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The Washington Post - January 11, 2018

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
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THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
. $2
Trump vows to fight
injunction on DACA
“It’s terrifying, and you just have no control, and it’s taking out everything in its path.”
Lindsey Reed, bartender in Santa Barbara, Calif.
A ‘DREAMERS’ DEAL WOULD FACE HURDLES
Immigration bill could arrive by end of this week
M ARIA S ACCHETTI,
P ATRICIA S ULLIVAN
AND E D O ’ K EEFE
BY
The Trump administration
vowed Wednesday to fight a federal injunction that temporarily
blocked its plans to rescind work
permits for young undocumented immigrants, insisting that
Congress must find a solution for
those known as “dreamers.”
On Capitol Hill, lawmakers
said a bipartisan proposal could
come as early as Thursday or
Friday, but such legislation would
probably face fierce resistance
from progressives opposed to
ceding any ground on immigration rights and conservatives
who feel the same on security
issues.
President Trump has made
MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Firefighters search a car trapped under debris from a mudslide Wednesday in Montecito, Calif., northwest of Los Angeles.
After mudslides, ‘everything’s gone’
M AX U FBERG,
M ARK B ERMAN
AND S COTT W ILSON
BY
montecito, calif. — Emergency crews climbed and clawed
through thick flows of mud and
dangerous debris Wednesday in
some of Southern California’s
most exclusive neighborhoods,
as the death toll from the collapse of rain-soaked hillsides
rose to 17 people with more than
a dozen others missing.
This neighborhood of gated
Death toll at 17 in Calif.
region charred by fires;
at least 13 are missing
homes and sloping streets
just south of Santa Barbara has
taken on the character of a
Hollywood set, weeks after
flames threatened the kind of
destruction that mudslides have
done in days. Wide swaths of
For Virginia’s top salesman,
legacy is still being written
BY
ash and earth have smashed
multimillion-dollar homes into
pieces, filled hotel lobbies with
muck, and blocked the main
highway from Los Angeles for
miles with mud several feet
deep.
But the human tragedy, which
unfolded overnight Tuesday and
continued Wednesday, far exceeded the emotional punch of
the severe property damage.
Whole families have been carried away by the mud. Rescued
children who survived their par-
MUDSLIDES CONTINUED ON A2
DACA CONTINUED ON A6
ICE targets 7-Eleven stores
Immigration agents delivered audit
notices across the country. A6
Democrats’ debate
To stand their ground on DACA and
funding, or force a shutdown? A7
Retirements fuel GOP
fears of losing the House
Rep. Issa of California
is latest political veteran
to say he won’t run again
ents remain in critical condition
in a hospital whose staffers are
challenged by road closures and
their own damaged property. At
least 13 other people are missing.
As helicopters picked families
off the roofs of their battered
homes, community members
branched out on their own to
look for survivors and bodies,
searching creek beds and
canyons, runoff points at local beaches, and splintered
piles of wood and stone that
cracking down on illegal immigration a top priority, a stance
that was underlined Wednesday
with a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement search for undocumented workers at dozens of
7-Eleven stores nationwide. The
agency said it was the largest
targeting of a single employer
since Trump took office.
A key part of Trump’s crackdown is the decision to end the
Obama-era Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals program,
BY
M IKE D E B ONIS
The number of House Republicans planning to forgo reelection
bids this year is on track to outpace majority-party retirements
in any recent election where control of the chamber flipped — an
ominous sign fueling GOP fears
of a political wave that could shift
power to Democrats in November’s midterm elections.
Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) on
Wednesday became the latest
GOP veteran to announce that he
would not seek reelection, two
days after his fellow California
Republican, House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Edward R. Royce, said he would
retire. Democrats had placed
both men high on their midterm
target lists, and key congressional
forecasters immediately moved
their seats to likely Democratic
pickups after the Republicans’
announcements.
Issa’s and Royce’s departures
come amid other gathering head
ISSA CONTINUED ON A4
New front in GOP’s civil war?
Mitt Romney’s resurgence feeds
debate over his party’s future. A4
In a freer Saudi Arabia, artists dream — and worry
Hopes for a creative flowering are tempered by concerns about just how much freedom is on offer
G REGORY S . S CHNEIDER
es. I’m okay with that.”
This jab at his neighboring
state never fails to get a laugh,
Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe
whether McAuliffe delivers it to
bounds out of a gray SUV in the
an audience of cyber-spooks or to
loading dock under the Renaisa startled patron in a coffee shop.
sance Hotel in downtown WashIt’s salesman’s patter, honed after
ington. Bodyguards in suits race
four years of using his position as
to keep up.
Moments later he’s seated in a
governor to pitch companies on
the advantages of locatdarkened
ballroom,
where Deputy National
ing in Virginia. Now his
term in office is winding
Intelligence Director Sue
down, but McAuliffe is
Gordon is warning cystill wound up.
bersecurity-conference
“We got some Califorattendees about threats
nia folks, right?” he says,
and vulnerabilities. Into more whoops. “Yeah?
telligence officials and
You like sharks? . . . You
security executives, dincome to Virginia, we
ing on chicken, clap so- McAuliffe
don’t have sharks in Virberly.
ginia Beach. Dolphins, they come
Then McAuliffe takes the lecright up to the beach, they pick up
tern.
your children, they give rides,
“Good afternoon, everybody!”
they drop them back off.”
he booms. “How many Virginia
The bada-bing is why some
residents we got?”
wrote off McAuliffe as miscast for
The crowd seems to perk up.
stiff-necked Virginia politics. He
“Woooo!” a few people shout.
was too slick, a Bill Clinton crony
“Fantastic,” McAuliffe says.
and operator who was unpre“Maryland?” A slightly softer chopared for the tedious grind of
rus of wooos, to which he responds: “You guys like paying taxMCAULIFFE CONTINUED ON A10
BY K AREEM F AHIM
IN RIYADH, SAUDI ARABIA
T
IMAN AL-DABBAGH FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Filmmaker Khaled Nadershah, left, and actress Summer Shesha in Jiddah. With bureaucratic
strictures easing, permits to shoot in Jiddah’s streets came through in just a week, Nadershah said.
IN THE NEWS
THE NATION
GIANLUIGI GUERCIA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Wars’ effects on animals The frequency,
rather than intensity, of armed conflict is a
factor in population decline, a study found. A3
Bang for the buck Republicans, seeking quick
benefits from the tax law, want employers to
withhold less from paychecks. A15
A decision by the U.S.
attorney general to seek
additional federal enforcement of marijuana
laws could cause election-year strife among
Republicans. A8
Congressional Democrats hit a “breaking
point” this week, opting
to release reports and
transcripts without
GOP buy-in. A12
THE WORLD
President Trump is expected to continue
Iran’s reprieve from
tough sanctions but signal his dislike of the related nuclear deal. A12
South Korea’s leader
attributed new Korean
talks to President
Trump. A13
Russia identified a village from which it said
drones attacked its
Hmeimim military base
in Syria. A14
THE ECONOMY
There is little correlation between the dangers of various drugs
and the stringency of
laws regulating their
use, a report noted. A17
President Trump privately suggested increasing the gas tax to
help fund an infrastructure overhaul, but GOP
congressional leaders
shot that idea down. A17
“Blockchain,” the technology underpinning
the bitcoin craze, is
feeding excitement
about how the concept
can move beyond digital
currency. A17
THE REGION
Democrat Shelly Simonds, who lost a drawing
to break a deadlocked
Virginia legislative race,
conceded defeat, giving
the GOP narrow control
of the House of Delegates. B1
The drama of recounts
and tiebreakers for control of Virginia’s House
of Delegates gave way to
pledges of trust. And the
session’s opening day in
Maryland was filled
with ceremonies. B1
Virginia’s first openly
transgender lawmaker,
Danica Roem, feels the
pressure to prove she
can pass legislation. B1
A former Baltimore
councilwoman who was
attacked by two teens in
2016 became a mentor
to them. B1
More than 400 families and individuals have
been placed in housing
as part of the city’s
“Home for the Holidays”
campaign. B3
A federal appeals
court decided not to
block a Virginia Republican from being sworn
into the House of Delegates over a ballot mixup. B4
he government of this ultraconservative kingdom
has lately become a tireless patron of the
arts, sponsoring concerts by
Western performers such as New
Age artist Yanni and promoting
comic festivals and book fairs.
Cinemas, banned for decades, are
set to open soon.
The thaw is part of a push by
Saudi Arabia’s 32-year-old crown
prince, Mohammed bin Salman,
to ease some social restrictions,
and the flurry of official announcements has thrilled a generation of young Saudis for whom
a night of music or movies most
often meant trips abroad.
But the plans have raised concerns, too, about the kind of cultural scene that emerges in a
place governed by an austere religious creed and where the benefactor is an absolute monarchy
that takes a dim view of unfettered speech. The undertaking
SAUDIS CONTINUED ON A11
Inside
LOCAL LIVING
Opening up a world
Here are nine ways to
help a child with learning
or behavior issues.
ST YLE
‘All the Money’ gap
A pay disparity affecting
actress Michelle Williams
generates outrage. C1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A15
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES ......................... A20
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B5
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS ............................ A13
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 37
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
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A2
EZ
The Labor Department reports on jobless claims for the
week ending Jan. 6, which are expected to come in at
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All day
The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions
Committee meets to vote on the nominations for various
Education, Labor, and Health and Human Services
department positions. Visit washingtonpost.com/politics
for developments.
All day
The seventh anniversary of the U.S.-Russia civilian
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7 p.m.
The Washington Capitals host the Carolina Hurricanes
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CO R R ECTI O N S
A headline and photo caption
with a Jan. 10 A-section article
about the Interior Department
adopting a new screening
process for discretionary
grants to outside groups
incorrectly said that it was the
Environmental Protection
Agency taking that action. The
EPA instituted a similar policy
last summer.
A Jan. 9 A-section article about
an embryo-custody battle in
Colorado incorrectly located the
town of Glenwood Springs. It is
north of Aspen, not south.
A Dec. 10 Arts & Style article
about memorable movie lines of
2017 misidentified an actress in
“The Big Sick.” She is Zoe Kazan,
not Zoe Kasdan.
The Washington Post is committed to
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. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
Playing ping-pong with the president
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President Trump,
it has long been
observed, has a
propensity to
agree with the last
thing he hears.
Dana
Certainly he
Milbank
has core
WASHINGTON convictions —
Hillary is crooked,
SKETCH
there was no
collusion, he is
very successful and brilliant —
but beyond that he has shown
himself to be swayed with
remarkable ease: He said he was
rethinking his position on
Obamacare after a post-election
talk with President Obama,
revised his views on NATO after
speaking with Europeans,
softened his views on China after
a chin-wag with the Chinese,
shifted on NAFTA after talking
with the Mexicans and switched
his budget views after hearing
from Chuck and Nancy.
This raises the tantalizing
prospect that Trump could be a
better president if he were not
surrounded by the likes of
Stephen Miller, as well as the
alarming possibility that he
could be even worse if the last
voice he heard before making a
decision were that of, say,
Vladimir Putin, or Alex Jones
(who boasts that Trump repeats
his conspiracy theories word for
word).
But this all depends on what is
going on in Trump’s head when
he repeats the last words he
hears: Is he actually internalizing
the views, or is he merely
echoing? Is he a chameleon or a
parrot?
Now we know. This week’s
extraordinary session in the
Cabinet Room with a bicameral,
bipartisan group of lawmakers,
and an impulsive decision by
Trump to let journalists film
55 minutes of his meeting, gave
the world a glimpse of Trump’s
agree-with-the-last-speaker
tendency we’ve heard described.
Clearly, Trump is merely
echoing, not embracing, the
words he hears. No mind could
possibly assimilate as many
diametrically opposed ideas as
Trump’s appeared to in those
55 minutes.
Watching that session was as
exciting as watching China’s
Olympic ping-pong team — and
the president was the ball. Trump
— remarkably unideological and
also undisciplined — pinged
from one lawmaker’s argument
to another’s, agreeing heartily
with virtually all, no matter how
at odds they were with each
other.
Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) told
Trump that DACA legislation to
protect immigrant “dreamers”
had to be done “in a matter of
days — literally of days,” referring
to a Jan. 19 budget deadline.
Replied Trump: “I agree with
that, Dick. I very much agree
with that.”
A few minutes later, Rep.
Martha McSally (R-Ariz.) took
exactly the opposite view,
suggesting that DACA action
could wait until March and that
instead there had to be an
immediate Pentagon budget
increase: “Those who need us
right now before the January 19
deadline is our military.”
Replied Trump: “I think a lot
of people would agree with that.
We need our military.”
House Minority Whip Steny
Hoyer (D-Md.), paddled Trump
back the other way, saying more
military spending would have to
be accompanied by similar hikes
for domestic programs such as
infrastructure.
Replied Trump: “I think we
can do a great infrastructure bill.”
This was fun!
Minutes after Hoyer invoked
the phrase “comprehensive
immigration reform” — a phrase
hard-liners see as code for
“amnesty” — Trump was using
the phrase, too.
“When you talk about
comprehensive immigration
reform,” Trump said (after Sen.
Lindsey Graham, a GOP
maverick, had also floated the
idea), “which is where I would
like to get to eventually — if we
do the right bill here, we are not
very far way.”
Anybody can play this game.
House Majority Leader Kevin
McCarthy (R-Calif.) and Sen.
David Perdue (R-Ga.) both said
border security and a solution to
“chain migration” — a
conservative priority — must be
included in the DACA bill. Trump
readily agreed.
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-
Calif.) proposed the opposite, a
“clean DACA bill” — that is,
without border security and
chain migration — before taking
up a comprehensive overhaul,
and Trump said, “I would like to
do that.”
McCarthy, alarmed, swatted
Trump back in the other
direction. He reiterated that the
DACA bill should include border
security and chain migration.
Trump agreed with this, too.
“And the lottery,” he added,
tossing in another conservative
priority about making
immigration merit-based.
Back and forth Trump
bounced.
One moment he appeared to
agree with Perdue that the DACA
bill would include the
conservatives’ chain-migration
plan. The next moment he
appeared to confirm to Sen. Jeff
Flake (R-Ariz.) that the DACA
legislation would not be paired
with that provision.
One moment he was saying
“without the wall, we cannot
have border security.” The next
he was assuring Sen. Mazie
Hirono (D-Hawaii) that “there
are large areas where you don’t
need a wall.”
Trump called it a success.
“We’re all very much on a similar
page,” he concluded.
Perhaps he didn’t care that, in
his reflexive echoing of each
speaker, he had contradicted
himself repeatedly. More likely
he didn’t even notice.
Twitter: @Milbank
Hundreds of homes still in danger from mudslides
MUDSLIDES FROM A1
once were homes.
Churches became shelters for
the thousands of evacuees, who
may have no place to live for
months. Thousands of others are
without water or power and may
remain so for days.
Brenda Bottoms, a Montecito
resident, described on Wednesday the muddy handprints she
saw on the sides of neighboring
homes, which had been slammed
and partly carried off by a fastmoving mudflow.
“This is a neighborhood,” Bottoms said, tears running down
her cheeks. “You know the family
with five kids that live right over
there. And now everything’s
gone.”
The mudslides mark the cruel
postscript to the Thomas Fire,
which burned for much of December, becoming the largest
wildfire by area in California
history. For weeks before Christmas, flames scorched the steep
hills above Montecito, squeezed
between the Santa Ynez Mountains and the Pacific Ocean
northwest of Los Angeles, forcing
9,000 residents to evacuate.
Firefighters from across the
state worked to save nearly all of
Montecito’s houses, an achievement that city residents describe
as nothing short of a miracle
given the intensity of the offshore
winds and the ferocity of the fire
that burned through tinder-dry
KENNETH SONG/SANTA BARBARA NEWS-PRESS/REUTERS
Rescuers carry a woman trapped by mud Tuesday in Montecito,
Calif. At least 100 homes have been destroyed by mudslides.
brush and tree stands in a rainy
season without rain.
The blaze left the mountains
bare, especially along the slopes
and in the canyons just above
Montecito, a stretch running
from near Westmont College to
roughly Romero Canyon, where a
few hundred residents were
trapped temporarily by the mudslides.
Those neighborhoods, which
include the homes of Oprah Winfrey, Rob Lowe and other Hollywood stars, are now the most
vulnerable. Evacuation orders
were issued days before the pre-
dicted downpour this week, sparing many when the hillsides, no
longer held together by brush
and trees, spilled into the neighborhoods.
Santa Barbara County fire officials said Wednesday that 100
homes were destroyed by the
mudslides and an additional 300
were damaged. Many more remain in jeopardy — fire officials
say as many as 1,500 — but the
weather could turn in their favor.
The National Weather Service
forecasts sun and light wind
through early next week, when
work crews also expect that
Highway 101 will reopen where it
passes through Montecito. But
periods of rain are predicted to
follow.
One of the main arteries for
the mud has been Hot Springs
Road and Olive Mill Road, which
join and run from the hills to the
sea, passing Our Lady of Mount
Carmel Church, running over
Highway 101 and ending at the
exclusive Coral Casino Beach and
Cabana Club. Bodies have been
found along its length, and a
woman’s remains were recovered
on Butterfly Beach, just below the
Coral Casino.
Things looked “apocalyptic”
after the deluge, said Lindsey
Reed, 33, who works as a bartender and server at the private
beach club.
“It’s terrifying, and you just
have no control, and it’s taking
out everything in its path,” she
said.
Where Olive Mill meets Coast
Village Road stands the Montecito Inn, a local landmark
whose ground floor has been
filled with mud and debris. Along
Coast Village, the main business
route in Montecito that runs
parallel to Highway 101, businesses have been damaged. Fire
officials said eight have been
destroyed so far in the county.
Throughout Wednesday, residents who ventured outside witnessed the grim chore of search
and rescue. Some crews had to be
dropped into impassable areas by
helicopter Wednesday, and the
California National Guard has
lent military vehicles that rescue
officials say have proved invaluable.
Peter Hartmann, a dentist who
lives in Santa Barbara and works
in Montecito, watched crews gingerly dig through mounds of
mud, unsure of what they would
find. What they did discover was
agonizing.
“A 2- or a 3-year-old girl had
been pulled out of the mud by
firefighters,” said Hartman, 60,
recounting what he saw. “She
wasn’t breathing yet, from what I
understand from a neighbor who
was there.”
Hartmann said “it was just
heart-wrenching” to see her
small,
mud-covered
body
emerge. He said he recalled
thinking, “God, just let her live.”
Rescue workers tended to her,
cleaning the mud off her face.
And as they cleaned her up, she
started breathing.
“That firefighter actually
broke down and cried after she
was in the ambulance,” he said.
Hartmann, a freelance photojournalist in his spare time, spent
Wednesday traversing the area,
mostly on foot with many roads
closed or impassable. Some residents who ignored the evacuation orders were effectively cut
off. He saw others trekking a mile
to the supermarket, walking back
with water bottles and food
stuffed into their backpacks.
Early Wednesday afternoon,
Hartmann came across another
group of search-and-rescue
workers digging in the mud, this
time with a tragic result.
“I think they just found another body,” he said. “The coroner
came and took it away.”
On Para Grande Lane, near the
base of Cold Spring Creek, Boris
Romanowsky, 59, shook his head
Wednesday as he surveyed the
damage. Romanowsky, a former
firefighter, could see what should
have been done before the slides
began.
“I knew that bridge should
have been fixed about five years
ago. That thing was a choke
point,” he said, pointing first to
the bridge that was destroyed by
the flooding, and then to the
property adjacent to the bridge,
where the walls showed a water
line several feet off the ground.
“This house just sold,” he said.
“They just had a big estate sale
about six months ago.”
Romanowsky said the rush of
the flood, coupled with harsh
rains and a large gas explosion on
the east end of town, made for a
disorienting experience.
“The noise was so loud you
could hardly hear yourself think,”
he said. “We had fire on the
eastern sky before sunrise and we
had this train wreck of a river
going through at the same time,
and we had rain so loud that you
could hardly see.”
Romanowsky said he has been
checking in on his neighbors,
many of whom, like him, still
have no power or water. He said,
despite the forecasts for more
rain in the coming weeks, he has
no plans to leave.
“I monitor on a transistor
radio,” he said. “I’ve been here
since the first fire. I don’t evacuate.”
mark.berman@washpost.com
scott.wilson@washpost.com
Berman and Wilson reported from
Washington. Avi Selk, Marwa
Eltagouri and Julie Tate in
Washington contributed to this
report.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
SU
Politics & the Nation
Frequency of war found to be key factor in wildlife declines
Research also suggests
animals can bounce back
after conflicts end
BY
K ARIN B RULLIARD
As if we needed another argument against war, here goes: It’s
bad for wild animals.
This is true even with lowlevel conflict, and it’s especially
true if the conflict repeats or
drags on, according to a new
study published in Nature. In a
wide-ranging examination of the
net effect of such disruptions on
African wildlife populations over
more than six decades, researchers found the frequency of war —
rather than the intensity — to be
a key factor in declines of wildlife.
“It takes a relatively little
amount of conflict, and a relatively low frequency of conflict,
before the average population is
declining,” said lead author Joshua Daskin, a conservation ecologist and postdoctoral fellow at
Yale University. “All the socioeco-
nomic things that come along
with a war are probably making
conservation quite difficult.”
The researchers’ conclusion
might sound obvious, but there
has been little previous examination of the overall impact of
armed conflict on animals. The
case-study work to date focused
on specific conflicts’ consequences and found both positive
and negative effects.
The negative effects are numerous. Land mines and bombs
can kill fauna as well as human
targets. Armies sometimes intentionally destroy critical habitat
— by dumping herbicides on
forests, for example, as the United States did during the Vietnam
War — or finance their fight by
selling ivory. Collapsed institutions mean less enforcement of
laws protecting animals, and
economic fallout can force desperate civilians to hunt wild
animals for food.
On the other hand, wars can
also cause human displacement,
and “anything that causes people
to vacate can be a beneficial
thing for nonhuman wildlife,”
said co-author Robert Pringle, an
assistant professor of ecology
and evolutionary biology at
Princeton University. Poaching
and habitat destruction might
slow, and mining might stop.
This is sometimes called the
“refuge effect,” and it can be seen
in the demilitarized zone dividing North Korea and South
Korea.
Pringle and Daskin, who finished his PhD at Princeton last
year, both do research in Mozambique’s Gorongosa National
Park, where a 15-year civil war
nearly decimated wildlife. They
wanted to know more about the
big picture — is war generally
positive, negative or neutral for
wildlife? Among other reasons,
they note, the question is important because the vast majority of
wars since 1950 have taken place
in the world’s most biodiverse
regions.
The pair decided to focus on
protected areas in Africa between 1946 and 2010. They
mapped events there using a
standard definition — fights that
killed at least one person in a
broader battle that caused
25 human deaths in a year — and
found conflicts in 71 percent of
the areas during that time peri-
od. Then came the hardest part:
finding reliable wildlife population data.
Daskin said he used published
research as well as “gray literature” such as park management
figures, government wildlife
agency documents and reports
from nongovernmental organizations. He looked only at populations of large herbivores, in
part because they “have really
outsize roles in maintaining
these ecosystems,” but also because they’re counted more easily and, therefore, more frequently. In the end, Daskin had data
for 253 wildlife populations and
36 species, including giraffes,
warthogs and wildebeests.
Next, the authors looked at
correlations between wildlife
populations and variables that
can influence them, like drought,
human population density and
the presence of mining, as well as
two factors related to war: conflict frequency and conflict intensity.
When the authors crunched it
all together, the biggest and only
statistically significant predictor
of wildlife declines was conflict
frequency. While wildlife popula-
VERMONT
State Senate approves
use of recreational pot
Ohio school’s $11,000
security charge violates
free speech, suit claims
BY
ROBERT F. BUKATY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A pedestrian splashes through a puddle of melted snow Wednesday in Portland, Maine, as temperatures
climbed to the mid-30s. Milder temperatures were a welcome relief after a long stretch of subzero cold in
the state. The brief January thaw in the Northeast has led to ice jams and flooding in some areas.
— Associated Press
FLORIDA
Court rejects award
to man shot by deputy
A federal appeals court has
thrown out a $23 million jury
award to a black man who was
unarmed when he was shot and
paralyzed by a Florida sheriff’s
deputy.
The U.S. Court of Appeals for
the 11th Circuit in Atlanta
ordered a new trial on claims by
Dontrell Stephens, 24. Two of the
three judges agreed that jury
instructions were flawed. A
federal jury in South Florida had
awarded the verdict last February.
Palm Beach County Sheriff’s
Sgt. Adams Lin shot Stephens in
September 2013, four seconds
after stopping Stephens for riding
his bike into traffic.
Lin mistook Stephens’s
cellphone for a gun, saying he
feared for his life when Stephens
flashed his left hand toward him.
Lin’s dashboard-camera video
showed the phone was in
Stephens’s right hand.
carrying out a terrorist attack
against a mass transit system,
according to an indictment filed
in federal court in Manhattan. He
faces life in prison if convicted.
Ullah was previously charged
in a criminal complaint filed by
prosecutors shortly after his
arrest last month.
According to prosecutors,
Ullah attempted to detonate a
pipe bomb secured to his body in
a pedestrian tunnel in the subway
station in Manhattan’s Times
Square that is connected to the
sprawling Port Authority Bus
Terminal on the morning of
Dec. 11.
Ullah was hospitalized with
injuries suffered after the bomb
ignited but failed to detonate;
three other people suffered minor
injuries, according to
prosecutors.
Ullah, who has lived in the
— Associated Press
NEW YORK
ISIS-linked suspect
indicted in bomb plot
The Bangladeshi man accused
of attempting a suicide bombing
in a busy New York City
commuter hub in the name of the
Islamic State in December was
indicted on U.S. terrorism
charges by a grand jury on
Wednesday.
Akayed Ullah, 27, faces charges
that include supporting a foreign
terrorist organization, using a
weapon of mass destruction and
“War is awful for people. It’s
bad for wildlife. But it’s not so
cataclysmically bad that we
should be giving up on anything,”
Pringle said. “In fact, there are
great opportunities for restoration.”
He and Daskin hope their
findings can help governments
and wildlife organizations better
predict and mitigate the influence of conflict on wildlife. Both
point to the place where they do
work — Gorongosa National
Park — as an example. It lost
about 90 percent of its wildlife
during the war that ended in
1992, but it’s now back to “about
80 percent of the prewar populations,” Daskin said.
“That’s been achieved not just
by trucking in large numbers of
animals from other protected
areas, as has often been highlighted, but by creating the conditions in the local region for
conservation to be possible,”
Daskin said. “It’s an excellent
case study in what can happen
after the conflict.”
karin.brulliard@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/animalia
University is sued over
fee for white nationalist
DIGEST
The state Senate on Wednesday
gave final approval to a bill that
would allow the recreational use
of marijuana, putting Vermont on
course to become the first state in
the country to legalize pot by an
act of the legislature rather than
through a citizen referendum.
By a voice vote, the Senate
agreed to a proposal that would
make it legal for adults to possess
and grow small amounts of
marijuana but does not set up a
system to tax and regulate the
production and sale of the drug.
The bill was approved by the
House last week, and Gov. Phil
Scott (R) has indicated he will
sign it.
The bill, which would take
effect July 1, would allow adults
older than 21 to possess up to
1 ounce of marijuana and have
two mature marijuana plants or
four immature plants in each
dwelling unit, no matter how
many people live there.
tion trajectories stayed stable in
peaceful times, they dropped
with even a slight increase in
conflict and were “almost invariably negative” in high-conflict
zones, the authors found.
Pringle said they were somewhat surprised that conflict intensity wasn’t correlated with
dips in wild animals. The numbers don’t suggest why, and Pringle said that understanding
these dynamics will take more
research with larger data sets.
But he and Daskin have theories.
“Our interpretation is that
conflict destabilizes everything.
When people don’t feel secure,
institutions start to break down,
livelihoods start to be disrupted,”
Pringle said. Yet intense conflict
may provide a buffer for wildlife,
because “people evacuate. People
don’t hang around and go set
snares in the forest.”
The researchers emphasized
that their findings were not limited to gloom. The only cases of
extinction in the areas they studied took place in the Pian Upe
Wildlife Reserve in Uganda,
where giraffes and two species of
antelope vanished between 1983
and 1995.
United States since 2011, told
police after the blast that he “did
it for the Islamic State,” according
to the criminal complaint.
— Reuters
Puppy joins Boston museum
staff: Boston’s Museum of Fine
Arts on Wednesday introduced
the newest addition to its staff, a
Weimaraner puppy named Riley
that will be trained to sniff out
insects or other pests that could
potentially damage priceless
works of art. Riley belongs to and
will be trained by Nicki Luongo,
the museum’s director of
protective services. Deputy
Director Katie Getchell told the
Boston Globe that insects are an
ongoing concern for museums.
Riley will be used behind the
scenes and won’t be seen by
visitors.
— Associated Press
S USAN S VRLUGA
A supporter of white nationalist Richard Spencer sued the
University of Cincinnati this
week, claiming the school’s president violated Spencer’s right to
free speech. It was the latest
lawsuit seeking to force a public
university to allow Spencer’s
controversial message on campus.
The school had agreed to allow
Spencer to speak — something
many universities declined to do
in the days and weeks after
Spencer led torch-bearing followers in a march at the University of Virginia that touched off a
weekend of violent clashes in
August. But University of Cincinnati officials required a nearly
$11,000 security fee for the event,
the suit claims. The room itself
would cost $500 to rent.
The lawsuit claims that
heightened security costs for
such campus events result from
left-wing extremists threatening
the safety of conservative speakers and that imposing such steep
fees amounts to unconstitutional
discrimination based on the expected content of the speech.
“A price tag cannot be affixed
to the fundamental right of free
speech,” said Kyle Bristow, attorney for Spencer supporter Cameron Padgett, who had requested
the Ohio venue. “A speech tax
does not comport with the United States Constitution and will
not whatsoever be tolerated by
my client.”
Greg Vehr, a University of
Cincinnati spokesman, said: “As
a state institution, and as a
matter of principle, we adhere to
the foundational rights embedded in the First Amendment.
This includes protecting the
right to free speech. We have
stood by this principle all along
and will continue to do so.
“However, Spencer was not
invited or sponsored by any
member of the university community, and like other non-sponsored speakers, he must pay a fee
to rent university space. This
includes a security fee. The fee
assessed is a mere fraction of the
costs we anticipate incurring as a
result of this event, but we hold
firm in our efforts to respect the
principles of free speech while
maintaining safety on campus.”
At the University of Florida in
October, officials spent more
than $500,000 on security when
Spencer spoke on campus, and
the governor declared a state of
emergency in advance of the
white nationalist’s appearance.
Padgett continued to seek
campus venues for Spencer’s
speeches, requests that have put
public schools in the difficult
position of balancing the First
Amendment with their concerns
about safety and their messages
addressing the importance of
inclusion and diversity on campuses.
In recent months, Padgett
sued Michigan State, Penn State
and Ohio State universities after
the schools denied requests to
have Spencer speak on campus.
Last spring, a federal judge
overturned Auburn University’s
decision to cancel a speech by
Spencer, finding no evidence
that Spencer promoted violence
and ruling the ban as unconstitutional.
The lawsuit against the University of Cincinnati’s president,
Neville Pinto, was filed Monday
in the U.S. District Court for the
Southern District of Ohio.
susan.svrluga@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Calif. congressman says he won’t seek reelection
ISSA FROM A1
winds for the GOP, including national polls showing a growing
voter preference for Democratic
congressional candidates; robust
fundraising and grass-roots support for candidates challenging
Republican incumbents; and the
drag of President Trump’s unpopularity on his party.
“It kind of reminds me of
2006,” said Rep. Patrick J. Tiberi
(R-Ohio), referring to the year
Democrats picked up 31 seats and
retook the majority after 12 years.
“It felt like you were running
uphill every day in terms of the
environment, and I think that’s
how it feels now.”
Tiberi is among the departing
Republicans, resigning his House
seat on Thursday to begin a job
leading the Ohio Business
Roundtable. He cited family reasons as the driving factor for his
decision, but he said the political
reality was hard to ignore.
At least 29 House seats held by
Republicans will be open in November; only 22 GOP seats were
open in 2006, and 19 Democratic
seats in 2010. The 1994 “Republican revolution” that swept the
GOP into power after decades of
Democratic rule saw 27 Democratic retirements.
A striking feature of the slate of
GOP retirements is the number of
committee chairmen, including
Royce and Issa, who had already
lost or were about to lose their
leadership posts as a result of
party-governed term limits. The
prospect of losing control of the
chamber may have made staying
in office even less palatable — but
it also will leave the House GOP
conference with far fewer experienced lawmakers.
“They saw 2006 or 2010, and
they’re like: ‘You know what? I’m
going to take a different road,’ ”
Tiberi said.
House Republican rules limit
chairmen to three consecutive
terms. Five sitting chairmen who
have exhausted their tenures, including Royce, are forgoing reelection. Top GOP leaders cite
those party rules as a primary
reason for the spate of retirements.
“Very few people are excited
about going from a committee
chairmanship to being a rankand-file member, and those who
ASTRID RIECKEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) speaks to reporters after a meeting with Deputy Attorney General Rod J.
Rosenstein in May. Issa announced Wednesday that he will not run for another term.
do it, like Darrell Issa, don’t do it
for very long,” said Rep. Steve
Stivers (R-Ohio), who leads the
National Republican Congressional Committee. “It’s just the
circle of life, and we have to be
ready for it. We have good candidates, and I feel good about our
chances in these seats.”
Indeed, not all the retirements
present clear pickup opportunities for Democrats. Many of the
open seats are in districts considered solidly Republican, vacated
by lawmakers who might have
easily secured reelection.
The obstacles for the GOP,
however, are unmistakable. Democrats need a net gain of 24 seats
to capture the majority.
Democrats average a 13-point
lead over Republicans in surveys
over the past month pitting a
generic Democratic candidate
against a Republican. That’s larger than the six- to eight-point lead
that analysts say Democrats need
to retake the House. So far this
cycle, the NRCC has been outraised by its Democratic counterpart, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee,
though the NRCC maintains a
cash-on-hand advantage and a
major independent committee
supporting House GOP candidates this week reported raising
$26 million in 2017 to help protect the GOP majority.
Republicans also face the pos-
“Very few people are
excited about going
from a committee
chairmanship to being a
rank-and-file member,
and those who do it, like
Darrell Issa, don’t do it
for very long.”
Rep. Steve Stivers (R-Ohio), about
House Republican rules limiting
committee chairmen to three
consecutive terms
sibility that districts could be
redrawn in Democrats’ favor over
the coming months. A federal
judge invalidated North Carolina’s GOP-drawn map this week,
and cases are pending over lines
Republican legislatures drew in
Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.
Republicans are at less risk of
losing the Senate, where only a
few GOP incumbents are vulnerable and many Democrats are
seeking reelection in states
Trump won in 2016. But the decision of Sens. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.)
and Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) to retire
and the surprise victory of Sen.
Doug Jones (D-Ala.) in a special
election last month offered Democrats a plausible, if improbable,
path to the majority.
Issa built a national profile as
the chief congressional antagonist to Barack Obama and his
administration during Issa’s tenure as ranking Republican and
then chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform
Committee, between 2008 and
2015. He later targeted former
secretary of state Hillary Clinton,
as she prepared to seek the presidency, over her response to the
deadly 2012 attacks on Americans
in Benghazi, Libya.
But Issa’s hold on his San Diego-area district became increasingly tenuous in recent years, and
he barely fended off a Democratic
challenger in 2016.
In a statement Wednesday, Issa
did not give a reason for his
departure but reflected on a
two-decade political career that
included jump-starting the process that led to the 2003 recall of
California Gov. Gray Davis (D). He
declined to elaborate in a brief
interview Wednesday.
“Eighteen years is a long time,
and I’m looking forward to another chapter in my life,” he said.
“We’ll see what it is.”
Several other House Republicans said in interviews Wednes-
day that they had been struck by
the intensity of the grass-roots
“resistance” to Trump and Republican officeholders. “I’ve had opposition for 38 years; it’s now
matriculated into hatred,” said
Rep. Christopher H. Smith
(R-N.J.).
But some insisted that Republicans could withstand the onslaught and keep their majority in
November. Stivers said the comparison to the prior waves is
unfair, pointing to the GOP’s 5-0
record in special House elections
for seats held by Republicans in
the past year.
“It would be nice if [Democrats
would] win something before you
try to make it into 2006,” he said.
Democrats, however, outpaced
their past performances in each
of those districts. And they will
have at least three more chances
this year to claim GOP seats before Election Day. Special elections are scheduled this year to
fill vacant seats in Pennsylvania,
Arizona and Ohio.
Jesse Ferguson, a former senior
DCCC aide who worked at the
committee during the 2010 cycle,
said all signs point to 2018 resembling that year’s wave — but in
reverse.
“There’s no question some
Democrats in 2010 ran for the
hills. But this time, it looks like
Republicans are trying to find the
lifeboat on the Titanic,” he said.
“Retirements are a harbinger of
what the party is facing, and you
have some Republicans jumping
ship because they are worried
about their reelection and others
leaving because they don’t want
to come back to a party that is in
the minority.”
Rep. John Yarmuth (D-Ky.),
who was first elected to the House
in the 2006 wave, said he’s already detected a “sense of inevitability” among his GOP colleagues
— and a touch of political gallows
humor.
Yarmuth is the top Democrat
on the House Budget Committee
and stands to claim the gavel if
Republicans lose their majority.
“People say, ‘Enjoy your chairmanship,’ ” he said about comments he’s gotten from Republicans.
mike.debonis@washpost.com
Scott Clement contributed to this
report.
Romney’s possible Senate bid fuels debate over GOP’s future
War between the
establishment and the
unorthodox could widen
BY
AND
R OBERT C OSTA
A SHLEY P ARKER
Mitt Romney’s comeback on
the national stage, through the
byway of his probable bid for the
Senate in Utah, has prompted a
sharp debate among Republicans
over whether traditional political
figures are still welcome as leaders of a party dominated by President Trump.
Those arguments have intensified amid the rush of speculation
in recent weeks over Romney’s
next steps, with the looming presence of the Republicans’ 2012
presidential nominee on the ballot in this year’s midterm elections seen as a new front in the
civil war that has gripped the
party.
Many establishment voices, eager for a resurgence in the Trump
era, have seized on the prospect
of a Sen. Romney as a clean-cut
Republican counterweight to the
unorthodox and chaotic Trump
presidency. Trump-aligned conservatives, meanwhile, have recoiled and said the party’s base
voters have moved on and would
shun the former Massachusetts
governor as an elite relic of the
sort of conventional politics they
rejected by embracing the reality
television star-turned-president.
Both sides acknowledge that
regardless of whether Romney,
70, runs this year for the seat held
by retiring Sen. Orrin G. Hatch
(R-Utah), Republicans nationally
would continue to be consumed
by identity debates, fallout from
the party’s Balkanization and discord over what its voters want
from its leaders — insider or
outsider, polished or raw, champion of Wall Street or economic
populist.
“Romney opens up the discussion, illustrating the fight for the
soul of a fractured party,” said
Peter Wehner, a veteran of three
Republican administrations and
a senior fellow at the Ethics and
Public Policy Center.
Wehner, who advised Romney’s 2012 campaign, added:
“Trump’s failures have left him
without an iron grip on the party,
GARRETT ELLWOOD/NBA ENTERTAINMENT/GETTY IMAGES
Mitt Romney is considering a run for the seat held by retiring Sen.
Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah). Some analysts say the former presidential
candidate could be a counterweight to President Trump.
leaving an opening for different
faces and people like Romney, an
alternative approach.”
On the right, however, activists
who have a deep affinity for
Trump’s upheaval of the GOP said
a Romney revival would represent if anything the gasp of an old
order in a party captured by the
president — calling the bloc of
establishment Republicans united mostly by a loathing of Trump.
“Is Mitt-ism really a thing?
There’s conservatism. There’s
Rockefeller
Republicanism.
There’s Trumpism. But I don’t
know that Mitt-ism is really a
thing,” said Andy Surabian, a
political consultant and senior
adviser to Great America Alliance, an independent pro-Trump
group. Surabian has worked
closely with former White House
chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon, who has been trying to build
support for outsider Republican
candidates.
Surabian suggested that Romney and Trump’s Beltway opposition lack a national constituency
and that their power comes from
inside Washington rather than
from a groundswell of voters.
Over the past year, Bannon has
railed against Romney and questioned his honor, but Bannon’s
relationship with the president,
and his political standing, unraveled over the publication of journalist Michael Wolff ’s “Fire and
Fury,” a book that includes searing comments by Bannon about
Trump’s family.
And on Tuesday, Breitbart announced that Bannon would be
leaving the news network, further diminishing his stature and
power on the right.
Hatch, 83, announced last
week that he would not seek an
eighth term. Romney has not
made definitive public statements about his plans, but Republicans close to him have said
he has been considering a campaign for months and conferred
with friends as Hatch finalized
his decision.
On Monday, a Romney aide
announced that the former governor was treated for prostate cancer last summer. “The cancer was
removed surgically and found not
to have spread beyond the prostate,” the aide said in a statement.
Romney’s prognosis is “very
good,” and he was “treated successfully,” according to a person
close to him.
Romney allies are quick to say
he would probably resist serving
as a symbol of mainstream Republicanism, should he choose to
mount a campaign. Although
Romney has been one of the
president’s sharpest critics, they
said he is also cautious and would
see a Senate perch as a chance to
concentrate on policymaking,
taking defiant stands on Trump’s
conduct only when he deems it
necessary.
“Is there a market out there for
a new type of leader in the Republican Party who is going to be very
issue-focused and who is going to
champion substance over flash,
and try to serve as a moral center
for the party? Is there a marketplace for that? Yes,” said Republican consultant Kevin Madden, a
former Romney staffer on his
2008 and 2012 presidential campaigns. “The question is just how
big of a marketplace.”
Romney notably weighed in
last month ahead of Alabama’s
special U.S. Senate election, in
which former state judge and
GOP nominee Roy Moore was
accused of initiating sexual contact with teenage girls years ago.
“Roy Moore in the US Senate
would be a stain on the GOP and
on the nation,” Romney tweeted.
“No vote, no majority is worth
losing our honor, our integrity.”
Karl Rove, a former senior
White House adviser to President
George W. Bush and supporter of
Romney’s 2012 bid, said of Romney: “He’s an adult. My sense is
he’d find areas of agreement with
President Trump, and when they
had disagreements he’d be respectful. He would provide stature in the Senate, and with a
demonstrated ability to govern
he’d be someone who could forge
consensus or unify the caucus.”
Rep. Peter T. King (N.Y.), a
centrist Republican, said Romney has an opening to run without much hassle from Bannon
because of Bannon’s messy public
clash with Trump.
“Bannon being diminished by
Trump diminishes the challenges
that would face Mitt. It makes it
easier.”
Romney would be the clear
front-runner in a Utah campaign.
The state’s electorate is unique:
It’s more conservative than grassroots populist in its leanings — it
gave an anti-Trump independent
candidate 21 percent of the vote
in the 2016 election — and is
dominated by followers of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints, which counts Romney
as one of its most prominent
members. Romney also carries
extensive goodwill there from his
time running the Salt Lake City
Olympics in 2002.
A relatively high-profile Democrat, Salt Lake County Council
member Jenny Wilson, is running for the seat and has said that
the victory of Sen. Doug Jones
(D-Ala.) last month would bring
attention to her candidacy in a
ruby-red state.
Romney’s reliability as a
Trump foe is dubious, which even
some of his supporters concede.
Months after denouncing Trump
as a “con man” and “phony” in a
March 2016 speech at the University of Utah during the Republican presidential primary race,
Romney seriously considered
joining the Trump administration, possibly as secretary of
state, during the transition.
“I had a wonderful evening
with president-elect Trump,” a
smiling Romney declared after a
private dinner with Trump at an
expensive New York restaurant
where frog legs and chocolate
cake were served. “We had another discussion about affairs
throughout the world, and these
discussions I’ve had with him
have been enlightening and interesting and engaging.”
Romney’s remarks made the
cadre of anti-Trump voices in his
orbit cringe and worry that he
was being pulled into what they
saw as the reality-television-type
audition drama as Trump prepared to take office. Romney, who
was passed over for the top job at
the State Department, returned
to the position of Trump critic
throughout 2017. When Trump
said that counterprotesters at a
white-supremacist rally in Charlottesville shared the blame for
the mayhem that left a woman
dead and many injured, Romney
wrote on Facebook that Trump’s
comments “caused racists to rejoice.”
Within Trump’s circle, they are
not cheering Romney’s consideration — and Trump had urged
Hatch to run again, according to
people close to the president. But
they question whether Romney
would be a problem.
“I don’t see him becoming an
antagonist,” said Chris Ruddy, the
chief executive of Newsmax Media and a Trump ally. “You look at
Mitt’s history, he came out early
against Trump but didn’t push
the point after the nomination
was secured. It’s not his personality to be way out there.”
Ruddy believes that Romney
could be positioning himself for a
2020 presidential bid should
Trump choose not to run for
reelection, and thinks Romney
would move carefully if he returned to national politics.
“Mitt’s thinking 2020, get the
stature,” Ruddy said.
robert.costa@washpost.com
ashley.parker@washpost.com
. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
New York
City sues
5 major
oil firms
Government claims
present, future damage
from climate change
BY C HRIS M OONEY
AND D INO G RANDONI
The New York City government
is suing the world’s five largest
publicly traded oil companies,
seeking to hold them responsible
for present and future damages to
the city from climate change.
The suit, filed Tuesday against
BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips,
ExxonMobil and Royal Dutch
Shell, alleges that the companies
together produced 11 percent of
all of global warming gases
through the oil and gas products
they have sold over the years. The
suit also charges that the companies and the oil industry as a
whole have known for some time
about the consequences but
sought to obscure them.
“In this litigation, the City
seeks to shift the costs of protecting the City from climate change
impacts back onto the companies
that have done nearly all they
could to create this existential
threat,” says the lawsuit brought
by New York corporation counsel
Zachary Carter, which was filed in
U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.
The legal strategy has already
been embraced by several California cities and counties, but
prior suits seeking to blame companies for their role in causing
climate change have floundered.
It remains unclear whether a
new wave of litigation will succeed. The new suits have the
benefits of stronger climate science and reports about how
much some companies knew
about climate change decades
ago.
Last year, California’s Marin
County, San Mateo County and
the city of Imperial Beach similarly sued a group of fossil fuel
companies over damages related
to climate change — citing a
theory called “public nuisance,”
which argues that companies
are causing an injury to the
localities under common law.
The cities of San Francisco and
Oakland and the city and county
of Santa Cruz also filed in recent
months.
“I think the significant development here is that this is the
first of these cases in this last
year that’s filed outside of California,” said Michael Burger, who
directs the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia
University. If more and more
localities sue, “we might be able
to see adequate pressure applied
to these companies to inspire
action on climate change,” he
said.
So far, that has not been the
response. ExxonMobil has instead responded strongly to the
claims, seeking in Texas court to
depose California state officials
and others involved in bringing
the cases for “potential claims of
abuse of process, civil conspiracy,
and violation of ExxonMobil’s civil rights.”
Climate change “is a complex
societal challenge that should be
addressed through sound government policy and cultural change
to drive low-carbon choices for
businesses and consumer . . . not
by the courts,” Curtis Smith, head
of U.S. media relations for Shell,
wrote in an email.
BP and ConocoPhillips, two
other defendants named in the
lawsuit, declined to comment.
Exxon responded to New
York’s lawsuit on its blog. “Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is a global issue and requires global participation and
actions. Lawsuits of this kind —
filed by trial attorneys against an
industry that provides products
we all rely upon to power the
economy and enable our domestic life — simply do not do that,”
wrote Suzanne McCarron, Exxon’s vice president of public and
government affairs.
“This lawsuit is factually and
legally meritless, and will do
nothing to address the serious
issue of climate change,” Chevron
spokesman Braden Reddall wrote
by email. “Reducing greenhouse
gas emissions is a global issue
that requires global engagement.
Should this litigation proceed, it
will only serve special interests at
the expense of broader policy,
regulatory and economic priorities.”
chris.mooney@washpost.com
dino.grandoni@washpost.com
Brady Dennis contributed to this
report.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
State Dept. simplifies
overseas travel warnings
BY
C AROL M ORELLO
The State Department on
Wednesday unveiled four tiered
categories to warn travelers of
potential dangers overseas, using
common-sense language ranging
from “Exercise normal precautions” to “Do not travel.”
The new rankings replace the
more vague and often confusing
system of issuing “travel alerts”
for short-term dangers posed by
events such as health epidemics
or mass protests and “travel
warnings” for long-standing concerns such as armed conflict or
political instability. The new
rankings are applied to every
country, and even Antarctica.
Michelle Bernier-Toth, head of
the Office of Overseas Citizens
EZ
Services, said the changes were
made because few people understood the distinctions in the previous, broad rankings.
“I personally was tired of explaining the difference between a
travel warning and a travel alert,
even to some of my colleagues,”
she said.
Under the new rankings, Level
1, the lowest advisory, signals a
need to “exercise normal precautions” in places where there is no
more than the usual risk involved
in international travel. Canada
and Australia are among the
countries at Level 1.
Level 2 means “exercise in-
A5
RE
creased caution” and applies to
nations where there is a heightened safety risk. Many countries
in Western Europe, where there
have been terrorist attacks in recent years, are listed as Level 2.
Antarctica is also Level 2.
Level 3 translates bluntly as
“Reconsider travel,” with the recommendation to avoid going to
countries with serious risks. Turkey, Russia and Venezuela are
considered Level 3.
Level 4 is for countries with a
“greater likelihood of life-threatening risks” in which the U.S.
government may be very limited
in its ability to help. Travelers
already in those countries are
advised to leave as soon as it is
safe.
Eleven countries received the
“Do not travel” recommendation
— Mali, Central African Republic,
Libya, South Sudan, Somalia,
Yemen, Syria, Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan and North Korea.
In addition, the new system
will explain why the advisory was
made, using one-letter logos: C
for crime, T for terrorism, U for
civil unrest, H for health risks, N
for natural disasters, E for special
events such as an election or O for
some other reason.
U.S. citizens are not banned
from traveling to Level 4 countries. The one exception is North
Korea, where the State Department has prohibited citizens from
using their U.S. passports to visit
without first obtaining a waiver.
In the past, governments of
countries for which the State Department has issued travel warnings have complained vociferously, usually out of concerns about
their tourism industry. BernierToth said U.S. embassies were
given the new rankings ahead of
time so they could notify the governments of the impending
changes.
carol.morello@washpost.com
A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
Immigration sweep targets 7-Eleven stores
Operation is new front
in a broader effort to
toughen enforcement
BY
ALEX WONG/GETTY IMAGES
Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Calif.), second from left, wrote that women
should dress in black at the president’s State of the Union speech in
solidarity with “survivors of sexual harassment/violence.”
Women urged to wear
black for Trump speech
Congresswoman wants
State of the Union to take
cue from Golden Globes
BY
E LISE V IEBECK
Female Democratic lawmakers are working to keep the
spotlight on the issue of sexual
harassment by inviting their colleagues to wear black to President Trump’s State of the Union
address at the end of the month.
Led by Rep. Jackie Speier
(D-Calif.), the protest seeks to
call attention to abuses of power
in the workplace that affect
women and other vulnerable
groups. It draws inspiration
from the recent Golden Globe
Awards, where women wore
black to highlight the problem of
sexual harassment in Hollywood.
“This is a culture change that
is sweeping the country and
Congress is embracing it,” Speier
said in a written statement.
Capitol Hill also was inundated late last year with allegations
of sexual harassment by lawmakers and senior aides, prompting
a debate over how best to hold
offenders accountable. Speier is
the author of a bill to strengthen
victims’ rights in the reporting
and mediation process, and lawmakers are in talks about how to
pursue policy changes.
Seven male lawmakers have
resigned or said they would not
seek reelection since October
over allegations of sexual harass-
ment or other misconduct. The
most prominent example was
former senator Al Franken (DMinn.), whom several women
accused of inappropriately
touching them before he entered
politics. Franken, who denied
some of the accounts, resigned
Jan. 2.
Sexual misconduct was a significant issue in the recent special election to fill Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s former Senate
seat. Several women in Alabama
accused Republican candidate
Roy Moore of pursuing them
romantically when they were
teenagers; one said he touched
her sexually when she was 14. In
a stunning victory for the left in
the Deep South, Moore lost to
Democrat Doug Jones by 21,924
votes.
Trump, too, is implicated in
the debate over sexual harassment since facing allegations of
misconduct from more than a
dozen women during the 2016
election. In December, three
women reasserted their allegations in a bid to renew pressure
on the White House. Spokesmen
for Trump have said the claims
are false.
Speier urged on Twitter that
members of Congress from both
parties join her protest on
Jan. 30 and show “solidarity w/
survivors of sexual harassment/
violence in Hollywood, politics,
the military, academia, etc.”
Members of the Democratic
Women’s Working Group will
wear black, and Speier’s office
expects many other lawmakers
to follow suit.
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
Tycoon sues Manafort,
Gates over business deal
A similar case was filed in the
Cayman Islands in 2014.
“We are surprised by this filing,”
said Jason Maloni, president of
public relations firm JadeRoq and
a spokesman for Manafort. “This
is a commercial matter which we
thought had been addressed and
resolved years ago. We will reBY S TEVEN M UFSON
spond, if we must do so, in the
appropriate manner.”
The billionaire Russian tycoon
Gates could not be reached for
Oleg Deripaska filed suit in New
comment.
York State Court Wednesday
Manafort and Gates in 2006
against President Trump’s former
had wooed Deripaska to invest in a
campaign manager Paul J.
$200 million fund to make private
Manafort and his partner Rick
equity deals, primarily in
Gates, claiming the two
Russia and Ukraine.
had defrauded him of
Manafort and Gates
$18.9 million.
formed a Cayman Islands
The case was filed by
partnership called PeriSurf Horizon, a firm concles Emerging Market
trolled by Deripaska. It
Partners.
Deripaska
alleged that Manafort
knew Gates, who had
and Gates had used as
helped arrange meetings
“their personal piggy
for him with Sen. John
banks” a web of partner- Oleg
McCain (R-Ariz.). He inships financed with Deripaska
vested $18.9 million
funds invested by Derithrough Surf Horizon
paska in 2007 and 2008.
and paid $7.35 million in
The lawsuit refers ofmanagement fees.
ten to the indictment
However, the lawsuit
brought
against
says, there were no other
Manafort and Gates by
investors and the fund’s
special counsel Robert S.
sole investment was a
Mueller III. The lawsuit
Ukrainian cable TV stasaid that “the dealings of
tion called Black Sea CaManafort and Gates with Paul J.
ble. It adds that Manafort
Surf mirror the pattern of Manafort
and Gates overstated the
corporate dealings alcost of the station. The suit says
leged in the Indictment” and that
that Manafort and Gates “had sithe special counsel’s case “providphoned for themselves millions of
ed further support” for the allegadollars.”
tions.
During the 2008 credit crunch,
Deripaska also says that bank
Deripaska had asked for his monrecords obtained May 2017 in a
Cyprus lawsuit showed that ey back but never received any of
it.
Manafort and Gates moved funds
The suit adds that Manafort
in and out of accounts “without
and Gates “grossly” mismanaged
any apparent business reason, but
the investment, “resulting in a toultimately making payments of
tal loss of the amount invested.”
millions of dollars to them indiSurf Horizon said that it wasn’t
vidually or to their personal venuntil one of its affiliates filed a
dors or creditors.”
proceeding in Cyprus that it obSurf Horizon also alleges that
tained the records it sought from
Manafort and Gates gave false tesManafort and Gates. Those rectimony in the Cyprus case.
ords, it said, “provided proof for
The lawsuit asks for legal fees,
the first time that Manafort and
$1.1 million in compensatory damGates had defrauded Surf.”
ages and $25 million in punitive
damages.
steven.mufson@washpost.com
Suit mentions indictment
against former Trump
campaign manager
N ICK M IROFF
U.S. Immigration and Customs
Enforcement agents blitzed dozens of 7-Eleven stores before
dawn Wednesday to interview
employees and deliver audit notifications, carrying out what the
agency said was the largest operation targeting an employer since
President Trump took office.
ICE said its agents showed up
at 98 stores and made 21 arrests.
The agency described the operation as a warning to other companies that may have unauthorized
workers on their payroll.
“Today’s actions send a strong
message to U.S. businesses that
hire and employ an illegal workforce: ICE will enforce the law,
and if you are found to be breaking the law, you will be held
accountable,” Thomas D. Homan,
the agency’s top official, said in a
statement.
Homan characterized the operation as a new front in the
Trump administration’s broader
immigration crackdown and its
effort to increase deportations.
ICE agents have made 40 percent
more arrests in the past year.
“Businesses that hire illegal
workers are a pull factor for
illegal immigration and we are
working hard to remove this
magnet,” Homan’s statement
said. “ICE will continue its efforts
to protect jobs for American
workers by eliminating unfair
competitive advantages for companies that exploit illegal immigration.”
ICE said it sent agents to deliver audit notifications and conduct interviews at 6 a.m., temporarily shutting down 7-Eleven
stores in the District and in 17
states: California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana,
Maryland, Michigan, Missouri,
Nevada, New Jersey, New York,
North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas and Washington.
Irving, Tex.-based 7-Eleven has
CHRIS CARLSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents serve an employment audit notice at a 7-Eleven
store in Los Angeles on Wednesday. Agents showed up at 98 stores nationwide and made 21 arrests.
more than 60,000 stores worldwide, according to its website. In
a statement, the company said it
was not responsible for the hiring
decisions of individual franchise
owners.
“7-Eleven Franchisees are independent business owners and are
solely responsible for their employees including deciding who
to hire and verifying their eligibility to work in the United States,”
the company said in an emailed
statement.
“As part of the 7-Eleven franchise agreement, 7-Eleven requires all franchise business owners to comply with all federal,
state and local employment
laws,” the statement continued.
“7-Eleven takes compliance with
immigration laws seriously and
has terminated the franchise
agreements of franchisees convicted of violating these laws.”
ICE described Wednesday’s
sweep as a follow-up enforcement operation that built on a
2013 raid resulting in the arrests
of nine 7-Eleven franchise owners
and managers. They were
charged with “conspiring to commit wire fraud, stealing identities
and concealing and harboring
illegal aliens employed at their
stores,” according to the agency.
ICE said all but one pleaded
guilty and were ordered to pay
more than $2.6 million in back
wages to workers.
Last year, ICE said it conducted
1,360 employee audits, making
more than 300 arrests on criminal and administrative violations. Businesses were ordered to
pay $97.6 million in judicial forfeiture, fines and restitution, the
agency said, and $7.8 million in
civil fines.
“We are going to be doing more
of this work and dedicating more
resources to make sure businesses are complying with the law,”
said Dani Bennett, an ICE spokeswoman. “This is a demonstration
of our commitment to enforcing
the law.”
Store owners and managers
will have three days to provide
the agency with information
about the immigration status of
their employees, Bennett said.
Prosecuting business owners
who hire illegal workers is often
difficult for the government, because company owners typically
insist they were deceived by employees using fake Social Security
numbers.
Supporters of tougher immigration enforcement want to require all employers to use the
government’s E-Verify system,
which checks employees’ I-9 employment eligibility forms, Social
Security numbers and other identifying information with federal
databases. Critics say E-Verify is
error-prone and a needless expansion of government power.
Nearly 8 in 10 Americans said
employers should be required to
validate the immigration status
of new hires, including 6 in 10
who support it strongly, according to a September 2017 Washington Post-ABC News poll.
Large majorities of Democrats
(65 percent) and Republicans
(93 percent) said they would back
such a mandate, the survey
found.
nick.miroff@washpost.com
Suit, injunction over DACA could drag on for years
DACA FROM A1
which the president and his supporters called an egregious example of executive overreach. That
effort was upended late Tuesday,
when U.S. District Judge William
Alsup in San Francisco said the
nearly 690,000 DACA recipients
must retain their work permits
and protection from deportation
while a lawsuit challenging the
decision to end the program
moves forward.
Dreamers struggled to make
sense of the ruling on Wednesday.
Initially, they celebrated the injunction in a blitz of phone calls
and text messages. But it quickly
became clear that this was not
the victory they wanted.
Lawyers said the lawsuit and
perhaps the injunction could
drag on for years, and could also
be appealed by the Justice Department, which spokesman
Devin O’Malley said “looks forward to vindicating its position in
further litigation.” The Department of Homeland Security did
not say whether it would begin
renewing work permits, despite
an order from Alsup to do so, and
provided no guidance on its website, which includes a message in
red letters: “DACA is ending.”
The ruling offers “a temporary
window without a permanent
solution,” said Missael Garcia, 27,
a DACA recipient who works as a
chef at a Baltimore restaurant
and has been saving and building
up credit with hopes of opening
his own restaurant someday.
“This is going to be a continual
cycle of protests, marches, civil
disobedience.”
Leezia Dhalla, 28, came to the
United States from Canada at the
age of 6. Without legal status, she
took out $100,000 in student
loans to get through college. Her
DACA protections are set to expire May 4, and she’s worried that
she won’t be able to renew her
apartment lease or fulfill her
dreams of attending law school.
“It’s disconcerting because it’s
so chaotic,” Dhalla said. “It feels
like an emotional roller coaster to
wake up and not have answers
about my future.”
Alsup said the government
must continue to renew DACA
and work authorizations for immigrants who had the status
when the Trump administration
ended the program on Sept. 5,
though he said the federal government could deny them the
right to return to the United
States if they travel abroad. He
also said the government did not
have to accept new applicants.
The ruling said California and
a host of other plaintiffs had
demonstrated that they were
likely to succeed on their claims
that the Trump administration’s
rescission of the nearly six-yearold program was “capricious,”
and that the states, tech companies and other employers — and
immigrants themselves — had
much to lose in the meantime if
the administration was wrong.
On the campaign trail, Trump
had called the program an “illegal
amnesty” and promised to swiftly
eliminate it. But he let it linger for
months after taking office, and
said he’d treat dreamers with
“love” and try to hammer out a
deal with Congress.
In September, facing legal action from Republican attorneys
general who oppose the program,
Trump’s administration announced it would phase out
DACA starting March 5, when an
estimated 1,000 dreamers a day
would lose their work permits
and protection from deportation.
Trump has said repeatedly since
then that Congress must pass a
law to protect dreamers if they
are to be allowed to stay.
“An issue of this magnitude
must go through the normal legislative process,” White House
spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee
Sanders reiterated Wednesday.
“President Trump is committed
to the rule of law and will work
with members of both parties to
reach a permanent solution that
corrects the unconstitutional actions taken by the last administration.”
Top Democrats and Republicans met again Wednesday to
begin sorting through the details
of an agreement that would resolve the fate of people protected
by DACA; bolster border security;
make changes in legal, familybased migration; and end or revamp the diversity lottery system.
Senate
Minority
Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)
tweeted that a solution to DACA
must be part of any federal budget deal, an effort to stoke negotiations in coming days. On Twitter,
he said the court ruling “in no
way diminishes the urgency of
resolving the DACA issue. On
this, we agree with @WhiteHouse, who says the ruling
doesn’t do anything to reduce
Congress’ obligation.”
Sen. John Cornyn (R-Tex.), a
lead broker on immigration policy, agreed that the ruling
“doesn’t change the need for us to
act, and so we’re going forward.”
But later he told reporters that he
didn’t think the issue would be
resolved by a Jan. 19 spending
deadline because there still isn’t
an actual agreement on spending
levels.
House Minority Whip Steny H.
Hoyer (D-Md.), who joined
Cornyn at the White House on
Tuesday for a highly unusual
televised meeting with Trump,
recalled the president asking lawmakers, “Is there anybody here
not for taking care of the DACA
recipients?”
“Not one of them said they
were against that,” Hoyer said.
“Everyone agreed yes, we need to
take care of DACA-protected individuals, we need to take care of
them now.”
Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.)
hosted Republican senators in
his office to follow up on the
meeting with Trump. The group
has been in discussions for several months in hopes of brokering a deal that could earn the 60
votes needed to overcome procedural hurdles in the closely
“Whether it’s by the
president’s
announcement or a
court decision, it’s time
for us to meet the
president’s challenge
and to create a law that
solves this problem.”
Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.)
divided Senate.
The fate of dreamers is “hanging out there with great uncertainty,” Durbin told reporters.
“Whether it’s by the president’s
announcement or a court decision, it’s time for us to meet the
president’s challenge and to create a law that solves this problem.”
But any bipartisan agreement
could be derailed by lawmakers
who oppose any concessions on
immigration rights or security
issues.
“This particular issue is one
that can divide members in the
House and Senate from the president if he embraces a deal that is
considered too lenient on the
immigration issue,” warned Rep.
Mark Meadows (R-N.C.), chairman of the conservative House
Freedom Caucus.
Rep. Filemon Vela (D-Tex.), a
strident critic of Trump’s calls for
a border wall, said many lawmakers are frustrated by the scope of
the negotiations. “There’s so
many moving parts on this, it’s
even hard to tell who’s really
doing the negotiating,” he said.
“It’s a mess.”
The White House called the
injunction “outrageous” and the
Justice Department has said it
will appeal.
Kari Hong, an assistant professor at Boston College Law School
who supervises a law clinic in the
9th Circuit, said Alsup’s ruling
signaled the Trump administration couldn’t rescind DACA without a solid reason.
“The courts said you can’t just
change your policy, you have to
have facts and you have to have a
reason,” Hong said.
Immigration lawyers also differed on whether dreamers
should renew their status now.
Some suggested that immigrants
file an application to get their
foot in the door while the judge’s
ruling is pending. But others said
they risked losing the hefty application fee and worried that some
immigrants would fall prey to
fraud.
“It’s urgent that we have a
permanent solution with a pathway to citizenship,” said Ivonne
Orozco, 26, New Mexico’s teacher
of the year, who has lived in the
United States since she was 12
years old, brought from Mexico
by her parents. She teaches Spanish at a public school in Albuquerque and is also finishing a
master’s degree at the University
of New Mexico with straight A’s.
Her DACA status expires in 2019.
In a joint news conference at
the White House with Norwegian
Prime Minister Erna Solberg,
Trump was asked if he would
support a DACA bill that did not
include money for the border
wall he has proposed.
“No, no, no,” he replied. “It’s
got to include the wall. We need
the wall for security. We need the
wall for safety. We need the wall
to stop the drugs from pouring in.
I would imagine the people in the
room, both Democrat and Republican — I really believe they are
going to come up with a solution
to the DACA problem that’s been
going on for a long time, and
maybe beyond that, immigration
as a whole.”
maria.saccheti@washpost.com
patricia.sullivan@washpost.com
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
Mike DeBonis, David Nakamura and
Erica Werner contributed to this
report.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
RE
Democrats weigh perils of an election-year shutdown
Some insist DACA must
be tied to spending bill, a
potentially risky route
M IKE D E B ONIS,
E RICA W ERNER
AND E D O ’ K EEFE
BY
A year after losing the presidency, Democrats are facing an uncomfortable question: Are they
willing to force a government
shutdown to extract political victories — a hardball tactic for
which they have long blasted Republicans?
The dilemma comes as a Jan. 19
funding deadline approaches and
bipartisan negotiations over immigration and other issues have
so far failed to produce an agreement. The thorniest issue is the
fate of “dreamers” — roughly 2
million
young
immigrants
brought to the United States illegally as children, some of whom
had gained legal status under a
program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals that
President Trump canceled.
A growing number of Democratic lawmakers have announced
that they will not support any
spending bill unless the fate of
DACA recipients is secured. Now
party leaders must decide how far
they are willing to go.
A bipartisan White House
meeting on Tuesday produced
vague and sometimes contradictory promises from Trump but no
clear path toward a deal. Top Republican leaders, meanwhile, said
they oppose adding immigration
provisions to a spending bill
ahead of the Jan. 19 deadline.
That leaves Democratic leaders
walking a tightrope, wielding
their leverage but also trying to
avoid the peril of an election-year
shutdown that could rally the Republican base and alienate swing
voters.
At the heart of the challenge is
an internal split between lawmakers up for reelection this year,
several of them in Republicanleaning states, and those eyeing a
higher national profile, who are
trying to appeal to the party’s
liberal base.
“There’s many people in the
Democratic Party who believe
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.), right, seen Wednesday on Capitol Hill with Sen. Tina Smith (D-Minn.),
said she doesn’t mind if border security is tied to a DACA bill, unlike some Democratic colleagues.
that the only thing we should do is
a clean DACA [bill] with no border
security,” said Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.), who is seeking
reelection in a state Trump won
and attended Tuesday’s White
House meeting to advocate for
maritime and northern border security measures. “I’m not one of
those people. I think we need border security — but I want a plan.”
Meanwhile, potential 2020
presidential hopefuls such as Sen.
Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.) are
drawing a hard line. “No wall,
nope,” she told reporters Monday.
“It’s very important that we have a
secure border, but spending billions and billions of dollars on this
wall because of a political promise
and a campaign promise is ridiculous.”
Republicans have majorities in
both chambers of Congress, but
they do not have the Senate “supermajority” necessary to rally
the 60 votes needed for major
legislation. Even if every GOP senator were to support a spending
bill, it could not pass without the
support of at least nine Democrats.
Lawmakers defused last year’s
spending showdowns, the first
with Trump in the White House,
by largely punting into 2018 key
decisions on spending levels, immigration policy and the federal
debt limit. Now, thanks in part to
an impending immigration deadline and pressure from activists,
Democrats are under pressure not
only to take action now, but also
not to bend to GOP demands for
border wall funding and other
policy changes that would curtail
immigration.
Top Democrats spent years decrying Republican shutdown
threats under President Barack
Obama. Now, they reject the notion their party could in any way
be liable for a shutdown.
Senate
Minority
Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said
Tuesday that Trump’s insistence
on an expensive Mexican border
wall would be to blame: “Make no
mistake about it: A government
shutdown will fall entirely on his
shoulders,” Schumer said.
But to Republican lawmakers,
the irony is unmistakable.
“The shoe is on the other foot a
little bit,” said Rep. Tom Cole (ROkla.), a senior member of the
House Appropriations Committee. “I just think it’s an irresponsible threat to deploy any time by
either party. It’s interesting to see
the Democrats being irresponsible for a change.”
After winning the House in
2010, Republicans engaged in a
string of showdowns with Obama
over spending and other policy issues. A fiscal standoff in 2011 produced a long-term budget agreement that placed caps on the
spending Congress doles out on a
year-to-year basis. In 2013, Republicans forced a two-week shutdown over the Affordable Care Act
without ultimately extracting any
policy concessions. And in 2015,
another shutdown appeared imminent over funding for Planned
Parenthood, only to be defused by
the sudden resignation of House
Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio).
Democrats routinely criticized
that behavior, spurred by the demands of the GOP’s hard-line conservative base, as “hostage-taking” that eroded the public’s faith
in government. Now, Republican
leaders feel comfortable criticizing Democrats for doing the same.
“There are some people on the
left that just want to use these
complicated issues as negotiating
points to threaten things like government shutdowns as opposed
to finding solutions, and I think
the American people are tired of
that approach,” said House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.).
Democrats are facing demands
from their own hard-line base,
including one that they reject
funding for Trump’s wall. The
White House last week insisted on
$18 billion for a wall as a condition
for any DACA deal.
On a conference call Tuesday convened by the immigrant advocacy
group America’s Voice, a dozen activists demanded that Congress act
by Jan. 19 on behalf of dreamers,
threatening political retribution if
lawmakers failed to do so.
“A vote for any spending bill on
Jan. 19 that does not have the
Dream Act is a vote to deport the
dreamers,” said Angel Padilla, policy director of Indivisible, referring to a bill that would grant legal
status and a path to citizenship to
DACA recipients and more than a
million more dreamers who did
not participate in the program.
The sense of urgency among
Democrats has been fueled by the
fact that tens of thousands of
DACA recipients have already lost
legal status. The program expires
entirely in March, a date that Republican leaders have cast as the
actual deadline for action.
“I’m surprised to run into people around here who don’t know
that people actually are losing
their status,” said Sen. Michael F.
Bennet (D-Colo.). “There’s this
idea that it can wait until March —
it’s got to be done by the 19th.”
But plenty of Democrats — including many who are outspoken
supporters of more liberal immigration policies — have voiced
discomfort with the idea of engaging in the sort of shutdown brinkmanship that marked the Obama
presidency.
Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.), for instance, has called for passage of
the Dream Act but also represents
hundreds of thousands of federal
employees who stand to be furloughed in the event of a shutdown.
Ahead of a December deadline,
Kaine said he could not vote to
force a shutdown over the issue,
and he was noncommittal Monday when asked if he’d be willing
to draw a hard line for a dreamer
fix in the next spending bill.
Kaine said he was “not going to
predetermine” his position absent
the details of a deal, but he also
urged immigration activists to focus their efforts on Republicans
who have not supported prodreamer legislation rather than
Democrats who have.
“They have a right to do what
they want to do, and look, I get it:
They’re panicked, and they ought
to be, because this president
broke a promise to them,” he said.
“But the last thing they need is for
me to panic. They need me to be a
tough negotiator and find the
most likely way to get them the
permanent protection they need.”
Republican leaders, meanwhile, remain wary of any shutdown scenario given their congressional majorities, according
to lawmakers and aides, but they
also believe that it would be far
from a political disaster if Democrats go to the mat over immigration policy. They believe, the Republicans said, that they can deliver the message that Democrats
made unreasonable demands and
that the GOP was more than willing to negotiate.
“I think it’s a loser for everybody, but it’s probably more of a
loser if you’re in control,” said Sen.
Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), the fourthranking Senate GOP leader, who
added a caveat for Democrats: “It
depends on the reason that they
use for that shutdown.”
Numerous Republicans said
this week that Democrats would
have to accept some sort of wall
funding to make the deal work.
In a Fox News interview Tuesday, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.)
accused Democrats of reversing
their prior position, noting that
physical barriers were part of a
comprehensive immigration bill
that passed the Senate in 2013.
“It’s something they’ve supported in the past, but now for
symbolic and political reasons,
they’re against it,” he said. “So the
Democrats are the ones threatening to shut down the government.”
Democrats reject that claim, if
not the underlying reality.
Rep. Gerald E. Connolly
(D-Va.), who represents a suburban Washington district chock
full of federal employees, said the
party has tried to foster a “climate
of creative ambiguity.”
“We’re going to use every lever
point we have,” Connolly said. “I
don’t think we’re the party of shutting down government. That is
the other party. But right now they
need our votes for a lot of things.”
mike.debonis@washpost.com
erica.werner@washpost.com
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
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A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
New pot
crackdown
creates rift
in the GOP
BY K IRK R OSS,
R OBERT B ARNES
S ANDHYA S OMASHEKHAR
raleigh, n.c. — Republican
Sessions wants to reopen
door to expanded federal
enforcement of the laws
BY
JANUARY 11 , 2018
North Carolina GOP
vows to appeal rejection
of congressional map
AND
K AREN T UMULTY
Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s decision to reopen the
door to more federal enforcement
of marijuana laws has created a
growing backlash within his own
party, and potentially an electionyear problem for some of its most
vulnerable members.
Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.),
who has announced plans to
block all Justice Department
nominees unless Sessions backs
down, met with the attorney general Wednesday but said the two
are no closer to agreement beyond a pledge to “continue our
discussions and conversations,
and perhaps even expanding
those conversations to others
who are in Congress.”
Meanwhile, Gardner said he is
marshaling fellow lawmakers to
oppose the new policy. A dozen
senators met Tuesday in Gardner’s office “to talk about what we
need to be doing legislatively and
the direction we should be pursuing in Congress on this matter,” he
said.
Gardner declined to identify
the senators, but he said they
include Democrats and Republicans who represent states that
have legalized marijuana for
medical and recreational purposes and states that are considering
doing so.
Although marijuana is illegal
under federal law, eight states
and the District of Columbia have
passed laws allowing recreational
consumption. Pot is legal, in some
form or under some circumstances, in an additional 22
states.
Sessions’s directive, issued last
week, overturns an Obama-era
policy discouraging federal enforcement in states where marijuana is legal. The attorney general said prosecutors should use
their own discretion, taking into
consideration the department’s
limited resources, the seriousness
of the crime and the deterrent
effect that they could impose.
Over the past two decades,
public opinion has swung dramatically toward decriminalizing
pot. A survey conducted in October by the Pew Research Center
found that 61 percent of U.S.
adults support marijuana legalization, which is nearly double
the percentage favoring it in
2000. Among Republicans overall, 43 percent were in favor —
although that number reached
62 percent among GOP-leaning
voters younger than 40.
“Cannabis is a totally different
political issue now than it was 50
years ago,” said Rep. Dana Rohra-
. THURSDAY,
ROGELIO V. SOLIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dave Singletary, an advocate for legalizing recreational and medicinal cannabis, waits in the
hallway leading to the House Chambers for lawmakers so he can lobby for their support at the
Capitol in Jackson, Miss. Singletary, executive director of the Mississippi Cannabis Coalition,
wears his cannabis leaf suit to attract attention and start conversations.
bacher (R-Calif.), a leading advocate for allowing states to decide
the question for themselves. “Politically, none of the old analysis is
holding true.”
Among Republicans, the topic
is a particularly treacherous one,
because it pulls at the seams of
the party’s coalition — pitting
social conservatives against those
who stand most strongly for
states’ rights, libertarians and fiscal hawks who see the burgeoning marijuana industry as a major
source of tax revenue.
“The attorney general is going
to find out pretty quickly he’s in a
distinct minority, not only among
the American public, but in the
United States Congress,” said
John Hudak, deputy director of
the Brookings Institution’s Center for Effective Public Management and author of the 2016 book
“Marijuana: A Short History.”
“This is one more headache,”
Hudak said, “and one more issue
that they do not want to be on the
defensive about with the voters.”
Many of the places where marijuana legalization is most popular — in California, for instance,
where it has just taken effect —
are also areas where Republicans
are struggling the hardest to hold
onto House seats.
Some insist that GOP candidates will not suffer from the new
policy if they make clear that they
disagree.
“Republican candidates for
Congress will answer that question based on what fits their
district or state,” said Ralph Reed,
head of the Faith and Freedom
Coalition, an evangelical political
group that has campaigned
against legalization.
“Will it really hurt us among
young voters? It could,” Reed acknowledged, but he added: “You
cannot ignore a federal law on the
books. It breeds cynicism. It undermines respect. It undermines
confidence in government itself.”
How important marijuana becomes as a topic of campaign
debate is likely to hinge on how
Sessions’s directive, issued last
week, is implemented by U.S. attorneys across the country, many
of whom are serving on an interim basis until permanent appointments can be made and confirmed by the Senate.
“We now have, in what I believe
is a states’ rights area, 93 unelected federal officials determining
state decisions,” Gardner said.
Early indications are that they
could head in significantly different directions, reflecting different priorities.
In Colorado, where recreational marijuana use is legal, interim
U.S. attorney Bob Troyer said he
will continue to put his focus only
on “identifying and prosecuting
those who create the greatest
safety threats to our communities
around the state.”
But in Massachusetts, where
recreational sales are to begin
this year under a ballot initiative
passed in 2016, U.S. Attorney Andrew Lelling indicated that no
pot sellers should consider themselves safe: “Deciding, in advance, to immunize a certain category of actors from federal prosecution would be to effectively
amend the laws Congress has
already passed, and that I will not
do.”
Oregon has long had a tolerant
attitude toward marijuana. It decriminalized possession of less
than 1 ounce in 1973. And the
newly legalized recreational pot
industry brought in $85 million
in tax revenue last year, said state
Attorney General Ellen Rosen-
blum.
“We have a growing, robust
industry. You can’t put that genie
back in the bottle,” Rosenblum
said. “We’re not freaking out. One
of the keys is a good relationship
with your U.S. attorney.”
In Oregon’s case, the acting
U.S. attorney, Billy J. Williams —
who is awaiting Senate confirmation to remain in that post — has
indicated he will continue to pursue “shared public safety objectives, with an emphasis on stemming the overproduction of marijuana and the diversion of marijuana out of state, dismantling
criminal organizations and
thwarting violent crime in our
communities.”
During the 2016 campaign,
then-candidate Donald Trump
sent mixed signals on the issue.
He told Fox News host Bill
O’Reilly that recreational marijuana is causing “a lot of problems out there.” But as he was
campaigning in Colorado, a state
where recreational marijuana is
legal, Trump said in an interview
with Denver’s KUSA: “I think it’s
up to the states, yeah. I’m a states
person. I think it should be up to
the states, absolutely.”
But after Sessions announced
the new policy, the White House
declared that Trump was completely in agreement.
“The President believes in enforcing federal law,” press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
said. “That would be his top priority. That is regardless of what the
topic is, whether it’s marijuana,
or whether it’s immigration, the
president strongly believes we
should enforce federal law.”
karen.tumulty@washpost.com
Sari Horwitz contributed to this
report.
leaders in North Carolina
pledged Wednesday to appeal a
federal court’s decision striking
down their plan for redrawing
congressional districts, promising to take to the Supreme Court
a case that could have broad
repercussions for future elections nationally.
A three-judge panel on Tuesday invalidated the map drawn
by the Republican-controlled
legislature in 2016, calling it
improper partisan gerrymandering. The decision was the first
striking down of a congressional
map on the grounds that it was
rigged in favor of a political
party.
The court panel ordered lawmakers to redraw the boundaries
by Jan. 29, although Republican
leaders said Wednesday they
plan to appeal the ruling to the
U.S. Supreme Court; they said
they also plan to request a stay of
the ruling. The GOP leaders have
a good chance at success, as the
Supreme Court is often hesitant
to become involved in a state’s
contests in an election year.
The decision still could reverberate widely, as lawmakers
across the country are turning to
technology to draw evermore
intricate maps aimed at controlling the outcome of elections.
Already this term, the Supreme
Court will consider challenges to
gerrymandered maps in Wisconsin, where the legislature also is
controlled by Republicans, and
in Maryland, where it is controlled by Democrats.
The decision adds to a growing movement to have the Supreme Court finally decide
whether partisan gerrymandering can be so extreme as to
violate voters’ constitutional
rights. While the court has
thrown out maps for other reasons, such as racial bias, it has
never thrown out a state’s redistricting plan on the grounds that
it was too partisan. Such a ruling
could radically change American
elections.
Republican leaders said they
would move swiftly to appeal to
the Supreme Court. “We’re absolutely going to file an appeal, and
we’re absolutely going to request
a stay,” Rep. David Lewis (R-Harnett), who chairs the House redistricting committee, said
Wednesday. That process will
start this week, Lewis said.
Robin Hayes, chairman of the
North Carolina Republican Party, defended the map, which
looks more or less tidy — carefully drawn to avoid the irregularshaped districts that have been a
hallmark of gerrymandering.
“A ‘gerrymander’ is, by definition and common understanding, a strange-looking ‘monster’
drawing,” he said in a statement.
“This map is clearly not that.”
Hayes also took aim at the
judge who authored the decision, James A. Wynn Jr., an
appointee of President Barack
Obama’s.
“Judge Wynn is not being a
judge, he is acting as a pundit by
trying to impose his liberal beliefs instead of making a judicial
ruling,” Hayes said.
The panel’s decision was
unanimous. Wynn was joined by
U.S. District Judges W. Earl Britt,
a Jimmy Carter appointee, and
William L. Osteen Jr., a George
W. Bush appointee. Osteen dissented on part of Wynn’s rationale, however.
Tuesday’s decision was made
easier for the panel by a kind of
smoking gun: Republican leaders in the North Carolina General Assembly openly conceded
that the 2016 map was drawn to
benefit Republicans.
They hired a consultant from
the Republican National Committee to draw the map and
excluded Democrats from the
process, the court panel said.
That consultant, the court said,
testified that he was told “to
minimize the number of districts
Rep. David Lewis
(R-Harnett) declared
that he drew the map to
give an advantage to
Republican candidates.
in which Democrats would have
an opportunity to elect a Democratic candidate.”
“Rather than seeking to advance any democratic or constitutional interest,” the panel
wrote in a lengthy opinion, “the
state legislator responsible for
drawing the 2016 plan,” Lewis,
declared that he drew the map to
advantage Republican candidates because he thinks “electing
Republicans is better than electing Democrats.”
The court’s decision drew
praise from some Democrats,
who have been critical of Republican-led gerrymandering efforts. Those efforts have gained
more attention because many
state legislatures are controlled
by Republicans.
“Today’s ruling was just the
latest example of the courts telling state legislators in North
Carolina that citizens should be
able to pick their representatives, instead of politicians picking their voters,” Eric H. Holder
Jr., attorney general under
Obama and chairman of the
National Democratic Redistricting Committee, said in a statement.
robert.barnes@washpost.com
sandhya.somashekhar
@washpost.com
Fred Barbash contributed to this
report.
Trump embraces earmarks, but don’t expect the same from GOP lawmakers
Marc Short,
President Trump’s
chief emissary to
PAUL KANE
Congress, does
not sound like he
wants to renew earmarks, those
narrowly crafted provisions that
lawmakers used to slip into
legislation. After all, nearly a
decade ago, Short worked as a
senior aide when House
Republicans declared that any
positive effect that earmarks
had in helping pass broad
legislative proposals was far
outweighed by their corrupting
nature.
“I think that there’s plenty of
sound arguments that say it also
did help create a swamp
condition here and that people
were incented to vote for bills
for the wrong reason,” Short told
CNN’s Wolf Blitzer on Tuesday
evening.
That exchange undercut the
momentum that had burst open
about six hours earlier when
Short’s boss raised the idea of
reinstating the practice —
hailing the political grease that
might quiet the squeaky wheel
that Congress has become.
“I hear so much about
earmarks, the old earmark
system, how there was a great
friendliness when you had
earmarks,” Trump said during
Tuesday’s extraordinary 55minute open-door meeting with
a bipartisan collection of
lawmakers.
Despite Trump’s praise, don’t
count on congressional
Republicans to suddenly reverse
course and embrace earmarks.
@PKCapitol
This back-and-forth
punctuated the difficulty of
trying to negotiate with Trump,
whose personal background is
as a wheeling-dealing developer
who knows that sometimes an
impasse can be overcome by a
bit more cash applied in the
right place. Yet, to win in his
new industry, politics, Trump
has adopted the Republican
Party and surrounded himself
with many traditional
conservatives among his senior
staff and Cabinet.
Moreover, the president’s
allies on Capitol Hill are more
traditional conservatives who
don’t just want a deal, whatever
the deal may be.
That tension became crystal
clear in Trump’s exchange with
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.)
on whether to pass a simple,
“clean” bill to give immediate
legal status to hundreds of
thousands of undocumented
immigrants who were brought
to the country as children. Once
Trump seemed to signal he
might support such an idea, to
then tackle broader immigration
and border security later, House
Majority Leader Kevin
McCarthy (R-Calif.) jumped in to
remind Trump what the GOP’s
position was: A deal for
“dreamers” had to be
accompanied by a massive
infusion of border security and
other immigration law changes.
Trump’s remarks on earmarks
are illustrative of how much his
first instincts, particularly on
issues that are new to him, are
non-ideological and tend toward
ANDREW HARNIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
White House Director of Legislative Affairs Marc Short, right, with
Chief of Staff John F. Kelly. Short said President Trump was just
putting a discussion about earmarks “on the table.”
crafting a deal. And Short’s
response demonstrated how,
when Trump seems to blurt
something out that wasn’t really
on the agenda, it should be
taken with a grain of salt until
other senior Trump advisers and
congressional Republicans have
weighed in.
“I think the president is
putting the discussion on the
table. He’s not really weighing in
one way or the other at this
point,” Short told Blitzer,
regarding earmarks.
It was a remarkable
undercutting of the president’s
position, measured against past
administrations, but taken for
granted in the Trump era. Short
told Blitzer that Trump was
merely voicing the “frustration
the American people have” in
watching Congress end in
gridlock and that Trump has
heard from people that
earmarks “provided grease to
get bills done.”
Blitzer gave a brief history of
how the earmark practice had
been linked to scandalous
projects that seemed meritless,
projects that were just
benefiting the lobbyists pushing
them and the lawmakers getting
campaign donations from the
lobbyists. Short smiled, happy to
hear Blitzer embracing his view
on earmarks.
“Wolf, it’s so good to hear you
present it that way because, yes,
that has been a concern,” he
said.
It was not a complete
dismissal of Trump’s position,
but Short clearly wanted Blitzer
and the world to know that the
president’s words on this issue
were just, well, not to be taken
literally. And yet, in the
bipartisan meeting with
lawmakers, Trump didn’t make
his earmark position in only a
quick aside. He devoted two full
minutes to the issue, praising
the narrow projects as beneficial
not just to passing legislation
but also to creating an esprit de
corps among lawmakers.
“They went out to dinner at
night, and they all got along,
and they passed bills. That was
an earmark system. And maybe
we should think about it,”
Trump said.
Ultimately, the earmark issue
will be resolved by members of
Congress. House Speaker Paul D.
Ryan (R-Wis.) has allowed the
Rules Committee to schedule a
few hearings on the topic, as it
has bubbled up periodically
among members of his caucus
who want to be able to
demonstrate to their
constituents that they have
something to show for their
work in Washington.
It’s hard to envision
Republicans reversing
themselves on this issue. A
decade ago, deep in the
minority, House Republicans
seized on the issue as an
example of political corruption
and pointed at key lieutenants
of then-Speaker Nancy Pelosi
(D-Calif.) as creatures of the
swamp.
Their position also became a
political necessity, an attempt at
absolution for the way they had
allowed the earmark practice to
run rampant during the 12-year
reign of House Republicans. A
couple of members of their
ranks went to federal prison, a
slew of former staffers who
became lobbyists pleaded guilty,
and K Street king Jack Abramoff
had not one but two movies
made about his corruption ring.
Still, it was not easy for House
Republicans to call for a ban on
earmarks. By 2008, Mike Pence
(R-Ind.), in his eighth year in the
House, still requested a couple
of earmarks of his own. By 2009,
the future vice president was a
member of the GOP leadership,
as chairman of the House
Republican Conference, then the
No. 3 post.
He joined the push, led by
John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) and
Eric Cantor (R-Va.), to get the
conference to vote that they
would ban the practice if they
captured the majority in the
2010 midterms.
“Republicans did something
very dramatic today that’s going
to make it very uncomfortable
for business as usual,” Pence told
Fox News in March 2010, the day
Republicans approved the
proposal. “So now House
Republicans are going to the
American people and saying,
‘We want a clean break from the
runaway spending in the past.’ ”
Pence’s top staffer, at the time,
was Marc Short.
paul.kane@washpost.com
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
Justices seem reluctant to block Ohio law purging voter rolls
BY
R OBERT B ARNES
Challengers of an Ohio law that
purges voters who do not participate in consecutive elections or
respond to a notice from state officials seemed to face an uphill battle
Wednesday at the Supreme Court.
During oral arguments, only the
court’s three most liberal justices
seemed convinced that Ohio’s procedure violates a federal law that
forbids rescinding registration because of a person’s decision not to
vote. Challengers say the law has
had an outsize impact among minority voters and in the state’s urban areas.
“The essence of this case,” said
Justice Sonia Sotomayor, is whether Ohio’s process is “disenfranchising disproportionately certain cities where large groups of minorities live, where large groups of
homeless people live, and across
the country they’re the group that
votes the least.”
Sotomayor was the only justice
to address the political implications of the law, but it is not coincidence the case comes from Ohio, a
political battleground state. Partisan tweaks of election laws to either make it easier to vote or impose more exacting restrictions
are a constant across the country.
Democratic states have filed briefs
supporting the challengers; Republican states have supported
Ohio, indicating that if the Ohio
law passes muster, more states
might employ it.
And there’s another sign of the
case’s political implications: After
past administrations supported
the law’s challengers, President
Trump’s Solicitor General Noel J.
Francisco switched sides and on
Wednesday argued for Ohio.
Only Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Elena Kagan were as
critical of the Ohio law as Sotomayor. Ohio’s is the most aggressive
law of those of fewer than 10 states
that use nonvoting as a trigger for
beginning the process of removal
from voting rolls.
Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, often the pivotal justice in voting
cases, and Justice Stephen G. Breyer, usually a reliable liberal vote,
sympathized with Ohio’s intent.
“The reason they’re purging
them is they want to protect the
voter roll from people . . . that have
moved and they’re voting in the
wrong district,” Kennedy said.
“That’s the reason. What we’re
talking about are the best tools to
implement . . . that purpose.”
Breyer said Ohio and other
states want precise voter rolls to
make sure voters are in the correct
districts and to avoid voter fraud
and impersonation.
“What should the state do?” he
asked.
Washington lawyer Paul M.
Smith, representing two groups
challenging the law, said states
have a number of options available. But the federal law “says you
can’t use failure to vote as the
reason for purging somebody from
the rolls.”
Ohio denied that is what it does.
And unlike many voting cases that
come before the court, Wednesday’s case centered not on grand
constitutional principles but on in-
JACQUELYN MARTIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
An American Federation of Government Employees worker rallies
outside the Supreme Court in opposition to Ohio’s voter roll purges.
terpreting seemingly contradictory directives of federal law.
Beyond the prohibition on removing voters because they failed
to vote, the law calls on states to
keep accurate rolls and allows removal when a person fails to respond to a request to confirm registration and then fails to vote in
two federal elections.
Ohio sends a notice after a voter
skips a single federal election cycle. If they fail to respond and do
not vote in the next four years,
their names are removed from the
rolls.
“Nobody is removed solely by
reason of their failure to vote,”
Ohio State Solicitor Eric E. Murphy
told the justices, adding, “They’re
removed if they fail to respond to a
notice and fail to vote over six
years, which is more than the minimum protections.”
Smith said the process was seriously flawed. By starting the process because a person did not vote in
an election, “you’re going to vastly
over-purge people.” He said that
only 20 percent of those who receive notices return them, even
though they still live at the same
address and are eligible to vote.
One of the challengers, for instance, is Larry Harmon of Akron.
He lived at the same address for 16
years but decided not to vote in
2009 and 2010. The state sent him
a notice in 2011, which he does not
remember receiving. He continued not to vote because he didn’t
like his choices, and when he
showed up to participate in the
2015 elections, he found he was no
longer registered.
The state routinely sends out
thousands of similar notices.
When the U.S. Court of Appeals for
the 6th Circuit said the law could
not be enforced in the November
2016 elections, at least 7,500 voters
participated who would have otherwise been ineligible.
Conservative Justice Samuel A.
Alito Jr. appeared to think Ohio’s
other protections were adequate.
“Why isn’t the best interpretation of this that one cannot be
removed from the list solely because of failure to vote?” Alito
asked, with the emphasis on “solely.”
Later, questioning Smith about
Ohio’s procedure, Alito said: “Does
it say the failure to vote is a ground
for removal, or does it say that
moving out of the district is a
ground for removal, and failure to
vote plays a part in the determination of whether a person has
moved out of the district? It’s evidentiary.”
Smith said failure to vote was
hardly a reason to believe someone
had moved. Better, he said, to use
driver’s licenses or some other database. Harmon, for instance, continued to pay property taxes on the
same address.
Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.
got Smith to concede that not voting could be a starting point in
some cases. Smith said it could be
evidence that a person has moved
if a non-forwardable notice came
back to the state, providing a reason to believe the person no longer
lived at the address. But that is not
Ohio’s process.
Neither Justices Clarence
Thomas nor Neil M. Gorsuch, who
usually vote with the other conservatives, asked questions.
Sotomayor wanted Francisco to
explain the government’s change
from supporting challengers when
the case was heard in the appeals
court, and supporting Ohio now.
“There’s a 24-year history of solicitor generals of both political
parties under . . . presidents of
both political parties who have
taken a position contrary to yours,”
Sotomayor said, adding that it
“seems quite unusual that your
office would change its position so
dramatically.”
Francisco did not give a very
succinct answer — in part because
Sotomayor continued to pepper
him with questions.
But he said a reexamination of
the issue within the Trump administration convinced him that Congress intended states could use the
failure to vote as a trigger for a
broader process.
The case is Husted v. A. Philip
Randolph Institute.
robert.barnes@washpost.com
Voting fraud panel will
destroy, not share, data
BY
S PENCER S . H SU
State voter registration data
collected by President Trump’s
abandoned election fraud commission will be destroyed and not
shared with the Department of
Homeland Security or any other
agency, a White House aide told a
federal judge.
White House Director of Information Technology Charles Herndon also said in a legal filing in
Washington late Tuesday that
none of the panel’s other “records
or data will be transferred to the
DHS or another agency” from this
point on, except for disclosure or
archiving that a court or federal
law might require.
Herndon’s declaration left unclear what other information the
panel may have assembled since
its formation in May, if any analysis was done and whether information had already been shared
with others outside the Presidential Advisory Commission on
Election Integrity, according to
lawyers who participated in a
telephone conference call with
the court Wednesday.
The call included lawyers for
the government and for a panel
member who had sued the commission, alleging it kept him in
the dark on its operations. The
commission faces lawsuits by 10
other voting rights and public
accountability groups challenging its data collection, privacy
impacts and lack of transparency.
“The Commission did not create any preliminary findings,”
Herndon wrote for the government. “Pending resolution of outstanding litigation involving the
Commission, and pending consultation with [the National Archives and Records Administration], the White House intends to
destroy all state voter data,” he
said.
Herndon’s declaration appears
to contradict statements Jan. 3 by
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders when she
said Trump had dissolved the
panel and asked DHS “to review
its initial findings and determine
next courses of actions.”
That same day, the panel’s vice
chairman, Kansas Secretary of
State Kris W. Kobach, had said
DHS’s Immigration and Customs
Enforcement “has a greater ability to move quickly to get the
investigation done.” He said in a
weekend interview with The
Washington Post that he thought
DHS could re-create the state
data rather easily if need be.
The DHS Office of Public Affairs did not respond to a request
for comment after Tuesday’s filings.
Trump created the commission
after repeatedly suggesting that
millions of illegal voters cost him
the popular vote in 2016. Studies
and state officials from both parties have found no evidence of
widespread voting fraud, and the
request triggered a political
firestorm as state leaders from
both parties objected to the potential release of personal information, suppression of voter participation and encroachment on
states’ oversight of voting laws.
A coalition of voting rights and
public-interest groups Wednesday praised the White House for
its intent to destroy state voter
records but continued to accuse
the administration of attempting
a “hide-the-ball trick” to evade
open government and privacy
laws by not disclosing records of
work the commission already had
done.
“The Commission was created,
it existed for several months, and
it gathered information about issues of vital public importance,
and it cannot . . . simply be
thrown down the ‘memory hole,’ ”
said an attorney for Maine Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap (D),
a commission member who sued
the panel in November to disclose
more of its records.
“I think we still have a right to
know what our government is
working on, and as a member of
the commission, I have an obligation to know what was going on,”
Dunlap said Wednesday.
U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly largely agreed with
Dunlap in a Dec. 22 ruling.
The White House’s new filing
came as Dunlap urged the court
to order the commission to preserve all records pending compliance with the judge’s order. Government attorneys asked the
judge to toss out her order, saying
it was moot now that the panel is
no more.
In Wednesday’s conference
call, Justice Department lawyers
reiterated that the commission
produced no findings and that
the White House Counsel’s Office
and the office of records management would decide what records
to archive, according to Dunlap’s
lawyers.
The call did not clear up what
former commissioners or staff
could do with other data or materials gathered or produced for
the panel, said Melanie Sloan,
senior adviser to American Oversight, a watchdog group representing Dunlap. The judge ordered more briefings.
Eleven privacy and civil rights
groups who have sued the commission wrote to Secretary of
Homeland Security Kirstjen M.
Nielsen on Monday asking her
not to “accept or maintain” any
personal data from the effort. She
is set to testify Tuesday before a
Senate Judiciary Committee
oversight hearing.
The Electronic Privacy Information Center filed suit Monday
for records of any discussions
between the commission and
DHS, noting that 20 states sent
data responding to the request for
voting information on more than
150 million registered voters.
The Brennan Center for Justice
called proposals to use DHS immigration, detention and citizenship application databases to
purge voter rolls an error-prone
misuse of enforcement authority
that would probably disenfranchise eligible voters.
spencer.hsu@washpost.com
John Wagner contributed to this
report.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
Departing Virginia governor earned foes’ grudging respect
gun to ease years of worsening
congestion.
Similarly, the southeastern
Port of Virginia had been struggling and was on the verge of
being sold before McAuliffe led an
overhaul. Now it’s setting one tonnage record after another.
And he backed plans for two
major natural-gas pipelines
through rural parts of the state,
angering environmentalists and
the progressive wing of his party.
They’ll create jobs, he argued.
Because many of those positions were also in line with Republican priorities, opponents argue
that McAuliffe takes too much
credit.
“What is Terry McAuliffe’s signature accomplishment?” says
Garren Shipley, a longtime GOP
provocateur who represents the
Republican National Committee
in Richmond. Playing the “Seinfeld” TV theme music on his
phone, Shipley says, “It’s the governorship about nothing.”
From a tactical point of view,
though, Shipley acknowledges admiration for the way McAuliffe
linked social issues to economic
development. “Full marks for
that. We have noticed that, as
well,” he says. “Terry McAuliffe is
many things, but stupid is not one
of them.”
MCAULIFFE FROM A1
governing.
But when he steps aside Saturday for his chosen successor and
fellow Democrat, Gov.-elect Ralph
Northam, the 60-year-old McAuliffe can point to a slate of achievements — low unemployment,
$20 billion in promised business
investment, a revived Port of Virginia, increased money for education, positive approval ratings.
As it turns out, being a manic
salesman has its political advantages, especially in a divided state
government where the opposing
party controls the legislature. Issues don’t have to be partisan if
they’re hitched to the all-American ideal of making a buck.
Democrats credit the governor’s
approach with positioning them
for sweeping victories statewide,
from Virginia’s being the only
Southern state to go for his old
friend Hillary Clinton in 2016 to
November’s surge that brought
them to near-parity with Republicans in the House of Delegates.
McAuliffe leaves office as a credible name on the list of 2020 Democratic presidential contenders.
While coy about his plans after
office, McAuliffe has said that he
will work with former attorney
general Eric H. Holder Jr. on his
redistricting project to end gerrymandering and will help Democratic candidates running for governor in 36 states — two initiatives
that will keep McAuliffe visible
across the country.
“I don’t know what I’m going to
do about 2020. I really don’t,” he
says in an interview. “I’d never be
in Congress. It’s not my personality. Never in the Senate.” Would he
be a presidential running mate?
“That’s a great question. Never
been asked that,” he says. “You
know, that’s not my action. But, I
mean, never say no.”
Republicans argue that McAuliffe never pulled off any big legislative wins. His showiest accomplishment — the restoration of
voting rights to some 173,000 convicted felons — was an end run
around the General Assembly. Republican leaders took him all the
way to the state Supreme Court to
try to block it.
There’s one area, though,
where even his staunchest political opponents give him credit.
“This governor has worked
very hard on economic development,” Senate Majority Leader
Thomas K. Norment Jr. (R-James
City) says. The real test, Norment
warns, is how much of the bluster
about development deals comes
to fruition. “He is effusive in his
enthusiasm about what he has
accomplished and what the outyear results are going to be. . . .
We’re hopeful that they will [bear
fruit], but I do think that his enthusiasm is a little exaggerated.”
Off on the wrong foot
Even grudging respect from
Republicans is something of an
accomplishment for McAuliffe,
whose campaign in 2013 against
Ken Cuccinelli II was an unusually ugly partisan brawl by Virginia
standards.
After his narrow victory, McAuliffe’s showboating style got him
off to a bad start with Republicans
in the legislature. His priority was
to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, and he boasted
that he would wine and dine the
TIMOTHY C. WRIGHT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Gov. Terry McAuliffe pauses Wednesday night during the opening remarks of his final
State of the Commonwealth speech before the General Assembly. Over his right shoulder —
in the striped tie — is Gov.-elect Ralph Northam (D), who will be inaugurated Saturday.
opposition until they capitulated.
“This word will sound more
negative than I mean it to be,”
political scientist Quentin Kidd
says, “but he was Trumpian in the
way he would sell himself and sell
what he could do. Republicans
were very dismissive of him. They
were beside themselves that they
lost to a guy like Terry McAuliffe.”
Then-House Speaker William J.
Howell (R-Stafford) pledged before McAuliffe was even sworn in
that the legislature would never
expand Medicaid, and no amount
of schmoozing ever moved the
General Assembly’s tough corps
of Republican leaders.
So after a disappointing first
year, McAuliffe adapted. He kept
putting the Medicaid expansion
in his budgets, but he also developed working relationships with
the chairmen of the legislative
finance committees. Virginia has
a constitutional requirement to
balance its budget each year, and
there was never much drama as
McAuliffe and Republicans filled
shortfalls and constructed basic
budgets.
And he shifted his rhetoric to
his natural strong suit, economic
development. Initially, McAuliffe
struck some as too hung up on
simply wooing companies to
move to Virginia.
“When he came in and said
‘jobs, jobs, jobs,’ I’m not sure he
really focused on the training and
skill sets you need for those jobs,”
says Bobbie Kilberg, president
and chief executive of the Northern Virginia Technology Council.
An arm of the council known as
TechPAC had endorsed Cuccinelli
for governor, a shock to the probusiness McAuliffe. When McAuliffe interviewed with the influential group, he struck some members as superficial and unprepared to talk policy.
Kilberg, a longtime Republican, says McAuliffe has matured
in office. He deserves credit, she
says, for realizing that Virginia’s
economy requires unglamorous
underpinnings — workforce
training, money for higher education, a reshaping away from dependence on government contracting.
“He’s grown tremendously in
his understanding of specific policy initiatives and his ability to
implement them,” she says. “If
that was one of the criticisms that
TechPAC had back then, I think
he’s overcome those.”
Economy trumps ideology
McAuliffe wielded economic
development as a kind of weapon
against ideologically charged issues.
He used it to attack legislation
from conservatives that would
have required transgender people
to use bathrooms that conform to
their birth gender. Tech companies won’t consider locating in a
state that even debates such a bill,
McAuliffe warned. If such bills
passed, McAuliffe vetoed them.
Last year he broke the Virginia
record for vetoes, eventually hitting 120.
He used the need to improve
the state’s business climate to
push for better funding for
schools, teacher raises, mentalhealth services and transportation. While motorists have
howled about high tolls on the
new 66 Express Lanes in Northern Virginia, McAuliffe gets kudos
in Hampton Roads for jumpstarting tunnel expansion and express-lane projects that have be-
Developing a legacy
McAuliffe’s most in-your-face
act was his aggressive move to
restore felon voting rights. When
the state Supreme Court agreed
with Republicans that he had
overstepped by granting rights to
all former felons at once, McAuliffe vowed to sign the restorations one at a time. Thousands of
them.
He says it’s his single proudest
achievement, the centerpiece of
a record on civil rights that included a forceful response to the
violent white nationalist rally
last summer in Charlottesville.
That event, in which one counterprotester died and two state
troopers were killed in a helicopter crash, brought out rare displays of anger and emotion in
McAuliffe.
But it’s not what he cites as his
legacy. “I think I will be known as
the governor who truly diversified
Virginia’s economy,” he says in an
interview.
If so, it’s something that will
take years to play out. Virginia is
still heavily dependent on federal
spending, and though its overall
unemployment rate has fallen to
3.7 percent, parts of the state are
worse off than others.
McAuliffe routinely — as in,
several times a day — cites the
capital investment he has attracted to Virginia. The roughly
$20 billion is far more than any of
his predecessors. From a billiondollar Facebook data center to
massive Amazon warehouses to a
proliferation of breweries and cideries all over the state, the new
investment is tied to some
207,000 new jobs.
The catch is that many of those
projects are a long way from fruition. There have been a handful of
notable busts — a Chinese manufacturer that got $1.4 million in
state grants for a factory in Appomattox County that never materialized, for instance, and another
Chinese company that promised
to pay back $5 million in state
loans after failing to deliver a
giant facility in Chesterfield
County.
But with his rallying cry of
“Sleep when you’re dead,” McAuliffe says the more you attract, the
more will stick. He only half-jokes
that he’ll work up until his final
minute in office trying to tip that
number over $20 billion.
The state official most burdened by that goal is Todd Haymore, who as secretary of commerce and trade has accompanied
McAuliffe on 33 of his 35 foreign
trade trips and myriad jaunts
around the state to announce new
deals.
Haymore could probably win a
lifetime of free beers in Richmond
with tales about keeping up with
McAuliffe: They ate chicken feet
in China after busting open an
embargo against Virginia poultry.
After one deal fell through, an
angry McAuliffe ordered him to
get off the helicopter — in midflight. The governor told French
sommeliers — in Paris — that
Virginia wines are the best in the
world. Haymore dozed off at an
official dinner after 36 hours of
travel, and McAuliffe punched
him in the leg to wake him up.
Haymore played a similar role
for McAuliffe’s predecessor, Republican Robert F. McDonnell.
He, too, was an economic-development whiz — his slogan was
“Bob’s for Jobs” — though his legacy has been overshadowed by the
money-for-favors scandal that
nearly sent him to prison.
But Haymore says nothing really compares with McAuliffe’s frenetic pace.
“I’ve never experienced anything like it,” Haymore says.
On this typical day last month,
McAuliffe called a company in
Europe at 2 a.m. to try to close a
deal, then got on the state Beechcraft in Richmond at 8 a.m. and
flew to Virginia Beach to announce a factory expansion. From
there he flew to Manassas to help
a glass company announce 40
new jobs. Then he drove to Washington for a news conference
about Metro. Later that night he
had a fundraising dinner. In between, the cybersecurity conference.
McAuliffe made cybersecurity
his signature issue in 2016 when
he served as head of the National
Governors Association, so he’s no
stranger to the topic. But speaking
to the audience, his larger focus
becomes clear.
He tells the officials how important their work is. He describes
how he has gotten Virginia to
spend more money for cyber-job
training, to build a workforce for
the future. He boasts of being the
only governor to attend a particular global security conference.
Suddenly this wonkiest of gatherings has become something else.
A sales pitch.
“If you want to be a success,”
McAuliffe says, “you’ve got to put
your business in Virginia.” Then
he closes with a classic move, getting the mark to participate in the
pitch. Where do you suppose, he
asks the crowd, is the first National Guard unit in the country with a
cyber-command center?
“Virginia!” the conference-goers say in unison.
“Folks,” McAuliffe says, laughing, “I’m just trying to tell you
here. I’m just trying to make you
some money.”
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
Trump sends controversial nominees back to Senate despite concerns
Questions linger over
their qualifications and
political baggage
BY
J OHN W AGNER
President Trump has re-upped
a slew of controversial picks for
administration and judicial posts
whose nominations languished in
the Senate last year amid questions about their qualifications
and the political baggage they
would bring to the job.
A list of 75 nominees sent to the
Senate this week for reconsideration includes K.T. McFarland for
U.S. ambassador to Singapore, despite scrutiny by congressional investigators as part of their probe
into ties between the Trump campaign and Russia.
Others include a nominee who
would be the first politician to lead
NASA, a pick to lead the Council
on Environmental Quality who
has cast doubt on climate change,
a choice to chair the Consumer
Product Safety Commission who
has drawn opposition from consumer groups and two judicial
nominees rated “unqualified” by
the American Bar Association.
“They’ve renominated a lot of
folks who aren’t going to be confirmed,” said Jim Manley, a lobbyist and longtime aide to former
Senate Minority Leader Harry M.
Reid (D-Nev.). “Instead of finding
more qualified candidates, they’re
doubling down and trying to roll
the Senate.”
Republicans argue Trump’s
nominees have faced unwarranted resistance from Senate Democrats, whom they accuse of trying
to run out the clock on many of the
president’s picks, and say most
remain worthy of consideration.
Trump himself has repeatedly
complained about Senate Democrats, calling them “good at obstruction.”
Under Senate rules, a single
member can object to a nomination being carried over into the
new year. About 150 Trump nominees drew no objections in December, but an unusually large
number — nearly 90 — were sent
back to the White House at the end
of the year.
All but 14 of those have been
renominated by Trump. Most of
those nominees had previously
announced their plans to withdraw or had been voted down by a
Senate committee, including
three picks for the federal judiciary and Scott Garrett, Trump’s
choice to lead the Export-Import
Bank. He had voted to eliminate
the agency as a member of Congress.
Others who publicly exited include Sam Clovis, Trump’s nominee to become the chief scientist at
the Agriculture Department.
Clovis, who has no experience
in the hard sciences, withdrew his
name from consideration in November amid revelations he was
among top officials on the Trump
campaign who were aware of efforts by foreign policy adviser
George Papadopoulos to broker a
relationship between the campaign and Russian officials.
A Republican consultant with
close ties to the White House said
one reason Trump has renominated even some of his more controversial picks is a sense of loyalty.
“Most of these are being held up
by Democrats,” said the consultant, who requested anonymity to
speak more candidly. “If some of
them are being slow-walked, that
doesn’t necessarily mean they
should be abandoned.”
Among the more high profile
re-nominations is that of McFarland, a former deputy national
security adviser and close ally of
Michael Flynn, Trump’s ousted national security adviser who is now
cooperating with the special counsel in the Rusisia probe.
McFarland’s first nomination
in May stalled amid concerns
about her knowledge of contacts
between Russian operatives and
Trump campaign officials.
McFarland, a former Fox News
commentator, testified in July she
was “not aware of any of the issues
or events” related to Flynn’s contact with Sergey Kislyak, the former Russian ambassador to the
United States. Emails obtained by
the New York Times in December
showed McFarland was aware of a
key exchange between Flynn and
Kislyak.
Richard Grenell, Trump’s nominee for ambassador to Germany, is
also being re-upped for consideration despite resistance from
Democrats. Grenell, a former diplomatic aide to President George
W. Bush, is a frequent Fox News
commentator and outspoken critic of the media.
Also renominated this week
was Kathleen Hartnett White to
lead the Council on Environmental Quality, an agency that coordinates environmental efforts
across the administration.
White, a former Texas regulator
who once called carbon dioxide a
“harmless trace gas” that was
merely “plant food,” was grilled at
her confirmation hearing about
her qualifications and past statements on climate change. In November, more than 300 scientists
wrote to the Senate opposing her
appointment.
NASA, meanwhile, has been
without an administrator since
Charles Bolden resigned a year
ago. It took nine months for the
White House to nominate Jim
Bridenstine, a Republican congressman from Oklahoma, who
faced withering questioning from
Democrats at his Senate confirmation hearing late last year.
Sen. Bill Nelson, a former astro-
naut and influential Democrat
from Florida, led the charge
against Bridenstine, calling into
question his credentials.
Nelson said “the NASA administrator should be a consummate
space professional who is technically and scientifically competent
and a skilled executive,” as well as
someone who can unite people —
criteria he said Bridenstine lacks.
During his tenure in Congress,
Bridenstine has focused on space
issues, including sponsoring an
expansive bill known as the American Space Renaissance Act. He
has also been endorsed by Buzz
Aldrin, the second man to walk on
the moon.
Still, Bridenstine’s path to confirmation remains tricky due to
concerns voiced by some Republicans, including Sen. Marco Rubio
of Florida, who said he does not
want to see “the politicization of
NASA.” During the 2016 presidential race, Bridenstine appeared in
ads on behalf of Sen. Ted Cruz of
Texas and suggested Rubio, then a
White House candidate, was soft
on terror.
Others on Trump’s list this week
include former Republican congresswoman Ann Marie Buerkle
of New York to chair the Consumer Product Safety Commission, a
five-member panel responsible
for regulating thousands of other
products.
Buerkle, who has been a member of the commission since 2013
and now serves as its acting chairwoman, was the subject of a New
York Times story late last year
with the headline: “Trump Pick to
Head Consumer Safety Board Is
Seen as Too Close to Industries.”
The piece reported that she has
seldom voted for a mandatory recall, a maximum fine or a tougher
safety standard.
Others with an uncertain path
in the Senate who were renominated this week include Sam
Brownback, the Republican governor of Kansas, whom Trump put
forward in July as his pick to be
ambassador at large for international religious freedom. He has
faced resistance from Democrats
related to his record on LGBT
rights.
Trump’s list of resubmissions
also includes two nominees to the
federal judiciary rated “not qualified” by the American Bar Association.
The ABA concluded Charles
Goodwin, Trump’s nominee to a
seat on the U.S. District Court for
the Western District of Oklahoma,
is unqualified because of his
“work habits.” And, the ABA said
Holly Teeter, Trump’s nominee to a
seat on the U.S. District Court for
the District of Kansas, is not qualified based on her lack of trial court
experience.
john.wagner@washpost.com
Christian Davenport contributed to
this report.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
M2
Exempting Fla. from offshore drilling riles coastline states
Action seen as Trump’s
effort to aid governor,
protect Mar-a-Lago
BY D AVID
AND J OHN
W EIGEL
W AGNER
The Trump administration’s
decision to exempt Florida from
expanded
offshore
drilling
kicked off a frenzy Wednesday in
other coastal states, with governors from both political parties
asking: Why not us?
“We cannot afford to take a
chance with the beauty, the majesty and the economic value and
vitality of our wonderful coastline,” South Carolina Gov. Henry
McMaster (R), who backed President Trump in his state’s competitive 2016 primary, said in a
statement.
“Not Off Our Coast,” North
Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper (D)
wrote in a tweet. “We’ve been
clear: this would bring unacceptable risks to our economy, our
environment, and our coastal
communities.”
The Florida carve-out, announced Tuesday by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, created new
doubts about the fate of the
entire offshore drilling decision
— and immediately became another challenge for Republicans
as they work to hold off Democrats in the midterm elections.
Nine of the 11 states that opposed
the drilling order have gubernatorial races this year, and many
of the most competitive contests
for the House will unfold in
districts that touch coastline.
By Wednesday afternoon,
state attorneys general, joined by
environmental groups, were suggesting that Zinke had undermined the entire drilling rule
with his high-profile visit to Tallahassee, where he heaped praise
on “straightforward, easy to
work for” Gov. Rick Scott (R) — a
political ally whom Trump has
repeatedly urged to run for
the Senate.
“The Administrative Procedure Act requires there to be a
reasonable rationale behind
agency decisions, and that they
can’t be arbitrary and capricious,” said Michael Brune, the
executive director of the Sierra
Club, referring to a 1946 law
governing major regulatory
changes. “So, saying Florida is
exempt because Rick Scott is
straightforward and trustworthy? That Florida’s coastlines are
unique? That seems to be the
definition of arbitrary and capricious.”
Scott spokeswoman Lauren
Schenone said the governor had
not contacted the White House
about the issue but had expressed his concerns to Zinke in
face-to-face meetings in October
and on Tuesday, as well as in
multiple phone calls.
In a Wednesday interview
with The Washington Post, Zinke
said he first met Scott when his
state and the federal government
were preparing for Hurricane
Irma, then a second time when
the two worked on Everglades
restoration. Zinke said he felt a
personal connection with the
governor, so when Scott contacted him in writing he felt an
obligation to respond.
“Quite frankly, Governor Scott
called me and expressed in writing a desire to have a meeting,”
he said. That meeting was the
first “in what I believe will be a
series of conversations” with other governors, the secretary said.
“I will no doubt talk to every
governor,” Zinke said. “It doesn’t
matter to me whether you’re
Republican or Democrat. This is
going to be a long process. This is
going to be at least a year with
public comment. We have to get
it right, look at the geology, look
at the science.”
The White House declined to
say whether Trump was personally involved in the decision to
exempt Florida. Two senior
aides, speaking on the condition
of anonymity, said they were not
aware of any efforts on his behalf.
“Secretary Zinke has been directed to develop a 5-year program for development in the
Outer continental shelf,” deputy
White House press secretary Hogan Gidley said in a statement.
“The Secretary is currently in the
process of speaking to stakeholders, like Governor Scott yesterday, to determine the most responsible and environmentally
sound path forward. All states
have different concerns and
needs which is why this is an
ongoing process with a built-in
60-day comment period.”
The decision has been subject
to a torrent of ridicule and anger
from coastal governors and senators who wondered why their
states have not been exempted.
In a conference call with reporters, Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) unloaded on Zinke and Trump,
saying that Gov. Terry McAuliffe
(D-Va.) and Lt. Gov. Ralph
Northam (D-Va.) had asked for
an exemption and heard nothing
back.
“Is it because the governor of
Florida is a Republican and the
Virginia governor and governor-
elect are Democrats?” Kaine said.
“Are they putting Florida off-limits because President Trump has
a vacation property — Mar-a-Lago — on the Atlantic coast of
Florida and he worries about the
environmental risk there, but
he’s not worried about environmental risk in Virginia?”
Oregon Gov. Kate Brown (D)
called the decision “outrageous,”
saying in an interview that she
had contacted Zinke with hopes
of having a similar conversation
“I will no doubt talk
to every governor.
It doesn’t matter
to me whether
you’re Republican
or Democrat.”
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke
but had not heard back.
“Our tourism is as important
to Oregon as tourism is to Florida,” Brown said, adding that
drilling would also be a detriment to her state’s natural resource industries.
To Brown, it appeared that
Trump was either trying to bolster Scott’s political prospects,
helping his own standing in a key
swing state for 2020 or “protecting his real estate holdings in
Mar-a-Lago.”
“What else am I supposed to
think?” Brown asked.
The
commentary
about
Trump’s properties was bipartisan. Rep. Mark Sanford (R-S.C.),
a former governor who repre-
sents his state’s Atlantic coastline, suggested during an interview with CNN that the president held one standard for states
where he vacationed and one for
the rest of the country.
“It smacks of what we never
want to see in politics, which is:
Is it self-serving?” Sanford said.
“I mean, you can’t say, ‘I don’t
want to see an oil rig from
Mar-a-Lago’ as you look out from
the waters of Palm Beach, but it’s
okay to look at an oil rig out from
Hilton Head or Charleston,
South Carolina.”
But most of the opposition to
both the drilling order and the
Florida exception came from
Democrats. In an interview, California Attorney General Xavier
Becerra said that the standards
Zinke applied to Florida — the
importance of tourism and coastal industries — were “standards
that California can meet.” Becerra also suggested that Zinke had
given states strong grounds to
challenge the drilling decision
and that industries hoping to
develop energy off the coast
should not necessarily expect it
to happen.
“This puts some of that into
doubt,” Becerra said. “We want to
make it clear to everyone in
California that things have not
changed as a result of this announcement.”
Democrats, who view Scott as
the GOP’s best possible challenger to Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.),
added to the chorus by suggesting that they would turn the
decision into a liability. Before
the carve-out, Nelson had been
urging bipartisan legislation to
halt the offshore drilling order.
“I have spent my entire life
fighting to keep oil rigs away
from our coasts. But now, sud-
For Saudi
artists, a
sense of
possibility
SAUDIS FROM A1
has raised questions here about
the role of independent artists
who had toiled in the kingdom for
years, navigating bureaucratic
hurdles and rigid social boundaries to win international recognition for the Saudi arts.
Would the government’s plans
give a boost to independent curators, underground musicians and
first-time filmmakers? Or would
it lash art to the whims of government ministries and privilege
only those artists favored by the
state?
“Art should be away from any
agendas. That is what makes us
concerned,” said Abdulnasser
Gharem, co-founder of a pioneering Saudi arts collective called
Edge of Arabia. His own work,
including paintings and installations, often is shown abroad.
The debate over culture gets at
the nature of the sweeping changes underway in Saudi Arabia under Mohammed. A focus on entertainment and culture is central to
a plan to diversify the country’s
oil-dependent economy while expanding some social freedoms.
Saudi officials and the crown
prince’s supporters say the changes — including allowing women
to drive (a concession promised
by the late King Abdullah) and
curbing the authority of the “religious police” — represent a longdelayed effort to drag the kingdom into the modern era. Some
initiatives, such as the opening of
cinemas, have also promised a
vast economic opportunity.
But critics warn that it will take
years to determine whether highly touted government reforms —
for example, to stamp out corruption and curb extremist discourse
— were meant to change an ossified system or simply repackage
it.
In embracing the arts, the Saudi leadership drew a lesson in
image-making from its ally and
neighbor, the United Arab Emirates, which long ago recognized
that its homegrown cultural
scene was also a “powerful tool of
soft power and diplomacy,” said
Beth Derderian, a doctoral candidate in anthropology at Northwestern University who studies
the development of arts and culture in the UAE.
Other moves by the Saudi leadership have stirred confusion
about its priorities, including the
recent purchase by a Saudi prince
of a painting by Leonardo da
Vinci for $450 million — a vast
sum, given the government’s stated commitment to anti-corruption and austerity measures. After media reports indicated that
the real buyer had been Moham-
PHOTOS BY IMAN AL-DABBAGH FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
med, Saudi officials said the
painting had been acquired for
the new Louvre Museum in Abu
Dhabi, the capital of the UAE.
From his bustling studio in a
villa in the capital, Gharem
launched a residency program six
years ago to nurture young Saudi
artists. In a country where many
view contemporary art with suspicion, the studio was a rare
incubator of creativity. It reflected a small Saudi scene that flourished over the past decade —
despite occasional clashes with
religious figures and the government.
“We were under pressure for
years. It made the scene organic,”
Gharem said on a recent evening
in his studio.
But artists also faced peril.
One, Ashraf Fayadh, a Palestinian
poet, curator and artist, was convicted on apostasy charges in
2015 and sentenced by a Saudi
court to death by beheading. The
accusations, which Fayadh’s lawyers said stemmed from a personal dispute, included charges that
his poetry had promoted atheism.
After an international outcry,
the sentence was reduced to eight
years in prison, along with 800
lashes.
Efforts to foster culture are
coming as artists are feeling increased pressure because of tensions in the wider Persian Gulf.
A feud has divided the gulf monarchies, pitting Qatar against
Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, the UAE
and Egypt. In addition, surging
hostilities between Shiite Iran
and the Sunni gulf states have
fueled an increasingly vicious sectarian enmity.
The resulting atmosphere of
often-strident nationalism has
largely quieted dissenting voices
in the media, on social networks
and in the arts.
TOP: Filmmaker Khaled Nadershah with cast and crew on the set in Jiddah last month.
Nadershah, 26, is shooting his first feature film in Saudi Arabia. He praised state plans for
opening cinemas and supporting filmmakers as encouraging first steps. ABOVE: Artist
Abdulnasser Gharem adjusts his headdress at Gharem Studio in Jiddah. Gharem is a cofounder of the pioneering arts collective Edge of Arabia.
The tensions have been apparent in the past few years in the
UAE, long considered a cosmopolitan hub for artists across the
region, including immigrants
who grew up in that country. But
in recent years, it has become
more difficult for some artists,
especially those who are Shiite
Muslims or originally from Iran,
either to travel to the UAE or
renew their visas for access to the
country, Derderian said.
At a recent exhibition in Abu
Dhabi, a painting by Gharem was
removed, he said, after an official
complained. The painting, called
“Prosperity Without Growth,” depicted a figure wearing clothes
that suggested he was both a
Sunni and Shiite Muslim — a
message about unity that apparently was too toxic for the moment.
“It’s not the time to tell the
truth,” Gharem said.
Other Saudi artists were more
optimistic.
“We say, ‘In movement, there is
a blessing,’ ” said Mohammed
Hafiz, co-founder of Athr, a contemporary gallery that opened in
2009, who has advised the government on its foray into culture.
Hafiz said officials are approaching the arts as a “holistic
ecosystem” of theaters, museums,
auction houses and other venues
that would bolster arts education
and nurture an embrace of art in
society at large. One of the most
ambitious projects, the King Abdulaziz Center for World Culture,
features a library and museum,
and it recently launched a competition to promote contemporary
Saudi artists.
And critically, Hafiz said, the
government is consulting local
artists as it moves forward —
among them Ahmed Mater, one of
Saudi Arabia’s best-known contemporary artists, whose work,
including large-scale photographs, videos and installations,
is being shown at the Brooklyn
Museum.
denly, Secretary Zinke announces plans to drill off Florida’s coast
and four days later agrees to
‘take Florida off the table’ ”?
Nelson said in a statement
Wednesday. “I don’t believe it.
This is a political stunt orchestrated by the Trump administration to help Rick Scott, who has
wanted to drill off Florida’s coast
his entire career. We shouldn’t be
playing politics with the future of
Florida.”
In a separate statement, the
Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee called Scott “a
self-serving con-man” and said
Trump had helped “manufacture
a crisis to try to help his political
ambitions.”
Scott spokesman John Tupps
said in a statement that the
governor’s success in getting the
exemption had been a clear win
for the state.
“Senator Nelson and anyone
else who opposes oil drilling off
Florida’s coast should be happy
that the governor was able to
secure this commitment,” Tupps
said. “This isn’t about politics.
This is good policy for Florida.”
Scott is not the only Republican governor who would stand to
benefit politically from an exemption. In Maryland, Gov. Larry Hogan (R) is up for reelection
this year in a Democratic-leaning
state and has been an outspoken
opponent of offshore drilling.
“The governor has made it
extremely clear that he opposes
this kind of exploration off our
coastline, and that will never
change,” Hogan spokeswoman
Amelia Chasse said Wednesday.
david.weigel@washpost.com
john.wagner@washpost.com
Darryl Fears contributed to this
report.
There was bound to be a period
of “trial and error,” Hafiz acknowledged. But, he said, “you
stay still and nothing happens. . . .
The whole society is moving
much faster than it was before.”
Among young artists, a sense of
possibility has taken hold.
Nada AlMojadedi, a filmmaker,
said it would take time take for
Saudi audiences to embrace local
content. They “haven’t been accustomed to watching stories
about themselves,” she said. But
the government’s encouragement
— or at least its endorsement of
cultural events — has been a
boon, she added.
Her short film, called “Zaina’s
Cake,” was screened at a film
festival sponsored by the Saudi oil
company Aramco last spring that
was attended by filmmakers from
across the country, she said. During one recent week, it played at
film nights in Riyadh and the
eastern city of Dammam.
Khaled Nadershah, a 26-yearold filmmaker shooting his first
feature in Saudi Arabia, praised
the plans to open cinemas and
support filmmakers as encouraging first steps.
“People need to see that there is
such a thing as Saudi movies and
that the industry is real,” he said.
Already there is evidence that
attitudes toward artists are
changing as bureaucratic barriers
have tumbled: His permits to film
on the streets of the city of Jiddah
had taken only a week to come
through, Nadershah said.
His ambition is broad — to tell
“all the untold stories about my
culture and society,” he said. His is
a small, self-financed film called
“Exit 5,” about a divorced woman
struggling to get her parents’ approval to study abroad. “A very
common problem,” he added.
He is less concerned with negotiating social taboos than with the
challenge of finding a platform
for an independent film. New
cinemas are opening, but the Saudi audience that will fill the seats
is largely obsessed with U.S.
mainstream entertainment, he
said.
“There is a new wave of artists
trying to find a Saudi popular
culture,” he said. “It’s so inspiring.
But I can’t say we are quite there
yet.”
Ahmed Mater said he had
agreed to head a governmentsponsored art institute in part to
represent his generation of independent artists. “They will have a
voice and a say in the purpose and
direction of the institute,” he said
in a text message, referring to a
project by the Misk Foundation,
sponsored by the crown prince.
Mater, whose work has been
confrontational at times — for
instance, documenting the ravages of development in Mecca, Islam’s holiest city — said he did not
think the government’s embrace
would stifle Saudi artists.
“On the contrary, it provides
windows through which new opportunities can spring,” he said.
“The art scene will continue as it
is; I think the nature of conversation, creativity, connections assures that.”
kareem.fahim@washpost.com
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
Democrats go solo on Russia probe
Frustrated lawmakers
release documents
without GOP buy-in
BY
Mueller’s move signals
possible focus on
computer crimes
BY
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) angered some Republicans after she published on Tuesday the
transcript of an interview with the founder of the research firm behind a controversial dossier.
Increasingly, Democrats see Republicans as dedicating more energy to attacking federal law enforcement than seriously investigating the allegations that have
been unearthed. For them, the
criminal referral of Steele — who
approached the FBI in 2016 over
concerns Trump could be blackmailed or compromised, Simpson
told the committee — was “a
breaking point,” according to one
congressional aide.
Democrats across Congress
charge that the GOP has long since
abandoned its commitment to investigate allegations against the
president. They say Republicans’
focus on the dossier, their continued scrutiny of the FBI’s conduct
during the Hillary Clinton email
probe, their revived interest in
how the Justice Department explored the circumstances of a 2010
uranium deal, and recent calls for
special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III to step down over alleged bias
in his team’s ranks all are attempts
to block for Trump.
The criminal referral for Steele,
however, was an unprecedented
escalation, aides said — and one
that necessitated a direct response.
“The effort plainly is to discredit the investigation before it reaches a potentially incriminating conclusion,” said Sen. Richard J. Blumenthal (D-Conn.). “To stop the
investigation — but if not stop it, at
least demean its credibility before
charges are brought.”
Although not every Republican
condemned Feinstein’s decision
“to set the record straight” by releasing the Simpson transcript,
the move infuriated Grassley, who
accused her of undermining the
investigation’s integrity.
“You want other people to voluntarily comply? And it may make
them nervous. You’re giving everyone they want to talk to, they know
what the questions are going to
be,” Grassley said. “It weakens our
chance of getting information.”
Grassley and Graham, who coauthored the letter referring
Steele for a criminal inquiry and
together have led the Senate
charge for a second special counsel to review the FBI’s conduct, say
the steps panel Republicans have
taken are legitimate.
“It’s not a distraction to see how
the Justice Department used the
dossier, how reliable it is, because
that goes to the heart of the rule of
law,” Graham said.
Several House committees have
launched similar probes in recent
months, fueling an already bitter
feud among leading Democrats
and Republicans over the pace
and direction of the House Intelligence Committee’s Russia investigation. Panel Republicans, led by
chairman Devin Nunes (R-Calif.),
are developing what’s been characterized as a “corruption” report
about FBI officials involved in the
Russia probe, while Democrats
are writing a report of their own
about what they see as GOP efforts
to undercut and prematurely
shutter the investigation.
House Democrats are incensed
that the committee’s splintering
probe is being eclipsed by new
GOP-led investigations into the
FBI’s conduct during the Clinton
email scandal.
“House Republicans have chosen to put President Trump ahead
of our national interests,” a group
of six Democratic committee ranking members wrote to Ryan this
week, suggesting he and other
GOP leaders “have blocked, stonewalled, and rejected our basic requests to investigate, hold public
hearings, and advance legislation”
related to Russian meddling in the
2016 U.S. elections.
In response, Ryan spokeswoman AshLee Strong said it “would be
irresponsible” not to “put forward
the results of the investigation
sooner rather than later,” in keeping with the goal of “identifying
Russia meddling in our election
and preventing it in the future.”
Of the three congressional panels investigating the president and
Russia, only the Senate Intelligence Committee appears to have
maintained bipartisan calm. Panel heads Sens. Richard Burr
(R-N.C.) and Mark R. Warner
(D-Va.) continue to cooperate as
they interview witnesses. But it is
unclear whether their investigation will conclude soon enough to
serve as a cautionary lesson for
future election cycles, which experts believe will be as susceptible
to foreign meddling as the 2016
presidential contest was.
That was the motivation behind
a decision from Democrats on the
Senate Foreign Relations Committee to weigh in this week as well,
publishing a 200-plus page report
on how Russia deploys an “asymmetric arsenal” of tactics to interfere, disinform, and compromise
the integrity of democracies that
challenge its interests or global
standing.
The committee has not been
investigating allegations concerning the president or anomalies of
the 2016 U.S. elections. But panel
Democrats — who failed to bring
along any GOP support for their
report in the year since the ranking Democrat, Sen. Benjamin L.
Cardin (D), commissioned it — say
it is vital that Trump heed their
warnings to deter Russians from
meddling in upcoming elections
in 2018 and 2020.
“President Trump must be
clear-eyed about the Russian
threat, take action to strengthen
our government’s response and
our institutions, and — as have
other presidents in times of crisis
— mobilize our country and work
with an international coalition to
counter the threat and assert our
values,” Cardin said.
It is unclear whether the report,
which relies on public information, will have much impact beyond buttressing the historical
record of Russian aggression
against the West. Committee aides
stressed that it is the first government report to comprehensively
lay out the threat’s size and scope.
A spokesman for the committee
chairman, Sen. Bob Corker (RTenn.), acknowledged he had received a copy but said “no further
full committee activity is planned
at this time.”
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
Ed O’Keefe contributed to this report.
JANUARY 11 , 2018
Cyber specialist added
to special counsel’s team
K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
Democrats are striking out on
their own this week over all but
one of the congressional investigations into Russian meddling, independently releasing reports and
transcripts, and attacking Republicans they accuse of intentionally
undermining active probes in deference to President Trump.
Senior Democratic officials in
the Senate, frustrated by what
they consider a Republican campaign to discredit the law enforcement and intelligence agencies investigating the president, cleared
their members to release the interview transcript of one of the Russia investigation’s most sensitive
witnesses and, separately, to publish a report detailing the disinformation and intimidation tactics
the Kremlin deploys against democracies globally.
In the House, Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) endorsed a
letter sent Tuesday to Speaker
Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.), accusing
him of orchestrating a campaign
to bury a congressional probe into
Trump’s alleged ties to the Russian
government and defame the agencies investigating those matters.
Throughout the Capitol, partisan divisions have engulfed the
Russia investigations, transforming what were supposed to be nonpartisan probes into political
flamethrowing competitions, as
each side accuses the other of going rogue. And lawmakers on both
sides of the aisle are bracing for
the partisan sniping to worsen.
“We get political up here pretty
quick . . . and we’ll fight among
ourselves what oversight looks
like” at every stage of the investigation, Judiciary Committee
member Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.) predicted, “as long as
there is breath in us all.”
On Tuesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee’s ranking Democrat, Dianne Feinstein (Calif.),
went around committee Chairman Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa)
to publish the transcript of a 10hour closed-door interview in August with Glenn Simpson, founder
of Fusion GPS, the research firm
behind a now-famous dossier detailing Trump’s alleged Russia ties.
The move earned a rebuke from
Grassley, who has been fixated on
the dossier and last week urged
the Justice Department to investigate possible criminal charges for
its author, former British intelligence agent Christopher Steele.
Feinstein said Wednesday that
with the transcript’s release, “people can make up their own minds”
about what materialized during
the committee’s interview with
Simpson, noting that she intended
to apologize to Grassley for not
notifying him first.
Feinstein also indicated she felt
“pressured” to release the transcript but later retracted that
statement and dismissed Trump’s
assertion that her decision was
politically motivated.
. THURSDAY,
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
Special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III has added a veteran
cyber prosecutor to his team,
filling what has long been a gap
in expertise and potentially signaling a recent focus on computer crimes.
Ryan K. Dickey was assigned
to Mueller’s team in early November from the Justice Department’s computer crime and intellectual-property section, said a
spokesman for the special counsel’s office. He joined 16 other
lawyers who are highly respected
by their peers but who have come
under fire from Republicans
wary of some of their political
contributions to Democrats.
Dickey’s addition is particularly notable because he is the
first publicly known member of
the team specializing solely in
cyber issues. The others’ expertise is mainly in a variety of
white-collar crimes, including
fraud, money laundering and
public corruption, though Mueller also has appellate specialists
and one of the government’s
foremost experts in criminal law.
Zainab Ahmad and Brandon
Van Grack have handled some
cybercrime issues in the past,
though they are recognized more
for their work on terrorism and
national security.
Mueller was appointed in May
to investigate any possible links
or coordination between the
Russian government and the
Trump campaign to influence
the 2016 election, and any matters that might arise out of that
work.
He has charged or negotiated
plea deals with four former
Trump campaign or administration officials, including former
national security adviser Michael Flynn and former campaign manager Paul Manafort,
though Manafort’s charges have
nothing to do with his work for
Trump.
Flynn and another former
campaign adviser, George Papadopoulos, are now cooperating
with the Mueller team. Mueller
recently indicated to Trump’s
legal team that his office is likely
to seek an interview with the
president, though Trump offered
ambiguous comments Wednesday as to whether he would be
willing to do that, denying he had
colluded with Russia and saying,
“It seems unlikely you’d even
have an interview.”
Mueller’s work has long had
an important cybersecurity component — central to the probe is
Russia’s hacking of Democrats’
emails in an effort to undermine
confidence in the U.S. electoral
system and help Trump win. The
original FBI counterintelligence
probe was launched in part because a Trump campaign adviser
was said to have told an Austral-
ian diplomat that Russia had
emails that could embarrass
Democrats, and in July 2016,
private Democratic messages
thought to have been hacked by
Russia began appearing online.
Mueller also is in possession of
information from Facebook
about politically themed advertisements bought through Russian accounts.
Legal analysts have said that
one charge Mueller might pursue
would be a conspiracy to violate
the Computer Fraud and Abuse
Act, if he can demonstrate that
members of Trump’s team conspired in Russia’s hacking effort
to influence the election.
Some in the legal world had
wondered why Mueller had not
previously tapped a cyber prosecutor to join his team.
Trump has long denied any
wrongdoing and has decried the
probe as a “witch hunt.” He
tweeted Wednesday: “The single
greatest Witch Hunt in American
history continues. There was no
collusion, everybody including
the Dems knows there was no
Ryan K. Dickey has
participated in a
number of high-profile
computer-crime
prosecutions, including
the case against the
hacker “Guccifer.”
collusion, & yet on and on it goes.
Russia & the world is laughing at
the stupidity they are witnessing.
Republicans should finally take
control!”
Dickey,
who
previously
worked as an assistant U.S. attorney in the Eastern District of
Virginia, has participated in a
number of high-profile computer-crime prosecutions — including the ongoing case against the
file-sharing site Megaupload and
the investigation of the Romanian hacker known as “Guccifer.”
Guccifer, whose real name is
Marcel Lehel Lazar, penetrated
email, Facebook and other online
accounts of celebrities and political figures, including former secretary of state Colin Powell, former Bill Clinton aide Sidney
Blumenthal and a family member of George W. Bush. His hacking inadvertently revealed that
Hillary Clinton was using a private email account when she was
secretary of state.
Someone using the moniker
Guccifer 2.0 in June 2016
claimed credit for hacking the
Democratic National Committee’s network, though the intelligence community later assessed
that the Russian spy agency GRU
had used the persona and two
websites to release data hacked
from the Democrats. Lazar had
long been in custody by that
time; he was sentenced in September 2016 to four years and
four months in U.S. prison.
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
Trump expected to keep sanctions relief for Iran but might add penalties
Officials said to have
pushed president to save
nuclear deal he despises
BY A NNE G EARAN,
C AROL M ORELLO
AND K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
President Trump is expected to
agree this week to continue granting Iran a reprieve from sanctions
over its nuclear program, while
again signaling his displeasure
with the international nuclear
deal that lifted the penalties, U.S.
and European officials, congressional aides and others said.
He also is expected to announce
new sanctions linked to human
rights and other issues that would
not directly affect the nuclear
agreement but would underscore
U.S. concerns about Iran’s response to recent anti-government
protests and other actions, officials and others said.
The decision, first reported by
the Associated Press, keeps the
United States in the Iran deal, at
least for the time being, despite
Trump’s suggestion last year that
he was inclined to walk away from
it. Most of Trump’s national security advisers, including Secretary
of State Rex Tillerson and Defense
Secretary Jim Mattis, have urged
him to waive the sanctions again.
Had Trump decided to reimpose nuclear sanctions that the
Obama administration suspended almost two years ago to the day,
the United States would have reneged on its commitment under
the deal and isolated itself from
allies that have insisted they will
stick with it.
It could also have emboldened
Iranian hard-liners. The political
unrest, which rocked the clerical
and political establishment,
spread amid deep disappointment that sanctions relief provided by the nuclear deal has not
trickled down economically to ordinary Iranians. Some analysts
say that the United States would
be seen as turning its back on the
protesters and their economic demands if it reimposes broad economic sanctions.
Instead, any additional sanctions imposed now or in coming
weeks would probably target the
government or military elite, and
not the wider Iranian economy,
two officials said.
A spokesman for the White
House National Security Council
did not respond to a request for
comment.
On Wednesday night, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
posted a statement on Twitter condemning arrests of Iranian protesters. “We will not remain silent
as the Iranian dictatorship represses the basic rights of its citizens and will hold Iran’s leaders
accountable for any violations,”
she wrote.
Refusing to waive sanctions
would have empowered Iranian
hard-liners who distrust the United States and turned Washington
into an adversary they could
blame for internal disruptions,
PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A rally near the White House on Saturday showed solidarity with
said John Glaser, head of foreign
policy studies at the libertarian
Cato Institute. “It would be insulting if the United States and its
leaders would try to take credit for
the protests or superimpose them
onto our own political, domestic
issues here,” he said.
The president faces deadlines
beginning Friday to approve the
continued relief from sanctions,
Iran’s main benefit from the landmark 2015 agreement that Trump
has called the “worst deal” imaginable for the United States. He also
faces another deadline to tell Congress whether he will “certify” that
Iran is complying with the deal
and that it is serving the interest of
the United States.
Trump withheld that certifica-
tion at the last deadline, in October, and his anticipated decision
to do the same this time would
have no immediate effect. But he
seems to be laying the groundwork for an eventual withdrawal.
Officials and observers interviewed this week said Trump has
been advised against making big
changes now, before Congress has
come up with promised legislation to address concerns about
what he calls loopholes in the deal
and add conditions for future U.S.
participation.
Officials and others who spoke
on the condition of anonymity because the decisions are not final
said they expect Trump to agree
with that approach but cautioned
that he could still balk. At issue is
the Republican president’s resentment at being asked to keep alive a
deal he loathes, and that his Democratic predecessor considered a
signature accomplishment.
Under current law, the president has to suspend nuclear sanctions on a rolling basis — each
time the certification deadline or
separate deadlines to keep the
sanctions in suspension come
due.
The congressional leaders
working on what they call “fixes”
to the deal met with White House
national security adviser H.R. McMaster last Thursday to recommend that the president continue
to suspend nuclear sanctions, congressional and administration officials said.
Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (RTenn.) and ranking Democrat
Benjamin L. Cardin (Md.) have
been working together on a package that would address Trump’s
concern that the deal only delays
Iran’s ability to obtain a nuclear
weapon. Various members of Congress and U.S. allies, including Israel, have said that as restrictions
against Tehran are lifted under the
deal, Iran’s “breakout” window
will shorten dramatically.
The deal expanded the breakout window from an estimated
two months before the negotiations to one year, presumably giving governments time to react if
Iran were found to be cheating.
But some of the current restrictions eventually expire.
Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), who
has been an influential voice for
Trump on Iran issues, has warned
that by 2030 the breakout window
will be “a matter of weeks.”
Corker accompanied Trump to
Nashville on Monday, riding with
the president on Air Force One
with the goal of making his case
about holding the line.
Changing the terms of the
agreement itself would require approval from European cosigners as well as Russia, China
and Iran.
Iran is a signatory to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty,
committing itself to never pursue
nuclear weapons, but it is entitled
to use nuclear technology for
peaceful purposes.
Mark Dubowitz, head of the
nonpartisan Foundation for Defense of Democracies, said he expects more non-nuclear sanctions
over some of the issues that protesters were most concerned
about, including corruption, human rights abuses and “cyber repression.”
“Are we actually going to see
measures that strike a blow at the
heart of the regime’s corruption
and repression, or are they going
to be meaningless sanctions
targeting a few individuals?”
Dubowitz said. “I hope we’re going
to see them strike at the supreme
leader’s network of foundations
and companies he has built on the
back of illegally expropriated Iranian private property. It’s a targetrich environment, if the administration is serious.”
anne.gearan@washpost.com
carol.morello@washpost.com
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
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The World
Colombia withdraws negotiator in setback for peace talks with rebel group
A SSOCIATED P RESS
bogota, colombia — President Juan Manuel Santos said
new rebel attacks on Wednesday
have prompted him to recall his
chief negotiator to peace talks
with Colombia’s last remaining
insurgent group in a setback for
efforts to end a half-century of
political violence in the South
American nation.
The reported clashes occurred
hours after the expiration of a
temporary bilateral cease-fire
that the United Nations, church
leaders and government officials
had praised as an important
advance in reducing violence
and moving toward an end to
Colombia’s final rebel conflict.
Rebels with the National Liberation Army (ELN) and government delegates had expressed
hope of reaching a new agreement on an extended cease-fire
during a fresh round of talks
scheduled to start Wednesday in
Ecuador.
“Inexplicably, the ELN not
only refused, but they reinitiated
terrorist attacks this morning,”
Santos said in a short televised
address. “On the exact day new
talks were slated to begin.”
Santos said he has asked chief
negotiator Gustavo Bell to return
immediately from Quito to
“evaluate the future of the process” and ordered Colombia’s
military to respond to the new
aggressions with force. The Defense Ministry announced less
than an hour later that authorities had detained two ELN
rebels on weapons and terrorism
charges.
“My commitment to peace has
been and will be unwavering,”
Santos said. “But peace is obtained through willpower and
concrete acts. Not just with
words.”
Colombia reached a historic
peace agreement with the nation’s largest rebel group, the
Revolutionary Armed Forces of
Colombia (FARC), in late 2016,
ending Latin America’s longestrunning conflict. The end of
that conflict has been hailed
internationally, although it has
also opened a new power struggle in remote areas previously
controlled by FARC rebels and
still occupied by ELN combatants.
Peace talks with the smaller
ELN, whose founders in the
1960s included radical Roman
Catholic priests, began in February.
Colombia’s peace delegation
said there were four new attacks
early Wednesday, including a
grenade launched at marines.
ELN negotiators said the new
attacks “occur in the middle of a
complex conflict” and should not
alter the course of negotiations.
They reiterated their commitment toward reaching an agreement on a new cease-fire that
“overcomes the difficulties” of
the previous one.
Under the temporary ceasefire agreement, the 1,500member ELN had pledged to
renounce hostage-taking, recruitment of minors and attacks
on infrastructure. The government, in turn, had vowed to
improve conditions for jailed
rebels and boost protections for
leftist activists in areas dominated by the ELN.
Seoul credits Trump with talks between Koreas
President Moon Jae-in is walking a fine diplomatic line between two mercurial personalities — an ally in Washington and a foe in Pyongyang
BY
ANNA FIFIELD
seoul — South Korean President Moon Jae-in must keep up a
delicate balancing act between
two unpredictable leaders: the
one with nukes in the North, and
the one in Washington who leads
his country’s closest ally.
But Moon — newer in office
even than President Trump —
appears to be managing that
feat. This week, he has ushered
in the first positive news related
to North Korea in years, responding to an overture from
Kim Jong Un and, on Wednesday, very diplomatically giving
much of the credit to Trump.
“I give President Trump huge
credit for bringing about the
inter-Korean talks, and I’d like to
thank him for that,” Moon said at
a news conference in Seoul.
Moon’s remark came in response to a question about
Trump’s Saturday tweet that the
talks were taking place because
he was “firm, strong and willing
to commit our total ‘might’
against the North.”
Trump has been calling for
“maximum pressure” on North
Korea and has sometimes suggested that military action
might be needed.
Moon said the fact that North
Korea returned to talks — albeit
about the Olympics, not about
its nuclear weapons program —
could be the result of U.S.-led
sanctions and pressure.
He assured the United States
that South Korea would not act
out of step with the international community regarding any
sanctions relief that might be
needed to facilitate North Korea’s attendance at the Winter
Olympics in the South next
month.
Yet with the agreement, however modest, Moon has managed
to alter the narrative that North
Korea cannot be reasoned with.
Moon has dubbed the games
the “Peace Olympics” and desperately wants North Korea to
attend.
“South Korea is not intending
to ease sanctions on North Korea
unilaterally and separately from
KIM HONG-JI/POOL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Seoul will push for more talks to resolve the nuclear crisis on the Korean Peninsula, President Moon Jae-in said Wednesday.
the international sanctions,”
said Moon, who was elected in a
landslide victory last May after
the impeachment of disgraced
President Park Geun-hye.
After nine months in office,
Moon enjoys strong support
from the South Korean public,
with most polls putting his approval ratings in the 70s.
His government has been going to great lengths to avoid
antagonizing the American president, who has been capricious
on issues including the South
Korea-U.S. trade deal.
But Moon, a liberal who favors
engagement with Pyongyang,
also needed to make nice with
Kim.
This is partly because Moon
“I give President Trump huge credit for
bringing about the inter-Korean talks, and I’d
like to thank him for that.”
President Moon Jae-in of South Korea
wants to minimize the gap between North and South, but also
because he wants to fend off
suggestions from some in Washington that military action
might be needed as a lesson to
Pyongyang.
Trump’s national security adviser, H.R. McMaster, suggested
at the end of last year that time
was running out to deal with
North Korea.
A military strike on North
Korea would have devastating
consequences for South Korea.
About 25 million people — half
of South Korea’s population —
live within range of the North’s
conventional
artillery,
and
among them are tens of thousands of Americans.
Moon has resolutely opposed
any military action and has
warned that no strike must take
place without his approval —
although these are not the terms
of the South Korean security
agreement with the United
States.
Tuesday’s talks were the immediate result of Kim’s New
Year’s Day pronouncement that
North Korea would be willing to
send a delegation to the Winter
Games set to open Feb. 9 in
PyeongChang, 40 miles south of
the border between the Koreas.
As many as 500 North Koreans — including senior officials, athletes, cheering and performing-arts squads, taekwondo
teams and journalists — are
expected to attend. The exact
Military: Troops, others
killed 10 Rohingya
Burma’s military
acknowledged Wednesday that
its forces and Buddhist villagers
killed 10 Rohingya Muslims
whose bodies were found in a
mass grave in a village in
troubled Rakhine state.
The public admission of
wrongdoing is the military’s first
since it launched “clearance
operations” against ethnic
Rohingya in August, prompting
more than 650,000 to flee into
neighboring Bangladesh to
escape what the United Nations
has called “ethnic cleansing.”
A statement on the military
commander in chief’s Facebook
page said the Rohingya found in
the grave had threatened
Buddhist villagers and were
killed in retaliation.
The United Nations and other
groups accuse the military of
widespread atrocities against
Rohingya Muslims.
The government of Buddhistmajority Burma has refused to
accept Rohingya Muslims as a
minority group, even though they
have lived in the country for
generations. They were stripped
of their citizenship in 1982.
In related news, prosecutors
formally charged two journalists
from the Reuters news agency on
Wednesday with violating the
Official Secrets Act, signaling that
anna.fifield@washpost.com
Yoonjung Seo contributed to this
report.
girl’s rape, killing: A mob
D I G ES T
BURMA
makeup of the delegation is
under discussion.
Moon said he was “open to any
form of meeting, including a
summit” with Kim to help improve inter-Korean relations and
to make progress on the nuclear
issue, although he said he was
not interested in “talks for the
sake of talks.”
But there is significant skepticism after Tuesday’s tentative
agreement on Olympic participation and the resumption of
inter-Korean military talks.
Army Gen. Vincent K. Brooks,
commander of U.S. Forces Korea, said it was “notable” that
North Korea had taken this step
but that caution was warranted.
“What is the motivation? We
don’t know,” Brooks said in a
speech in Seoul. “We will have to
see that over time.”
Some analysts think that Kim
is looking to drive a wedge
between South Korea and the
United States, exposing a gap in
their alliance.
“Kim Jong Un wants to break
the chain of international pressure against North Korea,” said
Nam Sung-wook, a former intelligence think tank chief now
teaching at Korea University.
“And the weakest link in that
chain is South Korea.”
This has been a classic North
Korean strategy in previous
years, when the Kim regime has
appealed to its “brethren” in the
South to try to weaken the
united front against it.
But John Delury, a professor
of international relations at Yonsei University in Seoul, said it
was wrong to write Moon off as
naive or as someone who can be
manipulated by Kim.
“Moon is not trying to claim
any of the credit here. He’s giving
it to Kim for suggesting these
talks in his New Year’s Day
speech and to Trump for his
tough talk,” Delury said. “This is
because Moon has embarked on
a patient and steady diplomatic
track.”
angered over the recent rape and
killing of an 8-year-old girl
attacked a police station and a
nearby government building in
Pakistan’s eastern Punjab
province, triggering clashes that
left at least two people dead and
several injured. The violence
erupted in the city of Kasur hours
before the funeral of Zainab
Ansari, whose case has drawn
wide outrage. Police said her
body was found in a garbage bin.
the case will go forward despite
international condemnation.
Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo
were arrested Dec. 12 after police
accused them of violating the
colonial-era law by acquiring
“important secret papers” from
two police officers who had
worked in Rakhine.
— Associated Press
ETHIOPIA
Malaysia says it will pay up to
$70 million if firm finds plane:
Lawmakers back ban
on foreign adoptions
Ethiopian lawmakers have
approved a ban on foreign
adoptions amid concerns about
mistreatment of children
overseas.
The approval came after
rare heated debate as some
lawmakers worried that the East
African nation does not have
enough child-care centers to
absorb the fallout from the ban.
Ethiopia had been among the
top 10 countries for adoptions in
the United States, according to
State Department figures
released last year. But the 2011
death in the United States of an
Ethiopia-born girl, with her
adoptive mother convicted of
homicide by abuse, led to an
outcry back home, and Ethiopia
reduced foreign adoptions by
90 percent that year.
The new National Child Policy
says orphans should grow up in
their homeland while honoring
their culture and traditions.
YASIN BULBUL/POOL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, at center in fifth row, attends a justice conference in Ankara,
the capital. Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said at the conference Wednesday that Turkish courts will have
ruled on all cases of those suspected of taking part in a 2016 coup attempt by the end of this year.
Malaysia said it will pay the U.S.
company Ocean Infinity up to
$70 million if it can find the
wreckage or black boxes of
Malaysia Airlines Flight 370
within three months, in a
renewed bid to solve the plane’s
disappearance nearly four years
ago. The government signed a
“no cure, no fee” deal with the
Houston-based company to
resume the hunt, a year after the
official search was called off. The
plane vanished March 8, 2014,
with 239 people on board.
Death toll in Madagascar
cyclone rises to 33: The U.N.
The law will come into effect
once it is published in the
government legal gazette,
probably in the coming weeks.
The number of foreign
children adopted by U.S. parents
dropped almost 5 percent in 2016
to 5,372, continuing a steady
decline over more than a decade,
according to the latest State
Department data.
— Associated Press
About 100 migrants feared dead
at sea: The Libyan navy said
about 100 migrants are missing
at sea and feared dead while the
coast guard rescued at least 279
others off the coast of Libya. The
migrants, mostly Africans, had
embarked on the perilous trip
across the Mediterranean aboard
several vessels. Those missing
were from a single rubber boat
that capsized. Libya has become a
frequently used route to Europe
for those fleeing poverty and
conflict.
humanitarian agency said the
death toll from a cyclone in
Madagascar has reached 33.
A statement citing national
authorities said 22 people remain
missing. Tropical Cyclone Ava
struck the Indian Ocean island
over the weekend, causing the
evacuation of more than 24,000
people.
2 dead in protests over Pakistani
— From news services
A14
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
Russia: Drones that attacked base in Syria came from rebel-aligned village
AND
BY L IZ S LY
Z AKARIA Z AKARIA
beirut — Russia on Wednesday
identified the village from which a
swarm of drones attacked its main
military base in Syria and released
photographs of the crudely constructed aircraft that were used.
The revelations only somewhat
cleared up the mystery surrounding what amounts to the biggest
concerted attack on Russia’s main
military base of Hmeimim since
the Russian military intervention
in Syria began in 2015.
Russia said it held Turkey accountable for the drone attack,
calling it a breach of their ceasefire agreement in northern Syria,
while Turkey accused Russia and
Iran of jeopardizing the entire
peace process by launching an
offensive to take control of an
opposition-held air base in the
area.
The Russian Defense Ministry
named the opposition-controlled
village of Muwazarra in southern
Idlib province as the location from
which a swarm of at least a dozen
drones armed with crude explosives was launched Saturday, attacking the Hmeimim air base
and the nearby naval base of Tartus in northwestern Syria. Under
the cease-fire deal, Turkey is supposed to restrain opposition forces in Idlib province.
The Defense Ministry posted
photographs of one of the drones
on its Facebook page, showing
what looked like a homemade
model aircraft that did not seem
particularly sophisticated.
The fixed-wing drone resembled an oversize toy aircraft and
appeared to have been cheaply
assembled from a type of plywood,
said Aaron Stein of the Washington-based Atlantic Council. The
craft was attached to the kind of
engines used to power lawn mowers and strapped with at least nine
small rockets that could have been
dropped from the drone or used to
turn the craft into a bomb.
It was unclear from the photographs how the drones were guided, but simple GPS devices could
conceivably have been programmed to fly the planes over a
long distance to reach the air base,
using GPS coordinates available
on the Internet, Stein said.
“The drones look to me like a
DIY project, and decidedly lowtech,” he said.
The drones nonetheless represent the first time such a weapon
has been used in Syria in this way.
Six days earlier, two Russian
servicemen were killed in what
was widely reported as a mortar
attack on the Hmeimim base. At
least some fighter jets in Russia’s
fleet also appear to have been
damaged in the attack. But increasingly there are suspicions
that the attack also may have been
carried out with weaponized
drones.
Neither of the attacks has been
claimed, heightening the mystery
around who was responsible.
The Islamic State has used commercially available quad-type
drones to drop small quantities of
explosives on enemy troops in Syria and Iraq, but those devices have
a range of no more than one to two
kilometers, according to the IHS
Markit consultancy group.
Russia says the drones used in
the attacks had a range of about 30
to 60 miles and on Wednesday
said they were launched from the
village of Muwazarra, about 50
miles from Hmeimim. The village
is controlled by the “moderate
opposition,” said a report in Russia’s official Defense Ministry
newspaper.
Residents of the village in the
Jabal Zawiya mountains said they
had no knowledge of the attack
and expressed fear that Russia
would retaliate against them. “We
reject the Russian accusations
completely,” said Mohanned Issaf,
27, who lives in the village and was
contacted over social media. “The
village has always come under
shelling, and the regime and Russia don’t need an excuse to bomb
us. But now they might bomb
more after these false accusations.”
Muwazarra has been on the
front line of the war between rebels and forces loyal to President
Bashar al-Assad since the earliest
days of the war, when the region
quickly came under the control of
U.S.-allied moderate rebels with
the Syrian Revolutionary Forces.
But after the al-Qaeda affiliate
Jabhat al-Nusra drove the SRF out
of the area in 2014, it has been
under overall control of the extremists. The village remains loyal
to the moderate opposition, but
military positions surrounding it
belong to the Nusra offshoot
Harakat Tahrir al-Sham, or HTS,
said another man who lives in the
village and did not want his name
to be used. The closest HTS base,
lying in a valley to the east of the
village, was destroyed in a Russian
airstrike earlier this week, he said
— after the attacks on Hmeimim.
The HTS is a possible suspect in
the drone attack “because they are
the biggest and strongest of the
opposition groups” in the area,
said Aron Lund, who analyzes Syria for the Century Foundation.
Many Syrians and also Russians have speculated that foreign
intelligence agencies with reasons
to provoke the Russians may have
helped a local group conduct the
attack. “There’s a lot of fishy stuff
going on in Idlib — agents running around, and groups working
with groups they shouldn’t work
with,” Lund said. “It’s very, very
murky.”
liz.sly@washpost.com
Zakaria reported from Istanbul.
Canada to Salvadorans:
Please don’t come here
BY ALAN FREEMAN
LUDOVIC MARIN/POOL/REUTERS
French President Emmanuel Macron delivers his New Year’s wishes to reporters Jan. 3 at the Elysee Palace in Paris.
France weighs disinformation law
BY JAMES MCAULEY
paris — French President Emmanuel Macron is preparing to
introduce a law against “fake
news” by the end of 2018. But
critics are voicing concerns over
what they see as potential infringement on the freedom of expression.
Macron’s proposal, announced
last week, would add France to a
growing list of European countries
that have taken official action
against disinformation online. A
similar German law went into effect Jan. 1, and the Czech Republic
established an anti-fake-news task
force a year ago.
Although its specific contents
have yet to be released, Macron’s
measure would grant judges emergency powers to remove or block
certain content deemed to be
“fake” during sensitive election periods. It would also require greater
transparency for sponsored content and permit France’s media
watchdog, the Conseil Supérieur
de l’Audiovisuel, to combat “any
attempt at destabilization” by foreign-financed media organizations.
“Thousands of propaganda accounts on social networks are
spreading all over the world, in all
languages, lies invented to tarnish
political officials, personalities,
public figures, journalists,” Macron told journalists last week.
“We are going to develop our
legal means of protecting democracy against fake news.”
Skeptics quickly pounced. “The
first question is: What is fake
news? Who will define it?” said
Daniel Schneidermann, a media
columnist for the French newspaper Libération and the director of
“Arrêt sur Images” (Freeze Frame),
a leading online venue for media
criticism in France.
“Fake news” has been an issue
for Macron since France’s 2017
presidential election, when numerous false reports claimed that
he benefited from offshore accounts — stories that his far-right
opponent, Marine Le Pen, regularly referenced. His campaign was
also targeted in a major data
breach on the last day of the contest, when thousands of emails
and internal communications
were dumped into the public domain before voters went to the
polls.
By all accounts, his principal
targets seem to be Russian stateowned media organizations, such
as Sputnik and RT, formerly
known as Russia Today. Both have
French-language websites, and RT
began broadcasting in France in
late December.
At a joint news conference in
May, Macron stood next to Russian
President Vladimir Putin and decried these Russian news organizations as “organs of influence and
propaganda that spread counterfeit truths about me.” His view
appears not to have changed: RT
journalists, for instance, have difficulty securing accreditation for
covering French government
events.
“RT France journalists had already faced extreme difficulties
and discrimination in doing their
jobs, which included unfounded
denial of access to En Marche HQ
and the Élysée Palace,” wrote Xenia Fedorova, chief executive of RT
France, in an emailed statement.
She referred to the headquarters
of Macron’s political party and the
French presidential palace.
“Yet, recent comments by President Macron suggest that we are
only at the beginning of curtailing
of press freedoms in France,” Fedorova added.
RT has also been the target of a
crackdown in the United States,
where its English-language channel was required last year to register as an agent of the Russian
government in retaliation for allegedly publishing anti-American
propaganda. RT’s accreditation to
cover Congress was subsequently
revoked.
Most French journalists are
loath to defend RT, and many
share Macron’s suspicions about
the motives of organizations financed by the Kremlin. But some
worry that a new regulatory law
would be ineffective in fighting
disinformation and would establish a risky precedent.
In an editorial, Le Monde,
France’s leading newspaper, said
the proposal, “on a subject as crucial as the freedom of the press, is
by nature dangerous.”
In the French press, a common
point of reference has been a similar new German law against hate
speech. It was nominally intended
to fight online threats, misleading
accusations and defamation by
forcing major social-network platforms to withhold certain comments in Germany if they are
deemed illegal and offensive and
have been flagged by users. Critics
call it a prime example of a wellintended law gone wrong.
Since it took effect last week, a
number of users — among them
prominent journalists and activists — have cited cases of what they
perceive as infringement on freedom of speech. The German satirical magazine Titanic, for instance,
was temporarily locked out of its
Twitter account. An author said
Twitter removed a tweet in which
she criticized German authorities
for allegedly failing to pursue xenophobia investigations.
Macron’s interest in social media platforms may only repeat the
German example, some critics say.
james.mcauley@washpost.com
Rick Noack in Berlin contributed to
this report.
ottawa — When the Trump administration banned immigration
from seven Muslim-majority countries a year ago, Canadian Prime
Minister Justin Trudeau sent out
an unambiguous tweet about Canada’s stance on refugees and asylum seekers.
“To those fleeing persecution,
terror and war, Canadians will welcome you, regardless of your faith.
Diversity is our strength,” Trudeau
wrote Jan. 28.
But when the U.S. Department
of Homeland Security announced
this week that it was withdrawing
temporary protected status, or
TPS, for 200,000 Salvadorans, giving them 18 months to sort out their
immigration status permanently
or face deportation, the reaction
from the Canadian government
was more muted.
Fearing an influx of newcomers
crossing “irregularly” into Canada
from the United States, the Canadian government has embarked on
an information campaign to discourage Salvadorans from trekking
north, as thousands of Haitians did
when threatened with a loss of protected status last summer.
The government announced
that it was planning to send Pablo
Rodriguez, a Spanish-speaking
member of Parliament, to California in the coming days to talk to
community groups, lawyers and
Spanish-language media. His message is simple: If you don’t qualify
for refugee or asylum status, don’t
try to cross into Canada.
“Canada has a robust and structured immigration system that
must be respected,” Argentinaborn Rodriguez told Canadian
newspaper La Presse in a Frenchlanguage interview. “Before leaving your job, pulling your child
from school and selling your house
to come to Canada, make sure you
understand the rules and the laws.
Because if you don’t fill these criteria, chances are you’ll be returned, not to the U.S. but to your
native country.”
The government also says there
are plans for a “targeted digital
campaign” aimed at TPS-affected
communities.
Last summer, when rumors
swirled through the Haitian community that its members were going to lose the TPS designation in
place since the 2010 Haiti earthquake (the decision to lift the designation was announced in November), a wave of Haitians headed to
the Canadian border. As many as
250 a day crossed “irregularly”
along a rural road in Upstate New
York into neighboring Quebec,
prompting a crisis of sorts. Authorities were forced to put a temporary
tent encampment at the border
and house migrants at Montreal’s
Olympic Stadium.
After an outreach program
aimed at the Haitian community in
places such as Miami, the influx of
migrants has slowed. Only 60 or so
migrants now cross into the country through Quebec per day and
most of them are from Nigeria,
according to Scott Bardsley, a
spokesman for Canadian Public
Safety Minister Ralph Goodale.
Hursh Jaswal, an aide to Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen,
said that while those migrants
needing protection will be allowed
to stay, the others will be removed.
He noted that only 8 percent of
completed asylum claims filed by
Haitians who entered Canada over
the past year were accepted. The
vast majority of claimants are still
awaiting a hearing.
In a news conference Tuesday,
Hussen said the government was
not expecting a surge of Salvadorans but has plans in place just in
case.
Under terms of the Canada-U.S.
Safe Third Country Agreement,
most migrants are required to request refugee protection in the first
safe country they arrive in. For
many migrants crossing into Canada from the United States, that
means they are legally blocked
from entering Canada at a regular
border point. However, if they cross
“irregularly” through the undefended frontier, they are arrested
but can immediately make a refugee claim. After undergoing a security check, they can stay in the
country until they get a hearing.
Refugee claimants can work and
receive health care while waiting
for their hearings. According to the
Canadian Broadcasting Corp.,
14,467 people crossed into Canada
outside legal border points in the
first nine months of 2017, with half
coming from Haiti.
Angela Ventura, spokeswoman
for the El Salvador Association of
Windsor in Ontario, said she has
been getting calls from Salvadorans living in the United States who
are anxious to know whether they
should come to Canada if they are
forced to leave the United States.
“I advise them to do it legally, not
illegally,” said Ventura, a paralegal
by training who has been in Canada
for 28 years.
She said she has pleaded with
the government to consider allowing these Salvadorans to come to
Canada not simply as refugees.
“They have been in the U.S. for 17
or 18 years. They are reliable workers with mortgages,” Ventura said.
“If somebody has a small business
in California, why not allow them
to establish a small business in
Canada?
foreign@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/worldviews
At first campaign stop, Putin tries to convince Russians of a rosy economy
BY ANDREW ROTH
tver, russia — Just two years
ago, the sprawling Tver Carriage
Works was close to a standstill,
producing few train cars, bleeding
hundreds of millions of rubles a
year, cutting workdays to prevent
widespread layoffs and bracing
itself for worker protests.
“Let Putin come again,” dejected
workers told a reporter for a Russian news website then, aching for
the kind of bailout that Russian
President Vladimir Putin had become known for since the economic crisis of 2008. The factory
was emblematic of Russia’s larger
economic woes, heading into years
of recession, capped by Westernimposed financial sanctions and
Russian food embargoes, and accompanied by a devaluation of the
ruble that left it at half its previous
worth against the dollar.
For most incumbents, that
would signal at an uphill battle for
reelection. But on Wednesday, Putin arrived in Tver, on the main rail
line between Moscow and St. Petersburg, to the welcome of a small
cadre of workers as he hit the
campaign trail, although it was
tough to distinguish the event
from the normal meet-and-greets
he has held for his past 18 years in
power, 14 of them as president. In
fact, the only thing that set
Wednesday apart was the appearance of a dozen or so members of
the foreign press, rarely invited to
join the Kremlin pool, ahead of a
March vote just over two months
away.
Twice now Putin has intervened
to save the Carriage Works, the
first time by peeling off tens of
millions of dollars of government
money in 2009 to pay for orders,
and then last year by instituting
huge tax breaks on the purchase of
long-distance rolling stock, bringing in hundreds more orders for
railway cars for the factory.
Putin is hoping to convince
workers that the economy is back
to normal, which experts say is
reflected in growing economic activity but not in stagnant wages.
And while the outcome of the
election is a foregone conclusion,
the results of the get-out-the-vote
effort are not.
“It’s true, you’ve had a tough
period since the end of 2014,” Putin
told a group of workers standing
by some of the tram cars the
factory of more than 35,000 employees produces. “But since last
year, growth has returned.”
In many ways it sounds like
2012, when Putin elevated the voices of conservative Russians, particularly from the country’s rust belt,
over the voices of pro-democracy
protesters in large cities like Moscow and St. Petersburg. Despite a
raucous 2017 political season and
the emergence of a youth protest
movement, Putin’s message, so far,
has changed little, with an accent
on visits to heavy factories hit hard
by the recent crisis.
“There’s a lot of talk about youth
and of course that’s important, but
it’s still a small, passive part of the
electorate,” said Valery Fyodorov,
head of the state-owned Russian
Public Opinion Research Center,
in a recent interview. “But the core
of Putin’s electorate is still the
older generation, and he wants to
associate not just with the future,
but also with those topics popular
with the elderly today: sovereignty,
import substitution, and the
growth of one’s own economy.”
And that makes wage stagnation a central concern.
“Incomes aren’t going up,” Fyodorov said. “Inflation is down and
that’s good. But incomes are flat.
After two years of crisis and another year of who-knows-what,
people want to buy clothing, automobiles, apartments. A new consumer boom. You need money for
that. And there’s no money.”
The factory here is a prime
example. There are no longer concerns over a three-day workweek,
said Anton Zhdanov, a factory engineer and head of one of the
factory unions, reached by telephone before the visit. But wages
have stayed flat.
During Putin’s visit, the director
of the factory said he’d like to
represent the president as a surrogate during the campaign. But
asked earlier if the factory would
throw its weight behind Putin,
he demurred.
The Carriage Works is not under
pressure to allow its resources to
be used by the Putin campaign,
said the director, Andrei Solovei.
“Our elections are free and every
person will make his or her own
choice. But as for me — I am Putin’s
supporter and I have always supported him. So I am going to vote
for Vladimir Vladimirovich,” he
said, following the Russian practice of referring to a person —
Putin, in this case — by his given
name and patronymic.
andrew.roth@washpost.com
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
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A glimpse
at what’s next
Jordan Jtakin walks
though an Intel exhibit
about 5G wireless
broadband technology at
the annual CES technology
convention in Las Vegas.
U.S. wireless providers say
they are preparing to make
5G service available in
some cities this year.
STEVE MARCUS/REUTERS
IRS urges speed over accuracy as it adjusts to new law
Effort to cut withholdings
now could result in
surprising tax bills in ’19
BY
D AMIAN P ALETTA
The Trump administration is
pushing American businesses to
withhold less in taxes from paychecks by February, aiming to
quickly deliver the boost in takehome pay that Republicans promised their tax law would bring.
But the rush could expose millions of workers to the risk of
underpaying taxes to the government now, which means they
might owe more than they expect
when they file tax returns in April
2019.
Business and taxpayers looking for clarity will be appealing to
an Internal Revenue Service that,
according to an internal watchdog report Wednesday, is underfunded and ill-prepared to answer basic questions. The national taxpayer advocate, an independent official within the IRS,
noted that the agency has estimated that it would need
$495 million in 2018 and 2019 to
meet the new obligations created
by the GOP-backed tax law.
Funding for the IRS has fallen
by about 20 percent, accounting
for inflation, since 2010. Before
the law’s passage, the IRS expected to be able to answer only
60 percent of the 100 million
telephone calls it receives annually from taxpayers — a burden
expected to increase under the
new law.
“The IRS will have its hands
full in implementing the new
law,” said Nina E. Olson, the taxpayer advocate. “The IRS will
have a lot of issues to work
through, and taxpayers will have
a lot of questions.”
The IRS is urging employers to
immediately change their taxwithholding arrangements, even
though doing so will require them
to use outdated forms as they
figure out how much to set aside
for tax payments. The forms,
known as W-4s, were tailored to
measure tax payments under the
old tax code, which was largely
rewritten in the new law.
In the next few days, the IRS
plans to issue guidelines to companies and payroll processors on
how to use the old forms to calculate tax payments under the law.
But there is no simple switch-over
calculation, and the uncertainty
could mean workers underpaying
or overpaying their taxes by thousands of dollars in 2018 — something that is likely to remain
unknown until they file their tax
returns next year.
The potential discrepancies
are a side effect of the expedited
overhaul that the Treasury Department and IRS are seeking to
implement, prioritizing speed
over accuracy as the Trump administration hopes tax cuts will
bolster the economy before the
midterm elections.
The rapid turnaround puts
companies in a squeeze as they
attempt to get employees the information they need to file their
2017 taxes — they are legally mandated to finish that process by the
end of the month — while also
preparing for the year ahead.
“Our view is that would be an
extremely tight time frame,” said
Eira Jones, leader of Deloitte’s
national employment tax practice. “It’s likely there would need
to be a greater testing period.”
Jones said March would have
been a more practical goal for the
paychecks to be adjusted.
The White House and IRS
faced several options for implementing the new income tax regime. They could have required
all working Americans to fill out
new tax forms and provide information that would have allowed
employers to more accurately decide how much to withhold. But
that process could have taken
months, probably delaying any
benefit from the tax cuts until
much later in 2018.
The law cuts income tax rates
at all levels for the next several
years, meaning most taxpayers
will see at least modest decreases
in their federal bills.
But the law also changes the
tax code’s complex system of deductions. It expanded the standard deduction taken by many in
the middle class and a Child Tax
Credit, but the law also put new
caps on how much people can
deduct for state and local tax
payments or for interest paid on a
new home mortgage.
The deduction changes mean
the tax cuts will vary widely between workers with similar wages, with the size of the relief
depending on location, family
size and situation.
It is not immediately clear
what type of household is at the
greatest risk of having a new
paycheck that does not match
what their tax obligations really
are. This will depend on how the
IRS and Treasury Department design the new withholding tables.
But a household that earns
$150,000 and has several children could end up temporarily
overpaying federal taxes under
the new system because it would
qualify for the Child Tax Credit in
a way that is not likely to be
captured by the old W-4 forms.
People in a household earning
the same amount in New York or
California who bought an expensive house this year and have no
children could find that they did
not pay enough taxes in their
paychecks and get hit with a bigger tax bill in 2019.
As they pushed their bill into
law, Trump and congressional Republicans repeatedly promised
that the new tax regime would
substantively improve workingand middle-class Americans’ financial outlook — even as Democrats hammered the plan as a
giveaway to corporations and the
wealthy with little in tax relief left
over for anyone else.
How voters feel about the new
tax law is expected to play a large
role in the midterm elections in
November, when Republicans
hope to hold on to their majorities
in the House and Senate. But
while the new paychecks arrive
well before Election Day, many
workers won’t get final answers
on whether those bills are accurate until well after.
The process of withholding
taxes from paychecks “will be less
precise, but it’s really hard to
quantify how much less and how
bad it will be,” said Mark Mazur, a
former senior IRS official who is
now executive director of the Tax
Policy Center.
For years, companies took basic information from their employees into account before determining how much to withhold
from their paychecks, and this
information was determined by
answers on the two-page W-4
form. But the new tax system is
different, and some of the questions on the W-4 are no longer
relevant.
For example, question G on the
W-4 asks whether someone is in a
household that earns less than
$100,000 to determine whether
they qualify for the Child Tax
Credit. But the new tax law
changed the Child Tax Credit, as it
now applies to married couples
that earn up to $400,000.
“It’s hard to know what information is going to be provided to
payroll processors and human resources departments that can
take care of that,” said Michael
Mundaca, co-director of the national tax office at Ernst & Young.
In several months, the IRS is
expected to follow up by asking
employers to have all U.S. employees fill out new forms that will
make the tax-withholding process more precise.
They will no longer be relying
on a system that tabulated the
number of “personal allowances”
each taxpayer had, such as the
size of their family, to determine
the tax withholding for paychecks.
“With the elimination of those
personal allowances, we are anxiously awaiting guidance from
IRS which is scheduled to be
released this month,” said Shelly
Abril, head of payroll compliance
at Gusto, a company that provides
payroll and other services to
40,000 small businesses.
Abril said “the difficulty will
really be owned by the employees
and their tax professionals to determine the implications of their
2018 tax liability.”
If companies don’t withhold
enough income tax, taxpayers
could experience short-term euphoria when they receive larger
paychecks but then face a stunning tax bill in April 2019.
Similarly, if Americans underpay their taxes in February and
March, the government could run
up a huge budget deficit, creating
a cash crunch at a time when
lawmakers are under immense
pressure to raise the debt ceiling.
It could not be learned whether
the IRS plans to give any guidance
that would direct employers to
withhold taxes at a different level
based on where someone lives,
even though the tax cuts will have
different impacts on Americans
in different states.
For example, a middle-income
taxpayer who owns a home in
New York or California is likely to
need to withhold more money
than a middle-income taxpayer in
Florida because of a new limit
that prohibits Americans from
deducting more than $10,000 in
state and local taxes from their
federal income. But the W-4 does
not include any questions about
homeownership or the amount of
state and local taxes paid.
For the tax cuts to be factored
into paychecks quickly, the IRS is
not expected to direct companies
to review individual W-4s and see
if they can glean new information
that might make the adjustments
more accurate.
For example, it would not be
difficult for employers to check
payroll records to determine each
employee’s salary as a way to
predict whether they would qualify for an expanded Child Tax
Credit. But this process would
have limited benefit, because the
employer would not know whether a spouse’s income pushes them
over the new $400,000 threshold.
Olson warned that other
changes will probably need to be
made before Americans file their
2018 tax returns by April 2019.
The new tax law, for example,
lowers the amount of mortgage
interest that can be deducted
from income, but it grandfathers
in all mortgages made before
Dec. 15, 2017.
“At present, the IRS generally
does not know the date of a mortgage closing, the terms of a refinancing, or the date or terms of a
purchase contract,” Olson said.
The Treasury Department and
IRS have given little information
about how they are designing the
new tax-withholding system under the outdated W-4 forms, leading to complaints from Demo-
crats that the Trump administration could try to make the tax cuts
seem even rosier than they are
before the midterms only to hit
Americans with big tax bills next
year.
“We oppose any attempts by
the Administration to systematically under-withhold income
taxes during the 2018 tax year,
knowing that in 2019 taxpayers
may find they owe taxes when
they were expecting a refund,”
Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and
Rep. Richard E. Neal (D-Mass.)
wrote in a letter to IRS acting
commissioner David Kautter on
Monday.
The letter included questions
seeking information about what
political influence, if any, Treasury officials had in deciding how
much money should be withheld
in the paychecks.
It comes at a unique time for
the IRS, as Kautter is simultaneously serving as a senior Treasury Department official, an unusual arrangement. He is both a
Senate-confirmed Treasury official and leading a large staff of tax
experts at the IRS making decisions about technicalities in tax
policy.
In 1992, the George H.W. Bush
administration
unilaterally
changed the withholding tables
to allow Americans to temporarily keep more of their income, even
though they would owe the money when they filed their tax returns the following April.
This infuriated millions of
Americans who didn’t like the
idea of being hit with a big tax bill
all at once, and many people
asked to be exempt from the
changes.
A person involved in the process of reworking withholding tables said the IRS and Treasury
dismissed the concerns raised by
Wyden and Neal, saying the process is being handled with care and
without political interference.
The IRS reported in April that
Americans filed 135.6 million tax
returns for income earned in
2016. Almost 100 million of those
filers received a tax refund, which
averaged $2,763.
more than $1 billion in the
single-family rental industry.
will employ up to 4,000 workers.
The plant, which will produce
300,000 vehicles a year, is set to
open on a 2,500-acre site in 2021
about 14 miles from Toyota’s
engine plant in Huntsville.
Toyota plans to build Corolla
cars at the plant, while Mazda
will build crossover SUVs.
damian.paletta@washpost.com
Jeff Stein contributed to this report.
DIGEST
CORPORATIONS
Buffett adds 2 to
Berkshire board
Berkshire Hathaway is adding
Gregory E. Abel and Ajit Jain as
directors, boosting the size of its
board to 14 members as the
company begins to prepare for
life after Warren Buffett.
Buffett and Charles T. Munger,
Berkshire’s vice chairman, will
retain their board positions.
Buffett said on CNBC Wednesday
that the new board members are
“part of a movement toward
succession over time.”
He said the move isn’t because
of any looming concerns, saying
he is in “remarkably good
health.” Yet the 87-year-old said
that it was time to have a plan
and that Abel and Jain are the
right choices.
“They’ve both got Berkshire in
their blood,” Buffett said.
Abel, chairman and chief
executive of Berkshire
Hathaway Energy, is being
named vice chairman of noninsurance business operations.
Jain, the executive vice
president of National
Indemnity Co., is being
appointed vice chairman of
insurance operations.
Buffett shot down the idea
that Abel and Jain would share
the chief executive post once he
is no longer running the
company. He said there would be
one person in the position but
did not say who that would
potentially be.
— Associated Press
CYBERSECURIT Y
Man charged in
‘Fruitfly’ hacks
An Ohio man was charged in a
16-count indictment on
Wednesday for allegedly using
malware known as “Fruitfly” to
surreptitiously record people by
secretly taking over their
computer cameras and
microphones, the U.S. Justice
Department said.
The indictment said from
2003 through early 2017, Phillip
Durachinsky, 28, collected data
from thousands of computers
belonging to individuals,
companies, schools, a police
department and the U.S.
Department of Energy.
According to the indictment,
Durachinsky collected a variety
of information from the
computers, including bank
records, photographs, people’s
Internet searches and
keystrokes, and potentially
embarrassing communications.
— Reuters
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Freddie Mac is using its balance
sheet to finance a portfolio of
single-family rental homes. The
mortgage giant’s multifamily
arm is acquiring a loan backed
by almost 200 houses owned by
TrueLane Homes, a landlord
focused on affordable rentals in
small metropolitan areas in the
South and Midwest. The deal is
the first loan purchase under a
federal pilot program that allows
Freddie Mac to invest a little
Diet Coke is getting a makeover
to try to revive the soda’s sales.
Coca-Cola said Wednesday it’s
adding a slimmer, 12-ounce Diet
Coke can, updating the logo and
offering the drink in four new
flavors: blood orange, cherry,
mango and ginger lime. The
taste of the plain Diet Coke will
stay the same, the company said.
Diet Coke sales have fallen as
more people switch to other lowcalorie drinks. The changes will
show up in U.S. stores by the end
of the month, Coca-Cola said.
Toyota and Mazda confirmed
Wednesday that they will build a
$1.6 billion joint venture
assembly plant in Alabama that
— From news services
COMING TODAY
8:30: Labor Department
releases the producer price index
for December.
10 a.m.: Freddie Mac releases
weekly mortgage rates.
2 p.m.: Treasury releases federal
budget for December.
Earnings: Delta.
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
GOP eyes more funding for IRS to implement tax law
from taxpayers that will result.
The challenges were underscored Wednesday in a report by
the national taxpayer advocate,
an independent official within
the IRS, that noted early estimates suggest the agency needs
$495 million in 2018 and 2019 to
meet the new obligations created
by the Republican-backed tax law.
Nina E. Olson, the taxpayer
advocate, said in a statement as
she released her report that funding cuts already “have rendered
the IRS unable to provide acceptable levels of taxpayer service.”
Now the agency “will have its
hands full in implementing the
new law,” Olson said. “The IRS
will have a lot of issues to work
through, and taxpayers will have
a lot of questions.”
The IRS received $11.2 billion
in funding in 2017, but any increase this year could not be
determined until Congress resolves a larger dispute about governmentwide spending levels.
Despite the GOP’s generally
anti-tax stance and its suspicion
of federal bureaucracies, Republicans have every incentive to make
sure the complex tax law rolls out
After years of cuts,
Republicans shift stance
to help new rule succeed
BY E RICA W ERNER
AND J EFF S TEIN
After years of assaults on the
Internal Revenue Service budget
and quixotic attempts by House
conservatives to impeach its director, Republicans have decided
the beleaguered agency needs
more money.
The reason: the tremendous
new workload created for the IRS
by the multitrillion tax law signed
late last year by President Trump.
IRS staffing levels have nosedived since Republicans won control of the House in 2010, but now
the agency is tasked with a workload that includes writing new
withholding tables for businesses
and workers and interpreting the
interaction of a complex federal
law with a patchwork of state and
local taxes in all 50 states. Not to
mention the numerous inquiries
smoothly. And for that, they will
need a functional IRS, which even
several conservatives acknowledged would require a larger
budget.
“We want to make sure that we
get the new law implemented
well, and I think they are clamoring for assistance,” said Sen. John
Thune (R-S.D.), the No. 3 Senate
strenuously with the IRS under
the Obama administration, said:
“I’m open to it if it’s rational and
makes sense. There’s a lot of work.
I want people to see the biggest
paycheck they can get.”
Funding for the IRS has fallen
by about 20 percent, accounting
for inflation, since 2010. The
agency has lost well over 15,000
“We need to reform the IRS because it’s been more
of an adversary to the American taxpayer than it
has been a help. But I am concerned that they’re
not able to do their job . . . to protect personal
financial data by taxpayers and the like.”
Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-Tex.)
workers in that time, including
about 3,000 in the taxpayer services division and 4,000 in the
enforcement division.
For years, pleas for more IRS
funding have fallen on deaf ears
on Capitol Hill, where Republicans instead focused on contro-
Republican. “So I suspect that if
the requests are reasonable, there
would be some sympathy for ensuring that this new law gets
implemented in the correct way.”
Rep. Dave Brat (R-Va.), a member of the conservative House
Freedom Caucus, which clashed
versy over the agency’s targeting
of
tax-exempt
conservative
groups.
Although Republicans are prepared to support more funding
for the IRS, most were hardly
offering a full-throated embrace.
“We need to reform the IRS
because it’s been more of an adversary to the American taxpayer
than it has been a help,” Senate
Majority Whip John Cornyn (RTex.) told reporters Wednesday.
“But I am concerned that they’re
not able to do their job and not
[maintain] their information systems to protect personal financial
data by taxpayers and the like.”
Before the tax law’s passage,
the IRS expected to be able to
answer only 60 percent of the
routed calls from the 100 million
calls it receives annually from
taxpayers — a burden expected to
increase under the new law. Since
2014, the agency has stopped answering anything beyond “basic”
questions from taxpayers during
filing season.
Republicans have said their tax
law will streamline and simplify
the U.S. tax code, in part by increasing the number of Ameri-
cans who claim the standard deduction on their income taxes.
But the new law created confusion about its implementation in
late December, when taxpayers in
several states rushed to try to
prepay their 2018 property taxes
in the hope of avoiding the new
cap on the state and local tax
deduction.
That uncertainty led the IRS to
put out guidelines about who
could and could not plan on deducting their property taxes
ahead of time. The taxpayer advocate appears to expect similar
challenges to emerge over the
next several months.
The report noted that previous
tax legislation also caused big
spikes in the agency’s workload.
The 1986 tax overhaul signed by
President Ronald Reagan, for instance, led the IRS to hire an
additional 1,300 staff members
and increase the number of
phone calls it answered by 30
percent. A similar impact is expected from the GOP tax law. Over
the course of 2017, however, the
IRS lost 6,801 permanent staffers.
erica.werner@washpost.com
jeffrey.stein@washpost.com
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–5%
0%
+5%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
241.14
101.22
174.29
320.26
165.87
128.66
39.91
46.07
74.20
86.08
18.93
254.33
191.80
164.18
42.50
–0.1
0.7
0.0
0.6
–0.3
0.6
0.6
–0.3
–1.5
–0.8
2.0
0.2
–0.7
0.2
–2.6
2.5
1.9
3.0
8.6
5.3
2.8
4.2
0.4
4.2
2.9
8.5
–0.2
1.2
7.0
–7.9
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
143.97
110.25
173.51
57.30
87.82
64.22
90.47
36.47
132.11
134.90
224.20
51.69
118.98
99.67
109.47
–0.1
1.1
0.0
0.9
–0.5
0.2
–0.6
0.2
–0.3
0.5
–0.7
0.2
–0.1
–0.7
–0.4
3.0
3.1
0.8
1.8
2.7
2.7
–1.5
0.7
–2.6
5.7
1.7
–2.3
4.4
0.9
1.8
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
0.8368
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1951
0.0089
1.3507
0.3098
0.7975
0.0517
0.0075
1.1302
0.2585
0.6672
0.0433
150.5090
34.5158
88.8620
5.7691
0.2293
0.5905
0.0383
Japan ¥ per
111.4300
133.1700
Britain £ per
0.7404
0.8848
0.0066
Brazil R$ per
3.2352
3.8686
0.0289
4.3605
Canada $ per
1.2540
1.4987
0.0112
1.6938
0.3884
Mexico $ per
19.3147
23.0839
0.1730
26.0895
5.9830
Mexico $
2.5746
0.1667
0.0649
15.4030
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 28,396.00
Russell 2000
1559.80
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 549.81
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
9.82
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
–0.1
0.0
–0.3
–2.6
YTD % Chg
2.6
1.6
1.2
–11.1
$3.2355
$3.4900
$63.57
$1,319.30
$2.91
+0.6
0.0
+1.0
+0.4
–0.6
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded (Ticker)
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
% Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.3690
$17.04
$9.5500
$0.1465
$4.3425
+0.3
+0.1
–0.9
–0.5
+0.5
day
month
$1200
$1000
$800
–0.4
0.7
0.1
1.5
1.6
0.5
0.5
1.7
0.1
Gainers
DST Systems Inc
Maiden Holdings Ltd
Meta Financial
United Continental
Buckle Inc
Intuitive Surgical
Hibbett Sports Inc
JC Penney
Churchill Downs
Atlas Air Worldwide
Discovery Comm C
AK Steel Holding
CenturyLink Inc
Discovery Comm
Century Aluminum
Tivity Health Inc
Syneos Health Inc
Cato Corp
Dave & Buster's Ent
Lantheus Holdings
Daily
Close % Chg
$79.89
$7.60
$102.20
$73.08
$22.30
$423.76
$23.00
$3.97
$253.10
$60.65
$21.69
$6.44
$17.48
$22.83
$20.61
$38.20
$42.10
$13.48
$46.10
$23.55
22.6
16.9
12.0
6.7
6.7
6.6
6.2
6.1
6.1
5.8
5.8
5.7
5.7
5.5
5.3
5.2
5.0
4.8
4.8
4.7
Losers
SuperValu
NetScout Systems
Signet Jewelers Ltd
SYNNEX Corp
MiMedx Group Inc
MSC Indstr Direct
Southwestern Energy
CEVA Inc
Vitamin Shoppe Inc
EBay
Big 5 Sprtg Goods
InstalledBuildngPrd
DENTSPLY SIRONA
Financial Engines
Cabot Oil&Gas
RH
Atla Tele-Network
American Axle & Mfg
Cedar Realty Trust
OGE Energy Corp
Daily
Close % Chg
$16.94
$26.28
$52.69
$131.79
$14.32
$92.53
$5.41
$46.10
$5.00
$37.70
$6.33
$72.95
$62.76
$28.70
$27.96
$91.48
$58.90
$18.01
$5.50
$30.89
–13.7
–13.6
–6.9
–6.3
–5.5
–5.3
–5.3
–5.1
–4.8
–4.6
–4.5
–4.2
–4.1
–4.0
–4.0
–3.9
–3.9
–3.9
–3.8
–3.8
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6600
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.26
0.45
0.80
1.49
2.89
5.55
4.50%
3.94%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.50%
Federal Funds
3.30%
1.70%
LIBOR 3-Month
10-year note
Yield: 2.56
2-year note
Yield: 1.97
5-year note
Yield: 2.33
6-month bill
Yield: 1.58
15-Year fixed mortgage
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
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1-Year ARM
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Does this page look familiar? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
NF407 6x.5
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
M2
Could you drive better with a brain-reading cap?
las vegas —
The
Switch
Might the car of
the future be able
to read your
GEOFFREY A.
mind?
FOWLER
At CES, the big
tech trade show,
cars dominated much of the
conversation. But one experience
stood out because it was so farout: I donned an experimental
cap from Nissan that interpreted
signals from my brain with the
goal of making me a better
driver.
Brainwave, as it is called,
looked (and felt) pretty odd, with
wires poking into my scalp. It is
an intriguing idea of how tech
might make the driving
experience more enjoyable,
instead of just making it
disappear.
No, Brainwave did not let me
drive without using my hands or
summon a ride with only my
thoughts. But it did gather
electroencephalogram, or EEG,
data from 11 spots on my brain’s
motor cortex while I drove a
videogame-style car simulation
through curvy terrain.
That brain data is useful for
cars with semiautonomous
capabilities, says Lucian
Gheorghe, the Nissan scientist
behind this tech. Certain brain
waves, researchers have found,
can be interpreted as a signal
you want to turn the wheel, up to
half a second before you do so.
Brainwave could predict that you
want to turn, and the car’s
artificial intelligence could start
the action before your hands do.
“The idea is to try to build a
partner from the AI, not to use
the AI itself as a replacement,”
Gheorghe said. “Then every
driver can drive better.”
Every driver — and car — is a
little different, so the simulation
I test-drove sought to collect
data on two things: how fast my
brain responds to road stimuli;
and the smoothness of my
The
Switch
JHAAN ELKER/THE WASHINGTON POST
Nissan is testing an experimental cap that interprets signals from the brain with the goal of helping people drive better. For example,
Brainwave could predict that you want to turn, and the car’s artificial intelligence could start the action before your hands do.
driving. For a more pleasurable
drive, you want those two factors
to be as much in sync as possible.
If Brainwave ever gets to the
market, it could help novice
drivers smooth out their ride
and, thus, enjoy it more,
Gheorghe says. Very experienced
drivers might be able to use the
tech to make ordinary vehicles
handle like sporty ones.
Brainwave might also be
useful in totally autonomous
cars to give passenger feedback
to the software doing the
driving. When the passenger
wants something to happen, and
it doesn’t, Gheorghe says that
“disaccord” can be measured in
the brain. If Brainwave senses
disaccord while a self-driving car
is accelerating, for example, the
car could learn to ease up on the
gas.
Now comes the hard part.
Nissan is not putting Brainwave
in cars anytime soon. Among its
challenges: Getting accurate
EEG readings is very hard.
Nissan cap was not particularly
comfortable — it has to figure
out how to make one that can fit
many head shapes.
Nissan probably does not
want to be in the business of
making brain-reading hats,
Gheorghe says. It wants to be
prepared for a future where
brain-reading technology might
be something people use at
home or work already, and can
bring with them into the car.
“We are becoming a
manufacturer of brainconnected ready vehicles,” he
says.
We are at least 10 years out
from truly melding mind and
machine. When it comes to
driving, I’ll take all the help I can
get.
geoffrey.fowler@washpost.com
Trump gets Report finds disconnect on drug laws, drug dangers
another
win in fight
for CFPB
The treaties and
laws governing
CHRISTOPHER how drugs are
regulated by
INGRAHAM
nations were, for
the most part,
written a half-century or more
ago. And while the science
surrounding drugs and drug use
has advanced rapidly over that
time, the laws have barely evolved.
As a result, there is little
correlation between the dangers
of various drugs and the
stringency of laws regulating their
use. That disconnect is
abundantly clear in a new report
on world drug use by the Global
Commission on Drug Policy, a
group that advocates for less
punitive drug laws.
In a 2007 Lancet study,
drug policy experts assessed the
potential harms associated with
using various drugs, using the
latest available research to come
up with a total measure of “risk”
for each drug.
Cannabis (marijuana), for
instance, is a relatively low-risk
Wonkblog
BY
R ENAE M ERLE
A federal judge on Wednesday
sided with the Trump administration for a second time in a fight for
control of the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau, denying a request by a high-ranking agency employee that she be put in charge
instead of the White House’s pick.
U.S. District Judge Timothy J.
Kelly on Wednesday turned down
Leandra English’s request for a temporary restraining order that would
prevent White House budget director Mick Mulvaney from serving as
the CFPB’s acting director. “English
has not demonstrated a likelihood
of success on the merits or shown
that she will suffer irreparable injury absent injunctive relief,” Kelly
said in the 46-page ruling.
Trump appointed Mulvaney to
the temporary post late last year
after the agency’s former director,
Richard Cordray, announced he
was stepping down. But by then,
Cordray had already named his former chief of staff, English, as acting
director, setting up a partisan battle
for control of the powerful agency.
English’s attorneys have argued
that the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act,
which established the CFPB after
the financial crisis, laid out a specific plan of succession authorizing
the deputy director to take over
until a White House nominee is
confirmed by the Senate. Also, they
said, Mulvaney cannot wear two
hats by simultaneously leading the
independent financial regulator
while serving as director the Office
of Management and Budget.
“We are disappointed in today’s
decision,” Deepak Gupta, English’s
attorney, said in a statement. “The
law is clear: President Trump may
not circumvent the Senate confirmation process by installing his
White House budget director to run
the CFPB part time. Mr. Mulvaney’s
appointment undermines the Bureau’s independence and threatens
its mission to protect American
consumers.”
Gupta did not indicate whether
English would appeal the decision.
Kelly, a Trump appointee who
joined the federal court in Washington in September, previously sided
with the Trump administration in
November, denying English a restraining order to prevent Mulvaney from taking over the agency.
English then applied for a temporary injunction, which Kelly denied
Wednesday.
renae.merle@washpost.com
Spencer S. Hsu contributed to this
report.
Buy it or not,
bitcoin may
still change
your life
drug: There is no chance of
overdose, and rates of addiction
are relatively low. Heroin, on the
other hand, is extremely
dangerous: deadly in high doses
and very addictive, to say nothing
of the dangers posed by potential
adulterants that dealers and
traffickers often add to their
products.
In a purely rational world, you
would probably regulate cannabis
and heroin very differently: One is
quite deadly and damaging, the
other much less so. But under
international law, as set by the
1961 U.N. Single Convention on
Narcotic Drugs, the two
substances are for all intents and
purposes equivalent: They fall
under the strictest category of
regulation, reserved for
substances with no medical use
and a high potential for abuse.
The U.N. Single Convention
sets the terms for how countries
regulate drugs within their
borders. Generally speaking, the
countries party to it — nearly
every country in the world —
abide by it. If the treaty says
cannabis and heroin are
equivalent drugs, that becomes
the de facto position of most of the
world’s governments — regardless
of what the science says.
In the United States, for
instance, the Drug Enforcement
Administration did not officially
acknowledge until 2015 that
marijuana is less dangerous than
heroin. (The drugs do, however,
remain classified the same under
federal law.)
On the other hand, alcohol and
tobacco are much deadlier
substances than we usually give
them credit for. Excessive
drinking kills upward of
88,000 people in the United States
each year, while tobacco is
implicated in nearly half a million
fatalities — most because of longterm health issues — each year.
Both substances are highly
addictive, alcohol use is closely
associated with violent crime, and
some research indicates both
substances may serve as
“gateways” to more lethal drugs,
such as heroin. But neither
alcohol nor tobacco are regulated
under international drug treaties.
They remain legal to purchase
and consume in most countries,
subject to modest restrictions,
such as age limits, depending on
locale.
In recent years, certain places
have started updating their laws
to restore a sense of
proportionality to the way they
regulate drugs.
In Uruguay, as well as in a
number of U.S. states, marijuana
is legal for recreational use. Such
moves have prompted some
saber-rattling from the United
Nations but nothing in the way of
serious repercussions.
As of 2016, according to the
Global Commission on Drug
Policy report, roughly a quarter of
a billion people worldwide used
drugs that were illegal. Nearly 90
percent of them did so without
experiencing addiction or
diagnosable problems related to
their drug use.
christopher.ingraham@washpost.com
Trump floats a gas tax hike; GOP leaders quash it
But some Republicans
echo approach to funding
infrastructure projects
BY D AMIAN P ALETTA
AND E RICA W ERNER
President Trump privately suggested massively increasing the
gas tax to help fund a national
infrastructure overhaul, but Republican leaders in Congress
moved quickly to shut down the
idea.
During a White House meeting
with House Transportation Committee Chairman Bill Shuster
(R-Pa.) several weeks ago, Trump
mused about a gas tax increase to
50 cents per gallon, almost triple
the current level, according to a
person briefed on the exchange
who requested anonymity to discuss White House deliberations.
The White House declined to
comment on the exchange, and
Shuster declined to discuss the
conversations with the White
House, calling them “completely
private.”
Trump, Cabinet members and
GOP leaders also discussed a gas
tax increase during joint meetings
this weekend in Camp David. Sen.
John Cornyn (R-Tex.), who attended the meetings, would not reveal
who raised the subject of raising
the gas tax, but he said there was
no ambiguity about how Congress
planned to proceed.
“I’m sure it came up in some
context, because that’s what a lot
of people have proposed at different times,” Cornyn said. “But I
have complete confidence that we
will not be raising the gas tax.”
The discussions underscore the
difficulty Trump faces as he seeks
to finance his 2016 campaign
promise of a $1 trillion national
infrastructure upgrade. Trump
has said the infrastructure spending is central to his economic
agenda, and he believes the investments could create millions of
new jobs across the country.
The White House is expected to
release an infrastructure plan as
soon as this month, but that plan
is not expected to dictate how the
projects would be paid for, in part
to avoid controversy and preserve
flexibility.
Though a potential source of
significant revenue, any increase
in the federal gas tax has remained politically tenuous, as
critics say it disproportionately
harms poor Americans because
they are less able to absorb such
changes in fuel costs. Many Republicans have consistently opposed past proposals for increases, though some have said they are
open to such a move.
The current federal fuel tax is
18.4 cents per gallon for gasoline
and 24.4 cents per gallon for diesel
fuel. The gas tax was last raised in
1993, and it is not indexed to
inflation. The tax mostly finances
the Highway Trust Fund, with a
small portion going to the Leaking
Underground Storage Tank Trust
Fund.
Because the federal government has not raised the gas tax in
24 years, a number of states have
raised their own gasoline taxes to
pay for state projects.
White House officials said they
still have not made a final determination on whether they will
pursue an increase in the gas tax,
even though GOP leaders have
made clear an increase will not
have enough Republican support
to become law.
A White House spokeswoman
said the concept “hasn’t been taken off the table, as most previous
administrations have done.”
“The goal is to move away from
Washington dictating to states
what they need to do, so I wouldn’t
expect what the administration
rolls out to be that explicit in
regard to gas tax, tolling” or other
ideas, the spokeswoman said.
Trump had made similar gas
tax comments to Bloomberg News
during an April interview, saying
an increase was “something that I
would certainly consider . . . if we
earmarked money toward the
highways.”
Several
Republicans
had
echoed Trump’s openness to hike
the gas tax, saying it was one way
to raise money for infrastructure
projects. “I’m still open to it,” said
Sen. Mike Rounds (R-S.D.) late
Tuesday after meeting with White
House officials about infrastructure plans for this year.
Shuster said he could not guarantee the gas tax would not be
increased.
“What I’ve said for the past
couple of years is: Everything
should be on the table,” Shuster
said when asked whether the proposal was still under consideration. “Guaranteeing anything in
Washington is folly. We can’t guarantee anything.”
A number of Democrats, meanwhile, have clamored for a gas tax
increase, saying it is needed to
fund infrastructure improvements. Rep. Peter A. DeFazio (DOre.) proposed essentially raising
the gas tax 1 cent per year in a way
that he said would raise $500 billion over 30 years to pay for infrastructure projects.
White House aides have said
the president’s broader infrastructure plan would be designed
with $200 billion in federal funding and rely on states, localities or
private investors to cover the remaining $800 billion, but Trump
has waffled on this, saying he
doesn’t believe partnerships between the federal government
and private investors would work.
President Barack Obama did
not propose increasing the gas
tax, but he did propose a $10-abarrel tax on crude oil that could
have effectively raised the gas tax
because companies would pass
those costs on to consumers. The
Obama administration projected
that would raise $65 billion a year
when fully phased in.
damian.paletta@washpost.com
erica.werner@washpost.com
Steven Mufson contributed to this
report.
las vegas — One
of the many
buzzwords at this
week’s CES
HAYLEY
technology show, is
TSUKAYAMA
“blockchain” — the
technology
underpinning the bitcoin craze.
While bitcoin is the flash of the
moment, there’s growing
excitement about how this concept
can move beyond digital currency
and affect people’s lives.
Simply put, blockchain is like a
ledger book that can be groupedited by people in the cloud.
There’s no central company or
government that has to verify a
transaction, which means things
can move more quickly. As changes
are made, it keeps a public log of
what changed, when and how. For
that reason, it’s very difficult to
fake a change or gain access to the
log if you’re not supposed to. The
records also aren’t tied to your
name, so it makes blockchain
another more secure way that
people can exchange data.
“It’s not really about bitcoin at
all,” said Halsey Minor, a founder of
CNET and Salesforce who’s now
focusing his attention on
blockchain and video. Blockchain
is as important a new technology
as the Internet, he said, and
anyone who doesn’t see that “is
missing the point.”
Some places and companies
have already started using
blockchain in ways that go beyond
currency changing hands. Estonia,
for example, relies on the
blockchain technology to run its
national identity card, which is
similar to a U.S. Social Security
number. Kodak will start using it
to keep track of who owns photo
rights.
And now at CES, entrepreneurs
are touting more applications of
the technology. Here are other
ways people at CES envision we
could use blockchain technology in
the future:
Paying for power
ImpactPPA is a power company
that lets you buy time on a
generator to power your home or
donate power to people in places
that aren’t wired for electricity. The
group has generators in 35
countries around the world.
Blockchain lets ImpactPPA deliver
power quickly to people who need
it, when they need it, without
having to wait hours or days for
their money to be processed by a
bank and a power company.
The company’s chief executive,
Dan Bates, showed me how it
works. From his app, he purchased
a single unit of power — about 60
seconds — on a generator in
Hyderabad, India. After just a
minute or two of waiting while the
blockchain processed his request,
the generator started moving. And
it all happened in less time than it
takes to pay a power bill online,
and without having to go through
any exchanges despite the
international nature of the
transaction.
Calling for help
Guardian Circle is a security
firm that wants to use blockchain
to take emergency services into a
new age. Founder Mark Jeffrey was
inspired to try this after a loved
one had a seizure while home
alone. Guardian Circle will use
blockchain to send an instant alert
to the people you choose — friends,
family, medical professionals or its
own security staff. Unlike the 911
system or similar senior alert apps,
it will also be able to share your
location quickly and securely with
the people you’ve chosen, even if
you’re on a cellphone.
It also lets those people speak to
one another, to make it easier to
coordinate how to deal with an
incident — for example, if your
mother knows about an allergy
you have but the neighbor who’s
first on the scene doesn’t.
Letting other people use your
computer to feed the world’s
binge-watching
Minor’s venture, VideoCoin,
aims to use blockchain to help with
a problem facing the modern
Internet: the amount of processing
power it takes to support all the
video we’re watching. The
company wants to tap the world’s
idle computers, such as the
desktop you have sitting at home
while you’re at work, to help solve
that problem. Using blockchain,
VideoCoin can reach many people
at once, keep track of them and
aggregate the power of those idle
computers as well as idle centers.
Those who participate can store
and pass video or use their
computing power to process video
— and are rewarded with
VideoCoin’s own digital currency.
hayley.tsukayama@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/news/
the-switch
A18
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Trump’s earmarks stance shows the perils of a short memory
Drawing cheers
from the swamp
he promised to
drain, President
JAMES
Trump
HOHMANN
wholeheartedly
embraced
earmarks this week as a lubricant
to grease the gears of government.
During a televised meeting at
the White House, the president
riffed for two minutes about how
bringing back pork-barrel
spending would lead to more
bipartisan cooperation.
“Our system lends itself to not
getting things done, and I hear so
much about earmarks — the old
earmark system — how there was
a great friendliness when you had
earmarks,” he said. “In the old
days of earmarks . . . they went out
to dinner at night, and they all got
along, and they passed bills. . . . A
lot of the pros are saying that if
you want to get along, and if you
want to get this country really
rolling again, you have to look at
[earmarks.]”
Here’s the rub: The good old
days weren’t so good. Former
congressman Randy “Duke”
Cunningham (R-Calif.) literally
had a “bribe menu” that told
defense contractors exactly how
much they could pay for him to
deliver earmarks to their
businesses. He left Congress in
2005 and spent seven years in
prison for taking $2.4 million.
That included a yacht named after
him (“The Dukester”) that was
provided by a defense company
president and docked at the
waterfront near the Capitol. It
doesn’t include the prostitutes
who were also made available to
him.
Remember the Bridge to
Nowhere? In 2005, Congress
earmarked $223 million to link
the remote Alaska town of
Ketchikan (population 8,900) to
the even more remote island of
Gravina (population 50!).
There were smaller, but just as
memorable, abuses: Sen. Richard
Burr (R-N.C.) got half a million
The
Daily 202
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump touted “the old days of earmarks,” when “there was a great friendliness” among
lawmakers. Those were also the days, however, of massive bribery scandals involving lawmakers.
bucks for a teapot museum in a
town of 18,000. (It shuttered
when the federal money dried
up.)
Scandalous spending led to
reform: Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.)
imposed a one-year moratorium
on earmarks when she became
House speaker in 2007. Then John
A. Boehner (R-Ohio) banned them
altogether when Republicans
took control of the House in 2011.
Trump nodded to the abuses,
but he played them down. “We
have to put better controls
because it got a little bit out of
hand, but maybe that brings
people together,” he told
lawmakers who had gathered to
talk about immigration.
Conservative groups were
aghast: Heritage Action chief
executive Michael Needham said
it was “nearly unthinkable” that
Trump “would consider
reinstating one of the most
egregious examples of cronyism
on Capitol Hill.”
“If Republicans bring back
earmarks, then it virtually
guarantees that they will lose the
House,” said Club for Growth
President David McIntosh, a
former congressman from
Indiana. “Bringing back earmarks
is the antithesis of draining the
swamp.”
“The claim that earmarks are
necessary to help pass bills has
been debunked by the passage in
the House of all 12 appropriations
bills for fiscal year 2018,” said
Citizens Against Government
Waste President Tom Schatz.
They probably shouldn’t be
surprised. As a candidate, Trump
routinely bragged about getting
special favors from politicians to
whom he gave money as a
developer. At heart, he is a
dealmaker — not an ideologue.
There is nothing to suggest that
he genuinely cares about reining
in government spending. He’s
called himself the king of debt. He
signed a tax bill that will blow up
the nation’s debt by at least
$1 trillion. He’s advocating an
approach to infrastructure that
looks an awful lot like the 2009
stimulus package that helped
spark the tea party movement.
The bigger story, though, might
be that Trump just doesn’t know
very much about the history of
abuse and how much earmarks
besmirched the legislative
process. The first president in
American history with no prior
governing or military experience,
sometimes it seems as if his view
of how Washington works comes
from watching “The West Wing.”
(Like “The Apprentice,” it aired on
NBC.) Trump has an idealized
vision of the past because he
didn’t have to live through the
dark heyday of Jack Abramoff,
Bob Ney, Jack Murtha and Ted
Stevens.
He has repeatedly
demonstrated naivete about basic
issues that have vexed
Washington. “Nobody knew that
health care could be so
complicated,” he said in February.
Trump thought he could
persuade China to pressure North
Korea to stop its nuclear activities
— until Chinese President Xi
Jinping tutored him on the
history of the region. “After
listening for 10 minutes, I realized
it’s not so easy,” the president said
in April.
The president has made clear
several other times that he doesn’t
know even elementary-level
history. Trump made puzzling
comments about Andrew
Jackson’s views on the Civil War,
which broke out 16 years after he
died. “People don’t ask that
question,” he said in May, “but
why was there the Civil War? Why
could that one not have been
worked out?”
In many ways, Trump is taking
America on a vacation from
history. His “America first”
campaign slogan is the same one
isolationists used during the
1930s to justify inaction in the
face of a rising tide of fascism.
But this is bigger than one
president. One of the United
States’ biggest challenges in the
21st century is its lack of historical
memory.
The Trump administration is
counting on the country having a
short attention span as it works to
systematically deconstruct the
administrative state. Not even a
decade after the worst financial
crisis since the Great Depression,
Trump is working with Wall Street
bankers (some of whom work in
the White House) to undo
provisions in Dodd-Frank that
were designed to prevent another
meltdown. When people weren’t
paying attention over Christmas,
the administration moved to
weaken rules that a bipartisan
commission came up with to
prevent another Deepwater
Horizon oil spill. Trickle-down
economics has not panned out,
and Gov. Sam Brownback’s
experiment in Kansas failed
cataclysmically, yet the new tax
law assumes that this time will
somehow be different. The list
goes on and on.
Those who cannot remember
the past are condemned to repeat
it.
Trump’s comments have
already given a shot in the arm to
a long-dormant effort by
entrenched incumbents to revive
earmarks.
The House Rules Committee
quickly announced plans to hold
two hearings next week on ending
the moratorium. Rep. Pete
Sessions (R-Tex.), the committee’s
chairman, said he thinks it can be
done in a “transparent and
meritorious” way. One idea he’s
floating is limiting earmarks only
to state or local governments or to
certain agencies, such as the Army
Corps of Engineers.
Killing earmarks was one of Jeff
Flake’s proudest achievements in
Congress. He played a leading
role. But under the spell of
Trumpism, the outgoing senator
from Arizona recognizes that his
brand of principled conservatism
is falling out of favor inside the
Republican Party. “This is not a
good idea,” he tweeted.
To be sure, there are a lot of
politicians in both parties who
think earmarks are wonderful.
The subject divides Democrats,
just as it does Republicans. Sen.
Harry M. Reid (D-Nev.) publicly
broke with Barack Obama on
getting rid of earmarks in 2011.
Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii)
sees them as a way to restore the
constitutional prerogative of the
legislative branch. “Earmarks
make sense because the legislative
branch holds the constitutional
authority to determine how
money is spent,” he tweeted.
Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), a
former state auditor who is up for
reelection this year, has long been
anti-earmark. “Huh? The President
just embraced earmarks? Talk
about the swampiest of swamp
creatures,” she tweeted. “You gotta
be kidding me.”
james.hohmann@washpost.com
Health insurers take on Republicans in FREEZE YOUR BUNS. WARM YOUR HEART.
JANUARY 18–20 | WASHINGTON HARBOUR, GEORGETOWN
unusual battle over federal payments
face-offs between
the Trump
administration
and Obamacare
insurers as insurers try to hunt
down billions of dollars
they’ve been promised for
participating in the Affordable
Care Act’s marketplaces.
The legal battles revolve
around two hefty pots of money
Republicans have termed
“bailouts” for insurance
companies but which are
provided under the 2010 healthcare law to help those
insurers manage risk, provide
extra discounts to the lowestincome Americans — and aid
in stabilizing the Obamacare
marketplaces, which have
turned out to need more help
than expected.
In an unusual anti-industry
move, the GOP-led
administration and Congress are
refusing to make these dual
payments as Republicans
continue their offensive against
President Barack Obama’s
health-care law. The broadside is
now prompting a host of
lawsuits from marketplace
insurers who cover around
10 million Americans in a rare
political battle between
erstwhile allies — Republicans
and the insurance industry.
This morning, a three-judge
panel at the U.S. Court of
Appeals for the
Federal Circuit is set to hear
cases brought by two insurers —
Land of Lincoln Mutual Health
and Moda Health Plan — who
are seeking billions in “riskcorridor payments.” The appeals
court is expected to give a
definitive ruling on both cases,
over which lower courts have
split.
And a co-op in Maine recently
became the first of probably
many insurers to sue the federal
government for halting “costsharing reduction” payments,
which reimburse companies for
discounting extra costs that
come with the plans purchased
by the lowest-income
marketplace consumers.
Big legal questions are at
stake: whether the federal
government has a responsibility
PAIGE
WINFIELD
CUNNINGHAM
to pay insurers the money
they’re owed, and whether the
money can be provided without
an appropriation by Congress. A
lot of cash is in play, too: about
$12.3 billion is unpaid for the
risk-corridor program and about
$2 billion for “cost-sharing
reduction” (CSR) payments.
All things considered, the
cases could be some of the
biggest civil lawsuits in U.S.
history — and even have a
chance of ending up at the
Supreme Court in yet another
potential landmark case sparked
by the ACA.
“I can’t think of civil litigation
that is larger in sheer dollar
amounts than what we’re
talking about here,” Nicholas
Bagley, a health law professor at
University of Michigan Law
School, told me.
Insurers have a somewhat
easier case to make for why they
should get CSR dollars. The
Trump administration
continued paying the
subsidies on a monthly basis in
its first eight months but then
abruptly halted the payments in
October, pointing to a previous
court ruling saying Congress
and not the executive branch
needed to provide the money.
Insurers trying to secure riskcorridor funding could face a
bigger challenge because
Congress passed a measure
by Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) in
2014 essentially requiring the
Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services to pay out
only what it takes in from health
plans. (The risk-corridor
program tries to stabilize the
ACA marketplaces by collecting
funds from profitable companies
and redistributing them to plans
with losses that exceed a certain
amount.)
The move led to severe
funding shortfalls for the riskcorridor program. In 2015, CMS
paid just 12.6 percent of
insurers’ funding requests, and
the gap has grown even wider
since then.
As a result, some health plans
tanked. Shaun Greene, former
chief executive of the Utahbased co-op Arches Health Plan,
said his organization closed in
2016 specifically because the
federal government reneged on
what was supposed to be an
$11 million payment.
“It was an obligation the
federal government had,”
Greene told me. “Part of the deal
is they would put in the safety
net of the risk corridors, so we
priced our plans accordingly.
When they defaulted, it
decimated our balance sheet.”
Republicans’ position in all
this is a bit counterintuitive.
Typically suspicious of the
government and friendly to
industry, Trump and GOP
lawmakers are rallying
against health insurers that took
the risk of participating in the
new Obamacare marketplaces
and want the government to
hold up its end of the bargain.
It’s important to understand
the GOP’s long history of
fighting the ACA to understand
the party’s position. In 2014, the
House sued the Obama
administration for paying the
CSRs without congressional
appropriation, partly because
lawmakers wanted to make a
point about their power of the
purse but also because
they wanted a legal way to
telegraph displeasure with the
health-care law.
In a similar vein, many
Republicans in Congress
adopted “bailout” messaging
against the risk-corridor
payments, trying to argue that
the federal government was
unlawfully propping up
unsuccessful insurance
companies.
The Trump administration
may have a stronger argument
when it comes to risk-corridor
payments by arguing the text of
the ACA isn’t entirely clear on
whether the program should be
revenue-neutral, thus
discouraging insurers
from relying on it. In 2016, a
federal court ruled in favor of
the government in the case
brought by Land of Lincoln.
But if the courts ultimately
allow the federal government to
permanently halt payments, that
could undermine insurers’
willingness to participate in the
ACA marketplaces — and have a
broader, chilling effect on the
willingness of private industry
to partner with the government.
paige.cunningham@washpost.com
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Planning for a super-megalopolis
EDITORIALS
Take a deal. Build the wall.
Protecting ‘dreamers’ is worth the price of funding Mr. Trump’s border-security plan — even the wall.
P
agents, is largely a waste. Rather than seriously
addressing the opioid epidemic, or mounting cyberwarfare threats, or America’s crumbling infrastructure, the president wants to fortify a border where
illegal crossings, as measured by Border Patrol
apprehensions, are already at their lowest point
since the Nixon administration.
But consider how rare it is that a dumb idea in
Congress actually buys something smart in return.
In this case, the return on that dumb idea would be
huge. (And betting that the courts will save the
dreamers is too risky, notwithstanding a federal
judge’s ruling Tuesday freezing dreamers’ protections — for now.)
The wall’s $18 billion price tag would be spread
over a decade. If a few billion dollars annually is the
trade-off that provides certainty — a pathway to
citizenship or permanent legal status — for nearly
700,000 young immigrants brought to this country
as children by their parents, it’s worth it. Because the
alternative — all those lives ruined, all those jobs
lost, all that education and promise cut short — is
much worse.
Democrats who choke on the wall, loath to hand
Why just
Florida?
Mr. Trump a political triumph, might ask themselves
what other deals they might strike that would do so
much tangible good, for so many people, so immediately — and at such a relatively modest price. The
likely answer is: very few.
Some Republicans are angling for more than half
a loaf. Using the dreamers as hostages, they want to
decimate legal immigration, slash family reunification visas and dissolve the lottery system that
provides visas for people from Africa and other
regions that generate relatively few immigrants.
Those measures would inflict real harm on real
people. By contrast, spending billions on border
security, while profligate, has enjoyed bipartisan
support in the past. In 2006, many prominent
Democrats, including then-Sens. Hillary Clinton
and Barack Obama, voted for 700 miles of fencing at
the southwest frontier, albeit at a time when illegal
crossings were more than three times greater than
they are today.
Many in Congress may have lost the muscle
memory required to strike a compromise, but here’s
a reminder: In politics, as in life, compromise is
often painful. That doesn’t mean you refuse it.
TOM TOLES
Exempting the state from an offshore
drilling plan sure looks partisan.
“If that’s your standard, we, too, should be removed
from your list. Immediately.”
Shortly after the announcement, a bipartisan
group of governors from states such as New York,
Oregon and South Carolina all asked publicly for
their own special exceptions.
We have long advocated for increased drilling off
the country’s coasts, as long as it is smartly regulated. But the decision to do so will be neither durable
nor fair if it comes by selectively ignoring the
complaints of states in which the president does not
identify a political or personal interest. One cannot
help but compare this episode to the tax bill Mr.
House would make to the Congressional Accountability Act before repaying the treasury.
Here’s a better idea: Keep the money, but do your
constituents and Congress a favor and resign immediately. Mr. Farenthold’s continued service is an
embarrassment and discredits the claims of Republican leaders that they won’t tolerate sexual harassment.
Revelations of the use of $84,000 in taxpayer
money to settle a 2014 lawsuit brought by his former
communications director, Lauren Greene, resulted
in renewed scrutiny. The House Ethics Committee
formed an investigative subcommittee to examine
Ms. Greene’s claims. (The investigation has since
expanded to look at other allegations, including
improper use of official resources for campaign
Trump just signed, which strips deductions from
taxpayers in blue states in order to fund various GOP
ideological priorities.
If the Florida decision had been the result of a
thoughtful process that ended in a report explaining
how Florida’s coast is somehow more precious than
every other stretch of coast the Trump administration has slated to open, it would have at least
appeared less capricious. Instead, the administration exposed one of the big drivers of its severe
dysfunction: its attitude that the federal government is a fiefdom that Mr. Trump and his lieutenants
rule according to their whim.
purposes and whether Mr. Farenthold made false
statements to the committee.) The New York Times
detailed an office culture rife with sexual innuendo
and verbal abuse, and another former staffer — a man
— came forward with claims of mistreatment.
Mr. Farenthold announced he would not run for
reelection, acknowledging his “constituents deserve
better” than the way he has conducted himself in
office.
He got that right, yet there have been few demands
from members of his party to resign, though Mr. Ryan
still thinks he should repay the $84,000. That forbearance is a disappointing contrast with Democratic
leaders who properly signaled in the case of nowformer Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) that no
tolerance for sexual harassment means no tolerance.
ABCDE
TEC H N O L O G Y
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
We need a national focus on data security
Regarding the Jan. 6 news “As security flaws are
revealed, tech firms barely keep up”:
Whether the security flaw is in software or hardware, it should be no surprise that there is no effective
protection of data. The Meltdown and Spectre design
flaws are of significance only because they are in
hardware CPU chips and in all commercial computers installed over the past decade. Further, these
hardware vulnerabilities cannot be absolutely closed
without replacing the physical chip in every computer — something neither practical nor speedy.
The real problem is that all cybersecurity efforts
are rooted in where the data is located and not in the
data itself. Move the data, and the security changes.
Exploits of hardware and software vulnerabilities
can be enabled only in software. Yet all computers
today operate with a set of “controls and permis-
I applaud Maryland Del. Ariana B. Kelly (DMontgomery), her fellow women legislators of Maryland and their 26 male colleagues who seek “to make
Maryland the most woman-friendly state legislature
in the country” [“Maryland’s reckoning on sexual
harassment has arrived,” Local Opinions, Dec. 31].
As they pursue their goal, I urge them:
Treat inappropriate actions taken by unmarried
vs. “married senior colleague(s)” as equally egregious.
In her opening paragraphs, Ms. Kelly appeared to
distinguish, perhaps inadvertently, between the two.
Sexual harassment is sexual harassment, regardless
of the marital status of the harasser or the harassed.
Advocate “prohibiting romantic and sexual relationships between supervisors and subordinates or
interns” and creating protection and accountability
for lobbyists. Ms. Kelly wrote that the Maryland
Women’s Caucus will “weigh” these possible “tough
policies” to prevent harassment. Weaker policies than
these would render their effort to reduce sexual
harassment in their workplace impotent.
Teri Simpson Lojewski, Berlin, Md.
What one should learn at college
Republicans could show they take sexual harassment seriously by showing the door to one of their own.
“I
Time to get tough
The Jan. 7 editorial “The missiles of 2018” was
misleading. The issue, violations of the IntermediateRange Nuclear Forces Treaty, is important, but the
editorial suggested that U.S. complaints about Russian violations are comparable to Moscow’s complaints and that the alleged U.S. violations are the
work of the Trump administration (“Now that trust is
crumbling”). But Russian violations are egregious
and have been in the public domain for years.
The Russian tit-for-tat accusation, as the editorial
noted, involves the U.S. Aegis Ashore missile defense
system. The Russian argument is that the launcher
for the Aegis SM series missile could be used,
theoretically, for Tomahawk land-attack missiles. But
verification that launchers do not contain such
missiles (which no longer have nuclear warheads) is
child’s play, and thus the equating of serious and
accurate accusations with fake ones is simply wrong.
Finally, the Aegis deployment decision was taken by
the Obama administration.
James F. Jeffrey, Alexandria
The writer, a fellow at the Washington Institute,
served as a deputy national security adviser
working on these issues in 2007 and 2008.
Mr. Farenthold has got to go
WANT to be clear that I didn’t do anything
wrong, but I also don’t want the taxpayers to
be on the hook for this.” That is what
embattled Rep. Blake Farenthold (R-Tex.)
said last month when he promised to repay the
$84,000 made in a settlement to a former aide who
had accused him of sexual harassment and other
improper conduct. He told a Corpus Christi TV
station on Dec. 4 that he would take out a personal
loan and probably give a check to House Speaker Paul
D. Ryan (R-Wis.) later that week.
Given the tawdry nature of Mr. Farenthold’s time
in Congress, it comes as no surprise that he has failed
to make good on that promise. The inexplicable
excuse from his spokeswoman was that on the advice
of counsel he was waiting to see what changes the
In 2007, the Metropolitan Washington Council of
Governments celebrated its 50th anniversary with
the symposium “Charting the Future of the National
Capital Region.” Perhaps its most significant observation was made by Robert Lang, director of
Virginia Tech’s Metropolitan Institute, who predicted that by the mid-21st century, Baltimore and
Richmond would join with the stronger Washington
economy to form the Chesapeake megapolitan region. He further envisioned Mid-Atlantic and New
England regions, leading to a super-megapolitan
region stretching from Washington to Boston.
Our recent winter weather and the cancellation of
thousands of flights have underscored the need for
regional planning. Sure, there are challenges. What’s
needed is an initiative with the requisite leadership
similar to that of President Dwight Eisenhower and
the Interstate Highway System.
John Mason, Fairfax
Russia’s arguments are duds
C
YNICISM HAS always been a part of politics,
but rarely are politicians so brazen and
self-serving as President Trump and his
interior secretary, Ryan Zinke, have been
over the past week. First they announced a new
offshore drilling plan that would force unwilling
coastal states to open up their waters to oil and gas
exploration, prioritizing “energy dominance” over
long-standing local concerns. Then just a few days
later, they gave swing state Florida a special exception from the unpopular drilling plan, crediting Gov.
Rick Scott (R), who may run for Senate this year, for
securing the dispensation.
Critics, including longtime drilling opponent Sen.
Bill Nelson (D), Mr. Scott’s likely opponent in
November, immediately accused the Trump administration of orchestrating these announcements to
boost the Republican in a key 2018 race. Yet the
alternative — that this spectacle was not planned but
just as rushed and arbitrary as it seemed — is hardly
better. Also discomfiting is the question of how
much Mr. Trump’s ownership of Florida beachfront
property factored into the decision. The president
appears to be treating public policy as a tool for
partisan and personal gain while reinforcing the
sense that important federal decisions depend on
his moment-to-moment sense of how they might
help or hurt him.
For his part, Mr. Zinke defended the decision to
exempt Florida by arguing that the administration
always intended to consult with governors before
making any final drilling decisions. “Local voice
matters,” he insisted. “I support the governor’s
position that Florida is unique and its coasts are
heavily reliant on tourism as an economic driver.”
It took approximately no time for leaders in other
drilling-skeptical states to call Mr. Zinke on his
words.
“Virginia’s governor (and governor-elect) have
made this same request, but we have not received
the same commitment. Wonder why...” Sen. Tim
Kaine (D-Va.) tweeted.
“California is also ‘unique’ & our ‘coasts are
heavily reliant on tourism as an economic driver,’ ”
California Attorney General Xavier Becerra tweeted.
JANUARY 11 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
RESIDENT TRUMP says he is optimistic a
deal can be struck to shield “dreamers,” the
young undocumented immigrants whose
lives he put in jeopardy by stripping them of
work permits and deportation protection, beginning March 5. His price, and that of many Republicans, is up to $33 billion in border-security measures, including Mr. Trump’s “beautiful” wall.
If that’s the deal — not one freighted with a
laundry list of other items on the GOP wish list —
Democrats should take it.
Granted, Mr. Trump once told Americans that a
border wall, paid for by Mexico, would cost $4
billion. After that, he said $6 billion or $7 billion, and
later $10 billion. Now his administration says it’s
really $18 billion for 722 miles of wall, of which just
316 miles would be a brand-new structure along the
2,000-mile southwest frontier. Oh, and Mexico’s
credit card seems to be missing.
The wall is a dumb idea. It won’t do much to
suppress illegal border crossings, which in any event
have been falling for decades. And the additional
border-security spending proposed by the administration, including thousands of new Border Patrol
. THURSDAY,
sions” — governing all operations of the computer —
that reside within each computer’s software. And
vulnerabilities within any software (and hardware)
can be exploited to circumvent these controls and
permissions.
Until we relocate and embed the controls and
permissions as part of the data itself, this cybersecurity problem will continue, and attackers will have
the upper hand.
Data security is the No. 1 problem in national and
personal security, yet there is no focused effort by
national policy nor industry discussion of this potential solution using data-embedded security.
Frank J. Sauer, Arlington
The writer, a former FBI deputy assistant director
for software, is researching defenses against cybercrime and cyberterrorism for Outdo Inc.
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In his Jan. 8 Education column, “Franchising the
Ivy League: How about a Princeton at Pismo Beach
campus?,” Jay Mathews cited a study that seems to
equate a college education’s success with earnings in
post-college life. Making money is, perhaps, a legitimate objective but not the only one and probably not
even the most important.
I’m saddened whenever I hear that a student’s or
parent’s goal is a high starting salary upon graduation. While I learned some professional skills in
college that served me well in the job market, I’ve
come to realize — as an octogenarian — that it was
the “soft things” one absorbs from a good college
education that help a person to live with himself or
herself. What really matters in college is developing
broad reading habits; learning to think logically and
critically; learning to convey thoughts clearly; learning to appreciate and understand good music, poetry,
history, literature, philosophy, fine art and economics; and getting a feel for group dynamics and
the societies in which we must live.
The “trade school” stuff aimed at achieving a high
starting salary is fine and useful for a while, but
exposure to the humanities and social sciences seems
at least as important as dollar signs when one deals
with life. Parents should keep this in mind as they
send their children off to college, whatever the status
of that college happens to be.
Ed Nanas, Gainesville, Va.
Enough with the ‘Fire and Fury’
The Jan. 6 Style article “In line with expectations”
was very informative for reasons probably not
intended. Folks lining up at midnight (really?) for a
book, “Fire and Fury,” that skewers President Trump
for alleged mental deficits and palace intrigue in the
White House, speaks volumes about how out of
touch Washington is with flyover America. Contrary
to what those in the opposition would have us
believe, the book, based on what many now say are
falsehoods and speculation, will have as much
impact on the typical voter as a Harold Stassen
presidential run had in past years. It will fade for
most Americans as quickly as paint dries.
At a time of ill winds blowing from Iran and
North Korea, and bread-and-butter issues dominating kitchen-table conversation in most of the
United States, it is likely that most Americans
would have neither the time nor the interest to line
up for hours to buy a political gossip book. Only in
Washington.
Robert E. Klein, Gainesville, Va.
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THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A21
RE
CHARLES LANE
E.J. DIONNE JR.
Freaking
ourselves out
for a good cause
Trump’s moment of truth
T
Y
ou wouldn’t expect to find good
news in a federal government report titled “Prisoners in 2016,” but
this lugubriously named Justice
Department document is indeed full of
fact-based reasons to feel better about the
United States.
Specifically, it confirms that the U.S.
incarceration rate reached a 19-year low at
the end of 2016: There were 450 prisoners
per 100,000 U.S. residents held in state and
federal prisons in 2016, compared with 444
prisoners per 100,000 in 1997. This rate was
11 percent below the all-time peak of 506 per
100,000 in 2007.
There’s a lesson here, and it’s not just the
familiar one about the need to remember all
the ways life in the United States might
actually be improving, or at least not getting
worse — despite the endless flow of troubling, and spectacular, news from President
Trump’s Washington.
It’s also about the relationship between
alarmism and progress, and how the former
may help bring about the latter, even if the
facts don’t necessarily support it 100 percent.
We now know that the U.S. incarceration
rate, though still far higher than that of
other industrialized democracies, was already on its way down as of 2010, when
Michelle Alexander published “The New
Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of
Colorblindness,” propelling the issue of
racially disparate imprisonment onto the
national agenda. We also know, thanks to
Justice Department data, that the incarceration rate for African Americans declined
almost twice as fast as the rate for whites
between 2007 and 2016.
The consciousness that Alexander’s book
raised cannot possibly explain these trends,
because they started before it was published. Yet if she hadn’t rung the alarm,
positive developments might not have intensified as rapidly or as durably as they did.
Her ideas swiftly mutated from radical
critique to conventional wisdom, influencing policy from the then-Obama administration to state governments in the deep-red
Deep South, where several states’ imprisonment rates have been declining faster than
the national average.
Another example of the alarmism-progress dialectic from a different policy area:
Concern over rising health-care costs is the
stuff of both Republican and Democratic
jeremiads, with the GOP blaming Obamacare and Democrats blaming a different cast
of villains, including private insurance companies and Big Pharma.
What if both blue and red alarmism are,
at least in one respect, behind the times?
According to a newly published study by the
Kaiser Family Foundation, the gap between
the per capita growth rate in health-care
spending and the per capita growth rate of
the overall economy has been shrinking for
years.
The two rates were essentially the same
between 2010 and 2013, though health-cost
growth exceeded economic growth modestly in 2014 and 2015. There’s a good chance
the 2010s will see the lowest differential
between health-cost growth and overall
growth since the 1990s.
In short, growth in health care’s share of
the economy is decelerating. We may be
slowly but surely bending the cost curve
downward, to a sustainable rate of growth,
even at a time of coverage expansion.
There are undoubtedly many reasons for
this, including the simple fact that there
must be some inherent limit on health-cost
growth. We can’t devote 100 percent of the
economy to health care any more than we
could sentence 100 percent of the population to prison.
Cost control in Obamacare, such as the
proposed excise tax on “Cadillac” private
health plans, probably helped, too; but
surely one source of progress was the
general belief, accurate or not, that the
situation was getting worse and therefore
required urgent action.
Could Trump administration policy reverse these two positive trends, given Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s tough-on-crime
rhetoric, plus the president’s promises to
repeal Obamacare and otherwise fiddle
with health care? Maybe, but the states, not
the Justice Department, control the vast
majority of criminal prosecutions and prison sentences; Obamacare repeal, meanwhile, keeps failing, though ending the
individual health-insurance mandate via
Republican tax reform did cloud the picture.
Reality and perceptions of reality will
probably never coincide perfectly. Yet the
role that alarmism sometimes plays in
spurring change shows that this is not
necessarily a bad thing. The point is to take
neither alarm at the status quo, nor satisfaction with it, to a counterproductive extreme.
A balanced sense of both the challenges
and opportunities in our current predicament — a.k.a. sanity — would seem to be the
appropriate aspiration.
And notwithstanding everything that you
see, hear and read, optimism is sane. The
data prove it.
lanec@washpost.com
C O RREC TI O N
Elizabeth Bruenig’s Jan. 7 Sunday Opinion column, “Consider the laziness of the
idle rich,” incorrectly reported that data
drawn from Christopher Faricy’s book “Welfare for the Wealthy” were from 2016. The
figures, on federal Medicaid spending,
employer-based health insurance, and Pell
grants and college-related tax deductions,
were from 2012.
MIKHAIL KLIMENTYEV/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES
President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin speak at a meeting
in Danang, Vietnam, in November 2017.
No other president has
ignored such a threat
BY
B EN C ARDIN
F
or the better part of 20 years,
Russian President Vladimir Putin has engaged in a relentless
assault against democratic institutions abroad, universal values and
the rule of law. He has carried out these
attacks with an asymmetric arsenal:
cyberattacks; disinformation; support
for fringe political groups; the weaponization of energy resources, organized crime and corruption; and even
military aggression.
Putin has used such techniques because he has operated from a position
of weakness, hobbled by a faltering
economy, a substandard military and
few followers on the world stage. And
his attacks have grown in intensity and
complexity over the past few years,
driven by a desire to also repress
democratic aspirations among his own
citizens. While our European partners
have taken steps to better defend
themselves, the United States has done
little to protect its institutions.
Despite the efforts of some in national security leadership, as well as
dedicated career public servants
across the executive branch, one person is preventing a strong, government-wide response that holds Russia
accountable for its destabilizing activities: the president of the United States.
Never before has the White House so
clearly ignored a national security
threat.
If we fail to respond with the urgency this threat requires, the regime in
Moscow will be further emboldened —
not just to undermine European stability but to build on its success in
interfering in our 2016 presidential
election by undermining the 2018 midterm elections and the 2020 presidential election.
These are some of the findings of a
report that I am releasing Wednesday.
Research began in the months following the 2016 election because it is
critical that the American people better understand the scope and scale of
the Russian government threat to
democratic institutions and support
the steps necessary to defend our
system of government and our very
society. The report shows that Putin’s
threat to our nation, and our allies, is
growing.
The Russian president’s rap sheet of
meddling in Europe is long and sordid.
Some of the most egregious examples
include:
A coup attempt in Montenegro to
storm the nation’s parliament and capture or kill the prime minister ahead of
that nation’s attempt to join the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization.
Russian media propaganda, especially Internet trolls and bots, which
were discovered in the public debate
ahead of recent major referendums
such as “Brexit” in Britain and the
Catalonia independence movement in
Spain, as well as national elections in
France and Germany. Indications are
that Italy may well be next.
The murder of a number of Russian opposition figures and critics
across Europe.
The violation of international law
by invading Russia’s neighbors, such as
Georgia and Ukraine.
Several countries in Europe have
realized the danger that the Kremlin
poses and have taken serious steps to
build resilience against Putin’s aggression. These governments have bolstered cyberdefenses, conducted media literacy efforts, gone after Russian
organized crime, and started to diversify energy supplies, rallying multiple
sectors of society in mutual defense —
government, corporations, civil society, the media, academia and students.
The same cannot be said in the
United States. But even beyond electoral interference, the report also
found examples of Kremlin-backed efforts to affect the daily lives of Americans and things that they care about:
cheating Americans out of medals at
the Olympic Games and supporting
cybercriminals who attack American
businesses and who steal the financial
information of millions of American
consumers.
So what should we do about it?
First, President Trump must provide unequivocal presidential leadership to mobilize our own government
and the American people. Second, the
United States must embark on an
effort to build more resilience here at
home and in democratic institutions
across Europe — the best defense
against Russian interference. Third,
the United States and our allies should
go on the offence and expose and
freeze Kremlin-linked dirty money,
placing Moscow under a preemptive
and escalatory sanctions regime as a
deterrent to future attacks on democratic institutions. Fourth, we should
work with social-media companies
and hold them accountable for their
role in allowing the Kremlin’s disinformation campaigns to spread unchecked, toxifying public discourse
and exacerbating political and societal
divisions.
Out of the ashes of World War II, the
United States led the world in constructing the current liberal international order through democratic institutions, shared values and accepted
norms. The enduring transatlantic
bond between America and Europe —
the foundation for that order — is
anathema to Putin, who seeks to protect little more than his own power and
wealth.
The United States must therefore
work closely with our European allies
to counter the Kremlin’s ongoing, intensifying assault on democracy
around the world.
The writer represents Maryland in the U.S.
Senate, where he is the ranking Democrat
on the Foreign Relations Committee.
RIGHT TURN
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/right-turn
The GOP is having
a very bad 2018
The announced retirements of Republican Sens. Bob Corker (Tenn.) and Jeff
Flake (Ariz.) — plus Democratic nowSen. Doug Jones’s stunning upset in Alabama and the emergence of crackpot Republican candidates (e.g., Joe Arpaio and
Kelli Ward in Arizona) — have put the
Senate majority in play. A tidal wave of
retirements in the House, including nine
chairmen as of Wednesday, increases the
chances of a GOP wipeout.
On Wednesday, Republican Rep. Darrell Issa announced he would not seek
reelection in his Southern California district. With the previous announcement
that Rep. Ed Royce, chairman of the
House Foreign Affairs Committee, is retiring, the California GOP continues to shrivel. Stu Rothenberg quips, “Will the last
Republican congressman in the state
please turn off the party’s lights?”
The Cook Political Report moved
Royce’s seat from lean Republican to lean
Democratic (along with retiring Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen’s seat in Florida’s
27th Congressional District). Issa’s seat
also moves from Cook’s tossup column to
lean Democratic. As things stand, Cook
has three GOP seats in the lean Democratic column, plus 16 in the tossup column —
and not a single Democratic tossup or
Democratic seat in the lean Republican
column. Twenty-one Republicans are in
the lean Republican category.
It is quite possible things will get worse
for Republicans. Retirements beget retirements. (Incumbents ask themselves:
“If Royce can’t win, how am I going to?”)
Donors, sensing the year will be a disaster,
become less willing to open their wallets.
Quality recruits become hard to find. With
more seats at risk, Republicans’ finances
will be stretched thin. Conversely, Democrats will have an abundance of good
candidates and generous donors, all motivated by the very real possibility they can
take majorities in both houses.
All of this comes before special counsel
Robert S. Mueller III finishes his investigation, which may put Republicans in the
uncomfortable spot of deciding either to
move forward on a referral for impeachment, if there is one, or continue to defend
a hobbled president against charges of
lawlessness. Come to think of it, dumping
President Trump might be the only thing
that could save their majorities.
— Jennifer Rubin
here is a reason bipartisan government is so hard these days.
It’s not because “both parties”
are intransigent or because
“both parties” have moved to the “extremes.” It’s because what were once
widely seen as moderate, commonsense solutions are pushed off the table
by a far right that defines compromise
as acquiescence to its agenda.
And since I don’t get to say it often, I
want to thank President Trump for
making this abundantly clear during
the unexpectedly televised part of his
meeting with congressional leaders on
Tuesday. At one point, he stumbled into
a sensible and compassionate approach to the plight of “dreamers”—
immigrants brought here illegally by
their parents when they were children.
They have grown up entirely as Americans.
Temporarily, the “build a wall” president was transformed into a champion
of what he called a “bill of love.”
Trump’s excursion into the politics of
charity was prompted when Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) asked if he
would support a “clean DACA bill.” By
this she meant legislation that would
maintain President Barack Obama’s
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals
program without funding a border wall
or making any other concessions to
immigration hard-liners.
Trump, who had set DACA to expire
this March, was ready to roll. “Yeah, I
would like to do it,” he said. And he
went further, expressing a desire for
“comprehensive immigration reform”
that would legalize the status of the
nation’s 11 million undocumented immigrants.
It fell to House Majority Leader
Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) to remind
Trump of his actual position, or at the
least the position he has espoused most
often, by suggesting politely that “you
need to be clear, though. . . . You have to
have security.”
The newly gracious Trump was pummeled by parts of his right-wing base
for embracing the view of former Florida governor Jeb Bush, whom he had
derided in 2016 for calling on us to love
our immigrant brothers and sisters. At
7:16 p.m. on Tuesday, the president
retreated on Twitter: “As I made very
clear today, our country needs the
security of the Wall on the Southern
Border, which must be part of any
DACA approval.” Of course, if he had
been “very clear,” he wouldn’t have
needed to send that tweet.
Most of Trump’s critics played his
performance as a sign of his ignorance
about the issues before him, and, yes, of
his own policy commitments. It was
also an object example of his habit in
face-to-face meetings of agreeing with
nearly everything everyone says.
There’s a lot to this, but the larger
lesson is more important: Progress in
many areas where the parties could
work together is being blocked because
of the need for Trump and the Republican Party to kowtow to conservative
ultras.
In his unguarded moment, Trump
simply reflected the belief of the vast
majority of Americans that it is ridiculous and cruel to deport the dreamers.
Trump has acknowledged this before. It was ironic that hours after
Trump’s triple axel on the question,
Judge William Alsup halted the president’s original effort to end DACA by
citing Trump’s own words to make the
case against him.
“Does anybody really want to throw
out good, educated and accomplished
young people who have jobs, some
serving in the military?” Trump had
said in September. Well, the other
Trump seemed to want to do just that.
Trump is also stuck with his promise
to build the border wall despite the fact
that a USA Today survey of Congress
last fall found that fewer than 25
percent of Republicans were willing to
endorse the plan. But the wall is all
about his brand.
And the GOP’s nativist wing was
aghast that he might dare consider
regularizing the status of immigrants
here illegally, something that Americans, according to the polls, overwhelmingly accept must happen at
some point.
The cost of extremism is obvious on
other matters as well. The Children’s
Health Insurance Program is a genuinely bipartisan achievement that, at
low cost, gets health care to 9 million
young Americans. But the renewal is
hung up because House Republicans
are demanding that it be paid for by
cutting Obamacare spending on various preventive-care measures. Really?
Since when is prevention a partisan
issue?
There are arguments between the
left and the right worth having. But as
Trump made clear, there are many
problems we could solve if ideological
posturing did not lay such a heavy hand
on our politics. We might even find
ways to love each other, at least a little
bit.
ejdionne@washpost.com
GEORGE F. WILL
An unfair meritocracy
D
uring World War I, chemist
James Conant was deeply involved in research on what was
considered the worst imaginable weapon: poison gas. During World
War II, as a science adviser to President
Franklin Roosevelt, Conant was so central to the development of the atomic
bomb that he was at Alamogordo, N.M.,
on July 16, 1945. His most disruptive
act, however, may have come in the
interim when, as Harvard’s president,
he helped put the university, and the
nation, on the path toward a meritocracy by advocating adoption of the Scholastic Aptitude Test.
As his granddaughter Jennet Conant
explains in her new biography, “Man of
the Hour: James B. Conant, Warrior
Scientist,” the Harvard at which he,
from a middle-class Dorchester, Mass.,
family, matriculated in 1910 was a place
of insufferable snobbery and mediocrity, devoted to passing on the inherited
privileges of the families whose boys
were funneled there from prestigious
prep schools. To the consternation of
Boston’s Brahmins, Conant became
Harvard’s president in 1933 at age 40,
hoping that standardized tests for admissions would mitigate the large degree to which enrollments at elite institutions reflected the transmission of
family advantages. Ninety-two years
after the SAT was first offered in 1926, it
seems to have only slightly modified the
advantages transmitted.
The Brookings Institution’s Richard
V. Reeves, writing in the Chronicle
Review, says that colleges and universities, partly because of the complexity
of the admission process, are “perpetuating class divisions across generations” as America develops what the
Economist calls a “hereditary meritocracy.” It is, however, difficult to see how
something like this can be avoided. Or
why it should be.
Also in the Review, Wilfred M. McClay of the University of Oklahoma
decries higher education’s “dysfunctional devotion to meritocracy,” which
he says is subverting the ideal that one’s
life prospects should not be substantially predictable from facts about one’s
family. Meritocracy, “while highly democratic in its intentions, has turned out
to be colossally undemocratic in its
results” because of “the steep decline of
opportunity for those Americans who
must live outside the magic circle of
meritocratic validation.” Entrance into
that circle often is substantially determined by higher education, especially
at elite institutions. At two premier
public universities, the University of
Michigan and the University of Virginia, the percentages of students from
the bottom 60 percent of households
ranked by earnings (17 and 15 percent,
respectively) are comparable to the percentages at Yale and Princeton universities (16 and 14, respectively).
In “A Theory of Justice,” the 20th
century’s most influential American
treatise on political philosophy, John
Rawls argued that “inequalities of birth
and natural endowment are undeserved.” So, social benefits accruing to
individuals because of such endowments are justified only if the prospering of the fortunate also improves the
lot of the less fortunate. And Rawls’s
capacious conception of what counts as
a “natural” endowment included advantages resulting from nurturing families. But as sociologist Daniel Bell
warned in 1972, “There can never be a
pure meritocracy because high-status
parents will invariably seek to pass on
their positions, either through the use
of influence or simply by the cultural
advantages their children inevitably
possess.”
Actually, the cultural advantages are
so salient that the importance of crass
influence is diminishing. Furthermore,
to the extent that a meritocratic society
measures and rewards intelligence,
which is to some extent a genetic inheritance, equal opportunity becomes difficult even to define.
A meritocratic assignment of opportunity by impersonal processes and
measurements might seem democratic,
but it can feel ruthless and can be
embittering: By using ostensibly objective standards to give individuals momentum toward places high in society’s
inevitable hierarchies, those who do not
flourish are scientifically stigmatized.
And as the acquisition and manipulation of information become increasingly important to social flourishing,
life becomes more regressive: The benefits of information accrue disproportionately to those who are already favored by aptitudes, both natural and
acquired through family nurturing and
education. Add “assortative mating” —
well-educated and upwardly mobile
strivers marrying each other — and
society’s cognitive stratification reinforces itself.
Something, however, has to sort people out, and we actually want the gifted
and accomplished to ascend to positions that give scope to their talents.
Furthermore, we do not want to discourage families from trying to transmit advantages to their children. The
challenge is to ameliorate meritocracy’s
severity by, among other things, nuanced admissions policies at colleges
and universities that seek students
whose meager family advantages can be
supplemented by the schools.
georgewill@washpost.com
A22
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JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
THE DISTRICT
OBITUARIES
A writer examines what
happened to Axis
diplomats during World
War II. B3
More than 400 homeless
families and individuals
have been housed in a
city holiday campaign. B3
Thomas Bopp gained
scientific immortality as
one of the discoverers of
a comet in 1995. B5
Simonds concedes, rejects a recount Rainbow scarf in hand, Roem sworn in
BY P AUL S CHWARTZMAN
AND L AURA V OZZELLA
richmond — Democrat Shelly
Simonds, who lost a random
drawing to settle a deadlocked
state legislative race last week,
conceded defeat Wednesday,
ending a tumultuous election
and cementing Republicans’
narrow control of Virginia’s
House of Delegates.
Simonds tweeted her concession less than an hour before
the House reconvened in the
Md. coach
fired over
nationalist
activities
REPUBLICAN YANCEY
IS SWORN IN
GOP cements control
of House of Delegates
state Capitol for its 60-day session and cleared the way for her
Republican opponent, Del. David Yancey (Newport News), to
take his seat without protests
from Democrats.
Simonds, in a telephone interview from Florida, said she
chose not to seek a second
recount — one to which she was
entitled — because she did not
expect to prevail in a dispute
that captured national attention.
“I’m my usual angry, pissedoff self about the situation,”
Simonds said. “But we assessed
all the options, and they all
landed us in court. And I don’t
think we would win.”
SIMONDS CONTINUED ON B4
BY
A NTONIO O LIVO
richmond — The bill she was
filing was due at 10 a.m., two hours
before Danica Roem would be
sworn in Wednesday as Virginia’s first openly transgender
state lawmaker.
The newcomer from Prince
William County had made a procedural error earlier in the
week, when she tried to assign a
commuter-rail study to the
wrong agency. She did not want
her first official day to begin
Delegate busy on her first
day as Va.’s first openly
transgender lawmaker
with another error.
But as she tried to finalize the
language on legislation that would
shield journalists from being
forced to reveal their sources, a
stream of well-wishers and lobbyists stopped by her office in the
Pocahontas state legislature building, offering congratulations,
hugs and advice.
Roem politely thanked each visitor before finally shutting her office door and leaning in to a laptop
covered with death-metal band
stickers.
“I am not going to blow this
thing,” she said, under her breath.
“You’re going to get it in one way
or another,” said her aide, Maria
Salgado.
Roem hunched her shoulders
ROEM CONTINUED ON B4
O≠ to civil start, but battles brew
Teacher attended rally
in Charlottesville
BY
D ONNA S T. G EORGE
Students at an all-girls Catholic
high school in Maryland discovered another side to one of their
former coaches last week: Gregory Conte, who had also worked as
a substitute teacher, maintained
strong ties to white nationalists
who rallied last summer in Charlottesville.
The Academy of the Holy Cross
in Kensington fired Conte in October. But Conte’s role in the classroom and on the playing field
have come to wider attention in
recent days as students made the
connection on social media, the
school emailed families and a
string of news reports was published.
Kathleen Ryan Prebble, the
school’s president, said in an interview Wednesday that Conte
started coaching at Holy Cross in
2014 and later began working as a
substitute teacher. He used an
alternate name — Gregory Ritter
— in his political activities, and
the school was unaware, she said.
That changed in late October,
TIMOTHY C. WRIGHT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
COACH CONTINUED ON B5
Del. Kathy Tran (D-Fairfax) holds her daughter Elise during the swearing-in ceremony at the Virginia General Assembly. Tran is beginning her first
session in the House. Her daughter had to be scooped up by a doorkeeper as she nearly crawled into a hallway, adding a note of camaraderie.
Attackers’
victim
becomes
their ally
Former Baltimore
councilwoman advocates
for teens who hurt her
BY
K ELYN S OONG
Former Baltimore councilwoman Rochelle “Rikki” Spector
was recovering in the hospital
shortly after being viciously attacked by two teenagers in a
carjacking attempt that left her
bruised and with a black eye — “I
looked like a raccoon,” Spector
said — when the council’s president, Bernard C. “Jack” Young,
paid her a visit.
Young, like many of their colleagues on the council, was livid.
What kind of children would
attack a tiny octogenarian woman in her own parking garage, he
asked himself. Young expected
Spector to be seething with a
desire for justice.
The great-grandmother had
other thoughts on her mind.
“She wasn’t worried about
prosecuting them,” Young said.
“She was more about, ‘What can
we do for them?’ I was taken
aback.”
Since the assault and robbery
took place in December 2016,
Spector has taken an active role
ADVOCATE CONTINUED ON B5
Contentious elections give way to pledges
of trust as Virginia’s General Assembly convenes
BY
G REGORY S . S CHNEIDER, L AURA V OZZELLA
AND F ENIT N IRAPPIL
richmond — The drama of recounts and tiebreakers for control
of Virginia’s House of Delegates
gave way to pledges of trust
Wednesday as Republicans and
Democrats agreed unanimously
on how to organize the closely
divided chamber.
And outgoing Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D), in jubilant remarks delivered as his final state of the commonwealth address Wednesday
night, urged the lawmakers to set
aside partisan differences and get
things done.
Members voted 98 to 0 for Republican M. Kirkland Cox (Colonial Heights) to take over as
speaker, recognizing the 51-to-49
advantage the GOP retains in the
House after a fall wave election
brought Democrats to near-parity.
There were not 100 votes because one Democrat was absent to
tend to a family illness, and Cox
carried on a tradition of not casting a vote for himself.
The House avoided an ugly
showdown over power after the
VIRGINIA CONTINUED ON B2
TIMOTHY C. WRIGHT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Del. Chris Hurst (D), right, chats Wednesday with Alleghany County
Sheriff Kevin Hall in Hurst's new General Assembly office in Richmond.
Opening day of Md. legislative session starts
with ceremony and a call to set politics aside
BY O VETTA W IGGINS
AND J OSH H ICKS
Maryland Senate President
Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. (DCalvert) didn’t mince words
Wednesday about what to expect
during the 2018 legislative session.
With battles brewing over how
to respond to federal action on
health care and taxes, Miller told
his colleagues: “This is going to be
one of the most contentious sessions you’ll have to ever deal with.
. . . This tax plan is going to cause
us a fit. We’re going to have to find
a Maryland solution. . . . I ask for
all of your help; I ask for God’s
help.”
But on the opening day, legislative work took a back seat to traditional ceremonies, with lawmakers’ children and grandchildren by
their sides, spouses in seats along
the chamber walls and elected officials from across the state watching from the audience. The session
formally opened with short
speeches from Miller, House
Speaker Michael E. Busch (DAnne Arundel), Gov. Larry Hogan
MARYLAND CONTINUED ON B2
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
House Speaker Michael E. Busch (D-Anne Arundel), center, is
greeted by Del. C. William Frick (D-Montgomery) on opening day.
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
McAuli≠e calls for unity in final commonwealth address
ting campaign funds to personal
use and cracking down on predatory student loans.
“None of these items are inherently political,” McAuliffe said in
his prepared remarks, before —
much as Cox had earlier in the day
— calling on the lawmakers to put
aside differences and work to
solve such problems.
He paid tribute to the new,
more diverse look of the House of
Delegates. “As I look across this
room, I see many new faces. The
people of Virginia, in their wisdom, have made significant
changes to the composition of this
General Assembly with a simple
message in mind: Work together
to get things done,” he said.
The new legislature, he said, is
an opportunity “to do things differently than they have been done
in the past, and to finally break the
gridlock on issues where we haven’t made as much progress as
we should.”
Befitting a governor who made
economic development the centerpiece of his administration,
McAuliffe rolled out one last business announcement — the
$45 million expansion of a metal
VIRGINIA FROM B1
Democrat who lost a random tiebreaker — Shelly Simonds, who
had been locked in a tie with
Republican incumbent David
Yancey for a district in Newport
News — conceded defeat Wednesday morning and pledged not to
seek a second recount.
Democrats pressed for rules
changes to give them more influence on committees, and then fell
into line behind Cox for the powerful role of speaker. He succeeds
William Howell (R-Stafford), who
retired after 15 years in the position and 30 years in the House.
Cox, 60, a 28-year House veteran, immediately called for a new
era of bipartisanship.
“We are not two parties; we are
one House,” he said. “We cannot
allow the partisanship that has
infected so much of our country to
distract us any longer.”
In that spirit, Cox’s nomination
as speaker was seconded by a
Democrat, Del. Luke Torian
(Prince William). “You might be
surprised by my rising” to speak,
Torian told the House. “I don’t
look at the politics, I look at the
man. . . . I know without a shadow
of a doubt that he will lead this
House well.”
In return, Democrats won some
concessions on the rules under
which the House will operate. Republicans put in writing that they
will continue to observe proportional representation on committees and extended that practice to
subcommittees — meaning the
newly empowered Democrats will
have a greater voice in determining which bills reach the full
chamber.
Before November’s elections,
Republicans enjoyed a 66-to-34
advantage in the House and total
control over the committee process.
In a change that sounds arcane
but was hailed by members as an
improvement in transparency, the
leadership also agreed to record
votes taken in subcommittees.
The change means the majority
party can no longer kill bills
through the anonymity of voice
votes.
“That’s a big win for us,” said
Del. Marcus Simon (D-Fairfax). “I
think we’ve got great rules.”
One concession Democrats
failed to get in writing was a
promise that the Republican lead-
TIMOTHY C. WRIGHT FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Members of the Virginia House of Delegates stand for a prayer Wednesday morning in Richmond before the start of the 2018 session of the
General Assembly. As Democrats neared parity with Republicans following fall elections, leaders called for a new era of bipartisanship.
ership would consult with them in
assigning members to committees. Majority Leader Todd Gilbert
(R-Shenandoah) assured Democrats that they would be heard on
such things.
“It is clear that we are in a much
different posture with respect to
one another than we have been in
the past and that we will continue
to have to work together closely on
many issues going forward,” Gilbert said.
That changed environment
was evident as soon as members
began gathering in the House
chamber for the noon opening of
the 60-day legislative session.
There were 19 new members — 16
of them Democrats and 12 of them
women. Amid hugs, high-fives
and at least one near-escape of a
baby — Democratic Del. Kathy
Tran’s young daughter had to be
scooped up by a doorkeeper as she
nearly crawled out into the hall-
way — the House of Delegates had
a celebratory air.
When Torian rose to second
Cox’s nomination, House Clerk
Paul Nardo at first couldn’t locate
him because he was sitting among
the swollen Democratic ranks in
what was once Republican territory.
Down the Capitol’s marble hallway, there was little drama in the
Senate, whose 40 members were
not up for election in November.
Gov.-elect Ralph Northam (D)
presided over the chamber, as he
will until his term as lieutenant
governor wraps up at the end of
the week. He will yield the gavel to
Lt. Gov.-elect Justin Fairfax (D)
after their inaugurations Saturday.
In the Senate gallery as a visitor,
Fairfax received a standing ovation from the Senate, which Republicans control by a 21-to-19
margin. Among those who took to
their feet was the Republican Fairfax defeated in November, state
Sen. Jill Holtzman Vogel (Fauquier). Northam’s wife, Pam, was also
recognized in the gallery as “first
lady-elect.” Northam jokingly informed her from the rostrum that
she was moving to Richmond
soon and needed to pack her bags.
Senate Majority Leader Thomas K. Norment (R-James City)
razzed Northam, who spent six
years in the Senate before becoming lieutenant governor, over his
choice of tie.
The camaraderie underlined
how close Northam is to many in
the legislature, and the hope that
many expressed for some bipartisan cooperation.
After the House adjourned, Cox
told reporters that he sees potential for bipartisan deals on opioid
addiction, economic development and support for veterans,
but that Republicans wouldn’t
back down from their conservative vision even with a slimmed
majority.
Cox maintained that Medicaid
expansion — the top Democratic
priority — would be too costly but
said he could see possible agreement on other issues surrounding
Medicaid.
“Once again, I think the test
when we’re doing this is that we
work across the aisle. Now, let’s
also say we are in the majority; it is
51-49. We also feel like we have a
mandate,” he said.
Extending health-care coverage has long been the goal of
McAuliffe, who implored lawmakers to expand it in his address to
the legislature.
McAuliffe also called on the
General Assembly to act on other
priorities that he and Northam
share, such as gun safety measures, criminal justice reform,
prohibiting candidates from put-
“Work together to get
things done.”
Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D)
manufacturing plant outside Petersburg. And he claimed credit
for sparking a turnaround in Virginia’s economy, with unemployment low and state revenue collections running well ahead of
predictions.
But the ebullient McAuliffe also
hit a somber note, paying tribute
to the young woman and the two
state troopers who lost their lives
during last summer’s white-supremacist rally in Charlottesville.
He called it the lowest point of his
time as governor.
“That day was full of hatred,
cowardice and unspeakable loss,”
he said. “But as we continue to
mourn their loss, I hope we will
honor their legacy by finding the
good in each other and in our
commonwealth, even in times of
great challenge.”
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
Despite bonhomie in Maryland, fights could still follow
MARYLAND FROM B1
(R) and U.S. Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin (D).
The House of Delegates delayed
action for a day on overriding Hogan’s 2017 veto of a bill that requires businesses to provide paid
sick leave, and the Senate postponed a vote on overturning another bill that prohibits the state’s
colleges and universities from asking about criminal history on applications.
“This is going to be a rockin’,
rollin’ session,” Del. Adrienne A.
Jones (D-Baltimore County) told
members of the House. “Stay
tuned, and get plenty of rest.”
Hogan is pushing hard for lawmakers to let his sick-leave veto
stand and embrace a different
paid leave bill he is offering. He is
also expected to tangle with the
Democratic-controlled legislature
over his proposal to give money
back to Maryland taxpayers adversely affected by the federal tax
changes and over the best way to
“This is going to be a
rockin’, rollin’ session.”
Del. Adrienne A. Jones
provide health insurance to
146,000 low-income children in
jeopardy of losing coverage under
the federal Children’s Health Insurance Program.
On Wednesday, during his minute-long greeting in the House
and Senate chambers, Hogan suggested “pushing the pause button”
on politics during the session,
even though it is an election year.
“We have plenty of time to campaign,” he told members of the
House. “Let’s try to spend the next
90 days talking to each other and
coming up with compromises.”
Democrats are hoping to ride a
wave of opposition to President
Trump in Maryland and oust Hogan, who has strong approval ratings and is vying to become the
state’s first two-term Republican
governor in nearly 60 years.
Early Wednesday on Annapolis
Summit, a podcast hosted by Mark
Steiner on the first day of session,
Miller said that Hogan has been
working to “pick off” some of the
29 votes needed to override his
veto of the sick-leave bill.
Hogan says the bill is too tough
on employers and could violate
workers’ privacy by allowing employers to ask why they need to
take leave.
In addition to the override attempts and tax overhaul, the agenda for lawmakers includes
strengthening the legislature’s
policy against sexual harassment,
stemming crime in Baltimore and
dedicating a permanent revenue
source for Metro.
On the podcast, Hogan said any
revenue that lands in state coffers
as a result of Congress shrinking
the amount of state, local and
property taxes that can be deducted from federal income taxes
should be used to shield taxpayers
who will have to spend more in
state income taxes.
Miller said the legislature plans
to convene a panel of tax experts to
figure out how best to address the
new federal tax law.
In his address to state lawmakers, Cardin, a member of the U.S.
Senate Finance Committee, promised to “make sure our delegation
gives you the support you need to
understand what’s in that tax bill
and what you can do.”
“Your session here has been
made more complicated because
of legislation that has been passed
in Washington,” he said.
Miller said during the podcast
that he plans to create a “powerful” commission that will offer recommendations to the General Assembly on ways to root out what
women have described as pervasive sexual misconduct in Annap-
THE DAILY QUIZ
According to this week’s Local Living
story on the comeback of board
game nights, sales of games and
puzzles grew by how much in 2016?
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Del. Carolyn J.B. Howard (DPrince George’s), above,
applauds during opening day of
the Maryland General
Assembly. Lawmakers were
joined by their families during
ceremonies for the first day of
the 2018 legislative session.
House Speaker Michael E.
Busch, during a speech,
acknowledged his sister
Kathleen “Laurie” Bernhardt,
right, for donating most of her
liver for his operation. Busch
had ended the 2017 session
looking gaunt from a
deteriorating liver that
eventually required a
transplant.
MEMBER EXCLUSIVES
olis. He expects to hold about five
public hearings during the legislative session, in which people will
be encouraged to testify about the
culture at the State House, offer
ways to prevent sexual harassment and suggest improvements
to the process for handling complaints.
“We’re going to pick the very
best and the very brightest women
around the state that we can bring
together to investigate the situation and make recommendations
to us,” Miller said. “This is something that is extremely serious,
and the public needs to know that
we take this very seriously.”
The commission would offer
recommendations that would be
considered by the General Assembly’s legislative policy committee,
which is co-chaired by Miller and
Busch.
“It needs to be addressed. It’s a
respect issue,” said Sen. Joan Carter Conway (D-Baltimore City) of
the decision to create a commission.
Busch said Maryland’s legislature should ultimately be “the
most comfortable workplace and
safest workplace in the country.”
Both Miller and Busch were
unanimously reelected Wednesday to their leadership posts,
which they have held for 31 and 15
years, respectively. Miller is the
longest-serving state Senate president in the country.
Busch, who ended the 2017 session looking gaunt from a deteriorating liver that required a transplant, thanked lawmakers for
their support during the ordeal
and acknowledged his sister Kathleen “Laurie” Bernhardt, who was
in attendance, for donating most
of her liver for the operation.
“She reminds me that I owe her
big time all the time, and I do,” he
quipped. “I stand here before you
today, in some respects, as a miracle of modern medicine.”
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
josh.hicks@washpost.com
DID YOU KNOW?
Stay Tuned: Free Tickets to Howie Day on January 21
at The Hamilton Live
Rock On: Free Tickets to Destroyer on January 28
at Black Cat
Day’s emotionally resonant lyrics and inventive melodies have earned him critical praise
and a legion of fans. The Bangor, Maine native began playing piano at age five and guitar
at age 12. After graduating from high school, Day became a fixture at college coffeehouses
across the U.S. He began experimenting with effects pedals and loop-sampling techniques,
layering live percussion with vocal harmonies and guitar parts to become a veritable oneman band. See details at washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Events & Contests.
Dan Bejar started Destroyer as a solo home-recording project in the early- to midnineties. Exploring and overturning genres such as glam, MIDI and yacht rock Bejar
was proclaimed “Rock’s Exiled King” by New York City-based music magazine, The
Fader. His work flouts convention in favor of musical leaps of faith, statements of
purpose cloaked in subterfuge and the joyous refrain of an optimist’s heart cloaked in
cynicism. See details at washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Events & Contests.
Not a PostPoints member yet?
It’s free. Sign up and get rewarded.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
Axis diplomats had a
short-lived life of luxury
It’s one of the most
striking images of
Washington from
just after the
surprise attack on
Pearl Harbor:
John
Smoke rising from
Kelly's
the garden of the
Washington Japanese Embassy
on Massachusetts
Avenue NW as
diplomats burned box after box of
secret documents.
But have you ever wondered
what happened next?
Harvey Solomon did — and
the Takoma Park, Md., writer is
hoping there are still some people
around who recall one of the
oddest episodes of the World War
II home front: more than 1,000
employees from Axis embassies
— diplomats, their families, staff
and servants — were sent from
Washington to live in luxury
hotels.
“The FBI and the State
Department wanted them out of
the embassies,” Solomon said.
“They might still be
communicating via radio, and
they had diplomatic pouches. All
that had to end.”
The solution was to move them
to the countryside. The first ones
to go were the Germans, headed
L O C A L D IG ES T
THE DISTRICT
Man is accused of
stealing police cruiser
A 38-year-old man was arrested
and charged Wednesday after he
allegedly stole a D.C. police cruiser
in Southeast Washington.
Kenneth F. Davis of Northwest
was charged with unauthorized
use of a vehicle, reckless driving
and other charges.
D.C. police said the cruiser was
taken just before 1 a.m. in the 600
block of Pennsylvania Avenue SE,
outside a convenience store.
A police report said officers
parked their cruiser and went
inside the store. They saw Davis
get into the cruiser and drive off,
the report said. The driver ran
several stoplights along
Pennsylvania Avenue and
eventually crashed into another
cruiser.
The driver tried to flee but was
taken into custody, police said.
— Dana Hedgpeth
VIRGINIA
Girl is assaulted
while walking home
Authorities in Loudoun County
said a middle-school girl was
assaulted while walking home
from school in the Sterling, Va.,
area, and they are asking for help
identifying a man believed to be
involved.
It happened about 4 p.m. on
Jan. 3 as the girl walked on a path
near Wrightwood Place and saw a
man who appeared to be jogging.
Officials with the Loudoun
County Sheriff’s Office said the
man grabbed the girl and then
touched her inappropriately. She
screamed, and the man fled.
Officials said the man is 25 to
30 years old and is about 5 feet 5
inches tall.
— Dana Hedgpeth
MARYLAND
Woman seen hustled
out of hospital in cold
A Baltimore hospital said it was
investigating Wednesday after
video posted online showed an
apparently incapacitated woman
put out in the cold wearing
nothing but a hospital gown.
On Wednesday, a man who said
he was a psychotherapist and a
student at the University of
Maryland Medical Center
Midtown Campus posted a video
of the woman being hustled out of
the hospital by staff and left at a
bus stop, her possessions strewn
on the street.
The woman appeared to have a
wound on her forehead, and was
wearing a hospital gown that was
falling off. She grunted and
shouted, and appeared to say:
“Please help me!”
The man who posted the video
said it was 30 degrees outside and
challenged hospital staff. “So y’all
are just going to leave this lady out
here with no clothes on?” he said
in the video. “That is not okay.”
A spokeswoman for the
hospital verified its authenticity
and said it was filmed Tuesday.
“We share the shock and
disappointment of many who
have viewed the video,” Lisa
Clough, a spokeswoman for the
hospital, said in a statement.
“This unfortunate event is not
representative of our patientcentered mission.”
— Justin Wm. Moyer
by acting Ambassador Hans
Thomsen and his glamorous
wife, Bebe. On Dec. 19, 1941, they
were taken by special train from
Union Station to White Sulphur
Springs, W.Va. They would be
cooling their heels at the
Greenbrier resort.
At the end of the month, the
Japanese, including ambassador
Kichisaburo Nomura and
special envoy Saburo Kurusu,
were sent to the Homestead in
Hot Springs, Va. In mid-January,
the Italians moved into the
Greenbrier. There were also a
smattering of Bulgarians,
Hungarians and Romanians.
“In those years, there was no
real winter season,” Solomon
said. “Those resorts were
summer resorts. In winter, they
were very quiet.”
And conveniently far from
civilization. Fences were strung.
Guard shacks were built.
Spotlights were installed.
They were, as Solomon has
titled the book he’s publishing
next year, “Such Splendid
Prisons.”
“They got incredible food and
had fantastic digs,” he said.
“These were posh places.”
Even so, there were
complaints, especially by the
PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
At left, the Italian ambassador, Don Ascanio dei Principi Colonna, didn’t like being cooped up with the
Germans. At right, in 1939, before the United States entered the war, Hans Thomsen, right, acting
counselor of the German Embassy, and his wife leave the embassy for a reception at the White House.
Italians, who kvetched about not
being able to take walks. The
Italian ambassador, an Old World
throwback named Prince
Ascanio Colonna, complained
about the other guests: the
Germans. He didn’t like being
cooped up with them.
Eventually, the Italians would
be moved to the Grove Park Inn
in scenic Asheville, N.C., and the
Japanese moved in.
They didn’t like the Germans,
either. Perhaps it was all that Nazi
enthusiasm. In April 1942,
Germans donned their finery,
pinned swastika buttons to their
lapels and celebrated Hitler’s
birthday.
Said a Greenbrier waiter: “The
party was a hell of a hail of
‘heils.’ ”
Some Americans groused that
the enemy was residing in gilded
luxury, but the United States had
its reasons for the arrangement.
“The key word that comes up
over and over again in the
archives is ‘reciprocity,’ ”
Solomon said. “We wanted our
diplomats in Berlin and Rome
and Tokyo treated as well as we
were going to treat their
diplomats.”
The Axis diplomats were called
“detainees,” not “internees.” And
they continued to receive their
salaries. The Swiss ambassador
was the liaison for the German
detainees. On his first visit, he
brought $35,000 in cash to
distribute.
“People had money to burn,”
Solomon said. “They bought lots
and lots of things in the hotel
stores.”
Solomon said a half-dozen
babies were born to the confined
enemy diplomats. There were a
handful of weddings, too. After
about six months, most of the
diplomats had been sent back to
their home countries in exchange
for U.S. personnel. The war would
rage for another three years.
A World War II buff, Solomon
become aware of the odd episode
while researching a screenplay
about the Office of Strategic
Services, precursor to the CIA. A
single line in a biography of OSS
founder Wild Bill Donovan
mentioned the detainees.
Solomon is looking for anyone
who may have worked at the
resorts or the embassies during
that time. If that’s you, you can
email him at
WWIIbook.ssp@outlook.com.
Although living at a luxury
resort while the world burns
around you sounds like paradise,
things didn’t always go the
detainees’ way. Solomon found
one letter from the Spanish
Embassy, which oversaw
Japanese affairs during the war.
The Japanese detainees had a
request for something they’d left
at their embassy and hoped could
be sent to them.
Said Solomon: “What were
they asking for? Five cases of
Johnny Walker Black Label and
five cases of Old Parr, another
scotch.”
Penciled onto the memo by a
State Department staffer were
two words: “Not feasible.”
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/john-kelly.
THE DISTRICT
Hundreds placed in housing as part of Bowser-launched e≠ort
BY
R ACHEL C HASON
More than 400 families and
individuals who are without
homes or teetering on homelessness have been placed in housing
since November as part of a focused effort by the administration
of Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D).
Bowser launched the “Home
for the Holidays” campaign as
part of her goal to make homelessness in the District — where soaring home prices have led to an
affordable housing crisis — “rare,
brief and nonrecurring.”
The District, which subsidizes
the cost of housing for 1,300 families through its “rapid rehousing”
program, used the campaign in
part to recruit 10 new landlords
who agree to accept city subsidies
and rent to people exiting homelessness.
“We said to them that the District has stepped up to support
families, and now we need you to
step up to make quality, safe units
available,” Bowser said at a news
conference where four D.C. residents signed their new leases. “We
said we wanted 400 families to be
housed during the holidays, and
what [the Department of Human
Services] has been able to do is to
exceed that goal.”
Through the campaign, the
District identified 60 new units of
subsidized housing, said Laura
Zeilinger, the District’s human
services director.
Two-thirds of the families and
individuals placed in housing
through the campaign were enrolled in the city’s rapid rehousing
program, which has come under
fire from advocates, while the remaining third are receiving
vouchers for permanent housing,
said Larry Handerhan, Zeilinger’s
chief of staff.
There were 315 families and 107
individuals who received housing
during the campaign, compared
with 220 families during the same
period last year, Handerhan said.
A comparable figure on individuals was not available.
As of Tuesday night, there were
725 families in shelter in the District, including in D.C. General
and motel rooms paid for by the
city, Handerhan said. Those families are waiting for housing subsidized by the city.
To encourage landlords to participate in the “rapid rehousing”
program, the administration cre-
ated a fund that covers costs associated with property damage and
unpaid rent. In exchange, the city
asks landlords to relax some
screening criteria, including poor
credit and past evictions. The District also strengthened its case
management system to “provide
better oversight” for those in its
rapid rehousing program follow-
“We need you to step up
to make quality, safe
units available.”
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser,
on what the city told landlords
ing complaints from landlords,
Handerhan said.
Anything the city can do to
recruit new, good landlords will
benefit those seeking affordable
housing, said Kate Coventry, a
senior policy analyst at the D.C.
Fiscal Policy Institute.
“I’ve met people who have
housing vouchers but cannot find
a unit,” Conventry said. “No matter what kind of assistance we give
people, we need more landlords.”
But advocates have also raised
questions about the efficacy of the
District’s rapid rehousing program, which cost taxpayers $24
million in fiscal 2018.
A report last year from the
Washington Legal Clinic for the
Homeless found that in the quickly gentrifying District, a large
number of families in the rapid
rehousing program end up in
apartments that are too expensive
for them to keep after subsidies
from the city — which typically
range from 40 to 60 percent — run
out.
Max Tipping, who wrote the
report, said he was happy that
families were receiving places of
their own through Bowser’s campaign but added that it is important to keep in mind what happens when the families’ leases
expire.
“What are we going to do to
make sure that families don’t cycle back into homelessness and
get retraumatized in the shelter?”
he asked.
Zeilinger said that although resources limit the number of longterm vouchers available, the yearlong subsidies offered through
the rapid rehousing program
mean “people can do things they
never thought possible because
they have the stability of housing
underneath them.”
Antonio Wells, 30, who signed a
12-month lease for an apartment
in Meadowbrook Run in Southeast on Wednesday, said he was
grateful for the city’s help and
hopeful about making enough
money to cover the $1,010 per
month rent when the subsidy
ends. Wells, who works part time
as a cook, said his lease stipulates
he will start by paying $194 per
month, which will vary based on
changes to his income.
Wells, a native Washingtonian,
said he was living with his mother
and 4-year-old daughter when his
mother’s landlord threatened to
evict him because he was not on
the lease. In September, he went
to the Virginia Williams Family
Resource Center, where staff
helped him into his new apartment, which he described
Wednesday as “fresh, new and
empty.” He said he planned to
surprise his daughter with their
new home when she got home
from school.
rachel.chason@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Poll: Baker holds lead in Democratic gubernatorial primary race
BY
J OSH H ICKS
A Maryland poll shows Prince
George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker III with a sizable lead
over other candidates in the
state’s crowded Democratic gubernatorial primary contest, but a
large proportion of voters remain
undecided.
The survey from Gonzales Research & Media Services, released
Wednesday and first reported by
the Baltimore Sun, showed that
24 percent of likely Democratic
voters support Baker, placing him
10 points above both of his nearest
competitors, Baltimore County
Executive Kevin Kamenetz and
former NAACP president Ben
Jealous.
One-third of the respondents,
33 percent, said they are undecided, indicating that voter preferences have not jelled.
Seven Democrats are competing for the nomination to chal-
lenge Gov. Larry Hogan, who is
vying to become the first Republican governor reelected in the state
in 60 years. The filing deadline is
Feb. 27, and the primary election
will be held June 26.
Hogan has high approval ratings
and a formidable war chest. Democrats are hoping to ride a wave of
opposition to President Trump and
the GOP-controlled Congress to
oust him in November.
The Gonzales poll found the
rest of the Democratic field in the
single digits. State Sen. Richard S.
Madaleno Jr. (Montgomery) had
support from about 5 percent of
respondents, followed by 2 percent for Krishanti Vignarajah,
who was a policy adviser for first
lady Michelle Obama, and 1 percent apiece for technology entrepreneur Alec Ross and lawyer Jim
Shea.
Baker’s lead is driven largely by
the Washington suburbs, where
44 percent of Democrats support
him, compared with about 10 percent in other parts of the state. The
region includes his home turf in
deep-blue Prince George’s, along
with Montgomery County, a Democratic stronghold that is the
state’s most populous jurisdiction, and Charles, Calvert and St.
Mary’s counties.
Kamenetz led the field in the
suburbs around Baltimore City,
with support from 29 percent of
Democrats in Anne Arundel,
Baltimore, Harford and Howard
counties.
Patrick Gonzales of Gonzales
research said the candidates face a
challenge in trying to distinguish
themselves during the primary
contest, in part because their policy differences are negligible. He
added that picking up support
from advocacy groups and community organizers will be critical.
In primaries, he said, “the
grass-roots component plays a
much more determinative role
than in general elections.”
Respondents said their top political priority this year is “remov-
VIRGINIA
DISTRICT
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josh.hicks@washpost.com
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report
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Gonzales Research conducted
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
The rainbow scarf
was still with her
ROEM FROM B1
and kept typing.
Many LGBT groups and progressives — who helped fund
Roem’s campaign against a longtime incumbent who once described himself as Virginia’s “chief
homophobe” — see Roem’s presence in the General Assembly
as an affirmation of the arrival of
transgender people into the country’s mainstream.
Her victory over former Del.
Robert G. Marshall (R) in Prince
William County’s 13th District was
part of a wave of Democratic wins
in November that nearly leveled
the balance of power in Richmond. But for Roem, and for advocates, it was about more than
which party has control.
“Her swearing-in is a milestone
for the community,” said Sarah
McBride, press secretary for the
Washington-based Human Rights
Campaign, who at the Democratic
National Convention in 2016 became the first trans American to
address a major party convention.
“It’s a tangible reflection of the
progress we have been making.”
Five other transgender candidates across the country also won
local races in November, triggering what advocates describe as a
flood of new LGBT candidates
seeking office this year.
“In Texas alone, there is something like 41 LGBT candidates
running at all different levels,”
said Annise Parker, a former Houston mayor who is president of the
Victory Fund, an organization
that helps elect LGBT candidates.
“People are inspired, and they
want to go out there and be part of
the change that is happening in
America.”
Roem is believed to be the first
VIRGINIA
Federal court
won’t block
swearing-in
BY
RACHEL WEINER
A federal appeals court declined to stop a Virginia Republican from being sworn into the
House of Delegates Wednesday
over a mistake that threw an extremely close election into question.
The decision came just two
hours before the convening of the
legislature, where Republicans
hold a narrow majority in both
chambers after November’s elections.
Republican Robert Thomas
beat Democrat Joshua Cole in the
Fredericksburg-area 28th District
by 73 votes. But errors in voting
data meant hundreds of people
were assigned to the wrong legislative district. Four Democratic
state lawmaker in the country to
be sworn in after campaigning as
an openly transgender candidate.
She enters Richmond as a standard-bearer for that community,
her 64,000 Twitter followers lending muscle to her legislative agenda, which is mostly about good
governance and fixing local infrastructure.
She is chief sponsor of 10 bills so
far, including a resolution that addresses her signature pledge to
alleviate traffic congestion on a
key thoroughfare. The legislation
calls on the state Department of
Transportation to study alternative intersection designs along
Route 28, a precursor to getting rid
of traffic signals on the highway.
Another bill seeks to extend a ban
against lobbying by former state
employees from one year to three.
Roem’s ability to get bills passed
will depend on how well she navigates Richmond’s deceptively polite political landscape. One of her
first attempts at coalition building
came when she asked state Sen. J.
Chapman “Chap” Petersen (DFairfax) if she could champion
House versions of bills he introduced seeking to further regulate Dominion Energy, the state’s
biggest corporate political donor.
“I give her credit,” Petersen said.
“She has approached people like
myself with a little bit more seniority and is using our experience to
be a more effective delegate.”
On Wednesday, Roem was
unsure how to fit into the sometimes buttoned-down culture of
the General Assembly, or even
where to find the House chambers.
For her swearing-in,she had
planned to sport the same rainbow headscarf she wore constantly while campaigning. She said it
voters sued for Thomas to be
blocked from taking office while a
special election is held.
A federal judge in the Eastern
District of Virginia concluded that
the mistakes made in voter data
and by poll workers on Election
Day, while unfortunate, did not
appear so widespread that Thomas should be blocked from taking
his seat. The Democratic voters
appealed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit.
A three-judge panel of the appeals court agreed unanimously,
without explaining their decision.
Thomas took his oath of office
in the House of Delegates, along
with his colleagues.
“Today I was honored to take a
seat in the oldest legislative body
in the new world,” Thomas said. “I
took the oath of office with equal
measures of awe and humility. I
cannot thank the people of House
District 28 enough for placing
their trust in me to represent
them. The path to Richmond was
full of challenges, but I am happy
to finally get to work.”
Cole’s campaign manager, Eric
Sundberg, said Wednesday that
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PHOTOS BY JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Del. Danica Roem (D-Prince William), casts one of her first votes Wednesday in the House of Delegates
at the Virginia State Capitol. She said she is determined to “make government boring again” by reading
every bill that comes across her desk, but first, she was heartily greeted by many lawmakers.
would be a declaration of what
many Democrats are calling “a
new day” in the General Assembly,
where Republicans now hold a
slim 51-49 majority. But, acknowledging the decorum inside the
state capitol designed by Thomas
Jefferson, she decided against
that fashion choice.
“My presence here is exclamation enough,” Roem said.
On Tuesday night, Roem was
full of nervous energy. One minute, she spoke passionately with
an entrepreneur camped outside a
party caucus meeting about the
Cole plans to run again for the seat
in 2019.
“We’re disappointed, of course,
with the decision not to hear the
appeal,” Sundberg said. “But . . .
we don’t think the issue should be
left to sit, even if it’s not addressed
right now.”
Sundberg said he hoped Thomas will “pursue the issue and do
what’s right for the people of the
28th District.”
Katie Baker, a spokeswoman for
the House Democratic Caucus,
called the election “irreparably
tainted.”
At least 86 voters, including
some in a heavily Democratic precinct, were mistakenly issued ballots to vote in the neighboring
House District 88, where the Republican won by a wide margin.
And 61 voters in the 88th District,
which tilts Republican, were mistakenly given ballots to vote in the
28th.
The Virginia NAACP weighed
in Tuesday, saying in a court filing
that letting the election results
stand “will deny African American
voters an opportunity to elect
their candidate of choice.”
Fredericksburg is nearly a quarter black, and two heavily Democratic precincts in the city were
affected by the mistake.
Cole and Democratic activists
held rallies during the week between Christmas and New Year’s,
framing the issue as a civil rights
cause.
State officials, the state NAACP
contended, “acted willfully to diminish the voices of District 28’s
African American voters.”
Michael Matheson of the firm
ThompsonMcMullan, representing local election officials, responded in his own filing that
there was not “even a scintilla of
evidence” of any willful attempt to
disenfranchise voters, “much less
one that is racially motivated.”
Local election officials from the
Fredericksburg area and the Republican Party of Virginia said the
mistakes were garden variety and
scattershot rather than systemic.
They said the errors affected too
small a percentage of voters to
warrant a new election.
One of the plaintiffs, D.D. Lecky,
said in court filings that when she
tried to vote for Cole on Election
Day and pointed to a map in her
Fredericksburg polling place that
showed she lived in the 28th District, officials then took the map
down. But she told reporters last
week that she thought that decision was made out of genuine belief that the map was wrong, not
maliciousness.
Republicans now hold a 51-to49 seat majority in the House of
Delegates. Democrat Shelly Simonds announced Wednesday that
she would not seek a recount in a
tied race that was decided last
week when state officials drew a
name from a bowl, clearing the
way for Republican David Yancey
to take his seat.
VIRGINIA
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
Fenit Nirappil contributed to this
report.
need to upgrade the aging water
system in the city of Manassas
Park. Another, she exulted over
how there had been no anti-LGBT
bills filed yet in the legislature, and
practiced yoga poses in a crowded
hotel lobby, hoping to generate more good vibes.
“This is how you do the crow
position,” Roem said to state Sen.
Jennifer Wexton (D-Loudoun),
bending forward to place her
hands on the carpet and raise
her rear end in the air.
“Don’t show us,” Wexton said
nervously. “We get the idea.”
Roem’s
predecessor
spent 26 years in the House of
Delegates and was a well-liked,
avuncular figure, despite extreme
views on fiscal and social issues
that put him to the right of many
Republican lawmakers.
During a bitter general election
campaign, Marshall attacked
Roem’s gender identity and refused to refer to her as a woman or
with female pronouns. Roem, for
. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
her part, criticized Marshall for
being too focused on pursuing a
conservative, anti-gay agenda.
She said Marshall has not called
to offer any congratulations or advice, even in areas where they
agree, such as their mutual concern over rampant development
in Prince William.
“It’s not my responsibility now,”
Marshall said when reached by
phone on Wednesday. “People who
are there have to best figure out
what to do.”
He said he was spending his day
at home in Manassas, going
through old files and deciding
what to keep.
Roem said that, despite her celebrity, she is determined to “make
government boring again” by
reading every bill that comes
across her desk before she votes.
She said she would limit her socializing in Richmond, though
that has proved a challenge so far.
Wherever she went, Democratic colleagues stopped Roem for a
hug or to gather for a selfie while
news cameras hovered. Republicans, meanwhile, mostly kept
their distance.
“Enjoy these moments,” Del.
John Bell (D-Loudoun) told Roem
about her first day. “They’re special. Every time I’m in the chamber, I look at this ornate space and
go: ‘I’m actually in this place. Oh,
my God.’ ”
she finally set foot inside the
House chamber for the swearingin ceremony, Roem glanced up
toward a balcony where her mother and other family members sat.
She smiled as she held up a lanyard bearing her delegate’s credentials so they could see.
When it was time to recite the
oath to uphold the U.S. and Virginia constitutions, Roem raised
her right hand and spoke in clear,
measured tones.
In her left hand, she later said,
she tightly gripped her rainbow
headscarf.
antonio.olivo@washpost.com
Patricia Sullivan contributed to this
report.
Northam nominates majority-female
Cabinet, apparently a first for state
BY
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
Virginia Gov.-elect Ralph
Northam (D) announced the
last of 15 Cabinet picks earlier
this week, assembling what his
office says would be the first
majority-female Cabinet in
state history.
On Tuesday, Northam tapped
Esther Lee, a Fairfax economic
development official and an official in President Barack
Obama’s administration, to
serve as secretary of commerce.
Pending approval by the legislature, Lee would be the
eighth woman to serve in one of
15 Cabinet-level positions.
“Our commonwealth’s diversity is our strength, which is
why I made a commitment to
building a Cabinet that reflects
it,” Northam said in a statement.
“I’m honored to have this
formidable group of experi-
enced, accomplished female
leaders joining me in working
to build a Virginia that works
for everyone, no matter who you
are, no matter where you live.”
In November, Northam defeated Republican Ed Gillespie,
who also vowed that his Cabinet
would reflect Virginia’s diversity. The Democrat, who is a
pediatric neurologist, carried
female voters by 22 points.
Departing Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) has six women serving
in his Cabinet.
Virginia also elected a record
number of women to the state
legislature in November: Twenty-eight were seated Wednesday, up from 17. Still, only one
woman has ever been elected to
statewide office in Virginia: former attorney general Mary Sue
Terry (D).
Ensuring female representation at high levels of government has long been a goal for
advocates.
In a 2008 report, the Center
for Women in Government and
Civil Society at the University of
Albany found that women made
up 42 percent of the top advisers in governors’ offices in 2007.
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau assembled a cabinet that was half female when
he took office three years ago.
Asked about the importance
of gender, he simply said, “because it’s 2015.”
In the 2016 presidential race,
Democrat
Hillary
Clinton
vowed that her Cabinet would
be half female.
President Trump has five
women serving in 23 Cabinetlevel positions; the most ever
was nine out of 22 in President
Bill Clinton’s second term, according to the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University.
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
Simonds already planning next run
SIMONDS FROM B1
Simonds, 50, said she called
Yancey to concede Wednesday
morning and asked him to support Medicaid expansion. “He
said, ‘We can talk about it
later,’ ” she recalled.
In the interview, Simonds
repeated her promise to challenge Yancey in 2019, a campaign that would be her third
attempt to defeat him. She said
she hoped to send out her first
fundraising email Wednesday.
“Next time, I’m not going to
lose,” she said.
Yancey expressed understanding that his district includes many Simonds supporters who believe the election’s
outcome was tainted. But he
also said, “The campaign is over,
and it’s time to govern.”
“I hear their voice and I will
do the very best I can to represent everybody in Newport
News,” he said.
Asked about Simonds’s request that he support Medicaid
expansion, Yancey declined to
comment. Nor would he commit
to seeking reelection and facing
Simonds in a rematch. “Right
now, my focus is on doing the
job that I was elected to do.”
With Yancey taking his seat in
the House, Republicans have a
51-to-49 majority in the House.
After the chamber assembled at
noon, newly elected House
Speaker M. Kirkland Cox (R-Colonial Heights) called for an end
to the partisan discord that
defined the period since an
election in which Republicans
lost 15 seats.
The Yancey-Simonds contest
was one of two contested Republican victories that allowed
the GOP to retain control of the
House. The GOP has led the
House for 18 years, dominating
by a 63-to-34 majority before
the elections.
A handful of voters filed a
lawsuit over the other disputed
election, in which 147 voters in
the Fredericksburg area received ballots with the wrong
candidates listed. The campaign’s winner, Republican Bob
Thomas, defeated his opponent
by 73 votes. A short time before
Simonds conceded, a federal
appeals court rejected the voters’ request to invalidate the
race, allowing Thomas to be
sworn in.
Democrats needed to reverse
both the Yancey and Thomas
victories to seize control of the
chamber, but they could have
forced Republicans into a power-sharing deal by picking up
just one of those seats.
On Election Day, Yancey appeared to win the race by 10
votes, but a recount put Simonds ahead by a one vote. The
next day, a three-judge recount
court ruled that a single ballot
that had been discarded during
the recount should be tallied for
Yancey. The race was tied with
each having 11,608 votes.
A state election officials
broke the tie last Thursday by
picking Yancey’s name out of a
stoneware bowl, a random
drawing required under Virginia law. Since then, the state’s
political class waited for Simonds to decide whether to seek a
second recount, a question she
resolved at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday when she tweeted: “It is
with great disappointment that
I am conceding the election to
David Yancey.”
Simonds wrote the tweet at
the airport in Orlando, where
she was about to fly home with
her two daughters after accompanying her husband, Paul, a
NASA engineer, to a work conference. “My daughters were
looking over my shoulder,” she
said. “We were very sad.”
Simonds said she plans to
immediately immerse herself in
the details of her next campaign, promising to focus on
education changes, among other issues. “I have a lot of work to
do,” she said.
Simonds said her weekend in
Orlando was a chance for some
needed relaxation and included
a trip to Universal Studios,
where she experienced a more
entertaining kind of drama than
the one overwhelming her in
recent weeks.
“I traded in a political roller
coaster for a real roller coaster,”
she said. “It felt great.”
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
paul.schwartzman@washpost.com
Fenit Nirappil contributed to this
report.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Woman is a ‘beacon of hope’ for teens
ADVOCATE FROM B1
in the lives of the two teenagers
who attacked her, becoming a
mentor to them in partnership
with nonprofits in Baltimore.
The 81-year-old Spector, who finished her last term days after the
incident, has decided to dedicate
her post-council career to improving the juvenile justice system so that effective programs
are in place for at-risk youths as
early as possible.
Both teenagers, now 16 and 14,
spent time in juvenile detention
and were put under house arrest
after the attack. The younger boy
also spent two months in a
juvenile rehabilitation facility in
Montgomery County.
The Washington Post generally does not identify juveniles
charged with crimes.
“These are our kids,” said
Spector, who represented District 5 on the City Council from
June 1977 until December 2016.
“They’re our people. They live
where we live. They walk where
we walk. We share our space. We
have to learn to respect and not
harm each other.”
Within a week after the boys
were arrested, Spector attended
a court hearing where she met
Michelle Suazo, vice president
and co-founder of UEmpower of
Maryland, a multi-program nonprofit founded in 2013 that provides food and mentoring to
low-income families in Baltimore. Among those whom UEmpower served were the teens who
had attacked Spector.
Suazo approached Spector
and offered her apologies for
what the boys had done. Then
she proposed a plan. Suazo wanted Spector to visit the Carrollton
Ridge neighborhood of Southwest Baltimore where the boys
grew up.
The median household income for Southwest Baltimore
was $24,946 in 2014, and
35.4 percent lived below the
poverty line, according to the
U.S. Census Bureau.
The Baltimore school board
voted in December 2016 to shut
down Samuel F.B. Morse Elementary School, effective last
summer. It was a space that had
MICHELLE SUAZO
After being attacked by two teens, former Baltimore councilwoman
Rochelle “Rikki” Spector wanted to help them. “I see how these
boys are growing,” she said after working with them.
“I don’t hang around
the people I was doing
that dumb stuff with.
. . . So my life,
it just turned around.”
The older boy who attacked Spector,
speaking to the Baltimore Sun
provided a respite from the dangers of the streets for kids growing up in Carrollton Ridge, Suazo
said.
“If you go into this neighborhood, you can see the buildings
are crumbling. There are no
resources for children,” Suazo
said. “They have no voice. They
were left to be forgotten when
the [attack on Spector] happened. . . . We were so horrified
by the situation, but we wanted
to see if there was a way to work
together to come up with a
solution.”
Spector agreed and described
being mortified by the dire situation she witnessed.
“I saw completely open drug
dealing all over the place,” Spector said, adding that she also saw
very young teen prostitutes hailing men in the street.
Spector started to meet with
the boys at UEmpower events
and recently became a board
member of the nonprofit. She
helped the team secure kitchen
and cafeteria space at the former
neighborhood elementary school
for UEmpower’s flagship food
project.
Parents of the boys did not
respond to interview requests
from The Post, but Spector said
she already sees changes in their
behavior.
The older boy told the Baltimore Sun last week that his
performance in school has improved as a result of the mentoring.
“After this incident happened,
and they put me on house arrest,
I just started busting my school
work out,” he said. “My grades
started going up and up and up. I
don’t hang around the people I
was doing that dumb stuff with. I
B5
RE
hang around with whole new
people who don’t even live on
this side of town. So my life, it
just turned around.”
At one cooking demo, the
teens learned to cook from a
professional chef and made an
extra meal just for their new
mentor. Spector ate the food and
gave the boys a hug.
“I see how these boys are
growing, how they’re treating
each other,” she said. “It’s transformational. And the adults that
are coming forth and mentoring,
they’re walking angels. I’m in
awe of them.”
Melvin Willingham, who leads
the Makings of a Man Male Youth
Initiative mentorship program
in conjunction with UEmpower,
first met both teens around the
time of the incident.
In the time since, and with
Spector’s help, the younger boy
has learned to be more trusting
of adults who want to help him,
Willingham said, and the older
one has been more patient and
aware of his standing as a leader
and role model among his peers.
“Rikki is a beacon of hope for
them,” Willingham added. “Her
showing compassion, her showing the desire to come down to
work with them to make sure
they’re okay, to help improve
their lives and empower their
lives, that is huge for them. It
gives them an opportunity to be
more than what society has labeled them to be — which is
at-risk youths that have a slim
chance to be a [productive]
member of society.”
Spector and the older boy
were honored at a recent gala at
the Bnai Jacob Shaarei Zion
synagogue in Baltimore. Among
those attending were elected officials, judges and police officers
from all over the city. The teenager was shaking with nerves as
he walked up to the stand and
had to lean on the 5-foot-2 Spector to avoid collapsing.
He was concerned that the
crowd would resent him for his
actions from a year earlier.
“I’m so proud of you,” Spector
said to him as they embraced
each other. They both walked off
the stage to a standing ovation.
kelyn.soong@washpost.com
Students ‘horrified’ by
coach’s alt-right ties
COACH FROM B1
when the school received anonymous emails. Prebble said she
spoke with Conte, who confirmed
his alt-right activities — which,
because they conflict with the
school’s mission as a Christ-centered community that values diversity, led to Conte’s dismissal.
“He never showed that side to
us,” said Prebble, who dismissed
him immediately but did not send
a letter then because she considered it an employment issue.
On Friday, Prebble met with
students to discuss the issue, describing their reaction as “quite
horrified.” More than 40 percent
identify as students of color.
She said she emphasized to
students that “this was not about
conservative versus liberal values. This was about extremism
and this was about hate — that’s
what the alt-right is about. And
that this obviously was in direct
opposition to our school.”
Conte, 29, said in an interview
Wednesday he enjoyed working
at the college-preparatory school
of 470 students — where he had
served as junior varsity field
hockey coach and assistant track
coach — but was not surprised by
his dismissal. “I knew it was only
a matter of time,” he said.
In the last year, he said he has
expanded his work with white
nationalist leader Richard Spencer and is director of operations
at the National Policy Institute,
where Spencer is president. He
was with Spencer in August for
the torch-lit protest in Charlottesville and during demonstrations
that followed, he said.
“He has proven to be indispensable in terms of planning our
demonstrations and events, coordinating them as they happen,
and keeping our supporters and
staff — especially our president,
Richard Spencer — safe,” the
think tank’s website says of Conte.
Asked about his views Wednesday, Conte did not describe himself as a white supremacist, which
he said implies a belief that
whites are morally superior to
others. “I don’t believe that, no,
but that doesn’t mean that I’m not
going to stick up for my own
people,” he said.
With students at Holy Cross, he
said, he did not “openly preach”
alt-right views but sometimes
raised questions about commonly held beliefs — for instance,
whether all hate is bad and why
diversity is good.
The National Policy Institute
website noted Conte’s interview
with WJLA-TV, in which he spoke
about what he might say to the
leaders and parents of Holy Cross.
“You should have stood up for
me,” he told the television station.
“I am a son of your people. I am
one of you. And I’ve expressed a
slightly out-of-normal-position
political opinion, and you’re going to throw me by the wayside
for it. And this is why your political system is going to fail.”
Conte’s work in education extended beyond Holy Cross.
He was a substitute teacher in
Montgomery County’s public
schools, including at Quince Orchard High School. He started in
2013, and worked there only once
this school year, the district said.
His status as a substitute in
Montgomery was frozen Nov. 1
after allegations surfaced about
his participation in the Charlottesville torchlight protest. District spokesman Derek Turner
said a variety of claims was made,
including that Conte was involved in violence in Charlottesville, but more needs to be known
before the district decides on his
final employment status.
The Montgomery schools’ employee code of conduct forbids
harassment and discrimination
based on race, gender, ethnicity
and other traits, he noted.
Having a particular viewpoint
is not an automatic disqualifier
for employment in a public institution, Turner said. “It’s not having the views,” he said. “It’s how
he expresses those views and how
it affects our students.”
Conte said he was not sure if he
had been fired from the public
school system. But he said he did
not intend to teach there any
longer. “I’ve got a lot of other stuff
I’m doing,” he said.
donna.stgeorge@washpost.com
obituaries
THOMAS BOPP, 68
Saw glow of what
would be a comet
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
On the night of July 22, 1995,
the stars aligned for Thomas
Bopp. A 47-year-old parts manager living in Glendale, Ariz., he
worked for an asphalt and concrete supply company and had
taken to stargazing on Saturday
nights, traveling to a remote
patch of desert with a telescopeowning friend, Jim Stevens.
Although Mr. Bopp had been
marveling at the heavens since
childhood, when his father took
him outside to see the Perseid
meteor shower, he was still a hobbyist, unfamiliar with the locations of many deep-space galaxies, nebulae and star clusters.
Stevens, a telescope maker who
had become something of an astronomical mentor for Mr. Bopp,
urged his protege to step up to the
lens to gaze at a prominent cluster
of stars in the constellation Sagittarius. A few minutes after 11 p.m.,
however, Mr. Bopp saw not just
the cluster but also “a little fuzzy
glow,” he later told the Canadian
magazine Maclean’s. “I thought I
had a faint galaxy or something.”
Rather, Mr. Bopp — within
minutes of another Southwest astronomer, 37-year-old Alan Hale
— had discovered what is officially known as C/1995 O1, a dirty
snowball of dust, rock and ice that
went on to inspire a California
death cult and light up the sky for
hundreds of millions of observers
around the world.
Mr. Bopp, who received a flurry
of international attention and a
form of scientific immortality
from the Hale-Bopp comet that
bears his name, died Jan. 5 at a
hospital in Phoenix. He was 68.
The cause was liver failure, said
his daughter, April Esch.
Mr. Bopp had never seen a
comet before the summer of 1995,
missing Halley’s in 1986 and the
disappointing smudge of Comet
Kohoutek in 1973. But he and
Hale, unusually similar in appearance, became the balding, portly
faces of comet science for several
months in 1997, when the Hale-
Bopp comet came within 122 million miles of Earth, sported a tail
millions of miles long and landed
the two astronomers on an episode of the TV show “Bill Nye the
Science Guy” and on ABC News
with the shared title of person of
the week.
“I don’t do much,” Mr. Bopp
told the Phoenix New Times, still
taken aback at his newfound
fame. “I have my work, my family,
and I like to look at stars.”
At various times on that night
in July 1995, the stargazers believed they had discovered Comet
Bopp, Comet Bopp-Stevens and
Comet Hale, following an astronomical convention in which a
comet’s discoverers are credited
by name.
Hale, who was unemployed at
the time, had a doctorate in astronomy and had spotted dozens
of comets outside his home in
Cloudcroft, N.M. This one, he said
in a phone interview, initially appeared as “just a dinky little fuzzball,” showing no signs that it
would eventually brighten and
become visible to the naked eye.
Unaware of each other’s observations, he and Mr. Bopp spent
several minutes tracking the comet, ensuring that it wasn’t a star
cluster or some other object in the
sky, before reporting their findings to the Central Bureau for
Astronomical Telegrams at Harvard University, which has long
been known for the announcement of newly discovered astronomical objects.
Unlike Hale, however, Mr. Bopp
was standing in the middle of the
desert, with spotty cell service and
far from a computer he could use
to send an email. He drove 20
miles to a truck stop, according to
an account in People magazine,
and when a Western Union representative told him there was no
address on file to send a telegram
to the Central Bureau, Mr. Bopp
got in his car again and drove all
the way to Glendale. He eventually found the address at home and
placed the telegram, well after
Hale had sent multiple emails
JOHNNY HORNE/SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON POST
Comet Hale-Bopp photographed the morning of March 11, 1997, from a dark site north of Fayetteville,
N.C. The five-minute exposure was made with a special high-speed astronomical camera. The photo
shows details and color in the comet that are not evident to observers. Below, Thomas Bopp.
ELECTRA FIELD/ENCHANTED SKIES STAR PARTY
with detailed coordinates for the
comet.
By what he later remembered
as “bizarre chance,” Dan Green,
the bureau’s associate director at
the time, was in the office Sunday
morning when a call came from
Western Union announcing Mr.
Bopp’s discovery.
“If I hadn’t answered the
phone,” Green wrote in an email,
“Bopp’s name probably would not
have gone on the comet’s name,”
with Hale receiving sole credit.
Instead, both names were memorialized, with the two astronomers connecting the following
day and developing an intermittent friendship on the lecture and
television news-show circuits,
booking enough appearances that
Mr. Bopp effectively quit his job.
“I can find another job, but this
is something that happens once in
10,000 lifetimes,” he told Newsweek, referring to the comet’s expected return in what was then
estimated as 4897.
While the two stargazers tried
to use the comet as a means of
expanding public interest in astronomy, others saw it in prophetic terms. Several dozen men and
women in a cult called Heaven’s
Gate viewed the comet as a means
of ascending to heaven, and under
the direction of leader Marshall
Herff Applewhite killed themselves in a mass suicide in Rancho
Santa Fe, Calif.
Mr. Bopp, whose finances were
reportedly dwindling as the com-
et made its closest approach to
Earth in spring 1997, faced his
own personal tragedy. A brother
and sister-in-law were fatally
struck by a car while standing in
the desert and photographing the
comet.
“This,” he told National Geographic days later, as photographs
of the comet appeared on the
covers of newspapers around the
world, “has been the best week of
my life. And the worst.”
Thomas Joel Bopp was born in
Denver on Oct. 15, 1949, and
raised in Youngstown, Ohio. His
father was a jeweler who gave
10-year-old Tom his first telescope, according to Sky & Telescope magazine. Mr. Bopp said his
interest in the sky dwindled until
his Air Force service took him to
the Philippines, where he observed the optical phenomenon in
which green flashes appear on the
horizon during sunrise or sunset.
Mr. Bopp graduated in 1974
from Youngstown State University with a bachelor’s degree in
business administration and
moved to the Phoenix area in
1980.
A marriage to Charlotte Carter
ended in divorce. Survivors include his daughter, of Peoria,
Ariz.; three sisters; two brothers;
and a granddaughter.
Mr. Bopp worked as a Toyota
dealership shuttle driver in recent
years, and he continued speaking
about the Hale-Bopp comet while
volunteering at observatories in
the Phoenix area.
“I just hope it inspires people to
go out and look at the stars,” he
told the Phoenix New Times in
1996.
harrison.smith@washpost.com
B6
EZ
obituaries
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
RHOADS
ECKERT
BETTY LAGLE ECKERT
On January 7, 2018, in Annandale, VA. Born
in Pennsylvania in 1930, Betty lived in the
Northern Virginia area for almost 60 years. She
worked at the Navy Annex in the 1950's as a
key punch operator. Betty was predeceased
by her husband of 45 years, John R. Eckert.
She is survived by two children and two
grandchildren. Graveside services will be held
on Friday, January 12, 2018 at National Memorial Park, Falls Church, VA at 1 p.m. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be made to the
American Diabetes Association, donations.diabetes.org. Arrangements by Advent Funeral
Services, 703-241-7402.
TATSURO TOYODA, 88
Former
president
of Toyota
Motor Corp.
BY
Y URI K AGEYAMA
Tatsuro Toyoda, the former
Toyota Motor Corp. president
who led the company’s climb to
become one of the world’s top
automakers, died Dec. 30. He
was 88.
The cause was pneumonia,
the Japanese automaker said.
Other details were not disclosed.
Mr. Toyoda, the automaker’s
seventh president and son of
the company’s founder, stepped
down from the position in 1995,
while continuing in other posts,
such as adviser, a title he held
until his death.
He was instrumental in setting up a California joint venture with U.S. rival General
Motors in 1984, called NUMMI,
or New United Motor Manufacturing Inc., heralded as a pioneering international collaboration.
EVANS
JOHN WILLIAM RHOADS, JR.
July 19, 1967
January 11, 2002
Loved. Missed. Remembered Always.
Mom, Dad, Deb and family
DEATH NOTICE
ALBRITTON-HARLEY
JAMES S. EVANS, SR.
Peacefully on January 5, 2018 in Rockville,
MD. He is survived by a host of family
members and friends. Family will receive
friends on Saturday, January 13, 2018 from
10 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. The memorial service will be held at Resurrection
Baptist Church, 900 Ednor Road, Silver
Spring, MD 20905. Arrangement entrusted
to SNOWDEN FUNERAL HOME.
www.snowdencares.com
TOYOTA MOTOR CORP./ASSOCIATED PRESS
He became known for
his efforts to bring
Toyota’s corporate
culture together with
American culture,
including introducing a
new style of labormanagement relations.
Mr. Toyoda served as
NUMMI’s first president and
became known for his efforts to
bring Toyota’s corporate culture of super-efficiency, teamwork and empowering workers
together with American culture, including introducing a
new style of labor-management
relations.
Mr. Toyoda’s father, Kiichiro
Toyoda, founded the company
in 1937. He succeeded his brother, Shoichiro Toyoda, as president. The current president,
Akio Toyoda, is Shoichiro Toyoda’s son. The company name is
spelled and pronounced with a
“T,” instead of the “D’’ as in the
family name, because it was
considered to bring luck, according to fortunetelling.
Born in 1929, Tatsuro Toyoda
was a graduate of the University of Tokyo, earning a degree
in mechanical engineering.
The rural house that marks
the automaker’s birthplace is
preserved as a historic monument. Toyota employees still
repeat the sayings handed
down by the family leaders
about hard work and a handson approach.
In 1953, Mr. Toyoda joined
Toyota, which now makes the
Prius hybrid, Camry sedan and
Lexus luxury models and is
among the top automakers in
annual global vehicle sales.
Mr. Toyoda earned an MBA in
1958 from New York University,
where he studied under qualitycontrol expert W. Edwards Deming, who was credited with
influencing Japanese manufacturing and helping to develop
its reputation for quality.
A complete list of survivors
was not immediately available.
— Associated Press
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
KRUGER
NEVILLE
MARTIN H. KRUGER (Age 88)
On Sunday, January 7, 2018 of Gaithersburg,
MD., Martin Kruger, beloved husband of
55 years of the late Lillie Kruger, passed
away peacefully. He was born on January
16, 1929 in Brooklyn, New York. Beloved
father and grandfather, he is survived by
his daughter Claire Kruger, her husband
Michael Krotman and their children Aaron
and Emily Krotman, his son Martin Kruger,
wife Margaret Kruger and their daughter
Maria Kruger. Martin is also survived by his
loving nieces, Kathleen Mosher (William),
Maryellen Woolsey (Walter) and Peggy
Kruger and many other loving relatives and
friends. He was predeceased by his brother
William and his sister-in-law, Margaret, and
his nephew William.
A private graveside service will be held
at Quantico National Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers donations may be made in Martin’s
name to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Please view and sign online the family
guestbook at
www.pumphreyfunerahome.com
LEE
LAURA ALBRITTON-HARLEY
LAURA ALBRITTON-HARLEY of Suitland, MD
passed on for eternal rest Saturday, January 6,
2018. She leaves to mourn her loving daughter,
Donna Albritton-Hughes (Kemry); granddaughter, Michelle and Rosslyn; grandson, Reginald
and a host of other relatives. Family will receive
friends on Friday, January 12, 2018 at Allen
Chapel AME Church, 2498 Alabama Ave., SE,
Washington, DC, Wake 10 a.m., Funeral Service
11 a.m. Interment Washington National Cemetery, Suitland, MD.
ANTHONY
SUSAN E. ANTHONY "Suzy" (Age 52)
Susan Anthony, of McLean, VA, passed
away on January 3, 2018, after a brief
illness. She leaves behind her husband of
26 years, James Anthony, and her three
sons Michael, Nicholas and Alexander. She
is also survived by her father, Joseph Stofan
of North Canton, OH, and her sisters Nikki
Daugherty of Charlottesville, VA, Debbie
Seusy of Fort Collins, CO, and Melissa
Berry of Louisville, KY. Her mother, Florence
Palfrey Stofan, and sister, Lynn Tasker, predeceased her. Suzy was born in Pittsburgh
and was valedictorian of her Dover High
School class (in Ohio). She graduated from
Carnegie Mellon University with a major
in Information Systems. After a few years
in the IT industry, she began following her
passion for teaching by joining the Peace
Corps and instructing high school students
in math and physics in Cameroon, Africa.
She then came back to Northern Virginia,
married, and started her own business
teaching core computer skills to people
of all ages. After raising her boys for 12
years, she got her Masters in Education
and taught math and algebra at Longfellow
Middle School until very recently. She will
always be remembered for her beautiful
smile, her warmth, her laughter, and her
love of teaching. Funeral services will be
private but a celebration of her life will be
held in early Spring, 2018. In lieu of flowers,
the family requests that donations be made
in her name to the Halquist Memorial
Inpatient Center, a hospice in Arlington, VA.
FRANKLIN
Philip Earle Franklin, of Potomac, MD,
would have been 90 today, January 11,
2018, but passed away on September 14,
2017, surrounded by his loving family. He
had suffered a stroke a year earlier and
was able to be cared for at home by
his oldest daughter, Debora J. Krauss and
her husband, Andrew and a dedicated
hospice team. He was born in Detroit,
Michigan and grew up in Baltimore, MD,
later moving to Washington, DC, where
he graduated from Woodrow Wilson High
School, 1945. He served in the US Army
Air Force from 1945-1947, at the end of
World War II and in the US Army as a
1st Lieutenant in the Infantry from 19501952, during the Korean War. Between
these tours of military duty, he earned a
BA in Foreign Relations at GW. He earned
a MA in Public Policy in 1956 from George
Washington University. From 1953-1967, he
worked as a maritime economist at the
US Department of Commerce. From 19671978, he worked in the US Department of
Transportation as Chief of the Economics
Division, in the Office of the Secretary.
He received his Doctorate in Maritime Economics at American University in 1968. A
fellowship at Harvard yielded post-doctorate work in the Center for International
Affairs in 1972-73. He became a consulting
economist in 1978 and retired in 1996. He
was married to Jacqueline Rogers Franklin
and had five daughters, Debora of Port
Republic, Janice F. Carmody (Michael) of Silver Spring; Stephanie F. Carmody of Banner
Elk, NC; Diana F. Wood (Jeffrey) of Port
Republic and Jennifer A. Franklin of Pacific
Grove, CA. He also has 16 grandchildren
and nine great-grandchildren. He enjoyed
traveling, reading, genealogy, Maryland history, philately and numismatics. There will
be a private service.
GREENBAUM
EDWARD L. LEE, II
Passed away peacefully on January 6, 2018, in
Bend, Oregon. His good nature, sense of humor
and smile will be missed by all that knew him.
Born in 1944 in Saginaw, Michigan, Ed enlisted
in the U.S. Marine Corps after high school. In
addition to wartime deployment to Vietnam,
he served as a Marine Security Guard at two
U.S. Embassies. After leaving the military, Ed
earned a B.S in Law Enforcement and an M.S.
in Criminal Justice. In 1973, Ed joined the U.S.
Department of State (DOS) where he served
as Special Agent in domestic assignments and
as Regional Security Officer at U.S. Embassies
abroad, including Cyprus, Korea, and Thailand.
Upon returning to Washington, Ed was the
Director of Training for the Office of Security,
followed by serving in Panama as Associate
Director of Security for U.S. Embassy security
programs in Latin America. In 1984, he served
as Assistant Inspector General for the USAID.
Ed returned to private life in 1986 as a security
consultant and served as an adjunct faculty
member, teaching graduate level courses at
George Washington University. During this
time, he also served as chief investigator
on a Congressionally-mandated international
missing persons case. In 2002, he returned to
federal service in the Office of ATA at DOS,
fully retiring in 2006. Outside of work, he wrote
numerous freelance lifestyle articles and did
freelance photography as well. Ed loved his
family and the Marine Corps, and dedicated
his career to the federal government. He is
survived by his daughters, Victoria Lee and
Jennifer Newman, and their husbands. Memorials may be made in Ed’s name to the
Alzheimer’s Association. Services private.
LIGON
FAIRFAX ALEXANDER LIGON
SYLVIA W. BELL (Age 88)
Peacefully on December 7, 2017. Wife of the
late William Bell. She volunteered with the Salvation Army Woman’s Auxiliary on Sherman
Avenue. Funeral services will be held at Johnson & Jenkins Funeral Home, 716 Kennedy St.,
NW, on Thursday, January 11, 2018 at 10 a.m.
CLAYTON
KENNETH ROGER DOUGLAS CLAYTON
1938 - 2017
On December 26, 2017, Kenneth Roger Douglas
Clayton passed away peacefully at the age of
79. He leaves to cherish loving memories
and a host of honorable accomplishments
that include winning the 1963 US Amateur
Chess Championship and in 1967, earning
the title of National Chess Grand Master. He
was a graduate of the Dunbar High School
(Washington, DC) class of 1955.
He is survived by his loving wife, daughters,
stepsons, brother, sister, father and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Visitation will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday,
January 13, 2018, at Calvary Episcopal Church,
820 6th St NE Washington, DC. Service to follow
at 11 a.m.
DORSEY
On Tuesday, January 9, 2018
of North Potomac, MD. Beloved
husband of Sherri Greenbaum.
Devoted father of Jamie (Matt)
Alford, Staci (Misha) Neff,
Bradley Greenbaum and the
late Andrew Greenbaum. Loving brother
of Nathan (Beth) Greenbaum and Ronnie
(Gale) Greenbaum. Cherished Zayda of Ayla
Alford and Ellis Neff. Dr. M. Gary Greenbaum
was a graduate of the Howard University
College of Dentistry. He was a Fellow of
The Academy of General Dentistry as well
as an active member and past president
of both the Alpha Omega and Maimonides
Dental Societies. Dr. Greenbaum had been
elected Fellowship in the American College
of Dentists and the International College of
Dentists. He had been recognized as one
of Washington DC's top rated dentists by
both the Washingtonian Magazine and the
Washington Consumer checkbook. Funeral
services will be held on Thursday, January
11, 11 a.m. at B'nai Israel Congregation
in Rockville, MD. Interment to follow at
Judean Memorial Gardens in Olney, MD.
Family will observe Shiva at the residence
of Sherri Greenbaum on Thursday, Saturday
and Sunday at 7 p.m. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to the
Alpha Omega Foundation, 50 W Edmonston
Dr. #303, Rockville, MD 20852. Shomrei
Neshama of Greater Washington is in
charge of arrangements.
www.shomreineshama.com
HOWARD
MARGARET MARY HOWARD "Peg"
1922 ~ 2018
Margaret Mary “Peg” Howard of Severna
Park, MD, passed away peacefully at home
on Sunday, January 7, 2018. At her passing,
Peg was lovingly attended by her nine
children, having been pre-deceased by her
husband, Tom, five years earlier. She was
84.
A Memorial Mass will be held at St. Andrew
by-the-Bay Catholic Church on Wednesday,
April 11, at 10 a.m. Please view Peg’s
full obituary by searching for Peggy Love
Howard on Facebook.
HOWELL
GARETH L. HOWELL
On January 4, 2018 in Falls Church, Virginia.
Gareth is survived by his wife, Amy Titus, and
sons, Llewelyn and Rhys. Gareth was born on
October 14, 1942 in Cardiff, Wales. A funeral is
scheduled for Friday, January 12, 2018 at 1 p.m.
at Falls Church Presbyterian Church.
JONES
GLORIA MILTRUDE DORSEY
On Friday January 5, 2018 at Holy Cross Hospital of Germantown, beloved mother of Gloria
Allen and Millard Dorsey peacefully went to
her final rest. She is survived by three grandchildren Brandon Dorsey, Shannon Dorsey, and
Ronald B-V Allen; five great-grandchildren;
three great-great-grandchildren; son-in-law
Ronald Allen and friends. Family and friends
are invited to celebrate the life of Gloria Dorsey
in a memorial service which will be held on
January 18, 2018 at Peoples Congregational
United Church of Christ. 4704 13th Street, N.W.
at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, please make
donations to the General Fund of Peoples
Congregational Church in her name.
CLINTON JONES
Entered into eternal rest on Friday, December 29, 2017 at Southern Maryland Hospital. Beloved
husband of the late Smithly Cleo
Jones. Survived by devoted son,
Jermaine Jones. Also survived by
three sisters, Ruth Jones Enoch
(Hurley), Louise Jones Ellis (Donald deceased)
and Adele Jones Harrison (Gary); one niece, five
nephews and a host of cousins, other relatives
and many friends. Friends may visit with the
family on Friday, January 12 from 10 a.m. until
time of service at 11 a.m. at Pilgrim Rest Baptist
Church, 4611 Sheriff Rd., NE, Washington, DC.
Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Services by
Hodges & Edwards.
Fairfax Alexander Ligon 98 passed peacefully
on December 31, 2017 Father of Paulette
Diallo, Muhammad Q. Sharif, Ronald Ligon,
Frederick Ligon, Robert Ligon, Juanita Ligon,
Pamela Ligon and Michael Ligon. Grandfather
of six grandchildren and several great-grandchildren. He is also survived by sisters, many
other relatives and friends Mr. Ligon will lie in
state on January 12, 2018 at The Ambassador
Baptist Church, 1412 Minnesota Avenue S.E.
Washington DC 20020 from 10 a.m. until time
of funeral at 11 a.m. Interment National Harmony Memorial Park Arrangements by CHINNBAKER 703-979-1666.
HELEN R. KLEIN
TILLEY
Devoted wife, mother, grandmother, and
fast friend, Betty Ritter Tilley is survived by
her son Richard MacFarlane Tilley, granddaughter Kathleen Marie Mayo, son-in-law
John Mayo, sister Jeanne Ritter Kramer,
and brother Robert Harbaugh Ritter. She
is predeceased by her beloved husband of
65 years, Dr. Russell MacFarlane Tilley, Jr.,
daughter Kimberly Ann Tilley, and brother
Lloyd H. Ritter, Jr.
A memorial service will be held on Saturday,
January 13, 2018,1 p.m., at Metropolitan
Memorial United Methodist Church, 3401
Nebraska Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20016.
JACQUELINE ROBINSON NEVILLE
On Thursday, January 4, 2018 of Bowie, MD.
Devoted mother of Jasmine Hankerson (Corey)
and DeWayne Neville (Samantha); beloved
daughter of Charles and Barbara C. Robinson
of Glen Bernie, MD. She is also survived by
four grandchildren, Mikaiah and Aaryn Neville,
Jackson and Nathan Hankerson; sister, Carolyn
Snowden (George); brothers, Charles Robinson, III (Robbie) and Timothy Robinson (Damien)
and other relatives and friends. Family will
receive friends on Friday, January 12, at Fort
Lincoln Funeral Home, 3401 Bladensburg Rd.
Brentwood, MD at 12:30 p.m. until time of
service 1:30 p.m. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
Susanne Emily Oldham took her leave of
family and friends on the first day of 2018,
January 1. Throughout her 67 year Susanne
brought creativity, energy and a unique
perspective to every endeavor.
After growing up in Yellow Springs, Ohio,
she pursued flute studies with Richard
Adeney, Principal Flutist with the London
Philharmonic, and Jack Wellbaum, solo piccolo in the Cincinnati Symphony, receiving
an Associate Diploma from the Royal College of Music; the Bachelor of Music degree
from the College-Conservatory of Music
in Cincinnati, Ohio; and Master of Music
from Colorado State University. As an arts
administrator she worked with the NJ State
Council on the Arts; Middlesex County
Cultural and Heritage Commission; Rutgers
Concert Bureau; and Amberson Enterprises
(Leonard Bernstein’s management company). As the Coordinator of Music Programs
at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC, she was manager of The Folger
Consort. At age 50 she joined the Peace
Corps, serving in Lesotho.
After moving back to Yellow Springs to
be near family, she and John Semmlow
renovated the Arthur Morgan House into a
bed and breakfast which she successfully
operated for ten years.
Her musical talent was offered up in a
variety of ways, as a participant in I Solisti
di Zirnachron, a folk dance band; the New
Brunswick Chamber Orchestra; the Yellow
Springs Chamber Orchestra and Community Chorus; and the women’s a Cappella
group Sokolitse.
Susanne was predeceased by parents
James V. Oldham and Gerda Wilk Oldham.
She will be missed by her partner of many
years John Semmlow; siblings Bob Oldham,
Ned Oldham and Kathy Beverly (Dan Beverly) and David Oldham (Barbara Duvall
Oldham); as well as nieces Karen Beverly
Klausen, Jody Beverly Lee (Adams Lee), and
Carol Oldham (Nejem Raheem); nephew
Andy Beverly (Stephanie Beverly); seven
grand nieces and nephews; numerous
cousins, and the myriad other relatives,
friends and acquaintances whose lives she
touched. Susanne’s remains are interred at
Glen Forest Cemetery, Yellow Springs, Ohio.
A memorial service will be held on February
18, 2018 at 2 p.m. at the First Presbyterian
Church, Yellow Springs. Performances by
the Folger Consort at the National Cathedral on February 2 and 3, 2018 will be
dedicated to Susanne’s memory.
LIPMAN
ELISE M. LIPMAN
On Wednesday, January 10, 2018,
ELISE M. LIPMAN of Rockville, MD.
Beloved daughter of Arlene Joyce
and the late Donald Lipman. Cherished sister of Stephen (Amy) Lipman. Dear aunt of Rachel, Alex and
Sophie. Funeral services will be held on Friday,
January 12, 2018, 10 a.m. at Congregation
Har Shalom, 11510 Falls Rd., Potomac, MD.
Interment following at Judean Memorial Gardens, Olney, MD. After the interment, shiva
will be observed at the home of Arlene Joyce
Lipman, continuing on Sunday through
Wednesday with minyans at 7:30 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to the Jewish
Caring Network Tikva House, 122 Slade Ave.,
Ste. 100a, Baltimore, MD 21208, www.jewishcaringnetwork.org or to the charity of your
choice. Arrangements entrusted to TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL HOME, 202-541-1001.
MELVIN
JOE L. MELVIN
We regret to inform our members
of the passing of Joe L. Melvin,
Book #759171 on January 8, 2018.
Brother Melvin became a Rodman
Iron Worker in December 1966.
Memorial Service at the Woodland
Estates Clubhouse, 602 Woodland
Estate Avenue, Ruskin, FL 33570, Thursday,
January 11, 2018. Brother Melvin will be greatly
missed by all. Official DBF #150
MENDELSON
ADAM LEWIS MENDELSON (Age 42)
Died suddenly in Hamilton, VA
on January 7, 2018. Adored
father of his beloved children
Zachary and Alexi, survived
by the mother of his children,
Debra Mendelson; devoted
son of Ira (Becky) Mendelson
and Ilene Cohen; cherished brother of David
(Mindy) Mendelson and stepbrothers Shaun
Taylor and Chad (Brooke) Taylor and many
first cousins. Graveside funeral services
will be held on Thursday, January 10 at
10 a.m. at Judean Gardens, Olney, MD.
Shiva will be observed Thursday following
the service and Friday until 12 noon at
the residence of Ira and Becky Mendelson.
Contributions may be made to the charity
of your choice. Arrangements by HinesRinaldi Funeral Home, LLC under Jewish
Funeral Practices Committee of Greater
Washington Contract.
NANCE
In lieu of flowers, please make a donation
in Betty Tilley’s name to the Asbury Foundation for Benevolent Care, 201 Russell
Avenue Gaithersburg, MD. 20877 301-2164050.
TISDALE
MARGARET J. TISDALE
On Wednesday, January 3, 2018. Margaret J.
Tisdale, of Washington, DC. Beloved wife of
John L. Tisdale; loving mother of Anthony
(Donna) and Tamara Tisdale; cherished grandmother of six, loving sister of Mary Gross,
David Janifer, Marshall (Rose) Janifer and David
Janifer. She is also survived by a host of other
relatives and friends. Visitation will be held
from 10 to 11 a.m., Friday, January 12, 2018 at
Plymouth Congregational Church, 5301 North
Capitol Street, NE, Washington, DC, where
funeral services will follow. Interment will be in
Fort Lincoln Cemetery, Brentwood, MD.
SANGER
WILLIAM STANLEY SANGER, JR.
William Stanley Sanger Jr, the son of William
and Reba Sanger, was born on February 11,
1932 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. He died
on November 19, 2017. Bill attended the
University of Oklahoma where he graduated from the College of Law in 1956. He was
preceded in death by his dear wife, Irene, in
March 2003. He is survived by his daughter,
Pam, and his granddaughter, Darla. Bill
was a senior career official at the Federal
Trade Commission, where he served with
distinction for 35 years. At his retirement in
1992, he had been serving as head of the
Enforcement Division in the Bureau of Consumer Protection for many years. In that
position he was responsible for ensuring
compliance with numerous rules and regulations that protect consumers and provide
them valuable information, such as the Textile, Wool and Fur Rules, the Care Labeling
Rule, the Octane Posting Rule, the R-value
(insulation) Rule and the Mail Order Rule.
He also oversaw compliance with all the
administrative orders that the FTC issued
to address practices that allegedly violated
the law and harmed consumers. His oversight led to what were then record-setting
civil penalties to resolve violations of such
orders. Bill also was actively involved in
key FTC policy issues, participating in work
on new approaches to civil penalties and
consumer information remedies. Beyond
his many formal accomplishments, Bill was
widely admired and respected by his staff,
colleagues, and people outside the FTC, for
his wisdom, kindness and mentoring. Bill
was a long time member of St. Timothy's
Episcopal Church in Herndon, Virginia. Serving in many volunteer roles, he was known
as a faithful and loving servant among his
church family. A memorial service will be
held on Saturday, January 13 at 2 p.m. at
St. Timothy's Episcopal Church, 432 Van
Buren St, Herndon, VA 20170. In lieu of
flowers, the family welcomes donations to
St. Timothy's.
SHAW
BERNARD SHAW "BERNIE"
On Tuesday, January 9, 2018
of Silver Spring, MD. Beloved
husband of Beverly Shaw.
Devoted father of Steve,
Michael (Debby) and Carrie
(Ram) Shaw. Loving grandfather
of Aaron. Graveside services will be held
Friday, January 12, 1:30 p.m. at Garden
of Remembrance Memorial Park in Clarksburg, MD.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
TOVEN
EMELIE L. TOVEN
On Tuesday, January 2, 2018 of Rockville, MD.
Wife of the late Richard A. Toven. Beloved
mother of Christopher M. Toven and his wife
Beth and Jeffrey P. “Jay” Toven and his partner
Jon Gibson. Loving grandmother of Nicole,
Christina and Matthew Toven.
Relatives and friends will be received at
PUMPHREY’S FUNERAL HOME, 300 W. Montgomery Ave. (Rt. 28 just off I-270), Rockville,
MD on Saturday, January 13, 2018 from 3 to 6
p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial and inurnment
will take place at Arlington National Cemetery
at a later date.
Please view and sign the family online guestbook at www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
TROLL
ROBERT JULIUS TROLL (Age 93)
On Friday, January 5, 2018, Robert Julius Troll
passed peacefully at his home in Annapolis,
Maryland. He was surrounded by family in his
final days. Born September 29, 1924, Robert
(Bob) is a native Washingtonian and attended
Central High where he was a standout athlete.
Heavily recruited, he chose to stay close to
home and the family bakery while attending
and playing football, baseball and boxing at the
University of Maryland. He was also involved
with University publications as an illustrator
and cartoonist.
His lifelong artistic career began at the DC
Department of Recreation, Cultural Arts Division as a stage and set designer and painter.
Some of his theatre work that drew critical
acclaim included the settings for the Shakespeare Festival at the Sylvan Theater, Christmas Specials for the Children of Washington,
Howard Univ Cramton Auditorium, the Civic
Opera Association, and the National Ballet in
the Opera House of the Kennedy Center. Set
designs also included WTTG Channel 5 Panorama, Miss D.C. Pageants, and parade floats for
inaugurations and festivals in Washington.
With a sketchpad always at his side, he enjoyed
living on the water, boating, fishing and crabbing.
He is predeceased by his wife of 62 years
(Mary Jane), and is survived by three children,
Thomas Troll (Denise), Linda Stelter and Carol
Masengale (Steve); eight grandchildren and
eight great grandchildren. Services private. A
celebration of life will be held on January 13,
2018 from 1 to 3 p.m. at Lasting Tributes,
814 Bestgate Road, Annapolis, MD. Memorial
contributions can be made to the Chesapeake
Bay Foundation (www.cbf.org).
VALENTINE
JOAN VALENTINE
On Sunday, December 31, 2017. Friends may
visit with the family on Friday, January 12
from 10 a.m. until time of service 11 a.m. at
Grace United Methodist Church, 11700 Old Fort
Rd., Ft. Washington, MD. Interment Harmony
Memorial Park.
WALLSTEN
SHARON M. WALLSTEN
On Wednesday, January 10, 2018,
SHARON M. WALLSTEN of Washington, DC. Beloved wife of
Thomas S. Wallsten. Devoted
mother of Scott (Jen Sermoneta)
and Peter (Stacey Bosshardt) Wallsten. Dear sister of Adele Fried and Barbara
(Robert H.) Kay. Loving grandmother of Charlotte, Nathaniel, Isaac and Theodor. Graveside
funeral services will be held on Friday, January
12, 2018, 11 a.m. at Mt. Lebanon Cemetery,
Adelphi, MD. After the interment, shiva will be
observed at the home of Scott Wallsten and
Jen Sermoneta. Memorial contributions may
be made to the Foundation Fighting Blindness,
www.blindness.org. Arrangements entrusted
to TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL HOME, 202541-1001.
WASCALUS
CARLA WASCALUS (Passin) (Age 74)
Of Lake of the Woods, VA, passed away January
7, 2018.
Carla grew up in the District and the surrounding area and graduated from Immaculata High
School. She retired from the CIA after 20 years
of service. She was friendly, kind, and generous
and will be missed by her husband, Joe;
daughter, Sarah; son, Jacob; her grandchildren
Quinn, Kira, Vera, and Carl; and the rest of her
family.
A visitation will be held from 5 to 7 p.m.,
January 12 at Johnson Funeral Home, Locust
Grove, VA. A funeral mass will be held 11 a.m.
on January 13 at St. Patrick Catholic Church,
Fredericksburg, VA.
TEPLITZ
KLEIN
On January 10, 2018, Helen R. Klein,
dear sister of Dr. Melvin (Caren)
Klein, David (Esther) Klein, and the
late Dr. Stanley (Roslyn) Klein;
beloved daughter of the late Hilda
and Milton Klein.
Funeral services and interment will
be held at Garden of Remembrance Clarksburg,
MD on Thursday, January 11, at 1 p.m. Please
omit flowers. Contributions in her memory
may be sent to Hebrew Home of Greater
Washington, 6121 Montrose Road, Rockville,
MD 20852. In mourning at the home of Dr.
Melvin Klein, through Sunday. Arrangements
by SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC.
sollevinson.com
DEATH NOTICE
SUSANNE EMILY OLDHAM
BELL
M. GARY GREENBAUM, DDS
JANUARY 11 , 2018
OLDHAM
BERTHA HARRIS BELL
BELL
. THURSDAY,
BETTY RITTER TILLEY (Age 92)
February 1, 1925 - January 4, 2018
PHILIP EARLE FRANKLIN
On Saturday, January 6, 2018, beloved mother,
grandmother and great grandmother Bertha
H. Bell, age 96, was called home to glory.
She was survived by six children, 14 grandchildren, 26 great-grandchildren, 16 great-greatgrandchildren; and a host of loving relatives
and friends. On Friday, January 12, 2018
the Viewing will begin at 9:30 a.m. until the
time of the Home Going Celebration at 11
a.m. at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1500 9th Street
NW, Washington, DC. Interment immediately
following at Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
Tatsuro Toyoda, served as
president of Toyota Motor
Corp. until 1995 but continued
to serve as an adviser.
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ANGELA SUEZETTE NANCE
On Saturday, January 6, 2018,
Angela Suezette Nance former
A&C neighborhood commissioner
of district 1A02 peacefully entered
into eternal life. Loving mother of
Lavina Ballard; devoted grandmother of Micheal, Raymond, Jermal, and Nicholas Ballard, Tajae Mcneill, and
Kaila Ballard. Also survived by many other
relatives and friends. Family will receive friends
on Saturday, January, 13 , from 9 a.m. until the
time of funeral service at 11 a.m., at St. Marks
Baptist Church, 624 Underwood Street, NW
Washington, DC. Interment Glenwood Cemetery.
www.wisemanfuneralhome.com
WATKINS
VIGDOR L. TEPLITZ "Vic"
February 5, 1937-December 14, 2017
RUTH LOUINE WATKINS (Age 84)
Physicist, diplomat, professor, devoted husband and father. A long-time resident of
Bethesda, Maryland, Vic leaves behind wife
Doris, son Harry, daughter Hilary, two grandchildren (Max and George), sister Mary Morse,
and many friends and close colleagues. Vic’s
work was devoted to theoretical physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. During his long career,
Vic was a faculty member at MIT, head of
the Physics Department at Virginia Tech, chair
of the Physics Department at SMU, and chief
of University Programs at NASA’s Goddard
Space Flight Center. He worked with the Arms
Control and Disarmament Agency and the
White House Office of Science and Technology
Policy. Later, he consulted for the Space and
Advanced Technology Office of OES at the U.S.
Department of State. Vic will be missed. No
funeral services were held.
On Monday, January 8, 2018, of
Silver Spring, MD. Beloved wife
of the late Donald Watkins, Sr.;
mother of Debbie (John) Murray,
Diana (Pat) McMahan and Donald
Watkins, Jr.; grandmother of Ryan,
Chris, Matt, Dan, Nick and Kendall.
Relatives and friends may call at Collins Funeral
Home, 500 University Boulevard West, Silver
Spring, MD, (Valet Parking), on Thursday, January 11 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m., where
Funeral Service will be celebrated on Friday,
January 12 at 11 a.m. Interment Parklawn
Memorial Park. Memorial contributions may be
made to the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation,
230 East Ohio Street, Suite 500, Chicago, Illinois
60611 or the American Cancer Society, P.O. Box
22478, Oklahoma City, OK 73123.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B7
RE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
WILLIAMS
BROWN
CHARAK
GONZALEZ
PEVER
WILLIAMS
NORMAN AUGUSTUS BROWN, JR.
MASON THOMAS CHARAK
SELINA V. WILLIAMS
On January 4, 2018. Beloved mother of Clifton
Williams. Also survived by five brothers, other
relatives and friends. Visitation on Friday, January 12 at 9 a.m., Service 10 a.m. at St.
Anthony's Catholic Church, 1029 Monroe St.,
NE. Services by Johnson & Jenkins.
ZILLIACUS
CAROL ZILLIACUS
On January 8, 2018, Carol Steinman
Zilliacus (nee Perlin); beloved wife
of Steve Zilliacus; devoted mother
of Jonathan Andrew Steinman
(Marcie
Basson)
and
Peter
Lawrence (Sheri Maria) Steinman;
dear stepmother of C. Patrick Zilliacus and the
late Erik Zilliacus; adored daughter of the late
Gussie and Louis Perlin; loving grandmother
of Samuel, Douglas, Nathaniel, Nicholas and
Noah Steinman.
Funeral services will be held at Oakland Mills
Interfaith Center - The Meeting House, 5885
Robert Oliver Place, Columbia, MD 21045 on
Friday, January 12, at 4 p.m. Interment is
private. Please omit flowers. Contributions in
her memory may be sent to The Jewish Foundation for the Righteous, 305 7th Avenue,
#1900, New York, NY 10001. The family will be
receiving at 13520 Collingwood Terrace, Silver
Spring, MD 20904, Saturday 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Arrangements by SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC.
sollevinson.com
IN MEMORIAM
On January 2, 2018, Norman A.
Brown, Jr is survived by his daughter, Gloria Bumpass; one sister, Gloria Terrell; two grandchildren; and
a host of other relatives and many
friends, The family will receive
friends on Friday, January 12, from
10 a.m. until time of service 11 a.m. at Mt.
Carmel Baptist Church, 901 3rd St. NW. Rev.
Gerald H. Hesson, Interim Pastor. Interment
Maryland National Cemetery. Service s entrusted to Hacketts.
CARDOZO
PRICE
Mason Thomas Charak, 94, of
Bethesda, MD on January 9,
2018. Beloved husband of the
late Harriet. Devoted father of
Lewis Blaine Charak and Meredith Beckhardt. Loving grandfather of Deanna Beckhardt and Joshua Beckhardt. Adored cousin of Sue Yarrow. He
was a veteran of WWII in the European
Theater, and had a distinguished career at
both NASA and NOAA. Services will be
12:30 p.m. on Friday, January 12, 2018 at
Garden of Remembrance Memorial Park,
14321 Comus Rd., Clarksburg, MD. The
family will be sitting shiva at the home of
Blaine Charak following services. Donations
in his memory can be made to the
Alzheimer's Association, alz.org.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
JUANITA N. GONZALEZ
WANDA PEVER (Age 86)
On Sunday, January 7, 2018, Juanita N. Gonzalez, of Washington, DC. Devoted daughter of
the late Rev. Wesley B. Nash and Eloise Wright
Nash-Nichols; beloved wife of the late Cambell
Gonzalez; loving mother of Administrative Law
Judge, Amelia G. Govan, Dr. Anita Gonzalez
(John R. Diehl) and John C. Gonzalez (Dr. Beverly
Yates); cherished grandmother of Leesha Ayanna Cook Amen (Priest), RaLee Cook (Andrea),
Shaka G. Brown, Xochina El Hilali, Jonathan
Diehl, Raphael and Jasmine Gonzalez and the
late Hasaan A. Brown. Also survived by six
great-grandchildren, dear cousins, nieces and
a host of family and friends.
Visitation will be held on Sunday, January 14,
2018 from 1 p.m. until time of service at 3
p.m. at the Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home, 11800
New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20904.
Interment Private at Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
Of Dunkirk, MD passed away Friday, January 5,
2018. A native of Martinsburg, WV. She lived a
full and fruitful life. She worked as a Resident
Manager for the BF Saul company for 25 years,
before continuing her work life with the CCNPP
(Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant). She finally
retired in 1998. Wanda was known for her care
for others in the community as well as being an
avid painter of ceramics.
She is survived by her loving and caring husband of 49 years, George Pever. She is survived
by her son Dean Keller and his companion Mercedes Braithwaite; granddaughter Jackie Deelaney and husband Jason; her great-grandson
Drake “Cletus” Deelaney; daughter-in-laws,
Vickie J. Bowen and husband Danny, Valeri
J. Matthews and husband Robert; grandsons,
Jacob, Chad and Chase; by her aunt Eva and
her cousins Chip Lickey and Shirley Nye and
step grandson Ryan Clark, and many devoted
friends.
The family will receive friends at Murphy’s
Funeral Home, 4510 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA
Saturday, January 13, 2018, from 11 a.m. to 1
p.m. for the viewing where a funeral service
will begin at 1 p.m. Interment to follow at
National Memorial Park, Falls Church, VA.
DYSON
GRAHAM
BARBARA FISHER WILLIAMS
(Henderson)
On Friday, January 5, 2018, beloved mother of
Guy A. (Kia R.) Williams, Sr. D. Min.; devoted
grandmother of Lauren, Guy A. Jr., Kailani,
Aaliyah, Josiah and Daniel Williams; sister of
Donald W. Fisher. She is also survived by a host
of other relatives and friends. Ms. Williams will
lie in state at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1500 9th
St., NW, on Saturday, January 13 from 10 a.m.
until service at 11 a.m. Interment Harmony
Memorial Park. Online condolences may be
made at:
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
WILSON
RYAN
BARBARA ELAINE PRICE "Bobbi"
January 11, 1954 ~ September 2, 2016
We're thinking of you and missing you on your
birthday. It seems without you in our lives
things have not been the same and we all love
so very much, but God loved you more. We
haven't forgotten you and we will never will.
Mom, Ernestine, Uncles, Brother, &
Jimmy (Joan), Aunts, Margaret & Elaine,
Cousins, Willie (Courtney), William,
Jillian, Nikki (Joel), "The Boyz" Adrian,
Alejandro, Godfather, Art Dorrington,
Dear friends, Angie Hill-Beaty, Debbie
& Dianna Krasney, Linda Dean,
Weldon Bazmore
RICKETTS
ALICE CORNEILLE CARDOZO
(Age 105)
On Wednesday, January 10, 2018, Alice
Corneille Cardozo died peacefully at her
home in Washington, DC, surrounded by
her family and the spirit of her late husband
Michael H. Cardozo IV. Alice is survived
by her children, Michael H. Cardozo V,
Julia Cardozo Eisendrath, Alice Rebecca
Cardozo; her grandchildren Ben Eisendrath,
Mark Eisendrath, Eden Cardozo Levy, Julia
Cardozo, Michael Cardozo VI; and her greatgrandchildren Tappen Eisendrath, Teal
Eisendrath, Jay Eisendrath, Jack Levy and
Gabriel Levy.
At her death, Alice was Barnard College’s
oldest living alumna. She credited Barnard
for nurturing her life-long love of learning,
especially her passion for art and music.
When we listen to opera and philharmonic
performances, we will picture her special
smile and the sparkle in her eyes as Luciano
Pavarotti and others join her on the wings
of familiar melodies.
PAMELA KAY WILSON (Age 56)
RUTH BERRY DYSON
On Thursday, December 21, 2017. Survived
by devoted friend and caregiver, Thomas L.
Hill, Sr.; son, Michael (Marilyn) Locksley. She is
also survived by seven grandchildren, 20 greatgrandchildren and a host of other relatives and
friends. Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Omega
Omega service for Mrs. Dyson will take place at
Salem Baptist Church, 917 N St., NW, on Friday,
January 12 at 9:30 a.m. and she will lie in state
from 10 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. Interment
Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
Online condolences can be made:
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
FAVORS
Services will be private. Donations in her
memory can be made to the Alice Corneille
Cardozo ’36 Scholarship at Barnard:
Barnard College, Office of Development,
3009 Broadway, New York, NY 10027.
ERMA L. GRAHAM
Peacefully on Thursday, January 4, 2018. Loving wife of
Johnnie
Graham;
devoted
mother of Catherine Graham,
Cheryl Conyers, Johnnie Graham, III, Raynese Hopkins and
Tisha Walford; dear sister of
Gene Ronald Scott, Earl Scott, Cornelius Prue,
Walter Prue, LaraVern Scott, Stella Mae Scott,
Diann Dolford and Tonie Scoggins. She is also
survived by 13 grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren, other relatives and friends. Visitation
on Saturday, January 13 from 10 a.m. until time
of service, 12 noon, at New Hope Church of
God, 4200 Old Washington Rd., Waldorf, MD.
Interment Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery on
Wednesday, January 17 at 1 p.m.
www.briscoe-tonicfuneralhome.com
LAGANA
CEASER
DEATH NOTICE
ANTHONY
On Monday, January 8, 2018, AARON FAVORS
passed away peacefully after a long illness. He
was surrounded by family and caregivers, all
of whom will remember his warmth, dignity
and grace. He is survived by his wife, Evelyn;
daughter, Ronni (Bill) Colavito; son, Aaron W.
(Sandi); stepdaughter, Erika DaRonco (Blaine);
stepson, Spencer P. Boyer (Clare); two brothers, H. Kenneth and Bryan; many cousins,
nieces and nephews. Services will be held
on Saturday, January 13, 2018 at Albright
Memorial United Methodist Church, 411 Rittenhouse St., NW. Visitation will begin at 10 a.m.,
followed by service at 11 a.m. Interment to
follow at Fort Lincoln Cemetery. Arrangements
by McGUIRE.
www.mcguire-services.com
FORD
NELLIE BERTIE CEASER
(Age 86)
JULIA ANTHONY
(Age 20)
On Tuesday, December 12, 2017 of Arlington,
Virginia. Survived by parents, Steven and
Pamela Anthony; grandparents, Gary and Carolyn Anthony and Maxwell and Paula Beaver;
and many aunts, uncles, and cousins. Relatives
and friends may gather at Everly Wheatley
Funeral Home, 1500 W. Braddock Rd., Alexandria, Virginia 22302 at 12:30 p.m. on Saturday,
February 3, 2018, where a Memorial Service
will be held at 1 p.m. In support of Julia’s
fundraising, she would have liked you to consider being a donor at https://bethematch.org
Please view and sign the family guestbook at:
www.everlywheatley.com
Passed away on Wednesday, January 3, 2018.
Survived by beloved husband of 40 years,
Charles Ceasar; sister, Carrie Shepherd
(Thomas); five brothers, Carl (Helen), Sterling
(Brenda), Edward, James (Shirley) and Randolph; and a host of nieces and nephews
who affectionally called her Aunt Pal and
other relatives and friends. Family will receive
friends on Saturday, January 13 at 9 a.m.
St. North East Holy Trinity Church, 709 4th
Street NE., Washington, DC 20002 until time of
service 10 a.m. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery. Arrangements by Fort Lincoln Funeral
Home.
HATTIE INEZ ISLER FORD (Age 106)
CECONI
BOWEN
On December 29, 2017, HATTIE INEZ ISLER
FORD, 106 years young went home to be with
the Lord. She leaves to cherish her memory her
children, Mary Ford, Delores Ford, Sylvia Wood,
Fred S. Ford, John Ford, Maureen Jenkins,
Ronald Ford and Donald Ford; 28 grandchildren; 43 great-grandchildren; 23 great-greatgrandchildren; one great-great-great-grandchild; a host of nieces, nephews, relatives
and friends. Services will be held at Friendship
Baptist Church, 900 Delaware Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20024 on Friday, January 12, 2018,
Viewing 10 a.m., Service 11 a.m. Rev. J. Michael
Little, Officiating. Arrangements by POPE
FUNERAL HOMES. In lieu of flowers, donations
can be made to Friendship Baptist Church,
Senior Ministries and Feed the Homeless Ministries. www.popefh.com
ANTHONY AUGUSTINE LAGANA, SR.
Anthony Augustine Lagana, Sr., 78, of
Poolesville, MD died January 7, 2018. He was a
loving husband to Betty Lagana for 39 years
until her passing in 2002. He was blessed
to be remarried in 2008 to Lillian (Sugar)
Lagana where they retired in Mt. Pleasant,
South Carolina. He was the son of the late
Leo and Mary Lagana and oldest brother to
Steve Lagana, Michael Lagana, and the late
Ronnie Lagana Sr. He has four children, three
daughters, Elaine Moxley and husband Mark,
Kim Miller and husband Dan, Mary Lynch and
husband Billy, and one son, Tony Lagana Jr.
Grandfather of Jessica Dorsey, Jeremy Stickley,
Brenda Stickley, Josh McVay, Megan Moxley,
Kristy Lagana, Sam Monterrosa and Amanda
Downs. He also has 15 great-grandchildren.
The family will receive friends on Saturday,
January 13 at 1 p.m. at Our Lady of the Presentation, 17220 Tom Fox Ave., Poolesville, MD.
Following will be a celebration at Asian House
of Poolesville, 19611 Fisher Ave., Poolesville,
MD. In lieu of flowers donations can be made
to St. Judes children's research hospital,
https://www.stjude.org/.
When the need
arises, let families
find you in the
Funeral Services Directory.
To be seen in the Funeral
Services Directory, please
call paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
PEARCY
MARY HENKEL CECONI
FRANCES SHARON STEAR BOWEN
(Age 81)
Of Spotsylvania County, Virginia passed on to
the care and comfort of her Lord and Savior
Jesus Christ Monday morning, January 1, 2018
in Kathmandu, Nepal.
Sharon was the widow of Richard ‘Dick’
Bowen, Colonel USAF Ret. who predeceased
her by four years and mother of Mark Bowen
who predeceased her by 26 years. Survivors
include her son Matthew (Anne) Bowen and
daughters Lindi (Mike) Copeland and Patricia
(Steve) Garvis, 13 grandchildren and four great
grandchildren.
Sharon was a vibrant and active member
of Church of the Messiah, Episcopal Fredericksburg and the Fawn Lake community.
Sharon raised her family around the world and
across the country, making homes in Brussels
Belgium, Vienna Austria and Washington, DC
as a Military Officer, Diplomat and Civil Servant’s wife. Sharon’s family resided in McLean,
Virginia for forty years where she taught and
served at St. John’s Episcopal Church, Garden
Club, and Community Bible Study. She
embraced opportunities to explore other cultures, make new friends and extend her and
her family’s horizons. We are warmed still by
the incandescence of her smile and the grace
shone outward to all.
Born on a depression era farm in Cozad
Nebraska, Sharon is another member of the
greatest generation to have devoted her life
in the service of community and country. We
memorialize and celebrate her life at twelve
noon, this Saturday, January 13 at Church
of the Messiah Episcopal, Fredericksburg, Virginia.
Passed away peacefully on Thursday, January 4, 2018 at the age of 101 surrounded
by her family at her home in Vienna, VA.
Born November 20, 1916 at her grandparents’ home in Knoxville, MD she was the
daughter of the late James and Elizabeth
Henkel. Beloved wife of 55 years of the
late Philip J Ceconi, she is survived by
her three children Katharine Ceconi Reiter,
William P. Ceconi and wife Joyce M. Ceconi,
and Elizabeth Ceconi Sherrill and husband
James P Harvey; three grandchildren Philip
J. Ceconi II, LT. Christopher Michael Ceconi
USN, and Lauren Katharine Sherrill; and
several nieces and nephews. She is predeceased by her sister, Katharine Henkel
Stone.
Mary grew up in Washington, DC before
electric lights and automobiles were common. She graduated from Central High
School which is now Cardozo High School
and attended Strayer Business School.
Mary remained in the District until she
married Phil Ceconi on November 3, 1945
when they moved to Arlington Virginia; in
1965 they moved to Vienna Virginia.
Mary was a pioneer among working
women. When most women left their jobs
to start their families, Mary maintained her
36-year career with the US Department
of Agriculture while raising three children.
Mary was known for her passion for shopping and was always very well dressed,
both in and out of the office. After retiring in
1971, Mary enjoyed traveling across the US
and Canada with her husband and spending
winters in Madeira Beach on the Florida
gulf coast. Mary will be remembered for her
dedication to family, fondness for sweets,
and love of reading.
Her family extends its heartfelt thanks for
the attention and kindness of her caregivers Lillian Mamani, Vilma Gonzalez, Consuelo Vaca and Flor Nooralian. Interment
will be private. Please no flowers, instead
contributions may be made to the Salesian
Sisters in memory of Mary Ceconi, Attention: Sr. Mary Rinaldi, 659 Belmont Avenue
North, Haledon NJ 07508.
CHARLES GODWIN PEARCY
Colonel US Army (ret.)
Colonel Charles Godwin Pearcy, U.S. Army
(ret.), a long-time resident of Alexandria, died
in his quarters on January 6, 2018, at the age
of 81. He had been sick for more than a year
following a stroke.
Colonel Pearcy was born in Shreveport, LA,
the son of career Army officer and pioneer
Army aviator Col. Charles Goodwin Pearcy
and Anne Meador Pearcy. He graduated from
The Citadel, The Military College of South
Carolina in Charleston, SC, in 1960 with a
degree in electrical engineering. He received
a Regular Army commission as a second
lieutenant of field artillery. He was married to
Jessie (Bonnie) MacKay of Westport, CT. Their
marriage ended in divorce, with no children.
Col. Pearcy attended various Army schools
and colleges, including the Airborne School,
the U.S. Army Command and Staff College,
and the U.S. Army War College. He served
two combat tours in Vietnam, serving in 1962
as an advisor to a South Vietnamese infantry
unit and subsequently as an Artillery Battery
Commander with the 25th Infantry Division.
He also commanded an Airborne Artillery
Battalion with the 101st Airborne Division
Steven was a graduate of UMass, Amherst,
MA, with Master degrees from Villanova
University and George Washington University, the latter in Environmental Sciences.
He was employed for 20 years at the EPA
Energy Star Division. Previous to that he
worked for Sunlight Power Int. where he
spent months at a time establishing their
facility in Morroco.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
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SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
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He was an avid environmentalist, a lifelong
Boston Patriot, Celtic, and Red Sox fan.
He also attended Trinity College in Oxford,
England and was the author of several
publications related to environmental
issues and was well known in the industry
representing the EPA at national seminars
and conferences.
AARON FAVORS, JR., Ph.D
DOROTHY E. RICKETTS
As we love you, dear Mommy, so we miss you,
In our memory you are near.
Loved, remembered, thought of always,
Bringing many a silent tear.
Your Children, Grandchildren,
and Great-Grandchildren
STEVEN J. RYAN
May 12, 1965 ~ January 5, 2018
Born in Milton, MA, son of Charlotte and
John Ryan died after a brief illness in
Arlington, VA, late of Fairfax, VA and Randolph, MA. He leaves his wife of 28 years,
Michele, and his dear daughter, Jamie Nye
Ryan, the light of his life; his mother Charlotte Simmons and stepfather James Simmons of Plymouth, MA; sisters Susan Ryan
of Sarasota, FL and Cathleen Unkovic of
Wynnewood, PA and brother Jeffery Ryan of
Jersey City, NJ; his in-laws, John and Nancy
Castagna, niece Syndie Haigh, nephew and
godson John Haigh, Denice Haigh all of
Philadelphia, PA.
Of Woodbridge, VA, died on January 7, 2018 at
home with her husband present. Mrs. Wilson
was preceded in death by her parents, Arthur
L. Pridemore, Sr. and Bernice Lorine Dozier
Pridemore of Woodbridge. Survivors include
her husband, Thomas H. Wilson and her brother Arthur L. Pridemore, Jr. Mrs. Wilson was a
recently retired administrative assistant for the
Prince William County Office of Criminal Justice
Services. She was a graduate of Bluefield
College with a Bachelor of Science degree and
was a member of the Alpha Chi Honor Society.
Her husband will receive friends at Pierce
Funeral Home, 9609 Center Street, Manassas,
VA on Friday January 12 at 5 p.m. with a funeral
service at the same location immediately following at 6 p.m. A graveside service will
occur at Stonewall Memory Gardens, 12004
Lee Highway, Manassas on January 13 at 10
a.m. Rev. Dr. Billy Tatum officiate on both
dates. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be
made in Pam’s memory through www.capitalcaring.org, which provided hospice services to
Mrs. Wilson, or to any charity that supports
Sarcoidosis research or treatment.
following cessation of hostilities in Southeast
Asia. As a Colonel, he served in the mid1980s as Commander of Joint Task Force
Bravo at Soto Cano (Palmerola) Air Base
in Honduras at a time of maximum U.S.
involvement in Central America. Staff assignments included service in the Pentagon on
the Joint Staff J-5 Strategic Plans Directorate
and as the Chief of Staff of the Army Chair
at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces.
His military awards included the Defense
Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit,
Bronze Star Medal with “V” for valor device,
Bronze Star Medal with two oak leaf clusters,
Meritorious Service Medal with three oak
leaf clusters, the Vietnam Gallantry Cross
Unit Citation, Combat Infantryman Badge,
Parachute Badge, Air Assault Badge, Joint
Chiefs of Staff Identification Badge, and Army
Staff Identification Badge. The Combat
Infantryman Badge was not usually given
to a member of the field artillery branch, and
it was the one military award he wore on his
civilian attire.
Following his retirement from the Army in
1990 he worked on the staff of U.S. Senator
Trent Lott (R-MS), serving as legislative assistant for national security. For eleven years
he taught at the Industrial College of the
Armed Forces (ICAF), now called the Dwight
D. Eisenhower School for National Security
and Resource Strategy, retiring in 2010. While
at ICAF he taught military strategy, and had a
particular fondness for leading staff rides to
study the Battle of Gettysburg. Throughout
his adult life he was a strong supporter of
The Citadel, setting up alumni-run recruiting
drives, these efforts culminating in Col.
Pearcy being awarded the “Alumni of the
Year Award” for volunteer recruiting. His
activities went beyond recruiting new
cadets. He was also a serious mentor to
many cadets and followed them in their
respective careers, giving advice and encouragement. Several of these mentees achieved
senior officer status in the US armed forces
and in the intelligence community.
Colonel Pearcy will be buried with full military
honors in Arlington National Cemetery.
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
Steven was loved dearly by his family and
friends and will be sorely missed. Funeral
service will be held at Money and King
Funeral Home, 171 W. Maple Ave., Vienna,
VA on Friday January 12 at 11 a.m. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be made in his
memory to the Sierra Club, 415-977-5500
or www.sierraclub.org or the charity of
your choice. Online condolences and fond
memories of Steven may be offered to the
family at
www.moneyandking.com
CURRENT 2018 RATES:
( PER DAY)
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4" - $685
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6"+ for ALL color notices
$224 each additional inch wkday
$250 each additional inch Sunday
MARIANNE GAERTNER SCHARPF
On Sunday, January 7, 2018, at Suburban
Hospital. Born and raised in Pittsburgh, PA,
she was awarded a full academic scholarship to the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University). She
earned a Bachelor of Science in English
Literature from Carnegie Tech, where she
was President of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. Moved to the Washington, DC, area
in 1967, when her husband was appointed
President of Graphic Communications
Association. Great lover of classical music
and theater and long-time donor to Washington-area lively arts groups. Beloved
and loving wife of Norman Walter Scharpf,
who died in 2010; brother of Richard L.
Gaertner, M.D.; proud mother of Norman
Thatcher, Edmund Peter, and Samford
Adams Scharpf; and adoring grandmother
of Nathalie, Holden, Nadia, Sophia, Harry,
Ashley, and Macy. Funeral service will
be held at her church of 50 years, All
Saints Episcopal Church, Chevy Chase, at
3 p.m. on January 17. In lieu of flowers,
contributions can be made in her name
to the All Saints Church Endowment Fund,
c/o Treasurer Nancy Harris, 3 Chevy Chase
Circle, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, or online at
http://allsaintschurch.net/giving/. Private
burial will be at St. Paul’s Rock Creek
Cemetery. Please view and sign guestbook
at www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com.
Notices with photos begin at 3"
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DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
KAYE
SYLVIA DECKELBAUM KAYE
On Tuesday, January 9, 2018,
surrounded by her loving family,
SYLVIA DECKELBAUM KAYE
passed away. A native Washingtonian, Sylvia was born January
22, 1934, to Rose (Egber) and
Fred Deckelbaum and was a lifelong resident
of the Washington Area. She shared her life
with Myles, her devoted husband of 64 years,
her sons Brian, Scott (Barbara) and Jeff (Scott
Mezistrano) and her adoring granddaughter,
Zara. She is also survived by her brother,
Nelson Deckelbaum (Louann) and sister, Mil-
dred Kipperman, her loving nieces, nephews,
cousins, and their families. Sylvia was greatly
loved by her many friends in Washington,
and her winter home at the Deep Canyon
Tennis Club in Palm Desert, CA, especially
her lifelong friends, Miriam Cherner and Bev
Kressin, and her dear friend Leona Garvin.
Affectionately known to her family as Zeesee,
Yiddish for "Sweet One", her name defined
her character. She enjoyed art, theater, tennis, travel, mahjong, card games, word
games, and particularly family summers in
Atlantic City and Ocean City. Sylvia was
grateful for the gift of a longer life through
the generosity of her liver and kidney donors
and the dedication of so many medical professionals. A proud Ambassador for Donate
Life California, Sylvia was honored as Ambassador of the Year in 2011. Funeral services
will be held on Thursday, January 11, 2018, 11
a.m. at Temple Sinai, 3100 Military Rd., NW,
Washington, DC. Interment private. Shiva will
be observed at Ingleside at King Farm, 701
King Farm Blvd., Rockville, MD, on Thursday,
Saturday and Sunday evenings at 7 p.m.
Valet service available. Her family requests
that memorial donations be made to Donate
Life California or the College of the Desert
Foundation. Please consider making the gift
of life by registering as an organ donor. Sylvia
will be remembered as a blessing to those
fortunate to have known her. Arrangements
entrusted to TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL
HOME, 202-541-1001.
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Warm-ish with clouds
Southerly flow increases ahead of
the next strong cold front, which is
still well to the west throughout the
day. It’s unlikely to be “clean”
warmth, as we’ll see clouds and
increasing humidity. There will be some sun, as
well. Highs should head through the 50s and
maybe toward 60 in spots. Winds are from the
south around 5 to 10 mph.
Today
Shower
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Rain, fog
Saturday
Mostly cloudy
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Mostly sunny
Monday
Mostly sunny
Tuesday
Partly sunny
55° 39
66° 44
49° 23
31° 19
32° 24
37° 20
FEELS*: 53°
FEELS: 64°
FEELS: 41°
FEELS: 22°
FEELS: 36°
FEELS: 30°
CHNCE PRECIP: 55%
P: 65%
P: 20%
P: 20%
P: 15%
P: 25%
WIND: S 4–8 mph
W: S 7–14 mph
W: SSW 10–20 mph
W: NNW 8–16 mph
W: ESE 4–8 mph
W: SSW 7–14 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Hagerstown
52/49
Davis
57/50
M
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
52/50
Dover
54/46
Washington
55/51
Su
Weather map features for noon today.
Philadelphia
51/48
Harrisburg
52/48
FORECAST
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
43° 5:00 p.m.
27° 5:23 a.m.
43°/29°
70° 1950
–3° 1875
43° 4:00 p.m.
20° 5:10 a.m.
42°/24°
59° 2016
0° 1982
42° 3:00 p.m.
21° 7:15 a.m.
41°/24°
70° 1950
–2° 1875
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –12.3° yr. to date: –12.3°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 41°
Ocean City
51/48
OCEAN: 32°
Lexington
51/48
Richmond
60/57
Norfolk
58/54
Virginia Beach
56/52
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 34°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
56/51
OCEAN: 33°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
0.16"
0.88"
0.16"
0.88"
0.0"
2.7"
0.00"
0.03"
0.81"
0.03"
0.81"
0.0"
4.7"
0.00"
0.12"
0.96"
0.12"
0.96"
0.0"
5.2"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
1 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly cloudy, some rain. High 45–49.
Wind south 4–8 mph. Tonight, rainy, mild, dense fog. Low
43–47. Wind southwest 3–6 mph. Friday, foggy, rainy, mild.
High 53–57. Wind southwest 4–8 mph. Saturday, partly
sunny. High 32–41.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny, milder. High 50–58.
Wind southeast 4–8 mph. Tonight, cloudy, becoming rainy,
fog late. Low 45–54. Wind southeast 8–16 mph. Friday,
rainy, mild, foggy. High 55–65. Wind south 8–16 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly cloudy, mild. Wind
southeast 4–8 knots. Waves a foot or less. Visibility good. • Lower
Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly cloudy, mild. Wind
southeast 4–8 knots. Waves a foot or less on the lower Potomac and
on the Chesapeake.• River Stages: Today, the Little Falls stage will be
about 2.8 feet, rising to 2.9 feet on Friday. Flood stage at Little Falls
is 10 feet.
Washington
ACTUAL
Cape May
48/45
Annapolis
49/46
Charlottesville
51/49
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
Sa
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
3:39 a.m.
10:20 a.m.
4:04 p.m.
11:10 p.m.
Annapolis
12:26 a.m.
6:48 a.m.
1:45 p.m.
7:42 p.m.
Ocean City
3:14 a.m.
9:36 a.m.
3:24 p.m.
9:34 p.m.
Norfolk
5:18 a.m.
11:34 a.m.
5:34 p.m.
11:35 p.m.
Point Lookout
2:49 a.m.
9:38 a.m.
4:17 p.m.
9:11 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Edinburg, TX 82°
Low: Cut Bank, MT –6°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
48/46/pc
49/26/s
21/19/sf
60/55/r
66/33/pc
52/50/c
10/4/sn
69/59/sh
–1/–17/c
43/34/c
48/44/pc
52/48/r
48/45/c
71/61/sh
64/54/c
61/58/r
38/24/s
57/20/r
60/38/r
55/44/r
59/28/pc
42/25/s
Tomorrow
57/29/r
55/28/s
28/25/sn
62/32/r
57/28/s
63/40/r
12/6/sn
60/26/r
–1/–24/sn
45/27/pc
56/48/r
52/14/i
53/17/r
71/47/r
60/23/r
66/44/r
42/22/sn
25/12/sf
42/16/sn
45/16/sn
48/28/s
50/24/pc
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
30/0/i
51/34/r
60/32/s
–8/–13/s
1/–24/sn
49/42/pc
83/66/pc
71/34/t
60/26/r
70/40/sh
76/63/pc
40/7/sn
62/43/s
64/27/r
71/53/s
66/38/r
65/29/r
81/71/c
51/17/r
18/–5/sn
66/39/sh
74/49/sh
48/46/c
58/54/c
16/5/pc
35/14/i
62/38/s
–3/–9/s
–4/–23/c
56/44/r
83/67/s
53/32/s
30/13/i
42/24/pc
75/50/r
23/10/pc
63/46/s
40/23/pc
75/55/s
42/19/sn
31/22/sn
82/66/sh
22/10/c
7/–6/c
42/23/i
50/32/pc
58/48/r
65/50/r
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
44/19/c
23/1/sn
79/62/pc
51/48/c
68/47/s
59/52/c
45/38/c
54/46/r
50/44/pc
63/60/r
57/31/c
60/57/c
57/43/pc
61/15/r
84/74/sh
45/34/pc
69/53/s
57/50/c
84/73/sh
52/46/r
38/33/sn
48/48/c
79/64/s
34/12/sn
38/19/s
16/5/sn
80/53/r
62/48/r
72/50/s
55/21/r
50/34/r
52/39/c
56/50/r
68/49/r
51/27/pc
68/50/r
57/38/pc
26/17/pc
85/74/pc
45/25/c
71/54/s
60/48/pc
84/74/pc
50/46/c
37/32/c
55/13/r
76/57/r
32/12/s
World
High: Birdsville, Australia 113°
Low: Suhana, Russia –63°
Today
Addis Ababa
70/46/pc
Amsterdam
45/38/sh
Athens
58/48/sh
Auckland
79/64/c
Baghdad
66/42/pc
Bangkok
80/66/s
Beijing
29/10/s
Berlin
38/32/r
Bogota
65/45/sh
Brussels
46/37/sh
Buenos Aires
94/75/c
Cairo
76/52/s
Caracas
74/64/pc
Copenhagen
40/34/r
Dakar
77/66/c
Dublin
43/36/c
Edinburgh
40/29/pc
Frankfurt
45/36/c
Geneva
45/36/c
Ham., Bermuda 69/67/pc
Helsinki
29/24/c
Ho Chi Minh City 92/72/pc
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Last
Quarter
Tomorrow
74/41/s
43/36/sh
59/51/sh
81/66/s
70/42/s
81/63/s
38/14/s
37/28/c
66/46/r
42/34/sh
91/69/t
70/52/s
73/63/pc
38/31/c
77/66/s
47/42/c
42/33/sh
43/34/c
43/31/pc
71/68/pc
28/24/c
90/69/pc
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
62/49/c
71/43/pc
53/47/sh
64/45/pc
77/56/pc
52/23/s
82/75/sh
73/50/pc
88/74/pc
77/69/pc
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45/39/sh
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86/73/s
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42/38/r
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90/75/pc
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26/17/sn
45/41/sh
46/38/c
41/33/c
61/54/s
72/42/pc
51/44/r
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85/59/s
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81/74/sh
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Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
90/75/pc
68/40/s
55/45/sh
83/62/pc
88/57/s
43/33/r
18/5/s
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Set
5:06 p.m.
1:28 p.m.
5:04 p.m.
1:04 p.m.
12:58 p.m.
3:41 p.m.
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91/76/c
73/43/s
58/40/sh
87/64/pc
86/59/s
42/31/r
22/14/s
37/26/s
79/74/r
33/27/c
83/75/pc
56/49/pc
57/38/pc
44/33/s
43/10/i
42/34/c
33/22/c
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
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THE RELIABLE SOURCE
BOOK WORLD
MUSIC REVIEW
CAROLYN HAX
Jacqueline Kent Cooke
says she was merely
defending herself in that
coat-check kerfuffle. C2
You won’t be able to
get Nick Harkaway’s
dystopian “Gnomon”
out of your head. C3
Irish mezzo-soprano Tara
Erraught performs at the
Kennedy Center, and
she’s, well, very likable. C4
Teens don’t embrace their
6-month-old stepsister.
Ask yourself why before
approaching them. C8
Scrutiny of
Franco after
misconduct
allegations
BY
ART REVIEW
S ONIA R AO
James Franco arrived at the
Golden Globe Awards on Sunday
wearing a Time’s Up pin designed
to show support for women who
have dealt with harassment or
assault. But the actor seems to be
facing a brewing scandal of his
own.
The night of the Globes, in
which Franco won best actor in a
comedy or musical for “The Disaster Artist,” three actresses tweeted
accusations of sexual misconduct.
Franco denied the claims in a
Tuesday night appearance on
CBS’s “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert,” hours after the New
York Times canceled a TimesTalk
event scheduled for Wednesday
that was set to feature him and his
brother Dave, who also starred in
“The Disaster Artist.” The Times
said in a statement to the New
York Daily News that it canceled
the event “given the controversy
surrounding recent allegations.”
The controversy began when
actress Ally Sheedy sent a series of
tweets after Franco appeared at
the awards show on Sunday.
“Why is a man hosting? Why is
James Franco allowed in? Said too
much. Nite love ya #goldenglobes,” she tweeted, later adding,
“James Franco just won. Please
never ask me why I left the film/tv
business.”
Sheedy, whom Franco directed
in the 2014 off-Broadway play
“The Long Shrift,” deleted the
tweets later that night. But screenshots still managed to circulate as
Rebel
without
a pause
BY
COPYRIGHT DAVID HOCKNEY/TATE
CHRIS DELMAS/
Post writer
suspended,
apologizes
for behavior
ART CONTINUED ON C3
COPYRIGHT DAVID HOCKNEY/COLLECTION OF GIANCARLO GIAMMETTI
P AUL F ARHI
The Washington Post suspended reporter Joel Achenbach on
Wednesday for what it called “inappropriate workplace conduct”
involving current and former female colleagues.
Achenbach, a veteran reporter,
is the first Post journalist to be
disciplined for misconduct of this
kind since a wave of sexual-harassment allegations began rolling through news outlets and
other organizations in the wake
of revelations about Hollywood
producer Harvey Weinstein in
early October.
The Post said Achenbach
would be suspended for 90 days
without pay, the most severe
newsroom punishment the paper
has handed out in recent years for
violations of its workplace or
journalistic standards. His suspension began immediately.
The paper’s top news managers declined to describe Achenbach’s misconduct in detail and
said the investigation into his
behavior took two months.
“We have investigated the allegations made against Joel, and
based on the facts that The Post
has gathered to date we have
placed him on a 90-day disciplinPOST CONTINUED ON C3
tive at the Metropolitan Museum of Art is one
of the delights of the season. Room after
room unfolds a
sense of his seemingly limitless visual talent, his mix
of whimsy and
keen insight, his
love of the world,
and his courage.
The last of these, courage, is twofold. His
early work was explicitly homoerotic at a
time — the early 1960s — when same-sex
relations were a crime in his native England.
And all of his work, then and since, is
strikingly individual, often running counter
to the prevailing tastes and dogma of the art
world. This engaging exhibition suggests that
these two forms of daring are connected, the
independence achieved as a gay man in a
hostile world carrying over to a larger sense
of independence from the fashion and dictates of other artists and critics.
Hockney, who emerged as an artist just as
London was entering its postwar “swinging”
age of music, fashion and sexual liberation,
has always been a hard artist to incorporate
into the standard narratives of 20th-century
art. His best-known work, made during an
extended stay in Los Angeles in the 1960s, is
figurative and wry, with a pop-art sheen to it.
If that was all he ever produced — if he hadn’t
left a legacy of magnificent drawings, or
designed opera stage sets, or used Polaroids
to play games with multiple perspective
points — then he might well be seen as a
minor artist entranced by swimming pools,
palm trees and other blandishments of
sun-drenched suburbia.
But this exhibition, seen earlier at the Tate
Britain and the Centre Georges Pompidou in
Paris, explodes that misconception. Often,
when one explores the work of a single artist
over decades of production, you struggle to
find connections between the various chapters. The recent Robert Rauschenberg exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art was full of
fissures and sudden changes of course and an
often bewildering sense that there wasn’t just
When the world
zigs, Hockney
has always been
willing to zag
FRANCO CONTINUED ON C2
BY
P HILIP K ENNICOTT
new york — The David Hockney retrospec-
“A Bigger Splash,” 1967, and “California
Art Collector,” 1963, are on display in the
Met’s David Hockney retrospective.
For Williams and others, a world of disparity in pay
BY
E LAHE I ZADI
When Michelle Williams attended Sunday’s Golden Globes
with Tarana Burke, the activist
behind #MeToo, the actress
adeptly turned the focus of red
carpet interviews back on the
message she and other celebrity
activists wanted to bolster: It’s
finally time to end sexual harassment and assault in all industries.
It was a resonant statement for
Williams, who was up for a bestactress Golden Globe for the drama “All the Money in the World,”
which she had initially filmed
with Kevin Spacey. After allegations of sexual misconduct
against Spacey came to light,
director Ridley Scott replaced the
embattled actor with Christopher
Plummer and got the cast back
together to reshoot pivotal
scenes.
But it turns out Williams,
billed as the lead actress, got paid
way less for reshoots than a
supporting actor: Mark Wahlberg. As The Washington Post’s
Steven Zeitchik reported in No-
KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES
Mark Wahlberg received $1.5 million for reshooting scenes for “All the Money in the World”
while co-star Michelle Williams was paid less than $1,000.
vember, Wahlberg got paid millions for about 10 days of work.
Williams and others earned a
small fraction of that.
Then on Tuesday, USA Today
reported some exact figures: Williams earned $80 per diem, adding up to less than $1,000, and
less than 1 percent of the
$1.5 million Wahlberg earned.
According to the outlet, Wahlberg’s team negotiated the reshoot fee. Reps for the movie
studio, the actors and their
shared agency did not comment
to the outlet, nor did they months
ago to The Post.
Scott had previously told USA
Today that the actors did the
reshoots “for nothing,” and that
he also didn’t get paid. Williams
had also previously said she offered to be “wherever they needed me, whenever they needed me.
And they could have my salary,
they could have my holiday, whatever they wanted. Because I appreciated so much that they were
making this massive effort.”
The details over the pay gap
generated plenty of outrage, inPAY GAP CONTINUED ON C2
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Jacqueline Kent Cooke tells her
side of the story about that coat-check scu±e
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kanye West at the MTV Video
Music Awards in 2016.
HEY, ISN’T THAT . . .?
Rapper, designer and realityTV star Kanye West, touring the
National Museum of African
American History and Culture
on Monday?
Yeezy (dressed in stylishtourist mode in a dark hoodie)
took in the exhibits alongside his
dad, Ray West, and daughter
North. Museum director Lonnie
Bunch greeted the party before
they went on a tour, a
spokeswoman for the museum
tells us.
No word on whether there’s
any other business that brings
the high-profile fam to
Washington — or whether West
is planning to meet with
President Trump. Recall that
West made headlines (that’s
another one of his talents) last
year when he visited the
president-elect at Trump Tower,
during which the two “discussed
life,” according to Trump.
J
acqueline Kent Cooke says this
Jacqueline Kent Cooke: “I never
said that word, I would never say
that to anyone.”
was all just a big
misunderstanding.
The 29-year-old daughter of
the late Redskins owner Jack
Kent Cooke was arrested last week
for allegedly assaulting Matthew
Haberkorn, a 52-year-old lawyer,
with a glass clutch after lobbing an
anti-Semitic remark at Haberkorn’s
family on New Year’s Eve at a fancy
Upper East Side restaurant in New
York.
“We were right behind Mr.
Haberkorn’s family in the line,”
Cooke told the New York Daily News,
“but they were taking a really long
time looking for their tickets, so I —
ticket in hand — told his mother,
‘Excuse me, I have to get through.’
She clearly didn’t hear what I said,
and immediately screamed at the
top of her lungs, ‘She called me a
Jew!’ ”
According to Haberkorn, Cooke,
who was waiting in the coat-check
line behind Haberkorn’s family, said,
“Hurry up, Jew. I’ve got places to be.”
A confrontation ensued that left
PATRICK MCMULLAN/GETTY IMAGE
Abedin, Weiner
to settle their
divorce out of
the public eye
Huma Abedin and Anthony
Weiner’s divorce can be called a
lot of things: “Messy” comes to
mind, and definitely “sordid.”
One thing it can’t be labeled
now? Public.
The couple withdrew the
proceeding from the New York
court where it was being
heard, the New York Post
reported Wednesday. But hold
your horses — the legal
maneuver didn’t mean those
two crazy kids are patching
things up. Abedin, a top aide
to former presidential
candidate Hillary Clinton, and
Weiner, the former
MARY ALTAFFER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Huma Abedin and Anthony Weiner in September.
congressman and New York
mayoral candidate now serving
jail time for sexting a minor,
were just seeking to keep the
details of their split under
wraps.
Haberkorn, a personal-injury
attorney from San Francisco,
bloodied by Cooke’s $300 Lulu
Guinness mirrored Perspex clutch.
Cooke told the Daily News that
she “had no idea they were even
Jewish.” The heiress added that she
was in no way anti-Semitic, telling
the paper that her grandmother was
Jewish. “I never said that word, I
would never say that to anyone,”
continued Cooke, whose alleged
crime is being investigated by
NYPD’s Hate Crime Task Force.
In her counterclaim against
Haberkorn, Cooke alleges that she
was, in fact, the victim. Though she
admitted to clocking Haberkorn
with her purse, she said the move
was in self-defense. Haberkorn,
according to Cooke, was “in a rage”
and tried to push her boyfriend.
“I was defending my boyfriend, I
was frightened, I was scared, but I
never intended to hurt Mr.
In a statement to the New
York Daily News, Abedin’s
attorney said it’s for the sake
of their 6-year-old son. “In
order to ensure the
proceedings have a minimal
impact on their child, the
parties have decided to finalize
their divorce swiftly and
privately,” lawyer Charles
Miller said.
Privacy would certainly be a
change for the couple’s
tumultuous and muchscrutinized marriage, which
Abedin sought to end after her
husband’s sexting scandals,
which cost him his promising
political career — and, maybe,
cost her boss the presidency.
(The feds’ examination of
Weiner’s laptop led them to
emails from Abedin, ultimately
prompting the FBI to reopen a
probe into Clinton’s use of a
private email server, all in the
waning days of the campaign.)
Haberkorn,” insisted Cooke, who
said she suffered a broken finger in
the resulting shoving match.
Cooke claimed that Haberkorn’s
motive in pressing charges against
her is financial, telling the Daily
News that the attorney saw “dollar
signs” after looking up her name.
“He assumed I was a billionaire,
which I’m not. I live on a budget like
anyone else. I get a monthly
allowance, I am not shopping on
Madison Avenue. I take the subway,
and I am very frugal,” she said. “I am
not Paris Hilton.”
According to Haberkorn’s
attorney, Andrew T. Miltenberg, no
civil suit has been filed in the case,
and Haberkorn didn’t know who
Cooke was before he pressed
charges.
Miltenberg suggested that Cooke
“was looking to place blame.”
“She is not sorry, only
embarrassed in her social circles,” he
said in a statement to the Daily
News. “Instead of more half-truths
and fabrications, Ms. Kent-Cooke,
how about an apology.”
Okay, everybody,
we need you to
breathe. Ivanka
isn’t pregnant.
First daughter and presidential
adviser Ivanka Trump set off isshe-or-isn’t-she speculation
Wednesday morning when she
posted a birthday tribute to her
husband, Jared Kushner,
accompanied by a pic of them in
which she is cradling a baby bump.
“Happy birthday, Jared! Thank
you for being the most amazing
father, husband, and best friend I
could have dreamed of. Here’s to
you!,” she wrote, adding a
birthday cake emoji and the
hashtag “#Throwback.”
The hashtag clearly shows it
was an old picture from when she
was pregnant with one of the
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
CARLOS BARRIA/REUTERS
Jared Kushner and Ivanka
Trump: Not expecting.
couple’s three children, Arabella,
Joseph and Theodore. But was it
a sweet way to announce that the
couple was expecting again? After
all, Ivanka carefully curates her
social media feed to project
exactly the image she chooses.
But there’s no need to shop for
designer onesies, folks — a person
familiar with the couple says
there’s no Kushner-Trump Baby
No. 4 on the way.
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
Franco denies accuracy Williams is most recent actress to see pay disparity
of allegations on Twitter
lions Pitt got — but was denied.
She also had to pay her own
location fees while filming in
New Orleans. As she wrote: “The
math really is pretty simple:
there are way more talented
black actresses than there are
intelligent, meaningful roles for
them, and we’re consistently
charged with diving for the
crumbs of the scraps, lest we
starve.”
PAY GAP FROM C1
FRANCO FROM C1
actress Violet Paley tweeted another accusation.
“Cute #TIMESUP pin James
Franco,” she wrote. “Remember
the time you pushed my head
down in a car towards your exposed penis & that other time you
told my friend to come to your
hotel when she was 17? After you
had already been caught doing
that to a different 17 year old?”
A
third
actress,
Sarah
Tither-Kaplan, wrote a tweet directed at Franco that stated, “Remember a few weeks ago when
you told me the full nudity you had
me do in two of your movies for
$100/day wasn’t exploitative because I signed a contract to do it?
Times up on that!”
The Washington Post requested
comment from all four actors.
None responded except Paley, who
declined to comment for the time
being.
This isn’t the first time Franco
has dealt with allegations of inappropriate behavior. In 2014, the
actor was accused of pursuing an
underage girl via Instagram when
he allegedly direct-messaged a 17year-old fan and tried to meet her
at a hotel, according to the Hollywood Reporter.
Franco addressed the situation
while appearing on “Live! With
Kelly and Michael” after screenshots of the conversation spread
online, saying he was unaware of
the girl’s age.
“I’m embarrassed, and I guess
I’m just a model of how social
media is tricky,” he said. “It’s a way
that people meet each other today,
but what I’ve learned — I guess
because I’m new to it — is you
don’t know who’s on the other
end.”
Asked by Colbert at the end of
Tuesday’s interview to address the
recent allegations, Franco denied
their accuracy and clarified that
he wore the Time’s Up pin “because I do support it.”
“First of all, I have no idea what
I did to Ally Sheedy” he said. “I had
nothing but a great time with her,
total respect for her.”
Regarding the other allegations, he added, “The things that I
heard were on Twitter are not
accurate, but I completely support
people coming out and being able
to have a voice, because they
didn’t have a voice for so long. So I
don’t want to — I don’t want to,
you know, shut them down in any
way. I think it’s a good thing, and I
support it.”
Colbert followed up by asking if
“If I’ve done something
wrong, I will fix it.”
James Franco, in an interview on
“The Late Show With Stephen
Colbert”
there was a way to have this discussion off social media.
“Do you have any idea of what
the answer might be to come to
some sense of what the truth is so
there can be some sort of reconciliation between people who clearly
have different views of things?” he
asked the actor. “I mean, it’s a big
question, but I don’t know how to
leave, or to further, this discussion.”
In reference to his own situation, Franco said: “The way I live
my life, I can’t live if there’s restitution to be made. I will make it. So if
I’ve done something wrong, I will
fix it. I have to. I mean, I think
that’s how that works. I don’t
know what else to do.”
Regarding the bigger issue, he
added: “Look, I really don’t have
the answers. And I think the point
of this whole thing is that we
listen. You know, there were incredible people talking that night.
They had a lot to say. And I’m here
to listen and learn and change my
perspective where it’s off, and I’m
completely willing and want to.”
sonia.rao@washpost.com
cluding among celebrities. “She
has been in the industry for 20
[years],” Jessica Chastain tweeted. “She deserves more than 1% of
her male costar’s salary.”
“This is so messed up that it is
almost hard to believe. Almost,”
Judd Apatow tweeted. “This is
how this business works.”
But before Hollywood grappled so publicly with sexual harassment and assault, the gender
pay gap was one of the industry’s
dominant issues. Here are the
other recent controversies:
Jennifer Lawrence
The Sony hack brought out a
lot of dirty laundry in the industry, including pay discrepancies
for the 2013 movie “American
Hustle.” Lawrence was an international star at the time, thanks
to her “Hunger Games” franchise,
and an Oscar winner. But
through the hack, she discovered
in 2014 that she got paid less than
her male co-stars (Bradley Cooper, Christian Bale and Jeremy
Renner).
A year later, Lawrence wrote
an essay for Lenny Letter directly
addressing the pay gap, saying
that after the hack, “I didn’t get
mad at Sony. I got mad at myself. I
failed as a negotiator because I
gave up early. I didn’t want to
keep fighting over millions of
dollars that, frankly, due to two
franchises, I don’t need. . . . But if
I’m honest with myself, I would
be lying if I didn’t say there was
an element of wanting to be liked
that influenced my decision to
close the deal without a real
fight.”
Amy Adams
Adams also was paid less than
her male co-stars in “American
Hustle.”
“She worked every day on that
movie and got paid nothing. It’s
really horrible actually, it’s almost
embarrassing,” her co-star Cooper later said. “[She] should have
been paid more than everybody.”
Adams later said that she knew
NELSON/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
From left, actresses Natalie Portman, America Ferrera and Emma
Stone and tennis great Billie Jean King at the Golden Globes.
she was getting paid less than her
male co-stars.
“I didn’t speak about it before
and I’m probably not going to
speak about it forever, because I
disagreed with . . . not Jennifer
per se, but people who had
opinions on how women should
go about negotiating,” the actress told GQ in 2016. “The truth
is we hire people to negotiate on
our behalf, men and women. . . .
I knew I was being paid less and
I still agreed to do it because the
option comes down to do it or
don’t do it. So you just have to
decide if it’s worth it for you. It
doesn’t mean I liked it.”
Natalie Portman
The actress revealed last year
that Ashton Kutcher was paid
three times more than she was for
the 2011 rom-com “No Strings
Attached.”
“I knew and I went along with
it because there’s this thing with
‘quotes’ in Hollywood,” she said in
a Marie Claire interview, referring to the practice of determining an actor’s salary in part based
on previous salaries. “His [quote]
was three times higher than mine
so they said he should get three
times more. I wasn’t as pissed as I
should have been. I mean, we get
paid a lot, so it’s hard to complain, but the disparity is crazy.”
Emma Stone
When discussing her role in
“Battle of the Sexes,” Stone revealed that in her career, male
co-stars have taken a pay cut so
that she can have parity with
them: “That’s something they do
for me because they feel it’s
what’s right and fair. . . . If my
male co-star, who has a higher
quote than me but believes we are
equal, takes a pay cut so that I can
match him, that changes my
quote in the future and changes
my life.”
Taraji P. Henson
Although she would go on to be
nominated for a supporting-actress Oscar for her role in “The
Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” Henson would later write
that she ended up getting paid
“the equivalent of sofa change”
compared with what co-stars
Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett
received. As she wrote in her
memoir, Henson’s manager at
one point asked for “somewhere
in the mid six figures — no doubt
a mere percentage” of the mil-
Patricia Arquette
Her rousing 2015 Oscars acceptance speech ended with a call-toaction that cast a light on the
gender pay gap.
“To every woman who gave
birth, to every taxpayer and citizen of this nation, we have fought
for everybody else’s equal rights,”
she said after winning for best
supporting actress for “Boyhood.”
“It’s our time to have wage equality once and for all and equal
rights for women in the United
States of America.”
The next year, Arquette said on
the red carpet that since her
speech, she has lost or had to
walk away from roles, and hinted
that she thought it was because of
her speech.
Catt Sadler
The E! anchor left the network
last month because, she said, she
was getting paid half of what her
male co-star made. Sadler said
that her team “asked for what I
know I deserve and were denied
repeatedly” during negotiations.
Celebrities such as Debra
Messing and Eva Longoria called
out Sadler’s departure on E! itself
during the network’s Sunday’s
Golden Globes red carpet coverage.
By Tuesday, Frances Berwick,
who heads up E! and other NBC
entertainment networks, said
publicly that Sadler and her cohost Jason Kennedy had different
roles “and therefore different salaries,” Variety reported. “Our employees’ salaries are based on
their roles and their expertise,
regardless of gender.”
elahe.izadi@washpost.com
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
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Hockney continues to evolve without ever losing continuity
ART FROM C1
one Rauschenberg, but many. But
Hockney is the rare artist who
continually evolves without losing a powerful sense of continuity.
Early works, made while he
was in 20s, take on sexual desire
in a confrontational way, with
some of the darkness found in
the works of Francis Bacon (an
artist Hockney admired at the
time). But this feral energy is
soon exorcised, and his focus
shifts from desire to beauty, from
furtive activity to open admiration. Beautiful men are seen in
swimming pools, male couples
co-inhabit benign domestic spaces, and the frisson of cruising
gives way to a sense of tenderness that is, perhaps, even more
challenging to heterosexual sensibilities.
These early works, in which
male figures are rendered as
sack-like grotesques, bleeding
and blurring into abstract backgrounds, suggest a kind of torment, but torment leavened by
humor. In later works, that humor is in turn leavened by a
sense of isolation and nostalgia.
In a misguided effort to raise
Hockney’s credentials as a serious painter, critics often point to
the many ways in which he
grappled with abstraction, as if
every great painter of the period
had to stake out his or her place
in relationship to the dominant
mode of painting. But Hockney
doesn’t seem terribly addled by
abstraction. Rather, he absorbs
from it what he needs and deploys it to his own advantage. He
is, perhaps, a bit like some fine
composers, including Hindemith
and Stravinsky, who borrowed
and reconfigured gestures and
ideas from atonal or serial composers without ever subscribing
to a musical ideology.
Or, as a quotation from Hockney printed on the back of the
exhibition catalogue puts it, “I
paint what I like, when I like, and
where I like, with occasional
nostalgic journeys.” Those nostalgic journeys offer much of the
COPYRIGHT DAVID HOCKNEY/JENNI CARTER/ART GALLERY OF NEW SOUTH WALES
All of David Hockney’s
work is strikingly
individual, often
running counter to the
prevailing tastes of the
art world.
ABOVE: “Portrait of an
Artist (Pool With Two
Figures),” 1972.
best of the show. There are
drawings on paper made with all
the finesse of Picasso, and perhaps even more humanity. There
are large-format paintings in
which beloved paintings from
earlier ages — Piero della Francesca, Vermeer, van Gogh — are
incorporated, taped onto a
screen which suggests a mix of
contemporary abstraction and
pointillism.
The geometries of his early
California paintings are sometimes said to mimic or confront
the grid forms popular among
minimalist painters at the time.
BOOK WORLD
In the shadows of a surveillance state
BY
M ICHAEL D IRDA
Imagine, if you will, a Pynchonesque mega-novel that periodically calls to mind the films
“Inception” and “The Matrix,”
Raymond Chandler’s quest romances about detective Philip
Marlowe, John le Carré’s intricately recursive “Tinker, Tailor,
Soldier, Spy,” the dizzying science
fiction of Philip K. Dick, William
Gibson and Neal Stephenson,
Iain Pears’s hypertextual “Arcadia” and Haruki Murakami’s alternate world “IQ84” and even
this week’s Washington Post story
about China’s push for “total surveillance.”
What would such an ambitious
book look like? You know the
answer already.
Nick Harkaway’s “Gnomon”
opens in the not-too-distant future, when England is governed
by the System. Perfect security
has been achieved through a constant monitoring of virtually all
citizens. Cameras, microphones
and other sensors are ubiquitous.
Every aspect of a person’s life is
immediately gathered into a vast
database. Each day a cross section
of the populace votes on civic
questions and proposed regulations — the polls, not the pols,
guarantee a kind of pure democracy. In exchange for total personal transparency, the System offers
safety and empowerment to all.
In this world, a police force,
called the Witness, often prevents
crimes before they happen.
Through high-level technology
its officers communicate nonstop
with a kind of super-Siri. They
can even employ instant lie detection to assess an informant’s honesty and level of sincerity. In some
extreme cases, surgical probes
may be used in interrogation.
These are widely recognized as
benign, with no debilitating consequences. At least not usually.
“The death of a suspect in
custody,” says Inspector Neith in
the opening sentence of “Gnomon,” “is a very serious matter.
There is no one at the Witness
Programme who does not feel a
sense of personal failure this
morning.” An ornery old woman
named Diana Hunter has died
during a supposedly routine interrogation, and Neith, well
known for her probity, has been
assigned to learn what went
wrong. The case file bears the
randomly generated name “Gnomon.”
Gnomon? Throughout, Harkaway — not only the author of
three excellent previous novels
and a study of digital culture, but
also, as he must be tired of hear-
GNOMON
By Nick Harkaway
Knopf. 704 pp. $28.95
ing, the son of John le Carré —
regularly drops in arcane words
and literary or historical allusions, which he usually defines or
identifies, though not always
right away. Just keep reading. A
gnomon is the perpendicular part
of a sundial, the part that casts a
shadow.
To understand what happened
to Diana Hunter, Inspector Neith
employs a standard investigative
tool: She connects her own mind
to a Witness interface that allows
her to relive — in a kind of
dream-state — what Hunter was
thinking during the brain probe.
It grows quickly apparent that the
woman was terrified the surgical
procedure would, in her own
words, “hollow me out like a
pumpkin and leave me with a
pumpkin smile: a wide, idiot,
toothless grin.” Hunter also turns
out to have valued privacy to a
seemingly paranoid degree. She
has kept her house, filled with
books and art, entirely free of
electronics, made it a zone into
which the System could not peer.
As Neith and the reader quickly guess, Diana Hunter wasn’t just
a kindly old lady who lent books
to the neighborhood children. In
fact, she had — through some
kind of special training — prepared herself to combat any cranial intrusion by guarding her
inner self with four wildly different screen-narratives, each recounted by a very different protagonist. In the first, a Greek
mathematical
genius-turnedbanker relates his financial and
sexual exploits. The second focuses on Saint Augustine’s cast-off
mistress, now grown deeply
learned in the occult and desperate to bring her dead son back to
life. In the third, we follow a
once-famous Ethiopian painter
who comes out of retirement to
design the art for a computer
game created by his granddaughter. For the fourth, we grow privy
to the thoughts of a far-future
hive-mind called Gnomon, who
seems able to travel in time.
Harkaway divides up and parcels out these four narratives over
the course of Neith’s investigation. Each, I should stress, is
genre-novel exciting just on its
own. Still, one soon notices certain repeated motifs and symbols: a descent into darkness and
near-death, references to ominous Fire Judges, a computer
game that resembles the society
of the System, a magical place
sometimes called the Chamber of
Isis or Firespine, the ability to
walk through walls, the eerie recurrence of the number 5. What is
really going on?
As the enigmatic and androgynous figure known as Lonnrot
tells Neith: “The truth is rotational; it is a pattern of responses
arranged around a core. As one
uncovers one answer, it vanishes
away to reveal another . . . until
the whole is visible at one time
and is revealed to be quite different from what was suggested by
the individual parts.” Are Hunter’s narratives really fictional?
Has she planted secret information in them? Could she actually
be playing her interrogators and
using their brain probe for mysterious ends of her own? And,
most tantalizing of all, why does
Lonnrot ask, “How long ago do
you think Diana Hunter’s interrogation started?”
Neith believes wholeheartedly
in the System, convinced that
universal surveillance is a small
price to pay for universal
well-being. Still, she finds herself
suspicious of the smoothly debonair Oliver Smith, who runs the
innocuous-sounding
agency
called the Turnpike Trust. An
elderly bookseller later tells her
that no one can locate copies of
the books published by the young
Diana Hunter. Eventually, the
case takes Neith to Oxford to
question a celebrated professor of
semiotics, then to a foreign embassy to confront an old enemy
known as the Waxman. Finally, a
computer whiz shows her how, in
an emergency, to contact a darkweb entity called Kraken.
Despite the richness of its invention and virtuosic tricksiness,
“Gnomon” is probably a bit too
long. Still, it means to dazzle and
it does, while also raising serious
questions about identity, privacy,
human rights and the just society.
Like a Cedar Point roller coaster,
its final chapters will leave your
head spinning. But what a ride!
mdirda@gmail.com
Michael Dirda reviews books every
Thursday for The Washington Post.
On Jan. 14 at 3 p.m. Nick Harkaway
will be at Politics and Prose, 5015
Connecticut Ave. NW.
Modernist buildings resolve into
vertical patterns of colored windows. But these visual games
usually have emotional resonance, functioning more as commentaries on the architecture
than on minimalist painting. One
particularly stunning work from
the California years, the 1967 “A
Lawn Being Sprinkled,” shows
eight perfectly triangular plumes
of water shot out of irrigation
nozzles set into a pristine patch
of green lawn, like vaporous topiary. Two forlorn palm trees that
rise above a distant fence locate
the scene in California. Eliminate
those trees and blur a few of the
details — smudge the planks of
the wooden fence, smooth out the
texture of the grass — and this
could be an entirely abstract
composition. And yet the painting doesn’t seem to want to flirt
with that danger. It is happily
representational — or at least
happy to use representational
gestures. And the curious stylization of the water jets seems more
about offering a typically droll
comment on the alluring, industrial perfection of American life
than they are a feint in the
direction of abstraction.
Hockney’s photo collages, often made with dozens of Polaroid images pasted into a dizzying, multi-perspective view of a
recognizable scene — his mother at a ruined abbey on a rainy
day, or an intersection on a
desert highway — are sometimes dismissed as gimmicky.
But like the supposed references
to minimalism or abstraction,
they often have strikingly emotional power. The scene of his
mother, in particular, captures
her vulnerability in a way that
transcends the virtuosity of the
photo collage. A pair of shoes,
presumably those of the artist,
give the work an uncanny emotional power, somehow standing in for the tension between
distance and intimacy that
marks many close family relationships.
Hockney’s more recent work
has turned to landscape, rendered in brilliant, even garish
colors. Matisse and Van Gogh are
clearly in the background, perhaps too much so. But these
works are not radically disjunctive from the earlier work. They
are rich with the familiar Hockney fascination with how a mark
on the canvas conveys information, how formalized and often
bizarre the language of painting
has always been. Hockney is now
80 years old and has had a
prolific career. The most recent
works are more difficult to love
than the earlier work, but that is
in part because they don’t seem
to fit the expectations we might
have of an older painter: They
seem more energetic, less contained, and more spontaneous
than the work that has come
before. They may not be the work
for which Hockney is remembered, but one can admire them
for what they say about the
artist’s relation to life. He seems
inexhaustible.
philip.kennicott@washpost.com
David Hockney is on view through
Feb. 25 at the Metropolitan Museum
of Art in New York. For more
information, visit metmuseum.org.
Veteran Post reporter suspended
POST FROM C1
ary suspension for inappropriate
workplace conduct,” Managing
Editor Tracy Grant said in a statement. “The Washington Post is
committed to providing a safe
and respectful work environment
for all employees. We will continue to investigate any allegations
that come to light and will take
further action if necessary.”
Grant declined to comment
further, citing privacy reasons.
Achenbach also would not
elaborate in an interview on
Wednesday. He instead referred
to a statement: “I’m very sorry to
say that I’ve behaved badly and
have been suspended by The Post
for three months for inappropriate workplace conduct. I’ve said
and done things that were unprofessional, and I apologize to the
women affected by this and acknowledge their courage in
speaking out.” He added that he
found The Post’s disciplinary
process fair and cooperated with
it.
A memorandum Grant sent to
Achenbach spelling out the terms
of his suspension doesn’t include
details of the allegations against
him. It said, however, that the
disciplinary action was based on
interviews with current and former colleagues and with Achenbach himself. It also said he admitted engaging in the conduct in
question and that he would face
further punishment, including
the possible termination of his
employment, if new information
or allegations arise.
A copy of the memo was sent to
the Washington-Baltimore Newspaper Guild, Local 32035, which
represents Post newsroom employees in labor-management ne-
gotiations.
Achenbach, 57, is one of The
Post’s longest-serving and most
versatile writers. He joined the
paper in 1990 from the Miami
Herald and has worked for the
Style section, Sunday magazine,
Outlook section and National
staff. He started the paper’s first
online-only
column,
called
“Rough Draft,” and with “Achenblog” was among the paper’s earliest bloggers. For the past decade, he has covered science news
and features. Achenbach has also
written for National Geographic
magazine and published several
books, including an account of
the BP oil spilled titled, “A Hole at
the Bottom of the Sea: The Race to
Kill the BP Oil Gusher.”
The Post has been among the
leading publications in reporting
on workplace harassment since
the New York Times published its
first exposé on Weinstein three
months ago. The Post broke several stories about misconduct by
public figures, most prominently
Roy Moore, the Alabama Republican Senate candidate who was
accused of sexually inappropriate
behavior with teenage girls when
he was in his 30s. Moore lost a
special runoff election in December to Democrat Doug Jones.
A number of figures in journalism, government and entertainment have lost their careers and
reputations in the wake of the
Weinstein story, including TV
hosts Charlie Rose and Matt Lauer, Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.),
political pundit Mark Halperin,
actor Kevin Spacey and radio
legend Garrison Keillor.
The Post’s decision to suspend
rather than fire Achenbach mirrors the Times’s disciplinary action against its White House reporter, Glenn Thrush, who was
suspended for two months and
removed from covering the president following a lengthy investigation of misconduct that occurred when he was a reporter at
Politico.
paul.farhi@washpost.com
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THEATRE
Now thru January 28!
“The Humans”
Tue-Fri at 8
Sat & Sun at 2 & 8
Now Thru January 28!
Tue-Fri at 7:30
Sat & Sun at 1:30 & 7:30
“On Your Feet!”
Added matinee Jan. 25
No evening perf. Jan 28
Stephen Karam’s uproarious, hopeful, and heartbreaking
play takes place over the course of a family dinner on
Thanksgiving. As darkness falls and eerie things start to
go bump in the night, the Blake clan’s deepest fears and
greatest follies are laid bare. Our modern age of anxiety is
keenly observed in this new American classic that won the
2016 Tony Award® for Best Play. Recommended for age 15
and up,
Kennedy Center
Eisenhower Theater
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
“What Broadway
needs more of:
extraordinary
‘Humans.’ The
best play of the
year!”—The
Washington Post
From their humble beginnings in Cuba, Emilio and Gloria
Estefan came to America and broke through all barriers to
become a crossover sensation at the very top of the pop
music world. But just when they thought they had it all, they
almost lost everything. On Your Feet! takes you inside their
real-life story, with some of the most iconic songs of the
past quarter century.
Kennedy Center
Opera House
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
Recommended for
age 8 and up.
MUSIC - CONCERTS
FMMC Chorale
Concert
January 12 & 13, 2018
8:00 PM
Concert featuring the Friday Morning Music Club Chorale
and Soloists
Schubert: Mass no. 2
Mozart: Requiem
Lutheran Church of the
Reformation
212 E. Captiol St., NE
(202) 543-4200
Fmmc.org
Free
Free Will Offering
Suggested.
Closest Metro:
South Capitol
(Blue, Silver,
Organge)
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
National Symphony
Orchestra:
Bernstein's "The
Age of Anxiety" /
Ravel's "Bolero"
Tonight at 7
Saturday at 8
Yutaka Sado leads a tribute of works composed or
conducted by Bernstein, with whom Sado studied conducting. The program includes Ravel's Boléro, Rossini's Overture
to The Thieving Magpie, Bernstein's "The Age of Anxiety"
featuring pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet, and Tchaikovsky's
Francesca da Rimini.
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
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ForeWords, with
Anna Celenza.
Beginning at
6:45 p.m. before
the Sat., Jan. 13
performance.
AfterWords Immediately following tonight's concert.
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THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
MUSIC REVIEW
Tara Erraught: Between like and love
BY
A NNE M IDGETTE
Tara Erraught is a bonny Irish
lass who is almost aggressively likable. That’s her personality as a
performer, and she plays it up to
the hilt. Erraught is a mezzo-soprano who’s doing well for herself in
Europe and, since her 2015 U.S.
debut in the second cast of the
Washington National Opera’s “Cenerentola,” in the States. On Tuesday night, she gave a recital
through Vocal Arts DC at the Terrace Theater, together with the pianist John O’Conor, which made it
an Irish lovefest of an evening.
Erraught comes off like a character in a historical drama from
the 1950s, all creamy-white skin
and pert ripostes and wide-eyed
freshness. This is all very agreeable, and arguably appropriate to
an art form that has a certain
amount of period flair itself (nothing on her program postdated the
mid-20th century). Her program,
too, had exactly the accepted
amount of range and variation: a
French set, consisting of three
Liszt songs in that language; two
German sets, of Wolf and Strauss;
an English-language set, of Roger
Quilter songs, sung with veritably
operatic plumminess; and, to finish, some Italian, in the form of a
less-known and delicious short
cantata about Joan of Arc that
Rossini wrote after he had retired
from writing opera. She then responded to the warm but not rapturous applause with two Irish
encores: “Gortnamona” by William Percy French and, inevitably,
“Danny Boy.”
What Erraught is not is a deep or
penetrating artist. Indeed, she
needs to shift into a higher artistic
gear as she looks ahead to an age at
which all this vivaciousness may
not play quite so well. At the moment, she seems to view a song as
something to which things must
be done, and she does those things
with a great deal of commitment:
modulating her voice, articulating
her words and offering little stock
KRISTIN SPEED
Mezzo-soprano Tara Erraught.
gestures (the singer’s trope of the
earnest, I-am-having-deep-feelings back-and-forth shake of the
head). All of this is done, though,
with a textbook obedience. What
she doesn’t do is relax into the
music, and into her own voice, and
allow the music to bloom and soar
beyond the outlines of what’s written on the page.
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Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
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Monster Hunt 2 (Zhuo yao ji
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(PG-13) 3:40
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9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
As a result, some of the surefire
hits on the program fell a little flat.
She made a point of telling the
audience that she has lived in Germany for years, but while her Wolf
songs were excellent, her set of beloved Strauss favorites was disappointing. Although her forte
seemed to be sentiment, her presentation remained so external and
by-the-book that she didn’t touch
the sentimental ache at the heart of
“Allerseelen” or “Morgen.” And
though the sprightly “Ständchen”
would seem to be right in her expressive wheelhouse, she couldn’t
deliver, vocally, on this light song’s
deceptively weighty climax.
And yet, since her whole focus
was on communication, she was
often vocally careless. She tended
to drift sharp (starting with “Enfant, si j’etais roi,” the opening Liszt
song, in which O’Conor’s piano
threatened to bury her). She often
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Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
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Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
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Alien Intrusion: Unmasking a
Deception 7:00
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8:20
Jai Simha (Jaisimha) (NR)
6:00-9:30
Along With the Gods: The Two
Worlds 10:55-2:15-5:50-9:25
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) 12:00-1:00-4:35
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:00-6:15
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
11:20-3:00-6:45-10:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
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XD: 11:10-2:45-6:25-10:00
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1:00-2:45-4:20-8:00-9:55-10:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An
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3:30-6:50-10:30
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All the Money in the World (R)
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Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
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12:00
Condorito: The Movie (Condorito:
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3D (PG-13) 12:15
Alien Intrusion: Unmasking a
Deception 7:00
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
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Stadium 14
20000 Century Boulevard
Ferdinand (PG) 12:45-3:306:15-9:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:15-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) 6:15-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
1:30-3:15-5:15-7:15-8:30-10:45
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12:00-2:45-5:30-8:15-11:00
Downsizing (R) 1:30
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Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:15-4:157:15-10:15
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All the Money in the World (R)
3:00-6:45-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3D (PG-13) 2:00-8:00
Alien Intrusion: Unmasking a
Deception 7:00
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
12:00-3:30-10:30
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 1:15-4:10
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
1:30-4:00-6:35-9:05
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 12:45-1:45-2:45-4:00-5:006:15-7:15-8:15-9:35-10:30
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 1:504:30-7:20-9:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 1:00-2:00-3:45-4:456:30-7:30-9:15-10:15
Coco (PG) CC: 1:20-4:25
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 1:25-2:25-4:15-5:15-6:55-7:559:30-10:30
ArcLight Bethesda
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 5:007101 Democracy Boulevard
6:40-9:10
Ferdinand (PG) 11:50-2:15-4:40 Downsizing (R) CC: 1:05
The Disaster Artist (R) 3:15
The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
The Greatest Showman (PG)
7:30-10:00
11:25-2:40-5:10-7:30-10:05
All the Money in the World (R)
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:20-7:10-10:00
Stadium 14
12:55
6505 America Blvd.
Molly's Game (R) CC: 1:00-4:05Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 10:557:10-10:15
Ferdinand (PG) 1:15-4:00-6:451:50-4:05-7:15-9:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 7:00-9:40 9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:30Landmark
(PG-13) 11:15-1:55-2:45-4:254:30-7:15-10:15
Bethesda Row Cinema
5:50-8:25-10:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Coco (PG) 12:15-2:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:30- 12:30-1:30-3:50-5:00-7:15-8:30Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) 4:20-7:20-10:00
10:35
10:35-1:05-4:30-7:55-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PGDarkest Hour (PG-13) 11:35-2:20- The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:00-1:40- 13) 6:00-9:30
2:10-3:50-4:30-7:00-7:30-9:305:05-7:45-9:20
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:30-3:00
9:40-10:05
The Shape of Water (R) 11:20Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
2:05-4:55-7:50-11:00
(PG-13) 12:45-3:35-4:45-6:251:20-4:10-6:50-9:50
Downsizing (R) 12:20-4:10
Lady Bird (R) CC: 12:50-1:35-3:20- 7:40-9:15
Molly's Game (R) 11:00-1:05-4:20- 5:40-7:50-9:55
Coco (PG) 12:30-3:15
7:25-10:35
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 7:00-9:45 Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
All the Money in the World (R)
1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45
Darkest
Hour
(PG-13)
CC:
1:1011:30-2:25-4:10-6:10-10:25
Wonder (PG) 1:15-4:00-7:00-10:00
3:40-4:00-6:30-7:10-9:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:15-4:15Three
Billboards
Outside
Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 10:40-3:20-6:45
7:15-10:15
Missouri (R) CC: 4:40
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-8:30-9:35
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:30-8:00-10:35
Old
Greenbelt
Theatre
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Downsizing (R) 12:45-3:50
129 Centerway
10:25-1:30-4:45-8:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 7:00-9:45
The
Greatest
Showman
(PG)
I, Tonya (R) CC: 11:55-2:35-5:25Molly's Game (R) 12:45-4:005:15-7:45
8:05-10:40
7:15-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
All the Money in the World (R)
11:40-5:20-9:25
3899 Branch Avenue
1:00-4:05
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:15-7:35
Ferdinand (PG) 12:45-3:20Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:45-2:106:10-8:40
3D (PG-13) 1:45-10:30
5:45-9:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) The Post (PG-13) 7:15-10:15
The Commuter (PG-13) 7:05-9:50 12:30-3:45-7:00
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 7:10Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:05-2:25 Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
14716 Baltimore Avenue
10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:00-1:00-2:45-3:45-5:30 Ferdinand (PG) 12:45-3:30
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
The
Greatest
Showman (PG) 1:151020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
4:20-6:55-9:45
1:00-3:20-5:40-8:05
Ferdinand (PG) 1:40-4:30-7:00Star
Wars:
The
Last Jedi (PG-13)
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:40
9:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) The Commuter (PG-13) 7:00-8:05 12:20-2:20-3:50-7:30-10:10
Star
Wars:
The
Last
Jedi 3D
11:00-1:30-2:30-5:00-6:00-8:30Regal Bowie Stadium 14
(PG-13) 6:00
9:30
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
Pitch
Perfect
3
(PG-13)
12:20Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:20Ferdinand (PG) 1:05-4:10-7:202:50-5:20-8:00-10:30
1:50-4:40-7:20-10:00
10:00
Jumanji:
Welcome
to
the
Jungle
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:00(PG-13) 1:05-4:10-7:15
(PG-13) 11:10-1:00-2:00-3:504:00-6:50-9:50
Coco (PG) 12:35-3:10
4:50-6:50-7:50-9:40-10:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Father Figures (R) 3:40-10:00
Coco (PG) 1:10-3:50
1:10-3:30-4:40-7:00-8:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Father Figures (R) 6:30-9:20
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 1:301:30-5:00-7:45-10:30
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) 4:25-10:10
Downsizing (R) 12:25-6:45
11:15-12:50-3:20-5:50-8:20-9:50- Coco (PG) 1:15-4:05
Molly's Game (R) 12:30-3:4510:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 7:00-10:25
Wonder (PG) 1:20-4:05-7:10
(PG-13) 3:10-4:35-6:10-9:10-10:30 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
All the Money in the World (R)
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) 3D (PG-13) 10:20
1:20-4:20-7:15-10:20
2:55-5:30-8:10
Paddington 2 (PG) 6:15-9:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Wonder (PG) 2:00
All the Money in the World (R)
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
Downsizing (R) 1:00-4:00
12:55-4:00-10:35
Bow Tie Harbour 9
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 3:40The Commuter (PG-13) 7:35-9:30
2474 Solomons Island Road
6:40-9:40
- Prince in Exile (NR)
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:35-10:15 Agnathavasi
12:15-4:00-8:15
11:10-1:50-4:40-7:40-10:20
The Commuter (PG-13) 7:00-9:45 The Post (PG-13) 7:10
The Shape of Water (R) 12:30All the Money in the World (R)
Regal Rockville Center
3:30-6:40-9:30
3:20-6:30-9:30
Stadium 13
Downsizing (R) 11:00-4:10
Molly's Game (R) 3:50-7:10-10:20
199 East Montgomery Avenue
Molly's Game (R) 12:40-3:50Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:45-10:30
6:50-9:50
3D (PG-13) 1:40-7:40
The Commuter (PG-13) 7:00-10:00
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-10:00
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-10:00
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-10:00
Lady Bird (R) 2:00
Alien Intrusion: Unmasking a
I, Tonya (R) 10:50-1:40-4:30I, Tonya (R) 7:00-10:15
Deception 7:00
7:20-10:10
Alien Intrusion: Unmasking a
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:30-1:20Deception 7:00
Stadium 20 & IMAX
4:10-7:10-10:00
900 Ellsworth Drive
Regal Waugh Chapel
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 11:20-1:554:35
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 3:25
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:15-1:45-4:25-7:15-9:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 11:25-1:15-2:25-4:40-8:05
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 11:252:15-5:05-7:30-9:55
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 11:40-1:45-7:20
Coco (PG) CC: 11:30-1:30-4:05
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: (!) 11:20-2:30-5:05-7:40-10:15
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:30-2:157:40-10:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 11:201:20-4:15-7:10-10:05
Tiger Zinda Hai (NR) 12:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:504:40-7:35-10:25
Downsizing (R) CC: 11:25-3:20
Molly's Game (R) CC: (!) 12:303:40-6:50-10:00
All the Money in the World (R)
CC: (!) 12:55-4:00-7:15-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3D (PG-13) CC: 4:30-10:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC:
12:10-3:35-7:05-10:30
Goldbuster (Yao ling ling) (NR) (!)
Stadium 12 & IMAX
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD Ferdinand (PG) 1:20-4:10
2:05-4:35
1419 South Main Chapel Way
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The Disaster Artist (R) 12:05-2:55Ferdinand (PG) 11:40-2:20
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:35-10:10
Missouri (R) 7:00-9:45
5:35-8:05-10:55
Regal Westview
Stadium 16 & IMAX
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Ferdinand (PG) 11:00-1:45-4:307:15-10:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:30-2:15-5:00-8:00-10:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 3:30-10:30
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:151:45-4:15-7:15-10:00
Coco (PG) 12:15-3:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:00-1:15-4:30-5:157:30-8:15-10:30
Father Figures (R) 6:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Wonder (PG) 12:15-3:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:30-3:306:30-9:30
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:45
The Shape of Water (R) 12:303:45-6:45-9:45
The Commuter (PG-13) 7:15-10:15
Downsizing (R) 9:30
Molly's Game (R) 11:30-3:156:45-10:15
All the Money in the World (R)
12:00-4:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3D (PG-13) 2:00-11:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
12:00-7:00
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:15-12:45-1:30-4:15-5:00-7:458:30-11:15
I, Tonya (R) 1:45-4:45-7:30-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3D (PG-13) CC: 4:00-9:45
AMC Hoffman Center 22
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 1:00-3:50
The Disaster Artist (R) CC:
6:10-9:05
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 4:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
11:00-6:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:00-12:00-1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 11:15-12:50-2:45-6:15-7:409:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) CC: 2:00-4:15-9:00
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 11:051:25-2:30-3:45-6:30-9:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:15-6:30-9:30
Coco (PG) CC: 12:40-3:20
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:05
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 11:45-1:00-2:30-3:45-5:157:15-8:00-9:45-10:30
Wonder (PG) CC: 12:50-3:40
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:104:05-6:55-9:50
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 5:00-7:30
The Commuter (PG-13) CC:
7:00-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:204:20-7:20-10:10
Downsizing (R) CC: 1:25-4:257:25-10:25
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 4:00
UA Snowden Square
Molly's Game (R) CC: 11:40-3:00Stadium 14
6:20-9:40
9161 Commerce Center Drive
All the Money in the World (R)
Ferdinand (PG) 12:30-3:10-9:15 CC: 1:10-4:10-7:10-10:10
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:30- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
4:15-6:50-9:30
Missouri (R) CC: 1:25
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Condorito: The Movie (Condorito:
12:30-1:20-3:50-4:40-7:10-8:10- La película) (PG) CC: 7:00-9:05
10:30
I, Tonya (R) 11:25-2:10-4:55Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
7:40-10:30
(PG-13) 3:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 7:00-10:00
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:45Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
3:10-5:30-7:50-10:15
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC:
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 12:00-3:30
(PG-13) 12:50-1:50-4:50-6:30Alien Intrusion: Unmasking a
7:45-10:35
Deception 7:00
Coco (PG) 1:15-4:00-6:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Father Figures (R) 12:40
(PG-13) 11:00-2:05-5:00-7:45Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) 10:30
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:40
The Greatest Showman Sing-ADarkest Hour (PG-13) 1:15-4:30- Long (PG) 7:00-9:40
7:30-10:25
AMC Potomac Mills 18
The Shape of Water (R) 1:10-4:002700 Potomac Mills Circle
7:00-9:50
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 11:10-1:45Paddington 2 (PG) 5:45-8:30
4:20
Molly's Game (R) 1:00-4:10The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 8:45
7:20-10:30
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:45
All the Money in the World (R)
Thor:
Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
1:50-4:45-7:40-10:40
7:40-10:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The
Greatest
Showman (PG) CC:
3D (PG-13) 3:40-9:20
11:20-2:00-4:40-7:15-9:50
Alien Intrusion: Unmasking a
Star
Wars:
The
Last Jedi (PG-13)
Deception 7:00
CC: 11:00-1:30-4:00-5:00-8:30Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile
10:50
(NR) 10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PGXscape Theatres
13) CC: 12:30-7:30
Brandywine 14
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 11:107710 Matapeake Business Drive
1:20-2:20-3:45-4:45-6:10-7:10-9:40
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:30-1:10- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3:50-6:50-9:00
(PG-13) CC: 11:00AM
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Coco (PG) CC: 2:15-4:50
10:50-1:20-4:05-6:40-9:10
Father Figures (R) CC: 4:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
CC: 12:10-3:40-7:00-10:20
CC: 11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 11:40- Wonder (PG) CC: 1:15
2:30-5:10-7:40-10:10
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 12:25Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 3:20-6:15-9:20
(PG-13) CC: 11:20-2:10-5:00-7:50 Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 5:00Coco (PG) CC: 9:55-12:30
7:30-10:00
Father Figures (R) CC: 10:10The Shape of Water (R) CC: 12:0012:50
3:00-6:00-9:00
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Downsizing (R) CC: 11:00-2:00
CC: (!) 10:50
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 4:25
Paddington 2 (PG) OC; CC: (!)
All the Money in the World (R)
5:10-7:45
CC: 11:00-2:00-5:00-8:00
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 7:05- Molly's Game (R) CC: 11:05-3:459:35-10:15
7:00-10:15
Downsizing (R) CC: 10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: (!)
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) CC:
10:00-12:40-3:20-6:20-9:40
11:30-3:00-6:30-10:00
Molly's Game (R) CC: (!) 9:50Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
1:00-4:10-7:30-10:40
(PG-13) CC: 12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
All the Money in the World (R)
Molly's Game (R) 12:20
CC: (!) 10:20-1:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) (PG-13) 1:00-4:00
CC: 11:30-2:50-6:10-9:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 7:00-9:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle I, Tonya (R) 7:00-10:00
(PG-13) CC: 10:40-1:30-3:10-4:20- The Commuter (PG-13) 7:00-9:45
7:10-10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The Post (PG-13) CC: 7:15-9:55
Missouri (R) CC: 7:00-9:50
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
AMC Shirlington 7
CC: (!) 11:10-11:50-2:00-2:40-3:302772 South Randolph St.
4:50-5:30-7:20-8:00-9:50
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
iPic Pike & Rose
1:30-4:25-7:45
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Ferdinand (PG) 1:45
CC: 4:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG12:30-3:45-6:30-9:30
13) CC: 1:00-7:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:15(!) 12:00-3:30-7:15-11:00
4:15-7:30
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 2:00-4:45 The Shape of Water (R) CC:
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 1:30-4:15-7:30
(PG-13) (!) 12:45-4:15-7:30-10:40 Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
Paddington 2 (PG) (!) 5:00-8:15- 1:15-4:20-7:15
11:15
Molly's Game (R) CC: 1:00The Commuter (PG-13) 7:45-10:50 4:00-7:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:15-3:45- All the Money in the World (R)
6:30-9:45
CC: 1:00-4:00
Downsizing (R) 11:45-3:00
The Post (PG-13) CC: 7:00
Molly's Game (R) 11:45-3:15AMC Tysons Corner 16
6:45-10:30
7850e Tysons Corner Center
The Post (PG-13) (!) 7:00-10:15
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:35-1:104:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
11:20-2:00-4:45-7:35-10:20
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: CC: 11:50-1:15-3:10-7:25-10:10
2:15-4:45-7:15-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PGStar Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 13) CC: 7:55
CC: 2:00-3:30-6:45-10:00
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 10:25Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 1:45- 12:45-3:05-5:25-10:40
4:20-7:15-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG-13) CC: 10:25-4:35-10:45
(PG-13) CC: 1:15-6:45
Coco (PG) CC: 11:10-1:50-4:25
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Murder on the Orient Express
CC: 1:00-5:15-7:45-10:30
(PG-13) CC: 11:05-2:05
Molly's Game (R) CC: 1:15-4:00- Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
7:15-10:15
CC: (!) 10:20-12:50-3:20-5:50All the Money in the World (R)
8:30-11:00
CC: 1:15-4:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:30The Post (PG-13) CC: 7:00-10:00 1:20-4:10-7:20-10:30
VIRGINIA
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 5:007:30-10:05
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: (!)
7:00-9:40
Downsizing (R) CC: 9:50
Molly's Game (R) CC: 10:30-1:354:40-7:45-10:50
All the Money in the World (R)
CC: 10:45-1:55-5:05
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:3512:10-1:45-3:10-4:50-6:10-7:409:00-10:25
I, Tonya (R) (!) 10:40-1:30-4:207:10-9:55
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
11:00-2:20-6:00-9:25
Alien Intrusion: Unmasking a
Deception (!) 7:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:20-4:30-10:55
Tommy Wiseau's The Room
(!) 8:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:40-7:50
AMC Worldgate 9
13025 Worldgate Drive
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 5:007:30-10:00
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema One Loudoun
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Ferdinand (PG) 12:00-2:50-4:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:50-3:45-7:40-11:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:20-1:55-5:45-8:40-11:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:40-2:15
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 10:0012:40-3:20-6:20-9:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 10:20-1:40-4:00-5:008:20-11:20
Molly's Game (R) 12:10-4:308:00-10:30
Paddington 2 (PG) 6:05-9:20
I, Tonya (R) 10:40-12:20-3:307:40-11:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 7:20-11:25
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-10:10
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
2911 District Ave
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:15-1:003:55-6:45-9:35
The Shape of Water (R) 11:452:30-5:20-8:05-10:40
All the Money in the World (R)
10:20-1:20-4:10-7:15-10:15
Downsizing (R) 10:30-1:30-4:357:30-10:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
10:25-12:55-3:30-6:00-8:30-10:55
Call Me by Your Name (R) 11:002:00-5:00-8:00-10:50
I, Tonya (R) 10:45-1:35-4:207:00-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:00-1:15-4:30-7:45-11:00
Bow Tie
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX
11940 Market Street
Justice League (PG-13) 3:20
Ferdinand (PG) 12:20
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:304:40-7:10-10:10
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
2:00-5:30-9:00
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 1:10-4:207:00-9:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:00-4:10-7:20-10:20
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-8:30
The Commuter (PG-13) 7:00-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) 12:503:40-6:40-9:40
Downsizing (R) 12:20
Molly's Game (R) 12:10-3:206:30-9:50
All the Money in the World (R)
12:40-3:50-6:50-10:00
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:00-3:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:30-3:306:20-9:20
Cinema Arts Theatre
9650 Main St
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
9:55-12:10-2:25-4:40-9:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 10:00-1:00-4:00-7:10-10:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 9:4012:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:55
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 9:4012:05-2:35-5:05-7:40-10:00
Molly's Game (R) CC: 10:10-1:154:15-7:20-10:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 9:45-12:15-2:405:10-7:50-10:05
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
1600 Village Market Boulevard
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:10-2:40-5:10-7:40
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 12:002:20-5:20-7:50
Coco (PG) 11:45-2:30-5:05-7:35
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
12:20-3:00-5:30-8:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 7:45
All the Money in the World (R)
CC: 11:40-2:50-7:05
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:30-1:30-2:15-4:155:00-7:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:003:45-7:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:50-12:45-3:10-4:00-6:30-7:30
Molly's Game (R) CC: 12:304:10-7:15
Manassas 4 Cinemas
8890 Mathis Ave.
Ferdinand (PG) 1:15-3:30-5:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:50-4:10-6:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
2:30-5:30
The Greatest Showman (PG)
1:45-4:00-6:10
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
6201 Multiplex Drive
Ferdinand (PG) 11:05-1:40-4:15
The Greatest Showman (PG)
11:55-2:25-4:55-7:30-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:00-11:00-1:15-2:15-4:30-5:307:45-8:45-11:00
approximated the middle pitches
in a phrase, which blunted the
impact of the delicate Wolf miniatures like “Begegnung.” And she
offered only smeared ornaments
in the final Rossini cantata, where
her obedience was a particular
hindrance: The piece is a big fat gift
to a singer who can take it and run
with it, but it wasn’t, here, the orgy
of vocalism that it could be.
This is a harsh evaluation of a
likable singer. But likability is not
enough for a lasting career, or a
deeper impact, and Erraught has
the goods to offer more. O’Conor,
though sometimes over-loud,
showed how it can be done with
telling details on the piano, like
the little bubbling watery lines in
Wolf’s mermaid song “Nixe Binsefuss.” In Erraught’s case, the talent
is certainly there, but the artistry
is a work in progress.
anne.midgette@washpost.com
Thursday, January 11, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 10:1512:35-2:55-5:20-7:50-10:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 10:45-4:20-7:15
Coco (PG) 11:35-2:45
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:40-2:10-4:50-7:20-9:55
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:50-1:454:35-7:35-10:40
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:30-10:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 7:00-9:40
Tiger Zinda Hai (NR) 10:10-1:35
Molly's Game (R) 11:55-3:25
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3D (PG-13) 1:30-10:15
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-9:45
Jai Simha (Jaisimha) (NR)
6:00-9:30
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
11:50-3:20-6:50-10:10
The Commuter (PG-13) 7:00-9:40
Molly's Game (R) 12:30-3:456:30-9:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3D (PG-13) 10:40
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-9:50
Regal
Fairfax Towne Center 10
4110 West Ox Road
Ferdinand (PG) 12:00-2:45
The Greatest Showman (PG)
12:00-2:35-5:10-7:45-10:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:00-12:30-3:25-3:55-6:50-7:2010:15-10:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
(PG-13) 2:55
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:152:55-5:30-8:15-10:40
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Rave Cinemas
12:05-2:40-5:20-8:00-10:35
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:25-8:00
11900 Palace Way
Downsizing (R) 12:40
Ferdinand (PG) 11:05-2:20-4:55All the Money in the World (R)
7:35-10:10
12:40-3:50-10:30
Justice League (PG-13) 4:05
I, Tonya (R) 12:00-3:55-10:20Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:0010:50
2:00
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-9:50
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Along With the Gods: The Two
10:55-1:30-4:10-7:20-10:25
Worlds 12:40-3:50-7:05-10:40
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:55Alien Intrusion: Unmasking a
2:30-5:10-7:30-10:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:50-1:40- Deception 7:00
1987: When the Day Comes
4:30-7:40-10:50
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (NR) 7:30
(PG-13) 10:45-1:35-4:15-7:05Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
10:05
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Ferdinand (PG) 12:30-3:00-5:3011:20-1:50-4:20-7:15-10:00
8:00-10:30
Coco (PG) 10:35-1:25
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
The Shape of Water (R) 11:1512:45-1:30-2:30-6:00-8:00-9:30
2:05-4:50-7:45-10:35
The Greatest Showman (PG)
The Commuter (PG-13) 7:00-10:15 12:00-1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
Molly's Game (R) 10:40-1:45-4:45- Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
7:55-11:00
3D Experience (PG-13) 12:00-3:30
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-9:55
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:45Lady Bird (R) 11:35-1:55-4:25
3:15-5:45-8:15-10:30
Jai Simha (Jaisimha) (NR)
Coco (PG) 12:15-2:45-5:15
6:05-9:35
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG-13) 12:15-1:45-3:00-5:45(PG-13) XD: 11:30-2:15-5:057:15-8:30-10:00
7:50-10:45
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
XD: 12:05-2:35-5:20-8:05-10:40
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR) Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:15-4:157:15-10:15
11:10-2:40-6:10-9:40
Wonder (PG) 1:15-4:00-6:45
Regal Ballston Common
Downsizing (R) 9:30
Stadium 12
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:45-10:30
671 N. Glebe Road
The Commuter (PG-13) 7:00-9:45
Ferdinand (PG) 1:15-4:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) 1:45- Molly's Game (R) 12:30-3:457:00-10:15
4:25-7:15-10:00
All the Money in the World (R)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
12:30-3:45
(PG-13) 2:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3D (PG-13) 4:30
1:05-4:35-8:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 2:25IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
4:45-7:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 7:00-10:30
The Post (PG-13) 7:30-10:15
(PG-13) 1:25-4:20-7:15
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
Coco (PG) 1:00-3:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:20-4:10- 12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
6:00-9:00-9:55
Regal Kingstowne
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Stadium 16 & RPX
1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45
5910 Kingstowne Towne Center
The Shape of Water (R) 1:10Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:35-10:15
4:15-10:10
Regal Manassas
Wonder (PG) 1:40
Stadium 14 & IMAX
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:45-10:20
11380 Bulloch Drive
The Commuter (PG-13) 7:15-10:20
Ferdinand (PG) 1:15
Call Me by Your Name (R)
Star
Wars:
The Last Jedi (PG-13)
7:05-10:15
1:50-3:10-5:10-8:30
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-9:55
The
Greatest
Showman (PG) 1:40Alien Intrusion: Unmasking a
4:40-7:40-10:15
Deception 7:00
Star
Wars:
The
Last Jedi An IMAX
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
3D Experience (PG-13) 12:50-7:30
1:20-5:00-8:30
Pitch
Perfect
3
(PG-13) 12:20Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
1:20-2:50
3D (PG-13) 10:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
12:30-3:00-5:40-8:15-10:40
45980 Regal Plaza
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Ferdinand (PG) 12:20-3:15-6:00 (PG-13) 12:40-2:00-5:00-6:45Justice League (PG-13) 12:358:00-10:45
3:20
Wonder (PG) 12:30-3:45-6:20-9:00
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:30-4:1512:50-3:45-6:15-9:05
7:00-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:30-2:55-6:45-7:15-9:40-10:10 Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:40-10:20
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- The Commuter (PG-13) 7:00-9:40
Molly's Game (R) 12:45-4:0013) 12:30-3:50
7:15-10:30
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:15Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
2:40-5:15-7:35-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 3D (PG-13) 3:40-9:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
(PG-13) 11:35-1:05-4:15-5:30IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
7:30-10:35
The Star (PG) 11:40-2:15-4:45-7:20 4:10-10:50
All the Money in the World (R)
Coco (PG) 12:25-3:00-5:35-8:30
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) 1:10-4:20-7:20-10:20
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-9:50
11:45-2:30-5:20-8:00-10:30
Wonder (PG) 12:45-3:40-6:20-9:20 Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:55-4:05- 12:20-3:30-6:40-9:45
6:55-9:45
Regal Potomac Yard
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:30-10:00
Stadium 16
Tiger Zinda Hai (NR) 12:10-3:553575 Potomac Avenue
7:45-9:55
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:40-10:20
All the Money in the World (R)
Alien Intrusion: Unmasking a
12:40-4:00-7:00-10:00
Deception 7:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Regal
Missouri (R) 11:35-2:20
Springfield Town Center 12
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-3:25-5:45-8:15
6500
Springfield
Town Center
Velaikkaran (NR) 11:50-3:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:40-10:30
3D (PG-13) 2:35
Regal Virginia Gateway
Okka Kshanam (NR) 12:05-3:10
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
The Post (PG-13) 7:00-10:00
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR) Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:30
12:15-3:30-6:45-10:00
Smithsonian - Airbus
Sketch (Tamil) (NR) 8:00
IMAX Theater
Jai Simha (Jaisimha) (NR)
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
7:00-9:00
D-Day:
Normandy
1944 3D (NR)
Thaanaa Serndha Koottam
11:10AM
(Tamil) (NR) 8:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
Regal Dulles Town Center 10 3D Experience (PG-13) 4:10-9:55
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Ferdinand (PG) 1:15
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-3:25
The Greatest Showman (PG)
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:00
12:10-2:45-6:15-8:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
12:00-1:30-3:00-4:30-7:15-10:15 12:40-7:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
University Mall Theatre
(PG-13) 6:00
10659 Braddock Road
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:45The Star (PG) CC: 12:00-1:452:00-5:30-8:15-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 3:30-5:15
Coco (PG) CC: 12:15-2:30-4:45(PG-13) 11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00
7:15
Coco (PG) 1:00-4:00
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 7:00-9:25
12:15-3:15-4:15-7:45-10:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 12:05-2:40-4:55The Shape of Water (R) 12:207:30-9:50
3:30-9:15
Paddington 2 (PG) 5:00-7:30-10:00 Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: 9:30
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
BOTH SIDES VULNERABLE
NORTH
J953
A86
KQ5
J 10 2
EAST
K87
K 10 7 2
J9843
7
WEST
Q 10 6 2
Q95
10 7
AQ43
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
A4
J43
A62
K9865
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1
Pass
1
1 NT
Pass
2 NT
Opening lead — 5
EAST
Pass
All Pass
T
hursday, January 11. It
was cool in Los Angeles.
We were working the daywatch out of Burglary. The
boss is Captain Stewart. My
partner’s Bill Gannon. He’s
a good player. My name’s
Friday.
We got a call about a case
of forcible entry at a club in
Ventura. We checked it out.
The suspect was still playing.
One of his opponents spoke
with us.
“It was terrible, officer.”
“Just the facts, ma’am.”
“I was declarer at 2NT, and
West led a heart. I ducked
twice, won the third heart
and let the jack of clubs ride.
West took the queen.
“If he had led a low spade
next — to the nine, king and
my ace — I would have been
safe. I could force out the
ace of clubs, and the defense
would have only five tricks.
“But at Trick Five, West
forced an entry to his partner’s good heart. He led the
queen of spades, and I had
to go down. He’s a burglar.
Cuff him!”
We took West into custody.
He was convicted of forcible entry. The judge said he
wished he defended as well.
CLASSIC PEANUTS
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
K 8 7 K 10 7 2
J98437
Your partner opens one
club, and the next player
overcalls one spade. What do
you say?
ANSWER: If your partnership doesn’t use negative
doubles, discuss them. A
BLONDIE
double here shows enough
values to respond with
hearts plus club support or
diamonds. Negative doubles
let you avoid being shut out
of the auction. Some players
might pass because opener
might rebid in clubs, but that
is only one possibility.
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | JANUARY 11
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you naturally
gravitate toward
winning solutions.
A friend or several
friends might push you in one
direction, but you might feel
that the other path is better. If
you are single, you could meet
The One through a friend or
an associate. Take your time
before making a commitment.
If you are attached, the two
of you find that you spend
a lot of time together with
your friends. Be sure to make
more one-on-one time for you
and your sweetie. Scorpio is
unusually responsive to you.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Your vision of what is possible
stems from your high energy.
You might decide to launch an
entrepreneurial idea or push
a project in a new direction.
Others could be skeptical of
your vision, but you have the
follow-through that is needed.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You don’t need to do anything
but be present in the moment.
Others seek you out. No
matter what is presented to
you, you are likely to have
many new ideas or slants on
ideas that you have not yet
thought of.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You could be sorry that you
started a conversation about
a personal issue. Sometimes,
you don’t want to hear
WEINGARTENS & CLARK opinions from those who are
clearly not informed. Avoid
someone else’s lecturing style
if you can.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
A loved one seems to motivate
you to get going. Whether a
mood is dragging you down
or an interaction with a friend
is uncomfortable, know
that things still can turn in
your favor. It will be key to
leave an opening for that
transformation.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Investigate what is happening
on the homefront. You could
be overwhelmed with what
someone else is asking of you.
Be as direct as possible when
responding. Make it OK to say
“no” once in a while. You can’t
always come up with the right
answer.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You have been known to
become fussy and critical.
Try to avoid that pitfall as you
expand your horizons and
meet new people who are
different from your norm. Be
open to other lifestyles and
different modes of thinking.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Be more aware of your
financial situation, but do not
allow the matter to prevent you
from loving and living life to the
fullest. You could see a change
as mandatory, which might put
the kibosh on your fun.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
With the Moon in your sign,
you might be hard to contain.
You don’t always make the
best decisions or always head
in the right direction, but right
now you know exactly which
way to go and when.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You sense that more is going
on behind the scenes than you
are aware. Stop and consider
what is holding you back from
finding out more information.
Observe more, and see what
comes up.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You have very little to lose if
you focus on your priorities.
You have many ideas that drive
you in a certain direction. You
feel fortunate that so much
activity is whirling around you.
A friend could be instrumental
in making a decision.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You might notice that many of
your associates are dealing
with tempests in their teacups.
As a result, they could have
difficulty relating to anything
but what is happening around
them.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Read between the lines with
a loved one at a distance or
with someone who tends to be
quite withdrawn. You might not
be right in your assumption, so
ask questions if need be. Just
be aware of the vibes coming
off others.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
. THURSDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
JANUARY 11 , 2018
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
Today, the Boston Celtics take on the Philadelphia
76ers in London. The game will be the eighth National
Basketball Association regular-season matchup in
Britain’s capital. The first took place in 2011.
Another cloudy day, perhaps with
some rain but somewhat warmer
than usual.
Would you like your class
to be a Class of KidsPost?
Ask your teacher to find out
how on our website.
ILLUSTRATION BY TESSA JOHNSON, 5, ARLINGTON
Athlete found
a sport that
doesn’t leave
her bored
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
MARY ALTAFFER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Maddie Mastro is living
a dream. She is a 17-yearold snowboarder
FRED BOWEN
competing for a place on
the U.S. team that will go
to the 2018 Winter
Olympics in South
Korea. (The
snowboarding team will
be selected January 21.)
I spoke with Maddie as she prepared
for an Olympic trials competition in
Aspen, Colorado.
Rhett and Escher are Nederlandse
kooikerhondje, a breed recognized
by the American Kennel Club.
The Score
Two more breeds
of dogs can compete
in American shows
KidsPost: When did you start to
snowboard?
Maddie Mastro: I started skiing when I
was 2 years old and switched to
snowboarding when I was around 6.
PHOTOS BY SEAN M. HAFFEY/GETTY IMAGES
KP: What did you like about
snowboarding?
MM: It was something new and
challenging. I loved the rush of being on
the board.
helped me become a better all-around
athlete.
KP: You specialize in halfpipe. How do
you practice all those crazy aerial tricks?
MM: There are ways to make practice
safer. Sometimes you practice the moves
on a trampoline. Other times you practice
in the pipe but land on a huge pillow.
KP: Were you good right away?
MM: I always felt comfortable standing
sideways on the board. I was comfortable
with turning and being in the air. So I
guess I was a natural.
KP: Do you fall when you are practicing?
MM: I fall a lot during practice. But as
KP: Did you play other sports growing
up?
my mom always says, “If you’re not
falling, you’re not trying.” Your body
definitely takes a beating.
MM: I grew up in a very active family in
California. My parents gave me the
opportunity to play lots of sports. Soccer,
gymnastics, surfing, T-ball, just about
every sport. I loved being outside and
active.
Maddie Mastro says new moves on her
snowboard always make her nervous.
“But I just tell myself: ‘You know
you’re good at this. You can do it.’ ”
KP: Did playing other sports help with
your snowboarding?
MM: Definitely. Playing other sports
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
By C.C. Burnikel
KP: I don’t want to jinx you, but . . . what
will you do if you don’t make the Olympic
team?
MM: Whether I make the team or not
will not break me as a snowboarder or as
a person. I got into snowboarding
because I found snowboarding was fun
for me. That won’t change. I am still
young. I can try for the next Olympics.
kidspost@washpost.com
Bowen writes the sports opinion column for
KidsPost. He is the author of 22 sports books
for kids. His latest is called “Outside Shot.”
— Associated Press
Mom mi≠ed stepkids don’t coo at baby
Adapted from a
recent online discussion.
Dear Carolyn: I
have two
stepchildren, 17
and 15. They
switch off
between our
house and their mother’s. My
husband and I have been
married three years and have a
6-month-old daughter.
I am really sad about the lack
of affection between my stepkids
and my daughter. They never
hold her or play with her or ask
to feed her. They basically
pretend she isn’t there.
My husband says to just give
them time, but he doesn’t do
much to encourage all of us to do
things together. It’s like he
spends time with his older kids
or the baby but not all of us at
once.
I want us to be a family and it
doesn’t feel like we are now. You
can’t force affection, but I would
like to know how to encourage it.
— Stepparent
Carolyn
Hax
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
18
22
24
26
28
29
DOWN
Bear feet
Aquaman’s
realm
__ Cup:
classic candy
in a yellow
wrapper
Hot and spicy
Young
Spider-Man
portrayer
Holland
Pundit’s
piece
Short note
Wild fight
Suppressed,
with “on”
False friend
Bet on it
Shade trees
Way too
interested
Dumpster
output
Put up with
“Well,
sorrrr-ry!”
Massachusetts
college or
its town
“Holy smokes!”
Stir
1/11/18
31 Letter between
Delta and
Foxtrot
32 “It Ain’t All
About the
Cookin’”
memoirist
Paula
33 Pigeon calls
34 Poker stake
35 Bank on it
39 Chap
40 Cause of
a buzz
43 Adventurous
trip
45 “Another
problem?”
48 Forget-me-__:
flowers
50 Shoulder
warmer
52 Jenna, to Jeb
53 Unsmiling
54 Firing range
supply
55 Doofus
57 Pond plant
58 Small
valley
60 Editor’s
mark
62 You may feel
one on your
shoulder
63 Even so
WEDNESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ACROSS
1 Splendor
5 Lara Croft
targets
10 In that case
14 Jamba Juice
berry
15 “Tommy” is one
16 Chewy Hershey
candy
17 Step on it
19 Activates, as a
security system
20 Tossed course
21 Company that
introduced
Styrofoam
22 Spacek of
“Bloodline”
23 Things to avoid
25 Foamy
pick-me-up
27 Defeat
decisively
30 Tied in the
harbor
33 Flowing
garment
36 __ Paulo, Brazil
37 Roman poet
who coined
“carpe diem”
38 Creator of
Iceland’s
Imagine
Peace Tower
39 Sleep on it
41 “SNL” writer/
actor Michael
42 “Becket” star
44 Auction
ending?
45 Inert gas
46 Not very often
47 Like some poll
questions
49 Youngsters
51 Hamlet
cousins
54 Put down
56 Crone
59 Knuckleheads
61 Wild bunches
62 Count on it
64 Lawn pest
65 “That’s
too bad”
66 It might be a
whole lot
67 Follow
instructions
68 Covert
agent
69 Safari
shelter
KP: Are you ever nervous before you try a
new move?
MM: I’m nervous all the time. Before
trying new tricks, or in a new situation.
But I just tell myself: “You know you’re
good at this. You can do it.” The feeling
goes away when I start to snowboard.
KP: You are 17 years old. Are you still in
school?
MM: I graduated high school a year early
at 16. I am looking forward to going to
college someday. My mom is an English
teacher, so I love to read. In fact, I just
started John Green’s new book before you
called.
A spirited Dutch duck-luring dog
and a friendly French rabbit hound
are now running with the American
Kennel Club’s pack.
The club announced Wednesday
that it’s recognizing the Nederlandse
kooikerhondje (NAY-dehr-lahn-seh
KOY-kehr-hahnd-jeh) and the grand
basset griffon Vendeen (vahn-DAYahn). They’re the first breeds added
to the roster since 2016.
They’re eligible for many dog
shows this year but can’t compete at
the prestigious Westminster Kennel
Club show until next year.
The Nederlandse kooikerhondje
goes back hundreds of years in
Holland.
Kooikerhondjes were trained to
help hunters attract ducks into netcovered canals.
The grand basset griffon Vendeen
goes by “GBGV” for short.
GBGVs are known for their speed,
stamina and cheerful nature.
Traditional pack hunters, they tend
to get along well with other dogs, says
AKC spokeswoman Brandi Hunter.
Requirements for recognition
include having at least 300 dogs of
the breed spread around at least 20
states.
Stepparent: Treating this as an
isolated problem that started six
months ago, I look to your
husband. His either/or approach
to his kids offers both the easiest
explanation and the easiest
possible solution. Get him
invested in doing more as a
family unit, and you’ll slowly,
naturally promote more of a
bond. It’s tough with older
teenagers, but doable.
But treating this as a problem
that can’t be isolated to the past
six months, I think we’re closer
to the truth. Because any
blended family issue is going to
have a backstory that includes
the dissolution of the kids’ family
of origin, the formation of the
blended family and the three or
so years of family-building that
preceded the birth of your child.
If there are seeds in that
history of the alienation you’re
seeing now, and if you planted
them yourself, helped in any way
to nurture them or even just
pretended they weren’t there,
then you’re accountable, too.
I don’t have enough
information to judge, obviously,
but you make no mention of the
emotional conditions into which
you brought this baby. If you
weren’t invested in emotional
cohesion before you had your
daughter, then it would be a bit
rich for you to expect it now that
it’s your own child who would
benefit.
So, ask yourself the hard
questions about how the “before”
— yours, his, theirs, everyone’s —
brought you to this “after.”
Then bring that insight to
your husband, along with ideas
for how to eat dinner, travel,
celebrate and make conversation
as one unit vs. two. The best way
to encourage affection is to show
it, and the best way to show it is
for its own sake, without
defensiveness, and without any
notion of a quid pro quo.
Re: Stepkids: Babies are
intimidating as heck. I think the
first baby I held was when I was
like 30 and my best friend
basically shoved hers in my
arms. So if you’re waiting for
teenagers to ask to hold your
baby as a sign of family cohesion
. . . er . . . it could be a long wait.
— Anonymous
Re: Stepkids: I can see how a
father of kids approaching
adulthood would want to spend
time with them that’s not
dominated by a baby. Make the
best of the time you all spend
together but recognize that alone
time for them is okay, too.
— Anonymous 2
Anonymous: Both make perfect
sense, thanks.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
M2
D
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
PRO FOOTBALL
Maryland will be without reserve guard Dion Wiley
(concussion) for its game tonight at Ohio State. D2
Virginia Tech’s defense suffers two big losses as
Tremaine and Terrell Edmunds leave for NFL draft. D2
Unlike most teams at this point of the playoffs, the
Jaguars are still playing despite their quarterback. D3
Wizards come up empty late
Patriots only
can silence
all the noise
with their play
BY
foxborough,
mass. — Sitting in
the top of Tom
Brady’s locker,
next to his jar of
healthy coconut
Sally
oil, is an industrial
Jenkins
hard hat. It’s the
perfect emblem
for the New England Patriots,
who are so habitually and
constitutionally impervious to
flying objects and junk that gets
thrown at them at this time of
year. Ask a question of players
around here, and it appears to
bounce right off their heads. They
look at you as if they never felt a
thing.
That was the expression on
Stephon Gilmore’s face when
asked about ESPN’s report that
Brady, Coach Bill Belichick and
owner Robert Kraft no longer get
along and the franchise is coming
apart from the force of their egos.
Gilmore paused in his gray sweats
in the center of a swarm of
reporters and actually said,
“What report?”
The one that says something
has turned sour inside the
franchise that is going for its sixth
Super Bowl title in 17 seasons. The
one that started a storm in the
week before the Patriots’
divisional playoff game against
the Tennessee Titans by
suggesting there are
imperceptible but widening
cracks on their team despite a
13-3 record and the top seed in
the AFC. That one. What about it?
“I’m all-in on Tennessee,”
Belichick said in that bottom-ofa-drain voice of his, where
expression goes to die.
Outside, a crew worked to
remove the snow built up at
Gillette Stadium from last week’s
blizzard. Shovel by shovel, they
methodically cleared the aisles
and each step of the stadium
stairs, even as an aluminum sky
overhead threatened to bring
another nor’easter. Inside, the
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
John Wall led all scorers with 35 points Wednesday night, but the
Wizards could not avenge a 47-point loss to Utah in December.
C ANDACE B UCKNER
The Washington Wizards did
not need reminders about their
last matchup against the Utah
Jazz. The scars from that Dec. 4
game remain, still fresh enough
that the team has refused to review the 47-point loss in the film
room. Players and coaches can
stomach those memories only in
brief clips.
Still, before Wednesday night’s
game, someone had not forgotten
and scribbled “47 pts” on the
team’s whiteboard, outlining the
JAZZ 107, WIZARDS 104
Sloppiness results
in another loss to Utah
digits in three colors. The unknown artist’s reminder could
not prevent the Wizards from
another staggering loss to Utah,
107-104.
“That’s something you never
stop thinking as a competitor,
and that’s why it hurts even more
to lose this one,” Kelly Oubre Jr.
said about the 47-point blowout.
“It was in the back of our mind.”
This time, the Wizards were
home and had a fully healthy
roster. John Wall, who missed the
first meeting while recovering
from left knee inflammation,
played. So did Otto Porter Jr.,
after taking a game off to heal
from back and hip issues. And yet,
void of excuses and seemingly
filled with motivation, Washington played one of its sloppiest
games of the season.
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D5
Trotz resolute in Cup quest
As Caps coach moves up the list of career victories, there’s one thing missing from his résumé
JENKINS CONTINUED ON D3
NFL playoffs: Divisional round
Saturday
Falcons at Eagles, 4:35 p.m., NBC
Titans at Patriots, 8:15 p.m., CBS
Sunday
Jaguars at Steelers, 1:05 p.m., CBS
Saints at Vikings, 4:40 p.m., Fox
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
“I may not get it as a coach,” the Capitals’ Barry Trotz said of winning a Stanley Cup. “It may come as a scout or a GM; it may come in a different form.”
BY
Gruden’s deal
is a blessing
to NFL coaches
everywhere
So now we know
what it costs to
reconnect with
the elusive one
who got away:
$100 million. That
Jerry
is the reported
Brewer
value of Jon
Gruden’s 10-year
contract to return to coaching
and to the Oakland (for now)
Raiders, the team that traded him
16 years ago on an Al Davis whim.
In this case, absence makes the
wallet grow fatter.
It should be noted that Gruden
didn’t just sign the most lucrative
coaching deal in American
professional sports history. He
also became the nation’s newest
indispensable coach, a most rare
achievement. Whenever a sports
figure changes the financial game
with a record contract, our
instinct is to debate worth, and
our slack-jawed conclusion tends
to be, “Ain’t nobody worth that!”
But there’s no question that, for
the volatile profession of pro and
major-college coaching, the
Raiders’ monster commitment to
Gruden is a significant — perhaps
even seminal — moment.
Is Gruden, who hasn’t coached
a game in nine years, worth the
money? It’s a question better
asked to Raiders owner Mark
Davis, who was intent on atoning
for his late father’s impulsive
decision to trade Gruden to the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2002. A
BREWER CONTINUED ON D4
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
In an office decorated with mementos
of his long and rewarding career, pictures and keepsakes chronicling the
highlights, Barry Trotz allowed himself
to dream about an absent image. In his
hand, he held a stainless-steel travel
mug, engraved to read “2ND FAVORITE
CUP.”
This wasn’t the first time he had
leaned back in his chair and envisioned
what he would do with the Stanley Cup if
he ever earned a day with it. “I think
that’s what motivates you, too,” Trotz
said last week.
Trotz recently moved into fifth place
on the NHL’s all-time coaching wins list,
now 740 to his name in 19 years. His .685
points percentage in three-plus seasons
with the Capitals is better than any other
coach in franchise history. For a third
time in his career, he was tabbed as a
bench boss for the All-Star Game. He is
one of the most respected and accomplished coaches in the league.
But just like Washington star captain
Alex Ovechkin, Trotz lacks a Stanley Cup
on his decorated résumé. He also has
never gotten past the second round of
the playoffs. If the window to do so is
steadily closing for this aging Capitals
core, it’s especially so for Trotz, coaching
in the last year of his contract and potentially in his last opportunity to win with
this team.
“I realized I want to have a Cup but I
may not get it as a coach,” Trotz said. “It
may come as a scout or a GM; it may
come in a different form. I don’t know. I
still want to be a part of a Cup winner. I
TROTZ CONTINUED ON D6
Empty spot
Stanley Cup championships among
coaches with the most regular season wins:
COACH
WINS
GAMES
Scotty Bowman
1,244
2,141
CUPS
9
Joel Quenneville
872
1,581
3
Ken Hitchcock
805
1,497
1
Al Arbour
782
1,607
4
Barry Trotz
740
1,485
0
Lindy Ruff
736
1,493
0
Dick Irvin
692
1,449
4
Pat Quinn
684
1,400
0
Mike Keenan
672
1,386
1
Ron Wilson
648
1,401
0
Hurricanes at Capitals: Today, 7 p.m., NHL Network, NBCSW | All-star rosters announced: Braden Holtby, Alex Ovechkin named. D6
A ‘unicorn’ comes to girls’ basketball
St. John’s freshman Fudd, one of nation’s top recruits, thrives no matter her position
BY
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
St. John’s freshman Azzi Fudd can play all five positions, making
her a perfect fit for the current era of positionless basketball.
J ESSE D OUGHERTY
As soon as the ball tipped, right
when Azzi Fudd went from standing still to starting toward an
opening on the right wing, each
of her actions, however big or
small, was narrated inside the
airy gymnasium.
“See how she created her own
shot?” asked Dave Rasdolsky, sitting six rows up as Fudd, a freshman on the St. John’s girls’ basketball team, scored the first two
points against rival Paul VI in
early January.
“Watch her screen away,” he
said a possession later.
“Look, look, look at her defend,” he whispered as play
swung to the other end of the
floor. “She is so balanced.”
Rasdolsky is not a broadcaster.
Or a coach. Or a fan of St. John’s or
Paul VI. He is a dad from Reston
who wanted his 12-year-old
daughter, Brooke, a basketball
player herself, to see the 15-yearold Fudd in action.
Fudd, who has played just
13 high school games and is averaging 22 points in them, has
already been compared to WNBA
stars Maya Moore and Diana Taurasi. “She may already be the best
high school player in the country,”
one local coach said. “I’m serious.”
Her first scholarship offer
came from Maryland when she
was in sixth grade, and the 5-foot11 guard has since been recruited
by a large handful of power conference programs, including
Stanford, Tennessee and Connecticut, whose legendary Coach
Geno Auriemma stopped in to see
her work out this past fall on an
otherwise normal day at St.
John’s in Northwest Washington.
“What do you think it was
like?” she asked, smiling at her
own sarcasm. “I was so nervous.”
Well, did it show?
“No,” she shot back, smiling
even wider. “I crushed it that day.”
Now she was up against Paul
VI, a girls’ basketball powerhouse, and as she shook loose on
BASKETBALL CONTINUED ON D4
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
washingtonpost.com/sports
MARYLAND
EARLY LEAD
Wiley has
concussion,
won’t face
Ohio State
BY
Football
remains
Americans’
favorite
D.C. SPORTS BOG
R OMAN S TUBBS
Maryland guard Dion Wiley
will miss Thursday night’s game
at Ohio State after suffering a
concussion in Sunday’s 91-73 win
over Iowa, Terrapins Coach Mark
Turgeon said Wednesday.
Wiley was injured early in the
second half after taking a blow to
the head in a collision with a
Hawkeyes player. He immediately left the game and went back
to the locker room, spoiling what
was arguably his most promising
performance of the season. Wiley
had hit four of his five shots and
finished with 10 points, giving
Maryland the kind of lift off the
bench it has desperately needed
since its rotation was thinned by
season-ending injuries to forwards Justin Jackson and Ivan
Bender.
“He was defending. He was
making shots. He was making us
harder to guard,” Turgeon said.
“He’s really been practicing well
since the week before Christmas.
I could see it coming. We need
him.”
Jackson had surgery on his
torn right labrum Wednesday
morning and is expected to return to College Park on Thursday;
Bender had surgery on his torn
right meniscus last week.
Maryland’s roster is down to
eight scholarship players without
Wiley, who Turgeon said was progressing Wednesday morning
and could be ready for Monday
night’s test at Michigan. Nonetheless, Maryland (14-4, 3-2 Big Ten)
will have to face the hot Buckeyes
(13-4, 4-0) — who dismantled
then-No. 1 Michigan State by
16 points Sunday in Columbus —
with senior guard Jared Nickens
and little-used Sean Obi and Joshua Tomaic as its primary reserves.
While it’s a given that Maryland point guard Anthony Cowan
Jr. will have to play more than
35 minutes per game for the rest
of the season, now Kevin Huerter
and Darryl Morsell are expected
to carry that workload as well.
Wiley’s return can’t come soon
enough.
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/
terrapinsinsider
QUOTABLE
“He had asked me,
and I go, ‘Really?
Okay. All right.’ ”
BOB HENLEY,
Nationals third base coach, describing
his reaction when Manager Dave
Martinez asked him also to coach the
team’s outfielders. Henley accepted
even though he never played
professionally in the outfield. (Via
washingtonpost.com/nationals)
BY
ROBERT F. BUKATY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vernon Davis, shown watching curling at the 2014 Winter Games, remains an ambassador for the sport four years later.
Redskins’ Davis supports curling
Veteran tight end brings attention to Olympic sport ahead of PyeongChang Games
BY
S COTT A LLEN
The 2017 NFL season marked the
return of joy and creativity to end zones
throughout the league, whose relaxed
prohibitions against fun permitted
players to celebrate touchdowns with
choreographed routines and to use the
sacred pigskin as a prop without
penalty. One of the most amusing
routines came in September, when a
group of players celebrated a score with
a nod to the Olympic sport of curling.
Surprisingly, Washington Redskins
tight end Vernon Davis wasn’t involved.
“I’m going to have to get in the end
zone and do it again,” Davis said in
October, when he first learned that
Detroit Lions wide receiver Golden Tate
pretended to throw a stone while
teammates mimicked sweeping after a
touchdown. “I’ll have them stand right
there. One can be the sweeper. We’ll set
it up. I’ll have to explain it to them.”
Davis, a curling enthusiast, had
dropped by The Washington Post to
discuss his love of curling and
involvement
in
USA
Curling’s
partnership with Cheetos for the
upcoming
Winter
Games
in
PyeongChang. The 33-year-old D.C.
native and former Maryland star would
get in the end zone only twice more in
2017, first in the Redskins’ blowout loss
against the Los Angeles Chargers and
then in the home finale against the
Denver Broncos. Davis simply handed
the ball to the referee after scoring in
Los Angeles and celebrated the latter
touchdown with a mock free throw,
which earned him a $12,154 fine the
year before, so his own curling-inspired
end zone routine will have to wait until
next season.
In the meantime, Davis is helping
bring attention to USA Curling ahead of
next month’s Olympics. He’s featured in
a music video released this week titled
“Teach Me How To Curl” with Pro
Football Hall of Fame running back
LaDainian Tomlinson and performer
Todrick Hall. (The song is a riff on Cali
Swag District’s 2010 hit “Teach Me How
To Dougie.”)
Davis said he would like to help do for
the sport of curling what he has done
for the arts community in D.C. through
the Vernon Davis Foundation for the
Arts.
“Growing up in Washington, D.C., I
couldn’t pursue the arts because I was
afraid of people criticizing me,” Davis
said. “I find that really prevalent among
professional
athletes
nowadays.
Because every artist, whether he’s a
singer or plays an instrument, you don’t
know. No one on the team really knows
this guy is an artist unless he talks about
it. Especially African Americans don’t
know about curling unless you bring
awareness to it.”
Davis’s introduction to curling came
in 2009, when Bay Area-based reporter
Janie McCauley suggested the then-San
Francisco 49ers tight end give it a try for
a story she was writing ahead of the
2010 Winter Olympics. Davis spent
nearly two hours learning the sport at a
curling center in San Jose.
“I just have an open mind,” Davis
said. “I try not to shy away from things
until I try it. I feel like athletes in
general, especially football and
basketball players in particular, would
love the sport if they knew more about
it. It’s all strategy-based. You come up
with a good strategy to execute, and
once you find a good strategy, you can
[reflect] on that and visualize what
happens, and it makes it fun, just like
shuffleboard.”
Davis, who has his own curling shoes
and broom and estimates he has been
curling about 25 times, was USA
Curling’s honorary captain at the 2010
Vancouver Olympics and traveled to
Sochi in 2014 to cheer on the team. He
said he hopes to be in PyeongChang.
“It’s one of those things like golf,” he
said. “You get out when you can, and
unless you put a lot of time into it, you
can’t become great at it. And then
finding an ice rink that supports
curling, there aren’t too many curling
clubs. I’ve been to a curling club in
Denver, in San Francisco. Pretty much
in every city that I’ve played in, I’ve been
to their curling club.”
Davis said he has never taken a
teammate curling, but if he were
selecting three players to fill out his own
four-man team from the Redskins’
roster, he would look to his fellow tight
ends.
“When we compete during the
offseason, we’ll push the sleds and we’ll
compete,” Davis said. “Usually [the tight
ends] will win everything, so I’m going
with my group, man. I’m picking Niles
Paul, Jordan Reed and maybe [Jeremy]
Sprinkle. That’s my group right there. I
think I’d want to be the lead. He throws
the first stone. I kind of like to get a feel
and set everything up. I can see it before
it happens.”
scott.allen@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
dcsportsbog
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NHL
7 p.m.
Edmunds brothers
leaving Va. Tech early
Virginia Tech’s defense
suffered two big losses
Wednesday as brothers Tremaine
and Terrell Edmunds announced
on social media that they are
leaving school early to enter the
NFL draft.
Tremaine, a junior linebacker
this past season, led the Hokies
with 109 tackles. Several draft
analysts project that he will be a
first-round selection.
Terrell, a redshirt junior
safety, saw his season cut short
in November when he had
shoulder surgery.
The Edmunds brothers are
from Danville, Va., and played at
Dan River High for their dad,
former NFL player Ferrell
Edmunds. . . .
Alabama wide receiver Calvin
Ridley, Clemson wide receiver
Deon Cain and LSU running
back Derrius Guice announced
they will enter the NFL draft.
The deadline to declare for the
draft is Monday. . . .
LSU Coach Ed Orgeron
promoted tight ends coach Steve
Ensminger to offensive
coordinator.
American football, or at least
the professional version of it, is in
a rut. The NFL’s TV ratings have
tanked (college football’s regular
season ratings declined as well,
though Monday night’s national
title game put up some good numbers). No one knows what a catch
is, and most everyone agrees that
instant replay needs fixing. Head
injuries — and the NFL’s bumbling reaction to them — have just
about everyone concerned.
Nevertheless, football remains
America’s most popular spectator
sport, according to a Gallup poll
released this week. Of the
1,049 respondents to the telephone
survey
conducted
Dec. 4-11, 37 percent said football
is their favorite sport to watch,
and while that number is down
from the all-time high of 43 percent in 2006 and 2007, it’s still far
ahead of basketball (11 percent)
and baseball (9 percent).
Football’s decline perhaps
could be expected, given the negative stories coming out of the
sport, but baseball’s decline might
be more worrisome. It fell below
double digits in the Gallup poll for
the first time (the survey was first
taken in 1937) and is barely ahead
of soccer, which garnered 7 percent of the responses, an all-time
high and up 4 percentage points
from the last poll in 2013.
The other answers: ice hockey
(4 percent), auto racing (2 percent) and tennis (2 percent). Golf,
volleyball, boxing, gymnastics,
motocross, ice/figure skating and
rodeo all garnered 1 percent.
“Other” received 5 percent. The
margin of sampling error is plus/
minus 4 percentage points.
Football did comparatively
well in all age groups, with
30 percent of respondents ages 18
to 34, 40 percent of respondents
ages 33 to 54 and 39 percent ages
55 and older saying it was their
favorite spectator sport.
Plus, football has maintained
its lead over basketball in the poll.
In this year’s survey, the gap between football and basketball was
26 percentage points, only one
point lower than in the previous
poll and more than three points
higher than the average gap between football and the secondplace sport over the past 13 such
polls (22.9 points). The closest
any sport has gotten to football’s
popularity in the poll was in
March 2001, when there was only
a 12-point difference between
football and second-place basketball.
One number might cause worry for everyone involved in sports,
however.
“The number of Americans
who say they do not have a favorite sport has grown from 8% in
2000 to 15% now — an increase
larger than for any sport during
that time,” Gallup reports.
matt.bonesteel@washpost.com
DIGEST
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
M ATT B ONESTEEL
BASEBALL
A baseball agent was fired
after he was accused of using a
camera to surreptitiously record
clients in a shower.
CSE Talent, the agency headed
by Lonnie Cooper, said in a
statement that it had fired Jason
Wood, who had headed its
baseball division since April.
FanRag Sports reported that a
player, whom it did not identify,
discovered the camera while
using a shower at Wood’s home.
Wood also was suspended
Wednesday by the Major League
Baseball Players Association.
“The allegations that have
surfaced today are absurd and
untrue,” Wood said in a
statement sent to some baseball
writers.
Wood’s clients included
Boston Red Sox outfielder
Andrew Benintendi. . . .
ESPN and the Associated
Press reported that free agent
outfielder Jay Bruce reached
agreement on a three-year,
$39 million contract to return to
the New York Mets.
Bruce, 30, is a .249 career
hitter with 277 home runs over
10 seasons. The Mets traded him
to the Cleveland Indians during
the stretch drive last summer. . . .
Slugger Khris Davis and the
Oakland Athletics agreed to a
one-year, $10.5 million contract,
more than doubling his salary.
TENNIS
Serena Williams told Vogue
that she dealt with a medical
scare right after the birth of her
daughter.
In a story posted on
Vogue.com, Williams discussed
developing several small blood
clots in her lungs while in the
hospital after Alexis Olympia
Ohanian Jr. was born in
September.
The 36-year-old Williams, who
is married to Reddit co-founder
Alexis Ohanian, has not played
in a tournament since she won
her 23rd Grand Slam singles title
at the Australian Open last
January. Williams is skipping
this year’s Australian Open,
which begins next week. . . .
Novak Djokovic won in his
first competitive match in six
months, a 6-1, 6-4 victory over
Dominic Thiem in Melbourne,
Australia.
Wearing a compression sleeve
to protect his troublesome right
elbow, Djokovic dominated the
fifth-ranked Thiem in an
exhibition match at the Kooyong
Classic, an Australian Open
tuneup event.
MISC.
Arsenal and host Chelsea
labored to a 0-0 draw in the first
leg of their League Cup semifinal
at Stamford Bridge.
The second leg between the
London rivals is Jan. 24 at
Emirates Stadium. . . .
Real Madrid reached the
quarterfinals of the Copa del Rey,
but its struggles continued with
a 2-2 draw at home against
second-division team Numancia.
Madrid advanced 5-2 on
aggregate.
Elsewhere, Leganes reached
the Copa del Rey quarterfinals
for the first time despite a 2-1
loss at Villarreal, while last year’s
runner-up, Alaves, defeated
visiting Formentera, 2-0, to
advance. . . .
Stephane Peterhansel
extended his overall lead of the
Dakar Rally after winning the
fifth stage.
Peterhansel leads Spain’s
Carlos Sainz by 31:16. . . .
In Park City, Utah, Canada’s
Mikael Kingsbury won his
12th straight World Cup moguls
event and set a record with his
47th career victory.
He moved past Americans
Hannah Kearney and Donna
Weinbrecht for the record.
— From news services
Carolina at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, NHL Network,
WJFK (106.7 FM)
NBA
3 p.m.
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Boston vs. Philadelphia » NBA TV
Cleveland at Toronto » TNT
San Antonio at Los Angeles Lakers » TNT
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
8 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
10 p.m.
11 p.m.
11 p.m.
Maryland at Ohio State » ESPN2, WTEM (980 AM)
Tennessee State at Eastern Illinois » CBS Sports Network
Tulsa at Houston » ESPNU
Iowa at Illinois » Fox Sports 1
Western Kentucky at Old Dominion » beIN Sports
Louisiana Tech at Middle Tennessee » CBS Sports Network
Clemson at North Carolina State » ESPN
Wichita State at East Carolina » ESPN2
Stanford at Washington State » ESPNU
Oregon at Arizona State » Fox Sports 1
Saint Mary’s (Calif.) at Santa Clara » ESPNU
Utah at UCLA » ESPN2
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
10 a.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
9 p.m.
Marist at Quinnipiac » ESPNU
Notre Dame at Louisville » ESPN
Tennessee at Texas A&M » SEC Network
Michigan State at Maryland » Big Ten Network
Mississippi at Mississippi State » SEC Network
GOLF
7 a.m.
7 p.m.
European Tour: South African Open, first round » Golf Channel
PGA Tour: Sony Open, first round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
4:30 a.m.
10 p.m.
11 p.m.
WTA: Sydney International, quarterfinals » beIN Sports
WTA: Sydney International, semifinals » beIN Sports
ATP: Auckland Open, semifinals » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
1:25 p.m.
3:25 p.m.
Copa del Rey: Cadiz at Sevilla » beIN Sports
Copa del Rey: Celta at Barcelona » beIN Sports
BOYS’ HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL
5:30 p.m.
Orlando Christian Prep (Fla.) at Montverde Academy (Fla.) » ESPN2
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
Jaguars seem to have it all except a quarterback
BY
M ARK M ASKE
The Jacksonville Jaguars will
take the field for an AFC semifinal
Sunday in Pittsburgh with a future as bright as their present.
The new regime of Coach Doug
Marrone and front-office football
czar Tom Coughlin has reinvigorated the franchise. The defense is
young and terrific, and rookie
running back Leonard Fournette
certainly appears to be the real
deal.
But then there’s Blake Bortles.
It has become almost too easy
to question or ridicule Bortles, the
fourth-year quarterback for the
Jaguars who has mixed moments
of promise with far too many
mistakes and steps backward
throughout his NFL career. But
the ease of it, the lack of a challenge, doesn’t seem to stop anyone. Houston Texans defensive
standout Jadeveon Clowney derided Bortles’s on-field abilities
this season by calling him “trash”
— and that was at a time when
Bortles was playing well.
Bortles threw 13 interceptions
during the regular season, bringing his four-season NFL total to 64.
He somehow managed to have
more rushing yards (88) than passing yards (87) in a 10-3 triumph
Sunday over the Buffalo Bills in the
opening round of the playoffs.
It is enough to wonder: Just
how good would the Jaguars be
with a quarterback better than
Bortles?
“I think even in the short term
he’s a question mark,” former
Washington Redskins quarterback Joe Theismann said. “It
takes forever for him to get the
ball out of his hand. His accuracy
is questionable. The Jacksonville
Jaguars are where they are because of their defense. But eventually you can only protect the
quarterback position so much. . . .
Blake Bortles won’t be the quarterback of the Jaguars next year.”
That remains to be seen, of
course. The Jaguars picked up
their fifth-year option in Bortles’s
REINHOLD MATAY/USA TODAY SPORTS
Quarterback Blake Bortles threw 13 interceptions this season to bring his four-year career total to 64.
rookie contract for next season at
a salary of more than $19 million.
But that option year is guaranteed
only for injury. So the Jaguars still
could move on from Bortles at
quarterback if they choose.
“Everyone understands the value of a quarterback,” Theismann
said by phone this week. “With
that number at $19 million, I can’t
imagine Jacksonville paying him
that kind of money. His delivery is
so slow. Could it be fixed? It could
be. It’s possible. But do you pay
someone $19 million to see if he
can fix that?”
That view is shared by others in
and around the sport.
“They’ve put together a really
good young team there,” said a
front-office executive with another NFL franchise, who spoke
on the condition of anonymity to
give a frank opinion of another
team’s roster. “But if you’re them,
you certainly have to give some
serious thought to going a different direction at quarterback.
There will be some options this
offseason.”
Coughlin, the two-time Super
Bowl-winning coach for the New
York Giants, could bring about a
reunion with Eli Manning if Manning does not remain in New
York. Could the Jaguars explore a
trade for Kansas City’s Alex
Smith, with the Chiefs perhaps
ready to turn to Patrick Mahomes
II as their starter? Could they be
in the running for prospective
free agent Kirk Cousins, assuming
he is not franchise-tagged again
by the Washington Redskins?
“How about a kid who ranks in
the top 10 quarterbacks who lives
in Washington?” Theismann said.
“That would make sense for them.
But nobody is going to know
what’s going to happen with Kirk
Cousins until March.”
For now, it will be Bortles trying to rebound from his 12-for-23
passing performance against the
Bills as the third-seeded Jaguars
attempt to upset the second-seed-
ed Steelers and advance to the
AFC championship game.
“When you run for more yards
than you throw for, that tells you
all you need to know,” Theismann
said. “Pittsburgh is going to make
him throw the football, and I
think the Jaguars are going to
struggle. To be honest, there really
isn’t anything I’m impressed with.
If you keep him in the pocket,
you’re going to control their offense.”
Bortles acknowledged after the
victory over the Bills that it’s “usually not ideal for a quarterback” to
have more rushing yards than
passing yards in a game. But as
least it was part of a winning
effort, he said.
“We get to play again,” Bortles
said Sunday. “That’s all you can
ask for. Obviously offensively we
didn’t play the way we wanted to
play. And kind of like our defense
has played all year, they were
incredible. Gave us opportunities.
At the end of the day, you’ve got to
score one more point than the
other team. And we found a way
to do that.”
Marrone said at a news conference Monday that he does not
believe Bortles has lost confidence as a passer.
“I always see him coming to
work the same way,” Marrone
said. “If his confidence isn’t rattled by what’s gone on in the past,
I don’t think something like that’s
going to rattle him. You know
what I’m saying? I think he’s going
to come and just try to work
because his one characteristic is
his toughness. That’s his greatest
characteristic, to me, when people ask me. It’s like, ‘Hey, what do
you like about him?’ I say, ‘He’s
tough, both mentally and physically.’
“He shows up every day. . . . He
just wants to know what he has to
do, what he has to improve on,
what he’s got to do to help the
offense and just go to work. That’s
the way he’s been all year. So he
hasn’t changed.”
The Jaguars won handily in
Pittsburgh, 30-9, during the regular season. But that was a game in
which Steelers quarterback Ben
Roethlisberger threw five interceptions, two of which were returned for touchdowns by the
Jaguars. A second triumph over
the Steelers this season probably
would require a performance by
Bortles and the Jaguars’ offense
far different from what transpired this past weekend.
“Everything is a concern when
you want to play better, when you
don’t play well,” Marrone said.
“Like I said, we collectively, everyone — it starts with me to [offensive coordinator Nathaniel]
Hackett to the assistant coaches
to the players — we’ve got to do a
better job. We’ve got to do a better
job starting today. We’ve got to do
a better job tomorrow. I mean, I
know it sounds cliche. But it’s not
like it’s one area. We’ve got to pick
it up in all the areas and do a
better job offensively.”
mark.maske@washpost.com
SALLY JENKINS
Patriots dismiss reports of tension, but the proof will be on the field
JENKINS FROM D1
Patriots worked at the same dull,
digging pace, shoveling out
platitudes and refusing to admit
any chink in this impenetrable
fortress of a franchise, which so
many teams would love to believe
is finally permeable and might
even collapse from within.
“Can’t anybody help us but us,”
cornerback Malcolm Butler said.
“We’re all we got. That’s how you
have to look at it.
“You just don’t pay attention to
it,” he added. “It’s hard sometimes
when people are just talking, but
when it comes down to it, it’s
keeping your head down and
keep pushing and not worrying
about people that aren’t in our
locker room and going through
things we’re going through. And
keep it real tight.”
Privately, people on the inside
acknowledge that tensions are
inevitable among competitive
people who have spent years
together under a variety of high
pressures. Brady is a quirky
obsessive, and the driven
Belichick knows only one tone:
demanding. But they also
adamantly insist that the
situation is not as dire as
portrayed. Someday the Patriots’
run will end because Brady is,
after all, 40 years old, a person
close to him says. “But not for this
reason.”
To believe the Patriots are
fracturing and that this is their
last big run, you have to believe
that the three principal
characters have begun to behave
in profoundly uncharacteristic
ways. You have to throw away
almost everything you know and
have seen of Brady, Belichick and
Kraft for two decades. You have to
believe that Brady, for the first
time in his career, has become a
pouty diva who demands special
status and privileges and have to
ignore the many times he has
restructured his contract to make
it more team-friendly in the
interest of winning. You have to
believe that he is so insecure that
he pressed for his backup Jimmy
Garoppolo to be traded and
rejoiced when Garoppolo was
dealt to the 49ers.
“In 18 years I have never
celebrated when a player was
traded or cut,” Brady said,
rebutting the notion on his
weekly radio show Tuesday. “It is
such a poor characterization.”
You would have to believe that
Kraft abandoned his longtime
policy of being resolutely handsoff about football matters. You
have to believe that one of the
most restrained and
organizationally conscious
owners in the league suddenly
called Belichick to the owner’s
suite and big-footed him,
instructed Belichick to trade
Garoppolo to appease Brady.
Kraft insists the meeting and the
mandate absolutely didn’t
happen.
And you would have to believe
that the famously dispassionate
Belichick became suddenly more
emotionally attached to
Garoppolo, who had won just two
games for the Patriots, than to an
MVP who has won five Super
Bowls, including two of the past
three. And that Belichick
therefore, for the first time in his
highly calculating career, made a
terrible deal and maybe even
intentionally kneecapped the
organization he has so
painstakingly hand-built. As
opposed to doing the careful
math on the Patriots’ salary cap
and the money they would have
to offer Garoppolo to keep playing
behind Brady and the leverage
they probably would lose if he
didn’t move on a deal for
Garoppolo in what he saw as “the
last window” to get some value
for him.
You would have to believe he
wanted Garoppolo to embarrass
the Patriots — as opposed to
hoping that by sending him to a
struggling team across the
country and in an opposite
division and conference in the
NFC West, under a first-year head
coach, he probably wouldn’t come
back to beat them on the field
anytime soon.
Everyone complains about
their bosses. Everyone gets testy
with their longtime mates. It
doesn’t always mean you want to
divorce or quit or tear down all
you have built. Brady’s
unexpected good health and MVP
level of play at age 40 undeniably
have put the Patriots in a unique
kind of limbo, and no doubt it
comes with tension. Especially
given his reliance on highly
unconventional health guru Alex
Guerrero, whose special access
undoubtedly angered the
conventional medical and
training staffs — who have reason
to be territorial and defensive
given Brady’s very public
rejection of their pill-needle-andknife care.
But the real indication that the
mortar is dissolving in this
building will not come from
media reports. It will come from a
subtle change in the on-field
habits that have been the Patriots’
signatures for years, the lockstep
precision and attention to detail
and their remarkably disciplined
focus, the ability to shut out
everything else and to “control
the day,” as special teams captain
Matthew Slater put it.
You will know it if they become
a telltale bit slipshod. “That single
fundamental you’ve been talking
about since OTAs? That can be
pivotal on Saturday,” Slater said.
You will know when you see a
faint decline in their will, to put
up with the pressures and the
noise and the inevitable
nor’easters, both weather-born
and media-brought, that come
with their success. “Saturday
night. Foxborough, Gillette. Fans
loud. Cold,” Slater says.
Maybe the Patriots are done.
Maybe Brady really is slipping
and feeling threatened and
Belichick is disenchanted, and
maybe it’s time for a new
organization, led by younger men.
Or just maybe they aren’t done
yet. Maybe they remain the most
inflexible, uncompromising,
exacting, self-willed and victoryravenous team you have ever
seen.
“Fate whispers to the warrior,
‘You cannot withstand the
storm,’ ” Brady posted on
Instagram late Monday. “The
warrior whispers back, ‘I am the
storm.’ ”
sally.jenkins@washpost.com
For more by Sally Jenkins, visit
washingtonpost.com/jenkins.
NFL NOTES
Steelers’
Shazier is
on hand
for practice
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
Pittsburgh Steelers Pro Bowl
linebacker Ryan Shazier won’t
play again this season. Yet he remains very much a part of the
team even after injuring his spine
against Cincinnati last month.
Shazier attended practice
Wednesday for the first time since
he underwent spine stabilization
surgery Dec. 6.
Shazier posted a photo on Instagram from the team’s indoor training facility as Pittsburgh prepared
to host Jacksonville this weekend.
Shazier is pictured in a wheelchair
wearing sweatpants and a Steelers
jacket, a visit that gave his teammates a needed jolt.
“It was awesome to see him,”
guard Ramon Foster said. “Everybody is worried but him, and it
proves that he’s as strong as it
gets.”
The extent of Shazier’s injury
has not been released. In his Instagram post, he said his visit to the
facility was “a first down” in his
recovery. Shazier wrote he has
been “making strides” over the
past month but added he is “far
from done.” The 25-year-old said
he is “working harder than ever”
to get back.
Defensive end Cam Heyward
said Shazier is helping break down
film like a scout, an extension of
his role as the defensive play caller.
PANTHERS: Former Washington Redskins coach Norv Turner was finalizing details that
would make him Carolina’s next
offensive coordinator, ESPN reported.
Turner’s son, Scott, an analyst
who worked with quarterbacks at
Michigan, also would come to
Carolina as the next position
coach for Cam Newton, according
to a source.
Carolina this week fired offensive coordinator Mike Shula and
quarterbacks coach Ken Dorsey.
SEAHAWKS: Seattle fired offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell
and offensive line coach Tom Cable. Bevell was in charge of calling
plays, while Cable was responsible
for a running game and offensive
line that failed to meet expectations.
It was a stunning sweep for
Coach Pete Carroll, who has been
immensely loyal to his assistants
during his tenure.
Carroll’s only other significant
firing was offensive coordinator
Jeremy Bates following the 2010
season, Carroll’s first in Seattle.
RAIDERS: The Fritz Pollard
Alliance called for the NFL to investigate whether Oakland violated the “Rooney Rule” when it
hired Jon Gruden as coach.
Fritz Pollard Alliance counsel
Cyrus Mehri and N. Jeremi Duru
said they were concerned that
Raiders owner Mark Davis came
to an agreement with Gruden before the team interviewed any minority candidates as required by
the NFL since 2003.
TITANS: Tennessee Coach
Mike Mularkey said running back
DeMarco Murray will not play
against the New England Patriots
in Saturday’s playoff game because of a knee injury.
The coach listed Murray as dayto-day after the Titans beat Kansas
City on Saturday. But Murray has
yet to practice this week.
Derrick Henry will start his
third straight game Saturday.
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
JERRY BREWER
With a huge contract, Gruden is
the biggest name in job security
BREWER FROM D1
year later, Gruden led the Bucs to
a 48-21 Super Bowl victory over
the Raiders. The revisionist
thought is that Gruden, who
posted a 38-26 record and won
two playoff games in Oakland
from 1998 to 2001, could have
achieved sustained success if he
had stayed with the Raiders.
“Raider Nation, this is a big
effin’ deal,” Davis said as he
introduced Gruden on Tuesday.
How much was it worth to
Davis just to invite a bunch of
people to a news conference and
say those words? $10 million?
$25 million?
Whatever the amount, it’s
worth more to Gruden’s
disposable profession. This
January, six NFL jobs came open.
Five of those coaches were fired;
Bruce Arians retired in Arizona.
One of the fired coaches, Jim
Caldwell, had a 36-28 record with
the Detroit Lions that is quite
close to the mark of Gruden glory
that made Davis so nostalgic. Do
you know what three winning
seasons and two postseason
appearances in four years should
make you in Detroit? A legend.
But the Lions want someone new,
and because they’re the Lions,
new is almost certain to perform
way worse than Caldwell.
These days, when you see six
coaching openings in the NFL,
you think, “That’s it?” There were
a half-dozen other coaches on the
hot seat. When no NBA coaches
were fired at the end of last
season, it felt odd (but in a joyful
way, I’m sure). Then the 2017-18
season began, and two coaches
were canned before December.
Sadly, it felt normal.
Job performance doesn’t even
factor into some coaching firings
now. It has become acceptable
simply to explain, “We need a new
voice.” It really means, “We need a
new gimmick to inspire hope.” It
has become understood that good
coaches — not just the bad ones
— have short expiration dates.
Now Gruden returns to this
toxic atmosphere for the first
time since the Bucs fired him. But
this time, Gruden has an owner
who celebrates nabbing him after
“six years of chasing.”
“My biggest dream come true,”
Davis said.
Davis might not be the most
ambitious dreamer.
But that’s a wonderful thing for
Gruden. And if he succeeds, it will
be wonderful for most all
coaches. Yes, Gruden needs to
prove that he still has it. But he’s
just 54 years old, and the game
hasn’t changed too much. As a
television personality, he has
tracked football’s evolution, and
he should have a plan for
adjusting to rule changes and
maximizing the limited time he
will have with players now.
If Gruden learned from his
failures at the end of his tenure in
Tampa, he will be fine. His
coaching wasn’t the problem. The
biggest factor was that he didn’t
work with Rich McKay, and after
McKay left the organization,
Gruden lobbied for Bruce Allen.
The combination of Allen and
Gruden on personnel decisions
was a disaster. This time, Gruden
will be working with Raiders
General Manager Reggie
McKenzie, who is a much more
accomplished talent evaluator. If
they can work together, the
Raiders will thrive.
“How long I stay here will be
determined by how well we play,”
Gruden said Tuesday.
Well, yes and no. It’s more
accurate to say that a long
Gruden stay has been
predetermined by how well he is
paid. Davis won’t be firing
Gruden anytime soon, not with
all the money he now owes him.
The coach has a runway. He can
finish building the Raiders, who
already have a decent roster with
some nice top-end talent, without
panicking. He is now on an
exclusive list of coaches
impervious to premature
judgment, right alongside
championship-collecting gems
such as Nick Saban, Gregg
Popovich and Mike Krzyzewski.
That trio has combined for
16 championships. Gruden is a
proven winner, but he’s different
because he capitalized on being
perceived as unattainable. Nine
years ago, he was a well-regarded
coach. Since then, he has
acquired a mythical level of
greatness. He turned into the
impossible date, and his reported
$6.5 million ESPN salary made it
only easier for him to reject
suitors.
But this is a job that he had to
take. Why? Because this was a job
that was taken from him 16 years
ago. For coaches, it always comes
back to security. Gruden wanted
to remain the Raiders coach
when he was traded, but Al Davis
wasn’t sure about signing him
long term. Then Tampa Bay
agreed to trade two first-round
picks, two second-rounders and
$8 million to get Gruden.
After that ridiculous deal,
Gruden finished Tony Dungy’s
work and won a Super Bowl in his
first season with the Bucs. What
will he do now that a team has
committed $100 million to him?
Maybe it won’t be as dramatic
this time. Maybe Gruden will do a
good, strategic job and build a
Raiders team that can win for a
long time and have multiple
legitimate chances at a
championship.
Gruden will receive the
patience to do it right. His
contract demands it. He just
doesn’t have to live up to being
Mark Davis’s dream hire. He has
to do his part to make it
reasonable for coaches to have
their biggest dream come true:
job security.
jerry.brewer@washpost.com
For more by Jerry Brewer, visit
washingtonpost.com/brewer.
INSULATION SALE
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
St. John’s freshman Azzi Fudd, center, is averaging 22 points per game and already has drawn interest from several top college programs.
Fudd can do it all on a basketball court
BASKETBALL FROM D1
the perimeter and canned an
open three, Fudd demonstrated
why she is not just a budding
star but also a symbol of evolution in girls’ basketball. On the
boys’ side, from the NBA on
down to high school, blurred
positional lines are evident in
point guards standing 6-6 or
taller, five-guard lineups or big
men who launch threes. In girls’
basketball, a more subtle shift
toward a positionless game is
also reaching across levels.
Just look at Azzi Fudd.
“She does everything,” Rasdolsky said to Brooke, and feeling
like he may have gotten his point
across, he was quiet for a few
possessions.
“When something starts happening at the professional level,
like in the WNBA, it is only
natural for it to trickle down to
college and then eventually high
school,” said Kara Lawson, a
women’s basketball analyst for
ESPN and a television analyst for
the Washington Wizards. “It’s
never been a bad thing to be able
to do everything. But now the
women’s game is demanding that
of its players more, and that’s
when you see a young player like
Azzi come along.”
‘She’s like Kawhi Leonard’
The Fudds lounged around
their sunlit living room in Falls
Church on a Sunday in late November. Their dog, Curry, named
for Golden State Warriors star
Stephen, begged for attention as
they all pondered the same question: When did Azzi fall in love
with basketball?
“Uh . . . I don’t know when it
was,” Azzi said, looking at her
parents. “I mean, I used to hate
practicing.”
“She showed a knack for the
game right away,” said Tim Fudd,
her father.
“Not in her first game,” interjected Katie Smrcka-Duffy Fudd,
her mother. Azzi, sunk into a
brown leather couch, let out a
short giggle. “She was horrible.”
“Okay,” Tim insisted. “But after
that . . . ”
“She was a freak of nature from
a very young age,” Katie said,
finishing Tim’s sentence. “That
helped her fall in love with it.”
Katie starred at Georgetown,
twice leading the Big East in
scoring, before she was drafted
into the WNBA by the Sacramento Monarchs. Tim played at
American in the mid-1990s, has
coached men’s college basketball
and boys’ high school basketball,
and now is an assistant for the
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girls’ team at St. John’s. They are
both basketball trainers and
coaches for the Fairfax Stars, an
AAU program that Azzi plays for
based in Northern Virginia.
When Azzi was 7, she took two
basketballs and told Katie to
“Watch this.” She dribbled them at
the same time, and Katie told her
at least to do it right and pick her
head up. But then Azzi crossed the
balls over, switching hands while
keeping her dribble, and Katie,
wide-eyed, was fine with her
daughter looking at the floor.
Katie and Tim mixed everything into Azzi’s workouts: spotup shooting, off-the-dribble jumpers, ballhandling, post moves.
Azzi, named for former Stanford
star Jennifer Azzi, picked it all up
so fast. She played with the boys in
seventh and eighth grade. She
zoomed into high school with limitless potential.
“She’s like Kawhi Leonard. It’s
hard to say what position she is.
She’s just Azzi and does everything, you know?” St. John’s
Coach Jonathan Scribner said before the season. “You just don’t
see it very often. She is something
that’s different. You’re seeing a
unicorn.”
Unicorn is the term used for
NBA players bucking traditional
conceptions of basketball positions. That includes New York
Knicks forward Kristaps Porzingis,
who is 7-foot-3 with a jump shot
and ballhandling ability; Milwaukee Bucks superstar Giannis Antetokounmpo, a 6-foot-11 point
guard and a front-runner for the
MVP award; and New Orleans
Pelicans forward Anthony Davis,
who is 6-foot-10 with a full arsenal
of guard skills on offense. Leonard,
the San Antonio Spurs star, represents this positionless trend as a
6-foot-7 wing who can defend any
player on the court.
Azzi is technically a combo
guard capable of running an offense and thriving as an off-ball
scorer. But as Scribner pointed out,
it is hard to define her as just that.
She is a high-percentage threepoint shooter and has the upperbody strength to score inside. She
is a strong perimeter defender and
can protect the paint. She played
point guard for Team USA’s gold
medal-winning
16-and-under
team this past summer — as a
14-year-old — but Coach Carla
Berube said, “We could also rely on
her to guard all five positions.”
Tim sees the WNBA functioning much like the NBA in terms of
positionality. He points to Moore’s
Minnesota Lynx, who have won
four of the past seven league titles,
and how their offense allows each
player to fluidly move around the
court. Then there is Los Angeles
Sparks star Candace Parker, one of
the sport’s premier players, who is
6-foot-4 but plays on the perimeter, setting up the offense and
shooting as much as she is in the
paint. His daughter wants to get to
that level, and Tim has identified
the blueprint.
De-emphasizing the five traditional positions — point guard,
shooting guard, small forward,
power forward and center — allows teams to maximize versatility and vary their approaches on
the offensive and defensive end.
On offense, the popular, modern
analytics-based approach is to
take the most efficient shots on
the court: from behind the threepoint line and at the rim. Having
tall players who can shoot and
surrounding them with longarmed, multifaceted guards is the
best way to carry out that formula, which sits at the center of
basketball’s movement away
from set positions and is being
showcased by the reigning champions in the both the NBA (Warriors) and the WNBA (Lynx).
“It’s trending to where the
players are more positionless,”
Tim said. “Girls are that much
more effective if they can play
multiple positions because then
it’s just playing basketball.”
Does Azzi prefer one spot over
another?
“Um. . .” she started, and again
looked at her parents for help.
Both of them smirked and stayed
silent. “I like scoring. I also like
playing the point guard now. I
probably like being a guard better. I don’t know. I like them all. I
just like being on the court.”
‘I’m still just 15’
“Move! Move, Azzi!” Tim yelled
from the bench inside Paul VI’s
gym in early January, with the
score now knotted at 45 and the
defense tracking Azzi all over the
court.
“Come on, Azz, move somewhere,” Katie muttered from
across the court, holding an iPad
that helps her track stats, from
made shots to deflections, for the
entire St. John’s team. All eyes
were on Azzi as the game clock
dipped below one minute, and
Tim and Katie already tell their
daughter to get used to it. The
comparisons to some of the
game’s best players, the college
offers, the relentless doubleteams — it is only just beginning.
Someday, someday soon, they
say to their daughter, people will
be calling a little girl the next Azzi
Fudd.
“I don’t feel like there is pressure from that,” Azzi said. “It feels
like an honor for people to say
those things. And I know it comes
with some responsibility, but I’m
still just 15.”
Off a steal, Azzi drove to the
basket and nudged St. John’s
ahead by two. Then she hit two
free throws, then two more and
ended up scoring the final six
points in a six-point St. John’s
victory. Katie said Azzi “didn’t
seem like herself” before snapping an iPhone photo of her
daughter’s final stat line:
27 points, eight rebounds, 8 for 16
from the field, 4 for 5 from three,
7 for 7 from the free throw line.
Tim, tie loosened by a stressful
ending, walked across the floor to
have a long conversation with
Maryland women’s basketball
Coach Brenda Frese.
Fans slowly filtered out of the
gym and into a cold night, tugging on beanies and wrapping
scarves around their necks. Paul
VI flickered the lights a few times
to let the stragglers know it was
time to go home. But two young
kids hung by the door leading to
the locker rooms. They refused to
leave before getting a picture
with their favorite player.
They wanted one more glimpse
of Azzi Fudd.
jesse.dougherty@washpost.com
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
MID-ATLANTIC PREP HOCKEY LEAGUE
NBA ROUNDUP
No. 1 Eagles simplify,
surge past No. 3 Bears
Shorthanded Miami earns sixth straight victory
GONZAGA 5,
LANDON 1
BY
D ILLON M ULLAN
It took top-ranked Gonzaga a
little while to discover its advantage. But once the Eagles figured
out No. 3 Landon, it was just a
matter of time before they pulled
away for a 5-1 win at Fort Dupont
Ice Arena in Southeast.
Cole Vallese started by skating
zigzags around the Bears’ zone without carving a path through to the
net. Farrell Dinn stickhandled in
circles near the Bears’ goal, but taller
defenders blocked shooting lanes.
Then the sophomore linemates
found paths to the net in straight
lines. And the direct offense was
the key.
“At the beginning of the game,
we tried to be fancy and overcomplicated,” Vallese said. “Once we
adapted to their play style, we kept
it simple and used each other well,
and the goals started coming.”
Gonzaga built pressure with a
string of faceoffs in its offensive
zone in the final minute of the
second period, but Landon junior
goalie Ty Morton saved three consecutive shots from the point to
keep the game 1-1. Without success
from long range, Dinn pushed the
next faceoff between the opposing
center’s legs, burst to the puck and
hit a centering pass to Vallese, who
finished at the back post to give
the Eagles the lead heading into
the third period.
“Their center’s stick was off to the
side, so I knew that I could get the
puck through him safely. I told Cole
before the faceoff to go to the net,
and he was perfectly open at the
back door,” said Dinn, who stands
5-foot-5. “Being this small is fine.
When I can work it to my advantage, it boosts my confidence.”
Landon senior Nico Kenary
scored the opening goal on the
power play in the first period.
Midway through the third period, two Gonzaga penalties gave
Landon a chance to equalize with
a two-man advantage for 34 seconds. As the Bears attempted to
work a shot, Vallese jumped a pass
across the blue line, raced straight
to the goal and finished the breakaway for a shorthanded score to
give the Eagles a two-goal cushion.
“That was a gut check. You felt
the bench got dejected on that
goal,” Landon senior captain
Owen Concannon said. “They’re
the top team in the area right now,
but we know we can play with
anyone. We’ll learn from this.”
Vallese finished with two goals
and an assist, while Dinn had a
goal and an assist. Sophomore forward Max Thiessen added two
goals in the third period as Gonzaga (10-3-1, 4-0-1 Mid-Atlantic
Prep Hockey League) stayed undefeated against local competition.
The Eagles and Landon (10-2, 2-1)
have split the past eight MAPHL
championships.
“This was a good performance
with the defense killing power
plays and the offense scoring a
bunch,” senior captain Chase Vallese said. “We are playing good
hockey right now. Everyone on
this team has found their role.”
dillon.mullan@washpost.com
VIRGINIA PATRIOT DISTRICT BOYS’ BASKETBALL
Stallions bring intensity
in win over state champs
SOUTH COUNTY 63,
W.T. WOODSON 45
BY
C ALLIE C APLAN
Seconds after Cody Kellan fell
to the floor, watching another
one of his three-pointers fall
through the net Wednesday
night, the halftime buzzer sounded and the guard’s South County
teammates surrounded him.
While the W.T. Woodson players walked to the locker room,
passing by a Stallions student
section that was hollering about
the scoreboard, some South
County players fanned their
hands around Kellan, pretending
to cool him down after he had
scored from beyond the arc on
three straight possessions.
That moment in South County’s 63-45 home victory over the
Cavaliers exemplified just what
Coach Mike Robinson had hoped
to see from his squad this week:
excitement, dominance and,
most importantly, intensity.
“They’re starting to play with a
sense of urgency, so when you do
that, you get the best outcome,”
Robinson said. “You play with
some intensity and some pride,
and it makes everything a lot
better.”
Robinson thought his players’
energy dipped after the holidays.
The Stallions were undefeated
for the first time in school history
entering their winter break, but
distractions and commitments
outside of basketball made for
lapses in focus. Plus, weather
disruptions to practices and
games — Wednesday night was a
makeup after a weather-related
school closure postponed the
game Friday — led to an inconsistent schedule.
So after South County lost
consecutive outings to Marshall
and Patriot on Dec. 29 and Jan. 3,
respectively, Robinson pleaded
for more energy. And he pulled
Kellan aside Wednesday to urge
the sophomore to play harder.
“I always try to be honest with
them,” Robinson said. “Let them
know when the intensity isn’t
there anymore.”
Kellan listened, hustling on
defense and leading all scorers
with 20 points. The first six field
goals he made were from threepoint range.
“When I saw the ball go in the
first time, I was like, ‘Let me
shoot another,’ ” Kellan said.
“And I saw it go in again, so I just
kept on shooting.”
Center
Quentin
MilloraBrown helped South County
(11-2, 2-0 Patriot District) establish a double-digit lead in the
first quarter with six of his
17 points coming in the frame.
Then Kellan had those three
three-pointers in the second period to ensure that W.T. Woodson
(7-6, 0-2), the defending Virginia
6A state champion, trailed by 20
at halftime.
callie.caplan@washpost.com
HEAT 114,
PACERS 106
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Goran Dragic scored 20 points,
and backup Wayne Ellington
made the decisive three-pointer
with 25.5 seconds left Wednesday
night to help the Miami Heat
hold on for a rare 114-106 win
over the Indiana Pacers in Indianapolis.
With four players sitting out
because of injuries and James
Johnson suspended by the league
for throwing punches in a victory
over the Toronto Raptors, the
Heat showed up with eight players available for its second road
game in two nights.
“None of these wins are going
to come easy, but I think it just
says a lot about how tough we
are,” Josh Richardson said after
scoring 14 points and shooting
3 for 4 from three-point range.
“Every night, we have to scratch
and claw for everything, and it’s
paying off.”
Miami won its sixth in a row
and snapped a 10-game road
losing streak to Indiana.
TIMBERWOLVES
104,
THUNDER 88: Jimmy Butler
had 26 points, seven rebounds
and eight assists, and Minnesota
pulled away in the second half in
Minneapolis. Russell Westbrook
had 38 points and 10 rebounds
for Oklahoma City.
BULLS
122, KNICKS 119
(2OT): Rookie Lauri Markkanen
scored a season-high 33 points to
lift visiting Chicago.
Kris Dunn had missed 14 of his
first 17 shots before banking in a
runner with just under a minute
left in the second overtime for
the tiebreaking points.
BUCKS
110, MAGIC 103:
Giannis Antetokounmpo scored
26 points and Khris Middleton
added 22 as host Milwaukee
handed Orlando its sixth straight
loss and 15th in its past 16.
GRIZZLIES 105, PELICANS 102: Tyreke Evans scored
28 points, including a pair of free
throws with 5.9 seconds left, to
lead host Memphis.
ROCKETS 121, TRAIL
BLAZERS 112: Chris Paul scored
a season-high 37 points and Eric
Gordon added 30 to help Houston win its second straight.
HAWKS
110, NUGGETS
Dennis Schröder had
19 points and 10 assists as Atlanta
won in Denver to end a 10-game
road losing streak.
97:
PISTONS
114, NETS 80:
Andre
Drummond
scored
22 points and grabbed 20 rebounds, and Detroit cruised in
New York.
MAVERICKS 115, HORNETS 111: Harrison Barnes had
25 points and 11 rebounds and
Yogi Ferrell made seven threepointers and scored 22 points as
Dallas won in Charlotte.
Curry re-sprains right ankle
Golden State Warriors star Stephen Curry was out for Wednesday night’s game against the Los
Angeles Clippers in Oakland,
Calif., after he slipped during the
shoot-around and re-sprained
his troublesome right ankle.
It’s the same injury that recently sidelined him for 11 games,
though Coach Steve Kerr said, “I
don’t think it’s serious.”
During the game, Kevin Durant became the 44th player in
NBA history to score 20,000 career points. He reached the milestone on a pull-up jumper from
the left wing at the 1:41 mark of
the second quarter.
Wizards come up empty against Jazz
Jazz 107, Wizards 104
WIZARDS FROM D1
The Wizards showed little regard in the half court, tying a
season high with 23 turnovers.
They got beat on defense, and
Oubre’s late decision in the game
to cheat off his responsibility, Jazz
forward Joe Ingles, led to disastrous results and served as a
microcosm for these second-half
gaffes.
“Mental lapses, man. What do
you want me to say?” Oubre said.
“It’s on me. As a player, I got to do
a better job of staying disciplined.
I got to do a better job of making
sure my man doesn’t score the
game-leading three.
“That’s on me,” Oubre echoed.
“I got to do a better job of pretty
much locking in, making sure my
man doesn’t do the things he
wants to do. I put that on myself
100 percent.”
Instead of acting like a team
that has turned the corner since
that gloomy December night in
Utah, the Wizards (23-18) looked
stuck in the same mud that has
defined the season through the
first 41 games.
Although Wall finished with
35 points and 11 assists, he also
had eight turnovers. Bradley Beal
added 23 points but made just 3 of
10 shots in the second half. In the
closing seconds, Beal had the
final look to tie the game. But Beal
allowed his mind to race through
scenarios instead of putting his
right hand in action. He elevated
for the three-pointer but thought
Utah’s Donovan Mitchell had recovered to defend the shot, so
Beal never released the ball —
instead allowing it to fall out of
his hands and committing his
team’s final, crushing turnover.
“You’re not going to win like
that,” Beal said about the turnover total. He also considered the
61 points the Wizards allowed in
the second half.
“That’s the game right there,”
Beal said.
Utah (17-24) has not built upon
its demolition of the Wizards
more than a month ago. Since
that night, the Jazz had won just
three of its next 16 games, the
second-worst record in the NBA
over that stretch. Yet the Wizards
somehow brought out the best
the Jazz could offer.
Ricky Rubio scored a team-best
21 points, one of six Jazz players
who reached double figures.
While the Wizards cobbled together only 16 bench points, Utah
Utah .................................... 25
Washington ........................ 32
UTAH
Ingles
Jerebko
Udoh
Mitchell
Rubio
Johnson
Hood
O'Neale
Sefolosha
Burks
TOTALS
21
18
37
27
24 — 107
27 — 104
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
38:18 4-12 1-1 1-5 6 1 10
20:06
3-6 3-4 2-4 1 2
9
33:36 7-10 2-2 5-9 2 3 16
30:59 7-20 0-0 1-5 4 4 16
41:26 9-17 0-0 1-2 3 4 21
33:27
5-9 3-4 0-4 4 0 16
14:57 3-11 0-0 0-6 2 0
7
13:32
4-4 1-2 1-4 1 1 10
8:51
1-1 0-0 0-0 0 1
2
4:48
0-2 0-0 0-0 0 1
0
240 43-92 10-13 11-39 23 17 107
Percentages: FG .467, FT .769. 3-Point Goals: 11-33, .333
(Johnson 3-4, Rubio 3-5, Mitchell 2-10, O’Neale 1-1,
Hood 1-5, Ingles 1-6, Burks 0-1, Jerebko 0-1). Team
Rebounds: 4. Team Turnovers: 12 (20 PTS). Blocked
Shots: 3 (Udoh 2, Mitchell). Turnovers: 12 (Rubio 3, Hood
2, Jerebko 2, Johnson 2, Mitchell 2, Ingles). Steals: 15
(Udoh 4, Johnson 3, Rubio 3, Burks, Jerebko, Mitchell,
O’Neale, Sefolosha). Technical Fouls: Hood, 12:00 third
WASHINGTON
Morris
Porter Jr.
Gortat
Beal
Wall
Oubre Jr.
Meeks
Scott
Satoransky
Smith
Mahinmi
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
26:57
3-4 0-0 1-6 2 3
8
36:57
5-9 2-2 2-6 1 4 14
27:08
4-7 0-0 1-8 2 1
8
39:42 9-19 4-6 0-5 7 2 23
42:20 14-27 4-7 2-6 11 1 35
24:39
4-5 2-2 1-6 0 4 12
16:38
0-4 0-0 1-2 0 0
0
13:09
1-1 0-0 0-2 0 1
2
5:40
1-1 0-0 0-1 2 0
2
4:18
0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
2:32
0-0 0-0 1-3 0 1
0
240 41-78 12-17 9-45 25 17 104
Percentages: FG .526, FT .706. 3-Point Goals: 10-25, .400
(Wall 3-6, Morris 2-3, Oubre Jr. 2-3, Porter Jr. 2-4, Beal
1-5, Meeks 0-4). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 23
(27 PTS). Blocked Shots: 1 (Wall). Turnovers: 23 (Wall 8,
Beal 5, Morris 3, Oubre Jr. 2, Porter Jr. 2, Mahinmi,
Satoransky, Scott). Steals: 8 (Porter Jr. 3, Wall 3,
Morris, Satoransky). Technical Fouls: None.
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Bradley Beal finished with 23 points on 9-for-19 shooting against
the visiting Jazz, but the Wizards were done in by 23 turnovers.
showed depth with strong performances from reserves Joe
Johnson (16 points) and Royce
O’Neale (10).
“We fought, knowing that we
have a tough stretch,” Rubio said.
“We fought all the way in that
game and stepped up big. A lot of
guys played well, and we got the
win.”
As Washington reached the
midpoint of the season, the team
had two consecutive practice
days in preparation for the rematch, a rarity. The Wizards concentrated on their offense, using
those practice sessions to correct
the problems in which they had
averaged 16.5 points and 20 percent shooting in the fourth quarter over the previous two games.
Although the Wizards came
out fast, opening a 12-point lead
behind seven straight made field
goals created off assists, the refined offense dulled before halftime.
Washington labored to score in
the final 4:13 of the second quarter, accounting for only one field
goal. The stagnation and sloppiness continued into the third
quarter. The Wizards committed
turnovers in droves — nine that
led to 14 points for the Jazz — and
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Orlando Magic
reverted to solo performances.
When the Jazz pulled ahead on
the strength of strong three-point
shooting from Johnson (3 for 4)
and sharp two-man play between
Ingles and Jonas Jerebko that led
to a layup, Washington countered
with Mike Scott losing a possession and Wall forcing a drive to
the rim that he wasn’t able to
finish.
“First quarter, we did a great
job coming out with pace and
moving the ball,” Wall said. “We
got defensive stops. Second quarter, we got away from it. They
played with a little more momentum, pace and got out in transition. It was an up-and-down
game from there.”
In the final quarter, the Wizards trailed by 10 points. Another
embarrassing moment seemed
inevitable. Then something
sparked.
After Oubre took a hard fall on
a fearless drive to the rim, he
made both free throws and pulled
Washington within three. Wall
made a three-pointer with less
than three minutes remaining,
trimming the deficit to 98-96.
Oubre, providing the only spark
from the Wizards’ bench, drilled
his corner three to give the Wiz-
Tomorrow
7 NBCSW
vs. Brooklyn Nets
Saturday
7 NBCSW
vs. Milwaukee Bucks
Monday
2 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
ards the 99-98 advantage.
When Wall hit his third threepointer of the game, Washington
went back ahead by one point, but
Oubre lost Ingles, who had an off
shooting night, and allowed him
to drill his only three-pointer in
six attempts with 1:09 to play to
put the Jazz up two.
Johnson made 3 of 4 free
throws down the stretch to push
the lead to three with seven seconds left. On the final play, after
Beal pulled back on his threepointer, he allowed the ball to hit
the ground, meaning he couldn’t
touch it again or else commit a
travel. A turnover happened anyway, and the “47 pts” that had
been earlier drawn on the whiteboard was wiped away by the end
of the game. The message failed
to inspire.
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D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
JANUARY 11 , 2018
Holtby joins Ovechkin
as Caps all-star choices Minnesota prevails to pull ahead of rival Chicago
NHL ROUNDUP
All-Star Game rosters
Goaltender receives
third straight selection,
but Carlson is left out
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
For a third straight year, Capitals goaltender Braden Holtby
was selected to the NHL All-Star
Game, joining captain Alex
Ovechkin, the top fan-vote recipient in the Metropolitan Division,
and Coach Barry Trotz as the
Washington representatives in
Tampa at the end of this month.
The roster announcements by
the league Wednesday contained
one bitter surprise for Washington as defenseman John Carlson
was left off. Carlson is second
among NHL defensemen in scoring with five goals and 29 assists,
but with a three-on-three format,
each division team has just three
defensemen, while every NHL
team is required to have a representative in the game. The Metropolitan defensemen selected
were Pittsburgh’s Kris Letang,
Columbus’s Seth Jones and Carolina’s Noah Hanifin. Jones and
Hanifin are their teams’ only representatives.
Letang’s selection is especially
curious because while he has
been one of the league’s best
defensemen over his career, he
has struggled this season with
just three goals and 24 assists.
The Penguins also already had a
representative with center Sidney
Crosby.
Carlson might also have been
snubbed because the NHL wanted to avoid naming too many
players from one team. Philadelphia defenseman Shayne Gostisbehere also had a strong case to
make the team with nine goals
and 23 assists this season.
Nine teams have multiple representatives, with the NHL-leading Tampa Bay Lightning sending
a league-high four players to the
game: Nikita Kucherov, Steven
Stamkos, Victor Hedman and
goaltender Andrei Vasilevskiy.
Meanwhile, former Capital
Mike Green will represent the
Detroit Red Wings as a defenseman for the Atlantic Division
team.
“I think everybody thinks
about it,” Carlson said Tuesday
night. “This is a tough team to
sneak in on because there’s so
many other great players that are
at the top of the league. I think
everyone wants to go, though.”
This is the second year Ovechkin and Holtby will be at the
All-Star Game together, and
while Holtby’s numbers aren’t
quite as impressive as the past
two seasons, when he was a Vezina Trophy finalist twice, he arguably has meant more to the team
this season. With a less experienced defense corps in front of
him, Holtby has posted a record
of 24-8-0 with a 2.68 goals against
average and .917 save percentage
Atlantic Division (all-star appearance)
F Aleksander Barkov, FLA (1st)
F Jack Eichel, BUF (1st)
F Nikita Kucherov, TBL (2nd)
F Brad Marchand, BOS (2nd)
F Auston Matthews, TOR (2nd)
F Steven Stamkos*, TBL (5th)
D Mike Green, DET (2nd)
D Victor Hedman, TBL (2nd)
D Erik Karlsson, OTT (5th)
G Carey Price, MTL (6th)
G Andrei Vasilevskiy, TBL (1st)
Coach: Jon Cooper, TBL (1st)
Ryan Suter gave Minnesota the
lead on a four-on-four early in the
third period, Devan Dubnyk made
34 saves, and the visiting Wild
held off the Chicago Blackhawks,
2-1, on Wednesday night to end a
two-game slide.
Jonas Brodin scored in the second period for Minnesota (23-
while the NHL-worst Coyotes received winger Richard Panik and
minor leaguer Laurent Dauphin.
SENATORS 4, MAPLE
LEAFS 3: Tom Pyatt broke a tie
with 3:05 left, and Ottawa won in
Toronto.
Pyatt took a feed from Matt
Duchene on a three-on-one — after Toronto defenseman Morgan
Rielly got caught pinching at Ottawa’s blue line — and beat Frederik
Andersen high to the blocker side.
Thomas Chabot, Mike Hoffman
and Gabriel Dumont also scored
to help the Senators rebound from
an 8-2 home loss to Chicago on
Tuesday night. Craig Anderson
made 44 saves after being pulled
against the Blackhawks.
Andreas Borgman, James van
Riemsdyk and Rielly scored for
Toronto, and Andersen made
29 saves.
Ottawa’s Bobby Ryan is sidelined by another hand injury.
It is Ryan’s third hand injury in
12 months and seventh since 2014.
He broke the index finger on his
right hand and missed time in
November before aggravating it in
December.
Central Division
F Patrick Kane, CHI (7th)
F Nathan MacKinnon, COL (2nd)
F Brayden Schenn, STL (1st)
F Tyler Seguin, DAL (5th)
F Eric Staal, MIN (5th)
F Blake Wheeler, WPG (1st)
D John Klingberg, DAL (1st)
D Alex Pietrangelo, STL (1st)
D P.K. Subban*, NSH (3rd)
G Connor Hellebuyck, WPG (1st)
G Pekka Rinne, NSH (2nd)
Coach: Peter Laviolette, NSH (3rd)
Pacific Division
F Brock Boeser, VAN (1st)
F Johnny Gaudreau, CGY (4th)
F Anze Kopitar, LAK (4th)
F Connor McDavid*, EDM (2nd)
F James Neal, VGK (3rd)
F Rickard Rakell, ANA (1st)
D Brent Burns, SJS (5th)
D Drew Doughty, LAK (4th)
D Oliver Ekman-Larsson, ARI (2nd)
G Marc-Andre Fleury, VGK (3rd)
G Jonathan Quick, LAK (3rd)
Coach: Gerard Gallant, VGK (2nd)
* Fan-elected captain
in 32 games. He ranks second in
the NHL in wins and has allowed
two goals or fewer in 16 games,
with Washington 15-1-0 in those
games. Earlier this season, Holtby recorded his 200th career win
in his 319th career game, becoming the second-fastest player in
NHL history to reach the milestone.
The three straight all-star selections for Holtby are a record
for a Washington goaltender.
Note: Capitals head equipment manager Brock Myles was
named the Metropolitan Division
equipment manager. Myles, in his
12th season with Washington,
will be joined by Capitals assistant equipment manager Craig
“Woody” Leydig, equipment assistant Dave Marin and locker
room assistant Ray Straccia.
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
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Trotz resolute but realistic in Cup quest
TROTZ FROM D1
would like to be the coach, but I
wish I could say, ‘Yeah, it’s going to
happen’ — and I’m saying that
every day to myself, ‘It’s going to
happen, it’s going to happen’ — but
I don’t know if it is. And I wouldn’t
trade anything.”
There’s a case to be made that
this season is Trotz’s most impressive coaching job with Washington. The Capitals were discounted
after a difficult offseason that saw
the departures of forwards Marcus Johansson, Justin Williams
and Daniel Winnik and defensemen Nate Schmidt, Karl Alzner
and Kevin Shattenkirk. Washington attempted to fill those lineup
holes and work around its considerable salary cap constraints with
two rookie blue-liners, two forward prospects and two veteran
forwards making the league minimum after their previous teams
didn’t want them anymore.
The Capitals are somehow in
first place in the competitive Metropolitan
Division
halfway
through the season, weathering
the roster turnover, early-season
injuries and the lingering hurt
from last year’s disappointing
playoff exit. Since Trotz became
coach before the 2014-15 season,
the Capitals are first in the NHL in
cumulative wins, points, goals and
power-play percentage, and they
have allowed the fewest goals per
game.
“I thought I prepared well, and
I’m not even close to what Barry
can do,” said Dallas Stars Coach
Ken Hitchcock, third all time in
C A P I TA L S ’ N E X T T H R E E
vs. Carolina Hurricanes
Today
7 NBCSW,
NHL Network
at Carolina Hurricanes
Tomorrow
7:30 NBCSW Plus
at New Jersey Devils
Jan. 18
7 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
wins with 805. “I think the thing
that is remarkable about Barry is
that nothing is spontaneous.
There’s a plan for everything. I was
surprised how ultra-organized the
plan was. . . . Barry plans every
hour of every day in advance of
what he’s going to do. There’s a
reason that his teams are going to
be consistent.”
Over the course of 15 years,
Trotz helped build the Nashville
Predators from a lowly expansion
franchise to a regular playoff presence through that meticulous attention to detail. “You could beat
Nashville, but you could never outwork them,” Hitchcock said. But
that didn’t mean Trotz had no fun.
On one occasion, recognizing his
team needed to loosen up during a
losing streak, Trotz had the Predators’ right-handed shooters use
left-handed sticks and vice versa,
making for a comical practice.
This season required Trotz similarly to relinquish some of the
control and order he might prefer.
For a second straight year last
season, the Capitals had compiled
the league’s best regular season
record, and for a second straight
year, they lost to the Pittsburgh
Penguins, eventual Stanley Cup
champions. Washington was still
in a collective hangover in October, and Trotz knew he needed to
give his team some space.
“The teams that have won experienced adversity,” said Hall of
Fame coach Scotty Bowman, who
won 1,244 games and nine championships. “I mean, it’s not a good
formula, but you usually get pretty
close, then you slip down a bit,
then you’ve got to retool or do
something different. . . . You’ve
just got to keep working at it.
That’s what I would tell people.
You can’t drink any kind of KoolAid to make it better. You just have
to stick with it.”
The
Capitals
floundered
through their first 20 games, appearing on the verge of collapse
after back-to-back blowout losses
at Nashville and Colorado in November. There was concern that
after Trotz’s first three seasons all
ended with the same result, a
heartbreaking second-round loss
in the playoffs, players were tuning him out in the fourth year. The
time for giving the players space
was over, and Trotz was harsh in
the locker room after the 6-2 loss
to the Avalanche in Denver. It
wasn’t a guarantee he would still
be the coach at the end of the
month, but the Capitals turned a
corner the next week, and they’re
16-3-2 in the past 21 games.
“We’ve talked about why certain
teams won and why certain teams
didn’t that we’ve coached,” Hitchcock said. “What were the core ingredients? We spent a long time
this summer talking about it. You
know, it was a tough summer for
him. . . . The teams that did have
success, they have certain qualities,
and we talked about what those
qualities were, and how much we
could influence those qualities. It
was a pretty direct talk, to be honest with you. The one thing we
came up with, which was really
interesting, is you can’t be afraid to
coach people up.”
Working with Ovechkin the
past four years has given Trotz a
different perspective on legacies.
He doesn’t believe Ovechkin’s individual accomplishments as the
greatest goal scorer of this generation should be tarnished because
his teams haven’t won a Stanley
Cup. Trotz asked if legendary defenseman Ray Bourque had stayed
in Boston for his entire career and
not won a championship with Colorado in his final game, would he
be less of a player? Or what about
San Jose center Joe Thornton, who
could have more than 1,500 career
points but no Cup by the time he
retires?
He’s talking about others, but
he’s also talking about himself and
how his career will eventually be
judged.
“I wouldn’t trade anything to
have a Cup,” Trotz said. “I think all
the experiences that I’ve had and
what we’re doing are the right
thing.
“But I want the Cup. There’s no
question.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
Livingston’s buzzer-beating three propels Patriots
GEORGE MASON 81,
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17-4). The Wild pulled two points
ahead of Chicago (21-16-6) in the
tight Central Division and tussle
for playoff spots in the Western
Conference.
Blackhawks defenseman Brent
Seabrook, a healthy scratch in Chicago’s 8-2 win in Ottawa on Tuesday night, was back in the lineup
and celebrated with his first goal
since opening night.
Earlier in the day, Chicago acquired winger Anthony Duclair
from the Arizona Coyotes.
The Blackhawks also got defenseman Adam Clendening,
Metropolitan Division
F Josh Bailey, NYI (1st)
F Sidney Crosby, PIT (3rd)
F Claude Giroux, PHI (5th)
F Taylor Hall, NJD (3rd)
F Alex Ovechkin*, WSH (7th)
F John Tavares, NYI (5th)
D Noah Hanifin, CAR (1st)
D Seth Jones, CBJ (2nd)
D Kris Letang, PIT (4th)
G Braden Holtby, WSH (3rd)
G Henrik Lundqvist, NYR (4th)
Coach: Barry Trotz, WSH (3rd)
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Otis Livingston II drilled a 25foot buzzer-beater that hit nothing but net and lifted George Mason past Saint Joseph’s, 81-79, on
Wednesday night at EagleBank
Arena.
The Patriots (8-9, 2-2 Atlantic 10)
broke away from the early backand-forth scrapping with a 14-4
run that opened a 10-point lead,
and George Mason led until there
were five seconds left in the game.
Chris Clover capped a dogged
comeback by Saint Joseph’s (7-8,
2-2) with a drive with five seconds
remaining that gave the Hawks a
79-78 lead — their first since it was
14-12.
After a timeout, Justin Kier
dribbled past midcourt and
flipped the ball to Livingston on
the wing, and he launched the
deep three-pointer.
VIRGINIA TECH 83, WAKE
FOREST 75: Ahmed Hill scored
21 points while Justin Robinson
came up with three critical baskets late to help the Hokies hold
off the Demon Deacons in Winston-Salem, N.C.
Robinson had just one basket
before his flurry in the final two
minutes. One was a putback while
being fouled for a three-point play,
another was a driving layup, and a
third came when he beat Brandon
Childress to a long inbounds pass
for a score.
Each proved critical for the
Hokies (13-4, 2-2 ACC), who had
seen the Demon Deacons whittle a
17-point deficit midway through
the second half to four twice in the
final five minutes.
Robinson
finished
with
13 points.
Childress scored 17 points for
the Demon Deacons (8-8, 1-3).
DAVIDSON 72, GEORGE
WASHINGTON 45: Kellan Gra-
dy scored 19 points and Jon Axel
Gudmundsson had 19 points, nine
rebounds and two steals to help
the Wildcats trample the Colonials in Davidson, N.C.
Peyton
Aldridge
added
15 points and KiShawn Pritchett
scored 11 on 5-for-7 shooting for
Davidson (8-7, 3-1 Atlantic 10).
Grady scored 11 points, hitting a
three-pointer and converting a
three-point play, during a 19-6
opening run, and the Wildcats led
the rest of the way. George Washington (8-9, 1-3) missed 10 of 12
from the field and committed five
turnovers in the first 12 minutes.
Hoyas women come up short
Georgetown
rallied
from
14 points down in the third quarter
to get within two late in the final
period, but the Hoyas couldn’t get
over the hump and fell to Villanova,
60-58, at McDonough Arena.
Junior guard Dionna White led
all scorers with 19 points on 8-for16 shooting for the Hoyas (7-8, 2-3
Big East), who committed just
eight turnovers but missed 10 of 12
three-point attempts and shot
40 percent from the field.
Adrianna Hahn led the Wildcats (13-2, 3-2) with 17 points.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
NATIONAL ROUNDUP
SCOREBOARD
Wildcats
play like
No. 1 team
in blowout
VILLANOVA 89,
XAVIER 65
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Phil Booth hit five three-pointers and scored 21 points, and Jalen
Brunson added 17 points to lead
No. 1 Villanova to an 89-65 win
over No. 10 Xavier on Wednesday
night in Philadelphia.
The Wildcats (15-1, 3-1 Big East)
returned to the top spot of the
Associated Press top 25 poll Monday and dominated like a team
that won’t lose its grip on that
ranking anytime soon.
Kerem Kanter led Xavier (15-3,
3-2) with 16 points.
MICHIGAN
STATE 76,
RUTGERS 72 (OT): Miles Bridg-
es ended his scoreless start with
7:43 left in regulation and finished
with just 11 points to help the No. 4
Spartans (16-2, 4-1 Big Ten) barely
bounce back from a loss with an
overtime victory over the Scarlet
Knights (11-7, 1-4) in East Lansing,
Mich.
Michigan State was coming off
a lopsided loss at Ohio State.
Corey Sanders scored 22 points
for Rutgers. Earlier Wednesday,
the school gave Coach Steve Pikiell
a three-year contract extension
through the 2023-24 season.
DUKE 87, PITTSBURGH
52: Marvin Bagley III finished
with 16 points and 15 rebounds,
and the No. 7 Blue Devils (14-2, 2-2
ACC) had little trouble bouncing
back from a loss to North Carolina
State by drilling the Panthers (8-9,
0-4) in Pittsburgh.
TEXAS
D7
M2
BASKETBALL
NBA
Bucks 110, Magic 103
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ORLANDO ........................... 29
MILWAUKEE ...................... 30
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................33
Toronto ......................................28
Philadelphia ...............................19
New York ...................................19
Brooklyn.....................................15
L
10
11
19
22
26
Pct
.767
.718
.500
.463
.366
GB
—
3
111/2
13
17
SOUTHEAST
W
Miami.........................................24
Washington ...............................23
Charlotte....................................15
Orlando ......................................12
Atlanta.......................................11
L
17
18
24
30
30
Pct
.585
.561
.385
.286
.268
GB
—
1
8
121/2
13
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................26
Detroit .......................................22
Milwaukee .................................22
Indiana .......................................21
Chicago ......................................15
L
14
18
18
20
27
Pct
.650
.550
.550
.512
.357
GB
—
4
4
51/2
12
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................29
San Antonio ...............................28
New Orleans ..............................20
Dallas .........................................15
Memphis ....................................13
L
11
14
20
28
27
Pct
.725
.667
.500
.349
.325
GB
—
2
9
151/2
16
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota..................................27
Portland .....................................22
Oklahoma City ...........................22
Denver........................................21
Utah ...........................................17
L
16
19
20
20
24
Pct
.628
.537
.524
.512
.415
GB
—
4
41/2
5
9
PACIFIC
W
x-Golden State...........................33
x-L.A. Clippers ...........................18
Phoenix ......................................16
Sacramento ...............................13
L.A. Lakers .................................13
L
8
21
26
27
27
Pct
.805
.462
.381
.325
.325
GB
—
14
171/2
191/2
191/2
LOUISVILLE 73, FLORIDA
STATE 69: Deng Adel scored
16 points, and the Cardinals (12-4,
2-1 ACC) rallied from a 13-point
halftime deficit to defeat the 23rdranked Seminoles (12-4, 1-3) in
Tallahassee and snap their 28game home winning streak.
South Carolina signs Bowen
Suspended Louisville freshman
Brian Bowen Jr. signed to play
with South Carolina.
Bowen was held out of practices
and games after Louisville announced that it was being investigated as part of a federal corruption probe of bribery in college
basketball that led to the firing of
coach Rick Pitino.
The 6-foot-7 forward enrolled at
South Carolina this week. He will
sit out the next two semesters
before hitting the court because of
NCAA transfer rules.
MINNESOTA: Center Reggie
Lynch “categorically denies” allegations of sexual assault lodged
against him by two women, his
lawyer said.
Lynch, who has not played since
Jan. 3, has appealed in both cases.
ST. JOHN’S: Sophomore
guard Marcus LoVett, the Red
Storm’s second-leading scorer,
will miss the remainder of the
season because of a knee injury.
TCU women beat No. 7 Texas
Kianna Ray made two free
throws with six seconds left, and
TCU beat a top 10 team for the first
time in more than eight years,
upsetting No. 7 Texas, 79-77, in Fort
Worth.
The Horned Frogs moved to 11-5
overall and 2-3 in the Big 12, while
the Longhorns dropped to 13-2,
4-1.
NCAA women
23
36
34 — 103
21 — 110
ORLANDO: Simmons 2-6 2-2 7, Gordon 4-18 3-4 11,
Biyombo 5-7 4-4 14, Payton 3-8 0-0 6, Fournier 8-14 3-3
21, Iwundu 2-3 1-1 5, Speights 4-9 2-2 14, Mack 3-3 2-2 8,
Augustin 2-10 0-0 4, Afflalo 0-2 0-0 0, Hezonja 6-10 0-0
13. Totals 39-90 17-18 103.
MILWAUKEE: Middleton 9-14 4-6 22, Antetokounmpo
10-15 6-10 26, Henson 7-11 0-0 14, Bledsoe 7-14 0-0 15,
Brogdon 6-10 1-2 14, Snell 1-1 2-2 5, Wilson 0-0 0-0 0,
Maker 1-5 3-4 5, Dellavedova 3-6 0-1 7, Brown 1-4 0-0 2,
Kilpatrick 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 45-81 16-25 110.
Three-point Goals: Orlando 8-29 (Speights 4-8, Fournier
2-5, Simmons 1-2, Hezonja 1-2, Payton 0-2, Augustin 0-5,
Gordon 0-5), Milwaukee 4-19 (Snell 1-1, Dellavedova 1-3,
Brogdon 1-3, Bledsoe 1-6, Maker 0-1, Brown 0-2, Middleton
0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 34 (Biyombo 9),
Milwaukee 46 (Henson 10). Assists: Orlando 26 (Payton 7),
Milwaukee 20 (Brogdon 7). Total Fouls: Orlando 21,
Milwaukee 21. Technicals: Orlando coach Magic (Defensive
three second), Fournier, Brown. A: 14,543 (18,717).
WESTERN CONFERENCE
x-Late game
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Miami 90, at Toronto 89
Portland 117, at Oklahoma City 106
at Dallas 114, Orlando 99
at L.A. Lakers 99, Sacramento 86
Pistons 114, Nets 80
DETROIT ............................. 34
BROOKLYN ......................... 26
29
15
27
20
24 — 114
19 — 80
DETROIT: Bullock 3-6 0-0 7, T.Harris 10-14 0-1 22,
Drummond 9-15 4-6 22, Smith 4-8 0-0 8, Bradley 6-16 0-0
13, Johnson 0-3 0-0 0, Ellenson 0-1 0-0 0, Tolliver 2-3 0-0
6, Moreland 1-2 0-0 2, Marjanovic 1-3 0-0 2, Galloway 1-3
0-0 2, Buycks 6-10 3-4 17, Kennard 5-9 1-1 13. Totals
48-93 8-12 114.
BROOKLYN: J.Harris 2-7 3-3 9, Hollis-Jefferson 3-8 9-10
15, Zeller 3-5 1-1 7, Dinwiddie 1-5 0-0 2, Crabbe 7-11 1-1
20, Acy 0-5 0-0 0, Mozgov 1-2 0-0 3, Okafor 0-3 0-0 0,
Allen 2-5 0-0 4, Doyle 2-7 0-0 5, Stauskas 1-8 0-0 3,
LeVert 5-8 0-0 12. Totals 27-74 14-15 80.
Three-point Goals: Detroit 10-21 (Buycks 2-2, Tolliver
2-3, Kennard 2-3, T.Harris 2-4, Bullock 1-1, Bradley 1-4,
Ellenson 0-1, Johnson 0-1, Drummond 0-1, Galloway
0-1), Brooklyn 12-37 (Crabbe 5-9, LeVert 2-4, J.Harris
2-5, Mozgov 1-1, Doyle 1-4, Stauskas 1-5, Zeller 0-1,
Hollis-Jefferson 0-1, Dinwiddie 0-3, Acy 0-4). Fouled
Out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 54 (Drummond 20),
Brooklyn 35 (Hollis-Jefferson 7). Assists: Detroit 24
(Bradley, Drummond, Smith 5), Brooklyn 19 (Crabbe,
Dinwiddie, LeVert, Hollis-Jefferson 3). Total Fouls:
Detroit 14, Brooklyn 11. Technicals: Brooklyn coach Nets
(Defensive three second) 2. A: 13,457 (17,732).
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Grizzlies 105, Pelicans 102
Utah 107, at Washington 104
Dallas 115, at Charlotte 111
Miami 114, at Indiana 106
Detroit 114, at Brooklyn 80
Chicago 122, at New York 119 (2OT)
at Milwaukee 110, Orlando 103
at Memphis 105, New Orleans 102
at Minnesota 104, Oklahoma City 88
at Houston 121, Portland 112
Atlanta 110, at Denver 97
L.A. Clippers at Golden State, Late
NEW ORLEANS .................. 38
MEMPHIS ........................... 29
9
17
32 — 102
28 — 105
MEMPHIS: Brooks 0-4 0-0 0, Green 7-12 6-6 20, Gasol
8-14 4-6 21, Evans 10-24 6-7 28, Harrison 3-11 4-5 11,
Ennis III 1-1 2-2 4, Martin 0-1 2-2 2, Wright 3-5 2-2 8,
D.Davis 0-1 0-0 0, Chalmers 4-12 0-0 9, Selden 1-3 0-2 2.
Totals 37-88 26-32 105.
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Boston vs. Philadelphia at London, 3
Cleveland at Toronto, 8
L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 10
San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
Three-point Goals: New Orleans 11-35 (Cousins 5-8,
Rondo 2-4, Moore 2-7, Cunningham 1-3, Miller 1-6, Clark
0-3, Holiday 0-4), Memphis 5-19 (Evans 2-6, Harrison
1-3, Gasol 1-3, Chalmers 1-4, Selden 0-1, Brooks 0-2).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: New Orleans 40 (Cousins
8), Memphis 50 (Green 14). Assists: New Orleans 20
(Holiday 6), Memphis 21 (Gasol 7). Total Fouls: New
Orleans 26, Memphis 26. Technicals: Memphis coach
Grizzlies (Defensive three second). A: 14,312 (18,119).
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Orlando at Washington, 7
Cleveland at Indiana, 7
Utah at Charlotte, 7
Brooklyn at Atlanta, 7:30
Golden State at Milwaukee, 8
New York at Minnesota, 8
Portland at New Orleans, 8
Memphis at Denver, 9
Houston at Phoenix, 10:30
NCAA men
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Mavericks 115, Hornets 111
DALLAS .............................. 20
CHARLOTTE ....................... 28
23
31
NEW ORLEANS: Moore 5-13 4-5 16, Cunningham 4-7 0-0
9, Cousins 6-15 12-17 29, Rondo 5-8 2-2 14, Holiday 5-12
2-4 12, Miller 2-7 0-0 5, Diallo 1-1 1-2 3, Asik 0-1 0-2 0,
Nelson 0-1 0-0 0, Liggins 2-3 0-0 4, Clark 4-9 2-2 10.
Totals 34-77 23-34 102.
99, TCU 98 (2OT):
Jericho Sims made a go-ahead free
throw with five seconds left, then
the Longhorns watched as the
Horned Frogs’ Jaylen Fisher
missed a layup at the buzzer to
send Texas (11-5, 2-2 Big 12) to a
double-overtime victory over
No. 16 TCU (13-3, 1-3) in Austin.
Texas got its biggest win of the
season hours after the school announced that sophomore guard
Andrew Jones has been diagnosed
with leukemia and has started
treatment.
17
23
H I GH S C HOOLS
39
24
24
25
32 — 115
34 — 111
DALLAS: Matthews 2-8 0-0 4, Barnes 9-13 4-4 25,
Nowitzki 8-16 0-0 19, Ferrell 7-10 1-2 22, Smith Jr. 4-13 7-8
15, Powell 0-0 3-4 3, Kleber 2-7 0-0 4, Mejri 1-1 0-0 2, Barea
4-9 2-3 12, Harris 2-6 5-7 9. Totals 39-83 22-28 115.
CHARLOTTE: Kidd-Gilchrist 5-9 1-2 11, Williams 2-3 0-0
5, Howard 5-5 5-18 15, Walker 16-28 6-6 41, Batum 2-9
0-0 4, O’Bryant III 0-1 0-0 0, Kaminsky 4-10 0-0 10,
Carter-Williams 1-3 0-0 2, Monk 2-4 0-0 6, Graham 2-4
0-0 5, Lamb 4-8 3-4 12. Totals 43-84 15-30 111.
Three-point Goals: Dallas 15-36 (Ferrell 7-10, Barnes
3-5, Nowitzki 3-7, Barea 2-3, Harris 0-1, Kleber 0-2,
Matthews 0-3, Smith Jr. 0-5), Charlotte 10-26 (Walker
3-9, Kaminsky 2-3, Monk 2-4, Williams 1-2, Graham 1-2,
Lamb 1-3, O’Bryant III 0-1, Batum 0-2). Fouled Out:
Mejri. Rebounds: Dallas 39 (Barnes 11), Charlotte 43
(Howard 12). Assists: Dallas 23 (Smith Jr. 6), Charlotte
16 (Walker 4). Total Fouls: Dallas 22, Charlotte 22.
Technicals: Powell, Walker. A: 14,462 (19,077).
EAST
Duke 87, Pittsburgh 52
U-Conn. 62, UCF 53
UMBC 72, Maine 67
Villanova 89, Xavier 65
SOUTH
Davidson 72, George Washington 45
Florida 71, Mississippi St. 54
George Mason 81, Saint Joseph’s 79
Georgia Tech 60, Notre Dame 53
Louisville 73, Florida St. 69
Virginia Tech 83, Wake Forest 75
MIDWEST
Indiana St. 69, N. Iowa 67
Kansas St. 86, Oklahoma St. 82
Michigan St. 76, Rutgers 72 (OT)
Missouri 68, Georgia 56
Northwestern 83, Minnesota 60
SOUTHWEST
LSU 75, Arkansas 54
Temple 66, SMU 64
FAR WEST
Colorado St. 84, Utah St. 75
New Mexico 75, Wyoming 66
MIAMI ................................ 38
INDIANA ............................. 26
20
21
26
31
30 — 114
28 — 106
MIAMI: Richardson 5-9 1-2 14, Olynyk 4-8 1-2 11,
Whiteside 7-10 2-2 16, Dragic 8-16 3-4 20, Jones Jr. 4-6
0-1 8, Adebayo 4-9 7-9 15, Ellington 5-13 1-1 15,
T.Johnson 6-10 0-0 15. Totals 43-81 15-21 114.
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 6-11 3-4 15, T.Young 6-8 0-1 12,
Sabonis 8-15 2-3 18, Collison 2-4 3-3 7, Oladipo 9-20 8-11
26, Leaf 1-2 0-0 2, Jefferson 2-5 0-0 4, J.Young 1-2 0-2 2,
Joseph 2-8 1-2 5, Stephenson 6-11 2-3 15. Totals 43-86
19-29 106.
Three-point Goals: Miami 13-30 (Ellington 4-10, Richardson 3-4, T.Johnson 3-6, Olynyk 2-4, Dragic 1-4,
Adebayo 0-1, Jones Jr. 0-1), Indiana 1-18 (Stephenson
1-4, Leaf 0-1, Joseph 0-3, Bogdanovic 0-4, Oladipo 0-6).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Miami 37 (Whiteside 15),
Indiana 44 (T.Young 9). Assists: Miami 25 (Dragic 9),
Indiana 13 (Oladipo, Stephenson 4). Total Fouls: Miami
25, Indiana 23. Technicals: Miami coach Erik Spoelstra,
Indiana coach Nate McMillan. A: 14,540 (18,500).
PORTLAND ......................... 19
HOUSTON ........................... 25
26
30
32
31
35 — 112
35 — 121
PORTLAND: Turner 7-11 2-3 18, Aminu 2-6 0-0 6, Nurkic
4-13 0-0 8, Lillard 9-16 10-12 29, McCollum 9-16 4-4 24,
Harkless 0-1 0-0 0, Collins 2-3 0-0 5, Davis 4-4 3-7 11,
Napier 2-8 4-6 9, Connaughton 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 40-83
23-32 112.
HOUSTON: Ariza 0-6 0-0 0, Anderson 3-8 1-2 8, Capela
5-9 3-5 13, Paul 13-29 8-8 37, Gordon 11-23 3-4 30, Green
4-11 1-2 12, Tucker 3-6 2-2 8, Black 6-8 1-2 13. Totals
45-100 19-25 121.
Three-point Goals: Portland 9-26 (Turner 2-4, Aminu 2-4,
McCollum 2-5, Collins 1-1, Napier 1-4, Lillard 1-6,
Connaughton 0-1, Harkless 0-1), Houston 12-38 (Gordon
5-12, Green 3-7, Paul 3-11, Anderson 1-4, Tucker 0-1,
Ariza 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Portland 40
(Davis 10), Houston 49 (Capela 9). Assists: Portland 21
(Lillard 8), Houston 25 (Paul 11). Total Fouls: Portland
26, Houston 30. Technicals: Nurkic, Tucker, Paul. A:
18,055 (18,055).
EAST
Albany (NY) 72, Stony Brook 68
Buffalo 72, Miami (Ohio) 67
Caldwell 91, Wilmington (Del.) 66
Fordham 66, Davidson 58
Hartford 81, Mass.-Lowell 42
Harvard 70, La Salle 61
Maine 64, UMBC 50
Marquette 77, Providence 60
Minnesota 91, Penn St. 71
New Hampshire 63, Binghamton 61
Rider 61, Fairfield 45
Saint Joseph’s 81, Richmond 72
South Florida 89, Temple 73
Stonehill 76, St. Rose 63
VCU 61, Rhode Island 49
Villanova 60, Georgetown 58
SOUTH
East Carolina 73, Tulsa 67
Georgia College 69, Clayton St. 67
King (Tenn.) 65, Lees-McRae 55
Lamar 75, SE Louisiana 58
NC State 56, Georgia Tech 43
Nicholls 61, McNeese St. 54
Point (Ga.) 73, St. Andrews 49
Spalding 77, Blackburn 52
Stephen F. Austin 73, New Orleans 66
UNC Pembroke 61, Augusta 59
Virginia St. 74, Johnson C. Smith 67
MIDWEST
Ball St. 74, Akron 61
Cent. Michigan 90, Bowling Green 54
Dayton 80, St. Bonaventure 59
DePaul 82, Creighton 54
Hope 82, Alma 64
Kansas St. 67, Iowa St. 60
Kent St. 76, E. Michigan 69
Michigan 84, Indiana 79
Nebraska 80, Illinois 72
Purdue 47, Rutgers 33
Seton Hall 62, Xavier 51
Siena Heights 73, Lourdes 68
South Dakota 87, Mount Marty 25
St. John’s 73, Butler 55
Toledo 75, Ohio 57
Trine 65, Adrian 29
W. Michigan 88, N. Illinois 83
West Virginia 74, Kansas 54
Wichita St. 69, Memphis 61
SOUTHWEST
Abilene Christian 80, Houston Baptist 68
Cent. Arkansas 57, Incarnate Word 35
Cincinnati 88, Houston 82
Oklahoma 73, Texas Tech 52
TCU 79, Texas 77
FAR WEST
Boise St. 75, Fresno St. 66
Colorado St. 56, Utah St. 45
UNLV 69, Air Force 57
Wyoming 66, New Mexico 55
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
DISTRICT
Anacostia 64, Dunbar 28
Eastern 57, School Without Walls 15
Wilson 53, Cardozo 30
MARYLAND
Damascus 46, Seneca Valley 27
DuVal 55, Northwestern 30
McDonough 60, Patuxent 24
Poolesville 62, Blake 17
Richard Montgomery 60, Clarksburg 54
Walter Johnson 57, Einstein 29
Wootton 71, Northwest 52
VIRGINIA
George Mason 57, Strasburg High 30
Lake Braddock 52, Robinson 37
Patriot 65, Gar-Field 33
South County 61, North Stafford 36
South Lakes 62, West Potomac 49
Washington-Lee 51, Annandale 39
PRIVATE
Flint Hill 63, Holy Child 58
National Christian 58, Three Point Line Christian Academy (Va.) 44
Oakcrest 47, Field 34
St. Mary's Ryken 64, Carroll 41
ICE HOCKEY
HOCKEY
B OY S ’ B A S K E TB A L L
EASTERN CONFERENCE
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
Columbus ......................
New Jersey ...................
N.Y. Rangers .................
Pittsburgh .....................
Carolina .........................
Philadelphia ..................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
W
27
25
22
22
22
19
19
21
L
13
16
11
15
19
15
15
18
OL PTS. GF GA
3
57 135 121
3
53 121 121
8
52 130 125
5
49 128 117
3
47 126 138
8
46 119 131
8
46 123 122
4
46 146 158
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay ....................
Boston ...........................
Toronto .........................
Florida ...........................
Detroit ..........................
Montreal .......................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
W
31
23
25
18
17
18
15
10
L
9
10
17
18
17
20
18
24
OL PTS. GF GA
3
65 160 107
7
53 131 102
3
53 146 131
6
42 120 137
7
41 112 127
4
40 108 129
9
39 117 149
9
29 96 150
CENTRAL
Winnipeg ......................
Nashville .......................
St. Louis ........................
Dallas ............................
Minnesota .....................
Chicago .........................
Colorado ........................
W
26
25
26
24
23
21
22
L
11
11
17
16
17
16
16
OL PTS. GF GA
7
59 151 121
6
56 131 114
3
55 134 122
3
51 132 118
4
50 127 127
6
48 134 118
3
47 135 124
PACIFIC
Vegas ............................
Los Angeles ..................
San Jose ........................
Calgary ..........................
Anaheim .......................
Edmonton .....................
Vancouver .....................
Arizona .........................
W
29
24
21
22
19
18
16
10
L
10
13
13
16
15
23
21
27
OL PTS. GF GA
2
60 143 113
5
53 126 99
6
48 110 106
4
48 118 121
9
47 117 120
3
39 119 143
6
38 111 143
6
26 98 150
Virginia Tech (13-4)
Blackshear 3-9 2-4 10, Alexander-Walker 3-7 0-0 7,
Robinson 4-8 5-5 13, Hill 7-12 2-2 21, Bibbs 7-10 1-2 18,
Horne 0-0 0-0 0, Wilson 0-0 0-0 0, Bede 0-1 0-0 0, Clarke
5-10 3-3 14. 29-57 Totals 13-16 83.
Wake Forest (8-8)
Thompson 1-3 1-2 3, Moore 6-11 0-2 12, Crawford 4-13
0-0 10, Wilbekin 3-7 1-1 9, Brown 2-5 0-0 4, Mitchell 0-1
0-0 0, Okeke 0-0 0-0 0, Sarr 4-5 0-0 8, Bilas 0-0 0-0 0,
Childress 6-16 2-2 17, Woods 5-9 0-0 12, Eggleston 0-0
0-0 0. Totals 31-70 4-7 75.
Halftime: Virginia Tech 45-30. Three-point goals: Virginia Tech 12-28 (Hill 5-10, Bibbs 3-6, Blackshear 2-4,
Clarke 1-2, Alexander-Walker 1-4, Bede 0-1, Robinson
0-1), Wake Forest 9-25 (Childress 3-8, Woods 2-4,
Crawford 2-5, Wilbekin 2-5, Sarr 0-1, Mitchell 0-1, Brown
0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Virginia Tech 27
(Clarke, Blackshear 6), Wake Forest 40 (Moore 13).
Assists: Virginia Tech 20 (Robinson 7), Wake Forest 11
(Childress, Crawford 4). Total fouls: Virginia Tech 13,
Wake Forest 14. A: 8,260 (14,665).
at Washington 3, Vancouver 1
Winnipeg 7, at Buffalo 4
Chicago 8, at Ottawa 2
at Tampa Bay 5, Carolina 4
at Nashville 2, Edmonton 1
Florida 7, at St. Louis 4
Calgary 3, at Minnesota 2 (OT)
7 10 — 122
7 7 — 119
PB (10-1) Dudley 21, Reaves 14, Mayaka 12, Sume 4,
Clary 4, Yomba 3, Bell 2, Etuaful 2, Miller 2 Totals 22 8-8
64.
C (3-7) Moshyedi 14, Geenan 8, Orta 6, Liquorie 6, Piker
6, Slomnicki 5, Janis 3 Totals 15 3-11 48.
Halftime: Paint Branch, (40-28).
Three-point goals: C 5 (Slomnicki 1, Orta 1, Liquorie 2,
Moshyedi 1); PB 4 (Dudley 1, Reaves 2, Yomba 1).
P (12-0) Thompson 12, Green 13, Lee 10, Abrigo 7,
Magaha 6, Hobbs 5, Hobbs 3, Haddaway 2, Terragno 2
Totals 21 11-21 62.
B (2-4) Fox 13, Konzmann 2, Konzmann 2 Totals 5 4-9 17.
Halftime: Poolesville, (27-2).
Three-point goals: B 1 (Fox 1); P 3 (Thompson 1, Abrigo
1, Green 1).
NO. 13 NATIONAL CHRISTIAN 58,
THREE POINT LINE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY (VA.) 44
NC (10-4) Cunningham 20, Aspemaka-Vital 13, Hewlett
11, Hubbard 8, Meyers 3, Thomas 2, Brown 1 Totals 17
12-14 58.
TPL (1-2)Totals 0 0-0 44.
Halftime: National Christian, (26-20).
Three-point goals: NC 4 (Meyers 1, Hewlett 1, Cunningham 2).
NO. 15 RICHARD MONTGOMERY 60,
CLARKSBURG 54
C (9-1) Mcinnis 20, Klock 13, Paul 10, Kerchaert 6, Wright
3, Howson 2 Totals 16 10-17 54.
RM (11-0) Rashad 22, Williams 17, Osborne 8, Yan 8,
Tounkara 5 Totals 17 11-23 60.
Halftime: Clarksburg, (28-27).
Three-point goals: RM 5 (Williams 3, Yan 1, Tounkara 1);
C 4 (Mcinnis 3, Kerchaert 1).
FLINT HILL 63, NO. 17 HOLY CHILD 58
FH (7-4) Wiley 23, Lamont 16, Boyce 10, Miller 8, Jordan
5, McBride 1 Totals 11 20-27 63.
HC (6-3) Yantsos 19, Dapaa 14, Ambrosi 11, Welbon 5,
Skeeter 4, Hortin 3, Strittmatter 2 Totals 18 13-19 58.
Halftime: Holy Child, (30-29).
Three-point goals: HC 3 (Yantsos 1, Welbon 1, Hortin 1);
FH 7 (Lamont 1, Wiley 3, Boyce 2, Miller 1).
MONTGOMERY 4A/3A WEST
WOOTTON 71, NORTHWEST 52
W (5-4) Goldberg 32, Bridge 16, Gillick 15, Geline 4,
Bennaim 2, Rahman 2 Totals 17 16-19 71.
N (3-6) Herwood 23, Mostrom 8, Benjamin 6, Janus 5,
Cotton 2, Photinakis 2 Totals 9 4-7 52.
Halftime: Wootton, (29-26).
Three-point goals: N 8 (Herwood 6, Janus 1, Mostrom 1);
W 7 (Goldberg 5, Gillick 2)
MONTGOMERY 4A/3A EAST
SPRINGBROOK 77, KENNEDY 51
PRINCE GEORGE'S 4A
DUVAL 55, NORTHWESTERN 30
K (3-6) Nyamey 17, Johnson 11, Lewis 10, Regnis 5,
Ntam 4 Totals 15 8-13 51.
S (8-3) Rucker 28, Balanc 23, Whitney-HaWkins 14,
Jessup 7, Deruisseau 2 Totals 22 3-3 77.
Halftime: Springbrook, (37-18).
Three-point goals: S 9 (Balanc 2, Jessup 1, WhitneyHaWkins 4, Rucker 2); K 3 (Nyamey 2, Johnson 1)
D (1-4) Davis 12, Crockett 11, Hoes 8, Abbas 6, Bates 6,
Key 4, Nzenwa 4, Johnson 2, Major 2 Totals 21 4-10 55.
N (2-8) Johnson 12, Villain 9, King 5, Johnson 4 Totals 7
13-23 30.
Halftime: DuVal, (27-13).
Three-point goals: N 1 (Villain 1); D 3 (Crockett 1, Key 1,
Davis 1)
MONTGOMERY 4A/3A SOUTH
WHITMAN 78, WHEATON 58
CONCORDE DISTRICT
LAKE BRADDOCK 52, ROBINSON 37
W (3-7) Getahun 21, Aggrey 14, Bridges 9, Tedesse 7,
Makoni 4, Ogunde 3 Totals 18 1-4 58.
W (6-5) Sanson 25, Squeri 21, Shaver 18, Ruiz 5, Jensen
3, Farren 2, Holloway 2, Diouf 2 Totals 23 5-12 78.
Halftime: Whitman, (42-27).
Three-point goals: W 9 (Shaver 1, Sanson 5, Jensen 1,
Squeri 2); W 7 (Bridges 1, Getahun 5, Tedesse 1)
LB (8-5) Miller 12, Joachim 8, Galonis 8, Park 7, Boone 7,
Park 6, Otugo 2, Haynes 2 Totals 14 15-20 52.
R (5-8) Edwards 10, Hugney 10, Gressett 5, McBride 4,
Edwards 2, Lewis 2, Bubak 2, Downey 2 Totals 10 8-10
37.
Halftime: Lake Braddock, (28-16).
Three-point goals: R 3 (Hugney 1, Edwards 2); LB 3
(Miller 1, Galonis 2)
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Ottawa 4, at Toronto 3
Minnesota 2, at Chicago 1
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Carolina at Washington, 7
Columbus at Buffalo, 7
Calgary at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Davidson (8-7)
Aldridge 6-14 2-2 15, Michelsen 1-2 0-0 2, Grady 7-13 4-5
19, Gudmundsson 6-12 1-1 14, Pritchett 5-7 0-0 11,
Jones 0-1 0-0 0, Magarity 4-5 0-0 8, Watkins 0-0 0-0 0,
Brown 0-0 0-0 0, Freundlich 0-0 1-2 1, Collins 1-1 0-1 2,
Wynter 0-0 0-0 0, Reigel 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 30-56 8-11 72.
Halftime: Davidson 29-17. Three-point goals: George
Washington 5-22 (Nolan 3-5, Watanabe 1-4, Bolden 1-8,
Mitola 0-1, J.Williams 0-1, Mazzulla 0-1, Jack 0-2),
Davidson 4-16 (Pritchett 1-1, Grady 1-3, Gudmundsson
1-4, Aldridge 1-5, Michelsen 0-1, Jones 0-1, Reigel 0-1).
Fouled out: None. Rebounds: George Washington 23
(Watanabe 5), Davidson 36 (Gudmundsson, Magarity 9).
Assists: George Washington 12 (Nolan, Mitola, Bolden,
Watanabe, Jack 2), Davidson 13 (Aldridge 4). Total fouls:
George Washington 15, Davidson 13. A: 3,310 (5,295).
George Mason 81,
Saint Joseph's 79
GC (4-10) Carter 17, Carter 16, Jacks 10, Curtis 3, Melton
3, Mbeng 2 Totals 8 11-13 51.
BM (8-5) Williams 12, Bell 12, Womack 10, Marshall 9,
Moore 6, Wilkins 5, Joyner 4, Rounds 2 Totals 17 5-12 60.
Halftime: McNamara, (33-26). Three-point goals: BM 7
(Williams 2, Wilkins 1, Womack 3, Moore 1); GC 8 (Curtis
1, Carter 2, Melton 1, Carter 2, Jacks 2)
G (6-2) Hawkins 23, Ituka 21, Graham 7, Neal 6,
Tamakloe 4, Thomas 2 Totals 19 7-12 63.
S (4-6) Lacey 10, Salzar 8, Cooper-Brown 4, Lacey 4, Long
4, Martella 2, Johnson 2, Setse 2, Jordan 1 Totals 16 5-9
40.
Halftime: Gaithersburg, (29-25).
Three-point goals: G 6 (Graham 1, Hawkins 5)
Washington at Carolina, 7:30
Vancouver at Columbus, 7
Calgary at Florida, 7:30
Winnipeg at Chicago, 8:30
Edmonton at Arizona, 9
ROCKVILLE 65, MAGRUDER 56
OTTAWA .................................. 1
TORONTO ................................ 0
1
1
2 —
2 —
4
3
M (4-8) Hawkes 13, Asamoah Jr 5, Myrie 1 Totals 11
13-21 56.
R (3-7) McTighe 8, Pace 4, Mantzouranis 3, Bailey 17
Totals 17 28-40 65.
Halftime: Rockville, (28-23). Three-point goals: R 1
(Bailey 1); M 7 (Bannister 2, Broh 3, Hernandez 2)
FIRST PERIOD
SENECA VALLEY 89, DAMASCUS 53
Scoring: 1, Ottawa, Chabot 3 (Dzingel), 11:26.
D (1-11) Linthicum 16, Thomas 14, Green 6, Jesse 4,
Cerulli 4, Zarchin 3, Escario 2, Bhandari 2, Rogers 1,
Wilkerson 1 Totals 16 15-27 53.
SV (8-2) Blake 23, Dotson 19, Trautman 12, Price 10,
Whitsett 10, Goldsberry 7, Clyburn 6, Toliver 2 Totals 19
9-11 89.
Halftime: Seneca Valley, (52-27).
Three-point goals: SV 14 (Trautman 2, Price 2, Goldsberry 1, Blake 5, Dotson 4); D 2 (Green 1, Cerulli 1)
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Ottawa, Hoffman 11 (Duchene), 1:52. 3,
Toronto, Borgman 3 (Bozak, Komarov), 18:10.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Toronto, van Riemsdyk 19 (Bozak, Marner),
0:54. 5, Ottawa, Dumont 1 (Burrows, Chlapik), 2:15. 6,
Toronto, Rielly 5 (Hainsey, Nylander), 12:28. 7, Ottawa,
Pyatt 5 (Smith, Duchene), 16:55.
SHOTS ON GOAL
OTTAWA ................................ 12
12
8 — 32
TORONTO .............................. 16
16
15 — 47
Power-play opportunities: Ottawa 0 of 1; Toronto 0 of 3.
Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 12-13-5 (47 shots-44 saves).
Toronto, Andersen 22-13-2 (32-28). A: 19,117 (18,819).
T: 2:42.
BETHESDA-CHEVY CHASE 79,
QUINCE ORCHARD 62
WJ (7-3) Lucas 10, Tavik 10, Assaker 8, Wagar
Assaker 5, Vichi 4, Kemp 4, Schell 3, Leverson
Sarnowski 2, Papadopulos 2 Totals 21 9-12 57.
E (3-5) McDonnell 15, Whitaker 6, Jakobsberg
Martinez 2 Totals 9 8-14 29.
Halftime: Einstein, (17-14). Three-point goals: E
(McDonnell 1); WJ 2 (Schell 1, Leverson 1)
1
0
1 —
0 —
Saint Joseph's (7-8)
Funk 5-13 1-2 15, Oliva 1-3 0-0 2, Demery 6-14 4-5 16,
Newkirk 8-17 5-7 24, Clover 8-14 0-1 19, Longpre 0-1 0-0 0,
Lodge 0-0 0-0 0, Robinson 1-5 1-2 3. 29-67 Totals 11-17 79.
NEW YORK: Thomas 0-1 0-0 0, Porzingis 11-24 0-4 24,
Kanter 6-10 3-4 15, Jack 8-13 0-0 16, Lee 6-11 0-0 16,
Beasley 10-22 5-7 26, McDermott 3-4 3-4 11, O’Quinn 2-4
2-2 6, Ntilikina 0-3 0-0 0, Baker 2-4 0-0 5. Totals 48-96
13-21 119.
George Mason (8-9)
Calixte 3-7 0-2 6, Mar 2-6 0-0 5, Livingston 10-13 0-0 25,
Kier 6-13 0-0 12, Grayer 5-10 0-1 13, Wilson 0-0 0-0 0,
Greene 2-6 0-1 5, Boyd 5-10 4-4 15. Totals 33-65 4-8 81.
SECOND PERIOD
Halftime: George Mason 47-42. Three-point goals: Saint
Joseph’s 10-30 (Funk 4-10, Clover 3-6, Newkirk 3-8,
Longpre 0-1, Oliva 0-1, Robinson 0-2, Demery 0-2),
George Mason 11-24 (Livingston 5-6, Grayer 3-6, Mar
1-3, Boyd 1-3, Greene 1-4, Kier 0-2). Fouled out: None.
Rebounds: Saint Joseph’s 28 (Newkirk 7), George Mason
42 (Kier 10). Assists: Saint Joseph’s 14 (Newkirk 5),
George Mason 12 (Kier 7). Total fouls: Saint Joseph’s 10,
George Mason 11. A: 2,783 (10,000).
Scoring: 3, Minnesota, Suter 6 (Granlund, Koivu), 3:03.
2
1
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Chicago, Seabrook 2 (Kempny, Schmaltz),
12:24.
N (9-0) Black 20, Thomas 18, Woodard 11, Lumsden 7,
Mayer 6, Nelson 4, Fuentes 3, Stubbs 3, Assiongbon 2
Totals 23 16-24 74.
W (5-5) Koch 17, Warshaw 15, Nannen 14, Johnson 12,
Levin 8, Wilson 3 Totals 22 10-16 69.
Halftime: Northwest, (38-37).
Three-point goals: W 5 (Warshaw 3, Koch 2); N 4 (Black
1, Lumsden 1, Thomas 1, Stubbs 1)
Scoring: 2, Minnesota, Brodin 4 (Dumba, Zucker), 9:58.
THIRD PERIOD
SHOTS ON GOAL
MINNESOTA ............................ 5
10
12 — 27
CHICAGO ................................ 14
9
12 — 35
Power-play opportunities: Minnesota 0 of 3; Chicago 0 of
3. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 16-9-2 (35 shots-34
saves). Chicago, Forsberg 3-6-3 (27-25). A: 21,721
(19,717). T: 2:33.
6,
3,
6,
ATP/WTA
APIA INTERNATIONAL SYDNEY
At Olympic Park Tennis Centre; In Sydney
Purse: Men, $468,910 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
MEN’S SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, def. Albert Ramos-Vinolas (1),
Spain, 6-3, 7-5; Adrian Mannarino (5), France, def.
Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, 6-2, 6-1; Fabio Fognini (4),
Italy, def. Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4;
Benoit Paire, France, def. Leonardo Mayer, Argentina,
6-2, 3-6, 6-1; Alex de Minaur, Australia, def. Damir
Dzumhur (7), Bosnia-Herzegovina, 6-2, 3-0 retired;
Daniil Medvedev, Russia, def. Jared Donaldson, United
States, 6-3, 4-6, 7-5; Feliciano Lopez, Spain, def. Diego
Schwartzman (3), Argentina, 6-3, 7-6 (7-1); Gilles
Muller (2), Luxembourg, def. John Millman, Australia,
7-6 (7-5), 6-4.
WOMEN’S SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Agnieszka Radwanska, Poland, def. CiCi Bellis, United
States, 7-6 (7-4), 6-0; Garbine Muguruza (1), Spain, def.
Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, 6-3, 7-6 (7-1); Camila Giorgi,
Italy, def. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, 7-6 (9-7), 6-2;
Daria Gavrilova, Australia, def. Sam Stosur, Australia,
6-4, 6-2.
WOMEN’S SINGLES —QUARTERFINALS
Daria Gavrilova, Australia, def. Garbine Muguruza (1),
Spain, walkover.
ATP
At ASB Tennis Arena; In Auckland, New Zealand
Purse: $501,345 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Roberto Bautista Agut (5), Spain, def. Steve Johnson,
United States, 2-6, 6-2, 6-1; Peter Gojowczyk, Germany,
def. Jack Sock (1), United States, 6-3, 6-3; Jiri Vesely,
Czech Republic, def. Sam Querrey (3), United States, 6-4,
6-7 (12-10), 7-6 (7-5); Robin Haase, Netherlands, def.
Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, 7-6 (7-4), 6-3; David Ferrer (7),
Spain, def. Joao Sousa, Portugal, 6-2, 6-2; Karen Khachanov, Russia, def. Pablo Cuevas (6), Uruguay, 6-2, 7-6
(7-4); Juan Martin del Potro (2), Argentina, def. Denis
Shapovalov, Canada, 6-2, 6-4; Chung Hyeon, South Korea,
def. John Isner (4), United States, 7-6 (7-3), 5-7, 6-2.
WTA
HOBART INTERNATIONAL
GUNSTON DISTRICT
SOUTH COUNTY 63, W.T. WOODSON 45
At Domain Tennis Centre; In Hobart, Australia
Purse: $226,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SC (11-2) Kellan 20, Millora-Brown 17, Powe 10, Bullock
7, Latta 4, Wilson 4, Dunn 1 Totals 15 9-13 63.
WTW (7-6) Mains 16, Spurlock 13, Urbach 7, Lee 5,
Hennessey 2, Gambold 2 Totals 13 7-8 45.
Halftime: South County, (30-12).
Three-point goals: WTW 4 (Spurlock 1, Urbach 1, Mains
1, Lee 1); SC 8 (Powe 2, Kellan 6)
SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Alison Riske, United States, def. Kirsten Flipkens,
Belgium, walkover; Heather Watson, Britain, def. Jaimee Fourlis, Australia, 6-2, 6-2; Aryna Sabalenka,
Belarus, def. Zhang Shuai (1), China, 7-6 (7-3), 6-4;
Monica Niculescu, Romania, def. Varvara Lepchenko,
United States, 6-4, 6-2.
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1
ASB CLASSIC
QO (5-6) Dorsey 18, Brown 18, Faroane 12, Garrett 4,
Dorsey 4, Bikim 3, Fierstein 2, Parisotto 1 Totals 17
16-18 62.
B-CC (8-3) McAuliffe 18, Wood 18, Baer 17, English 17,
Gibson 7, Groom 2 Totals 25 8-12 79.
Halftime: Bethesda-Chevy Chase, (40-34).
Three-point goals: B-CC 7 (Baer 2, McAuliffe 2, Wood 3);
QO 4 (Brown 2, Faroane 2)
NORTHWEST 74, WOOTTON 69
Wild 2, Blackhawks 1
MINNESOTA ............................ 0
CHICAGO .................................. 1
NONLEAGUE
WALTER JOHNSON 57, EINSTEIN 29
TE NNI S
GAITHERSBURG 63, SHERWOOD 40
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Senators 4, Maple Leafs 3
George Washington (8-9)
Steeves 1-4 0-0 2, Zeigler 3-3 1-2 7, Nolan 3-7 1-2 10,
Bolden 2-12 0-0 5, Watanabe 5-12 1-2 12, Sasser 0-0 0-0
0, Toro 1-4 0-0 2, Langarica 0-0 2-2 2, Mitola 0-1 0-0 0,
J.Williams 0-2 1-2 1, Mazzulla 2-4 0-1 4, Jack 0-3 0-0 0.
17-52 Totals 6-11 45.
WCAC
MCNAMARA 60, GOOD COUNSEL 51
B (5-5) Hetherington 20, Kanu 12, Hill 6, Sawo 5, Fekere
4, Tempchin 4, Samuels 3, Raheem 1 Totals 12 7-12 55.
P (4-8) Tyler 16, Haddaway 16, Lang 13, Barry 11, Zinn 5,
Dutton 2, Basehore 2 Totals 21 20-24 65.
Halftime: Poolesville, (29-23).
Three-point goals: P 1 (Lang 1); B 8 (Fekere 1, Kanu 2, Hill
1, Hetherington 4)
CHICAGO: Valentine 8-14 0-1 20, Markkanen 10-22 5-5 33,
Lopez 9-14 2-2 20, Dunn 4-18 0-0 9, Holiday 5-10 4-5 16,
Zipser 0-1 0-0 0, Portis 2-7 0-0 4, Felicio 1-1 1-2 3, Grant 2-3
0-0 4, Nwaba 4-8 5-5 13. Totals 45-98 17-20 122.
Three-point Goals: Chicago 15-33 (Markkanen 8-15,
Valentine 4-8, Holiday 2-2, Dunn 1-3, Zipser 0-1, Grant
0-1, Portis 0-3), New York 10-22 (Lee 4-5, McDermott
2-3, Porzingis 2-6, Beasley 1-2, Baker 1-3, Thomas 0-1,
Jack 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 48
(Markkanen 10), New York 51 (Beasley 12). Assists:
Chicago 21 (Dunn 8), New York 24 (Jack 10). Total Fouls:
Chicago 19, New York 20. Technicals: O’Quinn, New York
coach Knicks (Delay of game). A: 19,812 (19,812).
GI R LS ’ BA S K E TBALL
TOP 20
NO. 9 POOLESVILLE 62, BLAKE 17
NONLEAGUE
POOLESVILLE 65, BLAKE 55
Bulls 122, Knicks 119 (2OT)
CHICAGO .................. 26 22 30 27
NEW YORK ............... 25 27 30 23
LB (9-4) James 25, Hassett 18, Dunn 17, Grable 14,
Margraf 6, Anderson 6, Cullen 5, O'Grady Walsh 5,
Sowards 3, Cobb 2 Totals 13 18-34 101.
R (6-7) Douglas 27, Rowson 26, LaPlante 17, Rowson 7,
Winchell 5, Delgado 5, Pitter 4, Rothstein 3, Krug 2
Totals 28 13-23 96.
Halftime: Lake Braddock, (47-41).
Three-point goals: R 9 (Rowson 3, LaPlante 3, Winchell
1, Delgado 1, Rowson 1); LB 19 (James 1, Dunn 5, Grable
3, Cullen 1, Hassett 5, Sowards 1, O'Grady Walsh 1,
Anderson 2)
D (8-4) Mitchell 10, SINGLETARY 8, BROWN 4, BRYANT
4, HASKINS 2 Totals 11 6-11 28.
A (10-2) Leonard 22, Moye 17, Coates 11, Banks 7,
Hawkins 4, Simmons 2, Anthony 1 Totals 16 11-19 64.
Halftime: Anacostia, (35-21).
Three-point goals: A 7 (Moye 1, Leonard 5, Banks 1).
TOP 20
NO. 19 PAINT BRANCH 64, CHURCHILL 48
NHL
CONCORDE DISTRICT
LAKE BRADDOCK 101, ROBINSON 96
NO. 19 ANACOSTIA 64, DUNBAR 28
PRIVATE
Georgetown Prep 10, St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 2
Landon 0, Gonzaga 0
Stone Ridge 11, St. John's 0
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Davidson 72,
George Washington 45
Rockets 121, Trail Blazers 112
MARYLAND
Atholton 54, Glenelg 45
Bethesda-Chevy Chase 79, Quince Orchard 62
Calvert 61, Huntingtown 51
Centennial 57, Marriotts Ridge 48
DuVal 58, Northwestern 57
Einstein 60, Walter Johnson 48
Gaithersburg 63, Sherwood 40
Great Mills 62, Northern 58
Lackey 60, La Plata 54
Northwest 74, Wootton 69
Oakland Mills 67, Howard 40
Paint Branch 64, Churchill 48
Poolesville 65, Blake 55
River Hill 72, Long Reach 54
Rockville 65, Magruder 56
Seneca Valley 89, Damascus 53
Springbrook 77, Kennedy 51
Whitman 78, Wheaton 58
VIRGINIA
Colgan 57, Gar-Field 46
Lake Braddock 101, Robinson 96
Musselman (W.Va.) 75, Loudoun County 74
South County 63, W.T. Woodson 45
Stone Bridge 69, Osbourn 58
PRIVATE
McNamara 60, Good Counsel 51
National Christian 69, Three Point Line Christian Academy (Va.) 41
Severn School 69, Archbishop Curley 52
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Virginia Tech 83, Wake Forest 75
Heat 114, Pacers 106
BOYS' BASKETBALL
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Legal Notices
“Attention. This notice is being
published in this newspaper to notify the father of a child who was born
at George Washington University
Hospital located in Washington, D.C.
on November 29, 2017, time
unknown. The baby was surrendered at birth by the mother under
the Safe Haven Law and given to
The District of Columbia’s Child and
Family Services Agency (CFSA).
Under the Safe Haven Law, the
father is considered the non-surrendering parent and has to take
steps to exert his fatherhood rights.
The baby is an African American
male (the father may be Hispanic or
Latino) who as a newborn, weighed
7 pounds 2 ounces and was full
term.
If you think you are the baby’s
father, you must contact CFSA!
CFSA must be notified or contacted
by you, the father, to express your
intent as the father of exercising
your parental rights and responsibilities. Failure to do so will be
a relinquishment of your parental
rights. You have 20 days from the
date of this publication to contact
CFSA by phone - 202-727-4817, or
by email – mary.hembry@dc.gov, or
appear in person at 200 I Street S.E.
Washington, DC and ask to speak
with Mary Hembry.
If CFSA is not contacted in 20 days
from the date of this publication you
are giving up your rights to this child
and this will be considered your
irrevocable waiver of any right to
notice of, or opportunity to participate in, any termination of parental
rights proceeding or adoption proceeding involving the surrendered
newborn. The Court may grant a
petition for adoption without your
consent following the relinquishment of parental rights and the
termination of parental rights.”
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
KA'MAYA SYLVIA CARTER
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
KA'MAYA SYLVIA NELSON
FAMILY LAW: 150350FL
Charles Howard Nelson III
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Ka'Maya
Sylvia Carter to Ka'Maya Sylvia Nelson. The petitioner is seeking a
name change because: It's her correct /proper last name which correctly reflects her bloodline and
lineage.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 26th
day of January, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 11th day of
January, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
NATHAN ASNAKO BESHAH
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
NATHAN MARK BESHAH
FAMILY LAW: 149696FL
Mineret Deribe
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
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CLASSIFIED
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Adopt Cats
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Nathan
Asnake Beshah to Nathan Mark
Beshah. The petitioner is seeking
a name change because: His father
change name.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 26th
day of January, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 11th day of
January, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
MIKYAS ASNAKE BESHAH
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
MIKYAS MARK BESHAH
FAMILY LAW: 149696FL
Mineret Deribe
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Mikyas
Asnake Beshah to Mikyas Mark
Beshah. The petitioner is seeking
a name change because: His father
change name.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 26th
day of January, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 11th day of
January, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
NOAH SOLOMON SHEMELES
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
NOAH SHEMELES SOLOMON
FAMILY LAW: 150265FL
Solomon Shemeles Alemu
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Noah
Solomon Shemeles to Noah Shemeles Solomon. The petitioner is seeking a name change because: We
want him to be called with his
father's first name.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 26th
day of January, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 11th day of
January, 2018.
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
815
820
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
SCARLETT MICHELLE LOPEZ DELCID
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
SCARLETT MICHELLE DELCID
FAMILY LAW: 147969FL
Jaqueline Marilu Delcid
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Scarlett
Michelle Lopez Delcid to Scarlett
Michelle Delcid. The petitioner is
seeking a name change because:
Luis isn't the Biological father.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 26th
day of January, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 11th day of
January, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
LESLIE JAMILEX RAMIREZ
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
LESLIE JAMILEX SANCHEZ
FAMILY LAW: 150170FL
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820
Official Notices
MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF THE
ENVIRONMENT
WATER AND SCIENCE ADMINISTRATION
NOTICE OF FINAL DETERMINATION
Montgomery County
Application for State Discharge Permit, 17DP3845,
NPDES Permit MD0071951:
The Purple Line Transit Constructors (PLTC), 6811 Kenilworth
Avenue, Suite 300, Riverdale, MD 20737, submitted an
application for a new permit to discharge an average
of 172,800 gallons per day of groundwater from a wellpoint system and the combination of groundwater and
stormwater from within construction excavation during
construction of the Bethesda Shaft, part of the Purple Line
project, located off Elm St. between Wisconsin Ave. and
East Ln., to Little Falls Branch (Use I-P). Note that this
application was originally submitted and had its application
received publication processed as a modification request
(State Permit 14-DP-3818A), but was later requested to
be separated into a different individual NPDES permit, as
reflected above.
The Department published a tentative permit determination
on September 7 and September 14, 2017 and received
comments regarding the proposed draft permit. After
considering all comments received, the Department has
made a final determination to issue the permit with no
changes from the tentative Determination.
Any person adversely affected by this final determination
may request a judicial review. The judicial review must be
filed no later than February 12, 2018 in the circuit court of
the county where the activity will occur.
Persons wishing to review the final permit may do so
by contacting Mr. Michael Richardson, Chief, Industrial
and General Permits Division at 410-537-3654 to make an
appointment. Copies of documents may be obtained at a
cost of $0.36 per page.
Notice of Public Hearing
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Leslie Jamilex
Ramirez to Leslie Jamilex Sanchez.
The petitioner is seeking a name
change because: Absence of father.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 26th
day of January, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 11th day of
January, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Council of Rockville will
conduct a public hearing on Monday, January 22, 2018, at 7:00
p.m., (rescheduled from January 8, 2018) or as soon thereafter as
it may be heard, in the Council Chambers, Rockville City Hall, 111
Maryland Avenue, Rockville, Maryland, in connection with proposed
new water and sewer rates and proposed new ready to serve charges
for fiscal years FY 2019, FY 2020 and FY 2021. More information
and the proposed new rates can be found on the City of Rockville’s
website at www.rockvillemd.gov/budget under the December 11,
2017 agenda item, “Water and Sewer Rate Study” or by calling the
Finance department at 240-314-8400. All hearings begin at 7:00
p.m. and are held in the Council Chambers at Rockville City Hall.
Persons wishing to testify are asked to call 240-314-8280 before 4:00
p.m. on the date of the hearing to have their names placed on the
speakers’ list.
MAYOR AND COUNCIL OF ROCKVILLE
By: Kathleen Conway, City Clerk/Director of Council Operations
815
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
HIWOT ZE TADESSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
HIWOT TADESSE
FAMILY LAW: 149975FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
IN THE MATTER OF
JOHNNY BENETEZ LOPEZ
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
JOHN ABRAHAM GRANADOS
FAMILY LAW: 150220FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Johnny Benetez
Lopez to John Abraham Granados.
The petitioner is seeking a name
change because: I'm married to
Glenda Granados and want to carry
her last name and shorten my first
name.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 26th
day of January, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 11th day of
January, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
CHARLES AYDEN RODRIGUEZ
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
AYDEN MIGUEL VELEZ
FAMILY LAW: 150027FL
Suyeil Velez
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from Charles
Ayden Rodriguez to Ayden Miguel
Velez. The petitioner is seeking a
name change because: Carlos
Rodriguez is not the biological
father.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 26th
day of January, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 11th day of
January, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
HOWARD HO FUNG TO
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
HOWARD TO
FAMILY LAW: 150129FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Howard Ho Fung
To to Howard To . The petitioner is
seeking a name change because:
Mistake on naturalization documents.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 26th
day of January, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 11th day of
January, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
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Official Notices
Proposed Water and Sewer Rates and Proposed Ready to Serve
Charges for Fiscal Years 2019, 2020 and 2021
SF
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to home delivery.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
1-800-753-POST
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
1-800-753-POST
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The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Hiwot Ze
Tadesse to Hiwot Tadesse. The petitioner is seeking a name change
because: Explaining her name to
customers is horendous and causes
her to lose time and money on the
job.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 26th
day of January, 2018. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 11th day of
January, 2018.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND
IN RE ADOPTION/GUARDIANSHIP OF
LORENZO D.
Adoption No. 16542
NOTICE
To: UNKNOWN BIRTH FATHER,
a/k/a "Man-Man"
You are hereby notified that an
adoption case has been filed in
the Circuit Court for Montgomery
County, case number 16542A. All
persons who believe themselves t
be parents of a male child born on
January 14, 2016 in Prince George's
County to Courtnee Celine Davis
shall file a written response. A copy
of the show cause may be obtained
from the clerk's office at:
Circuit Court for
Montgomery County
50 Maryland Avenue
Rockville , Maryland 20850
(240) 777-9422
If you do not file a written objection
within 60 days from the date of this
notice is published and/or posted,
you will have agreed to the permanent loss of your parental rights to
this child.
DATE OF ISSUE: 12/20/2017
Barbara Meiklejohn
Clerk
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COLLEGE
PARK WOODS SWIMMING CLUB,
INC.
Case No: CAE 17-23591
Case No: CAE 17-23592
SHOW CAUSE ORDER
Upon consideration of the Petitioner College Park Woods Swimming
Club, Inc.'s First Amended Petition
for an Order of Sale and Ratification
of Sale (CAE 17-23591), Petition for
Declaratory Judgment (CAE 1723592) and Motion for Alternative
Service, it is this 1st day of December, 2017 by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland.
ORDERED, that the current and former members of the Petitioner, the
Respondent the City of College
Park, Maryland, AND any othe interested person SHOW CAUSE in writing on or before the 14th day of
February, 2018, why the relief
prayed in the Petition should not be
granted, PROVIDED that a copy of
any related Petitions or documents
accompanied by the Notice of Publication is served with a copy of this
Order on or before the 26th day of
January, 2018; and it is further,
ORDERED, that pursuant to Md. Rule
2-122, the Petitioner is hereby
directed to effectuate alternative
service by the followinf means:
1. To publish this Order and Notice
of Publication in the Prince George's
Sentinel, the Enquirer-Gazzette, and
the UMD Diamondback for THREE
(3) consecutive weeks;
2. To deliver this Order and Notice
of Posting to the Sheriff's Office
for Prince George's County to be
posted on the Petitioner's real property and the Courthouse; and
3. To deliver through certified mail
and e-mail the Notice of Publication
to ALL INTERESTED PARTIES including but not limited to, creditors,
potential former equity members,
current members, etc.
ORDERED, that pursuant to Md. Rule
2-122, the City of College Park
(herein, "the City") is hereby directed to effectuate alternative service
by the following means:
1. To publish this Order and Notice
of Publication in the local College
Park newsletter;
2. To post this Order and Notice of
Posting at City Hall; and
3. To publish this Order and Notice
of Publication on the City's website.
ORDERED, that the above matter
stand for a hearing on the 2nd day
of March, 2018 at 1:30 pm for once
half hour.
HON. LEO E. GREEN, JR.
Judge, Circuit Court for
Prince George's County Maryland
815
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
IN THE MATTER OF THE COLLEGE
PARK WOODS SWIMMING CLUB,
INC. FOR AN ORDER OF SALE AND
RATIFICATION OF THE CONTRACT
OF SALE FOR ITS REAL PROPERTY
Case No: CAE 17-23591
COLLEGE PARK WOODS SWIMMING
CLUB, INC.
Case No: CAE 17-23592
JOHN DOE, et al.
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
The Petitioner, the College Park
Woods Swimming Club, Inc., (herein, "the Petitioner") has voted to
dissolve itself and sell its only real
property, commonly known as 3545
Marlbrough Way, College Park,
Maryland, 20740. To protect the
interests of any and all equity members, past and current, creditors,
tenants, or any other interested
party of the Petitioner, the Petitioner has initiated two companion
cases to affectuate its upcoming
sale and determine the rights of its
past and current members.
In the first case, the Petitioner has
entered into the Contract of Sale
on October 17, 2017 with the City
of College Park (herein, "the City").
The Petitioner has filed an action
seeking judicial ratification of this
Contract of Sale. See In the Matter
of the College Park Woods Swimming Club, Inc. for an Order of
Sale and Ratification of the Contract
of Sale for its Real Property, CAE
17-23591, in the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County. The purpose of this case is to request
the Circuit Court to issue an Order
to ratify this sale. The sales price
is the current SDAT value as of
October 17, 2017, $256,100.00 for
the Petitioner's real property and
any personal property on the property.
Any interested Party with the claim
against the real property or against
the Petitioner well as any party
objecting to the Contract of Sale
must file a written claim with the
court in this case by motion or
petition no later than the 14th day
of February, 2018. A hearing on this
matter shall be held on the 2nd
day of March, 2018 at 1:30 PM
before the Honorable Leo E. Green,
Jr. Failure to file an objection or
response or appear at this hearingmay result in a judgment granting
the Petitioner's requested relief for
ratification of the Contract of Sale
on the Petitioner's real property
and forfeiting any rights to the Petitioner's real property and personal
property situated in its Real Property.
In a companion case, College Park
Woods Swimming Club, Inc. vs. John
Doe, et al., CAE 17-23592 in the
Circuit Court for Prince George's
County, the Petitioner seeks a
declaratory judgment to validate its
amended by-laws ratified on March
29, 2017 and to confirm the identities of he current membership
(both associate and equity) and the
former, inactive equity members of
the Petitioner.
This Notice shall begin the timeframe to foreclose on any unknown
equity member's interest in the dissolution and distribution of the
residue estate of the Petition pursuant to Md. Ann. Code, Corp. §
3-412. The Petitioner also hereby
gives notice that it shall seek to
reduce the amount of time for any
unknown equity members to prove
their interest in the Petitioner from
three (3) years default time-period
until the date of the final Order of
the Court in College Park Woods
Swimming Club, Inc. vs. John Doe,
et al., CAE 17-23592 in the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County
which shall be made before January
of 2019.
By Order of the Court, notice of
these proceedings shall be made
upon all interested parties who may
have a claim against the Petitioner
or the proceeds of the sale, or who
object to the sale of the Petitioner's
real property, including, without
limitation, the current members of
the Petitioner and any former members or inactive equity members
entitled to a refund of their equity
share any creditors of the Petitioner, any tenants of the Petitioner
and any other interested party
who objects to the sale of the
Petitioner's real property.
You are encouraged to consult an
attorney regarding any claim you
may have. If you do not have an
attorney, you may obtain one
through the Prince George's County
Bar Association Lawyer Referral
Service by calling (301) 952-1440.
HON. SYDNEY J. HARRISON #58
Clerk of the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, MD
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Official Notices
•InSight Imaging, Establish Computed Tomography Service
(COPN Request VA-8319)
The hearings will be held on Monday, January 22, 2018,
beginning at 7:30 PM in the Northern Virginia Regional
Commission Conference Room (3040 Williams Drive, Suite
200, Fairfax, VA).
Interested parties are invited to attend the hearings and to
submit written comments by January 22, 2018 to HSANV,
3040 Williams Drive, Suite 200, Fairfax, VA 22031.
825
Bids & Proposals
Bids & Proposals
TENDER NOTICE
INVITATION 001/BACE/2018
TYPE: Invitation number 001/BACE/2018 – Republication of
Invitation number 003/BACE/2017.
OBJECT: Contracting of Services, in four batches, by
COMAER, covering the supply of orbital means for satellite
remote sensing services and access to new and catalogued
pre-existing images including right of use of the selected
images, according to specifications set in Basic Project
number 001/COMAE/2017.
DELIVERY OF DOCUMENTS AND OPENING MEETING: on
14th February 2018, at 11:00h. INFORMATION: Monday
to Friday, from 11:00 to 18:00 h, at the Tenders and
Contracts Division, located at 16 Great James Street, Holborn
– London – WC1N 3DP – email: tender01@bace.org.uk.
TENDER DOCUMENTATION CAN BE OBTAINED AT: Brazilian
Aeronautical Commission in Europe located at the aforementioned address or via website: www.bace.org.uk under
the Announcements heading. London, 10th January 2018.
ANDRÉ LUÍS GOMES MONTEIRO Col
Head of BACE
815
815
Legal Notices
Legal Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 439
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001470
BETTIE HILL JOHNSON
PRO SE
DAVID ALLEN LYON
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
B. Sandra Foster, whose address
is 13 Leighton Court, Simpsonville,
South Carolina 29680 was appointed Personal Representative of the
estate of Bettie Hill Johnson who
died on 10th of June 2013 with a Will
and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will ) shall be filed With
the Register of Wills, D.C., Building
A, 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before June 28, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before June 28, 2018, or be forever
barred. Persons believed to be heirs
or legatees of the decedent who do
not receive a copy of this notice
by mail within 25 days of its first
publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
G. Don Westfall, whose address is
124 Sawmill Creek Dr., Nellysford,
VA 22958 was appointed Personal Representative of the estate of
David Allen Lyon who died on
August 8, 2017 without a Will and
will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed With the
Register of Wills, D.C., Building A,
515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before July 11, 2018. Claims against
the decedent shall be presented to
the undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before July 11,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
B. Sandra Foster
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001423
OLIE R. WRIGHT
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
G. Don Westfall
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001449
ELIZABETH A. WALSH
Scott M. Hartinger
100 N. Court Street
Frederick MD 21701
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Michael D. Wright, whose address
is 10002 Belden Ct., Lanham, MD
20706 was appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Olie
R. Wright who died on March 30,
2015 without a Will and will serve
without Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed With the
Register of Wills, D.C., Building A,
515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before June 28, 2018. Claims
against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a
copy to the Register of Wills or
filed with the Register of Wills with
a copy to the undersigned, on or
before June 28, 2018, or be forever
barred. Persons believed to be heirs
or legatees of the decedent who do
not receive a copy of this notice
by mail within 25 days of its first
publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Mary Ann Dockendorf, whose
address is 708 E. 16th Street, Frederick, MD 21701 was appointed Personal Representative of the estate
of Elizabeth A. Walsh who died
on 09-22-2017 without a Will and
will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed With the
Register of Wills, D.C., Building A,
515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before July 11, 2018. Claims against
the decedent shall be presented to
the undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before July 11,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Michael D. Wright
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Mary Ann Dockendorf
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001471
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001483
SAMUEL CASAMENTO
PRO SE
KAREN HANSEN-TURTON
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
NOTICE OF STANDARD PROBATE
Jeanne Casamento, whose address
is 6421 78th Street, Cabin John,
Maryland 20818 was appointed Personal Representative of the estate
of Samuel Casamento who died on
16 November 2017 with a Will and
will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will ) shall be filed With
the Register of Wills, D.C., Building
A, 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor,
Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before July 11, 2018. Claims against
the decedent shall be presented to
the undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before July 11,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Jeanne Casamento
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
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1-800-753-POST SF
SF
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is convenient.
Andrew G. Simpson
1921 Gallows Road Suite 750
Vienna VA 22182
(703) 548 3900
PETITIONER
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
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to home delivery.
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Notice is hereby given that a petition has been filed in this Court
by Andrew G. Simpson for standard
probate, including the appointment
of one or more personal representatives. Unless a responsive pleading in the form of a complaint or
an objection in accordance with
Superior Court Probate Division
Rule 407 is filed in this Court within
30 days from the date of first publication of this notice, the Court may
take the action hereinafter set
forth.
Order any interested person to
show cause why the provisions of
the lost or destroyed will dated
12/17/2009 should not be admitted
to probate as expressed in the petition.
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BERNICE DAVIS
PRO SE
NOTICE OF STANDARD PROBATE
Notice is hereby given that a petition has been filed in this Court
by Susan Norwood for standard
probate, including the appointment
of one or more personal representatives. Unless a responsive pleading in the form of a complaint or
an objection in accordance with
Superior Court Probate Division
Rule 407 is filed in this Court within
30 days from the date of first publication of this notice, the Court may
take the action hereinafter set
forth.
Admit to probate the will dated
2/21/15 exhibited with the petition
upon proof satisfactory to the Court
of due execution by affidavit of the
witnesses or otherwise.
Order any interested person to
show cause why the provisions of
the lost or destroyed will dated
2/21/15 should not be admitted to
probate as expressed in the petition.
Susan Norwood
9504 Grandhaven Avenue
Upper Marlboro MD 20772
(301) 5745146
PETITIONER
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
VIRGINIA:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
FAUQUIER COUNTY
GENERAL LEE WHITE, JR.
Plaintiff,
v.
CASE NO. CL17-87
Unknown heirs of GRANT T. TYLER
and
ETTA E. EMBREY, also known as
Esther Edith Tyler, Etta E. Tyler, Etta
Edith Embrey and Edith Tyler
Embrey
FLORENCE L. BLACKWELL, also
known as Florence L. Tyler
JOHN BLACKWELL
JAMES W. THOMAS
MAURISE THOMAS, also known as
Marise L. Thomas
WISE WASHINGTON
JULIA B. WASHINGTON, also known
as Julia Blackwell Tyler
MILLIE C. WASHINGTON,, also
known as Millie Catherine Tyler and
Millie Catherine Tyler Washington
FLORENCE EMBREY PERRY
FRANK MARSHALL EMBREY
WILLIAM CLEVELAND EMBREY
GWENDOLYN SALES
LUSHA SALES
MELODY SALES
JOEY EMBREY
WILLIAM EMBREY
TAMMY EMBREY
YVETTE EMBREY
SHARRON WALLER
JOSEPH EMBREY, JR.
JUANITA THOMAS JOHNSON
WESLEY G. WASHINGTON
SYLVIA JOHNSON
OLIVER B. JOHNSON
NANCY JOHNSON
ALICE L. LEWIS JONES
GWENDOLYN LEWIS
SHARON PITCHER
ALEX PITCHER
RHODA PITCHER MENSON
MICHAEL PITCHER
DONALD RODGERS
MARY WASHINGTON FIELDS
BEVERLY PITCHER
BEVERLY CRAY
ALVIN D. CRAY
GLADYS BLACKWELL
CLARA PARKER THOMAS
ESTHER THOMAS ROBERTSON
GENEVA WEBSTER THOMAS
RUBY A. THOMAS
WALTER THOMAS
JOHN THOMAS
DENETRA THOMAS SMITH
MARIAN JOHNSON DECOSTA
JANICE E. PRESSEY ODUM
LINDA MAE LEWIS
WILLIAM H. LEWIS, JR.
GERALDINE PITCHER
KATHLYN JONES MOORE
VINCENT JONES
if living, and their heirs,
stepchildren, devisees and
grantees, if any there be,
PARTIES UNKNOWN
Defendants.
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
Defendants.
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
Th purpose of this cause is to quiet
title to the land in General Lee
White, Jr., to terminate the interests
of Grant T. Tyler, Esta E. Tyler, Etta
E. Embrey, Florence L. Blackwell,
John Blackwell, James W. Thomas,
Maurise Thomas, Wise Washington,
Julia B. Washington, and Millie C.
Washington, their heirs and all
others; to prove that title has been
established by adverse possession;
to remove any clouds on title; and
for such other and further relief
as this case in equity may require.
The property which is the subject
of this cause is in Fauquier County.
It is described as PIN #7819-719226-000, containing 1.3500 acres,
situate on the NE side of Route
610, Cedar Run Magisterial District,
Fauquier County, Virginia, which
was deeded to General Lee White,
Jr. by
It is therefore ORDERED that this
Order be published in The Washington Post once a week for four
consecutive weeks and that the
above-named persons and those
made defendants by the general
description of "Parts Unknown",
appear on or before the 9th day
of February, 2018 in the Clerk's
Office of this Court and do what is
necessary to protect their respective interests herein.
ENTERED this 20 day of December,
2017
Jeffrey W. Parker, Judge
I ASK FOR THIS:
Powell Lawson Duggan, Esq.
(VSB No. 19740)
WALKER JONES, PC
31 Winchester Street
Warrenton, Virginia 20186
(540) 347-9223
(540) 347-3825 (facsimile)
pduggan@walkerjoneslaw.com
Counsel for Plaintiff
VIRGINIA:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
FAUQUIER COUNTY
GENERAL LEE WHITE, JR.
Plaintiff,
v.
CASE NO. CL15-528
STEPHEN DAVIS, et al.
Defendants.
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
Th purpose of this cause is to partition real estate, to pay any owners
according to their interests as
determined by the Court, to allot
the real estate to General Lee White,
Jr. and to quiet title to the land in
General Lee White, Jr. The property
which is the subject of this cause is
in Fauquier County, Virginia.
It is therefore ORDERED that this
Order published in The Washington
Post once a week for four consecutive weeks and that Stephen
Davis, Jr., Stephanie D. Uddin, Stacey
J. Davis, Shaunte Turner, and State
Bank, formerly known as State Bank
of Remington, Inc., appear on or
before the 6th day of February, 2018,
in the Clerk's Office of this Court
and do what is necessary to protect
his interest herein.
ENTERED this 20 day of December,
2017.
Jeffrey W. Parker, Judge
I ASK FOR THIS:
Powell Lawson Duggan, Esq.
(VSB No. 19740)
WALKER JONES, PC
31 Winchester Street
Warrenton, Virginia 20186
(540) 347-9223
(540) 347-3825 (facsimile)
pduggan@walkerjoneslaw.com
Counsel for Plaintiff
825
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
Legal Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001478
•Fairfax ENT, Establish Computed Tomography Service
(COPN Request VA-8313)
825
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Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
The Health Systems Agency of Northern Virginia
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Official Notices
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
840
840
Trustees Sale - DC
January 11, 18, 25, 2018
12149960
Pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage
Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart
B, and the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner,
I will conduct a COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1510 Queen Street NE,
Washington, DC in execution of a certain deed of trust by Blondell B.
Brockington dated February 21, 2007, in the original principal amount of
$412,500.00 recorded in the Land Records of the District of Columbia, as
Instrument No. 2007023520, and the Assignment recorded in the Land
Records of the District of Columbia in favor of the Secretary of Housing
and Urban Development recorded on April 5, 2016 as Instrument Number
2016033187, default having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby
secured and at the request of the holder, the undersigned Foreclosure
Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction in the front of the
building housing the Superior Court for the District of Columbia located
at 500 Indiana Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20001 on February 1, 2018
at 9:10 A.M., the property described in said deed of trust, located at
the above address, with improvements thereon and more particularly
described as follows: 1510 Queen Street NE, Washington, DC 20002, for
which further legal description is attached to the Deed of trust. This
property is also presently known for assessment and taxation purposes
as Lot numbered Two Forty-three in Square numbered Forty Seventy-six.
TERMS OF SALE: Neither the FORECLOSURE COMMISSIONER nor the
holder of the note secured by the deed of trust will deliver possession of
the property to the successful bidder. The purchaser at the sale will be
required to pay all closing costs. Real estate taxes, water/sewer fees and
other public charges will be prorated as of the date of sale. The risk of
loss or damage to the property passes to the purchaser immediately upon
the conclusion of the sale. Terms: A bidder's deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price in the form of certified funds payable to the Secretary
of Housing and Urban Development and must be present at the time of
sale. The balance of the purchase price will be due within 30 days at the
office of the Foreclosure Commissioner. Time is of the essence as to the
closing date and the payment of the purchase price. If payment of the
balance does not occur within thirty days of the sale date, the deposit will
be forfeited. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based
upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a
foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure
Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of
the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as
provided herein. Foreclosure Commissioner shall have no duty to obtain
possession for purchaser. The property and the improvements thereon
will be sold "AS IS" and without representation or warranties of any kind.
The sale is subject to all liens, encumbrances, conditions, easements and
restrictions, if any, superior to the mentioned deed of trust and lawfully
affecting the property. Sale is subject to post-sale confirmation that the
borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior
to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination
of whether the borrower(s) reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.
In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser's sole
remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the Purchaser's deposit
without interest. Additional terms to be announced at the sale. HUD does
not guarantee that the property will be vacant. Anderson Law, Foreclosure
Commissioner, 2492 N. Landing Rd, Ste 104, Virginia Beach, VA 23456,
757-301-3636 Tel, 757-301-3640 Fax. Ad to run January 11, 2018, January
18, 2018, January 25, 2018.
January 11, 18, 25, 2018
12149957
850
850
Montgomery County
Montgomery County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
18115 METZ DR.
GERMANTOWN, MD 20874
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Joann
V. Braithwaite n/k/a Joann Valiew Braithwaite dated April 18, 2006 and
recorded in Liber 32278, folio 795 among the Land Records of Montgomery
County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery
County, at the Court House Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850,
on
JANUARY 24, 2018 AT 11:19 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-01566208.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $24,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65421.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 4, Jan 11 & Jan 18, 2018
830
12150169
830
Special Notices
Lillian M. DeCosimo, M.D. /
About Care GYN Associates, PLLC
Announces the closure of her medical practice effective December 1,
2017. To request a copy of your
medical records please mail your
request to: P.O. Box 220925 Chantilly, VA 220925 or email: drdecosimo
@ outlook.com
Special Notices
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
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Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
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Bids & Proposals
Capitol Paving of D.C., Inc.
Capitol Paving is soliciting qualified
MBE/WBE subcontractors to perform DC Water Sol # 170170 –
Public Space Restoration Contract
for FY18-FY21. email – bids@capitolpaving.com ; call – 571.277.1022
or fax – 202.832.5126 – Bid Opening
11/01/2017
Trustees Sale - DC
Pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage
Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart
B, and the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner, I
will conduct a COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1804 L Street NE, Washington,
DC in execution of a certain deed of trust by Mary L. Worrell dated August
6, 2009, in the original principal amount of $240,000.00 recorded in the
Land Records of the District of Columbia, as Instrument No. 2009086555,
and the Assignment recorded in the Land Records of the District of
Columbia in favor of the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development
recorded on June 29, 2015 as Instrument Number 2015064972, default
having occurred in the payment of the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder, the undersigned Foreclosure Commissioner
will offer for sale at public auction in the front of the building housing
the Superior Court for the District of Columbia located at 500 Indiana
Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20001 on February 1, 2018 at 9:00 A.M., the
property described in said deed of trust, located at the above address,
with improvements thereon and more particularly described as follows:
1804 L Street NE, Washington, DC 20002, for which further legal description
is attached to the Deed of trust. This property is also presently known
for assessment and taxation purposes as Lot numbered Ninety-Eight in
Square numbered Forty-four Seventy.
TERMS OF SALE: Neither the FORECLOSURE COMMISSIONER nor the
holder of the note secured by the deed of trust will deliver possession of
the property to the successful bidder. The purchaser at the sale will be
required to pay all closing costs. Real estate taxes, water/sewer fees and
other public charges will be prorated as of the date of sale. The risk of
loss or damage to the property passes to the purchaser immediately upon
the conclusion of the sale. Terms: A bidder's deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price in the form of certified funds payable to the Secretary
of Housing and Urban Development and must be present at the time of
sale. The balance of the purchase price will be due within 30 days at the
office of the Foreclosure Commissioner. Time is of the essence as to the
closing date and the payment of the purchase price. If payment of the
balance does not occur within thirty days of the sale date, the deposit will
be forfeited. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based
upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a
foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure
Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of
the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as
provided herein. Foreclosure Commissioner shall have no duty to obtain
possession for purchaser. The property and the improvements thereon
will be sold "AS IS" and without representation or warranties of any kind.
The sale is subject to all liens, encumbrances, conditions, easements and
restrictions, if any, superior to the mentioned deed of trust and lawfully
affecting the property. Sale is subject to post-sale confirmation that the
borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior
to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination
of whether the borrower(s) reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.
In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser's sole
remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the Purchaser's deposit
without interest. Additional terms to be announced at the sale. HUD does
not guarantee that the property will be vacant. Anderson Law, Foreclosure
Commissioner, 2492 N. Landing Rd, Ste 104, Virginia Beach, VA 23456,
757-301-3636 Tel, 757-301-3640 Fax. Ad to run January 11, 2018, January
18, 2018, January 25, 2018.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
850
Montgomery County
850
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2608 SUNSHINE CT.
BROOKEVILLE, MD 20833
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Sumera
Cheema dated May 26, 2005 and recorded in Liber 29985, folio 356 among
the Land Records of Montgomery County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at
the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court House Door, 50
Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
JANUARY 24, 2018 AT 11:20 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #08-03373186.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $66,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67930.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 4, Jan 11 & Jan 18, 2018
OPQRS
EZ
Montgomery County
12150170
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13224 MEANDER COVE DR., UNIT #41
GERMANTOWN, MD 20874
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Fredrick P.
Waldorf a/k/a Frederick P. Waldorf dated November 24, 2009 and recorded
in Liber 38655, folio 183 among the Land Records of Montgomery County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County,
at the Court House Door, 50 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850, on
JANUARY 31, 2018 AT 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Montgomery County, MD and
described as Unit 41 in "The Villas at Willow Cove, a Condominium" and
more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-02687900.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, to be adjusted
to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees
and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property
from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the
time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66143.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 11, Jan 18 & Jan 25, 2018
12152096
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
18441 Crownsgate Circle
Germantown, MD 20874
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
CONSTANCE ROBINSON AND RANDI A. ROBINSON, dated
March 21, 2006 and recorded in Liber 32076, folio 740
among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD,
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed
as Case No.440975V; Tax ID No.06-03189984 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
JANUARY 29, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 578593)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
JANUARY 11, 18, 25, 2018
851
D9
Prince Georges County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
524 Beebe Court
Frederick, MD 21703
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to QUINTUS WILLIAMS, Trustee(s),
dated April 14, 2016, and recorded among the Land Records
of FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 11095, folio
0346, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE FREDERICK
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 100 W. PATRICK ST,
FREDERICK, MD 21701 ON,
JANUARY 16, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT NUMBERED ONE HUNDRED FOURTEEN (114), IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT 4, SECTION 8, HILLCREST
ORCHARDS", AS PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED
AMONG THE PLAT RECORDS OF FREDERICK COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK 27, PAGE 82.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (53643)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
851
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY11, 18, 25, 2018
12153243
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
413 Ritchie Parkway
Rockville, MD 20852
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
HARTLEY ROBERTSON, dated June 11, 2007 and recorded
in Liber 34548, folio 789 among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.403281V; Tax ID
No.04-00172065 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
JANUARY 29, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $38,400.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 556088)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. COHEN,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
PostPoints takes
you to the best
shows in town.
12153250
Prince Georges County
DECEMBER 28, 2017, JANUARY 4, 11, 2018
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13502 Derry Glenn Court Apt. 303 and PS # 332
Germantown, MD 20874
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from ALLISON
MCDANIEL, dated March 14, 2014 and recorded in Liber
48480, folio 233 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.429295V; Tax ID No.02-03537914
& 02-03526716 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
JANUARY 29, 2018 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $18,600.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
www.hwestauctions.com
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned JANUARY 11, 18, 25, 2018
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 572974)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
Membership is rewarding.
SHANNON MENAPACE,
KHALID D. WALKER,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
ERIN M. SHAFFER
Substitute Trustee
Plaintiff,
V.
MILDRED GRESHAM
6206 Greenvale Parkway
Riverdale, MD 20737
Defendant(s)
CASE NO. CAEF15-00844
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby issued by the
Circuit Court of Prince George's
County this 22nd day of December,
2017, that the sale of the property
mentioned in these proceedings,
made and reported by Erin M.
Shaffer, Substitute Trustee, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause
to the contrary be shown on or
before the 22nd day of January,
2018 provided a copy of this Notice
be inserted in The Washington
Post, a newspaper published in
Prince George's County, Maryland,
once in each of three (3) successive weeks on or before the 22nd
day of January, 2018.
The report states the amount of
sale to be $200,000.00
Sydney J. Harrison(#619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Prince Georges County, MD
January 4, 11, 18, 2018
12151748
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
CARMEN DE LA PAZ REYES A/K/A
CARMEN REYES
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF13-36275
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 21st
day of December, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, Trustees, of the Real Property
designated as 8424 CARROLLTON
PKWY, New Carrollton, MD 20784,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 22nd day of January,
2018 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 22nd day of January,
2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $193,000.00.
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Dec 28, 2017, Jan 4, 11, 2018
12151145
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
NORMAN W NORTHERN
LUCRETIA M ALLEN
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14106
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 21st
day of December, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 9309
Eldon Drive, Clinton, MD 20735,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 22nd day of January,
2018 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 22nd day of January,
2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $251,900.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Dec 28, 2017, Jan 4, 11, 2018
12151147
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
SF
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
12153248
12147498
Prince Georges County
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
1-800-753-POST
851
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
856
856
Frederick County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1802 ROCKY GLEN DR.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3733 LAWSON RD.
IJAMSVILLE, MD 21754
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Maria
Fotopoulos a/k/a Marcia Fotopoulos and Vasilios Fotopoulos, dated April
28, 2004 and recorded in Liber 4644, folio 198 among the Land Records
of Frederick County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof
and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit
Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St.,
Frederick, MD 21701, on
JANUARY 24, 2018 AT 1:05 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $19,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 6% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #15-611369).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 4, Jan 11 & Jan 18
12151167
Prince Georges County
DUANE SCHULTERBRANDT
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-17781
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 21st
day of December, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 12801
Libertys Delight Dr Unit 73B, Bowie,
MD 20720, and reported in the
above entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 22nd day
of January, 2018 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 22nd
day of January, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $233,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Dec 28, 2017, Jan 4, 11, 2018
12151146
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
MARIA D. GAITAN
DIANA GAITAN
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-35906
NOTICE
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 21st
day of December, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by William M. Savage,
Gregory N. Britto, Kristine D.
Brown, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 13216 PINE
ROAD, Bowie, MD 20720, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 22nd day of January,
2018 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 22nd day of January,
2018.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 27th
day of December, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 146
Farmington Road West, Accokeek,
MD 20607, and reported in the
above entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 29th day
of January, 2018 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 29th
day of January, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $253,163.10.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $391,455.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
C. VICTOR MBAKPUO A/K/A
VICTOR C. MBAKPUO
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF13-07071
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 3rd
day of January, 2018 by the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, Maryland and by the
authority thereof, that the sale
made by Kristine D. Brown, William
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R.
Kip Stone, Trustees, of the Real
Property designated as 11603 SILVERGATE LN, Bowie, MD 20720, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 5th day of February,
2018 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 5th day of February,
2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $342,992.26.
Jan 11, 18, 25, 2018
12153264
SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
Jan 4, 11, 18, 2018
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from William J.
Kinsella and Katheryn Margaret Kinsella, dated May 24, 2013 and recorded
in Liber 9599, folio 1 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the
parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer
for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the
Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
JANUARY 24, 2018 AT 1:06 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $33,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #17-602065).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Jan 4, Jan 11 & Jan 18
857
12151168
Howard County
857
Howard County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6920 Deer Pasture Drive
Columbia, MD 21045
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
RICHARD L. KOLESAR, dated July 17, 2006 and recorded in
Liber 10162, folio 290 among the Land Records of HOWARD
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.13C17111192; Tax ID No.16115150 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD,
COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
JANUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $35,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576621)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12152060
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 4, 11, 18, 2018
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 27th
day of December, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 7722
NALLEY CT, Hyattsville, MD 20785,
and reported in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified
and confirmed, unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 29th day of January,
2018 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 29th day of January,
2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $132,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Jan 4, 11, 18, 2018
12152059
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
SF
Frederick County
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
vs.
VIRGINIA A BARDEN
GEORGE W BARDEN
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-11639
NOTICE
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
CHANDRA L CONNOLLY
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-22402
NOTICE
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
1-800-753-POST
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Home delivery
is convenient.
851
856
1203 BISHOP CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21702
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-072238.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67155.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Dec 28, Jan 4 & Jan 11
12149987
851
Frederick County
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Scott
Carson and Rebbecca Carson a/k/a Rebbecca L. Montes dated June 18,
2004 and recorded in Liber 4696, folio 64 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof,
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for
Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick,
MD 21701, on
JANUARY 17, 2018 AT 12:55 PM
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Dec 28, 2017, Jan 4, 11, 2018
12151144
vs.
AMBIYO SCHULTERBRANDT
856
Frederick County
SF
From dramas and musicals to standup and ballet, discover great ways to
save money, win tickets and have fun
at the theater.
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S2930 6x2
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11, 2018
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
VICKIE M. TAYLOR
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-22411
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 3rd
day of January 2018, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 7501 Lockman Lane, Beltsville, MD 20705, will
be ratified and confirmed unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 5th day
of February, 2018, provided a copy
of this NOTICE be published at
least once a week in each of three
successive weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the
5th day of February, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$279,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
January 11, 18, 25, 2018 12153268
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Ebone S. Janifer
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-21443
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 28th day of December 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 4009 Meadow Trail Lane,
Hyattsville, Maryland 20784, made
and reported by James E. Clarke,
Renee Dyson, Hugh J. Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel
and Brian Thomas, Substitute
Trustees, be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the
29th day of January, 2018, provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in The Washington Post once in
each of three (3) successive weeks
before the 29th day of January,
2018.
12151614
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
The Estate of Wayne Simpson
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-17865
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 28th day of December 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 11007 Waco Drive, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, made and
reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Hugh J. Green, Shannon
Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and
Brian Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 29th day
of January, 2018, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 29th day of January, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $194,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Jan 4, 11, 18, 2018
852
12152058
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Thomas W. Hodge, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
James R. Schott, Jr.
Defendants
No. C-02-CV-17-002186
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $194,000.00.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this
Wednesday, December 20, 2017 that
the sale of the property in the
proceedings mentioned, made and
reported by Thomas W Hodge, Substitute Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 19th
day of January 2018 next; provided,
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 19th day of January 2018 next.
The report states that the amount
of sale of the property at 8374
FROSTWOOD DRIVE, LAUREL, MD
20724 to be $218,500.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Jan 4, 11, 18, 2018
12152056
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
12/28/17,1/4/, 1/11/18 12151048
D10
857
Howard County
OPQRS
857
857
Howard County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9766 Northern Lakes Lane
Laurel, MD 20723
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from SHAZIA
SADIQ, dated December 23, 2011 and recorded in Liber 13685,
folio 010 among the Land Records of HOWARD COUNTY, MD,
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed
as Case No.13C17112629; Tax ID No.06-590500 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction AT THE THOMAS DORSEY
BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
JANUARY 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $36,100.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 565349)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
JANUARY 4, 11, 18, 2018
12151611
1. Coffee
2. Paper
3. Bills
Prince William County
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Tiffany L. Pauley and
Henry T. Giddins, Jr.
Defendant(s)
Civil No.13C17112715
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Howard County, Maryland, this 4th
day of JANUARY, 2018, that the
foreclosure sale of the property
described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
5067 Columbia Road, Unit 18-12,
Columbia, Maryland 21044 made
and reported by James E. Clarke,
Renee Dyson, Hugh J. Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and Brian Thomas, Substitute
Trustees, be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the
5th day of FEBRUARY 2018; provided a copy of this Order be inserted
in The Washington Post, once in
each of three (3) successive weeks
before the 5th day of FEBRUARY,
2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $314,100.00.
BY THE COURT:
Wayne A. Robey
Clerk of the Circuit Court
MATL562432
Orlans PC
PO Box 2548
Leesburg, Virginia 20177
Jan 11, 18, 25, 2018
12123816
871
City of Alexandria
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2331 HENSHAW PLACE, #301,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22311
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $343,920.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
December 29, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the CITY OF
ALEXANDRIA as Deed Instrument
Number 070000168, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, on
the courthouse steps at the front
of the Circuit Court building for
the City of Alexandria located at
520 King Street, Alexandria, Virginia on February 7, 2018 at 11:30
AM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 50630210
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-252330.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
1/4/2018, 1/11/2018
872
12151455
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
1914 CRESCENT PRK DR #2122,
RESTON, VA 20190
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
June 22, 2007, and recorded at Instrument Number 200706250074725
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $210,000.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
January 24, 2018 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot
909, Section 3, Point of Woods at Manassas, as the same appears duly
dedicated, platted and recorded in Deed Book 561 at Page 750, among the
Land Records of Prince William County, VA, and as more fully described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
January 4, 11, 2018
872
12150938
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
12153236
Home delivery
is convenient.
S0833-2 2x3
1-800-753-POST
876
Loudoun County
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
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Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
13554 DARTER CT,
CLIFTON, VA 20124
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
13105 Haddock Road
Woodbridge, VA 22193
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $341,250.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.000000% dated
February 1, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 18203,
Page 98, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on February 14, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0553 07020071A
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$95,000.00, dated May 13, 2004,
recorded among the land records
of the Circuit Court for Prince William County on May 26, 2004,
as
Instrument
Number
200405260088546, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on February 2,
2018 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: BEING
KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT
420, SECTION 8-E, ''DALE CITY'',
AS THE SAME APPEARS DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED
IN DEED BOOK 558, PAGE 403
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA. Tax ID: 8192-48-4858.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-261424.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Jan. 11, 18, 2018
12153223
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $9,500.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: Conv/Conv (Trustee #
580792)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0713
Dec. 28, 2017, Jan 4, 11, 18, 2018
12150940
How about some
home delivery?
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
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Loudoun County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
VACANT LAND
Tax Map No. 48-H-4-1
Parcel ID No. 188-17-9105-000
In execution of a Deed of Trust & Security Agreement from Loudoun
Racquet and Swim Club, a Virginia general partnership (predecessor in
interest to Route 773 Investors, LLC, a Virginia limited liability company),
dated November 22, 2000, securing a maximum principal amount of
$825,000, and later increased to $1,125,000, and recorded on November
29, 2000, in the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court of Loudoun County,
Virginia (the “Clerk’s Office”), in Deed Book 1844, at Page 2280, as
modified by a Modification Agreement recorded in Deed Book 2199, at
Page 1315, in the Clerk’s Office, as further modified by a Modification
Agreement recorded as Instrument Number 20040405-0030965 in the
Clerk’s Office, and as further modified by a Modification Agreement
recorded as Instrument Number 20071228-0089650 in the Clerk’s Office
(collectively, the “Deed of Trust”), the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction:
The real property, and improvements (the “Property”) lying and being
in Loudoun County, Virginia more particularly described as follows:
Beginning at a found iron pipe in the south line of Route No. 773, Fort
Evans Road, N.E. at a corner to Warrenton Production Credit Associates;
Thence leaving Warrenton Production Credit Associates and running with
the south line of Route No. 773, Fort Evans Road, North 70° 43’ 05” East
108.14 feet to a found iron pipe, then on a curve to the right whose
radius is 11434.16 feet and whose chord bearing and chord are North 710
00’ 16” East 114.31 feet and an arc distance of 114.31 feet to an iron
pipe set, then continuing with Route No. 773, Fort Evans Road, then CWC
Investments Inc., South 18° 33’ 47” East 202.56 feet to a set iron pipe,
North 710 26’ 13” East 123.90 feet to a set iron pipe and then continuing
with CWC Investments, Inc., then the south line of Route No. 773, Fort
Evans Road, North 18° 33’ 47” West 202.59 feet to a set iron pipe, then
continuing with the south line of Route No. 773, Fort Evans Road, North
710 26’ 13” East 176.04 feet to a found iron pipe, corner to Kelly. Thence
leaving Route No. 773, Fort Evans Road, and running with Kelly, South 18°
33’ 47” East 661.08 feet to a found iron pipe in the north line of Route
No. 15 by pass, northwest ramp; Thence leaving Kelly and running with
the north line of Route No. 15 by-pass, northwest ramp, North 88° 46’ 28”
West 104.79 feet to VDH Monument, then on a curve to the left whose
radius is 327.00 feet and whose chord bearing and chord are North 89° 49’
39” West 12.02 feet and an arc distance of 12.02 feet to a VDH monument,
then on a curve to the left whose radius is 289.67 feet and whose chord
bearing and chord are South 82° 15’ 50” West 106.28 feet and an arc
distance of 106.89 feet to a set iron pipe, corner to Lot 6, Leesburg Square;
Thence leaving Route No. 15 by pass, northwest ramp, and running with
Lot 6, Leesburg Square, North 54° 09’ 11” West 457.30 feet to a found iron
pipe corner to Warrenton Production Credit Associates; Thence leaving
Lot 6, Leesburg Square and running with Warrenton Production Credit
Associates, North 35° 50’ 43” East 98.45 feet to a found iron pipe and
North 54° 09’ 12” West 209.48 feet to the point of beginning, containing
4.9118 acres of land, more or less.
The Property described above shall be sold at 11:30 A.M., local time, on
January 26, 2018, (the “Date of Sale”), in front of the courthouse of the
Circuit Court of Loudoun County, Virginia, located at 18 East Market Street,
Leesburg, Virginia.
THE PROPERTY IS BEING SOLD “AS IS, WHERE IS”; NEITHER THE SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE NOR THE NOTEHOLDER MAKE ANY REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY, PHYSICAL CONDITION, ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITION, CONSTRUCTION, WORKMANSHIP, MATERIALS,
HABITABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, MERCHANTABILITY,
ZONING OR RESTRICTIONS ON USE OF ALL OR ANY PART OF THE PROPERTY
BEING SOLD.
The Property shall be sold subject to the following: (a) matters known or
unknown, conditions, restrictions, rights-of-way, easements, reservations,
filed and unfiled mechanics and materialmen’s liens, to the extent any of
the foregoing, recorded or unrecorded, may lawfully apply to the Property
being sold, or any part thereof, and take priority over the liens or security
interest of the Deed of Trust; and (b) any matters or conditions announced
by the Substitute Trustee at sale.
All prospective purchasers recognize and agree that any investigation,
examination, or inspection of the property is within the control of the
owner(s) or other parties in possession and their agents and not within
the control of the Substitute Trustee, the noteholder, or their successors
or assigns. Risk of loss or damage to the Property shall be borne by the
purchaser from and after the time of the sale. Real estate taxes and all
other public charges and assessments shall be adjusted for the current
tax year to the Date of Sale, and the purchaser shall be responsible
for payment of such taxes and charges beginning on the Date of Sale.
TERMS OF SALE: Settlement shall be by cashier’s check or wire transfer
or immediately available federal funds. A deposit of One Hundred Fifty
Thousand and 00/100 Dollars ($150,000.00) will be required in the form
of a cashier’s check at the time of sale drawn on a financial institution
acceptable to the Substitute Trustee and the Noteholder and such check
must be delivered to the Substitute Trustee by each party desiring to
bid on the Property, except that no deposit shall be required of the
Noteholder or its nominee. Within three (3) business days after the sale,
the successful purchaser shall deposit with the Substitute Trustee such
additional funds as are necessary to result in a total of ten percent (10%)
of the final sale price being deposited with the Substitute Trustee. At the
conclusion of the bidding, the Substitute Trustee will return deposits to
unsuccessful bidders. The balance of the purchase price will be due by
wire transfer. The terms of sale shall be complied with by the successful
bidder within thirty (30) days from date of auction. Sale is subject to post
sale confirmation that the borrower did not file for protection under the
U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to the sale. Upon acceptance of its bid by the
Substitute Trustee, the successful bidder shall be required to execute a
Memorandum of Sale in the form made available for inspection prior to
this sale, which Memorandum of Sale will contain an express waiver of
any cause of action against the Substitute Trustee and/or the Noteholder
with respect to the condition or suitability of the Property (including as
to the Property being in compliance with any federal, state, or local
laws, regulations or rulings, particularly any laws, regulations or rulings
relating to environmental contamination or hazardous wastes), and will
include additional terms of sale. Time shall be of essence with respect
to settlement. Any extensions of the settlement date shall be in the sole
discretion of Substitute Trustee. The Substitute Trustee reserves the right
to withdraw the Property from the sale if he deems the highest bid or
bids to be inadequate. Should the successful bidder default in making
settlement, the Substitute Trustee shall be entitled to enforce all rights
against the purchaser as set forth in the Memorandum of Sale, including,
but not limited to, the right to retain the deposit and resell the Property
at the cost and risk of the defaulting successful bidder. After such
default and forfeiture, the Property may, at the discretion of the Substitute
Trustee, be sold to the next highest bidder of the Property whose bid
was acceptable to the Substitute Trustee. All costs of settlement and
conveyance, examination of title, recording taxes, costs and charges, title
insurance premiums, etc., shall be at the cost of the Purchaser. In the
event the Substitute Trustee does not execute a deed of conveyance, the
purchaser’s sole remedy shall be refund of the deposit. The Property shall
be conveyed by Special Warranty Deed. It shall be the responsibility of
the purchaser to determine the status of any management, maintenance,
service or equipment contracts and make its own arrangements for
assuming such contracts if it desires. The Substitute Trustee makes
no representations or warranties as to whether such contracts exist or
are assignable. Obtaining possession of the Property shall be the sole
responsibility of Purchaser, and the Substitute Trustee will not deliver
possession of all or any part of the Property being sold. The Substitute
Trustee reserves the right to amend or supplement the terms of sale
by verbal announcement at the sale or to modify the requirements for
bidder’s deposits.
881
Orange County
29329 Saint Just Drive,
Unionville, VA 22567
Orange County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $146,000.00, dated September
22, 2006 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of
Orange County, Virginia, in Document No. 060010573, default having occurred in the payment of
the Note thereby secured and at
the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at
the entrance to the Circuit Court
of Orange County, 110 North Madison Road, Orange, on February
7, 2018 at 3:30 PM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 64, Merry Meadows, Section 1,
with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust,if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (59079)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Jan 11, 18, 2018
12153801
Career Training - Emp Svcs
ATTEND AVIATION COLLEGE
- Get FAA approved Aviation
Maintenance training. Financial aid for qualified students.
Job placement assistance.
Call AIM for free information
888-896-7869
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L
JOBS
Landscape Laborers - Temporary,
full-time
4/1/1811/16/18. 8 jobs w/ LandCare
USA, Sterling, VA & job sites
in Arlington, Fairfax, Fauquier,
Loudoun, Prince William,
Stafford, Alexandria, Falls
Church, Fredericksburg, Manassas & Manassas Park cty/
cntys. Use hand/power tools/
equip. Lay sod, mow, trim,
plant, water, fertilize, dig,
rake. Lift/carry 50 lbs, when
nec. Upon suspicion drug test
req'd. Background and e-Verify check req'd. 3 mos landscape exp req'd.35 hr/wk
6:30 AM-2 PM M-F, Sat/Sun
work req'd, when nec. Wage
is no less than $14.70/hr (OT
varies @ $22.05/hr). Raise/
bonus at emplr discretion.
Transport (incl. meals &, as
nec, lodging) to place of
employ provided or paid to
wkrs residing outside normal
commute distance by completion of 50% of job period.
Return transport provided or
paid to same wkrs if wkr completes job period or is dismissed early. Wkrs are guaranteed offer of 3/4 of work
hrs each 12-wk period. Tools,
supplies, equip, & uniform
provided at no cost. Potential deduct for advances, vol.
health/Dental insurance, vol.
retirement plan and/or vol.
savings plan may apply. Emplr
may assist to secure wkr-paid
lodging at reasonable cost if
needed. Emplr provides incidental transport btw job sites.
Interview req'd. Fax resume
to (703) 368-4687 or apply at:
VEC Alexandria, 5520 Cherokee Ave., Alexandria, VA
22312,
(703)
813-1300.
JO#1242169.
M
JOBS
MAINTENANCE
Applicant must have exp in
apartment maint & have
your own transp & tools.
Good refs & pass criminal
bckgr chk. Fax resume:
703-567-4063
How about some
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SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
SF
BETTSVILLE - No pets, nr bus, 2
rooms avail., $600/mo. all util incl.
each, Call: 301-346-9518
CAPITAL HEIGHTS - Senior home to
share. Furn rooms. $600. + $300
SD W/D.Prvt prkg + prvt fence. All
utils incl. Near Metro. N/S inside.
1 wk free. Text/Call 202-568-0792
Capital Hgts-Clean rm in pvt home, nr
Metro. No Smoke. Refs. M pref. Cable
ready. No dep. $675. 301-925-1242
Gaithersburg— $650, 1 bedrm, 1 ba,
Bayridge Dr, 240-793-0908, HSI,
Nr Pub Transp, pkg
HYATTSVILLE- House to shr. 1BR for
$650. Share bath & kitchen. All
utils incl & cable. Call 240-396-7926
MOUNT RAINIER/ CHEVERLY- large
room $150/week + $150 security
deposit Call 240-615-6596
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
NW DC- furnished room with bath.
Good bus location. $250 per week
and utilities incl. 301-807-4808
MARYLAND
SF
1-800-753-POST
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Roommates
Roommates
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
P JOBS
Paving Laborer - Temporary,
full-time 4/1/18-12/12/18. 7
jobs w/Chad Accipiter LLC,
dba Southern MD Paving &
Sealcoating Owings, MD & job
sites in Anne Arundel,
Calvert,
Charles,
Prince
George's & St. Mary's cntys.
Perform physical labor assoc.
w/asphalt paving of parking
areas/hwys.
Move/unload
supplies/materials.
Clean/
prep work sites, fill cracks,
sealcoat, shovel, & patch. Use
hand/power tools incl. tampers, hand rollers, shovels,
lutes or rakes. Lift/carry 50
lbs, when nec. Random &
upon suspicion drug test
req'd. 12 mos exp req’d.
40hr/wk 7AM-3:30PM M-F.
Sat/Sun work req'd, when
nec. Wage is no less than
$17.27/hr (OT varies @
$25.91/hr). Raise/bonus at
emplr discretion. Trans. (incl.
meals &, as nec, lodging) to
place of employ provided or
pd to wkrs residing outside
normal commute dist. by
completion of 50% of job period. Return trans. provided or
pd to same wkrs if wkr completes job period or is dismissed early. Wkrs are guaranteed offer of 3/4 of work
hrs each 12-wk period. Tools,
supplies, equip, uniform &
daily trans. to/from wksite
from central loc provided at
no cost. Potential deduct for
reasonable cost of lodging
may apply. Emplr may assist
to secure wkr-pd lodging if
needed. Emplr provides incidental trans. btw job sites.
Interview req'd. To apply mail
resume to P.O. Box 477,
Owings, MD 20736, email
info@somdpaving.com,
or
apply at: Southern MD JobSource, 175 Post Office Road,
Waldorf MD 20602, (301) 6458712. JO#775592.
SF
Oxon Hills/Temple Hills-Lg BRs, some
w/pvt BA. $675-$875 utils incl. 1 per
occ. 240-432-0751 or 301-537-2247
SILVER SPRING - Room in basement,
with BA, separate entrance, close
to Wheaton Metro. 240-264-7482
VIRGINIA
Roommates
Springfield— $850, furnished basement, 1/2ba, and shared 1 ba, free
WiFi, convenient 703-912-5616
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Out-of-Town
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DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
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Office Space, Rent
FRIENDSHIP HEIGHTS
Office/Retail space available Signature Townhouse
1,000 Square Feet
Contact WC Smith (202-408-3200)
WILLIAM K. LEWIS, Substitute Trustee
Richard E. Hagerty
Troutman Sanders LLP
1850 Towers Crescent Plaza, Suite 500
Tysons Corner, VA 22182
(703) 734-4326
January 11, 18, 2018
12153485
FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE
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C3748 10x5.25
FROM "NO
873
Fairfax County
SF
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $337,500.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.625000% dated
October 26, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 17907,
Page 0313, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on February 14, 2018 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0173 13022122
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-265076.
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
Prince William County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
9063 Silver Maple Court,
Manassas, VA 20110
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
ENROLL IN EASY PAY TODAY
873
TRUSTEE SALE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HOWARD COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Jan. 11, 18, 2018
Democracy Dies in Darkness
873
Howard County
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S0833-2 10x3
THE DISTRICT EDITION
THE WASHINGTON POST
THURSDAY, JANUARY 11, 2018
Local Living
A world of difference
How to help a child with learning issues thrive, at school and in life. PAGE 14
Home Board games are having a big moment.
Experts share their favorites and talk about how to
incorporate them in entertaining. 8
Gardening Ready to chop
down an old, decaying
tree? Not so fast. 12
Wellness How grocery
stores try to influence
your shopping. 13
On Parenting What to do
about a preschooler who
won’t stop biting. 16
2
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Home Front
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the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
ON THE COVER
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LOCAL LIVING STAFF
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Home
HOW TO
Choose an HVAC maintenance plan
BY
J EANNE H UBER
Q: The main floors of my three-
story townhouse get heat and air
conditioning from a Trane
natural gas furnace with an
outside air conditioner unit. The
basement apartment has a
Lennox heat pump. I want to
arrange a maintenance plan for
these systems, but prices vary
greatly, as do the services
included. I’ve seen everything
from a 10-minute check of the
gauge to longer cleaning of
inside bits. How do I select a
good company, and what
maintenance tasks should they
do? Should they clean the filter?
Change the humidifier pad?
Mount Pleasant, Va.
A: You’re not alone in
experiencing the frustration of
trying to figure out what a
maintenance contract should
include. More than a decade ago,
the Air Conditioning Contractors
of America, a trade association,
recognized that heating,
ventilating and air conditioning
contractors were using many
different approaches for
inspecting and maintaining
equipment. As the association
says on its website, “There was
no way to determine if the many
types of ‘seasonal tune-ups’,
‘clean and checks’, and
‘maintenance services’
performed on HVAC equipment
were equivalent.” So the
association developed checklists,
including the minimum tasks
that should be done during a
maintenance check.
One of those guides is spot-on
for your needs, because it covers
maintenance of equipment in
one- and two-family dwellings of
three stories or less. You can
download it at the association’s
website, acca.org/industry/
quality. This document includes
a checklist for inspecting and
adjusting gas furnaces on pages 7
to 9; one for your main air
conditioner (including the
evaporator coils inside and the
condensing unit outside) on
page 14; and one for the
basement heat pump (listed as
air-to-air heat pump condenser)
on page 16. Just skimming these
sections makes it clear that a
company that merely checks
ISTOCK
Online guides can help homeowners negotiate maintenance contracts for heating/ventilating systems.
gauges isn’t doing an adequate
job. The company should do a
whole list of things, including
checking that electrical
connections are tight and
inspecting the heat exchanger
for signs of corrosion, cracks or
other problems.
The association’s website also
includes a “find a contractor”
service that allows you to search
by zip code for members near
you. Whether you confine your
interviews to companies listed
there or consult with others, you
can use the association’s
checklists to ensure that the
services a company offers
include the items that the
industry considers necessary.
You’re unlikely to find the same
wording, however. Heating and
air conditioning companies
usually start with the industry
guidelines and then tweak them
to “make it into your own” list of
service points, said Ryan
Bramble, operations manager for
Aire Serv Heating and Air
Conditioning in Front Royal, Va.
(855-259-2280; aireserv.com),
which is listed on the
association’s website and serves
your community.
In some cases, the industry
guidance is vague. For example,
regarding the two issues you
raise — whether the service
company should clean the filter
and change the humidifier pad
— the checklists say only to
inspect and clean or change if
necessary. One reason for that:
Equipment varies. In these cases,
it pays to read what the
manufacturer of your equipment
recommends. Lennox, for
example, recommends replacing
one-inch pleated filters on its air
conditioners once a month (a
homeowner task), but says that a
pro should replace all other filter
sizes at an annual maintenance
visit.
You can learn other useful
things by reading the
manufacturers’ maintenance
guidelines. For a natural gas
furnace, the Trane website offers
tips for an annual maintenance
check that homeowners can do,
along with advice about when a
pro should be brought in. If
family finances are tight, it
might be tempting to skip a
professional maintenance
contract and just call in help if
something troubling turns up,
especially because many of the
steps seem simple. You do a
visual inspection, vacuum out
the furnace cabinet, check the
belt for fraying and loose tension
(Can you push it down more
than ½ inch?) and change the
furnace filter.
However, there is a difference
between how a homeowner can
check things and what a pro can
accomplish, Bramble said. A
homeowner can check whether
flames are mostly yellow or
orange, rather than blue — a sign
that the gas isn’t burning
completely, which not only
wastes money but also increases
the risk of carbon monoxide’s
getting into living spaces. But a
pro with the right equipment
and an appropriate to-do list will
be able to determine oxygen and
carbon monoxide levels, flue
temperature and other details,
allowing the furnace to be
adjusted for optimum
performance.
Whether you need a
maintenance contract depends
partly on your personal costbenefit calculations. Some
companies promise priority
service and reduced rates for
service calls to customers who
have maintenance contracts.
There is also the peace of mind
that comes from having someone
with an experienced eye do the
inspection. On the other hand, if
you hire someone who does little
beyond changing the furnace
filter, you are wasting money.
Other than following
instructions on the package
about which side should face
away from the fan, this task is a
no-brainer. No homeowner
needs a pro to do that.
Have a problem in your home?
Send questions to
localliving@washpost.com. Put “How
To” in the subject line, tell us where
you live and try to include a photo.
The green pages.
Did you know? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
NF407 4x1
3
DC
2/1/18
1/21/18
Cyprus Air Heating and Cooling
164 Reviews as of 1/9/2018
1/21/18
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the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
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SPLURGE OR SAVE
The ne plus ultra of purples
BY
MEGAN MCDONOUGH
Usher in the new year by infusing a bright new color, like Ultra Violet, an
intense purple that the Pantone Color Institute has dubbed the “it” color of
2018, into your home decor.
Describing it as “dramatically provocative and
thoughtful,” Pantone says the color communicates
“originality, ingenuity and visionary thinking that
points us toward the future.”
New York design duo Jamie Drake and Caleb
Drake and Anderson
Anderson of Drake/Anderson offered some
suggestions on using the rich, vibrant shade at home.
“Ultra Violet is a dynamic, bold hue, and we suggest going bold with its
application,” Drake and Anderson said in an email. “Use it on the walls for
drama, or upholster a sofa in the rich color.”
Even if you’d prefer it in smaller doses, “there isn’t a combination Ultra
Violet won’t work with,” they added. “It all depends on how you play with
the shade, tone and quantity.”
megan.mcdonough@washpost.com
$1,470
Kathryn McCoy Design large amethyst
votive (bergdorfgoodman.com)
$6,130
Aurora lamps in wisteria ($6,130 for
two, christopherspitzmiller.com)
$211.99
Purple leather Moroccan pouf ottoman
(overstock.com)
$3,079
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
Relic RLC01-95 9-by-12-foot rug
(modernrugs.com)
$469.50
Wing Lounge Chair by Modway
(truthincraft.com)
$34.95
Amethyst tealight
(zgallerie.com)
$199.98
Purple Haze double gourd table
lamps ($199.98 for two, lampsplus.com)
$129.99
Purple Moroccan leather pouf
(ikramdesign.com)
$1,998.95
Kaleen Relic purple indoor handcrafted
Southwestern 9-by-12-foot rug
(lowes.com)
$228.85
Fine Mod Imports swan chair
(katerno.com)
PRODUCT PHOTOS FROM RETAILERS
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Faux foam, mock maple: How to spot
pitfalls in furniture labels
ISTOCK
BY
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
A
E LISABETH L EAMY
mericans spend more
than $100 billion a year
on furniture, and often
we’re not getting what
we thought we paid for. Furniture
labels are confusing — frequently
downright misleading — and the
government no longer specifically oversees their content. Furniture makers and sellers are still
supposed to adhere to the Federal
Trade Commission Act, which
bars “unfair or deceptive acts,”
but that’s it. In 2002, the FTC
rescinded its specific guidelines
for the household furniture industry.
Today the exact practices those
guidelines used to prohibit are
rampant. “In my 20 years working in the furniture industry, I
have seen standards relaxed as a
result of the FTC changes,” said
Jennifer Litwin, author of “Best
Furniture Buying Tips Ever.”
“This has hurt consumers shopping in both the low-end and
high-end markets.”
John Smith, designer and manufacturer at Willem Smith FurnitureWorks in Fairfax, Va., says
deceptive marketing is frustrating for “the good guys” in the
industry. “Although the adage
‘you get what you pay for’ frequently holds true, it would be
helpful if you ‘knew what you
paid for’ as well,” Smith said. Most
don’t, and because of the infrequency of furniture purchases, if
the buyer has been deceived, it’s
not their fault.
Here are several common furniture labeling problems, along
with advice for how to forge your
own solutions.
cordingly.
Misrepresented wood
The old FTC guideline said
manufacturers should not use
wood names on their labels unless the piece was made of “solid
wood of the type named.” In other
words, calling a piece of furniture
“oak” because it was coated in
oak-colored stain or clad in oak
veneer was against the rules. I
once purchased a table labeled
“dark cherry,” a desk labeled
“brown cherry” and a nightstand
labeled “horizon maple” and had
a craftsman slice them in half
with a chain saw so that we could
see what they were really made of.
None of them contained the type
of tree listed on the label. Instead,
they were just particle board and
plywood.
What to do: Furniture sellers
used to have to put all the details
of a piece’s construction on the
sales tag. Today it’s important to
check any additional information
on brochures or websites to get
the full story. Furniture made of
solid wood stained to look like
another wood is not a bad thing,
as long as it’s disclosed. Veneers
are not inherently bad, either, as
long as you’re aware and don’t
count on refinishing them someday. To spot particle board, look at
the back, peer inside drawers and
turn the piece over to see the
bottom. Finally, feel the surface of
the furniture. If you can’t feel the
grain at all, it could be laminate.
Laminate is basically plastic with
a wood pattern laser-printed onto
it. All of these alternatives have
their place, but you should know
what you’re getting and pay ac-
Misrepresented leather
“Bonded leather” is the scourge
of the upholstered furniture industry. I foolishly purchased a
bonded leather office chair for my
own home several years ago. A
few months later, the “leather”
surface started peeling off because it wasn’t leather at all.
Bonded leather actually consists
of a thin plastic front, a fabric
middle and ground up leather
particles on the back. It’s been the
subject of consumer lawsuits and
industry hand-wringing, but it’s
still out there. The FTC does
maintain a leather labeling
guideline, which says manufacturers should disclose the
amount of ground leather in
bonded leather, but it doesn’t
specifically apply to furniture.
What to do: If you want real
leather furniture, avoid the labels
“genuine leather,” “bonded leather,” “bicast leather” and “PU
leather” — which stands for polyurethane leather. Instead, Smith,
who runs a leather accreditation
course for the design industry,
says to look for leather labeled
“full grain” or “top grain.” But
even those labels are sometimes
manipulated. I bought a chair
described as “rich 100 percent
split grain cow hide” and sent it to
a lab for testing. It turned out to
be plastic. To guard against that,
consider the price. If it’s too cheap
to be true, it isn’t true.
Misrepresented fabric
Real linen is made from fibers
found in the flax plant. It’s prized
because it’s natural, durable and
breathable, so it stays cool in the
summer. Unfortunately, Litwin —
who has gone undercover to more
than 500 furniture stores across
the country — says she increasingly sees other fabrics passed off
as linen. “A lot of stores are selling
fabric marked ‘linen’ in neutral
colors, when really it’s just a
cheaper polyester blend,” Litwin
said.
What to do: Again, go beyond
the sale tag. Ask the seller for
paperwork documenting the actual fiber content of the upholstery or look online. Last resort,
request the material safety data
sheet for the fabric. Furniture
fabrics are required to be fire
resistant, so they are tested at
labs, and this document should
also state the fiber content of the
fabric.
Misrepresented foam
There’s been a backlash against
polyurethane foam because it’s a
petroleum product. Enter “soy
foam.” It’s a feel-good label that
eco-conscious consumers seem to
like. Unfortunately, according to
Smith, cushions labeled “soy
foam” are actually hybrids and
are almost certainly made from
far less soy foam than they are
polyurethane foam. “Soy may be
great and green, but the percentage is minimal,” Smith said.
“Don’t be misled by a marketeer’s
purposely obtuse description into
believing that your sofa is a reconstituted field of organic soybeans.
It’s not.”
What to do: Ask for documentation of what percentage of the
foam is actually derived from soy.
Then decide whether you are
willing to pay a premium for it.
For this and any furniture advertised as “green,” look for outside
certifications by groups such as
Greenguard rather than taking
the store’s word for it.
“AHFA is committed to educating its members about the importance of truth in marketing and
advertising,” said Patricia Bowling of the American Home Furnishings Alliance. However, she
pointed out that most of AHFA’s
members are manufacturers and
importers, not retailers. And, of
course, consumers interact with
the retailer. Because of that, a few
more tips:
• Get it in writing. See whether
the store manager will give you
written documentation of what
materials the piece is made of.
• Ask about a warranty. Many
furniture stores and manufacturers don’t offer them, but if you are
making a large purchase, perhaps
they will create one just for you.
• Know the return policy.
That includes who has to get the
furniture back to the warehouse
and whether there is a restocking
fee.
• Pay with a credit card. Some
cards automatically extend your
warranty. Plus, if you have a dispute, you can withhold payment
while the card company helps you
work it out.
localliving@washpost.com
Elisabeth Leamy hosts the podcast
“Easy Money.” She is a 13-time Emmy
winner and a 25-year consumer
advocate for programs such as
“Good Morning America.” Connect
with her at leamy.com and
@ElisabethLeamy.
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1/26/18
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ENTERTAINING
In golden age of board games, take a turn as host
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
BY
M ARIE E LIZABETH O LIVER
Growing up, everyone in my
family received a board game for
Christmas. We’d spend the lazy
days that followed jumping in
and out of mysterious worlds,
word puzzles and intricate versions of charades. But as we grew
up and moved out, the fading
stacks of cardboard began collecting dust, and Netflix took over as
our new post-holiday ritual. That
was, until a few years ago.
Inspired by an excuse to indulge in spiced rum cocktails and
bored with our streaming queue,
my siblings and I invited out-oftown cousins over to our parents’
house, broke out some of the old
standbys, and started a new holiday tradition that resulted in us
adding a few games to our adult
Christmas lists.
Apparently, we’re not alone.
“By our calculations, we are in
the golden age of board games,”
says Kyle Engen, founder and
steward of operations at the Interactive Museum of Gaming and
Puzzlery.
Matthew Hudak, toys and
games analyst with Euromonitor
International, agrees, citing a recent market report that sales of
games and puzzles grew by
15 percent in 2016. “It’s something that has been bubbling up
for years now, but 2016 was the
most influential year for board
games,” he says. “It’s massive.
There were more than 5,000
board games introduced into the
U.S. market last year.”
According to Hudak, traditional board games are still the bulk of
the market, but hobby board
games, catered for adults, pushed
the category’s growth to the next
level. “It’s become a new go-to
social activity,” he adds.
There’s plenty of speculation
about what’s driving the boom —
video games, the Internet, millennials preferring to socialize at
home, hygge-style — but Barry
“BJ” Rozas, a lawyer from Louisiana who moonlights as a board
game reviewer, says it really
comes down to one thing: “Today’s games are better.”
Rozas, a veteran gamer who
created the blog Board Game
Gumbo to share his passion for
hobby games, credits creative
game designers with getting people excited about board games
again. Some of his favorites for
beginners include: Ticket to Ride,
Carcassonne and Pandemic.
“Very few people ask me for
Candy Land anymore,” says Kathleen Donahue, whose popular
game shop Labyrinth on Capitol
Hill is celebrating its seventh
Great games
Looking to spice up your game
night? Try one of these expert
picks.
Junk
Art
“It’s a modern-day, really cool,
artsy Jenga. It’s easy for people to
jump in and out.” — Kathleen
Donahue, Labyrinth
Best for: New gamers.
Pandemic
“It’s a cooperative story-based
game, where you act as CDC
workers.” — Kathleen Donahue,
Labyrinth
Best for: A tough crowd. It’s
one of the most popular games in
the country.
Werewords
ISTOCK
anniversary this year. “People
come in and say, ‘I’ve been playing
Pandemic lately and I love it. Do
you have any other recommendations?’ ”
According to Donahue, one of
this year’s biggest sellers, Codenames, is also a perfect party
game. “Everyone who came to my
Christmas Eve dinner loved it,”
she says. “My stepson, my mom,
my college roommate, my 10year-old son.”
Which leads her to one of the
other benefits of incorporating a
board game into your next gathering: “Games give that framework to interact with people in an
easy manner,” says Donahue, who
hosts more than 700 gaming
events each year.
“The rules have already been
set up, so you can be in a social
situation and relate to people on a
non-superficial level without being too serious.”
And that is something entertaining experts have been preaching for a long time.
“We have a library of game-related books, including six or seven that are from the ’30s and ’40s,
on how to throw a party,” says
Engen, referring to his collection
at the museum. “They have instructions for social ‘games,’ such
as everyone putting each other’s
coat away or having everyone sit
back-to-back and say something
about themselves.”
Fast-forward 80 years, and al-
“Very few people ask me
for Candy Land
anymore. People come
in and say, ‘I’ve been
playing Pandemic lately
and I love it. Do you
have any other
recommendations?’ ”
Kathleen Donahue of Labyrinth, a
game shop on Capitol HIll
though old-school ice breakers
may feel a little forced or awkward, a board game can be the
perfect thing to bring everyone
together in a fun way — especially
when you’re inviting friends from
different circles or co-workers,
says Amanda Saiontz Gluck, creator of the blog Fashionable Hostess.
Gluck recommends setting the
stage for your game night in the
family room with a laid-back atmosphere around comfy couches.
Her No. 1 tip? Bring everything
you need for the party to the
coffee table and have everything
accessible, so people aren’t disengaging to go to the kitchen or to
the bar.
“Bring an ice bucket with wine,
washingtonpost.com
Chat Thursday at 11 a.m. John Loecke and Jason Oliver Nixon of the
design firm Madcap Cottage join staff writer Jura Koncius for our weekly
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beer or Champagne, and glasses
set up,” she recommends. “Serve
good munching food, such as a
cheese board you can prep ahead
of time or crudites, and get cozy
around the table.”
Gluck says during the winter
months, she loves having extra
pillows and throw blankets ready,
especially ones with warm textures, such as cashmere, fur and
velvet. Alternatively, she says, you
can also incorporate a board
game or two alongside a cozy
drink display at the end of a more
formal dinner party.
“Once everyone’s full, sit down
with hot tea and hot chocolate
and dessert around the table,” she
suggests.
According to Rozas, if you (or
your guests) haven’t opened a
game box since middle school,
there are a few common pitfalls to
avoid.
“Have a set time,” he says. “I
remember the first time I
planned a game night, some of
the participants were worried.
They pictured the old Dungeons
& Dragons days when we played
for 12 hours.”
And, he adds, “don’t overwhelm people with a giant stack
of games you don’t know the rules
to,” he adds. “Pick a couple and
learn the rules ahead of game
night. There’s plenty of YouTube
videos and tutorials on Punchboard Media.”
And who knows, once you get
going, you might just make board
game night a regular occurrence.
“Every Thursday night, I play
games, and it’s a time I don’t have
to think or worry about anything,” Donahue says. “Once people start that, they don’t want to
give it up.”
“One person knows a secret
word, and they’re trying to get
everyone to guess the word. The
werewolf is trying to get people
not to guess it.” — BJ Rozas, Board
Game Gumbo
Best for: Good friends. “Anyone
who enjoys the party game Mafia.
There’s a lot of communication
and a lot of laughs.”
Captain
Sonar
“It’s a good bonding game.
You’re put in a strange scenario.”
— Kyle Engen, Interactive Museum of Gaming and Puzzlery
Best for: People who are getting to know each other.
Hotshots
“It’s a cooperative game, so
everyone is working to win together. You work as firefighters
out in the wilderness. Everybody
has a unique role and works
together to beat back fires.” — BJ
Rozas, Board Game Gumbo
Best for: Mixed age groups,
noncompetitive crowds.
Kill
Doctor Lucky
“Clue was invented as a pastime during the blackout in the
Second World War. Now Kill Doctor Lucky is a game in which we’re
all invited back to the house, but
we can’t have anyone else see us.
It’s a game that happens before
the game of Clue. What if we’re
the ones who do the murder?” —
Kyle Engen, Interactive Museum
of Gaming and Puzzlery
Best for: Nostalgic gamers, “if
you’re okay with the moral ambiguity.”
New
York 1901
“When you throw out a map of
Manhattan from 1901 and tell
people, ‘we’re going to build out
the boroughs of New York,’ those
are themes people can instantly
get. It’s just competitive enough
that people aren’t getting their
feelings hurt.” — BJ Rozas, Board
Game Gumbo
Best for: Those in a time
crunch. “It plays in under an
hour.”
localliving@washpost.com
9
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HOME FRONT
The best way to make the most out of small storage space
Julie
Morgenstern
Organizing
and decluttering expert
Julie Morgenstern joined
staff writer
Jura Koncius
last week on
our Home
Front online
chat. Here is
sifting through when the mood
strikes.
an edited excerpt.
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
Q: I just purchased a condo with
limited closet space. Do you
have suggestions for getting the
most out of it? I’m looking for
organizing ideas for the very
small coat closet and kitchen.
A: There are many ways to
stretch limited storage. Get out
of the business of bulk
purchasing, which can be great
if you live in a big home but
doesn’t work for small spaces.
Online services allow you to
“subscribe” to basic household
supplies, which automatically
come to your door every month
or so. Assign specific functions
to each closet. Get furniture
with storage: end tables with
drawers, coffee tables with liftup lids, etc. And use vertical
space. The inside of every door
of every closet can be used for
hooks and racks and shelves. See
if there is a wall where you can
add an armoire, shelves or
storage.
Q: My problem is paper. Cards,
handwritten notes, articles
ripped from magazines or
newspapers. Do I create a
miscellaneous paper file?
Suggestions, please, on where
and how to start organizing
these random but important
pieces of paper.
A: Never create anything called
“miscellaneous.” It’s the easiest
way to clean up, but it’s
impossible to retrieve anything
from a file or container called
“miscellaneous,” because even 10
minutes later, we can’t
remember what we meant by
“miscellaneous.” You need to
break paper into specific
categories and label each
according to how you would
look for it. Ask yourself, “Under
what circumstances would I
look for this piece of paper?”
Cards and handwritten notes
might go under “Memorabilia”
or “Thoughtful words” or
“Friends and family.” Articles of
interest might be “Conversation
starters” or “Knowledge” or
“Things that tickle my funny
bone” (as one client of mine
did).
Q: I just cleaned out my clothes
KELLY/MOONEY PRODUCTIONS/COURTESY OF JULIE MORGENSTERN
A master closet organized by productivity expert Julie Morgenstern, who offered tips on how to stretch
limited storage space in her recent chat with The Washington Post.
closet and I have several bags to
donate and consign. What is the
best way to consign these days?
In the past I’ve been surprised at
how stores will not take all
clothes, even when they are
from top stores. They seem
much more selective than
before. Do you recommend
working with some of the online
consignment companies?
A: We are in a time when there
is so much stuff, and people
want to get rid of it, so giving
things away (or selling them) is
not always so easy. Some things
to keep in mind:
Find out what sorts of items
consignment shops near you
want, then send them only those
things.
Check out websites like
LetGo and AptDeco (in several
cities across the country), where
you can post photos of things
you are selling and people in
your area can buy them.
Recognize that we often
cherish things we’ve owned
more than others would, so
unless things are in exceptional
condition, it can be hard to sell
them.
Q: I am normally very
organized. I moved and started
a new job last year, and my
organizing skills seem to have
stayed behind. I had plans to get
my house and things at work
organized fairly quickly, but it’s
been six months and I’m still a
mess. The house appears to be
neat and clean, but if you look in
the cupboards and closets you’ll
see it’s really not. Things that
belong together are not
together. Things are shoved into
places where they don’t belong.
Thinking about what needs to
be done to get it right
overwhelms me. I’m the same at
work. To make matters worse, I
am putting off doing things I
need to do because they
suddenly seem so difficult. I’m
not sure exactly why I went from
being super organized to a
complete mess. I’m not totally
happy about the move/new job,
so that may be part of it.
Suggestions for getting back on
track?
A: I think you answered your
own question: Not being happy
about the move/new job
probably led to resistance to
settling in and creating a new
“nest” in either place. You don’t
really want to put roots down.
But you are suffering from the
chaos and should put your
organizing skills to work for
you. Remember, the more
organized you are, the more
mobile you are. So getting
organized to make your life
function better in the moment
doesn’t really tie you to your
new job or home. It just makes
life easier so you have more
choices and freedom. It’s a great
way of taking care of yourself in
a place that is otherwise not as
nurturing. So nurture yourself
and get things in order one
room at a time, starting with the
room you spend the most time
in.
Q: What’s the best way to
organize scarves? They are a big
jumble in my drawer.
A: Scarves work best on a series
of hooks on the inside of a closet
door (maybe two rows of hooks,
one at the top of the door, one in
the middle). Or, if they are
beautiful, you can hang them on
decorative hooks on a bedroom
wall, as a design feature.
Q: I am the repository for a lot
of inherited memorabilia from
my family: books, photographs,
old documents, etc. It all means
a lot to me, and I don’t want to
get rid of any of it, but I need to
somehow organize it so that it
takes up less space. It’s now
distributed throughout my
house, mainly in an assortment
of boxes. Any suggestions would
be appreciated.
A: Memorabilia is best enjoyed
when it is displayed and
accessible. When it sits in boxes
it’s rarely gone through or
appreciated. For anything that
remains in boxes, perhaps you
can get a big armoire, or
beautiful piece of storage
furniture, divide the
memorabilia into categories
(e.g. journals, letters, photos,
etc.), and transfer each category
into a beautiful labeled archival
box, allowing yourself or other
family members the pleasure of
Q: I need a way to contain
things in my daughter’s
bathroom. It is the world’s
smallest full bath, in our
basement. The previous owners
put in a short cabinet above the
toilet that will hold all her stuff,
but right now it is just sort of
thrown in the cabinet willy-nilly.
When I went down to clean it
out, I discovered mold on the
bottom shelf from old spills,
fresh Band-Aids in their
packages stuck to the shelf and
lots of trash. I know I can’t make
her keep it clean, but if it were a
little more attractive, perhaps
she would be inspired to do so. I
plan to clean it (not sure how)
and repaint it (along with the
rest of the bathroom), and then
what? Baskets for everything?
Money is tight. Ideas?
A: In a small bathroom, there
are typically four areas to find
storage: the medicine chest
(which is best used for everyday
items like skin care,
toothbrushes, etc. — store
medicines outside the bathroom
in a closet or cabinet); under the
sink (put stacking pullout
plastic or mesh drawers on
either side of the water pipe to
get the most out of that space);
the shower area (add a shower
caddie for shampoo, etc.); and
over the toilet (line the shelves
with acrylic or metal mesh
drawer dividers for easier
cleaning and a more attractive
look).
Q: My young daughter and I are
taking an online drawing class.
It’s great! But we now have
pencils, charcoals and erasers
lying around as well as a 12-inch
model of a person and very large
sketchbooks. Is there any
sensible way to organize these
materials while making it fairly
easy to pull it out when it’s time
to draw?
A: Designate a place in the
house that will become the “Art
Zone.” Then assign a cabinet or
drawers to hold all the paper
and supplies. Within the
cabinet, any sort of small
containers that group similar
items (charcoals in one, colored
pencils in another, erasers in
another) will make it fun and
easy to find things and put them
away.
localliving@washpost.com
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read the rest of this transcript and
submit questions to the next chat,
Thursday at 11 a.m. at
live.washingtonpost.com.
Home Sales
D I S T RIC T OF C OL UMBIA
These sales data recorded by the
D.C. Office of Tax and Revenue
were provided by Black Knight
Financial Services. For information
about other residential real estate
transactions, visit
washingtonpost.com/homesales.
NORTHWEST
Aberfoyle Pl., 3284-Joel R. and
Arielle K. Elliott to Deborah A. and
Matthew C. Virtue, $860,000.
Ashmead Pl., 2310, No. 202Michelle Nawar to Josephine
Tucker, $366,000.
Belmont St., 1451, No. 414Chanda M. Mcreasy to Sara R.
Lappano, $480,000.
Buchanan St., 918-Nicholas W.
Vilelle to Laura and Kenneth Olsen,
$721,000.
Caroline St., 1515-James David
McFadden to Sean and Katie
O’neil, $1.11 million.
Cathedral Ave., 4201, No. 112EScott Schulke and the Towers
Condominium Association to
Bahiroo and Daria Karimian,
$142,000.
Chevy Chase Pkwy., 5504-Lustig
Associates Corp. to Stuart F. Delery
and Richard M. Gervase,
$2.8 million.
Church St., 1450, No. 503-Mohan
U. and Jean U. Kumar to Margaret
Mary Frericks and Christopher
Michael Iavarone, $799,000.
Columbia Rd., 1880, No. 103Christopher J. Geoffrey Perceval
and Nicola Alice Perceval to Craig
D. and Brittani Boise, $525,000.
Connecticut Ave., 4707, No. 616Katia D’hulster to Kevin Liang,
$399,990.
Connecticut Ave., 5402, No. 405Kimberly E. Sedmak and Bruce F.
Lee to Jennifer Simone Padgett,
$299,000.
Corey Pl., 3714-Andrew M. and
Erin H. Ross to Shelly Huchel and
Brett Guiley, $1.5 million.
Decatur St., 919-Callie Verner and
John Eideberg to Regina M. Garza
and Michael L. Heise, $700,000.
E St., 915, No. 909-Manya Solos to
Kaiyomarz Pesi and Zareen
Daruvalla Mohta, $472,000.
Fairmont St., 1306-Kelly Higashi
to Jason Barlow, $1.05 million.
Fordham Rd., 3812-Amie
Carabetta to Evan Cox and William
Sheehan, $1.65 million.
Garfield St., 4323-Rupsha 2013
Inc. to Christopher J. Tavlarides
and Dana Lee, $2.45 million.
Geranium St., 1124-Virginia Ruth
Mahoney and Sawdatou Mahoney
Edwards to David M. Edwards and
Ekundayo Mahoney, $457,219.
Harrison St., 4509-Jason and
Deborah Samenow to Sean R. and
DC
Emily K. Tyler, $875,000.
Ingomar St., 3718-Ilari Lindy and
Lisa O. Donoghue-Lindy to Peter
Wallstein and Stacey Bosshardt,
$1.4 million.
Irving St., 1676-Susan E. Ohle to
Fabian Daniel Seiderer,
$1.25 million.
Kalorama Rd., 1910, No. 403Elizabeth and Martha S. Carriger to
Gretchen McCune, $850,000.
Kansas Ave., 4616-Shailesh and
Sudipti Kumar to Cynthia Newell
and Thomas Bartholomew,
$890,000.
Kilbourne Pl., 1826-William E. and
Lucille N. Kenworthy to Kevin M.
Storm and Claudia A. Bancalari,
$1.05 million.
L St., 2425, No. 412-James Robert
Graham III and Jane Ellen Henney
to Howard Knee and Carol A.
Schneiderman, $760,000.
Linnean Terr., 5148-U.S. Bank to
David Marcellus Dale, $851,000.
Lowell St., 3611-Robert Jack and
Ann Parker McKeehan to Simon
Andrew and Meghan Carroll
Latcovich, $2 million.
M St., 910, No. 712-Nader Lotfi
and William Therlen to Samantha
Jill Langer and Eric Robertson
Walzer, $1.25 million.
Macomb St., 3207-Elisavietta
Artamonoff Ritchie to Melissa A.
Vanouse and Matthew S. Caywood,
$1.31 million.
Missouri Ave., 409-Thomas
Michael Flaherty and Heimy
Salgado to William Kevin Grant and
Mary Knight, $540,000.
N St., 27, No. 2-Cynthai K. Von
Holle and Courtney M. Dohoney to
Angela C. Baker and Benjamin S.
Demers, $680,000.
N St., 1300, No. 805-Gregory A.
Keil and Charles T. Keil Jr. to
Charles T. Wysocki, $680,000.
Nebraska Ave., 5915-Kevin D.
Nichols to Cletus R. and Lisa S.
Willems, $882,500.
New Mexico Ave., 2801, No. 711Barbara L.E. Cristy to Stuart A. and
Frances P. Kenworthy, $895,000.
Ontario Rd., 2714, No. 3Christopher and Alexandra Dodds
to Paul S. Goldberg, $710,000.
P St., 1767, No. 4-John L.
Kupcinski to Can B. Celik,
$672,500.
Paper Mill Ct., 1055-James D.
McCartney to Sheng Tao and
Katherine Thill Li, $640,000.
Park Rd., 1309, No. 302-James W.
and Chrsitina M. Bixby to Gloria K.
Aggrey, $739,000.
Plymouth St., 2020-David J.
Villano and Timothy D. Branner to
Gabriel Fernando Santiago and
Elisabeth Gretke Maria Kramer,
$1.5 million.
Princeton Pl., 747-Nancy Sanchez
and Benjamin W. Hogan to George
and Rebecca Brown, $795,000.
Q St., 1408, No. 22-David Van
Fleet Bloys to Katherine M. Sullivan
and David M. Cruz, $840,000.
Q St., 2237-Matthew B. Colangelo
and Anne Kimball Small to Akio
Tagawa, $2.15 million.
R St., 1401, No. 405-Christopher
Michael Iavarone and Margaret
Mary Frericks to Daniel Vukelich,
$564,000.
Rhode Island Ave., 55, No. 1Johnny Molina to Dustin Allen and
Tiffany Yoon, $779,000.
Rhode Island Ave., 1441, No. 706Dana Alan Gausepohl to
Paraskevas Kourtsounis,
$503,500.
River Rd., 4509-Jaime and
Carmen E. Ramon to Maria J.
Martinez Hutter and Pablo A.
Pereira, $1.19 million.
Rosemont Ave., 2021-Adam
Robert Prescott and Kathryn
Monteith Levett to Eugene Ross
and Christine McCormack Hamory,
$1.07 million.
S St., 1625, No. 6-Andrew D. and
Micelle Y. Hallmark to Timothy
Phang, $255,000.
Seaton St., 1720-Christopher C.
Belcher to Evan and Yafen Evon
Chen, $635,000.
Sherier Pl., 4955-Joanne Doddy
Fort to Whitney J. Jordan,
$1.07 million.
Sherman Cir., 36-Cheryl Diane
Miller to Julio Henriquez,
$470,000.
Stuyvesant Pl., 3361-Martin
Hamburger and Mary Eliza Reilly to
Robert J. Jundman and Elana J.
Tyrangiel, $1.2 million.
T St., 1825, No. 404-Myriam
Hamdallah to Laura Chi Okpala,
$404,000.
Tunlaw Rd., 2426-Alan M. Berube
and Cristina L. Boccuti to Jack
Morgan and Adrienne Showler,
$970,000.
Underwood St., 32-Options Inc. to
Alexander Firer and Kristen Chellis,
$539,000.
V St., 150, No. V402-Elizabeth A.
Dooghan to Elizabeth and Robert
Dean Macgill, $500,000.
Van Ness St., 2939, No. 1019Vijay and Chandra Nilekani to
Howard Horwitz, $325,000.
Walnut St., 28-Kevin V. Werner
and Christian L. Dimaano to
Charles Morgan and Anna A.
Cooper, $736,000.
Western Ave., 7049-Michael W.
Koch to Barbara Polk and
Alexander Dixon, $1.06 million.
Fourth St., 1211, No. 2-Justin H.
and Mackenzie A. Oberst to Jason
and Rachelle Chan, $840,000.
Eighth St., 1609-Brian Mitchell
and Katie Marie Peters to Natacha
Ying Lam, $1.32 million.
10th St., 2120-Ali Reza Honarkar
and Debi Fox to Geoffrey Tate,
$1.33 million.
11th St., 2250, No. 402-Bryan H.
Curry to Dawson W. Cagle,
$920,000.
12th St., 1229, No. 204-Natalie
Hawwa to Kathryn Jameson and
Eduardo Pizarro, $777,000.
12th St., 2020, No. 112-David W.
Parham to Christopher Edge,
$764,900.
13th St., 3716-Woodie Head Jr. to
Abhijit Dutta, $650,000.
14th St., 2125, No. 330-Kristen
Nicole Howe to Ramzi Nahawi,
$605,000.
16th St., 2001, No. 102-Tanya
Stroh Caruso to Suhail Naber,
$335,000.
18th St., 1930, No. 2-Jeremy S.
Gold to Joon I. Kim and Boeui
Kang, $569,000.
23rd St., 1155, No. 6A-Square 696
Corp. to Frank and Anita Sciacca,
$2.67 million.
25th St., 1111, No. 307-James M.
Speyer and Paige Speyer Shirk to
Sioban F. Reyes, $610,000.
27th St., 1337-John Salamon to
Ken Nahshon and Leslie Klein,
$1.28 million.
31st St., 6425-H. Donald Messer
to Charles R. and Elizabeth Struse,
$887,500.
35th St., 3704-Richard Tyler and
Alyson Lee Curtis to David Neil
Greengrass and Jessica Scott
Reimelt, $1.05 million.
38th St., 4105-Stephen D. and
Aline W. Quint to Sudhi Ranjan
Mukherjee and Venila Reddy
Kodmur, $1.3 million.
42nd St., 4614-Phillip N. and
Martha C. Edmondson to John and
Monica Keller, $952,500.
47th St., 4721-Michael Tarkan and
Sarah Starling Marshall to Stephen
and Mary Kletter, $1.24 million.
52nd St., 3825-Allison S. and John
Brenton Shaw to Laura and Jason
Puryear, $2.93 million.
SOUTHEAST
Bass Pl., 5004-Kiara D. Liverpool
to Derrick A. Simpson, $256,900.
Brandywine St., 642-Viola
Richardson and Lajuan Howard to
Vernell Wicker, $215,000.
Carolina Ave. N., 901-Katie
Spinello to Jonathan Pettibon,
$427,000.
D St., 1816-Tracy Nagelbush to
Jessica Rae and Sean Philip
Aucoin, $530,000.
E St., 1518-Kelly A. and Marc B.
Sawyer to Aisaku A. Pradhan and
Megan E. Rauscher, $1.07 million.
G St., 917-Haley Sawyer and
Clifford Orvedal to Elizabeth Venit
and Justin Paul Dietz, $840,000.
Howard Rd., 1427-Samuel
Perryman to Morgan Johnson,
$259,900.
Minnesota Ave., 2714-District of
Columbia Housing Authority to
Johnnie Mae Riggsbee, $310,000.
Orange St., 447-James West to
Brian King, $296,000.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1514-National
Residential Nominee Services to
David S. Boxer, $818,000.
Raleigh Pl., 651-Christopher C.
Jones to Mona Rayside, $282,000.
S St., 1311-U.S. Bank to Wan Li,
$241,500.
Southern Ave., 4360-Sybil W.
Barnes and Lillie R. Walker to Kim
Sharlise Berry, $306,500.
HOMES CONTINUED ON 21
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
NORTHEAST
A St., 1373-Gregory A. and Aileen
K. Alexander to William and
Katherine Telligman, $789,450.
Anacostia Ave., 149-Olyvie C.
Woodland to Michelle Freeman,
$265,000.
Bryant St., 207-Boulevard Corp. to
Matthew A. and Amanda M.
Bushell, $740,000.
C St., 1916-Kevin A. Horgan to
Matthew Bisanz and Catherine
Sprague, $759,000.
E St., 703-Gustavo F. Velasquez
Aguilar and Emily Velasquez to Joel
Micah Gamoran and Bridget Lynn
Hoffmann, $805,000.
Evarts St., 421, No. 1-Katherine
Leahy to Mary Catherine Ott,
$352,000.
Florida Ave., 1367, No. 301-Sarah
Faherty to Peter J. Najda and
Lauren E. Seffel, $470,000.
I St., 415-415 Eye St. Corp. to Britt
A. Lake, $515,000.
Just St., 5116-Howard N. Bierman
to Christopher Mancini, $160,000.
Lee St., 4919-Zunnobia B. Hakir to
Darren C. Jackson, $410,000.
Monroe St., 2419-Jonathan Todt
and Erin E. O’leary to Nathaniel C.
Kaine, $640,000.
Mount Olivet Rd., 966-Bayview
Loan Servicing Corp. to Eric James
Bushee, $240,000.
Nicholson St., 236-T. Denise Dove
to Ifeoluwadamilola and Akhi
Johnson, $410,000.
Otis St., 1825-Wells Fargo Bank to
Robert D. Paul, $275,000.
Sheriff Rd., 5093-5093 Sheriff
Road Corp. to Jovan Mitchell,
$310,000.
Vista St., 3202-Bayview Loan
Servicing Corp. to Andrea Anderson
and Christopher Byrd, $595,000.
Wylie St., 1239-Richard Geoffrey
and Paige P. Byrne to Thomas J.
and Sarah Carroll, $590,000.
Third St., 1927, No. 300-Federal
National Mortgage Association to
Stephanie Lynne Wolf, $253,000.
Fourth St., 2002, No. 1-Jamie
Lynn Brigham to Nancy T. Montoya,
$455,000.
Seventh St., 727-Kimberly S.
Neutzling to Marc G. Knobbe and
David Baillat, $779,000.
Ninth St., 816-Elena G. Babinecz
to Reza Shahabadi, $856,000.
10th St., 910-Henry and Rosa M.
Wilson to Laura E. Timmerman and
James Hunter Price, $680,000.
12th St., 326, No. 2-Arjun K. Mody
and Amee Garg to Randall Austin
Schrimsher, $808,000.
13th Pl., 4429-Hoyt A. and Maia
Coleman King to Adam AignerTreworgy and Susan Joyce Davis,
$720,000.
14th St., 107-Rudolph R. and Jerry
A. Robinson to Tamara E. Guillory,
$630,000.
20th St., 3922-Daniel C. Vock and
Mariana E. Gomez to Kevin Chi
Han Chan and Mary Patrice Tipton,
$525,000.
24th St., 526-Kareem R. and
Leslie M. Mansour to Norman
Eugene Morris Jr. and Angela J.
Palazzolo, $680,000.
44th St., 526-Lois Mayo and
Allison Rafawn Hunter Alvarado to
Wendell Pierre, $213,750.
11
12
DC
Home
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
Old trees will tell you when their time is up
Old magnolias
never die, they
just fade away.
That seems to be
the fate of the
most historic tree
Adrian
at the White
Higgins
House, a Southern
magnolia planted
GARDENING
by Andrew
Jackson and now
so ancient and fragile that part of
it was dismantled last month.
The decision to take down or
at least dismember an old tree is
neither easy nor always
objective, but professional
arborists are guided by a risk
assessment protocol that brings
a rationality to the process. The
evaluation assesses the tree’s
vigor, the thickness of its
sapwood shell, its disease
stresses, the state of the roots
and the like. Arborists also
consider its location and the
proximity to what they call
“targets” — property and people.
“A tree in the middle of the
woods is not a problem,” said
arborist Paul Wolfe of Integrated
Plant Care in Rockville, Md. “In
an urban area, that’s some
problem.”
The Jackson magnolia could
not be less out of the way. It
stands between the Rose Garden
and the west side of the South
Portico, and though sheltered by
the executive mansion, it is
buffeted by the rotor wash of the
presidential helicopter.
Gardeners, by the way, tend to
be highly ambivalent about
Southern magnolias. These
emblems of the Deep South are
stately and evergreen and have
exquisite blossoms, creamy white
chalices surrounding a column of
beautiful stamens. The fragrance
is sweet and lemony.
But the leaves are tough as old
boots, and they drop continually
from June until the fall. Also, it is
virtually impossible to grow
anything else beneath a
Magnolia grandiflora.
“It’s a wonderful tree, but in
my neighbor’s yard, not mine,”
Wolfe said.
Many of us live in older urban
properties where big trees sit
cheek by jowl with homes, cars
and with us.
There is a prevailing mentality
among many homeowners that
big old trees are inherently
threatening and should be
removed. This is sort of like
refusing to get on a plane
because it can crash.
With the 2012 derecho and
other destructive storms before
and since, “people are fearful
that large trees around their
houses might fall,” said Michael
Guercin of Branches Tree Experts
Tip of the Week
January is a good month to
purchase vegetable and flower
seeds — the early bird gets the
best selection — but it’s too early to
start the great majority of plants
indoors. Take the next month to set
up equipment and materials for
seed starting, which ramps up in
mid- to late February for the MidAtlantic.
— Adrian Higgins
ADRIAN HIGGINS/THE WASHINGTON POST
This white oak is one of the oldest at Arlington National Cemetery and shows evidence of remedial
pruning of damaged limbs. Large, ancient trees are not necessarily a threat, experts say.
in Kensington, Md. “We have had
to tell people these trees don’t
represent a danger and are safe.”
“The worst thing they can do is
have somebody take a very
healthy tree and hat-rack it
back,” said Wolfe, referring to the
practice of lopping the top
sections from trunks and limbs.
“And after the derecho there
were people who just took down
every tree on their property.”
If you’re worried about limbs
or whole trees crashing down,
what should you do? I would ask
a consulting arborist or one
certified by the International
Society of Arboriculture to offer
an expert opinion on a tree you’re
worried about, but an opinion
only. A consultation is typically
$75 to $150, Guercin said. This
removes any impulse to suggest
work to generate business.
Dead wood should be
removed, but experts will tell you
that decay and cavities alone are
not enough to condemn trees. It
comes down to the extent of the
decay and whether it reaches
into the roots, Guercin said.
“A tree with a cavity often
responds by growing reaction
wood” that strengthens it, said
Ed Milhous, an arborist in
Haymarket, Va. His firm is called
TreesPlease. “Anybody who says,
‘There’s a cavity in that tree, it
needs to be removed,’ is out of
line.”
An ancient tree with problems
can be managed: A decayed limb
might be removed, a fungal
disease addressed, soil
compaction mitigated.
Competent cabling is an effective
way to prevent an old tree from
breaking apart, at least for
several additional decades, but it
needs to be adjusted periodically
as the tree grows.
I asked Greg Huse, an urban
forester at Arlington National
Cemetery, to show me some of
the oldest trees in what is
Washington’s other national
arboretum (albeit across the
river in Virginia). The 624-acre
cemetery has approximately
8,800 trees, some as old as 300
years, and, yes, is a certified
arboretum. On a windswept hill
on the cemetery’s southern
fringes, Huse pointed out a dwarf
hackberry tree that is the cochampion in size in Virginia. I
noticed on the brow of a nearby
hill a large shade tree with its
main trunk skillfully removed
about one third of the way up.
This is an old black locust that
lost its central leader in a storm
but is otherwise a healthylooking specimen.
“It’s not that great-looking, but
when leafed out in the growing
season it’s going to have a
completely different look to it,”
he said. Huse then took me to a
specimen white oak in Section 2
below Arlington House that is
close to 100 feet tall, with limbs
as thick as the trunks of most
trees. It’s one of the oldest trees
on the property, with a broad
spreading silhouette. Three of
the old secondary leaders have
been removed, surgically, after
storm damage. The oak has
soldiered on beautifully.
Finally, he showed me an old
but low-growing littleleaf linden
with obvious decay in some of its
branches; it has been cabled and
braced. It is not a pretty tree, but
it’s one full of character and age,
and even on some of the decayed
branches it’s showing vigorous
growth.
Huse said the approach by the
cemetery’s team of arborists is to
keep a close eye on each tree,
prune out dead or damaged
wood, attend to storm damage,
but generally intervene as little
as possible. “We only like to take
a tree out if it’s dead or
irretrievably damaged in a big
storm,” he said.
Ultimately, the fate of an old
and compromised tree comes
down to the owner’s comfort
level for risk or to the
sentimental attachment to the
tree. “We find on older trees that
people are emotionally tied to
them and we go to incredible
lengths to keep trees up that
otherwise would fail,” said Jason
Grabosky, a professor of urban
forestry at Rutgers University.
“We try to engineer our way out
of the biology.”
Sometimes a tree appears vital
when it’s not. “We were
contracted to take down a very
large tulip tree in Chevy Chase,
and I thought it was perfectly
sound,” Wolfe said. When he cut
into it, the interior was hollow.
“There was no indication it
was rotten,” he said. “Now we are
further along” with diagnostic
tools.
If I had several old and
precious trees on my property, I
would develop a long-term
connection with an arborist I
trusted for their preventive care.
Old trees decline and die
(middle-aged ones, too), and
sometimes you have to accept
that a friend’s time has come.
The loss of a beloved tree can
provide its own silver lining: the
opportunity to put in sun-loving
perennials, shrubs or a new tree.
Most of my trees were planted
by me. Some are now large but
relatively young, and I have
positioned them a very safe
distance from the helipad.
adrian.higgins@washpost.com
@adrian_higgins on Twitter
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read past columns by Higgins at
washingtonpost.com/home.
Wellness
13
DC
ISTOCK
Supermarket mind games: How to outsmart them
BY
C HRISTY B RISSETTE
H
encourage you to buy certain
products. Sometimes those
scents go hand-in-hand with
samples — such as when you can
smell sausage cooking from the
meat section — and sometimes
grocery stores use machines to
pump scents such as apple pie or
chocolate chip cookies through
the air, drawing you toward the
bakery section. It’s called “scent
marketing,” and yes, it works.
The scents from sampling do
double duty — they draw you in
and encourage you to try the
product, and they make you hungry. Once you try a product,
you’re much more likely to purchase it. But even if you don’t buy
the product being sampled,
smelling the food and tasting a
tiny bit leaves you wanting more,
so you’re more likely to cave and
pick up foods that weren’t on
your list. How do you avoid
giving in? Never go to the store
on an empty stomach. Being
hungry while shopping always
leads to buying things you don’t
need — and that are not healthful.
Grocery store shelves are also
strategically laid out to sway your
purchases. Companies pay top
dollar to be placed at eye level,
especially when they’re marketing to children. Placing kidgeared (read: sugary and not so
healthful) cereals where kids can
see them is a major marketing
tactic used by manufacturers.
They know that if children can
get attached to a product and beg
their parents enough, chances
are good that the product will
end up in the cart. Get used to
saying no to the sugary cereals
and offer your kids the healthier
options that are typically at an
adult’s eye level.
All of the sales tactics that can
get you to buy less-nutritious
foods also provide opportunities
for supermarkets to help you
make healthier choices. Placing
more nutritious products at eye
level or sampling fruits and vegetables can boost their sales.
Some supermarkets have
rolled out “Guiding Stars” or
other similar programs to help
you identify healthful options —
and these programs have
worked. “Buy one get one free”
promotions or huge sales on
highly processed foods can trick
you into buying them to get a
deal, but the same goes for
healthful foods. Grocery stores
are also using savings programs
to encourage shopping for
healthful products, because great
value sells incredibly well.
When you’re done shopping,
there’s one more place that supermarkets can trick you: the
checkout aisle. They are typically
filled with inexpensive snacks,
such as candy bars and chips.
Supermarkets bank on you buying these things impulsively to
eat in the car. The good news is
that some grocery stores are now
providing more healthful snack
options at their checkouts. Shop
in those checkout lanes (they’re
usually marked) and opt for fruit
and nuts that are kept in stock.
My best advice for staying on
track while grocery shopping?
Plan your meals for the week,
write out a list of healthful items
and stick to it.
localliving@washpost.com
Christy Brissette is a dietitian, foodie
and president of
80TwentyNutrition.com. Follow her
on Twitter @80twentyrule.
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
ave you ever gone into
your grocery store just
to pick up a bunch of
broccoli and walked out
with a cart full of snack foods? It’s
happened to all of us, and it’s no
accident on the supermarket’s
part. The way these stores are
organized and the strategies they
use for getting you to buy specific
items are designed to get you to
spend more money, and usually
not on the healthiest foods.
If you’re trying to eat as healthfully as possible and keep your
budget in check, what tricks
should you be on the lookout for?
Here are the top ways your supermarket uses consumer psychology to influence your purchases
and your health.
Before you even walk in the
store, supermarkets have you set
up to buy things you don’t need.
Shopping carts are getting bigger
and bigger, and the increase in
size is deliberate; the larger your
cart, the more likely you are to
impulse-purchase foods to fill it
up.
Once you’re set up with an
oversize cart and walk in the
door, you’ll be greeted with an
arrangement of seasonal items.
We’re talking frosted cookies in
December, chocolate bunnies in
April — you name it. These items
act as a speed bump, getting you
to slow down and contemplate
which treats you might need for
upcoming holidays (or to treat
yourself ). Even if you don’t buy
these items immediately, the supermarket has put them on your
mind. You’ll find them placed
throughout the store, making it
easy for you to grab the cookies or
candy you’ve been thinking
about since you walked in.
Move past the seasonal treats
and you’ll find yourself in the
produce section. Produce is
placed first in your path not to
encourage you to buy more of it,
but to make you feel super
healthy. Once you have healthful
options such as fruits and vegetables in your cart, you feel good
about what you’re buying. That
means you’re more likely to give
in to the less healthful products
you find throughout the store.
Stores often go beyond strategic layout and also use scents to
14
DC
Family
AMY MATSUSHITA-BEAL FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
BY
P HYLLIS F AGELL
B
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
rian and Daniel raced down the
sixth-grade hallway, scribbling on
anyone they could ambush with
Sharpies. By the time they got hauled into
the main office, they were covered in ink.
The principal let them have it, then paused
to answer his phone. That was when Brian
noticed the stamp. By the time the call was
over, Brian had branded Daniel’s forehead
seating, helped him meet the increased demands of middle school.
As a school counselor, I often hear from
parents whose children are struggling academically or behaviorally. They have questions that vary from the logistical to the
personal. Should they consult a professional
or give it time? How can they know if their
expectations are realistic? Would a diagnosis
kill their child’s self-esteem?
Bob Cunningham, head of the private
a path forward
with the words, “From the Desk of Principal
Brent.”
Brian had been impulsive in elementary
school, but sixth grade brought bigger challenges. He buckled under the pressure of
multiple classes and no recess. A psychologist
diagnosed him with attention-deficit disorder, and his school gave him a Section 504
Plan. His formal accommodations, which
included frequent breaks and preferential
Robert Louis Stevenson School in Manhattan,
advises parents to trust their instincts and
take action when their children’s grades decline, their behavior changes, they resist going
to school or their friends start ditching them.
“Don’t let small slips add up to big problems,”
he says. Research shows that identifying
problems early can improve a child’s outcome,
adds Howard Bennett, a pediatrician and
author of “The Fantastic Body.”
As parents embark on the journey to
identify and address learning or attention
issues, here are nine ways they can support
and empower their child.
Treat kids as the expert in their lives (but
interview others)
“Most questions delivered to kids are really
accusations with a question mark at the end,”
says Ned Johnson, president of PrepMatters
and co-author of “The Self-Driven Child: The
Science and Sense Behind Giving Kids More
Control of Their Lives.” “Ask: ‘Do you think
this is harder for you than other kids? Are you
the last one done on a test?’ ”
Keep a log and talk to counselors, teachers
and other adults in your child’s life to identify
patterns. Parents might discover that symptoms change depending on the classroom
setup, the skills required in a specific class, the
teacher’s behavior management skills or their
relationship with the child, says Melanie
Auerbach, the director of student support at
Sheridan School, a private school in the
District. “If the teacher is highly distractible
and the student likes to rap his desk with his
knuckles, that’s not going to be a good
combination,” she says. “Testing makes sense
when there’s been a persistent and chronic
issue across settings, as opposed to situational
behavior.”
15
DC
Partner with the school
Provide the school with work samples, the
historical record and any diagnostic
information, says Amanda Morin, author of
“The Everything Parent’s Guide to Special
Education” and an expert for Understood, an
organization that supports parents of
children who have learning and attention
issues. Be specific. Parents can say, “My child
isn’t reading at grade level,” or “English
causes more outbursts than math.”
Be deliberate in how you communicate.
Don’t fire off accusations or present a list of
demands. Ann Dolin, founder of Educational
Connections Tutoring in Fairfax, Va.,
suggests that parents use the words “I’ve
noticed” instead of “you.” As in, “I’ve noticed
that even with my help, Jimmy is spending
two hours on Spanish homework.”
Chris Nardi, principal of the Thomas W.
Pyle Middle School in Montgomery County,
tells parents and educators to pick up the
phone or meet in person whenever an email
exceeds a paragraph. He recently emailed his
son’s teacher with a concern. When her
response was terse, he knew there was a
disconnect. “I said, ‘Can we go offline and
talk, because I think we’re misinterpreting
our tones?’ ”
Everyone wants to do what’s best for your
child, Nardi says. “Call a teacher or
counselor, share your concerns and ask them
to help you understand.” Gather data from
other sources, too. Know the special
education process and your rights. Section
504 and Individualized Education Programs
(IEPs) are legally binding documents, and
parents are equal participants on the team by
law. Parents can find more resources and
information about support groups at
Understood (understood.org) and Parent
Center Hub (parentcenterhub.org).
Don’t ignore the social sphere
“If your child has poor impulse control
and says whatever is on his mind, it doesn’t
take much to imagine the social
implications,” Cunningham says. If he’s late
or disruptive, a teacher may punish the
entire class. If he doesn’t pull his weight on a
group project, his social standing will take a
hit. Parents can role-play scenarios at home,
such as forgetting to meet a friend. “Help her
Change what you do first
Parents need to think about what they can
do to provide a better situation for their
children who are struggling. “If your child
isn’t getting to school on time, you might
have to get up earlier, or check that your
child is in the shower before you start
making lunches,” Cunningham says. “Your
expectation is still that your child is going to
get to school on time, but you need to offer
more scaffolding.”
Cunningham tells parents to try one new
strategy at a time and stick with it for three
weeks. Maybe your child has a separate
alarm that reminds them it’s time to pack up,
or uses lists to help prioritize their “must
do’s,” “should do’s” and “could do’s.”
visual popped into my head.”
Take the ‘I do, we do, you do’ approach
Supports should be removed as kids learn
skills. “Is your goal to make sure they’re
getting everything right, or to teach them
how to do it independently next time?” asks
Donna Volpitta, founder of the Center for
Resilient Leadership in Pound Ridge, N.Y.
Parents can contact the school for their child,
then guide their children as they write their
teacher an email, then step back when they
can do it on their own.
Morin tells parents not to
overcompensate: “I know I’m doing too
much when I’m making three trips to the
school to bring sneakers and a textbook, and
it’s interfering with the rest of the family’s
functioning.”
Be direct but sensitive
A professional can help children
understand how they learn without
judgment, Auerbach, of the Sheridan School,
says. “They can say: ‘Know why it’s so easy
for you to memorize those math facts?
Because you have really good long-term
memory. It’s harder for you to remember six
plus seven when you’re solving a word
problem because your working memory is
not as strong.’ ”
Nine ways parents can support kids
who have learning or behavior issues
Capitalize on kids’ strengths
and interests
Make sure teachers know where your child
excels. If your kid is strong socially but has
weak literacy skills, group work might be a
good choice. Schools can offer children
leadership roles that highlight their skills,
build their confidence and influence the way
others view them. Challenges often come
with built-in strengths, says educator Laurel
Blackmon, the founder of LCB Consulting,
which works in the D.C. area. “Kids with
dyslexia can make connections across big
ideas, and kids with ADHD bring energy and
dynamism to a classroom,” she says. When
teachers draw on kids’ interests, they build
their capacity to sustain attention.
Model self-advocacy skills
Miriam Tager, Ella’s mother and an
assistant professor of early-childhood
education at Westfield State University in
Massachusetts, says her daughter knew how
to ask teachers whether they had read her
IEP by the time she was in fifth grade.
“My parents were constantly advocating
for me, so I figured out how to use teacherly
language,” Ella says. “Teachers take you more
seriously when they see you understand and
want to learn.” By sixth grade, she was
implementing her own strategies. “I used my
study hall to watch a video on evolution and
cells, so when they came up in the text, the
Parents may need to work out their own
issues so that they can be calm and
empathetic. “Your child is exquisitely
sensitive to your reaction,” says Rachel
Simmons, author of “Enough As She Is.” “We
have to check ourselves and make sure our
disappointment about a limitation in our
child is not about an unresolved wound or an
over-identification with our child’s success.”
Mary, whose seventh-grader Zoe has
attention-deficit disorder, sought therapy
because she had trouble coming to terms
with her daughter’s diagnosis. Her
psychologist helped her understand that Zoe
will be consistently inconsistent. “She’s like a
9-year-old who has no filter and doesn’t
recognize the boundaries of privacy,” says
Mary, who wanted to use only her first name
to protect her daughter’s privacy. “It was
liberating to let go of expectations that were
setting us both up for failure.”
It’s not always easy to take the long view,
but Ella hopes parents will embrace her
attitude. “Disability stands for something you
can’t do,” she says. “I can read and learn, just
differently. When I grow up, I plan to be a
rocket scientist or an astrophysicist.”
localliving@washpost.com
Phyllis L. Fagell, LCPC, is the counselor at Sheridan
School in the District and a therapist at the
Chrysalis Group in Bethesda. She tweets @pfagell
and blogs at phyllisfagell.com.
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
Identify the right issues
Kids with specific learning disabilities can
have attention issues, and children with
attention issues can have anxiety. The root of
the problem isn’t always obvious. Parents
might think their child is anxious because
math is a struggle, but math may be hard
because of their anxiety.
Ella Tager, a seventh-grader who was
diagnosed with dyslexia in first grade, notes
that she has symptoms that are typical of
someone with attention-deficit disorder.
“Sometimes I need to move to process the
frustration of not knowing what’s going on,”
she explains. “It gives me time to get
unstuck.” The right strategies and
interventions will vary by child and change
over time.
say, ‘Jenny, I know that was a problem for you
when I was late. I didn’t mean to be
disrespectful to you — that’s something I’m
working on,’ ” he says.
Professionals often emphasize the
importance of having one or two close
friends, but that may be a mistake for kids
with social difficulties. “Deep friendship can
be hard for the target friend,” Cunningham
says. “A lot of kids with social issues will have
significantly improved lives if the goal is
more comfortable interactions with a
broader range of classmates or teammates.”
16
DC
Family
ON PARENTING
Punishment useless for toddler who bites. Boundaries may help.
BY
M EGHAN L EAHY
Q: My 3-year-old is increasingly
willful and is having trouble listening
and following directions. He’s also
starting to bite when we tell him no.
We’ve tried everything — getting
down on his level and explaining
calmly the behavior we want, having
him repeat what we’ve asked, giving
him positive attention, giving choices.
Our response when he bites is “Please
stop, I don’t like that, it hurts,” and
then we remove ourselves from him
and the situation immediately. All of
this usually works, and he’s usually
very well behaved, but he must be in a
rough spot these days because it’s not
working right now. Lately, we’ve
started exploring consequences —
taking away his trains, etc. — but we
HATE it, and it also doesn’t seem
effective. So what can we do? Do we
just stay consistent, keep doing what’s
worked in the past and hope things
change soon? Or are there other
techniques we can try?
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
A: I love that you are writing, because you
are at an important point in your parenting
life. No pressure (ha), but this is a
developmental stage where parents typically
begin to apply all kinds of illogical
punishments and irrational consequences,
creating an “us vs. them” scenario that can
really affect and hurt your parenting life.
Let’s go over what “normal” behavior
looks like for a 3-year-old. As with all
preschoolers, it’s a “good news, bad news”
scenario. The good news is that a 3-year-old
is growing and emerging in independence,
physically and emotionally. With this
emergence comes a great deal of emotional
and physical messiness. Why? Well, human
development is often filled with peaks and
valleys, spurts and gaps, and a 3-year-old is
right there. His brain is growing rapidly,
and even though his language may be
improving, he is still very immature. The
bad news? Your 3-year-old has a brain that
is still mostly focused on himself and his
own needs (not overly considerate of
others), most of his emotions are pretty big
(leading to outbursts that defy reason), and
he is easily dysregulated (one minute
happy, the next minute very upset). It’s a
pretty big mess and 100 percent normal to
have a 3-year-old who is not interested in
following your direction and seems
inconsiderate of your feelings.
And while I am not going to slam
everything you are trying (because I know
you have the best of intentions), I need to
ISTOCK
tell you that you are headed down the
harder of two paths. It is a normal
parenting move to try to bring rational
thought to someone who is irrational
(your son). You see clearly what needs to
happen, what makes sense, that there
needs to be another choice, and you want
to help your son see the light.
Essentially, as adults, we are using our
rational, mature brains and we want to
instruct our children in the right choices.
But no matter what we say or do, we cannot
make our children think more rationally.
Getting on his level and speaking to him
assumes he can make another choice and,
furthermore, that he is “choosing” to be
bad. The biting is indicating that he is
growing more frustrated and discouraged.
It is a sign on the road that says
“WARNING: Trouble Ahead.”
But why is he biting now and not before?
Well, 2-year-old children, even though they
are mostly emotional messes, desperately
want to please their parents. Getting on
their level, walking away from them and
threatening them will often work. But this
will not last long. A 3-year-old will not take
threats sitting down. He will fight back.
And he will bite. And while this is
inconvenient, it is normal. Absolutely
normal. We want our children to be allergic
to being bossed around, right?
“But Meghan,” you’re probably thinking,
“there has to be a way to get my son to
listen to me a little more.” Yes, there is.
First, I love that your instinct is to get
down to his level and talk to him. Instead
of doing that when your son is being “bad,”
do that simply to connect. Take time, every
single day, to play with your son. Quality is
more important than quantity here, and I
want you to mirror his joy. Smiling,
laughing, silliness, asking thoughtful
questions, getting into his world . . . all of it
counts. Every child seeks to feel deeply
connected to his parents, and the more he
feels like a good boy, the more he will
behave like a good boy.
Feeling deeply connected is what is
needed to facilitate cooperation. Think
about it: Do you want to cooperate with
someone who punishes you? Who shames
you? Who doesn’t listen? No, you don’t.
Second, let’s look at what is causing
your son’s frustration. Is there a chronic
routine or time of day or event that is
bringing the same issues? And is there
something you can do about it? I am not
suggesting you upend your life so that
your son doesn’t experience any
frustration. That would be a disaster. But
there is something to be said for
simplifying your lives. For instance, are
you missing hunger or fatigue cues? Could
a simple snack help him? Are you offering
him too many choices when you need to
provide him what is needed (which is a
form of parenting love)?
Third, are you growing the frustration
when it begins? So, when your son begins to
get angry, do you pick up the power-struggle rope with more demands and commands of him? Remember: Frustration
plus frustration equals more frustration.
This sounds like, “I need you to not be
angry right now.” “I need you to use your
words, calmly and kindly.” “Your behavior
is unacceptable. Stop or I am walking
away.” All these statements have come out
of every parent’s mouth, but I am here to
deliver the sad truth that these statements
don’t help. If your son could control himself, he would. If your son could say something more kindly, he would. He can’t
access that part of his mind, so pushing him
to be “better” is going to get you the
opposite.
Finally, fulfill the needs of the situation
with strong boundaries and a soft heart.
That means that you do not allow your son
to hit, kick, scream in a restaurant or store.
You scoop him up and get somewhere that
is a bit more private until the storm
passes. If you are at home, say “I see how
frustrated you are; this stuffed animal is
great for biting” or “I know this toy is not
working for you. Playing with Legos is very
frustrating.” Whatever you do, don’t fight.
If you see the frustration, name it and help
let it out. This may sound like the opposite
of the parenting advice out there, but
keeping feelings in is how we get all of our
problems. And he’s 3. The expectation that
he can emotionally control himself will do
you far more harm than good. He needs
boundaries and compassion.
So, yes, your instinct is right when you
mention that consequences don’t feel
right. Consequences don’t feel right
because you know that they are not
landing the right way. This doesn’t mean
that you don’t parent; that you don’t
remove problems and toys and even the
child from situations that are not working.
You do. That is kindness; you are acting as
his prefrontal cortex, and you will do this
for years and years to come. (Umm,
technology and kids?! Buckle up.)
Consequences and punishments are for
children who are old enough to make the
connections, but punishments for a
3-year-old will serve only to build
frustration.
Stay the course of providing strong
boundaries and deep compassion; it will
get better. And keep listening to your
intuition. Good luck!
Also at washingtonpost.com Read the
transcript of a recent live Q&A with Leahy at
washingtonpost.com/advice, where you can also
find past columns. Her next chat is scheduled for
Jan. 17.
Send questions about parenting to
meghan@mlparentcoach.com.
Crime Report
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
These were among incidents
reported by D.C. police. For
information, call 202-727-9099.
NORTHEAST
HOMICIDES
Bryant St., 1800-1999 blocks, 7
p.m. Dec. 26. With gun.
Eastern Ave., 900-1099 blocks, 7
p.m. Dec. 27. With gun.
ASSAULTS
Douglas St., 4200-4499 blocks,
8:39 a.m. Jan. 2.
Gault Pl., 4400-4599 blocks, 7:28
p.m. Jan. 2. With gun.
Hayes St., 3500-3752 blocks, 7:24
p.m. Jan. 2.
K St., unit block, 8:34 a.m. Dec. 31.
With gun.
ROBBERIES
Benning Rd., 1500-1699 blocks,
11:25 a.m. Dec. 28.
Benning Rd., 1500-1699 blocks, 2
a.m. Dec. 31. With gun.
Benning Rd., 4400 block, 5:09
a.m. Dec. 31.
Berry Rd., 3100 block, 7:59 a.m.
Dec. 27. With gun.
Bladensburg Rd., 800 block, 2:19
a.m. Dec. 31. With gun.
Bladensburg Rd., 900 block, 5:38
p.m. Dec. 28.
Bladensburg Rd., 1200 block,
10:30 p.m. Dec. 27. With gun.
Bladensburg Rd., 1200 block,
11:46 p.m. Jan. 1. With gun.
C St., 1800 block, 11:16 a.m. Dec.
28.
Central Ave., 4700 block, 3:54
p.m. Dec. 30. With gun.
Holbrook St., 1200 block, 6:32
p.m. Jan. 2. With gun.
Lincoln Rd., 2100-2399 blocks,
2:38 p.m. Jan. 2.
Quarles St., 4900 block, 1:56 p.m.
Dec. 29. With gun.
T St., 100 block, 3:36 p.m. Dec. 27.
With gun.
First St., 1200 block, 7:36 a.m. Jan.
1. With gun.
Second St., 5600-5744 blocks,
9:22 a.m. Dec. 27.
12th St., 3600 block, 3:22 p.m.
Jan. 2.
14th St., 2300 block, 9:59 p.m.
Dec. 26. With gun.
15th St., 2200-2399 blocks, 2:43
p.m. Jan. 2. With gun.
17th St., 200 block, 2:46 p.m. Dec.
29. With knife.
56th St., 400 block, 8:15 a.m. Dec.
31. With gun.
BREAK-INS
Edson Pl., 4200-4399 blocks, 6:34
p.m. Dec. 31.
Florida Ave., 1200 block, 6:18 a.m.
Dec. 28.
Hayes St., 5200 block, 3:48 a.m.
Dec. 28.
17
DC
Minnesota Ave., 4000-4121
blocks, 5:03 p.m. Dec. 30.
Fourth St., 2100 block, 11:51 p.m.
Dec. 31.
24th St., 600-799 blocks, 8:50
a.m. Dec. 27.
50th St., 500-601 blocks, 5:35
a.m. Dec. 27.
THEFTS
Adams St., 1800 block, 2:29 p.m.
Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Adams St., 3100-3299 blocks,
12:50 p.m. Dec. 31.
Anacostia Ave., 300 block, 5:19
p.m. Dec. 28.
Barnes St., 700 block, 5:26 a.m.
Dec. 30. From vehicle.
Benning Rd., 1500-1699 blocks,
11:39 a.m. Jan. 1.
Benning Rd., 1800 block, 6:53
p.m. Dec. 29.
Bladensburg Rd., 900 block, 9:45
p.m. Dec. 28.
Bladensburg Rd., 900 block, 6:07
p.m. Jan. 2.
Bladensburg Rd., 2800-3200
blocks, 12:16 p.m. Dec. 29. From
vehicle.
Bladensburg Rd., 2800 block,
2:27 p.m. Jan. 2. From vehicle.
Clermont Dr., 4400 block, 4:04
a.m. Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Congress St., 1100 block, 5:56
a.m. Dec. 31. From vehicle.
D St., 1600 block, 11:18 a.m. Dec.
31.
E St., 1700 block, 4:13 p.m. Dec.
28. From vehicle.
Edson Pl., 4200-4399 blocks, 9:56
p.m. Dec. 28.
Foote St., 4900 block, 10:15 a.m.
Jan. 1. From vehicle.
G St., 300 block, 9:38 a.m. Dec. 27.
From vehicle.
Gales St., 1600 block, 7:20 a.m.
Dec. 29.
Gales St., 2000 block, 8:46 a.m.
Dec. 28.
H St., 300 block, 2:09 p.m. Dec. 29.
H St., 600 block, 1:29 p.m. Dec. 27.
H St., 600 block, 11:32 a.m. Dec.
28.
H St., 800 block, 4:10 p.m. Dec. 29.
Hawaii Ave., 300 block, 8:08 p.m.
Dec. 30.
Hecht Ave., 2000 block, 3:21 p.m.
Jan. 2.
Jay St., 3500-3899 blocks, 11:57
a.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
Kendall St., 1800 block, 10:25
a.m. Dec. 30.
Kenilworth Terr., 600 block, 9:29
a.m. Dec. 30.
L St., 200 block, 4:26 a.m. Dec. 27.
L St., 300 block, 8:11 a.m. Dec. 30.
From vehicle.
M St., 100 block, 1:26 p.m. Dec. 30.
M St., unit block, 4:40 p.m. Jan. 1.
From vehicle.
Market St., 2400 block, 6:37 a.m.
Dec. 27. From vehicle.
Market St., 2400 block, 11:50 a.m.
Dec. 31.
Michigan Ave., 700 block, 9:55
a.m. Dec. 30. From vehicle.
Michigan Ave., 1000 block, 8:48
a.m. Dec. 29.
Michigan Ave., 1900 block, 5:47
p.m. Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Minnesota Ave., 4000-4121
blocks, 11:28 a.m. Jan. 2.
Monroe St., 600 block, 2:20 p.m.
Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Monroe St., 700 block, 7:01 a.m.
Dec. 30. From vehicle.
Mount Olivet Rd., 1200 block,
12:21 p.m. Dec. 29.
Neal St., 1100 block, 5:33 p.m.
Dec. 27.
Quincy Pl., unit block, 11:41 a.m.
Dec. 27.
Quincy St., 1400 block, 8:48 a.m.
Dec. 30. From vehicle.
Randolph St., 2200-2399 blocks,
3:30 p.m. Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Rhode Island Ave., 500-799
blocks, 1:20 p.m. Jan. 2. From
vehicle.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
3:22 p.m. Dec. 27.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
1:28 p.m. Dec. 29.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
7:07 a.m. Dec. 31.
CRIME CONTINUED ON 19
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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17TH
FROM 2:00 - 4:00PM
LIMITED SPACES. RESERVE YOUR SPOT TODAY! 202-800-1744
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
Join local professional organizer
Wendy Zanders, January 17th from
2:00-4:00p.m., and learn
. how to
streamline your life with a
Sunday Basket® Workshop!
18
DC
PostPoints takes you to
Bobby McKey’s
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
Dueling Piano Bar.
Each month,
enter for the chance to
win free reservations
and no cover charge for
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S2927 5x12
19
Crime Report
CRIME FROM 17
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Adams St., 1800 block, 2:17 p.m.
Dec. 28.
Emerson St., 500 block, 1:16 p.m.
Dec. 29.
Foote St., 4200-4399 blocks, 5:32
p.m. Jan. 2.
Isherwood St., 1500 block, 7:44
a.m. Dec. 29.
Jay St., 4900-5067 blocks, 12:43
a.m. Dec. 28.
Kenilworth Ave., 1100-1299
blocks, 2:49 p.m. Dec. 27.
Kenilworth Ave., 1500 block, 6:02
p.m. Jan. 1.
Lexington Pl., 600 block, 2:52
p.m. Jan. 2.
Lincoln Rd., 1900 block, 7:34 a.m.
Dec. 29.
Nannie Helen Burroughs Ave.,
4600-4799 blocks, 5:05 a.m. Dec.
29.
Nannie Helen Burroughs Ave.,
4900 block, 7:41 p.m. Dec. 28.
Queens Chapel Rd., 2100 block,
5:50 p.m. Jan. 1.
Rhode Island Ave., 3100 block,
8:55 a.m. Dec. 28.
Sargent Rd., 5000 block, 6:31 a.m.
Dec. 31.
Sheriff Rd., 5000-5139 blocks,
3:41 a.m. Dec. 28.
Sixth St., 600 block, 10:41 a.m.
Dec. 28.
Seventh St., 3200 block, 8:27 a.m.
Dec. 28.
12th St., 5200 block, 2:17 p.m.
Dec. 28.
43rd Rd., 200 block, 2:56 p.m. Jan.
1.
49th St., 1300 block, 2:52 a.m.
Dec. 29.
62nd St., 300 block, 2:19 a.m. Dec.
29.
NORTHWEST
ASSAULTS
Connecticut Ave., 3200 block,
7:29 p.m. Dec. 30. With knife.
Decatur St., 300 block, 10:46 a.m.
Dec. 27. With gun.
Fairmont St., 700 block, 5:16 p.m.
Dec. 29. With gun.
Georgia Ave., 2000 block, 8:31
a.m. Dec. 27. With gun.
Georgia Ave., 6600 block, 7:31
p.m. Dec. 29.
H St., 600 block, 4:24 a.m. Dec. 27.
With gun.
H St., 600 block, 11:47 p.m. Dec.
31.
Newton Pl., 600 block, 4:54 p.m.
Dec. 31. With gun.
Sherman Ave., 3300 block, 10:11
p.m. Dec. 30.
16th St., 3200 block, 1:16 a.m. Jan.
2. With knife.
ROBBERIES
Columbia Rd., 1500 block, 9:28
p.m. Dec. 30. With gun.
Connecticut Ave., 5700 block,
12:20 p.m. Dec. 28.
Georgia Ave., 6500 block, 10:17
p.m. Jan. 1.
Jenifer St., 3900 block, 11:34 a.m.
Dec. 30.
New Jersey Ave., 900 block, 4:16
p.m. Dec. 28. With gun.
U St., 300 block, 7:26 p.m. Dec. 31.
With gun.
Vermont Ave., 1100 block, 1:47
a.m. Jan. 2. With gun.
Warder St., 3600 block, 11:31 p.m.
Dec. 26. With gun.
13th St., 6200 block, 5:19 a.m.
Dec. 27.
14th St., 1900 block, 9:45 p.m.
Dec. 31.
BREAK-INS
Columbia Rd., 1700 block, 5:26
a.m. Dec. 27.
F St., 600 block, 3:16 a.m. Jan. 1.
Florida Ave., 700 block, 4:15 a.m.
Dec. 30.
Mount Pleasant St., 3100 block,
8:30 a.m. Dec. 20.
Mount Pleasant St., 3100 block,
7:36 a.m. Dec. 27.
Seventh St., 800 block, 6 a.m. Jan.
1.
11th St., 2300-2499 blocks, 8:20
p.m. Dec. 31.
16th St., 3500-3648 blocks, 8:47
p.m. Dec. 26.
18th St., 2000 block, 3:29 a.m.
Jan. 1.
18th St., 2100 block, 6:09 a.m.
Dec. 30.
THEFTS
Brandywine St., 3500 block, 8:39
a.m. Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Brandywine St., 4100 block, 3:22
p.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
Brandywine St., 4800 block, 5:46
a.m. Dec. 31. From vehicle.
Broad Branch Rd., 5900 block,
3:28 p.m. Dec. 28.
Butterworth Pl., 4200 block, 9:29
a.m. Dec. 30.
Chain Bridge Rd., 2600-3199
blocks, 5:37 a.m. Jan. 1. From
vehicle.
Chapin St., 1400 block, 2:30 p.m.
Dec. 28.
Columbia Rd., 1400 block, 3:44
p.m. Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Columbia Rd., 1500 block, 4:10
a.m. Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Columbia St., 1400 block, 11:43
a.m. Jan. 2. From vehicle.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
2:40 p.m. Dec. 29.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
4:02 p.m. Dec. 30.
Connecticut Ave., 1200 block,
10:55 a.m. Dec. 15.
Connecticut Ave., 1200 block,
11:48 a.m. Jan. 2.
Connecticut Ave., 1300-1699
blocks, 7:20 a.m. Dec. 29.
Connecticut Ave., 1700 block,
1:33 p.m. Dec. 29.
Connecticut Ave., 3300-3499
blocks, 5:45 a.m. Jan. 1.
Connecticut Ave., 4400 block,
9:40 a.m. Jan. 1.
Constitution Ave., 300 block, 9:53
a.m. Dec. 28. From vehicle.
Corcoran St., 1700 block, 10:28
a.m. Jan. 2. From vehicle.
Decatur St., 800 block, 3:31 p.m.
Jan. 1.
Eastern Ave., 6700-6899 blocks,
9:17 a.m. Dec. 31. From vehicle.
Euclid St., 1100-1299 blocks, 4:09
a.m. Dec. 28. From vehicle.
Fairmont St., 1100-1299 blocks,
2:59 a.m. Dec. 28.
Farragut St., 1500 block, 5:12 a.m.
Dec. 31. From vehicle.
Florida Ave., 900 block, 6:42 p.m.
Jan. 2.
Fordham Rd., 4200 block, 12:23
p.m. Dec. 30. From vehicle.
Fort Stevens Dr., 1300 block, 9:40
a.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
G St., 700 block, noon Dec. 29.
From vehicle.
G St., 1200 block, 11:10 a.m. Dec.
28.
Georgia Ave., 2600 block, 3:39
p.m. Dec. 28. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 2800 block, 1:48
a.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 3200 block, 9:07
a.m. Jan. 1. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 3400 block, 7:19
p.m. Dec. 28. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block, 12:04
p.m. Dec. 27.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block, 2:03
p.m. Dec. 27.
Georgia Ave., 4100 block, 1:49
a.m. Dec. 28.
Georgia Ave., 4100 block, 1:26
p.m. Dec. 29.
Georgia Ave., 5200 block, 1:24
p.m. Jan. 2.
Georgia Ave., 5300 block, 4:06
a.m. Dec. 30. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 5900 block, 9:41
a.m. Jan. 2.
Georgia Ave., 5900 block, 3:08
p.m. Jan. 2.
H St., 600 block, 8:08 p.m. Dec. 26.
H St., 900 block, 7:36 a.m. Dec. 28.
From vehicle.
H St., 1400 block, 2:48 p.m. Dec.
28. From vehicle.
H St., 1500 block, 10:58 a.m. Jan.
2. From vehicle.
H St., 1800 block, 6:01 a.m. Dec.
28.
H St., unit block, 4:05 p.m. Jan. 2.
Hamilton St., 1500 block, 3:35
a.m. Dec. 31. From vehicle.
Harrison St., 4400 block, 4:27
p.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
Hiatt Pl., 3200 block, 10:06 a.m.
Jan. 2. From vehicle.
Highland Pl., 3100-3299 blocks,
10:21 a.m. Dec. 19.
Idaho Ave., 3200 block, 11:51 a.m.
Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Irving St., 1600 block, 6:57 a.m.
Dec. 27. From vehicle.
K St., 400 block, 11:13 p.m. Dec.
29.
K St., 3100 block, 2:48 p.m. Dec.
31. From vehicle.
K St., 3100 block, 10:40 a.m. Jan.
2. From vehicle.
Kalorama Rd., 1900 block, 10:52
a.m. Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Kansas Ave., 3900 block, 8:25
a.m. Dec. 29.
Kenyon St., 1700 block, 8:45 a.m.
Dec. 28. From vehicle.
Luzon Ave., 6600 block, 5:26 a.m.
Jan. 2. From vehicle.
M St., 1800 block, 11:28 p.m. Dec.
31.
M St., 3000 block, 12:39 p.m. Dec.
29.
M St., 3100 block, 1:06 p.m. Dec.
29.
M St., 3200 block, 7:38 a.m. Dec.
27.
M St., 3200 block, 2:23 p.m. Dec.
27.
M St., 3200 block, 4:04 p.m. Dec.
30.
M St., 3200 block, 2 p.m. Jan. 1.
M St., 3200 block, 11:39 a.m. Jan.
2.
Manchester Lane, 1400 block,
6:27 a.m. Dec. 31. From vehicle.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
6:36 a.m. Dec. 29.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
4:47 a.m. Jan. 2. From vehicle.
Mintwood Pl., 1800 block, 2:26
p.m. Jan. 2.
Mintwood Pl., 1800 block, 2:45
p.m. Jan. 2.
Monroe St., 1400-1599 blocks,
6:17 a.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
Monroe St., 1400-1599 blocks,
9:16 a.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
Mount Pleasant St., 3400 block,
2:09 a.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
N St., 1900 block, 1:41 p.m. Jan. 2.
From vehicle.
N St., 2100 block, 4:23 p.m. Dec.
27. From vehicle.
N St., 2300 block, 4:11 p.m. Dec.
28.
N St., 2300 block, 10:49 a.m. Jan.
2.
New York Ave., unit block, 9:05
a.m. Dec. 28. From vehicle.
Newton St., 1600 block, 3:39 a.m.
Dec. 20. From vehicle.
Newton St., 1700 block, 1:56 a.m.
Dec. 30. From vehicle.
North Capitol St., 1800-2199
blocks, 7:50 a.m. Dec. 29.
Oglethorpe St., 500-699 blocks,
3:54 a.m. Dec. 28. From vehicle.
Ontario Rd., 2700 block, 10:30
a.m. Dec. 30. From vehicle.
P St., 1400 block, 1:48 p.m. Dec.
29.
P St., 2600 block, 8:43 a.m. Dec.
24.
Park Pl., 3200 block, 4:25 a.m.
Dec. 27.
Park Rd., 1400 block, 8:52 a.m.
Dec. 28. From vehicle.
Parkwood Pl., 1300 block, 2:54
p.m. Jan. 1. From vehicle.
Pennsylvania Ave., 700-899
blocks, 8:43 a.m. Dec. 28. From
vehicle.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1200 block,
8:09 p.m. Dec. 28.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1200 block,
1:55 p.m. Jan. 2.
Pennsylvania Ave., 2100 block,
11:20 a.m. Jan. 1. From vehicle.
Piney Branch Rd., 7000 block,
7:26 a.m. Jan. 2. From vehicle.
Prospect St., 3200 block, 11:08
a.m. Jan. 2.
Q St., 1400 block, 7:49 a.m. Dec.
30.
Quincy St., 700 block, 3:51 a.m.
Jan. 2. From vehicle.
R St., 1400 block, 4:39 p.m. Jan. 2.
From vehicle.
R St., unit block, 3:42 p.m. Jan. 1.
From vehicle.
Rittenhouse St., 1300 block,
12:29 p.m. Dec. 31.
Rock Creek Church Rd., 200
block, 6:29 a.m. Dec. 28.
Rock Creek Church Rd., 700-828
blocks, 4:27 a.m. Dec. 28. From
vehicle.
S St., 600 block, 2:56 p.m. Dec. 28.
From vehicle.
S St., 1200 block, 1:25 a.m. Jan. 1.
Somerset Pl., 1300 block, 5:30
a.m. Dec. 30. From vehicle.
T St., 900 block, 10:28 p.m. Dec.
29. From vehicle.
T St., 1300 block, 12:08 p.m. Dec.
29. From vehicle.
T St., 1300 block, 10:38 p.m. Dec.
29. From vehicle.
T St., 1400 block, 12:20 p.m. Dec.
29.
CRIME CONTINUED ON 20
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
2:17 p.m. Jan. 1.
Riggs Rd., 300 block, 11:09 a.m.
Dec. 27.
Riggs Rd., 300 block, 11:53 a.m.
Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Riggs Rd., 300 block, 4:16 p.m.
Dec. 29.
Riggs Rd., 300 block, 9:24 a.m.
Dec. 30.
Sheridan St., 1-199 blocks, 8:44
a.m. Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Sheriff Rd., 4400 block, 4:39 p.m.
Jan. 2.
South Dakota Ave., 4500 block,
9:42 a.m. Dec. 31. From vehicle.
V St., 3100-3299 blocks, 1:46 p.m.
Dec. 28.
Varnum St., 1000-1199 blocks,
4:24 p.m. Jan. 1. From vehicle.
Webster St., unit block, 6:35 a.m.
Dec. 30. From vehicle.
First Pl., 4400 block, 7:57 a.m.
Dec. 29. From vehicle.
First St., 1200 block, 3:55 p.m.
Dec. 30.
Second St., 1300 block, 3:34 p.m.
Dec. 28.
Second St., 5600-5744 blocks,
7:42 a.m. Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Third St., 1200 block, 12:19 p.m.
Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Third St., 5200 block, 6:23 p.m.
Jan. 1.
Third St., 5200 block, 6:49 p.m.
Jan. 2.
Fourth St., 1300 block, 7:51 a.m.
Dec. 29.
Fifth St., 1300 block, 8:44 a.m.
Dec. 27. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 2900 block, 9:05 a.m.
Dec. 29.
Eighth St., 800 block, 5:15 a.m.
Dec. 29. From vehicle.
12th St., 3000 block, 9:10 a.m.
Dec. 27. From vehicle.
12th St., 3200 block, 2:50 p.m.
Dec. 29. From vehicle.
16th St., 1200 block, 8:13 a.m. Jan.
1. From vehicle.
24th Pl., 2100 block, 1:05 p.m.
Dec. 31.
54th St., 300 block, 7:22 a.m. Dec.
30.
DC
20
DC
Crime Report
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
CRIME FROM 19
T St., unit block, 12:50 p.m. Jan. 2.
From vehicle.
U St., unit block, 5:32 a.m. Jan. 1.
Upshur St., 1400-1599 blocks,
4:03 p.m. Dec. 28.
V St., 700 block, 4:30 a.m. Dec. 31.
From vehicle.
Vermont Ave., 1000 block, 8:44
p.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
Vermont Ave., 1100 block, 3:25
p.m. Dec. 31. From vehicle.
Wallach Pl., 1300 block, 12:34
a.m. Dec. 30. From vehicle.
Wisconsin Ave., 1000 block, 12:07
p.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
Wisconsin Ave., 1000 block, 9:14
p.m. Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Wisconsin Ave., 1000 block, 9:40
p.m. Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Wisconsin Ave., 1300 block, 7:19
p.m. Dec. 26.
Wisconsin Ave., 1700 block, 9:10
a.m. Jan. 1.
Wisconsin Ave., 2200 block,
12:02 a.m. Dec. 30. From vehicle.
Wisconsin Ave., 4900 block, 4:28
p.m. Jan. 2.
First Pl., 5400 block, 12:37 p.m.
Dec. 27.
Third St., 900 block, 11:34 a.m.
Jan. 1. From vehicle.
Third St., 4900 block, 11:59 a.m.
Dec. 28. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 1900 block, 1:34 p.m.
Dec. 30.
Sixth St., 1100 block, 7:54 a.m.
Dec. 19.
Sixth St., 1700 block, 7:54 p.m.
Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 1800 block, 10:29 p.m.
Dec. 31. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 700 block, 1:10 p.m.
Dec. 28.
Seventh St., 800 block, 3:47 a.m.
Dec. 29.
Seventh St., 1100 block, 4:03 p.m.
Dec. 28. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 1300 block, 5:46 p.m.
Jan. 2.
Seventh St., 1900 block, 10:30
a.m. Dec. 27.
Eighth St., 400 block, 7:26 a.m.
Dec. 28.
Eighth St., 800 block, 7:23 a.m.
Dec. 27.
Eighth St., 2100-2299 blocks, 8:39
a.m. Jan. 2. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 1900 block, 2:49 p.m.
Jan. 2.
11th St., 400 block, 9:43 p.m. Dec.
31.
11th St., 500 block, 1:39 p.m. Jan.
2. From vehicle.
12th St., 200-399 blocks, 1:51 p.m.
Jan. 2. From vehicle.
12th St., 1800 block, 8:40 p.m.
Dec. 28.
13th St., 1800 block, 9:41 p.m.
Dec. 29. From vehicle.
13th St., 2100 block, 10:47 p.m.
Dec. 29. From vehicle.
14th St., 1600 block, 4:21 p.m.
Dec. 29.
14th St., 1800 block, 2:50 p.m.
Dec. 29.
14th St., 1800 block, 11:07 p.m.
Dec. 30.
14th St., 1900 block, 11:05 a.m.
Dec. 30. From vehicle.
14th St., 1900 block, 6:13 p.m. Jan.
2. From vehicle.
14th St., 2200 block, 9:32 a.m.
Dec. 27. From vehicle.
14th St., 2300 block, 2:26 p.m.
Jan. 1.
14th St., 3000 block, 11:21 a.m.
Jan. 2. From vehicle.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 1:12
p.m. Dec. 29.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 5 a.m.
Dec. 30.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 3:20
p.m. Dec. 30.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 4:43
p.m. Dec. 30.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 2:02
p.m. Jan. 2.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 4:17
p.m. Jan. 2.
15th St., 1700 block, 4 p.m. Dec.
28. From vehicle.
16th St., 1100 block, 6:53 a.m.
Dec. 29. From vehicle.
16th St., 6000 block, 3:37 a.m.
Dec. 29.
17th St., 1300 block, 10 a.m. Dec.
31. From vehicle.
17th St., 2400 block, 4:32 a.m.
Dec. 31. From vehicle.
18th St., 1200 block, 6:27 p.m.
Dec. 27.
18th St., 2400 block, 12:30 p.m.
Dec. 28.
18th St., 2400 block, 9:24 p.m.
Dec. 29.
18th St., 2400 block, 3:12 p.m.
Dec. 30.
18th St., 2400 block, 7:04 p.m.
Dec. 31.
19th St., 1800 block, 10:03 a.m.
Dec. 27. From vehicle.
20th St., 2100-2299 blocks, 11:39
a.m. Dec. 29. From vehicle.
22nd St., 1500 block, 8:26 p.m.
Dec. 31.
24th St., 1000 block, 2:14 p.m.
Dec. 28.
33rd St., 1000 block, 6:25 a.m.
Dec. 30. From vehicle.
49th St., 2800 block, 5:55 a.m.
Dec. 27. From vehicle.
Dec. 30.
Wallach Pl., 1300 block, 4:01 a.m.
Jan. 2.
Wisconsin Ave., 2300-2499
blocks, 11:30 p.m. Dec. 31.
14th St., 1900 block, 12:54 a.m.
Jan. 1.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
THEFTS
Connecticut Ave., 2100 block,
10:45 a.m. Jan. 2.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block, 12:28
p.m. Jan. 2.
Georgia Ave., 4800 block, 5:53
p.m. Jan. 2.
Georgia Ave., 6600 block, 5:16
p.m. Jan. 1.
Georgia Ave., 7700 block, 2:53
p.m. Dec. 31.
Hoban Rd., 1700 block, 6:48 a.m.
Dec. 27.
Jefferson Pl., 1800 block, 9:40
p.m. Dec. 21.
New Hampshire Ave., 5400 block,
4:53 p.m. Dec. 21.
North Capitol St., 5000 block,
3:50 a.m. Dec. 30.
Otis Pl., 1400 block, 5 p.m. Dec.
30.
Tilden St., 4900 block, 1:27 p.m.
SOUTHEAST
HOMICIDES
Adrian St., 800 block, 7 p.m. Dec.
27.
First St., 3900 block, 7 p.m. Dec.
28. With gun.
ASSAULTS
Chesapeake St., 700 block, 1:40
a.m. Jan. 2. With knife.
Congress St., 1300 block, 3:59
p.m. Dec. 27. With gun.
Congress St., 1300 block, 2:09
p.m. Dec. 28. With gun.
G St., 4900-5099 blocks, 7:42 p.m.
Dec. 28. With knife.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 2300
block, 12:19 p.m. Dec. 31. With gun.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 2900
block, 9:43 a.m. Dec. 28. With gun.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1100 block,
5:29 p.m. Dec. 27.
Southern Ave., 4400 block, 5:57
p.m. Dec. 31. With gun.
V St., 1700 block, 8:36 p.m. Dec.
27. With knife.
ROBBERIES
Alabama Ave., 2600-2799 blocks,
2:10 p.m. Dec. 28. With gun.
Chesapeake St., 400-599 blocks,
10:28 p.m. Dec. 30. With gun.
Naylor Rd., 2500 block, 3:36 p.m.
Jan. 1. With gun.
Stanton Rd., 3000 block, 8:50
a.m. Dec. 27. With gun.
24th St., 2300 block, 5:12 p.m.
Jan. 2. With gun.
BREAK-INS
Minnesota Ave., 3400-3513
blocks, 9:12 a.m. Jan. 1.
Ridge Pl., 1300 block, 10:41 a.m.
Jan. 2.
T St., 1300 block, 11:50 a.m. Dec.
29.
Wheeler Rd., 3400 block, 9:59
p.m. Dec. 31.
30th St., 3000 block, 4:01 p.m.
Dec. 28.
Alabama Ave., 800 block, 7:56
a.m. Dec. 29. From vehicle.
Alabama Ave., 1400-1529 blocks,
10:03 a.m. Jan. 2.
Alabama Ave., 1500-1699 blocks,
3:41 p.m. Dec. 27.
Alabama Ave., 4100 block, 5:35
a.m. Dec. 29.
Benning Rd., 4900 block, 11:39
a.m. Dec. 29.
Burns St., 700 block, 5:33 p.m.
Dec. 29.
C St., 5100-5299 blocks, 5:24 a.m.
Dec. 27.
E St., 900 block, 2:19 p.m. Dec. 30.
From vehicle.
East Capitol St., 5200 block,
12:54 a.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
East Capitol St., 5300 block,
11:35 a.m. Dec. 30.
Gainesville St., 2800-2999 blocks,
6:57 a.m. Dec. 28. From vehicle.
Gainesville St., 3200 block, 12:28
a.m. Dec. 28. From vehicle.
Good Hope Rd., 1600-1799 blocks,
9:40 a.m. Jan. 2. From vehicle.
Good Hope Rd., 1800-1934 blocks,
10:01 a.m. Dec. 31. From vehicle.
Good Hope Rd., 2300 block, 6:05
a.m. Dec. 28. From vehicle.
Good Hope Rd., 2300 block, 12:21
p.m. Dec. 30.
Green St., 2300 block, 12:49 p.m.
Dec. 27. From vehicle.
Hillside Rd., 4600 block, 12:57
p.m. Dec. 31.
K St., unit block, 3:54 a.m. Dec. 31.
Langston Pl., 2700-2899 blocks,
1:07 p.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
M St., 400 block, 6:47 a.m. Jan. 2.
M St., unit block, 3:26 a.m. Dec. 27.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 2200
block, 3:34 p.m. Dec. 30.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 2400
block, 3:32 p.m. Dec. 29.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 3000
block, 7:59 a.m. Dec. 31.
Massachusetts Ave., 4200 block,
5:33 a.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
Minnesota Ave., 2200 block, 9:14
a.m. Dec. 30.
North Carolina Ave., 600 block,
2:54 p.m. Jan. 2.
North Carolina Ave., 700 block,
11:40 a.m. Dec. 31.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
4:39 p.m. Jan. 1.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1500 block,
3:01 p.m. Jan. 2. From vehicle.
Pennsylvania Ave., 2300 block,
6:53 a.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
Pennsylvania Ave., 3200 block,
5:31 p.m. Dec. 27.
Pennsylvania Ave., 3200 block,
5:28 a.m. Dec. 30.
Potomac Ave., 1300 block, 9:35
a.m. Dec. 30.
Potomac Ave., 1300 block, 12:13
p.m. Dec. 30.
Potomac Ave., 1800 block, 6:22
a.m. Jan. 1. From vehicle.
Southern Ave., 2500-2999 blocks,
6:03 a.m. Dec. 31. From vehicle.
Stanton Rd., 3400 block, 3:42
p.m. Jan. 2. From vehicle.
T St., 2100 block, 4:36 a.m. Dec.
28. From vehicle.
Wayne Pl., 100 block, 7:20 a.m.
Dec. 28.
Third St., 4000-4399 blocks, 3:11
p.m. Dec. 27.
Eighth St., 400 block, 10:26 a.m.
Dec. 29.
13th St., 3200 block, 9:41 a.m.
Jan. 1.
14th St., 400 block, 9:22 a.m. Jan.
2. From vehicle.
18th St., 100 block, 8:11 a.m. Dec.
28. From vehicle.
31st St., 2800 block, 2:26 a.m.
Dec. 27. From vehicle.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Alabama Ave., 1200-1408 blocks,
9:19 a.m. Dec. 30.
Anacostia Rd., 200-499 blocks,
1:05 p.m. Jan. 2.
B St., 3600 block, 9:05 a.m. Jan. 1.
E St., 5300 block, 11:57 a.m. Dec.
27.
Erie St., 2900 block, 11:55 p.m.
Dec. 28.
Lyndale Pl., 3100 block, 1:36 a.m.
Dec. 27.
Mississippi Ave., 1000-1299
blocks, 9:47 a.m. Dec. 27.
Nelson Pl., 2900 block, 1:33 p.m.
Jan. 1.
Savannah St., 1200 block, 10:04
p.m. Dec. 26.
Southern Ave., 3600-3711 blocks,
5:22 a.m. Dec. 29.
Southern Ave., 3600-3711 blocks,
12:14 p.m. Jan. 2.
Trenton Pl., 1200 block, 4:17 p.m.
Dec. 27.
First St., 3800 block, 2:17 p.m.
Dec. 28.
13th St., 2000 block, 5:23 a.m.
Jan. 2.
16th St., 100 block, 6:58 p.m. Jan.
1.
18th St., 2600 block, 8:29 a.m.
Dec. 31.
19th St., 1700 block, 10:16 p.m.
Dec. 26.
21st St., 3500 block, 4:59 p.m.
Dec. 29.
23rd St., 3200 block, 3:20 p.m.
Dec. 28.
54th St., 1-149 blocks, 6:27 a.m.
Jan. 1.
SOUTHWEST
ASSAULTS
Galveston St., 1-199 blocks, 10:33
a.m. Dec. 29. With knife.
Half St., 1400 block, 7:02 a.m. Dec.
28. With gun.
First St., 1300 block, 11:45 a.m.
Jan. 2. With knife.
ROBBERY
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 3900
block, 10:10 p.m. Dec. 27. With gun.
BREAK-INS
Galveston Pl., 1-153 blocks, 6:18
p.m. Dec. 27.
First St., 1500 block, 1:01 p.m.
Dec. 28.
Second St., 3900 block, 12:28
a.m. Dec. 30.
THEFTS
Delaware Ave., 1200-1399 blocks,
1:54 p.m. Dec. 30.
Half St., 1500 block, 11:35 a.m.
Dec. 29. From vehicle.
I St., 500 block, 2:07 p.m. Dec. 27.
From vehicle.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 3900
block, 7:16 a.m. Dec. 27.
South Capitol St., 1000-1299
blocks, 10:31 p.m. Dec. 26.
South Capitol St., 3800-3999
blocks, 2:45 a.m. Dec. 29.
South Capitol St., 4600-4799
blocks, 8:50 p.m. Dec. 27.
South Capitol Terr., 4700 block,
10:24 a.m. Jan. 2.
First St., 1500 block, 8:15 a.m.
Dec. 31. From vehicle.
Third St., 1000 block, 9:51 p.m.
Dec. 31. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 400 block, 10:49 a.m.
Dec. 30. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 700-899 blocks, 5:13
p.m. Dec. 27. From vehicle.
21
Community News
DC
HEALTH CODE VIOLATIONS
These food establishments were
closed because of health code
violations. The list, compiled from
health department reports,
reflects actions taken by the
departments.
MARYLAND
Dash In
5398 Queens Chapel Rd.,
Hyattsville
Closed Saturday because of
roaches.
and food contamination.
Reopened the next day.
Pho Nom Nom
842-A Rockville Pike, Rockville
Closed Dec. 28 because of mice
THE DISTRICT
14 Street Snack Bar
4616 14th St. NW
Closed Jan. 3 because of gross
unsanitary conditions including
vermin.
Wendy’s
6210 Kenilworth Ave., Riverdale
Closed Jan. 2 for operating without
hot water. Reopened the next day.
VIRGINIA
No new closures were reported.
— Compiled by Terence McArdle
What Inspires You?
The Bottle Shop
2216 18th St. NW
Closed. Jan 3 for operating without
a license.
It’s the question that matters most to us.
Because we’re making something special.
The one place in the world that’s yours.
Jumbo Slice Pizza
1344 U St. NW
Closed Dec. 28 for operating
without a manager on duty, a
current business license and for
operating under gross unsanitary
conditions.
Inspiring Homeowners Since 1961.
Pizza Hut
1990 M St. NW
Closed Friday for operating under
gross unsanitary conditions.
Reopened Saturday.
Sol Mexican Grill
1251 H St. NE
Closed Dec. 26 for failing to
minimize presence of insects,
rodents and other pests.
Reopened last Thursday.
Dennies Market
5000 Benning Rd. SE
Closed last Thursday for operating
without a certified food manager
on duty and without hot water.
Reopened the next day.
Home Sales
U Pl., 1920-Norman A. Slye
Hawkins to Sarah McClanahan,
$320,000.
Seventh St., 3313-Peter J. Pons
and Herman A. Alvarado to Walter
Jorden, $400,000.
SOUTHWEST
Darrington St., 137-Omld Land
Group Corp. to Shelton Roulhac,
$301,000.
G St., 350, No. N202-Roy G. and
Christina M. Pratt to Michael Emil
Marcarelli, $555,000.
Seventh St., 700, No. 102-Barbara
Ann Sanders to Edwin L. Walker,
$410,000.
14th St. Design Studio
Find your inspiration at our 14th St. Design
Studio. Since 1961, Case has designed and
built more of the finest kitchens, bathrooms,
additions, and interior spaces than any other
local remodeler. Our entire focus is turning
dreams into reality.
CaseDesign.com | 202.873.2020
the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
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washingtonpost.com/jobs
DC
FEATURED EMPLOYERS SPOTLIGHT
Washington
Post
Featured Employers are DC’s largest and most prominent organizations. They include employers
across a range of industries, like
IT, accounting, healthcare, and
government, and are hiring candidates today!
George Mason University
Education–George Mason University is a university
with three campuses, each with a distinctive academic focus that plays a critical role in the economy
of its region. At each campus, students, faculty,
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General Administration Supervisor I/
Coordinator I–Fairfax
Job Category : Classified
Staff Working hours :
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and Payroll invites…
Information Technology Specialist 2–
Fairfax
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Hughes Network Systems
Engineering–Hughes is the world's leading provider
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Advisory Engineer–
Principal Engineer Germantown
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AboutWeb
Technology and Software–AboutWeb is a Certified
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well as a leading provider of cybersecurity solutions,
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Our HUBZone certification combined with two decades of IT solutions expertise and over ten years of
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Senior Data Architect Front End Developer
and Modeler–
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Gwynn Oak
Java Script)–Baltimore
AboutWeb is looking for AboutWeb is looking
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Legal E
Delivery and Transportation–The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority operates the second
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Law–With twenty years of full-service legal staffing,
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your interaction with Legal e-Staffing, Inc. will be
conducted by telephone and online prior to a brief…
Asst Dir Track And
Structures–
Washington D.C.
Job Description, Job
Title: ASST DIR TRACK
AND STRUCTURES Job
ID: 180001 Location:
VA - Alexandria Yard
Full/Part Time: FullTime Posting OpenClose 12/29/2017 01/08/2018 Union NRP
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Application Support
Specialist (Law Firm)–
Washington D.C.
APPLICATION SUPPORT
SPECIALIST
HOURS:
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D.C. law firm seeks a
knowledgeable
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Support Specialist to:
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Sustainability
Program Manager–
Washington D.C.
Job Description, Job
Title:
Sustainability
Program Manager Job
ID: 170780 Location:
DC-Jackson
GrahamHdqtrs Full/Part Time:
Full-Time Posting OpenClose 12/29/2017 01/28/2018 Union NRP
Regular/Temporary…
Real Estate / Property Management–Join one of the
leading Property Management Firms in the Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD markets since 1965.
Grady Management Inc. is a full service residential,
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and commercial properties in locations throughout the east coast. Grady Management also provides asset management and consulting services
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the Institute of Real Estate Management, as an…
Administrative
Maintenance TechniAssistant–Laurel
cian - Apartment
HVAC mechanical ser- Community–
vices firm is seeking a Hyattsville
full-time
administra- Apartment
Maintetive assistant. Must be nance Tech Hyattsville,
computer literate with MD Grady Managestrong working knowl- ment Inc., one of the
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ability to multi-task, management firms, is
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National Academies
Nonprofit–The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are private, nonprofit institutions that provide expert advice on some of the
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Most of our work is conducted through seven…
Staff Accountant Research Associate Contracts and Grants Board on Children,
Accounting–
Youth, and Families–
Washington D.C.
Washington D.C.
The National Academy The National Academy
of Sciences, National of Sciences, National
Academy of Engineer- Academy of Engineering, and National Acad- ing, and National Academy of Medicine work emy of Medicine work
together as the Na- together as the National Academies of Sci- tional Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and ences, Engineering, and
Medicine to provide…
Medicine to provide…
Other–Since 1978, The Ford Agency has provided
Washington’s competitive business market with
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small business, The Ford Agency is proud of its ability to adapt to changing trends while always maintaining the highest level of recruiting standards for
both our clients and our candidates. Our team of
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recruiting services to clients and candidates, including direct hire, temporary-to-hire, and temporary
placement, and we approach each type with…
Part-Time IT Assistant - Receptionist/AdminTemp-to-Hire–
istrative Assistant Washington D.C.
Temporary–
The Ford Agency is Washington D.C.
looking for a part-time A busy contracting
IT Assistant with help agency in the Takoma
desk experience and Park area is working
excellent interpersonal with The Ford Agency
communication skills. to find a customer
The successful candi- service-oriented Recepdate will join the team tionist/Administrative
at a commercial real Assistant to provide allestate company in…
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Holy Cross Hospital
Sparks Group
The Endocrine Society
Alexandria City Public Schools
Healthcare–At Holy Cross Health, we seek to become the most trusted provider of health care in
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every employee of Holy Cross Health has played a
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Director of LaboraSpeech Language
tory Services–
Pathologist (PRN)–
Silver Spring
Germantown
Ensures activities of the Responsible for asClinical Laboratory and sessing and treating
Anatomic Pathology op- patients referred for
erate in a manner con- speech-language, hearsistent with institution- ing and swallowing
al mission, operational disorders, in effective
goals, objectives and, and professional manpolicies,
professional ner, while adhering to
standards and govern- Maryland State laws
mental...
and American...
Other–Bringing the Best People and the Best Companies Together Since 1970. Sparks Group (formerly
SPARKS, Sparks IT Solutions, and Sparks Personnel)
is the Washington DC Area's leading temporary
staffing and full-time recruiting services provider.
Whether you are seeking your next opportunity or
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Administrative
Field Marketing
Coordinator –
Manager–McLean
Learning & Development– Job Summary/Company
Alexandria
: Are you a passionJob
Summary/Com- ate, savvy, "out-of-box"
pany: Sparks Group has marketer? Are you
partnered with a non- seeking a rewarding
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is looking for an Admin- can contribute to the
istrative Coordinator to success of innovative
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you are an…
great technology firm…
Nonprofit–Endocrine Society is the world's largest
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clinical practice in the field of endocrinology. Society membership continues to grow with more than
17,000 members from over 100 countries. These
professionals are dedicated to the research and…
Manager, Education– Education Program
Washington D.C.
Coordinator - ANCC–
Under the direction of Silver Spring
the Director, Education, Implements, evaluates
the Manager, Education and manages the adidentifies new learning ministrative processes
opportunities and man- and outcomes related
ages the design, plan- to educational proning and execution of grams and associated
programs and continu- products and services.
ously evaluates their Creates and manages
effectiveness. They will databases and develalso incorporate adult… ops reports related to…
Washington Post Jobs’ Featured
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Washington Metropolitan Area Transit
Authority
Government Contractor–Established in 1996 by experts in military healthcare acquisition, Axiom Resource Management (AXIOM) provides superior program management and analytical support to clients
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cadre of experienced healthcare analysts, epidemiologists, and public health analysts are recognized
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are strategically located across the United States
supporting clients in San Antonio, Texas; San Diego,
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Clinical Informatics
Junior Financial
Coordinator–Arlington Analyst–Arlington
We are seeking a Clini- We are seeking a Junior
cal Informatics Coor- Finance Analyst to supdinator to support the port the Defense Health
Program
Executive Management System
Office, Defense Health- Modernization program
care
Management in Rosslyn, VA. SuccessSystems (PEO DHMS) ful candidate will: Act
in Arlington, VA. Suc- as the program Organicessful Candidate will: zational Defense Travel
Coordinate the imple- Administrator
(ODTA)
mentation and…
for the Defense Travel…
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the washington post . thursday, january 11 , 2018
This spotlight showcases a small
sample of our Featured Employers, allowing you to learn about
each company and some of the
thousands of jobs they are currently hiring for. Check out the FE
Spotlight each Sunday to discover
new DC area companies.
Ford Agency
Education–Alexandria City Public Schools is one of
the most diverse school systems in the country and
we celebrate that diversity. Our students come from
more than 80 different countries, speak more than
60 languages, and represent a rainbow of ethnic
and cultural groups. They are economically diverse,
but all are rich in that the residents of Alexandria are
dedicated to ensuring that each and every one of
them achieves success. The children of Alexandria
have benefited significantly from the strong support
of City Council and the Alexandria community…
Speech Language
ELL/Biology Teacher–
Pathologist–Alexandria Alexandria
Job Description: The Job Description: The job
Speech
Language of ELL Teacher develops
Pathologist
provides bilingual students' abiliservices to students ty to effectively perform
with
communication courses of study in the
disorders in the areas English language by
of written and oral implementing district
language, articulation, approved curriculum;
fluency, and/or voice documents
teaching
within the educational and student progress/
setting. Qualifications… activities/outcomes…
Litigation Paralegal
(IP)–Washington D.C.
LITIGATION PARALEGAL
State-of-the-art IP firm
in Washington, D.C.
seeks an experienced
Litigation
Paralegal
– a highly-motivated
professional with an
interest in joining a
team-oriented, highly
specialized IP practice.
Competitive salary…
Anne Arundel County Public Schools
Education–Anne Arundel County Public Schools
(AACPS) provides a challenging and rewarding educational experience for every child. We offer a comprehensive system-wide multicultural curriculum
from kindergarten through 12th grade. At every level, the focus is on success for every student. Quality
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Explore career opportunities with a progressive
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Specialist - Transpor- Manager - Warehouse
tation–Annapolis
II–Annapolis
Position Summary: Is Position Summary: Is
this position exempt this position exempt
from overtime pay? from overtime pay? Yes
Yes Plans and manages Oversees all activities
the daily operation of of the Logistics Operatschool buses for an as- ing Supply Warehouse.
signed area of the con- Supervises the receivtract or system-owned ing, storing, security
fleet to include the su- and distribution of suppervision of school con- plies, materials and
tractors, drivers…
equipment in…
4Staff
Science–Welcome to 4Staff, LLC, the most dynamic
staffing service in Washington, DC with the most
experience. We are owned by two individuals
with over 40 years of combined experience in the
Washington, DC staffing market. Please let us know
how we can assist you with your Temporary, Tempto-Hire and Direct Hire career goals. We hope that
you consider choosing 4Staff to help you with your
career move, and are confident that it will be an enjoyable and rewarding experience with us. 4Staff is
a full service staffing firm that can offer you…
Raiser's Edge
Accounting Manager Software experience– Non-Profit ExperiWashington D.C.
ence–Washington D.C.
Raiser’s Edge Do you Accounting Manager –
have working knowl- Non-Profit Experience
edge of Raiser’s Edge Do you have at least
software? Our client, 5 years of Accounting
a Charitable Organiza- experience
working
tion located near Metro in a Non-Profit OrgaCenter has an opening nization? Our client in
for a Temporary with downtown Washington,
Raiser’s Edge experi- DC is seeking a Direct
ence to cover or a…
Hire Accounting…
Visit washingtonpost.com/jobs to view complete details and to apply to these and thousands of other listings.
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