub
Jerabek.
That leaves the team with
roughly $617,000 in salary cap
space, according to CapFriendly.com, but Washington now has
the maximum 23 players — including eight defensemen. Any
other acquisitions would require
a corresponding roster move to
remove a player in some fashion.
Three players on the team can be
sent down to the American Hockey League without exposure to
waivers: rookies Jakub Vrana,
Madison Bowey and the newly
acquired Jerabek.
In keeping with what has been
a tricky balance throughout the
season, the Capitals want to make
another run at a Stanley Cup with
their aging superstar core of Alex
Ovechkin and Nicklas Backstrom, but they are no longer
willing to compromise the future
to do so. MacLellan parted with
the better of the team’s two 2018
third-round picks in acquiring
Kempny, but after he dealt a
prospect (forward Zach Sanford)
and a first-round pick to the St.
Louis Blues in exchange for defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk a
year ago, he’s taking a more
conservative approach before
this trade deadline. MacLellan
has said he intends to hold on to
his high draft picks, but “if something makes sense with lowerend draft picks, we are more open
to do that.”
Dealing a 2019 fifth-round pick
for Jerabek, who has played just
25 games in the NHL, matches
that approach. Both he and
Kempny are mobile, puck-moving blue-liners, addressing a team
concern as the Capitals have
struggled to get the puck out of
their own end efficiently.
Over the past 20 games, Washington has allowed 3.35 goals per
game, a jarring decline from the
league’s best defensive team a
year ago. But MacLellan also
indicated earlier this month that
he didn’t want to stunt the development of rookie defensemen
Christian Djoos and Bowey by
bringing in players who would
take away playing time.
“I think all along we have been
trying to balance developing two
young defensemen and trying to
give them the experience they
need to get — and considering
adding a defenseman to give us
more depth,” MacLellan said
Tuesday at an event for Washington’s upcoming outdoor game in
Annapolis.
C API TALS ’ NE X T THR E E
at Florida Panthers
Today
7:30 NBCSW
vs. Buffalo Sabres
Saturday
7 NBCSW
at Columbus Blue Jackets
Monday
7 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
To add another player, the Capitals’ realistic options are to trade
someone off the roster, waive a
depth forward or simply reassign
one of their three players who
don’t require waivers. Washington is unlikely to waive a player of
value because it would risk losing
him for nothing in an episode of
poor asset management.
Even with the limited salary
cap space, a trade partner could
retain up to half of a player’s
roster in a deal. After adding two
defensemen, the Capitals’ only
logical move left would be to add
a veteran winger.
The most high-profile trade
deadline sellers are the New York
Rangers, Ottawa Senators, Detroit Red Wings and Vancouver
Canucks. But if Washington
doesn’t want to part with high
draft picks, it won’t be able to
meet the high asking prices for
marquee players such as the
Rangers’ Michael Grabner and
Ryan McDonagh or Ottawa’s
Mike Hoffman. The team also
lacks the cap space for that.
Asked about a reunion with Detroit’s Mike Green, a blue line
staple in Washington for 10 years,
a Capitals source balked.
Even if the team reconciled
concerns of compromising the
future, the Capitals lack much to
offer in terms of prospects. Their
best young forwards already are
on the NHL roster, and the organization that dealt Filip Forsberg for a sorry return five years
ago is understandably hesitant to
repeat the mistake.
Among its assets, Washington
has young defensemen in its system with Lucas Johansen, Jonas
Siegenthaler, Connor Hobbs and
Colby Williams. The organization
also has coveted goaltender Ilya
Samsonov, though with him expected to make his North American debut next season and backup goaltender Philipp Grubauer
entering restricted free agency
again this summer, it seems unlikely the Capitals will want to
part with Samsonov, a 2015 firstrounder.
Grubauer, 26, has trade value,
but a team source indicated earlier in the season that Washington
wasn’t comfortable dealing him
in-season with no reliable option
behind him, in case starter
Braden Holtby got injured.
But considering MacLellan’s
bold track record over the past
three-plus years, it usually has
been safe to assume he has something else “under his sleeve.”
“I think we’re trying to keep
aware and communicate with
other teams on who is being
moved, and I think it shifts and
changes a lot,” MacLellan said. “If
something makes sense for us, we
will try to improve our team.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
Samantha Pell contributed to this
report.
NHL ROUNDUP
XAVIER 89,
GEORGETOWN 77
BY
A VA W ALLACE
Perhaps after a week-long
break, Georgetown Coach Patrick Ewing simply had more
pent-up energy on the sideline.
Perhaps after seeing his Hoyas
pull off wins against Seton Hall
and Butler in their previous two
games, his expectations had simply grown.
Regardless, Ewing spun on his
heel hard enough to send the
bottom of his gray suit coat flying
up around his waist, stared
blankly at the scoreboard and
swung his arm with all the force
of a baseball ump making an
emphatic out call Wednesday
night as he watched No. 4 Xavier
chip away at Georgetown’s slim
first-half lead.
In a battle that started as a
fast-paced offensive showdown,
the Musketeers outclassed and
outlasted Georgetown in the second half for an 89-77 win at
Capital One Arena to complete a
season sweep of the Hoyas and
remain atop this Big East, just
ahead of No. 3 Villanova.
For one half of basketball, at
least, Georgetown (15-11, 5-10 Big
East) looked ready to pick up
where it had left off after its
mini-break. The Hoyas shot
55.2 percent from the field,
moved the ball crisply and kept
turnovers to a minimum to surprise Xavier (25-4, 13-3) with a
40-38 lead at halftime.
But the better team held
steady after intermission as the
Hoyas’ passing turned sloppy
and their hot first-half shooting
cooled.
It didn’t help that they didn’t
get much from their late-game
go-to scorer. Marcus Derrickson
scored just five points in the
second half and finished with
nine points and four rebounds.
“I expect more out of them,”
Ewing said. “I think we’ve grown
a lot from where we were, with
the growing pains that we had to
endure with the close losses that
we’ve had. You know, I expected
us to be a lot more focused and
come out with more of a laser
focus, especially in this game,
especially with the long layoff
that we had. But I don’t think it
was there.”
While Georgetown’s focus
lapsed, Xavier used a 12-0 run in
the second half to take the lead
for good.
The Musketeers turned to
their deep lineup as leading
scorer Trevon Bluiett, who averages 19.9 points, shot 1 for 10
from the field and finished with
two points in another disappointing outing in Washington.
Bluiett, a senior, has shot 1 for 20
from the field and 0 for 11 from
the three-point line in his past
two games on Georgetown’s
home court.
“I joked with him right there
at the end when he was on the
bench, I hope the Big East tournament isn’t played here,” Xavier
Coach Chris Mack said of Bluiett.
“I think maybe folks in D.C. that
don’t have a TV and come to the
games think he’s an average
player, below average player. But
we do have a deep team.”
Freshman
Naji
Marshall
scored a career high 21-points,
and second-leading scorer J.P.
Macura added 20, making four
three-pointers. Quentin Goodin
contributed 19.
The Musketeers shot 57.1 percent from the field in the second
half and outrebounded Georgetown 19-13 as the Hoyas laid off
on defense and slowed their pace
in the face of Xavier’s steady
shooting.
For Georgetown, freshman
Jamorko Pickett continued his
strong play in the second half of
his freshman year and matched a
career high with 21 points. He
made six three-pointers and often provided the Hoyas spurts of
energy when they needed it
most.
Jessie Govan added 15 points
and a team-high 11 rebounds, but
he wasn’t able to do much damage in the post.
“It’s a good win for our team,”
Mack said. “I thought that the
first time that we played Georgetown, what stood out to our
coaching staff and our team were
two things. Number 1, their ability to get the ball up the floor in a
hurry . . . and then just Jessie and
Marcus’s ability to score in the
low post, to bring you out. Those
two in Game 1 combined for
42 points and 24 rebounds, and if
those numbers would have been
similar tonight, we might’ve
been sitting here with a loss.”
Georgetown did not bring
players out to speak with the
media for the third time this
season following a loss.
For Ewing, despite playing a
top-five opponent, Wednesday’s
loss was disappointing because
Georgetown has raised its level
of play in these final few weeks
before the Big East tournament
in New York. The Hoyas’ rebounding has improved, and
freshmen Pickett and Jahvon
Blair have become more confident. Derrickson has been
steady throughout conference
play.
But Wednesday showed that
the Hoyas still have strides to
make.
“They made plays, hit shots,
and we didn’t,” Ewing said. “. . .
They wanted it more than us in
the second half. We were right
there in the first half. . . . They
just outplayed us in the second
half.”
ava.wallace@washpost.com
Struggling Chicago finds
its footing in a shootout
BLACKHAWKS 3,
SENATORS 2 (SO)
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Nick Schmaltz scored the deciding goal in the seventh round of
the shootout to give Chicago a 3-2
win over the visiting Ottawa Senators on Wednesday night, just the
Blackhawks’ second victory in
11 games.
Schmaltz fired a wrist shot between the legs of Mike Condon
after Patrick Kane and rookie Alex
DeBrincat connected earlier in the
tiebreaker. Matt Duchene and
Mike Hoffman scored in the shootout for the Senators, who lost their
second straight.
Kane scored his team-leading
23rd goal and set up Artem Anisimov’s 16th in regulation for the
Blackhawks. Anton Forsberg
stopped 32 shots through overtime and five of seven in the shootout.
Duchene and Zack Smith
scored for the Senators in regulation, Stone had two assists, and
Condon finished with 36 saves
through overtime.
Chicago’s Joel Quenneville
coached his 1,600th NHL game.
Only Scotty Bowman and Al Arbour coached more.
The Senators and last-place
Blackhawks, two teams well out of
playoff contention heading into
the NHL’s trade deadline Monday,
both played their first of three
games in four nights.
Kane opened the scoring at
14:19 of the first after taking a drop
pass from Vinnie Hinostroza and
firing from the slot. The puck slithered under Condon was crossing
the goal line before Kane followed
through and slammed it in.
Smith tied it at 1 1:37 later on a
tip-in from the left side of the
crease. Derick Brassard set him up
with a slick cross-ice pass.
The Senators’ bus was involved
in a minor accident en route to
United Center for the game. No
one was injured.
Coyotes, Kings swing deal
The Arizona Coyotes acquired
goalie Darcy Kuemper from the
Los Angeles Kings for forward Tobias Rieder and goalie Scott
Wedgewood.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D.C. INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION GIRLS’ BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP
D5
M2
D.C. INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION BOYS’ BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP
Moye’s 50-point outburst secures title Hikim helps lead the Tigers to repeat
ANACOSTIA 77,
DUNBAR 38
BY
WILSON 71,
T. ROOSEVELT 59
S AMANTHA P ELL
Mya Moye looked up at the
scoreboard midway through the
third quarter of Wednesday’s D.C.
Interscholastic Athletic Association championship game against
Dunbar and a red “30” flashed on
the screen. She had already scored
30 points with more than 12 minutes remaining in the game.
“I can get 50,” Moye thought to
herself. “Why not?”
So Moye, a two-time DCIAA
player of the year, did just that,
scoring 50 points to lead Anacostia
to a 77-38 victory over Dunbar at
Howard University. The 20thranked Indians, the defending
DCIAA champions, won their third
DCIAA title in four seasons. Last
year, Anacostia beat Bell, 67-44, for
the title.
“There’s nothing else I can say,”
Anacostia Coach Reginald Walker
said. “Her other guard went down
[Zykia Leonard, with a knee injury in the second quarter], and so
combined they would have had
50 points, and that is what she
had. I didn’t even realize it either
until late in the fourth quarter.”
Anacostia improved to 21-4.
Dunbar dropped to 20-6.
This year, in Anacostia’s run to
its title, it defeated its previous
two opponents — Eastern and
Banneker — by a combined score
of 125-44. Moye had 15 points
against Banneker and 20 points
against Eastern. Wednesday night
was the first 50-point game of
Moye’s high school career, and she
hit eight three-pointers.
Moye, a 5-foot-6 point guard,
BY
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Mya Moye helped Anacostia overcome the loss of Zykia Leonard to
a knee injury to lead the 20th-ranked Indians in a rout Wednesday.
was averaging 19.9 points coming
in. She is a candidate for the
Gatorade player of the year award
in D.C. and recently picked up an
offer from Maryland-Eastern
Shore.
“I was just trying to play hard
and go out with a bang, and that is
what I did,” Moye said. “It is exciting to go out your senior year with
a lot of trophies and stuff. I was
going for it. I was working for it.”
Anacostia already had beaten
Dunbar once in the regular season — a 64-28 victory Jan. 10. And
Wednesday night, while the
stakes were a little bit higher,
nothing seemed to change. Anacostia has been a dominant team
in the DCIAA over the years, regu-
larly blowing out teams by
20 points or more.
After a slow start by both
teams, muddled with turnovers
and sloppy passes, the wheels
started turning for Anacostia after closing the first quarter with
an 18-11 lead. By halftime, Anacostia held a 42-17 advantage as Dunbar struggled to knock down
shots and get past the Indians’
perimeter defense. Moye had
25 points at halftime, and Authumn Cathcart had nine points.
“We’ve had a great four-year
run,” Walker said. “Hopefully
Zykia isn’t hurt too bad and we
can keep this run going in the
state tournament.”
samantha.pell@washpost.com
C ALLIE C APLAN
With about a minute left in the
game Wednesday night, Ayinde
Hikim flapped his arms and
looked around Howard’s Burr
Gymnasium.
The Wilson senior guard knew
his team had clinched its second
straight D.C. Interscholastic Athletic Association championship
over Theodore Roosevelt. He was
ready to celebrate.
So after the final buzzer sounded on the No. 15 Tigers’ 71-59
victory in Northwest D.C., Hikim
followed his teammates, who
grabbed championship hats and
T-shirts and ran to the stands.
Hikim smiled, satisfied to have
added to his high school career
with another trophy.
“I wanted to go out with a
bang. I didn’t want anything to
stop me,” Hikim said, reflecting
on winning two straight titles
after Wilson previously hadn’t
earned a championship since
1984. “It’s definitely becoming a
powerhouse. I’m going out with a
two-peat, and now it’s time to go
to states.”
Hikim, an uncommitted senior
who earned DCIAA tournament
MVP recognition, led all scorers
with 18 points, including 14 in the
second half, while sophomore
guard Dimingus Stevens added
12 points to pace the Tigers.
Theodore Roosevelt guard
Marcus Dockery powered the
Rough Riders (27-7, 12-1) with
13 points, but the production
wasn’t enough to avenge a 33point regular season loss to the
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Dimingus Stevens rises above the crowd to put the ball in the basket
for No. 15 Wilson in its victory over Theodore Roosevelt.
Tigers (28-9, 13-0 DCIAA) this
month.
“It’s a great feeling, this twopeat,” Wilson Coach Angelo Hernandez said.
Taking part in the pictures and
raising the league trophy is what
Hernandez imagined at the beginning of the year. He added two
transfers — guard Jay Heath and
Stevens from O’Connell — to
complement his talent from the
previous season.
But the Tigers endured a tough
start to the season. They played in
a national tournament across the
country — facing teams from nine
states — and often suffered losses
to top private school competition.
That forged the toughness and
tenacity Hernandez watched his
players
show
throughout
Wednesday night’s contest.
Three times Roosevelt pulled
within three points in the third
quarter. But each time, the Tigers
responded with a bucket on the
ensuing possession. Then they
ended the period on a 9-2 run to
build a double-digit lead they
maintained throughout most of
the final quarter.
In that period, Hikin showed
his dominance as a ballhandler,
controlling the pace of the game
and baiting Roosevelt’s players
into fouls. He took four trips to
the foul line, once because of one
of the game’s several technical
fouls.
As he thought about the senior’s performance just before accepting the trophy, Hernandez
smiled, saying Hikim deserves
the successful final stretch as the
Tigers look toward to the D.C.
State Athletic Association tournament next week.
“He’s got a lot of game, and he
can only get better,” Hernandez
said. “I’m going to miss him.”
callie.caplan@washpost.com
Ten story lines to ponder during NBA’s second half
BY
T IM B ONTEMPS
The NBA’s regular season returns from its week-long hiatus
Thursday, and virtually all
30 teams have something to play
for over the next seven weeks.
Here are 10 things to watch:
SUE OGROCKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Cavaliers’ LeBron James has looked reenergized since the team
made a series of deadline moves, including adding Jordan Clarkson.
Beal, Wizards get ready
for tough closing stretch
WIZARDS FROM D1
tensions became public following
reports of a locker room meeting.
The Cavaliers’ front office responded by making stunning
wholesale changes. Gone were
Isaiah Thomas, Dwyane Wade,
Channing Frye, Jae Crowder, Derrick Rose and Iman Shumpert. In
were Jordan Clarkson, George
Hill, Rodney Hood and Larry
Nance Jr.
“I think they jell well. I think
they mesh really well,” Wizards
guard Bradley Beal said. “It’s
worked. I think it was what was
best for the organization. I can’t
really speak for them, but they’re
a good team.”
Over All-Star Weekend, injured
Cavaliers forward Kevin Love admitted that it was pretty “apparent” that the team needed a makeover. In only two games with the
new guys, Cleveland’s chemistry
has looked palpable. As the Cavaliers won on the road over the
Boston Celtics and Oklahoma City
Thunder, James averaged nearly a
triple-double, and when he wasn’t
on the court, he was joyously celebrating others’ effort.
“They still have LeBron. [He]
makes everybody better,” Wizards
Coach Scott Brooks said. “They’re
playing with just a new, refreshed
sense of urgency. A couple of guys
probably [have] never been into
the playoffs, and they’re excited
about the playoff chase.”
Beal now has firsthand knowledge of what it’s like to play with
James. In his first All-Star Game,
Beal practiced and played on the
team captained by James. Though
the experience was limited to two
days and few moments together
in a locker room, Beal left feeling
more respect for the all-star MVP.
“He’s an unbelievable teammate, first and foremost,” Beal
said of James. “That was an unbelievable experience and to see his
preparation, his focus, his mentality, what he does to take care of
his body before and after games.
That’s a true testament of a Hall of
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
at Cleveland Cavaliers
Today
8 TNT
vs. Charlotte Hornets
Tomorrow
7 NBCSW
vs. Philadelphia 76ers
Sunday
8 NBCSW, ESPN
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
Famer and one of the best ever to
play the game.
“So you respect that and all
aspects of it, and his approach and
his leadership, it’s top-notch,”
Beal continued. “It’s crazy because you always play against
him. To play with him, you get the
experience to get inside.”
If Beal takes one thing from
James, it should be his approach
to staying healthy. When the Wizards return to play, Beal, who had
little rest over the all-star break,
will be expected to resume carrying the load because Wall remains
sidelined. In the remaining 25
regular season games, Washington has the toughest schedule in
the Eastern Conference. Thursday night’s game in Cleveland is
just the beginning. The Wizards
play five games in seven nights,
concluding with a home game
against the reigning NBA champion Golden State Warriors.
“That’s one of the downfalls to
being an all-star, I guess. You don’t
necessarily get the full break, but I
just got to take care of my body,”
Beal said. “Trust it, listen to my
body the best that I can. Trust my
teammates. . . . They’ve been playing well. We’ve been playing well
as of late. We want to keep that
momentum going. Just making
sure I rehab right. Get my treatments and get my proper rest as
well.
“I’ll definitely be smart about
my body,” Beal continued, “and
get the rest when I can.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
1. Are the Cavaliers for real?
The constant drama surrounding the Cleveland Cavaliers has
been the NBA’s biggest story. But
three deals pulled off by first-year
General Manager Koby Altman
around the Feb. 8 trade deadline —
sending out six players and a pick
and bringing back four solid additions — have completely remade
the Cavaliers.
The Cavaliers return to action
Thursday at home against the
Washington Wizards, having won
four straight going into the break.
If that form holds over the next
seven weeks, Cleveland will be the
overwhelming favorite to make it
to the NBA Finals for a fourth
consecutive season.
2. The up-in-the-air East
playoff race
The Cavaliers, Toronto Raptors
and Boston Celtics are virtually
guaranteed of making the playoffs. Beyond that, it’s anybody’s
guess.
Only five games separate the
Wizards in fourth place and the
Detroit Pistons in ninth, leaving
six teams fighting for five playoff
spots between now and mid-April.
The status of all six teams — the
Wizards, Indiana Pacers, Milwaukee Bucks, Philadelphia 76ers, Miami Heat and Pistons — will become a daily talking point.
3. The somehow crazier West
playoff race
Things are even more insane
out west. The Golden State Warriors and Houston Rockets will be
battling for the top spot, but all six
remaining playoff spots are up for
grabs.
Thanks to the 11-game winning
streak by the Utah Jazz, there are
10 Western Conference teams
with winning records. There are
41/2 games separating the San Antonio Spurs and Minnesota Timberwolves — tied for third — with
the 10th-place Jazz. There are
about 100 different ways this
could wind up.
4. Who will be the top seed in
the West?
The Warriors have finished
with the NBA’s best record in each
of Coach Steve Kerr’s three seasons with the franchise. For the
first time, however, that could
change. The Rockets come out of
the break riding a 10-game winning streak that pushed them to
the league’s best record, one halfgame ahead of Golden State.
Houston is 27-1 when James Harden, Chris Paul and Clint Capela all
play this season, and the Rockets
have won two of three meetings
with Golden State.
While Houston will push to get
home-court advantage, it is un-
clear whether the Warriors will do
the same. Kerr has talked up its
importance in the past, but in a
season where he has resorted to
having the players coach themselves to get them focused, it may
be less of a priority.
several theories have emerged as
to what went awry.
Here’s hoping, for Fultz’s sake,
he’s able to return and display the
obvious talent he once showed.
Right now, though, that day seems
far away.
5. Will James Harden win
MVP?
In two of the past three seasons,
Harden was runner-up in the
league’s MVP race. This year,
though, he looks like the clear
front-runner. Along with Houston
boasting the league’s best record,
Harden is putting together arguably his best season (31.3 points,
9.0 assists, 44.8 percent shooting
overall and 38.4 percent from
three-point range), while the rest
of the field has fallen behind.
Harden was the runaway leader
in the latest version of The Washington Post’s NBA straw poll, conducted this month. It appears only
an injury could derail his hopes of
being named MVP.
9. How many coaches and
general managers will be
fired?
There have been three head
coaches fired this season — Earl
Watson in Phoenix, David Fizdale
in Memphis and Jason Kidd in
Milwaukee. Rich Cho was let go as
Charlotte’s general manager Monday.
Several more coaches could be
out of a job. For New York (Jeff
Hornacek), Atlanta (Mike Budenholzer), Orlando (Frank Vogel),
Charlotte (Steve Clifford) and the
Los Angeles Clippers (Doc Rivers),
teams with new or changing front
offices could decide to make
changes. If the New Orleans Pelicans miss the playoffs, both Coach
Alvin Gentry and General Manager Dell Demps could go. Same goes
for Coach Mike Malone in Denver.
6. Who will win rookie of the
year?
Through the first couple
months of the season, 76ers guard
Ben Simmons was expected to run
away with this award. But that was
before Donovan Mitchell’s star
turn as the Jazz surged back into
the playoff picture. Then Mitchell
took things a step further by winning the slam dunk contest Saturday night.
This is a race that will truly
come down to the wire. The guess
here is Mitchell will edge out Simmons for the award if Utah manages to make the playoffs, and
Simmons will take it if the Jazz
misses. Regardless, this is a race
with two right answers.
The next several weeks could decide all of their fates and potentially imperil others.
10. The Great Tank Race of
2018
There are several teams battling to have the best chance of
landing a top pick in June’s NBA
draft. Six — the Suns, Mavericks,
Kings, Grizzlies, Hawks and Magic
— have 18 wins, while the Brooklyn Nets have 19 and the Chicago
Bulls 20. The New York Knicks,
meanwhile, have lost eight in a
row — and look as if they could
lose 28 in a row with star Kristaps
Porzingis out for the season.
The Bulls announced they
would be giving significant playing time to young players Tuesday.
Mark Cuban has publicly said,
“Losing is our best option,” which
led to the Mavericks owner being
fined $600,000 Wednesday. Expect the other teams in this mix
(other than the Nets, who don’t
have their draft pick) to follow a
similar path. The result will be a
hilarious race to the bottom.
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
7. When will injured stars
return, and how will they
look?
The Wizards have played well
since John Wall underwent knee
surgery. The idea that they are
better off without Wall is foolish,
but the Wizards need him healthy
if they want to make a deep playoff
run. Kevin Love, like Wall, should
make a complete recovery from
hand surgery in time for the playoffs, but his return will mean yet
another adjustment for the remade Cavaliers.
Kawhi Leonard has played just
nine games because of tendinopathy in his right quad, and Spurs
Coach Gregg Popovich told reporters Wednesday he would be “surprised” if Leonard returns this
season. The Spurs have to hope
Popovich is wrong if they’re to
have any chance of making noise
in the West.
8. Will Markelle Fultz return
this season?
This is perhaps the greatest
mystery of this NBA season. Fultz,
the consensus top pick in last
year’s NBA draft, has seen his
beautiful jump shot completely
fall apart. Video snippets of him
shooting awkward jumpers have
routinely melted the Internet, and
202-855-7033 DC | 301-683-7290 MD
571-429-5449 VA
Corporate Discounts Available
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
scoreboard
BA S KETBA L L
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
W
Toronto ......................................41
Boston........................................40
Philadelphia ...............................30
New York ...................................23
Brooklyn.....................................19
L
16
19
25
36
40
Pct
.719
.678
.545
.390
.322
GB
—
2
10
19
23
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................33
Miami.........................................30
Charlotte....................................24
Orlando ......................................18
Atlanta.......................................18
L
24
28
33
39
41
Pct
.579
.517
.421
.316
.305
GB
—
31/2
9
15
16
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................34
Indiana .......................................33
Milwaukee .................................32
Detroit .......................................28
Chicago ......................................20
L
22
25
25
29
37
Pct
.607
.569
.561
.491
.351
GB
—
2
21/2
61/2
141/2
HOCKEY
Virginia Tech 65,
No. 15 Clemson 58
NHL
Clemson (20-7)
Thomas 5-5 2-4 12, Simms 1-3 0-0 3, Skara 3-7 0-0 7,
Reed 10-24 0-0 28, DeVoe 3-9 1-4 8, Donnal 0-1 0-0 0,
Trapp 0-2 0-2 0, Spencer 0-6 0-0 0. 22-57 Totals 3-10 58.
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
Pittsburgh .....................
Philadelphia ..................
New Jersey ...................
Columbus ......................
Carolina .........................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
N.Y. Rangers .................
W
34
35
31
31
30
27
29
27
L
19
22
19
21
25
23
26
28
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay ....................
Boston ...........................
Toronto .........................
Florida ...........................
Detroit ..........................
Montreal .......................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
W
40
37
37
26
24
22
21
17
Virginia Tech (20-8)
Blackshear 4-12 6-7 14, Robinson 4-13 4-4 14, Bibbs 3-9
0-0 8, Wilson 3-6 0-2 8, Alexander-Walker 1-6 0-0 2,
Horne 2-6 4-6 9, Hill 1-2 1-2 3, Bede 0-1 0-0 0, Jackson 1-1
0-0 3, Clarke 1-2 1-4 4. Totals 20-58 16-25 65.
Halftime: Virginia Tech 26-25. Three-point goals: Clemson 11-36 (Reed 8-20, Simms 1-2, Skara 1-3, DeVoe 1-6,
Donnal 0-1, Trapp 0-2, Spencer 0-2), Virginia Tech 9-24
(Robinson 2-4, Wilson 2-4, Bibbs 2-5, Jackson 1-1, Clarke
1-1, Horne 1-2, Hill 0-1, Alexander-Walker 0-2, Blackshear 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Clemson 36
(Thomas, Reed 10), Virginia Tech 34 (Blackshear 7).
Assists: Clemson 9 (Reed, DeVoe 3), Virginia Tech 14
(Robinson 5). Total fouls: Clemson 18, Virginia Tech 10.
L
13
24
26
38
40
Pct
.772
.593
.544
.321
.310
GB
—
10
13
251/2
261/2
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota..................................36
Oklahoma City ...........................33
Denver........................................32
Portland .....................................32
Utah ...........................................30
L
25
26
26
26
28
Pct
.590
.559
.552
.552
.517
GB
—
2
21/2
21/2
41/2
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................44
L.A. Clippers...............................30
L.A. Lakers .................................23
Sacramento ...............................18
Phoenix ......................................18
L
14
26
34
39
41
Pct
.759
.536
.404
.316
.305
GB
—
13
201/2
251/2
261/2
No. 17 Michigan 72, Penn St. 63
Michigan (23-7)
Wagner 5-9 4-4 18, Livers 0-0 2-2 2, Simpson 4-10 1-2 9,
Abdur-Rahkman 3-6 2-4 9, Matthews 0-5 0-0 0, Teske
0-2 0-0 0, Poole 4-8 3-3 13, Brooks 1-2 0-0 2, Simmons
0-0 0-0 0, Robinson 6-9 4-4 19. 23-51 Totals 16-19 72.
Penn St. (19-11)
Stevens 9-18 0-4 19, Moore 2-4 2-2 6, Carr 8-19 1-1 21,
Reaves 2-3 3-4 8, Garner 1-6 0-0 3, Pierce 1-2 0-0 2,
Watkins 0-2 0-0 0, Harrar 1-1 0-0 2, Zemgulis 0-0 0-0 0,
Bostick 1-4 0-0 2, Wheeler 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 25-59 6-11
63.
Halftime: Michigan 34-26. Three-point goals: Michigan
10-21 (Wagner 4-5, Robinson 3-6, Poole 2-2, Abdur-Rahkman 1-3, Brooks 0-1, Matthews 0-1, Simpson 0-3),
Penn St. 7-18 (Carr 4-9, Reaves 1-2, Stevens 1-2, Garner
1-5). Fouled out: Reaves. Rebounds: Michigan 32 (Wagner 8), Penn St. 26 (Stevens 8). Assists: Michigan 15
(Abdur-Rahkman 5), Penn St. 10 (Carr 6). Total fouls:
Michigan 15, Penn St. 19.
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Brooklyn at Charlotte, 7
New York at Orlando, 7
Philadelphia at Chicago, 8
Washington at Cleveland, 8
Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 10
L.A. Clippers at Golden State, 10:30
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Atlanta at Indiana, 7
Boston at Detroit, 7
Charlotte at Washington, 7
Milwaukee at Toronto, 7:30
Cleveland at Memphis, 8
Miami at New Orleans, 8
Minnesota at Houston, 8
L.A. Clippers at Phoenix, 9
Portland at Utah, 9
San Antonio at Denver, 9
Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
Holy Cross 70, American U. 64
American U. (6-22)
Iorio 3-10 1-2 9, Little 0-0 0-0 0, Motuzis 7-13 1-1 21,
Bragg 2-5 0-0 5, Nelson 5-13 1-2 11, Diallo 4-7 0-0 11,
Beckton 1-6 4-4 7. 22-54 Totals 7-9 64.
Holy Cross (11-17)
Floyd 6-10 2-3 14, Grandison 5-7 4-4 16, Green 4-8 0-0 8,
Butler 5-13 4-6 14, Benzan 1-4 3-4 5, Niego 2-3 1-1 6, Faw
1-2 2-2 5, Zignorski 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 25-48 16-20 70.
Halftime: American U. 38-31. Three-point goals: American U. 13-32 (Motuzis 6-10, Diallo 3-6, Iorio 2-5, Beckton
1-3, Bragg 1-4, Nelson 0-4), Holy Cross 4-6 (Grandison
2-3, Niego 1-1, Faw 1-1, Butler 0-1). Fouled out: None.
Rebounds: American U. 21 (Iorio 6), Holy Cross 32
(Butler 10). Assists: American U. 15 (Nelson 8), Holy
Cross 12 (Floyd 4). Total fouls: American U. 18, Holy
Cross 10. A: 1,394 (3,600).
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Orlando at Philadelphia, 5
Boston at New York, 7:30
Memphis at Miami, 7:30
Oklahoma City at Golden State, 8:30
Chicago at Minnesota, 9
Dallas at Utah, 9
Portland at Phoenix, 9
L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, 10
George Washington 103,
Richmond 77
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Richmond (9-18)
Golden 5-8 1-2 11, Sherod 4-14 0-0 9, Buckingham 5-11
8-8 21, Gilyard 5-10 0-0 11, Fore 3-7 4-4 10, Ford 0-0 0-0
0, Friendshuh 0-0 0-0 0, Oddo 1-1 0-0 2, Kirby 0-2 0-0 0,
Johnson 2-7 6-6 11, Cayo 1-1 0-0 2. 26-61 Totals 19-20
77.
Detroit at Charlotte, 1
New Orleans at Milwaukee, 3
San Antonio at Cleveland, 3:30
Houston at Denver, 8
Philadelphia at Washington, 8
George Washington (13-15)
Steeves 5-8 0-0 10, Toro 8-10 0-0 16, Watanabe 8-13 5-6
23, Nolan 4-11 1-1 12, Mazzulla 2-3 2-2 6, Sasser 0-0 0-0
0, Langarica 0-0 0-0 0, Zeigler 6-6 0-0 12, Jack 3-3 1-1 9,
Granger 0-0 0-0 0, J.Williams 2-3 0-0 5, Bolden 4-4 0-0
10, Mitola 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-61 9-10 103.
Medal table
OL PTS. GF GA
7
75 187 180
4
74 195 180
10
72 181 174
8
70 181 183
5
65 159 170
10
64 162 180
6
64 203 219
5
59 173 191
WOMEN'S DOWNHILL
L
17
13
20
25
26
29
28
32
OL PTS. GF GA
3
83 215 161
8
82 191 142
5
79 205 172
6
58 166 186
9
57 157 177
8
52 151 188
10
52 160 207
11
45 143 198
OTHER U.S. FINISHER
Nation
Norway
Germany
Canada
Netherlands
United States
France
OA Russia
Japan
Austria
South Korea
Italy
Sweden
Switzerland
China
Czech Republic
Britain
Finland
Slovakia
Australia
Belarus
Poland
Spain
Ukraine
Slovenia
Kazakhstan
Latvia
Liechtenstein
CENTRAL
Nashville .......................
Winnipeg ......................
x-Dallas .........................
St. Louis ........................
Minnesota .....................
Colorado ........................
Chicago .........................
W
36
35
34
34
32
32
26
L
14
16
21
23
20
23
27
OL PTS. GF GA
9
81 185 154
9
79 199 161
4
72 179 157
4
72 173 156
7
71 177 169
4
68 184 177
8
60 173 175
PACIFIC
x-Vegas .........................
San Jose ........................
Los Angeles ..................
x-Anaheim ....................
x-Calgary .......................
Vancouver .....................
Edmonton .....................
Arizona .........................
W
39
33
33
30
30
23
24
17
L
16
19
22
20
21
30
31
32
OL PTS. GF GA
4
82 202 160
8
74 178 163
5
71 174 149
11
71 169 170
9
69 169 175
7
53 161 194
4
52 164 194
10
44 143 197
x-late game
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Philadelphia 3, Montreal 2 (OT)
Tampa Bay 4, Washington 2
Columbus 2, New Jersey 1
Toronto 1, Florida 0
Nashville 3, Detroit 2
San Jose 3, St. Louis 2
Los Angeles 4, Winnipeg 3
Boston 3, Edmonton 2
Colorado 5, Vancouver 4 (OT)
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
1. (5) Sofia Goggia, Italy, 1:39.22.
2. (19) Ragnhild Mowinckel, Norway, 1:39.31.
3. (7) Lindsey Vonn, United States, 1:39.69.
4. (3) Tina Weirather, Liechtenstein, 1:39.85.
5. (14) Alice McKennis, United States, 1:40.24.
6. (2) Corinne Suter, Switzerland, 1:40.29.
7. (8) Breezy Johnson, United States, 1:40.34.
8. (13) Michelle Gisin, Switzerland, 1:40.55.
15. (10) Laurenne Ross, United States, 1:41.10.
Bobsled
WOMEN'S TWO-MAN
FINAL RANKING
1. Germany 1 (Mariama Jamanka, Lisa Buckwitz),
3:22.45.
2. United States 2 (Elana Meyers Taylor, Lauren Gibbs),
3:22.52.
3. Canada 1 (Phylicia George, Kaillie Humphries),
3:22.89.
4. Germany 2 (Stephanie Schneider, Annika Drazek),
3:22.97.
5. United States 1 (Jamie Greubel Poser, Aja Evans),
3:23.02.
6. Canada 3 (Alysia Rissling, Heather Moyse), 3:23.63.
7. Canada 2 (Christine De Bruin, Melissa Lotholz),
3:23.89.
8. Britain 1 (Mica McNeill, Mica Moore), 3:24.07.
Cross-country skiing
MEN'S TEAM SPRINT
FINAL
1. Norway (Martin Johnsrud Sundby, Johannes Hoesflot
Klaebo), 15:56.26.
2. OA Russia (Alexander Bolshunov, Denis Spitsov),
15:57.97.
3. France (Maurice Manificat, Richard Jouve), 15:58.28.
4. Sweden (Marcus Hellner, Calle Halfvarsson),
15:59.33.
5. Italy (Dietmar Nockler, Federico Pellegrino), 16:14.81.
6. United States (Simeon Hamilton, Erik Bjornsen),
16:16.98.
7. Czech Republic (Ales Razym, Martin Jaks), 16:24.83.
8. Canada (Alex Harvey, Len Valjas), 16:31.86.
9. Finland (Martti Jylhae, Ristomatti Hakola), 16:32.30.
10. Germany (Sebastian Eisenlauer, Thomas Bing),
16:42.20.
WOMEN'S TEAM SPRINT
FINAL
Chicago 3, Ottawa 2 (SO)
Dallas at Anaheim, late
Calgary at Vegas, late
1. United States (Kikkan Randall, Jessica Diggins),
15:56.47.
2. Sweden (Charlotte Kalla, Stina Nilsson), 15:56.66.
3. Norway (Marit Bjorgen, Maiken Caspersen Falla),
15:59.44.
4. Switzerland (Laurien Van der Graaff, Nadine Faehndrich), 16:17.79.
5. Finland (Mari Laukkanen, Krista Parmakoski),
16:19.18.
6. Slovenia (Alenka Cebasek, Anamarija Lampic),
16:28.24.
7. Poland (Justyna Kowalczyk, Sylwia Jaskowiec),
16:32.48.
8. France (Coraline Hugue, Aurore Jean), 16:32.49.
9. OA Russia (Yulia Belorukova, Natalia Nepryaeva),
16:41.76.
10. Germany (Nicole Fessel, Sandra Ringwald), 17:06.57.
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Columbus at Philadelphia, 7
Minnesota at New Jersey, 7
N.Y. Islanders at Toronto, 7
Washington at Florida, 7:30
Buffalo at Detroit, 7:30
N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, 7:30
Tampa Bay at Ottawa, 7:30
San Jose at Nashville, 8
Colorado at Edmonton, 9
Calgary at Arizona, 9
Dallas at Los Angeles, 10:30
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Figure skating
Minnesota at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30
Winnipeg at St. Louis, 8
San Jose at Chicago, 8:30
Vancouver at Vegas, 10:30
WOMEN'S SHORT PROGRAM
Vcu (16-12)
Tillman 11-17 3-7 26, Mobley 0-1 0-0 0, Vann 3-7 2-2 8,
Jenkins 7-16 0-0 17, Williams 3-5 4-4 11, Santos-Silva
2-3 0-0 4, Lane 1-3 0-0 2, Crowfield 2-3 0-0 6, Maye 2-2
0-0 5, Simms 1-2 0-0 3. 32-59 Totals 9-13 82.
Blackhawks 3, Senators 2 (OT)
Scoring: 1, Chicago, Kane 23 (Kampf, Hinostroza), 14:19.
2, Ottawa, Smith 5 (Stone, Brassard), 15:56.
SOUTH
U-Mass. (11-17)
Hines 3-4 0-0 6, Pierre 4-14 0-0 10, Pipkins 11-21 8-10 38,
Anderson 5-12 3-3 15, McLean 2-6 0-0 4, West 1-2 0-0 2,
Miller 1-6 0-0 3. Totals 27-65 11-13 78.
SECOND PERIOD
1. Alina Zagitova, OA Russia, 82.92.
2. Evgenia Medvedeva, OA Russia, 81.61.
3. Kaetlyn Osmond, Canada, 78.87.
4. Satoko Miyahara, Japan, 75.94.
5. Kaori Sakamoto, Japan, 73.18.
6. Carolina Kostner, Italy, 73.15.
7. Gabrielle Daleman, Canada, 68.90.
8. Choi Dabin, South Korea, 67.77.
9. Mirai Nagasu, United States, 66.93.
10. Karen Chen, United States, 65.90.
11. Bradie Tennell, United States, 64.01.
12. Maria Sotskova, OA Russia, 63.86.
13. Nicole Rajicova, Slovakia, 60.59.
14. Nicole Schott, Germany, 59.20.
15. Elizabet Tursynbayeva, Kazakhstan, 57.95.
16. Kailani Craine, Australia, 56.77.
17. Isadora Williams, Brazil, 55.74.
18. Emmi Peltonen, Finland, 55.28.
19. Alexia Paganini, Switzerland, 55.26.
20. Loena Hendrickx, Belgium, 55.16.
21. Kim Hanul, South Korea, 54.33.
22. Mae Berenice Meite, France, 53.67.
23. Ivett Toth, Hungary, 53.22.
24. Li Xiangning, China, 52.46.
25. Larkyn Austman, Canada, 51.42.
26. Diana Nikitina, Latvia, 51.12.
27. Giada Russo, Italy, 50.88.
28. Anita Oestlund, Sweden, 49.14.
29. Anna Khnychenkova, Ukraine, 47.59.
30. Aiza Mambekova, Kazakhstan, 44.40.
Auburn 90, Alabama 71
Davidson 76, Fordham 52
Duke 82, Louisville 56
Nicholls 96, McNeese St. 79
SMU 77, East Carolina 58
South Carolina 66, Georgia 57
Virginia 65, Georgia Tech 54
Virginia Tech 65, Clemson 58
Halftime: VCU 39-38. Three-point goals: VCU 9-22
(Jenkins 3-9, Crowfield 2-3, Maye 1-1, Williams 1-1,
Simms 1-2, Tillman 1-3, Mobley 0-1, Vann 0-2), U-Mass.
13-32 (Pipkins 8-13, Anderson 2-4, Pierre 2-9, Miller 1-4,
McLean 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: VCU 34
(Tillman 13), U-Mass. 29 (McLean 8). Assists: VCU 20
(Mobley 6), U-Mass. 16 (Anderson 6). Total fouls: VCU
16, U-Mass. 14.
Scoring: 3, Chicago, Anisimov 16 (Gustafsson, Kane),
5:52. 4, Ottawa, Duchene 16 (Stone, Claesson), 12:01.
Freestyle skiing
SHOOTOUT
MEN'S SKI CROSS
QUARTERFINALS
HEAT 1
NCAA men
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
Xavier 89, Georgetown 77
Boston U. 81, Lafayette 65
Bucknell 85, Navy 61
Colgate 87, Army 83
George Mason 79, Saint Joseph’s 76
George Washington 103, Richmond 77
Hartford 65, New Hampshire 56
Holy Cross 70, American U. 64
Lehigh 80, Loyola (Md.) 74
Michigan 72, Penn St. 63
North Carolina 78, Syracuse 74
Stony Brook 64, UMBC 57
VCU 82, UMass 78
Vermont 75, Binghamton 54
Villanova 93, DePaul 62
Halftime: George Washington 54-25. Three-point goals:
Richmond 6-23 (Buckingham 3-7, Johnson 1-5, Gilyard
1-5, Sherod 1-6), George Washington 10-15 (Nolan 3-6,
Jack 2-2, Bolden 2-2, Watanabe 2-3, J.Williams 1-1,
Mazzulla 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Richmond 19
(Golden 6), George Washington 30 (Toro 9). Assists:
Richmond 12 (Buckingham, Gilyard 3), George Washington 30 (Mazzulla 10). Total fouls: Richmond 14, George
Washington 15.
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Philadelphia at Ottawa, 2
Colorado at Calgary, 4
Pittsburgh at Florida, 7
N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 7
Carolina at Detroit, 7
Winnipeg at Dallas, 7
Boston at Toronto, 7
Chicago at Columbus, 7
Buffalo at Washington, 7
Tampa Bay at Montreal, 7
Anaheim at Arizona, 8
Edmonton at Los Angeles, 10
VCU 82, Massachusetts 78
OTTAWA ............................ 1
CHICAGO ............................ 1
1
1
0
0
0 — 2
0 — 3
FIRST PERIOD
Ottawa 2 (Duchene G, Chabot NG, Dzingel NG, Hoffman
G, Gaborik NG, Pyatt NG, Stone NG), Chicago 3 (Toews
NG, Kane G, Duclair NG, DeBrincat G, Anisimov NG, Jurco
NG, Schmaltz G).
MIDWEST
SHOTS ON GOAL
Bradley 82, Missouri St. 78
Illinois St. 89, Drake 81, OT
Marquette 85, St. John’s 73
TCU 89, Iowa St. 83
Wichita St. 93, Tulane 86
OTTAWA ............................ 4
14
9
7 — 34
CHICAGO .......................... 14
10
10
4 — 38
Power-play opportunities: Ottawa 0 of 1; Chicago 0 of 2.
Goalies: Ottawa, Condon 4-10-5 (38 shots-36 saves).
Chicago, Forsberg 7-12-3 (34-32). A: 21,532 (19,717).
SOUTHWEST
Lamar 87, Houston Baptist 73
Nevada 80, San Jose St. 67
Oklahoma St. 79, Texas Tech 71
No. 1 Virginia 65,
Georgia Tech 54
Georgia Tech (11-17)
Wright 3-7 0-0 6, Cole 0-1 0-0 0, Lammers 9-15 4-6 22,
Jackson 6-14 0-0 15, Okogie 3-10 0-0 7, Gueye 0-0 0-0 0,
Ogbonda 0-0 0-0 0, Schafer 0-0 0-0 0, Alston 1-4 2-2 4.
22-51 Totals 6-8 54.
Virginia (25-2)
Wilkins 3-3 1-2 7, Salt 3-6 0-1 6, Hall 2-9 2-2 7, Guy 3-8
0-0 8, Jerome 5-9 4-4 18, Diakite 4-4 1-1 9, Johnson 0-1
1-2 1, Hunter 3-8 3-6 9. Totals 23-48 12-18 65.
Halftime: Virginia 31-30. Three-point goals: Georgia
Tech 4-14 (Jackson 3-8, Okogie 1-3, Alston 0-1, Wright
0-2), Virginia 7-14 (Jerome 4-6, Guy 2-4, Hall 1-3, Hunter
0-1). Fouled out: Wright. Rebounds: Georgia Tech 25
(Wright, Lammers 7), Virginia 29 (Salt 6). Assists:
Georgia Tech 11 (Okogie 4), Virginia 12 (Jerome 5). Total
fouls: Georgia Tech 16, Virginia 12.
No. 4 Xavier 89, Georgetown 77
Xavier (25-4)
Jones 0-2 0-0 0, Marshall 8-10 3-4 21, Goodin 5-5 6-7 19,
Bluiett 1-10 0-0 2, Macura 7-15 2-2 20, O’Mara 4-6 1-1 9,
Kanter 2-5 2-2 6, Gates 3-8 0-0 8, Scruggs 2-4 0-0 4.
32-65 Totals 14-16 89.
Georgetown (15-11)
Pickett 6-11 3-4 21, Derrickson 4-10 0-0 9, Govan 7-12
1-3 15, Mulmore 0-1 2-2 2, Johnson 5-6 0-0 11, Walker
0-0 0-0 0, Sodom 0-0 0-0 0, Blair 3-10 4-5 12, Mosely 0-1
0-0 0, Dickerson 3-7 0-1 7. Totals 28-58 10-15 77.
Halftime: Georgetown 40-38. Three-point goals: Xavier
11-29 (Macura 4-10, Goodin 3-3, Marshall 2-3, Gates 2-7,
Scruggs 0-1, Bluiett 0-5), Georgetown 11-19 (Pickett
6-7, Blair 2-5, Johnson 1-1, Dickerson 1-2, Derrickson
1-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Xavier 36 (Macura,
Marshall 7), Georgetown 26 (Govan 11). Assists: Xavier
18 (Bluiett, Macura, Marshall 4), Georgetown 19 (Mulmore 6). Total fouls: Xavier 18, Georgetown 17.
Oklahoma State 79,
No. 7 Texas Tech 71
Texas Tech (22-6)
Gray 3-7 2-2 8, Odiase 0-3 1-2 1, Evans 1-7 0-0 2,
Zh.Smith 7-12 4-4 20, Culver 5-12 3-6 15, Hamilton 2-4
0-0 6, Moretti 1-3 0-0 3, Webster 0-0 0-0 0, Stevenson
5-10 2-2 14, Francis 1-2 0-0 2. 25-60 Totals 12-16 71.
Oklahoma St. (16-12)
Solomon 0-0 3-4 3, McGriff 2-5 4-4 9, Waters 6-6 2-3 18,
K.Smith 6-13 8-10 21, Carroll 5-9 2-2 14, Sima 2-3 0-0 4,
N’Guessan 0-0 0-0 0, Dziagwa 2-3 0-0 6, Averette 0-3 1-2
1, Shine 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 24-46 20-25 79.
Halftime: Texas Tech 35-34. Three-point goals: Texas
Tech 9-23 (Zh.Smith 2-2, Hamilton 2-4, Culver 2-5,
Stevenson 2-5, Moretti 1-2, Evans 0-5), Oklahoma St.
11-22 (Waters 4-4, Dziagwa 2-2, Carroll 2-5, K.Smith
1-3, Shine 1-4, McGriff 1-4). Fouled out: Francis.
Rebounds: Texas Tech 27 (Culver 7), Oklahoma St. 28
(McGriff 7). Assists: Texas Tech 13 (Stevenson 3),
Oklahoma St. 13 (K.Smith 6). Total fouls: Texas Tech 22,
Oklahoma St. 18.
George Mason 79,
Saint Joseph's 76
George Mason (13-15)
Mar 6-14 0-0 16, Calixte 1-1 0-0 2, Livingston 4-13 4-4 13,
Grayer 4-9 0-0 9, Kier 6-13 7-9 19, Wilson 2-3 0-0 4, Boyd
4-10 2-2 12, Greene 1-3 2-4 4. 28-66 Totals 15-19 79.
Saint Joseph's (12-15)
Longpre 1-3 0-0 2, Funk 2-12 3-3 7, Newkirk 6-13 9-11 23,
Clover 8-16 5-6 21, Robinson 6-11 0-0 13, Lodge 0-0 0-0 0,
Edwards 0-2 0-2 0, Williams 1-1 0-0 2, Oliva 2-3 3-4 8.
Totals 26-61 20-26 76.
Halftime: George Mason 37-26. Three-point goals:
George Mason 8-25 (Mar 4-10, Boyd 2-3, Grayer 1-5,
Livingston 1-6, Greene 0-1), Saint Joseph’s 4-22 (Newkirk 2-4, Oliva 1-2, Robinson 1-2, Longpre 0-1, Edwards
0-2, Clover 0-3, Funk 0-8). Fouled out: Oliva. Rebounds:
George Mason 40 (Mar, Livingston, Greene 6), Saint
Joseph’s 36 (Funk 13). Assists: George Mason 12 (Mar,
Livingston 3), Saint Joseph’s 11 (Newkirk, Oliva 3).
Total fouls: George Mason 17, Saint Joseph’s 16. A:
3,082 (4,200).
NCAA women
North Carolina (22-7)
Maye 4-8 1-2 9, Pinson 9-12 3-4 23, Johnson 2-9 2-2 6,
Williams 2-7 0-0 5, Berry 6-17 2-2 18, Manley 4-10 4-5
12, Brooks 0-0 0-0 0, Platek 2-2 0-0 5, Robinson 0-0 0-0 0,
Woods 0-0 0-0 0. 29-65 Totals 12-15 78.
Syracuse (18-10)
Brissett 4-11 6-6 17, Dolezaj 2-2 0-0 4, Chukwu 1-1 0-0 2,
Battle 8-22 8-9 24, Howard 9-18 2-2 25, Sidibe 0-2 0-0 0,
Moyer 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 25-58 16-17 74.
Halftime: North Carolina 41-32. Three-point goals: North
Carolina 8-22 (Berry 4-12, Pinson 2-2, Platek 1-1,
Williams 1-3, Johnson 0-4), Syracuse 8-23 (Howard
5-10, Brissett 3-8, Battle 0-5). Fouled out: None.
Rebounds: North Carolina 32 (Williams 8), Syracuse 31
(Chukwu 11). Assists: North Carolina 25 (Pinson 7),
Syracuse 13 (Battle 6). Total fouls: North Carolina 14,
Syracuse 16.
HEAT 4
At Romai Tennis Academy in Budapest
Purse: $226,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
1. Sergey Ridzik, OA Russia (Q).
2. David Duncan, Canada (Q).
3. Francois Place, France.
4. Jean Frederic Chapuis, France.
Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, def. Monica Niculescu, Romania, 6-3, 7-5; Jana Cepelova, Slovakia, def. Carina
Witthoeft, Germany, 6-2, 6-2; Zhang Shuai (2), China,
def. Arina Rodionova, Australia, 6-3, 6-2; Dominika
Cibulkova (1), Slovakia, def. Fanny Stollar, Hungary, 6-3,
6-3; Timea Babos (3), Hungary, def. Tatjana Maria,
Germany, 6-1, 6-0.
DOUBLES
FIRST ROUND
MIDWEST
Ball St. 85, W. Michigan 58
Buffalo 88, Bowling Green 67
Cent. Michigan 91, N. Illinois 77
Dayton 71, George Mason 66
Kansas 66, Oklahoma St. 59
Miami (Ohio) 77, Akron 50
Michigan St. 69, Wisconsin 61
Ohio 79, Kent St. 78
Ohio St. 88, Northwestern 54
Purdue 64, Illinois 51
Toledo 80, E. Michigan 69
SOUTHWEST
Oklahoma 80, Iowa St. 71
Oral Roberts 72, Nebraska-Omaha 56
TCU 72, Texas Tech 60
Texas A&M-CC 70, Abilene Christian 51
B A S EB A L L
Alison Van Uytvanck, Belgium, def. Mihaela Buzarnescu
(5), Romania, 6-1, 6-0; Viktoria Kuzmova, Slovakia, def.
Sabine Lisicki, Germany, 6-2, 6-4; Petra Martic, Croatia,
def. Aliaksandra Sasnovich (6), Belarus, 3-6, 6-4, 6-4.
Lesley Kerkhove, Netherlands, and Lidziya Marozava
(4), Belarus, def. Kateryna Kozlova, Ukraine, and Arina
Rodionova, Australia, 6-4, 6-4; Irina Bara and Mihaela
Buzarnescu, Romania, def. Anna Blinkova, Russia, and
Darija Jurak, Croatia, 7-6 (7-5), 6-1; Ysaline Bonaventure, Belarus, and Reka-Luca Jani, Hungary, def. Dalma
Galfi and Panna Upvardy, Hungary, 6-4, 2-6, 10-2;
Georgina Garcia Perez, Spain, and Fanny Stollar, Hungary, def. Anna Bondar and Agnes Butka, Hungary, 6-3, 6-4.
ATP
OPEN 13
At Palais des Sports in Marseille, France
Purse: $800,880 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SINGLES
FIRST ROUND
Mischa Zverev, Germany, def. Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, 6-4,
6-4; Gilles Muller (6), Luxembourg, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 7-5, 6-3; Nicolas Mahut, France, def.
Stefanos Tsitsipas, Greece, 7-5, 7-6 (7-4).
SECOND ROUND
Damir Dzumhur (7), Bosnia-Herzegovina, def. Thomas
Fabbiano, Italy, 6-7 (7-5), 7-6 (9-7), 7-6 (7-5); Lucas
Pouille (3), France, def. Pierre-Hugues Herbert, France,
3-6, 7-6 (6), 6-4; Julien Benneteau, France, def. Roberto
Bautista Agut (5), Spain, 7-6 (7-2), 7-6 (7-5).
DOUBLES
FIRST ROUND
Marcus Daniell, New Zealand, and Dominic Inglot (4),
Britain, def. Maximilian Marterer, Germany, and Joao
Sousa, Portugal, 7-6 (13-11), 7-6 (7-2).
MLB spring training
QUARTERFINALS
Rohan Bopanna, India, and Edouard Roger-Vasselin (2),
France, def. Jamie Cerretani, United States, and Adil
Shamasdin, Canada, 3-6, 7-6 (7-3), 10-4; Raven Klassen,
South Africa, and Michael Venus (1), New Zealand, def.
Florin Mergera, Romania, and Daniel Nestor, Canada,
6-3, 6-3.
Arizona 6, Arizona State 2
Boston College vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., TBD
Florida Southern vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1
U. of Tampa vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 1
Northeastern vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 1
Minnesota vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 6
TRANSACTIONS
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Detroit vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 1
Minnesota vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 1
Pittsburgh vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 1
St. Louis vs. Miami at Jupiter, Fla., 1
Washington vs. Houston at , , 1
Tampa Bay vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 1
Philadelphia vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:07
Atlanta vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 1:10
Chi. Cubs vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 3
Chi. White Sox vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 3
Cincinnati vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 3
L.A. Angels vs. Oakland at Mesa, Ariz., 3
Milwaukee vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3
Arizona vs. Colorado at Scottsdale, Ariz., 3:10
Seattle vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 3:10
SEMIFINALS
HEAT 1
1. Brady Leman, Canada (Q).
2. Marc Bischofberger, Switzerland (Q).
3. Armin Niederer, Switzerland.
4. Filip Flisar, Slovenia.
HEAT 2
1. Kevin Drury, Canada (Q).
2. Sergey Ridzik, OA Russia (Q).
3. Arnaud Bovolenta, France.
4. David Duncan, Canada.
FINAL B
1. Armin Niederer, Switzerland.
2. Arnaud Bovolenta, France.
3. Filip Flisar, Slovenia.
4. David Duncan, Canada.
FINAL A
1. Brady Leman, Canada.
2. Marc Bischofberger, Switzerland.
3. Sergey Ridzik, OA Russia.
NR. Kevin Drury, Canada, DNF.
Speedskating
MEN'S TEAM PURSUIT
FINAL D
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
THURSDAY’S GAMES
No. 10 North Carolina 78,
Syracuse 74
HUNGARIAN LADIES OPEN
American U. 72, Holy Cross 57
Army 69, Colgate 49
Bucknell 49, Navy 40
Cincinnati 70, Temple 52
Davidson 58, La Salle 51
Fordham 51, Duquesne 43
Iowa 77, Rutgers 67
Lafayette 44, Boston U. 41
Lehigh 64, Loyola (Md.) 55
St. Bonaventure 77, Rhode Island 72
Belmont 66, Jacksonville St. 35
Incarnate Word 57, Northwestern St. 53
New Orleans 77, Sam Houston St. 50
Nicholls 63, McNeese St. 51
South Florida 81, Houston 65
UCF 63, Memphis 40
UConn 91, Tulane 47
UMass 58, Richmond 49
VCU 88, Saint Louis 84
1. Armin Niederer, Switzerland (Q).
2. Filip Flisar, Slovenia (Q).
3. Thomas Zangerl, Austria.
4. Jonas Lenherr, Switzerland.
WTA
SINGLES
FIRST ROUND
MLB
MLB: Suspended Houston RHP Forrest Whitley (Class
AA Corpus Christi) 50 games without pay for a violation
of baseball’s minor league drug prevention and treatment program.
Baltimore Orioles: Agreed to terms with OF Colby
Rasmus on a minor league contract.
Texas Rangers: Acquired international slot compensation from Cincinnati for RHP Miguel Medrano.
Pittsburgh Pirates: Signed OF Michael Saunders to a
minor league contract.
Washington Nationals: Agreed to terms with RHP
Joaquin Benoit on a one-year contract. Placed RHP Joe
Ross on the 60-day DL.
THE TOP 10
Through Wednesday
G
13
12
9
6
6
5
0
3
4
4
3
4
2
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
Wrestling
S
11
7
5
6
4
4
4
5
2
3
2
4
5
5
2
0
0
2
2
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
B
9
5
7
4
6
5
9
3
4
2
4
0
1
2
3
3
4
0
1
0
1
2
0
0
1
1
1
T
33
24
21
16
16
14
13
11
10
9
9
8
8
7
6
4
4
3
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
4. (W) Canada (Denny Morrison, Ted Jan Blomen, Jordan
Bechos, Benjamin Donnelly), 3:42.16.
4. (L) United States (Brian Hansen, Emery Lehman,
Jonathan Garcia, Joey Mantia), 3:50.77.
FINAL C
3. (W) Italy (Andrea Giovannini, Nicola Tumolero,
Riccardo Bugari), DSQ.
3. (L) Japan (Ryosuke Tsuchiya, Shane Williamson,
Seitaro Ichinohe), 3:41.62.
FINAL B
BRONZE MEDAL
2. (W) Netherlands (Sven Kramer, Jan Blokhuijsen,
Patrick Roest), 3:38.40.
2. (L) New Zealand (Shane Dobbin, Reyon Kay, Peter
Michael), 3:43.54.
FINAL A
GOLD MEDAL
1. (W) Norway (Haavard Bokko, Sverre Lunde Pedersen,
Simen Spieler Nilsen, Sindre Henriksen), 3:37.32.
1. (L) South Korea (Lee Seung-Hoon, Joo Hyung-Joon,
Kim Min Seok, Chung Woong Jae), 3:38.52.
WOMEN'S TEAM PURSUIT
FINAL D
4. (W) Poland (Luiza Zlotkowska, Natalia Czerwonka,
Katarzyna Bachleda-Curus, Karolina Bosiek), 3:03.11.
4. (L) South Korea (No Seon Yeong, Kim Bo-Reum, Park
Seung-Hi, Park Ji-Woo), 3:07.30.
FINAL C
3. (W) China (Li Dan, Hao Jiachen, Liu Jing, Han Mei),
3:00.04.
3. (L) Germany (Claudia Pechstein, Gabriele Hirschbichler, Roxanne Dufter, Michelle Uhrig), 3:04.67.
FINAL B
BRONZE MEDAL
2. (W) United States (Mia Manganello, Heather Bergsma, Brittany Bowe), 2:59.27.
2. (L) Canada (Ivanie Blondin, Isabelle Weidemann, Josie
Morrison), 2:59.72
FINAL A
GOLD MEDAL
1. (W) Japan (Miho Takagi, Ayaka Kikuchi, Nana Takagi,
Ayano Sato), 2:53.89.
1. (L) Netherlands (Ireen Wust, Marrit Leenstra, Antoinette De Jong, Lotte Van Beek), 2:55.48.
Damascus won its seventh Montgomery County championship in a row, with seven wrestlers picking up
individual titles. . . . Battlefield earned its first Virginia
Class 6A state championship, with nine wrestlers
placing in the top five in their respective weight
classes. . . . Huntingtown scored 288 team points to earn
its fourth Southern Maryland Athletic Conference title
in five seasons. . . . Robinson had six place winners at the
Virginia Class 6A state championship as the Rams
finished in second place for the second season in a
row. . . . Glenelg scored 227 points and won its third
consecutive Howard County title, crowning three individual champions. . . . Four Westfield wrestlers were
place-winners at the Virginia Class 6A state championship as the Bulldogs scored 70 points and finished
eighth.
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Team
Damascus
Battlefield
Huntingtown
Robinson
Glenelg
Westfield
St. John's
Spalding
Churchill
Landon
Freestyle skiing
THE TOP 10
THURSDAY'S RESULTS
WOMEN'S SKI CROSS
QUALIFYING
Ice hockey
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Record
20-5-1
19-2-1
10-0
20-2
23-8-3
9-0-1
18-10-2
7-1-2
9-7
9-5-1
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
PRELIMINARY ROUND
GROUP A
W
Czech Republic.............. 2
Canada .......................... 2
Switzerland .................. 1
South Korea.................. 0
L
0
0
2
3
OTW
1
0
0
0
OTL
0
1
0
0
Pts GF GA
8 9 4
7 11 4
3 10 9
0 1 14
GROUP B
L
1
1
1
1
OTW OTL Pts GF GA
0
0 6 14 5
2
0 4 8 12
0
1 4 4 8
0
1 4 6 7
L
0
1
2
2
OTW OTL Pts GF GA
0
0 9 8 1
0
0 6 11 6
1
0 2 4 7
0
1 1 2 11
GROUP C
W
Sweden .........................3
Finland ..........................2
Germany........................0
Norway..........................0
Team
Gonzaga
Landon
Broad Run
Churchill
DeMatha
Briar Woods
O'Connell
West Potomac
Blair
Marriotts Ridge
Results
Men’s hockey
W
OA Russia .................... 2
Slovenia ....................... 0
United States .............. 1
Slovakia ....................... 1
Record
25-0
9-1
33-2
11-0
23-1
19-3
19-10
11-6
16-2
15-6
Gonzaga lost, 4-3 (1-0), to O’Connell in a shootout in a
Washington Catholic Athletic Conference semifinal before bouncing back with a 6-1 win over St. Albans in the
first round of the MAPHL playoffs Tuesday. . . . Landon
beat Georgetown Prep, 5-2, in the IAC final Thursday and
again, 11-1, in a MAPHL quarterfinal Tuesday. . . . After a
7-0 win over South River in the first round, Churchill
advanced to the MSHL semifinals with a 11-1 victory
over Frederick County on Tuesday. . . . The Stags beat
O’Connell, 3-1, in the WCAC final Thursday and again in a
MAPHL quarterfinal Tuesday, 4-0. . . . After a 2-1 upset
of No. 2 seed Carroll County in the first round, No. 15 seed
Blair advanced to the MSHL semifinals with an 8-1 win
over seventh-seeded Northern on Tuesday.
1. Marielle Thompson, Canada, 1:13.11.
2. Kelsey Serwa, Canada, 1:13.33.
3. Brittany Phelan, Canada, 1:13.56.
4. Sandra Naeslund, Sweden, 1:13.58.
5. Fanny Smith, Switzerland, 1:13.90.
6. Alizee Baron, France, 1:14.11.
7. Katrin Ofner, Austria, 1:14.30.
8. Andrea Limbacher, Austria, 1:14.71.
9. Sami Kennedy-Sim, Australia, 1:14.97.
10. Sanna Ludi, Switzerland, 1:15.13.
11. India Sherret, Canada, 1:15.48.
12. Marielle Berger Sabbatel, France, 1:15.60.
13. Nikol Kucerova, Czech Republic, 1:15.61.
14. Debora Pixner, Italy, 1:15.72.
15. Anastasiia Chirtcova, OA Russia, 1:15.83.
16. Talina Gantenbein, Switzerland, 1:15.97.
17. Lisa Andersson, Sweden, 1:16.15.
18. Stephanie Joffroy, Chile, 1:16.70.
19. Victoria Zavadovskaya, OA Russia, 1:16.80.
20. Julia Eichinger, Germany, 1:17.56.
21. Reina Umehara, Japan, 1:17.81.
22. Emily Sarsfield, Britain, 1:18.25.
23. Priscilla Annen, Switzerland, 2:30.03.
NR. Lucrezia Fantelli, Italy, DNS.
Playoff round
MONDAY, FEB. 19
QUALIFICATIONS
United States 5, Slovakia 1
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
QUALIFICATIONS
VIRGINIA
Hayfield 64, Mount Vernon 49
Hylton 57, Colgan 48
Madison 64, Patriot 59
Westfield 70, South Lakes 68
North Stafford 64, Potomac (Va.) 61
Marshall 56, Osbourn 44
South County 64, Annandale 50
Battlefield 61, Oakton 47
PRIVATE
Knoxville Christian 45, Riverdale Baptist 44
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
MARYLAND
Rock Creek Christian 86, Parkdale 42
VIRGINIA
Marshall 61, Herndon 50
Osbourn Park 51, Madison 40
T.C. Williams 39, South County 30
Woodbridge 51, West Potomac 36
Langley 42, Westfield 39
West Springfield 38, Mount Vernon 34
Oakton 41, South Lakes 35
Hayfield 55, Lake Braddock 40
PRIVATE
National Cathedral 45, Sandy Spring 27
St. Andrew’s 39, Holton-Arms 35
B OY S ’ B A S K E TB A L L
Finland 5, South Korea 2
Norway 2, Slovenia 1, OT
Germany 2, Switzerland 1, OT
TOP 20
QUARTERFINALS
NO. 14 MARSHALL 56, OSBOURN 44
Czech Republic 3, United States 2, SO
M (21-2) Lampman 18, Gamble 14, Robinson 9, Schlaffer
8, Deaver 7 Totals 11 4-4 56.
O (15-9) Breeding 16, Withers 13, Hogan 6, Freeman 4,
Pearson 2, Hylton 2, Hollingsworth 1 Totals 10 3-6 44.
Halftime: Marshall, (30-22).
Three-point goals: O 7 (Withers 3, Breeding 4); M 10
(Robinson 1, Gamble 4, Lampman 3, Schlaffer 2).
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
QUARTERFINALS
Germany 4, Sweden 3, OT
OA Russia 6, Norway 1
Canada 1, Finland 0
NO. 17 SOUTH COUNTY 64, ANNANDALE 50
FRIDAY’S GAMES
SEMIFINALS
SC (21-3) Millora-Brown 23, Latta 13, Bullock 12, Myles
7, Myles 4, Powe 3, Taylor 2 Totals 16 20-33 64.
A (15-11)Totals 0 0-0 50.
Halftime: South County, (28-23).
Three-point goals: SC 4 (Bullock 2, Myles 2).
Czech Republic vs. OA Russia, 2:30 a.m.
Germany vs. Canada, 7 a.m.
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Bronze Medal, 7 a.m.
Gold Medal, 11
VIRGINIA 6A
HEAT 2
1. Kevin Drury, Canada (Q).
2. Arnaud Bovolenta, France (Q).
3. Semen Denshcikov, OA Russia.
NR. Robert Winkler, Austria, DNF.
SECOND ROUND
SOUTH
1. Brady Leman, Canada (Q).
2. Marc Bischofberger, Switzerland (Q).
NR. Alex Fiva, Switzerland, DNF.
NR. Adam Kappacher, Austria, DNF.
HEAT 3
TENNIS
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
H I GH S C HOOLS
Wednesday's Olympic results
Alpine skiing
EASTERN CONFERENCE
WESTERN CONFERENCE
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................44
San Antonio ...............................35
New Orleans ..............................31
Memphis ....................................18
Dallas .........................................18
OLYMPICS
MARSHALL 56, OSBOURN 44
Czech Republic 3,
United States 2 (SO)
CZECH REPUBLIC .............. 1
UNITED STATES ................ 1
1
1
0
0
0 — 2
0 — 2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, United States, Ryan Donato (Troy Terry),
6:20. 2, Czech Republic, Jan Kolar (Jan Kovar), 15:12.
Penalties: Jordan Greenway, USA (holding), 3:34; Jan
Kolar, CZR (tripping), 9:36; Martin Erat, Cze (slashing),
17:36; John McCarthy, USA (boarding), 20:00.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Czech Republic, Tomas Kundratek (Martin
Ruzicka, Vojtech Mozik), 8:14. 4, United States, Jim
Slater (Brian O’Neill), 10:23 (sh). Penalties: Troy Terry,
USA (high sticking), 3:28; Mark Arcobello, USA (tripping), 18:47.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: No scoring. Penalties: Roman Cervenka, Cze
(high sticking), 7:55; Vojtech Mozik, Cze (slashing),
18:40.
SHOOTOUT
Czech Republic 1 (Martin Ruzicka NG, Petr Koukal G, Jan
Kovar NG, Dominik Kubalik NG, Tomas Kundratek NG);
United States 0 (Chris Bourque NG, Ryan Donato NG,
Mark Arcobello NG, Troy Terry NG, Bobby Butler NG).
SHOTS ON GOAL
CZECH REPUBLIC ........ 9
8
9
2
1 29
UNITED STATES .......... 7
6
4
3
0 20
Goalies: Czech Republic, Pavel Francouz. United States,
Ryan Zapolski.
M (21-2) Lampman 18, Gamble 14, Robinson 9, Schlaffer
8, Deaver 7 Totals 11 4-4 56.
O (15-9) Breeding 16, Withers 13, Hogan 6, Freeman 4,
Pearson 2, Hylton 2, Hollingsworth 1 Totals 10 3-6 44.
Halftime:Marshall, (30-22).
Three-point goals: O 7 (Withers 3, Breeding 4); M 10
(Robinson 1, Gamble 4, Lampman 3, Schlaffer 2).
CONCORDE DISTRICT
WESTFIELD 70, SOUTH LAKES 68
SL (19-6) Savage 14, Saunders 10, Dagbe 9, Johnson 8,
Aghayere 11, Krukowski 9, Powers 3 Totals 16 12-24 68.
W (16-8) Reed 24, Hairston 11, Opoku 11, Gregory 10,
Scruggs 4, Daniel 6, Weaver 2 Totals 19 20-29 70.
Halftime: Westfield, (33-24).
Three-point goals: W 4 (Hairston 1, Opoku 1, Reed 2); SL
8 (Johnson 2, Saunders 2, Savage 2, Dagbe 1, Krukowski
1)
BATTLEFIELD 61, OAKTON 47
B (17-8) Washington 13, Bounds 13, Gault 9, Pagon 8,
Estridge 8, Terry 6, Svenson 3, Gaither 1 Totals 24 7-14
61.
O (17-6) Johnson 15, Digby 11, Jaquette 7, Johnson-Parrotte 4, Johnson 3, Smith 3, Mejia 3, Schulz 1 Totals 10
6-10 47.
Halftime: Battlefield, (31-25).
Three-point goals: O 7 (Johnson-Parrotte 1, Johnson 1,
Johnson 2, Jaquette 1, Digby 1, Mejia 1); B 2 (Svenson 1,
Bounds 1)
GI R LS ’ BA S K E TBALL
Snowboard Thursday's results
WOMEN'S BIG AIR
FINAL RANKING
NO. 6 ROCK CREEK CHRISTIAN 86, PARKDALE 42
1. Anna Gasser, Austria, (85.5; 89.0; 96.0) 185.0.
2. Jamie Anderson, United States, (90.0; 87.25) 177.25.
3. Zoi Sadowski Synnott, New Zealand, (65.5; 92.0)
157.5.
4. Reira Iwabuchi, Japan, (79.75; 67.75) 147.5.
5. Sina Candrian, Switzerland, (27.75; 76.25; 64.0)
140.25.
6. Silje Norendal, Norway, (70.5; 61.0) 131.5.
7. Yuka Fujimori, Japan, (82.25; 40.5) 122.75.
8. Miyabi Onitsuka, Japan, (78.75; 39.75; 40.25) 119.0.
9. Spencer O’Brien, Canada, (51.25; 14.25; 62.0) 113.25.
10. Julia Marino, United States, (34.0; 74.5; 18.75) 108.5.
11. Jessika Jenson, United States, (16.75; 21.5; 19.0)
40.5.
12. Laurie Blouin, Canada, (38.0; 39.25; DNS) 77.25.
Men’s curling
Country .............................................. W
x-Sweden............................................. 7
x-Canada.............................................. 6
x-United States ................................... 5
Britain.................................................. 5
Switzerland ......................................... 5
Norway ................................................ 4
South Korea......................................... 4
Japan ................................................... 4
Italy...................................................... 3
Denmark .............................................. 2
x-clinched playoff berth
TOP 20
L
2
3
4
4
4
5
5
5
6
7
P (15-3) Yancey 4, Minnis 10, Johnson 7 Totals 4 10-12
42.
RCC (26-6) WASHINGTON 23, GROSS 13, RIVERA 9,
SKINNER 8, THOMAS 7, MCKNIGHT 4 Totals 23 10-13
86.
Halftime: Rock Creek Christian, (39-23).
Three-point goals: RCC 10 (KEITH 4, GROSS 1, RIVERA 1,
SKINNER 1, WASHINGTON 3); P 8 (Calhoun 5, Indianesia
1, Minnis 1, Johnson 1).
NO. 17 MARSHALL 61, HERNDON 50
M (23-3) Soule 14, Trivisonno 9, Dirkse 7 Totals 20 15-22
61.
H (17-6) Newman 24, Brunson 7, Boulware 2 Totals 11
4-4 50.
Halftime: Marshall, (34-24).
Three-point goals: H 8 (Brunson 1, Newman 4, Johnson
1, Kimble 2); M 2 (Soule 2).
VIRGINIA 6A NORTH
OAKTON 41, SOUTH LAKES 35
O (15-11) Perine 13, Kaloi 12, Mori 6, Meshanko 6,
Coleman 4 Totals 11 16-25 41.
SL (19-6) Young 10, Benvenuti 6, Cotton 4, Smith 4,
Scott 4, Spears 3, Nielsen 2, Boffman 2 Totals 8 13-21 35.
Halftime:South Lakes, (17-17).
Three-point goals: SL 2 (Benvenuti 2); O 1 (Coleman 1).
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Britain 10, Norway 3
Canada 8, Japan 4
South Korea 8, Switzerland 7
Sweden 7, Italy 3
United States 8, Switzerland 4
Italy 6, Norway 4
Japan 6, Denmark 4
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Canada 8, Denmark 3
United States 10, Britain 4
Norway 7, Sweden 2
South Korea 10, Japan 4
CONCORDE DISTRICT
LANGLEY 42, WESTFIELD 39
L (19-6) Callaghan 14, Azad 9, Jepsen 8, Britt 5, Maloney
4, Chapman 2 Totals 16 4-7 42.
W (15-11) Johnson 13, Williams 10, Wardak 7, McNamara 5, Reed 4 Totals 12 6-7 39.
Halftime: Langley, (24-14).
Three-point goals: W 3 (McNamara 1, Wardak 1,
Johnson 1); L 2 (Callaghan 1, Britt 1)
TIEBREAKER
GUNSTON DISTRICT
Switzerland 9, Britain 5
WEST SPRINGFIELD 38, MOUNT VERNON 34
THURSDAY’S MATCHES
SEMIFINALS
WS (13-7) Sharman 15, White 15, Morroni 4, Buckner 2,
Ellsworth 2 Totals 14 7-14 38.
MV (8-15) Solomon 9, Anderson 8, Floyd 8, Bordley 4,
Larkins 3, Anderson 2 Totals 11 6-14 34.
Halftime: West Springfield, (18-10).
Three-point goals: MV 2 (Solomon 1, Larkins 1); WS 1
(White 1)
n 2)
Canada vs. United States, 6 a.m.
Sweden vs. Britain-Switzerland winner, 6 a.m.
BRONZE MEDAL
Semifinals losers, 1:35 a.m.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
SU
Pyeongchang
HOCKEY
Americans’ Olympic experience ends with shootout loss
BY
A DAM K ILGORE
gangneung, south korea —
As the clock ticked toward the
conclusion of overtime, Coach
Tony Granato thought, “I don’t
like the idea of this.” His team was
playing to delay the end. Most of
the U.S. men’s hockey players had
come from European teams, minor leagues or semiretirement. A
win meant another day here, another day of USA across the chest
and global relevance and the potential for adulation. A loss would
launch them back to hockey’s hinterlands.
With those stakes, their sport
would morph into a parlor game,
and not a parlor game they were
suited to win. The team produced
by USA Hockey’s odd experiment
skated hard, scrapped in corners
and cared like hell. What it lacked
was even a modicum of goal-finishing skill. And once the clock hit
zeros with the score still tied, that
would be the only skill measured.
It would come down to a shootout.
“It’s hard to believe the way it
was being played and how hard
those teams were competing
[that] it was going to go to that,”
Granato said.
The Czech Republic eliminated
the United States from the Olympic tournament Wednesday afternoon with a 3-2 win after an overtime shootout, when all five Americans failed to score on Czech goalie Pavel Francouz. All game at halffull Gangneung Hockey Centre,
the United States had survived
despite the Czechs’ frequent domination. Every just-missed chance,
every squandered power play, every gigantic save by goalie Ryan
Zapolski — all of it vanished in the
cursed shootout.
“I feel empty,” said journeyman
forward Jim Slater, whose shorthanded second-period goal extended the game in the first place.
Slater played in just three of the
five games here, and he had been
included because he was, Granato
said, “a worker.” Slater nearly had
another crack at the dominant
Russian team.
But the United States faltered
utterly in the shootout. Francouz
presented problems. He wore his
glove on his right hand, not left,
like most goalies. He charged out
of the net with aggression. He was
big and quick.
For the Americans, Chris
Bourque went first. It may have
been karmic misfire — his father,
the legendary defenseman Ray,
had lost a shootout to the Czechs
in the Olympics 20 years earlier
RONALD MARTINEZ/GETTY IMAGES
A puck flies out of play during the quarterfinal men’s hockey game between the United States and the Czech Republic. The Americans were eliminated in a 3-2 shootout loss.
while playing for Canada. After a
series of dekes, Bourque buried a
shot into Francouz’s blocker.
Ryan Donato, the Harvard kid
who led the U.S. team with five
goals in the tournament, including
the first Wednesday afternoon,
fooled Francouz but couldn’t stuff
the puck inside the right post. Mark
Arcobello shot a wrister from close
range into Francouz’s pads. Troy
Terry couldn’t slip a backhand past,
able to induce Francouz to drop his
shoulder but unable to flip the
puck over him. Bobby Butler went
last, and when Francouz rebuffed
him, the Czechs exulted.
Their one goal against Zapolski
had been enough. Petr Koukal, the
second Czech shooter, fooled
Zapolski with a deke and slipped
the puck between his legs. Zapols-
ki had made four other saves in the
shootout. But the American shooters, with the NHL players at home,
could not muster one response.
Where have you gone, T.J. Oshie?
The U.S. team could have won
in regulation. With 2:42 left in the
third period, forward Brian
O’Neill beat Francouz with a wrister from the slot, but the puck
pinged off the crossbar. “Even
when I hit the bar,” O’Neill said, “I
thought it was going in.”
With 80 seconds left, Czech
Vojtech Mozik took a slashing penalty. But the U.S. power play had
been a particular kind of mess all
day, and the Americans never generated much heat on Francouz.
Even playing four-on-three for
40 seconds to start overtime, the
United States did not threaten.
Unlike the Czechs, the Americans
had to play Tuesday just to make
the quarterfinals.
“Maybe our legs weren’t there,”
Zapolski said. “You could kind of
see, once they got in our zone we
had a difficult time getting it out.”
The loss robbed the United
States of a semifinal rematch
against the Olympic Athletes from
Russia, who had beaten them, 4-0,
in group play. The Americans left
that game, despite the lopsided
score, believing they had played
the Russians evenly.
“I wanted one more crack at
them,” Granato said. “They’re an
elite team. They might be as good
as 20 out of the 30 teams playing in
the NHL right now. That’s how
good they are. But I thought how
we played them, how we attacked
SPEEDSKATING
them, I think we could have went
back at them.”
Instead, the Americans gathered on their half of the rink. They
pounded the ice with their sticks
and waved to the crowd.
“If you were in our locker room,
you wouldn’t know we’ve only
been together for two weeks,” said
Terry, a 20-year-old University of
Denver forward who tallied five
assists and piloted the U.S. attack.
“When I look back, I’ll have a
whole locker room full of brothers
I didn’t have two weeks ago.”
Having grown close, they now
will scatter in disparate directions.
Captain Brian Gionta may try to
hook on with an NHL team. O’Neill
will head back to his Kontinental
Hockey League team. Donato, a
Boston Bruins prospect still play-
ing at Harvard, planned on doing
homework on the flight home.
Donato, Terry and Jordan
Greenway may go on to lengthy
careers, to Stanley Cup playoffs,
maybe even All-Star Games. For
the semi-retirees and minor
leaguers and KHLers, two weeks
spent in South Korea with USA
across their chest will be the pinnacle.
“In 10 or 15 years, when we’re
done playing, it’s something we’ll
look back on as probably the best
moment of our careers,” Zapolski
said.
It had a chance to be so much
better, to last just a little longer.
They will go home without a medal, but what hurts most is just
leaving each other at all.
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
SPEEDSKATING
Koreans who left fellow skater behind face backlash U.S. medal drought ends
with team pursuit bronze
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
gangneung, south korea —
Noh Seon-Yeong’s tears have mobilized the hosts of the PyeongChang Olympics, marring the
Games for a nation that prides
itself on sportsmanship and civility.
Noh, a long-track speedskater,
cried in the infield of the Gangneung Oval on Monday night after
being humiliated by her teammates in the quarterfinals of the
team pursuit. Kim Bo-Reum and
Park Ji Woo walked by their distraught teammate, unmoved, after abandoning her in an event
that is defined by cooperation.
Only one person on the Korean
team comforted her: Coach Bob
de Jong, a four-time Olympic
medalist for the Netherlands.
Koreans were so angered by the
display that a petition was started
on President Moon Jae-in’s website asking that Kim and Park be
banned from the national team
because “it is a clear national
disgrace that such people with a
personality problem are representing a country in the Olympics.” By Wednesday, that petition
had 400,000 signatures.
In the pursuit, teams of three
skaters race for time. Cooperation
is permitted; skaters can push
their teammates, literally, and
strategy often calls for a faster
skater to be positioned behind a
slower one to do just that. Most
teams trade off the lead spot, but
all stay in the pack.
But instead of helping Noh or
even skating at a pace that would
keep her with the pack, Kim and
Park skated away from their slower teammate in their quarterfinal
heat Monday night. Noh finished
alone, four seconds later, exposed
as the weakest link in a team that
could have — and, according to
the sports’ long-standing unwritten rules, should have — shielded
her.
Kim and Park gained nothing
RONALD MARTINEZ/GETTY IMAGES
Noh Seon-Yeong fell behind her Korean teammates during the team
pursuit competition, and they crossed the finish line without her.
by finishing earlier. The clock
runs until all three skaters cross
the line. Shortly after Noh did,
with none of her teammates within reach, she broke down in tears.
Kim, 25, told reporters the
group had trained hard for these
Olympics and “our third racer was
far behind us, and the gap became
even wider as we reached the
finish line,” according to the Korea Times. These comments were
not received well by South Koreans, who have little tolerance
for criticizing colleagues in public.
The uproar grew so great that
Kim addressed the problem in a
last-minute news conference
Tuesday night in which she apologized for “hurting the feelings of
so many people.” Park didn’t appear. Neither did Noh, who was
sick with the flu, according to the
Korea Times.
Amid all the chaos, the Korean
pursuit team still had its consolation race scheduled Wednesday
night. Speculation swirled, but all
three showed up and skated in
silence, together in a pack, if not in
spirit, losing in a race that determined seventh and eighth place.
South Koreans understood
how much competing in the
PyeongChang Games meant to
Noh. Her brother, Noh Jin-Kyu,
was the country’s top medal hope
in short-track speedskating before the Sochi Games, but bone
cancer rendered him unable to
compete. He died two years later,
at 23.
Since then, Noh made her intentions clear: She wanted to
compete in PyeongChang and
dedicate her performance to him.
In the months leading up to these
Games, Noh thought she had secured the spot she needed. She
would compete in team pursuit.
Then, three weeks before Opening
Ceremonies, the Korean Skating
Union informed Noh she could
not compete. The KSU had miscommunicated with the Interna-
tional Skating Union about a rule
that required skaters in the team
pursuit to qualify for at least one
individual event. Unaware of the
requirement, she had not met it.
In the aftermath of that decision, Noh lashed out against the
KSU. She had told Korean reporters she thought the KSU had
pushed her brother too hard in
search of gold. So when she was
banned, according to reports, she
declared she was no longer proud
to represent her country.
Then the International Olympic Committee disallowed two
Russian speedskaters. Noh accepted a berth offered by the IOC
and an apology offered by the
president of the KSU. She told
Chosun Media, among others,
that she “wanted to end her national team career without regret.” Her fourth Olympics would
be her last.
The incident probably will not
harm Noh’s legacy, but it has damaged her teammates’. Kim lost
sponsorship deals and had to
make her social media posts private. Park is 19, and her reputation
in this speedskating-crazed country will never be the same.
When the announcer called the
Koreans’ names before their race
Wednesday night, a few people
booed Kim and Park. Most opted
for polite cheers. When Noh was
announced, the whole crowd
roared.
The three Koreans, skating this
time in a pack, fell behind early
and slipped further back late.
They crossed the finish line together, still silent and somber.
When reporters clamored for
them afterward — one even
grabbed Park’s arm — none of
them said a word. Instead, they
walked toward the locker room,
skates in hand, each of them separated by a few yards but forever
linked by what happened when
two of them turned their backs on
the third.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
gangneung, south korea —
Little by little, race by race, the U.S.
speedskating team started sliding
toward bad memories. Their medal-free debacle in Sochi four years
ago had left the Americans embarrassed and determined. But until
Wednesday, with just a few events
to go, they hadn’t won any medals
at the PyeongChang Olympics, either. Combined, the U.S. men and
women had gone 23 Olympic longtrack races without a medal, a
streak that dated from the 2010
Vancouver Games.
Then, in the one race the U.S.
women seemed least likely to take,
that medal came — bronze in the
team pursuit Wednesday — their
first since the inception of the
event in 2006.
“It really means a lot. I’m super
proud to share this moment with
these girls and the girls of U.S.
speedskating,” U.S. team member
Heather Bergsma said. “Finally.”
The U.S. women didn’t even initially qualify a team for the event,
finishing ninth. Only the top eight
make it. Then the International
Olympic Committee excluded the
Russians. The Americans got
bumped into contention.
They started practicing a few
days before the race, and while it
might look like skating in a
straight line shouldn’t need much
honing, strategy looms large.
Teams must decide how often to
switch their slowest skater into
the lead, how and when to position themselves, and other strategies. The four Americans on the
team — Bergsma, Brittany Bowe,
Mia Manganello and Carlijn
Schoutens — hadn’t had much
time to figure it all out.
That they even qualified for the
semifinals constituted a surprise.
Then they drew the mighty Netherlands in the first semifinal. In-
stead of racing Bowe, who finished
fourth, fifth and fifth in her three
individual events here, they sat
her for the semifinal and raced
Schoutens instead. Against the
Netherlands, even a Bowe-led
team probably wouldn’t have
fared well. So the Americans decided not to fight for a spot in the
gold medal race but to give themselves their best chance at bronze.
The strategy paid off. Bowe was
fresh for the final race against
Canada and helped the Americans
open a 3.5-second lead by the midway point. All along, the plan had
been for Bowe and Bergsma to get
them a lead and for Manganello to
hold it. She took over with 21/2 laps
to go. With a race already on her
legs, she started to tire. She called
for help. Contact is allowed in
team pursuit, so Bergsma pushed
Bowe and Bowe pushed Manganello. By the last two laps, the lead
was less than a second. Around the
last turn, tired legs nearly tripped
the trio into a disastrous fall.
But they stayed up, on their feet
and on the clock, and finished less
than a half-second ahead of the
Canadians for bronze. Bowe and
Bergsma and Manganello linked
arms. Eventually, they skated to
Schoutens and carried the flag
around together. The U.S. team
finally had its medal.
The race ensured Bowe, 29, who
had skated well enough to win a
medal here in the individual
events, finally would do so. She
came in fourth, tenths of a second
off the podium in the 1,000 meters.
She finished fifth in the 500 and
1,500 meters, two very different
races that attest to elite sprinting
and stamina abilities.
“Even though I came up short
here many times,” Bowe said, “I
just remain really grateful for the
opportunity to be on that start
line.”
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
Pyeongchang
Immigrant backgrounds help U.S. figure skaters discover a winning edge
BY
L IZ C LARKE
gangneung, south korea —
At the end of each lesson — and
there have been hundreds and
hundreds of lessons with Coach
Tom Zakrajsek — U.S. figure skater
Vincent Zhou bows to his teacher.
Even on the busiest days at
Broadmoor Skating Club in Colorado Springs, when Zakrajsek
must skate off to another section
of the ice to start the next lesson
with a waiting pupil while Zhou
completes his compulsory cooldown laps, Zhou will skate to
wherever his coach is before departing to bow in gratitude for the
wisdom he has imparted.
“That kind of respect is so rare,”
Zakrajsek said in an interview this
week. But it is a hallmark of his
most driven pupils, particularly
the would-be Olympians whose
parents are first-generation American immigrants. Two among
them, Zhou, 17, and Mirai Nagasu,
24, are such examples.
In many ways, Zakrajsek, 54,
who was reared in life lessons
from his Polish and Slovenian
grandmothers, shares a language
with his first-generation American skaters, whether of Asian or
Eastern European descent.
“We were taught to appreciate
our grandparents’ struggles to
come over to the country and
make a new life from the time I
was a little kid,” Zakrajsek recalled
of his childhood in Garfield
Heights, Ohio. “Both of my grandmothers and my mother and father gave us the history, that East-
ern European work ethic: ‘Make
something of yourself! If you have
a dream, work at it!’ So when I see
that in skaters, I think about it.
And I think a lot of that is the story
of our country, right?”
Of the 14 members of the 2018
U.S. Olympic figure skating team,
six are of Asian descent. Nagasu’s
parents are first-generation Japanese immigrants. The parents of
Zhou and Nathan Chen are firstgeneration Chinese immigrants.
Karen Chen’s parents emigrated
from Taiwan in 1995. And siblings
Maia and Alex Shibutani, whose
Japanese parents met as musicians at Harvard, became the first
ice dancers of Asian descent to win
Olympic medals in that event
Tuesday, when they took bronze.
The previous week, they joined
Nagasu, Nathan Chen, Bradie Tennell, Adam Rippon, Chris Knierim
and Alexa Scimeca-Knierim in
clinching the United States’
bronze in the team event.
The collective success of these
figure skaters, with the women’s
singles title to be determined this
week, is testament to how the 2018
U.S. Olympic team has benefited
from the participation of athletes
with a diverse heritage. On a subtler level, it stands as a formidable
case against the closed-border sentiment that has found new voice in
a country forged by immigrants.
Nathan Chen, 18, who is
coached by Rafael Arutyunyan, a
Harley-riding, Armenian-native
product of the former Soviet
Union figure skating system,
leaves the 2018 PyeongChang
Olympics with a bronze medal in
the team event and a place in the
sport’s history.
After a disastrous start to his
quest for an individual medal,
Chen became the first to land six
quadruple jumps in a fearless, furious effort to gain ground in the
following night’s decisive free
skate. While he scored the top
marks for the performance, it
wasn’t enough for a medal, vaulting him from 17th to fifth in the
final standings.
Refusing to quit, Chen had explained earlier in the week, was a
family value. His father, a medical
research scientist born in rural
China, worked and attended
school after moving to the United
States in 1988 while supporting
his family of five children. Youngest among them, Chen first
learned to skate in his sister’s
hand-me-down boots. His promising early results, winning the U.S.
novice championships at age 10,
helped land invaluable financial
aid from a foundation started by
three-time U.S. champion Michael
Weiss that helped defray the cost
of his lessons.
“My parents did not come to the
U.S. with much; they had a lot of
hardship,” Chen recounted. “We
were all just taught to work as
hard as we could, use these opportunities to advance and just really
appreciate all that we had.”
Nagasu, who launched her pursuit of an individual Olympic medal with Wednesday’s women’s
short program, already has etched
her place in figure skating history,
as well, becoming the first American woman (and third in the
world) to land a triple axel in
Olympic competition. She did so
Feb. 12, helping the United States
earn bronze in the team event. But
her parents, Kiyoto and Ikuko,
weren’t on hand to watch. They
were busy running their sushi restaurant in Arcadia, Calif., and
learned of the outcome only after
the dinner rush.
“They have to make a living
somehow, and the sushi restaurant
is how they make their business,”
Nagasu explained this week. When
she was a young child, the restaurant doubled as her bedroom; she
spent many nights sleeping on a
bed in a storage closet while her
parents worked. Later, Nagasu
went to work alongside them, getting paid in quarters.
“I have a great work ethic because I’ve watched my parents
work super hard,” Nagasu said.
So it is a big deal, Nagasu noted,
that her father agreed to close the
restaurant for a few days this week
— long enough so he and his wife
could fly to South Korea to watch
their only child compete at the
Olympics.
“I’ve learned a lot from my parents. For them to put their business on hold — to come all the way
to Korea and to watch me skate —
especially for my dad . . .” Nagasu
said, her thought trailing off. “He
feels responsible — not just for my
mom and for himself and myself —
but there are other people who
work there, too. He’s always saying, ‘I don’t have time for you! I
have to feed the people!’ ”
Nagasu and fellow Americans
Karen Chen and Tennell are facing
an uphill battle at Gangneung Ice
Arena, where Russian-born skaters competing under the banner
Olympic Athletes from Russia and
Japanese skaters are expected to
dominate. Of the top 13 scores
posted in international competition during the 2017-18 season,
Russian and Japanese skaters accounted for 11, led by reigning
world champion Evgenia Medvedeva and her 15-year-old compatriot, Alina Zagitova.
“The Russians and the Asians
dominate our sport right now because I can see a cultural mind-set
of, ‘Nothing is ever good enough,’ ”
said Zakrajsek, who sees the same
quality in his pupils Zhou and
Nagasu, as well several of his Russian American charges. “No matter how good you are, [the mindset is] you figure out how to be
better, and you do that in every
way in your life — as a person, in
academics, in your sport, if you
play an instrument. It’s an approach to life that makes it very
easy as a coach to work with someone like that. . . . That’s not common, I think, in American society
nowadays.”
In Zhou’s case, the drive for
perfection has come at a price.
The only son of Chinese immigrants, both computer scientists
by training, Zhou describes himself as introspective, a poet and
philosopher who has little in common with typical 17-year-olds.
He approaches figure skating as
his job. And his mother sacrificed
her own career for his, in 2009,
moving him six hours from the
family’s home to seek intensive
training while his father and sister
remained in Palo Alto, Calif. Splitting up the family meant stretching resources thin. For much of the
time, before Zhou moved to Colorado to work with Zakrajsek, he
and his mother lived in a oneroom apartment.
To the extent Zhou has struggled, he has been confronting his
shortcomings after bad practices.
His standards for himself are extremely high.
“That’s part of the Asian American way,” Zhou explained, “so
when I don’t meet those standards, I come away feeling just
this burning desperation that I
didn’t do enough.”
Zhou did just that in his Olympic debut, making history as the
first to land a quad Lutz in Olympic competition. He went on to
finish sixth (one spot behind U.S.
teammate Nathan Chen), boosted
by a free skate that included five
quadruple jumps.
“Our parents basically made it
from the bottom up,” Zhou said,
reflecting on the Asian American
heritage he considers a gift.
“. . . Lots of the Asian Americans
on the Olympic team have a similar background, where their parents know what it’s like to struggle
and have to work hard to get somewhere. That’s something they
teach us, and it has helped us all
succeed.”
liz.clarke@washpost.com
FIGURE SKATING
Russians are in command after masterful short programs
BY
L IZ C LARKE
gangneung, south korea —
Even before the first competitor
skated at Gangneung Ice Arena,
the question looming over figure
skating’s women’s short program
Wednesday wasn’t one of the razor-thin margins.
It was a question of gaps: How
wide would the chasm be between Russia’s elite teenagers —
15-year-old Alina Zagitova and
two-time world champion Evgenia Medvedeva, 18 — and the rest
of the figure skating world?
The answer is “vast.” Zagitova
and Medvedeva demonstrated
that with performances that
soared over the rest, setting them
up for a gold-silver finish, though
not necessarily in that order,
when the decisive free skate determines the medalists at the
PyeongChang Olympics.
All three Americans — Mirai
Nagasu, Karen Chen and Bradie
Tennell — stumbled in performances, ending up ninth, 10th and
11th,
respectively.
Roughly
12 points in arrears to Wednesday’s third-place finisher, Kaetlyn
Osmond of Canada, it would be
virtually impossible for any U.S.
skater to close the gap sufficiently
to reach the podium. That, in
turn, would ensure the third consecutive Winter Olympics without an individual medal for a U.S.
woman figure skater.
“This isn’t what I wanted, but
at the same time, you can’t always
have what you want,” said Nagasu, 24, who had made history as
the first American woman to land
a triple axel in an Olympics during last week’s team event. Hoping to replicate the feat, Nagasu
over-rotated, her adrenaline flowing too hard, and fell on the
landing, putting one knee and
two hands down to brace herself.
Still, she voiced pride amid the
tears that fell as one interviewer
after the next asked what had
gone wrong with a jump that no
other female skater is attempting
at these Games.
“I’m so incredibly proud of myself for taking that fall and continuing the rest of the program
and getting every element done,”
said Nagasu, who placed fourth at
the 2010 Vancouver Olympics and
was snubbed for a spot on the
2014 Sochi squad.
Part ballerina, part butterfly,
Medvedeva shattered her own
world record for a short program
with an exquisite, lighter-than-air
program to Chopin’s “Nocturne.”
Less than 20 minutes later, Zagitova relegated Medvedeva’s record 81.61 points to the sport’s ash
bin with an 82.92 for her performance set to “Black Swan.”
Both Medvedeva and Zagitova
— wearing a tutu-skirt that, at
first blush, made her look like a
tiny ballerina in a musical jewelry
box — tricked the adoring audience of 12,000 into believing that
what they do is simply too pretty
to be a sport. But figure skating is
cruel and often cutthroat, as
many competitors were remind-
ARIS MESSINIS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A multiple exposure photo shows Russia’s Evgenia Medvedeva performing her short program. Her world record score was later topped by countrywoman Alina Zagitova.
ed Wednesday, falling and faltering in programs they had polished for months in hopes of
peaking at precisely this moment.
Speaking to reporters afterward, Zagitova recounted the
physical and psychological hardships that led to this moment,
poised to become figure skating’s
second-youngest Olympic champion. (Tara Lipinski was the
youngest in 1998.) She also would
win the first gold medal for the
Olympic Athletes from Russia,
who are competing here without
representing their country officially.
Zagitova confirmed that she
broke a leg two or three years ago,
as well as an arm. She also referenced a “breaking point” of her
career, when her Russian coach
kicked her out of the training
program because she didn’t work
hard enough. After weeping for
three days over the prospect of
returning to her home town, Zagitova explained, she was granted
another chance to prove her dedication.
“You have to love figure skating
to be able to perform well,” Zagitova said, through a translator.
“You have to go out every single
day and do the same thing over
and over.”
Medvedeva, seated to her right
in a post-competition news conference, giggled when asked
whether the two skaters were
friends as well as rivals.
“We are girls. We are young
girls! We talk about everything
with each other,” Medvedeva said,
flashing a smile at Zagitova. Then
her mood grew serious.
“When we take the ice, this is
sport,” Medvedeva said. “Every
competition, I feel, is like a little
war. This is sport. This is war.”
Medvedeva went on to explain
that there are countless more
Russian skaters in the developmental ranks, already working on
jumps and elements that are
more difficult than the ones she
has mastered.
“It forces you to be stronger
when you see the younger skaters
doing more difficult things,” Medvedeva said. “You just feel inside
so strange because you are older,
and you want to be stronger than
them.”
Such is the depth of figure
skating excellence in Russia. Its
2014 Olympic champion, Adelina
Sotnikova, isn’t on the 2018 team
and has hardly been missed.
Of the top 10 scores posted by
women in the 2017-18 International Skating Union season, five
were by Russian skaters. The top
score by an American (Tennell)
ranked 14th.
This is part of what the top U.S.
figure skaters face in seeking to
end their Olympic medal
drought. It has been 16 years since
the last American woman won
Olympic figure skating gold —
Sarah Hughes, in the 2002 Salt
Lake City Games. And it has been
12 years since an American woman won an Olympic medal of any
sort, as Sasha Cohen did at the
Turin Games, taking silver.
The current world standard, as
exemplified by Zagitova and Medvedeva, is simply beyond their
reach. The Russians boast technical expertise and artistry that
towers above their rivals. Moreover, they are shrewd in structuring the programs — placing more
difficult elements in the second
half of the programs, rather than
early, to collect bonus points
awarded for stamina when skaters’ legs are fatigued.
Lipinski, now a figure skating
analyst for NBC, weighed in with
an unflinching analysis in the
New York Times on the eve of
Wednesday’s competition, explaining how American women
lost their dominance in the sport
and what needs to happen for
them to reassert hegemony. The
headline: “It’s time to take risks in
the rink again.”
The trouble started, Lipinski
noted, when international figure
skating revised its scoring system
14 years ago, and the United
States didn’t follow suit — at least
in its developmental ranks. Rath-
er than challenging young skaters
to stretch their technical ability,
U.S. Figure Skating’s scoring system at the juvenile and novice
levels rewarded skaters for spotless performances. It gave little
incentive for trying harder skills.
Meanwhile, the rest of the skating world — Russia and Japan, in
particular — was minting wouldbe champions who fearlessly attacked the most difficult jumps,
pushing their own limits.
The solution, Lipinski wrote,
lies in the bold approach of skaters such as Nagasu, who are determined to push their own boundaries.
Tennell, 20, the recently minted U.S. national champion who
only recently emerged on the international scene, had the challenge of competing first. Known
as a rock-solid jumper, Tennell
had planned an ambitious program that opened with a triple
Lutz-triple toe loop combination.
But her timing was off on the first
of the two jumps, which made the
second element impossible to
complete, and she fell.
Tennell couldn’t remember the
last time she had fallen in a
competition and attributed the
uncharacteristic error not to the
nerves of competing in her first
Olympics but to the simple fact of
being human.
“We all make mistakes,” said
Tennell, who prepared for her
performance as she routinely
does, eating a bowl of cornflakes,
listening to Queen’s “Bohemian
Rhapsody” and sitting still as her
mother bundled her long blond
hair in a bun.
Her score (64.01) reflected a
one-point deduction for the fall
and relatively low marks for the
artistic elements (component
scores) of her programs, such as
transitions and interpretation of
the music, in this case, from the
score of the South Korean war
film “Taegukgi.”
Chen, 18, also a first-time
Olympian, was the last American
to go and came closest to delivering a pristine performance. Skating to music from “On Golden
Pond,” which opened with birdsong, Chen wore a sequined white
dress with a feather-like ruffle
down one sleeve. But after her
first graceful steps, she put a hand
down on her opening triple Lutz
and was forced to abandon the
second element of the high-value
combination.
“I’m not going to lie; I’m pretty
disappointed in myself,” Chen
said. “I definitely felt the pressure. I felt the nerves. I think part
of it was just realizing that this is
the Olympics. This is what I’ve
dreamed of since I was young,
and . . . I wanted to skate so well.
liz.clarke@washpost.com
KLMNO
Pyeongchang
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2018
EZ
SU
For U.S. pair, no shame in second
Meyers Taylor captures another silver medal in women’s bobsledding, but this one makes her ‘so proud’
BY CHICO HARLAN
daegwallyeong, south korea
— The only thing that changed was
the context, and that made all the
difference.
The first time Elana Meyers Taylor won an Olympic silver medal,
she couldn’t sleep the following
nights. She was so bothered by
what had happened that she
opened up her computer and let her
emotions bleed out. “I need to
write,” she began, and she talked
about how she was “haunted” by
her last run down the course, replaying the errors in her mind. She
said she would be second-guessing
herself for the next four years. She
wondered whether she had
“choked in front of the whole
world.”
“How does it feel to have your
lifelong dream slip away literally
from your fingertips?” she wrote on
her blog. “It sucks.”
Then, on Wednesday night, Meyers Taylor, along with her new
teammate, Lauren Gibbs, won another silver medal, edged out by a
pair from Germany. This time, the
gap between first and second place
was even smaller — 0.07 seconds —
than it had been in Sochi. But Meyers Taylor, 33, was ecstatic. It was
her second silver medal, but it was
the first time she wanted to celebrate one — and as she did, her
family and friends shouted in the
stands, “Four more years! Four
more years!”
“In Sochi, I felt like I lost a gold,”
Meyers Taylor said. “Here, we won a
silver.”
In doing so, the United States’
top women’s bobsledder earned a
subtle form of redemption. In place
of a gold medal, Meyers Taylor got
something else: proof that she
could perform as she wanted to,
that under pressure she could make
the calculations that define this
sport’s minuscule margins. Competing in her third Olympics, Meyers Taylor has won two silvers and a
bronze; the United States has
placed at least one team on the
podium in all five Olympics that
women’s bobsled has been a sport.
“I won’t be writing the same
blog” this time, Meyers Taylor said.
“I am so proud. All you can ask of
yourself is to go out there and give
your best, and I truly believe I gave
my best.”
Throughout the two-day event,
Meyers Taylor and Gibbs were neck
and neck with the German duo of
Mariama Jamanka and Lisa Buckwitz. They were the two most consistent teams. They went back and
forth trading track records. The
Americans boosted their runs with
rapid-fire starts; the Germans had
the fastest finishing times. In a
competition with 20 pairs — with
each taking four runs through the
course — the Meyers Taylor-piloted
bobsled and the Jamanka-piloted
bobsled recorded four of the five
fastest times.
With one heat remaining, the
U.S. team trailed by 0.04 seconds.
Meyers Taylor and Gibbs were the
penultimate bobsledders of the
night. They arrived at the starting
line and shucked their outer layers.
Meyers Taylor pulled down her visor and tapped Gibbs on the back.
Then, they were off, hitting a speed
of 82.1 mph. When they crossed the
finish line, they hugged. They were
in first place.
And so, they watched the Germans.
The crowd roared as they took
off but then grew silent, looking at
monitors near the finish line. At the
first time checkpoint along the
course, the Germans trailed the U.S.
pace. At the second, they trailed as
well — but more narrowly. They
were off the U.S. pace by 0.08 seconds. And then 0.03 seconds. They
kept building speed. And then, at
the finish line, they were suddenly
ahead — by 0.07 seconds.
“Incredible,” Meyers Taylor said.
“So much goes into that one moment,” said Jamie Greubel Poser,
who piloted the other U.S. team,
which finished fifth.
Gibbs saw the numbers and bent
over, shaking her head. She
seemed, for a moment, in a daze.
But Meyers Taylor extended a hand.
They hugged. They walked to the
EDGAR SU/REUTERS
ABOVE: Elana Meyers Taylor, front, and Lauren Gibbs took the lead with their final run, but they were edged out by a German team on the event’s last
run and finished 0.07 seconds behind. BELOW: Meyers Taylor, left, a GW graduate, earned her third Olympic medal, and Gibbs picked up her first.
podium. They were smiling. They
congratulated Jamanka and Buckwitz. They stepped on the podium.
“I just feel so much pride,”
Gibbs’s father, Al, said.
Meyers Taylor and Gibbs are seven months apart in age. They both
played college sports: for Gibbs,
volleyball at Brown; for Meyers Taylor, softball at George Washington.
But whereas Meyers Taylor has
been a top figure in bobsledding for
a decade — transitioning from
pusher to pilot, pushing for gender
equality in the sport and becoming
a self-appointed Team USA bobsled
recruiter — Gibbs is fairly new. Less
than four years ago, she left a sixfigure job to try the sport on a lark.
She didn’t even watch the Games in
Sochi.
“I’m sorry, guys,” Gibbs said,
laughing, and she talked about how
what it felt like being a silver medalist.
“When is a good time to tell my
parents I’m maybe not going back
to work?” Gibbs said. “Right when I
won a medal?
“I ran out of words [for the feeling] like five interviews ago, but it’s
pretty incredible. I recommend it to
everybody.”
ALEXANDER HASSENSTEIN/GETTY IMAGES
Norway
Germany
Canada
GOLD
SILVER
BRONZE
TOTAL
GOLD
SILVER
BRONZE
TOTAL
GOLD
SILVER
BRONZE
TOTAL
13
11
9
33
12
7
5
24
9
5
7
21
chico.harlan@washpost.com
Live updates: For analysis and
results throughout the Games,
visit washingtonpost.com/sports
D10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
Pyeongchang
Zagitova’s brilliance is less shocking than her birth date
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
gangneung, south korea —
Each Olympics brings at least one
moment of unspeakable horror
for many of those with the courage to browse the biographies of
the athletes. The horror comes
upon seeing a certain birth date,
doing some quick arithmetic and
realizing that the person born on
the date in question is old enough
to thrive in the Olympics without
toppling or even teething. In that
vein, the events of Wednesday at
Gangneung Ice Arena forced a
glimpse to check the birth date of
brilliant Russian figure skater
Alina Zagitova.
Discretion is advised.
Certain blocks of the readership may wish to avert eyes.
Here: May 18, 2002.
Some people walking around
these Olympics wear clothing older than that.
Yet the arithmetic shows that
somebody born in May 2002 not
only might be able to skate upon
ice but provide an Olympic audience with a show of an almost
celestial elegance, élan and expertise. Zagitova set a world record
with her score of 82.92, then she
said some things that sounded
funny just because of that birth
date.
Asked about the time she had
both a broken arm and a broken
leg, she said, through an interpreter, “It happened a long time
ago.” While you could make a case
that nothing in her life could have
happened a long time ago, she
followed it up by saying, “It was
like two to three years ago,” two to
three years being a sizable chunk
of her life thus far.
Continuing: “And at that time I
was in one competition, and even
though at the time my arm was
broken, I broke my leg once again
at that place, as well, in that
competition.”
She’s tough. That’s clear.
In the television interview just
after her skate and the posting of
her astronomical score, she said
something else that might have
gone a mite misunderstood in the
translation, but it wound up
emerging like this: “I think it’s
very obvious that I have the most
difficult program in the world.
And the program was made by my
trainers who work for me.”
She did not seem the authoritarian type, to run around urging
LUCY NICHOLSON/REUTERS
Alina Zagitova, among the youngest Olympians at 15 years old, set a world record with a score of 82.92 in her short program during the women’s figure skating competition.
tiptop effort from trainers who
work for her, but if she were, they
probably should go ahead and
obey.
In forging her record at age
15 years 279 days, Zagitova called
to mind Tara Lipinski — not that
Lipinski really needs to be called
to mind around here — winning
the gold medal at the 1998 Olympics in Nagano, Japan, at age
15 years 255 days. Zagitova also
gave her countrywoman, co-favorite Evgenia Medvedeva, that
rare chance to talk about a sort of
a next generation.
Medvedeva had skated before
Zagitova and had registered an
81.61, a world record that lasted
about as long as a mayfly, maybe
less. “Honestly, I think this is
normal,” Medvedeva said, even
though, of course, nothing about
their level of brilliance is normal.
Continuing: “I think this is
normal and makes us stronger.
And I remember myself and my
first [major competition], and I
remember my feelings. Everything is new for me, and I really
was so, so, so, so happy, and I hope
Alina is feeling the same as my
feelings.”
She spoke from her vast experience, having been born on
Nov. 19, 1999 — or last century.
“I can’t say I was surprised,
because every day Alina is, how
hard she works,” Medvedeva said.
Zagitova, who last month
edged Medvedeva to become the
2018 European champion, hails
from Izhevsk, roughly the 20thlargest city in Russia, along the
Izh River in the Ural Mountains.
Her parents named her for 2004
rhythmic gymnastics gold medalist Alina Kabaeva, who later became a member of the Russian
Parliament. She began the sport
at 5, which also is not necessarily
a long time ago.
“I feel glad because I was not
that much nervous today, [not as
much] as I expected,” she said
through an interpreter, and that
called to mind the possibility that
in February 2018, it can be an
advantage to have been born as
recently as May 18, 2002. As she
left the so-called “mixed zone,”
the place where athletes meet
reporters, she walked off on her
skates, then ran off down a hallway on those same skates, skinny
legs kind of flying around.
At that moment, if not in her
extraordinary program, she did
look 15.
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
Athletes in extreme sports should never be treated as second-class Olympians
pyeongchang,
south korea —
If you’re addicted
to sports misery,
you can’t just look
at the United
Jerry
States’ modest
Brewer
Winter Olympics
medal haul thus
far. No, that’s not depressing
enough. To crank up the anguish
to its max, you must turn
haughty, create an antiquated
tier system to rank the
importance of each sport and
then surmise that the Americans
are even further off relevance’s
radar.
The arrogant conclusion: If
you think it’s bad that the United
States might finish out of the top
five in the medal standings
despite having the largest team
in Winter Olympics history, it’s
worse when you consider it has
been buoyed by kiddie-table
sports such as snowboarding and
freestyle skiing.
And that would be a dismissive
and primitive way of thinking.
These Olympics shouldn’t
mystify American traditionalists.
If anything, it should force them
to accept change, embrace the
evolving interests of young
athletes and show gratitude that
the “extreme sports” have kept
our national ego out of intensive
care.
The supposed daredevil sports
have accounted for 10 of the
country’s 19 medals. They have
captured five of the seven golds.
Mikaela Shiffrin was celebrated
for her giant slalom gold, but the
Alpine skier shares the title of
most impressive winning
performance with shredders
Chloe Kim, Red Gerard and
Shaun White. And then there’s
Jamie Anderson, who won her
second straight snowboarding
slopestyle gold medal despite
winds that could have flown her
back home.
“I just think a new wave of
people are coming in, and it’s not
all about getting timed against a
clock,” said American freestyle
skier Aaron Blunck, who is 21 and
finished seventh in the halfpipe.
“We’ve proved that we can
actually go out and put down
under pressure just as hard as
DMITRI LOVETSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Red Gerard, 17, claimed gold in the slopestyle Feb. 11, making him the youngest American to win a medal in a snowboarding event.
they can. I think it’s cool. I really
hope that people get the respect
out of that and realize this is a
cool sport. This is something that
is very hard and takes true talent
to do. At the end of the day, we’re
still a sport like everything else,
and I just hope we get the love
that we deserve.”
There are plenty who love
these sports. Widespread
respect? Well, that’s a work in
progress. We’re 23 years into the
X Games era, believe it or not.
Snowboarding was added to the
Olympic program 20 years ago,
for the 1998 Nagano Games. It
started with halfpipe and giant
slalom events for the men and
women, and gradually,
snowboarding has grown to
represent a five-discipline chunk
of the Winter Olympics. Freestyle
skiing took off when moguls
became a medal sport in 1992,
and now it has five events, too.
The rise of these events has
created something of a culture
war. There are the new Winter
Olympics, where being launched
into the air and flipping and
spinning is so cool. And there are
the old Winter Olympics, where
hockey, Alpine skiing,
speedskating and figure skating
overshadow everything else.
But what’s a snobby observer
to do when Team USA stinks at
most of the traditional and
important stuff and excels at the
new and fun? It’s only reasonable
either to stop looking at the
newer events as junk food or
enjoy that you get to have candy
bars for dinner.
Sports are cyclical, of course.
For all the consternation about
Team USA’s struggles in certain
events, the reason could be as
simple as the improvement of
other nations and the presence of
some once-in-a-generation stars
pushing Americans to the
background. In time, the United
States won’t be dominant in
snowboarding; in fact, the shift is
already starting. New sports will
emerge, and old sports will be
available to be recaptured. That’s
just how this works.
But now is no time to use
success in an underappreciated
area as a weapon to promote a
failure narrative. It’s
disappointing that the United
States is falling just out of the
arbitrarily hailed top three in
many events. But it’s incredible
that the extreme sports stars
have grown from Olympic
renegades to worthy of reverence
for keeping America so
competitive.
American snowboarders have
earned six medals so far. That’s
one fewer than the United States
has racked up in Alpine skiing,
speedskating, figure skating and
hockey (counting the U.S.
women, who are guaranteed gold
or silver) combined. It’s strange
to live in a world in which all
three U.S. women’s figure skaters
fall during the short program and
find themselves out of medal
contention. It’s strange to think
that this will be the third straight
Olympics without an American
female winning an individual
figure skating medal.
Maybe it’s just a slump. Maybe
it’s indicative of greater issues,
including the assortment of
options that athletes have. There
was a time when Kim might have
had to put on skates and jumped
and danced to music to win a
Winter Olympics medal. But
there’s a snowboarding halfpipe
competition now. And she owns
the sport. And she adds to the
tradition of Peggy Fleming, Kristi
Yamaguchi and even Bonnie
Blair in her own way. There’s no
asterisk because Kim isn’t a
figure skater or speedskater. Kim,
17, is simply a gold medalist in a
fresh sport who has the youth
and potential to be a legend.
Still, there are moments when
snowboarders and others feel
like second-class Olympians. The
most dramatic example came last
week when officials forced the
women’s snowboarding
slopestyle final to be held in
unsafe windy conditions. The
performances were awful, and
the athletes felt worse. They
wanted it to be a showcase event,
but it became a troubling sign
that their sport isn’t as valued as
others.
“And I think that’s complete
B.S.,” said Anderson, who added a
big air silver to her slopestyle
gold. “We should have had an
opportunity to perform in good
weather, where we could
showcase our good riding.”
Leave it to Hailey Langland,
another 17-year-old snowboarder,
to provide a different perspective.
While disappointed on that
windy day, she was also inspired.
“We literally looked like
superhumans out there,” she
said. “For all of us to ride through
that kind of wind and keep
charging, I think it’s really
badass, and I’m proud.”
It’s time to stop minimizing
the impact these superhumans
have had on the Olympics in
general. And with the Americans
struggling at the Old Games, they
can’t be viewed as the candy that
threatens to ruin our teeth. They
aren’t consolation prizes, either.
They are, in a stunning role
reversal, the Olympic heroes that
the nation needs.
jerry.brewer@washpost.com
For more by Jerry Brewer, visit
washingtonpost.com/brewer.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D11
M2
Pyeongchang
SNOWBOARDING
Anderson’s second medal makes for a first at Olympics
BY
R ICK M AESE
daegwallyeong, south korea — Jamie Anderson is a highflying, trailblazing, free-spirited
snowboarding daredevil who, by
now, has grown plenty accustomed to being the best, the baddest — and the first.
Anderson added to her medal
haul by winning silver in the
women’s big air competition
Thursday morning, becoming the
first female snowboarder to win
two medals at a single Olympics.
Her three career Olympic medals
tie her with Shaun White and
Kelly Clark, the iconic American
halfpipe riders.
“That’s crazy to me. It’s all pretty surreal,” she said. “Just being
able to be an Olympian is such a
treat. But to come here and win
medals is, wow, next level.”
Anderson already had successfully defended her Olympic title
from Sochi in the women’s slopestyle competition and took aim
Thursday morning at the inaugural big air competition, a staple of
the Winter X Games that’s making
its Olympic debut at the PyeongChang Games.
Unlike snowboarding’s halfpipe or slopestyle, the big air
event consists of a single trick.
Riders shoot down a 160-foot
ramp, launch into the air and
perform as many spins and flips
as possible.
The big air winner is determined by adding the two best
scores from the three-run finals.
Anderson, 27, had posted the
sixth-highest score in the qualification round but sent a big message with the first of her three
runs in the finals. She landed a
dizzying frontside 1080 spin,
earning a score of 90.0 and giving
her an edge with two tricks to go.
Her second trick — a 980 —
earned her an 87.25, which meant
she had two of the day’s four
highest scores heading into the
competition’s final runs. Anderson held a 2.75-point lead over
Austria’s Anna Gasser, who won
the big air world title last year and
was considered by many to be a
favorite for gold. Gasser had posted the top score in qualifying — a
LARS BARON/GETTY IMAGES
Jamie Anderson landed a frontside 1080 spin to capture silver in the women’s big air competition, becoming the first female snowboarder to win two medals in one Games.
98.0 — and Anderson knew she
needed to go bigger with her final
run. She settled on a cab 1080 —
three full spins — even though she
had never landed the trick.
She came close but couldn’t put
it down cleanly, giving Gasser a
window.
“I was definitely a little bit
disappointed because that one I
really just wanted to do for me,”
Anderson said. “That’s how it is.
Sometimes you land them; sometimes you don’t. But you get up
and keep freakin’ charging.”
All Anderson could do was
watch as Gasser took her place at
the top of the ramp. The Austrian
rider was planning the biggest
trick of the competition — a cab
double cork 1080, which is essentially two flips and one full spin.
“That was a little risk I took,”
Gasser explained later. “I wasn’t
sure, ‘Should I keep it safe? Should
I just do that trick again and get a
better score? Or should I risk it?’
But I watched the girls, and everyone was so good, so I was like,
‘Okay, I’m going to try to do this
trick.’ ”
Gasser landed it, and a big
score seemed inevitable.
“Insane,” the bronze medal
winner Zoi Sadowski Synnott of
New Zealand said. “She is on an-
other level.”
Gasser had spun and flipped
her way to the top spot of the
podium. Her final run was scored
a 96.0, which gave Gasser a total of
185.0, besting Anderson’s 177.25.
“I felt really peaceful, honestly,”
Anderson said. “Because I came
out and did what I wanted to do.
That’s all I can do. The rest of it is
out of my power.”
Anderson was all smiles after-
ward, happy to take home both
gold and silver medals from PyeongChang. And she isn’t ruling out
adding to her medal haul and
returning to the Olympics in
2022.
“I hate future-tripping, so I
can’t say yet,” she said. “But I love
it, and as long as I’m still healthy
and happy and enjoying it, I
would love to continue.”
rick.maese@washpost.com
Wise wins gold, Ferreira silver in ski halfpipe to give U.S. medal count a boost
HALFPIPE FROM D1
— seven of which have come in the
past 36 hours. In this case, the
medals were earned by a pair who
have lived as roommates in Korea
for more than three weeks and
who started their time here by
getting matching left arm tattoos
of the PyeongChang logo.
“I love him to death,” Ferreira
said of Wise.
In taking first place, Wise defended the gold medal he would
won in Sochi. But he came to this
one differently, overcoming an uneven day in which his first two
runs — scored a 17.00 and a 6.40 —
led to awkward landings. Before
taking off on his last run, Wise
asked his coaches whether he
should try to pull off a technically
difficult set of moves, four different kinds of double corks. Wise
was thinking he shouldn’t.
“They said, ‘That’s not who you
are,’ ” Wise later said. “So I went
for it.”
He nailed it. He earned a 97.20
and a roaring ovation.
“I’m just over the moon.”
The United States had eyed this
event as one of its most promising
SERGEI ILNITSKY/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
U.S. freestyle skiers Alex Ferreira, left, and David Wise won silver and gold, respectively, in halfpipe.
events. The finals included 12 skiers — four of them Americans, all
of whom had survived an earlier
round of qualifying that pared the
field from 27. During that qualify-
ing round, U.S. skiers Aaron
Blunck, Ferreira and Torin YaterWallace had posted the top three
scores of the day. Wise had finished eighth, but he was still con-
sidered a medal favorite. The team
was loaded with so much talent
that Wise said just making the
team was a “lifetime accomplishment.”
“Halfpipe, in the same way as
slopestyle and big air and all the
snowboard events, really caters to
creativity,” he said. “It caters to
doing things sort of differently
than everybody else does. And I
think as Americans we have rebel
in our blood. It’s who we are. It
defines us as a country. There was
a really strong group of American
skiers today; our runs look completely different.”
The United States just missed
the podium sweep, though. New
Zealand’s Nico Porteous won the
bronze with a score of 94.80. His
countryman, Beau James-Wells,
was the only other skier to score
above 90. Blunck finished seventh. Yater-Wallace finished
ninth.
The four Americans here know
one another well. They have competed against one another for
years.
Three of them are from Colorado. At these Games, they have
paired up as roommates. And they
are used to succeeding together:
Last month at the Winter X
Games, Wise, Ferreira and YaterWallace took the top three spots in
the superpipe event.
For Yater-Wallace, the chance
to be back in the sport is especially
rewarding. In 2015, he was hit
with a sudden wave of sickness. He
tried to ignore it. In fact, he went
skiing. But days later, he was airlifted to a hospital in Utah, stricken by a viral infection that affected
his lungs and liver. Doctors put
him in a medically induced coma.
Just two months later, he won a
gold medal at the X Games.
During the first of the three
heats Thursday, Wise’s skis got
tangled as he was landing after a
jump. He skidded to the ground,
and judges awarded his run a
17.00. Blunck and Yater-Wallace
settled in the middle of the pack.
But Ferreira rose to the top, pulling off a dazzling run packed with
amplitude, earning a 92.60 — the
highest score of the heat.
In the second heat, Ferreira
kept his lead, again pulling off the
best run of the heat — a 96.00 — to
jump back ahead of Porteous, who
several minutes earlier had
earned a 94.80. And that set up
Wise’s moment to shine.
“The competition was so epic,”
Wise said.
chico.harlan@washpost.com
Myhrer claims the slalom after Hirscher, then Kristoffersen both fail to finish
SLALOM FROM D1
and giant slalom, capturing his
first two gold medals, a capstone to
an all-time career. He also entered
the slalom as a favorite, with 23year-old Norwegian Henrik Kristoffersen his closest challenger.
Kristoffersen led after the first
run, but his second run only added
to the distressing improbability.
He also missed a gate, leaving gold
for 35-year-old Swede Andre
Myhrer, who finished in 1.38.99.
“It was a big surprise that I won
this gold medal in super combined,” Hirscher said. “It was as
well a big surprise that I’m standing right now here, out of the race.
But this is part of the game. Hopefully, there are still tickets for a
plane right now.”
Kristoffersen’s slip complicated
his emergence as one of the
world’s great skiers — he and
Hirscher had placed one-two in
11 events this World Cup season.
Ramon Zenhaeusern of Swit-
zerland won silver, 0.34 seconds
behind Myhrer, and Austrian Michael Matt claimed the bronze.
David Chodounsky led a trio of
Americans with a 18th place finish, outskiing his No. 26 starting
position with a 1:40.84 total time.
Mark Engel finished 31st (1:49.31),
and Nolan Casper missed a gate
and did not finish.
Despite colossal expectations,
Hirscher entered Thursday with
muted hopes. In training runs the
past two days, Hirscher found the
snow powdery and clingy on his
skis. He prefers hard, icy courses
such as the ones predominant in
Europe.
In training, Hirscher said, he
could never find a set up that
allowed him to navigate the snow
conditions with any speed. A significant part of Hirscher’s success
lies in his ability to test and choose
the most effective equipment. On
Thursday, he found nothing that
made him anticipate success.
“We were not able to find some-
thing that made it possible to let
the skis go around the gates
smooth and clean,” Hirscher said.
“Skiers, they sometimes have a
grip problem on ice, for example. I
never have grip problems on ice. If
it is grippy and hard, packed snow
like here today, I’m really not able
to handle this. But this is as well
my mistake of my technique and
my powerful skiing. The smoother
you ski, the better you are in these
conditions.”
Hirscher found himself at peace
following the run. First, he had
two gold medals. Second, no matter how stunning his performance
to the grandstand, he figured it
could happen. Knowing the conditions, he had been preparing to
swallow defeat for three days.
“If you have already accepted
you have no chance if nothing is
going to change, then you have
enough time to be fine with it,”
Hirscher said.
Still, the sight of Hirscher skiing
out — when a skier simply coasts
to the bottom of the hill — felt
unnatural, like LeBron James airballing a free throw in the Finals.
Hirschrer had finished 51 consecutive events, including 24 straight
slaloms. He had finished every
race since Feb. 14, 2016.
“I can’t remember the last run
he made a mistake,” Italian slalom
skier Manfred Moelgg said.
His dearth of DNFs was by careful design. As he built the greatest
men’s skiing career of his era,
Hirscher prioritized season-long
championships, which meant safer lines and cautious races. He still
won World Cup races, a startling
55 of them — he possessed so many
brilliant traits, he could land atop
podiums even as he managed risk.
But he left the impression, even as
he won more prizes than any of
skier of his era, he was offering
only a percentage of his full powers.
The PyeongChang Olympics
had been cast as Hirscher’s ultimate validation, the crowning
achievement of an all-time legacy.
What they had really been was a
full reveal of his genius. He
showed what happens when he
eschews prudence for domination, when all he cares about is
being the fastest man down the
mountain, when he regards victory as essential. He had won the
giant slalom by the largest Olympic margin since 1968.
“Now his time can come to show
everybody in the world, without
tactics and just going full for the
victory, what he’s able to do,” said
Hirscher’s coach, Michael Pircher.
But the riskier, faster runs also
carried the prospect of disaster. In
unkind conditions, Hirscher experienced it.
“He’s had so much pressure,
two golds,” British skier Dave Ryding said. “It’s inevitable. It’s slalom.”
In the aftermath, speculation
turned to Hirscher’s Olympic future. He had said these would be
his last Games, but in the wake of
the slalom, he waffled.
“Not sure,” Hirscher said. “I
need a gold medal in slalom. Just
kidding. We will see in four years.”
Hirscher has thrived while
competing under as much pressure as any athlete in the Games.
He had failed to win a gold medal
in his first two Olympics, and
while he viewed his six seasonlong world titles as a grander accomplishment, ski-mad Austria
demanded he add a gold medal.
Could he really be considered the
best ever without one? “If he don’t
win,” his press manager Stefan
Illek said, “it’s Watergate.”
Despite the end, his Olympics
had been far from that. His Games
ended with staggering sights, with
gasps and groans, but that is not
how he — or his country — would
remember them.
“All in all, there is no room or
place for the disappointing of people,” Hirscher said. “They are very
happy with two gold medals.”
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
D12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
Pyeongchang
SERGEI ILNITSKY/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Canada’s Brady Leman, second from right, chases Switzerland’s Marc Bischofberger, right, during the men’s ski cross semifinals Wednesday before winning the gold medal in the freestyle skiing event.
WOMEN’S HOCKEY
MEN’S HOCKEY
FREESTYLE SKIING
SPEEDSKATING
For Finland, bronze
is still beautiful
Semifinals feature
surprises vs. powers
On day of crashes,
Leman finishes first
Dutch men denied
in team pursuit
For the third time in six Olympic
women’s hockey tournaments, Finland
is the best of the rest.
With the United States and Canada
maintaining their stranglehold on the
sport, the Finns claimed the third spot
on the podium — the only one they
realistically hoped for — by beating the
Russia team, 3-2, on Wednesday in the
bronze medal game in Gangneung,
South Korea.
“It was a big goal for us,” said captain
Jenni Hiirikoski, who was also a member of the 2010 team that finished third
to the North Americans. “On a good day,
we have a chance against the U.S. and
Canada. But this is what we wanted.”
Noora Raty stopped 20 shots and Petra
Nieminen, Susanna Tapani and Linda
Valimaki scored for Finland, which also
took bronze — behind the United States
and Canada — in the inaugural Olympic
women’s event in 1998.
Lyudmila Belyakova had a goal and
an assist and Olga Sosina also scored for
the Olympic Athletes from Russia. It
was their best Olympic result ever, following up a fifth-place finish in 2014
despite having home-ice advantage.
“We drew the right conclusions after
our performance in Sochi, and we
fought for the bronze medal,” Coach
Alexei Chistyakov said. “It was not sufficient, but we will aim at that next time.”
Canada and the Russians are in the
semifinals as expected.
The other two semifinalists weren’t
expected to be here at all.
The Olympic men’s hockey tournament final four has two surprise visitors:
the Czech Republic, which is in its first
semifinal since 2006, and Germany,
which is in contention for its first medal
since 1976 — as West Germany before
unification. The Czech Republic will
play the favored Russians on Friday
after knocking off the United States, 3-2,
in a shootout, while Germany will face
Canada after upsetting top-seeded Sweden, 4-3, in overtime.
Germany didn’t even qualify for the
Sochi Olympics, and now Coach Marco
Sturm’s team gets a chance to face twotime defending-champion Canada,
which lost starting goaltender Ben
Scrivens to an upper-body injury and
needed Kevin Poulin to make 15 saves to
beat Finland, 1-0.
The Olympic Athletes from Russia
swept aside Norway, 6-1, and have a
chance to end their country’s 16-year
medal drought.
“Our dream’s still on,” said captain
Pavel Datysuk, who was on the Russian
team that won bronze in 2002.
Added former NHL star Ilya Kovalchuk: “We are a very hungry group of
guys. Next game will be the biggest one.”
Brady Leman earned Olympic gold
for Canada in men’s ski cross Wednesday, beating Marc Bischofberger of Switzerland in a wild final at Phoenix Snow
Park in PyeongChang, South Korea.
Leman took the lead early during the
last round and then held off Bischofberger in a two-man duel after Canada’s Kevin Drury and Russian athlete
Sergey Ridzik collided early on. Ridzik
picked himself up and raced down for
bronze well behind the leaders.
The event calls for side-by-side racing
over bumps, jumps and dips down the
mountain at speeds of over 40 mph. The
elimination rounds included a handful
of frightening crashes that forced several men to leave the course on a medical sled.
The worst came when 2011 world
champion Chris Del Bosco lost control
in midair late in the run. The right side
of the Canadian’s body slammed hard
into the snow, and he lay motionless for
several minutes before emergency personnel carefully placed him on the sled.
There was no immediate update on the
extent of the 35-year-old’s injuries.
Terence Tchiknavorian of France appeared to injure his right leg after landing a jump awkwardly, and Christoph
Wahrstoetter of Austria became tangled
up in the fence after colliding with Erik
Mobaerg of Sweden.
Norwegian veteran Havard Bokko
stood atop the highest platform on the
Olympic podium in Gangneung, South
Korea. Glancing down to his left, a step
lower, he saw the orange-clad Dutch.
Something like that had never happened to him at the Olympics.
“It is a pretty nice feeling to look
down on them on the podium,” Bokko
said Wednesday after helping Norway
beat the Netherlands in the men’s team
pursuit.
The Norwegians beat the Dutch men
in the team pursuit semifinals. They
followed that with a victory over the
host nation in the final.
“This is no fun,” said Dutch great
Sven Kramer, who was looking for a
fifth career Olympic gold medal.
Both victorious nations knew the
Dutch team’s Achilles’ heel — individual competition is so tough that it
trumps teamwork. And in team pursuit, with its smooth cooperation
among a trio of racers seamlessly trading the lead, the sum of the parts, even
if they are not the best, can yield gold.
“We never train all together,” Kramer
said. “It is one of the reasons why team
pursuit can fail.”
The Dutch still lead with six speedskating gold medals and 13 overall, but
they won’t get close to their 23-for-36
total from the 2014 Sochi Games.
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
TODAY’S TV
What to watch: Evgenia
Medvedeva and Alina Zagitova,
competing as Olympic Athletes
from Russia, are the favorites in
women’s figure skating. The
Americans counter with Bradie
Tennell, Mirai Nagasu and Karen
Chen. Julia Marino and Hailey
Langland are contenders in the big
air competition.
NBC
3-5 p.m. Women’s biathlon, 4x6kilometer relay gold; men’s Nordic
combined, team large hill gold
8 p.m.-midnight Figure skating,
women’s free skate gold (live);
women’s skiing, combined,
downhill run (live); women’s
snowboarding, big air gold (live);
short-track speedskating, men’s
500 and women’s 1,000
12:35-2 a.m. Women’s skiing,
combined, slalom run, gold (live);
women’s freestyle skiing, ski cross
gold
NBCSN
2-5:20 a.m. Snowboard, men’s
and women’s parallel giant slalom;
men’s Nordic combined, team
large hill gold; curling, men’s and
women’s tiebreaker
5:20-7:45 a.m. Women’s biathlon,
4x6km relay gold (live); men’s
Nordic combined, team large hill/
4x5km gold (live)
7:45-10:45 a.m. Short-track
speedskating, men’s 500 and
women’s 1,000 gold
10:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m. Curling,
men’s and women’s tiebreaker
1:45 p.m.-4:45 p.m. Men’s curling,
semifinal
7-10 p.m. Figure skating, women’s
free skate (live)
10 p.m.-2 a.m. Men’s curling;
short-track speedskating
CNBC
5-8 p.m. Men’s curling, semifinal
Live updates online
For analysis and results throughout
the Games, visit
washingtonpost.com/sports
BRIAN SNYDER/REUTERS
VADIM GHIRDA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
NOTES
Doping hearing canceled after Russian signals he will accept his punishment
A SSOCIATED P RESS
The Court of Arbitration for
Sport canceled a doping hearing
for Russian curler Alexander
Krushelnitsky after he indicated
he would accept a sanction at the
PyeongChang Olympics.
Krushelnitsky tested positive
for the banned substance meldonium after winning bronze in
mixed doubles with his wife, Anastasia Bryzgalova.
The Russian Curling Federation told Russian state TV that
Krushelnitsky would return his
medal because he believed he had
no chance of winning the case.
The court said “all parties”
agreed to cancel the hearing,
which
pitted
Krushelnitsky
against the International Olympic
Committee and World Curling
Federation.
The court will issue a decision
later Thursday based on written
statements.
The case comes two days before
the IOC must decide whether to
formally reinstate the Russian
team for the Closing Ceremonies
in PyeongChang, South Korea.
IOC: The spokesman for the
International Olympic Committee is hinting that its longest-serving member should think about
stepping down for criticizing fellow members and calling some of
them “old farts.”
Canadian Dick Pound has
harshly criticized the IOC for not
banning Russian athletes from
the PyeongChang Olympics despite a massive doping scandal.
Pound referred to some fellow
members as “old farts” in a British
newspaper interview. Pound suggested athletes could stay away
from the Olympics if the IOC
didn’t get tougher on doping.
IOC spokesman Mark Adams
said, “In the end, if you don’t like
the coffee that’s served at a coffee
shop, if you don’t like the decor, if
you don’t like the prices, then you
maybe go to another coffee shop.”
Pound couldn’t be immediately
reached for comment Wednesday.
WEATHER: Ester Ledecka’s
quest for the second half of the
rarest of Olympic doubles will
start two days later than expected.
Officials juggled scheduling at the
action park because of heavy
winds that are expected Friday.
Ledecka, the Czech skier and
snowboarder who won the super-G in Alpine in a shocker, is also
entered in snowboarding’s parallel giant slalom. Qualifying runs
were set for Thursday but have
been moved to Saturday and will
be run the same day as the final
rounds.
Women’s ski cross qualifying
was moved up a day to Thursday.
The elimination rounds for that
event were moved from Friday
afternoon to the morning, before
the winds are expected to hit.
CLOSING
CEREMONIES:
K-pop band Exo will play at the
Closing Ceremonies on Sunday.
Organizers on Wednesday announced the performance by the
South Korean-Chinese group,
which has a vast following among
teenagers. Among them is Russian
figure skater Evgenia Medvedeva,
who is in second place in the women’s figure skating competition
heading into the free skate Friday.
Medvedeva, 18, said she listened to Exo before her stunning
short program in the team figure
skating event last week.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D13
SU
Pyeongchang
Vonn’s greatness on skis must be measured in more than just her Olympic medals
bukpyeong,
south korea —
Her body still
functions, and
because her mind
has never changed,
Barry
she still can will all
Svrluga
that scar tissue
down a ski hill at
harrowing speeds. But this here is
the end for Lindsey Vonn, at least
in the Olympics. What it took to
slide into the start gate Wednesday
morning at Jeongseon Alpine
Centre — a helmet on her head, a
rod in her right arm, a
reconstructed knee, scars she can’t
count but no fear in her heart —
we may never fully understand.
Vonn is the best female ski racer
in history, full stop. At some point
— and some point soon — we can
discuss whether we can drop
“female” from that description,
respectfully shove the Swedish
great Ingemar Stenmark to the
side and leave her atop the
podium, alone.
Vonn won a bronze medal
Wednesday in the women’s
downhill at the PyeongChang
Olympics. For a 33-year-old whose
limbs have been splayed on
mountains from Colorado to
Cortina, that is a singular
achievement that must be viewed
through the long lens of her career.
She is the oldest woman to win an
Olympic medal in Alpine skiing.
But man, that little stat feels twodimensional, something that’s
true but doesn’t begin to get at the
depth of the story, which is
simultaneously familiar and
inspiring.
“Really, are you asking me to
commentate [on] the greatest
skier?” said Wednesday’s gold
medalist, Sofia Goggia of Italy.
Yes, Sofia. Yes, we are.
“It speaks for itself,” Goggia
said. “She has 140 or 130 [World
Cup] podiums. Me, I have 20. She
has 81 victories. I have four.”
It is a perspective that every
World Cup skier on that insane,
globe-trotting circuit carries with
her. They are numbers that make
up the foundation of Vonn’s career,
numbers that seem unattainable
to anyone else who entered the
starting gate Wednesday. Now she
has more numbers: three Olympic
medals, this downhill bronze to go
with the gold she won eight years
ago in Vancouver and a bronze in
the super-G from those same
Games when she was, as she said
Wednesday, “on top of the world.”
The places she has been since.
Wow. Broken bones, divorce, the
missed 2014 Olympics with a bad
knee. Life. There might be parts of
Wednesday’s run that Vonn could
examine and criticize, sections of
the course where she might have
made up the 47 hundredths of a
second she finished behind Goggia
or the 38 hundredths she finished
behind Norway’s Ragnhild
Mowinckel, who took silver, her
second medal here. But being
there, that counted for something
for Vonn because that was never
guaranteed.
“I never am the person that said
I can’t do something, or I’ve never
thought of quitting because of an
injury,” Vonn said. “But it’s taken
its toll. And that’s why I can’t keep
ski racing, you know?”
She paused a good, long while.
Her career is not done, not quite.
Indeed, on Thursday she
competed in the Alpine combined,
and she led after the downhill run
— a confident, calm ski in which
she covered the same course
32 hundredths of a second faster
than she did Wednesday — ahead,
this time, of Mowinckel. But she
will have to ski slalom, too, and in
that run, she will lose time —
particularly to Shiffrin, who was
1.98 seconds behind Vonn but with
just five skiers ahead of her. Vonn’s
last podium finish in a World Cup
combined was in 2015. Maybe she
has one more in her? Either way,
she will say goodbye to the
Olympics at the bottom of this
same hill.
But not doing any of this? That’s
not Vonn. The reason she has
ended up on her back and her
head and her side, skidding down
so many of these slopes around the
globe, is because not doing it is not
an option.
“I think my injuries made me
stronger,” she said. “I do because I
wouldn’t be the same person that I
am today. When you’re young, you
ski and you win and you don’t
appreciate things. I’ve been in the
fences so many times. I know so
many doctors on a first-name basis
that it’s ridiculous. So if you need
any medical care, just let me know.
I can hook you up.”
So her rehab from this injury or
that one, that became her life. It
might have been advisable to
travel to the grocery store in
bubble wrap. “I think she’s got a
really good ability to block out
pain,” said Chris Knight, her
primary coach with the U.S. Ski
Team. She has needed it because
even with a body that has been
reassembled with duct tape and
chewing gum, her brain has only
told her, ever, to attack, attack,
attack.
“Getting her here, for us,”
Knight said, “was half the battle.”
A dozen years ago, in the Italian
mountains near the French
border, Vonn hurtled herself down
a course in a training run for the
Olympic downhill at the Turin
Games. Her legs split like a fawn
trying to stand on a frozen pond.
She was airlifted by helicopter off
the mountain and spent the night
in the hospital.
Two days later, she raced in the
Olympics.
“She does not have a glass jaw,”
her father, Alan, told me in a
phone interview all those years
ago.
Now she has more armor
around not just her jaw but her
body, her mind, her heart. She isn’t
21 anymore. All this stuff hardens
you. “In ski-racing age,” she said,
“I’m over the hill.” And yet, while
Mikaela Shiffrin and her resilient,
responsive, 22-year-old body
surged ahead to become the next
American skiing icon, perhaps an
all-time great, Vonn could have
bailed. Instead, she went back to
work.
“Every single meal she’s eaten
for the last two years is to build up
to this moment,” said Karin
Kildow, one of her sisters. “Every
single gym workout . . . . Every
single thing she’s done every day
for the last eight years has been for
this day and those two minutes.”
On Wednesday, she shared
favorite status with Goggia, an
endearing Italian who is the latest
match-race opponent for Vonn in
World Cup speed events. Goggia
skied fifth and took the lead. Vonn
went seventh and couldn’t catch
her. And so the American never
led. Gold was never a question.
“It was just a touch tentative in
the middle section,” Knight said.
That’s not, though, what
Lindsey Vonn will take from these
Olympics, not in two years or 20.
What she will take is that she was
here, that she joined Bode Miller
and Julia Mancuso as the only
three-time Alpine medalists in U.S.
history. Miller and Mancuso are in
South Korea, but they’re retired.
Vonn, she still raced. After all this
time and all those travails, that
maybe mattered most.
“I’ve been through the hard
times,” Vonn said. “ . . . That makes
me a stronger person. I wouldn’t
change it. I would like to have a
little less pain. But otherwise, I
wouldn’t change it.”
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
In stunner, duo wins gold for first cross-country medal in U.S. women’s history
CROSS-COUNTRY FROM D1
Diggins could not feel her legs,
numb from the frenzied, indelible
sprint she had just completed.
Randall screamed, ran to Diggins
and tackled her.
“Oh my gosh!” Diggins cried.
“Did we just win the Olympics?”
“Yeaaahhh!” Randall shouted
back.
The thrilling gold medal triumph of Diggins and Randall —
an effervescent 26-year-old from
Afton, Minn., and a 35-year-old
mother from Anchorage — was
many things, depending on perspective. By late Wednesday
night, the participants were talking about the impact the race
might have on cross-country in
the United States and across the
world. It was an improbable victory and a career achievement. It
was a surpassing finish and a
historic moment. It was, in Randall’s words, “amazing validation.” It was, in the longest view, a
miracle.
Randall had won her first
Olympic medal at her fifth and
final Games, in her 18th event —
more than any other first-time
Winter Olympics medalist. Diggins and Randall had won the first
women’s cross-country medal in
U.S. history and the country’s first
cross-country medal for any gender in 42 years.
In 2002, Randall and Norway’s
Marit Bjoergen both debuted at
the Salt Lake City Olympics. On
Wednesday, Bjoergen won bronze
with partner Maiken Caspersen
Falla, which gave her the
14th medal of her career, the most
ever among Winter Olympians.
While Bjoergen was winning
14 medals, Randall was waiting
for one. Diggins had made it happen with her 100-meter sprint.
Randall had made it possible with
the previous 16 years.
“For the last 100 meters, I just
gave it everything that I have,”
Diggins said. “Because when you
have a teammate that you really
love and you care about waiting
for you at the finish, you’re never
going to give up.”
In 1998, Randall gave up her
dream of running in the Olympics, switched to cross-country
skiing and told herself she would
win a gold medal at the Olympics
in 10 years. The United States, for
practical purposes, did not have a
women’s cross-country program.
For several years, she was the only
woman on the team, so she would
travel around Europe with the
men’s team. In her first Word Cup
race, she finished dead last. At the
DIEGO AZUBEL/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Jessie Diggins, left, and Kikkan Randall edged Sweden to capture gold in the team sprint. Randall, competing in her fifth and final Olympics, earned her first career medal.
2002 Salt Lake City Games, Randall finished 44th in her only race.
“I don’t even know if we were
fielding a relay in the Olympics,”
Randall said. “We were excited if
we got a top 30. It just seemed
totally out of the realm of possibility.”
Year by year, it started to feel
possible. The sport’s governing
body introduced the faster-paced
sprint events, which suited her
strengths. More women gravitated to cross-country. Randall won
at the world championships in
2013. When Randall left Sochi
without a medal four years ago,
she felt disappointment.
Entering PyeongChang, Randall felt an almost cosmic presence. She had worn No. 5 when
she played soccer, and she believed her fifth Olympics would
deliver her medal.
Before Wednesday, though, it
had not been a good Olympics. In
her three previous events, she had
finished fifth, 16th and 40th.
Teammate Sadie Bjornsen had
skied faster. U.S. team officials
debated whom to pair with Diggins in the team sprint. U.S. Chief
of Sport Luke Bodensteiner, who
first watched Randall ski when
she was 14, believed the final
climb on the course would be
decisive. He trusted Randall most.
“Kikkan kind of started all
this,” Bodensteiner said.
At their hotel Wednesday afternoon, hewing to a pre-race ritual,
Diggins and Randall painted each
other’s faces with USA on one
cheek and red, white and blue
stars on the other. Diggins provides the glitter and sparkles, and
she draws the “S” on Randall’s
cheek in the shape of a lightning
bolt.
“Sparkles and glitter has always been this promise to myself,”
Diggins said. “I’m going to go out
there, and I’m going to lay it all
down.”
Randall and Diggins each
would ski three alternating laps.
Randall placed them in contention with her first lap. On her
second lap, Diggins pushed the
pace to separate the top three
teams. Randall’s final lap effectively clinched a medal — history
in itself. Diggins would determine
which color.
On the final downhill, Diggins
slowed and tucked behind Nilsson, so she could draft off her and
slingshot ahead of her up the last
small hill. Around the penultimate turn, shaped like an “S,” she
left Falla behind and engaged
with Nilsson.
In practice, coaches race
against Diggins for the final
100 yards of her laps, so she has to
match their fresh legs with her
dead ones. The drill annihilates
Diggins’s legs, but she does it for
moments such as this one.
“She’s so tenacious,” Bodensteiner said. “She’s got this extra
gear. When the chips are down,
she finds it. And she will not let
go.”
“As soon as they hit the lanes, I
was like, ‘There’s a gold medal
right there,’ ” U.S. men’s crosscountry skier Andy Newell said.
“No way would Jess let anyone
beat her to the line.”
“I could feel her behind me
when the last 100 meters came,”
Nilsson said. “Today, she’s stronger than me.”
When Diggins crossed, she and
Randall fought tears. They
stretched a giant American flag
behind their backs, beaming.
Randall found Bodensteiner, who
had watched her build the moment from nothing. “We just cried
together,” Bodensteiner said.
Late Wednesday, Randall and
Bjoergen sat next to one another
on the podium. Bjoergen might be
the greatest Winter Olympian
ever. Randall was a first-time
medalist. On this night, finally,
she was the best.
“I’m very happy for her,” said
Bjoergen, who turns 38 next
month. “We both were in Salt
Lake for the first time together.
We had the long career together.
She’s a mom, too. So it’s special to
see her standing with me.
“It’s very good for our sport,
too, that Jessie and Kikkan was
there today. It’s not good that it’s
only Sweden and Norway. I feel
that we need some more.”
Randall believes more are on
the way. She believes girls who
saw her and Diggins win will want
to try cross-country. Already, her
shepherding of other American
women into cross-country has
surfaced. On a cold night on the
other side of the world, Randall
stood at the finish line and saw
one coming at her, her skis churning, the lights glistening off icy
snow, like something out of a vivid
dream.
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/cars
EZ
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2018
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x1
Autos Wanted
DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S.
LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your
donation helps local families with
food, clothing, shelter, counseling.
Tax deductible. MVA License
#W1044. 410-636-0123 or
www.LutheranMissionSociety.org
WP 2x1
1447
CARS • TRUCKS • SUVS & MORE
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
1480
Trucks
CHEVY 2003 S10 Short Cab Pick Up,
Blue, 113,000 miles, good condition.
MD inspected. $4295/obo. Call 202246-9380
WP 2x1
AUTOMOTIVE
WP 2x1
In partnership with
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
homes for sale,
commercial real estate
rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
dogs, cats, birds, fish
washingtonpost.com/jobs
cars.com
washingtonpost.com/
realestate
apartments.com
washingtonpost.com/
merchandise
washingtonpost.com/pets
Over 700 Booths!
In 2 BUILDINGS!
An AMAZING Treasure Hunt!
SHOP FOR BARGAINS!
Dulles Expo, Chantilly,Va
4320 Chantilly Shop Ctr 20151
Sat 8:30-6…Sun 11-5
Park free…Adm $10
Online tickets avail @
www.thebigfleamarket.com
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—1 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
Appliances
Kirby Vacuum Cleaner/Shampooer—$195 Like New-Extra Bags &
Belts-Cost $1800 . 571-606-0319
Art
Mother/Child Art—$200 Large/small
paintings, sculpture, collectibles.
Bethesda, MD- 301-365-2986
Collectibles
COMIC CON Frederick Md.—Sun.
Feb. 25 10am-4pm Frederick Clarion
Inn Event Center 5400 Holiday Dr
21703 Adm. $5, 12 & under Free
shoffpromotions.com
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—1 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
610
To place an ad, go to washingtonpostads.com
Dogs for Sale
German Shepherd Pups- AKC, Traditional saddle back black & tan. Shots
& checked for worms. Parents &
grandparents on site, so you know
what you are getting. Good quality
G.S. puppy from local breeder. We
are not a puppy mill and we do
not ship. $900. Call 804-691-6717
Golden Retriever—AKC Wormed first
shots $700, male/female, will be 8
wks old- ready now 443-404-6968
Maltese—$1200, Male and female,
8 weeks old, 240-502-6762
Old English Bulldog—$1200, 3M/4F,
8 wks old, 1st Shots, Full Bred
w/Papers & Pedigree, 240-513-5223
Rottweiler—1st pick female
Rottweiler puppy, 13 weeks,
$2000, AKC, European bloodline,
shots utd, Big head, large bones,
great personality. 571-268-1011
SHELTIE PUPPIES - AKC registered,
very small parents, 1 sable white
male available. Brown and blue eye
color. 14 wks. Call 540-560-5132
SHELTIE PUPPIES - AKC, tri and
sable females. Ready to go now.
Raised in home. Chambersburg, PA.
Call 717-816-5161
Shih-Poo(shih-tzu/poodle) pups8 weeks, M/F, non-shed and hypoallergenic, S/W, brindle, great family
pets, adorable $650 703-577-9469
Shihpoo Shihtzu & more—Puppies For
Sale. 304-904-6289, Cash, CC, Easy
Objets d'art—$200 Porcelain/glass. Finance, www.wvpuppy.com, 59
Boehm, Lladro, Steuben, Baccarat. East Rd, Martinsburg WV, exit 16E.
Bethesda, MD - 301-365-2986
SIBERIAN HUSKY PUPPIESSMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
Black&white, red&white, males &
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
females, AKC reg. 10 weeks old.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
540-877-1567 timreissig@yahoo.com
Will Come to you!
245
815
Electronics
AUDIOPHILE
SPEAKER
STANDS—150.00 $150, Reston, VA,
703-435-8506
AUDIOPHILE SPEAKER STANDS—
$125, Reston, VA, 703-435-8506
Therapy Lamp—32
NatureBright
Light and Ion Therapy Lamp $32,
Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
255
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
14'OEM STEEL WHEELS, VOLVO—
$80, Reston, VA, 703-435-8506
260
Furniture
Student Desk & Chair—$45 Metal
24x40 top with 2 drawers, v/good
cond. roller chair, 301-345-1693
265
Home & Garden
BRICKS—$249 New 10 Hole Bldg
Size, less or more if need (apprx
2000) .45 each 301-345-1693
Car Seats—33 Generic infantt or
Graco child car seat $44 (70 both)
Alexandria, VA 571431-1501
Nordic Track Exercise Skier—$195
Exc.Cond-Folds up easy to fit in
car. Cost $800 new. 571-606-0319
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
Wedgewood China—$100 /place setting. Full service, Gold Ascot.
Bethesda, MD - 301-365-2986
275
Merchandise Wanted
ELECTRONIC CLEANOUTS—1 RADIO
TUBES HI-FI AMPS PARTS MCINTOSH MOST CASH 410-740-5222
GOVT SURPLUS TUBES—1
JOINT
ARMY NAVY JAN PREMIUM PAID
410-740-5222 CASH 50's 60's 70's
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—1 I
drive to you, pay CASH, and haul
them away. Call 571-830-5871
Old Bottles Of Bourbon And Rye—50
Seeking full bottles of vintage
bourbon/rye. Alex 443-223-7669
OLD HI-FI ITEMS—1 COLLECTOR PAYS
MOST CASH PLEASE CALL THANK
YOU 410-740-5222 WANTED
Radio tubes—249 WANTED ham
radios huge speakers tube hifi amps2025279501, vcvdc@msn.com
291
Sporting Goods
& Services
FOLDING BIKE—$65 20" Silver Unis
folding bike in good shape, lv message, 301-345-1693
Marathon Waders—$73, Alexandria,
VA, 703-765-2554 Sports Waders
SZ 13 Exc Cond Orig Box
SCUBAGEAR Large—$249
Wetsuit,Fins,Gloves,Boots,Mask/Snrkl,
Wght belt/wghts 301-345-1693
360
Estate Sales
POTOMAC: 11005 Riverwood Dr.
Thu;Fri;Sat. 10 – 4 PM.
Furniture, china, kitchen, large
amount of most categories.
Fabulous costume, sterling and
gold jewelry. Known for fair
prices. .. For photos & details
www.janehellerestatesales.com
366
Real Estate Auctions
AUCTION!
Luxury Waterfront Villa
complete with Private Pier &
Nature Preserve – Ft. Washington,
MD; 1 ACRE – Opening
Bid - $350,000 – List
$1,000,000 – Gorgeous
5 Bdrm; 4.5 Bth;
www.PrimeAuctionSolutions.com
AUCTION March 16, 12 NOON;
OPEN HOUSE – SUN; Online &
On-Site Auction 703-889-8949
610
Dogs for Sale
Cane Corso—$800/OBO, Females,
6mos old, Vet Health Check, Tails
Docked, Dewormed, Up to date
shots Larnell Johnson, 202-207-7410
DOBERMAN PUPPIES - AKC, big
boned, family raised, great temperament, parents on premises. 8 weeks
old. some have Ears done. All colors
available. $500/$900. 240-674-2844
or 240-674-3994
ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPS- AKC, 4M,
2F, champ lines, 9 weeks, $2500,
Call 240-441-9069 or email:
pinewoodbulldogs@gmail.com
English Cream Retrievers—5 AKC reg.
8-week old females. Beautiful coloring and great bloodlines. Great temperament and personalities. They'll
make amazing family members.
$1600 Call or text Jonathan at 804839-3258
or
email
me
at
timberlandpuppies@gmail.com
Fox Red Labs—AKC. $900,
M & F, 7 wks. 540-223-0406
& 540-748-2256,
labsndoodles.net
French Bulldogs - 10 wks, 1 F,
3M, tan&white, brindle & white.
$2,500 each.
301-252-9213 or visit:
www.windsoroakfarm.com
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
815
815
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
GERMAN SHEPARD PUPS- AKC reg.
2 Females. Ready 2/18. Parents on
site. Vet check & microchip incl.
Call for info & pricing 703-953-8404
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
DONNA OLIVE WILLSON
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
DONNA OLIVE WELLINGTON
FAMILY LAW: 150986FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Donna Olive Willson to Donna Olive Wellington. The
petitioner is seeking a name change
because: From adoption name to
birth name.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 9th
day of March, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
February, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
ISABELLE ANNICK CIAMPI
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
ISABELLE ANNICK VERANE
FAMILY LAW: 151198FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Isabelle Annick
Ciampi to Isabelle Annick Verane.
The petitioner is seeking a name
change because: of divorce.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 9th
day of March, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
February, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
ANDREA JESUS ASCENCIO
BENAVIDES
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
ANDREA JESUS ASCENCIO
FAMILY LAW: 151115FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Andrea Jesus
Ascencio Benavides to Andrea
Jesus Ascencio. The petitioner is
seeking a name change because:
my name is too long.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 9th
day of March, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
February, 2018.
IN THE MATTER OF
NICHOLAS RAY HERNANDEZ
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
NICHOLAS RAY RAYMOND
FAMILY LAW: 151151FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Nicholas Ray
Hernandez to Nicholas Ray Raymond. The petitioner is seeking a
name change because: I would Like
to carry my mother's name.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 9th
day of March, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
February, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND
Kari L. OLSEN,
Plaintiff,
v.
Anne Adline FRANCOIS, et al.,
Defendants
Case No. 436773-V
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
A complaint was filed with the Circuit Court for Montgomery County,
Maryland on September 12, 2017,
alleging that a Deed of Trust dated
January 11, 2007 and recorded
among the Land Records of Montgomery County, Maryland in Liber
33683 beginning at Folio 209 is no
longer valid; and that a Deed of
Trust dated February 1, 2008 and
recorded among the Land Records
of Montgomery County, Maryland
in Liber 35762 beginning at Folio
131 is no longer valid; seeking to
quiet title to certain real property
commonly known as 5306 Danbury
Road, Bethesda, Maryland 20814
(the "Property"), and more particularly described as follows:
Lot numbered Four (4) in Block lettered "D" in the subdivision known as
"ALTA VISTA", as per plat thereof duly
recorded among the Land Records
of Montgomery County, Maryland in
Plat Book 87 at Plat No. 9185;
and seeking additional relief. This
Order of Publication is being granted to give notice to the following
Defendants of the pendency of this
lawsuit:
- Anne Francois;
- Dominique Bouley;
- John Ross; and
- All Persons Unknown, Claiming
Any Legal or Equitable Right,
Title, Estate, Lien, or Interest in
the Property Described in the Complaint Adverse to the Plaintiff's Title
or Any Cloud on the Plaintiff's Title
to the Property.
It is this 16th day of February, 2018,
ORDERED, that the Plaintiff cause a
copy of this Notice to be published
at least once a week for three
consecutive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation published
in Montgomery County, Maryland;
publication to be completed by The
Washington Post; that Defendants
Anne Francois, Dominique Bouley,
John Ross, and All Persons
Unknown, Claiming Any Legal or
Equitable Right, Title, Estate, Lien,
or Interest in the Property Described
in the Complaint Adverse to the
Plaintiff's Title or Any Cloud on the
Plaintiff's Title to the Property must
file a response to the Complaint on
or before May 4, 2018. Defendants
are warned that failure to file a
response within the time allowed
may result in a default judgment
or the granting of the relief sought.
ENTERED this 16th day of February,
2018.
Anne K. Albright
Circuit Court Judge
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
MARIAME SYLVIE AYOUNE DEMBA
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
MARIAME DEMBA PAM
FAMILY LAW: 151182FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Mariame Sylvie
Ayoune Demba to Mariame Demba
Pam. The petitioner is seeking a
name change because: her last
name "Ayoune" is associated with
war-criminal and puts her at risk for
being associated with name.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 9th
day of March, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
February, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Alexa
Waverly Bliss Mettler to Waverly
Bliss Kay Mettler. The petitioner is
seeking a name change because:
Mistake in changing name before
first birthday. Everyone calls her by
Waverly and we all agree it is right
for her.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 9th
day of March, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 22nd day of
February, 2018.
815
Legal Notices
IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE
DISTRICT COURT DIVISION
18 JT 110
NORTH CAROLINA
GUILFORD COUNTY
In Re:
Hodge, A Minor Child.
NOTICE OF SERVICE OF
PROCESS BY PUBLICATION
TO:The father of a female child born
on November 20, 2017, in High
Point, North Carolina, respondent.
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a petition
seeking termination of your
parental rights and obligations to
the above-named child conceived
on or about February 24-26, 2017,
at the Marriott Hotel in Alexandra,
Virginia, and born to LaNita Renee
Hodge, on November 20, 2017, in
High Point, Guilford County, North
Carolina, has been filed against you.
The child's father may be a tall
African-American man with salt and
pepper hair who met the child's
mother at a social mixer in the bar
at the Marriott Hotel in Alexandria,
Virginia.
You are required to file written
answer to the petition within forty
(40) days of February 15, 2018,
exclusive of that date. Upon failure
to do so, your parental rights, if
any, will be terminated at a hearing
in Juvenile Court, Guilford County
Courthouse, Greensboro, North Carolina, immediately following said
40-day answer period or as soon
thereafter as the matter can be
heard. You are entitled to attend
this hearing.
You are entitled to be represented
by counsel, court-appointed if you
are indigent, provided you request
counsel at or prior to said hearing.
This is a new case. Any attorney
appointed previously to represent
you will not represent you in this
proceeding unless ordered to do so
by the Court. You may call the
Assistant Clerk of Court, Juvenile
Division, in Guilford County at (336)
412-7555 for further information.
The date, time and place of hearing
of the petition will be mailed to you
following said 40-day answer period
or on your filing of an answer, if your
whereabouts are then known.
Michele G. Smith
Attorney for Petitioner
The Children’s Home Society of
North Carolina, Inc.
Post Office Box 989
Greensboro, North Carolina 27402
Telephone: (336) 379-1390
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Luminent Mortgage Trust 2007-2
Plaintiff
v.
Gloria Gaskins
Defendant
Case No. 2015 CA 001564 R(RP)
By Oral Ruling Granting Plaintiff’s
Motion for Service of Process by
Publication entered in the above
referenced case on January 17,
2018 the Plaintiff, by undersigned
counsel, hereby inform interested
parties as follows:
There now is pending before the
Superior Court of the District of
Columbia an action, case number
2015 CA 001564 R(RP), HSBC Bank
USA, National Association as
Trustee for Luminent Mortgage
Trust 2007-2 v. Gloria Gaskins,
seeking to affect title to the property now or formerly owned by Gloria
Gaskins located at 4217 Edson
Place NE, Washington, DC 20019.
A copy of the action is available
in the Civil Actions Clerk’s Office
of the Court. A written answer,
including any claims or defenses,
must be filed in the Civil Action’s
Clerk’s Office, Room 5000, Superior Court of the District of Columbia, 500 Indiana Avenue, NW,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before the fortieth (40th) day,
exclusive of Sundays and legal holidays, occurring after the day of
the first publication of this order;
otherwise the cause will be proceeded with as in cause of default.
Samuel I White PC
600 Rockville Pike, Suite 100
Rockville MD 20852
Attorney for Plaintiff
301-804-3400
Feb 15, 22, Mar 1, 2018 12164854
IN THE UNITED STATES
DISTRICT COURT FOR THE
DISTRICT OF MARYLAND
Case No. 8:18-cv-00059-PX
KCS LENDING LLC
Plaintiff,
v.
WENDELL GARRISON, et al.,
Defendants
NOTICE TO COMMUNITY FIRST BANK
AND ALL PERSONS UNKNOWN
CLAIMING ANY LEGAL OR EQUITABLE
RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR
INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY
KNOWN AS 6413 KILMER STREET,
CHEVERLY, MARYLAND 20785, THAT
IS ADVERSE TO KCS LENDING LLC'S
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY OF
COMPLAINT FILED AND SERVICE BY
PUBLICATION
The above-captioned action is one
to quiet title in connection with
certain residential real property
located at 6413 Kilmer Street, Cheverly, Maryland 20785 (the "Property"). The legal description of the
Property is as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SEVEN (7) IN BLOCK
LETTERED "E" IN A SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "CHEVERLY MANORS"
AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY IN PLAT
BOOK BB9, AT PLAT 75.
The Plaintiff in this action has sued
the Defendants to quiet title, seeking relief that the Property should
be titled in the name of Solar Plus
Energy, Inc., and that any tax or
judgment liens of Wendell Garrison
have not attached to the Property.
The latest date on which the Defendants may file a response to the
Plaintiff's Complaint filed in the
above-captioned action is March
11, 2018.
The failure by the Defendants to
file a response to the Plaintiff's
Complaint filed in the above-captioned action by the aforesaid date
may result in the entry of a judgment by default against the Defendants or the granting of the relief
sought by the Plaintiff in this action.
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
ALEXA WAVERLY BLISS METTLER
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
WAVERLY BLISS KAY METTLER
FAMILY LAW: 151230FL
Amanda Mettler
Petitioner
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
Home
delivery
is
convenient.
1-800-753-POST
In the Court of Common Pleas, Division of Domestic Relations, Lake
County, Ohio located at 25 North
Park Place, Painesville, Ohio 44077,
and pursuant to Civil Rule 4.4 Legal
Notice is hereby issued in the matter of Cecilia Calderon-Mayen v.
Otto Rene Mayen Cordova upon:
Otto Rene Mayen Cordova, whose
last known address was 11721
Emack Road, Beltsville, Maryland
20705, otherwise whose place of
residence is unknown and cannot
by reasonable diligence be ascertained, will take notice on the 26th
day of December, 2017, the plaintiff, Cecilia Calderon-Mayen filed a
Complaint for Divorce against him
in the Court of Common Pleas of
Lake County, Ohio, the same being
Case No. 17 DR 000742 in said
Court, praying therein for an
Absolute Divorce from the Defendant; orders regarding a division of
property, debts, distributive award
and spousal support consistent
with the evidence; for an order of
fees and costs consistent with the
evidence; and for such other and
further relief as the Court deems
equitable and necessary.
Said party is required to answer
with 28 days after last publication,
which shall be conspicuously published once a week for six (6) successive weeks pursuant to Civil Rule
and Local Rule. Service is complete
on the date of last publication.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
SF
815
Legal Notices
NOTICE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS
BY PUBLICATION
STATE OF MARYLAND,
COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY
In the Circuit Court for
Montgomery County, Maryland
Live Oak Banking Company .v.
AVRM, LLC, et al, Case No.438936V
To Dr. Tolulope K. Akinyemi:
Please take notice that a Complaint
seeking relief against you has been
filed in the above-entitled action.
The nature of the relief sought is as
follows:
Breach of Contract and seeks Monetary Damages
You are required to make defense
to such pleading no later than
March 26, 2018 and your failure
to do so may result in a judgment by
default or the granting of the relief
sought.
This , the 8th day of February, 2018
Shawn C. Whittaker,
Attorney for Plaintiff
Whittaker & Associates, PC
1010 Rockville Pike, Suite 607
Rockville, MD 20852
NOTICE TO OLIVIER JAVAUDIN
IN THE UNITED STATES
BANKRUPTCY COURT
FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF
VIRGINIA
ALEXANDRIA DIVISION
IN RE:
CASSANDRA L. JOHNSON
Debtor
Case No. 17-11893-BFK
JANET M. MEIBURGER, Trustee,
Plaintiff,
v.
Adv. Pro. No. 17-01117-BFK
OLIVIER JAVAUDIN
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ADVERSARY
PROCEEDING
Please take notice that a lawsuit
has been filed against you in the
bankruptcy case of Cassandra L.
Johnson, Case No. 17-11893. The
Complaint requests approval to sell
3908 Woodley Drive, Alexandria, VA
22309. A copy of the Complaint has
been mailed to you at 3908 Woodley
Drive, Alexandria, VA 22309. You
are required to submit a motion or
answer to the Complaint. If you fail
to respond to the Complaint, your
failure will be deemed to be your
consent to entry of a judgment by
the Bankruptcy Court and judgment
by default may be taken against
you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint. You may obtain a copy
of the Complaint and related documents from the Bankruptcy Court,
200 South Washington Street,
Alexandria, VA 22314 or by contacting the Trustee, Janet M. Meiburger,
The Meiburger Law Firm, P.C. (703)
556-9404, 1493 Chain Bridge Road,
Suite 201, McLean, Virginia 22101.
RE: ESTATE OF Martha Faltinsky
NOTICE is hereby given pursuant
to Virginia state law, that it is the
intention of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.
to pay over and deliver to Raymond
J. Faltinsky personal representative
of the Estate of Martha Faltinsky,
deceased, of California, said state
being the domicile of said decedent
at the time of his death, money
held at Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. to
which Martha Faltinsky, deceased,
was entitled, and which money is in
the possession of Wells Fargo Bank,
N.A., said money having a value
of more than Twenty-five Thousand
Dollars ($25,000.00), and such payment and delivery to be made after
a lapse of thirty (30) days from the
completion of due publication of
this notice, provided at the time
of such payment the undersigned
has no actual knowledge of the
appointment within this state of
a personal representative for such
decedent.
SUPERIOR COURT OF
THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 FEP 000021
November 21, 2017 - Date of Death
James A. Kaufman, whose address
is 7514 Arrowood Road, Bethesda,
MD 20814 was appointed personal representative of the estate of
Ralph Kaufman, deceased, by the
Orphan's Court for Prince George's
County, State of Maryland, on January 23, 2018. Service of process
may be made upon Stephen M.
Ballard, 2401 Pennsylvania Avenue,
NW, Suite H, Washington, DC 20037
whose designation as District of
Columbia agent has been filed with
the Register of Wills, DC.
The decedent owned the following
District of Columbia real property:
4200 Massachusetts Avenue, NW,
Unit B2-65, Washington, DC 20016
(Square 1601, Lot 2254). The decedent owned District of Columbia
personal property. Claims against
the decedent may be presented to
the undersigned and filed with the
Register of Wills for the District of
Columbia, Building A, 515 5th, NW,
3rd Floor, Washington DC 20001
within 6 months from the date of
first publication of this notice.
James A. Kaufman
Personal Representative
Anne Meister
Register of Wills
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 26
ANTONIA MELTON DAVIDSON
PRO SE
Jeanette Day Loser, whose address
is 61 Sylva Rd., Tappahannock, VA
22560 was appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Antonia
Melton Davidson who died on
November 5, 2017 without a Will
and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed With the
Register of Wills, D.C., Building A,
515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before August 8, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before August 8, 2018, or be forever
barred. Persons believed to be heirs
or legatees of the decedent who do
not receive a copy of this notice
by mail within 25 days of its first
publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Akua Hall, whose address is 14014
Vista Drive #21C, Laurel MD 20707
was appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Dolores C.
Hall who died on December 9, 2017
without a Will and will service without Court supervision. All unknown
heirs and heirs whose whereabouts
are unknown shall enter their
appearance in this proceeding.
Objections to such appointment
shall be filed With the Register of
Wills, D.C., Building A, 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor, Washington,
D.C. 20001, on or before August 8,
2018. Claims against the decedent
shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register
of Wills or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before August 8, 2018,
or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Akua Hall
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001176
SF
DIANA SOLOMON
Dawn Jackson, Esq.
1300 Caraway Ct Ste 100
Largo Maryland 20774
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Tamiko
Overton-Parks, whose
address is 56 Sheridan St. NE
Washington DC 20011 is appointed personal representative of the
estate of Diana Solomon, who died
on February 27, 2016 without a will
and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., Building A,
515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before August 15, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before August 15, 2018, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Tamiko Overton-Parks
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000057
JERRY A. MOORE, JR.
Gary Altman
11300 Rockville Pike, Suite 708
Rockville, MD 20852
Jerry A. Moore III, whose address is
1624 Manchester Lane NW, Washington, DC 20011, was appointed
personal representative of the
estate of Jerry A. Moore, Jr., who
died on December 19, 2017 with
a will and will serve without Court
supervision. All unknown heirs and
heirs whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or to the
probate of decedent's Will) shall
be filed with the Register of Wills,
D.C., 515 5th Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor, Washington DC
20001, on or before August 22,
2018. Claims against the decedent
shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register
of Wills or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before August 22,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Jerry A. Moore III
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
JAMES CURTIS YOUNG
Stephen J. Williams
9500 Arena Drive, Suite 280
Largo, MD 20774
Tracey M. Young, whose address
is 9804 Black Eagle Way, Upper
Marlboro, MD 20772, was appointed personal representative of the
estate of James Curtis Young, who
died on August 13, 2017 without
a will and will serve without Court
supervision. All unknown heirs and
heirs whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections
to such appointment shall be filed
with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515
5th Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
August 15, 2018. Claims against
the decedent shall be presented
to the undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills or filed
with the Register of Wills with a
copy to the undersigned, on or
before August 15, 2018, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
SF
LEGAL NOTICES
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
825
Bids & Proposals
Bids & Proposals
J. Fletcher Creamer & Son, Inc. is seeking Disadvantaged
and Minority Business firms to subcontract opportunities for
a proposal to the District of Columbia Water and Sewer
Authority for Low Service 66 Inch Steel Water main. Areas of
opportunity are: curb, sidewalk, asphalt milling and paving,
excavation, trucking, labor to supplement JFC crews, Welding, dewatering, chlorination, cathodic protection,material
supply and traffic control. Bids are due to the owner
4/4/2018. JFC will provide plans and specifications if needed
and assistance with bonds and procurement. Your quote
is requested by 3/23/2018. Award will be based on your
safety record, references, pricing and work history/work
load. Contact dkoger@jfcson.com or by calling (908)9865695 Dave Koger.
840
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Trustees Sale - DC
Pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage
Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart
B, and the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner,
I will conduct a COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1510 Queen Street NE,
Washington, DC in execution of a certain deed of trust by Blondell B.
Brockington dated February 21, 2007, in the original principal amount of
$412,500.00 recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, as
Instrument No. 2007023520, and the Assignment recorded in the Land
Records of the District of Columbia in favor of the Secretary of Housing
and Urban Development recorded on April 5, 2016 as Instrument Number
2016033187, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby
secured and at the request of the holder, the undersigned Foreclosure
Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction in the front of the
building housing the Superior Court for the District of Columbia located
at 500 Indiana Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20001 on March 1, 2018 at
9:00 A.M. (note this is an adjournment from the sale date of February 1,
2018), the property described in said deed of trust, located at the above
address, with improvements thereon and more particularly described as
follows: 1510 Queen Street NE, Washington, DC 20002, for which further
legal description is attached to the Deed of trust. This property is also
presently known for assessment and taxation purposes as Lot numbered
Two Forty-three in Square numbered Forty Seventy-six.
TERMS OF SALE: Neither the FORECLOSURE COMMISSIONER nor the
holder of the note secured by the deed of trust will deliver possession of
the property to the successful bidder. The purchaser at the sale will be
required to pay all closing costs. Real estate taxes, water/sewer fees and
other public charges will be prorated as of the date of sale. The risk of
loss or damage to the property passes to the purchaser immediately upon
the conclusion of the sale. Terms: A bidder's deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price in the form of certified funds payable to the Secretary
of Housing and Urban Development and must be present at the time of
sale. The balance of the purchase price will be due within 30 days at the
office of the Foreclosure Commissioner. Time is of the essence as to the
closing date and the payment of the purchase price. If payment of the
balance does not occur within thirty days of the sale date, the deposit will
be forfeited. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based
upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a
foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure
Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of
the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as
provided herein. Foreclosure Commissioner shall have no duty to obtain
possession for purchaser. The property and the improvements thereon
will be sold "AS IS" and without representation or warranties of any kind.
The sale is subject to all liens, encumbrances, conditions, easements and
restrictions, if any, superior to the mentioned deed of trust and lawfully
affecting the property. Sale is subject to post-sale confirmation that the
borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior
to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination
of whether the borrower(s) reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.
In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser's
sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the Purchaser's
deposit without interest. Additional terms to be announced at the sale.
HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant. Anderson Law,
Foreclosure Commissioner, 2492 N. Landing Rd, Ste 104, Virginia Beach,
VA 23456, 757-301-3636 Tel, 757-301-3640 Fax. Add to run February 8,
2018, February 15, 2018, February 22, 2018.
February 8, 15, 22, 2018
815
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
4709 JAY STREET NE
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on December 18, 2007, as
Instrument Number 2007156188, and in accordance Judgment
filed on February 7, 2018 in case 2016 CA 002318 R(RP) and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within
the office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335
WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC
20015-2034 on,
MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
4709 JAY STREET NE, WASHINGTON, DC 20019, LOT NUMBERED ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SIX (146) IN SQUARE NUMBERED FIFTY-ONE HUNDRED FIFTY (5150).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (6% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 34608
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12163783
815
Legal Notices
Legal Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001320
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000085
LORRAINE A. OERTEL
Paul R. Dean, Jr. Esq.
PO Box 371
Basye, VA 22810
ANDREW J. WILLIAMS
PRO SE
FERBRUARY 22, MARCH 1, 8, 15, 2018
815
Katharine Rogers
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Carla Burrell & Jasmine Burrell,
whose addresses are 613 Atlantic
St. SE Washington, DC 20032 and
609 Atlantic St. SE Washington, DC
20032, were appointed personal
representatives of the estate of
Andrew J. Williams, who died on
October 28th, 2017 without a will
and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
August 15, 2018. Claims against
the decedent shall be presented
to the undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills or filed
with the Register of Wills with a
copy to the undersigned, on or
before August 15, 2018, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Carla Burrell
Jasmine Burrell
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SF
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054E 2x2
850
NOTICE OF STANDARD PROBATE
Notice is hereby given that a petition has been filed in this Court
by Raymond Scott Ruegg standard
probate, including the appointment
of one or more personal representatives. Unless a responsive pleading in the form of a complaint or
an objection in accordance with
Superior Court Probate Division
Rule 407 is filed in this Court within
30 days from the date of first publication of this notice, the Court may
take the action hereinafter set
forth.
Admit to probate the will dated
Oct. 26, 2017 exhibited with the
petition, without the inclusion of
the two Codicils dated October 31,
2017, previously submitted, for the
reasons expressed in the memorandum attached to the petition.
Pamela M. Buskirk, Esq.
1775 Wiehle Ave., #400,
Reston, VA 20190
(703) 218-2113
PETITIONER
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Official Notices
ABC LICENSE: Mac St Hospitality
Group LLC trading as Souvlaki Bar
9 Catoctin Cir SW Unit A Leesburg
(Loudoun County) Virginia 201753831. The above establishment is
applying to the VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE
CONTROL (ABC) for a WINE AND
BEER ON AND OFF PREMISES
license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Christos S. Sarantis
Manager NOTE: Objections to the
issuance of this license must be
submitted to ABC no later than 30
days from the publishing date of the
first of two required newspaper
legal notices. Objections should be
registered at www.abc.virginia.gov
or 800-552-3200.
Donald Wheeler Young II.Pls contact
Charmain Sweat at 3013052089.
825
Bids & Proposals
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY
IFB7011099. OLD BRIDGE ROAD
SIDEWALK. Sealed Bids will be
received until 3:00 P.M., March 20,
2018. To become a registered Plan
Holder for this project access Prince
William County e-procurement
website at: www.pwcgov.org/bid .
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
12166729
Special Notices
Lynnwood B Andrews PhD is closing
her practice. To obtain your records
you must contact Dr. Andrews at
(802) 649-7073, before retrieving
them at 6270 Montrose Rd Rockville
MD between 1-4PM on 3/21/18. All
medical records will be destroyed
after 3/21/18.
TERRENCE VAN WYCK A/K/A
TERRENCE R. VAN WYCK
PRO SE
820
Wake up to
home delivery.
You, too, could have
home delivery.
830
Legal Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000116
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Katharine Rogers (AKA Katherine
Rodgers), whose address is 334
Willway Drive, Manakin Sabot, VA
23013, was appointed personal representative of the estate of Lorraine
A. Oertel, who died on September
13, 2017 with a will and will serve
without Court supervision.
All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
August 22, 2018. Claims against
the decedent shall be presented to
the undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before August
22, 2018, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not
receive a copy of this notice by mail
within 25 days of its first publication
shall so inform the Register of Wills,
including name, address and relationship.
1-800-753-POST
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
On or before March 27, 2018, any person may request a hearing on
Network Innovations' Application. If not filed electronically, an original
and fifteen (15) copies of the request for hearing shall be submitted to
the Clerk of the Commission at the address set forth below. Requests
shall include: (i) a precise statement of the interest of the filing party;
(ii) a statement of the specific action sought to the extent then known;
(iii) a statement of the legal basis for such action; and (iv) a precise
statement why a hearing should be conducted in the matter. Persons
filing a request for hearing shall serve a copy of their request upon
Network Innovations at the address set forth above.
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000073
1-800-753-POST
On or before March 27, 2018, any person desiring to comment
on Network Innovations' Application may do so by directing such
comments in writing to the Clerk of the Commission at the address
set forth below. Interested persons desiring to submit comments
electronically may do so by following the instructions found on the
Commission’s website: http://www.scc.virginia.gov/case. A hard copy
of the comments, whether submitted in writing or electronically, shall
be served on Network Innovations at the address_set forth.above.
825
Home delivery
is convenient.
Wake up to
home delivery.
Copies of the Application are available for public inspection between
the hours of 8:15a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding
holidays, in the Commission’s Document Control Center located on
the first floor of the Tyler Building, 1300 East Main Street, Richmond,
Virginia 23219. Copies of the Application also may be downloaded
from the Commission’s website: http://www.scc.virginia.gov/case, or
may be ordered from Network Innovations: Matt W. Dean, Regulatory
Agent, Telecom Professionals, Inc., P.O. Box 720128, Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma 73172-0128.
All written communications to the Commission concerning Network
Innovations' Application shall be directed to Joel H. Peck, Clerk, State
Corporation Commission, c/o Document Control Center, P.O. Box
2118, Richmond, Virginia 23218-2118, and shall refer to Case No. PUR2017-00176.
Tracey M. Young
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Jeanette Day Loser
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
840
Official Notices
On December 21, 2017, Network Innovations Virginia, Inc. ("Network
Innovations" or "Company") filed an application with the State
Corporation Commission ("Commission ") for a certificate of public
convenience and necessity to provide local exchange telecommunications services throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia
("Application").
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
820
Official Notices
DOLORES C. HALL
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
FREE UNDER $250
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC OF AN APPLICATION BY NETWORK
INNOVATIONS VIRGINIA, INC., FOR A CERTIFICATE OF PUBLIC
CONVENIENCE AND NECESSITY TO PROVIDE LOCAL EXCHANGE
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICES IN THE COMMONWEALTH OF
VIRGINIA CASE NO. PUR-2017-00176
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
RALPH KAUFMAN
Name of Decedent
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT OF
FOREIGN PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE AND
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
1-800-753-POST
820
Legal Notices
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2018 ADM 000031
WP 2x1
Antiques
DC BIG FLEA &
ANTIQUE MARKET
MARCH 3-4
225
EZ
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
205
210
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2018
the local expert
on local jobs
For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
208
CLASSIFIED
D14
SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND
BENJAMIN P. SMITH, et. al.
Substitute Trustees
vs.
GLEN STERLING, LLC
Defendant(s)
Civil No. 440788-V
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO RULE 14-305 (C)
Pursuant to Rule 14-305(c), Notice
is hereby given this 12th day of
FEBRUARY, 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Montgomery County,
Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by
Benjamin P. Smith, one of the
trustees herein, will be ratified
and confirmed, unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 14th day of MARCH,
2018 provided a copy of ths Notice
be inserted in some newspaper
published in said County once in
each of three successive weeks
before the 14th day of MARCH,
2018.
The report states the amount of
sale to be $420,000.00. The property sold has the following street
address:
1731 Briggs Chaney Road
Silver Spring, MD 20905
File No. 121944.00106
/s/Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
440788V
Benjamin P. Smith, ESQ
Shulman, Rogers, Gandal, Pordy &
Ecker, P. A. - Sixth Floor
12505 Park Potomac Ave.
Potomac, MD 20854-6803
Feb 15, 22, 28, 2018
12165485
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2018
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
OPQRS
EZ
Trustees Sale - DC
PARDO & DRAZIN, LLC
Jason A. Pardo, Attorney
4400 Jenifer Street, NW, Suite 2
Washington, DC 20015
202-223-7900
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY
4626 Brooks Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20019
(Lot 887 in Square 5134)
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Purchase
Money Deed of Trust in the original principal amount of
$145,000.00 dated January 27, 2015 and recorded on January
30, 2015 as Instrument No. 2015008932 among the Land
Records of the District of Columbia from Rogue Construction,
LLC, as Grantor, to Lawrence Tucker of Tucker & Associates,
PLLC, as Trustee, for the benefit of F&N Enterprises, LLC as
Beneficiary (“Deed of Trust”), default having occurred in the
terms and conditions thereof, and following the mailing and
recordation in the Land Records of a Deed of Appointment of
Substitute Trustee appointing Farzad Ghassemi as Substitute
Trustee under the Deed of Trust (“Substitute Trustee”), an
Affidavit of Non-Residential Mortgage Foreclosure, and a Notice
of Foreclosure Sale of Real Property or Condominium Unit, at
the request of the current noteholder, the Substitute Trustee will
sell at public auction at the office of Harvey West Auctioneers,
Inc., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC
20015, on
February 27, 2018 at 2:45 PM
ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in the City of Washington, District of Columbia, known as 4626 Brooks Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20019
(Lot 0887 in Square 5134), and more fully described in the
Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an “AS IS” condition, with no
warranty of any kind, and subject to conditions, restrictions,
agreements, liens, and encumbrances of record affecting the
same – except those encumbrances of record that are released by
operation of District of Columbia law by virtue of the foreclosure
of the Deed of Trust.
Purchaser will take title to the property subject to all taxes, water
and sewer charges, and other utility charges, if any. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the
date of sale forward. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $15,000.00 by cash or by
cashier’s check will be required of the purchaser at the time and
place of sale. Purchaser shall settle within thirty (30) days of
sale. TIME SHALL BE OF THE ESSENCE WITH RESPECT TO
SETTLEMENT BY PURCHASER. Balance of the purchase price
to be paid in cash or certified funds at settlement. Interest to
be paid on the unpaid purchase money from the date of sale to
the date of settlement at the interest rate of 25% per annum as
set forth in the debt instrument secured by the Deed of Trust.
Purchaser shall be responsible for payment of all settlement
costs.
The noteholder and its affiliates, if a bidder, shall not be required
to post a deposit or to pay interest.
In the event that purchaser does not settle as required for any
reason, purchaser shall be in default. Upon such default, the
deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute Trustee and all of
the expenses of this sale (including attorneys’ fees and full
commission on the gross sale price) shall be charged against and
paid out of the forfeited deposit. Substitute Trustee may resell
the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser.
The defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus
proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property.
If the Substitute Trustee is unable to convey title as required
herein, the sole remedy of the purchaser in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon
refund of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute
Trustee.
The Substitute Trustee reserves the right, in his sole discretion,
to reject any and all bids, to withdraw the property from sale
at any time before or at the auction, to extend the time to
receive bids, to waive or modify the deposit requirement, to
waive or modify the requirement that interest be paid on the
unpaid purchase money, and/or to extend the period of time for
settlement.
Additional terms may be announced at the sale. The successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute
Trustee a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion
of bidding.
Farzad Ghassemi, Substitute Trustee
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
2549 ALABAMA AVENUE, SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20020
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on July 5, 2006, as Instrument
Number 2006088743, and in accordance Judgment filed on
November 6, 2017 in case 2017 CA 000959 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office of
HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue,
NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015-2034 on,
MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
2549 ALABAMA AVENUE, SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20020,
SQUARE 5730, LOT 0885 AND SQUARE 5730, LOT 0887.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (2.05%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 46743
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
FERBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH 1, 8, 2018
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING
KNOWN AS:
5304 4TH STREET
WASHINGTON, DC 20011
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on October 20, 2004, as
Instrument Number 2004146202, and in accordance Judgment
filed on December 18, 2017 in case 2016 CA 005475 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within
the office of HARVEY WEST on AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335
WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC
20015-2034
MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
5304 4TH STREET, WASHINGTON, DC 20011, LOT 74, IN
SQUARE 3258
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (7% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 24763
SAMUEL I. WHITE, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12164275
FERBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH 1, 8, 2018
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
FEBRUARY 14, 16, 20, 22, 26, 2018
12158889
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
44 49TH STREET, SE, UNIT 101
WASHINGTON, DC 20019
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
Samuel I. White, P.C.
District
of
Columbia
recorded on March 15, 2007, as Instrument
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
Number 2007036707, and in accordance Judgment filed on
SUITE 100
January 23, 2018 in case 2016 CA 009177 R(RP) and at the
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 WISCONSIN
736 BRANDYWINE STREET, SE UNIT 103
AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC 20015-2034 on,
WASHINGTON, DC 20032
MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
the District of Columbia recorded on December 18, 2007, as more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Instrument Number 2007156112, and in accordance Judgment Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
filed on January 31, 2018 in case 2016 CA 002570 R(RP) Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within 44 49TH STREET, SE, UNIT 101, WASHINGTON, DC 20019,
the office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 LOT 2002 IN SQUARE 5331.
WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
20015-2034 on,
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condithe land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, matemore particularly described in the above referenced Deed of rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as: other laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
736 BRANDYWINE STREET, SE UNIT 103, WASHINGTON, DC to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
20032, LOT 117, IN SQUARE 6163
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
without either express or implied warranty or representation, any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a Section 42-1903.13.
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (6.875%
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
Section 42-1903.13.
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (6.75% ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause Trustee’s File No. 48773
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
FERBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH 1, 8, 2018
12164860
Trustee’s File No. 23583
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET. AL.,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
FERBRUARY 22, MARCH 1, 8, 15, 2018
12166728
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x1
LEGAL NOTICES
12163605
840
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE, SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
PUBLIC AUCTION SALE
SHARES OF CAPITAL STOCK
"MEMBERSHIP SHARES" OF
HARBOUR SQUARE OWNERS INC.
a cooperative housing corporation, entitling the owner
thereof to possession of a dwelling unit
KNOWN AS
560 N STREET, SW UNIT N113, WASHINGTON, DC 20024
SALE ON MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a certain
Security Agreement from Marian G. Gaynor, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the secured creditor, by
its undersigned attorney will sell at Public Auction AT THE
OFFICE OF HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., LOCATED AT
5335 WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, Suite 440, WASHINGTON,
DC 20015.
All the membership shares described in said Security Agreement
being HARBOUR SQUARE OWNERS INC. shares of Capital
Stock of the HARBOUR SQUARE OWNERS INC., allocated
to 560 N Street, SW Unit N113, Washington, DC 20024,
together with all rights, duties and obligations under the
terms of a certain Occupancy Agreement dated September 2,
2004 between Marian G. Gaynor and the HARBOUR SQUARE
OWNERS INC. Subject to the terms, provisions and conditions
contained in the Articles of Incorporation, By-Laws, Occupancy
Agreement, Co-Operative Ownership Contract and House Rules
of the HARBOUR SQUARE OWNERS INC.
The membership shares will be sold subject to their proportionate share of certain underlying purchase money mortgages, the
exact amount due thereon will be announced at time of sale and
subject to all conditions, liens restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same, and subject to any assessments including
assessments pursuant to D.C. Code Sections 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 5.875% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of settlement. Settlement within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. "[t]here will
be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the
event settlement is delayed for any reason" and that "[t]axes
. . . [and] Co-Op dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale." Adjustments on all taxes,
public charges and special or regular assessments will be made
as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If
applicable, Co-Op dues and assessments that may become due
after the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
DANIEL J. PESACHOWITZ, ESQUIRE
Attorney
FERBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH 1, 8, 2018
12163276
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
5010 SEDGWICK STREET, NW
WASHINGTON, DC 20016
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on March 5, 1996, as Instrument
Number 9600013394, and in accordance Judgment filed on
October 19, 2017 in case 2016 CA 008732 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office
of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 WISCONSIN
AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC 20015-2034 on,
MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
5010 SEDGWICK STREET, NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20016,
LOT NUMBERED TWO (2) IN SQUARE NUMBERED FOURTEEN
HUNDRED SEVENTY-ONE (1471)
Sale Subject to 1st Lien Deed of Trust:
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (3.5% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 45459
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
1527 42ND STREET, SE
WASHINGTON, DC 20020
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on September 28, 2007, as
Instrument Number 2007126651, and in accordance Judgment
filed on October 21, 2016 in case 2015 CA 000176 R(RP)
and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within
the office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335
WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC
20015-2034 on
MARCH 27, 2018 at 3:00 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
1527 42ND STREET, SE, WASHINGTON, DC 20020, LOT
NUMBERED TWELVE (12), IN SQUARE NUMBERED FIFTY
THREE HUNDRED SEVENTY (5370).
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (2% per
annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from FEBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH 1, 8, 2018
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 24160
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12159731
ARE YOUR
TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x3
FEBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH 1, 8, 2018
12164202
850
Montgomery County
850
D15
Montgomery County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
25 ETHELWOOD CT.
OLNEY, MD 20832
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Patricia L.
Caplan dated June 14, 2007 and recorded in Liber 34525, folio 86 among
the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at
the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court House Door, 50
Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
MARCH 7, 2018 AT 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #08-01789568.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $67,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 56551.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 15, Feb 22 & Mar 1
12164136
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
407 CHRISTOPHER AVE., UNIT #32
GAITHERSBURG, MD 20879
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Sally
Dorsey dated May 10, 2013 and recorded in Liber 47000, folio 293 among
the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at
the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court House Door, 50
Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
MARCH 7, 2018 AT 11:14 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and
described as Unit No. Fifty-four (54) in a horizontal property regime known
as "The Hyde Park Condominium, Phase I" and more fully described in the
aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-01686102.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69473.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 15, Feb 22 & Mar 1
12164133
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
14416 MARINE DR.
SILVER SPRING, MD 20905
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Javier A.
Zaldua and Krissanne L. Zaldua dated October 27, 2006 and recorded in
Liber 33599, folio 745 among the Land Records of Montgomery County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County,
at the Court House Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
MARCH 7, 2018 AT 11:13 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-00323631.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $47,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69424.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 15, Feb 22 & Mar 1
12164132
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2 MINERAL SPRINGS CT.
GAITHERSBURG, MD 20878
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Mitchell
Vanderhall a/k/a Basil Abdulkhabir and Lashell Vanderhall dated February
7, 1994 and recorded in Liber 12347, folio 211 among the Land Records
of Montgomery County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court
for Montgomery County, at the Court House Door, 50 Maryland Ave.,
Rockville, MD 20850, on
MARCH 14, 2018 AT 11:20 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-01775788.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 14334.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 22, Mar 1 & Mar 8
12165300
D16
850
Montgomery County
OPQRS
850
Montgomery County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13204 GLEN MILL RD.
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Katherine
Tiong dated March 17, 2006 and recorded in Liber 32046, folio 15 among
the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at
the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court House Door, 50
Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
MARCH 7, 2018 AT 11:11 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #04-00046582.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $100,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69170.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 15, Feb 22 & Mar 1
12164130
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
5909 GRIFFITH RD.
GAITHERSBURG, MD 20882
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Marie
Claire Okala Abe a/k/a Marie-Claire Okala Abe and Ayuk George Ojong
dated November 17, 2006 and recorded in Liber 33417, folio 522 among
the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at
the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court House Door, 50
Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
MARCH 7, 2018 AT 11:12 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-02798502.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $100,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 56540.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 15, Feb 22 & Mar 1
12164131
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9235 Hummingbird Terrace
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
MICHAEL J. TRILLING AND EDITH B. LAZENBY, dated July
8, 2009 and recorded in Liber 37660, folio 479 among
the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as
Case No.405255V; Tax ID No.09-01473753 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
FEBRUARY 26, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $24,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 558464)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. COHEN,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 8, 15, 22, 2018
12164026
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13012 Tamarack Road
Silver Spring, MD 20904
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
BLANCA E. JOYA HERNANDEZ AKA BLANCA JOYA AND ROSA
D. JOYA AND RAMON C. OLIVARES, dated July 12, 2016
and recorded in Liber 52526, folio 464 AND RE-RECORDED
IN LIBER 52603, FOLIO 472 among the Land Records
of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.438250V;
Tax ID No.05-00329810 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850,
on
FEBRUARY 26, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $36,200.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 579708)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
850
850
Montgomery County
EZ
852
Montgomery County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
12812 TAMARACK RD.
SILVER SPRING, MD 20904
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Mathunni
Mathai, Arun S. Mathai and Kunjamma Mathai dated November 28,
2005 and recorded in Liber 31426, folio 117 among the Land Records
of Montgomery County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court
for Montgomery County, at the Court House Door, 50 Maryland Ave.,
Rockville, MD 20850, on
FEBRUARY 28, 2018 AT 11:20 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-00338563.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $46,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 69317.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 8, Feb 15 & Feb 22
12159388
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
You, too, could have
home delivery.
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH 1, 2018
12159736
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x2
1-800-753-POST
SF
703 449-5800
Feb 8, 15, 22, 2018
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
DANIEL J. ZEALBERG
ESTATE OF MARIE ANN ZEALBERG
ELIZABETH PAYNE,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-18682
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 1st day
of February 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 1410 Airport
Lane, Accokeek, MD 20607, will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 1st day
of March, 2018, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
1st day of March, 2018.
Home delivery
is convenient.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$98,253.55.
1-800-753-POST
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
SF
852
Anne Arundel County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8158 Mallard Shore Drive
Laurel, MD 20724
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to 1ST SIGNATURE SETTLEMENT SERVICES,
Trustee(s), dated March 27, 2006, and recorded among the
Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
17662, folio 134, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8
CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
MARCH 12, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in BALTIMORE COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT 126, IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT 10 OF 11,
RUSSETT, PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, PHASE II, PARCEL
7, PART OF RUSSETT, P.U.D. FUTURE DEVELOPMENT OF
PARCEL A", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 157, AT PLAT 32, AS PLAT NO. 8405
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 2% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (37130)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Feb 8, 15, 22, 2018
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
869 Chestnut Tree Drive
Annapolis, MD 21409
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated October
19, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 19999, folio 659, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401 ON,
MARCH 12, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 1, BLOCK VVV, PLAT 7, AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT
ENTITLED "CAPE ST. CLAIR", WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY IN
PLAT BOOK 22 FOLIO 2.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 6.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (4073)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Thomas W. Hodge, et al.
Substitute Trustees
MARYLAND
12163761
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2018
Anne Arundel County
GREENSPOONMARDER, P.A.
1125 West Street, Suite 265
Annapolis, MD 21401
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1904 WAYLENE DRIVE
HANOVER, MD 21076
March 12, 2018 AT 10:00 AM
By virtue of a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
William H. Roberts and Patricia F. Roberts, dated November
6, 2006, and recorded in the Land Records of Anne Arundel
County, Maryland, at Liber 18487, Folio 572, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustee will
sell at public auction, at the front of the Anne Arundel County
courthouse located at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401.
All that FEE SIMPLE lot of ground and the improvements
thereon, situated in Anne Arundel County and being more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBER 6-R, AS
SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED, “DIVISION LINE BETWEEN
LOTS 6 AND 7 CHANGED TO ACCOMODATE EXISTING TOPOGRAPH”, PREPARED BY ANAREX, INC., AND RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
IN LIBER 4288, FOLIO 86. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
BEING KNOWN AS 1904 WAY LENE DR., HANOVER, MD 21076
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the loan
and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered into by
the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale is void
and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without interest.
Purchaser must obtain possession and assumes risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of the auction forward.
The property will be sold in an “as is” condition, without express
or implied warranty as to the nature and description of the
improvements as contained herein, and subject to conditions
restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, but
omitting any covenant or restriction based on race, color,
religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, if any,
and with no warranty of any kind.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $31,000.00 by cash, certified
check or cashier’s check will be required of the purchaser, if
other than the note holder, at time and place of sale, balance
in immediately available funds upon final ratification of sale by
the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, Maryland, interest
to be paid at the rate of 5.875% on unpaid purchase money
from date of sale to date of settlement. The secured party
herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a deposit. Third
party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will be required to
complete full settlement of the purchase of the property within
TWENTY (20) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification of the sale
by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser’s deposit shall be
forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense
of the defaulting purchaser. All other public charges and private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground
rent, taxes, if any, to be adjusted to date of sale. Cost of
all documentary stamps and transfer taxes and all other costs
incident to the settlement shall be borne by the purchaser. If
applicable, condominium and/or homeowner association dues
and assessments due pursuant to Md. Real Property Article
11-110 and those that may become due after the time of
sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Purchaser must
obtain possession and assumes the risk of loss or damage to
the property from the date of sale forward. If the sale is
rescinded or not ratified for any reason, including post sale
lender audit, or the Substitute Trustee is unable to convey good
and marketable title, or a resale is to take place for any reason,
the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to a
refund of the aforementioned deposit. The purchaser waives all
rights and claims against the Substitute Trustee whether known
or unknown. These provisions shall survive settlement. Upon
refund of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect,
and the purchaser shall have no further claim against Substitute
Trustee. The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of
the loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without
www.hwestauctions.com
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, may be
announced at the time and date of sale. (File #44210.004 / 02- A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
FEBRUARY 22, MARCH 1, 8, 2018
12164480
CV-17-002386)
Erin M. Shaffer,
Substitute Trustee
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1113 Kingwood Drive
Takoma Park, MD 20912
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to CARRIE WARD, Trustee(s), dated March 13,
2014, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 48506, folio 496, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
MARCH 5, 2018 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED SEVEN (7), IN BLOCK NUMBERED SIX (6) IN
THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION ONE, GREEN HILL
FARMS" AS PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK BB 7 AT PLAT NO. 100 [POSITION] THE PROPERTY
IS SUBJECT TO A PRIOR MORTGAGE. IF AVAILABLE THE
AMOUNT WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT THE TIME OF THE SALE
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
www.hwestauctions.com
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
FEBRUARY 8, 15, 22, 2018
12164025 liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
www.hwestauctions.com
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA FEBRUARY 22, MARCH 1, 8, 2018
12165128
SUITE 100
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
851
851
Prince
Georges
County
Prince
Georges
County
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
KNOWN AS
E. Clarke
James E. Clarke
of the purchase price with interest at 7.5% per annum from James
Renee Dyson
Renee Dyson
864 College Parkway, Unit 101
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within Hugh J. Green
Hugh J. Green
Menapace
Shannon Menapace
Rockville, MD 20850
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments Shannon
Christine M. Drexel
Christine M. Drexel
Thomas
Brian Thomas
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments Brian
Substitute Trustees
Substitute Trustees
will
be
made
as
of
the
date
of
sale
and
thereafter
assumed
Deed of Trust to DENNIS F. HARDIMAN, Trustee(s), dated
Plaintiffs
Plaintiffs
December 20, 2012, and recorded among the Land Records by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner v.
v.
of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 45986, folio association dues and assessments that may become due after Manu M. Kamara
Monique N. Fox
Defendant(s)
209, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-14750
Civil No. CAEF17-27843
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
NOTICE PURSUANT
NOTICE PURSUANT
taxes,
title
insurance,
and
all
other
costs
incident
to
settlement
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the Prince George's County, Maryland, Prince George's County, Maryland,
1st day of February 2018, that
this 1st day of February 2018, that
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting this
the foreclosure sale of the properthe foreclosure sale of the properdescribed in the deed of trust
ty described in the deed of trust
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class ty
herein and located at
docketed herein and located at
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by docketed
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
6968 Mayfair Terrace, Laurel, Mary12177 Dove Circle, Laurel, Marysaid Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any land 20707, made and reported land 20708, made and reported
MARCH 5, 2018 at 1:30 PM
James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a by
Hugh J. Green, Shannon MenaHugh J. Green, Shannon MenaALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If pace, Christine M. Drexel, and pace, Christine M. Drexel, and
Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
Brian Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to Brian
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
as follows:
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the unless cause to the contrary be unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 1st day
shown on or before the 1st day
purchaser's
only
remedy
is
return
of
the
deposit.
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
of March, 2018, provided a copy
of March, 2018, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
of this Order be inserted in The
RECORDED FEBRUARY 1, 2013 IN LIBER 45986, FOLIO Trustee's File No. (56703)
Washington Post once in each of
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
three (3) successive weeks before
209.
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
the 1st day of March, 2018.
the 1st day of March, 2018.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
The Report of Sale states the
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $229,731.00.
amount of the sale at $171,000.00.
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Sydney J. Harrison #619
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiPrince George's County, Maryland
Prince George's County, Maryland
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateFeb. 8, 15, 22, 2018
12163770
Feb. 8, 15, 22, 2018
12163769
rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
FOR
PRINCE
GEORGE'S
COUNTY
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
www.hwestauctions.com
MARYLAND
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, FEBRUARY 15, 22, MARCH
MARYLAND
1, 2018
12153826
James E. Clarke
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Renee Dyson
851
851
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
Prince Georges County
Prince Georges County Trustee(s)
Hugh J. Green
Plaintiff(s)
Shannon Menapace
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
Christine M. Drexel
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
vs.
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
Brian Thomas
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
MARY M MERTZENICH
Substitute Trustees
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
Defendant(s)
Plaintiffs
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Mortgagor(s)
Trustee(s)
v.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
Plaintiff(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-25298
Sharon Taylor
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
vs.
NOTICE
Defendant(s)
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance vs.
CONSTANCE L TROUTMAN
XAVIER JOHNSON
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 1st
Civil No. CAEF17-27808
of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from Defendant(s)
Defendant(s)
day of February, 2018 by the Circuit
NOTICE PURSUANT
Mortgagor(s)
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within Mortgagor(s)
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
GEORGE'S,
Maryland
and
by
the
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-15628
CIVIL NO: CAEF14-15466
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
authority thereof, that the sale
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
NOTICE
NOTICE
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
Prince George's County, Maryland,
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R.
this 1st day of February 2018, that
IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 1st
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 1st
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed NOTICE
Kip
Stone,
Trustees,
of
the
Real
the
foreclosure sale of the properday of February, 2018 by the Circuit
day of February, 2018 by the Circuit
Property
designated
as
6408
Solar
ty
described in the deed of trust
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE Avenue, Bowie, MD 20720, and docketed
herein and located at
Maryland and by the
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
association dues and assessments that may become due after GEORGE'S,
reported
in
the
above
entitled
4703
Medora Drive, Suitland, Maryauthority thereof, that the sale
authority thereof, that the sale
will be finally ratified and
land 20746, made and reported
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. made by Kristine D. Brown, William made by Kristine D. Brown, William cause,
confirmed,
unless
cause
to
the
by
James
E.
Clarke, Renee Dyson,
Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R.
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto,
contrary thereof be shown on or
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer M.
Hugh J. Green, Shannon MenaKip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner, Philip
Trustees, of the Real Property desthe 1st day of March, 2018
pace, Christine M. Drexel, and
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement S. Shriver, Trustees, of the Real ignated as 4806 71ST AVENUE, before
next;
provided
a
copy
of
this
Order
Brian
Thomas,
Substitute Trustees,
designated as 15734 Piller
Hyattsville, MD 20784, and reportbe inserted in THE WASHINGTON
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for Property
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
Lane, Bowie, MD 20716, and reported in the above entitled cause, will
1150 15th Street, Washingunless cause to the contrary be
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the ed in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, POST,
ton,
DC,
MD
in
said
COUNTY
OF
shown
on
or
before the 1st day
finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary therePRINCE GEORGE'S once a week for
of March, 2018, provided a copy
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting be
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 1st
three successive weeks before the
of this Order be inserted in The
be shown on or before the 1st
day of March, 2018 next; provided
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class of
1st
day
of
March,
2018.
Washington
Post
once in each of
day of March, 2018 next; provided
of this Order be inserted
three (3) successive weeks before
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by a copy of this Order be inserted ain copy
THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
The report states the amount of
the 1st day of March, 2018.
THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
the sale to be $263,000.00.
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any in
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
The Report of Sale states the
BY THE COURT:
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week for three
amount of the sale at $182,400.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
once a week for three
successive weeks before the 1st
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If GEORGE'S
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Sydney J. Harrison #619
successive weeks before the 1st
day of March, 2018.
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to day of March, 2018.
The report states the amount of
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
Prince George's County, Maryland
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the The report states the amount of the sale to be $211,982.37.
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Feb. 8, 15, 22, 2018
12163766
the sale to be $174,800.00.
Manassas, Virginia 20109
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
BY THE COURT:
703 449-5800
852
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Anne Arundel County
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Trustee's File No. (54906)
Feb 8, 15, 22, 2018
12163762
Clerk of the Circuit Court
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Feb 8, 15, 22, 2018
12163759
852
12163765
Versus
Kathleen S. Jackson
Defendant
No. C-02-CV-17-002473
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Friday,
February 9, 2018 that the sale of
the property in the proceedings
mentioned, made and reported by
Thomas W Hodge, Substitute
Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 12th
day of March 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 12th day of March 2018 next.
The report states that the amount
of sale of the property at 1251 River
Bay Road, Annapolis, MD 21409 to
be $270,000.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Feb 15, 22, 28,2018
12165497
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
FEBRUARY 22, MARCH 1, 8, 2018
12164479
COULD YOU USE
SOME EXTRA CASH?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054B 2x2
852
Anne Arundel County
852
OPQRS
EZ
Anne Arundel County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
521 Kent Road
Glen Burnie, MD 21060
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to ATI TITLE, Trustee(s), dated November 19,
2004, and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 15674, folio 0736, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401 ON,
MARCH 12, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NO. 20, BLOCK F, AS SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED,
"REVISIONS OF BLOCK F, SECTION I, GLEN GARDENS", AS
RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL
COUNTY, IN PLAT CABINET NO. 4, ROD NO. G-1, NOW IN PLAT
BOOK 22, FOLIO 30.
THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO AN ANNUAL GROUND RENT
OF $108.00 PAYABLE ON THE 2nd DAYS OF February AND
August OF EACH AND EVERY YEAR.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 9.83% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (57144)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
FEBRUARY 22, MARCH 1, 8, 2018
12164473
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1906 Cannon Ball Court
Odenton, MD 21113
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LESLIE J. KEIDEL, Trustee(s), dated January
5, 2009, and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 20708, folio 090, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401 ON,
MARCH 12, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED 126, IN THE SUBDIVISION ENTITLED, "P. U.
D. PLAT FIVE, PARCEL THREE, SEVEN OAKS", AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 118, PAGE 36, PLAT NO. 6210
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 2% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (57746)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7912 Stonehearth Road
Severn, MD 21144
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to OLD REPUBLIC TITLE COMPANY, Trustee(s),
dated March 8, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records
of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 25956, folio
0241, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH
CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
MARCH 12, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NO. 10, BLOCK "C", SECTION ONE, PLAT 2, THE
PROVINCES, RECORDED ON PLAT BOOK NO. 42, FOLIO 29.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 5.06% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (48657)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1601 Cambridge Road
Edgewater, MD 21037
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust, dated January 25, 2006, and recorded among the
Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
18372, folio 497, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8
CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
MARCH 12, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOTS NUMBERED 486, 487, 488 AND 493 IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "WOODLAND BEACH" AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 8, PLAT NO. 8.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 5.994% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (9067)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
1-800-753-POST
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Versus
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054E 2x2
852
856
Anne Arundel County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1641 Midland Road
Edgewater, MD 21037
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to EDWARD P. BARKER, WILLIAM J.
ZIEGLER AND WANDA H. WRIGHT, Trustee(s), dated September
21, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 19582, folio 0373,
the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH
CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
MARCH 12, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED OCTOBER 15, 2007 IN LIBER 19582, FOLIO
0373.
THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO A PRIOR MORTGAGE. IF
AVAILABLE THE AMOUNT WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT THE TIME
OF THE SALE
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 5.24% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (51028)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
FEBRUARY 22, MARCH 1, 8, 2018
12164471
Anne Arundel County
Frederick County
856
D17
Frederick County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
100 Featherstone Place
Frederick, MD 21702
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
GREGORY R. BLOSE AND KRISTINA J. BLOSE, dated August
25, 2009 and recorded in Liber 7371, folio 0180 AND
MODIFIED BY A LOAN MODIFICATION AGREEMENT RECORDED IN LIBER 10175, FOLIO 0114 among the Land Records of
FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-10-CV-17-000183;
Tax ID No.02-458152 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at
100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 26, 2018 at 11:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $25,800.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576983)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 22, MARCH 1, 8, 2018
12164272 A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
FEBRUARY 22, MARCH 1, 8, 2018
12164223
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
www.hwestauctions.com
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
www.hwestauctions.com
FEBRUARY 22, MARCH 1,8, 2018
12164058
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
FEBRUARY 8, 15, 22, 2018
12164018
856
856
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
Frederick County
Frederick County
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
KNOWN AS
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Laurel, Maryland 20707
Bethesda, MD 20814
449 Colonial Ridge Lane
www.mwc-law.com
(301) 907-8000
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
Arnold, MD 21012
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
2257 WETHERBURNE WAY
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
SUITE 100
FREDERICK, MD 21702
Deed of Trust to MICHAEL LYON, Trustee(s), dated May 5, 2014,
9215 BALTIMORE NATIONAL PIKE
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Jacqueline
and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL
MIDDLETOWN, MD 21769
R. Bryant, dated May 7, 2004 and recorded in Liber 4636, folio 21 among
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 27298, folio 237, the holder
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Kevin
the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having occurred under
D. Hartley and Oneida L. Hartley dated March 1, 2006 and recorded in
the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
Liber 5911, folio 24 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD,
undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick
KNOWN AS
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
7794 Fox Court
FEBRUARY 28, 2018 AT 1:09 PM
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
MARCH 14, 2018 AT 1:09 PM
Pasadena,
MD
21122
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #16-352063.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD Deed of Trust to DAVID E. WATERS AND ANTHONY B. OLMERT, described
property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
SR. , Trustee(s), dated May 29, 2015, and recorded among the The
21401 ON,
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
kind.
Land
Records
of
ANNE
ARUNDEL
COUNTY,
MARYLAND
in
Liber
MARCH 12, 2018 at 10:00 AM
Terms
of
Sale:
A
deposit
of
$62,000
by
cash
or
certified
check.
Balance
28447, folio 427, the holder of the indebtedness secured by of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in
such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County. Interest
sole discretion, for $17,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
the
Deed
of
Trust
Note
from
the
date
of
sale
to
the
date
funds
are
Balance
of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
described as follows:
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement the final ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned of
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
RECORDED MAY 22, 2014 AND RECORDED IN LIBER 27298, Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE of
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
FOLIO 237.
THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 FOR
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
MARCH 12, 2018 at 10:00 AM
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be ground
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
borne
by
the
purchaser.
Purchaser
shall
be
responsible
for
obtaining
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condi- thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mate- described as follows:
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
be announced at the time of sale.
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or LOT #28-A AS SHOWN ON PLAT ENTITLED "SECTION ONE - Ifpurchaser's
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
QUEENS
PARK
SUBDIVISION"
RECORDED
AMONG
THE
PLAT
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK NO. 44, the
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
FOLIO
22.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition this
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA without either express or implied warranty or representation, deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the property.
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #15-618138).
and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a risk
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, reselling
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser 908
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- and
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
Feb 8, Feb 15 & Feb 22
12163352
of the purchase price with interest at 5.25% per annum from chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
Trustees' file number 59575.
laws,
ordinances
or
regulations,
or
other
similar
matters,
and
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Diane
S.
Rosenberg,
Mark
D.
Meyer,
et
al.,
Substitute
Trustees
Laurel, Maryland 20707
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
www.mwc-law.com
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
record
affecting
same
including
any
condominium
and
of
HOA
Feb
22,
Mar
1
&
Mar
8
12165299
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
5503 TRACEY BRUCE CT.
ADAMSTOWN, MD 21710
association dues and assessments that may become due after assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Natalia
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
Martin a/k/a Natalia Martin Sampson and Kristopher G. Sampson, dated
March 14, 2007 and recorded in Liber 6503, folio 308 among the Land
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
Records of Frederick County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned
312
Marshall
Avenue,
Suite
800
Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for of the purchase price with interest at 3.5% per annum from
Laurel, Maryland 20707
Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St.,
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
www.mwc-law.com
Frederick, MD 21701, on
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
MARCH 7, 2018 AT 1:00 PM
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
10737 CHURCH HILL RD.
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
MYERSVILLE, MD 21773
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Keith Lyle The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a association dues and assessments that may become due after Roberson and Julie Lynn Roberson, dated June 21, 2007 and recorded in conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
6645, folio 573 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD,
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Liber
default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the
kind.
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement for
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
sole discretion, for $48,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
MARCH 14, 2018 AT 1:15 PM
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
Trustee's File No. (53800)
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting THEREON
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to of 6.625% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of in
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
record
affecting
the
subject
property,
if
any,
and
with
no
warranty
of
any
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any kind.
forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or be
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their the
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
discretion, for $32,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to sole
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of charges,
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
www.hwestauctions.com
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
of 5.625% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
Trustee's File No. (42081)
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
FEBRUARY 22, MARCH 1, 8, 2018
12164273
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
852
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
Ask me about home delivery!
Anne Arundel County
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Diane S. Rosenberg, et al.
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
852
Eric Camacho
Defendant
No. C-02-CV-17-002759
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Friday,
February 9, 2018 that the sale of the
property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by Sydney Roberson, Substitute Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 12th
day of March 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 12th day of March 2018 next.
The report states that the amount
of sale of the property at 1728
Carriage Lamp Court, Severn, MD
21144 to be $220,000.00.
1-800-753-POST
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
Feb 15, 22, 28, 2018
SF
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
FEBRUARY 22, MARCH 1,8, 2018
12164060
COULD YOU USE
SOME EXTRA CASH?
CLASSIFIED
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
12165492
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054B 2x2
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #17-602783).
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 22, Mar 1 & Mar 8
12164981
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #15-615784).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 15, Feb 22 & Mar 1
12164447
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
WP 2x1
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2018
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x2
OPQRS
Frederick County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Kristyn
Alahouzos and John E. Alahouzos dated April 7, 2006 and recorded in
Liber 5974, folio 270 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court
House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
FEBRUARY 28, 2018 AT 1:22 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-318038.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65058.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12159386
Stern & Eisenberg Mid-Atlantic, P.C.
9920 Franklin Square Dr., Suite 100
Baltimore, MD 21236
410-635-5127
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1475 EDEN DR.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Marion
Lewis Abrecht, Jr. and Kathy Kelly Abrecht, dated March 9, 2007 and
recorded in Liber 6509, folio 187 among the Land Records of Frederick
County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick
County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701,
on
FEBRUARY 28, 2018 AT 1:15 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions,
restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with
no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County. TIME IS OF THE
ESSENCE. If the purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10)
days of ratification, the purchaser relinquishes their deposit and the Sub.
Trustees may file an appropriate motion with the court to resell the
property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the
Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued
by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper
or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided
by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the
purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon
the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office.
It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified
mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to
go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub. Trustees and
all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission
on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid
from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from
any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to
the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
at the rate of 6.875% per annum from the date of sale to the date
the funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. Taxes, ground
rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues,
all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including
sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted
for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the
purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer
taxes, (including agricultural transfer taxes, if applicable), documentary
stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be
responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes
the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post
sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered
into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to
the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by
the Sub. Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal
effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub. Trustees are
unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale
is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by
the Sub. Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be
limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest.
Steven K. Eisenberg, Paul J. Moran, Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Feb 8, Feb 15 & Feb 22
872
Fairfax County
872
Fairfax County
NOTICE OF TRUSTEES' SALE
OFFICE BUILDING AT
GREENBRIAR TOWN CENTER
13135 LEE JACKSON MEMORIAL HIGHWAY
FAIRFAX, VA 22033
5806 WHITEROSE WAY
NEW MARKET, MD 21774
Feb 8, Feb 15 & Feb 22
872
12159389
In execution of a Deed of Trust and Security Agreement and Assignment
of Rents and Fixture Filing (“Deed of Trust”) dated December 15, 2006 in
the original amount of $16,650,000.00, recorded in Book 18991 at Page
0691 in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court for Fairfax County, Virginia,
default having been made in the payment of the debt therein secured,
and being instructed to do so by the party secured by the Deed of Trust
(the “Noteholder”), the undersigned Substitute Trustees, any of whom
may act, will on March 13, 2018, at 10:00 a.m., by the front main entrance
to the Fairfax County Judicial Center, 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax,
Virginia 22030, offer for sale at public auction to the highest bidder the
following real property (“Property”) located in Fairfax, Virginia, as more
particularly described by metes and bounds descriptions in the Deed of
Trust.
LOT 2, Greenbriar Town Center
Address: 13135 Lee Jackson Memorial Highway
Parcel ID: 0451-01-00010-D
The address and Parcel ID provided are for convenience only. The legal
description in the Deed of Trust is the sole description that controls and
that will be used in the conveyance deed.
The personal property and non-real estate rights and interests to be
offered for sale by the Substitute Trustees consist of all forms of personal
property located upon or related to the Property and owned by the owner
of the Property, as more particularly described in the Deed of Trust,
excluding equipment or furnishings that may be leased. The Property
also includes all leases and other rights and interests as defined and
described in the Deed of Trust. No representations or warranties are
made as to the existence or condition of any such items, it being the
sole responsibility of the purchaser to make such determination. The
Substitute Trustees reserve the right to exclude certain personal property
from inclusion in the foreclosure sale of the Property. Such excluded
items will be announced at the time of the sale.
A deposit in the form of a cashier’s check of $800,000.00 will be required
of all bidders at the time of sale, except from a bidder on behalf of the
Noteholder or its subsidiary or affiliate. The Noteholder or any subsidiary
or affiliate thereof may apply the outstanding amount of the debt under
the Note as a credit to its bid.
The deposit, without interest, will be applied to the purchase price at
settlement. Settlement will be held on or before thirty (30) days after sale;
time being of the essence. Upon purchaser’s default, the deposit shall
be forfeited and the Property shall be resold at the risk and costs of the
defaulting purchaser. After any such default and forfeiture, the Property
and any and all personal property applicable thereto may, at the discretion
of the Substitute Trustees, be conveyed to the next highest bidder on the
Property whose bid was acceptable to the Substitute Trustees.
The Property and all personal property applicable thereto shall be sold
“AS IS” and “WITH ALL FAULTS.” Neither the Substitute Trustees nor the
Noteholder, nor their respective agents, successors, and assigns, make
any representations or warranties with respect to the Property including,
without limitation, representations or warranties as to the structural
integrity, physical condition, construction, workmanship, materials, habitability, compliance with applicable zoning regulations, fitness for a
particular purpose or merchantability of all or any part of the Property
or personal property applicable thereto. The purchaser recognizes and
agrees that any investigation, examination, or inspection of the Property
and personal property applicable thereto being sold is within the control
of the owner or other parties in possession and their agents and not within
the control of the Substitute Trustees, the Noteholder, or their successors
or assigns.
Conveyance of the Property shall be with special warranty and shall be
subject to all existing housing, building, zoning and other code violations,
if any, subject to all critical area and wetland violations, if any, subject
to all environmental problems and violations which may exist on or with
respect to the Property, if any, and shall be subject to all recorded and
unrecorded liens, encumbrances, security interests, easements, rights-ofway, covenants, agreements, conditions, restrictions, leases, occupancy
agreements and mechanics and materialmen’s liens, to the extent any of
the foregoing may lawfully apply to the Property being sold, or any part
thereof, and take priority over the liens and security interests of the Deed
of Trust. The Property also shall be sold subject to all leases of space
within the buildings on the Property.
Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the Property will be sold
without representation or warranty as to the environmental condition of
the Property or the compliance of the Property with federal, state, or local
laws and regulations concerning the purchase or disposal of hazardous
substances. Acceptance of the deed to the Property shall constitute a
waiver of any claims against the Substitute Trustees, the Noteholder,
and their respective agents, successors, and assigns, concerning the
environmental condition of the Property including, but not limited to,
claims arising under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, and/or state or local
law, ordinances or regulations. The purchaser shall be required to sign
a Memorandum of Sale (as herein defined) waiving any cause of action
it may have against the Substitute Trustees or the Noteholder, and
their respective agents, successors and assigns, for any condition of
the Property that may not comply with any federal, state or local law,
regulation or ruling including, without limitation, any laws, regulations
and rulings relating to environmental contamination or hazardous wastes.
Such agreement also shall provide that if, notwithstanding such agreement, a court of competent jurisdiction should permit such a claim to
be made against the Substitute Trustees and/or the Noteholder, or their
respective agents, successors and assigns, such agreement shall serve
as the overwhelming primary factor in any equitable apportionment of
response costs or other liability. Nothing in this paragraph shall release,
waive or preclude any claims the purchaser may have against any person
in possession or control of the Property.
Risk of loss or damage to the Property and personal property applicable
thereto shall be borne by the purchaser from and after the strike down
of the bid at the foreclosure sale. The purchaser shall pay all closing
costs, including the preparation of the Substitute Trustees deed and all
taxes and recording costs assessed thereon (including, but not limited
to, the grantor’s tax and the Congestion Relief Fee), settlement fees, title
examination charges and title insurance premiums. Real estate taxes
prorated to the date of the foreclosure will be paid by the Substitute
Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for all real estate taxes due on
the Property from and after the date of the sale. The Substitute Trustees
will not deliver possession of all or any part of the Property being sold.
The Substitute Trustees reserve the right to amend or supplement the
terms of sale by verbal announcements during the sale, to modify the
requirements for bidders’ deposits, to reject any and all bids, to withdraw
all or part of the Property from the sale prior to the commencement of
bidding, to postpone the sale, and to conduct such other sales as the
Substitute Trustees may determine in their discretion.
At the time of sale, the successful bidder shall be required to execute a
memorandum of sale (the “Memorandum of Sale”) which shall include, by
reference, all the terms and conditions contained herein.
The form of Memorandum of Sale is available from the Substitute Trustee
upon request and will be available at sale time.
Immediately upon delivery of the deed for the Property by the Substitute
Trustees, all duties, liabilities, and obligations of the Substitute Trustees, if
any, to the purchaser with respect to the Property shall be extinguished.
872
12165716
872
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
2577 Oak Tree Lane
Woodbridge, VA 22191
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $296,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.000000% dated
September 29, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the County of
Fairfax as Deed Book 17813, Page
0683, the undersigned appointed
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction all that
property located in the County of
Fairfax, on the courthouse steps
at the front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of Fairfax
located at 4110 Chain Bridge
Road, Fairfax, Virginia on March
21, 2018 at 2:30 PM, the property
with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 026-2-19-0306-A
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$323,200.00, dated February 23,
2007, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on March
2, 2007, as Instrument Number
200703020026851, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on March 30,
2018 at 9:30 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: Lot ThirtyNine (39), ''RIVER OAKS,'' Section
1, Phase 5, as the same appears
duly dedicated, platted and
recorded in Instrument Number
200506070091718
and
plat
recorded as Instrument Number
20050607091719 among the land
records of Prince William County,
Virginia. Tax ID: 8289-88-3251.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-267587.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 22, Mar 1, 2018
12165757
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
8315 CLAREMONT WOODS DR,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22309
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $240,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.625000% dated
October 25, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 17909,
Page 1466, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on March 28, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 101 3 27 0037
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-264562.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 22, Mar 1, 2018
12165728
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
12321 FOLKSTONE DRIVE,
OAK HILL, VA 20171
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $552,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 8.875000% dated
September 15, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 17760,
Page 1809, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on March 28, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0352 02 0052
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-250304.
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
12783 OAK FARMS DR.,
HERNDON, VA 20171
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
5511 BROADMOOR STREET,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22315
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $736,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.500000% dated
November 21, 2007, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 19674,
Page 1538, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on March 21, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 035-2-19-0002
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $399,920.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.500000% dated
May 15, 2007, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 19329, Page 2108,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on March 21, 2018
at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 1002-02-0292
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Membership is rewarding.
PostPoints takes you
to special exhibits.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-248011.
From dinosaur bones and
space shuttles to panda
bears and modern art,
discover great ways to
save money, win tickets
and have fun at museums.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 15, 22, 2018
12164841
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
S2931 2x5
FROM "NO
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-262955.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 22, Mar 1, 2018
12165758
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
Towne #: 5000.0899
SF
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
12164829
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3635 BROCKENBROUGH DRIVE,
DUMFRIES, VA 22026
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$73,641.00, with an annual interest rate of 4.500000% dated June
17, 2009, recorded among the
land records of the Circuit Court
for the COUNTY OF PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number
200906190059739, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the COUNTY OF PRINCE WILLIAM, on the Court House steps
in front of Main Entrance for the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on March 27, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 43828
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
18-272348.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 22, Mar 1, 2018
12165999
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
13144 KINNICUTT,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22192
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $378,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 5.500000% dated
February 23, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number 200502250029636,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on March 13, 2018 at 4:00
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 8392-28-7089
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-271651.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 15, 22, 2018
12164889
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
877
877
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $50,000.00, dated April 6, 2005
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of Spotsylvania
County, Virginia, in Document No.
200500013492, default having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, on March 20, 2018 at
12:00 PM the property described
in said deed, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
1.4913 acres, more or less as
shown on plat recorded in Deed
Book 445, Page 285, with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (30726)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Feb 22, March 1, 2018 12166369
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
437 LAUREL AVENUE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22408
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated March 28, 2011,
in the original principal amount
of $282,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. LR 201100005910
. The undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on March 22,
2018 , at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND, WITH ALL
RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES THERETO
APPURTENANT, LOCATED IN SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY VIRGINIA, AND
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS LOT 293 OF SECTION 5,
SPOTSWOOD ESTATES SUBDIVISION AS SHOWN ON PLAT OF SULLIVAN, DONAHUE AND INGALLS,
DATED MAY 12TH, 1983, REVISED
FEBRUARY 14TH, 1984 AND
RECORDED IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE
OF THE CIRCUIT OF SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, IN PLAT BOOK
15, PAGE 50.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3249921.
Feb 22, Mar 1, 2018
12166714
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3204091.
February 15, 22, 2018 12165445
878
Stafford County
TRUSTEE SALE
1585 Mountain View Road,
Stafford, VA 22554
Stafford County
604 Bailey Road,
Charlottesville, VA 22903
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $64,475.00, dated October 14,
1999 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
City of Charlottesville, Virginia, in
Document No. 005208, in Book No.
767, at Page 701, default having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Circuit Court, 315 East High Street,
Charlottesville, on March 21, 2018
at 3:15 PM the property described
in said deed, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
Lot 26L, Block D, Orangedale, with
improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (57004)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Feb 22, March 1, 2018 12166371
Career Training - Emp Svcs
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$263,000.00, dated May 11, 2006
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of the Stafford
County, Virginia, in Document No.
LR060016869, default having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse
Road, Stafford, on March 13, 2018
at 11:00 AM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Containing 0.9856 acres, as shown
on plat of survey recorded with
Deed in Deed Book 622, Page 191,
with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (59878)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Feb 15, 22,2018
12165236
AIRLINES ARE HIRING
Get FAA approved hands on
Aviation training. Financial aid
for qualified students – Career
placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance
888-896-7869
C
JOBS
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
1-800-753-POST
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Suitland, Oxon Hill
and Temple Hills, MD
Call Mr. Howard at
301-627-2408
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
P
JOBS
Property Management
Assistant Apt. Manager
High closing ratio. Strong verbal & written skills. Knowl.
of the Jenark system. Some
wkend work req'd. Fair Housing knowl. Own transp. Fax
resume to 703-567-4063
MARYLAND
Roommates
ADELPHI - FURNISHED ROOM FOR
RENT. $820/mo all utilities included,
close to bus line. Call 240-280-5289
BELTSVILLE - Lg BR w/ shr BA w/
1 male in big 4BR, 3BA SFH. Cable,
W/D. $450 + utils. Call 301-538-8575
BOWIE- Room for rent in basement
of TH. Nice neighborhood. No pets.
$550 everything incl. 240-400-3973
Ft Washington- Pref M to shr house.
Furn BR. $125/week, all util included
Call Larry after 2PM 202-441-5165
SILVER SPRING - Room in basement,
with BA, separate entrance, close
to Wheaton Metro. 240-264-7482
MD Real Estate
Auctions
AUCTION!
Luxury Waterfront Villa
complete with Private Pier &
Nature Preserve – Ft. Washington,
MD; 1 ACRE – Opening
Bid - $350,000 – List
$1,000,000 – Gorgeous
5 Bdrm; 4.5 Bth;
www.PrimeAuctionSolutions.com
AUCTION March 16, 12 NOON;
OPEN HOUSE – SUN; Online &
On-Site Auction 703-889-8949
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
Office Space, Rent
for the following
areas:
FRIENDSHIP HEIGHTS
Office/Retail space available Signature Townhouse
1,000 Square Feet
Contact WC Smith (202-408-3200)
For routes in
DuPont Circle and
GW area in D.C.
Call Howard
Kennedy at
202-543-6880
For routes in
Upper NW area
in D.C.
Call Dan Santos at
240-912-7978
Home
delivery
makes good
sense.
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
1-800-753-POST
for the following
areas:
SF
Don Money at
301-674-0010
SF
JOBS
The Washington
Post
Olney, Silver Spring
& Rockville, MD
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
C
For routes in
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
City of Charlottesville
TRUSTEE SALE
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated May 7, 2007, in
the original principal amount of
$328,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 200700014889 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on March 8,
2018, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: LAND SITUATED IN THE
COUNTY OF SPOTSYLVANIA IN THE
STATE OF VA. LOT 331, SECTION
4A, , THE FALLS AT LEE‘S PARKE,
AS THE SAME IS DULY DEDICATED,
PLATTED, AND RECORDED IN
INSTRUMENT
NUMBER
200500045995, AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS
OF
SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
Home delivery
is convenient.
PostPoints takes
you to the best
shows in town.
884
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
5409 SILVER MAPLE LANE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22407
TRUSTEE SALE
9710 Brock Road,
Spotsylvania, VA 22553-3907
Spotsylvania County
Wake up to
home delivery.
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
Membership is rewarding.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
You, too, could have
home delivery.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $12,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
(Trustee # 581468)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
The Vendor Auction.com will be
used in conjunction with this sale
Feb 22, Mar 1, 2018
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2018
EZ
Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2225 LOVEDALE LANE APT. J,
RESTON, VA 20191
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Feb. 22, Mar 1, 2018
12165729
William H. Casterline, Jr.
Jeremy B. Root
James R. Meizanis
For Information contact:
William H. Casterline, Jr.
BLANKINGSHIP & KEITH, PC
4020 University Drive #300
Fairfax, Virginia 22030
(703) 691-1235
February 20, 21, 22, 2018
873
Fairfax County
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
SF
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
From dramas and musicals to standup and ballet, discover great ways to
save money, win tickets and have fun
at the theater.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
Not a member? It’s free! JOIN TODAY.
SF
FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE
FRIES?"
SF
S2930 6x2
856
You know us for shopping, and
now Cars.com is the site for the
entire life of your car. So for
every turn, turn to Cars.com.
C3748 10x5.25
D18
856
Frederick County
THE DISTRICT EDITION
THE WASHINGTON POST
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2018
Local Living
Serving
a new
purpose
A Hillwood exhibit shows how
your heirloom china can be
used in a modern way. PAGE 8
Home If a cluttered kitchen is stifling your
inner Julia Child, try these suggestions to
organize cabinets, counters and more. 13
Gardening The most
popular orchid isn’t the only
one worth knowing. 16
Wellness The psychology
behind food cravings,
and how to beat them. 17
On Parenting Mom
wonders if preschool will
help a clingy toddler. 18
2
INSID E
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
DC
4
14
15
16
17
18
19
21
Splurge or Save
Home Front
Home sales
Gardening
Wellness
On Parenting
Crime report
Code violations
Home
HOW TO
The blotch-free way to refinish a fiberglass door
BY
J EANNE H UBER
Q: I have a Therma-Tru
ON THE COVER
Photo by Katherine
Frey/The
Washington Post
LOCAL LIVING
STAFF
Editor: Kendra
Nichols • Deputy
Editors: Amy
Joyce, Mari-Jane
Williams • Art
Director: Victoria
Adams Fogg
• Designer: J.C.
Reed • Staff
Writers: Jura
Koncius, Megan
McDonough
• Columnists:
Adrian Higgins,
Meghan Leahy
ADVERTISING
Doug Coffelt,
202-334-4440
• Email
localliving@
washpost.com
• Telephone
202-334-4409
• Mail Local
Living section,
The Washington
Post, 1301 K St.
NW, Washington,
D.C. 20071
fiberglass front door that a
friend recently re-stained using
the company’s stain kit. The
door was sanded (I believe
lightly with fine sandpaper) but
not stripped. The exterior side
turned out blotchy and is totally
unacceptable. I think the door
needs to be stripped and restained, but how do I find
someone to do that?
Alexandria
A: Finishing a fiberglass door,
whether you use a kit like
Therma-Tru’s or buy the
finishing materials on your own,
is a two-step process: First you
add color via an oil-based gel
stain, then you top that with a
clear finish, typically a waterbased one designed for exterior
use.
It’s possible to refresh the
clear topcoat once it becomes
dull. Therma-Tru recommends
prepping the old finish by
washing it and letting it dry,
figuring that a dull old finish is
rough enough for the new
topcoat to adhere. Other
manufacturers offer different
advice. Jeld-Wen, for example,
says to scuff up the old finish
first with superfine steel wool
(often labeled as 0000).
It’s also possible to touch up
small spots where the color has
been scraped off. But this type of
touch-up has to be literally just
that: Touch a small brush dipped
in a bit of stain onto the bare
spot, then lift the brush away. If
you try to rub on stain without
completely removing the
previous topcoat, you will end
up with a mess — as you’ve
experienced. Wherever the old
clear coat remained after the
door was lightly sanded, the oilbased stain just skated on the
surface. “Trying to apply new
stain to the topcoat — it does not
adhere,” said Ladonna Bowlin, a
customer-care agent for ThermaTru Doors in Maumee, Ohio
(800-843-7628; thermatru.com).
“It looks blotchy.”
The only solution, at this
point, is to strip the door and
start over — provided you have a
door made by a manufacturer
that verifies you can use a
stripper without ruining the
fiberglass. Therma-Tru says
certain strippers can be used on
its doors, while Jeld-Wen warns
against using any type of
stripper or solvent. For other
brands, check by calling the
manufacturer’s customer service
number.
Therma-Tru recommends only
THERMA -TRU
Fiberglass doors have a realistic wood look, but staining them improperly will ruin it. If you need to
apply a new stain, start by completely removing the topcoat. Otherwise, you’ll be left with blotches.
methylene chloride strippers,
which are quick and effective
but not kind to the environment
or human health. Methylene
chloride is a greenhouse gas, so
it contributes to global warming.
It’s also considered a potential
carcinogen, and even short-term
exposures to high
concentrations may cause
mental confusion,
lightheadedness, nausea,
vomiting and headache. Kyle
Rhine, a marketing specialist at
Therma-Tru, said the company
recommends this stripper
because it is effective at pulling
stain out of the texture that
simulates wood grain and
because it is compatible with the
fiberglass material that the
company uses.
If you use a methylene
chloride stripper, work outdoors
if at all possible to guarantee
enough fresh air. Where
ventilation is limited, even
wearing a half-face respirator
with cartridges suitable for
organic vapors isn’t much help;
although methylene chloride is
an organic vapor, it works its
way through these cartridges
very quickly, so you can’t depend
on them to protect you.
Methylene chloride can also be
absorbed through the skin, so
wear chemical-resistant gloves.
Adding to the complications
of stripping, Therma-Tru
recommends leaving the
stripper on for only three to five
minutes, because a longer time
might also strip off the factoryapplied primer. To stay within
the time limit, apply stripper to
only a small area at a time and
wipe away the residue
immediately. If you need to, use
fine steel wool (000) to get
It’s possible to touch up
small spots where
the color has been
scraped off. But this
type of touch-up has to
be literally just that:
Touch a small brush
dipped in a bit of stain
onto the bare spot,
then lift the brush away.
residue out of corners, but be
quick and very gentle so that you
do not scrub away the faint
texture that gives the door its
realistic wood look.
If you find yourself wiping off
ash-gray residue, or rose-colored
material if your door has a
mahogany stain, that’s a sign
that you are into the primer
layer, in which case you can
completely strip the door, wash
it down thoroughly and then
start over, working your way up
from a fresh coat of alkyd- or
water-based primer, topped by
stain and then a clear coat.
Or, at that point, you could
skip the stain concept and just
paint, using the same kind of
water-based paint you’d use for
any door. Paint is also the
solution for homeowners who
don’t like the look of fiberglass
doors made by companies that
warn against using any type of
stripper, since it is impossible to
re-stain these doors.
As to how to find someone to
do the work, try calling house
painters. Make sure the person
you hire has experience with
fiberglass doors or reads the care
instructions from the
manufacturer. Therma-Tru’s
advice about finishing and
refinishing starts on Page 24 of
the owner’s manual, which you
can download from the
“homeowner resources” section
at thermatru.com.
Have a problem in your home?
Send questions to localliving@
washpost.com. Put “How To” in the
subject line, tell us where you live
and try to include a photo.
3
DC
3/4/18
3/15/18
Cyprus Air Heating and Cooling
176 Reviews as of 2/20/2018
3/4/18
!" #! !$ $% &! '(%)* % +*" ,"%% $-(!.% %'/.0% !" 123 &*$%4*5 6 '%7%
"FREE ESTIM'll: NLY FR NEW SSTEM REPLACEMENT -CA FR DETAIS CERT� TeRMSANO CONOITIONS APLY. APPROV R FINANClfG NT GUARANTEED 9$49 CUPON EXCWDES DC RESl>ENTS ANO SS EXCLUSIVEL$ FR NEW CUSTOMERS
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
4.1
4
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
DC
Home
SPLURGE OR SAVE
$450
$2,295
$49
$14.99
Small Water Drop
jug in aubergine
(dwr.com)
Serge Mouille
tripod desk lamp
(gueridon.com )
Marble-and-wood
geometric object,
large octahedron
(westelm.com)
$895
$352
Helsinki basket
(barneys.com)
Burled
free-form wood vase
(theline.com)
Wood-and-marble
geometric
paperweight
(worldmarket.com)
$129
Curvilinear mid-century
table lamp (westelm.com)
$4.99
Sannolik vase in pink
(ikea.com)
$24.99
$218.99
Round teak wood vase
(target.com)
Wood leather magazine holder
in reddish brown (allmodern.com)
Give your bookshelf a little more character
BY
MEGAN MCDONOUGH
You may have seen the hashtag #shelfie plastered all
over your social media feed — usually next to
an artfully arranged shelving unit or rainbow
color-coded bookshelf.
A search for the hashtag yields nearly a million posts
on Instagram alone. Not to be mistaken for a selfie, a
“shelfie” is often used to show off a clutter-free, wellstaged shelf, mantel or bookcase that is functional
and visually appealing.
We enlisted Victoria Smith of the lifestyle blog SF Girl
by Bay for her shelfie advice.
“I’ve added built-in bookshelves in my home, and
probably one of my favorite ways to decorate is
Victoria Smith
More Splurge
or Save online
For more designer picks,
go to washingtonpost.com/home.
PRODUCT PHOTOS FROM RETAILERS
displaying objets d’art and mementos that mean
something special to me,” Smith wrote in an email.
Vintage books, flowers and treasures from past travels
can help transform a bland bookcase
into a conversation piece.
“Choose items that you connect with, but also share
a complementary color palette, and I think you’ll find
it pretty pleasing to the eye. Lately, I’m very interested
in classic natural elements — crystals, leather,
ceramics — with a modern twist,” Smith says. “The
goal is to achieve a cohesive collection, instead of
clutter, and I think with these pieces you’d be
achieving just that.”
megan.mcdonough@washpost.com
DC
5
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
6
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
DC
Home
ISTOCK
Low-flow toilets save water, money
BY
E LISABETH L EAMY
J
uly 15, 1946. That’s the date
stamped inside the tank of
my guest room toilet. That
explains a lot. My house was
built in 1946, so it’s an original toilet. You can hear the humming of pipes for several minutes
after someone flushes the thing.
It takes all that time to fill back
up. I am not imagining this. The
Environmental Protection Agency says toilets manufactured before 1980 use an average of five
gallons per flush, sometimes
more.
The EPA also says that toilets
use more water than anything else
in our homes (30 percent). Amazing! That’s why I wanted to know
whether switching to low-flow toilets was worth it, how fast those
toilets would pay for themselves,
and how much money I — and you
— could potentially save. So I
plugged various scenarios into the
EPA’s WaterSense Calculator.
Replacing pre-1980 toilets
The calculator asks how many
people live in your house and the
age of your toilets. If my whole
house was full of 1946 toilets, like
the one in my guest room, and my
mother-in-law were visiting,
which would make us a family of
four, our savings would be extra
impressive. By switching to highefficiency WaterSense toilets,
which use just 1.28 gallons per
flush, we would save 27,000 gallons of water and $230 per year.
Next I peeked into the tank of
the toilet in my master bathroom.
The mint-green color and Space
Age shape hint at the time period,
and, sure enough, this one was
stamped February 6, 1990. Happy
28th birthday, baby! Toilets
made between 1980 and 1994
averaged 3.5 gallons per flush. So
imagine if my entire house were
outfitted with these, and that my
mother-in-law still hadn’t left. In
this case, by switching to WaterSense toilets, I would save
16,000 gallons of water and $140
per year.
Unsure when your own toilets
were manufactured and how
much water they use? Your toilet’s
“date of birth” should be stamped
inside the tank, as mine were.
Some manufacturers also list the
number of gallons per flush. This
could also be inside the tank or in
the small space between the seat
hinge and the tank. It will say
something like 3.5 gpf, which
stands for gallons per flush.
The law
So why and how have manufacturers managed to create toilets
that use 1.28 gallons of water to
flush, rather than five or more? In
1995, the National Energy Policy
Act began requiring plumbing
manufacturers to make — and
homeowners who were remodeling to buy — toilets that used
1.6 gallons of water per flush or
less.
Some states then adopted — or
exceeded — that national standard. During the worst of its
drought, California stipulated
that only toilets that use 1.28 gallons per flush could be sold in the
state. These are called “high-efficiency” or “WaterSense” toilets.
Colorado and Texas adopted similar standards. Georgia requires
you to install WaterSense toilets if
you’re building or renovating.
Connecticut, Nevada, New York
and Washington state have emulated the 1.6 gallon federal standard.
Getting the bugs out
Unfortunately, the first generation of low-flow toilets did not
work well and turned many consumers off. They often required
multiple flushes to do the job and
clogged easily. The EPA is so
defensive about these early failures that it created a “Flush Fact
vs. Flush Fiction” pamphlet. The
pamphlet explains that toilets
bearing the WaterSense label
“must meet strict criteria for water efficiency and flushing performance” and must “meet or
exceed national plumbing performance standards.”
Independent testing by Consumer Reports confirms these
claims. The magazine awarded its
top five toilets scores ranging
from 74 to 78. All five use between
1.28 and 1.6 gallons of water per
flush, “resist drain clogs,” and are
rated “excellent” or “very good” at
solid waste removal.
What did not rate well in Consumer Reports’ testing were dualflush toilets, which use less water
to flush urine. Here the scores
ranged from 42 to 58. Testers said
some of the models did a poor job
of bowl cleaning and only a fair
job of solid waste removal. Perhaps it’s no loss, because the
average amount of water used by
a dual-flush toilet, in its two
modes, is similar to what a
WaterSense toilet uses.
How fast they pay
for themselves
When I searched for high-efficiency toilets on an EPA portal, I
had 91 pages of choices. Clearly,
there’s plenty of competition to
make and sell these ultra-efficient
1.28-gallon models. And with
competition come cost cuts!
Three of Consumer Reports’ top
picks cost just $240 to $275.
• Remember, I can save $230 a
year by switching my house over
from pre-1980s toilets to WaterSense toilets. So in a single
year, I save enough to cover the
cost of one toilet.
• I can save $140 per year by
switching my house from 19801994 toilets to WaterSense toilets.
In that case, it’ll take two years for
the savings to cover the cost of a
toilet.
So go ahead, peer into your
toilet tanks and start doing your
own math.
localliving@washpost.com
Elisabeth Leamy hosts the podcast
“Easy Money.” She is a 13-time Emmy
winner and a 25-year consumer
advocate for programs such as
“Good Morning America.” Connect
with her at leamy.com and
@ElisabethLeamy.
DC
7
3/9/18
1.888.821.5708
3/9/18
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
3/9/18
8
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
DC
Home
From fussy to fashionable
Planning to get rid of your heirloom china? An exhibition at Hillwood has a better idea.
BY J URA K ONCIUS
PHOTOS BY K ATHERINE F REY
The stacks of old family china sitting forlornly in
sideboards, cabinets and boxes in many homes
reflect the state of entertaining today. Many
millennials aren’t wild about their grandmother’s
flowered formal plates, preferring to stick to their
plain white wedding dishes. Gen Xers and boomers,
who often gravitate to dining at a kitchen island,
rarely bother to pull out the “good stuff ” and are
already trying to unload it.
The curators at Hillwood Estate, Museum &
Gardens, the grand Washington home of late
hostess Marjorie Merriweather Post, thought about
this lifestyle shift when they conceived their latest
special exhibit, which opened Feb. 17. “The Artistic
Table: Contemporary Tastemakers Present Inspired
CONTINUED ON 10
ABOVE: Timothy Corrigan’s table
celebrates French gardens. The citrongreen damask tablecloth sets off china
of his own design, Jardin Francais for
Royal Limoges. Accessories include
vintage Gucci quail salt and pepper
shakers. The 1909 Tiffany & Co. silver
candelabra are part of the Hillwood
collection. AT LEFT AND ON THE
COVER: Hutton Wilkinson and Josh
Hildreth created a tea setting filled
with luxurious items including crystal
frogs and jeweled starfish napkin
rings. The tablecloth fabric was
designed by Wilkinson for Jim
Thompson. Marjorie Merriweather
Post’s porcelain plates are part of the
19th-century Order of St. George
Imperial Porcelain Factory set.
9
DC
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
ABOVE AND LEFT: This
table by Alex
Papachristidis sought to
combine Post’s Russian
and European tableware
with contemporary pieces.
The centerpiece is a
handcrafted porcelain
flower arrangement by
Vladimir Kanevsky.
Custom monogrammed
napkins tie into the blues,
purples and pinks of the
plates. The gold salt and
pepper cellars are a
modern design by
Christopher Spitzmiller.
Post’s blue Sevres dinner
plates from 1768 and
monogrammed Italian
glass wine goblets were
used on the table.
10
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
DC
Home
FROM 8
Table Settings” highlights Post’s collections of
Russian imperial and 18th-century French
porcelain and other luxurious tableware
from her years of entertaining. Curators
asked a group of interior designers to
combine Post’s formal porcelains, glassware
and silver with contemporary pieces, to
showcase new ideas for table settings.
Post entertained lavishly at Hillwood and
her other estates, which include Mar-a-Lago
in Palm Beach, Fla., now owned by President
Trump, and Camp Topridge, an Adirondack
lodge. If there was one lesson to be learned
from Post, it was not to be afraid of your nice
things, according to Estella M. Chung, director of collections at Hillwood, the estate that
Post bought in 1955 and owned until her
death in 1973. Every few weeks she would
host a formal dinner, garden party or tea,
pulling out her silver lobster forks, 18th-century Russian goblets and gold jelly spoons.
ABOVE: P. Gaye Tapp’s
table combines Asian,
Danish modern and
contemporary pieces such
as wine glasses from
Williams Sonoma. The
tablecloth fabric is
Carolina Irving’s Exotic
Bloom in indigo and cream.
The acrylic flatware is from
Sabre Paris in Gustave
blue. The vintage navy-blue
pottery tumblers came from
Tapp’s own collections.
Tapp added the rattan
chargers to give a casual
look to the formal china.
The blue-and-white plates
are from the Hillwood
collection and are part of
the Chinese Export
Armorial Service made
around 1785.
She was eager to preserve her collections and
lifestyle for future generations. “She knew an
era was ending,” Chung says. “Her house was
the American version of a European country
house, and she knew that style of entertaining and staffing was coming to an end.” Just
imagine: All of her dishes were always
washed by hand, by her trained staff.
In this exhibit, Post’s historic tableware is
displayed throughout the mansion, from a
formal dinner featuring seven Russian services in the dining room to a breakfast tray
with violet-sprigged dishes in her bedroom.
“We always have china on display, but in this
exhibition, we wanted to present even more
pieces in a new way and show this is relevant
to contemporary life,” says Wilfried Zeisler,
Hillwood’s chief curator.
The six designer tables, along with a
seventh formally set round table that re-creates one of Post’s 1960s dinners, are displayed
in the dacha building. The designers behind
the exhibit share a few entertaining secrets
that might help anyone find ways to incorporate old china into a less formal lifestyle.
Use an old thing in a new way: Don’t set
your table like your grandmother did
When New York designer Alex Papachristidis decorated the silver-and-gold dining
room at the Kips Bay show house a couple of
years ago, people came up to him and said,
‘My kids don’t want my china.’ ” He has tried
to give them advice on ways to make table
setting more approachable yet still elegant.
“Play with what you have. If you have
antique dishes, find a bold colored solid dish
that looks nice with it and some funky
modern flatware,” Papachristidis says.
“Throw in an unusual hand-painted glass
from a vintage store.”
One of his go-tos: durable Caspari wipeclean place mats, available in designs including a green leaf and blue-and-white chinoiserie. “They look so chic,” he says, “yet they are
so practical.”
11
DC
Use something unexpected, such as a
leopard-print tablecloth. One way to keep
cloths looking fresh is to spray them with
Scotchgard so you can wipe off spills. And if
you want to protect them further, layer a
smaller machine-washable tablecloth on top
of them to soak up any stains.
Never set the table the same way twice
If you pull out the same dishes, glassware
and tablecloth for every event, it’s time to
change it up, says designer Barry Dixon of
Warrenton, Va. If you’re not having fun
setting your table, it can seem like just
another boring chore.
Think of accessorizing a table as you do
your wardrobe. Whether you are using basic
white Ikea buffet plates or your mother-inlaw’s vintage pink-and-brown Noritake, you
can give them a new look by adding color or
pattern elsewhere on the table, Dixon says.
If you have old-fashioned floral china, add
glass plates in jewel tones to the table to
update it. Instead of white napkins, collect
linen squares in different colors and keep
them ironed and ready to go, Dixon says. If
you have an extra yard of fabric from curtains
or pillows, use it to make napkins that tie
your table to the interiors. Dixon is always on
the lookout for interesting tableware. “I love
driving down Virginia’s Interstate 81,” Dixon
says. “Any place you turn off, you might find a
small shop or flea market with some amazing
new find.”
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
RIGHT: Charlotte Moss created a picnic at
Topridge, Post’s Adirondack getaway. The
faux-bois Victorian silver centerpiece has a
twig-and-vine motif. Moss designed the
woodland napkin monogram. The Chinese
export porcelain Peony Service plates that
belonged to Post date to 1770.
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
Don’t be so afraid of putting
your china in the dishwasher
Designer Timothy Corrigan kept hearing
from clients and friends that they ate on their
best china only on holidays because it was so
much work to hand-wash it. Corrigan, who
has offices in Los Angeles and Paris, uses his
family and vintage porcelain collection on a
daily basis and loads it all into the dishwasher. (Many dishwashers have a special, gentler
“china” setting.) “I believe that every day is
special,” he says. “Use your china. Don’t save
it for an important day. Today is the day.”
From a French antique porcelain dealer, he
once learned some interesting statistics that
might calm those worried about dulling the
gold trim on their plates: Most gold on china
can withstand 600 to 800 dishwasher washes
before it really fades.
To reinforce his philosophy of using the
good stuff frequently, he developed his own
china pattern — Jardin Français for Royal
Limoges. The pattern is created using a new
technology that makes gold accents microwave- and dishwasher-safe.
He also sticks his antique German sterling
flatware in the dishwasher, a no-no in some
circles, but he says that “using it all the time
keeps it looking good; you don’t have to
polish it.” But don’t stick your fragile crystal
in the dishwasher — that’s better off being
washed by hand.
12
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
DC
Home
of Kentucky Fried Chicken before a party and
piled it onto her Georgian silver platters.
Says Wilkinson, “It’s all about the presentation.”
Upgrade from plain white tablecloths:
Dress your table in color
Yes, you can have a formal dinner without
using a white tablecloth, says P. Gaye Tapp,
a North Carolina-based designer. Years
ago, white linen tablecloths and napkins
were the only choice for fancy meals. Not
anymore.
Tapp says couples whose dishes are gathering dust should consider bringing them out
and coming up with a plan to match them to a
modern textile pattern. You can pick out
colors in your china and look for fabric to set
it off. She loves the look of vintage batik
napkins paired with a bold tablecloth made
out of a tree-of-life Indian pattern in indigo
and cream.
“If you use a formal white tablecloth, like
many people do, it just makes everything
seem more formal,” Tapp says. The same
china settings, whether floral or gold-edged,
put against a more contemporary fabric look
fresh and different.
jura.koncius@washpost.com
ABOVE: Barry Dixon’s
table for two has jeweltone accents in
magenta, red and
purple and features
wrapped gifts. The
fabrics for the
tablecloth and
napkins are designed
by Dixon for Vervain.
The clear goblets
belonged to Dixon’s
grandmother. The
porcelain soup plates
from the Hillwood
collection were made in
1905 at the Imperial
Porcelain Factory in
Russia. The purple
glasses are also
Hillwood’s.
FROM PREVIOUS PAGE
Revive Sunday family dinner
New York designer Charlotte Moss is
distressed that many families rarely eat
dinner together at a table set for a meal.
“Everyone is on their laptops around a coffee
table or a counter grabbing something,” Moss
says.
Families would benefit from an old ritual:
the Sunday night dinner. “End your weekend
and start your week with a little bit of
civilization,” Moss says. Everyone helps, and
kids can learn basic table-setting skills and
manners. “It doesn’t have to be formal,” Moss
says. “Arrange fruit as a centerpiece.” Tell
your kids the story of your china.
Being familiar with table manners makes
you comfortable and confident in many
situations, Moss says. Your kids will appreciate the experience later, when they get
invited to a special someone’s house to meet
the family or when navigating business
lunches.
“Whether your china is your grandmother’s formal porcelain or your mother’s castoffs, you should use it,” says Moss, whose 10th
book, “Charlotte Moss Entertains,” is due out
in April. “Don’t be afraid.”
It’s not about the food: Invite friends,
set a beautiful table and order takeout
Some people have a fear of entertaining
because they really don’t enjoy or feel
confident about cooking. That is no excuse
for not using your good china, says Hutton
Wilkinson, president of Los Angeles-based
Tony Duquette. “It’s really more about the
presentation. But of course, it helps if the
food tastes good, too.”
Washington designer Josh Hildreth, who
collaborated with Wilkinson, says a table set
with your best things shows family and
friends how much you appreciate them.
“Putting out plates and setting a nice table
creates a different experience for guests,”
Hildreth says.
“Buy china not because you eat off it, but
because it’s beautiful,” Wilkinson says. The
two designers like to decorate their tables
with curiosities such as crystal frogs or
bejeweled starfish napkin rings.
Wilkinson says people are meeting in
restaurants because they are too busy to
cook. But there are alternatives. He recalls a
glamorous hostess who sent out for buckets
IF YOU GO: “The Artistic Table: Contemporary
Tastemakers Present Inspired Table Settings” at
Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens at 4155
Linnean Ave. NW in Washington will be open
through June 10. Hours are Tuesday through
Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets are $18. For
information, go to hillwoodmuseum.org.
Chat Thursday at 11 a.m. Estella M. Chung,
director of collections at Hillwood Estate,
Museum & Gardens, joins staff writer Jura
Koncius for our weekly online Q&A on
decorating and household advice. Submit
questions at washingtonpost.com/home.
At Home newsletter Go to the Home &
Garden page to subscribe to our email newsletter,
delivered every Thursday.
Hillwood curators created a table setting for the exhibit based on a 1960s party
given by Post. Included were silver ashtrays and Lalique menu holders.
13
Home
DC
ORGANIZING
Takeout again? It’s time to declutter your kitchen.
BY
N ICOLE A NZIA
Some people can live with a
messy home office or a disorganized bedroom closet, and it
doesn’t affect their lives in any
fundamental way. But the kitchen
is different. We all have to eat. If
the kitchen is a mess, it can have a
real impact on your lifestyle.
If you’re not inspired to cook
because you can’t easily find the
tools you need, or if you’re convinced you don’t have ample
space to prepare a meal, not only
will your emotional and physical
health be affected, but the endless takeout can also kill your
budget.
I consulted with Katherine DiGiovanni of Refine Home Concepts, who specializes in kitchen
organization and what she calls
“kitchen coaching,” to develop
these recommendations for maximizing your storage space and
making your kitchen work for
you.
Kitchen helpers
There are several MVP products for organizing any kitchen,
but in small kitchens these items
can make a big difference.
Cabinets: To make things like
spices, cooking oils and baking
decorations easy to see and grab
in your upper cabinets, use a riser
or a Lazy Susan. And don’t be
afraid to adjust shelves to make
things easier to reach, if necessary. It’s not as hard as it looks and
can make a big difference. Install-
PHOTOS BY STACY ZARIN GOLDBERG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: In small kitchens, a pot rack can free up space in cabinets. BELOW: Save counter space by storing knives on a magnetic strip,
rather than in a knife block, and by leaning cutting boards against the backsplash, where the wood can create visual warmth.
ing pullout drawers in cabinets
will help maximize space for
things like storage containers or
dish towels and will also work
well on deep shelves so that food
stored in the back isn’t forgotten.
Clear bins help corral like items
and are great for keeping bags of
rice, pasta, chips and cookies upright.
When storage is especially
tight, consider hanging your most
frequently used pots and pans on
a hanging pot rack. Pot racks
come in two varieties, wallmounted and ceiling-mounted,
and can help free up a lot of real
estate in your lower cabinets. In
fact, whenever you’re in need of
space in a kitchen, look up! Are
there places up high to put shelving or hooks?
Pantry and refrigerator: Look
for versatile organizational products such as Mason jars, which are
easy to clean, or stacking clear
plastic containers. And if you’re
tight on pantry or cabinet storage
for dry goods, large Mason jars
filled with red lentils or spinach
pasta can double as decor.
Drawers: Drawer dividers can
be used in shallow drawers to
make measuring spoons, a meat
thermometer, a can opener, a
corkscrew, tongs and knives easy
to find and put away.
Saving counter space
Countertops, free of clutter, are
utilitarian and aesthetically
pleasing. Don’t store rarely used
appliances on the counter just
because it seems difficult to put
them away. The items that stay on
your countertop should be those
that you use frequently, such as a
toaster or coffeemaker. So unless
you’re a die-hard baker, you probably shouldn’t be wasting valuable real estate with a stand mixer. A hand mixer will do just fine —
and be much easier to store away.
If you’re short on drawer space,
use one countertop canister for
the six utensils you use most often
when cooking.
And be sure to make use of wall
space. Most knife blocks take up
significant countertop space;
knives can be stored more efficiently in a drawer or on a magnetic strip attached to the wall.
And by the way, you don’t need 12
different knives. Splurge on three
or four good knives (for instance,
a chef’s knife, a serrated paring
knife and a serrated bread knife),
and that’s all you need. Magnetic
strips can also hold small containers of spices, saving valuable cabinet or drawer space.
If your upper cabinets are
mounted high enough above your
countertops, you can even store
stemmed wine glasses underneath.
And last but certainly not least,
what to do with those large cutting boards? If you have a large
wooden cutting board, you might
be able to lean it upright against
the backsplash. The wood can
create a little warmth in an otherwise stark kitchen and will still be
easy to access when you need it.
You can also place it on top of the
refrigerator, where it’s out of sight
but still easy to grab. If you opt for
a collection of smaller, plastic cutting boards, they can usually be
hung on a hook for a fun splash of
color or slid underneath dish towels or potholders in a drawer.
Don’t buy into the idea that you
need a large, elaborate kitchen to
cook healthy, tasty meals. A small
but well-organized kitchen can be
just as functional and — bonus —
requires less cleaning.
localliving@washpost.com
Anzia is a freelance writer and owner
of Neatnik. She can be reached at
nicole@neatnik.org.
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
Take stock and cull the clutter
First, take a complete inventory of your kitchen. Pull everything
out of the cabinets and drawers
and put back only the items you
need and use. Less is more. Why?
There are tools that every kitchen
needs, but if you have too many
gadgets and dishes crowding your
cabinets and drawers, it makes
accessing them difficult, which
means you’ll never use them. It’s
better to stick with the basics and
store things so that they’re easy to
access.
Instead of having a dozen red
and white wine glasses, 18 water
glasses, four martini glasses, six
champagne flutes and 10 mugs
crammed into one cabinet, pare
down your glassware. Store the
items you use daily within reach
of the sink and dishwasher, and
donate the extras or store them
elsewhere. Likewise, you probably don’t need one drawer dedicated to dish towels and another
for potholders. Six dish towels
and two hot pads are probably
sufficient and can fit into one
drawer.
14
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
DC
Home
HOME FRONT
Advice worth building on from a ‘Trading Spaces’ carpenter
Joanie
Sprague, the
newest member of TLC’s
“Trading
Spaces” revival, joined staff
writer Jura
Joanie
Koncius last
Sprague
week on our
Home Front
online chat. Here is an edited excerpt.
Q: Do you think that stainless is
a must if you are getting a new
appliance?
A: No, not at all. Stainless is
pretty awesome, yes, but it
depends on the look of your
kitchen. Is it more farm-style?
Do you have a lot of natural
light? A lot of appliance brands
are coming out with black
stainless, or wood and fauxwood fronts on refrigerators,
etc. Also, white is classic, and a
lot of people don’t want to deal
with fingerprints. You can also
have a custom cabinet panel
installed over your fridge to
match your kitchen.
Q: Is it worth reupholstering a
sofa if it’s a good-quality design
and still in good shape? What
about slipcovers?
A: If it’s a super-good-quality
frame and you love the design, I
say go for it. This could be a
great weekend project. Make
sure you get quality fabric and
materials, and either rent or buy
a powered staple gun to do the
upholstering.
you could easily handle a tile or
beadboard backsplash, or
maybe even building some fun
outdoor furniture. Check out
the Rehab Life on YouTube.
They are a great resource for
beginner furniture builders.
Q: What’s the best product for
Q: In the spirit of cleaning out
spot-cleaning an upholstered
chair?
A: I have ruined things by using
the wrong products. First, what
is the stain on your chair? If it’s
oil, make sure you use a twostep process: Use a damp cloth
with very little detergent and
then a dry cloth to press it just
after (dab, not scrub).
unnecessary items, I’ve found a
couple of old posters that I had
framed in glass with metal
frames. I can take out the
posters, but how do I get rid of
the frames? I live in a high-rise,
so I can’t just smash the glass
and dispose of it in the trash or
recycling. Can frames be
recycled or thrown away?
A: I had this happen to me, too.
When we redid our bathrooms, I
took out these giant old mirrors.
I had no clue what to do with
them. I didn’t want to toss them
in the dumpster. They were
literally just sheets of glass with
no frame, so I couldn’t give
them away and feel safe about
it. The best thing you can do is
to crisscross the frame with
duct or blue painter’s tape
across the front and back, wrap
it in an old blanket or bubble
wrap, add more tape, label it
“GLASS for DISPOSAL,” and set
it downstairs next to your
dumpster.
Q: We are planning to install a
backsplash in our kitchen, and
we are having the hardest time
sourcing the tiles. We have been
to high-end tile stores as well as
the big-box stores and need help
figuring out the cost and
whether we can install it
ourselves. Do you have a
formula for figuring this out?
A: Sourcing tiles can be
overwhelming, especially if you
don’t have a ton of options.
Have you tried looking online,
too? If you are going to do this
yourself, there are a lot of fun
options at Wayfair. They ship for
free, too.
Winter
Savings
¢
89
SUNDAYS
Save up to 85%
Get 52 weeks of Sunday-only home delivery for
just $2.65 89¢ a week! Or 7-day home delivery
for only $12.25 $1.89 a week! Both come
with unlimited digital access, including all web
content and apps. You’ll also get 1 bonus digital
subscription to share and a 30-day digital pass
to share every month.
1-800-955-1197, Ext. 3
sub.wpsubscribe.com/18winterx
Offer expires 3/31/18. Available to new subscribers only.
Restrictions may apply. New subscriptions are subject to a $4.95 activation fee.
S1455 2x5
MATSPERSSON0/GETTY IMAGES
To clean a moldy deck, Joanie Sprague says, use a power washer
with vinegar added to the water. When the deck is dry, re-treat it.
Q: I would like to tile my
shower with glass tiles. I
understand they cost more and
are harder to place, so it’s not
really a DIY project. Is there
anything more I should know
about them? For example, do
they chip easily? I love the look
but want to make sure I won’t
regret it in a few years.
A: I love glass tile, and honestly
you can’t go wrong with this
option. Tile work is one of my
favorite things because there
are so many things you can do
with it. With glass, however,
there are often fewer color
options. Also, yes, you should
use a pro who can install the
glass tile, as it is usually
translucent and you can see the
adhesive through it. So it’s
better to not attempt
installation solo. The other
great things about glass are that
it doesn’t absorb water and that
mildew doesn’t grow on it —
which is a win for cleaning!
Q: Are there any grants
available to help redo an almost
100-year-old home? I have to do
everything — fix lintels, stucco
and the roof — which will total
almost $100,000. The project
would make a good educational
tool for construction skills.
A: You should check with your
city or municipality and any
historical society in your area.
One hundred years may not be
old enough in some cases to be
deemed historic, but there may
be some tax incentives out
there. I’d ask other homeowners
in your area, too.
Q: What’s the best way to clean
a moldy deck?
A: Use a power washer, with
Q: How did you learn carpentry
skills? Do you do your own work
at home?
A: I had learned a lot about
home renovation as a kid,
working with my dad. He was a
glazier for almost 20 years
before he became a pastor. So I
followed him a lot, handing him
tools, etc. But as I got older, my
own interests led me to
carpentry, furniture refinishing
and construction. Even though I
modeled, I was always doing
some sort of project with my
hands on the side. I even landed
a show on the DIY Network nine
years ago where I really got into
construction and learned from
some of the best cabinet makers
in the business. Although I’m
still quite green in some aspects
of carpentry, it’s become a
passion and something I work
at everyday.
Q: I am new to DIY projects and
am wondering when to DIY and
not to DIY. I just put up a pallet
accent wall with surprisingly no
problems. So I am a little braver.
Where do I need to cool my jets?
A: It just depends on what
you’re looking to do next. I
think if you can do a pallet wall,
steam, if you can get one.
Otherwise, a regular power
washer is fine. You can add
vinegar or some agent to the
water, too. When it’s cleaned off
and dry (and make sure it’s
bone-dry), re-treat the deck.
Make sure your gutters don’t
spill onto the deck and sweep it
weekly, getting the debris out of
the cracks as best you can. Also,
keep greenery and plants away
from the deck, if possible.
Q: Is crown molding really a
must in a living room?
A: I don’t think crown molding
is needed in every space. You
can have a very contemporary
home with eight-foot ceilings
and still have molding. That
being said, if you have higher
ceilings (over nine to 10 feet), it
does look great. Just remember
to keep it smaller if you have
lower ceilings. I would use a
max of three to four inches on
eight-foot walls.
localliving@washpost.com
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read the rest of this transcript and
submit questions to the next chat,
Thursday at 11 a.m., at
live.washingtonpost.com.
Home Sales
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
These sales data recorded by the
D.C. Office of Tax and Revenue
were provided by Black Knight Inc.
For information about other
residential real estate
transactions, visit
washingtonpost.com/homesales.
NORTHWEST
Allison St., 330-Jamison K.
Berwager and Minal Amin to
Melissa Salamnowitz, $736,000.
Beekman Pl., 1626, No. C-Jesse
and Devon Lee McCollum to Kym
Louise Smithies and Breanna
Lynne Ridsdel, $770,000.
Belmont St., 1608, No. CRebecca D. Rinehart to Brian L.
and Christine B. Zimbler,
$729,900.
Buchanan St., 1316-Renee
Parker to Samuel S. Parker Jr.,
$114,905.
Calvert St., 1915, No. 401-Robert
J. Gray Jr. to Kurt K. Schier and
Lisa Jane Gold Schier, $637,000.
Cathedral Ave., 4201, No. 510ETessie L. Bennington to Samuel A.
Emmerling and Gina A. Dominick,
$247,000.
Church St., 1401, No. 317Terrance C. Ford to Nicholas Paul
Olley Webster, $565,000.
Clifton St., 1343, No. 102-Denise
J. Hart to Sebastian Oquendo
Toro, $517,000.
Columbia Rd., 1954, No. 109Meli Figueres to Charles Andrew
and Vivianne Marie Peckham,
$180,000.
Connecticut Ave., 3701, No. 222Mark David Schroeder to Amber
Higgins, $285,000.
Fairmont St., 1101, No. 9-David
Seidenfeld to Annette and Hugh
Hilliard, $510,000.
Glover Dr., 2922-Foxhall Real
Estate Corp. to Sarah G. Rapawy
and Roberto J. Gonzalez,
$3.5 million.
Harlan Pl., 6635-Mark A.
DC
Kudlowitz and Emily J. Pikren to
Somil and Shanta Trivedi,
$655,000.
Jefferson St., 608, No. 104Blanca M. and Juan G. Diaz to
Carlos U. Bonilla and Rosa Pavon
Ortiz, $295,000.
L St., 2425, No. 709-Deer Creek
Real Estate Inc. to Isabella
Broggini, $633,000.
Longfellow St., 426-Walter and
Elizabeth Manning to David M.
Dailey II and Mary A. Petrovic,
$583,000.
Lowell St., 5025-Jon C. and Emily
G. Henderson to Christopher C.
and Emily M. Sower,
$3.98 million.
Massachusetts Ave., 400, No.
712-Daniel J. Rosenthal and Chloe
E. Kanter to Paul and Saroj Patel,
$578,000.
Meridian Pl., 1438, No. LL6-Andy
W. Drewlinger to Taren K. BurkettSorlie and Collin W. Sorlie,
$295,000.
Mintwood Pl., 1863, No. 2-Alexa
H. Ghafouri to Melinda Margaret
Ostermeyer, $714,000.
Monroe St., 1020, No. 401Michael M. Li to Carrie Beth
Cabelka, $520,000.
Mount Pleasant St., 3314, No.
36-Scott W. Foster to Elizabeth
Heil, $347,500.
N St., 1411, No. 2-Matthew J.
Vissides Jr. to Rania A. Mohamed
Ibrahim Almashar, $1.02 million.
New York Ave., 66, No. 303Bethany Jane Lipman to Lisa Chiu,
$363,000.
Newton St., 1821-1821 Newton
Property Corp. to Nazo Burgy,
$540,000.
O St., 3424-Kathryn Anna Park to
Nabil R. and Caroline Emad,
$905,000.
Overlook Rd., 5063-Michael M.
Kaiser and John S. Roberts to
Mary Van Schuyler Raiser,
$3.77 million.
Park Rd., 1527, No. 202-Luis
Toribio and Benedicta Torres to
Angelica A. Austin, $325,000.
Peabody St., 317-Nefse Corp. to
Abidemi B. and Natasha K.
Oyedele, $799,000.
Primrose Rd., 1675-Gary Wayne
Thomas Jr. and Darren Robert
Vigen to Todd A. Lee and Melissa
L. Maddox-Lee, $915,000.
Q St., 1625, No. 102-John H. and
Valerie W. Wheeler to Matthew L.
Curtin and Maria C. Ricart Ariza,
$665,000.
Quincy St., 716-Tralonne Shorter
to Patricia Bo-Ling Hsue,
$680,000.
R St., 1727, No. 101-Erik Norman
Johnson to David and Virginia
Vismer, $515,000.
Randolph Pl., 58-Lynne M. Civin
to Nathaniel and Jane Wu Brower,
$935,000.
Rhode Island Ave., 613-David J.
Korkian and Meredith A. Katz to
Charles and Maggie L. Carroll,
$640,000.
Rittenhouse St., 223-Jill D. Peck
to Amber Husbands, $660,000.
Rock Creek Church Rd., 3622RCCD Corp. to Vivek Vinod and
Arpi Patel Khare, $875,000.
S St., 1716, No. S-B-Daniel and
Jacqueline McGroarty to Kristin
Gerlach, $160,141.
Scott Cir., 1, No. 502-Frances
Burkhart S. Jr. to Juan J. Delgado,
$275,000.
Sheridan St., 520-JDK Corp. to
Robert Hartwell and Heather
Guith, $546,000.
Tunlaw Rd., 2404-Charlotte G.
and Scott C. Philips to Paasha and
Megan Mahdavi, $1.2 million.
V St., 5012-Brent Allen Bohmont
and Carolyn Esther Brown to
Nathan W. Ford and Mara E.
Penne, $920,000.
Van Ness St., 3724-Matthew
David Strickler to Thomas Michael
Neff and Mary Lyndon Haviland,
$975,000.
Vermont Ave., 1326, No. 5-Jed A.
Friedman to Felipe F. Dizon Jr.,
$419,000.
Warder St., 3573, No. 7-Michael
Tien Ngoc Nguyen and Marissa
Suzanne Gordon-Nguyen to Ryan
C. Wilson and Antwan Jones,
$570,000.
Windom Pl., 3720-Zachary L. and
Faith J. Ezrailson to Scott Jacobs
and Elizabeth Silverman,
$990,000.
Wisconsin Ave., 3028, No. 205Brendan Krause to Theresa
D’Angelo Polizzi, $269,000.
Yuma St., 5137-Oscar and Amy S.
Mann to Robert Lotstein and
Kristin Huffman, $1.45 million.
Fifth St., 4418-Dilan Investment
Corp. to Catherine Robinson,
$1.16 million.
Eighth St., 7546-Carmella
Crockett and Jason A. Duncan to
Gurmit and Kanchan K. Singh,
$330,000.
11th St., 2100, No. 305-Carlin R.
Woog and Lauren Anne Thomson
to Leslie Moeller, $732,000.
13th St., 1320, No. 11-Joy Younce
Mcvicker to Jesse L. Beringer,
$585,000.
14th St., 2125, No. 625-Maureen
Q. McGough to Abraham J. and
Moses F. Fraifeld, $390,000.
15th St., 1515, No. 605-Patrick
M. Burkhart to Peter and Christine
Pejic, $1.4 million.
17th St., 1401, No. 208-Deborah
J. Bortot to Jason Jafarian,
$399,999.
17th St., 2410, No. 309-Daniel A.
and Lee Kapner to Steven Victor
Grossenbacher and Andrew West,
$795,000.
21st St., 522, No. 806-Zinna
Family Partnership to Erika
Mariela Paz Molina, $230,000.
22nd St., 1414, No. 34-Alan and
Denise Pellegrini to Peter S.
Leyton, $1.4 million.
24th St., 922, No. 801-Richard C.
Shaub and Kathleen A. Adamec to
Vahram Nercissiantz, $220,000.
30th St., 4550-Timothy Clark
Emerson and Jan Sidebotham to
Scott V. McGoohan and Nicole L.
Bambas McGoohan, $1.35 million.
34th St., 1672-Ronald B. and
Anne McCutcheon Lewis to
Stanley Smith, $850,000.
39th St., 3631, No. F318-Ryan
and Lauren Martin to Nicholas
and Julia K. Murray, $480,000.
42nd St., 4210-Christopher Lane
and Sara C. Bennett to Michelle F.
and Michael K. Miller,
$1.65 million.
49th St., 4208-Laurie Lee to Evan
and Elizabeth Pike Mannis,
$1.06 million.
SOUTHEAST
A St., 4656-Hafiz Corp. to
Alexander Ian Rose-Henig,
$330,000.
Altamont Pl., 2311, No. 3-Sarojini
Ford to Lashon Adams, $77,500.
Brandywine St., 721, No. 102Mary Louise Morris and Beverly B.
Allen to Ruben J. Hillar, $100,000.
Burke St., 1831-Mildred D.
Barnes to Matthew John Cusack,
$587,100.
Chaplin St., 1243-Jack Spicer
Properties Corp. to Angela Joyner,
$432,000.
D St., 1702-Elite Global Holdings
Corp. to David Thomas, $812,500.
E St., 1412-Joshua A. Kramer and
Julia M.A. Kramer to Stephen
David and Elizabeth G. Halliday,
$1.06 million.
Hildreth St., 4208-Charlie A.
McGinley to Jason Wucinski,
$335,000.
Independence Ave., 1215-Jeffrey
Terk Mahan to Barry Rodgers,
$1.13 million.
K St., 1240-Patrick M. Velliky to
Rebecca C. Murphy, $596,000.
Savannah Pl., 1882-Eh1002
Corp. to Rumbidzai R. Mufuka,
$339,000.
Trenton Pl., 2000-Taryn White to
Abiyot Hirui, $310,000.
Valley Ave., 437-Lucrative
Creative Investment Organization
to Keishney M. Hill, $340,000.
Fourth St., 928-Jeremy W. and
Devon T. Anderson to Matthew
Michael McKendree, $975,000.
Ninth St., 112-Charles E. and
Renee S. Erdmann to Mary Beth
Stroiney, $950,000.
11th St., 208-Joseph Michael and
Joanne Hatch Matthews to Eric
Ostermeier, $949,500.
13th St., 1012-1012 13th St. SE
Corp. to Adam Z. Risell and Cheryl
Justis, $825,000.
17th St., 320-SBRT Corp. to
Rekha and Michael Alan Sherman,
$715,000.
47th St., 121-Nancy Vasaitis to
Angellica Garrigan, $288,500.
SOUTHWEST
First St., 4010-Darrell G. Brown to
Corey Andre Jackson, $355,000.
Seventh St., 700, No. 509Timothy R. Lee to Naomi D.
Brown, $315,000.
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
NORTHEAST
Abbey Pl., 1112-Matthew Latham
to Matthew H. Weltz, $730,500.
Adams St., 1337, No. 3-Kari L.
Nelson and Joshua Beatty to
Katherine D. and Jonathan Oates,
$275,000.
C St., 1306-1306 C St. NE Corp. to
Matthew P. Hare and Mary Abigail
Foley, $867,000.
Capitol St. N., 6415-William
Andrew and Yuliya Zingertal Rzad
to David C. Johnson, $485,000.
D St., 1030-Addy J. De Kluiver and
Christine M. Klein to Caitlin
Mulney and Timothy W. Drake,
$830,000.
Decatur Pl., 706-F&C
Improvements Corp. to Marvin
Benjamin Haiman and Christopher
Storrs Cotten, $625,000.
Eastern Ave., 1310-Scott R.
Mastin to Carrie L. Gibson and
Brady J. Buckner, $315,000.
Elliott St., 619-Thomas Chaffee
and Whitney Barnett Paxson to
Kenneth M. and Kathleen A.
Fisher, $815,000.
F St., 1606-Nantucket Holdings to
Kate Miller Nesmith, $629,500.
Franklin St., 633-633 Franklin St.
NE Corp. to Daniel B. and Denise
Anthony, $705,000.
Hansberry Ct., 3708-Solomon
Keene Jr. to Lisa R. Larracuente,
$543,000.
I St., 1123-Roderic Darnell Webb
to Dennis Lawrence, $701,000.
Jackson St., 1244-Chris
Chwastyk and Michelle Rios to
Cristina Anne Heffernan and Rishi
Seth, $725,000.
Levis St., 1610-Build for the
Space Corp. to Gregory M. Mathis
Jr., $505,000.
Maryland Ave., 812-Joshua and
Lindsay White to Kevin K. Meehan
and Lauren Frances King,
$958,000.
Morris Pl., 661, No. 1-Anita R.
and Chris D. Iacaruso to Justin
Siraj and Rusa Reimnitz,
$401,500.
Newton St., 3123-FM Properties
Inc. to David Devaney Brantley,
$447,000.
Oklahoma Ave., 300, No. 202Robin Maria Salmon to Anthony
Cassillo, $282,000.
Q St., 53-Andrey Vagichev to
Daniel K. and Brittany M. Roh,
$818,553.
Tennessee Ave., 245-H&H
Development Corp. and Jeffrey
Keil to Alexander Kramer and
Caitlin D. Spicer, $1.28 million.
U St., 176-Hilda Audrey Hamm
and Tracy Lynne Hamm to Nicolas
and Danielle L. Ojeda, $500,935.
Second St., 1831, No. 402-Sara
P. Fatell to Carlos Olmo Armas
Aleman, $420,000.
Third St., 717-Bonnie K.
Shindelman to Benjamin and Holly
Snow, $945,000.
Fourth St., 2701, No. 101-400
Evarts Partners Corp. to Edmund
Horstman, $349,000.
Sixth St., 1114-Terry L. Gillum to
Maria and Phillip Ochs, $840,000.
Eighth St., 4004-Brookland
Holdings Corp. to Ronald B. and
Kristina M. Saville, $224,006.
10th St., 2622-Nancy S. Peterson
to Nora K. Brown, $599,000.
11th St., 5021-Betty W.
Murchison-John and Christopher
A. John to Michael Manglitz and
Jessica Den Houter, $415,000.
13th St., 252-Emil I. Chudnovsky
and Robin L.R. Chudnovsky to
Gareth Jones and Sara Harr,
$665,000.
18th Pl., 308, No. 3-Patrick and
Stefanie O’Brien to Rhett Dillon
Quarles and Katlin Vernoy Kraska,
$330,000.
30th St., 2842-Uptown
Development Corp. to Jeffrey
Robert and Grace Elizabeth
Cecilia, $399,000.
47th St., 115-Edward and Annette
White to Michelle A. Chavis,
$435,000.
15
16
the washington post . thursday, february 22 , 2018
DC
Home
Moth orchid’s ascent obscures other alluring varieties
It’s hard not to like
beautiful moth
orchids, even if
they are cloned by
the millions and
are so ubiquitous
Adrian
that they don’t just
Higgins
decorate our lives,
they infuse them.
GARDENING
They are named
for the way their
floral sprays suggest moths,
though when I study them, I don’t
see a winged insect but a (usually)
white, crystalline shield around
an intricate flower.
With every gaze, I also feel
compelled to tell everyone that as
lovely as a phalaenopsis is, to give
it its botanic name, there are so
many other pretty orchids out
there worth getting to know.
More than 10,000 species of birds
inhabit the planet, but there are
at least twice that many orchid
species. So to think of the orchid
world just in terms of
phalaenopsis is akin to regarding
the avian world solely in terms of
ducks.
Consider the oncidium, whose
delicate sideways sprays of vivid
blooms suggest a model mobile
by Alexander Calder. Or the
ruffled trumpet of the corsage
orchid, the cattleya. Among
terrestrial orchids, none is more
enticingly sinister than the
bulbous, wine-colored slipper
orchid. It’s the orchid Count
Dracula would keep, if he weren’t
sleeping all day.
The moth orchid has become
predominant because growers
have perfected its mass
propagation and because it will
endure more casual care than
others. You may not need a fancy
greenhouse to grow the other
orchids, but you have to be more
diligent about their watering and
feeding, as well as temperature
and light tolerances.
Maybe it’s time to venture
beyond the world of moths. Or
maybe you just want to get a
sense of a broader orchid
universe, in which case this is
your moment.
Many tropical orchids are in
peak bloom during our late
winter, making February and
March prime time for orchid
shows. You can go to
conservatories in most big cities
at this time of year to get your
orchid fix. These include the New
York Botanical Garden, the
Chicago Botanic Garden, the
Missouri Botanical Garden, the
Phipps Conservatory and the
Atlanta Botanical Garden, to
name a few. In Washington, the
annual orchid show organized
jointly by the Smithsonian and
the U.S. Botanic Garden opens
Friday at the botanic garden’s
Tip of the Week
After weeks of root development,
winter weeds are beginning to
develop their top growth and
should be removed before they
become more vigorous in advance
of seeding. Check beds for
bittercress, annual poa, chickweed
and henbit. They are easily weeded
with a sharp hoe, without the need
for herbicides.
— Adrian Higgins
PHOTOS BY MORGAN HORELL/LONGWOOD GARDENS
ABOVE: In the Silver Garden at
Longwood Gardens, 200 blue
vandas form part of “Orchid
Extravaganza.” LEFT: The
moth orchid achieves elegance
in spite of its ubiquity. The
variety Baldan’s Kaleidoscope
is draped around the Music
Room entrance.
conservatory. “Orchid Spectrum”
runs until April 8. Hillwood
Estate, Museum & Gardens holds
Orchid Month in March, which
features tours of the orchid
collection in the greenhouse as
well as workshops.
I did my orchid peeping in the
capacious, ornate glasshouses of
Longwood Gardens, in Kennett
Square, Pa., where “Orchid
Extravaganza” runs until March
25. I asked my guide, Longwood
orchid expert Greg Griffis, how
can we break out of the
phalaenopsis rut?
He took me to the Cascade
Garden, a small gallery within the
greenhouses marked by
Amazonian rain forest plants. A
cluster of creamy yellow blossoms
hovered above a bed of red-tipped
bromeliads. This is a variety
named Lemon Drop, a type of
oncidium orchid.
Oncidium orchids lend
themselves to growing in the
home because they fall into the
middle of ranges for light,
temperature and watering, he
said. “Most orchids bloom on new
growth, and one of the nice things
about oncidiums is they produce
multiple leaves, so it’s easier to
have multiple flowers,” he said.
Bill McLaughlin, plant curator
at the U.S. Botanic Garden, said
oncidiums have some of the most
convoluted parentage in the
byzantine orchid-breeding world,
but that genetic soup works for
them in their ability to survive as
a houseplant rather than
pampered on the greenhouse
bench.
But back to Dracula. I asked
Griffis to show me some tropical
slipper orchids, and he led me to
the winding path in a small, lush
jungle called the Tropical Terrace,
where two great colonies of the
orchids known as
paphiopedilums were clustered.
The first group was of the deep
purple types — collectors call
them vinicolor — near the top of
the winding path. At the bottom,
there were brighter white and
light green versions veering
toward yellow. This is a rarer
group that includes blooms in red
and honey colors. It has taken
breeders more than half a century
to produce these, Griffis said.
“They can flower horribly
deformed and the next year be
perfect,” he said. It sounds like the
purple ones are the slippers to
wear at home. The culture is fairly
easy, he said. They like it warm,
shaded and on the humid side —
an east window would be a good
bet. He recommends growing
them in a soil mix of quarter-inch
bark, perlite and fine charcoal.
They like their roots moist but not
soaking wet.
If you like cymbidiums — I find
the blooms lost in the thicket of
their upright leaves — they are
happy to spend the summers
outside in the shade. The trick is
to leave them out in the fall,
waiting until before the first frost
to bring them in. They need that
chilling to initiate their winter
flowering, Griffis said.
The show in Washington is
themed around color and the
ecology of orchids in the wild. In a
world of the moth orchid, “people
are not grasping that the orchid
family contains over 20,000
species and they grow
everywhere, except in the Arctic,”
McLaughlin said.
Part of the fun of going to a
show is to see orchids that are
fussy and need the right
environments and skilled care. In
other words, don’t try this at
home. The cattleya, indescribably
luxuriant in its color and display,
needs bright light, high humidity
and other special requirements.
“They’re not great houseplants,”
McLaughlin said. “I have to say,
their colors are amazing.”
Although they are treedwellers, cattleyas are exquisitely
presented in containers in the
Acacia Passage at Longwood, a
glass hallway also marked by
flowering, scented acacias. In an
adjoining gallery called the Silver
Garden, vanda orchids are
arranged almost as an art
installation, more than 200 aloft
on wires in a handful of intensely
blue varieties. The roots hang
down like Rapunzel’s hair.
Because vandas draw their
moisture from the jungle fog,
their roots need continual
misting, as often as three times a
day. That’s every day. Cancel your
vacation.
But perhaps the greatest value
of a show like this is to see how
the gardeners and designers
elevate the lowly moth orchid,
which is done by planting them
en masse — 600 yellow and white
flowering varieties alone on the
12-foot entrance arch in the East
Conservatory. The show was
designed by Longwood’s James
Sutton.
In the Fern Passage, I find
cascades of moth orchids unlike
anything you will see at the
grocery store — the flower spikes
are four feet or more and with 30
huge blooms on them. This is
achieved by stopping them from
flowering for as long as five years,
Griffis said. When they are let off
the leash, they go to town.
At the entrance to the
conservatory’s Music Room, 350
moth orchids are planted in
moss-draped gutters, 22 rows of
them, to form a curtain. They are
all the same, a delightfully
patterned variety named Baldan’s
Kaleidoscope. The bloom is
golden with a tracery of magenta
venation. The archways
demonstrate once again that the
moth orchid may be common, but
it’s never vulgar.
adrian.higgins@washpost.com
@adrian_higgins on Twitter
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read past columns by Higgins at
washingtonpost.com/home.
Wellness
17
DC
NUTRITION
ISTOCK
Understanding cravings can help you control them
BY
C ARRIE D ENNETT
Cravings vs. impulses
Some cravings would be better
described as an urge or impulse.
A true craving is more of a slow
burn — like when you have a yen
for a favorite dish or cuisine that
you haven’t enjoyed for a while —
that will smolder until you eventually satisfy it. An impulse is
more of a flash in the pan — it
comes on suddenly and will burn
out on its own if you let it.
Unfortunately, our brains
seem to be more wired to respond
to impulses than to think beyond
them. One technique for dealing
with impulse-type cravings is to
“surf the urge.” To do this, imagine your craving as an ocean
wave. Watch it as it builds gradually, getting stronger and stronger until it peaks and then gradually dissipates. Rather than deny
the urge, actively surf it. Having
the experience of watching the
urge fade can make it easier to
handle impulsive cravings when
they next arise.
If your craving for, say, a cookie
just won’t go away, get the best
cookie you can find, and sit and
savor it. What doesn’t work is
chasing the craving with foods
you consider more “acceptable.”
If what you truly want is a cookie,
all the apples or cinnamon rice
cakes in the world won’t satisfy it.
Environmental cues
Do you crave popcorn the moment you step into a movie theater? Grab a snack every time you
lounge in front of the television?
Get the urge for a cookie each day
at 3 p.m.? If you’ve come to
associate certain times, places or
activities with a particular food,
what probably started as a craving has morphed into mindless
eating, then on to pure habit. To
untangle yourself from this Pavlovian response to food, practice
asking yourself “Am I hungry?”
whenever you have the urge to
eat. If the answer is no, ask
yourself, “Why do I want to eat
this?” If your answer is something like “Because it’s there” or
“Because it’s what I always do,”
consider experimenting with not
having the food to see how it
feels.
Emotional and
psychological needs
Do you crave ice cream or
pasta when you’re feeling
stressed, sad, angry or lonely? A
2014 study co-authored by psychologist Traci Mann, author of
“Secrets From the Eating Lab,”
found that eating comfort foods
doesn’t improve mood any faster
than eating nothing at all. Cravings may also hit when we are
bored or busy and feel the need
for stimulation or pleasure. Plus,
emotional eating doesn’t help
you get to the heart of what’s
bothering you.
Food addiction
The types of foods that tend to
trigger cravings — the “hyperpalatable” foods that contain the
trifecta of added sugar, salt and
fat — often get labeled as
“addictive.” Although so