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The Washington Post — January 13, 2018

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Cloudy 41/18 • Tomorrow: Cold 29/17 B6
Londoners
gleeful as
Trump calls
o≠ Feb. visit
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
PRESIDENT APPEARS
TO DENY VULGARITY
Sen. Durbin contradicts
him, calls remarks ‘vile’
BY
AND
west palm beach, fla. — President Trump’s vulgar comments
disparaging Haiti, El Salvador
and African countries reverberated across the country Friday —
including in one immigrant-rich
state central to the GOP’s political
fortunes where the party was already facing head winds: Florida.
Trump’s reference to “shithole
countries” in an Oval Office meeting with lawmakers Thursday
sent Florida Gov. Rick Scott, a
close ally the president is courting
to run for the U.S. Senate, scrambling to distance himself from the
controversy. Republican lawmakFLORIDA CONTINUED ON A6
TRUMP CONTINUED ON A4
london — President Trump’s
BRITAIN CONTINUED ON A10
‘Disgraceful and racist’
In insulted countries, reactions of
shock, anger — and pride. A5
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump arrives Friday to sign a proclamation for Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.) called Trump’s
Thursday comments “hate-filled” and “racist,” and House Democrats said they planned to introduce a resolution censuring the president.
A new presidential insult,
the same divided reactions
BY J ENNA J OHNSON,
V ANESSA W ILLIAMS
AND M ARC F ISHER
One barnyard epithet, and the
leader of the free world was now
definitively a racist or, alternatively, was back in the good graces of
those who had worried he was
wavering in his nationalism.
One ugly denunciation of the
population of much of the planet,
and President Trump had once
again propelled himself to center
stage — boxing out discussion of
any number of world crises and,
more immediately, freezing progress toward a bipartisan deal on
immigration policy.
Trump’s slur Thursday against
the “shithole countries” from
which he would rather the United
States take fewer immigrants
sparked a louder-than-usual tempest Friday, but the storm took a
very familiar shape.
Each side reacted more or less
according to script: evermore
frustrated expressions of outrage
from those who believed that the
president had confirmed his racism; and evermore fervent defenses from those who supported
Trump in the first place because,
as many of them have argued for
two years, he says what many
Americans think.
“Well, being president, I think
he should be more careful with
what he says,” said Marjorie Caddick, 93, a longtime Republican
who lives in Munster, Ind., and
voted for Trump. “He’s laughable,
RACE CONTINUED ON A4
Fla. Republicans
fear fallout in
crucial elections
BY S EAN S ULLIVAN
AND L ORI R OZSA
ANDREW INNERARITY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
An insult amid mourning
Haitians, such as this activist
marching in Miami’s Little Haiti,
above, remembered their country’s
earthquake eight years ago as they
reflected on President Trump’s
remarks about them. B1
The Debrief
Insults imply Trump wants a return
to shameful periods in history. A5
The dinner-table test
How do good people react when a
person says something bad? C1
‘What did she grow up to be?’
In 1983, she let a stranger hold her newborn at a D.C. bus station. She would never see her again.
BY P AUL D UGGAN
IN WATERBURY, CONN.
BABY CONTINUED ON A2
Firms struggle to find, retain
workers as economy hums
BY
T
he woman in the bus depot, the
perpetrator, was amiable and chatty, Eleanor Williams tearfully told
the police.
This was long ago, after Williams,
young and naive, had been tragically
preyed upon, investigators said. Today,
it’s a cold case.
The woman, whose crime in the terminal that day shattered Williams’s psyche,
was African American and appeared to
be in her 20s, Williams recalled, speaking
publicly for the first time in decades
about a mystery that has perplexed D.C.
police. Williams said the stranger’s perfidy left her so mired in guilt and shame
that she later contemplated killing herself.
The woman, about 5-foot-3 and slender, struck up a conversation with Williams in the passenger waiting area,
cooing over Williams’s infant daughter.
After a while, in the sweetest voice, she
asked whether she could hold the child.
Please? Just for a minute?
She said her name was Latoya.
MICHAEL NOBLE JR. FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Eleanor Williams, 52, at her Connecticut home. Williams’s infant daughter, April, was
kidnapped when Williams, then 18 and traveling from southeast Virginia, stopped at the old
Trailways station in Washington and a stranger offered to change her baby’s diaper for her.
IN sunday’s post
E D O ’ K EEFE
A NNE G EARAN
President Trump’s comments
about African countries and Haiti
drew condemnation from around
the world Friday, putting the
White House and Republicans on
the defensive while casting doubt
on hopes of resolving disputes in
the coming weeks over immigration legislation.
In a tweet Friday, Trump
seemed to deny using the term
“shithole” to refer to some countries during a private White
House meeting Thursday but acknowledged he used “tough” language during the negotiations.
Among Republicans, there were
differing responses to the comments, but few of them outright
condemned his remarks.
The lone Democrat present for
the Oval Office encounter said
that Trump’s denial was false and
that the president “said things
that were hate-filled, vile and
racist.”
“I cannot believe that in the
history of the White House, in
that Oval Office, any president
has ever spoken the words that I
personally heard our president
speak yesterday,” Sen. Richard J.
Durbin (D-Ill.) told reporters.
In a sign that the outcry over
Trump’s remarks is unlikely to
abate quickly, senior House Democrats said they planned next
week to introduce a resolution
censuring the president for his
comments.
A day after the White House
did not deny that Trump used the
vulgarity, first reported by The
Washington Post, Trump dove
into the controversy and blasted
out his own version of the meeting early Friday on Twitter.
“The language used by me at
the DACA meeting was tough, but
this was not the language used.
What was really tough was the
outlandish proposal made — a
big setback for DACA!” Trump
wrote, referring to negotiations
over the Obama administration’s
Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals program that allowed
K ARLA A DAM
cancellation of a possible trip to
the British capital next month
inspired glee and concern Friday,
while raising new questions
about the strained relations between London and Washington.
In an early-morning tweet,
Trump said he was scrapping a
visit because he is “not a big fan”
of the real estate deal in which
the United States sold the lease of
its old embassy, located in an
affluent central London neighborhood, to move to a new site in
south London, an area Trump
described as an “off location.”
Many Londoners suggested
the real reason he is not coming
is because he is concerned about
hostile demonstrations.
Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London, said a visit would spark
“mass peaceful protests.” Trump
is not welcome in London while
he pursues a “divisive agenda,”
Khan tweeted, and “it seems he’s
finally got that message.”
But at least one prominent
British cabinet official took no
part in the gloating. Foreign
Secretary Boris Johnson, a former mayor of London, accused
Khan and Labour Party leader
Jeremy Corbyn of endangering
the “crucial relationship” between the United States and
Britain. He also called Khan a
“puffed up pompous popinjay.”
The White House had not
formally announced the visit
Trump said he had canceled, but
the president was widely expected to attend a ceremony next
month to dedicate the new embassy. Robert “Woody” Johnson,
the U.S. ambassador to Britain
and a friend of Trump’s, told the
. $2
Global outrage over Trump comments persists
He cites ‘bad’ embassy
deal; others suspect
fear of protests
BY
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
D AVID J . L YNCH
Ron Sandlin has tried everything.
He has boosted pay, added
vacation days and even lowered
the minimum age requirement
from 25 to 23. But he still can’t
find enough qualified people to
drive Patriot Transportation
Holding’s oil trucks.
“I’ve been in this business
since 1984, and I’ve never seen
what we’re dealing with in terms
of hiring people,” said Sandlin,
president of the Jacksonville,
Fla., trucking firm. “Driver pay is
going to have to continue to go
up, and our customers are going
to have to pay for it.”
This is what full employment
looks like. A decade after the
worst economic downturn since
the Great Depression, the United
States suddenly finds itself at a
place where almost everyone
who wants a job can find one.
The unemployment rate in December was 4.1 percent, leaving
employers struggling to attract
and retain good workers and
raising the prospect of higher
wages as the United States approaches congressional elections
in November.
“Employees today have lots of
options in all corners of industry,
whether you’re in fast food or
retail or investment banking,”
said Art Mazor, a principal at
Deloitte Consulting. “This feels
super tight.”
Since President Trump signed
a $1.5 trillion tax cut in December, several major employers
have announced pay increases or
one-time bonuses. The latest
came Thursday when Walmart
announced plans to raise its
starting hourly wage to $11 from
$9, and distribute bonuses of up
to $1,000. Other companies, such
as American Airlines, AT&T,
Comcast and Bank of America,
have cited the tax legislation as
the trigger for similar moves,
drawing cheers from Republicans.
But the pace of wage growth
JOBS CONTINUED ON A6
Inside
The robo-callers’ triumph How Washington tried — and
failed — to defend your
phones. Magazine
In the social media
spotlight Child actors such as
Finn Wolfhard, right, of
“Stranger Things” are
bombarded with praise and
criticism, even the occasional
weird come-on. Also known
as harassment. Arts & Style
A Trail of Three Capes In
Tasmania, 29 miles of
exclusive beauty have been
opened to all. The track
boasts stunning Australian
coastline, a spectacular boat
ride and smooth boardwalks.
For a price. Travel
KYLE BEAN
$76
CHARLEY GALLAY/GETTY IMAGES FOR TNT
THE NATION
THE NATION
Report: Porn star got paid
Iran accord alive for now
A lawyer for then-candidate Donald
Trump allegedly made a $130,000
hush-money payment in the weeks
before the 2016 election, the Wall
Street Journal reported. A4
President Trump waived some
sanctions but said he won’t grant
another reprieve unless the pact is
altered to permanently block any
pathway to build nuclear arms. A10
BUSINESS NEWS..............................................A11
COMICS ............................................................. C5
OPINION PAGES...............................................A13
LOTTERIES.........................................................B3
OBITUARIES.......................................................B4
TELEVISION.......................................................C3
WORLD NEWS....................................................A9
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B6
CONTENT © 2018
The Washington Post / Year 141, No. 39
7 1 9 2
A2
EZ
I N CA S E Y O U M I S S ED I T
Some reports that you may have missed. Read more at washingtonpost.com.
Google, Twitter face
discrimination suits
Expanded AP classes
draw more minorities
Google and Twitter were sued
Monday in discrimination cases
that are the latest signs of a
broad effort by some
conservatives to challenge
technology companies on the
grounds that they favor liberal or
moderate voices, reflecting the
prevailing political sensibilities
in Silicon Valley.
Ten years ago, girls were so
scarce in high school computer
science classes that the number
of female students taking
Advanced Placement tests in
that subject could be counted on
one hand in nine states. Now,
testing totals for female, black
and Latino students have all
doubled.
washingtonpost.com/business
washingtonpost.com/local
Charges dismissed
against Nev. rancher
Refunds for riders
if Metro is late?
A federal judge on Monday
dismissed criminal charges
against Nevada rancher Cliven
Bundy, who rose to national
prominence during his armed
standoff with government
authorities in 2014 as he
challenged their authority over
federal lands.
The next time a Metro
meltdown makes you late for
work, you may be entitled to a
refund. The “Rush-Hour
Promise” program would provide
full refund credits to peak-period
rail and Metrobus riders who
encounter delays of 15 minutes
or more, the agency said.
washingtonpost.com/national
washingtonpost.com/local
KLMNO
CO R R ECTI O N S
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The Crossword in this
weekend’s Washington Post
Magazine, which was printed in
advance, includes an incorrect
clue for 90 Across. It should be
“Minibar site,” not “Minibar sites.”
A Jan. 12 A-section article about
Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.)
accusing Republicans of blocking
access to witnesses in the House
Intelligence Committee’s Russia
probe incorrectly attributed a
written statement to House
Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.). It
was Ryan’s spokeswoman, AshLee
Strong, who said in a statement:
“While Mr. Schiff tries to distract
from the serious, bipartisan
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D I G ES T
FLORIDA
PUERTO RICO
20-year-old wins
$451 million jackpot
Astronaut addresses
students from space
A 20-year-old Florida man
claimed the $451 million Mega
Millions jackpot on Friday.
A Florida Lottery news release
said Friday that Shane Missler, of
Port Richey, chose to receive his
winnings in a one-time, lumpsum payment of $281,874,999.
“I’m only 20, but I hope to use it
to pursue a variety of passions,
help my family and do some good
for humanity,” he said in a
statement.
The winning numbers to claim
the nation’s 10th-largest jackpot
were 28-30-39-59-70 with a Mega
Ball of 10.
The winning ticket was bought
at a 7-Eleven in Port Richey. The
retailer will receive a $100,000
bonus.
The first astronaut of Puerto
Rican heritage reached out Friday
to schoolchildren on the
hurricane-bashed island.
Flying aboard the
International Space Station,
NASA astronaut Joe Acaba
fielded questions from students
at the Puerto Rico Institute of
Robotics in Manati.
One student asked how Puerto
Rico looked from space after
Hurricane Maria struck in
September.
Acaba said the first thing he
noticed was the lack of lights,
making the island almost
impossible to see at night.
A boy noted that after the
hurricane, it was difficult for
some Puerto Ricans to eat, given
the limited variety of available
food. Does Acaba find the limited
space menu tough to swallow?
The menu, while pretty good,
repeats every week or two and
does get monotonous, Acaba said.
Of course, he said it doesn’t
compare to such Puerto Rican
specialties as pasteles, stuffed
meat pastries wrapped in banana
leaves popular around Christmas,
and rice with pigeon peas and
pork.
Acaba, a former schoolteacher,
is to return to Earth at the end of
February.
— Associated Press
OHIO
Teacher to black pupil:
You could be ‘lynched’
A white teacher in Ohio who
admitted to telling a black
student he would be lynched by
his classmates if he didn’t get
back to work will have to undergo
sensitivity training.
According to Mason school
officials, Renee Thole admitted to
making the comment to the
student in December. A formal
letter of reprimand placed in
Thole’s file Thursday says the
teacher will be required to
undergo cultural proficiency
training.
District spokeswoman Tracey
Carson says there is nothing that
can be done to take back Thole’s
words, and “this is a serious miss
on her part.” District officials
noted in their reports that this is
her first offense.
The student’s mother, Tanisha
Agee-Bell, says she is not satisfied
with the school district’s
punishment, calling it unclear.
— Associated Press
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13 , 2018
For mother, almost 35 years of guilt, pain
and constant wonder: Is April out there?
BABY FROM A1
Which might have been a lie.
Who knows?
She said she was headed “out
west” — maybe also a lie.
Williams was 18 then, on Dec.
2, 1983, a date that haunts her. She
had grown up on a nine-acre farm
in southeastern Virginia, and she
still lived there. Before that morning, when she set out for Kansas
by motor coach with her daughter, she had never ventured more
than 30 miles from her home, she
said.
Her baby, April Nicole Williams, 31/2 months old, was bundled in a pink-and-white snowsuit. The trip’s first leg, 200 miles,
brought them to downtown
Washington, to the old Trailways
depot at 12th and I streets NW,
which closed not long afterward.
They were scheduled for a
three-hour afternoon stop. Carrying April and her diaper bag,
Williams, who had been awake
since before dawn, trudged into
the station and sat down wearily,
with 1,200 miles of highway still
ahead of her.
Latoya, if that was really her
name, “came over next to me at
some point and just started talking to me,” Williams said recently
at her Connecticut apartment,
sobbing as she described the awful mistake she made 34 years
ago. Latoya “was being friendly,
asking me lots of questions. Like,
‘Where are you going?’ And, ‘How
old is your baby?’ She was nice,
you know? Then she was like, ‘Do
you mind if I hold her?’ And I was
sitting right next to her, right
there, so I said okay, and I let her.”
Until lately, Williams, 52,
hadn’t spoken publicly about her
firstborn child since the week in
1983 when her world fell apart.
She kept the memories mostly to
herself, buried under a weight of
sorrow. In her apartment, she
shared the story haltingly, pausing for long stretches to gather
her composure.
The woman, cradling April,
said the baby needed a diaper
change, Williams recalled.
“She said: ‘Oh, I’ll take her to
the bathroom. You look tired.’ And
I was skeptical, like, “Well . . .
‘Okay, I guess.’ Because I was
tired. And I thought about it, but I
had already said okay, and she
had already got up and taken her
to the bathroom.
“And then, I don’t know, about
10 minutes later, when she didn’t
come back, I started getting nervous.”
Williams struggles every day to
live with this: She entrusted her
infant daughter to a stranger in a
bus station, some woman. Latoya
was her name, or maybe not.
“She went to change her,” Williams said, “and I never saw them
again.”
‘I blame myself ’
One year ago yesterday a 3month-old girl was kidnapped at
the old Trailways bus terminal in
downtown Washington, prompting one of the largest and longest
manhunts in the city’s history.
Today, while the chance of the
baby’s return has decreased, the
hope, it seems, has not. — The
Washington Post, Dec. 3, 1984.
There’s still hope, although
very little.
She weighed 11 pounds when
she vanished.
Assuming she is alive, she
turned 34 last summer.
“I’m pretty sure this is the only
cold-case kidnapping we have,
the only stranger kidnapping,
where we still have a victim out,”
Cmdr. Leslie Parsons, head of the
D.C. police criminal investigations division, said recently. Parsons wouldn’t discuss details of
the case, but apparently there
isn’t much to say. “About the only
thing we can do proactively at this
point is put it out in the media,” he
said. “Hopefully someone will see
it, and they’ll call us.”
When another anniversary of
the abduction rolled around in
December, the department issued
a news release, a standard plea for
help: “The infant victim was
named April Williams. She has a
small birthmark on top of her left
wrist in a straight line.” The state-
MICHAEL NOBLE JR. FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Eleanor Williams works as a surgical technician in Connecticut. She is “extremely close” to her grown
son and daughter, both born after April. She has two grandchildren and hopes for more, she said.
ment was a terse rendition of the
basic facts, repeated by police
many times through the years,
including details from the mother’s 1983 recollection of her chat
with the kidnapper.
“The suspect could have a sister named Latisha or Natisha,”
the department said. “The suspect could have the astrological
sign of ‘Leo.’ The suspect is described as [having] . . . a dark
brown complexion and spots on
her face. Her ears were pierced
with two holes in each ear.”
It said of Latoya, “she could go
by Rene or Rene Latoya.”
A few weeks ago, the detective
handling the case contacted Williams in Connecticut, where she
has lived since 1988, and asked
her to speak with the news media.
Publicity is good for cold cases, he
told her: You shake the tree, and
something might fall out. Plus, it’s
the Internet age. The last time
Williams talked publicly about
April, in the days right after the
kidnapping, articles and photos
didn’t routinely circle the planet
as they do now.
Williams balked at sitting for
an in-person interview, telling a
reporter on the phone that Connecticut was her “safe haven,” that
she wanted to be left alone there,
free of the painful past. She said
she has tried for years to block out
what happened, to rid her memory of everything about that afternoon except for April’s little face.
Then, after a few days, she
changed her mind and said okay.
Then, the next morning, she
canceled.
Then, later in the week, she
phoned and said all right, come to
Waterbury.
“Of course I blame myself,” she
said in her apartment. Her hands
were trembling. “I blame myself
every minute, right up to this
minute. It’s been 34 years, and it’s
not something that’s over. I deal
with it every day, whether I talk
about it or not. . . . It’s always on
my mind. It’s always: ‘How could
you be so stupid? Why? Why did
you do it?’ ”
She lives alone and works as a
surgical technician, helping physicians with their instruments in
operating rooms. She is “extremely close” to her grown son and
daughter, both born after April.
She has two grandchildren and
hopes for more, she said.
“There were times when I was
younger when I wanted to commit suicide, I just felt so bad and
so guilty,” she said. “But my other
kids were always my strength.
Like, what would they do if anything ever happened to me? I
remember coming home one
night after work and thinking, ‘I
could just drive off the road into a
tree, and nobody would ever
know that I wanted to do this.’
And then I thought about my
other kids.”
Williams was 4 when her mother died in 1969, on Christmas
night. She is the second-youngest
of six siblings and was raised by
her father on her paternal grandparents’ farm near Suffolk, Va. In
late 1982, when she was a senior
in high school, she found out she
was pregnant.
“I wasn’t happy about it,” she
recalled. “I mean, I was 17 years
old! I didn’t want to have a baby. I
thought about having an abortion, but I decided not to. . . .
There’s something about when
babies start moving and kicking.
You know there’s something inside you, and it’s like a bonding.
It’s just some kind of way special.”
April was born Aug. 17, 1983,
two months after her mother’s
high school graduation. Williams
said the father was a local teenager who wanted no part of parenthood. She saw no future with
him, either, and they lost touch
after the baby arrived.
By then, Williams was interested in someone else — a soldier in
Kansas, a young man she had
never seen. One of her brothers
was in the Army, stationed at Fort
Riley, and he had mentioned his
sister Eleanor to a buddy named
Kevin. She and Kevin became pen
pals during her pregnancy, trading letters and photos for months,
and talking by phone.
In November that year, Kevin
wired her money for a bus ticket
to Kansas, so they could meet and
spend the holidays together.
Williams had never been out of
southeast Virginia.
She made it as far as Washington, where she wound up spending a week, frightened, disoriented, often panicked, with news
lights flashing and detectives
pressing her, wanting to know
this, wanting to know that — then
more detectives, asking, asking,
demanding.
These were stone-hard questions from stone-hard men with
badges, the gist of the queries
being: What did you do to her?
Tell us. Where is she?
Latoya took her!
And a polygraph examiner, quietly, in a mortician’s voice:
“Did you sell your baby?”
At last, when the police seemed
satisfied with her story, Williams
was gently sent on her way, home
to the farm. She said she hasn’t set
foot in the District since.
“And I never will go back, ever.”
Birthdays spent wondering
Mother of Kidnapped Baby
Hypnotized — Post headline,
March 10, 1984.
Latoya had short hair, dark and
wavy.
She wore green pants and a
white ski jacket with a purple
floral lining.
Williams told the detectives
that.
The Post reported at the time
that the woman in the bus station
had taken the baby with her to a
fast-food counter to buy sodas.
This detail showed up in the
newspaper repeatedly, but it
wasn’t accurate, Williams said.
She recalled reading it that week.
And she said the mistake didn’t
surprise her, because she had
learned, in just a few hours’ time
back then, to never trust anyone
she doesn’t know. Police, report-
— Associated Press
Father is indicted on capital
murder charges in Dallas:
Wesley Mathews, the father of a
3-year-old girl whose body was
found in a culvert near their
suburban Dallas home about a
year after she was adopted from
an Indian orphanage, was
indicted Friday on capital
murder. The child, Sherin
Mathews, disappeared in early
October, sparking a broad search
involving numerous law
enforcement agencies before her
body was found later that month.
— Associated Press
IMAGES FROM THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR MISSING & EXPLOITED CHILDREN
LEFT: A baby photo of April. CENTER: An age-progression image of April done in 2011, when she
would have been 28 years old. RIGHT: A D.C. police sketch of the suspect in the abduction.
ers, strangers in bus depots —
trust nobody.
“That’s how I am now,” she said.
“I’m always going to be that way.”
These days, there would almost
certainly be video footage of some
Latoya walking into a bus terminal. Security cameras would capture her in the waiting area,
would record her chatting up a
young mother, then heading to a
restroom or wherever, and sneaking out of the station with a tiny
bundle in her arms. But the
Latoya of 1983 stole a baby in the
pre-surveillance age. “If we had
images of the suspect,” Parsons
said, “we’d definitely put them
out to the public.”
She is a ghost.
Hours after the abduction, the
driver of a Metrobus and several
passengers reported seeing a
woman on the bus who matched
the suspect’s description. The
woman, carrying an infant, got off
at Rhode Island Avenue and 18th
Street NE, near the Prince
George’s County line, the witnesses said. Squads of police officers
canvassed the area for days,
knocking on doors. But the trail, if
it was a trail, went cold.
Deep in Virginia, meanwhile,
Williams grew tired of being
stared at.
“I just couldn’t deal with everybody looking at me and talking
about me and having something
to say about my situation,” she
recalled. “It was always, ‘She gave
her baby away.’ People were always whispering that. Or, ‘She’s
just not fit to have a child.’ I mean,
the way people are, they’re cruel.
They’re mean. Until something
happens to them.”
A month after the abduction,
Williams left the farm for Kansas
again on a motor coach.
Emotionally she was immature, still an adolescent, she said.
Kevin, the Fort Riley soldier,
was there when she got off the
bus.
“All I needed him for was to
have a baby to replace April,”
Williams said. “He knew the only
reason for me visiting him was
because I wanted to get pregnant
again, because I wanted another
April. I thought it was going to
make me feel better. I thought it
would make it hurt less. But actually all it did was make it hurt
more.”
She soon lost touch with Kevin.
Their daughter was born the
following September.
Williams asked that the daughter’s name not be published, for
privacy’s sake. She is 33 and understands the circumstances of
her conception. Williams told her
the story when she was teenager.
She also told her son, born in
1986. The three have had many
long conversations about April
and the emotional impact of her
disappearance, Williams said.
She said they are parent, daughter, son, and the best of friends.
And the siblings know that every Aug. 17, they should leave their
mother alone.
“I always spend April’s birthday by myself,” Williams said. “I
don’t want to be around my other
kids, because that’s me and April’s
day. I sit and just think about her,
hold on to her picture, cry. And I
just wonder what she could be
doing.”
Her voice was pleading.
“All the stuff they do in school,
the awards they get. Did she get
any awards? You know, the prom,
homecoming, graduation — did
she go to the prom? What did she
grow up to be? Does she have a
career? Does she have kids?”
Williams gazed at the small
tabletop in front of her.
“Did she have a wedding? Did
she have . . .”
It’s pointless, always pointless.
For answers never come.
paul.duggan@washpost.com
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
M2
politics & the nation
Ky. is first state allowed to impose Medicaid work rules
BY
A MY G OLDSTEIN
A day after the Trump administration announced that it
would allow states to compel
poor people on Medicaid to work
or get ready for jobs, federal
health officials on Friday granted
Kentucky permission to impose
those requirements.
Becoming the first state to
move forward with the profound
change to the safety-net health
insurance program is a victory
for Kentucky’s Republican governor, Matt Bevin, who during his
2015 campaign for office vowed
to reverse the strong embrace of
the Affordable Care Act by his
Democratic predecessor.
Bevin first pledged to undo the
state’s expansion of Medicaid,
which had helped to shrink the
ranks of uninsured Kentuckians
more than in almost any other
state. Bevin then pivoted to the
idea of keeping the additional
people in the program — with
strings attached that the federal
government had never permitted
in Medicaid’s half-century history.
The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced early Friday afternoon
that it had approved a “waiver” —
that is, the state’s application to
experiment with changes to Med-
icaid’s usual rules. At a news
conference at the capitol in
Frankfort, Bevin said that state
agencies will phase in the “community engagement and employment initiative” in different parts
of the state from July to November.
The governor said the changes
will be “transformational . . . in
good ways and powerful ways.”
He argued that helping people
find work will lead them out of
poverty and government dependence, ultimately improving Kentuckians’ subpar health status.
“Why should a working-age
person not be expected to do
something in exchange for what
they are provided?” Bevin said.
He focused in particular on the
ACA’s expansion population, repeatedly calling them people “for
whom Medicaid was not originally designed.” Bevin has been one
of many Republican governors
contending that their state budgets cannot afford the extra beneficiaries, even though federal
money covers the vast majority of
the expense. While Kentucky officials previously said the changes
would rein in Medicaid costs,
Bevin on Friday suggested that
increases in job-training efforts
might offset any savings from
fewer Medicaid beneficiaries.
Since Kentucky expanded
ALEX SLITZ/LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin on Friday announces federal approval
for Kentucky to use a work requirement for Medicaid beneficiaries.
Medicaid under the ACA four
years ago, to include people with
incomes of up to 138 percent of
the federal poverty level, nearly
half a million newly eligible residents have joined the program.
Briefing reporters, aides to the
governor estimated that about
half of 350,000 able-bodied,
working-age Medicaid recipients
subject to the “community engagement” requirement already
meet its terms to work at least 80
hours per month, volunteer or be
in job training. Individuals will
need to send documentation to
prove their compliance.
Those who do not will receive a
notice after a month, then be
given one more month to “cure”
their violation. After that, their
benefits will cease until they
prove they have begun following
the rules.
When the state first applied for
federal permission in 2016, it
proposed that “community engagement” gradually increase to
80 hours a month over the first
year. Officials later altered their
application to require 80 hours
from the beginning, saying that
the requirement aligned with
rules for people on welfare or the
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, as food stamps
are now called.
The country’s first work requirement applies to Kentucky
residents who joined Medicaid
under the ACA, as well as traditional Medicaid beneficiaries
who are not pregnant and not
primary caretakers.
The requirement is among several changes that the CMS is
allowing Kentucky to adopt. They
include a system that will require
some people in the program to
make small monthly premium
payments, incentives to adopt
healthy behaviors and different
benefits provided to certain
groups.
Once the changes take effect,
the program can lock out for six
months people above the federal
poverty line who fail to pay required premiums or who do not
reapply in time to determine
whether they remain eligible.
People also can be penalized if
they do not promptly report any
changes in their income.
One aide to Bevin said the
state’s Medicaid rolls are forecast
to be reduced by about 95,000
people by the end of the five years
that the CMS granted for this
experiment. He did not say how
many of those individuals would
lose eligibility vs. no longer needing the program.
Critics of the Trump adminis-
tration’s move had vowed to sue
once the first state waiver was
granted, contending that work
requirements violate the objectives of the vast insurance program created in 1965 as a major
advance in access to care for the
nation’s poor.
Leonardo Cuello, health policy
director at the National Health
Law Program, said that the plan
approved by the CMS “will harm
thousands upon thousands Kentuckians and contains numerous
violations of the Medicaid statute” and that the organization “is
very, very carefully considering
taking legal action.”
Brad Woodhouse, director of
Protect our Care Campaign, a
pro-ACA group in which many
alumni of the Obama administration are involved, said that the
federal agency’s decision “marks
not just a shift in policy, but a
shift in the fundamental decency
of the United States. . . . Changing Medicaid will do nothing to
help Americans find jobs. It will
merely take away their health
care.”
Bevin rejected such criticism,
calling the CMS’s approval “a
significant milestone on our journey to lead the nation in transforming Medicaid in a fiscally
responsible way.”
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
Tragic mudslide ordeals
recounted in California
BY M ARK
AND T ONY
B ERMAN
B IASOTTI
When the flooding began early
Tuesday, Alice and James Mitchell were still at their home in
Montecito, Calif., just a mile from
the beach. The couple had celebrated James’s 89th birthday
Monday, but they also had spent
part of the day preparing to evacuate in case they were ordered to
leave. Mudslides were a possible
result of the recent wildfires’ denuding the hillsides of trees.
Then came the rain, which sent
rivers of water, mud and debris
roaring through the scenic coastal community just south of Santa
Barbara. When it was over, the
Mitchell home was gone, washed
down the road toward the ocean.
Just a piece of a wall remained,
said Clay Weimer, the couple’s
son-in-law.
“It was like a construction crew
came in and wiped it; it was
clean,” Weimer said in a telephone interview Friday. “It hardly
had any mud on it. It was just
wiped clean.”
Weimer said his wife, Kelly,
had been trying to reach her
parents since Tuesday morning,
and the bad news came Wednesday: The bodies of James and
Alice, who were married for five
decades and were the grandparents of six, had been found in the
detritus.
“The main target, you would
swear, was [their] house,” said
Weimer, 59, a software engineer.
“Everybody in the path of that
was doomed. . . . It’s devastating.”
The disaster has claimed at
least 18 lives, cutting across generations and killing parents
alongside their children. The
youngest victim was 3. James
Mitchell was the oldest. All were
killed by “multiple traumatic injuries due to flash flood with
mudslides,” according to the Santa Barbara Sheriff ’s Office.
In an area where the Thomas
Fire already had caused lengthy
evacuations last month, many
said a sense of weariness had set
in. People had packed up, left and
come back, and some were not so
eager to leave again. Authorities
warned Monday that many in
Montecito should flee ahead of
the rains, but not everyone did.
Alice and James Mitchell had
been forced from their home
once, evacuating weeks earlier
for the wildfires that burned
nearby. But because they were in
a voluntary evacuation zone this
week, they stayed, Clay Weimer
said.
“Everybody was tired from the
fire warnings,” Weimer said Friday. “It was a long fire, tough fire,
and then everybody kind of relaxed too much.”
That fire, the largest in California history, had roared across the
hillsides above Montecito, leaving sloping patches of earth that
were expected to give way in a
downpour. When the rivers of
water and mud had stopped, dozens of homes were destroyed and
hundreds of others damaged.
Some of the damaged homes had
“boulders or cars or other debris
punch through them,” Santa Barbara County Sheriff Bill Brown
said in an interview Friday.
More than two dozen people
were injured, and at least five
remained missing Friday, authorities said, although they noted
that the number is expected to
fluctuate. It had risen to 43 missing a day earlier, but many of
those people were found, having
been cut off from communication
without power or cellphone signal, Brown said.
“We’re hoping against hope
that we can find somebody that
might be alive,” Brown said.
JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES
A firefighter searches cars Friday next to a home that was destroyed by Tuesday’s mudslides in Montecito, Calif.
As the search and rescue efforts continued, stories of grim
loss have begun to emerge. Montecito is a small town, so it felt as
if everyone knew someone who
was lost in or seriously affected by
the disaster.
Among those killed was Josephine “Josie” Gower, 69, an “always cheery” regular at the Read
‘N Post, a newsstand and gift
shop, said Jan Hendrickson, the
store’s owner. David Cantin, 49,
got his hair cut Monday at Montecito Barbers, a small shop in the
Coast Village Road center, right
before he died in the mudslides.
“He’s been coming here since
before I started working here,”
said Cantin’s barber, Tim Sanchez, who owns the shop. “My dad
used to cut his hair.”
Mark Montgomery, 54, a prominent hand surgeon in Santa Bar-
bara, was swept out of his home
along with his son, Duffy, 19, and
daughter, Caroline, 22. The siblings were carried downhill in the
churn of mud, stone and debris,
said Mark’s brother, David Montgomery, who is a Washington Post
reporter.
Duffy survived, was treated in
the hospital and released with
cuts, bruises and a shoulder fracture. Caroline, a high school water polo star and a senior at
Barnard College in New York, was
fatally injured and died in her
brother’s arms, her uncle said.
Mark was an avid ice hockey
player who had skated in a game
the night before the mudslides.
His body was found a day after his
children were recovered, about a
mile from their home. The father
and daughter had shared a love of
taking canoe trips on the wilder-
ness lakes and portages of Canada, David Montgomery said.
Some people were prepared to
go but decided to stay in their
homes, among them a woman
and her mother who were
trapped by a six-foot wall of mud.
The Mitchells likewise opted to
stay. Kelly Weimer spoke to her
parents on Monday. Alice had
gone to the store, and they were
planning a small celebration for
James’s birthday. They were
ready to leave if they needed to.
“That’s the last we heard of
them,” Clay Weimer said. “We
were really sure they were just
rescued.”
When Clay and Kelly Weimer
could not reach the Mitchells,
they jumped in their car Tuesday
and headed south from the Bay
Area.
Even after Kelly Weimer
learned that her parents had been
lost in the mudslides, she held out
one last hope, her husband said.
Her parents had a dog — Gigi, a
small white poodle — who had
not been found. Gigi was a rescue
dog the couple had taken in a year
earlier, and the dog followed
them everywhere, Clay Weimer
said. Maybe the dog was okay.
“That’s all she could talk about
last night,” Weimer said.
More bad news came Friday
morning: Gigi’s body had been
found.
“I saw the place,” Weimer said.
“And I don’t think Superman
would’ve survived it.”
mark.berman@washpost.com
Biasotti reported from Montecito,
Calif. Julie Tate and Scott Wilson in
Washington and David Shultz in
Montecito contributed to this report.
Final auction of the season! MLK weekend!
Breast cancer drug stalls tumor cells
BY
L AURIE M C G INLEY
The Food and Drug Administration on Friday cleared the first
treatment for patients with advanced breast cancer caused by
BRCA mutations, which are genetic defects that raise the risk of
malignancies.
The drug, called Lynparza, already is approved for patients
with advanced ovarian cancer
associated with the same mutations. Richard Pazdur, director of
the FDA’s Oncology Center of
Excellence, said in a statement
that expanding the approval to
breast-cancer patients “demonstrates the current paradigm of
developing drugs that target the
underlying genetic causes of a
cancer, often across cancer
types.”
Lynparza belongs to a class of
drugs called PARP inhibitors that
block an enzyme involved in repairing damaged DNA.
By blocking the enzyme, the
DNA in cancer cells may be less
likely to be fixed, leading to the
death of those cells and potential-
ly a slowdown or halt in tumor
growth, the FDA said.
The drug, also known as
olaparib, is marketed by AstraZeneca and Merck.
The agency said its approval
was based on a randomized clinical trial of more than 300 advanced breast cancer patients
with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.
The trial found that the length of
time during which the tumors
did not grow significantly, a
measure called progression-free
survival, was a median of seven
months for patients treated with
Lynparza compared with about
four months for patients receiving chemotherapy only. Lynparza
did not improve the overall
length of survival, however.
When those results were published last June, Mark Robson, an
oncologist at Memorial Sloan
Kettering Cancer Center who led
the multisite trial, described the
treatment as “an early chapter in
a woman’s journey” dealing with
breast cancer — one that can
delay the start of chemotherapy
and help preserve her quality of
life.
In an interview Friday, he
called the drug an “exciting new
option” for patients with BRCAcaused cancer. “It’s a building
block,” he said, adding that researchers need to determine
whether results can be improved
by using it with other treatments.
The FDA on Friday also approved Myriad Genetics’s diagnostic test, called BRACAnalysis
CDx, as a companion to Lynparza. The test, which was previously
cleared for ovarian cancer patients, identifies which breast
cancer patients have BRCA mutations.
The National Cancer Institute
estimates that about 253,000
women will be diagnosed with
breast cancer this year and that
more than 40,000 will die of the
disease.
About 5 percent to 10 percent
of patients with breast cancer
have a BRCA mutation.
laurie.mcginley@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
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Lawyer for
Trump paid
porn star,
report says
$130,000 before election
was to keep woman quiet
about alleged affair
BY
J OSH D AWSEY
An adult-film star was paid
$130,000 by a lawyer for Donald
Trump in the weeks before the
2016 election to not talk publicly
about a sexual relationship with
the then-Republican candidate,
according to a report in the Wall
Street Journal.
The lawyer, Michael Cohen, allegedly paid Stephanie Clifford to
remain silent about an encounter
at Lake Tahoe in 2006, a year after
Trump married his third wife,
Melania, according to the Journal. The Journal said the payment
was made to a client-trust account at City National Bank in
Los Angeles.
The Washington Post was not
able to independently confirm
the payment and was not able to
reach the bank.
“These rumors have circulated
time and again since 2011. President Trump once again vehemently denies any such occurrence, as has Ms. Daniels,” Cohen
said to The Post. Cohen also issued a statement that he said was
from Clifford, whose professional
name is Stormy Daniels.
“Rumors that I have received
hush money from Donald Trump
are completely false,” reads the
statement, signed by Stormy
Daniels. “If indeed I did have a
relationship with Donald Trump,
trust me, you wouldn’t be reading
about it in the news, you would be
reading about it in my book.”
Cohen has called himself
Trump’s “fix-it man” and has become part of the investigation
into Russian meddling in the
2016 election for his emails to
Russian officials about a business
project there, including a note to
Vladimir Putin’s spokesman.
Clifford could not be reached
for comment. Her partner, Glendon Crain, did not respond to
messages. Keith Davidson, a lawyer that the Journal said was
representing Clifford, did not respond to emails and phone calls
seeking comment.
A White House official said
that “these are old, recycled reports, which were published and
strongly denied prior to the election.” The official did not specifically respond to the allegation of
a payoff to Clifford.
In the days before the 2016
election, the Journal reported
that Clifford was in talks with
ABC’s “Good Morning America”
to air her story about Trump. That
report came days after The Washington Post released a video from
a 2005 “Access Hollywood” recording in which Trump said he
could grab women by the genitals
because he was famous.
The Journal also reported in
2016 that the National Enquirer
— a publication owned by a close
friend of Trump — paid Playboy
model Karen McDougal $150,000
for her story about an affair with
Trump but never published it.
Clifford, a native of Louisiana,
considered running against
then-U.S. Sen. David Vitter (R) in
2010 but decided against it.
Her mother, Sheila Weimer,
said she hasn’t spoken to Clifford
in 12 years and had no idea
whether her daughter had made a
legal settlement or had a sexual
relationship with Trump.
“I don’t have her phone number. I don’t have a way to get in
touch with her,” Weimer said. She
said her daughter “grew up and
went her own merry way.”
Weimer said she did not know
her daughter was also known as
Stormy or had starred in adult
films.
But she had praise for Trump.
“I love Trump. I think he’s
great,” Weimer said. “I think he’s
making a lot of good progress for
our country.”
joshua.dawsey@washpost.com
The Washington Post
is printed using
recycled fiber.
NF407 1x2.5
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13 , 2018
Vulgarity changes few minds about the president
RACE FROM A1
and he doesn’t get the respect that
he should have because he says
these things.” But Caddick said
that even if Trump is “too loose
with his tongue . . . he means
well.”
She also agreed with Trump on
the need to tighten up on immigration: “These are poor countries, and . . . we’ve given them so
much money, and it doesn’t get
better.”
The storm over Trump’s comments — in which he was bemoaning immigration from Haiti, El
Salvador and African countries
rather than from wealthier nations such as Norway — has taken
the year-old debate over his demolition of presidential tradition to
new terrain. For the first time in
diplomatic
history,
nations
around the world inserted a gutter vulgarity into official statements. The United Nations’ human rights spokesman, Rupert
Colville, declared that “there is no
other word one can use but ‘racist.’ ”
“With one word,” wrote the
New Yorker’s Robin Wright,
Trump “has demolished his ability to be taken seriously on the
global stage.”
But did he, really? Is Trump’s
latest comment a showstopper —
or just another scene in a longrunning production that wins audiences through pugnacious behavior, profane language and all
manner of provocation?
“This is par for the course,” said
former House speaker Newt Gingrich, a supporter of the president
who is writing a book about
Trump’s America. “Trump relies
on the fact that his opponents are
so nihilistic and elitist that they’ll
react hysterically to something
like this. And his base isn’t re-
motely corroded by this. Almost
anything he does that is outside
the establishment resonates in
the end with people who say, well,
at least he’s sticking it to the powerful.”
Gingrich said the normal concerns that presidents and other
politicians have about their legacies and reputations don’t seem to
apply to Trump, who has made
smashing conventions the core of
his brand for nearly half a century.
Critics of the president argued
that the main issue is not Trump’s
language or even what’s in his
heart, but rather the policies he’s
enacting and the midterm elections coming up this year.
“We’ve got to get beyond the
antics and address the policy,”
said the Rev. William J. Barber II, a
member of the NAACP’s national
board who has been rallying progressives to “put checks and balances on Trump’s power by changing the makeup of the Congress.”
“It’s not just Trump,” Barber
said. “Everyone in his administration . . . is participating in systemic racism. . . . We turn our outrage
into sustained organizing, protests, voter registration and voter
mobilization.”
The Rev. Al Sharpton, the civil
rights activist and TV talk show
host, said the fact that Trump’s
slur came during a meeting on
immigration policy put it in a
different category from past controversial remarks. “Some of the
stuff he said in the past was just as
offensive and insulting,” he said,
but this time, Trump was “framing
21st-century Jim Crow immigration law.”
Sharpton plans to campaign for
a congressional censure of the
president. “The threat is not his
rhetoric; it’s what he’s doing,” he
said. “He’s making laws out of this.
. . . We have trade agreements
with people in Africa. We work on
security issues with African nations; that’s where ISIS is, that’s
where al-Qaeda is. What do we get
out of Norway? . . . If we insult
everybody in Africa, how can we
have intel on the ground for fighting ISIS and al-Qaeda?”
To Tiffany Mock, 50, a teacher
and Trump supporter who lives in
Cumberland, Md., the president
was simply noting that many
more people from impoverished
countries want to immigrate to
the United States than from affluent nations such as Norway.
“I don’t like the language or the
comments that he made, but I do
like that he’s putting America
first,” Mock said, adding that she
didn’t hear Trump favoring white
immigrants over other races. “I
didn’t take it as racist. He’s not a
racist. I’m not a racist — although
they say you’re a racist if you say
that you’re not a racist.”
Right-wing extremists and
white supremacists welcomed
Trump’s comment. Former Ku
Klux Klan leader and Louisiana
legislator David Duke said on
Twitter that the president “restores a lot of love in us by saying
blunt but truthful things that no
other President in our lifetime
would dare say!”
On cable TV and social media,
Trump’s language became fodder
for round-the-clock hardening of
long-standing views about his unsuitability to hold office, or, conversely, his heroic championing of
ordinary Americans.
“The president of the United
States is racist,” CNN anchor Don
Lemon began on his broadcast
Thursday night.
But on Fox News Channel, Jesse
Watters concluded that “this is
how the forgotten men and women in America talk at the bar. . . . Is
it graceful? No. . . . Is it a little
offensive? Of course it is. But you
know what? This doesn’t move the
needle at all. This is who Trump
is.”
For career politicians in his
own party, confrontations with
Trump’s vocabulary of insults and
exaggerations make for repeated
awkward moments. House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) on Friday
called Trump’s choice of words
“very unfortunate, unhelpful” and
praised African immigrants in his
home town but said nothing
about racism.
Before Trump won, Ryan was
more pointed in his criticism.
During the 2016 campaign, the
speaker called Trump’s attack on a
federal judge because of his Mexican heritage the “textbook definition of a racist comment.”
Although this week’s example of
Trump’s rhetoric was not intended
for public consumption, it mirrored a number of incidents when
the president has attached stereotypes to people based on their
backgrounds: his comments about
Muslims; his description of blacks
as living in urban war zones and
having nothing to lose; his singling
out of a lone black man at a rally as
“my African American.”
Last March, at a meeting with
members of the Congressional
Black Caucus, Trump asked his
guests if they knew Secretary of
Housing and Urban Development
Ben Carson, the only African
American in his Cabinet, NBC
News reported Friday, citing
sources who were in the room.
The president was surprised
when it turned out that none of
the lawmakers knew Carson.
The same report also said that
Trump suggested during a briefing that a career intelligence analyst should be negotiating with
North Korea because she was a
“pretty Korean lady.”
In the tumult following the report of Trump’s immigration comment, which he seemed to deny in
a tweet Friday morning, a few
voices broke through party lines.
Former Republican National
Committee chairman Michael
Steele, asked if he thought Trump
is racist, said in a TV interview:
“Yeah, I do. At this point, the
evidence is incontrovertible.”
In a separate interview with
The Washington Post, Steele said
the difference between Trump’s
past slurs and this one was the
connection to national policy:
When Trump launched his campaign in 2015 by stating that Mexican immigrants were “bringing
drugs, they’re bringing crime,
they’re rapists,” he was “speaking
in broad brushes, reflecting his
own internalized view of Mexicans,” Steele said. “This time
around, it’s in the context of policy. This is about using the resources of the federal government
to aid and assist people who are
seeking a better life for themselves . . . and his view of this is
‘Why should we help them?
They’re from shithole countries.’ ”
Steele called it “disappointing
as hell” that Republicans in Congress have not had “a more forceful rhetorical response to the president, particularly by the members who were in the room and
heard it.” This fall, he said, voters
will hold their representatives to
account.
“This is no longer about Donald
Trump, what he said and did,”
Steele said. “All presidents come
to reflect America, our values, reflect who we are, and the question
we have to ask ourselves is: Is this
an accurate reflection of who we
are?”
jenna.johnson@washpost.com
vanessa.williams@washpost.com
marc.fisher@washpost.com
Outrage at Trump’s words grows, domestically and internationally
TRUMP FROM A1
children brought to the country
illegally, known as “dreamers,” to
avoid deportation.
But Trump’s attempt at a denial did little to quell the international outrage at his reported
comments that the United States
should seek immigrants from
countries such as Norway instead
of from African and Latin American nations.
“There is no other word one
can use but ‘racist,’ ” United Nations human rights spokesman
Rupert Colville said at a briefing
in Geneva. “You cannot dismiss
entire countries and continents
as ‘shitholes,’ whose entire populations, who are not white, are
therefore not welcome.”
Ebba Kalondo, spokeswoman
for the African Union, said the
comments were alarming.
“Considering the historical reality of how many Africans arrived in the U.S. during the Atlantic slave trade, this flies in the face
of all accepted behavior and practice,” she said.
The controversy began Thursday, when the president grew
frustrated with lawmakers during an Oval Office meeting as they
discussed protecting immigrants
from Haiti, El Salvador and African countries as part of a bipartisan deal over the dreamers, according to several people briefed
on the meeting.
“Why are we having all these
people from shithole countries
come here?” Trump said, according to these people, referring to
countries mentioned by the lawmakers.
Trump then suggested that the
United States should instead
bring more people from countries
such as Norway, whose prime
minister he met with Wednesday.
A White House official said
Trump also suggested that he
would be open to more immigrants from Asian countries because he felt that they help the
United States economically.
In addition, the president singled out Haiti, telling lawmakers
that immigrants from that country must be left out of any deal,
these people said.
“Why do we need more Haitians?” Trump said, according to
people familiar with the meeting.
“Take them out.”
In November, the Trump administration rescinded deportation protection granted to nearly
60,000 Haitians after the 2010
earthquake and told them to return home by July 2019. This
week, the administration announced that similar protections
for roughly 200,000 Salvadorans
will end in September 2019 —
unless Congress enacts legislation providing them permanent
legal status.
In another tweet Friday, Trump
focused on remarks attributed to
him about Haiti, saying: “Never
said anything derogatory about
Haitians other than Haiti is, obvi-
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump gives a pen he used to sign a proclamation honoring Martin Luther King Jr. to King’s nephew Isaac Newton Farris Jr.
ously, a very poor and troubled
country. Never said ‘take them
out.’ Made up by Dems. I have a
wonderful relationship with Haitians. Probably should record future meetings — unfortunately,
no trust!”
Reaction to Trump’s remarks
across the political spectrum and
around the globe mirrored what
has happened in the past — hastily arranged meetings among diplomats, outrage and sharp criticism from Democrats, and measured comments by Republicans.
At an appearance in Milwaukee, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan
(R-Wis.) called Trump’s words
“very unfortunate, unhelpful,”
pointing to his own Irish ancestors’ migration to America.
“It is a beautiful story of America, and that is a great story and
that is the story we have today
and that is a story we had yesterday and that is what makes this
country so exceptional and
unique in the first place,” he said.
“So I see this as a thing to
celebrate, and I think it’s a big
part of our strength.”
Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), who
has been negotiating the immigration policy deal with Durbin
and Sen. Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.), said in an interview with
The Post that he was not at the
meeting, but heard about
Trump’s comments “before it
went public. And what I’ve heard
reported is consistent about what
I heard about the meeting.”
Flake said that Thursday’s
comments reflect what Trump
has reportedly said in the past
about Haiti and Nigeria. “I’m not
surprised at the sentiment expressed — it’s consistent with
what he’s said — but that he
would do that knowing the fury it
would cause.”
In a statement Friday afternoon, Graham, who was at the
meeting, did not specifically address what Trump said.
“Following comments by the
President, I said my piece directly
to him yesterday,” he said. “The
President and all those attending
the meeting know what I said and
how I feel. I’ve always believed
that America is an idea, not defined by its people but by its
ideals.”
On Friday, Sen. Tim Scott
(R-S.C.) told a South Carolina
newspaper that Graham told him
that the reported comments are
“basically accurate.”
“If that comment is accurate,
the comment is incredibly disappointing,” Scott told the Post &
Courier.
In a joint statement, Sens. Tom
Cotton (R-Ark.) and David Perdue
(R-Ga.) — two of Trump’s biggest
allies on Capitol Hill who attended Thursday’s meeting — said,
“We do not recall the president
saying these comments specifically but what he did call out was
the imbalance in our current
immigration system, which does
not protect American workers
and our national interest.”
Trump, the senators said,
“brought everyone to the table
this week and listened to both
sides. But regrettably, it seems
that not everyone is committed to
negotiating in good faith.”
Cotton and Perdue are co-
sponsors of legislation that would
enact severe restrictions on legal
immigration — a bill Trump has
said he supports, but that senior
GOP leaders have said could not
pass Congress.
Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (RFla.), who also attended the meeting, did not address the comments in a statement issued by
his office Friday.
“There are almost 800,000
young DACA beneficiaries who
are facing imminent deportation
in March if we don’t reach a deal,”
he said. “I’m not going to be
diverted from all possible efforts
to continue to negotiate to reach
a deal. So statements at the 11th
hour are not going to distract
me.”
An immigration hard-liner in
Congress, Rep. Steve King
(R-Iowa), tweeted support for
Trump’s remarks Friday: “If those
countries aren’t as you described,
Democrats should be happy to
deport criminal aliens back to
them. &End #AnchorBabies, too.”
In the wake of news reports
about his comments, Trump initially was not particularly upset
by the outcry and spent a portion
of Thursday night calling friends
and confidants to assess the potential fallout — part of his routine attempts to take the temperature of longtime contacts, according to a White House official
familiar with the situation who
spoke on the condition of anonymity to speak frankly about the
president’s response.
While Trump does not generally enjoy widespread negative media coverage of his more contro-
versial statements, the official
added he is cognizant that the
situation will probably be perceived differently in Washington
and on television news compared
with his political base across the
country.
Hillary Clinton, Trump’s 2016
Democratic rival, weighed in,
tweeting that Friday’s eighth anniversary of a major earthquake
in Haiti “is a day to remember the
tragedy, honor the resilient people of Haiti, & affirm America’s
commitment to helping our
neighbors. Instead, we’re subjected to Trump’s ignorant, racist
views of anyone who doesn’t look
like him.”
Left unanswered is how much
damage Trump’s comments have
done to the ability of Congress to
soon reach a deal on DACA.
Durbin said in a written statement Friday that he and others in
his bipartisan group will continue pressing for an agreement. It
“continues to build support for
the only deal in town,” he said.
Graham voiced a similar sentiment in his statement.
“I believe it is vitally important
to come to a bipartisan solution
to the immigration and border
challenges we face today,” he said.
“I am committed to working with
Republicans and Democrats to
find common ground so we can
move forward.”
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
anne.gearan@washpost.com
Ashley Parker, Mike DeBonis, Erica
Werner and Josh Dawsey contributed
to this report.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Trump’s words reveal a deeper truth about his views
There is far more
to the latest
controversy
KAREN
TUMULTY
surrounding
President Trump
than the vulgar
and implicitly racist language he
used to draw a distinction
between desirable and
undesirable immigrants.
Trump’s choice of words also
revealed a deeper and more
substantive truth about how the
president views — and
misunderstands — America’s
unique relationship with its
immigrants.
Trump claims to want, as he
tweeted Friday morning, “a merit
based system of immigration and
people who will help take our
country to the next level.”
Yet the president did not talk
about the qualifications of the
people he seeks to bring in —
that they be scientists, engineers,
doctors. Instead, during private
remarks to lawmakers in the
Oval Office on Thursday, he
focused on their origins —
The Debrief
putting a preference on places
like Norway, which consistently
ranks among the richest nations
in the world, over “shithole
countries.”
By his standard, the ancestors
of most Americans, including his
own, might well have been
excluded. Hardship is
traditionally what drives people
to uproot and seek out
opportunities elsewhere.
“It’s the people who have the
motivation, who have the push
and drive to change their
circumstances, who are the ones
who take the risks to leave. And
that tends to be a very positive
set of personal characteristics for
a country that is a receiving
country,” said Doris Meissner,
former commissioner of the
U.S. Immigration and
Naturalization Service during
the Clinton administration, who
is now a senior fellow at the
Migration Policy Institute.
“The idea that if you’re from a
country that is a failing country,
that somehow predicts or
Insulted countries react
with anger — and pride
BY P AUL S CHEMM
AND E LI R OSENBERG
addis ababa, ethiopia — Presi-
dent Trump’s dismissal of Haiti, El
Salvador and African nations as
“shithole countries” whose inhabitants are not desirable for U.S.
immigration shocked people
around the world and provoked
swift condemnation.
The president made the remarks Thursday during a White
House meeting with lawmakers
and suggested that immigrants
from Norway would be preferable. Trump has since apparently
denied making the off-color remark, describing the language he
used only as “tough.”
“The African Union Commission is frankly alarmed at statements by the president of the
United States when referring to
migrants of African countries and
others in such contemptuous
terms,” said Ebba Kalondo, the
spokeswoman for the African
Union. “Considering the historical reality of how many Africans
arrived in the U.S. during the Atlantic slave trade, this flies in the
face of all accepted behavior and
practice.”
She added that the statement
was particularly unpleasant coming from the leader of a country
that is a “global example” of how a
strong and diverse country can be
the product of migration, and she
expressed hope that eventually
“the values the U.S. is known for
because of its particular experience with migration will come to
bear.”
The reaction from the United
Nations’ human rights spokesman, Rupert Colville, was uncharacteristically blunt. He described
the remark as “racist.”
“There is no other word one can
use but ‘racist,’ ” he said at a briefing in Geneva. “You cannot dismiss entire countries and continents as ‘shitholes’ whose entire
populations, who are not white,
are therefore not welcome.”
In Haiti, people took to Twitter
to share pictures of their country
— green hills, palm trees in the
sunset and sparkling turquoise
water.
“Hey
#ShitHolePresident!”
wrote Harold Isaac. “Here is what
my #shithole looks like.”
Haiti’s ambassador to the United States condemned Trump’s
statement and said his country
has asked for an explanation of
Trump’s comments from U.S. officials. The ambassador, Paul G.
Altidor, said in a statement that
the Haitian Embassy in Washington was inundated with emails
from Americans apologizing for
Trump’s remark, an outpouring
he found heartening.
Haiti’s largest newspaper condemned it as “racist and disgraceful” and said such comments have
“no place in the relations between
nations or people, even less so in
the mouth of a president of a
nation friendly to Haiti.”
In Africa, there were similar
reactions celebrating the beauty
of the continent’s countries. Leanne Manas, a presenter for South
African broadcaster SABC, tweeted: “Good morning from the
greatest, most beautiful ‘shithole
country’ in the world!!!”
The deputy secretary general of
the ANC hit back at Trump’s comment during a news conference in
South Africa.
“Ours is not a shithole country.
Neither is Haiti or any other country in distress,” Jessie Duarte said.
Meanwhile, the Daily Maverick, a Johannesburg-based news
site, wryly suggested that “Casual
Friday at the White House is soon
to include hoods and tiki torches
at this rate.”
Botswana gave a rare official
response to the remarks, summoning the U.S. ambassador
there “to clarify whether Botswana is regarded as a ‘shithole’ country” as well and wondering why
“President Trump must use this
descriptor and derogatory word
when talking about countries
with whom the U.S. has had cordial and mutually beneficial bilateral relations for many years.” The
statement concluded by calling
the remarks racist.
A State Department official
said Friday that Senegal had also
summoned the U.S. ambassador
to that country for an explanation.
The official, who was not authorized to comment publicly about
the matter, spoke on the condition
of anonymity.
Kenyan political cartoonist
Victor Ndula, who has criticized
Trump’s immigration policies in
the past, drew a “ ‘White’ House
map of Africa,” with regions labeled as “west of the shithole,”
“southern shithole” and “horn of
the shithole” for Kenya’s Star
newspaper.
“It’s derogatory and sad to belong to countries that have been
labeled ‘shithole’ countries,” said
Moses Osani, a communications
specialist on his lunch break in
Nairobi. “Immigrants also contribute to the economy of the U.S.
We have relatives who work so
hard, some three jobs a day, working and hoping for a breakthrough for their families back
home.”
Vicente Fox, a former president
of Mexico and a harsh critic of
Trump, also noted the United
States’ immigrant history. “Your
mouth is the foulest shithole in
the world,” he tweeted, addressing
Trump. “With what authority do
you proclaim who’s welcome in
America and who’s not. America’s
greatness is built on diversity, or
have you forgotten your immigrant background, Donald?”
In El Salvador, news of the comments quickly shot to the top of
media websites. “Donald Trump
insults El Salvador,” read one
headline.
El Salvador’s foreign minister,
Hugo Martinez, said he is seeking
an official response from U.S. authorities.
“It’s always been a foreign policy priority of our government to
fight for the respect and dignity of
our countrymen independent of
their immigration status,” he said.
“Our countrymen are hard-working people who are always contributing to the countries where
they’re living and, of course, also
in our country.”
In light of Trump’s alleged preference for immigrants from Norway, a number of users on social
media were resharing a Norwegian website launched in 2016
aiming to persuade Trump-skeptical Americans to migrate there.
Reaction across the United
States, home to a large population
of immigrants from these countries, was emotional.
Farah Larrieux, a Haitian immigrant and organizer in Miami,
referenced statements Trump
made in Miami’s Little Haiti
neighborhood while campaigning
before the 2016 election that he
wanted “to be the biggest champion” for Haitian Americans.
“This is beyond politics. The
guy has no respect for anyone. I
am trying not to cry,” she told CBS.
paul.schemm@washpost.com
eli.rosenberg@washpost.com
Maria Sacchetti in Washington, Rick
Noack in Berlin, Michael Birnbaum in
Brussels, Josh Partlow in Mexico City,
Rael Ombuor in Nairobi and Kevin
Sieff in Cotonou, Benin, contributed to
this report.
forecloses you from being able to
succeed as an immigrant, I’ve
never heard of anything like
that,” Meissner said.
Trump’s words, with their
racial connotations, also suggest
he wants to return to what has
come to be regarded as one of the
more shameful and xenophobic
periods of immigration policy.
In 1924, a set of laws was
passed that set quotas limiting
the number of people admitted
to this country based on where
they came from, with a goal of
preserving the United States’
ethnic homogeneity.
“The premise of national
origin quotas was that some
countries produce good
immigrants, others produce bad
immigrants,” said NPR
correspondent Tom Gjelten,
author of the 2015 book “A
Nation of Nations: A Great
American Immigration Story.”
“There were actually
‘scientific’ studies purporting to
categorize countries according to
the quality and characteristics of
A5
M2
their people, and the quotas
were devised in part on the basis
of the testimony of ‘expert’
opinion,” Gjelten said.
Those pseudoscientific
conclusions produced a system
that heavily favored
predominantly white countries.
Norway got 6,500 annual
slots, while the entire continent
of Africa was allowed 1,200.
Even within Europe, there was
a tilt that corresponded with
complexion. Northern and
Scandinavian countries could
send 142,483 a year; eastern and
southern Europe, 18,439.
That system remained in place
until 1965, when Lyndon
B. Johnson, as part of his Great
Society initiative, persuaded
Congress to replace national
quotas with a preference for
preserving families and
attracting skilled labor.
Allowing immigrants to bring
over relatives is what Trump and
other Republicans now refer to
as “chain migration,” and it is
something they want to end.
LBJ also portrayed his
immigration as a merit-based
system, declaring as he signed
the law on Liberty Island: “This is
a simple test, and it is a fair test.
Those who can contribute most
to this country — to its growth, to
its strength, to its spirit — will be
the first that are admitted.
“The fairness of this standard
is so self-evident that we may
well wonder that it has not
always been applied,” Johnson
added. “Yet the fact is that for
over four decades the
immigration policy of the United
States has been twisted and has
been distorted by the harsh
injustice of the national origins
quota system.”
Even before Trump’s
comments in a private meeting
Thursday, his administration
had made it clear that long-held
values about immigration should
no longer apply.
In an appearance last August
on CNN, White House senior
policy adviser Stephen Miller
even quarreled with the
sentiment of the famous Emma
Lazarus poem inscribed at the
base of the Statue of Liberty, one
that practically every elementary
school student knows: “Give me
your tired, your poor, your
huddled masses yearning to
breathe free.”
Miller said: “The poem that
you’re referring to was added
later. It’s not actually part of the
Statue of Liberty.”
That missed a larger point:
The statue itself was French; the
poem is what helped make it
American.
This is far from the first
argument the country has had
over whom it should welcome.
“Each new generation that
comes is controversial. You look
at immigration in the rearview
mirror, it typically turns out
right and benign. You look at it
as it’s happening, and it’s always
controversial and unwelcome,”
Meissner said.
“And yet, that is among our
defining characteristics and one
of the reasons that we’re a
successful nation,” she added.
“It’s an enormous comparative
advantage to most other
societies around the world, and
has been proven to be over time.”
karen.tumulty@washpost.com
Alice Crites contributed to this report.
A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13 , 2018
Wages to continue rising as economy nears full employment
JOBS FROM A1
has been accelerating at least
since the fall of 2015. For the year
ending Sept. 30, wages rose
3.2 percent, compared with
2.9 percent for the same period
one year earlier and 2.2 percent
two years ago, according to economist Jim O’Sullivan of HighFrequency Economics.
Unemployment has been lower than the 4.6 percent rate that
the Federal Reserve says is sustainable over the long term since
March, which helps explain the
brightening outlook for workers.
“It’s really not until unemployment drops below the full employment level that you get upward pressure on wages,” O’Sullivan said.
Employers face an especially
daunting landscape in Ames,
Iowa, which has the nation’s
lowest jobless rate at 1.5 percent.
The local Chamber of Commerce
has helped recruit workers from
as far away as North Carolina,
while employers have doubled
bonuses for employees who refer
new hires, said Brenda Dreyer,
the Chamber’s head of workforce
development.
“This is not the same world of
recruiting,” she said. “You can’t
do just one thing anymore. You
really have to be going at it in a
number of ways.”
At Mary Greeley Medical Center, the 220-bed hospital in Ames,
chief executive Brian Dieter has
adopted more flexible employee
scheduling to appeal to students
from nearby Iowa State University. The hospital also has tried to
recruit to “nontraditional workers,” including retirees, to fill
entry-level clerical, housekeeping and valet parking jobs, he
says.
Chris Nelson, the fourthgeneration owner of a centuryold electrical business in Ames,
struggles to maintain a full roster
of electricians. He has raised
wages, redoubled efforts to attract young people to apprenticeships that last four to five years
and even taken on semiretired
workers to plug the gaps in his
70-worker firm.
“As the economy has continued to improve, it’s really hit this
past year,” Nelson said. “There’s
more work around than there are
people trained to do it.”
In November, when Dupont
announced plans to close a local
cellulosic ethanol plant, 90 workers found themselves jobless
right before Thanksgiving. Dryer,
of the Ames Chamber, contacted
them within a week, acting as a
matchmaker for companies with
vacancies. Many soon landed positions at firms such as Hach
Chemical and Danfoss Power Solutions.
At Patriot Transportation, Sandlin, 56, says hiring difficulties
have increased as the economy
healed from the punishing recession. A lack of drivers is causing
him to forgo new business opportunities, he said, adding that he
could easily boost his roughly
600-person payroll by 10 percent
if he could find qualified candidates.
He has raised pay over the past
year by 3 to 4 percent, added two
vacation days and offered hiring
and longevity bonuses that run
up to $10,000 in certain cases.
“We’re trying to do things to
make the job more appealing,” he
said.
Sandlin’s struggles are not
unique. The construction industry has complained about a
shortage of experienced workers.
In a survey by the Association of
General Contractors released
earlier this month, 78 percent of
respondents said they were having a hard time finding qualified
workers, an increase from
73 percent one year ago.
In the short run, economists
expect the jobless rate to continue falling, dipping below 4 percent later this year for the first
time since December 2000. The
economy already has been expanding for more than eight
years, steadily shrinking the unemployment rate from its October 2009 peak of 10 percent.
Last month, Congress approved the $1.5 trillion tax cut
that economists say will further
stimulate the economy.
Millions of aging or discour-
aged workers who retreated to
the sidelines in the aftermath of
the recession will likely be drawn
back into the workforce. That
would be a healthy development,
unless the job market gets so
tight that employers engage in
bidding wars that rapidly drive
wages and prices higher.
“We still have some slack,” said
Michael Strain, an economist
with the American Enterprise
Institute. “The unemployment
rate can continue to fall without
sparking a significant increase in
inflation.”
In Wichita, Spirit AeroSystems
will take up some of that slack.
The maker of aircraft components such as fuselages announced in December that it will
hire 1,000 workers over the next
five years as part of a $1 billion
expansion.
The company says it already is
facing a tight labor market, especially for skilled workers. Spirit
has broadened ties with local
vocational institutions, expanded its skilled apprenticeship program and gone national with
recruiting efforts that formerly
stayed close to home.
“We’re seeing a wide variety of
applicants but fewer with direct
aerospace or manufacturing experience than we have in the
past,” said Justin Welner, vice
president for human resources.
“Those experienced candidates
who do apply are highly sought
after, and we generally find ourselves competing with other employers.”
Tight labor markets are likely
to persist. Over the next decade,
as the baby boomers retire, the
labor force will expand by
0.5 percent annually, roughly
one-third as fast as it did between
1950 and 2016, predicted the
Congressional Budget Office.
Such an anemic workforce rise
will sap the economy’s forward
momentum, which is why most
economists expect Trump to fall
well short of his goal of 3 to
6 percent growth. Through 2027,
the CBO anticipates, the United
States will grow at an average
annual rate of 1.8 percent.
david.lynch@washpost.com
Republicans fear Trump is hurting them in Florida, an electorally crucial state
FLORIDA FROM A1
ers issued strongly worded statements condemning what the
leader of their party said. And
GOP strategists and activists worried about the fallout in a battleground that is home to one of the
country’s largest populations of
Latin Americans.
Trump’s presidential victory
hinged heavily on his surprise win
in Florida, which Republicans are
trying to build on in this year’s
midterm elections. But the drag of
Trump’s polarizing actions and
words can be felt acutely in some
quarters of this state, where marquee elections for a Senate seat
and the governorship will play out
this year, and which is expected to
be as pivotal in the 2020 presidential contest as it was in 2016.
“It’s not helping,” Michael Barnett, vice chairman of the Florida
Republican Party, said of Trump’s
remarks. Barnett, an African
American attorney in Palm Beach
County who is close to the Haitian
community there, added, “As far
as making our job harder, we’ve
been through a lot already with
him.”
Some Florida Republicans
quickly condemned the president’s remarks. Sen. Marco Rubio
issued a series of tweets Friday
praising Haitian Americans for
their contributions to the country.
Hours before that started, Rep.
Carlos Curbelo (R-Fla.), who is
running for reelection in a battleground South Florida district,
tweeted, “Under no circumstances is it acceptable to degrade, denigrate, or dehumanize”
immigrants who are in the United
States under what is known as
temporary protected status.
The president’s Oval Office insult, during a discussion about
negotiations over immigration
policy, followed months of other
behavior that has threatened to
undercut Republicans in Florida.
After Hurricane Maria hit
Puerto Rico in September, Trump
told local officials they should feel
“very proud” they hadn’t lost hundreds of lives like in “a real catastrophe” like Hurricane Katrina.
Later, he gave the federal response “a 10,” even as the island
territory was struggling to recover.
ANDREW INNERARITY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Marchers in Miami’s Little Haiti neighborhood mark the eighth anniversary of the devastating Haitian
earthquake — and protest President Trump’s disparaging remarks about the Caribbean country.
brought to this country illegally
as children, as well as improvements to border security and
changes to two other elements of
the immigration system: one allowing U.S. citizens to sponsor
certain relatives for citizenship,
and the other, known as the “diversity visa lottery,” that distributes 50,000 visas annually to nations with low rates of migration
to the United States.
Trump became angry during a
conversation about the visa lottery program, which benefits
some African countries, and
about the temporary protected
status afforded to immigrants
from certain nations, including El
Salvador and Haiti.
“Why do we need more Haitians?” Trump said, according to
several people briefed on the
meeting. “Take them out.”
Trump has aggressively courted Scott to run for the Senate, but
those who know him are mixed
about how likely he is to take the
plunge. One associate said the
governor is continuing to gear up
for a likely campaign and plans to
host a least a pair of fundraisers
for his political operation this
month.
If Scott runs against Nelson, his
personal fortune and name recognition across the state would, at a minimum, probably force Democrats to
invest millions in Florida they could
otherwise spend elsewhere.
At a maximum, Scott could
compete seriously for a seat that
could help Republicans keep their
narrow Senate majority, which
stands at 51 to 49.
As Scott decides whether to
run, having Trump in his corner
on the campaign trail is an increasingly dubious prospect. An
October University of North Florida poll of registered voters found
37 percent approved of Trump,
while 59 percent disapproved.
Scott was seen much more positively, with 59 percent approving
of his job performance. Both this
survey and another one showed
Nelson and Scott were just about
even in a head-to-head matchup
for Senate.
Barnett, who helped arrange a
meeting with Trump and the Haitian community in South Florida
during the campaign and was on
the tarmac with six Haitian pas-
tors when Trump flew into Palm
Beach International Airport last
month, said the Trump he met
would not speak the way he did at
the private meeting this week.
But Palm Beach County Commissioner Mack Bernard, a Democrat who was born in Haiti, said
he believes Trump used the word
“shithole” — and that he meant it.
“His comments were disgraceful, vile and repugnant,” said Bernard, who moved to Florida when
he was 10. Bernard said if Florida
Republicans aren’t quick to denounce Trump’s comments,
they’ll face a backlash in the midterm elections.
Trump won Florida and its 29
electoral votes by just 1.3 percentage points. If Democrats flip that
outcome in 2020 and hold everything else Hillary Clinton won in
2016, the party would need only
nine more electoral votes to regain the presidency.
Scott is term-limited, triggering an open race for the governorship that nonpartisan analysts
have rated as a toss-up. The field
includes Rep. Ron DeSantis (RFla.), a Trump ally.
Some influential Republicans
defended the president, insisting
the firestorm was overblown.
“I think when you have hard
negotiations on immigration,
there’s going to be pushing and
shoving,” said Brian Ballard, a
Florida lobbyist who raised money for Trump’s campaign. “I think
at the end of the day, what product
comes out of those negotiations is
key.”
Others sought to sidestep the
controversy in an effort to remain
focused on producing an immigration deal alongside a spending
bill that must pass by midnight on
Jan. 19 to keep the federal government open.
“I’m not going to be diverted
from all possible efforts to continue to negotiate to reach a deal. So
statements at the 11th hour are
not going to distract me,” Rep.
Mario Diaz-Balart (R-Fla.), a participant in Thursday’s Oval Office
meeting, said in a statement.
cybersecurity firm Rendition Infosec.
In a twist, the attackers used
malware that appeared to be
ransomware — a technique that
encrypts victims’ data and decrypts it only if a ransom is paid
— to make it look as though the
culprits were criminal hackers or
some group other than a nation
state.
They deployed NotPetya a
month after a different worm,
WannaCry, infected computers
with ransomware in 150 countries. The U.S. National Security
Agency linked that virus to the
North Korean government, The
Washington Post reported last
year.
“For many days, people were
classifying NotPetya as an actual
ransomware,” said Matt Suiche,
founder of Comae Technologies,
a cybersecurity firm. “It took a
few days for people to understand what it was doing” — that
it was permanently wiping data,
he said.
The hackers worked for the
military spy service’s Main Center for Special Technology, the
CIA reported.
That unit is highly involved in
the GRU’s cyberattack program,
including the enabling of influence operations.
In 2016, Florida was home to
nearly 1.1 million Puerto Ricans,
second only to New York. By one
estimate after last year’s storm, at
least 100,000 Puerto Ricans were
expected to relocate to Florida, at
least on a temporary basis.
More recently, the Trump administration announced plans to
expand oil drilling in most waters
of the U.S. continental shelf, a
move opposed by governors from
New Jersey to Florida. A few days
later, officials announced an exemption for Florida — an apparent recognition of the political
peril of the expansion in a crucial
state, but a move that Sen. Bill
Nelson (D-Fla.) called a “political
stunt.” The White House declined
to say whether Trump was personally involved in the decision to
exempt Florida, where the president owns Mar-a-Lago, an oceanfront club in Palm Beach.
On Friday, Florida Democrats
remained focused on Trump’s
“shithole” remark.
“People are listening carefully
to what the president is saying,
and they’re internalizing the racism, xenophobia and hatred he is
spreading,” said Lauren Baer, a
Democrat who is running for Congress in Florida’s 18th District. “I
think that will effect what they do
in the ballot box.”
In a written statement Thursday, Scott repudiated Trump’s
coarse remark.
“If this report is true, it is absolutely wrong to say or think this. I
do not think this way, nor do I
agree with this kind of sentiment.
I represent Florida, and we are an
amazing melting pot where over
250 languages are spoken,” the
Republican governor said. “I
work every day to make this the
The president’s remarks came
at a moment of frustration during
an Oval Office meeting Thursday
as Republican and Democratic
lawmakers presented an opening
bid for a broad immigration package.
The deal included a solution for
“dreamers,” young immigrants
Russian hackers target
Senate email, report says
hoven declined to say because the
matter is still being investigated.
A U.S. official said Russian and
Chinese hackers regularly target
American politicians, government employees and their associates, but declined to discuss
whether any recent hacking efforts had been successful.
Pawn
Storm’s
campaign
against the Senate comes as lawmakers prepare for midterm elections in November. Nunnikhoven
said that the group has a pattern
of targeting political organizations in the run-up to elections.
Targeting senators and their
staff is “consistent with the pattern
of what we’ve seen in the last few
years,” when, ahead of a major
political event, the group “tries to
gain a foothold to gain access to an
organization,” he said.
Trend Micro concluded that
hacking campaigns against political organizations were unlikely
to dissipate.
“Political organizations have to
be able to communicate openly
with their voters, the press and
the general public. This makes
them vulnerable to hacking and
spear phishing,” the company
said in its report.
Russian military blamed
for data wipe in Ukraine
BY
S HANE H ARRIS
The Russian hackers who stole
emails from the Democratic National Committee as part of a
campaign to interfere in the 2016
election have been trying to steal
information from the U.S. Senate,
according to a report published
Friday by a computer security
firm.
Beginning in June, the hackers
set up websites meant to look like
an email system available only to
people using the Senate’s internal
computer network, said the report
by Trend Micro. The sites were
designed to trick people into divulging their personal credentials,
such as usernames and passwords.
The Associated Press was first
to write about the report.
These “spear phishing” techniques are frequently used by the
Russian group, which the company dubs Pawn Storm, to read or
copy emails or other private documents.
“This group is politically motivated,” said Mark Nunnikhoven,
Trend Micro’s vice president for
cloud security.
Trend Micro has linked the
group, better known as Fancy
Bear, to activities targeting political organizations in Germany
and the campaign of French President Emmanuel Macron. In
2016, U.S. intelligence agencies
concluded that the group, which
officials say is associated with
Russian military intelligence,
stole emails from the DNC that
were subsequently provided to
WikiLeaks.
“The U.S. Senate, as a target,
seems to represent the next step”
in the group’s ambitions, Nunnikhoven said, because it is both a
political body and also an institution of government.
Nunnikhoven said that his company had given information about
Pawn Storm’s activities to the Senate. The office of the Senate sergeant at arms, which handles computer security for the chamber,
declined to comment.
The Trend Micro report didn’t
say whether the operation targeting the Senate had successfully
stolen information, and Nunnik-
most welcoming state for everyone — Haitians, Cubans, Venezuelans, and others from all around
the world that call Florida home.”
According to a 2010 Census
publication, of the estimated
830,000 people in the United
States in 2009 with Haitian ancestry, about two-thirds lived in Florida, with around 376,000, and
New York, with 191,000.
“As far as making our job harder, we’ve been
through a lot already with” President Trump.
Michael Barnett, a top Republican Party official in Florida
shane.harris@washpost.com
Devlin Barrett contributed to this
report.
BY
E LLEN N AKASHIMA
The CIA has attributed to
Russian military hackers a cyberattack that crippled computers
in Ukraine last year, an effort to
disrupt that country’s financial
system amid its ongoing war
with separatists loyal to the
Kremlin.
The June 2017 attack, delivered through a mock ransomware virus dubbed NotPetya,
wiped data from the computers
of banks, energy firms, senior
government officials and an airport.
The GRU military spy agency
created NotPetya, the CIA concluded with “high confidence” in
November, according to classified reports cited by U.S. intelligence officials.
The CIA declined to comment.
Ukraine has been a significant
target of GRU cyberattacks coinciding with Russia’s annexation
of Crimea and aggression elsewhere. The NotPetya assault was
launched on Ukraine’s Constitution Day, a public holiday.
The virus also affected computer systems in Denmark, India
and the United States, but more
than half of those victimized
were in Ukraine.
The attacks reflect Russia’s
mounting aggression in cyberspace as part of a larger “hybrid
warfare” doctrine that marries
traditional military means with
cyber-tools to achieve its goal of
regional dominance. “It’s a pattern of more bold, aggressive
action,” said Robert Hannigan,
former head of Britain’s GCHQ
intelligence agency.
The hackers used what is
known as a “watering hole” attack. They infected a website to
which they knew their targets
would navigate — in this case, a
Ukrainian site that delivered updates for tax and accounting
software programs.
It’s a tactic that Russian government hackers also have used
to compromise industrial control system networks. The goal
here was “the disruption of
Ukraine’s financial system,” said
Jake Williams, founder of the
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
Sullivan reported from Washington.
Scott Clement in Washington
contributed to this report.
ellen.nakashima@washpost.com
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Road to spending deal gets tougher as shutdown looms
BY
E RICA W ERNER
A week from a government
shutdown deadline, lawmakers
had no clear path to a deal Friday,
each side was already blaming
the other for a potential failure,
and emboldened Democrats
seized on President Trump’s incendiary comments about immigrants to insist they would hold
firm in their demands.
A shutdown Jan. 20 would
come on the anniversary of
Trump’s inauguration, but the
president himself appeared to
have made the path to bipartisan
compromise tougher with his
Oval Office comments about immigrants from “shithole countries.”
Trump’s remarks sent lawmakers into their corners on the
divisive issue. And even though
GOP leaders insist that immigration negotiations should be separate from talks on a two-year
spending deal, they acknowledge
that they have become inextricably linked because Democratic
votes are needed to keep the
government open in the Senate
and potentially in the House.
Democrats are intent on using
that leverage to force a solution
for hundreds of thousands of
undocumented
immigrants
brought here as youths. With no
deal on the horizon for those
“dreamers,” who face losing temporary protections granted by
the Obama administration, there
was also no obvious solution to
keep the government open.
“As a House member I look at
this as a Senate problem, and
their issues have complicated our
capacity to do simple functions of
funding the government,” said
Rep. Patrick T. McHenry (R-N.C.),
the chief deputy whip in the
House. “This is a stubborn minority that has extraneous political problems they’re trying to
bring into the funding of government,” McHenry said, referring
to immigration.
Democrats, who are under intense pressure from immigrant
advocates to oppose any spending legislation without a deal for
dreamers, countered that Trump
was to blame for complicating
matters.
“The president’s racist outburst suggests he is more interested in fighting culture wars
than solving problems,” said Rep.
Nita M. Lowey (N.Y.), the top
Democrat on the House Appropriations Committee. “That
sends a bad signal about his
ability to be a constructive part of
reaching a spending agreement
or meeting any other challenge
we face.”
There will be just a handful of
legislative days to forge a deal
when lawmakers return next
week from the long Martin Luther King Jr. Day weekend. Few
expect that an agreement will be
reached in that time on immigration
and
government-wide
spending for military and domestic programs, as well as children’s
health insurance and disaster
relief, which are also tied up in
the talks.
That means the only option for
keeping the government running
would be a fourth short-term
“continuing resolution” that extends existing spending levels to
give negotiators more time. But
whether that could pass is uncertain, and if it doesn’t, the government will begin to shut down Jan.
20, with parks closing and nonessential workers furloughed.
Many Democrats have been
cautious about saying they would
oppose spending legislation —
and force a shutdown — over
immigration. But Trump’s comments disparaging Haitian immigrants and African nations have
clearly stiffened their spines. And
although Republicans contend
that Democrats would take the
blame if the government shut
down, many Democrats scoff
since Republicans control both
chambers of Congress and the
White House.
“Why is a Democrat going to
sign on to a bill that may represent a compromise on what they
really want if they think the
president’s just going to veto it?”
asked Rep. Joaquin Castro (DTex.), vice chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.
Republicans plan to make it as
hard as possible for Democrats to
oppose a spending bill, including
potentially linking the legislation
to an extension of the Children’s
Health Insurance Program and
perhaps disaster aid for Texas,
Florida and Puerto Rico. They
plan multiple votes and intend to
use the same arguments Democrats employed against the GOP
during a 16-day partial government shutdown in 2013, when
federal workers had to go without pay while some taxpayer
services were closed.
But must-pass spending legislation next week also faces a
threat from within the Republican ranks. Defense hawks insist
that more money is needed for
the military, and they have grown
frustrated with passing bills that
extend existing spending levels
without giving the Pentagon the
increase military leaders say is
necessary to ensure readiness.
“While we’re under the CR
[continuing resolution] our
troops aren’t getting the increased funding we’ve committed to do in the House, and that
needs to be a nonpartisan issue,”
said Rep. Warren Davidson (ROhio), who said he would consider opposing another continuing
resolution depending on the final
package.
House GOP leaders fear that a
revolt from fed-up defense hawks
could imperil their ability to pass
a spending bill with Republican
votes alone, which would hand
Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
(D-Calif.) the leverage to make
demands on immigration or other issues.
The dynamics add up to an
unusually uncertain outlook,
with many lawmakers reluctant
to predict how events will play
out.
“I don’t think there will be” a
government shutdown, House
Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.)
said at a WisPolitics event at the
University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee on Friday, but he offered
few specifics.
“We will get this done,” Ryan
said, in response to a question on
children’s health funding. “Exact-
ly when, I’m not so sure.”
On the spending piece, lawmakers are trying to strike a
two-year deal setting new spending levels for military and domestic programs, and staving off
automatic spending caps.
The White House wants the
discretionary number for defense spending to be about
$603 billion, which is $54 billion
more than the $549 billion that
would kick in for the 2018 fiscal
year under the automatic spending caps established in 2011. Congressional defense hawks are
seeking even more, but Democrats are demanding “parity,”
meaning that nondefense spending should increase by the same
amount as military spending.
Republicans reject the parity
demand and insist on offsetting
cuts for any spending increases.
Democrats argue that since Republicans passed a $1.5 trillion
tax bill that will add to the debt,
they have no grounds for calling
for offsets.
Despite the disputes, some
lawmakers contend that a deal
could fall quickly into place if
immigration could be resolved.
erica.werner@washpost.com
Ed O’Keefe contributed to this
report.
Trump undergoes his first physical exam as president
BY
AND
J ENNA J OHNSON
L ENNY B ERNSTEIN
President Trump’s personal
physician once claimed that he
would be “the healthiest individual ever elected to the presidency,”
but there’s a good deal of evidence
casting doubt on that assertion.
Trump, who underwent his first
presidential physical exam Friday
afternoon, is older than all previous presidents when they first
took office. He is also the heaviest
president in at least a generation
and consumes a diet heavy with
Big Macs, Filet-O-Fish sandwiches, fried chicken, pizza, well-done
steak and two rounds of dessert.
He seems to get little exercise beyond swinging a golf club, as he
spends most of his time on the
course traveling in an electric cart.
And he likes to brag about how
little sleep he gets.
The risks of such a health profile
are well known: heart disease,
strokes, diabetes and high blood
pressure, to name a few.
“He doesn’t look healthy,” said
Daryl Isaacs, a New York internist
at NYU Langone Health, who
monitored the impact of
Morgan Spurlock’s month-long
McDonald’s-only diet for the 2004
documentary “Super Size Me” and
is one of the few medical experts
willing to venture an opinion
about the president. “His complexion doesn’t look healthy.”
Trump’s physical exam was conducted at Walter Reed National
Military Medical Center under the
supervision of Navy Rear Adm.
Ronny L. Jackson, who has been
the lead White House doctor since
2013 and oversaw two of President
Barack Obama’s exams. Trump, 71,
arrived at Walter Reed just before
1 p.m. and left shortly after 4 p.m.
“The President’s physical exam
today at Walter Reed National
Military Medical Center went exceptionally well,” Jackson said in a
White House statement, which at
first misspelled his given name.
“The President is in excellent
health and I look forward to briefing some of the details on Tuesday.”
White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders said
Thursday that Jackson would
compile detailed results over the
long weekend and appear at Tuesday’s press briefing to take ques-
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/POOL/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Navy Rear Adm. Ronny L. Jackson gives a thumbs-up Friday after supervising President Trump’s
physical exam at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda.
tions.
Undergoing this physical is voluntary, and Trump can pick and
choose what the public hears
about his health.
Sanders announced the exam
in early December, a day after the
president gave a speech announcing his plans to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and, at one
point, heavily slurred his words.
At the time, Sanders said that the
president’s throat was simply dry,
and she said this week that the
exam had been in the works before
that incident.
The exam would not include a
psychological test, a White House
spokesman said beforehand, and
officials would not say whether
Trump would undergo cognitive
tests. Trump’s mental fitness has
come under scrutiny after the release of a book that portrayed him
as unprepared for the presidency,
incapable of processing information and uninterested in making
difficult decisions.
The physical-exam results disclosed by previous presidents
have varied. Obama, George W.
Bush and Bill Clinton all released
their heights and weights, lists of
the medications they took, cholesterol levels, blood pressure and
other lab results.
Obama’s reports were usually
two pages with details about his
on-again-off-again relationship
with smoking (“smoking cessation efforts” in 2010, “tobacco
free” in 2011 and “remains tobacco
free” in 2014 and 2016). Bush’s
results often filled more than four
pages, even disclosing his body-fat
percentage. Clinton’s doctor acknowledged his struggles to stay
healthy amid the stress of the
presidency and campaigning, and
the 6-foot-2 president weighed
214 pounds at his last exam in
2001.
Trump said in 2016 that he was
6-foot-3 and 236 pounds, which
the medical community considers
overweight; if he were 6-foot-2, as
listed on his New York driver’s
license, he would be considered
obese. At the time, Trump acknowledged that he needed to lose
15 to 20 pounds. Since his inauguration, Trump appears to have
gained weight.
The Friday exam could offer
great insight into Trump’s health
— or at least provide a verified
assessment of his height and
weight. During the campaign,
Trump released two one-page letters from his personal physician in
New York, Harold N. Bornstein,
that showed his cholesterol levels
were controlled with medication
and were within the healthy range
for a man his age. At the time,
Trump’s blood pressure was
116/70, and his blood sugar was
99, both of which are normal.
Bornstein said other tests — an
EKG and chest X-ray in April 2016,
a transthoracic echocardiogram,
or ultrasound of the heart, in December 2014 and a colonoscopy in
July 2013 — were all normal.
Bornstein wrote that Trump
takes just two medications: a
small dose of aspirin and a statin
to lower his cholesterol. Bornstein
said in an interview with the New
York Times last year that Trump
had also taken a prostate-related
drug that can promote hair
growth and an antibiotic to control rosacea, a common skin problem.
In discussing his health, Trump
usually points to the longevity of
his parents: His mother was 88
when she died, and his father died
at 93 after suffering from Alzheimer’s disease for about five years.
“I consider my health, stamina
and strength one of my greatest
assets,” Trump tweeted in December 2015. “The world has watched
me for many years and can so
testify — great genes!”
Trump has other factors work-
Gerrymandering, sales tax in Supreme Court’s sights
BY
R OBERT B ARNES
The Supreme Court on Friday
added a third examination of discriminatory
gerrymandering
charges to its docket, this time
from Texas, and announced it will
consider overruling a decades-old
precedent that hobbles states
from requiring online retailers to
collect sales tax.
Those cases — along with a
challenge to how Securities and
Exchange Commission employees enforce investment protection laws — highlight a batch of
grants that will fill much of the
court’s remaining term, the justices announced Friday.
And one other issue still could
be added: a review of President
Trump’s latest travel ban on immigrants and visitors from certain countries. The justices will
consider next week whether to
take that case.
On the gerrymandering front,
the Supreme Court already has
heard a challenge to the way
Wisconsin Republicans drew legislative district maps. And last
month it accepted a petition from
Maryland Republicans to review
the way that state’s Democratic
leadership redrew the lines of a
congressional district held by a
GOP congressman. Both of those
cases involved charges of partisan
gerrymandering.
The cases from Texas involve
long-running disputes about
whether Texas Republicans intentionally discriminated against
minority voters when redrawing
lines for congressional districts
and the legislature in 2011.
A three-judge panel last summer found that two of the Texas
congressional districts violated
the Constitution and the Voting
Rights Act, and were intentionally discriminatory. It found simi-
larly that the state’s legislative
district maps were flawed.
It had ordered the state to
redraw the lines in time for the
2018 elections. Instead, Texas
asked the Supreme Court to put
the rulings on hold until justices
could review the ruling’s merits.
The court agreed on a 5-to-4
vote in September, with the
court’s four liberals objecting.
Both the congressional and legislative map cases are Abbott v.
Perez.
The sales-tax case represents a
consolidated effort by states to
overturn a 1992 Supreme Court
decision upholding a constitutional rule that barred requiring
vendors to collect sales tax on
mail-order sales unless the business had a “physical presence” in
the state.
The rule has always been seen
as controversial, and the explosion of Internet sales means state
and local governments have lost
billions of dollars in tax revenue.
They say that the ruling is unfair
to them and to bricks-and-mortar
retailers within their borders that
have no choice but to collect the
taxes.
South Dakota took the lead and
told the court it was time to
overturn the precedent, Quill
Corp. v. North Dakota.
Companies now “can instantly
tailor their marketing and overnight delivery of hundreds of
thousands of products to individual customers based on their IP
addresses; these companies can
surely calculate sales tax from a
zip code.”
But online retailers that asked
the court to stay out of the Internet sales battles disagreed. “The
burdens will fall primarily on
small and medium-size companies whose access to a national
market will be stifled,” said law-
ing in his favor: He grew up in a
wealthy family and had access to
quality health care. He says he has
never drunk alcohol or smoked.
And he minimizes his access to
germs, even avoiding handshakes.
“It’s a medical fact that this is
how germs are spread,” Trump
wrote in his 2004 book, “How to
Get Rich.” “I wish we could follow
the Japanese custom of bowing
instead.”
Trump answered questions
about his health during a September 2016 interview with the television personality Mehmet Oz.
Trump said he had not been sick in
years — “People are amazed because I don’t get much with the
colds” — and felt like he was still 35
years old. Trump said that his primary form of exercise at the time
was giving rally speeches.
“I’m up there using a lot of
motion — I guess in its own way,
it’s a pretty healthy act,” Trump
said. “A lot of times, these rooms
are very hot, like saunas, and I
guess that is a form of exercise.”
Since the election, Trump has
golfed several times a month, although he rides in a golf cart as
much as possible. During a photo
shoot with fellow world leaders in
Italy last summer, Trump was
transported in a golf cart up a
small hill while everyone else
walked.
The president once explained
that he believes “the human body
was like a battery, with a finite
amount of energy, which exercise
only depleted” — a theory refuted
by doctors and physical trainers.
Later in the interview, Trump
said he had long struggled with
his weight and hoped to lose 15 or
20 pounds, although “it’s tough
because of the way I live.” A recent
book by former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski and former aide David Bossie, “Let
Trump Be Trump,” said the presidential candidate would often eat
one McDonald’s meal a day consisting of two Big Macs, two FiletO-Fish sandwiches and a chocolate shake — a menu that would
total at least 2,400 calories and
more than 3,400 milligrams of
sodium.
Heavy bursts of fast food are not
part of most doctor-recommended
eating plans. During the filming of
“Super Size Me,” Isaacs said the
documentary’s protagonist gained
24 pounds in a month, had increased cholesterol and other
health problems, and quickly developed “fatty liver” because the
organ could not handle the consumption of a heavily caloric meal
in a short period of time.
Medical experts interviewed by
The Washington Post were reluctant to comment specifically
about Trump because they do not
have access to all the relevant
information about his health profile. But all said the diet and exercise regimen he has acknowledged following diverges widely
from the guidelines they provide
their patients.
They recommend a diet heavy
in fruits, vegetables and low-fat
protein such as chicken and fish,
with small amounts of sugar and
salt. The diet should be coupled
with at least 150 minutes of exercise per week, ideally spread over
four or five sessions.
“There’s no age where it’s safe”
to follow an unhealthy diet and
exercise regimen, said Alan
Braverman, a cardiologist and
professor of medicine at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. “You can’t start
too early, and it’s really a lifetime
recommendation.”
Experts cautioned that age itself is a significant risk factor.
Although people age differently,
in general, patients in their early
70s cannot treat their bodies the
way they did decades earlier and
hope to remain healthy.
“Aging puts a dent in our physiology, our ability to lose weight,
our exercise capacity,” said Ranit
Mishori, a professor of family
medicine at the Georgetown University School of Medicine. “That’s
just natural.”
Trump’s interview with Oz in
2016 came amid concerns about
the health of his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton. Trump had
gleefully seized on the issue and
once imitated Clinton stumbling
while falling ill at a 9/11 memorial
event.
“I think you have an obligation
to be healthy,” Trump said. “I just
don’t think you can do the work if
you’re not healthy. I don’t think
you can represent the country
properly if you’re not a healthy
person.”
yers for Wayfair, Overstock.com
and Newegg.
They said that the number of
taxing jurisdictions in the United
States is estimated at between
10,000 and 16,000.
And they contend that it
should be up to Congress, not the
courts, to remedy any problems
that local governments say they
have.
The petition “invites the court
to assume a legislative role, supplanting Congress, the body to
which the Constitution assigns
responsibility for regulating commerce ‘among the several states,’
and which is actively addressing
the issue,” the companies said.
But Congress has struggled for
years to come up with a plan, even
though some online retailers
have said that they would welcome a national remedy rather
than deal with individual states.
The case is South Dakota v.
Wayfair.
The SEC case is a technical
issue that could affect how other
regulatory agencies do their
work.
At issue is whether the SEC’s
administrative law judges are employees or, because they wield
significant decision-making authority, are “inferior officers” covered by the Constitution’s “appointments clause.”
Such officers must be appointed by the president, the head of a
federal agency or by a court.
The case is brought by Raymond Lucia, a former California
radio host and investment adviser known for his “Buckets of Money” strategy. His case was heard
by an administrative law judge,
and he received a lifetime ban
from investment-related work.
It is also notable because it is
another case for which the Trump
administration’s Justice Department switched sides. It says it
now agrees with Lucia and others
in the business community who
say that the SEC’s way of appointing the judges violates the Constitution.
The case is Lucia v. SEC.
jenna.johnson@washpost.com
leonard.bernstein@washpost.com
robert.barnes@washpost.com
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
The World
Germany’s SPD leaders urge support for coalition deal with Merkel
R EUTERS
berlin — German Social Demo-
cratic (SPD) leaders appealed to
party members Friday to swallow
their doubts and endorse an overnight deal to renew a “grand
coalition” with Chancellor Angela
Merkel’s conservatives for another four years.
The deal eased months of uncertainty that has undermined
Germany’s role as the European
Union’s pivotal power, as the bloc
confronts such major challenges
BY L OVEDAY M ORRIS
AND R UTH E GLASH
IN MAALE ADUMIM, WEST BANK
S
ince becoming mayor of
Maale Adumim more than
20 years ago, Benny
Kashriel has doggedly
campaigned for his community to
be recognized as part of Israel.
Now, with President Trump in
the White House, Kashriel thinks
it may just happen.
His settlement is approximately four miles east of Jerusalem in
the occupied West Bank. Most of
the international community
considers its construction to be
illegal, built on land captured
during the 1967 war.
Still, it has steadily grown from
what began as a cluster of prefabricated buildings erected by
23 families in the 1970s into a
burgeoning satellite city of Jerusalem. Palm trees line the wide
roads of what looks like a Florida
suburb. Red-roofed houses and
high-rises are home to 42,000
people, who are served by all of
the accouterments of a modern
city: schools, restaurants, cafes
and a shopping mall.
Expansion here is particularly
contentious because it could cut
off Arab areas of East Jerusalem
from other Palestinian territory
and hobble the creation of a viable Palestinian state. Still, Maale
Adumim keeps growing. In the
industrial park on its outskirts,
already home to 360 businesses,
ground has just been broken on
“Design City,” a nearly 600,000square-foot, 160-outlet interiordesign retail mall.
While previous U.S. administrations called settlements an obstacle to the peace process, the
Trump administration has been
more restrained in publicly criticizing them, a clear break from
the frequent censure under President Barack Obama of Israeli settlement activity.
Emboldened by a more supportive White House, Israeli leaders have proposed a flurry of bills
and proclamations that seek to
annex areas of the West Bank and
re-engineer Jerusalem’s demographic balance by redrawing the
city’s map to exclude Arab neighborhoods and include Israeli settlements.
Last year, Israeli lawmakers
introduced legislation, called the
Greater Jerusalem bill, that
would expand the city’s municipal boundaries to include 19 settlements, including Maale Adumim. For the moment the bill
has stalled, not yet making it to a
vote in the Knesset, Israel’s parliament. But other efforts are underway.
Betty Herschman, advocacy di-
as Brexit, euro-zone reform and
immigration, and questions
about Merkel’s future.
“The world will not wait for us,”
a weary-looking Merkel said Friday morning after 25 hours of
talks, which yielded a deal opening the way to formal negotiations on the details.
But some in the wary SPD rank
and file said the deal lacked sufficient concessions to the centerleft party, which after four years
of a sometimes awkward coalition with Merkel suffered its
Wary party members
want more concessions
worst election results since 1933
last September.
Christian Democratic lawmakers greeted their leader with a
round of applause when she outlined the arrangement, which
pledged closer cooperation with
France to strengthen the euro
zone and a crackdown on arms
sales to countries in conflict
zones.
But SPD leaders will have a
harder time convincing members
that they should approve the pact
at a Jan. 21 party congress and
again in a postal vote at the end of
formal coalition negotiations.
“The SPD got its way in many
areas,” senior SPD lawmaker
Hubertus Heil told public broadcaster RBB in what is likely to be
the first of many such entreaties
to rank-and-file members in the
coming week.
SPD Chairman Martin Schulz
was addressing those members
when, standing alongside Merkel,
he told reporters that the outline
deal would preserve and
strengthen Germany’s welfare
state for future generations.
“From the kindergarten to the
school, to the university and the
workplace and then on into old
age and care homes, we want to
strengthen respect, opportunity
and solidarity, and bring these
systems up to date,” he said.
New push to redraw Jerusalem borders
Trump’s softer stance has emboldened efforts to annex West Bank areas, re-engineer demographics
ODED BALILTY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Palestinian laborers work last February at a construction site in a housing project in the settlement of Maale Adumim, near Jerusalem.
Last year, lawmakers introduced a bill to expand the city’s municipal boundaries to include 19 settlements, including Maale Adumim.
rector at Ir Amim, which monitors developments in Jerusalem
as they relate to the peace process, said Israel has seen a
“groundswell of unilateral proposals.”
On New Year’s Eve, the central
committee of Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu’s ruling Likud party adopted a nonbinding
resolution proposing annexation
of all West Bank settlements to
Israel and allowing unfettered
construction.
The prime minister was not
present at the gathering, but Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan
told the crowd that Trump’s presidency presents a “historic opportunity.”
“Today we have a president in
the White House who says explicitly, yes, he understands that the
obstacle to peace is Palestinian
incitement, not settlement in
Judea and Samaria,” he said, employing the names that some Is-
raelis use to refer to the West
Bank. “We must not miss this
opportunity.”
Some political observers see
the Likud action as motivated by
domestic politics, a populist
“They feel like they have
a free hand now. We are
at a very, very critical
juncture.”
Hanan Ashrawi, PLO official
move as Israeli elections approach.
But Hagai El-Ad, the director of
the Israeli human rights group
B’Tselem, said there is a battle
underway between those who
want to continue “smart occupation,” which manages to “fly two
inches below international outrage” while incrementally shifting facts on the ground, and those
who advocate “dumb occupation”
— moving forward with formal
annexation.
Trump’s presidency has given
new vigor to the latter, he said.
Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, in particular, was taken by Israelis and
Palestinians as an endorsement
of Israel’s policies.
“They’ve been encouraged by
the current administration, especially after the resolution on Jerusalem,” said Hanan Ashrawi, a
member of the Palestine Liberation Organization’s executive
committee. “They feel like they
have a free hand now. We are at a
very, very critical juncture.”
In his office in Maale Adumim,
Kashriel says the change of attitude toward settlements under
the Trump administration was
immediately apparent.
All previous U.S. administrations had largely shunned the
settler community, he said. “They
boycotted us. They never wanted
to meet us,” he said.
But Kashriel was invited to
Trump’s inauguration in Washington. “I think they wanted to
show us there is a change in the
atmosphere in Washington,” he
said. That was followed by an
invitation to Fourth of July celebrations at the U.S. ambassador’s
residence north of Tel Aviv.
Trump’s son-in-law, Jared
Kushner, and his family are longtime supporters of Israeli settlements in the West Bank, as is
Trump’s ambassador to Israel,
David M. Friedman.
“So you see that there is
change,” Kashriel said. “This is
the reason now that the Knesset
members are all the time raising
these resolutions.”
“The most important goal is to
strengthen the Jewish majority in
The parties agreed to spend
more on the E.U. — a long way
short of Schulz’s ambition to create a “United States of Europe” by
2025. The SPD’s plan to create
parity between private and public
health care was also missing from
the deal.
Pledges to spend more in poorer regions and allow up to 1,000
family members each month to
join refugees already living in
Germany also seemed designed to
placate SPD members distrustful
of governing with Merkel again.
Jerusalem,” said Intelligence
Minister Israel Katz, who wrote
the text of the Greater Jerusalem
bill.
The bill would incorporate
Jewish settlements into the city.
Jerusalem Affairs Minister Zeev
Elkin, who supports the legislation, has made a further proposal.
He would like boundaries of the
city’s municipality redrawn to
split off Arab areas of East Jerusalem that are separated from the
rest of the city by Israel’s separation barrier, while keeping them
as part of the state.
A vote in the Knesset this
month made that prospect possible while also raising the number
of lawmakers who would be needed to support a proposal to give
up Israeli sovereignty over any
part of the city.
Areas outside the security wall
already have become virtually
lawless. Further, although they
are legally part of Jerusalem, the
municipality no longer provides
basic services, citing security reasons. But these neighborhoods
are not under the control of the
Palestinian Authority, either.
Israeli authorities have turned
a blind eye to unabated Arab
construction in those neighborhoods, compared with tight restrictions on building permits in
Arab areas inside the wall.
Munir Zagheir, a community
representative for Kafr Aqab, one
of the areas Elkin suggests removing from the municipality, says
there has been a long-term effort
to pull Palestinians out of central
Jerusalem and “empty Arabs to
the sides.”
About a mile from Kashriel’s
office, 58 Arab Bedouin families
live in a ramshackle collection of
tents and shacks called Jabal alBaba. Attalah Jahleen, their 42year-old representative, said the
community’s fortunes have deteriorated over the past year.
“Before Trump took office, the
American consulate used to visit
us on a regular basis,” he said.
“Since Trump took over, nothing.”
The U.S. Consulate in Jerusalem said its staff “continues to
speak with a wide variety of contacts in Jerusalem, the West Bank
and Gaza.”
The families received eviction
orders late last year, and there
have been dozens of demolition
orders, with Israeli authorities
attempting to resettle them elsewhere.
Trump administration officials, Jahleen said, “have given up
on us.”
loveday.morris@washpost.com
ruth.eglash@washpost.com
Sufian Taha contributed to this
report.
DIGEST
SYRIA
government to send the army
into several cities and towns.
Activists and opposition
politicians appealed for fresh
protests in the capital, Tunis, on
Friday and Sunday, the seventh
anniversary of the toppling of
the country’s authoritarian
president, Zine el-Abidine
Ben Ali. On Friday, things were
mostly quiet, with just 200
people protesting peacefully in
the capital, a witness said.
BRAZIL
Rebels who hit base
Defiant Lula readies
eliminated, Russia says presidential bid
The Russian military said
Friday that it eliminated a group
of rebels that had attacked its air
base in Syria.
The Russian Defense Ministry
said it tracked the rebels with
drones and other assets and hit
them with artillery while they
were getting into a vehicle in the
northwestern province of Idlib.
It said in a statement that the
Russian military also destroyed a
rebel facility for assembling
drones in Idlib.
A mortar attack on the
Hmeimim air base killed two
Russian servicemen on New
Year’s Eve, the Defense Ministry
said. It said that warplanes
weren’t hit, but the Russian
business daily Kommersant
reported that seven aircraft were
damaged beyond repair.
Last weekend, rebels also
launched a drone attack on
Hmeimim and a Russian naval
base in Tartus. The raid involving
13 drones was the first such
attack since Russia launched its
military intervention in Syria in
September 2015.
Brazil’s former president Luiz
Inácio Lula da Silva will launch
his bid for the presidency Jan. 25,
regardless of the outcome of an
appellate court hearing on his
corruption conviction scheduled
for the day before.
Lula’s bid is “an act of
defiance” in response to political
persecution, Alexandre Padilha,
vice president of the Workers’
Party, said in an interview.
Political parties will not officially
formalize their candidates
for October’s elections until
August.
Lula was sentenced to 91/2 years
for graft and money laundering
in July and faces a handful of
other criminal charges.
The former president and his
supporters say the charges
against him are politically
motivated and an attempt to
stop him from returning to
power.
Lula leads the opinion polls
for this year’s presidential
election. If the appeals court
upholds his conviction on Jan. 24,
he may be barred from running.
— Associated Press
— Bloomberg News
— Reuters
3 churches in Chile firebombed:
JOHN WESSELS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
An injured man is pulled to safety after police opened fire on
demonstrators gathered outside a cathedral in Kinshasa, Congo’s
capital, following a Mass by Cardinal Laurent Monsengwo, a
government critic. The service was a commemoration for the victims
of a crackdown against New Year’s Eve marches that demanded the
removal of President Joseph Kabila.
TUNISIA
New arrests include
opposition leaders
Tunisian authorities arrested
150 more people, including
opposition leaders, on Friday,
bringing the total detained to
nearly 800 in response to protests
this week against price and tax
increases.
Demonstrations, some violent,
flared across Tunisia on Monday,
when one protester was killed,
before ebbing Thursday.
Protesters have burned dozens of
state buildings, prompting the
President Michelle Bachelet
asked Chileans on Friday to
receive Pope Francis in a “climate
of respect,” hours after three
Roman Catholic churches were
firebombed and a note was left at
the scene threatening the pontiff.
In the overnight attacks in
Santiago, the capital and largest
city in the country where the
pope will arrive Monday, the
churches were hit with firebombs
and then sprayed with accelerant.
“The next bombs will be in your
cassock,” read pamphlets found
outside one of the churches.
Canadian police search for man
who cut 11-year-old’s hijab:
Toronto police are investigating
an attack on an 11-year-old girl
whose hijab head covering was
repeatedly cut on her way to
school Friday, heightening
pressure on Canadian
governments to take further
action against attacks on
Muslims. An assailant, in two
attempts within 10 minutes, cut
the girl’s hijab using scissors
while she was walking with her
brother, Toronto police said.
Ex-army figure to challenge
Sissi in Egyptian election: A
former Egyptian army chief of
staff will contest the upcoming
presidential election in March, a
top aide said, as other candidates
have faced heavy pressure to drop
out and pave the way for a
sweeping reelection victory for
President Abdel Fatah al-Sissi.
Ragab Helal Hemida, head of the
policies committee in the Egypt
Arabism Democratic Party, said
that Lt. Gen. Sami Anan has
accepted his party’s nomination.
Voting is scheduled to take place
March 26-28. Hemida said that
Sissi’s popularity has taken a
blow after painful austerity
measures saw a large sector of
Egyptians fall into poverty or
hardship. He added that under
Sissi, Egypt’s human rights
record has sharply deteriorated.
— From news services
A10
EZ
JANUARY 13 , 2018
Trump: Fix Iran nuclear deal, or U.S. will withdraw
Teen’s suicide
may prompt
Australia to act
on bullying
BY
. SATURDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Accord is alive for now;
some new sanctions are
placed on Tehran
A . O DYSSEUS P ATRICK
sydney — When she was 6 years
old, Amy Jayne Everett appeared
in an ad for Akubra hats, which
represent Australian outback life
in the same way Stetson hats symbolize Texas.
But as Amy grew into an awkward teenager, she was subjected
to relentless online bullying. Last
week, at age 14, she committed
suicide.
The death of a young woman
whose face was familiar to millions of Australians shocked the
nation and prompted Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull to plead
for an end to juvenile bullying,
both in real life and online.
Cyberbullying is widely acknowledged as a serious problem
for teenagers, but experts, parents
and educators are struggling to
come up with solutions. Even
though suicide is the top cause of
death for 15- to 44-year-olds in
Australia, it is not discussed much
in public, in part because media
outlets fear that reporting on selfinflicted deaths will trigger more
suicides.
Amy’s death is changing this
attitude, even if only slightly. In an
emotional Facebook post, her father, Tick, suggested that those
who had persecuted the teenager
attend her funeral, which was
held Friday morning in Katherine, a cattle-ranching town in the
remote Northern Territory.
“If by some chance the people
who thought this was a joke and
made themselves feel superior by
the constant bullying and harassment see this post, please come to
our service and witness the complete devastation you have created,” Tick Everett wrote.
Relatives of other suicide victims also are speaking out, raising
hopes that greater awareness of
the problem will save lives.
“The government needs to start
doing a bit more, bring in some
anti-bullying laws,” Quentin Pearson, whose 14-year-old son took
his life in 2016, told the Australian, a newspaper. “Nothing happens to [the bullies], and they’ll
just go on to the next poor kid.”
It is illegal in Australia to use
the Internet to harass anyone, but
prosecutions are relatively rare.
Turnbull said society needs to do
more to protect young people,
although he did not make specific
suggestions.
“As a parent and as a grandparent, my heart breaks for Dolly and
her family,” he wrote on Akubra’s
Facebook page, using Amy Everett’s nickname. “Every step must
be taken to reduce the incidence
of bullying, whether offline or on,
and eliminate it wherever we can.”
The family of another victim
has proposed a law in the state of
South Australia that would impose prison terms of up to 10 years
for bullying. Legislators are considering it.
What exactly happened to Amy
and how she took her life is unclear. She was on vacation from
her private boarding school and
had once written a note saying,
“Stand up, speak even if your voice
shakes.” It appears to have been a
sign of the stress she was feeling.
“This powerful message tells
the dark, scary place our beautiful
angel had traveled to,” her father,
mother and sister said in a statement.
The Everett family said it plans
to set up a foundation in their
daughter’s name dedicated to increasing awareness of bullying,
depression and teenage suicide.
foreign@washpost.com
BY C AROL M ORELLO
AND A NNE G EARAN
President Trump on Friday kept
alive the Iran nuclear deal he detests by waiving sanctions for the
third time, but he said he will not
grant another reprieve unless the
agreement is amended to permanently block a potential pathway
for Iran to build nuclear weapons.
In conjunction with the waivers, the Treasury Department
placed sanctions on 14 people and
entities for alleged offenses unrelated to Iran’s nuclear industry.
The new measures concern human rights abuses and censorship
in Iran, and the arming of groups
throughout the region.
Trump’s decision avoided placing the United States in violation
of the commitments it made in the
landmark 2015 deal. But he affirmed his willingness to withdraw from it in a few months
unless changes are made.
“Despite my strong inclination,
I have not yet withdrawn the United States from the Iran nuclear
deal,” Trump said in a statement.
“Instead, I have outlined two possible paths forward: either fix the
deal’s disastrous flaws, or the
United States will withdraw.”
Critics of the deal deemed the
president’s decision “an opportunity to do better,” as Sen. Bob
Corker (R-Tenn.), chairman of the
Senate Foreign Relations Committee, called it.
But supporters expressed skepticism that the deal will survive in
its current form. Trita Parsi, head
of the National Iranian American
Council, called it a “temporary
stay of execution.”
“In a nutshell, he’s saying, ‘Kill
the deal with me, or we’ll kill it
alone,’ ” said Robert Malley, who
worked on the National Security
Council under President Barack
Obama.
Trump blamed Iran for a litany
of alleged malign activities, including support for terrorist
groups and the “murderous regime” of Syrian President Bashar
al-Assad, and torture, mass arrests
and oppression at home.
Trump said his strategy for confronting Iran through sanctions
and support for Iranian political
freedom “stands in stark contrast
to the policy and actions of the
previous administration.”
“President Obama failed to act
as the Iranian people took to the
streets in 2009. He turned a blind
eye as Iran built and tested dangerous missiles and exported terror. He curried favor with the Iranian regime in order to push
through the disastrously flawed
Iran nuclear deal,” Trump said.
Iranian officials warned that a
U.S. withdrawal from the deal
would spell its doom.
Foreign Minister Mohammad
Javad Zarif said on Twitter that
“Trump’s policy & today’s announcement amount to desperate
attempts to undermine a solid
multilateral agreement.”
“JCPOA is not renegotiable,” he
said, using an abbreviation for the
deal’s formal name, the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action. “Rather
than repeating tired rhetoric, US
must bring itself into full compli-
ance — just like Iran.”
As a signatory to the international Non-Proliferation Treaty,
Iran has committed to not building nuclear weapons, even after
the restrictions on its program
lapse, and it is entitled to use
nuclear technology for peaceful
purposes.
Trump listed his conditions for
legislation that would address future U.S. participation and called
on European allies “to join with
the United States in fixing significant flaws in the deal, countering
Iranian aggression, and supporting the Iranian people.”
“If other nations fail to act during
this time, I will terminate our deal
with Iran,” warned Trump, who will
revisit the decision in 120 days.
Officials said the administration will discuss the changes it is
seeking with Europeans but will
not talk directly with Iran.
Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin (Md.),
the top Democrat on the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee,
called Trump’s statement an “ultimatum” and said the president is
“making negotiations with Europe more difficult by the way he’s
laying out the conditions.”
All parties to the accord would
have to agree to any changes. That
is highly unlikely. The Europeans,
who consider the deal a great success contributing to their security,
have said that Iran’s non-nuclear
behavior must be addressed separately.
The changes Trump has demanded include timely inspections of all sites requested by the
International Atomic Energy
Agency, reflecting a concern that
Iran could be conducting nuclear
research clandestinely at military
sites.
Trump also wants to terminate
the phased expiration dates of various limitations placed on Iran’s
nuclear program. Sometimes
called “sunset provisions,” many
of lapse in 10 to 15 years. Trump
wants them to continue indefinitely so that the United States can
rapidly resume sanctions if Iran is
ever found to be cheating.
Rep. Eliot L. Engel (N.Y.), the
top Democrat on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said the
demands are unattainable.
“The Trump administration’s
policy announced today sets impossible standards that would ultimately isolate the United States
rather than isolating the regime in
Tehran,” Engel said.
“Like it or not, we need to uphold our end of the bargain so that
we can hold Iran to its obligations
and crack down on the regime’s
other destabilizing activities.”
Some of the new sanctions announced by the Treasury Department are a response to crackdowns on anti-government protests and blocking access to social
media sites.
The entities sanctioned include
Iran’s Supreme Council of Cyberspace and its subsidiary, the National Cyberspace Center, which
police the Internet, restricting access to websites that challenge the
regime.
The sanctions with the most
political repercussions are against
the administrative head of Iran’s
judiciary, Sadegh Amoli Larijani.
A hard-line cleric appointed by
Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah
Ali Khamenei, Larijani is a highly
influential member of Iran’s most
powerful political family. His older brother, Ali Larijani, is the
speaker of Iran’s parliament.
Iran’s judicial system is notoriously repressive, and the country
remains one of the world’s leading
executioners. According to the European Union, which placed its
own sanctions on the judiciary
chief in 2012, Sadegh Larijani has
“personally signed off on numerous death penalty sentences.”
“Naming and shaming Sadegh
Larijani is one small way the U.S.
can bring its human rights policy
and coercive economic strategy
against Iran into greater alignment,” said Behnam Ben Taleblu,
Iran expert at the Foundation for
Defense of Democracies.
Other sanctions target companies accused of conducting prohibited transactions with Iranian
entities. Malaysia-based Green
Wave Telecommunications was
named for providing U.S. technology to Iranian companies.
The Treasury Department also
listed several Chinese individuals
and companies for breaking similar rules to provide materials to
Iran that could be used in navigation and weapons systems. Two
Iranian companies that build and
maintain the nation’s military helicopters also are on the list.
“The designations today politically go to the top of the regime
and send a very strong message
that the United States is not going
to tolerate their continued abuses,
continued violations of the rights
of their citizens,” said an administration official, speaking on the
condition of anonymity under
rules for briefing reporters.
carol.morello@washpost.com
anne.gearan@washpost.com
Erin Cunningham and Bijan Sabbagh
in Istanbul and Karoun Demirjian in
Washington contributed to this report.
Trump cancellation raises concern about U.S.-British relations
BRITAIN FROM A1
BBC last month he was optimistic about a visit in the new year.
Unlike other European leaders, British Prime Minister Theresa May initially went out of her
way to extend a hand of friendship to the new Trump administration. She offered the president
a full state visit just a week after
his inauguration, prompting
speculation that she was hoping
to secure a good trade deal postBrexit. But things have since
grown strained.
Robin Niblett, the director of
Chatham House, a London think
tank, said that U.S.-British relations are “buffeted” by Trump’s
moods. He noted that on some
matters, such as the day-to-day
business of security cooperation
between the two countries, the
relationship is good but that on
big foreign policy issues — such
as the Paris climate agreement or
the Iran nuclear deal — it is tense.
“A personal relationship between Trump and May should be
there to cover some of those
differences in strategic approach,
but it just can’t,” he said, adding
that Trump is “constantly looking
for new excuses not to come.”
Some foreign policy analysts
in Washington suggested Trump
and May could meet this year on
the sidelines of summits in other
countries, and one suggested
Trump could visit a smaller city
in Britain, perhaps one that included one of his golf resorts.
“It is extraordinary that the
president of the United States
cannot visit Britain over the fear
of mass protests,” said Thomas
Wright, director of the Center on
the United States and Europe at
the Brookings Institution in
LEON NEAL/GETTY IMAGES
A wax figure of President Trump stands outside the new U.S. Embassy in London. The president
tweeted that he will not go ahead with a visit to the billion-dollar complex planned for next month.
Washington. “That’s unprecedented.”
Julie Smith, a senior fellow at
the Center for a New American
Security who served as deputy
national security adviser for Vice
President Joe Biden, called it “a
sorry state of play.”
“It says a lot about where our
relationship is with the U.K. and
how thin-skinned our president
is,” she said.
Smith scoffed at the idea that
Trump was worried about the
cost and location of the embassy,
noting that the move has been in
the works for years.
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“It is extraordinary that the president of
the United States cannot visit Britain over
the fear of mass protests. That’s
unprecedented.”
Thomas Wright, Center on the United States and Europe
at the Brookings Institution
The old embassy is in elegant
Mayfair, an area dotted with
foreign embassies and close to
West End department stores. The
area is full of residential buildings, and neighbors were apt to
complain about the threat to
their homes.
Robert H. Tuttle, who served
as U.S. ambassador to Britain
from 2005 to 2009, said he knew
early on that the mission would
need to move.
“There were two narrow side
streets by the embassy,” he said in
an interview. “They are very slim,
and if someone came down there
with a truck, à la the Oklahoma
City bombing, it would not only
blow up half the embassy and kill
half the people in it, but it would
also kill half the people in nearby
residences.”
Johnson, the current ambassador, agreed that security concerns after Sept. 11, 2001, necessitated the move. The new, bigger
embassy is in Nine Elms, a former industrial area in Battersea,
south of the River Thames. It’s as
close to Westminster as the old
embassy.
In a piece for the Evening
Standard newspaper, Johnson
wrote that the new billion-dollar
facility “did not cost the US
taxpayer a cent” — it was financed by selling off other London properties — and is “the
most secure, hi-tech and environ-
mentally friendly embassy that
the United States has ever built. “
In his tweet, which landed at
5 a.m. London time, Trump
wrote: “Reason I canceled my
trip to London is that I am not a
big fan of the Obama Administration having sold perhaps the best
located and finest embassy in
London for ‘peanuts,’ only to
build a new one in an off location
for 1.2 billion dollars. Bad deal.
Wanted me to cut ribbon — NO.”
In fact, it was the George W.
Bush administration that decided more than a decade ago to
relocate the embassy during a
worldwide push to improve secu-
rity at U.S. diplomatic sites.
Trump is a highly controversial figure in Britain, where he
recently succeeded in uniting
politicians across the political
aisle when he retweeted a farright group’s anti-Muslim videos.
There is reason to believe that a
visit by the president also would
be met by loud opposition in the
streets.
Shortly after Trump’s inauguration, tens of thousands of demonstrators turned out in London
for a women’s march in solidarity
with anti-Trump rallies worldwide.
A group called “Stop Trump”
vowed the “biggest demonstration in British history,” should
Trump visit. On a Facebook event
page, more than 8,000 registered
to attend a rally for a protest
event that isn’t even scheduled.
A wax figure of the U.S. president did not get the memo about
the canceled visit and on Friday
made a brief appearance outside
the new embassy.
Trump’s visit there was expected to be a scaled-down working
trip that would include a ribboncutting ceremony. British media
outlets reported that Secretary of
State Rex Tillerson will now do
the honors.
Two White House officials did
not respond to requests for comment Friday.
Asked about Trump calling off
his embassy visit, a Downing
Street spokesman reiterated that
a full state visit, where the queen
acts as official host, “has been
accepted and stands.”
Despite being offered nearly a
year ago, that visit has yet to be
scheduled.
Meanwhile, Twitter users
seized the moment. The site was
abuzz with people sharing fanciful reasons for canceling a trip to
London using the hashtag #ICancelledMyTripToLondon.
One user wrote: “#ICancelledMyTripToLondon because Hadrian hasn’t finished building that
wall. Shoddy.”
karla.adam@washpost.com
Jennifer Hassan and Rick Noack in
London and Adam Taylor and David
Nakamura in Washington
contributed to this report.
Atlantic
Ocean
Old embassy
Hyde Park
IR
RE
RELAND
RE
D
Buckingham
Palace
North
Sea
BRITAIN
London
London Eye—
Big Ben—
200 MILES
FRANCE
L O N D O N
WESTMINSTER
New embassy
s
Thame
R.
Source: Maps4News/HERE
1 MILE
THE WASHINGTON POST
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
RE
Economy & Business
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Diseases’ di∞culties
stump drug companies
Getting ready for showtime
BY
CARLOS OSORIO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Workers set up for the North American International Auto Show on Friday as a video plays. The annual
event in Detroit, which last year drew more than 800,000 attendees, will open Saturday.
Facebook’s shift: What will change?
BY
H AYLEY T SUKAYAMA
How do Facebook’s planned
feed changes affect me? That’s the
question that people asked Friday, a day after the social network’s announcement. But the
answer to that depends on whom
you ask.
Facebook said that it’s shifting
the focus of its news feed to
promote “meaningful” posts,
mostly from family and friends.
The tweaks come amid an ongoing discussion about how the
company can maintain enough
trust and interest to keep people
returning to its site and support
the advertisers that pay its bills.
People who use Facebook
know that it has made several
tweaks to its news feed over the
years. And, for most, these latest
changes may be subtle. It’s likely
you’ll still see news articles or
even notifications about good
deals prominently on your feed,
as long as they’re posted by your
friends.
What will change, however, is
the way Facebook prioritizes
what to show you first. In the
past, Facebook has placed more
emphasis on serving up posts
that serve your interests. Now, it
will give more weight to those
that, for example, have lengthy
comments or that have otherwise
generated a lot of debate.
What’s less clear is how these
changes will address Facebook’s
problem with false information
10-YEAR TREASURY
CURRENCIES
DOWN $0.90 PER $1,000, 2.55% YIELD $1=110.96 YEN; EURO=$1.220
The company plans to alter the way it delivers its
news feed. The change in emphasis, however,
might be bad for advertisers.
NOAH BERGER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Facebook has announced plans to change the focus of its news feed
to promote stories that people will find more meaningful.
on the site, as many stories that
spread are shared by users’
friends and family.
Still, in some ways, this new
focus takes Facebook back to its
roots, having started as a way to
connect students on college campuses before eventually allowing
all people to join in 2006. The
move may help Facebook stem a
drop-off in “organic” posts — the
kind that Facebook is now trying
to highlight — that has been a
problem for the network for
years, and has irked users who
mostly want to use the network to
connect with people they love.
But the changes may spell trouble for the ecosystem of companies that have come to rely on
Facebook’s platform as a way to
reach potential customers and
readers.
Many worry that these changes
will cut off that vital stream. And
while Facebook has worked to
pacify fears about these changes,
it has acknowledged that the
changes will have a negative effect in the short term.
Campbell Brown, head of news
partnerships, warned that all
types of Facebook engagement
may “decrease as the updates roll
out over the next couple of
months” in a message shared on a
Facebook group for media professionals.
The shifting relationship between Facebook and its publishers could also signal a bumpy
road for the social network's bottom line in the near future. Facebook makes the vast majority of
its money from advertising and
sponsored posts, after all.
Investors were sour on the
news. Facebook’s stock Friday
closed down 4.47 percent to
$179.37.
Analysts said that Facebook’s
revenue is likely to take a hit in
the short term, but added that
this step to make its network
seem more authentic is probably
necessary for the company to
keep people’s trust over time.
“While the News Feed changes
just announced could be worrisome in terms of an ad growth
hiccup, we believe this overhaul
was the right move for longer
term user engagement and driving ‘meaningful content,’ which
remains the core ingredient in
Facebook’s recipe for success for
the coming years,” said Daniel
Ives, analyst for GBH Insights.
Facebook said that the changes
will start rolling out within the
next couple of months.
hayley.tsukayama@washpost.com
C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
The first days of 2018 have been
a bleak reminder of how tough it
is to develop drugs for some of the
world’s most frightening diseases, which rob people of their
memories, abilities and personalities.
In the span of one week, pharma giant Pfizer announced that it
was ending its internal efforts to
develop new drugs for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.
Axovant Sciences announced that
its experimental drug, which late
last year failed an Alzheimer’s
trial, had also failed to treat a
different form of dementia. A day
later, a leading medical journal
published an account of yet another experimental drug that
failed to prevent cognitive decline
in people with mild-to-moderate
Alzheimer’s disease.
These setbacks pile on to an
already depressing situation:
More than 400 failed clinical trials since the last Alzheimer’s drug
— which treats only the symptoms of the disease, temporarily
— was approved more than a
decade ago.
“If you think it’s been a bad
week, it’s been a bad 14 years. It’s
14 years since the last new drug
was approved by the FDA, and the
string of failures this week is
nothing new, and not unexpected,” said David Bennett, director
of the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease
Center in Chicago. “I view Pfizer
getting out of the Alzheimer’s
business as not a good thing for
the field, but that doesn’t mean
that I have a strong recommendation for what Pfizer should do in
its next trial.”
Alzheimer’s is a formidable foe
for a number of reasons. The
brain isn’t easy to access, and
much about how it works remains
mysterious, even as scientific
knowledge has moved forward.
Doctors can’t take easy, repeat
biopsies to see whether a drug is
working.
Trials are long and expensive. It
has become increasingly clear
that it is necessary to treat patients early, then wait to see if the
disease is prevented or slowed.
Patients, though they are affected in heartbreaking ways, typically are unable to act as advocates for more funding or research when they are in the throes
of the disease — unlike cancer or
AIDS patients.
That doesn’t mean pharmaceutical companies and researchers
are giving up. Dennis Selkoe, a
professor of neurology at
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
in Boston, who has served as the
head of the external neuroscience
advisory board for Pfizer, said
that part of the reason for the long
string of failures is that in their
desperation to find a drug, companies conducted trials that
weren’t optimal — not targeting
people early enough in the disease, or not using the best possible drugs.
“When the world says, ‘Man, it’s
terrible — Alzheimer’s has gotten
nowhere,’ I don’t think it’s a lack
of knowledge about the disease
mechanism. It’s because we’ve
chosen weak drugs that don’t do
much. And we’ve tried them when
people already have significant
impairment,” Selkoe said.
The failures have helped inform research. Trials increasingly
test drugs earlier, when they are
more likely to have an effect. Improved imaging technology has
helped researchers to peer into
the brain. Growing knowledge of
the disease, which is characterized by the buildup of amyloid
beta protein, as well as tangles of
tau protein, has helped guide the
development of smarter drugs.
An experimental drug called
aducanumab, from the Massachusetts-based biotech company
Biogen, is being tested in latestage trials after showing success
in reducing amyloid plaque in
early trials. Selkoe said that he
enrolls his own patients in this
trial and is hopeful that, if it
shows good results, it could spur
more companies to develop drugs
in this space. Selkoe has no financial relationship with Biogen.
But the long list of failures may
make companies hesitant to fund
research when they have limited
resources and more promising
drug development programs in
other disease areas.
Pfizer will maintain a venture
fund of undisclosed size to invest
in neuroscience research.
“After years of research and
investment and putting our
strong and focused efforts into
advancing neuroscience therapies, we recognized our ongoing
efforts were not going to deliver
the impactful medical advances
for patients that we had aspired to
achieve,” Pfizer spokeswoman
Neha Wadhwa said in a statement. “This was a difficult decision and it is not lost on us that
there is a tremendous need for
new therapies in this therapeutic
area.”
Part of the difficulty is that
people with Alzheimer’s disease
often suffer from other brain pathologies that also make major
contributions to their cognitive
decline. That is yet another complexity of the aging brain that
could make it harder to know if a
potential Alzheimer’s drug is
working. It also raises the prospect that fragile, elderly patients
might one day have to take cocktails of drugs to preserve their
cognition.
One solution is to try to isolate
people with the purest form of the
disease, using imaging scans or
other tools to find people with
Alzheimer’s who are lacking other
signs of pathology.
But Bennett is trying to get
companies interested in developing drugs that bolster cognitive
reserves generally, rather than
treat a specific disease. The idea is
that there could be proteins that
serve a protective effect or negative ones that could be suppressed.
Selkoe pointed out that, despite the failures, the urgency of
the disease keeps companies
pushing forward.
“I’m optimistic,” Selkoe said.
“Even though they keep on failing, there are lots of other shots
on goal.”
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
wonkblog
DIGEST
TECHNOLOGY
Google pulls game apps
over malware, porn ads
Alphabet’s Google said Friday it
had taken down 60 gaming
applications after security firm
Check Point said it had found new
malicious software in the apps
available to children and adults at
the Google Play Store.
The software displayed
pornographic ads and tried to trick
users into buying premium
services, Check Point said.
“We’ve removed the apps from
Play, disabled the developers’
accounts and will continue to show
strong warnings to anyone that has
installed them,” a Google
representative said.
Dubbed AdultSwine, the
malware hides in game apps that
Google Play data says have been
downloaded 3 million to 7 million
times, Check Point said. Google said
the inappropriate ads within the
apps were not Google ads.
The malware also tried to trick
users into installing fake security
apps and could open the door for
other attacks, such as theft of user
data, Check Point said.
The games included “Paw Puppy
Run Subway Surf,” “Shin Hero Boy
Adventure Game” and “Addon
Sponge Bob for MCPE.”
— Reuters
foreclosure sanctions.
After the banks were accused of
botching thousands of foreclosures
in 2011, the Fed and other regulators
required lenders to fix their
servicing of residential mortgages.
BANKING
Fed fines five over
mortgage foreclosures
The Federal Reserve is closing
the book on sanctions against U.S.
banks over improper handling of
mortgage foreclosures, fining firms
that include one once chaired by
Treasury Secretary Steven
Mnuchin.
In an enforcement case that has
stretched seven years, the Fed said
Friday that it is fining five
companies. More than $35 million
in new penalties include $14 million
for Goldman Sachs, $8 million for
Morgan Stanley, $4.4 million for
U.S. Bancorp, $3.5 million for
PNC and $5.2 million for CIT,
which had purchased OneWest
Bank, the firm that bought
IndyMac.
Mnuchin was chairman of
OneWest and U.S. Comptroller of
the Currency Joseph Otting was its
chief executive when the firm faced
of conditions, a vehicle’s engine
control module may incorrectly
assess the engine’s operating status
and cause it to stall, Fiat Chrysler
said.
U.S. consumer prices rose a scant
— Bloomberg News
AIRLINES
High rate of on-time
arrivals in November
U.S. airlines in November had
their highest on-time arrival rates in
eight years, the Department of
Transportation said Friday, setting
another watermark in a recordbreaking year for safety and
performance.
November also matched the
record for fewest canceled
domestic flights, 0.3 percent, set
in September and November 2016.
Leading with the highest on-time
arrival rates were Delta Air Lines,
with 93.7 percent of flights arriving
on time; Spirit Airlines, with
89.8 percent ; and Hawaiian
Airlines, with 89.3 percent.
Those with the lowest on-time
arrival rates were Alaska Air
subsidiaries Virgin America and
Alaska Airlines, and regional carrier
MARCELO SAYAO/EPA--EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
A worker sits at his mobile stall in Rio de Janeiro. The Fluminense
region of Brazil has been experiencing an economic crisis for more
than a year, and people have sought jobs in informal sectors. This
week, Standard & Poor’s downgraded the country’s long-term debt
rating to BB-, three notches below investment grade.
SkyWest Airlines.
— Reuters
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Fiat Chrysler said Friday that it
was recalling more than 162,000
2017 Chrysler Pacifica minivans
because a software glitch may cause
the vehicles to stall. The ItalianAmerican automaker said one
accident had potentially been
linked to the defect. Under a rare set
0.1 percent in December, slowed by
falling energy prices, the Labor
Department reported Friday. But
core inflation — which excludes
the volatile food and energy
categories — surged 0.3 percent, the
most in 11 months. The rise in core
inflation grabbed attention in
financial markets, where investors
have been sending bond yields up in
recent days out of concern that
rising inflation may prompt the
Federal Reserve to accelerate the
pace of its interest-rate hikes.
Visa will stop requiring signatures
for purchases made in North
America using chip-card
technology, a win for big brickand-mortar retailers. The move
takes effect in April for more than
2.5 million merchant locations
equipped to read EMV-chip cards,
Visa said Friday. Merchants have
campaigned for years to ditch
signatures because of higher fees.
— From news reports
A12
EZ
D.C. o∞cials reduce
Trump hotel’s tax bill
cause after receiving additional
information from the Trump Organization, the office agreed to
reduce the assessment to
$110 million, 32.7 percent less.
The change will reduce the
property’s 2018 tax bill from
$3,020,367 to $2,029,000, for a
savings of $991,367.
Because the Trump Organization does not own the building —
it leases the property from the
General Services Administration
— the company is responsible for
paying possessory interest taxes,
a stand-in for property taxes
applied to businesses on public
land.
In a statement to The Washington Post, D.C. Chief Financial
Officer Jeffrey S. DeWitt said the
initial assessment was “based on
assessments on the city’s other
luxury hotels and the rents paid
to GSA on leases to single users
for entire office buildings.”
DeWitt said the new assessment was agreed to “after the city
received actual cost and income
information through discovery
in the appeal process and we
Lowered assessment
means a savings of
nearly $1 million
BY
J ONATHAN O ’ C ONNELL
President Trump’s D.C. hotel
received a $53.6 million reduction in its 2018 assessment from
the District of Columbia tax
office, saving his company nearly
$1 million.
The District tax office initially
valued the Trump International
Hotel, in the federally owned Old
Post
Office
building,
at
$163,587,412, according to a
Jan. 12 written agreement.
D.C. assesses property two
years ahead of when it is taxed,
meaning that the 2018 bill is
based on an assessment of the
building from 2016, the year it
opened.
Apparently the hotel did not
debut as strongly as tax officials
initially expected, however, be-
. SATURDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The District of Columbia tax office has reduced the 2018
assessment on the Trump International Hotel by $53.6 million.
believe represents a fair value.”
A Trump Organization spokeswoman declined to comment.
Trump resigned from his company when he entered the White
House but still benefits from the
project financially, despite his
company’s leasing the property
from the federal government.
The arrangement has prompted an outcry and a series of
lawsuits from ethics experts,
good-government groups and
elected Democrats, in part because the hotel does business
with foreign governments.
It isn’t unusual for commercial property owners to appeal
their tax assessments. Hundreds
do so every year, through a
three-step appeals process that
ends with a D.C. Superior Court
finding, if the two sides can’t
come to an agreement.
D.C. assessed the building at
$91 million in the three previous
years, when it was mostly vacant
or under construction. Tax records show that the Trump Organization appealed assess-
ments in previous years but
received no reduction from the
tax office, an appeals board or
the court.
Vernon W. Johnson III, a lawyer at Nixon Peabody in Washington, said that most tax appeals are not effective but that
the Trump Organization must
have provided convincing information that the business was not
worth as much in 2016 as the
assessors expected.
“That tells me that the owner
was able to show the tax office
that the actual income was much
lower than the District was assuming, and the District must
have been receptive to that because they agreed without further appeals,” Johnson said.
DeWitt’s office did not disclose
the information it received from
the Trump Organization that
changed the assessment. However, according to records provided
by the company to the GSA —
and made public by congressional Democrats — Trump lost
more than $1.1 million in the
period the hotel was open from
September to October, shortly
before the election. Such losses
could reduce the tax assessment,
experts said.
After Trump won the election,
the hotel’s fortunes seemed to
swing dramatically, as it earned a
JANUARY 13 , 2018
$1.97 million profit in the first
four months of 2017, according to
financial statements the GSA
accidentally posted online.
Attorney David A. Fuss of
Wilkes Artis represented the hotel for the Trump Organization in
previous years and declined to
discuss the property. But he said
that “it’s not an uncommon result” to see property owners win
appeals, particularly on complex
properties that are difficult to
compare.”
“Possessory interest taxes are
rather on the new side in the
District of Columbia, and there’s
a deeper analysis that has to be
undertaken,” Fuss said. The same
taxes apply to shops in Union
Station and to the Howard Theatre, a private business that operates in a city-owned venue.
Trump received 12,723 votes in
the District, compared with
282,830 for Hillary Clinton. But
officials said his company received a fair shake from the
assessment process.
Gregory C. Syphax, chairman
of the D.C. Real Property Tax
Appeals Commission, which
hears some appeals but did not
weigh in on Trump’s 2018 assessment, said. “No matter who they
are, everyone gets treated the
exact same way.”
jonathan.oconnell@washpost.com
Holiday season was good to retailers GM car gives up steering wheel, pedals
spending performance since
2005.
“The basic story line here is that
holiday sales were extremely
strong,” said Chris Christopher,
executive director of research
firm IHS Markit. “Growth more
than surpassed expectations,
even though we’re seeing a structural shift in the industry as shoppers move online.”
Economists said factors including a growing economy and
booming stock market helped
spur spending growth. The nation’s unemployment rate is at a
17-year low, and wages are inching
up, giving consumers enough confidence to fill their carts, whether
in stores or online. Online spending grew 11.5 percent during the
holidays to $138.4 billion.
Holiday sales grew in every retail sector except sporting goods,
according to the NRF. Sales of
building materials and supplies
grew 8.1 percent from 2016, while
furniture rose 7.5 percent and
electronics grew 6.7 percent. Sales
of clothing and accessories were
up 2.7 percent.
“The economy was in great
shape going into the holiday season, and retailers had the right
mix of inventory, pricing and staffing to help them connect with
shoppers very efficiently,” Jack
Americans spent more
than expected and most
since 2005, analysts say
BY
A BHA B HATTARAI
Finally, some good news for the
nation’s retailers: Americans
spent more than expected this
holiday season, fueling the strongest growth in holiday retail sales
since the end of the Great Recession
Holiday sales rose to $691.9 billion in November and December,
marking a 5.5 percent increase
from the year before, according to
the National Retail Federation.
The lobbying group had forecast
holiday spending growth of 3.6 to
4 percent.
“Whether they shopped instore, online or on their phones,
consumers were in the mood to
spend,” Matthew Shay, president
and chief executive of the NRF,
said in a statement.
Separately on Friday, the Commerce Department said retail
sales grew 0.4 percent in December and 0.9 percent in November.
Taken together, analysts said, that
represented the best holiday
BY
Kleinhenz, the NRF’s chief economist, said in a statement.
Kohl’s reported a 6.9 percent
increase in holiday sales at stores
open at least one year, while sales
rose 3.4 percent at Target and J.C.
Penney.
Macy’s reported 1.1 percent
growth in same-store sales during
that period, led by increased demand for active apparel, shoes,
dresses and coats. “Consumers
were ready to spend this season,”
Jeff Gennette, Macy’s chief executive, said in a statement. “We saw
improved sales trends in our
stores and continued to see
double-digit growth on our digital
platforms.”
For decades, the holiday season
has been a critical time for the
nation’s retailers, and analysts
said that was particularly true in
2017. Retailers closed a record
7,000 U.S. stores last year, while
dozens of big-name companies,
including Gymboree, RadioShack
and BCBG Max Azria, filed for
bankruptcy.
Some say the season’s success
could be a turning point for the
industry. “We think the willingness to spend and growing purchasing power seen during the
holidays will be key drivers of the
2018 economy,” Kleinhenz said.
P ETER H OLLEY
The future of driving doesn’t
involve driving — at all.
That’s the big takeaway from a
first peek inside General Motors’
new autonomous car, which lacks
the steering wheel, pedals, manual
controls and human drivers that
have come to define the experience
of riding inside an automobile for
more than a century.
That means the Cruise AV — a
fourth-generation autonomous vehicle based on the Chevy Bolt EV —
is in total control.
GM submitted a petition Thursday to the Transportation Department, asking for the government
to let it roll out the new vehicle,
which it says is safe. GM plans to
mass-produce the vehicle as early
as next year, the automotive giant
announced Friday. The manufacturer is touting the vehicle as the
world’s “first production-ready vehicle” built with the sole purpose of
operating “safely on its own with
no driver,” a degree of independence known as “Level 4” autonomy.
GM is far from the only company testing Level 4 vehicles. A
California-based AV start-up
named Zoox and Alphabet’s Waymo do, too.
“We view this as being a very
important next step in our plan to
abha.bhattarai@washpost.com
construction.
“With its advanced sensor systems, the Cruise AV has the capability to see the environment
around it, in 360 degrees, day and
night,” the safety report adds. “It is
designed to identify pedestrians in
a crosswalk, or an object darting
suddenly into its path, and to respond accordingly. It can maneuver through construction cones,
yield to emergency vehicles and
react to avoid collisions.”
As The Washington Post reported last month, the ambitious timeline GM has set for getting the
Cruise AV on the road could place
the automaker in an enviable position — the unique ability to provide
existing ride-hailing companies
such as Lyft or Uber with a growing
fleet of autonomous vehicles or,
better yet, to unleash GM’s own
service.
The company has access to vast
dealership networks, nationwide
influence and manufacturing
prowess, potentially offering a
GM-driven ride-hailing service the
opportunity to supplant the Silicon Valley start-ups that have been
seeking for years to disrupt the
auto industry.
deploy self-driving vehicles at scale
in 2019, and it’s all part of our
mission to move to a world of zero
crashes,” said Ray Wert, head of
storytelling and advanced technology communications at GM.
GM is already testing secondand third-generation self-driving
Cruise AVs on busy streets in San
Francisco and Phoenix with a human engineer in the vehicle. It
relies on cameras, radar and highprecision laser sensors known as
“lidar” for navigation.
Beginning in 2019, the fourth
generation of that vehicle will be
used in a ride-sharing program in
multiple American cities, where
“the vehicles will travel on a fixed
route controlled by their mapping
system,” Bloomberg News reported.
To improve safety, the vehicles
will share information with one
another and rely on two computer
systems, which operate simultaneously so that if one computer
encounters a problem, the second
computer can serve as a backup,
according to GM’s self-driving safety report that it submitted to the
Transportation Department.
The report says the Cruise AV
was designed to operate in chaotic,
fluid conditions, such as with
aggressive drivers, jaywalkers,
bicyclists, delivery trucks and
peter.holley@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/innovations
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
U.S. Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
25,850
1 Year
% Chg
25,803.19 +2.0
+29.7
Close
25,725
25,600
25,475
25,350
25,225
Nasdaq Composite Index
7270
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Weekly
% Chg
7261.06
+1.7
+30.9
Weekly
% Chg
Industry Group
Multiline Retail
Airlines
Internet & Catalog Retail
Energy Equipment & Svcs
Distributors
Diversified Telecomm
Food Products
Electric Utilities
Water Utilities
REITS
–10%
0%
+10%
9.2
6.5
5.9
5.1
4.7
–2.1
–2.2
–2.2
–2.3
–3.6
7170
7120
2786.24
S&P 500 Index
+1.6
+22.7
2795
2775
2755
2735
Mon.
Tue.
Wed.
Thur.
Fri.
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Weekly
% Chg
79,349.12
16,308.18
49,179.48
0.4
–0.3
–1.4
398.49
5517.06
13,245.03
7778.64
0.3
0.8
–0.6
0.7
6070.05
4225.00
31,412.54
23,653.82
1 Year % Chg
–40%
0%
+40%
Company
Close
Weekly
% Chg
1 Year
% Chg
244.47
100.97
177.09
336.21
170.30
133.60
40.87
46.15
75.41
87.52
18.76
257.03
196.42
163.14
43.24
1.6
–0.1
1.2
8.9
5.1
4.5
3.4
0.2
0.0
0.9
1.2
0.6
2.0
0.4
–3.4
37.8
31.3
48.5
112.4
81.2
15.0
36.1
12.7
29.4
1.4
–40.2
5.4
45.4
–2.9
17.8
Company
Close
Weekly
% Chg
1 Year
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
145.76
112.67
173.57
58.66
89.60
64.67
89.61
36.54
134.73
136.58
228.64
51.86
120.09
100.87
112.47
2.9
4.0
–0.3
2.9
1.6
1.1
–1.8
–0.9
1.9
3.8
0.0
–1.2
1.0
0.7
0.8
27.2
30.6
42.2
–5.7
43.1
23.4
6.9
12.1
15.4
23.2
40.8
–1.6
47.6
48.4
4.6
US $
EU € per
0.8198
–0.9
2.1
1.9
–0.3
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.2200
0.0090
1.3739
0.3119
0.8023
0.0525
0.0074
1.1261
0.2560
0.6578
0.0430
152.4310
34.6230
89.0330
5.8273
0.2270
0.5840
0.0382
Japan ¥ per
110.9600
135.3800
Britain £ per
0.7279
0.8880
0.0066
Brazil R$ per
3.2054
3.9052
0.0288
4.4049
Canada $ per
1.2463
1.5205
0.0112
1.7122
0.3888
Mexico $ per
19.0427
23.2328
0.1720
26.1642
5.9400
Mexico $
2.5724
0.1684
0.0654
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 28,806.69
Russell 2000
1591.97
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 558.79
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
10.16
1 Year % Chg
22.0
17.0
23.7
–12.0
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Weekly
(Ticker) % Chg
Close
Weekly
% Chg
$1.3620
$17.14
$9.6050
$0.1418
$4.2050
–1.3
–0.8
–1.1
–6.0
–2.4
week
$600
$1000
year
$1400
–5.2
–0.2
–0.5
4.9
3.8
2.3
0.9
7.2
–0.9
Company
Novavax Inc
Lightbridge Corp
Osiris Therapeutics
Intrexon Corp
Discovery Comm
CASI Pharma
CEL-SCI Corp
Neuralstem Inc
Corporate Office
Community Financial
Fed Realty Invst
Vanda Pharma
Intelsat SA
United Therapeutics
Intersections Inc
Comstock Holding
Close
Weekly
% Chg
$1.61
$1.52
$7.25
$14.71
$24.33
$3.75
$2.15
$2.02
$27.15
$36.85
$122.81
$14.50
$3.28
$141.27
$2.05
$1.70
24.8
23.6
13.5
11.9
10.6
10.3
10.3
6.9
–3.5
–4.1
–4.3
–4.9
–5.2
–5.7
–7.2
–9.1
week
$0
$1000
year
$3100
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Consumer Rates
Weekly % Chg
1.6
2.0
2.4
10.2
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
15.2788
Interest Rates
Other Measures
–0.3
–1.4
+4.7
+1.0
+14.5
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
Cross Currency Rates
US $ per
Weekly
% Chg
Local Gainers and Losers
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
$3.2185
$3.4625
$64.30
$1,334.90
$3.20
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
7220
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.30
0.46
0.80
1.52
2.90
5.55
4.50%
Bank Prime
3.96%
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.50%
Federal Funds
3.30%
1.72%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.42%
10-year note
Yield: 2.55
2-year note
Yield: 2.00
5-year note
Yield: 2.34
6-month bill
Yield: 1.59
15-Year fixed mortgage
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
Free For All
An election isn’t
a ‘takeover’
2017 poorly reviewed
I was utterly turned off by Dave Barry’s unfunny,
juvenile review of 2017 [“The year of living deliriously,” Washington Post Magazine, Dec. 31].
I couldn’t get past March. His year in review was
akin to 10 elephants with diarrhea and possibly
worse than reading President Trump’s tweets. I love
good humor and strong sarcasm. Barry displayed
neither in this offering. His worst offense, other
than being unfunny, was his obsession with denigrating the reaction to Russian interference in the
U.S. election. The legitimate outrage and subsequent investigation are not humorous. Perhaps
Barry is vying to replace White House press
secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders.
There were more than a few humorous twists and
turns in 2017. There were also many serious
occurrences, which Barry cavalierly mentioned.
Barry is about as funny as a barium milkshake from
Chernobyl.
Andrew Boller, Basel, Switzerland
The first phrase of the
opening sentence in the
Dec. 31 front-page article “On
vow to trim, Trump delivers”
was irresponsible and politically motivated. It said, “Nearly a year into his takeover of
Washington.” The president
did not take over Washington;
he was elected to the office
based on the law of this
land. To suggest otherwise is
irresponsible and politically
motivated fake news, no matter on which side of the political discourse one resides.
No wonder the mainstream
media is held in such low
esteem.
Steve Siegfried,
Evergreen, Colo.
After a dent was made this past year into sexual
harassment and the damage it has caused, why
publish the first sentence of Dave Barry’s year in
review? He wrote, “Looking back on 2017 is like
waking up after a party where you made some poor
decisions, such as drinking tequila squeezed from
the underpants of a person you do not really know.”
The implication was disgusting. He could do
better — and so could The Post.
Meg McGowan-Tuttle, Portland, Ore.
It takes scientific truth
40 years ahead
of the trend
SHANNON STAPLETON/REUTERS
Firefighters work at an apartment building in New York on Jan. 2.
The portion of the Dec. 30 Religion article “12 who
died in 2017 put array of faiths in action” on Frank
Worthen seemed to suggest that “conversion therapy” fostered by Exodus International — which
claimed to make gay people straight — folded
because it was “controversial.” While it was controversial, the real cause was rigorous social science and
the findings of virtually all medical and psychological professions, led by the American Medical Association and the American Psychological Association.
Their evidence showed that people cannot change
their sexual orientation and that attempts to do so
can and have caused lasting harm to individuals.
Even though Worthen insisted all his life that
Jesus had the power to change sexual orientation,
the article correctly added that the failed Exodus
International eventually apologized for the harm it
caused. A fraud such as conversion therapy may
stoke controversy, but it takes scientific truth to
defeat lies.
Bob Witeck, Arlington
ISTOCK
A delightful stock photo
Judith Graham’s Jan. 2 Navigating Aging column,
“An active social life may be a secret to brain health”
[Health & Science], included a delightful photograph of an older woman and man yukking it up —
she with her tongue stuck out fully, no less. What a
great image! But who are they? This photo cried out
for a caption identifying these two stellar examples
of how to age with humor.
Martha E. Powers, Fairfax
A fantastic frozen frame
What an awesome picture of firefighters working on a fire
in New York [National Digest, Jan. 3]. The firefighters
seemed nearly engulfed in icicles — not fire. Although more
than a thousand words were certainly represented about
what’s happening with our weather in this shot, I was left
wanting to see more and to know more about the scene —
especially about the outcome of their valiant efforts. I’ll bet
the firefighters’ families — like me — would like to frame this
one.
Elizabeth Brooks-Evans, Silver Spring
The Jan. 1 front-page article “Colleges offer tuition
help in exchange for future
income” goes back only to
2016 discussing Purdue University’s
recent
tuitionfor-income exchange. Remembering back to collegeapplication days, I know that
Yale University did essentially the same thing no later
than 1972.
Zachary H. Levine, Rockville
Crimes and misdemeanors in an Allen analysis
Richard Morgan’s Jan. 7 Outlook essay about
Woody Allen, “Making art out of lechery,” was deeply
dishonest. Morgan talked in present tense about “an
82-year-old’s fixation with 18-year-olds,” yet Morgan
mostly discussed work Allen wrote at least 40 years
ago.
Morgan said any Allen movie could be titled “A
Woman Gets Objectified by a Man.” “Annie Hall”?
“Zelig”? “The Purple Rose of Cairo”? “Midnight in
Paris”? Morgan distorted “The Kugelmass Episode,”
omitting how it lampoons Kugelmass — who’s seeing
Madame Bovary. If “c’est moi” was written near
Kugelmass’s dialogue, perhaps Allen considered having Kugelmass say that in Yonville.
Allen is right that this #MeToo movement can
become a witch hunt; proof is what Senate Democrats did to now-former senator Al Franken (DMinn.).
Judy Klass, Nashville
Richard Morgan’s essay on Woody Allen obviously was trading on the sensitivity of the moment to
men’s abuse of underage women. He mentioned
Allen’s alleged abuse of Dylan Farrow, and the
reverberations from that note are meant to wash over
every other instance of Allen filming or writing about
women. No other real case of abuse is mentioned,
though he came up with one imagined scenario of
sexual harassment (against Nati Abascal).
The author said Allen’s private notes show an
“obsession” with young women but offered only a
couple of mentions of women ages 16 to 18, a meager
harvest from those 56 boxes of Allen’s sketches
reaching across 57 years of his life. That’s not obsession. The author says Allen writes “Freudian” scripts,
but the big word just sits there reverberating darkly.
And perhaps the cheapest of shots: The objectifying of a woman by a man, “in [Allen’s] view, is the
pinnacle of art, its truest calling and highest purpose.” No example discussed.
Morgan worked with snarky comments, innuendo
and distortion. A short list of Oscar-nominated
female roles became “a nesting-doll joke . . . Allen
used [Diane] Keaton and the others . . . [as] an Oscar
lure shiny enough to blind aspiring acolytes to his
darkness.” Desperate for wit, he aimed this cheap
shot at one of Allen’s real accomplishments: the
PASCAL LE SEGRETAIN/GETTY IMAGES
Woody Allen in 2016 in Cannes, France.
creation of complex female characters with a range of
interesting personalities and destinies that appealed
to and, in some cases, made great actresses.
Morgan’s judgments were crude, his wit shallow
(“garden of earthly deletes”). He has reduced a
filmmaker of depth and wit to a misogynistic fetishist. His article was neither film criticism nor journalism, just opportunistic.
Stephen Jaeger, Burbank, Calif.
Woody Allen is not unique among artists who
have explored the apparently timeless theme of aging
men yearning for younger women (and aging women
observing this melancholic phenomenon). Doing so
does not make him a lecher, a term that, as with many
other epithets, has lost its power through agendadriven overuse.
Allen and some of the actors who have appeared in
his films have earned the respect of his audiences and
his peers because he has explored that theme with
humor, irony, poignancy and a deft directorial skill.
What’s clear is that Richard Morgan approached the
Allen archives with prosecutorial intent and with an
eye on the market for such unnuanced and insulting
portrayals.
Kerry Snow, College Park
ADRIAN HIGGINS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Winterberry holly.
This land is our land
Berry dangerous for pets
Adrian Higgins’s Jan. 4 Gardening column, “Winterberry’s great balls of fire blaze in January’s pale
sunlight” [Local Living], would have been complete
had it noted this shrub isn’t for gardeners with dogs
or cats, to whom the berries are toxic. Higgins should
know better.
Good thing (at least for these purposes) we had a
deep freeze preventing anyone from running to the
local nursery anyway.
Michael Postar, North Bethesda
The Dec. 31 front-page article
“ ‘Smothered’ and ‘shoved aside’
in rural America” asserted that
President Barack Obama “set
aside millions of acres of undeveloped land as national monuments
. . . preventing huge areas from
being mined, logged or farmed.”
That characterization reinforced
the false impression that the designation was a momentous and
sweeping land grab in which private lands were appropriated for
inclusion in the public lands system.
In fact, these lands were already
File this one under fiction
“The worst book about Charles Darwin ever
written” [Book World, Dec. 31], Jerry A. Coyne’s
review of “Charles Darwin: Victorian Mythmaker,”
made a good attempt to try to dissuade people from
buying this absurd “biography” of Darwin, but I
think it was an enormous oversight that Coyne did
not take Harper to task for publishing it.
Even ignoring the provenance of Harper (as part
of News Corp.), surely this conglomeration of lies,
unsubstantiated and misused references, and
confirmation-bias “research” should be categorized
for what it is — a counterfactual novel — and not
classified as a biography.
Elaine Homstad, Annandale
Lost in translation
ASTRID RIECKEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Morning dew covers the plants at the National Arboretum in Washington on Dec. 21.
Letters can be sent to letters@washpost.com.
Submissions must be exclusive to The Post and should
include the writer’s address and day and evening
telephone numbers. Because of the volume of material we
receive, we are unable to acknowledge submissions;
writers whose letters are under consideration for
publication will be contacted.
federally owned and managed.
Through the designation, Obama
added a layer of protection, but a
layer that also generally protected
valid existing rights to mine or
lease and uses such as grazing.
As for farming, Obama’s actions had no impact one way or
the other because farming has
never been an authorized use of
federal lands.
Erica Rosenberg, Washington
The writer, an environmental
lawyer, was counsel to
Senate and House committees
overseeing public lands.
A comforting read near the end of the year
Thanks for the Dec. 24 Metro article
“Reverie in the trees,” a well-balanced blend
of straight reporting, poetic language and
photography about the winter solstice at the
National Arboretum. I can’t be the only one
who found it a comforting read at the end of
a troubling year. I needed that.
Rob Nelson, Baltimore
Despite the crucial roles that
translators and interpreters play
in providing The Post and all
other media information about
global events, the media consistently confuse the two.
A translator translates documents. An interpreter interprets
oral or signed speech. (Some talented individuals indeed do both,
but the skill sets are different. I’m
a former interpreter who couldn’t
cut it and am now a translator.)
The Jan. 4 Metro article “For
those who aided U.S., a lift” was a
case in point. It said, “Despite
efforts by nonprofit groups to
locate and subsidize housing for
interpreters, translators often
lack work history to land even
basic jobs and have no credit history to obtain loans or apartments.” The article purported to
be concerned about interpreters
who are translators?
Translators and interpreters
really deserve to be called by their
proper job titles.
Benjamin Barrett,
La Conner, Wash.
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Time for some 21st-century trains
EDITORIALS
A solution in search of a problem
The White House’s move to allow states to have work requirements for Medicaid is superfluous and harmful.
I
and chronic coverage gap for working-age, nondisabled adults who lacked jobs, or whose employers did not provide insurance but paid their
employees too little for them to buy it on their own.
Obamacare tried to fill that gap — and break the
link between work and insurance — by opening up a
subsidized individual market and by admitting
millions of working-age adults to Medicaid. This
was progress, both ideologically and substantively.
And now the Trump administration proposes to
undermine it by allowing states to require nondisabled adults to work for Medicaid benefits
heretofore provided based on only income.
This is a solution in search of a problem. The
majority of the target population already work
(60 percent) or live with a worker (79 percent),
according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. So even
if the official rationale for the new policy — the
Department of Health and Human Services says
work improves health — is valid, it’s superfluous in
most cases. Of those who aren’t working, many have
care-giving responsibilities that either they would
have to abandon or states would have to accept as
the equivalent of work outside the home, after a lot
of complex and expensive administrative hassle.
Eight states have petitions pending for the
relevant legal waiver that would allow them to
impose work requirements. Of these, five expanded
Medicaid through Obamacare, so the necessary
effect would be to tighten eligibility for that
population, ending coverage for at least some poor
people who have it now. (A waiver for Kentucky, also
an expansion state, has just been approved.) Of the
other states that did not expand Medicaid, the new
policy would, in some cases, add to administrative
burdens without affecting work incentives for
anyone except a relative handful of non-disabled
adults.
And, of course, people who can’t meet a work
requirement will not cease seeking medical care;
they will get it as they used to before Medicaid, by
showing up at emergency rooms, where they must
be treated, often at higher expense than would have
been the case if they had insurance.
In pursuit of truth
in Burma
Regarding Dana Milbank’s Jan. 9 Washington
Sketch column, “Trump’s Napoleon complex (the
one from ‘Animal Farm,’ not, like, the other guy)”:
As a middle school English teacher, I have told my
students frequently as we navigate our way through
classic literature that writers do not write in a
vacuum but, often and creatively, respond to what is
happening in the world around them using the
stories they create as vehicles. George Orwell did
that in his 1945 allegorical tale “Animal Farm.”
Interestingly, he had trouble getting it published
because the Allies were reluctant to irritate Soviet
leader Joseph Stalin in their shaky post-World War II
alliance.
Like Mr. Milbank, I see the current political
climate mimicking Orwell’s fantasy. Although the
pigs are convincing when they promise a better
future, things do not change for the “working class,”
and it seems doubtful that it will for ours. “So sad,” as
the swine leader might remark.
Carole Tauber, Rockville
“W
Don’t deport them
LYNN BO BO/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK
Reuters journalists Wa Lone (center, front) and Kyaw Soe Oo (center, rear) are escorted by police as
they leave the court in Rangoon, Burma, on Wednesday.
maximum sentence of 14 years in prison.
Later Wednesday, the military released results of
its investigation into the mass grave the journalists
were probing. A statement said that 10 bodies there
were of Muslims who had been killed by villagers
and security forces “because they were terrorists.”
The Burmese military campaign was triggered by
an August attack on security posts by a small
Rohingya militant group, but the military’s statement about terrorism should be viewed with acute
skepticism. The truth is still elusive. The Reuters
journalists were chasing it, and putting them in jail
was to prevent them from finding it.
Burma’s military remains a powerful force in the
country, even though it has passed partial control
to civilians, now under the leadership of the Nobel
Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi. Her weak
response to the Rohingya operation may be
explained by the military’s continued dominance of
security matters, but she should not tolerate the
prosecution of the two reporters. Already, journalists complain there has been serious backsliding of
press freedom under her government. She must
stand up for a free press as the core of a free society,
demand release of the Reuters pair and allow
unfettered access to Rakhine state.
OPRAH WINFREY
Please, no more celebrity presidential candidates in 2020
In his Jan. 9 op-ed, “Never underestimate Oprah,”
Eugene Robinson all but endorsed Oprah Winfrey for
the presidency. We can agree that, unlike the current
president, she has an excellent haircut, is not a
shameless egotist and doesn’t make your skin crawl
whenever you see her on television, but that’s just to
say she would be better than President Trump, which
is very faint praise.
Ms. Winfrey wouldn’t hand her television show
over to someone who had never worked in front of a
camera and had no demonstrated ability to attract
and hold an audience; why should we hand the
country over to her? Could she perhaps start as mayor
of Chicago? As far as I know, Ms. Winfrey, to her
credit, hasn’t expressed interest in running, but the
electorate has become so childish that it seems inevitable. Frank Zappa once said of young Americans,
“The people are desperate to be entertained.” That
was decades ago, but things haven’t gotten better —
more like worse.
I saw 10 minutes of the “Today” show yesterday,
and the subject was Ms. Winfrey. The host turned her
cheerful morning TV face to the audience and, with
that happy-talk delivery, asked if they’d like to see
Ms. Winfrey run. The unspoken but unmistakable
question was, “Wouldn’t that be fun?” Unsurprisingly,
the response was enthusiastic approval.
Keith Smith, Silver Spring
We need to end the political aspirations of celebrities and political neophytes. If Oprah Winfrey wants
to run for office, let her start in Congress, as a
representative, until she learns the legislative process. We are absolutely finished with putting beginners in the highest office in the land. You don’t go from
zero to 100 just because you are a celebrity. Work your
way up. We are finished handing you the keys to the
kingdom because you’re a bit famous.
The vanity campaigns by the rich and famous have
to end before they’re even allowed to start.
Jess Vermont, Arlington
I admire Oprah Winfrey. I really do. Her Golden
Globe Awards speech was fiery and inspiring and
exciting and well thought out. Clearly, she can speak
(after all, she is an actress). She has done well with her
life and enriched ours with her many talents.
Regarding the Jan. 7 Metro article “Enthusiasm,
opposition grow for maglev train plan”:
The proposed Baltimore-Washington high-speed
rail project would complement our existing rail and
mass transit systems, especially if completed to New
York City and Boston, and perhaps south to Richmond and major urban areas of North Carolina. Our
nation needs to upgrade and improve our infrastructure, and this project can be just one of these efforts.
A vibrant regional economy depends on diverse
modes of transportation. New businesses and companies will consider a region’s diversity of transportation when deciding where to locate their headquarters.
The magnetic-levitation system, or maglev, is
much greener than conventional fossil-fuel-based
rail systems, such as Amtrak and MARC, which
mostly use diesel. We must begin to implement nonfossil-fuel-based rail transportation, similar to the
newer high-speed trains in Japan, China and Europe.
The United States should develop proven new
modes of transportation. Such projects also create
employment opportunities for college students specializing in engineering and the sciences. The
Baltimore-to-Washington portion of the maglev
could produce more than 70,000 jobs in planning,
design, engineering and construction. More than a
thousand jobs would be filled with the operation and
maintenance. And spinoff industries could arise
from this project.
High-speed maglev from city center to city center
has advantages over air travel and traffic-laden
freeways, saving people time, wear and tear. We need
to give the 21st-century, green, high-speed rail
transportation that maglev offers a try.
Robert Snyder, Greenbelt
‘Animal Farm’ hits close to home
Reuters reporters are not criminals
for investigating a mass grave.
E ARE not doing anything wrong.
Please help us by uncovering the
truth.” Those words on Wednesday
from Kyaw Soe Oo, on the steps of a
courthouse in Rangoon, Burma, are an apt description of a test case for the nation’s democratic
aspirations. Mr. Kyaw Soe Oo is a Reuters reporter
and, with a colleague, Wa Lone, has been imprisoned and charged with carrying out the “crime” of
investigative journalism. They must be freed if
Burma, also known as Myanmar, is to sustain even a
shred of respect for democracy.
The two journalists were investigating reports of
a mass grave in Rakhine state, where the Burmese
military has conducted a scorched-earth campaign
against the Muslim minority Rohingya population.
Long marginalized by the majority Buddhists, the
Rohingya have in recent months been subject to
ethnic cleansing from their villages, propelling
about 650,000 into exodus in neighboring Bangladesh, where they are crowded into camps. Human
rights monitors say the campaign brought murder,
rape and destruction to the Rohingya villages.
The journalists were looking into reports of a
mass grave in the village of Inn Din. Reporting such
as this has been extremely difficult because of
government restrictions on journalists and independent investigators. The journalists were arrested Dec. 12 after being invited to meet police officials
on the outskirts of Rangoon, where they were first
given some documents, then almost immediately
taken into custody. The government has said the
reporters “illegally acquired information with the
intention to share it with foreign media.” On
Wednesday, they were formally charged with
obtaining state secrets and violating the Official
Secrets Act, a British colonial-era law with a
JANUARY 13 , 2018
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
N CONTRAST with those of other advanced
industrial democracies, especially in Europe,
the U.S. system of social insurance and income
support distributes benefits based not only on
membership in society, but also on work effort, past
and present. In the realm of health insurance, this
means that instead of adopting universal coverage
as a national legal standard, then devising a unitary
system to meet that goal, the United States cobbled
together programs whose organizing principle, such
as it is, is work. A plurality of adults get taxsubsidized insurance through their employers; most
retirees get Medicare, paid for out of deductions
from their past paychecks. Many others — poor
children, people with disabilities — obtain insurance from programs whose premise is that the
recipients are neither expected nor able to work,
which is itself a work-related criterion.
This makes no actuarial sense, because the need
for health care and work are not necessarily
connected. It created the impediment to worker
mobility known as “job lock.” And it created a large
. SATURDAY,
al. May calmer heads prevail.
Penelope Suritz, Arlington
No, no. Oprah Winfrey should not run as a Democrat. Run as an independent to show both major
parties they have lost their way in governing for the
people.
Walt Cheatham, Arlington
LUCY NICHOLSON/REUTERS
Oprah Winfrey at the Golden Globe Awards in
Beverly Hills, Calif., on Jan. 7.
But we have already had the experience of a TV star
running for (and becoming!) president. And his lack
of political knowledge, work ethic and experience in
anything remotely akin to governmental issues may
bring us all down.
It is one thing to like a person; it is quite another to
actually put him or her in charge of your country. I
fear that the same people who thought a failed
businessman and a reality show host would be able to
work in the complex environs of our government
might want to try again.
I do think Ms. Winfrey is stable and, like, really
smart. And I am sure that she listens to her advisers
and actually reads. But she is not presidential materi-
I am reading with growing concern the vox
populi crying for Oprah Winfrey to run for president
in 2020. While I think she is an amazing person who
has done much with her fame and wealth to help
direct public dialogue about numerous social issues,
including her emotional speech at the Golden Globe
Awards, none of that necessarily qualifies her for the
highest leadership position in our national government.
Have we learned nothing from the 2016 election
and the current occupant of the Oval Office? We need
candidates who have governing experience at the
local, state or national level. This is evident in the
current president’s push for policies that require
more thought, debate and bipartisan cooperation to
address both immediate and unforeseen consequences of them.
I know dedicated elected officials at every level of
government may not have Hollywood-style charisma,
but they have experience and knowledge, and the vast
majority incorporate an intrinsic desire to serve the
people, not themselves.
Natalie Root, Arlington
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While I am a supporter of stronger enforcement
of our immigration policies, particularly for undocumented immigrants, I cannot support this action
to stop the temporary protected status for Salvadorans or those from other nations [“Hurting many,
helping no one,” editorial, Jan. 10].
The key issue for me is that they are not here
illegally. As a result of residency extensions, the
Salvadorans at risk have been here for 17 years,
working jobs, paying taxes, sending money to
relatives in El Salvador, getting married and having
children who are U.S. citizens. Should we tear apart
families of people who have been here for 17 years?
No, provided, of course, that they haven’t committed
crimes. Any person who has been in this country for
more than 10 years and has done nothing wrong
should be given the opportunity to become a citizen
of the United States.
It is time that Congress gets its act together and
fixes the immigration laws. Let’s stop playing
politics and considering what’s best for one party vs.
the other party, and do what is best for this country.
Bob Moore, Purcellville
My good friend “Josue” is a Salvadoran man who
has been living in Virginia for 14 years. He works in a
poultry plant, paying taxes. He is a homeowner,
active in his church and a community leader who
helps organize the Harrisonburg International Festival and other events. The Trump administration
has just terminated the legal temporary protected
status of more than 200,000 Salvadorans.
Is the Trump administration really going to pay to
round up and deport hundreds of thousands of
Salvadorans, Haitians, Nicaraguans and others?
There are 21,500 Salvadorans living under temporary protected status in Virginia. Salvadorans are
not leaving to return to a country with one of the
highest murder rates in the world. No one would.
The result is that we will have 21,500 more people in
Virginia paid under the table, driving without a
license, living in fear, not cooperating with law
enforcement for fear of being trapped themselves.
And 19,200 U.S.-born children in Virginia would
lose their parents.
Is this what we want in Virginia and the country?
Sam Nickels, Harrisonburg, Va.
The writer, a former case manager with
NewBridges Immigrant Resource Center,
is a lawyer who consults on legal cases of
Salvadoran immigrants with mental illness facing
deportation.
Given that the U.S. population is somewhere in
excess of 320 million, the people here who are under
temporary protected status represent less than
0.5 percent of our total population.
Their contributions to our economy are at least
equal to that of the typical citizen.
Let’s have a rational discussion about making the
best use of this pool of energy and talent instead of
taking a divisive and inhumane action that would
leave the refugees and their home countries worse
off.
John D. Barnes, Chevy Chase
First they came for the Haitians, then they came
for the Salvadorans, then they came for me.
Gail C. Weigl, Alexandria
With current news of problems with Salvadorans, “dreamers,” and Immigration and Customs
Enforcement raids, we should perhaps see if France
would take back the Statue of Liberty, as it is
apparently no longer desired here.
Raymond Meyer, Winchester, Va.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
COLBERT I. KING
EZ
A15
RE
CHRISTINE EMBA
DRAWING BOARD
D.C. public schools’
truant leadership
‘All the Money in
the World’ — just
not for women
T
he press of other workaday news stories, plus
added reports of White House deviltry, overshadow the scandal brewing in the public
school system of our nation’s capital. The
schools story ought to occupy the minds of everyone
who professes to care about the future of the District.
The facts, laid out this week in an email from D.C.
Council Chairman Phil Mendelson (D), capture the
scope of the offense, as documented in a Nov. 28 report,
“What Really Happened at Ballou, the D.C. High School
Where Every Senior Got Into College,” by WAMU and
NPR.
“Of the students enrolled as seniors at Ballou [Senior
High] last year, 164 received diplomas. However, half of
those graduates were truant more than three months
of school, unexcused. Twenty-percent were truant
more than half the school year. One student missed
over 150 days, but graduated,” Mendelson wrote.
Wait, there’s more.
“Numerous teachers as well as students,” wrote the
council chairman, “have said that teachers felt pressure to pass chronically absent students. If teachers
pushed back, they might be given poor evaluations,
putting their jobs at risk.”
Ballou’s principal, since reassigned to the central
office, says the truancy data is misleading because the
district’s attendance policy requires that the school
mark students absent if they miss more than 20 percent of a day. But Mendelson, a veteran city lawmaker
with a reputation for no high jinks or showboating,
said the system of evaluations and pay bonuses incentivizes social promotion. “Two months before graduation,” Mendelson discovered, “only 57 students were on
track to graduate. But in June, 164 received diplomas.”
To compound the scandal, it turns out that D.C.
school officials had been made aware of the alarming
situation months before the story hit the airwaves.
Post writers Moriah Balingit and Andrew Ba Tran
reported this month that a group of teachers met with
school officials to call attention to the crisis the day
after Ballou graduates received their diplomas in June.
The Post also reported that a teacher at the school
followed up in an email to Chancellor Antwan Wilson a
month after the meeting.
Wilson never responded.
The chancellor, well after the fact, acknowledged at a
council hearing that a teacher had tried to alert him to
the Ballou situation. But he said he didn’t look into it
until the WAMU and NPR report aired. Explained
Wilson lamely, “We know that there was a Ballou
teacher who in August complained through the grievance process,” but “our team, prioritizing impact, had
not gotten to it.”
That is unfortunate. Had Wilson and his team at D.C.
Public Schools headquarters gotten off their duffs and
responded, they would have learned that Ballou is not
an isolated problem.
“Last year,” Mendelson said, “64% of the entire
[Ballou] school was truant 21 or more days. But at H.D.
Woodson [High School], 76% was truant 21 days or
more days. The number was 54% at Anacostia, 40% at
Cardozo, 45% at Eastern and 48% at Roosevelt.”
Mr. Chancellor, you have a systemwide problem on
your hands.
And it seems to be a corollary to a deficiency I wrote
about two years ago: The four-year DCPS graduation
rate — 58.3 percent — was one of the lowest in the
nation in 2015. The rate for black males was even lower
at 48 percent. Worse still, 591 DCPS students in 2014
were dropouts. Several high schools with graduation
rates of 60 percent or less were dubbed “dropout
factories.”
Well, has current school leadership addressed that
problem with suspect graduation rates? As Mendelson
and a handful of city public officials who are not
mindless DCPS cheerleaders are quick to point out,
inflating graduation rates only cheats students. What
else is it but cheating when we promote and hand out
diplomas to students who don’t show up for school and
who don’t qualify to walk across the stage on graduation day?
How does that enable a student to acquire skills and
land a job in this increasingly competitive world? How
does pushing out students who haven’t learned actually prepare them for the challenges and responsibilities
of adulthood?
My late parents, my two siblings and I are products
of the D.C. public school system. Our schools — once
legally and de facto racially segregated — lacked some
of the resources found in majority white schools. But
the value of our diplomas was not degraded — not at
Dunbar Senior High, alma mater of my mom, my sister
and me. Social promotions and inflated graduation
rates were inventions of the future. Poverty was no
excuse for not learning. Desire mattered. So, too,
achievement, regardless of the personal challenges
some of us faced in getting to school. We were still held
to high standards.
Our principals and teachers did not enable failure:
They demanded we meet expectations, a crappy world
notwithstanding. Hard-working parents would have
been heartbroken if we had betrayed them by cutting
school most of the year.
The scandal would have been to throw away the
opportunity to get an education — and the failure of
our principal and teachers to provide one.
A
BY SACK FOR THE STAR TRIBUNE
BY HORSEY FOR THE LOS ANGELES TIMES
BY LUCKOVICH FOR THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION
BY DANZIGER FOR THE RUTLAND HERALD
kingc@washpost.com
ll the money in the world, but not enough
to pay women equally.
This week, it was revealed that four-time
Oscar-nominated actress Michelle Williams received less than one-tenth of 1 percent of
co-star Mark Wahlberg’s pay to reshoot scenes for
“All the Money in the World,” a thriller released
Christmas Day. The reshoots themselves were
necessary to cut alleged sexual abuser Kevin Spacey
out of the film, with Christopher Plummer replacing him.
According to an exclusive report from USA
Today, Williams was paid a per diem of $80 for 10
days of added work. Wahlberg received the same —
plus $1.5 million more.
Obviously, the disparity is outrageous. The
revelations are especially staggering coming on the
heels of the #TimesUp protest at the Golden Globes
just days ago, itself an expression of the #MeToo
movement that has for months publicized rampant
gender inequity and sexual harassment in Hollywood and other industries.
One thing this moment of reckoning has done is
open the eyes of observers — men and women alike
— to the imbalances that make possible such
egregious offenses against women. Williams said as
much herself in a profile published the day after her
pay discrepancy was revealed: “Sexual harassment
is a branch on the tree, and the tree is the power
imbalance.”
So what are the other branches? Williams’s
predicament highlights a few.
The most obvious spans industries and sectors of
life: the fact that women’s work is undervalued
relative to men’s. In Hollywood, a movie’s female
headliner often gets paid millions less than her
male co-star. In less glamorous industries, estimates of the wage gap range from 77 to 91 cents on
the dollar. And closer to home, labor seen as
“women’s work,” such as cleaning or caregiving, is
often compensated poorly — if it’s seen as worthy of
notice at all.
And then there’s the question of work opportunities. The profile of Williams also noted that “All the
Money in the World” finally put her in a leading role
after a decade and a half of work; she was neither
love interest nor kindly wife, but a main character.
Knowing that the movie risked being shelved,
Williams offered to forgo her salary (and Thanksgiving vacation) to ensure that the reshoots got
done in time. Yes, that was a choice she made. But if
there were more opportunities for women, perhaps
Williams wouldn’t have been put in the position of
gifting away her pay for one shot at success.
Harder to sort out are those places where the
branches of gendered assumptions and work
intertwine. There is a long-standing notion that
women are expected to sacrifice and not complain
for the good of the team. Williams volunteered to
work free so the movie could be finished;
Wahlberg, obviously, did not. Think of how this
power imbalance plays out in cases of harassment: Women are pressured, explicitly or implicitly, to stand down and keep quiet rather than
ruin the careers of their abusers. Men? Well, not
so much.
It’s difficult to blame the producers of “All the
Money in the World” for accepting Williams’s offer
to sacrifice for the greater good. Which time- and
resource-crunched manager, offered a way to save
millions of dollars and jump-start a production,
would turn it down? The better question to ask,
however, is why it’s so often women who make the
offer and shoulder the results.
How do we cut down this tree? It’s more
complicated than it sounds. Some would say that
it’s the woman’s job to speak up, to not allow herself
to be taken advantage of, to negotiate as hard as a
man would. But it’s also her employers’ and our
society’s jobs to not label her difficult or angry
when she does. Women who ask for more are still
seen as “intimidating” and “aggressive,” research
shows, and are flagged as hard to work with. Men
who negotiate are seen as savvy.
Most important, we must remember that the
tree’s roots are deep. Sexism and its resulting power
imbalances are not just about one incident of
misaligned pay or a single come-on gone bad
(despite what actress Catherine Deneuve might
say). These are simply examples of how the world
works when power, historically and by design, is
tilted toward men. Remaining aware and outspoken reminds us to whittle away at the source
whenever and however we can.
Many Hollywood stars, male and female, have
spoken out in Williams’s defense. The Screen
Actors Guild is investigating whether “All the
Money in the World” broke any contract rules.
We’re more aware and more mobilized than ever,
and each new incident seems like a hatchet blow
against the trunk of a twisted tree. The tree may
never fully come down, but we should hit as hard as
we can.
christine.emba@washpost.com
ALEXANDRA PETRI
Why would anyone from Norway want to come here?
“President Trump grew frustrated with lawmakers Thursday in the Oval Office when they discussed
protecting immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador and
African countries as part of a bipartisan immigration deal, according to several people briefed on the
meeting. ‘Why are we having all these people from
shithole countries come here?’ Trump said, according to these people, referring to countries mentioned
by the lawmakers. Trump then suggested that the
United States should instead bring more people from
countries such as Norway.”
— The Post, Friday, Jan. 12
I
defy anyone to stand up with a straight face and
say they are surprised by Trump’s remark. But as
usual, Congress is trying. Sen. Orrin G. Hatch
(R-Utah) said, “I look forward to getting a more
detailed explanation regarding the president’s comments.”
Now Trump maintains this was not the language
he used. Sure. It sounds completely unlike him.
What could the explanation be?
The first speech out of Trump’s mouth after he
descended the escalator: “When Mexico sends its
people, they’re not sending their best. They’re not
sending you. They’re not sending you. They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re
bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing
drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists.”
He just forgot the words he was allowed to use to
say this sort of thing. He keeps forgetting.
This is only a surprise in the sense that going to the
bathroom and finding that someone has not flushed
the toilet is a surprise. You know it isn’t supposed to
happen, but it’s exactly the kind of thing you would
expect to find there. It is a surprise in the sense that
usually this part is bleeped. It is a surprise in the
sense that seeing the thing that is usually blurred or
covered with a black bar is a surprise, which is to say,
not. He forgot to leave the fig leaf on; that is all. We
are shocked, shocked to find anything that might
hint at racism in this establishment, whose slogan is
Let’s Bring Back The 1950s And Also We Have Serious
Complaints About Colin Kaepernick!
I guess the shock is that usually he uses a smaller
whistle. But he doesn’t, not really. So it’s just the
word, then.
You are supposed to cloak these kind of senti-
ments, you see. You are supposed to say hand-ups not
hand-outs and just be wistful about the 1950s for no
particular reason. You are supposed to say what a
nice sort of lady Taylor Swift is, not like these other
sorts of ladies. You are supposed to express a vague
misty warmth about the past, before all this “political
correctness.” You do not remember most of what
happened in the past, of course. Abraham Lincoln
did something that was important to do, and especially at that time. Andrew Jackson probably could
have prevented the Civil War. What was the Civil War
about again? Probably nothing. Probably there were
good people on both sides.
No, I’m sorry. Maybe Trump just meant that he
wants to make America a nicer place to live in than
Norway, and the thought got a little tangled on
something on the way to his mouth. All he is saying is
that he wants to give everyone health care and, uh,
socialism? This is certainly a roundabout way of
saying this, but, you know, benefit of the doubt.
No, this cannot be what he meant.
Besides from the beginning, Trump seems to have
been taking a different tack when it came to
immigration. Between the travel bans and the escala-
tor remarks and the news conferences where Stephen Miller shouted that the poem by Emma Lazarus
was added to the Statue of Liberty later and the —
well, most things, come to think of it! Maybe that is
his tactic. He is trying to make America worse so that
nobody will want to come, not from Norway, not
from anywhere. Could that be it?
No, only someone who had been paying even a
minimal amount of attention to anything Trump said
at any time would think Trump might possibly have
some racist ideas. You are not just supposed to get
out there and say the word “shithole.” You must be
vague. Heritage. Statues. We don’t write symphonies
anymore. You are supposed to dance around these
words. There is a subtlety and art to all this. You
cannot just be overt about it.
It is not that people disagree, of course. It is just in
poor taste, like leaving the lid of the sewer off, or
typing out “shithole” instead of the tasteful s---. What
could those dashes possibly be? It could be any word
at all.
Alexandra Petri writes the ComPost blog at
washingtonpost.com/blogs/compost.
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13 , 2018
Prosecutors will request May 14 trial date for Manafort and Gates
BY
S PENCER S . H SU
Prosecutors with special counsel Robert S. Mueller III said Friday that they will ask a federal
judge to set a May 14 trial date for
President Trump’s former campaign manager Paul Manafort, as
well as a business partner, on
fraud, conspiracy and money
laundering charges.
The government stated its intention in a court filing that also
summarized how much evidence
prosecutors have turned over as
required to Manafort’s co-defendant, Rick Gates. The filing comes
ahead of a hearing Tuesday to
update U.S. District Judge Amy
Berman Jackson of Washington
on the status of the case.
Manafort, 68, and his longtime
deputy Gates, 45, have pleaded not
guilty and remain under home
detention while details are
worked out for their release on
secured bonds of $10 million and
nearly $5 million, respectively.
They were indicted Oct. 30 in
connection with Manafort’s secret
lobbying for a Russia-friendly political party in Ukraine, in the first
publicly disclosed criminal charges in Mueller’s investigation of
possible Russian influence in U.S.
political affairs.
Separately, former Trump national security adviser Michael
Flynn and Trump campaign foreign policy aide George Papadopoulos have pleaded guilty to lying
to investigators about their for-
eign contacts and are cooperating
with investigators.
On Friday, Mueller’s team said
that it had turned over more than
590,000 records to Gates, among
them emails, financial and corporate records — including 2,200
designated by prosecutors as
“hot” or high-priority — and copies of information on 87 electronic
devices collected through 19
search warrants. Thirty-five of the
devices were seized from
Manafort’s house, the filing says.
The number of records in the
case has ballooned since prosecutors made a similar disclosure
Dec. 8, when they gave both defendants some 400,000 items, including contents of 36 memory devices, and disclosed 15 warrants.
The latest four-page filing
states that the government’s investigation has continued and
that on Friday, the government
turned over a sixth batch of records, including foreign bank records obtained since the two men
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Colors may not reproduce accurately on newsprint. Prices based on 24˝ x 36.̋ Minimum charges applied to all shutters less than nine square feet.
were charged.
In a footnote, prosecutors noted that they are not turning over to
Gates records that they obtained
from Manafort that are not relevant to Gates’s case, and vice versa. They also wrote that “electronic evidence seized from Manafort’s
residence was previously made
available to Manafort earlier this
year (to the extent that the FBI was
able to access the devices/media
seized at that time).”
spencer.hsu@washpost.com
KLMNO
METRO
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
High today at
approx. 12 a.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
41°
8 p.m.
39 37 31 28°
°
°
°
Precip: 20%
Wind: SSW
10-20 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
RELIGION
THE DISTRICT
OBITUARIES
A TV show explores the
role of Billy Graham in
Queen Elizabeth’s life.
How much is accurate? B2
The city will spend nearly
$5 million to restore two
river islands in “the Year
of the Anacostia.” B2
Edgar Ray Killen, a KKK
leader, was convicted
in the killings of three
civil rights workers. B4
2016 Metro rape victim tearfully testifies in Montgomery court
BY
D AN M ORSE
The 39-year-old woman boarded a Metro train at 9 a.m., exhausted from her overnight nursing
shift. She headed home, away
from downtown Washington, as
the crowd on the Red Line
thinned. She fell asleep.
In riveting testimony in a
Montgomery County courtroom,
the woman told jurors what happened next. At least two of them
would soon be crying.
She awoke near the Fort Totten
B
SU
She says she took a nap
and woke later to a male
passenger with a knife
station. A man stood several seats
away. They were alone in the Metro car.
“He approached me,” she said,
“and I saw a knife.”
The criminal trial against John
P. Hicks has addressed a question
that stunned Washington-area
commuters when the case surfaced
in 2016: How could someone be
raped in broad daylight on a weekday Metro train as it was moving?
“That’s exactly what did happen, ladies and gentlemen,” prosecutor Donna Fenton told jurors,
who are scheduled to begin deliberating Tuesday.
Tatiana David, an attorney for
Hicks, did not deny a rape occurred. She said the police arrested the wrong suspect.
“He is an innocent man, wrong-
ly accused of a crime that he didn’t
commit, because of a bad identification, and because of a bad investigation,” David said of Hicks.
In their case, the prosecution
focused on the victim’s testimony,
surveillance video from inside a
Metro station, travel records from
Hicks’s SmarTrip card and DNA
reportedly from Hicks that was
pulled from a tissue found below a
seat partially obscured by a partition in the corner of a train car.
The tissue, according to testimony, wasn’t found until hours
after the attack — a period in
which the train in question took
riders up and down the Red Line
as Metro Transit Police detectives
hunted for what amounted to a
moving crime scene.
Part of their challenge was getting commuters off trains where
the attack might have occurred
and having those trains routed to
end-of-the-line rail yards so the
cars could be properly processed
for evidence. The transit detectives pulled trains out of service
TRIAL CONTINUED ON B4
Md. will
compel
paid sick
leave
BECOMES 9TH STATE
IN NATION TO DO SO
Colleges’ questions on
criminal pasts are barred
Inaugural day marching orders
BY
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
On Friday, Virginia National Guard members walked the grounds at the Virginia State Capitol in Richmond for final preparations for
Inauguration Day on Saturday. Gov.-elect Ralph Northam is to be sworn in at noon. Story, B3
O VETTA W IGGINS
Maryland on Friday became the
ninth state in the country to require paid sick leave and the second to bar colleges from asking
prospective students about their
criminal histories after Democrats easily overrode two 2017 vetoes by Republican Gov. Larry Hogan.
Both bills were top priorities of
progressive advocacy groups.
Their resurrection illustrates the
power Democrats wield in both
houses of the state legislature
even as Hogan maintains sky-high
approval ratings, and they underscore the urgency of Hogan’s quest
to flip five Senate seats in the
November elections and dissolve
the Democrats’ veto-proof majority.
Hogan campaigned hard to
persuade Democrats to enact his
own proposal and abandon the
General Assembly’s sick-leave legislation, which he said would hurt
businesses and potentially invade
workers’ privacy. But the Senate
voted 30-17 to override the veto,
one vote more than was needed.
It voted 32-15 to override the
ban-the-box legislation affecting
college applications. The House of
Delegates overrode both vetoes on
Thursday.
Advocates pushed for six years
for Maryland to join other states
in forcing businesses to give sick
leave to workers who are ill or
need to care of a sick family member. The bill also provides “safe”
leave for workers to seek help to
deal with domestic abuse or sexual assault. Under the law, companies with 15 or more employees
will be required to provide five
days of paid sick or safe leave a
year.
“Passage of this bill will make
MARYLAND CONTINUED ON B2
Panel to shut down D.C.’s
only public all-girls school
Excel Academy has
underperformed for
years, charter board says
BY
P ERRY S TEIN
More than 700 students could
be scrambling to find a new school
for the next academic year after a
D.C. board voted unanimously to
revoke the charter of the city’s
only all-girls public school.
The six-member D.C. Public
Charter School Board said Thursday that students at Excel Academy Public Charter School in
Southeast Washington are lagging
behind their peers, and the school
— with students in preschool
through eighth grade — shows
scant evidence of improvement.
“The longer girls are at Excel,
the further they fall behind their
peers in the city,” said Saba Bireda,
a member of the charter school
board.
While a drastic move, the revocation of a charter is far from
unprecedented. The District has
shuttered nearly two dozen small
and large charter schools since
2012, although some have been
able to remain open with new
leadership.
The decision comes as enrollment in charter schools is burgeoning in the District, accounting for more than four of every 10
public school students. Other
charter schools with large enrollments have faced a fate similar to
Excel’s; in 2014, at least three big
charter schools were closed or
taken over because of poor performance.
Each year, about 400 charter
schools open in the country, while
200 to 300 close because of low
enrollment, poor performance
and financial woes, according to
Todd Ziebarth, senior vice president at the National Alliance for
Public Charter Schools, an advocacy organization.
“The bargain is that we are
going to give these schools more
room to innovate, but in exchange
we are going to hold them to
higher accountability,” Ziebarth
said. “When we see the D.C. Public
Charter School Board doing this,
it is upholding that bargain.”
Excel leaders said they oppose
the decision and are exploring
options to challenge it, including a
takeover.
“The narrative that we haven’t
been paying attention, or that we
haven’t attempted to make a
change, is just wrong,” said Beth
Heider, chairwoman of the
school’s Board of Trustees. “We’ll
see what happens. We’re not dead
yet.”
The D.C. Charter School Board
said enrollment specialists would
meet with each family at Excel to
ensure they find a new school.
Under District law, the school
SCHOOL CONTINUED ON B4
Amid mourning, a cutting insult
As Haitians recall deadly quake, they also demand a Trump apology
BY
M ARIA S ACCHETTI
They are scientists and supermodels, NBA players and college
professors. They design Chrysler
cars and negotiate on “Shark
Tank.” Their roots are in Haiti,
the world’s first black republic,
which fought off slavery decades
before the United States did. But
many of their contributions are
being made here.
The poorest country in the
Western Hemisphere, Haiti is
often in the news for its crises,
including the earthquake on
Jan. 12, 2010, that killed an
estimated 200,000 people. President Trump reportedly referred
to the country on Thursday as a
“shithole.”
On Friday, the eighth anniversary of that quake, Haitian Ambassador to the United States
Paul Getty Altidor said he would
use the publicity surrounding
that remark to introduce a new
narrative — across the political
spectrum.
He said he wants American
liberals to view Haiti as a nation
capable of creating businesses,
jobs and wealth, and he wants
Trump and other immigration
hard-liners to see Haitians who
come to the United States as
contributors to the nation.
“Most people would not think
of scientists or engineers or tech
folks and Haiti in the same
Guilty plea in
drug-fueled
Md. crash that
killed student
BY
gration package being negotiated on Capitol Hill new protections for the nearly 60,000 Haitians
granted
temporary
protected status in the United
States after the earthquake.
The Trump administration announced in November that Haitians’ protected status would expire in July 2019, saying the
country had sufficiently recovered from the earthquake for
people to return home.
Haitian immigrants tend to
have slightly lower education
Adedire Ososanya had just
finished attending the funeral of
a relative when he hopped into
his car to leave. The Morgan
State University student liked to
take photos in his free time and
was asked to snap some to memorialize the service.
“He told me, ‘Daddy, I’m going
home,’ ” Olayinka Ayodle remembered his son saying after
the funeral. “That was the last we
heard of him.”
Ososanya’s relatives went
from mourning one family member to another on Dec. 17, 2015,
when a car swerved into oncoming traffic and crashed head-on
into the 20-year-old’s silver Nissan.
Ososanya was just a minute
away from his Upper Marlboro
home when he was ejected from
his car and killed.
Two years after the fatal collision, the man driving the car
that crashed into Ososanya’s
pleaded guilty to one count of
criminally negligent manslaughter. James Calero, 33, of Bowie,
Md., entered his plea Friday in
Prince George’s County Circuit
Court.
Calero, prosecutors said, was
HAITI CONTINUED ON B6
CRASH CONTINUED ON B2
ALLISON SHELLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
On the eighth anniversary of a devastating earthquake in Haiti,
Paul Getty Altidor, Haiti’s ambassador to the United States, poses
for a portrait at the Caribbean country’s embassy in Washington.
sentence,” he said during a tour
of the embassy, which occupies a
Beaux-Arts mansion on Massachusetts Avenue NW.
The United States is home to
more than 630,000 Haitian immigrants, not counting their
U.S.-born children. About 50
Haitian Americans have been
elected to public office. Haitian
immigrants send an estimated
$2 billion a year to their homeland, mostly from the United
States — one of many reasons
that Haiti and some U.S. lawmakers want to include in the immi-
L YNH B UI
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
religion
Did “The Crown” take liberties in depicting her religious devotion and bond with U.S. evangelist?
S ARAH P ULLIAM B AILEY
One of the running themes
throughout the Netflix show
“The Crown” is the devout Christian faith of Queen Elizabeth,
who is shown kneeling for prayer
at her bedside as her husband
jokingly teases her to offer one
for him. The queen, after all,
serves not just as head of state
but head of the Church of England, the mother church of Anglicanism worldwide.
“Monarchy is God’s sacred
mission to grace and dignify the
Earth,” her elderly grandmother,
Queen Mary, tells Elizabeth early
in the show.
The second season of the series portrays the queen as someone who, feeling betrayed by a
family member, wrestled deeply
with questions of faith and forgiveness. The show also depicts
her budding relationship with
famous American evangelist Billy Graham, who drew millions of
people to his “crusades” around
the world and was a friend to
many U.S. presidents.
Several writers have pointed
out that “The Crown” took more
liberties with historical fact and
chronology in its second season.
So did the show take some liberties in depicting the queen’s faith
and her relationship with the
evangelist?
Spoilers ahead!
“The Crown” shows the queen
sipping her tea while watching
the evangelist on television
preach to a packed stadium. Even
though several of her family
members seemed befuddled by
Graham, his fiery preaching style
piqued the queen’s curiosity, and
she asked for a private meeting
with him. “I think he’s rather
handsome,” the queen tells her
husband.
“You do speak with such wonderful clarity and certainty,” Elizabeth, played by Claire Foy, tells
Graham. After he delivers a sermon for the royal family at
Windsor Castle, the queen says
that she felt “a great joy” to be “a
simple congregant, being taught,
being led . . . to be able to just
disappear and be. . .” “A simple
Christian,” Graham replies. “Yes,”
Elizabeth says. “Above all things,
I do think of myself as just a
simple Christian.”
In the show, the royal family
struggles with its relationship to
former King Edward VIII, Elizabeth’s uncle who abdicated the
throne to marry a divorcée and
became the duke of Windsor.
That familial struggle becomes
increasingly tense as the queen
learns the family’s dark secret:
Her uncle had become friendly
with the Nazis during World War
II, plotted to overthrow his
brother, and encouraged Germany to bomb England.
After learning the shocking
details about her uncle, the
queen asks Graham open-ended
questions about forgiveness.
Played by actor Paul Sparks,
Graham tells the queen that she
should pray for those she “cannot
forgive.”
So what really happened?
Here’s what we know from scholars and books.
1. Evidence of the queen’s
faith is easily traceable.
Scholars believe the queen
possessed a “deep vibrancy of her
faith” as someone who read
scripture daily, attended church
weekly and regularly prayed,
said Stan Rosenberg, a member
of the Faculty of Theology and
Religion at the University of
Oxford. Despite suffering public
attacks for her handling of Princess Diana’s death and her political views, she is widely admired
for her faith, and “folks here
know her to be thoughtful, authentic, serious, and devout but
not a pressingly intrusive Christian,” he said.
The queen’s Christmas messages, a British tradition that
Guilty plea
comes as man
faces charges
in 2nd crash
CRASH FROM B1
driving with cocaine, methamphetamine, THC and PCP in his
system on the night of the
crash.
“We’re pleased in this case that
we were able to take Mr. Calero
ROBERT VIGLASKY/NETFLIX/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Claire Foy, with Matt Smith as Prince Philip, portrays Queen Elizabeth, below, in Netflix’s “The
Crown,” which depicts the monarch’s relationship with American evangelist Billy Graham, below.
goes back to 1932, have provided
a window into her private faith.
“I know just how much I rely
on my faith to guide me through
the good times and the bad,” she
said in 2002. “Each day is a new
beginning. I know that the only
way to live my life is to try to do
what is right, to take the long
view, to give of my best in all that
the day brings, and to put my
trust in God. . . . I draw strength
from the message of hope in the
Christian gospel.”
2. Queen Elizabeth and Billy
Graham met in 1955.
Franklin
Graham,
Billy
Graham’s son, said his father had
a good relationship with the
queen, not necessarily a pen-pal
connection where they’d write to
each other regularly, but he
spoke several times in her private
chapel and was knighted in 2001.
But Billy Graham initially met
resistance, his son said, and some
in Parliament tried to block him
from coming. (Franklin Graham,
who is planning to speak in
September, faces his own version
of British resistance now, according to the Guardian.)
Franklin Graham said the
show asked him to consult, but
he declined, saying any conversations he had with his father were
private. He said his father usually
gave a dignitary a Bible, often the
latest one he was carrying, so he
believes he probably gave the
queen one.
“There’s no question, she’s
very devout in her faith and very
strong in her faith,” Franklin
Graham said. “Her faith has been
consistent not just with conversations with my father but
throughout her life.”
The queen’s meeting with the
evangelist came about after
Graham launched one of his
“crusades.” Graham had spoken
to “the greatest religious congregation, 120,000, ever seen until
then in the British Isles,” according to a biography of the late
John Stott, a chaplain to the
queen. During one of his rallies,
Graham preached for 12 weeks,
drawing 2 million people.
Graham delivered a sermon
for the queen on Easter Sunday
in 1995 in the royal family’s
private chapel.
“Good manners do not permit
one to discuss the details of a
private visit with Her Majesty,
but I can say that I judge her to be
a woman of rare modesty and
character,” he wrote in his autobiography “Just As I Am.”
off the streets and keep him off
the streets,” said John Erzen, a
spokesman for the Prince
George’s County State’s Attorney’s Office.
Calero’s public defender, Doug
Irminger, said his client “is remorseful for what happened in
this case.”
“It was a tragedy,” Irminger
said. “Someone lost his life. My
client has accepted responsibility for his actions.”
The crash occurred around
10:30 p.m. along Route 202 just
north of Old Marlboro Road.
Witnesses reported that the
car Calero was driving had been
swerving on and off the road
“She is unquestionably one of
the best-informed people on
world affairs I have ever met,”
wrote Graham, who is now 99
and living in his mountain home
in Montreat, N.C. “. . . I have
always found her highly intelligent and knowledgeable about a
wide variety of issues, not just
politics.”
3. It’s unlikely, though possible, that the two met alone.
“The Crown” shows the queen
meeting alone with the evangelist so they could discuss things
privately. However, Graham long
had a personal rule that he would
not meet alone with another
woman, something that became
known as “the Billy Graham rule”
and has come under the spotlight
since Vice President Pence has
said he uses the same rule.
Historian and Graham biographer William Martin says
Graham began the practice in
1948, and it encompassed lunches, counseling sessions, even a
ride to an auditorium or an
airport, because the pastor believed it helped keep him from
“even the appearance of evil.”
Martin says, however, that
there’s not much chance that the
queen would have been left truly
alone, even if no attendant was in
the room. But if the queen asked
for this, Martin and fellow
Graham historian Grant Wacker
think he probably would have
made an exception.
“Graham always meant for the
rule to be observed with common
sense,” said Wacker, who is a
historian at Duke Divinity
School. “The point was to prevent candlelit dinners far from
home.”
4. How Graham might have
responded to the question
about forgiveness.
The queen tells Graham she
asked him to return to Buckingham Palace to talk about forgiveness. “Are there any circumstances, do you feel, where one
can be a good Christian and yet
not forgive?” she says. Graham
says Christian teaching is very
clear that no one is beneath
forgiveness. But forgiveness is
conditional, she counters.
“One prays for those one cannot forgive,” he says.
The exchange highlights a
fuzzy line between personal forgiveness and public forgiveness.
Does Elizabeth, as a niece, have a
responsibility to forgive her uncle? Should she, as the queen,
extend forgiveness to someone
who, by the show and historical
documents’ account, betrayed
his country?
It’s unclear exactly what was
said in those meetings. Wacker
said that after Graham revealed
private conversations with President Harry Truman, Truman nev-
before striking Ososanya’s vehicle, prosecutors said.
Investigators estimated Calero
was driving 57 to 71 mph on a
road where the speed limit is 50,
Erzen said.
The spokesman said Calero is
also facing charges in a separate
crash in which investigators
suspect he was under the influence.
“He has certainly proven that
he is a danger to the community,”
Erzen said.
Calero is scheduled to be sentenced in March and faces up to
three years in prison for the
crash that killed Ososanya.
Outside the courtroom after
JANUARY 13 , 2018
THE DISTRICT
A window into queen’s faith
BY
. SATURDAY,
er forgave him, and Graham
resolved not to discuss any conversation with any head of state
again.
However, Queen Elizabeth has
made several public comments
about the role of forgiveness in
her life.
“Forgiveness lies at the heart
of the Christian faith,” she said in
2011. “It can heal broken families,
it can restore friendships and it
can reconcile divided communities. It is in forgiveness that we
feel the power of God’s love.”
5. The queen mother might
have liked Graham more than
the series portrayed.
The show portrays the queen
and the queen mother watching
the evangelist on television, and
the queen mother appears
shocked that England seems enthralled by “someone who
learned their trade selling brushes door-to-door in North Carolina,” and that people would turn
“out in droves for an American
zealot.” “He’s not a zealot,” Elizabeth tells her mother. “He’s
shouting, darling,” she replies.
“Only zealots shout.”
But “The Crown” historical
consultant Robert Lacey writes
in his show companion book that
the queen mother possessed “a
deep and literal faith,” “experienced the Second World War as a
battle against godlessness,” and
welcomed Graham’s visits.
In Graham’s autobiography, he
wrote that the queen mother had
a “quiet but firm faith.”
“The last time I preached at
Windsor, as I walked in I saw her
sitting over to my right, with
others in the royal family,” he
wrote. “She deliberately caught
my eye and gestured slightly to
let me know she was supporting
me and praying for me.”
6. Ruth Graham probably
didn’t wear ugly shoes to meet
the queen.
Anne Blue Wills, who is working on a biography of Ruth
Graham, Billy Graham’s wife,
says that it’s unlikely that Ruth
(seen only from a distance)
would have worn flat brown
sandals for her visit to Buckingham Palace.
“The whole outfit, actually,
struck me as dumpy — and
intentionally unattractive Christians were a pet peeve for Ruth,”
Wills said.
A picture of the pair leaving
for the 1954 crusade aboard the
SS United States shows Ruth
with a fur stole over one arm,
wearing leather gloves and a
corsage. “She had a great sense of
style and unless ugly sandals
were ‘in,’ I don’t think she would
have worn them to meet the
queen for the first time,” Wills
said.
sarah.bailey@washpost.com
Calero entered his plea, Ayodle
took a long pause to compose
himself before he could talk
about his son, a “humble guy”
who had one year left at Morgan
State before he would have graduated with a finance degree.
Ayodle said his son was someone
on the “right path.”
“Either you choose to do the
right thing, or you choose the
wrong thing,” Ayodle said of
Calero’s decision to drive under
the influence. “He chose the
wrong thing, and it’s unfortunate
that it had to be my son he had to
take . . . a young boy with a whole
life in front of him.”
lynh.bui@washpost.com
Mayor commits money
to islands in Anacostia
BY
R ACHEL C HASON
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D)
announced Friday a $4.7 million
investment in two islands in the
Anacostia River that have been
neglected for decades amid stalled
plans from developers, environmentalists and previous administrations.
Bowser, who has declared 2018
“the Year of the Anacostia,” also
designated portions of 45-acre
Kingman Island and five-acre
Heritage Island as state conservation areas, which restricts their
use to environmental, education
and recreational purposes. The
funds go toward outdoor classrooms, raised walkways, a floating
lab platform and bathrooms.
“Our goal is a fishable, swimmable Anacostia River, and over the
past few years, we have made tremendous progress toward that
goal,” Bowser said. “However,
there is more to do, and these
conservation designations and
this new funding will help us get
that work done.”
Improvements to Kingman and
Heritage islands could mean “a
much higher level of outdoor environmental education” for children
who live east of the Anacostia in
the District’s poor and predominantly African American neighborhoods, said Doug Siglin, executive director of the Anacostia
Waterfront Trust.
The Rev. Keith D. Kitchen, pastor of the Zion Baptist Church of
Eastland Gardens in Ward 7, said
when young people see the government is serious about investing in the river, “their self-esteem
will rise and their learning possibilities will increase.”
Students already explore the islands, which can be reached by
walkways from a parking lot at
RFK Stadium, but are limited by
the lack of bathrooms and shelter,
said Kitchen, who often walks the
trails there before he heads to
church. He called the islands a
reminder of the natural beauty
that can exist even when located
“on a river choked with pollution.”
The fate of Kingman Island has
long been tied to the stadium.
When the Redskins left in the mid1990s, so, too, did the island begin
to feel abandoned. That has
changed in recent years with increased investment from advocates, who Kitchen said plan to
Advocates for
sick-leave bill
campaigned
for six years
MARYLAND FROM B1
life a little easier for thousands of
hard-working
Marylanders,”
Caryn York, executive director of
the Job Opportunity Task Force,
said in a statement. “No longer
will working families have to
choose between taking care of
themselves or loved ones and paying for rent or groceries.”
Eight other states — Connecticut, California, Massachusetts,
Oregon, Vermont, Arizona, Washington and Rhode Island — as well
as smaller jurisdictions that include the District and Montgomery County have enacted paidsick-leave laws.
Republicans said the Maryland
law will lead to job loss, and they
criticized Democrats for refusing
to consider a less-generous alternative Hogan proposed this year
before acting on the override. Minority Whip Stephen S. Hershey
Jr. (R-Kent) called the measure
“an overly prescriptive policy that
hurts job creators.”
But supporters said the legislation will ensure that more than
half a million workers, many of
whom are in low-paying jobs, are
able to take time off when needed.
Sen. Thomas M. Middleton (DCharles), chairman of the Finance
Committee, which debated the
bill last year, said he viewed its
passage as part of his responsibility as a legislator to “protect the
health and welfare of our citizens.”
Hogan spokeswoman Amelia
Chasse said the governor will continue to push the General Assembly to consider his proposal,
which would require businesses
with 25 or more employees to offer
paid sick leave and which phases
in the program over three years.
At the very least, she said, Hogan is calling on lawmakers to fix
“serious flaws” in the bill, including the lack of flexibility for businesses and the possibility that
workers’ privacy could be violated
if employers ask about the reasons
they need time off.
Senate President Thomas V.
continue raising money to fund an
environmental center, which
would probably cost another
$5 million.
The slow-moving river that divides the District has long collected trash and sewage. But beginning this spring, the Anacostia
will be substantially cleaner because a massive underground tunnel being built by D.C. Water is
expected to divert 98 percent of
wastewater flow.
Once the tunnel is completed,
and assuming it has not rained
recently, Siglin said he would
“happily jump in” the river — a
suggestion that would have
seemed unthinkable not long ago.
The idea that the river was toxic
“became both a real and symbolic
thing that spoke to the division in
our city,” said D.C. Council member David Grosso (I-At Large),
who introduced a bill with council
member Vincent C. Gray (DWard 7) this month to designate
Kingman Island a state park.
“If we can do more on both sides
of the river, it can be a focus point
for bringing our city together,”
said Grosso, who credited former
mayor Anthony A. Williams (D)
with promoting the Anacostia
River’s health as a way to unify the
city.
Williams planned a $9 million
environmental education center
on Kingman Island in 2005; however, those plans were abandoned
when Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)
took office. A plan approved by the
D.C. Council in 1997 would have
created an amusement park on
the site, but that was shut down by
the District’s federally appointed
control board.
The first attempt to develop the
islands, which were created by the
Army Corps of Engineers in 1916
from soil dredged from the river
bottom, was when Lady Bird
Johnson recruited an architect to
develop an educational center in
1966, Siglin said. That failed, too.
But Bowser’s commitment will
make a difference, in part because
it is “less grandiose” than previous
plans and in part because it has
support from the communities on
both sides of the river, Siglin said.
“This is the fifth time we’ve
tried to do something good on
Kingman Island, but I’m pretty
confident we can really get something done this time,” he said.
rachel.chason@washpost.com
Mike Miller Jr. (D-Calvert) said
the governor’s bill would receive a
hearing and that he hoped Hogan,
who has not appeared before a
legislative committee to discuss a
bill during his three years in office,
will testify about the measure.
He said the legislature would
consider enacting the law in 90
days, rather than 30, giving the
state additional time to set regulations and help businesses get up
to speed.
Mike O’Halloran, Maryland
state director of the National Federation of Independent Business
in Maryland, said he was “thoroughly disappointed” in the override vote of a “one-size-fits-all”
mandate that will have “disastrous” results on the state’s economy.
But Middleton said the Senate
amended the bill last year to address concerns from the business
community, including reducing
the number of annual paid leave
days from seven to five.
Maryland follows Louisiana in
enacting the “ban-the-box” legislation, which prohibits public and
private colleges from asking
about criminal convictions on student applications. Louisiana
passed a similar measure last year.
The bill expands Maryland’s
criminal justice reform efforts.
Sen. Joan Carter Conway (D-Baltimore City) said it was designed to
provide an opportunity to criminals who are trying to turn their
lives around.
Maryland already prohibits
public employers from asking
about past convictions on job applications. The new law is aimed
at making it easier for people with
a criminal past to improve their
lives by attending college and
earning a degree.
Advocates say having the question on college applications can
disqualify some prospective students and scare away others.
The ban does not apply directly
to Maryland colleges that use the
Common Application or other
third-party application systems.
But those colleges will be required
to include a notice on their websites that any information they
receive about criminal history will
not disqualify applicants from being accepted.
Shareese DeLeaver Churchill, a
spokeswoman for Hogan, said the
measure shows “blatant disregard for victims’ rights” and will
make campuses less safe.
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
MARYLAND
VIRGINIA
Former delegate drops out of
GOP congressional primary
For swearing-in, soul and a flyover
BY
J ENNA P ORTNOY
A former Maryland state delegate who was seeking the Republican nomination to replace outgoing Democrat John Delaney in
the U.S. House dropped out of that
race Friday, saying he wants to
focus exclusively on efforts to curtail the opioid epidemic.
Matt Mossburg, who served one
term in the Maryland General Assembly in the 1990s, is a recovering opioid addict. He said running
for Congress hindered his efforts
to lobby for the issue in Annapolis.
“People don’t want to hear Republican or Democrat when,
chances are, either they or someone they know is struggling with
addiction,” Mossburg said.
The move helps clear a path to
the nomination for Amie Hoeber,
a defense contractor who challenged Delaney in 2016 and has
the funds to compete in Washington’s expensive media market. Another GOP candidate, nurse practitioner Lisa Lloyd, is seeking office for the first time and lacks
Hoeber’s fundraising network,
name recognition and ability to
self-finance.
Mossburg said he will stay neutral in the primary, which is June
26.
Six Democrats are seeking the
nomination to succeed Delaney:
retired intelligence officer Andrew Duck, pediatrician and novelist Nadia Hashimi, former aerospace executive Chris Hearsey,
Del. Aruna Miller (Montgomery),
state Sen. Roger Manno (Montgomery) and Total Wine co-founder David Trone.
There has been speculation
that Mossburg would withdraw
from the race to work on the opioid crisis for Gov. Larry Hogan (R),
who has made addiction issues a
priority in his administration.
“I have spoken with people in
his administration about working
with him, but there’s nothing on
the table,” Mossburg said in an
interview Friday.
Mossburg is trying to rally support for the creation of a state task
force to examine the pros and cons
of using other drugs to treat opioid addition, and to look for ways
to ensure elected officials maintain strong oversight of the pharmaceutical industry.
He decided to run for Congress
last year after sharing his experience during a public hearing on
opioid legislation. After losing his
statehouse seat in the late 1990s,
he developed a four-year addiction to narcotics. He relapsed in
2010, after eight years of sobriety,
while he was the main caregiver
for his then-wife, who was seriously injured in a car accident.
“I was like a tornado blowing
through people’s lives, just causing wreckage and blaming everybody else for our problems and
not taking personal responsibility,” he said in a campaign video.
By the summer of 2013, Mossburg was broke and living out of
his car. For most of a year, he said,
he couldn’t take care of himself
and contemplated suicide. Eventually he ended up in the hospital.
From there, he entered a 28-day
rehabilitation program.
Now in what he calls “active
recovery,” he wants to expand detox centers, sober houses and
peer-to-peer networks. He does
not endorse using other drugs —
such as methadone and buprenorphine — to wean people off opioids.
Maryland’s 6th District stretches from liberal Washington suburbs in Montgomery County to
more conservative counties
reaching into Appalachia. Its
boundaries are the subject of a
gerrymandering lawsuit that is
pending before the U.S. Supreme
Court.
jenna.portnoy@washpost.com
LOC AL D I GE S T
Northam raises about
$1.9 million for his
inauguration events
BY
G REGORY S . S CHNEIDER
richmond — Houdon’s marble
statue of George Washington in
the Capitol Rotunda was decorated with greenery Friday and the
grounds echoed with microphone
checks as workers prepared for
Saturday’s inauguration of Democrat Ralph Shearer Northam as
Virginia’s 73rd governor.
Northam, a Democrat, rode a
wave election last fall in which his
party smashed two decades of Republican dominance in the House
of Delegates and kept control of
the lieutenant governor’s and attorney general’s seats.
Justin Fairfax, a former U.S. attorney from Fairfax County, will be
sworn in as lieutenant governor —
replacing Northam in that role. He
becomes only the second African
American elected statewide in Virginia history, after former governor L. Douglas Wilder. And Mark
Herring will kick off his second
term as attorney general.
They’ll work with a legislature
still controlled by Republicans but
with Democrats just shy of parity,
the House split 51-49, the state
Senate at 21-19.
The General Assembly kicked
off its session Wednesday with
broad calls for cooperation after a
political season inflamed by partisan passions over the Trump administration. Although the fall
election’s outcome was drawn out
by state-funded recounts and vote
challenges in close districts, the
House managed to set aside rancor this week and unanimously
elect Republican M. Kirkland Cox
(R-Colonial Heights) as speaker.
Outgoing Gov. Terry McAuliffe
(D) called for unity in his final
State of the Commonwealth
speech Wednesday night. Prohib-
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Virginia Gov.-elect Ralph Northam, left, and Gov. Terry McAuliffe
detail their legislative package Tuesday at the Capitol in Richmond.
ited by the state Constitution from
serving a second consecutive
term, McAuliffe will hand over the
Executive Mansion to his friend
and chosen successor, Northam.
Moving vans were spotted outside
the mansion Friday.
Before being lieutenant governor, Northam, 58, spent six years
in the state Senate representing
Norfolk and the Eastern Shore. A
pediatric neurologist and Army
veteran, he grew up in Onancock,
making him only the second governor in state history to hail from
the remote Eastern Shore.
By the beginning of this week,
Northam had raised an estimated
$1.9 million for festivities related
to the inauguration, although final figures will not be reported
until March.
Among the major individual
donors are nursing home executive W. Heywood Fralin, developer
Bruce Thompson, philanthropist
Karen Schaufeld, business executive John Wynne and retired chief
executive Gilmer G. Minor III —
each of whom gave $50,000, according to the nonpartisan Virginia Public Access Project.
The biggest corporate donors
include Dominion Energy and to-
bacco giant Altria, which both
gave at least $50,000. Two associations — the Virginia Hospital and
Healthcare Association and the
Virginia Cable Telecommunications Association — each gave
$35,000, according to VPAP.
Swearing-in ceremonies will
start at noon on the portico of the
Thomas Jefferson-designed Capitol. Risers for some 4,000 expected guests have been under construction on the lawn for more
than two months.
The inauguration grandstands
will feature representatives from
every locality in Virginia — a first,
according to Northam’s office —
and three UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters from the Virginia National
Guard will conduct a flyover of the
inaugural parade.
Starting just after the swearingin, the parade will feature 26
groups from across the state, including the Soul Squad marching
band from Freedom High School
in Prince William County; 30 fiddlers from Southwest Virginia
known as the Crooked Road Fiddler Army; and Deborah Pratt,
billed as the fastest oyster shucker
in Virginia.
VIRGINIA
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Thu.):
Lucky Numbers (Fri.):
DC-4 (Thu.):
DC-4 (Fri.):
DC-5 (Thu.):
DC-5 (Fri.):
4-0-1
8-3-6-4
6-4-8-9-8
3-1-5
8-7-5
9-8-2-8
8-3-4-9
0-2-9-2-1
0-1-3-9-1
MARYLAND
Day/Pick 3:
1-1-5
Pick 4:
8-2-2-7
Night/Pick 3 (Thu.):
3-5-1
Pick 3 (Fri.):
9-7-1
Pick 4 (Thu.):
4-8-6-9
Pick 4 (Fri.):
7-4-6-5
Multi-Match (Thu.):
3-7-10-23-27-42
Match 5 (Thu.):
8-15-20-36-38 *25
Match 5 (Fri.):
13-29-31-32-38 *22
5 Card Cash:
4H-10D-3C-5D-4C
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5 (Fri.):
Night/Pick-3 (Thu.):
Pick-3 (Fri.):
Pick-4 (Thu.):
Pick-4 (Fri.):
Cash-5 (Thu.):
Cash-5 (Fri.):
2-0-4
8-6-7-4
1-2-11-30-34
8-8-9
1-4-9
5-9-0-9
8-5-4-7
11-16-19-28-34
11-16-18-28-29
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
18-22-23-41-53 ¶1
Mega Millions:
17-18-33-46-60 **24
Megaplier:
4x
Lucky for Life:
8-12-15-16-41 ‡9
*Bonus Ball
**Mega Ball
¶Cash Ball
‡Lucky Ball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
There comes a day for those
who dare walk outside after a wintry mix falls when they tumble tail
over teakettle to the icy, cold
ground. Not just a stumble or a
slip, but a full-fledged wipeout. A
pratfall. A faceplant. A day when
man meets ice, and ice triumphs.
For Tim Besecker, a 49-year-old
salesman from Ashburn, Va., that
day was Tuesday. A widely shared
security camera video shows
Besecker venturing out of his
home after a bout of freezing rain,
then slipping and recovering —
before sliding about 20 feet down
his driveway to his front lawn,
where he finally eats it.
This was an, ahem, epic fall.
Besecker launched into something that looked almost elegant
— a moonwalk, maybe? — before
finishing splayed on his hindquarters for all the block to see. Had his
mailbox not stopped his progress,
he may have ended up in the
street, and this would have been
the kind of story that includes the
term “local hospital.”
“I was just going to work, and
the next thing I know I’m on a ride
down my driveway,” he said.
Besecker’s wife, Kelly, posted
the video to Facebook the day of
Self-Revelation Church
of Absolute Monism
Golden Lotus Temple Yoga Philosophy
Swami Premananda of India, Founder
“IN ALL THINGS, GIVE THANKS”
Church and Sunday School Services, 11 AM
WWW.SELFREVELATIONCHURCH.ORG
301-229-3871, 4748 Western Ave., Bethesda, MD
BAPTIST
Shiloh
Shiloh Baptist Church
9th & P Streets, N.W.
Wallace Charles Smith
Senior Minister
Sunday, January 14, 2018
Youth & Young Adult Sunday
7:45 AM
Rev. Thomas L. Bowen
Preaching
BAPTIST
METAPHYSICAL
MT. PLEASANT BAPTIST
DIVINE SCIENCE CHURCH
OF THE HEALING CHRIST
215 R.I. Ave., N.W., Wash., D.C. 202-332-5748
Office Hours: M-F 8:30-5 pm
Rev. Terry D. Streeter, Pastor
January 14, 2018
7:45 am
10:45 am
Why Preaching is Difficult
II Timothy 4:3-4
Honor to a Jealous God
Exodus 34:14-26
Visit our website at www.MPBCDC.org
BAPTIST
Nineteenth Street
4606 16th Street, NW
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Rev. Cheryl Coleman Hall, preaching
Be sure to visit www.everyblessing.org
10:55 AM
Minister James Wright
Preaching
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST
January 14 9:30 AM & 11:15 AM (ASL interpretation @ 11:15) n
"Songs of Freedom"
Led by Bokamoso South African Youth Choir
16th & Harvard NW; 202.332.5266; all-souls.org
Sunday School:
BROADCAST LIVE AT:
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2018
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four Special sections in
The Washington Post and
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First issue will be
published March 16
Wishes for a
Happy New Year
of Peace and Plenty
for all Humankind
ROMAN CATHOLIC
Mass in Honor of the Infant of Prague
9 A.M. | 10:50 A.M. | 11 A.M.
9:30 A.M.
ROMAN CATHOLIC
Masses 5:15 (Vigil)
7:30 , 9 , 10:30 12 (Choir)
1:30 (Spanish) & 4:30 ALL SOULS CHURCH, UNITARIAN
“Can You Hear
Me Now?”
73-year-old killed
in Springfield crash
14 January 2018
Second Sunday in Ordinary Time
Metaphysical Book Store, Tues.-Thur., 10 am-3 pm
4101 NEBRASKA
AVE NW
Tenleytown Metro
Plenty of Parking
202.537.0800
VIRGINIA
Reverend Monsignor Walter R. Rossi, Rector
LIFE ANNOUNCES ITSELF
Rev. J. Friedline
PRESBYTERIAN
— Peter Hermann
Basilica of the National Shrine
of the Immaculate Conception
2025 35th St. NW, Washington, DC 20007
202/333-7630 or Dial for Meditation 202/338-1240
Sunday, Jan. 14 - 11:00 am divinescience.org
Dr. David Renwick
Sunday Worship:
Interpreting Service for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing
#ShilohDC
www.shilohbaptist.org
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Two construction workers
were seriously injured, and a
third suffered minor injuries
Friday afternoon when a
portion of a brick wall collapsed
at a construction site in
Northwest Washington,
according to the D.C. fire
department.
The collapse occurred about
2:30 p.m. in the 1500 block of
North Capitol Street NW, in the
Truxton Circle neighborhood
north of New York Avenue.
— Ellie Silverman
RELIGIOUS SERVICES DIRECTORY
ABSOLUTE MONISM
Brick wall falls on
construction workers
justin.moyer@washpost.com
Man’s epic, icy faceplant not his ‘first spill’
J USTIN W M. M OYER
— Peter Hermann
and Martin Weil
the fall. It was the kind of thing
that friends and family would
laugh at. And, maybe, a few other
people. “I didn’t think 40 million
people would check it out,” he said.
As of Friday, the Facebook video
had been viewed 54 million times
with more than 1.2 million shares.
On Thursday, Besecker was
grappling with the question the
star of every lighthearted viral video must: Why are so many people
enjoying your humiliating moment?
“I think it’s happened to a lot of
people and they can relate,” he
said. “It’s not my first spill.”
VIRGINIA
BY
A teenager was killed, and
two men were wounded in a
shooting Friday afternoon in the
basement of a house in
Northeast Washington, police
said.
The shooting happened
shortly after 2 p.m. in a twostory duplex in the 400 block of
Riggs Road NE, near Eastern
Avenue and the border with
Maryland, in the Riggs Park
neighborhood.
The teenager was identified
by police as Davon Fisher, 17, of
Northeast. D.C. police said the
two men were taken to a
hospital with wounds that were
not thought to be lifethreatening.
In a statement posted on the
Police Department’s
neighborhood blog, authorities
said a suspected gunman was
seen running from the house.
One person was killed and
another injured in a crash
Thursday afternoon in
Springfield, police said.
James Jones, 73, of Manassas
hit a Jersey wall while driving
his 2006 Ford Ranger south on
Loisdale Road in Fairfax County,
police said in a news release.
This caused his SUV to veer into
the opposite lane and collide
with an oncoming vehicle
driven by a 66-year-old woman
from Lorton.
Jones was taken to a hospital,
where he was pronounced dead.
The other driver was taken to a
hospital with injuries that
police said were not lifethreatening.
Police said they do not think
speed or alcohol contributed to
the collision, and detectives
were investigating whether
Jones “suffered a medical
emergency before the crash,”
according to the news release.
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
L O TTER I ES
Results from Jan. 12
THE DISTRICT
Teenager killed
in triple shooting
10:00 Crypt Church
Most Reverend Mario Dorsonville
Auxiliary Bishop of Washington
Celebrant & Homilist
Confessions 10 - 12 ,
12:30 - 1:30 (Spanish) & 2 - 4 _____________
18 January 2018
Vigil Mass for Life
5:30 (Choir) Great Upper Church
Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Archbishop of New York
Chairman, Secretariat of Pro-Life Activities
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops
Celebrant & Homilist
Broadcast
Live on EWTN
_____________
19 January 2018
Mass for Life
7:30 Great Upper Church
Most Reverend Edward J. Burns, Bishop of Dallas
Celebrant & Homilist
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Broadcast
Live on EWTN
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
BEABOUT
SLOTKIN
OBITUARIES
JANUARY 13 , 2018
LARRY W. BEABOUT (Age 71)
Passed away peacefully on January 8, 2018.
Services at Arlington National Cemetery, date
pending. Visit the American Cancer Society
website for his Mosaic Page and details.
EDGAR RAY KILLEN, 92
Klansman convicted in 1964 civil rights slayings
M ATT S CHUDEL
Edgar Ray Killen, a Mississippi
preacher and Ku Klux Klan leader
who four decades after the fact
was convicted in the killing of
three civil rights workers during
the Freedom Summer of 1964,
died Jan. 11 at the Mississippi State
Penitentiary near Parchman. He
was 92 and was serving a sentence
of 60 years.
The state corrections department announced the death. The
cause was not immediately
known.
The slayings of the three civil
rights workers — James Chaney,
Andrew Goodman and Michael
Schwerner — were among the
most notorious events of the civil
rights era and formed the basis for
the 1988 film “Mississippi Burning,” which starred Gene Hackman and Willem Dafoe as FBI
investigators.
The killings occurred in Neshoba County, Miss., which had a long
reputation as a center of Klan violence. Mr. Killen, whose family
had lived in the area for generations, operated a sawmill,
preached at Baptist churches and
owned a small farm about 15 miles
from the county seat of Philadelphia, Miss.
On June 21, 1964, Chaney,
Goodman and Schwerner were in
Neshoba County to inspect a black
church that had been burned
down and to register voters as part
of a civil rights effort known as
Freedom Summer. As the three
men were driving, a deputy sheriff
pulled over their station wagon on
the pretext of speeding and took
them to the county jail. They were
released at 10 p.m. and told to get
out of the county as fast as possible.
They were followed by two cars
filled with Klansmen, who had
KYLE CARTER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Edgar Ray Killen, front, is seen outside the Neshoba County
Detention Center in Philadelphia, Miss., on Jan. 12, 2005.
the Jackson (Miss.) ClarionLedger. In 1998, Mitchell learned
of a secret taped interview in
which a Klan leader, Sam Bowers,
said “the main instigator” of the
1964 killings was still a free man.
Further investigations led to
Mr. Killen, who went on trial for
murder in a state court in 2005.
Mr. Killen, 80 at the time, was in a
wheelchair as he recovered from
two broken legs suffered while
cutting wood.
Before the jury began deliberating, prosecutors added manslaughter to the original murder
charges. In the end, Mr. Killen was
convicted of three counts of manslaughter. The verdict was delivered on June 21, 2005 — 41 years to
the day after the killings.
Mr. Killen was given the maximum sentence of three consecutive terms of 20 years, for a total of
60 years in prison.
Edgar Ray Killen was born Jan.
17, 1925, in Union, Miss., where his
family had been involved in logging, lumber and farming since
the 19th century.
Details about his early life are
sketchy. He was married twice but
had no children. He said he was an
ordained minister and was a pastor at several churches. He was
convicted in 1976 of threatening a
woman by telephone.
Although he did not admit to
being a member of the Klan, he
had been known to federal investigators and other Klan watchers
for decades.
In 1968, after the assassination
of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
in Memphis, FBI agents knocked
on Mr. Killen’s door, seeking information. As the agents were about
to leave, Mr. Killen asked whether
they had identified the killer.
He added, “Man, I just want to
shake his hand.”
been alerted and organized by Mr.
Killen, according to court evidence. After a high-speed chase on
a dark highway, the civil rights
workers were overtaken on Rock
Cut Road — less than two miles
from Mr. Killen’s home — forced
from their car and shot to death at
close range.
Their bodies were not discovered for 44 days. A search led by
the FBI eventually found them
buried 15 feet deep in an earthen
dam on a nearby farm.
Chaney, 21, was an African
American from Mississippi. Goodman, 20, and Schwerner, 24, were
white New Yorkers. Their deaths,
widely chronicled in the media,
sparked outrage and were a major
turning point in the civil rights
movement. Within two weeks,
President Lyndon B. Johnson
signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
Mr. Killen, who was known to
be a Klan organizer or “Kleagle,”
came under immediate suspicion.
He was among 18 local men, including police officers, later arrested by federal agents and tried
for conspiracy.
Testimony from the 1967 trial
described Mr. Killen as the ringleader who coordinated the vigilante Klan group, although he was
not present for the killings.
Seven Klansmen were convicted of conspiracy, but Mr. Killen
was acquitted. The all-white jury
reportedly voted 11-to-1 in favor of
convicting him, but the lone holdout said she could “never convict a
preacher.”
Mr. Killen returned to his normal life in Neshoba County.
He rarely gave interviews, but
in 1998 he sat down with the New
York Times. Without directly addressing whether he was involved
in the killings of Chaney, Goodman and Schwerner, he said:
“Those boys were Communists
who went to a Communist training school. I’m sorry they got
themselves killed. But I can’t show
remorse for something I didn’t
do.”
Interest in the case was revived
by “Mississippi Burning” and by
the reporting of Jerry Mitchell of
without their consent, which the
woman declined to give.
As she continued her testimony,
her voice grew clearer. She described her job and her commute.
Although her rides home occurred during morning rush hour,
she traveled against the commuting flow, taking the Red Line
north of Washington into Montgomery County, where ridership
in that direction gets sparse.
Fenton asked her to describe
the morning of April 12, 2016.
She spoke of her train ride and
how she awoke around the time she
heard an announcement for the
Fort Totten station. She realized
there was only one other passenger
in the train car. She pulled her cellphone from her bag, she testified.
“Are you going to Glenmont?” she
said the other passenger asked.
She nodded and returned to her
phone. The man asked if she had a
boyfriend, she told jurors, before
he suddenly showed her a folding
knife with a four-inch blade.
“He grabbed me off from my
seat,” she testified, describing how
she was pulled toward a partitioned seat at the end of the car. “I
grabbed his knife to pull it away
from my body . . . and I felt a
burning sensation from my hand.”
Her words, steady until then on
the witness stand, grew halting.
“He said,” she began, pausing
for nine seconds, “he said, ‘Pull
down your pants.’ ”
She employed delicate words to
describe the attack she said she
endured, until Fenton gently asked
her to be more specific.
She talked of pleading and praying.
“Please don’t do this to me,” she
remembered saying. “Please don’t
hurt me.”
“Just do what I say,” she said the
man said, “and I will not hurt you.”
The woman took a noticeable
pause in her testimony. Circuit
Judge Cheryl McCally called for a
10-minute break.
Back on the stand, the victim
spoke of how the attack ended
several stations from where she
said it had begun and of how she
pulled a tissue from her bag and
spit into it before the man finally
left the Metro car. She walked out
of the train onto a platform in a
daze, she told jurors, as she said
what she recalled hearing.
“She’s not talking,” someone
said. “She’s bleeding.”
“Please, please don’t leave,” she
recalled telling a stranger on the
platform. “Please keep me safe.”
A short time later, a Metro
police officer was speaking with
her, testimony showed.
The train was on its way back to
Washington and detectives were
about to start urgently looking at
surveillance recordings and hunt
for the train car she’d been in.
During cross examination, Samantha Sandler, another attorney
representing Hicks, challenged
descriptions of the attacker the
woman had provided to police and
at a hospital. He was an African
American man, bald, no facial hair,
and about 5-foot, 4-inches to 5foot, 6-inches tall, as Sandler recounted the woman’s statements.
But as Hicks’s attorneys had
previously noted to jurors, their
client was about five inches taller,
was not bald and had facial hair.
The victim countered that English
is not her first language and that
she had equated the word “bald”
with closely cropped hair.
In her closing argument Friday,
Sandler also questioned the forensic value of the tissue because it had
been on the train floor for hours.
“How many people stepped on
that tissue?” Sandler said to jurors.
Fenton, one of the prosecutors,
countered that the detectives
found the tissue in good shape and
used it to extract DNA for testing.
Even before the trial, the Red
Line case in 2016 drew attention.
Public notice of the rape aboard
a train surfaced only after news
reporters were tipped off to the
incident more than a month after it
occurred. Metro had not announced the incident to the public,
outraging riders and officials.
After Hicks’s arrest on the rape
charge, it became clear in court
filings that Metro Transit Police had
identified him as a suspect in a
separate Red Line incident of indecent exposure but had not immediately sought to arrest him.
In the rape trial, Hicks is charged
with first-degree rape, first-degree
sex offense and first-degree assault.
D.C. board’s decision based on
flawed assessment, Excel says
lates it must score 45 percent on
the D.C. Charter School Board’s
annual assessment of school performance, which takes into account attendance, test scores, reenrollment rates and more. But
over the past five years, the school
has averaged just 41 percent.
The school board said its staff
members had met with Excel leaders during the past two years to
prepare for the five-year review,
but the school has not reached all
of its targets.
“This is not a decision that anyone on this board takes lightly,”
board member Rick Cruz said.
“Our goal is to ensure that people
who attend public charter schools
have a quality education.”
Excel administrators and parents who attended Thursday’s
vote said the board had misjudged
the school.
“I’m a little baffled,” said Anacostia resident Sharese Clayton,
who sends her two daughters to
Excel and doesn’t know where
they will attend next year. “This
school is working for my family. If
it wasn’t working, trust me, I
would have left. Education is very
important to me.”
School leaders argued the
framework used by the charter
school board to assess schools is
biased against those with a large
percentages of at-risk students.
Two-thirds of Excel students are
considered at-risk, meaning they
receive welfare or food stamps, or
are homeless or in the foster-care
system.
But Naomi Rubin DeVeaux,
deputy director of the D.C. Public
Charter School Board, said at
Thursday’s vote that 22 of the
city’s 120 charter schools have
greater at-risk populations than
Excel, and most of those schools
perform better on their annual
assessments.
School leaders pushed back
against criticism that not enough
of Excel’s students re-enroll. Leaders said a significant portion of
their enrollment once came from
the dilapidated Barry Farm public
housing complex. The city started
redeveloping the complex several
months ago, forcing families to
relocate and potentially enroll
their children in different schools.
Leaders acknowledged that Excel’s middle school hasn’t performed as well as the elementary
school, but a new middle school
principal was recently appointed
to help turn around those grades.
“That they can simply do it and
ignore that they have a flawed tool
measuring us — that’s wrong not
only for us, but for other charter
schools that have a large portion
of at-risk students,” said Deborah
Lockhart, chief executive officer
at Excel.
Defense in
Red Line rape
case says man
misidentified
TRIAL FROM B1
three times after the reported attack.
“When we have to take a train
out of service, it’s a big deal,” Detective Michael Morehouse testified.
“My sergeant was on the phone
with rail operations. They were
like, ‘You guys are crazy. You already have two trains out of service.’ And we actually threatened
them and said, ‘If you don’t bring
that out to the Glenmont rail yard,
we will go stop it wherever it’s at
and process it there.’ ”
Metro detectives had Hicks in
custody by the end of the day of
the reported rape, a swift arrest of
a man they say had slipped out of
the station and gone home.
In Hicks’s trial this week, the
victim walked to the witness
stand on Wednesday. Put under
oath and asked whether she
would tell the truth, her first three
words were barely audible.
“Yes, I do,” she whispered.
The Washington Post generally
does not identify individuals who
say they were sexually assaulted
SCHOOL FROM B1
board must review a school’s charter to operate every five years to
ensure it meets goals agreed to
when receiving its charter.
Excel Academy was founded 10
years ago, and its students, who
largely come from low-income
families, have struggled to match
citywide averages on math and
English standardized tests. In the
2016-2017 school year, 9 percent of
Excel students met or exceeded
expectations in math, compared
with 27 percent citywide. In English, 19 percent met or exceeded
expectations, compared with 31
percent citywide.
Excel’s operating charter stipu-
matt.schudel@washpost.com
dan.morse@washpost.com
perry.stein@washpost.com
Dr. JAY E. SLOTKIN
January 13, 1943 ~ October 10, 1997
Your smile, kindness, and humor continue
to live on in the hearts of all who love you.
You are missed and remembered more
than ever!
Love, David, Sharon, Jayme, Ben,
Jon, Ellie and Brooke
DEATH NOTICE
ALBA
MICHAEL S. ALBA
Colonel, USAF (Ret.)
November 15, 1939~January 1, 2018
Of Vienna, VA. Colonel Alba was born
in Norristown, Pennsylvania. He was a
graduate of Villanova University, BSE, The
George Washington University, MSA and
The Industrial College of the Armed Forces
where he also served on the faculty.
Colonel Alba served with NORAD(Chicago
Air Defense Sector), Alaskan Air Command
(Elmendorf), AFROTC assistant professor
at Georgetown University, Air Force advisory team at Binh Thuy South Vietnam,
USSAG Nakom Phenom, Thailand, HQ Air
South, NATO, Naples, Italy, Asst. Secretary,
JCS NSC Matters XOXJ, Pentagon, Secretary of the Air Force legislative liaison
office. In his last command at NDU, Fort
Lesley J McNair, he secured 32 million
dollars from the US Congress for the construction of George C Marshall Hall which
was dedicated by President George H.W.
Bush. Among his many medals awarded
was the Bronze Star for serving as an
advisor to the South Vietnamese Air Force.
Colonel Alba retired from the Air Force in
1988 and joined Merrill Lynch for 14 years
rising to First Vice President. Colonel Alba
is survived by his wife of 54 years, Nancy
of Vienna, VA; daughter, Mary Beth Chavez
(Jeremy) of Las Vegas, Nevada, daughter,
Stephanie Bowman (Martin) of Canton,
Georgia, son, Christopher (Tara) of Fairfax,
VA; sister Marianne Sergio of Collegeville,
Pennsylvania and 10 grandchildren. There
will be a Catholic Mass of Christian Burial
at Our Lady of Good Counsel Church
in Vienna, Virginia on Thursday, January
18, 2018 at 11 a.m. Burial at Arlington
National Cemetery will be at a later date.
The family requests. in lieu of flowers,
memorial donations be made to "The,
Little Sisters of the Poor", 1503 Michael
Road, Richmond, Virginia 23229.
C. SAM BERGER
1928 ~ 2018
On Wednesday, January 10, 2018,
Clarence Sam Berger peacefully
entered into eternal life. Devoted
husband of Emma Berger Restovic;
loving father of Jennifer Berger and
the late Jocelyn Berger (1961-2012)
and Andrew Berger (1962-2005). For
60 years, Sam shared his wonderful life with his
best friend and wife, Emma. After growing up
in Pottsville, PA he served in the U.S. Air Force
and then went to Drexel University where
he earned a B.S. in 1955 and furthered his
education earning his MBA at Loyola University
in 1974 and his Master of Science from Johns
Hopkins University in 1987. His 40+ year engineering career as a NASA contractor took him
on projects all over the world including Canada,
Germany, Japan, Korea, Australia, Mexico and
Chile. Highlights include working on the first
manned space flight programs, Mercury where
he was stationed in Antofagasta Chile and met
the love of his life, Gemini and Apollo and
continued through the Space Shuttle missions
that launched the Hubble Space Telescope
and set up the International Space Station.
Sam was a great gardener, world traveler,
loved exploring science, culture, music and the
natural world and was known to break into
dance with his lovely wife, daughters or any
lady friends who could keep up.
Family and Friends are invited to call at the
Witzke Funeral Home, 5555 Twin Knolls Rd.,
Columbia, MD 21045 on Sunday from 3 to 5
p.m. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated on
Monday at 10 a.m. at St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church at Wilde Lake Interfaith Center,
10431 Twin River Rd., Columbia 21044 followed
by interment at Columbia Memorial Park,
12005 Clarksville Pike, Clarksville, MD 21029.
In lieu of flowers, donate to Catholic Relief
Services via www.support.crs.org to make contribution in memory of Sam Berger (please click
‘notify family’ option). On-line condolences
may be made at:
www.witzkefuneralhomes.com
BOHLS
ROBERT JOSEPH BOHLS, SR.
Beloved husband of Sharon Jordan Goodrich,
passed away peacefully Tuesday, January 9,
2018 in Williamsburg, VA after a long illness.
The family will receive friends from 2 to 4 p.m.
on Monday, January 15, 2018 at Nelsen Funeral
Home, 3785 Strawberry Plains Road, Williamsburg, VA and from 9:45 to 10:45 a.m., prior
to the Funeral Mass which will be held at 11
a.m., Tuesday, January 16 at St. Bede Catholic
Church, 3686 Ironbound Road, Williamsburg
VA. Interment at Arlington National Cemetery
will follow in late spring. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made in his memory to the
Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration
(theaftd.org). Condolences and full obituary
may be shared at:
www.nelsenwilliamsburg.com
CORDELL
RUTH LOUISE FLETCHER CORDELL
ATWATER
CORA COOKE ATWATER
Passed peacefully on Thursday, December 28,
2017. Survived by daughters Leigh, Kai and Linn
Turpin, Lillet Williams; grandchildren Kaitlinn
Uwaezuoke and Cohen Williams; and a host of
other relatives and friends. Memorial service is
Monday, January 15, 2018, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at
the Holiday Inn College Park, 10000 Baltimore
Avenue, College, Park, MD 20740.
On January 8, 2018. Ruth was preceded in
death by her late husband Charles Cordell, her
parents, Daniel and Elsie Fletcher, her sister,
Dottie Kingree, her brother, Daniel Fletcher and
one grandson, Jason Round. She is survived
by two brothers, John (Joanne) and Carl (Anna)
Fletcher; four daughters, Linda (Wendell)
Round, Sharon (Butch) Giles, Cynthia (Dan)
Delozier and Crystal (Bill) Haddix; nine grandchildren and 14 great- grandchildren. Friends
may visit on Monday January 15, 2018 from
5 to 8 p.m. at Advent Funeral Services, 7211
Lee Highway, Falls Church, VA 22046 and
where funeral services will be held on Tuesday,
January 16, 2018 at 10:30 a.m. Interment
at National Memorial Park, Falls Church, VA.
HINDEN
Times business best-sellers list and in 2013
the fourth edition was published.
Stan graduated from Syracuse University in
1950 after serving in the U.S. Army during
World War II as a soldier in the U.S. occupation force in post-war Japan. There he put
out a newsletter for his unit in the Kobe
area.
He started his journalism career in radio
broadcasting but soon transitioned into print
media as a reporter for Newsday in Garden
City, New York and then as an editor for
the National Journal in Washington D.C.
before his tenure at The Washington Post.
His final journalistic identity was as AARP’s
columnist on Social Security, making understandable such mysteries as changes in full
retirement age and rules of spousal benefits.
STANLEY J. HINDEN
Former Washington Post financial reporter
and New York Times best-selling author,
Stanley “Stan” J. Hinden died January 9,
2018, in Mission Viejo, CA. He was 90. Born
January 27, 1927, in New York City, New York
to parents Edward and Rose (Kroshinsky)
Hinden, he spent most of his life on the East
Coast only recently relocating to California.
Stan was a Washington Post financial
reporter from 1973 to 1996 writing about
stocks and mutual funds and served as an
editorial page features and weekly sections
editor. After “retiring” he was motivated by
the experiences he and his wife Sara had
as retirees to write The Post’s “Retirement
Journal” column from 1996 to 2003, appearing each month in the Sunday business
section.
In 1998, the Post nominated the “Retirement
Journal” for a Pulitzer Prize in Commentary,
while at the same time the column won an
award from the American University School
of Communication and the Investment Company Institute for excellence in personal
finance reporting.
In 2000, he was inspired by the various
subjects he wrote about in his “Retirement
Journal” column and turned them into a
book “How to Retire Happy: The 12 Most
Important Decisions You Must Make
BeforeYou Retire." It made the New York
Former Post colleague and friend, John
Burgess said, "At The Washington Post,
Stan was known for unfailing accuracy in his
writing. I remember that in the 1990s, the
head of the Post’s Business section urged
reporters to ‘be like Stan’ in writing articles
with the absolute highest level of accuracy
and fairness. Stan was truly tireless and
devoted to journalism, keeping up writing
the AARP's Social Security column until
shortly before his 90th birthday.”
Stan is preceded in death by his wife Sara,
who died in September 2013. They wed in
1953 and celebrated 60 years of marriage.
He is survived by sons Alan (Gina) Hinden
of Gaithersburg, MD, and Lawrence (Denice)
Hinden of Mission Viejo, CA and daughter
Pam Hinden (Jennifer Ochoa) of Bronx, New
York as well as grandchildren Sandy, Ted
(Jennifer), Amber (Justin) and Anna,
and great-grandchildren Devon, Phoenix,
Phoebe and Orion.
A chapel service will be held Sunday, January
14 at 11:30 a.m. at Judean Memorial Gardens, 16225 Batchellors Forest Rd., Olney,
Maryland 20832 (www.judeangardens.com)
where he will be buried alongside his wife
Sara.
In lieu of flowers, and in honor of Stan’s
service to the Leisure World Lion’s Club,
donations may be made to Lion’s Club
International at http://www.lcif.org/EN/.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
Because your loved one served proudly...
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
C0979 2x3
BY
BERGER
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
RE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
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DEATH NOTICE
CROSBY
JONES
OLDHAM
TILLEY
CARDOZO
KORYDA
ANTHONY CROSBY
DWIGHT C. JONES (Age 72)
On Wednesday, January 3, 2018, Anthony "AC"
Crosby of Temple Hills, Maryland. Beloved
husband of Vanessa D. Wiseman; loving father
of Michael Crosby, Anthony Wiseman (Milca),
Christopher Crosby, Darren Wiseman, and
Andrea Howe; cherished grandfather of
twelve; adored brother of Melvin Crosby-Bey,
Rufers Clark, and Derrick Clark. Friends may
visit with the family from 1 to 2 p.m. on
Saturday, January 13 at Marshall March Funeral Home of Maryland, 4308 Suitland Road,
Suitland, MD where funeral services will follow.
Interment in National Harmony cemetery.
CUMBERLAND
JOHN CUMBERLAND
The Officers and Members of the
Southwest Washington Alumni
Association are deeply saddened
by the passing of our Brother and
good friend, John Cumberland.
James McGrath, President
DAVIDSON
EUGENE S. DAVIDSON
(Age 93)
On January 11, 2018 of Arlington,
VA. Eugene was preceded in
death by his beloved wife of 60
years, Carol Davidson; cherished
father of Robert (Laura) Davidson,
Ann (Jack) Moline, and John
(Marcy) Davidson; loving grandfather of Jennie (Kevin) O’Holleran, Julia and
Max Moline and Elizabeth, Sarah, Erica, and
Lindsey Davidson; and great-grandfather of
two. Funeral service at Temple Rodef Shalom,
2100 Westmoreland St., Falls Church, VA on
Monday, January 15, 2018 at 10 a.m. Interment
King David Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to the
Carol Davidson Fund of Temple Rodef Shalom.
DOYLE
BARBARA ANNE DOYLE (Age 92)
Mother, friend and chef, on December 31,
2017, of natural causes. Born in Baltimore,
MD, October 21, 1925, she is the last surviving
child of Esther (Leinbach) Bull and George
Bull. Barbara leaves her three children, Barbara
Doyle Norris, Thomas Doyle and Andrew Doyle,
along with grandchildren, Wendy, Chris,
Shawn, Melanie, Bernadette and Genevieve;
great-grandchildren, Crystal, Amber, Cody,
Autumn, Jack and Caroline and great-greatgrandchild, Everly. She was a devoted friend,
confidant and volunteer to many during her
17 years at Riderwood. Memorial service at 11
a.m., January 22 at Riderwood Village Chapel,
3110 Gracefield Rd., Silver Spring, MD 20904.
FRIEDMAN
JANET NORMA BYERS FRIEDMAN
June 14, 1933 ~ January 11, 2018
Beloved partner of Chuck
French; loving mother to
Henry (Laurie) Friedman of
Bethesda, MD and Cynthia
(Mark) Mellman of Tampa,
FL; loving grandmother of
Noah and Sadie Friedman,
Aaron and Alissa Mellman; loving aunt to
Phyllis Robinson and many other family
and friends.
Janet was a long time resident of Lexington, MA, having lived in the same
house since 1958. She was an exceptional
psychiatric nurse at Waltham Hospital for
many decades. Her love of theater included her wonderful community Arlington
Friends of the Drama.
In lieu of flowers, donations can be made
to Arlington Friends of the Drama
www.AFDtheater.org; Jewish Family and
Children’s Services of Boston www.jfcsboston.org; Jewish Federation of Greater
Washington www.shalomdc.org.
Service at Douglass Funeral Home, 51
Worthen Road, Lexington, MA, Sunday,
January 14.
Shiva observed Sunday after Service and
Monday evening Janet’s Home, 17 Oxbow
Road, Lexington, MA
Shiva observed: Sunday, January 21 at The
home of Laurie and Henry Friedman 5910
Lone Oak Drive, Bethesda, MD.
GARDNER
DANIEL E. GARDNER
1934-2017
On December 21, 2017, Dan died at home
in Chevy Chase, Maryland in the company of
his wife of 48 years, Kirsten; daughter, Kate
Sweeney; and son, Owen. He is survived as
well by son-in-law, Marshall Sweeney; granddaughters, Nora and Willa Sweeney; sisters,
Ann Freeman and Gail Patton; brother, Glen
and his wife, Betty; and brothers-in-law, Paul
and Douglas Hammer.
An economist for the U.S. Department of Commerce for 33 years, Dan served as a Commerce
representative to the World Trade Organization
and traveled to numerous foreign capitals in
that connection.
Locally, he was an avid member of the DC
Roadrunners Club and maintained a backyard
vegetable garden whose bounty he shared
with neighbors. He served as a volunteer for
the Chevy Chase Library and for his local
Congressman.
A special enthusiasm was participating in a
monthly poker game for decades. His last
game was in November 2017.
A remembrance will be held in the spring.
Formerly of District Heights, MD, expired Tuesday, January 9, 2018 at his residence in Richmond, VA. Funeral will be held at Affinity
Funeral Home, 2720 Enterprise Pkwy., Richmond, VA 23294 on Tuesday, January 16, 2018.
Viewing 11 a.m. until service time at 12 noon.
KNEER
DUFFY FINNERAN KNEER
August 3, 1958 – November 25, 2017
Duffy Kneer of Ashburn, VA peacefully
passed away November 25, 2017. She is
survived by her loving husband, Rudolph
Kneer; her sister, Felicia Finneran of Winchester, VA; and brother David Sobel, of
Harrisville, NH; nieces Stephanie, Amy and
Tara; nephew Elijha; sister-in-law Patricia
McGrady-Finneran; step-children Douglas,
Suzanne and David; and seven step-grandchildren. Duffy was preceded in death by
her parents Francis and Amy Finneran, and
her twin siblings, Joe and Tina.
Duffy was born in Westport, CT and moved
to McLean, VA where she graduated from
the Emerson Preparatory School, Marymount College and completed her education at Benjamin Franklin University, Washington, DC. Duffy had a wide ranging career
in the mortgage industry beginning in 1985.
This path culminated at McLean Mortgage
Corp, Fairfax, VA as a Chief Compliance
Officer and she was awarded the 2017 J.C.
Brown Circle of Excellence posthumously.
Duffy was steadfast in her loyalty and dedication to her family and work. She was
a genuine loving and giving wife, stepmother, grandmother, sister and aunt and
will forever be in our hearts. There will be
a Celebration of Life with family and friends
at the end of January.
LYLES
RUSSELL B. LYLES, JR.
Peace is the beauty of life. It is sunshine. It is
the smile of a child, the love of a mother, the
joy of a father, the togetherness of a family. It is
the advancement of man, the victory of a just
cause, the triumph of truth.
-Menachem Begin
SUSANNE EMILY OLDHAM
Susanne Emily Oldham took her leave of
family and friends on the first day of 2018,
January 1. Throughout her 67 year Susanne
brought creativity, energy and a unique
perspective to every endeavor.
After growing up in Yellow Springs, Ohio,
she pursued flute studies with Richard
Adeney, Principal Flutist with the London
Philharmonic, and Jack Wellbaum, solo piccolo in the Cincinnati Symphony, receiving
an Associate Diploma from the Royal College of Music; the Bachelor of Music degree
from the College-Conservatory of Music
in Cincinnati, Ohio; and Master of Music
from Colorado State University. As an arts
administrator she worked with the NJ State
Council on the Arts; Middlesex County
Cultural and Heritage Commission; Rutgers
Concert Bureau; and Amberson Enterprises
(Leonard Bernstein’s management company). As the Coordinator of Music Programs
at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC, she was manager of The Folger
Consort. At age 50 she joined the Peace
Corps, serving in Lesotho.
After moving back to Yellow Springs to
be near family, she and John Semmlow
renovated the Arthur Morgan House into a
bed and breakfast which she successfully
operated for ten years.
Her musical talent was offered up in a
variety of ways, as a participant in I Solisti
di Zirnachron, a folk dance band; the New
Brunswick Chamber Orchestra; the Yellow
Springs Chamber Orchestra and Community Chorus; and the women’s a Cappella
group Sokolitse.
Susanne was predeceased by parents
James V. Oldham and Gerda Wilk Oldham.
She will be missed by her partner of many
years John Semmlow; siblings Bob Oldham,
Ned Oldham and Kathy Beverly (Dan Beverly) and David Oldham (Barbara Duvall
Oldham); as well as nieces Karen Beverly
Klausen, Jody Beverly Lee (Adams Lee), and
Carol Oldham (Nejem Raheem); nephew
Andy Beverly (Stephanie Beverly); seven
grand nieces and nephews; numerous
cousins, and the myriad other relatives,
friends and acquaintances whose lives she
touched. Susanne’s remains are interred at
Glen Forest Cemetery, Yellow Springs, Ohio.
A memorial service will be held on February
18, 2018 at 2 p.m. at the First Presbyterian
Church, Yellow Springs. Performances by
the Folger Consort at the National Cathedral on February 2 and 3, 2018 will be
dedicated to Susanne’s memory.
These words constitute the essence of Russell
B. Lyles, Jr.’s creed. Though he left this life on
Friday, January 5, 2018, his legacy is embodied
in his quest for peace, a passionate love
of friends and family, and his belief in the
advancement of our communities through education and the pursuit of truth.
His extraordinary life began on September
5, 1926 in Washington, DC, son of Russell
and Alcinda Lyles and younger brother of
Antoinette and Chauncey. Russell spent his
childhood in a thriving community, the center
of a wide social group. While among them, he
decided to pursue a life defined by nurturing
the educational needs of at-risk children and
young adults.
After graduating from Dunbar High School,
Russell served with distinction in the Quartermaster Corps of the US Army. Following his
honorable discharge, he enrolled in Morgan
State College, and graduated in 1951 with a
BS in Psychology. He then completed his MS
in Social Work in 1954 at Howard University.
During his time in undergraduate school, he
became a distinguished member of the Kappa
Alpha Psi fraternity. As a dedicated member of
his fraternity, he served the organization with
verve, unwavering loyalty, and commitment.
After completing his college education, Russell
channeled his passion for social work into a
career devoted to advocating for child welfare
as a Senior Caseworker for Boys’ Village of
Maryland, a Social Services Consultant, an
Assistant Principal, and a Regional Specialist
in programs for at-risk youth. He retired in
1983, but continued to contribute to social
work efforts in the Baltimore school system
and state government.
OLFKY
PHYLLIS L. OLFKY "Phyl" (Age 82)
On Wednesday, January 10, 2018 of College
Park, MD. Beloved wife of the late Robert S.
Olfky. Cherished mother of Michele (James),
Dave (Nancy), and Eric (Joanne). Adored
grandmother of Karin and Julia Deck, Jessica and Robert Olfky, and great-grandmother of Hannah Deck-Parker. Sister of Beverly
and the late Miriam. Also survived by her
beloved aides, Nicole and Pearl, as well
as many nieces and nephews. She was
always there with a big smile and a warm
hug. We will greatly miss her words of
wisdom and her generous spirit, and Jude
Law has lost his biggest fan. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contributions may be
made in her name to Foundation Fighting
Blindness, 7168 Columbia Gateway Drive,
Suite, 100, Columbia, MD 21046; Hospice
of the Chesapeake, 90 Ritchie Highway,
Pasadena, MD 21122; or the March of
Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White
Plains, NY 10605. A celebration of her life is
being planned for mid-February.
www.gaschs.com
SAYAN
SHIRLEY JONES MARTIN
McMILLAN
HALL
In lieu of flowers, please make a donation
in Betty Tilley’s name to the Asbury Foundation for Benevolent Care, 201 Russell
Avenue Gaithersburg, MD. 20877 301-2164050.
TOMASELLO
CARL TOMASELLO
Passed away peacefully in his sleep at his Silver
Spring home on Tuesday, January 9, 2018 at
the age of 98. He was born April 7, 1919.
He is survived by his daughter, Fay Kleinhen
and her husband along with six grandchildren,
16 great grandchildren and four great-great
grandchildren and was preceded in death by
wife, Janet and daughter, Janice Kesler and her
husband.
Mr. Tomasello was born in Hammonton, NJ to
parents, Angelo and Maria Tomasello following
their immigration from Sicily. Along with his
sister and two brothers, Carl helped care for
the family’s chickens, italian vegetable garden,
and fruit trees.
At the age of 19, Mr. Tomasello enlisted in
the Navy and was stationed in Washington,
DC where he was assigned to the presidential
yacht, the USS Potomac. After being discharged from the Navy, he went on to work as
a civilian for the Army and was stationed at the
Pentagon as a military attaché officer under
the Deputy Chief of Staff for Military Operations
and traveled extensively throughout the middle
east.
While in the service, Carl met Janet Drinnan
who was a WAC in the US armed forces.
In 1943 Carl and Janet married and lived in
Cheverly, MD, where they had two daughters,
Fay and Janice. In 1964 Carl and Janet moved to
Colesville, MD where they watched their family
grow and flourish. In retirement Carl loved
going to the beach with family and he spent
many hours in his woodworking shop making
model cars and wooden ornaments.
Dr. ELIE A. SAYAN
Passed away peacefully in his sleep on
Wednesday, January 10, 2018, he was 92
years old. He was born December 24, 1925, in
Damascus, MD to Elie and Ann Sayan. He was
a 1953 graduate of Sorbonne Medical School
in Paris, France. He married Josette Adrienne
Giraudet on March 31, 1957 in New York, New
York. Elie dedicated his life to the field of
medicine, specifically surgery, where he spent
most of his career in Prince George's County,
MD. He displayed a passion for healing and to
the service of his fellow man. Elie truly lived
life to the fullest through his work, the Catholic
Church, and his family. Elie is survived by his
beloved wife, Josette; nine children, MarieNoelle (John), Christophe (Marilyn), Vincent
(Kim), Paul (Nancy), Frederic (Linda), Nicole
(Christian), Gabrielle, Claire and Philip; 17
grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Family, friends, and others whose lives Elie touched
are invited to the Hardesty Funeral Home,
905 Galesville Rd., Galesville, MD on Sunday,
January 14, 2018 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7
to 9 p.m. Funeral services will be held on
Monday, January 15, 2018 at 11 a.m. at Our
Lady of Perpetual Help, 515 Loch Haven Road,
Edgewater, MD. Interment to follow at Lakemont Memorial Gardens. Memorials may be
made in Elie's name to the Alzheimer's Association, 1850 York Road, Ste D, Timonium, MD
21093. Online condolences can be made at:
www.hardestyfuneralhome.com
SISSELMAN
YVETTE SCHACHTER SISSELMAN
WALTER VANCE HALL (Age 87)
A retired Foreign Service officer, died on
January 6, 2018. He had served in Seoul,
South Korea; Naples, Italy; and Suva, Fiji,
as well as in the U.S. Mission to the United
Nations in Vienna, Austria. Following his
retirement in 1982, he continued to work
in the State Department on freedom of
information cases until 2000.
Walter Vance Hall Jr. was born in 1930 in
Emmerton, Va., the son of Walter Vance
Hall Sr. and Emma Lemoine Griffith. He
graduated from Hampden-Sydney College,
served in the U.S. Navy, and then earned
a degree in foreign service at Georgetown
University.
Vance was a lifelong member of North
Farnham Parish Church in Farnham, VA.,
and during his long residence in Alexandria
he was an active parishioner at St. Paul’s
Episcopal Church. He served as a member
of the board of directors of the Historic
Alexandria Foundation, and the American
Library Company. He also served two terms
on the Alexandria Archeology Commission
and was a longtime member of the Metropolitan Club.
Vance particularly enjoyed his nearly 20
years of tutoring children in the Alexandria
public schools. He also took great pleasure
in working in his garden, reading, entertaining friends and cooking. He was an
enthusiastic traveler, especially to Italy.
He is survived by his wife, Julia Elisabeth
Ramberg Hall of Alexandria, whom he married in Rome in 1963, two sons, John
Ramberg Hall (and his wife Denise Ann Hall)
of Hackettstown, NJ and Walter Vance Hall
III of Chesapeake, VA., and two grandsons,
Lleyton Vance Hall and Anders John Hall.
A Liturgy in Thanksgiving for his life will
be held at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church,
Alexandria, at 1 p.m. on Sunday, January 14.
Interment will be at North Farnham Parish
Church, Farnham, VA., at 11:30 a.m. on
Monday, January 15.
Memorial contributions may be made to
The Saint Paul’s Foundation.
Entered into eternal rest on Saturday, January
6, 2018. She is survived by her husband, John
D. McMillan; two sons, Demetrius McMillan
(Ronique) and Delbert McMillan; seven grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; two sisters,
Leola Sanders and Mary Lee Harrell; a host
of other relatives and friends. Mrs. McMillan
will lie in state at Upper Room Baptist Church,
60 Burns St., NE on Monday, January 15 from
9 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. Interment at
Harmony Memorial Park.
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
On Friday, January 12, 2018,
YVETTE S. SISSELMAN of Elkton,
MD, formerly of Silver Spring, MD.
Beloved wife of the late George
Sisselman; loving aunt of Rebecca
Cebula, Jack Schachter, Laura
Freas, Bruce and Jane Kornbluth; sister of the
late Arlan Schachter and Frances Kornbluth;
also survived by several great and great great
nieces and nephews. Graveside service will be
held on Sunday, January 14, 2018, 3 p.m. at
King David Memorial Garden, Falls Church, VA.
Memorial contributions may be made to the
charity of your choice. Arrangements entrusted TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL HOME,
202-541-1001
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
The Celebration of Rick’s Life will be held
Sunday, January 14, 2018 from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
at the Loyal Order of Moose Lodge at 7701
Beulah Street, Alexandria VA.
TODD
CHARAK
TOVEN
On Tuesday, January 2, 2018 of Rockville, MD.
Wife of the late Richard A. Toven. Beloved
mother of Christopher M. Toven and his wife
Beth and Jeffrey P. “Jay” Toven and his partner
Jon Gibson. Loving grandmother of Nicole,
Christina and Matthew Toven.
Relatives and friends will be received at
PUMPHREY’S FUNERAL HOME, 300 W. Montgomery Ave. (Rt. 28 just off I-270), Rockville,
MD on Saturday, January 13, 2018 from 3 to 6
p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial and inurnment
will take place at Arlington National Cemetery
at a later date.
TURNER
MASON THOMAS CHARAK
Mason Thomas Charak, 94, of
Bethesda, MD on January 9,
2018. Beloved husband of the
late Harriet. Devoted father of
Lewis Blaine Charak and Meredith Beckhardt. Loving grandfather of Deanna Beckhardt and Joshua Beckhardt. Adored cousin of Sue Yarrow. He
was a veteran of WWII in the European
Theater, and had a distinguished career at
both NASA and NOAA. Services will be
12:30 p.m. on Friday, January 12, 2018 at
Garden of Remembrance Memorial Park,
14321 Comus Rd., Clarksburg, MD. The
family will be sitting shiva at the home of
Blaine Charak following services. Donations
in his memory can be made to the
Alzheimer's Association, alz.org.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
WEISS
A native of Detroit, MI, Julie was a graduate of Kingwood School Cranbrook; Denison
University., B.S. with Honors, and University.
of Virginia, M Ed. She taught 6th grade and
later was a high school guidance counselor.
Julie and Jerry moved to the Washington area
when he graduated from law school in 1962.
They lived in several areas ultimately settling
in Potomac for more than 40 years. Julie
was honored by the Montgomery County
Executive for her distinguished service for
many years in the abused persons program.
She also hosted gift giving receptions in
her Potomac home for Toys for Tots for
almost two decades. Her fondest memories
included teaching 6th grade in Charlottesville,
and spending time at her favorite place,
their Bethany Beach, DE house which she
designed.
A memorial service will be held on January 16
at 11 a.m. at St. Francis Episcopal Church in
Potomac followed by a reception. Interment
will be at Arlington National Cemetery at a
later date. In lieu of flowers donations may
be made in her memory to the Toys for Tots
Foundation, Gifts Processing Administrator,
18251 Quantico Gateway Dr., Triangle, VA
22172. Please view and sign online family
guestbook at:
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
JUANITA N. GONZALEZ
On Sunday, January 7, 2018, Juanita N. Gonzalez, of Washington, DC. Devoted daughter of
the late Rev. Wesley B. Nash and Eloise Wright
Nash-Nichols; beloved wife of the late Cambell
Gonzalez; loving mother of Administrative Law
Judge, Amelia G. Govan, Dr. Anita Gonzalez
(John R. Diehl) and John C. Gonzalez (Dr. Beverly
Yates); cherished grandmother of Leesha Ayanna Cook Amen (Priest), RaLee Cook (Andrea),
Shaka G. Brown, Xochina El Hilali, Jonathan
Diehl, Raphael and Jasmine Gonzalez and the
late Hasaan A. Brown. Also survived by six
great-grandchildren, dear cousins, nieces and
a host of family and friends.
Visitation will be held on Sunday, January 14,
2018 from 1 p.m. until time of service at 3
p.m. at the Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home, 11800
New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20904.
Interment Private at Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
HOYT
On Thursday, January 11, 2018.
DORIS G. WEISS of Kensington, MD
formerly of Miami, FL. Beloved
mother of Robert (Sherry) Weiss;
loving grandmother of Jared, Gavin
(Meredith) and Dylan Weiss.
Graveside services to be held at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery, South Miami, FL on Monday, January
15, 2018 at 2 p.m. Memorial contributions
may be made to the charity of your choice.
Arrangements entrusted to TORCHINSKY
HEBREW FUNERAL HOME, 202-541-1001
BROWNING
CHARLES EVERETT HOYT (Age 80)
Of Washington, DC, on December 20, 2017,
after a brief illness, surrounded by his loving
family. He was born in New York City on
January 30, 1937, to Red and Betty Hoyt and
grew up in Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island.
Charlie graduated from the Phillips Exeter
Academy in 1955 and from Yale in 1959. He
then spent three and a half years in the US
Army, followed by the University of Virginia
Law School. After graduation he joined the
law firm of Winthrop, Stimson, Putnam &
Roberts, then spent the remainder of his
career at Mobil Oil Corporation.
Tommy R. Browning died on January 5,
2018 after a long battle with Alzheimer’s.
Beloved by all who knew him he was
an easy-going, fun-loving man devoted to
his family. He leaves behind his loving
wife, Barb; son, Mike (Janine); daughter,
Teri Pierce (Mark), daughter, Betsy Aldridge,
and stepson, Mark Stein along with six
grandchildren and four great grandchildren.
He also leaves his brother, Glenn (Shirley),
in Illinois (from a family of eight children)
along with so many nieces and nephews.
He was an active member of the Bailey’s
Crossroads Lions Club and their eyeglass
recycling program for many years. He
worked for the Navy Department for many
years including two tours on active duty,
retiring in 1988. Celebration of Life gathering to be determined.
Donations may be made to the Bailey’s
Crossroads Lions Club care of James at
7955 DeArment Ct., Springfield VA 22153 or
Hospice at 2900 Telestar Ct., Falls Church
VA 22042-1206
He is survived by wife of 47 years, Arleen G.
Todd; and son, Chet Todd.
The visitation will be held from 12 Noon until 2
p.m. on Sunday, January 14, 2018 at Demaine
Funeral Home, Old Town Alexandria with the
funeral service to follow at 2 p.m.
CEMETERY LOTS
Fort Lincoln Cemetery - 1 Double Crypt, Garden of Apostles, $5,500. Call 302-227-1676
FT. LINCOLN CEMETERY- 4 sites for sale, $5500
each, lot 613, block 14, great value for their
price! Call 240-381-7975
To be seen in the Funeral
Services Directory, please
call paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
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To place a notice, call:
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DEATH NOTICE
TOMMY R. BROWNING (Age 87)
ROUSE J. TODD
"Smokey"
Passed away on January 6, 2018 in Ft. Belvoir,
VA. He was born on December 30, 1931 in
Crowell, TX to Louis and Callie Todd.
When the need
arises, let families
find you in the
Funeral Services Directory.
ALICE E. TURNER (Age 94)
Beloved sister, aunt, and friend, passed away
December 20, 2017 of a heart attack. Alice was
born in Chicago, IL, May 6, 1923 and was raised
by her Grandmother in Troy, Indiana. After High
School, Alice took a bus to Washington, DC
and has been a resident there for 76 years.
She started as an usher at the Warner Theater
and later at the FBI. Alice then had a 40year career at Air Force Association, (AFA) and
quickly became the Director of Membership
during the time in which AFA went from
paper to computers. Although, Alice never
married, over the years, she had many friends
that become part of her family. She was
unique, funny and sassy. She was the director,
bartender, life of the party and loyal to all.
She is predeceased by her oldest sister Mary
Senf. Alice has survived by her youngest sister,
Virginia Wymer; niece, Susan (Dan) Meardon;
nephew, Richard (Mary Lou) Wymer; great
niece and nephew, Patricia (Brandon) and Doug
(Eric) Meardon; great-great nieces, Alanna and
Ava; special friends, John Lohse and Bill Ashley
and a host of many other friends. A memorial
service will be held in early spring. Services will
be handled by DeVol Funeral Home, Washington, DC.
nephew, Mark Gilbert and grandnephew,
Julian Arthur Dos Santos.
On Friday, January 5, 2018 of Adamstown,
MD., formerly of Potomac, MD, beloved wife
of 60 years of Gerald Gilbert. Dear Mother
of Joy (Michael) Sappington, of Tuscarora, MD
and Bruce (Stacia) Gilbert, of Danville, PA;
beloved grandmother of four grandchildren,
Ryan and Larissa Sappington, Jake and Darby
Gilbert; loving sister of Dr. Penny HauserCram and Dr. Bruce Hauser. Juliana is also
survived by many other loving relatives and
friends. She was especially close to her
Services will be private. Donations in her
memory can be made to the Alice Corneille
Cardozo ’36 Scholarship at Barnard:
Barnard College, Office of Development,
3009 Broadway, New York, NY 10027.
He is survived by his brothers and sisters,
Charles L Koryda, Jr., Barbara Koryda Biallas
(David), Patricia Jane Koryda, Tom Moon (Kim),
Nancy Moon-Rush (Joachim); by step-mother,
Margaret Moon Koryda; by brothers-in-law,
Robert Holroyd and Bruce Morris; by four
nephews and four great-nephews and nieces;
his companion, Susan Laughinghouse; and his
dear friend Jeanne Bennett.
.
EMELIE L. TOVEN
GILBERT
JULIANA M. GILBERT
(Age 82)
At her death, Alice was Barnard College’s
oldest living alumna. She credited Barnard
for nurturing her life-long love of learning,
especially her passion for art and music.
When we listen to opera and philharmonic
performances, we will picture her special
smile and the sparkle in her eyes as Luciano
Pavarotti and others join her on the wings
of familiar melodies.
RICHARD A. KORYDA
On December 10, 2017 at home in Springfield,
VA surrounded by family, after a long and
courageous battle with cancer. The son of
Charles and Mary Jane Koryda, he was born
in West Virginia in 1955 and soon the family
moved to McLean, VA where he grew up.
Rick was a star athlete, playing baseball and
football at McLean High School, and received
full baseball scholarships to Mineral Area College and to East Carolina University where he
is still cited for his high batting average. He
was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals, but
suffered a career ending injury. He played
softball on leagues throughout Fairfax County
and also coached. When not on a baseball
diamond Rick worked in the printing industry,
most recently at the large printing company
Harbor Duvall Graphics in Baltimore where he
was the plant manager.
A funeral service will be held on Tuesday
January 16, 2018, 11 a.m. at Hines-Rinaldi
funeral home at 11800 New Hampshire Ave.,
Silver Spring, MD. Interment will follow at
Colesville Methodist Church Cemetery at 52
Randolph Rd., Silver Spring, MD.
DORIS G. WEISS
ALBERTA McMILLAN
ALICE CORNEILLE CARDOZO
(Age 105)
On Wednesday, January 10, 2018, Alice
Corneille Cardozo died peacefully at her
home in Washington, DC, surrounded by
her family and the spirit of her late husband
Michael H. Cardozo IV. Alice is survived
by her children, Michael H. Cardozo V,
Julia Cardozo Eisendrath, Alice Rebecca
Cardozo; her grandchildren Ben Eisendrath,
Mark Eisendrath, Eden Cardozo Levy, Julia
Cardozo, Michael Cardozo VI; and her greatgrandchildren Tappen Eisendrath, Teal
Eisendrath, Jay Eisendrath, Jack Levy and
Gabriel Levy.
GONZALEZ
For we who are left behind, there can be no
greater loss than to live in a world without a
man who was the embodiment of humor and
compassion; a man who dearly loved his family
and friends; a man who taught us to have faith
in the face of struggle; and a man who inspired
admiration in everyone he met. Russell lived
with absolute dignity, and left this earth on his
own terms and without complaint. Indeed, he
will always be our example of what it means to
embrace a life well-lived. Services will be held
at a later date.
Peacefully On January 3, 2018 Shirley J. Martin
wife of George W. Martin; mother of David J.,
Ramon F. (Patricia), Stephen D. (Shirley) George
P. and Maria A. Martin. She is also survived by
six grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren;
nieces; nephews; and a host of other relatives
and friends. Mrs. Martin will lie in state from
9 a.m. until time of funeral service mass at
10 a.m. at Saint Anthony of Padua Catholic
Church, 1029 Monroe St. NE Washington, DC
20017. Interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery.
Arrangements by CHINN-BAKER 703-979-1666
A memorial service will be held on Saturday,
January 13, 2018,1 p.m., at Metropolitan
Memorial United Methodist Church, 3401
Nebraska Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20016.
Please view and sign the family online guestbook at www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
In 1954, he married Florence Barbara Diggs
and remained dedicated to her until her death
on October 9, 2012. With Barbara, he had
Jocelyn, the late Russell III, and Lauri, and was
a devoted father, one who guided, inspired,
and engendered in them a love of education,
independence, and social justice. To him, family was everything, and his most joyful moments
were spent in the company of his children, his
many cousins, nieces, and nephews, and his
dear friend Cornelia Stokes.
MARTIN
BETTY RITTER TILLEY (Age 92)
February 1, 1925 - January 4, 2018
Devoted wife, mother, grandmother, and
fast friend, Betty Ritter Tilley is survived by
her son Richard MacFarlane Tilley, granddaughter Kathleen Marie Mayo, son-in-law
John Mayo, sister Jeanne Ritter Kramer,
and brother Robert Harbaugh Ritter. She
is predeceased by her beloved husband of
65 years, Dr. Russell MacFarlane Tilley, Jr.,
daughter Kimberly Ann Tilley, and brother
Lloyd H. Ritter, Jr.
Charlie was an avid sportsman, photographer, lover of music and fine wine shared
with friends. He actively supported academic and musical not-for-profit organizations, serving on the boards of Washington Area Lawyers for the Arts, Choral Arts
Society of Washington, and Levine Music,
as well as fund-raising for Exeter, Yale, and
UVA Law.
He is remembered for his infectious enthusiasm, adventurous spirit, passion for
music, love of people, generosity and compassion, and lifelong friendships.
Charlie is survived by his wife, Deborah
Weinberger; daughters Samantha Lindgren
(Don) of Alfred, ME, and Victoria Hoyt Dick
(John) of Orinda, CA; his brothers Anthony
S. and William W. Hoyt; two grandchildren
(Charlie and Hawley), and many nieces and
nephews.
A celebration of his life will be held on
Saturday, February 3, 2018, from 1 to 4 p.m.
at the Chevy Chase Club, 6100 Connecticut
Ave, Chevy Chase, MD. In lieu of flowers
the family suggests donations to his alma
maters or to Levine Music, 2801 Upton St
NW, Washington, DC 20008.
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B6
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13 , 2018
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Windy and much colder
We could see a couple of snowflakes
as cold air enters the region and
moisture departs. But be ready for
stiff winds and a steady cooling-off.
Highs are in the 40s or even 50s in
the early morning, but temperatures will fall into
and through the 30s for much of the day. Winds
whip out of the northwest between 15 and
25 mph, with higher gusts.
Today
Cloudy
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Cold
Monday
Partly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Tuesday
Partly sunny
Wednesday
Cloudy
OFFICIAL RECORD
Thursday
Sunny
Temperatures
41° 18
29° 17
34° 25
39° 21
30° 18
34° 23
FEELS*: 32°
FEELS: 21°
FEELS: 36°
FEELS: 38°
FEELS: 17°
FEELS: 24°
CHNCE PRECIP: 20%
P: 15%
P: 10%
P: 55%
P: 30%
P: 0%
WIND: SSW 10–20 mph
W: NNW 8–16 mph
W: ESE 4–8 mph
W: S 4–8 mph
W: NNW 8–16 mph
W: WNW 8–16 mph
°
°
°
°
°
NATION
Hagerstown
33/12
Davis
20/2
W
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
40/13
Dover
45/14
Washington
41/18
Tu
Weather map features for noon today.
Philadelphia
47/16
Harrisburg
33/11
Th
Norfolk
56/21
Virginia Beach
56/22
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
BWI
64° 3:59 p.m.
57° 12:56 a.m.
43°/28°
76° 1890
3° 1886
70° 1:00 p.m.
58° 1:00 a.m.
42°/24°
70° 2018
–4° 1977
63° 3:03 p.m.
53° 2:00 a.m.
41°/24°
70° 2017
1° 1981
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 35°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.22"
0.38"
1.07"
0.38"
1.07"
0.0"
2.7"
0.20"
0.23"
0.99"
0.23"
0.99"
0.0"
4.7"
0.33"
0.45"
1.16"
0.45"
1.16"
0.0"
5.2"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:26 a.m.
4:26 a.m.
7:35 a.m.
2:51 a.m.
2:35 a.m.
6:03 a.m.
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
90/77/c
75/44/s
56/40/pc
84/61/pc
82/59/s
41/28/sh
35/20/sn
44/35/s
81/74/r
30/26/c
85/61/t
61/53/pc
57/37/s
45/34/s
14/4/pc
36/29/c
31/17/pc
1 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, colder, breezy, partly sunny. High 26–
35. Wind northwest 6–12 mph. Tonight, partly cloudy, very
cold. Low 7–11. Wind northwest 4–8 mph. Sunday, mostly
sunny, very cold. High 17–21. Wind northwest 4–8 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny, windy, colder. High
43–56. Wind northwest 15–25 mph. Tonight, very cold,
mostly clear, breezy. Low 14–21. Wind northwest 6–12 mph.
Sunday, mostly sunny, cold. High 26–30. Wind northwest
10–20 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, partly sunny, breezy,
colder. Wind northwest 12–22 knots. Waves 1–2 feet. Visibility
good. • Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, partly sunny,
breezy, colder. Wind northwest 12–22 knots. Waves 1–2 feet on the
Potomac, 2–4 feet on the Chesapeake.• River Stages: Today, the
stage at Little Falls will be around 3.3 feet, rising to 3.8 feet Sunday.
Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
12:04 a.m.
5:25 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
5:44 p.m.
2:02 a.m.
8:22 a.m.
3:24 p.m.
9:27 p.m.
11:08 p.m.
4:52 a.m.
11:24 a.m.
5:00 p.m.
12:25 a.m.
7:00 a.m.
1:15 p.m.
7:13 p.m.
4:11 a.m.
11:21 a.m.
6:07 p.m.
10:50 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
Stationary Front
90s
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Vero Beach, FL 85°
Low: Embarrass, MN –39°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
30/2/sn
51/28/s
38/33/sn
40/24/pc
51/26/s
40/13/pc
39/26/pc
37/19/pc
3/–1/pc
45/30/s
56/16/r
13/2/sn
19/–8/sn
53/32/pc
26/11/c
47/22/pc
43/29/pc
17/4/pc
23/9/c
18/7/sf
44/27/s
49/28/s
Tomorrow
15/–1/s
54/30/pc
38/27/c
41/27/s
56/34/pc
28/11/s
35/7/c
41/24/pc
23/–15/sn
44/29/s
23/14/s
15/4/c
6/–10/s
46/26/s
26/14/pc
40/19/pc
49/20/s
22/19/pc
24/15/pc
20/10/pc
52/35/s
54/25/pc
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
12/3/pc
20/10/c
61/33/s
13/9/pc
–3/–10/s
43/10/r
83/66/s
51/30/s
21/5/c
37/22/s
53/34/pc
19/11/pc
64/45/pc
35/21/pc
81/56/pc
26/11/c
29/17/pc
76/52/s
15/3/pc
3/–7/s
29/16/c
45/30/s
45/14/pc
56/21/pc
24/6/sn
22/16/s
62/36/pc
26/16/pc
14/–13/sn
24/5/s
83/68/s
53/36/s
21/15/s
42/24/s
52/33/pc
30/19/sf
64/45/s
36/25/pc
82/55/pc
27/18/pc
32/24/pc
70/56/pc
21/18/pc
15/–4/sn
32/23/pc
47/34/s
25/13/s
30/22/s
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
32/20/s
14/8/c
61/37/pc
47/16/pc
77/50/pc
20/4/sn
46/7/i
59/42/pc
56/17/r
48/22/pc
52/27/pc
49/18/pc
58/38/c
24/10/pc
84/74/sh
47/27/s
77/54/pc
60/48/pc
83/74/sh
55/42/pc
38/31/c
13/–4/sn
59/39/pc
25/17/s
47/25/s
32/7/sn
60/42/pc
28/17/s
76/50/pc
18/6/pc
21/1/s
55/41/s
27/12/s
37/18/s
55/31/pc
32/16/s
56/43/pc
28/25/sf
83/73/pc
43/27/pc
74/53/pc
63/51/pc
83/73/pc
55/42/s
38/31/s
11/–8/c
61/42/pc
44/26/sf
Jan 16
New
World
High: Bourke, Australia 114°
Low: Delyankir, Russia –68°
Jan 24
First
Quarter
Jan 31
Full
Today
Addis Ababa
74/39/pc
Amsterdam
43/31/c
Athens
57/46/t
Auckland
76/67/c
Baghdad
69/43/c
Bangkok
81/66/pc
Beijing
39/16/s
Berlin
33/24/c
Bogota
68/48/r
Brussels
43/31/c
Buenos Aires
83/62/t
Cairo
70/52/s
Caracas
73/62/pc
Copenhagen
34/29/c
Dakar
76/65/pc
Dublin
47/38/r
Edinburgh
42/37/c
Frankfurt
42/33/c
Geneva
44/32/s
Ham., Bermuda 72/68/pc
Helsinki
28/23/c
Ho Chi Minh City 88/72/pc
Tomorrow
75/40/s
39/33/pc
51/40/sh
77/68/pc
71/44/s
83/68/s
45/19/s
32/25/s
67/47/sh
42/35/s
70/63/r
67/53/s
73/63/pc
33/30/c
77/66/pc
47/42/c
46/42/c
39/28/s
43/33/pc
72/68/pc
27/21/c
88/73/c
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
62/55/s
71/40/pc
49/41/r
61/45/pc
90/60/s
54/26/s
82/74/sh
74/52/pc
88/74/pc
77/68/pc
57/45/r
45/35/c
42/33/r
83/74/pc
68/33/pc
12/–13/sn
20/16/c
91/78/pc
80/52/pc
73/45/pc
24/18/sn
5/–12/sn
43/33/c
31/24/c
Haitians
Temperature
swings break, outraged
by Trump’s
tie records
5 days apart insult
M ARTIN W EIL
At one spot in the Washington
area, it got so cold this week that it
set a record. At the same spot in
the same week, it got warm
enough Friday to match a record.
The difference was as small as five
days but as large as 71 degrees.
Startling as that swing was, the
story of Washington’s weather on
Friday may have been something
more difficult to describe with
numbers. In fact, it was a symbol
of indistinctness. It was the fog.
Whether white or gray, a blanket of fog covered waterways in
the area. It concealed the surface
of the Potomac River in the morning, and it persisted into the evening to bedeck the banks of the
Anacostia River.
It “was kind of spooky,” said
Taylor Jackson, who watched the
fog roll in from the Anacostia near
Nationals Park.
Science has its explanations:
warm air laden with moisture,
streaming over icy rivers, is a
recipe for condensation and fog.
Less susceptible to the quantitative precision of thermodynamics was the intangible sense of
beauty, romance and mystery created over the area by the cloak of
fog.
Morning fog surged under the
14th Street Bridge and ran
through the arches of the Arlington Memorial Bridge.
Meanwhile in the realm of the
measurable, the top temperature
of 70 degrees at Dulles International Airport tied a record for
warmth there for Jan. 12. Only five
days earlier, the low of minus-1
degree set a record there for cold.
martin.weil@washpost.com
THE DAILY QUIZ
According to the Real Estate
cover story, how many
houses did Jeff Reilly lose
in bidding wars?
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, and then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints, Quizzes to enter the
correct response.
66/59/s
71/39/pc
44/38/sn
53/45/pc
90/61/s
54/22/s
84/75/pc
73/50/pc
87/74/pc
77/69/pc
53/41/sh
42/40/pc
45/29/sh
83/75/c
64/34/pc
0/–16/s
24/22/sf
91/76/pc
82/54/pc
72/46/pc
28/26/sn
1/–11/s
46/36/pc
33/24/c
92/78/t
77/47/s
54/41/c
80/60/pc
85/56/pc
37/28/c
42/30/c
56/41/pc
81/74/sh
32/27/c
73/62/sh
71/56/s
56/39/s
45/37/s
19/8/pc
34/25/c
27/15/s
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
VIRGINIA
Catholic
school probes
use of racial
slur in video
BY
HAITI FROM B1
rates than Americans overall,
but their children’s education
levels exceed the national average. Fourteen percent have advanced degrees, compared with
11 percent for the general U.S.
population.
Friday was supposed to be a
day of mourning for Haitians,
with candlelight vigils, religious
services, meditation and prayer.
Altidor, who escaped the Hotel
Montana in Haiti seconds before
it collapsed and joined in the
search for survivors, expected
Friday to be a quiet day of
reflection.
Instead, he toured media outlets and monitored the news
from Port-au-Prince, where the
U.S. chief of mission in Haiti was
meeting with Haitian officials to
discuss the furor over the president’s reported remarks.
In a series of tweets, Trump
denied the comments attributed
to him. But Haitian Americans,
and others, demanded an apology.
“The president should be
ashamed of himself,” said Jean
Bradley Derenoncourt, a newly
sworn-in city council member in
Brockton, Mass., who fled the
earthquake in 2010 and became
a U.S. citizen. “My blood is
boiling right now.”
Rep. Mia Love (R-Utah), the
only Haitian American in Congress, tweeted Thursday that
“this behavior is unacceptable
from the leader of our nation.”
The president actively courted Haitians on the campaign
trail, visiting Little Haiti in
Miami and attempting to seize
Feb 7
Last
Quarter
Set
5:08 p.m.
2:42 p.m.
5:09 p.m.
1:00 p.m.
12:51 p.m.
3:34 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
THE REGION
BY
M
Dulles
OCEAN: 42°
Pollen: Low
Point Lookout
Su
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –7.0° yr. to date: –7.0°
OCEAN: 35°
Ocean City
Sa
Precipitation
Kitty Hawk
50/23
Norfolk
F
Reagan
OCEAN: 31°
Richmond
49/18
Annapolis
FORECAST
Ocean City
46/17
Lexington
36/13
Washington
ACTUAL
Cape May
44/16
Annapolis
43/17
Charlottesville
41/18
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
M
REGION
AVERAGE
became Brockton’s first Haitian
American lawmaker.
“That’s the American Dream,
right? That’s the greatness of
this country,” he said.
To expand Americans’ perspective on Haiti, Altidor said,
the embassy offers tours, cooking classes (with a 5,000-person
waiting list, including members
of Congress), language lessons
and trivia nights.
Haitian artwork is on display
throughout the building. Altidor
said he urges U.S. college students to study in Haiti — to
learn from the country — instead of just volunteering or
offering aid.
“Trump is a footnote. There’s
a bigger issue here at stake,” the
ambassador said. “Ultimately,
there’s series of stigmas in his
head. When he’s thinking Haiti,
that’s what comes to mind.”
maria.sacchetti@washpost.com
sarah.larimer@washpost.com
ALLISON SHELLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Framed biographies of famous people of Haitian descent hang on a wall as Paul Getty Altidor, the
nation’s ambassador to the United States, foreground, conducts a tour of the Haitian Embassy in
Washington on Friday. Altidor came to the United States as a child and later earned a degree from MIT.
on their frustration with the
pace of rebuilding after the
earthquake and with the involvement of his opponent Hillary Clinton’s family foundation.
Thursday was not the first
time Trump has offended the
community, however. In December, the New York Times reported that Trump complained in
June that thousands of Haitians
allowed to enter the United
States on visas last year “all have
AIDS.” The White House denied
the report.
Altidor’s email account has
been inundated with thousands
of apologetic messages from
across the United States, an
outpouring he described as
heartening and a “testament of
the strong bond” between the
nations.
The ambassador is the son of
a Haitian-born cabdriver from
Boston who brought him to the
MEMBER EXCLUSIVES
United States when he was 15
and knew little English. He
bagged groceries at a supermarket and finished high school,
then went on to graduate from
Boston College and earn a master’s degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
He cites myriad other success
stories: Garcelle Beauvais, a
Haitian-born actress; C. Reynold Verret, president of Xavier
University of Louisiana; Patrick
Gaspard, a former Obama administration official and the son
of Haitian parents who is the
president of the Open Society
Foundations.
Derenoncourt, the city council member, is also one of them.
After the earthquake, he joined
his father in Massachusetts. He
learned English, bussed tables
at a restaurant and ultimately
graduated from Suffolk University in Boston. In January, he
S ARAH L ARIMER
A Catholic high school in Northern Virginia has launched an investigation after a student appeared in a video using a racial
slur.
Administrators at Paul VI Catholic High School are conducting
the probe into the video, which
has circulated on social media,
according to a statement released
Thursday by Angela Pellerano, director of media relations for the
Catholic Diocese of Arlington,
which oversees the school.
“Paul VI High School is rooted
in Catholic moral values and a
loving respect for others,” the
statement said. “All students are
expected to be respectful and
courteous and to refrain from harassment of any kind.”
It continued: “All disciplinary
matters concerning students are
addressed seriously and are kept
confidential.”
The video shows a student at
the private school in Fairfax. Pellerano did not release details about
the student, such as his name or
grade level.
The clip, which has spread on
social media, shows a youth in a
sweatshirt. The student, who is
white, talks quickly in the video,
which lasts about 10 seconds. In
his profane rant, he uses a racial
slur. It was not clear from the
video what prompted the outburst.
The clip was posted to Twitter
earlier this month, along with the
phone number for Paul VI. “Twitter, do ya thing,” the tweet said.
The footage also appears to have
been posted on Snapchat.
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Enjoy the music of one of Motown’s main men, courtesy of Sixx Sings Band.
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(drums), Michael Mason (bass), Tony Contee (guitar) & vocal lead SIXX help
keep the sounds of Motown alive by honoring America’s “greatest living
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washingtonpost.com/postpoints
KLMNO
Style
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
SU
C
At moments like these, saying nothing says a lot about you
BY
P HILIP K ENNICOTT
thin medical gown was tossed to
the roadside in freezing weather
Over the past year, as our politiby security guards from the Unical culture has grown more coarse versity of Maryland Medical Cenand corrupt, I’ve felt difter Midtown Campus in
ferent things: someBaltimore. Who orders
CRITIC’S
times, anger; often, bitsuch a thing, and why
NOTEBOOK
ter resignation; and ocwould anyone carry out
casionally, a bemused
that order? Then, the
sense of pure absurdity. But the
president of the United States
past two nights I have actually
calls Haiti, El Salvador and Afriwept. Why now? Why in response can nations “shithole” countries.
to these particular prompts? A Who says that kind of thing? Who
confused and ailing woman in a thinks it? Who listens to it without
reflexive outrage?
According to a few of the president’s defenders, this is what we
all really think. “This is how the
forgotten men and women of
America talk at the bar,” said a Fox
News host, imputing to ordinary
Americans sentiments they
wouldn’t suffer to be said at their
own dinner tables. There was the
usual talk about “tough” language,
as if using racist language was
merely candor or an admirable
impatience with euphemism.
His defenders seemed to say
that if the president says things
that we would be ashamed even to
think, he is somehow speaking a
kind of truth. But while there may
be countries that are poor and
suffer from civil discord, there are
no “shithole” countries, not one,
anywhere on Earth. The very idea
of “shithole” countries is designed
to short-circuit our capacity for
empathy on a global scale.
These two incidents, in Baltimore and in the Oval Office, seem
related — inhumane indifference
from a hospital and blatant bigotry from the president — which is
even more troubling. They are
about who is on what side of the
door, or the wall, or any other
barrier that defines the primal “us
and them” that governs so much of
the worst of our human-made
world. When Trump called disfavored countries “shitholes,” he
was indulging the most lethal and
persistent tribalism of all: pure,
unabashed racism. After a candi-
dacy and now a presidency
marked by implications of racism,
the president has grown more
comfortable with speaking in
overtly racist terms, condemning
whole countries and their people
for not being more like “Norway,”
one of the whitest countries on
Earth.
Remarks like these from the
president are still shocking but
hardly surprising, given the frequency with which they occur.
NOTEBOOK CONTINUED ON C2
Choice words
at another
Hollywood
awards show
BY
JOE PUGLIESE/NETFLIX
Letterman’s debut lacks
the luster of his late-night gig
Former
president
Barack Obama
was the guest for
the premiere of
“My Next Guest
Needs No
Introduction
With David
Letterman” on
Netflix.
BY
H ANK S TUEVER
What could seem better than getting David
Letterman and President Obama together
again and sitting them down in front of an
audience to talk for an hour about whatever’s
been on their minds since they left their old
jobs? What better fantasy-come-true for anyone who misses both men terribly?
Unfortunately, Letterman’s new show for
Netflix, a six-episode series called “My Next
Guest Needs No Introduction,” fails to deliver
on its promise, falling flat in its Friday debut.
Letterman, who retired so elegantly in 2015,
seems only half-engaged here and far too much
in the thrall of his first guest, who left office a
year ago and has avoided the talk-show circuit
until now.
Both men seem rusty at the art of banter.
They’re off their game. The interview doesn’t
produce any surprising or newsworthy statements from Obama. Instead, Letterman asks
Obama to talk about his upbringing, his mother, his reckoning with his own identity —
well-trod territory, retold as if viewers have
never heard of this person named Barack
Obama.
The discussion meanders along the surface,
touching on Russian interference in U.S. elections and the state of discourse in American
A few days after the Golden
Globe Awards, a very similar crowd
of movie and television stars gathered in Santa Monica, Calif., for the
23rd annual Critics’ Choice
Awards.
Although one familiar face was
missing: James Franco, who sat for
some extremely uncomfortable TV
interviews this week after allegations of sexual misconduct surfaced on social media. (He has
called the accusations “not accurate.”) The Associated Press reported that Franco won the best comedy actor trophy for his role in “The
Disaster Artist,” which was presented in a pre-telecast ceremony,
and he was nowhere to be found.
The main portion of the twohour event was broadcast on the
CW on Thursday night — here are
eight things to know from the telecast.
1. Olivia Munn and Niecy
Nash called out men of Hollywood — including Mark Wahlberg.
Wahlberg got plenty of criticism
this week after USA Today reported
that the actor earned $1.5 million
for reshooting his role in “All the
Money in the World” after Christopher Plummer replaced Kevin
Spacey; meanwhile, his co-star Michelle Williams earned less than
$1,000.
Critics’ Choice host Olivia Munn
called him out during a bit with
Niecy Nash, in which the two actresses toasted the “good guys” in
Hollywood in the post-Harvey
Weinstein era.
“I’d like to raise that glass to the
studio executive who had me meet
him in the hotel conference room
instead of his actual hotel room,”
AWARDS CONTINUED ON C2
Olivia Munn, left, and Niecy
Nash toast the “good guys” at
the Critics’ Choice Awards.
The TV icon sits down with former president Obama, and both come across as flat in a meandering chat
TV REVIEW
E MILY Y AHR
society — though never deeply. “One of the
biggest challenges we have to our democracy is
the degree to which we don’t share a common
baseline of facts,” Obama says. “What the Russians exploited [was] already here — we are
operating in completely different information
universes. If you watch Fox News, you are living
on a different planet than you are if you listen
to NPR.”
Obama describes his disappointment that
social media, which was so key to his 2008 and
2012 victories, has become a carefully calibrated weapon.
“I had a very optimistic feeling about [social
TV REVIEW CONTINUED ON C2
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
THEATER REVIEW
Rhythm of ‘On Your Feet!’ is gonna get you
BY
MATTHEW MURPHY
Christie Prades stars as pop superstar Gloria Estefan in the touring Broadway musical.
P ETER M ARKS
People who claim they aren’t
happier when they leave “On Your
Feet!” than when they arrived
aren’t adequately in touch with
their feelings.
That’s my opinion, and I’m
sticking to it. Oh, sure, the touring show in the Kennedy Center
Opera House — subtitled “The
Emilio and Gloria Estefan Broadway Musical” — relies all too
faithfully on the worn treads of
showbiz biography: Star struggles, falls in love, hits it big, fights
for her art and with her mother,
suffers painful setbacks and, as is
absolutely compulsory on the
sunny side of the genre, triumphs
in the end.
But hey, the star is Gloria Estefan. She and husband Emilio and
their group, Miami Sound Machine, have made some terrific
music together. “Dr. Beat,” “Don’t
Want to Lose You,” “Live for Loving You” are among the 26 songs
that fill the hall. As a result, the
pop-tune-packed show, slickly directed by Jerry Mitchell — and
featuring exceptionally wellmatched Christie Prades as Gloria and Mauricio Martinez as
Emilio — exudes exhilarating
amounts of Estefan-inspired passion, joy and that old-school,
crowd-pleasing ingredient: pi-
zazz.
Like the swivel-hipped cadre of
dancers who salsa and mambo
the night away courtesy of choreographer Sergio Trujillo’s seductive steps, the show is alive — and
it never flags. There’s a party
going on up there, amid the
(thank heavens) well-amplified
proceedings. And if you have the
urge to get up and conga during
the boisterous rendition of “Get
on Your Feet,” well, the cast is only
too happy to see to it that you do.
“On Your Feet!” and book writer Alexander Dinelaris give an
audience a complete portrait of
how intertwined are the romantic
MUSICAL CONTINUED ON C4
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
NOTEBOOK FROM C1
AWARDS FROM C1
Letterman’s
interview
with Obama
merely purrs
TV REVIEW FROM C1
networks],” Obama says. “What
we missed was the degree to
which people who are in power —
special interests, foreign governments, et cetera — can in fact
manipulate that and . . .”
“Propagandize,” Letterman offers.
“Propagandize,” Obama says.
“I was under the impression
that Twitter would be the mechanism by which truth was told
around the world,” Letterman
says in his trademark deadpan.
The interview offers few if any
direct jabs taken at the current
JANUARY 13 , 2018
Silence about the emperor’s
clothing, and his naked racism
#MeToo, too,
and other
Critics’ Choice
takeaways
Munn said.
“Yes! Congratulations for doing
what you supposed to do,” Nash
said.
Later in the bit, Munn added:
“Thank you to the producers for
paying Niecy and I the same
amount of money, and Mark Wahlberg $1 million.” (The crowd:
“Ooohh.”) “I know, he took a pay
cut. It’s really nice and generous of
him.”
2. There’s still no clear frontrunner for Oscar best picture.
Not that the Critics’ Choice is the
most reliable indicator of what Oscar voters are thinking, but it helps
narrow the field. “Three Billboards
Outside Ebbing, Missouri” won
best drama at the Golden Globes,
while “Lady Bird” won best comedy. The National Board of Review
presented best picture to “The
Post.” At the Critics’ Choice, best
picture went to. . .“The Shape of
Water.” So that clears up nothing.
3. The Oscar acting categories, however, seem more set.
The Critics’ Choice acting winners were similar to the Globes, and
basically what we should expect
from the Oscars: Allison Janney (“I,
Tonya”) for supporting actress;
Sam Rockwell (“Three Billboards”)
for supporting actor; Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards”) for
drama actress; and Gary Oldman
(“Darkest Hour”) for drama actor.
The comedy categories were a
bit different: Although Franco repeated his Golden Globes win for
best comedy actor, Margot Robbie
(“I, Tonya”) won the trophy over
Globes winner Saoirse Ronan
(“Lady Bird”) for best comedy actress. And “The Big Sick” won best
comedy instead of “Lady Bird.”
4. Celebrities alluded to the
#MeToo era.
There was a lot of talk at the
Golden Globes about the recent
wave of sexual harassment allegations out of Hollywood. While it
didn’t come up as often at the Crit-
. SATURDAY,
CHRISTOPHER POLK/GETTY IMAGES FOR THE CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS
Rachel Brosnahan, the star of “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” gives a shout-out to the Time’s Up
initiative when she accepts the Critics’ Choice Award for best actress in a comedy series.
ics’ Choice Awards, there were
plenty of references.
“We’re very happy that our movie is coming out in a year where
Hollywood is having a lot of difficult conversations with itself, and
we’re amplifying voices that have
been silenced for too long,” Kumail
Nanjiani said as he accepted the
best comedy award for “The Big
Sick.” “And I think as men, we have
been talking for centuries. It’s time
for us to shut up, listen and amplify.”
“In the past weeks and months,
we’ve been witnessing a movement
in our industry and society,” said
“Wonder Woman” star Gal Gadot,
who was honored with the #SeeHer
Award, for accurate representation
of women in entertainment. “And I
want to share this award with all
the women and men who stand for
what’s right. Standing for those
who can’t stand or speak for themselves.”
Rachel Brosnahan, who won
best TV comedy actress for Amazon’s “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,”
reminded everyone not to “lose focus” on the Time’s Up initiative, a
recently created legal fund to fight
sexual harassment.
5. There was one T.J. Miller
joke.
Remember when the former
“Silicon Valley” star hosted the
Critics’ Choice Awards? No? Then
you may have been a bit lost when
Rachel Bloom (CW’s “Crazy ExGirlfriend”) and Anthony Anderson (ABC’s “Blackish”) presented
an award and talked about stilted
onstage banter, and Bloom
cracked, “It’s no more awkward
than when T.J. Miller used to host
this thing.”
Some people in the crowd audibly reacted to that one. “He can take
it!” Bloom said. “He can take it.”
6. HBO’s “Big Little Lies”
and Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s
Tale” proved once again that
they’re unbeatable.
Just like at the Emmy Awards
and the Golden Globes, “THT” and
“BLL” won best drama and best
limited series, respectively. And as
long as these two shows are on TV,
we can’t imagine anything else ever
winning again.
7. Nicole Kidman thanked
“all” her children.
Also at the Emmys and Golden
Globes, social-media users reacted
during Kidman’s acceptance
speeches when she mentioned her
two daughters she has with Keith
Urban, and didn’t say anything
about her two older children that
she adopted with her ex-husband,
Tom Cruise.
So one line in particular from
Kidman’s speech was notable this
time around, after she won for best
actress in a limited series for her
role in “Big Little Lies”: “I want to
thank all of my children, who show
me so much love.”
8. “The Shape of Water’s”
producer defended Fox Searchlight from the Disney merger.
Disney recently acquired the
majority of assets from 21st Century Fox, including Fox Searchlight, the studio behind many acclaimed movies — including “The
Shape of Water.” The film, a fairytale love story between a mute
woman and an otherworldly beast,
won best picture, and its producer
defended the studio in the wake of
the merger.
“Thank you to Fox Searchlight
. . . they’re making the kind of movies that we need to make, we want
to make, and people need to see,”
said J. Miles Dale. “So I don’t know
if [Walt Disney Co. chief executive]
Bob Iger’s out there or not, I don’t
know what will happen with this
Disney thing, but I urge you not to
mess this up. They’ve got a good
thing going, and they rock.”
president, probably because
Obama’s too smart to take the bait
and Letterman’s too reluctant to
offer it. There are also lots of jokes
about both men being quote-unquote unemployed. “You’re hanggliding, you’re climbing volcanoes, you’re wrestling sharks,”
Letterman observes. “I’m at Bed
Bath & Beyond picking out wire
hangers.”
Free to be whatever he wants in
front of the camera now, Letterman opts for befuddled pussycat
rather than old lion. He fawns over
the former president for most of
the hour, reaching a climax near
the end (after a plug for Obama’s
foundation and library), when he
says, “When I was a kid, and it’s
still taught today, irrespective of
the man or woman who holds the
office, you have to respect the office of president. Without a question of a doubt, you are the first
president I truly and fully respect.”
The format of “My Next Guest
Needs No Introduction” is in
many ways what some viewers
have longed for in the talk-show
format. Stripped of decor (the interview was shot with two leather
chairs on a darkened stage at City
College of New York), the show is
able to intently focus on conversation, which is no longer beholden
to whatever movie or book or TV
show the guest is selling (presidential libraries and foundations
notwithstanding). Paul Shaffer recorded a jaunty instrumental for
the animated theme, which seems
to be the show’s lone nod to Letterman’s old format.
In the first episode, Letterman
also delivers a taped segment, in
which he walks across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala.,
with Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), who
was beaten and arrested along
with others who marched across
the bridge in support of civil rights
in 1965.
The bridge was also the site of
one of Obama’s most memorable
speeches, delivered on the 50th
anniversary of the march. Letterman seems sincerely if belatedly
in awe of what happened there. It’s
Lewis who gets the opportunity to
deliver the show’s clearest comment on President Trump, after
Letterman asks the congressman
emily.yahr@washpost.com
“You’re climbing
volcanoes, you’re
wrestling sharks. I’m at
Bed Bath & Beyond
picking out wire
hangers.”
David Letterman, in his interview with
former president Barack Obama
about his decision to skip last
year’s inauguration.
“Without being just flat-out
specific about it,” Letterman says.
“How big a setback is the current
administration [to civil rights]?”
What I want to know is how the
men in the room with him reacted.
This is the dinner table test: When
you are sitting and socializing
with a bigot, what do you do when
he reveals his bigotry? I’ve seen it
happen, once, when I was a young
man, and I learned an invaluable
lesson. An older guest at a formal
dinner said something blatantly
anti-Semitic. I was shocked and
laughed nervously. Another friend
stared at his plate silently. Another excused himself and fled to
the bathroom. And then there was
the professor, an accomplished
and erudite man, who paused for a
moment, then slammed his fist on
the table and said, “I will never
listen to that kind of language, so
either you will leave, or I will
leave.” The offender looked
around the table, found no allies
and left the gathering. I don’t
know if he felt any shame upon
expulsion.
Did Sen. Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.) threaten to leave the Oval
Office? Did Sen. Richard J. Durbin
(D-Ill.) speak sharply to the president, saying no one should speak
like that, not in the White House,
not in the United States, not in
decent society? (He did, at least
the next morning when speaking
to the media.) Did anyone suggest
that perhaps the president should
wash his mouth out with soap and
take a time out to think about
what he just did?
I suspect none of that happened
and that no matter how awkward
everyone felt, the usual deference
to the president remained intact.
And just so, when someone at
the University of Maryland Medical Center ordered the security
guards to dump a frail and confused patient out in the cold, they
didn’t say no. They didn’t say: We
cannot do that, because it is
wrong. It took a passerby with a
camera, Imamu Baraka, to see the
wrongness of the act in its fullness,
and confront not just the guards
but the nation’s conscience.
I weep, not because I doubt the
goodness of most of the people
among whom I live in this country.
“It is a major setback to the
hopes and dreams and aspirations
of a people,” Lewis says. “Not just
African Americans, but all Americans, because I think what has
happened in America today is a
threat not just to the country but
the planet.”
Back onstage, Letterman gets
several laughs by pretending
Obama is still in office. After a
particularly wonky answer from
Obama, Letterman replies: “To
hear you describe this in a way
that I can understand, just makes
me so happy you’re still president.” Near the end of the hour, he
says to Obama: “Now, Mr. President, I know you have to get back
to the Oval Office . . . .”
In the episode’s final minutes,
Obama, pondering his own success and the lives of successful
people, asks Letterman if he feels
like his life has been lucky.
Letterman gives a beautiful answer, verging on tears: “Mr. President, this is what I’m struggling
with at this point in my life: I have
There must be more Imamu Barakas than Donald Trumps in this
land. Rather, I weep because the
training in moral and civic corruption has already begun, it will
inevitably continue, and it is gathering speed. The attack is aimed at
the very thing we think should
preserve us, our instincts to be
kind, to welcome, protect and provide.
The use of terms like “shithole”
imputes personal and moral failure to people who by mere chance
live in troubled countries. It extinguishes their humanity and with
it, any concern we might have for
their well-being.
The deference shown by hospital security guards to their employers is of a different order than
that shown by members of Congress to a racist president. The
hospital’s president, Mohan Suntha, has promised a full investigation and said, “We firmly believe
what occurred Tuesday night does
not reflect who we are.” Of course,
what occurred defines who they
are, though they may think they
are better than that. “We are trying to understand the points of
failure that led to what we witnessed on that video.”
This is bureaucratic cant and
drivel. Worse, it frames the problem in the wrong way. We already
know we have a medical system
that incentivizes dumping poor
patients, excluding the uninsured
and pushing intractable cases out
the door. What matters more is the
moral climate of the institution.
Who made it possible, necessary
and apparently easy for those security guards to “just do our jobs”?
Who made complicity in cruelty
part of the daily function of the
place?
And now, we must ask a few
simple questions of the men who
sat in the room with a president
denigrating predominantly black
and brown countries as “shitholes”: What did you say back to
the man? And why didn’t you
leave? Their answers are fundamental to what we need to know
about their character and fitness
for office.
philip.kennicott@washpost.com
been nothing but lucky. When
John Lewis and his friends
[marched across the bridge], in
April of ’65, me and my friends
were driving to Florida to get on a
cruise ship to go to the Bahamas
because there was no age limit to
purchase alcohol, and we spent
the entire week, pardon my
French, s---faced. Why wasn’t I in
Alabama? Why was I not aware? I
have been nothing but lucky.”
Rather than wrap up with this,
“My Next Guest” would have done
well to keep the cameras rolling
another hour, and begin the show
at this deeper, more personal and
more meaningful moment, and
work forward from there. And
more than once it seems Obama
should be the one interviewing
Letterman.
My Next Guest Needs No
Introduction With David
Letterman (one hour), now
streaming on Netflix. The next
episode, featuring George Clooney,
streams Feb. 9.
THEATRE
Now thru January 28!
“The Humans”
Tue-Fri at 8
Sat & Sun at 2 & 8
Now Thru January 28!
“On Your Feet!”
Tue-Fri at 7:30
Sat & Sun at 1:30 & 7:30
Added matinee Jan. 25
No evening perf. Jan 28
Stephen Karam’s uproarious, hopeful, and heartbreaking
play takes place over the course of a family dinner on
Thanksgiving. As darkness falls and eerie things start to
go bump in the night, the Blake clan’s deepest fears and
greatest follies are laid bare. Our modern age of anxiety is
keenly observed in this new American classic that won the
2016 Tony Award® for Best Play. Recommended for age 15
and up,
Kennedy Center
Eisenhower Theater
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
“What Broadway
needs more of:
extraordinary
‘Humans.’ The
best play of the
year!”—The
Washington Post
From their humble beginnings in Cuba, Emilio and Gloria
Estefan came to America and broke through all barriers to
become a crossover sensation at the very top of the pop
music world. But just when they thought they had it all, they
almost lost everything. On Your Feet! takes you inside their
real-life story, with some of the most iconic songs of the
past quarter century.
Kennedy Center
Opera House
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
Recommended for
age 8 and up.
MUSIC - CONCERTS
FMMC Chorale
Concert
January 12 & 13, 2018
8:00 PM
Concert featuring the Friday Morning Music Club Chorale
and Soloists
Schubert: Mass no. 2
Mozart: Requiem
Lutheran Church of the
Reformation
212 E. Captiol St., NE
(202) 543-4200
Fmmc.org
Free
Ronald Reagan Building
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Tix available at ticketmaster.com
202.397.SEAT
$36
Free Will Offering
Suggested.
Closest Metro:
South Capitol
(Blue, Silver,
Organge)
COMEDY
Orange is the
New Barack
Fridays & Saturdays
at 7:30pm
A musical, political satire.
We put the MOCK in Democracy!
Info: 202.312.1555
www.capsteps.com
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
Discounts available
for groups of 10 or
more.
Call 202-312-1427
16-2898
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
1/13/18
7:00
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4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
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7.1 WJLA (ABC)
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Relieve pain ◆ NFL
14.1 WFDC (UNI) WFDC News Week Review
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ Family Feud ◆ Family Feud
22.1 WMPT (PBS) Great Performances
26.4 WETA (PBS) Doc Martin
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
News
32.1 WHUT (PBS) ◆ Weekend
50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Goldbergs
66.1 WPXW (ION) Law & Order: SVU
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
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◆ The Four: Battle for Stardom
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Fox 5 News at 10
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On Your Side
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9 News
(7:55) Fútbol Mexicano Primera División (Live)
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Celtic Woman -- Homecoming: Ireland
Memory Rescue
Doc Martin
(8:45) Doc Martin
(9:34) Movie: To Catch a Thief ★★★ (1955)
WETA-Eats 2
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Afropop: Cultural Exchange Independent Lens
Arnold
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◆
CABLE CHANNELS
ROSALIND O'CONNOR/NBC
Saturday Night Live (NBC at 11:30) The comedy show returns from its
winter hiatus with a live show. Actor Sam Rockwell (“The Hitchhiker’s
Guide to the Galaxy”) hosts and Halsey is the musical guest.
Say Yes to the Dress (TLC at 8)
Twins Marlo and Margo are back,
but now Marlo is the one looking
for a dress, and bride Val needs a
gown for her glacier wedding.
RETURNING
Snapped: Killer Couples
(Oxygen at 6) Season 9.
House Hunters Renovation
(HGTV at 10) Season 13.
PREMIERES
Jodi Arias: An American Murder
Mystery (ID at 10) The 2008
murder case of Travis Alexander, in
which girlfriend Jodi Arias was the
main suspect, is examined in this
miniseries.
Seeking Sister Wife
(TLC at 10:10) Three families work
to add another wife to the mix in
this new plural-marriage-related
show.
SUNDAY LISTINGS
Fox News Sunday (Fox at 9 a.m.)
Secretary of Homeland Security
Kirstjen Nielsen and California
Attorney General Xavier Becerra.
This Is America & the World
(WETA at 10 and WHUT at 7:30
p.m.) Journalist David Ignatius (Part
2).
SPECIAL
Trophy (CNN at 9) An inside look at
big game hunting and
conservation.
RETURNING
Divorce (HBO at 10) Season 2.
Crashing (HBO at 10:30) Season 2.
— Sarah Polus
Meet the Press (NBC at 10:30)
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.).
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
(5:00) Live PD
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(7:08) Breaking Bad
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AMC
Pit Bulls and Parolees
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(10:01) The Vet Life
Pit Bulls and Parolees
Animal Planet
(5:25) Movie: ATL ★★
Movie: Baggage Claim ★ (2013)
Movie: Big Momma’s House 2 ★ (2006)
BET
Ocean’s 11
(7:28) Movie: Ocean’s Eleven ★★★ (2001)
Movie: Ocean’s Twelve ★★★ (2004)
Bravo
Gumball
Cleveland
Family Guy
Rick, Morty
Rick, Morty
Family Guy
Dragon
Dragon
Black Clover
Cartoon Network Gumball
The Axe Files
CNN Newsroom
Anthony Bourdain Parts
Anthony Bourdain Parts
Anthony Bourdain Parts
CNN
Movie: Horrible Bosses ★★ (2011)
Comedy Central Hot Tub Time Machine 2 ★ Movie: Office Space ★★ (1999)
Naked and Afraid
Naked and Afraid
Naked and Afraid
Naked and Afraid
Discovery
Movie: Tangled ★★★ (2010)
(8:40) Tangled: The Series
(9:35) Movie: Tangled ★★★ (2010)
Bunk’d
Walk the
Disney
Superbad
Movie: The Other Guys ★★★ (2010)
Movie: The Other Guys ★★★ (2010)
E!
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30/30
Shorts
E:60
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Guy’s Grocery Games
Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive
Food Network
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Watters’ World
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(7:15) Movie: Up ★★★ (2009)
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Freeform
(6:00) Despicable Me 2
Movie: Minions ★★ (2015)
Movie: Minions ★★ (2015)
FX
Movie: Love on the Slopes (2018)
Movie: Frozen in Love (2018)
Golden Girls Golden Girls
Hallmark
Movie: Mystery Woman: Redemption ★★ (2005)
Mystery Woman
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King Arthur: Legend
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Crashing
Movie: Semi-Pro ★★ (2008)
HBO
Property Brothers
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(6:00) You Killed My Mother Movie: Deadly Delusion (2017)
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(6:00) Don’t Make Waves
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Movie: Madea’s Witness Protection ★★ (2012)
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VH1
Aft. Rep.
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Week. Night. Week. Night. Week. Night. Right Side
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Blue Bloods
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WGN
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Video file
format
5 Offenbach
opera “Daphnis
et __”
10 Jerk’s concern
14 Former Sony
brand
15 Aggressive
corporate
tactics
16 Fast-food
legend
17 Presently
18 Mail-order
outlet for
outdoorsy
types
19 Harpsichordist
Kipnis
20 ’60s
counterculture
slogan
23 Math ratios
24 Poetic night
25 Cry of
dominance
30 “The Yankee
Doodle Boy”
composer
32 Big letters in
toys
33 CBS Sports
NFL analyst
Tony
34 Map abbr.
35 Loosed
39 Neat ending?
40 After-lunch
sandwich
42 Word with
big or house
43 Together
45 20-mile annual
Boston-area
fundraiser
sponsored by
Project Bread
49 “Macbeth”
character
50 Gay leader?
51 Excuse
for rowdy
behavior
57 Defeat
soundly
58 Serve
59 Per
60 “No prob!”
61 Merci, across
the border
62 Nigerian pop
star
63 Cry of glee
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
By Alan DerKazarian
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR
THE WASHINGTON POST
© 2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
64 Orson
Scott Card
protagonist __
Wiggin
65 Side for a dog
DOWN
1 Hat-tipper’s
word
2 Fruit in un
cóctel
3 Fuzzy Endor
resident
4 Hindu god with
the head of an
elephant
5 Sings smoothly
6 “Family Feud”
host since 2010
7 Exists simply
8 Valhalla VIP
9 ExxonMobil
trade name
10 Garb for
schussing
11 Transplant
figure
12 Way out
13 Spanning: abbr.
21 Only NFC team
that hasn’t
played in a
Super Bowl
22 Talks acronym
1/13/18
25 Area of
expertise
26 Nasser’s org.
27 Caviar
28 Key of
Beethoven’s
Ninth: abbr.
29 Tie on the farm
30 Talk big
31 Not esta or esa
36 “Foucault’s Pendulum” author
37
38
41
44
Crew member
Apollo 11 lander
“See ya later”
Fish market
offering
46 NFL threes
47 Facebook
reversal
48 Word in Hamlet’s “To be
or not to be”
soliloquy
51 “My man!”
52 Cross a stream,
perhaps
53 English : John ::
Slavic : __
54 Girasol, e.g.
55 Sci-fi character
voiced by
Frank Oz
56 Expel strongly
57 Green
moisture
FRIDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
A butterfly
can help a
wallflower
blossom
Adapted from a recent online discussion.
Dear Carolyn: So
I am an introvert,
and it has taken
me years to finally
accept this and
allow myself to be
happy alone rather than
constantly trying to appease my
extroverted family with attempts
to socialize that ultimately just
made me feel like a wallflower.
It isn’t that I don’t like people. I
just don’t enjoy big parties. I love
small get-togethers with good
friends, or even a person I don’t
know so well, as long as there is a
chance to talk without feeling
overwhelmed by the numbers.
My son is like me, but my
daughter got the extrovert gene
and has more friends than hairs
on her head. She seems to thrive
in big crowds and has no issues
joining one and asking to play,
even when she does not know
them. She is still at an age in
which I need to supervise her
Carolyn
Hax
social engagements, and I often
feel like the odd person out in the
mother groups, who seem to
know each other and can chat
easily with each other while I
hide behind my Kindle.
Any advice for this wallflower
mother as she tries to navigate
her social-butterfly daughter’s
activities?
— Introvert
Introvert: My advice for any
childrearing-related problem
that 1. is not dangerous, merely
taxing/annoying, and 2. will
eventually go away, is to give
yourself permission to piece
together ways to get through it.
So, yeah, Kindle.
But do step away from it
sometimes for limited stretches.
It’ll facilitate your daughter’s
deeper friendships — kids get
invited many places through
parents — and model for her the
importance of getting out of our
comfort zones. Even if she doesn’t
understand it now, it’s a seed for
later.
Plus, you might make a few
nice connections despite yourself
that you can turn into quiet
coffee visits.
Dear Carolyn: I’ve just crested
the mid-30s hump, and I still
can’t decide whether I want to try
to have kids. My husband is
equally agnostic. How do you
know when you know, you know?
— Bio Clock Is Ticking
Bio Clock Is Ticking: You don’t
want-want kids, so just decide
not to have them.
Then live with that decision for
a while. See how it fits. It is, after
all, the far easier decision to
reverse if you change your mind.
Dear Carolyn: Is it unethical or
cruel of me to stop paying for
cigarettes for a friend who has no
job and no way to fund his own
habit, knowing he will have to go
through withdrawal? I’ve offered
to fund any “stop smoking” effort
he wants to try (nicotine
replacement, classes,
medications, etc.). I just can’t
afford to keep spending $350/
month on his smoking.
— Funding an Addiction
Funding an Addiction: When
you cut off his supply as you
suggest, you will be giving him
two choices: get smokingcessation treatment free of
charge (to him), or go cold turkey.
If he opts for cold turkey, then
that’s his choice, not your cruelty.
To my mind, the more
interesting question here is
whether it’s cruel or unethical to
keep financing a habit that he
cannot continue on his own and
that correlates so highly with
disability and early death.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her column
delivered to your inbox each morning
at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
C4
EZ
Musical about Estefans isn’t
profound, but it’s a lot of fun
MUSICAL FROM C1
and professional ambitions of
Gloria and Emilio. The musical is
as much about their unstoppable
drive as it is about their music.
Compelled to push back against a
recording industry that wants to
keep them pigeonholed in
the “Latin market,” the Cubanborn Estefans are presented here
as paragons of first-generation
American aspiration. “You can’t
cross over, because nobody crosses over,” says the New York producer (Devon Goffman) who
doesn’t want to record their first
song in English.
Incensed by the nativistsounding naysaying, Martinez’s
quick-to-pounce Emilio gets the
biggest crowd reaction of the
night when he stares back at the
producer and dismisses the put-
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
down with the applause line:
“Whether you know it or not, this
is what an American looks like!”
That declaration plays well in
2018. With flashbacks to the exodus of Cuba after the takeover by
Fidel Castro, the musical makes
sure we’re aware of the sacrifices
of the Estefans’ families, especially those of Gloria’s father José
Fajardo (Jason Martinez), who
arrived in the United States and
not too long after was sent to
Vietnam, where he was severely
wounded.
Nancy Ticotin is particularly
impressive as Gloria’s mother,
also named Gloria. A singer in her
own right — Ticotin’s smashing in
a Havana nightclub scene, singing the impassioned “Mi Tierra”
— the mother becomes an embittered thorn in her daughter’s side.
Their conflict grows, much to the
chagrin of kindly Consuelo (Alma
Cuervo, reprising her Broadway
turn), who seems more a fairy
godmother than a mere abuela.
Ticotin’s persuasive embodiment
of the mother’s jealousy and mistrust of Emilio grandly sets up the
inevitable, misty-eyed reconciliation scene, around the hospital
bed of the younger Gloria, herself
seriously injured in a crash of her
tour bus.
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin The Commuter (PG-13) CC: (!)
IMAX Theater
10:45-1:30-4:00-6:45-9:30
601 Independence Avenue SW
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 9:30-10:30-
Ang Panday (2017)11:40-3:106:30-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX 12:45-3:00-5:15-7:15-9:45
(PG-13) 5:20
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: 3D Experience (PG-13) 12:30-7:00 The Post (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:30-12:30- The Commuter (PG-13) 11:40-2:20Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the 3:15-6:00-9:45
11:05-1:50-4:30-8:00-10:45
5:05-8:00-10:50
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Sea 3D (NR) 11:00AM
Proud Mary (R) XD: 12:15-2:45AMC Magic Johnson
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:25CC: 1:00
5:15-7:45-10:30
Capital Center 12
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- 11:50-3:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 3D
800 Shoppers Way
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The IMAX Ferdinand (PG) CC: 1:40-4:25-7:00 (PG-13) 2:10-8:10
13) CC: 9:45
2D Experience (PG-13) 4:10-9:55
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Hoyt's West Nursery
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
(PG-13) CC: 11:05-4:35-10:20
Cinema 14
11:30-2:10-4:50-7:20-10:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) CC:
1591 West Nursery Road
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:10-2:10-4:50-7:40-10:15
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 12:30
AFI Silver Theatre
CC: 11:35-2:50-6:10-9:30
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:40-1:15Cultural Center
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 10:30- The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
4:00-7:10-9:45
8633 Colesville Road
1:20-4:05-6:35-9:05
1:00-3:20-5:45-8:15-10:35
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:05- The Shape of Water (R) 2:15-7:05 Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) CC: Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:45-4:30-6:50-9:45
CC: 12:30-4:00-7:00-10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 11:50-2:30-5:25-8:00-10:40
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:15-2:00- Missouri (R) 4:45
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:45-1:15- Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 2:454:45-7:30-10:15
5:05-7:25-9:45
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-1:50-4:10- 3:45-6:30-9:00
Molly's Game (R) CC: 12:10-3:30- 6:45-9:10
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 11:45- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
6:45-10:00
(PG-13) CC: 12:30-1:30-3:15-4:15Lady Bird (R) 12:15-9:30
2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
All the Money in the World (R) CC: Phantom Thread 70mm (R) 11:00- Downsizing (R) CC: 9:40
6:15-7:15-9:00-10:15
11:00-3:40-6:35
Coco (PG) CC: 12:30
1:40-4:20-7:00-9:40
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:10AM
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC: 1:00Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
All the Money in the World (R)
AMC Academy 8
4:05-7:10-10:15
CC: 1:45-3:00-4:25-5:25-7:00-8:00CC: 4:45
6198 Greenbelt Road
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:00-11:009:30-10:30
Proud
Mary
(R)
CC:
11:15-12:45Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:50-1:25-4:00
11:40-12:45-2:30-3:40-5:15-6:30Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 1:15-4:10Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 1:30-3:00-4:00-5:15-6:15-7:30-8:30- 6:45-9:15
7:25-9:20-10:15
9:45-10:45
CC: 12:35-3:55-7:15-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:10AM
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 1:20- The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:45- The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 1:50I, Tonya (R) 2:00-5:00-8:00-11:00
4:40-7:20-9:50
4:30-7:15-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 3D 3:45-6:10-8:25-10:45
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:10Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 1:45-7:30
4:00-6:50-9:40
The
IMAX
2D
Experience
(PG-13)
(PG-13) CC: 11:10-1:55-4:50-7:45Proud Mary (R) CC: 12:30-3:00Molly's Game (R) CC: 12:50-4:0012:15-3:15-6:00-9:00
10:30
5:30-8:00-10:30
7:05-10:10
Ferdinand (PG) 10:30AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The IMAX Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) CC:
Proud Mary (R) CC: 12:45-1:452D Experience (PG-13) CC: 12:00- (!) 10:45-1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30-11:00 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3:15-4:30-5:30-6:50-7:50-9:20-10:20
(PG-13) 10:50-2:00-7:40-10:20
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 11:303:30-7:00-10:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 12:40-3:302:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
ArcLight Bethesda
AMC Loews Uptown 1
6:30-9:10
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: (!)
7101 Democracy Boulevard
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Landmark
10:45-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
The Disaster Artist (R) 9:40
The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:30Bethesda Row Cinema
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 11:00-12:15- The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:307:30-10:30
7235 Woodmont Avenue
1:15-3:35-5:50-7:00-8:00-9:15-10:15 2:40-5:05-7:05-10:20
Big (PG) 10:00AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:30AMC Center Park 8
1:30-4:20-7:20-10:00
AMC Mazza Gallerie
11:25-1:05-4:15-7:30-10:40
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:25-2:40- The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:00-10:501:00-1:40-3:50-4:30-6:50-7:30The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:15
4:50-7:00-10:50
9:40-10:05
10:10-10:40-5:10-7:40-10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) CC: 11:30-2:50-6:30-10:00
(PG-13) 10:25-1:55-4:35-7:20-10:00 Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
10:20-1:20-4:10-6:55-9:50
CC: 12:20-3:50-10:30
Coco (PG) 11:15-3:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:25-12:50-3:20Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- (PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:45-7:30- Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
5:40-7:50-9:55
13) CC: 7:10
11:00-2:55-5:50-8:10-10:45
10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) CC: Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:35-2:15- Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:0012:50-3:40-7:00-9:50
(PG-13) CC: 10:50-1:40-4:30-7:20- (!) 12:15-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
5:00-7:45-10:30
10:10
The Shape of Water (R) 11:45-2:35- Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:20Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 11:001:10-4:00-7:10-9:50
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:00-12:30- 1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
5:20-8:05-10:15
3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Molly's Game (R) 11:10-2:10-5:10- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: (!)
Missouri (R) CC: 10:50-1:50-4:40Molly's Game (R) CC: 1:10-4:208:15-10:35
11:15-1:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
7:30-10:40
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 11:45-2:00- All the Money in the World (R) 1:50- 7:25-10:00
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 10:20-12:50- 4:30-7:00-9:30
Old Greenbelt Theatre
4:05-7:10-9:25
3:10-5:30-7:50-10:10
129 Centerway
The Post (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:30-3:15- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The Post (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:30-2:20- 6:15-9:00
Missouri (R) 12:10-5:25
Hugo (2011) (PG) 11:00AM
4:00-7:00-9:50
The
Post
(PG-13)
11:55-2:30-5:15The
Post
(PG-13)
3:00-5:30-8:00
AMC Columbia 14
The Opera House (!) 12:55
7:00-8:00-10:10
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:30Albert Einstein Planetarium - Ferdinand (PG) (!) 10:00AM
3899 Branch Avenue
1:25-4:20-7:15
National Air & Space Museum The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
6th Street and Independence Ave SW 10:40-1:20-4:00-6:50-9:25
Ferdinand (PG) 1:40
(PG-13) 11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:10
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Paddington 2 (PG) 12:35-9:10
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:50-2:20- 1:00-3:15-5:30-7:45-10:20
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:10-6:10
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG- 4:40-7:35-10:05
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:40-2:10-4:40Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:20-1:10Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:0013) 2:40-9:45
7:10-9:40
1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 11:30- 4:45-7:55
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:00-2:30I, Tonya (R) CC: 11:20-2:00-4:55The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
2:00-4:30-7:05-9:35
5:00-7:30-10:05
7:40-9:55
One World, One Sky: Big Bird's
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Proud Mary (R) 12:15-1:15-2:30Phantom Thread (R) CC: 9:00
Adventure (NR)
(PG-13) CC: 6:25
3:30-4:45-5:45-7:00-8:00-9:15-10:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) CC: Paddington 2 (PG) 11:05-1:30Angelika
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
4:00-6:30
10:50-1:40-4:20-7:20-9:55
Pop-Up at Union Market
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:30-1:30Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
Ferdinand
(PG) 12:55-3:35-6:15
4:25-7:00-10:00
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
The Disaster Artist (R) 11:15-1:20The
Greatest
Showman (PG) 12:15Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:00-1:40- Father Figures (R) 11:00
3:35-5:40-7:45-9:50
3:00-6:00-9:10
4:15-6:55-9:35
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:30Ferdinand (PG) 10:00-12:40-3:25
Star
Wars:
The
Last Jedi (PG-13)
The Commuter (PG-13) (!) 10:501:45-4:15-7:20-9:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 12:10-3:30-6:55-10:20
The Post (PG-13) 11:15-2:00-4:30- 1:30-4:10-7:00-9:50
2:30-6:00-9:30
Pitch
Perfect
3
(PG-13)
12:45-3:10The Shape of Water (R) 2:507:00-9:20
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:10-1:50- 5:45-8:10-10:45
6:00-9:00
4:40-7:20-9:50
Avalon Theatre
Jumanji:
Welcome
to
the
Jungle
Molly's Game (R) CC: 11:25-2:50- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
5612 Connecticut Avenue
(PG-13) 1:20-4:20-7:20-9:00-10:25
6:20-9:40
(PG-13) 11:00-2:00-4:50-7:50-10:45 Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
The Post (PG-13) 12:00-2:35Marshall (PG-13) 11:40AM
Coco (PG) 11:20AM
5:15-8:00
3:20-6:20-9:20
All the Money in the World (R)
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
I, Tonya (R) 2:00-4:45-7:30
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-2:35-5:15CC: 3:30
10:20-12:50-3:20-5:45-8:10-10:35 8:00-10:35
Landmark
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 10:55-1:15- Wonder (PG) 10:30-1:20-4:05
The Commuter (PG-13) 1:15-3:55Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
3:40-6:00-8:20-10:35
Paddington 2 (PG) 10:10-1:20-4:00- 6:40-9:30
807 V Street, NW
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 3D 6:40-9:20
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:40Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) (PG-13) 9:20
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:30-2:20- 3:50-9:50
CC: 11:45-12:15-3:30-7:00-10:00
The Post (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:10-1:55- 5:10-6:50-8:00-9:40-10:40
Molly's Game (R) 12:30-3:45Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 12:30- 4:40-7:30-10:20
Proud Mary (R) 10:40-1:00-3:107:00-10:15
2:30-4:35-7:15-9:30
I, Tonya (R) 10:45-1:40-4:35-7:30- 5:30-7:40-10:00
Proud Mary (R) 12:05-1:25-2:40Molly's Game (R) CC: 12:00-4:00- 10:20
All the Money in the World (R)
3:55-5:10-6:25-6:30-7:40-8:55-10:10
7:05-9:50
The Opera House (!) 12:55
10:50-1:55-5:00-8:00
All
the Money in the World (R)
All the Money in the World (R) CC: Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Lady Bird (R) 6:00-8:20-10:40
4:10-10:30
11:35-2:15-4:55-7:35-10:10
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
Star
Wars:
The
Last
Jedi
(PG-13)
The
Post (PG-13) 1:10-4:30-7:50The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:30-2:00- 10:30-1:20-4:20-7:15-10:10
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
10:40
3:00-5:00-5:30-7:20-8:00-9:45-10:15 AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
The Opera House 12:55
Bow
Tie
Harbour
9
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Landmark E Street Cinema
The Greatest Showman Sing-A2474 Solomons Island Road
555 11th Street NW
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 10:30-1:35-4:30
Long (PG) 1:00-7:30
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:10Pan's Labyrinth (El laberinto del
1:50-4:40-7:20-10:10
Regal Cinemas Majestic
11:05-1:50-4:35-7:10-9:50
Fauno) (R) 11:59
Shape of Water (R) 9:40-12:30Stadium 20 & IMAX
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:05- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) The
3:30-6:40-9:30
900 Ellsworth Drive
CC: 12:00-3:25-6:50-10:15
1:05-4:05-7:05-9:55
Post (PG-13) 10:40-1:30-4:50- Ferdinand (PG) 12:10-3:35-6:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 1:40- The
7:40-10:30
The
Disaster
Artist (R) 3:10-5:50Missouri (R) CC: 10:15-12:50-3:50- 4:05-8:10-10:35
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:30-1:20- 8:35-11:10
6:50-9:25
Coco (PG) CC: 10:35-1:15-3:50
4:10-7:10-10:00
Justice
League
(PG-13) 9:20
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:40-1:10-3:20- Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) CC:
Molly's Game (R) 9:30-12:40-3:50- The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:20(!) 2:10-4:45-7:20-10:05
5:30-7:40-9:50
6:50-9:50
3:25-6:05-8:45-11:25
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:40-2:40-5:25
I, Tonya (R) CC: 10:10-1:10-4:10I, Tonya (R) 10:50-1:40-4:30-7:30- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
7:10-9:40
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 11:2010:20
12:00-4:00-7:30-8:10-11:00-11:30
1:55-4:55-7:30-10:10
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:00Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:10-2:3010:45-1:00-1:45-4:00-4:45-7:00The Commuter (PG-13) CC: (!)
5:30-8:15-10:50
7000
Arundel
Mills
Circle
7:45-10:00-10:45
11:45-2:40-5:20-7:55-10:35
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:35- Ferdinand (PG) 12:20-3:10-6:00-9:00 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13)
12:20-1:15-3:35-6:30-7:30(R) 11:59
1:25-4:20-7:15-10:10
The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:459:30-10:30
The Room (R) 11:59
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:50- 3:35-6:25-9:20
Coco
(PG)
11:05-4:05-5:20
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:30- 1:45-4:40-7:45-10:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:15
Molly's Game (R) CC: (!) 12:35-3:45- 12:05-1:50-3:40-7:20-8:50-10:45
12:15-2:50-5:45-8:30-11:15
7:05-10:25
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:30-3:20Wonder (PG) 11:40-2:25
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:45AM
10:00-12:45-3:45-6:45-9:30
6:00-8:30-11:05
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:20-1:55-4:30Landmark West End Cinema Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 10:40-1:00- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
3:20-5:40-8:00-10:20
(PG-13) 11:15-1:15-3:10-4:15-5:10- 7:25-10:10
2301 M Street NW
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:30-2:15The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 11:00- All the Money in the World (R) CC: 7:15-9:15-11:15
4:50-7:50-10:30
6:30-9:35
Coco (PG) 11:05AM
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:00-3:30Three
Billboards
Outside
Ebbing,
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:45-1:006:25-9:35
Missouri (R) CC: 3:30-9:05
11:05-11:45-1:45-2:35-3:30-4:253:15-5:30-7:45-9:55
Call Me by Your Name (R) 11:55The
Post
(PG-13)
CC:
(!)
11:10-2:005:25-6:10-7:25-8:15-9:00-10:15The Florida Project (R) CC: 10:45- 4:50-7:40-10:30
3:05-6:15-9:25
11:00
1:15-4:15-7:15-9:50
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:40-1:05-6:40 Paddington 2 (PG) 10:55-1:40-4:20- Molly's Game (R) 11:50-3:10Medal of Honor Theater 6:30-9:50
I, Tonya (R) (!) 11:15-2:05-5:007:00-9:40
NMMC
7:50-10:40
The Shape of Water (R) 11:00-2:15- Proud Mary (R) 12:05-2:35-5:1518900 Jefferson Davis Highway
7:45-10:10
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR) 5:35-8:55
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:00- (!) 11:30-2:55-6:20-9:45
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:40-2:20- All the Money in the World (R)
12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
11:45AM
Ang Panday (2017)(!) 6:25-7:255:05-8:00-10:50
9:25-10:25
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:25-2:25- Condorito: The Movie (Condorito:
Regal Gallery Place
La película) (PG) 11:00-2:10-4:35Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Stadium 14
5:40-8:40
6:55-9:15-11:30
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) Molly's Game (R) 12:05-3:25701 Seventh Street NW
The Post (PG-13) 11:15-1:35-4:306:35-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 10:30-1:20-4:10-7:00-9:55
7:25-10:45
Ferdinand (PG) 11:00AM
Proud Mary (R) 11:30-1:10-2:0010:30-4:30-10:35
3:45-4:30-6:15-7:00-8:45-9:30-11:15 I, Tonya (R) 12:20-3:45-6:40-9:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
AMC Loews
(PG-13) 10:45-5:15-11:20
All the Money in the World (R) 10:15 The Opera House 12:55
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
11115 Mall Circle
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
2:50-6:45-10:30
3:20-5:45-8:20-10:45
Missouri (R) 11:55-6:20
Ferdinand (PG) 10:00AM
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:40- The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: The Post (PG-13) 11:00-1:50-4:40- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
7:20-10:00
7:30-10:20
11:00-1:45-4:15-7:00-10:30
Molly's Game (R) 1:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) I, Tonya (R) 11:35-2:30-5:30-8:25- 11:10-2:00-5:00-8:00-11:00
11:15
Regal Germantown
Proud Mary (R) 11:05-1:30-3:45CC: 11:30-3:00-6:30-9:15
Stadium 14
8:20-10:45
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 12:15- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 3D
20000 Century Boulevard
(PG-13) 2:10-8:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 3D 2:45-5:30-8:00-9:00
(PG-13) 1:45-7:45
The Opera House 12:55
Ferdinand (PG) 12:45-3:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Opera House 12:55
The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:15(PG-13) CC: 10:15-2:15-5:00-6:15- Along With the Gods: The Two
Worlds 12:10-3:30-6:50-10:35
3:00-5:45-8:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 10:00
1:40-8:05
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) CC: Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:15-5:10-11:15
12:30-4:00-7:30-11:00
Molly's Game (R) 10:30-4:5511:45-1:15-3:45-7:45-10:15
8:00-11:05
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR) Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:15-2:45Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 11:30Proud Mary (R) 6:00
11:20-3:05-6:45-10:25
2:00-4:45-7:30-10:00
5:15-7:45-10:15
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
MARYLAND
Prades and Mauricio Martinez
forge a wholly convincing bond
themselves — a stronger chemistry even than was apparent on
Broadway between the roles’ excellent originators, Ana Villafañe
and Josh Segarra; Prades and
Martinez’s voices share a more
satisfying balance of power,
which also adds to the impression
that Gloria and Emilio were made
for each other. Which, of course,
is why a vivacious “On Your Feet!”
exists at all.
peter.marks@washpost.com
On Your Feet! The Gloria and
Emilio Estefan Broadway
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:00-2:00-5:00-6:45-8:009:45-11:00
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:30-2:15-5:00-8:00-10:45
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:15-2:00-4:457:30-10:15
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:00-1:454:30-7:15-10:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:00-4:157:15-10:30
Molly's Game (R) 3:00-6:15-9:30
Proud Mary (R) 12:00-2:15-4:307:00-9:15
All the Money in the World (R) 12:00
The Post (PG-13) 12:30-3:306:30-9:30
I, Tonya (R) 11:30-2:30-5:30-8:30
The Opera House 12:55
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
3:30-7:00-10:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:45-1:454:45-7:45-10:45
The Shape of Water (R) 11:00-2:005:00-8:00-11:00
Molly's Game (R) 12:00-3:156:30-9:45
Proud Mary (R) 11:30-2:15-5:007:45-10:30
All the Money in the World (R)
10:30AM
The Post (PG-13) 11:15-2:15-5:158:15-11:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
10:45-1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
UA Snowden Square
Stadium 14
9161 Commerce Center Drive
The Greatest Showman (PG) 10:0512:40-3:20-6:00-8:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:15-2:50-6:30-9:50
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 10:45-1:10Stadium 14
3:50-6:15-8:50
6505 America Blvd.
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Ferdinand (PG) 1:00-3:40-6:20
(PG-13)
10:10-1:00-4:00-7:15-10:10
The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:40Coco (PG) 10:00-12:50-3:30
3:15-5:50-8:25-11:00
Insidious:
The Last Key (PG-13)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:15-12:40-3:10-5:45-8:20-10:45
12:30-3:50-7:15-9:00-10:45
Paddington
2 (PG) 10:30-1:20-4:15Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:30-3:30-5:05-6:30-8:00- 7:00-9:30
The
Commuter
(PG-13) 10:009:30-11:00
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:40
Coco (PG) 12:45-3:25
Darkest
Hour
(PG-13)
2:30-6:00-9:00
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
The Shape of Water (R) 10:50-1:501:30-4:15-7:00-10:00
4:50-7:50-10:50
Wonder (PG) 6:05-9:00
Call Me by Your Name (R) 7:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:15-4:00Molly's Game (R) 10:40-12:35-3:406:45-9:30
The Commuter (PG-13) 1:45-4:30- 6:45-10:00
Proud Mary (R) 10:05-12:00-3:157:15-10:15
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:45-3:45- 5:30-8:10-10:30-11:00
The Post (PG-13) 10:20-1:30-4:306:45-9:45
Molly's Game (R) 1:05-4:15-7:30- 7:30-10:20
I, Tonya (R) 10:00-1:40-4:40-7:4010:45
10:30
Proud Mary (R) 1:00-3:15-5:30The Opera House 12:55
7:45-10:15
- Prince in Exile
All the Money in the World (R) 2:00 Agnathavasi
(NR) 10:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Xscape Theatres
Missouri (R) 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
Brandywine 14
The Post (PG-13) 1:45-4:45-7:457710 Matapeake Business Drive
10:35
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 9:55-12:55-3:40
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
14716 Baltimore Avenue
10:05-12:40-3:20-6:00-8:40
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:00- Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 10:451:40-4:20-7:05-10:10
1:15-3:45-6:50-9:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
11:30-3:10-6:45-10:20
(PG-13) CC: 11:20-2:10-5:00-8:00
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:15-2:40- Paddington 2 (PG) OC; CC: (!) 10:405:00-7:35-10:05
12:30-1:10-3:50-5:40-6:40-9:10
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 9:50(PG-13) 12:00-3:35-6:35-9:35
12:20-2:50-5:20-7:50-10:20-11:20
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:1011:20-2:00-4:50-7:30-10:00
12:50-3:30-6:30-9:20
Paddington 2 (PG) 10:55-1:35-4:15- Molly's Game (R) CC: (!) 9:45-1:007:00-9:45
4:15-7:30-11:00
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:10-1:50- Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 9:40-12:105:10-8:00-10:45
2:40-5:10-7:40-10:10-10:50
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:05-2:10- All the Money in the World (R) CC:
4:35-7:45-10:40
(!) 10:30AM
Molly's Game (R) 12:40-3:55Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
7:15-10:30
CC: 11:00-2:20-7:20-10:45
Proud Mary (R) 12:25-3:00-5:30Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
8:10-10:35
(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:45-7:45-10:35
The Post (PG-13) 12:15-3:20The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:10-1:506:55-9:50
4:20-6:10-9:00
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR) Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) CC:
11:15-2:50-6:30-10:10
(!) 10:00-3:10-8:10-10:40-11:40
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 11:30-2:00Regal Rockville Center
4:30-6:20-7:00-8:50-9:30-11:30
Stadium 13
I, Tonya (R) 11:25-2:10-4:55-7:4010:25
The Opera House 12:55
Ang Panday (2017)10:15-1:15-4:257:25-10:20
The Greatest Showman Sing-ALong (PG) 11:35-6:50
Proud Mary (R) 10:00-12:30-3:005:30-8:00-10:40
AMC Potomac Mills 18
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 11:15-1:50
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 9:30
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:40-2:15-4:50-7:40-10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 11:20-2:50-6:10-7:10-9:40-10:40
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 2:104:35; 10:55-7:35-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 1:50-4:50-7:40-9:50
Coco (PG) CC: 11:15-1:55
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) CC:
11:50-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:35-2:20-5:10
Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 11:00-1:454:30-7:15-9:50
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 10:50
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 1:304:25-7:25-10:20
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 2:155:10-8:00-10:50
Call Me by Your Name (R) CC:
12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Molly's Game (R) CC: 11:50-3:006:20-9:25
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:00AM
All the Money in the World (R)
CC: 4:35
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:30-2:004:20-6:45-9:10-11:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 8:00
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:10-2:004:45-7:45-10:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:50-4:35
I, Tonya (R) 11:15-1:20-4:10-7:0010:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
11:45-2:50-5:40-8:40
Ferdinand (PG) 11:00AM
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:00-1:454:30-7:15-10:00
Lady Bird (R) CC: 7:00
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 10:00-4:00-10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 3D (PG13) CC: 1:00-7:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:451:45-4:45-7:45-10:30
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:151:15-4:15-7:00-10:00
Molly's Game (R) CC: 10:00-1:004:00-7:10-10:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:15-1:154:15-7:15-10:00
Phantom Thread (R) CC: 10:301:30-4:30-7:30-10:25
AMC Tysons Corner 16
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Ferdinand (PG) CC: 1:10-4:00-7:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
11:10-1:50-4:45-7:25-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
199 East Montgomery Avenue
CC: 2:55-6:25-9:50
iPic Pike & Rose
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 10:25The Greatest Showman (PG) 10:4511830 Grand Park Avenue
12:45-3:25-5:50-8:15-10:40
2:15-4:15-8:15-10:30
Ferdinand (PG) 2:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:25
10:45-1:15-4:45-7:00-10:45
11:00-3:00-6:45-10:45
Coco (PG) CC: 10:45-1:40-4:30-7:05
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 10:30-3:00- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) CC:
5:15-7:45-10:30
(PG-13) 12:00-3:30-7:00-10:15
(!)
12:05-3:20-5:55-8:25-10:55-12:05
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Paddington 2 (PG) (!) 11:30-2:45Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 11:00(PG-13) 11:00AM; 1:45-5:00-8:00- 6:15-9:30
1:35-4:15-6:55-9:30
11:00
The Commuter (PG-13) (!) 1:15The Commuter (PG-13) CC: (!)
Coco (PG) 10:45AM
4:30-7:45-11:00
11:15-1:55-4:40-7:30-10:05-12:40
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Molly's Game (R) 11:45-3:45Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:1011:45-2:30-5:15-7:45-10:15
7:30-11:30
Paddington 2 (PG) 10:30AM
Proud Mary (R) (!) 11:15-2:00-5:00- 1:05-4:05-7:15-10:15
Molly's Game (R) CC: 10:15-1:30Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:15-3:45- 8:00-11:15
4:35-7:45-10:50
6:45-9:45
The Post (PG-13) (!) 12:45-4:00Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:05AM
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:30-2:00- 7:15-10:30
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 10:20-12:404:30-7:15-9:45
3:15-5:35-8:00-10:25-12:30
The Shape of Water (R) 1:15-4:15All the Money in the World (R) CC:
7:30-10:30
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
9:35-12:35
Molly's Game (R) 12:00-3:302150 Clarendon Blvd.
The Post (PG-13) CC: 10:30-12:006:45-10:15
Proud Mary (R) 10:30-12:45-4:45- The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: 1:15-2:50-4:10-5:45-7:10-8:4510:45-1:15-5:00-7:30-10:00
9:55-11:30
7:15-9:45
The Post (PG-13) 11:15-2:00-5:00- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) I, Tonya (R) (!) 10:10-1:00-4:20CC: 10:30-1:45-3:45-7:00-10:45
7:35-10:30
7:45-10:30
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 11:00- Star Wars: The Last Jedi The IMAX
I, Tonya (R) 1:00-3:45-6:45-9:45
1:30-4:15-6:45-9:30
2D Experience (PG-13) 10:00-1:25The Opera House 12:55
Welcome to the Jungle (PG- 5:00-8:30-11:55
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:00-1:45-4:30- Jumanji:
13) CC: 11:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30 The Opera House (!) 12:55
7:30-10:00
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) CC: Ferdinand (PG) 10:00AM
Regal Waugh Chapel
10:30-1:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Stadium 12 & IMAX
Molly's Game (R) CC: 11:15-2:30- (PG-13) 10:50-1:45-4:50-7:55-10:45
1419 South Main Chapel Way
3:45-6:45-10:00
AMC Worldgate 9
The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:30- The Post (PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:3013025 Worldgate Drive
3:20-6:30-9:15
7:15-10:15
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) I, Tonya (R) 11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45 The Greatest Showman (PG) CC:
10:00-12:30-3:10-6:00-9:00
11:45-3:15-6:45-10:15
The Post (PG-13) 11:00AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:35-2:00AMC Hoffman Center 22
CC: 11:35-3:00-6:20-9:50
5:10-7:35-9:55
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PGJumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:10-2:00-4:50-7:40-10:35 Ferdinand (PG) CC: 11:20-1:55-4:40 13) CC: 11:00-1:50-4:45-7:35-10:25
The Disaster Artist (R) CC: 10:35
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13) CC:
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 9:25
(!) 12:00-2:40-5:15-7:45-10:30
11:50-2:40-5:30-8:15-10:55
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:00-1:40-4:20- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 10:25 Paddington 2 (PG) CC: (!) 10:30The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: 1:20-4:00-6:40-9:20
7:00-9:40
Molly's Game (R) CC: (!) 11:40-2:50The Commuter (PG-13) 12:10-2:45- 10:10-12:45-3:20-6:05-9:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) 6:10-9:25
5:20-7:55-10:30
Proud Mary (R) CC: (!) 10:40-1:00Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:25-3:30- CC: 11:50-3:30-7:00-9:25-10:30
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) CC: 11:05- 3:20-5:40-7:55-10:10
10:05
1:25-3:45-6:30-9:15
The Post (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:50-1:40Call Me by Your Name (R) 7:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
4:30-7:20-10:15
Proud Mary (R) 12:00-2:30-5:20(PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:30-3:25-4:15- Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
8:00-10:20
7:30-10:10
(!) 12:05-3:30-7:05-10:30
The Post (PG-13) 12:20-3:40-7:10Coco (PG) CC: 11:15-1:50
10:15
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Insidious:
The
Last
Key
(PG-13)
One Loudoun
I, Tonya (R) 11:10-2:30-4:30-7:30- CC: 11:10-1:45-2:20-4:15-5:15-6:4520575 East Hampton Plaza
10:20
7:45-9:30-10:15
The Commuter: The IMAX 2D
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:05-12:50-3:40 Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:00-4:00-7:40
Experience (PG-13) 11:30-2:10Paddington 2 (PG) CC: 10:15-1:154:40-7:10-10:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:154:00-6:45-9:30
3:20-5:40-8:40-11:30
Regal Westview
The Commuter (PG-13) CC: 11:45Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Stadium 16 & IMAX
2:30-5:15-8:15-10:45
11:20
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 10:20Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Ferdinand (PG) 10:00-12:301:10-4:05-6:55-9:50
11:20; 10:10-1:15-3:003:15-6:00
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 1:20- (PG-13)
5:15-8:20
The Greatest Showman (PG) 10:15- 4:20-7:20-10:10
Paddington
2 (PG) 11:20-2:401:15-4:00-6:45-9:30
Downsizing (R) CC: 4:35-7:35
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Molly's Game (R) CC: 11:35-2:45- 6:40-9:40
Molly's
Game
(R) 10:35-12:55-4:2011:00-3:15-7:15-9:00-11:00
6:20-9:40
8:00-11:20
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 10:30-1:15- Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:25AM
The Commuter (PG-13) 4:30-7:203:45-6:15-9:00
Proud Mary (R) CC: 11:30-2:0010:05
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
4:30-7:00-9:30
I, Tonya (R) 10:45-2:00-6:00-9:25
(PG-13) 10:00-1:00-2:30-4:00-5:30- All the Money in the World (R)
The Post (PG-13) 12:30-3:40-7:007:00-8:15-10:00-11:15
CC: 7:25
9:10-10:20
Coco (PG) 10:15-1:00-3:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The
Greatest Showman Sing-AInsidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Missouri (R) CC: 6:20-9:05
Long (PG) 11:40-6:20
10:45-1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45
Condorito: The Movie (Condorito:
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
Wonder (PG) 6:30-9:30
La película) (PG) CC: 11:05-1:202911 District Ave
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:30-2:15-5:00- 3:40-6:00-8:20-10:40
7:45-10:30
The Post (PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:15- Downsizing (R) 1:45
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:15-2:00- 5:00-7:45-10:30
Phantom Thread (R) (!) 10:00-1:05Lady Bird (R) CC: 11:00-2:05-4:25 4:00-5:00-7:00-10:00
4:45-7:30-10:15
VIRGINIA
Call Me by Your Name (R) 11:152:15-5:15-8:15-10:55
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:15-1:003:55-6:45-9:35
All the Money in the World (R) 10:35
The Shape of Water (R) 10:45-1:304:35-7:15-9:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:00-8:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) 10:2512:55-3:30-6:00-8:30-10:55
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:00-1:15-4:30-7:45-10:55
I, Tonya (R) 11:15-2:00-4:50-7:3010:30
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13 , 2018
Musical, Book by Alexander
Dinelaris, music by Emilio and
Gloria Estefan and Miami Sound
Machine. Choreography, Sergio
Trujillo; sets, David Rockwell;
costumes, Emilio Sosa; lighting,
Kenneth Posner; sound, SCK Sound
Design; music direction, Clay
Ostwald; projections, Darrel
Maloney; production stage
manager, Eric Insko. With Amaris
Sanchez, Carmen Sanchez, Kevin
Tellez, Jordan Vergara. About 2
hours 30 minutes. $59-$149.
Through Jan. 28 at John F. Kennedy
Center for the Performing Arts. Visit
kennedy-center.org or call 202-4674600.
Saturday, January 13, 2018
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:40-2:30-5:15-8:15-11:00
Wonder (PG) 6:30
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:10-1:45-4:307:15-10:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:10-3:056:15-9:15
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:00-1:354:10-6:45-9:30
The Shape of Water (R) 7:30-10:25
Call Me by Your Name (R) 12:253:50-7:35-10:40
Proud Mary (R) 12:30-3:15-6:008:30-10:55
The Post (PG-13) 11:15-2:05-5:007:45-10:35
Bow Tie
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX The Opera House 12:55
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile
11940 Market Street
(NR) 9:50
Vakhtangov Theatre: Uncle
Regal Countryside
Vanya11:30AM
Stadium 20
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:1045980 Regal Plaza
2:30-5:10-8:10-10:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:453:20-5:50-8:30
10:20-2:00-6:00-10:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
11:40-3:00-6:20-10:00
(PG-13) 4:10-7:20-10:20
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:20-2:10-4:50- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:50-3:40-6:30-9:40
7:30-10:10
Coco (PG) 11:45-4:45-9:45
The Shape of Water (R) 10:50Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
5:00-8:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 12:10-2:45-5:15-8:00-10:30
Wonder (PG) 12:35-3:25
Missouri (R) 1:40-11:00
The Post (PG-13) 10:40-12:00-1:30- Darkest Hour (PG-13) 1:00-4:107:00-9:55
3:00-4:40-6:10-7:50-9:10-10:30
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:00-1:50- Paddington 2 (PG) 11:50-2:30-5:107:45-10:15
4:20-7:00-9:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:10-1:00- Tiger Zinda Hai (NR) 12:30-4:35-8:15
4:00-6:50-9:40
The Shape of Water (R) 11:40-2:35Molly's Game (R) 10:00-1:10-4:30- 5:30-8:45
7:40-10:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
I, Tonya (R) 11:30-2:20-5:20-8:20- Missouri (R) 1:05-4:00-6:45-9:35
11:10
Call Me by Your Name (R) 7:00
Lady Bird (R) 12:20-2:40-5:00Cinema Arts Theatre
7:30-9:50
9650 Main St
The Greatest Showman (PG) CC: Proud Mary (R) 12:40-2:50-5:057:20-9:30
9:55-12:10-2:25-4:40-7:00-9:20
Sketch (Tamil) (NR) 12:05-3:30Darkest Hour (PG-13) CC: 9:406:50-10:10
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:55
The Shape of Water (R) CC: 10:00- The Post (PG-13) 12:55-3:356:15-9:25
1:00-4:00-7:10-9:35
Molly's Game (R) CC: 10:10-1:15- Thaanaa Serndha Koottam (Tamil)
(NR) 3:10-9:20
4:15-7:20-10:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
Missouri (R) CC: 9:45-12:15-2:40- 11:55-3:15-6:35-10:05
The Brawler (Mukkabaaz) (NR)
5:10-7:50-10:05
The Post (PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:05- 12:25-3:55-7:05-10:20
Jai Simha (Jaisimha) (NR) 11:452:35-5:05-7:40-10:00
3:05-6:25-9:45
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
Okka Kshanam (NR) 10:00
1600 Village Market Boulevard
Parchi (NR) 12:00-2:55-5:45-9:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:35- The Greatest Showman Sing-A2:10-4:45-7:15-9:40
Long (PG) 2:15-7:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Thaanaa Serndha Koottam (Tamil)
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:25
(NR) 12:15-6:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:50-2:20-5:00- Regal Dulles Town Center 10
7:30-9:55
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Proud Mary (R) 12:15-3:50-6:05The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:408:20-10:35
3:30-6:15-8:45
All the Money in the World (R)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
CC: 10:05
1:00-4:00-6:45-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:25-2:05-4:50-7:45-10:30 Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 12:00-2:15The Commuter (PG-13) 12:10-2:40- 5:45-8:15-10:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
5:10-7:40-10:10
The Post (PG-13) 11:20-2:00-4:40- (PG-13) 12:45-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
7:20-10:00
12:15-3:45-6:30-9:00
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-2:00-4:3012:00-3:20-7:00-10:20
7:00-9:30
Molly's Game (R) CC: 12:45-4:00The Commuter (PG-13) 12:30-4:157:05-10:15
7:15-9:45
Manassas 4 Cinemas
Molly's Game (R) 12:50-2:458890 Mathis Ave.
6:00-9:15
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:30- Proud Mary (R) 11:50-3:15-5:301:45-4:00-6:10-8:20
7:45-10:15
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Post (PG-13) 12:20-3:00-4:45(PG-13) 11:30-1:50-4:10-6:30-8:50 7:30-10:30
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:30-1:45-4:00- Regal Fairfax Towne Center 10
6:10-8:20
4110 West Ox Road
The Post (PG-13) 11:30-1:50-4:10- The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:006:30-8:50
2:35-5:10-7:45-10:20
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
6201 Multiplex Drive
12:00-1:00-3:25-6:50-10:15
The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:05- Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 3:30-5:552:35-5:05-7:35-10:40
8:20-10:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
10:05-1:15-4:25-7:50-11:00
12:15-2:50-5:30-8:15-10:50
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 10:15-12:35- Paddington 2 (PG) 12:05-5:252:55-5:20-8:00-10:25
8:05-10:40
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Proud Mary (R) 12:55-3:15-5:35(PG-13) 10:35-4:15-7:20-10:15
7:55-10:15
Coco (PG) 10:00-12:55-3:50-6:45- All the Money in the World (R) 12:20
9:45
The Post (PG-13) 12:45-3:506:40-9:40
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:40-2:10-4:40-7:15-9:50
I, Tonya (R) 12:40-3:40-6:30-9:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:50-1:45- The Opera House 12:55
5:15-8:05-10:55
Along With the Gods: The Two
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:30-2:00-4:30- Worlds 3:45-7:05-10:15
7:00-9:30
1987: When the Day Comes (NR)
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:55-2:25- 4:25-7:30-10:30
4:55-7:30-10:00
Paddington 2 (PG) 2:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle 3D Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
(PG-13) 1:30
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Proud Mary (R) 10:00-12:15-2:30- Ferdinand (PG) 12:45-3:15-5:45-8:15
4:45-7:05-9:20
Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
The Post (PG-13) 11:25-2:15-5:00- Star
12:00-3:30-5:30-7:00-9:00-10:30
7:45-10:30
Greatest Showman (PG) 1:30Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR) The
4:15-6:45-9:30
11:50-3:20-6:50-10:10
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 1:15-3:30Rave Cinemas
6:00-8:15-10:30
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
11900 Palace Way
(PG-13) 1:30-3:00-4:30-5:45-7:15Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:35-9:55 8:30-10:00
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:25- Coco (PG) 12:15-2:45
2:05-4:40-7:25-10:20
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:20-1:40- 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:15
4:20-7:20-10:10
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-2:30-5:00Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
7:30-10:00
(PG-13) 10:40-1:25-4:15-7:05-10:05 The Commuter (PG-13) 12:30-3:00Coco (PG) 10:55-4:35-7:10
5:30-8:00-10:30
The Shape of Water (R) 11:30-2:20- Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:15-3:155:05-7:55-10:50
6:15-9:15
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Molly's Game (R) 12:45-4:0011:15-1:45-4:25-7:15-10:15
7:15-10:30
The Commuter (PG-13) 10:50-1:30- Proud Mary (R) 12:30-2:45-5:154:10-7:30-10:00
7:45-10:00
Molly's Game (R) 10:45-1:50-4:55- All the Money in the World (R) 12:00
8:00-11:00
The Post (PG-13) 1:15-4:00-6:45-9:30
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 11:05-2:00- Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
4:50-7:40-10:25
12:30-3:45-7:00-10:15
The Post (PG-13) 11:00-1:55-4:45- Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
7:35-10:30
The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)
Lady Bird (R) 11:40-2:10-4:301:00-3:45-6:30-9:15
7:45-10:35
Regal Kingstowne
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
Stadium 16 & RPX
(PG-13) XD: 11:35-2:15-5:00-7:505910 Kingstowne Towne Center
10:45
Ferdinand (PG) 1:30-6:40
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR) The Greatest Showman (PG) 12:4011:10-2:40-6:10-9:40
3:30-6:05-9:20
The Post (PG-13) XD: 11:45-2:35- Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
5:25-8:10-10:55
12:10-3:45-7:05-9:15-10:20
Regal Ballston Common
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 1:10-3:35Stadium 12
5:50-8:30-10:45
671 N. Glebe Road
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:05- (PG-13) 1:45-5:00-6:00-8:00-9:001:40-4:15-6:50-9:20
10:45; 12:45-4:05-7:00-9:45
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13) Coco (PG) 12:30-4:00
12:00-3:25-7:00-10:20
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
12:15-2:45-4:45-7:30-10:00
(PG-13) 11:20-2:10-5:05-8:00-10:50 Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-2:30-5:157:45-10:30
Coco (PG) 11:30-2:00-4:40
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:25-3:206:15-9:10
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:05-2:455:20-7:50-10:40
Molly's Game (R) 1:25-2:55-6:20-9:30
All the Money in the World (R) 1:00
Proud Mary (R) 12:55-3:05-5:458:15-10:35
The Post (PG-13) 1:15-4:15-7:20-10:05
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
12:00-3:15-6:30-9:50
Parchi (NR) 4:10-7:15-10:15
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:502:30-5:00-7:40-10:30
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
12:30-4:00-7:30-10:45
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:50-2:20-5:10-8:00-10:50
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
12:45-3:10-5:40-8:15-10:45
Wonder (PG) 11:50-3:45-6:20
Paddington 2 (PG) 1:20-4:107:00-9:30
The Commuter (PG-13) 12:40-3:155:50-8:30-11:00
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 12:00-2:506:15-9:10
Molly's Game (R) 12:15-3:206:30-9:50
Proud Mary (R) 12:20-2:40-5:207:45-10:10
All the Money in the World (R) 9:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 1:00-3:50-6:45-9:40
The Post (PG-13) 1:10-4:20-7:1010:00
The Commuter: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 1:50-4:30-7:15-9:45
Agnathavasi - Prince in Exile (NR)
12:10-3:30-6:50-10:15
Regal Potomac Yard
Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
Ferdinand (PG) 11:00-1:30-4:05-6:40
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:152:05-4:45-7:35-10:25
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:20-3:00-6:30-9:35-10:05
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:50-2:154:35-7:20-10:00
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:05-12:25-2:00-3:25-4:556:15-7:45-9:10-10:45
Coco (PG) 11:10-1:45-4:25-7:05
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) 3:05-6:00-8:55
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:45-2:20-5:05-7:50-9:20-10:40
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:00-1:40-4:207:00-9:40
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:30-2:105:00-7:30-10:20
Molly's Game (R) 11:35-2:556:10-9:25
Proud Mary (R) 11:00-12:00-1:152:25-3:35-4:50-5:55-7:15-8:159:50-10:50
All the Money in the World (R)
3:40-9:15
The Post (PG-13) 11:10-1:55-4:407:40-10:35
The Opera House 12:55
The Greatest Showman Sing-ALong (PG) 1:00-6:35
Regal
Springfield Town Center 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:352:10-5:20-8:00-10:40
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
11:20-2:40-6:10-9:45
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 11:30-2:305:10-7:50-10:30
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:15-2:00-4:40-7:40-10:20
Paddington 2 (PG) 11:00-1:40-4:207:00-9:40
The Commuter (PG-13) 11:10-1:504:30-7:10-10:00
The Shape of Water (R) 12:203:20-9:20
Molly's Game (R) 12:10-3:406:50-10:15
The Post (PG-13) 12:00-3:006:00-9:00
I, Tonya (R) 11:50-2:50-5:50-9:10
The Shape of Water (R) 6:20
Proud Mary (R) 11:40-2:20-4:507:20-9:50
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
Ferdinand (PG) 10:50-1:20-3:50
The Greatest Showman (PG) 11:452:40-6:00-8:30-10:55
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (PG-13)
10:35-1:50-5:15-8:45
Pitch Perfect 3 (PG-13) 10:55-1:153:45-6:45-9:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:15
Coco (PG) 11:10-2:10-5:10
Insidious: The Last Key (PG-13)
11:20-1:55-4:50-7:25-10:05
Paddington 2 (PG) 10:30AM
Darkest Hour (PG-13) 10:40-1:354:40-7:45-10:40
The Shape of Water (R) 8:00-10:50
The Commuter (PG-13) 10:3012:55-3:25-6:15-9:00
Molly's Game (R) 2:50-5:50-9:05
Proud Mary (R) 11:50-2:20-4:257:00-9:35
The Post (PG-13) 11:05-1:40-4:207:35-10:20
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle
(PG-13) 12:05-2:45-5:30-6:308:15-9:15
Paddington 2 (PG) 12:00-2:30-5:007:30-10:00
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10AM
Star Wars: The Last Jedi An IMAX
3D Experience (PG-13) 4:10-9:55
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20AM
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
12:00-3:25
Star Wars: The Last Jedi The IMAX
2D Experience (PG-13) 12:40-7:00
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 1:004:00-7:00-9:35-12:00
Coco (PG) CC: 12:15-2:30-4:45
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) CC: 7:15-9:40
Wonder (PG) CC: 12:05-2:404:55-7:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
9:50-12:00
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
(R) 12:00AM
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C5
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
BOTH SIDES VULNERABLE
NORTH
K65
K62
753
AQ42
WEST
10 8 7
J97
K6
J 10 9 8 5
EAST
QJ93
Q 10 8 4
J 10 9 8
6
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
A42
A53
AQ42
K73
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1 NT
Pass
3 NT
Opening lead — J
EAST
All Pass
T
he ABCs of good dummy
CLASSIC PEANUTS
play: learning to handle
individual suit combinations
correctly. For example, with
Q-10 opposite A-K-4-3-2,
declarer’s percentage play
for five tricks is a finesse with
the 10.
At today’s 3NT, declarer
starts with eight top tricks.
The clubs will break 3-3 only
a little more than a third of
the time — no doubt less
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
than that when West has led
a club — so declarer would
like a second diamond trick.
If he wins the first club in
dummy and leads a diamond
to his queen, he goes down.
West takes the king, and
East still has a double stopper in the suit.
But declarer should be in
no hurry to finesse. At Trick
Two he can play a low diaLIO
mond from both hands.
South wins the next trick
and cashes the ace of diamonds. The king happens to
fall, so he is safe. If instead
both defenders played low,
South would lead a heart to
dummy to return a third diamond toward his queen. He
would get two diamond tricks
whenever the lie of the cards
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
permitted.
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
K65K62
753AQ42
Both sides vulnerable. The
dealer, at your left, opens
three spades. Your partner
doubles, and the next player
passes. What do you say?
ANSWER: Partner’s double
is for takeout and promises
BLONDIE
a hand worth 18 points or
more. To pass for penalty
might be right, but beating
three spades doubled more
than one trick (or at all) could
be a nervous affair. Bid 3NT.
You should be able to assemble nine tricks while shutting
out the dealer’s spade suit.
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2018, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C6
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13 , 2018
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | JANUARY 13
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
This year you open
up to new ideas with
greater ease than you
have in the recent
past. You often double-check
what you do, as you sense
that there could be an error.
If you are single, you might
connect with someone with
unusual excitement and
attraction at first, but then pull
away later. You are likely to
have many potential suitors.
If you are attached, the two of
you seriously consider making
some changes. You both will
benefit from more private
time together. Sagittarius
understands you well.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Your thoughts might be
focused on someone at
a distance. Open up a
discussion with a friend,
and get his or her opinion.
Brainstorm to find a solution;
you’ll be pleased with the
results.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
A conversation about a
potential trip could be
somewhat provocative. Some
of you might opt to hop in the
car and take off on a miniexcursion. Getting out of your
immediate environment adds
to your sense of well-being.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
How you see a situation could
change dramatically. At first,
you might view the matter as
WEINGARTENS & CLARK being a hassle. Given some
time, you’ll decide to jump
in and discover how exciting
the experience can be. No
boredom for you today!
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Emotions run high. Even if
you see a chance to change
direction, you might opt to
stay on your present course.
Confusion seems to float
around you, and could create
an issue.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You might wish that a situation
was less difficult and more
rewarding. Talk with the
others involved and get some
feedback. Opt to direct your
energy to matters that support
your sense of well-being. A fiery
friend is full of excitement.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Refuse to be cornered into a
discussion about a domestic
issue. A roommate or partner
might put you down if you do
not agree with him or her.
Trust your judgment. You might
stumble upon a good idea, but
perhaps it is not clear yet.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
An issue arises in your
personal life that elicits a
negative or heavy feeling. You
simply don’t want to discuss it
past a certain point. Recognize
the unpredictability that you
trigger by walking away from a
conversation.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You might question what is
going on with a neighbor or
relative who seems a bit off.
Regardless of whether this
person is aware of his or her
unusual behavior, listen to
what he or she has to share.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Be ready to blaze a new path,
should the opportunity present
itself. A creative and/or
impulsive moment could turn
a heavy issue into a fun puzzle
to solve. A loved one might
want more of your time.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You can do only so much.
The time has come to slow
down and use this Saturday
to rest up. You might be
uncomfortable with changing
plans, but making an
accommodation for yourself is
necessary.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
A lot is occurring around you.
Friends seek you out to share
news or to help you get a party
moving. Make it your pleasure
to lighten the mood. Take
some time to check in with
someone who might not feel
up to snuff.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
You could be intensely involved
with thoughts that have very
little to do with the here and
now. Schedule a trip or make a
call to a friend; otherwise, you
could spend the day thinking
about this matter. A partner
wants to get your attention.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2018, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
KLMNO
SPORTS
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
M2
D
Beagle, Caps beat the horn Wizards subdue Magic late
CAPITALS 4,
HURRICANES 3
BY
WIZARDS 125,
MAGIC 119
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
raleigh, n.c. — Jay Beagle’s job simply
was to win the defensive-zone faceoff. But
as Alex Ovechkin carried the puck up the
ice, Beagle drove to the net. When Nicklas
Backstrom’s pass landed on his stick, he
swatted at it. When it crossed the goal line,
Beagle skated back into the glass and
allowed his teammates to swarm him. The
goal beat the horn signaling the end of
regulation by 1.3 seconds.
“I’m just crashing the net eyes closed,
and it hits my stick, so there you go,”
Beagle said.
As Beagle spoke to reporters in the PNC
Arena visiting locker room after the Capitals’ 4-3 win over the Carolina Hurricanes
on Friday night, Alex Ovechkin stood off to
the side and chirped. “That’s a legend,” the
captain said of Beagle.
Washington’s best center in the faceoff
circle, Beagle typically takes draws in the
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D4
The NFL’s most
unlikely owner
emerges as one
of its very best
In an embarrassing and
trying season for NFL
owners, Shahid Khan
stands — remarkable,
fresh-faced and
triumphant — as an
Jerry
example the league
Brewer
desperately needed. Look
at him: compassionate,
vocal, free thinking. He also happens to
be a dark-skinned Muslim with a
signature handlebar mustache that
deserves its own theme music.
He’s different. That’s wonderful. His
Jacksonville Jaguars are no longer court
jesters, and now that they have a wicked
defense and promising future, you can
see the man Khan has always been. Just
like the Jaguars have experienced a
breakthrough after a 10-year postseason
absence, the 67-year-old Khan has
emerged as an intriguing owner. Under
uncomfortable circumstances for
wealthy billionaires accustomed to
being left alone while they monitor their
ridiculous NFL profits, Khan has been
better than most of his aloof and callous
brethren. He has been accessible,
humane and sincere.
It shouldn’t matter whether you agree
BY
GERRY BROOME/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Washington’s Jay Beagle scored the game-winning goal with
1.3 seconds remaining Friday night against Carolina.
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Wizards guard John Wall finished with 30 points and nine
assists against the Magic and Mario Hezonja on Friday.
C ANDACE B UCKNER
Over the years, the Washington Wizards
have distanced themselves from the Orlando Magic, one of their neighbors in the
Southeast Division. Since 2012, the Wizards have dominated the series at home,
but Friday night at Capital One Arena, the
teams played as close as copycats.
The Wizards’ lightning-quick point
guard relentlessly attacked the paint. So
did the Magic’s floppy-haired striker.
Washington trotted out a big man who
finished through fouls. Orlando had one
of those, too. And when the Wizards
scored at will, their foe got to the basket
with the same consistency.
It was only late in the fourth quarter
when the Wizards finally found separation for a 125-119 win. Washington (24-18)
has won 12 of the past 13 meetings against
Orlando in Chinatown. But the matchup
did not seem one-sided when the Wizards
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D4
Is Tom Brady
falling off at 40?
Don’t bet on it.
BREWER CONTINUED ON D3
By the numbers,
Cousins certainly
belongs among
league’s elite QBs
As you watch the NFL
playoffs this weekend, feel
free to scream as you
realize again what you
already feared last
weekend: Except for Tom
Thomas
Brady, there isn’t a
Boswell
quarterback in the
postseason who is
significantly better than Kirk Cousins.
As I will show statistically later in this
column, in the whole NFL only Aaron
Rodgers joins Brady as entirely out of
Cousins’s class. Over the past three years,
Cousins has proved that he is in a clump
of a half-dozen excellent QBs — eyelash
close in total productivity — who
compose the next-highest quarterback
rank.
But as this weekend will underline,
most of them have produced their
numbers with gifted supporting casts of
which Cousins only can dream in D.C. All
the Kirk-comparable QBs on view in the
next two days, such as Drew Brees, Matt
Ryan and Ben Roethlisberger, have
surrounding casts so electric that you
wonder, “What would Kirk do if he could
throw to Julio Jones or Antonio Brown,
not Jamison Crowder, or simply hand it
to Le’Veon Bell or Mark Ingram, not
BOSWELL CONTINUED ON D2
BASEBALL
Nats reach one-year deals with
Anthony Rendon, Michael
A. Taylor and Tanner Roark. D2
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Navy Coach Ken Niumatalolo is
away from team amid reports he
could be headed to Arizona. D2
CHARLES KRUPA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Late inconsistency, critical report raise doubts, but analysts see no real drop-off
BY
A DAM K ILGORE
On Saturday night, when the New England
Patriots host the Tennessee Titans in an AFC
divisional round game, Tom Brady will start the
35th playoff game of his career. It is possible none
have come with the distinct strain of uneasiness
currently surrounding him. Brady finds himself at
a peculiar stage, still excellent and yet ancient by
the standards of his profession, exalted and yet
constantly prodded for weakness. His age makes
him a marvel but also a target for dissection. The
end will come at some point, and everybody is eager
to spot it.
How could there be shakiness found in Brady, the
reigning Super Bowl MVP, the heavy favorite to be
named MVP of this season, the cornerstone of a
dynasty creeping toward the completion of its
second decade? His team went 13-3, claimed the
AFC’s top seed and scored the second-most points in
the NFL, even though his favorite target, Julian
Edelman, missed the entire season with a torn knee
ligament.
Still, doubts have begun to bubble. Brady’s uncharacteristic unevenness down the stretch, coupled with the revelation tucked in an ESPN blockbuster on tensions within the Patriots that his own
BRADY CONTINUED ON D3
NFL PLAYOFFS: DIVISIONAL ROUND
Today Falcons at Eagles, 4:35 p.m., NBC | Titans at Patriots, 8:15 p.m., CBS
Tomorrow Jaguars at Steelers, 1:05 p.m., CBS | Saints at Vikings, 4:40 p.m., Fox
D2
EZ
D I G ES T
SOCCER
Spirit is in talks to play
match at United’s field
The Washington Spirit is in
advanced talks with D.C. United
about playing a National
Women’s Soccer League match
this summer at United’s new
stadium, testing the waters for
possibly multiple games at Audi
Field in coming seasons.
Tom Hunt, United’s president
of business operations,
confirmed the discussions Friday.
Spirit President Chris Hummer
said, “We’ve come to terms, but
it’s up to the scheduling whether
we can pull it off.”
Neither specified a date, but
the only weekend in which both
United and the Washington
Nationals, who play two blocks
away, are out of town is Aug. 2526. Because of parking and
logistical issues, United is trying
to avoid scheduling events on the
same day as baseball games.
The NWSL has yet to announce
the 2018 schedule. The season
will kick off in late March.
The Spirit, which is entering its
sixth season, is based at Maryland
SoccerPlex in upper Montgomery
County.
— Steven Goff
The Bundesliga resumed
Friday after the winter break,
with Bayern Munich moving
14 points ahead of the field after a
3-1 win at Bayer Leverkusen.
Goals from Javi Martinez and
Franck Ribery in either half and
a brilliant free kick from James
Rodriguez in injury time kept the
defending champions on course
for a record-extending sixth
consecutive title.
It was Leverkusen’s first defeat
at home this season and ended a
12-game unbeaten run. . . .
Malaga’s struggles in the
Spanish league continued with a
1-0 loss at Getafe, extending the
team’s losing streak to four
matches.
Malaga could drop to last place
in the 20-team standings if Las
Palmas earns at least a point at
Girona on Saturday. . . .
Veteran forward Jimmy
Briand had a hand in both goals
as Guingamp moved up to sixth
place in the French league with a
2-0 win at Strasbourg.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Darrell Davis had 28 points
and nine assists, and Dayton set a
program record with 17 threepointers in a 106-79 rout of
visiting Virginia Commonwealth.
The Flyers shot 62.9 percent
(39 for 62) from the field,
including 53.1 percent (17 for 32)
from long range. Jordan Davis
had 13 of his 21 points in the first
half for Dayton (9-8, 3-2 Atlantic
10). Justin Tillman had 26 points
and 12 rebounds for the Rams (117, 3-2). . . .
Utah Athletic Director Chris
Hill was fined $10,000 and
reprimanded by the Pacific-12 for
inappropriate language and
public comments regarding the
officiating after Sunday’s loss to
No. 11 Arizona State. . . .
Qadashah Hoppie scored
15 points and Maya Singleton
had 11 points and 14 rebounds to
lead the St. John’s women (11-7,
4-3 Big East) to a 64-41 victory
over Georgetown in New York.
Dionna White scored
16 points and Mikayla Venson
added 16 for the Hoyas (7-9, 2-4).
SKIING
Victor Muffat-Jeandet rose
from 27th place after the
downhill run to win a World Cup
combined event in Wengen,
Switzerland.
The Frenchman got his first
career win using the fastest run
in slalom to finish 0.96 seconds
ahead of Pavel Trikhichev of
Russia.
Peter Fill of Italy was the best
of the downhill specialists, placing
third, 1.15 behind Muffat-Jeandet.
BASEBALL
Third basemen Josh
Donaldson and Kris Bryant set
records when they were among
145 players who agreed to oneyear contracts rather than go to
salary arbitration.
Donaldson and Toronto agreed
at $23 million, the largest oneyear deal for an arbitrationeligible player. The 32-year-old
topped the $21,625,000 deal
covering 2018 agreed to last May
by Washington and outfielder
Bryce Harper.
Donaldson, the 2015 AL MVP,
got a $6 million raise after hitting
.270 last season with 33 homers
and 78 RBI in 113 games.
Bryant settled with the
Chicago Cubs at $10.85 million,
the most for a player eligible for
arbitration for the first time. The
previous mark was held by
Philadelphia first baseman Ryan
Howard, who was awarded
$10 million by a three-person
panel in 2008.
Bryant hit .295 with 29 home
runs and 73 RBI last year, when
he made $1.05 million.
Baltimore third baseman
Manny Machado, like Donaldson
eligible for free agency after this
season, agreed at $16 million.
Houston pitcher Dallas Keuchel
agreed to a $13.2 million deal.
National League batting
champion Charlie Blackmon
and Colorado agreed to
$14 million. He can become a free
agent after this season.
— From news services
and staff reports
TELEVISION AND RADIO
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Brooklyn at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, WFED (1500 AM)
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Boston at Montreal » NHL Network
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13 , 2018
Nats’ arbitration-eligible trio get deals
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
The Washington Nationals
reached deals with all three of
their arbitration-eligible players,
going right down to Friday’s 1
p.m. deadline before coming to
agreements with Anthony Rendon, Tanner Roark and Michael
A. Taylor.
Rendon, coming off an MVPcaliber season, agreed to a
$12.3 million deal. Roark settled
at $6.475 million, according to
people familiar with the situation who confirmed a report by
USA Today. Taylor settled at
$2.525 million, according to a
person familiar with his situation.
Rendon made $5.8 million in
arbitration last season and was
expected to earn a substantial
raise after hitting .301 with
100 RBI in his most consistent
and productive season yet.
More importantly, however,
Rendon is two seasons away from
free agency — a moment at which
teams often make a big push to
extend homegrown talent. Both
Rendon’s agent, Scott Boras, and
Nationals General Manager Mike
Rizzo expressed a willingness to
discuss an extension. In December, Rendon said he would be
open to that possibility, too. That
DAVID KOHL/USA TODAY SPORTS
The Nationals and third
baseman Anthony Rendon
agreed to a $12.3 million deal.
the two sides agreed on a oneyear deal does not preclude them
from negotiating an extension at
this time next year or anytime
before then. But as of Friday,
Rendon was under contract only
through 2018, and whether the
two sides seriously discussed an
extension remains unclear.
Often, the Nationals settle
with their players before the
deadline, choosing to find middle
ground outside of league-sanctioned arbitration hearings that
can produce ill will. If the team
and the player do not settle by
that deadline, they still may negotiate until a hearing, though
some teams — referred to as
“file-and-trial” clubs — set that
filing deadline as a drop-dead
moment. The Nationals have not
held to that rule without exception but do tend to go to hearings
if they have not settled by the
deadline. Those hearings usually
take place in February, and given
that the team argues a player’s
value down, those hearings can
foster awkwardness because of
the more unflattering arguments
teams make against their own.
Roark made $4.3 million last
season for what qualified as a
down year given his previous
consistency. After accumulating
15 wins in his first full season as a
starter in 2014 and 16 in 2016,
Roark won 13 games in 2017 as
his ERA jumped nearly two full
runs from those seasons. Most
around the Nationals speculated
that Roark’s extended stint with
Team USA in the World Baseball
Classic left him scrambling
through an unorthodox spring,
which in turn disrupted his season.
That the Nationals avoided a
hearing with Roark might be
more important long-term than
with another player; while the
two sides have never voiced anything but respect, they have plenty of room for animosity. Roark
was the man pushed from the
rotation when the Nationals unexpectedly signed Max Scherzer
in the winter of 2015. He also was
the man scheduled to start Game
4 of this year’s National League
Division Series before Stephen
Strasburg was suddenly named a
late re-addition to the plans.
Roark was clear about his disappointment in that decision and
the fact that he did not appear in
the NLDS at all, though he said
he understood the choice, given
the talent around him.
Taylor is in his first year of
arbitration eligibility, meaning
he has no precedent on which to
build and no established salary
he must exceed. MLB Trade Rumors projected the Nationals’
presumptive starting center
fielder to make $2.3 million next
season.
So as usual, the Nationals have
avoided hearings with their arbitration-eligibles, something that
should clarify their payroll and
allow them to focus on filling out
their roster. They still need bench
help, bullpen reinforcements and
potentially an established fifth
starter. But they have checked
another offseason box and done
so with just the usual dose of
deadline-day drama.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
Niumatalolo reportedly candidate for Arizona job
BY
A VA W ALLACE
Navy football Coach Ken Niumatalolo was absent from campus Friday as reports swirled that
he was a leading candidate for
the same position at Arizona.
The Arizona Daily Star, which
first reported the news that Niumatalolo had interviewed for the
position
in
Tucson,
and
FootballScoop.com both reported Friday afternoon that Niumatalolo has been offered the job.
The Washington Post confirmed through two people with
knowledge of the situation that
Niumatalolo, 52, was at the
American Football Coaches Association convention in Charlotte
on Monday but missed previously scheduled meetings Tuesday.
He was not present as expected at
Navy football offices on Thursday
or Friday, one of the people said.
Neither Niumatalolo nor Navy
Athletic Director Chet Gladchuk
responded to text or voice messages from The Post seeking comment.
Niumatalolo is the winningest
coach in Midshipmen program
history with a record of 84-48. He
recently capped his 10th full
season as a head coach, all in
Annapolis, with a 49-7 win over
Virginia in the Military Bowl on
Dec. 28.
The Arizona job came open
when Rich Rodriguez was fired
Jan. 2 amid allegations of sexual
misconduct brought by a former
athletic department employee.
Niumatalolo was reportedly
recommended to replace Rodriguez by Dick Tomey, who coached
Arizona from 1987 until 2000.
The two are friends and share a
link to the University of Hawaii,
where Tomey was head coach
from 1977 to 1986 and Niumatalolo lettered for three seasons as a
quarterback before graduating in
1989.
Niumatalolo, who is Mormon,
has entertained coaching opportunities outside of Annapolis before, most seriously when the
head-coaching vacancy opened
at Brigham Young in 2015. The
Hawaii native traveled to Provo,
Utah, in December of that year
but ultimately declined the job
offer to stay at Navy.
The reports of Niumatalolo’s
candidacy at Arizona also raised
at least one alarm within the
Wildcats program. In a tweet he
later deleted, standout quarterback Khalil Tate said he “didn’t
come to Arizona” to play in the
triple-option scheme favored by
Niumatalolo.
Tate, who would be a junior
next season, took over as the
starter in Rodriguez’s spread offense in the fifth game of last
season and immediately enjoyed
success. He threw for 1,591 yards,
14 touchdowns and nine interceptions and added 1,411 yards
and 12 touchdowns rushing in
11 games last season. The California native was the first Wildcats
player to have three games of at
least 200 rushing yards in a
season.
ava.wallace@washpost.com
THOMAS BOSWELL
Stats show Cousins is among NFL’s best quarterbacks
BOSWELL FROM D1
Samaje Perine?”
The Washington passer, who’s
likely to leave D.C. in the coming
months, could hardly have a
better advertisement for himself
than last week’s 10-3 Jaguars win
over Buffalo, in which Blake
Bortles and Tyrod Taylor threw
60 passes, many of them simple
checkdowns, for a sickly 208 net
passing yards. How many fans in
Jacksonville and Buffalo are
thinking, “Get us that free agent
Cousins”?
Or recall the collapse of Kansas
City, held scoreless in the second
half of a 22-21 loss to Tennessee,
as quarterback Alex Smith could
generate nothing despite having
the NFL’s leading rusher, Kareem
Hunt (1,327 yards), behind him
and Tyreek Hill (1,183 receiving
yards) at wide receiver. The
Chiefs’ dilemma? They had lost
1,038-yard tight end Travis Kelce.
What would Cousins, reduced
in his final game to playing
behind two third-string linemen,
handing to fifth-string runner
Kapri Bibbs and throwing to
what-route-will-he-decide-to-run
receiver Josh Doctson, give to
have such “limitations”?
From Denver to Jacksonville,
from Buffalo to the Meadowlands
— and maybe even in Pittsburgh,
if Big Ben retires — teams will
crunch numbers, study film and
decide how many millions to offer
Cousins in a couple of months,
after the Redskins decide which
tag to apply to their free agent.
Just how good is Cousins, who
had “leading” rushers the past
three years named Alfred Morris,
Robert Kelley and Perine and
who had a healthy quality
receiving corps only in one
season, 2016? Don’t get too
nostalgic about DeSean Jackson
and Pierre Garcon. They averaged
1,023 receiving yards per man in
2016 but in 2015 only 653 apiece.
When the jury reaches its verdict
on Cousins, it will conclude that
he usually acted alone.
Brees, Ryan and Roethlisberger
have similar stats to Cousins and
in some areas not as good, but they
have Michael Thomas, Jones and
Brown, who caught 1,245, 1,444
and 1,533 yards worth of passes
this year.
The Redskins have an
atrocious record for 25 years in
identifying quality wide
receivers. I have written that
The case for Cousins
In the past three regular seasons, Kirk Cousins’s stats stack up well against
any quarterback in the NFL not named Tom Brady or Aaron Rodgers:
PLAYER
STARTS
QB RATING TD-TO-TURNOVERS YARDS PER PLAY
Tom Brady
Drew Brees
Russell Wilson
Matt Ryan
Aaron Rodgers
Kirk Cousins
Alex Smith
Matthew Stafford
Dak Prescott
Ben Roethlisberger
Andy Dalton
Philip Rivers
Tyrod Taylor
Derek Carr
Jared Goff
Case Keenum
Carson Wentz
Marcus Mariota
Cam Newton
Blake Bortles
44
47
48
48
39
48
46
48
32
40
45
48
43
46
22
28
29
42
46
48
105.0
102.1
98.9
98.7
98.4
97.5
97.2
96.5
95.5
94.4
93.9
92.6
92.5
91.5
89.4
89.3
88.8
88.6
85.2
83.8
99-22 (+77)
97-40 (+57)
94-38 (+56)
79-45 (+34)
92-30 (+62)
94-47 (+47)
69-25 (+44)
88-44 (+44)
57-24 (+33)
79-46 (+33)
75-36 (+39)
90-52 (+38)
65-21 (+44)
82-41 (+41)
35-19 (+16)
37-23 (+14)
51-27 (+24)
67-46 (+21)
97-47 (+50)
86-61 (+25)
6.92
6.97
6.43
7.14
6.00
6.77
6.48
6.41
6.52
7.05
6.27
6.74
5.95
6.23
5.94
6.18
5.87
6.47
5.91
6.09
The Washington Post research
column before. Cousins is just the
latest victim. His top three
receivers the past three years had
7,236 yards. Brees’s top trios had
9,010. Ryan and Roethlisberger
have Jones and Brown, who have
caught 4,724 and 4,651 yards of
passes the past three years.
Cousins’s top receiver (Crowder)
has 2,240.
Cousins is not a “good”
quarterback, as the selfprotective orthodoxy of some
Redskins fans maintains. It’s
much more likely he is one of the
next great NFL quarterbacks,
along with young Carson Wentz
and perhaps Jared Goff. Cousins
and Russell Wilson, both 29, are
headed for fine duels, too.
Let’s look at three key
measures of quarterback
excellence over the past three
years. One is traditional:
quarterback rating. The top six
are Brady (105.0), Brees (102.1),
Wilson (98.9), Ryan (98.7),
Rodgers (98.4) and Cousins
(97.5).
Some consider Passer Rating
Differential to be “the mother of
all NFL stats” because it is such a
good predictor of won-lost record
and postseason success. If your
team starts with a passer rating of
97.5 (Cousins), you just need to
build a quality pass defense with
a passer rating under the league
average (85.1 in 2017) to virtually
ensure a playoff team with fine
January chances.
Let me introduce two new
stats, which are tweaks on old
ones. First, touchdowns vs.
turnovers. No, not the usual
touchdown passes vs.
interceptions. I prefer all
touchdowns, by pass and run, vs.
all turnovers, interceptions and
lost fumbles.
Why should Cam Newton’s
21 rushing scores from 2015 to
2017 be ignored when Philip
Rivers has zero? Also, let’s
acknowledge the gap between a
fumbler, such as Bortles, with
14 lost in three years, and a
tightfisted Roethlisberger (just
three).
Looked at this way, Brady, with
a 99-22 touchdown-to-turnover
ratio, and Rodgers, 92-30, are
almost in a different quarterback
universe. The next most
impressive group, with tons of
touchdowns but half as many
turnovers (or fewer), features
Brees (97-40), Wilson (94-38),
Newton (97-47) and Cousins (9447).
Some QBs have superb ratios
but are so ultra-conscious of ball
security that they generate fewer
scores, such as Smith (69-25) and
Taylor (65-21).
The leaders in total
touchdowns are Brady at 99, Brees
and Newton at 97, and Cousins
and Wilson at 94. If Rodgers
hadn’t missed nine games this
season, he would be No. 1.
Next, let’s cook up a new stat
that consolidates all the plays in
which the quarterback’s
performance defines the
outcome: passes, sacks and
rushes. Who averages the most
yards per play when all types of
plays are combined? In other
words, who’s best at gaining big
gobs of passing yardage while
also avoiding sacks, scrambling
for gains and even running on
purpose?
Ryan, the 2016 MVP, is the
leader over the past three years
(7.14 yards per play), followed by
Roethlisberger, Brees, Brady,
Cousins and Rivers. For total
yardage (passing plus rushing,
minus sacks), the leaders are
Brees, Rivers, Ryan and Cousins.
There’s that guy Cousins again.
If Cousins’s stats (97.5 QB
rating, 94-47 touchdown-toturnover ratio and 6.77 yards per
play) are elite, what constitutes a
backup QB who will kill you as a
starter? That would be crossyour-fingers Nick Foles, who will
have to start for the Eagles on
Saturday. In the past three years,
in almost 500 passes, he’s at 75.3,
16-to-16 and 5.19. That’s the
make-do profile for the likes of
Brock Osweiler (76.3, 34-to-30,
5.40), Blaine Gabbert (77.5, 24-to22, 5.38) or, in D.C., Colt McCoy
(78.9, 28-to-26, 5.35 in his career).
The clear message of these
numbers is that Washington’s
owner, president and coach
should all hug Cousins every day
— roses are always nice — and
offer him enormous piles of
money while he is still technically
in town. Recently, Cousins said he
wanted to spend his future
playing for a franchise that was a
“winner” and gave him a sense of
“peace,” plus lots of money, too.
That doesn’t sound like D.C.
But you never absolutely know.
However, if Cousins gets away,
fans can still watch him play in
the future. Probably deep into
January. Maybe February, too.
thomas.boswell@washpost.com
For more by Thomas Boswell, visit
washingtonpost.com/boswell.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
professional football
JERRY BREWER
NFL NOTES
In Khan, the NFL’s most unlikely owner emerges as one of its best Steelers’
Brown
sent home
with illness
BREWER FROM D1
with his stances on player
protests, President Trump’s
policies or simply what being an
American means. What
resonates is that Khan was
willing to give a damn, even
when it would have been better
for business to stay silent or
issue one of those say-nothing
statements that read like a
student trying to satisfy an
essay’s word requirement. What
matters most is that Khan, in
these divisive times, shares the
valuable, intrinsic perspective of
a man born in Pakistan who
immigrated to the United States
at 16 to attend the University of
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
made himself into a billionaire
in the auto parts industry and
personified the American
Dream.
Other owners — most of them
white men older than Khan with
boilerplate backgrounds and
cookie-cutter beliefs and values
— struggled with the polarity of
this season. It wasn’t merely that
they disagreed with the player
protests; the real problem was
that they didn’t understand their
players’ societal concerns and
didn’t care to ask about and
contribute to a feasible solution
until the matter became so
important it needed to be
negotiated. Some leaped
recklessly into the discord in
September after Trump
disparaged the league, locked
arms to support their players
without considering the
repercussions and then
backpedaled like a defensive
back covering a speedy receiver.
But Khan was more
consistent. During the Week 3
protests — the pivotal moment of
the season — he linked arms
with Jacksonville tight end
Marcedes Lewis and linebacker
Telvin Smith before a game in
PHELAN M. EBENHACK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shahid Khan’s Jacksonville Jaguars played their first playoff game
since 2007 on Sunday against Buffalo, a 10-3 victory.
London. He closed his eyes and
clenched a fist during the
national anthem. It was the first
game since Trump went after the
NFL, and Khan provided an
indelible image of the league’s
resistance. Then Khan, who
voted for Trump and donated
$1 million to his inaugural
committee, responded with a
genuine explanation.
“Our team and the National
Football League reflects our
nation, with diversity coming in
many forms — race, faith, our
views and our goals,” he said in a
statement. “We have a lot of
work to do, and we can do it, but
the comments by the President
make it harder. That’s why it was
important for us, and personally
for me, to show the world that
even if we may differ at times, we
can and should be united in the
effort to become better as people
and a nation.”
Khan also has spoken against
Trump’s proposal of a travel ban
for residents of seven Muslimmajority countries. And last
week, when Jacksonville hosted
and won a first-round playoff
game against Buffalo, Khan and
the Jaguars Foundation donated
1,000 tickets — 500 to refugees
who live in Northeast Florida
and another 500 to Puerto Rican
families in North and Central
Florida displaced by Hurricane
Maria.
Khan used a moment that
could have been all about how he
turned around a laughingstock
franchise and sent a bigger
message. Was it a political
statement? Of course. But it was
also a kind and emphatic gesture
that, for at least three hours,
injected some humanity into the
often hostile conversation about
immigrants and refugees.
NFL Commissioner Roger
Goodell attended the game and
emphasized the positive impact
Khan is having on the league.
When Khan reached an
agreement to buy the team in
2011, the challenge to resurrect
the Jaguars was immense.
During his early years as an
owner, it seemed Khan was more
likely to move the team to
London than enjoy success in
Florida. But as the Jaguars
prepare to visit Pittsburgh in the
divisional round, they are one of
the league’s best young teams.
Winning illuminates Khan’s
value.
“Shad has this great optimism
and this great enthusiasm, and
he believes in this community
and he believes in the NFL and
the Jaguars, and he wants to
make everything better,” Goodell
told reporters last week.
Goodell added: “He’s been
incredibly valuable to us on the
league level, [and] he’s involved
in a lot of different communities.
There’s not many things I don’t
want to speak to Shad about to
get his perspective on. He’s
become an incredibly valuable
owner in a short period of time.”
Last month, I wrote about why
the NFL needs to make
ownership diversity a greater
priority. Some oversimplified the
point and griped that I was
trying to create affirmative
action or a Rooney Rule for
owners, which is silly because
only members of an elite group
of wealthy people have the
money to own an NFL team. You
must be a billionaire, preferably
one many times over, to feel
comfortable running a
competitive franchise. In this
country, an overwhelming
majority of billionaires are older
white males who gradually built
their large fortunes.
Khan is the lone nonwhite
NFL majority owner. There are
six women, but they are either
very old (two in their 90s) or
they inherited ownership from
their husbands or fathers. The
league would benefit from any
kind of improved diversity in the
ownership ranks: age, race,
gender, approach, thought. It’s
important because it is becoming
clear that the league needs to
evolve. On just about every issue
it faces, the NFL is too slow to
react and not cognizant enough
about long-term implications.
It’s worth considering the impact
that fresh perspectives can have.
The issue has long been
considered in the league office.
Twenty years ago, when Goodell
was the NFL’s executive vice
president for football
development, he made diversity
a part of his agenda. When the
league decided to return a
franchise to Cleveland, Goodell
visited Washington to meet with
BET co-founder Robert Johnson,
who later became an NBA owner
in Charlotte.
The price was too high for
Johnson, as it would be for many
who are still building wealth.
You don’t hand out NFL
franchises because it’s a cool
idea; acquiring a team is a highstakes business deal. But
diversity can still be an
aspiration. The NFL — all sports
leagues — can do a better job of
targeting intriguing, fresh owner
candidates and being
transparent with them about
how to own a team eventually.
When minority stakes in teams
are available, leagues can do a
better job of having a diverse list
of vetted investors to suggest to
owners.
When Khan was building his
business, he made it known that
he wanted to own an NFL team.
Jerry Colangelo, who once
owned the NBA’s Phoenix Suns
and MLB’s Arizona
Diamondbacks, mentored him.
Six years ago, the Jacksonville
opportunity presented itself.
Khan purchased a team that
many thought couldn’t succeed.
Khan considered it a dream
realized.
Now he exemplifies not only
the best of what the NFL is, but
what it can be.
jerry.brewer@washpost.com
For more by Jerry Brewer, visit
washingtonpost.com/brewer.
Analysts see no discernible drop-o≠ in Brady’s play
BRADY FROM D1
coaches have seen “slippage” in
Brady this season, has prompted
the latest round of questions
about whether age has finally
started to leech Brady’s brilliance.
If Brady was not 40, his
81.6 passer rating over the final
five games of the season, which
he played with a nagging Achilles’
injury, would be dismissed as part
of a season’s typical ebb. The
sterling late-season performance
of Jimmy Garoppolo, the heralded backup the Patriots shipped to
San Francisco in October for a
second-round pick, would not
have evoked panicked regret
across New England.
In the ESPN story, an anonymous Patriots staffer described a
play in which Brady overlooked
an open receiver downfield for a
possible touchdown, instead
throwing over the middle to
wideout Chris Hogan, who was
tackled short of a first down and
injured his shoulder. “Tom was
trying to get it out quick,” the
staffer told ESPN. “As fragility has
increased, nervousness has also
increased.”
Despite the emerging concern,
experts see reason to relax. Hall of
Fame quarterback Kurt Warner,
who played until age 38 and now
analyzes the NFL for Westwood
One, said he has seen no discernible drop-off from Brady despite a
late-season rough patch.
“I will say, I can’t remember too
many five-game stretches where
Tom kind of played at this level or
not up to his normal standard,”
Warner said. “I’m just one that’s
very leery of always [saying], ‘He
hit the 40 wall.’ Or, ‘Father Time
caught up to him between Week
10 and Week 12.’ That kind of
stuff, I think it’s crazy. But people
always want to do that. They’re
looking for that moment, where
everything starts to go the other
direction.”
Zac Robinson, briefly an NFL
backup quarterback and now an
analyst for Pro Football Focus,
watched and graded every snap
every quarterback took in the
NFL this season. He concluded
Brady had the best season. He
saw two games — both late in the
season — when Brady’s level
dipped, the first owing to a poor
performance from the entire Patriots offense and the second
pockmarked with unusual inaccuracy from Brady.
“Other than that, I don’t see
any diminishing accuracy, arm
strength, movement in the pocket
— any of that stuff,” Robinson
said. “In terms of skittishness,
he’s still the most poised guy and
STEVEN SENNE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Analyst Zac Robinson rated the Patriots’ Tom Brady, left, the top quarterback of the 2017 season and said, “He’s still the most poised guy.”
the best guy in terms of working
the pocket.”
For aging quarterbacks, Robinson said, a telltale sign of eroding
skill is when a quarterback’s leg
strength slips, leading to poor
mechanics and decreased zip on
passes. “I certainly don’t see that”
from Brady, Robinson said. “He
still has a ton of power in his arm
and strength-wise looks as good
as it did, and you could argue it’s
even better now. He’s still as
efficient as ever with his mechanics, and it leads to him being able
to keep that arm strength at the
level it’s at.”
Warner believes he became a
better quarterback as he aged,
much for the same reason Brady
has maintained elite performance. Like Warner, Brady relies
on intellect and accuracy instead
of physical dominance. Brady
keeps a famously strict and intense physical maintenance regimen, but his mind always has
been his primary weapon. Warner said as long as he kept a
baseline of fitness, age never
bothered him physically — he
believes he would have the physical capability to make throws in
an NFL game today, at 46.
“But if you suffer an injury,
now that’s a whole different deal,”
Warner said. “Especially if it’s a
nagging injury where you got to
fight through. That wears on anybody mentally, especially as you
get older.”
Before Week 12, Brady appeared on the Patriots’ injury
report with an Achilles’ issue. The
injury coincided with Brady’s relative downturn, particularly
against pressure and in throwing
deep passes. A statistical breakdown shows Brady passed deep
with less frequency as the season
wore on but still at a higher rate
than average.
In the season’s first seven
games, Brady threw deep more
often than any quarterback in the
league and more often, by far,
than at any point in his career,
according to data compiled by
Pro Football Focus. Brady threw a
pass at least 20 yards in the air —
the barrier PFF uses for deep
passing — 40 times, 15.3 percent
of his throws, and completed 18.
In the first 11 games of the
season, according to NFL research, Brady had a 113.5 rating
on deep passes. In his past five
games, Brady completed only 9 of
26 deep passes, with three interceptions and no touchdowns,
good for a 25.3 rating.
Any study of Brady quickly
reveals the importance of tight
end Rob Gronkowski. In that
final five-game stretch, Brady
completed 5 of 6 deep passes to
Gronkowski but just 4 of 20 to all
other receivers. Gronkowski’s
best pattern, the seam route deep
down the middle, meshes with
Brady’s best throw. Robinson said
Brady throws the seam pattern
better than any quarterback in
football, and Gronkowski’s size
gives Brady options to squeeze
the pass in against any coverage.
With Gronkowski suspended
for Week 14 in Miami, Brady
played his worst game of the
season and one of the worst
games of his career. He completed 6 of 17 passes when blitzed,
Robinson said, as receivers failed
to shake man-to-man coverage.
“There wasn’t any quick outlets to
get the ball out of his hand,”
Robinson said. The Dolphins’ defense also forced Brady to make
deep sideline passes, perhaps the
weakest part of his game.
Brady did not appear on the
Patriots’ injury report Tuesday, a
first since his Achilles’ injury
surfaced. For the nitpicking that
can justifiably be done about
Brady’s performance with the injury, the Patriots went 4-1 in those
five games, including a victory at
Pittsburgh in which Brady was
sublime, particularly on a final
drive
heavily
featuring
Gronkowski.
“Watch him at the end of that
Pittsburgh game,” Warner said.
“Didn’t look like any age to me.”
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
Wide receiver Antonio Brown
was sent home from Pittsburgh
Steelers practice Friday, but it
wasn’t because of the calf injury he
has been nursing for the past four
weeks.
Brown was a full practice participant all week, but Coach Mike
Tomlin said Brown fell ill Friday.
So Tomlin kept him away from the
team two days before the Steelers’
divisional-round playoff game
Sunday against the Jacksonville
Jaguars.
On their official injury report
released late Friday afternoon, the
Steelers listed Brown as questionable.
“I didn’t want him to get any of
the guys who weren’t sick, sick,”
Tomlin said. “We’ll bring him back
in the building [Saturday] and
continue with his game readiness.
We don’t have a lot of reservations
about him from a physical health
standpoint. We do need to get him
well from an illness standpoint.”
Brown hasn’t played since he
left a Dec. 17 game against the
Patriots because of a contusion in
his lower left leg. He returned to
practice Monday and remains in
line to appear in his 10th playoff
game.
PANTHERS: Carolina hired
Norv Turner as its offensive coordinator to replace Mike Shula,
who was fired earlier in the week
after seven seasons with the team.
Turner, 65, is the latest member
of the Turner family to join the
Panthers.
His brother, Ron Turner, works
as the team’s offensive consultant,
and nephew Cameron is the assistant quarterbacks coach. Turner is
expected to bring son Scott Turner
on as quarterbacks coach. . . .
Linebacker Thomas Davis said
the 2018 season will be his last.
Davis confirmed his decision
during an appearance on NFL
Network on Friday. While the Panthers didn’t make an official announcement, the team posted a
picture of Davis on its Twitter page
with the word “Respect.”
SAINTS: New Orleans wide
receiver Brandon Coleman was
ruled out of Sunday’s divisionalround playoff game in Minnesota.
Coleman has not practiced this
week because of a neck injury.
JAGUARS: Jacksonville is
about as healthy as it could have
hoped heading into the divisional
round of the AFC playoffs.
Linebackers Telvin Smith (ankle) and Paul Posluszny (abdomen) practiced Friday. So did cornerbacks Jalen Ramsey (Achilles’)
and Aaron Colvin (illness).
VIKINGS: Minnesota Coach
Mike Zimmer said he hasn’t made
a decision regarding the status of
quarterback Sam Bradford, who
has practiced the past two weeks
in an attempt to be activated from
the injured reserve list.
BROWNS: Hue Jackson
somehow survived an 0-16 season.
Not everyone who worked for him
with the Browns was as lucky.
Cleveland’s coach overhauled
his staff, adding two assistants he
knows from previous NFL stops.
Jackson hired former New York
Giants wide receivers coach Adam
Henry for the same role with the
Browns, and former Cincinnati offensive coordinator Ken Zampese
will coach the quarterbacks.
The team also parted ways with
running game coordinator/running backs coach Kirby Wilson,
special teams coordinator Chris
Tabor, quarterbacks coach David
Lee, special teams assistant
Shawn Mennenga and special
teams quality control coach Stan
Watson.
BEARS: Chicago hired former Oregon coach Mark Helfrich
as its offensive coordinator.
Vic Fangio is returning as defensive coordinator after being
passed up for the Bears’ head
coaching job.
BILLS: Buffalo fired offensive
coordinator Rick Dennison after
the team finished 29th in offense
this season.
— Associated Press
Redskins lose assistant coach
Washington Redskins assistant
offensive line coach Kevin Carberry is leaving to join Stanford’s football staff, a person with knowledge
of the move confirmed.
Carberry, who spent the past
two seasons working under veteran offensive line coach Bill Callahan, will be Stanford’s running
game coordinator and offensive
line coach.
— Kimberley A. Martin
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13 , 2018
Last-second
Calgary topples Florida score caps
for sixth straight victory Washington
FLAMES 4,
comeback
PANTHERS 2
NHL ROUNDUP
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Mikael Backlund had an emptynet goal and a pair of assists, helping lift the Calgary Flames over the
Florida Panthers, 4-2, for their
sixth straight victory Friday night
in Sunrise, Fla.
Johnny Gaudreau, Matthew
Tkachuk and Sean Monahan also
scored for the Flames, and David
Rittich stopped 41 shots in his first
start in seven games.
Evgenii Dadanov scored both
goals for the Panthers, breaking a
19-game goal drought. James Reimer made 25 saves in his
16th consecutive start, but it
wasn’t enough to keep Florida
from its fourth loss in five games.
Tkachuk put Calgary ahead 2-1
on his goal at 10:38 of the second
period when Travis Hamonic’s
shot bounced off Reimer’s right
skate and Tkachuk poked in the
rebound.
Gaudreau stretched the lead to
3-1 on his power-play goal with
3:45 left in the second.
BLACKHAWKS
2, JETS 1:
Rookie center David Kampf
scored his first NHL goal and added an assist on his birthday, Jeff
Glass stopped 31 shots, and Chicago held off visiting Winnipeg.
Jan Rutta also scored for the
Blackhawks, who ended the Jets’
three-game winning streak and
handed Winnipeg its first regulation loss in seven games (6-0-1).
Glass, 32, lost a bid for his first
career shutout when Patrik Laine
scored with 3:41 left in the game.
Kampf, playing his ninth game
on his 23rd birthday, opened the
scoring at 4:51 of the second when
Connor Murphy’s screened shot
deflected in off him.
CANUCKS 5, BLUE JACKETS 2: Sven Baertschi sparked a
four-goal second period for Vancouver, Jacob Markstrom had
27 saves, and the visiting Canucks
beat the Blue Jackets.
Seth Jones put Columbus up 1-0
in the first period, but Vancouver
powered ahead in the second.
Baertschi, Erik Gudbranson,
Brandon Gaunce and Alexander
Edler scored, and Jake Virtanen
added an empty-net goal with
nine seconds left in the third to
help the Canucks snap a five-game
skid.
OILERS
4, COYOTES 2:
Darnell Nurse scored twice on rising slap shots from the left circle,
and Edmonton overcame an early
two-goal deficit to end a threegame losing streak with a win in
Glendale, Ariz.
Lightning’s Hedman is out
The Tampa Bay Lightning will
be without all-star defenseman
Victor Hedman for three to six
weeks because of a lower-body
injury.
Hedman, in his ninth NHL season, was hit on the side of his left
knee and could not put any weight
on his left skate as he headed to the
bench in the second period of
Thursday’s 5-1 loss to Calgary.
PENGUINS: Pittsburgh goaltender Matt Murray is in Canada
with his family to tend to a personal matter and will be away from
the team indefinitely.
The Penguins recalled Casey
DeSmith from their American
Hockey League affiliate in WilkesBarre/Scranton to serve behind
Tristan Jarry.
DUCKS: Forward Andrew
Cogliano agreed to a three-year,
$9.75 million extension through
the 2020-21 season with Anaheim.
Cogliano hasn’t missed a game
in his 11-season NHL career. His
streak of playing in 829 consecutive games for the Edmonton Oilers and the Ducks, who acquired
him in 2011, is the fourth longest in
NHL history.
CAPITALS FROM D1
defensive zone with other lines
before skating to the bench and
changing for the winger who usually skates on that forward trio.
But with 17 seconds left in regulation, Coach Barry Trotz told Beagle to stay on for the full shift,
especially if Washington won the
draw and got a clean zone exit.
“Twenty seconds left, I live for
those draws,” Beagle said. “That’s
what I’ve always like to take, when
there’s those pressure situations
on those draws in our zone.”
The 1.3 seconds that kept the
game from overtime meant Carolina didn’t even get a standings
point out of the closely contested
contest, and in the ultra-competitive Metropolitan Division, that
one point could make a difference
at the end of the season. As Washington enters its five-day bye
week, the team is in first place
with a cushy six-point lead.
“It keeps some good distance,”
Trotz said. “We’ve got a few days off
here, and it’ll make the break a lot
more pleasurable, that’s for sure.”
Goaltender Philipp Grubauer
had stopped 86 straight evenstrength shots over his previous
eight-plus periods before Jeff
Skinner split Washington’s John
Carlson and Brooks Orpik and
then seemed to catch Grubauer off
guard with a perfectly placed shot.
That gave the Hurricanes a 3-2
lead less than two minutes into the
third period. Grubauer would finish with 36 saves.
Washington then got a powerplay opportunity 4:03 into the period when Noah Hanifin was
called for hooking Tom Wilson,
but Backstrom was called for tripping 1:07 later, negating a man-advantage that seemed to be the
Capitals’ best opportunity to tie
GERRY BROOME/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Capitals goaltender Philipp Grubauer had 36 saves against Jeff Skinner and the Hurricanes on Friday.
Capitals 4, Hurricanes 3
WASHINGTON ......................... 1
CAROLINA ............................... 1
1
1
2 —
1 —
4
3
FIRST PERIOD
at New Jersey Devils
Scoring: 1, Carolina, Staal 13 (Aho, Williams), 3:20 (pp).
2, Washington, Eller 9 (Vrana, Ovechkin), 7:25 (pp).
Thursday
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Washington, Ovechkin 28 (Kuznetsov, Carlson), 0:28. 4, Carolina, Aho 16 (Staal, Faulk), 8:50 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Carolina, Skinner 14 (Fleury, Stempniak),
1:49. 6, Washington, Connolly 10, 16:52. 7, Washington,
Beagle 5 (Ovechkin, Backstrom), 19:58.
SHOTS ON GOAL
WASHINGTON ....................... 12
7
8 — 27
CAROLINA ............................. 10
18
11 — 39
Power-play opportunities: Washington 1 of 4 Goalies:
Washington, Grubauer 4-5-3 (39 shots-36 saves). Carolina, Ward 11-5-2 (27-23). A: 16,239 (18,680). T: 2:32.
the game. Players looked frustrated — Oshie smacked his stick
against the ice, and Ovechkin appeared to shout at an official.
But Washington’s bench found
its signature poise, and with 3:08
left in regulation, Oshie’s
forecheck pressure forced Hanifin
into an egregious turnover, an errant pass in front of Carolina’s net.
Brett Connolly got to the puck and
wasted no time swatting it
through goaltender Cam Ward’s
pads to tie the game at three.
Connolly has three goals in the
past seven games, and since Trotz
moved Oshie to the third line with
center Lars Eller, the line arguably
has been the team’s best.
Strong fourth quarter buoys Wizards
WIZARDS FROM D1
and Magic entered the fourth
quarter tied at 98.
“You got 12 minutes to figure it
out,” Wizards guard John Wall
said, revealing the team’s mentality after surrendering nearly
100 points through 36 minutes.
Wall made the most of the final
quarter, making 4 of 5 shots for nine
of his 30 points to go with nine
assists. Earlier in the game, the
27-year-old became the youngest
player in franchise history to reach
10,000 points. The milestone came
on his third bucket of the first quarter, but perhaps the bigger moment
was his drive and finish with
55.7 seconds remaining in the game
that pushed the Wizards to a sevenpoint cushion.
Wall’s clinching fourth quarter
loomed larger with the appropriate context: He had grimaced
while walking off the court at halftime after rolling his ankle but
played the rest of the game without limitation.
“It wasn’t bad, but who knows
with John? That guy just tapes it
up, goes out there and competes,”
Coach Scott Brooks said. “It’s what
makes him a special player. He
plays with bumps and bruises that
sometimes you got to be the bigger
man and sit him down, and we’ve
done that in practice quite a bit.
But he’s a competitor, and we needed every bit of his effort and energy,
defensive toughness and offense
and shot-making ability tonight.”
Bradley Beal, described as an allstar in absolute terms by Magic
Coach Frank Vogel before the game,
matched Wall with 30 points on 12for-17 shooting — and didn’t make a
three-pointer. The Wizards collected a season-high 74 points in the
paint.
“Just being aggressive. Being in
attack mode, putting the ball on the
floor, making plays, try to force the
ref to blow the whistle a little bit,”
Beal said. “Stay in attack mode.”
The only problem: The Magic
stayed just as aggressive.
The Wizards again played to the
level of a lesser opponent. In a game
with 12 lead changes and 13 ties, the
Magic (12-31) stood toe-to-toe with
the Wizards despite being ravaged
by injuries. Orlando has used
16 starting lineups, the second
most in the league. Even so, it shot
51.2 percent against the Wizards,
who own the NBA’s eighth-best defensive rating.
Washington had no answers for
Magic point guard Elfrid Payton,
who scored 27 points on 9-for-12
shooting.
Although Wizards backup center Ian Mahinmi, who had one of his
best games in a Washington uniform, rolled to the rim and made
seven of his eight field goal attempts
C API TALS ’ NE X T TH R E E
7 NBCSW
vs. Montreal Canadiens
Friday
7:30 NBCSW,
NHL Network
vs. Philadelphia Flyers
Jan. 21
12:30 NBC
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
“That’s the thing with Osh,” Connolly said. “He gives you 110 percent
of his effort every single game.”
Grubauer entered Friday’s game
3-0-2 over his past six appearances
with a 1.04 goals against average
and a .965 save percentage, allowing just two even-strength goals in
that span. He has been virtually
unbeatable at even strength — he
entered the game having stopped
110 of the past 111 even-strength
shots he had faced — but the Hurricanes were able to do damage with
the power play from the start.
Connolly was called for interference 3:10 into the game, and just
10 seconds later, a pretty Carolina
passing sequence was capped off
Indiana stops Cleveland
with 22-point comeback
A SSOCIATED P RESS
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Brooklyn Nets
Today
7 NBCSW
vs. Milwaukee Bucks
Monday
2 NBCSW
at Charlotte Hornets
Wednesday
7 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
and three of four at the free throw
line — “He was great,” Beal said —
Orlando countered with starter Bismack Biyombo, an energetic big
whom the Wizards could not keep
off the line (21 points, 13 rebounds
and five of six free throws).
“We have to be sharp in our
pick-and-roll coverage,” Brooks
said, highlighting the helpside
defense as a sore spot. “And a lot
of times we want to put heat on
the basketball, and if you don’t do
it, if you’re in a gray area, and they
Wizards 125, Magic 119
Orlando ............................... 33
Washington ........................ 34
ORLANDO
Gordon
Simmons
Biyombo
Fournier
Payton
Hezonja
Speights
Iwundu
Augustin
Afflalo
TOTALS
30
31
35
33
21 — 119
27 — 125
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
38:25 4-15 3-4 3-10 7 1 14
32:58 8-11 6-6 0-0 5 5 23
33:20
8-9 5-6 7-13 4 2 21
31:54 4-14 0-0 0-3 2 2 10
38:16 9-12 8-9 2-5 8 1 27
23:04
3-7 2-4 0-5 1 5
9
13:01
2-7 0-0 0-2 0 2
6
12:35
1-2 0-0 0-0 2 1
2
9:44
0-0 1-2 0-1 3 0
1
6:43
2-3 0-0 0-1 0 2
6
240 41-80 25-31 12-40 32 21 119
Percentages: FG .512, FT .806. 3-Point Goals: 12-29, .414
(Gordon 3-6, Afflalo 2-2, Speights 2-6, Fournier 2-8,
Payton 1-1, Simmons 1-1, Hezonja 1-5). Team Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 15 (19 PTS). Blocked Shots:
3 (Biyombo 2, Speights). Turnovers: 15 (Gordon 4,
Payton 3, Speights 3, Simmons 2, Augustin, Fournier,
Hezonja). Steals: 7 (Fournier 2, Iwundu 2, Augustin,
Biyombo, Payton). Technical Fouls: None.
WASHINGTON
Morris
Porter Jr.
Gortat
Beal
Wall
Oubre Jr.
Mahinmi
Scott
Satoransky
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
22:33
3-7 0-0 1-4 1 2
7
39:18 4-13 1-1 1-2 2 1
9
27:07
6-9 0-0 6-11 1 4 12
36:29 12-17 6-8 0-3 7 3 30
36:15 13-21 3-5 0-3 9 1 30
28:58 4-12 0-0 2-7 1 4 10
20:38
7-8 3-4 4-8 1 2 17
16:47
3-4 0-1 0-3 2 1
6
11:55
2-4 0-0 0-0 2 4
4
240 54-95 13-19 14-41 26 22 125
Percentages: FG .568, FT .684. 3-Point Goals: 4-16, .250
(Oubre Jr. 2-7, Morris 1-2, Wall 1-2, Beal 0-2, Porter Jr.
0-3). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 11 (14 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 6 (Mahinmi 3, Wall 3). Turnovers: 11 (Wall
4, Oubre Jr. 2, Satoransky 2, Mahinmi, Morris, Porter Jr.).
Steals: 9 (Porter Jr. 2, Satoransky 2, Beal, Gortat,
Mahinmi, Oubre Jr., Wall). Technical Fouls: None.
can get anything they want, and
that’s what happened tonight.
And our weak side wasn’t in, but
our offense was really good tonight. It’s like one of those cartoons as a kid: You plug the one
hole, and the oil pops out of the
next slot. We have to get better.
Brooklyn [which visits Saturday
night] beat us twice, and they
beat us with speed this last game.
We got to get better.”
The Wizards finally found some
distance thanks to their defense,
which limited Orlando to two field
goals in the final four minutes.
“We just did a great job of taking better shots but also getting
back in transition. But even in the
end, we gave up four quick layups,”
Wall said. “We do a better job in
transition. They are a team with
Payton, [when] we made or
missed, he was pushing every
time, trying to find guys. We kind
of went small and were able to
switch everything and did a better
job containing the ball.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
NBA ROUNDUP
PACERS 97,
CAVALIERS 95
The Wizards’ Bradley Beal had 30 points on 12-for-17 shooting and added seven assists in Friday’s win.
with Justin Williams setting up a
Jordan Staal wrister from the slot.
Washington’s power play got a
chance roughly two minutes later,
and just seconds before the man-advantage expired, a mad scramble
broke out in front of the net. Ward
was on all fours trying to cover the
puck as it pin-balled between seven
bodies around the crease.
The puck eventually got loose,
and Ovechkin swiped it with his
stick and passed it to Jakub Vrana.
Vrana’s shot caromed off the post,
then off Eller’s foot and then into
the net for one of the season’s
oddest goal sequences.
“They were determined that the
puck was going to end up in the
back of the net,” Trotz said.
The teams traded power-play
goals again in the second period, but
then that determined gleam Trotz
referenced roared back just in time.
“We’re winning games, and I
think we’re exceeding a lot of people’s expectations for us this year,”
Connolly said. “It’s a lot of fun to be
doing that right now. We’ve got a
really good feeling here. Everyone’s having a great time playing.
A lot of laughs, and you know,
that’s when hockey’s fun. We’re
having a good time right now.”
Lance
Stephenson
had
16 points and 11 rebounds, Darren
Collison scored 22 points, and the
Indiana Pacers rallied from a 22point, first-half deficit to beat the
Cleveland Cavaliers, 97-95, on Friday night in Indianapolis.
The Pacers have won three of
four and improved to 3-0 against
the three-time defending Eastern
Conference champs.
LeBron James did everything
he could to prevent the Cavaliers
from losing a third straight game.
He finished with 27 points, 11 assists and eight rebounds.
But James had two chances in
the final two seconds to win it and
missed both opportunities — after
Victor Oladipo gave Indiana the
lead for good on a three-pointer
with 2:09 left in the game.
First, the four-time MVP
stepped out of bounds with 1.7 seconds to go, a play that was confirmed on replay review. Then,
after Collison made a free throw to
give the Pacers a 97-95 lead,
James’s
desperation
three
bounced high off the rim as the
buzzer sounded.
HORNETS 99, JAZZ 88:
Kemba Walker scored 22 points
and Frank Kaminsky added 16 to
lead host Charlotte to its fourth
victory in six games.
Marvin Williams scored 15 and
Michael Kidd-Gilchrist 12 for
Charlotte, which won despite an
off night for Dwight Howard, who
scored just two first-half points.
Howard finished with eight points
on 2-for-9 shooting. He also went
4 for 10 from the foul line.
Donovan Mitchell scored
35 points for Utah, which has lost
14 of 19.
Towns fell one assist shy of his
second career triple-double, scoring 23 points and grabbing 15 rebounds as Minnesota beat New
York in Minneapolis.
The
Timberwolves
shot
56.7 percent (38 for 67) over the
final three quarters to come from
behind and win their fourth game
in a row and 11th of 14 overall.
NETS 110, HAWKS 105:
Spencer Dinwiddie had 20 points,
10 assists and nine rebounds, Jahlil Okafor added 17 points in a
reserve role, and Brooklyn won in
Atlanta.
Dinwiddie made the go-ahead
basket with 11 seconds left as the
Nets snapped a three-game losing
streak to move past an embarrassing 34-point home loss to Detroit
two nights earlier.
Guard Dennis Schroder finished with a career-high 34 points
for the NBA-worst Hawks, who
have lost five of six.
PELICANS 119, TRAIL
BLAZERS 113: Anthony Davis
scored 36 points in his return from
a right ankle sprain, and New Orleans beat visiting Portland.
Davis did not appear at all bothered by the injury that kept him
out of Wednesday night’s narrow
loss in Memphis, scoring on everything from explosive dribble
drives to soaring dunks.
DeMarcus
Cousins
had
24 points and 19 rebounds, and
Jrue Holiday scored 25 points for
New Orleans, which hit the halfway point of the regular season
one game above .500.
NUGGETS 87, GRIZZLIES
78: Will Barton scored 17 points,
94:
Trey Lyles had 16, and host Denver
overcame a slow start to beat
Memphis and snap a season-worst
three-game losing streak.
Nikola Jokic added 14 points
and nine rebounds for Denver,
which played without guard Gary
Harris, who was excused for personal reasons. It was the first
game Harris has missed this season. Barton started in his place.
TIMBERWOLVES
118,
KNICKS 108: Karl-Anthony
Utah’s Hood fined $35,000
Utah Jazz guard Rodney Hood
was fined $35,000 by the NBA for
slapping a phone out of a fan’s
hand.
Hood was forced to leave
Wednesday’s game against the
Wizards after receiving a second
technical foul. He knocked the
phone out of a fan’s hand while
walking past the man who was
sitting courtside and looked to be
recording Hood exiting the court.
The incident took place with
2:21 left in the third quarter of a
107-104 Jazz win at Washington.
WARRIORS
108, BUCKS
Kevin Durant scored
26 points, Draymond Green added
21, and Golden State used a 13-4
run in the fourth quarter to win in
Milwaukee.
With sharpshooting star Stephen Curry still sidelined by a
right ankle injury, the Warriors
clamped down on defense and did
most of their damage on the other
end in the lane.
The Warriors were just 3 for 13
from three-point range until Durant and Green hit back-to-back
threes in the final three minutes to
seal their 11th straight road win.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 , 2018
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
HI GH S C HOOL S C OR E BOAR D
BOYS' BASKETBALL
DISTRICT
Coolidge 61, School Without Walls 51
Theodore Roosevelt 88, Ballou 52
Thurgood Marshall 71, Cesar Chavez 44
MARYLAND
Bethesda-Chevy Chase 75, Walter Johnson 51
Blake 66, Damascus 58
Broadneck 65, Severna Park 52
Clarksburg 65, Northwest 62
CMIT-South 67, Tall Oaks 42
Eleanor Roosevelt 76, Suitland 52
Meade 72, Chesapeake 63
Paint Branch 77, Sherwood 40
Springbrook 71, Blair 64
Wise 66, Bowie 52
VIRGINIA
Centreville 66, Oakton 56
Colgan 47, Forest Park 38
Edison 81, Jefferson 69
Freedom-South Riding 64, Broad Run 61
Lake Braddock 80, Fairfax 65
Langley 60, McLean 53
Madison 58, Westfield 51
Potomac Falls 56, Rock Ridge 53
Robinson 61, South County 60
South Lakes 61, Herndon 47
Stone Bridge 83, Champe 53
West Potomac 63, Hayfield 59
PRIVATE
Episcopal 76, Landon 52
Georgetown Prep 62, Gilman 51
McLean School 74, Washington International 34
Paul VI 79, McNamara 65
Saint James 75, Maret 67
Severn School 64, St. John's Catholic Prep 41
St. Mary's Ryken 71, Good Counsel 48
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 78, Bullis 76
St. John's 80, All Hallows High 58
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
PHOTOS BY JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
VIRGINIA LIBERTY DISTRICT GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
Newman sparks Hornets’ divine rally
HERNDON 44,
SOUTH LAKES 43
BY
M ICHAEL E RRIGO
When the comeback was complete and the game won, players
from the No. 7 Herndon girls’
basketball team sprinted from the
bench to center court and met the
Hornets’ starters in a mosh. Herndon had overcome a 16-point deficit for a 44-43 win at South Lakes,
and although the rally didn’t
score a trophy, Friday’s win over a
rival sparked a joyous postgame
scene.
“It’s a rivalry game. Every one is
like a championship to us,” said
senior guard Devyne Newman,
whose free throw with five seconds remaining was the difference. “But this one was especially
crazy.”
The Hornets (9-1, 2-0 Liberty
District) entered the fourth quarter facing an 11-point deficit. With
her team down nine, sophomore
guard Jessie Pearson banked in a
three-pointer for her first basket.
She followed it with a right-handed scoop on the next possession,
Herndon’s Devyne Newman, top right, was fouled in the final
seconds before sinking the game-winning free throw. The Hornets’
student section, above, helped Herndon rally from 16 points down.
cutting the lead to four. The Herndon student section came to life,
and South Lakes called a timeout.
After a dominant performance
through three quarters, the Seahawks had scored only one point
in the fourth, and a nervous buzz
filled the gym.
From there, Newman took over.
The dynamic guard, averaging
22.7 points, drove to her right and
made a layup to make it a one-possession game. South Lakes then
hit one of two free throws to push
its lead to three. It was the Seahawks’ final point of the night.
With both teams pressing and
the crowd on its feet, the final
minute included three straight
trips to the line for Newman. She
missed the first of two free throws
with the game tied at 43 and five
seconds left. It was only her second miss from the line all night.
“I was thinking, ‘Just don’t
choke now,’ ” said Newman, who
finished with 20 points. “I knew if
I missed one I definitely wouldn’t
miss the second. I never miss two.”
She sank the second. The Seahawks, flustered after surrendering the lead for the first time, were
unable to inbound for a final shot.
The buzzer sounded, and the Hornets took off for midcourt.
“When it’s a rivalry, the game is
never over. I told them we just had
to cut it down to single digits for
the fourth. We didn’t exactly do
that, but we were close. And we
executed from there,” Herndon
Coach Cornelius Snead said.
The game matched a pair of
teams that like to press. Through
the first three quarters, South
Lakes (10-2, 2-1) did a better job of
handling the pressure and getting
easy looks for freshman center
Adrianna Smith, who finished
with 14 points.
“With a big crowd, everybody
starts off slow,” Newman said. “We
got a little angry at some points,
but we just had to calm each other
down to get back into it.”
michael.errigo@washpost.com
MONTGOMERY 4A WEST BOYS’ BASKETBALL
Friendly freshman rivalry helping Trojans succeed
GAITHERSBURG 62,
QUINCE ORCHARD 44
BY
C ALLIE C APLAN
As Gaithersburg guard Jordan
Hawkins rose for a dunk just before the halftime buzzer Friday
night, Jao Ituka rose from his seat
on the bench.
When Hawkins slammed the
ball through the net, Ituka stumbled over a chair and onto the
bleachers, so enamored with his
fellow freshman’s highlight play
that he turned around and made a
declaration.
“I got to get me one of those,
too,” Ituka shouted to a friend
sitting behind him.
For the final points of his gamehigh 23 in Gaithersburg’s 62-44
home win against Quince Orchard, the star rookie guard made
good on his word with a jam in
transition off a steal.
The move wasn’t to be selfish,
Ituka said, and instead was meant
to reflect his growing confidence,
grit and competitiveness — especially with Hawkins.
“We’re like this,” Ituka said,
crossing his fingers to demonstrate
his relationship with Hawkins before describing the duo’s rivalry. “If
you make a dunk, I make a dunk. If
you hit a three, I hit a three. If you
get a layup, I get a layup, so it’s like
that back and forth.
Ituka, a 6-foot-1 guard who
probably has a Division-I future,
elected to play with the Trojans
this year amid numerous offers
from private and prep schools
around the area.
As he has become more comfort-
able — Trojans Coach Jeff Holda
said there was an adjustment period given Ituka hadn’t played much
organized basketball before entering high school — he has shed the
nerves that Holda said were visible
in his first outing and has emerged
as a dominant presence.
Ituka leads the team with
17 points per game, scoring in double digits in all but two. He has
worked closely with Holda to learn
the Trojans’ zone-trap defensive
scheme and has taken part in team
building exercises to help Gaithersburg’s standout rookies bond with
the three seniors who start.
“Over the course of the season,
he’s gone from being our leading
scorer to some nights being maybe
our second-leading scorer but our
leading rebounder, and some
nights we ask him to guard the
other team’s best player,” Holda
said. “He’s learning the game as he
goes.”
The result for Gaithersburg: a
9-2 record (2-0 Montgomery 4A
West) after defeating Quince Orchard (5-7, 1-2), which played for
the Maryland 4A state championship last March. Through 11 games
last season, the Trojans were 2-9.
And the result for Ituka: relaxation.
He opened the game with nine
points in the first quarter, including the team’s first six, before taking a breather in the second period.
That’s when Ituka turned around
in his seat and, with a smile, asked
for a sip of a friend’s drink and the
rest of his pizza crust.
“Even if the game is pressure, I
still need to feel calm and have fun,”
Ituka said. “Then when I get back
into the game, I just turn it on.”
callie.caplan@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Bladensburg 54, High Point 16
Bowie 0, Wise 0
Damascus 56, Blake 24
Douglass 61, Friendly 22
Eleanor Roosevelt 68, Suitland 60
Oxon Hill 72, Potomac 8
Paint Branch 79, Sherwood 49
Parkdale 65, DuVal 23
Quince Orchard 49, Gaithersburg 47
Richard Montgomery 63, Wootton 40
Seneca Valley 52, Northwood 40
Severna Park 43, Broadneck 25
Wheaton 40, Einstein 34
VIRGINIA
Colgan 34, Forest Park 20
Falls Church 48, Stuart 39
George Mason 40, Central-Woodstock 36
Herndon 44, South Lakes 43
Lake Braddock 58, Fairfax 44
Langley 61, McLean 35
Madison 44, Westfield 41
Marshall 53, Chantilly 39
Mount Vernon 69, Annandale 60
Robinson 55, South County 42
Stone Bridge 61, Champe 50
Tuscarora 66, Briar Woods 27
Washington-Lee 52, Yorktown 47
West Springfield 32, W.T. Woodson 28
Woodbridge 68, Freedom-Woodbridge 40
PRIVATE
Bishop Ireton 62, Carroll 44
Elizabeth Seton 68, Holy Cross 32
Field 28, Edmund Burke 21
Flint Hill 52, Bullis 43
Paul VI 66, McNamara 53
RC 55, Potomac School 49
Sidwell Friends 62, Maret 35
St. John's 74, O'Connell 47
B OY S ’ B A S K E TB A L L
TOP 20
NO. 3 PAUL VI 79, MCNAMARA 65
BM (8-6) Williams 18, Womack 18, Marshall 11, Moore 6,
Bell 6, Rounds 4, Kirkland 2 Totals 19 9-12 65.
PVI (11-2) Slater 18, Harris 17, Roach 15, Oduro 7, Ford 6,
Joyner 5, Robinson 4, Keels 3, Paige 2, Freeman 2 Totals
26 12-17 79.
Halftime: Paul VI, (40-30).
Three-point goals: PVI 5 (Keels 1, Roach 1, Joyner 1,
Slater 2); BM 6 (Williams 4, Womack 1, Rounds 1).
NO. 6 WISE 66, BOWIE 52
B (5-4) Burke 13, Freeman-Davis 13, Santa-Cruz 8,
Harris 6, Walker 4, Mitchell 2, Gbugu 2, Toler 2, Joseph 2
Totals 15 7-9 52.
W (10-1) Devonish 12, Gibbons 11, Johnson 11, Crowell
9, Covington 8, Chase 6, Arnold 3, Longshore 2, Corley 2,
Webb 2 Totals 19 16-24 66.
Halftime: Wise, (33-23).
Three-point goals: W 4 (Crowell 1, Johnson 2, Arnold 1);
B 5 (Burke 2, Freeman-Davis 1, Harris 2).
NO. 7 ST. JOHN'S 80, ALL HALLOWS HIGH 58
AH Totals 0 0-0 58.
SJ (10-4) Morsell 18, Wood 15, Njoku 15, Dunn 7, Abbott
7, Savage 6, Spooner 4, Leggett 4, Hunt 2, Naboya 2
Totals 25 3-4 80.
Halftime: St. John's, (34-31).
Three-point goals: SJ 9 (Wood 1, Dunn 1, Savage 2,
Morsell 4, Abbott 1).
NO. 8 EPISCOPAL 76, LANDON 52
L (4-8) Reynolds 10, Lilly 10, Harley 8, Patterson 6,
Larosiliere 5, Camphausen 5, Davis 3, Gray 3, Hollensteiner 2 Totals 13 5-11 52.
E (12-1) Johnson 23, Johnson 14, Steele 14, Shannon 11,
Pfaffenberger 8, Chenery 4, Rondeau 2 Totals 24 13-20
76.
Halftime: Episcopal, (37-16).
Three-point goals: E 5 (Johnson 1, Johnson 1, Steele 3); L
7 (Reynolds 1, Harley 1, Larosiliere 1, Camphausen 1,
Lilly 2, Gray 1).
NO. 9 GEORGETOWN PREP 62, GILMAN 51
G (0-1)Totals 0 0-0 51.
GP (11-3) Nweke 14, Curfman 13, Offurum 9, Somerville
8, Mulquin 7, Bynum 5, Desire 4, Oranye 2 Totals 13
18-21 62.
Halftime: Georgetown Prep, (39-24). Three-point goals:
GP 6 (Somerville 1, Bynum 1, Curfman 3, Mulquin 1).
NO. 12 ELEANOR ROOSEVELT 76, SUITLAND 52
ER (7-2) Bailey 19, Faulkner 14, Thomas 2, Butler 2,
Cochran 1, Allen 8 Totals 27 10-16 76.
S (6-4) Diggs 14, Roberts 9, Johnson 8, Lockley 8,
Zimmerman 6, Reed 2, Hazer 2, Mozee 2, Turner 1 Totals
11 9-12 52.
Halftime: Eleanor Roosevelt, (41-28).
Three-point goals: S 7 (Roberts 3, Zimmerman 2, Lockley
2); ER 4 (Bailey 2, Brown 2).
ST. STEPHEN'S/ST. AGNES 78, NO. 14 BULLIS 76
SSSA (9-4) DePollar 21, Lipscomb 15, Screen 13,
Thompson 12, Howard 9, White 8 Totals 23 11-12 78.
B (10-5) Morse 25, Smith 16, Hanin 12, Amsellem 7,
Tarke 5, Wilson 5, Reynolds 4, Yeutter 2 Totals 15 16-22
76.
Halftime: St. Stephen's/St. Agnes, (42-35).
Three-point goals: B 10 (Morse 4, Smith 2, Hanin 4);
SSSA 7 (Howard 2, DePollar 4, Lipscomb 1).
Island time suits Harman just fine at Sony Open
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Different islands and vastly different courses but the same good
play from Brian Harman.
A week after Harman shared
the 36-hole lead at Kapalua, he
ran off three straight birdies Friday and closed with a 15-foot eagle
for a 7-under-par 63 and a threeshot lead going into the weekend
at the Sony Open in Honolulu.
Harman was at 13-under 127,
and no one could catch him in the
second round.
Chris Kirk, who shared the 18hole lead with Harman, opened
by pitching in from 25 yards for
eagle on No. 10. He ended his day
by driving into the canal on the
par-5 ninth and making bogey for
a 67. Kirk was three behind with
Zach Johnson (67), John Peterson
(64), Tom Hoge (65) and Talor
Gooch (66).
The two courses on the PGA
Tour’s Hawaii swing are nothing
alike. The Plantation Course at
Kapalua was built on the side of
the mountain on the west tip of
Maui and features fairways that
can stretch nearly 90 yards wide
and big slopes in the greens. Waialae is at sea level with smaller,
WJ (3-8) Koenick 11, Criss 8, Kaleeba 8, Bournias 6,
Mahne 5, Roales 4, Alemu 3, Castellano 3, Markey 2,
Newman 1 Totals 6 15-24 51.
B-CC (9-3) Wood 17, Baer 11, McAuliffe 10, Gibson 10,
English 6, Bascolo Oudot 5, Doherty 5, Graves 5, Chappell
5, Hylton 1 Totals 16 10-14 75.
Halftime: Bethesda-Chevy Chase, (35-20).
Three-point goals: B-CC 11 (Bascolo Oudot 1, Doherty 1,
Wood 2, Baer 3, McAuliffe 2, Chappell 1, Gibson 1); WJ 8
(Mahne 1, Alemu 1, Bournias 1, Koenick 1, Roales 1,
Kaleeba 2, Criss 1)
He was seven shots behind.
EUROPEAN TOUR: Chris
Paisley and Adrien Saddier
opened a big lead after two
rounds of the South African Open
in Johannesburg as they moved to
13 under, four shots clear of their
nearest challengers.
England’s Paisley shot 7-under
65 to move up from second place.
France’s Saddier had the round of
the day at Glendower Golf Club, a
course record-equaling 63 with
an eagle and seven birdies.
GREGORY SHAMUS/GETTY IMAGES
Brian Harman finished his second round with an eagle to reach
13 under par through 36 holes at the Sony Open in Honolulu.
flatter greens and fairways
framed by trees.
But Harman is playing just as
well on Oahu as he did on Maui.
He surged ahead with two quick
birdies on the back nine, made the
turn in 32 and ran off three
straight birdies early on the front
nine. After making his only bogey
from a bunker on the par-3 seventh, Harman hit 7-iron from
172 yards to 15 feet on No. 9 for a
closing eagle.
Johnson had a nine-hole
stretch of eight pars and a bogey
until a strong finish. He birdied
the par-3 seventh and closed with
an eagle to salvage a 67.
Defending champion Justin
Thomas was closer to the cut line
than the lead until he made two
birdies and an eagle to shoot 67.
McIlroy reveals heart ailment
Rory McIlroy said he has a
heart ailment that will have to be
monitored regularly but is not
expected to affect his play.
McIlroy said in an interview
with the London Telegraph that
he has a thickening of the left
ventricle. He said doctors told
him it was caused by a viral infection he suffered 18 months ago.
He said he will get an electrocardiogram every six months and an
MRI exam once per year.
“There’s a bit of scar tissue. For
now, I just need to stay on top of it
and have to stay fit,” he said. “Hey,
I was planning on doing that
anyway.”
W (8-5) Opoku 13, Hairston 11, Gregory 9, Reed 9, Morin
3, Summey 2, Kiley 2, Daniel 2 Totals 13 10-14 51.
M (7-5) Finney 15, Darab 10, Hugie 10, Thompson 9,
Hecht 8, Koskovich 4, Conforti 2 Totals 18 10-14 58.
Halftime: Westfield, (30-22).
Three-point goals: M 4 (Darab 1, Thompson 1, Hugie 2);
W 5 (Hairston 3, Gregory 1, Morin 1)
GUNSTON DISTRICT
WEST POTOMAC 63, HAYFIELD 59
H (5-5) Cobbs 20, Joiner 12, Bailey 9, Pringle 9, Robinson
5, Traylor 2, Ntiahmoah 2 Totals 15 11-22 59.
WP (3-9) Mackey Jr. 19, Adjei 13, Harrigan 11, Etheredge
8, Munson 6, Trotter 4, Mazzoccoli 2 Totals 23 14-18 63.
Halftime: West Potomac, (36-31).
Three-point goals: WP 1 (Mackey Jr. 1); H 6 (Joiner 2,
Cobbs 1, Bailey 2, Pringle 1)
LAKE BRADDOCK 80, FAIRFAX 65
F (8-5) Abtew 16, Peters 15, Ackerman 9, Lewis 8,
Napper 8, Colbert 4, Pelczynski 3, Mbangue 2 Totals 21
11-26 65.
LB (9-4) James 42, Grable 11, Cobb 6, Hassett 5, Cullen 5,
Margraf 3, Flowers 3, Dunn 2, Ellis 1, Zerbo 1, Doyle 1
Totals 18 23-34 80.
Halftime: Lake Braddock, (32-23).
Three-point goals: LB 7 (James 3, Grable 1, Cobb 1,
Cullen 1, Hassett 1); F 4 (Abtew 4)
GI R LS ’ BA S K E TBALL
TOP 20
NO. 2 PAUL VI 66, NO. 10 MCNAMARA 53
PVI (13-2) Owusu 22, Collins 19, Thibodeau 17, Klimkiewicz 6, Kenefick 2 Totals 21 9-19 66.
BM (11-1) Brown-Turner 21, Matharu 18, King 9, Gibson
5 Totals 15 17-30 53.
Halftime: Paul VI, (31-19).
Three-point goals: BM 2 (Matharu 1, Brown-Turner 1);
PVI 5 (Thibodeau 5).
NO. 7 HERNDON 44, SOUTH LAKES 43
SL (10-2) Smith 14, Benvenuti 7, Scott 6, Boffman 4,
Spears 4, Cotton 1 Totals 14 8-16 43.
H (8-1) Newman 23, Brunson 7, Pearson 5, Koch 3,
Johnson 3, Strawser 3 Totals 6 17-24 44.
Halftime: South Lakes, (26-18).
Three-point goals: H 5 (Brunson 1, Koch 1, Johnson 1,
Newman 1, Pearson 1).
NO. 12 TUSCARORA 66, BRIAR WOODS 27
BW (1-5)Totals 0 0-0 27.
T (14-0) Middleton 21, Middleton 11, Santos 9, Fitz 8,
Austin 4, Cabassa 4, Raborg 3, Evans 2, Machulski 2,
Hacker 2 Totals 21 6-10 66.
Halftime: Tuscarora, (36-15).
Three-point goals: T 6 (Santos 1, Fitz 2, Middleton 3).
NO. 15 RICHARD MONTGOMERY 63,
WOOTTON 40
W (6-5)Totals 0 0-0 40.
RM (12-0) Osborne 22, Rashad 18, Williams 14, Schuck 5
Totals 17 11-17 63.
Halftime: Richard Montgomery, (41-21).
Three-point goals: RM 6 (Osborne 4, Williams 1, Yan 1).
NO. 16 OXON HILL 72, POTOMAC (MD.) 8
P (3-4) Harewood 4, Scott 2, McDonald 2 Totals 2 1-8 8.
OH (11-0) Staples 22, Warren 18, Wilson 8, Cuyler 6,
Elam 5, Jackson 4, Monteiro 3, Whitaker 3, Beckett 3
Totals 17 11-18 72.
Halftime: Oxon Hill, (50-5).
Three-point goals: OH 9 (Staples 5, Warren 1, Whitaker
1, Wilson 1, Elam 1); P 1 (Harewood 1).
NO. 18 MARSHALL 53, CHANTILLY 39
M (12-2) Ford 19, South 6, Soule 6, Trivisonno 6, Grill 5,
Leap 5, Donnellan 2, McFaul 2, Dirkse 2 Totals 19 3-3 53.
C (5-8) O'Brien 14, Baxter 10, Pavlech 6, Bibbee 3,
Thompson 2, Copeland 2, Mazari 2 Totals 12 12-14 39.
Halftime: Marshall, (31-11).
Three-point goals: C 1 (Bibbee 1); M 4 (Grill 1, Leap 1,
Trivisonno 2).
NO. 20 PARKDALE 65, DUVAL 23
P (6-1) Calhoun 19, Johnson 14, Yancey 13, Minnis 8,
Indianesia 5, Beasely 2, Vallair 2, Manful 2 Totals 16 6-6
65.
D (2-4) Key 7, Boucher 4, Abbas 3, Davis 3, Bates 2,
Nzenwa 2, Hoes 1, Major 1 Totals 7 3-11 23.
Halftime: Parkdale, (36-10).
Three-point goals: D 2 (Key 1, Davis 1); P 9 (Calhoun 6,
Johnson 2, Yancey 1).
MONTGOMERY 4A WEST
QUINCE ORCHARD 49, GAITHERSBURG 47
QO (5-6) Kelley 14, Kamali 11, Badmus 9, Regan 6,
Michaels 5, Popa 4 Totals 14 9-14 49.
G (7-3) Odom 17, Kuinazah 13, Ashiogwa 8, Brogdon 6,
Dixon 2, Ofori 1 Totals 15 8-20 47.
Halftime: Quince Orchard, (29-11).
Three-point goals: G 3 (Odom 2, Kuinazah 1); QO 4
(Badmus 1, Michaels 1, Kelley 2)
MONTGOMERY 4A SOUTH
WHEATON 40, EINSTEIN 34
W (5-3) Simmons 16, Jones 13, Alli 4, Hammed-Owens
4, Haile 2, Nichloson 1 Totals 10 5-15 40.
E (3-6) Whitaker 14, McDonnell 13, Jakobsberg 5,
Martinez 2 Totals 10 5-9 34.
Halftime: Wheaton, (24-11).
Three-point goals: E 3 (McDonnell 2, Whitaker 1); W 5
(Simmons 4, Jones 1)
PRINCE GEORGE'S 4A
ELEANOR ROOSEVELT 68, SUITLAND 60
S (8-2) Peterson 21, Clark 19, Hall 8, Strachan 5, Wages
3, Gatling 2, Jackson 2 Totals 19 19-36 60.
ER (8-2) McCalla 22, Adams 8, McCormick 8, Lee 8,
Workman 6, Johnson 6, Scott 5, McFarlane 5 Totals 20
13-21 68.
Halftime: Eleanor Roosevelt, (36-28).
Three-point goals: ER 5 (McCalla 2, Scott 1, Workman 1,
McCormick 1); S 1 (Wages 1)
PRINCE GEORGE'S 3A/2A/1A
DOUGLASS 61, FRIENDLY 22
D (8-1) Riddick 14, Ford 10, Griffith 9, Ford 7, Carey 5,
Perry 5, Hansberry 4, Carey 3, Allen 2, Smith 2 Totals 19
5-11 61.
F (0-5) Barbour 10, Baker 4, Zimmermann 2, Jefferson 2
Totals 3 3-8 22.
Halftime: Douglass, (34-10).
Three-point goals: F 3 (Barbour 3); D 6 (Ford 1, Carey 1,
Perry 1, Ford 2, Griffith 1)
ISL AA
MONTGOMERY 4A SOUTH
BETHESDA-CHEVY CHASE 75,
WALTER JOHNSON 51
GOLF ROUNDUP
MADISON 58, WESTFIELD 51
POTOMAC DISTRICT
POTOMAC FALLS 56, ROCK RIDGE 53
PF (10-3) Anderson 25, Hawes 12, Anthony 7, Asbury 6,
Robinson 4, Misch 2 Totals 14 13-17 56.
RR (5-8) Fitch 20, Conrow 12, Doe 10, Sanderson 4,
Bhakta 3, Wright 2, Larsen 2 Totals 16 0-2 53.
Halftime: Potomac Falls, (32-31).
Three-point goals: RR 7 (Bhakta 1, Fitch 4, Conrow 2); PF
5 (Robinson 1, Anthony 2, Hawes 2)
STONE BRIDGE 83, CHAMPE 53
SB (6-6) Kling 27, Buckley 17, Thokala 13, Rhodes 8,
Warden 8, DiLuigi 5, Ware 5 Totals 10 15-24 83.
C (5-5) Watkins 10, Easter 8, Ryan 8, Savage 8, Garmon
7, Conway 6, Arbore 4, Antwi 1, Godwin 1 Totals 11 7-19
53.
Halftime: Stone Bridge, (42-25).
Three-point goals: C 8 (Arbore 1, Easter 2, Ryan 2,
Savage 1, Conway 1, Garmon 1); SB 16 (Kling 6, Buckley
2, DiLuigi 1, Rhodes 2, Warden 2, Thokala 3)
FLINT HILL 52, BULLIS 43
B (7-6) Walker 12, Saddler 7, Howard 6, Page 6, Carrillo 3,
Urofsky 3, Pendleton 3, Arjukese 3 Totals 13 8-14 43.
FH (9-4) Jordan 13, Lamont 13, Miller 9, Wiley 7, Boyce 6,
Rice 2, Noone 2 Totals 14 18-28 52.
Halftime: Bullis, (25-20).
Three-point goals: FH 2 (Boyce 1, Lamont 1); B 3 (Walker
1, Urofsky 1, Arjukese 1)
WCAC
ELIZABETH SETON 68, HOLY CROSS 32
ES (5-5) Clayborne 13, Addison 12, Cater 8, Gray 6,
Brown 6, Robinson 5, Gaines-Burns 5, Baldwin 5, Ming 5,
Lonergan 3 Totals 20 4-11 68.
HC (2-8) Fuller 11, Muzzatti 9, Faunteroy 5, Beckham 5,
Dent 2 Totals 10 6-9 32.
Halftime: Elizabeth Seton, (36-13).
Three-point goals: HC 2 (Faunteroy 1, Muzzatti 1); ES 8
(Addison 2, Robinson 1, Gray 1, Lonergan 1, Ming 1,
Brown 2)
PVAC
FIELD 28, EDMUND BURKE 21
F (2-7) Blackman 12, Rauch 6, Yardas 2, Pardo 2,
Mengistu-Gunn 2, Bennett 2, Shaw 2 Totals 8 6-15 28.
EB (0-4) Black 6, DeShazier 5, Fofana 4, Mauser 3,
Garrett 3 Totals 6 3-13 21.
Halftime: Field, (17-11).
Three-point goals: EB 2 (DeShazier 1, Mauser 1); F 2
(Rauch 2)
LIBERTY DISTRICT
WCAC
ST. MARY'S RYKEN 71, GOOD COUNSEL 48
GC (4-11) Carter 14, Nwosu 11, Carter 8, Walker 6, Jacks
4, Melton 3, Curtis 1, Mbeng 1 Totals 18 9-21 48.
SMR (3-6) Tabbs 26, Tull 16, Eackles 15, Tang 5, Bikoy 3,
Pappas 3, Kurnaz 2, Jasper 1 Totals 16 21-27 71.
Halftime: St. Mary's Ryken, (32-16).
Three-point goals: SMR 6 (Tull 2, Pappas 1, Tabbs 2,
Tang 1); GC 1 (Nwosu 1)
LIBERTY DISTRICT
LANGLEY 60, MCLEAN 53
L (7-6) Beckett 21, Carton 15, Brzezinkski 8, Hoeymans
7, Muir 6, Thrasher 3 Totals 16 10-13 60.
M (4-7) Prock 25, Senft 11, Stout 9, Hale 4, Lopez 2, Aka
2 Totals 10 9-11 53.
Halftime: Langley, (31-27).
Three-point goals: M 8 (Prock 6, Stout 2); L 6 (Beckett 3,
Carton 2, Thrasher 1)
WASHINGTON-LEE 52, YORKTOWN 47
Y (3-7) Shean 19, Shipley 12, Hemstreet 8, Winer 3
Totals 11 8-17 47.
WL (6-5) Nigatu 18, Mosley 12, Doolittle 8, Rood 8,
Srinivasan 6 Totals 15 10-15 52.
Halftime: Washington-Lee, (23-12).
Three-point goals: WL 4 (Mosley 1, Nigatu 1, Srinivasan
2); Y 4 (Shipley 1, Shean 3)
LANGLEY 61, MCLEAN 35
L (9-3) Callaghan 14, Shively 12, Azad 9, Maloney 6,
Costley 4, Jepsen 4, Mufti 4, Illoh 2, Chapman 1 Totals 22
8-11 61.
M (5-7) Moskowitz 13, Dufrane 9, Cox 4, Jones 4, Irons 3,
Hedrick 2 Totals 9 8-10 35.
Halftime: Langley, (25-17).
Three-point goals: M 3 (Moskowitz 2, Dufrane 1); L 3
(Britt 1, Shively 1, Azad 1)
LAKE BRADDOCK 58, FAIRFAX 44
LB (9-5) Park 19, Joachim 15, Miller 6, Boone 6, Galonis
5, Otugo 4, Park 3 Totals 19 20-29 58.
F (7-8) McNaughton 18, Heslep 9, George 9, NapperBraxton 3, Moore 3, Herzog 2 Totals 6 14-16 44.
Halftime: Lake Braddock, (26-20).
Three-point goals: F 6 (Heslep 2, George 1, McNaughton
2, Moore 1).
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13 , 2018
scoreboard
B A S K ETB A L L
NBA
Warriors 108, Bucks 94
EASTERN CONFERENCE
GOLDEN STATE .................. 36
MILWAUKEE ...................... 27
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................34
Toronto ......................................29
Philadelphia ...............................19
New York ...................................19
Brooklyn.....................................16
L
10
11
20
23
26
Pct
.773
.725
.487
.452
.381
GB
—
3
121/2
14
17
SOUTHEAST
W
Miami.........................................24
Washington ...............................24
Charlotte....................................16
Orlando ......................................12
Atlanta.......................................11
L
17
18
24
31
31
Pct
.585
.571
.400
.279
.262
GB
—
71/2
13
131/2
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland ...................................26
Detroit .......................................22
Milwaukee .................................22
Indiana .......................................22
Chicago ......................................15
L
16
18
19
20
27
Pct
.619
.550
.537
.524
.357
GB
—
3
31/2
4
11
SOUTHWEST
W
x-Houston ..................................29
San Antonio ...............................28
New Orleans ..............................21
Dallas .........................................15
Memphis ....................................13
L
11
15
20
28
28
Pct
.725
.651
.512
.349
.317
GB
—
21/2
81/2
151/2
161/2
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota..................................28
Portland .....................................22
Oklahoma City ...........................22
Denver........................................22
Utah ...........................................17
L
16
20
20
20
25
Pct
.636
.524
.524
.524
.405
GB
—
5
5
5
10
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................34
L.A. Clippers...............................20
x-Phoenix...................................16
L.A. Lakers .................................14
Sacramento ...............................13
L
9
21
26
27
28
Pct
.791
.488
.381
.341
.317
GB
—
13
171/2
19
20
1/
2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
x-Late game
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
27
22
17
33
MILWAUKEE: Middleton 2-12 3-4 8, Antetokounmpo
10-19 3-3 23, Henson 2-6 2-2 6, Bledsoe 8-16 2-2 21,
Brogdon 7-14 1-1 17, Snell 4-7 0-0 11, Maker 2-5 0-0 5,
Dellavedova 0-4 0-0 0, Brown 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 36-85
11-12 94.
Three-point Goals: Golden State 5-15 (Young 2-2,
Durant 2-6, Green 1-4, Iguodala 0-1, Thompson 0-2),
Milwaukee 11-28 (Snell 3-5, Bledsoe 3-5, Brogdon 2-5,
Maker 1-1, Brown 1-1, Middleton 1-5, Dellavedova 0-3,
Antetokounmpo 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Golden State 43 (Green 10), Milwaukee 34 (Henson 8).
Assists: Golden State 28 (Green 7), Milwaukee 21
(Dellavedova, Antetokounmpo, Middleton, Brogdon 4).
Total Fouls: Golden State 13, Milwaukee 20. A: 18,717
(18,717).
Nuggets 87, Grizzlies 78
MEMPHIS ........................... 26
DENVER .............................. 16
21
27
13
24
MEMPHIS: Brooks 4-11 0-0 8, Green 2-9 0-0 5, Gasol 8-19
5-5 22, Evans 5-13 0-0 12, Harrison 3-4 3-4 9, Ennis III
5-10 0-1 12, Martin 0-2 0-0 0, Davis 2-5 0-0 4, Chalmers
1-2 3-4 6, McLemore 0-1 0-0 0, Selden 0-1 0-0 0. Totals
30-77 11-14 78.
DENVER: Chandler 3-9 0-0 8, Jokic 3-8 7-8 14, Plumlee
2-4 0-0 4, Murray 1-7 9-10 11, Barton 5-12 4-4 17,
Jefferson 1-1 2-2 4, Faried 2-7 0-0 4, Lyles 7-13 2-5 16,
Beasley 3-9 2-3 9. Totals 27-70 26-32 87.
Three-point Goals: Memphis 7-24 (Ennis III 2-5, Evans
2-7, Chalmers 1-1, Green 1-2, Gasol 1-6, Brooks 0-3),
Denver 7-22 (Barton 3-6, Chandler 2-3, Jokic 1-3, Beasley
1-4, Murray 0-2, Lyles 0-4). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Memphis 36 (Gasol 11), Denver 47 (Plumlee 9). Assists:
Memphis 17 (Harrison 6), Denver 15 (Murray, Barton,
Jokic, Plumlee 3). Total Fouls: Memphis 28, Denver 18.
A: 15,607 (19,155).
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
Late Thursday
L.A. CLIPPERS .................... 29
SACRAMENTO ................... 21
Brooklyn at Washington, 7
L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 2
Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 3:30
Oklahoma City at Charlotte, 5
Golden State at Toronto, 7:30
Detroit at Chicago, 8
Denver at San Antonio, 8:30
Milwaukee at Miami, 1
New Orleans at New York, 3:30
Indiana at Phoenix, 8
Portland at Minnesota, 9
16 — 88
25 — 99
UTAH: Ingles 1-6 0-0 2, Sefolosha 3-5 0-0 7, Favors 2-4
1-2 5, Rubio 3-11 0-0 7, Mitchell 10-20 10-11 35, Johnson
2-8 0-0 5, O’Neale 3-6 4-4 11, Jerebko 0-1 0-0 0, Udoh 0-3
1-2 1, Hood 4-13 4-4 15. Totals 28-77 20-23 88.
CHARLOTTE: Kidd-Gilchrist 3-7 6-6 12, Williams 5-11
2-2 15, Howard 2-9 4-10 8, Walker 5-14 8-9 22, Batum
5-11 0-0 11, O’Bryant III 0-2 0-0 0, Kaminsky 6-13 3-3 16,
Carter-Williams 1-1 0-0 2, Lamb 5-8 1-2 11, Graham 0-2
2-2 2. Totals 32-78 26-34 99.
Three-point Goals: Utah 12-35 (Mitchell 5-11, Hood 3-9,
Sefolosha 1-1, Rubio 1-3, O’Neale 1-3, Johnson 1-4,
Jerebko 0-1, Ingles 0-3), Charlotte 9-27 (Walker 4-6,
Williams 3-8, Kaminsky 1-4, Batum 1-5, Graham 0-1,
O’Bryant III 0-1, Lamb 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Utah 45 (O’Neale 10), Charlotte 46 (Howard 13).
Assists: Utah 19 (Ingles 6), Charlotte 17 (Walker 6).
Total Fouls: Utah 26, Charlotte 19. Technicals: Utah
coach Jazz (Defensive three second), Howard. A: 14,848
(19,077).
Pacers 97, Cavaliers 95
24
32
16
32
21 — 95
21 — 97
CLEVELAND: James 11-25 3-4 27, Crowder 2-5 0-2 5,
Love 8-14 4-4 21, Calderon 3-8 1-2 8, Smith 4-10 0-0 9,
Osman 3-6 1-2 8, Green 4-8 5-5 13, Thompson 1-4 0-0 2,
Korver 1-6 0-0 2. Totals 37-86 14-19 95.
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 2-4 0-0 6, T.Young 5-16 0-0 12,
Sabonis 4-11 4-4 12, Collison 9-11 3-4 22, Oladipo 8-21
1-1 19, Leaf 0-1 0-0 0, Jefferson 4-7 0-1 8, Joseph 1-3 0-0
2, Stephenson 6-11 1-2 16. Totals 39-85 9-12 97.
Three-point Goals: Cleveland 7-34 (James 2-9, Crowder
1-3, Osman 1-3, Calderon 1-4, Smith 1-4, Love 1-5, Green
0-1, Korver 0-5), Indiana 10-21 (Stephenson 3-6, Bogdanovic 2-3, T.Young 2-5, Oladipo 2-6, Collison 1-1). Fouled
Out: None. Rebounds: Cleveland 47 (Love 10), Indiana 44
(Sabonis 15). Assists: Cleveland 19 (James 11), Indiana 16
(Stephenson, Collison 4). Total Fouls: Cleveland 15,
Indiana 18. Technicals: James. A: 17,923 (18,500).
Nets 110, Hawks 105
28
25
21
24
36 — 110
31 — 105
BROOKLYN: Carroll 5-9 0-2 13, Hollis-Jefferson 6-14 2-5
14, Zeller 2-5 0-0 4, Dinwiddie 6-15 5-7 20, Crabbe 3-10
2-3 10, Acy 3-6 0-0 9, Allen 2-4 2-2 6, Okafor 6-8 5-6 17,
Stauskas 0-1 0-0 0, LeVert 3-9 1-1 7, Harris 4-6 0-0 10.
Totals 40-87 17-26 110.
ATLANTA: Prince 0-4 1-2 1, Ilyasova 2-6 2-2 6, Plumlee
3-4 2-4 8, Schroder 14-26 3-3 34, Bazemore 4-8 6-8 16,
Muscala 1-1 1-2 3, Collins 2-4 1-1 5, Dedmon 5-11 0-0 11,
Taylor 1-3 0-0 3, Delaney 2-6 4-4 9, Dorsey 3-7 0-0 9.
Totals 37-80 20-26 105.
Three-point Goals: Brooklyn 13-34 (Acy 3-6, Carroll 3-7,
Dinwiddie 3-9, Harris 2-2, Crabbe 2-6, Stauskas 0-1,
Hollis-Jefferson 0-1, LeVert 0-2), Atlanta 11-28 (Schroder 3-5, Dorsey 3-5, Bazemore 2-2, Taylor 1-2, Delaney
1-3, Dedmon 1-4, Collins 0-1, Prince 0-3, Ilyasova 0-3).
Fouled Out: Dedmon. Rebounds: Brooklyn 43 (Dinwiddie
9), Atlanta 46 (Collins 10). Assists: Brooklyn 29 (Dinwiddie 10), Atlanta 21 (Schroder 7). Total Fouls: Brooklyn
24, Atlanta 25. A: 13,093 (19,049).
Timberwolves 118, Knicks 108
30
31
29
32
22 — 108
31 — 118
NEW YORK: Porzingis 6-19 2-4 17, Thomas 0-1 0-0 0,
Kanter 8-10 0-0 16, Lee 6-10 0-0 14, Jack 7-12 2-2 18,
Beasley 6-8 0-0 13, McDermott 0-0 0-0 0, O’Quinn 5-7 2-3
12, Ntilikina 1-3 0-0 2, Hardaway Jr. 6-13 0-0 16. Totals
45-83 6-9 108.
MINNESOTA: Wiggins 7-20 1-3 16, Gibson 8-11 1-1 17,
Towns 9-15 3-4 23, Teague 3-11 5-6 12, Butler 6-12 0-1
13, Bjelica 4-4 0-0 10, Dieng 5-8 0-0 10, Jones 3-5 0-0 7,
Crawford 4-9 0-1 10. Totals 49-95 10-16 118.
Three-point Goals: New York 12-24 (Hardaway Jr. 4-8,
Porzingis 3-5, Jack 2-3, Lee 2-5, Beasley 1-1, O’Quinn
0-1, Thomas 0-1), Minnesota 10-27 (Bjelica 2-2, Towns
2-4, Crawford 2-5, Jones 1-2, Butler 1-3, Wiggins 1-4,
Teague 1-6, Dieng 0-1). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
New York 36 (Kanter 12), Minnesota 43 (Towns 15).
Assists: New York 25 (Jack 8), Minnesota 33 (Towns 9).
Total Fouls: New York 17, Minnesota 12. Technicals:
New York coach Knicks (Defensive three second). A:
18,978 (18,798).
Pelicans 119, Trail Blazers 113
PORTLAND ......................... 25
NEW ORLEANS .................. 31
36
30
25
27
27 — 113
31 — 119
PORTLAND: Napier 7-15 0-0 17, Aminu 7-16 2-2 19,
Nurkic 7-9 5-6 19, Lillard 9-22 3-4 23, McCollum 9-21 1-2
23, Harkless 2-4 0-0 4, Collins 2-5 0-0 4, E.Davis 1-3 0-0 2,
Connaughton 1-6 0-0 2. Totals 45-101 11-14 113.
NEW ORLEANS: Moore 2-7 0-0 4, A.Davis 16-23 4-4 36,
Cousins 9-21 3-3 24, Rondo 1-2 0-0 3, Holiday 8-11 8-8 25,
Miller 4-6 6-6 16, Cunningham 1-1 0-0 2, Nelson 2-4 0-0
4, Clark 2-7 1-2 5. Totals 45-82 22-23 119.
Three-point Goals: Portland 12-42 (McCollum 4-10, Napier 3-5, Aminu 3-9, Lillard 2-11, Harkless 0-2, Connaughton 0-5), New Orleans 7-19 (Cousins 3-7, Miller 2-4,
Rondo 1-1, Holiday 1-2, A.Davis 0-1, Moore 0-2, Nelson
0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Portland 39 (Aminu
11), New Orleans 43 (Cousins 19). Assists: Portland 24
(Lillard 8), New Orleans 26 (Cousins 8). Total Fouls:
Portland 22, New Orleans 16. A: 17,003 (16,867).
ATP/WTA
SONY OPEN
APIA INTERNATIONAL SYDNEY
At Waialae CC; In Honolulu
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,044; Par: 70 (35-35)
At Olympic Park Tennis Centre; In Sydney
Purse: Men, $468,910 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
VCU (11-7)
Tillman 10-16 4-5 26, Vann 3-6 2-2 8, J.Williams 3-8 5-5
11, Crowfield 0-3 0-0 0, Jenkins 4-11 0-0 11, Lane 1-1 0-0
2, Santos-Silva 2-2 0-2 4, Mobley 1-4 2-2 5, Djonkam 0-0
0-0 0, Jackson 1-3 0-0 3, Maye 0-1 0-0 0, Simms 4-5 0-0 9.
29-60 Totals 13-16 79.
Dayton (9-8)
Cunningham 6-10 1-4 13, Crutcher 4-8 0-0 12, J.Davis
7-13 3-3 21, D.Davis 9-10 6-6 28, Landers 7-12 1-1 15,
Svoboda 1-2 0-0 2, X.Williams 3-3 0-0 9, Gruden 1-2 0-0
3, Crosby 1-2 0-0 3, Westerfield 0-0 0-0 0, Greer 0-0 0-0 0.
Totals 39-62 11-14 106.
Halftime: Dayton 66-41. Three-point goals: VCU 8-21
(Jenkins 3-6, Tillman 2-4, Simms 1-1, Jackson 1-2,
Mobley 1-3, J.Williams 0-1, Crowfield 0-2, Vann 0-2),
Dayton 17-32 (D.Davis 4-5, Crutcher 4-8, J.Davis 4-8,
X.Williams 3-3, Crosby 1-1, Gruden 1-2, Svoboda 0-1,
Cunningham 0-2, Landers 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: VCU 25 (Tillman 12), Dayton 32 (Crutcher,
Landers 8). Assists: VCU 17 (J.Williams 6), Dayton 34
(Crutcher 10). Total fouls: VCU 17, Dayton 14. A: 12,507
(13,435).
Radford (11-7)
Polite 5-11 4-8 15, Phillips 2-3 2-5 6, Jones 2-13 1-2 6,
Hicks 2-6 1-2 6, Bradford 0-0 0-0 0, Butts 0-1 0-0 0,
Holland 3-5 0-0 6, Fields 3-9 0-0 7, Tanner 2-5 2-2 8,
Cousin 0-1 0-0 0. 19-54 Totals 10-19 54.
SACRAMENTO: Temple 0-2 0-0 0, Cauley-Stein 6-8 0-0
12, Randolph 7-15 2-2 16, Fox 3-10 2-2 8, Hill 5-13 10-13
21, Labissiere 2-5 3-4 8, Koufos 7-8 0-0 14, Bogdanovic
7-11 4-4 22, Hield 5-13 2-3 14. Totals 42-85 23-28 115.
Halftime: Gardner-Webb 28-16. Three-point goals: Radford 6-22 (Tanner 2-3, Hicks 1-2, Polite 1-4, Fields 1-5,
Jones 1-6, Butts 0-1, Cousin 0-1), Gardner-Webb 6-18
(O’Reilly 3-7, Efianayi 2-3, Turner 1-1, Jamison 0-1,
Laster 0-2, Robateau 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds:
Radford 30 (Polite, Phillips 9), Gardner-Webb 36 (Niangane 12). Assists: Radford 12 (Fields, Bradford 4),
Gardner-Webb 6 (Turner, O’Reilly 2). Total fouls: Radford 14, Gardner-Webb 21. A: 1,244 (3,500).
23
29
24
19
19 — 81
25 — 93
Three-point Goals: San Antonio 8-20 (Forbes 4-7,
Aldridge 1-1, White 1-1, Ginobili 1-2, Gasol 1-2, Paul 0-1,
Bertans 0-2, Mills 0-4), L.A. Lakers 13-38 (Ball 4-7, Hart
2-3, Ingram 2-5, Caldwell-Pope 2-6, Kuzma 2-9, Lopez
1-4, Ennis 0-1, Clarkson 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 45 (Gasol 12), L.A. Lakers 47 (Ball,
Nance Jr. 10). Assists: San Antonio 21 (Mills, Murray,
Gasol 5), L.A. Lakers 22 (Ball 6). Total Fouls: San Antonio
15, L.A. Lakers 17. A: 18,997 (19,060).
NBA LEADERS
Entering Friday’s games
SCORING
Harden, HOU .....................
Antetokounmpo, MIL .......
James, CLE ........................
Durant, GOL ......................
Cousins, NOR ....................
Davis, NOR ........................
Westbrook, OKC ...............
Lillard, POR .......................
DeRozan, TOR ...................
Booker, PHX ......................
Oladipo, IND ......................
Irving, BOS ........................
Porzingis, NYK ..................
Beal, WAS .........................
Embiid, PHL ......................
Williams, L.A.C. ................
Aldridge, SAN ...................
Walker, CHA .....................
Butler, MIN .......................
McCollum, POR .................
G
35
38
41
34
40
34
42
34
40
32
36
42
35
41
30
40
41
37
41
40
FG
334
400
425
321
349
319
390
274
348
266
318
370
297
351
243
293
358
274
300
328
FIELD GOALS
Capela, HOU ..................................
Jordan, L.A.C. ................................
Adams, OKC ..................................
Henson, MIL ..................................
Kanter, NYK ..................................
Collins, ATL ...................................
Gibson, MIN ..................................
Davis, NOR ....................................
James, CLE ....................................
Valanciunas, TOR ..........................
Antetokounmpo, MIL ....................
Favors, UTA ...................................
Randle, L.A.L. ................................
Sabonis, IND .................................
Howard, CHA .................................
Moore, NOR ...................................
Gortat, WAS .................................
Drummond, DET ............................
Towns, MIN ...................................
Lopez, CHI .....................................
Beasley, NYK .................................
Horford, BOS .................................
FT
319
272
186
166
246
214
213
206
255
179
156
162
176
169
191
219
187
170
239
112
PTS.
1132
1089
1113
894
1034
876
1054
850
999
796
885
1009
831
968
704
923
925
808
887
862
AVG.
32.3
28.7
27.1
26.3
25.8
25.8
25.1
25.0
25.0
24.9
24.6
24.0
23.7
23.6
23.5
23.1
22.6
21.8
21.6
21.6
FG
214
199
211
148
219
153
210
319
425
156
400
195
206
194
224
219
157
217
324
239
176
217
FGA
320
301
333
243
367
261
368
569
762
281
721
354
378
357
414
405
291
403
602
457
337
418
PCT.
.669
.661
.634
.609
.597
.586
.571
.561
.558
.555
.555
.551
.545
.543
.541
.541
.540
.538
.538
.523
.522
.519
THREE-POINTERS
3FG
Mirotic, CHI ..................................... 47
Tatum, BOS ..................................... 61
Lyles, DEN ....................................... 51
Thompson, GOL ............................. 140
Hill, SAC .......................................... 46
Porter Jr., WAS ............................... 67
Moore, NOR ..................................... 70
Hield, SAC ....................................... 82
Korver, CLE .................................... 101
Collison, IND ................................... 52
Harris, DET .................................... 101
George, OKC .................................. 124
Olynyk, MIA .................................... 53
Lee, NYK .......................................... 69
Babbitt, ATL .................................... 41
Williams, CHA ................................. 58
Miller, NOR ..................................... 73
Ingles, UTA ...................................... 95
Ferrell, DAL ..................................... 72
Nowitzki, DAL ................................. 72
3FGA
101
133
112
309
102
149
156
184
227
118
230
285
122
159
95
135
171
223
170
171
PCT.
.465
.459
.455
.453
.451
.450
.449
.446
.445
.441
.439
.435
.434
.434
.432
.430
.427
.426
.424
.421
FREE THROWS
FT
Lee, NYK .......................................... 73
Redick, PHL ................................... 103
Paul, HOU ........................................ 76
Belinelli, ATL ................................... 80
Curry, GOL ..................................... 174
Lillard, POR ................................... 206
Murray, DEN .................................. 102
Williams, L.A.C. ............................ 219
Crowder, CLE ................................... 64
Collison, IND ................................... 82
Middleton, MIL .............................. 144
Fournier, ORL .................................. 95
Durant, GOL .................................. 166
Irving, BOS .................................... 162
Love, CLE ....................................... 181
Rubio, UTA ...................................... 98
Butler, MIN ................................... 239
Lowry, TOR .................................... 115
Jokic, DEN ....................................... 98
McCollum, POR ............................. 112
FTA
76
109
81
86
188
224
111
241
71
92
162
107
187
183
205
111
272
131
112
128
PCT.
.961
.945
.938
.930
.926
.920
.919
.909
.901
.891
.889
.888
.888
.885
.883
.883
.879
.878
.875
.875
REBOUNDS
Drummond, DET ...............
Jordan, L.A.C. ....................
Cousins, NOR ....................
Howard, CHA ....................
Towns, MIN .......................
Capela, HOU ......................
Embiid, PHL ......................
Davis, NOR ........................
Jokic, DEN .........................
Kanter, NYK ......................
Antetokounmpo, MIL .......
Chandler, PHX ...................
Love, CLE ...........................
Westbrook, OKC ...............
Vucevic, ORL .....................
Adams, OKC ......................
Aldridge, SAN ...................
Gasol, MEM .......................
Len, PHX ...........................
Gasol, SAN ........................
Simmons, PHL ..................
Gortat, WAS .....................
G OFF. DEF. TOT. AVG.
38 186 385 571 15.0
41 180 429 609 14.9
40
82 413 495 12.4
39 138 335 473 12.1
43 118 395 513 11.9
35 115 272 387 11.1
30
63 262 325 10.8
34
80 271 351 10.3
34
88 258 346 10.2
38 134 248 382 10.1
38
85 296 381 10.0
31
96 206 302 9.7
40
89 296 385 9.6
42
74 329 403 9.6
34
61 255 316 9.3
37 180 137 317 8.6
41 139 212 351 8.6
40
53 289 342 8.6
37 104 204 308 8.3
41
64 274 338 8.2
38
69 243 312 8.2
41
83 250 333 8.1
METROPOLITAN
Washington ..................
Columbus ......................
New Jersey ...................
N.Y. Rangers .................
Carolina .........................
Pittsburgh .....................
Philadelphia ..................
N.Y. Islanders ...............
W
28
25
22
22
20
22
19
21
L
14
18
11
15
16
19
15
18
OL PTS. GF GA
3
59 140 127
3
53 124 129
8
52 130 125
5
49 128 117
8
48 125 136
3
47 126 138
8
46 123 122
4
46 146 158
ATLANTIC
Tampa Bay ....................
Boston ...........................
Toronto .........................
Florida ...........................
Detroit ..........................
Montreal .......................
Ottawa ..........................
Buffalo ..........................
W
31
23
25
18
17
18
15
11
L
10
10
17
19
17
20
18
24
OL PTS. GF GA
3
65 161 112
7
53 131 102
3
53 146 131
6
42 122 141
7
41 112 127
4
40 108 129
9
39 117 149
9
31 99 151
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
Winnipeg ......................
Nashville .......................
St. Louis ........................
Dallas ............................
Minnesota .....................
Chicago .........................
Colorado ........................
W
26
25
26
24
23
22
22
L
12
11
17
16
17
16
16
OL PTS. GF GA
7
59 152 123
6
56 131 114
3
55 134 122
3
51 132 118
4
50 127 127
6
50 136 119
3
47 135 124
PACIFIC
Vegas ............................
Los Angeles ..................
Calgary ..........................
San Jose ........................
Anaheim .......................
Edmonton .....................
Vancouver .....................
Arizona .........................
W
29
24
24
21
19
19
17
10
L
10
13
16
13
15
23
21
28
OL PTS. GF GA
2
60 143 113
5
53 126 99
4
52 127 124
6
48 110 106
9
47 117 120
3
41 123 145
6
40 116 145
6
26 100 154
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
Carolina 3, at Washington 1
at Buffalo 3, Columbus 1
Calgary 5, at Tampa Bay 1
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
Washington 4, at Carolina 3
Vancouver 5, at Columbus 2
Calgary 4, at Florida 2
at Chicago 2, Winnipeg 1
Edmonton 4, at Arizona 2
SATURDAY’S GAMES
N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 1
Detroit at Pittsburgh, 1
Boston at Montreal, 7
Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7
Winnipeg at Minnesota, 7
Colorado at Dallas, 9
Edmonton at Vegas, 10
Arizona at San Jose, 10:30
Anaheim at Los Angeles, 10:30
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Detroit at Chicago, 12:30
Calgary at Carolina, 3
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 7:30
Vancouver at Minnesota, 8
MONDAY’S GAMES
Longwood 58, Liberty 51
Longwood (5-13)
Montague 1-3 0-0 2, Geter 2-3 1-1 5, Ashe 1-6 4-4 7,
Glover 2-6 2-2 7, Walton 6-13 8-8 22, Cintron 2-4 1-2 6,
Franklin 2-2 2-5 6, Smith 0-3 0-0 0, Shields 1-1 0-0 3.
17-41 Totals 18-22 58.
L.A. LAKERS: Ingram 11-21 2-5 26, Randle 0-6 0-0 0,
Lopez 1-5 1-2 4, Ball 7-11 0-0 18, Caldwell-Pope 4-10 0-1
10, Nance Jr. 6-9 2-2 14, Kuzma 3-12 2-2 10, Ennis 0-2 0-0
0, Clarkson 2-8 1-2 5, Hart 2-3 0-0 6. Totals 36-87 8-14
93.
26
22
PGA Tour
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Gardner-Webb (9-9)
Zeck 1-2 2-2 4, Niangane 1-3 2-3 4, Turner 3-4 1-2 8,
O’Reilly 7-15 0-0 17, Efianayi 3-11 4-4 12, Laster 5-11 1-2
11, Robateau 0-7 1-2 1, Jamison 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 21-55
11-15 59.
SAN ANTONIO: Anderson 3-5 0-0 6, Aldridge 6-15 7-8 20,
Gasol 4-14 0-0 9, Murray 7-14 0-0 14, Forbes 7-12 0-2 18,
Bertans 0-2 2-2 2, Costello 0-1 0-0 0, Mills 0-5 0-0 0,
White 1-1 1-2 4, Ginobili 3-5 1-1 8, Paul 0-2 0-0 0. Totals
31-76 11-15 81.
21
27
NHL
EAST
Canisius 70, St. Peter’s 58
Hobart 97, Bard 58
Niagara 78, Monmouth (NJ) 77
Penn 69, Cornell 61
Penn St. 76, Nebraska 74 (OT)
Princeton 72, Columbia 56
Rider 78, Quinnipiac 60
SOUTH
Gardner-Webb 59, Radford 54
Hampton 78, Delaware St. 56
Longwood 58, Liberty 51
MIDWEST
Butler 94, Marquette 83
Dayton 106, VCU 79
Detroit 93, Youngstown St. 91
IUPUI 67, Green Bay 61
Kent St. 70, Ohio 69
Providence 71, DePaul 64
UIC 88, Milwaukee 73
Upper Iowa 84, St. Cloud St. 74
L.A. CLIPPERS: Wallace 3-7 1-2 8, Griffin 5-14 6-6 18,
Jordan 4-4 0-0 8, Teodosic 4-9 0-0 10, L.Williams 10-24
5-5 30, Dekker 0-1 1-2 1, W.Johnson 4-7 2-2 13, Harrell
11-12 3-9 25, Reed 1-2 2-2 4, Evans 1-4 2-2 4. Totals
43-84 22-30 121.
SAN ANTONIO ................... 15
L.A. LAKERS ....................... 20
Hornets 99, Jazz 88
NEW YORK ......................... 27
MINNESOTA ...................... 24
21 — 121
26 — 115
Late Thursday
Milwaukee at Washington, 2
Charlotte at Detroit, 12:30
Toronto at Philadelphia, 1
New York at Brooklyn, 3
San Antonio at Atlanta, 3
Miami at Chicago, 3:30
L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 5:30
Golden State at Cleveland, 8
Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 8
Indiana at Utah, 9
Houston at L.A. Clippers, 10:30
BROOKLYN ......................... 25
ATLANTA ........................... 25
28
29
Lakers 93, Spurs 81
MONDAY’S GAMES
CLEVELAND ....................... 34
INDIANA ............................. 12
43
39
TE NNI S
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
Gardner-Webb 59, Radford 54
Three-point Goals: L.A. Clippers 13-31 (L.Williams 5-12,
W.Johnson 3-4, Teodosic 2-5, Griffin 2-7, Wallace 1-3),
Sacramento 8-26 (Bogdanovic 4-6, Hield 2-7, Labissiere
1-1, Hill 1-6, Randolph 0-1, Temple 0-2, Fox 0-3). Fouled
Out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 39 (Griffin 12),
Sacramento 44 (Koufos 14). Assists: L.A. Clippers 28
(Teodosic 9), Sacramento 23 (Fox 6). Total Fouls: L.A.
Clippers 19, Sacramento 25. A: 17,583 (17,608).
SUNDAY’S GAMES
UTAH .................................. 25
CHARLOTTE ....................... 25
18 — 78
20 — 87
GOLF
NCAA men
Dayton 106, VCU 79
Clippers 121, Kings 115
SATURDAY’S GAMES
28 — 108
12 — 94
GOLDEN STATE: Durant 12-20 0-2 26, Green 8-17 4-4 21,
Pachulia 4-5 0-0 8, McCaw 3-5 0-0 6, Thompson 4-11 4-4
12, West 4-7 0-0 8, Looney 3-3 3-4 9, Livingston 3-5 0-0 6,
Iguodala 0-4 4-4 4, Young 3-3 0-0 8. Totals 44-80 15-18
108.
Boston 114, Philadelphia 103, in London
at Toronto 133, Cleveland 99
L.A. Clippers 121, at Sacramento 115
at L.A. Lakers 93, San Antonio 81
at Washington 125, Orlando 119
at Indiana 97, Cleveland 95
at Charlotte 99, Utah 88
Brooklyn 110, at Atlanta 105
Golden State 108, at Milwaukee 94
at Minnesota 118, New York 108
at New Orleans 119, Portland 113
at Denver 87, Memphis 78
Houston at Phoenix, Late
HOCKEY
Liberty (12-6)
James 4-9 0-0 8, Pacheco-Ortiz 3-8 2-2 9, Cabbil 4-10 1-3
10, Kemrite 0-2 0-0 0, I.Williams 3-7 3-5 9, Baxter-Bell
2-4 3-4 7, Talbert 0-2 0-0 0, McDowell 1-4 0-0 3, Cuffee
2-3 0-0 5. Totals 19-49 9-14 51.
Halftime: Liberty 28-20. Three-point goals: Longwood
6-16 (Walton 2-4, Shields 1-1, Cintron 1-1, Glover 1-3,
Ashe 1-4, Montague 0-1, Smith 0-2), Liberty 4-18
(Cuffee 1-1, Pacheco-Ortiz 1-3, McDowell 1-3, Cabbil
1-5, Kemrite 0-1, Baxter-Bell 0-1, James 0-2, Talbert
0-2). Fouled out: I.Williams. Rebounds: Longwood 30
(Geter 8), Liberty 25 (James 6). Assists: Longwood 12
(Ashe, Glover 4), Liberty 8 (Pacheco-Ortiz 3). Total
fouls: Longwood 14, Liberty 20. A: 1,989 (8,085).
NCAA women
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
Delaware 58, Hofstra 51
Penn 68, Cornell 48
Princeton 69, Columbia 47
St. John’s 64, Georgetown 41
Towson 72, UNC-Wilmington 71
Villanova 67, Seton Hall 59
Yale 77, Brown 63
SOUTH
Hampton 66, Delaware St. 62
James Madison 70, Elon 67
MIDWEST
DePaul 79, Xavier 48
Drake 85, Indiana St. 64
Marquette 69, Butler 67
N. Iowa 65, Evansville 41
S. Illinois 63, Bradley 62
Valparaiso 76, Loyola of Chicago 60
FAR WEST
E. Washington 71, Idaho 64
Oregon St. 57, Arizona St. 54
Southern Cal 86, Colorado 51
Stanford 70, Washington St. 57
UC Irvine 74, Hawaii 67
Southern Cal 86, Colorado 51
Southern Cal (12-4)
Simon 6-12 2-4 14, Abejon 1-5 1-2 4, Adams 4-7 2-2 13,
Mazyck 9-14 5-6 29, Moore 5-11 5-11 15, Effa 0-0 0-0 0,
Milisic 2-2 0-0 4, Tapley 3-8 0-0 7, 30-59 Totals 15-25 86.
Colorado (11-5)
Bunn 0-6 1-2 1, Jank 0-5 3-4 3, Caylao-Do 2-4 1-2 6,
Leonard 1-10 0-0 2, Robinson 3-9 2-2 8, Curtis 0-0 0-0 0,
Carter 2-5 1-2 6, Castro 1-1 0-2 2, Diop 0-1 0-0 0,
Hollingshed 3-4 2-2 10, Knight 0-0 1-2 1, Thomas 4-9 2-2
12, 16-54 Totals 13-20 51.
SOUTHERN CAL ................. 19 17 27 23
—86
COLORADO ......................... 13 16 11 11
—51
Three-point goals: Southern Cal 11-24 (Simon 0-1, Abejon
1-4, Adams 3-4, Mazyck 6-9, Moore 0-1, Tapley 1-5),
Colorado 6-22 (Bunn 0-1, Caylao-Do 1-2, Leonard 0-5,
Robinson 0-4, Carter 1-3, Diop 0-1, Hollingshed 2-2,
Thomas 2-4). Assists: Southern Cal 16 (Moore 8),
Colorado 7 (Leonard 3). Fouled out: Colorado Bunn.
Rebounds: Southern Cal 40 (Simon 11), Colorado 34 (Jank
5). Total fouls: Southern Cal 19, Colorado 21. A: 1,533.
Dallas at Boston, 1
Anaheim at Colorado, 3
San Jose at Los Angeles, 4
N.Y. Islanders at Montreal, 7:30
Canucks 5, Blue Jackets 2
VANCOUVER ........................... 0
COLUMBUS .............................. 1
4
0
1 —
1 —
5
2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Columbus, Jones 8 (Foligno, Panarin), 4:33
(pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Vancouver, Baertschi 9 (Vanek, Gagner), 1:19
(pp). 3, Vancouver, Gudbranson 1 (H.Sedin, Eriksson),
5:38. 4, Vancouver, Gaunce 2 (Vanek, Del Zotto), 14:31
(pp). 5, Vancouver, Edler 2 (H.Sedin, D.Sedin), 17:15.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Columbus, Harrington 2 (Foligno, Calvert),
12:35. 7, Vancouver, Virtanen 6 (Granlund), 19:51.
SHOTS ON GOAL
VANCOUVER ........................... 8
12
9 — 29
COLUMBUS ............................ 11
12
6 — 29
Power-play opportunities: Vancouver 2 of 3; Columbus 1
of 2. Goalies: Vancouver, Markstrom 11-14-5 (29 shots27 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 21-14-3 (28-24). A:
16,705 (18,500). T: 2:29.
Flames 4, Panthers 2
CALGARY ................................. 0
FLORIDA .................................. 0
3
1
1 —
1 —
4
2
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Florida, Dadonov 8 (Trocheck, Huberdeau),
0:27 (pp). 2, Calgary, Monahan 21 (Hamilton, Giordano),
1:00. 3, Calgary, Tkachuk 12 (Backlund, Hamonic), 10:38.
4, Calgary, Gaudreau 15 (Backlund, Monahan), 16:15
(pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Florida, Dadonov 9, 13:03. 6, Calgary, Backlund 9 (Tkachuk), 19:14.
SHOTS ON GOAL
CALGARY ............................... 11
9
9 — 29
FLORIDA ................................ 12
19
12 — 43
Power-play opportunities: Calgary 1 of 3; Florida 1 of 4.
Goalies: Calgary, Rittich 4-1-1 (43 shots-41 saves).
Florida, Reimer 12-12-5 (28-25). A: 14,519 (19,250). T:
2:35.
Blackhawks 2, Jets 1
WINNIPEG ............................... 0
CHICAGO .................................. 0
0
2
1 —
0 —
1
2
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Chicago, Kampf 1 (Murphy, DeBrincat), 4:51.
2, Chicago, Rutta 5 (Kampf, Duclair), 16:25.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Winnipeg, Laine 20, 16:19.
SHOTS ON GOAL
WINNIPEG ............................... 7
11
14 — 32
CHICAGO .................................. 6
12
9 — 27
Power-play opportunities: Winnipeg 0 of 3; Chicago 0 of
3. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 23-5-6 (27 shots-25
saves). Chicago, Glass 3-1-1 (32-31). A: 21,588 (19,717).
T: 2:27.
FOOTBALL
NFL playoffs
Oilers 4, Coyotes 2
FIRST ROUND
EDMONTON ............................. 2
ARIZONA ................................. 2
SATURDAY’S RESULTS
Tennessee 22, at Kansas City 21
Atlanta 26, at Los Angeles Rams 13
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
at Jacksonville 10, Buffalo 3
at New Orleans 31, Carolina 26
0
0
2 —
0 —
4
2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Arizona, Richardson 2 (Chychrun, Martinook),
2:03. 2, Arizona, Archibald 2 (Keller, Dvorak), 3:17. 3,
Edmonton, Nurse 4 (Khaira, Larsson), 14:16. 4, Edmonton, Maroon 10 (Klefbom, McDavid), 19:22.
DIVISIONAL ROUND
THIRD PERIOD
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Atlanta (-3) at Philadelphia, 4:35 (NBC)
Tennessee at New England (-131/2), 8:15 (CBS)
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Jacksonville at Pittsburgh (-7), 1:05 (CBS)
New Orleans at Minnesota (-5), 4:40 (FOX)
Scoring: 5, Edmonton, Nurse 5 (McDavid, Draisaitl),
3:57. 6, Edmonton, Nugent-Hopkins 16 (Lucic), 19:40.
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
SUNDAY, JAN. 21
AFC
TBD, 3:05 (CBS)
NFC
TBD, 6:40 (FOX)
PRO BOWL
SUNDAY, JAN. 28
IN ORLANDO
AFC vs. NFC, 3 (ESPN/ABC)
SUPER BOWL
SUNDAY, FEB. 4
IN MINNEAPOLIS
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 (NBC)
Divisional round injury report
ATLANTA FALCONS AT PHILADELPHIA EAGLES
Falcons: No injuries reported. Eagles: QUESTIONABLE:
LB Dannell Ellerbe (hamstring), CB Sidney Jones (hamstring).
TENNESSEE TITANS
AT NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS
Titans: OUT: RB DeMarco Murray (knee). Patriots:
QUESTIONABLE: DT Alan Branch (knee), RB Rex Burkhead (knee), LB Marquis Flowers (illness), RB Mike
Gillislee (knee), DE Eric Lee (ankle, finger), RB James
White (ankle)
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS
AT PITTSBURGH STEELERS
Jaguars: QUESTIONABLE: LB Blair Brown (ankle), WR
Jaydon Mickens (hamstring). Steelers: QUESTIONABLE:
WR Antonio Brown (calf, illness).
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS
AT MINNESOTA VIKINGS
Saints: OUT: WR Brandon Coleman (neck). QUESTIONABLE: QB Taysom Hill (illness), LB Michael Mauti
(illness). Vikings: QUESTIONABLE: CB Terence Newman
(foot).
FIRST ROUND — THURSDAY’S RESULTS
Chris Kirk ........................................... 33 30
Zach Johnson ..................................... 31 32
Vaughn Taylor ................................... 32 32
Kyle Stanley ...................................... 30 34
Talor Gooch ........................................ 33 31
Brian Harman .................................... 31 33
Peter Malnati .................................... 32 33
Daisuke Kataoka ............................... 33 32
Matt Every ......................................... 30 35
Tom Hoge .......................................... 31 34
Ollie Schniederjans ........................... 35 31
Cameron Smith ................................. 34 32
Ryan Blaum ....................................... 32 34
Nicholas Lindheim ............................. 32 34
Sangmoon Bae ................................... 31 35
William McGirt .................................. 33 33
Jerry Kelly ......................................... 32 34
John Peterson ................................... 30 36
Conrad Shindler ................................. 32 34
Robert Streb ...................................... 35 32
J.J. Spaun .......................................... 33 34
Charles Howell III .............................. 33 34
James Hahn ....................................... 32 35
Austin Cook ....................................... 35 32
Si Woo Kim ........................................ 33 34
Webb Simpson .................................. 33 34
Daniel Berger ..................................... 32 35
Jason Kokrak ..................................... 35 32
Matt Jones ........................................ 33 34
Brandon Harkins ................................ 33 34
Lanto Griffin ...................................... 36 31
Shugo Imahira ................................... 34 33
Gary Woodland .................................. 35 32
Brian Stuard ...................................... 36 31
Patton Kizzire .................................... 31 36
Ryan Armour ..................................... 32 35
Justin Thomas ................................... 33 34
Chris Stroud ....................................... 34 33
Beau Hossler ..................................... 34 33
Sam Saunders ................................... 32 35
Colt Knost .......................................... 36 32
Blayne Barber .................................... 33 35
Ted Potter, Jr. .................................... 33 35
Jonathan Byrd ................................... 35 33
D.A. Points ......................................... 33 35
Emiliano Grillo ................................... 33 35
Wesley Bryan .................................... 34 34
Marc Leishman .................................. 37 31
Xander Schauffele ............................. 34 34
Tyrone Van Aswegen ........................ 35 33
John Oda ............................................ 32 36
Stephan Jaeger ................................. 34 34
Sam Ryder ......................................... 36 32
Chez Reavie ....................................... 37 31
Steve Allan ........................................ 36 32
Hudson Swafford .............................. 34 34
Kevin Kisner ...................................... 34 34
Andrew Landry .................................. 32 36
Joel Dahmen ...................................... 34 34
Hyung-Sung Kim ............................... 32 36
Nate Lashley ...................................... 34 34
Seamus Power ................................... 34 34
Aaron Wise ........................................ 32 36
Brice Garnett ..................................... 34 34
Richy Werenski ................................. 36 33
Morgan Hoffmann ............................. 35 34
K.J. Choi ............................................. 35 34
Russell Knox ...................................... 34 35
Jordan Spieth .................................... 36 33
Ben Martin ......................................... 35 34
Scott Brown ...................................... 35 34
Scott Piercy ....................................... 36 33
Harris English .................................... 36 33
Jason Dufner ..................................... 33 36
Jonathan Randolph ........................... 36 33
Kyle Thompson .................................. 32 37
Abraham Ancer ................................. 35 34
Michael Kim ....................................... 36 34
Harold Varner III ................................ 36 34
Fabian Gomez .................................... 37 33
Peter Uihlein ...................................... 35 35
Roberto Diaz ...................................... 34 36
Adam Schenk ..................................... 38 32
Keegan Bradley ................................. 35 35
Sean O'Hair ....................................... 37 33
Dominic Bozzelli ................................ 35 35
Jamie Lovemark ................................ 35 35
Billy Hurley III .................................... 37 33
Brian Gay ........................................... 34 36
Mac Hughes ....................................... 37 33
Tony Finau ......................................... 36 34
Stewart Cink ...................................... 35 35
Jim Herman ....................................... 35 35
Rob Oppenheim ................................. 35 35
Ethan Tracy ....................................... 35 35
Corey Conners ................................... 34 36
Keith Mitchell .................................... 37 33
a-Tyler Ota ........................................ 35 35
Danny Lee .......................................... 34 37
Ryan Palmer ...................................... 36 35
Bill Haas ............................................ 36 35
Kevin Tway ........................................ 36 35
Vijay Singh ........................................ 35 36
Chad Campbell ................................... 37 34
Brett Stegmaier ................................ 36 35
Ben Silverman ................................... 34 37
Eric Dugas .......................................... 34 37
Andrew Putnam ................................ 36 35
Jon Curran ......................................... 37 34
Kevin Na ............................................ 35 36
Whee Kim .......................................... 36 35
Kelly Kraft ......................................... 35 36
Greg Chalmers ................................... 36 35
Cody Gribble ...................................... 34 37
Rory Sabbatini ................................... 37 34
Steve Wheatcroft ............................. 35 37
John Huh ............................................ 36 36
Jonas Blixt ......................................... 36 36
Luke Donald ....................................... 36 36
Russell Henley ................................... 36 36
Bronson Burgoon ............................... 35 37
Matt Atkins ....................................... 37 35
Tyler Duncan ...................................... 34 38
Andrew Yun ....................................... 37 35
Ricky Barnes ...................................... 37 35
Yusaku Miyazato ............................... 35 37
Smylie Kaufman ................................ 35 37
Aaron Baddeley ................................. 34 38
Xinjun Zhang ..................................... 35 37
Martin Piller ...................................... 34 38
Mark Wilson ...................................... 40 33
Troy Merritt ....................................... 35 38
Luke List ............................................ 35 38
J.J. Henry ........................................... 37 36
Tom Lovelady .................................... 37 36
Cameron Tringale .............................. 38 36
Omar Uresti ....................................... 37 37
Patrick Rodgers ................................. 37 37
Jimmy Walker ................................... 36 38
Zecheng Dou ...................................... 36 38
Gunn Yang ......................................... 36 38
Tatsuya Kodai .................................... 38 37
Satoshi Kodaira ................................. 36 39
Michael Thompson ............................ 40 38
SHOTS ON GOAL
EDMONTON ........................... 13
5
9 — 27
ARIZONA ............................... 10
5
7 — 22
Power-play opportunities: Edmonton 0 of 1; Arizona 0 of
1. Goalies: Edmonton, Talbot 15-16-2 (3 shots-1 saves),
Montoya 3-1-0 (19-19). Arizona, Raanta 6-12-3 (26-23).
A: 14,077 (17,125). T: 2:22.
— 63 -7
— 63 -7
— 64 -6
— 64 -6
— 64 -6
— 64 -6
— 65 -5
— 65 -5
— 65 -5
— 65 -5
— 66 -4
— 66 -4
— 66 -4
— 66 -4
— 66 -4
— 66 -4
— 66 -4
— 66 -4
— 66 -4
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 67 -3
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 68 -2
— 69 -1
— 69 -1
— 69 -1
— 69 -1
— 69 -1
— 69 -1
— 69 -1
— 69 -1
— 69 -1
— 69 -1
— 69 -1
— 69 -1
— 69 -1
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 70 E
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 71 +1
— 72 +2
— 72 +2
— 72 +2
— 72 +2
— 72 +2
— 72 +2
— 72 +2
— 72 +2
— 72 +2
— 72 +2
— 72 +2
— 72 +2
— 72 +2
— 72 +2
— 72 +2
— 73 +3
— 73 +3
— 73 +3
— 73 +3
— 73 +3
— 74 +4
— 74 +4
— 74 +4
— 74 +4
— 74 +4
— 74 +4
— 75 +5
— 75 +5
— 78 +8
a-Amateur
European Tour
SOUTH AFRICAN OPEN
At Glendower Golf Club; In Gauteng, South Africa
Purse: $1.21 million
Yardage: 7,594
SECOND ROUND
Chris Paisley, England...........................66-65
Adrien Saddier, France..........................68-63
Jacques Kruyswijk, South Africa ..........68-67
Retief Goosen, South Africa .................69-67
Chase Koepka, United States ...............65-71
Branden Grace, South Africa ................65-71
Scott Vincent, Zimbabwe .....................70-66
Nacho Elvira, Spain ...............................67-70
Jacques Blaauw, South Africa ..............68-70
Lee Soomin, South Korea......................68-70
Rhys West, South Africa ......................72-66
Justin Walters, South Africa................69-69
Renato Paratore, South Africa .............71-67
a-Matt Saulez, South Africa .................69-70
Mattheiu Pavon, France........................72-67
Trevor Fisher Jnr, South Africa ............69-70
a-Kyle McClatchie, South Africa...........68-71
Charl Schwartzel, South Africa ............69-70
Erik Van Rooyen, South Africa..............67-72
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
131
131
135
136
136
136
136
137
138
138
138
138
138
139
139
139
139
139
139
ALSO
Zack Byrd, United States................ 69-71
—
140
(a-amateur)
NHL LEADERS
Entering Friday’s games
POINTS
GP
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ................ 44
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado ............... 41
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ............... 44
Blake Wheeler, Winnipeg...................... 44
Claude Giroux, Philadelphia ................. 42
John Tavares, N.Y. Islanders ................ 43
Johnny Gaudreau, Calgary .................... 43
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia ................ 42
Josh Bailey, N.Y. Islanders ................... 42
Connor McDavid, Edmonton ................. 44
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh ......................... 44
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ................. 44
G
27
18
17
14
14
22
14
8
12
15
18
27
A PTS
33 60
34 52
35 52
38 52
38 52
29 51
37 51
43 51
38 50
33 48
29 47
19 46
GOALS
GP
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 44
Alex Ovechkin, Washington ............................. 44
Anders Lee, N.Y. Islanders
... 43
Sean Couturier, Philadelphia ........................... 42
Brock Boeser, Vancouver ................................. 40
William Karlsson, Vegas
... 41
John Tavares, N.Y. Islanders
... 43
Tyler Seguin, Dallas ......................................... 43
Sean Monahan, Calgary ................................... 43
G
27
27
25
23
22
22
22
21
20
ASSISTS
GP
Jakub Voracek, Philadelphia ............................ 42
Josh Bailey, N.Y. Islanders
... 42
Claude Giroux, Philadelphia ............................. 42
Blake Wheeler, Winnipeg ................................ 44
Johnny Gaudreau, Calgary ............................... 43
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay ........................... 44
Nathan MacKinnon, Colorado .......................... 41
John Klingberg, Dallas ..................................... 43
Nikita Kucherov, Tampa Bay ............................ 44
Connor McDavid, Edmonton ............................. 44
John Carlson, Washington ............................... 44
Phil Kessel, Pittsburgh .................................... 44
John Tavares, N.Y. Islanders
... 43
A
43
38
38
38
37
35
34
33
33
33
29
29
29
World Golf Ranking
Through Sunday
1. Dustin Johnson .......................... USA
2. Jordan Spieth............................. USA
3. Jon Rahm .................................... ESP
4. Justin Thomas ........................... USA
5. Hideki Matsuyama...................... JPN
6. Justin Rose ................................ ENG
7. Rickie Fowler ............................. USA
8. Brooks Koepka ........................... USA
9. Henrik Stenson ..........................SWE
10. Sergio Garcia............................. ESP
11. Rory McIlroy...............................NIR
12. Marc Leishman ........................ AUS
13. Jason Day................................. AUS
14. Paul Casey................................ ENG
15. Matt Kuchar ............................. USA
16. Pat Perez.................................. USA
17. Tyrrell Hatton .......................... ENG
18. Tommy Fleetwood ................... ENG
19. Alex Noren ...............................SWE
20. Rafael Cabrera Bello ................. ESP
21. Francesco Molinari.....................ITA
22. Charley Hoffman...................... USA
23. Brian Harman........................... USA
24. Louis Oosthuizen ......................SAF
25. Patrick Reed............................. USA
26. Xander Schauffele ................... USA
27. Kevin Kisner............................. USA
28. Daniel Berger ........................... USA
29. Matthew Fitzpatrick................ ENG
30. Branden Grace...........................SAF
31. Ross Fisher .............................. ENG
32. Kevin Chappell ......................... USA
33. Adam Scott .............................. AUS
34. Charl Schwartzel.......................SAF
35. Patrick Cantlay......................... USA
36. Yuta Ikeda ................................. JPN
37. Siwoo Kim ................................ KOR
38. Thomas Pieters......................... BEL
11.19
9.03
8.79
8.30
7.89
7.75
6.83
6.15
5.78
5.56
5.50
5.23
4.91
4.80
4.65
4.57
4.56
4.49
4.42
3.91
3.78
3.73
3.71
3.67
3.63
3.48
3.38
3.20
3.16
3.04
2.91
2.90
2.87
2.84
2.72
2.68
2.67
2.64
MEN’S SINGLES — SEMIFINALS
Daniil Medvedev, Russia, def. Fabio Fognini (4), Italy,
2-6, 6-4, 6-1; Alex de Minaur, Australia, def. Benoit
Paire, France, 4-6, 6-1, 6-1.
WOMEN’S SINGLES — SEMIFINALS
Ashleigh Barty, Australia, def. Daria Gavrilova, Australia, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2; Angelique Kerber, Australia, def.
Camila Giorgi, Italy, 6-2, 6-3.
MEN’S DOUBLES — CHAMPIONSHIP
Lukasz Kubot, Poland, and Marcelo Melo (1), Brazil, def.
Jan-Lennard Struff, Germany, and Viktor Troicki, Serbia,
6-3, 6-4.
WOMEN’S DOUBLES — CHAMPIONSHIP
Gabriela Dabrowski, Canada, and Xu Yifan (3), China,
def. Latisha Chan, Taiwan, and Andrea Sestini Hlavackova (1), Czech Republic, 6-4, 5-2 retired.
ATP
ASB CLASSIC
At ASB Tennis Arena; In Auckland, New Zealand
Purse: $501,345 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES — CHAMPIONSHIP
Roberto Bautista Agut (5), Spain, def. Robin Haase,
Netherlands, 6-7 (9-7), 7-6 (7-3), 7-6 (7-5); Juan Martin
del Potro (2), Argentina, def. David Ferrer (7), Spain, 6-4,
6-4.
DOUBLES — CHAMPIONSHIP
Max Mirnyi, Belarus, and Philipp Oswald, Austria, def.
Raven Klaasen, South Africa, and Michael Venus (2),
New Zealand, 7-6 (9-7), 7-6 (8-6); Oliver Marach,
Austria, and Mate Pavic (1), Croatia, def. Santiago
Gonzalez, Mexico, and Julio Peralta (3), Chile, 6-4, 4-6,
10-6.
WTA
HOBART INTERNATIONAL
At Domain Tennis Centre; In Hobart, Australia
Purse: $226,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES — SEMIFINALS
Elise Mertens (2), Belgium, def. Heather Watson,
Britain, 6-4, 1-6, 6-2; Mihaela Buzarnescu, Romania, def.
Lesia Tsurenko (5), Ukraine, 6-2, 6-2.
DOUBLES — SEMIFINALS
Lyudmyla Kichenok, Ukraine, and Makoto Ninomiya
(4), Japan, def. Alison Bai and Lizette Cabrera,
Australia, 3-6, 6-3, 10-4; Elise Mertens, Belgium, and
Demi Schuurs (3), Netherlands, def. Veronika Kudermetova, Russia, and Aryna Sabalenka, Belarus, 6-1,
5-7, 10-7.
BAS E BALL
MLB calendar
Jan. 24 BBWAA Hall of Fame voting announced.
Jan. 29-Feb. 16 Salary arbitration hearings, Phoenix.
Jan. 30-Feb. 1 Owners meetings, Beverly Hills, Calif.
Feb 15 Voluntary reporting date for pitchers, catchers
and injured players.
Feb. 19 Voluntary reporting date for other players.
Feb. 24 Mandatory reporting date.
March 29 Opening day. Active rosters reduced to 25
players.
April 17-18 Cleveland vs. Minnesota at San Juan, Puerto
Rico.
June 4 Amateur draft starts.
June 15 International amater signing period closes.
July 2 International amateur signing period opens.
July 6 Last day to sign for amateur draft picks subject to
deadline.
July 17 All-Star Game, Washington.
July 29 Hall of Fame inductions, Cooperstown, N.Y
July 31 Last day to trade a player without securing
waivers.
Aug. 31 Last day to be contracted to an organization and
be eligible for postseason roster.
Oct. 2-3 Wild-card games.
Dec. 10-13 Winter meetings, Las Vegas.
TR ANS AC TI ONS
MLB
Baltimore Orioles: Agreed to terms with 3B Manny
Machado, LHP Zach Britton, RHP Brad Brach and C Caleb
Joseph on one-year contracts.
Boston Red Sox: Agreed to terms with INF Brock Holt; SS
Xander Bogaerts; Cs Sandy Leon and Christian Vazquez;
OF Jackie Bradley Jr., and RHPs Joe Kelly and Brandon
Workman; and LHPs Drew Pomeranz and Eduardo
Rodriguez on one-year contracts.
Chicago White Sox: Agreed to terms with 1B Jose Abreu,
INF Leury Garcia and LHPs Luis Avilan and Carlos Rodon
on one-year contracts.
Cleveland Indians: Agreed to terms with RHPs Danny
Salazar and Zach McAllister and OF Lonnie Chisenhall on
one-year contracts.
Detroit Tigers: Agreed to terms with RHPs Shane
Greene and Alex Wilson and OF Nicholas Castellanos on
one-year contracts.
Houston Astros: Agreed to terms with C Evan Gattis;
LHP Dallas Keuchel and RHPs Lance McCullers Jr. and
Brad Peacock on one-year contracts.
Kansas City Royals: Agreed to terms with RHPs Kelvin
Herrera and Nate Karns on one-year contracts.
Los Angeles Angels: Agreed to terms with LHP Jose
Alvarez, RHP Cam Bedrosian, 1B C.J. Cron, C Martin
Maldonado, RHP J.C. Ramirez, RHP Garrett Richards,
RHP Matt Shoemaker and LHP Tyler Skaggs on one-year
contracts.
Minnesota Twins: Agreed to terms with RHPs Trevor
May and Ryan Pressly, INFs Ehire Adrianza and Eduardo
Escobar and OF Robbie Grossman on one-year contracts.
New York Yankees: Agreed to terms with SS Didi
Gregorius; RHPs Sonny Gray, Dellin Betances and Adam
Warren; LHP Chasen Shreve and C Austin Romine on
one-year contracts.
Oakland Athletics: Agreed to terms with RHPs Liam
Hendriks, Chris Hatcher and Blake Treinen; C Josh
Phegley and SS Marcus Semien on one-year contracts.
Promoted Troy Smith to vice president of marketing.
Seattle Mariners: Agreed to terms with RHPs David
Phelps, Erasmo Ramirez and Nick Vincent; LHP James
Paxton and C Mike Zunino on one-year contracts.
Tampa Bay Rays: Agreed to terms with RHP Alex
Colome, DH/OF Corey Dickerson, INFs Matt Duffy and
Brad Miller, OF Steven Souza, Jr., C Jesus Sucre and RHP
Dan Jennings on one-year contracts.
Texas Rangers: Agreed to terms with LHP Jake Diekman,
RHP Keone Kela and INF Jurickson Profar on one-year
contracts.
Toronto Blue Jays: Agreed to terms with 3B Josh
Donaldson; OFs Kevin Pillar and Ezequiel Carrera; RHPs
Aaron Sanchez and Dominic Leone; 2B Devon Travis and
LHP Aaron Loup on one-year contacts.
Arizona Diamondbacks: Agreed to terms with SS Nick
Ahmed, RHP Brad Boxberger, LHP Andrew Chafin, C
Chris Herrmann, 3B Jake Lamb, SS Chris Owings, OF
David Peralta, OF A.J. Pollock, LHP Robbie Ray, RHP
Taijuan Walker, LHP Sam Freeman, RHP Arodys Vizcaino
and RHP Dan Winkler on one-year contracts.
Chicago Cubs: Agreed to terms with 3B Kris Bryant and
SS Addison Russell on one-year contracts.
Cincinnati Reds: Agreed to terms with RHP Anthony
DeSclafani, CF Billy Hamilton and RHP Michael Lorenzen
on one-year contracts.
Colorado Rockies: Agreed to terms with OF Charlie
Blackmon, RHP Chad Bettis, INF DJ LeMahieu and LHP
Chris Rusin on one-year contacts.
Los Angeles Dodgers: Agreed to terms with RHP Pedro
Baez, LHP Tony Cingrani, RHP Josh Fields, C Yasmani
Grandal, INF/OF Kike Hernandez, OF Joc Pederson and
LHP Alex Wood on one-year contracts.
Miami Marlins: Agreed to terms with 3B Derek Dietrich
and SS Miguel Rojas on one-year contracts.
Milwaukee Brewers: Agreed to terms with RHP Corey
Knebel, RHP Jimmy Nelson, INF Hernan Perez and SS
Jonathan Villar on one-year contracts.
New York Mets: Agreed to terms with RHPs Matt
Harvey, Noah Syndergaard, Jacob deGrom, Jeurys Familia, A.J. Ramos, Hansel Robles, C Travis d’Arnaud and INF
Wulmer Flores on one-year contracts.
Philadelphia Phillies: Agreed to terms with 3B Maikel
Franco, SS Luis Garcia, 2B Cesar Hernandez and C
Cameron Rupp on one-year contracts.
Pittsburgh Pirates: Agreed to terms with RHP Gerrit
Cole, SS Jordy Mercer and RHP George Kontos on
one-year contracts.
St. Louis Cardinals: Agreed to terms with OF Randal
Grichuk, LHP Tyler Lyons, OF Marcell Ozuna and RHP
Michael Wacha on one-year contracts.
San Diego Padres: Agreed to terms with RHP Kirby
Yates; INFs Freddy Galvis and Cory Spangenberg and OF
Matt Szczur on one-year contracts.
San Francisco Giants: Agreed to terms with 2B Joe
Panik; RHPs Hunter Strickland, Sam Dyson and Cory
Gearrin and LHP Will Smith on one-year contracts.
NFL
Buffalo Bills: Fired offensive coordinator Rick Dennison.
Carolina Panthers: Named Norv Turner offensive coordinator.
Chicago Bears: Named Mark Helfrich offensive coordinator, Chris Tabor special teams coordinator, Charles
London running backs coach and Mike Furrey wide
receivers coach. Re-signed defensive coordinator Vic
Fangio.
Cleveland Browns: Named Adam Henry wide receivers
coach, Ken Zampese quarterbacks coach and Al Saunders senior assistant/special projects. Parted ways with
run game coordinator/running backs coach Kirby Wilson,
quarterbacks coach David Lee, special teams assistant
Shawn Mennenga and special teams quality control
coach Stan Watson. Announced special teams coordinator Chris Tabor resigned to join the Chicago Bears.
Kansas City Chiefs: Named Deland McCullough running
backs coach.
Oakland Raiders: Named Paul Guenther defensive coordinator, Greg Olson offensive coordinator and Rich
Bisaccia assistant head coach/special teams coordinator.
NHL
Washington Capitals: Recalled F Travis Boyd from
Hershey (AHL).
EFGHI
homes for sale,
commercial real estate
rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
dogs, cats, birds, fish
washingtonpost.com/jobs
cars.com
washingtonpost.com/
realestate
apartments.com
washingtonpost.com/
merchandise
washingtonpost.com/pets
360
Lost
Appliances
Espresso Machine, Breville, Dual Boiler, inop—$0, Free for pick up. Fairfax,
VA, 703-727-7043
215
Books, Music & Movies
2018
Declutter
Calendar—$39
Declutter your home in 2018! N.
Bethesda, MD, 240-246-5405
225
Clothing, Shoes
& Accessories
FURS/ST. JOHN KNITS—FUR
COATS STARTING AT $400.00,
6341 OLD BRANCH AVENUE,
TEMPLE HILLS, MD, 202-7706871.THIS SATURDAY.12-7PM.
To place an ad, go to washingtonpostads.com
5410 Connecticut Ave NW #303
HADLEY AND ASSOCIATES
ESTATE SERVICES
Jan 12 & 13
10-3 pm
Furn: cherry vintage chests, dr tble,
chrs; servers; corner cabinet; night
stands; full bed; vanity/mirror;
adjustable bed; sleep sofa; vintage
& new sewing machines; china;
ladies clothing; kit items; TV’s;
So much more.
See Estatesale.net. Tkts ½ prior.
Vienna, VA - 1001 Delilah Dr. SW
Fri- Sun, 10-3. Full House Sale
www.caringtransitionsnova.com
for pics and details.
Found
FAIRFAX CO. ANIMAL SERVICES
HOUND MIX F W/BLK
FFX CO
GERM SHEP M TN/BLK
FFX CO
BLOODHOUND F BLK/TN
FFX CO
AM STAFF TERR MIX M TN/W FFX CO
GERM SHEP/FOXH M BR/W FFX CO
LAB RETR MIX F BLK/W
FFX CO
WH TERR SOFT M BLK/GR
FFX CO
GREAT PYR MIX F WH
FFX CO
GUINEA PIG M BR/W
FFX CO
GUINEA PIG M TN/W
FFX CO
FOR MORE INFO CALL (703) 830-1100
HOWARD CO. ANIMAL CONTROL
If you have lost an animal in the
Howard County/
Washington Metro area:
CALL 410-313-2780
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
876
Dogs for Sale
POMERPANIAN PUPPPIES- 8 WEEKS
SHOTS DEWORMED, ADORABLE,
HEALTH GUARANTEE $800.
540-538-1037, Fredericksburg, VA
SHELTIE Puppies AKC for sale, tri
colored females, male and female
sable. 7 weeks old, Chambersburg,
PA. Call 717-816-5161
SHELTIE PUPPIES - AKC registered,
very small parents, 2 sable white
males available. brown and blue eye
color. 9 wks. Call 540-560-5132
Shihtzus Cavapoos & more—Puppies
for Sale. 304-904-6289, Cash, CC,
Easy Finance, www.wvpuppy.com,
59 East Rd, Martinsburg WV, exit16E
Standard Poodle — AKC, $1500, M/F,
11 wks , Black/ Brown,
solid,abstract, sable, phantom
240-417-8316
STANDARD POODLE
Black, male, AKC, 9 weeks old,
fabulous temperament.
$1,500. Call 302-228-4553
Westie—2 adorable Westie AKC
males, 9wk, Grt pedigree with
papers, 1st shots/wormed $1600
304-249-4946
YORKSHIRE TERRIER PUPPIES,
2 M, 1 F, CKC papers, first shots,
wormed,$1000 F, $950 M. Serious
inquires only. 301-523-6728
MONTGOMERY CO. ANIMAL SHELTER 622
NEW, 1972 Mopar Hoodie—55 $55,
If you have lost an animal in the
Hyattsville, MD, 301-322-6449Zip- Washington Metro area: Please call
pered 2XL, Large logo on back.
the Montgomery Co. Animal Shelter
New Men's White Pants—15 $15, at 240-773-5960 or online for found
animals at www.mchumane.org
Hyattsville, MD, 301-322-6449Izod
36x32 with tags.
4Paws—Adopt fr 30+ cat/
610
kitten $v Sat 1-5 Sat Fairfax
New Seude Purses/Handbags—30
$30, Hyattsville, MD, 301-322- Boxer/Pups—2 adorable boxer pups.
Petco www.fourpaws.org
6449Two, Black and Red
703-352-3300 CFC#34517
Ready 1/12/18. Vet checked and 1st
shots. Call Karen at 717 504 2547.
NEW, Stephen Strasburg Jersey—35
$35, Hyattsville, MD, 301-322-6449DOBERMAN PUPPIES - AKC, big
825
Majestic XL road(grey) Jersey.
boned, family raised, great temperament, parents on premises. 8 weeks
245
Capitol Paving of D.C., Inc.
old. some have Ears done. All colors
Capitol Paving is soliciting qualified
available. $500/$900. 240-674-2844
Therapy Lamp—33
NatureBright
MBE/WBE subcontractors to peror 240-674-3994
Light and Ion Therapy Lamp $33,
form DC Water Sol # 170170 –
DOBERMAN PUPPIES - AKC, big
Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
Public Space Restoration Contract
boned, family raised, great tempera- for FY18-FY21. email – bids@capiVintage Stereo Receiver—$250 1974 ment, parents on premises. 8 weeks
tolpaving.com ; call – 571.277.1022
HK 730, excellent cond. Original old. some have Ears done. All colors
or fax – 202.832.5126 – Bid Opening
owner. 301-452-3497
available. $500/$900. 240-674-2844
11/01/2017
or 240-674-3994
255
Doberman pups—$1,200, Black & 850
Rust, 8 wks, 865-278-4491, Open
contract for breeding. Dalsty's very
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
last litter. $200 off if bought by 1/17
Performance Brake Pads, Trucks,
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
DOODLES - M&F, shots, wormed,
SUVs, Cars—$75, Toll Free: 888-257MARYLAND
4 months old, house breaking
7149
DIANE S. ROSENBERG
started, super friendly, family raised.
MARK D. MEYER
260
$750 & up. Call 301-639-8636
JOHN A. ANSELL, III
KENNETH SAVITZ
NEW QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS
JENNIFER ROCHINO
SET—$150.00 Sykesville, MD, CALL
SYDNEY ROBERSON
240-426-0699
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
GERMAN SHEPARD PUPS4340 East West Highway
AKC registered.ready 2/18 4 M, 2 F.
265
Suite 600
taking deposits now.
Bethesda, MD 20814
703-953-8404
Substitute Trustees
Firewood—$210.00
Delivered,
GERMAN
SHEPHERD
PUPS
Pure
Plaintiff(s)
Stacking available,Ask for Alan 703bred,
shots,
vet
checked.11
wks
794-0513
v.
Males & females. $500/$900.
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian Call 240-398-6312 or 301-728-6171
Jonathan M. Stone
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
20079 Dunstable Circle, Unit 402
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
Germantown, MD 20876
Defendant(s)
275
Case No. 438125V
German
Shepherd—BeautiNOTICE
Buy Chinese furniture,Jewelry, paintful
Black
&
Red
Pups
from
ing,porcelain,—249 c:7039669935,
Notice
is
hereby
given this 27th
top European Imported
sharonantique@gmail.com
day of December, 2017, by the Cirparents. Vet Checked,
I BUY VINYL RECORDS!—150 I drive
cuit Court for Montgomery CounAKC, Health/Hips Guar.
to you and haul them away. Call
ty, Maryland, that the sale of
804-895-0022 www.Vom
Mark at 571-830-5871
20079 Dunstable Circle, Unit 402,
BrandonHaus.com
Germantown, MD 20876, made
Old Bottles of Bourbon—50 Seeking
and reported, will be ratified and
full/sealed bottles of vintage bourconfirmed, unless cause to the
bon and rye. Alex 443-223-7669
GERMAN SHEPHERD- AKC registered
contrary thereof be shown on or
Radio tubes—249 WANTED ham puppies. Working blood lines.
before the 26th day of January,
radios huge speakers tube hif amps Grandfather is an import. 12 weeks.
2018, provided a copy of this
$1,000.
Call 757-593-1974
202 527 9501, vcvdc@msn.com
notice be inserted in a daily newspaper printed in said County, once
Golden/Lab Pups- 3/4 Golden
VINTAGE HI-FI TUBE AMPS—TUBES
in each of three successive weeks
BIG SPKRS MCINTOSH AMPS MOST retiriever, 1/4 lab, ready Jan 10, vet
before the 26th day of January,
CASH 410-740-5222 50's 60's 70's
checked w/ first shots & dewormed,
2018. The Report of Sale states
$500 CASH, 540-810-1327
the amount of the foreclosure
291
GOLDEN RET AKC & GOLDEN /
sale price to be $143,000.00.
LAB RET CROSS PUPS & ADULTS
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents
Clerk of the Circuit Court
on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543
Montgomery County, MD
Child Seats—33 Generic infant $33
W www.VictoriasPups.com W
or Graco child car seat $44 (70
12/30/2017, 1/6,13/2018 12151584
Golden Retriever—AKC Wormed first
both) Alexandria, VA 571431-1501
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
shots $900, male/femal, will be 8
358
FOR THE COUNTY OF
wks old- ready 1/26 443-404-6968
MONTGOMERY, MARYLAND
Great Dane Pup—Male, Black and
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Alexandria—14 W. Uhler Ave,
White pups, 2 months old,
Trustee(s)
Alexandria, VA, 01/13/2018, 8a-2p,
$1800, 202-438-6059
Plaintiff(s)
703-405-4168
Lab Pups—Yellow, AKC, guaranteed,
CENTREVILLE - 14506 Smithwood Dr. wormed/1st shots. Socialized with
vs.
Sat 1/13-Mon 1/15, 9:30-5:30. Furn, kids. 703-203-0702. Check out my PATRICK T. PAK
dining table w/ chairs, beds, mat- website: www.belgianwayfarm.com EUNICE E. PAK
tresses, lthr sofa/love seats, paintDefendant(s)
Labradoodle—M
&
F,
8
wks,
vacc,
ings, office furn, treadmill, hoverMortgagor(s)
board, bicycles, sleds, grill & more de-wormings, socialized. Vet chkd,
Health guar. Parents both AKC reg.
CIVIL NO. 434093V
& family pets. $1,250. 304-641-5804
360
NOTICE
MALTESE PUPS - AKC, adorable,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THIS
4304 BRANDYWINE ST NW,
shots, vetted, health guarantee,
26th
day
of
December,
2017 by the
WASHINGTON, DC
champ lines, home raised. Ready
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
Eclectic Estate Sale! DIR: River Rd,
now. Call 434-384-7032
MONTGOMERY, Maryland, and by
43rd St NW, Brandywine St NW.
the
authority
thereof,
that
the sale
Sat 9-3; Sun 9-1.
made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto,
www.FOURSALES.com
R.
Kip
Stone,
Thomas
J.
Gartner,
MASTIFF
PUPS
(SOUTH
AFRICAN
Need a Quality Sale? 703-256-8300
Phillip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
BOERBOELS)- Reg, Fs, S/W, health
Real Property designated as 17733
guar, fawn w/ dark mask, ready
Buehler Road #18, Olney, MD
01/14, $1,800. 410-271-1433
20832, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally ratiMini Poodle—$800, AKC Black
fied and confirmed, unless cause
Males, 16 wks, raised w/children,
1-800-753-POST
to the contrary thereof be shown
beautiful, playful, 540-905-0365
SF
on or before the 25th day of January, 2018, next; provided a copy
Min Schnauzer—AKC vet checked w/
of this order be inserted in THE
certificate vaccines hair cut tails
Home delivery is so easy.
WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th
docked dewclaws removed puppy
Street, Washington DC, MD pub1-800-753-POST SF kit 443-684-0664 raised in home
lished in said COUNTY OF MONTGOMERY once a week for three
successive weeks before the 25th
day of January, 2018.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $225,000.00
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
12/30/2017, 1/6,13/2018 12151586
Adopt Cats
Dogs for Sale
Bids & Proposals
Electronics
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
Montgomery County
Furniture
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K
i
Merchandise Wanted
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& Services
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Home delivery
is convenient.
Antiques & Auctions
205
205
Antiques
I BUY VINYL RECORDS!—150 I drive
to you and haul them away. Call
Mark at 571-830-5871
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Antiques
KENSINGTON
ANTIQUE ROW
Antiques & Specialty Shops
Antique & Vintage Furniture.
Lighting, Jewelry, Art, Linens,
China, Silver, Mirrors, Books...
Multi-Dealer Mall B Stay 4 Lunch
KensingtonAntiqueRow.com
E. Howard Ave., Kensington,
MD N. on Conn., R. on Howard,
2 mi. N of Beltway (I-495)
Free Parking!
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
610
Estate Sales
DC
602
Collectibles
I BUY VINYL RECORDS!—150 I drive
to you and haul them away. Call
Mark at 571-830-5871
229
EZ
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
Jordanian passport- #N260933
DOI: 8/31/2015 Place of issue:
Irbid/Jordan. lost on Jan 5, 2018. Call
ali hani saleh zayid 313-338-7373
208
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2018
the local expert
on local jobs
For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
110
CLASSIFIED
Wake up
to home delivery.
876
Loudoun County
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%) of
the sale price or ten percent (10%) of the original principal balance of
the subject Deed of Trust, whichever is lower, in the form of cash or
certified funds payable to the Substitute Trustee within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser’s deposit may be forfeited to the Substitute
Trustee. Time is of the essence. If the sale is set aside for any reason,
the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled to a return of the deposit paid.
Additional terms to be announced at the sale. Substitute Trustee: Tracy
S. Kissler, Esq., c/o: Shawn C. Whittaker, Esq., Whittaker & Associates,
PC, 1010 Rockville Pike, Suite 607, Rockville, MD 20852, (301)-838-4502
January 6, 13, 20, 27, 2018
12152937
850
851
Montgomery County
820
Official Notices
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
WILLIAM D. BROWN, JR
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. 426356V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 26th
day of DECEMBER, 2017, by the
Circuit Court for Montgomery
County, Maryland, that the sale of
the property mentioned in these
proceedings and described as
1414 Wake Forest Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20879 will be ratified
and confirmed unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 25th day of JANUARY, 2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper
of general circulation published in
said County before the 25th day
of JANUARY, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$278,900.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
12/30/2017, 1/6,13/2018 12151585
851
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
JEFFREY R. JONES
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF16-24831
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 21st day
of December 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 13201
Chalfont Avenue, Fort Washington,
MD 20744, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 22nd day of January,
2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 22nd day of January, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$220,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 30, 2017, Jan 6, 13, 2018
12151736
Prince Georges County General Jobs
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
MONICA LYNN MCDOWELL
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF16-43131
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 21st day
of December 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 404
Willow Hill Place, Hyattsville, MD
20785, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 22nd day of January,
2018, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 22nd day of January, 2018.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$209,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 30, 2017, Jan 6, 13, 2018
12151741
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Erin M. August
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
The Estate of Charles M. Proctor
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF16-35913
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 19th day of December 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 8913 Clayton Lane, Clinton, Maryland 20735, made and reported
by James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
Brian Thomas, Erin M. August,
Hugh J. Green and Patrick M. A.
Decker, Substitute Trustees, be
RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless
cause to the contrary be shown on
or before the 19th day of January,
2018, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 19th day of
January, 2018.
Greenskeepers - Temporary/
full-time 4/1/2018-12/1/2018.
20 jobs w/ Robert Trent Jones
Golf Club, Gainesville, VA in
Prince William co. Maintain
grounds/turf of golf course
in playing condition. Perform
w/o close supervsn, including
till/cultivate/grade turf, apply
lime/chemicals, mow greens/
tees/fairways/approaches/
short cuts, dig, rake the
rough/greens/fairway, connect hose/sprinkler systems,
grade/clean traps, repair
roadbeds. May plant/trim/
spray trees/shrubs. Must
exercise independent judgment; may be asked to demo
tasks to other employees,
non-supervisory. Lift/carry 50
lbs when nec. E-Verify check
reqd. 3 mos exp reqd. 40
hr/wk 6:00 AM-2:30 PM MF. Sat/Sun work reqd when
nec. Wage is no less than
$14.70/hr (OT varies @
$22.05/hr). Raise/bonus at
emplr discretion. Trans. (incl.
meals & as nec. lodging) to
place of employ provided/pd
to wkrs residing outside normal commute distance by
completion of 50% of job period. Return trans. Provided/pd
to same wkrs if wkr completes job period or dismissed
early. Wkrs guaranteed offer
of 3/4 of work hrs each 12-wk
period. Tools, supplies, equip,
uniform & daily trans. to/from
wksite from central loc provided at no cost. Potential
deduct for reasonable cost
of lodging may apply. Emplr
may assist to secure wkr-paid
lodging if nec. Interview reqd.
Fax resume to (703) 754-4787
or apply at: VEC-Prince William, 13370 Minnieville Rd,
Woodbridge, VA 22192, (703)
897-0407. JO# 1249581.
M
JOBS
MAINTENANCE
Applicant must have exp in
apartment maint & have
your own transp & tools.
Good refs & pass criminal
bckgr chk. Fax resume:
703-567-4063
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home delivery?
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The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $120,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Dec 30, 2017, Jan 6, 13, 2018
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12151745
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Official Notices
820
Official Notices
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority
Purpose
Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority
on the two dockets noted above as follows:
Hearing No. 617
Wednesday, January 31, 2018
Metro Headquarters Building, 600 Fifth Street NW, Washington, DC 20001
Open House 5:30 • Public Hearing 6 p.m. • Speaker registration is on-site only
Please note that this date is subject to Metro’s inclement weather cancellation policy.
In the event of a cancellation, Metro will post information about a new hearing on wmata.com.
The locations for all public hearings are wheelchair accessible. Any individual who requires special assistance such as a sign language interpreter or additional
accommodation to participate in the public hearing, or who requires these materials in an alternate format, should contact Danise Peña at 202-962-2511 or
TTY: 202-962-2033 as soon as possible in order for Metro to make necessary arrangements. For language assistance, such as an interpreter or information in another
language, please call 202-962-2582 at least 48 hours prior to the public hearing date.
For more information please visit www.wmata.com/budget
In accordance with Section 62 of the WMATA Compact, Metro will conduct a
public hearing at the location listed in this notice. Information on the hearing will
be provided in area libraries, in Metrorail stations, on Metrobus and MetroAccess
vehicles, and online at www.wmata.com/budget.
HOW TO REGISTER TO SPEAK – All organizations or individuals desiring to be heard
with respect to these two dockets will be afforded the opportunity to present their
views and make supporting statements and to offer alternative proposals. Public
officials will be allowed five minutes each to make their presentations. All others will
be allowed three minutes each. Relinquishing of time by one speaker to another will
not be permitted.
There will be no advance registration to speak. Those wishing to provide oral
testimony will sign up to speak at the hearing, will be called to testify in the order
they sign up, and can sign up to speak at any time prior to the close of the hearing.
Elected public officials will be allowed to provide their testimony as soon as feasible
after their registration. If you will not be able to stay to provide your testimony orally
when your name is called, staff will provide you with multiple ways to submit your
comments into the public record including the use of a digital recorder to record
your oral comments.
Please note that all comments received are releasable to the public upon request,
and may be posted on WMATA’s website, without change, including any personal
information provided.
HOW TO SUBMIT TESTIMONY NOT AT THE PUBLIC HEARING – Testimony may be
submitted online about Metro’s operating and capital budget at wmata.com/budget.
Online submission will be available by 9 a.m. on Saturday, January 13, 2018 and will
close on Monday, February 5, 2018 at 5 p.m. This is in addition to your ability to speak
at a public hearing. For those without access to computers or internet, testimony
may also be mailed to the Office of the Secretary, Washington Metropolitan Area
Transit Authority, 600 Fifth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001. All comments must be
received by the Office of the Secretary by 5 p.m. on Monday, February 5, 2018 to be
included in the public record. The comments received by the Office of the Secretary,
along with the online submissions and public hearing comments, will be presented
to the Board and will be part of the official public hearing record. Please note all
statements are releasable to the public upon request, and may be posted on WMATA’s
website, without change, including any personal information provided.
For a detailed description of all proposals, please visit www.wmata.com/budget, or
for those who do not have access to computers or internet, note that copies of the
dockets in their entirety are also available at area libraries or can be requested from
Metro’s Office of the Secretary by calling 202-962-2511.
The Metro Board has authorized an FY2019 budget public hearing, in accordance
with the WMATA Compact and as required by the Federal Transit Administration
(FTA). The proposed budget for FY2019 is described in detail in the dockets
attached.
WMATA PROPOSAL FOR DOCKET B18-01: Proposed FY2019 Operating Budget
Overview
The General Manager’s three priorities for Metro are safety, service reliability, and
financial responsibility, with safety as the top priority. These priorities have guided
the development of Metro’s FY2019 proposed budget and informed every key
decision. Metro must rebuild trust with both its riders and its funding jurisdictions,
and this proposed budget provides the resources to achieve the priorities and
continue the rebuilding effort.
The proposed operating budget for FY2019 is $1.9 billion. The budget is funded
with $828 million of projected operating revenues, primarily from passenger
fares, parking fees, and advertising revenues, and $1,009 million of jurisdictional
contributions. The budget assumes no fare increases, no service reductions, $38
million of management actions to reduce expenses and increase business revenues,
and a $29 million increase in jurisdictional subsidy (three percent) compared to
FY2018.
Metro’s primary FY2019 budget challenge is declining passenger revenue as
ridership continues to decrease. Bus and rail ridership and revenue through the
first quarter of FY2018 were below budget, and this trend is projected to continue
throughout the fiscal year. Total estimated ridership in FY2019 for rail and bus is four
percent below the FY2018 budget, and FY2019 rail and bus revenues are projected
to be $25 million below FY2018.
While Metro estimates that some of the riders who reduced their trips on Metro
due to SafeTrack will return, the overall trends are still challenging, and it will take
time to rebuild customer trust and confidence in Metro. Rail ridership in FY2019 is
expected to equal FY2018 ridership, but below the FY2018 budget.
Metrobus is not experiencing the same stabilization. Consistent with regional and
national trends, bus ridership in FY2018 is projected to be below both last year’s
actual performance and the FY2018 budget. Further, Metrobus FY2018 revenue is
lower than estimated. Therefore, the FY2019 revenue projection has been lowered
based on the FY2018 year-end forecast. Improving the customer experience –
particularly on-time performance – is critical to reversing current trends.
To stay within the three percent subsidy growth cap, the budget funds legacy
commitments, mandates, and inflationary costs. Additional management actions
include $25 million in base cost reductions, $5 million in overtime cost controls, and
an $8 million increase in non-transit revenues.
WMATA PROPOSAL FOR DOCKET B18-02: Proposed FY2019 Capital
Improvement Program and Federal FY2018 Grant Applications
WMATA intends to apply for Federal Fiscal Year 2018 grants under the Fixing
America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act and the Passenger Rail Investment and
Improvement Act of 2008 (PRIIA) to support ongoing capital investments.
These applications will be filed under the provisions of FAST (P.L. 114-94) and
PRIIA (P.L. 110-432).
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Based on preliminary information provided by the Federal Transit Administration
(FTA), the Washington DC Metropolitan Region expects to receive approximately
$360 million in FTA formula funding under the FAST Act in Federal FY2018. This
regional funding is distributed between WMATA, the Potomac and Rappahannock
Transportation Commission (PRTC), and the Maryland Transit Administration (MTA)
subject to a pre-existing agreement. Under this agreement, in Federal FY2017,
WMATA received approximately 86 percent of the total FTA formula funding for the
region. If WMATA’s funding share remains consistent with the prior year, WMATA will
receive approximately $310 million in federal funding.
Additionally, WMATA estimates $148.5 million will be available to the agency
through the PRIIA program in Federal FY2018. This funding partnership between the
federal government and the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia, which has
been in effect since 2009 and is authorized for ten years, provides critical resources
to WMATA for safety improvements, railcar purchases, and other important state of
good repair investments.
In accordance with Board policy, WMATA intends to apply for these grant funds
within four weeks of the Board’s adoption of the capital budget, which is currently
scheduled for March 2018. WMATA also intends to submit the final Program of
Projects to the National Capital Region Transportation Planning Board (TPB) as
input to the updated Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) for the Washington
Metropolitan area.
WMATA FY2019 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
WMATA’s proposed FY2019 Capital Investment Plan is $1.28 billion which is
focused on safety improvements, the rebuilding of the Metro system, and improving
the effectiveness of the current rail and bus network. The vast majority of the
planned investment advances the safety, rehabilitation, and replacement of Metro’s
infrastructure, facilities, equipment, systems, railcars, buses, and paratransit
vehicles.
The proposed FY2019 program will be funded through investments from the federal
government, state and local governments, and other sources. The proposed program
assumes federal sources make up $459 million of the $1.28 billion funding plan.
The remaining portion of the program is funded with $787 million of state and local
investment (including match to federal funds, and direct local contributions), $27
million from the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority (MWAA), and $5 million
for jurisdictional projects.
The Capital Improvement Program consists of the following six major investment
categories:
• Railcars, which includes acquisition of new vehicles, maintenance and
overhaul activities on existing vehicles to ensure safe and reliable operation,
and construction and rehabilitation on railcar maintenance facilities;
• Rail Systems, which includes investment in propulsion (including
tie-breaker stations, traction power substations, power cables, and
transformers) and signals and communications systems (including radio
systems and underground wireless infrastructure);
• Track & Structures, which includes fixed rail (e.g., running rail, switches,
fasteners, crossties, etc.), structures (e.g., tunnels and bridges), and track
maintenance equipment;
• Stations & Passenger Facilities, which includes platforms and other
structures, vertical transportation (elevators and escalators), fare collection
systems, station systems, and parking facilities;
• Bus & Paratransit, which includes bus acquisition, bus overhaul
and maintenance activities to ensure safe and reliable operation, bus
maintenance facilities, bus passenger facilities, and replacement of
paratransit vehicles; and
• Business Support, which includes information technology (IT), Metro Transit
Police (MTPD) investments, and other support and equipment services.
Consideration will be given to the special needs of people with disabilities and
seniors in implementing projects. All projects conform to the comprehensive land
use and transportation plans in the Washington Metropolitan area. No significant
adverse environmental effects are anticipated as a result of these projects.
In accordance with FTA regulation 49 CFR Part 604, WMATA conducts bus
subcontracting service incidental to its mass transportation services only where
permitted by exceptions contained in those regulations. WMATA’s subcontract
operations are self-supporting with rates established to return all operational costs
whether direct or indirect. Services and charges are published in the Subcontracting
and Special Transit Service Tariff #17 of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit
Authority, effective March 1, 2008, as amended by Board Resolution 2008-56
adopted on November 20, 2008. Copies of the Tariff and Bus Subcontracting Cost
Allocation Plan are available for public inspection from WMATA’s Department of Bus
Services.
REFERENCE MATERIAL AVAILABLE FOR REVIEW – The proposed WMATA FY2019
Capital Improvement Program is included in the WMATA FY2019 Proposed Budget,
which is available online at wmata.com/budget.
The FY2019 Proposed Budget is also available for inspection through February 5,
2018, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday - Friday except holidays,
at the Office of the Secretary, Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, 600
Fifth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001.
This public notice of the public hearing and the time established for public review
and comments on the Program of Projects satisfies the MAP-21 public participation
requirements. The program of projects outlined in the FY2019 Proposed Budget
will be the final program of projects unless modified prior to final approval by the
WMATA Board of Directors.
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Official Notices
Docket B18-01: Proposed FY2019 Operating Budget and
Docket B18-02: Proposed FY2019 Capital Improvement Program and
Federal FY2018 Grant Applications
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
SF
SF
FREE UNDER $250
Notice of Public Hearing
In execution of a certain Deed of Trust dated February 7, 2011, in the
original principal amount of $850,000.00 recorded in the Clerk’s Office,
Circuit Court for LOUDOUN COUNTY, Virginia, as Instrument No. 201102080009324, the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property located in the COUNTY OF LOUDOUN, on
the courthouse steps in front of the Circuit Court building for the County
of Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg, VA 20176, on
February 1, 2018 at 9:30 A.M., the property with improvements located at
44081 Pipeline Plaza, Ste. 4-210, Ashburn, VA 20147, PIN: 087-29-7279-008,
Tax Map Number: /79/N/1P4/210/.
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If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
44081 PIPELINE PLAZA, STE. 4-210, ASHBURN, VA 20147
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THE WASHINGTON POST . SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 2018
Real Estate
D
Let the
bidders
beware
B
I
BI
There’s a war out there: Too
many buyers are vying for
too few houses. 6
D
BI
D
BID
BID
ISTOCKPHOTO, WASHINGTON POST ILLUSTRATION
WHERE WE LIVE: FOREST HILLS
HARNEY
BUYING NEW
Access to Rock Creek Park is this Northwest D.C.
community’s biggest draw. 3
Be on guard for
“greenwashing.” 5
Condos for under
$400K on Capitol Hill. 8
3.99%
Mortgage rates rise. 5
2
EZ
Town Square
Real Estate News & Notes
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13, 2018
There’s a new twist on television’s
version of house hunting
If you’re among the 25 million people
who watch HGTV’s “House Hunters”
every month, you know the drill: The
prospective home buyers make a list of
priorities, visit three properties and
choose one to buy.
Now, HomeAway, a vacation rentalhome platform, has teamed with Chicken
Soup for the Soul Entertainment to
produce “Vacation Rental Potential,”
which airs on A&E Network.
The hook with this show is that the
shoppers are looking for a vacation home
to buy with the help of income from shortterm rentals. The buyers compare three
vacation homes and weigh the location,
price and design preferences, as well as
the potential rental income, to choose
which one to buy. Buyers will be able to
review rental income information from
HomeAway on each of three properties in
their preferred resort area.
The average vacation rental property on
HomeAway grosses about $30,000 per
year in rental income, which many owners
use to pay down the mortgage on their
property.
The series will visit 10 popular areas for
vacation rentals, including: Park City,
Utah; Myrtle Beach, S.C.; Breckinridge,
Colo.; Gatlinburg, Tenn., and South
Walton, Fla.
Viewers can participate in the program
by renting properties that have been
showcased for their own vacations. As
soon as the property is chosen, the buyers
make it available to viewers and others
through the HomeAway.com rental site.
For information, visit homeaway.com/
vrp.
To see a trailer of the program, go to
aetv.com/shows/vacation-rentalpotential.
participate in a workshop sponsored by
Stylish Patina to paint a customized item
or learn about chalk paint. A family zone
will be open with face painting, an
obstacle course and other activities.
The Home + Remodeling Show will be
at the Dulles Expo Center, 4320 Chantilly
Shopping Center, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jan. 19 and 20, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Jan.
21. Tickets are $9 online and $12 at the
door.
For information or to buy tickets, visit
homeandremodelingshow.com.
HOMEVISIT
This 680-square-foot, two-bedroom, two-bathroom condo at 1658 West Virginia
Ave. NE in the District’s Trinidad neighborhood is listed at $299,900.
Affordable home of the week:
D.C. condo for under $300,000
When the median sales price for a home
is $550,000, as reported by Rockvillebased Bright MLS, home buyers in
Washington may need to make some
compromises. A condo, provided the
monthly fees are not too high, can be a
good option.
In addition, buyers in the District
should think carefully about how much
space they must have, as opposed to how
much space they prefer. Although many
people want a second bedroom for guests
or an office, it’s possible for a den or alcove
to provide those functions.
For example, the condo at 1658 West
Virginia Ave. NE, No. 202, could be
labeled as a two-bedroom unit or as a onebedroom and den condo. The unit has 680
square feet and two bathrooms. Priced at
$299,900, the condo has a monthly fee of
$280 per month. Annual property taxes
are $448. One secured parking space is
included in the condo fee. Pets are
allowed.
The condo, on the top floor of the
building, has a living room open to the
kitchen, which has a gas range and granite
counters. The master bedroom has a walkin closet and a second closet, along with a
private full bathroom with subway tiles on
the walls. The bedrooms are carpeted, and
the living room and kitchen have Pergo
laminate wood flooring. The unit has a
washer and dryer.
The building, in the Trinidad
neighborhood, is near H Street, Union
Market and NOMA. Assigned schools are
Wheatley Education Campus for
preschool through eighth grade, and
Dunbar High, both rated below-average
based on test scores by greatschools.org.
For more photos, visit spws.
homevisit.com/mls/213450/1658-WESTVIRGINIA-AVE-NE-202-WASHINGTON-DC-20002.
For more information, contact real estate
agent Stephanie Bredahl of Washington
Fine Properties at 202-821-5145.
COURTESY OF HOMEAWAY
This vacation rental in Gatlinburg,
Tenn., is among the properties that will
be featured on the new A&E show
“Vacation Rental Potential.”
RE AL ESTAT E
Real Estate Editor:
V. Dion Haynes, dion.haynes@washpost.com
Art Director:
Dwuan June
Advertising Manager:
Howard J.S. Bomstein,
howard.bomstein@washpost.com
To contact us:
realestate@washpost.com
Mail:
The Washington Post, Real Estate Section
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071
Home + Remodeling Show
coming to Dulles Expo Center
If you plan to renovate or redecorate
this year, consider jump-starting your
plans with a visit to the Home +
Remodeling Show, coming to the Dulles
Expo Center Jan. 19 to 21.
Attendees can see presentations by
HGTV’s “Kitchen Cousins,” Anthony
Carrino and John Colaneri, as well as
John Loecke and Jason Oliver Nixon,
owners of the Madcap Cottage interior
design firm.
A 1,400-square-foot custom home will
be built and furnished to demonstrate
design and color trends, and a booth will
be set up to demonstrate DIY lighting
fixtures.
For hands-on activities, attendees can
Washington tops list of places to move
Americans move less frequently than
they used to: According to the U.S. Census,
11 percent of the U.S. population moved
between 2015 and 2016, down from 20
percent in 1948, when the bureau began
tracking Americans on the move.
For people who are moving, the No. 1
choice in 2017 was the District, according
to Updater, a relocation technology
platform.
The survey, which looked at data from
Jan. 1 to Oct. 1, found that the top 15
destinations for movers were:
Washington, D.C.
Dallas-Fort Worth
Los Angeles
New York City
Atlanta
Austin
Houston
Philadelphia
San Francisco
Chicago
Orlando
Seattle
Denver
Boston
Phoenix
“Washington’s position on our list
demonstrates that the city is an attractive
destination for reasons that extend well
beyond its traditional reputation for the
government, lobbying and defense,” said
David Greenberg, chief executive of
Updater.
“D.C. has long been known as recessionproof and traditional because of the
government’s presence,” Greenberg said.
“Yet in the last few years, the city has
become a vibrant hub for entrepreneurs,
opened beautiful bike lanes and trails,
energized neighborhoods like H Street,
and welcomed an influx of incredible
restaurants.”
Eric Pearson, president of Pearson
Smith Realty in Washington, echoes
Greenberg’s comments.
“It really is no surprise the Washington,
D.C., region is a top destination for
Americans,” Pearson said. “It has plentiful
jobs, strong schools and a diversity of
lifestyle options. The region is nationally
ranked for its high quality of life,
supported by abundant amenities,
including museums, entertainment
venues, restaurants, wineries and
breweries, and numerous hiking and
biking trails, that is second to none.”
For information, visit updater.com.
— Michele Lerner
GREG PALLANTE/HOME + REMODELING SHOW
The Home + Remodeling Show will
feature presentations by Anthony
Carrino and John Colaneri from HGTV's
“Kitchen Cousins” program.
To pass on a tip or item, contact us at
realestate@washpost.com and put “Town
Square” in the subject line.
Where We Live
3
EZ
Forest Hills
A leafy
refuge, not
far from
downtown
NW neighborhood nestles
between Rock Creek Park and
Connecticut Avenue amenities
L ESTER D AVIS
Md.
Detail
Va.
MILITARY
RD. NW
D.C.
Rock Creek
Park
FOREST
HILLS
Van Ness-UDC
TILDEN ST. NW
Cleveland Park
never expected to be able to walk to a park,”
he said.
“I really like the neighborhood and my
significant other is happy and my dog is,
too. If I can keep those two girls happy,
then I’m doing all right.”
Source: maps4news.com/here
THE WASHINGTON POST
Schools: Ben W. Murch Elementary,
Alice Deal Middle and Woodrow Wilson
High.
Transit: The Van Ness-UDC Station on
Metro’s Red Line serves Forest Hills.
Metrobus’s H2, H3, H4, L1, L2, and L4
routes also serve the community.
realestate@washpost.com
To see more photos of Forest Hills, go to
washingtonpost.com/realestate.
JANUARY 13, 2018
Crime: In 2017, there were roughly 15
burglaries, 10 reports of stolen automobiles, six robberies and six assaults in the
police service area that includes Forest
Hills, according to D.C. police.
. SATURDAY,
Living there: Forest Hills is roughly
bordered by Nebraska Avenue on the
north, Rock Creek Park on the east, Tilden
Street on the south and Connecticut Avenue on the west.
In the past 12 months, 29 properties
have sold in Forest Hills, ranging from a
1,725-square-foot, three-bedroom, threebathroom rambler for $851,000 to a 7,390square-foot, five-bedroom, five-bathroom
Colonial for $3.7 million, said Cabe, the
real estate agent with Compass.
There are two homes for sale in Forest
Hills, a one-bedroom, one-bathroom condominium for $275,000 and a 3,500square-foot, five-bedroom, five-bathroom
Colonial for $1,399,000.
Smithsonian
National Zoological
Park
THE WASHINGTON POST
Sands works in the West End and said he
can get to his office in less than 15 minutes,
which “by D.C. standards is an excellent
commute.”
“I’ve lived in two places in Forest Hills
and I wouldn’t want to live anywhere else,”
he said. “The only downside is that for
some strange reason people have dogs that
bark,” said Sands, with a chuckle.
Matthew Dreher, who’s lived in Forest
Hills for three years, said that he discovered the neighborhood while visiting a
friend who lived there.
He was ready to leave his apartment on
Capitol Hill and liked the fact that Forest
Hills offered easy access to restaurants and
that he could walk to a grocery store in five
minutes, he said.
The neighborhood, he said, has exceeded his expectations.
“Forest Hills feels like a cross between
suburbia and urbanity. It feels like you’re
separated from the city a little bit, but
everything you need is walking distance. I
RENO RD. NW
Secluded setting: Situated near Chevy
Chase and Connecticut Avenue, Forest
Hills, as the name implies, is a leafy,
established neighborhood that boasts
Rock Creek Park as its back yard, said
Erich Cabe, a real estate agent with Compass.
“A lot of potential buyers really appreciate the access to Rock Creek Park and how
quickly you can travel downtown. You can
walk to the Metro and surrounding parks
while still being in a private and secluded
setting,” said Cabe, who also noted that the
community’s designation as an official
Tree and Slope Protection Overlay District
helps protect the character of the neighborhood by limiting the height of buildings
and mandating the maximum ground
coverage for individual lots.
Ken Sands, who has lived in a late-1970s,
2,800-square-foot, four-bedroom, fourbathroom contemporary on 30th Street in
Forest Hills since 2007, said he loves the
mature trees and access to great stores that
come with living in the neighborhood. But
what he relishes most, he said, are his
morning commutes because, in a city
known for stressful trips to work, his is
quick and relatively carefree.
PHOTOS BY JUSTIN T. GELLERSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
“Forest Hills has a suburban kind of feel, but you still have the benefits of city living with bigger lots and more space,” says Kevin
Batteh, who found it a good place for his young children. Parks and natural attractions are plentiful in the D.C. neighborhood.
W
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In the early 2000s, as Kevin Batteh’s
three children approached school age, the
realities of living in the District’s Shaw
neighborhood — from the lack of parking
to small yards and busy streets — became
more difficult to ignore.
So Batteh, who envisioned his children
playing on a cul-de-sac and walking to
school, set out in search of a neighborhood
that better fit his ideal.
He landed, after a tedious search, on the
District’s Forest Hills neighborhood near
Rock Creek Park.
“We lived in Shaw for 15 years and we
loved the neighborhood but we were at a
stage in our lives where we wanted a front
and back yard and a place where our kids
could ride their bikes in the street,” said
Batteh, who settled in 2016 on a 6,559square-foot, seven-bedroom, six-bathroom
house on Chesapeake Street NW.
“Forest Hills has a suburban kind of feel,
but you still have the benefits of city living
with bigger lots and more space. We don’t
have to stress about where we’re going to
park our car when we get home,” Batteh
said.
NE
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4
EZ
House of the Week
Historic home on Capitol Hill retains 1892 ‘DNA’
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13, 2018
BY
K ATHY O RTON
Back in 1889, the Washington
Real Estate Co. capitalized on the
building boom taking place on
Capitol Hill, buying the land
where this rowhouse overlooking
Lincoln Park stands.
There was a rush by developers
such as the Washington Real Estate Co. to construct housing that
was affordable and that appealed
to middle-class residents. The
company scooped up 1 million
square feet of land along East Capitol Street SE for $350,000. “We
bought the property because we
think it’s a good investment,” John
H. Walter, company president,
told the Washington Star.
The company hired Charles E.
Barry and Henry Simpson to design the homes, according to Robert S. Pohl, an author of books on
Capitol Hill who writes for the
blog The Hill Is Home. Barry &
Simpson designed many buildings throughout the city, including ones for Georgetown University and Gonzaga College High
School and the addition to the
American Security and Trust Co.
Building.
The architectural firm chose
the Richardsonian Romanesque
style for its design of the homes, a
style of Romanesque Revival architecture named after architect
Henry Hobson Richardson. Most
of Richardson’s designs used stone
to evoke a sense of permanence.
According to local lore, the gray
stones used for these homes were
the same as those used for the
Thomas Jefferson Building of the
Library of Congress.
Alvaro F. Gibbens and his wife,
Mary Barr Warfield Gibbens, were
the first owners of the home. Gibbens was an author, a poet, a newspaper editor, a clerk in the U.S.
Treasury Department, postmaster
of Charleston, W.Va., and twice
president of the West Virginia Historical Society.
His first wife, Bessie Egan, died
in 1890. A year later, he married
Mary Barr Warfield, who was a
descendant of Capt. Joseph Burgess of Maryland. Gibbens was her
PHOTOS BY HOMEVISIT
The four-level home’s living room. The current owners hired architect Steve Lawlor to modernize it while retaining its historic integrity.
.
third husband. Her first husband
was a nephew of President Andrew Jackson’s wife; her second
husband was the great-grandson
of Lord William Butterworth Bayley. She died shortly after her marriage to Gibbens.
George W. Esterly, who came to
Washington from Wisconsin to be
the deputy auditor for State and
other departments, lived in the
home shortly after the Gibbenses.
Esterley’s father invented a farm
implement that rivaled the McCormick reaper. Esterly worked
for his father’s company before
coming to Washington.
The current owners, who
bought the four-level home in
The exterior of the rowhouse. Alvaro F. Gibbens and his wife, Mary
Barr Warfield Gibbens, were the first owners of the home.
2008, hired architect Steve Lawlor
to renovate it and bring it into the
modern day while maintaining its
historic integrity.
“Most of the house was gutted,”
Lawlor said. “We brought it back,
keeping some of the DNA of the
house.”
Lawlor redid the kitchen in
2008, installing statuary marble
countertops and Affinity cabine-
try. A built-in banquet provides a
cozy seating area. Glass doors lead
to a bright and airy screened
porch. The kitchen was given two
design awards — the National Association of the Remodeling Industry’s Coty award and Qualified
Remodeler’s Chrysalis award.
The top-floor master suite,
which includes an office space,
also was redone by Lawlor.
1115 EAST CAPITOL ST. SE,
WASHINGTON
$2,175,000
Features: Built in 1892, the
Capitol Hill stone rowhouse was
designed in the Richardsonian
Romanesque style. The four-level
house, which faces Lincoln Park,
has three fireplaces, elegant crown
molding, millwork and wainscoting.
The lower level includes a family
room, bedroom, bathroom and full
kitchen.
Bedrooms/bathrooms: 7/3
Approximate square footage:
3,994
Lot size: 0.04 acre
Open house: Jan. 21, 1 to 3 p.m.
Agent: Patrick Morris, Century 21
Redwood Realty
For more photos of this home
and other houses for sale in the
area, go to washingtonpost.com/
wherewelive.
The seven-bedroom, threebathroom,
3,994-square-foot
house is listed at $2,175,000. An
open house is scheduled for Jan. 21
from 1 to 3 p.m.
kathy.orton@washpost.com
5
Market Analysis
EZ
Not everything that’s green is gold: Look out for ‘greenwashing’
This is an update
of a column that
appeared in July
2016.
The practice is
called
The
“greenwashing,”
Nation's
and home
Housing
shoppers need to
be on guard: It
KENNETH R.
means a house is
HARNEY
being marketed as
environmentally
friendly and energy-saving when
it doesn’t really deserve that
description.
Greenwashing is a growing
issue in real estate as multiple
studies demonstrate that
consumers are attracted to — and
will often pay premiums for —
homes that are highly efficient in
saving on utilities bills.
Just about everybody likes the
concept of green, and builders
and real estate agents
increasingly use the term as a
sales come-on. But experts say
what’s marketed as green too
often isn’t what it purports to be
when you take a close look.
Sandra Adomatis, an appraiser
in Punta Gorda, Fla., who is
nationally known for her
expertise in valuing green
properties, says “look in the MLS
[multiple listing service] and
you’ll see lots of homes listed as
having green features,” but it may
mean as little as “somebody put
in some LED lightbulbs or a
couple of Energy Star appliances
in the kitchen.”
In an interview, Adomatis
described one listing she saw
recently on a home built in 1959.
It indicated that the house had a
Home Energy Rating System
score of zero — as good as you can
get. (The HERS index measures a
home’s energy efficiency and
MIKE BLAKE/REUTERS
Workers from Baker Electric install solar panels on the roof of a home in the Scripps Ranch community
in San Diego. Homes with such green features as solar panels are often a sales come-on.
requires testing of the home’s
performance by a certified HERS
rater. The lower the score, the
better.)
Adomatis knew it was unlikely
that an older home would come
anywhere close to such an
impressive rating, so she asked
the listing agent why she was
marketing the house with a zero
HERS score. Her response: “I
don’t know what HERS is or how
they score, so I just put in zero.”
Wow.
Allison A. Bailes III, founder
and president of Energy
Vanguard, a home energy rating
and consulting company based in
Decatur, Ga., says, “absolutely,
[greenwashing] happens all the
time. A lot of [builders] are doing
things that are just standard,” but
they’re marketing them as green.
He says he saw one company
aggressively advertising its
allegedly green homes, but most
of the details didn’t amount to
much. It was hype: insulation Rvalues that met, but did not
exceed, minimum local building
code requirements; codeminimum HVAC systems;
“digital thermostats,” which are
commonplace; Energy Star
appliances; and a long list of
other unremarkable features. As
to Energy Star appliances, Bailes
noted in a blog post, “if you’ve
done any shopping lately, you
may have noticed that it’s hard to
find one that’s NOT Energy Star
certified.”
Kari Klaus, chief executive and
founder of Viva Green Homes in
Arlington, Va., a national listing
portal exclusively for “ecofriendly” homes, says
“greenwashing is a growing
problem — clearly there’s a desire
to jump on the train and use
buzzwords” like “green,”
“sustainable” and “high
efficiency” too often with little to
back up the claims. Her website
(vivagreenhomes.com) carries
free listings for certified (HERS,
LEED, Energy Star, Built Green,
Net Zero and others) as well as
noncertified homes that have
some green features such as solar
week.
“Bond yields are surging due to
inflation worries and the uptick in
economic performance and will
take mortgage rates along for the
ride,” said Greg McBride, chief
financial analyst at Bankrate.com.
Meanwhile, mortgage applications moved higher to start the
new year, according to the latest
data from the Mortgage Bankers
Association. The market composite index — a measure of total loan
application volume — increased
8.3 percent from a week earlier.
The refinance index shot up 11
percent, while the purchase index
climbed 5 percent.
The refinance share of mortgage activity accounted for 52.9
percent of all applications.
“Overall, application activity
increased last week after accounting for the New Year’s Day holiday,
taking us back to levels of activity
last seen in early December, both
in terms of purchase and refinance applications,” said Joel
Kan, an MBA economist. “This
was likely a catch-up week for
potential borrowers as we head
into the new year.”
The MBA also released its mortgage credit availability index this
week, which showed credit availability decreased in December.
The MCAI fell 1.8 percent, to
179.2, last month. A decline in the
MCAI indicates that lending standards are tightening, while an increase signals they are loosening.
— Kathy Orton
5%
30-YEAR FIXED 3.99
4
5-YEAR ARM 3.46
3
15-YEAR FIXED 3.44
2
1
0
’16
’17
Source: Freddie Mac
THE WASHINGTON POST
More at washingtonpost.com/
wherewelive
’18
JANUARY 13, 2018
than they were a year ago, but the
momentum is clearly on an upward trend, as markets grapple
with a growing consensus that the
American economy is at full capacity, softer international demand for U.S. debt and larger
fiscal deficits on the horizon,” said
Aaron Terrazas, a senior economist at Zillow. “Inflation and consumer spending data due this
week could reinforce the narrative of a strong U.S. economy, particularly if December retail sales
are in line with or above expectations.”
Bankrate.com, which puts out a
weekly mortgage rate trend index,
found that almost two-thirds of
the experts it surveyed say rates
will move higher in the coming
Weekly averages for popular
mortgage types
. SATURDAY,
Mortgage rates shot up this
week.
According to the latest data released Thursday by Freddie Mac,
the 30-year fixed-rate average
climbed to 3.99 percent with an
average 0.5 point. (Points are fees
paid to a lender equal to 1 percent
of the loan amount.) It was 3.95
percent a week ago and 4.12 percent a year ago.
The 15-year fixed-rate average
grew to 3.44 percent with an average 0.5 point. It was 3.38 percent a
week ago and 3.37 percent a year
ago. The five-year adjustable rate
average ticked up to 3.46 percent
with an average 0.4 point. It was
3.45 percent a week ago and 3.23
percent a year ago.
“Mortgage rates are still lower
Ken Harney’s email address is
Harneycolumn@gmail.com.
THE WASHINGTON POST
A full-capacity economy helps push 30-year figure higher
panels, geothermal, energyefficient windows and doors,
water conservation devices, etc.
When noncertified homes are
listed on the site, the seller or
agent must check off boxes
indicating what green features
the property offers. The site then
produces a “Green Score” ranging
from one to five stars to give
potential purchasers a rough idea
of how green the house really is.
The site also allows visitors to
shop for specific features or high
ratings area by area.
So how can buyers and
shoppers recognize a bona fide
green house? Adomatis says you
need to look for six essential
elements:
The site planning for the
house is sensitive to the
immediate environment,
minimizes tree destruction and is
strong on managing water
runoff.
Energy efficiency
throughout, from highperformance HVAC, lighting,
insulation and appliances.
Exceptional interior air
quality thanks to the use of
advanced air filtration and
exchange systems.
Extensive use of nontoxic
building materials.
Water conservation
efficiencies, such as water-saving
toilets and shower fixtures and
possibly some reuse of
wastewater.
Ease of long term operation
and management.
The “house should work for
you” thanks to the combination
of green features and products,
she says, “rather than you having
to work for the house.”
6
EZ
Cover Story
Battle stories from
bidding wars
Strategies for success in a very tight housing market
BY
M ARA L EE
T
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13, 2018
he first time Jeff Reilly lost a bidding war, he was trying to buy a
duplex east of the H Street corridor in the District. He had a
$50,000 escalation clause, to $370,000, and was beaten by a
$380,000 cash offer. ¶ Reilly, 29, did not have his heart set on
the purchase. He was planning to use it as an investment property and
continue to rent in Alexandria. ¶ But once he got engaged to Charlotte
Perpall, 29, in May, they switched gears, and decided to buy a house they
could live in while Reilly fixed it up. ¶ The next two months were so full of
house tours, bidding wars and sellers who accepted no bid at all that the
couple, now married, can hardly remember which happened when. ¶
They think they bid on six other houses they didn’t close on. Or was it
five? ¶ Noel Sesay, an agent with One Real Estate in Washington, represented them for most of that time. He said about 75 percent of the bids he
submits are going up against other buyers. ¶ Ben Stern, a real estate agent
who mostly represents buyers in the District for Buyer’s Edge, paused for
a long time when asked how often he had a buyer who was not competing
with simultaneous offers. He guessed: once a year?
BI
D
BID
BID
ISTOCKPHOTO, WASHINGTON POST ILLUSTRATION
7
EZ
TRAVIS DOVE/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Completed homes at a development in Lancaster, S.C. Dan Metcalf, a real estate agent with the Finn Family group in Takoma Park, says buyers who are outbid can learn from
their mistakes. He also says that potential buyers should consider homes that aren’t cute. “The market right now is extremely driven by aesthetics,” he says.
might need $80,000 to $100,000 to put in
air conditioning, remodel the kitchen and
fix a sagging porch. They backed out.
Their lease was up May 31, and their
landlord wasn’t willing to go month-tomonth, so they were on the verge of giving
up. Then a house in Brightwood that had a
recently redone Ikea kitchen and had air
conditioning came on the market for
$458,000. They put in an escalation clause
for up to $475,000, and they needed every
last dollar of it. There were 11 other offers,
but theirs, even with only 3 percent down,
was the winner. They learned the kitchen
remodel had been done without a permit,
so they’ve picked up some DIY skills and
upgraded to safe outlets in the kitchen, put
handles in the shower, painted, and
patched and smoothed plaster.
Although a lack of shower handles didn’t
deter these bidders in Brightwood, Metcalf
said more buyers should consider more
houses that aren’t cute. “The market right
now is extremely driven by aesthetics,” he
said.
Metcalf said buyers who are outbid can
learn from their mistakes. Don’t offer
below asking and pair it with an escalation
clause past asking. Make your earnest
deposit at least 5 percent of the asking price
if you are going to be putting that much or
more down. More is better. The deposit
isn’t at risk until after inspection.
And, he said, consider houses that have
been sitting on the market for weeks. “If it’s
over 15 days on the market, no one looks at
it,” he said. “If it’s mispriced, that could be
fixed.”
Although most said it was exhausting to
shop for houses in a market that Stern
called “peak craziness,” Reilly looks back
on the months of frenetic activity with
fondness.
“I enjoyed it,” he said. “If you’re getting
beat, you know you’re not overpaying.”
realestate@washpost.com
JANUARY 13, 2018
on the gentrification curve instead.
In the District, that generally means
moving north or east. Instead of Shaw,
Bloomingdale. Instead of Bloomingdale,
Eckington. Instead of Eckington, Trinidad.
Instead of Petworth, Brightwood.
Stern said it’s not as common for someone to start looking in the District but
ending up buying in a more affordable
suburb such as Mount Rainier, West
Hyattsville or Silver Spring.
But Ann Wentzel, 33, and Scott Wallace,
32, changed more than just Zip codes when
they repeatedly failed to win bids several
months ago.
The couple had been renting a bungalow
in Takoma Park for $2,200 a month when
they decided in December 2016 to start
looking to buy in that city within a mile of
Metro — for less than $500,000.
The first bid was on a house in Takoma
Park that had gone on the market that
month. The sellers had dropped the price
about $10,000, which put it below the
half-million mark.
They offered the asking price but asked
for $5,000 back at closing, and lost out to a
buyer who had 20 percent down. They had
only a 10 percent down payment. “We
didn’t know what we were doing,” Wentzel
said.
Next, they tried a Cape Cod in Silver
Spring, about two miles to downtown.
They went in asking at $495,000, and
asked for $5,000 back because it needed a
roof. The successful bidder paid $516,500.
Sesay said it’s rare to have a buyer with
five or six failed bids, but that winning on
the third try is pretty typical.
Ann and Scott did win their third bid, a
Brightwood rowhouse for $487,000 that
they thought needed $50,000 worth of
work.
“We were like, ‘Oh, [expletive],” Ann
recalled, after learning they were chosen.
After inspection, the couple were told it
. SATURDAY,
month in Alexandria and decided to retreat
from the D.C. housing market. Reilly’s
commute would have been much longer if
they had moved to Northeast Washington
— he’s a contractor at Quantico — but he
was willing to do it for the opportunity to
make money when they resold the house in
a few years.
Reilly grew up tagging along with his
dad on construction jobs in New Mexico, so
he thought he’d buy in an up-and-coming
D.C. neighborhood, do the renovation himself and catch the wave of appreciation.
But, back in Alexandria, they were still
outbid on a place near the Braddock Road
Metro station in late May. Finally, Reilly
found the house they bought July 3, and
Sesay wrote the offer on July Fourth. The
asking price was $545,000; they offered
$535,000, and compromised on $540,000.
They were the first offer in, although five
more followed on July 5, and they heard
one was higher.
“Noel was amazing, how fast he could
turn around an offer,” Reilly said.
Reilly’s fiancee, now wife, didn’t even see
the house until after they closed. But it
wasn’t the first time one pulled the trigger
when the other just saw photos on the
Internet. Reilly had been out of town for
work when she entered a bid on one of the
D.C. houses.
Besides just deciding to offer more money, buyers adjust to the hyper-competitive
market in a number of ways, agents say.
One is lowering their expectations of
what they can afford. If they wanted a
two-bedroom condo, they’ll look at onebedroom properties. If they wanted a rowhouse that didn’t need any work, now
they’re willing to redo an ugly kitchen.
They’ll drop off-street parking as a requirement.
But for folks who want a rowhouse, they
usually won’t downsize to a condo, Stern
said. They’ll shift to a neighborhood earlier
THE WASHINGTON POST
The problem happens because too many
people are chasing too little inventory,
especially
across
the
$350,000to-$700,000 price range of the rowhouses
and single-family homes in the District and
Takoma Park in Montgomery County.
“Everything does seem to be faster,” said
Dan Metcalf, a real estate agent with the
Finn Family group in Takoma Park. Metcalf
mostly represents sellers in Takoma Park,
and he said commonly they request bids
Tuesday after the first weekend on the
market.
Perpall and Reilly were up for making
decisions quickly.
Their next attempt was to buy a Craftsman house on a half-acre in Woodridge, in
Northeast Washington, east of Brookland
and near Mount Rainer in Prince George’s
County.
“The bones of the house were beautiful,”
Reilly said. But even though their agent
found the owner a new place to move to, as
requested, the would-be seller ultimately
stayed put.
Next came the house they call the “pee
house.”
“You walk in the house, you get smacked
in the face with the stench of urine,” Reilly
said. It went for more than $500,000, and
the couple’s bid had been at asking, in the
mid-$400,000s.
The next time they didn’t have the
highest offer in a bidding war was near the
Rhode Island Avenue Metro, one Perpall
called “the chicken house,” because the
neighbors had chickens in the back yard.
That was the highest bid they’d made so
far, with escalation to $580,000, even
though, in retrospect, Reilly’s not even sure
if it could have passed inspection to qualify
for a VA loan.
“You were pretty demoralized after the
chicken house,” Reilly said to his wife. She
agreed. “I was totally heartbroken.”
The couple were renting month-to-
8
EZ
Buying New
Eleven 15th
Capitol Hill condos offer contemporary design
BY
M ICHELE L ERNER
First-time home buyer Seth Moucka
knows something about staying flexible and
being open to different possibilities in the
tight Washington housing market. Moucka,
a buyer at the Eleven 15th condominiums at
11 15th St. NE, searched for about nine
months for a condo.
“I lived in Lyon Village in Arlington for
seven years and thought I wanted to buy
there, but then I realized I was spending all
my time in D.C. in Shaw and Bloomingdale
and 14th Street,” says Moucka, an Iowa
native who came to the area 12 years ago to
work for the Education Advisory Board,
which recently became EAB. “I decided I
had a better chance of a return on my
investment in D.C., too.”
Moucka, who preferred new construction, started looking at the Wharf but found
that everything in his price range sold out
quickly. Near the Navy Yard, he found high
condo fees and a long wait for new construction. Next, Moucka decided he liked 16th
Street Heights for its residential character,
but he decided the commute to Reagan
National Airport would be too long; he
travels frequently for his work. Finally, he
looked at a resale condo on Capitol Hill near
Lincoln Park and realized the neighborhood felt like home.
“I like it that you can walk to H Street but
not actually live right on top of H Street,”
Moucka says. “Maybe it’s because I’m from
Iowa, but I like being in an area with a lot of
big trees and families walking around. But I
still want to be close to the bars and restaurants I like.”
Once he focused on Capitol Hill, he saw
signs for the new Eleven 15th condo development and was among the early buyers.
Not only does he like the neighborhood, but
he was able to buy one of the few units with a
balcony.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13, 2018
Two doors: Although a large percentage
of the people in the 10-unit building so far
are first-time buyers, units are also being
purchased by downsizing buyers and investors, says Megan Schlabaugh, operations
director of Lock 7 Development, the builder
of Eleven 15th.
“One of the principals of Lock 7 lives in
Capitol Hill and is always looking for new
projects in the neighborhood,” Schlabaugh
says. “When this property became available,
we jumped on the opportunity, because we
know how rare it is to build new-construction condos in Capitol Hill.”
Eleven 15th, which has a contemporary
design, has 10 one- and two-bedroom units,
each with one bathroom.
The smaller units allow for relatively
affordable pricing in the $300,000s and
$400,000s.
One unusual feature of the condos at
Eleven 15th is that each unit has two doors.
Instead of installing a fire escape on the
back of the building, the developer opted to
have a front and back door for each condo
that provide access to either the front or
back of the building via a hallway and stairs.
The building doesn’t have an elevator.
The one-bedroom condos, which have
600 square feet, feel more spacious than the
BENJAMIN C. TANKERSLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The kitchen, seen from the living room, in Unit 1 at Eleven 15th. The 10 one- and two-bedroom units are close to Metro, shops and
restaurants. They have hardwood flooring and customizable Elfa closet systems, and are priced from $329,900 to $469,900.
two-bedroom units, which each have 750
square feet.
Unit Two, a one-bedroom, one-bath residence priced at $329,900, has an open floor
plan with a kitchen island that can serve as a
dining area, and a living area with floor-toceiling windows and a coat closet. At the
back of the unit are a closet with a washer
and dryer, a bedroom with a floor-to-ceiling
window, and a bathroom with a combination tub and shower.
Unit Five, a two-bedroom, one-bath residence priced at $459,900, has an open floor
plan with a box bay window at the front of a
living area with four floor-to-ceiling windows. This space also includes the open
kitchen and dining area. A laundry closet
and a full bathroom are between the kitchen
and bedrooms. At the back of the unit are
two bedrooms. The master bedroom has a
Juliet balcony and a double-door closet. The
guest bedroom has a walk-in closet.
All closets in the building include a customizable Elfa closet system to maximize
efficiency.
Unit Seven, a two-bedroom residence
with the same floor plan as Unit Five, is
priced at $469,900. This unit features Capitol Hill views from its windows.
Unit 10, a one-bedroom residence with
the same layout as Unit Two, is priced at
$389,900. This upper-level condo includes
a private balcony off the living area.
Unit One, a two-bedroom residence with
the same layout as Units Five and Seven, is
priced at $429,900 because of its lower-level location.
The condo fees, which are $205 for onebedroom units and $303 for two-bedroom
units, are relatively low. Building amenities
include bike storage, a secure entry system
and a small courtyard for outdoor space. In
addition, there will be a transportation
monitor system in the lobby that will display the latest Metro and bus arrival times
at nearby stops.
What’s nearby: “The building is situated
in an ideal location only two blocks from
Lincoln Park, five blocks from the Stadium
Armory Metro and walking distance to all
the stores in Eastern Market,” Schlabaugh
says.
Residents can walk to numerous locations on Capitol Hill, including restaurants
and shops at Eastern Market and on Barracks Row. At Eastern Market, fresh local
produce, meat and more are available, along
with community events, arts and crafts, and
a flea market. Bookstores, restaurants and
coffee shops surround the market.
Barracks Row, which is home to more
than 30 local and national restaurants,
includes Pineapple and Pearls, Rose’s Luxury and the new ChiKo, a Chinese-Korean
fusion restaurant. Residents can also walk
to grocery stores and other specialty stores.
The H Street corridor is nearby for more
restaurants, nightlife and entertainment.
Lincoln Park, a favorite for families and dog
lovers, is also nearby.
Schools: Maury Elementary, Eliot-Hine
Middle, Eastern High.
Transit: Three Metro stations are one
mile or less from Eleven 15th, including
Stadium-Armory, Potomac Avenue and
Eastern Market, all providing Blue, Orange
ELEVEN 15TH
11 15th St. NE, Washington
The condos are priced from $329,900 to
$469,900.
Builder: Lock 7 Development
Features: Each unit has hardwood flooring,
customizable Elfa closet systems, a full-size
washer and dryer, a programmable Nest
thermostat, pre-wiring for a security system,
recessed lighting and large windows. The
open kitchens have quartz counters, subway
tile backsplashes, stainless-steel appliances,
under-cabinet lighting and gas cooking. The
bathrooms have patterned tile flooring,
subway tile walls and quartz counters. Some
units have a balcony.
Bedrooms/bathrooms: 1 or 2 / 1
Square footage: Approximately 600 to 750.
Condominium association fees: $205 or
$303 per month.
View models: Open by appointment.
Contact: Kate Hanley with Urban Pace at
202-774-6022 or visit eleven15th.com.
and Silver Line service. The area is also
served by numerous bus routes. No offstreet parking is provided for condo residents, in part because of good access to
transit. In addition, no alley access is available for parking behind the building.
realestate@washpost.com
To see more photos of Eleven 15th, go to
washingtonpost.com/realestate.
9
Market Analysis
EZ
Experts share their predictions for 2018 home prices
BY
K ATHY O RTON
new type of suburb, which she
dubs “urban suburban.” It’s a
place with the walkability and
amenities of an urban lifestyle as
well as highly rated schools.
And technology will encourage
more people to have roommates.
The number of households with
roommates has increased significantly within the past decade.
Apps like Nesterly, which pairs
millennials with baby boomers,
and CoBuy, which supports group
home buying, are fostering nontraditional home buying and cohabitation.
Richardson expects the 30year fixed mortgage rate to inch
up between 4.3 percent and 4.5
percent in 2018.
Zillow
Like Richardson, Zillow chief
economist Svenja Gudell says inventory will remain a major concern this year. As of September,
there were 12 percent fewer
homes on the market nationwide
than there were a year ago. And
those for sale tend to be out of
reach for a first-time home buyer.
More than half of the homes for
sale were priced in the top third of
home values.
Many observers blame home
builders for not building more to
increase the housing stock. The
number of new homes built each
year remains well below historical norms. But Gudell predicts
that builders will at long last turn
their focus to entry-level homes
this year.
“Builders cannot and will not
ignore a hungry market,” she
wrote.
Home prices will continue to
rise but at a more modest pace.
Zillow surveyed 100 economists
and housing experts, who projected prices to increase 4.1 percent in
2018.
Gudell expects millennials to
flock to the suburbs, where they
will find more affordable homes,
and many homeowners will continue to remodel rather than sell.
She predicts boomers and millennials will drive home design.
Mortgage Bankers
Association
MBA predicts mortgage rates
will become more volatile in the
coming year now that the Federal
Reserve is winding down its balance sheet.
“As far as rates are concerned,
10-year Treasury yields are forecast to increase in 2018, increasing to 2.7 percent from a 2.3
percent average in 2017, and then
climbing to 3.0 percent and 3.4
percent in 2019 and 2020,” wrote
MBA economists Lynn Fisher,
Mike Fratantoni and Joel Kan.
“Mortgage rates will follow a sim-
ilar path, increasing to 4.5 percent in 2018 from 4.0 percent in
2017. We estimate that mortgage
rates will reach the 5.0 percent
level by the middle of 2018, but
rising only slightly beyond that to
average 5.3 percent in 2020.”
Mortgage applications will be
fueled by purchases rather than
refinances in the coming years.
“Our forecast for 2018 is that
we will see continued growth in
purchase originations, as we expect around 7 percent growth for
the year, followed by 5 percent in
each of 2019 and 2020, as purchase originations continue to
exceed the [$1 trillion] mark in
each of these years,” according to
Fisher, Fratantoni and Kan. “Sustained strength in the economy, a
tight job market, and a high likelihood of growth in household formation continue to support this
forecast. Refinance activity will
continue to decrease as rates increase, decreasing 29 percent in
2018 and another 7 percent in
2019.”
kathy.orton@washpost.com
JANUARY 13, 2018
ects nationally year-over-year inventory will return to positive
territory by the fall. The first cities
expected to see inventory recover
are Boston, Detroit, Kansas City,
Nashville and Philadelphia. But
the majority of the growth will
come in the mid-to-upper-tier
prices.
Southern markets such as Tulsa, Little Rock, Dallas and Charlotte will show the most sales
growth in the coming year.
Vivas anticipates the 30-year
fixed mortgage rate will average
4.6 percent, rising to 5 percent by
the end of the year.
Redfin
Nela Richardson, chief economist at Redfin, says inventory will
be the major factor shaping the
2018 housing market. “For the
third year in a row, the nationwide inventory shortage is likely
to continue to hinder sales and
increase prices,” she wrote.
Starter home inventory has not
increased meaningfully since
2011.
With few houses on the market, homes will sell faster than
ever. Richardson anticipates
more than 30 percent of homes on
the market selling within two
weeks.
Richardson also predicts home
buyers will leave high SALT (state
and local tax) states. Homeowners will flee California, New
York, New Jersey, Maryland, Massachusetts and Illinois “for places
where they can get more home for
less money,” she wrote.
Meanwhile, wealthier millennials will drive the formation of a
. SATURDAY,
Realtor.com
Javier Vivas, director of economic research at Realtor.com,
anticipates a more modest increase in home prices. He predicts a 3.2 percent increase, but
most of the slowdown will be felt
in the higher-priced segments.
Entry-level homes will continue
to see price gains because of the
large number of buyers and limited number of homes for sale.
Vivas is more optimistic about
the inventory shortage. He proj-
TRAVIS DOVE/BLOOMBERG
Recently built homes in the Tree Tops development in Lancaster, S.C., are ready for new owners. Some housing analysts say a shortage of
houses for first-time buyers will be a factor in shaping the 2018 market.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Before the passage of the tax
bill, experts were anticipating
more of the same from the housing market in 2018. The limited
supply of homes for sale was the
biggest issue facing the market
last year, and it will continue to be
a problem, particularly in the
entry-level market. Although
some are predicting those constraints to ease, the persistent low
supply is expected to keep driving
prices higher. Mortgage rates
were fairly static last year but
most experts see them rising in
the coming year.
Because the tax bill was passed
after the real estate entities put
out their 2018 forecasts, their projections below don’t include what
impact, if any, several provisions
in the bill — such as the caps on
the mortgage interest and property tax deductions — will have on
the market. Some experts are anticipating prices won’t rise nearly
as fast because of the new law.
Others say it will help first-time
home buyers enter the market.
Here is a roundup of their
forecasts and what they expect
the major trends to be in the
coming year:
National Association
of Realtors
NAR predicts home prices will
rise about 5.5 percent in 2018.
“Low supply is pushing prices
higher and making home buying
less affordable in several parts of
the country,” said Lawrence Yun,
NAR chief economist.
Yun said the biggest impediment to sales is the massive shortage of supply in relation to overall
demand. The lagging pace of newhome construction in recent
years is further creating a logjam
in housing turnover. “The lack of
inventory has pushed up home
prices by 48 percent from the low
point in 2011, while wage growth
over the same period has been
only 15 percent,” he said.
Yun anticipates that mortgage
rates will gradually climb and
that the 30-year fixed-rate average will reach 4.5 percent by the
end of 2018.
10
EZ
Ilyce R. Glink and
Samuel J. Tamkin
Real Estate Matters
Jill Chodorov
On buying and selling
Justin Pierce
On flipping homes
Nancy Simmons Starrs
On rental issues
Tim Carter
Ask the Builder
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
JANUARY 13, 2018
Braintrust
Buying, selling, financing, renting, building,
flipping and more. Our columnists are real estate
professionals with ideas and experience on every
aspect of home. Tap the knowledge.
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PAGE 16
Real Estate
Weekly Print Section
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